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Sample records for gev monoenergetic ion

  1. Monoenergetic and GeV ion acceleration from the laser breakout afterburner using ultrathin targetsa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, L.; Albright, B. J.; Hegelich, B. M.; Bowers, K. J.; Flippo, K. A.; Kwan, T. J. T.; Fernández, J. C.

    2007-05-01

    A new laser-driven ion acceleration mechanism using ultrathin targets has been identified from particle-in-cell simulations. After a brief period of target normal sheath acceleration (TNSA) [S. P. Hatchett et al., Phys. Plasmas 7, 2076 (2000)], two distinct stages follow: first, a period of enhanced TNSA during which the cold electron background converts entirely to hot electrons, and second, the "laser breakout afterburner" (BOA) when the laser penetrates to the rear of the target where a localized longitudinal electric field is generated with the location of the peak field co-moving with the ions. During this process, a relativistic electron beam is produced by the ponderomotive drive of the laser. This beam is unstable to a relativistic Buneman instability, which rapidly converts the electron energy into ion energy. This mechanism accelerates ions to much higher energies using laser intensities comparable to earlier TNSA experiments. At a laser intensity of 1021W/cm2, the carbon ions accelerate as a quasimonoenergetic bunch to 100s of MeV in the early stages of the BOA with conversion efficiency of order a few percent. Both are an order of magnitude higher than those realized from TNSA in recent experiments [Hegelich et al., Nature 441, 439 (2006)]. The laser-plasma interaction then evolves to produce a quasithermal energy distribution with maximum energy of ˜2GeV.

  2. Monoenergetic and GeV ion acceleration from the laser breakout afterburner using ultrathin targets

    SciTech Connect

    Yin, L.; Albright, B. J.; Hegelich, B. M.; Bowers, K. J.; Flippo, K. A.; Kwan, T. J. T.; Fernandez, J. C.

    2007-05-15

    A new laser-driven ion acceleration mechanism using ultrathin targets has been identified from particle-in-cell simulations. After a brief period of target normal sheath acceleration (TNSA) [S. P. Hatchett et al., Phys. Plasmas 7, 2076 (2000)], two distinct stages follow: first, a period of enhanced TNSA during which the cold electron background converts entirely to hot electrons, and second, the ''laser breakout afterburner'' (BOA) when the laser penetrates to the rear of the target where a localized longitudinal electric field is generated with the location of the peak field co-moving with the ions. During this process, a relativistic electron beam is produced by the ponderomotive drive of the laser. This beam is unstable to a relativistic Buneman instability, which rapidly converts the electron energy into ion energy. This mechanism accelerates ions to much higher energies using laser intensities comparable to earlier TNSA experiments. At a laser intensity of 10{sup 21} W/cm{sup 2}, the carbon ions accelerate as a quasimonoenergetic bunch to 100 s of MeV in the early stages of the BOA with conversion efficiency of order a few percent. Both are an order of magnitude higher than those realized from TNSA in recent experiments [Hegelich et al., Nature 441, 439 (2006)]. The laser-plasma interaction then evolves to produce a quasithermal energy distribution with maximum energy of {approx}2 GeV.

  3. Relativistically Induced Transparency Acceleration (RITA) - laser-plasma accelerated quasi-monoenergetic GeV ion-beams with existing lasers?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahai, Aakash A.

    2013-10-01

    Laser-plasma ion accelerators have the potential to produce beams with unprecedented characteristics of ultra-short bunch lengths (100s of fs) and high bunch-charge (1010 particles) over acceleration length of about 100 microns. However, creating and controlling mono-energetic bunches while accelerating to high-energies has been a challenge. If high-energy mono-energetic beams can be demonstrated with minimal post-processing, laser (ω0)-plasma (ωpe) ion accelerators may be used in a wide-range of applications such as cancer hadron-therapy, medical isotope production, neutron generation, radiography and high-energy density science. Here we demonstrate using analysis and simulations that using relativistic intensity laser-pulses and heavy-ion (Mi ×me) targets doped with a proton (or light-ion) species (mp ×me) of trace density (at least an order of magnitude below the cold critical density) we can scale up the energy of quasi-mono-energetically accelerated proton (or light-ion) beams while controlling their energy, charge and energy spectrum. This is achieved by controlling the laser propagation into an overdense (ω0 <ωpeγ = 1) increasing plasma density gradient by incrementally inducing relativistic electron quiver and thereby rendering them transparent to the laser while the heavy-ions are immobile. Ions do not directly interact with ultra-short laser that is much shorter in duration than their characteristic time-scale (τp <<√{mp} /ω0 <<√{Mi} /ω0). For a rising laser intensity envelope, increasing relativistic quiver controls laser propagation beyond the cold critical density. For increasing plasma density (ωpe2 (x)), laser penetrates into higher density and is shielded, stopped and reflected where ωpe2 (x) / γ (x , t) =ω02 . In addition to the laser quivering the electrons, it also ponderomotively drives (Fp 1/γ∇za2) them forward longitudinally, creating a constriction of snowplowed e-s. The resulting longitudinal e--displacement from

  4. Towards GeV laser-driven ion acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hegelich, B. M.; Yin, L.; Albright, B. J.; Flippo, K. A.; Gautier, D. C.; Johnson, R. P.; Letzring, S.; Shah, R. C.; Shimada, T.; Fernandez, J. C.; Henig, A.; Kiefer, D.; Liechtenstein, V.; Schreiber, J.; Habs, D.; Meyer-Ter-Vehn, J.; Rykovanov, S.; Wu, H. C.

    2008-11-01

    Applications like ion-driven fast ignition (IFI) with heavy ions or laser-based hadron therapy require efficient laser-driven ion acceleration to ˜ 0.1 -- 1 GeV. The Break-Out Afterburner (BOA) [1] regime and the Phase-Stable Acceleration (PSA) [2] regime, also reported as Radiation Pressure Acceleration (RPA) [3], promise quasi-monoenergetic beams at such energies, with ˜ 10% efficiency,. This talk summarizes our joint exploratory research program in this new and exciting area, emphasizing the realization of these mechanisms with today's lasers. The laser requirements are discussed, especially pulse contrast. The first experimental results are reported. [1] L. Yin et al., Laser & Part. Beams 24, 1-8 (2006) [2] X. Zhang et al., Phys. Plasmas 14, 123108 (2007) [3] A. P. L. Robinson et al., New J. Phys. 10, 013021 (2008)

  5. Generation of high-energy mono-energetic heavy ion beams by radiation pressure acceleration of ultra-intense laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, D.; Qiao, B.; McGuffey, C.; He, X. T.; Beg, F. N.

    2014-12-01

    Generation of high-energy mono-energetic heavy ion beams by radiation pressure acceleration (RPA) of intense laser pulses is investigated. Different from previously studied RPA of protons or light ions, the dynamic ionization of high-Z atoms can stabilize the heavy ion acceleration. A self-organized, stable RPA scheme specifically for heavy ion beams is proposed, where the laser peak intensity is required to match with the large ionization energy gap when the successive ionization state passes the noble gas configurations [such as removing an electron from the helium-like charge state ( Z - 2 ) + to ( Z - 1 ) + ]. Two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations show that a mono-energetic Al13+ beam with peak energy 1.0 GeV and energy spread of only 5% can be obtained at intensity of 7 × 10 20 W / cm 2 through the proposed scheme. A heavier, mono-energetic, ion beam (Fe26+) can attain a peak energy of 17 GeV by increasing the intensity to 10 22 W / cm 2 .

  6. Generation of quasi-monoenergetic carbon ions accelerated parallel to the plane of a sandwich target

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J. W.; Murakami, M.; Weng, S. M.; Xu, H.; Ju, J. J.; Luan, S. X.; Yu, W.

    2014-12-15

    A new ion acceleration scheme, namely, target parallel Coulomb acceleration, is proposed in which a carbon plate sandwiched between gold layers is irradiated with intense linearly polarized laser pulses. The high electrostatic field generated by the gold ions efficiently accelerates the embedded carbon ions parallel to the plane of the target. The ion beam is found to be collimated by the concave-shaped Coulomb potential. As a result, a quasi-monoenergetic and collimated C{sup 6+}-ion beam with an energy exceeding 10 MeV/nucleon is produced at a laser intensity of 5 × 10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}.

  7. Low-emittance monoenergetic electron and ion beams from ultra-intense laser-solid interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Cowan, T E; Roth, M; Allen, M M; Johnson, J; Hatchett, S P; Le Sage, G P; Wilks, S C

    2000-03-03

    Recent experiments at the LLNL Petawatt Laser have demonstrated the generation of intense, high energy beams of electrons and ions from the interaction of ultra-intense laser light with solid targets. Focused laser intensities as high as 6 x 10{sup 20} W/cm{sup 2} are achieved, at which point the quiver energies of the target electrons extend to {approx}10 MeV. In this new, fully relativistic regime of laser-plasma interactions, nuclear processes become important and nuclear techniques are required to diagnose the high-energy particle production. In recent experiments we have observed electrons accelerated to 100 MeV, up to 60 MeV brehmsstrahlung generation, photo-nuclear fission and positron-electron pair creation. We also have observed monoenergetic jets of electrons having sufficiently small emittance to be interesting as a laser-accelerated beam, if the production mechanism could be understood and controlled. The huge flux of multi-MeV ponderomotively accelerated electrons produced in the laser-solid interaction is also observed to accelerate contaminant ions from the rear surface of the solid target up to 50 MeV. We describe spectroscopic measurements which reveal intense monoenergetic beam features in the proton energy spectrum. The total spectrum contains >10{sup 13} protons, while the monoenergetic beam pulses contain {approx}1 nC of protons, and exhibits a longitudinal and transverse emittance smaller than conventional RF proton accelerator beams.

  8. Diffuse, Monoenergetic, Broadband (wave) and Ion Aurora: Results from a New Generation Precipitation Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newell, Patrick; Sotirelis, Thomas; Wing, Simon

    We introduce an auroral precipitation model which separately categorizes the discrete aurora and both the electron and ion diffuse aurora. The discrete aurora includes acceleration by two distinct physical mechanisms, namely quasi-static electric fields, producing monoenergetic peaks, and dispersive Alfvén waves, producing broadband electron acceleration. The new model is parameterized by functional fits to solar wind driving, with each MLAT and MLT bin sepa-rately fitted, permitting the first comprehensive comparison of the hemispheric contribution by auroral type. The diffuse aurora is surprisingly dominant, constituting 84 pct of the energy flux into the ionosphere during conditions of low solar wind driving (63 pct e-, 21 pct ions). The diffuse aurora is not quiescent, tripling in power from low to high solar wind driving conditions. Even under the latter condition, the diffuse aurora contains 71 pct of the hemispheric energy flux (57 pct e-, 14 pct ions). Monoenergetic aurora contributes more energy flux than does broadband acceleration signatures. However the broadband aurora rises fastest with activity, increasing by a factor of 8.0 from low to high driving. Seasonal dependence is investigated. Dayside and nightside variations are separately considered, as are conditions of low and high solar wind driving. Several clear patterns emerge. One is that the dayside tends to maximize precipitation in the summer, and much more so for low solar wind driving. Nightside precipita-tion is higher in the winter, and much more so for high solar wind driving. Dayside effects are strongest in number flux, and stronger in diffuse aurora than accelerated aurora. The ease of ion entry through the summer cusp, along with the constraints of charge quasi-neutrality, and the rise in dayside currents in the summer hemisphere adequately explains much (perhaps all) of the dayside behavior. Nightside effects are more apparent in energy flux, with the winter/summer ratio of

  9. Approach towards quasi-monoenergetic laser ion acceleration with doped target

    SciTech Connect

    Morita, Toshimasa

    2014-05-15

    Ion acceleration using a laser pulse irradiating a disk target that includes hydrogen and carbon is examined using three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. It is shown that over 200 MeV protons can be generated using a 620 TW, 5 × 10{sup 21} W/cm{sup 2} laser pulse. In a polyethylene (CH{sub 2}) target, protons and carbon ions separate and form two layers by radiation pressure acceleration. A strong Coulomb explosion in this situation and Coulomb repulsion between each layer generates high energy protons. A doped target consisting of low density hydrogen within a carbon disk becomes a double layer target that is comprised of a thin low density hydrogen disk on the surface of a high-Z atom layer. This then generates a quasi-monoenergetic proton beam.

  10. Properties and the origin of Almost Monoenergetic Ion (AMI) beams observed near the Earth's bow shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lutsenko, V. N.; Gavrilova, E. A.

    2011-08-01

    Beams of Almost Monoenergetic Ions (AMI) in the energy range from 20 to 800 keV were discovered in the DOK-2 experiment (Interball project) in the magnetosheath and upstream of the Earth's bow shock. This work summarizes the analysis results of ~730 AMI events registered in 1995-2000. Statistics of AMI properties, their nature and origin are considered. The analysis of a large array of new data confirmed our earlier suggested ideas on the AMI nature, origin, and their acceleration model. These ideas were further developed and refined. According to this model, AMI are a result of solar wind ions acceleration in small regions with a potential electric field arising due to disruptions of the bow shock current sheet filaments. It has been found that the reason of the current filaments disruptions in most cases was the Hot Flow Anomaly phenomenon (HFA) caused by an interaction of a tangential discontinuity in the solar wind with the Earth's bow shock. It is shown that the study of AMI can provide new information on large-scale properties and dynamics of the bow shock current sheet.

  11. GeV Laser Ion Acceleration from Ultrathin Targets: The Laser Break-Out Afterburner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Lin

    2006-10-01

    A new laser-driven ion acceleration mechanism has been identified using particle-in-cell simulations. After a brief period of target normal sheath acceleration (TNSA) [S. P. Hatchett, et al., Phys. Plasmas, 7, 2076 (2000)], two distinct stages follow: first, a period of enhanced TNSA during which the cold electron background converts entirely to hot electrons, and second, the ``laser break-out afterburner'' (BOA) when the laser penetrates to the rear of the target and generates a large longitudinal electric field localized at the rear of the target with the location of the peak field co-moving with the ions. This mechanism allows ion acceleration to GeV energies at vastly reduced laser intensities compared with earlier acceleration schemes. The new mechanism enables the acceleration of carbon ions to greater than 2 GeV energy at a laser intensity of only 10^21 W/cm^2, an intensity that has been realized in existing laser systems. Other techniques for achieving these energies in the literature [D. Habs et al., Progress in Particle and Nuclear Physics, 46, 375 (2001); T. Esirkepov et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 175003-1 (2004)] rely upon intensities of 10^24 W/cm^2 or above, i.e., 2-3 orders of magnitude higher than any laser intensity that has been demonstrated to date. Also, the BOA mechanism attains higher energy and efficiency than TNSA where the scaling laws [Hegelich et al., Phys. Plasmas, 12, 056314 (2005)] predict carbon energies of 50 MeV/u for identical laser conditions. In the early stages of the BOA, the carbon ions accelerate as a quasi-monoenergetic bunch with median energy higher than that realized recently experimentally [Hegelich et al., Nature, 441, 439 (2006)].

  12. Quasi-monoenergetic ion generation by hole-boring radiation pressure acceleration in inhomogeneous plasmas using tailored laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weng, S. M.; Murakami, M.; Azechi, H.; Wang, J. W.; Tasoko, N.; Chen, M.; Sheng, Z. M.; Mulser, P.; Yu, W.; Shen, B. F.

    2014-01-01

    It is proposed that laser hole-boring at a steady speed in inhomogeneous overdense plasma can be realized by the use of temporally tailored intense laser pulses, producing high-fluence quasi-monoenergetic ion beams. A general temporal profile of such laser pulses is formulated for arbitrary plasma density distribution. As an example, for a precompressed deuterium-tritium fusion target with an exponentially increasing density profile, its matched laser profile for steady hole-boring is given theoretically and verified numerically by particle-in-cell simulations. Furthermore, we propose to achieve fast ignition by the in-situ hole-boring accelerated ions using a tailored laser pulse. Simulations show that the effective energy fluence, conversion efficiency, energy spread, and collimation of the resulting ion beam can be significantly improved as compared to those found with un-tailored laser profiles. For the fusion fuel with an areal density of 1.5 g cm-2, simulation indicates that it is promising to realize fast ion ignition by using a tailored driver pulse with energy about 65 kJ.

  13. Quasi-monoenergetic ion beam acceleration by laser-driven shock and solitary waves in near-critical plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, W. L.; Qiao, B.; Huang, T. W.; Shen, X. F.; You, W. Y.; Yan, X. Q.; Wu, S. Z.; Zhou, C. T.; He, X. T.

    2016-07-01

    Ion acceleration in near-critical plasmas driven by intense laser pulses is investigated theoretically and numerically. A theoretical model has been given for clarification of the ion acceleration dynamics in relation to different laser and target parameters. Two distinct regimes have been identified, where ions are accelerated by, respectively, the laser-induced shock wave in the weakly driven regime (comparatively low laser intensity) and the nonlinear solitary wave in the strongly driven regime (comparatively high laser intensity). Two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations show that quasi-monoenergetic proton beams with a peak energy of 94.6 MeV and an energy spread 15.8% are obtained by intense laser pulses at intensity I0 = 3 × 1020 W/cm2 and pulse duration τ = 0.5 ps in the strongly driven regime, which is more advantageous than that got in the weakly driven regime. In addition, 233 MeV proton beams with narrow spread can be produced by extending τ to 1.0 ps in the strongly driven regime.

  14. Generation of high-energy mono-energetic heavy ion beams by radiation pressure acceleration of ultra-intense laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, D.; Qiao, B.; McGuffey, C.; Beg, F. N.; He, X. T.

    2014-12-15

    Generation of high-energy mono-energetic heavy ion beams by radiation pressure acceleration (RPA) of intense laser pulses is investigated. Different from previously studied RPA of protons or light ions, the dynamic ionization of high-Z atoms can stabilize the heavy ion acceleration. A self-organized, stable RPA scheme specifically for heavy ion beams is proposed, where the laser peak intensity is required to match with the large ionization energy gap when the successive ionization state passes the noble gas configurations [such as removing an electron from the helium-like charge state (Z−2){sup +} to (Z−1){sup +}]. Two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations show that a mono-energetic Al{sup 13+} beam with peak energy 1.0 GeV and energy spread of only 5% can be obtained at intensity of 7×10{sup 20} W/cm{sup 2} through the proposed scheme. A heavier, mono-energetic, ion beam (Fe{sup 26+}) can attain a peak energy of 17 GeV by increasing the intensity to 10{sup 22} W/cm{sup 2}.

  15. Radiation microscope for SEE testing using GeV ions.

    SciTech Connect

    Doyle, Barney Lee; Knapp, James Arthur; Rossi, Paolo; Hattar, Khalid M.; Vizkelethy, Gyorgy; Brice, David Kenneth; Branson, Janelle V.

    2009-09-01

    Radiation Effects Microscopy is an extremely useful technique in failure analysis of electronic parts used in radiation environment. It also provides much needed support for development of radiation hard components used in spacecraft and nuclear weapons. As the IC manufacturing technology progresses, more and more overlayers are used; therefore, the sensitive region of the part is getting farther and farther from the surface. The thickness of these overlayers is so large today that the traditional microbeams, which are used for REM are unable to reach the sensitive regions. As a result, higher ion beam energies have to be used (> GeV), which are available only at cyclotrons. Since it is extremely complicated to focus these GeV ion beams, a new method has to be developed to perform REM at cyclotrons. We developed a new technique, Ion Photon Emission Microscopy, where instead of focusing the ion beam we use secondary photons emitted from a fluorescence layer on top of the devices being tested to determine the position of the ion hit. By recording this position information in coincidence with an SEE signal we will be able to indentify radiation sensitive regions of modern electronic parts, which will increase the efficiency of radiation hard circuits.

  16. Efficient quasi-monoenergetic ion beams from laser-driven relativistic plasmas

    PubMed Central

    Palaniyappan, Sasi; Huang, Chengkun; Gautier, Donald C.; Hamilton, Christopher E.; Santiago, Miguel A.; Kreuzer, Christian; Sefkow, Adam B.; Shah, Rahul C.; Fernández, Juan C.

    2015-01-01

    Table-top laser–plasma ion accelerators have many exciting applications, many of which require ion beams with simultaneous narrow energy spread and high conversion efficiency. However, achieving these requirements has been elusive. Here we report the experimental demonstration of laser-driven ion beams with narrow energy spread and energies up to 18 MeV per nucleon and ∼5% conversion efficiency (that is 4 J out of 80-J laser). Using computer simulations we identify a self-organizing scheme that reduces the ion energy spread after the laser exits the plasma through persisting self-generated plasma electric (∼1012 V m−1) and magnetic (∼104 T) fields. These results contribute to the development of next generation compact accelerators suitable for many applications such as isochoric heating for ion-fast ignition and producing warm dense matter for basic science. PMID:26657147

  17. Efficient quasi-monoenergetic ion beams from laser-driven relativistic plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Palaniyappan, Sasi; Huang, Chengkun; Gautier, Donald C.; Hamilton, Christopher E.; Santiago, Miguel A.; Kreuzer, Christian; Sefkow, Adam B.; Shah, Rahul C.; Fernández, Juan C.

    2015-12-11

    Table-top laser–plasma ion accelerators have many exciting applications, many of which require ion beams with simultaneous narrow energy spread and high conversion efficiency. However, achieving these requirements has been elusive. We report the experimental demonstration of laser-driven ion beams with narrow energy spread and energies up to 18 MeV per nucleon and ~5% conversion efficiency (that is 4 J out of 80-J laser). Using computer simulations we identify a self-organizing scheme that reduces the ion energy spread after the laser exits the plasma through persisting self-generated plasma electric (~1012 V m-1) and magnetic (~104 T) fields. Furthermore, these results contribute to the development of next generation compact accelerators suitable for many applications such as isochoric heating for ion-fast ignition and producing warm dense matter for basic science.

  18. Efficient quasi-monoenergetic ion beams from laser-driven relativistic plasmas.

    PubMed

    Palaniyappan, Sasi; Huang, Chengkun; Gautier, Donald C; Hamilton, Christopher E; Santiago, Miguel A; Kreuzer, Christian; Sefkow, Adam B; Shah, Rahul C; Fernández, Juan C

    2015-01-01

    Table-top laser-plasma ion accelerators have many exciting applications, many of which require ion beams with simultaneous narrow energy spread and high conversion efficiency. However, achieving these requirements has been elusive. Here we report the experimental demonstration of laser-driven ion beams with narrow energy spread and energies up to 18 MeV per nucleon and ∼5% conversion efficiency (that is 4 J out of 80-J laser). Using computer simulations we identify a self-organizing scheme that reduces the ion energy spread after the laser exits the plasma through persisting self-generated plasma electric (∼10(12) V m(-1)) and magnetic (∼10(4) T) fields. These results contribute to the development of next generation compact accelerators suitable for many applications such as isochoric heating for ion-fast ignition and producing warm dense matter for basic science. PMID:26657147

  19. Efficient quasi-monoenergetic ion beams from laser-driven relativistic plasmas

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Palaniyappan, Sasi; Huang, Chengkun; Gautier, Donald C.; Hamilton, Christopher E.; Santiago, Miguel A.; Kreuzer, Christian; Sefkow, Adam B.; Shah, Rahul C.; Fernández, Juan C.

    2015-12-11

    Table-top laser–plasma ion accelerators have many exciting applications, many of which require ion beams with simultaneous narrow energy spread and high conversion efficiency. However, achieving these requirements has been elusive. We report the experimental demonstration of laser-driven ion beams with narrow energy spread and energies up to 18 MeV per nucleon and ~5% conversion efficiency (that is 4 J out of 80-J laser). Using computer simulations we identify a self-organizing scheme that reduces the ion energy spread after the laser exits the plasma through persisting self-generated plasma electric (~1012 V m-1) and magnetic (~104 T) fields. Furthermore, these results contributemore » to the development of next generation compact accelerators suitable for many applications such as isochoric heating for ion-fast ignition and producing warm dense matter for basic science.« less

  20. Efficient quasi-monoenergetic ion beams from laser-driven relativistic plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palaniyappan, Sasi; Huang, Chengkun; Gautier, Donald C.; Hamilton, Christopher E.; Santiago, Miguel A.; Kreuzer, Christian; Sefkow, Adam B.; Shah, Rahul C.; Fernández, Juan C.

    2015-12-01

    Table-top laser-plasma ion accelerators have many exciting applications, many of which require ion beams with simultaneous narrow energy spread and high conversion efficiency. However, achieving these requirements has been elusive. Here we report the experimental demonstration of laser-driven ion beams with narrow energy spread and energies up to 18 MeV per nucleon and ~5% conversion efficiency (that is 4 J out of 80-J laser). Using computer simulations we identify a self-organizing scheme that reduces the ion energy spread after the laser exits the plasma through persisting self-generated plasma electric (~1012 V m-1) and magnetic (~104 T) fields. These results contribute to the development of next generation compact accelerators suitable for many applications such as isochoric heating for ion-fast ignition and producing warm dense matter for basic science.

  1. Demonstrated Efficient Quasi-Monoenergetic Carbon-Ion Beams Approaching Fast Ignition (FI) Requirements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández, Juan C.; Palaniyappan, S.; Huang, C.; Gautier, D. C.; Santiago, M.

    2015-11-01

    Using massive computer simulations of relativistic laser-plasma interactions, we have identified a self-organizing scheme that exploits persisting self-generated plasma electric (~TV/m) and magnetic (~104 Tesla) fields to reduce the ion energy spread of intense laser-driven ion beams after the laser exits the plasma. Consistent with the scheme, we have demonstrated on the LANL Trident laser carbon-ion beams with narrow spectral peaks at 220 MeV, with high conversion efficiency (~ 5%). These parameters are within a factor of 2 of FI requirements. The remaining gap may be bridged by increasing the laser intensity by a factor of 4, according to our data. We also discuss how this beam may be focused, to address the remaining requirement for FI, besides the total laser energy. This work is sponsored by the LANL LDRD Program.

  2. Mono-energetic ions emission by nanosecond laser solid target irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muoio, A.; Tudisco, S.; Altana, C.; Lanzalone, G.; Mascali, D.; Cirrone, G. A. P.; Schillaci, F.; Trifirò, A.

    2016-09-01

    An experimental campaign aiming to investigate the acceleration mechanisms through laser-matter interaction in nanosecond domain has been carried out at the LENS (Laser Energy for Nuclear Science) laboratory of INFN-LNS, Catania. Pure Al targets were irradiated by 6 ns laser pulses at different pumping energies, up to 2 J. Advanced diagnostics tools were used to characterize the plasma plume and ion production. We show the preliminary results of this experimental campaign, and especially the ones showing the production of multicharged ions having very narrow energy spreads.

  3. 8 GeV H- ions: Transport and injection

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, W.; Bryant, H.; Drozhdin, A.; Hill, C.; Kostin, M.; Macek, R.; Ostiguy, J.-F.; Rees, G.H.; Tang, Z.; Yoon, P.; /Fermilab /New Mexico U. /Los Alamos /Rutherford /Rochester U.

    2005-05-01

    Fermilab is working on the design of an 8 GeV superconducting RF H{sup -} linac called the Proton Driver. The energy of H{sup -} beam will be an order of magnitude higher than the existing ones. This brings up a number of technical challenges to transport and injection of H{sup -} ions. This paper will focus on the subjects of stripping losses (including stripping by blackbody radiation, field and residual gas) and carbon foil stripping efficiency, along with a brief discussion on other issues such as Stark states lifetime of hydrogen atoms, single and multiple Coulomb scattering, foil heating and stress, radiation activation, collimation and jitter correction, etc.

  4. Skin depth criterion for foil thickness in laser pressure acceleration of monoenergetic ions

    SciTech Connect

    Tripathi, Vipin K.; Liu, Chuan S.; Shao Xi; Sharma, Anamika

    2011-04-15

    An analytical formalism is developed to study the nonlinear laser penetration through radiation pressure accelerated thin foils, employed to produce high energy ions. We include the effects of relativistic mass increase and nonuniform electron density compression due to the ponderomotive force in plasma permittivity. For foils like diamond the usual optimum foil thickness l{sub opt}={lambda}{sub L}n{sub cr}a{sub 0}/{pi}n{sub 0} (where {lambda}{sub L} and a{sub 0} are the wavelength and normalized amplitude of the laser), at which the ponderomotive force on electrons balances the space charge force due to the ions left behind, is significantly below the skin depth unless the laser intensity is excessively large and significant laser transmission through the foil reduces the radiation pressure on it. The reflection coefficient decreases with laser field strength, though the ponderomotive force led electron compression tends to raise it. The reflection coefficient also decreases significantly with foil velocity, which is a sensitive function of laser field strength and foil thickness.

  5. Experimental study of the water-to-air stopping power ratio of monoenergetic carbon ion beams for particle therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez-Parcerisa, D.; Gemmel, A.; Jäkel, O.; Parodi, K.; Rietzel, E.

    2012-06-01

    Reference dosimetry with ionization chambers requires a number of chamber-specific and beam-specific calibration factors. For carbon ion beams, IAEA report TRS-398 yields a total uncertainty of 3% in the determination of the absorbed dose to water, for which the biggest contribution arises from the water-to-air stopping power ratio (sw, air), with an uncertainty of 2%. The variation of (sw, air) along the treatment field has been studied in several Monte Carlo works presented over the last few years. Their results were, in all cases, strongly dependent on the choice of mean ionization potentials (I-values) for air and water. A smaller dependence of (sw, air) with penetration depth was observed. Since a consensus on Iw, air and Iair has not yet been reached, the validity of such studies for clinical use cannot be assessed independently. Our approach is based on a direct experimental measurement of water-equivalent thicknesses of different air gaps at different beam energies. A theoretical expression describing the variation of the stopping power ratio with kinetic energy, sw,air(E), was derived from the Bethe-Bloch formula and fit to the measured data, yielding a coherent pair of Iw and Iair values with Iair/Iw = 1.157 ± 0.023. Additionally, the data from five different beam energies were combined in an average value of sw,air = 1.132 ± 0.003 (statistical) ± 0.003 (variation over energy range), valid for monoenergetic carbon ion beams at the plateau area of the depth dose distribution. A detailed uncertainty analysis was performed on the data, in order to assess the limitations of the method, yielding an overall standard uncertainty below 1% in sw,air(E). Therefore, when properly combined with the appropriate models for the fragment spectra, our experimental work can contribute to narrow the uncertainty margins currently in use in absorbed dose to water determination for dosimetry of carbon ion beam radiotherapy.

  6. Experimental study of the water-to-air stopping power ratio of monoenergetic carbon ion beams for particle therapy.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Parcerisa, D; Gemmel, A; Jäkel, O; Parodi, K; Rietzel, E

    2012-06-01

    Reference dosimetry with ionization chambers requires a number of chamber-specific and beam-specific calibration factors. For carbon ion beams, IAEA report TRS-398 yields a total uncertainty of 3% in the determination of the absorbed dose to water, for which the biggest contribution arises from the water-to-air stopping power ratio (s(w, air)), with an uncertainty of 2%. The variation of (s(w, air)) along the treatment field has been studied in several Monte Carlo works presented over the last few years. Their results were, in all cases, strongly dependent on the choice of mean ionization potentials (I-values) for air and water. A smaller dependence of (s(w, air)) with penetration depth was observed. Since a consensus on I(w, air) and I(air) has not yet been reached, the validity of such studies for clinical use cannot be assessed independently. Our approach is based on a direct experimental measurement of water-equivalent thicknesses of different air gaps at different beam energies. A theoretical expression describing the variation of the stopping power ratio with kinetic energy, s(w,air)(E), was derived from the Bethe-Bloch formula and fit to the measured data, yielding a coherent pair of I(w) and I(air) values with I(air)/I(w) = 1.157 ± 0.023. Additionally, the data from five different beam energies were combined in an average value of s(w,air) = 1.132 ± 0.003 (statistical) ± 0.003 (variation over energy range), valid for monoenergetic carbon ion beams at the plateau area of the depth dose distribution. A detailed uncertainty analysis was performed on the data, in order to assess the limitations of the method, yielding an overall standard uncertainty below 1% in s(w,air)(E). Therefore, when properly combined with the appropriate models for the fragment spectra, our experimental work can contribute to narrow the uncertainty margins currently in use in absorbed dose to water determination for dosimetry of carbon ion beam radiotherapy. PMID:22596046

  7. Proton acceleration by single-cycle laser pulses offers a novel monoenergetic and stable operating regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, M. L.; Yan, X. Q.; Mourou, G.; Wheeler, J. A.; Bin, J. H.; Schreiber, J.; Tajima, T.

    2016-04-01

    Prompted by the possibility to produce high energy, single-cycle laser pulses with tens of Petawatt (PW) power, we have investigated laser-matter interactions in the few optical cycle and ultra relativistic intensity regimes. A particularly interesting instability-free regime for ion production was revealed leading to the efficient coherent generation of short (femtosecond; 10 - 15 s ) monoenergetic ion bunches with a peak energy greater than GeV. Of paramount importance, the interaction is absent of the Rayleigh Taylor Instabilities and hole boring that plague techniques such as target normal sheath acceleration and radiation pressure acceleration.

  8. Negative-ion injection by charge exchange at 2.4 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Ruggiero, A.G.

    1995-09-01

    The present technical note describes multi-turn injection by charge exchange of 2.4-GeV negative ions in a Accumulator Ring used as an intense Pulsed Spallation Neutron Source. The major concern of beam loss due to magnetic stripping of the negative ions is addressed. It is demonstrated that, despite the high energy of the ions and the limitation on the magnitude of the magnetic field, it is possible to control the amount of beam losses to a fractional value of better than 10{sup {minus}5}, as it is required to avoid latent activation of the accelerator components. The injection magnet system which accomplish this is described. The paper addresses also the concern of beam loss due to the same effect in the 2.4-GeV injector linear accelerator, and in the transport from the Linac to the Accumulator Ring.

  9. Acceleration of highly charged GeV Fe ions from a low-Z substrate by intense femtosecond laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishiuchi, M.; Sakaki, H.; Esirkepov, T. Zh.; Nishio, K.; Pikuz, T. A.; Faenov, A. Ya.; Skobelev, I. Yu.; Orlandi, R.; Sako, H.; Pirozhkov, A. S.; Matsukawa, K.; Sagisaka, A.; Ogura, K.; Kanasaki, M.; Kiriyama, H.; Fukuda, Y.; Koura, H.; Kando, M.; Yamauchi, T.; Watanabe, Y.; Bulanov, S. V.; Kondo, K.; Imai, K.; Nagamiya, S.

    2015-03-01

    Almost fully stripped Fe ions accelerated up to 0.9 GeV are demonstrated with a 200 TW femtosecond high-intensity laser irradiating a micron-thick Al foil with Fe impurity on the surface. An energetic low-emittance high-density beam of heavy ions with a large charge-to-mass ratio can be obtained, which is useful for many applications, such as a compact radio isotope source in combination with conventional technology.

  10. Efficient quasi-monoenergetic ion beams up to 18 MeV/nucleon via self-generated plasma fields in relativistic laser plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palaniyappan, Sasi; Huang, Chengkun; Gautier, Donald; Hamilton, Christopher; Santiago, Miguel; Kreuzer, Christian; Shah, Rahul; Fernandez, Juan; Los Alamos National Laboratory Team; Ludwig-Maximilian-University Team

    2015-11-01

    Table-top laser-plasma ion accelerators seldom achieve narrow energy spreads, and never without serious compromises in efficiency, particle yield, etc. Using massive computer simulations, we identify a self-organizing scheme that exploits persisting self-generated plasma electric (~ TV/m) and magnetic (~ 104 Tesla) fields to reduce the ion energy spread after the laser exits the plasma - separating the ion acceleration from the energy spread reduction. Consistent with the scheme, we experimentally demonstrate aluminum and carbon ion beams with narrow spectral peaks at energies up to 310 MeV (11.5 MeV/nucleon) and 220 MeV (18.3 MeV/nucleon), respectively, with high conversion efficiency (~ 5%, i.e., 4J out of 80J laser). This is achieved with 0.12 PW high-contrast Gaussian laser pulses irradiating planar foils with optimal thicknesses of up to 250 nm that scale with laser intensity. When increasing the focused laser intensity fourfold (by reducing the focusing optic f/number twofold), the spectral-peak energy increases twofold. These results pave the way for next generation compact accelerators suitable for applications. For example, 400 MeV (33.3 MeV/nucleon) carbon-ion beam with narrow energy spread required for ion fast ignition could be generated using PW-class lasers.

  11. Direct manipulation of the uncompensated antiferromagnetic spins in exchange coupled system by GeV ion irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Paul, Amitesh; Boeni, P.; Paul, N.; Hoepfner, Britta; Lauermann, Iver; Lux-Steiner, M.; Trautmann, C.; Mattauch, S.

    2012-06-18

    Incident ion energy to matrix electrons of a material is dissipated within a narrow cylinder surrounding the swift heavy ion path. The temperature of the lattice exceeds the melting point and upon quenching causes nanometric modifications. We present here a unique ex situ approach in manipulating the uncompensated spins in antiferromagnetic layers of ferro-/antiferromagnetic exchange coupled systems on a nanometric scale. We use the impact of relativistic heavy ion (1-2 GeV) irradiation on such systems. We find an increase in the bias field and a restoration of the reversal via domain nucleation in the trained state. These are identified as plausible results of ion-induced antiferromagnetic ordering with little or no effect on the layer structure. This study demonstrates, therefore, the possibility of nanoscale tailoring of exchange coupled systems that survive even in the trained state.

  12. Laser-driven 1 GeV carbon ions from preheated diamond targets in the break-out afterburner regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, D.; Yin, L.; Gautier, D. C.; Wu, H.-C.; Letzring, S.; Dromey, B.; Shah, R.; Palaniyappan, S.; Shimada, T.; Johnson, R. P.; Schreiber, J.; Habs, D.; Fernández, J. C.; Hegelich, B. M.; Albright, B. J.

    2013-08-01

    Experimental data are presented for laser-driven carbon C6+ ion-acceleration, verifying 2D-PIC studies for multi-species targets in the Break-Out Afterburner regime. With Trident's ultra-high contrast at relativistic intensities of 5 × 1020 W/cm2 and nm-scale diamond targets, acceleration of carbon ions has been optimized by using target laser-preheating for removal of surface proton contaminants. Using a high-resolution wide angle spectrometer, carbon C6+ ion energies exceeding 1 GeV or 83 MeV/amu have been measured, which is a 40% increase in maximum ion energy over uncleaned targets. These results are consistent with kinetic plasma modeling and analytic theory.

  13. Laser-driven 1 GeV carbon ions from preheated diamond targets in the break-out afterburner regime

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, D.; Department für Physik, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München, D-85748 Garching; Max-Planck-Institut für Quantenoptik, D-85748 Garching ; Yin, L.; Gautier, D. C.; Wu, H.-C.; Letzring, S.; Shah, R.; Palaniyappan, S.; Shimada, T.; Johnson, R. P.; Fernández, J. C.; Hegelich, B. M.; Albright, B. J.; Dromey, B.; Schreiber, J.; Habs, D.; Max-Planck-Institut für Quantenoptik, D-85748 Garching

    2013-08-15

    Experimental data are presented for laser-driven carbon C{sup 6+} ion-acceleration, verifying 2D-PIC studies for multi-species targets in the Break-Out Afterburner regime. With Trident's ultra-high contrast at relativistic intensities of 5 × 10{sup 20} W/cm{sup 2} and nm-scale diamond targets, acceleration of carbon ions has been optimized by using target laser-preheating for removal of surface proton contaminants. Using a high-resolution wide angle spectrometer, carbon C{sup 6+} ion energies exceeding 1 GeV or 83 MeV/amu have been measured, which is a 40% increase in maximum ion energy over uncleaned targets. These results are consistent with kinetic plasma modeling and analytic theory.

  14. Laser-driven collimated tens-GeV monoenergetic protons from mass-limited target plus preformed channel

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, F. L.; Wu, H. C.; Wu, S. Z.; Zhou, C. T.; Cai, H. B.; He, X. T.; Yu, M. Y.; Tajima, T.; Yan, X. Q.

    2013-01-15

    Proton acceleration by ultra-intense laser pulse irradiating a target with cross-section smaller than the laser spot size and connected to a parabolic density channel is investigated. The target splits the laser into two parallel propagating parts, which snowplow the back-side plasma electrons along their paths, creating two adjacent parallel wakes and an intense return current in the gap between them. The radiation-pressure pre-accelerated target protons trapped in the wake fields now undergo acceleration as well as collimation by the quasistatic wake electrostatic and magnetic fields. Particle-in-cell simulations show that stable long-distance acceleration can be realized, and a 30 fs monoenergetic ion beam of >10 GeV peak energy and <2 Degree-Sign divergence can be produced by a circularly polarized laser pulse at an intensity of about 10{sup 22} W/cm{sup 2}.

  15. Monoenergetic Energy Doubling in a Hybrid Laser-Plasma Wakefield Accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidding, B.; Königstein, T.; Osterholz, J.; Karsch, S.; Willi, O.; Pretzler, G.

    2010-05-01

    An ultracompact laser-plasma-generated, fs-scale electron double bunch system can be injected into a high-density driver/witness-type plasma wakefield accelerator afterburner stage to boost the witness electrons monoenergetically to energies far beyond twice their initial energy on the GeV scale. The combination of conservation of monoenergetic phase-space structure and fs duration with radial electric plasma fields Er˜100GV/m leads to dramatic transversal witness compression and unprecedented charge densities. It seems feasible to upscale and implement the scheme to future accelerator systems.

  16. Monoenergetic energy doubling in a hybrid laser-plasma wakefield accelerator.

    PubMed

    Hidding, B; Königstein, T; Osterholz, J; Karsch, S; Willi, O; Pretzler, G

    2010-05-14

    An ultracompact laser-plasma-generated, fs-scale electron double bunch system can be injected into a high-density driver/witness-type plasma wakefield accelerator afterburner stage to boost the witness electrons monoenergetically to energies far beyond twice their initial energy on the GeV scale. The combination of conservation of monoenergetic phase-space structure and fs duration with radial electric plasma fields E(r)∼100  GV/m leads to dramatic transversal witness compression and unprecedented charge densities. It seems feasible to upscale and implement the scheme to future accelerator systems. PMID:20866970

  17. Monoenergetic Energy Doubling in a Hybrid Laser-Plasma Wakefield Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Hidding, B.; Koenigstein, T.; Osterholz, J.; Willi, O.; Pretzler, G.; Karsch, S.

    2010-05-14

    An ultracompact laser-plasma-generated, fs-scale electron double bunch system can be injected into a high-density driver/witness-type plasma wakefield accelerator afterburner stage to boost the witness electrons monoenergetically to energies far beyond twice their initial energy on the GeV scale. The combination of conservation of monoenergetic phase-space structure and fs duration with radial electric plasma fields E{sub r{approx}}100 GV/m leads to dramatic transversal witness compression and unprecedented charge densities. It seems feasible to upscale and implement the scheme to future accelerator systems.

  18. Monoenergetic Neutrons for Stellar Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosconi, M.; Heil, M.; Käppeler, F.; Plag, R.; Mengoni, A.; Nolte, R.

    2009-09-01

    With modern techniques, neutron-capture cross sections can be determined with uncertainties of a few percent. However, Maxwellian averaged cross sections calculated from such data require a correction (because low-lying excited states are thermally populated in the hot stellar photon bath) which has to be determined by theoretical calculations. These calculations can be improved with information from indirect measurements, in particular by the inelastic scattering cross section. For low-lying levels, the inelastically scattered neutrons are difficult to separate from the dominant elastic channel. This problem is best solved by means of pulsed, monoenergetic neutron beams. For this reason, a pulsed beam of 30 keV neutrons with an energy spread of 7 to 9 keV FWHM and a width from 10 to 15 ns has been produced at Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe using the 7Li(p, n)7Be reaction directly at the reaction threshold. With this neutron beam the inelastic scattering cross section of the first excited level at 9.75 keV in 187Os was determined with a relative uncertainty of 6%. The use of monoenergetic neutron beams has been further pursued at the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt in Braunschweig, including the 3H(p, n)3He reaction for producing neutrons with an energy of 64 keV.

