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Sample records for ghrelin mrna expression

  1. Expression of Ghrelin in gastrointestinal tract and the effect of early weaning on Ghrelin expression in lambs.

    PubMed

    Wang, Weimin; Cheng, Liang; Guo, Jiangpeng; Ma, Youji; Li, Fadi

    2014-02-01

    Ghrelin, an endogenous ligand for growth hormone secretagogue receptor, plays an important role in stimulating hormone secretion, development of gastrointestinal tract, food intake and regulating energy balance of animals. In this study we isolated the cDNA sequence of ovine Ghrelin from the abomasums of 7-day-aged lambs. Real-time PCR was used to determine the abundance of Ghrelin mRNA in lamb gastrointestinal tract, and analyze the development changes of abomasums Ghrelin mRNA expression in 0-56 days lambs, as well as find the effects of 42-day weaning on Ghrelin mRNA expression in lamb abomasums. The results showed that: (1) Ghrelin mRNA was expressed widely in gastrointestinal tract and was significantly higher in the abomasums than in other tissues (rumen, reticulum, omasum, duodenum, jejunum, ileum) (P < 0.01); (2) The expression of abomasums Ghrelin mRNA in lamb increased with the growth of age, it reached a plateau at the age of 49 days, however, got a slightly decrease at the age of 56 days; (3) The expression of abomasums Ghrelin mRNA of the 42 days-weaned groups were significantly lower than the no-weaned groups (P < 0.05), and the Ghrelin mRNA expression of the two treatments reached a maximum at the age of 49 days; (4) Correlation analysis indicated that the linear correlativity between abomasums Ghrelin mRNA expression and abomasums weight was very prominent (R(2) = 0.647, P = 0.009). Our results suggested that ovine Ghrelin gene may play an important role in the development of lamb abomasums and 42-day weaning could down regulate the expression of abomasum Ghrelin mRNA, but the mechanism of these needs further research. PMID:24385298

  2. Gastrointestinal Spatiotemporal mRNA Expression of Ghrelin vs Growth Hormone Receptor and New Growth Yield Machine Learning Model Based on Perturbation Theory

    PubMed Central

    Ran, Tao; Liu, Yong; Li, Hengzhi; Tang, Shaoxun; He, Zhixiong; Munteanu, Cristian R.; González-Díaz, Humberto; Tan, Zhiliang; Zhou, Chuanshe

    2016-01-01

    The management of ruminant growth yield has economic importance. The current work presents a study of the spatiotemporal dynamic expression of Ghrelin and GHR at mRNA levels throughout the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) of kid goats under housing and grazing systems. The experiments show that the feeding system and age affected the expression of either Ghrelin or GHR with different mechanisms. Furthermore, the experimental data are used to build new Machine Learning models based on the Perturbation Theory, which can predict the effects of perturbations of Ghrelin and GHR mRNA expression on the growth yield. The models consider eight longitudinal GIT segments (rumen, abomasum, duodenum, jejunum, ileum, cecum, colon and rectum), seven time points (0, 7, 14, 28, 42, 56 and 70 d) and two feeding systems (Supplemental and Grazing feeding) as perturbations from the expected values of the growth yield. The best regression model was obtained using Random Forest, with the coefficient of determination R2 of 0.781 for the test subset. The current results indicate that the non-linear regression model can accurately predict the growth yield and the key nodes during gastrointestinal development, which is helpful to optimize the feeding management strategies in ruminant production system. PMID:27460882

  3. Gastrointestinal Spatiotemporal mRNA Expression of Ghrelin vs Growth Hormone Receptor and New Growth Yield Machine Learning Model Based on Perturbation Theory.

    PubMed

    Ran, Tao; Liu, Yong; Li, Hengzhi; Tang, Shaoxun; He, Zhixiong; Munteanu, Cristian R; González-Díaz, Humberto; Tan, Zhiliang; Zhou, Chuanshe

    2016-01-01

    The management of ruminant growth yield has economic importance. The current work presents a study of the spatiotemporal dynamic expression of Ghrelin and GHR at mRNA levels throughout the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) of kid goats under housing and grazing systems. The experiments show that the feeding system and age affected the expression of either Ghrelin or GHR with different mechanisms. Furthermore, the experimental data are used to build new Machine Learning models based on the Perturbation Theory, which can predict the effects of perturbations of Ghrelin and GHR mRNA expression on the growth yield. The models consider eight longitudinal GIT segments (rumen, abomasum, duodenum, jejunum, ileum, cecum, colon and rectum), seven time points (0, 7, 14, 28, 42, 56 and 70 d) and two feeding systems (Supplemental and Grazing feeding) as perturbations from the expected values of the growth yield. The best regression model was obtained using Random Forest, with the coefficient of determination R(2) of 0.781 for the test subset. The current results indicate that the non-linear regression model can accurately predict the growth yield and the key nodes during gastrointestinal development, which is helpful to optimize the feeding management strategies in ruminant production system. PMID:27460882

  4. Correlation of ghrelin concentration and ghrelin, ghrelin-O-acetyltransferase (GOAT) and growth hormone secretagogue receptor 1a mRNAs expression in the proventriculus and brain of the growing chicken.

    PubMed

    Kitazawa, Takio; Hiraga, Takeo; Teraoka, Hiroki; Yaosaka, Noriko; Kaiya, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    To determine mechanisms for age-related decrease of GHS-R1a expression in the chicken proventriculus, changes in mRNA expression of ghrelin and ghrelin-O-acetyltransferase (GOAT) as well as ghrelin concentrations in the proventriculus and plasma were examined in growing chickens. Changes in expression levels of ghrelin, GOAT and GHS-R1a mRNAs were also examined in different brain regions (pituitary, hypothalamus, thalamus, cerebellum, cerebral cortex, olfactory bulb, midbrain and medulla oblongata). Ghrelin concentrations in the proventriculus and plasma increased with aging and reached plateaus at 30-50 days after hatching. High level of ghrelin mRNA decreased at 3 days after hatching, and it became stable at half of the initial level. Expression levels of GHS-R1a and GOAT decreased 3 or 5 days after hatching and became stable at low levels. Significant negative correlations were found between plasma ghrelin and mRNA levels of GOAT and GHS-R1a. Expression levels of ghrelin mRNA were different in the brain regions, but a significant change was not seen with aging. GHS-R1a expression was detected in all brain regions, and age-dependent changes were observed in the pituitary and cerebellum. Different from the proventriculus, the expression of GOAT in the brain increased or did not change with aging. These results suggest that decreased GHS-R1a and GOAT mRNA expression in the proventriculus is due to endogenous ghrelin-induced down-regulation. Expression levels of ghrelin, GOAT and GHS-R1a in the brain were independently regulated from that in the proventriculus, and age-related and region-dependent regulation pattern suggests a local effect of ghrelin system in chicken brain. PMID:25435492

  5. Mole ghrelin: cDNA cloning, gene expression, and diverse molecular forms in Mogera imaizumii.

    PubMed

    Satou, Motoyasu; Kaiya, Hiroyuki; Nishi, Yoshihiro; Shinohara, Akio; Kawada, Shin-Ichiro; Miyazato, Mikiya; Kangawa, Kenji; Sugimoto, Hiroyuki

    2016-06-01

    Here, we describe cDNA cloning and purification of the ghrelin gene sequences and ghrelin peptides from the Japanese true mole, Mogera imaizumii. The gene spans >2.9kbp, has four exons and three introns, and shares structural similarity with those of terrestrial animals. Mature mole ghrelin peptide was predicted to be 28 amino acids long (GSSFLSPEHQKVQQRKESKKPPSKPQPR) and processed from a prepropeptide of 116 amino acids. To further elucidate molecular characteristics, we purified ghrelin peptides from mole stomach. By mass spectrometry, we found that the mole ghrelin peptides had higher ratios of the odd-number fatty acids (C9 and C11 as much as C8) attached to the third serine residue than other vertebrate ghrelin. Truncated forms of ghrelins such as [1-27], [1-19], [1-16] and [1-15], and that lacked the 14th glutamine residue (des-Gln14 ghrelin) were produced in the stomach. Marked expression of ghrelin mRNA in lung was observed as in stomach and brain. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that the branch of M. imaizumii has slightly higher dN/dS ratios (the nucleotide substitution rates at non-synonymous and synonymous sites) than did other eulipotyphlans. Peptide length was positively correlated with human ghrelin receptor activation, whereas the length of fatty-acyl chains showed no obvious functional correlation. The basal higher luciferase activities of the 5'-proximal promoter region of mole ghrelin were detected in ghrelin-negative C2C12 cells and hypoxic culture conditions impaired transcriptional activity. These results indicated that moles have acquired diverse species of ghrelin probably through distinctive fatty acid metabolism because of their food preferences. The results provide a gateway to understanding ghrelin metabolism in fossorial animals. PMID:27102942

  6. Molecular characterization and expression profile of ghrelin gene during different reproductive phases in buffalo (Bubalus bubalis).

    PubMed

    Kandasamy, S; Jain, A; Baviskar, P; Kumar, R; Joshi, P; Agarwal, S K; Mitra, A

    2013-08-01

    Ghrelin, a novel motilin-related endogenous ligand for growth hormone secretagouge receptor, is implicated in various biological functions, including regulation of female reproduction. But the presence of ghrelin and its role in reproductive functions in buffalo, a species with poor reproductive efficiency, is not known. In the present study full-length ghrelin cDNA was isolated from bubaline abomasum, which encodes the entire prepropeptide of 116 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence of ghrelin of buffalo showed >95% and 31% identity with that of ruminants (cattle, sheep, and goat) and humans, respectively. Analysis of synonymous and nonsynonymous nucleotide substitutions in the coding region of ghrelin indicated that these sequences of different species have been under purifying selection. The 3995-bp amplicon of ghrelin gene consisting of 4 exons and 3 introns was cloned with genomic DNA from buffalo. Further, ghrelin expression was determined by quantitative real-time PCR, in situ hybridization, and immunohistochemistry in bubaline endometrial tissues at different stages of the estrous cycle and early pregnancy. Our results indicated the persistent expression of ghrelin mRNA and protein in the endometrium during stage I (day 3-5), stage II (day 6-15), and stage III (day 16-21) of the estrous cycle and also during early (~day 30-40) pregnancy. Immunohistochemistry and quantitative real-time PCR experiments indicated the relatively higher expression of ghrelin in the endometrium during stage II (day 6-15) of the estrous cycle and early pregnancy than during stage I (day 3-5) and stage III (day 16-21) of the estrous cycle, but no statistically significant difference in ghrelin expression was observed among stages. To conclude, the results of the present study indicate the persistent expression of ghrelin in the uterine endometrium throughout the estrous cycle and in early pregnancy which might be helpful in determining its role in buffalo reproduction. PMID

  7. Ghrelin

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The gut hormone ghrelin was discovered in 1999. In the last 15 years, ample data have been generated on ghrelin. Bedsides its hallmark function as an appetite stimulator, ghrelin also has many other important functions. In this review, we discussed ghrelin's functions in learning and memory, gut mov...

  8. Regulation of oxidative stress and somatostatin, cholecystokinin, apelin gene expressions by ghrelin in stomach of newborn diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Coskun, Zeynep Mine; Sacan, Ozlem; Karatug, Ayse; Turk, Neslihan; Yanardag, Refiye; Bolkent, Sehnaz; Bolkent, Sema

    2013-09-01

    The aim of the study was to determine whether ghrelin treatment has a protective effect on gene expression and biochemical changes in the stomach of newborn streptozotocin (STZ) induced diabetic rats. In this study, four groups of Wistar rats were used: control, ghrelin control, diabetic and diabetic+ghrelin. The rats were sacrificed after four weeks of treatment for diabetes. The gene expressions of: somatostatin, cholecystokinin, apelin and the altered active caspase-3, active caspase-8, proliferating cell nuclear antigen, were investigated in the pyloric region of the stomach and antioxidant parameters were measured in all the stomach. Although ghrelin treatment to diabetic rats lowered the stomach lipid peroxidation levels, the stomach glutathione levels were increased. Exogenous ghrelin caused an increased activities of stomach catalase, superoxide dismutase, glutathione reductase and glutathione peroxidase in diabetic rats. Numbers of somatostatin, cholecystokinin and proliferating cell nuclear antigen immunoreactive cells decreased in the diabetic+ghrelin group compared to the diabetic group. Apelin mRNA expressions were remarkably less in the diabetic+ghrelin rats than in diabetic rats. The results may indicate that ghrelin treatment has a protective effect to some extent on the diabetic rats. This protection is possibly accomplished through the antioxidant activity of ghrelin observed in type 2 diabetes. Consequently exogenous ghrelin may be a candidate for therapeutic treatment of diabetes. PMID:23566555

  9. Expression and localization of ghrelin and its receptor in ovarian follicles during different stages of development and the modulatory effect of ghrelin on granulosa cells function in buffalo.

    PubMed

    Gupta, M; Dangi, S S; Singh, G; Sarkar, M

    2015-01-01

    Ghrelin, a hormone predominantly found in the stomach, was recently described as a factor that controls female reproductive function. The aim of our study was to investigate the expression and localization of ghrelin and its active receptor, growth hormone secretagogue receptor type 1a (GHS-R1a) in buffalo ovarian follicles of different follicular size and to investigate role of ghrelin on estradiol (E2) secretion, aromatase (CYP19A1), proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and apoptosis regulator Bax gene expression on granulosa cell culture. Using real time PCR and western blot, we measured gene and protein expression of examined factors. Localization was done with immunofluorescence method. Expression of ghrelin increased with follicle size with significantly highest in dominant or pre-ovulatory follicle (P<0.05). Expression of GHS-R1a was comparable in medium and large follicle but was higher than small follicles (P<0.05). Both the factors were localized in granulosa and theca cells. Pattern of intensity of immunofluorescence was similar with mRNA and protein expression. In the in vitro study granulosa cells (GCs) were cultured and treated with ghrelin each at 1, 10 and 100ng/ml concentrations for two days after obtaining 75-80 per cent confluence. Ghrelin treatment significantly (P<0.05) inhibited E2 secretion, CYP19A1 expression, apoptosis and promoted cell proliferation. In conclusion, this study provides novel evidence for the presence of ghrelin and receptor GHS-R1a in ovarian follilcles and modulatory role of ghrelin on granulosa cell function in buffalo. PMID:25275756

  10. Novel expression and functional role of ghrelin in chicken ovary.

    PubMed

    Sirotkin, A V; Grossmann, R; María-Peon, M T; Roa, J; Tena-Sempere, M; Klein, S

    2006-09-26

    Ghrelin has recently emerged as pleiotropic regulator of a wide array of endocrine and non-endocrine functions. The former likely includes the control of gonadal function, as expression of ghrelin and its putative receptor, the GH secretagogue receptor type 1a (GHS-R1a), has been described in mammalian gonads, and direct effects of ghrelin in the control of testicular secretion and cell proliferation have been reported. Yet, the expression and/or functional role of ghrelin in gonads from non-mammalian species remain to be analyzed. The present study aimed to evaluate the expression of ghrelin and GHS-R genes in the chicken ovary, and to assess the potential involvement of ghrelin in the direct control of chick ovarian function. To this end, RT-PCR assays for ghrelin and GHS-R1a mRNAs were performed in ovarian tissue, and cultures of chicken ovarian cells were conducted in the presence of increasing doses (1, 10 or 100 ng/ml) of the ghrelin analog, ghrelin 1-18. Our results demonstrate that both ghrelin and GHS-R1a mRNAs are expressed in chick ovarian tissue. Moreover, challenge of ovarian granulosa cells with ghrelin 1-18 was able to induce markers of proliferation (i.e. expression of both PCNA and cyclin), and to modulate markers of apoptosis (i.e. decreased expression of caspase-3, bax, bcl-2 and TUNEL-positive cells). Moreover, ghrelin 1-18 increased the expression of PCNA, cyclin, bax and p53 in cultures of ovarian follicular fragments, where it also stimulated the release of progesterone, estradiol, arginine-vasotocin (AVT) and IGF-I, but not of testosterone. In conclusion, our study provides novel evidence for the gonadal expression of the genes encoding ghrelin and its cognate receptor in a non-mammalian species, i.e. the chicken ovary, and unravels the potential involvement of this newly discovered molecule in the control of key gonadal functions in the chick, such as proliferation, apoptosis, and hormone release. PMID:16891055

  11. Ghrelin

    PubMed Central

    Müller, T.D.; Nogueiras, R.; Andermann, M.L.; Andrews, Z.B.; Anker, S.D.; Argente, J.; Batterham, R.L.; Benoit, S.C.; Bowers, C.Y.; Broglio, F.; Casanueva, F.F.; D'Alessio, D.; Depoortere, I.; Geliebter, A.; Ghigo, E.; Cole, P.A.; Cowley, M.; Cummings, D.E.; Dagher, A.; Diano, S.; Dickson, S.L.; Diéguez, C.; Granata, R.; Grill, H.J.; Grove, K.; Habegger, K.M.; Heppner, K.; Heiman, M.L.; Holsen, L.; Holst, B.; Inui, A.; Jansson, J.O.; Kirchner, H.; Korbonits, M.; Laferrère, B.; LeRoux, C.W.; Lopez, M.; Morin, S.; Nakazato, M.; Nass, R.; Perez-Tilve, D.; Pfluger, P.T.; Schwartz, T.W.; Seeley, R.J.; Sleeman, M.; Sun, Y.; Sussel, L.; Tong, J.; Thorner, M.O.; van der Lely, A.J.; van der Ploeg, L.H.T.; Zigman, J.M.; Kojima, M.; Kangawa, K.; Smith, R.G.; Horvath, T.; Tschöp, M.H.

    2015-01-01

    Background The gastrointestinal peptide hormone ghrelin was discovered in 1999 as the endogenous ligand of the growth hormone secretagogue receptor. Increasing evidence supports more complicated and nuanced roles for the hormone, which go beyond the regulation of systemic energy metabolism. Scope of review In this review, we discuss the diverse biological functions of ghrelin, the regulation of its secretion, and address questions that still remain 15 years after its discovery. Major conclusions In recent years, ghrelin has been found to have a plethora of central and peripheral actions in distinct areas including learning and memory, gut motility and gastric acid secretion, sleep/wake rhythm, reward seeking behavior, taste sensation and glucose metabolism. PMID:26042199

  12. In Situ Localization and Rhythmic Expression of Ghrelin and ghs-r1 Ghrelin Receptor in the Brain and Gastrointestinal Tract of Goldfish (Carassius auratus).

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Bretaño, Aída; Blanco, Ayelén M; Unniappan, Suraj; Kah, Olivier; Gueguen, Marie-M; Bertucci, Juan I; Alonso-Gómez, Ángel L; Valenciano, Ana I; Isorna, Esther; Delgado, María J

    2015-01-01

    Ghrelin is a gut-brain peptide hormone, which binds to the growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHS-R) to regulate a wide variety of biological processes in fish. Despite these prominent physiological roles, no studies have reported the anatomical distribution of preproghrelin transcripts using in situ hybridization in a non-mammalian vertebrate, and its mapping within the different encephalic areas remains unknown. Similarly, no information is available on the possible 24-h variations in the expression of preproghrelin and its receptor in any vertebrate species. The first aim of this study was to investigate the anatomical distribution of ghrelin and GHS-R1a ghrelin receptor subtype in brain and gastrointestinal tract of goldfish (Carassius auratus) using immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization. Our second aim was to characterize possible daily variations of preproghrelin and ghs-r1 mRNA expression in central and peripheral tissues using real-time reverse transcription-quantitative PCR. Results show ghrelin expression and immunoreactivity in the gastrointestinal tract, with the most abundant signal observed in the mucosal epithelium. These are in agreement with previous findings on mucosal cells as the primary synthesizing site of ghrelin in goldfish. Ghrelin receptor was observed mainly in the hypothalamus with low expression in telencephalon, pineal and cerebellum, and in the same gastrointestinal areas as ghrelin. Daily rhythms in mRNA expression were found for preproghrelin and ghs-r1 in hypothalamus and pituitary with the acrophase occurring at nighttime. Preproghrelin, but not ghs-r1a, displayed a similar daily expression rhythm in the gastrointestinal tract with an amplitude 3-fold higher than the rest of tissues. Together, these results described for the first time in fish the mapping of preproghrelin and ghrelin receptor ghs-r1a in brain and gastrointestinal tract of goldfish, and provide the first evidence for a daily regulation of both genes

  13. In Situ Localization and Rhythmic Expression of Ghrelin and ghs-r1 Ghrelin Receptor in the Brain and Gastrointestinal Tract of Goldfish (Carassius auratus)

    PubMed Central

    Unniappan, Suraj; Kah, Olivier; Gueguen, Marie-M.; Bertucci, Juan I.; Alonso-Gómez, Ángel L.; Valenciano, Ana I.; Isorna, Esther; Delgado, María J.

    2015-01-01

    Ghrelin is a gut-brain peptide hormone, which binds to the growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHS-R) to regulate a wide variety of biological processes in fish. Despite these prominent physiological roles, no studies have reported the anatomical distribution of preproghrelin transcripts using in situ hybridization in a non-mammalian vertebrate, and its mapping within the different encephalic areas remains unknown. Similarly, no information is available on the possible 24-h variations in the expression of preproghrelin and its receptor in any vertebrate species. The first aim of this study was to investigate the anatomical distribution of ghrelin and GHS-R1a ghrelin receptor subtype in brain and gastrointestinal tract of goldfish (Carassius auratus) using immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization. Our second aim was to characterize possible daily variations of preproghrelin and ghs-r1 mRNA expression in central and peripheral tissues using real-time reverse transcription-quantitative PCR. Results show ghrelin expression and immunoreactivity in the gastrointestinal tract, with the most abundant signal observed in the mucosal epithelium. These are in agreement with previous findings on mucosal cells as the primary synthesizing site of ghrelin in goldfish. Ghrelin receptor was observed mainly in the hypothalamus with low expression in telencephalon, pineal and cerebellum, and in the same gastrointestinal areas as ghrelin. Daily rhythms in mRNA expression were found for preproghrelin and ghs-r1 in hypothalamus and pituitary with the acrophase occurring at nighttime. Preproghrelin, but not ghs-r1a, displayed a similar daily expression rhythm in the gastrointestinal tract with an amplitude 3-fold higher than the rest of tissues. Together, these results described for the first time in fish the mapping of preproghrelin and ghrelin receptor ghs-r1a in brain and gastrointestinal tract of goldfish, and provide the first evidence for a daily regulation of both genes

  14. Characterization of a Novel Ghrelin Cell Reporter Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Sakata, Ichiro; Nakano, Yoshihide; Osborne-Lawrence, Sherri; Rovinsky, Sherry A.; Lee, Charlotte E.; Perello, Mario; Anderson, Jason G.; Coppari, Roberto; Xiao, Guanghua; Lowell, Bradford B.; Elmquist, Joel K.; Zigman, Jeffrey M.

    2009-01-01

    Ghrelin is a hormone that influences many physiological processes and behaviors, such as food intake, insulin and growth hormone release, and a coordinated response to chronic stress. However, little is known about the molecular pathways governing ghrelin release and ghrelin cell function. To better study ghrelin cell physiology, we have generated several transgenic mouse lines expressing humanized Renilla reniformis green fluorescent protein (hrGFP) under the control of the mouse ghrelin promoter. hrGFP expression was especially abundant in the gastric oxyntic mucosa, in a pattern mirroring that of ghrelin immunoreactivity and ghrelin mRNA. hrGFP expression also was observed in the duodenum, but not in the brain, pancreatic islet, or testis. In addition, we used fluorescent activated cell sorting (FACS) to collect and partially characterize highly enriched populations of gastric ghrelin cells. We suggest that these novel ghrelin-hrGFP transgenic mice will serve as useful tools to better understand ghrelin cell physiology. PMID:19361544

  15. Change in intrarenal Ghrelin expression in immune complex-mediated glomerular disease in dogs

    PubMed Central

    YABUKI, Akira; MIZUKAMI, Keijiro; TOKUNAGA, Satoshi; YAMATO, Osamu

    2015-01-01

    Ghrelin is a peptide hormone that is mainly produced by the stomach. The kidney is a major source of local ghrelin, and maintaining body fluid balance is considered a critical role of renal ghrelin. However, there are no reports on renal ghrelin in small animal medicine. The present study investigated the intrarenal localization of and change in ghrelin expression in dogs with immune complex-mediated glomerulonephritis (ICGN). Ghrelin immunoreactivity (IR) was observed in the distal tubules of normal kidneys. Ghrelin IR was weak in ICGN kidneys, and the quantitative ghrelin IR score was significantly lower in ICGN kidneys than in normal kidneys. In cases of ICGN, plasma creatinine concentrations showed a positive correlation with the ghrelin IR score. PMID:26256231

  16. Daily supplementation with ghrelin improves in vitro bovine blastocysts formation rate and alters gene expression related to embryo quality.

    PubMed

    Dovolou, Eleni; Periquesta, Eva; Messinis, Ioannis E; Tsiligianni, Theodora; Dafopoulos, Konstantinos; Gutierrez-Adan, Alfonso; Amiridis, Georgios S

    2014-03-01

    Ghrelin is a gastric peptide having regulatory role in the reproductive system functionality, acting mainly at central level. Because the expression of ghrelin system (ghrelin and its receptor) has been detected in the bovine ovary, the objectives of the present study were to investigate whether ghrelin can affect the developmental potential of in vitro-produced embryos, and to test their quality in terms of relative abundance of various genes related to metabolism, apoptosis and oxidation. In the first experiment, in vitro-produced zygotes were cultured in the absence (control [C]) and in the presence of three concentrations of acylated ghrelin (200 pg/mL [Ghr200], 800 pg/mL [Ghr800]; and 2000 pg/mL [Ghr2000]); blastocyst formation rates were examined on Days 7, 8, and 9. In the second experiment, only the 800 pg/mL dose of ghrelin was used. Zygotes were produced as in experiment 1 and 24 hours post insemination they were divided into 4 groups; in two groups (C; without ghrelin; Ghr800 with ghrelin), embryos were cultured without medium replacement; in the remaining two groups (Control N and GhrN), the culture medium was daily renewed. A pool of Day-7 blastocysts were snap frozen for relative mRNA abundance of various genes related to metabolism, oxidation, implantation, and apoptosis. In experiment 3, embryos were produced as in experiment 2, but in the absence of serum (semi-defined culture medium). In experiment 1, no differences were detected between C, Ghr200, and Ghr2000, although fewer blastocysts were produced in group Ghr800 compared with C. In experiment 2, the lowest blastocysts yield was found in Ghr800, whereas daily renewal of ghrelin (Ghr800N) resulted to increased blastocysts formation rate, which on Day 7 was the highest among groups (P < 0.05). In experiment 3, ghrelin significantly suppressed blastocysts yield. Significant differences were detected in various relative mRNA abundance, giving an overall final notion that embryos produced in the

  17. Hepatic changes in metabolic gene expression in old ghrelin and ghrelin receptor knockout mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ghrelin knockout (GKO) and ghrelin receptor (growth hormone secretagogue receptor) knockout (GHSRKO) mice exhibit enhanced insulin sensitivity, but the mechanism is unclear. Insulin sensitivity declines with age and is inversely associated with accumulation of lipid in liver, a key glucoregulatory ...

  18. Ghrelin promotes oral tumor cell proliferation by modifying GLUT1 expression.

    PubMed

    Kraus, Dominik; Reckenbeil, Jan; Wenghoefer, Matthias; Stark, Helmut; Frentzen, Matthias; Allam, Jean-Pierre; Novak, Natalija; Frede, Stilla; Götz, Werner; Probstmeier, Rainer; Meyer, Rainer; Winter, Jochen

    2016-03-01

    In our study, ghrelin was investigated with respect to its capacity on proliferative effects and molecular correlations on oral tumor cells. The presence of all molecular components of the ghrelin system, i.e., ghrelin and its receptors, was analyzed and could be detected using real-time PCR and immunohistochemistry. To examine cellular effects caused by ghrelin and to clarify downstream-regulatory mechanisms, two different oral tumor cell lines (BHY and HN) were used in cell culture experiments. Stimulation of either cell line with ghrelin led to a significantly increased proliferation. Signal transduction occurred through phosphorylation of GSK-3β and nuclear translocation of β-catenin. This effect could be inhibited by blocking protein kinase A. Glucose transporter1 (GLUT1), as an important factor for delivering sufficient amounts of glucose to tumor cells having high requirements for this carbohydrate (Warburg effect) was up-regulated by exogenous and endogenous ghrelin. Silencing intracellular ghrelin concentrations using siRNA led to a significant decreased expression of GLUT1 and proliferation. In conclusion, our study describes the role for the appetite-stimulating peptide hormone ghrelin in oral cancer proliferation under the particular aspect of glucose uptake: (1) tumor cells are a source of ghrelin. (2) Ghrelin affects tumor cell proliferation through autocrine and/or paracrine activity. (3) Ghrelin modulates GLUT1 expression and thus indirectly enhances tumor cell proliferation. These findings are of major relevance, because glucose uptake is assumed to be a promising target for cancer treatment. PMID:26407611

  19. Sex biased expression of ghrelin and GHSR associated with sexual size dimorphism in yellow catfish.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jin; Ma, Wenge; He, Yan; Wu, Junjie; Dawar, Farman Ullah; Ren, Fan; Zhao, Xiaohan; Mei, Jie

    2016-03-10

    Sexual size dimorphism has been observed in many cultivable fish species including yellow catfish, in which male fish grow much faster than female fish. Ghrelin is a potent stimulator of pituitary growth hormone (GH) release and known to potentially promote food intake and body weight gain. In order to investigate the molecular mechanism of sexual size dimorphism in yellow catfish (Pelteobagrus fulvidraco), ghrelin and its functional receptor, growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHSR) cDNAs were cloned. Real-time PCR indicated that both ghrelin and GHSR were more highly expressed in hypothalamus and gut of male fish than female. During normal larval development, expression of ghrelin and GHSR genes was significantly higher in males than in females. 17a-Methyltestosterone (MT) treatment enhanced the expression of ghrelin in female larval fish and GHSR in both sexes, whereas the expression of ghrelin in male larval fish increased in the beginning, then decreased as the treatment time prolonged. Furthermore, the expression of ghrelin and GHSR in male juvenile was significantly increased compared with female juvenile, in short and long term fasting periods, suggesting that male fish may have a better appetite than female during fasting. Our results demonstrate that sex difference in the expression of ghrelin and GHSR may be involved in sexual size dimorphism by regulating feeding and GH/IGF signaling in yellow catfish. PMID:26692148

  20. Purification of rat and human ghrelins.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Masayasu; Hosoda, Hiroshi; Kangawa, Kenji

    2012-01-01

    Small synthetic molecules called growth hormone secretagogues (GHSs) stimulate the release of growth hormone (GH) from the pituitary. They act through the GHS-R, a G-protein-coupled receptor highly expressed in the hypothalamus and pituitary. Using an orphan receptor strategy with a stable cell line expressing GHS-R, we purified endogenous ligands for GHS-R from rat and human stomach and named it "ghrelin," after a word root (ghre) in Proto-Indo-European languages meaning "grow." Ghrelin is a peptide hormone in which the third amino acid, usually a serine but in some species a threonine, is modified by a fatty acid; this modification is essential for ghrelin's activity. The main active form of rat ghrelin is 28-amino acid peptides with n-octanoyl modification. In rat stomach, a second type of ghrelin peptide was purified, identified as des-Gln14-ghrelin. With the exception of the deletion of Gln14, des-Gln14-ghrelin is identical to ghrelin, retaining the n-octanoic acid modification. Des-Gln14-ghrelin is encoded by an mRNA created by alternative splicing of the ghrelin gene. As in the rat, the major active form of human ghrelin is a 28-amino acid peptide with an n-octanoylated Ser3. However, in human stomach, several minor forms of human ghrelin peptides have been isolated. These can be classified into four groups by the type of acylation observed at Ser3 and into two groups by the amino acids in length. The discovery of ghrelin indicates that the release of GH from the pituitary and appetite stimulation might be regulated by ghrelin derived from the stomach. PMID:22975045

  1. Ghrelin regulates cell cycle-related gene expression in cultured hippocampal neural stem cells.

    PubMed

    Chung, Hyunju; Park, Seungjoon

    2016-08-01

    We have previously demonstrated that ghrelin stimulates the cellular proliferation of cultured adult rat hippocampal neural stem cells (NSCs). However, little is known about the molecular mechanisms by which ghrelin regulates cell cycle progression. The purpose of this study was to investigate the potential effects of ghrelin on cell cycle regulatory molecules in cultured hippocampal NSCs. Ghrelin treatment increased proliferation assessed by CCK-8 proliferation assay. The expression levels of proliferating cell nuclear antigen and cell division control 2, well-known cell-proliferating markers, were also increased by ghrelin. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis revealed that ghrelin promoted progression of cell cycle from G0/G1 to S phase, whereas this progression was attenuated by the pretreatment with specific inhibitors of MEK/extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2, phosphoinositide 3-kinase/Akt, mammalian target of rapamycin, and janus kinase 2/signal transducer and activator of transcription 3. Ghrelin-induced proliferative effect was associated with increased expression of E2F1 transcription factor in the nucleus, as determined by Western blotting and immunofluorescence. We also found that ghrelin caused an increase in protein levels of positive regulators of cell cycle, such as cyclin A and cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) 2. Moreover, p27(KIP1) and p57(KIP2) protein levels were reduced when cell were exposed to ghrelin, suggesting downregulation of CDK inhibitors may contribute to proliferative effect of ghrelin. Our data suggest that ghrelin targets both cell cycle positive and negative regulators to stimulate proliferation of cultured hippocampal NSCs. PMID:27325242

  2. Effects of zearalenone-diet on expression of ghrelin and PCNA genes in ovaries of post-weaning piglets.

    PubMed

    Dai, Meiling; Jiang, Shuzhen; Yuan, Xuejun; Yang, Weiren; Yang, Zaibin; Huang, Libo

    2016-05-01

    Numerous reports have provided evidence that zearalenone (ZEN) can increase the weight of genital organs. These findings have been confirmed by many studies in which the ghrelin gene was expressed in the ovary and was implicated in the control of cells in reproductive tissues. The proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) is an important marker of cell proliferation. The present study investigates the effects of a ZEN-treated diet on the development of ovaries in post-weaning piglets by the detection of ghrelin and PCNA protein and relative abundance of mRNA using optical microscopy, immunohistochemistry and quantitative real-time (qRT-PCR). A total of 20 piglets (Duroc × Landrace × Yorkshire) weaned at 28 d, with an average body weight of 8.74 ± 0.26 kg (P=0.919) were used in this study. Piglets in the control group (n=10) were fed a normal basal diet, and those in the treatment group (n=10) were fed a diet containing ZEN (1.04 mg/kg), for 35 d. The proportion of growing follicles and diameter of the largest growing follicle in ovaries were greater in piglets fed the diet with ZEN. The total integrated optical densities of protein and mRNA of ghrelin and PCNA were greater with the feeding of the ZEN-treatment diet. The results suggested that 1.04 mg/kg ZEN could promote the autocrine action or expression of the ghrelin gene in piglet ovary, and further accelerate the development of ovaries (follicles). PMID:27020865

  3. Effects of ghrelin and des-acyl ghrelin on neurogenesis of the rat fetal spinal cord

    SciTech Connect

    Sato, Miho; Nakahara, Keiko; Goto, Shintaro; Kaiya, Hiroyuki; Miyazato, Mikiya . E-mail: a0d201u@cc.miyazaki-u.ac.jp; Date, Yukari; Nakazato, Masamitsu; Kangawa, Kenji; Murakami, Noboru

    2006-11-24

    Expressions of the growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHS-R) mRNA and its protein were confirmed in rat fetal spinal cord tissues by RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. In vitro, over 3 nM ghrelin and des-acyl ghrelin induced significant proliferation of primary cultured cells from the fetal spinal cord. The proliferating cells were then double-stained using antibodies against the neuronal precursor marker, nestin, and the cell proliferation marker, 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU), and the nestin-positive cells were also found to be co-stained with antibody against GHS-R. Furthermore, binding studies using [{sup 125}I]des-acyl ghrelin indicated the presence of a specific binding site for des-acyl ghrelin, and confirmed that the binding was displaced with unlabeled des-acyl ghrelin or ghrelin. These results indicate that ghrelin and des-acyl ghrelin induce proliferation of neuronal precursor cells that is both dependent and independent of GHS-R, suggesting that both ghrelin and des-acyl ghrelin are involved in neurogenesis of the fetal spinal cord.

  4. Estradiol and testosterone modulate the tissue-specific expression of ghrelin, ghs-r, goat and nucb2 in goldfish.

    PubMed

    Bertucci, Juan Ignacio; Blanco, Ayelén Melisa; Canosa, Luis Fabián; Unniappan, Suraj

    2016-03-01

    Ghrelin, and nesfatin-1 (encoded by nucleobindin2/nucb2) are two metabolic peptides with multiple biological effects in vertebrates. While sex steroids are known to regulate endogenous ghrelin and NUCB2 in mammals, such actions by steroids in fish remain unknown. This study aimed to determine whether estradiol (E2) and testosterone (T) affects the expression of preproghrelin, ghrelin/growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHS-R), ghrelin O-acyl transferase (GOAT) and NUCB2 in goldfish (Carassius auratus). First, a dose-response assay was performed in which fish were intraperitoneally (ip) implanted with pellets containing 25, 50 or 100 μg/g body weight (BW) of E2 or T. It was found that sex steroids (100 μg/g BW) administered for 2.5 days achieved the highest E2 or T in circulation. In a second experiment, fish were ip implanted with pellets containing 100 μg/g BW of E2, T or without hormone (control). RT-qPCR analyses at 2.5 days post-administration show that gut preproghrelin and GOAT expression was upregulated by both E2 and T treatments, while the same effect was observed for GHS-R only in the pituitary. Both treatments also reduced hypothalamic preproghrelin mRNA expression. NUCB2 expression was increased in the forebrain of T treated group and reduced in the gut and pituitary under both treatments. These results show for the first time a modulation of preproghrelin and nucb2/nesfatin-1 by sex steroids in fish. The interaction between sex steroids and genes implicated in both metabolism and reproduction might help meeting the reproduction dependent energy demands in fish. PMID:26773340

  5. Identification of neurons that express ghrelin receptors in autonomic pathways originating from the spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Furness, John B; Cho, Hyun-Jung; Hunne, Billie; Hirayama, Haruko; Callaghan, Brid P; Lomax, Alan E; Brock, James A

    2012-06-01

    Functional studies have shown that subsets of autonomic preganglionic neurons respond to ghrelin and ghrelin mimetics and in situ hybridisation has revealed receptor gene expression in the cell bodies of some preganglionic neurons. Our present goal has been to determine which preganglionic neurons express ghrelin receptors by using mice expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) under the control of the promoter for the ghrelin receptor (also called growth hormone secretagogue receptor). The retrograde tracer Fast Blue was injected into target organs of reporter mice under anaesthesia to identify specific functional subsets of postganglionic sympathetic neurons. Cryo-sections were immunohistochemically stained by using anti-EGFP and antibodies to neuronal markers. EGFP was detected in nerve terminal varicosities in all sympathetic chain, prevertebral and pelvic ganglia and in the adrenal medulla. Non-varicose fibres associated with the ganglia were also immunoreactive. No postganglionic cell bodies contained EGFP. In sympathetic chain ganglia, most neurons were surrounded by EGFP-positive terminals. In the stellate ganglion, neurons with choline acetyltransferase immunoreactivity, some being sudomotor neurons, lacked surrounding ghrelin-receptor-expressing terminals, although these terminals were found around other neurons. In the superior cervical ganglion, the ghrelin receptor terminals innervated subgroups of neurons including neuropeptide Y (NPY)-immunoreactive neurons that projected to the anterior chamber of the eye. However, large NPY-negative neurons projecting to the acini of the submaxillary gland were not innervated by EGFP-positive varicosities. In the celiaco-superior mesenteric ganglion, almost all neurons were surrounded by positive terminals but the VIP-immunoreactive terminals of intestinofugal neurons were EGFP-negative. The pelvic ganglia contained groups of neurons without ghrelin receptor terminal innervation and other groups with

  6. Expression of ghrelin receptor (GHSR-1a) in rat epididymal spermatozoa and the effects of its activation.

    PubMed

    Łukaszyk, Andrzej; Kotwicka, Małgorzata; Jankowska, Anna; Kasprzak, Aldona; Ruciński, Marcin; Sterzyńska, Karolina; Ziółkowska, Agnieszka; Sawiński, Piotr; Ruchala, Marek

    2012-11-01

    In this study we demonstrated the expression of the ghrelin receptor GHSR-1a in rat spermatids and epididymal spermatozoa, as well as some effects of ghrelin on the spermatozoa in vitro. For the demonstration of GHSR-1a the immunocytochemical, immunofluorescence and Western blotting techniques were applied using three different types of antibodies. The response of spermatozoa to ghrelin was tested in a series of in vitro experiments and their effects were evaluated using confocal microscopy and flow cytometry. GHSR-1a protein was found as expressed in the Golgi and acrosomes of spermatids and acrosome regions or the head cell membrane of epididymal spermatozoa. The GHSR-1a expression in spermatozoa was also confirmed by Western blot. No differences were found in percentage of spermatozoa showing annexin-V binding and expression of active form caspase-3 between control and ghrelin-treated spermatozoa. This result may indicate no pro-apoptotic effects of ghrelin neither at 10(-9) nor 10(-6)mol/L concentration. Ghrelin (10(-6)mol/L) increased free intracellular calcium ion concentration in the rat spermatozoa. Moreover, stimulation with 10(-6)mol/L ghrelin increased, while 10(-4)mol/L ghrelin decreased the number of spermatozoa showing progressive motility. In conclusion, the expression of the GHSR-1a receptor in spermatozoa, as well as ghrelin influences on sperm motility and intracellular calcium ion concentration suggest that such biological effects of ghrelin may be produced under in vivo conditions. PMID:23153700

  7. Effects of Ghrelin on Sexual Behavior and Luteinizing Hormone Beta-subunit Gene Expression in Male Rats

    PubMed Central

    Babaei-Balderlou, Farrin; Khazali, Homayoun

    2016-01-01

    Background: The hormones of hypothalamo-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis have facilitative effects on reproductive behavior in mammals. Ghrelin as a starvation hormone has an inhibitory effect on HPG axis’ function. Hence, it is postulated that ghrelin may reduce the sexual behavior through inhibiting of HPG axis. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of ghrelin and its antagonist, [D-Lys3 ]-GHRP-6, on sexual behavior and LH beta-subunit gene expression in male rats. Methods: In this experimental study, 128 male Wistar rats were divided into two groups. Each group was further subdivided into eight subgroups (n=8 rats/subgroup) including the animals that received saline, ghrelin (2, 4 or 8 nmol), [D-Lys3 ]-GHRP-6 (5 or 10 nmol) or co-administration of ghrelin (4 nmol) and [D-Lys3 ]-GHRP-6 (5 or 10 nmol) through the stereotaxically implanted cannula into the third cerebral ventricle. The sexual behavior of male rats encountering with females and the hypo-physeal LH beta-subunit gene expression were evaluated at two different groups. Data were analyzed by ANOVA and p<0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: Ghrelin injection (4 and 8 nmol) significantly (p<0.01) increased the latencies to the first mount, intromission and ejaculation as well as the post-ejaculatory interval. Also, 4 and 8 nmol ghrelin significantly (p<0.05) increased the number of mount and decreased the number of ejaculation. In co-administrated groups, [D-Lys3 ]-GHRP-6 antagonized the effects of ghrelin. Ghrelin injection (4 and 8 nmol) reduced the LH beta-subunit gene expression while pretreatment with [D-Lys3 ]-GHRP-6 improved the gene expression. Conclusion: Ghrelin decreased the sexual behavior and LH beta-subunit gene expression in male rats, whereas [D-Lys3 ]-GHRP-6 antagonizes these effects. PMID:27141463

  8. Effects of Dietary Fibers on Weight Gain, Carbohydrate Metabolism and Gastric Ghrelin Gene Expression in High Fat Diet Fed Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhong Q.; Zuberi, Aamir; Zhang, Xian H.; Macgowan, Jacalyn; Qin, Jianhua; Ye, Xin; Son, Leslie; Wu, Qinglin; Lian, Kun; Cefalu, William T.

    2009-01-01

    Diets that are high in dietary fiber are reported to have substantial health benefits. We sought to compare the metabolic effects for three types of dietary fibers, i.e. sugar cane fiber (SCF), psyllium (PSY) and cellulose (CEL) on body weight, carbohydrate metabolism and stomach ghrelin gene expression in a high-fat diet fed mouse model. Thirty-six male mice (C57BL/6) were randomly divided into four groups that consumed high fat-diets or high fat diet containing 10% SCF, PSY, and CEL respectively. After baseline measurements were assessed for body weight, plasma insulin, glucose, leptin and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), animals were treated for 12 weeks. Parameters were re-evaluated at end of study. Whereas there was no difference at the baseline, body weight gains in the PSY and SCF groups were significantly lower than in CEL group at end of study, No difference in body weight was observed between the PSY and SCF animals. Body composition analysis demonstrated that fat mass in the SCF group was considerably lower than in the CEL and HFD groups. In addition, fasting plasma glucose and insulin and areas under curve of IPGTT were also significantly lower in the SCF and PSY groups than in the CEL and HFD groups. Moreover, fasting plasma concentrations of leptin were significantly lower and GLP-1 level was two-fold higher in the SCF and PSY mice than in the HFD and CEL mice. Ghrelin mRNA levels of stomach in SCF groups were significantly lower than in CEL and HFD groups as well. These results suggest differences in response to dietary fiber intake in this animal model as high fat diets incorporating dietary fibers such as SCF and PSY appeared to attenuate weight gain, enhance insulin sensitivity, and modulate leptin and GLP-1 secretion and gastric ghrelin gene expression. PMID:17998014

  9. Reduced ghrelin production induced anorexia after rat gastric ischemia and reperfusion.

    PubMed

    Mogami, Sachiko; Suzuki, Hidekazu; Fukuhara, Seiichiro; Matsuzaki, Juntaro; Kangawa, Kenji; Hibi, Toshifumi

    2012-02-01

    The gastrointestinal (GI) tract is one of the most susceptible organs to ischemia. We previously reported altered gastric motility after gastric ischemia and reperfusion (I/R). However, there have also been few reports of alterations in the eating behavior after gastric I/R. Ghrelin is a GI peptide that stimulates food intake and GI motility. Although ghrelin itself has been demonstrated to attenuate the mucosal injuries induced by gastric I/R, the endogenous ghrelin dynamics after I/R has not yet been elucidated. The present study was designed to investigate the relationship between food intake and the ghrelin dynamics after gastric I/R. Wistar rats were exposed to 80-min gastric ischemia, followed by 12-h or 48-h reperfusion. The food intake, plasma ghrelin levels, gastric preproghrelin mRNA expression levels, and the histological localization of ghrelin-immunoreactive cells were evaluated. The effect of exogenous ghrelin on the food intake after I/R was also examined. Food intake, the plasma ghrelin levels, the count of ghrelin-immunoreactive cells corrected by the percentage areas of the remaining mucosa, and the expression levels of preproghrelin mRNA in the stomach were significantly reduced at 12 h and 48 h after I/R compared with the levels in the sham-operated rats. Intraperitoneal administration of ghrelin significantly reversed the decrease of food intake after I/R. These data show that gastric I/R evoked anorexia with decreased plasma ghrelin levels and ghrelin production, which appears to be attributable to the I/R-induced gastric mucosal injuries. The decrease in the plasma ghrelin levels may have been responsible for the decreased food intake after gastric I/R. PMID:22114115

  10. Ghrelin O-Acyl Transferase in Zebrafish Is an Evolutionarily Conserved Peptide Upregulated During Calorie Restriction.

