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Sample records for ghost expressing trypanosoma

  1. Clathrin expression in Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Clathrin-mediated vesicular trafficking, the mechanism by which proteins and lipids are transported between membrane-bound organelles, accounts for a large proportion of import from the plasma membrane (endocytosis) and transport from the trans-Golgi network towards the endosomal system. Clathrin-mediated events are still poorly understood in the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease in Latin America. In this study, clathrin heavy (TcCHC) and light (TcCLC) chain gene expression and protein localization were investigated in different developmental forms of T. cruzi (epimastigotes, trypomastigotes and amastigotes), using both polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies raised against T. cruzi recombinant proteins. Results Analysis by confocal microscopy revealed an accumulation of TcCHC and TcCLC at the cell anterior, where the flagellar pocket and Golgi complex are located. TcCLC partially colocalized with the Golgi marker TcRAB7-GFP and with ingested albumin, but did not colocalize with transferrin, a protein mostly ingested via uncoated vesicles at the cytostome/cytopharynx complex. Conclusion Clathrin heavy and light chains are expressed in T. cruzi. Both proteins typically localize anterior to the kinetoplast, at the flagellar pocket and Golgi complex region. Our data also indicate that in T. cruzi epimastigotes clathrin-mediated endocytosis of albumin occurs at the flagellar pocket, while clathrin-independent endocytosis of transferrin occurs at the cytostome/cytopharynx complex. PMID:24947310

  2. Geophysical expression of the Ghost Dance Fault, Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Ponce, D.A.; Langenheim, V.E.

    1995-12-01

    Gravity and ground magnetic data collected along surveyed traverses across Antler and Live Yucca Ridges, on the eastern flank of Yucca Mountain, Nevada, reveal small-scale faulting associated with the Ghost Dance and possibly other faults. These studies are part of an effort to evaluate faulting in the vicinity of a potential nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain.

  3. Geophysical expression of the Ghost Dance fault, Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ponce, D.A.; Langenheim, V.E.

    1995-01-01

    Gravity and ground magnetic data collected along surveyed traverses across Antler and Live Yucca Ridges, on the eastern flank of Yucca Mountain, Nevada, reveal small-scale faulting associated with the Ghost Dance and possibly other faults. These studies are part of an effort to evaluate faulting in the vicinity of a potential nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain.

  4. Differential Gene Expression in Benznidazole-Resistant Trypanosoma cruzi Parasites

    PubMed Central

    Villarreal, Diana; Nirdé, Philippe; Hide, Mallorie; Barnabé, Christian; Tibayrenc, Michel

    2005-01-01

    We analyzed the differential gene expression among representative Trypanosoma cruzi stocks in relation to benznidazole exposures using a random differentially expressed sequences (RADES) technique. Studies were carried out with drug pressure both at the natural susceptibility level of the wild-type parasite (50% inhibitory concentration for the wild type) and at different resistance levels. The pattern of differential gene expression performed with resistant stocks was compared to the population structure of this parasite, established by random amplified polymorphic DNA analysis and multilocus enzyme electrophoresis. A RADES band polymorphism was observed, and over- or underexpression was linked to the resistance level of the stock. The analysis of RADES bands suggested that different products may be involved in benznidazole resistance mechanisms. No significant association was found between phylogenetic clustering and benznidazole susceptibility. Benznidazole resistance may involve several mechanisms, depending on the level of drug exposure. PMID:15980339

  5. Escherichia coli ghost production by expression of lysis gene E and Staphylococcal nuclease.

    PubMed

    Haidinger, W; Mayr, U B; Szostak, M P; Resch, S; Lubitz, W

    2003-10-01

    The production of bacterial ghosts from Escherichia coli is accomplished by the controlled expression of phage phiX174 lysis gene E and, in contrast to other gram-negative bacterial species, is accompanied by the rare detection of nonlysed, reproductive cells within the ghost preparation. To overcome this problem, the expression of a secondary killing gene was suggested to give rise to the complete genetic inactivation of the bacterial samples. The expression of staphylococcal nuclease A in E. coli resulted in intracellular accumulation of the protein and degradation of the host DNA into fragments shorter than 100 bp. Two expression systems for the nuclease are presented and were combined with the protein E-mediated lysis system. Under optimized conditions for the coexpression of gene E and the staphylococcal nuclease, the concentration of viable cells fell below the lower limit of detection, whereas the rates of ghost formation were not affected. With regard to the absence of reproductive cells from the ghost fractions, the reduction of viability could be determined as being at least 7 to 8 orders of magnitude. The lysis process was characterized by electrophoretic analysis and absolute quantification of the genetic material within the cells and the culture supernatant via real-time PCR. The ongoing degradation of the bacterial nucleic acids resulted in a continuous quantitative clearance of the genetic material associated with the lysing cells until the concentrations fell below the detection limits of either assay. No functional, released genetic units (genes) were detected within the supernatant during the lysis process, including nuclease expression. PMID:14532068

  6. Gene Discovery through Expressed Sequence Tag Sequencing in Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    Verdun, Ramiro E.; Di Paolo, Nelson; Urmenyi, Turan P.; Rondinelli, Edson; Frasch, Alberto C. C.; Sanchez, Daniel O.

    1998-01-01

    Analysis of expressed sequence tags (ESTs) constitutes a useful approach for gene identification that, in the case of human pathogens, might result in the identification of new targets for chemotherapy and vaccine development. As part of the Trypanosoma cruzi genome project, we have partially sequenced the 5′ ends of 1,949 clones to generate ESTs. The clones were randomly selected from a normalized CL Brener epimastigote cDNA library. A total of 14.6% of the clones were homologous to previously identified T. cruzi genes, while 18.4% had significant matches to genes from other organisms in the database. A total of 67% of the ESTs had no matches in the database, and thus, some of them might be T. cruzi-specific genes. Functional groups of those sequences with matches in the database were constructed according to their putative biological functions. The two largest categories were protein synthesis (23.3%) and cell surface molecules (10.8%). The information reported in this paper should be useful for researchers in the field to analyze genes and proteins of their own interest. PMID:9784549

  7. Midgut expression of immune-related genes in Glossina palpalis gambiensis challenged with Trypanosoma brucei gambiense

    PubMed Central

    Hamidou Soumana, Illiassou; Tchicaya, Bernadette; Chuchana, Paul; Geiger, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Tsetse flies from the subspecies Glossina morsitans morsitans and Glossina palpalis gambiensis, respectively, transmit Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense and Trypanosoma brucei gambiense. The former causes the acute form of sleeping sickness, and the latter provokes the chronic form. Although several articles have reported G. m. morsitans gene expression following trypanosome infection, no comparable investigation has been performed for G. p. gambiensis. This report presents results on the differential expression of immune-related genes in G. p. gambiensis challenged with T. b. gambiense. The aim was to characterize transcriptomic events occurring in the tsetse gut during the parasite establishment step, which is the crucial first step in the parasite development cycle within its vector. The selected genes were chosen from those previously shown to be highly expressed in G. m. morsitans, to allow further comparison of gene expression in both Glossina species. Using quantitative PCR, genes were amplified from the dissected midguts of trypanosome-stimulated, infected, non-infected, and self-cleared flies at three sampling timepoints (3, 10, and 20 days) after a bloodmeal. At the 3-day sampling point, transferrin transcripts were significantly up-regulated in trypanosome-challenged flies versus flies fed on non-infected mice. In self-cleared flies, serpin-2 and thioredoxin peroxidase-3 transcripts were significantly up-regulated 10 days after trypanosome challenge, whereas nitric oxide synthase and chitin-binding protein transcripts were up-regulated after 20 days. Although the expression levels of the other genes were highly variable, the expression of immune-related genes in G. p. gambiensis appears to be a time-dependent process. The possible biological significance of these findings is discussed, and the results are compared with previous reports for G. m. morsitans. PMID:25426112

  8. Expression, purification and crystallization of Trypanosoma cruzi dihydroorotate dehydrogenase complexed with orotate

    SciTech Connect

    Inaoka, Daniel Ken; Takashima, Eizo; Osanai, Arihiro; Shimizu, Hironari; Nara, Takeshi; Aoki, Takashi; Harada, Shigeharu; Kita, Kiyoshi

    2005-10-01

    The Trypanosoma cruzi dihydroorotate dehydrogenase, a key enzyme in pyrimidine de novo biosynthesis and redox homeostasis, was crystallized in complex with its first reaction product, orotate. Dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (DHOD) catalyzes the oxidation of dihydroorotate to orotate, the fourth step and the only redox reaction in the de novo biosynthesis of pyrimidine. DHOD from Trypanosoma cruzi (TcDHOD) has been expressed as a recombinant protein in Escherichia coli and purified to homogeneity. Crystals of the TcDHOD–orotate complex were grown at 277 K by the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion technique using polyethylene glycol 3350 as a precipitant. The crystals diffract to better than 1.8 Å resolution using synchrotron radiation (λ = 0.900 Å). X-ray diffraction data were collected at 100 K and processed to 1.9 Å resolution with 98.2% completeness and an overall R{sub merge} of 7.8%. The TcDHOD crystals belong to the orthorhombic space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 67.87, b = 71.89, c = 123.27 Å. The presence of two molecules in the asymmetric unit (2 × 34 kDa) gives a crystal volume per protein weight (V{sub M}) of 2.2 Å{sup 3} Da{sup −1} and a solvent content of 44%.

  9. Tigutcystatin, a cysteine protease inhibitor from Triatoma infestans midgut expressed in response to Trypanosoma cruzi

    SciTech Connect

    Buarque, Diego S.; Spindola, Leticia M.N.; Martins, Rafael M.; Braz, Gloria R.C.; Tanaka, Aparecida S.

    2011-09-23

    Highlights: {yields} Tigutcystatin inhibits Trypanosoma cruzi cysteine proteases with high specificity. {yields} Tigutcystatin expression is up-regulated in response to T. cruzi infection. {yields} It is the first cysteine proteases inhibitor characterized from a triatomine insect. -- Abstract: The insect Triatoma infestans is a vector of Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiological agent of Chagas disease. A cDNA library was constructed from T. infestans anterior midgut, and 244 clones were sequenced. Among the EST sequences, an open reading frame (ORF) with homology to a cystatin type 2 precursor was identified. Then, a 288-bp cDNA fragment encoding mature cystatin (lacking signal peptide) named Tigutcystatin was cloned fused to a N-terminal His tag in pET-14b vector, and the protein expressed in Escherichia coli strain Rosetta gami. Tigutcystatin purified and cleaved by thrombin to remove His tag presented molecular mass of 11 kDa and 10,137 Da by SDS-PAGE and MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry, respectively. Purified Tigutcystatin was shown to be a tight inhibitor towards cruzain, a T. cruzi cathepsin L-like enzyme (K{sub i} = 3.29 nM) and human cathepsin L (K{sub i} = 3.78 nM). Tissue specific expression analysis showed that Tigutcystatin was mostly expressed in anterior midgut, although amplification in small intestine was also detected by semi quantitative RT-PCR. qReal time PCR confirmed that Tigutcystatin mRNA is significantly up-regulated in anterior midgut when T. infestans is infected with T. cruzi. Together, these results indicate that Tigutcystatin may be involved in modulation of T. cruzi in intestinal tract by inhibiting parasite cysteine proteases, which represent the virulence factors of this protozoan.

  10. Global Gene Expression Profiling through the Complete Life Cycle of Trypanosoma vivax

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Andrew P.; Goyard, Sophie; Xia, Dong; Foth, Bernardo J.; Sanders, Mandy; Wastling, Jonathan M.; Minoprio, Paola; Berriman, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    The parasitic flagellate Trypanosoma vivax is a cause of animal trypanosomiasis across Africa and South America. The parasite has a digenetic life cycle, passing between mammalian hosts and insect vectors, and a series of developmental forms adapted to each life cycle stage. Each point in the life cycle presents radically different challenges to parasite metabolism and physiology and distinct host interactions requiring remodeling of the parasite cell surface. Transcriptomic and proteomic studies of the related parasites T. brucei and T. congolense have shown how gene expression is regulated during their development. New methods for in vitro culture of the T. vivax insect stages have allowed us to describe global gene expression throughout the complete T. vivax life cycle for the first time. We combined transcriptomic and proteomic analysis of each life stage using RNA-seq and mass spectrometry respectively, to identify genes with patterns of preferential transcription or expression. While T. vivax conforms to a pattern of highly conserved gene expression found in other African trypanosomes, (e.g. developmental regulation of energy metabolism, restricted expression of a dominant variant antigen, and expression of ‘Fam50’ proteins in the insect mouthparts), we identified significant differences in gene expression affecting metabolism in the fly and a suite of T. vivax-specific genes with predicted cell-surface expression that are preferentially expressed in the mammal (‘Fam29, 30, 42’) or the vector (‘Fam34, 35, 43’). T. vivax differs significantly from other African trypanosomes in the developmentally-regulated proteins likely to be expressed on its cell surface and thus, in the structure of the host-parasite interface. These unique features may yet explain the species differences in life cycle and could, in the form of bloodstream-stage proteins that do not undergo antigenic variation, provide targets for therapy. PMID:26266535

  11. Mitochondrial Gene Expression Is Responsive to Starvation Stress and Developmental Transition in Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Aubie K.; Kalem, Murat C.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Trypanosoma cruzi parasites causing Chagas disease are passed between mammals by the triatomine bug vector. Within the insect, T. cruzi epimastigote-stage cells replicate and progress through the increasingly nutrient-restricted digestive tract, differentiating into infectious, nonreplicative metacyclic trypomastigotes. Thus, we evaluated how nutrient perturbations or metacyclogenesis affects mitochondrial gene expression in different insect life cycle stages. We compared mitochondrial RNA abundances in cultures containing fed, replicating epimastigotes, differentiating cultures containing both starved epimastigotes and metacyclic trypomastigotes and epimastigote starvation cultures. We observed increases in mitochondrial rRNAs and some mRNAs in differentiating cultures. These increases predominated only for the edited CYb mRNA in cultures enriched for metacyclic trypomastigotes. For the other transcripts, abundance increases were linked to starvation and were strongest in culture fractions with a high population of starved epimastigotes. We show that loss of both glucose and amino acids results in rapid increases in RNA abundances that are quickly reduced when these nutrients are returned. Furthermore, the individual RNAs exhibit distinct temporal abundance patterns, suggestive of multiple mechanisms regulating individual transcript abundance. Finally, increases in mitochondrial respiratory complex subunit mRNA abundances were not matched by increases in abundances of nucleus-encoded subunit mRNAs, nor were there statistically significant increases in protein levels of three nucleus-encoded subunits tested. These results show that, similarly to that in T. brucei, the mitochondrial genome in T. cruzi has the potential to alter gene expression in response to environmental or developmental stimuli but for an as-yet-unknown purpose. IMPORTANCE Chagas disease is caused by insect-transmitted Trypanosoma cruzi. Halting T. cruzi’s life cycle in one of its

  12. Recombinant expression and biochemical characterisation of two alanyl aminopeptidases of Trypanosoma congolense.

    PubMed

    Pillay, Davita; Boulangé, Alain F V; Coustou, Virginie; Baltz, Théo; Coetzer, Theresa H T

    2013-12-01

    Trypanosoma congolense is a haemoprotozoan parasite that causes African animal trypanosomosis, a wasting disease of cattle and small ruminants. Current control methods are unsatisfactory and no conventional vaccine exists due to antigenic variation. An anti-disease vaccine approach to control T. congolense has been proposed requiring the identification of parasitic factors that cause disease. Immunoprecipitation of T. congolense antigens using sera from infected trypanotolerant cattle allowed the identification of several immunogenic antigens including two M1 type aminopeptidases (APs). The two APs were cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. As the APs were expressed as insoluble inclusion bodies it was necessary to develop a method for solubilisation and subsequent refolding to restore conformation and activity. The refolded APs both showed a distinct substrate preference for H-Ala-AMC, an optimum pH of 8.0, puromycin-sensitivity, inhibition by bestatin and amastatin, and cytoplasmic localisation. The two APs are expressed in procyclic metacyclic and bloodstream form parasites. Down-regulation of both APs by RNAi resulted in a slightly reduced growth rate in procyclic parasites in vitro. PMID:24177338

  13. Synchronous expression of individual metacyclic variant surface glycoprotein genes in Trypanosoma brucei.

    PubMed

    Ramey-Butler, Kiantra; Ullu, Elisabetta; Kolev, Nikolay G; Tschudi, Christian

    2015-01-01

    One distinctive feature of the Trypanosoma brucei life cycle is the presence of two discrete populations that are based on differential expression of variant surface glycoproteins (VSGs). Both are adapted to the environmental pressures they face and more importantly, both contribute directly to transmission. Metacyclics in the tsetse fly enable transmission to a new mammalian host, whereas bloodstream trypanosomes must avoid immune destruction to the extent that sufficient numbers are available for transmission, when the insect vector takes a blood meal. At present, there are few investigations on the molecular aspects of parasite biology in the tsetse vector and specifically about the activation of metacyclic VSG gene expression. Here we used an established in vitro differentiation system based on the overexpression of the RNA-binding protein 6 (RBP6), to monitor two metacyclic VSGs (VSG 397 and VSG 653) during development from procyclics to infectious metacyclic forms. We observed that activation of these two mVSGs was simultaneous both at the transcript and protein level, and manifested by the appearance of only one of the mVSGs in individual cells. PMID:25896436

  14. Role of expression site switching in the development of resistance to human Trypanosome Lytic Factor-1 in Trypanosoma brucei brucei

    PubMed Central

    Kieft, Rudo; Stephens, Natalie A.; Capewell, Paul; MacLeod, Annette; Hajduk, Stephen L.

    2012-01-01

    Human high-density lipoproteins (HDLs) play an important role in human innate immunity to infection by African trypanosomes with a minor subclass, Trypanosome Lytic Factor-1 (TLF-1), displaying highly selective cytotoxicity to the veterinary pathogen Trypanosoma brucei brucei but not against the human sleeping sickness pathogens Trypanosoma brucei gambiense or Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense. T. b. rhodesiense has evolved the serum resistance associated protein (SRA) that binds and confers resistance to TLF-1 while T. b. gambiense lacks the gene for SRA indicating that these parasites have diverse mechanisms of resistance to TLF-1. Recently, we have shown that T. b. gambiense (group 1) resistance to TLF-1 correlated with the loss of the haptoglobin/hemoglobin receptor (HpHbR) expression, the protein responsible for high affinity binding and uptake of TLF-1. In the course of these studies we also examined TLF-1 resistant T. b. brucei cell lines, generated by long-term in vitro selection. We found that changes in TLF-1 susceptibility in T. b. brucei correlated with changes in variant surface glycoprotein (VSG) expression in addition to reduced TLF-1 binding and uptake. To determine whether the expressed VSG or expression site associated genes (ESAGs) contribute to TLF-1 resistance we prepared a TLF-1 resistant T. b. brucei with a selectable marker in a silent bloodstream expression site (BES). Drug treatment allowed rapid selection of trypanosomes that activated the tagged BES. These studies show that TLF-1 resistance in T. b. brucei is largely independent of the expressed VSG or ESAGs further supporting the central role of HpHbR expression in TLF-1 susceptibility in these cells. PMID:22226682

  15. Role of expression site switching in the development of resistance to human Trypanosome Lytic Factor-1 in Trypanosoma brucei brucei.

    PubMed

    Kieft, Rudo; Stephens, Natalie A; Capewell, Paul; MacLeod, Annette; Hajduk, Stephen L

    2012-05-01

    Human high-density lipoproteins (HDLs) play an important role in human innate immunity to infection by African trypanosomes with a minor subclass, Trypanosome Lytic Factor-1 (TLF-1), displaying highly selective cytotoxicity to the veterinary pathogen Trypanosoma brucei brucei but not against the human sleeping sickness pathogens Trypanosoma brucei gambiense or Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense. T. b. rhodesiense has evolved the serum resistance associated protein (SRA) that binds and confers resistance to TLF-1 while T. b. gambiense lacks the gene for SRA indicating that these parasites have diverse mechanisms of resistance to TLF-1. Recently, we have shown that T. b. gambiense (group 1) resistance to TLF-1 correlated with the loss of the haptoglobin/hemoglobin receptor (HpHbR) expression, the protein responsible for high affinity binding and uptake of TLF-1. In the course of these studies we also examined TLF-1 resistant T. b. brucei cell lines, generated by long-term in vitro selection. We found that changes in TLF-1 susceptibility in T. b. brucei correlated with changes in variant surface glycoprotein (VSG) expression in addition to reduced TLF-1 binding and uptake. To determine whether the expressed VSG or expression site associated genes (ESAGs) contribute to TLF-1 resistance we prepared a TLF-1 resistant T. b. brucei with a selectable marker in a silent bloodstream expression site (BES). Drug treatment allowed rapid selection of trypanosomes that activated the tagged BES. These studies show that TLF-1 resistance in T. b. brucei is largely independent of the expressed VSG or ESAGs further supporting the central role of HpHbR expression in TLF-1 susceptibility in these cells. PMID:22226682

  16. Expression and deletion analysis of the Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense cysteine protease in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Pamer, E G; Davis, C E; So, M

    1991-01-01

    Trypanosoma brucei, the cause of African sleeping sickness, differentiates in the mammalian bloodstream from a long, slender trypanosome into a short, stumpy trypanosome. This event is necessary for infection of the tsetse fly and maintenance of the life cycle. We have previously shown that the stumpy form contains 10- to 15-fold-greater cysteine protease activity than either the slender form or the insect midgut procyclic, and we have isolated a cDNA encoding the protease. In order to determine whether the cDNA encodes the developmentally regulated cysteine protease, we have purified the protease from trypanosomes and have made a polyclonal antiserum against it. The trypanosomal protease gene was then expressed in Escherichia coli with three different methionines within the pre- and propeptides acting as initiation sites. In each case, a protein was synthesized that was recognized by an antiserum specific for the developmentally regulated trypanosomal cysteine protease. The protein synthesized from the more upstream initiation site within the propeptide was proteolytically active. The recombinant protease and the trypanosomal enzyme were identical with respect to peptide substrates and protease inhibitors. The protein remained active when synthesized in a truncated form lacking the nine consecutive prolines and carboxy-terminus extension, indicating that the terminal 108 amino acids are not necessary for proteolytic activity. Images PMID:1997411

  17. Expression, purification and crystallization of Trypanosoma cruzi dihydroorotate dehydrogenase complexed with orotate.

    PubMed

    Inaoka, Daniel Ken; Takashima, Eizo; Osanai, Arihiro; Shimizu, Hironari; Nara, Takeshi; Aoki, Takashi; Harada, Shigeharu; Kita, Kiyoshi

    2005-10-01

    Dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (DHOD) catalyzes the oxidation of dihydroorotate to orotate, the fourth step and the only redox reaction in the de novo biosynthesis of pyrimidine. DHOD from Trypanosoma cruzi (TcDHOD) has been expressed as a recombinant protein in Escherichia coli and purified to homogeneity. Crystals of the TcDHOD-orotate complex were grown at 277 K by the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion technique using polyethylene glycol 3350 as a precipitant. The crystals diffract to better than 1.8 A resolution using synchrotron radiation (lambda = 0.900 A). X-ray diffraction data were collected at 100 K and processed to 1.9 A resolution with 98.2% completeness and an overall Rmerge of 7.8%. The TcDHOD crystals belong to the orthorhombic space group P2(1)2(1)2(1), with unit-cell parameters a = 67.87, b = 71.89, c = 123.27 A. The presence of two molecules in the asymmetric unit (2 x 34 kDa) gives a crystal volume per protein weight (VM) of 2.2 A3 Da(-1) and a solvent content of 44%. PMID:16511183

  18. FACT plays a major role in histone dynamics affecting VSG expression site control in Trypanosoma brucei.

    PubMed

    Denninger, Viola; Rudenko, Gloria

    2014-11-01

    Chromatin remodelling is involved in the transcriptional regulation of the RNA polymerase I transcribed variant surface glycoprotein (VSG) expression sites (ESs) of Trypanosoma brucei. We show that the T. brucei FACT complex contains the Pob3 and Spt16 subunits, and plays a key role in ES silencing. We see an inverse correlation between transcription and condensed chromatin, whereby FACT knockdown results in ES derepression and more open chromatin around silent ES promoters. Derepressed ESs show increased sensitivity to micrococcal nuclease (MNase) digestion, and a decrease in histones at silent ES promoters but not telomeres. In contrast, FACT knockdown results in more histones at the active ES, correlated with transcription shut-down. ES promoters are derepressed in cells stalled at the G2/M cell cycle stage after knockdown of FACT, but not in G2/M cells stalled after knockdown of cyclin 6. This argues that the observed ES derepression is a direct consequence of histone chaperone activity by FACT at the G2/M cell cycle stage which could affect transcription elongation, rather than an indirect consequence of a cell cycle checkpoint. These experiments highlight the role of the FACT complex in cell cycle-specific chromatin remodelling within VSG ESs. PMID:25266856

  19. FACT plays a major role in histone dynamics affecting VSG expression site control in Trypanosoma brucei

    PubMed Central

    Denninger, Viola; Rudenko, Gloria

    2014-01-01

    Chromatin remodelling is involved in the transcriptional regulation of the RNA polymerase I transcribed variant surface glycoprotein (VSG) expression sites (ESs) of Trypanosoma brucei. We show that the T. brucei FACT complex contains the Pob3 and Spt16 subunits, and plays a key role in ES silencing. We see an inverse correlation between transcription and condensed chromatin, whereby FACT knockdown results in ES derepression and more open chromatin around silent ES promoters. Derepressed ESs show increased sensitivity to micrococcal nuclease (MNase) digestion, and a decrease in histones at silent ES promoters but not telomeres. In contrast, FACT knockdown results in more histones at the active ES, correlated with transcription shut-down. ES promoters are derepressed in cells stalled at the G2/M cell cycle stage after knockdown of FACT, but not in G2/M cells stalled after knockdown of cyclin 6. This argues that the observed ES derepression is a direct consequence of histone chaperone activity by FACT at the G2/M cell cycle stage which could affect transcription elongation, rather than an indirect consequence of a cell cycle checkpoint. These experiments highlight the role of the FACT complex in cell cycle-specific chromatin remodelling within VSG ESs. PMID:25266856

  20. Expression of Procyclin mRNAs during Cyclical Transmission of Trypanosoma brucei

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Trypanosoma brucei, the parasite causing human sleeping sickness, relies on the tsetse fly for its transmission. In the insect, EP and GPEET procyclins are the major surface glycoproteins of procyclic (midgut) forms of the parasite, with GPEET predominating in the early procyclic form and two isoforms of EP in the late procyclic form. EP procyclins were previously detected on salivary gland trypanosomes, presumably epimastigotes, by immunoelectron microscopy. However, no procyclins could be detected by mass spectrometry when parasites were isolated from infected glands. We have used qualitative and quantitative RT-PCR to analyse the procyclin mRNAs expressed by trypanosomes in the tsetse midgut and salivary glands at different time points after infection. The coding regions of the three EP isoforms (EP1, EP2 and EP3) are extremely similar, but their 3′ untranslated regions contain unique sequences that make it possible to assign the cDNAs amplified by this technique. With the exception of EP2, we found that the spectrum of procyclin mRNAs expressed in the midgut mirrors the protein repertoire of early and established procyclic forms. Surprisingly, procyclin mRNAs, including that of GPEET, are present at relatively high levels in salivary gland trypanosomes, although the proteins are rarely detected by immunofluorescence. Additional experiments using transgenic trypanosomes expressing reporter genes or mutant forms of procyclin point to a mechanism of translational or post-translational control, involving the procyclin coding regions, in salivary gland trypanosomes. It is widely accepted that T. brucei always has a coat of either variant surface glycoprotein or procyclin. It has been known for many years that the epimastigote form does not have a variant surface glycoprotein coat. The finding that this life cycle stage is usually negative for procyclin as well is new, and means that the paradigm will need to be revised. PMID:16276404

  1. Pepper's Ghost

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenslade, Thomas B.

    2011-09-01

    Without applications of physics such as counter-weighted sets and backdrops, inclined planes, stage lighting instruments, and other mechanisms for deus ex machina, dramatic productions would revert to the words only—fine for Shakespeare and Becket, but not good for audiences who are accustomed to experiencing plays with the eye as well as the ear. Pepper's Ghost is a 19th-century stage illusion, based on basic optical principles, that can find its way into your introductory classroom.

  2. Reflective ghost imaging through turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Hardy, Nicholas D.; Shapiro, Jeffrey H.

    2011-12-15

    Recent work has indicated that ghost imaging may have applications in standoff sensing. However, most theoretical work has addressed transmission-based ghost imaging. To be a viable remote-sensing system, the ghost imager needs to image rough-surfaced targets in reflection through long, turbulent optical paths. We develop, within a Gaussian-state framework, expressions for the spatial resolution, image contrast, and signal-to-noise ratio of such a system. We consider rough-surfaced targets that create fully developed speckle in their returns and Kolmogorov-spectrum turbulence that is uniformly distributed along all propagation paths. We address both classical and nonclassical optical sources, as well as a computational ghost imager.

  3. Enhanced succinic acid production in Aspergillus saccharolyticus by heterologous expression of fumarate reductase from Trypanosoma brucei.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lei; Lübeck, Mette; Ahring, Birgitte K; Lübeck, Peter S

    2016-02-01

    Aspergillus saccharolyticus exhibits great potential as a cell factory for industrial production of dicarboxylic acids. In the analysis of the organic acid profile, A. saccharolyticus was cultivated in an acid production medium using two different pH conditions. The specific activities of the enzymes, pyruvate carboxylase (PYC), malate dehydrogenase (MDH), and fumarase (FUM), involved in the reductive tricarboxylic acid (rTCA) branch, were examined and compared in cells harvested from the acid production medium and a complete medium. The results showed that ambient pH had a significant impact on the pattern and the amount of organic acids produced by A. saccharolyticus. The wild-type strain produced higher amount of malic acid and succinic acid in the pH buffered condition (pH 6.5) compared with the pH non-buffered condition. The enzyme assays showed that the rTCA branch was active in the acid production medium as well as the complete medium, but the measured enzyme activities were different depending on the media. Furthermore, a soluble NADH-dependent fumarate reductase gene (frd) from Trypanosoma brucei was inserted and expressed in A. saccharolyticus. The expression of the frd gene led to an enhanced production of succinic acid in frd transformants compared with the wild-type in both pH buffered and pH non-buffered conditions with highest amount produced in the pH buffered condition (16.2 ± 0.5 g/L). This study demonstrates the feasibility of increasing succinic acid production through the cytosolic reductive pathway by genetic engineering in A. saccharolyticus. PMID:26521243

  4. Generation of Salmonella ghost cells expressing fimbrial antigens of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli and evaluation of their antigenicity in a murine model

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Chan Song; Hur, Jin; Eo, Seong Kug; Park, Sang-Youel; Lee, John Hwa

    2016-01-01

    Salmonella Typhimurium ghost cells expressing K88ab, K88ac, K99, and FasA fimbriae of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) in their envelopes were constructed. The genes encoding the fimbriae were individually cloned into an expression plasmid, pMMP81, carrying the asd gene, which was subsequently electroporated into the Δasd S. Typhimurium mutant. Plasmid pJHLP99, carrying the phiX174 lysis gene E, was also subsequently electroporated into the Salmonella mutant. The presence of the individual fimbriae on the ghost cells was examined by Western blot analysis. Forty BALB/c mice were equally divided into 2 groups of 20 mice each. Group A mice were intramuscularly vaccinated with a mixture of the 4 ghost cells expressing the individual fimbriae. The group B mice were inoculated with sterile phosphate-buffered saline as a control. The antigen-specific serum IgG concentrations were significantly higher in group A than in group B from week 2 until week 6 after inoculation. In addition, the antigen-specific IgA concentrations in fecal samples were significantly higher in group A than in group B at week 2 after inoculation. A large difference between the groups in the number of antigen-specific IgA-secreting cells in the small intestine was observed by immunohistochemical study. Also, the splenic lymphocyte proliferative responses were significantly greater in group A than in the control mice. These results suggest that vaccination with our Salmonella ghost cells can induce both humoral and cell-mediated immune responses and that the increased number of antigen-specific IgA-secreting cells in the small intestine may be correlated with the elevated fecal IgA immune response. PMID:26733731

  5. Expression and the Peculiar Enzymatic Behavior of the Trypanosoma cruzi NTH1 DNA Glycosylase

    PubMed Central

    Ormeño, Fernando; Barrientos, Camila; Ramirez, Santiago; Ponce, Iván; Valenzuela, Lucía; Sepúlveda, Sofía; Bitar, Mainá; Kemmerling, Ulrike; Machado, Carlos Renato; Cabrera, Gonzalo; Galanti, Norbel

    2016-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiological agent of Chagas’ disease, presents three cellular forms (trypomastigotes, epimastigotes and amastigotes), all of which are submitted to oxidative species in its hosts. However, T. cruzi is able to resist oxidative stress suggesting a high efficiency of its DNA repair machinery.The Base Excision Repair (BER) pathway is one of the main DNA repair mechanisms in other eukaryotes and in T. cruzi as well. DNA glycosylases are enzymes involved in the recognition of oxidative DNA damage and in the removal of oxidized bases, constituting the first step of the BER pathway. Here, we describe the presence and activity of TcNTH1, a nuclear T. cruzi DNA glycosylase. Surprisingly, purified recombinant TcNTH1 does not remove the thymine glycol base, but catalyzes the cleavage of a probe showing an AP site. The same activity was found in epimastigote and trypomastigote homogenates suggesting that the BER pathway is not involved in thymine glycol DNA repair. TcNTH1 DNA-binding properties assayed in silico are in agreement with the absence of a thymine glycol removing function of that parasite enzyme. Over expression of TcNTH1 decrease parasite viability when transfected epimastigotes are submitted to a sustained production of H2O2.Therefore, TcNTH1 is the only known NTH1 orthologous unable to eliminate thymine glycol derivatives but that recognizes and cuts an AP site, most probably by a beta-elimination mechanism. We cannot discard that TcNTH1 presents DNA glycosylase activity on other DNA base lesions. Accordingly, a different DNA repair mechanism should be expected leading to eliminate thymine glycol from oxidized parasite DNA. Furthermore, TcNTH1 may play a role in the AP site recognition and processing. PMID:27284968

  6. Humoral immune responses in brushtail possums (Trichosurus vulpecula) induced by bacterial ghosts expressing possum zona pellucida 3 protein.