  19. Multifractal moments in heavy ion Pb-Pb collisions at 158 A GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutt, Sunil

    2016-05-01

    In present work, we use the method of scaled factorial moments to search for intermittent behavior in Pb-Pb interactions at 158 A GeV. The analysis is done on photon distributions obtained using preshower photon multiplicity detector. Scaled factorial moments are used to study short range fluctuations in pseudorapidity distributions of photons. Scaled factorial moments are calculated using horizontal corrected and vertical analysis. The results are compared with simulation analysis using VENUS event generator.

  20. Effects of fast monoenergetic electrons on the generalized Bohm criterion for electronegative dusty plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Chekour, S.; Tahraoui, A.; Zaham, B.

    2012-05-15

    In this work, we have generalized the computation of Bohm criterion for electronegative complex plasma in the presence of fast monoenergetic electrons coming from a plane electrode. For this, we have established a 1D, collisionless, stationary, and unmagnetized electronegative plasma sheath model. The electrons and negative ions are considered in thermodynamic equilibrium; however, the positive ions, the dust grains, and the fast monoenergetic electrons are described by cold fluid equations. The generalized Bohm criterion has been calculated by using Sagdeev's pseudo potential method and the dust grain charge equation. The self-consistent relation between the dust grain surface potential at the edge and dust grains density is also derived. The numerical results reveal that the presence of the fast monoenergetic electrons increases the positive ion Mach number. On the other hand, the raise of electronegativity decreases this positive Mach number. The evolution of dust grain surface potential at the sheath edge is also illustrated and discussed.

  1. ρ0 photoproduction in ultraperipheral relativistic heavy ion collisions at sNN=200 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abelev, B. I.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Anderson, B. D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G. S.; Bai, Y.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L. S.; Baudot, J.; Baumgart, S.; Beavis, D. R.; Bellwied, R.; Benedosso, F.; Betts, R. R.; Bhardwaj, S.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L. C.; Blyth, S.-L.; Bombara, M.; Bonner, B. E.; Botje, M.; Bouchet, J.; Braidot, E.; Brandin, A. V.; Bueltmann, S.; Burton, T. P.; Bystersky, M.; Cai, X. Z.; Caines, H.; Sánchez, M. Calderón De La Barca; Callner, J.; Catu, O.; Cebra, D.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, J. Y.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Choi, K. E.; Christie, W.; Chung, S. U.; Clarke, R. F.; Codrington, M. J. M.; Coffin, J. P.; Cormier, T. M.; Cosentino, M. R.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Das, D.; Dash, S.; Daugherity, M.; Moura, M. M. De; Dedovich, T. G.; Dephillips, M.; Derevschikov, A. A.; Souza, R. Derradi De; Didenko, L.; Dietel, T.; Djawotho, P.; Dogra, S. M.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Du, F.; Dunlop, J. C.; Mazumdar, M. R. Dutta; Edwards, W. R.; Efimov, L. G.; Elhalhuli, E.; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Eun, L.; Fachini, P.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Feng, A.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Fu, J.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Gaillard, L.; Ganti, M. S.; Garcia-Solis, E.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gorbunov, Y. N.; Gordon, A.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Grube, B.; Guertin, S. M.; Guimaraes, K. S. F. F.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, N.; Guryn, W.; Haag, B.; Hallman, T. J.; Hamed, A.; Harris, J. W.; He, W.; Heinz, M.; Henry, T. W.; Hepplemann, S.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffman, A. M.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Horner, M. J.; Huang, H. Z.; Hughes, E. W.; Humanic, T. J.; Igo, G.; Iordanova, A.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jakl, P.; Jin, F.; Jones, P. G.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kajimoto, K.; Kang, K.; Kapitan, J.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Kettler, D.; Khodyrev, V. Yu.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Klein, S. R.; Knospe, A. G.; Kocoloski, A.; Koetke, D. D.; Kollegger, T.; Kopytine, M.; Kotchenda, L.; Kouchpil, V.; Kowalik, K. L.; Kravtsov, P.; Kravtsov, V. I.; Krueger, K.; Kuhn, C.; Kumar, A.; Kurnadi, P.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; Lange, S.; Lapointe, S.; Laue, F.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, C.-H.; Levine, M. J.; Li, C.; Li, Q.; Li, Y.; Lin, G.; Lin, X.; Lindenbaum, S. J.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Liu, H.; Liu, J.; Liu, L.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Longacre, R. S.; Love, W. A.; Lu, Y.; Ludlam, T.; Lynn, D.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, J. G.; Ma, Y. G.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Majka, R.; Mangotra, L. K.; Manweiler, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Matis, H. S.; Matulenko, Yu. A.; McShane, T. S.; Meschanin, A.; Millane, J.; Miller, M. L.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mischke, A.; Mitchell, J.; Mohanty, B.; Morozov, D. A.; Munhoz, M. G.; Nandi, B. K.; Nattrass, C.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J. M.; Nepali, C.; Netrakanti, P. K.; Ng, M. J.; Nogach, L. V.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Okada, H.; Okorokov, V.; Olson, D.; Pachr, M.; Pal, S. K.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pavlinov, A. I.; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Perevoztchikov, V.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Phatak, S. C.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Poljak, N.; Porile, N.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Potekhin, M.; Potukuchi, B. V. K. S.; Prindle, D.; Pruneau, C.; Pruthi, N. K.; Putschke, J.; Qattan, I. A.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Relyea, D.; Ridiger, A.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Rose, A.; Roy, C.; Ruan, L.; Russcher, M. J.; Rykov, V.; Sahoo, R.; Sakrejda, I.; Sakuma, T.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sarsour, M.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmitz, N.; Seger, J.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Seyboth, P.; Shabetai, A.; Shahaliev, E.; Shao, M.; Sharma, M.; Shi, X.-H.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Simon, F.; Singaraju, R. N.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, N.; Snellings, R.; Sorensen, P.; Sowinski, J.; Speltz, J.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stadnik, A.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Staszak, D.; Stock, R.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Suarez, M. C.; Subba, N. L.; Sumbera, M.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Z.; Surrow, B.; Symons, T. J. M.; Toledo, A. Szanto De; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Tang, Z.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thein, D.; Thomas, J. H.; Tian, J.; Timmins, A. R.; Timoshenko, S.; Tokarev, M.; Trainor, T. A.; Tram, V. N.; Trattner, A. L.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R. E.; Tsai, O. D.; Ulery, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Buren, G. Van; Kolk, N. Van Der; Leeuwen, M. Van; Molen, A. M. Vander; Varma, R.; Vasconcelos, G. M. S.; Vasilevski, I. M.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Vernet, R.; Videbaek, F.; Vigdor, S. E.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S. A.; Wada, M.; Waggoner, W. T.; Wang, F.; Wang, G.; Wang, J. S.; Wang, Q.; Wang, X.; Wang, X. L.; Wang, Y.; Webb, J. C.; Westfall, G. D.; , C. Whitten, Jr.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, S. W.; Witt, R.; Wu, J.; Wu, Y.; Xu, N.; Xu, Q. H.; Xu, Z.; Yepes, P.; Yoo, I.-K.; Yue, Q.; Zawisza, M.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zhan, W.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, W. M.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhao, Y.; Zhong, C.; Zhou, J.; Zoulkarneev, R.; Zoulkarneeva, Y.; Zuo, J. X.

    2008-03-01

    Photoproduction reactions occur when the electromagnetic field of a relativistic heavy ion interacts with another heavy ion. The STAR Collaboration presents a measurement of ρ0 and direct π+π- photoproduction in ultraperipheral relativistic heavy ion collisions at sNN=200 GeV. We observe both exclusive photoproduction and photoproduction accompanied by mutual Coulomb excitation. We find a coherent cross section of σ(AuAu→Au*Au*ρ0)=530±19(stat.)±57(syst.) mb, in accord with theoretical calculations based on a Glauber approach, but considerably below the predictions of a color dipole model. The ρ0 transverse momentum spectrum (pT2) is fit by a double exponential curve including both coherent and incoherent coupling to the target nucleus; we find σinc/σcoh=0.29±0.03(stat.)±0.08(syst.). The ratio of direct π+π- to ρ0 production is comparable to that observed in γp collisions at HERA and appears to be independent of photon energy. Finally, the measured ρ0 spin helicity matrix elements agree within errors with the expected s-channel helicity conservation.

  2. Preliminary experience with monoenergetic photon mammography

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, R.E.; Washburn, D.; Pisano, E.; Thomlinson, W.C.; Chapman, D.; Gmur, N.F.; Zhong, Zhong; Sayers, D.

    1995-12-31

    We are using a beam port at the National Synchrotron Light Source facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory as a source of monoenergetic photons. The photon source is radiation from a bending magnet on the X-ray storage ring and provides a usable X-ray spectrum from 5 keV to over 50 keV. A tunable crystal monochromotor is used for energy selection. The beam is 79mm wide and 0.5 mm high. We imaged the ACR mammography phantom and a contrast-detail phantom using a phosphor plate as the unaging detector. Phantom images were obtained at 16, 18, 20 and 22 keV. Phantom thickness varied from 15 mm to 82 mm. These images were compared to images obtained with a conventional dedicated mammography unit. Subjective preliminary results show that image contrast of the monoenergetic images is similar to those obtained from the conventional x-ray source with somewhat sharper and cleaner images from the monoenergetic source. Quantitative analysis shows that the monoenergetic images have improved contrast compared to the polyenergetic derived images. Entrance skin dose measurements show a factor of 5 to 10 times less radiation for the monoenergetic images with equivalent or better contrast Although there remain a number of technical problems to be addressed and much more work to be done, we are encouraged to further explore the use of monoenergetic imaging.

  3. Elliptical flow in relativistic ion collisions at \\sqrt{s}= 200 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahana, D. E.; Kahana, S. H.

    2008-07-01

    A consistent picture of the Au + Au and D + Au, \\sqrt{s}= 200 A GeV measurements at RHIC obtained with the PHENIX, STAR, PHOBOS and BRAHMS detectors including both the rapidity and transverse momentum spectra was previously developed with the simulation LUCIFER. The approach was modelled on the early production of a fluid of pre-hadrons after the completion of an initial phase of high-energy interactions. The formation of pre-hadrons is discussed here, in a perturbative QCD approach as advocated by Kopeliovich, Nemchik and Schmidt. In the second phase of LUCIFER, a considerably lower energy hadron-like cascade ensues. Since the dominant collisions occurring in this latter phase are meson-meson in character while the initial collisions are between baryons, i.e. both involve hadron-sized interaction cross-sections, there is good reason to suspect that the observed elliptical flow will be produced naturally, and this is indeed found to be the case.

  4. Induction of Chromosomal Aberrations in Human Cells after Irradiation with Filtered and Unfiltered Beams of 1 Gev/amu Iron Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, P.; Williams, A.; Nagasawa, H.; Peng, Y.; Chatterjee, A.; Bedford, J.

    To determine whether shielding materials that might be utilized for radiation protection of astronauts would affect the RBE of HZE particles such as those of concern for deep space missions we irradiated non cycling G0 monolayer cultures of contact inhibited normal human fibroblasts with 1 Gev amu iron ions with and without filtration with various thicknesses of Aluminum Al or polyethylene CH 2 and then measured the frequencies of chromosome-type aberrations dicentrics and excess fragments in the first post-irradiation mitosis Irradiations were carried out at the NRSL facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory For doses ranging up to 4 to 6 Gy the dose response for the total of these aberrations per cell was not significantly affected by beam filtrations up to 5 4 cm Al or up to 11 cm polyethylene relative to the unfiltered beam Neither was the dose response significantly different for unfiltered beams of 300 or 600 Mev amu iron ions relative to the 1 Gev amu iron ions The studies with 1 Gev amu iron ions were repeated four different times over a period of four years in each case with coded samples so the individual scoring aberrations would not know the irradiation conditions employed Comparison of the same effects in parallel experiments using 137 Cs gamma-rays allowed us to estimate that the RBE for aberration induction by these HZE iron ions for these acute high dose-rate exposures was approximately

  5. Response of CR39 track etch detector to 10 A GeV Fe 26+ ion beam and total charge changing cross section measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, A.; Gupta, R.; Jalota, S.; Giacomelli, G.; Patrizii, L.; Togo, V.

    2012-01-01

    Total charge changing cross-section of 10 A GeV Fe 26+ ion beam on polyethylene and CR39 targets was measured. Charge of the fragments of projectiles was detected using CR39 nuclear track detectors by a new technique of one-side etching using an automated optical microscope with an image analysing software. The calculated value of total charge changing cross-section is σ tot = (2694 ± 142)mb and is in good agreement with the experimental values by other methods within error. The restricted energy loss ( REL) at energy 10 A GeV for all the fragments was theoretically calculated by using Bethe-Bloch equation and then obtained a calibration curve of reduced etch-rate ratio ( p) versus REL showing the response of CR39 track detectors to 10 A GeV Fe 26+ beam. The curve was fitted by a polynomial showing the relation between p and REL.

  6. Laser Radiation Pressure Accelerator for Quasi-Monoenergetic Proton Generation and Its Medical Implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, C. S.; Shao, X.; Liu, T. C.; Su, J. J.; He, M. Q.; Eliasson, B.; Tripathi, V. K.; Dudnikova, G.; Sagdeev, R. Z.; Wilks, S.; Chen, C. D.; Sheng, Z. M.

    Laser radiation pressure acceleration (RPA) of ultrathin foils of subwavelength thickness provides an efficient means of quasi-monoenergetic proton generation. With an optimal foil thickness, the ponderomotive force of the intense short-pulse laser beam pushes the electrons to the edge of the foil, while balancing the electric field due to charge separation. The electron and proton layers form a self-organized plasma double layer and are accelerated by the radiation pressure of the laser, the so-called light sail. However, the Rayleigh-Taylor instability can limit the acceleration and broaden the energy of the proton beam. Two-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations have shown that the formation of finger-like structures due to the nonlinear evolution of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability limits the acceleration and leads to a leakage of radiation through the target by self-induced transparency. We here review the physics of quasi-monoenergetic proton generation by RPA and recent advances in the studies of energy scaling of RPA, and discuss the RPA of multi-ion and gas targets. The scheme for generating quasi-monoenergetic protons with RPA has the potential of leading to table-top accelerators as sources for producing monoenergetic 50-250 MeV protons. We also discuss potential medical implications, such as particle therapy for cancer treatment, using quasi-monoenergetic proton beams generated from RPA. Compact monoenergetic ion sources also have applications in many other areas such as high-energy particle physics, space electronics radiation testing, and fast ignition in laser fusion.

  7. Centrality dependence of identified particle elliptic flow in relativistic heavy ion collisions at √{sN N}=7.7 -62.4 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamczyk, L.; Adkins, J. K.; Agakishiev, G.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alekseev, I.; Aparin, A.; Arkhipkin, D.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Averichev, G. S.; Bai, X.; Bairathi, V.; Banerjee, A.; Bellwied, R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattarai, P.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L. C.; Bordyuzhin, I. G.; Bouchet, J.; Brandenburg, D.; Brandin, A. V.; Bunzarov, I.; Butterworth, J.; Caines, H.; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M.; Campbell, J. M.; Cebra, D.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chakaberia, I.; Chaloupka, P.; Chang, Z.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, X.; Chen, J. H.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chisman, O.; Christie, W.; Contin, G.; Crawford, H. J.; Das, S.; De Silva, L. C.; Debbe, R. R.; Dedovich, T. G.; Deng, J.; Derevschikov, A. A.; di Ruzza, B.; Didenko, L.; Dilks, C.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Du, C. M.; Dunkelberger, L. E.; Dunlop, J. C.; Efimov, L. G.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Esha, R.; Evdokimov, O.; Eyser, O.; Fatemi, R.; Fazio, S.; Federic, P.; Fedorisin, J.; Feng, Z.; Filip, P.; Fisyak, Y.; Flores, C. E.; Fulek, L.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Garand, D.; Geurts, F.; Gibson, A.; Girard, M.; Greiner, L.; Grosnick, D.; Gunarathne, D. S.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, S.; Guryn, W.; Hamad, A.; Hamed, A.; Haque, R.; Harris, J. W.; He, L.; Heppelmann, S.; Heppelmann, S.; Hirsch, A.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Horvat, S.; Huang, H. Z.; Huang, B.; Huang, X.; Huck, P.; Humanic, T. J.; Igo, G.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jang, H.; Jiang, K.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kalinkin, D.; Kang, K.; Kauder, K.; Ke, H. W.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Khan, Z. H.; Kikoła, D. P.; Kisel, I.; Kisiel, A.; Kochenda, L.; Koetke, D. D.; Kollegger, T.; Kosarzewski, L. K.; Kraishan, A. F.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Kulakov, I.; Kumar, L.; Kycia, R. A.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; Landry, K. D.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, J. H.; Li, X.; Li, Y.; Li, W.; Li, C.; Li, X.; Li, Z. M.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Lomnitz, M.; Longacre, R. S.; Luo, X.; Ma, L.; Ma, Y. G.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, R.; Magdy, N.; Majka, R.; Manion, A.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Masui, H.; Matis, H. S.; McDonald, D.; Meehan, K.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mishra, D.; Mohanty, B.; Mondal, M. M.; Morozov, D. A.; Mustafa, M. K.; Nandi, B. K.; Nasim, Md.; Nayak, T. K.; Nigmatkulov, G.; Niida, T.; Nogach, L. V.; Noh, S. Y.; Novak, J.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Oh, K.; Okorokov, V.; Olvitt, D.; Page, B. S.; Pak, R.; Pan, Y. X.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlik, B.; Pei, H.; Perkins, C.; Peterson, A.; Pile, P.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Poljak, N.; Poniatowska, K.; Porter, J.; Posik, M.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Pruthi, N. K.; Putschke, J.; Qiu, H.; Quintero, A.; Ramachandran, S.; Raniwala, S.; Raniwala, R.; Ray, R. L.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Roy, A.; Ruan, L.; Rusnak, J.; Rusnakova, O.; Sahoo, N. R.; Sahu, P. K.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sarkar, A.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmah, A. M.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schmitz, N.; Seger, J.; Seyboth, P.; Shah, N.; Shahaliev, E.; Shanmuganathan, P. V.; Shao, M.; Sharma, B.; Sharma, M. K.; Shen, W. Q.; Shi, S. S.; Shou, Q. Y.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Sikora, R.; Simko, M.; Singha, S.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, N.; Smirnov, D.; Song, L.; Sorensen, P.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Stepanov, M.; Stock, R.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Sumbera, M.; Summa, B.; Sun, X.; Sun, Z.; Sun, Y.; Sun, X. M.; Surrow, B.; Svirida, N.; Szelezniak, M. A.; Tang, Z.; Tang, A. H.; Tarnowsky, T.; Tawfik, A.; Thäder, J.; Thomas, J. H.; Timmins, A. R.; Tlusty, D.; Tokarev, M.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R. E.; Tribedy, P.; Tripathy, S. K.; Trzeciak, B. A.; Tsai, O. D.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Upsal, I.; Van Buren, G.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vandenbroucke, M.; Varma, R.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Vertesi, R.; Videbæk, F.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S. A.; Vossen, A.; Wang, F.; Wang, Y.; Wang, G.; Wang, Y.; Wang, J. S.; Wang, H.; Webb, J. C.; Webb, G.; Wen, L.; Westfall, G. D.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, S. W.; Witt, R.; Wu, Y. F.; Wu, Y.; Xiao, Z. G.; Xie, W.; Xin, K.; Xu, Z.; Xu, H.; Xu, Y. F.; Xu, Q. H.; Xu, N.; Yang, Y.; Yang, C.; Yang, S.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Q.; Ye, Z.; Ye, Z.; Yepes, P.; Yi, L.; Yip, K.; Yoo, I.-K.; Yu, N.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zha, W.; Zhang, J. B.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, Z.; Zhang, X. P.; Zhao, J.; Zhong, C.; Zhou, L.; Zhu, X.; Zoulkarneeva, Y.; Zyzak, M.; STAR Collaboration

    2016-01-01

    Elliptic flow (v2) values for identified particles at midrapidity in Au + Au collisions measured by the STAR experiment in the Beam Energy Scan at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider at √{sN N}= 7.7 -62.4 GeV are presented for three centrality classes. The centrality dependence and the data at √{sN N}= 14.5 GeV are new. Except at the lowest beam energies, we observe a similar relative v2 baryon-meson splitting for all centrality classes which is in agreement within 15% with the number-of-constituent quark scaling. The larger v2 for most particles relative to antiparticles, already observed for minimum bias collisions, shows a clear centrality dependence, with the largest difference for the most central collisions. Also, the results are compared with a multiphase transport (AMPT) model and fit with a blast wave model.

  8. Laser Acceleration of Monoenergetic Protons Trapped in Moving Double Layer

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, C. S.; Tripathi, V. K.; Shao, X.

    2008-10-15

    We present analytic theory of monoenergetic protons acceleration by short pulse laser irradiation on a thin foil with specific thickness suggested by Yan et al. in simulations. The laser ponderomotive force pushes the electrons forward, leaving ions behind until the space charge field balances the ponderomotive force at distance {delta}. For the optimal target thickness D = {delta}>c/{omega}{sub p}, the electron sheath piled up at the rear surface of width skin depth moves into vacuum, carrying with it the protons contained in the sheath. These protons are trapped by the self field of the electron sheath and are collectively accelerated as a double layer by the laser ponderomotive force. We present here the analytic expression for the energy of the accelerated protons as a function of time, laser intensity, wavelength, and plasma density. For example, proton energy can reach {approx_equal}200 MeV at a = 5, and pulse length 90 fs.

  9. Searching for dark matter annihilation to monoenergetic neutrinos with liquid scintillation detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, J.; Sandick, P.

    2015-06-22

    We consider searches for dark matter annihilation to monoenergetic neutrinos in the core of the Sun. We find that liquid scintillation neutrino detectors have enhanced sensitivity to this class of dark matter models, due to the energy and angular resolution possible for electron neutrinos and antineutrinos that scatter via charged-current interactions. In particular we find that KamLAND, utilizing existing data, could provide better sensitivity to such models than any current direct detection experiment for m{sub X}≲15 Gev. KamLAND’s sensitivity is signal-limited, and future liquid scintillation or liquid argon detectors with similar energy and angular resolution, but with larger exposure, will provide significantly better sensitivity. These detectors may be particularly powerful probes of dark matter with mass O(10) GeV.

  10. Centrality dependence of midrapidity density from GeV to TeV heavy-ion collisions in the effective-energy universality picture of hadroproduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkisyan, Edward K. G.; Mishra, Aditya Nath; Sahoo, Raghunath; Sakharov, Alexander S.

    2016-07-01

    The dependence on centrality, or on the number of nucleon participants, of the midrapidity density of charged particles measured in heavy-ion collisions at the collision energy of about 20 GeV at RHIC to the highest LHC energy of 5 TeV is investigated within the recently proposed effective-energy approach. This approach relates multihadron production in different types of collisions by combining, under the proper scaling of the collision energy, the constituent quark picture with Landau relativistic hydrodynamics. The measurements are shown to be well described based on the similarity of multihadron production process in (anti)proton-proton interactions and heavy-ion collisions driven by the centrality-dependent effective energy of participants.

  11. Neutron filters for producing monoenergetic neutron beams

    SciTech Connect

    Harvey, J.A.; Hill, N.W.; Harvey, J.R.

    1982-01-01

    Neutron transmission measurements have been made on high-purity, highly-enriched samples of /sup 58/Ni (99.9%), /sup 60/Ni (99.7%), /sup 64/Zn (97.9%) and /sup 184/W (94.5%) to measure their neutron windows and to assess their potential usefulness for producing monoenergetic beams of intermediate energies from a reactor. Transmission measurements on the Los Alamos Sc filter (44.26 cm Sc and 1.0 cm Ti) have been made to determine the characteristics of the transmitted neutron beam and to measure the total cross section of Sc at the 2.0 keV minimum. When corrected for the Ti and impurities, a value of 0.35 +- 0.03 b was obtained for this minimum.

  12. Generation of quasi-monoenergetic protons from a double-species target driven by the radiation pressure of an ultraintense laser pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pae, Ki Hong; Kim, Chul Min; Nam, Chang Hee

    2016-03-01

    In laser-driven proton acceleration, generation of quasi-monoenergetic proton beams has been considered a crucial feature of the radiation pressure acceleration (RPA) scheme, but the required difficult physical conditions have hampered its experimental realization. As a method to generate quasi-monoenergetic protons under experimentally viable conditions, we investigated using double-species targets of controlled composition ratio in order to make protons bunched in the phase space in the RPA scheme. From a modified optimum condition and three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations, we showed by varying the ion composition ratio of proton and carbon that quasi-monoenergetic protons could be generated from ultrathin plane targets irradiated with a circularly polarized Gaussian laser pulse. The proposed scheme should facilitate the experimental realization of ultrashort quasi-monoenergetic proton beams for unique applications in high field science.

  13. p{sup 0} photoproduction in ultraperipheral relativistic heavy ion collisions at {radical}{ovr s}{sub NN} = 200 GeV.

    SciTech Connect

    Abelev, B. I.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Anderson, B. D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Krueger, K.; Spinka, H. M.; Underwood, D. G.; STAR Collaboration; High Energy Physics; Univ. of Illinois; Panjab Univ.; Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre; Kent State Univ.; Particle Physic Lab.

    2008-01-01

    Photoproduction reactions occur when the electromagnetic field of a relativistic heavy ion interacts with another heavy ion. The STAR Collaboration presents a measurement of {rho}{sup 0} and direct {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} photoproduction in ultraperipheral relativistic heavy ion collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV. We observe both exclusive photoproduction and photoproduction accompanied by mutual Coulomb excitation. We find a coherent cross section of {sigma} (AuAu {yields} Au{sup +}Au{sup +} {rho}{sup 0}) = 530 {+-} 19(stat.) {+-} 57(syst.) mb, in accord with theoretical calculations based on a Glauber approach, but considerably below the predictions of a color dipole model. The {rho}{sup p} transverse momentum spectrum (p{sub T}{sup 2}) is fit by a double exponential curve including both coherent and incoherent coupling to the target nucleus; we find {sigma}{sub inc}/{sigma}{sub coh} = 0.29 {+-} 0.03(stat.) {+-} 0.08(syst.). The ratio of direct {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} to {rho}{sup 0} production is comparable to that observed in {gamma}{sub p} collisions at HERA and appears to be independent of photon energy. Finally, the measured {rho}{sup 0} spin helicity matrix elements agree within errors with the expected s-channel helicity conservation.

  14. Acceleration of highly charged GeV Fe ions from a low-Z substrate by intense femtosecond laser

    SciTech Connect

    Nishiuchi, M. Sakaki, H.; Esirkepov, T. Zh.; Pirozhkov, A. S.; Sagisaka, A.; Ogura, K.; Kiriyama, H.; Fukuda, Y.; Kando, M.; Bulanov, S. V.; Kondo, K.; Nishio, K.; Orlandi, R.; Koura, H.; Imai, K.; Pikuz, T. A.; Faenov, A. Ya.; Skobelev, I. Yu.; Sako, H.; Matsukawa, K.; and others

    2015-03-15

    Almost fully stripped Fe ions accelerated up to 0.9 GeV are demonstrated with a 200 TW femtosecond high-intensity laser irradiating a micron-thick Al foil with Fe impurity on the surface. An energetic low-emittance high-density beam of heavy ions with a large charge-to-mass ratio can be obtained, which is useful for many applications, such as a compact radio isotope source in combination with conventional technology.

  15. A novel laser-collider used to produce monoenergetic 13.3 MeV 7Li (d, n) neutrons

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, J. R.; Zhang, X. P.; Yuan, D. W.; Li, Y. T.; Li, D. Z.; Rhee, Y. J.; Zhang, Z.; Li, F.; Zhu, B. J.; Li, Yan F.; Han, B.; Liu, C.; Ma, Y.; Li, Yi F.; Tao, M. Z.; Li, M. H.; Guo, X.; Huang, X. G.; Fu, S. Z.; Zhu, J. Q.; Zhao, G.; Chen, L. M.; Fu, C. B.; Zhang, J.

    2016-01-01

    Neutron energy is directly correlated with the energy of the incident ions in experiments involving laser-driven nuclear reactions. Using high-energy incident ions reduces the energy concentration of the generated neutrons. A novel “laser-collider” method was used at the Shenguang II laser facility to produce monoenergetic neutrons via 7Li (d, n) nuclear reactions. The specially designed K-shaped target significantly increased the numbers of incident d and Li ions at the keV level. Ultimately, 13.3 MeV neutrons were obtained. Considering the time resolution of the neutron detector, we demonstrated that the produced neutrons were monoenergetic. Interferometry and a Multi hydro-dynamics simulation confirmed the monoenergetic nature of these neutrons. PMID:27250660

  16. A novel laser-collider used to produce monoenergetic 13.3 MeV (7)Li (d, n) neutrons.

    PubMed

    Zhao, J R; Zhang, X P; Yuan, D W; Li, Y T; Li, D Z; Rhee, Y J; Zhang, Z; Li, F; Zhu, B J; Li, Yan F; Han, B; Liu, C; Ma, Y; Li, Yi F; Tao, M Z; Li, M H; Guo, X; Huang, X G; Fu, S Z; Zhu, J Q; Zhao, G; Chen, L M; Fu, C B; Zhang, J

    2016-01-01

    Neutron energy is directly correlated with the energy of the incident ions in experiments involving laser-driven nuclear reactions. Using high-energy incident ions reduces the energy concentration of the generated neutrons. A novel "laser-collider" method was used at the Shenguang II laser facility to produce monoenergetic neutrons via (7)Li (d, n) nuclear reactions. The specially designed K-shaped target significantly increased the numbers of incident d and Li ions at the keV level. Ultimately, 13.3 MeV neutrons were obtained. Considering the time resolution of the neutron detector, we demonstrated that the produced neutrons were monoenergetic. Interferometry and a Multi hydro-dynamics simulation confirmed the monoenergetic nature of these neutrons. PMID:27250660

  17. A novel laser-collider used to produce monoenergetic 13.3 MeV 7Li (d, n) neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, J. R.; Zhang, X. P.; Yuan, D. W.; Li, Y. T.; Li, D. Z.; Rhee, Y. J.; Zhang, Z.; Li, F.; Zhu, B. J.; Li, Yan F.; Han, B.; Liu, C.; Ma, Y.; Li, Yi F.; Tao, M. Z.; Li, M. H.; Guo, X.; Huang, X. G.; Fu, S. Z.; Zhu, J. Q.; Zhao, G.; Chen, L. M.; Fu, C. B.; Zhang, J.

    2016-06-01

    Neutron energy is directly correlated with the energy of the incident ions in experiments involving laser-driven nuclear reactions. Using high-energy incident ions reduces the energy concentration of the generated neutrons. A novel “laser-collider” method was used at the Shenguang II laser facility to produce monoenergetic neutrons via 7Li (d, n) nuclear reactions. The specially designed K-shaped target significantly increased the numbers of incident d and Li ions at the keV level. Ultimately, 13.3 MeV neutrons were obtained. Considering the time resolution of the neutron detector, we demonstrated that the produced neutrons were monoenergetic. Interferometry and a Multi hydro-dynamics simulation confirmed the monoenergetic nature of these neutrons.

  18. Water radiolysis with heavy ions of energies up to 28 GeV. . 1. Measurements of primary g values as track segment yields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamashita, Shinichi; Katsumura, Yosuke; Lin, Mingzhang; Muroya, Yusa; Miyazaki, Toyoaki; Murakami, Takeshi

    2008-04-01

    Water radiolysis has been investigated with heavy ions having energies up to 28 GeV provided from the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC) at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS). Beams of 4He 2+, 12C 6+, 20Ne 10+, 28Si 14+, 40Ar 18+ and 56Fe 26+ with respective energies of 150, 400, 400, 490, 500 and 500 MeV/ u corresponding LET values of 2.2, 13, 30, 54, 92 and 183 eV/nm, respectively, were taken for the irradiation. The LET changes in sample solutions can be neglected due to their high energies for the irradiation of 1-cm cells. Primary g values have been determined for three important products, hydrated electron (e -aq), hydroxyl radical (·OH), and hydrogen peroxide (H 2O 2) as track segment yields (differential yields) under the conditions of neutral pH. With increasing LET, the g values of e -aq and ·OH decrease from 2.4 and 2.6 in 4He 2+ radiolysis to 0.9 and 1.1 (100 eV) -1 in 56Fe 26+ radiolysis, respectively. It was also found that the primary g value of e -aq is smaller than that of ·OH for any type of ion beam. For the 12C 6+ beam, other energies such as 290, 220, 135 MeV/ u were taken for the irradiation to investigate the effects of type or atomic number of ions on the measured yields. Furthermore, effects of dissolved oxygen on enhancement of H 2O 2 production have also been investigated with aerated NaNO 3 solutions. The presence of dissolved oxygen caused 15-35% enhancement in H 2O 2 yields for all beams. In addition, the results of the present work were compared with reported track segment yields.

  19. Quantitative and Qualitative Differences in Neurocognitive Impairment Induced by 1 GeV 56Fe Ions and X-Rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Britten, R.; Mitchell, S.; Parris, B.; Johnson, A.; Singletary-Britten, S.; Lonart, G.; Drake, R.

    2008-10-01

    During the planned mission to Mars, Astronauts will be exposed to heavy charged particles (Hze). Our group has been determining the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of Hze (1 GeV 56Fe, LET = 150 kev/um) with respect to neurocognitive impairment, specifically spatial memory, short-term working memory and attentional set shifting. Our current data suggest that Hze have RBE values of about 7 for hippocampal-dependent spatial memory tasks (Barnes Maze) and possibly even higher for certain attentional processes. We have also used MALDI-TOF serum profiling analysis to identify several proteins that are biomarkers of both the level and LET of the radiation exposure, and biomarkers of cognitive performance. Our data suggest that Hze particles have a distinctly different impact upon neurocognitive function in rats than do X-rays. From a mission perspective, attentional set shifting is the neurocognitive function most likely to be impacted by the predicted Hze exposure; unfortunately Set shifting underlies our ability to execute complex plans. The proteins identified could be used to monitor the Astronauts for radiation exposure and any associated loss of neurocognitive function, and some may actually give an insight into the complex processes that lead to radiation-induced cognitive impairment.

  20. Monte Carlo transport model comparison with 1A GeV accelerated iron experiment: heavy-ion shielding evaluation of NASA space flight-crew foodstuff

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, D. L. Jr; Townsend, L. W.; Miller, J.; Zeitlin, C.; Heilbronn, L.

    2002-01-01

    Deep-space manned flight as a reality depends on a viable solution to the radiation problem. Both acute and chronic radiation health threats are known to exist, with solar particle events as an example of the former and galactic cosmic rays (GCR) of the latter. In this experiment Iron ions of 1A GeV are used to simulate GCR and to determine the secondary radiation field created as the GCR-like particles interact with a thick target. A NASA prepared food pantry locker was subjected to the iron beam and the secondary fluence recorded. A modified version of the Monte Carlo heavy ion transport code developed by Zeitlin at LBNL is compared with experimental fluence. The foodstuff is modeled as mixed nuts as defined by the 71st edition of the Chemical Rubber Company (CRC) Handbook of Physics and Chemistry. The results indicate a good agreement between the experimental data and the model. The agreement between model and experiment is determined using a linear fit to ordered pairs of data. The intercept is forced to zero. The slope fit is 0.825 and the R2 value is 0.429 over the resolved fluence region. The removal of an outlier, Z=14, gives values of 0.888 and 0.705 for slope and R2 respectively. c2002 COSPAR. Published by Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Monte Carlo transport model comparison with 1A GeV accelerated iron experiment: heavy-ion shielding evaluation of NASA space flight-crew foodstuff.

    PubMed

    Stephens, D L; Townsend, L W; Miller, J; Zeitlin, C; Heilbronn, L

    2002-01-01

    Deep-space manned flight as a reality depends on a viable solution to the radiation problem. Both acute and chronic radiation health threats are known to exist, with solar particle events as an example of the former and galactic cosmic rays (GCR) of the latter. In this experiment Iron ions of 1A GeV are used to simulate GCR and to determine the secondary radiation field created as the GCR-like particles interact with a thick target. A NASA prepared food pantry locker was subjected to the iron beam and the secondary fluence recorded. A modified version of the Monte Carlo heavy ion transport code developed by Zeitlin at LBNL is compared with experimental fluence. The foodstuff is modeled as mixed nuts as defined by the 71st edition of the Chemical Rubber Company (CRC) Handbook of Physics and Chemistry. The results indicate a good agreement between the experimental data and the model. The agreement between model and experiment is determined using a linear fit to ordered pairs of data. The intercept is forced to zero. The slope fit is 0.825 and the R2 value is 0.429 over the resolved fluence region. The removal of an outlier, Z=14, gives values of 0.888 and 0.705 for slope and R2 respectively. PMID:12539754

  2. Monte Carlo transport model comparison with 1A GeV accelerated iron experiment: heavy-ion shielding evaluation of NASA space flight-crew foodstuff

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephens, D. L.; Townsend, L. W.; Miller, J.; Zeitlin, C.; Heilbronn, L.

    Deep-space manned flight as a reality depends on a viable solution to the radiation problem. Both acute and chronic radiation health threats are known to exist, with solar particle events as an example of the former and galactic cosmic rays (GCR) of the latter. In this experiment Iron ions of 1A GeV are used to simulate GCR and to determine the secondary radiation field created as the GCR-like particles interact with a thick target. A NASA prepared food pantry locker was subjected to the iron beam and the secondary fluence recorded. A modified version of the Monte Carlo heavy ion transport code developed by Zeitlin at LBNL is compared with experimental fluence. The foodstuff is modeled as mixed nuts as defined by the 71 st edition of the Chemical Rubber Company (CRC) Handbook of Physics and Chemistry. The results indicate a good agreement between the experimental data and the model. The agreement between model and experiment is determined using a linear fit to ordered pairs of data. The intercept is forced to zero. The slope fit is 0.825 and the R 2 value is 0.429 over the resolved fluence region. The removal of an outlier, Z=14, gives values of 0.888 and 0.705 for slope and R 2 respectively.

  3. Swift heavy ion irradiation of water ice from MeV to GeV energies. Approaching true cosmic ray compaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dartois, E.; Ding, J. J.; de Barros, A. L. F.; Boduch, P.; Brunetto, R.; Chabot, M.; Domaracka, A.; Godard, M.; Lv, X. Y.; Mejía Guamán, C. F.; Pino, T.; Rothard, H.; da Silveira, E. F.; Thomas, J. C.

    2013-09-01

    Context. Cosmic ray ion irradiation affects the chemical composition of and triggers physical changes in interstellar ice mantles in space. One of the primary structural changes induced is the loss of porosity, and the mantles evolve toward a more compact amorphous state. Previously, ice compaction was monitored at low to moderate ion energies. The existence of a compaction threshold in stopping power has been suggested. Aims: In this article we experimentally study the effect of heavy ion irradiation at energies closer to true cosmic rays. This minimises extrapolation and allows a regime where electronic interaction always dominates to be explored, providing the ice compaction cross section over a wide range of electronic stopping power. Methods: High-energy ion irradiations provided by the GANIL accelerator, from the MeV up to the GeV range, are combined with in-situ infrared spectroscopy monitoring of ice mantles. We follow the IR spectral evolution of the ice as a function of increasing fluence (induced compaction of the initial microporous amorphous ice into a more compact amorphous phase). We use the number of OH dangling bonds of the water molecule, i.e. pending OH bonds not engaged in a hydrogen bond in the initially porous ice structure as a probe of the phase transition. These high-energy experiments are combined with lower energy experiments using light ions (H, He) from other facilities in Catania, Italy, and Washington, USA. Results: We evaluated the cross section for the disappearance of OH dangling bonds as a function of electronic stopping power. A cross-section law in a large energy range that includes data from different ice deposition setups is established. The relevant phase structuring time scale for the ice network is compared to interstellar chemical time scales using an astrophysical model. Conclusions: The presence of a threshold in compaction at low stopping power suggested in some previous works seems not to be confirmed for the high

  4. Features of compound multiplicity in heavy-ion interactions at 4. 5 A GeV/ c

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmad, T.; Irfan, M. )

    1991-10-01

    This paper mainly deals with some important features of compound multiplicity in the inelastic nuclear reactions induced by 4.5{ital A} GeV/{ital c} carbon and silicon ions in nuclear emulsion. The characteristics of this parameter observed in the present study are compared with the corresponding values obtained for proton-emulsion interactions at the same incident momentum per nucleon. The average compound multiplicity is found to vary linearly with black and heavy particle multiplicities. Finally, the compound multiplicity distributions for carbon- and silicon-emulsion interactions are observed to obey a Koba-Nielsen-Olesen (KNO) type of scaling law.

  5. Theoretical Studies on Intense Laser Produced Quasi-Monoenergetic Particle Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Sheng, Z. M.; Zhang, J.; Wang, W. M.; Yan, X. Q.; Chen, M.; Chen, J. E.

    2009-07-25

    A brief review is presented on our recent theoretical studies on the quasi-monoenergetic electron and proton beam generation by intense laser pulses. For the electron beam generation from laser wakefields, the mechanisms of electron injection by a laser pulse in the colliding geometry are investigated. It shows that there exist two mechanisms, which are called collective injection and stochastic injection. The number of injection electrons is studied as a function of the injection pulse intensity, pulse duration, as well as laser polarization. The injection by a transverse intersecting laser pulse is also investigated, which appears relatively easy for experimental setup. The required laser parameters are comparable to the colliding geometry. The proton acceleration by collisionless electrostatic shock waves is investigated and shock wave propagation through the interface of two targets with different ion species is simulated. It is found that ions with a relatively large charge-to-mass ratio can be accelerated successively in two counter-propagating shocks when they are overtaken by shock fronts until their energy is larger than the scalar potential of the shock waves. A scheme of ion acceleration in the new parameter regime called phase stable acceleration is proposed with the use of circularly-polarized laser pulses irradiating on very thin solid targets, which would enable one to obtain quasi-monoenergetic proton beams of multi-100 MeV with 100 TW-class lasers.

  6. Hadronic resonance production in d+au collisions at {radical}{ovr s}{sub NN} =200 GeV measured at the BNL relativistic heavy ion collider.

    SciTech Connect

    Abelev, B. I.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Anderson, B. D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Krueger, K.; Spinka, H. M.; Underwood, D. G.; STAR Collaboration; High Energy Physics; Univ. of Illinois; Panjab Univ.; Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre; Kent State Univ.; Particle Physic Lab.

    2008-01-01

    We present the first measurements of the {rho}(770){sup 0},K*(892), {Delta}(1232){sup ++}, {sigma}(1385), and {Lambda}(1520) resonances in d+Au collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV, reconstructed via their hadronic decay channels using the STAR detector (the solenoidal tracker at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider). The masses and widths of these resonances are studied as a function of transverse momentum p{sub T}. We observe that the resonance spectra follow a generalized scaling law with the transverse mass m{sub T}. The of resonances in minimum bias collisions are compared with the of {pi},K and {bar p}. The {rho}{sup 0}/{pi}{sup -}, K{sup +}/K{sup -}, {Delta}{sup ++}/p, {Sigma}(1385)/{Lambda}, and {Lambda}(1520)/{Lambda} ratios in d+Au collisions are compared with the measurements in minimum bias p+p interactions, where we observe that both measurements are comparable. The nuclear modification factors (R{sub dAu}) of the {rho}{sup 0},K{sup +}, and {Sigma}{sup +} scale with the number of binary collisions (N{sub bin}) for p{sub T} > 1.2 GeV/c.