    PubMed

    Hatef, Azadeh; Yufa, Roman; Unniappan, Suraj

    2015-10-01

    Ghrelin is a multifunctional orexigenic hormone with a unique acyl modification enabled by ghrelin O-acyl transferase (GOAT). Ghrelin is well-characterized in nonmammals, and GOAT sequences of several fishes are available in the GenBank. However, endogenous GOAT in non-mammals remains poorly understood. In this research, GOAT sequence comparison, tissue-specific GOAT expression, and its regulation by nutrient status and exogenous ghrelin were studied. It was found that the bioactive core of zebrafish GOAT amino acid sequence share high identity with that of mammals. GOAT mRNA was most abundant in the gut. GOAT-like immunoreactivity (i.r.) was found colocalized with ghrelin in the gastric mucosa. Food deprivation increased, and feeding decreased GOAT and preproghrelin mRNA expression in the brain and gut. GOAT and ghrelin peptides in the gut and brain showed corresponding decrease in food-deprived state. Intraperitoneal injection of acylated fish ghrelin caused a significant decrease in GOAT mRNA expression, suggesting a feedback mechanism regulating its abundance. Together, these results provide the first in-depth characterization of GOAT in a non-mammal. Our results demonstrate that endogenous GOAT expression is responsive to metabolic status and availability of acylated ghrelin, providing further evidences for GOAT in the regulation of feeding in teleosts. PMID:26226634

  11. Effects of ghrelin on protein expression of antioxidative enzymes and iNOS in the rat liver

    PubMed Central

    Dobutovic, Branislava; Sudar, Emina; Tepavcevic, Snezana; Djordjevic, Jelena; Djordjevic, Ana; Radojcic, Marija

    2014-01-01

    Introduction We investigated the effects of ghrelin on protein expression of the liver antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutases (SODs), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), and glutathione reductase (GR), nuclear factor κB (NFκB) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). Furthermore, we aimed to investigate whether extracellular regulated protein kinase (ERK1/2) and protein kinase B (Akt) are involved in ghrelin-regulated liver antioxidant enzymes and iNOS protein expression. Material and methods Male Wistar rats were treated with ghrelin (0.3 nmol/5 µl) injected into the lateral cerebral ventricle every 24 h for 5 days, and 2 h after the last treatment the animals were sacrificed and the liver excised. The Western blot method was used to determine expression of antioxidant enzymes, iNOS, phosphorylation of Akt, ERK1/2 and nuclear factor κB (NFκB) subunits 50 and 65. Results There was significantly higher protein expression of CuZnSOD (p < 0.001), MnSOD (p < 0.001), CAT (p < 0.001), GPx, (p < 0.001), and GR (p < 0.01) in the liver isolated from ghrelin-treated animals compared with control animals. In contrast, ghrelin significantly (p < 0.01) reduced protein expression of iNOS. In addition, phosphorylation of NFκB subunits p65 and p50 was significantly (p < 0.001 for p65; p < 0.05 for p50) reduced by ghrelin when compared with controls. Phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and of Akt was significantly higher in ghrelin-treated than in control animals (p < 0.05 for ERK1/2; p < 0.01 for Akt). Conclusions The results show that activation of Akt and ERK1/2 is involved in ghrelin-mediated regulation of protein expression of antioxidant enzymes and iNOS in the rat liver. PMID:25276168

  12. Transitional change in rat fetal cell proliferation in response to ghrelin and des-acyl ghrelin during the last stage of pregnancy

    SciTech Connect

    Inoue, Yoshiyuki; Nakahara, Keiko; Kangawa, Kenji; Murakami, Noboru

    2010-03-12

    Expression of mRNA for the ghrelin receptor, GHS-R1a, was detected in various peripheral and central tissues of fetal rats, including skin, bone, heart, liver, gut, brain and spinal cord, on embryonic day (ED)15 and ED17. However, its expression in skin, bone, heart and liver, but not in gut, brain and spinal cord, became relatively weak on ED19 and disappeared after birth (ND2). Ghrelin and des-acyl ghrelin facilitated the proliferation of cultured fetal (ED17, 19), but not neonatal (ND2), skin cells. On the other hand, with regard to cells from the spinal cord and hypothalamus, the proliferative effect of ghrelin continued after birth, whereas the effect of des-acyl ghrelin on neurogenesis in these tissues was lost at the ED19 fetal and ND2 neonatal stages. Immunohistochemistry revealed that the cells in the hypothalamus induced to proliferate by ghrelin at the ND2 stage were positive for nestin and glial fibrillary acidic protein. These results suggest that in the period immediately prior to, and after birth, rat fetal cells showing proliferation in response to ghrelin and des-acyl ghrelin are at a transitional stage characterized by alteration of the expression of GHS-R1a and an undefined des-acyl ghrelin receptor, their responsiveness varying among different tissues.

  13. Peripheral injections of cholecystokinin, apelin, ghrelin and orexin in cavefish (Astyanax fasciatus mexicanus): effects on feeding and on the brain expression levels of tyrosine hydroxylase, mechanistic target of rapamycin and appetite-related hormones.

    PubMed

    Penney, Carla C; Volkoff, Hélène

    2014-01-15

    The effects of intraperitoneal injections of cholecystokinin (CCK), apelin, ghrelin, and orexin on food intake were examined in the blind cavefish Astyanax fasciatus mexicanus. CCK (50ng/g) induced a decrease in food intake whereas apelin (100ng/g), orexin (100ng/g), and ghrelin (100ng/g) induced an increase in food intake as compared to saline-injected control fish. In order to better understand the central mechanism by which these hormones act, we examined the effects of injections on the brain mRNA expression of two metabolic enzymes, tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), and mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR), and of appetite-regulating peptides, CCK, orexin, apelin and cocaine and amphetamine regulated transcript (CART). CCK injections induced a decrease in brain apelin injections, apelin injections induced an increase in TH, mTOR, and orexin brain expressions, orexin treatment increased brain TH expression and ghrelin injections induced an increase in mTOR and orexin brain expressions. CART expression was not affected by any of the injection treatments. Our results suggest that the enzymes TH and mTOR and the hormones CCK, apelin, orexin, and ghrelin all regulate food intake in cavefish through a complex network of interactions. PMID:24287340

  14. Ghrelin action in the brain controls adipocyte metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Theander-Carrillo, Claudia; Wiedmer, Petra; Cettour-Rose, Philippe; Nogueiras, Ruben; Perez-Tilve, Diego; Pfluger, Paul; Castaneda, Tamara R.; Muzzin, Patrick; Schürmann, Annette; Szanto, Ildiko; Tschöp, Matthias H.; Rohner-Jeanrenaud, Françoise

    2006-01-01

    Many homeostatic processes, including appetite and food intake, are controlled by neuroendocrine circuits involving the CNS. The CNS also directly regulates adipocyte metabolism, as we have shown here by examining central action of the orexigenic hormone ghrelin. Chronic central ghrelin infusion resulted in increases in the glucose utilization rate of white and brown adipose tissue without affecting skeletal muscle. In white adipocytes, mRNA expression of various fat storage–promoting enzymes such as lipoprotein lipase, acetyl-CoA carboxylase α, fatty acid synthase, and stearoyl-CoA desaturase–1 was markedly increased, while that of the rate-limiting step in fat oxidation, carnitine palmitoyl transferase–1α, was decreased. In brown adipocytes, central ghrelin infusion resulted in lowered expression of the thermogenesis-related mitochondrial uncoupling proteins 1 and 3. These ghrelin effects were dose dependent, occurred independently from ghrelin-induced hyperphagia, and seemed to be mediated by the sympathetic nervous system. Additionally, the expression of some fat storage enzymes was decreased in ghrelin-deficient mice, which led us to conclude that central ghrelin is of physiological relevance in the control of cell metabolism in adipose tissue. These results unravel the existence of what we believe to be a new CNS-based neuroendocrine circuit regulating metabolic homeostasis of adipose tissue. PMID:16767221

  15. Ghrelin accelerates in vitro maturation of bovine oocytes.

    PubMed

    Dovolou, E; Messinis, I E; Periquesta, E; Dafopoulos, K; Gutierrez-Adan, A; Amiridis, G S

    2014-08-01

    Ghrelin, apart from its metabolic role, is nowadays considered as a basic regulator of reproductive functions of mammals, acting at central and gonadal levels. Here, we investigated for possible direct actions of ghrelin on in vitro maturation of bovine oocytes and for its effects on blastocyst yield and quality. In experiment 1, cumulus oocyte complexes (COCs) were matured in the presence of four different concentrations of ghrelin (0, 200, 800 and 2000 pg/ml). In vitro fertilization and embryo culture were carried out in the absence of ghrelin, and blastocyst formation rates were examined on days 7, 8 and 9. In experiment 2, only the 800 pg/ml dose of ghrelin was used. Four groups of COCs were matured for 18 or 24 h (C18, Ghr18, C24 and Ghr24), and subsequently, they were examined for oocyte nuclear maturation and cumulus layer expansion; blastocysts were produced as in experiment 1. The relative mRNA abundance of various genes related to metabolism, oxidation, developmental competence and apoptosis was examined in snap-frozen cumulus cells, oocytes and day-7 blastocysts. In experiment 1, ghrelin significantly suppressed blastocyst formation rates. In experiment 2, more ghrelin-treated oocytes matured for 18 h reached MII compared with controls, while no difference was observed when maturation lasted for 24 h. At 18 and 24 h, the cumulus layer was more expanded in ghrelin-treated COCs than in the controls. The blastocyst formation rate was higher in Ghr18 (27.7 ± 2.4%) compared with Ghr24 (17.5 ± 2.4%). Differences were detected in various genes' expression, indicating that in the presence of ghrelin, incubation of COCs for 24 h caused over-maturation (induced ageing) of oocytes, but formed blastocysts had a higher hatching rate compared with the controls. We infer that ghrelin exerts a specific and direct role on the oocyte, accelerating its maturational process. PMID:24889518

  16. Ghrelin receptor in Japanese fire belly newt, Cynops pyrrhogaster.

    PubMed

    Kaiya, Hiroyuki; Kangawa, Kenji; Miyazato, Mikiya

    2015-11-01

    We identified cDNA encoding a functional ghrelin receptor (growth hormone secretagogue-receptor 1a (GHS-R1a)) in a urodele amphibian, the Japanese fire belly newt (Cynops pyrrhogaster). Two functional receptor proteins, composed of 378- and 362-amino acids, were deduced from the identified cDNA because two candidate initiation methionine sites were found. The long-chain receptor protein shared 80%, 69%, and 59% identities with the bullfrog GHS-R1a, human GHS-R1a and tilapia GHS-R1a-like receptor, respectively. Phylogenetic analysis suggested that the newt receptor is grouped to the clade of the tetrapod homologs, and very closed to anuran amphibians. In functional analyses, homologous newt ghrelin, heterologous bullfrog and rat ghrelin, and a GHS-R1a agonist, GHRP-6 increased intracellular Ca(2+) concentration in human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 cells stably expressed newt GHS-R1a. The responsiveness was much greater in the short-chain receptor than in the long-chain receptor. Both receptors preferred to bind Ser(3)-ghrelin including newt and rat ghrelin than Thr(3)-ghrelin with bullfrog ghrelin. GHRP-6 has a similar affinity to bullfrog ghrelin. GHS-R1a mRNA was expressed in the brain, pituitary, intestine, pancreas, testis and fat body with high level, and eyes, heart, stomach, liver, gall bladder, kidney and dorsal skin with low level. In a fasting experiment, gene expression of GHS-R1a in the brain and pituitary increased 4days after fasting, and the increased level decreased to the initial level 2weeks after fasting. These changes are consistent with the change in ghrelin mRNA. In contrast, expression of ghrelin and GHS-R1a mRNA in the stomach decreased on day 4 after fasting, and increased 2weeks after fasting. These results indicate that ghrelin and its receptor system are present and altered by energy states in this newt. PMID:26172570

  17. Ghrelin and gastric acid secretion

    PubMed Central

    Yakabi, Koji; Kawashima, Junichi; Kato, Shingo

    2008-01-01

    Ghrelin, a novel growth hormone-releasing peptide, was originally isolated from rat and human stomach. Ghrelin has been known to increase the secretion of growth hormone (GH), food intake, and body weight gain when administered peripherally or centrally. Ghrelin is also known to stimulate the gastric motility and the secretion of gastric acid. In the previous studies, the action of ghrelin on acid secretion was shown to be as strong as that of histamine and gastrin in in-vivo experiment. In the studies, the mechanism for the action of ghrelin was also investigated. It was shown that vagotomy completely inhibited the action of ghrelin on the secretion of gastric acid suggesting that vagal nerve is involved in the mechanism for the action of ghrelin on acid secretion. As famotidine did not inhibit ghrelin-induced acid secretion in the study by Masuda et al, they concluded that histamine was not involved in the action of ghrelin on acid secretion. However, we have shown that famotidine completely inhibited ghrelin-induced acid secretion and histidine decarboxylase (HDC) mRNA was increased in gastric mucosa by ghrelin injection which is inhibited by vagotomy Our results indicate that histamine is involved in the action of ghrelin on acid secretion. Furthermore synergistic action of gastrin and ghrelin on gastric acid secretion was shown. Although gastrin has important roles in postprandial secretion of gastric acid, ghrelin may be related to acid secretion during fasting period or at night. However, further studies are needed to elucidate the physiological role of ghrelin in acid secretion. PMID:19009648

  18. A low-salt diet increases the expression of renal sirtuin 1 through activation of the ghrelin receptor in rats.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shao-Yu; Lin, Shuei-Liong; Chen, Yung-Ming; Wu, Vin-Cent; Yang, Wei-Shiung; Wu, Kwan-Dun

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that sirtuin 1 (Sirt1) is renoprotective; however, details regarding its distribution and functions in the kidney remain unknown. Here, we demonstrated that Sirt1 was mainly expressed in the tubulointerstitial cells of normal rat kidneys and was co-localized with aquaporin 2, indicating it may be involved in water/salt regulation. Renal Sirt1 expression increased in the non-glomerular cytoplasmic portion of the kidney after a 24-h fast, but no significant changes in Sirt1 expression occurred after water loading (50 mL/kg) or 24-h water deprivation. After consuming a low-salt (0.075%) or 60% calorie restriction diet for 7 days, Sirt1 expression in the rat kidney was significantly increased, whereas a high-salt (8%) diet did not change the level of Sirt1 expression. The low-salt diet also increased Sirt1 expression in the heart, muscle, brain, and fat tissues. The increased Sirt1 that was observed in rats on a low-salt diet was associated with increased ghrelin expression in the distal nephron, with both molecules exhibiting similar distribution patterns. An in vitro experiment suggested that ghrelin increases Sirt1 expression in cortical collecting duct cells by activating ghrelin receptors. Our study indicates that this 'ghrelin-Sirt1 system' may participate in regulating sodium reabsorption in the distal nephron. PMID:27600292

  19. A low-salt diet increases the expression of renal sirtuin 1 through activation of the ghrelin receptor in rats

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Shao-Yu; Lin, Shuei-Liong; Chen, Yung-Ming; Wu, Vin-Cent; Yang, Wei-Shiung; Wu, Kwan-Dun

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that sirtuin 1 (Sirt1) is renoprotective; however, details regarding its distribution and functions in the kidney remain unknown. Here, we demonstrated that Sirt1 was mainly expressed in the tubulointerstitial cells of normal rat kidneys and was co-localized with aquaporin 2, indicating it may be involved in water/salt regulation. Renal Sirt1 expression increased in the non-glomerular cytoplasmic portion of the kidney after a 24-h fast, but no significant changes in Sirt1 expression occurred after water loading (50 mL/kg) or 24-h water deprivation. After consuming a low-salt (0.075%) or 60% calorie restriction diet for 7 days, Sirt1 expression in the rat kidney was significantly increased, whereas a high-salt (8%) diet did not change the level of Sirt1 expression. The low-salt diet also increased Sirt1 expression in the heart, muscle, brain, and fat tissues. The increased Sirt1 that was observed in rats on a low-salt diet was associated with increased ghrelin expression in the distal nephron, with both molecules exhibiting similar distribution patterns. An in vitro experiment suggested that ghrelin increases Sirt1 expression in cortical collecting duct cells by activating ghrelin receptors. Our study indicates that this ‘ghrelin-Sirt1 system’ may participate in regulating sodium reabsorption in the distal nephron. PMID:27600292

  20. Low serum levels of ghrelin are associated with gallstone disease

    PubMed Central

    Méndez-Sánchez, Nahum; Ponciano-Rodríguez, Guadalupe; Bermejo-Martínez, Luisa; Villa, Antonio R; Chávez-Tapia, Norberto C; Zamora-Valdés, Daniel; Pichardo-Bahena, Raúl; Barredo-Prieto, Blanca; Uribe-Ramos, Martha H; Ramos, Martha H; Baptista-González, Héctor A; Uribe, Misael

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To explore the role of ghrelin in gallstone disease. METHODS: We carried out a cross-sectional study in 150 subjects, 38 with gallstones (cases) and 112 controls. We also did a real-time PCR-RT study in twenty gallbladder samples each. Body mass index (BMI), serum insulin, ghrelin, and serum lipids were measured. Logistic regression analyses (univariate and multivariate) were conducted to estimate the probability of gallstone disease associated with serum ghrelin concentrations. RESULTS: Cases were statistically different from controls in gender distribution (P = 0.01), age (53 vs 44 yr, P = 0.002), BMI (28 vs 25; P = 0.004), and glucose (5.26 vs 4.98 mmol/L; P = 0.05). The prevalence of ghrelin serum levels above the third tercile was lower in subjects without metabolic syndrome (P < 0.05). In a multivariate model, we found a protective effect, when ghrelin values were higher than the median value (OR = 0.27, 95%CI 0.09-0.82, P = 0.02). Twenty (20%) gallbladder specimens expressed ghrelin mRNA. CONCLUSION: Serum ghrelin concentrations are associated with a protective effect of GD. PMID:16718795

  1. Production of ghrelin by the stomach of patients with gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Kizaki, Junya; Aoyagi, Keishiro; Sato, Takahiro; Kojima, Masayasu; Shirouzu, Kazuo

    2014-01-01

    Poor nutrition and weight loss are important factors contributing to poor quality of life (QOL) after gastrectomy in patients with gastric cancer. Ghrelin is a hormone produced by the stomach that, plays a role in appetite increase and fat storage. The present study aims to clarify the location of ghrelin mRNA in the stomach, changes in blood ghrelin concentrations after gastrectomy and whether or not they are associated with the reconstruction method in patients with gastric cancer. We collected seven normal mucosa samples from different parts of six totally resected stomachs with gastric cancer. We extracted RNA from the normal mucosa, synthesized cDNA from total RNA (1 μg), and then quantified ghrelin mRNA using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (Q-PCR). Ghrelin blood concentrations were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kits in 74 patients with gastric cancer (total gastrectomy (TG), n=23; distal gastrectomy (DG), n=30; proximal gastrectomy (PG), n=11; pylorus preserving gastrectomy (PPG), n=10). In order, the ghrelin gene was expressed most frequently in the gastric body, followed by the fornix, cardia, antrum and pylorus ring. Blood ghrelin concentrations after surgery similarly changed in all groups. The average blood ghrelin concentrations were significantly higher in the DG and PPG groups than in the TG group on postoperative days (POD) 1, 7, 30, 90 and 180. However, blood ghrelin concentrations did not significantly differ between the DG and TG groups on POD 270 and 360. Cells that produce ghrelin are supposed to be located mostly in the fundic gland of the stomach. We speculate that the production of ghrelin from other organs increases from around nine months after total gastrectomy. Therefore, evaluating the nutritional status and the weight of patients at nine months after total gastrectomy is important to help these patients improve their QOL. PMID:24858413

  2. Ghrelin protects infarcted myocardium by induction of autophagy and AMP-activated protein kinase pathway.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Ming-Jie; Kong, Bin; Wang, Tao; Wang, Xin; Huang, He; Maghsoudi, Taneen

    2016-08-01

    The majority of studies have reported that enhancing autophagy in the myocardium is cardioprotective. Here, we tested the hypothesis that ghrelin, a growth hormone-releasing peptide, will protect infarcted myocardium by inducing of autophagy. Myocardial infarction was induced in mice by left coronary artery ligation the surviving mice 24 h after surgical were started on 2 week treatments with one of the following: vehicle, acylated ghrelin(50 mg/kg per day) or acylated ghrelin plus 3-MA(an autophagy inhibitor, 15 mg/kg, per day). We found that ghrelin significantly improved the cardiac function, and autophagy was enhanced by elevated LC3-II/LC-I ratio and mRNA expression of autophagy related protein. In vitro, cultured neonatal rat ventricular cardiomyocytes were subjected to simulate ischemia/reperfusion, 3-MA significantly attenuated ghrelin-induced autophagy, which was associated with activated AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signal pathway. Moreover, ghrelin reduced cell death, and RNAi-mediated knockdown of autophagy protein 5 (Atg5) partly abolished ghrelin's cardioprotective effect. It is the first time to demonstrate that the cardioprotective effect of ghrelin on ischemia myocardium in part through regulating of autophagy signal pathway. PMID:27235554

  3. Ghrelin, ghrelin-O-acyl transferase, nucleobindin-2/nesfatin-1 and prohormone convertases in the pancreatic islets of Sprague Dawley rats during development.

    PubMed

    Mohan, Haneesha; Gasner, Michaela; Ramesh, Naresh; Unniappan, Suraj

    2016-06-01

    Ghrelin and nesfatin-1 are regulators of blood glucose and energy balance. Prohormone convertases (PCs) enable processing of ghrelin and nesfatin-1 from its precursors. An acylation, enabled by ghrelin O-acyl transferase (GOAT) is critical for many of the biological actions of ghrelin. To date, there is no research on the developmental expression of GOAT, and the co-expression of both NUCB2/nesfatin-1 and prohormone convertases in the pancreas. The objective of this research was to immunolocalize ghrelin, GOAT, NUCB2/nesfatin-1, PC1/3 and PC2 in the pancreas during fetal and postnatal periods of Sprague Dawley (SD) rats using immunohistochemical analysis. GOAT mRNA in the rat pancreas during development was also determined. In the pancreas, not all islet cells immunopositive for GOAT are immunoreactive for ghrelin on postnatal (P) days 20, 27 and adult. GOAT mRNA expression in the pancreas at P27 was higher than the expression levels in rest of the developmental stages tested. Both PC1/3 and PC2 are co-expressed with NUCB2/nesfatin-1 on embryonic (E) day E21, P13, P20. While similar co-localization was also found in P27 for NUCB2/nesfatin-1 and PC1/3, NUCB2/nesfatin-1 and PC2 were found in distinct populations of cells in P27. Some ghrelin and GOAT positive cells stained for nesfatin-1 as well. Meanwhile, no co-localization of somatostatin and glucaon with nesfatin-1 was found in the pancreas of SD rats. Our findings suggest that the endocrine pancreas can produce and process precursors of ghrelin and nesfatin-1 to make bioactive forms of both peptides. PMID:27071923

  4. Ghrelin inhibits AngII -induced expression of TNF-α, IL-8, MCP-1 in human umbilical vein endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Bin; Fang, Fang; Yang, Tianlu; Yu, Zaixin; Zhang, Bin; Xie, Xiumei

    2015-01-01

    Aim: Ghrelin, a gastric peptide, is involved in several metabolic and cardiovascular processes. Emerging evidence indicates the potential involvement of ghrelin in low-grade inflammatory diseases such as atherosclerosis and hypertension. Cytokine-induced inflammation is critical in these pathological states. The growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHSR) has been identified in blood vessels, so we predict that ghrelin might inhibit proinflammatory responses in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). The aim of this study is to examine the effect of ghrelin on angiotension II (AngII)-induced expression of TNF-α, MCP-1, IL-8 in HUVECs. Method: HUVECs were pretreated with ghrelin, with or without the specific antagonist of GHSR [D-Lys3]-GHRP-6, the selective inhibitor of nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB) PDTC, and the selective inhibitor of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2) PD98059. The cells were finally treated with AngII. The expression of TNF-α, MCP-1, IL-8 was examined by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The activity of ERK1/2 and NF-κB was analyzed by Western blot. Result: our study showed that ghrelin inhibited AngII -induced expression of IL-8, TNF-α and MCP-1 in the HUVECs via GHSR pathway in concentration- and time-dependent manners. We also found that ghrelin inhibited AngII -induced activation of ERK1/2 and NF-κB. Conclusions: these results suggest that Ghrelin may play novel antiinflammatory and immunoregulatory roles in HUVECs. PMID:25785032

  5. Ghrelin attenuates sepsis-associated acute lung injury oxidative stress in rats.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Mian; He, Wanmei; Li, Lijun; Li, Bin; Luo, Liang; Huang, Xubin; Guan, Kaipan; Chen, Weiling

    2015-04-01

    This study investigated the effect of ghrelin on oxidative stress in septic rat lung tissue. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into sham-operation, sepsis, and ghrelin groups. Sepsis was induced by cecal ligation and puncture. Ghrelin was administered intraperitoneally at 3 and 15 h post-operation. Bronchoalveolar lavage was performed to collect alveolar macrophages (AMs). Inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) messenger RNA (mRNA) expression in alveolar macrophages and iNOS protein levels were measured by reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR) and Western blot. Pulmonary pathology was analyzed and nitrotyrosine expression was examined by immunohistochemistry. Plasma superoxide dismutase (SOD) and lung wet/dry weight were measured. In the sepsis group, iNOS mRNA expression in AMs was 1.33 ± 0.05, 1.44 ± 0.08, and 1.57 ± 0.11 at 6, 12, and 20 h post-surgery, respectively, and were higher compared with the sham-operation group (p<0.05). No increase was observed at longer time points. iNOS mRNA expression in the sepsis group was lower compared with the ghrelin group (2.27 ± 0.37) (p<0.05) at 20 h post-surgery. iNOS protein levels in the ghrelin group (0.87 ± 0.03, p<0.05) were lower than in the sepsis group at 20 h. Ghrelin group pathological scores were lower than in the sepsis group (p<0.05). Plasma SOD was slightly non-significantly decreased in the ghrelin group. No difference was observed in lung wet/dry weight ratios between sepsis and ghrelin groups. iNOS mRNA expression in AMs was elevated between 6 and 20 h after cecal ligation and puncture (CLP), but did not progress. Ghrelin attenuated pulmonary iNOS protein expression and tended to increase plasma SOD activity. Ghrelin suppressed pulmonary nitrosative stress in septic rats, but did not improve lung wet/dry weight ratios. PMID:25037094

  6. Effects of ghrelin and motilin on smooth muscle contractility of the isolated gastrointestinal tract from the bullfrog and Japanese fire belly newt.

    PubMed

    Kitazawa, Takio; Shimazaki, Misato; Kikuta, Ayumi; Yaosaka, Noriko; Teraoka, Hiroki; Kaiya, Hiroyuki

    2016-06-01

    Ghrelin has been identified in some amphibians and is known to stimulate growth hormone release and food intake as seen in mammals. Ghrelin regulates gastrointestinal motility in mammals and birds. The aim of this study was to determine whether ghrelin affects gastrointestinal smooth muscle contractility in bullfrogs (anuran) and Japanese fire belly newts (urodelian) in vitro. Neither bullfrog ghrelin nor rat ghrelin affected longitudinal smooth muscle contractility of gastrointestinal strips from the bullfrog. Expression of growth hormone secretagogue receptor 1a (GHS-R1a) mRNA was confirmed in the bullfrog gastrointestinal tract, and the expression level in the gastric mucosa was lower than that in the intestinal mucosa. In contrast, some gastrointestinal peptides, including substance P, neurotensin and motilin, and the muscarinic receptor agonist carbachol showed marked contraction, indicating normality of the smooth muscle preparations. Similar results were obtained in another amphibian, the Japanese fire belly newt. Newt ghrelin and rat ghrelin did not cause any contraction in gastrointestinal longitudinal muscle, whereas substance P and carbachol were effective causing contraction. In conclusion, ghrelin does not affect contractility of the gastrointestinal smooth muscle in anuran and urodelian amphibians, similar to results for rainbow trout and goldfish (fish) but different from results for rats and chickens. The results suggest diversity of ghrelin actions on the gastrointestinal tract across animals. This study also showed for the first time that motilin induces gastrointestinal contraction in amphibians. PMID:26704852

  7. Changes in mRNA expression of arcuate nucleus appetite-regulating peptides during lactation in rats

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Yoshihiro; Nakahara, Keiko; Maruyama, Keisuke; Okame, Rieko; Ensho, Takuya; Inoue, Yoshiyuki; Murakami, Noboru

    2014-01-01

    The contribution of hypothalamic appetite-regulating peptides to further hyperphagia accompanying the course of lactation in rats was investigated by using PCR array and real-time PCR. Furthermore, changes in the mRNA expression for appetite-regulating peptides in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARC) were analyzed at all stages of pregnancy and lactation, and also after weaning. Food intake was significantly higher during pregnancy, lactation, and after weaning than during non-lactation periods. During lactation, ARC expression of mRNAs for agouti-related protein (AgRP) and peptide YY was increased, whereas that of mRNAs for proopiomelanocortin (POMC) and cholecystokinin (CCK) was decreased, in comparison with non-lactation periods. The increase in AgRP mRNA expression during lactation was especially marked. The plasma level of leptin was significantly decreased during the course of lactation, whereas that of acyl-ghrelin was unchanged. In addition, food intake was negatively correlated with the plasma leptin level during lactation. This study has clarified synchronous changes in the expression of many appetite-regulating peptides in ARC of rats during lactation. Our results suggest that hyperphagia during lactation in rats is caused by decreases in POMC and CCK expression and increases in AgRP expression in ARC, the latter being most notable. Together with the decrease in the blood leptin level, such changes in mRNA expression may explain the further hyperphagia accompanying the course of lactation. PMID:24299740

  8. Is there an effect of ghrelin/ghrelin analogs on cancer? A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Sever, Sakine; White, Donna L; Garcia, José M

    2016-09-01

    Ghrelin is a hormone with multiple physiologic functions, including promotion of growth hormone release, stimulation of appetite and regulation of energy homeostasis. Treatment with ghrelin/ghrelin-receptor agonists is a prospective therapy for disease-related cachexia and malnutrition. In vitro studies have shown high expression of ghrelin in cancer tissue, although its role including its impact in cancer risk and progression has not been established. We performed a systematic literature review to identify peer-reviewed human or animal in vivo original research studies of ghrelin, ghrelin-receptor agonists, or ghrelin genetic variants and the risk, presence, or growth of cancer using structured searches in PubMed database as well as secondary searches of article reference lists, additional reviews and meta-analyses. Overall, 45 (73.8%) of the 61 studies reviewed, including all 11 involving exogenous ghrelin/ghrelin-receptor agonist treatment, reported either a null (no statistically significant difference) or inverse association of ghrelin/ghrelin-receptor agonists or ghrelin genetic variants with cancer risk, presence or growth; 10 (16.7%) studies reported positive associations; and 6 (10.0%) reported both negative or null and positive associations. Differences in serum ghrelin levels in cancer cases vs controls (typically lower) were reported for some but not all cancers. The majority of in vivo studies showed a null or inverse association of ghrelin with risk and progression of most cancers, suggesting that ghrelin/ghrelin-receptor agonist treatment may have a favorable safety profile to use for cancer cachexia. Additional large-scale prospective clinical trials as well as basic bioscientific research are warranted to further evaluate the safety and benefits of ghrelin treatment in patients with cancer. PMID:27552970

  9. Lipopolysaccharide differentially decreases plasma acyl and desacyl ghrelin levels in rats: potential role of the circulating ghrelin acylating enzyme GOAT

    PubMed Central

    Stengel, Andreas; Goebel, Miriam; Wang, Lixin; Reeve, Joseph R.; Taché, Yvette; Lambrecht, Nils W.G.

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in rodents is an established model for studying innate immune responses to gram-negative bacteria and mimicking symptoms of infections including reduced food intake associated with decreased circulating total ghrelin levels. The ghrelin-acylating enzyme, ghrelin-O-acyltransferase (GOAT) involved in the formation of acyl ghrelin (AG) was recently identified. We investigated changes in circulating AG, desacyl ghrelin (DG) and GOAT induced by intraperitoneal LPS (100μg/kg) and associated changes in food intake. Plasma AG and total ghrelin were assessed by radioimmunoassay, GOAT protein by Western blot and mRNA by RT-qPCR. DG was derived from total minus AG. Plasma AG and DG were decreased at 2h, 5h and 7h (p<0.01) post injection compared to vehicle and recovered at 24h. At 2h there was a significantly greater decrease of AG (-53%) than DG (-28%) resulting in a decreased AG/DG ratio (1:5, p <0.01), which thereafter returned to pre-injection values (1:3). This altered ratio was associated with a 38% decrease in plasma GOAT protein compared to vehicle (p <0.001), whereas gastric GOAT protein was slightly increased by 10% (p<0.05). GOAT mRNA expression was unchanged. Food intake was reduced by 58% measured during the 1.5-2h period post LPS injection. Decreased plasma AG and DG preceded the rise in rectal temperature and blood glucose that peaked at 7h. These data indicate that LPS induces a long-lasting reduction of AG and DG levels that may have a bearing with the decrease in food intake. The faster drop in AG than DG within 2h is associated with reduced circulating GOAT. PMID:20599577

  10. Effect of heat stress on performance and expression of selected amino acid and glucose transporters, HSP90, leptin and ghrelin in growing pigs.

    PubMed

    Cervantes, Miguel; Cota, Margarita; Arce, Néstor; Castillo, Gilberto; Avelar, Ernesto; Espinoza, Salvador; Morales, Adriana

    2016-07-01

    Exposing animals to high ambient temperature provokes heat stress (HS) that may affect cellular function and reduced productive performance. The effect of chronic exposure (21d) of pigs to high ambient temperature on expression of amino acid (b(0,+)AT, CAT1) and glucose (SGLT1, GLUT4) transporters, ghrelin, leptin and HSP90 was evaluated. Eighteen pigs (32.6kg body weight) were distributed into 3 groups: (1) pigs housed under natural high ambient temperature conditions, and fed ad libitum (HS); (2) pigs housed in an air-conditioned room at 24°C (thermo-neutral) fed ad libitum (TNad); (3) pigs housed as in (2), but pair-fed with the HS pigs (TNpf). Body temperature, respiratory frequency, weight gain, feed intake, and feed conversion ratio were measured. At d-21 pigs were euthanized and samples from stomach, duodenum, jejunum, liver, longissimus and semitendinosus muscles, and white adipose tissue were collected for mRNA analysis. In the HS room ambient temperature fluctuated every day (23.6-37.6°C). Respiratory frequency and body temperature were higher in HS pigs (P<0.001). Weight gain and feed intake of TNad were higher (P<0.001) than TNpf and HS; gain: feed ratio was not affected by ambient temperature. Expression of HSP90 was higher in duodenum and longissimus (P≤0.038) of HS compared to TNpf. Expression of ghrelin, leptin and b(0,+)AT were not affected by ambient temperature (P>0.050). CAT1 expression in liver was higher (P=0.050) but in longissimus was lower (P=0.017) in HS than in TNpf pigs. Expression of SGLT1 was higher (P=0.045) in duodenum of HS than in TNpf but it was not different in jejunum (P=0.545); GLUT4 tended to be higher in liver and semitendinosus of HS pigs (P=0.063). In conclusion, feed intake remains low whereas respiratory frequency and body temperature remain higher; and expression of HSP90, CAT1, SGLT1 and GLUT4 increases in some tissues in pigs under chronic HS conditions. PMID:27264891

  11. Hesperidin potentiates ghrelin signaling.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Hajime; Asakawa, Akihiro; Kawamura, Namiko; Yagi, Takakazu; Inui, Akio

    2014-01-01

    Hesperidin, a flavanone glycoside consisting of the flavone hesperitin bound to the disaccharide rutinose, is found in highly nutritious foods, such as oranges, tangelos, tangerines, grapefruits, and other citrus fruits. Exogenous hesperidin has been shown to influence a wide variety of biological functions, including induction of apoptosis and suppression of proliferation in human cancer cells; inhibition of tumor development in various tissues; and expression of antibacterial, antiviral, and antifungal activities. Previous in vivo studies have revealed that hesperidin may play a role in ghrelin secretion from the stomach through antagonism of the serotonin receptors. Because ghrelin appears to be involved in the pathophysiological mechanisms of several human disorders, hesperidin could be a promising target for the treatment of various diseases. This review addresses studies focused on the orexigenic and prokinetic activities of hesperidin in the context of ghrelin secretion. This article also presents some promising patents of hesperidin. PMID:25176345

  12. Ghrelin receptor agonist GHRP-2 prevents arthritis-induced increase in E3 ubiquitin-ligating enzymes MuRF1 and MAFbx gene expression in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Granado, Miriam; Priego, Teresa; Martín, Ana I; Villanúa, Maria Angeles; López-Calderón, Asunción

    2005-12-01

    Chronic arthritis is a catabolic state associated with an inhibition of the IGF system and a decrease in body weight. Cachexia and muscular wasting is secondary to protein degradation by the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. The aim of this work was to analyze the effect of adjuvant-induced arthritis on the muscle-specific ubiquitin ligases muscle ring finger 1 (MuRF1) and muscle atrophy F-box (MAFbx) as well as on IGF-I and IGF-binding protein-5 (IGFBP-5) gene expression in the skeletal muscle. We also studied whether the synthetic ghrelin receptor agonist, growth hormone releasing peptide-2 (GHRP-2), was able to prevent arthritis-induced changes in the skeletal muscle. Arthritis induced an increase in MuRF1, MAFbx (P < 0.01), and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha mRNA (P < 0.05) in the skeletal muscle. Arthritis decreased the serum IGF-I and its gene expression in the liver (P < 0.01), whereas it increased IGF-I and IGFBP-5 gene expression in the skeletal muscle (P < 0.01). Administration of GHRP-2 for 8 days prevented the arthritis-induced increase in muscular MuRF1, MAFbx, and TNF-alpha gene expression. GHRP-2 treatment increased the serum concentrations of IGF-I and the IGF-I mRNA in the liver and in the cardiac muscle and decreased muscular IGFBP-5 mRNA both in control and in arthritic rats (P < 0.05). GHRP-2 treatment increased muscular IGF-I mRNA in control rats (P < 0.01), but it did not modify the muscular IGF-I gene expression in arthritic rats. These data indicate that arthritis induces an increase in the activity of the ubiquitin-proteasome proteolytic pathway that is prevented by GHRP-2 administration. The parallel changes in muscular IGFBP-5 and TNF-alpha gene expression with the ubiquitin ligases suggest that they can participate in skeletal muscle alterations during chronic arthritis. PMID:16030067

  13. Methyl Donor Deficiency Affects Fetal Programming of Gastric Ghrelin Cell Organization and Function in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Bossenmeyer-Pourié, Carine; Blaise, Sébastien; Pourié, Grégory; Tomasetto, Catherine; Audonnet, Sandra; Ortiou, Sandrine; Koziel, Violette; Rio, Marie-Christine; Daval, Jean-Luc; Guéant, Jean-Louis; Beck, Bernard

    2010-01-01

    Methyl donor deficiency (MDD) during pregnancy influences intrauterine development. Ghrelin is expressed in the stomach of fetuses and influences fetal growth, but MDD influence on gastric ghrelin is unknown. We examined the gastric ghrelin system in MDD-induced intrauterine growth retardation. By using specific markers and approaches (such as periodic acid–Schiff, bromodeoxyuridine, homocysteine, terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase biotin-dUTP nick end labeling, immunostaining, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction), we studied the gastric oxyntic mucosa cellular organization and ghrelin gene expression in the mucosa in 20-day-old fetuses and weanling pups, and plasma ghrelin concentration in weanling rat pups of dams either normally fed or deprived of choline, folate, vitamin B6, and vitamin B12 during gestation and suckling periods. MDD fetuses weighed less than controls; the weight deficit reached 57% at weaning (P < 0.001). Both at the end of gestation and at weaning, they presented with an aberrant gastric oxyntic mucosa formation with loss of cell polarity, anarchic cell migration, abnormal progenitor differentiation, apoptosis, and signs of surface layer erosion. Ghrelin cells were abnormally located in the pit region of oxyntic glands. At weaning, plasma ghrelin levels were decreased (−28%; P < 0.001) despite unchanged mRNA expression in the stomach. This decrease was associated with lower body weight. Taken together, these data indicate that one mechanism through which MDD influences fetal programming is the remodeling of gastric cellular organization, leading to dysfunction of the ghrelin system and dramatic effects on growth. PMID:19948829

  14. Association of cord blood des-acyl ghrelin with birth weight, and placental GHS-R1 receptor expression in SGA, AGA, and LGA newborns.

    PubMed

    González-Domínguez, Martha I; Lazo-de-la-Vega-Monroy, Maria-Luisa; Zaina, Silvio; Sabanero, Myrna; Daza-Benítez, Leonel; Malacara, Juan Manuel; Barbosa-Sabanero, Gloria

    2016-07-01

    Although ghrelin in cord blood has been associated to birth weight, its role in fetal and postnatal growth has not been elucidated. The aim of this study was to analyze total ghrelin, acyl ghrelin (AG), and des-acyl ghrelin (DAG) in cord blood of newborns with idiopathic birth weight alterations, and to evaluate protein expression of placental GHS-R1, in order to investigate their correlation with birth weight and placental weight. We performed a cross-sectional comparative study in umbilical cord blood and placentas from healthy mothers of SGA, AGA, and LGA (small, adequate and large for gestational age) term newborns (n = 20 per group). Cord blood total ghrelin, AG, and DAG were measured by ELISA, and placental GHS-R1 expression was evaluated by Western blot. Cord blood DAG was higher in SGA compared to AGA newborns (902.1 ± 109.1 and 597.4 ± 58.2 pg/ml, respectively, p = 0.01) while LGA and AGA showed similar values (627.2 ± 76.4 pg/ml for LGA, p = 0.80). DAG negatively correlated with birthweight (r = -0.31, p = 0.02) and placental weight (r = -0.33, p = 0.02). No differences in AG or total ghrelin were found. GHS-R1 protein in placenta was not differentially expressed among SGA, AGA, and LGA. Our results suggest a role of DAG in intrauterine growth. Further studies are needed in order to elucidate the mechanisms by which DAG participates in fetal growth. PMID:26754660

  15. Enhanced Ghrelin Levels and Hypothalamic Orexigenic AgRP and NPY Neuropeptide Expression in Models of Jejuno-Colonic Short Bowel Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Gillard, Laura; Billiauws, Lore; Stan-Iuga, Bogdan; Ribeiro-Parenti, Lara; Jarry, Anne-Charlotte; Cavin, Jean-Baptiste; Cluzeaud, Françoise; Mayeur, Camille; Thomas, Muriel; Freund, Jean-Noël; Lacorte, Jean-Marc; Le Gall, Maude; Bado, André; Joly, Francisca; Le Beyec, Johanne

    2016-01-01

    Short bowel syndrome (SBS) patients developing hyperphagia have a better outcome. Gastrointestinal endocrine adaptations help to improve intestinal functions and food behaviour. We investigated neuroendocrine adaptations in SBS patients and rat models with jejuno-ileal (IR-JI) or jejuno-colonic (IR-JC) anastomosis with and without parenteral nutrition. Circulating levels of ghrelin, PYY, GLP-1, and GLP-2 were determined in SBS rat models and patients. Levels of mRNA for proglucagon, PYY and for hypothalamic neuropeptides were quantified by qRT-PCR in SBS rat models. Histology and immunostaining for Ki67, GLP-1 and PYY were performed in SBS rats. IR-JC rats, but not IR-JI, exhibited significantly higher crypt depths and number of Ki67-positive cells than sham. Fasting and/or postprandial plasma ghrelin and PYY concentrations were higher, or tend to be higher, in IR-JC rats and SBS-JC patients than in controls. Proglucagon and Pyy mRNA levels were significantly enhanced in IR-JC rats. Levels of mRNA coding hypothalamic orexigenic NPY and AgRP peptides were significantly higher in IR-JC than in sham rats. We demonstrate an increase of plasma ghrelin concentrations, major changes in hypothalamic neuropeptides levels and greater induction of PYY in SBS-JC rats and patients suggesting that jejuno-colonic continuity creates a peculiar environment promoting further gut-brain adaptations. PMID:27323884

  16. Enhanced Ghrelin Levels and Hypothalamic Orexigenic AgRP and NPY Neuropeptide Expression in Models of Jejuno-Colonic Short Bowel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Gillard, Laura; Billiauws, Lore; Stan-Iuga, Bogdan; Ribeiro-Parenti, Lara; Jarry, Anne-Charlotte; Cavin, Jean-Baptiste; Cluzeaud, Françoise; Mayeur, Camille; Thomas, Muriel; Freund, Jean-Noël; Lacorte, Jean-Marc; Le Gall, Maude; Bado, André; Joly, Francisca; Le Beyec, Johanne

    2016-01-01

    Short bowel syndrome (SBS) patients developing hyperphagia have a better outcome. Gastrointestinal endocrine adaptations help to improve intestinal functions and food behaviour. We investigated neuroendocrine adaptations in SBS patients and rat models with jejuno-ileal (IR-JI) or jejuno-colonic (IR-JC) anastomosis with and without parenteral nutrition. Circulating levels of ghrelin, PYY, GLP-1, and GLP-2 were determined in SBS rat models and patients. Levels of mRNA for proglucagon, PYY and for hypothalamic neuropeptides were quantified by qRT-PCR in SBS rat models. Histology and immunostaining for Ki67, GLP-1 and PYY were performed in SBS rats. IR-JC rats, but not IR-JI, exhibited significantly higher crypt depths and number of Ki67-positive cells than sham. Fasting and/or postprandial plasma ghrelin and PYY concentrations were higher, or tend to be higher, in IR-JC rats and SBS-JC patients than in controls. Proglucagon and Pyy mRNA levels were significantly enhanced in IR-JC rats. Levels of mRNA coding hypothalamic orexigenic NPY and AgRP peptides were significantly higher in IR-JC than in sham rats. We demonstrate an increase of plasma ghrelin concentrations, major changes in hypothalamic neuropeptides levels and greater induction of PYY in SBS-JC rats and patients suggesting that jejuno-colonic continuity creates a peculiar environment promoting further gut-brain adaptations. PMID:27323884

  17. mRNA modifications: Dynamic regulators of gene expression?

    PubMed Central

    Hoernes, Thomas Philipp; Hüttenhofer, Alexander; Erlacher, Matthias David

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The expression of a gene is a tightly regulated process and is exerted by a myriad of different mechanisms. Recently, RNA modifications located in coding sequences of mRNAs, have been identified as potential regulators of gene expression. N6-methyladenosine (m6A), 5-methylcytosine (m5C), pseudouridine (Ψ) and N1-methyladenosine (m1A) have been found within open reading frames of mRNAs. The presence of these mRNA modifications has been implicated to modulate the fate of an mRNA, ranging from maturation to its translation and even degradation. However, many aspects concerning the biological functions of mRNA modifications remain elusive. Recently, systematic in vitro studies allowed a first glimpse of the direct interplay of mRNA modifications and the efficiency and fidelity of ribosomal translation. It thereby became evident that the effects of mRNA modifications were, astonishingly versatile, depending on the type, position or sequence context. The incorporation of a single modification could either prematurely terminate protein synthesis, reduce the peptide yield or alter the amino acid sequence identity. These results implicate that mRNA modifications are a powerful mechanism to post-transcriptionally regulate gene expression. PMID:27351916

  18. mRNA Composition and Control of Bacterial Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Liang, S.-T.; Xu, Y.-C.; Dennis, P.; Bremer, H.

