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Sample records for giammarco vetrocoke sulfur process

  1. Sulfur recovery process

    SciTech Connect

    Hise, R.E.; Cook, W.J.

    1991-06-04

    This paper describes a method for recovering sulfur from a process feed stream mixture of gases comprising sulfur-containing compounds including hydrogen sulfide using the Claus reaction to convert sulfur-containing compounds to elemental sulfur and crystallization to separate sulfur-containing compounds from a tail gas of the Claus reaction for further processing as a recycle stream. It comprises: providing a Claus feed stream containing a stoichiometric excess of hydrogen sulfide, the Claus feed stream including the process feed stream and the recycles stream; introducing the Claus feed stream and an oxidizing agent into a sulfur recovery unit for converting sulfur-containing compounds in the Claus feed stream to elemental sulfur; withdrawing the tail gas from the sulfur recovery unit; separating water from the tail gas to producing a dehydrated tail gas; separating sulfur-containing compounds including carbonyl sulfide from the dehydrated tail gas as an excluded material by crystallization and withdrawing an excluded material-enriched output from the crystallization to produce the recycle stream; and combining the recycle stream with the process feed stream to produce the Claus feed stream.

  2. Elemental sulfur recovery process

    DOEpatents

    Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, M.; Zhicheng Hu.

    1993-09-07

    An improved catalytic reduction process for the direct recovery of elemental sulfur from various SO[sub 2]-containing industrial gas streams. The catalytic process provides combined high activity and selectivity for the reduction of SO[sub 2] to elemental sulfur product with carbon monoxide or other reducing gases. The reaction of sulfur dioxide and reducing gas takes place over certain catalyst formulations based on cerium oxide. The process is a single-stage, catalytic sulfur recovery process in conjunction with regenerators, such as those used in dry, regenerative flue gas desulfurization or other processes, involving direct reduction of the SO[sub 2] in the regenerator off gas stream to elemental sulfur in the presence of a catalyst. 4 figures.

  3. Elemental sulfur recovery process

    DOEpatents

    Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, Maria; Hu, Zhicheng

    1993-01-01

    An improved catalytic reduction process for the direct recovery of elemental sulfur from various SO.sub.2 -containing industrial gas streams. The catalytic process provides combined high activity and selectivity for the reduction of SO.sub.2 to elemental sulfur product with carbon monoxide or other reducing gases. The reaction of sulfur dioxide and reducing gas takes place over certain catalyst formulations based on cerium oxide. The process is a single-stage, catalytic sulfur recovery process in conjunction with regenerators, such as those used in dry, regenerative flue gas desulfurization or other processes, involving direct reduction of the SO.sub.2 in the regenerator off gas stream to elemental sulfur in the presence of a catalyst.

  4. Sulfur oxides scrubbing process

    SciTech Connect

    Reeder, P.E.

    1986-07-15

    A process is described for removing sulfur oxides and solid particulates from a gaseous effluent. The steps of the process consist of: contacting within a venturi structure a gaseous effluent containing sulfur oxides with a liquid scrubbing mixture; passing the admixture of the gaseous effluent and liquid scrubbing mixture through a constricted passage of the venturi structure to increase the velocity thereof; separating the admixture into a liquid portion and a gas portion; delivering the gas portion of the separation step to a packed tower beneath the packed section thereof; contacting the gas portion with liquid scrubbing mixture in the packed section of the tower to form a gaseous overhead effluent substantially free of sulfur oxides and a bottoms liquid; combining the bottom liquid from the packed section of the tower with the liquid portion from the separating step to form a combined liquid bottoms; adjusting the pH of the combined liquid bottoms with a basic solution to form a liquid scrubbing mixture, the basic solution selected from the group consisting of alkali metal hydroxides, ammonium hydroxide, and ammonia; and dividing the liquid scrubbing mixture into a tower bottoms products, a first recycle stream providing the liquid scrubbing mixture to the first contacting step, and a second recycle stream providing the liquid scrubbing mixture to the second contacting step.

  5. Advanced Sulfur Control Processing

    SciTech Connect

    Gangwal, S.K.; Portzer, J.W.; Turk, B.S.; Gupta, R.

    1996-12-31

    The primary objective of this project is to determine the feasibility of an alternate concept for the regeneration of high temperature desulfurization sorbents in which elemental sulfur, instead of SO{sub 2}, is produced. If successful, this concept will eliminate or alleviate problems caused by the highly exothermic nature of the regeneration reaction, the tendency for metal sulfate formation, and the need to treat the regeneration off-gas to prevent atmospheric SO{sub 2}, emissions. Iron and cerium-based sorbents were chosen on the basis of thermodynamic analysis to determine the feasibility of elemental sulfur production. The ability of both to remove H{sub 2}S during the sulfidation phase is less than that of zinc-based sorbents, and a two-stage desulfurization process will likely be required. Preliminary experimental work used electrobalance reactors to compare the relative rates of reaction of O{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O with FeS. More detailed studies of the regeneration of FeS as well as the sulfidation of CeO{sub 2} and regeneration of Ce{sub 2}O{sub 2}S are being carried out in a laboratory-scale fixed-bed reactor equipped with a unique analytical system which permits semi-continuous analysis of the distribution of elemental sulfur, H{sub 2}S, and SO{sub 2} in the reaction product gas.

  6. Process for removing sulfur from sulfur-containing gases

    DOEpatents

    Rochelle, Gary T.; Jozewicz, Wojciech

    1989-01-01

    The present disclosure relates to improved processes for treating hot sulfur-containing flue gas to remove sulfur therefrom. Processes in accorda The government may own certain rights in the present invention pursuant to EPA Cooperative Agreement CR 81-1531.

  7. Sulfur-oxygen processes on Io

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, Robert M.; Smythe, William D.

    1987-01-01

    Laboratory studies of irradiated sulfur dioxide frost have found that sulfur trioxide should be formed as a consequence of the irradiation process. The spectral reflectance of solid sulfur trioxide was measured in the laboratory and it was found that the compound has strong absorption features at 3.37 and 3.70 microns. These features are not present in the spectral geometric albedo of Io. This is interpreted as an indication that sulfur trioxide may exist in such limited abundance that it is undetectable in disk averaged spectrophotometry. It is suggested that the Near-Infrared Mapping Spectrometer on the Galileo spacecraft should be able to identify condensed sulfur trioxide on Io particularly in regions bordering the sulfur dioxide deposits. The presence of elemental sulfur on Io's surface has been questioned on several grounds, most notably the suggested production process (quenched molten sulfur extrusions) and the effect of radiation (particularly X-rays) on some of the allotropes. Mixtures of sulfur allotropes were produced in the laboratory by quenching molten sulfur and it was found that the spectra indicate the presence of certain red-colored allotropes which are preserved upon quenching. The color of the sulfur glass produced is redder when the temperature of the original melt is higher. This is consistent with the suggestion that Io's spectral geometric albedo can be partly explained by the presence of quenched sulfur glasses.

  8. Sulfur recovery plant and process using oxygen

    SciTech Connect

    Palm, J.W.

    1989-01-17

    This patent describes a process for the recovery of sulfur from a gaseous stream containing hydrogen sulfide, the process comprising the steps of: (a) introducing a thermal reaction mixture comprising (1) the gaseous stream containing hydrogen sulfide, and (2) an oxygen-enriched stream of air or pure oxygen into a combustion zone of a Claus furnace; (b) combusting the thermal reaction mixture in the Claus furnace to thereby produce hot combustion gases comprising hydrogen sulfide, sulfur dioxide, carbon dioxide, water, and elemental sulfur; (c) introducing the hot combustion gases into a Claus catalytic reactor; (d) subjecting the hot combustion gases in the catalytic reactor to Claus reaction conditions in the presence of a Claus catalyst to thereby produce a Claus plant gaseous effluent stream comprising hydrogen sulfide, sulfur dioxide, carbon dioxide, water, and elemental sulfur; (e) introducing the Claus plant gaseous effluent into a condenser to thereby produce liquid sulfur, which is recovered, and a gaseous condenser effluent, which comprises hydrogen sulfide, sulfur dioxide, carbon dioxide and water; (f) converting substantially all sulfur species in the gaseous condenser effluent to hydrogen sulfide, to thereby form a condenser effluent comprising hydrogen sulfide, carbon dioxide and water; (g) removing water from the condenser effluent from step (f); and (h) moderating the temperature in the Claus furnace by returning at least a portion of the dried condenser effluent from step (g), as a diluent stream, to a combustion zone of the Claus furnace in step (a) above.

  9. Sulfur recovery plant and process using oxygen

    SciTech Connect

    Palm, J.W.

    1989-07-18

    This patent describes a process for recovery of sulfur from a gaseous stream containing hydrogen sulfide. The process consists the steps of: introducing a thermal reaction mixture comprising the gaseous stream containing hydrogen sulfide, and an oxygen-enriched stream of air or pure oxygen into a combustion zone of a Claus furnace; combusting the thermal reaction mixture in the Claus furnace to thereby produce hot combustion gases comprising hydrogen sulfide, sulfur dioxide, carbon dioxide, water, and elemental sulfur; introducing the hot combustion gases into a Claus catalytic reactor; subjecting the hot combustion gases in the catalytic reactor to Claus reaction conditions in the presence of a Claus catalyst to thereby produce a Claus plant gaseous effluent stream comprising hydrogen sulfide, sulfur dioxide, carbon dioxide, water, and elemental sulfur; introducing the Claus plant gaseous effluent into a condenser to thereby produce liquid sulfur, which is recovered, and a gaseous condenser effluent, which comprises hydrogen sulfide, sulfur dioxide, carbon dioxide and water and which is divided into a recycle portion and a tailgas portion; converting substantially all sulfur species in the recycle portion of the gaseous condenser effluent to hydrogen sulfide to thereby form condenser effluent comprising hydrogen sulfide, carbon dioxide and water; removing water from the recycle portion of the condenser; and moderating the temperature in the Claus furnace by returning at least a portion of the dried recycle condenser, as a diluent stream, to a combustion zone of the Claus furnace.

  10. Catalyst for elemental sulfur recovery process

    DOEpatents

    Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, M.; Liu, W.

    1995-01-24

    A catalytic reduction process is described for the direct recovery of elemental sulfur from various SO[sub 2]-containing industrial gas streams. The catalytic process provides high activity and selectivity, as well as stability in the reaction atmosphere, for the reduction of SO[sub 2] to elemental sulfur product with carbon monoxide or other reducing gases. The reaction of sulfur dioxide and reducing gas takes place over a metal oxide composite catalyst having one of the following empirical formulas: [(FO[sub 2])[sub 1[minus]n](RO)[sub n

  11. Process for removing sulfur from coal

    DOEpatents

    Aida, Tetsuo; Squires, Thomas G.; Venier, Clifford G.

    1985-02-05

    A process for the removal of divalent organic and inorganic sulfur compounds from coal and other carbonaceous material. A slurry of pulverized carbonaceous material is contacted with an electrophilic oxidant which selectively oxidizes the divalent organic and inorganic compounds to trivalent and tetravalent compounds. The carbonaceous material is then contacted with a molten caustic which dissolves the oxidized sulfur compounds away from the hydrocarbon matrix.

  12. Process for removing sulfur from coal

    DOEpatents

    Aida, T.; Squires, T.G.; Venier, C.G.

    1983-08-11

    A process is disclosed for the removal of divalent organic and inorganic sulfur compounds from coal and other carbonaceous material. A slurry of pulverized carbonaceous material is contacted with an electrophilic oxidant which selectively oxidizes the divalent organic and inorganic compounds to trivalent and tetravalent compounds. The carbonaceous material is then contacted with a molten caustic which dissolves the oxidized sulfur compounds away from the hydrocarbon matrix.

  13. Development of enhanced sulfur rejection processes

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, R.H.; Luttrell, G.; Adel, G.; Richardson, P.E.

    1993-03-23

    Research at Virginia Tech led to two complementary concepts for improving the removal of inorganic sulfur from much of the Eastern US coals. One controls the surface properties of coal pyrite (FeS[sub 2]) by electrochemical-.potential control, referred to as the Electrochemically Enhanced Sulfur Rejection (EESR) Process: The second controls the flotation of middlings, i.e., particles composed of pyrite with coal inclusions by using polymeric reagents to react with pyrite and convert the middlings to hydrophilic particles, and is termed the Polymer Enhanced Sulfur Rejection (PESR) Process. These new concepts are based on recent research establishing the two main reasons why flotation fails to remove more than about 50% of the pyritic sulfur from coal: superficial oxidization of liberated pyrite to form polysulfide oxidation products so that a part of the liberated pyrite floats with the coal; and hydrophobic coal inclusions in the middlings dominating their flotation so that the middlings also float with the coal. These new pyritic-sulfur rejection processes do not require significant modifications of existing coal preparation facilities, enhancing their adoptability by the coal industry. It is believed that they can be used simultaneously to achieve both free pyrite and locked pyrite rejection.

  14. Development of enhanced sulfur rejection processes

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, R.H.; Luttrell, G.H.; Adel, G.T.; Richardson, P.E.

    1996-03-01

    Research at Virginia Tech led to the development of two complementary concepts for improving the removal of inorganic sulfur from many eastern U.S. coals. These concepts are referred to as Electrochemically Enhanced Sulfur Rejection (EESR) and Polymer Enhanced Sulfur Rejection (PESR) processes. The EESR process uses electrochemical techniques to suppress the formation of hydrophobic oxidation products believed to be responsible for the floatability of coal pyrite. The PESR process uses polymeric reagents that react with pyrite and convert floatable middlings, i.e., composite particles composed of pyrite with coal inclusions, into hydrophilic particles. These new pyritic-sulfur rejection processes do not require significant modifications to existing coal preparation facilities, thereby enhancing their adoptability by the coal industry. It is believed that these processes can be used simultaneously to maximize the rejection of both well-liberated pyrite and composite coal-pyrite particles. The project was initiated on October 1, 1992 and all technical work has been completed. This report is based on the research carried out under Tasks 2-7 described in the project proposal. These tasks include Characterization, Electrochemical Studies, In Situ Monitoring of Reagent Adsorption on Pyrite, Bench Scale Testing of the EESR Process, Bench Scale Testing of the PESR Process, and Modeling and Simulation.

  15. INDUSTRIAL PROCESS PROFILES FOR ENVIRONMENTAL USE: CHAPTER 23. SULFUR, SULFUR OXIDES AND SULFURIC ACID

    EPA Science Inventory

    The catalog of Industrial Process Profiles for Environmental Use was developed as an aid in defining the environmental impacts of industrial activity in the United States. Entries for each industry are in consistent format and form separate chapters of the study. The sulfur indus...

  16. Sulfur recovery process including removal of residual sulfur from Claus catalyst after regeneration

    SciTech Connect

    Cabanaw, B.E.

    1990-03-13

    This patent describes a process for the recovery of sulfur. It comprises: passing an acid gas feedstream having as a sulfur species essentially only hydrogen sulfide therein to a Claus plant comprising a thermal conversion zone and at least one Claus catalytic reaction zone operated under adsorption conditions including temperature for forming and depositing a preponderance of sulfur formed on catalyst therein.

  17. Catalyst for elemental sulfur recovery process

    DOEpatents

    Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, Maria; Liu, Wei

    1995-01-01

    A catalytic reduction process for the direct recovery of elemental sulfur from various SO.sub.2 -containing industrial gas streams. The catalytic process provides high activity and selectivity, as well as stability in the reaction atmosphere, for the reduction of SO.sub.2 to elemental sulfur product with carbon monoxide or other reducing gases. The reaction of sulfur dioxide and reducing gas takes place over a metal oxide composite catalyst having one of the following empirical formulas: [(OF.sub.2).sub.1-n (RO.sub.1)n].sub.1-k M.sub.k, [(FO.sub.2).sub.1-n (RO.sub.1.5).sub.n ].sub.1-k M.sub.k, or [Ln.sub.x Zr.sub.1-x O.sub.2-0.5x ].sub.1-k M.sub.k wherein FO.sub.2 is a fluorite-type oxide; RO represents an alkaline earth oxide; RO.sub.1.5 is a Group IIIB or rare earth oxide; Ln is a rare earth element having an atomic number from 57 to 65 or mixtures thereof; M is a transition metal or a mixture of transition metals; n is a number having a value from 0.0 to 0.35; k is a number having a value from 0.0 to about 0.5; and x is a number having a value from about 0.45 to about 0.55.

  18. Assessment of sulfur removal processes for advanced fuel cell systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorton, G. A.

    1980-01-01

    The performance characteristics of potential sulfur removal processes were evaluated and four of these processes, the Selexol process, the Benfield process, the Sulfinol process, and the Rectisol process, were selected for detailed technical and economic comparison. The process designs were based on a consistent set of technical criteria for a grass roots facility with a capacity of 10,000 tons per day of Illinois No. 6 coal. Two raw gas compositions, based on oxygen blown and air blown Texaco gasification, were used. The bulk of the sulfur was removed in the sulfur removal unit, leaving a small amount of sulfur compounds in the gas. The remaining sulfur compounds were removed by reaction with zinc oxide in the sulfur polishing unit. The impact of COS hydrolysis pretreatment on sulfur removal was evaluated. Comprehensive capital and O and M cost estimates for each of the process schemes were developed.

  19. Sulfur recovery process using metal oxide absorbent

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, M.H.; Pendergraft, P.T.

    1990-09-04

    This patent describes an improvement in a process for the recovery of sulfur. The process comprises introducing a H{sub 2}S containing stream into a Claus plant producing Claus plant effluent; during an absorption period introducing Claus plant effluent into a first absorption zone containing ZnO absorbent and reacting at least H{sub 2}S with ZnO producing sulfided absorbent ZnS and absorber effluent; and concurrently introducing O{sub 2} and a fraction of first absorption zone effluent into a second absorption zone regenerating ZnS to ZnO and returning effluent to the Claus plant.

  20. Process for reducing sulfur in coal char

    DOEpatents

    Gasior, Stanley J.; Forney, Albert J.; Haynes, William P.; Kenny, Richard F.

    1976-07-20

    Coal is gasified in the presence of a small but effective amount of alkaline earth oxide, hydroxide or carbonate to yield a char fraction depleted in sulfur. Gases produced during the reaction are enriched in sulfur compounds and the alkaline earth compound remains in the char fraction as an alkaline earth oxide. The char is suitable for fuel use, as in a power plant, and during combustion of the char the alkaline earth oxide reacts with at least a portion of the sulfur oxides produced from the residual sulfur contained in the char to further lower the sulfur content of the combustion gases.

  1. Process for the separation of sulfur oxides from a gaseous mixture containing sulfur oxides and oxygen

    SciTech Connect

    Derosset, A.J.; Ginger, E.A.

    1980-12-23

    An improved process for the separation of sulfur oxides from a gaseous mixture containing sulfur oxides and oxygen is disclosed. The gaseous mixture is contacted with a solid sulfur oxide acceptor comprising copper, copper oxide, or a mixture thereof dispersed on a carrier material in combination with a platinum group metal component and a component selected from the group consisting of rhenium, germanium and tin.

  2. Process for removing sulfur from sulfur-containing gases: high calcium fly-ash

    DOEpatents

    Rochelle, Gary T.; Chang, John C. S.

    1991-01-01

    The present disclosure relates to improved processes for treating hot sulfur-containing flue gas to remove sulfur therefrom. Processes in accordance with the present invention include preparing an aqueous slurry composed of a calcium alkali source and a source of reactive silica and/or alumina, heating the slurry to above-ambient temperatures for a period of time in order to facilitate the formation of sulfur-absorbing calcium silicates or aluminates, and treating the gas with the heat-treated slurry components. Examples disclosed herein demonstrate the utility of these processes in achieving improved sulfur-absorbing capabilities. Additionally, disclosure is provided which illustrates preferred configurations for employing the present processes both as a dry sorbent injection and for use in conjunction with a spray dryer and/or bagfilter. Retrofit application to existing systems is also addressed.

  3. Clues to early diagenetic sulfurization processes from mild chemical cleavage of labile sulfur-rich geomacromolecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, P.; Schneckenburger, P.; Schaeffer, P.; Albrecht, P.

    2000-10-01

    Macromolecular fractions, isolated from the solvent extract of sulfur-rich Recent (Siders Pond, USA; Lake Cadagno, Switzerland; Walvis Bay, Namibia) and immature sediments (Gibellina, Messinian of Sicily; Vena del Gesso, Messinian of Italy), were investigated by chemical degradation using sodium ethanethiolate/methyliodide. This mild reagent which cleaves polysulfide bonds to yield methylsulfides has the advantage over other methods of leaving intact other functionalities (like double bonds) and preserving sulfur atoms at their incorporation site. The method is, therefore, well-suited to the molecular level investigation of sulfur-rich macromolecules from Recent sediments containing highly functionalized polysulfide-bound subunits. In Recent anoxic sulfur-rich sediments, the release of various methylthioethers clearly demonstrates that intermolecular sulfurization of organic matter does occur at the earliest stages of diagenesis. Steroids and phytane derivatives are the major sulfurized lipids, a feature also observed in more mature sulfur-rich sediments. Several phytene derivatives, such as cis and trans 1-methylthiophyt-2-enes, as well as methylthiosteroids, including 5α- and 5β-3-(methylthio)-cholest-2-enes, were identified by comparison with synthesized standards. Steroid methylthioenolethers are released from polysulfide-bound steroid enethiols present in the macromolecular fractions. The latter, which correspond to thioketones, can be considered as intermediates in the reductive sulfurization pathway leading from steroid ketones to polysulfide-bound saturated steroid skeletons and are characterized for the first time in the present study. Thus, it could be shown that the major part of the polysulfide-bound lipids occurring in Recent sediments is apparently the result of sulfurization processes affecting carbonyls (aldehydes and ketones). The unsaturated methylthioethers obtained from Recent sediments were not present in more mature evaporitic samples, which suggests that polysulfide-bound unsaturated thiols are intermediates formed during the first sulfurization steps occurring soon after deposition and that they are rapidly transformed by various processes taking place during early diagenesis, notably to yield their saturated counterparts.

  4. Elemental sulfur from regenerable FGD and IGCC processes

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, S.G.; Oehlberg, R.J.; Cianciolo, B.C.

    1998-07-01

    Gas streams containing concentrated levels of SO{sub 2} are common in many regenerable flue-gas desulfurization (FGD) processes, in gas-treatment systems associated with coal gasification processes, and in hydrocarbon treatment processes. Generally, the most desirable sulfur by-product is elemental sulfur. In the past, a modified Claus process was usually the method employed to convert SO{sub 2} to elemental sulfur. The Claus process, however, involves multiple reactors in series, is relatively expensive, consumes significant energy, and does not go to completion, which means that a tail gas treatment plant and other facilities are required. For over five years, Sorbent Technologies corporation has been developing and scaling up a simpler, less-costly process for converting SO{sub 2}-rich gases directly to elemental sulfur. The process is based on a new SO{sub 2}-to-elemental sulfur catalyst. The simple technology operates at typical coal gasification temperatures and can use natural gas (reformed methane) or other typical process gases for SO{sub 2} reduction. This new direct-to-sulfur process was recently tested at the Federal Energy Technology Center's advanced Copper Oxide Process FGD pilot plant in Pittsburgh, A skid-mounted test unit was placed after the copper oxide regenerator, where it turned the high-concentration SO{sub 2} off-gas directly into elemental sulfur. This paper discusses the chemistry involved in the new technology, traces its development, and presents the results achieved in various pilot plant tests.

  5. Process for production of synthesis gas with reduced sulfur content

    DOEpatents

    Najjar, Mitri S.; Corbeels, Roger J.; Kokturk, Uygur

    1989-01-01

    A process for the partial oxidation of a sulfur- and silicate-containing carbonaceous fuel to produce a synthesis gas with reduced sulfur content which comprises partially oxidizing said fuel at a temperature in the range of 1800.degree.-2200.degree. F. in the presence of a temperature moderator, an oxygen-containing gas and a sulfur capture additive which comprises an iron-containing compound portion and a sodium-containing compound portion to produce a synthesis gas comprising H.sub.2 and CO with a reduced sulfur content and a molten slag which comprises (i) a sulfur-containing sodium-iron silicate phase and (ii) a sodium-iron sulfide phase. The sulfur capture additive may optionally comprise a copper-containing compound portion.