  7. Oblique incidence for broad monoenergetic proton beams

    SciTech Connect

    Jette, David; Yuan Jiankui; Chen Weimin

    2010-11-15

    Purpose: The depth dose of a monoenergetic broad parallel proton beam has been modeled in a number of ways, but evidently not yet for oblique incidence. The purpose of this investigation is to find an accurate analytic formula for this case, which can then be used to model the depth dose of a broad beam with an initial Gaussian angular distribution. Methods: The Bortfeld model of depth dose in a broad normally incident proton beam has been extended to the case of oblique incidence. This extension uses an empirically determined Gaussian parameter {sigma}{sub x} which (roughly) characterizes the off-axis dose of a proton pencil beam. As with Bortfeld's work, the modeling is done in terms of parabolic cylinder functions. To obtain the depth dose for an initial angular distribution, the result is integrated over the angle of incidence, weighted by a Gaussian probability function. The predictions of the theory have been compared to MCNPX Monte Carlo calculations for four phantom materials (water, bone, aluminum, and copper) and for initial proton energies of 50, 100, 150, 200, and 250 MeV. Results: Comparisons of the depth dose predicted by this theory with Monte Carlo calculations have established that with very good accuracy, {sigma}{sub x} can be taken to be independent both of the depth and of the angle of incidence. As a function of initial proton range or of initial proton energy, {sigma}{sub x} has been found to obey a power law to very high accuracy. Good fits to Monte Carlo calculations have also been found for an initial Gaussian angular distribution. Conclusions: This investigation is the first step in the accurate modeling of a proton pencil beam with initial Gaussian angular distribution. It provides the longitudinal factor, with its Bragg peak buildup and sharp distal falloff. A transverse factor must still be incorporated into this theory and this will give the lateral penumbra of a collimated proton beam. Also, it will be necessary to model the dose of

  8. Coaxial Mono-Energetic Gamma Generator for Active Interrogation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludewigt, B. A.; Antolak, A. J.; Henestroza, E.; Kwan, J. W.; Leitner, M.; Leung, K.-N.; Waldron, W.; Wilde, S.

    2009-03-01

    Compact mono-energetic photon sources are sought for active interrogation systems to detect shielded special nuclear materials in, for example, cargo containers, trucks and other vehicles. A prototype gamma interrogation source has been designed and built that utilizes the 11B(p,γ)12C reaction to produce 12 MeV gamma-rays which are near the peak of the photofission cross section. In particular, the 11B(p,γ)12C resonance at 163 kV allows the production of gammas at low proton acceleration voltages, thus keeping the design of a gamma generator comparatively small and simple. A coaxial design has been adopted with a toroidal-shaped plasma chamber surrounding a cylindrical gamma production target. The plasma discharge is driven by a 2 MHz rf-power supply (capable up to 50 kW) using a circular rf-antenna. Permanent magnets embedded in the walls of the plasma chamber generate a multi-cusp field that confines the plasma and allows higher plasma densities and lower gas pressures. About 100 proton beamlets are extracted through a slotted plasma electrode towards the target at the center of the device that is at a negative 180 kV. The target consists of LaB6 tiles that are brazed to a water-cooled cylindrical structure. The generator is designed to operate at 500 Hz with 20 μs long pulses, and a 1% duty factor by pulsing the ion source rf-power. A first-generation coaxial gamma source has been built for low duty factor experiments and testing.

  9. Coaxial Mono-Energetic Gamma Generator for Active Interrogation

    SciTech Connect

    Ludewigt, Bernhard A.; Antolak, A.J.; Henestroza, E.; Leitner, M.; Leung, K.-N.; Waldron, W.; Wilde, S.; Kwan, J.W.

    2008-08-01

    Compact mono-energetic photon sources are sought for active interrogation systems to detect shielded special nuclear materials in, for example, cargo containers, trucks and other vehicles. A prototype gamma interrogation source has been designed and built that utilizes the 11B(p,gamma)12C reaction to produce 12 MeV gamma-rays which are near the peak of the photofission cross section. In particular, the 11B(p,gamma)12C resonance at 163 kV allows the production of gammas at low proton acceleration voltages, thus keeping the design of a gamma generator comparatively small and simple. A coaxial design has been adopted with a toroidal-shaped plasma chamber surrounding a cylindrical gamma production target. The plasma discharge is driven by a 2 MHz rf-power supply (capable up to 50 kW) using a circular rf-antenna. Permanent magnets embedded in the walls of the plasma chamber generate a multi-cusp field that confines the plasma and allows higher plasma densities and lower gas pressures. About 100 proton beamlets are extracted through a slotted plasma electrode towards the target at the center of the device that is at a negative 180 kV. The target consists of LaB6 tiles that are brazed to a water-cooled cylindrical structure. The generator is designed to operate at 500 Hz with 20 mu s long pulses, and a 1percent duty factor by pulsing the ion source rf-power. A first-generation coaxial gamma source has been built for low duty factor experiments and testing.

  10. Coaxial Mono-Energetic Gamma Generator for Active Interrogation

    SciTech Connect

    Ludewigt, B. A.; Henestroza, E.; Kwan, J. W.; Leitner, M.; Leung, K.-N.; Waldron, W.; Wilde, S.; Antolak, A. J.

    2009-03-10

    Compact mono-energetic photon sources are sought for active interrogation systems to detect shielded special nuclear materials in, for example, cargo containers, trucks and other vehicles. A prototype gamma interrogation source has been designed and built that utilizes the {sup 11}B(p,{gamma}){sup 12}C reaction to produce 12 MeV gamma-rays which are near the peak of the photofission cross section. In particular, the {sup 11}B(p,{gamma}){sup 12}C resonance at 163 kV allows the production of gammas at low proton acceleration voltages, thus keeping the design of a gamma generator comparatively small and simple. A coaxial design has been adopted with a toroidal-shaped plasma chamber surrounding a cylindrical gamma production target. The plasma discharge is driven by a 2 MHz rf-power supply (capable up to 50 kW) using a circular rf-antenna. Permanent magnets embedded in the walls of the plasma chamber generate a multi-cusp field that confines the plasma and allows higher plasma densities and lower gas pressures. About 100 proton beamlets are extracted through a slotted plasma electrode towards the target at the center of the device that is at a negative 180 kV. The target consists of LaB{sub 6} tiles that are brazed to a water-cooled cylindrical structure. The generator is designed to operate at 500 Hz with 20 {mu}s long pulses, and a 1% duty factor by pulsing the ion source rf-power. A first-generation coaxial gamma source has been built for low duty factor experiments and testing.

  11. Dose responses of diamond detectors to monoenergetic X-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Z.; Hugtenburg, R. P.; Green, S.; Beddoe, A. H.

    2004-01-01

    The characterisation of a detectors response in the kilovoltage range is necessary to understand its response to scattered radiation in the megavoltage range. Scattered radiation is absorbed in the detector by the highly Z-dependent photoelectric process. Measurements of diamond detector response to highly filtered quasi-monoenergetic X-rays and synchrotron-generated monoenergetic photons have been performed revealing effects that relate to the presence of copper and silver used to form electrical contact with the crystal. A three-component model of energy absorption, utilizing tabulated cross-sections for C, Cu and Ag, is proposed and a calculation of phantom scatter factors for diamond detector is given.

  12. Laser guiding for GeV laser-plasma accelerators.

    PubMed

    Leemans, Wim; Esarey, Eric; Geddes, Cameron; Schroeder, Carl; Tóth, Csaba

    2006-03-15

    Guiding of relativistically intense laser beams in preformed plasma channels is discussed for development of GeV-class laser accelerators. Experiments using a channel guided laser wakefield accelerator at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) have demonstrated that near mono-energetic 100 MeV-class electron beams can be produced with a 10 TW laser system. Analysis, aided by particle-in-cell simulations, as well as experiments with various plasma lengths and densities, indicate that tailoring the length of the accelerator, together with loading of the accelerating structure with beam, is the key to production of mono-energetic electron beams. Increasing the energy towards a GeV and beyond will require reducing the plasma density and design criteria are discussed for an optimized accelerator module. The current progress and future directions are summarized through comparison with conventional accelerators, highlighting the unique short-term prospects for intense radiation sources based on laser-driven plasma accelerators. PMID:16483950

  13. Laser Guiding for GeV Laser-Plasma Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Leemans, Wim; Esarey, Eric; Geddes, Cameron; Schroeder, C.B.; Toth, Csaba

    2005-06-06

    Guiding of relativistically intense laser beams in preformed plasma channels is discussed for development of GeV-class laser accelerators. Experiments using a channel guided laser wakefield accelerator (LWFA) at LBNL have demonstrated that near mono-energetic 100 MeV-class electron beams can be produced with a 10 TW laser system. Analysis, aided by particle-in-cell simulations, as well as experiments with various plasma lengths and densities, indicate that tailoring the length of the accelerator, together with loading of the accelerating structure with beam, is the key to production of mono-energetic electron beams. Increasing the energy towards a GeV and beyond will require reducing the plasma density and design criteria are discussed for an optimized accelerator module. The current progress and future directions are summarized through comparison with conventional accelerators, highlighting the unique short term prospects for intense radiation sources based on laser-driven plasma accelerators.

  14. Monoenergetic neutrinos from dark matter annihilation: Issues of exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Jason

    2016-06-01

    We consider searches for dark matter annihilation in the Sun resulting in monoenergetic neutrinos, produced either directly or through the decay of stopped pions and kaons. We find that this strategy is very successful at increasing the signal-to-background ratio, but that current experiments may be signal limited. We discuss the exposures need to fully exploit this search strategy.

  15. XRD study of yttria stabilized zirconia irradiated with 7.3 MeV Fe, 10 MeV I, 16 MeV Au, 200 MeV Xe and 2.2 GeV Au ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakano, K.; Yoshizaki, H.; Saitoh, Y.; Ishikawa, N.; Iwase, A.

    2016-03-01

    To simulate energetic neutron irradiation effects, yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) which is one of the major materials for electrical corrosion potential sensors (ECP sensors) was irradiated with heavy ions at energies ranging from 7.3 MeV to 2.2 GeV. Ion irradiation effects on the lattice structure were analyzed using the X-ray diffraction (XRD). The increase in lattice constant was induced by the ion irradiation. It was dominated by the elastic collision process and not by the electronic excitation process. The lattice disordering which was observed as a broadening of XRD peaks was also induced by the irradiation especially for 200 MeV Xe ion irradiation. The present result suggests that the expansion and/or the disordering of YSZ lattice induced by energetic neutrons may affect the durability of a joint interface between a metal housing and YSZ membrane for the usage of ECP sensors in nuclear power reactors.

  16. Observation of anomalous reaction mean free paths of nuclear-projectile fragments in research emulsion from 2 A GeV heavy-ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Karant, Y.J.

    1981-07-01

    From an analysis of 1460 projectile fragment collisions in nuclear research emulsion exposed to 2.1 A GeV /sup 16/O and 1.9 A GeV /sup 56/Fe at the Bevalac, evidence is presented for the existence of an anomalously short interaction mean free path of projectile fragments for the first several cm after emission. The result is significant to beyond the 3 standard deviation confidence level.

  17. Note: A monoenergetic proton backlighter for the National Ignition Facility.

    PubMed

    Rygg, J R; Zylstra, A B; Séguin, F H; LePape, S; Bachmann, B; Craxton, R S; Garcia, E M; Kong, Y Z; Gatu-Johnson, M; Khan, S F; Lahmann, B J; McKenty, P W; Petrasso, R D; Rinderknecht, H G; Rosenberg, M J; Sayre, D B; Sio, H W

    2015-11-01

    A monoenergetic, isotropic proton source suitable for proton radiography applications has been demonstrated at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). A deuterium and helium-3 gas-filled glass capsule was imploded with 39 kJ of laser energy from 24 of NIF's 192 beams. Spectral, spatial, and temporal measurements of the 15-MeV proton product of the (3)He(d,p)(4)He nuclear reaction reveal a bright (10(10) protons/sphere), monoenergetic (ΔE/E = 4%) spectrum with a compact size (80 μm) and isotropic emission (∼13% proton fluence variation and <0.4% mean energy variation). Simultaneous measurements of products produced by the D(d,p)T and D(d,n)(3)He reactions also show 2 × 10(10) isotropically distributed 3-MeV protons. PMID:26628185

  18. Bremstrahlung versus Monoenergetic Photons for Photonuclear Inspection Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. James L. Jones

    2008-06-01

    Bremsstrahlung sources have been utilized for various non-intrusive inspection or interrogation applications for over 100 years - with the primary focus being radiographic imaging. In the last several decades, it has become evident that photons of energy greater than 6 MeV can also provide useful photonuclear information that can extend the capabilities and information available from active inspections. These energetic inspection photons can be produced as a continuum of energies (i.e., bremsstrahlung distribution) or as a set of one or more discrete photon energies (i.e., monoenergetic distribution). This paper will discuss the photonuclear process and its energetic photon energy dependence, will discuss the photonuclear role in nuclear material detection, will present applicable photon sources along with their field deployment status, and highlight some advantages and disadvantages of bremsstrahlung and monoenergetic photons sources.

  19. Note: A monoenergetic proton backlighter for the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Rygg, J. R.; LePape, S.; Bachmann, B.; Khan, S. F.; Sayre, D. B.; Zylstra, A. B.; Séguin, F. H.; Gatu-Johnson, M.; Lahmann, B. J.; Petrasso, R. D.; Sio, H. W.; Craxton, R. S.; Garcia, E. M.; Kong, Y. Z.; McKenty, P. W.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Rosenberg, M. J.

    2015-11-15

    A monoenergetic, isotropic proton source suitable for proton radiography applications has been demonstrated at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). A deuterium and helium-3 gas-filled glass capsule was imploded with 39 kJ of laser energy from 24 of NIF’s 192 beams. Spectral, spatial, and temporal measurements of the 15-MeV proton product of the {sup 3}He(d,p){sup 4}He nuclear reaction reveal a bright (10{sup 10} protons/sphere), monoenergetic (ΔE/E = 4%) spectrum with a compact size (80 μm) and isotropic emission (∼13% proton fluence variation and <0.4% mean energy variation). Simultaneous measurements of products produced by the D(d,p)T and D(d,n){sup 3}He reactions also show 2 × 10{sup 10} isotropically distributed 3-MeV protons.

  20. Note: A monoenergetic proton backlighter for the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rygg, J. R.; Zylstra, A. B.; Séguin, F. H.; LePape, S.; Bachmann, B.; Craxton, R. S.; Garcia, E. M.; Kong, Y. Z.; Gatu-Johnson, M.; Khan, S. F.; Lahmann, B. J.; McKenty, P. W.; Petrasso, R. D.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Sayre, D. B.; Sio, H. W.

    2015-11-01

    A monoenergetic, isotropic proton source suitable for proton radiography applications has been demonstrated at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). A deuterium and helium-3 gas-filled glass capsule was imploded with 39 kJ of laser energy from 24 of NIF's 192 beams. Spectral, spatial, and temporal measurements of the 15-MeV proton product of the 3He(d,p)4He nuclear reaction reveal a bright (1010 protons/sphere), monoenergetic (ΔE/E = 4%) spectrum with a compact size (80 μm) and isotropic emission (˜13% proton fluence variation and <0.4% mean energy variation). Simultaneous measurements of products produced by the D(d,p)T and D(d,n)3He reactions also show 2 × 1010 isotropically distributed 3-MeV protons.

  1. Monoenergetic Electronic Beam Production Using Dual Collinear Laser Pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, A. G. R.; Mangles, S. P. D.; Dangor, A. E.; Kamperidis, C.; Krushelnick, K.; Najmudin, Z.; Murphy, C. D.; Foster, P.; Lancaster, K. L.; Norreys, P. A.; Gallacher, J. G.; Jaroszynski, D. A.; Viskup, R.

    2008-06-27

    The production of monoenergetic electron beams by two copropagating ultrashort laser pulses is investigated both by experiment and using particle-in-cell simulations. By proper timing between guiding and driver pulses, a high-amplitude plasma wave is generated and sustained for longer than is possible with either of the laser pulses individually, due to plasma waveguiding of the driver by the guiding pulse. The growth of the plasma wave is inferred by the measurement of monoenergetic electron beams with low divergence that are not measured by using either of the pulses individually. This scheme can be easily implemented and may allow more control of the interaction than is available to the single pulse scheme.

  2. Interferometry radii in heavy-ion collisions at {radical}(s)=200 GeV and 2.76 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Bozek, Piotr

    2011-04-15

    The expansion of the fireball created in Au-Au collisions at {radical}(s)=200 GeV and Pb-Pb collisions at 2.76 TeV is modelled using relativistic viscous hydrodynamics. The experimentally observed interferometry radii are well reproduced. Additional pre-equilibrium flow slightly improves the results for the lower energies studied.

  3. Monoenergetic proton emission from nuclear reaction induced by high intensity laser-generated plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Torrisi, L.; Cavallaro, S.; Giuffrida, L.; Cutroneo, M.; Krasa, J.; Margarone, D.; Velyhan, A.; Ullschmied, J.; Kravarik, J.; Wolowski, J.; Szydlowski, A.; Rosinski, M.

    2012-02-15

    A 10{sup 16} W/cm{sup 2} Asterix laser pulse intensity, 1315 nm at the fundamental frequency, 300 ps pulse duration, was employed at PALS laboratory of Prague, to irradiate thick and thin primary CD{sub 2} targets placed inside a high vacuum chamber. The laser irradiation produces non-equilibrium plasma with deutons and carbon ions emission with energy of up to about 4 MeV per charge state, as measured by time-of-flight (TOF) techniques by using ion collectors and silicon carbide detectors. Accelerated deutons may induce high D-D cross section for fusion processes generating 3 MeV protons and 2.5 MeV neutrons, as measured by TOF analyses. In order to increase the mono-energetic proton yield, secondary CD{sub 2} targets can be employed to be irradiated by the plasma-accelerated deutons. Experiments demonstrated that high intensity laser pulses can be employed to promote nuclear reactions from which characteristic ion streams may be developed. Results open new scenario for applications of laser-generated plasma to the fields of ion sources and ion accelerators.

  4. Laser acceleration of monoenergetic protons with a near-critical, optically-shaped gas target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yu-Hsin; Helle, Michael; Ting, Antonio; Gordon, Daniel; Polyanskiy, Mikhail; Pogorelsky, Igor; Babzien, Marcus; Najmudin, Zulfikar

    2015-11-01

    Laser-based ion acceleration is studied using the intense terawatt CO2 laser pulse with a near-critical hydrogen gas target. The gas density profile is tailored by a hydrodynamic shock, which is launched by ablation of solid with a moderate-energy, nanosecond Nd:YAG laser pulse in the vicinity of the gas jet. A sharp density gradient is thus created near the edge of the gas column, resulting to ~ 6X local density enhancement up to several times of critical density within 100 micrometers before CO2 laser pulse arrives. With such density profile, we have observed quasi-monoenergetic proton beams with energies >1 MeV and good shot-to-shot reproducibility. In contrast, no protons were observed when the hydrodynamic shock is absent. Results from experiments and simulations will be presented. This work is supported by U.S. Department of Energy.

  5. Observation of Quasi Mono-Energetic Protons in Laser Spray-Target Interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Ramakrishna, B.; Borghesi, M.; Doria, D.; Sarri, G.; Ter-Avetisyan, S.; Andreev, A.; Ehrentraut, L.; Sandner, W.; Schnuerer, M.; Steinke, S.; Nickles, P. V.

    2010-02-02

    Laser driven ion acceleration arises from charge separation effects caused by an ultrahigh intensity laser pulse. Limited mass targets confine the accelerated electrons within the target size and prevent the large area spreading seen in extended foil targets. Furthermore, if the target size is smaller than the laser wavelength and focal spot diameter, homogeneous heating of the target is ensured. Observation of quasi-monoenergetic protons in the interaction of a high intensity high contrast laser pulse at 5x10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2} with 150 nm--diameter water droplets is investigated. An ensemble of such objects is formed in a spray. Quasi mono energetic proton bursts of energy Eapprox1.6 MeV are observed and are associated with a specific ionization and explosion dynamics of the spheres.

  6. Compact quasi-monoenergetic photon sources from laser-plasma accelerators for nuclear detection and characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geddes, Cameron G. R.; Rykovanov, Sergey; Matlis, Nicholas H.; Steinke, Sven; Vay, Jean-Luc; Esarey, Eric H.; Ludewigt, Bernhard; Nakamura, Kei; Quiter, Brian J.; Schroeder, Carl B.; Toth, Csaba; Leemans, Wim P.

    2015-05-01

    Near-monoenergetic photon sources at MeV energies offer improved sensitivity at greatly reduced dose for active interrogation, and new capabilities in treaty verification, nondestructive assay of spent nuclear fuel and emergency response. Thomson (also referred to as Compton) scattering sources are an established method to produce appropriate photon beams. Applications are however restricted by the size of the required high-energy electron linac, scattering (photon production) system, and shielding for disposal of the high energy electron beam. Laser-plasma accelerators (LPAs) produce GeV electron beams in centimeters, using the plasma wave driven by the radiation pressure of an intense laser. Recent LPA experiments are presented which have greatly improved beam quality and efficiency, rendering them appropriate for compact high-quality photon sources based on Thomson scattering. Designs for MeV photon sources utilizing the unique properties of LPAs are presented. It is shown that control of the scattering laser, including plasma guiding, can increase photon production efficiency. This reduces scattering laser size and/or electron beam current requirements to scale compatible with the LPA. Lastly, the plasma structure can decelerate the electron beam after photon production, reducing the size of shielding required for beam disposal. Together, these techniques provide a path to a compact photon source system.

  7. GeV plasma accelerators driven in waveguides

    SciTech Connect

    Hooker, S.M.; Brunetti, E.; Esarey, E.; Gallacher, J.G.; Geddes,C.G.R.; Gonsalves, A.J.; Jaroszynski, D.A.; Kamperidis, C.; Kneip, S.; Krushelnick, K.; Leemans, W.P.; Mangles, S.P.D.; Murphy, C.D.; Nagler,B.; Najmudin, Z.; Nakamura, K.; Norreys, P.A.; Panasenko, D.; Rowlands-Rees, T.P.; Schroeder, C.B.; Toth, Cs.; Trines, R.

    2007-11-01

    During the last few years laser-driven plasma acceleratorshave been shown to generate quasi-monoenergetic electron beams withenergies up to several hundred MeV. Extending the output energy oflaser-driven plasma accelerators to the GeV range requires operation atplasma densities an order of magnitude lower, i.e. 1018 cm-3, andincreasing the distance over which acceleration is maintained from a fewmillimetres to a few tens of millimetres. One approach for achieving thisis to guide the driving laser pulse in the plasma channel formed in agas-filled capillary discharge waveguide. We present transverseinterferometric measurements of the evolution of the plasma channelformed and compare these measurements with models of the capillarydischarge. We describe in detail experiments performed at LawrenceBerkeley National Laboratory and at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory inwhich plasma accelerators were driven within this type of waveguide togenerate quasimonoenergetic electron beams with energies up to 1GeV.

  8. Contribution of {pi}{sup 0} and {eta} Dalitz decays to the dilepton invariant-mass spectrum in 1A GeV heavy-ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    TAPS Collaboration

    1997-12-01

    The Dalitz-decay contributions of {pi}{sup 0} and {eta} mesons to the di-electron invariant-mass spectrum at 1 A GeV have been obtained from a systematics of inclusive meson production cross sections measured for the collision systems {sup 12}C+{sup nat}C and {sup 40}Ar,{sup 40}Ca+{sup nat}Ca in the bombarding-energy range of 0.8{endash}2.0 A GeV. These results are compared with the recently published di-electron mass spectra of the DLS collaboration. Systematic errors and angular-distribution effects are discussed. We conclude that the low-mass part of the DLS data cannot be explained by the Dalitz decays of light neutral mesons only. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  9. Elliptic flow in heavy-ion collisions at energies √{sN N}=2.7 - 39 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, Yu. B.; Soldatov, A. A.

    2015-02-01

    The transverse-momentum-integrated elliptic flow of charged particles at midrapidity, v2(charged), and that of identified hadrons from Au +Au collisions are computed in a wide range of incident energies 2.7 ≤√{sN N}≤ 39 GeV. The simulations are performed within a three-fluid model by employing three different equations of state (EoSs): a purely hadronic EoS and two versions of the EoS involving the deconfinement transition—a first-order phase transition and a smooth crossover one. The present simulations demonstrate low sensitivity of v2(charged) to the EoS. All considered scenarios equally well reproduce recent STAR data on v2(charged) for mid-central Au +Au collisions and properly describe its change of sign at the incident energy decrease below √{sN N}≈ 3.5 GeV. The predicted integrated elliptic flow of various species exhibits a stronger dependence on the EoS. A noticeable sensitivity to the EoS is found for antibaryons and, to a lesser extent, for K- mesons. In particular, the v2 excitation functions of antibaryons exhibit a nonmonotonicity within the deconfinement scenarios that was predicted by Kolb, Sollfrank, and Heinz. However, low multiplicities of antibaryons at √{sN N}≤ 10 GeV result in large fluctuations of their v2, which may wash out this nonmonotonicity.

  10. ACCELERATING POLARIZED PROTONS TO 250 GEV

    SciTech Connect

    BAI,M.; AHRENS, L.; ALEKSEEV, I.G.; ALESSI, J.; BEEBE-WANG, J.; ET AL.

    2007-06-25

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) as the first high energy polarized proton collider was designed t o provide polarized proton collisions a t a maximum beam energy of 250 GeV. I t has been providing collisions a t a beam energy of 100 Gel' since 2001. Equipped with two full Siberian snakes in each ring, polarization is preserved during the acceleration from injection to 100 GeV with careful control of the betatron tunes and the vertical orbit distortions. However, the intrinsic spin resonances beyond 100 GeV are about a factor of two stronger than those below 100 GeV? making it important t o examine the impact of these strong intrinsic spin resonances on polarization survival and the tolerance for vertical orbit distortions. Polarized protons were accelerated t o the record energy of 250 GeV in RHIC with a polarization of 46% measured a t top energy in 2006. The polarization measurement as a function of beam energy also shows some polarization loss around 136 GeV, the first strong intrinsic resonance above 100 GeV. This paper presents the results and discusses the sensitivity of the polarization survival t o orbit distortions.

  11. Brachytherapy structural shielding calculations using Monte Carlo generated, monoenergetic data

    SciTech Connect

    Zourari, K.; Peppa, V.; Papagiannis, P.; Ballester, Facundo; Siebert, Frank-André

    2014-04-15

    Purpose: To provide a method for calculating the transmission of any broad photon beam with a known energy spectrum in the range of 20–1090 keV, through concrete and lead, based on the superposition of corresponding monoenergetic data obtained from Monte Carlo simulation. Methods: MCNP5 was used to calculate broad photon beam transmission data through varying thickness of lead and concrete, for monoenergetic point sources of energy in the range pertinent to brachytherapy (20–1090 keV, in 10 keV intervals). The three parameter empirical model introduced byArcher et al. [“Diagnostic x-ray shielding design based on an empirical model of photon attenuation,” Health Phys. 44, 507–517 (1983)] was used to describe the transmission curve for each of the 216 energy-material combinations. These three parameters, and hence the transmission curve, for any polyenergetic spectrum can then be obtained by superposition along the lines of Kharrati et al. [“Monte Carlo simulation of x-ray buildup factors of lead and its applications in shielding of diagnostic x-ray facilities,” Med. Phys. 34, 1398–1404 (2007)]. A simple program, incorporating a graphical user interface, was developed to facilitate the superposition of monoenergetic data, the graphical and tabular display of broad photon beam transmission curves, and the calculation of material thickness required for a given transmission from these curves. Results: Polyenergetic broad photon beam transmission curves of this work, calculated from the superposition of monoenergetic data, are compared to corresponding results in the literature. A good agreement is observed with results in the literature obtained from Monte Carlo simulations for the photon spectra emitted from bare point sources of various radionuclides. Differences are observed with corresponding results in the literature for x-ray spectra at various tube potentials, mainly due to the different broad beam conditions or x-ray spectra assumed. Conclusions

  12. Monoenergetic acceleration of a target foil by circularly polarized laser pulse in RPA regime without thermal heating

    SciTech Connect

    Khudik, V.; Yi, S. A.; Siemon, C.; Shvets, G.

    2012-12-21

    A kinetic model of the monoenergetic acceleration of a target foil irradiated by the circularly polarized laser pulse is developed. The target moves without thermal heating with constant acceleration which is provided by chirping the frequency of the laser pulse and correspondingly increasing its intensity. In the accelerated reference frame, bulk plasma in the target is neutral and its parameters are stationary: cold ions are immobile while nonrelativistic electrons bounce back and forth inside the potential well formed by ponderomotive and electrostatic potentials. It is shown that a positive charge left behind of the moving target in the ion tail and a negative charge in front of the target in the electron sheath form a capacitor whose constant electric field accelerates the ions of the target. The charge separation is maintained by the radiation pressure pushing electrons forward. The scalings of the target thickness and electromagnetic radiation with the electron temperature are found.

  13. High resolution dosimetry in monoenergetic proton beam therapy on a normoxic polymer gel: the importance of high spatial resolution for reduced Bragg-Peak-quenching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berg, A.; Wieland, M.; Naumann, J.; Jaekel, O.

    2013-06-01

    Proton ion beam therapy demands for high resolution dosimetry due to the high dose gradients present in lateral confinement and final Bragg-peak. In polymer gels the reduction of the linear dose response in the area of the Bragg-peak is reported (Bragg-peak quenching), which is assumed to be mainly due to the high linear energy transfer (LET). We here investigate the impact of the spatial resolution in T2-mapping for accurate Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)-based polymer gel dosimetry in the Bragg-peak for monoenergetic ion beams. We implemented MR-protocols for T2-mapping at microscopic resolution on a High-Field 7T human MR-scanner using an insert gradient system and sensitive rf-coils. The best results are obtained for an optimzed polymer gel based on THPC with an optimized MR-protocol for reduced measurement time and sufficient SNR at 0,547 mm pixel size. The dose in the fine Bragg-peak could be measured correctly for a monoenergetic proton beam as confirmed by Monte Carlo dose simulations. Such high spatial resolutions at minimum are necessary for an accurate measurement of the dose in the sharp Bragg-peak for monoenergetic ion beams. We demonstrate that at higher pixel size the dose levels may be underestimated due to spatial averaging in MRI-based polymer gel dosimetry.

  14. Characteristic X-ray radiation excited by 450 MeV/nucleon C+6 ions and 1.3 GeV protons in extracted and circulated beams of accelerator U70

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afonin, A. G.; Britvich, G. I.; Chesnokov, Yu. A.; Durum, A. A.; Kostin, M. Yu.; Maisheev, V. A.; Pikalov, V. A.; Savin, D. A.; Yanovich, A. A.; Kubankin, A. S.; Nazhmudinov, R. M.; Shul'ga, N. F.; Uglov, S. R.; Shchagin, A. V.

    2015-07-01

    The results of the experimental observation of characteristic X-ray radiation (CXR) excited in solid targets by the extracted and circulated 450 MeV/u C+6 ions beams and circulating 1.3 GeV protons beam are presented. The spectra of X-ray radiation measured from different targets are presented and discussed. It was found that the background radiation near the beams is low enough that allows the observation of the CXR spectral peaks with energies from a few to tens keV by semiconductor X-ray detectors. Applications of the CXR for monitoring of the number of accelerated particles in experimental applied and basic research, including radiobiology and radiation medicine as well as the relativistic nuclear physics and steering of beams by bent crystalline deflectors are proposed.

  15. Formation of close-to-target products in reactions induced by {sup 12}C ions on tin isotopes at the energy of 2.2 GeV per nucleon

    SciTech Connect

    Hovhannisyan, G. H. Danagulyan, A. S.; Balabekyan, A. R.; Demekhina, N. A.; Adam, J.; Kalinnikov, V. G.; Pronskikh, V. S.

    2012-02-15

    Cross sections for charge-exchange reactions induced by the interaction between {sup 12}C ions of energy E{sub 12{sub C}} = 2.2 GeV per nucleon and tin targets enriched in the isotopes {sup 118,120,124}Sn were measured by the induced-activity method. The cross sections for products whose charge numbers were in excess of the target charge number (Sb and Te) were determined. The shape of the isotope distribution of Sb products was indicative of the evaporative character of neutron emission in the formation of final-state products. The dependence of cross sections for charge-exchange reactions on the nucleonic composition of the target was considered. The contribution of electromagnetic excitation to the cross section for the reaction {sup 124}Sn({sup 12}C, x){sup 124}Sn was estimated.

  16. Plasma-wall interaction in an electrostatic sheath of plasma containing a monoenergetic electron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ou, Jing; Zhao, Xiaoyun; Gan, Chunyun

    2016-04-01

    The plasma-wall interaction in the presence of a monoenergetic electron beam has been studied by taking into account the self-consistency among plasma transport in a collisionless electrostatic sheath, deposited energy flux at the wall and material thermal response for carbon and tungsten as wall materials. The variations of the potential drop across the sheath, ion velocity at the sheath edge, and surface temperature of material as a function of electron beam flux are explored in the presence of the electron emission. It is found that when electron beam does not dominate the sheath, potential drop across the sheath depends strongly on the material properties due to the impact of electron emission while the surface temperature of material shows monotonic variation. In the case of carbon wall, the electron beam may dominate the sheath at a certain electron beam concentration or energy. Under this circumstance, both the potential drop across the sheath and surface temperature of material demonstrate the sharp increasing transition. The development of local hot spot on the plasma facing material is caused by the enhanced ion energy flux instead of the electron beam energy flux. If the electron emission is not taken into account, as a smaller electron beam flux, both the potential drop across the sheath and surface temperature of material display the significant change and then it may be easier to develop for the local hot spot on the plasma facing material.

  17. Inverse Compton Scattering from Laser Accelerated Quasi-Monoenergetic Electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, Yoshitaka; Kuwabara, Hajime; Ishii, Katsuhiro; Hanayama, Ryohei; Kawashima, Toshiyuki; Kitagawa, Yoneyoshi

    2010-11-01

    The progress of the laser accelerator shows us the possible applications to the industries, such as an inspection source for soft materials like as human bodies, plants foods and medicines. The inverse Compton scattering will realize such a novel inspection system. We demonstrate for the fist time that the laser-accelerated mono-energetic electrons inversely scatter the same counter laser beam to the Compton X-ray emissions. A Ti:sapphire laser (500mJ width 150fs) is divided into two beams. Main beam is focused to an edge of a helium gasjet to accelerate electrons to 13 and 22 MeV monoenergies, which inversely scattered the counter laser beam into 6 and 11 keV X-ray emissions in agreement with that calculated from the obtained electron spectra. The scattering is within 30 deg. around the main beam direction.

  18. Monoenergetic fast neutron reference fields: II. Field characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nolte, Ralf; Thomas, David J.

    2011-12-01

    Monoenergetic neutron reference fields are required for the calibration of neutron detectors and dosemeters for various applications ranging from nuclear physics and nuclear data measurements to radiation protection. In a series of two separate publications the metrological aspects of the production and measurement of fast neutrons are reviewed. In the first part, requirements for the nuclear reactions used to produce neutron fields as well as methods for target characterization and the general layout of reference facilities were discussed. This second part focuses on the most important techniques for field characterization and includes the determination of the neutron fluence as well as the spectral neutron distribution and the determination of the fluence of contaminating photons. The measurements are usually carried out relative to reference cross sections which are reviewed in a separate contribution, but for certain conditions 'absolute' methods for neutron measurements can be used which are directly traceable to the international system of units (SI).

  19. Generating high-current monoenergetic proton beams by a circularly polarized laser pulse in the phase-stable acceleration regime.

    PubMed

    Yan, X Q; Lin, C; Sheng, Z M; Guo, Z Y; Liu, B C; Lu, Y R; Fang, J X; Chen, J E

    2008-04-01

    A new ion acceleration method, namely, phase-stable acceleration, using circularly-polarized laser pulses is proposed. When the initial target density n(0) and thickness D satisfy a(L) approximately (n(0)/n(c))D/lambda(L) and D>l(s) with a(L), lambda(L), l(s), and n(c) the normalized laser amplitude, the laser wavelength in vacuum, the plasma skin depth, and the critical density of the incident laser pulse, respectively, a quasiequilibrium for the electrons is established by the light pressure and the space charge electrostatic field at the interacting front of the laser pulse. The ions within the skin depth of the laser pulse are synchronously accelerated and bunched by the electrostatic field, and thereby a high-intensity monoenergetic proton beam can be generated. The proton dynamics is investigated analytically and the results are verified by one- and two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. PMID:18517963

  20. Energy Differential Response of Cancer Cells for Low Dose Irradiation:Impact of Monoenergetic Brachytherapy Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Gueye, Paul; Prilepskiy, Yuriy; Keppel, Cynthia; Britten, R

    2010-06-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this work was to evaluate the energy differential response of cancer cells under identical dose exposure to asses the relevancy of mono-energetic sources for Brachytherapy treatments. Method and Materials: An electron energy spectrum impinging on lived breast cancer cell lines (MDA321) was obtained by placing a 19.65 {micro}Ci {sup 90}Sr/{sup 90}Y radioactive source in front of a non-uniform magnetic field constructed from two 5.08 x 5.0 cm x 2.54 cm neodimium ion permanent dipole magnets with a 1 cm separation gap. The cell lines were placed on the exit pole face of the magnet and were subsequently irradiated with different electron energies ranging from about 0.75 MeV to 1.85 MeV. The energy distribution was accurately measured with a scintillating fiber detector system that provided a 0.5% agreement with ICRU and a 5% energy resolution. The dosimetry was performed using a series of data acquired with a {sup 9}Sr/{sup 90}Y 4.5 mCi SIA-6 eye applicator, 6-21 MeV fixed energies from a Varian 2100 EX linac, EBT Gafchromic and Kodak ERT2 films, and an ion chamber detector. The accuracy of the dose rate obtained at different locations along and away from the magnet inside the cell containers was within 10.7%. Results: The cell lines were irradiated with a 0.5-4 Gy dose range. The data indicate a very strong differential energy response for electrons around 1 MeV (more lethal) compare to those with lesser or greater energy and a survival rate of at most 10% at very low dose (0.5-2 Gy). Conclusion: Mono-energetic Brachytherapy sources may provide a new pathway for radio-therapy treatment optimizations following a dedicated study showing very unusual high lethality in a specific energy window for MDA321 breast cancer cells.

  1. Observation of π+π-π+π- photoproduction in ultraperipheral heavy-ion collisions at sNN=200 GeV at the STAR detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abelev, B. I.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alakhverdyants, A. V.; Anderson, B. D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G. S.; Balewski, J.; Barnby, L. S.; Baumgart, S.; Beavis, D. R.; Bellwied, R.; Benedosso, F.; Betancourt, M. J.; Betts, R. R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Biritz, B.; Bland, L. C.; Bonner, B. E.; Bouchet, J.; Braidot, E.; Brandin, A. V.; Bridgeman, A.; Bruna, E.; Bueltmann, S.; Bunzarov, I.; Burton, T. P.; Cai, X. Z.; Caines, H.; Calderón de La Barca Sánchez, M.; Catu, O.; Cebra, D.; Cendejas, R.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, J. Y.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Choi, K. E.; Christie, W.; Chung, P.; Chung, S. U.; Clarke, R. F.; Codrington, M. J. M.; Corliss, R.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Das, D.; Dash, S.; Davila Leyva, A.; de Silva, L. C.; Debbe, R. R.; Dedovich, T. G.; Dephillips, M.; Derevschikov, A. A.; Derradi de Souza, R.; Didenko, L.; Djawotho, P.; Dogra, S. M.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Dunlop, J. C.; Dutta Mazumdar, M. R.; Efimov, L. G.; Elhalhuli, E.; Elnimr, M.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Eun, L.; Evdokimov, O.; Fachini, P.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Fersch, R. G.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Ganti, M. S.; Garcia-Solis, E. J.; Geromitsos, A.; Geurts, F.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gorbunov, Y. N.; Gordon, A.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Grube, B.; Guertin, S. M.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, N.; Guryn, W.; Haag, B.; Hallman, T. J.; Hamed, A.; Han, L.-X.; Harris, J. W.; Hays-Wehle, J. P.; Heinz, M.; Heppelmann, S.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffman, A. M.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Huang, H. Z.; Humanic, T. J.; Huo, L.; Igo, G.; Iordanova, A.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jakl, P.; Jena, C.; Jin, F.; Jones, C. L.; Jones, P. G.; Joseph, J.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kajimoto, K.; Kang, K.; Kapitan, J.; Kauder, K.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Kettler, D.; Kikola, D. P.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Klein, S. R.; Knospe, A. G.; Kocoloski, A.; Koetke, D. D.; Kollegger, T.; Konzer, J.; Kopytine, M.; Koralt, I.; Korsch, W.; Kotchenda, L.; Kouchpil, V.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Krus, M.; Kumar, L.; Kurnadi, P.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; Lapointe, S.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, C.-H.; Lee, J. H.; Leight, W.; Levine, M. J.; Li, C.; Li, L.; Li, N.; Li, W.; Li, X.; Li, X.; Li, Y.; Li, Z.; Lin, G.; Lindenbaum, S. J.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Liu, H.; Liu, J.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Longacre, R. S.; Love, W. A.; Lu, Y.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, Y. G.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Majka, R.; Mall, O. I.; Mangotra, L. K.; Manweiler, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Masui, H.; Matis, H. S.; Matulenko, Yu. A.; McDonald, D.; McShane, T. S.; Meschanin, A.; Milner, R.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mischke, A.; Mitrovski, M. K.; Mohanty, B.; Mondal, M. M.; Morozov, D. A.; Munhoz, M. G.; Nandi, B. K.; Nattrass, C.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J. M.; Netrakanti, P. K.; Ng, M. J.; Nogach, L. V.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Okada, H.; Okorokov, V.; Olson, D.; Pachr, M.; Page, B. S.; Pal, S. K.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Perevoztchikov, V.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Phatak, S. C.; Pile, P.; Planinic, M.; Ploskon, M. A.; Pluta, J.; Plyku, D.; Poljak, N.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Potukuchi, B. V. K. S.; Powell, C. B.; Prindle, D.; Pruneau, C.; Pruthi, N. K.; Pujahari, P. R.; Putschke, J.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Redwine, R.; Reed, R.; Rehberg, J. M.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Rose, A.; Roy, C.; Ruan, L.; Russcher, M. J.; Sahoo, R.; Sakai, S.; Sakrejda, I.; Sakuma, T.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sangaline, E.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmitz, N.; Schuster, T. R.; Seele, J.; Seger, J.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Seyboth, P.; Shahaliev, E.; Shao, M.; Sharma, M.; Shi, S. S.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Simon, F.; Singaraju, R. N.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, N.; Sorensen, P.; Sowinski, J.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Staszak, D.; Stevens, J. R.; Stock, R.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Suarez, M. C.; Subba, N. L.; Sumbera, M.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Y.; Sun, Z.; Surrow, B.; Symons, T. J. M.; Szanto de Toledo, A.; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Tang, Z.; Tarini, L. H.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thein, D.; Thomas, J. H.; Tian, J.; Timmins, A. R.; Timoshenko, S.; Tlusty, D.; Tokarev, M.; Trainor, T. A.; Tram, V. N.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R. E.; Tsai, O. D.; Ulery, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; van Buren, G.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vanfossen, J. A., Jr.; Varma, R.; Vasconcelos, G. M. S.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Videbaek, F.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S. A.; Wada, M.; Walker, M.; Wang, F.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, J. S.; Wang, Q.; Wang, X.; Wang, X. L.; Wang, Y.; Webb, G.; Webb, J. C.; Westfall, G. D.; Whitten, C., Jr.; Wieman, H.; Wingfield, E.; Wissink, S. W.; Witt, R.; Wu, Y.; Xie, W.; Xu, N.; Xu, Q. H.; Xu, W.; Xu, Y.; Xu, Z.; Xue, L.; Yang, Y.; Yepes, P.; Yip, K.; Yoo, I.-K.; Yue, Q.; Zawisza, M.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zhan, W.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, W. M.; Zhang, X. P.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhao, J.; Zhong, C.; Zhou, J.; Zhou, W.; Zhu, X.; Zhu, Y. H.; Zoulkarneev, R.; Zoulkarneeva, Y.; STAR Collaboration

    2010-04-01

    We present a measurement of π+π-π+π- photonuclear production in ultraperipheral Au-Au collisions at sNN=200 GeV from the STAR experiment. The π+π-π+π- final states are observed at low transverse momentum and are accompanied by mutual nuclear excitation of the beam particles. The strong enhancement of the production cross section at low transverse momentum is consistent with coherent photoproduction. The π+π-π+π- invariant mass spectrum of the coherent events exhibits a broad peak around 1540±40 MeV/c2 with a width of 570±60 MeV/c2, in agreement with the photoproduction data for the ρ0(1700). We do not observe a corresponding peak in the π+π- final state and measure an upper limit for the ratio of the branching fractions of the ρ0(1700) to π+π- and π+π-π+π- of 2.5% at 90% confidence level. The ratio of ρ0(1700) and ρ0(770) coherent production cross sections is measured to be 13.4±0.8stat.±4.4syst.%.