    2000-01-01

    The expression of any given bacterial protein is predicted to depend on (i) the transcriptional regulation of the promoter and the translational regulation of its mRNA and (ii) the synthesis and translation of total (bulk) mRNA. This is because total mRNA acts as a competitor to the specific mRNA for the binding of initiation-ready free ribosomes. To characterize the effects of mRNA competition on gene expression, the specific activity of β-galactosidase expressed from three different promoter-lacZ fusions (Pspc-lacZ, PRNAI-lacZ, and PRNAII-lacZ) was measured (i) in a relA+ background during exponential growth at different rates and (ii) in relA+ and ΔrelA derivatives of Escherichia coli B/r after induction of a mild stringent or a relaxed response to raise or lower, respectively, the level of ppGpp. Expression from all three promoters was stimulated during slow exponential growth or at elevated levels of ppGpp and was reduced during fast exponential growth or at lower levels of ppGpp. From these observations and from other considerations, we propose (i) that the concentration of free, initiation-ready ribosomes is approximately constant and independent of the growth rate and (ii) that bulk mRNA made during slow growth and at elevated levels of ppGpp is less efficiently translated than bulk mRNA made during fast growth and at reduced levels of ppGpp. These features lead to an indirect enhancement in the expression of LacZ (or of any other protein) during growth in media of poor nutritional quality and at increased levels of ppGpp. PMID:10809680

  19. Dietary supplementation with zinc oxide stimulates ghrelin secretion from the stomach of young pigs.

    PubMed

    Yin, Jingdong; Li, Xilong; Li, Defa; Yue, Tao; Fang, Qian; Ni, Jianjun; Zhou, Xuan; Wu, Guoyao

    2009-10-01

    Dietary supplementation with zinc is known to enhance food intake and growth in young children. However, the underlying mechanisms remain largely unknown. Ghrelin, a peptide derived mainly from stomach, plays an important role in food-intake regulation. The present study was conducted with the piglet model to test the hypothesis that zinc may increase gastric ghrelin secretion. In Experiment 1 (Exp. 1) , thirty-six 28-day-old weaned pigs were assigned to two groups (18 pigs/group), receiving four-week supplementation of 0 or 2000 mg/kg Zn (as ZnO) to the basal diet containing 100 mg/kg Zn. In Experiment (Exp. 2), sixteen 28-day-old piglets were assigned to the same treatments (n=8/group) as in Exp. 1, except that they were pair-fed an equal amount of diet. At the end of the experiments, blood, stomach and duodenum samples were obtained for biochemical analysis, including assays of ghrelin protein and insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) in plasma, as well as quantification of ghrelin and IGF-I mRNA levels in the duodenum and gastric mucosa. Further, gastric mucosal cells from unsupplemented piglets were cultured with 0-0.5 mM ZnO for 2-24 h for assays of ghrelin production and gene expression. Dietary Zn supplementation increased plasma concentrations of ghrelin, IGF-I and cholecystokinin; IGF-I gene expression in the duodenum as well as food intake and piglet growth (Exp. 1). The effects of ZnO on plasma levels of ghrelin, intestinal IGF-I expression and piglet growth were independent of food intake. Addition of ZnO to culture medium enhanced ghrelin production from gastric mucosal cells without affecting ghrelin mRNA levels. Collectively, our results indicate that ZnO stimulates ghrelin secretion from the stomach at the post-transcriptional level. This novel finding aids in elucidating the cellular and molecular mechanism for a role of zinc in promoting food intake and growth of young children. PMID:18926680

  20. Ghrelin stimulates myogenic differentiation in a mouse muscle satellite cell line and in primary cultures of bovine myoblasts.

    PubMed

    Montoya-Flores, D; Mora, O; Tamariz, E; González-Dávalos, L; González-Gallardo, A; Antaramian, A; Shimada, A; Varela-Echavarría, A; Romano-Muñoz, J L

    2012-08-01

    Ghrelin is an acylated hormone that influences food intake, energy metabolism and reproduction, among others. Ghrelin may also stimulate proliferating myoblast cell differentiation and multinucleated myotube fusion. The aim of this work was to assess the effect of human ghrelin (hGHRL) and human ghrelin fragment 1-18 (hGHRL1-18) on myoblast differentiation by means of mRNA expression and protein level. Two types of cells were tested, the cell line i28 obtained from mouse skeletal muscle and primary cultures of bovine myoblasts. Both ghrelin and its N-terminal fragment hGHRL1-18 were used at concentrations of 0, 0.01, 0.1, 1, 10 and 100 nm. Treatments were applied to pre-confluent cultures and were maintained for 4 days. We determined that between 0.1 and 100 nm, hGHRL and hGRHL1-18 had similar effects on myogenic differentiation of i28 cells (p < 0.01). On the other hand, only the higher concentrations (10 and 100 nm) of hGHRL stimulated bovine myoblast differentiation. These results could be attributed to the presence, in both i28 cells and in bovine myoblasts, of the mRNA for GHS-R1a and CD36 receptors. The use of ghrelin in livestock production is still questionable because of the limited effects shown in this study, and additional research is needed in this field. PMID:21777295

  1. Pituitary immunoexpression of ghrelin in anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Rotondo, Fabio; Scheithauer, Bernd W; Syro, Luis V; Rotondo, Angelo; Kovacs, Kalman

    2012-12-01

    Ghrelin, an orexigenic hormone, is known to occur in the normal anterior pituitary where its physiologic role is uncertain but may include promotion of appetite. We sought to investigate anticipated differences in adenohypophysial and neurohypophysial ghrelin immunoexpression between normal subjects and patients with anorexia nervosa who had succumbed to complications of the disease. We hypothesized that the glands of anorexia nervosa patients would show relative diminished action in ghrelin content. The study included 12 autopsy-derived pituitaries of anorexia nervosa and 10 control glands. The streptavidin-biotin-peroxidase complex method and double immunohistochemical staining method were used to determine which cell types expressed both ghrelin and adenohypophysial hormones. Nontumorous control pituitaries were also obtained at autopsy. In anorexia nervosa and control adenohypophyses, ghrelin was mainly localized in somatotrophs and to a lesser extent in corticotrophs and gonadotrophs. Ghrelin accumulated within nerve fibers and Herring bodies in the neurohypophysis and pituitary stalk. In the controls, ghrelin expression was apparent in only a few cases. It was mild and only along few nerve fibers. In the adenohypophyses of anorexia nervosa patients, ghrelin was not depleted. It appears that in these patients, ghrelin is transported in excess from the hypothalamic neurohypophysial tract to the neurohypophysis. PMID:22081273

  2. Catestatin and GABAAR related feeding habits rely on dopamine, ghrelin plus leptin neuroreceptor expression variations.

    PubMed

    Mele, Maria; Iachetta, Giuseppina; Alò, Raffaella; Avolio, Ennio; Fazzari, Gilda; Carelli, Antonio; Laforgia, Vincenza; Canonaco, Marcello

    2016-04-01

    Catestatin (CST), an endogenously small sympathoinhibitory peptide is capable of interfering with the major cerebral neuroreceptor-blocking site, i.e. γ-aminobutyric acidA receptor (GABAAR) system especially in limbic brain areas that are involved with feeding behaviors. The GABAARergic-related effects seem to derive from its interaction with other molecular neuroreceptors such as dopaminergic, ghrelin and leptinergic. In this context, the present study aimed to investigate probable feeding responses (eating and drinking) induced by treatment with CST and the GABAAR antagonist bicucullin (BIC) alone or simultaneously (CST+BIC) in the Syrian hibernating hamster (Mesocricetus auratus) model. Hamsters that received these compounds via intracerebroventricular infusions displayed notable variations of feeding and drinking bouts. In particular, an anorexigenic response was evident following treatment with CST while BIC evoked a significant increase of eating and drinking behaviors. Surprisingly when both agents were given simultaneously, a predominating anorexigenic response was detected as shown by evident CST-dependent reduction of feeding bouts. Contextually such behaviors, especially those following the combined treatment were tightly correlated with the significantly increased cerebral dopamine receptor 1 (D1) plus reduced ghrelin receptor (GhsR) and leptin receptor (LepR) transcript levels. Overall, the anorexigenic effect of CST deriving from its tight interaction with GABAARs activity plus D1 and GhsR transcripts tends to propose these neuronal elements as pivotal factors responsible for feeding disorders. PMID:26875516

  3. Vibrational force alters mRNA expression in osteoblasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tjandrawinata, R. R.; Vincent, V. L.; Hughes-Fulford, M.

    1997-01-01

    Serum-deprived mouse osteoblastic (MC3T3E1) cells were subjected to a vibrational force modeled by NASA to simulate a space shuttle launch (7.83 G rms). The mRNA levels for eight genes were investigated to determine the effect of vibrational force on mRNA expression. The mRNA levels of two growth-related protooncogenes, c-fos and c-myc, were up-regulated significantly within 30 min after vibration, whereas those of osteocalcin as well as transforming growth factor-beta1 were decreased significantly within 3 h after vibration. No changes were detected in the levels of beta-actin, histone H4, or cytoplasmic phospholipase A2 after vibration. No basal levels of cyclooxygenase-2 expression were detected. In addition, the extracellular concentrations of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), a potent autocrine/paracrine growth factor in bone, were not significantly altered after vibration most likely due to the serum deprivation state of the osteoblasts. In comparison with the gravitational launch profile, vibrational-induced changes in gene expression were greater both in magnitude and number of genes activated. Taken together, these data suggest that the changes in mRNA expression are due to a direct mechanical effect of the vibrational force on the osteoblast cells and not to changes in the local PGE2 concentrations. The finding that launch forces induce gene expression is of utmost importance since many of the biological experiments do not dampen vibrational loads on experimental samples. This lack of dampening of vibrational forces may partially explain why 1-G onboard controls sometimes do not reflect 1-G ground controls. These data may also suggest that scientists use extra ground controls that are exposed to launch forces, have these forces dampened on launched samples, or use facilities such as Biorack that provide an onboard 1-G centrufuge in order to control for space shuttle launch forces.

  4. Leptin mRNA expresses in the bull reproductive organ.

    PubMed

    Abavisani, A; Baghbanzadeh, A; Shayan, P; Tajik, P; Dehghani, H; Mirtorabi, M

    2009-12-01

    Leptin, a 167-amino acid hormone, is secreted mainly by fat tissue. It has some powerful effects on the regulation of metabolism and reproductive function through endocrine and probably paracrine mechanisms. The contribution rate of leptin function on the male reproductive system is not still clear. Characterization of leptin expression in reproductive organs will suggest that in addition to its endocrine action, leptin has also paracrine/autocrine effects on reproduction. The expression of functional leptin receptor mRNA has been already recognized in testis of rodents, human and cattle. Thus, the aim of the present study was to investigate the presence of leptin mRNA in the bovine testis, because it will be the first step for understanding of its paracrine/autocrine effects on the male reproductive organs in cattle. The present study was the first to showed leptin mRNA expression in the testis of Holstein cattle using reverse transcription and polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis. RT-PCR products were amplified with nested PCR using inner leptin primer pairs to emphasis the first results. Besides, bovine beta actin gene was acted as an internal positive control as well as RNA purification marker. Our findings suggest that in addition to its endocrine actions at the hypothalamic-pituitary axis, leptin can has an autocrine and/or paracrine role in bull testicular function. PMID:19466574

  5. Prolyl carboxypeptidase mRNA expression in the mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Jin Kwon; Diano, Sabrina

    2014-01-13

    Prolyl carboxypeptidase (PRCP), a serine protease, is widely expressed in the body including liver, lung, kidney and brain, with a variety of known substrates such as plasma prekallikrein, bradykinin, angiotensins II and III, and α-MSH, suggesting its role in the processing of tissue-specific substrates. In the brain, PRCP has been shown to inactivate hypothalamic α-MSH, thus modulating melanocortin signaling in the control of energy metabolism. While its expression pattern has been reported in the hypothalamus, little is known on the distribution of PRCP throughout the mouse brain. This study was undertaken to determine PRCP expression in the mouse brain. Radioactive in situ hybridization was performed to determine endogenous PRCP mRNA expression. In addition, using a gene-trap mouse model for PRCP deletion, X-gal staining was performed to further determine PRCP distribution. Results from both approaches showed that PRCP gene is broadly expressed in the brain. PMID:24161824

  6. Dietary Caprylic Acid (C8:0) Does Not Increase Plasma Acylated Ghrelin but Decreases Plasma Unacylated Ghrelin in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Lemarié, Fanny; Beauchamp, Erwan; Dayot, Stéphanie; Duby, Cécile; Legrand, Philippe; Rioux, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    Focusing on the caprylic acid (C8:0), this study aimed at investigating the discrepancy between the formerly described beneficial effects of dietary medium chain fatty acids on body weight loss and the C8:0 newly reported effect on food intake via ghrelin octanoylation. During 6 weeks, Sprague-Dawley male rats were fed with three dietary C8:0 levels (0, 8 and 21% of fatty acids) in three experimental conditions (moderate fat, caloric restriction and high fat). A specific dose-response enrichment of the stomach tissue C8:0 was observed as a function of dietary C8:0, supporting the hypothesis of an early preduodenal hydrolysis of medium chain triglycerides and a direct absorption at the gastric level. However, the octanoylated ghrelin concentration in the plasma was unchanged in spite of the increased C8:0 availability. A reproducible decrease in the plasma concentration of unacylated ghrelin was observed, which was consistent with a decrease in the stomach preproghrelin mRNA and stomach ghrelin expression. The concomitant decrease of the plasma unacylated ghrelin and the stability of its acylated form resulted in a significant increase in the acylated/total ghrelin ratio which had no effect on body weight gain or total dietary consumption. This enhanced ratio measured in rats consuming C8:0 was however suspected to increase (i) growth hormone (GH) secretion as an increase in the GH-dependent mRNA expression of the insulin like growth Factor 1 (IGF-1) was measured (ii) adipocyte diameters in subcutaneous adipose tissue without an increase in the fat pad mass. Altogether, these results show that daily feeding with diets containing C8:0 increased the C8:0 level in the stomach more than all the other tissues, affecting the acylated/total ghrelin plasma ratio by decreasing the concentration of circulating unacylated ghrelin. However, these modifications were not associated with increased body weight or food consumption. PMID:26196391

  7. Expression of prepro-ghrelin and related receptor genes in the rat adrenal gland and evidences that ghrelin exerts a potent stimulating effect on corticosterone secretion by cultured rat adrenocortical cells.

    PubMed

    Rucinski, Marcin; Ziolkowska, Agnieszka; Tyczewska, Marianna; Malendowicz, Ludwik K

    2009-08-01

    The orexigenic peptide ghrelin (GHREL) and obestatin (OBS) originate from the same peptide precursor, preproghrelin (ppGHREL). Apart from orexigenic effect, GHREL also regulates neuroendocrine function. We investigated GHREL and OBS effects on corticosterone secretion by freshly isolated and cultured rat adrenocortical cells. Classic RT-PCR revealed the presence of ppGHREL, GHS-R1a, GPR39v1 and GPR39v2 and GOAT4 (ghrelin O-acyl transferase) mRNAs in rat adrenals and cultured for 4 days rat adrenocortical cells. Expression of ppGHREL, GHS-R1a, and GOAT genes was notably higher in the cortex than in medulla. High expression level of GOAT gene was found in the zona glomerulosa, while expression level of both GPR39v1 and GPR39v2 genes was similar in adrenal cortical zones and in medulla. In freshly isolated cells neither GHREL nor OBS had an effect on corticosteroid output. Prolonged exposure of cultured cells to GHREL resulted in a potent, comparable to ACTH, stimulating effect of GHREL on corticosterone secretion. Prolonged exposure to OBS was ineffective. Neither GHREL nor OBS had any effect on proliferation of studied cells, while ACTH notably lowered it. GHREL down regulated GHS-R1a gene expression while both ACTH and GHREL stimulated expression level of GPR39v1 gene. Expression of CYP11A1 gene was notably stimulated and that of StAR gene remained unaffected by ACTH or GHREL. Thus, our study is the first to demonstrate direct stimulating effect of GHREL on corticosterone output by cultured rat adrenocortical cells. This stimulating action differs from that evoked by ACTH and is not dependent on the presence of functional ACTH receptor. PMID:19416745

  8. Sequence and expression of ferredoxin mRNA in barley

    SciTech Connect

    Zielinski, R.; Funder, P.M.; Ling, V. )

    1990-05-01

    We have isolated and structurally characterized a full-length cDNA clone encoding ferredoxin from a {lambda}gt10 cDNA library prepared from barley leaf mRNA. The ferredoxin clone (pBFD-1) was fused head-to-head with a partial-length cDNA clone encoding calmodulin, and was fortuitously isolated by screening the library with a calmodulin-specific oligonucleotide probe. The mRNA sequence from which pBFD-1 was derived is expressed exclusively in the leaf tissues of 7-d old barley seedlings. Barley pre-ferredoxin has a predicted size of 15.3 kDal, of which 4.6 kDal are accounted for by the transit peptide. The polypeptide encoded by pBFD-1 is identical to wheat ferredoxin, and shares slightly more amino acid sequence similarity with spinach ferredoxin I than with ferredoxin II. Ferredoxin mRNA levels are rapidly increased 10-fold by white light in etiolated barley leaves.

  9. The role of ghrelin in the regulation of glucose homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Alamri, Bader N; Shin, Kyungsoo; Chappe, Valerie; Anini, Younes

    2016-04-01

    Ghrelin is a 28-amino acid (aa) stomach-derived peptide discovered in 1999 as the endogenous ligand for growth hormone secretagogue-receptor (GHS-R). Ghrelin-producing cells constitute a distinct group of endocrine cells dispersed throughout the gastric mucosa and to a lesser extent in the small intestine and the endocrine pancreas. Ghrelin plasma levels rise during fasting and chronic caloric restriction to stimulate food intake and fat storage and to prevent life-threatening falls in blood glucose. Plasma ghrelin levels decrease after a meal is consumed and in conditions of energy surplus (such as obesity). Ghrelin has emerged as a key player in the regulation of appetite and energy homeostasis. Ghrelin achieves these functions through binding the ghrelin receptor GHS-R in appetite-regulating neurons and in peripheral metabolic organs including the endocrine pancreas. Ghrelin levels are negatively correlated with body mass index (BMI) and insulin resistance. In addition, ghrelin secretion is impaired in obesity and insulin resistance. Several studies highlight an important role for ghrelin in glucose homeostasis. Genetic, immunological, and pharmacological blockade of ghrelin signaling resulted in improved glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity. Furthermore, exogenous ghrelin administration was shown to decrease glucose-induced insulin release and increase glucose level in both humans and rodents. GHS-R was shown to be expressed in pancreatic β-cells and ghrelin suppressed insulin release via a Ca2+-mediated pathway. In this review, we provide a detailed summary of recent advances in the field that focuses on the role of insulin and insulin resistance in the regulation of ghrelin secretion and on the role of ghrelin in glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS). PMID:27235674

  10. The Antidepressant-like Effects of Estrogen-mediated Ghrelin

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Pu; Liu, Changhong; Liu, Lei; Zhang, Xingyi; Ren, Bingzhong; Li, Bingjin

    2015-01-01

    Ghrelin, one of the brain-gut peptides, stimulates food-intake. Recently, ghrelin has also shown to play an important role in depression treatment. However, the mechanism of ghrelin’s antidepressant-like actions is unknown. On the other hand, sex differences in depression, and the fluctuation of estrogens secretion have been proved to play a key role in depression. It has been reported that women have higher level of ghrelin expression, and ghrelin can stimulate estrogen secretion while estrogen acts as a positive feedback mechanism to up-regulate ghrelin level. Ghrelin may be a potential regulator of reproductive function, and estrogen may have additional effect in ghrelin’s antidepressantlike actions. In this review, we summarize antidepressant-like effects of ghrelin and estrogen in basic and clinical studies, and provide new insight on ghrelin’s effect in depression. PMID:26412072

  11. Establishment of a gastric cell-based assay system for exploring inhibitors of octanoylated ghrelin production.

    PubMed

    Oiso, Shigeru; Nobe, Miyuki; Yamaguchi, Yuhei; Umemoto, Shigeru; Nakamura, Kazuo; Kariyazono, Hiroko

    2013-10-01

    Ghrelin, a gastric hormone, is a growth hormone-releasing peptide. Its serine-3 acylation with octanoic acid is essential for its orexigenic activity, and therefore, inhibition of the acylation of ghrelin may help in decreasing appetite and preventing obesity. This study aimed to establish a human gastric cell-based assay system to evaluate candidate inhibitors of octanoylated ghrelin production. In human gastric carcinoma AGS cells, obligatory factors for the posttranslational modification of ghrelin, such as certain prohormone convertases responsible for processing of proghrelin to the mature ghrelin and the enzyme-catalyzing acyl-modification of ghrelin, were well expressed, but ghrelin was expressed at low levels. Accordingly, we transfected a ghrelin-expressing vector into AGS cells and isolated a stable ghrelin-expressing cell line (AGS-GHRL8). AGS-GHRL8 cells secreted octanoylated ghrelin in accordance with the concentrations of octanoic acid in the culture medium. Given that ingested heptanoic acid is used for the acyl-modification of ghrelin, we evaluated whether heptanoic acid inhibits production of octanoylated ghrelin in AGS-GHRL8 cells. Butyric acid was used as a control. Indeed, heptanoic acid predictably decreased the secretion of octanoylated ghrelin, whereas butyric acid did not. The AGS-GHRL8 line established in this study will facilitate the screening of inhibitors of octanoylated ghrelin production. PMID:23704134

  12. Translational research of ghrelin.

    PubMed

    Ueno, Hiroaki; Shiiya, Tomomi; Nakazato, Masamitsu

    2010-07-01

    Gastrointestinal peptides play important roles regulating feeding and energy homeostasis. Most gastrointestinal peptides including glucagon like peptide-1, peptide YY, amylin, and oxytomodulin are anorectic, and only ghrelin is an orexigenic peptide. Ghrelin increases appetite, modulates energy balance, suppresses inflammation, and enhances growth hormone secretion. Given its diversity of functions, ghrelin is expected be an effective therapy for lean patients with cachexia caused by chronic heart failure, chronic respiratory disease, anorexia nervosa, functional dyspepsia, and cancer. Clinical trials have demonstrated that ghrelin effectively increases lean body mass and activity in cachectic patients. Ghrelin interrupts the vicious cycle of the cachectic paradigm through its orexigenic, anabolic, and anti-inflammatory effects, and ghrelin administration may improve the quality of life of cachectic patients. We discuss the significant roles of ghrelin in the pathophysiology of cachectic diseases and the possible clinical applications of ghrelin. PMID:20633140

  13. Screening of mRNA Chemical Modification to Maximize Protein Expression with Reduced Immunogenicity.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Satoshi; Kataoka, Kazunori; Itaka, Keiji

    2015-01-01

    Chemical modification of nucleosides in mRNA is an important technology to regulate the immunogenicity of mRNA. In this study, various previously reported mRNA formulations were evaluated by analyzing in vitro protein expression and immunogenicity in multiple cell lines. For the macrophage-derived cell line, RAW 264.7, modified mRNA tended to have reduced immunogenicity and increased protein expression compared to the unmodified mRNA. In contrast, in some cell types, such as hepatocellular carcinoma cells (HuH-7) and mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs), protein expression was decreased by mRNA modification. Further analyses revealed that mRNA modifications decreased translation efficiency but increased nuclease stability. Thus, mRNA modification is likely to exert both positive and negative effects on the efficiency of protein expression in transfected cells and optimal mRNA formulation should be determined based on target cell types and transfection purposes. PMID:26213960

  14. Screening of mRNA Chemical Modification to Maximize Protein Expression with Reduced Immunogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Uchida, Satoshi; Kataoka, Kazunori; Itaka, Keiji

    2015-01-01

    Chemical modification of nucleosides in mRNA is an important technology to regulate the immunogenicity of mRNA. In this study, various previously reported mRNA formulations were evaluated by analyzing in vitro protein expression and immunogenicity in multiple cell lines. For the macrophage-derived cell line, RAW 264.7, modified mRNA tended to have reduced immunogenicity and increased protein expression compared to the unmodified mRNA. In contrast, in some cell types, such as hepatocellular carcinoma cells (HuH-7) and mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs), protein expression was decreased by mRNA modification. Further analyses revealed that mRNA modifications decreased translation efficiency but increased nuclease stability. Thus, mRNA modification is likely to exert both positive and negative effects on the efficiency of protein expression in transfected cells and optimal mRNA formulation should be determined based on target cell types and transfection purposes. PMID:26213960

  15. Ghrelin Decreases Firing Activity of Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone (GnRH) Neurons in an Estrous Cycle and Endocannabinoid Signaling Dependent Manner

    PubMed Central

    Farkas, Imre; Vastagh, Csaba; Sárvári, Miklós; Liposits, Zsolt

    2013-01-01

    The orexigenic peptide, ghrelin is known to influence function of GnRH neurons, however, the direct effects of the hormone upon these neurons have not been explored, yet. The present study was undertaken to reveal expression of growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHS-R) in GnRH neurons and elucidate the mechanisms of ghrelin actions upon them. Ca2+-imaging revealed a ghrelin-triggered increase of the Ca2+-content in GT1-7 neurons kept in a steroid-free medium, which was abolished by GHS-R-antagonist JMV2959 (10µM) suggesting direct action of ghrelin. Estradiol (1nM) eliminated the ghrelin-evoked rise of Ca2+-content, indicating the estradiol dependency of the process. Expression of GHS-R mRNA was then confirmed in GnRH-GFP neurons of transgenic mice by single cell RT-PCR. Firing rate and burst frequency of GnRH-GFP neurons were lower in metestrous than proestrous mice. Ghrelin (40nM-4μM) administration resulted in a decreased firing rate and burst frequency of GnRH neurons in metestrous, but not in proestrous mice. Ghrelin also decreased the firing rate of GnRH neurons in males. The ghrelin-evoked alterations of the firing parameters were prevented by JMV2959, supporting the receptor-specific actions of ghrelin on GnRH neurons. In metestrous mice, ghrelin decreased the frequency of GABAergic mPSCs in GnRH neurons. Effects of ghrelin were abolished by the cannabinoid receptor type-1 (CB1) antagonist AM251 (1µM) and the intracellularly applied DAG-lipase inhibitor THL (10µM), indicating the involvement of retrograde endocannabinoid signaling. These findings demonstrate that ghrelin exerts direct regulatory effects on GnRH neurons via GHS-R, and modulates the firing of GnRH neurons in an ovarian-cycle and endocannabinoid dependent manner. PMID:24124622

  16. The Stomach-Derived Hormone Ghrelin Increases Impulsive Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Anderberg, Rozita H; Hansson, Caroline; Fenander, Maya; Richard, Jennifer E; Dickson, Suzanne L; Nissbrandt, Hans; Bergquist, Filip; Skibicka, Karolina P

    2016-01-01

    Impulsivity, defined as impaired decision making, is associated with many psychiatric and behavioral disorders, such as attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder as well as eating disorders. Recent data indicate that there is a strong positive correlation between food reward behavior and impulsivity, but the mechanisms behind this relationship remain unknown. Here we hypothesize that ghrelin, an orexigenic hormone produced by the stomach and known to increase food reward behavior, also increases impulsivity. In order to assess the impact of ghrelin on impulsivity, rats were trained in three complementary tests of impulsive behavior and choice: differential reinforcement of low rate (DRL), go/no-go, and delay discounting. Ghrelin injection into the lateral ventricle increased impulsive behavior, as indicated by reduced efficiency of performance in the DRL test, and increased lever pressing during the no-go periods of the go/no-go test. Central ghrelin stimulation also increased impulsive choice, as evidenced by the reduced choice for large rewards when delivered with a delay in the delay discounting test. In order to determine whether signaling at the central ghrelin receptors is necessary for maintenance of normal levels of impulsive behavior, DRL performance was assessed following ghrelin receptor blockade with central infusion of a ghrelin receptor antagonist. Central ghrelin receptor blockade reduced impulsive behavior, as reflected by increased efficiency of performance in the DRL task. To further investigate the neurobiological substrate underlying the impulsivity effect of ghrelin, we microinjected ghrelin into the ventral tegmental area, an area harboring dopaminergic cell bodies. Ghrelin receptor stimulation within the VTA was sufficient to increase impulsive behavior. We further evaluated the impact of ghrelin on dopamine-related gene expression and dopamine turnover in brain areas key in impulsive behavior control. This study provides the first

  17. The Stomach-Derived Hormone Ghrelin Increases Impulsive Behavior.

    PubMed

    Anderberg, Rozita H; Hansson, Caroline; Fenander, Maya; Richard, Jennifer E; Dickson, Suzanne L; Nissbrandt, Hans; Bergquist, Filip; Skibicka, Karolina P

    2016-04-01

    Impulsivity, defined as impaired decision making, is associated with many psychiatric and behavioral disorders, such as attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder as well as eating disorders. Recent data indicate that there is a strong positive correlation between food reward behavior and impulsivity, but the mechanisms behind this relationship remain unknown. Here we hypothesize that ghrelin, an orexigenic hormone produced by the stomach and known to increase food reward behavior, also increases impulsivity. In order to assess the impact of ghrelin on impulsivity, rats were trained in three complementary tests of impulsive behavior and choice: differential reinforcement of low rate (DRL), go/no-go, and delay discounting. Ghrelin injection into the lateral ventricle increased impulsive behavior, as indicated by reduced efficiency of performance in the DRL test, and increased lever pressing during the no-go periods of the go/no-go test. Central ghrelin stimulation also increased impulsive choice, as evidenced by the reduced choice for large rewards when delivered with a delay in the delay discounting test. In order to determine whether signaling at the central ghrelin receptors is necessary for maintenance of normal levels of impulsive behavior, DRL performance was assessed following ghrelin receptor blockade with central infusion of a ghrelin receptor antagonist. Central ghrelin receptor blockade reduced impulsive behavior, as reflected by increased efficiency of performance in the DRL task. To further investigate the neurobiological substrate underlying the impulsivity effect of ghrelin, we microinjected ghrelin into the ventral tegmental area, an area harboring dopaminergic cell bodies. Ghrelin receptor stimulation within the VTA was sufficient to increase impulsive behavior. We further evaluated the impact of ghrelin on dopamine-related gene expression and dopamine turnover in brain areas key in impulsive behavior control. This study provides the first

  18. Multi-species sequence comparison reveals conservation of ghrelin gene-derived splice variants encoding a truncated ghrelin peptide.

    PubMed

    Seim, Inge; Jeffery, Penny L; Thomas, Patrick B; Walpole, Carina M; Maugham, Michelle; Fung, Jenny N T; Yap, Pei-Yi; O'Keeffe, Angela J; Lai, John; Whiteside, Eliza J; Herington, Adrian C; Chopin, Lisa K

    2016-06-01

    The peptide hormone ghrelin is a potent orexigen produced predominantly in the stomach. It has a number of other biological actions, including roles in appetite stimulation, energy balance, the stimulation of growth hormone release and the regulation of cell proliferation. Recently, several ghrelin gene splice variants have been described. Here, we attempted to identify conserved alternative splicing of the ghrelin gene by cross-species sequence comparisons. We identified a novel human exon 2-deleted variant and provide preliminary evidence that this splice variant and in1-ghrelin encode a C-terminally truncated form of the ghrelin peptide, termed minighrelin. These variants are expressed in humans and mice, demonstrating conservation of alternative splicing spanning 90 million years. Minighrelin appears to have similar actions to full-length ghrelin, as treatment with exogenous minighrelin peptide stimulates appetite and feeding in mice. Forced expression of the exon 2-deleted preproghrelin variant mirrors the effect of the canonical preproghrelin, stimulating cell proliferation and migration in the PC3 prostate cancer cell line. This is the first study to characterise an exon 2-deleted preproghrelin variant and to demonstrate sequence conservation of ghrelin gene-derived splice variants that encode a truncated ghrelin peptide. This adds further impetus for studies into the alternative splicing of the ghrelin gene and the function of novel ghrelin peptides in vertebrates. PMID:26792793

  19. Effects of ghrelin and its analogues on chicken ovarian granulosa cells.

    PubMed

    Sirotkin, A V; Grossmann, R

    2008-02-01

    The aim of these in vitro experiments was (1) to examine the effects of ghrelin on the basic functions of ovarian cells (proliferation, apoptosis, secretory activity); (2) to determine the possible involvement of the GHS-R1a receptor and PKA- and MAPK-dependent post-receptor intracellular signalling cascades; (3) to identify the active part of the 28-amino acid molecule responsible for the effects of ghrelin on ovarian cells. We compared the effect of full-length ghrelin 1-28, a synthetic activator of GHS-R1a, GHRP6, and ghrelin molecular fragments 1-18 and 1-5 on cultured chicken ovarian cells. Indices of cell apoptosis (expression of the apoptotic peptide bax and the anti-apoptotic peptide bcl-2), proliferation (expression of proliferation-associated peptide PCNA), and expression of protein kinases (PKA and MAPK) within ovarian granulosa cells were analysed by immunocytochemistry. The secretion of progesterone (P(4)), testosterone (T), estradiol (E(2)) and arginine-vasotocin (AVT) by isolated ovarian follicular fragments was evaluated by RIA/EIA. It was observed that accumulation of bax was increased by ghrelin 1-28, GHRP6 and ghrelin 1-18, but not by ghrelin 1-5. Expression of bcl-2 was suppressed by addition of ghrelin 1-28, GHRP6 and ghrelin 1-5, but promoted by ghrelin 1-18. The occurrence of PCNA was reduced by ghrelin 1-28, GHRP6, ghrelin 1-18 and ghrelin 1-5. An increase in the expression of MAPK/ERK1, 2 was observed after addition of ghrelin 1-28, GHRP6 and ghrelin 1-18, but not ghrelin 1-5. The accumulation of PKA decreased after treatment with ghrelin 1-28 and increased after treatment with GHRP6 and ghrelin 1-18 but not ghrelin 1-5. Secretion of P(4) by ovarian follicular fragments was decreased after addition of ghrelin 1-28 or ghrelin 1-5 but stimulated by GHRP6 and ghrelin 1-18. Testosterone secretion was inhibited by ghrelins 1-28 and 1-18, but not by GHRP6 or ghrelin 1-5. Estradiol secretion was reduced after treatment with ghrelin 1-28 but

  20. The prognostic value of epidermal growth factor receptor mRNA expression in primary ovarian cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Bartlett, J. M.; Langdon, S. P.; Simpson, B. J.; Stewart, M.; Katsaros, D.; Sismondi, P.; Love, S.; Scott, W. N.; Williams, A. R.; Lessells, A. M.; Macleod, K. G.; Smyth, J. F.; Miller, W. R.

    1996-01-01

    The expression of mRNA for the epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor, EGF and transforming growth factor alpha (TGF-alpha) was determined in 76 malignant, six borderline and 15 benign primary ovarian tumours using the reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and related to clinical and pathological parameters. Of the malignant tumours, 70% (53/76) expressed EGF receptor mRNA, 31% (23/75) expressed EGF mRNA and 35% (26/75) expressed TGF-alpha mRNA. For the borderline tumours, four of six (67%) expressed EGF receptor mRNA, 1/6 (17%) expressed TGF-alpha mRNA and none expressed EGF mRNA. Finally, 33% (5/15) of the benign tumours expressed EGF receptor mRNA, whereas 40% (6/15) expressed EGF mRNA and 7% (1/15) expressed TGF-alpha mRNA. The presence of the EGF receptor in malignant tumours was associated with that of TGF-alpha (P = 0.0015) but not with EGF (P = 1.00), whereas there was no relationship between the presence of EGF and TGF-alpha (P = 1.00). EGF receptor mRNA expression was significantly and positively associated with serous histology (P = 0.006) but not with stage or grade. Neither EGF nor TGF-alpha showed any link with histological subtype or stage. The survival of patients with malignant tumours possessing EGF receptor mRNA was significantly reduced compared with that of patients whose tumours were negative (P = 0.030 for all malignant tumours; P = 0.007 for malignant epithelial tumours only). In contrast, neither the expression of TGF-alpha nor EGF was related to survival. These data suggest that the presence of EGF receptor mRNA is associated with poor prognosis in primary ovarian cancer. Images Figure 1 PMID:8562334

  1. Ghrelin inhibits oxLDL-induced inflammation in RAW264.7 mouse macrophages through down-regulation of LOX-1 expression via NF-κB signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Sun, N; Wang, H; Wang, L

    2016-01-01

    Oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) is one of the many causes of the initiation and progression of atherosclerosis, which can subsequently promote the uptake of oxLDL by macrophages and lead to inflammation in the blood vessels. In the present study, we evaluated the protective effects of ghrelin on oxLDL-induced RAW264.7 mouse macrophages. Ghrelin was able to inhibit the release of several pro-inflammatory cytokines including tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interleukin (IL)-6. In addition, ghrelin also inhibited the expression of Lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1 (LOX-1) in oxLDL treated macrophages. Furthermore, we demonstrated that ghrelin could inhibit the expression of p-IκBα, and the inhibitory effects could be blocked by BAY 117082. Taken together, ghrelin possesses anti-inflammatory effects on oxLDL-induced inflammation in macrophages, suggesting that it can prevent or treat atherosclerosis, and deserves to be further studied and developed to be potent drug for treating atherosclerosis. PMID:26950452

  2. Early onset of ghrelin production in a marsupial.

    PubMed

    Menzies, Brandon R; Shaw, Geoff; Fletcher, Terry P; Renfree, Marilyn B

    2009-02-27

    Ghrelin regulates appetite in mammals and can stimulate growth hormone (GH) release from the pituitary. In rats and humans, ghrelin cells appear in the stomach during late fetal life. Nevertheless, the role of ghrelin in early mammalian development is not well understood. Marsupials deliver highly altricial young that weigh less than 1g so they must feed and digest milk at a comparatively immature stage of development. Since they complete their growth and differentiation while in the pouch, they are accessible models in which to determine the time course of ghrelin production during development. We examined the distribution of gastric ghrelin cells, plasma ghrelin concentrations and pituitary expression of the ghrelin receptor (ghsr-1alpha) and GH in the tammar wallaby, Macropus eugenii. There were ghrelin immunopositive cells in the developing mesenchyme of the stomach from day 10 post partum (pp) to day 150pp. Subsequently ghrelin protein in the fore-stomach declined and was absent by day 250pp but remained in the gastric cells of the hind-stomach. Ghrelin was detected in the developing pancreas from day 10pp but was absent by day 150pp and in the adult. Pituitary ghsr-1alpha expression and plasma concentrations of ghrelin increased significantly up to day 70-120pp while GH expression was also elevated, declining with GH to reach adult levels by day 180pp. These results demonstrate an early onset of gastric ghrelin expression in the tammar in concert with a functional stomach at a relatively earlier stage than that of developmentally more mature eutherian young. PMID:19026714

  3. Effects of dietary fibers on weight gain, carbohydrate metabolism, and gastric ghrelin gene expression in mice fed a high-fat diet.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhong Q; Zuberi, Aamir R; Zhang, Xian H; Macgowan, Jacalyn; Qin, Jianhua; Ye, Xin; Son, Leslie; Wu, Qinglin; Lian, Kun; Cefalu, William T

    2007-12-01

    Diets that are high in dietary fiber are reported to have substantial health benefits. We sought to compare the metabolic effects of 3 types of dietary fibers -- sugarcane fiber (SCF), psyllium (PSY), and cellulose (CEL) -- on body weight, carbohydrate metabolism, and stomach ghrelin gene expression in a high-fat diet-fed mouse model. Thirty-six male mice (C57BL/6) were randomly divided into 4 groups that consumed high-fat diet alone (HFD) or high-fat diet containing 10% SCF, PSY, and CEL, respectively. After baseline measurements were assessed for body weight, plasma insulin, glucose, leptin, and glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1), animals were treated for 12 weeks. Parameters were reevaluated at the end of study. Whereas there was no difference at the baseline, body weight gains in the PSY and SCF groups were significantly lower than in the CEL group at the end of study. No difference in body weight was observed between the PSY and SCF animals. Body composition analysis demonstrated that fat mass in the SCF group was considerably lower than in the CEL and HFD groups. In addition, fasting plasma glucose and insulin and areas under the curve of intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test were also significantly lower in the SCF and PSY groups than in the CEL and HFD groups. Moreover, fasting plasma concentrations of leptin were significantly lower and GLP-1 level was 2-fold higher in the SCF and PSY mice than in the HFD and CEL mice. Ghrelin messenger RNA levels of stomach in the SCF group were significantly lower than in the CEL and HFD groups as well. These results suggest differences in response to dietary fiber intake in this animal model because high-fat diets incorporating dietary fibers such as SCF and PSY appeared to attenuate weight gain, enhance insulin sensitivity, and modulate leptin and GLP-1 secretion and gastric ghrelin gene expression. PMID:17998014

  4. Molecular identification of ghrelin receptor (GHS-R1a) and its functional role in the gastrointestinal tract of the guinea-pig.

    PubMed

    Kitazawa, Takio; Nakamura, Tatsuro; Saeki, Atsuki; Teraoka, Hiroki; Hiraga, Takeo; Kaiya, Hiroyuki

    2011-09-01

    Ghrelin stimulates gastric motility in vivo in the guinea-pig through activation of growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHS-R). In this study, we identified GHS-R1a in the guinea-pig, and examined its distribution and cellular function and compared them with those in the rat. Effects of ghrelin in different regions of gastrointestinal tract were also examined. GHS-R1a was identified in guinea-pig brain cDNA. Amino acid identities of guinea-pig GHS-R1a were 93% to horses and 85% to dogs. Expression levels of GHS-R1a mRNA were high in the pituitary and hypothalamus, moderate in the thalamus, cerebral cortex, pons, medulla oblongata and olfactory bulb, and low in the cerebellum and peripheral tissues including gastrointestinal tract. Comparison of GHS-R1a expression patterns showed that those in the brain were similar but the expression level in the gastrointestinal tract was higher in rats than in guinea-pigs. Guinea-pig GHS-R1a expressed in HEK 293 cells responded to rat ghrelin and GHS-R agonists. Rat ghrelin was ineffective in inducing mechanical changes in the stomach and colon but caused a slight contraction in the small intestine. 1,1-Dimethyl-4-phenylpiperazinium and electrical field stimulation (EFS) caused cholinergic contraction in the intestine, and these contractions were not affected by ghrelin. Ghrelin did not change spontaneous and EFS-evoked [(3)H]-efflux from [(3)H]-choline-loaded ileal strips. In summary, guinea-pig GHS-R1a was identified and its functions in isolated gastrointestinal strips were characterized. The distribution of GHS-R1a in peripheral tissues was different from that in rats, suggesting that the functional role of ghrelin in the guinea-pig is different from that in other animal species. PMID:21843569

  5. Identification, tissue distribution and functional characterization of the ghrelin receptor in West African lungfish, Protopterus annectens.

    PubMed

    Kaiya, Hiroyuki; Konno, Norifumi; Kangawa, Kenji; Uchiyama, Minoru; Miyazato, Mikiya

    2014-12-01

    We identified two ghrelin receptor isoforms, the ghrelin receptor type-1a (GHS-R1a) and its alternative splice form (GHS-R1b) for West African lungfish, Protopterus annectens. Lungfish GHS-R1a and 1b comprised 361 and 281 amino acids, respectively. Lungfish GHS-R1a showed the highest identity to coelacanth GHS-R1a (80.4%). The highest expression of GHS-R1a mRNAs was seen in the brain, liver, ovary, heart, intestine, and gills. GHS-R1b mRNAs were also detected in the same tissues with GHS-R1a, but their expression level was 1/20 that of GHS-R1a. In human embryonic kidney 293 cells transiently expressing lungfish GHS-R1a, rat and bullfrog ghrelin, and two GHS-R1a agonists, GHRP-6 and hexarelin, increased intracellular Ca(2+) concentrations. The intensity of the Ca(2+) increases induced by GHS-R1a agonists was twice when compared to that induced by ghrelin, although the median effective doses (ED50) were similar, suggesting a long-lasting effect of GHS-R1a agonists with similar affinity. We also examined changes in the GHS-R gene expression during an eight-week estivation. Body weight was slightly lowered, but plasma sodium and glucose concentrations decreased; plasma urea concentration increased significantly 4weeks after the start of estivation. Overall, expression of GHS-R1a mRNA decreased, but changes in GHS-R1b mRNA expression were inconsistent with those of GHS-R1a during estivation, suggesting an involvement of GHS-R in energy homeostasis, as seen in mammals. Our results suggest that the ghrelin-GHS-R1a system is present in this lungfish although ghrelin has not yet been found. The structure of GHS-R1a is closer to that of tetrapods than Actinopterygian fish, indicating a process of evolution that follows the Crossopterygii such as coelacanth. PMID:25093625

  6. Neuronal deletion of ghrelin receptor almost completely prevents diet-induced obesity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ghrelin signaling has major effects on energy- and glucose-homeostasis, but it is unknown whether ghrelin's functions are centrally and/or peripherally mediated. The ghrelin receptor, Growth Hormone Secretagogue Receptor (GHS-R), is highly expressed in brain and detectable in some peripheral tissues...

  7. Ghrelin and reproductive disorders.

    PubMed

    Repaci, Andrea; Gambineri, Alessandra; Pagotto, Uberto; Pasquali, Renato

    2011-06-20

    Ghrelin is an important factor involved in most of the metabolic and hormonal signals which adapt the reproductive functions in conditions of altered energy balance. Moreover, the coordinated role of leptin and ghrelin appears in fact to have a specific role in the regulation of puberty. Systemic action of ghrelin on the reproductive axis involves the control of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gondal axis. In addition, it has been shown that ghrelin may directly act at a gonadal level in both females and males. Available data also demonstrate that sex steroid hormones and gonadotropins may in turn regulate the gonadal effect of ghrelin, as documented by studies performed in females with the polycystic ovary syndrome and in hypogonadal men. Notably, recent studies also confirm a potentially important role for ghrelin in fetal and neonatal energy balance, and specifically in allowing fetal adaptation to an adverse intrauterine environment. PMID:21453749

  8. Developmentally Regulated Expression of HDNF/NT-3 mRNA in Rat Spinal Cord Motoneurons and Expression of BDNF mRNA in Embryonic Dorsal Root Ganglion.

    PubMed

    Ernfors, Patrik; Persson, Håkan

    1991-01-01

    Northern blot analysis was used to demonstrate high levels of hippocampus-derived neurotrophic factor/neurotrophin-3 (HDNF/NT-3) mRNA in the embryonic day (E) 13 - 14 and 15 - 16 spinal cord. The level decreased at E18 - 19 and remained the same until postnatal day (P) 1, after which it decreased further to a level below the detection limit in the adult. In situ hybridization revealed that the NT-3 mRNA detected in the developing spinal cord was derived from motoneurons and the decrease seen at E18 - 19 was caused by a reduction in the number of motoneurons expressing NT-3 mRNA. The distribution of NT-3 mRNA-expressing cells in the E15 spinal cord was very similar to the distribution of cells expressing choline acetyltransferase or nerve growth factor receptor (NGFR) mRNA. Moreover, a striking similarity between the developmentally regulated expression of NT-3 and NGFR mRNA was noted in spinal cord motoneurons. A subpopulation of all neurons in the dorsal root ganglia expressed brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) mRNA from E13, the earliest time examined, to adulthood. These results are consistent with a trophic role of NT-3 for proprioceptive sensory neurons innervating the ventral horn, and imply a local action of BDNF for developing sensory neurons within the dorsal root ganglia. PMID:12106253

  9. Ghrelin Regulates Glucose and Glutamate Transporters in Hypothalamic Astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Fuente-Martín, Esther; García-Cáceres, Cristina; Argente-Arizón, Pilar; Díaz, Francisca; Granado, Miriam; Freire-Regatillo, Alejandra; Castro-González, David; Ceballos, María L; Frago, Laura M; Dickson, Suzanne L; Argente, Jesús; Chowen, Julie A

    2016-01-01

    Hypothalamic astrocytes can respond to metabolic signals, such as leptin and insulin, to modulate adjacent neuronal circuits and systemic metabolism. Ghrelin regulates appetite, adiposity and glucose metabolism, but little is known regarding the response of astrocytes to this orexigenic hormone. We have used both in vivo and in vitro approaches to demonstrate that acylated ghrelin (acyl-ghrelin) rapidly stimulates glutamate transporter expression and glutamate uptake by astrocytes. Moreover, acyl-ghrelin rapidly reduces glucose transporter (GLUT) 2 levels and glucose uptake by these glial cells. Glutamine synthetase and lactate dehydrogenase decrease, while glycogen phosphorylase and lactate transporters increase in response to acyl-ghrelin, suggesting a change in glutamate and glucose metabolism, as well as glycogen storage by astrocytes. These effects are partially mediated through ghrelin receptor 1A (GHSR-1A) as astrocytes do not respond equally to desacyl-ghrelin, an isoform that does not activate GHSR-1A. Moreover, primary astrocyte cultures from GHSR-1A knock-out mice do not change glutamate transporter or GLUT2 levels in response to acyl-ghrelin. Our results indicate that acyl-ghrelin may mediate part of its metabolic actions through modulation of hypothalamic astrocytes and that this effect could involve astrocyte mediated changes in local glucose and glutamate metabolism that alter the signals/nutrients reaching neighboring neurons. PMID:27026049

  10. Ghrelin Regulates Glucose and Glutamate Transporters in Hypothalamic Astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Fuente-Martín, Esther; García-Cáceres, Cristina; Argente-Arizón, Pilar; Díaz, Francisca; Granado, Miriam; Freire-Regatillo, Alejandra; Castro-González, David; Ceballos, María L.; Frago, Laura M.; Dickson, Suzanne L.; Argente, Jesús; Chowen, Julie A.