  6. Process for removing pyritic sulfur from bituminous coals

    DOEpatents

    Pawlak, Wanda; Janiak, Jerzy S.; Turak, Ali A.; Ignasiak, Boleslaw L.

    1990-01-01

    A process is provided for removing pyritic sulfur and lowering ash content of bituminous coals by grinding the feed coal, subjecting it to micro-agglomeration with a bridging liquid containing heavy oil, separating the microagglomerates and separating them to a water wash to remove suspended pyritic sulfur. In one embodiment the coal is subjected to a second micro-agglomeration step.

  7. Microbial architecture of environmental sulfur processes: a novel syntrophic sulfur-metabolizing consortia.

    PubMed

    Norlund, Kelsey L I; Southam, Gordon; Tyliszczak, Tolek; Hu, Yongfeng; Karunakaran, Chithra; Obst, Martin; Hitchcock, Adam P; Warren, Lesley A

    2009-12-01

    Microbial oxidation of sulfur-rich mining waste materials drives acid mine drainage (AMD) and affects the global sulfur biogeochemical cycle. The generation of AMD is a complex, dynamic process that proceeds via multiple reaction pathways. The role of natural consortia of microbes in AMD generation, however, has received very little attention despite their widespread occurrence in mining environments. Through a combination of geochemical experimentation and modeling, scanning transmission X-ray microscopy, and fluorescent in situ hybridization, we show a novel interdependent metabolic arrangement of two ubiquitous and abundant AMD bacteria: chemoautotrophic sulfur-oxidizing Acidithiobacillus sp. and heterotrophic Acidiphilium sp. Highly reminiscent of anaerobic methane oxidation (AOM) consortia, these bacteria are spatially segregated within a planktonic macrostructure of extracellular polymeric substance in which they syntrophically couple sulfur oxidation and reduction reactions in a mutually beneficial arrangement that regenerates their respective sulfur substrates. As discussed here, the geochemical impacts of microbial metabolism are linked to the consortial organization and development of the pod structure, which affects cell-cell interactions and interactions with the surrounding geochemical microenvironment. If these pods are widespread in mine waters, echoing the now widespread discovery of AOM consortia, then AMD-driven CO(2) atmospheric fluxes from H(2)SO(4) carbonate weathering could be reduced by as much as 26 TgC/yr. This novel sulfur consortial discovery indicates that organized metabolically linked microbial partnerships are likely widespread and more significant in global elemental cycling than previously considered. PMID:19943646

  8. Integrated process for converting sulfur-containing fuels to low sulfur combustible gas

    SciTech Connect

    Moss, G.

    1981-03-10

    Sulfur-containing fuels are converted to substantially sulfurfree combustible gas in an integrated process involving part combustion in a dense phase fluidized conversion bed of particles comprising alkaline earth metal oxides. An oxygen-containing gas is passed into the base of the bed to maintain a relatively high fuel/air ratio. Sulfur is chemically fixed in the particles by reaction to form alkaline earth metal sulfide. Particles containing alkaline earth metal sulfide are circulated from one region of the conversion bed to one region of a dense phase fluidized regeneration bed operated at a higher temperature and fluidized by passing into the base thereof an oxygen-containing gas which exothermically regenerates chemically active alkaline earth metal oxide from the sulfide liberating gases which have a low oxygen content and a relatively high content of sulfur moieties (e.g. SO2). Hot particles are circulated from a second region of the regeneration bed to a second region of the conversion bed for use in fixing further quantities of sulfur from sulfur-containing fuel. Both beds contain a high molar proportion of unreacted alkaline earth metal oxide thereby imparting high sulfur-retaining capability to the conversion bed, and the beds interact cooperatively with each other at least in that particles entering the regeneration bed moderate temperatures therein and particles entering the conversion bed add heat thereto thereby reducing the fuel requirement for maintaining the conversion bed temperature.

  9. The Fate of Sulfur in Late-Stage Magmatic Processes: Insights From Quadruple Sulfur Isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, N. S.; Ono, S.; Shaw, A. M.

    2009-05-01

    Multiple sulfur isotopes (32S, 33S, 34S and 36S) have recently been shown to be useful tracers of fluid-rock interaction in seafloor hydrothermal systems [1]. Here we present the application of multiple sulfur isotopes to subaerial volcanoes with the aim of unraveling the various processes fractionating sulfur in the upper volcanic system. We take advantage of the fact that the ascent of volcanic gases through a hydrothermal system causes complex isotopic fractionation between the quaduple sulfur isotopes. δ34S is thought to trace the source of sulfur as well as magma degassing; at equilibrium, δ33S follows a mass-dependent fractionation relationship such that two phases in equilibrium with each other have equal Δ33S values (Δ33S ≡ ln(δ33S+1) - 0.515×ln(δ34S+1)). Disequilibrium Δ33S values can indicate isotope mixing and other fluid-rock interactions. The ultimate aim of this study is to assess the use of quadruple sulfur isotopes to obtain quantitative information on the sulfur cycle at convergent plate margins. The sulfur mass balance at convergent margins is poorly constrained, partly because late-stage processes are challenging to quantify and lead to large uncertainties in the global output fluxes. Quadruple sulfur isotopes provide a powerful tool to untangle the convoluted history of volcanic systems. Here we report the first quadruple sulfur isotopic values for H2S, SO2 and native sulfur from arc volcanoes. Fumarolic gases (˜100°C) and sulfur sublimates were collected from Poas and Turrialba, two actively degassing volcanoes in Costa Rica. The gases were bubbled in situ through chemical traps to separate H2S from SO2: H2S was reacted to form ZnS, and SO2 to form BaSO4. Sulfur was chemically extracted from the solid phases and precipitated as Ag2S, which was fluorinated to SF6 and analysed by IRMS. Poas and Turrialba have H2S/SO2 ˜1 and 0.01, respectively. δ34SH2S and δ34SSO2 are similar to gases measured at other arcs [2], - 7.9‰ and 0.6‰ for Poas, and -8.5‰ and +9‰ for Turrialba, likely reflecting a mixture of mantle (δ34S = 0‰) and slab sources which have been degassed to variable degrees. Sulfur sublimate values are similar to those for H2S. Δ33S values are different within each H2S/SO2 pair (Δ33SH2S and Δ33SSO2 are -0.01‰ and -0.02‰ for Poas, 0‰ and -0.07‰ for Turrialba), indicating that at Turrialba, the two gas species are not in isotopic equilibrium. Reaction of the gases with mineral phases, such as sulfur-bearing alteration products in the volcanic edifice (e.g., alunite, anhydrite, sulfides) may explain these differences. [1] Ono et al. (2007), GCA 70 1170-1182, [2] Taylor (1986), RiM 16 185-225

  10. Two-reactor, high-recovery sulfur plant and process

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, R.L.; Palm, J.W.

    1989-04-18

    This patent describes a process for the recovery of sulfur wherein an acid gas feedstream comprising hydrogen sulfide is processed for the recovery of sulfur in a Claus process sulfur recovery plant. The process consists of: (a) passing the acid gas feedstream successively through the thermal reaction zone, the first position Claus catalytic reaction zone, and the second position Claus catalytic reaction zone for the recovery of sulfur; (b) preconditioning the first position Claus catalytic reaction zone by introducing thereinto a cold stream having an inlet temperature effective for condensing sulfur on at least a portion of the catalyst and passing the resulting stream through a remaining substantial portion of the catalyst, the cold stream thus used for preconditioning being produced by cooling acid gas feedstream effluent from the thermal reaction zone to the first position catalytic reaction zone to the temperature; and (c) switching the thus preconditioned Claus catalytic reaction zone in the first position into the second position and continuing cooling the thus preconditioned freshly regenerated reactor in the second position concurrently with forming and depositing sulfur on catalyst therein, and switching the Claus catalytic reaction zone in the second position into the first position and continuing the process according to (a), (b), and (c).

  11. Elemental sulfur from regenerable FGD and IGCC processes

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, S.G.; Oehlberg, R.J.; Cianciolo, B.C.

    1998-04-01

    Gas streams containing concentrated levels of SO{sub 2} are common in many regenerable flue-gas desulfurization (FGD) processes, in gas-treatment systems associated with coal gasification processes, and in hydrocarbon treatment processes. Generally, the most desirable sulfur by-product is elemental sulfur. In the past, a modified Claus process was usually the method employed to convert SO{sub 2} to elemental sulfur. The Claus process, however, involves multiple reactors in series, is relatively expensive, consumes significant energy, and does not go to completion, which means that a tail gas treatment plant and other facilities are required. For over five years, Sorbent Technologies Corporation has been developing and scaling up a simpler, less-costly process for converting SO{sub 2}-rich gases directly to elemental sulfur. The process is based on a new SO{sub 2}-to-elemental sulfur catalyst. The simple technology operates at typical coal gasification temperatures and can use natural gas (reformed methane) or other typical process gases for SO{sub 2} reduction. This new direct-to-sulfur process was recently tested at the Federal Energy Technology Center`s advanced Copper Oxide Process FGD pilot plant in Pittsburgh. A skid-mounted test unit was placed after the copper oxide regenerator, where it turned the high-concentration SO{sub 2} off-gas directly into elemental sulfur. This paper discusses the chemistry involved in the new technology, traces its development, and presents the results achieved in various pilot plant tests.

  12. Process of decreasing the sulfur content of exhaust gases obtained during the recovery of sulfur

    SciTech Connect

    Schlauer, J.; Fischer, H.; Kriebel, M.

    1983-09-20

    In a process of decreasing the sulfur content of exhaust gases obtained during the recovery of sulfur from acid gases containing H/sub 2/S and other S-containing compounds in the Claus process, the acid gases which contain H/sub 2/S and other S-containing compounds are reacted in a Claus plant to form elemental sulfur. A gas which contains H/sub 2/S or SO/sub 2/ is subsequently added at a controlled rate to maintain a stoichiometric ratio of 2:1 of H/sub 2/S to SO/sub 2/ in the tail gas from the Claus plant. The gas which contains H/sub 2/S or SO/sub 2/ may be added to the tail gas from the Claus plant or before the last contacting stage of a multistage Claus plant. During the addition of a gas which contains H /sup 2/S the Claus plant can be operated at an H/sub 2/S to SO/sub 2/ ratio of or below 2:1. During the addition gas which contains SO/sub 2/ the Claus plant can be operated at an H/sub 2/S to SO/sub 2/ ratio of or above 2:1. The H/sub 2/ and SO/sub 2/ contained in the tail gas are chemically reacted to form elementary sulfur in a tail gas-desulfurizing plant and the sulfur is withdrawn.

  13. HYBRID SULFUR RECOVERY PROCESS FOR NATURAL GAS UPGRADING

    SciTech Connect

    Girish Srinivas; Steven C. Gebhard; David W. DeBerry

    2001-05-01

    This first quarter report of 2001 describes progress on a project funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to test a hybrid sulfur recovery process for natural gas upgrading. The process concept represents a low cost option for direct treatment of natural gas streams to remove H{sub 2}S in quantities equivalent to 0.2-25 metric tons (LT) of sulfur per day. This process is projected to have lower capital and operating costs than the competing technologies, amine/aqueous iron liquid redox and amine/Claus/tail gas treating, and have a smaller plant footprint, making it well suited to both on-shore and offshore applications. CrystaSulf{trademark} (service mark of Gas Research Institute) is a new nonaqueous sulfur recovery process that removes hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) from gas streams and converts it into elemental sulfur. CrystaSulf features high sulfur recovery similar to aqueous-iron liquid redox sulfur recovery processes, but differs from the aqueous processes in that CrystaSulf controls the location where elemental sulfur particles are formed. In the hybrid process, approximately 1/3 of the total H{sub 2}S in the natural gas is first oxidized to SO{sub 2} at low temperatures over a heterogeneous catalyst. Low temperature oxidation is done so that the H{sub 2}S can be oxidized in the presence of methane and other hydrocarbons without oxidation of the hydrocarbons. The project involves the development of a catalyst using laboratory/bench-scale catalyst testing, and then demonstration of the catalyst at CrystaTech's pilot plant in west Texas. During this reporting periods new catalyst formulations were tested. The experiments showed that the newest catalyst has slightly better performance, but catalyst TDA No.2 is still superior overall for use with the hybrid CrystaSulf process due to lower costs. Plans for catalyst pelletization and continued testing are described.

  14. HYBRID SULFUR RECOVERY PROCESS FOR NATURAL GAS UPGRADING

    SciTech Connect

    Dennis Dalrymple

    2003-10-01

    This third quarter report of 2003 describes progress on a project funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to test a hybrid sulfur recovery process for natural gas upgrading. The process concept represents a low-cost option for direct treatment of natural gas streams to remove H{sub 2}S in quantities equivalent to 0.2-25 metric tons (LT) of sulfur per day. This process is projected to have lower capital and operating costs than the competing technologies, amine/aqueous iron liquid redox and amine/Claus/tail gas treating, and have a smaller plant footprint, making it well suited to both on-shore and off-shore applications. CrystaSulf{reg_sign} (service mark of CrystaTech, Inc.) is a new nonaqueous sulfur recovery process that removes hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) from gas streams and converts it into elemental sulfur. CrystaSulf features high sulfur recovery similar to aqueous-iron liquid redox sulfur recovery processes, but differs from the aqueous processes in that CrystaSulf controls the location where elemental sulfur particles are formed. In the hybrid process, approximately 1/3 of the total H{sub 2}S in the natural gas is first oxidized to SO{sub 2} at low temperatures over a heterogeneous catalyst. Low temperature oxidation is done so that the H{sub 2}S can be oxidized in the presence of methane and other hydrocarbons without oxidation of the hydrocarbons. The project involves the development of a catalyst using laboratory/bench-scale catalyst testing, and then demonstration of the catalyst at CrystaTech's pilot plant site in west Texas.

  15. HYBRID SULFUR RECOVERY PROCESS FOR NATURAL GAS UPGRADING

    SciTech Connect

    Dennis Dalrymple

    2004-04-01

    This first quarter report of 2004 describes progress on a project funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to test a hybrid sulfur recovery process for natural gas upgrading. The process concept represents a low-cost option for direct treatment of natural gas streams to remove H{sub 2}S in quantities equivalent to 0.2-25 metric tons (LT) of sulfur per day. This process is projected to have lower capital and operating costs than the competing technologies, amine/aqueous iron liquid redox and amine/Claus/tail gas treating, and have a smaller plant footprint, making it well suited to both on-shore and off-shore applications. CrystaSulf{reg_sign} (service mark of CrystaTech, Inc.) is a new nonaqueous sulfur recovery process that removes hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) from gas streams and converts it into elemental sulfur. CrystaSulf features high sulfur recovery similar to aqueous-iron liquid redox sulfur recovery processes, but differs from the aqueous processes in that CrystaSulf controls the location where elemental sulfur particles are formed. In the hybrid process, approximately 1/3 of the total H{sub 2}S in the natural gas is first oxidized to SO{sub 2} at low temperatures over a heterogeneous catalyst. Low temperature oxidation is done so that the H{sub 2}S can be oxidized in the presence of methane while avoiding methane oxidation and fouling due to coking from other hydrocarbon contaminants. The project involves the development of a catalyst using laboratory/bench-scale catalyst testing, and then demonstration of the catalyst at CrystaTech's pilot plant site in west Texas.

  16. New treating processes for sulfur-containing natural gases

    SciTech Connect

    Kislenko, N.; Aphanasiev, A.; Nabokov, S.; Ismailova, H.

    1996-12-31

    The traditional method of removing H{sub 2}S from sour natural gases is first to treat the gas with a solvent and then to recover the H{sub 2}S from the sour stream in a Claus plant. This method recovers up to 97% of the sulfur when a three-stage Claus unit is employed. Amine/Claus units have operating difficulties for small sulfur capacities (up to 5 tons/day) because the operation of the fired equipment (reaction furnace) is much more difficult. Therefore, for small scale sulfur recovery plants redox processes which exhibit a significant reduction in investment and operating costs are normally used. Many different factors influence the choice of gas desulfurization technology--composition and gas flow, environmental sulfur recovery requirements and CO{sub 2}/H{sub 2}S ratio.

  17. HYBRID SULFUR RECOVERY PROCESS FOR NATURAL GAS UPGRADING

    SciTech Connect

    Dennis Dalrymple

    2003-07-01

    This second quarter report of 2003 describes progress on a project funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to test a hybrid sulfur recovery process for natural gas upgrading. The process concept represents a low cost option for direct treatment of natural gas streams to remove H{sub 2}S in quantities equivalent to 0.2-25 metric tons (LT) of sulfur per day. This process is projected to have lower capital and operating costs than the competing technologies, amine/aqueous iron liquid redox and amine/Claus/tail gas treating, and have a smaller plant footprint, making it well suited to both on-shore and off-shore applications. CrystaSulf{reg_sign} (service mark of CrystaTech, Inc.) is a new nonaqueous sulfur recovery process that removes hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) from gas streams and converts it into elemental sulfur. CrystaSulf features high sulfur recovery similar to aqueous-iron liquid redox sulfur recovery processes, but differs from the aqueous processes in that CrystaSulf controls the location where elemental sulfur particles are formed. In the hybrid process, approximately 1/3 of the total H{sub 2}S in the natural gas is first oxidized to SO{sub 2} at low temperatures over a heterogeneous catalyst. Low temperature oxidation is done so that the H{sub 2}S can be oxidized in the presence of methane and other hydrocarbons without oxidation of the hydrocarbons. The project involves the development of a catalyst using laboratory/bench-scale catalyst testing, and then demonstration of the catalyst at CrystaTech's pilot plant in west Texas. Previous reports described development of a catalyst with the required selectivity and efficiency for producing sulfur dioxide from H{sub 2}S. In the laboratory, the catalyst was shown to be robust and stable in the presence of several intentionally added contaminants, including condensate from the pilot plant site. Bench-scale catalyst testing at the CrystaSulf pilot plant using the actual pilot plant gas was successful, and a skid-mounted catalyst pilot unit has been designed for fabrication and testing at the CrystaSulf pilot site.

  18. HYBRID SULFUR RECOVERY PROCESS FOR NATURAL GAS UPGRADING

    SciTech Connect

    Joe Lundeen; Girish Srinivas; David W. DeBerry

    2003-01-01

    This fourth quarter report of 2002 describes progress on a project funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to test a hybrid sulfur recovery process for natural gas upgrading. The process concept represents a low cost option for direct treatment of natural gas streams to remove H{sub 2}S in quantities equivalent to 0.2-25 metric tons (LT) of sulfur per day. This process is projected to have lower capital and operating costs than the competing technologies, amine/aqueous iron liquid redox and amine/Claus/tail gas treating, and have a smaller plant footprint, making it well suited to both on-shore and offshore applications. CrystaSulf (service mark of CrystaTech, Inc.) is a new nonaqueous sulfur recovery process that removes hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) from gas streams and converts it into elemental sulfur. CrystaSulf features high sulfur recovery similar to aqueous-iron liquid redox sulfur recovery processes, but differs from the aqueous processes in that CrystaSulf controls the location where elemental sulfur particles are formed. In the hybrid process, approximately 1/3 of the total H{sub 2}S in the natural gas is first oxidized to SO{sub 2} at low temperatures over a heterogeneous catalyst. Low temperature oxidation is done so that the H{sub 2}S can be oxidized in the presence of methane and other hydrocarbons without oxidation of the hydrocarbons. The project involves the development of a catalyst using laboratory/bench-scale catalyst testing, and then demonstration of the catalyst at CrystaTech's pilot plant in west Texas. Previous reports described development of a catalyst with the required selectivity and efficiency for producing sulfur dioxide from H{sub 2}S. In the laboratory, the catalyst was shown to be robust and stable in the presence of several intentionally added contaminants, including condensate from the pilot plant site. Bench-scale catalyst testing at the CrystaSulf pilot plant using the actual pilot plant gas was successful and a skid-mounted, catalyst pilot unit has been designed for fabrication and testing at the CrystaSulf pilot site.

  19. HYBRID SULFUR RECOVERY PROCESS FOR NATURAL GAS UPGRADING

    SciTech Connect

    Girish Srinivas; Steven C. Gebhard; David W. DeBerry

    2002-07-01

    This second quarter report of 2002 describes progress on a project funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to test a hybrid sulfur recovery process for natural gas upgrading. The process concept represents a low cost option for direct treatment of natural gas streams to remove H{sub 2}S in quantities equivalent to 0.2-25 metric tons (LT) of sulfur per day. This process is projected to have lower capital and operating costs than the competing technologies, amine/aqueous iron liquid redox and amine/Claus/tail gas treating, and have a smaller plant footprint, making it well suited to both on-shore and offshore applications. CrystaSulf (service mark of CrystaTech, Inc.) is a new nonaqueous sulfur recovery process that removes hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) from gas streams and converts it into elemental sulfur. CrystaSulf features high sulfur recovery similar to aqueous-iron liquid redox sulfur recovery processes, but differs from the aqueous processes in that CrystaSulf controls the location where elemental sulfur particles are formed. In the hybrid process, approximately 1/3 of the total H{sub 2}S in the natural gas is first oxidized to SO{sub 2} at low temperatures over a heterogeneous catalyst. Low temperature oxidation is done so that the H{sub 2}S can be oxidized in the presence of methane and other hydrocarbons without oxidation of the hydrocarbons. The project involves the development of a catalyst using laboratory/bench-scale catalyst testing, and then demonstration of the catalyst at CrystaTech's pilot plant in west Texas. Previous reports described development of a catalyst with the required selectivity and efficiency for producing sulfur dioxide from H{sub 2}S. In the laboratory, the catalyst was shown to be robust and stable in the presence of several intentionally added contaminants, including condensate from the pilot plant site. This report describes testing using the laboratory apparatus but operated at the pilot plant using the actual pilot plant gas, which contains far more contaminants than can be simulated in the laboratory. The results are very encouraging, with stable and efficient operation being obtained for a prolonged period of time.

  20. HYBRID SULFUR RECOVERY PROCESS FOR NATURAL GAS UPGRADING

    SciTech Connect

    Dennis Dalrymple

    2003-04-01

    This first quarter report of 2003 describes progress on a project funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to test a hybrid sulfur recovery process for natural gas upgrading. The process concept represents a low cost option for direct treatment of natural gas streams to remove H{sub 2}S in quantities equivalent to 0.2-25 metric tons (LT) of sulfur per day. This process is projected to have lower capital and operating costs than the competing technologies, amine/aqueous iron liquid redox and amine/Claus/tail gas treating, and have a smaller plant footprint, making it well suited to both on-shore and off-shore applications. CrystaSulf{reg_sign} (service mark of CrystaTech, Inc.) is a new nonaqueous sulfur recovery process that removes hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) from gas streams and converts it into elemental sulfur. CrystaSulf features high sulfur recovery similar to aqueous-iron liquid redox sulfur recovery processes, but differs from the aqueous processes in that CrystaSulf controls the location where elemental sulfur particles are formed. In the hybrid process, approximately 1/3 of the total H{sub 2}S in the natural gas is first oxidized to SO{sub 2} at low temperatures over a heterogeneous catalyst. Low temperature oxidation is done so that the H{sub 2}S can be oxidized in the presence of methane and other hydrocarbons without oxidation of the hydrocarbons. The project involves the development of a catalyst using laboratory/bench-scale catalyst testing, and then demonstration of the catalyst at CrystaTech's pilot plant in west Texas. Previous reports described development of a catalyst with the required selectivity and efficiency for producing sulfur dioxide from H{sub 2}S. In the laboratory, the catalyst was shown to be robust and stable in the presence of several intentionally added contaminants, including condensate from the pilot plant site. Bench-scale catalyst testing at the CrystaSulf pilot plant using the actual pilot plant gas was successful, and a skid-mounted catalyst pilot unit has been designed for fabrication and testing at the CrystaSulf pilot site.