  2. Observation of pi+ pi- pi+pi- photoproduction in ultraperipheral heavy-ion collisons at sqrt sNN = 200 GeV at the STAR Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Abelev, B.I.; Dunlop, J.; et al. STAR Collaboration

    2010-04-02

    We present a measurement of {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} photonuclear production in ultraperipheral Au-Au collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV from the STAR experiment. The {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} final states are observed at low transverse momentum and are accompanied by mutual nuclear excitation of the beam particles. The strong enhancement of the production cross section at low transverse momentum is consistent with coherent photoproduction. The {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} invariant mass spectrum of the coherent events exhibits a broad peak around 1540 {+-} 40 MeV/c{sup 2} with a width of 570 {+-} 60 MeV/c{sup 2}, in agreement with the photoproduction data for the {rho}{sup 0}(1700). We do not observe a corresponding peak in the {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} final state and measure an upper limit for the ratio of the branching fractions of the {rho}{sup 0}(1700) to {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} and {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} of 2.5% at 90% confidence level. The ratio of {rho}{sup 0}(1700) and {rho}{sup 0}(770) coherent production cross sections is measured to be 13.4 {+-} 0.8{sub stat.}{+-}4.4{sub syst.}%.

  3. Observation of pi+pi-pi+pi- photoproduction in ultraperipheral heavy-ion collisions at sqrt sNN = 200 GeV at the STAR detector

    SciTech Connect

    STAR Collaboration; Abelev, Betty

    2010-07-05

    We present a measurement of {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} photonuclear production in ultra-peripheral Au-Au collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV from the STAR experiment. The {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} final states are observed at low transverse momentum and are accompanied by mutual nuclear excitation of the beam particles. The strong enhancement of the production cross section at low transverse momentum is consistent with coherent photoproduction. The {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} invariant mass spectrum of the coherent events exhibits a broad peak around 1540 {+-} 40 MeV/c{sup 2} with a width of 570 {+-} 60 MeV/c{sup 2}, in agreement with the photoproduction data for the {rho}{sup 0}(1700). We do not observe a corresponding peak in the {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} final state and measure an upper limit for the ratio of the branching fractions of the {rho}{sup 0}(1700) to {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} and {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} of 2.5% at 90% confidence level. The ratio of {rho}{sup 0}(1700) and {rho}{sup 0}(770) coherent production cross sections is measured to be 13.4 {+-} 0.8{sub stat.} {+-} 4.4{sub syst.}%.

  4. Spin alignment measurements of the K*0(892) and ϕ(1020) vector mesons in heavy ion collisions at sNN=200 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abelev, B. I.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Anderson, B. D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G. S.; Bai, Y.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L. S.; Baudot, J.; Baumgart, S.; Beavis, D. R.; Bellwied, R.; Benedosso, F.; Betts, R. R.; Bhardwaj, S.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Biritz, B.; Bland, L. C.; Bombara, M.; Bonner, B. E.; Botje, M.; Bouchet, J.; Braidot, E.; Brandin, A. V.; Bueltmann, S.; Burton, T. P.; Bystersky, M.; Cai, X. Z.; Caines, H.; Sánchez, M. Calderón De La Barca; Callner, J.; Catu, O.; Cebra, D.; Cendejas, R.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, J. Y.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Choi, K. E.; Christie, W.; Chung, S. U.; Clarke, R. F.; Codrington, M. J. M.; Coffin, J. P.; Cormier, T. M.; Cosentino, M. R.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Das, D.; Dash, S.; Daugherity, M.; Moura, M. M. De; Dedovich, T. G.; Dephillips, M.; Derevschikov, A. A.; Souza, R. Derradi De; Didenko, L.; Dietel, T.; Djawotho, P.; Dogra, S. M.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Du, F.; Dunlop, J. C.; Mazumdar, M. R. Dutta; Edwards, W. R.; Efimov, L. G.; Elhalhuli, E.; Elnimr, M.; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Eun, L.; Fachini, P.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Feng, A.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Gaillard, L.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Ganti, M. S.; Garcia-Solis, E.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gorbunov, Y. N.; Gordon, A.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Grube, B.; Guertin, S. M.; Guimaraes, K. S. F. F.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, N.; Guryn, W.; Haag, B.; Hallman, T. J.; Hamed, A.; Harris, J. W.; He, W.; Heinz, M.; Heppelmann, S.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hoffman, A. M.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Huang, H. Z.; Hughes, E. W.; Humanic, T. J.; Igo, G.; Iordanova, A.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jakl, P.; Jin, F.; Jones, P. G.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kajimoto, K.; Kang, K.; Kapitan, J.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Kettler, D.; Khodyrev, V. Yu.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Klein, S. R.; Knospe, A. G.; Kocoloski, A.; Koetke, D. D.; Kollegger, T.; Kopytine, M.; Kotchenda, L.; Kouchpil, V.; Kravtsov, P.; Kravtsov, V. I.; Krueger, K.; Kuhn, C.; Kumar, A.; Kumar, L.; Kurnadi, P.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; Lange, S.; Lapointe, S.; Laue, F.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, C.-H.; Levine, M. J.; Li, C.; Li, Y.; Lin, G.; Lin, X.; Lindenbaum, S. J.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Liu, H.; Liu, J.; Liu, L.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Longacre, R. S.; Love, W. A.; Lu, Y.; Ludlam, T.; Lynn, D.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, J. G.; Ma, Y. G.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Majka, R.; Mangotra, L. K.; Manweiler, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Matis, H. S.; Matulenko, Yu. A.; McShane, T. S.; Meschanin, A.; Millane, J.; Miller, M. L.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mischke, A.; Mitchell, J.; Mohanty, B.; Morozov, D. A.; Munhoz, M. G.; Nandi, B. K.; Nattrass, C.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J. M.; Nepali, C.; Netrakanti, P. K.; Ng, M. J.; Nogach, L. V.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Okada, H.; Okorokov, V.; Olson, D.; Pachr, M.; Pal, S. K.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Perevoztchikov, V.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Phatak, S. C.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Poljak, N.; Porile, N.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Potekhin, M.; Potukuchi, B. V. K. S.; Prindle, D.; Pruneau, C.; Pruthi, N. K.; Putschke, J.; Qattan, I. A.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Ridiger, A.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Rose, A.; Roy, C.; Ruan, L.; Russcher, M. J.; Rykov, V.; Sahoo, R.; Sakrejda, I.; Sakuma, T.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sarsour, M.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmitz, N.; Seger, J.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Seyboth, P.; Shabetai, A.; Shahaliev, E.; Shao, M.; Sharma, M.; Shi, S. S.; Shi, X.-H.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Simon, F.; Singaraju, R. N.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, N.; Snellings, R.; Sorensen, P.; Sowinski, J.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stadnik, A.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Staszak, D.; Stock, R.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Suarez, M. C.; Subba, N. L.; Sumbera, M.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Z.; Surrow, B.; Symons, T. J. M.; Toledo, A. Szanto De; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Tang, Z.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thein, D.; Thomas, J. H.; Tian, J.; Timmins, A. R.; Timoshenko, S.; Tokarev, M.; Trainor, T. A.; Tram, V. N.; Trattner, A. L.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R. E.; Tsai, O. D.; Ulery, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Buren, G. Van; Kolk, N. Van Der; Leeuwen, M. Van; Molen, A. M. Vander; Varma, R.; Vasconcelos, G. M. S.; Vasilevski, I. M.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Videbaek, F.; Vigdor, S. E.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S. A.; Wada, M.; Waggoner, W. T.; Wang, F.; Wang, G.; Wang, J. S.; Wang, Q.; Wang, X.; Wang, X. L.; Wang, Y.; Webb, J. C.; Westfall, G. D.; Whitten, C., Jr.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, S. W.; Witt, R.; Wu, J.; Wu, Y.; Xu, N.; Xu, Q. H.; Xu, Z.; Yepes, P.; Yoo, I.-K.; Yue, Q.; Zawisza, M.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zhan, W.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, W. M.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhao, Y.; Zhong, C.; Zhou, J.; Zoulkarneev, R.; Zoulkarneeva, Y.; Zuo, J. X.

    2008-06-01

    We present the first spin alignment measurements for the K*0(892) and ϕ(1020) vector mesons produced at midrapidity with transverse momenta up to 5 GeV/c at sNN=200 GeV at RHIC. The diagonal spin-density matrix elements with respect to the reaction plane in Au+Au collisions are ρ00=0.32±0.04 (stat) ± 0.09 (syst) for the K*0 (0.8

  5. Tomography of injection and acceleration of monoenergetic electrons in a laser-wakefield accelerator.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, C-T; Huang, C-M; Chang, C-L; Ho, Y-C; Chen, Y-S; Lin, J-Y; Wang, J; Chen, S-Y

    2006-03-10

    A tomographic diagnosis method was developed to systematically resolve the injection and acceleration processes of a monoenergetic electron beam in a laser-wakefield accelerator. It was found that all the monoenergetic electrons are injected at the same location in the plasma column and accelerated from 5 to 55 MeV energy in 200 microm distance. This is a direct measurement of the real acceleration gradient in a laser-wakefield accelerator, and the experimental data are consistent with the model of transverse wave breaking and beam loading for monoenergetic electron injection. PMID:16606269

  6. Water radiolysis with heavy ions of energies up to 28 GeV. 3. Measurement of G(MV*+) in deaerated methyl viologen solutions containing various concentrations of sodium formate and Monte Carlo simulation.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Shinichi; Katsumura, Yosuke; Lin, Mingzhang; Muroya, Yusa; Miyazaki, Toyoaki; Murakami, Takeshi; Meesungnoen, Jintana; Jay-Gerin, Jean-Paul

    2008-10-01

    Formation yields of methyl viologen cation radicals G(MV*+) (100 eV)(-1) have been measured in deaerated aqueous solutions of 0.25 mM methyl viologen (MV(2+)) containing various concentrations of formate anion (0.01-2 M) after irradiation with six different ion beams (4He(2+), 12C(6+), 20Ne(10+), 28Si(14+), 40Ar(18+) and 56Fe(26+) with incident energies varying from 0.6 to 28 GeV) provided by the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC) at the National Institute of Radiological Science (NIRS) in Japan. The sample solutions are irradiated at the incident energy of the ions using 1-cm irradiation cells. Corresponding LET values cover the range from 2.2 to 185 eV/nm. G(MV*+) increases with increasing formate concentration. In 4He(2+) radiolysis, it increases from 5.7 to 7.1 as the concentration of formate is increased from 0.01 to 2 M, while in 56Fe(26+) radiolysis, the MV*+ yield value changes from 2.2 to 4.1. The other values lie between the yields for 4He(2+) and 56Fe(26+). In addition, G(MV*+) decreases with increasing LET. In the case of 12C(6+) radiolysis, G(MV*+) increases with increasing energy of the carbon ions from 135 to 400 MeV/nucleon, i.e., with decreasing LET from 21 to 11 eV/nm. In parallel to the above measurements, Monte Carlo simulations of the radiolysis of the MV(2+)/formate solutions have been performed. Ionic strength effects on reactions between charged species are taken into account. To reproduce the experimental results, previously unreported reactions such as e(aq)(-) + MV*+, MV*(+) + *OH and *COO- + *OH have been introduced in the reaction scheme. After optimization, the rate constants of these latter two reactions are determined to be (3 +/- 0.5) x 10(10) and (5 +/- 0.5) x 10(10) M(-1) s(-1), respectively. By contrast, the reaction between e(aq)- and MV*+ is too slow to affect G(MV*+). On the basis of these calculations, characteristics of intratrack reactions induced by heavy-ion beams are discussed in reference not only to the

  7. Comparative Study of Radiation Dosage Distribution and Medical Implication of Quasi-monoenergetic Proton Generated from Laser Acceleration of Ultra-thin Foil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batpurev, Temuge; Cao, Jennifer; Xie, Wang; Liu, Tung-Chang; Shao, Xi; Liu, Chuan-Sheng

    2012-10-01

    Recently the search for mono-energetic protons has gained great interest, particularly in applications such as proton therapy for cancer treatment. The advantage of proton therapy is that unlike photon radiation, proton beams deposit most of the energy at the tumor, sparing surrounding tissue and vital organs. A compact laser-driven proton accelerator is attractive for proton cancer therapy since the electric fields for particle acceleration can reach the order of tens of GV per cm which allows large reduction of the system size. Recent work by Liu et al. [2012] shows that laser acceleration of an ultra-thin multi-ion foil can generate high quality quasi-monoenergetic proton beams. The proton acceleration is due to the combination of radiation pressure and heavy-ion Coulomb repulsion. To assess the feasibility of laser-proton cancer therapy with such a proton accelerator, we simulated the interaction of protons with water and determine the radiation dosage deposition for particle beams produced from the PIC simulation of laser acceleration of multi-ion targets. We used the SRIM code to calculate the depth and lateral dose distribution of protons. We also compared the dosage map produced from protons generated from laser acceleration of single ion and multi-ion targets.

  8. Using Quasi-Monoenergetic Photon Sources To Probe Photo-Fission Resonances

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Micah S.; Hall, James M.; McNabb, Dennis P.; Tuffley, Michael J.; Ahmed, Mohammed W.; Stave, Sean; Weller, Henry R.; Karwowski, Hugon; Thompkins, Jeromy

    2011-06-01

    We present preliminary results of photo-fission measurements of uranium isotopes with the quasi-monoenergetic gamma-ray source, HIGS. The measurements were performed to search for photo-fission resonances. We discuss potential applications to use photo-fission resonances to identify special nuclear material in cargo containers. We discuss the importance of quasi-monoenergetic gamma-ray sources for this kind of application.

  9. Neutrino Mass Measurement Using a Directed Mono-Energetic Beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsifrinovich, Vladimir; Folan, Lorcan

    2015-04-01

    It was shown that a directed mono-energetic neutrino beam can be generated by electron capture beta-decay in a sample with a strong hyperfine field at the radioactive nuclei. We study the conditions required to measure the neutrino rest mass using the recoil force produced by a directed neutrino beam. We consider the displacement of an atomic force microscope cantilever due to such a recoil force. We find the change in the cantilever displacement associated with the non-zero neutrino mass, as a function of nuclear half-life T1 / 2, cantilever spring constant, and temperature. We consider the opportunity to increase the sensitivity of the neutrino mass measurement using averaging of the measurement signal. We show that the optimal time for the signal accumulation is, approximately, 1.8T1 / 2. We compute the optimal signal-to-noise ratio for 119Sb nuclei decaying to 119Sn with a decrease in the nuclear spin from I = 5/2 to I = 3/2, and T1 / 2 = 38.2 hours. Finally, we present the parameters values required for detection of sub-eV neutrino rest mass, and estimate the angular distribution of neutrino radiation as a function of temperature.

  10. A Cold Strontium Ion Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erickson, Christopher J.; Lyon, Mary; Blaser, Kelvin; Harper, Stuart; Durfee, Dallin

    2010-03-01

    We present a cold ion source for strontium 87. The source is based off of a standard Low-Velocity-Intense-Source (LVIS) for strontium using permanent magnets in place of anti-Helmholtz coils. Atoms from the LVIS are then ionized in a two photon process as they pass a 20kV anode plate. The result is a mono-energetic beam of ions whose velocity is tunable. Applications for the ions include spectroscopy and ion interferometry.

  11. Polarized proton collisions at 205 GeV at RHIC.

    PubMed

    Bai, M; Roser, T; Ahrens, L; Alekseev, I G; Alessi, J; Beebe-Wang, J; Blaskiewicz, M; Bravar, A; Brennan, J M; Bruno, D; Bunce, G; Courant, E; Drees, A; Fischer, W; Gardner, C; Gill, R; Glenn, J; Haeberli, W; Huang, H; Jinnouchi, O; Kewisch, J; Luccio, A; Luo, Y; Nakagawa, I; Okada, H; Pilat, F; Mackay, W W; Makdisi, Y; Montag, C; Ptitsyn, V; Satogata, T; Stephenson, E; Svirida, D; Tepikian, S; Trbojevic, D; Tsoupas, N; Wise, T; Zelenski, A; Zeno, K; Zhang, S Y

    2006-05-01

    The Brookhaven Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) has been providing collisions of polarized protons at a beam energy of 100 GeV since 2001. Equipped with two full Siberian snakes in each ring, polarization is preserved during acceleration from injection to 100 GeV. However, the intrinsic spin resonances beyond 100 GeV are about a factor of 2 stronger than those below 100 GeV making it important to examine the impact of these strong intrinsic spin resonances on polarization survival and the tolerance for vertical orbit distortions. Polarized protons were first accelerated to the record energy of 205 GeV in RHIC with a significant polarization measured at top energy in 2005. This Letter presents the results and discusses the sensitivity of the polarization survival to orbit distortions. PMID:16712305

  12. Transport model study of nuclear stopping in heavy-ion collisions over the energy range from 0.09A to 160A GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan Ying; Li Qingfeng; Li Zhuxia; Liu Fuhu

    2010-03-15

    Nuclear stopping in heavy-ion collisions over a beam energy range from SIS and AGS up to SPS is studied in the framework of the modified Ultrarelativistic Quantum Molecular Dynamics transport model, in which mean field potentials of both formed and 'preformed' hadrons (from string fragmentation) and medium-modified nucleon-nucleon elastic cross sections are considered. It is found that nuclear stopping is influenced by both the stiffness of the equation of state and medium modifications of nucleon-nucleon cross sections at SIS energies. At high SPS energies, a two-bump structure is shown in the experimental rapidity distribution of free protons, which can be understood by considering the preformed hadron potentials.

  13. Modeling of heavy-flavor pair correlations in Au-Au collisions at 200 A GeV at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Shanshan; Qin, Guang-You; Bass, Steffen A.

    2015-11-01

    We study the nuclear modification of angular and momentum correlations between heavy quark pairs in ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collisions. The evolution of heavy quarks inside the thermalized medium is described via a modified Langevin approach that incorporates both elastic and inelastic interactions with the medium constituents. The spacetime evolution of the fireball is obtained from a (2 +1 )-dimensional viscous hydrodynamics simulation. The hadronization of heavy quarks is performed by utilizing a hybrid model of fragmentation and coalescence. Our results show that the nuclear modification of the transverse momentum imbalance of D D ¯ pairs reflects the total energy loss experienced by the heavy quarks and may help us probe specific regions of the medium. The angular correlation of heavy-flavor pairs, especially in the low- to intermediate-transverse-momentum regime, is sensitive to the detailed energy-loss mechanism of heavy quarks inside the quark-gluon plasma.

  14. OVERVIEW OF MONO-ENERGETIC GAMMA-RAY SOURCES & APPLICATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Hartemann, F V; Albert, F; Anderson, G G; Anderson, S G; Bayramian, A J; Betts, S M; Chu, T S; Cross, R R; Ebbers, C A; Fisher, S E; Gibson, D J; Ladran, A S; Marsh, R A; Messerly, M J; O'Neill, K L; Semenov, V A; Shverdin, M Y; Siders, C W; McNabb, D P; Barty, C P; Vlieks, A E; Jongewaard, E N; Tantawi, S G; Raubenheimer, T O

    2010-05-18

    Recent progress in accelerator physics and laser technology have enabled the development of a new class of tunable gamma-ray light sources based on Compton scattering between a high-brightness, relativistic electron beam and a high intensity laser pulse produced via chirped-pulse amplification (CPA). A precision, tunable Mono-Energetic Gamma-ray (MEGa-ray) source driven by a compact, high-gradient X-band linac is currently under development and construction at LLNL. High-brightness, relativistic electron bunches produced by an X-band linac designed in collaboration with SLAC NAL will interact with a Joule-class, 10 ps, diode-pumped CPA laser pulse to generate tunable {gamma}-rays in the 0.5-2.5 MeV photon energy range via Compton scattering. This MEGa-ray source will be used to excite nuclear resonance fluorescence in various isotopes. Applications include homeland security, stockpile science and surveillance, nuclear fuel assay, and waste imaging and assay. The source design, key parameters, and current status are presented, along with important applications, including nuclear resonance fluorescence. In conclusion, we have optimized the design of a high brightness Compton scattering gamma-ray source, specifically designed for NRF applications. Two different parameters sets have been considered: one where the number of photons scattered in a single shot reaches approximately 7.5 x 10{sup 8}, with a focal spot size around 8 {micro}m; in the second set, the spectral brightness is optimized by using a 20 {micro}m spot size, with 0.2% relative bandwidth.

  15. ION SOURCE WITH SPACE CHARGE NEUTRALIZATION

    DOEpatents

    Flowers, J.W.; Luce, J.S.; Stirling, W.L.

    1963-01-22

    This patent relates to a space charge neutralized ion source in which a refluxing gas-fed arc discharge is provided between a cathode and a gas-fed anode to provide ions. An electron gun directs a controlled, monoenergetic electron beam through the discharge. A space charge neutralization is effected in the ion source and accelerating gap by oscillating low energy electrons, and a space charge neutralization of the source exit beam is effected by the monoenergetic electron beam beyond the source exit end. The neutralized beam may be accelerated to any desired energy at densities well above the limitation imposed by Langmuir-Child' s law. (AEC)

  16. Production of a monoenergetic electron bunch in a self-injected laser-wakefield accelerator.

    PubMed

    Chang, C-L; Hsieh, C-T; Ho, Y-C; Chen, Y-S; Lin, J-Y; Wang, J; Chen, S-Y

    2007-03-01

    Production of a monoenergetic electron bunch in a self-injected laser-wakefield accelerator is investigated with a tomographic method which resolves the electron injection and acceleration processes. It is found that all the electrons in the monoenergetic electron bunch are injected at the same location in the plasma column and then accelerated with an acceleration gradient exceeding 2 GeV/cm. The injection position shifts with the position of pump-pulse focus, and no significant deceleration is observed for the monoenergetic electron bunch after it reaches the maximum energy. The results are consistent with the model of transverse wave breaking and beam loading for the injection of monoenergetic electrons. The tomographic method adds a crucial dimension to the whole array of existing diagnostics for laser beams, plasma waves, and electron beams. With this method the details of the underlying physical processes in laser-plasma interactions can be resolved and compared directly to particle-in-cell simulations. PMID:17500801

  17. The exact solution of the monoenergetic transport equation for critical cylinders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Westfall, R. M.; Metcalf, D. R.

    1972-01-01

    An analytic solution for the critical, monoenergetic, bare, infinite cylinder is presented. The solution is obtained by modifying a previous development based on a neutron density transform and Case's singular eigenfunction method. Numerical results for critical radii and the neutron density as a function of position are included and compared with the results of other methods.

  18. Multiple quasi-monoenergetic electron beams from laser-wakefield acceleration with spatially structured laser pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Y.; Li, M. H.; Li, Y. F.; Wang, J. G.; Tao, M. Z.; Han, Y. J.; Zhao, J. R.; Huang, K.; Yan, W. C.; Ma, J. L.; Li, Y. T.; Chen, L. M.; Li, D. Z.; Chen, Z. Y.; Sheng, Z. M.; Zhang, J.

    2015-08-15

    By adjusting the focus geometry of a spatially structured laser pulse, single, double, and treble quasi-monoenergetic electron beams were generated, respectively, in laser-wakefield acceleration. Single electron beam was produced as focusing the laser pulse to a single spot. While focusing the laser pulse to two spots that are approximately equal in energy and size and intense enough to form their own filaments, two electron beams were produced. Moreover, with a proper distance between those two focal spots, three electron beams emerged with a certain probability owing to the superposition of the diffractions of those two spots. The energy spectra of the multiple electron beams are quasi-monoenergetic, which are different from that of the large energy spread beams produced due to the longitudinal multiple-injection in the single bubble.

  19. Observation of monoenergetic protons from a near-critical gas target tailored by a hydrodynamic shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y.-H.; Helle, M. H.; Ting, A.; Gordon, D. F.; Polyanskiy, M. N.; Pogorelsky, I.; Babzien, M.; Najmudin, Z.

    2015-05-01

    We present our recent experimental results of monoenergetic protons accelerated from the interaction of an intense terawatt CO2 laser pulse with a near-critical hydrogen gas target, with its density profile tailored by a hydrodynamic shock. A 5-ns Nd:YAG laser pulse is focused onto a piece of stainless steel foil mounted at the front edge of the gas jet nozzle orifice. The ablation launches a spherical shock into the near-critical gas column, which creates a sharp density gradient at the front edge of the target, with ~ 6X local density enhancement up to several times of critical density within ~<100 microns. With such density profile, we have obtained monoenergetic proton beams with good shot-to-shot reproducibility and energies up to 1.2 MeV.

  20. Simulation of monoenergetic electron generation via laser wakefield accelerators for 5-25 TW lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Tsung, F.S.; Lu, W.; Tzoufras, M.; Mori, W.B.; Joshi, C.; Vieira, J.M.; Silva, L.O.; Fonseca, R.A.

    2006-05-15

    In 2004, using a 3D particle-in-cell (PIC) model [F. S. Tsung et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 93, 185004 (2004)], it was predicted that a 16.5 TW, 50 fs laser propagating through nearly 0.5 cm of 3x10{sup 18} cm{sup -3} preformed plasma channel would generate a monoenergetic bunch of electrons with a central energy of 240 MeV after 0.5 cm of propagation. In addition, electrons out to 840 MeV were seen if the laser propagated through 0.8 cm of the same plasma. The simulations showed that self-injection occurs after the laser intensity increases due to a combination of photon deceleration, group velocity dispersion, and self-focusing. The monoenergetic beam is produced because the injection process is clamped by beam loading and the rotation in phase space that results as the beam dephases. Nearly simultaneously [S. P. D. Mangles et al., Nature 431, 535 (2004); C. G. R. Geddes et al., ibid. 431, 538 (2004); J. Faure et al., ibid. 431, 541 (2004)] three experimental groups from around the world reported the generation of near nano-Coulomb of low emittance, monoenergetic electron beams using similar laser powers and pulse lengths as those reported in our simulations. Each of these experiments is modeled using the same 3D PIC code OSIRIS. The simulations indicate that although these experiments use a range of plasma parameters, density profiles, laser powers, and spot sizes; there are some commonalities to the mechanism for the generation of monoenergetic beams. Comments are given on how the energy and beam quality can be improved in the future.

  1. Solutions of Boltzmann`s Equation for Mono-energetic Neutrons in an Infinite Homogeneous Medium

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Wigner, E. P.

    1943-11-30

    Boltzman's equation is solved for the case of monoenergetic neutrons created by a plane or point source in an infinite medium which has spherically symmetric scattering. The customary solution of the diffusion equation appears to be multiplied by a constant factor which is smaller than 1. In addition to this term the total neutron density contains another term which is important in the neighborhood of the source. It varies as 1/r{sup 2} in the neighborhood of a point source. (auth)

  2. Monte Carlo calculations of initial energies of electrons in water irradiated by photons with energies up to 1GeV.

    PubMed

    Todo, A S; Hiromoto, G; Turner, J E; Hamm, R N; Wright, H A

    1982-12-01

    Previous calculations of the initial energies of electrons produced in water irradiated by photons are extended to 1 GeV by including pair and triplet production. Calculations were performed with the Monte Carlo computer code PHOEL-3, which replaces the earlier code, PHOEL-2. Tables of initial electron energies are presented for single interactions of monoenergetic photons at a number of energies from 10 keV to 1 GeV. These tables can be used to compute kerma in water irradiated by photons with arbitrary energy spectra to 1 GeV. In addition, separate tables of Compton-and pair-electron spectra are given over this energy range. The code PHOEL-3 is available from the Radiation Shielding Information Center, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37830. PMID:7152948

  3. Calibration of Cherenkov detectors for monoenergetic photon imaging in active interrogation applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rose, P. B.; Erickson, A. S.

    2015-11-01

    Active interrogation of cargo containers using monoenergetic photons offers a rapid and low-dose approach to search for shielded special nuclear materials. Cherenkov detectors can be used for imaging of the cargo provided that gamma ray energies used in interrogation are well resolved, as the case in 11B(d,n-γ)12C reaction resulting in 4.4 MeV and 15.1 MeV photons. While an array of Cherenkov threshold detectors reduces low energy background from scatter while providing the ability of high contrast transmission imaging, thus confirming the presence of high-Z materials, these detectors require a special approach to energy calibration due to the lack of resolution. In this paper, we discuss the utility of Cherenkov detectors for active interrogation with monoenergetic photons as well as the results of computational and experimental studies of their energy calibration. The results of the studies with sources emitting monoenergetic photons as well as complex gamma ray spectrum sources, for example 232Th, show that calibration is possible as long as the energies of photons of interest are distinct.

  4. A Figure of Merit Comparison between Bremsstrahlung and Monoenergetic X-Ray Sources for Angiography.

    PubMed

    Boone, J M; Seibert, J A

    1994-01-01

    A figure of merit (FOM) has been developed which embodies parameters related to image quality in the numerator and radiation integral dose to the patient in the denominator. In this manner, maximizing image quality and minimizing radiation dose amounts to maximizing the FOM. Furthermore, the FOM is designed to be independent of x-ray exposure (number of photons used), and this eliminates one important parameter in an optimization scenario. Monoenergetic x-ray beams (0% bandwidth) are compared with conventional Bremsstrahlung x-ray sources from a tungsten target, for angiographic imaging systems using 144 mg/cm2 Csl image intensifiers as the detector. Thus the results are applicable to both digital subtraction angiography (DSA) and digital fluoroscopic procedures involving iodine-based contrast (e.g., roadmapping). The results demonstrate improvement factors (the ratio of the best FOM of the monoenergetic beam over the best FOM of the polyenergetic beam) ranging from 2.3 to 1.4. The improvement factors averaged over four iodine contrast thicknesses (50, 100, 500, and 1000 mg/cm2) were 1.61 (σ = 0.159) for the 10 cm thick patient, 1.68 (σ= 0.172) for the 20 cm thick patient, and 1.82 (σ= 0.186) for the 30 cm thick patient. The conclusions are that monoenergetic x-ray beams are capable of delivering the same image quality at about half the radiation dose to the patient compared to conventional X-ray tubes. PMID:21307470

  5. Search for Monoenergetic Positron Emission from Heavy-Ion Collisions at Coulomb-Barrier Energies

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmad, I.; Back, B.B.; Betts, R.R.; Dunford, R.W.; Freer, M.; Happ, T.; Henderson, D.; Kutschera, W.; Last, J.; Lister, C.J.; Rhein, M.D.; Schiffer, J.P.; Wilt, P.; Wuosmaa, A.H.; Austin, S.M.; Kashy, E.; Maier, M.R.; Mercer, D.J.; Mikolas, D.; Winfield, J.S.; Yurkon, J.E.; Betts, R.R.; Conner, C.; Calaprice, F.P.; Young, A.; Chan, K.C.; Chishti, A.; Kaloskamis, N.I.; Xu, G.; Fox, J.D.; Roa, D.E.; Freedman, S.J.; Freer, M.; Gazes, S.B.; Schiffer, J.P.; Wolanski, M.R.; Hallin, A.L.; Liu, M.; Happ, T.; Rhein, M.D.; Perera, P.A.; Wolfs, F.L.; Trainor, T.A.

    1997-01-01

    Positron production in {sup 238}U+{sup 232}Th and {sup 238}U+{sup 181}Ta collisions near the Coulomb barrier has been studied. Earlier experiments reported narrow lines in the spectra of positrons, accumulated without the requirement of electrons detected in coincidence. No evidence of such structure is observed in the present data. The positron energy spectra are compared with estimates from dynamic atomic processes, and from internal pair conversion of electromagnetic transitions from the excited nuclei. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  6. Simulation of processes in a SSNTD exposed by monoenergetic neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, P.; Fromm, M.; Groetz, J. E.; Torrealba, F.; Chambaudet, A.

    1998-03-01

    The nuclear track technique is based on the registering of latent track ions in a solid state dielectric material (Solid State Nuclear Track Detector) which will be chemically etched in order to be observed and analysed using microscopic analysis tools. The purpose of this study is to observe how a polymeric detector irradiated by a neutron fluence can explain the intensity of ionizing radiations to which structures, electronic components or living organism are exposed. To do this, it is necessary to take into account on the one hand the production of ionizing particles in the detector, and on the other hand the efficacy of their detection. The model we propose must be able to link the number of etched tracks and their parameters to the neutron fluence. The use of both a Monte Carlo code which determines the number of recoil nuclei and a computed model of etched track parameters calculations is needed. The Monte Carlo code performs a simulation of neutron-nucleus elastic collision in the detector. We compute the number of recoil nuclei produced between the surface and a depth of 20 μm in the detector. The computer code assigns six pseudo-random numbers ( xE, zE, a, b, c, α) to each neutron having an energy EN and an angle of incidence and give the results of calculations. We used statistical tests (the moments of the origin of order n and of the average of order n, the χ2 test, the gap test, the Pearson test, the run-up run-down test and the serial test) to check the quality of our pseudo-random number generator. Finally, we will compare the calculated results of the response of the SSNTD (tracks cm -2) with the experimental ones to validate the simulation.

  7. Response functions of Fuji imaging plates to monoenergetic protons in the energy range 0.6-3.2 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Bonnet, T.; Denis-Petit, D.; Gobet, F.; Hannachi, F.; Tarisien, M.; Versteegen, M.; Aleonard, M. M.

    2013-01-15

    We have measured the responses of Fuji MS, SR, and TR imaging plates (IPs) to protons with energies ranging from 0.6 to 3.2 MeV. Monoenergetic protons were produced with the 3.5 MV AIFIRA (Applications Interdisciplinaires de Faisceaux d'Ions en Region Aquitaine) accelerator at the Centre d'Etudes Nucleaires de Bordeaux Gradignan (CENBG). The IPs were irradiated with protons backscattered off a tantalum target. We present the photo-stimulated luminescence response of the IPs together with the fading measurements for these IPs. A method is applied to allow correction of fading effects for variable proton irradiation duration. Using the IP fading corrections, a model of the IP response function to protons was developed. The model enables extrapolation of the IP response to protons up to proton energies of 10 MeV. Our work is finally compared to previous works conducted on Fuji TR IP response to protons.

  8. Upgrade of CEBAF from 6 Gev To 12 Gev: Status

    SciTech Connect

    Harwood, Leigh

    2013-04-19

    The CEBAF accelerator is being upgraded from 6 GeV to 12 GeV by the US Department of Energy. The accelerator upgrade is being done within the existing tunnel footprint. The accelerator upgrade includes: 10 new srfbased high-performance cryomodules plus RF systems, doubling the 2K helium plant's capability, upgrading the existing beamlines to operate at nearly double the original performance envelope, and adding a beamline to a new experimental area. Construction is over 75% complete with final completion projected for late FY13. Details of the upgrade and status of the work will be presented.

  9. Tomographic study of ion tracks by ion energy loss spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Vacik, J.; Havranek, V.; Hnatowicz, V.; Lavrentiev, V.; Horak, P.; Fink, D.; Apel, P.

    2013-04-19

    Ion energy loss spectroscopy is suggested to determine the shape of the (latent, etched and filled) ion tracks in polymers using ion probes of various beam sizes. For a milli-probe, it can be considered as a one-dimensional tomography of many identical (rotationally symmetric) objects. For a micro-probe, the technique can be understood as a micro-tomography of the single ion track. In both cases, the ion energy loss spectroscopy requires monoenergetic ions with a low intensity (< 10{sup -3} s{sup -1}) and a well defined angular beam set-up. Here we present a study of the possible use of the ion milli-and micro-probes in a tomographic study of the ion track 3D geometry and its evolution during chemical etching.

  10. Isotope-specific detection of low density materials with mono-energetic (gamma)-rays

    SciTech Connect

    Albert, F; Anderson, S G; Gibson, D J; Hagmann, C A; Johnson, M S; Messerly, M J; Semenov, V A; Shverdin, M Y; Tremaine, A M; Hartemann, F V; Siders, C W; McNabb, D P; Barty, C J

    2009-03-16

    The first demonstration of isotope-specific detection of a low-Z, low density object, shielded by a high-Z and high density material using mono-energetic gamma-rays is reported. Isotope-specific detection of LiH shielded by Pb and Al is accomplished using the nuclear resonance fluorescence line of {sup 7}Li at 0.478 MeV. Resonant photons are produced via laser-based Compton scattering. The detection techniques are general and the confidence level obtained is shown to be superior to that yielded by conventional x-ray/{gamma}-ray techniques in these situations.

  11. Filtered epithermal quasi-monoenergetic neutron beams at research reactor facilities.

    PubMed

    Mansy, M S; Bashter, I I; El-Mesiry, M S; Habib, N; Adib, M

    2015-03-01

    Filtered neutron techniques were applied to produce quasi-monoenergetic neutron beams in the energy range of 1.5-133keV at research reactors. A simulation study was performed to characterize the filter components and transmitted beam lines. The filtered beams were characterized in terms of the optimal thickness of the main and additive components. The filtered neutron beams had high purity and intensity, with low contamination from the accompanying thermal emission, fast neutrons and γ-rays. A computer code named "QMNB" was developed in the "MATLAB" programming language to perform the required calculations. PMID:25544666

  12. Ionization-assisted relativistic electron generation with monoenergetic features from laser thin foil interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Glazyrin, I. V.; Karpeev, A. V.; Kotova, O. G.; Bychenkov, V. Yu.; Fedosejevs, R.; Rozmus, W.

    2012-07-11

    The concept of ionization-induced injection into the laser pulse to produce quasi-monoenergetic bunches of electrons from ultra-thin solid dense targets is analyzed. When the laser pulse propagates through semi-transparent foil the electrons from inner atom shells remain bound during the rise time of the laser pulse and are ionized by the laser intensity near its maximum amplitude, which satisfies the best injection condition for subsequent acceleration. It was found that a bunch of quasimonoenergetic electrons from inner atom shells moves co-directionally with laser pulse and acquire energy {approx}m{sub e}c{sup 2}a{sup 2}/2.

  13. Quasi-monoenergetic proton beam from a proton-layer embedded metal foil irradiated by an intense laser pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kyung Nam; Lee, Kitae; Kumar, Manoj; Kim, Ha-Na; Park, Seong Hee; Jeong, Young Uk; Vinokurov, Nikolay; Kim, Yong Gi

    2016-03-01

    A target structure, ion-layer embedded foil (ILEF) is proposed for producing a quasi-monoenergetic proton beam by utilizing a bulk electrostatic field, which is generated by irradiating the target with an ultra-intense laser pulse, inside the plasma. Compared with the case of a single metal foil in which the proton layer is initially present on the surface, in the ILEF target, the proton layer is initially located inside a metal foil. A two-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation shows that the target generates a proton beam with a narrow energy spread. With a laser intensity of 2 × 1019 W/cm2, a 22-MeV proton beam with an energy spread of 8% at the full-width-half-maximum (FWHM) is obtained when the proton layer is located at 0.4 μm inside the rear surface of a 2.4 μm-thick copper foil. When the proton layer moves toward the front side, a proton beam with a flat-top energy distribution ranging from 15 MeV to 35 MeV is obtained. Further, with a higher laser intensity of 1021 W/cm2, a proton beam with the maximum energy of 345 MeV and FWHM energy spread of 7.2% is obtained. The analysis of the PIC simulation with an aid of a fluid analysis shows that the spectrum is affected by the initial position of the proton layer, its initial spread during the formation of the sheath field, and the space charge effect.

  14. Benchmarking of the mono-energetic transport coefficients-results from the International Collaboration on Neoclassical Transport in Stellarators (ICNTS)

    SciTech Connect

    Beidler, C. D.; Allmaier, K.; Isaev, Maxim Yu; Kasilov, K.; Kernbichler, W.; Leitold, G.; Maassberg, H.; Mikkelsen, D. R.; Murakami, Masanori; Schmidt, M.; Spong, Donald A; Tribaidos, V.; Wakasa, A.

    2011-01-01

    Numerical results for the three mono-energetic transport coefficients required for a complete neoclassical description of stellarator plasmas have been benchmarked within an international collaboration. These transport coefficients are flux-surface-averaged moments of solutions to the linearized drift kinetic equation which have been determined using field-line-integration techniques, Monte Carlo simulations, a variational method employing Fourier-Legendre test functions and a finite-difference scheme. The benchmarking has been successfully carried out for past, present and future devices which represent different optimization strategies within the extensive configuration space available to stellarators. A qualitative comparison of the results with theoretical expectations for simple model fields is provided. The behaviour of the results for the mono-energetic radial and parallel transport coefficients can be largely understood from such theoretical considerations but the mono-energetic bootstrap current coefficient exhibits characteristics which have not been predicted.

  15. Research Perspectives at Jefferson Lab: 12 GeV and Beyond

    SciTech Connect

    Kees de Jager

    2002-09-01

    The plans for upgrading the CEBAF accelerator at Jefferson Lab to 12 GeV are presented. The research program supporting that upgrade are illustrated with a few selected examples. The instrumentation under design to carry out that research program is discussed. Finally, a conceptual design of a future upgrade which combines a 25 GeV fixed-target facility and an electron-ion collider facility at a luminosity of up to 10{sup 35}cm{sup -2}s{sup -1} and a CM energy of over 40 GeV.

  16. Is the 130 GeV line real? A search for systematics in the Fermi-LAT data

    SciTech Connect

    Finkbeiner, Douglas P.; Su, Meng; Weniger, Christoph E-mail: mengsu@cfa.harvard.edu

    2013-01-01

    Our recent claims of a Galactic center feature in Fermi-LAT data at approximately 130 GeV have motivated a large number of papers proposing explanations ranging from dark matter annihilation to monoenergetic pulsar winds. Because of the importance of such interpretations for physics and astrophysics, a discovery will require not only additional data, but a thorough investigation of possible LAT systematics. While we do not have access to the details of each event reconstruction, we do have information about each event from the public event lists and spacecraft parameter files. These data allow us to search for suspicious trends that could indicate a spurious signal. We consider several hypotheses that might make an instrumental artifact more apparent at the Galactic center, and find them implausible. We also search for an instrumental signature in the Earth limb photons, which provide a smooth reference spectrum for null tests. We find no significant 130 GeV feature in the Earth limb sample. However, we do find a marginally significant 130 GeV feature in Earth limb photons with a limited range of detector incidence angles. This raises concerns about the 130 GeV Galactic center feature, even though we can think of no plausible model of instrumental behavior that connects the two. A modest amount of additional limb data would tell us if the limb feature is a statistical fluke. If the limb feature persists, it would raise doubts about the Pass 7 processing of E > 100 GeV events. At present we find no instrumental systematics that could plausibly explain the excess Galactic center emission at 130 GeV.