    2016-01-01

    Hypothalamic astrocytes can respond to metabolic signals, such as leptin and insulin, to modulate adjacent neuronal circuits and systemic metabolism. Ghrelin regulates appetite, adiposity and glucose metabolism, but little is known regarding the response of astrocytes to this orexigenic hormone. We have used both in vivo and in vitro approaches to demonstrate that acylated ghrelin (acyl-ghrelin) rapidly stimulates glutamate transporter expression and glutamate uptake by astrocytes. Moreover, acyl-ghrelin rapidly reduces glucose transporter (GLUT) 2 levels and glucose uptake by these glial cells. Glutamine synthetase and lactate dehydrogenase decrease, while glycogen phosphorylase and lactate transporters increase in response to acyl-ghrelin, suggesting a change in glutamate and glucose metabolism, as well as glycogen storage by astrocytes. These effects are partially mediated through ghrelin receptor 1A (GHSR-1A) as astrocytes do not respond equally to desacyl-ghrelin, an isoform that does not activate GHSR-1A. Moreover, primary astrocyte cultures from GHSR-1A knock-out mice do not change glutamate transporter or GLUT2 levels in response to acyl-ghrelin. Our results indicate that acyl-ghrelin may mediate part of its metabolic actions through modulation of hypothalamic astrocytes and that this effect could involve astrocyte mediated changes in local glucose and glutamate metabolism that alter the signals/nutrients reaching neighboring neurons. PMID:27026049

  11. Ghrelin receptor regulates adipose tissue inflammation in aging

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aging is commonly associated with low-grade adipose inflammation, which is closely linked to insulin resistance. Ghrelin is the only circulating orexigenic hormone which is known to increase obesity and insulin resistance. We previously reported that the expression of the ghrelin receptor, growth ho...

  12. Elevated TREM2 mRNA expression in leukocytes in schizophrenia but not major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Yoshino, Yuta; Kawabe, Kentaro; Yamazaki, Kiyohiro; Watanabe, Shinya; Numata, Shusuke; Mori, Yoko; Yoshida, Taku; Iga, Junichi; Ohmori, Tetsuro; Ueno, Shu-Ichi

    2016-06-01

    The pathological mechanisms of schizophrenia (SCZ) have not been clarified, but the microglia hypothesis has recently been discussed. We previously reported that the mRNA for a protein related to activation of microglia, triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cell 2 (TREM2), is expressed higher in peripheral leukocytes in SCZ than controls. In this study, we analyzed TREM2 mRNA expression in leukocytes from both SCZ and major depressive disorder (MDD) patients. We compared 50 SCZ patients and 42 MDD patients with age-matched controls. Levels of TREM2 mRNA in leukocytes were analyzed with quantitative real-time PCR method using TaqMan probe. TREM2 mRNA expression was significantly higher in leukocytes of SCZ subjects than controls, but the expression level was non-significantly different in MDD subjects. We observed a decrease in TREM2 mRNA expression in leukocytes from one SCZ patient after clozapine treatment. The expression did not change following ECT, but the expression level in this patient was still significantly higher than that in controls. We conclude that the high amount of TREM2 mRNA expression in leukocytes is specific to SCZ but not MDD and that changes in TREM2 mRNA expression may be a trait biomarker for SCZ. PMID:27130565

  13. Role of calcium and EPAC in norepinephrine-induced ghrelin secretion.

    PubMed

    Mani, Bharath K; Chuang, Jen-Chieh; Kjalarsdottir, Lilja; Sakata, Ichiro; Walker, Angela K; Kuperman, Anna; Osborne-Lawrence, Sherri; Repa, Joyce J; Zigman, Jeffrey M

    2014-01-01

    Ghrelin is an orexigenic hormone secreted principally from a distinct population of gastric endocrine cells. Molecular mechanisms regulating ghrelin secretion are mostly unknown. Recently, norepinephrine (NE) was shown to enhance ghrelin release by binding to β1-adrenergic receptors on ghrelin cells. Here, we use an immortalized stomach-derived ghrelin cell line to further characterize the intracellular signaling pathways involved in NE-induced ghrelin secretion, with a focus on the roles of Ca(2+) and cAMP. Several voltage-gated Ca(2+) channel (VGCC) family members were found by quantitative PCR to be expressed by ghrelin cells. Nifedipine, a selective L-type VGCC blocker, suppressed both basal and NE-stimulated ghrelin secretion. NE induced elevation of cytosolic Ca(2+) levels both in the presence and absence of extracellular Ca(2+). Ca(2+)-sensing synaptotagmins Syt7 and Syt9 were also highly expressed in ghrelin cell lines, suggesting that they too help mediate ghrelin secretion. Raising cAMP with the phosphodiesterase inhibitor 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine also stimulated ghrelin secretion, although such a cAMP-mediated effect likely does not involve protein kinase A, given the absence of a modulatory response to a highly selective protein kinase A inhibitor. However, pharmacological inhibition of another target of cAMP, exchange protein-activated by cAMP (EPAC), did attenuate both basal and NE-induced ghrelin secretion, whereas an EPAC agonist enhanced basal ghrelin secretion. We conclude that constitutive ghrelin secretion is primarily regulated by Ca(2+) influx through L-type VGCCs and that NE stimulates ghrelin secretion predominantly through release of intracellular Ca(2+). Furthermore, cAMP and its downstream activation of EPAC are required for the normal ghrelin secretory response to NE. PMID:24189139

  14. Negative regulation of neuromedin U mRNA expression in the rat pars tuberalis by melatonin.

    PubMed

    Aizawa, Sayaka; Sakata, Ichiro; Nagasaka, Mai; Higaki, Yuriko; Sakai, Takafumi

    2013-01-01

    The pars tuberalis (PT) is part of the anterior pituitary gland surrounding the median eminence as a thin cell layer. The characteristics of PT differ from those of the pars distalis (PD), such as cell composition and gene expression, suggesting that the PT has a unique physiological function compared to the PD. Because the PT highly expresses melatonin receptor type 1, it is considered a mediator of seasonal and/or circadian signals of melatonin. Expression of neuromedin U (NMU) that is known to regulate energy balance has been previously reported in the rat PT; however, the regulatory mechanism of NMU mRNA expression and secretion in the PT are still obscure. In this study, we examined both the diurnal change of NMU mRNA expression in the rat PT and the effects of melatonin on NMU in vivo. In situ hybridization and quantitative PCR analysis of laser microdissected PT samples revealed that NMU mRNA expression in the PT has diurnal variation that is high during the light phase and low during the dark phase. Furthermore, melatonin administration significantly suppressed NMU mRNA expression in the PT in vivo. On the other hand, 48 h fasting did not have an effect on PT-NMU mRNA expression, and the diurnal change of NMU mRNA expression was maintained. We also found the highest expression of neuromedin U receptor type 2 (NMUR2) mRNA in the third ventricle ependymal cell layer, followed by the arcuate nucleus and the spinal cord. These results suggest that NMU mRNA expression in the PT is downregulated by melatonin during the dark phase and shows diurnal change. Considering that NMU mRNA in the PT showed the highest expression level in the brain, PT-NMU may act on NMUR2 in the brain, especially in the third ventricle ependymal cell layer, with a circadian rhythm. PMID:23843987

  15. Negative Regulation of Neuromedin U mRNA Expression in the Rat Pars Tuberalis by Melatonin

    PubMed Central

    Aizawa, Sayaka; Sakata, Ichiro; Nagasaka, Mai; Higaki, Yuriko; Sakai, Takafumi

    2013-01-01

    The pars tuberalis (PT) is part of the anterior pituitary gland surrounding the median eminence as a thin cell layer. The characteristics of PT differ from those of the pars distalis (PD), such as cell composition and gene expression, suggesting that the PT has a unique physiological function compared to the PD. Because the PT highly expresses melatonin receptor type 1, it is considered a mediator of seasonal and/or circadian signals of melatonin. Expression of neuromedin U (NMU) that is known to regulate energy balance has been previously reported in the rat PT; however, the regulatory mechanism of NMU mRNA expression and secretion in the PT are still obscure. In this study, we examined both the diurnal change of NMU mRNA expression in the rat PT and the effects of melatonin on NMU in vivo. In situ hybridization and quantitative PCR analysis of laser microdissected PT samples revealed that NMU mRNA expression in the PT has diurnal variation that is high during the light phase and low during the dark phase. Furthermore, melatonin administration significantly suppressed NMU mRNA expression in the PT in vivo. On the other hand, 48 h fasting did not have an effect on PT-NMU mRNA expression, and the diurnal change of NMU mRNA expression was maintained. We also found the highest expression of neuromedin U receptor type 2 (NMUR2) mRNA in the third ventricle ependymal cell layer, followed by the arcuate nucleus and the spinal cord. These results suggest that NMU mRNA expression in the PT is downregulated by melatonin during the dark phase and shows diurnal change. Considering that NMU mRNA in the PT showed the highest expression level in the brain, PT-NMU may act on NMUR2 in the brain, especially in the third ventricle ependymal cell layer, with a circadian rhythm. PMID:23843987

  16. Unacylated Ghrelin Promotes Skeletal Muscle Regeneration Following Hindlimb Ischemia via SOD‐2–Mediated miR‐221/222 Expression

    PubMed Central

    Togliatto, Gabriele; Trombetta, Antonella; Dentelli, Patrizia; Cotogni, Paolo; Rosso, Arturo; Tschöp, Matthias H.; Granata, Riccarda; Ghigo, Ezio; Brizzi, Maria F.

    2013-01-01

    Background Surgical treatment of peripheral artery disease, even if successful, does not prevent reoccurrence. Under these conditions, increased oxidative stress is a crucial determinant of tissue damage. Given its reported antioxidant effects, we investigated the potential of unacylated‐ghrelin (UnAG) to reduce ischemia‐induced tissue damage in a mouse model of peripheral artery disease. Methods and Results We show that UnAG but not acylated ghrelin (AG) induces skeletal muscle regeneration in response to ischemia via canonical p38/mitogen‐actived protein kinase signaling UnAG protected against reactive oxygen species–induced cell injuries by inducing the expression of superoxide dismutase‐2 (SOD‐2) in satellite cells. This led to a reduced number of infiltrating CD68+ cells and was followed by induction of the myogenic process and a reduction in functional impairment. Moreover, we found that miR‐221/222, previously linked to muscle regeneration processes, was up‐regulated and negatively correlated with p57Kip2 expression in UnAG‐treated mice. UnAG, unlike AG, promoted cell‐cycle entry in satellite cells of mice lacking the genes for ghrelin and its receptor (GHSR1a). UnAG‐induced p38/mitogen‐actived protein kinase phosphorylation, leading to activation of the myogenic process, was prevented in SOD‐2–depleted SCs. By siRNA technology, we also demonstrated that SOD‐2 is the antioxidant enzyme involved in the control of miR‐221/222–driven posttranscriptional p57Kip2 regulation. Loss‐of‐function experiments targeting miR‐221/222 and local pre–miR‐221/222 injection in vivo confirmed a role for miR‐221/222 in driving skeletal muscle regeneration after ischemia. Conclusions These results indicate that UnAG‐induced skeletal muscle regeneration after ischemia depends on SOD‐2–induced miR‐221/222 expression and highlight its clinical potential for the treatment of reactive oxygen species–mediated skeletal muscle

  17. Bioinspired Nanocomplex for Spatiotemporal Imaging of Sequential mRNA Expression in Differentiating Neural Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Messenger RNA plays a pivotal role in regulating cellular activities. The expression dynamics of specific mRNA contains substantial information on the intracellular milieu. Unlike the imaging of stationary mRNAs, real-time intracellular imaging of the dynamics of mRNA expression is of great value for investigating mRNA biology and exploring specific cellular cascades. In addition to advanced imaging methods, timely extracellular stimulation is another key factor in regulating the mRNA expression repertoire. The integration of effective stimulation and imaging into a single robust system would significantly improve stimulation efficiency and imaging accuracy, producing fewer unwanted artifacts. In this study, we developed a multifunctional nanocomplex to enable self-activating and spatiotemporal imaging of the dynamics of mRNA sequential expression during the neural stem cell differentiation process. This nanocomplex showed improved enzymatic stability, fast recognition kinetics, and high specificity. With a mechanism regulated by endogenous cell machinery, this nanocomplex realized the successive stimulating motif release and the dynamic imaging of chronological mRNA expression during neural stem cell differentiation without the use of transgenetic manipulation. The dynamic imaging montage of mRNA expression ultimately facilitated genetic heterogeneity analysis. In vivo lateral ventricle injection of this nanocomplex enabled endogenous neural stem cell activation and labeling at their specific differentiation stages. This nanocomplex is highly amenable as an alternative tool to explore the dynamics of intricate mRNA activities in various physiological and pathological conditions. PMID:25494492

  18. Calpain expression in lymphoid cells. Increased mRNA and protein levels after cell activation.

    PubMed

    Deshpande, R V; Goust, J M; Chakrabarti, A K; Barbosa, E; Hogan, E L; Banik, N L

    1995-02-10

    Although calpain is ubiquitously present in human tissues and is thought to play a role in demyelination, its activity is very low in resting normal lymphocytes. To determine the nature of calpain expression at the mRNA and protein levels in human lymphoid cells, we studied human T lymphocytic, B lymphocytic, and monocytic lines as well as peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Stimulation of cells with the phorbol ester phorbol myristate acetate and the calcium ionophore A23187 resulted in increased calpain mRNA and protein expression. Calpain mRNA expression is also increased in human T cells stimulated with anti-CD3. A dissociation between the increases of RNA and protein suggested that calpain could be released from the cells; the subsequent experiments showed its presence in the extracellular environment. 5,6-Dichloro-1b-D-ribofuranosylbenzimidazole, a reversible inhibitor of mRNA synthesis, reduced calpain mRNA levels by 50-67% and protein levels by 72-91%. Its removal resulted in resumption of both calpain mRNA and protein synthesis. Cycloheximide, a translational inhibitor, reduced calpain protein levels by 77-81% and calpain mRNA levels by 96% in activated THP-1 cells. Interferon-gamma induced calpain mRNA and protein in U-937 and THP-1 cells. Dexamethasone increased mRNA expression in THP-1 cells. Our results indicate that activation of lymphoid cells results in de novo synthesis and secretion of calpain. PMID:7852311

  19. The number of preproghrelin mRNA expressing cells is increased in mice with activity-based anorexia.

    PubMed

    François, Marie; Barde, Swapnali; Achamrah, Najate; Breton, Jonathan; do Rego, Jean-Claude; Coëffier, Moïse; Hökfelt, Tomas; Déchelotte, Pierre; Fetissov, Sergueï O

    2015-06-01

    Plasma levels of ghrelin, an orexigenic peptide, are increased during conditions of chronic starvation, such as in patients with anorexia nervosa. However, it is not known whether such increase can be related to the number of preproghrelin mRNA-expressing cells in the stomach, and if chronic starvation may activate a tentative central ghrelin production. In this work, in situ hybridization technique was used to analyze the presence and number of preproghrelin mRNA-expressing cells in the stomach and the hypothalamus of mice with activity-based anorexia (ABA) induced by the combination of running wheel activity with progressive, during 10 days, feeding-time restriction (FTR) and compared with sedentary FTR, ABA pair-fed (PF) and ad libitum-fed control mice. All food-restricted mice lost more than 20% of body weight. Body weight loss was similar in ABA and PF mice, but it was more pronounced than in FTR mice. Food intake was also lower in ABA than in FTR mice. Preproghrelin mRNA-expressing cells in the stomach were increased proportionally to the body weight loss in all food-restricted groups with the highest number in ABA mice. No preproghrelin mRNA-producing cells were detectable in the hypothalamus of either control or food-restricted mice. Thus, the increased number of gastric preproghrelin mRNA-producing cells during chronic starvation proportionally to the body weight loss and reduced food intake may underlie increased plasma ghrelin. Hyperactivity-induced anorexia appears to further increase the number of preproghrelin mRNA-producing cells in the stomach. No evidence was found for ghrelin expression in the hypothalamus, not even in any of the present experimental models. PMID:25963530

  20. Dietary glycerol for quail: association between productive performance and COX III mRNA expression.

    PubMed

    Silva, S C C; Gasparino, E; Batista, E; Tanamati, F; Vesco, A P D; Lala, B; de Oliveira, D P

    2016-01-01

    This study was carry out to evaluate mRNA expression of mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase III in the Pectoralis superficialis muscle of 28-day-old quails fed diets containing 0, 8, and 12% glycerol. Total RNA was extracted (N = 10) and cDNA was amplified using specifics primers for qRT-PCR. Feed efficiency and feed intake were evaluated. COX III mRNA expression in breast muscle was higher in the group fed with 12% glycerol (0.863 AU); no differences were observed in the expression of this gene between the muscle of animals fed diets without glycerol (0.357 AU) and 8% glycerol (0.415 AU). Quails that showed greater COX III mRNA expression also showed the lowest feed efficiency. These results show that there is a difference in COX III mRNA expression in breast muscle of 28-day-old quail fed diets different concentrations of glycerol. PMID:27323091

  1. Anxiolytic-Like Effects of Increased Ghrelin Receptor Signaling in the Amygdala

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Morten; Ratner, Cecilia; Rudenko, Olga; Christiansen, Søren H.; Skov, Louise J.; Hundahl, Cecilie; Woldbye, David P.D.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Besides the well-known effects of ghrelin on adiposity and food intake regulation, the ghrelin system has been shown to regulate aspects of behavior including anxiety and stress. However, the effect of virus-mediated overexpression of the ghrelin receptor in the amygdala has not previously been addressed directly. Methods: First, we examined the acute effect of peripheral ghrelin administration on anxiety- and depression-like behavior using the open field, elevated plus maze, forced swim, and tail suspension tests. Next, we examined the effect of peripheral ghrelin administration and ghrelin receptor deficiency on stress in a familiar and social environment using the Intellicage system. Importantly, we also used a novel approach to study ghrelin receptor signaling in the brain by overexpressing the ghrelin receptor in the amygdala. We examined the effect of ghrelin receptor overexpression on anxiety-related behavior before and after acute stress and measured the modulation of serotonin receptor expression. Results: We found that ghrelin caused an anxiolytic-like effect in both the open field and elevated plus maze tests. Additionally, it attenuated air-puff–induced stress in the social environment, while the opposite was shown in ghrelin receptor deficient mice. Finally, we found that overexpression of the ghrelin receptor in the basolateral division of the amygdala caused an anxiolytic-like effect and decreased the 5HT1a receptor expression. Conclusions: Ghrelin administration and overexpression of the ghrelin receptor in the amygdala induces anxiolytic-like behavior. Since the ghrelin receptor has high constitutive activity, ligand-independent signaling in vivo may be important for the observed anxiolytic-like effects. The anxiolytic effects seem to be mediated independently from the HPA axis, potentially engaging the central serotonin system. PMID:26578081

  2. Complex organisation and structure of the ghrelin antisense strand gene GHRLOS, a candidate non-coding RNA gene

    PubMed Central

    Seim, Inge; Carter, Shea L; Herington, Adrian C; Chopin, Lisa K

    2008-01-01

    Background The peptide hormone ghrelin has many important physiological and pathophysiological roles, including the stimulation of growth hormone (GH) release, appetite regulation, gut motility and proliferation of cancer cells. We previously identified a gene on the opposite strand of the ghrelin gene, ghrelinOS (GHRLOS), which spans the promoter and untranslated regions of the ghrelin gene (GHRL). Here we further characterise GHRLOS. Results We have described GHRLOS mRNA isoforms that extend over 1.4 kb of the promoter region and 106 nucleotides of exon 4 of the ghrelin gene, GHRL. These GHRLOS transcripts initiate 4.8 kb downstream of the terminal exon 4 of GHRL and are present in the 3' untranslated exon of the adjacent gene TATDN2 (TatD DNase domain containing 2). Interestingly, we have also identified a putative non-coding TATDN2-GHRLOS chimaeric transcript, indicating that GHRLOS RNA biogenesis is extremely complex. Moreover, we have discovered that the 3' region of GHRLOS is also antisense, in a tail-to-tail fashion to a novel terminal exon of the neighbouring SEC13 gene, which is important in protein transport. Sequence analyses revealed that GHRLOS is riddled with stop codons, and that there is little nucleotide and amino-acid sequence conservation of the GHRLOS gene between vertebrates. The gene spans 44 kb on 3p25.3, is extensively spliced and harbours multiple variable exons. We have also investigated the expression of GHRLOS and found evidence of differential tissue expression. It is highly expressed in tissues which are emerging as major sites of non-coding RNA expression (the thymus, brain, and testis), as well as in the ovary and uterus. In contrast, very low levels were found in the stomach where sense, GHRL derived RNAs are highly expressed. Conclusion GHRLOS RNA transcripts display several distinctive features of non-coding (ncRNA) genes, including 5' capping, polyadenylation, extensive splicing and short open reading frames. The gene is also

  3. Differential distribution of ghrelin-O-acyltransferase (GOAT) immunoreactive cells in the mouse and rat gastric oxyntic mucosa

    PubMed Central

    Stengel, Andreas; Goebel, Miriam; Wang, Lixin; Taché, Yvette; Sachs, George; Lambrecht, Nils W.G.

    2013-01-01

    The enzyme that acylates ghrelin was recently identified in mice as the fourth member of the membrane-bound O-acyltransferases superfamily (MBOAT4) and named ghrelin-O-acyltransferase (GOAT). Only one report showed GOAT mRNA expression in ghrelin-expressing cells of the mouse stomach. We investigated the distribution of GOAT protein in peripheral tissues and co-expression with endocrine markers in the gastric mucosa using a custom-made anti-GOAT antibody. Tissues were collected from male Sprague-Dawley rats and C57BL/6 mice. Western blot revealed two immunoreactive bands in rat and mouse gastric corpus mucosal proteins, a 50 kDa band corresponding to the GOAT protein and a 100 kDa band likely corresponding to a dimer. Western blot also detected GOAT in the plasma and levels were strongly increased after 24-h fasting in mice and slightly in rats. GOAT-immunoreactive cells were located in the gastric corpus mucosa and the anterior pituitary gland, whereas other peripheral tissues of rats and mice examined were negative. In mice, GOAT-immunoreactive cells were mainly distributed throughout the middle portion of the oxyntic glands, whereas in rats they were localized mainly in the lower portion of the glands. Double labeling showed that 95±1% of GOAT-immunoreactive cells in mice co-labeled with ghrelin, whereas in rats only 56±4% of GOAT-positive cells showed co-expression of ghrelin. The remainder of the GOAT-immunopositive cells in rats co-expressed histidine decarboxylase (44±3%). No co-localization was observed with somatostatin in rats or mice. These data suggest species differences between rats and mice in gastric GOAT expression perhaps resulting in a different role of the MBOAT4 enzyme in the rat stomach. Detection of GOAT in the plasma raises the possibility that ghrelin octanoylation may occur in the circulation and the fasting-induced increase in GOAT may contribute to the increase of acylated ghrelin after fasting. PMID:20059966

  4. Prefrontal cortical-striatal dopamine receptor mRNA expression predicts distinct forms of impulsivity.

    PubMed

    Simon, Nicholas W; Beas, Blanca S; Montgomery, Karienn S; Haberman, Rebecca P; Bizon, Jennifer L; Setlow, Barry

    2013-06-01

    Variation in dopamine receptor levels has been associated with different facets of impulsivity. To further delineate the neural substrates underlying impulsive action (inability to withhold a prepotent motor response) and impulsive choice (delay aversion), we characterised rats in the Differential Reinforcement of Low Rates of Responding task and a delay discounting task. We also measured performance on an effort-based discounting task. We then assessed D1 and D2 dopamine receptor mRNA expression in subregions of the prefrontal cortex and nucleus accumbens using in situ hybridisation, and compared these data with behavioral performance. Expression of D1 and D2 receptor mRNA in distinct brain regions was predictive of impulsive action. A dissociation within the nucleus accumbens was observed between subregions and receptor subtypes; higher D1 mRNA expression in the shell predicted greater impulsive action, whereas lower D2 mRNA expression in the core predicted greater impulsive action. We also observed a negative correlation between impulsive action and D2 mRNA expression in the prelimbic cortex. Interestingly, a similar relationship was present between impulsive choice and prelimbic cortex D2 mRNA, despite the fact that behavioral indices of impulsive action and impulsive choice were uncorrelated. Finally, we found that both high D1 mRNA expression in the insular cortex and low D2 mRNA expression in the infralimbic cortex were associated with willingness to exert effort for rewards. Notably, dopamine receptor mRNA in these regions was not associated with either facet of impulsivity. The data presented here provide novel molecular and neuroanatomical distinctions between different forms of impulsivity, as well as effort-based decision-making. PMID:23510331

  5. Prefrontal cortical–striatal dopamine receptor mRNA expression predicts distinct forms of impulsivity

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Nicholas W.; Beas, Blanca S.; Montgomery, Karienn S.; Haberman, Rebecca P.; Bizon, Jennifer L.; Setlow, Barry

    2014-01-01

    Variation in dopamine receptor levels has been associated with different facets of impulsivity. To further delineate the neural substrates underlying impulsive action (inability to withhold a prepotent motor response) and impulsive choice (delay aversion), we characterised rats in the Differential Reinforcement of Low Rates of Responding task and a delay discounting task. We also measured performance on an effort-based discounting task. We then assessed D1 and D2 dopamine receptor mRNA expression in subregions of the prefrontal cortex and nucleus accumbens using in situ hybridisation, and compared these data with behavioral performance. Expression of D1 and D2 receptor mRNA in distinct brain regions was predictive of impulsive action. A dissociation within the nucleus accumbens was observed between subregions and receptor subtypes; higher D1 mRNA expression in the shell predicted greater impulsive action, whereas lower D2 mRNA expression in the core predicted greater impulsive action. We also observed a negative correlation between impulsive action and D2 mRNA expression in the prelimbic cortex. Interestingly, a similar relationship was present between impulsive choice and prelimbic cortex D2 mRNA, despite the fact that behavioral indices of impulsive action and impulsive choice were uncorrelated. Finally, we found that both high D1 mRNA expression in the insular cortex and low D2 mRNA expression in the infralimbic cortex were associated with willingness to exert effort for rewards. Notably, dopamine receptor mRNA in these regions was not associated with either facet of impulsivity. The data presented here provide novel molecular and neuroanatomical distinctions between different forms of impulsivity, as well as effort-based decision-making. PMID:23510331

  6. Alternative splicing of parathyroid hormone-related protein mRNA: expression and stability

    PubMed Central

    Sellers, R S; Luchin, A I; Richard, V; Brena, R M; Lima, D; Rosol, T J

    2011-01-01

    Parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) is a multifunctional protein that is often dysregulated in cancer. The human PTHrP gene is alternatively spliced into three isoforms, each with a unique 3′-untranslated region (3′-UTR), encoding 139, 173 and 141 amino acid proteins. The regulation of PTHrP mRNA isoform expression has not been completely elucidated, but it may be affected by transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1). In this study, we examined differences in the PTHrP mRNA isoform expression in two squamous carcinoma cell lines (SCC2/88 and HARA), an immortalized keratinocyte cell line (HaCaT), and spontaneous human lung cancer with adjacent normal tissue. In addition, the effect of TGF-β1 on PTHrP mRNA isoform expression and stability was examined. Cell-type specific expression of PTHrP mRNA isoforms occurred between the various cell lines, normal human lung, and immortalized human keratinocytes (HaCaT). PTHrP isoform expression pattern was significantly altered between normal lung tissue and the adjacent lung cancer. In vitro studies revealed that TGF-β1 differentially altered the mRNA steady-state levels and mRNA stability of the PTHrP isoforms. Protein–RNA binding studies identified different proteins binding to the 3′-UTR of the PTHrP isoforms (139) and (141), which may be important in the differential mRNA stability and response to cytokines between the PTHrP isoforms. The data demonstrate that there is cell-type specific expression of PTHrP mRNA isoforms, and disruption of the normal regulation during cancer progression may in part be associated with TGF-β1-induced changes in PTHrP mRNA isoform expression and stability. PMID:15291755

  7. Impact of STAT/SOCS mRNA Expression Levels after Major Injury

    PubMed Central

    Brumann, M.; Matz, M.; Kusmenkov, T.; Stegmaier, J.; Biberthaler, P.; Kanz, K.-G.; Mutschler, W.; Bogner, V.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Fulminant changes in cytokine receptor signalling might provoke severe pathological alterations after multiple trauma. The aim of this study was to evaluate the posttraumatic imbalance of the innate immune system with a special focus on the STAT/SOCS family. Methods. 20 polytraumatized patients were included. Blood samples were drawn 0 h–72 h after trauma; mRNA expression profiles of IL-10, STAT 3, SOCS 1, and SOCS 3 were quantified by qPCR. Results. IL-10 mRNA expression increased significantly in the early posttraumatic period. STAT 3 mRNA expressions showed a significant maximum at 6 h after trauma. SOCS 1 levels significantly decreased 6 h–72 h after trauma. SOCS 3 levels were significantly higher in nonsurvivors 6 h after trauma. Conclusion. We present a serial, sequential investigation in human neutrophil granulocytes of major trauma patients evaluating mRNA expression profiles of IL-10, STAT 3, SOCS 1, and SOCS 3. Posttraumatically, immune disorder was accompanied by a significant increase of IL-10 and STAT 3 mRNA expression, whereas SOCS 1 mRNA levels decreased after injury. We could demonstrate that death after trauma was associated with higher SOCS 3 mRNA levels already at 6 h after trauma. To support our results, further investigations have to evaluate protein levels of STAT/SOCS family in terms of posttraumatic immune imbalance. PMID:24648661

  8. Ghrelin and reproduction: ghrelin as novel regulator of the gonadotropic axis.

    PubMed

    Tena-Sempere, Manuel

    2008-01-01

    Identification of ghrelin in late 1999, as the endogenous ligand of the growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHSR), opened up a new era in our understanding of the regulatory mechanisms of several neuroendocrine systems, including growth and energy homeostasis. Based on similarities with other endocrine integrators and its proposed role as signal for energy insufficiency, it appeared tempting to hypothesize that ghrelin might also operate as regulator of reproductive function. Yet, contrary to other of its biological actions the reproductive "dimension" of ghrelin has remained largely unexplored. Nonetheless, experimental evidence, coming mostly from animal studies, have been gathered during the last years suggesting that ghrelin may actually function as a metabolic modulator of the gonadotropic axis, with predominant inhibitory effects in line with its role as signal of energy deficit. These effects likely include inhibition of luteinizing hormone (LH) secretion (which has been reported in different species and developmental stages), as well as partial suppression of normal puberty onset. In addition, expression and/or direct gonadal actions of ghrelin have been reported in the human, rat, and chicken. Altogether, those findings document a novel reproductive facet of ghrelin, which may cooperate with other neuroendocrine integrators, as leptin, in the joint control of energy balance and reproduction. PMID:17983861

  9. Astrocyte cultures derived from human brain tissue express angiotensinogen mRNA

    SciTech Connect

    Milsted, A.; Barna, B.P.; Ransohoff, R.M.; Brosnihan, K.B.; Ferrario, C.M. )

    1990-08-01

    The authors have identified human cultured cell lines that are useful for studying angiotensinogen gene expression and its regulation in the central nervous system. A model cell system of human central nervous system origin expressing angiotensinogen has not previously been available. Expression of angiotensinogen mRNA appears to be a basal property of noninduced human astrocytes, since astrocytic cell lines derived from human glioblastomas or nonneoplastic human brain tissue invariably produced angiotensinogen mRNA. In situ hybridization histochemistry revealed that angiotensinogen mRNA production was not limited to a subpopulation of astrocytes because >99% of cells in these cultures contained angiotensinogen mRNA. These cell lines will be useful in studies of the molecular mechanisms controlling angiotensin synthesis and the role of biologically active angiotensin in the human brain by allowing the authors to examine regulation of expression of the renin-angiotensin system in human astrocyte cultures.

  10. Molecular evolution of GPCRs: Ghrelin/ghrelin receptors.

    PubMed

    Kaiya, Hiroyuki; Kangawa, Kenji; Miyazato, Mikiya

    2014-06-01

    After the discovery in 1996 of the GH secretagogue-receptor type-1a (GHS-R1a) as an orphan G-protein coupled receptor, many research groups attempted to identify the endogenous ligand. Finally, Kojima and colleagues successfully isolated the peptide ligand from rat stomach extracts, determined its structure, and named it ghrelin. The GHS-R1a is now accepted to be the ghrelin receptor. The existence of the ghrelin system has been demonstrated in many animal classes through biochemical and molecular biological strategies as well as through genome projects. Our work, focused on identifying the ghrelin receptor and its ligand ghrelin in laboratory animals, particularly nonmammalian vertebrates, has provided new insights into the molecular evolution of the ghrelin receptor. In mammals, it is assumed that the ghrelin receptor evolution is in line with the plate tectonics theory. In contrast, the evolution of the ghrelin receptor in nonmammalian vertebrates differs from that of mammals: multiplicity of the ghrelin receptor isoforms is observed in nonmammalian vertebrates only. This multiplicity is due to genome duplication and polyploidization events that particularly occurred in Teleostei. Furthermore, it is likely that the evolution of the ghrelin receptor is distinct from that of its ligand, ghrelin, because only one ghrelin isoform has been detected in all species examined so far. In this review, we summarize current knowledge related to the molecular evolution of the ghrelin receptor in mammalian and nonmammalian vertebrates. PMID:24353285

  11. An Integrative Review on Role and Mechanisms of Ghrelin in Stress, Anxiety and Depression.

    PubMed

    Bali, Anjana; Jaggi, Amteshwar Singh

    2016-01-01

    Ghrelin is orexigenic hormone primarily synthesized by endocrine X/A-like cells of gastric oxyntic mucosa to stimulate appetite and food intake along with regulation of growth hormone and insulin secretion; glucose and lipid metabolism; gastrointestinal motility; blood pressure, heart rate and neurogenesis. Furthermore, peripherally (after crossing the blood brain barrier) as well as centrally synthesized ghrelin (in the hypothalamus) regulates diverse functions of central nervous system including stress-associated behavioral functions. Exposure to stress alters the ghrelin levels and alteration in ghrelin levels significantly affects neuro-endocrinological parameters; metabolism-related physiology, behavior and mood. Studies have shown both anxiolytic and anxiogenic role of ghrelin suggesting its dual role in modulating anxiety-related behavior. However, it is proposed that increase in ghrelin levels during stress condition is an endogenous stress coping behavior and increased ghrelin levels may be required to prevent excessive anxiety. In preclinical and clinical studies, an elevation in ghrelin levels during depression has been correlated with their antidepressant activities. Ghrelin-induced modulation of stress and associated conditions has been linked to alteration in hypothalamic- pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis; autonomic nervous system (mainly sympathetic nervous system and serotonergic neurotransmission. A reciprocal relationship has been reported between corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) and ghrelin as ghrelin increases the release of CRH, ACTH and corticosteroids; while CRH decreases the expression of ghrelin. Similarly, ghrelin increases the serotonin turnover and in turn, serotonin controls ghrelin signaling to modulate anxietyrelated behavior. The present review discusses the dual role of ghrelin in stress and related behavioral disorders along with possible mechanisms. PMID:25981609

  12. Expression of lipoprotein lipase mRNA and secretion in macrophages isolated from human atherosclerotic aorta.

    PubMed

    Mattsson, L; Johansson, H; Ottosson, M; Bondjers, G; Wiklund, O

    1993-10-01

    The expression of lipoprotein lipase (LPL) mRNA and the LPL activity were studied in macrophages (CD14 positive) from human atherosclerotic tissue. Macrophages were isolated after collagenase digestion by immunomagnetic isolation. About 90% of the cells were foam cells with oil red O positive lipid droplets. To analyze the mRNA expression, PCR with specific primers for LPL was used. Arterial macrophages were analyzed directly after isolation and the data showed low expression of LPL mRNA when compared with monocyte-derived macrophages. To induce the expression of LPL mRNA in macrophages, PMA was used. When incubating arterial macrophages with PMA for 24 h we could not detect any increase in LPL mRNA levels. Similarly, the cells secreted very small amounts of LPL even after PMA stimulation. In conclusion, these studies show a very low expression of LPL mRNA in the CD14-positive macrophage-derived foam cells isolated from human atherosclerotic tissue. These data suggest that the CD14-positive cells are a subpopulation of foam cells that express low levels of lipoprotein lipase, and the lipid content could be a major factor for downregulation of LPL. However, the cells were isolated from advanced atherosclerotic lesions, and these findings may not reflect the situation in early fatty streaks. PMID:8408628

  13. Ghrelin Receptor Mutations and Human Obesity.

    PubMed

    Wang, W; Tao, Y-X

    2016-01-01

    Growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHSR) was originally identified as an orphan receptor in porcine and rat anterior pituitary membranes. In 1999, GHSR was deorphanized and shown to be a receptor for ghrelin, a peptide hormone secreted from the stomach. Therefore, GHSR is also called ghrelin receptor. In addition to regulating growth hormone secretion, ghrelin receptor regulates various physiological processes, including food intake and energy expenditure, glucose metabolism, cardiovascular functions, gastric acid secretion and motility, and immune function. Several human genetic studies conducted in populations originated from Europe, Africa, South America, and East Asia identified rare mutations and single nucleotide polymorphisms that might be associated with human obesity and short stature. Functional analyses of mutant GHSRs reveal multiple defects, including cell surface expression, ligand binding, and basal and stimulated signaling. With growing understanding in the functionality of naturally occurring GHSR mutations, potential therapeutic strategies including pharmacological chaperones and novel ligands could be used to correct the GHSR mutants. PMID:27288828

  14. A link between FTO, ghrelin, and impaired brain food-cue responsivity.

    PubMed

    Karra, Efthimia; O'Daly, Owen G; Choudhury, Agharul I; Yousseif, Ahmed; Millership, Steven; Neary, Marianne T; Scott, William R; Chandarana, Keval; Manning, Sean; Hess, Martin E; Iwakura, Hiroshi; Akamizu, Takashi; Millet, Queensta; Gelegen, Cigdem; Drew, Megan E; Rahman, Sofia; Emmanuel, Julian J; Williams, Steven C R; Rüther, Ulrich U; Brüning, Jens C; Withers, Dominic J; Zelaya, Fernando O; Batterham, Rachel L

    2013-08-01

    Polymorphisms in the fat mass and obesity-associated gene (FTO) are associated with human obesity and obesity-prone behaviors, including increased food intake and a preference for energy-dense foods. FTO demethylates N6-methyladenosine, a potential regulatory RNA modification, but the mechanisms by which FTO predisposes humans to obesity remain unclear. In adiposity-matched, normal-weight humans, we showed that subjects homozygous for the FTO "obesity-risk" rs9939609 A allele have dysregulated circulating levels of the orexigenic hormone acyl-ghrelin and attenuated postprandial appetite reduction. Using functional MRI (fMRI) in normal-weight AA and TT humans, we found that the FTO genotype modulates the neural responses to food images in homeostatic and brain reward regions. Furthermore, AA and TT subjects exhibited divergent neural responsiveness to circulating acyl-ghrelin within brain regions that regulate appetite, reward processing, and incentive motivation. In cell models, FTO overexpression reduced ghrelin mRNA N6-methyladenosine methylation, concomitantly increasing ghrelin mRNA and peptide levels. Furthermore, peripheral blood cells from AA human subjects exhibited increased FTO mRNA, reduced ghrelin mRNA N6-methyladenosine methylation, and increased ghrelin mRNA abundance compared with TT subjects. Our findings show that FTO regulates ghrelin, a key mediator of ingestive behavior, and offer insight into how FTO obesity-risk alleles predispose to increased energy intake and obesity in humans. PMID:23867619

  15. Ghrelin stimulates angiogenesis in human microvascular endothelial cells: Implications beyond GH release

    SciTech Connect

    Li Aihua; Cheng Guangli; Zhu Genghui; Tarnawski, Andrzej S. . E-mail: atarnawski@yahoo.com

    2007-02-09

    Ghrelin, a peptide hormone isolated from the stomach, releases growth hormone and stimulates appetite. Ghrelin is also expressed in pancreas, kidneys, cardiovascular system and in endothelial cells. The precise role of ghrelin in endothelial cell functions remains unknown. We examined the expression of ghrelin and its receptor (GHSR1) mRNAs and proteins in human microvascular endothelial cells (HMVEC) and determined whether ghrelin affects in these cells proliferation, migration and in vitro angiogenesis; and whether MAPK/ERK2 signaling is important for the latter action. We found that ghrelin and GHSR1 are constitutively expressed in HMVEC. Treatment of HMVEC with exogenous ghrelin significantly increased in these cells proliferation, migration, in vitro angiogenesis and ERK2 phosphorylation. MEK/ERK2 inhibitor, PD 98059 abolished ghrelin-induced in vitro angiogenesis. This is First demonstration that ghrelin and its receptor are expressed in human microvascular endothelial cells and that ghrelin stimulates HMVEC proliferation, migration, and angiogenesis through activation of ERK2 signaling.

  16. Expression of D2 dopamine receptor mRNA in the arterial chemoreceptor afferent pathway.

    PubMed

    Czyzyk-Krzeska, M F; Lawson, E E; Millhorn, D E

    1992-11-01

    Dopamine is a major neurotransmitter in the arterial chemoreceptor pathway. In the present study we wished to determine if messenger RNAs for dopamine D1 and D2 receptor are expressed in carotid body (type I cells), in sensory neurons of the petrosal ganglion which innervate the carotid body and in sympathetic neurons of the superior cervical ganglion. We failed to detect D1 receptor mRNA in any of these tissues. However, we found that D2 receptor mRNA was expressed by dopaminergic carotid body type I cells. D2 receptor mRNA was also found in petrosal ganglion neurons that innervated the carotid sinus and carotid body. In addition, a large number of sympathetic postganglionic neurons in the superior cervical ganglion expressed D2 receptor mRNA. PMID:1362730

  17. In1-ghrelin splicing variant is overexpressed in pituitary adenomas and increases their aggressive features

    PubMed Central

    Ibáñez-Costa, Alejandro; Gahete, Manuel D.; Rivero-Cortés, Esther; Rincón-Fernández, David; Nelson, Richard; Beltrán, Manuel; de la Riva, Andrés; Japón, Miguel A.; Venegas-Moreno, Eva; Gálvez, Ma Ángeles; García-Arnés, Juan A.; Soto-Moreno, Alfonso; Morgan, Jennifer; Tsomaia, Natia; Culler, Michael D.; Dieguez, Carlos; Castaño, Justo P.; Luque, Raúl M.

    2015-01-01

    Pituitary adenomas comprise a heterogeneous subset of pathologies causing serious comorbidities, which would benefit from identification of novel, common molecular/cellular biomarkers and therapeutic targets. The ghrelin system has been linked to development of certain endocrine-related cancers. Systematic analysis of the presence and functional implications of some components of the ghrelin system, including native ghrelin, receptors and the recently discovered splicing variant In1-ghrelin, in human normal pituitaries (n = 11) and pituitary adenomas (n = 169) revealed that expression pattern of ghrelin system suffers a clear alteration in pituitary adenomasas comparedwith normal pituitary, where In1-ghrelin is markedly overexpressed. Interestingly, in cultured pituitary adenoma cells In1-ghrelin treatment (acylated peptides at 100 nM; 24–72 h) increased GH and ACTH secretion, Ca2+ and ERK1/2 signaling and cell viability, whereas In1-ghrelin silencing (using a specific siRNA; 100 nM) reduced cell viability. These results indicate that an alteration of the ghrelin system, specially its In1-ghrelin variant, could contribute to pathogenesis of different pituitary adenomas types, and suggest that this variant and its related ghrelin system could provide new tools to identify novel, more general diagnostic, prognostic and potential therapeutic targets in pituitary tumors. PMID:25737012

  18. In1-ghrelin splicing variant is overexpressed in pituitary adenomas and increases their aggressive features.

    PubMed

    Ibáñez-Costa, Alejandro; Gahete, Manuel D; Rivero-Cortés, Esther; Rincón-Fernández, David; Nelson, Richard; Beltrán, Manuel; de la Riva, Andrés; Japón, Miguel A; Venegas-Moreno, Eva; Gálvez, Ma Ángeles; García-Arnés, Juan A; Soto-Moreno, Alfonso; Morgan, Jennifer; Tsomaia, Natia; Culler, Michael D; Dieguez, Carlos; Castaño, Justo P; Luque, Raúl M

    2015-01-01

    Pituitary adenomas comprise a heterogeneous subset of pathologies causing serious comorbidities, which would benefit from identification of novel, common molecular/cellular biomarkers and therapeutic targets. The ghrelin system has been linked to development of certain endocrine-related cancers. Systematic analysis of the presence and functional implications of some components of the ghrelin system, including native ghrelin, receptors and the recently discovered splicing variant In1-ghrelin, in human normal pituitaries (n = 11) and pituitary adenomas (n = 169) revealed that expression pattern of ghrelin system suffers a clear alteration in pituitary adenomasas compared with normal pituitary, where In1-ghrelin is markedly overexpressed. Interestingly, in cultured pituitary adenoma cells In1-ghrelin treatment (acylated peptides at 100 nM; 24-72 h) increased GH and ACTH secretion, Ca(2+) and ERK1/2 signaling and cell viability, whereas In1-ghrelin silencing (using a specific siRNA; 100 nM) reduced cell viability. These results indicate that an alteration of the ghrelin system, specially its In1-ghrelin variant, could contribute to pathogenesis of different pituitary adenomas types, and suggest that this variant and its related ghrelin system could provide new tools to identify novel, more general diagnostic, prognostic and potential therapeutic targets in pituitary tumors. PMID:25737012

  19. In1-ghrelin, a splice variant of ghrelin gene, is associated with the evolution and aggressiveness of human neuroendocrine tumors: Evidence from clinical, cellular and molecular parameters.

    PubMed

    Luque, Raul M; Sampedro-Nuñez, Miguel; Gahete, Manuel D; Ramos-Levi, Ana; Ibáñez-Costa, Alejandro; Rivero-Cortés, Esther; Serrano-Somavilla, Ana; Adrados, Magdalena; Culler, Michael D; Castaño, Justo P; Marazuela, Mónica

    2015-08-14

    Ghrelin system comprises a complex family of peptides, receptors (GHSRs), and modifying enzymes [e.g. ghrelin-O-acyl-transferase (GOAT)] that control multiple pathophysiological processes. Aberrant alternative splicing is an emerging cancer hallmark that generates altered proteins with tumorigenic capacity. Indeed, In1-ghrelin and truncated-GHSR1b splicing variants can promote development/progression of certain endocrine-related cancers. Here, we determined the expression levels of key ghrelin system components in neuroendocrine tumor (NETs) and explored their potential functional role. Twenty-six patients with NETs were prospectively/retrospectively studied [72 samples from primary and metastatic tissues (30 normal/42 tumors)] and clinical data were obtained. The role of In1-ghrelin in aggressiveness was studied in vitro using NET cell lines (BON-1/QGP-1). In1-ghrelin, GOAT and GHSR1a/1b expression levels were elevated in tumoral compared to normal/adjacent tissues. Moreover, In1-ghrelin, GOAT, and GHSR1b expression levels were positively correlated within tumoral, but not within normal/adjacent samples, and were higher in patients with progressive vs. with stable/cured disease. Finally, In1-ghrelin increased aggressiveness (e.g. proliferation/migration) of NET cells. Altogether, our data strongly suggests a potential implication of ghrelin system in the pathogenesis and/or clinical outcome of NETs, and warrant further studies on their possible value for the future development of molecular biomarkers with diagnostic/prognostic/therapeutic value. PMID:26124083

  20. In1-ghrelin, a splice variant of ghrelin gene, is associated with the evolution and aggressiveness of human neuroendocrine tumors: Evidence from clinical, cellular and molecular parameters

    PubMed Central

    Gahete, Manuel D.; Ramos-Levi, Ana; Ibáñez-Costa, Alejandro; Rivero-Cortés, Esther; Serrano-Somavilla, Ana; Adrados, Magdalena; Culler, Michael D.; Castaño, Justo P.; Marazuela, Mónica

    2015-01-01

    Ghrelin system comprises a complex family of peptides, receptors (GHSRs), and modifying enzymes [e.g. ghrelin-O-acyl-transferase (GOAT)] that control multiple pathophysiological processes. Aberrant alternative splicing is an emerging cancer hallmark that generates altered proteins with tumorigenic capacity. Indeed, In1-ghrelin and truncated-GHSR1b splicing variants can promote development/progression of certain endocrine-related cancers. Here, we determined the expression levels of key ghrelin system components in neuroendocrine tumor (NETs) and explored their potential functional role. Twenty-six patients with NETs were prospectively/retrospectively studied [72 samples from primary and metastatic tissues (30 normal/42 tumors)] and clinical data were obtained. The role of In1-ghrelin in aggressiveness was studied in vitro using NET cell lines (BON-1/QGP-1). In1-ghrelin, GOAT and GHSR1a/1b expression levels were elevated in tumoral compared to normal/adjacent tissues. Moreover, In1-ghrelin, GOAT, and GHSR1b expression levels were positively correlated within tumoral, but not within normal/adjacent samples, and were higher in patients with progressive vs. with stable/cured disease. Finally, In1-ghrelin increased aggressiveness (e.g. proliferation/migration) of NET cells. Altogether, our data strongly suggests a potential implication of ghrelin system in the pathogenesis and/or clinical outcome of NETs, and warrant further studies on their possible value for the future development of molecular biomarkers with diagnostic/prognostic/therapeutic value. PMID:26124083

  1. Unification of gene expression data applying standard mRNA quantification references for comparable analyses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    High throughput quantitative measurements of gene expression data have problems of reproducibility and comparability due to a lack of standard mRNA quantification references. Efforts have been made to safeguard data fidelity, yet generating quality expression data of inherent value remains a challe...