  1. Process for removal of sulfur compounds from fuel gases

    DOEpatents

    Moore, Raymond H.; Stegen, Gary E.

    1978-01-01

    Fuel gases such as those produced in the gasification of coal are stripped of sulfur compounds and particulate matter by contact with molten metal salt. The fuel gas and salt are intimately mixed by passage through a venturi or other constriction in which the fuel gas entrains the molten salt as dispersed droplets to a gas-liquid separator. The separated molten salt is divided into a major and a minor flow portion with the minor flow portion passing on to a regenerator in which it is contacted with steam and carbon dioxide as strip gas to remove sulfur compounds. The strip gas is further processed to recover sulfur. The depleted, minor flow portion of salt is passed again into contact with the fuel gas for further sulfur removal from the gas. The sulfur depleted, fuel gas then flows through a solid absorbent for removal of salt droplets. The minor flow portion of the molten salt is then recombined with the major flow portion for feed to the venturi.

  2. Process for desulfurization of sulfur dioxide-containing gas streams

    SciTech Connect

    Stowe, D.H. Jr.

    1991-08-13

    This patent describes a process for the desulfurization of sulfur dioxide-containing gases. It comprises contacting a sulfur dioxide-containing gas stream with an aqueous solution of magnesium hydroxide in a wet scrubber, wherein the aqueous solution of magnesium hydroxide has a magnesium ion content of between about 5000 to about 15,000 parts per million, to remove sulfur dioxide therefrom; subjecting a portion of the spent scrubbing medium to oxidation and then treating the oxidized product with a magnesium-containing lime slurry to obtain magnesium hydroxide and calcium sulfate, the magnesium-containing lime used to prepare the slurry containing about 1.5 to about 7 weight percent magnesium oxide, with the balance being calcium oxide; separating calcium sulfate from the treated product and recycling magnesium hydroxide to the scrubber.

  3. HYBRID SULFUR RECOVERY PROCESS FOR NATURAL GAS UPGRADING

    SciTech Connect

    Girish Srinivas; Steven C. Gebhard; David W. DeBerry

    2001-08-01

    This first quarter report of 2001 describes progress on a project funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to test a hybrid sulfur recovery process for natural gas upgrading. The process concept represents a low cost option for direct treatment of natural gas streams to remove H{sub 2}S in quantities equivalent to 0.2-25 metric tons (LT) of sulfur per day. This process is projected to have lower capital and operating costs than the competing technologies, amine/aqueous iron liquid redox and amine/Claus/tail gas treating, and have a smaller plant footprint, making it well suited to both on-shore and offshore applications. CrystaSulf (service mark of Gas Research Institute) is a new nonaqueous sulfur recovery process that removes hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) from gas streams and converts it into elemental sulfur. CrystaSulf features high sulfur recovery similar to aqueous-iron liquid redox sulfur recovery processes, but differs from the aqueous processes in that CrystaSulf controls the location where elemental sulfur particles are formed. In the hybrid process, approximately 1/3 of the total H{sub 2}S in the natural gas is first oxidized to SO{sub 2} at low temperatures over a heterogeneous catalyst. Low temperature oxidation is done so that the H{sub 2}S can be oxidized in the presence of methane and other hydrocarbons without oxidation of the hydrocarbons. The project involves the development of a catalyst using laboratory/bench-scale catalyst testing, and then demonstration of the catalyst at CrystaTech's pilot plant in west Texas. During this reporting period tests were done to determine the effect of hydrocarbons such as n-hexane on catalyst performance with and without H{sub 2}S present. The experiments showed that hexane oxidation is suppressed when H{sub 2}S is present. Hexane represents the most reactive of the C1 to C6 series of alkanes. Since hexane exhibits low reactivity under H{sub 2}S oxidation conditions, and more importantly, does not change the SO{sub 2} selectivity, we can conclude that the C1-C6 hydrocarbons should not significantly interfere with the oxidation of H{sub 2}S into SO{sub 2}. Plans to determine the effect of aromatic compounds on catalyst performance for extended periods, and for catalyst pelletization and continued testing are described.

  4. HYBRID SULFUR RECOVERY PROCESS FOR NATURAL GAS UPGRADING

    SciTech Connect

    Girish Srinivas; Steven C. Gebhard; David W. DeBerry

    2002-04-01

    This first quarter report of 2002 describes progress on a project funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to test a hybrid sulfur recovery process for natural gas upgrading. The process concept represents a low cost option for direct treatment of natural gas streams to remove H{sub 2}S in quantities equivalent to 0.2-25 metric tons (LT) of sulfur per day. This process is projected to have lower capital and operating costs than the competing technologies, amine/aqueous iron liquid redox and amine/Claus/tail gas treating, and have a smaller plant footprint, making it well suited to both on-shore and offshore applications. CrystaSulf{sup SM} (service mark of CrystaTech, Inc.) is a new nonaqueous sulfur recovery process that removes hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) from gas streams and converts it into elemental sulfur. CrystaSulf features high sulfur recovery similar to aqueous-iron liquid redox sulfur recovery processes, but differs from the aqueous processes in that CrystaSulf controls the location where elemental sulfur particles are formed. In the hybrid process, approximately 1/3 of the total H{sub 2}S in the natural gas is first oxidized to SO{sub 2} at low temperatures over a heterogeneous catalyst. Low temperature oxidation is done so that the H{sub 2}S can be oxidized in the presence of methane and other hydrocarbons without oxidation of the hydrocarbons. The project involves the development of a catalyst using laboratory/bench-scale catalyst testing, and then demonstration of the catalyst at CrystaTech's pilot plant in west Texas. In a previous reporting period tests were done to determine the effect of hydrocarbons such as n-hexane on catalyst performance with and without H{sub 2}S present. The experiments showed that hexane oxidation is suppressed when H{sub 2}S is present. Hexane represents the most reactive of the C1 to C6 series of alkanes. Since hexane exhibits low reactivity under H{sub 2}S oxidation conditions, and more importantly, does not change the SO{sub 2} selectivity, we can conclude that the C1-C6 hydrocarbons should not significantly interfere with the oxidation of H{sub 2}S into SO{sub 2}. During this quarter the effect of aromatic compounds were also found to have no effect on catalyst performance. This report gives the results of testing using contaminants from the pilot plant site.

  5. Performance and cost models for the direct sulfur recovery process. Task 1 Topical report, Volume 3

    SciTech Connect

    Frey, H.C.; Williams, R.B.

    1995-09-01

    The purpose of this project is to develop performance and cost models of the Direct Sulfur Recovery Process (DSRP). The DSRP is an emerging technology for sulfur recovery from advanced power generation technologies such as Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) systems. In IGCC systems, sulfur present in the coal is captured by gas cleanup technologies to avoid creating emissions of sulfur dioxide to the atmosphere. The sulfur that is separated from the coal gas stream must be collected. Leading options for dealing with the sulfur include byproduct recovery as either sulfur or sulfuric acid. Sulfur is a preferred byproduct, because it is easier to handle and therefore does not depend as strongly upon the location of potential customers as is the case for sulfuric acid. This report describes the need for new sulfur recovery technologies.

  6. HYBRID SULFUR RECOVERY PROCESS FOR NATURAL GAS UPGRADING

    SciTech Connect

    Dennis Dalrymple

    2004-06-01

    This final report describes the objectives, technical approach, results and conclusions for a project funded by the U.S. Department of Energy to test a hybrid sulfur recovery process for natural gas upgrading. The process concept is a configuration of CrystaTech, Inc.'s CrystaSulf{reg_sign} process which utilizes a direct oxidation catalyst upstream of the absorber tower to oxidize a portion of the inlet hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) to sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) and elemental sulfur. This hybrid configuration of CrystaSulf has been named CrystaSulf-DO and represents a low-cost option for direct treatment of natural gas streams to remove H{sub 2}S in quantities equivalent to 0.2-25 metric tons (LT) of sulfur per day and more. This hybrid process is projected to have lower capital and operating costs than the competing technologies, amine/aqueous iron liquid redox and amine/Claus/tail gas treating, and have a smaller plant footprint, making it well suited to both onshore and offshore applications. CrystaSulf is a nonaqueous sulfur recovery process that removes H{sub 2}S from gas streams and converts it to elemental sulfur. In CrystaSulf, H{sub 2}S in the inlet gas is reacted with SO{sub 2} to make elemental sulfur according to the liquid phase Claus reaction: 2H{sub 2}S + SO{sub 2} {yields} 2H{sub 2}O + 3S. The SO{sub 2} for the reaction can be supplied from external sources by purchasing liquid SO{sub 2} and injecting it into the CrystaSulf solution, or produced internally by converting a portion of the inlet gas H{sub 2}S to SO{sub 2} or by burning a portion of the sulfur produced to make SO{sub 2}. CrystaSulf features high sulfur recovery similar to aqueous-iron liquid redox sulfur recovery processes, but differs from the aqueous processes in that CrystaSulf controls the location where elemental sulfur particles are formed. In the hybrid process, the needed SO{sub 2} is produced by placing a bed of direct oxidation catalyst in the inlet gas stream to oxidize a portion of the inlet H{sub 2}S. Oxidation catalysts may also produce some elemental sulfur under these conditions, which can be removed and recovered prior to the CrystaSulf absorber. The CrystaSulf-DO process can utilize direct oxidation catalyst from many sources. Numerous direct oxidation catalysts are available from many suppliers worldwide. They have been used for H{sub 2}S oxidation to sulfur and/or SO{sub 2} for decades. It was believed at the outset of the project that TDA Research, Inc., a subcontractor, could develop a direct oxidation catalyst that would offer advantages over other commercially available catalysts for this CrystaSulf-DO process application. This project involved the development of several of TDA's candidate proprietary direct oxidation catalysts through laboratory bench-scale testing. These catalysts were shown to be effective for conversion of H{sub 2}S to SO{sub 2} and to elemental sulfur under certain operating conditions. One of these catalysts was subsequently tested on a commercial gas stream in a bench-scale reactor at CrystaTech's pilot plant site in west Texas with good results. However, commercial developments have precluded the use of TDA catalysts in the CrystaSulf-DO process. Nonetheless, this project has advanced direct oxidation catalyst technology for H{sub 2}S control in energy industries and led to several viable paths to commercialization. TDA is commercializing the use of its direct oxidation catalyst technology in conjunction with the SulfaTreat{reg_sign} solid scavenger for natural gas applications and in conjunction with ConocoPhillips and DOE for gasification applications using ConocoPhillips gasification technology. CrystaTech is commercializing its CrystaSulf-DO process in conjunction with Gas Technology Institute for natural gas applications (using direct oxidation catalysts from other commercial sources) and in conjunction with ChevronTexaco and DOE for gasification applications using ChevronTexaco's gasification technology.

  7. A new sulfur-recovery process: The RSRP

    SciTech Connect

    Kerr, R.K.; Dillon, J.; Sit, S.P.; Tagodsinski, R.F.

    1982-07-26

    Laboratory tests have demonstrated the technical feasibility of a continuous, pressurized, sub-dewpoint process to recover sulfur from acid gas. It could potentially supplant a conventional Claus process plus a tail gas clean-up process. These tests have also demonstrated the feasibility of a continuous, pressurized, sub-dewpoint process to catalytically oxidize H/sub 2/S. The process would enable lean acid gases to be oxidized directly. Cost estimates indicate that the cost of the RSRP system is comparable to a Claus plant and lower than a Claus plant plus a tail gas clean-up plant.

  8. Conversion of Sulfur by Wet Oxidation in the Bayer Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhanwei; Li, Wangxing; Ma, Wenhui; Yin, Zhonglin; Wu, Guobao

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, the effects of temperature, oxidation time, and oxygen concentration on the conversion of sulfur by wet oxidation in the Bayer process were investigated at length. The results show that active sulfur S2- and S2O3 2- in sodium aluminate solution can be converted completely by wet oxidation during the digestion process, thus the effects of S2- and S2O3 2- on alumina product quality are eliminated; increased temperature, oxidation time, and oxygen concentration are conducive to conversion of S2- and S2O3 2-. At the same time, part of the organic carbon in the sodium aluminate solution is also oxidized by wet oxidation, and the color of the sodium aluminate solution noticeably fades.

  9. Low Quality Natural Gas Sulfur Removal and Recovery CNG Claus Sulfur Recovery Process

    SciTech Connect

    Klint, V.W.; Dale, P.R.; Stephenson, C.

    1997-10-01

    Increased use of natural gas (methane) in the domestic energy market will force the development of large non-producing gas reserves now considered to be low quality. Large reserves of low quality natural gas (LQNG) contaminated with hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S), carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and nitrogen (N) are available but not suitable for treatment using current conventional gas treating methods due to economic and environmental constraints. A group of three technologies have been integrated to allow for processing of these LQNG reserves; the Controlled Freeze Zone (CFZ) process for hydrocarbon / acid gas separation; the Triple Point Crystallizer (TPC) process for H{sub 2}S / C0{sub 2} separation and the CNG Claus process for recovery of elemental sulfur from H{sub 2}S. The combined CFZ/TPC/CNG Claus group of processes is one program aimed at developing an alternative gas treating technology which is both economically and environmentally suitable for developing these low quality natural gas reserves. The CFZ/TPC/CNG Claus process is capable of treating low quality natural gas containing >10% C0{sub 2} and measurable levels of H{sub 2}S and N{sub 2} to pipeline specifications. The integrated CFZ / CNG Claus Process or the stand-alone CNG Claus Process has a number of attractive features for treating LQNG. The processes are capable of treating raw gas with a variety of trace contaminant components. The processes can also accommodate large changes in raw gas composition and flow rates. The combined processes are capable of achieving virtually undetectable levels of H{sub 2}S and significantly less than 2% CO in the product methane. The separation processes operate at pressure and deliver a high pressure (ca. 100 psia) acid gas (H{sub 2}S) stream for processing in the CNG Claus unit. This allows for substantial reductions in plant vessel size as compared to conventional Claus / Tail gas treating technologies. A close integration of the components of the CNG Claus process also allow for use of the methane/H{sub 2}S separation unit as a Claus tail gas treating unit by recycling the CNG Claus tail gas stream. This allows for virtually 100 percent sulfur recovery efficiency (virtually zero SO{sub 2} emissions) by recycling the sulfur laden tail gas to extinction. The use of the tail gas recycle scheme also deemphasizes the conventional requirement in Claus units to have high unit conversion efficiency and thereby make the operation much less affected by process upsets and feed gas composition changes. The development of these technologies has been ongoing for many years and both the CFZ and the TPC processes have been demonstrated at large pilot plant scales. On the other hand, prior to this project, the CNG Claus process had not been proven at any scale. Therefore, the primary objective of this portion of the program was to design, build and operate a pilot scale CNG Claus unit and demonstrate the required fundamental reaction chemistry and also demonstrate the viability of a reasonably sized working unit.

  10. A Development of Ceramics Cylinder Type Sulfuric Acid Decomposer for Thermo-Chemical Iodine-Sulfur Process Pilot Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Hiroshi Fukui; Isao Minatsuki; Kazuo Ishino

    2006-07-01

    The hydrogen production method applying thermo-chemical Iodine-Sulfur process (IS process) which uses a nuclear high temperature gas cooled reactor is world widely greatly concerned from the view point of a combination as a clean method, free carbon dioxide in essence. In this process, it is essential a using ceramic material, especially SiC because a operation condition of this process is very corrosive due to a sulfuric acid atmosphere with high temperature and high pressure. In the IS process, a sulfuric acid decomposer is the key component which performs evaporating of sulfuric acid from liquid to gas and disassembling to SO{sub 2} gas. SiC was selected as ceramic material to apply for the sulfuric acid decomposer and a new type of binding material was also developed for SiC junction. This technology is expected to wide application not only for a sulfuric acid decomposer but also for various type components in this process. Process parameters were provided as design condition for the decomposer. The configuration of the sulfuric acid decomposer was studied, and a cylindrical tubes assembling type was selected. The advantage of this type is applicable for various type of components in the IS process due to manufacturing with using only simple shape part. A sulfuric acid decomposer was divided into two regions of the liquid and the gaseous phase of sulfuric acid. The thermal structural integrity analysis was studied for the liquid phase part. From the result of this analysis, it was investigated that the stress was below the strength of the breakdown probability 1/100,000 at any position, base material or junction part. The prototype model was manufactured, which was a ceramic portion in the liquid phase part, comparatively complicated configuration, of a sulfuric acid decomposer. The size of model was about 1.9 m in height, 1.0 m in width. Thirty-six cylinders including inlet and outlet nozzles were combined and each part article was joined using the new binder (slurry binder) and calcinated. Final polishing of the flange faces established in the entrance nozzles was also satisfactory. Many parts were joinable using new technology (new binder). For this reason, new technology is applicable to manufacture of not only a sulfuric acid decomposer but the instruments in the IS process, or other chemical processes. (authors)

  11. Process and system for removing sulfur from sulfur-containing gaseous streams

    DOEpatents

    Basu, Arunabha; Meyer, Howard S.; Lynn, Scott; Leppin, Dennis; Wangerow, James R.

    2012-08-14

    A multi-stage UCSRP process and system for removal of sulfur from a gaseous stream in which the gaseous stream, which contains a first amount of H.sub.2S, is provided to a first stage UCSRP reactor vessel operating in an excess SO.sub.2 mode at a first amount of SO.sub.2, producing an effluent gas having a reduced amount of SO.sub.2, and in which the effluent gas is provided to a second stage UCSRP reactor vessel operating in an excess H.sub.2S mode, producing a product gas having an amount of H.sub.2S less than said first amount of H.sub.2S.

  12. Test of TDA's Direct Oxidation Process for Sulfur Recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Girish Srinivas; Steven C. Gebhard; Eugene Peeples; Sandra Huzyk; Randy Welch

    2005-01-01

    This project was a Phase III pilot plant test of TDA's gas sweetening process done under realistic conditions. TDA Research Inc successfully completed the test at Whiting Petroleum's Sable San Andreas Gas Plant. The feed was approximately 228,000 standard cubic feet per day (SCFD) of gas that contained approximately 60 vol% CO{sub 2}, 20 vol% CH{sub 4} and 10 vol% C{sub 3}+ and higher hydrocarbons. The feed was associated gas from CO{sub 2} flooding operations carried out on Whiting's oil wells. The gas is collected and piped to the Sable gas plant where it is normally flared. We sited our pilot plant in line with the flare so that we could remove the hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) prior to flaring. The average H{sub 2}S concentration in the gas during the field test was 7341 ppm. The selectivity of our process for converting H{sub 2}S into elemental sulfur was essentially 100% and the catalyst converted 90% of the H{sub 2}S into sulfur and water (the remaining 10% of the H{sub 2}S passed through unconverted). Importantly, no catalyst deactivation was observed for over the course of the 1000+ hour test. Minimal (ca. 10-15 ppm) of SO{sub 2} was formed during the test. Approximately 3.6 tons of elemental sulfur was recovered from a total inlet of 3.9 tons of sulfur (as H{sub 2}S). The total amount of SO{sub 2} released from the plant (taking into account flaring of the unconverted 10% H2S) was 0.86 tons. This amount of SO{sub 2} is much lower than the normal 8 tons that would have been emitted if all of the H{sub 2}S were flared over the time of the pilot plant test. The pilot plant was simple to operate and required much less operator intervention than is typical for a new unit being commissioned. Our operator (Mr. Eugene Peeples) has more than 30 years of experience operating commercial scale liquid redox sulfur recovery processes and in his opinion, TDA's Direct Oxidation pilot plant is easier to operate than liquid systems. The ease of use and low capital and operating costs of TDA's Direct Oxidation process makes it an attractive technology to be used where traditional sulfur recovery technologies are too expensive (e.g. small to medium sized plants). Currently, TDA's direct oxidation process has been exclusively licensed to SulfaTreat, and is being offered commercially under the trade name SulfaTreat-DO{reg_sign}. We anticipate that the first plant will be installed in 2005.

  13. Integrated Process Configuration for High-Temperature Sulfur Mitigation during Biomass Conversion via Indirect Gasification

    SciTech Connect

    Dutta. A.; Cheah, S.; Bain, R.; Feik, C.; Magrini-Bair, K.; Phillips, S.

    2012-06-20

    Sulfur present in biomass often causes catalyst deactivation during downstream operations after gasification. Early removal of sulfur from the syngas stream post-gasification is possible via process rearrangements and can be beneficial for maintaining a low-sulfur environment for all downstream operations. High-temperature sulfur sorbents have superior performance and capacity under drier syngas conditions. The reconfigured process discussed in this paper is comprised of indirect biomass gasification using dry recycled gas from downstream operations, which produces a drier syngas stream and, consequently, more-efficient sulfur removal at high temperatures using regenerable sorbents. A combination of experimental results from NREL's fluidizable Ni-based reforming catalyst, fluidizable Mn-based sulfur sorbent, and process modeling information show that using a coupled process of dry gasification with high-temperature sulfur removal can improve the performance of Ni-based reforming catalysts significantly.

  14. Process and apparatus for recovery of sulfur from ammonia containing acid gas streams

    SciTech Connect

    Palm, J.W.

    1987-02-17

    This patent describes a Claus process for the recovery of sulfur, the steps comprising: passing a first stream containing hydrogen sulfide, sulfur dioxide, and ammonia through a low temperature Claus catalytic conversion zone and depositing elemental sulfur and ammonium compounds on catalyst therein; deriving a regeneration stream from the Claus process and regenerating the resulting laden catalyst therewith vaporizing sulfur and ammonia therefrom and producing a regeneration effluent stream comprising elemental sulfur and ammonia; cooling the regeneration effluent stream and condensing elemental sulfur therefrom and producing a sulfur lean regeneration effluent stream; introducing at least a portion of the sulfur lean regeneration effluent stream into a hydrogenation zone and converting substantially all sulfur compounds therein to hydrogen sulfide. The resulting hydrogen sulfide containing stream is introduced into an ammonia removal zone. The resulting stream is contacted with a first aqueous stream and produces a second aqueous stream enriched in ammonia and a sulfur lean regeneration effluent stream reduced in ammonia content; removing ammonia from the second aqueous stream and producing an ammonia enriched stream; returning the sulfur lean regeneration effluent stream reduced in ammonia content to the Claus process adjacent and downstream of the point of derivation of the regeneration stream for the further recovery of sulfur therefrom; and introducing the ammonia enriched stream into an ammonia conversion zone and reducing the concentration of ammonia therein.