  17. Monoenergetic beams of relativistic electrons from intense laser-plasma interactions.

    PubMed

    Mangles, S P D; Murphy, C D; Najmudin, Z; Thomas, A G R; Collier, J L; Dangor, A E; Divall, E J; Foster, P S; Gallacher, J G; Hooker, C J; Jaroszynski, D A; Langley, A J; Mori, W B; Norreys, P A; Tsung, F S; Viskup, R; Walton, B R; Krushelnick, K

    2004-09-30

    High-power lasers that fit into a university-scale laboratory can now reach focused intensities of more than 10(19) W cm(-2) at high repetition rates. Such lasers are capable of producing beams of energetic electrons, protons and gamma-rays. Relativistic electrons are generated through the breaking of large-amplitude relativistic plasma waves created in the wake of the laser pulse as it propagates through a plasma, or through a direct interaction between the laser field and the electrons in the plasma. However, the electron beams produced from previous laser-plasma experiments have a large energy spread, limiting their use for potential applications. Here we report high-resolution energy measurements of the electron beams produced from intense laser-plasma interactions, showing that--under particular plasma conditions--it is possible to generate beams of relativistic electrons with low divergence and a small energy spread (less than three per cent). The monoenergetic features were observed in the electron energy spectrum for plasma densities just above a threshold required for breaking of the plasma wave. These features were observed consistently in the electron spectrum, although the energy of the beam was observed to vary from shot to shot. If the issue of energy reproducibility can be addressed, it should be possible to generate ultrashort monoenergetic electron bunches of tunable energy, holding great promise for the future development of 'table-top' particle accelerators. PMID:15457251

  18. LASER TECHNOLOGY FOR PRECISION MONOENERGETIC GAMMA-RAY SOURCE R&D AT LLNL

    SciTech Connect

    Shverdin, M Y; Bayramian, A; Albert, F; Anderson, S G; Betts, S M; Chu, T S; Cross, R R; Gibson, D J; Marsh, R; Messerly, M; Phan, H; Prantil, M; Wu, S; Ebbers, C; Scarpetti, R D; Hartemann, F V; Siders, C W; McNabb, D P; Bonanno, R E; Barty, C P

    2010-04-20

    Generation of mono-energetic, high brightness gamma-rays requires state of the art lasers to both produce a low emittance electron beam in the linac and high intensity, narrow linewidth laser photons for scattering with the relativistic electrons. Here, we overview the laser systems for the 3rd generation Monoenergetic Gamma-ray Source (MEGa-ray) currently under construction at Lawrence Livermore National Lab (LLNL). We also describe a method for increasing the efficiency of laser Compton scattering through laser pulse recirculation. The fiber-based photoinjector laser will produce 50 {micro}J temporally and spatially shaped UV pulses at 120 Hz to generate a low emittance electron beam in the X-band RF photoinjector. The interaction laser generates high intensity photons that focus into the interaction region and scatter off the accelerated electrons. This system utilizes chirped pulse amplification and commercial diode pumped solid state Nd:YAG amplifiers to produce 0.5 J, 10 ps, 120 Hz pulses at 1064 nm and up to 0.2 J after frequency doubling. A single passively mode-locked Ytterbium fiber oscillator seeds both laser systems and provides a timing synch with the linac.

  19. Determination of scatter factor parameters and electron disequilibrium for monoenergetic photon beams.

    PubMed

    McDonough, J; Bloch, P; Bjärngard, B E

    1999-02-01

    The tissue-phantom-ratio (TPR) is expressed as the product of the phantom scatter factor (SF), an electron disequilibrium factor, and an attenuation factor, equal to the zero-area TPR. The scatter factor, as a function of depth d and field size s, has been described by two parameters a and w, SF(d,s) = 1 + asd/(ws + d). We have determined the parameters a and w for 20 monoenergetic photon beams between 1 and 20 MeV. Pencil-beam energy-deposition kernels were obtained using Monte Carlo simulations. The kernels were used to calculate broad-beam depth-dose data, which were converted to TPR and fitted to the equation above using an iterative search over a-w space. The parameter a is nearly equal to the attenuation coefficient for all energies while the parameter w increases with energy. The resulting a and w compare favorably to values determined for clinical photon beams, as a function of the measured attenuation coefficient. With the scatter factor determined, we isolated the electron disequilibrium factor for each monoenergetic beam. It can be characterized as a quadratic function of the depth. The coefficients of the quadratic function can be related to the range of the most energetic secondary electron produced. PMID:10076974

  20. Evaluation of a personal and environmental dosemeter based on CR-39 track detectors in quasi-monoenergetic neutron fields.

    PubMed

    Caresana, M; Ferrarini, M; Parravicini, A; Sashala Naik, A

    2014-10-01

    In this paper, the evaluation of the dosimetric capability of a detector based on a CR-39 solid-state nuclear track detector coupled to a 1 cm thickness of PMMA radiator was made with the aim of understanding the applicability of this technique to personal and environmental neutron dosimetry. The dosemeter has been exposed to monoenergetic and quasi-monoenergetic neutron beams at PTB in Braunschweig, Germany and at Ithemba Laboratories, in Faure, South Africa, with peak energies ranging from 0.565 to 100 MeV. The results showed a response that is almost independent of the neutron energy in the whole energy range. PMID:24324248

  1. Observation of pi{sup +}pi{sup -}pi{sup +}pi{sup -} photoproduction in ultraperipheral heavy-ion collisions at sq root(s{sub NN})=200 GeV at the STAR detector

    SciTech Connect

    Abelev, B. I.; Betts, R. R.; Evdokimov, O.; Garcia-Solis, E. J.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Iordanova, A.; Kauder, K.; Suarez, M. C.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Bhati, A. K.; Kumar, L.; Pruthi, N. K.; Ahammed, Z.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Dutta Mazumdar, M. R.; Ganti, M. S.; Ghosh, P.; Mohanty, B.; Mondal, M. M.

    2010-04-15

    We present a measurement of pi{sup +}pi{sup -}pi{sup +}pi{sup -} photonuclear production in ultraperipheral Au-Au collisions at sq root(s{sub N{sub N}})=200 GeV from the STAR experiment. The pi{sup +}pi{sup -}pi{sup +}pi{sup -} final states are observed at low transverse momentum and are accompanied by mutual nuclear excitation of the beam particles. The strong enhancement of the production cross section at low transverse momentum is consistent with coherent photoproduction. The pi{sup +}pi{sup -}pi{sup +}pi{sup -} invariant mass spectrum of the coherent events exhibits a broad peak around 1540+-40 MeV/c{sup 2} with a width of 570+-60 MeV/c{sup 2}, in agreement with the photoproduction data for the rho{sup 0}(1700). We do not observe a corresponding peak in the pi{sup +}pi{sup -} final state and measure an upper limit for the ratio of the branching fractions of the rho{sup 0}(1700) to pi{sup +}pi{sup -} and pi{sup +}pi{sup -}pi{sup +}pi{sup -} of 2.5% at 90% confidence level. The ratio of rho{sup 0}(1700) and rho{sup 0}(770) coherent production cross sections is measured to be 13.4+-0.8{sub stat.}+-4.4{sub syst.}%.

  2. RBE of quasi-monoenergetic 60 MeV neutron radiation for induction of dicentric chromosomes in human lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Nolte, R; Mühlbradt, K-H; Meulders, J P; Stephan, G; Haney, M; Schmid, E

    2005-12-01

    The production of dicentric chromosomes in human lymphocytes by high-energy neutron radiation was studied using a quasi-monoenergetic 60 MeV neutron beam. The average yield coefficient [see text] of the linear dose-response relationship for dicentric chromosomes was measured to be (0.146+/-0.016) Gy-1. This confirms our earlier observations that above 400 keV, the yield of dicentric chromosomes decreases with increasing neutron energy. Using the linear-quadratic dose-response relationship for dicentric chromosomes established in blood of the same donor for 60Co gamma-rays as a reference radiation, an average maximum low-dose RBE (RBEM) of 14+/-4 for 60 MeV quasi-monoenergetic neutrons with a dose-weighted average energy [see text] of 41.0 MeV is obtained. A correction procedure was applied, to account for the low-energy continuum of the quasi-monoenergetic spectral neutron distribution, and the yield coefficient alpha for 60 MeV neutrons was determined from the measured average yield coefficient [see text]. For alpha, a value of (0.115+/-0.026) Gy-1 was obtained corresponding to an RBEM of 11+/-4. The present experiments extend earlier investigations with monoenergetic neutrons to higher energies. PMID:16283348

  3. The 12 GeV Energy Upgrade at Jefferson Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Pilat, Fulvia C.

    2012-09-01

    Two new cryomodules and an extensive upgrade of the bending magnets at Jefferson Lab has been recently completed in preparation for the full energy upgrade in about one year. Jefferson Laboratory has undertaken a major upgrade of its flagship facility, the CW re-circulating CEBAF linac, with the goal of doubling the linac energy to 12 GeV. I will discuss here the main scope and timeline of the upgrade and report on recent accomplishments and the present status. I will then discuss in more detail the core of the upgrade, the new additional C100 cryomodules, their production, tests and recent successful performance. I will then conclude by looking at the future plans of Jefferson Laboratory, from the commissioning and operations of the 12 GeV CEBAF to the design of the MEIC electron ion collider.

  4. Simulation of the Quasi-Monoenergetic Protons Generation by Parallel Laser Pulses Interaction with Foils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei-Quan; Yin, Yan; Zou, De-Bin; Yu, Tong-Pu; Yang, Xiao-Hu; Xu, Han; Yu, Ming-Yang; Ma, Yan-Yun; Zhuo, Hong-Bin; Shao, Fu-Qiu

    2014-11-01

    A new scheme of radiation pressure acceleration for generating high-quality protons by using two overlapping-parallel laser pulses is proposed. Particle-in-cell simulation shows that the overlapping of two pulses with identical Gaussian profiles in space and trapezoidal profiles in the time domain can result in a composite light pulse with a spatial profile suitable for stable acceleration of protons to high energies. At ~2.46 × 1021 W/cm2 intensity of the combination light pulse, a quasi-monoenergetic proton beam with peak energy ~200 MeV/nucleon, energy spread <15%, and divergency angle <4° is obtained, which is appropriate for tumor therapy. The proton beam quality can be controlled by adjusting the incidence points of two laser pulses.

  5. Highly collimated monoenergetic target-surface electron acceleration in near-critical-density plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Mao, J. Y.; Chen, L. M.; Huang, K.; Ma, Y.; Zhao, J. R.; Yan, W. C.; Ma, J. L.; Wei, Z. Y.; Li, D. Z.; Aeschlimann, M.; Zhang, J.

    2015-03-30

    Optimized-quality monoenergetic target surface electron beams at MeV level with low normalized emittance (0.03π mm mrad) and high charge (30 pC) per shot have been obtained from 3 TW laser-solid interactions at a grazing incidence. The 2-Dimension particle-in-cell simulations suggest that electrons are wake-field accelerated in a large-scale, near-critical-density preplasma. It reveals that a bubble-like structure as an accelerating cavity appears in the near-critical-density plasma region and travels along the target surface. A bunch of electrons are pinched transversely and accelerated longitudinally by the wake field in the bubble. The outstanding normalized emittance and monochromaticity of such highly collimated surface electron beams could make it an ideal beam for fast ignition or may serve as an injector in traditional accelerators.

  6. Laser-wakefield acceleration of monoenergetic electron beams in the first plasma-wave period.

    PubMed

    Mangles, S P D; Thomas, A G R; Kaluza, M C; Lundh, O; Lindau, F; Persson, A; Tsung, F S; Najmudin, Z; Mori, W B; Wahlström, C-G; Krushelnick, K

    2006-06-01

    Beam profile measurements of laser-wakefield accelerated electron bunches reveal that in the monoenergetic regime the electrons are injected and accelerated at the back of the first period of the plasma wave. With pulse durations ctau >or= lambda(p), we observe an elliptical beam profile with the axis of the ellipse parallel to the axis of the laser polarization. This increase in divergence in the laser polarization direction indicates that the electrons are accelerated within the laser pulse. Reducing the plasma density (decreasing ctau/lambda(p)) leads to a beam profile with less ellipticity, implying that the self-injection occurs at the rear of the first period of the plasma wave. This also demonstrates that the electron bunches are less than a plasma wavelength long, i.e., have a duration <25 fs. This interpretation is supported by 3D particle-in-cell simulations. PMID:16803242

  7. Measuring E and B Fields in Laser-Produced Plasmas with Monoenergetic Proton Radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Li, C. K.; Seguin, F. H.; Frenje, J. A.; Rygg, J. R.; Petrasso, R. D.; Town, R. P. J.; Amendt, P. A.; Hatchett, S. P.; Landen, O. L.; Mackinnon, A. J.; Patel, P. K.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Sangster, T. C.; Knauer, J. P.

    2006-09-29

    Electromagnetic (E/B) fields generated by the interaction with plasmas of long-pulse, low-intensity laser beams relevant to inertial confinement fusion have been measured for the first time using novel monoenergetic proton radiography methods. High-resolution, time-gated radiography images of a plastic foil driven by a 10{sup 14} W/cm{sup 2} laser implied B fields of {approx}0.5 MG and E fields of {approx}1.5x10{sup 8} V/m. Simulations of these experiments with LASNEX+LSP have been performed and are in overall (though not exact) agreement with the data both for field strengths and for spatial distributions; this is the first direct experimental test of the laser-generated B-field package in LASNEX. The experiments also demonstrated that laser phase plates substantially reduce medium-scale chaotic field structure.

  8. All the Astrophysical Jet Sources: Driven by Mono-energetic e± Beams?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundt, Wolfgang

    2006-12-01

    Gopal Krishna and I are now considering E × B-drifting jets since some 25 years, and are still convinced that they form the only consistent description of the huge body of observations. New is our 2004 tightening that (all) the jets consist of mono-energetic flows of extremely relativistic electron-positron pairs, of bulk Lorentz factor γ lesssim 104, moving in equipartition with their frozen-in magnetic and electric fields. Whenever their supersonic propagation gets blocked by some (heavy) obstacle, their frozen-in Poynting flux converts the delta-shaped particle-energy distribution into an almost white (in power) power law: E2NE ~ E-epsilon with epsilon gtrsim 0.

  9. Characterization of a tunable quasi-monoenergetic neutron beam from deuteron breakup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bleuel, D. L.; McMahan, M. A.; Ahle, L.; Barquest, B. R.; Cerny, J.; Heilbronn, L. H.; Jewett, C. C.

    2007-08-01

    A neutron irradiation facility is being developed at the 88-inch cyclotron at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory for the purposes of measuring neutron reaction cross sections on radioactive targets and for radiation effects testing. Applications are of benefit to stockpile stewardship, nuclear astrophysics, next generation advanced fuel reactors and cosmic radiation biology and electronics in space. The facility will supply a tunable, quasi-monoenergetic neutron beam in the range of 10-30 MeV or a white neutron source, produced by deuteron breakup reactions on thin and thick targets, respectively. Because the deuteron breakup reaction has not been well studied at intermediate incident deuteron energies, above the target Coulomb barrier and below 56 MeV, a detailed characterization was necessary of the neutron spectra produced by thin targets. Neutron time-of-flight (TOF) methods have been used to measure the neutron spectra produced on thin targets of low-Z (titanium) and high-Z (tantalum) materials at incident deuteron energies of 20 MeV and 29 MeV at 0°. Breakup neutrons at both energies from low-Z targets appear to peak at roughly half of the available kinetic energy, while neutrons from high-Z interactions peak somewhat lower in energy, owing to the increased proton energy due to breakup within the Coulomb field. Furthermore, neutron spectra appear narrower for high-Z targets. These centroids are consistent with recent preliminary proton energy measurements using silicon telescope detectors conducted at LBNL, though there is a notable discrepancy with spectral widths. Prospects for producing a tunable, quasi-monoenergetic neutron facility of 106-108 n/cm2/s at LBNL are promising.

  10. Comparison of Techniques to Reduce Bremsstrahlung Background Radiation from Monoenergetic Photon Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, M; McNabb, D

    2006-06-29

    An important applied technology is a tunable mono-energetic photon source [1]. These sources are made of relativistic electron accelerators coupled to low-energy lasers, which produce high-energy, mono-energetic-rays. One challenge associated with systems such as this is a continuum of bremsstrahlung background created when an electron beam passes through an aperture of some sort and the electron bunch or its halo impinges on the aperture pictured in figure 1. For instance, in the current T-REX [1] design for the interaction point between the laser- and electron-beam, the electron-beam passes through the center of a mirror used to reflect the laser. There is a potential with this design that bremsstrahlung radiation may be produced at the edges of the mirror openings and contaminate the mono-energetic photon beam. Certain applications [2] may be sensitive to this contamination. To reduce the bremsstrahlung contaminate a collimator (thickness {approx}24in. (calculated from XCOM database [3]) to attenuate by a factor of 10{sup -3} the 112MeV photons expected in the T-REX demonstration [1]) is situated between the aperture and target. To maximize the brightness of the photon-beam, the collimator opening must be no less than the size of the photon-beam spot size expected to be about 1mm. This fixes the collimator opening. a priori the aperture size must be greater than the collimator opening and is a function distance between the aperture and collimator. In this paper we focus on two approaches to estimate the aperture size, given a collimator and a target whose sizes and distances from the aperture are given. In the next section we will discuss these approaches.

  11. Spin alignment measurements of the K{sup *0}(892) and {sup}{o}(1020) vector mesons in heavy ion collisions at {radical}{ovr s}{sub NN}=200 GeV.

    SciTech Connect

    Abelev, B. I.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Anderson, B. D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Krueger, K.; Spinka, H. M.; Underwood, D. G.; STAR Collaboration; High Energy Physics; Univ. of Illinois; Panjab Univ.; Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre; Kent State Univ.; Particle Physic Lab.

    2008-01-01

    We present the first spin alignment measurements for the K*{sup 0}(892) and (1020) vector mesons produced at midrapidity with transverse momenta up to 5 GeV/c at {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV at RHIC. The diagonal spin-density matrix elements with respect to the reaction plane in Au+Au collisions are {rho}{sub 00} = 0.32 {+-} 0.04 (stat) {+-} 0.09 (syst) for the K*{sup 0} (0.8 < p{sub T} < 5.0 GeV/c) and {rho}{sub 00} = 0.34 {+-} 0.02 (stat) {+-} 0.03 (syst) for the {phi} (0.4 < p{sub T} < 5.0 GeV/c) and are constant with transverse momentum and collision centrality. The data are consistent with the unpolarized expectation of 1/3 and thus no evidence is found for the transfer of the orbital angular momentum of the colliding system to the vector-meson spins. Spin alignments for K*{sup 0} and {phi} in Au+Au collisions were also measured with respect to the particle's production plane. The {phi} result, {rho}{sub 00} = 0.41 {+-} 0.02 (stat) {+-} 0.04 (syst), is consistent with that in p+p collisions, {rho}{sub 00} = 0.39 {+-} 0.03 (stat) {+-} 0.06 (syst), also measured in this work. The measurements thus constrain the possible size of polarization phenomena in the production dynamics of vector mesons.

  12. Nonintrusive emittance measurement of 1 GeV H- beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y.; Aleksandrov, A.; Long, C.; Menshov, A.; Pogge, J.; Webster, A.; Zhukov, A.

    2012-05-01

    A laser wire based transverse phase space measurement system has been developed at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS). The system enables a direct measurement of the transverse emittance in both directions on a 1 GeV hydrogen ion (H-) beam at the high energy beam transport (HEBT) beam line. The measurement is non-destructive and has been conducted on a neutron production H- beam. This paper describes the design, implementation, and measurement performance of the system. The experience on the installation and commissioning of the laser emittance measurement system will also be discussed.

  13. Baryon number fluctuations from a crossover equation of state compared to heavy-ion collision measurements in the beam energy range √{sNN}=7.7 to 200 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albright, M.; Kapusta, J.; Young, C.

    2015-10-01

    Fluctuations of the proton number distribution in central Au-Au collisions have been measured by the STAR Collaboration in a beam energy scan at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). The motivation is a search for evidence of a critical point in the equation of state. It was found that the skewness and kurtosis display an interesting energy dependence. We compare these measurements to an equation of state which smoothly interpolates between an excluded volume hadron resonance gas at low energy density to a perturbative plasma of quarks and gluons at high energy density. This crossover equation of state agrees very well with the lattice QCD equation of state. The crossover equation of state can reproduce the data if the fluctuations are frozen at a temperature significantly lower than the average chemical freeze-out.

  14. Suprathermal ion detector results from Apollo missions.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freeman, J. W., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    This paper reviews briefly the knowledge of the ion environment of the moon as obtained from the Apollo Lunar Surface Experiments Package, Suprathermal Ion Detector Experiment. Topics to be discussed include: an interplanetary shock as seen from the lunar surface; bow shock and magnetosheath ions; magnetotail plasma seen during a magnetic disturbance; suprathermal ions seen during passage of the sunset and sunrise terminators; and ions associated with neutral gas clouds in the vicinity of the moon, and in particular the low energy mono-energetic spectrum of these ions. It is believed that these low energy spectra and some terminator ions can be explained by ion acceleration by the interplanetary electric field. This paper serves as catalog to references to these and other related phenomena.

  15. Beta-Decay Study of ^{150}Er, ^{152}Yb, and ^{156}Yb: Candidates for a Monoenergetic Neutrino Beam Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Estevez Aguado, M. E.; Algora, A.; Rubio, B.; Bernabeu, J.; Nacher, E.; Tain, J. L.; Gadea, A.; Agramunt, J.; Burkard, K.; Hueller, W.; Doring, J.; Kirchner, R.; Mukha, I.; Plettner, C.; Roeckl, E.; Grawe, H.; Collatz, R.; Hellstrom, M.; Cano-Ott, D.; Karny, M.; Janas, Z.; Gierlik, M.; Plochocki, A.; Rykaczewski, Krzysztof Piotr; Batist, L.; Moroz, F.; Wittman, V.; Blazhev, A.; Valiente, J. J.; Espinoza, C.

    2011-01-01

    The beta decays of ^{150}Er, ^{152}Yb, and ^{156}Yb nuclei are investigated using the total absorption spectroscopy technique. These nuclei can be considered possible candidates for forming the beam of a monoenergetic neutrino beam facility based on the electron capture (EC) decay of radioactive nuclei. Our measurements confirm that for the cases studied, the EC decay proceeds mainly to a single state in the daughter nucleus.

  16. Fragmentation of nitrogen-14 nuclei at 2.1 Gev per nucleon.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heckman, H. H.; Greiner, D. E.; Lindstrom, P. J.; Bieser, F. S.

    1971-01-01

    An experiment has been carried out at the bevatron on the nuclear fragmentation of nitrogen-14 ions at an energy of 2.1 billion electron volts (Gev) per nucleon. Because of the near equality of the velocities of the nitrogen-14 beam and the fragmentation products at an angle of 0 deg, we find it possible to identify the nuclear fragments isotopically.

  17. Z-dependence of thick-target bremsstrahlung produced by monoenergetic low-energy electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czarnecki, S.; Short, A.; Williams, S.

    2016-07-01

    The dependence of thick-target bremsstrahlung emitted by low-energy beams of monoenergetic electrons on the atomic number of the target material has been investigated experimentally for incident electron energies of 4.25 keV and 5.00 keV using thick aluminum, copper, silver, tungsten, and gold targets. Experimental data suggest that the intensity of the thick-target bremsstrahlung emitted is more strongly dependent on the atomic number of the target material for photons with energies that are approximately equal to the energy of the incident electrons than at lower energies, and also that the dependence of thick-target bremsstrahlung on the atomic number of the target material is stronger for incident electrons of higher energies than for incident electrons of lower energies. The results of the experiments are compared to the results of simulations performed using the PENELOPE program (which is commonly used in medical physics) and to thin-target bremsstrahlung theory, as well. Comparisons suggest that the experimental dependence of thick-target bremsstrahlung on the atomic number of the target material may be slightly stronger than the results of the PENELOPE code suggest.

  18. An angular multigrid method for computing mono-energetic particle beams in Flatland

    SciTech Connect

    Boergers, Christoph MacLachlan, Scott

    2010-04-20

    Beams of microscopic particles penetrating scattering background matter play an important role in several applications. The parameter choices made here are motivated by the problem of electron-beam cancer therapy planning. Mathematically, a steady particle beam penetrating matter, or a configuration of several such beams, is modeled by a boundary value problem for a Boltzmann equation. Grid-based discretization of such a problem leads to a system of algebraic equations. This system is typically very large because of the large number of independent variables in the Boltzmann equation-six if no dimension-reducing assumptions other than time independence are made. If grid-based methods are to be practical for these problems, it is therefore necessary to develop very fast solvers for the discretized problems. For beams of mono-energetic particles interacting with a passive background, but not with each other, in two space dimensions, the first author proposed such a solver, based on angular domain decomposition, some time ago. Here, we propose and test an angular multigrid algorithm for the same model problem. Our numerical experiments show rapid, grid-independent convergence. For high-resolution calculations, our method is substantially more efficient than the angular domain decomposition method. In addition, unlike angular domain decomposition, the angular multigrid method works well even when the angular diffusion coefficient is fairly large.

  19. Dark matter searches for monoenergetic neutrinos arising from stopped meson decay in the Sun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rott, Carsten; In, Seongjin; Kumar, Jason; Yaylali, David

    2015-11-01

    Dark matter can be gravitationally captured by the Sun after scattering off solar nuclei. Annihilations of the dark matter trapped and accumulated in the centre of the Sun could result in one of the most detectable and recognizable signals for dark matter. Searches for high-energy neutrinos produced in the decay of annihilation products have yielded extremely competitive constraints on the spin-dependent scattering cross sections of dark matter with nuclei. Recently, the low energy neutrino signal arising from dark-matter annihilation to quarks which then hadronize and shower has been suggested as a competitive and complementary search strategy. These high-multiplicity hadronic showers give rise to a large amount of pions which will come to rest in the Sun and decay, leading to a unique sub-GeV neutrino signal. We here improve on previous works by considering the monoenergetic neutrino signal arising from both pion and kaon decay. We consider searches at liquid scintillation, liquid argon, and water Cherenkov detectors and find very competitive sensitivities for few-GeV dark matter masses.

  20. Quasi-monoenergetic laser-plasma acceleration of electrons to 2 GeV

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaoming; Zgadzaj, Rafal; Fazel, Neil; Li, Zhengyan; Yi, S. A.; Zhang, Xi; Henderson, Watson; Chang, Y.-Y.; Korzekwa, R.; Tsai, H.-E.; Pai, C.-H.; Quevedo, H.; Dyer, G.; Gaul, E.; Martinez, M.; Bernstein, A. C.; Borger, T.; Spinks, M.; Donovan, M.; Khudik, V.; Shvets, G.; Ditmire, T.; Downer, M. C.

    2013-01-01

    Laser-plasma accelerators of only a centimetre’s length have produced nearly monoenergetic electron bunches with energy as high as 1 GeV. Scaling these compact accelerators to multi-gigaelectronvolt energy would open the prospect of building X-ray free-electron lasers and linear colliders hundreds of times smaller than conventional facilities, but the 1 GeV barrier has so far proven insurmountable. Here, by applying new petawatt laser technology, we produce electron bunches with a spectrum prominently peaked at 2 GeV with only a few per cent energy spread and unprecedented sub-milliradian divergence. Petawatt pulses inject ambient plasma electrons into the laser-driven accelerator at much lower density than was previously possible, thereby overcoming the principal physical barriers to multi-gigaelectronvolt acceleration: dephasing between laser-driven wake and accelerating electrons and laser pulse erosion. Simulations indicate that with improvements in the laser-pulse focus quality, acceleration to nearly 10 GeV should be possible with the available pulse energy. PMID:23756359

  1. Decisive disappearance search at high Δ m2 with monoenergetic muon neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Axani, S.; Collin, G.; Conrad, J. M.; Shaevitz, M. H.; Spitz, J.; Wongjirad, T.

    2015-11-01

    "KPipe" is a proposed experiment which will study muon neutrino disappearance for a sensitive test of the Δ m2˜1 eV2 anomalies, possibly indicative of one or more sterile neutrinos. The experiment is to be located at the J-PARC Materials and Life Science Experimental Facility's spallation neutron source, which represents the world's most intense source of charged kaon decay-at-rest monoenergetic (236 MeV) muon neutrinos. The detector vessel, designed to measure the charged-current interactions of these neutrinos, will be 3 m in diameter and 120 m long, extending radially at a distance of 32 to 152 m from the source. This design allows a sensitive search for νμ disappearance associated with currently favored light sterile neutrino models and features the ability to reconstruct the neutrino oscillation wave within a single, extended detector. The required detector design, technology, and costs are modest. The KPipe measurements will be robust since they depend on a known energy neutrino source with low expected backgrounds. Further, since the measurements rely only on the measured rate of detected events as a function of distance, with no required knowledge of the initial flux and neutrino interaction cross section, the results will be largely free of systematic errors. The experimental sensitivity to oscillations, based on a shape-only analysis of the L /E distribution, will extend an order of magnitude beyond present experimental limits in the relevant high-Δ m2 parameter space.

  2. A 0. 5 to 3. 0 MeV monoenergetic positron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Huomo, H.; AsokaKumar, P.; Henderson, S.D.; Phlips, B.F.; Mayer, R.; McDonough, J.; Hacker, H.; McCorkle, S.; Schnitzenbaumer, P.; Greenberg, J.S.

    1988-01-01

    An adjustable, 0.5--3 MeV monoenergetic positron beam has been constructed at Brookhaven. Currently a /sup 22/Na source with a W(100) foil transmission moderator produces a 1.1 mm FWHN beam with an intensity of 3/times/10/sup 5/ e/sup +//sec at a target located downstream from the accelerator. The divergence of the beam is less than 0.1/degree/ at 2.2 MeV energy. A SOA gun with 2 lens transport system brings the beam to a focus at the entrance of an electrostatic 3 MeV Dynamitron accelerator. The post acceleration beam transport system comprises 3 focusing solenolds, 4 sets of steering magnets and a 90/degree/ double focusing bending magnet. The beam energy spread at the target is <1 keV FWHN deduced from the beam size. Below we describe the positron extraction optics and acceleration, the construction of the beamline and the beam diagnostic devices. The salient beam parameters are listed at the end of this paper. 2 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Dark matter searches for monoenergetic neutrinos arising from stopped meson decay in the Sun

    SciTech Connect

    Rott, Carsten; In, Seongjin; Kumar, Jason; Yaylali, David

    2015-11-24

    Dark matter can be gravitationally captured by the Sun after scattering off solar nuclei. Annihilations of the dark matter trapped and accumulated in the centre of the Sun could result in one of the most detectable and recognizable signals for dark matter. Searches for high-energy neutrinos produced in the decay of annihilation products have yielded extremely competitive constraints on the spin-dependent scattering cross sections of dark matter with nuclei. Recently, the low energy neutrino signal arising from dark-matter annihilation to quarks which then hadronize and shower has been suggested as a competitive and complementary search strategy. These high-multiplicity hadronic showers give rise to a large amount of pions which will come to rest in the Sun and decay, leading to a unique sub-GeV neutrino signal. We here improve on previous works by considering the monoenergetic neutrino signal arising from both pion and kaon decay. We consider searches at liquid scintillation, liquid argon, and water Cherenkov detectors and find very competitive sensitivities for few-GeV dark matter masses.

  4. High-energy quasi-monoenergetic neutron fields: existing facilities and future needs.

    PubMed

    Pomp, S; Bartlett, D T; Mayer, S; Reitz, G; Röttger, S; Silari, M; Smit, F D; Vincke, H; Yasuda, H

    2014-10-01

    The argument that well-characterised quasi-monoenergetic neutron (QMN) sources reaching into the energy domain >20 MeV are needed is presented. A brief overview of the existing facilities is given, and a list of key factors that an ideal QMN source for dosimetry and spectrometry should offer is presented. The authors conclude that all of the six QMN facilities currently in existence worldwide operate in sub-optimal conditions for dosimetry. The only currently available QMN facility in Europe capable of operating at energies >40 MeV, TSL in Uppsala, Sweden, is threatened with shutdown in the immediate future. One facility, NFS at GANIL, France, is currently under construction. NFS could deliver QMN beams up to about 30 MeV. It is, however, so far not clear if and when NFS will be able to offer QMN beams or operate with only so-called white neutron beams. It is likely that by 2016, QMN beams with energies >40 MeV will be available only in South Africa and Japan, with none in Europe. PMID:24153422

  5. Source characterization and modeling development for monoenergetic-proton radiography experiments on OMEGA

    SciTech Connect

    Manuel, M. J.-E.; Zylstra, A. B.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Casey, D. T.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Sinenian, N.; Li, C. K.; Frenje, J. A.; Seguin, F. H.; Petrasso, R. D.

    2012-06-15

    A monoenergetic proton source has been characterized and a modeling tool developed for proton radiography experiments at the OMEGA [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Comm. 133, 495 (1997)] laser facility. Multiple diagnostics were fielded to measure global isotropy levels in proton fluence and images of the proton source itself provided information on local uniformity relevant to proton radiography experiments. Global fluence uniformity was assessed by multiple yield diagnostics and deviations were calculated to be {approx}16% and {approx}26% of the mean for DD and D{sup 3}He fusion protons, respectively. From individual fluence images, it was found that the angular frequencies of Greater-Than-Or-Equivalent-To 50 rad{sup -1} contributed less than a few percent to local nonuniformity levels. A model was constructed using the Geant4 [S. Agostinelli et al., Nuc. Inst. Meth. A 506, 250 (2003)] framework to simulate proton radiography experiments. The simulation implements realistic source parameters and various target geometries. The model was benchmarked with the radiographs of cold-matter targets to within experimental accuracy. To validate the use of this code, the cold-matter approximation for the scattering of fusion protons in plasma is discussed using a typical laser-foil experiment as an example case. It is shown that an analytic cold-matter approximation is accurate to within Less-Than-Or-Equivalent-To 10% of the analytic plasma model in the example scenario.

  6. Source characterization and modeling development for monoenergetic-proton radiography experiments on OMEGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manuel, M. J.-E.; Zylstra, A. B.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Casey, D. T.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Sinenian, N.; Li, C. K.; Frenje, J. A.; Séguin, F. H.; Petrasso, R. D.

    2012-06-01

    A monoenergetic proton source has been characterized and a modeling tool developed for proton radiography experiments at the OMEGA [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Comm. 133, 495 (1997)], 10.1016/S0030-4018(96)00325-2 laser facility. Multiple diagnostics were fielded to measure global isotropy levels in proton fluence and images of the proton source itself provided information on local uniformity relevant to proton radiography experiments. Global fluence uniformity was assessed by multiple yield diagnostics and deviations were calculated to be ˜16% and ˜26% of the mean for DD and D3He fusion protons, respectively. From individual fluence images, it was found that the angular frequencies of ≳50 rad-1 contributed less than a few percent to local nonuniformity levels. A model was constructed using the Geant4 [S. Agostinelli et al., Nuc. Inst. Meth. A 506, 250 (2003)], 10.1016/S0168-9002(03)01368-8 framework to simulate proton radiography experiments. The simulation implements realistic source parameters and various target geometries. The model was benchmarked with the radiographs of cold-matter targets to within experimental accuracy. To validate the use of this code, the cold-matter approximation for the scattering of fusion protons in plasma is discussed using a typical laser-foil experiment as an example case. It is shown that an analytic cold-matter approximation is accurate to within ≲10% of the analytic plasma model in the example scenario.

  7. Characterization of a Tunable Quasi-Monoenergetic Neutron Beamfrom Deuteron Breakup

    SciTech Connect

    Bleuel, D.L.; McMahan, M.A.; Ahle, L.; Barquest, B.R.; Cerny, J.; Heilbronn, L.H.; Jewett, C.C.

    2006-12-14

    A neutron irradiation facility is being developed at the88-Inch Cyclotron at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory for thepurposes of measuring neutron reaction cross sections on radioactivetargets and for radiation effects testing. Applications are of benefit tostockpile stewardship, nuclear astrophysics, next generation advancedfuel reactors, and cosmic radiation biology and electronics in space. Thefacility will supply a tunable, quasi-monoenergetic neutron beam in therange of 10-30 MeV or a white neutron source, produced by deuteronbreakup reactions on thin and thick targets, respectively. Because thedeuteron breakup reaction has not been well studied at intermediateincident deuteron energies, above the target Coulomb barrier and below 56MeV, a detailed characterization was necessary of the neutron spectraproduced by thin targets.Neutron time of flight (TOF) methods have beenused to measure the neutron spectra produced on thin targets of low-Z(titanium) and high-Z (tantalum) materials at incident deuteron energiesof 20 MeV and 29 MeV at 0 deg. Breakup neutrons at both energies fromlow-Z targets appear to peak at roughly half of the available kineticenergy, while neutrons from high-Z interactions peak somewhat lower inenergy, owing to the increased proton energy due to breakup within theCoulomb field. Furthermore, neutron spectra appear narrower for high-Ztargets. These centroids are consistent with recent preliminary protonenergy measurements using silicon telescope detectors conducted at LBNL,though there is a notable discrepancy with spectral widths.

  8. Overview of Mono-Energetic Gamma-Ray Sources and Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Hartemann, Fred; Albert, Felicie; Anderson, Scott; Barty, Christopher; Bayramian, Andy; Chu, Tak Sum; Cross, R.; Ebbers, Chris; Gibson, David; Marsh, Roark; McNabb, Dennis; Messerly, Michael; Shverdin, Miroslav; Siders, Craig; Jongewaard, Erik; Raubenheimer, Tor; Tantawi, Sami; Vlieks, Arnold; Semenov, Vladimir; /UC, Berkeley

    2012-06-25

    Recent progress in accelerator physics and laser technology have enabled the development of a new class of tunable gamma-ray light sources based on Compton scattering between a high-brightness, relativistic electron beam and a high intensity laser pulse produced via chirped-pulse amplification (CPA). A precision, tunable Mono-Energetic Gamma-ray (MEGa-ray) source driven by a compact, high-gradient X-band linac is currently under development and construction at LLNL. High-brightness, relativistic electron bunches produced by an X-band linac designed in collaboration with SLAC NAL will interact with a Joule-class, 10 ps, diode-pumped CPA laser pulse to generate tunable {gamma}-rays in the 0.5-2.5 MeV photon energy range via Compton scattering. This MEGaray source will be used to excite nuclear resonance fluorescence in various isotopes. Applications include homeland security, stockpile science and surveillance, nuclear fuel assay, and waste imaging and assay. The source design, key parameters, and current status are presented, along with important applications, including nuclear resonance fluorescence.

  9. Vacancy-type defects induced by grinding of Si wafers studied by monoenergetic positron beams

    SciTech Connect

    Uedono, Akira; Yoshihara, Nakaaki; Mizushima, Yoriko; Kim, Youngsuk; Nakamura, Tomoji; Ohba, Takayuki; Oshima, Nagayasu; Suzuki, Ryoichi

    2014-10-07

    Vacancy-type defects introduced by the grinding of Czochralski-grown Si wafers were studied using monoenergetic positron beams. Measurements of Doppler broadening spectra of the annihilation radiation and the lifetime spectra of positrons showed that vacancy-type defects were introduced in the surface region (<98 nm), and the major defect species were identified as (i) relatively small vacancies incorporated in dislocations and (ii) large vacancy clusters. Annealing experiments showed that the defect concentration decreased with increasing annealing temperature in the range between 100 and 500°C. After 600–700°C annealing, the defect-rich region expanded up to about 170 nm, which was attributed to rearrangements of dislocation networks, and a resultant emission of point defects toward the inside of the sample. Above 800°C, the stability limit of those vacancies was reached and they started to disappear. After the vacancies were annealed out (900°C), oxygen-related defects were the major point defects and they were located at <25 nm.

  10. Concurrence of monoenergetic electron beams and bright X-rays from an evolving laser-plasma bubble

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Wenchao; Chen, Liming; Li, Dazhang; Zhang, Lu; Hafz, Nasr A. M.; Dunn, James; Ma, Yong; Huang, Kai; Su, Luning; Chen, Min; Sheng, Zhengming; Zhang, Jie

    2014-01-01

    Desktop laser plasma acceleration has proven to be able to generate gigaelectronvolt-level quasi-monoenergetic electron beams. Moreover, such electron beams can oscillate transversely (wiggling motion) in the laser-produced plasma bubble/channel and emit collimated ultrashort X-ray flashes known as betatron radiation with photon energy ranging from kiloelectronvolts to megaelectronvolts. This implies that usually one cannot obtain bright betatron X-rays and high-quality electron beams with low emittance and small energy spread simultaneously in the same accelerating wave bucket. Here, we report the first (to our knowledge) experimental observation of two distinct electron bunches in a single laser shot, one featured with quasi-monoenergetic spectrum and another with continuous spectrum along with large emittance. The latter is able to generate high-flux betatron X-rays. Such is observed only when the laser self-guiding is extended over 4 mm at a fixed plasma density (4 × 1018 cm−3). Numerical simulation reveals that two bunches of electrons are injected at different stages due to the bubble evolution. The first bunch is injected at the beginning to form a stable quasi-monoenergetic electron beam, whereas the second one is injected later due to the oscillation of the bubble size as a result of the change of the laser spot size during the propagation. Due to the inherent temporal synchronization, this unique electron–photon source can be ideal for pump–probe applications with femtosecond time resolution. PMID:24711405

  11. Fragmentation of N-14 nuclei at 29 GeV - Inclusive isotope spectra at 0 deg.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heckman, H. H.; Greiner, D. E.; Lindstrom, P. J.; Bieser, F. S.

    1972-01-01

    We report the first results of a Bevatron heavy-ion experiment on the inclusive spectra of isotopically identified nuclei 3(Z-range between 3 and 7), produced by the fragmentation of 29-GeV N-14 ions in carbon and hydrogen. The preliminary values of the partial differential cross sections at 0 deg give evidence that the modes of fragmentation of N-14 projectiles are independent of the target nucleus.

  12. Nuclear reaction effects in conventional risk assessment for energetic ion exposure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, John W.; Shinn, Judy L.; Townsend, Lawrence W.

    1990-01-01

    A volume of tissue through which a monoenergetic ion fluence has passed is considered, and the energy absorbed by the media in the passage is evaluated. Various contributions to biological risk are quantified using quality factors presently in force. The effects of newly proposed quality factors are evaluated.