    PubMed

    Cui, Xianlan; Duckworth, Janine A; Lubitz, Petra; Molinia, Frank C; Haller, Christoph; Lubitz, Werner; Cowan, Phil E

    2010-06-11

    The introduced common brushtail possum (Trichosurus vulpecula) is a major pest in New Zealand and immunocontraceptive vaccines are being developed for biocontrol of possum populations, with bacterial ghosts (BGs) being evaluated as a means of oral delivery. Recombinant BGs expressing possum zona pellucida 3 protein (ZP3) as an L' membrane-anchored protein (ZP3-L') or as an S-layer SbsA-fusion protein (MBP-SbsA-ZP3) were produced by the expression of the cloned bacteriophage phiX174 lysis gene E in E. coli NM522. The humoral immune responses of possums immunised with BGs expressing possum ZP3 were investigated following oral, intranasal/conjunctival, parenteral, and intraduodenal administration to evaluate the BG-ZP3 system for possum fertility control. Antibodies to possum ZP3 were detected in the serum, oviduct secretions, and follicular fluid of immunised animals. Intranasal/conjunctival immunisation elicited reliable antibody immune response in serum and at a key effector site, the ovarian follicular fluid. Intraduodenal administration of possum ZP3 BG vaccine as a priming immunisation elicited significant systemic immune responses, but oral immunisation did not, indicating that protection of BG vaccines from degradation by gastric acidity would enhance the effectiveness of orally delivered vaccines. The detection of antibodies at elevated levels at target sites in the reproductive tract following mucosal delivery demonstrates, for the first time, the potential of BGs as an effective system for vaccine delivery to wild animals, and intranasal/conjunctival immunisation as a promising means for delivery of immunocontraceptive vaccines to wild animals. PMID:20434548

  7. Bacterial ghosts as multifunctional vaccine particles.

    PubMed

    Szostak, M P; Mader, H; Truppe, M; Kamal, M; Eko, F O; Huter, V; Marchart, J; Jechlinger, W; Haidinger, W; Brand, E; Denner, E; Resch, S; Dehlin, E; Katinger, A; Kuen, B; Haslberger, A; Hensel, A; Lubitz, W

    1997-02-01

    Expression of cloned PhiX174 gene E in Gram-negative bacteria results in lysis of the bacteria by formation of an E-specific transmembrane tunnel structure built through the cell envelope complex. Bacterial ghosts have been produced from a variety of bacteria including Escherichia coli. Salmonella typhimurium, Salmonella enteritidis, Vibrio cholerae, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, Pasteurella haemolytica, Pasteurella multocida, and Helicobacter pylori. Such ghosts are used as non-living candidate vaccines and represent an alternative to heat or chemically inactivated bacteria. In recombinant ghosts, foreign proteins can be inserted into the inner membrane prior to E-mediated lysis via specific N-, or C-, or N- and C-terminal anchor sequences. The export of proteins into the periplasmic space or the expression of recombinant S-layer proteins vastly extents the capacity of ghosts or recombinant ghosts as carriers of foreign epitopes or proteins. Oral, aerogenic or parenteral applications of (recombinant) ghosts in experimental animals induced specific humoral and cellular immune responses against bacterial and target components including protective mucosal immunity. The most relevant advantage of ghosts and recombinant bacterial ghosts as immunogens is that no inactivation procedures that denature relevant immunogenic determinants are employed in the production of ghosts used as vaccines or as carriers of relevant antigens. The inserted target antigens into the inner membrane or into S-layer proteins are not limited in size. PMID:9382740

  8. Permeability properties of erythrocyte ghosts.

    PubMed

    TEORELL, T

    1952-05-01

    1. Erythrocyte ghosts from human blood were produced by gentle water hemolysis. The ghost-containing hemolysate (about 20 mN) was added to media of different composition (KCl, NaCl, glucose, sucrose, etc.) and varying concentration ranging from 8 to 840 mN. The volume changes of the ghost cells were followed by a light absorption method. The potassium and sodium concentrations were also analyzed in some representative cases. 2. The ghosts shrank, or swelled, in two stages. An initial phase with a momentary expulsion, or uptake, of water leading to an osmotic equilibrium, was followed by a second phase in which a slow swelling or shrinking proceeded toward a final constant volume. 3. The ghosts were semipermeable in the sense that water always passed rapidly in either direction so as to maintain isotonicity with the external medium. The relation between ghost cell volumes (V) and the total concentration (C(e)) of the suspension medium can be expressed by a modified van't Hoff-Mariotte law: (C(e) + a)(V - b) = constant. Here a is a term correcting for an internal pressure and b is the non-solvent volume of the ghost cells. This means that the ghosts behave as perfect osmometers. 4. On the other hand appreciable concentration differences of the K and Na ions could be maintained across the intact ghost cell membranes for long periods. Whether this phenomenon is due simply to very low cation permeability or to active transport processes cannot be decided, although the first assumption appears more probable. 5. When the ghosts were treated with small concentrations of a lytic substance like Na oleate, the alkali ion transfer was greatly increased. This seems to be a simple exchange diffusion process with simultaneous, continued maintenance of osmotic equilibrium (= the second phase). A simplified theory is also given for the kinetics of the volume variations and ion exchange during the second phase (cf. the Appendix). 6. Miscellaneous observations on the effects of p

  9. Expression, purification and kinetic characterization of His-tagged glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase from Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Cheleski, Juliana; Freitas, Renato F; Wiggers, Helton José; Rocha, Josmar R; de Araújo, Ana Paula Ulian; Montanari, Carlos A

    2011-04-01

    Trypanosomes are flagellated protozoa responsible for serious parasitic diseases that have been classified by the World Health Organization as tropical sicknesses of major importance. One important drug target receiving considerable attention is the enzyme glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase from the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease (T. cruzi Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (TcGAPDH); EC 1.2.1.12). TcGAPDH is a key enzyme in the glycolytic pathway of T. cruzi and catalyzes the oxidative phosphorylation of D-glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate (G3P) to 1,3-bisphosphoglycerate (1,3-BPG) coupled to the reduction of oxidized nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, (NAD(+)) to NADH, the reduced form. Herein, we describe the cloning of the T. cruzi gene for TcGAPDH into the pET-28a(+) vector, its expression as a tagged protein in Escherichia coli, purification and kinetic characterization. The His(6)-tagged TcGAPDH was purified by affinity chromatography. Enzyme activity assays for the recombinant His(6)-TcGAPDH were carried out spectrophotometrically to determine the kinetic parameters. The apparent Michaelis-Menten constant (K(M)(app)) determined for D-glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate and NAD(+) were 352±21 and 272±25 μM, respectively, which were consistent with the values for the untagged enzyme reported in the literature. We have demonstrated by the use of Isothermal Titration Calorimetry (ITC) that this vector modification resulted in activity preserved for a higher period. We also report here the use of response surface methodology (RSM) to determine the region of optimal conditions for enzyme activity. A quadratic model was developed by RSM to describe the enzyme activity in terms of pH and temperature as independent variables. According to the RMS contour plots and variance analysis, the maximum enzyme activity was at 29.1°C and pH 8.6. Above 37°C, the enzyme activity starts to fall, which may be related to previous

  10. Predominant clonal evolution leads to a close parity between gene expression profiles and subspecific phylogeny in Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Telleria, Jenny; Barnabé, Christian; Hide, Mallorie; Bañuls, Anne-Laure; Tibayrenc, Michel

    2004-09-01

    We investigated the relationships between overall phylogenetic diversity in Trypanosoma cruzi evidenced by multilocus markers (MLEE and RAPD) on the one hand, and gene expression patterns, revealed by mRNA analysis on the other hand. Nineteen laboratory-cloned stocks representative of this parasite's overall phylogenetic diversity and ecogeographical range were analyzed using random amplified differentially expressed sequences (RADES). The bat trypanosome T. cruzi marinkellei was taken as outgroup. The profiles obtained showed that RADES polymorphism cannot be considered as a simple subsample of general RAPD polymorphism. Indeed, many RADES bands were not present in general RAPD profiles, and vice versa. Phylogenies obtained from RADES on the one hand, and MLEE/RAPD on the other hand, were very similar. This suggests that in spite of the recent observation of hybrid genotypes and mosaic genes in T. cruzi, clonal evolution in this parasite has been preponderant enough on an evolutionary scale to carve the polymorphism on all types of DNA sequences, including expressed genes, although these genes are assumed to undergo natural selection pressure contrary to noncoding sequences and neutral polymorphisms. PMID:15279959

  11. Ghost cell lesions

    PubMed Central

    Rajesh, E.; Jimson, Sudha; Masthan, K. M. K.; Balachander, N.

    2015-01-01

    Ghost cells have been a controversy for a long time. Ghost cell is a swollen/enlarged epithelial cell with eosnophilic cytoplasm, but without a nucleus. In routine H and E staining these cells give a shadowy appearance. Hence these cells are also called as shadow cells or translucent cells. The appearance of these cells varies from lesion to lesion involving odontogenic and nonodontogenic lesions. This article review about the origin, nature and significance of ghost cells in different neoplasms. PMID:26015694

  12. Generation and analysis of expressed sequence tags from Trypanosoma cruzi trypomastigote and amastigote cDNA libraries.

    PubMed

    Agüero, Fernán; Abdellah, Karim Ben; Tekiel, Valeria; Sánchez, Daniel O; González, Antonio

    2004-08-01

    We have generated 2771 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) from two cDNA libraries of Trypanosoma cruzi CL-Brener. The libraries were constructed from trypomastigote and amastigotes, using a spliced leader primer to synthesize the cDNA second strand, thus selecting for full-length cDNAs. Since the libraries were not normalized nor pre-screened, we compared the representation of transcripts between the two using a statistical test and identify a subset of transcripts that show apparent differential representation. A non-redundant set of 1619 reconstructed transcripts was generated by sequence clustering. This dataset was used to perform similarity searches against protein and nucleotide databases. Based on these searches, 339 sequences could be assigned a putative identity. One thousand one-hundred and sixteen sequences in the non-redundant clustered dataset (68.8%) are new expression tags, not represented in the T. cruzi epimastigote ESTs that are in the public databases. Additional information is provided online at http://genoma.unsam.edu.ar/projects/tram. To the best of our knowledge these are the first ESTs reported for the life cycle stages of T. cruzi that occur in the vertebrate host. PMID:15478800

  13. Differential expression and characterization of a member of the mucin-associated surface protein family secreted by Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    De Pablos, Luis Miguel; González, Gloria González; Solano Parada, Jennifer; Seco Hidalgo, Víctor; Díaz Lozano, Isabel María; Gómez Samblás, María Mercedes; Cruz Bustos, Teresa; Osuna, Antonio

    2011-10-01

    We describe the characterization, purification, expression, and location of a 52-kDa protein secreted during interaction between the metacyclic form of Trypanosoma cruzi and its target host cell. The protein, which we have named MASP52, belongs to the family of mucin-associated surface proteins (MASPs). The highest levels of expression of both the protein and mRNA occur during the metacyclic and bloodstream trypomastigote stages, the forms that infect the vertebrate host cells. The protein is located in the plasma membrane and in the flagellar pockets of the epimastigote, metacyclic, and trypomastigote forms and is secreted into the medium at the point of contact between the parasite and the cell membrane, as well as into the host-cell cytosol during the amastigote stage. IgG antibodies specific against a synthetic peptide corresponding to the catalytic zone of MASP52 significantly reduce the parasite's capacity to infect the host cells. Furthermore, when the protein is adsorbed onto inert particles of bentonite and incubated with a nonphagocytic cell culture, the particles are able to induce endocytosis in the cells, which seems to demonstrate that MASP52 plays a role in a process whereby the trypomastigote forms of the parasite invade the host cell. PMID:21788387

  14. Mir-190b negatively contributes to the Trypanosoma cruzi- infected cell survival by repressing PTEN protein expression

    PubMed Central

    Monteiro, Cíntia Júnia; Mota, Suianne Letícia Antunes; Diniz, Lívia de Figueiredo; Bahia, Maria Terezinha; Moraes, Karen CM

    2015-01-01

    Chagas disease, which is caused by the intracellular protozoanTrypanosoma cruzi, is a serious health problem in Latin America. The heart is one of the major organs affected by this parasitic infection. The pathogenesis of tissue remodelling, particularly regarding cardiomyocyte behaviour after parasite infection, and the molecular mechanisms that occur immediately following parasite entry into host cells are not yet completely understood. Previous studies have reported that the establishment of parasitism is connected to the activation of the phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3K), which controls important steps in cellular metabolism by regulating the production of the second messenger phosphatidylinositol-3,4,5-trisphosphate. Particularly, the tumour suppressor PTEN is a negative regulator of PI3K signalling. However, mechanistic details of the modulatory activity of PTEN on Chagas disease have not been elucidated. To address this question, H9c2 cells were infected with T. cruzi Berenice 62 strain and the expression of a specific set of microRNAs (miRNAs) were investigated. Our cellular model demonstrated that miRNA-190b is correlated to the decrease of cellular viability rates by negatively modulating PTEN protein expression in T. cruzi-infected cells. PMID:26692329

  15. Sinusoidal ghost imaging.

    PubMed

    Khamoushi, S M Mahdi; Nosrati, Yaser; Tavassoli, S Hassan

    2015-08-01

    We introduce sinusoidal ghost imaging (SGI), which uses 2D orthogonal sinusoidal patterns instead of random patterns in "computational ghost imaging" (CGI). Simulations and experiments are performed. In comparison with the"differential ghost imaging" algorithm that was used to improve the SNR of ghost imaging, results of SGI show about 3 orders of magnitude higher SNR, which can be reconstructed even with a much smaller number of patterns. More importantly, based on the results, SGI provides the great opportunity to generate innate processed images by predefined selection of patterns. This can speed up detection process considerably and paves the way for real applications. PMID:26258330

  16. Novel Protective Antigens Expressed by Trypanosoma cruzi Amastigotes Provide Immunity to Mice Highly Susceptible to Chagas' Disease▿

    PubMed Central

    Silveira, Eduardo L. V.; Claser, Carla; Haolla, Filipe A. B.; Zanella, Luiz G.; Rodrigues, Mauricio M.

    2008-01-01

    Earlier studies have demonstrated in A/Sn mice highly susceptible to Chagas' disease protective immunity against lethal Trypanosoma cruzi infection elicited by vaccination with an open reading frame (ORF) expressed by amastigotes. In our experiments, we used this mouse model to search for other amastigote-expressed ORFs with a similar property. Fourteen ORFs previously determined to be expressed in this developmental stage were individually inserted into a eukaryotic expression vector containing a nucleotide sequence that encoded a mammalian secretory signal peptide. Immunization with 13 of the 14 ORFs induced specific antibodies which recognized the amastigotes. Three of those immune sera also reacted with trypomastigotes and epimastigotes. After a lethal challenge with Y strain trypomastigotes, the vast majority of plasmid-injected mice succumbed to infection. In some cases, a significant delay in mortality was observed. Only two of these ORFs provided protective immunity against the otherwise lethal infection caused by trypomastigotes of the Y or Colombia strain. These ORFs encode members of the trans-sialidase family of surface antigens related to the previously described protective antigen amastigote surface protein 2 (ASP-2). Nevertheless, at the level of antibody recognition, no cross-reactivity was observed between the ORFs and the previously described ASP-2 from the Y strain. In immunofluorescence analyses, we observed the presence of epitopes related to both proteins expressed by amastigotes of seven different strains. In conclusion, our approach allowed us to successfully identify two novel protective ORFs which we consider interesting for future studies on the immune response to Chagas' disease. PMID:18579696

  17. Novel protective antigens expressed by Trypanosoma cruzi amastigotes provide immunity to mice highly susceptible to Chagas' disease.

    PubMed

    Silveira, Eduardo L V; Claser, Carla; Haolla, Filipe A B; Zanella, Luiz G; Rodrigues, Mauricio M

    2008-08-01

    Earlier studies have demonstrated in A/Sn mice highly susceptible to Chagas' disease protective immunity against lethal Trypanosoma cruzi infection elicited by vaccination with an open reading frame (ORF) expressed by amastigotes. In our experiments, we used this mouse model to search for other amastigote-expressed ORFs with a similar property. Fourteen ORFs previously determined to be expressed in this developmental stage were individually inserted into a eukaryotic expression vector containing a nucleotide sequence that encoded a mammalian secretory signal peptide. Immunization with 13 of the 14 ORFs induced specific antibodies which recognized the amastigotes. Three of those immune sera also reacted with trypomastigotes and epimastigotes. After a lethal challenge with Y strain trypomastigotes, the vast majority of plasmid-injected mice succumbed to infection. In some cases, a significant delay in mortality was observed. Only two of these ORFs provided protective immunity against the otherwise lethal infection caused by trypomastigotes of the Y or Colombia strain. These ORFs encode members of the trans-sialidase family of surface antigens related to the previously described protective antigen amastigote surface protein 2 (ASP-2). Nevertheless, at the level of antibody recognition, no cross-reactivity was observed between the ORFs and the previously described ASP-2 from the Y strain. In immunofluorescence analyses, we observed the presence of epitopes related to both proteins expressed by amastigotes of seven different strains. In conclusion, our approach allowed us to successfully identify two novel protective ORFs which we consider interesting for future studies on the immune response to Chagas' disease. PMID:18579696

  18. Infectivity of Trypanosoma cruzi strains is associated with differential expression of surface glycoproteins with differential Ca2+ signalling activity.

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz, R C; Favoreto, S; Dorta, M L; Oshiro, M E; Ferreira, A T; Manque, P M; Yoshida, N

    1998-01-01

    Mammalian cell invasion assays, using metacyclic trypomastigotes of Trypanosoma cruzi G and CL strains, showed that the CL strain enters target cells in several-fold higher numbers as compared with the G strain. Analysis of expression of surface glycoproteins in metacyclic forms of the two strains by iodination, immunoprecipitation and FACS, revealed that gp90, undetectable in the CL strain, is one of the major surface molecules in the G strain, that expression of gp82 is comparable in both strains and that gp35/50 is expressed at lower levels in the CL strain. Purified gp90 and gp35/50 bound more efficiently than gp82 to cultured HeLa cells. However, the intensity of the Ca2+ response triggered in HeLa cells by gp82 was significantly higher than that induced by gp35/50 or gp90. Most of the Ca2+ signalling activity of the metacyclic extract towards HeLa cells was due to gp82 and was inhibitable by gp82-specific monoclonal antibody 3F6. Ca2+ mobilization was also triggered in metacyclic trypomastigotes by host-cell components; it was mainly gp82-mediated and more intense in the CL than in the G strain. We propose that expression of gp90 and gp35/50 at high levels impairs binding of metacyclic forms to host cells through productive gp82-mediated interaction, which leads to the target-cell and parasite Ca2+ mobilization required for invasion. Analysis of metacyclic forms of eight additional T. cruzi strains corroborated the inverse correlation between infectivity and expression of gp90 and gp35/50. PMID:9461549

  19. Expression, purification and preliminary crystallographic analysis of oligopeptidase B from Trypanosoma brucei

    SciTech Connect

    Rea, Dean; Hazell, Carole; Andrews, Norma W.; Morty, Rory E.; Fülöp, Vilmos

    2006-08-01

    Recombinant oligopeptidase B from T. brucei has been prepared and crystallized. Data were collected to 2.7 Å. Heavy-atom soaks and preparation of selenomethionine-substituted protein are in progress for structure determination by MAD or MIR. African sleeping sickness, also called trypanosomiasis, is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in sub-Saharan Africa. Peptidases from Trypanosoma brucei, the causative agent, include the serine peptidase oligopeptidase B, a documented virulence factor and therapeutic target. Determination of the three-dimensional structure of oligopeptidase B is desirable to facilitate the development of novel inhibitors. Oligopeptidase B was overexpressed in Escherichia coli as an N-terminally hexahistidine-tagged fusion protein, purified using metal-affinity chromatography and crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion technique in 7%(w/v) polyethylene glycol 6000, 1 M LiCl, 0.1 M bis-tris propane pH 7.5. Diffraction data to 2.7 Å resolution were collected using synchrotron radiation. The crystals belong to space group P3{sub 1}21 or P3{sub 2}21, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 124.5, c = 249.9 Å. A complete data set to 2.7 Å was collected using synchrotron radiation.

  20. Differential protein expression throughout the life cycle of Trypanosoma congolense, a major parasite of cattle in Africa

    PubMed Central

    Eyford, Brett A.; Sakurai, Tatsuya; Smith, Derek; Loveless, Bianca; Hertz-Fowler, Christiane; Donelson, John E.; Inoue, Noboru; Pearson, Terry W.

    2011-01-01

    Trypanosoma congolense is an important pathogen of livestock in Africa. To study protein expression throughout the T. congolense life cycle, we used culture-derived parasites of each of the three main insect stages and bloodstream stage parasites isolated from infected mice, to perform differential protein expression analysis. Three complete biological replicates of all four life cycle stages were produced from T. congolense IL3000, a cloned parasite that is amenable to culture of major life cycle stages in vitro. Cellular proteins from each life cycle stage were trypsin digested and the resulting peptides were labeled with isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ). The peptides were then analyzed by tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). This method was used to identify and relatively quantify proteins from the different life cycle stages in the same experiment. A search of the Wellcome Trust's Sanger Institute's semi-annotated T. congolense database was performed using the MS/MS fragmentation data to identify the corresponding source proteins. A total of 2088 unique protein sequences were identified, representing 23% of the ∼9000 proteins predicted for the T. congolense proteome. The 1291 most confidently identified proteins were prioritized for further study. Of these, 784 yielded annotated hits while 501 were described as “hypothetical proteins”. Six proteins showed no significant sequence similarity to any known proteins (from any species) and thus represent new, previously uncharacterized T. congolense proteins. Of particular interest among the remainder are several membrane molecules that showed drastic differential expression, including, not surprisingly, the well-studied variant surface glycoproteins (VSGs), invariant surface glycoproteins (ISGs) 65 and 75, congolense epimastigote specific protein (CESP), the surface protease GP63, an amino acid transporter, a pteridine transporter and a haptoglobin–hemoglobin receptor. Several of

  1. Classical and quantum ghosts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sbisà, Fulvio

    2015-01-01

    The aim of these notes is to provide a self-contained review of why it is generically a problem when a solution of a theory possesses ghost fields among the perturbation modes. We define what a ghost field is and we show that its presence is associated with a classical instability whenever the ghost field interacts with standard fields. We then show that the instability is more severe at quantum level, and that perturbative ghosts can exist only in low energy effective theories. However, if we do not consider very ad hoc choices, compatibility with observational constraints implies that low energy effective ghosts can exist only at the price of giving up Lorentz invariance or locality above the cut-off, in which case the cut-off has to be much lower that the energy scales we currently probe in particle colliders. We also comment on the possible role of extra degrees of freedom which break Lorentz invariance spontaneously.

  2. Ghost Imaging with Sunlight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karmakar, Sanjit

    The main result of this dissertation is the first successful experimental demonstration of ghost imaging using the sun as a light source. This result supports the quantum theory of near-field thermal light ghost imaging and also clarifies the physics of near-field thermal light ghost imaging from the fundamental level. The quantum theory of two-photon interference is the key to understanding the nonlocal ghost imaging with thermal light sources. Two-photon interference occurs between two different yet indistinguishable probability two-photon amplitudes, nonclassical entities produced by the joint-detection between two distant photodetectors. An experimental study of nontrivial spatial correlation and nontrivial anti-correlation from a pulsed chaotic-thermal source is also reported briefly in this dissertation to understand the two-photon interference phenomenon in case of classical thermal light. On the other hand, the classical theory considers thermal light ghost imaging to be the result of intensity fluctuation correlation. Interestingly, the physicists who believe in intensity fluctuation correlation was misled by the speckle-to-speckle picture. The successful experimental demonstration of ghost imaging with sunlight suggests that the nonlocal ghost-imaging effect of thermal light is caused by quantum-mechanical two-photon interference and it also proves that the idea of "speckles" is unnecessary in near-field thermal light ghost imaging. Most importantly, sunlight does not have any speckle and the sun is a near-field source. The experimental studies on sunlight-based ghost imaging are discussed in two steps: (1) an experimental demonstration as well as a quantum mechanical explanation of the nontrivial intensity correlation with the sun, a natural thermal source, as a light source and (2) the demonstration of the experimental observation of ghost imaging with sunlight with its quantum-mechanical explanation. These observations with their theoretical

  3. Expression and subcellular localization of kinetoplast-associated proteins in the different developmental stages of Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background The kinetoplast DNA (kDNA) of trypanosomatids consists of an unusual arrangement of circular molecules catenated into a single network. The diameter of the isolated kDNA network is similar to that of the entire cell. However, within the kinetoplast matrix, the kDNA is highly condensed. Studies in Crithidia fasciculata showed that kinetoplast-associated proteins (KAPs) are capable of condensing the kDNA network. However, little is known about the KAPs of Trypanosoma cruzi, a parasitic protozoon that shows distinct patterns of kDNA condensation during their complex morphogenetic development. In epimastigotes and amastigotes (replicating forms) the kDNA fibers are tightly packed into a disk-shaped kinetoplast, whereas trypomastigotes (non-replicating) present a more relaxed kDNA organization contained within a rounded structure. It is still unclear how the compact kinetoplast disk of epimastigotes is converted into a globular structure in the infective trypomastigotes. Results In this work, we have analyzed KAP coding genes in trypanosomatid genomes and cloned and expressed two kinetoplast-associated proteins in T. cruzi: TcKAP4 and TcKAP6. Such small basic proteins are expressed in all developmental stages of the parasite, although present a differential distribution within the kinetoplasts of epimastigote, amastigote and trypomastigote forms. Conclusion Several features of TcKAPs, such as their small size, basic nature and similarity with KAPs of C. fasciculata, are consistent with a role in DNA charge neutralization and condensation. Additionally, the differential distribution of KAPs in the kinetoplasts of distinct developmental stages of the parasite, indicate that the kDNA rearrangement that takes place during the T. cruzi differentiation process is accompanied by TcKAPs redistribution. PMID:19497120

  4. Differential expression of midgut proteins in Trypanosoma brucei gambiense-stimulated vs. non-stimulated Glossina palpalis gambiensis flies

    PubMed Central

    Geiger, Anne; Hamidou Soumana, Illiassou; Tchicaya, Bernadette; Rofidal, Valérie; Decourcelle, Mathilde; Santoni, Véronique; Hem, Sonia

    2015-01-01

    The unicellular pathogenic protozoan Trypanosoma brucei gambiense is responsible for the chronic form of sleeping sickness. This vector-borne disease is transmitted to humans by the tsetse fly of the group Glossina palpalis, including the subspecies G. p. gambiensis, in which the parasite completes its developmental cycle. Sleeping sickness control strategies can therefore target either the human host or the fly vector. Indeed, suppression of one step in the parasite developmental cycle could abolish parasite transmission to humans, with consequences on the spreading of the disease. In order to develop this type of approach, we have identified, at the proteome level, events resulting from the tripartite interaction between the tsetse fly G. p. gambiensis, its microbiome, and the trypanosome. Proteomes were analyzed from four biological replicates of midguts from flies sampled 3 days post-feeding on either a trypanosome-infected (stimulated flies) or a non-infected (non-stimulated flies) bloodmeal. Over 500 proteins were identified in the midguts of flies from both feeding groups, 13 of which were shown to be differentially expressed in trypanosome-stimulated vs. non-stimulated flies. Functional annotation revealed that several of these proteins have important functions that could be involved in modulating the fly infection process by trypanosomes (and thus fly vector competence), including anti-oxidant and anti-apoptotic, cellular detoxifying, trypanosome agglutination, and immune stimulating or depressive effects. The results show a strong potential for diminishing or even disrupting fly vector competence, and their application holds great promise for improving the control of sleeping sickness. PMID:26029185

  5. Low-momentum ghost dressing function and the gluon mass

    SciTech Connect

    Boucaud, Ph.; Leroy, J. P.; Le Yaouanc, A.; Micheli, J.; Pene, O.; Gomez, M. E.; Rodriguez-Quintero, J.

    2010-09-01

    We study the low-momentum ghost propagator Dyson-Schwinger equation in the Landau gauge, assuming for the truncation a constant ghost-gluon vertex, as it is extensively done, and a simple model for a massive gluon propagator. Then, regular Dyson-Schwinger equation solutions (the zero-momentum ghost dressing function not diverging) appear to emerge, and we show the ghost propagator to be described by an asymptotic expression reliable up to the order O(q{sup 2}). That expression, depending on the gluon mass and the zero-momentum Taylor-scheme effective charge, is proven to fit pretty well some low-momentum ghost propagator data [I. L. Bogolubsky, E. M. Ilgenfritz, M. Muller-Preussker, and A. Sternbeck, Phys. Lett. B 676, 69 (2009); Proc. Sci., LAT2007 (2007) 290] from big-volume lattice simulations where the so-called ''simulated annealing algorithm'' is applied to fix the Landau gauge.

  6. Ghost dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Furukawa, Tomonori; Yokoyama, Shuichiro; Ichiki, Kiyotomo; Sugiyama, Naoshi; Mukohyama, Shinji E-mail: shu@a.phys.nagoya-u.ac.jp E-mail: naoshi@a.phys.nagoya-u.ac.jp

    2010-05-01

    We revisit ghost dark matter, the possibility that ghost condensation may serve as an alternative to dark matter. In particular, we investigate the Friedmann-Robertson-Walker (FRW) background evolution and the large-scale structure (LSS) in the ΛGDM universe, i.e. a late-time universe dominated by a cosmological constant and ghost dark matter. The FRW background of the ΛGDM universe is indistinguishable from that of the standard ΛCDM universe if M∼>1eV, where M is the scale of spontaneous Lorentz breaking. From the LSS we find a stronger bound: M∼>10eV. For smaller M, ghost dark matter would have non-negligible sound speed after the matter-radiation equality, and thus the matter power spectrum would significantly differ from observation. These bounds are compatible with the phenomenological upper bound M∼<100GeV known in the literature.

  7. Ghost condensate busting

    SciTech Connect

    Bilic, Neven; Tupper, Gary B; Viollier, Raoul D E-mail: gary.tupper@uct.ac.za

    2008-09-15

    Applying the Thomas-Fermi approximation to renormalizable field theories, we construct ghost condensation models that are free of the instabilities associated with violations of the null-energy condition.

  8. Expression of Trypanosoma brucei gambiense Antigens in Leishmania tarentolae. Potential for Use in Rapid Serodiagnostic Tests (RDTs)

    PubMed Central

    Rooney, Barrie; Piening, Turid; Büscher, Philippe; Rogé, Stijn; Smales, C. Mark

    2015-01-01

    The development of rapid serodiagnostic tests for sleeping sickness and other diseases caused by kinetoplastids relies on the affordable production of parasite-specific recombinant antigens. Here, we describe the production of recombinant antigens from Trypanosoma brucei gambiense (T.b. gambiense) in the related species Leishmania tarentolae (L. tarentolae), and compare their diagnostic sensitivity and specificity to native antigens currently used in diagnostic kits against a panel of human sera. A number of T.b. gambiense protein antigen candidates were chosen for recombinant expression in L. tarentolae based on current diagnostics in field use and recent findings on immunodiagnostic antigens found by proteomic profiling. In particular, the extracellular domains of invariant surface glycoprotein 65 (ISG65), variant surface glycoproteins VSG LiTat 1.3 and VSG LiTat 1.5 were fused with C-terminal histidine tags and expressed as soluble proteins in the medium of cultured, recombinant L. tarentolae. Using affinity chromatography, on average 10 mg/L of recombinant protein was purified from cultures and subsequently tested against a panel of sera from sleeping sickness patients from controls, i.e. persons without sleeping sickness living in HAT endemic countries. The evaluation on sera from 172 T.b. gambiense human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) patients and from 119 controls showed very high diagnostic potential of the two recombinant VSG and the rISG65 fragments with areas under the curve between 0.97 and 0.98 compared to 0.98 and 0.99 with native VSG LiTat 1.3 and VSG LiTat 1.5 (statistically not different). Evaluation on sera from 78 T.b. rhodesiense HAT patients and from 100 controls showed an acceptable diagnostic potential of rISG65 with an area under the curve of 0.83. These results indicate that a combination of these recombinant antigens has the potential to be used in next generation rapid serodiagnostic tests. In addition, the L. tarentolae expression system

  9. Phased array ghost elimination.

    PubMed

    Kellman, Peter; McVeigh, Elliot R

    2006-05-01

    Parallel imaging may be applied to cancel ghosts caused by a variety of distortion mechanisms, including distortions such as off-resonance or local flow, which are space variant. Phased array combining coefficients may be calculated that null ghost artifacts at known locations based on a constrained optimization, which optimizes SNR subject to the nulling constraint. The resultant phased array ghost elimination (PAGE) technique is similar to the method known as sensitivity encoding (SENSE) used for accelerated imaging; however, in this formulation is applied to full field-of-view (FOV) images. The phased array method for ghost elimination may result in greater flexibility in designing acquisition strategies. For example, in multi-shot EPI applications ghosts are typically mitigated by the use of an interleaved phase encode acquisition order. An alternative strategy is to use a sequential, non-interleaved phase encode order and cancel the resultant ghosts using PAGE parallel imaging. Cancellation of ghosts by means of phased array processing makes sequential, non-interleaved phase encode acquisition order practical, and permits a reduction in repetition time, TR, by eliminating the need for echo-shifting. Sequential, non-interleaved phase encode order has benefits of reduced distortion due to off-resonance, in-plane flow and EPI delay misalignment. Furthermore, the use of EPI with PAGE has inherent fat-water separation and has been used to provide off-resonance correction using a technique referred to as lipid elimination with an echo-shifting N/2-ghost acquisition (LEENA), and may further generalized using the multi-point Dixon method. Other applications of PAGE include cancelling ghosts which arise due to amplitude or phase variation during the approach to steady state. Parallel imaging requires estimates of the complex coil sensitivities. In vivo estimates may be derived by temporally varying the phase encode ordering to obtain a full k-space dataset in a scheme

  10. Ca2+ Content and Expression of an Acidocalcisomal Calcium Pump Are Elevated in Intracellular Forms of Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Hong-Gang; Zhong, Li; de Souza, Wanderley; Benchimol, Marlene; Moreno, Silvia; Docampo, Roberto

    1998-01-01

    The survival of a eukaryotic protozoan as an obligate parasite in the interior of a eukaryotic host cell implies its adaptation to an environment with a very different ionic composition from that of its extracellular habitat. This is particularly important in the case of Ca2+, the intracellular concentration of which is 3 orders of magnitude lower than the extracellular value. Ca2+ entry across the plasma membrane is a widely recognized mechanism for Ca2+ signaling, needed for a number of intracellular processes, and obviously, it would be restricted in the case of intracellular parasites. Here we show that Trypanosoma cruzi amastigotes possess a higher Ca2+ content than the extracellular stages of the parasite. This correlates with the higher expression of a calcium pump, the gene for which was cloned and sequenced. The deduced protein product (Tca1) of this gene has a calculated molecular mass of 121,141 Da and exhibits 34 to 38% identity with vacuolar Ca2+-ATPases of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Dictyostelium discoideum, respectively. The tca1 gene suppresses the Ca2+ hypersensitivity of a mutant of S. cerevisiae that has a defect in vacuolar Ca2+ accumulation. Indirect immunofluorescence and immunoelectron microscopy analysis indicate that Tca1 colocalizes with the vacuolar H+-ATPase to the plasma membrane and to intracellular vacuoles of T. cruzi. These vacuoles were shown to have the same size and distribution as the calcium-containing vacuoles identified by the potassium pyroantimoniate-osmium technique and as the electron-dense vacuoles observed in whole unfixed parasites by transmission electron microscopy and identified in a previous work (D. A. Scott, R. Docampo, J. A. Dvorak, S. Shi, and R. D. Leapman, J. Biol. Chem. 272:28020–28029, 1997) as being acidic and possessing a high calcium content (i.e., acidocalcisomes). Together, these results suggest that acidocalcisomes are distinct from other previously recognized organelles present in these parasites

  11. GHOST balloons around Antarctica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stearns, Charles R.

    1988-01-01

    The GHOST balloon position as a function of time data shows that the atmospheric circulation around the Antarctic Continent at the 100 mb and 200 mb levels is complex. The GHOST balloons supposedly follow the horizontal trajectory of the air at the balloon level. The position of GHOST balloon 98Q for a three month period in 1968 is shown. The balloon moved to within 2 deg of the South Pole on 1 October 1968 and then by 9 December 1968 was 35 deg from the South Pole and close to its position on 1 September 1968. The balloon generally moved from west to east but on two occasions moved in the opposite direction for a few days. The latitude of GHOST balloons 98Q and 149Z which was at 200 mb is given. Both balloons tended to get closer to the South Pole in September and October. Other GHOST balloons at the same pressure and time period may not indicate similar behavior.