  15. SULFURIC ACID REMOVAL PROCESS EVALUATION: SHORT-TERM RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    Gary M. Blythe; Richard McMillan

    2002-02-04

    The objective of this project is to demonstrate the use of alkaline reagents injected into the furnace of coal-fired boilers as a means of controlling sulfuric acid emissions. Sulfuric acid controls are becoming of increasing interest to utilities with coal-fired units for a number of reasons. Sulfuric acid is a Toxic Release Inventory species, a precursor to acid aerosol/condensable emissions, and can cause a variety of plant operation problems such as air heater plugging and fouling, back-end corrosion, and plume opacity. These issues will likely be exacerbated with the retrofit of SCR for NO{sub x} control on some coal-fired plants, as SCR catalysts are known to further oxidize a portion of the flue gas SO{sub 2} to SO{sub 3}. The project is testing the effectiveness of furnace injection of four different calcium- and/or magnesium-based alkaline sorbents on full-scale utility boilers. These reagents have been tested during four one- to two-week tests conducted on two First Energy Bruce Mansfield Plant units. One of the sorbents tested was a magnesium hydroxide slurry produced from a wet flue gas desulfurization system waste stream, from a system that employs a Thiosorbic{reg_sign} Lime scrubbing process. The other three sorbents are available commercially and include dolomite, pressure-hydrated dolomitic lime, and commercial magnesium hydroxide. The dolomite reagent was injected as a dry powder through out-of-service burners, while the other three reagents were injected as slurries through air-atomizing nozzles into the front wall of upper furnace, either across from the nose of the furnace or across from the pendant superheater tubes. After completing the four one- to two-week tests, the most promising sorbents were selected for longer-term (approximately 25-day) full-scale tests. The longer-term tests are being conducted to confirm the effectiveness of the sorbents tested over extended operation and to determine balance-of-plant impacts. This reports presents the results of the short-term tests; the long-term test results will be reported in a later document. The short-term test results showed that three of the four reagents tested, dolomite powder, commercial magnesium hydroxide slurry, and byproduct magnesium hydroxide slurry, were able to achieve 90% or greater removal of sulfuric acid compared to baseline levels. The molar ratio of alkali to flue gas sulfuric acid content (under baseline conditions) required to achieve 90% sulfuric acid removal was lowest for the byproduct magnesium hydroxide slurry. However, this result may be confounded because this was the only one of the three slurries tested with injection near the top of the furnace across from the pendant superheater platens. Injection at the higher level was demonstrated to be advantageous for this reagent over injection lower in the furnace, where the other slurries were tested.

  16. SULFURIC ACID REMOVAL PROCESS EVALUATION: SHORT-TERM RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    Gary M. Blythe; Richard McMillan

    2002-03-04

    The objective of this project is to demonstrate the use of alkaline reagents injected into the furnace of coal-fired boilers as a means of controlling sulfuric acid emissions. Sulfuric acid controls are becoming of increasing interest to utilities with coal-fired units for a number of reasons. Sulfuric acid is a Toxic Release Inventory species, a precursor to acid aerosol/condensable emissions, and can cause a variety of plant operation problems such as air heater plugging and fouling, back-end corrosion, and plume opacity. These issues will likely be exacerbated with the retrofit of SCR for NOX control on some coal-fired plants, as SCR catalysts are known to further oxidize a portion of the flue gas SO{sub 2} to SO{sub 3}. The project is testing the effectiveness of furnace injection of four different calcium- and/or magnesium-based alkaline sorbents on full-scale utility boilers. These reagents have been tested during four one- to two-week tests conducted on two FirstEnergy Bruce Mansfield Plant units. One of the sorbents tested was a magnesium hydroxide slurry produced from a wet flue gas desulfurization system waste stream, from a system that employs a Thiosorbic{reg_sign} Lime scrubbing process. The other three sorbents are available commercially and include dolomite, pressure-hydrated dolomitic lime, and commercial magnesium hydroxide. The dolomite reagent was injected as a dry powder through out-of-service burners, while the other three reagents were injected as slurries through air-atomizing nozzles into the front wall of upper furnace, either across from the nose of the furnace or across from the pendant superheater tubes. After completing the four one- to two-week tests, the most promising sorbents were selected for longer-term (approximately 25-day) full-scale tests. The longer-term tests are being conducted to confirm the effectiveness of the sorbents tested over extended operation and to determine balance-of-plant impacts. This reports presents the results of the short-term tests; the long-term test results will be reported in a later document. The short-term test results showed that three of the four reagents tested, dolomite powder, commercial magnesium hydroxide slurry, and byproduct magnesium hydroxide slurry, were able to achieve 90% or greater removal of sulfuric acid compared to baseline levels. The molar ratio of alkali to flue gas sulfuric acid content (under baseline conditions) required to achieve 90% sulfuric acid removal was lowest for the byproduct magnesium hydroxide slurry. However, this result may be confounded because this was the only one of the three slurries tested with injection near the top of the furnace across from the pendant superheater platens. Injection at the higher level was demonstrated to be advantageous for this reagent over injection lower in the furnace, where the other slurries were tested.

  17. RECENT ADVANCES IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF THE HYBRID SULFUR PROCESS FOR HYDROGEN PRODUCTION

    SciTech Connect

    Hobbs, D.

    2010-07-22

    Thermochemical processes are being developed to provide global-scale quantities of hydrogen. A variant on sulfur-based thermochemical cycles is the Hybrid Sulfur (HyS) Process, which uses a sulfur dioxide depolarized electrolyzer (SDE) to produce the hydrogen. In the HyS Process, sulfur dioxide is oxidized in the presence of water at the electrolyzer anode to produce sulfuric acid and protons. The protons are transported through a cation-exchange membrane electrolyte to the cathode and are reduced to form hydrogen. In the second stage of the process, the sulfuric acid by-product from the electrolyzer is thermally decomposed at high temperature to produce sulfur dioxide and oxygen. The two gases are separated and the sulfur dioxide recycled to the electrolyzer for oxidation. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has been exploring a fuel-cell design concept for the SDE using an anolyte feed comprised of concentrated sulfuric acid saturated with sulfur dioxide. The advantages of this design concept include high electrochemical efficiency and small footprint compared to a parallel-plate electrolyzer design. This paper will provide a summary of recent advances in the development of the SDE for the HyS process.

  18. A simple synthesis of hollow carbon nanofiber-sulfur composite via mixed-solvent process for lithium-sulfur batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qiang; Zhang, Zhian; Zhang, Kai; Fang, Jing; Lai, Yanqing; Li, Jie

    2014-06-01

    A hollow carbon nanofiber supported sulfur (HCNF-S) composite cathode material is prepared by a mixed-solvent (DMF/CS2) process in an organic solution for lithium-sulfur batteries. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM) observations show the hollow structures of the HCNF and the homogeneous distribution of sulfur in the composite. The performance of the HCNF-S cathode is evaluated in lithium-sulfur batteries using cyclic voltammetry, galvanostatic charge-discharge, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. It is found that the HCNF-S cathode shows perfect cycling stability. The results exhibit an initial discharge capacity of 1090 mAh g-1 and retains 600 mAh g-1 after 100 discharge/charge cycles at a high rate of 1 C. The excellent electrochemical properties benefit from the hollow and highly conductive network-like structure of HCNFs, which contribute to disperse sulfur and absorb polysulfides, and suppress the formation of residual Li2S layer.

  19. Using stable isotopes to monitor forms of sulfur during desulfurization processes: A quick screening method

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Liu, Chao-Li; Hackley, Keith C.; Coleman, D.D.; Kruse, C.W.

    1987-01-01

    A method using stable isotope ratio analysis to monitor the reactivity of sulfur forms in coal during thermal and chemical desulfurization processes has been developed at the Illinois State Geological Survey. The method is based upon the fact that a significant difference exists in some coals between the 34S/32S ratios of the pyritic and organic sulfur. A screening method for determining the suitability of coal samples for use in isotope ratio analysis is described. Making these special coals available from coal sample programs would assist research groups in sorting out the complex sulfur chemistry which accompanies thermal and chemical processing of high sulfur coals. ?? 1987.

  20. PROCESS OF TREATING URANIUM HEXAFLUORIDE AND PLUTONIUM HEXAFLUORIDE MIXTURES WITH SULFUR TETRAFLUORIDE TO SEPARATE SAME

    DOEpatents

    Steindler, M.J.

    1962-07-24

    A process was developed for separating uranium hexafluoride from plutonium hexafluoride by the selective reduction of the plutonium hexafluoride to the tetrafluoride with sulfur tetrafluoride at 50 to 120 deg C, cooling the mixture to --60 to -100 deg C, and volatilizing nonreacted sulfur tetrafluoride and sulfur hexafluoride formed at that temperature. The uranium hexafluoride is volatilized at room temperature away from the solid plutonium tetrafluoride. (AEC)

  1. Cooling and condensing of sulfur and water from claus process gas

    SciTech Connect

    Palm, J. W.; Kunkel, L. V.

    1985-07-02

    The Claus process gas is cooled in a condenser to condense most of the sulfur vapor in solid form. The gas leaving the condenser is then further cooled to condense water without producing substantially any sulfur in an undesirable form. The resulting gas of reduced water content is useful in Claus reaction, particularly the low temperature Claus reaction in which the product sulfur is adsorbed on the catalyst.

  2. Process for removing sulfur dioxide from flue gases

    SciTech Connect

    Stowe, D.H. Jr.; Benson, L.B.

    1991-02-26

    This patent describes improvement in a process for removing sulfur dioxide from flue gases in a wet scrubber, wherein an aqueous slurry formed from calcium hydroxide and magnesium hydroxide is contacted in the wet scrubber with the flue gases, and the slurry, after the contact, contains calcium sulfite solids and dissolved magnesium sulfite, and is discharged from the wet scrubber and passed to a thickener wherein a thickened aqueous sludge containing calcium sulfite solids is separated from an overflow liquor. The improvement comprises: returning at least a portion of the overflow liquor to the wet scrubber; concentrating the thickened aqueous sludge by removal of a sulfite solution, comprising water containing dissolved magnesium sulfite, therefrom; returning a first portion of the sulfite solution to the thickener; oxidizing magnesium sulfite in a second portion of the sulfite solution to form a sulfate solution containing magnesium sulfate; adding lime to the sulfate solution following the oxidation, to precipitate calcium sulfate and form an aqueous magnesium hydroxide suspension; and separating precipitated calcium sulfate from the aqueous magnesium hydroxide suspension.

  3. Tests indicate sulfur-recovery process improves on Claus-unit performance

    SciTech Connect

    Heisel, M.P.; Marold, F.J. )

    1989-08-14

    A one-reactor Clinsulf process, a new Claus Technology from Linde AG, allows the same sulfur-recovery rate of approximately 94-95% as a conventional two-stage Claus unit. When Clinsulf is combined with a conventional tail-gas treatment, such as SCOT or Clintox, any desired sulfur recovery can be realized at lower capital cost than with a conventional Claus unit. The least expensive version, however, is to add a second Clinsulf reactor operated below the sulfur dew point. In such a two-stage Clinsulf unit, a sulfur recovery of up to 99.8% can be realized.

  4. Development and Implementation of a Novel Sulfur Removal Process from H2S Containing Wastewaters.

    PubMed

    Daigger, Glen T; Hodgkinson, Andrew; Aquilina, Simon; Fries, M Kim

    2015-07-01

    A novel process for removing sulfur from wastewater containing dissolved sulfide has been developed and implemented in a membrane bioreactor (MBR) process treating anaerobically pretreated industrial (pulp and paper) wastewater at the Gippsland Water Factory. Controlled oxygen addition to the first bioreactor zone (constituting 27.7% of the total bioreactor volume) to create oxygen-limiting conditions, followed by oxygen-sufficient conditions in the remaining zones of the bioreactor, provide the necessary conditions. Dissolved sulfide is oxidized to elemental sulfur in the first zone, and the accumulated sulfur is retained in the bioreactor mixed liquor suspended solids (MLSS) in the remaining zones. Accumulated sulfur is removed from the process in the waste activated sludge (WAS). Oxidation of dissolved sulfide to elemental sulfur reduces the associated process oxygen requirement by 75% compared to oxidation to sulfate. Microscopic examinations confirm that biological accumulation of elemental sulfur occurs. Process performance was analyzed during a nearly 2-year commissioning and optimization period. Addition of air in proportion to the process influent dissolved sulfide loading proved the most effective process control approach, followed by the maintenance of dissolved oxygen concentrations of 1.0 and 1.5 mg/L in the two downstream bioreactor zones. Sufficient oxygen is added for the stoichiometric conversion of dissolved sulfide to elemental sulfur. Enhanced biological phosphorus removal also occurred under these conditions, thereby simplifying supplemental phosphorus addition. These operating conditions also appear to lead to low and stable capillary suction time values for the MBR mixed liquor. PMID:26163497

  5. Preparation of sulfurized powdered activated carbon from waste tires using an innovative compositive impregnation process.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Chung-Shin; Lin, Hsun-Yu; Wu, Chun-Hsin; Liu, Ming-Han; Hung, Chung-Hsuang

    2004-07-01

    The objective of this study is to develop an innovative compositive impregnation process for preparing sulfurized powdered activated carbon (PAC) from waste tires. An experimental apparatus, including a pyrolysis and activation system and a sulfur (S) impregnation system, was designed and applied to produce sulfurized PAC with a high specific surface area. Experimental tests involved the pyrolysis, activation, and sulfurization of waste tires. Waste-tire-derived PAC (WPAC) was initially produced in the pyrolysis and activation system. Experimental results indicated that the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area of WPAC increased, and the average pore radius of WPAC decreased, as water feed rate and activation time increased. In this study, a conventional direct impregnation process was used to prepare the sulfurized PAC by impregnating WPAC with sodium sulfide (Na2S) solution. Furthermore, an innovative compositive impregnation process was developed and then compared with the conventional direct impregnation process. Experimental results showed that the compositive impregnation process produced the sulfurized WPAC with high BET surface area and a high S content. A maximum BET surface area of 886 m2/g and the S content of 2.61% by mass were obtained at 900 degrees C and at the S feed ratio of 2160 mg Na2S/g C. However, the direct impregnation process led to a BET surface area of sulfurized WPAC that decreased significantly as the S content increased. PMID:15303299

  6. EQUILIBRIUM PARTIAL PRESSURE OF SULFUR DIOXIDE IN ALKALINE SCRUBBING PROCESSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of IERL-RTP in-house studies in which equilibrium partial pressure of SO2 was measured as a function of pH, temperature, and concentration of sulfur (IV) on various scrubber liquors. These studies were done for potassium-, sodium-, and citrate-based scrub...

  7. Sulfur tolerant molten carbonate fuel cell anode and process

    DOEpatents

    Remick, Robert J.

    1990-01-01

    Molten carbonate fuel cell anodes incorporating a sulfur tolerant carbon monoxide to hydrogen water-gas-shift catalyst provide in situ conversion of carbon monoxide to hydrogen for improved fuel cell operation using fuel gas mixtures of over about 10 volume percent carbon monoxide and up to about 10 ppm hydrogen sulfide.

  8. SH radical: the key intermediate in sulfur transformation during thermal processing of coal

    SciTech Connect

    Jinding Yan; Jianli Yang; Zhenyu Liu

    2005-07-01

    To uncouple the complex behavior of sulfur transformation during thermal processing of coal and to elucidate the main mechanism, typical organic and inorganic sulfur compounds impregnated on or mixed with a low-ash char are studied through temperature-programmed decomposition coupled with online mass spectrum analysis (TPD-MS) and followed by temperature-programmed oxidation coupled also with online mass spectrum analysis (TPO-MS) in a temperature range of up to 800{sup o}C. It is evident that the cleavages of C{sub al}-S and C{sub ar}-S bonds, where the subscripts al and ar stand for aliphatic and aromatic carbon, respectively, in the organic compounds result in the formation of SH radicals, which then undergo secondary reactions with the char to form various sulfur compounds such as H{sub 2}S, SO{sub 2}, COS, and elemental sulfur, as well as sulfur structures in the char. H{sub 2} has the ability to stabilize the SH radicals and weaken the interactions between the SH radicals and the char. For the sulfur compounds, which do not generate the SH radical, the only sulfur products detected are those formed directly from the decomposition of the starting sulfur compounds, H{sub 2}S from FeS{sub 2} in H{sub 2} or SO{sub 2} from Fe{sub 2}(SO{sub 4}){sub 3} in He, for example, and no sulfur structure is formed in the char. Minerals have significant effects on the bond cleavage temperature and the reactions of the SH radicals with the char. It is clear that the SH radical is a key species interacting with the char to form secondary sulfur compounds, while H{sub 2}S and SO{sub 2} play no role in the sulfur transformation to the carbon structure. 34 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

  9. HYBRID SULFUR PROCESS REFERENCE DESIGN AND COST ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    Gorensek, M.; Summers, W.; Boltrunis, C.; Lahoda, E.; Allen, D.; Greyvenstein, R.

    2009-05-12

    This report documents a detailed study to determine the expected efficiency and product costs for producing hydrogen via water-splitting using energy from an advanced nuclear reactor. It was determined that the overall efficiency from nuclear heat to hydrogen is high, and the cost of hydrogen is competitive under a high energy cost scenario. It would require over 40% more nuclear energy to generate an equivalent amount of hydrogen using conventional water-cooled nuclear reactors combined with water electrolysis compared to the proposed plant design described herein. There is a great deal of interest worldwide in reducing dependence on fossil fuels, while also minimizing the impact of the energy sector on global climate change. One potential opportunity to contribute to this effort is to replace the use of fossil fuels for hydrogen production by the use of water-splitting powered by nuclear energy. Hydrogen production is required for fertilizer (e.g. ammonia) production, oil refining, synfuels production, and other important industrial applications. It is typically produced by reacting natural gas, naphtha or coal with steam, which consumes significant amounts of energy and produces carbon dioxide as a byproduct. In the future, hydrogen could also be used as a transportation fuel, replacing petroleum. New processes are being developed that would permit hydrogen to be produced from water using only heat or a combination of heat and electricity produced by advanced, high temperature nuclear reactors. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is developing these processes under a program known as the Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative (NHI). The Republic of South Africa (RSA) also is interested in developing advanced high temperature nuclear reactors and related chemical processes that could produce hydrogen fuel via water-splitting. This report focuses on the analysis of a nuclear hydrogen production system that combines the Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR), under development by PBMR (Pty.) Ltd. in the RSA, with the Hybrid Sulfur (HyS) Process, under development by the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) in the US as part of the NHI. This work was performed by SRNL, Westinghouse Electric Company, Shaw, PBMR (Pty) Ltd., and Technology Insights under a Technical Consulting Agreement (TCA). Westinghouse Electric, serving as the lead for the PBMR process heat application team, established a cost-shared TCA with SRNL to prepare an updated HyS thermochemical water-splitting process flowsheet, a nuclear hydrogen plant preconceptual design and a cost estimate, including the cost of hydrogen production. SRNL was funded by DOE under the NHI program, and the Westinghouse team was self-funded. The results of this work are presented in this Final Report. Appendices have been attached to provide a detailed source of information in order to document the work under the TCA contract.

  10. Modified dry limestone process for control of sulfur dioxide emissions

    DOEpatents

    Shale, Correll C.; Cross, William G.

    1976-08-24

    A method and apparatus for removing sulfur oxides from flue gas comprise cooling and conditioning the hot flue gas to increase the degree of water vapor saturation prior to passage through a bed of substantially dry carbonate chips or lumps, e.g., crushed limestone. The reaction products form as a thick layer of sulfites and sulfates on the surface of the chips which is easily removed by agitation to restore the reactive surface of the chips.

  11. Process for recovery of sulfur from acid gases

    DOEpatents

    Towler, Gavin P.; Lynn, Scott

    1995-01-01

    Elemental sulfur is recovered from the H.sub.2 S present in gases derived from fossil fuels by heating the H.sub.2 S with CO.sub.2 in a high-temperature reactor in the presence of a catalyst selected as one which enhances the thermal dissociation of H.sub.2 S to H.sub.2 and S.sub.2. The equilibrium of the thermal decomposition of H.sub.2 S is shifted by the equilibration of the water-gas-shift reaction so as to favor elemental sulfur formation. The primary products of the overall reaction are S.sub.2, CO, H.sub.2 and H.sub.2 O. Small amounts of COS, SO.sub.2 and CS.sub.2 may also form. Rapid quenching of the reaction mixture results in a substantial increase in the efficiency of the conversion of H.sub.2 S to elemental sulfur. Plant economy is further advanced by treating the product gases to remove byproduct carbonyl sulfide by hydrolysis, which converts the COS back to CO.sub.2 and H.sub.2 S. Unreacted CO.sub.2 and H.sub.2 S are removed from the product gas and recycled to the reactor, leaving a gas consisting chiefly of H.sub.2 and CO, which has value either as a fuel or as a chemical feedstock and recovers the hydrogen value from the H.sub.2 S.

  12. SULFURIC ACID REMOVAL PROCESS EVALUATION: LONG-TERM RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    Gary M. Blythe; Richard McMillan

    2002-07-03

    The objective of this project is to demonstrate the use of alkaline reagents injected into the furnace of coal-fired boilers as a means of controlling sulfuric acid emissions. The project is being co-funded by the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory, under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-99FT40718, along with EPRI, the American Electric Power Company (AEP), FirstEnergy Corp., the Tennessee Valley Authority, and Dravo Lime, Inc. Sulfuric acid controls are becoming of increasing interest to power generators with coal-fired units for a number of reasons. Sulfuric acid is a Toxic Release Inventory species and can cause a variety of plant operation problems such as air heater plugging and fouling, back-end corrosion, and plume opacity. These issues will likely be exacerbated with the retrofit of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) for NO{sub x} control on many coal-fired plants, as SCR catalysts are known to further oxidize a portion of the flue gas SO{sub 2} to SO{sub 3}. The project previously tested the effectiveness of furnace injection of four different calcium-and/or magnesium-based alkaline sorbents on full-scale utility boilers. These reagents were tested during four one- to two-week tests conducted on two FirstEnergy Bruce Mansfield Plant (BMP) units. One of the sorbents tested was a magnesium hydroxide byproduct slurry produced from a modified Thiosorbic{reg_sign} Lime wet flue gas desulfurization system. The other three sorbents are available commercially and include dolomite, pressure-hydrated dolomitic lime, and commercial magnesium hydroxide. The dolomite reagent was injected as a dry powder through out-of-service burners, while the other three reagents were injected as slurries through air-atomizing nozzles inserted through the front wall of the upper furnace, either across from the nose of the furnace or across from the pendant superheater tubes. After completing the four one- to two-week tests, the most promising sorbents were selected for longer-term (approximately 25-day) full-scale tests on two different units. The longer-term tests were conducted to confirm the effectiveness of the sorbents tested over extended operation on two different boilers, and to determine balance-of-plant impacts. The first long-term test was conducted on FirstEnergy's BMP, Unit 3, and the second test was conducted on AEP's Gavin Plant, Unit 1. The Gavin Plant testing provided an opportunity to evaluate the effects of sorbent injected into the furnace on SO{sub 3} formed across an operating SCR reactor. This report presents the results from those long-term tests. The tests determined the effectiveness of injecting commercially available magnesium hydroxide slurry (Gavin Plant) and byproduct magnesium hydroxide slurry (both Gavin Plant and BMP) for sulfuric acid control. The results show that injecting either slurry could achieve up to 70 to 75% overall sulfuric acid removal. At BMP, this overall removal was limited by the need to maintain acceptable electrostatic precipitator (ESP) particulate control performance. At Gavin Plant, the overall sulfuric acid removal was limited because the furnace injected sorbent was less effective at removing SO{sub 3} formed across the SCR system installed on the unit for NOX control than at removing SO{sub 3} formed in the furnace. The long-term tests also determined balance-of-plant impacts from slurry injection during the two tests. These include impacts on boiler back-end temperatures and pressure drops, SCR catalyst properties, ESP performance, removal of other flue gas species, and flue gas opacity. For the most part the balance-of-plant impacts were neutral to positive, although adverse effects on ESP performance became an issue during the BMP test.

  13. Sulfur Iodine Process Summary for the Hydrogen Technology Down-Selection: Process Performance Package

    SciTech Connect

    Benjamin Russ

    2009-06-01

    This document describes the details of implementing a Sulfur-Iodine (S-I) hydrogen production plant to deploy with the Next General Nuclear Power Plant (NGNP). Technical requirements and specifications are included, and a conceptual plant design is presented. The following areas of interest are outlined in particular as a baseline for the various technology comparisons: (1) Performance Criteria - (a) Quantity of hydrogen produced, (b) Purity of hydrogen produced, (c) Flexibility to serve various applications, (d) Waste management; (2) Economic Considerations - (a) Cost of hydrogen, (b) Development costs; and (3) Risk - (a) Technical maturity of the S-I process, (b) Development risk, (c) Scale up options.