  13. Optimal energy for cell radiosensitivity enhancement by gold nanoparticles using synchrotron-based monoenergetic photon beams.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Wan Nordiana; Corde, Stéphanie; Yagi, Naoto; Abdul Aziz, Siti Aishah; Annabell, Nathan; Geso, Moshi

    2014-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles have been shown to enhance radiation doses delivered to biological targets due to the high absorption coefficient of gold atoms, stemming from their high atomic number (Z) and physical density. These properties significantly increase the likelihood of photoelectric effects and Compton scattering interactions. Gold nanoparticles are a novel radiosensitizing agent that can potentially be used to increase the effectiveness of current radiation therapy techniques and improve the diagnosis and treatment of cancer. However, the optimum radiosensitization effect of gold nanoparticles is strongly dependent on photon energy, which theoretically is predicted to occur in the kilovoltage range of energy. In this research, synchrotron-generated monoenergetic X-rays in the 30-100 keV range were used to investigate the energy dependence of radiosensitization by gold nanoparticles and also to determine the photon energy that produces optimum effects. This investigation was conducted using cells in culture to measure dose enhancement. Bovine aortic endothelial cells with and without gold nanoparticles were irradiated with X-rays at energies of 30, 40, 50, 60, 70, 81, and 100 keV. Trypan blue exclusion assays were performed after irradiation to determine cell viability. Cell radiosensitivity enhancement was indicated by the dose enhancement factor which was found to be maximum at 40 keV with a value of 3.47. The dose enhancement factor obtained at other energy levels followed the same direction as the theoretical calculations based on the ratio of the mass energy absorption coefficients of gold and water. This experimental evidence shows that the radiosensitization effect of gold nanoparticles varies with photon energy as predicted from theoretical calculations. However, prediction based on theoretical assumptions is sometimes difficult due to the complexity of biological systems, so further study at the cellular level is required to fully characterize the effects

  14. Optimal energy for cell radiosensitivity enhancement by gold nanoparticles using synchrotron-based monoenergetic photon beams

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Wan Nordiana; Corde, Stéphanie; Yagi, Naoto; Abdul Aziz, Siti Aishah; Annabell, Nathan; Geso, Moshi

    2014-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles have been shown to enhance radiation doses delivered to biological targets due to the high absorption coefficient of gold atoms, stemming from their high atomic number (Z) and physical density. These properties significantly increase the likelihood of photoelectric effects and Compton scattering interactions. Gold nanoparticles are a novel radiosensitizing agent that can potentially be used to increase the effectiveness of current radiation therapy techniques and improve the diagnosis and treatment of cancer. However, the optimum radiosensitization effect of gold nanoparticles is strongly dependent on photon energy, which theoretically is predicted to occur in the kilovoltage range of energy. In this research, synchrotron-generated monoenergetic X-rays in the 30–100 keV range were used to investigate the energy dependence of radiosensitization by gold nanoparticles and also to determine the photon energy that produces optimum effects. This investigation was conducted using cells in culture to measure dose enhancement. Bovine aortic endothelial cells with and without gold nanoparticles were irradiated with X-rays at energies of 30, 40, 50, 60, 70, 81, and 100 keV. Trypan blue exclusion assays were performed after irradiation to determine cell viability. Cell radiosensitivity enhancement was indicated by the dose enhancement factor which was found to be maximum at 40 keV with a value of 3.47. The dose enhancement factor obtained at other energy levels followed the same direction as the theoretical calculations based on the ratio of the mass energy absorption coefficients of gold and water. This experimental evidence shows that the radiosensitization effect of gold nanoparticles varies with photon energy as predicted from theoretical calculations. However, prediction based on theoretical assumptions is sometimes difficult due to the complexity of biological systems, so further study at the cellular level is required to fully characterize the

  15. ^238U Fission Ion Chamber for Neutron Dosimetry at the 88-Inch Cyclotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Brent; McMahan, Peggy; Barquest, Brad; Johnson, Mike

    2007-10-01

    Efficiency measurements have been conducted for a commercial ^238U fission ion chamber, to be used for neutron dosimetry at the 88-Inch Cyclotron at LBNL. Fast, quasi-monoenergetic neutrons in the energy range of 5 to 30 MeV are under development at the facility through deuteron break-up, for radiation effects testing and cross-section measurements for a variety of applications. Through comparisons with absolute fluxes obtained using activation foils, and energy spectra obtained using the time-of-flight method, efficiency for both monoenergetic and white spectrum neutrons can be calculated.

  16. Ion boundary conditions in semi-infinite fluid models of electron beam-plasma interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Levko, Dmitry

    2014-10-15

    The modified Bohm criterion is derived for the plasma consisting of the monoenergetic electron beam and thermal electrons. This criterion allows us to define the accurate ion boundary conditions for semi-infinite collisionless fluid models of electron beam–plasma interaction. In the absence of electron beam, these boundary conditions give the classical sheath parameters. When the monoenergetic electron beam propagates through the plasma, the fluid model with proposed boundary conditions gives the results, which are in qualitative agreement with the results obtained earlier in M. Sharifian and B. Shokri, Phys. Plasmas 14, 093503 (2007). However, dynamics and parameters of the plasma sheath are different.

  17. The application of metal artifact reduction (MAR) in CT scans for radiation oncology by monoenergetic extrapolation with a DECT scanner.

    PubMed

    Schwahofer, Andrea; Bär, Esther; Kuchenbecker, Stefan; Grossmann, J Günter; Kachelrieß, Marc; Sterzing, Florian

    2015-12-01

    Metal artifacts in computed tomography CT images are one of the main problems in radiation oncology as they introduce uncertainties to target and organ at risk delineation as well as dose calculation. This study is devoted to metal artifact reduction (MAR) based on the monoenergetic extrapolation of a dual energy CT (DECT) dataset. In a phantom study the CT artifacts caused by metals with different densities: aluminum (ρ Al=2.7 g/cm(3)), titanium (ρ Ti=4.5 g/cm(3)), steel (ρ steel=7.9 g/cm(3)) and tungsten (ρ W=19.3g/cm(3)) have been investigated. Data were collected using a clinical dual source dual energy CT (DECT) scanner (Siemens Sector Healthcare, Forchheim, Germany) with tube voltages of 100 kV and 140 kV(Sn). For each tube voltage the data set in a given volume was reconstructed. Based on these two data sets a voxel by voxel linear combination was performed to obtain the monoenergetic data sets. The results were evaluated regarding the optical properties of the images as well as the CT values (HU) and the dosimetric consequences in computed treatment plans. A data set without metal substitute served as the reference. Also, a head and neck patient with dental fillings (amalgam ρ=10 g/cm(3)) was scanned with a single energy CT (SECT) protocol and a DECT protocol. The monoenergetic extrapolation was performed as described above and evaluated in the same way. Visual assessment of all data shows minor reductions of artifacts in the images with aluminum and titanium at a monoenergy of 105 keV. As expected, the higher the densities the more distinctive are the artifacts. For metals with higher densities such as steel or tungsten, no artifact reduction has been achieved. Likewise in the CT values, no improvement by use of the monoenergetic extrapolation can be detected. The dose was evaluated at a point 7 cm behind the isocenter of a static field. Small improvements (around 1%) can be seen with 105 keV. However, the dose uncertainty remains of the order of 10

  18. TU-F-18A-09: CT Number Stability Across Patient Sizes Using Virtual-Monoenergetic Dual-Energy CT

    SciTech Connect

    Michalak, G; Grimes, J; Fletcher, J; McCollough, C; Halaweish, A

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Virtual-monoenergetic imaging uses dual-energy CT data to synthesize images corresponding to a single photon energy, thereby reducing beam-hardening artifacts. This work evaluated the ability of a commercial virtual-monoenergetic algorithm to achieve stable CT numbers across patient sizes. Methods: Test objects containing a range of iodine and calcium hydroxyapatite concentrations were placed inside 8 torso-shaped water phantoms, ranging in lateral width from 15 to 50 cm, and scanned on a dual-source CT system (Siemens Somatom Force). Single-energy scans were acquired from 70-150 kV in 10 kV increments; dual-energy scans were acquired using 4 energy pairs (low energy: 70, 80, 90, and 100 kV; high energy: 150 kV + 0.6 mm Sn). CTDIvol was matched for all single- and dual-energy scans for a given phantom size. All scans used 128×0.6 mm collimation and were reconstructed with 1-mm thickness at 0.8-mm increment and a medium smooth body kernel. Monoenergetic images were generated using commercial software (syngo Via Dual Energy, VA30). Iodine contrast was calculated as the difference in mean iodine and water CT numbers from respective regions-of-interest in 10 consecutive images. Results: CT numbers remained stable as phantom width varied from 15 to 50 cm for all dual-energy data sets (except for at 50 cm using 70/150Sn due to photon starvation effects). Relative to the 15 cm phantom, iodine contrast was within 5.2% of the 70 keV value for phantom sizes up to 45 cm. At 90/150Sn, photon starvation did not occur at 50 cm, and iodine contrast in the 50-cm phantom was within 1.4% of the 15-cm phantom. Conclusion: Monoenergetic imaging, as implemented in the evaluated commercial system, eliminated the variation in CT numbers due to patient size, and may provide more accurate data for quantitative tasks, including radiation therapy treatment planning. Siemens Healthcare.

  19. Chemistry and deposition driven by monoenergetic synchrotron radiation: Initial studies of condensed silanes and water on noble metals

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, J.F. |; Chaturvedi, S.; Strongin, D.R.

    1995-12-31

    The authors extend previous work in broadband synchrotron radiation (SR) excitation of condensed multilayers to the study of reactions driven by monoenergetic SR. The long term goal of this work is to understand the importance of core-level excitation on the reactions that lead to materials growth. Results are presented for two systems of interest: formation of silica from Si(CH{sub 3}){sub 4} and H{sub 2}O mixtures with 90 eV irradiation (below the core levels) and the energy dependence of the reaction of SiH{sub 4} and H{sub 2}O.

  20. 750 GeV diphoton excess

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altmannshofer, Wolfgang; Galloway, Jamison; Gori, Stefania; Kagan, Alexander L.; Martin, Adam; Zupan, Jure

    2016-05-01

    We explore several perturbative scenarios in which the diphoton excess at 750 GeV can potentially be explained: a scalar singlet, a two Higgs doublet model (2HDM), a 2HDM with an extra singlet, and the decays of heavier resonances, both vector and scalar. We draw the following conclusions: (i) due to gauge invariance a 750 GeV scalar singlet can accommodate the observed excess more readily than a scalar S U (2 )L doublet; (ii) scalar singlet production via gluon fusion is one option, however, vector boson fusion can also provide a large enough rate, (iii) 2HDMs with an extra singlet and no extra fermions can only give a signal in a severely tuned region of the parameter space; (iv) decays of heavier resonances can give a large enough diphoton signal at 750 GeV, while simultaneously explaining the absence of a signal at 8 TeV.

  1. JEFFERSON LAB 12 GEV CEBAF UPGRADE

    SciTech Connect

    Rode, C. H.

    2010-04-09

    The existing continuous electron beam accelerator facility (CEBAF) at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF) is a 5-pass, recirculating cw electron Linac operating at approx6 GeV and is devoted to basic research in nuclear physics. The 12 GeV CEBAF Upgrade is a $310 M project, sponsored by the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Nuclear Physics, that will expand its research capabilities substantially by doubling the maximum energy and adding major new experimental apparatus. The project received construction approval in September 2008 and has started the major procurement process. The cryogenic aspects of the 12 GeV CEBAF Upgrade includes: doubling the accelerating voltages of the Linacs by adding ten new high-performance, superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) cryomodules (CMs) to the existing 42 1/4 cryomodules; doubling of the 2 K cryogenics plant; and the addition of eight superconducting magnets.

  2. Low Momentum Direct Photons in Au + Au collisions at √{ s} = 39 GeV and 62 . 4 GeV measured by the PHENIX Experiment at RHIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khachatryan, Vladimir; Phenix Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    Direct photons, which are produced during all stages of a heavy-ion collision, directly probe the conditions of their production environment. The large yield and large anisotropy of low momentum direct photons observed in 200 GeV Au + Au collisions pose a significant challenge to theoretical models. Measurements at lower collision energy may provide new insight on the origin of the low momentum direct photons. Direct photons are difficult to measure with electromagnetic calorimeters, in particular at low momentum, because of neutral hadron and minimal-ionizing particle contamination, large decay photon backgrounds, and worsening calorimeter resolution. Therefore PHENIX has measured the direct photons at √{ s} = 200 GeV via their external conversion to di-electron pairs. This method virtually eliminates the hadron contamination due to a very clean photon identification based on di-electron pair. The same method is also used in our current analysis of the direct photons at two lower energies. We will present the current status on the measurements of the low momentum direct photons at √{ s} = 39 GeV and 62 . 4 GeV.

  3. Monoenergetic proton backlighter for measuring E and B fields and for radiographing implosions and high-energy density plasmas (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Li, C. K.; Seguin, F. H.; Frenje, J. A.; Rygg, J. R.; Petrasso, R. D.; Town, R. P. J.; Amendt, P. A.; Hatchett, S. P.; Landen, O. L.; Mackinnon, A. J.; Patel, P. K.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Knauer, J. P.; Sangster, T. C.; Stoeckl, C.

    2006-10-15

    A novel monoenergetic proton backlighter source and matched imaging detector have been utilized on the OMEGA laser system to study electric (E) and magnetic (B) fields generated by laser-plasma interactions and will be utilized in the future to radiograph implosions and high-energy density (HED) plasmas. The backlighter consists of an imploding glass microballoon with D {sup 3}He fuel, producing 14.7 MeV D {sup 3}He protons and 3 MeV DD protons that are then passed through a mesh that divides the protons into beamlets. For quantitative study of E+B field structure, monoenergetic protons have several unique advantages compared to the broad energy spectrum used in previous experiments. Recent experiments have been performed with a single laser beam (intensity of {approx}10{sup 14} W/cm{sup 2}) interacting with a CH foil, and B fields of {approx}0.5 MG and E fields of {approx}1.5x10{sup 8} V/m have been measured using proton deflectometry. LASNEX simulations are being used to interpret these experiments. Additional information will also be presented on the application of this technique to measuring E and B fields associated with Hohlraums and directly driven implosions, to radiographically mapping the areal density ({rho}R) distribution in imploded capsules, and to radiographing HED plasmas.

  4. Tailored ion energy distributions on plasma electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Economou, Demetre J.

    2013-09-15

    As microelectronic device features continue to shrink approaching atomic dimensions, control of the ion energy distribution on the substrate during plasma etching and deposition becomes increasingly critical. The ion energy should be high enough to drive ion-assisted etching, but not too high to cause substrate damage or loss of selectivity. In many cases, a nearly monoenergetic ion energy distribution (IED) is desired to achieve highly selective etching. In this work, the author briefly reviews: (1) the fundamentals of development of the ion energy distribution in the sheath and (2) methods to control the IED on plasma electrodes. Such methods include the application of “tailored” voltage waveforms on an electrode in continuous wave plasmas, or the application of synchronous bias on a “boundary electrode” during a specified time window in the afterglow of pulsed plasmas.

  5. Measurements of low energy auroral ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urban, A.

    1981-12-01

    Ion measurements in the energy range 0.1-30 keV observed during the 'Substorm Phenomena' and 'Porcupine' campaigns are summarized. Acceleration of the ions by an electrostatic field aligned parallel to the magnetic field is identified and found to be accompanied by intense electron precipitation. On the other hand, deceleration of the ions is observed in other field-aligned current sheets which are indicated by the electron and magnetic field measurements. Temporal successive monoenergetic ion variations suggest energy dispersion and a location of the source region at 9 earth radii. What is more, ion fluxes higher than those of the electrons are measured at pitch angles parallel to the magnetic field. It is noted that each of the examples was observed during different flights.

  6. Estimating Shock Spectra: Extensions beyond GEVS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Igusa, Takeru; Maahs, Gordon L.

    2008-01-01

    Shock response spectra (SRS) are the standard description of some vibration environments on spacecraft for equipment qualification. For shock events produced by pyrotechnic devices, SRS can have significant frequency content as high as 10 kHz. It is difficult to construct and analyze finite element models that can resolve dynamic behavior at such high frequencies. GEVS provides simple, empirically based methods for approximating the SRS for a wide variety of shock events. It begins with a base SRS according to the type of pyrotechnic device, and then provides attenuation relations to adjust this SRS according to distance from the shock source, the type of structural frame and the properties of any structural joints between the source and equipment. In our paper we extend GEVS to include more detailed information about the spacecraft structure. To retain the general framework of GEVS, we begin with a base SRS and adjust this SRS using attenuation relations. We use modal and traveling wave concepts to derive the attenuation relations for simple canonical structures. Then we show how these concepts can be used to analyze more complex structures using finite element mode shapes to explicitly calculate the attenuation factors. Since the low- to mid-frequency finite element modal information is extrapolated to obtain the low- to high-frequency attenuation relations, the resulting attenuated SRS is formulated as an upper bound rather than as mean predicted values. We illustrate the extended GEVS approach by analyzing the impact response of composite tubes and the shock response of the STEREO spacecraft.

  7. Nonintrusive Emittance Measurement of 1GeV H- Beam with a Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yun; Aleksandrov, Alexander V; Long, Cary D; Menshov, Alexander A; Pogge, James R; Webster, Anthony W; Zhukov, Alexander P

    2012-01-01

    A laser wire based transverse phase space measurement system has been developed at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS). The system allows a nonintrusive measurement of 1GeV hydrogen ion (H-) beam at the high energy beam transport (HEBT). This paper describes the design, installation, and measurement performance of the system. Major technical challenges in the implementation and commissioning of the nonintrusive phase space diagnostics at high brightness particle accelerator facilities are discussed.

  8. Future Research Program at JLab: 12 GeV and Beyond

    SciTech Connect

    Kees de Jager

    2007-09-06

    The project to upgrade the CEBAF accelerator at Jefferson Lab to 12 GeV is presented. Most of the research program supporting that upgrade, will require a highly polarized beam, as will be illustrated by a few selected examples. To carry out that research program will require an extensively upgraded instrumentation in two of the existing experimental halls and the addition of a fourth hall. The plans for a high-luminosity electron-ion collider are briefly discussed.

  9. Future Spin Physics at JLab: 12 GeV and Beyond

    SciTech Connect

    Kees de Jager

    2006-10-02

    The project to upgrade the CEBAF accelerator at Jefferson Lab to 12 GeV is presented. Most of the research program supporting that upgrade, will require a highly polarized beam, as will be illustrated by a few selected examples. To carry out that research program will require an extensively upgraded instrumentation in two of the existing experimental halls and the addition of a fourth hall. The plans for a high-luminosity electron-ion collider are briefly discussed.

  10. Research in atomic and applied physics using a 6-GeV synchrotron source

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, K.W.

    1985-12-01

    The Division of Atomic and Applied Physics in the Department of Applied Science at Brookhaven National Laboratory conducts a broad program of research using ion beams and synchrotron radiation for experiments in atomic physics and nuclear analytical techniques and applications. Many of the experiments would benefit greatly from the use of high energy, high intensity photon beams from a 6-GeV synchrotron source. A survey of some of the specific scientific possibilities is presented.

  11. Λ Λ Correlation Function in Au +Au Collisions at √{sN N }=200 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamczyk, L.; Adkins, J. K.; Agakishiev, G.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alekseev, I.; Alford, J.; Anson, C. D.; Aparin, A.; Arkhipkin, D.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Averichev, G. S.; Banerjee, A.; Beavis, D. R.; Bellwied, R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattarai, P.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L. C.; Bordyuzhin, I. G.; Borowski, W.; Bouchet, J.; Brandin, A. V.; Brovko, S. G.; Bültmann, S.; Bunzarov, I.; Burton, T. P.; Butterworth, J.; Caines, H.; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M.; Campbell, J. M.; Cebra, D.; Cendejas, R.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chaloupka, P.; Chang, Z.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, L.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Christie, W.; Chwastowski, J.; Codrington, M. J. M.; Contin, G.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Cui, X.; Das, S.; Davila Leyva, A.; De Silva, L. C.; Debbe, R. R.; Dedovich, T. G.; Deng, J.; Derevschikov, A. A.; Derradi de Souza, R.; di Ruzza, B.; Didenko, L.; Dilks, C.; Ding, F.; Djawotho, P.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Du, C. M.; Dunkelberger, L. E.; Dunlop, J. C.; Efimov, L. G.; Engelage, J.; Engle, K. S.; Eppley, G.; Eun, L.; Evdokimov, O.; Eyser, O.; Fatemi, R.; Fazio, S.; Fedorisin, J.; Filip, P.; Fisyak, Y.; Flores, C. E.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Garand, D.; Geurts, F.; Gibson, A.; Girard, M.; Gliske, S.; Greiner, L.; Grosnick, D.; Gunarathne, D. S.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, S.; Guryn, W.; Haag, B.; Hamed, A.; Han, L.-X.; Haque, R.; Harris, J. W.; Heppelmann, S.; Hirsch, A.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Horvat, S.; Huang, B.; Huang, H. Z.; Huang, X.; Huck, P.; Humanic, T. J.; Igo, G.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jang, H.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kalinkin, D.; Kang, K.; Kauder, K.; Ke, H. W.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Kesich, A.; Khan, Z. H.; Kikola, D. P.; Kisel, I.; Kisiel, A.; Koetke, D. D.; Kollegger, T.; Konzer, J.; Koralt, I.; Kosarzewski, L. K.; Kotchenda, L.; Kraishan, A. F.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Kulakov, I.; Kumar, L.; Kycia, R. A.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; Landry, K. D.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, J. H.; Li, C.; Li, W.; Li, X.; Li, X.; Li, Y.; Li, Z. M.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Lomnitz, M.; Longacre, R. S.; Luo, X.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, Y. G.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Majka, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Masui, H.; Matis, H. S.; McDonald, D.; McShane, T. S.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mohanty, B.; Mondal, M. M.; Morozov, D. A.; Mustafa, M. K.; Nandi, B. K.; Nasim, Md.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J. M.; Nigmatkulov, G.; Nogach, L. V.; Noh, S. Y.; Novak, J.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Oh, K.; Ohlson, A.; Okorokov, V.; Oldag, E. W.; Olvitt, D. L.; Page, B. S.; Pan, Y. X.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlak, T.; Pawlik, B.; Pei, H.; Perkins, C.; Pile, P.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Poljak, N.; Poniatowska, K.; Porter, J.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Pruthi, N. K.; Przybycien, M.; Putschke, J.; Qiu, H.; Quintero, A.; Ramachandran, S.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Riley, C. K.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Ross, J. F.; Roy, A.; Ruan, L.; Rusnak, J.; Rusnakova, O.; Sahoo, N. R.; Sahu, P. K.; Sakrejda, I.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sangaline, E.; Sarkar, A.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmah, A. M.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schmitz, N.; Seger, J.; Seyboth, P.; Shah, N.; Shahaliev, E.; Shanmuganathan, P. V.; Shao, M.; Sharma, B.; Shen, W. Q.; Shi, S. S.; Shou, Q. Y.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Simko, M.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, D.; Smirnov, N.; Solanki, D.; Sorensen, P.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Stevens, J. R.; Stock, R.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Sumbera, M.; Sun, X.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Y.; Sun, Z.; Surrow, B.; Svirida, D. N.; Symons, T. J. M.; Szelezniak, M. A.; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Tang, Z.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thomas, J. H.; Timmins, A. R.; Tlusty, D.; Tokarev, M.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R. E.; Tribedy, P.; Trzeciak, B. A.; Tsai, O. D.; Turnau, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Van Buren, G.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vandenbroucke, M.; Vanfossen, J. A.; Varma, R.; Vasconcelos, G. M. S.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Vertesi, R.; Videbæk, F.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Vossen, A.; Wada, M.; Wang, F.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, J. S.; Wang, X. L.; Wang, Y.; Wang, Y.; Webb, G.; Webb, J. C.; Westfall, G. D.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, S. W.; Witt, R.; Wu, Y. F.; Xiao, Z.; Xie, W.; Xin, K.; Xu, H.; Xu, J.; Xu, N.; Xu, Q. H.; Xu, Y.; Xu, Z.; Yan, W.; Yang, C.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Y.; Ye, Z.; Yepes, P.; Yi, L.; Yip, K.; Yoo, I.-K.; Yu, N.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zha, W.; Zhang, J. B.; Zhang, J. L.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, X. P.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhao, F.; Zhao, J.; Zhong, C.; Zhu, X.; Zhu, Y. H.; Zoulkarneeva, Y.; Zyzak, M.; STAR Collaboration

    2015-01-01

    We present Λ Λ correlation measurements in heavy-ion collisions for Au +Au collisions at √{sN N }=200 GeV using the STAR experiment at the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider. The Lednický-Lyuboshitz analytical model has been used to fit the data to obtain a source size, a scattering length and an effective range. Implications of the measurement of the Λ Λ correlation function and interaction parameters for dihyperon searches are discussed.

  12. A direct-drive exploding-pusher implosion as the first step in development of a monoenergetic charged-particle backlighting platform at the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenberg, M. J.; Zylstra, A. B.; Séguin, F. H.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Frenje, J. A.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Sio, H.; Waugh, C. J.; Sinenian, N.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R. D.; LePape, S.; Ma, T.; Mackinnon, A. J.; Rygg, J. R.; Amendt, P. A.; Bellei, C.; Benedetti, L. R.; Berzak Hopkins, L.; Bionta, R. M.; Casey, D. T.; Divol, L.; Edwards, M. J.; Glenn, S.; Glenzer, S. H.; Hicks, D. G.; Kimbrough, J. R.; Landen, O. L.; Lindl, J. D.; MacPhee, A.; McNaney, J. M.; Meezan, N. B.; Moody, J. D.; Moran, M. J.; Park, H.-S.; Pino, J.; Remington, B. A.; Robey, H.; Rosen, M. D.; Wilks, S. C.; Zacharias, R. A.; McKenty, P. W.; Hohenberger, M.; Radha, P. B.; Edgell, D.; Marshall, F. J.; Delettrez, J. A.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Betti, R.; Goncharov, V. N.; Knauer, J. P.; Sangster, T. C.; Herrmann, H. W.; Hoffman, N. M.; Kyrala, G. A.; Leeper, R. J.; Olson, R. E.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Nikroo, A.

    2016-03-01

    A thin-glass-shell, D3He-filled exploding-pusher inertial confinement fusion implosion at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) has been demonstrated as a proton source that serves as a promising first step toward development of a monoenergetic proton, alpha, and triton backlighting platform at the NIF. Among the key measurements, the D3He-proton emission on this experiment (shot N121128) has been well-characterized spectrally, temporally, and in terms of emission isotropy, revealing a highly monoenergetic (ΔE / E ∼ 4 %) and isotropic source (~3% proton fluence variation and ~0.5% proton energy variation). On a similar shot (N130129, with D2 fill), the DD-proton spectrum has been obtained as well, illustrating that monoenergetic protons of multiple energies may be utilized in a single experiment. These results, and experiments on OMEGA, point toward future steps in the development of a precision, monoenergetic proton, alpha, and triton source that can readily be implemented at the NIF for backlighting a broad range of high energy density physics (HEDP) experiments in which fields and flows are manifest, and also utilized for studies of stopping power in warm dense matter and in classical plasmas.

  13. A direct-drive exploding-pusher implosion as the first step in development of a monoenergetic charged-particle backlighting platforn at the National Ignition Facility

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Rosenberg, M. J.; Zylstra, A. B.; Seguin, F. H.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Frenje, J. A.; Johnson, M. Gatu; Sio, H.; Waugh, C. J.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R. D.; et al

    2016-01-18

    A thin-glass-shell, D3He-filled exploding-pusher inertial confinement fusion implosion at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) has been demonstrated as a proton source that serves as a promising first step toward development of a monoenergetic proton, alpha, and triton backlighting platform at the NIF. Among the key measurements, the D3He-proton emission on this experiment (shot N121128) has been well-characterized spectrally, temporally, and in terms of emission isotropy, revealing a highly monoenergetic (ΔE/E~4%) and isotropic source (~3% proton fluence variation and ~0.5% proton energy variation). On a similar shot (N130129, with D2 fill), the DD-proton spectrum has been obtained as well, illustrating thatmore » monoenergetic protons of multiple energies may be utilized in a single experiment. In conclusion, these results, and experiments on OMEGA, point toward future steps in the development of a precision, monoenergetic proton, alpha, and triton source that can readily be implemented at the NIF for backlighting a broad range of high energy density physics (HEDP) experiments in which fields and flows are manifest, and also utilized for studies of stopping power in warm dense matter and in classical plasmas.« less

  14. Centrality and pseudorapidity dependence of elliptic flow for charged hadrons in Au+Au collisions at √(sNN)=200 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Back, B. B.; Baker, M. D.; Ballintijn, M.; Barton, D. S.; Betts, R. R.; Bickley, A. A.; Bindel, R.; Budzanowski, A.; Busza, W.; Carroll, A.; Decowski, M. P.; García, E.; George, N. K.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gushue, S.; Halliwell, C.; Hamblen, J.; Heintzelman, G. A.; Henderson, C.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Hołyński, R.; Holzman, B.; Iordanova, A.; Johnson, E.; Kane, J. L.; Katzy, J.; Khan, N.; Kucewicz, W.; Kulinich, P.; Kuo, C. M.; Lin, W. T.; Manly, S.; McLeod, D.; Mignerey, A. C.; Nguyen, M.; Nouicer, R.; Olszewski, A.; Pak, R.; Park, I. C.; Pernegger, H.; Reed, C.; Remsberg, L. P.; Reuter, M.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Rosenberg, L.; Sagerer, J.; Sarin, P.; Sawicki, P.; Skulski, W.; Steinberg, P.; Stephans, G. S.; Sukhanov, A.; Tang, J.-L.; Tonjes, M. B.; Trzupek, A.; Vale, C. M.; Nieuwenhuizen, G. J.; Verdier, R.; Veres, G. I.; Wolfs, F. L.; Wosiek, B.; Woźniak, K.; Wuosmaa, A. H.; Wysłouch, B.

    2005-11-01

    This Rapid Communication describes the measurement of elliptic flow for charged particles in Au+Au collisions at √(sNN)=200 GeV using the PHOBOS detector at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. The measured azimuthal anisotropy is presented over a wide range of pseudorapidity for three broad collision centrality classes for the first time at this energy. Two distinct methods of extracting the flow signal were used to reduce systematic uncertainties. The elliptic flow falls sharply with increasing |η| at 200 GeV for all the centralities studied, as observed for minimum-bias collisions at √(sNN)=130 GeV.

  15. Dual isotope notch observer for isotope identification, assay and imaging with mono-energetic gamma-ray sources

    SciTech Connect

    Barty, Christopher P.J.

    2013-02-05

    A dual isotope notch observer for isotope identification, assay and imaging with mono-energetic gamma-ray sources includes a detector arrangement consists of three detectors downstream from the object under observation. The latter detector, which operates as a beam monitor, is an integrating detector that monitors the total beam power arriving at its surface. The first detector and the middle detector each include an integrating detector surrounding a foil. The foils of these two detectors are made of the same atomic material, but each foil is a different isotope, e.g., the first foil may comprise U235 and second foil may comprise U238. The integrating detectors surrounding these pieces of foil measure the total power scattered from the foil and can be similar in composition to the final beam monitor. Non-resonant photons will, after calibration, scatter equally from both foils.

  16. Optically active vacancies in GaN grown on Si substrates probed using a monoenergetic positron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Uedono, Akira Zhang, Yang; Yoshihara, Nakaaki; Fujishima, Tatsuya; Palacios, Tomás; Cao, Yu; Laboutin, Oleg; Johnson, Wayne; Ishibashi, Shoji; Sumiya, Masatomo

    2014-02-24

    Native defects in GaN layers grown on Si substrates by metal organic chemical vapor deposition have been studied using a monoenergetic positron beam. Measurements of Doppler broadening spectra of the annihilation radiation for GaN layers showed that optically active vacancy-type defects were formed in the layers. Charge transition of the defects due to electron capture was found to occur when the layers were irradiated by photons with energy above 2.71 eV. The concentration of such defects increased after 600–800 °C annealing, but the defects have not been annealed out even at 1000 °C. They were identified as Ga-vacancy-type defects, such as complexes between Ga vacancies and carbon impurities, and the relationship between their charge transition and optical properties were discussed.

  17. Vacancies and electron trapping centers in acidic ammonothermal GaN probed by a monoenergetic positron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uedono, Akira; Tsukada, Yusuke; Mikawa, Yutaka; Mochizuki, Tae; Fujisawa, Hideo; Ikeda, Hirotaka; Kurihara, Kaori; Fujito, Kenji; Terada, Shigeru; Ishibashi, Shoji; Chichibu, Shigefusa F.

    2016-08-01

    Defects in ammonothermal GaN have been studied using a monoenergetic positron beam. Through measurements of Doppler broadening spectra of the annihilation radiation, the major defect species was identified as a Ga vacancy coupled with impurities such as oxygen and/or hydrogen. Those defects were found to be stable even after annealing at 1000 °C. The shape parameter S for the Doppler broadening spectrum corresponding to positron annihilation at the surface was found to be decreased by illumination within energy ranges of 1.5-2.6 eV and 3.2-3.6 eV. This phenomenon is attributed to the suppression of recombinations between holes and electrons due to trapping centers, which can hold electrons for a long time, and a resultant accumulation of holes at the surface. Recovery of the S value required almost one day, but it was shortened by the annealing at 1000 °C.

  18. Pion femtoscopy in p + p collisions at {radical}(s)=200 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Aggarwal, M. M.; Bhati, A. K.; Pruthi, N. K.; Ahammed, Z.; Dong, X.; Grebenyuk, O.; Hjort, E.; Jacobs, P.; Kikola, D. P.; Kiryluk, J.; Klein, S. R.; Masui, H.; Matis, H. S.; Odyniec, G.; Olson, D.; Ploskon, M. A.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Powell, C. B.; Ritter, H. G.; Rose, A.

    2011-06-15

    The STAR Collaboration at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider has measured two-pion correlation functions from p+p collisions at {radical}(s)=200 GeV. Spatial scales are extracted via a femtoscopic analysis of the correlations, though this analysis is complicated by the presence of strong nonfemtoscopic effects. Our results are put into the context of the world data set of femtoscopy in hadron-hadron collisions. We present the first direct comparison of femtoscopy in p+p and heavy ion collisions, under identical analysis and detector conditions.

  19. Pion femtoscopy in p + p collisions at s=200 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alakhverdyants, A. V.; Alekseev, I.; Alford, J.; Anderson, B. D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G. S.; Balewski, J.; Barnby, L. S.; Baumgart, S.; Beavis, D. R.; Bellwied, R.; Betancourt, M. J.; Betts, R. R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Biritz, B.; Bland, L. C.; Bonner, B. E.; Bouchet, J.; Braidot, E.; Brandin, A. V.; Bridgeman, A.; Bruna, E.; Bueltmann, S.; Bunzarov, I.; Burton, T. P.; Cai, X. Z.; Caines, H.; Calderón de La Barca Sánchez, M.; Catu, O.; Cebra, D.; Cendejas, R.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, J. Y.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Choi, K. E.; Christie, W.; Chung, P.; Clarke, R. F.; Codrington, M. J. M.; Corliss, R.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Das, D.; Dash, S.; Davila Leyva, A.; de Silva, L. C.; Debbe, R. R.; Dedovich, T. G.; Derevschikov, A. A.; Derradi de Souza, R.; Didenko, L.; Djawotho, P.; Dogra, S. M.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Dunlop, J. C.; Dutta Mazumdar, M. R.; Efimov, L. G.; Elhalhuli, E.; Elnimr, M.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Eun, L.; Evdokimov, O.; Fachini, P.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Fersch, R. G.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Ganti, M. S.; Garcia-Solis, E. J.; Geromitsos, A.; Geurts, F.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gorbunov, Y. N.; Gordon, A.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Guertin, S. M.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, N.; Guryn, W.; Haag, B.; Hamed, A.; Han, L.-X.; Harris, J. W.; Hays-Wehle, J. P.; Heinz, M.; Heppelmann, S.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffman, A. M.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Huang, B.; Huang, H. Z.; Humanic, T. J.; Huo, L.; Igo, G.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jena, C.; Jin, F.; Jones, C. L.; Jones, P. G.; Joseph, J.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kajimoto, K.; Kang, K.; Kapitan, J.; Kauder, K.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Kettler, D.; Kikola, D. P.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Klein, S. R.; Knospe, A. G.; Kocoloski, A.; Koetke, D. D.; Kollegger, T.; Konzer, J.; Koralt, I.; Koroleva, L.; Korsch, W.; Kotchenda, L.; Kouchpil, V.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Krus, M.; Kumar, L.; Kurnadi, P.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; Lapointe, S.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, C.-H.; Lee, J. H.; Leight, W.; Levine, M. J.; Li, C.; Li, L.; Li, N.; Li, W.; Li, X.; Li, X.; Li, Y.; Li, Z. M.; Lin, G.; Lindenbaum, S. J.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Liu, H.; Liu, J.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Longacre, R. S.; Love, W. A.; Lu, Y.; Lukashov, E. V.; Luo, X.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, Y. G.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Majka, R.; Mall, O. I.; Mangotra, L. K.; Manweiler, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Masui, H.; Matis, H. S.; Matulenko, Yu. A.; McDonald, D.; McShane, T. S.; Meschanin, A.; Milner, R.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mischke, A.; Mitrovski, M. K.; Mohanty, B.; Mondal, M. M.; Morozov, B.; Morozov, D. A.; Munhoz, M. G.; Nandi, B. K.; Nattrass, C.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J. M.; Netrakanti, P. K.; Ng, M. J.; Nogach, L. V.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Okorokov, V.; Oldag, E. W.; Olson, D.; Pachr, M.; Page, B. S.; Pal, S. K.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Perevoztchikov, V.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Phatak, S. C.; Pile, P.; Planinic, M.; Ploskon, M. A.; Pluta, J.; Plyku, D.; Poljak, N.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Potukuchi, B. V. K. S.; Powell, C. B.; Prindle, D.; Pruneau, C.; Pruthi, N. K.; Pujahari, P. R.; Putschke, J.; Qiu, H.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Redwine, R.; Reed, R.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Rose, A.; Roy, C.; Ruan, L.; Sahoo, R.; Sakai, S.; Sakrejda, I.; Sakuma, T.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sangaline, E.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmitz, N.; Schuster, T. R.; Seele, J.; Seger, J.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Seyboth, P.; Shahaliev, E.; Shao, M.; Sharma, M.; Shi, S. S.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Simon, F.; Singaraju, R. N.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, N.; Sorensen, P.; Sowinski, J.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Staszak, D.; Stevens, J. R.; Stock, R.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Suarez, M. C.; Subba, N. L.; Sumbera, M.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Y.; Sun, Z.; Surrow, B.; Svirida, D. N.; Symons, T. J. M.; Szanto de Toledo, A.; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Tang, Z.; Tarini, L. H.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thein, D.; Thomas, J. H.; Tian, J.; Timmins, A. R.; Timoshenko, S.; Tlusty, D.; Tokarev, M.; Trainor, T. A.; Tram, V. N.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R. E.; Tsai, O. D.; Ulery, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; van Buren, G.; van Leeuwen, M.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vanfossen, J. A., Jr.; Varma, R.; Vasconcelos, G. M. S.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Videbaek, F.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S. A.; Wada, M.; Walker, M.; Wang, F.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, J. S.; Wang, Q.; Wang, X. L.; Wang, Y.; Webb, G.; Webb, J. C.; Westfall, G. D.; Whitten, C., Jr.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, S. W.; Witt, R.; Wu, Y. F.; Xie, W.; Xu, H.; Xu, N.; Xu, Q. H.; Xu, W.; Xu, Y.; Xu, Z.; Xue, L.; Yang, Y.; Yepes, P.; Yip, K.; Yoo, I.-K.; Yue, Q.; Zawisza, M.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zhan, W.; Zhang, J. B.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, W. M.; Zhang, X. P.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhao, J.; Zhong, C.; Zhou, J.; Zhou, W.; Zhu, X.; Zhu, Y. H.; Zoulkarneev, R.; Zoulkarneeva, Y.

    2011-06-01

    The STAR Collaboration at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider has measured two-pion correlation functions from p+p collisions at s=200 GeV. Spatial scales are extracted via a femtoscopic analysis of the correlations, though this analysis is complicated by the presence of strong nonfemtoscopic effects. Our results are put into the context of the world data set of femtoscopy in hadron-hadron collisions. We present the first direct comparison of femtoscopy in p+p and heavy ion collisions, under identical analysis and detector conditions.

  20. Acceleration of laser-driven ion bunch from double-layer thin foils

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, X.; Liang, E.; Yu, W.; Yu, M. Y.

    2012-05-15

    Generation of monoenergetic ion bunch from a double-layer thin-foil target irradiated by an intense linearly polarized laser pulse is investigated using two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation. The protons in the front low-density hydrogen target layer accelerated by the space-charge field of the laser-driven hot electrons can penetrate through the high-Z high-mass and high-density ion layer, resulting in an energetic proton bunch. A part of the latter is further accelerated by the space-charge field of the hot electrons in the vacuum behind the high-Z ion layer. With this scheme, quasi-monoenergetic proton bunches can be produced using presently available laser pulses of moderate contrast and duration.

  1. Ion beam requirements for fast ignition of inertial fusion targets

    SciTech Connect

    Honrubia, J. J.; Murakami, M.

    2015-01-15

    Ion beam requirements for fast ignition are investigated by numerical simulation taking into account new effects, such as ion beam divergence, not included before. We assume that ions are generated by the TNSA scheme in a curved foil placed inside a re-entrant cone and focused on the cone apex or beyond. From the focusing point to the compressed core, ions propagate with a given divergence angle. Ignition energies are obtained for two compressed fuel configurations heated by proton and carbon ion beams. The dependence of the ignition energies on the beam divergence angle and on the position of the ion beam focusing point has been analyzed. Comparison between TNSA and quasi-monoenergetic ions is also shown.

  2. Meson Spectroscopy At Jlab At 12 Gev

    SciTech Connect

    Fegan, Stuart

    2014-12-01

    The 12 GeV upgrade to the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) at Jefferson Lab will enable a new generation of experiments in hadronic nuclear physics, seeking to address fundamental questions in our understanding of QCD. The existence of exotic states, suggested by both quark models and lattice calculations, would allow gluonic degrees of freedom to be explored, and may help explain the role played by gluons in the QCD interaction. This article will review the meson spectroscopy program being planned at the lab following the 12 GeV upgrade, utilising real and quasi-real photon beams in two of the lab's four experimental halls, whose distinct capabilities will enable an extensive set of spectroscopy experiments to be performed at the same facility.

  3. Laser-driven wavebreaking, electron trapping, and mono-energetic beam production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esarey, Eric

    2006-10-01

    Recent breakthrough results reported in Nature demonstrate that laser-plasma accelerators can produce high quality (e.g., narrow energy spread) electron bunches at the 100 MeV level that may be useful for numerous applications. More recently, high quality electron beams at 1 GeV were produced in experiments at LBNL using 40 TW laser pulse interacting with a 3.3 cm plasma channel. In these experiments, the accelerated electrons were self-trapped from the background plasma, often attributed to the process of wavebreaking. Using a warm fluid model, a general analytic theory of wavebreaking has been developed that is valid for all regimes of interest, i.e., arbitrary temperature and phase velocity. This theory indicates that the maximum electric field obtainable by a relativistic plasma wave is lower that previously calculated. The relation between wavebreaking and particle trapping is discussed, and various quantities, such as the fraction of electrons trapped (i.e., the dark current), are calculated. A variety of methods for particle trapping relevant to present experiments, including 2D wavebreaking, density ramps, and laser injection, will be described. Limitations from dephasing and pump depletion will be summarized. Also presented will be 2D and 3D simulations modeling the production high quality electron beams from laser-plasma accelerators. C.G.R. Geddes et al., Nature 431, 538 (2004); S.P.D. Mangles et al., ibid., p. 535; J. Faure et al., ibid., p. 541. W.P. Leemans et al., submitted. C.B. Schroeder et al., Phys. Rev. E bf 72, 055401 (2005). C.B. Schroeder et al., Phys. Plasmas 13, 033103 (2006). G. Fubiani et al., Phys. Rev. E 73, 026402 (2006).

  4. Booster 6-GeV study

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Xi; Ankenbrandt, Charles M.; Pellico, William A.; Lackey, James; Padilla, Rene; Norem, J.; /Argonne

    2004-12-01

    Since a wider aperture has been obtained along the Booster beam line, this opens the opportunity for Booster running a higher intensity beam than ever before. Sooner or later, the available RF accelerating voltage will become a new limit for the beam intensity. Either by increasing the RFSUM or by reducing the accelerating rate can achieve the similar goal. The motivation for the 6-GeV study is to gain the relative accelerating voltage via a slower acceleration.