  2. Ribozyme cleaves rex/tax mRNA and inhibits bovine leukemia virus expression.

    PubMed Central

    Cantor, G H; McElwain, T F; Birkebak, T A; Palmer, G H

    1993-01-01

    Bovine leukemia virus (BLV) encodes at least two regulatory proteins, Rex and Tax. Tax, the transactivating protein, stimulates the long terminal repeat to promote viral transcription and may be involved in tumorigenesis. Rex is involved in the transition from early expression of regulatory proteins to later expression of viral structural proteins. We have targeted ribozymes against the mRNA encoding Rex and Tax. The ribozymes consist of the hammer-head catalytic motif flanked by antisense sequences that hybridize with the complementary rex/tax mRNA. To evaluate cleavage in a cell-free system, we transcribed portions of rex/tax mRNA and incubated them with synthetic RNA ribozymes. A ribozyme was identified that cleaves > 80% of the target RNA. Synthetic DNA encoding this ribozyme was cloned into the expression vector pRc/RSV and transfected into BLV-infected bat lung cells. Intracellular cleavage of rex/tax mRNA was confirmed by reverse transcriptase PCR. In cells expressing the ribozyme, viral expression was markedly inhibited. Expression of the BLV core protein p24 was inhibited by 61%, and reverse transcriptase activity in supernatant was inhibited by 92%. Ribozyme inhibition of BLV expression suggests that cattle expressing these sequences may be able to control BLV replication. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:7504287

  3. Stability regulation of mRNA and the control of gene expression.

    PubMed

    Cheadle, Chris; Fan, Jinshui; Cho-Chung, Yoon S; Werner, Thomas; Ray, Jill; Do, Lana; Gorospe, Myriam; Becker, Kevin G

    2005-11-01

    Microarray technology has become highly valuable for identifying complex global changes in gene expression patterns. Standard techniques measure changes in total cellular poly(A) mRNA levels. The assumption that changes in gene expression as measured by these techniques are directly and well correlated with changes in rates of new gene synthesis form the basis of attempts to connect coordinated changes in gene expression with shared transcription regulatory elements. Yet systematic attempts at this approach remain difficult to demonstrate convincingly. One reason for this difficulty may result from the intricate convergence of both transcriptional and mRNA turnover events which, together, directly influence steady-state mRNA levels. Recent technical advances have led to the successful scale-up and application of nuclear run-on procedures directly to microarrays. This development has allowed a gene-by-gene comparison between new gene synthesis in the nucleus and measured changes in total cellular polyA mRNA. Results from these studies have begun to challenge the strict interpretation of changes in gene expression measured by conventional microarrays as being closely correlated with changes in mRNA transcription rate, but rather they tend to support the significant expansion of the role played by changes in mRNA stability regulation to standard analyses of gene expression. Gene expression profiles obtained from both polyA mRNA (whole-cell) and nuclear run-on (newly transcribed) RNA across a time course of one hour following the activation of human Jurkat T cells with PMA plus ionomycin revealed that regulation of mRNA stability may account for as much as 50% of all measurements of changes in total cellular polyA mRNA in this system. Stability regulation was inferred by the absence of corresponding regulation of nuclear gene transcription activity for groups of genes strongly regulated at the whole cell level and which were also resistant to inhibition by Actinomycin

  4. CRF Type 2 Receptors Mediate the Metabolic Effects of Ghrelin in C2C12 cells

    PubMed Central

    Gershon, Eran; Vale, Wylie W

    2014-01-01

    Objective Ghrelin is known to regulate appetite control and cellular metabolism. The Corticotropin-Releasing Factor (CRF) family is also known to regulate energy balance. In this study, we investigated the links between ghrelin and the CRF family in C2C12 cells, a mouse myoblast cell line. Design and methods C2C12 cells were treated with ghrelin in the presence or absence of CRF receptor antagonists and then subjected to different metabolic analyses. Results Ghrelin enhanced glucose uptake by C2C12 cells, induced GLUT4 translocation to the cell surface and decreased RBP4 expression. A CRF-R2 selective antagonist, anti-sauvagine-30, blocked ghrelin-induced glucose uptake, Ghrelin upregulated CRF-R2 but not CRF-R1 levels. Moreover, ghrelin-treated C2C12 cells displayed a cAMP and pERK activation in response to Ucn3, a CRF-R2 specific ligand, but not in response to CRF or stressin, CRF-R1 specific ligands. Ghrelin also induced UCP2 and UCP3 expression, which were blocked by anti-sauvagine-30. Ghrelin did not induce fatty acids uptake by C2C12 cells or ACC expression. Even though C2C12 cells clearly exhibited responses to ghrelin, the known ghrelin receptor, GHSR1a, was not detectable in C2C12 cells. Conclusion Our results suggest that, ghrelin plays a role in regulating muscle glucose and, raise the possibility that suppression of the CRF-R2 pathway might provide benefits in high ghrelin states. PMID:23804489

  5. Gemin5 Binds to the Survival Motor Neuron mRNA to Regulate SMN Expression.

    PubMed

    Workman, Eileen; Kalda, Caitlin; Patel, Aalapi; Battle, Daniel J

    2015-06-19

    Reduced expression of SMN causes spinal muscular atrophy, a severe neurodegenerative disease. Despite the importance of maintaining SMN levels, relatively little is known about the mechanisms by which SMN levels are regulated. We show here that Gemin5, the snRNA-binding protein of the SMN complex, binds directly to the SMN mRNA and regulates SMN expression. Gemin5 binds with high specificity, both in vitro and in vivo, to sequence and structural elements in the SMN mRNA 3'-untranslated region that are reminiscent of the snRNP code to which Gemin5 binds on snRNAs. Reduction of Gemin5 redistributes the SMN mRNA from heavy polysomes to lighter polysomes and monosomes, suggesting that Gemin5 functions as an activator of SMN translation. SMN protein is not stoichiometrically present on the SMN mRNA with Gemin5, but the mRNA-binding activity of Gemin5 is dependent on SMN levels, providing a feedback mechanism for SMN to regulate its own expression via Gemin5. This work both reveals a new autoregulatory pathway governing SMN expression, and identifies a new mechanism through which SMN can modulate specific mRNA expression via Gemin5. PMID:25911097

  6. Cytochrome P450IA mRNA expression in feral Hudson River tomcod

    SciTech Connect

    Kreamer, G.L.; Squibb, K.; Gioeli, D.; Garte, S.J.; Wirgin, I. )

    1991-06-01

    The authors sought to determine if levels of cytochrome P450IA gene expression are environmentally induced in feral populations of Hudson River tomcod, a cancer prone fish, and whether laboratory exposure of tomcod to artificially spiked and naturally contaminated Hudson sediments can elicit a significant response. Using Northern blot analysis, they found levels of P450IA mRNA in tomcod collected from two Hudson River sites higher than those in tomcod from a river in Maine. Depuration of environmentally induced Hudson tomcod P450IA mRNA was rapid, with an initial detectable decline in P450 gene expression by 8 hr and basal levels reached by 5 days. Intraperitoneal injection of {beta}-napthoflavone in depurated Hudson tomcod resulted in a 15-fold induction of P450 gene expression within 26 hr. Exposure of depurated Hudson tomcod to natural sediment spiked with two PAHs resulted in a 7-fold induction of P450 gene expression. Exposure of depurated tomcod to sediment from a contaminated Hudson site also resulted in a 7- to 15-fold induction of P450IA mRNA expression. Northern blot analysis revealed a second polymorphic cytochrome P450IA mRNA band in some tomcod which was also detected by Southern blot analysis. Induction of cytochrome P450IA mRNA in Atlantic tomcod may provide a sensitive biomarker of environmentally relevant concentrations of some pollutants in the Hudson and other northeastern tidal rivers.

  7. Variations in cytokine mRNA expression during normal human pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Kruse, N; Greif, M; Moriabadi, N F; Marx, L; Toyka, K V; Rieckmann, P

    2000-01-01

    Epidemiological data provide evidence that disease activity of T cell-mediated, organ-specific autoimmune diseases is reduced during pregnancy. Although there are several experimental animal studies on the effect of pregnancy on the immune system, the situation in humans is less clear. We therefore performed a prospective analysis of cytokine mRNA expression in whole blood by a new on-line reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction technique and of serum hormone levels during pregnancy in healthy women. The control group included age-matched non-pregnant healthy women. Quantitativecytokine mRNA expression revealed significantly reduced IL-18, interferon-gamma (IFN-γ), and IL-2 mRNA levels in the first and second trimester in pregnancy compared with non-pregnant women. No difference between groups was detected for tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) mRNA. IL-4 and IL-10 mRNA were detected at low levels in only 20% of pregnant women and were reduced to a statistically significant extent in the second and third trimester compared with the control group. Changes in IL-18 mRNA expression correlated inversely with serum values for human choriogonadotropin (HCG) and IL-10 serum levels correlated with increases in serum 17β-oestradiol levels. These data indicate immunomodulatory effects of pregnancy at the cytokine level which may be related to the variations in the clinical course of organ-specific, T cell-mediated autoimmune diseases during pregnancy. PMID:10632669

  8. Endoplasmic reticulum stress increases AT1R mRNA expression via TIA-1-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Backlund, Michael; Paukku, Kirsi; Kontula, Kimmo K; Lehtonen, Jukka Y A

    2016-04-20

    As the formation of ribonucleoprotein complexes is a major mechanism of angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R) regulation, we sought to identify novel AT1R mRNA binding proteins. By affinity purification and mass spectroscopy, we identified TIA-1. This interaction was confirmed by colocalization of AT1R mRNA and TIA-1 by FISH and immunofluorescence microscopy. In immunoprecipitates of endogenous TIA- 1, reverse transcription-PCR amplified AT1R mRNA. TIA-1 has two binding sites within AT1R 3'-UTR. The binding site proximal to the coding region is glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH)-dependent whereas the distal binding site is not. TIA-1 functions as a part of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response leading to stress granule (SG) formation and translational silencing. We and others have shown that AT1R expression is increased by ER stress-inducing factors. In unstressed cells, TIA-1 binds to AT1R mRNA and decreases AT1R protein expression. Fluorescence microscopy shows that ER stress induced by thapsigargin leads to the transfer of TIA-1 to SGs. In FISH analysis AT1R mRNA remains in the cytoplasm and no longer colocalizes with TIA-1. Thus, release of TIA-1-mediated suppression by ER stress increases AT1R protein expression. In conclusion, AT1R mRNA is regulated by TIA-1 in a ER stress-dependent manner. PMID:26681690

  9. Endoplasmic reticulum stress increases AT1R mRNA expression via TIA-1-dependent mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Backlund, Michael; Paukku, Kirsi; Kontula, Kimmo K.; Lehtonen, Jukka Y.A.

    2016-01-01

    As the formation of ribonucleoprotein complexes is a major mechanism of angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R) regulation, we sought to identify novel AT1R mRNA binding proteins. By affinity purification and mass spectroscopy, we identified TIA-1. This interaction was confirmed by colocalization of AT1R mRNA and TIA-1 by FISH and immunofluorescence microscopy. In immunoprecipitates of endogenous TIA- 1, reverse transcription-PCR amplified AT1R mRNA. TIA-1 has two binding sites within AT1R 3′-UTR. The binding site proximal to the coding region is glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH)-dependent whereas the distal binding site is not. TIA-1 functions as a part of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response leading to stress granule (SG) formation and translational silencing. We and others have shown that AT1R expression is increased by ER stress-inducing factors. In unstressed cells, TIA-1 binds to AT1R mRNA and decreases AT1R protein expression. Fluorescence microscopy shows that ER stress induced by thapsigargin leads to the transfer of TIA-1 to SGs. In FISH analysis AT1R mRNA remains in the cytoplasm and no longer colocalizes with TIA-1. Thus, release of TIA-1-mediated suppression by ER stress increases AT1R protein expression. In conclusion, AT1R mRNA is regulated by TIA-1 in a ER stress-dependent manner. PMID:26681690

  10. OPIATE EXPOSURE AND WITHDRAWAL DYNAMICALLY REGULATE mRNA EXPRESSION IN THE SEROTONERGIC DORSAL RAPHE NUCLEUS

    PubMed Central

    Lunden, Jason; Kirby, Lynn G.

    2013-01-01

    Previous results from our lab suggest that hypofunctioning of the serotonergic (5-HT) dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) is involved in stress-induced opiate reinstatement. To further investigate the effects of morphine dependence and withdrawal on the 5-HT DRN system, we measured gene expression at the level of mRNA in the DRN during a model of morphine dependence, withdrawal and post withdrawal stress exposure in rats. Morphine pellets were implanted for 72h and then either removed or animals were injected with naloxone to produce spontaneous or precipitated withdrawal, respectively. Animals exposed to these conditions exhibited withdrawal symptoms including weight loss, wet dog shakes and jumping behavior. Gene expression for brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), TrkB, corticotrophin releasing-factor (CRF)-R1, CRF-R2, GABAA-α1, μ-opioid receptor (MOR), 5-HT1A, tryptophan hydroxylase2 and the 5-HT transporter was then measured using quantitative real-time PCR at multiple time-points across the model of morphine exposure, withdrawal and post withdrawal stress. Expression levels of BDNF, TrkB and CRF-R1 mRNA were decreased during both morphine exposure and following seven days of withdrawal. CRF-R2 mRNA expression was elevated after seven days of withdrawal. 5-HT1A receptor mRNA expression was decreased following 3 hours of morphine exposure, while TPH2 mRNA expression was decreased after seven days of withdrawal with swim stress. There were no changes in the expression of GABAA-α1, MOR or 5-HT transporter mRNA. Collectively these results suggest that alterations in neurotrophin support, CRF-dependent stress signaling, 5-HT synthesis and release may underlie 5-HT DRN hypofunction that can potentially lead to stress-induced opiate relapse. PMID:24055683

  11. Expression of Npas4 mRNA in Telencephalic Areas of Adult and Postnatal Mouse Brain

    PubMed Central

    Damborsky, Joanne C.; Slaton, G. Simona; Winzer-Serhan, Ursula H.

    2015-01-01

    The transcription factor neuronal PAS domain-containing protein 4 (Npas4) is an inducible immediate early gene which regulates the formation of inhibitory synapses, and could have a significant regulatory role during cortical circuit formation. However, little is known about basal Npas4 mRNA expression during postnatal development. Here, postnatal and adult mouse brain sections were processed for isotopic in situ hybridization using an Npas4 specific cRNA antisense probe. In adults, Npas4 mRNA was found in the telencephalon with very restricted or no expression in diencephalon or mesencephalon. In most telencephalic areas, including the anterior olfactory nucleus (AON), piriform cortex, neocortex, hippocampus, dorsal caudate putamen (CPu), septum and basolateral amygdala nucleus (BLA), basal Npas4 expression was detected in scattered cells which exhibited strong hybridization signal. In embryonic and neonatal brain sections, Npas4 mRNA expression signals were very low. Starting at postnatal day 5 (P5), transcripts for Npas4 were detected in the AON, CPu and piriform cortex. At P8, additional Npas4 hybridization was found in CA1 and CA3 pyramidal layer, and in primary motor cortex. By P13, robust mRNA expression was located in layers IV and VI of all sensory cortices, frontal cortex and cingulate cortex. After onset of expression, postnatal spatial mRNA distribution was similar to that in adults, with the exception of the CPu, where Npas4 transcripts became gradually restricted to the most dorsal part. In conclusion, the spatial distribution of Npas4 mRNA is mostly restricted to telencephalic areas, and the temporal expression increases with developmental age during postnatal development, which seem to correlate with the onset of activity-driven excitatory transmission. PMID:26633966

  12. The atypical antipsychotic, olanzapine, potentiates ghrelin-induced receptor signaling: An in vitro study with cells expressing cloned human growth hormone secretagogue receptor.

    PubMed

    Tagami, Keita; Kashiwase, Yohei; Yokoyama, Akinobu; Nishimura, Hitomi; Miyano, Kanako; Suzuki, Masami; Shiraishi, Seiji; Matoba, Motohiro; Ohe, Yuichiro; Uezono, Yasuhito

    2016-08-01

    The growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHS-R) belongs to Gαq-coupled G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) that mediates growth hormone release, food intake, appetite, glucose metabolism and body composition. Ghrelin has been identified as an endogenous ligand for GHS-R, and it is the only orexigenic peptide found in the peripheral organs. Olanzapine, an atypical antipsychotic agent that binds to and inhibits the activation of GPCR for several neurotransmitters, has metabolic side effects such as excessive appetite and weight gain. Recently, studies have revealed that the orexigenic mechanism of olanzapine is mediated via GHS-R signaling, although the precise mechanisms have not been clarified. In this study, we investigated the effect of olanzapine on ghrelin-mediated GHS-R signaling by using an electrical impedance-based receptor biosensor assay system (CellKey™). Olanzapine at concentrations of 10(-7) and 10(-6)mol/L enhanced ghrelin-induced (10(-10)-10(-8)mol/L) GHS-R activation. A Ca(2+) imaging assay revealed that olanzapine (10(-7) and 10(-6)mol/L) enhanced ghrelin (10(-7) M)-induced GHS-R activity. In contrast, haloperidol (an antipsychotic agent) failed to enhance this ghrelin-mediated GHS-R activation, as demonstrated by both the CellKey™ and Ca(2+) imaging assays. Together, these results suggest that olanzapine, but not haloperidol, promotes appetite by enhancing ghrelin-mediated GHS-R signaling. PMID:26775231

  13. Ghrelin, food intake, and botanical extracts: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Rezaie, Peyman; Mazidi, Mohsen; Nematy, Mohsen

    2015-01-01

    A kind of growth hormone secretagogue (GHS), ghrelin, was first isolated from the rat stomach and plays a major role in the activation of the growth hormone secretagogue receptor 1a (GHS-R1a) resulting the release of growth hormone (GH). The preproghrelin gene is placed on chromosome 3, at locus 3p25 –2 in humans and constitutes five exons and three introns. Ghrelin is most plentifully expressed in particular cells in the oxyntic glands of the gastric epithelium, initially named X/A-like cells. Almost 60-70% of circulating ghrelin is secreted by the stomach. Plasma ghrelin concentration alters throughout the day. Ghrelin has been suggested to act as a meal initiator because of its appetite-stimulating influences in free feeding rats in short period. In addition to ghrelin’s function as a meal motivator, it seems to contribute in long-term energy balance and nutritional status. In addition, many studies have been carried out in order to investigate the effects of natural and medicinal plants and botanical extracts on appetite, food intake, energy hemostasis, and the level of related hormones including ghrelin. Due to the importance of ghrelin in nutritional and medical sciences, this review was performed to understand new aspects of this hormone’s function. PMID:26445708

  14. Metabolic Benefit of Chronic Caloric Restriction and Activation of Hypothalamic AGRP/NPY Neurons in Male Mice Is Independent of Ghrelin.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Nicole H; Walsh, Heidi; Alvarez-Garcia, Oscar; Park, Seongjoon; Gaylinn, Bruce; Thorner, Michael O; Smith, Roy G

    2016-04-01

    Aging is associated with attenuated ghrelin signaling. During aging, chronic caloric restriction (CR) produces health benefits accompanied by enhanced ghrelin production. Ghrelin receptor (GH secretagogue receptor 1a) agonists administered to aging rodents and humans restore the young adult phenotype; therefore, we tested the hypothesis that the metabolic benefits of CR are mediated by endogenous ghrelin. Three month-old male mice lacking ghrelin (Ghrelin-/-) or ghrelin receptor (Ghsr-/-), and their wild-type (WT) littermates were randomly assigned to 2 groups: ad libitum (AL) fed and CR, where 40% food restriction was introduced gradually to allow Ghrelin-/- and Ghsr-/- mice to metabolically adapt and avoid severe hypoglycemia. Twelve months later, plasma ghrelin, metabolic parameters, ambulatory activity, hypothalamic and liver gene expression, as well as body composition were measured. CR increased plasma ghrelin and des-acyl ghrelin concentrations in WT and Ghsr-/- mice. CR of WT, Ghsr-/-, and Ghrelin-/- mice markedly improved metabolic flexibility, enhanced ambulatory activity, and reduced adiposity. Inactivation of Ghrelin or Ghsr had no effect on AL food intake or food anticipatory behavior. In contrast to the widely held belief that endogenous ghrelin regulates food intake, CR increased expression of hypothalamic Agrp and Npy, with reduced expression of Pomc across genotypes. In the AL context, ablation of ghrelin signaling markedly inhibited liver steatosis, which correlated with reduced Pparγ expression and enhanced Irs2 expression. Although CR and administration of GH secretagogue receptor 1a agonists both benefit the aging phenotype, we conclude the benefits of chronic CR are a consequence of enhanced metabolic flexibility independent of endogenous ghrelin or des-acyl ghrelin signaling. PMID:26812158

  15. Glucose induces FGF21 mRNA expression through ChREBP activation in rat hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Iizuka, Katsumi; Takeda, Jun; Horikawa, Yukio

    2009-09-01

    Fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21) has beneficial effects of improving the plasma glucose and lipid profiles in diabetic rodents. Here, we investigated carbohydrate response element binding protein (ChREBP) involvement in the regulation of FGF21 mRNA expression in liver. Glucose stimulation and adenoviral overexpression of dominant active ChREBP increased FGF21 mRNA. Consistently, adenoviral expression of dominant negative Mlx inhibited glucose induction of FGF21 mRNA. Furthermore, deletion studies of mouse FGF21 gene promoter (-2000 to +65 bp) revealed a glucose responsive region between -74 and -52 bp. These findings suggest that FGF21 expression is regulated by ChREBP. PMID:19660458

  16. Detection of MDR1 mRNA expression with optimized gold nanoparticle beacon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Qiumei; Qian, Zhiyu; Gu, Yueqing

    2016-03-01

    MDR1 (multidrug resistance gene) mRNA expression is a promising biomarker for the prediction of doxorubicin resistance in clinic. However, the traditional technical process in clinic is complicated and cannot perform the real-time detection mRNA in living single cells. In this study, the expression of MDR1 mRNA was analyzed based on optimized gold nanoparticle beacon in tumor cells. Firstly, gold nanoparticle (AuNP) was modified by thiol-PEG, and the MDR1 beacon sequence was screened and optimized using a BLAST bioinformatics strategy. Then, optimized MDR1 molecular beacons were characterized by transmission electron microscope, UV-vis and fluorescence spectroscopies. The cytotoxicity of MDR1 molecular beacon on L-02, K562 and K562/Adr cells were investigated by MTT assay, suggesting that MDR1 molecular beacon was low inherent cytotoxicity. Dark field microscope was used to investigate the cellular uptake of hDAuNP beacon assisted with ultrasound. Finally, laser scanning confocal microscope images showed that there was a significant difference in MDR1 mRNA expression in K562 and K562/Adr cells, which was consistent with the results of q-PCR measurement. In summary, optimized MDR1 molecular beacon designed in this study is a reliable strategy for detection MDR1 mRNA expression in living tumor cells, and will be a promising strategy for in guiding patient treatment and management in individualized medication.

  17. Active ghrelin and the postpartum.

    PubMed

    Baker, Jessica H; Pedersen, Cort; Leserman, Jane; Brownley, Kimberly A

    2016-06-01

    Postpartum depression (PPD) occurs in 10-15 % of women. The appetite hormone ghrelin, which fluctuates during pregnancy, is associated with depression in nonpregnant samples. Here, we examine the association between PPD and active ghrelin from pregnancy to postpartum. We additionally examine whether ghrelin changes from pregnancy to postpartum and differs between breastfeeding and non-breastfeeding women. Sixty women who participated in a survey examining PPD and had information in regard to ghrelin concentrations were included in the study. The Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale was used to assess symptoms of PPD. Raw ghrelin levels and ghrelin levels adjusted for creatinine were included as outcomes. Women screening positive for PPD at 12 weeks postpartum had higher pregnancy ghrelin concentrations. Ghrelin concentrations significantly decreased from pregnancy to 6 weeks postpartum and this change differed based on pregnancy depression status. Finally, ghrelin levels were lower in women who breastfed compared with women who were bottle-feeding. No significant findings remained once ghrelin levels were adjusted for creatinine. Although results do not suggest an association between PPD and ghrelin after adjusting for creatinine, future research should continue to explore this possibility extending further across the postpartum period with larger sample sizes. PMID:26424410

  18. Tissue-specific mRNA expression profiling in grape berry tissues

    PubMed Central

    Grimplet, Jerome; Deluc, Laurent G; Tillett, Richard L; Wheatley, Matthew D; Schlauch, Karen A; Cramer, Grant R; Cushman, John C

    2007-01-01

    Background Berries of grape (Vitis vinifera) contain three major tissue types (skin, pulp and seed) all of which contribute to the aroma, color, and flavor characters of wine. The pericarp, which is composed of the exocarp (skin) and mesocarp (pulp), not only functions to protect and feed the developing seed, but also to assist in the dispersal of the mature seed by avian and mammalian vectors. The skin provides volatile and nonvolatile aroma and color compounds, the pulp contributes organic acids and sugars, and the seeds provide condensed tannins, all of which are important to the formation of organoleptic characteristics of wine. In order to understand the transcriptional network responsible for controlling tissue-specific mRNA expression patterns, mRNA expression profiling was conducted on each tissue of mature berries of V. vinifera Cabernet Sauvignon using the Affymetrix GeneChip® Vitis oligonucleotide microarray ver. 1.0. In order to monitor the influence of water-deficit stress on tissue-specific expression patterns, mRNA expression profiles were also compared from mature berries harvested from vines subjected to well-watered or water-deficit conditions. Results Overall, berry tissues were found to express approximately 76% of genes represented on the Vitis microarray. Approximately 60% of these genes exhibited significant differential expression in one or more of the three major tissue types with more than 28% of genes showing pronounced (2-fold or greater) differences in mRNA expression. The largest difference in tissue-specific expression was observed between the seed and pulp/skin. Exocarp tissue, which is involved in pathogen defense and pigment production, showed higher mRNA abundance relative to other berry tissues for genes involved with flavonoid biosynthesis, pathogen resistance, and cell wall modification. Mesocarp tissue, which is considered a nutritive tissue, exhibited a higher mRNA abundance of genes involved in cell wall function and

  19. Peripheral blood mRNA expressions of stress biomarkers in manic episode and subsequent remission.

    PubMed

    Köse Çinar, Rugül; Sönmez, Mehmet Bülent; Görgülü, Yasemin

    2016-08-01

    Theoretical models of the neuroprogressive nature of bipolar disorder (BD) are based on the hypothesis that it is an accelerated aging disease, with the allostatic load playing a major role. Glucocorticoids, oxidative stress markers, inflammatory cytokines and neurotrophins play important roles in BD. The messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) expressions of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), glucocorticoid receptor (GR), heat shock protein 70 (HSP70), tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) were examined in the peripheral blood of 20 adult male, drug-free BD patients during manic and remission periods and in 20 adult male, healthy controls. mRNA expression was measured using the quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). Compared to the controls, the expressions of BDNF and tPA mRNA were down-regulated in mania. In remission, BNDF and tPA mRNA levels increased, but they were still lower than those of the controls. Between mania and remission periods, only the change in mRNA levels of BDNF reached statistical significance. The results suggest that BDNF and tPA may be biomarkers of BD and that proteolytic conversion of BDNF may be important in the pathophysiology of BD. The change in BDNF levels between mania and remission could be adaptive and used to follow the progression of BD. PMID:27138695

  20. mRNA Expression of Ovine Angiopoietin-like Protein 4 Gene in Adipose Tissues.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing; Jing, Jiong-Jie; Jia, Xia-Li; Qiao, Li-Ying; Liu, Jian-Hua; Liang, Chen; Liu, Wen-Zhong

    2016-05-01

    Angiopoietin-like protein 4 (ANGPTL4) is involved in a variety of functions, including lipoprotein metabolism and angiogenesis. To reveal the role of ANGPTL4 in fat metabolism of sheep, ovine ANGPTL4 mRNA expression was analyzed in seven adipose tissues from two breeds with distinct tail types. Forty-eight animals with the gender ratio of 1:1 for both Guangling Large Tailed (GLT) and Small Tailed Han (STH) sheep were slaughtered at 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, and 12 months of age, respectively. Adipose tissues were collected from greater and lesser omental, subcutaneous, retroperitoneal, perirenal, mesenteric, and tail fats. Ontogenetic mRNA expression of ANGPTL4 in these adipose tissues from GTL and STH was studied by quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction. The results showed that ANGPTL4 mRNA expressed in all adipose tissues studied with the highest in subcutaneous and the lowest in mesenteric fat depots. Months of age, tissue and breed are the main factors that significantly influence the mRNA expression. These results provide new insights into ovine ANGPTL4 gene expression and clues for its function mechanism. PMID:26954186

  1. mRNA expression pattern of gonadotropin receptors in bovine follicular cysts.

    PubMed

    Marelli, Belkis E; Diaz, Pablo U; Salvetti, Natalia R; Rey, Florencia; Ortega, Hugo H

    2014-12-01

    Follicular growth and steroidogenesis are dependent on gonadotropin binding to their receptors in granulosa and theca cells of ovarian follicles. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the expression patterns of follicle-stimulating hormone receptor (FSHR) and luteinizing hormone receptor (LHCGR) in ovarian follicular structures from cows with cystic ovarian disease (COD) as compared with those of regularly cycling cows. Relative real-time RT-PCR analysis showed that the expression of FSHR mRNA in granulosa cells was highest in small antral follicles, then decreased significantly as follicles increased in size, and was lowest in cysts. FSHR mRNA was not detected in the theca cells of any follicular category, including cysts. LHCGR mRNA expression in granulosa cells was significantly higher in large antral follicles than in cysts, and not detected in granulosa cells of small and medium antral follicles. In theca cells, the expression level of LHCGR mRNA in medium antral follicles was higher than in small and large antral follicles, whereas that in follicular cysts it was similar to those in small and medium antral follicles, but higher than that in large antral follicles. Our findings provide evidence that there is an altered gonadotropin receptor expression in bovine cystic follicles, and suggest that in conditions characterized by altered ovulation, such as COD, changes in the signaling system of gonadotropins may play a fundamental role in their pathogenesis. PMID:25454493

  2. Steroid receptor mRNA expression in the ovarian follicles of cows with cystic ovarian disease.

    PubMed

    Alfaro, Natalia S; Salvetti, Natalia R; Velazquez, Melisa M; Stangaferro, Matías L; Rey, Florencia; Ortega, Hugo H

    2012-06-01

    Steroid receptors have been demonstrated to be important intra-ovarian regulators of follicular development and ovulatory processes. The aim of the present study was to determine the expression of steroid receptor mRNA in ovarian follicular structures from cows with cystic ovarian disease (COD) compared with ovarian structures from regularly cycling cows using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The cystic follicles showed a higher estrogen receptor α (ESR1) mRNA expression in the theca and granulosa and a lower estrogen receptor β (ESR2) expression. The cystic follicles also showed a strong expression of androgen receptor mRNA in the granulosa. No changes were observed in total progesterone receptor mRNA, but a very significant increase in the B isoform was found in the granulosa of the cystic follicles. The findings of the current study provide evidence that an altered steroid signaling system may be present in bovine follicular cysts, and we suggest that in conditions characterized by altered ovulation, such as COD, changes in the expression of ovarian steroid receptors could play a fundamental role in the pathogeny of this disease. PMID:21536311

  3. mRNA Expression of Ovine Angiopoietin-like Protein 4 Gene in Adipose Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jing; Jing, Jiong-Jie; Jia, Xia-Li; Qiao, Li-Ying; Liu, Jian-Hua; Liang, Chen; Liu, Wen-Zhong

    2016-01-01

    Angiopoietin-like protein 4 (ANGPTL4) is involved in a variety of functions, including lipoprotein metabolism and angiogenesis. To reveal the role of ANGPTL4 in fat metabolism of sheep, ovine ANGPTL4 mRNA expression was analyzed in seven adipose tissues from two breeds with distinct tail types. Forty-eight animals with the gender ratio of 1:1 for both Guangling Large Tailed (GLT) and Small Tailed Han (STH) sheep were slaughtered at 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, and 12 months of age, respectively. Adipose tissues were collected from greater and lesser omental, subcutaneous, retroperitoneal, perirenal, mesenteric, and tail fats. Ontogenetic mRNA expression of ANGPTL4 in these adipose tissues from GTL and STH was studied by quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction. The results showed that ANGPTL4 mRNA expressed in all adipose tissues studied with the highest in subcutaneous and the lowest in mesenteric fat depots. Months of age, tissue and breed are the main factors that significantly influence the mRNA expression. These results provide new insights into ovine ANGPTL4 gene expression and clues for its function mechanism. PMID:26954186

  4. Abdominal surgery inhibits circulating acyl ghrelin and ghrelin-O-acyltransferase levels in rats: role of the somatostatin receptor subtype 2

    PubMed Central

    Stengel, Andreas; Goebel-Stengel, Miriam; Wang, Lixin; Shaikh, Almaas; Lambrecht, Nils W. G.; Rivier, Jean

    2011-01-01

    Clinical studies are evaluating the efficacy of synthetic ghrelin agonists in postoperative ileus management. However, the control of ghrelin secretion under conditions of postoperative gastric ileus is largely unknown. Peripheral somatostatin inhibits ghrelin secretion in animals and humans. We investigated the time course of ghrelin changes postsurgery in fasted rats and whether somatostatin receptor subtype 2 (sst2) signaling is involved. Abdominal surgery (laparotomy and 1-min cecal palpation) induced a rapid and long-lasting decrease in plasma acyl ghrelin levels as shown by the 64, 67, and 59% reduction at 0.5, 2, and 5 h postsurgery, respectively, compared with sham (anesthesia alone for 10 min, P < 0.05). Levels were partly recovered at 7 h and fully restored at 24 h. The percentage of acyl ghrelin reduction was significantly higher than that of desacyl ghrelin at 2 h postsurgery and not at any other time point. This was associated with a 48 and 23% decrease in gastric and plasma ghrelin-O-acyltransferase protein concentrations, respectively (P < 0.001). Ghrelin-positive cells in the oxyntic mucosa expressed sst2a receptor and the sst2 agonist S-346-011 inhibited fasting acyl ghrelin levels by 64 and 77% at 0.5 and 2 h, respectively. The sst2 antagonist S-406-028 prevented the abdominal surgery-induced decreased circulating acyl ghrelin but not the delayed gastric emptying assessed 0.5 h postinjection. These data show that activation of sst2 receptor located on gastric X/A-like cells plays a key role in the rapid inhibition of circulating acyl ghrelin induced by abdominal surgery while not being primarily involved in the early phase of postoperative gastric ileus. PMID:21636529

  5. EWS represses cofilin 1 expression by inducing nuclear retention of cofilin 1 mRNA.

    PubMed

    Huang, L; Kuwahara, I; Matsumoto, K

    2014-06-01

    In Ewing's sarcoma family tumors (ESFTs), the proto-oncogene EWS that encodes an RNA-binding protein is fused by chromosomal translocation to the gene encoding one of the E-twenty six (ETS) family of transcription factors, most commonly friend leukemia virus integration 1 (FLI-1). Although EWS/FLI-1 chimeric proteins are necessary for carcinogenesis, additional events seem to be required for transformation to occur. We have previously reported that a protein product of an EWS mRNA target, whose expression is negatively regulated by EWS but not by EWS/FLI-1, contributes to ESFT development. However, the mechanism by which EWS represses protein expression remains to be elucidated. Here, we report that overexpression of full-length EWS repressed protein expression and induced nuclear retention of reporter mRNAs in a tethering assay. In contrast, when a mutant lacking the EWS C-terminal nuclear localization signal (classified as a PY-NLS) was expressed, reporter protein expression was upregulated, and the number of cells exporting reporter mRNA to the cytoplasm increased. EWS binds to the 3'-untranslated region in another mRNA target, cofilin 1 (CFL1), and negatively regulates the expression of CFL1. Overexpression of EWS induced nuclear retention of CFL1 mRNA. Furthermore, ESFT cell proliferation and metastatic potential were suppressed by small interfering RNA-mediated CFL1 knockdown. Together, our findings suggest that EWS induces nuclear retention of CFL1 mRNA, thereby suppressing expression of CFL1, and that CFL1 promotes development of ESFT. Targeting CFL1 might therefore provide another novel approach for treatment of this aggressive disease. PMID:23831569

  6. Connecting protein and mRNA burst distributions for stochastic models of gene expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elgart, Vlad; Jia, Tao; Fenley, Andrew T.; Kulkarni, Rahul

    2011-08-01

    The intrinsic stochasticity of gene expression can lead to large variability in protein levels for genetically identical cells. Such variability in protein levels can arise from infrequent synthesis of mRNAs which in turn give rise to bursts of protein expression. Protein expression occurring in bursts has indeed been observed experimentally and recent studies have also found evidence for transcriptional bursting, i.e. production of mRNAs in bursts. Given that there are distinct experimental techniques for quantifying the noise at different stages of gene expression, it is of interest to derive analytical results connecting experimental observations at different levels. In this work, we consider stochastic models of gene expression for which mRNA and protein production occurs in independent bursts. For such models, we derive analytical expressions connecting protein and mRNA burst distributions which show how the functional form of the mRNA burst distribution can be inferred from the protein burst distribution. Additionally, if gene expression is repressed such that observed protein bursts arise only from single mRNAs, we show how observations of protein burst distributions (repressed and unrepressed) can be used to completely determine the mRNA burst distribution. Assuming independent contributions from individual bursts, we derive analytical expressions connecting means and variances for burst and steady-state protein distributions. Finally, we validate our general analytical results by considering a specific reaction scheme involving regulation of protein bursts by small RNAs. For a range of parameters, we derive analytical expressions for regulated protein distributions that are validated using stochastic simulations. The analytical results obtained in this work can thus serve as useful inputs for a broad range of studies focusing on stochasticity in gene expression.

  7. Replenishment of RANTES mRNA expression in activated eosinophils fromatopic asthmatics

    PubMed Central

    Velazquez, J R; Lacy, P; Moqbel, R

    2000-01-01

    Eosinophils have been shown to express the gene encoding regulated upon activation, normal T‐cell expressed and secreted (RANTES), a potent eosinophilotactic chemokine. RANTES protein expression in eosinophils has previously been shown to be up‐regulated by a number of agonists, including complement‐dependent factors (C3b/iC3b) and interferon‐γ (IFN‐γ). We hypothesized that gene expression of RANTES is regulated in these cells by eosinophil‐specific agonists. We analysed RANTES mRNA expression by reverse‐transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT‐PCR) in human peripheral blood eosinophils obtained from mild atopic asthmatics following stimulation over time. In resting eosinophils, a low level of RANTES mRNA was found to be constitutively expressed in all the atopic donors tested in this study (n = 6). Following stimulation with C3b/iC3b (serum‐coated surfaces), eosinophils released measurable levels of RANTES, while sustained transcript expression was detected for up to 24 hr of stimulation. In contrast, IFN‐γ (5 ng/ml) transiently and significantly (P < 0·05, n = 3) depleted relative amounts of RANTES PCR product (compared with β2‐microglobulin) after 1–4 hr of stimulation. RANTES transcript was again detectable after 24 hr of IFN‐γ incubation, suggesting that the pool of RANTES mRNA had been replenished. Other eosinophil‐active cytokines, interleukin‐3 (IL‐3), IL‐4, IL‐5 and granulocyte–macrophage colony‐stimulating factor, did not appear to modulate RANTES mRNA expression after 1 hr of incubation. The effect of IFN‐γ on RANTES mRNA was reversed by cycloheximide, suggesting that IFN‐γ may act by increasing the rate of translation of RANTES mRNA. These findings indicate that IFN‐γ may induce a rapid and transient effect on the translation and replenishment of RANTES mRNA in eosinophils. This novel observation supports the notion that eosinophils have the potential to replenish their stored and released

  8. RANKL, OPG and CTR mRNA expression in the temporomandibular joint in rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    LIU, WEI-WEI; XU, ZHI-MIN; LI, ZHENG-QIANG; ZHANG, YAN; HAN, BING

    2015-01-01

    The calcitonin receptor (CTR) and receptor activator of nuclear factor κB ligand (RANKL) have been found to be involved in the differentiation of osteoclasts. The association between the RANKL:osteoprotegerin (OPG) expression ratio and the pathogenesis of bone-destructive rheumatoid arthritis (RA) has been described in several joints, but the available data for the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) are limited. The aim of the present study was to investigate the involvement of osteoclasts at sites of bone erosion by determining the CTR expression and the RANKL:OPG expression ratio in the TMJ in a collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) model. Forty-eight male Wistar rats were randomly divided into two groups: Control group, injected with saline solution for 6 weeks; and CIA group, injected with emulsion. The RANKL and OPG mRNA expression was significantly increased in immunized rats compared with that in non-immunized rats. The RANKL:OPG expression ratio on the trabecular bone surface was 9.0 and 6.4 in the CIA group at weeks 4 and 6, respectively, while the RANKL:OPG expression ratio in the controls was 1.0:2. CTR mRNA expression was significantly upregulated in immunized rats compared with that in non-immunized rats; the level of CTR mRNA in the CTR-positive osteoclasts on the trabecular bone surface was 10.9- and 7.8-fold higher in the CIA rats than that in the control rats at weeks 4 and 6, respectively. In conclusion, focal bone destruction in an experimental model of arthritis in the TMJ can be attributed to cells expressing CTR, a defining feature of osteoclasts. The expression of RANKL and OPG mRNA within the inflamed synovium provides an insight into the mechanism of osteoclast differentiation and function at the border of bone erosion in arthritis. PMID:26622411

  9. Expression of CCT6A mRNA in chicken granulosa cells is regulated by progesterone.

    PubMed

    Wei, Qingqing; Zhu, Guiyu; Cui, Xinxing; Kang, Li; Cao, Dingguo; Jiang, Yunliang

    2013-08-01

    CCT6A, the zeta subunit of the chaperonin containing TCP1 complex, is the only cytosolic chaperonin in eukaryotes and is estimated to assist in the folding of multiple proteins including actin, tubulin, cyclin E, myosin, transducin and the Von Hippel Lindau tumor suppressor. In this study, we examined the expression of CCT6A and progesterone receptor (PGR) mRNA in various tissues of chickens and the regulation of CCT6A and PGR mRNA in ovarian granulosa cells. Northern blot analysis revealed that CCT6A had one transcript and was highly expressed in the ovary tissues from chickens at both the sexually immature and mature stages. CCT6A mRNA expression was increased maximally from pre-hierarchy follicles to F5 follicles and subsequently declined in pre-ovulatory and post-ovulatory follicles. The expression of PGR mRNA exhibited the similar pattern to CCT6A. In granulosa cells isolated from pre-ovulatory follicles, follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) inhibited the expression of CCT6A mRNA, whereas progesterone activated CCT6A and suppressed PGR expression in a time-dependent manner. We further investigated the regulation of CCT6A transcription by progesterone by constructing various progressive deletions and mutants and identified the core promoter element of CCT6A and the binding region of progesterone, which is located from -2056 to -2051. Taken together, our results indicate that CCT6A likely plays an important role in follicle growth, and in granulosa cells, progesterone activates CCT6A transcription via a progesterone response element (PRE) located in the distal promoter of CCT6A. PMID:23644154

  10. Serum KIBRA mRNA and Protein Expression and Cognitive Functions in Depression

    PubMed Central

    Talarowska, Monika; Szemraj, Janusz; Kowalczyk, Małgorzata; Gałecki, Piotr

    2016-01-01

    Background Genes participating in synaptic signalling or plasticity in brain regions such as the prefrontal cortex (PFC) and the hippocampus have been implicated in cognition. Recently, a new gene (KIBRA, WWC1) has been added to this group due to its impact on memory performance. Recurrent depressive disorder (rDD) is a multifactorial disease, that one of the typical features is cognitive impairment. The main objective of this study was to perform an analysis of the KIBRA gene on both mRNA and protein levels in patients suffering from rDD and to investigate the relationship between KIBRA expression and cognitive performance. Material/Methods The study comprised 236 subjects: patients with rDD (n=131) and healthy subjects (n=105, HS). Cognitive function assessment was based on: Trail Making Test, The Stroop Test, Verbal Fluency Test and Auditory Verbal Learning Test. Results Both mRNA and protein expression levels of KIBRA gene were significantly higher in healthy subjects when compared to rDD. The presented relationship is clear even after taking age, education and sex of the examined subjects into consideration. No statistically significant relationship was found in the experiments between any of the conducted tests and KIBRA gene expression on mRNA level for both the rDD and HS groups. The presented study has limitations related to the fact that patients were being treated with antidepressant. This is relevant due to the fact that some antidepressants may affect mRNA expression. Number of patients and healthy subjects may result in the lack of statistical significance in some cases. Conclusions 1. The results of our study show decreased expression of the KIBRA gene on both mRNA and protein levels in depression. 2. We did not find any significant relationship between KIBRA gene expression and cognitive functions in case of both the healthy subjects and the patients affected by rDD. PMID:26768155

  11. Selecting Reliable mRNA Expression Measurements Across Platforms Improves Downstream Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Pan; Diao, Lixia; Shen, Li; Li, Lerong; Heymach, John Victor; Girard, Luc; Minna, John D.; Coombes, Kevin R.; Byers, Lauren Averett; Wang, Jing

    2016-01-01

    With increasing use of publicly available gene expression data sets, the quality of the expression data is a critical issue for downstream analysis, gene signature development, and cross-validation of data sets. Thus, identifying reliable expression measurements by leveraging multiple mRNA expression platforms is an important analytical task. In this study, we propose a statistical framework for selecting reliable measurements between platforms by modeling the correlations of mRNA expression levels using a beta-mixture model. The model-based selection provides an effective and objective way to separate good probes from probes with low quality, thereby improving the efficiency and accuracy of the analysis. The proposed method can be used to compare two microarray technologies or microarray and RNA sequencing measurements. We tested the approach in two matched profiling data sets, using microarray gene expression measurements from the same samples profiled on both Affymetrix and Illumina platforms. We also applied the algorithm to mRNA expression data to compare Affymetrix microarray data with RNA sequencing measurements. The algorithm successfully identified probes/genes with reliable measurements. Removing the unreliable measurements resulted in significant improvements for gene signature development and functional annotations. PMID:27199546

  12. EXPRESSION OF AHR AND ARNT MRNA IN CULTURED HUMAN ENDOMETRIAL EXPLANTS EXPOSED TO TCDD

    EPA Science Inventory

    Expression of AhR and ARNT mRNA in cultured human endometrial explants exposed to TCDD.

    Pitt JA, Feng L, Abbott BD, Schmid J, Batt RE, Costich TG, Koury ST, Bofinger DP.

    Curriculum in Toxicology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA.

    Endom...

  13. Real time imaging of mRNA expression dynamics in live cells using protein complementation methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meller, Amit

    2009-03-01

    Traditional methods for mRNA quantification in cells, such as northern blots, quantitative PCR or microarrays assays, require cell lysis and therefore do not preserve its dynamics. These methods cannot be used to probe the spatio-temporal localization of mRNA in cells, which provide useful information for a wide range biomolecular process, including RNA metabolizim, expression kinetics and RNA interference. To probe mRNA dynamics in live prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells, we develop a method, which exploit the strong affinity of the eukaryotic initiation factor 4A (eIF4A) to specific RNA aptamers. Two parts of the eIF4A are fused to a split Green Fluorescence Protein (GFP), and are expressed in the cells at high abundance. However, only when the RNA apatmer is also present, the two protein parts complement and become fluorescent. Thus, the fluorescent background remains low, allowing us to directly image the expression of mRNA molecules in live e-coli cells from its early onset, over hours. We find that the expression kinetics can be classified in one out of at least three forms, which also display distinct spatial distributions. I will discuss the possible biological origin for these distributions and their time evolution.