  14. Hydrogen production by the GA sulfur-iodine process: a progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Besenbruch, G.E.; McCorkle, K.H.; Norman, J.H.; O'Keefe, D.R.; Schuster, J.R.; Trester, P.W.; Yoshimoto, M.

    1980-05-01

    The progress of the overall total development effort of the General Atomic (GA) sulfur-iodine thermochemical water-splitting cycle over the last two years is summarized. The major accomplishments have been: significant improvements in the chemistry of the process; development, review, and revision of an engineering flowsheet, resulting in a thermal process efficiency of 47%; screening, identification, and testing of potential materials-of-construction for the corrosive process fluids; small-scale demonstration of the cycle in a closed loop under recycle conditions; installation of bench-scale equipment and demonstration of parts of the process in this system; and development of a conceptual, preliminary flowsheet for the GA sulfur-iodine cycle driven by solar energy. The results of the work carried out during the last two years have demonstrated that thermochemical water splitting by the sulfur-iodine cycle is a feasible process and have provided confidence that thermal efficiencies in the range of 50% are achievable.

  15. Woodchip-sulfur based heterotrophic and autotrophic denitrification (WSHAD) process for nitrate contaminated water remediation.

    PubMed

    Li, Rui; Feng, Chuanping; Hu, Weiwu; Xi, Beidou; Chen, Nan; Zhao, Baowei; Liu, Ying; Hao, Chunbo; Pu, Jiaoyang

    2016-02-01

    Nitrate contaminated water can be effectively treated by simultaneous heterotrophic and autotrophic denitrification (HAD). In the present study, woodchips and elemental sulfur were used as co-electron donors for HAD. It was found that ammonium salts could enhance the denitrifying activity of the Thiobacillus bacteria, which utilize the ammonium that is produced by the dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA) in the woodchip-sulfur based heterotrophic and autotrophic denitrification (WSHAD) process. The denitrification performance of the WSHAD process (reaction constants range from 0.05485 h(-1) to 0.06637 h(-1)) is better than that of sulfur-based autotrophic denitrification (reaction constants range from 0.01029 h(-1) to 0.01379 h(-1)), and the optimized ratio of woodchips to sulfur is 1:1 (w/w). No sulfate accumulation is observed in the WSHAD process and the alkalinity generated in the heterotrophic denitrification can compensate for alkalinity consumption by the sulfur-based autotrophic denitrification. The symbiotic relationship between the autotrophic and the heterotrophic denitrification processes play a vital role in the mixotrophic environment. PMID:26650451

  16. Thermodynamic analysis of the process of formation of sulfur compounds in oxygen gasification of coal

    SciTech Connect

    G.Ya. Gerasimov; T.M. Bogacheva

    2001-05-15

    A thermodynamic approach to the description of the behavior of the system fuel-oxidizer in oxygen gasification of coal is used to reveal the main mechanisms of the process of capture of sulfur by the mineral part of the coal and to determine the fundamental possibility of the process for coals from different coal fields.

  17. Process and apparatus for generating elemental sulfur and re-usable metal oxide from spent metal sulfide sorbents

    DOEpatents

    Ayala, Raul E.; Gal, Eli

    1995-01-01

    A process and apparatus for generating elemental sulfur and re-usable metal oxide from spent metal-sulfur compound. Spent metal-sulfur compound is regenerated to re-usable metal oxide by moving a bed of spent metal-sulfur compound progressively through a single regeneration vessel having a first and second regeneration stage and a third cooling and purging stage. The regeneration is carried out and elemental sulfur is generated in the first stage by introducing a first gas of sulfur dioxide which contains oxygen at a concentration less than the stoichiometric amount required for complete oxidation of the spent metal-sulfur compound. A second gas containing sulfur dioxide and excess oxygen at a concentration sufficient for complete oxidation of the partially spent metal-sulfur compound, is introduced into the second regeneration stage. Gaseous sulfur formed in the first regeneration stage is removed prior to introducing the second gas into the second regeneration stage. An oxygen-containing gas is introduced into the third cooling and purging stage. Except for the gaseous sulfur removed from the first stage, the combined gases derived from the regeneration stages which are generally rich in sulfur dioxide and lean in oxygen, are removed from the regenerator as an off-gas and recycled as the first and second gas into the regenerator. Oxygen concentration is controlled by adding air, oxygen-enriched air or pure oxygen to the recycled off-gas.

  18. Sulfur dioxide removal process with gypsum and magnesium hydroxide production

    SciTech Connect

    College, J.W.; Benson, L.B.

    1992-01-28

    This patent describes improvement in a method for removing sulfur dioxide from flue gases wherein the flue gases are contacted in a wet scrubbing unit, in the absence of any substantial amount of calcium components, with an aqueous solution of magnesium components and magnesium sulfite produced, with aqueous solution, following the contact, collected and recycled to the wet scrubber for further contact with flue gases, and subjecting a portion of the aqueous discharge from the scrubbing unit, containing magnesium sulfite, to oxidation in an oxidation unit. The improvement comprises: adding calcium sulfate to the portion of aqueous discharge containing magnesium sulfite prior to oxidation in the oxidation unit to form an oxidized aqueous effluent containing calcium sulfate solids and dissolved magnesium sulfate; passing the oxidized aqueous effluent to a regeneration tank; adding lime to the regeneration tank to precipitate gypsum from and form an aqueous magnesium hydroxide suspension in the oxidized aqueous effluent; separating the precipitated gypsum from the aqueous magnesium hydroxide suspension; and returning at least a portion of the separated precipitated gypsum to the oxidizing unit as the added calcium sulfate.

  19. Nitrogen and Sulfur Deposition Effects on Forest Biogeochemical Processes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodale, C. L.

    2014-12-01

    Chronic atmospheric deposition of nitrogen and sulfur have widely ranging biogeochemical consequences in terrestrial ecosystems. Both N and S deposition can affect plant growth, decomposition, and nitrous oxide production, with sometimes synergistic and sometimes contradictory responses; yet their separate effects are rarely isolated and their interactive biogeochemical impacts are often overlooked. For example, S deposition and consequent acidification and mortality may negate stimulation of plant growth induced by N deposition; decomposition can be slowed by both N and S deposition, though through different mechanisms; and N2O production may be stimulated directly by N and indirectly by S amendments. Recent advances in conceptual models and whole-ecosystem experiments provide novel means for disentangling the impacts of N and S in terrestrial ecosystems. Results from a new whole-ecosystem N x S- addition experiment will be presented in detail, examining differential response of tree and soil carbon storage to N and S additions. These results combine with observations from a broad array of long-term N addition studies, atmospheric deposition gradients, stable isotope tracer studies, and model analyses to inform the magnitude, controls, and stability of ecosystem C storage in response to N and S addition.

  20. Catalytic hydrosolvation process converts coal to low-sulfur liquid fuel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Qader, S. A.

    1978-01-01

    Development of the catalytic hydrosolvation process for converting coal to low-sulfur fuel oil is described in this paper. Coal impregnated with catalyst was slurried with oil, and the mixture was hydrogenated at a temperature of 475 C, and 30 min residence time under 3600 psi pressure. A ton of coal yielded 3.5 bbl of fuel oil containing 0.2% sulfur, with naphtha and C1-C4 hydrocarbon gases as byproducts. A preliminary economic evaluation of the process indicated potential for further development.

  1. Sulfur Iodine Process Summary for the Hydrogen Technology Down-Selection

    SciTech Connect

    Benjamin Russ

    2009-05-01

    This report summarizes the sulfur-iodine (SI) thermochemical water splitting process for the purpose of supporting the process for evaluating and recommending a hydrogen production technology to deploy with the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP). This package provides the baseline process description as well as a comparison with the process as it was implemented in the Integrated Lab Scale (ILS) experiment conducted at General Atomics from 2006-2009.

  2. Using Mars's Sulfur Cycle to Constrain the Duration and Timing of Fluvial Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blaney, D. L.

    2002-01-01

    Sulfur exists in high abundances at diverse locations on Mars. This work uses knowledge of the Martian sulfate system to discriminate between leading hypotheses and discusses the implications for duration and timing of fluvial processes. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  3. DEVELOPMENT OF INFRARED METHODS FOR CHARACTERIZATION OF INORGANIC SULFUR SPECIES RELATED TO INJECTION DESULFURIZATION PROCESSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Current methods designed to control and reduce the amount of sulfur dioxide emitted into the atmosphere from coal-fired power plants and factories rely upon the reaction between SO2 and alkaline earth compounds and are called flue gas desulfurization (FGD) processes. Of these met...

  4. Configuring the thermochemical hydrogen sulfuric acid process step for the Tandem Mirror Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Galloway, T.R.

    1981-05-01

    This paper identifies the sulfuric acid step as the critical part of the thermochemical cycle in dictating the thermal demands and temperature requirements of the heat source. The General Atomic Sulfur-Iodine Cycle is coupled to a Tandem Mirror. The sulfuric acid decomposition process step is focused on specifically since this step can use the high efficiency electrical power of the direct converter together with the other thermal-produced electricity to Joule-heat a non-catalytic SO/sub 3/ decomposer to approximately 1250/sup 0/K. This approach uses concepts originally suggested by Dick Werner and Oscar Krikorian. The blanket temperature can be lowered to about 900/sup 0/K, greatly alleviating materials problems, the level of technology required, safety problems, and costs. A moderate degree of heat has been integrated to keep the cycle efficiency around 48%, but the number of heat exchangers has been limited in order to keep hydrogen production costs within reasonable bounds.

  5. Aqueous process for recovering sulfur from hydrogen sulfide-bearing gas

    SciTech Connect

    Basu, Arunabha

    2015-05-05

    A process for recovering sulfur from a hydrogen sulfide-bearing gas utilizes an aqueous reaction medium, a temperature of about 110-150.degree. C., and a high enough pressure to maintain the aqueous reaction medium in a liquid state. The process reduces material and equipment costs and addresses the environmental disadvantages associated with known processes that rely on high boiling point organic solvents.

  6. Process for sequestering carbon dioxide and sulfur dioxide

    DOEpatents

    Maroto-Valer, M. Mercedes; Zhang, Yinzhi; Kuchta, Matthew E.; Andresen, John M.; Fauth, Dan J.

    2009-10-20

    A process for sequestering carbon dioxide, which includes reacting a silicate based material with an acid to form a suspension, and combining the suspension with carbon dioxide to create active carbonation of the silicate-based material, and thereafter producing a metal salt, silica and regenerating the acid in the liquid phase of the suspension.

  7. The GA sulfur-iodine water-splitting process - A status report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Besenbruch, G. E.; Chiger, H. D.; Mccorkle, K. H.; Norman, J. H.; Rode, J. S.; Schuster, J. R.; Trester, P. W.

    1981-01-01

    The development of a sulfur-iodine thermal water splitting cycle is described. The process features a 50% thermal efficiency, plus all liquid and gas handling. Basic chemical investigations comprised the development of multitemperature and multistage sulfuric acid boost reactors, defining the phase behavior of the HI/I2/H2O/H3PO4 mixtures, and development of a decomposition process for hydrogen iodide in the liquid phase. Initial process engineering studies have led to a 47% efficiency, improvements of 2% projected, followed by coupling high-temperature solar concentrators to the splitting processes to reduce power requirements. Conceptual flowsheets developed from bench models are provided; materials investigations have concentrated on candidates which can withstand corrosive mixtures at temperatures up to 400 deg K, with Hastelloy C-276 exhibiting the best properties for containment and heat exchange to I2.

  8. Developing an energy efficient steam reforming process to produce hydrogen from sulfur-containing fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simson, Amanda

    Hydrogen powered fuel cells have the potential to produce electricity with higher efficiency and lower emissions than conventional combustion technology. In order to realize the benefits of a hydrogen fuel cell an efficient method to produce hydrogen is needed. Currently, over 90% of hydrogen is produced from the steam reforming of natural gas. However, for many applications including fuel cell vehicles, the use of a liquid fuel rather than natural gas is desirable. This work investigates the feasibility of producing hydrogen efficiently by steam reforming E85 (85% ethanol/15% gasoline), a commercially available sulfur-containing transportation fuel. A Rh-Pt/SiO2-ZrO2 catalyst has demonstrated good activity for the E85 steam reforming reaction. An industrial steam reforming process is often run less efficiently, with more water and at higher temperatures, in order to prevent catalyst deactivation. Therefore, it is desirable to develop a process that can operate without catalyst deactivation at more energy efficient conditions. In this study, the steam reforming of a sulfur-containing fuel (E85) was studied at near stoichiometric steam/carbon ratios and at 650C, conditions at which catalyst deactivation is normally measured. At these conditions the catalyst was found to be stable steam reforming a sulfur-free E85. However, the addition of low concentrations of sulfur significantly deactivated the catalyst. The presence of sulfur in the fuel caused catalyst deactivation by promoting ethylene which generates surface carbon species (coke) that mask catalytic sites. The amount of coke increased during time on stream and became increasingly graphitic. However, the deactivation due to both sulfur adsorption and coke formation was reversible with air treatment at 650°C. However, regenerations were found to reduce the catalyst life. Air regenerations produce exotherms on the catalyst surface that cause structural changes to the catalyst. During regenerations the accessibility of the precious metal particles is reduced which causes the catalyst to deactivate more rapidly during subsequent steam reforming cycles. Changes to the carrier morphology also occur at these conditions. Regenerating the catalyst before significant deactivation is measured can improve the stability of the catalyst. Thus a process with preemptive controlled air regenerations is proposed in order to run a steam reforming process with sulfur containing fuels.

  9. Processes for preparing carbon fibers using gaseous sulfur trioxide

    DOEpatents

    Barton, Bryan E.; Lysenko, Zenon; Bernius, Mark T.; Hukkanen, Eric J.

    2016-01-05

    Disclosed herein are processes for preparing carbonized polymers, such as carbon fibers, comprising: sulfonating a polymer with a sulfonating agent that comprises SO.sub.3 gas to form a sulfonated polymer; treating the sulfonated polymer with a heated solvent, wherein the temperature of said solvent is at least 95.degree. C.; and carbonizing the resulting product by heating it to a temperature of 500-3000.degree. C.

  10. A Tire-Sulfur Hybrid Adsorption Denitrification (T-SHAD) process for decentralized wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Krayzelova, Lucie; Lynn, Thomas J; Banihani, Qais; Bartacek, Jan; Jenicek, Pavel; Ergas, Sarina J

    2014-09-15

    Nitrogen discharges from decentralized wastewater treatment (DWT) systems contribute to surface and groundwater contamination. However, the high variability in loading rates, long idle periods and lack of regular maintenance presents a challenge for biological nitrogen removal in DWT. A Tire-Sulfur Hybrid Adsorption Denitrification (T-SHAD) process was developed that combines nitrate (NO3(-)) adsorption to scrap tire chips with sulfur-oxidizing denitrification. This allows the tire chips to adsorb NO3(-) when the influent loading exceeds the denitrification capacity of the biofilm and release it when NO3(-) loading rates are low (e.g. at night). Three waste products, scrap tire chips, elemental sulfur pellets and crushed oyster shells, were used as a medium in adsorption, leaching, microcosm and up-flow packed bed bioreactor studies of NO3(-) removal from synthetic nitrified DWT wastewater. Adsorption isotherms showed that scrap tire chips have an adsorption capacity of 0.66 g NO3(-)-N kg(-1) of scrap tires. Leaching and microcosm studies showed that scrap tires leach bioavailable organic carbon that can support mixotrophic metabolism, resulting in lower effluent SO4(2-) concentrations than sulfur oxidizing denitrification alone. In column studies, the T-SHAD process achieved high NO3(-)-N removal efficiencies under steady state (90%), variable flow (89%) and variable concentration (94%) conditions. PMID:24922353

  11. Low temperature removal of inorganic sulfur compounds from mining process waters.

    PubMed

    Liljeqvist, Maria; Sundkvist, Jan-Eric; Saleh, Amang; Dopson, Mark

    2011-06-01

    Process water and effluents from mining operations treating sulfide rich ores often contain considerable concentrations of metastable inorganic sulfur compounds such as thiosulfate and tetrathionate. These species may cause environmental problems if released to downstream recipients due to oxidation to sulfuric acid catalyzed by acidophilic microorganisms. Molecular phylogenic analysis of the tailings pond and recipient streams identified psychrotolerant and mesophilic inorganic sulfur compound oxidizing microorganisms. This suggested year round thiosalt oxidation occurs. Mining process waters may also contain inhibiting substances such as thiocyanate from cyanidation plants. However, toxicity experiments suggested their expected concentrations would not inhibit thiosalt oxidation by Acidithiobacillus ferrivorans SS3. A mixed culture from a permanently cold (4-6 °C) low pH environment was tested for thiosalt removal in a reactor design including a biogenerator and a main reactor containing a biofilm carrier. The biogenerator and main reactors were successively reduced in temperature to 5-6 °C when 43.8% of the chemical oxidation demand was removed. However, it was found that the oxidation of thiosulfate was not fully completed to sulfate since low residual concentrations of tetrathionate and trithionate were found in the discharge. This study has demonstrated the potential of using biotechnological solutions to remove inorganic sulfur compounds at 6°C and thus, reduce the impact of mining on the environment. PMID:21280027

  12. High temperature solar thermochemical processing - Hydrogen and sulfur from hydrogen sulfide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noring, J. E.; Fletcher, E. A.

    1982-08-01

    Sunlight, concentrated to high intensities, has a rarely recognized potential for adding process heat to reactors at high temperatures. Hydrogen sulfide is a by-product of the sweetening of fossil fuels. In this paper, by way of example, the production of hydrogen and sulfur from hydrogen sulfide is used as a device for showing how solar processing might be considered as a successor to a currently used industrial process, the Claus process. It is concluded that this and other processes should be explored as means of using as well as storing solar energy.

  13. Hydrogen production by the GA sulfur-iodine process: a progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Besenbruch, G.E.; McCorkle, K.H.; Norman, J.H.; O'Keefe, D.R.; Schuster, J.R.; Yoshimoto, M.

    1980-03-01

    A summary of the progress of the overall total development effort of the General Atomic (GA) sulfur-iodine thermochemical water-splitting cycle over the last two years is reported. The major accomplishments have been the following: (1) Significant improvements in the chemistry of the process. (2) Development, review, and revision of an engineering flowsheet, resulting in a thermal process efficiency of 47%. (3) Screening, identification, and testing of potential materials-of-construction for the corrosive process fluids. (4) Small-scale demonstration of the cycle in a closed loop under recycle conditions. (5) Installation of bench-scale equipment and demonstration of parts of the process in this system. (6) Development of a conceptual, preliminary flowsheet for the GA sulfur-iodine cycle driven by solar energy. The results of the work carried out during the last two years have demonstrated that thermochemical water splitting by the sulfur-iodine cycle is a feasible process and have provided confidence that thermal efficiencies in the range of 50% are achievable.

  14. Gasoline from natural gas by sulfur processing. Final technical report, June 1993--July 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Erekson, E.J.

    1996-07-01

    The overall objective of this research project was to develop a catalytic process to convert natural gas to liquid transportation fuels. The process, called the HSM (Hydrogen Sulfide-Methane) Process, consists of two steps that each use catalysts and sulfur-containing intermediates: (1) to convert natural gas to CS{sub 2} and (2) to convert CS{sub 2} to gasoline-range liquids. Experimental data generated in this project were for use in evaluating the commercial potential of the process.

  15. Effect of Dietary Processed Sulfur Supplementation on Water-holding Capacity, Color, and Lipid Profiles of Pork

    PubMed Central

    Yang, FengQi; Kim, Ji-Han; Yeon, Su Jung; Hong, Go-Eun; Park, Woojoon; Lee, Chi-Ho

    2015-01-01

    This study was performed to investigate the effect of dietary processed sulfur supplementation on water-holding capacity, color, and lipid profiles of pork according to the level of dietary processed sulfur (0%, CON; 0.3%, S). The pigs were slaughtered at an average final weight of 120 kg, and the longissimus dorsi muscles were collected from the carcasses. As results, pork processed with sulfur had significantly higher moisture and ash contents compared to those of CON but lower crude fat, pH, expressible drip, lower redness and yellowness, and greater lightness. Pork processed with sulfur showed significantly lower total lipid content, triglycerides, and atherosclerosis index but significantly higher high-density lipoprotein cholesterol. Feeding processed sulfur significantly lowered myristic acid, heptadecanoic acid, and stearic acid contents, whereas monounsaturated fatty acids and oleic acids were significantly higher compared to those in the CON. Higher amounts of polyunsaturated fatty acids and n-6 fatty acids were observed in the pork processed with sulfur than that of the CON. Therefore, supplementing pigs with dietary sulfur improved nutrient and meat quality. PMID:26877643

  16. Effect of Dietary Supplementation with Processed Sulfur on Meat Quality and Oxidative Stability in Longissimus dorsi of Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Noh, Ha-Young; Kim, Gyeom-Heon; Kim, Soo-Ki

    2015-01-01

    The effects of dietary supplementation of processed sulfur in pigs according to the level provided during the fattening phase were examined. The pigs were divided into three groups: control (CON), non-sulfur fed pigs; T1, 0.1% processed sulfur fed pigs; T2, 0.3% processed sulfur fed pigs. Physicochemical and sensory properties, as well as meat quality and oxidative stability of the Longissimus dorsi muscle were investigated. The feeding of processed sulfur did not affect moisture and protein contents (p>0.05). However, the crude fat content of T2 was significantly decreased compared to CON (p<0.05), while the pH value of T2 was significantly higher than those of both CON and T1 (p<0.05). Cooking loss and expressible drip of T2 were also significantly lower than that of CON (p<0.05). The redness of meat from T1 was significantly higher than both CON and T2 (p<0.01). During storage, lipid oxidation of the meat from sulfur fed pigs (T1 and T2) was inhibited compared to CON. Examination of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids revealed T2 to have significantly higher content than CON (p<0.05). In the sensory test, the juiciness and overall acceptability of T2 recorded higher scores than CON. This study demonstrated that meat from 0.3% processed sulfur fed pigs had improved nutrition and quality, with extended shelf-life. PMID:26761847

  17. Process sensitivity studies of the Westinghouse Sulfur Cycle for hydrogen generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carty, R.; Funk, J.; Soliman, M.; Conger, W.; Brecher, L.; Spewock, S.; Cox, K.

    1976-01-01

    The effect of variations of acid concentration, pressure, and temperature on the thermal process efficiency of the Westinghouse Sulfur Cycle was examined using the University of Kentucky's HYDRGN program. Modifications to the original program were made to duplicate the process flow sheet and take into account combined-cycle heat-to-work efficiencies for electrochemical work requirements, aqueous solutions, and heat-of-mixing effects. A total of 125 process variations were considered (acid concentration: 50-90 w/o; pressure: 15-750 psia; temperature: 922-1366 K (2000 F)). The methods of analysis, results, and conclusions are presented.

  18. Process sensitivity studies of the Westinghouse sulfur cycle for hydrogen generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carty, R. H.; Cox, K. E.; Funk, J. E.; Soliman, M. A.; Conger, W. L.; Brecher, L. E.; Spewock, S.

    1976-01-01

    The effect of variations of acid concentration, pressure, and temperature on the thermal process efficiency of the Westinghouse sulfur cycle was examined using the HYDRGN program. Modifications to the original program were made to duplicate the process flowsheet and take into account combined cycle heat-to-work efficiencies for electrochemical work requirements, aqueous solutions, and heat-of-mixing effects. A total of 125 process variations were considered (acid concentration: 50-90 w/o; pressure: 15-750 psia; temperature: 922K - 1366K). The methods of analysis, results, and conclusions are presented.