  5. Electron-ion collider eRHIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litvinenko, Vladimir N.

    In this article, we describe our planned future electron-ion collider (EIC), based on the existing Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) hadron facility, with two intersecting superconducting rings, each 3.8 km in circumference [1]. We plan to add a polarized electron beam with energy tunable within the 5-30-GeV range to collide with variety of species in the existing RHIC accelerator complex, from polarized protons with a maximum energy of 250 GeV, to heavy, fully striped ions with energies up to 100 GeV/u.

  6. Measurement of D* mesons in jets from p+p collisions at s=200GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abelev, B. I.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Anderson, B. D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G. S.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L. S.; Baudot, J.; Baumgart, S.; Beavis, D. R.; Bellwied, R.; Benedosso, F.; Betancourt, M. J.; Betts, R. R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Biritz, B.; Bland, L. C.; Bombara, M.; Bonner, B. E.; Botje, M.; Bouchet, J.; Braidot, E.; Brandin, A. V.; Bruna, E.; Bueltmann, S.; Burton, T. P.; Bystersky, M.; Cai, X. Z.; Caines, H.; Sánchez, M. Calderón De La Barca; Catu, O.; Cebra, D.; Cendejas, R.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, J. Y.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Choi, K. E.; Christie, W.; Clarke, R. F.; Codrington, M. J. M.; Corliss, R.; Cormier, T. M.; Cosentino, M. R.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Das, D.; Dash, S.; Daugherity, M.; Silva, L. C. De; Dedovich, T. G.; Dephillips, M.; Derevschikov, A. A.; de Souza, R. Derradi; Didenko, L.; Djawotho, P.; Dogra, S. M.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Du, F.; Dunlop, J. C.; Mazumdar, M. R. Dutta; Edwards, W. R.; Efimov, L. G.; Elhalhuli, E.; Elnimr, M.; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Eun, L.; Fachini, P.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Feng, A.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Gaillard, L.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Ganti, M. S.; Garcia-Solis, E. J.; Geromitsos, A.; Geurts, F.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gorbunov, Y. N.; Gordon, A.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Grube, B.; Guertin, S. M.; Guimaraes, K. S. F. F.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, N.; Guryn, W.; Haag, B.; Hallman, T. J.; Hamed, A.; Harris, J. W.; He, W.; Heinz, M.; Heppelmann, S.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffman, A. M.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Huang, H. Z.; Humanic, T. J.; Igo, G.; Iordanova, A.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jakl, P.; Jena, C.; Jin, F.; Jones, C. L.; Jones, P. G.; Joseph, J.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kajimoto, K.; Kang, K.; Kapitan, J.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Kettler, D.; Khodyrev, V. Yu.; Kikola, D. P.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Klein, S. R.; Knospe, A. G.; Kocoloski, A.; Koetke, D. D.; Kopytine, M.; Korsch, W.; Kotchenda, L.; Kouchpil, V.; Kravtsov, P.; Kravtsov, V. I.; Krueger, K.; Krus, M.; Kuhn, C.; Kumar, L.; Kurnadi, P.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; Lapointe, S.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, C.-H.; Lee, J. H.; Leight, W.; Levine, M. J.; Li, N.; Li, C.; Li, Y.; Lin, G.; Lindenbaum, S. J.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Liu, J.; Liu, L.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Longacre, R. S.; Love, W. A.; Lu, Y.; Ludlam, T.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, Y. G.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Majka, R.; Mall, O. I.; Mangotra, L. K.; Manweiler, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Matis, H. S.; Matulenko, Yu. A.; McShane, T. S.; Meschanin, A.; Milner, R.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mischke, A.; Mitchell, J.; Mohanty, B.; Morozov, D. A.; Munhoz, M. G.; Nandi, B. K.; Nattrass, C.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J. M.; Netrakanti, P. K.; Ng, M. J.; Nogach, L. V.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Okada, H.; Okorokov, V.; Olson, D.; Pachr, M.; Page, B. S.; Pal, S. K.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Perevoztchikov, V.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Phatak, S. C.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Poljak, N.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Potukuchi, B. V. K. S.; Prindle, D.; Pruneau, C.; Pruthi, N. K.; Putschke, J.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Redwine, R.; Reed, R.; Ridiger, A.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Rose, A.; Roy, C.; Ruan, L.; Russcher, M. J.; Sahoo, R.; Sakrejda, I.; Sakuma, T.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sarsour, M.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmitz, N.; Seger, J.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Seyboth, P.; Shabetai, A.; Shahaliev, E.; Shao, M.; Sharma, M.; Shi, S. S.; Shi, X.-H.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Simon, F.; Singaraju, R. N.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, N.; Snellings, R.; Sorensen, P.; Sowinski, J.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stadnik, A.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Staszak, D.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Suarez, M. C.; Subba, N. L.; Sumbera, M.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Y.; Sun, Z.; Surrow, B.; Symons, T. J. M.; de Toledo, A. Szanto; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Tang, Z.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thein, D.; Thomas, J. H.; Tian, J.; Timmins, A. R.; Timoshenko, S.; Tlusty, D.; Tokarev, M.; Trainor, T. A.; Tram, V. N.; Trattner, A. L.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R. E.; Tsai, O. D.; Ulery, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; van Buren, G.; van Leeuwen, M.; Molen, A. M. Vander; Vanfossen, J. A., Jr.; Varma, R.; Vasconcelos, G. M. S.; Vasilevski, I. M.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Videbaek, F.; Vigdor, S. E.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S. A.; Wada, M.; Waggoner, W. T.; Walker, M.; Wang, F.; Wang, G.; Wang, J. S.; Wang, Q.; Wang, X.; Wang, X. L.; Wang, Y.; Webb, G.; Webb, J. C.; Westfall, G. D.; Whitten, C., Jr.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, S. W.; Witt, R.; Wu, Y.; Xie, W.; Xu, N.; Xu, Q. H.; Xu, Y.; Xu, Z.; Yang, Y.; Yepes, P.; Yoo, I.-K.; Yue, Q.; Zawisza, M.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zhan, W.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, W. M.; Zhang, X. P.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhao, Y.; Zhong, C.; Zhou, J.; Zoulkarneev, R.; Zoulkarneeva, Y.; Zuo, J. X.

    2009-06-01

    We report the measurement of charged D* mesons in inclusive jets produced in proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy s=200GeV with the STAR experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. For D* mesons with fractional momenta 0.2GeV mean transverse energy, the production rate is found to be N(D*++D*-)/N(jet)=0.015±0.008(stat)±0.007(sys). This rate is consistent with perturbative QCD evaluation of gluon splitting into a pair of charm quarks and subsequent hadronization.

  7. High-current ion-ring accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Sudan, R.N. )

    1993-03-15

    An accelerator concept is outlined which enables 10[sup 15] to 10[sup 18] ions in the form of a charge neutralized ion ring to be accelerated to GeV energies. A repetition rate of 10 Hz will deliver an average current in the range of 0.1 A.

  8. Ion acceleration by petawatt class laser pulses and pellet compression in a fast ignition scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benedetti, C.; Londrillo, P.; Liseykina, T. V.; Macchi, A.; Sgattoni, A.; Turchetti, G.

    2009-07-01

    target, produce 2×1011 monoenergetic ions of 0.5 GeV with 30% efficiency. Fully 3D simulations show a non-dramatic degradation of the beam properties. In order to reach regimes interesting for the inertial fusion, 1-2 kJ lasers with pulse duration in the 100-500 fs range should be considered with an illuminated surface of few hundreds squared microns, which would insure ˜1012 ions per shot to be produced. The efficiencies would range from 30% to 70% so that the energy of ions would vary from 0.3 to 1.5 kJ. With a few hundreds of such lasers a total energy of ˜0.2-0.6 MJ, required in the fast ignition scenario, would be reached. By tailoring the space distribution of the beams and their time sequence an adiabatic compression may be reached avoiding the issues related to the charge neutralization in the final focus.

  9. Upgrade of CEBAF from 6-GeV To 12-GeV: Status

    SciTech Connect

    Harwood, Leigh H.

    2013-04-01

    The CEBAF accelerator is being upgraded from 6 GeV to 12 GeV by the US Department of Energy. The accelerator upgrade is being done within the existing tunnel footprint. The accelerator upgrade includes: 10 new srfbased high-performance cryomodules plus RF systems, doubling the 2K helium plants capability, upgrading the existing beamlines to operate at nearly double the original performance envelope, and adding a beamline to a new experimental area. Construction is over 75% complete with final completion projected for late FY13. Details of the upgrade and status of the work will be presented.

  10. Walking from 750 GeV to 950 GeV in the technipion zoo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuzaki, Shinya; Yamawaki, Koichi

    2016-06-01

    If the 750-GeV diphoton excess is identified with the color-singlet isosinglet technipion P0 (750) in the one-family walking technicolor model, as in our previous paper, then there should exist another color-singlet technipion-isotriplet one, P±,3, predicted at around 950 GeV independently of the dynamical details. The P±,3(950 ) are produced at the LHC via vector-boson and photon-fusion processes, predominantly decaying to W γ and γ γ , respectively. Those walking technicolor signals can be explored at run 2 or 3, which would further open the door for a plethora of other (colored) technipions.

  11. A CONCEPTUAL 3-GEV LANSCE LINAC UPGRADE FOR ENHANCED PROTON RADIOGRAPHY

    SciTech Connect

    Garnett, Robert W; Rybarcyk, Lawrence J.; Merrill, Frank E.; O'Hara, James F.; Rees, Daniel E.; Walstrom, Peter L.

    2012-05-14

    A conceptual design of a 3-GeV linac upgrade that would enable enhanced proton radiography at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) is presented. The upgrade is based on the use of superconducting accelerating cavities to increase the present LANSCE linac output energy from 800 MeV to 3 GeV. The LANSCE linac currently provides negative hydrogen ion (H{sup -}) and proton (H{sup +}) beams to several user facilities that support Isotope Production, NNSA Stockpile Stewardship, and Basic Energy Science programs. Required changes to the front-end, the accelerating structures, and to the RF systems to meet the new performance goals, and changes to the existing beam switchyard to maintain operations for a robust user program are also described.

  12. Neutral kaon interferometry in Au+Au collisions at sNN=200 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abelev, B. I.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Amonett, J.; Anderson, B. D.; Anderson, M.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G. S.; Bai, Y.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L. S.; Baudot, J.; Bekele, S.; Belaga, V. V.; Bellingeri-Laurikainen, A.; Bellwied, R.; Benedosso, F.; Bhardwaj, S.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L. C.; Blyth, S.-L.; Bonner, B. E.; Botje, M.; Bouchet, J.; Brandin, A. V.; Bravar, A.; Burton, T. P.; Bystersky, M.; Cadman, R. V.; Cai, X. Z.; Caines, H.; Sánchez, M. Calderón De La Barca; Castillo, J.; Catu, O.; Cebra, D.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. H.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Christie, W.; Coffin, J. P.; Cormier, T. M.; Cosentino, M. R.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Das, D.; Das, S.; Dash, S.; Daugherity, M.; Moura, M. M. De; Dedovich, T. G.; Dephillips, M.; Derevschikov, A. A.; Didenko, L.; Dietel, T.; Djawotho, P.; Dogra, S. M.; Dong, W. J.; Dong, X.; Draper, J. E.; Du, F.; Dunin, V. B.; Dunlop, J. C.; Mazumdar, M. R. Dutta; Eckardt, V.; Edwards, W. R.; Efimov, L. G.; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Fachini, P.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Filimonov, K.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Fu, J.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Gaillard, L.; Ganti, M. S.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gonzalez, J. E.; Gorbunov, Y. G.; Gos, H.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Guertin, S. M.; Guimaraes, K. S. F. F.; Gupta, N.; Gutierrez, T. D.; Haag, B.; Hallman, T. J.; Hamed, A.; Harris, J. W.; He, W.; Heinz, M.; Henry, T. W.; Hepplemann, S.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffman, A. M.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Horner, M. J.; Huang, H. Z.; Huang, S. L.; Hughes, E. W.; Humanic, T. J.; Igo, G.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jakl, P.; Jia, F.; Jiang, H.; Jones, P. G.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kang, K.; Kapitan, J.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Khodyrev, V. Yu.; Kim, B. C.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Kislov, E. M.; Klein, S. R.; Kocoloski, A.; Koetke, D. D.; Kollegger, T.; Kopytine, M.; Kotchenda, L.; Kouchpil, V.; Kowalik, K. L.; Kramer, M.; Kravtsov, P.; Kravtsov, V. I.; Krueger, K.; Kuhn, C.; Kulikov, A. I.; Kumar, A.; Kuznetsov, A. A.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; Lange, S.; Lapointe, S.; Laue, F.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, C.-H.; Lehocka, S.; Levine, M. J.; Li, C.; Li, Q.; Li, Y.; Lin, G.; Lin, X.; Lindenbaum, S. J.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Liu, H.; Liu, J.; Liu, L.; Liu, Z.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Long, H.; Longacre, R. S.; Love, W. A.; Lu, Y.; Ludlam, T.; Lynn, D.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, J. G.; Ma, Y. G.; Magestro, D.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Majka, R.; Mangotra, L. K.; Manweiler, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Martin, L.; Matis, H. S.; Matulenko, Yu. A.; McClain, C. J.; McShane, T. S.; Melnick, Yu.; Meschanin, A.; Millane, J.; Miller, M. L.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mironov, C.; Mischke, A.; Mishra, D. K.; Mitchell, J.; Mohanty, B.; Molnar, L.; Moore, C. F.; Morozov, D. A.; Munhoz, M. G.; Nandi, B. K.; Nattrass, C.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J. M.; Netrakanti, P. K.; Nogach, L. V.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Okorokov, V.; Oldenburg, M.; Olson, D.; Pachr, M.; Pal, S. K.; Panebratsev, Y.; Panitkin, S. Y.; Pavlinov, A. I.; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Perevoztchikov, V.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Phatak, S. C.; Picha, R.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Poljak, N.; Porile, N.; Porter, J.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Potekhin, M.; Potrebenikova, E.; Potukuchi, B. V. K. S.; Prindle, D.; Pruneau, C.; Putschke, J.; Rakness, G.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Razin, S. V.; Reinnarth, J.; Relyea, D.; Retiere, F.; Ridiger, A.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Rose, A.; Roy, C.; Ruan, L.; Russcher, M. J.; Sahoo, R.; Sakuma, T.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sarsour, M.; Sazhin, P. S.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmitz, N.; Schweda, K.; Seger, J.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Seyboth, P.; Shabetai, A.; Shahaliev, E.; Shao, M.; Sharma, M.; Shen, W. Q.; Shimanskiy, S. S.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Simon, F.; Singaraju, R. N.; Smirnov, N.; Snellings, R.; Sood, G.; Sorensen, P.; Sowinski, J.; Speltz, J.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stadnik, A.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Stock, R.; Stolpovsky, A.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Sugarbaker, E.; Sumbera, M.; Sun, Z.; Surrow, B.; Swanger, M.; Symons, T. J. M.; Toledo, A. Szanto De; Tai, A.; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thein, D.; Thomas, J. H.; Timmins, A. R.; Timoshenko, S.; Tokarev, M.; Trainor, T. A.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R. E.; Tsai, O. D.; Ulery, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Buren, G. Van; Kolk, N. Van Der; Leeuwen, M. Van; Molen, A. M. Vander; Varma, R.; Vasilevski, I. M.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Vernet, R.; Vigdor, S. E.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S. A.; Waggoner, W. T.; Wang, F.; Wang, G.; Wang, J. S.; Wang, X. L.; Wang, Y.; Watson, J. W.; Webb, J. C.; Westfall, G. D.; Wetzler, A.; Whitten, C., Jr.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, S. W.; Witt, R.; Wood, J.; Wu, J.; Xu, N.; Xu, Q. H.; Xu, Z.; Yepes, P.; Yoo, I.-K.; Yurevich, V. I.; Zhan, W.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, W. M.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhao, Y.; Zhong, C.; Zoulkarneev, R.; Zoulkarneeva, Y.; Zubarev, A. N.; Zuo, J. X.

    2006-11-01

    We present the first statistically meaningful results from two-Ks0 interferometry in heavy-ion collisions at sNN=200 GeV. A model that takes the effect of the strong interaction into account has been used to fit the measured correlation function. The effects of single and coupled channels were explored. At the mean transverse mass =1.07 GeV, we obtain the values R=4.09±0.46(stat)±0.31(sys) fm and λ=0.92±0.23(stat)±0.13(sys), where R and λ are the invariant radius and chaoticity parameters, respectively. The results are qualitatively consistent with mT systematics established with pions in a scenario characterized by a strong collective flow.

  13. Commissioning and Operation of 12 GeV CEBAF

    SciTech Connect

    Freyberger, Arne P.

    2015-09-01

    The Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) located at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Laboratory (JLab) has been recently upgraded to deliver continuous electron beams to the experimental users at a maximum energy of 12 GeV, three times the original design energy of 4 GeV. This paper will present an overview of the upgrade, referred to as the 12GeV upgrade, and highlights from recent beam commissioning results.

  14. Generation of tunable, 100-800 MeV quasi-monoenergetic electron beams from a laser-wakefield accelerator in the blowout regime

    SciTech Connect

    Banerjee, S.; Powers, N. D.; Ramanathan, V.; Ghebregziabher, I.; Brown, K. J.; Maharjan, C. M.; Chen, S.; Umstadter, D. P.; Beck, A.; Lefebvre, E.; Kalmykov, S. Y.; Shadwick, B. A.

    2012-05-15

    In this paper, we present results on a scalable high-energy electron source based on laser wakefield acceleration. The electron accelerator using 30-80 TW, 30 fs laser pulses, operates in the blowout regime, and produces high-quality, quasi-monoenergetic electron beams in the range 100-800 MeV. These beams have angular divergence of 1-4 mrad, and 5%-25% energy spread, with a resulting brightness 10{sup 11} electrons mm{sup -2} MeV{sup -1} mrad{sup -2}. The beam parameters can be tuned by varying the laser and plasma conditions. The use of a high-quality laser pulse and appropriate target conditions enables optimization of beam quality, concentrating a significant fraction of the accelerated charge into the quasi-monoenergetic component.

  15. Maximizing Iodine Contrast-to-Noise Ratios in Abdominal CT Imaging through Use of Energy Domain Noise Reduction and Virtual Monoenergetic Dual-Energy CT1

    PubMed Central

    Leng, Shuai; Yu, Lifeng; Fletcher, Joel G.; McCollough, Cynthia H.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To determine the iodine contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) for abdominal computed tomography (CT) when using energy domain noise reduction and virtual monoenergetic dual-energy (DE) CT images and to compare the CNR to that attained with single-energy CT at 80, 100, 120, and 140 kV. Materials and Methods This HIPAA-compliant study was approved by the institutional review board with waiver of informed consent. A syringe filled with diluted iodine contrast material was placed into 30-, 35-, and 45-cm-wide water phantoms and scanned with a dual-source CT scanner in both DE and single-energy modes with matched scanner output. Virtual monoenergetic images were generated, with energies ranging from 40 to 110 keV in 10-keV steps. A previously developed energy domain noise reduction algorithm was applied to reduce image noise by exploiting information redundancies in the energy domain. Image noise and iodine CNR were calculated. To show the potential clinical benefit of this technique, it was retrospectively applied to a clinical DE CT study of the liver in a 59-year-old male patient by using conventional and iterative reconstruction techniques. Image noise and CNR were compared for virtual monoenergetic images with and without energy domain noise reduction at each virtual monoenergetic energy (in kiloelectron volts) and phantom size by using a paired t test. CNR of virtual monoenergetic images was also compared with that of single-energy images acquired with 80, 100, 120, and 140 kV. Results Noise reduction of up to 59% (28.7/65.7) was achieved for DE virtual monoenergetic images by using an energy domain noise reduction technique. For the commercial virtual monoenergetic images, the maximum iodine CNR was achieved at 70 keV and was 18.6, 16.6, and 10.8 for the 30-, 35-, and 45-cm phantoms. After energy domain noise reduction, maximum iodine CNR was achieved at 40 keV and increased to 30.6, 25.4, and 16.5. These CNRs represented improvement of up to 64% (12.0/18.6) with

  16. Calculated shielding characteristics of eight materials for neutrons and secondary photons produced by monoenergetic source neutrons with energies less than 400 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Nakanishi, Noriyoshi; Shikata, Takashi; Fujita, Shin; Kosako, Toshiso

    1995-10-01

    Shielding characteristics of iron, lead, ordinary concrete, heavy concrete, graphite, marble, water, and paraffin were calculated for monoenergetic source neutrons with energies < 400 MeV. The depth dependence of neutron and secondary photon transmitted dose equivalents at the exit surfaces of shields of varying thickness is exhibited for some monoenergetic source neutrons and for each material. Their shielding characteristics are compared and discussed in terms of the degradation process of neutron energy and the change of neutron spectrum in typical shielding materials. Calculations were carried out by using the one-dimensional discrete ordinates code ANISN-JR and the cross-section library DLC-87/HILO. Systematic knowledge concerning the shielding of neutrons with energies < 400 MeV was successfully obtained.

  17. Visualization of expanding warm dense gold and diamond heated uniformly by laser-generated ion beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bang, W.; Albright, B. J.; Bradley, P. A.; Gautier, D. C.; Palaniyappan, S.; Vold, E. L.; Santiago Cordoba, M. A.; Hamilton, C. E.; Fernández, J. C.

    2015-11-01

    With a laser-generated beam of quasi-monoenergetic ions, a solid density target can be heated uniformly and isochorically. On the LANL Trident laser facility, we have used a beam of quasi-monoenergetic aluminum ions to heat gold and diamond foils. We visualized directly the expanding warm dense gold and diamond with an optical streak camera. Furthermore, we present a new technique to determine the initial temperatures of these heated samples from the measured expansion speeds of gold and diamond into vacuum. These temperatures are in good agreement with the expected temperatures calculated using the total deposited energy into the cold targets and SESAME equation-of-state tables at solid densities. We anticipate the uniformly heated solid density target will allow for direct quantitative measurements of equation-of-state, conductivity, opacity, and stopping power of warm dense matter, benefiting plasma physics, astrophysics, and nuclear physics. *This work is sponsored by the LANL LDRD Program.

  18. Theoretical overview: Light ion lessons, heavy ion hopes

    SciTech Connect

    Gavin, S.

    1992-01-01

    Experiments using light ion beams of atomic masses A [approximately] 30 have been underway since 1986 at the Brookhaven AGS and the CERN SPS at the respective energies [radical]s [approximately] 5 A GeV and 20 A GeV. The first truly heavy ion runs with a gold beam began this spring at the AGS. In this talk I will survey our progress towards an understanding of nuclear collision dynamics, focusing on those issues that are relevant to Au+Au at the AGS. In view of what we have already learned from the light ion data, I will argue that the prospects for producing matter at extreme density in these experiments are excellent.

  19. Theoretical overview: Light ion lessons, heavy ion hopes

    SciTech Connect

    Gavin, S.

    1992-12-31

    Experiments using light ion beams of atomic masses A {approximately} 30 have been underway since 1986 at the Brookhaven AGS and the CERN SPS at the respective energies {radical}s {approximately} 5 A GeV and 20 A GeV. The first truly heavy ion runs with a gold beam began this spring at the AGS. In this talk I will survey our progress towards an understanding of nuclear collision dynamics, focusing on those issues that are relevant to Au+Au at the AGS. In view of what we have already learned from the light ion data, I will argue that the prospects for producing matter at extreme density in these experiments are excellent.

  20. Analysis and comparison of monoenergetic fast neutron fluence determination using 238U samples at different positions with respect to the neutron source.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guohui; Liu, Xiang; Gao, Zhiqi; Wu, Hao; Liu, Jiaming

    2012-05-01

    Using two (238)U samples placed in a gridded ionization chamber and a parallel-plate fission chamber, fluence of monoenergetic fast neutrons was determined. Four runs of measurements were performed. Analysis showed that although the neutron fluences for the two (238)U samples differ by 20-33 times in the present work, the fluences at the position of the sample in the gridded ionization chamber determined by the two ways are in agreement within experimental uncertainties. PMID:22398325

  1. Fluence-to-Absorbed Dose Conversion Coefficients for Use in Radiological Protection of Embryo and Foetus Against External Exposure to Muons from 20MeV to 50GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jing

    2008-08-01

    This study used the Monte-Carlo code MCNPX to determine mean absorbed doses to the embryo and foetus when the mother is exposed to external muon fields. Monoenergetic muons ranging from 20 MeV to 50 GeV were considered. The irradiation geometries include anteroposterior (AP), postero-anterior (PA), lateral (LAT), rotational (ROT), isotropic (ISO), and top-down (TOP). At each of these irradiation geometries, absorbed doses to the foetal body were calculated for the embryo of 8 weeks and the foetus of 3, 6 or 9 months, respectively. Muon fluence-to-absorbed-dose conversion coefficients were derived for the four prenatal ages. Since such conversion coefficients are yet unknown, the results presented here fill a data gap.

  2. Fluence-to-Absorbed Dose Conversion Coefficients for Use in Radiological Protection of Embryo and Foetus Against External Exposure to Muons from 20MeV to 50GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Jing

    2008-08-07

    This study used the Monte-Carlo code MCNPX to determine mean absorbed doses to the embryo and foetus when the mother is exposed to external muon fields. Monoenergetic muons ranging from 20 MeV to 50 GeV were considered. The irradiation geometries include anteroposterior (AP), postero-anterior (PA), lateral (LAT), rotational (ROT), isotropic (ISO), and top-down (TOP). At each of these irradiation geometries, absorbed doses to the foetal body were calculated for the embryo of 8 weeks and the foetus of 3, 6 or 9 months, respectively. Muon fluence-to-absorbed-dose conversion coefficients were derived for the four prenatal ages. Since such conversion coefficients are yet unknown, the results presented here fill a data gap.

  3. Simultaneous generation of quasi-monoenergetic electron and betatron X-rays from nitrogen gas via ionization injection

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, K.; Yan, W. C.; Li, M. H.; Tao, M. Z.; Ma, Y.; Zhao, J. R.; Chen, L. M.; Li, D. Z.; Chen, Z. Y.; Ge, X. L.; Liu, F.; Hafz, N. M.; Zhang, J.

    2014-11-17

    Upon the interaction of 60 TW Ti: sapphire laser pulses with 4 mm long supersonic nitrogen gas jet, a directional x-ray emission was generated along with the generation of stable quasi-monoenergetic electron beams having a peak energy of 130 MeV and a relative energy spread of ∼ 20%. The betatron x-ray emission had a small divergence of 7.5 mrad and a critical energy of 4 keV. The laser wakefield acceleration process was stimulated in a background plasma density of merely 5.4 × 10{sup 17 }cm{sup −3} utilizing ionization injection. The non-self-focusing and stable propagation of the laser pulse in the pure nitrogen gaseous plasma should be responsible for the simultaneous generation of the high-quality X-ray and electron beams. Those ultra-short and naturally-synchronized beams could be applicable to ultrafast pump-probe experiments.

  4. Photon and neutron dose contributions and mean quality factors in phantoms of different size irradiated by monoenergetic neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Dietze, G.; Siebert, B.R.L.

    1994-10-01

    The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) in its Publication 60 introduced important changes in the concept of risk-related quantities. For external neutron radiation in particular the introduction of the equivalent dose with the radiation weighting factor w{sub R} instead of the dose equivalent concept with the quality factor Q(L) has many consequences. The value of w{sub R} is defined by the external neutron radiation field, while the radiation quality in the phantom depends on the radiation field at the position of interest and hence on the size of and the position in the phantom. It has been investigated to what extent the size of the phantom influences the mean irradiation quality in the phantoms. For incident monoenergetic neutrons, mean photon dose contributions and mean quality factors have been calculated. Results are presented for various phantoms which characterize the conditions for a mouse, a rat, the ICRU sphere and a human body. 9 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Detection of special nuclear material from delayed neutron emission induced by a dual-particle monoenergetic source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, M.; Nattress, J.; Jovanovic, I.

    2016-06-01

    Detection of unique signatures of special nuclear materials is critical for their interdiction in a variety of nuclear security and nonproliferation scenarios. We report on the observation of delayed neutrons from fission of uranium induced in dual-particle active interrogation based on the 11B(d,n γ)12C nuclear reaction. Majority of the fissions are attributed to fast fission induced by the incident quasi-monoenergetic neutrons. A Li-doped glass-polymer composite scintillation neutron detector, which displays excellent neutron/γ discrimination at low energies, was used in the measurements, along with a recoil-based liquid scintillation detector. Time-dependent buildup and decay of delayed neutron emission from 238U were measured between the interrogating beam pulses and after the interrogating beam was turned off, respectively. Characteristic buildup and decay time profiles were compared to the common parametrization into six delayed neutron groups, finding a good agreement between the measurement and nuclear data. This method is promising for detecting fissile and fissionable materials in cargo scanning applications and can be readily integrated with transmission radiography using low-energy nuclear reaction sources.

  6. The response of a 300 micron silicon detector to monoenergetic neutrons determined by the use of the Monte Carlo technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tahezadeh, M.; Anno, G.

    1972-01-01

    The response of a 300 micron thick silicon detector to an incident monoenergetic neutron beam is evaluated by the Monte Carlo method for the cases of both a shielded and a bare detector. The result of Monte Carlo calculation, using elastic, inelastic, and absorption reactions indicates that the response of the silicon detector to neutrons is basically due to the elastic scattering. In addition, the gamma rays generated in the shield of the detector will result in a response which is 3 or 4 orders of magnitude smaller than response to incident photons. The response of a bare silicon detector is calculated for neutron energies up to 6 MeV and bias energies from 50 to 250 KeV. It is found that the maximum response for a 300 micron thick silicon detector is less than .004 c/n within this selected neutron and bias energy range. When the pulse height defect is introduced in the calculation the results at low energy neutrons were reduced.

  7. Microstructured snow targets for high energy quasi-monoenergetic proton acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schleifer, E.; Nahum, E.; Eisenmann, S.; Botton, M.; Baspaly, A.; Pomerantz, I.; Abricht, F.; Branzel, J.; Priebe, G.; Steinke, S.; Andreev, A.; Schnuerer, M.; Sandner, W.; Gordon, D.; Sprangle, P.; Ledingham, K. W. D.; Zigler, A.

    2013-05-01

    Compact size sources of high energy protons (50-200MeV) are expected to be key technology in a wide range of scientific applications 1-8. One promising approach is the Target Normal Sheath Acceleration (TNSA) scheme 9,10, holding record level of 67MeV protons generated by a peta-Watt laser 11. In general, laser intensity exceeding 1018 W/cm2 is required to produce MeV level protons. Another approach is the Break-Out Afterburner (BOA) scheme which is a more efficient acceleration scheme but requires an extremely clean pulse with contrast ratio of above 10-10. Increasing the energy of the accelerated protons using modest energy laser sources is a very attractive task nowadays. Recently, nano-scale targets were used to accelerate ions 12,13 but no significant enhancement of the accelerated proton energy was measured. Here we report on the generation of up to 20MeV by a modest (5TW) laser system interacting with a microstructured snow target deposited on a Sapphire substrate. This scheme relax also the requirement of high contrast ratio between the pulse and the pre-pulse, where the latter produces the highly structured plasma essential for the interaction process. The plasma near the tip of the snow target is subject to locally enhanced laser intensity with high spatial gradients, and enhanced charge separation is obtained. Electrostatic fields of extremely high intensities are produced, and protons are accelerated to MeV-level energies. PIC simulations of this targets reproduce the experimentally measured energy scaling and predict the generation of 150 MeV protons from laser power of 100TW laser system18.

  8. 3 GeV Injector Design Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Wiedemann, H.; /SLAC, SSRL

    2009-12-16

    This Design Handbook is intended to be the main reference book for the specifications of the 3 GeV SPEAR booster synchrotron project. It is intended to be a consistent description of the project including design criteria, key technical specifications as well as current design approaches. Since a project is not complete till it's complete changes and modifications of early conceptual designs must be expected during the duration of the construction. Therefore, this Design Handbook is issued as a loose leaf binder so that individual sections can be replaced as needed. Each page will be dated to ease identification with respect to latest revisions. At the end of the project this Design Handbook will have become the 'as built' reference book of the injector for operations and maintenance personnel.

  9. Net charge fluctuations in Au + Au interactions at sqrt[s(NN)]=130 GeV.

    PubMed

    Adcox, K; Adler, S S; Ajitanand, N N; Akiba, Y; Alexander, J; Aphecetche, L; Arai, Y; Aronson, S H; Averbeck, R; Awes, T C; Barish, K N; Barnes, P D; Barrette, J; Bassalleck, B; Bathe, S; Baublis, V; Bazilevsky, A; Belikov, S; Bellaiche, F G; Belyaev, S T; Bennett, M J; Berdnikov, Y; Botelho, S; Brooks, M L; Brown, D S; Bruner, N; Bucher, D; Buesching, H; Bumazhnov, V; Bunce, G; Burward-Hoy, J; Butsyk, S; Carey, T A; Chand, P; Chang, J; Chang, W C; Chavez, L L; Chernichenko, S; Chi, C Y; Chiba, J; Chiu, M; Choudhury, R K; Christ, T; Chujo, T; Chung, M S; Chung, P; Cianciolo, V; Cole, B A; D'Enterria, D G; David, G; Delagrange, H; Denisov, A; Deshpande, A; Desmond, E J; Dietzsch, O; Dinesh, B V; Drees, A; Durum, A; Dutta, D; Ebisu, K; Efremenko, Y V; El Chenawi, K; En'yo, H; Esumi, S; Ewell, L; Ferdousi, T; Fields, D E; Fokin, S L; Fraenkel, Z; Franz, A; Frawley, A D; Fung, S-Y; Garpman, S; Ghosh, T K; Glenn, A; Godoi, A L; Goto, Y; Greene, S V; Grosse Perdekamp, M; Gupta, S K; Guryn, W; Gustafsson, H-A; Haggerty, J S; Hamagaki, H; Hansen, A G; Hara, H; Hartouni, E P; Hayano, R; Hayashi, N; He, X; Hemmick, T K; Heuser, J M; Hibino, M; Hill, J C; Ho, D S; Homma, K; Hong, B; Hoover, A; Ichihara, T; Imai, K; Ippolitov, M S; Ishihara, M; Jacak, B V; Jang, W Y; Jia, J; Johnson, B M; Johnson, S C; Joo, K S; Kametani, S; Kang, J H; Kann, M; Kapoor, S S; Kelly, S; Khachaturov, B; Khanzadeev, A; Kikuchi, J; Kim, D J; Kim, H J; Kim, S Y; Kim, Y G; Kinnison, W W; Kistenev, E; Kiyomichi, A; Klein-Boesing, C; Klinksiek, S; Kochenda, L; Kochetkov, V; Koehler, D; Kohama, T; Kotchetkov, D; Kozlov, A; Kroon, P J; Kurita, K; Kweon, M J; Kwon, Y; Kyle, G S; Lacey, R; Lajoie, J G; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lee, D M; Leitch, M J; Li, X H; Li, Z; Lim, D J; Liu, M X; Liu, X; Liu, Z; Maguire, C F; Mahon, J; Makdisi, Y I; Manko, V I; Mao, Y; Mark, S K; Markacs, S; Martinez, G; Marx, M D; Masaike, A; Matathias, F; Matsumoto, T; McGaughey, P L; Melnikov, E; Merschmeyer, M; Messer, F; Messer, M; Miake, Y; Miller, T E; Milov, A; Mioduszewski, S; Mischke, R E; Mishra, G C; Mitchell, J T; Mohanty, A K; Morrison, D P; Moss, J M; Mühlbacher, F; Muniruzzaman, M; Murata, J; Nagamiya, S; Nagasaka, Y; Nagle, J L; Nakada, Y; Nandi, B K; Newby, J; Nikkinen, L; Nilsson, P; Nishimura, S; Nyanin, A S; Nystrand, J; O'Brien, E; Ogilvie, C A; Ohnishi, H; Ojha, I D; Ono, M; Onuchin, V; Oskarsson, A; Osterman, L; Otterlund, I; Oyama, K; Paffrath, L; Palounek, A P T; Pantuev, V S; Papavassiliou, V; Pate, S F; Peitzmann, T; Petridis, A N; Pinkenburg, C; Pisani, R P; Pitukhin, P; Plasil, F; Pollack, M; Pope, K; Purschke, M L; Ravinovich, I; Read, K F; Reygers, K; Riabov, V; Riabov, Y; Rosati, M; Rose, A A; Ryu, S S; Saito, N; Sakaguchi, A; Sakaguchi, T; Sako, H; Sakuma, T; Samsonov, V; Sangster, T C; Santo, R; Sato, H D; Sato, S; Sawada, S; Schlei, B R; Schutz, Y; Semenov, V; Seto, R; Shea, T K; Shein, I; Shibata, T-A; Shigaki, K; Shiina, T; Shin, Y H; Sibiriak, I G; Silvermyr, D; Sim, K S; Simon-Gillo, J; Singh, C P; Singh, V; Sivertz, M; Soldatov, A; Soltz, R A; Sorensen, S; Stankus, P W; Starinsky, N; Steinberg, P; Stenlund, E; Ster, A; Stoll, S P; Sugioka, M; Sugitate, T; Sullivan, J P; Sumi, Y; Sun, Z; Suzuki, M; Takagui, E M; Taketani, A; Tamai, M; Tanaka, K H; Tanaka, Y; Taniguchi, E; Tannenbaum, M J; Thomas, J; Thomas, J H; Thomas, T L; Tian, W; Tojo, J; Torii, H; Towell, R S; Tserruya, I; Tsuruoka, H; Tsvetkov, A A; Tuli, S K; Tydesjö, H; Tyurin, N; Ushiroda, T; van Hecke, H W; Velissaris, C; Velkovska, J; Velkovsky, M; Vinogradov, A A; Volkov, M A; Vorobyov, A; Vznuzdaev, E; Wang, H; Watanabe, Y; White, S N; Witzig, C; Wohn, F K; Woody, C L; Xie, W; Yagi, K; Yokkaichi, S; Young, G R; Yushmanov, I E; Zajc, W A; Zhang, Z; Zhou, S

    2002-08-19

    Data from Au + Au interactions at sqrt[s(NN)]=130 GeV, obtained with the PHENIX detector at the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider, are used to investigate local net charge fluctuations among particles produced near midrapidity. According to recent suggestions, such fluctuations may carry information from the quark-gluon plasma. This analysis shows that the fluctuations are dominated by a stochastic distribution of particles, but are also sensitive to other effects, like global charge conservation and resonance decays. PMID:12190459