  12. Tilted ghost inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Senatore, Leonardo

    2005-02-15

    In a ghost inflationary scenario, we study the observational consequences of a tilt in the potential of the ghost condensate. We show how the presence of a tilt tends to make contact between the natural predictions of ghost inflation and the ones of slow roll inflation. In the case of positive tilt, we are able to build an inflationary model in which the Hubble constant H is growing with time. We compute the amplitude and the tilt of the two-point function, as well as the three-point function, for both cases of positive and negative tilt. We find that a good fraction of the parameter space of the model is within experimental reach.

  13. The new ekpyrotic ghost

    SciTech Connect

    Kallosh, Renata; Linde, Andrei; Kang, Jin U; Mukhanov, Viatcheslav E-mail: kangjinu@hotmail.com E-mail: mukhanov@theorie.physik.uni-muenchen.de

    2008-04-15

    The new ekpyrotic scenario attempts to solve the singularity problem by involving violation of the null energy condition in a model which combines the ekpyrotic/cyclic scenario with the ghost condensate theory and the curvaton mechanism of production of adiabatic perturbations of the metric. The Lagrangian of this theory, as well as of the ghost condensate model, contains a term with higher derivatives, which was added to the theory to stabilize its vacuum state. We found that this term may affect the dynamics of the cosmological evolution. Moreover, after a proper quantization, this term results in the existence of a new ghost field with negative energy, which leads to a catastrophic vacuum instability. We explain why one cannot treat this dangerous term as a correction valid only at small energies and momenta below some UV cutoff, and demonstrate the problems arising when one attempts to construct a UV completion of this theory.

  14. Trispectrum from ghost inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Izumi, Keisuke; Mukohyama, Shinji E-mail: shinji.mukohyama@ipmu.jp

    2010-06-01

    Ghost inflation predicts almost scale-invariant primordial cosmological perturbations with relatively large non-Gaussianity. The bispectrum is known to have a large contribution at the wavenumbers forming an equilateral triangle and the corresponding nonlinear parameter f{sub NL}{sup equil} is typically of order O(10{sup 2}). In this paper we calculate trispectrum from ghost inflation and show that the corresponding nonlinear parameter τ{sub NL} is typically of order O(10{sup 4}). We investigate the shape dependence of the trispectrum and see that it has some features different from DBI inflation. Therefore, our result may be useful as a template to distinguish ghost inflation from other models of inflation by future experiments.

  15. Dentinogenic ghost cell tumor

    PubMed Central

    Bafna, Sweety Sagarmal; Joy, Tabita; Tupkari, Jagdish Vishnu; Landge, Jayant Shivaji

    2016-01-01

    Dentinogenic ghost cell tumor (DGCT) is a rare, odontogenic neoplasm which is considered to be a solid variant of calcifying odontogenic cyst (COC) with locally aggressive behavior. It accounts for only 2–14% of all COCs. To the best of our knowledge, only 88 cases of DGCT have been reported in the literature from 1968 to 2014. Herewith, we report a case of DGCT in a 68-year-old male patient with clinical presentation as a soft tissue growth over alveolar ridge and histopathologically characterized by ameloblastomatous epithelium, abundance of eosinophilic material and ghost cells. PMID:27194885

  16. Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 bacterial ghosts retain crucial surface properties and express chlamydial antigen: an imaging study of a delivery system for the ocular surface

    PubMed Central

    Montanaro, Jacqueline; Inic-Kanada, Aleksandra; Ladurner, Angela; Stein, Elisabeth; Belij, Sandra; Bintner, Nora; Schlacher, Simone; Schuerer, Nadine; Mayr, Ulrike Beate; Lubitz, Werner; Leisch, Nikolaus; Barisani-Asenbauer, Talin

    2015-01-01

    To target chronic inflammatory ocular surface diseases, a drug delivery platform is needed that is safe, possesses immunomodulatory properties, and can be used either for drug delivery, or as a foreign antigen carrier. A new therapeutic approach that we have previously proposed uses nonliving bacterial ghosts (BGs) as a carrier-delivery system which can be engineered to carry foreign antigens and/or be loaded with therapeutic drugs. The parent strain chosen for development of our BG delivery system is the probiotic Escherichia coli strain Nissle 1917 (EcN), whose intrinsic properties trigger the innate immune system with the flagella and fimbriae used to attach and stimulate epithelial cells. In previous studies, we have shown that EcN BGs are safe for the ocular surface route, but evidence that EcN BGs retain flagella and fimbriae after transformation, has never been visually confirmed. In this study, we used different visualization techniques to determine whether flagella and fimbriae are retained on EcN BGs engineered either for drug delivery or as a foreign antigen carrier. We have also shown by immunoelectron microscopy that EcN retains two foreign antigens after processing to become EcN BGs. Furthermore, we demonstrated that BGs derived from EcN and expressing a foreign antigen attachment to conjunctival epithelial cells in vitro without causing reduced cell viability. These results are an important step in constructing a delivery system based on a nonliving probiotic that is suitable for use in ocular surface diseases pairing immunomodulation and targeted delivery. PMID:26229437

  17. Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 bacterial ghosts retain crucial surface properties and express chlamydial antigen: an imaging study of a delivery system for the ocular surface.

    PubMed

    Montanaro, Jacqueline; Inic-Kanada, Aleksandra; Ladurner, Angela; Stein, Elisabeth; Belij, Sandra; Bintner, Nora; Schlacher, Simone; Schuerer, Nadine; Mayr, Ulrike Beate; Lubitz, Werner; Leisch, Nikolaus; Barisani-Asenbauer, Talin

    2015-01-01

    To target chronic inflammatory ocular surface diseases, a drug delivery platform is needed that is safe, possesses immunomodulatory properties, and can be used either for drug delivery, or as a foreign antigen carrier. A new therapeutic approach that we have previously proposed uses nonliving bacterial ghosts (BGs) as a carrier-delivery system which can be engineered to carry foreign antigens and/or be loaded with therapeutic drugs. The parent strain chosen for development of our BG delivery system is the probiotic Escherichia coli strain Nissle 1917 (EcN), whose intrinsic properties trigger the innate immune system with the flagella and fimbriae used to attach and stimulate epithelial cells. In previous studies, we have shown that EcN BGs are safe for the ocular surface route, but evidence that EcN BGs retain flagella and fimbriae after transformation, has never been visually confirmed. In this study, we used different visualization techniques to determine whether flagella and fimbriae are retained on EcN BGs engineered either for drug delivery or as a foreign antigen carrier. We have also shown by immunoelectron microscopy that EcN retains two foreign antigens after processing to become EcN BGs. Furthermore, we demonstrated that BGs derived from EcN and expressing a foreign antigen attachment to conjunctival epithelial cells in vitro without causing reduced cell viability. These results are an important step in constructing a delivery system based on a nonliving probiotic that is suitable for use in ocular surface diseases pairing immunomodulation and targeted delivery. PMID:26229437

  18. Long noncoding RNA, polycomb, and the ghosts haunting INK4b-ARF-INK4a expression.

    PubMed

    Aguilo, Francesca; Zhou, Ming-Ming; Walsh, Martin J

    2011-08-15

    Polycomb group proteins (PcG) function as transcriptional repressors of gene expression. The important role of PcG in mediating repression of the INK4b-ARF-INK4a locus, by directly binding to the long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) transcript antisense noncoding RNA in the INK4 locus (ANRIL), was recently shown. INK4b-ARF-INK4a encodes 3 tumor-suppressor proteins, p15(INK4b), p14(ARF), and p16(INK4a), and its transcription is a key requirement for replicative or oncogene-induced senescence and constitutes an important barrier for tumor growth. ANRIL gene is transcribed in the antisense orientation of the INK4b-ARF-INK4a gene cluster, and different single-nucleotide polymorphisms are associated with increased susceptibility to several diseases. Although lncRNA-mediated regulation of INK4b-ARF-INK4a gene is not restricted to ANRIL, both polycomb repressive complex-1 (PRC1) and -2 (PRC2) interact with ANRIL to form heterochromatin surrounding the INK4b-ARF-INK4a locus, leading to its repression. This mechanism would provide an increased advantage for bypassing senescence, sustaining the requirements for the proliferation of stem and/or progenitor cell populations or inappropriately leading to oncogenesis through the aberrant saturation of the INK4b-ARF-INK4a locus by PcG complexes. In this review, we summarize recent findings on the underlying epigenetic mechanisms that link PcG function with ANRIL, which impose gene silencing to control cellular homeostasis as well as cancer development. PMID:21828241

  19. Long Noncoding RNA, Polycomb, and the Ghosts Haunting INK4b-ARF-INK4a Expression

    PubMed Central

    Aguilo, Francesca; Zhou, Ming-Ming; Walsh, Martin J.

    2012-01-01

    Polycomb group proteins (PcG) function as transcriptional repressors of gene expression. The important role of PcG in mediating repression of the INK4b-ARF-INK4a locus, by directly binding to the long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) transcript antisense noncoding RNA in the INK4 locus (ANRIL), was recently shown. INK4b-ARF-INK4a encodes 3 tumor-suppressor proteins, p15INK4b, p14ARF, and p16INK4a, and its transcription is a key requirement for replicative or oncogene-induced senescence and constitutes an important barrier for tumor growth. ANRIL gene is transcribed in the antisense orientation of the INK4b-ARF-INK4a gene cluster, and different single-nucleotide polymorphisms are associated with increased susceptibility to several diseases. Although lncRNA-mediated regulation of INK4b-ARF-INK4a gene is not restricted to ANRIL, both polycomb repressive complex-1 (PRC1) and -2 (PRC2) interact with ANRIL to form heterochromatin surrounding the INK4b-ARF-INK4a locus, leading to its repression. This mechanism would provide an increased advantage for bypassing senescence, sustaining the requirements for the proliferation of stem and/or progenitor cell populations or inappropriately leading to oncogenesis through the aberrant saturation of the INK4b-ARF-INK4a locus by PcG complexes. In this review, we summarize recent findings on the underlying epigenetic mechanisms that link PcG function with ANRIL, which impose gene silencing to control cellular homeostasis as well as cancer development. PMID:21828241

  20. Quantum ghost imaging through turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, P. Ben; Howland, Gregory A.; Howell, John C.; Chan, Kam Wai Clifford; O'Sullivan-Hale, Colin; Rodenburg, Brandon; Hardy, Nicholas D.; Shapiro, Jeffrey H.; Simon, D. S.; Sergienko, A. V.; Boyd, R. W.

    2011-05-15

    We investigate the effect of turbulence on quantum ghost imaging. We use entangled photons and demonstrate that for a specific experimental configuration the effect of turbulence can be greatly diminished. By decoupling the entangled photon source from the ghost-imaging central image plane, we are able to dramatically increase the ghost-image quality. When imaging a test pattern through turbulence, this method increases the imaged pattern visibility from V=0.15{+-}0.04 to 0.42{+-}0.04.

  1. Neutrinos: Nature's Ghosts?

    SciTech Connect

    Lincoln, Don

    2013-06-18

    Dr. Don Lincoln introduces one of the most fascinating inhabitants of the subatomic realm: the neutrino. Neutrinos are ghosts of the microworld, almost not interacting at all. In this video, he describes some of their properties and how they were discovered. Studies of neutrinos are expected to be performed at many laboratories across the world and to form one of the cornerstones of the Fermilab research program for the next decade or more.

  2. Neutrinos: Nature's Ghosts?

    ScienceCinema

    Lincoln, Don

    2014-08-12

    Dr. Don Lincoln introduces one of the most fascinating inhabitants of the subatomic realm: the neutrino. Neutrinos are ghosts of the microworld, almost not interacting at all. In this video, he describes some of their properties and how they were discovered. Studies of neutrinos are expected to be performed at many laboratories across the world and to form one of the cornerstones of the Fermilab research program for the next decade or more.

  3. Trypanosoma cruzi Infection Down-Modulates the Immunoproteasome Biosynthesis and the MHC Class I Cell Surface Expression in HeLa Cells

    PubMed Central

    Camargo, Ricardo; Faria, Liliam O.; Kloss, Alexander; Favali, Cecília B. F.; Kuckelkorn, Ulrike; Kloetzel, Peter-Michael; de Sá, Cezar Martins; Lima, Beatriz D.

    2014-01-01

    Generally, Trypanosoma cruzi infection in human is persistent and tends to chronicity, suggesting that the parasite evade the immune surveillance by down regulating the intracellular antigen processing routes. Within the MHC class I pathway, the majority of antigenic peptides are generated by the proteasome. However, upon IFN-γ stimulation, the catalytic constitutive subunits of the proteasome are replaced by the subunits β1i/LMP2, β2i/MECL-1 and β5i/LMP7 to form the immunoproteasome. In this scenario, we analyzed whether the expression and activity of the constitutive and the immunoproteasome as well as the expression of other components of the MHC class I pathway are altered during the infection of HeLa cells with T. cruzi. By RT-PCR and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis analysis, we showed that the expression and composition of the constitutive proteasome is not affected by the parasite. In contrast, the biosynthesis of the β1i, β2i, β5i immunosubunits, PA28β, TAP1 and the MHC class I molecule as well as the proteasomal proteolytic activities were down-regulated in infected-IFN-γ-treated cell cultures. Taken together, our results provide evidence that the protozoan T. cruzi specifically modulates its infection through an unknown posttranscriptional mechanism that inhibits the expression of the MHC class I pathway components. PMID:24752321

  4. A high throughput analysis of cytokines and chemokines expression during the course of Trypanosoma cruzi experimental oral infection.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Adele A; Notário, Ana Flávia O; Teixeira, Thaise L; e Silva, Rebecca T; Quintal, Amanda P N; Alves, Rosiane N; Brígido, Paula C; Siqueira, Carla S; Martins, Flávia A; Machado, Fabrício C; Clemente, Tatiana M; da Silva, Aline A; Borges, Bruna C; Teixeira, Samuel C; dos Santos, Marlus A; da Silva, Claudio V

    2016-05-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi has high biological and biochemical diversity and variable tissue tropism. Here we aimed to verify the kinetics of cytokine and chemokine in situ secretion in animals infected with two distinct T. cruzi strains after oral inoculation. Also, we investigated parasite migration, residence and pathological damage in stomach, heart and spleen. Our results showed that host immune response against T. cruzi infection is an intricate phenomenon that depends on the parasite strain, on the infected organ and on the time point of the infection. We believe that a wide comprehension of host immune response will potentially provide basis for the development of immunotherapeutic strategies in order to clear parasitism and minimize tissue injury. In this context, we find that KC poses as a possible tool to be used. PMID:26827742

  5. Differential expression of glycosomal and mitochondrial proteins in the two major life-cycle stages of Trypanosoma brucei.

    PubMed

    Vertommen, Didier; Van Roy, Joris; Szikora, Jean-Pierre; Rider, Mark H; Michels, Paul A M; Opperdoes, Fred R

    2008-04-01

    Label-free semi-quantitative differential three-dimensional liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (3D-LC-MS/MS) was used to compare the glycosomal and mitochondrial proteomes of the bloodstream- and insect-form of Trypanosoma brucei. The abundance of glycosomal marker proteins identified in the two life-cycle stages corresponded well with the relative importance of biochemical pathways present in the glycosomes of the two stages and the peptide spectral count ratios of selected enzymes were in good agreement with published data about their enzymatic specific activities. This approach proved extremely useful for the generation of large scale proteomics data for the comparison of different life-cycle stages. Several proteins involved in oxidative stress protection, sugar-nucleotide synthesis, purine salvage, nucleotide-monophosphate formation and purine-nucleotide cycle were identified as glycosomal proteins. PMID:18242729

  6. Pasteurella multocida- and Pasteurella haemolytica-ghosts: new vaccine candidates.

    PubMed

    Marchart, J; Dropmann, G; Lechleitner, S; Schlapp, T; Wanner, G; Szostak, M P; Lubitz, W

    2003-09-01

    Pasteurella multocida is an important animal pathogen. Bacterial ghosts produced by the expression of phage PhiX174 lysis gene E are empty cells devoid of cytoplasmic and genomic material. Lysis of P. multocida 7A and P. haemolytica A1 carrying Pasteurella-specific lysis vectors (pSR2 and pSON2) occurred 140 min after induction of gene E expression induced by temperature upshift. The E-mediated cell lysis and killing activity was the same in both Pasteurella species and no viable cells could be detected after lysis of P. multocida and P. haemolytica. Pasteurella ghosts were used for immunization of rabbits and mice. Rabbits immunized subcutaneously with either P. multocida- or P. haemolytica-ghosts developed antibodies reacting with the immunizating strain, as well as with other Pasteurella strains. The number of proteins in whole cell protein extracts recognized by the sera constantly increased during the observation period of 51 days. In addition, dose-dependent protection against homologous challenge was observed in mice immunized with P. multocida-ghosts. Animals which received 1.15 x 10(8) ghosts and a challenge dose of up to 60 cfu (LD90), showed 100% protection. According to these results, we suggest ghosts of P. multocida and P. haemolytica as new vaccine candidates. PMID:12922135

  7. RNA-seq de novo Assembly Reveals Differential Gene Expression in Glossina palpalis gambiensis Infected with Trypanosoma brucei gambiense vs. Non-Infected and Self-Cured Flies

    PubMed Central

    Hamidou Soumana, Illiassou; Klopp, Christophe; Ravel, Sophie; Nabihoudine, Ibouniyamine; Tchicaya, Bernadette; Parrinello, Hugues; Abate, Luc; Rialle, Stéphanie; Geiger, Anne

    2015-01-01

    Trypanosoma brucei gambiense (Tbg), causing the sleeping sickness chronic form, completes its developmental cycle within the tsetse fly vector Glossina palpalis gambiensis (Gpg) before its transmission to humans. Within the framework of an anti-vector disease control strategy, a global gene expression profiling of trypanosome infected (susceptible), non-infected, and self-cured (refractory) tsetse flies was performed, on their midguts, to determine differential genes expression resulting from in vivo trypanosomes, tsetse flies (and their microbiome) interactions. An RNAseq de novo assembly was achieved. The assembled transcripts were mapped to reference sequences for functional annotation. Twenty-four percent of the 16,936 contigs could not be annotated, possibly representing untranslated mRNA regions, or Gpg- or Tbg-specific ORFs. The remaining contigs were classified into 65 functional groups. Only a few transposable elements were present in the Gpg midgut transcriptome, which may represent active transpositions and play regulatory roles. One thousand three hundred and seventy three genes differentially expressed (DEGs) between stimulated and non-stimulated flies were identified at day-3 post-feeding; 52 and 1025 between infected and self-cured flies at 10 and 20 days post-feeding, respectively. The possible roles of several DEGs regarding fly susceptibility and refractoriness are discussed. The results provide new means to decipher fly infection mechanisms, crucial to develop anti-vector control strategies. PMID:26617594

  8. Gene expression study using real-time PCR identifies an NTR gene as a major marker of resistance to benznidazole in Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Chagas disease is a neglected illness, with limited treatments, caused by the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi. Two drugs are prescribed to treat the disease, nifurtimox and benznidazole, which have been previously reported to have limited efficacy and the appearance of resistance by T. cruzi. Acquisition of drug-resistant phenotypes is a complex physiological process based on single or multiple changes of the genes involved, probably in its mechanisms of action. Results The differential genes expression of a sensitive Trypanosoma cruzi strain and its induced in vitro benznidazole-resistant phenotypes was studied. The stepwise increasing concentration of BZ in the parental strain generated five different resistant populations assessed by the IC50 ranging from 10.49 to 93.7 μM. The resistant populations maintained their phenotype when the BZ was depleted from the culture for many passages. Additionally, the benznidazole-resistant phenotypes presented a cross-resistance to nifurtimox but not to G418 sulfate. On the other hand, four of the five phenotypes resistant to different concentrations of drugs had different expression levels for the 12 genes evaluated by real-time PCR. However, in the most resistant phenotype (TcR5x), the levels of mRNA from these 12 genes and seven more were similar to the parental strain but not for NTR and OYE genes, which were down-regulated and over-expressed, respectively. The number of copies for these two genes was evaluated for the parental strain and the TcR5x phenotype, revealing that the NTR gene had lost a copy in this last phenotype. No changes were found in the enzyme activity of CPR and SOD in the most resistant population. Finally, there was no variability of genetic profiles among all the parasite populations evaluated by performing low-stringency single-specific primer PCR (LSSP-PCR) and random amplified polymorphic DNA RAPD techniques, indicating that no clonal selection or drastic genetic changes had occurred for the

  9. Ghosts: Gateway to Organizational Transformation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weitzel, Tim; Had, Gary

    2001-01-01

    "Ghosts" are elements that influence an organization's view of itself, its ways of working, and its culturally specific attitudes; they exert an indirect influence over everything that happens within an organization. Successful organizational change requires identifying and integrating these ghosts. (JOW)

  10. Causes for "ghost" manifolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borok, S.; Goldfarb, I.; Gol'dshtein, V.

    2009-05-01

    The paper concerns intrinsic low-dimensional manifold (ILDM) method suggested in [Maas U, Pope SB. Simplifying chemical kinetics: intrinsic low-dimensional manifolds in composition space, combustion and flame 1992;88:239-64] for dimension reduction of models describing kinetic processes. It has been shown in a number of publications [Goldfarb I, Gol'dshtein V, Maas U. Comparative analysis of two asymptotic approaches based on integral manifolds. IMA J Appl Math 2004;69:353-74; Kaper HG, Kaper TJ, Asymptotic analysis of two reduction methods for systems of chemical reactions. Phys D 2002;165(1-2):66-93; Rhodes C, Morari M, Wiggins S. Identification of the low order manifolds: validating the algorithm of Maas and Pope. Chaos 1999;9(1):108-23] that the ILDM-method works successfully and the intrinsic low-dimensional manifolds belong to a small vicinity of invariant slow manifolds. The ILDM-method has a number of disadvantages. One of them is appearance of so-called "ghost"-manifolds, which do not have connection to the system dynamics [Borok S, Goldfarb I, Gol'dshtein V. "Ghost" ILDM - manifolds and their discrimination. In: Twentieth Annual Symposium of the Israel Section of the Combustion Institute, Beer-Sheva, Israel; 2004. p. 55-7; Borok S, Goldfarb I, Gol'dshtein V. About non-coincidence of invariant manifolds and intrinsic low-dimensional manifolds (ILDM). CNSNS 2008;71:1029-38; Borok S, Goldfarb I, Gol'dshtein V, Maas U. In: Gorban AN, Kazantzis N, Kevrekidis YG, Ottinger HC, Theodoropoulos C, editors. "Ghost" ILDM-manifolds and their identification: model reduction and coarse-graining approaches for multiscale phenomena. Berlin-Heidelberg-New York: Springer; 2006. p. 55-80; Borok S, Goldfarb I, Gol'dshtein V. On a modified version of ILDM method and its asymptotic analysis. IJPAM 2008; 44(1): 125-50; Bykov V, Goldfarb I, Gol'dshtein V, Maas U. On a modified version of ILDM approach: asymptotic analysis based on integral manifolds. IMA J Appl Math 2006

  11. Differential Expression of microRNAs in Thymic Epithelial Cells from Trypanosoma cruzi Acutely Infected Mice: Putative Role in Thymic Atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Linhares-Lacerda, Leandra; Palu, Cintia Cristina; Ribeiro-Alves, Marcelo; Paredes, Bruno Diaz; Morrot, Alexandre; Garcia-Silva, Maria Rosa; Cayota, Alfonso; Savino, Wilson

    2015-01-01

    A common feature seen in acute infections is a severe atrophy of the thymus. This occurs in the murine model of acute Chagas disease. Moreover, in thymuses from Trypanosoma cruzi acutely infected mice, thymocytes exhibit an increase in the density of fibronectin and laminin integrin-type receptors, with an increase in migratory response ex vivo. Thymic epithelial cells (TEC) play a major role in the intrathymic T cell differentiation. To date, the consequences of molecular changes promoted by parasite infection upon thymus have not been elucidated. Considering the importance of microRNA for gene expression regulation, 85 microRNAs (mRNAs) were analyzed in TEC from T. cruzi acutely infected mice. The infection significantly modulated 29 miRNAs and modulation of 9 was also dependent whether TEC sorted out from the thymus exhibited cortical or medullary phenotype. In silico analysis revealed that these miRNAs may control target mRNAs known to be responsible for chemotaxis, cell adhesion, and cell death. Considering that we sorted TEC in the initial phase of thymocyte loss, it is conceivable that changes in TEC miRNA expression profile are functionally related to thymic atrophy, providing new clues to better understanding the mechanisms of the thymic involution seen in experimental Chagas disease. PMID:26347748

  12. Ghost-Story Telling: Keeping It Appropriate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weintraub, Jeff

    1996-01-01

    Guidelines for telling ghost stories at camp involve considering children's fears at different ages, telling age appropriate stories, determining appropriate times for telling ghost stories, and minimizing fear when a child becomes frightened by a ghost story. Includes tips on the selection, preparation, and presentation of ghost stories. (LP)

  13. Developmentally regulated expression by Trypanosoma cruzi of molecules that accelerate the decay of complement C3 convertases

    SciTech Connect

    Rimoldi, M.T.; Sher, A.; Heiny, A.; Lituchy, A.; Hammer, C.H.; Joiner, K.

    1988-01-01

    The authors recently showed that culture-derived metacyclic trypomastigotes (CMT), but not epimastigotes (Epi), of the Miranda 99 strain of Trypanosoma cruzi evade lysis by the human alternative complement pathway because of inefficient binding of factor B to complement component C3b on the parasite surface. These results suggested that CMT and tissue-culture-derived trypomastigotes (TCT), which also activate the alternative pathway poorly, might produce a molecule capable of interfering with factor B binding to C3b. They now demonstrate that CMT and TCT lysates, as well as molecules spontaneously shed from CMT and TCT but not Epi, accelerate decay of /sup 125/I-labeled factor Bb from the alternative-pathway C3 convertase (C3bBb) assembled on zymosan or Epi and also accelerate decay of the classical-pathway C3 convertase (C4b2a) on sheep erythrocytes. Parasites metabolically labeled with (/sup 35/S)methionine spontaneously shed a limited number of radioactive components, ranging in molecular mass from 86 to 155 kDa for trypomastigotes and 25 to 80 kDa for Epi. Decay-accelerating activity within supernatants is inactivated by papain and is coeluted with /sup 35/S-containing polypeptides on FPLC anion-exchange chromatography, suggesting that the active constituents are protein molecules. Molecules with decay-accelerating activity may explain the developmentally regulated resistance to complement-mediated lysis in infective and vertebrate stages for T. cruzi life cycle.

  14. Living with ghosts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawking, S. W.; Hertog, Thomas

    2002-05-01

    Perturbation theory for gravity in dimensions greater than two requires higher derivatives in the free action. Higher derivatives seem to lead to ghosts, states with negative norm. We consider a fourth order scalar field theory and show that the problem with ghosts arises because, in the canonical treatment, φ and □φ are regarded as two independent variables. Instead, we base quantum theory on a path integral, evaluated in Euclidean space and then Wick rotated to Lorentzian space. The path integral requires that quantum states be specified by the values of φ and φ,τ. To calculate probabilities for observations, one has to trace out over φ,τ on the final surface. Hence one loses unitarity, but one can never produce a negative norm state or get a negative probability. It is shown that transition probabilities tend toward those of the second order theory, as the coefficient of the fourth order term in the action tends to zero. Hence unitarity is restored at the low energies that now occur in the universe.

  15. Quantum ghost imaging experiments at ARL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyers, Ronald E.; Deacon, Keith S.

    2010-08-01

    The first ghost image (GI) of an opaque object by Meyers et al.1, 2 demonstrated that GI has practical applications and inspired a series of variations used in reflective ghost imaging research. Here we report on some recent Ghost Imaging experiments using Compressive Imaging (CI) and Compressive Sensing (CS) conducted at the Army Research Laboratory. These experiments covered phenomena such as Compressive Turbulence-Free Ghost Imaging (CTFGI), and Compressive Ghost-Imaging-Inspired Imaging (CGIII).

  16. Hyperosmotic stress induces aquaporin-dependent cell shrinkage, polyphosphate synthesis, amino acid accumulation, and global gene expression changes in Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhu-Hong; Alvarez, Vanina E; De Gaudenzi, Javier G; Sant'Anna, Celso; Frasch, Alberto C C; Cazzulo, Juan J; Docampo, Roberto

    2011-12-23

    The protist parasite Trypanosoma cruzi has evolved the ability to transit between completely different hosts and to replicate in adverse environments. In particular, the epimastigote form, the replicative stage inside the vector, is subjected to nutritional and osmotic stresses during its development. In this work, we describe the biochemical and global gene expression changes of epimastigotes under hyperosmotic conditions. Hyperosmotic stress resulted in cell shrinking within a few minutes. Depending on the medium osmolarity, this was followed by lack of volume recovery for at least 2 h or by slow recovery. Experiments with inhibitors, or with cells in which an aquaporin gene (TcAQP1) was knocked down or overexpressed, revealed its importance for the cellular response to hyperosmotic stress. Furthermore, the adaptation to this new environment was shown to involve the regulation of the polyphosphate polymerization state as well as changes in amino acid catabolism to generate compatible osmolytes. A genome-wide transcriptional analysis of stressed parasites revealed down-regulation of genes belonging to diverse functional categories and up-regulation of genes encoding trans-sialidase-like and ribosomal proteins. Several of these changes were confirmed by Northern blot analyses. Sequence analysis of the 3'UTRs of up- and down-regulated genes allowed the identification of conserved structural RNA motifs enriched in each group, suggesting that specific ribonucleoprotein complexes could be of great importance in the adaptation of this parasite to different environments through regulation of transcript abundance. PMID:22039054

  17. Expression, purification, immunogenicity, and protective efficacy of a recombinant Tc24 antigen as a vaccine against Trypanosoma cruzi infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Campos, Viridiana; Martinez-Vega, Pedro; Ramirez-Sierra, Maria Jesus; Rosado-Vallado, Miguel; Seid, Christopher A; Hudspeth, Elissa M; Wei, Junfei; Liu, Zhuyun; Kwityn, Cliff; Hammond, Molly; Ortega-López, Jaime; Zhan, Bin; Hotez, Peter J; Bottazzi, Maria Elena; Dumonteil, Eric

    2015-08-26

    The Tc24 calcium binding protein from the flagellar pocket of Trypanosoma cruzi is under evaluation as a candidate vaccine antigen against Chagas disease. Previously, a DNA vaccine encoding Tc24 was shown to be an effective vaccine (both as a preventive and therapeutic intervention) in mice and dogs, as evidenced by reductions in T. cruzi parasitemia and cardiac amastigotes, as well as reduced cardiac inflammation and increased host survival. Here we developed a suitable platform for the large scale production of recombinant Tc24 (rTc24) and show that when rTc24 is combined with a monophosphoryl-lipid A (MPLA) adjuvant, the formulated vaccine induces a Th1-biased immune response in mice, comprised of elevated IgG2a antibody levels and interferon-gamma levels from splenocytes, compared to controls. These immune responses also resulted in statistically significant decreased T. cruzi parasitemia and cardiac amastigotes, as well as increased survival following T. cruzi challenge infections, compared to controls. Partial protective efficacy was shown regardless of whether the antigen was expressed in Escherichia coli or in yeast (Pichia pastoris). While mouse vaccinations will require further modifications in order to optimize protective efficacy, such studies provide a basis for further evaluations of vaccines comprised of rTc24, together with alternative adjuvants and additional recombinant antigens. PMID:26192358

  18. The Trypanosoma brucei DNA polymerase alpha core subunit gene is developmentally regulated and linked to a constitutively expressed open reading frame.