  14. hnRNP-U enhances the expression of specific genes by stabilizing mRNA.

    PubMed

    Yugami, Masato; Kabe, Yasuaki; Yamaguchi, Yuki; Wada, Tadashi; Handa, Hiroshi

    2007-01-01

    Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins (hnRNPs) are thought to be involved in pre-mRNA processing. hnRNP-U, also termed scaffold attachment factor A (SAF-A), binds to pre-mRNA and nuclear matrix/scaffold attachment region DNA elements. However, its role in the regulation of gene expression is as yet poorly understood. In the present study, we show that hnRNP-U specifically enhances the expression of tumor necrosis factor alpha mRNA by increasing its stability, possibly through binding to the 3' untranslated region. We also show that hnRNP-U enhances the expression of several other genes as well, including GADD45A, HEXIM1, HOXA2, IER3, NHLH2, and ZFY, by binding to and stabilizing these mRNAs. These results suggest that hnRNP-U enhances the expression of specific genes by regulating mRNA stability. PMID:17174306

  15. UCP2 mRNA expression is dependent on glucose metabolism in pancreatic islets

    SciTech Connect

    Dalgaard, Louise T.

    2012-01-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer UCP2 mRNA levels are decreased in islets of Langerhans from glucokinase deficient mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer UCP2 mRNA up-regulation by glucose is dependent on glucokinase. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Absence of UCP2 increases GSIS of glucokinase heterozygous pancreatic islets. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This may protect glucokinase deficient mice from hyperglycemic damages. -- Abstract: Uncoupling Protein 2 (UCP2) is expressed in the pancreatic {beta}-cell, where it partially uncouples the mitochondrial proton gradient, decreasing both ATP-production and glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS). Increased glucose levels up-regulate UCP2 mRNA and protein levels, but the mechanism for UCP2 up-regulation in response to increased glucose is unknown. The aim was to examine the effects of glucokinase (GK) deficiency on UCP2 mRNA levels and to characterize the interaction between UCP2 and GK with regard to glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in pancreatic islets. UCP2 mRNA expression was reduced in GK+/- islets and GK heterozygosity prevented glucose-induced up-regulation of islet UCP2 mRNA. In contrast to UCP2 protein function UCP2 mRNA regulation was not dependent on superoxide generation, but rather on products of glucose metabolism, because MnTBAP, a superoxide dismutase mimetic, did not prevent the glucose-induced up-regulation of UCP2. Glucose-stimulated insulin secretion was increased in UCP2-/- and GK+/- islets compared with GK+/- islets and UCP2 deficiency improved glucose tolerance of GK+/- mice. Accordingly, UCP2 deficiency increased ATP-levels of GK+/- mice. Thus, the compensatory down-regulation of UCP2 is involved in preserving the insulin secretory capacity of GK mutant mice and might also be implicated in limiting disease progression in MODY2 patients.

  16. mRNA expression and protein localization of dentin matrix protein 1 during dental root formation.

    PubMed

    Toyosawa, S; Okabayashi, K; Komori, T; Ijuhin, N

    2004-01-01

    Dentin matrix protein 1 (DMP1) is an acidic phosphoprotein. DMP1 was initially detected in dentin and later in other mineralized tissues including cementum and bone, but the DMP1 expression pattern in tooth is still controversial. To determine the precise localization of DMP1 messenger RNA (mRNA) and the protein in the tooth, we performed in situ hybridization and immunohistochemical analyses using rat molars and incisors during various stages of root formation. During root dentin formation of molars, DMP1 mRNA was detected in root odontoblasts in parallel with mineralization of the dentin. However, the level of DMP1 mRNA expression in root odontoblasts decreased near the coronal part and was absent in coronal odontoblasts. DMP1 protein was localized along dentinal tubules and their branches in mineralized root dentin, and the distribution of DMP1 shifted from the end of dentinal tubules to the base of the tubules as dentin formation progressed. During the formation of the acellular cementum, DMP1 mRNA was detected in cementoblasts lining the acellular cementum where its protein was localized. During the formation of the cellular cementum, DMP1 mRNA was detected in cementocytes embedded in the cellular cementum but not in cementoblasts, and its protein was localized in the pericellular cementum of cementocytes including their processes. During dentin formation of incisors, DMP1 mRNA was detected in odontoblasts on the cementum-related dentin, where its protein was localized along dentinal tubules near the mineralization front. The localization of DMP1 mRNA and protein in dentin and cementum was related to their mineralization, suggesting that one of the functions of DMP1 may be involved in the mineralization of dentin and cementum during root formation. PMID:14751569

  17. Expression and regulation of Icer mRNA in the Syrian hamster pineal gland.

    PubMed

    Diaz, Elena; Garidou, Marie-Laure; Dardente, Hugues; Salingre, Anthony; Pévet, Paul; Simonneaux, Valérie

    2003-04-10

    Inducible-cAMP early repressor (ICER) is a potent inhibitor of CRE (cAMP-related element)-driven gene transcription. In the rat pineal gland, it has been proposed to be part of the mechanisms involved in the shutting down of the transcription of the gene coding for arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase (AA-NAT, the melatonin rhythm-generating enzyme). In this study, we report that ICER is expressed in the pineal gland of the photoperiodic rodent Syrian hamster although with some difference compared to the rat. In the Syrian hamster pineal, Icer mRNA levels, low at daytime, displayed a 20-fold increase during the night. Nighttime administration of a beta-adrenergic antagonist, propranolol, significantly reduced Icer mRNA levels although daytime administration of a beta-adrenergic agonist, isoproterenol, was unable to raise the low amount of Icer mRNA. These observations indicate that Icer mRNA expression is induced by the clock-driven norepinephrine release and further suggest that this stimulation is restricted to nighttime, as already observed for Aa-nat gene transcription. Furthermore, we found that the daily profile of Icer mRNA displayed photoperiodic variation with a lengthening of the nocturnal peak in short versus long photoperiod. These data indicate that ICER may be involved in both daily and seasonal regulation of melatonin synthesis in the Syrian hamster. PMID:12670714

  18. Influenza A viruses suppress cyclooxygenase-2 expression by affecting its mRNA stability

    PubMed Central

    Dudek, Sabine Eva; Nitzsche, Katja; Ludwig, Stephan; Ehrhardt, Christina

    2016-01-01

    Infection with influenza A viruses (IAV) provokes activation of cellular defence mechanisms contributing to the innate immune and inflammatory response. In this process the cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) plays an important role in the induction of prostaglandin-dependent inflammation. While it has been reported that COX-2 is induced upon IAV infection, in the present study we observed a down-regulation at later stages of infection suggesting a tight regulation of COX-2 by IAV. Our data indicate the pattern-recognition receptor RIG-I as mediator of the initial IAV-induced COX-2 synthesis. Nonetheless, during on-going IAV replication substantial suppression of COX-2 mRNA and protein synthesis could be detected, accompanied by a decrease in mRNA half-life. Interestingly, COX-2 mRNA stability was not only imbalanced by IAV replication but also by stimulation of cells with viral RNA. Our results reveal tristetraprolin (TTP), which is known to bind COX-2 mRNA and promote its rapid degradation, as regulator of COX-2 expression in IAV infection. During IAV replication and viral RNA accumulation TTP mRNA synthesis was induced, resulting in reduced COX-2 levels. Accordingly, the down-regulation of TTP resulted in increased COX-2 protein expression after IAV infection. These findings indicate a novel IAV-regulated cellular mechanism, contributing to the repression of host defence and therefore facilitating viral replication. PMID:27265729

  19. Decreased drebrin mRNA expression in Alzheimer disease: correlation with tau pathology.

    PubMed

    Julien, Carl; Tremblay, Cyntia; Bendjelloul, Farid; Phivilay, Alix; Coulombe, Marie-Andrée; Emond, Vincent; Calon, Frédéric

    2008-08-01

    To investigate the mRNA expression of the dendritic spine protein drebrin in Alzheimer's disease (AD), we performed post-mortem in situ hybridization studies in brain sections from 20 AD patients and 21 controls. AD diagnosis was confirmed by decreased drebrin protein and increased Abeta(40) (+464%; P < 0.05), Abeta(42) (+369%; P < 0.0001), Abeta(42/40) ratio (+226%; P < 0.01), total tau (+2,725%; P < 0.0001), and paired helical filament tau (PHFtau; +867%; P < 0.001) compared with controls. We found significant decreases in drebrin mRNA in the parietal cortex (-27%; P < 0.01), the temporal cortex (-22%; P < 0.05), and the hippocampus (-25%; P < 0.05) of AD patients compared with controls. Cortical levels of drebrin mRNA correlated positively with soluble total tau (r(2) = +0.244) but negatively with duration of symptoms (r(2) = -0.357) and PHFtau (r(2) = -0.248). Drebrin mRNA levels were correlated to a lesser degree with the drebrin protein content (r(2) = +0.136) and with sim2 (r(2) = +0.176), a potential modulator of drebrin transcription. Our results suggest that the down-regulation of drebrin mRNA expression plays an important role in AD and is closely related to the progression of the disease. PMID:18338803

  20. BAY11 enhances OCT4 synthetic mRNA expression in adult human skin cells

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The OCT4 transcription factor is involved in many cellular processes, including development, reprogramming, maintaining pluripotency and differentiation. Synthetic OCT4 mRNA was recently used (in conjunction with other reprogramming factors) to generate human induced pluripotent stem cells. Here, we discovered that BAY 11-7082 (BAY11), at least partially through an NF-κB-inhibition based mechanism, could significantly increase the expression of OCT4 following transfection of synthetic mRNA (synRNA) into adult human skin cells. Methods We tested various chemical and molecular small molecules on their ability to suppress the innate immune response seen upon synthetic mRNA transfection. Three molecules - B18R, BX795, and BAY11 - were used in immunocytochemical and proliferation-based assays. We also utilized global transcriptional meta-analysis coupled with quantitative PCR to identify relative gene expression downstream of OCT4. Results We found that human skin cells cultured in the presence of BAY11 resulted in reproducible increased expression of OCT4 that did not inhibit normal cell proliferation. The increased levels of OCT4 resulted in significantly increased expression of genes downstream of OCT4, including the previously identified SPP1, DUSP4 and GADD45G, suggesting the expressed OCT4 was functional. We also discovered a novel OCT4 putative downstream target gene SLC16A9 which demonstrated significantly increased expression following elevation of OCT4 levels. Conclusions For the first time we have shown that small molecule-based stabilization of synthetic mRNA expression can be achieved with use of BAY11. This small molecule-based inhibition of innate immune responses and subsequent robust expression of transfected synthetic mRNAs may have multiple applications for future cell-based research and therapeutics. PMID:23388106

  1. Beta-integrin of Anopheles gambiae: mRNA cloning and analysis of structure and expression.

    PubMed

    Mahairaki, V; Lycett, G; Blass, C; Louis, C

    2001-06-01

    We have isolated an mRNA encoding a beta integrin subunit of the malaria mosquito Anopheles gambiae. Our analysis predicts a protein that is very similar to betaPS, the fruitfly orthologue. The gene is expressed during all developmental stages and it is found in all body parts, including the midgut. Finally, the expression of the gene does not seem to be modulated during blood meals, except for a substantial increase 48 h posthaematophagy, when digestion is nearly complete. PMID:11437913

  2. Expression of tilapia prepro-melanin-concentrating hormone mRNA in hypothalamic and neurohypophysial cells.

    PubMed

    Gröneveld, D; Eckhardt, E R; Coenen, A J; Martens, G J; Balm, P H; Wendelaar Bonga, S E

    1995-04-01

    Melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) is a neuropeptide involved in background adaptation in teleost fish, and in multiple regulatory functions in mammals and fish. To study the expression of the MCH preprohormone (ppMCH) in teleosts, we first cloned a hypothalamic cDNA encoding the complete ppMCH of tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus), and a cRNA probe derived from a 270 bp ppMCH cDNA fragment was used for the expression studies. The level of ppMCH mRNA expression in tilapia hypothalamus, measured by dot blot analysis, was significantly higher in fish adapted to a white background than in black-adapted animals, which is in accordance with the reported MCH plasma and tissue concentrations in fish. Northern blot analysis not only revealed a strong ppMCH mRNA signal in the hypothalamus, but also the presence of ppMCH mRNA in the neurointermediate lobe (NIL) of the pituitary. In situ hybridization and immunocytochemistry showed that ppMCH mRNA as well as MCH immunoreactivity are located in perikarya of two hypothalamic regions, namely in the nucleus lateralis tuberis (NLT) and the nucleus recessus lateralis (NRL). Quantitative analysis by dot blot hybridization revealed about eight times more ppMCH mRNA in the NLT than in the NRL and NIL of mature tilapias. ppMCH mRNA in the NIL could be localized to cell bodies of the neurohypophysis, which were also MCH immunoreactive. PMID:7619209

  3. Characterization and regulation of the rat and human ghrelin promoters.

    PubMed

    Wei, Wei; Wang, Guiyun; Qi, Xiang; Englander, Ella W; Greeley, George H

    2005-03-01

    Ghrelin is a recently discovered stomach hormone and endogenous ligand for the GH secretagogue receptor. The aim of these studies is to elucidate molecular mechanisms underlying regulation of the ghrelin gene. Distal and proximal transcription initiation sites are present. A short transcript, a product of the proximal site, showed a more widespread distribution. Two sets of 5'-upstream segments of the rat and human ghrelin genes were cloned and sequenced. Rat promoter segments upstream of the distal site showed highest activity in kidney (COS-7) and stomach (AGS) cells, whereas human promoter segments upstream of the proximal site showed highest activity in AGS and pituitary (GH3) cells in transient transfection assays. For the human, the core promoter spanned -667 to -468 bp, including the noncoding exon 1 and a short 5' sequence of intron 1. For the rat, the core promoter spanned -581 to -469 bp, and inclusion of exon 1 and a short 5'-sequence of intron 1 reduced activity by 67%. Mutation of initiator-like elements in the rat lowered activity by 20-50%, whereas in the human, all activity was abolished. Overexpression of upstream stimulatory factors increased ghrelin core promoter activity. Fasting increases stomach ghrelin expression, glucagon-a fasting-induced hormone, increased ghrelin expression in vivo in rats, and promoter activity by approximately 25-50%. Together, these findings indicate that structural differences between the rat and human ghrelin core promoters may account in part for the differences in their transcriptional regulation. Nonetheless, upstream stimulatory factor and glucagon exert similar effects on regulation of rat and human ghrelin promoters. PMID:15604212

  4. Regulation of bovine pyruvate carboxylase mRNA and promoter expression by thermal stress.

    PubMed

    White, H M; Koser, S L; Donkin, S S

    2012-09-01

    Pyruvate carboxylase (PC) catalyzes the rate-limiting step in gluconeogenesis from lactate and is a determinant of tricarboxylic acid cycle carbon flux. Bovine PC 5' untranslated region (UTR) mRNA variants are the products of a single PC gene containing 3 promoter regions (P3, P2, and P1, 5' to 3') that are responsive to physiological and nutritional stressors. The objective of this study was to determine the direct effects of thermal stress on PC mRNA and gene expression in bovine hepatocyte monolayer cultures, rat hepatoma (H4IIE) cells, and Madin-Darby bovine kidney epithelial (MDBK) cells. Hepatocytes were isolated from 3 Holstein bull calves and used to prepare monolayer cultures. Rat hepatoma cells and MDBK cells were obtained from American Type Culture Collection, Manassas, VA. Beginning 24 h after initial seeding, cells were subjected to either 37°C (control) or 42°C (thermal stress) for 24 h. Treatments were applied in triplicate in a minimum of 3 independent cell preparations. For bovine primary hepatocytes, endogenous expression of bovine PC mRNA increased (P < 0.1) with 24 h of thermal stress (1.31 vs. 2.79 ± 0.49, arbitrary units, control vs. thermal stress, respectively), but there was no change (P ≥ 0.1) in cytosolic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK-C) mRNA expression. Similarly, exposure of MDBK cells to thermal stress increased (P < 0.1) expression of bovine PC mRNA without altering (P ≥ 0.1) PEPCK-C mRNA expression. Conversely, there was no effect (P ≥ 0.1) of thermal stress on endogenous rat PC (0.47 vs. 0.30 ± 0.08, control vs. thermal stress) or PEPCK-C (1.61 vs. 1.20 ± 0.48, arbitrary units, control vs. thermal stress, respectively) mRNA expressions in H4IIE cells. To further investigate the regulation of PC, H4IIE cells were transiently transfected with bovine promoter-luciferase constructs containing either P1, P2, or P3, and exposed to thermal stress for 23 h. Activity of P1 was suppressed (P < 0.1) 5-fold, activity of P2

  5. Protective effects of ghrelin on cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity in mice.

    PubMed

    Nojiri, Takashi; Hosoda, Hiroshi; Kimura, Toru; Tokudome, Takeshi; Miura, Koichi; Takabatake, Hiroyuki; Miyazato, Mikiya; Okumura, Meinoshin; Kangawa, Kenji

    2016-08-01

    Cisplatin is a potent chemotherapeutic agent that has activity against malignant tumors. However, cisplatin causes various adverse effects, such as nephrotoxicity, which are associated with high morbidity and mortality. Recent studies have revealed that the mechanism of cisplatin nephrotoxicity includes a robust inflammatory response. Since ghrelin has been shown to have anti-inflammatory properties, we hypothesized that ghrelin might have protective effects against cisplatin nephrotoxicity. Mice were randomly divided into three groups: control, cisplatin with vehicle, and cisplatin with ghrelin. Ghrelin (0.8μg/kg/min via osmotic-pump, subcutaneously) or vehicle administration was started one day before cisplatin injection. At 72h after cisplatin administration (20mg/kg, intraperitoneally), we measured serum blood urea nitrogen and creatinine, urine albumin/creatinine, renal mRNA levels of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β, kidney injury molecule-1, and neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin by real-time polymerase chain reaction, and histological changes. Ghrelin significantly attenuated the increase in serum blood urea nitrogen and creatinine induced by cisplatin. Ghrelin tended to attenuate the increase in urine albumin/creatinine, although not significantly. Cisplatin-induced renal tubular injury and apoptosis were significantly attenuated by ghrelin pretreatment. Consequently, ghrelin significantly attenuated renal mRNA levels of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, interleukin-6, kidney injury molecule-1, and neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin. In conclusion, ghrelin produces protective effects in cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity through inhibition of inflammatory reactions. Pretreatment with ghrelin may become a new prophylactic candidate for cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity. PMID:27298204

  6. Human Ghrelin Mitigates Intestinal Injury and Mortality after Whole Body Irradiation in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhimin; Yang, Weng Lang; Jacob, Asha; Aziz, Monowar; Wang, Ping

    2015-01-01

    Widespread use of ionizing radiation has led to the realization of the danger associated with radiation exposure. Although studies in radiation countermeasures were initiated a half century ago, an effective therapy for a radiomitigator has not been identified. Ghrelin is a gastrointestinal hormone, and administration of ghrelin is protective in animal models of injuries including radiation combined injury. To test whether ghrelin can be protective in whole body irradiaton (WBI) alone, male Sprague Dawley (SD) rats were treated with human ghrelin (20 nmol/rat) daily for 6 days starting at either 24 h or 48 h after 10 Gray (Gy) WBI and survival outcome was examined. The 10 Gy WBI produced a LD70/30 model in SD rats (30% survival in 30 days). The survival rate in rats treated with ghrelin starting at 24 h was significantly improved to 63% and when treatment was initiated at 48 h, the survival remained at 61%. At 7 days post WBI, plasma ghrelin was significantly reduced from the control value. Ghrelin treatment starting at 24 h after WBI daily for 6 days improved histological appearance of the intestine, reduced gut permeability, serum endotoxin levels and bacterial translocation to the liver by 38%, 42% and 61%, respectively at day 7 post WBI. Serum glucose and albumin were restored to near control levels with treatment. Ghrelin treatment also attenuated WBI-induced intestinal apoptosis by 62% as evidenced by TUNEL staining. The expression of anti-apoptotic cell regulator Bcl-xl was decreased by 38% in the vehicle and restored to 75% of the control with ghrelin treatment. Increased expression of intestinal CD73 and pAkt were observed with ghrelin treatment, indicating protection of the intestinal epithelium after WBI. These results indicate that human ghrelin attenuates intestinal injury and mortality after WBI. Thus, human ghrelin can be developed as a novel mitigator for radiation injury. PMID:25671547

  7. Alpha1-adrenoreceptor in human hippocampus: binding and receptor subtype mRNA expression.

    PubMed

    Szot, Patricia; White, Sylvia S; Greenup, J Lynne; Leverenz, James B; Peskind, Elaine R; Raskind, Murray A

    2005-10-01

    Alpha1-adrenoreceptors (AR), of which three subtypes exist (alpha1A-, alpha1B- and alpha1D-AR) are G-protein-coupled receptors that mediate the actions of norepinephrine and epinephrine both peripherally and centrally. In the CNS, alpha1-ARs are found in the hippocampus where animal studies have shown the ability of alpha1-AR agents to modulate long-term potentiation and memory; however, the precise distribution of alpha1-AR expression and its subtypes in the human brain is unknown making functional comparisons difficult. In the human hippocampus, 3H-prazosin (alpha1-AR antagonist) labels only the dentate gyrus (molecular, granule and polymorphic layers) and the stratum lucidum of the CA3 homogeneously. Human alpha1A-AR mRNA in the hippocampus is observed only in the dentate gyrus granule cell layer, while alpha1D-AR mRNA expression is observed only in the pyramidal cell layers of CA1, CA2 and CA3, regions where 3H-prazosin did not bind. alpha1B-AR mRNA is not expressed at detectable levels in the human hippocampus. These results confirm a difference in hippocampal alpha1-AR localization between rat and humans and further describe a difference in the localization of the alpha1A- and alpha1D-AR mRNA subtype between rats and humans. PMID:16039007

  8. Epigenetic Regulation of Dopamine Transporter mRNA Expression in Human Neuroblastoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Green, Ashley L; Hossain, Muhammad M; Tee, Siew C; Zarbl, Helmut; Guo, Grace L; Richardson, Jason R

    2015-07-01

    The dopamine transporter (DAT) is a key regulator of dopaminergic neurotransmission. As such, proper regulation of DAT expression is important to maintain homeostasis, and disruption of DAT expression can lead to neurobehavioral dysfunction. Based on genomic features within the promoter of the DAT gene, there is potential for DAT expression to be regulated through epigenetic mechanisms, including DNA methylation and histone acetylation. However, the relative contribution of these mechanisms to DAT expression has not been empirically determined. Using pharmacologic and genetic approaches, we demonstrate that inhibition of DNA methyltransferase (DNMT) activity increased DAT mRNA approximately 1.5-2 fold. This effect was confirmed by siRNA knockdown of DNMT1. Likewise, the histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors valproate and butyrate also increased DAT mRNA expression, but the response was much more robust with expression increasing over tenfold. Genetic knockdown of HDAC1 by siRNA also increased DAT expression, but not to the extent seen with pharmacological inhibition, suggesting additional isoforms of HDAC or other targets may contribute to the observed effect. Together, these data identify the relative contribution of DNMTs and HDACs in regulating expression. These finding may aid in understanding the mechanistic basis for changes in DAT expression in normal and pathophysiological states. PMID:25963949

  9. Dithranol downregulates expression of Id1 mRNA in human keratinocytes in vitro.

    PubMed

    Ronpirin, C; Tencomnao, T

    2012-01-01

    The precise causes of psoriasis, a chronic skin disorder characterized by hyperproliferation of keratinocytes and incomplete keratinization, are unclear. It is known that expression of helix-loop-helix transcription factor Id1, which functions as an inhibitor of differentiation, is upregulated in psoriatic skin. We investigated the effect of the antipsoriatic drug dithranol on mRNA and protein expression levels of Id1 in the HaCaT keratinocyte cell line. Cultured HaCaT cells were treated with 0-0.5 μg/mL dithranol for 30 min. After 2 and 4 h, total cellular RNA and total proteins were isolated from HaCaT cells, and quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase (RT-PCR) and Western blot were used to determine the mRNA and protein levels of Id1, respectively. Changes in normalized Id1 mRNA levels were observed only after 4 h of dithranol treatment. There was reduced expression of Id1 mRNA transcripts in the HaCaT cells treated with 0.1 μg/mL dithranol, but the reduction was not significant. The expression of Id1 mRNA was significantly downregulated (almost 50%) when 0.25 or 0.5 μg/mL dithranol was applied to the HaCaT cells. However, the normalized Id1 protein levels were not significantly affected. The molecular mechanisms underlying this finding should be investigated further to help determine the therapeutic action of this drug. PMID:23079823

  10. c-kit mRNA expression in human and murine hematopoietic cell lines.

    PubMed

    André, C; d'Auriol, L; Lacombe, C; Gisselbrecht, S; Galibert, F

    1989-08-01

    The c-kit proto-oncogene belongs to the tyrosine kinase receptor family. Although its ligand is still unknown, there is increasing evidence to suggest its involvement in hematopoiesis. In order to detect lineage or differentiation related specificity, we have studied c-kit mRNA expression in both human and murine hematopoietic organs and cell lines. We show that c-kit mRNA expression is found at early stages of erythroid and myeloid differentiation. There is however, no evidence of c-kit expression in the lymphoid lineage. Our results suggest a possible role for c-kit as a receptor in the early stages of the erythroid/myeloid differentiation. PMID:2474787

  11. Leishmania amazonensis: Anionic currents expressed in oocytes upon microinjection of mRNA from the parasite.

    PubMed

    Lagos M, Luisa F; Moran, Oscar; Camacho, Marcela

    2007-06-01

    Transport mechanisms involved in pH homeostasis are relevant for the survival of Leishmania parasites. The presence of chloride conductive pathways in Leishmania has been anticipated since anion channel inhibitors limit the proton extrusion mediated by the H+ATPase, which is the major regulator of intracellular pH in amastigotes. In this study, we used Xenopus laevis oocytes as a heterologous expression system in which to study the expression of ion channels upon microinjection of polyA mRNA from Leishmania amazonensis. After injection of polyA mRNA into the oocytes, we measured three different types of currents. We discuss the possible origin of each, and propose that Type 3 currents could be the result of the heterologous expression of proteins from Leishmania since they show different pharmacological and biophysical properties as compared to endogenous oocyte currents. PMID:17328895

  12. Adrenocorticotropin receptors: Functional expression from rat adrenal mRNA in Xenopus laevis oocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Mertz, L.M.; Catt, K.J. )

    1991-10-01

    The adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) receptor, which binds corticotropin and stimulates adenylate cyclase and steroidogenesis in adrenocortical cells, was expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes microinjected with rat adrenal poly(A){sup +} RNA. Expression of the ACTH receptor in individual stage 5 and 6 oocytes was monitored by radioimmunoassay of ligand-stimulated cAMP production. Injection of 5-40 ng of adrenal mRNA caused dose-dependent increases in ACTH-responsive cAMP production. Size fractionation of rat adrenal poly(A){sup +}RNA by sucrose density-gradient centrifugation revealed that mRNA encoding the ACTH receptor was present in the 1.1-to 2.0-kilobase fraction. These data indicate that ACTH receptors can be expressed from adrenal mRNA in Xenopus oocytes and are fully functional in terms of ligand specificity and signal generation. The extracellular cAMP response to ACTH is a sensitive and convenient index of receptor expression. This system should permit more complete characterization and expression cloning of the ACTH receptor.

  13. mRNA as gene therapeutic: how to control protein expression.

    PubMed

    Tavernier, Geertrui; Andries, Oliwia; Demeester, Jo; Sanders, Niek N; De Smedt, Stefaan C; Rejman, Joanna

    2011-03-30

    For many years, it was generally accepted that mRNA is too unstable to be efficiently used for gene therapy purposes. In the last decade, however, several research groups faced this challenge and not only proved the feasibility of mRNA-mediated transfection with surprising results regarding transfection efficiency and duration of protein expression, but also were able to demonstrate major advantages over the use of pDNA. These advantages will be the first issue discussed in this review, which first of all addresses the notions that mRNA does not need to cross the nuclear barrier to exert its biological activity and in addition lacks CpG motifs, which reduces its immunogenicity. Secondly, it provides insight in the (in)stability of the mRNA molecule, in how mRNA can be modified to increase its half-life and in the necessities of exogenously produced mRNA to be successfully used in transfection protocols. Furthermore, this review gives an in-depth overview of the different techniques and vehicles for intracellular mRNA delivery exploited by us and other groups, comprising electroporation, gene gun injection, lipo- and polyplexes. Finally, it covers recent literature describing specific applications for mRNA based gene delivery, showing that until now most attention has been paid to vaccination strategies. This review offers a comprehensive overview of current knowledge of the major theoretical as well as practical aspects of mRNA-mediated transfection, showing both its possibilities and its pitfalls and should therefore be useful for a diverse scientific audience. PMID:20970469

  14. Aromatase and estrogen receptor alpha mRNA expression as prognostic biomarkers in patients with astrocytomas.

    PubMed

    Dueñas Jiménez, J M; Candanedo Arellano, A; Santerre, A; Orozco Suárez, S; Sandoval Sánchez, H; Feria Romero, I; López-Elizalde, R; Alonso Venegas, M; Netel, B; de la Torre Valdovinos, B; Dueñas Jiménez, S H

    2014-09-01

    Estrogens are oncogenic hormones at a high level in breast, prostate, endometrial and lung cancer. Estrogens are synthesized by aromatase which has been used as a biomarker both in breast and lung cancer. Estrogen biological activities are executed by their classic receptors (ERα and ERβ). ERα has been described as a cancer promoter and ERβ, as a possible tumor suppressor. Both receptors are present at low levels in primary multiforme glioblastoma (GBM). The GBM frequency is 50 % higher in men than in women. The GBM patient survival period ranges from 7 to 18 months. The purpose of this pilot study was to evaluate aromatase and estrogen receptor expression, as well as 17ß-estradiol concentration in astrocytoma patients biopsies to obtain a prognosis biomarker for these patients. We analyzed 36 biopsies of astrocytoma patients with a different grade (I-IV) of malignity. Aromatase and estrogen receptor mRNA expression were analyzed by semiquantitative RT-PCR, and the E2 levels, by ELISA. E2 concentration was higher in GBM, compared to grade II or III astrocytomas. The number of cells immunoreactive to aromatase and estrogen receptors decreased as the grade of tumor malignity increased. Aromatase mRNA expression was present in all biopsies, regardless of malignity grade or patient age or gender. The highest expression of aromatase mRNA in GBM patients was associated to the worst survival prognostic (6.28 months). In contrast lowest expression of ERα mRNA in astrocytoma patients had a worst prognosis. In conclusion, aromatase and ERα expression could be used as prognosis biomarkers for astrocytoma patients. PMID:25005528

  15. Genetic organization and mRNA expression of enolase genes of Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Postlethwait, P; Sundstrom, P

    1995-04-01

    In previous work, we cloned a Candida albicans cDNA for the glycolytic enzyme enolase and found a single, abundant enolase transcript on Northern (RNA) blots and a single protein on immunoblots, using antiserum raised against a recombinant enolase fusion protein. Because C. albicans enolase is abundantly produced during infection and elicits strong host immune responses, the mechanisms regulating enolase production are important for understanding the growth of C. albicans in vivo. To obtain more information on enolase gene expression by C. albicans, we used the enolase cDNA clone to investigate the genetic organization of enolase genes and the steady-state levels of enolase mRNA under several growth conditions. Gene disruption techniques in combination with Southern blot analyses of genomic DNA showed the presence of two enolase gene loci that could be distinguished by the locations of ClaI and Mn/I sites in their 3' flanking regions. Enolase steady-state mRNA levels were greatest during the middle phase of the logarithmic growth curve and were low during stationary phase. Minimal differences in enolase mRNA levels between yeast cells and hyphae were found. Propagation of C. albicans in glucose did not cause increased enolase mRNA levels compared with growth in a nonfermentable carbon source (pyruvate). It was concluded that two gene loci exist for C. albicans enolase and that enolase mRNA is constitutively produced at high levels during active metabolism. PMID:7896700

  16. Alpha-synuclein mRNA expression in oligodendrocytes in MSA

    PubMed Central

    Asi, Yasmine T; Simpson, Julie E; Heath, Paul R; Wharton, Stephen B; Lees, Andrew J; Revesz, Tamas; Houlden, Henry; Holton, Janice L

    2014-01-01

    Multiple system atrophy (MSA) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease presenting clinically with parkinsonian, cerebellar, and autonomic features. α-Synuclein (αsyn), encoded by the gene SNCA, is the main constituent of glial cytoplasmic inclusion (GCI) found in oligodendrocytes in MSA, but the methods of its accumulation have not been established. The aim of this study is to investigate alterations in regional and cellular SNCA mRNA expression in MSA as a possible substrate for GCI formation. Quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) was performed on postmortem brain samples from 15 MSA, 5 IPD, and 5 control cases to investigate regional expression in the frontal and occipital regions, dorsal putamen, pontine base, and cerebellum. For cellular expression analysis, neurons and oligodendrocytes were isolated by laser-capture microdissection from five MSA and five control cases. SNCA mRNA expression was not significantly different between the MSA, IPD and control cases in all regions (multilevel model, P = 0.14). After adjusting for group effect, the highest expression was found in the occipital cortex while the lowest was in the putamen (multilevel model, P < 0.0001). At the cellular level, MSA oligodendrocytes expressed more SNCA than control oligodendrocytes and expression in MSA neurons was slightly lower than that in controls, however, these results did not reach statistical significance. We have demonstrated regional variations in SNCA expression, which is higher in cortical than subcortical regions. This study is the first to demonstrate SNCA mRNA expression by oligodendrocytes in human postmortem tissue using qPCR and, although not statistically significant, could suggest that this may be increased in MSA compared to controls. PMID:24590631

  17. Regulation of luteinizing hormone receptor mRNA expression by a specific RNA binding protein in the ovary*

    PubMed Central

    Menon, K.M.J.; Nair, Anil K.; Wang, Lei; Peegel, Helle

    2009-01-01

    Summary The expression of LH receptor mRNA shows significant changes during different physiological states of the ovary. Previous studies from our laboratory have identified a post-transcriptional mechanism by which LH receptor mRNA is regulated following preovulatory LH surge or in response to hCG administration. A specific binding protein, identified as mevalonate kinase, binds to the open reading frame of LH receptor mRNA. The protein binding site is localized to nucleotides 203–220 of the LH receptor mRNA and exhibits a high degree of specificity. The expression levels of the protein show an inverse relationship to the LH receptor mRNA levels. The hCG-induced down-regulation of LH receptor mRNA can be mimicked by increasing the intracellular levels of cyclic AMP by a phosphodiesterase inhibitor. An in vitro mRNA decay assay showed that addition of the binding protein to the decay system caused accelerated LH receptor mRNA decay. Our results therefore show that LH receptor mRNA expression in the ovary is regulated post-transcriptionally by altering the rate of mRNA degradation by a specific mRNA binding protein. PMID:17055149

  18. Unmasking Upstream Gene Expression Regulators with miRNA-corrected mRNA Data

    PubMed Central

    Bollmann, Stephanie; Bu, Dengpan; Wang, Jiaqi; Bionaz, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    Expressed micro-RNA (miRNA) affects messenger RNA (mRNA) abundance, hindering the accuracy of upstream regulator analysis. Our objective was to provide an algorithm to correct such bias. Large mRNA and miRNA analyses were performed on RNA extracted from bovine liver and mammary tissue. Using four levels of target scores from TargetScan (all miRNA:mRNA target gene pairs or only the top 25%, 50%, or 75%). Using four levels of target scores from TargetScan (all miRNA:mRNA target gene pairs or only the top 25%, 50%, or 75%) and four levels of the magnitude of miRNA effect (ME) on mRNA expression (30%, 50%, 75%, and 83% mRNA reduction), we generated 17 different datasets (including the original dataset). For each dataset, we performed upstream regulator analysis using two bioinformatics tools. We detected an increased effect on the upstream regulator analysis with larger miRNA:mRNA pair bins and higher ME. The miRNA correction allowed identification of several upstream regulators not present in the analysis of the original dataset. Thus, the proposed algorithm improved the prediction of upstream regulators. PMID:27279737

  19. Elongation factor 1 gamma mRNA expression in oesophageal carcinoma.

    PubMed Central

    Mimori, K; Mori, M; Inoue, H; Ueo, H; Mafune, K; Akiyoshi, T; Sugimachi, K

    1996-01-01

    Elongation factor 1 gamma (EF1 gamma) is known to be a subunit of EF1, one of the G proteins that mediate the transport of aminoacyl tRNA to 80S ribosomes during translation. As little is known regarding the expression of EF1 gamma in human oesophageal carcinoma, this study looked at its expression using a northern blot analysis. Thirty six cases of oesophageal carcinoma and 15 oesophageal carcinoma cell lines were studied. The EF1 gamma mRNA overexpression at a level of twofold or more was seen in five (14%) of 36 carcinomatous tissues compared with the normal counterparts. All five overexpressed cases showed severe lymph node metastases compared with the non-overexpressed cases, and the difference was significant (p = 0.028). The stage of the disease of these five cases was far advanced compared with the nonoverexpressed cases (p = 0.012). All 15 oesophageal carcinoma cells expressed EF1 gamma mRNA relatively lower than the gastric or pancreatic carcinoma cell lines, in which EF1 gamma was originally isolated. As the expression of EF1 gamma mRNA could be detected even in the biopsy specimens, its overexpression in tumour tissue may provide preoperative useful information for predicting the aggressiveness of tumours. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:8566862

  20. Expression2Kinases: mRNA profiling linked to multiple upstream regulatory layers

    PubMed Central

    Gordonov, Simon; Lim, Maribel P.; Perkins, Matthew H.; Ma'ayan, Avi

    2012-01-01

    Motivation: Genome-wide mRNA profiling provides a snapshot of the global state of cells under different conditions. However, mRNA levels do not provide direct understanding of upstream regulatory mechanisms. Here, we present a new approach called Expression2Kinases (X2K) to identify upstream regulators likely responsible for observed patterns in genome-wide gene expression. By integrating chromatin immuno-precipitation (ChIP)-seq/chip and position weight matrices (PWMs) data, protein–protein interactions and kinase–substrate phosphorylation reactions, we can better identify regulatory mechanisms upstream of genome-wide differences in gene expression. We validated X2K by applying it to recover drug targets of food and drug administration (FDA)-approved drugs from drug perturbations followed by mRNA expression profiling; to map the regulatory landscape of 44 stem cells and their differentiating progeny; to profile upstream regulatory mechanisms of 327 breast cancer tumors; and to detect pathways from profiled hepatic stellate cells and hippocampal neurons. The X2K approach can advance our understanding of cell signaling and unravel drugs mechanisms of action. Availability: The software and source code are freely available at: http://www.maayanlab.net/X2K. Contact: avi.maayan@mssm.edu Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:22080467

  1. Combining miRNA and mRNA Expression Profiles in Wilms Tumor Subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Ludwig, Nicole; Werner, Tamara V.; Backes, Christina; Trampert, Patrick; Gessler, Manfred; Keller, Andreas; Lenhof, Hans-Peter; Graf, Norbert; Meese, Eckart

    2016-01-01

    Wilms tumor (WT) is the most common childhood renal cancer. Recent findings of mutations in microRNA (miRNA) processing proteins suggest a pivotal role of miRNAs in WT genesis. We performed miRNA expression profiling of 36 WTs of different subtypes and four normal kidney tissues using microarrays. Additionally, we determined the gene expression profile of 28 of these tumors to identify potentially correlated target genes and affected pathways. We identified 85 miRNAs and 2107 messenger RNAs (mRNA) differentially expressed in blastemal WT, and 266 miRNAs and 1267 mRNAs differentially expressed in regressive subtype. The hierarchical clustering of the samples, using either the miRNA or mRNA profile, showed the clear separation of WT from normal kidney samples, but the miRNA pattern yielded better separation of WT subtypes. A correlation analysis of the deregulated miRNA and mRNAs identified 13,026 miRNA/mRNA pairs with inversely correlated expression, of which 2844 are potential interactions of miRNA and their predicted mRNA targets. We found significant upregulation of miRNAs-183, -301a/b and -335 for the blastemal subtype, and miRNAs-181b, -223 and -630 for the regressive subtype. We found marked deregulation of miRNAs regulating epithelial to mesenchymal transition, especially in the blastemal subtype, and miRNAs influencing chemosensitivity, especially in regressive subtypes. Further research is needed to assess the influence of preoperative chemotherapy and tumor infiltrating lymphocytes on the miRNA and mRNA patterns in WT. PMID:27043538

  2. Regional distribution of solute carrier mRNA expression along the human intestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Meier, Yvonne; Eloranta, Jyrki J; Darimont, Jutta; Ismair, Manfred G; Hiller, Christian; Fried, Michael; Kullak-Ublick, Gerd A; Vavricka, Stephan R

    2007-04-01

    Intestinal absorption of drugs, nutrients, and other compounds is mediated by uptake transporters expressed at the apical enterocyte membrane. These compounds are returned to the intestinal lumen or released into portal circulation by intestinal efflux transporters expressed at apical or basolateral membranes, respectively. One important transporter superfamily, multiple members of which are intestinally expressed, are the solute carriers (SLCs). SLC expression levels may determine the pharmacokinetics of drugs that are substrates of these transporters. In this study we characterize the distribution of 15 human SLC transporter mRNAs in histologically normal biopsies from five regions of the intestine of 10 patients. The mRNA expression levels of CNT1, CNT2, apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter (ABST), serotonin transporter (SERT), PEPT1, and OCTN2 exhibit marked differences between different regions of the intestine: the first five are predominantly expressed in the small intestine, whereas OCTN2 exhibits strongest expression in the colon. Two transporter mRNAs studied (OCTN1, OATP2B1) are expressed at similar levels in all gut sections. In addition, ENT2 mRNA is present at low levels across the colon, but not in the small intestine. The other six SLC mRNAs studied are not expressed in the intestine. Quantitative knowledge of transporter expression levels in different regions of the human gastrointestinal tract could be useful for designing intestinal delivery strategies for orally administered drugs. Furthermore, changes in transporter expression that occur in pathological states, such as inflammatory bowel disease, can now be defined more precisely by comparison with the expression levels measured in healthy individuals. PMID:17220238

  3. Physiological roles revealed by ghrelin and ghrelin receptor deficient mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ghrelin is a hormone made in the stomach and known primarily for its growth hormone releasing and orexigenic properties. Nevertheless, ghrelin through its receptor, the GHS-R1a, has been shown to exert many roles including regulation of glucose homeostasis, memory & learning, food addiction and neur...

  4. Evaluation of Parkia pendula lectin mRNA differentially expressed in seedlings.

    PubMed

    Rêgo, M J B M; Santos, P B; Carvalho-Junior, L B; Stirling, J; Beltrão, E I C

    2014-05-01

    Parkia pendula (Willd.) Walp. (Fabaceae) is a neotropical species of the genus Parkia more abundantly distributed in Central to South America. From the seeds of P. pendula a glucose/mannose specific lectin (PpeL) was isolated that has been characterised and used as a biotechnological tool but until now this is the first manuscript to analyse P. pendula mRNA expression in seedlings. For this porpoise a Differential display reverse transcription polimerase chain reaction (DDRT-PCR) was used to evaluate the expression of P. pendula lectin mRNAs in non-rooted seedlings. No bands were observed in the agarose gel, indicating the absence of mRNA of PpeL seedlings. our findings confirm that lectins mRNAs are differently regulated among species even if they are grouped in the same class. PMID:25166336

  5. Interferon-alpha inhibits murine macrophage transforming growth factor-beta mRNA expression.

    PubMed

    Dhanani, S; Huang, M; Wang, J; Dubinett, S M

    1994-06-01

    Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta), a multifunctional polypeptide is produced by a wide variety of cells and regulates a broad array of physiological and pathological functions. TGF-beta appears to play a central role in pulmonary fibrosis and may contribute to tumor-associated immunosuppression. Alveolar macrophages are a rich source of TGF-beta and are intimately involved in lung inflammation. We therefore chose to study TGF-beta regulation in murine alveolar macrophages as well as an immortalized peritoneal macrophage cell line (IC-21). Murine macrophages were incubated with cytokines to evaluate their role in regulating TGF-beta mRNA expression. We conclude that IFN-alpha downregulates TGF-beta mRNA expression in murine macrophages. PMID:8088926

  6. Expression profiling of Drosophila mitochondrial genes via deep mRNA sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Tatiana Teixeira; Dolezal, Marlies; Schlötterer, Christian; Ottenwälder, Birgit

    2009-01-01

    Mitochondria play an essential role in several cellular processes. Nevertheless, very little is known about patterns of gene expression of genes encoded by the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). In this study, we used next-generation sequencing (NGS) for transcription profiling of genes encoded in the mitochondrial genome of Drosophila melanogaster and D. pseudoobscura. The analysis of males and females in both species indicated that the expression pattern was conserved between the two species, but differed significantly between both sexes. Interestingly, mRNA levels were not only different among genes encoded by separate transcription units, but also showed significant differences among genes located in the same transcription unit. Hence, mRNA abundance of genes encoded by mtDNA seems to be heavily modulated by post-transcriptional regulation. Finally, we also identified several transcripts with a noncanonical structure, suggesting that processing of mitochondrial transcripts may be more complex than previously assumed. PMID:19843606

  7. Genome-wide analysis of microRNA and mRNA expression signatures in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ming-hui; Fu, Sheng-bo; Xiao, Hua-sheng

    2015-01-01

    Cancer is an extremely diverse and complex disease that results from various genetic and epigenetic changes such as DNA copy-number variations, mutations, and aberrant mRNA and/or protein expression caused by abnormal transcriptional regulation. The expression profiles of certain microRNAs (miRNAs) and messenger RNAs (mRNAs) are closely related to cancer progression stages. In the past few decades, DNA microarray and next-generation sequencing techniques have been widely applied to identify miRNA and mRNA signatures for cancers on a genome-wide scale and have provided meaningful insights into cancer diagnosis, prognosis and personalized medicine. In this review, we summarize the progress in genome-wide analysis of miRNAs and mRNAs as cancer biomarkers, highlighting their diagnostic and prognostic roles. PMID:26299954

  8. Requirement for nuclear autoantigenic sperm protein mRNA expression in bovine preimplantation development.

    PubMed

    Nagatomo, Hiroaki; Kohri, Nanami; Akizawa, Hiroki; Hoshino, Yumi; Yamauchi, Nobuhiko; Kono, Tomohiro; Takahashi, Masashi; Kawahara, Manabu

    2016-03-01

    Nuclear autoantigenic sperm protein (NASP) is associated with DNA replication, cell proliferation, and cell cycle progression through its specific binding to histones. The aim of this study was to examine the roles of NASP in bovine preimplantation embryonic development. Using NASP gene knockdown (KD), we confirmed the reduction of NASP messenger RNA (mRNA) expression during preimplantation development. NASP KD did not affect cleavage but significantly decreased development of embryos into the blastocyst stage. Furthermore, blastocyst hatching was significantly decreased in NASP KD embryos. Cell numbers in the inner cell mass of NASP KD blastocysts were also decreased compared to those of controls. These results suggest that NASP mRNA expression is required for preimplantation development into the blastocyst stage in cattle. PMID:26690724

  9. Analysis of myosin heavy chain mRNA expression by RT-PCR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, C.; Haddad, F.; Qin, A. X.; Baldwin, K. M.

    1997-01-01

    An assay was developed for rapid and sensitive analysis of myosin heavy chain (MHC) mRNA expression in rodent skeletal muscle. Only 2 microg of total RNA were necessary for the simultaneous analysis of relative mRNA expression of six different MHC genes. We designed synthetic DNA fragments as internal standards, which contained the relevant primer sequences for the adult MHC mRNAs type I, IIa, IIx, IIb as well as the embryonic and neonatal MHC mRNAs. A known amount of the synthetic fragment was added to each polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and yielded a product of different size than the amplified MHC mRNA fragment. The ratio of amplified MHC fragment to synthetic fragment allowed us to calculate percentages of the gene expression of the different MHC genes in a given muscle sample. Comparison with the traditional Northern blot analysis demonstrated that our reverse transcriptase-PCR-based assay was reliable, fast, and quantitative over a wide range of relative MHC mRNA expression in a spectrum of adult and neonatal rat skeletal muscles. Furthermore, the high sensitivity of the assay made it very useful when only small quantities of tissue were available. Statistical analysis of the signals for each MHC isoform across the analyzed samples showed a highly significant correlation between the PCR and the Northern signals as Pearson correlation coefficients ranged between 0.77 and 0.96 (P < 0.005). This assay has potential use in analyzing small muscle samples such as biopsies and samples from pre- and/or neonatal stages of development.