  10. Two-pion Bose-Einstein correlations in pp collisions at s=900GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aamodt, K.; Abel, N.; Abeysekara, U.; Abrahantes Quintana, A.; Abramyan, A.; Adamová, D.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Aglieri Rinella, G.; Agocs, A. G.; Aguilar Salazar, S.; Ahammed, Z.; Ahmad, A.; Ahmad, N.; Ahn, S. U.; Akimoto, R.; Akindinov, A.; Aleksandrov, D.; Alessandro, B.; Alfaro Molina, R.; Alici, A.; Almaráz Aviña, E.; Alme, J.; Alt, T.; Altini, V.; Altinpinar, S.; Andrei, C.; Andronic, A.; Anelli, G.; Angelov, V.; Anson, C.; Antičić, T.; Antinori, F.; Antinori, S.; Antipin, K.; Antończyk, D.; Antonioli, P.; Anzo, A.; Aphecetche, L.; Appelshäuser, H.; Arcelli, S.; Arceo, R.; Arend, A.; Armesto, N.; Arnaldi, R.; Aronsson, T.; Arsene, I. C.; Asryan, A.; Augustinus, A.; Averbeck, R.; Awes, T. C.; Äystö, J.; Azmi, M. D.; Bablok, S.; Bach, M.; Badalà, A.; Baek, Y. W.; Bagnasco, S.; Bailhache, R.; Bala, R.; Baldisseri, A.; Baldit, A.; Bán, J.; Barbera, R.; Barnaföldi, G. G.; Barnby, L. S.; Barret, V.; Bartke, J.; Barile, F.; Basile, M.; Basmanov, V.; Bastid, N.; Bathen, B.; Batigne, G.; Batyunya, B.; Baumann, C.; Bearden, I. G.; Becker, B.; Belikov, I.; Bellwied, R.; Belmont-Moreno, E.; Belogianni, A.; Benhabib, L.; Beole, S.; Berceanu, I.; Bercuci, A.; Berdermann, E.; Berdnikov, Y.; Betev, L.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bianchi, L.; Bianchi, N.; Bianchin, C.; Bielčík, J.; Bielčíková, J.; Bilandzic, A.; Bimbot, L.; Biolcati, E.; Blanc, A.; Blanco, F.; Blanco, F.; Blau, D.; Blume, C.; Boccioli, M.; Bock, N.; Bogdanov, A.; Bøggild, H.; Bogolyubsky, M.; Bohm, J.; Boldizsár, L.; Bombara, M.; Bombonati, C.; Bondila, M.; Borel, H.; Borisov, A.; Bortolin, C.; Bose, S.; Bosisio, L.; Bossú, F.; Botje, M.; Böttger, S.; Bourdaud, G.; Boyer, B.; Braun, M.; Braun-Munzinger, P.; Bravina, L.; Bregant, M.; Breitner, T.; Bruckner, G.; Brun, R.; Bruna, E.; Bruno, G. E.; Budnikov, D.; Buesching, H.; Buncic, P.; Busch, O.; Buthelezi, Z.; Caffarri, D.; Cai, X.; Caines, H.; Calvo, E.; Camacho, E.; Camerini, P.; Campbell, M.; Canoa Roman, V.; Capitani, G. P.; Cara Romeo, G.; Carena, F.; Carena, W.; Carminati, F.; Casanova Díaz, A.; Caselle, M.; Castillo Castellanos, J.; Castillo Hernandez, J. F.; Catanescu, V.; Cattaruzza, E.; Cavicchioli, C.; Cerello, P.; Chambert, V.; Chang, B.; Chapeland, S.; Charpy, A.; Charvet, J. L.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Cherney, M.; Cheshkov, C.; Cheynis, B.; Chiavassa, E.; Chibante Barroso, V.; Chinellato, D. D.; Chochula, P.; Choi, K.; Chojnacki, M.; Christakoglou, P.; Christensen, C. H.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chuman, F.; Cicalo, C.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Cleymans, J.; Cobanoglu, O.; Coffin, J.-P.; Coli, S.; Colla, A.; Conesa Balbastre, G.; Conesa Del Valle, Z.; Conner, E. S.; Constantin, P.; Contin, G.; Contreras, J. G.; Corrales Morales, Y.; Cormier, T. M.; Cortese, P.; Cortés Maldonado, I.; Cosentino, M. R.; Costa, F.; Cotallo, M. E.; Crescio, E.; Crochet, P.; Cuautle, E.; Cunqueiro, L.; Cussonneau, J.; Dainese, A.; Dalsgaard, H. H.; Danu, A.; Das, I.; Dash, A.; Dash, S.; de Barros, G. O. V.; de Caro, A.; de Cataldo, G.; de Cuveland, J.; de Falco, A.; de Gaspari, M.; de Groot, J.; de Gruttola, D.; de Marco, N.; de Pasquale, S.; de Remigis, R.; de Rooij, R.; de Vaux, G.; Delagrange, H.; Delgado, Y.; Dellacasa, G.; Deloff, A.; Demanov, V.; Dénes, E.; Deppman, A.; D'Erasmo, G.; Derkach, D.; Devaux, A.; di Bari, D.; di Giglio, C.; di Liberto, S.; di Mauro, A.; di Nezza, P.; Dialinas, M.; Díaz, L.; Díaz, R.; Dietel, T.; Divià, R.; Djuvsland, Ø.; Dobretsov, V.; Dobrin, A.; Dobrowolski, T.; Dönigus, B.; Domínguez, I.; Don, D. M. M.; Dordic, O.; Dubey, A. K.; Dubuisson, J.; Ducroux, L.; Dupieux, P.; Dutta Majumdar, A. K.; Dutta Majumdar, M. R.; Elia, D.; Emschermann, D.; Enokizono, A.; Espagnon, B.; Estienne, M.; Esumi, S.; Evans, D.; Evrard, S.; Eyyubova, G.; Fabjan, C. W.; Fabris, D.; Faivre, J.; Falchieri, D.; Fantoni, A.; Fasel, M.; Fateev, O.; Fearick, R.; Fedunov, A.; Fehlker, D.; Fekete, V.; Felea, D.; Fenton-Olsen, B.; Feofilov, G.; Fernández Téllez, A.; Ferreiro, E. G.; Ferretti, A.; Ferretti, R.; Figueredo, M. A. S.; Filchagin, S.; Fini, R.; Fionda, F. M.; Fiore, E. M.; Floris, M.; Fodor, Z.; Foertsch, S.; Foka, P.; Fokin, S.; Formenti, F.; Fragiacomo, E.; Fragkiadakis, M.; Frankenfeld, U.; Frolov, A.; Fuchs, U.; Furano, F.; Furget, C.; Fusco Girard, M.; Gaardhøje, J. J.; Gadrat, S.; Gagliardi, M.; Gago, A.; Gallio, M.; Ganoti, P.; Ganti, M. S.; Garabatos, C.; García Trapaga, C.; Gebelein, J.; Gemme, R.; Germain, M.; Gheata, A.; Gheata, M.; Ghidini, B.; Ghosh, P.; Giraudo, G.; Giubellino, P.; Gladysz-Dziadus, E.; Glasow, R.; Glässel, P.; Glenn, A.; Gómez Jiménez, R.; González Santos, H.; González-Trueba, L. H.; González-Zamora, P.; Gorbunov, S.; Gorbunov, Y.; Gotovac, S.; Gottschlag, H.; Grabski, V.; Grajcarek, R.; Grelli, A.; Grigoras, A.; Grigoras, C.; Grigoriev, V.; Grigoryan, A.; Grigoryan, S.; Grinyov, B.; Grion, N.; Gros, P.; Grosse-Oetringhaus, J. F.; Grossiord, J.-Y.; Grosso, R.; Guber, F.; Guernane, R.; Guerra, C.; Guerzoni, B.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gulkanyan, H.; Gunji, T.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, R.; Gustafsson, H.-A.; Gutbrod, H.; Haaland, Ø.; Hadjidakis, C.; Haiduc, M.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamar, G.; Hamblen, J.; Han, B. H.; Harris, J. W.; Hartig, M.; Harutyunyan, A.; Hasch, D.; Hasegan, D.; Hatzifotiadou, D.; Hayrapetyan, A.; Heide, M.; Heinz, M.; Helstrup, H.; Herghelegiu, A.; Hernández, C.; Herrera Corral, G.; Herrmann, N.; Hetland, K. F.; Hicks, B.; Hiei, A.; Hille, P. T.; Hippolyte, B.; Horaguchi, T.; Hori, Y.; Hristov, P.; Hřivnáčová, I.; Hu, S.; Huang, M.; Huber, S.; Humanic, T. J.; Hutter, D.; Hwang, D. S.; Ichou, R.; Ilkaev, R.; Ilkiv, I.; Inaba, M.; Innocenti, P. G.; Ippolitov, M.; Irfan, M.; Ivan, C.; Ivanov, A.; Ivanov, M.; Ivanov, V.; Iwasaki, T.; Jachołkowski, A.; Jacobs, P.; Jančurová, L.; Jangal, S.; Janik, R.; Jena, C.; Jena, S.; Jirden, L.; Jones, G. T.; Jones, P. G.; Jovanović, P.; Jung, H.; Jung, W.; Jusko, A.; Kaidalov, A. B.; Kalcher, S.; Kaliňák, P.; Kalisky, M.; Kalliokoski, T.; Kalweit, A.; Kamal, A.; Kamermans, R.; Kanaki, K.; Kang, E.; Kang, J. H.; Kapitan, J.; Kaplin, V.; Kapusta, S.; Karavichev, O.; Karavicheva, T.; Karpechev, E.; Kazantsev, A.; Kebschull, U.; Keidel, R.; Khan, M. M.; Khan, S. A.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kharlov, Y.; Kikola, D.; Kileng, B.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, D. S.; Kim, D. W.; Kim, H. N.; Kim, J.; Kim, J. H.; Kim, J. S.; Kim, M.; Kim, M.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, S.; Kim, Y.; Kirsch, S.; Kisel, I.; Kiselev, S.; Kisiel, A.; Klay, J. L.; Klein, J.; Klein-Bösing, C.; Kliemant, M.; Klovning, A.; Kluge, A.; Knichel, M. L.; Kniege, S.; Koch, K.; Kolevatov, R.; Kolojvari, A.; Kondratiev, V.; Kondratyeva, N.; Konevskih, A.; Kornaś, E.; Kour, R.; Kowalski, M.; Kox, S.; Kozlov, K.; Kral, J.; Králik, I.; Kramer, F.; Kraus, I.; Kravčáková, A.; Krawutschke, T.; Krivda, M.; Krumbhorn, D.; Krus, M.; Kryshen, E.; Krzewicki, M.; Kucheriaev, Y.; Kuhn, C.; Kuijer, P. G.; Kumar, L.; Kumar, N.; Kupczak, R.; Kurashvili, P.; Kurepin, A.; Kurepin, A. N.; Kuryakin, A.; Kushpil, S.; Kushpil, V.; Kutouski, M.; Kvaerno, H.; Kweon, M. J.; Kwon, Y.; La Rocca, P.; Lackner, F.; Ladrón de Guevara, P.; Lafage, V.; Lal, C.; Lara, C.; Larsen, D. T.; Laurenti, G.; Lazzeroni, C.; Le Bornec, Y.; Le Bris, N.; Lee, H.; Lee, K. S.; Lee, S. C.; Lefèvre, F.; Lenhardt, M.; Leistam, L.; Lehnert, J.; Lenti, V.; León, H.; León Monzón, I.; León Vargas, H.; Lévai, P.; Li, X.; Li, Y.; Lietava, R.; Lindal, S.; Lindenstruth, V.; Lippmann, C.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, L.; Loginov, V.; Lohn, S.; Lopez, X.; López Noriega, M.; López-Ramírez, R.; López Torres, E.; Løvhøiden, G.; Lozea Feijo Soares, A.; Lu, S.; Lunardon, M.; Luparello, G.; Luquin, L.; Lutz, J.-R.; Ma, K.; Ma, R.; Madagodahettige-Don, D. M.; Maevskaya, A.; Mager, M.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Maire, A.; Makhlyueva, I.; Mal'Kevich, D.; Malaev, M.; Malagalage, K. J.; Maldonado Cervantes, I.; Malek, M.; Malinina, L.; Malkiewicz, T.; Malzacher, P.; Mamonov, A.; Manceau, L.; Mangotra, L.; Manko, V.; Manso, F.; Manzari, V.; Mao, Y.; Mareš, J.; Margagliotti, G. V.; Margotti, A.; Marín, A.; Martashvili, I.; Martinengo, P.; Martínez Hernández, M. I.; Martínez Davalos, A.; Martínez García, G.; Maruyama, Y.; Marzari Chiesa, A.; Masciocchi, S.; Masera, M.; Masetti, M.; Masoni, A.; Massacrier, L.; Mastromarco, M.; Mastroserio, A.; Matthews, Z. L.; Matyja, A.; Mayani, D.; Mazza, G.; Mazzoni, M. A.; Meddi, F.; Menchaca-Rocha, A.; Mendez Lorenzo, P.; Meoni, M.; Mercado Pérez, J.; Mereu, P.; Miake, Y.; Michalon, A.; Miftakhov, N.; Milano, L.; Milosevic, J.; Minafra, F.; Mischke, A.; Miśkowiec, D.; Mitu, C.; Mizoguchi, K.; Mlynarz, J.; Mohanty, B.; Molnar, L.; Mondal, M. M.; Montaño Zetina, L.; Monteno, M.; Montes, E.; Morando, M.; Moretto, S.; Morsch, A.; Moukhanova, T.; Muccifora, V.; Mudnic, E.; Muhuri, S.; Müller, H.; Munhoz, M. G.; Munoz, J.; Musa, L.; Musso, A.; Nandi, B. K.; Nania, R.; Nappi, E.; Navach, F.; Navin, S.; Nayak, T. K.; Nazarenko, S.; Nazarov, G.; Nedosekin, A.; Nendaz, F.; Newby, J.; Nianine, A.; Nicassio, M.; Nielsen, B. S.; Nikolaev, S.; Nikolic, V.; Nikulin, S.; Nikulin, V.; Nilsen, B. S.; Nilsson, M. S.; Noferini, F.; Nomokonov, P.; Nooren, G.; Novitzky, N.; Nyatha, A.; Nygaard, C.; Nyiri, A.; Nystrand, J.; Ochirov, A.; Odyniec, G.; Oeschler, H.; Oinonen, M.; Okada, K.; Okada, Y.; Oldenburg, M.; Oleniacz, J.; Oppedisano, C.; Orsini, F.; Ortiz Velasquez, A.; Ortona, G.; Oskarsson, A.; Osmic, F.; Österman, L.; Ostrowski, P.; Otterlund, I.; Otwinowski, J.; Øvrebekk, G.; Oyama, K.; Ozawa, K.; Pachmayer, Y.; Pachr, M.; Padilla, F.; Pagano, P.; Paić, G.; Painke, F.; Pajares, C.; Pal, S.; Pal, S. K.; Palaha, A.; Palmeri, A.; Panse, R.; Papikyan, V.; Pappalardo, G. S.; Park, W. J.; Pastirčák, B.; Pastore, C.; Paticchio, V.; Pavlinov, A.; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Pepato, A.; Pereira, H.; Peressounko, D.; Pérez, C.; Perini, D.; Perrino, D.; Peryt, W.; Peschek, J.; Pesci, A.; Peskov, V.; Pestov, Y.; Peters, A. J.; Petráček, V.; Petridis, A.; Petris, M.; Petrov, P.; Petrovici, M.; Petta, C.; Peyré, J.; Piano, S.; Piccotti, A.; Pikna, M.; Pillot, P.; Pinazza, O.; Pinsky, L.; Pitz, N.; Piuz, F.; Platt, R.; Płoskoń, M.; Pluta, J.; Pocheptsov, T.; Pochybova, S.; Podesta Lerma, P. L. M.; Poggio, F.; Poghosyan, M. G.; Polák, K.; Polichtchouk, B.; Polozov, P.; Polyakov, V.; Pommeresch, B.; Pop, A.; Posa, F.; Pospíšil, V.; Potukuchi, B.; Pouthas, J.; Prasad, S. K.; Preghenella, R.; Prino, F.; Pruneau, C. A.; Pshenichnov, I.; Puddu, G.; Pujahari, P.; Pulvirenti, A.; Punin, A.; Punin, V.; Putiš, M.; Putschke, J.; Quercigh, E.; Rachevski, A.; Rademakers, A.; Radomski, S.; Räihä, T. S.; Rak, J.; Rakotozafindrabe, A.; Ramello, L.; Ramírez Reyes, A.; Rammler, M.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Räsänen, S. S.; Rashevskaya, I.; Rath, S.; Read, K. F.; Real, J. S.; Redlich, K.; Renfordt, R.; Reolon, A. R.; Reshetin, A.; Rettig, F.; Revol, J.-P.; Reygers, K.; Ricaud, H.; Riccati, L.; Ricci, R. A.; Richter, M.; Riedler, P.; Riegler, W.; Riggi, F.; Rivetti, A.; Rodriguez Cahuantzi, M.; Røed, K.; Röhrich, D.; Román López, S.; Romita, R.; Ronchetti, F.; Rosinský, P.; Rosnet, P.; Rossegger, S.; Rossi, A.; Roukoutakis, F.; Rousseau, S.; Roy, C.; Roy, P.; Rubio-Montero, A. J.; Rui, R.; Rusanov, I.; Russo, G.; Ryabinkin, E.; Rybicki, A.; Sadovsky, S.; Šafařík, K.; Sahoo, R.; Saini, J.; Saiz, P.; Sakata, D.; Salgado, C. A.; Salgueiro Domingues da Silva, R.; Salur, S.; Samanta, T.; Sambyal, S.; Samsonov, V.; Šándor, L.; Sandoval, A.; Sano, M.; Sano, S.; Santo, R.; Santoro, R.; Sarkamo, J.; Saturnini, P.; Scapparone, E.; Scarlassara, F.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schiaua, C.; Schicker, R.; Schindler, H.; Schmidt, C.; Schmidt, H. R.; Schossmaier, K.; Schreiner, S.; Schuchmann, S.; Schukraft, J.; Schutz, Y.; Schwarz, K.; Schweda, K.; Scioli, G.; Scomparin, E.; Scott, P. A.; Segato, G.; Semenov, D.; Senyukov, S.; Seo, J.; Serci, S.; Serkin, L.; Serradilla, E.; Sevcenco, A.; Sgura, I.; Shabratova, G.; Shahoyan, R.; Sharkov, G.; Sharma, N.; Sharma, S.; Shigaki, K.; Shimomura, M.; Shtejer, K.; Sibiriak, Y.; Siciliano, M.; Sicking, E.; Siddi, E.; Siemiarczuk, T.; Silenzi, A.; Silvermyr, D.; Simili, E.; Simonetti, G.; Singaraju, R.; Singh, R.; Singhal, V.; Sinha, B. C.; Sinha, T.; Sitar, B.; Sitta, M.; Skaali, T. B.; Skjerdal, K.; Smakal, R.; Smirnov, N.; Snellings, R.; Snow, H.; Søgaard, C.; Soloviev, A.; Soltveit, H. K.; Soltz, R.; Sommer, W.; Son, C. W.; Son, H.; Song, M.; Soos, C.; Soramel, F.; Soyk, D.; Spyropoulou-Stassinaki, M.; Srivastava, B. K.; Stachel, J.; Staley, F.; Stan, E.; Stefanek, G.; Stefanini, G.; Steinbeck, T.; Stenlund, E.; Steyn, G.; Stocco, D.; Stock, R.; Stolpovsky, P.; Strmen, P.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Subieta Vásquez, M. A.; Sugitate, T.; Suire, C.; Šumbera, M.; Susa, T.; Swoboda, D.; Symons, J.; Szanto de Toledo, A.; Szarka, I.; Szostak, A.; Szuba, M.; Tadel, M.; Tagridis, C.; Takahara, A.; Takahashi, J.; Tanabe, R.; Tapia Takaki, J. D.; Taureg, H.; Tauro, A.; Tavlet, M.; Tejeda Muñoz, G.; Telesca, A.; Terrevoli, C.; Thäder, J.; Tieulent, R.; Tlusty, D.; Toia, A.; Tolyhy, T.; Torcato de Matos, C.; Torii, H.; Torralba, G.; Toscano, L.; Tosello, F.; Tournaire, A.; Traczyk, T.; Tribedy, P.; Tröger, G.; Truesdale, D.; Trzaska, W. H.; Tsiledakis, G.; Tsilis, E.; Tsuji, T.; Tumkin, A.; Turrisi, R.; Turvey, A.; Tveter, T. S.; Tydesjö, H.; Tywoniuk, K.; Ulery, J.; Ullaland, K.; Uras, A.; Urbán, J.; Urciuoli, G. M.; Usai, G. L.; Vacchi, A.; Vala, M.; Valencia Palomo, L.; Vallero, S.; van der Kolk, N.; Vande Vyvre, P.; van Leeuwen, M.; Vannucci, L.; Vargas, A.; Varma, R.; Vasiliev, A.; Vassiliev, I.; Vasileiou, M.; Vechernin, V.; Venaruzzo, M.; Vercellin, E.; Vergara, S.; Vernet, R.; Verweij, M.; Vetlitskiy, I.; Vickovic, L.; Viesti, G.; Vikhlyantsev, O.; Vilakazi, Z.; Villalobos Baillie, O.; Vinogradov, A.; Vinogradov, L.; Vinogradov, Y.; Virgili, T.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vodopianov, A.; Voloshin, K.; Voloshin, S.; Volpe, G.; von Haller, B.; Vranic, D.; Vrláková, J.; Vulpescu, B.; Wagner, B.; Wagner, V.; Wallet, L.; Wan, R.; Wang, D.; Wang, Y.; Wang, Y.; Watanabe, K.; Wen, Q.; Wessels, J.; Westerhoff, U.; Wiechula, J.; Wikne, J.; Wilk, A.; Wilk, G.; Williams, M. C. S.; Willis, N.; Windelband, B.; Xu, C.; Yang, C.; Yang, H.; Yasnopolskiy, S.; Yermia, F.; Yi, J.; Yin, Z.; Yokoyama, H.; Yoo, I.-K.; Yuan, X.; Yurevich, V.; Yushmanov, I.; Zabrodin, E.; Zagreev, B.; Zalite, A.; Zampolli, C.; Zanevsky, Yu.; Zaporozhets, S.; Zarochentsev, A.; Závada, P.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zelnicek, P.; Zenin, A.; Zepeda, A.; Zgura, I.; Zhalov, M.; Zhang, X.; Zhou, D.; Zhou, S.; Zhu, J.; Zichichi, A.; Zinchenko, A.; Zinovjev, G.; Zoccarato, Y.; Zycháček, V.; Zynovyev, M.

    2010-09-01

    We report on the measurement of two-pion correlation functions from pp collisions at s=900GeV performed by the ALICE experiment at the Large Hadron Collider. Our analysis shows an increase of the Hanbury Brown-Twiss radius with increasing event multiplicity, in line with other measurements done in particle- and nuclear collisions. Conversely, the strong decrease of the radius with increasing transverse momentum, as observed at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider and at Tevatron, is not manifest in our data.

  11. New measurement of the electron flux from 10 GeV to 100 GeV with the bets instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torii, S.; Tamura, T.; Tateyama, N.; Yoshida, K.; Yamagami, T.; Kamioka, E.; Saito, Y.; Murakami, H.; Kobayashi, T.; Komori, Y.; Kasahara, K.; Yuda, T.; Nishimura, J.

    The BETS (balloon-borne electron telescope with scintillating fibers) instrument has been developed for high-altitude balloon flights to observe the cosmic ray electrons with energies of 10 GeV to several 100 GeV. The detector is a Lead/SciFi sampling calorimeter consisting of 36 SciFi belts (each 280 mm wide) and 8 lead plates (each 5 mm thick). The electron identification is performed by triggering the electro-magnetic showers on board and by analyzing the three-dimensional shower images by an intensified CCD camera. It is demonstrated in the flight data in 1995 and 1997 that a reliable identification of the electron component against the proton background is achieved up to a few 100 GeV. The performance of detector was tested by the CERN-SPS electron beams in 1996 and with the proton beams in 1997. The obtained energy spectrum is consistent with the recent observation by HEAT, although our result still has a little room for improvement. The energy spectrum from 10 GeV to 1000 GeV which is obtained by combining these data and the emulsion chamber data (Nishimura 1997) suggests that the diffusion constant is about 1 × 10 28 ( E/GeV) 0.3 cm 2/sec in the energy range between 10 GeV and 1000 GeV. A hump in the energy spectrum is observed around several hundred GeV, which is expected from a nearby source.

  12. Determination of the Ce142(γ,n) cross section using quasi-monoenergetic Compton backscattered γ rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauerwein, A.; Sonnabend, K.; Fritzsche, M.; Glorius, J.; Kwan, E.; Pietralla, N.; Romig, C.; Rusev, G.; Savran, D.; Schnorrenberger, L.; Tonchev, A. P.; Tornow, W.; Weller, H. R.

    2014-03-01

    Background: Knowing the energy dependence of the (γ,n) cross section is mandatory to predict the abundances of heavy elements using astrophysical models. The data can be applied directly or used to constrain the cross section of the inverse (n,γ) reaction. Purpose: The measurement of the reaction Ce142(γ,n)141Ce just above the reaction threshold amends the existing experimental database in that mass region for p-process nucleosynthesis and helps to understand the s-process branching at the isotope Ce141. Method: The quasi-monoenergetic photon beam of the High Intensity γ-ray Source (HIγS), TUNL, USA, is used to irradiate naturally composed Ce targets. The reaction yield is determined afterwards with high-resolution γ-ray spectroscopy. Results: The experimental data are in agreement with previous measurements at higher energies. Since the cross-section prediction of the Ce142(γ,n) reaction is exclusively sensitive to the γ-ray strength function, the resulting cross-section values were compared to Hauser-Feshbach calculations using different γ-ray strength functions. A microscopic description within the framework of the Hartree-Fock-BCS model describes the experimental values well within the measured energy range. Conclusions: The measured data show that the predicted (γ,n) reaction rate is correct within a factor of 2 even though the closed neutron shell N =82 is approached. This agreement allows us to constrain the (n,γ) cross section and to improve the understanding of the s-process branching at Ce141.

  13. Review of Polarized Ion Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zelenski, A.

    2016-02-01

    Recent progress in polarized ion sources development is reviewed. New techniques for production of polarized H‑ ion (proton), D‑ (D+) and 3He++ ion beams will be discussed. A novel polarization technique was successfully implemented for the upgrade of the RHIC polarized H‑ ion source to higher intensity and polarization. In this technique, a proton beam inside the high magnetic field solenoid is produced by ionization of the atomic hydrogen beam (from an external source) in the He-gas ionizer cell. Polarized electron capture from the optically-pumped Rb vapor further produces proton polarization (Optically Pumped Polarized Ion Source technique). The upgraded source reliably delivered beam for the 2013 polarized run in RHIC at S = 510 GeV. This was a major factor contributing to RHIC polarization increase to over 60 % for colliding beams. Feasibility studies of a new polarization technique for polarized 3He++ source based on BNL Electron Beam Ion Source is also discussed.

  14. Observation of snake resonances at Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Bai, M.; Ahrens, L.; Alekseev, I.G.; Alessi, J.; et al

    2010-09-27

    The Siberian snakes are powerful tools in preserving polarization in high energy accelerators has been demonstrated at the Brookhaven Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). Equipped with two full Siberian snakes in each ring, polarization is preserved during acceleration from injection to 100 GeV. However, the Siberian snakes also introduce a new set of depolarization resonances, i.e. snake resonances as first discovered by Lee and Tepikian. The intrinsic spin resonances above 100 GeV are about a factor of two stronger than those below 100 GeV which raises the challenge to preserve the polarization up to 250 GeV. In 2009, polarized protons collided for the first time at the RHIC design store energy of 250 GeV. This paper presents the experimental measurements of snake resonances at RHIC. The plan for avoiding these resonances is also presented.

  15. ΛΛ correlation function in Au + Au collisions at √sNN = 200 GeV

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Adamczyk, L.

    2015-01-12

    In this study, we present ΛΛ correlation measurements in heavy-ion collisions for Au+Au collisions at √sNN = 200 GeV using the STAR experiment at the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC). The Lednický-Lyuboshitz analytical model has been used to fit the data to obtain a source size, a scattering length and an effective range. Implications of the measurement of the ΛΛ correlation function and interaction parameters for di-hyperon searches are discussed.

  16. ΛΛ correlation function in Au + Au collisions at √sNN = 200 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Adamczyk, L.

    2015-01-12

    In this study, we present ΛΛ correlation measurements in heavy-ion collisions for Au+Au collisions at √sNN = 200 GeV using the STAR experiment at the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC). The Lednický-Lyuboshitz analytical model has been used to fit the data to obtain a source size, a scattering length and an effective range. Implications of the measurement of the ΛΛ correlation function and interaction parameters for di-hyperon searches are discussed.

  17. Interpreting 750 GeV diphoton excess in plain NMSSM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badziak, Marcin; Olechowski, Marek; Pokorski, Stefan; Sakurai, Kazuki

    2016-09-01

    NMSSM has enough ingredients to explain the diphoton excess at 750 GeV: singlet-like (pseudo) scalar (a) s and higgsinos as heavy vector-like fermions. We consider the production of the 750 GeV singlet-like pseudo scalar a from a decay of the doublet-like pseudo scalar A, and the subsequent decay of a into two photons via higgsino loop. We demonstrate that this cascade decay of the NMSSM Higgs bosons can explain the diphoton excess at 750 GeV.

  18. Blazar Astronomy above 50 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, D. A.

    This contribution is dedicated to the memory of Chaman L. Bhat, an atmospheric Cherenkov pioneer and a leader of the Indian gamma-ray community, who died in a road accident on Mt. Abu on December 17, just after the workshop. While few blazars have been detected beyond EGRET energies, these extreme cases may be the ones that 'make or break' some models describing blazars in particular, and therefore AGNs in general. This paper first reviews the status of the various atmospheric Cherenkov gamma-ray telescopes. We then describe the most recent results from these instruments, paying particular attention to the recent detection of 1ES 1426+428 by the Whipple, CAT, and HEGRA imagers. We illustrate the dilemma of target selection using the example of W Com. We then discuss the consequences of the first measurements of Mrk 421 below 100 GeV by the solar heliostat arrays CELESTE and STACEE. This first foray into the energy range linking EGRET with the current imagers requires us to start using functional forms for the spectral energy distributions that are more physical than the simple power laws (or parabolas) used up to now to describe the imager or satellite results. We can hope that HESS, followed by MAGIC and VERITAS, as well as CELESTE and STACEE, will make this a recurring problem in 2002 and 2003.

  19. Microdosimetry of proton and carbon ions

    SciTech Connect

    Liamsuwan, Thiansin; Hultqvist, Martha; Lindborg, Lennart; Nikjoo, Hooshang; Uehara, Shuzo

    2014-08-15

    Purpose: To investigate microdosimetry properties of 160 MeV/u protons and 290 MeV/u{sup 12}C ion beams in small volumes of diameters 10–100 nm. Methods: Energy distributions of primary particles and nuclear fragments in the beams were calculated from simulations with the general purpose code SHIELD-HIT, while energy depositions by monoenergetic ions in nanometer volumes were obtained from the event-by-event Monte Carlo track structure ion code PITS99 coupled with the electron track structure code KURBUC. Results: The results are presented for frequencies of energy depositions in cylindrical targets of diameters 10–100 nm, dose distributionsyd(y) in lineal energy y, and dose-mean lineal energies y{sup ¯}{sub D}. For monoenergetic ions, the y{sup ¯}{sub D} was found to increase with an increasing target size for high-linear energy transfer (LET) ions, but decrease with an increasing target size for low-LET ions. Compared to the depth dose profile of the ion beams, the maximum of the y{sup ¯}{sub D} depth profile for the 160 MeV proton beam was located at ∼0.5 cm behind the Bragg peak maximum, while the y{sup ¯}{sub D} peak of the 290 MeV/u {sup 12}C beam coincided well with the peak of the absorbed dose profile. Differences between the y{sup ¯}{sub D} and dose-averaged linear energy transfer (LET{sub D}) were large in the proton beam for both target volumes studied, and in the {sup 12}C beam for the 10 nm diameter cylindrical volumes. The y{sup ¯}{sub D} determined for 100 nm diameter cylindrical volumes in the {sup 12}C beam was approximately equal to the LET{sub D}. The contributions from secondary particles to the y{sup ¯}{sub D} of the beams are presented, including the contributions from secondary protons in the proton beam and from fragments with atomic number Z = 1–6 in the {sup 12}C beam. Conclusions: The present investigation provides an insight into differences in energy depositions in subcellular-size volumes when irradiated by proton and

  20. Towards Spectral Control of Laser-Driven Ion Beams Generated in the Relativistic Transparency Regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez, Juan C.; Gautier, D. C.; Hamilton, C.; Huang, C.; Palaniyappan, S.

    2014-10-01

    Until recently, experiments on the LANL Trident laser in the relativistic transparency regime have demonstrated efficient, volumetric acceleration of the bulk target ions to high energies by the laser-plasma interaction, but with broad ion-energy distributions. That ion acceleration mechanism (Breakout Afterburner) is intrinsically capable of producing quasi-monoenergetic ion-energy distributions. However, there are processes responsible for energy spread, both during the laser-plasma interaction with present-day experimental conditions, as well as during the subsequent transport of the beam, driven by expansion of the co-moving hot-electron population. Strategies to counter such spread are discussed. Furthermore, our work to understand the recent observation of efficiently-generated, quasi-monoenergetic, ~150 MeV Al-ion beams indicates that the dynamics immediately following the laser-plasma interaction can be quite important and beneficial. It has uncovered a new strategy, i.e., using plasma-electron dynamics to increase the ion energy and to decrease its spread. This presentation thus motivates and frames two companion talks on these laser-driven Al-ion beams by Palaniyappan et al. and Huang et al. in this conference. This work is sponsored by the LANL LDRD Program.

  1. Cellular track model for study of heavy ion beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shinn, Judy L.; Katz, Robert; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Wilson, John W.; Ngo, Duc M.

    1993-01-01

    Track theory is combined with a realistic model of a heavy ion beam to study the effects of nuclear fragmentation on cell survival and biological effectiveness. The effects of secondary reaction products are studied as a function of depth in a water column. Good agreement is found with experimental results for the survival of human T-l cells exposed to monoenergetic carbon, neon, and argon beams under aerobic and hypoxia conditions. The present calculation, which includes the effect of target fragmentation, is a significant improvement over an earlier calculation because of the use of a vastly improved beam model with no change in the track theory or cellular response parameters.

  2. Generation of GeV protons from 1 PW laser interaction with near critical density targets

    PubMed Central

    Bulanov, Stepan S.; Bychenkov, Valery Yu.; Chvykov, Vladimir; Kalinchenko, Galina; Litzenberg, Dale William; Matsuoka, Takeshi; Thomas, Alexander G. R.; Willingale, Louise; Yanovsky, Victor; Krushelnick, Karl; Maksimchuk, Anatoly

    2010-01-01

    The propagation of ultraintense laser pulses through matter is connected with the generation of strong moving magnetic fields in the propagation channel as well as the formation of a thin ion filament along the axis of the channel. Upon exiting the plasma the magnetic field displaces the electrons at the back of the target, generating a quasistatic electric field that accelerates and collimates ions from the filament. Two dimensional particle-in-cell simulations show that a 1 PW laser pulse tightly focused on a near-critical density target is able to accelerate protons up to an energy of 1.3 GeV. Scaling laws and optimal conditions for proton acceleration are established considering the energy depletion of the laser pulse. PMID:20838426

  3. Spot size dependence of laser accelerated protons in thin multi-ion foils

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Tung-Chang Shao, Xi; Liu, Chuan-Sheng; Eliasson, Bengt; Wang, Jyhpyng; Chen, Shih-Hung

    2014-06-15

    We present a numerical study of the effect of the laser spot size of a circularly polarized laser beam on the energy of quasi-monoenergetic protons in laser proton acceleration using a thin carbon-hydrogen foil. The used proton acceleration scheme is a combination of laser radiation pressure and shielded Coulomb repulsion due to the carbon ions. We observe that the spot size plays a crucial role in determining the net charge of the electron-shielded carbon ion foil and consequently the efficiency of proton acceleration. Using a laser pulse with fixed input energy and pulse length impinging on a carbon-hydrogen foil, a laser beam with smaller spot sizes can generate higher energy but fewer quasi-monoenergetic protons. We studied the scaling of the proton energy with respect to the laser spot size and obtained an optimal spot size for maximum proton energy flux. Using the optimal spot size, we can generate an 80 MeV quasi-monoenergetic proton beam containing more than 10{sup 8} protons using a laser beam with power 250 TW and energy 10 J and a target of thickness 0.15 wavelength and 49 critical density made of 90% carbon and 10% hydrogen.

  4. Transverse-mass dependence of two-pion correlations in Au+Au collisions at square root[s(NN)] = 130 GeV.

    PubMed

    Adcox, K; Adler, S S; Ajitanand, N N; Akiba, Y; Alexander, J; Aphecetche, L; Arai, Y; Aronson, S H; Averbeck, R; Awes, T C; Barish, K N; Barnes, P D; Barrette, J; Bassalleck, B; Bathe, S; Baublis, V; Bazilevsky, A; Belikov, S; Bellaiche, F G; Belyaev, S T; Bennett, M J; Berdnikov, Y; Botelho, S; Brooks, M L; Brown, D S; Bruner, N; Bucher, D; Buesching, H; Bumazhnov, V; Bunce, G; Burward-Hoy, J; Butsyk, S; Carey, T A; Chand, P; Chang, J; Chang, W C; Chavez, L L; Chernichenko, S; Chi, C Y; Chiba, J; Chiu, M; Choudhury, R K; Christ, T; Chujo, T; Chung, M S; Chung, P; Cianciolo, V; Cole, B A; D'Enterria, D G; David, G; Delagrange, H; Denisov, A; Deshpande, A; Desmond, E J; Dietzsch, O; Dinesh, B V; Drees, A; Durum, A; Dutta, D; Ebisu, K; Efremenko, Y V; El Chenawi, K; Enokizono, A; En'yo, H; Esumi, S; Ewell, L; Ferdousi, T; Fields, D E; Fokin, S L; Fraenkel, Z; Franz, A; Frawley, A D; Fung, S-Y; Garpman, S; Ghosh, T K; Glenn, A; Godoi, A L; Goto, Y; Greene, S V; Grosse Perdekamp, M; Gupta, S K; Guryn, W; Gustafsson, H-A; Haggerty, J S; Hamagaki, H; Hansen, A G; Hara, H; Hartouni, E P; Hayano, R; Hayashi, N; He, X; Hemmick, T K; Heuser, J M; Hibino, M; Hill, J C; Ho, D S; Homma, K; Hong, B; Hoover, A; Ichihara, T; Imai, K; Ippolitov, M S; Ishihara, M; Jacak, B V; Jang, W Y; Jia, J; Johnson, B M; Johnson, S C; Joo, K S; Kametani, S; Kang, J H; Kann, M; Kapoor, S S; Kelly, S; Khachaturov, B; Khanzadeev, A; Kikuchi, J; Kim, D J; Kim, H J; Kim, S Y; Kim, Y G; Kinnison, W W; Kistenev, E; Kiyomichi, A; Klein-Boesing, C; Klinksiek, S; Kochenda, L; Kochetkov, V; Koehler, D; Kohama, T; Kotchetkov, D; Kozlov, A; Kroon, P J; Kurita, K; Kweon, M J; Kwon, Y; Kyle, G S; Lacey, R; Lajoie, J G; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lee, D M; Leitch, M J; Li, X H; Li, Z; Lim, D J; Liu, M X; Liu, X; Liu, Z; Maguire, C F; Mahon, J; Makdisi, Y I; Manko, V I; Mao, Y; Mark, S K; Markacs, S; Martinez, G; Marx, M D; Masaike, A; Matathias, F; Matsumoto, T; McGaughey, P L; Melnikov, E; Merschmeyer, M; Messer, F; Messer, M; Miake, Y; Miller, T E; Milov, A; Mioduszewski, S; Mischke, R E; Mishra, G C; Mitchell, J T; Mohanty, A K; Morrison, D P; Moss, J M; Mühlbacher, F; Muniruzzaman, M; Murata, J; Nagamiya, S; Nagasaka, Y; Nagle, J L; Nakada, Y; Nandi, B K; Newby, J; Nikkinen, L; Nilsson, P; Nishimura, S; Nyanin, A S; Nystrand, J; O'Brien, E; Ogilvie, C A; Ohnishi, H; Ojha, I D; Ono, M; Onuchin, V; Oskarsson, A; Osterman, L; Otterlund, I; Oyama, K; Paffrath, L; Palounek, A P T; Pantuev, V S; Papavassiliou, V; Pate, S F; Peitzmann, T; Petridis, A N; Pinkenburg, C; Pisani, R P; Pitukhin, P; Plasil, F; Pollack, M; Pope, K; Purschke, M L; Ravinovich, I; Read, K F; Reygers, K; Riabov, V; Riabov, Y; Rosati, M; Rose, A A; Ryu, S S; Saito, N; Sakaguchi, A; Sakaguchi, T; Sako, H; Sakuma, T; Samsonov, V; Sangster, T C; Santo, R; Sato, H D; Sato, S; Sawada, S; Schlei, B R; Schutz, Y; Semenov, V; Seto, R; Shea, T K; Shein, I; Shibata, T-A; Shigaki, K; Shiina, T; Shin, Y H; Sibiriak, I G; Silvermyr, D; Sim, K S; Simon-Gillo, J; Singh, C P; Singh, V; Sivertz, M; Soldatov, A; Soltz, R A; Sorensen, S; Stankus, P W; Starinsky, N; Steinberg, P; Stenlund, E; Ster, A; Stoll, S P; Sugioka, M; Sugitate, T; Sullivan, J P; Sumi, Y; Sun, Z; Suzuki, M; Takagui, E M; Taketani, A; Tamai, M; Tanaka, K H; Tanaka, Y; Taniguchi, E; Tannenbaum, M J; Thomas, J; Thomas, J H; Thomas, T L; Tian, W; Tojo, J; Torii, H; Towell, R S; Tserruya, I; Tsuruoka, H; Tsvetkov, A A; Tuli, S K; Tydesjö, H; Tyurin, N; Ushiroda, T; Van Hecke, H W; Velissaris, C; Velkovska, J; Velkovsky, M; Vinogradov, A A; Volkov, M A; Vorobyov, A; Vznuzdaev, E; Wang, H; Watanabe, Y; White, S N; Witzig, C; Wohn, F K; Woody, C L; Xie, W; Yagi, K; Yokkaichi, S; Young, G R; Yushmanov, I E; Zajc, W A; Zhang, Z; Zhou, S

    2002-05-13

    Two-pion correlations in square root[s(NN)] = 130 GeV Au+Au collisions at RHIC have been measured over a broad range of pair transverse momentum k(T) by the PHENIX experiment at RHIC. The k(T) dependent transverse radii are similar to results from heavy-ion collisions at square root[s(NN)] = 4.1, 4.9, and 17.3 GeV, whereas the longitudinal radius increases monotonically with beam energy. The ratio of the outwards to sidewards transverse radii (R(out)/R(side)) is consistent with unity and independent of k(T). PMID:12005626

  5. Multiplicities in Au-Au and Cu-Cu collisions at sNN=62.4 and 200 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prorok, Dariusz

    2013-09-01

    Likelihood ratio tests are performed for the hypothesis that charged particle multiplicities measured in Au-Au and Cu-Cu collisions at sNN=62.4 and 200 GeV are distributed according to the negative binomial form. Results suggest that the hypothesis should be rejected in all classes of collision systems and centralities of Pioneering High-Energy Nuclear Interaction Experiment Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider measurements. However, the application of the least-squares test statistic with systematic errors included shows that for the collision system Au-Au at sNN=62.4 GeV the hypothesis could not be rejected in general.

  6. Pion interferometry in Au+Au and Cu+Cu collisions at {radical}(s{sub NN})=62.4 and 200 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Abelev, B. I.; Barannikova, O.; Betts, R. R.; Garcia-Solis, E. J.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Iordanova, A.; Suarez, M. C.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Bhati, A. K.; Kumar, L.; Pruthi, N. K.; Ahammed, Z.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Mazumdar, M. R. Dutta; Ganti, M. S.; Ghosh, P.; Mohanty, B.; Nayak, T. K.; Pal, S. K.

    2009-08-15

    We present a systematic analysis of two-pion interferometry in Au+Au collisions at {radical}(s{sub NN})=62.4 GeV and Cu+Cu collisions at {radical}(s{sub NN})=62.4 and 200 GeV using the STAR detector at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). The multiplicity and transverse momentum dependences of the extracted correlation lengths (radii) are studied. The scaling with charged particle multiplicity of the apparent system volume at final interaction is studied for the RHIC energy domain. The multiplicity scaling of the measured correlation radii is found to be independent of colliding system and collision energy.

  7. 750 GeV Diphoton Excess May Not Imply a 750 GeV Resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Won Sang; Kim, Doojin; Kong, Kyoungchul; Lim, Sung Hak; Matchev, Konstantin T.; Park, Jong-Chul; Park, Myeonghun

    2016-04-01

    We discuss nonstandard interpretations of the 750 GeV diphoton excess recently reported by the ATLAS and CMS Collaborations which do not involve a new, relatively broad resonance with a mass near 750 GeV. Instead, we consider the sequential cascade decay of a much heavier, possibly quite narrow, resonance into two photons along with one or more additional particles. The resulting diphoton invariant mass signal is generically rather broad, as suggested by the data. We examine three specific event topologies—the "antler," the "sandwich," and the two-step cascade decay—and show that they all can provide a good fit to the observed published data. In each case, we delineate the preferred mass parameter space selected by the best fit. In spite of the presence of extra particles in the final state, the measured diphoton pT spectrum is moderate due to its anticorrelation with the diphoton invariant mass. We comment on the future prospects of discriminating with higher statistics between our scenarios, as well as from more conventional interpretations.

  8. Ion acceleration with a narrow energy spectrum by nanosecond laser-irradiation of solid target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altana, C.; Lanzalone, G.; Mascali, D.; Muoio, A.; Cirrone, G. A. P.; Schillaci, F.; Tudisco, S.

    2016-02-01

    In laser-driven plasma, ion acceleration of aluminum with the production of a quasi-monoenergetic beam has occurred. A useful device to analyze the ions is the Thomson parabolas spectrometer, a well-known diagnostic that is able to obtain information on charge-to-mass ratio and energy distribution of the charged particles. At the LENS (Laser Energy for Nuclear Science) laboratory of INFN-LNS in Catania, experimental measures were carried out; the features of LENS are: Q-switched Nd:YAG laser with 2 J laser energy, 1064 nm fundamental wavelengths, and 6 ns pulse duration.

  9. PIC Simulations Of Ion Acceleration By Linearly And Circularly Polarized Laser Pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Limpouch, Jiri; Klimo, Ondrej; Psikal, Jan; Tikhonchuk, Vladimir T.; Kawata, Shigeo; Andreev, Alexander A.

    2008-06-24

    Linearly polarized laser radiation accelerates electrons to very high velocities and these electron form a sheath layer on the rear side of thin targets where preferentially protons are accelerated. When mass-limited targets are used, the lateral transport of the absorbed laser energy is reduced and the accelerating field is enhanced. For targets consisting of two ion species, heavier ions facilitate formation of quasi-monoenergetic bunch of lighter ions. For circularly polarized light, fast electron production is suppressed by the absence of the oscillatory component of the ponderomotive force. Ions are accelerated on the front side by the separation field and very thin foil can be accelerated as one massive quasi-neutral block. As all ion species acquire the same velocity, this acceleration mechanism is preferred for heavier ions.

  10. Surface sealing using self-assembled monolayers and its effect on metal diffusion in porous low-k dielectrics studied using monoenergetic positron beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uedono, Akira; Armini, Silvia; Zhang, Yu; Kakizaki, Takeaki; Krause-Rehberg, Reinhard; Anwand, Wolfgang; Wagner, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    Surface sealing effects on the diffusion of metal atoms in porous organosilicate glass (OSG) films were studied by monoenergetic positron beams. For a Cu(5 nm)/MnN(3 nm)/OSG(130 nm) sample fabricated with pore stuffing, C4F8 plasma etch, unstuffing, and a self-assembled monolayer (SAM) sealing process, it was found that pores with cubic pore side lengths of 1.1 and 3.1 nm coexisted in the OSG film. For the sample without the SAM sealing process, metal (Cu and Mn) atoms diffused from the top Cu/MnN layer into the OSG film and were trapped by the pores. As a result, almost all pore interiors were covered with those metals. For the sample damaged by an Ar/C4F8 plasma etch treatment before the SAM sealing process, SAMs diffused into the OSG film, and they were preferentially trapped by larger pores. The cubic pore side length in these pores containing self-assembled molecules was estimated to be 0.7 nm. Through this work, we have demonstrated that monoenergetic positron beams are a powerful tool for characterizing capped porous films and the trapping of atoms and molecules by pores.