    PubMed Central

    Leegwater, P A; Strating, M; Murphy, N B; Kooy, R F; van der Vliet, P C; Overdulve, J P

    1991-01-01

    As an initial step towards the characterization of replicative DNA polymerases of trypanosomes, we have cloned, sequenced and examined the expression of the Trypanosoma (Trypanozoon) brucei brucei gene that encodes the DNA polymerase alpha catalytic core (pol alpha). The protein sequence contains the six conserved regions that have been recognized previously in eukaryotic and viral replicative DNA polymerases. In addition, we have identified a seventh region which appears to be conserved primarily in alpha-type DNA polymerases. The T.brucei DNA pol alpha core N-terminus is 123 and 129 amino acids smaller than that of the human and yeast homologue, respectively. The gene is separated by 386 bp from an upstream open reading frame (ORF) of 442 codons. Stable transcripts of the upstream sequence are detected in both dividing and non-dividing forms, while pol alpha transcripts are detected principally in dividing forms. Allelic copies of the T.brucei pol alpha region exhibit restriction site polymorphisms; one such sequence polymorphism affects the amino acid sequence of the T.brucei DNA pol alpha core. The T.brucei pol alpha region cross-hybridizes weakly with that of T.(Nannomonas) congolense and T.(Duttonella) vivax. Images PMID:1754381

  19. Heterodyne 3D ghost imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xu; Zhang, Yong; Yang, Chenghua; Xu, Lu; Wang, Qiang; Zhao, Yuan

    2016-06-01

    Conventional three dimensional (3D) ghost imaging measures range of target based on pulse fight time measurement method. Due to the limit of data acquisition system sampling rate, range resolution of the conventional 3D ghost imaging is usually low. In order to take off the effect of sampling rate to range resolution of 3D ghost imaging, a heterodyne 3D ghost imaging (HGI) system is presented in this study. The source of HGI is a continuous wave laser instead of pulse laser. Temporal correlation and spatial correlation of light are both utilized to obtain the range image of target. Through theory analysis and numerical simulations, it is demonstrated that HGI can obtain high range resolution image with low sampling rate.

  20. Optical communications: Temporal ghost imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faccio, Daniele

    2016-03-01

    Ghost imaging allows the creation of images using light that never interacts with the object. Researchers now show that this technique can be applied to reconstruct temporal 'images' of rapidly varying, picosecond signals in telecommunication systems.

  1. Chiral Bosonization of Superconformal Ghosts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shi, Deheng; Shen, Yang; Liu, Jinling; Xiong, Yongjian

    1996-01-01

    We explain the difference of the Hilbert space of the superconformal ghosts (beta,gamma) system from that of its bosonized fields phi and chi. We calculate the chiral correlation functions of phi, chi fields by inserting appropriate projectors.

  2. The trispectrum in ghost inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Qing-Guo

    2010-07-01

    We calculate the trispectrum in ghost inflation where both the contact diagram and scale-exchange diagram are taken into account. The shape of trispectrum is discussed carefully and we find that the local form is absent in ghost inflation. In general, for the non-local shape trispectrum there are not analogous parameters to τ{sub NL}{sup loc.} and g{sub NL}{sup loc.} which can completely characterize the size of local form trispectrum.

  3. Genomic Analyses, Gene Expression and Antigenic Profile of the Trans-Sialidase Superfamily of Trypanosoma cruzi Reveal an Undetected Level of Complexity

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues-Luiz, Gabriela F.; Mendes, Tiago A. O.; Rodrigues, Thiago S.; Gazzinelli, Ricardo T.; Teixeira, Santuza M. R.; Fujiwara, Ricardo T.; Bartholomeu, Daniella C.

    2011-01-01

    The protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi is the etiologic agent of Chagas disease, a highly debilitating human pathology that affects millions of people in the Americas. The sequencing of this parasite's genome reveals that trans-sialidase/trans-sialidase-like (TcS), a polymorphic protein family known to be involved in several aspects of T. cruzi biology, is the largest T. cruzi gene family, encoding more than 1,400 genes. Despite the fact that four TcS groups are well characterized and only one of the groups contains active trans-sialidases, all members of the family are annotated in the T. cruzi genome database as trans-sialidase. After performing sequence clustering analysis with all TcS complete genes, we identified four additional groups, demonstrating that the TcS family is even more heterogeneous than previously thought. Interestingly, members of distinct TcS groups show distinctive patterns of chromosome localization. Members of the TcSgroupII, which harbor proteins involved in host cell attachment/invasion, are preferentially located in subtelomeric regions, whereas members of the largest and new TcSgroupV have internal chromosomal locations. Real-time RT-PCR confirms the expression of genes derived from new groups and shows that the pattern of expression is not similar within and between groups. We also performed B-cell epitope prediction on the family and constructed a TcS specific peptide array, which was screened with sera from T. cruzi-infected mice. We demonstrated that all seven groups represented in the array are antigenic. A highly reactive peptide occurs in sixty TcS proteins including members of two new groups and may contribute to the known cross-reactivity of T. cruzi epitopes during infection. Taken together, our results contribute to a better understanding of the real complexity of the TcS family and open new avenues for investigating novel roles of this family during T. cruzi infection. PMID:22039427

  4. Malleable mitochondrion of Trypanosoma brucei.

    PubMed

    Verner, Zdeněk; Basu, Somsuvro; Benz, Corinna; Dixit, Sameer; Dobáková, Eva; Faktorová, Drahomíra; Hashimi, Hassan; Horáková, Eva; Huang, Zhenqiu; Paris, Zdeněk; Peña-Diaz, Priscila; Ridlon, Lucie; Týč, Jiří; Wildridge, David; Zíková, Alena; Lukeš, Julius

    2015-01-01

    The importance of mitochondria for a typical aerobic eukaryotic cell is undeniable, as the list of necessary mitochondrial processes is steadily growing. Here, we summarize the current knowledge of mitochondrial biology of an early-branching parasitic protist, Trypanosoma brucei, a causative agent of serious human and cattle diseases. We present a comprehensive survey of its mitochondrial pathways including kinetoplast DNA replication and maintenance, gene expression, protein and metabolite import, major metabolic pathways, Fe-S cluster synthesis, ion homeostasis, organellar dynamics, and other processes. As we describe in this chapter, the single mitochondrion of T. brucei is everything but simple and as such rivals mitochondria of multicellular organisms. PMID:25708462

  5. Ghost Head Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Looking like a colorful holiday card, a new image from NASA's Hubble Space Telescope reveals a vibrant green and red nebula far from Earth.

    The image of NGC 2080, taken by Hubble's Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2, designed and built by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., is available online at http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/images/wfpc . Images like this help astronomers investigate star formation in nebulas.

    NGC 2080, nicknamed 'The Ghost Head Nebula,' is one of a chain of star-forming regions lying south of the 30 Doradus nebula in the Large Magellanic Cloud. 30 Doradus is the largest star-forming complex in the local group of galaxies. This 'enhanced color' picture is composed of three narrow-band-filter images obtained by Hubble on March 28, 2000.

    The red and blue light come from regions of hydrogen gas heated by nearby stars. The green light on the left comes from glowing oxygen. The energy to illuminate the green light is supplied by a powerful stellar wind, a stream of high-speed particles coming from a massive star just outside the image. The central white region is a combination of all three emissions and indicates a core of hot, massive stars in this star-formation region. Intense emission from these stars has carved a bowl-shaped cavity in surrounding gas.

    In the white region, the two bright areas (the 'eyes of the ghost') - named A1 (left) and A2 (right) -- are very hot, glowing 'blobs' of hydrogen and oxygen. The bubble in A1 is produced by the hot, intense radiation and powerful stellar wind from one massive star. A2 contains more dust and several hidden, massive stars. The massive stars in A1 and A2 must have formed within the last 10,000 years, since their natal gas shrouds are not yet disrupted by the powerful radiation of the newborn stars.

    The Space Telescope Science Institute is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., for NASA, under contract with the Goddard Space Flight Center

  6. Distinct genomic organization, mRNA expression and cellular localization of members of two amastin sub-families present in Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Amastins are surface glycoproteins (approximately 180 residues long) initially described in Trypanosoma cruzi as particularly abundant during the amastigote stage of this protozoan parasite. Subsequently, they have been found to be encoded by large gene families also present in the genomes of several species of Leishmania and in other Trypanosomatids. Although most amastin genes are organized in clusters associated with tuzin genes and are up-regulated in the intracellular stage of T. cruzi and Leishmania spp, distinct genomic organizations and mRNA expression patterns have also been reported. Results Based on the analysis of the complete genome sequences of two T. cruzi strains, we identified a total of 14 copies of amastin genes in T. cruzi and showed that they belong to two of the four previously described amastin subfamilies. Whereas δ-amastin genes are organized in two or more clusters with alternating copies of tuzin genes, the two copies of β-amastins are linked together in a distinct chromosome. Most T. cruzi amastins have similar surface localization as determined by confocal microscopy and western blot analyses. Transcript levels for δ-amastins were found to be up-regulated in amastigotes from several T. cruzi strains, except in the G strain, which is known to have low infection capacity. In contrast, in all strains analysed, β-amastin transcripts are more abundant in epimastigotes, the stage found in the insect vector. Conclusions Here we showed that not only the number and diversity of T. cruzi amastin genes is larger than what has been predicted, but also their mode of expression during the parasite life cycle is more complex. Although most T. cruzi amastins have a similar surface localization, only δ-amastin genes have their expression up-regulated in amastigotes. The results showing that a sub-group of this family is up-regulated in epimastigotes, suggest that, in addition of their role in intracellular amastigotes, T. cruzi amastins

  7. Ghost imaging for a reflected object with a rough surface

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Chunfang; Zhang Dawei; Chen Bin; Bai Yanfeng

    2010-12-15

    Ghost imaging for the reflected object with rough surface is investigated. The surface height variance {sigma}{sub h}{sup 2} and the correlation length l{sub c} have been introduced to characterize the rough surface. Based on a simple scattering model, we derive the analytical expressions which are used to describe the effects of {sigma}{sub h}{sup 2} and l{sub c} on ghost imaging. The results show that both {sigma}{sub h}{sup 2} and l{sub c} have no influence on the image resolution, while the convergence of the correlation decreases as {sigma}{sub h}{sup 2} increases. Additionally, the bucket detector used in the test arm can dramatically improve the visibility of ghost images. The results are backed up by numerical simulations, in which a Monte Carlo approach to generate a rough surface has been used.

  8. Deoxyhypusine Modification of Eukaryotic Translation Initiation Factor 5A (eIF5A) Is Essential for Trypanosoma brucei Growth and for Expression of Polyprolyl-containing Proteins*

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Suong; Leija, Chrisopher; Kinch, Lisa; Regmi, Sandesh; Li, Qiong; Grishin, Nick V.; Phillips, Margaret A.

    2015-01-01

    The eukaryotic protozoan parasite Trypanosoma brucei is the causative agent of human African trypanosomiasis. Polyamine biosynthesis is essential in T. brucei, and the polyamine spermidine is required for synthesis of a novel cofactor called trypanothione and for deoxyhypusine modification of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 5A (eIF5A). eIF5A promotes translation of proteins containing polyprolyl tracts in mammals and yeast. To evaluate the function of eIF5A in T. brucei, we used RNA interference (RNAi) to knock down eIF5A levels and found that it is essential for T. brucei growth. The RNAi-induced growth defect was complemented by expression of wild-type human eIF5A but not by a Lys-50 mutant that blocks modification by deoxyhypusine. Bioinformatics analysis showed that 15% of the T. brucei proteome contains 3 or more consecutive prolines and that actin-related proteins and cysteine proteases were highly enriched in the group. Steady-state protein levels of representative proteins containing 9 consecutive prolines that are involved in actin assembly (formin and CAP/Srv2p) were significantly reduced by knockdown of eIF5A. Several T. brucei polyprolyl proteins are involved in flagellar assembly. Knockdown of TbeIF5A led to abnormal cell morphologies and detached flagella, suggesting that eIF5A is important for translation of proteins needed for these processes. Potential specialized functions for eIF5A in T. brucei in translation of variable surface glycoproteins were also uncovered. Inhibitors of deoxyhypusination would be expected to cause a pleomorphic effect on multiple cell processes, suggesting that deoxyhypusine/hypusine biosynthesis could be a promising drug target in not just T. brucei but in other eukaryotic pathogens. PMID:26082486

  9. TNF-α is expressed at sites of parasite and tissue destruction in the spleen of mice acutely infected with Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    LIMA, ELIANITA SUZART; ANDRADE, ZILTON A; ANDRADE, SONIA G

    2001-01-01

    Mice infected with a macrophagotropic strain of Trypanosoma cruzi develop progressive splenomegaly due to reactive hyperplasia with increased number of lymphocytes and macrophages, culminating in parasite disintegration and necrosis of parasitized cells. Necrotic changes have been attributed to the liberation of toxic cytokines, including TNF-α, from parasitized macrophages. In the present study, the presence of TNF‐α was investigated in situ. In addition the participation of destroyed parasites in inducing the liberation of TNF-α was examined in two highly susceptible mice strains (C3H and Swiss) and a more resistant strain (DBA). Swiss (90) C3H/He (83) and DBA (30) mice were infected with the Peruvian strain of T. cruzi. Nineteen infected Swiss mice, and 22 infected C3H/He were treated with Benznidazole (one or two doses, 100 mg/kg bw/day), on the 8th and 9th days after infection. Necrotic splenic lesions occurred in both susceptible and resistant strains of mice. Although differing in degree, lesions were more intense in C3H and Swiss than in DBA mice. Comparing untreated and treated susceptible mice, necrotic lesions were significantly less intense in the latter. By specific monoclonal antibody immunolabelling, TNF-α was demonstrated in the cytoplasm of macrophages and within necrotic areas, from Swiss, C3H/He and DBA mouse spleens. In conclusion, TNF-α, probably synthesized by macrophages, was strongly expressed at the sites of parasite and cell destruction, thus appearing to play a pivotal role in splenic necrotic changes associated with severe experimental T. cruzi infection. PMID:11846839

  10. Cytokine-dependent and–independent gene expression changes and cell cycle block revealed in Trypanosoma cruzi-infected host cells by comparative mRNA profiling

    PubMed Central

    Costales, Jaime A; Daily, Johanna P; Burleigh, Barbara A

    2009-01-01

    Background The requirements for growth and survival of the intracellular pathogen Trypanosoma cruzi within mammalian host cells are poorly understood. Transcriptional profiling of the host cell response to infection serves as a rapid read-out for perturbation of host physiology that, in part, reflects adaptation to the infective process. Using Affymetrix oligonucleotide array analysis we identified common and disparate host cell responses triggered by T. cruzi infection of phenotypically diverse human cell types. Results We report significant changes in transcript abundance in T. cruzi-infected fibroblasts, endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells (2852, 2155 and 531 genes respectively; fold-change ≥ 2, p-value < 0.01) 24 hours post-invasion. A prominent type I interferon response was observed in each cell type, reflecting a secondary response to secreted cytokine in infected cultures. To identify a core cytokine-independent response in T. cruzi-infected fibroblasts and endothelial cells transwell plates were used to distinguish cytokine-dependent and -independent gene expression profiles. This approach revealed the induction of metabolic and signaling pathways involved in cell proliferation, amino acid catabolism and response to wounding as common themes in T. cruzi-infected cells. In addition, the downregulation of genes involved in mitotic cell cycle and cell division predicted that T. cruzi infection may impede host cell cycle progression. The observation of impaired cytokinesis in T. cruzi-infected cells, following nuclear replication, confirmed this prediction. Conclusion Metabolic pathways and cellular processes were identified as significantly altered at the transcriptional level in response to T. cruzi infection in a cytokine-independent manner. Several of these alterations are supported by previous studies of T. cruzi metabolic requirements or effects on the host. However, our methods also revealed a T. cruzi-dependent block in the host cell cycle, at

  11. A prime-boost immunization with Tc52 N-terminal domain DNA and the recombinant protein expressed in Pichia pastoris protects against Trypanosoma cruzi infection.

    PubMed

    Matos, Marina N; Sánchez Alberti, Andrés; Morales, Celina; Cazorla, Silvia I; Malchiodi, Emilio L

    2016-06-14

    We have previously reported that the N-terminal domain of the antigen Tc52 (NTc52) is the section of the protein that confers the strongest protection against Trypanosoma cruzi infection. To improve vaccine efficacy, we conducted here a prime-boost strategy (NTc52PB) by inoculating two doses of pcDNA3.1 encoding the NTc52 DNA carried by attenuated Salmonella (SNTc52), followed by two doses of recombinant NTc52 expressed in Picchia pastoris plus ODN-CpG as adjuvant. This strategy was comparatively analyzed with the following protocols: (1) two doses of NTc52+ODN-CpG by intranasal route followed by two doses of NTc52+ODN-CpG by intradermal route (NTc52CpG); (2) four doses of SNTc52; and (3) a control group with four doses of Salmonella carrying the empty plasmid. All immunized groups developed a predominant Th1 cellular immune response but with important differences in antibody development and protection against infection. Thus, immunization with just SNTc52 induces a strong specific cellular response, a specific systemic antibody response that is weak yet functional (considering lysis of trypomastigotes and inhibition of cell invasion), and IgA mucosal immunity, protecting in both the acute and chronic stages of infection. The group that received only recombinant protein (NTc52CpG) developed a strong antibody immune response but weaker cellular immunity than the other groups, and the protection against infection was clear in the acute phase of infection but not in chronicity. The prime-boost strategy, which combines DNA and protein vaccine and both mucosal and systemic immunizations routes, was the best assayed protocol, inducing strong cellular and humoral responses as well as specific mucosal IgA, thus conferring better protection in the acute and chronic stages of infection. PMID:27177947

  12. Jung's Conception of the Holy Ghost.

    PubMed

    Gates, L

    1994-12-01

    Carl Jung saw the Holy Ghost as the crowning figure in God's revelation of Himself. For Jung, the Holy Ghost is that mysterious force which unites opposites and allows the transcendent to enter space and time. Through a process called "continuing incarnation", the Holy Ghost makes it possible for ordinary people to participate in "the sonship of God". PMID:24264129

  13. Holes in the ghost condensate

    SciTech Connect

    Krotov, D.; Rebbi, C.; Rubakov, V.; Zakharov, V.

    2005-02-15

    In a recently proposed model of 'ghost condensation', spatially homogeneous states may mix, via tunneling, with inhomogeneous states which are somewhat similar to bubbles in the theory of false vacuum decay, the corresponding bubble nucleation rate being exponentially sensitive to the ultraviolet completion of the model. The conservation of energy and charge requires that the energy density is negative and the field is strongly unstable in a part of the nucleated bubble. Unlike in the theory of false vacuum decay, this region does not expand during subsequent real-time evolution. In the outer part, positive energy outgoing waves develop, which eventually form shocks. Behind the outgoing waves and away from the bubble center, the background settles down to its original value. The outcome of the entire process is thus a microscopic region of negative energy and strong field - 'hole in the ghost condensate' - plus a collection of outgoing waves (particles of the ghost condensate field) carrying away finite energy.

  14. Functional studies of TcRjl, a novel GTPase of Trypanosoma cruzi, reveals phenotypes related with MAPK activation during parasite differentiation and after heterologous expression in Drosophila model system.

    PubMed

    dos-Santos, Guilherme Rodrigo Reis Monteiro; Fontenele, Marcio Ribeiro; Dias, Felipe de Almeida; de Oliveira, Pedro Lagerblad; Nepomuceno-Silva, José Luciano; de Melo, Luiz Dione Barbosa; Araujo, Helena Maria Marcolla; Lopes, Ulisses Gazos

    2015-11-01

    The life cycle of the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi comprises rounds of proliferative cycles and differentiation in distinct host environments. Ras GTPases are molecular switches that play pivotal regulatory functions in cell fate. Rjl is a novel GTPase with unknown function. Herein we show that TcRjl blocks in vivo cell differentiation. The forced expression of TcRjl leads to changes in the overall tyrosine protein phosphorylation profile of parasites. TcRjl expressing parasites sustained DNA synthesis regardless the external stimuli for differentiation. Heterologous expression in the Drosophila melanogaster genetic system strongly suggests a role from TcRjl protein in RTK-dependent pathways and MAPK activation. PMID:26408905

  15. Ghost Imaging with Matter Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khakimov, Roman; Henson, Bryce; Shin, David; Hodgman, Sean; Dall, Robert; Baldwin, Kenneth; Truscott, Andrew

    2016-05-01

    We demonstrate, for the first time, high resolution ghost imaging of a macroscopic object using atoms. Ghost imaging is a novel technique in which the image emerges from cross-correlation of particles (usually photons)in two separate beams. One beam is detected with a single-pixel (bucket detector) after passing through the object, while the other beam does not interact with the object and is registered with high spatial resolution. Neither detector can reconstruct the image independently. In our experiment, the two beams are formed by correlated pairs of ultracold metastable helium atoms originating from thecollision of two Bose-Einstein Condensates. After s-wave scattering the atoms form a spherical shell of strongly correlated pairs with opposite momenta. We extend this technique with more than a10-foldincrease in the number of correlated pairs available for eachsingle experiment run, by using higher-order Bragg scattering in the Kapitza-Dirac regime, with multiple shells generated from different diffraction orders. Using single-atom detection, we create ghost images of a target maskwith a resolution given by the width of the cross-corrrelation function of atomic momenta. Future extensions could include ghost interference and EPR tests.

  16. The Ghosts of the School Curriculum: Past, Present and Future

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kenway, Jane

    2008-01-01

    Ghosts haunt the school curriculum. Charles Dickens' "A Christmas Carol" provides a starting point for thinking about these curriculum ghosts. In the Preface, he states that he has "endeavoured in this Ghostly little book, to raise the Ghost of an Idea". In this article, the author seeks to raise the ghost of an idea, and to have a bit of fun with…

  17. Calibration artefacts in radio interferometry - II. Ghost patterns for irregular arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wijnholds, S. J.; Grobler, T. L.; Smirnov, O. M.

    2016-04-01

    Calibration artefacts, like the self-calibration bias, usually emerge when data are calibrated using an incomplete sky model. In the first paper of this series, in which we analysed calibration artefacts in data from the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope, we showed that these artefacts take the form of spurious positive and negative sources, which we refer to as ghosts or ghost sources. We also developed a mathematical framework with which we could predict the ghost pattern of an east-west interferometer for a simple two-source test case. In this paper, we extend our analysis to more general array layouts. This provides us with a useful method for the analysis of ghosts that we refer to as extrapolation. Combining extrapolation with a perturbation analysis, we are able to (1) analyse the ghost pattern for a two-source test case with one modelled and one unmodelled source for an arbitrary array layout, (2) explain why some ghosts are brighter than others, (3) define a taxonomy allowing us to classify the different ghosts, (4) derive closed form expressions for the fluxes and positions of the brightest ghosts, and (5) explain the strange two-peak structure with which some ghosts manifest during imaging. We illustrate our mathematical predictions using simulations of the KAT-7 (seven-dish Karoo Array Telescope) array. These results show the explanatory power of our mathematical model. The insights gained in this paper provide a solid foundation to study calibration artefacts in arbitrary, i.e. more complicated than the two-source example discussed here, incomplete sky models or full synthesis observations including direction-dependent effects.

  18. Ghost signals in Allison emittance scanners

    SciTech Connect

    Stockli, Martin P.; Leitner, M.; Moehs, D.P.; Keller, R.; Welton, R.F.; /SNS Project, Oak Ridge /Tennessee U.

    2004-12-01

    For over 20 years, Allison scanners have been used to measure emittances of low-energy ion beams. We show that scanning large trajectory angles produces ghost signals caused by the sampled beamlet impacting on an electric deflection plate. The ghost signal strength is proportional to the amount of beam entering the scanner. Depending on the ions, and their velocity, the ghost signals can have the opposite or the same polarity as the main beam signals. The ghost signals cause significant errors in the emittance estimates because they appear at large trajectory angles. These ghost signals often go undetected because they partly overlap with the real signals, are mostly below the 1% level, and often hide in the noise. A simple deflection plate modification is shown to reduce the ghost signal strength by over 99%.

  19. Ghost Signals In Allison Emittance Scanners

    SciTech Connect

    Stockli, Martin P.; Leitner, M.; Keller, R.; Moehs, D.P.; Welton, R. F.

    2005-03-15

    For over 20 years, Allison scanners have been used to measure emittances of low-energy ion beams. We show that scanning large trajectory angles produces ghost signals caused by the sampled beamlet impacting on an electric deflection plate. The ghost signal strength is proportional to the amount of beam entering the scanner. Depending on the ions, and their velocity, the ghost signals can have the opposite or the same polarity as the main beam signals. The ghost signals cause significant errors in the emittance estimates because they appear at large trajectory angles. These ghost signals often go undetected because they partly overlap with the real signals, are mostly below the 1% level, and often hide in the noise. A simple deflection plate modification is shown to reduce the ghost signal strength by over 99%.

  20. Supersymmetric cubic Galileons have ghosts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koehn, Michael; Lehners, Jean-Luc; Ovrut, Burt A.

    2013-07-01

    Galileons are higher-derivative theories of a real scalar which nevertheless admit second-order equations of motion. They have interesting applications as dark energy models and in early universe cosmology, and have been conjectured to arise as descriptions of brane dynamics in string theory. In the present paper, we study the bosonic sector of globally N=1 supersymmetric extensions of the cubic Galileon Lagrangian in detail. Supersymmetry requires that the Galileon scalar now becomes paired with a second real scalar field. We prove that the presence of this second scalar causes the equations of motion to become higher than second order, thus leading to the appearance of ghosts. We also analyze the energy scales up to which, in an effective field theory description, the ghosts can be tamed.

  1. UV-extending ghost inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, Mikhail M.; Sibiryakov, Sergey E-mail: sergey.sibiryakov@cern.ch

    2014-05-01

    We present a setup that provides a partial UV-completion of the ghost inflation model up to a scale which can be almost as high as the Planck mass. This is achieved by coupling the inflaton to the Lorentz-violating sector described by the Einstein-aether theory or its khronometric version. Compared to previous works on ghost inflation our setup allows to go beyond the study of small perturbations and include the background dynamics in a unified framework. In the specific regime when the expansion of the Universe is dominated by the kinetic energy of the inflaton we find that the model predicts rather high tensor-to-scalar ratio r ∼ 0.02÷0.2 and non-Gaussianity of equilateral type with f{sub NL} in the range from -50 to -5.

  2. Cascading gravity is ghost free

    SciTech Connect

    Rham, Claudia de; Khoury, Justin; Tolley, Andrew J.

    2010-06-15

    We perform a full perturbative stability analysis of the 6D cascading gravity model in the presence of 3-brane tension. We demonstrate that for sufficiently large tension on the (flat) 3-brane, there are no ghosts at the perturbative level, consistent with results that had previously only been obtained in a specific 5D decoupling limit. These results establish the cascading gravity framework as a consistent infrared modification of gravity.

  3. Ghost imaging with a single detector

    SciTech Connect

    Bromberg, Yaron; Katz, Ori; Silberberg, Yaron

    2009-05-15

    We experimentally demonstrate pseudothermal ghost imaging and ghost diffraction using only a single detector. We achieve this by replacing the high-resolution detector of the reference beam with a computation of the propagating field, following a recent proposal by Shapiro [Phys. Rev. A 78, 061802(R) (2008)]. Since only a single detector is used, this provides experimental evidence that pseudothermal ghost imaging does not rely on nonlocal quantum correlations. In addition, we show the depth-resolving capability of this ghost imaging technique.

  4. Quantification and Reduction of Ghosting Artifacts in Interleaved Echo-Planar Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Reeder, Scott B.; Atalar, Ergin; Bolster, Bradley D.; McVeigh, Elliot R.

    2007-01-01

    A mathematical analysis of ghosting artifacts often seen in interleaved echo-planar images (EPI) is presented. These artifacts result from phase and amplitude discontinuities between lines of k-space in the phase-encoding direction, and timing misregistrations from system filter delays. Phase offsets and time delays are often measured using “reference” scans, to reduce ghosting through post-processing. From the expressions describing ghosting artifacts, criteria were established for reducing ghosting to acceptable levels. Subsequently, the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) requirements for estimation of time delays and phase offsets, determined from reference scans, was evaluated to establish the effect of estimation error on artifact reduction for interleaved EPI. Artifacts resulting from these effects can be reduced to very low levels when appropriate reference scan estimation is used. This has important implications for functional MRI (fMRI) and applications involving small changes in signal intensity. PMID:9339445

  5. De novo transcriptome characterization of the ghost moth, Thitarodes pui, and elevation-based differences in the gene expression of its larvae.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wenjing; Sun, Hongxia; Guo, Jixing; Jiang, Fengze; Liu, Xin; Zhang, Guren

    2015-12-10

    Thitarodes pui larvae are the hosts of a medicinal fungus, Ophiocordyceps sinensis, and are naturally distributed at an altitude of 4100-4650 m on Segrila Mountain of the Tibetan Plateau. Here, we conducted transcriptome profiling of T. pui larvae based on the Illumina high-throughput sequencing platform. Subsequently, we explored elevation-based differences of T. pui by comparing gene expression profiles between larvae at high-altitude (natural conditions) and larvae exposed to short-term (2months) low-altitude conditions. A total of 105,935,208 clean reads were assembled into 70,048 unigenes with a mean length of 639 bp. All unigenes were searched against public databases, with 51.26% unigenes being successfully annotated in the NR, SWISS-PROT, EuKaryotic Orthologous Groups (KOG), Gene Ontology (GO), and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genome (KEGG) databases. A total of 11,846 unigenes were functionally classified into 239 KEGG pathways. Metabolism was the most represented pathway, with 4271 unigenes (36.05%). Using the transcriptome data as a reference, 629 (311 up-regulated/318 down-regulated) genes were differentially expressed by low-altitude larvae when compared with those of high-altitude larvae. The most significantly differentially expressed genes were annotated in the processes of carbohydrate metabolism, lipid metabolism, and respiration. This report provides valuable information about the T. pui transcriptome for future genomic studies, including how gene expression is altered in larvae reared at different elevations. PMID:26235680

  6. Transcriptome characterization and gene expression analysis related to sexual dimorphism in the ghost moth, Thitarodes pui, a host of Ophiocordyceps sinensis.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jixing; Jiang, Fengze; Yi, Jiequn; Liu, Xin; Zhang, Guren

    2016-08-22

    Thitarodes pui is one of the host species of the Chinese caterpillar fungus Ophiocordyceps sinensis as a traditional Chinese medicine with economic and medical importance. The pupal and adult stages of T. pui are sexually dimorphic. In order to elucidate the molecular mechanisms involved in the sexually dimorphic development of T. pui, we compared the transcriptomes of female and male pupae and adults. We obtained 15,881,734, 16,962,086, 17,514,743, and 17,770,904 clean reads from female pupae, male pupae, female adults, and male adults, respectively. The reads obtained from the four samples were pooled and assembled into 65,165 unigenes, 23,597 of which were annotated. Candidate genes involved in sexual development were identified and analysed. Gene expression analysis revealed that 1406 genes were differentially expressed in male and female pupae, 448 of which were up-regulated in males and 958 were up-regulated in females. A total of 2025 genes were differentially expressed in male and females adults, 1304 of which were up-regulated in males and 721 were up-regulated in females. The functional enrichment of the differentially expressed genes indicated that reproduction and cuticle synthesis were regulated differently between the sexes. The transcriptome data obtained provide significant information regarding the genes involved in sexually dimorphic development, which will improve our understanding of the molecular mechanisms related to sexual dimorphism and helpful for the moth mass rearing which would provide enough host insects for the sustainable utilization of O. sinensis. PMID:27182053

  7. Variational method for lattice spectroscopy with ghosts

    SciTech Connect

    Burch, Tommy; Hagen, Christian; Gattringer, Christof; Glozman, Leonid Ya.; Lang, C.B.

    2006-01-01

    We discuss the variational method used in lattice spectroscopy calculations. In particular we address the role of ghost contributions which appear in quenched or partially quenched simulations and have a nonstandard euclidean time dependence. We show that the ghosts can be separated from the physical states. Our result is illustrated with numerical data for the scalar meson.

  8. Ghosting reduction method for color anaglyphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, An Jin; Kim, Hye Jin; Choi, Jae Wan; Yu, Ki Yun

    2008-02-01

    Anaglyph is the simplest and the most economical method for 3D visualization. However, anaglyph has several drawbacks such as loss of color or visual discomfort, e.g., region merging and the ghosting effect. In particular, the ghosting effect, which is caused by green penetrating to the left eye, brings on a slight headache, dizziness and vertigo. Therefore, ghosting effects have to be reduced to improve the visual quality and make viewing of the anaglyph comfortable. Since red lightness is increased by penetration by green, the lightness of the red band has to be compensated for. In this paper, a simple deghosting method is proposed using the red lightness difference of the left and right images. We detected a ghosting area with the criterion, which was calculated from the statistics of the difference image, and then the red lightness of the anaglyph was changed to be brighter or darker according to the degree of the difference. The amount of change of red lightness was determined empirically. These adjustments simultaneously reduced the ghosting effect and preserved the color lightness within the non-ghosting area. The proposed deghosting method works well, and the goal of this paper was to detect the ghosting area automatically and to reduce the ghosting.

  9. Accretion of Ghost Condensate by Black Holes

    SciTech Connect

    Frolov, A

    2004-06-02

    The intent of this letter is to point out that the accretion of a ghost condensate by black holes could be extremely efficient. We analyze steady-state spherically symmetric flows of the ghost fluid in the gravitational field of a Schwarzschild black hole and calculate the accretion rate. Unlike minimally coupled scalar field or quintessence, the accretion rate is set not by the cosmological energy density of the field, but by the energy scale of the ghost condensate theory. If hydrodynamical flow is established, it could be as high as tenth of a solar mass per second for 10MeV-scale ghost condensate accreting onto a stellar-sized black hole, which puts serious constraints on the parameters of the ghost condensate model.

  10. Iterative denoising of ghost imaging.

    PubMed

    Yao, Xu-Ri; Yu, Wen-Kai; Liu, Xue-Feng; Li, Long-Zhen; Li, Ming-Fei; Wu, Ling-An; Zhai, Guang-Jie

    2014-10-01

    We present a new technique to denoise ghost imaging (GI) in which conventional intensity correlation GI and an iteration process have been combined to give an accurate estimate of the actual noise affecting image quality. The blurring influence of the speckle areas in the beam is reduced in the iteration by setting a threshold. It is shown that with an appropriate choice of threshold value, the quality of the iterative GI reconstructed image is much better than that of differential GI for the same number of measurements. This denoising method thus offers a very effective approach to promote the implementation of GI in real applications. PMID:25322001

  11. Selective activity of 2,4-diaryl-1,2,3,4-tetrahydroquinolines on Trypanosoma cruzi epimastigotes and amastigotes expressing β-galactosidase.