  19. Influence of Sulfur Species on Current Efficiency in the Aluminum Smelting Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meirbekova, Rauan; Haarberg, Geir Martin; Thonstad, Jomar; Saevarsdottir, Gudrun

    2016-04-01

    Anode impurities are the major source of sulfur in aluminum electrolysis. Sulfur in anodes is mainly found as organic compounds. Alumina also introduces small quantities of sulfur, typically in the form of sulfates. The scarcity and cost of low-sulfur raw materials and the possibility of sulfur removal from the cell by means of flue gas may make high-sulfur content anodes a viable option. However, some anode impurities are known to affect current efficiency in aluminum production and caution must be exercised. The effect of increased sulfur content in the aluminum electrolysis electrolyte must be studied. This paper explores the effect of increased sulfur concentration in the electrolyte on current efficiency in a laboratory cell. Sodium sulfate was added to the electrolyte as a source of sulfur at regular time intervals to maintain a constant sulfur concentration. Current efficiency decreased by 1.1 pct per each 100 mg/kg (ppm) increase in sulfur concentration in the electrolyte.

  20. Evaluation of kinetic parameters of a sulfur-limestone autotrophic denitrification biofilm process.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Hui; Zhang, Tian C

    2005-12-01

    In this study, four kinetic parameters of autotrophic denitrifiers in fixed-bed sulfur-limestone autotrophic denitrification (SLAD) columns were evaluated. The curve-matching method was used by conducting 22 non-steady-state tests for estimation of half-velocity constant, K(s) and maximum specific substrate utilization rate, k. To estimate the bacteria yield coefficient, Y and the decay coefficient, k(d), two short term batch tests (before and after the starvation of the autotrophic denitrifiers) were conducted using a fixed-bed SLAD column where the biofilm was fully penetrated by nitrate-N. It was found that K(s) = 0.398 mg NO(3-)-N/l, k = 0.15 d(-1), k(d) = 0.09-0.12 d(-1), and Y = 0.85-1.11 g VSS/g NO(3-)-N. Our results are consistent with those obtained from SLAD biofilm processes, but different from those obtained from suspended-growth systems with thiosulfate or sulfur powders as the S source. The method developed in this study might be useful for estimation of four Monod-type kinetic parameters in other biofilm processes. However, cautions must be given when the estimated parameters are used because the measurements of the biomass and the biofilm thickness could be further improved, and the assumption of sulfur being a non-limiting substrate needs to be proved. PMID:16289671

  1. Recent approaches for the direct use of elemental sulfur in the synthesis and processing of advanced materials.

    PubMed

    Lim, Jeewoo; Pyun, Jeffrey; Char, Kookheon

    2015-03-01

    Elemental sulfur is an abundant and inexpensive material obtained as a by-product of natural-gas and petroleum refining operations. Recently, the need for the development of new energy-storage systems brought into light the potential of sulfur as a high-capacity cathode material in secondary batteries. Sulfur-containing materials were also shown to have useful IR optical properties. These developments coupled with growing environmental concerns related to the global production of excess elemental sulfur have led to a keen interest in its utilization as a feedstock in materials applications. This Minireview focuses on the recent developments on physical and chemical methods for directly processing elemental sulfur to produce functional composites and polymers. PMID:25583026

  2. Physico-chemical characteristics of cement produced using sulfur bearing fuels in the black meal process for cement manufacture

    SciTech Connect

    Barkakati, P.; Bordoloi, D.; Bandyopadhyay, S.; Borah, U.C. )

    1993-09-01

    Assam coal containing 2-6% sulfur and around 40% volatiles can be used for making quality cement in the black meal process for cement manufacture using the Vertical Shaft Kiln (VSK) technology. It is observed that the use of these sulfur bearing fuels need little modification in the operational parameters of the VSK. The chemical, mineralogical and physical properties of the clinker/cement produced using Assam coal as fuel in the above process are provided. The clinkers generated with sulfur bearing coals are studied and probable reasons for obtaining quality cement even with an SO[sub 3] content of more than 3% in the clinkers are discussed.

  3. Method of removing sulfur emissions from a fluidized-bed combustion process

    DOEpatents

    Vogel, Gerhard John; Jonke, Albert A.; Snyder, Robert B.

    1978-01-01

    Alkali metal or alkaline earth metal oxides are impregnated within refractory support material such as alumina and introduced into a fluidized-bed process for the combustion of coal. Sulfur dioxide produced during combustion reacts with the metal oxide to form metal sulfates within the porous support material. The support material is removed from the process and the metal sulfate regenerated to metal oxide by chemical reduction. Suitable pore sizes are originally developed within the support material by heat-treating to accommodate both the sulfation and regeneration while still maintaining good particle strength.

  4. HYBRID SULFUR RECOVERY PROCESS FOR NATURAL GAS UPGRADING LAST TECHNICAL REPORT BEFORE NOVATION FROM URS CORP. TO CRYSTATECH, INC.

    SciTech Connect

    Girish Srinivas; Steven C. Gebhard; David W. DeBerry

    2001-02-01

    This project was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to test a hybrid sulfur recovery process for natural gas upgrading. The process concept represents a low cost option for direct treatment of natural gas streams to remove H{sub 2}S in quantities equivalent to 0.2-25 metric tons (LT) of sulfur per day. This process is projected to have lower capital and operating costs than the competing technologies, amine/aqueous iron liquid redox and amine/Claus/tail gas treating, and have a smaller plant footprint, making it well suited to both on-shore and offshore applications. CrystaSulf (service mark of Gas Research Institute) is a new nonaqueous sulfur recovery process that removes hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) from gas streams and converts it into elemental sulfur. CrystaSulf features high sulfur recovery similar to aqueous-iron liquid redox sulfur recovery processes, but differs from the aqueous processes in that CrystaSulf controls the location where elemental sulfur particles are formed. In the hybrid process, approximately 1/3 of the total H{sub 2}S in the natural gas is first oxidized to SO{sub 2} at low temperatures over a heterogeneous catalyst. Low temperature oxidation is done so that the H{sub 2}S can be oxidized in the presence of methane while avoiding methane oxidation. The project involved the development of a detailed plan for laboratory and bench scale-up application, laboratory/bench-scale catalyst testing, and demonstration of scale-up economic advantages. The bench-scale tests examined two different catalysts that are promoted modifications of TDA's patented partial oxidation catalyst used to make elemental sulfur. The experiments showed that catalyst TDA No.2 is superior for use with the hybrid CrystaSulf process in that much higher yields of SO{sub 2} can be obtained. Continued testing is planned.

  5. Sulfuric acid on Europa and the radiolytic sulfur cycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, R. W.; Johnson, R. E.; Anderson, M. S.

    1999-01-01

    A comparison of laboratory spectra with Galileo data indicates that hydrated sulfuric acid is present and is a major component of Europa's surface. In addition, this moon's visually dark surface material, which spatially correlates with the sulfuric acid concentration, is identified as radiolytically altered sulfur polymers. Radiolysis of the surface by magnetospheric plasma bombardment continuously cycles sulfur between three forms: sulfuric acid, sulfur dioxide, and sulfur polymers, with sulfuric acid being about 50 times as abundant as the other forms. Enhanced sulfuric acid concentrations are found in Europa's geologically young terrains, suggesting that low-temperature, liquid sulfuric acid may influence geological processes.

  6. THE EFFECT OF SULFUR ON METHANE PARTIAL OXIDATION AND REFORMING PROCESSES FOR LEAN NOX TRAP CATALYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    Parks, II, James E; Ponnusamy, Senthil

    2006-01-01

    Lean NOx trap catalysis has demonstrated the ability to reduce NOx emissions from lean natural gas reciprocating engines by >90%. The technology operates in a cyclic fashion where NOx is trapped on the catalyst during lean operation and released and reduced to N2 under rich exhaust conditions; the rich cleansing operation of the cycle is referred to as "regeneration" since the catalyst is reactivated for more NOx trapping after NOx purge. Creating the rich exhaust conditions for regeneration can be accomplished by catalytic partial oxidation of methane in the exhaust system. Furthermore, catalytic reforming of partial oxidation exhaust can enable increased quantities of H2 which is an excellent reductant for lean NOx trap regeneration. It is critical to maintain clean and efficient partial oxidation and reforming processes to keep the lean NOx trap functioning properly and to reduce extra fuel consumption from the regeneration process. Although most exhaust constituents do not impede partial oxidation and reforming, some exhaust constituents may negatively affect the catalysts and result in loss of catalytic efficiency. Of particular concern are common catalyst poisons sulfur, zinc, and phosphorous. These poisons form in the exhaust through combustion of fuel and oil, and although they are present at low concentrations, they can accumulate to significant levels over the life of an engine system. In the work presented here, the effects of sulfur on the partial oxidation and reforming catalytic processes were studied to determine any durability limitations on the production of reductants for lean NOx trap catalyst regeneration.

  7. Pretreatment of rice straw with combined process using dilute sulfuric acid and aqueous ammonia

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Use of lignocellulosic biomass has received attention lately because it can be converted into various versatile chemical compounds by biological processes. In this study, a two-step pretreatment with dilute sulfuric acid and aqueous ammonia was performed efficiently on rice straw to obtain fermentable sugar. The soaking in aqueous ammonia process was also optimized by a statistical method. Results Response surface methodology was employed. The determination coefficient (R2) value was found to be 0.9607 and the coefficient of variance was 6.77. The optimal pretreatment conditions were a temperature of 42.75°C, an aqueous ammonia concentration of 20.93%, and a reaction time of 48 h. The optimal enzyme concentration for saccharification was 30 filter paper units. The crystallinity index was approximately 60.23% and the Fourier transform infrared results showed the distinct peaks of glucan. Ethanol production using Saccharomyces cerevisiae K35 was performed to verify whether the glucose saccharified from rice straw was fermentable. Conclusions The combined pretreatment using dilute sulfuric acid and aqueous ammonia on rice straw efficiently yielded fermentable sugar and achieved almost the same crystallinity index as that of α-cellulose. PMID:23898802

  8. Production, preservation, and biological processing of mass-independent sulfur isotope fractionation in the Archean surface environment

    PubMed Central

    Halevy, Itay

    2013-01-01

    Mass-independent fractionation of sulfur isotopes (S MIF) in Archean and Paleoproterozoic rocks provides strong evidence for an anoxic atmosphere before ∼2,400 Ma. However, the origin of this isotopic anomaly remains unclear, as does the identity of the molecules that carried it from the atmosphere to Earth’s surface. Irrespective of the origin of S MIF, processes in the biogeochemical sulfur cycle modify the primary signal and strongly influence the S MIF preserved and observed in the geological record. Here, a detailed model of the marine sulfur cycle is used to propagate and distribute atmospherically derived S MIF from its delivery to the ocean to its preservation in the sediment. Bulk pyrite in most sediments carries weak S MIF because of microbial reduction of most sulfur compounds to form isotopically homogeneous sulfide. Locally, differential incorporation of sulfur compounds into pyrite leads to preservation of S MIF, which is predicted to be most highly variable in nonmarine and shallow-water settings. The Archean ocean is efficient in diluting primary atmospheric S MIF in the marine pools of sulfate and elemental sulfur with inputs from SO2 and H2S, respectively. Preservation of S MIF with the observed range of magnitudes requires the S MIF production mechanism to be moderately fractionating (20–40‰). Constraints from the marine sulfur cycle allow that either elemental sulfur or organosulfur compounds (or both) carried S MIF to the surface, with opposite sign to S MIF in SO2 and H2SO4. Optimal progress requires observations from nonmarine and shallow-water environments and experimental constraints on the reaction of photoexcited SO2 with atmospheric hydrocarbons. PMID:23572589

  9. Regenerative process and system for the simultaneous removal of particulates and the oxides of sulfur and nitrogen from a gas stream

    DOEpatents

    Cohen, Mitchell R.; Gal, Eli

    1993-01-01

    A process and system for simultaneously removing from a gaseous mixture, sulfur oxides by means of a solid sulfur oxide acceptor on a porous carrier, nitrogen oxides by means of ammonia gas and particulate matter by means of filtration and for the regeneration of loaded solid sulfur oxide acceptor. Finely-divided solid sulfur oxide acceptor is entrained in a gaseous mixture to deplete sulfur oxides from the gaseous mixture, the finely-divided solid sulfur oxide acceptor being dispersed on a porous carrier material having a particle size up to about 200 microns. In the process, the gaseous mixture is optionally pre-filtered to remove particulate matter and thereafter finely-divided solid sulfur oxide acceptor is injected into the gaseous The government of the United States of America has rights in this invention pursuant to Contract No. DE-AC21-88MC 23174 awarded by the U.S. Department of Energy.

  10. Regenerative process and system for the simultaneous removal of particulates and the oxides of sulfur and nitrogen from a gas stream

    DOEpatents

    Cohen, M.R.; Gal, E.

    1993-04-13

    A process and system are described for simultaneously removing from a gaseous mixture, sulfur oxides by means of a solid sulfur oxide acceptor on a porous carrier, nitrogen oxides by means of ammonia gas and particulate matter by means of filtration and for the regeneration of loaded solid sulfur oxide acceptor. Finely-divided solid sulfur oxide acceptor is entrained in a gaseous mixture to deplete sulfur oxides from the gaseous mixture, the finely-divided solid sulfur oxide acceptor being dispersed on a porous carrier material having a particle size up to about 200 microns. In the process, the gaseous mixture is optionally pre-filtered to remove particulate matter and thereafter finely-divided solid sulfur oxide acceptor is injected into the gaseous mixture.

  11. LS-RIOR, a new ironmaking process utilizing low cost, high sulfur petroleum coke as reductant and energy source

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, J.C.; Chorbajian, E.

    1984-01-01

    Due to worldwide restrictions on gaseous sulfur emissions in industrialized nations, and the overabundance of fuel grade coke, the price of high sulfur petroleum coke is expected to remain very low relative to other fuel and carbon sources. The LS-RIOR process is the only process now available that can utilize this inexpensive source of energy to convert iron ore fines to low sulfur sponge iron suitable for use as electric arc furnace (EAF) feedstock or basic oxygen furnace coolant. The key to this unique capability is in the LS-RIOR pelletizing process, which produces highly reactive pellets from iron ore fines using petroleum residuum as binder. As in the case with coke, petroleum residue is predicted to be in ample supply through the 20th century. LS-RIOR pellets can be easily desulfurized in the rotary kiln, while conventional iron ore pellets, which use bentonite binder, cannot be used to produce low sulfur sponge iron when high sulfur reductant is employed.

  12. Development of enhanced sulfur rejection processes. First Quarterly technical progress report, October 1, 1992--December 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, R.H.; Luttrell, G.; Adel, G.; Richardson, P.E.

    1993-03-23

    Research at Virginia Tech led to two complementary concepts for improving the removal of inorganic sulfur from much of the Eastern US coals. One controls the surface properties of coal pyrite (FeS{sub 2}) by electrochemical-.potential control, referred to as the Electrochemically Enhanced Sulfur Rejection (EESR) Process: The second controls the flotation of middlings, i.e., particles composed of pyrite with coal inclusions by using polymeric reagents to react with pyrite and convert the middlings to hydrophilic particles, and is termed the Polymer Enhanced Sulfur Rejection (PESR) Process. These new concepts are based on recent research establishing the two main reasons why flotation fails to remove more than about 50% of the pyritic sulfur from coal: superficial oxidization of liberated pyrite to form polysulfide oxidation products so that a part of the liberated pyrite floats with the coal; and hydrophobic coal inclusions in the middlings dominating their flotation so that the middlings also float with the coal. These new pyritic-sulfur rejection processes do not require significant modifications of existing coal preparation facilities, enhancing their adoptability by the coal industry. It is believed that they can be used simultaneously to achieve both free pyrite and locked pyrite rejection.

  13. Sulfuric acid-sulfur heat storage cycle

    DOEpatents

    Norman, John H.

    1983-12-20

    A method of storing heat is provided utilizing a chemical cycle which interconverts sulfuric acid and sulfur. The method can be used to levelize the energy obtained from intermittent heat sources, such as solar collectors. Dilute sulfuric acid is concentrated by evaporation of water, and the concentrated sulfuric acid is boiled and decomposed using intense heat from the heat source, forming sulfur dioxide and oxygen. The sulfur dioxide is reacted with water in a disproportionation reaction yielding dilute sulfuric acid, which is recycled, and elemental sulfur. The sulfur has substantial potential chemical energy and represents the storage of a significant portion of the energy obtained from the heat source. The sulfur is burned whenever required to release the stored energy. A particularly advantageous use of the heat storage method is in conjunction with a solar-powered facility which uses the Bunsen reaction in a water-splitting process. The energy storage method is used to levelize the availability of solar energy while some of the sulfur dioxide produced in the heat storage reactions is converted to sulfuric acid in the Bunsen reaction.

  14. Process for producing low-sulfur boiler fuel by hydrotreatment of solvent deashed SRC

    DOEpatents

    Roberts, George W.; Tao, John C.

    1985-01-01

    In this invention, a process is disclosed characterized by heating a slurry of coal in the presence of a process-derived recycle solvent and passing same to a dissolver zone, separating the resultant gases and liquid/solid products therefrom, vacuum distilling the liquid/solids products, separating the portions of the liquid/solids vacuum distillation effluent into a solid ash, unconverted coal particles and SRC material having a boiling point above 850.degree. F. and subjecting same to a critical solvent deashing step to provide an ash-free SRC product. The lighter liquid products from the vacuum distillation possess a boiling point below 850.degree. F. and are passed through a distillation tower, from which recycled solvent is recovered in addition to light distillate boiling below 400.degree. F. (overhead). The ash-free SRC product in accompanyment with at least a portion of the process derived solvent is passed in combination to a hydrotreating zone containing a hydrogenation catalyst and in the presence of hydrogen is hydroprocessed to produce a desulfurized and denitrogenized low-sulfur, low-ash boiler fuel and a process derived recycle solvent which is recycled to slurry the coal in the beginning of the process before heating.

  15. Sulfur barrier for use with in situ processes for treating formations

    DOEpatents

    Vinegar, Harold J.; Christensen, Del Scot

    2009-12-15

    Methods for forming a barrier around at least a portion of a treatment area in a subsurface formation are described herein. Sulfur may be introduced into one or more wellbores located inside a perimeter of a treatment area in the formation having a permeability of at least 0.1 darcy. At least some of the sulfur is allowed to move towards portions of the formation cooler than the melting point of sulfur to solidify the sulfur in the formation to form the barrier.

  16. Sulfur behavior in the Sasol-Lurgi fixed-bed dry-bottom gasification process

    SciTech Connect

    M. Pat Skhonde; R. Henry Matjie; J. Reginald Bunt; A. Christien Strydom; H. Schobert

    2009-01-15

    This article reports on the findings of a study regarding the sulfur behavior across a Sasol-Lurgi gasifier. This was undertaken to understand the behavior of the various sulfur-bearing components in the coal, as they are exposed to the conditions in the gasifier. In this study, conventional characterization techniques were employed to monitor the behavior of sulfur-bearing mineral matter across the gasifier. It was observed from the study that the sulfur-bearing mineral (pyrite) in the coal structure undergoes various changes with pyrite being transformed to pyrrhotite and then to various oxides of iron with the subsequent loss of sulfur to form H{sub 2}S. A low proportion of the sulfur species including the organically associated sulfur was encapsulated by a melt that was formed by the interaction between kaolinite and fluxing minerals (pyrite, calcite, and dolomite/ankerite) present in the coal at elevated temperatures and pressure, thereby ending up in the ash. The remaining small proportions of sulfur-bearing mineral matter including pyrite and organically bound sulfur in the unburned carbon in the carbonaceous shales also report to the ash. 18 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. SUMMARY REPORT: SULFUR OXIDES CONTROL TECHNOLOGY SERIES: FGD LIME/LIMESTONE PROCESSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This summary report describes the use of lime or limestone as an option for the treatment of sulfur oxides at fossil fuel steam and electric generating facilities. n this treatment, an aqueous slurry of slaked lime or wet ground limestone absorbs sulfur oxide from flue gas. bsorb...

  18. EFFECT OF FUEL SULFUR ON NITROGEN OXIDE FORMATION IN COMBUSTION PROCESSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of research that focuses on the questions: is the sulfur content of a fuel likely to have a major influence on the resulting NOx emissions; and does the presence of fuel sulfur cause major changes in mechanisms of fuel NO formation. Research results will ...

  19. H[sub 2]S in EOR--1: Gas processing for CO[sub 2] EOR involves sulfur removal

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, J.E. ); Tzap, S.J.; Kelley, R.E. ); Laczko, L.P. )

    1993-11-15

    A design study for a new West Texas gas processing plant for a CO[sub 2] EOR project provides for installation of H[sub 2]S removal processes to be delayed for 3 years after completion of the plant. During this delay, a more precise produced gas composition will be obtained so that the process equipment for removing H[sub 2]S can be properly selected and sized to handle the gas stream that at the peak will reach about 30 MMscfd. The new plant's processing components include inlet separation, sulfur removal and recovery, compression, dehydration, and NGL recovery. The new plant will be capable of processing CO[sub 2]-contaminated associated gas, recovering valuable propane-plus NGLs,a nd producing a miscible CO[sub 2] for reinjection. The first in a series of two articles details the process and configuration options. The concluding part will discuss in greater detail the sulfur recovery alternatives.

  20. Development of enhanced sulfur rejection processes. Second quarterly technical progress report, January 1, 1993--March 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, R.H.; Luttrell, G.; Adel, G.; Richardson, P.E.

    1993-06-14

    Research at Virginia Tech led to the development of two complementary concepts for improving the removal of inorganic sulfur from many eastern US coals. These concepts are referred to as Electrochemically Enhanced Sulfur Rejection (EESR) and Polymer Enhanced Sulfur Rejection (PESR). The EESR process uses electrochemical techniques to suppress the formation of hydrophobic oxidation products believed to be responsible for the floatability of coal pyrite. The PESR process uses polymeric reagents that react with pyrite and convert floatable middlings, i.e., composite particles composed of pyrite with coal inclusions, into hydrophilic particles. These new pyritic-sulfur rejection processes do not require significant modifications to existing coal preparation facilities, thereby enhancing their adoptability by the coal industry. It is believed that these processes can be used simultaneously to maximize the rejection of both well-liberated pyrite and composite coal-pyrite particles. The technical research was initiated on October 1, 1992, and a detailed work plan and work schedule were developed. During this reporting period, research was conducted to evaluate the liberation characteristics of various pyrite samples, to determine the electrochemical reactions that influence the hydrophobicity of pyrite, and to examine the potential use of electrochemical methods for controlling the flotation and depression of pyrite.

  1. Early diagenetic processes of saline meromictic Lake Kai-ike, southwest Japan: III. Sulfur speciation and isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakai, N.; Yamaguchi, K. E.; Oguri, K.

    2014-12-01

    Lake Kai-ike is a saline meromictic lake located along the coast of Kami-Koshiki Island. The lake is isolated from ocean by a gravel bar, through which seawater infiltrates by tidal pumping. The lake is permanently redox (density)-stratified with a mid-depth development of photic zone anoxia and a dense community of photosynthetic bacteria pinkish "bacterial plate". The early diagenesis of sulfur in sediments overlain by an anoxic water body was investigated using a sediment core (KAI4) from the lake. We determined abundance of various S-bearing species (i.e., Cr-reducible sulfide (= pyrite S: Spy), acid-volatile sulfide (AVS), sulfate sulfur (SSO4), elemental sulfur (S0), and organic sulfur) by an improved sequential extraction method. Here we focus on drastic and rapid changes on sulfur biogeochemistry found in the uppermost 5cm layer. With increasing depth, abundance of Spy increased but that of SSO4 and δ34S value of Spy (δ34Spy) decreased. These results suggest progressive formation of bacteriogenic pyrite. The δ34S values of SSO4 (δ34SSO4) ranged from 25.1 ‰ (at sediment surface) to 3.8 ‰ in the uppermost 5 cm layer. This δ34SSO4 decrease in the top 5 cm sediment suggests that SSO4 in the surface sediment inherits SO42- with elevated δ34S values (higher than typical seawater δ34S value of 21‰) in the water column, which is due to extensive bacterial sulfate reduction with preferential removal of low-δ34S sulfur as sulfide. In the lower part of the uppermost 5 cm layer, SO42- formed by oxidation of S0, AVS, and/or Spy with low-δ34S values by SO42--bearing seawater introduced by infiltration through the gravel bar. Increasing δ34Spy values with increasing depth suggest near complete consumption of SO42- by active bacterial sulfate reduction, and this process could be explained by Rayleigh distillation model. Early diagenesis of sulfur does occur in whole section of 25cm-long KAI4 core that accumulated for the last ~60 years (Yamaguchi et al., 2010; Palaeo3). Geochemical characteristics of sulfur in the uppermost part of Lake Kai-ike sediment were significantly modified during early diagenesis. Such diagenetic modification for sulfur isotopes should be fully taken into account to better reconstruct past anoxic environment such as Cretaceous OAEs and Archean oceans.