  10. Comparison of IgE expression at the mRNA and protein levels in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Turner, K J; Creany, J; Coelen, R J; Cameron, K J; Holt, B J; Beilharz, M W

    1991-01-01

    The regulating effects of IL-4 and pokeweed mitogen on IgE synthesis in vitro by human peripheral blood leucocytes has been compared with the corresponding effect of these regulators on the expression of IgE mRNA. The latter was measured by dot blot hybridization with an oligonucleotide coding for a unique six amino acid region of the CH epsilon 2 domain. Specificity of the oligonucleotide probe was established by its inability to hybridize with RNA extracted from HMY-2 (IgG) and XQ-15 (IgM) secreting cell lines whilst producing intense signals with RNA extracted from the IgE secreting cell line U266. Whilst IgE mRNA was detected in RNA extracted from PBL of both atopic and control subjects, spontaneous IgE synthesis was restricted to atopic PBL. IL-4 increased both IgE mRNA and IgE synthesis in all PBL samples but PWM, while significantly increasing IgE mRNA expression either failed to modify IgE synthesis or actively suppressed it. The assay system employed to quantitate IgE synthesis in vitro was shown to be inhibited by both IgE binding factors and IgG anti-IgE autoantibodies which are produced in PBL cultures. IgE mRNA levels might therefore more accurately monitor the regulatory effects of IL-4 and PWM on IgE synthesis than quantitation of the IgE by radioimmunoassay. Images Figure 1 PMID:1783428

  11. Codon influence on protein expression in E. coli correlates with mRNA levels.

    PubMed

    Boël, Grégory; Letso, Reka; Neely, Helen; Price, W Nicholson; Wong, Kam-Ho; Su, Min; Luff, Jon D; Valecha, Mayank; Everett, John K; Acton, Thomas B; Xiao, Rong; Montelione, Gaetano T; Aalberts, Daniel P; Hunt, John F

    2016-01-21

    Degeneracy in the genetic code, which enables a single protein to be encoded by a multitude of synonymous gene sequences, has an important role in regulating protein expression, but substantial uncertainty exists concerning the details of this phenomenon. Here we analyse the sequence features influencing protein expression levels in 6,348 experiments using bacteriophage T7 polymerase to synthesize messenger RNA in Escherichia coli. Logistic regression yields a new codon-influence metric that correlates only weakly with genomic codon-usage frequency, but strongly with global physiological protein concentrations and also mRNA concentrations and lifetimes in vivo. Overall, the codon content influences protein expression more strongly than mRNA-folding parameters, although the latter dominate in the initial ~16 codons. Genes redesigned based on our analyses are transcribed with unaltered efficiency but translated with higher efficiency in vitro. The less efficiently translated native sequences show greatly reduced mRNA levels in vivo. Our results suggest that codon content modulates a kinetic competition between protein elongation and mRNA degradation that is a central feature of the physiology and also possibly the regulation of translation in E. coli. PMID:26760206

  12. An intronic RNA structure modulates expression of the mRNA biogenesis factor Sus1

    PubMed Central

    AbuQattam, Ali; Gallego, José; Rodríguez-Navarro, Susana

    2016-01-01

    Sus1 is a conserved protein involved in chromatin remodeling and mRNA biogenesis. Unlike most yeast genes, the SUS1 pre-mRNA of Saccharomyces cerevisiae contains two introns and is alternatively spliced, retaining one or both introns in response to changes in environmental conditions. SUS1 splicing may allow the cell to control Sus1 expression, but the mechanisms that regulate this process remain unknown. Using in silico analyses together with NMR spectroscopy, gel electrophoresis, and UV thermal denaturation experiments, we show that the downstream intron (I2) of SUS1 forms a weakly stable, 37-nucleotide stem–loop structure containing the branch site near its apical loop and the 3′ splice site after the stem terminus. A cellular assay revealed that two of four mutants containing altered I2 structures had significantly impaired SUS1 expression. Semiquantitative RT-PCR experiments indicated that all mutants accumulated unspliced SUS1 pre-mRNA and/or induced distorted levels of fully spliced mRNA relative to wild type. Concomitantly, Sus1 cellular functions in histone H2B deubiquitination and mRNA export were affected in I2 hairpin mutants that inhibited splicing. This work demonstrates that I2 structure is relevant for SUS1 expression, and that this effect is likely exerted through modulation of splicing. PMID:26546116

  13. Expression of connexin 43 mRNA and protein in developing follicles of prepubertal porcine ovaries

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Melton, C.M.; Zaunbrecher, G.M.; Yoshizaki, G.; Patio, R.; Whisnant, S.; Rendon, A.; Lee, V.H.

    2001-01-01

    A major form of cell-cell communication is mediated by gap junctions, aggregations of intercellular channels composed of connexins (Cxs), which are responsible for exchange of low molecular weight (< 1200 Da) cytosolic materials. These channels are a growing family of related proteins. This study was designed to determine the ontogeny of connexin 43 (Cx43) during early stages of follicular development in prepubertal porcine ovaries. A partial-length (412 base) cDNA clone was obtained from mature porcine ovaries and determined to have 98% identity with published porcine Cx43. Northern blot analysis demonstrated a 4.3-kb mRNA in total RNA isolated from prepubertal and adult porcine ovaries. In-situ hybridization revealed that Cx43 mRNA was detectable in granulosa cells of primary follicles but undetectable in dormant primordial follicles. The intensity of the signal increased with follicular growth and was greatest in the large antral follicles. Immunohistochemical evaluation indicated that Cx43 protein expression correlated with the presence of Cx43 mRNA. These results indicate that substantial amounts of Cx43 are first expressed in granulosa cells following activation of follicular development and that this expression increases throughout follicular growth and maturation. These findings suggest an association between the enhancement of intercellular gap-junctional communication and onset of follicular growth. ?? 2001 Elsevier Science Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Promoter Methylation and mRNA Expression of Response Gene to Complement 32 in Breast Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Eskandari-Nasab, Ebrahim; Hashemi, Mohammad; Rafighdoost, Firoozeh

    2016-01-01

    Background. Response gene to complement 32 (RGC32), induced by activation of complements, has been characterized as a cell cycle regulator; however, its role in carcinogenesis is still controversial. In the present study we compared RGC32 promoter methylation patterns and mRNA expression in breast cancerous tissues and adjacent normal tissues. Materials and Methods. Sixty-three breast cancer tissues and 63 adjacent nonneoplastic tissues were included in our study. Design. Nested methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction (Nested-MSP) and quantitative PCR (qPCR) were used to determine RGC32 promoter methylation status and its mRNA expression levels, respectively. Results. RGC32 methylation pattern was not different between breast cancerous tissue and adjacent nonneoplastic tissue (OR = 2.30, 95% CI = 0.95–5.54). However, qPCR analysis displayed higher levels of RGC32 mRNA in breast cancerous tissues than in noncancerous tissues (1.073 versus 0.959; P = 0.001), irrespective of the promoter methylation status. The expression levels and promoter methylation of RGC32 were not correlated with any of patients' clinical characteristics (P > 0.05). Conclusion. Our findings confirmed upregulation of RGC32 in breast cancerous tumors, but it was not associated with promoter methylation patterns. PMID:27118972

  15. Cytokine mRNA expression in Peromyscus yucatanicus (Rodentia: Cricetidae) infected by Leishmania (Leishmania) mexicana.

    PubMed

    Loria-Cervera, Elsy Nalleli; Sosa-Bibiano, Erika Ivett; Van Wynsberghe, Nicole Raymonde; Saldarriaga, Omar Abdul; Melby, Peter C; Andrade-Narvaez, Fernando Jose

    2016-07-01

    Peromyscus yucatanicus, the main reservoir of Leishmania (Leishmania) mexicana in the Yucatan peninsula of Mexico, reproduces clinical and histological pictures of LCL in human as well as subclinical infection. Thus, we used this rodent as a novel experimental model. In this work, we analyzed cytokine mRNA expression in P. yucatanicus infected with L. (L.) mexicana. Animals were inoculated with either 2.5×10(6) or 1×10(2) promastigotes and cytokine expressions were analyzed by real-time RT-PCR in skin at 4 and 12weeks post-infection (wpi). Independently of the parasite inoculum none of the infected rodents had clinical signs of LCL at 4wpi and all expressed high IFN-γ mRNA. All P. yucatanicus inoculated with 2.5×10(6) promastigotes developed signs of LCL at 12wpi while the mice inoculated with 1×10(2) remained subclinical. At that time, both IFN-γ and IL-10 were expressed in P. yucatanicus with clinical and subclinical infections. Expressions of TNF-α and IL-4 were significantly higher in clinical animals (2.5×10(6)) compared with subclinical ones (1×10(2)). High TGF-β expression was observed in P. yucatanicus with clinical signs when compared with healthy animals. Results suggested that the clinical course of L. (L.) mexicana infection in P. yucatanicus was associated with a specific local pattern of cytokine production at 12wpi. PMID:27155064

  16. Distinct prognostic values of four-Notch-receptor mRNA expression in ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xinling; Teng, Lingling; Wang, Min

    2016-05-01

    Notch signaling pathway includes ligands and Notch receptors, which are frequently deregulated in several human malignancies including ovarian cancer. Aberrant activation of Notch signaling has been linked to ovarian carcinogenesis and progression. In the current study, we used the "Kaplan-Meier plotter" (KM plotter) database, in which updated gene expression data and survival information from a total of 1306 ovarian cancer patients were used to access the prognostic value of four Notch receptors in ovarian cancer patients. Hazard ratio (HR), 95 % confidence intervals, and log-rank P were calculated. Notch1 messenger RNA (mRNA) high expression was not found to be correlated to overall survival (OS) for all ovarian cancer, as well as in serous and endometrioid cancer patients followed for 20 years. However, Notch1 mRNA high expression is significantly associated with worsen OS in TP53 wild-type ovarian cancer patients, while it is significantly associated with better OS in TP53 mutation-type ovarian cancer patients. Notch2 mRNA high expression was found to be significantly correlated to worsen OS for all ovarian cancer patients, as well as in grade II ovarian cancer patients. Notch3 mRNA high expression was found to be significantly correlated to better OS for all ovarian cancer patients, but not in serous cancer patients and endometrioid cancer patients. Notch4 mRNA high expression was not found to be significantly correlated to OS for all ovarian cancer patients, serous cancer patients, and endometrioid cancer patients. These results indicate that there are distinct prognostic values of four Notch receptors in ovarian cancer. This information will be useful for better understanding of the heterogeneity and complexity in the molecular biology of ovarian cancer and for developing tools to more accurately predict their prognosis. Based on our results, Notch1 could be a potential drug target of TP53 wild-type ovarian cancer and Notch2 could be a potential drug

  17. Protective actions of des-acylated ghrelin on brain injury and blood-brain barrier disruption after stroke in mice.

    PubMed

    Ku, Jacqueline M; Taher, Mohammadali; Chin, Kai Yee; Barsby, Tom; Austin, Victoria; Wong, Connie H Y; Andrews, Zane B; Spencer, Sarah J; Miller, Alyson A

    2016-09-01

    The major ghrelin forms, acylated ghrelin and des-acylated ghrelin, are novel gastrointestinal hormones. Moreover, emerging evidence indicates that these peptides may have other functions including neuro- and vaso-protection. Here, we investigated whether post-stroke treatment with acylated ghrelin or des-acylated ghrelin could improve functional and histological endpoints of stroke outcome in mice after transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (tMCAo). We found that des-acylated ghrelin (1 mg/kg) improved neurological and functional performance, reduced infarct and swelling, and decreased apoptosis. In addition, it reduced blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption in vivo and attenuated the hyper-permeability of mouse cerebral microvascular endothelial cells after oxygen glucose deprivation and reoxygenation (OGD + RO). By contrast, acylated ghrelin (1 mg/kg or 5 mg/kg) had no significant effect on these endpoints of stroke outcome. Next we found that des-acylated ghrelin's vasoprotective actions were associated with increased expression of tight junction proteins (occludin and claudin-5), and decreased cell death. Moreover, it attenuated superoxide production, Nox activity and expression of 3-nitrotyrosine. Collectively, these results demonstrate that post-stroke treatment with des-acylated ghrelin, but not acylated ghrelin, protects against ischaemia/reperfusion-induced brain injury and swelling, and BBB disruption, by reducing oxidative and/or nitrosative damage. PMID:27303049

  18. CART mRNA expression in rat monkey and human brain: relevance to cocaine abuse.

    PubMed

    Fagergren, Pernilla; Hurd, Yasmin

    2007-09-10

    The neuropeptide CART (cocaine and amphetamine regulated transcript) is suggested to be regulated by psychostimulant administration. We review here the localization of CART mRNA expression in the human brain and its possible relevance to human cocaine abuse. Except for strong hypothalamic expression, the CART transcript is predominately expressed in target regions of the mesocorticolimbic dopamine system, such as the nucleus accumbens shell, amygdala complex, extended amygdala and orbitofrontal, enthorhinal and piriform cortices. The discrete limbic localization strongly implies involvement in reward and reinforcement behaviors. We therefore examined CART mRNA expression in both Sprague Dawley rats and Rhesus monkeys that had self-administered cocaine. Cocaine self-administration in the rat (1.5 mg/kg/inj, on a fixed ratio 1 schedule of reinforcement for 1 week) and monkey (0.03 or 0.3 mg/kg/inj on a fixed 3 min interval schedule of reinforcement for 5 or 100 days) did not alter transcript levels in CART expressing nucleus accumbens (monkey not studied), amygdala nuclei or cortical areas. However, in the monkey sublenticular extended amygdala, low dose cocaine self-administration resulted in increased CART transcript levels after both 5 and 100 days of self-administration, whereas no difference was found after high dose self-administration. In conclusion, we found no substantial alterations CART mRNA expression during cocaine self-administration, but this neuropeptide has the anatomical and functional potential to modulate brain areas relevant for cocaine abuse. Further studies are needed to evaluate the involvement of CART in other components of the cocaine abuse cycle. PMID:17631364

  19. Humoral immunity to human breast cancer: antigen definition and quantitative analysis of mRNA expression.

    PubMed

    Scanlan, M J; Gout, I; Gordon, C M; Williamson, B; Stockert, E; Gure, A O; Jäger, D; Chen, Y T; Mackay, A; O'Hare, M J; Old, L J

    2001-03-30

    The ability of the immune system to recognize structurally altered, amplified or aberrantly expressed proteins can be used to identify molecules of etiologic relevance to cancer and to define targets for cancer immunotherapy. In the current study, ninety-four distinct antigens reactive with serum IgG from breast cancer patients were identified by immunoscreening breast cancer-derived cDNA expression libraries (SEREX). A serological profile was generated for each antigen on the basis of reactivity with allogeneic sera from normal individuals and cancer patients, and mRNA expression profiles for coding sequences were assembled based upon the tissue distribution of expressed sequence tags, Northern blots and real-time RT-PCR. Forty antigens reacted exclusively with sera from cancer patients. These included well-characterized tumor antigens, e.g. MAGE-3, MAGE-6, NY-ESO-1, Her2neu and p53, as well as newly-defined breast cancer antigens, e.g. kinesin 2, TATA element modulatory factor 1, tumor protein D52 and MAGE D, and novel gene products, e.g. NY-BR-62, NY-BR-75, NY-BR-85, and NY-BR-96. With regard to expression profiles, two of the novel gene products, NY-BR-62 and NY-BR-85, were characterized by a high level of testicular mRNA expression, and were overexpressed in 60% and 90% of breast cancers, respectively. In addition, mRNA encoding tumor protein D52 was overexpressed in 60% of breast cancer specimens, while transcripts encoding SNT-1 signal adaptor protein were downregulated in 70% of these cases. This study adds to the growing list of breast cancer antigens defined by SEREX and to the ultimate objective of identifying the complete repertoire of immunogenic gene products in human cancer (the cancer immunome). PMID:12747765

  20. Ghrelin reverses experimental diabetic neuropathy in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Kyoraku, Itaru; Shiomi, Kazutaka; Kangawa, Kenji; Nakazato, Masamitsu

    2009-11-20

    Ghrelin, an acylated peptide produced in the stomach, increases food intake and growth hormone secretion, suppresses inflammation and oxidative stress, and promotes cell survival and proliferation. We investigated the pharmacological potential of ghrelin in the treatment of polyneuropathy in uncontrolled streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetes in mice. Ghrelin or desacyl-ghrelin was administered daily for 4 weeks after STZ-induced diabetic polyneuropathy had developed. Ghrelin administration did not alter food intake, body weight gain, blood glucose levels, or plasma insulin levels when compared with mice given saline or desacyl-ghrelin administration. Ghrelin administration ameliorated reductions in motor and sensory nerve conduction velocities in diabetic mice and normalized their temperature sensation and plasma concentrations of 8-isoprostaglandin {alpha}, an oxidative stress marker. Desacyl-ghrelin failed to have any effect. Ghrelin administration in a mouse model of diabetes ameliorated polyneuropathy. Thus, ghrelin's effects represent a novel therapeutic paradigm for the treatment of this otherwise intractable disorder.

  1. Differential dynamics of the mammalian mRNA and protein expression response to misfolding stress.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Zhe; Teo, Guoshou; Krueger, Sabrina; Rock, Tara M; Koh, Hiromi W L; Choi, Hyungwon; Vogel, Christine

    2016-01-01

    The relative importance of regulation at the mRNA versus protein level is subject to ongoing debate. To address this question in a dynamic system, we mapped proteomic and transcriptomic changes in mammalian cells responding to stress induced by dithiothreitol over 30 h. Specifically, we estimated the kinetic parameters for the synthesis and degradation of RNA and proteins, and deconvoluted the response patterns into common and unique to each regulatory level using a new statistical tool. Overall, the two regulatory levels were equally important, but differed in their impact on molecule concentrations. Both mRNA and protein changes peaked between two and eight hours, but mRNA expression fold changes were much smaller than those of the proteins. mRNA concentrations shifted in a transient, pulse-like pattern and returned to values close to pre-treatment levels by the end of the experiment. In contrast, protein concentrations switched only once and established a new steady state, consistent with the dominant role of protein regulation during misfolding stress. Finally, we generated hypotheses on specific regulatory modes for some genes. PMID:26792871

  2. Hypoxia-induced gene expression results from selective mRNA partitioning to the endoplasmic reticulum

    PubMed Central

    Staudacher, Jonas J.; Naarmann-de Vries, Isabel S.; Ujvari, Stefanie J.; Klinger, Bertram; Kasim, Mumtaz; Benko, Edgar; Ostareck-Lederer, Antje; Ostareck, Dirk H.; Bondke Persson, Anja; Lorenzen, Stephan; Meier, Jochen C.; Blüthgen, Nils; Persson, Pontus B.; Henrion-Caude, Alexandra; Mrowka, Ralf; Fähling, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Protein synthesis is a primary energy-consuming process in the cell. Therefore, under hypoxic conditions, rapid inhibition of global mRNA translation represents a major protective strategy to maintain energy metabolism. How some mRNAs, especially those that encode crucial survival factors, continue to be efficiently translated in hypoxia is not completely understood. By comparing specific transcript levels in ribonucleoprotein complexes, cytoplasmic polysomes and endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-bound ribosomes, we show that the synthesis of proteins encoded by hypoxia marker genes is favoured at the ER in hypoxia. Gene expression profiling revealed that transcripts particularly increased by the HIF-1 transcription factor network show hypoxia-induced enrichment at the ER. We found that mRNAs favourably translated at the ER have higher conservation scores for both the 5′- and 3′-untranslated regions (UTRs) and contain less upstream initiation codons (uAUGs), indicating the significance of these sequence elements for sustained mRNA translation under hypoxic conditions. Furthermore, we found enrichment of specific cis-elements in mRNA 5′- as well as 3′-UTRs that mediate transcript localization to the ER in hypoxia. We conclude that transcriptome partitioning between the cytoplasm and the ER permits selective mRNA translation under conditions of energy shortage. PMID:25753659

  3. Heterogeneous expression of protein and mRNA in pyruvate dehydrogenase deficiency.

    PubMed Central

    Wexler, I D; Kerr, D S; Ho, L; Lusk, M M; Pepin, R A; Javed, A A; Mole, J E; Jesse, B W; Thekkumkara, T J; Pons, G

    1988-01-01

    Deficiency of pyruvate dehydrogenase [pyruvate:lipoamide 2-oxidoreductase (decarboxylating and acceptor-acetylating), EC 1.2.4.1], the first component of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex, is associated with lactic acidosis and central nervous system dysfunction. Using both specific antibodies to pyruvate dehydrogenase and cDNAs coding for its two alpha and beta subunits, we characterized pyruvate dehydrogenase deficiency in 11 patients. Three different patterns were found on immunologic and RNA blot analyses. (i) Seven patients had immunologically detectable crossreactive material for the alpha and beta proteins of pyruvate dehydrogenase. (ii) Two patients had no detectable crossreactive protein for either the alpha or beta subunit but had normal amounts of mRNA for both alpha and beta subunits. (iii) The remaining two patients also had no detectable crossreactive protein but had diminished amounts of mRNA for the alpha subunit of pyruvate dehydrogenase only. These results indicate that loss of pyruvate dehydrogenase activity may be associated with either absent or catalytically inactive proteins, and in those cases in which this enzyme is absent, mRNA for one of the subunits may also be missing. When mRNA for one of the subunits is lacking, both protein subunits are absent, suggesting that a mutation affecting the expression of one of the subunit proteins causes the remaining uncomplexed subunit to be unstable. The results show that several different mutations account for the molecular heterogeneity of pyruvate dehydrogenase deficiency. Images PMID:3140238

  4. MRNA and miRNA expression patterns associated to pathways linked to metal mixture health effects.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Pacheco, M; Hidalgo-Miranda, A; Romero-Córdoba, S; Valverde, M; Rojas, E

    2014-01-10

    Metals are a threat to human health by increasing disease risk. Experimental data have linked altered miRNA expression with exposure to some metals. MiRNAs comprise a large family of non-coding single-stranded molecules that primarily function to negatively regulate gene expression post-transcriptionally. Although several human populations are exposed to low concentrations of As, Cd and Pb as a mixture, most toxicology research focuses on the individual effects that these metals exert. Thus, this study aims to evaluate global miRNA and mRNA expression changes induced by a metal mixture containing NaAsO2, CdCl2, Pb(C2H3O2)2·3H2O and to predict possible metal-associated disease development under these conditions. Our results show that this metal mixture results in a miRNA expression profile that may be responsible for the mRNA expression changes observed under experimental conditions in which coding proteins are involved in cellular processes, including cell death, growth and proliferation related to the metal-associated inflammatory response and cancer. PMID:24080485

  5. mRNA expression profiles of calmodulin and liver receptor homolog-1 genes in chickens.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Z-C; Xiao, L-H; Wang, Y; Chen, S-Y; Yang, Z-Q; Zhao, X-L; Zhu, Q; Liu, Y-P

    2012-01-01

    Calmodulin (CALM), a calcium-binding protein, is expressed in the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis; it plays a pivotal role in the reproductive system by regulating gonadotropin-releasing hormone signaling. Downstream of hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal signaling pathways, liver receptor homolog-1 (LRH-1) is involved in female gonadal hormone synthesis. In the chicken, although the two genes are known to be associated with reproductive traits, the interaction between gonadotropins and gonadal steroids remains unclear. We used quantitative real-time PCR to quantify the tissular (hypothalamus, pituitary, ovary, liver, kidney, oviduct, heart) and ontogenetic (12, 18, 32, and 45 weeks) mRNA expression profiles of CALM and LRH-1 in Erlang Mountainous chickens to determine their roles in the endocrine control of fertility, and compared these profiles with expression in Roman chickens. We found that the relative expressions of CALM and LRH-1 genes had the highest levels in the pituitary and ovary at 32 weeks. The expression level of CALM mRNA in the pituitary of Roman chickens was significantly higher than that in Erlang Mountainous chickens at 32 and 45 weeks, while the LRH-1 transcript level in the ovaries of Roman chickens was significantly lower than that of Erlang Mountainous chickens at 32 and 45 weeks. In summary, the transcript levels of CALM and LRH-1 genes are associated with chicken reproductive traits; in addition, we found that the CALM gene is the key regulator in the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal signaling network. PMID:23079841

  6. Reduced mRNA expression levels of MBD2 and MBD3 in gastric carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Pontes, Thaís Brilhante; Chen, Elizabeth Suchi; Gigek, Carolina Oliveira; Calcagno, Danielle Queiroz; Wisnieski, Fernanda; Leal, Mariana Ferreira; Demachki, Samia; Assumpção, Paulo Pimentel; Artigiani, Ricardo; Lourenço, Laércio Gomes; Burbano, Rommel Rodriguez; Arruda Cardoso Smith, Marília

    2014-04-01

    Aberrant methylation has been reported in several neoplasias, including gastric cancer. The methyl-CpG-binding domain (MBD) family proteins have been implicated in the chromatin remodeling process, leading to the modulation of gene expression. To evaluate the role of MBD2 and MBD3 in gastric carcinogenesis and the possible association with clinicopathological characteristics, we assessed the mRNA levels and promoter methylation patterns in gastric tissues. In this study, MBD2 and MBD3 mRNA levels were determined by RT-qPCR in 28 neoplastic and adjacent nonneoplastic and 27 gastritis and non-gastritis samples. The promoter methylation status was determined by bisulfite sequencing, and we found reduced MBD2 and MBD3 levels in the neoplastic samples compared with the other groups. Moreover, a strong correlation between the MBD2 and MBD3 expression levels was observed in each set of paired samples. Our data also showed that the neoplastic tissues exhibited higher MBD2 promoter methylation than the other groups. Interestingly, the non-gastritis group was the only one with positive methylation in the MBD3 promoter region. Furthermore, a weak correlation between gene expression and methylation was observed. Therefore, our data suggest that DNA methylation plays a minor role in the regulation of MBD2 and MBD3 expression, and the presence of methylation at CpGs that interact with transcription factor complexes might also be involved in the modulation of these genes. Moreover, reduced mRNA expression of MBD2 and MBD3 is implicated in gastric carcinogenesis, and thus, further investigations about these genes should be conducted for a better understanding of the role of abnormal methylation involved in this neoplasia. PMID:24338710

  7. Genomic Analysis and mRNA Expression of Equine Type I Interferon Genes

    PubMed Central

    Detournay, Olivier; Morrison, David A.; Wagner, Bettina; Zarnegar, Behdad

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed at identifying all of the type I interferon (IFN) genes of the horse and at monitoring their expression in equine cells on in vitro induction. We identified 32 putative type I IFN loci on horse chromosome 23 and an unplaced genomic scaffold. A phylogentic analysis characterized these into 8 different type I IFN classes, that is, putative functional genes for 6 IFN-α, 4 IFN-β, 8 IFN-ω (plus 4 pseudogenes), 3 IFN-δ (plus 1 pseudogene), 1 IFN-κ and 1 IFN-ɛ, plus 1 IFN-ν pseudogene, and 3 loci belonging to what has previously been called IFN-αω. Our analyses indicate that the IFN-αω genes are quite distinct from both IFN-α and IFN-ω, and we refer to this type I IFN as IFN-μ. Results from cell cultures showed that leukocytes readily expressed IFN-α, IFN-β, IFN-δ, IFN-μ, and IFN-ω mRNA on induction with, for example, live virus; while fibroblasts only expressed IFN-β mRNA on stimulation. IFN-κ or IFN-ɛ expression was not consistently induced in these cell cultures. Thus, the equine type I IFN family comprised 8 classes, 7 of which had putative functional genes, and mRNA expression of 5 was induced in vitro. Moreover, a relatively low number of IFN-α subtypes was found in the horse compared with other eutherian mammals. PMID:23772953

  8. Identification of a ghrelin-like peptide in two species of shark, Sphyrna lewini and Carcharhinus melanopterus.

    PubMed

    Kawakoshi, Akatsuki; Kaiya, Hiroyuki; Riley, Larry G; Hirano, Tetsuya; Grau, E Gordon; Miyazato, Mikiya; Hosoda, Hiroshi; Kangawa, Kenji

    2007-05-01

    In this study, we identified a ghrelin-like peptide (ghrelin-LP) in two elasmobranchs. The peptide, isoforms and cDNA encoding its precursor were isolated from the stomach of two sharks, the hammerhead (HH) shark (Sphyrna lewini) and the black-tip reef (BTR) shark (Carcharhinus melanopterus). The ghrelin-LP isolated from each shark was found to be 25 amino acids in length and exhibit high sequence homology with each other; only three amino acids were different. As has been shown in tetrapod and teleost fish ghrelins, shark ghrelin-LPs possess two forms that are distinguished by having the third serine residue (Ser) acylated by either octanoic or decanoic acid. The N-terminal four residues (GVSF), known as the active core of ghrelin, are not identical to those of other species (GSSF). Nevertheless, shark ghrelin-LP elevated Ca(2+) levels in CHO cell line expressing the growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHS-R). Unlike teleosts ghrelin's, shark ghrelin-LPs are not amidated at the C-terminus. Messenger RNA of ghrelin-LP in the HH shark was predominantly expressed in the stomach as seen in other species, followed by the brain, intestine, gill, heart and liver. The nucleotide sequence of the ghrelin-LP gene in the HH shark was characterized to compare organization of the ghrelin gene with those in other species. The size of the HH ghrelin-LP gene was 8541 bp, two to ten times larger than that of other species studied to date. The HH ghrelin-LP gene is composed of five exons and four introns, which is the same as ghrelin genes in mammals, chicken and rainbow trout. In conclusion, the shark ghrelin-LPs identified in this study exhibit many characteristics for ghrelin in terms of peptide modifications, GHS-R activation, tissue distribution, and gene organization; however, it is necessary to further clarify their biological properties such as growth hormone-releasing or orexigenic activity before designating these peptides as ghrelin. PMID:17362948

  9. Effect of running training on uncoupling protein mRNA expression in rat brown adipose tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamashita, Hitoshi; Yamamoto, Mikio; Sato, Yuzo; Izawa, Tetsuya; Komabayashi, Takao; Saito, Daizo; Ohno, Hideki

    1993-03-01

    The effect was investigated of endurance training on the expression of uncoupling protein (UCP) mRNA in brown adipose tissue (BAT) of rats. The exercised rats were trained on a rodent treadmill for 5 days per week and a total of 9 weeks. After the training programme, a marked decrease in BAT mass was found in terms of weight or weight per unit body weight; there was a corresponding decrease in DNA content and a downward trend in RNA and glycogen levels. The UCP mRNA was present at a markedly decreased level in BAT of trained animals. In consideration of the reduced levels of mRNAs for hormone-sensitive lipase and acylCoA synthetase, the brown adipose tissue investigated appeared to be in a relatively atrophied and thermogenically quiescent state.

  10. Cloning and expression analysis of prohibitin mRNA in canine mammary tumors.

    PubMed

    Matsuyama, Satoshi; Nakano, Yuko; Nakamura, Mieko; Yamamoto, Ryohei; Shimada, Terumasa; Ohashi, Fumihito; Kubo, Kihei

    2015-01-01

    Prohibitin is an antiproliferative protein that is a product of a putative tumor suppressor gene. However, there is little information on prohibitins in companion animals. In this study, we cloned canine prohibitin mRNA using RT-PCR and 3'-RACE (Rapid Amplification of cDNA Ends). The sequence was well conserved compared with those of other mammals, including human. The deduced amino acid sequence translated from the open reading frame completely corresponded to the human sequence. Canine prohibitin mRNA was expressed in all normal mammary and tumor samples examined. These results suggest that this protein plays a vital role in cell growth mechanisms and may be related to the occurrence of canine mammary tumors. PMID:25312047

  11. mRNA expression of dopamine receptors in peripheral blood lymphocytes of computer game addicts.

    PubMed

    Vousooghi, Nasim; Zarei, Seyed Zeinolabedin; Sadat-Shirazi, Mitra-Sadat; Eghbali, Fatemeh; Zarrindast, Mohammad Reza

    2015-10-01

    Excessive playing of computer games like some other behaviors could lead to addiction. Addictive behaviors may induce their reinforcing effects through stimulation of the brain dopaminergic mesolimbic pathway. The status of dopamine receptors in the brain may be parallel to their homologous receptors in peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs). Here, we have investigated the mRNA expression of dopamine D3, D4 and D5 receptors in PBLs of computer game addicts (n = 20) in comparison to normal subjects (n = 20), using a real-time PCR method. The results showed that the expression level of D3 and D4 dopamine receptors in computer game addicts were not statistically different from the control group. However, the expression of the mRNA of D5 dopamine receptor was significantly down-regulated in PBLs of computer game addicts and reached 0.42 the amount of the control group. It is concluded that unlike with drug addiction, the expression levels of the D3 and D4 dopamine receptors in computer game addicts are not altered compared to the control group. However, reduced level of the D5 dopamine receptor in computer game addicts may serve as a peripheral marker in studies where the confounding effects of abused drugs are unwanted. PMID:25967984

  12. Increased expression of C5a receptor (CD88) mRNA in canine mammary tumors.

    PubMed

    Hezmee, Mohd Noor Mohd; Kyaw-Tanner, Myat; Lee, Jia Yu Peppermint; Shiels, Ian A; Rolfe, Barbara; Woodruff, Trent; Mills, Paul C

    2011-01-01

    Mammary tumors are among the most common neoplastic conditions in dogs, and there is evidence that inflammation plays a role in the development of some tumor types in dogs. The complement system is a major participant in the inflammatory process and the complement activation component, C5a, is a potent inflammatory peptide. This study investigated the mRNA expression of the major receptor for C5a (C5aR; CD88) in histopathological samples of canine mammary tumors by quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) using canine-specific primers for CD88. A total of seven canine mammary tumors (four malignant carcinomas, two benign mixed mammary tumors, and one myoepithelioma) and eight normal mammary glands were analysed. All the tumor samples expressed low levels of CD88 mRNA, while none of the normal mammary tissues showed any detectable expression. These preliminary results suggest that C5a-CD88 interaction may play a contributory role in the inflammatory response associated with mammary tumor development in dogs. Further studies investigating the mechanisms behind complement activation and C5a receptor expression in canine mammary tumors are warranted. PMID:20846729

  13. Expression of cytokine mRNA transcripts in renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Olive, C; Cheung, C; Nicol, D; Falk, M C

    1998-08-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is a solid tumour of the kidney and is the most common renal neoplasm. Despite the presence of tumour infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) in RCC, these tumours continue to progress in vivo suggesting a poor host immune response to the tumour, and the suppression of TIL effector function. Cytokines are key molecules that modulate the function of T cells. The possibility is investigated that the local production of cytokines in RCC contributes to immunosuppression of TIL. The expression of pro-inflammatory (IFN-gamma/IL-2) and immunosuppressive (IL-10/TGF-beta) cytokine mRNA transcripts was determined in RCC, normal kidney and peripheral blood of RCC patients using a semi-quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) with cytokine-specific primers. Following Southern blot hybridization of the PCR products with internal radiolabelled oligonucleotide probes, cytokine transcript levels were measured by densitometry and expressed relative to the glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase densitometry score. With the exception of IL-10, there were no differences in expression of cytokine mRNA transcripts between the peripheral blood of patients and normal healthy individuals. It was found that TGF-beta transcripts were well represented in normal kidney and RCC. In contrast, the expression of IFN-gamma transcripts, while low in the majority of samples, was significantly increased in RCC when compared to normal kidney (P=0.05). The IL-2 and IL-10 transcripts showed a more variable expression in normal kidney and RCC, with no significant differences in expression between the sample groups. The data demonstrating pro-inflammatory and immunosuppressive cytokine expression in RCC do not support a prominent immunosuppressive cytokine profile in these tumours. PMID:9723777

  14. Decreased parvalbumin mRNA expression in dorsolateral prefrontal cortex in Parkinson’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Lanoue, Amélie C.; Blatt, Gene J.; Soghomonian, Jean-Jacques

    2013-01-01

    It has recently been shown that expression of the rate-limiting GABA-synthesizing enzyme glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) is decreased in Brodmann area 9 (BA9) of the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) in Parkinson’s disease (PD) compared to control brains (Lanoue, A.C., Dumitriu, A., Myers, R.H., Soghomonian, JJ., 2010. Exp Neurol. 206(1), 207–217). A subpopulation of cortical GABAergic interneurons expresses the calcium-binding protein parvalbumin and plays a critical role in the control of pyramidal neuron excitability and the generation of cortical gamma frequency oscillations. In view of its key role in the physiology of the cerebral cortex, we sought to determine whether the expression of parvalbumin and the number of parvalbumin-expressing neurons are altered in BA9 of PD brains. First, isotopic in situ hybridization histochemistry was used to examine mRNA expression of parvalbumin on post-mortem brain sections. Second, immunohistochemistry and design-based stereology were used to determine the density of parvalbumin-positive interneurons in BA9. Quantification of mRNA labeling at the single cell level showed a significant decrease in parvalbumin expression in PD cases. In contrast, neuronal density of parvalbumin-positive neurons was not significantly different between PD and controls. Results confirm that the GABAergic system is altered in the DLPFC in PD and identify the contribution of parvalbumin-expressing neurons in these alterations. We speculate that these effects could contribute to altered cortical excitability and oscillatory activity previously documented in PD. PMID:23891794

  15. Integrating GHS into the Ghrelin System

    PubMed Central

    Veldhuis, Johannes D.; Bowers, Cyril Y.

    2010-01-01

    Oligopeptide derivatives of metenkephalin were found to stimulate growth-hormone (GH) release directly by pituitary somatotrope cells in vitro in 1977. Members of this class of peptides and nonpeptidyl mimetics are referred to as GH secretagogues (GHSs). A specific guanosine triphosphatate-binding protein-associated heptahelical transmembrane receptor for GHS was cloned in 1996. An endogenous ligand for the GHS receptor, acylghrelin, was identified in 1999. Expression of ghrelin and homonymous receptor occurs in the brain, pituitary gland, stomach, endothelium/vascular smooth muscle, pancreas, placenta, intestine, heart, bone, and other tissues. Principal actions of this peptidergic system include stimulation of GH release via combined hypothalamopituitary mechanisms, orexigenesis (appetitive enhancement), insulinostasis (inhibition of insulin secretion), cardiovascular effects (decreased mean arterial pressure and vasodilation), stimulation of gastric motility and acid secretion, adipogenesis with repression of fat oxidation, and antiapoptosis (antagonism of endothelial, neuronal, and cardiomyocyte death). The array of known and proposed interactions of ghrelin with key metabolic signals makes ghrelin and its receptor prime targets for drug development. PMID:20798846

  16. Isoeugenol destabilizes IL-8 mRNA expression in THP-1 cells through induction of the negative regulator of mRNA stability tristetraprolin.

    PubMed

    Galbiati, Valentina; Carne, Alice; Mitjans, Montserrat; Galli, Corrado Lodovico; Marinovich, Marina; Corsini, Emanuela

    2012-02-01

    We previously demonstrated in the human promyelocytic cell line THP-1 that all allergens tested, with the exception of the prohapten isoeugenol, induced a dose-related release of interleukin-8 (IL-8). In the present study, we investigated whether this abnormal behavior was regulated by the AU-rich element-binding proteins HuR and tristetraprolin (TTP) or by the downstream molecule suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS)-3. The contact allergens isoeugenol, diethylmaleate (DEM), and 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene (DNCB), and the irritant salicylic acid were used as reference compounds. Chemicals were used at concentrations that induced a 20% decrease in cell viability as assessed by propidium iodide staining, namely 100 μg/ml (0.61 mM) for isoeugenol, 100 μg/ml (0.58 mM) for DEM, 3 μg/ml (14.8 μM) for DNCB, and 250 μg/ml (1.81 mM) for salicylic acid. Time course experiments of IL-8 mRNA expression and assessment of IL-8 mRNA half-life, indicated a decreased IL-8 mRNA stability in isoeugenol-treated cells. We could demonstrate that a combination and regulation of HuR and TTP following exposure to contact allergens resulted in a different modulation of IL-8 mRNA half-life and release. The increased expression of TTP in THP-1 cells treated with isoeugenol results in destabilization of the IL-8 mRNA, which can account for the lack of IL-8 release. In contrast, the strong allergen DNCB failing to up-regulate TTP, while inducing HuR, resulted in longer IL-8 mRNA half-life and protein release. SOCS-3 was induced only in isoeugenol-treated cells; however, its modulation did not rescue the lack of IL-8 release, indicating that it is unlikely to be involved in the lack of IL-8 production. Finally, the destabilization effect of isoeugenol on IL-8 mRNA expression together with SOCS-3 expression resulted in an anti-inflammatory effect, as demonstrated by the ability of isoeugenol to modulate LPS or ionomycin-induced cytokine release. PMID:21969073

  17. Effects of glutamine supplementation on splenocyte cytokine mRNA expression in rats with septic peritonitis

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, Sung-Ling; Lai, Yu-Ni; Shang, Huey-Fang; Lin, Ming-Tsan; Chiu, Wan-Chun; Chen, Wei-Jao

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effects of glutamine (GLN)-enriched diets before and GLN-containing total parenteral nutrition (TPN) after sepsis or both on the secretion of cytokines and their mRNA expression levels in splenocytes of rats with septic peritonitis. METHODS: Rats were assigned to a control group and 4 experimental groups. The control group and experimental groups 1 and 2 were fed a semipurified diet, while experimental groups 3 and 4 had part of the casein replaced by GLN which provided 25% of the total nitrogen. After rats were fed with these diets for 10 d, sepsis was induced by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP), whereas the control group underwent a sham operation, at the same time, an internal jugular vein was cannulated. All rats were maintained on TPN for 3 d. The control group and experimental groups 1 and 3 were infused with conventional TPN, while the TPN in experimental groups 2 and 4 was supplemented with GLN, providing 25% of the total nitrogen in the TPN solution. All rats were kiued 3 d after sham operation or CLP to examine their splenocyte subpopulation distribution and cytokine expression levels. RESULTS: Most cytokines could not be detected in plasma except for IL-10. No difference in plasma IL-10 was observed among the 5 groups. The IL-2, IL-4, IL-10, and TNF-α mRNA expression levels in splenocytes were significantly higher in experimental groups 2 and 4 than in the control group and group 1. The mRNA expression of IFN-γ was significantly higher in the GLN-supplemented groups than in the control group and experimental group 1. The proportion of CD45Ra+ was increased, while those of CD3+ and CD4+ were decreased in experimental group 1 after CLP was performed. There were no differences in spleen CD3+ lymphocyte distributions between the control and GLN-supplemented groups. CONCLUSION: GLN supplementation can maintain T-lymphocyte populations in the spleen and significantly enhance the mRNA expression levels of Th1 and Th2 cytokines and TNF

  18. Exercise training does not increase muscle FNDC5 protein or mRNA expression in pigs

    PubMed Central

    Fain, John N.; Company, Joseph M.; Booth, Frank W.; Laughlin, M. Harold; Padilla, Jaume; Jenkins, Nathan T.; Bahouth, Suleiman W.; Sacks, Harold S.

    2013-01-01

    Background Exercise training elevates circulating irisin and induces the expression of the FNDC5 gene in skeletal muscles of mice. Our objective was to determine whether exercise training also increases FNDC5 protein or mRNA expression in the skeletal muscles of pigs as well as plasma irisin. Methods Castrated male pigs of the Rapacz familial hypercholesterolemic (FHM) strain and normal (Yucatan miniature) pigs were sacrificed after 16–20 weeks of exercise training. Samples of cardiac muscle, deltoid and triceps brachii muscle, subcutaneous and epicardial fat were obtained and FNDC5 mRNA, along with that of 6 other genes, was measured in all tissues of FHM pigs by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. FNDC protein in deltoid and triceps brachii was determined by Western blotting in both FHM and normal pigs. Citrate synthase activity was measured in the muscle samples of all pigs as an index of exercise training. Irisin was measured by an ELISA assay. Results There was no statistically significant effect of exercise training on FNDC5 gene expression in epicardial or subcutaneous fat, deltoid muscle, triceps brachii muscle or heart muscle. Exercise-training elevated circulating levels of irisin in the FHM pigs and citrate synthase activity in deltoid and triceps brachii muscle. A similar increase in citrate synthase activity was seen in muscle extracts of exercise-trained normal pigs but there was no alteration in circulating irisin. Conclusion Exercise training in pigs does not increase FNDC5 mRNA or protein in the deltoid or triceps brachii of FHM or normal pigs while increasing circulating irisin only in the FHM pigs. These data indicate that the response to exercise training in normal pigs is not comparable to that seen in mice. PMID:23831442

  19. Cloning, characterization and mRNA expression of interleukin-6 in blunt snout bream (Megalobrama amblycephala).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chun-Nuan; Zhang, Ji-Liang; Liu, Wen-Bin; Wu, Qiu-Jue; Gao, Xiao-Chan; Ren, Hong-Tao

    2016-07-01

    In the present study, the interleukin-6 gene (IL-6) cDNA in blunt snout bream (Megalobrama amblycephala) was identified and its expression profiles under ammonia stress and bacterial challenge were investigated. The IL-6 sequence consisted of 1045 bp, including a 696 bp ORF which translated into a 232 amino acid (AA) protein. The protein contained a putative signal peptide of 24 AA in length. IL-6 expression analysis showed that the it is differentially expressed in various tissues under normal conditions and the highest IL-6 level was observed in the intestine tissue, followed by the liver, and then in the gills. Under ammonia stress, the IL-6 mRNA level both in spleens and intestine increased significantly (P < 0.05), with the maximum levels attained at 6 h, 12 h (72, 10-fold, respectively). Thereafter, they all significantly decreased (P < 0.01) and returned to the basal value within 48 h. Whereas, in livers it slightly decreased at 3 h firstly (0.5-fold), and then significantly (P < 0.05) increased with the maximum level attained 12 h (3-fold). Further expression analysis showed that the mRNA level of IL-6 in spleens, intestine and livers of blunt snout bream all increased significantly (P < 0.05), with maximum values attained at 6 h, 3 h, 6 h (10, 6, 18-fold, respectively) after Aeromonas hydrophila (A. hydrophila) injection, and then decreased to the basal value within 24 h which suggested that IL-6 was involved in the immune response to A. hydrophila. The cloning and expression analysis of the IL-6 provide theoretical basis to further study the mechanism of anti-adverseness and expression characteristics under stress conditions in blunt snout bream. PMID:26965748

  20. Posttraumatic temporal TGF-β mRNA expression in lens epithelial cells of paediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Berezowski, P; Strzalka-Mrozik, B; Forminska-Kapuscik, M; Mazurek, U; Filipek, E; Nawrocka, L; Pieczara, E; Banasiak, P; Kimsa, M

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine temporal TGFB1, TGFB2 and TGFB3 gene expression profiles in the anterior lens capsule of paediatric patients with posttraumatic cataract. The patient group comprised 22 children selected with a fragment of anterior lens capsule obtained during elective cataract surgery and sampled for molecular analysis. The levels of TGF-β isoforms in the anterior lens capsule were determined based on the number of mRNA copies per 1 μg total RNA by real-time qRTPCR. Three time-related result clusters were identified based on hierarchical cluster analysis: 2.2, 4.4 and 15.0 months (time span from injury to anterior capsule sampling during surgery) and compared with regard to temporal gene expression profile and quantitative relations of TGF-β1, 2 and 3 mRNAs. TGF-β1, TGF-β2, and TGF-β3 mRNAs were detected in all anterior lens capsule samples. A comparative analysis revealed: TGF-β1>TGF-β2>TGF-β3 during the entire observation period. The TGF-β mRNA levels continued to increase up to four months after injury, then returning close to the base levels after around 15 months. The expression patterns of TGF-β isoforms showed a similar tendency. Differences in the expression levels of TGF-β1 and TGF-β2 between the particular clusters were statistically significant. Posttraumatic transcriptional activities of TGF-β1 and TGF-β2 in the anterior lens capsule of paediatric patients depend on the time elapsing from injury. Our findings indicate that the transcriptional activities of TGFB family genes show a transient period of over-expression during the months after injury. TGF-β1 is a dominant isoform expressed in lens epithelial cells following injury. PMID:22464821

  1. Embedding mRNA Stability in Correlation Analysis of Time-Series Gene Expression Data

    PubMed Central

    Farina, Lorenzo; De Santis, Alberto; Salvucci, Samanta; Morelli, Giorgio; Ruberti, Ida

    2008-01-01

    Current methods for the identification of putatively co-regulated genes directly from gene expression time profiles are based on the similarity of the time profile. Such association metrics, despite their central role in gene network inference and machine learning, have largely ignored the impact of dynamics or variation in mRNA stability. Here we introduce a simple, but powerful, new similarity metric called lead-lag R2 that successfully accounts for the properties of gene dynamics, including varying mRNA degradation and delays. Using yeast cell-cycle time-series gene expression data, we demonstrate that the predictive power of lead-lag R2 for the identification of co-regulated genes is significantly higher than that of standard similarity measures, thus allowing the selection of a large number of entirely new putatively co-regulated genes. Furthermore, the lead-lag metric can also be used to uncover the relationship between gene expression time-series and the dynamics of formation of multiple protein complexes. Remarkably, we found a high lead-lag R2 value among genes coding for a transient complex. PMID:18670596

  2. Down-regulated expression of transforming growth factor beta 1 mRNA in endometrial carcinoma.

    PubMed Central

    Perlino, E.; Loverro, G.; Maiorano, E.; Giannini, T.; Cazzolla, A.; Napoli, A.; Fiore, M. G.; Ricco, R.; Marra, E.; Selvaggi, L.