    PubMed

    Fonseca-Berzal, Cristina; Merchán Arenas, Diego R; Romero Bohórquez, Arnold R; Escario, José A; Kouznetsov, Vladimir V; Gómez-Barrio, Alicia

    2013-09-01

    The growth inhibitory effect on Trypanosoma cruzi epimastigotes and the unspecific cytotoxicity over NCTC-929 fibroblasts of two series of previously synthesized 2,4-diaryl-1,2,3,4-tetrahydroquinolines (THQ), have been studied in vitro and compared with those of benznidazole (BZ). Derivatives AR39, AR40, AR41, AR91 and DM15 achieved outstanding selectivity indexes (SI) on the extracellular form (SITHQ>SIBZ>9.44) and thus, were tested in a more specific in vitro assay against amastigotes, showing less effectiveness than the reference drug (SIBZ>320) but also accomplishing great selectivity on the intracellular stage (SITHQ>25). These promising results, supported by the in silico prediction of high bioavailability and less potential risk than benznidazole, reveal several tetrahydroquinolines as prototypes of potential antichagasic drugs. PMID:23899616

  12. Volume Segmentation and Ghost Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziskin, Isaac; Adrian, Ronald

    2011-11-01

    Volume Segmentation Tomographic PIV (VS-TPIV) is a type of tomographic PIV in which images of particles in a relatively thick volume are segmented into images on a set of much thinner volumes that may be approximated as planes, as in 2D planar PIV. The planes of images can be analysed by standard mono-PIV, and the volume of flow vectors can be recreated by assembling the planes of vectors. The interrogation process is similar to a Holographic PIV analysis, except that the planes of image data are extracted from two-dimensional camera images of the volume of particles instead of three-dimensional holographic images. Like the tomographic PIV method using the MART algorithm, Volume Segmentation requires at least two cameras and works best with three or four. Unlike the MART method, Volume Segmentation does not require reconstruction of individual particle images one pixel at a time and it does not require an iterative process, so it operates much faster. As in all tomographic reconstruction strategies, ambiguities known as ghost particles are produced in the segmentation process. The effect of these ghost particles on the PIV measurement is discussed. This research was supported by Contract 79419-001-09, Los Alamos National Laboratory.

  13. Ghost Imaging of Space Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strekalov, D. V.; Erkmen, B. I.; Yu, N.

    2013-02-01

    The term "ghost imaging" was coined in 1995 when an optical correlation measurement using biphoton light from a parametric downconversion crystal was used to reconstruct an image of a mask by raster-scanning a detector in an empty optical channel. The ability to image objects nonlocally using only a "bucket" detector in the object channel and placing all high-resolution optics in the empty reference channel was found appealing by many scientists. The most important steps towards making this technique practical were understanding that thermal light sources can be used instead of biphoton sources, and that a bucket detector placed immediately after the object can be replaced by a distant point-like detector. We investigate the possibility of the next step, which would be to remove the optical beam splitter, which so far has been an indispensable part of ghost imaging with thermal light. In our approach, the object itself takes on the function of the beam splitter. If successful, this approach will allow for real-world application of the correlation imaging technique, even for the astronomical observations.

  14. Ghost imaging with broad distance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, De-Yang; Zhang, Lu; Du, Shao-Jiang; Xia, Yun-Jie

    2015-10-01

    We present a scheme that is able to achieve the ghost imaging with broad distance. The physical nature of our scheme is that the different wavelength beams are separated in free space by an optical media according to the slow light or dispersion principle. Meanwhile, the equality of the optical distance of the two light arms is not violated. The photon correlation is achieved by the rotating ground glass plate (RGGP) and spatial light modulator (SLM), respectively. Our work shows that a monochromic ghost image can be obtained in the case of RGGP. More importantly, the position (or distance) of the object can be ascertained by the color of the image. Thus, the imaging and ranging processes are combined as one process for the first time to the best of our knowledge. In the case of SLM, we can obtain a colored image regardless of where the object is. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61178012, 11204156, 11304179, and 11247240), the Specialized Research Fund for the Doctoral Program of Higher Education of China (Grant Nos. 20133705110001 and 20123705120002), the Scientific Research Foundation for Outstanding Young Scientists of Shandong Province, China (Grant No. BS2013DX034), and the Natural Science Foundation of Shandong Province, China (Grant No. ZR2012FQ024).

  15. Black holes in the ghost condensate

    SciTech Connect

    Mukohyama, Shinji

    2005-05-15

    We investigate how the ghost condensate reacts to black holes immersed in it. A ghost condensate defines a hypersurface-orthogonal congruence of timelike curves, each of which has the tangent vector u{sup {mu}}=-g{sup {mu}}{sup {nu}}{partial_derivative}{sub {nu}}{phi}. It is argued that the ghost condensate in this picture approximately corresponds to a congruence of geodesics. In other words, the ghost condensate accretes into a black hole just like a pressureless dust. Correspondingly, if the energy density of the ghost condensate at large distance is set to an extremely small value by cosmic expansion then the late-time accretion rate of the ghost condensate should be negligible. The accretion rate remains very small even if effects of higher derivative terms are taken into account, provided that the black hole is sufficiently large. It is also discussed how to reconcile the black-hole accretion with the possibility that the ghost condensate might behave like dark matter.

  16. Fast evaluation of surface sensitivity on ghost

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boehme, Beate

    2015-09-01

    Real optical systems are often suffering from false light caused by ghosts. In particular single reflections are critical in applications like reflected light illumination microscopy or confocal systems. The degradations of performance can be bright spots in the image or contrast, signal to noise or dynamic range reduction. Thus in these systems the suppression of first order reflections is important. State of the art optical design software supports ray trace based ghost image analysis. The automatic generation of reflex light paths is provided, but for systems with a large number of surfaces the analysis of all ghost light paths is time-consuming. Conventional Monte Carlo based non sequential ray trace sums up the reflections of all surfaces simultaneously. To achieve high accuracy a huge number of rays is necessary, what results in long computational time, especially if the distinction of surface influences needs multiple calculations. In this paper a fast method is proposed for the ranking of ghosts. It was developed for single reflections in centered optical systems. For each surface the ghost light path is calculated with paraxial and real ray trace. The ghost diameter and the corresponding illumination NA are calculated. Usually the distance of the reflex focus to the image is used as criterion to access the importance of a ghost. Here we use the power of the ghost ray bundle. It is compared with the signal strength and listed for all surfaces generating a ghost. So in one step a surface contribution of reflex powers as well as an estimation of total flux of reflected light is obtained. Due to the fact, that only a few rays have to be calculated, the method is rather fast. The accuracy can be estimated by comparison of paraxial and marginal ray trace. In the proposed method, some assumptions and approximations are made. They are assessed in respect to some practical examples, and by comparison with full brute force non-sequential ray trace. The usefulness of

  17. Ghost ileostomy: real and potential advantages.

    PubMed

    Miccini, Michelangelo; Amore Bonapasta, Stefano; Gregori, Matteo; Barillari, Paolo; Tocchi, Adriano

    2010-10-01

    Loop ileostomy is created to minimize the clinical impact of colorectal anastomotic leak. However, a lot of complications may be associated with ileostomy presence and with its reversal. Moreover, patients hardly accept the quality of life resulting from ileostomy. We describe a simple technique (ghost ileostomy) to combine all the advantages of a disposable ileostomy without entailing its complications in patients submitted to low rectal resection. In case of uneventful postoperative course, the ghost ileostomy prevents all complications related to defunctioning ileostomy. At the same time, in case of anastomotic leakage, the ghost ileostomy is easily and safely converted into a defunctioning ileostomy. PMID:20887836

  18. Ghost imaging lidar via sparsity constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Chengqiang; Gong, Wenlin; Chen, Mingliang; Li, Enrong; Wang, Hui; Xu, Wendong; Han, Shensheng

    2012-10-01

    For remote sensing, high-resolution imaging techniques are helpful to catch more characteristic information of the target. We extend pseudo-thermal light ghost imaging to the area of remote imaging and propose a ghost imaging lidar system. The experimental results demonstrate that the real-space image of a target at about 1.0 km range with 20 mm resolution is achieved by ghost imaging via sparsity constraints (GISC) technique. The characters of GISC technique compared to the existing lidar systems are also discussed.

  19. Spectral properties of ghost Neumann matrices

    SciTech Connect

    Bonora, L.; Santos, R. J. Scherer; Tolla, D. D.

    2008-05-15

    We continue the analysis of the ghost wedge states in the oscillator formalism by studying the spectral properties of the ghost matrices of Neumann coefficients. We show that the traditional spectral representation is not valid for these matrices and propose a new heuristic formula that allows one to reconstruct them from the knowledge of their eigenvalues and eigenvectors. It turns out that additional data, which we call boundary data, are needed in order to actually implement the reconstruction. In particular our result lends support to the conjecture that there exists a ghost three strings vertex with properties parallel to those of the matter three strings vertex.

  20. Ghost hunting—an assessment of ghost particle detection and removal methods for tomographic-PIV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elsinga, G. E.; Tokgoz, S.

    2014-08-01

    This paper discusses and compares several methods, which aim to remove spurious peaks, i.e. ghost particles, from the volume intensity reconstruction in tomographic-PIV. The assessment is based on numerical simulations of time-resolved tomographic-PIV experiments in linear shear flows. Within the reconstructed volumes, intensity peaks are detected and tracked over time. These peaks are associated with particles (either ghosts or actual particles) and are characterized by their peak intensity, size and track length. Peak intensity and track length are found to be effective in discriminating between most ghosts and the actual particles, although not all ghosts can be detected using only a single threshold. The size of the reconstructed particles does not reveal an important difference between ghosts and actual particles. The joint distribution of peak intensity and track length however does, under certain conditions, allow a complete separation of ghosts and actual particles. The ghosts can have either a high intensity or a long track length, but not both combined, like all the actual particles. Removing the detected ghosts from the reconstructed volume and performing additional MART iterations can decrease the particle position error at low to moderate seeding densities, but increases the position error, velocity error and tracking errors at higher densities. The observed trends in the joint distribution of peak intensity and track length are confirmed by results from a real experiment in laminar Taylor-Couette flow. This diagnostic plot allows an estimate of the number of ghosts that are indistinguishable from the actual particles.

  1. Target capture and target ghosts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auerbach, Steven P.

    1996-05-01

    Optimal detection methods for small targets rely on whitened matched filters, which convolve the measured data with the signal model, and whiten the result with the noise covariance. In real-world implementations of such filters, the noise covariance must be estimated from the data, and the resulting covariance estimate may be corrupted by presence of the target. The resulting loss in SNR is called 'target capture'. Target capture is often thought to be a problem only for bright targets. This presentation shows that target capture also arises for dim targets, leading to an SNR loss which is independent of target strength and depends on the averaging method used to estimate the noise covariance. This loss is due to a 'coherent beat' between the true noise and that portion of the estimated noise covariance due to the target. This beat leads to 'ghost targets', which diminish the target SNR by producing a negative target ghost at the target's position. A quantitative estimate of this effect will be given, and shown to agree with numerical results. The effect of averaging on SNR is also discussed for data scenes with synthetic injected targets, in cases where the noise covariance is estimated using 'no target' data. For these cases, it is shown that the so-called 'optimal' filter, which uses the true noise covariance, is actually worse than a 'sub-optimal' filter which estimates the noise from scene. This apparent contradiction is resolved by showing that the optimal filter is best if the same filter is used for many scenes, but is outperformed by a filter adapted to a specific scene.

  2. The ghost propagator in Coulomb gauge

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, P.; Reinhardt, H.

    2011-05-23

    We present results for a numerical study of the ghost propagator in Coulomb gauge whereby lattice results for the spatial gluon propagator are used as input to solving the ghost Dyson-Schwinger equation. We show that in order to solve completely, the ghost equation must be supplemented by a boundary condition (the value of the inverse ghost propagator dressing function at zero momentum) which determines if the solution is critical (zero value for the boundary condition) or subcritical (finite value). The various solutions exhibit a characteristic behavior where all curves follow the same (critical) solution when going from high to low momenta until 'forced' to freeze out in the infrared to the value of the boundary condition. The boundary condition can be interpreted in terms of the Gribov gauge-fixing ambiguity; we also demonstrate that this is not connected to the renormalization. Further, the connection to the temporal gluon propagator and the infrared slavery picture of confinement is discussed.

  3. Ghost inflation and de Sitter entropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jazayeri, Sadra; Mukohyama, Shinji; Saitou, Rio; Watanabe, Yota

    2016-08-01

    In the setup of ghost condensation model the generalized second law of black hole thermodynamics can be respected under a radiatively stable assumption that couplings between the field responsible for ghost condensate and matter fields such as those in the Standard Model are suppressed by the Planck scale. Since not only black holes but also cosmology are expected to play important roles towards our better understanding of gravity, we consider a cosmological setup to test the theory of ghost condensation. In particular we shall show that the de Sitter entropy bound proposed by Arkani-Hamed, et al. is satisfied if ghost inflation happened in the early epoch of our universe and if there remains a tiny positive cosmological constant in the future infinity. We then propose a notion of cosmological Page time after inflation.

  4. Lorentz violation and Faddeev-Popov ghosts

    SciTech Connect

    Altschul, B.

    2006-02-15

    We consider how Lorentz-violating interactions in the Faddeev-Popov ghost sector will affect scalar QED. The behavior depends sensitively on whether the gauge symmetry is spontaneously broken. If the symmetry is not broken, Lorentz violations in the ghost sector are unphysical, but if there is spontaneous breaking, radiative corrections will induce Lorentz-violating and gauge-dependent terms in other sectors of the theory.

  5. Transcription of Trypanosoma brucei maxicircles

    SciTech Connect

    Michelotti, E.F.; Hajduk, S.L.

    1987-05-01

    Trypanosoma brucei is a protozoan parasite which developmentally regulates mitochondrial activity. In the mammal T. brucei produces ATP entirely by glycolysis while cytochrome mediated respiration resumes in the life-stage in the midgut of the insect vector. Using quantitative S1 nuclease protection assays two types of regulation of the steady state levels of the mitochondrial transcripts were found. Transcription of cytochrome b, cytochrome oxidase, and the rRNA genes is repressed in early bloodstream developmental stages, undergoes dramatic activation in later bloodstream stages, and finally a lesser activation in the insect developmental stage. Transcription of NADH dehydrogenase genes, however, is unregulated. Mitochondrial transcripts with a 5' triphosphate terminus, representing the site of transcription initiation, were capped using guanylyl transferase. The in vitro capped RNA hybridized to only one of eight mitochondrial restriction fragments on a Southern blot, however, hybridization of Southern blots with RNA from ..cap alpha..-/sup 32/P-UTP pulsed mitochondria labelled all restriction fragments equally. These results suggest that each DNA strand has a single promoter which directs the transcription of a full-length RNA which is subsequently processed. Different mitochondrial genes, despite being expressed on the same precursor RNA molecule, are independently regulated by both transcription initiation and RNA processing.

  6. Thermodynamical description of the ghost dark energy model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honarvaryan, M.; Sheykhi, A.; Moradpour, H.

    2015-04-01

    In this paper, we point out thermodynamical description of ghost dark energy (GDE) and its generalization to the early universe. Thereinafter, we find expressions for the entropy changes of these dark energy (DE) candidates. In addition, considering thermal fluctuations, thermodynamics of the DE component interacting with a dark matter (DM) sector is addressed. We will also find the effects of considering the coincidence problem on the mutual interaction between the dark sectors, and thus the equation of state parameter of DE. Finally, we derive a relation between the mutual interaction of the dark components of the universe, accelerated with the either GDE or its generalization, and the thermodynamic fluctuations.

  7. Expression, purification, and biochemical characterization of recombinant DNA polymerase beta of the Trypanosoma cruzi TcI lineage: requirement of additional factors and detection of phosphorylation of the native form.

    PubMed

    Maldonado, Edio; Rojas, Diego A; Moreira-Ramos, Sandra; Urbina, Fabiola; Miralles, Vicente J; Solari, Aldo; Venegas, Juan

    2015-04-01

    Chagas disease, caused by the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi, is a major parasitic disease that affects millions of people in America. However, despite the high impact of this disease on human health, no effective and safe treatment has been found that eliminates the infecting parasite from human patients. Among the possible chemotherapeutic targets that could be considered for study in T. cruzi are the DNA polymerases, in particular DNA polymerase beta (polß), which previous studies have shown to be involved in kinetoplast DNA replication and repair. In this paper, we describe the expression, purification, and biochemical characterization of the Miranda clone polß, corresponding to lineage T. cruzi I (TcI). The recombinant enzyme purified to homogeneity displayed specific activity in the range described for a highly purified mammalian polß. However, the trypanosome enzyme exhibited important differences in biochemical properties compared to the mammalian enzymes, specifically an almost absolute dependency on KCl, high sensitivity to N-ethylmaleimide (NEM), and low sensitivity to ddTTP. Immuno-affinity purification of T. cruzi polymerase beta (Tcpolß) from epimastigote extracts showed that the native enzyme was phosphorylated. In addition, it was demonstrated that Tcpolß interacts with some proteins in a group of about 15 proteins which are required to repair 1-6 bases of gaps of a double strand damaged DNA. It is possible that these proteins form part of a DNA repair complex, analogous to that described in mammals and some trypanosomatids. PMID:25566774

  8. Brane induced gravity: Ghosts and naturalness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eglseer, Ludwig; Niedermann, Florian; Schneider, Robert

    2015-10-01

    Linear stability of brane induced gravity in two codimensions on a static pure tension background is investigated. The brane is regularized as a ring of finite circumference in extra space. By explicitly calculating the vacuum persistence amplitude of the corresponding quantum theory, we show that the parameter space is divided into two regions—one corresponding to a stable Minkowski vacuum on the brane and one being plagued by ghost instabilities. This analytical result affirms a recent nonlinear, but mainly numerical analysis. The main result is that the ghost is absent for a sufficiently large brane tension, in perfect agreement with a value expected from a natural effective field theory point of view. Unfortunately, the linearly stable parameter regime is either ruled out phenomenologically or becomes unstable for nontrivial cosmologies. We argue that supercritical brane backgrounds constitute the remaining window of opportunity. In the special case of a tensionless brane, we find that the ghost exists for all phenomenologically relevant values of the induced gravity scale. Regarding this case, there are contradicting results in the literature, and we are able to fully resolve this controversy by explicitly uncovering the errors made in the "no-ghost" analysis. Finally, a Hamiltonian analysis generalizes the ghost result to more than two codimensions.

  9. CD8+ T-Cells Expressing Interferon Gamma or Perforin Play Antagonistic Roles in Heart Injury in Experimental Trypanosoma Cruzi-Elicited Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Cipitelli, Márcio da Costa; Vinagre, Nathália Ferreira; Rodrigues, Maurício Martins; Gazzinelli, Ricardo Tostes; Lannes-Vieira, Joseli

    2012-01-01

    In Chagas disease, CD8+ T-cells are critical for the control of Trypanosoma cruzi during acute infection. Conversely, CD8+ T-cell accumulation in the myocardium during chronic infection may cause tissue injury leading to chronic chagasic cardiomyopathy (CCC). Here we explored the role of CD8+ T-cells in T. cruzi-elicited heart injury in C57BL/6 mice infected with the Colombian strain. Cardiomyocyte lesion evaluated by creatine kinase-MB isoenzyme activity levels in the serum and electrical abnormalities revealed by electrocardiogram were not associated with the intensity of heart parasitism and myocarditis in the chronic infection. Further, there was no association between heart injury and systemic anti-T. cruzi CD8+ T-cell capacity to produce interferon-gamma (IFNγ) and to perform specific cytotoxicity. Heart injury, however, paralleled accumulation of anti-T. cruzi cells in the cardiac tissue. In T. cruzi infection, most of the CD8+ T-cells segregated into IFNγ+ perforin (Pfn)neg or IFNγnegPfn+ cell populations. Colonization of the cardiac tissue by anti-T. cruzi CD8+Pfn+ cells paralleled the worsening of CCC. The adoptive cell transfer to T. cruzi-infected cd8−/− recipients showed that the CD8+ cells from infected ifnγ−/−pfn+/+ donors migrate towards the cardiac tissue to a greater extent and caused a more severe cardiomyocyte lesion than CD8+ cells from ifnγ+/+pfn−/− donors. Moreover, the reconstitution of naïve cd8−/− mice with CD8+ cells from naïve ifnγ+/+pfn−/− donors ameliorated T. cruzi-elicited heart injury paralleled IFNγ+ cells accumulation, whereas reconstitution with CD8+ cells from naïve ifnγ−/−pfn+/+ donors led to an aggravation of the cardiomyocyte lesion, which was associated with the accumulation of Pfn+ cells in the cardiac tissue. Our data support a possible antagonist effect of CD8+Pfn+ and CD8+IFNγ+ cells during CCC. CD8+IFNγ+ cells may exert a beneficial role, whereas CD8+Pfn+ may play a detrimental role

  10. Perforin and Gamma Interferon Expression Are Required for CD4+ and CD8+ T-Cell-Dependent Protective Immunity against a Human Parasite, Trypanosoma cruzi, Elicited by Heterologous Plasmid DNA Prime-Recombinant Adenovirus 5 Boost Vaccination▿

    PubMed Central

    de Alencar, Bruna C. G.; Persechini, Pedro M.; Haolla, Filipe A.; de Oliveira, Gabriel; Silverio, Jaline C.; Lannes-Vieira, Joseli; Machado, Alexandre V.; Gazzinelli, Ricardo T.; Bruna-Romero, Oscar; Rodrigues, Mauricio M.

    2009-01-01

    A heterologous prime-boost strategy using plasmid DNA, followed by replication-defective recombinant adenovirus 5, is being proposed as a powerful way to elicit CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell-mediated protective immunity against intracellular pathogens. We confirmed this concept and furthered existing research by providing evidence that the heterologous prime-boost regimen using the gene encoding amastigote surface protein 2 elicited CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell-mediated protective immunity (reduction of acute parasitemia and prolonged survival) against experimental infection with Trypanosoma cruzi. Protective immunity correlated with the presence of in vivo antigen-specific cytotoxic activity prior to challenge. Based on this, our second goal was to determine the outcome of infection after heterologous prime-boost immunization of perforin-deficient mice. These mice were highly susceptible to infection. A detailed analysis of the cell-mediated immune responses in immunized perforin-deficient mice showed an impaired gamma interferon (IFN-γ) secretion by immune spleen cells upon restimulation in vitro with soluble recombinant antigen. In spite of a normal numeric expansion, specific CD8+ T cells presented several functional defects detected in vivo (cytotoxicity) and in vitro (simultaneous expression of CD107a/IFN-γ or IFN-γ/tumor necrosis factor alpha) paralleled by a decreased expression of CD44 and KLRG-1. Our final goal was to determine the importance of IFN-γ in the presence of highly cytotoxic T cells. Vaccinated IFN-γ-deficient mice developed highly cytotoxic cells but failed to develop any protective immunity. Our study thus demonstrated a role for perforin and IFN-γ in a number of T-cell-mediated effector functions and in the antiparasitic immunity generated by a heterologous plasmid DNA prime-adenovirus boost vaccination strategy. PMID:19651871

  11. Perforin and gamma interferon expression are required for CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell-dependent protective immunity against a human parasite, Trypanosoma cruzi, elicited by heterologous plasmid DNA prime-recombinant adenovirus 5 boost vaccination.

    PubMed

    de Alencar, Bruna C G; Persechini, Pedro M; Haolla, Filipe A; de Oliveira, Gabriel; Silverio, Jaline C; Lannes-Vieira, Joseli; Machado, Alexandre V; Gazzinelli, Ricardo T; Bruna-Romero, Oscar; Rodrigues, Mauricio M

    2009-10-01

    A heterologous prime-boost strategy using plasmid DNA, followed by replication-defective recombinant adenovirus 5, is being proposed as a powerful way to elicit CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cell-mediated protective immunity against intracellular pathogens. We confirmed this concept and furthered existing research by providing evidence that the heterologous prime-boost regimen using the gene encoding amastigote surface protein 2 elicited CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cell-mediated protective immunity (reduction of acute parasitemia and prolonged survival) against experimental infection with Trypanosoma cruzi. Protective immunity correlated with the presence of in vivo antigen-specific cytotoxic activity prior to challenge. Based on this, our second goal was to determine the outcome of infection after heterologous prime-boost immunization of perforin-deficient mice. These mice were highly susceptible to infection. A detailed analysis of the cell-mediated immune responses in immunized perforin-deficient mice showed an impaired gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) secretion by immune spleen cells upon restimulation in vitro with soluble recombinant antigen. In spite of a normal numeric expansion, specific CD8(+) T cells presented several functional defects detected in vivo (cytotoxicity) and in vitro (simultaneous expression of CD107a/IFN-gamma or IFN-gamma/tumor necrosis factor alpha) paralleled by a decreased expression of CD44 and KLRG-1. Our final goal was to determine the importance of IFN-gamma in the presence of highly cytotoxic T cells. Vaccinated IFN-gamma-deficient mice developed highly cytotoxic cells but failed to develop any protective immunity. Our study thus demonstrated a role for perforin and IFN-gamma in a number of T-cell-mediated effector functions and in the antiparasitic immunity generated by a heterologous plasmid DNA prime-adenovirus boost vaccination strategy. PMID:19651871

  12. Ghost imaging of phase objects with classical incoherent light

    SciTech Connect

    Shirai, Tomohiro; Setaelae, Tero; Friberg, Ari T.

    2011-10-15

    We describe an optical setup for performing spatial Fourier filtering in ghost imaging with classical incoherent light. This is achieved by a modification of the conventional geometry for lensless ghost imaging. It is shown on the basis of classical coherence theory that with this technique one can realize what we call phase-contrast ghost imaging to visualize pure phase objects.

  13. Nucleologenesis in Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Nepomuceno-Mejía, Tomás; Lara-Martínez, Reyna; Hernández, Roberto; Segura-Valdez, María de Lourdes; Jiménez-García, Luis F

    2016-06-01

    Nucleolar assembly is a cellular event that requires the synthesis and processing of ribosomal RNA, in addition to the participation of pre-nucleolar bodies (PNBs) at the end of mitosis. In mammals and plants, nucleolar biogenesis has been described in detail, but in unicellular eukaryotes it is a poorly understood process. In this study, we used light and electron microscopy cytochemical techniques to investigate the distribution of nucleolar components in the pathway of nucleolus rebuilding during closed cell division in epimastigotes of Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiologic agent of American trypanosomiasis. Silver impregnation specific for nucleolar organizer regions and an ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid regressive procedure to preferentially stain ribonucleoprotein revealed the conservation and dispersion of nucleolar material throughout the nucleoplasm during cell division. Furthermore, at the end of mitosis, the argyrophilic proteins were concentrated in the nucleolar organizer region. Unexpectedly, accumulation of nucleolar material in the form of PNBs was not visualized. We suggest that formation of the nucleolus in epimastigotes of T. cruzi occurs by a process that does not require the concentration of nucleolar material within intermediate nuclear bodies such as mammalian and plant PNBs. PMID:27126372

  14. Varying ghost dark energy and particle creation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khurshudyan, M.

    2016-02-01

    One of the models of dark energy is the ghost dark energy, which has a geometrical origin. Recently, a certain type of phenomenological modification of ghost dark energy has been suggested which motivated us for this work. The goal of this paper is twofold. First, we would like to study the cosmological scenario involving interacting varying ghost dark energy. A cosmographic analysis of a non-interacting model is also performed. Then, we study the particle creation following the straight analogy between quantization in Minkowski background and canonical quantization of a scalar field in curved dynamical backgrounds. Particular attention will be paid to massless-particle production from a radiation-dominated universe (according to our toy model) which evolves to our large-scale universe. Constraints on the parameters of the models obtained during the cosmographic analysis did allow to demonstrate the possibility of a massless-particle creation in a radiation-dominated universe.

  15. Ghost imaging in the time domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryczkowski, Piotr; Barbier, Margaux; Friberg, Ari T.; Dudley, John M.; Genty, Goëry

    2016-03-01

    Ghost imaging is a novel technique that produces the image of an object by correlating the intensity of two light beams, neither of which independently carries information about the shape of the object. Ghost imaging has opened up new perspectives to obtain highly resolved images, even in the presence of noise and turbulence. Here, by exploiting the duality between light propagation in space and time, we demonstrate the temporal analogue of ghost imaging. We use a conventional fast detector that does not see the temporal ‘object’ to be characterized and a slow integrating ‘bucket’ detector that does see the object but without resolving its temporal structure. Our experiments achieve temporal resolution at the picosecond level and are insensitive to the temporal distortion that may occur after the object. The approach is scalable, can be integrated on-chip, and offers great promise for dynamic imaging of ultrafast waveforms.

  16. Ghost Image Correction in CSTAR Photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Zeyang; Zhou, Xu; Zhang, Hui; Zhou, Jilin; Wang, Songhu; Ma, Jun; Zhang, Tianmeng; Fan, Zhou; Zou, Hu

    2013-08-01

    During the Polar Night of 2008 at Dome A site (Antarctica), the Chinese Small Telescope ARray (CSTAR) gathered i-band photometric information (a total of over 300,000 images) of the 20 deg2 sky vicinity around the South Pole automatically and continuously. Within all the acquired images, we carry out an elaborate series of analyses and study the origin and influence of the ghost images in each frame. The point source catalog has also been amended by removing the ghost image effects from the real overlapped stars. This work provides a generalized ghost reduction pipeline and improves the photometric precision of the stars in the CSTAR FOV for the future search for transiting exoplanets.

  17. Living with ghosts in Lorentz invariant theories

    SciTech Connect

    Garriga, Jaume; Vilenkin, Alexander E-mail: vilenkin@cosmos.phy.tufts.edu

    2013-01-01

    We argue that theories with ghosts may have a long lived vacuum state even if all interactions are Lorentz preserving. In space-time dimension D = 2, we consider the tree level decay rate of the vacuum into ghosts and ordinary particles mediated by non-derivative interactions, showing that this is finite and logarithmically growing in time. For D > 2, the decay rate is divergent unless we assume that the interaction between ordinary matter and the ghost sector is soft in the UV, so that it can be described in terms of non-local form factors rather than point-like vertices. We provide an example of a nonlocal gravitational-strength interaction between the two sectors, which appears to satisfy all observational constraints.

  18. The bacterial ghost platform system

    PubMed Central

    Langemann, Timo; Koller, Verena Juliana; Muhammad, Abbas; Kudela, Pavol; Mayr, Ulrike Beate

    2010-01-01

    The Bacterial Ghost (BG) platform technology is an innovative system for vaccine, drug or active substance delivery and for technical applications in white biotechnology. BGs are cell envelopes derived from Gram-negative bacteria. BGs are devoid of all cytoplasmic content but have a preserved cellular morphology including all cell surface structures. Using BGs as delivery vehicles for subunit or DNA-vaccines the particle structure and surface properties of BGs are targeting the carrier itself to primary antigen-presenting cells. Furthermore, BGs exhibit intrinsic adjuvant properties and trigger an enhanced humoral and cellular immune response to the target antigen. Multiple antigens of the native BG envelope and recombinant protein or DNA antigens can be combined in a single type of BG. Antigens can be presented on the inner or outer membrane of the BG as well as in the periplasm that is sealed during BG formation. Drugs or supplements can also be loaded to the internal lumen or periplasmic space of the carrier. BGs are produced by batch fermentation with subsequent product recovery and purification via tangential flow filtration. For safety reasons all residual bacterial DNA is inactivated during the BG production process by the use of staphylococcal nuclease A and/or the treatment with β-propiolactone. After purification BGs can be stored long-term at ambient room temperature as lyophilized product. The production cycle from the inoculation of the pre-culture to the purified BG concentrate ready for lyophilization does not take longer than a day and thus meets modern criteria of rapid vaccine production rather than keeping large stocks of vaccines. The broad spectrum of possible applications in combination with the comparably low production costs make the BG platform technology a safe and sophisticated product for the targeted delivery of vaccines and active agents as well as carrier of immobilized enzymes for applications in white biotechnology. PMID:21326832

  19. Entangled-photon compressive ghost imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Zerom, Petros; Chan, Kam Wai Clifford; Howell, John C.; Boyd, Robert W.

    2011-12-15

    We have experimentally demonstrated high-resolution compressive ghost imaging at the single-photon level using entangled photons produced by a spontaneous parametric down-conversion source and using single-pixel detectors. For a given mean-squared error, the number of photons needed to reconstruct a two-dimensional image is found to be much smaller than that in quantum ghost imaging experiments employing a raster scan. This procedure not only shortens the data acquisition time, but also suggests a more economical use of photons for low-light-level and quantum image formation.

  20. Unusual ghost image in a panoramic radiograph.

    PubMed

    Venkatraman, Sreenivasan; Gowda, J S; Kamarthi, N

    2011-09-01

    A panoramic radiograph was taken for a 9-year-old female patient with her earrings on; thus, artefactual shadows were cast on the radiograph. In addition to the two real images of the earrings, three additional images were seen corresponding to ghost images of the earrings. They were unusual not only in appearance but also because there were three in number. This paper discusses the cause of such images as it revisits the principles of panoramic radiology with respect to ghost images. PMID:21831982

  1. Unusual ghost image in a panoramic radiograph

    PubMed Central

    Venkatraman, S; Gowda, JS; Kamarthi, N

    2011-01-01

    A panoramic radiograph was taken for a 9-year-old female patient with her earrings on; thus, artefactual shadows were cast on the radiograph. In addition to the two real images of the earrings, three additional images were seen corresponding to ghost images of the earrings. They were unusual not only in appearance but also because there were three in number. This paper discusses the cause of such images as it revisits the principles of panoramic radiology with respect to ghost images. PMID:21831982

  2. Multi-wavelength compressive computational ghost imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welsh, Stephen S.; Edgar, Matthew P.; Jonathan, Phillip; Sun, Baoqing; Padgett, Miles J.

    2013-03-01

    The field of ghost imaging encompasses systems which can retrieve the spatial information of an object through correlated measurements of a projected light field, having spatial resolution, and the associated reflected or transmitted light intensity measured by a photodetector. By employing a digital light projector in a computational ghost imaging system with multiple spectrally filtered photodetectors we obtain high-quality multi-wavelength reconstructions of real macroscopic objects. We compare different reconstruction algorithms and reveal the use of compressive sensing techniques for achieving sub-Nyquist performance. Furthermore, we demonstrate the use of this technology in non-visible and fluorescence imaging applications.