  2. USING THE SULFUR POLYMER STABILIZATION SOLIDIFICATION PROCESS TO TREAT RESIDUAL MERCURY WASTES FROM GOLD MINING OPERATIONS.

    SciTech Connect

    BOWERMAN,B.ADAMS,J.KALB,P.WAN,R.Y.LEVIER,M.

    2003-02-24

    Large quantities of mercury are generated as a by-product during the processing of gold ore following mining operations. Newmont Mining Corporation (NMC), which operates some of the world's largest gold mines, sought a method to permanently ''retire'' its mercury by-products, thereby avoiding potential environmental liability. Sulfur Polymer Stabilization-Solidification (SPSS) is an innovative technology developed at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) for treatment of mercury and mercury contaminated materials, such as soil, sludge and debris. BNL conducted a treatability study to determine the potential applicability of SPSS for treatment of Newmont mercury, and the treated product passed the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) test for toxicity. The SPSS process has been shown to be effective on radioactive and nonradioactive mercury and mercury-contaminated materials with a pilot-scale batch system capable of producing 0.03 m{sup 3} (1 ft{sup 3}) per batch. Engineering scale-up issues are discussed and material property tests addressing these issues are described.

  3. Contributions of organic matter and organic sulfur redox processes to electron flow in anoxic incubations of peat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    YU, Zhiguo; Peiffer, Stefan; Göttlicher, Jörg; Knorr, Klaus-Holger

    2015-04-01

    Anaerobic decomposition of peat soils involves a number of interdependent microbial processes that ultimately generate CO2 and CH4. In many peat soils, a high ratio of CO2:CH4 was reported, which presumably results from a direct or indirect role of soil organic matter serving as an electron acceptor. Therefore, in this study we intended to test the hypothesis that organic matter (OM) suppresses methanogenesis and sustains anaerobic CO2 production, serving as i) direct electron acceptor or ii) via supporting internal sulfur cycling to maintains CO2 production through bacterial sulfate reduction (BSR). We incubated peat samples of commercial bog peat, inoculated with a small amount of fresh peat to introduce an active microbial community. Samples were amended with sulfate or sulfide and incubated under anoxic conditions for 6 weeks at 30 ° C. Upon anaerobic incubation of peat virtually devoid of inorganic electron acceptors, CO2 and CH4 were produced at a ratio of 3.2. According to the electron budget, the calculated electron accepting capacity (EAC) of OM was 2.36 μeq cm3 d-1. Addition of sulfate significantly increased CO2 production and effectively suppressed CH4 production. After subtracting the EAC provided though sulfate addition (0.97~2.81 μeq cm-3 d-1), EACs supplied by OM reached 3.88 to 4.85 μeq cm-3 d-1.The contribution of organic sulfur was further evaluated by XANES spectroscopy and using natural abundance of δ34S as a tracer. Results demonstrated that BSR involved both addition of H2S and sulfate to OM leading to a formation of reduced organic sulfur and partial changes of oxidized organic sulfur species. The original peat prior to incubation contained 70.5% reduced organic S (R-S-H, R-S-R, R-S-S-R), and 25.9% oxidized S (R-SO3, R-SO2-R, R-SO4-R), whereas the treatment with H2S or sulfate addition comprised 75.7~ 81.1% reduced organic S, and only 21.1~18.9 % oxidized S. Our results imply that that organic matter contributes to anaerobic respiration i) directly by electron accepting capacity of redox active functional groups ii) directly by oxidized organic sulfur and iii) indirectly by recycling of sulfide to maintain BSR. Moreover, investigating the stability of organic sulfur compounds in peat soil towards abiotic and biotic reduction and oxidation is essential for the understanding of environmental sulfur cycling in anaerobic systems. Keywords: Methanogenesis; Electron transfer; organic sulfur; Redox processes; Freshwater systems;

  4. Bench-scale testing and evaluation of the Direct Sulfur Recovery Process

    SciTech Connect

    Gangwal, S.K.; McMichael, W.J.; Agarwal, S.K.; Chen, D.H.; Hopper, J.R.

    1992-11-01

    The present work seeks to (1) demonstrate the DSRP in an integrated two-stage bench-scale unit scaled up by a factor of up to 40, for up to 99 percent or higher recovery of sulfur, (2) explain the high sulfur yield and mechanism of DSRP reactions by conducting kinetic experiments and advanced thermodynamic calculations, and (3) continue technology transfer to the point where industry is willing to support further DSRP development. The DSRP Bench-Scale Unit hardware has been described in detail previously (Gangwal and McMichael, 1990; Gangwal and McMichael, 1991). The unit consists of a simulated off-gas and coal-gas delivery system connected to two high-pressure reactors and condensers in the configuration shown conceptually in Figure 1. The system is rated to 400 psig and the reactors, capable of operation at up to 400 psig at 750{degree}C, hold up to 1 L of catalyst each. The inlet and outlet gases are analyzed using two gas chromatographs (GCs) and a continuous SO{sub 2} analyzer. One major change recently made to the unit consists of installing advanced condensers suggested by experts in the field to facilitate more efficient separation of the sulfur after each reactor. A schematic diagram of the advanced condenser is shown in Figure 2. The sulfur-laden gas is cooled by surrounding steam at 250{degree}F in a coil and then flashed into the sulfur collection pot for separation of gas and sulfur. A sulfur drain is included so that it is not necessary to dismantle the condenser after every run. The ability to drain the sulfur during a run allows extended runs to be carried out. Also fittings are provided in strategic locations to allow dismantling when cleanup becomes necessary.

  5. Bench-scale testing and evaluation of the Direct Sulfur Recovery Process

    SciTech Connect

    Gangwal, S.K.; McMichael, W.J.; Agarwal, S.K.; Chen, D.H.; Hopper, J.R.

    1992-01-01

    The present work seeks to (1) demonstrate the DSRP in an integrated two-stage bench-scale unit scaled up by a factor of up to 40, for up to 99 percent or higher recovery of sulfur, (2) explain the high sulfur yield and mechanism of DSRP reactions by conducting kinetic experiments and advanced thermodynamic calculations, and (3) continue technology transfer to the point where industry is willing to support further DSRP development. The DSRP Bench-Scale Unit hardware has been described in detail previously (Gangwal and McMichael, 1990; Gangwal and McMichael, 1991). The unit consists of a simulated off-gas and coal-gas delivery system connected to two high-pressure reactors and condensers in the configuration shown conceptually in Figure 1. The system is rated to 400 psig and the reactors, capable of operation at up to 400 psig at 750[degree]C, hold up to 1 L of catalyst each. The inlet and outlet gases are analyzed using two gas chromatographs (GCs) and a continuous SO[sub 2] analyzer. One major change recently made to the unit consists of installing advanced condensers suggested by experts in the field to facilitate more efficient separation of the sulfur after each reactor. A schematic diagram of the advanced condenser is shown in Figure 2. The sulfur-laden gas is cooled by surrounding steam at 250[degree]F in a coil and then flashed into the sulfur collection pot for separation of gas and sulfur. A sulfur drain is included so that it is not necessary to dismantle the condenser after every run. The ability to drain the sulfur during a run allows extended runs to be carried out. Also fittings are provided in strategic locations to allow dismantling when cleanup becomes necessary.

  6. Effect of sulfur incorporation on solution-processed ZTO thin-film transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Sang-A.; Yu, Kyeong Min; Jeong, So-Hyun; Bae, Byung Seong; Yun, Eui-Jung

    2015-04-01

    In this research, we investigated the electrical properties of solution-processed sulfur (S)-incorporated zinc-tin-oxide (S-ZTO) thin-film transistors (TFTs). The best device characteristics, which include a threshold voltage of -0.74 V, a sub-threshold swing of 0.67 V/dec, an on/off current ratio of 8.31 × 105, and a mobility of 0.70 cm2/Vs, were observed for 0.06-M S-ZTO TFTs. The device properties of the 0.06-M S-ZTO TFTs were similar to those of ZTO TFTs whereas the illumination stress stabilities and the hysteresis characteristics of the transfer curve for 0.06-M S-ZTO TFTs were better than those for ZTO TFTs. The X-ray diffraction analysis for the S-ZTO thin films also showed that tin (Sn) atoms bonded chemically with S atoms, suggesting that S atoms occupied oxygen sites, which, in turn, the reduced the number of oxygen vacancies. Therefore, the improved stabilities observed in S-ZTO TFTs are attributed to the reduction in the number of oxygen vacancies due to replacement of O by S.

  7. Industrial process (VREC) for the thermal catalytic desulfurization of high sulfur content petroleum green cokes to electrode grade coke

    SciTech Connect

    Reis, T.

    1981-03-01

    Delayed (or fluid) coking can be considered as an economical and convenient desulfurization process for high sulfur content heavy residues, provided that a suitable process exists to remove sulfur from the green coke, down to 1.5 to 1.0 wt % and to obtain real densities above 2.04 g/c.c. Such a process has now been industrialized (VREC process) and its technical and economical implications in desulfurization of residues from delayed (fluid) coking as well as newer developments of the VREC process, are described in this paper. The main advantages of the VREC process are: (1) it uses a thermocatalytic reaction no other process uses; (2) it uses a well known rotary hearth kiln technology but has considerably improved this type of kiln; (3) it uses new and particularly efficient patented continuous control methods enabling the automatic control and regulation of sulfur content and real density of the coke during the thermocatalytic calcination and desulfurization. Disadvantages seem to be: (1) the use of recycle gas (volatile hydrocarbons) means coke dust must be separated, filtered and, presumably, relatively poor yield based on fixed carbon; (2) the vertical retorts are in graphite; (3) the gases contain H/sub 2/S, COS, CS/sub 2/, which must be purified by caustic scrubbing. They also contain tarry and waxy matter and it seems doubtful that the sulfur free spill gas and the recovered hydrocarbon liquids can be effectively credited as stated; and (4) the economics of $70 to 75/T of estimated operating costs exclusive of return on investment and federal taxes don't seem very challenging.

  8. A new process for converting SO2 to sulfur without generating secondary pollutants through reactions involving CaS and CaSO4.

    PubMed

    Sohn, H Y; Kim, Byung-Su

    2002-07-01

    Nonferrous smelters and coal gasification processes generate environmentally harmful sulfur dioxide streams, most of which are treated to produce sulfuric acid with the accompanying problems of market shortage and transportation difficulties. Some sulfur dioxide streams are scrubbed with an alkali solution or a solid substance such as limestone or dolomite, which in turn generates wastes that pose other pollution problems. While the conversion of sulfur dioxide to elemental sulfur has many environmental advantages, no processes exist that are environmentally acceptable and economically viable. A new method for converting sulfur dioxide to elemental sulfur by a cyclic process involving calcium sulfide and calcium sulfate without generating solid wastes has been developed. In this process, calcium sulfate pellets as the starting raw material are reduced by a suitable reducing agent such as hydrogen to produce calcium sulfide pellets, which are used to reduce sulfur dioxide producing elemental sulfur vapor and calcium sulfate. The latter is then reduced to regenerate calcium sulfide. Thermodynamic analysis and experimental results indicated that the CaS-SO2 reaction produces mainly sulfur vapor and solid calcium sulfate and that the gaseous product from the CaSO4-H2 reaction is mainly water vapor. The rates of the two reactions are reasonably rapid in the temperature range 1000-1100 K, and, importantly, the physical strengths and reactivities of the pellets are maintained largely unchanged up to the tenth cycle, the last cycle tested in this work. Sulfur dioxide-containing streams from certain sources, such as the regenerator off-gas from an integrated gasification combined cycle desulfurization unit and new sulfide smelting plants, contain much higher partial pressures of SO2. In these cases, the rate of the first reaction is expected to be proportionally higher than in the test conditions reported in this paper. PMID:12144280

  9. Sulfur in serpentinized oceanic peridotites: Serpentinization processes and microbial sulfate reduction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Alt, J.C.; Shanks, Wayne C., III

    1998-01-01

    The mineralogy, contents, and isotopic compositions of sulfur in oceanic serpentinites reflect variations in temperatures and fluid fluxes. Serpentinization of <1 Ma peridotites at Hess Deep occurred at high temperatures (200??-400??C) and low water/rock ratios. Oxidation of ferrous iron to magnetite maintained low fO2and produced a reduced, low-sulfur assemblage including NiFe alloy. Small amounts of sulfate reduction by thermophilic microbes occurred as the system cooled, producing low-??34S sulfide (1.5??? to -23.7???). In contrast, serpentinization of Iberian Margin peridotites occurred at low temperatures (???20??-200??C) and high water/rock ratios. Complete serpentinization and consumption of ferrous iron allowed evolution to higher fO2. Microbial reduction of seawater sulfate resulted in addition of low-??34S sulfide (-15 to -43???) and formation of higher-sulfur assemblages that include valleriite and pyrite. The high SO4/total S ratio of Hess Deep serpentinites (0.89) results in an increase of total sulfur and high ??34S of total sulfur (mean ??? 8???). In contrast, Iberian Margin serpentinites gained large amounts of 34S-poor sulfide (mean total S = 3800 ppm), and the high sulfide/total S ratio (0.61) results in a net decrease in ??34S of total sulfur (mean ??? -5???). Thus serpentinization is a net sink for seawater sulfur, but the amount fixed and its isotopic composition vary significantly. Serpentinization may result in uptake of 0.4-14 ?? 1012 g S yr-1 from the oceans, comparable to isotopic exchange in mafic rocks of seafloor hydrothermal systems and approaching global fluxes of riverine sulfate input and sedimentary sulfide output.

  10. A novel three phase fluidized bed process for simultaneous selective flocculation and microbial desulfurization of high sulfur coal

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, Liang-Shih; Bavarian, F.; Attia, Y.A.; Elzeky, M. )

    1990-10-16

    The purpose of this work was to investigate the feasibility of recovery and reclamation of ultrafine coal particles generated during the processing of coal. 10--35% of the total annual tonnage of coal in atypical coal preparation plant is estimated to be lost in forms of ultrafine particles during the mining, shipping, handling, and preparation of the coal. The technical feasibility of the proposed system which consisted of an integrated circuit of selective flocculation followed by microbial desulfurization, has been tested. The results indicate that using selective flocculation/froth flotation circuit, coal recoveryis 85% with 75% pyritic sulfur and 60% ash rejections. The remaining pyritic sulfur in the coal slurry was treated using microbial desulfurization in a draft-tube fluidized bed bioreactor. Using this reactor scheme considerable enhancement of the bioleaching rate was obtained. The results indicate that 90% rejection of pyritic sulfur can be achieved in less than 24 hrs. Note that the previously reported data for the bioleaching rate are from 4 to 12 days for the same amount of pyritic rejection. The results obtained in this work closely reflects the anticipated outcomes which were projected in the original proposal. Consequently, the results of this work implies a significant improvement in bioleaching process and the possibility for the commercialization of the microbial desulfurization process. Our results also indicate further improvement of this process by optimization of reactor sequence and operating conditions.

  11. A novel three phase fluidized bed process for simultaneous selective flocculation and microbial desulfurization of high sulfur coal. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, Liang-Shih; Bavarian, F.; Attia, Y.A.; Elzeky, M.

    1990-10-16

    The purpose of this work was to investigate the feasibility of recovery and reclamation of ultrafine coal particles generated during the processing of coal. 10--35% of the total annual tonnage of coal in atypical coal preparation plant is estimated to be lost in forms of ultrafine particles during the mining, shipping, handling, and preparation of the coal. The technical feasibility of the proposed system which consisted of an integrated circuit of selective flocculation followed by microbial desulfurization, has been tested. The results indicate that using selective flocculation/froth flotation circuit, coal recoveryis 85% with 75% pyritic sulfur and 60% ash rejections. The remaining pyritic sulfur in the coal slurry was treated using microbial desulfurization in a draft-tube fluidized bed bioreactor. Using this reactor scheme considerable enhancement of the bioleaching rate was obtained. The results indicate that 90% rejection of pyritic sulfur can be achieved in less than 24 hrs. Note that the previously reported data for the bioleaching rate are from 4 to 12 days for the same amount of pyritic rejection. The results obtained in this work closely reflects the anticipated outcomes which were projected in the original proposal. Consequently, the results of this work implies a significant improvement in bioleaching process and the possibility for the commercialization of the microbial desulfurization process. Our results also indicate further improvement of this process by optimization of reactor sequence and operating conditions.

  12. Sulfate reduction and mixotrophic sulfide-utilization denitrification integrated biofilm process for sulfate-laden wastewater treatment and sulfur recovery.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Liang, Xiao; Lin, Jianguo; Cao, Binxia; Guo, Ping; Liu, Xinyi; Wang, Zhen

    2015-01-01

    A novel and integrated biofilm process--the sulfate reduction (SR) and mixotrophic (MR) sulfide-utilization denitrification process (SMSD)--was recently proposed for sulfate treatment and sulfur recovery. The process consisted of two bioreactors: a 5.1 L anaerobic upflow reactor for SR, and a 3.5 L anaerobic upflow reactor for MR desulfurization-denitrification. The experiment was conducted for 370 days to evaluate the performance of SMSD at various sulfate concentrations and hydraulic retention times. The process successfully achieved sulfate, organics and nitrogen compound removal efficiencies of 94.1, 97.7 and 99.1%, respectively. Sulfate was predominantly converted to element sulfur, while nitrate and nitrite were finally converted to nitrogen gas. In SR, with the help of high pH and sponge cubes with various bacteria, 97.5% of sulfide conversion efficiency and 540 mgS/L of sulfide were obtained. In MR, sulfide was removed up to 100% and was partially oxidized to sulfur. The extent of heterotrophic denitrification, which ranged from 35.8 to 59.8%, depended on the categories of electron acceptors. PMID:26067506

  13. Instrumental methods of analysis of sulfur compounds in synfuel process streams. Quarterly technical progress report, October-December 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, J.; Sexton, E.; Talbott, J.; Yakupkovic, J.

    1984-01-01

    Task 1. Methods development for the speciation of the polysulfides. The contributions of this project to the electrochemical analysis of sulfides and polysulfides are reviewed and summarized. Electrochemical reduction at the dropping mercury electrode (DME) is the method of choice for the determination of polysulfidic sulfur. Total sulfidic sulfur can conveniently be quantitated in mixtures of sulfides and polysulfides, by measuring diffusion currents engendered by the anodic depolarization of the DME in the presence of the moieties HS/sup -/ and S/sub x//sup 2 -/. Task 2. Methods development for the speciation of dithionite and polythionates. In a solvent consisting of 40% ethanol-60% water, electrocapillary curves substantiated the adsorption of ethanol at the dropping mercury electrode. The potentials where adsorption occurred paralleled a shift of 1 volt in the polarographic half potential of the reaction: S/sub 4/O/sub 6//sup 2 -/ + 2e = 2S/sub 2/O/sub 3//sup 2 -/. Task 3. Total accounting of the sulfur balance in representative samples of synfuel process streams. Two H-Coal liquefaction sour water samples were analyzed representing different stages in the PETC clean-up procedures. One specimen was a sample stripped of H/sub 2/S and ammonia; the other, resulting from a different batch, was stripped and subsequently extracted with methyl isobutyl ketone. The stripped effluent contained less than 0.001 M concentrations of sulfide, polysulfide, thiosulfate, and sulfate. On the other hand, sulfate accounted for 90% of the total sulfur present in the stripped and extracted sample; the remainder consisted of sulfidic and polysulfidic sulfur as well as thiosulfate. 13 references, 2 figures, 3 tables.

  14. Decoupling of sulfur and nitrogen cycling due to biotic processes in a tropical rainforest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi-Balan, Simona A.; Amundson, Ronald; Buss, Heather L.

    2014-10-01

    We examined the terrestrial sulfur (S) cycle in the wet tropical Luquillo Experimental Forest (LEF), Puerto Rico. In two previously instrumented watersheds (Icacos and Bisley), chemical and isotopic measurements of carbon (C), nitrogen (N) and S were used to explore the inputs, in-soil processing, and losses of S through comparison to the N cycle. Additionally, the impact of soil forming factors (particularly climate, organisms, topography and parent material) on S cycling in this system was considered. Atmospheric inputs (δ34S values of 16.1 ± 2.8‰), from a mixture of marine and anthropogenic sources, delivered an estimated 2.2 g S/(m2yr) at Icacos, and 1.8 g S/(m2yr) at Bisley. Bedrock N and S inputs to soil were minimal. We estimated a hydrologic export of 1.7 ± 0.1 g S/(m2yr) at Icacos, and 2.5 ± 0.2 g S/(m2yr) at Bisley. Stream baseflow S isotope data revealed significant bedrock S in the hydrologic export at Bisley (with a distinctive δ34S values of 1.6 ± 0.7‰), but not at Icacos. Pore water data supported the co-occurrence of at least three major biological S-fractionating processes in these soils: plant uptake, oxidative degradation of organic S and bacterial sulfate reduction. The rates and relative importance of these processes varied in time and space. Vegetation litter was 3-5‰ depleted in 34S compared to the average pore water, providing evidence for fractionation during uptake and assimilation. Out of all abiotic soil forming factors, climate, especially the high rainfall, was the main driver of S biogeochemistry in the LEF by dictating the types and rates of processes. Topography appeared to impact S cycling by influencing redox conditions: C, N and S content decrease downslope at all sites, and the Bisley lower slope showed strongest evidence of bacterial sulfate reduction. Parent material type did not impact the soil S cycle significantly. To compare the fate of S and N in the soil, we used an advection model to describe the isotopic fractionation of total S and N associated with downward movement of organic matter in both dissolved and solid fractions. This model worked well for N, but the assumption of a constant fractionation factor α with depth failed to describe S transformations. This result revealed a fundamental difference between N and S cycling in these soils, indicating an apparent greater sensitivity of S isotopes to fluctuating redox conditions.

  15. Solution processable, cross-linked sulfur polymers as solid electrolytes in dye-sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Peng; Gardner, James M; Kloo, Lars

    2015-10-01

    Inverse-vulcanized polymeric sulfur has been prepared and utilized for solid-state dye sensitized solar cells. A power conversion efficiency of 1.5% was recorded with a short-circuit current of 4.1 mA cm(-2) and an open-circuit voltage of 0.75 V under standard AM 1.5G illumination (1000 W m(-2)). The results in the present study qualify the new polymeric sulfur material as a future candidate as low-cost, hole-transport material for solid-state dye-sensitized solar cells. PMID:26291876

  16. Simultaneous nitrogen and phosphorus removal in the sulfur cycle-associated Enhanced Biological Phosphorus Removal (EBPR) process.