    1998-01-01

    Transforming growth factor beta1 (TGF-beta1) is a potent modulator of cell proliferation in vitro, and recent studies have demonstrated its overexpression in several different tumours; nevertheless, the molecular mechanisms of TGF-beta1 action on cell growth and differentiation have not been fully elucidated. To clarify the role of TGF-beta and its receptor in human endometrial proliferation and differentiation, TGF-beta1 expression at both the mRNA and protein levels has been evaluated by using Northern blotting and immunohistochemistry, in both normal (atrophic, proliferative and secretory) and neoplastic (adenocarcinoma) endometrial samples. This study demonstrates that TGF-beta1 mRNA expression is dramatically reduced in endometrial carcinomas with respect to non-neoplastic tissues, whereas the immunohistochemical expression of TGF-beta1 is enhanced in the epithelial component of endometrial carcinomas compared with non-neoplastic tissues. These data suggest that TGF-beta1 acts as a paracrine regulator of endometrial cell proliferation and that it may contribute to the carcinogenic mechanisms of endometrial carcinoma. Images Figure 1 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 8 PMID:9579831

  3. Down-regulated expression of transforming growth factor beta 1 mRNA in endometrial carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Perlino, E; Loverro, G; Maiorano, E; Giannini, T; Cazzolla, A; Napoli, A; Fiore, M G; Ricco, R; Marra, E; Selvaggi, L

    1998-04-01

    Transforming growth factor beta1 (TGF-beta1) is a potent modulator of cell proliferation in vitro, and recent studies have demonstrated its overexpression in several different tumours; nevertheless, the molecular mechanisms of TGF-beta1 action on cell growth and differentiation have not been fully elucidated. To clarify the role of TGF-beta and its receptor in human endometrial proliferation and differentiation, TGF-beta1 expression at both the mRNA and protein levels has been evaluated by using Northern blotting and immunohistochemistry, in both normal (atrophic, proliferative and secretory) and neoplastic (adenocarcinoma) endometrial samples. This study demonstrates that TGF-beta1 mRNA expression is dramatically reduced in endometrial carcinomas with respect to non-neoplastic tissues, whereas the immunohistochemical expression of TGF-beta1 is enhanced in the epithelial component of endometrial carcinomas compared with non-neoplastic tissues. These data suggest that TGF-beta1 acts as a paracrine regulator of endometrial cell proliferation and that it may contribute to the carcinogenic mechanisms of endometrial carcinoma. PMID:9579831

  4. Lesion of the substantia nigra pars compacta downregulates striatal glutamate receptor subunit mRNA expression.

    PubMed

    Fan, X D; Li, X M; Ashe, P C; Juorio, A V

    1999-12-11

    This is a study of the effect of the unilateral administration of dopamine (DA) in the pars compacta of the substantia nigra (SN) of the rat on striatal glutamate receptor subunit (GluR1, GluR2 and NMDAR1) gene expression determined by in situ hybridization. The location of the nigral lesion was determined by tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) immunohistochemistry and its extent by the striatal DA and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) concentrations. The DA-induced lesions produce significant bilateral reductions in the expression of GluR1 and NMDAR1 subunit mRNA in the medio-lateral striatum, whereas the expression of striatal GluR2 receptors was not changed. The reduction in GluR1 and NMDAR1 subunit mRNA may be the consequence of glutamatergic hyperactivity developed in the presence of a damaged nigro-striatal system and these may be associated with the genesis of some neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:10629751

  5. Ustilago maydis natural antisense transcript expression alters mRNA stability and pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Donaldson, Michael E; Saville, Barry J

    2013-01-01

    Ustilago maydis infection of Zea mays leads to the production of thick-walled diploid teliospores that are the dispersal agent for this pathogen. Transcriptome analyses of this model biotrophic basidiomycete fungus identified natural antisense transcripts (NATs) complementary to 247 open reading frames. The U. maydis NAT cDNAs were fully sequenced and annotated. Strand-specific RT-PCR screens confirmed expression and identified NATs preferentially expressed in the teliospore. Targeted screens revealed four U. maydis NATs that are conserved in a related fungus. Expression of NATs in haploid cells, where they are not naturally occurring, resulted in increased steady-state levels of some complementary mRNAs. The expression of one NAT, as-um02151, in haploid cells resulted in a twofold increase in complementary mRNA levels, the formation of sense–antisense double-stranded RNAs, and unchanged Um02151 protein levels. This led to a model for NAT function in the maintenance and expression of stored teliospore mRNAs. In testing this model by deletion of the regulatory region, it was determined that alteration in NAT expression resulted in decreased pathogenesis in both cob and seedling infections. This annotation and functional analysis supports multiple roles for U. maydis NATs in controlling gene expression and influencing pathogenesis. PMID:23650872

  6. Attenuated mRNA expression of inflammatory mediators in neonatal rat lung following lipopolysaccharide treatment

    PubMed Central

    Le Rouzic, Valerie; Wiedinger, Kari; Zhou, Heping

    2012-01-01

    Neonates are known to exhibit increased susceptibility to bacterial and viral infections and increasing evidence demonstrates that the increased susceptibility is related to their attenuated immune response to infections. The lung is equipped with an innate defense system involving both cellular and humoral mediators. The present study was performed to characterize the expression of inflammatory mediators in the lung of neonatal rats in comparison with older animals. Rats at postnatal day 1 (P1), P21, and P70 were treated with saline or 0.25 mg/kg lipopolysaccharide (LPS) via intraperitoneal injection. Two hours later, animals were sacrificed and the transcriptional response of key inflammatory mediators and enzyme activity of myeloperoxidase (MPO) in the lung of these animals were examined. LPS-induced messenger RNA (mRNA) expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, namely interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor-α, antiinflammatory cytokines, namely IL-10 and IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1ra), and chemokines, namely macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-1β, MIP-2, and monocyte chemotactic protein-1, in P1 lung was much reduced compared to that in P21 and P70 animals at 2 hours postinjection. These data suggest that LPS-induced transcriptional response of cytokines and chemokines was much reduced in P1 lung even though the protein levels of these genes were not ascertained and mRNA levels of these genes may not reflect their final protein levels. MPO activity in LPS-treated P1 lung was also significantly attenuated compared to that in LPS-treated P70 lung, suggesting impaired neutrophil infiltration in P1 lung at 2 hours following LPS treatment. In parallel, the baseline mRNA expression of LPS-binding protein (LBP) in P1 lung was much lower than that in P21 and P70 lungs. While the protein level of LBP was not examined and the mRNA level of LBP may not reflect its final protein level, the reduced transcriptional response of cytokines and chemokines in

  7. Different Profile of mRNA Expression in Sinoatrial Node from Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Rat

    PubMed Central

    Ferdous, Zannatul; Qureshi, Muhammad Anwar; Jayaprakash, Petrilla; Parekh, Khatija; John, Annie; Oz, Murat; Raza, Haider; Dobrzynski, Halina; Adrian, Thomas Edward; Howarth, Frank Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Background Experiments in isolated perfused heart have shown that heart rate is lower and sinoatrial node (SAN) action potential duration is longer in streptozotocin (STZ)–induced diabetic rat compared to controls. In sino-atrial preparations the pacemaker cycle length and sino-atrial conduction time are prolonged in STZ heart. To further clarify the molecular basis of electrical disturbances in the diabetic heart the profile of mRNA encoding a wide variety of proteins associated with the generation and transmission of electrical activity has been evaluated in the SAN of STZ-induced diabetic rat heart. Methodology/Principal Findings Heart rate was measured in isolated perfused heart with an extracellular suction electrode. Expression of mRNA encoding a variety of intercellular proteins, intracellular Ca2+-transport and regulatory proteins, cell membrane transport proteins and calcium, sodium and potassium channel proteins were measured in SAN and right atrial (RA) biopsies using real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction techniques. Heart rate was lower in STZ (203±7 bpm) compared to control (239±11 bpm) rat. Among many differences in the profile of mRNA there are some worthy of particular emphasis. Expression of genes encoding some proteins were significantly downregulated in STZ-SAN: calcium channel, Cacng4 (7-fold); potassium channel, Kcnd2 whilst genes encoding some other proteins were significantly upregulated in STZ-SAN: gap junction, Gjc1; cell membrane transport, Slc8a1, Trpc1, Trpc6 (4-fold); intracellular Ca2+-transport, Ryr3; calcium channel Cacna1g, Cacna1h, Cacnb3; potassium channels, Kcnj5, Kcnk3 and natriuretic peptides, Nppa (5-fold) and Nppb (7-fold). Conclusions/Significance Collectively, this study has demonstrated differences in the profile of mRNA encoding a variety of proteins that are associated with the generation, conduction and regulation of electrical signals in the SAN of STZ-induced diabetic rat heart. Data from this

  8. Electroacupuncture Enhances Preproenkephalin mRNA Expression in Rostral Ventrolateral Medulla of Rats

    PubMed Central

    Li, Min; Tjen-A-Looi, Stephanie C.; Longhurst, John C.

    2010-01-01

    Electroacupuncture (EA) causes prolonged suppression of reflex elevations in blood pressure for at least 60 minutes in anesthetized preparations. Thus, EA can modify sympathetic outflow and elevated blood pressure through actions in a number of hind brain regions, including the rostral ventrolateral medulla (rVLM). Since our previous data show that the opioid system plays a role in EA-related prolonged inhibition of presympathetic neuronal activity in the rVLM, we postulated that EA increases preproenkephalin (PPE) mRNA in this region, possibly for prolonged periods of time. Under α–chloralose anesthesia, rats received EA (1-2 mA, 2 Hz, 0.5 ms) at P5-P6 acupoints (overlying median nerves) or sham (needle placement without electrical stimulation) for 30 min. PPE mRNA in the rVLM also was evaluated in control rats that received surgery but no EA or sham treatment. 20 min, 1.5 h or 4 h following EA or sham treatment, PPE mRNA in the rVLM was analyzed by reverse transcription and quantitative real-time PCR. Relative ratios of PPE mRNA levels (normalized with 18s house keeping gene) were increased 1.5 h after EA stimulation (7.77 ± 1.39, n=6) relative to sham (2.84 ± 0.37, n=5) but were unchanged both 20 min and 4 h after EA, compared to the sham or surgery groups at the same time points. Thus, 30 min of EA transiently stimulates the production of enkephalin in a region of the brain that importantly regulates sympathetic outflow suggesting that even a single brief acupuncture treatment can increase the expression of this modulatory neuropeptide. PMID:20399834

  9. IPLA2 mRNA expression by human neutrophils in type 2 diabetes and chronic periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Ayilavarapu, Srinivas; Kantarci, Alpdogan; Hasturk, Hatice; Van Dyke, Thomas E

    2014-10-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D) is becoming increasingly prevalent worldwide and complications of T2D cause significant systemic and dental morbidity in the susceptible individual. Although T2D has been linked as a significant risk factor for chronic periodontitis (CP), molecular mechanisms explaining the pathogenesis and inflammatory impact of CP in T2D are lacking. iPLA2 is the calcium-independent form of phospholipase A2. In previous studies, we demonstrated that iPLA2 enzyme activity is altered in T2D. The purpose of this study was to elucidate the level of the iPLA2 abnormality in T2D by measuring messenger RNA levels in T2D-associated CP. A total of 53 healthy and T2D subjects with CP were recruited for this study. The clinical periodontal exam included probing pocket depth, clinical attachment levels and bleeding on probing. Peripheral venous blood was collected and neutrophils were isolated. Real time polymerase chain reaction was used to quantify iPLA2 mRNA in neutrophils from healthy controls and people with diabetes. Results revealed that the prevalence of moderate to severe CP was increased in people with T2D. The iPLA, mRNA levels in diabetics with different severity of CP were not significantly different compared to healthy controls; 1.07 vs 0.97 (mild CP), 1.07 vs 0.85 (moderate CP) and 1.07 vs 1.05 (severe CP). Collectively, the data suggest that levels of iPLA2 mRNA in T2D are not different than in health and are not directly influenced by periodontal disease status. The impact of inflammation on iPLA2 regulation is at the level of activation of the enzyme rather than expression at the mRNA level. PMID:25654966

  10. Time-course of 5-HT(6) receptor mRNA expression during memory consolidation and amnesia.

    PubMed

    Huerta-Rivas, A; Pérez-García, G; González-Espinosa, C; Meneses, A

    2010-01-01

    Growing evidence indicates that antagonists of the 5-hydroxytryptamine (serotonin) receptor(6) (5-HT(6)) improve memory and reverse amnesia although the mechanisms involved are poorly understood. Hence, in this paper RT-PCR was used to evaluate changes in mRNA expression of 5-HT(6) receptor in trained and untrained rats treated with the 5-HT(6) receptor antagonist SB-399885 and amnesic drugs scopolamine or dizocilpine. Changes in mRNA expression of 5-HT(6) receptor were investigated at different times in prefrontal cortex, hippocampus and striatum. Data indicated that memory in the Pavlovian/instrumental autoshaping task was a progressive process associated to reduced mRNA expression of 5-HT(6) receptor in the three structures examined. SB-399885 improved long-term memory at 48h, while the muscarinic receptor antagonist scopolamine or the non-competitive NMDA receptor antagonist dizocilpine impaired it at 24h. Autoshaping training and treatment with SB-399885 increased 5-HT(6) receptor mRNA expression in (maximum increase) prefrontal cortex and striatum, 24 or 48h. The scopolamine-induced amnesia suppressed 5-HT(6) receptor mRNA expression while the dizocilpine-induced amnesia did not modify 5-HT(6) receptor mRNA expression. SB-399885 and scopolamine or dizocilpine were able to reestablish memory and 5-HT(6) receptor mRNA expression. These data confirmed previous memory evidence and of more interest is the observation that training, SB-399885 and amnesic drugs modulated 5-HT(6) receptor mRNA expression in prefrontal cortex, hippocampus and striatum. Further investigation in different memory tasks, times and amnesia models together with more complex control groups might provide further clues. PMID:19733250

  11. Correlation of Apobec Mrna Expression with overall Survival and pd-l1 Expression in Urothelial Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Mullane, Stephanie A; Werner, Lillian; Rosenberg, Jonathan; Signoretti, Sabina; Callea, Marcella; Choueiri, Toni K; Freeman, Gordon J; Bellmunt, Joaquim

    2016-01-01

    Metastatic urothelial carcinoma (mUC) has a very high mutational rate and is associated with an APOBEC mutation signature. We examined the correlation of APOBEC expression with overall survival (OS) and PD-L1 expression in a cohort of 73 mUC patients. mRNA expression of APOBEC3 family of genes (A3A, A3B, A3C, A3F_a, A3F_b, A3G, A3H) was measured using Nanostring. PD-L1 expression, evaluated by immunohistochemistry, on tumor infiltrating mononuclear cells (TIMCs) and tumor cells was scored from 0 to 4, with 2-4 being positive. Wilcoxon's non-parametric tests assessed the association of APOBEC and PD-L1. The Cox regression model assessed the association of APOBEC with OS. All APOBEC genes were expressed in mUC. Increased A3A, A3D, and A3H expression associates with PD-L1 positive TIMCs (p = 0.0009, 0.009, 0.06). Decreased A3B expression was marginally associated with PD-L1 positive TIMCs expression (p = 0.05). Increased A3F_a and A3F_b expression was associated with increased expression of PD-L1 on tumor cells (p = 0.05). Increased expression of A3D and A3H was associated with longer OS (p = 0.0009). Specific APOBEC genes have different effects on mUC in terms of survival and PD-L1 expression. A3D and A3H may have the most important role in mUC as they are associated with OS and PD-L1 TIMC expression. PMID:27283319

  12. Correlation of Apobec Mrna Expression with overall Survival and pd-l1 Expression in Urothelial Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Mullane, Stephanie A.; Werner, Lillian; Rosenberg, Jonathan; Signoretti, Sabina; Callea, Marcella; Choueiri, Toni K.; Freeman, Gordon J.; Bellmunt, Joaquim

    2016-01-01

    Metastatic urothelial carcinoma (mUC) has a very high mutational rate and is associated with an APOBEC mutation signature. We examined the correlation of APOBEC expression with overall survival (OS) and PD-L1 expression in a cohort of 73 mUC patients. mRNA expression of APOBEC3 family of genes (A3A, A3B, A3C, A3F_a, A3F_b, A3G, A3H) was measured using Nanostring. PD-L1 expression, evaluated by immunohistochemistry, on tumor infiltrating mononuclear cells (TIMCs) and tumor cells was scored from 0 to 4, with 2–4 being positive. Wilcoxon’s non-parametric tests assessed the association of APOBEC and PD-L1. The Cox regression model assessed the association of APOBEC with OS. All APOBEC genes were expressed in mUC. Increased A3A, A3D, and A3H expression associates with PD-L1 positive TIMCs (p = 0.0009, 0.009, 0.06). Decreased A3B expression was marginally associated with PD-L1 positive TIMCs expression (p = 0.05). Increased A3F_a and A3F_b expression was associated with increased expression of PD-L1 on tumor cells (p = 0.05). Increased expression of A3D and A3H was associated with longer OS (p = 0.0009). Specific APOBEC genes have different effects on mUC in terms of survival and PD-L1 expression. A3D and A3H may have the most important role in mUC as they are associated with OS and PD-L1 TIMC expression. PMID:27283319

  13. Seven transmembrane G protein-coupled receptor repertoire of gastric ghrelin cells★

    PubMed Central

    Engelstoft, Maja S.; Park, Won-mee; Sakata, Ichiro; Kristensen, Line V.; Husted, Anna Sofie; Osborne-Lawrence, Sherri; Piper, Paul K.; Walker, Angela K.; Pedersen, Maria H.; Nøhr, Mark K.; Pan, Jie; Sinz, Christopher J.; Carrington, Paul E.; Akiyama, Taro E.; Jones, Robert M.; Tang, Cong; Ahmed, Kashan; Offermanns, Stefan; Egerod, Kristoffer L.; Zigman, Jeffrey M.; Schwartz, Thue W.

    2013-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms regulating secretion of the orexigenic-glucoregulatory hormone ghrelin remain unclear. Based on qPCR analysis of FACS-purified gastric ghrelin cells, highly expressed and enriched 7TM receptors were comprehensively identified and functionally characterized using in vitro, ex vivo and in vivo methods. Five Gαs-coupled receptors efficiently stimulated ghrelin secretion: as expected the β1-adrenergic, the GIP and the secretin receptors but surprisingly also the composite receptor for the sensory neuropeptide CGRP and the melanocortin 4 receptor. A number of Gαi/o-coupled receptors inhibited ghrelin secretion including somatostatin receptors SSTR1, SSTR2 and SSTR3 and unexpectedly the highly enriched lactate receptor, GPR81. Three other metabolite receptors known to be both Gαi/o- and Gαq/11-coupled all inhibited ghrelin secretion through a pertussis toxin-sensitive Gαi/o pathway: FFAR2 (short chain fatty acid receptor; GPR43), FFAR4 (long chain fatty acid receptor; GPR120) and CasR (calcium sensing receptor). In addition to the common Gα subunits three non-common Gαi/o subunits were highly enriched in ghrelin cells: GαoA, GαoB and Gαz. Inhibition of Gαi/o signaling via ghrelin cell-selective pertussis toxin expression markedly enhanced circulating ghrelin. These 7TM receptors and associated Gα subunits constitute a major part of the molecular machinery directly mediating neuronal and endocrine stimulation versus metabolite and somatostatin inhibition of ghrelin secretion including a series of novel receptor targets not previously identified on the ghrelin cell. PMID:24327954

  14. Hippocampus ghrelin signaling mediates appetite through lateral hypothalamic orexin pathways

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Ted M; Hahn, Joel D; Konanur, Vaibhav R; Noble, Emily E; Suarez, Andrea N; Thai, Jessica; Nakamoto, Emily M; Kanoski, Scott E

    2015-01-01

    Feeding behavior rarely occurs in direct response to metabolic deficit, yet the overwhelming majority of research on the biology of food intake control has focused on basic metabolic and homeostatic neurobiological substrates. Most animals, including humans, have habitual feeding patterns in which meals are consumed based on learned and/or environmental factors. Here we illuminate a novel neural system regulating higher-order aspects of feeding through which the gut-derived hormone ghrelin communicates with ventral hippocampus (vHP) neurons to stimulate meal-entrained conditioned appetite. Additional results show that the lateral hypothalamus (LHA) is a critical downstream substrate for vHP ghrelin-mediated hyperphagia and that vHP ghrelin activated neurons communicate directly with neurons in the LHA that express the neuropeptide, orexin. Furthermore, activation of downstream orexin-1 receptors is required for vHP ghrelin-mediated hyperphagia. These findings reveal novel neurobiological circuitry regulating appetite through which ghrelin signaling in hippocampal neurons engages LHA orexin signaling. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.11190.001 PMID:26745307

  15. Decline in c-myc mRNA expression but not the induction of c-fos mRNA expression is associated with differentiation of SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Jalava, A.M.; Heikkilae, J.E.; Akerman, K.E.O. )

    1988-11-01

    The induction of differentiation in SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cells with 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) is accompanied by a rapid and a transient expression of c-fos mRNA and a down-regulation of c-myc RNA. The TPA-induced expression of c-fos mRNA was inhibited by H-7, a specific inhibitor of protein kinase C (PK-C). Dioctanoylglycerol (DiC{sub 8}) failed to induce differentiation of SH-SY5Y cells or to down-regulate c-myc mRNA but it did induce the expression of c-fos mRNA. Treatment of IMR-32 human neuroblastoma cells with TPA did not cause differentiation although c-fos mRNA was induced. Since PK-C in SH-SY5Y cells was activated by both TPA and DiC{sub 8} it is suggested that the activation of PK-C alone is not sufficient to induce differentiation in SH-SY5Y cells. The down-regulation of c-myc mRNA rather than the induction of c-fos mRNA seems to be associated with differentiation process in SH-SY5Y cells.

  16. mRNA Expression Signature of Gleason Grade Predicts Lethal Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Penney, Kathryn L.; Sinnott, Jennifer A.; Fall, Katja; Pawitan, Yudi; Hoshida, Yujin; Kraft, Peter; Stark, Jennifer R.; Fiorentino, Michelangelo; Perner, Sven; Finn, Stephen; Calza, Stefano; Flavin, Richard; Freedman, Matthew L.; Setlur, Sunita; Sesso, Howard D.; Andersson, Swen-Olof; Martin, Neil; Kantoff, Philip W.; Johansson, Jan-Erik; Adami, Hans-Olov; Rubin, Mark A.; Loda, Massimo; Golub, Todd R.; Andrén, Ove; Stampfer, Meir J.; Mucci, Lorelei A.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Prostate-specific antigen screening has led to enormous overtreatment of prostate cancer because of the inability to distinguish potentially lethal disease at diagnosis. We reasoned that by identifying an mRNA signature of Gleason grade, the best predictor of prognosis, we could improve prediction of lethal disease among men with moderate Gleason 7 tumors, the most common grade, and the most indeterminate in terms of prognosis. Patients and Methods Using the complementary DNA–mediated annealing, selection, extension, and ligation assay, we measured the mRNA expression of 6,100 genes in prostate tumor tissue in the Swedish Watchful Waiting cohort (n = 358) and Physicians' Health Study (PHS; n = 109). We developed an mRNA signature of Gleason grade comparing individuals with Gleason ≤ 6 to those with Gleason ≥ 8 tumors and applied the model among patients with Gleason 7 to discriminate lethal cases. Results We built a 157-gene signature using the Swedish data that predicted Gleason with low misclassification (area under the curve [AUC] = 0.91); when this signature was tested in the PHS, the discriminatory ability remained high (AUC = 0.94). In men with Gleason 7 tumors, who were excluded from the model building, the signature significantly improved the prediction of lethal disease beyond knowing whether the Gleason score was 4 + 3 or 3 + 4 (P = .006). Conclusion Our expression signature and the genes identified may improve our understanding of the de-differentiation process of prostate tumors. Additionally, the signature may have clinical applications among men with Gleason 7, by further estimating their risk of lethal prostate cancer and thereby guiding therapy decisions to improve outcomes and reduce overtreatment. PMID:21537050

  17. Ghrelin Decreases Angiogenesis, HIF-1α and VEGF Protein Levels in Chronic Hypoxia in Lung Tissue of Male Rats

    PubMed Central

    Mirzaei Bavil, Fariba; Alipour, Mohammad Reza; Keyhanmanesh, Rana; Alihemmati, Alireza; Ghiyasi, Rafigheh; Mohaddes, Gisou

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Hypoxia is a condition of decreased availability of oxygen. When cells are exposed to a low oxygen environment, they impel the hypoxia responses to adapt to new situation. The hypoxia response leads to the activation of various cellular signaling pathways. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of ghrelin on angiogenesis, Hypoxia-Inducible-Factor-1α (HIF-1) and Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) levels in normobaric hypoxia situation. Methods: Twenty four animals were divided into 4 groups (n=6): control (C), ghrelin (Gh), hypoxia (H), and hypoxic animals that received ghrelin (H+Gh). Hypoxia (11%) was induced by an Environmental Chamber System GO2 Altitude. Animals in ghrelin groups received a subcutaneous injection of ghrelin (150 μg/kg/day) for 14 days. Results: Our results showed that hypoxia significantly (p<0.05) increased angiogenesis without any significant changes on HIF-1 and VEGF levels, whereas ghrelin significantly (p<0.05) decreased angiogenesis, expression of HIF-1 and VEGF in this condition. Ghrelin administration did not show any significant changes in normal conditions. Conclusion: Ghrelin had no effect on angiogenesis, expression of HIF-1 and VEGF in normal oxygen conditions but it reduced angiogenesis process in lung tissue with reducing the level of HIF and VEGF in hypoxic condition. Therefore, effect of ghrelin on angiogenesis could be related to blood oxygen level. PMID:26504752

  18. Circadian control of mRNA polyadenylation dynamics regulates rhythmic protein expression

    PubMed Central

    Kojima, Shihoko; Sher-Chen, Elaine L.; Green, Carla B.

    2012-01-01

    Poly(A) tails are 3′ modifications of eukaryotic mRNAs that are important in the control of translation and mRNA stability. We identified hundreds of mouse liver mRNAs that exhibit robust circadian rhythms in the length of their poly(A) tails. Approximately 80% of these are primarily the result of nuclear adenylation coupled with rhythmic transcription. However, unique decay kinetics distinguish these mRNAs from other mRNAs that are transcribed rhythmically but do not exhibit poly(A) tail rhythms. The remaining 20% are uncoupled from transcription and exhibit poly(A) tail rhythms even though the steady-state mRNA levels are not rhythmic. These are under the control of rhythmic cytoplasmic polyadenylation, regulated at least in some cases by cytoplasmic polyadenylation element-binding proteins (CPEBs). Importantly, we found that the rhythmicity in poly(A) tail length is closely correlated with rhythmic protein expression, with a several-hour delay between the time of longest tail and the time of highest protein level. Our study demonstrates that the circadian clock regulates the dynamic polyadenylation status of mRNAs, which can result in rhythmic protein expression independent of the steady-state levels of the message. PMID:23249735

  19. Effect of radiofrequency radiation on MRNA expression in cultured rodent cells

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, J.E.; Kiel, J.L.; Winters, W.D.

    1988-01-01

    Radiofrequency radiation (RFR) has been reported to induce adverse effects in biological systems, such as teratogenic and embryo lethal effects in mammals particularly during exposures producing significant hyperthermia. Other studies have implicated microwave exposure with causing changes in chromosome number and structure, formation of cataracts in humans rabbits and dogs; and promoting malignant tumor formation in rats, as well as increasing tumor production and leukemias. In addition, microwave exposures have been reported to change the structure of purified double-stranded plasmid DNA, causing it to become nicked and increasing the proportion of relaxed to super coiled molecules. In view of these reports of changes at different levels of cellular function and structure of mammalian systems to microwaves, the authors asked themselves if changes at the level of mRNA expression could be detected after microwave exposure of cultured rodent cells. They chose to look at the mRNA expression of certain oncogenes known to show elevated levels during cell replication, at the heat shock proteins known to respond to stresses other than heat, and at the long terminal repeat (LTR) region of mouse mammary tumor virus in four rodent cell lines.

  20. mRNA Expression in Papillary and Anaplastic Thyroid Carcinoma: Molecular Anatomy of a Killing Switch

    PubMed Central

    Hébrant, Aline; Dom, Geneviève; Dewaele, Michael; Andry, Guy; Trésallet, Christophe; Leteurtre, Emmanuelle; Dumont, Jacques E.; Maenhaut, Carine

    2012-01-01

    Anaplastic thyroid carcinoma (ATC) is the most lethal form of thyroid neoplasia and represents the end stage of thyroid tumor progression. No effective treatment exists so far. ATC frequently derive from papillary thyroid carcinomas (PTC), which have a good prognosis. In this study, we analyzed the mRNA expression profiles of 59 thyroid tumors (11 ATC and 48 PTC) by microarrays. ATC and PTC showed largely overlapping mRNA expression profiles with most genes regulated in all ATC being also regulated in several PTC. 43% of the probes regulated in all the PTC are similarly regulated in all ATC. Many genes modulations observed in PTC are amplified in ATC. This illustrates the fact that ATC mostly derived from PTC. A molecular signature of aggressiveness composed of 9 genes clearly separates the two tumors. Moreover, this study demonstrates gene regulations corresponding to the ATC or PTC phenotypes like inflammatory reaction, epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) and invasion, high proliferation rate, dedifferentiation, calcification and fibrosis processes, high glucose metabolism and glycolysis, lactate generation and chemoresistance. The main qualitative differences between the two tumor types bear on the much stronger EMT, dedifferentiation and glycolytic phenotypes showed by the ATC. PMID:23115614

  1. mRNA expression profile of serotonin receptor subtypes and distribution of serotonergic terminations in marmoset brain

    PubMed Central

    Shukla, Rammohan; Watakabe, Akiya; Yamamori, Tetsuo

    2014-01-01

    To better understand serotonin function in the primate brain, we examined the mRNA expression patterns of all the 13 members of the serotonin receptor (5HTR) family, by in situ hybridization (ISH) and the distribution of serotonergic terminations by serotonin transporter (SERT) protein immunohistochemical analysis. Ten of the 13 5HTRs showed significant mRNA expressions in the marmoset brain. Our study shows several new features of the organization of serotonergic systems in the marmoset brain. (1) The thalamus expressed only a limited number of receptor subtypes compared with the cortex, hippocampus, and other subcortical regions. (2) In the cortex, there are layer-selective and area-selective mRNA expressions of 5HTRs. (3) Highly localized mRNA expressions of 5HT1F and 5HT3A were observed. (4) There was a conspicuous overlap of the mRNA expressions of receptor subtypes known to have somatodendritic localization of receptor proteins with dense serotonergic terminations in the visual cortex, the central lateral (CL) nucleus of the thalamus, the presubiculum, and the medial mammillary nucleus of the hypothalamus. This suggests a high correlation between serotonin availability and receptor expression at these locations. (5) The 5HTRs show differences in mRNA expression pattern between the marmoset and mouse cortices whereas the patterns of both the species were much similar in the hippocampus. We discuss the possible roles of 5HTRs in the marmoset brain revealed by the analysis of their overall mRNA expression patterns. PMID:24904298

  2. Genetic determination of the cellular basis of the ghrelin-dependent bone remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Chengshan; Fukuda, Toru; Ochi, Hiroki; Sunamura, Satoko; Xu, Cheng; Xu, Ren; Okawa, Atsushi; Takeda, Shu

    2015-01-01

    Objective Bone mass is maintained through a balance of bone formation and resorption. This homeostatic balance is regulated by various systems involving humoral and local factors. The discovery that the anorexigenic hormone leptin regulates bone mass via neuronal pathways revealed that neurons and neuropeptides are intimately involved in bone homeostasis. Ghrelin is a stomach-derived orexigenic hormone that counteracts leptin's action. However, the physiological role of ghrelin in bone homeostasis remains unknown. In this study, through the global knockout of ghrelin receptor (Ghsr) followed by tissue-specific re-expression, we addressed the molecular basis of the action of ghrelin in bone remodeling in vivo. Methods We performed molecular, genetic and cell biological analyses of Ghsr-null mice and Ghsr-null mice with tissue specific Ghsr restoration. Furthermore, we evaluated the molecular mechanism of ghrelin by molecular and cell-based assays. Results Ghsr-null mice showed a low bone mass phenotype with poor bone formation. Restoring the expression of Ghsr specifically in osteoblasts, and not in osteoclasts or the central nervous system, ameliorated bone abnormalities in Ghsr-null mice. Cell-based assays revealed ghrelin induced the phosphorylation of CREB and the expression of Runx2, which in turn accelerated osteoblast differentiation. Conclusions Our data show that ghrelin regulates bone remodeling through Ghsr in osteoblasts by modulating the CREB and Runx2 pathways. PMID:25737953

  3. IONOTROPIC GLUTAMATE RECEPTORS mRNA EXPRESSION IN THE HUMAN THALAMUS: ABSENCE OF CHANGE IN SCHIZOPHRENIA

    PubMed Central

    Dracheva, Stella; Byne, William; Chin, Benjamin; Haroutunian, Vahram

    2009-01-01

    Abnormalities in glutamate neurotransmission are thought to be among the major contributing factors to the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. Although schizophrenia has been regarded mostly as a disorder of higher cortical function, the cortex and thalamus work as a functional unit. Existing data regarding alterations of glutamate receptor subunit expression in the thalamus in schizophrenia remain equivocal. This postmortem study examined mRNA expression of ionotropic glutamate receptor (iGluR) subunits and PSD95 in 5 precisely defined and dissected thalamic subdivisions (medial and lateral sectors of the mediodorsal nucleus; and the ventrolateral posterior, ventral posterior, and centromedian nuclei) of persons with schizophrenia and matched controls using quantitative PCR with normalization to multiple endogenous controls. Among 15 genes examined (NR1 and NR2A-D subunits of NMDA receptor; GluR1-4 subunits of AMPA receptor; GluR5-7 and KA1-2 subunits of kainate receptor; PSD95), all but two (GluR4 and KA1) were expressed at quantifiable levels. Differences in iGluR gene expression were seen between different nuclei but not between diagnostic groups. The relative abundance of transcripts was: NR1≫NR2A>NR2B>NR2D>NR2C for NMDA, GluR2>GluR1>GluR3 for AMPA, and KA2>GluR5>GluR7>GluR6 for kainate receptors. The expression of PSD95 correlated with the expression of NR1, NR2A, NR2B, NR2D and GluR6 in all nuclei. These results provide detailed and quantitative information on iGluR subunit expression in multiple nuclei of the human thalamus but suggest that alterations in their expression are not a prominent feature of schizophrenia. PMID:18462708

  4. A distinct ERCC1 haplotype is associated with mRNA expression levels in prostate cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Woelfelschneider, Andreas; Popanda, Odilia; Lilla, Carmen; Linseisen, Jakob; Mayer, Claudia; Celebi, Oktay; Debus, Jürgen; Bartsch, Helmut; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Schmezer, Peter

    2008-09-01

    Both genetic variants and messenger RNA (mRNA) expression of DNA repair and tumor suppressor genes have been investigated as molecular markers for therapy outcome. However, the phenotypic impact of genetic variants often remained unclear, thus the rationale of their use in risk prediction may be limited. We therefore analyzed genetic variants together with anthropometric and lifestyle factors to see how these affect mRNA levels of ERCC1, MDM2 and TP53 in primary blood lymphocytes. mRNA expression was measured in 376 prostate cancer patients by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction after reverse transcription, and ERCC1 rs11615 T>C, ERCC1 rs3212986 C>A, MDM2 rs2279744 T>G and TP53 rs17878362 (p53PIN3) polymorphisms were determined. Considerable interindividual differences in mRNA expression were found (coefficients of variation: ERCC1, 45%; MDM2, 43% and TP53, 35%). ERCC1 expression was positively correlated with plasma levels of beta-carotene (P = 0.03) and negatively correlated with canthaxanthin (P = 0.02) and lutein (P = 0.02). Overall, the polymorphisms affected mRNA expression only weakly. Carriers of a distinct ERCC1 haplotype (CC) showed, however, significantly lower expression values than non-carriers (P = 0.001). Applying logistic regression, we found that CC haplotype carriers had a 1.69-fold increased odds ratio (95% confidence interval: 1.06-2.71) for reduced ERCC1 mRNA levels. This low ERCC1 expression might be associated with reduced DNA repair and better therapy response. In summary, the association we have found between ERCC1 genotype and mRNA expression supports recent clinical observations that genetic variation in ERCC1 can affect treatment outcome and prognosis. Our study further revealed a modulating effect by nutritional factors. PMID:18332046

  5. BENZO(A)PYRENE DECREASES BRAIN AND OVARIAN AROMATASE mRNA EXPRESSION IN FUNDULUS HETEROCLITUS

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Wu; Wang, Lu; Thornton, Cammi; Scheffler, Brian E.; Willett, Kristine L.

    2008-01-01

    The higher molecular weight polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) such as benzo(a)pyrene (BaP) are typically associated with genotoxicity, however, newer evidence suggests that these compounds may also act as endocrine system disruptors. We hypothesized that altered expression of the P450 enzyme aromatase genes could be a target for reproductive or developmental dysfunction caused by BaP exposure. Aromatase is at least partially responsible for estrogen homeostasis by converting androgens into estrogens. In fish, there are two isoforms of aromatase, a predominantly ovarian form, CYP19A1, and a brain form, CYP19A2. CYP19 mRNA expression was measured following BaP exposure (0, 10, 100 µg/L waterborne for 10 or 15 days) in Fundulus adults, juveniles and embryos by in situ hybridization. The CYP19A1 expression was significantly decreased after BaP exposure in the 3 month old Fundulus immature oocytes, but BaP did not affect CYP19A1 expression at any stage in adult oocytes. In embryo brains, BaP significantly decreased CYP19A2 compared to controls by 3.6-fold at 14 days post-fertilization. In adults, CYP19A2 expression was decreased significantly in the pituitary and hypothalamus (81% and 85% of controls, respectively). Promoter regions of Fundulus CYP19s were cloned, and putative response elements in the CYP19A1 and CYP19A2 promoters such as CRE, AhR and ERE may be involved in BaP-mediated changes in CYP19 expression. In order to compare the mechanism of BaP-mediated inhibition with that of a known aromatase inhibitor, fish were also exposed to fadrozole (20 and 100 µg/L). Fadrozole did not significantly decrease the mRNA expression in embryos or adult Fundulus. However, aromatase enzyme activity was significantly decreased in adult ovary and brain tissues. These studies provide a greater molecular understanding of the mechanisms of action of BaP and its potential to impact reproduction or development. PMID:18571745

  6. The Amygdala as a Neurobiological Target for Ghrelin in Rats: Neuroanatomical, Electrophysiological and Behavioral Evidence

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez-Crespo, Mayte; Skibicka, Karolina P.; Farkas, Imre; Molnár, Csilla S.; Egecioglu, Emil; Hrabovszky, Erik; Liposits, Zsolt; Dickson, Suzanne L.

    2012-01-01

    Here, we sought to demonstrate that the orexigenic circulating hormone, ghrelin, is able to exert neurobiological effects (including those linked to feeding control) at the level of the amygdala, involving neuroanatomical, electrophysiological and behavioural studies. We found that ghrelin receptors (GHS-R) are densely expressed in several subnuclei of the amygdala, notably in ventrolateral (LaVL) and ventromedial (LaVM) parts of the lateral amygdaloid nucleus. Using whole-cell patch clamp electrophysiology to record from cells in the lateral amygdaloid nucleus, we found that ghrelin reduced the frequency of mEPSCs recorded from large pyramidal-like neurons, an effect that could be blocked by co-application of a ghrelin receptor antagonist. In ad libitum fed rats, intra-amygdala administration of ghrelin produced a large orexigenic response that lasted throughout the 4 hr of testing. Conversely, in hungry, fasted rats ghrelin receptor blockade in the amygdala significantly reduced food intake. Finally, we investigated a possible interaction between ghrelin's effects on feeding control and emotional reactivity exerted at the level of the amygdala. In rats allowed to feed during a 1-hour period between ghrelin injection and anxiety testing (elevated plus maze and open field), intra-amygdala ghrelin had no effect on anxiety-like behavior. By contrast, if the rats were not given access to food during this 1-hour period, a decrease in anxiety-like behavior was observed in both tests. Collectively, these data indicate that the amygdala is a valid target brain area for ghrelin where its neurobiological effects are important for food intake and for the suppression of emotional (anxiety-like) behaviors if food is not available. PMID:23071554

  7. Increased neutrophil adherence and adhesion molecule mRNA expression in endothelial cells during selenium deficiency.

    PubMed

    Maddox, J F; Aherne, K M; Reddy, C C; Sordillo, L M

    1999-05-01

    Leukocyte aggregation and activation on endothelial cells (EC) are important preliminary events in leukocyte migration into tissue and subsequent inflammation. Thus, an increase in leukocyte adherence has the potential to affect inflammatory disease outcome. Selenium (Se) is an integral part of the antioxidant enzyme glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) and plays an important role in the maintenance of the redox state of a cell. Se supplementation in the bovine has been shown to improve the outcome of acute mastitis caused by coliform bacteria, in part by enhancing the speed of neutrophil migration into the affected mammary gland. However, the mechanisms by which Se modulates neutrophil migration have not been elucidated. Therefore, an in vitro model of Se deficiency in primary bovine mammary artery EC was used to examine the impact of Se status on the adhesive properties of EC. The effect of Se on functional activities was examined by measuring neutrophil adherence to Se-deficient and Se-supplemented EC. Se-deficient EC showed significantly enhanced neutrophil adherence when stimulated with tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) for 4 or 24 h, interleukin-1 for 12 h, or H2O2 for 20 min (P < 0.05). To determine the mechanisms underlying these changes in neutrophil adherence, the expression of EC adhesion molecules, ICAM-1, E-selectin, and P-selectin were examined at the molecular level by a competitive reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Results revealed higher mRNA expression for E-selectin and ICAM-1 in Se-deficient EC stimulated with TNF-alpha for 3 and 6 h, and greater expression of P-selectin mRNA in Se-supplemented EC with 3-h TNF-alpha stimulation. These studies provide new information to establish the role of Se nutrition in the initiation of leukocyte adherence to endothelium. PMID:10331495

  8. Antagonistic regulation of mRNA expression and splicing by CELF and MBNL proteins

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Eric T.; Ward, Amanda J.; Cherone, Jennifer M.; Giudice, Jimena; Wang, Thomas T.; Treacy, Daniel J.; Lambert, Nicole J.; Freese, Peter; Saxena, Tanvi; Cooper, Thomas A.; Burge, Christopher B.

    2015-01-01

    RNA binding proteins of the conserved CUGBP1, Elav-like factor (CELF) family contribute to heart and skeletal muscle development and are implicated in myotonic dystrophy (DM). To understand their genome-wide functions, we analyzed the transcriptome dynamics following induction of CELF1 or CELF2 in adult mouse heart and of CELF1 in muscle by RNA-seq, complemented by crosslinking/immunoprecipitation-sequencing (CLIP-seq) analysis of mouse cells and tissues to distinguish direct from indirect regulatory targets. We identified hundreds of mRNAs bound in their 3′ UTRs by both CELF1 and the developmentally induced MBNL1 protein, a threefold greater overlap in target messages than expected, including messages involved in development and cell differentiation. The extent of 3′ UTR binding by CELF1 and MBNL1 predicted the degree of mRNA repression or stabilization, respectively, following CELF1 induction. However, CELF1's RNA binding specificity in vitro was not detectably altered by coincubation with recombinant MBNL1. These findings support a model in which CELF and MBNL proteins bind independently to mRNAs but functionally compete to specify down-regulation or localization/stabilization, respectively, of hundreds of mRNA targets. Expression of many alternative 3′ UTR isoforms was altered following CELF1 induction, with 3′ UTR binding associated with down-regulation of isoforms and genes. The splicing of hundreds of alternative exons was oppositely regulated by these proteins, confirming an additional layer of regulatory antagonism previously observed in a handful of cases. The regulatory relationships between CELFs and MBNLs in control of both mRNA abundance and splicing appear to have evolved to enhance developmental transitions in major classes of heart and muscle genes. PMID:25883322

  9. KIF14 mRNA expression is a predictor of grade and outcome in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Corson, Timothy W; Gallie, Brenda L

    2006-09-01

    Gain of chromosome 1q is a hallmark of breast cancer, and likely reflects oncogene amplification. We previously identified mitotic kinesin KIF14 (kinesin family member 14) as an overexpressed candidate oncogene in the 1q31.3-1q32.1 minimal region of genomic gain in breast cancer cell lines. KIF14 also showed high expression in other cancers, notably an association with survival in lung tumors. We now report KIF14 expression in 99 primary breast tumors and 10 normal breast controls. Measured by real-time RT-PCR, KIF14 was overexpressed 10-fold on average in tumors relative to normals (t test p = 0.000054); expression increased with grade (ANOVA p = 0.000006). Infiltrating ductal carcinomas had higher KIF14 levels than lobular (p = 0.017), and estrogen receptor (ER) negative tumors had higher KIF14 levels than ER positive tumors (t test p = 0.030). KIF14 expression correlated positively with Ki-67 mRNA level (Spearman r = 0.692, p = 0.000001), fraction of positive nodes (r = 0.227, p = 0.024) and percent invasive cells (r = 0.360, p = 0.0002), and negatively with percent fatty stroma (r = -0.258, p = 0.010) and percent normal epithelium (r = -0.291, p = 0.003). KIF14 expression is thus tumor-specific and increased in more aggressive tumors. Indeed, KIF14 expression predicted overall survival (univariate Cox p = 0.010), with an odds ratio of 3.60 (1.37-9.48), in 50 tumors with available outcome data. KIF14 overexpression also predicted decreased disease-free survival (log-rank p = 0.049). These findings are the first evidence of association between expression of a mitotic kinesin and prognostic variables in breast cancer. PMID:16570270

  10. Adverse early life experience and social stress during adulthood interact to increase serotonin transporter mRNA expression

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, Katherine L.; Hale, Matthew W.; Lightman, Stafford L.; Plotsky, Paul M.; Lowry, Christopher A.

    2009-01-01

    Anxiety disorders, depression and animal models of vulnerability to a depression-like syndrome have been associated with dysregulation of serotonergic systems in the brain. To evaluate the effects of early life experience, adverse experiences during adulthood, and potential interactions between these factors on serotonin transporter (slc6a4) mRNA expression, we investigated in rats the effects of maternal separation (180 min/day from days 2–14 of life; MS180), neonatal handing (15 min/day from days 2–14 of life; MS15), or normal animal facility rearing control conditions (AFR) with or without subsequent exposure to adult social defeat on slc6a4 mRNA expression in the dorsal raphe nucleus (DR) and caudal linear nucleus. At the level of specific subdivisions of the DR, there were no differences in slc6a4 mRNA expression between MS15 and AFR rats. Among rats exposed to a novel cage control condition, increased slc6a4 mRNA expression was observed in the dorsal part of the DR in MS180 rats, relative to AFR control rats. In contrast, MS180 rats exposed to social defeat as adults had increased slc6a4 mRNA expression throughout the DR compared to both MS15 and AFR controls. Social defeat increased slc6a4 mRNA expression, but only in MS180 rats and only in the “lateral wings” of the DR. Overall these data demonstrate that early life experience and stressful experience during adulthood interact to determine slc6a4 mRNA expression. These data support the hypothesis that early life experience and major stressful life events contribute to dysregulation of serotonergic systems in stress-related neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:19781533