  3. Nature of light correlations in ghost imaging

    PubMed Central

    Ragy, Sammy; Adesso, Gerardo

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the nature of correlations in Gaussian light sources used for ghost imaging. We adopt methods from quantum information theory to distinguish genuinely quantum from classical correlations. Combining a microscopic analysis of speckle-speckle correlations with an effective coarse-grained description of the beams, we show that quantum correlations exist even in ‘classical'-like thermal light sources, and appear relevant for the implementation of ghost imaging in the regime of low illumination. We further demonstrate that the total correlations in the thermal source beams effectively determine the quality of the imaging, as quantified by the signal-to-noise ratio. PMID:22973501

  4. Applications of bacterial ghosts in biomedicine.

    PubMed

    Lubitz, Petra; Mayr, Ulrike Beate; Lubitz, Werner

    2009-01-01

    Bacterial Ghosts (BG) are empty cell envelopes of Gram-negative bacteria which have been produced by E-mediated lysis. BG are devoid of cytoplasmic content and in combination with the expression of the nuclease SNUC, BG are also devoid of chromosomal and plasmid DNA. Proof of concept and proof of principle studies showed that BG candidate vaccines are highly immunogenic and in many instances induce protective immunity against lethal challenge in animal models. Due to their nature of being bacterial envelope complexes, BG are endowed with intrinsic natural adjuvant activity. BG are able to stimulate the innate and adaptive immune system without any addition of exogenous adjuvants. Although the use of plasmid encoded genetic information is essential for the final make up of BG, BG are not to be considered as genetically manipulated organisms (GMO), as they are nonliving and devoid of genetic information. The latter aspect is of great importance for safety, as no pathogenic islands or antibiotic resistance cassettes can be transferred to other bacteria by horizontal gene transfer. This is an important difference to other chemical-, heat- and pressure- or radiation-inactivated vaccine candidates, which also very often need artificial adjuvants to be added to improve their immunogenicity. The final BG vaccine preparations are freeze dried and are stable for many years at ambient temperature. BG can also be used as carrier and delivery vehicles for drugs or active substances in tumor therapy and due to specific targeting of tumor cells allow a higher specificity of treatment and a reduction of the total amount of drug per application. As carrier of enzymatic activity BG can be used for a new concept of probiotics which can synthesise active compounds from substrates of the environment where they are applied with a certain preference for the gut system. Thus, BG represent a promising technology platform for novel vaccines including combination or DNA vaccines, as drug

  5. A Contemporary Approach to Classify Ghost Cells Comprising Oral Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Sumit Kumar; Narwal, Anjali; Devi, Anju

    2015-01-01

    Ghost cells are swollen eosinophilic epithelial cells that have lost their nuclei but retain the cellular and nuclear outline. Pathologic ghost cell formation could be the process of aberrant keratinization or the result of coagulative necrosis. Ghost cells have been described in several odontogenic lesions, which include calcifying epithelial odontogenic cysts or tumours like odontomas, ameloblastic fibro-odontomas, and ameloblastomas. This article present a view on the formation of ghost cells with proposal/introduction of a classification for ghost cell lesions of the oral cavity in an attempt to organize these lesions for the better understanding and academic purpose. PMID:26501039

  6. Salmonella enterica serovar enteritidis ghosts carrying the Escherichia coli heat-labile enterotoxin B subunit are capable of inducing enhanced protective immune responses.

    PubMed

    Jawale, Chetan V; Lee, John Hwa

    2014-06-01

    The Escherichia coli heat-labile enterotoxin B subunit (LTB) is a potent vaccine adjuvant. Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis ghosts carrying LTB (S. Enteritidis-LTB ghosts) were genetically constructed using a novel plasmid, pJHL187-LTB, designed for the coexpression of the LTB and E lysis proteins. S. Enteritidis-LTB ghosts were characterized using scanning electron microscopy to visualize their transmembrane tunnel structures. The expression of LTB in S. Enteritidis-LTB ghost preparations was confirmed by immunoblot and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. The parenteral adjuvant activity of LTB was demonstrated by immunizing chickens with either S. Enteritidis-LTB ghosts or S. Enteritidis ghosts. Chickens were intramuscularly primed at 5 weeks of age and subsequently boosted at 8 weeks of age. In total, 60 chickens were equally divided into three groups (n = 20 for each): group A, nonvaccinated control; group B, immunized with S. Enteritidis-LTB ghosts; and group C, immunized with S. Enteritidis ghosts. Compared with the nonimmunized chickens (group A), the immunized chickens (groups B and C) exhibited increased titers of plasma IgG and intestinal secretory IgA antibodies. The CD3(+) CD4(+) subpopulation of T cells was also significantly increased in both immunized groups. Among the immunized chickens, those in group B exhibited significantly increased titers of specific plasma IgG and intestinal secretory IgA (sIgA) antibodies compared with those in group C, indicating the immunomodulatory effects of the LTB adjuvant. Furthermore, both immunized groups exhibited decreased bacterial loads in their feces and internal organs. These results indicate that parenteral immunization with S. Enteritidis-LTB ghosts can stimulate superior induction of systemic and mucosal immune responses compared to immunization with S. Enteritidis ghosts alone, thus conferring efficient protection against salmonellosis. PMID:24671556

  7. Numerical Study of the Ghost-Ghost-Gluon Vertex on the Lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Mihara, A.; Cucchieri, A.; Mendes, T.

    2004-12-02

    It is well known that, in Landau gauge, the renormalization function of the ghost-ghost-gluon vertex Z-tilde1 (p2) is finite and constant, at least to all orders of perturbation theory. On the other hand, a direct non-perturbative verification of this result using numerical simulations of lattice QCD is still missing. Here we present a preliminary numerical study of the ghost-ghost-gluon vertex and of its corresponding renormalization function using Monte Carlo simulations in SU(2) lattice Landau gauge. Data were obtained in 4 dimensions for lattice couplings {beta} = 2.2, 2.3, 2.4 and lattice sides N = 4, 8, 16.

  8. Josie, Winnicott, and the Hungry Ghosts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerity, Lani Alaine

    2001-01-01

    Using a case study, discusses the "seductive environment," a virtual environment of popular culture in which the human mind is seduced and turned into a "hungry ghost." Examines ideas about possible solutions through art therapy. Reviews the value of the creative process, contemplation, and Winnicott's idea of play. (Contains 27 references.) (GCP)

  9. Ghost DBI-essence in fractal geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acikgoz, I.; Binbay, F.; Salti, M.; Aydogdu, O.

    2016-05-01

    Focusing on a fractal geometric ghost dark energy, we reconstruct the Dirac-Born-Infeld (DBI)-essence-type scalar field and find exact solutions of the potential and warped brane tension. We also discuss statefinders for the selected dark energy description to make it distinguishable among others.

  10. Patch-primitive driven compressive ghost imaging.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xuemei; Suo, Jinli; Yue, Tao; Bian, Liheng; Dai, Qionghai

    2015-05-01

    Ghost imaging has rapidly developed for about two decades and attracted wide attention from different research fields. However, the practical applications of ghost imaging are still largely limited, by its low reconstruction quality and large required measurements. Inspired by the fact that the natural image patches usually exhibit simple structures, and these structures share common primitives, we propose a patch-primitive driven reconstruction approach to raise the quality of ghost imaging. Specifically, we resort to a statistical learning strategy by representing each image patch with sparse coefficients upon an over-complete dictionary. The dictionary is composed of various primitives learned from a large number of image patches from a natural image database. By introducing a linear mapping between non-overlapping image patches and the whole image, we incorporate the above local prior into the convex optimization framework of compressive ghost imaging. Experiments demonstrate that our method could obtain better reconstruction from the same amount of measurements, and thus reduce the number of requisite measurements for achieving satisfying imaging quality. PMID:25969205

  11. 'Ghost of Mirach' Rears its Spooky Head

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] [figure removed for brevity, see original site] [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Visible/DSS Click on image for larger version Ultraviolet/GALEX Click on image for larger version Poster Version Click on image for larger version

    The 'Ghost of Mirach' galaxy is shown in visible light on the left, and in ultraviolet as seen by NASA's Galaxy Evolution Explorer on the right. The fields of view are identical in both pictures, with the Ghost of Mirach a galaxy called NGC 404 seen as the whitish spot in the center of the images. Mirach is a red giant star that looms large in visible light. Because NGC 404 is lost in the glare of this star, it was nicknamed the Ghost of Mirach.

    But when the galaxy is viewed in ultraviolet light, it comes to 'life,' revealing a never-before-seen ring. This ring, seen in blue in the picture on the right, contains new stars a surprise considering that the galaxy was previously thought to be, essentially, dead.

    The field of view spans 55,000 light years across. The Ghost of Mirach is located 11 million light-years from Earth. The star Mirach is very close in comparison it is only 200 light-years away and is visible with the naked eye.

    The visible data come from the Digitized Sky Survey of the Space Telescope Science Institute in Baltimore, Md.

  12. Who-o-o Reads Ghost Stories?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raburn, Josephine

    Ghost stories are most appealing in early adolescence, from the ages of 11 to 14 years. They are a natural for use with gifted children because they depend entirely upon language for their effect. The high interest they hold for a young person because of their subject matter also makes them a possibility for reluctant readers. As a psychological…

  13. Gribov's horizon and the ghost dressing function

    SciTech Connect

    Boucaud, Ph.; Leroy, J. P.; Le Yaouanc, A.; Micheli, J.; Pene, O.; Rodriguez-Quintero, J.

    2009-11-01

    We study a relation recently derived by K. Kondo at zero momentum between the Zwanziger's horizon function, the ghost dressing function and Kugo's functions u and w. We agree with this result as far as bare quantities are considered. However, assuming the validity of the horizon gap equation, we argue that the solution w(0)=0 is not acceptable since it would lead to a vanishing renormalized ghost dressing function. On the contrary, when the cutoff goes to infinity, u(0){yields}{infinity}, w(0){yields}-{infinity} such that u(0)+w(0){yields}-1. Furthermore w and u are not multiplicatively renormalizable. Relaxing the gap equation allows w(0)=0 with u(0){yields}-1. In both cases the bare ghost dressing function, F(0,{lambda}), goes logarithmically to infinity at infinite cutoff. We show that, although the lattice results provide bare results not so different from the F(0,{lambda})=3 solution, this is an accident due to the fact that the lattice cutoffs lie in the range 1-3 GeV{sup -1}. We show that the renormalized ghost dressing function should be finite and nonzero at zero momentum and can be reliably estimated on the lattice up to powers of the lattice spacing; from published data on a 80{sup 4} lattice at {beta}=5.7 we obtain F{sub R}(0,{mu}=1.5 GeV){approx_equal}2.2.

  14. Prebifurcation periodic ghost orbits in semiclassical quantization

    SciTech Connect

    Kus, M. ); Haake, F. ); Delande, D. )

    1993-10-04

    Classical periodic orbits are stationary-phase points in path integral representations of quantum propagators. We show that complex solutions of the stationary-phase equation, not corresponding to real classical periodic orbits, give additional contributions to the propagator which can be important, especially near bifurcations. We reveal the existence and relevance of such periodic ghost orbits for a kicked top.

  15. Training 101: Four Ghosts and Two Heads.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petrini, Catherine M., Ed.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Laus and Champagne offer clues for identifying training room "ghosts" (participants' past experiences, histories, demands, and needs) and describe how to get rid of them. Plutschak and Luke discuss the benefits of team training and suggest five rules to heed when training by the buddy system. (JOW)

  16. Modeling the Landau-gauge ghost propagator in 2, 3, and 4 spacetime dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cucchieri, Attilio; Dudal, David; Mendes, Tereza; Vandersickel, Nele

    2016-05-01

    We present an analytic description of numerical results for the ghost propagator G (p2) in the minimal Landau gauge on the lattice. The data were produced in the SU(2) case using the largest lattice volumes to date, for d =2 , 3 and 4 spacetime dimensions. Our proposed form for G (p2) is derived from the one-loop relation between ghost and gluon propagators, considering a tree-level ghost-gluon vertex and our previously obtained gluon-propagator results [A. Cucchieri et al., Phys. Rev. D 85, 094513 (2012). Although this one-loop expression is not a good description of the data, it leads to a one-parameter fit of our ghost-propagator data with a generally good value of χ2/d .o .f . , comparable to other fitting forms used in the literature. At the same time, we present a simple parametrization of the difference between the lattice data and the one-loop predictions.

  17. Infrared finite ghost propagator in the Feynman gauge

    SciTech Connect

    Aguilar, A. C.; Papavassiliou, J.

    2008-06-15

    We demonstrate how to obtain from the Schwinger-Dyson equations of QCD an infrared finite ghost propagator in the Feynman gauge. The key ingredient in this construction is the longitudinal form factor of the nonperturbative gluon-ghost vertex, which, contrary to what happens in the Landau gauge, contributes nontrivially to the gap equation of the ghost. The detailed study of the corresponding vertex equation reveals that in the presence of a dynamical infrared cutoff this form factor remains finite in the limit of vanishing ghost momentum. This, in turn, allows the ghost self-energy to reach a finite value in the infrared, without having to assume any additional properties for the gluon-ghost vertex, such as the presence of massless poles. The implications of this result and possible future directions are briefly outlined.

  18. Image-based EPI real time ghost correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shunshan; Buonocore, Michael H.

    2008-03-01

    This paper presents a new, real-time, ghost correction method for echo planar imaging (EPI) that has been implemented using the Imaging Calculation Environment (ICE) on a 3T Siemens MRI System. Conventional methods for correcting EPI image ghost are based on image phase correction or on a reference scan. This new method is also based on image phase correction, but uses a new algorithm for automatic determination of the phase correction, which allows entirely automated operation. With implementation of the new correction method in ICE, ghost-corrected images are automatically generated and loaded into the system's image database immediately after completion of each EPI scan. Experiments showed that this real time ghost correction method consistently reduced the ghost intensity in EPI images and improved overall image quality. On average, the ghost to signal ratio (GSR) improved from 13.0% to 3.2% using the new method.

  19. Time-correspondence differential ghost imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ming-Fei; Zhang, Yu-Ran; Luo, Kai-Hong; Wu, Ling-An; Fan, Heng

    2013-03-01

    Experimental data with digital masks and a theoretical analysis are presented for an imaging scheme that we call time-correspondence differential ghost imaging (TCDGI). It is shown that by conditional averaging of the information from the reference detector but with the negative signals inverted, the quality of the reconstructed images is in general superior to all other ghost imaging (GI) methods to date. The advantages of both differential GI and time-correspondence GI are combined, plus less data manipulation and shorter computation time are required to obtain equivalent quality images under the same conditions. This TCDGI method offers a general approach applicable to all GI techniques, especially when objects with continuous gray tones are involved.

  20. Exorcising the Ostrogradsky ghost in coupled systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, Remko; Roest, Diederik

    2016-07-01

    The Ostrogradsky theorem implies that higher-derivative terms of a single mechanical variable are either trivial or lead to additional, ghost-like degrees of freedom. In this letter we systematically investigate how the introduction of additional variables can remedy this situation. Employing a Lagrangian analysis, we identify conditions on the La-grangian to ensure the existence of primary and secondary constraints that together imply the absence of Ostrogradsky ghosts. We also show the implications of these conditions for the structure of the equations of motion as well as possible redefinitions of the variables. We discuss applications to analogous higher-derivative field theories such as multi-Galileons and beyond Horndeski.

  1. Gravitational waves in ghost free bimetric gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Mohseni, Morteza

    2012-11-01

    We obtain a set of exact gravitational wave solutions for the ghost free bimetric theory of gravity. With a flat reference metric, the theory admits the vacuum Brinkmann plane wave solution for suitable choices of the coefficients of different terms in the interaction potential. An exact gravitational wave solution corresponding to a massive scalar mode is also admitted for arbitrary choice of the coefficients with the reference metric being proportional to the spacetime metric. The proportionality factor and the speed of the wave are calculated in terms of the parameters of the theory. We also show that a F(R) extension of the theory admits similar solutions but in general is plagued with ghost instabilities.

  2. Ghost artifact cancellation using phased array processing.

    PubMed

    Kellman, P; McVeigh, E R

    2001-08-01

    In this article, a method for phased array combining is formulated which may be used to cancel ghosts caused by a variety of distortion mechanisms, including space variant distortions such as local flow or off-resonance. This method is based on a constrained optimization, which optimizes SNR subject to the constraint of nulling ghost artifacts at known locations. The resultant technique is similar to the method known as sensitivity encoding (SENSE) used for accelerated imaging; however, in this formulation it is applied to full field-of-view (FOV) images. The method is applied to multishot EPI with noninterleaved phase encode acquisition. A number of benefits, as compared to the conventional interleaved approach, are reduced distortion due to off-resonance, in-plane flow, and EPI delay misalignment, as well as eliminating the need for echo-shifting. Experimental results demonstrate the cancellation for both phantom as well as cardiac imaging examples. PMID:11477638

  3. Activated Muscle Satellite Cells Chase Ghosts.

    PubMed

    Mourikis, Philippos; Relaix, Frédéric

    2016-02-01

    The in vivo behaviors of skeletal muscle stem cells, i.e., satellite cells, during homeostasis and after injury are poorly understood. In this issue of Cell Stem Cell, Webster et al. (2016) now perform a tour de force intravital microscopic analysis of this population, showing that "ghost fiber" remnants act as scaffolds to guide satellite cell divisions after injury. PMID:26849298

  4. Superrenormalizable quantum gravity with complex ghosts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modesto, Leonardo; Shapiro, Ilya L.

    2016-04-01

    We suggest and briefly review a new sort of superrenormalizable models of higher derivative quantum gravity. The higher derivative terms in the action can be introduced in such a way that all the unphysical massive states have complex poles. According to the literature on Lee-Wick quantization, in this case the theory can be formulated as unitary, since all massive ghosts-like degrees of freedom are unstable.

  5. Ghosts, UFOs, and magic: positive affect and the experiential system.

    PubMed

    King, Laura A; Burton, Chad M; Hicks, Joshua A; Drigotas, Stephen M

    2007-05-01

    Three studies examined the potential interactions of the experiential system and positive affect (PA) in predicting superstitious beliefs and sympathetic magic. In Study 1, experientiality and induced positive mood interacted to predict the emergence of belief in videos purporting to show unidentified flying objects or ghosts. In Study 2, naturally occurring PA interacted with experientiality to predict susceptibility to sympathetic magic, specifically difficulty in throwing darts at a picture of a baby (demonstrating the law of similarity). In Study 3, induced mood interacted with experientiality to predict sitting farther away from, and expressing less liking for, a partner who had stepped in excrement (demonstrating the law of contagion). Results are interpreted as indicating that PA promotes experiential processing. Implications for the psychology of nonrational beliefs and behaviors are discussed. PMID:17484612

  6. Odontogenic ghost cell carcinoma with pulmonary metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Sukumaran, Renu; Somanathan, Thara; Kattoor, Jayasree

    2015-01-01

    Odontogenic ghost cell carcinoma (OGCC) is an exceptionally rare malignant odontogenic epithelial tumor. It is characterized by ameloblastic-like islands of epithelial cells with aberrant keratinization in the form of ghost cells with varying amounts of dysplastic dentin. Malignant histological characteristics include infiltration, cellular pleomorphism, numerous mitosis and necrosis. Its biological behavior varies from slow-growing locally invasive lesions to rapidly growing highly aggressive tumors. OGCC metastasizing to distant sites is extremely rare. Only three cases of metastasis have been reported in literature. We are reporting the case of a 54-year-old male patient who presented with tender swelling in the malar region. Histopathological examination revealed OGCC and he received postoperative radiotherapy. Two years later, he presented with a lung mass. Biopsy from the lung lesion showed the same morphology as that of maxillary tumor with scattered ghost cells. This case points to the aggressive behavior of OGCC and its metastatic potential. It also highlights the need for long-term follow-up of these patients. PMID:26980967

  7. Vertex operators of ghost number three in Type IIB supergravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikhailov, Andrei

    2016-06-01

    We study the cohomology of the massless BRST complex of the Type IIB pure spinor superstring in flat space. In particular, we find that the cohomology at the ghost number three is nontrivial and transforms in the same representation of the supersymmetry algebra as the solutions of the linearized classical supergravity equations. Modulo some finite dimensional spaces, the ghost number three cohomology is the same as the ghost number two cohomology. We also comment on the difference between the naive and semi-relative cohomology, and the role of b-ghost.

  8. Real-time pseudocolor coding thermal ghost imaging.

    PubMed

    Duan, Deyang; Xia, Yunjie

    2014-01-01

    In this work, a color ghost image of a black-and-white object is obtained by a real-time pseudocolor coding technique that includes equal spatial frequency pseudocolor coding and equal density pseudocolor coding. This method makes the black-and-white ghost image more conducive to observation. Furthermore, since the ghost imaging comes from the intensity cross-correlations of the two beams, ghost imaging with the real-time pseudocolor coding technique is better than classical optical imaging with the same technique in overcoming the effects of light interference. PMID:24561954

  9. Differential expression of Trypanosoma cruzi I associated with clinical forms of Chagas disease: overexpression of oxidative stress proteins in acute patient isolate.

    PubMed

    Díaz, M L; Solari, A; González, C I

    2011-08-24

    Chagas disease has a variable clinical course with different manifestations and heterogenous geographical distribution. Some studies suggest that this clinical variability could be influenced by the genetic variability of T. cruzi. Here we present the differential protein expression among trypomastigotes and amastigotes of T. cruzi group I isolates from patients with acute and chronic form of Chagas disease from Santander, Colombia. A total of 29 proteins were identified by MALDI-TOF and LC-MS/MS; twenty in trypomastigote and nine in amastigote stage. The 29 proteins identified were grouped in 7 functional categories: 1) metabolism 31%, 2) assembly of cytoskeleton 13.7%, 3) protein destination 13.7%, 4) defenses antioxidants 20.6%, 5) protein synthesis and cellular cycle 13.7%, 6) catabolism 6.8%, and 7) adhesion 3.4%. Tryparedoxin peroxidase, lipoamide dehydrogenase, tyrosine amino transferase and HSP70 were overexpressed in the acute Chagas isolate. Tryparedoxin peroxidase overexpression in the acute isolate was confirmed by Western blot analysis. Most of these proteins are associated with resistance to oxidative stress facilitating their survival within host cells. Therefore, these proteins may represent virulence factors associated with the development of the acute form of the disease and could be used as biomarkers of the clinical course of disease and as drug targets. PMID:21642025

  10. Computational Ghost Imaging for Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erkmen, Baris I.

    2012-01-01

    This work relates to the generic problem of remote active imaging; that is, a source illuminates a target of interest and a receiver collects the scattered light off the target to obtain an image. Conventional imaging systems consist of an imaging lens and a high-resolution detector array [e.g., a CCD (charge coupled device) array] to register the image. However, conventional imaging systems for remote sensing require high-quality optics and need to support large detector arrays and associated electronics. This results in suboptimal size, weight, and power consumption. Computational ghost imaging (CGI) is a computational alternative to this traditional imaging concept that has a very simple receiver structure. In CGI, the transmitter illuminates the target with a modulated light source. A single-pixel (bucket) detector collects the scattered light. Then, via computation (i.e., postprocessing), the receiver can reconstruct the image using the knowledge of the modulation that was projected onto the target by the transmitter. This way, one can construct a very simple receiver that, in principle, requires no lens to image a target. Ghost imaging is a transverse imaging modality that has been receiving much attention owing to a rich interconnection of novel physical characteristics and novel signal processing algorithms suitable for active computational imaging. The original ghost imaging experiments consisted of two correlated optical beams traversing distinct paths and impinging on two spatially-separated photodetectors: one beam interacts with the target and then illuminates on a single-pixel (bucket) detector that provides no spatial resolution, whereas the other beam traverses an independent path and impinges on a high-resolution camera without any interaction with the target. The term ghost imaging was coined soon after the initial experiments were reported, to emphasize the fact that by cross-correlating two photocurrents, one generates an image of the target. In

  11. Trypanosoma rangeli and Trypanosoma cruzi: molecular characterization of genes encoding putative calcium-binding proteins, highly conserved in trypanosomatids.

    PubMed

    Porcel, B M; Bontempi, E J; Henriksson, J; Rydåker, M; Aslund, L; Segura, E L; Pettersson, U; Ruiz, A M

    1996-12-01

    Genes encoding a 29-kDa flagellar calcium-binding protein (F29) in Trypanosoma cruzi, strongly homologous to EF-hand calcium-binding protein-encoding genes previously reported in this parasite, were isolated by immunoscreening. F29 is encoded by a number of very similar genes, highly conserved among different T. cruzi isolates. The genes are located on a pair of homologous chromosomes, arranged in one or two clusters of tandem repeats. PCR amplification of Trypanosoma rangeli genomic DNA, using primers derived from the T. cruzi F29 sequence made it possible to isolate the homologous gene in T. rangeli, encoding a 23-kDa protein called TrCaBP. Gene sequence comparisons showed homology to EF-hand calcium-binding proteins from T. cruzi (82.8%), Trypanosoma brucei brucei (60.2%), and Entamoeba histolytica (28.4%). Northern blot analysis revealed that the TrCaBP gene is expressed in T. rangeli as a polyadenylated transcript. The TrCaBP-encoding genes are present in at least 20 copies per cell, organized in tandem arrays, on large T. rangeli chromosomes in some isolates and on two smaller ones in others. This gene, however, seems to be absent from Leishmania. PMID:8948328

  12. Temperature Contours and Ghost-Surfaces for Chaotic Magnetic Fields

    SciTech Connect

    S.R. Hudson and J. Breslau

    2008-01-31

    Steady state solutions for anisotropic heat transport in a chaotic magnetic field are determined numerically and compared to a set of "ghost-surfaces", surfaces constructed via an action-gradient flow between the minimax and minimizing periodic orbits. The ghost-surfaces are in remarkable agreement with the temperature contours.

  13. Visions of Inflation in World History: Ghost Story III

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Niederjohn, M. Scott; Schug, Mark C.; Wood, William C.

    2013-01-01

    This article represents the third in a "ghost story" series by the same authors. Readers may recall that Mr. Bernanke was "visited" by the ghosts of Adam Smith and John Maynard Keynes in the March/April 2010 issue of "Social Education" as these two famous economists debated the economic recovery (see EJ878912). Mr.…

  14. On the pure spinor heterotic superstring b ghost

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleury, Thiago

    2016-03-01

    A simplified pure spinor superstring b ghost in a curved heterotic background was constructed recently. The b ghost is a composite operator and it is not holomorphic. However, it satisfies overline{partial}b=[Q,Ω ] , where Q is the BRST charge. In this paper, we find a possible Ω.

  15. Temperature Contours and Ghost Surfaces for Chaotic Magnetic Fields

    SciTech Connect

    Hudson, S. R.; Breslau, J.

    2008-03-07

    Steady state solutions for anisotropic heat transport in a chaotic magnetic field are determined numerically and compared to a set of 'ghost surfaces' -surfaces constructed via an action-gradient flow between the minimax and minimizing periodic orbits. The ghost surfaces are in remarkable agreement with the temperature contours.

  16. Intermediary metabolism of Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Urbina, J A

    1994-03-01

    In this article, Julio Urbino discusses the characteristics o f the intermediary metabolism of Trypanosoma cruzi (the causative agent of Chagas disease), which are responsible for the unusual capacity of this parasite to use carbohydrates or amino acids as carbon and energy sources without drastic changes in its catabolic enzyme levels(1-3). Many, but not all, o f the metabolic capabilities of this organism are shared with Leishmania and the procyclic form o f the African trypanosomes, and the reviewer presents a metabolic model which is also consistent with the information available on these other parasites(2,4). PMID:15275492

  17. A priori physicalism, lonely ghosts and Cartesian doubt.

    PubMed

    Goff, Philip

    2012-06-01

    A zombie is a physical duplicates of a human being which lacks consciousness. A ghost is a phenomenal duplicate of a human being whose nature is exhausted by consciousness. Discussion of zombie arguments, that is anti-physicalist arguments which appeal to the conceivability of zombies, is familiar in the philosophy of mind literature, whilst ghostly arguments, that is, anti-physicalist arguments which appeal to the conceivability of ghosts, are somewhat neglected. In this paper I argue that ghostly arguments have a number of dialectical advantages over zombie arguments. I go onto explain how the conceivability of ghosts is inconsistent with two kinds of a priori physicalism: analytic functionalism and the Australian physicalism of Armstrong and Lewis. PMID:21459620

  18. Accretion of a ghost condensate by black holes

    SciTech Connect

    Frolov, Andrei V.

    2004-09-15

    The intent of this paper is to point out that the accretion of a ghost condensate by black holes could be extremely efficient. We analyze steady-state spherically symmetric flows of the ghost fluid in the gravitational field of a Schwarzschild black hole and calculate the accretion rate. Unlike minimally coupled scalar field or quintessence, the accretion rate is set not by the cosmological energy density of the field, but by the energy scale of the ghost condensate theory. If hydrodynamical flow is established, it could be as high as a tenth of a solar mass per second for 10 MeV scale ghost condensate accreting onto a stellar-sized black hole, which puts serious constraints on the parameters of the ghost condensate model.

  19. Beam Dumping Ghost Signals in Electric Sweep Scanners

    SciTech Connect

    Stockli, M.P.; Leitner, M.; Keller, R.; Moehs, D.P.; Welton, R.F.

    2005-04-06

    Over the last 20 years many labs started to use Allison scanners to measure low-energy ion beam emittances. We show that large trajectory angles produce ghost signals due to the impact of the beamlet on the electric deflection plates. The strength of the ghost signal is proportional to the amount of beam entering the scanner. Depending on the ions and their velocity, ghost signals can have the opposite polarity as the main beam signals or the same polarity. These ghost signals are easily overlooked because they partly overlap the real signals, they are mostly below the 1% level, and they are often hidden in the noise. However, they cause significant errors in emittance estimates because they are associated with large trajectory angles. The strength of ghost signals, and the associated errors, can be drastically reduced with a simple modification of the deflection plates.

  20. Beam dumping ghost signals in electric sweep scanners

    SciTech Connect

    Stockli, M.P.; Leitner, M.; Moehs, D.P.; Keller, R.; Welton, R.F.; /SNS Project, Oak Ridge

    2004-12-01

    Over the last 20 years many labs started to use Allison scanners to measure low-energy ion beam emittances. We show that large trajectory angles produce ghost signals due to the impact of the beamlet on the electric deflection plates. The strength of the ghost signal is proportional to the amount of beam entering the scanner. Depending on the ions and their velocity, ghost signals can have the opposite polarity as the main beam signals or the same polarity. These ghost signals are easily overlooked because they partly overlap the real signals, they are mostly below the 1% level, and they are often hidden in the noise. However, they cause significant errors in emittance estimates because they are associated with large trajectory angles. The strength of ghost signals, and the associated errors, can be drastically reduced with a simple modification of the deflection plates.

  1. Ghosted images: old lesbians on screen.

    PubMed

    Krainitzki, Eva

    2015-01-01

    Screen images of old lesbians combine modes of representing female gender, lesbian sexuality, and old age, all of which contain layers of otherness within a hetero-patriarchal and youth-centered society. Analyzing a range of films, from independent to mainstream cinema, this article explores how the ghosted lesbian paradigm intersects with narratives of aging as decline in representations of lesbian characters who are over the age of sixty. The spectral matters of illness, death, mourning, and widowhood inevitably culminate in an unhappy ending. Removed from a lesbian community context, intergenerational continuity vanishes and the old lesbian emerges as the cultural other. PMID:25575318

  2. Covariant constraints in ghost free massive gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Deffayet, C.; Mourad, J.; Zahariade, G. E-mail: mourad@apc.univ-paris7.fr

    2013-01-01

    We show that the reformulation of the de Rham-Gabadadze-Tolley massive gravity theory using vielbeins leads to a very simple and covariant way to count constraints, and hence degrees of freedom. Our method singles out a subset of theories, in the de Rham-Gabadadze-Tolley family, where an extra constraint, needed to eliminate the Boulware Deser ghost, is easily seen to appear. As a side result, we also introduce a new method, different from the Stuckelberg trick, to extract kinetic terms for the polarizations propagating in addition to those of the massless graviton.

  3. Nontrivial Ghosts and Second-Class Constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chishtie, Farrukh; McKeon, D. G. C.

    In a model in which a vector gauge field Wμ a is coupled to an antisymmetric tensor field φ μ ν a possessing a pseudoscalar mass, it has been shown that all physical degrees of freedom reside in the vector field. Upon quantizing this model using the Faddeev-Popov procedure, explicit calculation of the two-point functions <ϕϕ> and at one-loop order seems to have yielded the puzzling result that the effective action generated by radiative effects has more physical degrees of freedom than the original classical action. In this paper we point out that this is not in fact a real effect, but rather appears to be a consequence of having ignored a "ghost" field arising from the contribution to the measure in the path integral arising from the presence of nontrivial second-class constraints. These ghost fields couple to the fields Wμ a and φ μ ν a, which makes them distinct from other models involving ghosts arising from second-class constraints (such as massive Yang-Mills (YM) models) that have been considered, as in these other models such ghosts decouple. As an alternative to dealing with second-class constraints, we consider introducing a "Stueckelberg field" to eliminate second-class constraints in favor of first-class constraints and examine if it is possible to then use the Faddeev-Popov quantization procedure. In the Proca model, introduction of the Stueckelberg vector is equivalent to the Batalin-Fradkin-Tyutin (BFT) approach to converting second-class constraints to being first-class through the introduction of new variables. However, introduction of a Stueckelberg vector is not equivalent to the BFT approach for the vector-tensor model. In an appendix, the BFT procedure is applied to the pure tensor model and a novel gauge invariance is found. In addition, we also consider extending the Hamiltonian so that half of the second-class constraints become first-class and the other half become associated gauge conditions. We also find for this tensor

  4. Gauge fields and ghosts in Rindler space

    SciTech Connect

    Zhitnitsky, Ariel R.

    2010-11-15

    We consider a two-dimensional Maxwell system defined on the Rindler space with metric ds{sup 2}=exp(2a{xi}){center_dot}(d{eta}{sup 2}-d{xi}{sup 2}) with the goal to study the dynamics of the ghosts. We find an extra contribution to the vacuum energy in comparison with Minkowski space-time with metric ds{sup 2}=dt{sup 2}-dx{sup 2}. This extra contribution can be traced to the unphysical degrees of freedom (in Minkowski space). The technical reason for this effect to occur is the property of Bogolubov's coefficients which mix the positive- and negative-frequency modes. The corresponding mixture cannot be avoided because the projections to positive-frequency modes with respect to Minkowski time t and positive-frequency modes with respect to the Rindler observer's proper time {eta} are not equivalent. The exact cancellation of unphysical degrees of freedom which is maintained in Minkowski space cannot hold in the Rindler space. In the Becchi-Rouet-Stora-Tyutin (BRST) approach this effect manifests itself as the presence of BRST charge density in L and R parts. An inertial observer in Minkowski vacuum |0> observes a universe with no net BRST charge only as a result of cancellation between the two. However, the Rindler observers who do not ever have access to the entire space-time would see a net BRST charge. In this respect the effect resembles the Unruh effect. The effect is infrared (IR) in nature, and sensitive to the horizon and/or boundaries. We interpret the extra energy as the formation of the ''ghost condensate'' when the ghost degrees of freedom cannot propagate, but nevertheless do contribute to the vacuum energy. Exact computations in this simple two-dimensional model support the claim made in a previous paper [F. R. Urban and A. R. Zhitnitsky, Nucl. Phys. B835, 135 (2010).] that the ghost contribution might be responsible for the observed dark energy in a four-dimensional Friedmann-Lemaitre-Robertson-Walker universe.

  5. Enzymatic Targets in Trypanosoma brucei.

    PubMed

    Scotti, Luciana; Mendonça, Francisco J B; da Silva, Marcelo S; Scotti, Marcus T

    2016-01-01

    One of the most neglected disease is the Sleeping sickness or Human African Trypanosomiasis (HAT), which is mostly restricted to poor regions of Africa. The disease is caused by parasitic infection with Trypanosoma brucei (T. brucei), and is acquired through the bite of the tsetse fly. In the first stage of the disease, the parasite is in the blood, but in stage 2, the infective form reaches the brain, causing great weakness and death. The few existing drugs against this infection, are highly toxic, and can cause the emergence of resistant forms of the parasite. Also, these drugs are not readily available. New drugs are needed. Many researchers are investigating new enzyme targets for the parasite, searching for more efficient and selective inhibitors that are capable to cause the parasite death with less toxicity to the host. Trypanothione reductase, farnesyl diphosphate synthase, 6-phospho-gluconate dehydrogenase, and UDP 4'-galactose epimerase are some of the enzymes involved in the studies reported on this review. In addition, we have applied ligandbased- virtual screening, using Random Forest associated with structure-based-virtual screening (docking), to a small dataset of 225 alkaloids from the Menispermaceae family (in-house data bank). The aim of this study is to select structures with potential inhibitory activity against trypanothione reductase from Trypanosoma brucei. The computer-aided drug design study selected certain alkaloids that might be worth further investigation. PMID:26983886

  6. A novel protein kinase is essential in bloodstream Trypanosoma brucei.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Bryan C; Booster, Nick; Vidadala, Rama Subba Rao; Maly, Dustin J; Parsons, Marilyn

    2016-07-01

    Human African trypanosomiasis a fatal disease for which no vaccines exist and treatment regimens are difficult. Here, we evaluate a Trypanosoma brucei protein kinase, AEK1, as a potential drug target. Conditional knockouts confirmed AEK1 essentiality in bloodstream forms. For chemical validation, we overcame the lack of AEK1 inhibitors by creating parasites expressing a single, functional analog-sensitive AEK1 allele. Analog treatment of mice infected with this strain delayed parasitemia and death, with one-third of animals showing no parasitemia. These studies validate AEK1 as a drug target and highlight the need for further understanding of its function. PMID:27018127

  7. Immobilization of plasmid DNA in bacterial ghosts.

    PubMed

    Mayrhofer, Peter; Tabrizi, Chakameh Azimpour; Walcher, Petra; Haidinger, Wolfgang; Jechlinger, Wolfgang; Lubitz, Werner

    2005-02-16

    The development of novel delivery vehicles is crucial for the improvement of DNA vaccine efficiency. In this report, we describe a new platform technology, which is based on the immobilization of plasmid DNA in the cytoplasmic membrane of a bacterial carrier. This technology retains plasmid DNA (Self-Immobilizing Plasmid, pSIP) in the host envelope complex due to a specific protein/DNA interaction during and after protein E-mediated lysis. The resulting bacterial ghosts (empty bacterial envelopes) loaded with pDNA were analyzed in detail by real time PCR assays. We could verify that pSIP plasmids were retained in the pellets of lysed Escherichia coli cultures indicating that they are efficiently anchored in the inner membrane of bacterial ghosts. In contrast, a high percentage of control plasmids that lack essential features of the self-immobilization system were expelled in the culture broth during the lysis process. We believe that the combination of this plasmid immobilization procedure and the protein E-mediated lysis technology represents an efficient in vivo technique for the production of non-living DNA carrier vehicles. In conclusion, we present a "self-loading", non-living bacterial DNA delivery vector for vaccination endowed with intrinsic adjuvant properties of the Gram-negative bacterial cell envelope. PMID:15681093

  8. Moving sources in a ghost condensate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peloso, Marco; Sorbo, Lorenzo

    2004-07-01

    Ghost condensation has been recently proposed as a mechanism inducing the spontaneous breaking of Lorentz symmetry. Corrections to the Newton potential generated by a static source have been computed: they yield a limit M<~10 MeV on the symmetry breaking scale, and-if the limit is saturated-they are maximal at a distance L~1000 km from the source. However, these corrections propagate at a tiny velocity, vs~10-12 m/s, many orders of magnitude smaller than the velocity of any plausible source. We compute the gravitational potential taking the motion of the source into account: the standard Newton law is recovered in this case, with negligible corrections for any distance from the source up to astrophysical scales. Still, the vacuum of the theory is unstable, and requiring stability over the lifetime of the Universe imposes a limit on M which is not too far from the one given above. In the absence of a direct coupling of the ghost to matter, signatures of this model will have to be searched in the form of exotic astrophysical events.

  9. Ghost Remains After Black Hole Eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2009-05-01

    NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory has found a cosmic "ghost" lurking around a distant supermassive black hole. This is the first detection of such a high-energy apparition, and scientists think it is evidence of a huge eruption produced by the black hole. This discovery presents astronomers with a valuable opportunity to observe phenomena that occurred when the Universe was very young. The X-ray ghost, so-called because a diffuse X-ray source has remained after other radiation from the outburst has died away, is in the Chandra Deep Field-North, one of the deepest X-ray images ever taken. The source, a.k.a. HDF 130, is over 10 billion light years away and existed at a time 3 billion years after the Big Bang, when galaxies and black holes were forming at a high rate. "We'd seen this fuzzy object a few years ago, but didn't realize until now that we were seeing a ghost", said Andy Fabian of the Cambridge University in the United Kingdom. "It's not out there to haunt us, rather it's telling us something - in this case what was happening in this galaxy billions of year ago." Fabian and colleagues think the X-ray glow from HDF 130 is evidence for a powerful outburst from its central black hole in the form of jets of energetic particles traveling at almost the speed of light. When the eruption was ongoing, it produced prodigious amounts of radio and X-radiation, but after several million years, the radio signal faded from view as the electrons radiated away their energy. HDF 130 Chandra X-ray Image of HDF 130 However, less energetic electrons can still produce X-rays by interacting with the pervasive sea of photons remaining from the Big Bang - the cosmic background radiation. Collisions between these electrons and the background photons can impart enough energy to the photons to boost them into the X-ray energy band. This process produces an extended X-ray source that lasts for another 30 million years or so. "This ghost tells us about the black hole's eruption long after

  10. Ghost Remains After Black Hole Eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2009-05-01

    NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory has found a cosmic "ghost" lurking around a distant supermassive black hole. This is the first detection of such a high-energy apparition, and scientists think it is evidence of a huge eruption produced by the black hole. This discovery presents astronomers with a valuable opportunity to observe phenomena that occurred when the Universe was very young. The X-ray ghost, so-called because a diffuse X-ray source has remained after other radiation from the outburst has died away, is in the Chandra Deep Field-North, one of the deepest X-ray images ever taken. The source, a.k.a. HDF 130, is over 10 billion light years away and existed at a time 3 billion years after the Big Bang, when galaxies and black holes were forming at a high rate. "We'd seen this fuzzy object a few years ago, but didn't realize until now that we were seeing a ghost", said Andy Fabian of the Cambridge University in the United Kingdom. "It's not out there to haunt us, rather it's telling us something - in this case what was happening in this galaxy billions of year ago." Fabian and colleagues think the X-ray glow from HDF 130 is evidence for a powerful outburst from its central black hole in the form of jets of energetic particles traveling at almost the speed of light. When the eruption was ongoing, it produced prodigious amounts of radio and X-radiation, but after several million years, the radio signal faded from view as the electrons radiated away their energy. HDF 130 Chandra X-ray Image of HDF 130 However, less energetic electrons can still produce X-rays by interacting with the pervasive sea of photons remaining from the Big Bang - the cosmic background radiation. Collisions between these electrons and the background photons can impart enough energy to the photons to boost them into the X-ray energy band. This process produces an extended X-ray source that lasts for another 30 million years or so. "This ghost tells us about the black hole's eruption long after

  11. Ghost imaging based on Pearson correlation coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Wen-Kai; Yao, Xu-Ri; Liu, Xue-Feng; Li, Long-Zhen; Zhai, Guang-Jie

    2015-05-01

    Correspondence imaging is a new modality of ghost imaging, which can retrieve a positive/negative image by simple conditional averaging of the reference frames that correspond to relatively large/small values of the total intensity measured at the bucket detector. Here we propose and experimentally demonstrate a more rigorous and general approach in which a ghost image is retrieved by calculating a Pearson correlation coefficient between the bucket detector intensity and the brightness at a given pixel of the reference frames, and at the next pixel, and so on. Furthermore, we theoretically provide a statistical interpretation of these two imaging phenomena, and explain how the error depends on the sample size and what kind of distribution the error obeys. According to our analysis, the image signal-to-noise ratio can be greatly improved and the sampling number reduced by means of our new method. Project supported by the National Key Scientific Instrument and Equipment Development Project of China (Grant No. 2013YQ030595) and the National High Technology Research and Development Program of China (Grant No. 2013AA122902).

  12. Interacting varying ghost dark energy models in general relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khurshudyan, Martiros; Khurshudyan, Amalya; Myrzakulov, Ratbay

    2015-06-01

    Motivated by recent developments in Cosmology we would like to consider an extension of the Ghost DE which we will name as varying Ghost DE. Ghost DE like other models was introduced recently as a possible way to explain accelerated expansion of the Universe. For the phenomenological origin of the varying Ghost dark energy in our Universe we can suggest an existence of some unknown dynamics between the Ghost Dark energy and a fluid which evaporated completely making sense of the proposed effect. Moreover, we assume that this was in the epochs and scales which are unreachable by present-day experiments, like in very early Universe. In this study we will investigate the model for cosmological validity. We will apply observational and causality constraints to illuminate physically correct behavior of the model from the phenomenological one. We saw that an interaction between the varying Ghost DE and cold DM (CDM) also provides a solution to the cosmological coincidence problem. And we found that the Ghost DE behaves as a fluid-like matter in early Universe.

  13. Robust EPI Nyquist ghost elimination via spatial and temporal encoding.

    PubMed

    Hoge, W Scott; Tan, Huan; Kraft, Robert A

    2010-12-01

    Nyquist ghosts are an inherent artifact in echo planar imaging acquisitions. An approach to robustly eliminate Nyquist ghosts is presented that integrates two previous Nyquist ghost correction techniques: temporal domain encoding (phase labeling for additional coordinate encoding: PLACE and spatial domain encoding (phased array ghost elimination: PAGE). Temporal encoding modulates the echo planar imaging acquisition trajectory from frame to frame, enabling one to interleave data to remove inconsistencies that occur between sampling on positive and negative gradient readouts. With PLACE, one can coherently combine the interleaved data to cancel residual Nyquist ghosts. If the level of ghosting varies significantly from image to image, however, the signal cancellation that occurs with PLACE can adversely affect SNR-sensitive applications such as perfusion imaging with arterial spin labeling. This work proposes integrating PLACE into a PAGE-based reconstruction process to yield significantly better Nyquist ghost correction that is more robust than PLACE or PAGE alone. The robustness of this method is demonstrated in the presence of magnetic field drift with an in-vivo arterial spin labeling perfusion experiment. PMID:20665898

  14. A look to nonlinear interacting Ghost dark energy cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khurshudyan, Martiros

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we organize a look to nonlinear interacting Ghost dark energy cosmology involving a discussion on the thermodynamics of the Ghost dark energy, when the universe is bounded via the Hubble horizon. One of the ways to study a dark energy model, is to reconstruct thermodynamics of it. Ghost dark energy is one of the models of the dark energy which has an explicitly given energy density as a function of the Hubble parameter. There is an active discussion towards various cosmological scenarios, where the Ghost dark energy interacts with the pressureless cold dark matter (CDM). Recently, various models of the varying Ghost dark energy has been suggested, too. To have a comprehensive understanding of suggested models, we will discuss behavior of the cosmological parameters on parameter-redshift z plane. Some discussion on Om and statefinder hierarchy analysis of these models is presented. Moreover, up to our knowledge, suggested forms of interaction between the Ghost dark energy and cold dark matter (CDM) are new, therefore, within obtained results, we provide new contribution to previously discussed models available in the literature. Our study demonstrates that the forms of the interactions considered in the Ghost dark energy cosmology are not exotic and the justification of this is due to the recent observational data.

  15. Phosphatidylinositol kinase activities in Trypanosoma cruzi epimastigotes.

    PubMed

    Gimenez, Alba Marina; Gesumaría, María Celeste; Schoijet, Alejandra C; Alonso, Guillermo D; Flawiá, Mirtha M; Racagni, Graciela E; Machado, Estela E

    2015-01-01

    Phosphatidylinositol (PtdIns) metabolism through phosphatidylinositol kinase (PIKs) activities plays a central role in different signaling pathways. In Trypanosoma cruzi, causative agent of Chagas disease, PIKs have been proposed as target for drug design in order to combat this pathogen. In this work, we studied the classes of PI4K, PIPK and PI3K that could participate in signaling pathways in T. cruzi epimastigote forms. For this reason, we analyzed their enzymatic parameters and detailed responses to avowed kinase inhibitors (adenosine, sodium deoxycholate, wortmannin and LY294002) and activators (Ca(2+), phosphatidic acid, spermine and heparin). Our results suggest the presence and activity of a class III PI4K, a class I PIPK, a class III PI3K previously described (TcVps34) and a class I PI3K. Class I PI3K enzyme, here named TcPI3K, was cloned and expressed in a bacterial system, and their product was tested for kinase activity. The possible participation of TcPI3K in central cellular events of the parasite is also discussed. PMID:26493613

  16. Immunopathological Aspects of Experimental Trypanosoma cruzi Reinfections

    PubMed Central

    Reis Machado, Juliana; Silva, Marcos Vinícius; Borges, Diego Costa; da Silva, Crislaine Aparecida; Ramirez, Luis Eduardo; dos Reis, Marlene Antônia; Castellano, Lúcio Roberto; Rodrigues, Virmondes; Rodrigues, Denise Bertulucci Rocha

    2014-01-01

    Chagas disease is caused by Trypanosoma cruzi infection. Besides the host-related factors, such as immune response and genetic background, the parasite, strain, and occurrences of reinfection episodes, may influence disease outcome. Our results demonstrate that both the primary infection and the reinfection with the Colombiana strain are connected with lower survival rate of the mice. After reinfection, parasitaemia is approximately ten times lower than in primary infected animals. Only Colombiana, Colombiana/Colombiana, and Y/Colombiana groups presented amastigote nests in cardiac tissue. Moreover, the mice infected and/or reinfected with the Colombiana strain had more T. cruzi nests, more intense inflammatory infiltrate, and higher in situ expression of TNF-α and IFN-γ than Y strain. Antigen-stimulated spleen cells from infected and/or reinfected animals produced higher levels of TNF-α, IFN-γ, and IL-10. Our results reinforce the idea that Chagas disease outcome is influenced by the strain of the infective parasite, being differentially modulated during reinfection episodes. It highlights the need of control strategies involving parasite strain characterization in endemic areas for Chagas disease. PMID:25050370

  17. Troglitazone induces differentiation in Trypanosoma brucei

    SciTech Connect

    Denninger, Viola; Figarella, Katherine; Schoenfeld, Caroline; Brems, Stefanie; Busold, Christian; Lang, Florian; Hoheisel, Joerg; Duszenko, Michael . E-mail: michael.duszenko@uni-tuebingen.de

    2007-05-15

    Trypanosoma brucei, a protozoan parasite causing sleeping sickness, is transmitted by the tsetse fly and undergoes a complex lifecycle including several defined stages within the insect vector and its mammalian host. In the latter, differentiation from the long slender to the short stumpy form is induced by a yet unknown factor of trypanosomal origin. Here we describe that some thiazolidinediones are also able to induce differentiation. In higher eukaryotes, thiazolidinediones are involved in metabolism and differentiation processes mainly by binding to the intracellular receptor peroxisome proliferator activated receptor {gamma}. Our studies focus on the effects of troglitazone on bloodstream form trypanosomes. Differentiation was monitored using mitochondrial markers (membrane potential, succinate dehydrogenase activity, inhibition of oxygen uptake by KCN, amount of cytochrome transcripts), morphological changes (Transmission EM and light microscopy), and transformation experiments (loss of the Variant Surface Glycoprotein coat and increase of dihydroliponamide dehydrogenase activity). To further investigate the mechanisms responsible for these changes, microarray analyses were performed, showing an upregulation of expression site associated gene 8 (ESAG8), a potential differentiation regulator.

  18. A Protein Complex Map of Trypanosoma brucei

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Vaibhav; Najafabadi, Hamed S.; Moshiri, Houtan; Jardim, Armando; Salavati, Reza

    2016-01-01

    The functions of the majority of trypanosomatid-specific proteins are unknown, hindering our understanding of the biology and pathogenesis of Trypanosomatida. While protein-protein interactions are highly informative about protein function, a global map of protein interactions and complexes is still lacking for these important human parasites. Here, benefiting from in-depth biochemical fractionation, we systematically interrogated the co-complex interactions of more than 3354 protein groups in procyclic life stage of Trypanosoma brucei, the protozoan parasite responsible for human African trypanosomiasis. Using a rigorous methodology, our analysis led to identification of 128 high-confidence complexes encompassing 716 protein groups, including 635 protein groups that lacked experimental annotation. These complexes correlate well with known pathways as well as for proteins co-expressed across the T. brucei life cycle, and provide potential functions for a large number of previously uncharacterized proteins. We validated the functions of several novel proteins associated with the RNA-editing machinery, identifying a candidate potentially involved in the mitochondrial post-transcriptional regulation of T. brucei. Our data provide an unprecedented view of the protein complex map of T. brucei, and serve as a reliable resource for further characterization of trypanosomatid proteins. The presented results in this study are available at: www.TrypsNetDB.org. PMID:26991453

  19. Mitochondrial pyruvate carrier in Trypanosoma brucei.

    PubMed

    Štáfková, Jitka; Mach, Jan; Biran, Marc; Verner, Zdeněk; Bringaud, Frédéric; Tachezy, Jan

    2016-05-01

    Pyruvate is a key product of glycolysis that regulates the energy metabolism of cells. In Trypanosoma brucei, the causative agent of sleeping sickness, the fate of pyruvate varies dramatically during the parasite life cycle. In bloodstream forms, pyruvate is mainly excreted, whereas in tsetse fly forms, pyruvate is metabolized in mitochondria yielding additional ATP molecules. The character of the molecular machinery that mediates pyruvate transport across mitochondrial membrane was elusive until the recent discovery of mitochondrial pyruvate carrier (MPC) in yeast and mammals. Here, we characterized pyruvate import into mitochondrion of T. brucei. We identified mpc1 and mpc2 homologs in the T. brucei genome with attributes of MPC protein family and we demonstrated that both proteins are present in the mitochondrial membrane of the parasite. Investigations of mpc1 or mpc2 gene knock-out cells proved that T. brucei MPC1/2 proteins facilitate mitochondrial pyruvate transport. Interestingly, MPC is expressed not only in procyclic trypanosomes with fully activated mitochondria but also in bloodstream trypanosomes in which most of pyruvate is excreted. Moreover, MPC appears to be essential for bloodstream forms, supporting the recently emerging picture that the functions of mitochondria in bloodstream forms are more diverse than it was originally thought. PMID:26748989

  20. Immune responses and protection induced by Brucella suis S2 bacterial ghosts in mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jun; Li, Yi; Sun, Yang; Ji, Xue; Zhu, Lingwei; Guo, Xuejun; Zhou, Wei; Zhou, Bo; Liu, Shuang; Zhang, Ruian; Feng, Shuzhang

    2015-08-15

    With the purpose of generating Brucella suis bacterial ghosts and investigating the immunogenicity of bacterial ghosts as a vaccine candidate, the lysis gene E and temperature-sensitive regulator cassette were cloned into a shuttle plasmid, pBBR1MCS-2, for construction of a recombinant temperature-sensitive shuttle lysis plasmid, pBBR1MCS-E. pBBR1MCS-E was then introduced into attenuated B. suis live vaccine S2 bacteria, and the resultant transformants were used for production of B. suis ghosts (BSGs) by inducing lysis gene E expression. The BSGs were characterized by observing their morphology by transmission electron microscopy. The safety and immunogenicity of BSGs were further evaluated using a murine model, the result suggested that BSG was as safe as formalin-killed B. suis. In mice, BSG demonstrated a similar capacity of inducing pathogen-specific serum IgG antibody response, spleen CD3(+) and CD4(+) T cell responses, induce secretion of gamma interferon and interleukin-4, and protection levels against Brucella melitensis 16M challenge, as the attenuated B. suis live vaccine. These data suggesting that BSG could confer protection against Brucella infection in a mouse model of disease and may be developed as a new vaccine candidate against Brucella infection. PMID:26022514

  1. Ghost imaging with thermal light by third-order correlation

    SciTech Connect

    Bai Yanfeng; Han Shensheng

    2007-10-15

    Ghost imaging with classical incoherent light by third-order correlation is investigated. We discuss the similarities and the differences between ghost imaging by third-order correlation and by second-order correlation, and analyze the effect from each correlation part of the third-order correlation function on the imaging process. It is shown that the third-order correlated imaging includes richer correlated imaging effects than the second-order correlated one, while the imaging information originates mainly from the correlation of the intensity fluctuations between the test detector and each reference detector, as does ghost imaging by second-order correlation.

  2. Structured image reconstruction for three-dimensional ghost imaging lidar.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hong; Li, Enrong; Gong, Wenlin; Han, Shensheng

    2015-06-01

    A structured image reconstruction method has been proposed to obtain high quality images in three-dimensional ghost imaging lidar. By considering the spatial structure relationship between recovered images of scene slices at different longitudinal distances, orthogonality constraint has been incorporated to reconstruct the three-dimensional scenes in remote sensing. Numerical simulations have been performed to demonstrate that scene slices with various sparse ratios can be recovered more accurately by applying orthogonality constraint, and the enhancement is significant especially for ghost imaging with less measurements. A simulated three-dimensional city scene has been successfully reconstructed by using structured image reconstruction in three-dimensional ghost imaging lidar. PMID:26072814

  3. Edge detection based on gradient ghost imaging.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xue-Feng; Yao, Xu-Ri; Lan, Ruo-Ming; Wang, Chao; Zhai, Guang-Jie

    2015-12-28

    We present an experimental demonstration of edge detection based on ghost imaging (GI) in the gradient domain. Through modification of a random light field, gradient GI (GGI) can directly give the edge of an object without needing the original image. As edges of real objects are usually sparser than the original objects, the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the edge detection result will be dramatically enhanced, especially for large-area, high-transmittance objects. In this study, we experimentally perform one- and two-dimensional edge detection with a double-slit based on GI and GGI. The use of GGI improves the SNR significantly in both cases. Gray-scale objects are also studied by the use of simulation. The special advantages of GI will make the edge detection based on GGI be valuable in real applications. PMID:26832041

  4. Deformation associated with ghost craters and basins in volcanic smooth plains on Mercury: Strain analysis and implications for plains evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimczak, Christian; Watters, Thomas R.; Ernst, Carolyn M.; Freed, Andrew M.; Byrne, Paul K.; Solomon, Sean C.; Blair, David M.; Head, James W.

    2012-09-01

    Since its insertion into orbit about Mercury in March 2011, the MESSENGER spacecraft has imaged most previously unseen regions of the planet in unprecedented detail, revealing extensive regions of contiguous smooth plains at high northern latitudes and surrounding the Caloris basin. These smooth plains, thought to be emplaced by flood volcanism, are populated with several hundred ghost craters and basins, nearly to completely buried impact features having rims for which the surface expressions are now primarily rings of deformational landforms. Associated with some ghost craters are interior groups of graben displaying mostly polygonal patterns. The origin of these graben is not yet fully understood, but comparison with numerical models suggests that the majority of such features are the result of stresses from local thermal contraction. In this paper, we highlight a previously unreported category of ghost craters, quantify extensional strains across graben-bearing ghost craters, and make use of graben geometries to gain insights into the subsurface geology of smooth plains areas. In particular, the style and mechanisms of graben development imply that flooding of impact craters and basins led to substantial pooling of lavas, to thicknesses of ˜1.5 km. In addition, surface strains derived from groups of graben are generally in agreement with theoretically and numerically derived strains for thermal contraction.

  5. Detail view of door surround, note bracket & ghost of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail view of door surround, note bracket & ghost of (former) arched opening in the brickwork beside it - Leonard Mackall House, 1686 Thirty-Fourth Street, Northwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  6. Report on ghosting in LL94 RAR data

    SciTech Connect

    Lehman, S.K.

    1996-01-23

    Ghosting in the Loch Linnhe 1994 (LL94) real aperture radar (RAR) data is the phenomenon of two range cells with high returns separated by two range cells with lower returns. The occurrence of ghosting is sporadic, there appears to be no relation between the value of the high returns, and there appears to be no relation between ghosting in the I (real) and Q (imaginary) parts of a range line. It was believed ghosting was due to a byte shift in the data. It only appears in data processed with the Livermore RAR codes. The authors present the steps used in diagnosing the problem, the eventual determination of the cause, and the solution.

  7. Theory of ghost scattering with incoherent light sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Jing

    2016-04-01

    Inspired by the idea of ghost imaging, we propose a ghost scattering scheme to study light scattering with incoherent light sources through the nonlocal correlation measurement of the differential scattering cross-section fluctuations in two different optical paths. We present a rigorous formal theory to describe the ghost scattering process. Also we have derived a simple and closed-form ghost scattering formula within the first-order Born approximation which is particularly suited for weak scatterers. We find that the scattering information of a test scatterer can be obtained by using only a single-pixel detector in the corresponding optical path through the nonlocal correlation measurement with the help of another reference path.

  8. Ghost fishing activity in derelict blue crab traps in Louisiana.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Julie A; Alford, Amy B

    2014-02-15

    Derelict crab traps impact the coastal ecosystem through continued catch of target species and species of conservation, economic, or recreational importance. During volunteer-supported crab trap cleanups in 2012 and 2013, we quantified ghost fishing activity in derelict crab traps in coastal Louisiana through a citizen scientist program. Volunteers removed 3607 derelict traps during these events, and over 65% of traps analyzed by citizen scientists were actively ghost fishing. Additionally, volunteers identified 19 species enmeshed in derelict traps, including a combination of fresh and saltwater species. We also detected a significant difference in the number of blue crab in actively ghost fishing derelict traps across removal locations with estimated catches varying between 2.4 and 3.5 crabs/trap. Our instantaneous estimates of ghost fishing activity are greater than those previously thought in Louisiana, further justifying current derelict crab trap prevention and removal extension and outreach programs in Louisiana and throughout the Gulf of Mexico. PMID:24360333

  9. Parallel and Streaming Generation of Ghost Data for Structured Grids

    SciTech Connect

    Isenburg, M; Lindstrom, P; Childs, H

    2008-04-15

    Parallel simulations decompose large domains into many blocks. A fundamental requirement for subsequent parallel analysis and visualization is the presence of ghost data that supplements each block with a layer of adjacent data elements from neighboring blocks. The standard approach for generating ghost data requires all blocks to be in memory at once. This becomes impractical when there are fewer processors - and thus less aggregate memory - available for analysis than for simulation. We describe an algorithm for generating ghost data for structured grids that uses many fewer processors than previously possible. Our algorithm stores as little as one block per processor in memory and can run on as few processors as are available (possibly just one). The key idea is to slightly change the size of the original blocks by declaring parts of them to be ghost data, and by later padding adjacent blocks with this data.

  10. 57. Historic American Buildings Survey From Motion Picture 'Ghost of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    57. Historic American Buildings Survey From Motion Picture 'Ghost of Romance' Date of Photo: August 4, 1920 CONVENTS - Mission San Carlos Borromeo, Rio Road & Lausen Drive, Carmel-by-the-Sea, Monterey County, CA

  11. Content-adaptive ghost imaging of dynamic scenes.

    PubMed

    Li, Ziwei; Suo, Jinli; Hu, Xuemei; Dai, Qionghai

    2016-04-01

    Limited by long acquisition time of 2D ghost imaging, current ghost imaging systems are so far inapplicable for dynamic scenes. However, it's been demonstrated that nature images are spatiotemporally redundant and the redundancy is scene dependent. Inspired by that, we propose a content-adaptive computational ghost imaging approach to achieve high reconstruction quality under a small number of measurements, and thus achieve ghost imaging of dynamic scenes. To utilize content-adaptive inter-frame redundancy, we put the reconstruction under an iterative reweighted optimization, with non-uniform weight computed from temporal-correlated frame sequences. The proposed approach can achieve dynamic imaging at 16fps with 64×64-pixel resolution. PMID:27137022

  12. Halloween Is Coming: Ghostly Themes in the English Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Diana; Broderick, Vincent J.

    1997-01-01

    Describes how an English teacher uses ghost stories in his classroom to further students' interest in and understanding of epics. Presents a short unit in which all the class work focuses on scary kinds of things. (SR)

  13. Mapping of VSG similarities in Trypanosoma brucei.

    PubMed

    Weirather, Jason L; Wilson, Mary E; Donelson, John E

    2012-02-01

    The protozoan parasite Trypanosoma brucei switches its variant surface glycoprotein (VSG) to subvert its mammalian hosts' immune responses. The T. brucei genome contains as many as 1600 VSG genes (VSGs), but most are silent noncoding pseudogenes. Only one functional VSG, located in a telomere-linked expression site, is transcribed at a time. Silent VSGs are copied into a VSG expression site through gene conversion. Truncated gene conversion events can generate new mosaic VSGs with segments of sequence identity to other VSGs. To examine the VSG family sub-structure within which these events occur, we combined the available VSG sequences and annotations with scripted BLAST searches to map the relationships among VSGs in the T. brucei genome. Clusters of related VSGs were visualized in 2- and 3-dimensions for different N- and C-terminal regions. Five types of N-termini (N1-N5) were observed, within which gene recombinational events are likely to occur, often with fully-coding 'functional' or 'atypical'VSGs centrally located between more dissimilar VSGs. Members of types N1, N3 and N4 are most closely related in the middle of the N-terminal region, whereas type N2 members are more similar near the N-terminus. Some preference occurs in pairing between specific N- and C-terminal types. Statistical analyses indicated no overall tendency for more related VSGs to be located closer in the genome than less related VSGs, although exceptions were noted. Many potential mosaic gene formation events within each N-terminal type were identified, contrasted by only one possible mosaic gene formation between N-terminal types (N1 and N2). These data suggest that mosaic gene formation is a major contributor to the overall VSG diversity, even though gene recombinational events between members of different N-terminal types occur only rarely. PMID:22079099

  14. Nitroheterocyclic drug resistance mechanisms in Trypanosoma brucei

    PubMed Central

    Wyllie, Susan; Foth, Bernardo J.; Kelner, Anna; Sokolova, Antoaneta Y.; Berriman, Matthew; Fairlamb, Alan H.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The objective of this study was to identify the mechanisms of resistance to nifurtimox and fexinidazole in African trypanosomes. Methods Bloodstream-form Trypanosoma brucei were selected for resistance to nifurtimox and fexinidazole by stepwise exposure to increasing drug concentrations. Clones were subjected to WGS to identify putative resistance genes. Transgenic parasites modulating expression of genes of interest were generated and drug susceptibility phenotypes determined. Results Nifurtimox-resistant (NfxR) and fexinidazole-resistant (FxR) parasites shared reciprocal cross-resistance suggestive of a common mechanism of action. Previously, a type I nitroreductase (NTR) has been implicated in nitro drug activation. WGS of resistant clones revealed that NfxR parasites had lost >100 kb from one copy of chromosome 7, rendering them hemizygous for NTR as well as over 30 other genes. FxR parasites retained both copies of NTR, but lost >70 kb downstream of one NTR allele, decreasing NTR transcription by half. A single knockout line of NTR displayed 1.6- and 1.9-fold resistance to nifurtimox and fexinidazole, respectively. Since NfxR and FxR parasites are ∼6- and 20-fold resistant to nifurtimox and fexinidazole, respectively, additional factors must be involved. Overexpression and knockout studies ruled out a role for a putative oxidoreductase (Tb927.7.7410) and a hypothetical gene (Tb927.1.1050), previously identified in a genome-scale RNAi screen. Conclusions NTR was confirmed as a key resistance determinant, either by loss of one gene copy or loss of gene expression. Further work is required to identify which of the many dozens of SNPs identified in the drug-resistant cell lines contribute to the overall resistance phenotype. PMID:26581221

  15. Nonperturbative gluon and ghost propagators in d = 3

    SciTech Connect

    Papavassiliou, Joannis

    2011-05-23

    We study the nonperturbative gluon and ghost propagators in d = 3 Yang-Mills, using the Schwinger-Dyson equations of the pinch technique. The use of the Schwinger mechanism leads to the dynamical generation of a gluon mass, which, in turn, gives rise to an infrared finite gluon propagator and ghost dressing function. The propagators obtained are in very good agreement with the results of SU(2) lattice simulations.

  16. Publication ethics and the ghost management of medical publication.

    PubMed

    Sismondo, Sergio; Doucet, Mathieu

    2010-07-01

    It is by now no secret that some scientific articles are ghost authored - that is, written by someone other than the person whose name appears at the top of the article. Ghost authorship, however, is only one sort of ghosting. In this article, we present evidence that pharmaceutical companies engage in the ghost management of the scientific literature, by controlling or shaping several crucial steps in the research, writing, and publication of scientific articles. Ghost management allows the pharmaceutical industry to shape the literature in ways that serve its interests. This article aims to reinforce and expand publication ethics as an important area of concern for bioethics. Since ghost-managed research is primarily undertaken in the interests of marketing, large quantities of medical research violate not just publication norms but also research ethics. Much of this research involves human subjects, and yet is performed not primarily to increase knowledge for broad human benefit, but to disseminate results in the service of profits. Those who sponsor, manage, conduct, and publish such research therefore behave unethically, since they put patients at risk without justification. This leads us to a strong conclusion: if medical journals want to ensure that the research they publish is ethically sound, they should not publish articles that are commercially sponsored. PMID:19222451

  17. Haunted manuscripts: ghost authorship in the medical literature.

    PubMed

    Ngai, Stephanie; Gold, Jennifer L; Gill, Sudeep S; Rochon, Paula A

    2005-01-01

    Ghost authorship occurs when an individual who contributed substantially to a manuscript is not named in the byline or acknowledgments. Ghost authors may be employed by industry to prepare clinical trial results for publication. An expert is then "hired" as author so as to lend an air of credibility and neutrality to the manuscript. Ghost authorship is difficult to detect, and most articles that have been identified as ghostwritten were revealed as such only after investigative work by lawyers, journalists, or scientists. Ghost authorship is ethically questionable in that it may be used to mask conflicts of interest with industry. As it has been demonstrated that industry sponsorship of clinical trials may be associated with outcomes favorable to industry, this is problematic. Evidence-based medicine requires that clinical decisions be based on empirical evidence published in peer-reviewed medical journals. If physicians base their decisions on dubious research data, this can have negative consequences for patients. Ghost authorship also compromises academic integrity. A "film credit" concept of authority is one solution to the problems posed by ghost authorship. Other approaches have been taken by the United Kingdom and Denmark. A solution is necessary, as the relationship between authorship and accountability must be maintained. PMID:16220624

  18. Wild chimpanzees are infected by Trypanosoma brucei

    PubMed Central

    Jirků, Milan; Votýpka, Jan; Petrželková, Klára J.; Jirků-Pomajbíková, Kateřina; Kriegová, Eva; Vodička, Roman; Lankester, Felix; Leendertz, Siv Aina J.; Wittig, Roman M.; Boesch, Christophe; Modrý, David; Ayala, Francisco J.; Leendertz, Fabian H.; Lukeš, Julius

    2015-01-01

    Although wild chimpanzees and other African great apes live in regions endemic for African sleeping sickness, very little is known about their trypanosome infections, mainly due to major difficulties in obtaining their blood samples. In present work, we established a diagnostic ITS1-based PCR assay that allows detection of the DNA of all four Trypanosoma brucei subspecies (Trypanosoma bruceibrucei, Trypanosoma bruceirhodesiense, Trypanosoma bruceigambiense, and Trypanosoma bruceievansi) in feces of experimentally infected mice. Next, using this assay we revealed the presence of trypanosomes in the fecal samples of wild chimpanzees and this finding was further supported by results obtained using a set of primate tissue samples. Phylogenetic analysis of the ITS1 region showed that the majority of obtained sequences fell into the robust T. brucei group, providing strong evidence that these infections were caused by T. b. rhodesiense and/or T. b. gambiense. The optimized technique of trypanosome detection in feces will improve our knowledge about the epidemiology of trypanosomes in primates and possibly also other endangered mammals, from which blood and tissue samples cannot be obtained. Finally, we demonstrated that the mandrill serum was able to efficiently lyse T. b. brucei and T. b. rhodesiense, and to some extent T. b. gambiense, while the chimpanzee serum failed to lyse any of these subspecies. PMID:26110113

  19. Wild chimpanzees are infected by Trypanosoma brucei.

    PubMed

    Jirků, Milan; Votýpka, Jan; Petrželková, Klára J; Jirků-Pomajbíková, Kateřina; Kriegová, Eva; Vodička, Roman; Lankester, Felix; Leendertz, Siv Aina J; Wittig, Roman M; Boesch, Christophe; Modrý, David; Ayala, Francisco J; Leendertz, Fabian H; Lukeš, Julius

    2015-12-01

    Although wild chimpanzees and other African great apes live in regions endemic for African sleeping sickness, very little is known about their trypanosome infections, mainly due to major difficulties in obtaining their blood samples. In present work, we established a diagnostic ITS1-based PCR assay that allows detection of the DNA of all four Trypanosoma brucei subspecies (Trypanosoma brucei brucei, Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense, Trypanosoma brucei gambiense, and Trypanosoma brucei evansi) in feces of experimentally infected mice. Next, using this assay we revealed the presence of trypanosomes in the fecal samples of wild chimpanzees and this finding was further supported by results obtained using a set of primate tissue samples. Phylogenetic analysis of the ITS1 region showed that the majority of obtained sequences fell into the robust T. brucei group, providing strong evidence that these infections were caused by T. b. rhodesiense and/or T. b. gambiense. The optimized technique of trypanosome detection in feces will improve our knowledge about the epidemiology of trypanosomes in primates and possibly also other endangered mammals, from which blood and tissue samples cannot be obtained. Finally, we demonstrated that the mandrill serum was able to efficiently lyse T. b. brucei and T. b. rhodesiense, and to some extent T. b. gambiense, while the chimpanzee serum failed to lyse any of these subspecies. PMID:26110113

  20. TbFlabarin, a flagellar protein of Trypanosoma brucei, highlights differences between Leishmania and Trypanosoma flagellar-targeting signals.

    PubMed

    Tetaud, Emmanuel; Lefebvre, Michèle; M'Bang-Benet, Diane-Ethna; Crobu, Lucien; Blancard, Corinne; Sterkers, Yvon; Pages, Michel; Bastien, Patrick; Merlin, Gilles

    2016-07-01

    TbFlabarin is the Trypanosoma brucei orthologue of the Leishmania flagellar protein LdFlabarin but its sequence is 33% shorter than LdFlabarin, as it lacks a C-terminal domain that is indispensable for LdFlabarin to localize to the Leishmania flagellum. TbFlabarin is mainly expressed in the procyclic forms of the parasite and localized to the flagellum, but only when two palmitoylable cysteines at positions 3 and 4 are present. TbFlabarin is more strongly attached to the membrane fraction than its Leishmania counterpart, as it resists complete solubilization with as much as 0.5% NP-40. Expression ablation by RNA interference did not change parasite growth in culture, its morphology or apparent motility. Heterologous expression showed that neither TbFlabarin in L. amazonensis nor LdFlabarin in T. brucei localized to the flagellum, revealing non-cross-reacting targeting signals between the two species. PMID:27060615

  1. Characterizing and modelling 'ghost-rock' weathered limestones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubois, Caroline; Goderniaux, Pascal; Deceuster, John; Poulain, Angélique; Kaufmann, Olivier

    2016-04-01

    'Ghost-rock' karst aquifer has recently been highlighted. In this particular type of aquifer, the karst is not expressed as open conduits but consists in zones where the limestone is weathered. The in-situ weathering of limestone leaves a soft porous material called 'alterite'. The hydro-mechanical properties of this material differs significantly from those of the host rock: the weathering enhances the storage capacity and the conductivity of the rock. This type of weathered karst aquifer has never been studied from a hydrogeological point of view. In this study, we present the hydraulic characterization of such weathered zones. We also present a modelling approach derived from the common Equivalent Porous Medium (EPM) approach, but including the spatial distribution of hydrogeological properties through the weathered features, from the hard rock to the alterite, according to a weathering index. Unlike the Discrete Fracture Network (DFN) approaches, which enable to take into account a limited number of fractures, this new approach allows creating models including thousands of weathered features. As the properties of the alterite have to be considered at a centimeter scale, it is necessary to upscale these properties to carry out simulations over large areas. Therefore, an upscaling method was developed, taking into account the anisotropy of the weathered features. Synthetic models are built, upscaled and different hydrogeological simulations are run to validate the method. This methodology is finally tested on a real case study: the modelling of the dewatering drainage flow of an exploited quarry in a weathered karst aquifer in Belgium.

  2. Escherichia coli ghosts promote innate immune responses in human keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Abtin, Arby; Kudela, Pavol; Mayr, Ulrike Beate; Koller, Verena Juliana; Mildner, Michael; Tschachler, Erwin; Lubitz, Werner

    2010-09-10

    Bacterial ghosts (BGs) as non-living bacterial envelopes devoid of cytoplasmic content with preserved and intact inner and outer membrane structures of their living counterparts have been used to study the ability of their surface components for the induction of antimicrobial peptides and pro-inflammatory cytokines in human primary keratinocytes (KCs). Quantitative real-time PCR analysis revealed that incubation of KCs with BGs generated from wild-type Escherichia coli induced the mRNA expression of antimicrobial psoriasin (S100A7c) in a BGs particle concentration-dependent manner. Using immunoblot analysis we showed that BGs generated from the flagellin-deficient (ΔFliC) E. coli strain NK9375 were as effective as its isogenic wild-type (wt) E. coli strain NK9373 to induce psoriasin expression when normalized to BG particles being taken up by KCs. However, results obtained from endocytic activity of KCs reflect that internalization of BGs is greatly dependent on the presence of flagellin on the surface of BGs. Moreover, BGs derived from wt E. coli NK9373 strongly induced the release of the pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-6 and IL-8, compared to ΔFliC E. coli NK9375 BGs. Taken together, obtained data demonstrate that non-living BGs possessing all bacterial bio-adhesive surface properties in their original state while not posing any infectious threat have the capacity to induce the expression of innate immune modulators and that these responses are partially dependent on the presence of flagellin. PMID:20696136

  3. Two-wavelength ghost imaging with two-lens system in atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Yunli; She, Weilong

    2014-03-01

    Based on the extended Huygens-Fresnel principle and the propagation law of a real ABCD optical system in turbulent atmosphere, an expression for two-wavelength ghost imaging with two-lens system is derived and the numerical simulations are made. The results show that the two-lens system can remarkably improve the image for a long propagation distance. The influence of the turbulence strength, the parameters of the radiation source and the focal length of the lenses on the image quality are discussed in detail.

  4. Endothelial Transmigration by Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    Coates, Bria M.; Sullivan, David P.; Makanji, Ming Y.; Du, Nga Y.; Olson, Cheryl L.; Muller, William A.; Engman, David M.; Epting, Conrad L.

    2013-01-01

    Chagas heart disease, the leading cause of heart failure in Latin America, results from infection with the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi. Although T. cruzi disseminates intravascularly, how the parasite contends with the endothelial barrier to escape the bloodstream and infect tissues has not been described. Understanding the interaction between T. cruzi and the vascular endothelium, likely a key step in parasite dissemination, could inform future therapies to interrupt disease pathogenesis. We adapted systems useful in the study of leukocyte transmigration to investigate both the occurrence of parasite transmigration and its determinants in vitro. Here we provide the first evidence that T. cruzi can rapidly migrate across endothelial cells by a mechanism that is distinct from productive infection and does not disrupt monolayer integrity or alter permeability. Our results show that this process is facilitated by a known modulator of cellular infection and vascular permeability, bradykinin, and can be augmented by the chemokine CCL2. These represent novel findings in our understanding of parasite dissemination, and may help identify new therapeutic strategies to limit the dissemination of the parasite. PMID:24312535

  5. Kinetic and biochemical characterization of Trypanosoma evansi nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Paulo Henrique Exterchoter; Batista, Franciane; Wagner, Glauber; Magalhães, Maria de Lourdes Borba; Miletti, Luiz Claudio

    2015-06-01

    Nucleoside triphosphate diphospho-hydrolases (NTPDases) catalyze the hydrolysis of several nucleosides tri and diphosphate playing major roles in eukaryotes including purinergic signaling, inflammation, hemostasis, purine salvage and host-pathogen interactions. These enzymes have been recently described in parasites where several evidences indicated their involvement in virulence and infection. Here, we have investigated the presence of NTPDase in the genome of Trypanosoma evansi. Based on the genomic sequence from Trypanosoma brucei, we have amplified an 1812 gene fragment corresponding to the T. evansi NTPDase gene. The protein was expressed in the soluble form and purified to homogeneity and enzymatic assays were performed confirming the enzyme identity. Kinetic parameters and substrate specificity were determined. The dependence of cations on enzymatic activity was investigated indicating the enzyme is stimulated by divalent cations and carbohydrates but inhibited by sodium. Bioinformatic analysis indicates the enzyme is a membrane bound protein facing the extracellular side of the cell with 98% identity to the T. brucei homologous NTPDase gene. PMID:25819299

  6. Tridimensional ultrastructure and glycolipid pattern studies of Trypanosoma dionisii.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Miriam Pires de Castro; Ramos, Thiago Cesar Prata; Pinheiro, Adriana Maria V N; Bertini, Silvio; Takahashi, Helio Kiyoshi; Straus, Anita Hilda; Haapalainen, Edna Freymuller

    2013-12-01

    Trypanosoma (Schizotrypanum) dionisii is a non-pathogenic bat trypanosome closely related to Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiological agent of Chaga's disease. Both kinetoplastids present similar morphological stages and are able to infect mammalian cells in culture. In the present study we examined 3D ultrastructure aspects of the two species by serial sectioning epimastigote and trypomastigote forms, and identified common carbohydrate epitopes expressed in T. dionisii, T. cruzi and Leishmania major. A major difference in 3D morphology was that T. dionisii epimastigote forms present larger multivesicular structures, restricted to the parasite posterior region. These structures could be related to T. cruzi reservosomes and are also rich in cruzipain, the major cysteine-proteinase of T. cruzi. We analyzed the reactivity of two monoclonal antibodies: MEST-1 directed to galactofuranose residues of glycolipids purified from Paracoccidioides brasiliensis, and BST-1 directed to glycolipids purified from T. cruzi epimastigotes. Both antibodies were reactive with T. dionisii epimastigotes by indirect immunofluorescense, but we noted differences in the location and intensity of the epitopes, when compared to T. cruzi. In summary, despite similar features in cellular structure and life cycle of T. dionisii and T. cruzi, we observed a unique morphological characteristic in T. dionisii that deserves to be explored. PMID:23933185

  7. Lensless ghost imaging through the strongly scattering medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhe, Yang; Lianjie, Zhao; Xueliang, Zhao; Wei, Qin; Junlin, Li

    2016-02-01

    Lensless ghost imaging has attracted much interest in recent years due to its profound physics and potential applications. In this paper we report studies of the robust properties of the lensless ghost imaging system with a pseudo-thermal light source in a strongly scattering medium. The effects of the positions of the strong medium on the ghost imaging are investigated. In the lensless ghost imaging system, a pseudo-thermal light is split into two correlated beams by a beam splitter. One beam goes to a charge-coupled detector camera, labeled as CCD2. The other beam goes to an object and then is collected in another charge-coupled detector camera, labeled as CCD1, which serves as a bucket detector. When the strong medium, a pane of ground glass disk, is placed between the object and CCD1, the bucket detector, the quality of ghost imaging is barely affected and a good image could still be obtained. The quality of the ghost imaging can also be maintained, even when the ground glass is rotating, which is the strongest scattering medium so far. However, when the strongly scattering medium is present in the optical path from the light source to CCD2 or the object, the lensless ghost imaging system hardly retrieves the image of the object. A theoretical analysis in terms of the second-order correlation function is also provided. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11175094 and 91221205), the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2015CB921002), and partially supported by the Basic Research Fund of Beijing Institute of Technology (Grant No. 20141842005).

  8. Ghost suppression in image restoration filtering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riemer, T. E.; Mcgillem, C. D.

    1975-01-01

    An optimum image restoration filter is described in which provision is made to constrain the spatial extent of the restoration function, the noise level of the filter output and the rate of falloff of the composite system point-spread away from the origin. Experimental results show that sidelobes on the composite system point-spread function produce ghosts in the restored image near discontinuities in intensity level. By redetermining the filter using a penalty function that is zero over the main lobe of the composite point-spread function of the optimum filter and nonzero where the point-spread function departs from a smoothly decaying function in the sidelobe region, a great reduction in sidelobe level is obtained. Almost no loss in resolving power of the composite system results from this procedure. By iteratively carrying out the same procedure even further reductions in sidelobe level are obtained. Examples of original and iterated restoration functions are shown along with their effects on a test image.

  9. Selective Preservation of Fossil Ghost Fish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meacham, Amanda

    2016-04-01

    A unique type of fossil fish preservation has been discovered in the Angelo Member (Fossil Lake) of the Green River Formation. The Angelo Member is a predominately evaporative deposit dominated by dolomite, but contains facies of fossiliferous laminated calcimicrite. Fossil fish occurring in two beds conspicuously lack bones. Fish in the lower bed are only preserved as organic material, including skin, pigments, and eyes. Fish in the upper bed have three-dimensional etching where bones once existed but also contain skin, pigments, and eyes. The top third of the upper bed often contains calcite crystals that are pseudomorphs after trona and possibly halite. Preliminary mineralogical analysis and mapping of evaporate facies suggests that this unique preservation may be related to lake geochemical conditions, such as high pH and alkalinity. To our knowledge, this is the first time this type of preservation has been observed and studied. Fossils and sediments within these beds are being studied both vertically and laterally through the one-meter thick sequence containing the fossil fish using XRD, isotopic, SEM, thin section, and total organic carbon analysis. Nine quarries, 0.5-1 meter square, were excavated for both fossils and rock samples along with 17 additional rock sample locations across an approximately 25-kilometer square region. This investigation has the capability of reconstructing the paleoenvironment and lake chemistry of Fossil Lake during the deposition of the "ghost-fish" beds and solving the mystery of the "missing bones" and the unusual process of preservation.

  10. Non-diffractive computational ghost imaging.

    PubMed

    Phillips, D B; He, Ruiqing; Chen, Qian; Gibson, G M; Padgett, M J

    2016-06-27

    Computational ghost imaging (CGI) enables an image to be recorded using a single-pixel detector. The image can be reconstructed from correlations between the scene and a series of known projected intensity patterns. In this work we investigate the performance of CGI using pseudo non-diffracting (ND) speckle patterns. We demonstrate an extended depth-of-field that is ∼ 2-3 times greater than that achievable with conventional speckle, when only computing each intensity pattern to a single depth. In addition, the average speckle grain size of ND speckle is reduced by a factor of ∼ 1.5 relative to conventional speckle, which enhances the lateral Rayleigh-limit resolving power of our reconstructed images. However, the point-spread function (PSF) of our imaging system takes the form of a Bessel beam, which manifests itself as long-range correlations between speckle grains in the projected patterns. We discuss the trade-off between enhancement of the depth-of-field and the lateral resolution when using ND speckle, at the expense of a reduction in image contrast. Our work demonstrates that the tailoring of lateral and axial correlations in projected intensity patterns permits PSF engineering in CGI. PMID:27410575

  11. Study on the algorithm of computational ghost imaging based on discrete fourier transform measurement matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Leihong; Liang, Dong; Li, Bei; Kang, Yi; Pan, Zilan; Zhang, Dawei; Gao, Xiumin; Ma, Xiuhua

    2016-07-01

    On the basis of analyzing the cosine light field with determined analytic expression and the pseudo-inverse method, the object is illuminated by a presetting light field with a determined discrete Fourier transform measurement matrix, and the object image is reconstructed by the pseudo-inverse method. The analytic expression of the algorithm of computational ghost imaging based on discrete Fourier transform measurement matrix is deduced theoretically, and compared with the algorithm of compressive computational ghost imaging based on random measurement matrix. The reconstruction process and the reconstruction error are analyzed. On this basis, the simulation is done to verify the theoretical analysis. When the sampling measurement number is similar to the number of object pixel, the rank of discrete Fourier transform matrix is the same as the one of the random measurement matrix, the PSNR of the reconstruction image of FGI algorithm and PGI algorithm are similar, the reconstruction error of the traditional CGI algorithm is lower than that of reconstruction image based on FGI algorithm and PGI algorithm. As the decreasing of the number of sampling measurement, the PSNR of reconstruction image based on FGI algorithm decreases slowly, and the PSNR of reconstruction image based on PGI algorithm and CGI algorithm decreases sharply. The reconstruction time of FGI algorithm is lower than that of other algorithms and is not affected by the number of sampling measurement. The FGI algorithm can effectively filter out the random white noise through a low-pass filter and realize the reconstruction denoising which has a higher denoising capability than that of the CGI algorithm. The FGI algorithm can improve the reconstruction accuracy and the reconstruction speed of computational ghost imaging.

  12. 76 FR 76812 - Requested Administrative Waiver of the Coastwise Trade Laws: Vessel BARBARY GHOST; Invitation for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-08

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Maritime Administration Requested Administrative Waiver of the Coastwise Trade Laws: Vessel BARBARY GHOST... the vessel BARBARY GHOST is: Intended Commercial Use Of Vessel: ``Sightseeing tours in the...

  13. Interacting Generalized Ghost Dark Energy in Non-isotropic Background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barati, F.

    2016-04-01

    In this work, the generalized Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) ghost model of dark energy in the framework of Einstein gravity is investigated. At first, the non-interacting generalized ghost dark energy in a Bianchi type I (BI) background is discussed. Then the equation of state parameter, ω D = p D / ρ D , the deceleration parameter, and the evolution equation of the generalized ghost dark energy are obtained. It was found that, in this case, ω D cannot cross the phantom line (ω D >-1) and eventually the universe approaches a de-Sitter phase of expansion (ω D →-1). Then, this investigation was extended to the interacting ghost dark energy in a non-isotropic universe. It was found that the equation of state parameter of the interacting generalized ghost dark energy can cross the phantom line (ω D <-1) provided the parameters of the model are chosen suitably. It was considered a specific model which permits the standard continuity equation in this theory. Besides ΩΛ and Ω m in standard Einstein cosmology, another density parameter, Ω σ , is expected by the anisotropy. The anisotropy of the universe decreases and the universe transits to an isotropic flat FRW universe accommodating the present acceleration.

  14. Quantum crossing symmetry as heart of ghost imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ion, D. B.; Ion, M. L.; Rusu, L.

    2010-03-01

    In this paper it is proved that the keys to understanding the ghost imaging are the crossing symmetric (CS) photon reactions in the nonlinear media. So CS introduced a real optical path between the object and his "ghost" image, making possible to apply the geometric optics for a rigorous proof of the essential laws of the "ghost" imaging phenomena. Hence, the laws of the plane quantum mirror (QM) and that of spherical quantum mirror, observed in the ghost-imaging experiments, are shown that can be obtained as natural consequences of the energy-momentum conservation laws. So, it is proved that the ghost imaging laws depend only on the energy-momentum conservation and not on the photons entanglement. Using DFG-typical features we obtained explicit predictions of the intensities of the idler photons in terms of the intensities of the interacting photon-(p and s)-beams in the nonlinear crystal. Two fundamental experiments for a decisive test of the [SPDC-DFG]-quantum mirrors are suggested.

  15. A Parallel Ghosting Algorithm for The Flexible Distributed Mesh Database

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Mubarak, Misbah; Seol, Seegyoung; Lu, Qiukai; Shephard, Mark S.

    2013-01-01

    Critical to the scalability of parallel adaptive simulations are parallel control functions including load balancing, reduced inter-process communication and optimal data decomposition. In distributed meshes, many mesh-based applications frequently access neighborhood information for computational purposes which must be transmitted efficiently to avoid parallel performance degradation when the neighbors are on different processors. This article presents a parallel algorithm of creating and deleting data copies, referred to as ghost copies, which localize neighborhood data for computation purposes while minimizing inter-process communication. The key characteristics of the algorithm are: (1) It can create ghost copies of any permissible topological order inmore » a 1D, 2D or 3D mesh based on selected adjacencies. (2) It exploits neighborhood communication patterns during the ghost creation process thus eliminating all-to-all communication. (3) For applications that need neighbors of neighbors, the algorithm can create n number of ghost layers up to a point where the whole partitioned mesh can be ghosted. Strong and weak scaling results are presented for the IBM BG/P and Cray XE6 architectures up to a core count of 32,768 processors. The algorithm also leads to scalable results when used in a parallel super-convergent patch recovery error estimator, an application that frequently accesses neighborhood data to carry out computation.« less

  16. Ghost imaging experiment with sunlight compared to laboratory experiment with thermal light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karmakar, Sanjit; Meyers, Ronald; Shih, Yanhua

    2012-10-01

    A recent article reports on the demonstration of ghost imaging using sunlight which also presents theory for ghost imaging in the atmosphere based on two photon interference. The current paper reviews the experiment from a different context than that presented by Karmakar, Meyers and Shih (KMS). Here we examine data from the KMS sunlight ghost imaging experiment and compare it to ghost imaging produced by true thermal light.

  17. Subverting lysosomal function in Trypanosoma brucei

    PubMed Central

    Alsford, Sam

    2016-01-01

    In this issue of Microbial Cell, Koh and colleagues present data highlighting the utility of the lysosomotropic compound L-leucyl-L-leucyl methyl ester (LeuLeu-OMe) as an anti-Trypanosoma brucei agent, adding to the range of compounds that either directly target lysosomal enzymes or that can be used to subvert the function of the lysosome for parasite destruction.

  18. Autochthonous Transmission of Trypanosoma cruzi, Louisiana

    PubMed Central

    Perniciaro, Leon; Yabsley, Michael J.; Roellig, Dawn M.; Balsamo, Gary; Diaz, James; Wesson, Dawn

    2007-01-01

    Autochthonous transmission of the Chagas disease parasite, Trypanosoma cruzi, was detected in a patient in rural New Orleans, Louisiana. The patient had positive test results from 2 serologic tests and hemoculture. Fifty-six percent of 18 Triatoma sanguisuga collected from the house of the patient were positive for T. cruzi by PCR. PMID:17553277

  19. Veneziano ghost, modified gluon propagator, and gauge copies in QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudal, D.; Guimaraes, M. S.

    2016-04-01

    In this short note, we come back to the recent proposal put forward by Kharzeev and Levin [Phys. Rev. Lett. 114, 242001 (2015)], in which they phenomenologically couple the nonperturbative Veneziano ghost to the perturbative gluon, leading to a modified gluon propagator (the "glost") of the Gribov type, with complex poles. As such, a possible link was made between the QCD topological θ -vacuum (Veneziano ghost) and color confinement (no physically observable gluons). We discuss some subtleties concerning gauge (Becchi-Rouet-Stora-Tuytin) invariance of this proposal, related to the choice of Feynman gauge. We draw particular attention to the incompatibility in the longitudinal sector with available nonperturbative results for the linear covariant gauge. We furthermore provide an example in the Landau gauge of a similar phenomenological vertex that also describes the necessary Veneziano ghost but does not affect the Landau gauge gluon propagator.

  20. How are crosstalk and ghosting defined in the stereoscopic literature?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woods, Andrew J.

    2011-03-01

    Crosstalk is a critical factor determining the image quality of stereoscopic displays. Also known as ghosting or leakage, high levels of crosstalk can make stereoscopic images hard to fuse and lack fidelity; hence it is important to achieve low levels of crosstalk in the development of high-quality stereoscopic displays. In the wider academic literature, the terms crosstalk, ghosting and leakage are often used interchangeably and unfortunately very few publications actually provide a descriptive or mathematical definition of these terms. Additionally the definitions that are available are sometimes contradictory. This paper reviews how the terms crosstalk, ghosting and associated terms (system crosstalk, viewer crosstalk, gray-to-gray crosstalk, leakage, extinction and extinction ratio, and 3D contrast) are defined and used in the stereoscopic literature. Both descriptive definitions and mathematical definitions are considered.

  1. Ghost removing for HDR real-time video stream generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouderbane, Mustapha; Dubois, Julien; Heyrman, Barthélémy; Lapray, Pierre-Jean; Ginhac, Dominique

    2016-04-01

    High dynamic range (HDR) imaging generation from a set of low dynamic range images taken in different exposure times is a low cost and an easy technique. This technique provides a good result for static scenes. Temporal exposure bracketing cannot be applied directly for dynamic scenes, since camera or object motion in bracketed exposures creates ghosts in the resulting HDR image. In this paper we describe a real-time ghost removing hardware implementation on high dynamic range video ow added for our HDR FPGA based smart camera which is able to provide full resolution (1280 x 1024) HDR video stream at 60 fps. We present experimental results to show the efficiency of our implemented method in ghost removing.

  2. Ghost anomalous dimension in asymptotically safe quantum gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Eichhorn, Astrid; Gies, Holger

    2010-05-15

    We compute the ghost anomalous dimension within the asymptotic-safety scenario for quantum gravity. For a class of covariant gauge fixings and using a functional renormalization group scheme, the anomalous dimension {eta}{sub c} is negative, implying an improved UV behavior of ghost fluctuations. At the non-Gaussian UV fixed point, we observe a maximum value of {eta}{sub c{approx_equal}}-0.78 for the Landau-deWitt gauge within the given scheme and truncation. Most importantly, the backreaction of the ghost flow onto the Einstein-Hilbert sector preserves the non-Gaussian fixed point with only mild modifications of the fixed-point values for the gravitational coupling and cosmological constant and the associated critical exponents; also their gauge dependence is slightly reduced. Our results provide further evidence for the asymptotic-safety scenario of quantum gravity.

  3. Two-color ghost imaging with enhanced angular resolving power

    SciTech Connect

    Karmakar, Sanjit; Shih, Yanhua

    2010-03-15

    This article reports an experimental demonstration on nondegenerate, two-color, biphoton ghost imaging which reproduced a ghost image with enhanced angular resolving power by means of a greater field of view compared with that of classical imaging. With the same imaging magnification, the enhanced angular resolving power and field of view compared with those of classical imaging are 1.25:1 and 1.16:1, respectively. The enhancement of angular resolving power depends on the ratio between the idler and the signal photon frequencies, and the enhancement of the field of view depends mainly on the same ratio and also on the distances of the object plane and the imaging lens from the two-photon source. This article also reports the possibility of reproducing a ghost image with the enhancement of the angular resolving power by means of a greater imaging amplification compared with that of classical imaging.

  4. Exocytosis and protein secretion in Trypanosoma

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Human African trypanosomiasis is a lethal disease caused by the extracellular parasite Trypanosoma brucei. The proteins secreted by T. brucei inhibit the maturation of dendritic cells and their ability to induce lymphocytic allogenic responses. To better understand the pathogenic process, we combined different approaches to characterize these secreted proteins. Results Overall, 444 proteins were identified using mass spectrometry, the largest parasite secretome described to date. Functional analysis of these proteins revealed a strong bias toward folding and degradation processes and to a lesser extent toward nucleotide metabolism. These features were shared by different strains of T. brucei, but distinguished the secretome from published T. brucei whole proteome or glycosome. In addition, several proteins had not been previously described in Trypanosoma and some constitute novel potential therapeutic targets or diagnostic markers. Interestingly, a high proportion of these secreted proteins are known to have alternative roles once secreted. Furthermore, bioinformatic analysis showed that a significant proportion of proteins in the secretome lack transit peptide and are probably not secreted through the classical sorting pathway. Membrane vesicles from secretion buffer and infested rat serum were purified on sucrose gradient and electron microscopy pictures have shown 50- to 100-nm vesicles budding from the coated plasma membrane. Mass spectrometry confirmed the presence of Trypanosoma proteins in these microvesicles, showing that an active exocytosis might occur beyond the flagellar pocket. Conclusions This study brings out several unexpected features of the secreted proteins and opens novel perspectives concerning the survival strategy of Trypanosoma as well as possible ways to control the disease. In addition, concordant lines of evidence support the original hypothesis of the involvement of microvesicle-like bodies in the survival strategy allowing

  5. The application of ghost imaging in infrared imaging detection technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Hongtao; Yang, Zhaohua; Li, Dapeng; Wu, Ling-an

    2015-11-01

    Traditional imaging are mostly based on the principle of lens imaging which is simple but the imaging result is heavily dependent on the quality of detector. It is usual to increase the detector array density or reduce the size of pixels to improve the imaging resolution, especially for infrared imaging. It will decrease the light flux causing the noise enhance relatively and add the cost on the contrary. Besides, there is a novel imaging technology called ghost imaging. We present a new infrared imaging method named computational ghost imaging only using a bucket detector without spatial resolution, which avoiding the allocation of flux on the pixel dimension as well as reducing the cost.

  6. Ghost-Free, Finite, Fourth-Order D=3 Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deser, S.

    2009-09-01

    Canonical analysis of a recently proposed linear+quadratic curvature gravity model in D=3 establishes its pure, irreducibly fourth derivative, quadratic curvature limit as both ghost-free and power-counting UV finite, thereby maximally violating standard folklore. This limit is representative of a generic class whose kinetic terms are conformally invariant in any dimension, but it is unique in simultaneously avoiding the transverse-traceless graviton ghosts plaguing D>3 quadratic actions as well as double pole propagators in its other variables. While the two-term model is also unitary, its additional mode’s second-derivative nature forfeits finiteness.

  7. Mapping the ghost free bigravity into braneworld setup

    SciTech Connect

    Yamashita, Yasuho; Tanaka, Takahiro E-mail: tanaka@yukawa.kyoto-u.ac.jp

    2014-06-01

    We discuss whether or not bigravity theory can be embedded into the braneworld setup. As a candidate, we consider Dvali-Gabadadze-Porrati two-brane model with the Goldberger-Wise radion stabilization. We will show that we can construct a ghost free model whose low energy spectrum is composed of a massless graviton and a massive graviton with a small mass. As is expected, the behavior of this effective theory is shown to be identical to the ghost free bigravity. Unfortunately, this correspondence breaks down at a relatively low energy due to the limitation of the adopted stabilization mechanism.

  8. Ghost imaging for three-dimensional optical security

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Wen Chen, Xudong

    2013-11-25

    Ghost imaging has become increasingly popular in quantum and optical application fields. Here, we report three-dimensional (3D) optical security using ghost imaging. The series of random phase-only masks are sparsified, which are further converted into particle-like distributions placed in 3D space. We show that either an optical or digital approach can be employed for the encoding. The results illustrate that a larger key space can be generated due to the application of 3D space compared with previous works.

  9. Fractional Fourier transform in temporal ghost imaging with classical light

    SciTech Connect

    Setaelae, Tero; Shirai, Tomohiro; Friberg, Ari T.

    2010-10-15

    We investigate temporal, second-order classical ghost imaging with long, incoherent, scalar plane-wave pulses. We prove that in rather general conditions, the intensity correlation function at the output of the setup is given by the fractional Fourier transform of the temporal object. In special cases, the correlation function is shown to reduce to the ordinary Fourier transform and the temporal image of the object. Effects influencing the visibility and the resolution are considered. This work extends certain known results on spatial ghost imaging into the time domain and could find applications in temporal tomography of pulses.

  10. Ghost Condensation and Modification of Gravity at Long distances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luty, Markus

    2004-05-01

    This talk will describe the physics of a "ghost condensate", a new kind of cosmological fluid that can fill the universe and give rise to novel gravitational effects. The fluid has a preferred rest frame, but is nonetheless compatible with maximally symmetric spacetimes such as flat space or de Sitter. In the presence of a ghost condensate, gravity is modified in a nontrivial way at large distances and late times. New phenomena include new contributions to dark energy and dark matter, antigravity, new spin-dependent forces, and oscillatory potentials. All of this new physics can be described by a completely explicit and consistent effective field theory.