    PubMed

    Wu, Di; Ekama, George A; Wang, Hai-Guang; Wei, Li; Lu, Hui; Chui, Ho-Kwong; Liu, Wen-Tso; Brdjanovic, Damir; van Loosdrecht, Mark C M; Chen, Guang-Hao

    2014-02-01

    Hong Kong has practiced seawater toilet flushing since 1958, saving 750,000 m(3) of freshwater every day. A high sulfate-to-COD ratio (>1.25 mg SO4(2-)/mg COD) in the saline sewage resulting from this practice has enabled us to develop the Sulfate reduction, Autotrophic denitrification and Nitrification Integrated (SANI(®)) process with minimal sludge production and oxygen demand. Recently, the SANI(®) process has been expanded to include Enhanced Biological Phosphorus Removal (EBPR) in an alternating anaerobic/limited-oxygen (LOS-EBPR) aerobic sequencing batch reactor (SBR). This paper presents further development - an anaerobic/anoxic denitrifying sulfur cycle-associated EBPR, named as DS-EBPR, bioprocess in an alternating anaerobic/anoxic SBR for simultaneous removal of organics, nitrogen and phosphorus. The 211 day SBR operation confirmed the sulfur cycle-associated biological phosphorus uptake utilizing nitrate as electron acceptor. This new bioprocess cannot only reduce operation time but also enhance volumetric loading of SBR compared with the LOS-EBPR. The DS-EBPR process performed well at high temperatures of 30 °C and a high salinity of 20% seawater. A synergistic relationship may exist between sulfur cycle and biological phosphorus removal as the optimal ratio of P-release to SO4(2-)-reduction is close to 1.0 mg P/mg S. There were no conventional PAOs in the sludge. PMID:24342048

  17. Removal of organic and inorganic sulfur from Ohio coal by combined physical and chemical process. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Attia, Y.A.; Zeky, M.El.; Lei, W.W.; Bavarian, F.; Yu, S.

    1989-04-28

    This project consisted of three sections. In the first part, the physical cleaning of Ohio coal by selective flocculation of ultrafine slurry was considered. In the second part, the mild oxidation process for removal of pyritic and organic sulfur.was investigated. Finally, in-the third part, the combined effects of these processes were studied. The physical cleaning and desulfurization of Ohio coal was achieved using selective flocculation of ultrafine coal slurry in conjunction with froth flotation as flocs separation method. The finely disseminated pyrite particles in Ohio coals, in particular Pittsburgh No.8 seam, make it necessary to use ultrafine ({minus}500 mesh) grinding to liberate the pyrite particles. Experiments were performed to identify the ``optimum`` operating conditions for selective flocculation process. The results indicated that the use of a totally hydrophobic flocculant (FR-7A) yielded the lowest levels of mineral matters and total sulfur contents. The use of a selective dispersant (PAAX) increased the rejection of pyritic sulfur further. In addition, different methods of floc separation techniques were tested. It was found that froth flotation system was the most efficient method for separation of small coal flocs.

  18. Effect of Dietary Processed Sulfur Supplementation on Texture Quality, Color and Mineral Status of Dry-cured Ham

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    This study was performed to investigate the chemical composition, mineral status, oxidative stability, and texture attributes of dry-cured ham from pigs fed processed sulfur (S, 1 g/kg feed), and from those fed a basal diet (CON), during the period from weaning to slaughter (174 d). Total collagen content and soluble collagen of the S group was significantly higher than that of the control group (p<0.05). The pH of the S group was significantly higher than that of the control group, whereas the S group had a lower expressible drip compared to the control group. The S group also showed the lower lightness compared to the control group (p<0.05). In regard to the mineral status, the S group had significantly lower Fe2+ and Ca2+ content than the control group (p<0.05), whereas the proteolysis index of the S group was significantly increased compared to the control group (p<0.05). The feeding of processed sulfur to pigs led to increased oxidative stability, related to lipids and pigments, in the dry-cured ham (p<0.05). Compared to the dry-cured ham from the control group, that from the S group exhibited lower springiness and gumminess; these results suggest that feeding processed sulfur to pigs can improve the quality of the texture and enhance the oxidative stability of dry-cured ham. PMID:26761895

  19. Development of enhanced sulfur rejection processes. Final technical progress report, fifth quarter, October 1--December 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, R.H.; Luttrell, G.; Adel, G.; Richardson, P.E.

    1994-10-01

    Two complementary concepts for improving the removal of inorganic sulfur from many eastern US coals are the Electrochemically Enhanced Sulfur Rejection (EESR) and Polymer Enhanced Sulfur Rejection (PESR). The EESR process uses electrochemical techniques to suppress the formation of hydrophobic oxidation products believed to be responsible for the floatability of coal pyrite. The PESR process uses polymeric reagents that react with pyrite and convert floatable middlings (composite particles composed of pyrite with coal inclusions) into hydrophilic particles. It is believed that these processes can be used simultaneously to maximize the rejection of both well-liberated pyrite and composite coal-pyrite particles. During the current reporting period, work was conducted in the following areas: studies of the liberation characteristics of various pyrite samples, identification of oxidation products on pyrite using XPS technique, studies of reagent adsorption on pyrite using FTIR and contact angles, identification of the most effective sacrificial anode material for depressing pyrite, and identification of the most effective polymer for depressing pyrite. Some of the more significant findings made during the current reporting periods are as follows: (1) liberation characteristics of Illinois No. 6 coal have been determined, (2) effects of pH and electrochemical potentials on the flotation of coal and mineral pyrite have been established, (3) an effective method of keeping coal pyrite under reducing conditions and, hence, preventing self-induced flotation has been developed, and (4) an effective polymeric pyrite depressant has been identified.

  20. Surface acoustic wave sensors/gas chromatography; and Low quality natural gas sulfur removal and recovery CNG Claus sulfur recovery process

    SciTech Connect

    Klint, B.W.; Dale, P.R.; Stephenson, C.

    1997-12-01

    This topical report consists of the two titled projects. Surface Acoustic Wave/Gas Chromatography (SAW/GC) provides a cost-effective system for collecting real-time field screening data for characterization of vapor streams contaminated with volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The Model 4100 can be used in a field screening mode to produce chromatograms in 10 seconds. This capability will allow a project manager to make immediate decisions and to avoid the long delays and high costs associated with analysis by off-site analytical laboratories. The Model 4100 is currently under evaluation by the California Environmental Protection Agency Technology Certification Program. Initial certification focuses upon the following organics: cis-dichloroethylene, chloroform, carbon tetrachloride, trichlorethylene, tetrachloroethylene, tetrachloroethane, benzene, ethylbenzene, toluene, and o-xylene. In the second study the CNG Claus process is being evaluated for conversion and recovery of elemental sulfur from hydrogen sulfide, especially found in low quality natural gas. This report describes the design, construction and operation of a pilot scale plant built to demonstrate the technical feasibility of the integrated CNG Claus process.

  1. ADVANCED SULFUR CONTROL CONCEPTS

    SciTech Connect

    Apostolos A. Nikolopoulos; Santosh K. Gangwal; William J. McMichael; Jeffrey W. Portzer

    2003-01-01

    Conventional sulfur removal in integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants involves numerous steps: COS (carbonyl sulfide) hydrolysis, amine scrubbing/regeneration, Claus process, and tail-gas treatment. Advanced sulfur removal in IGCC systems involves typically the use of zinc oxide-based sorbents. The sulfides sorbent is regenerated using dilute air to produce a dilute SO{sub 2} (sulfur dioxide) tail gas. Under previous contracts the highly effective first generation Direct Sulfur Recovery Process (DSRP) for catalytic reduction of this SO{sub 2} tail gas to elemental sulfur was developed. This process is currently undergoing field-testing. In this project, advanced concepts were evaluated to reduce the number of unit operations in sulfur removal and recovery. Substantial effort was directed towards developing sorbents that could be directly regenerated to elemental sulfur in an Advanced Hot Gas Process (AHGP). Development of this process has been described in detail in Appendices A-F. RTI began the development of the Single-step Sulfur Recovery Process (SSRP) to eliminate the use of sorbents and multiple reactors in sulfur removal and recovery. This process showed promising preliminary results and thus further process development of AHGP was abandoned in favor of SSRP. The SSRP is a direct Claus process that consists of injecting SO{sub 2} directly into the quenched coal gas from a coal gasifier, and reacting the H{sub 2}S-SO{sub 2} mixture over a selective catalyst to both remove and recover sulfur in a single step. The process is conducted at gasifier pressure and 125 to 160 C. The proposed commercial embodiment of the SSRP involves a liquid phase of molten sulfur with dispersed catalyst in a slurry bubble-column reactor (SBCR).

  2. Development of a solid absorption process for removal of sulfur from fuel gas. First quarterly technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Stegen, G.E.; Olson, K.M.

    1980-05-01

    Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratories has begun to develop a project for removing sulfur compounds from fuel gases at elevated temperature (> 700/sup 0/C) based on the use of molten mixtures of alkali metal carbonates and calcium carbonate as the active reactants. The sulfur removal capacity of the molten salt mixture may be regenerated by stripping with CO/sub 2/ and steam, usually at a reduced temperature. In this process, the molten salt mixture is contained within the pores of a porous ceramic substrate material which may be used in a packed bed, moving bed, or fluidized bed absorber. The process would be used most advantageously in applications where it is desirable to reduce or eliminate any cooling of the fuel gas between the gasifier outlet and the gas user. Examples of such applications include gas turbines, high temperature fuel cells, boilers, and furnaces which operate in relatively close proximity to a coal gasifier. In these applications, reduction or elimination of the gas cooling requirements will generally improve thermal efficiency by retaining the sensible heat in the gas and may result in simplification of the process by elimination of gas cooling (and in some cases reheating) equipment and by elimination of process condensates and the equipment required for their handling and treatment. The objectives of the program are to obtain process and materials data sufficient to demonstrate feasibility of the process at bench scale and to allow preliminary economic analysis. Process data to be obtained include sorbent sulfur capacity, reaction kinetics, and other operating characteristics. Various candidate materials will be purchased or fabricated and tested for suitability as porous ceramic substrate materials.

  3. The Sulfur-Iodine Cycle: Process Analysis and Design Using Comprehensive Phase Equilibrium Measurements and Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Thies, Mark C.; O'Connell, J. P.; Gorensek, Maximilian B.

    2010-01-10

    Of the 100+ thermochemical hydrogen cycles that have been proposed, the Sulfur-Iodine (S-I) Cycle is a primary target of international interest for the centralized production of hydrogen from nuclear power. However, the cycle involves complex and highly nonideal phase behavior at extreme conditions that is only beginning to be understood and modeled for process simulation. The consequence is that current designs and efficiency projections have large uncertainties, as they are based on incomplete data that must be extrapolated from property models. This situation prevents reliable assessment of the potential viability of the system and, even more, a basis for efficient process design. The goal of this NERI award (05-006) was to generate phase-equilibrium data, property models, and comprehensive process simulations so that an accurate evaluation of the S-I Cycle could be made. Our focus was on Section III of the Cycle, where the hydrogen is produced by decomposition of hydroiodic acid (HI) in the presence of water and iodine (I2) in a reactive distillation (RD) column. The results of this project were to be transferred to the nuclear hydrogen community in the form of reliable flowsheet models for the S-I process. Many of the project objectives were achieved. At Clemson University, a unique, tantalum-based, phase-equilibrium apparatus incorporating a view cell was designed and constructed for measuring fluid-phase equilibria for mixtures of iodine, HI, and water (known as HIx) at temperatures to 350 °C and pressures to 100 bar. Such measurements were of particular interest for developing a working understanding of the expected operation of the RD column in Section III. The view cell allowed for the IR observation and discernment of vapor-liquid (VL), liquid-liquid, and liquid-liquid-vapor (LLVE) equilibria for HIx systems. For the I2-H2O system, liquid-liquid equilibrium (LLE) was discovered to exist at temperatures up to 310-315 °C, in contrast to the models and predictions of earlier workers. For the I2-HI-H2O ternary, LLE and LLVE were all observed for the first time at temperatures of 160 and 200 °C. Three LLE tie-lines were measured at 160 °C, and preliminary indications are that the underlying phase behavior could result in further improvements in the performance of the S-I Cycle. Unfortunately, these new results were obtained too late in the project to be incorporated into the modeling and simulation work described below. At the University of Virginia, a uniquely complete and reliable model was developed for the thermodynamic properties of HIx, covering the range of conditions expected for the separation of product hydrogen and recycled iodine in the RD column located in Section III. The model was validated with all available property spectroscopy data. The results provide major advances over prior understanding of the chemical speciation involved. The model was implemented in process simulation studies of the S-I Cycle, which showed improvement in energy efficiency to 42%, as well as significantly smaller capital requirements due to lower pressure operation and much smaller equipment sizes. The result is that the S-I Cycle may be much more economically feasible than was previously thought. If both the experimental and modeling work described above were to be continued to ultimate process optimization, both the American public and the global community would benefit from this alternative energy source that does not produce carbon emissions.

  4. Development of enhanced sulfur rejection processes. Technical progress report, sixth quarter, 1 January 1994--31 March 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, R.H.; Luttrell, G.; Adel, G.; Richardson, P.E.

    1994-08-03

    Recent work identified two major reasons why advanced coal cleaning technologies fail to meet a 90--95% rejection of pyrite from coal. They are: superficial oxidation of pyrite as an inadvertent corrosion-type process occurring during mining and processing, and (2) incomplete liberation of pyrite from coal causing a large fraction of the pyrite to remain associated or locked with the coal as middlings. Research suggests two solutions to these problems; Electrochemically-Enhanced Sulfur Rejection (EESR) and Polymer-Enhanced Sulfur Rejection (PESR) processes. The EESR concept uses sacrificial anodes to prevent the oxidation of pyrite. This technique is flexible enough to be implemented during the process of grinding, conditioning or flotation. The PESR process is based on synthesizing polymeric organic reagents whose functional groups react with pyrite, possibly via an electrochemical mechanism, while the hydrophilic polymer chains are stretched over the coal inclusions, rendering the pyrite-coal composite particles nonfloatable. The overall objective of this research is to develop these processes into technologies for improving the rejection of pyritic sulfur from eastern US coals. The objectives of the research carried out during this report period were: to complete characterization of the {minus}100 and {minus}28 mesh Illinois No. 6 pyrite; to review all fundamental studies completed to date on pyrite; to assess the results of microflotation tests and the effectiveness of polymeric depressants for the purpose of planning the next phase of research that is directed at evaluating and optimizing the depression of pyrite using electrochemical control and polymeric depressants. The most significant and reliable results obtained from research to date are presented.

  5. Sulfur and carbon geochemistry of the Santa Elena peridotites: Comparing oceanic and continental processes during peridotite alteration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarzenbach, Esther M.; Gill, Benjamin C.; Gazel, Esteban; Madrigal, Pilar

    2016-05-01

    Ultramafic rocks exposed on the continent serve as a window into oceanic and continental processes of water-peridotite interaction, so called serpentinization. In both environments there are active carbon and sulfur cycles that contain abiogenic and biogenic processes, which are eventually imprinted in the geochemical signatures of the basement rocks and the calcite and magnesite deposits associated with fluids that issue from these systems. Here, we present the carbon and sulfur geochemistry of ultramafic rocks and carbonate deposits from the Santa Elena ophiolite in Costa Rica. The aim of this study is to leverage the geochemistry of the ultramafic sequence and associated deposits to distinguish between processes that were dominant during ocean floor alteration and those dominant during low-temperature, continental water-peridotite interaction. The peridotites are variably serpentinized with total sulfur concentrations up to 877 ppm that is typically dominated by sulfide over sulfate. With the exception of one sample the ultramafic rocks are characterized by positive δ34Ssulfide (up to + 23.1‰) and δ34Ssulfate values (up to + 35.0‰). Carbon contents in the peridotites are low and are isotopically distinct from typical oceanic serpentinites. In particular, δ13C of the inorganic carbon suggests that the carbon is not derived from seawater, but rather the product of the interaction of meteoric water with the ultramafic rocks. In contrast, the sulfur isotope data from sulfide minerals in the peridotites preserve evidence for interaction with a hydrothermal fluid. Specifically, they indicate closed system abiogenic sulfate reduction suggesting that oceanic serpentinization occurred with limited input of seawater. Overall, the geochemical signatures preserve evidence for both oceanic and continental water-rock interaction with the majority of carbon (and possibly sulfate) being incorporated during continental water-rock interaction. Furthermore, there is evidence for microbial activity that was possibly stimulated by carbon sourced from water-rock interaction with adjacent sediments or fluid inclusions. This study provides detailed insight into the complex hydrothermal history of continental serpentinization systems and adds to our understanding of the carbon and sulfur cycling within peridotite-hosted hydrothermal systems.

  6. Controlled Nucleation and Growth Process of Li2S2/Li2S in Lithium-Sulfur Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Jianming; Gu, Meng; Wang, Chong M.; Zuo, Pengjian; Koech, Phillip K.; Zhang, Jiguang; Liu, Jun; Xiao, Jie

    2013-09-20

    Lithium-sulfur battery is a promising next-generation energy storage system because of its potentially three to five times higher energy density than that of traditional lithium ion batteries. However, the dissolution and precipitation of soluble polysulfides during cycling initiate a series of key-chain reactions that significantly shorten battery life. Herein, we demonstrate that through a simple but effective strategy, significantly improved cycling performance is achieved for high sulfur loading electrodes through controlling the nucleation and precipitation of polysulfieds on the electrode surface. More than 400 or 760 stable cycling are successfully displayed in the cells with locked discharge capacity of 625 mAh g-1 or 500 mAh g-1, respectively. The nucleation and growth process of dissolved polysulfides has been electrochemically altered to confine the thickness of discharge products passivated on the cathode surface, increasing the utilization rate of sulfur while avoiding severe morphology changes on the electrode. More importantly, the exposure of new lithium metal surface to the S-containing electrolyte is also greatly reduced through this strategy, largely minimizing the anode corrosion caused by polysulfides. This work interlocks the electrode morphologies and its evolution with electrochemical interference to modulate cell performances by using Li-S system as a platform, providing different but critical directions for this community.

  7. Controlled comparison of advanced froth flotation process technology and economic evaluations for maximizing BTU recovery and pyritic sulfur rejection

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, K.E.; Ferris, D.D. ); Kosky, R.M. ); Warchol, J.J.; Musiol, W.F.; Shiao, S.Y. ); Luttrell, G.H.; Adel, G.T.; Yoon, R.H. )

    1990-01-01

    The overall objective of this round robin project was to select the most efficient, as determined by the efficiency index, cost effective, as determined by the annual cost per ton of SO{sub 2} removed, advanced flotation device available. This machine was to process ultra fine coal, maximize Btu recovery and maximize pyritic sulfur rejection. The device will first be installed as a one hundred pound per hour capacity unit and, subject to the outcome of Task 6 of the Engineering Development Contract, increased to a 3 ton per hour capacity unit for installation into a proof-of-concept preparation plant. All of the technical and economic results were submitted to the TST for consideration. The TST members evaluated the data and determined to rank each of the participants 50% on technical merit and 50% on economic merit. The technical merit was to be the efficiency index. The economical merit was to be the annual dollars per ton of clean coal corrected for carrying capacity and frother concentration and the results of Test No. 4. This factor does not penalize a particular technology for not meeting a 90% pyritic sulfur rejection and therefore leaves something to be desired as the only economic basis for decision. A second economic evaluation criteria was required that considered the $/ton of sulfur dioxide removed. The technical and economic factors were calculated and added together for the final evaluation ranking. The technical factor was calculated by multiplying the efficiency index for each participant by 0.5. The two economic factors were calculated by dividing 1000 by the $/ton of clean coal and multiplying by 0.5 and by dividing 10,000 by the $/ton of sulfur dioxide removed and multiply by 0.5. The 1000 and 10,000 are numbers selected such that when divided by their economic factors, respective numbers resulted in a two digit number. The results of these calculations are discussed. 4 refs., 18 figs., 27 tabs.

  8. Development of instrumental methods of analysis of sulfur compounds in coal process streams. Quarterly technical progress report for October-December 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, J.; Stutts, J. D.; Ankabrandt, S. J.; Stahl, J.; Yakupkovic, J. E.

    1981-01-01

    Work is in progress on the preparation of a user-oriented computer software manual, for estimating sulfur speciation in aqueous coal process streams form a thermodynamic data base. Capabilities and limitations of sulfide and polysulfide analysis by differential pulse polarography at a dropping mercury anode are assessed critically. Thallous nitrate used as the titrant reagent in a thermometric enthalpy titration yields the molar sum of monosulfide and polysulfide. Inorganic sulfur has been successfully speciated in coal conversion by-product water samples. A combination of differential pulse voltammetry, thermometric enthalpy titrations and classical methods was used. One hundred percent of the total sulfur present was quantitatively accounted for.

  9. The global sulfur cycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sagan, D. (Editor)

    1985-01-01

    The results of the planetary biology microbial ecology's 1984 Summer Research Program, which examined various aspects of the global sulfur cycle are summarized. Ways in which sulfur flows through the many living and chemical species that inhabit the surface of the Earth were investigated. Major topics studied include: (1) sulfur cycling and metabolism of phototropic and filamentous sulfur bacteria; (2) sulfur reduction in sediments of marine and evaporite environments; (3) recent cyanobacterial mats; (4) microanalysis of community metabolism in proximity to the photic zone in potential stromatolites; and (5) formation and activity of microbial biofilms on metal sulfides and other mineral surfaces. Relationships between the global sulfur cycle and the understanding of the early evolution of the Earth and biosphere and current processes that affect global habitability are stressed.

  10. Gasoline from natural gas by sulfur processing. Quarterly technical progress report No. 2, October 1, 1993--December 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Erekson, E.J.; Miao, F.Q.

    1994-02-01

    This report presents the work performed at the Institute of Gas Technology (IGT) during the second program quarter from October 1, 1993 to December 31, 1993, under Department of Energy (DOE) Contract No. DE-AC22-93PC92114. This program has co-ordinated funding for Task 1 from IGT`s Sustaining Membership Program (SMP), while DOE is funding Tasks 2--8. Progress in all tasks are reported. The overall objective of this research project is to develop a catalytic process to convert natural gas to liquid transportation fuels. The process consists of two steps that each utilize catalysts and sulfur containing intermediates: (1) to convert natural gas to CS{sub 2} and (2) to convert CS{sub 2} to gasoline range liquids. Experimental data will be generated to demonstrate the potential of catalysts and the overall process. During this quarter, progress in the following areas has been made. An existing unit at IGT was modified to accommodate the sulfur feedstocks and the higher temperatures (>1300{degree}K) required for studying the reactions of hydrogen sulfide and methane as proposed in Tasks 2--5. An HP 5890 gas chromatograph with a TCD (thermal conductivity detector) for detecting fixed gases including hydrogen and an FPD (flame photometric detector) for detecting sulfur compounds was purchased using SMP funds and has been installed and calibrated. A total of seventy runs on MoS{sub 2}, WS{sub 2}, ZrS{sub 2} catalysts as well as quartz wool were performed. As high as 61% H{sub 2}S conversion was observed.

  11. Advanced sulfur control concepts

    SciTech Connect

    Gangwal, S.K.; Turk, B.S.; Gupta, R.P.

    1995-11-01

    Regenerable metal oxide sorbents, such as zinc titanate, are being developed to efficiently remove hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) from coal gas in advanced power systems. Dilute air regeneration of the sorbents produces a tailgas containing a few percent sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}). Catalytic reduction of the SO{sub 2} to elemental sulfur with a coal gas slipstream using the Direct Sulfur Recovery Process (DSRP) is a leading first-generation technology. Currently the DSRP is undergoing field testing at gasifier sites. The objective of this study is to develop second-generation processes that produce elemental sulfur without coal gas or with limited use. Novel approaches that were evaluated to produce elemental sulfur from sulfided sorbents include (1) sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) regeneration, (2) substoichiometric (partial) oxidation, (3) steam regeneration followed by H{sub 2}S oxidation, and (4) steam-air regeneration. Preliminary assessment of these approaches indicated that developing SO{sub 2} regeneration faced the fewest technical and economic problems among the four process options. Elemental sulfur is the only likely product of SO{sub 2} regeneration and the SO{sub 2} required for the regeneration can be obtained by burning a portion of the sulfur produced. Experimental efforts have thus been concentrated on SO{sub 2}-based regeneration processes. Results from laboratory investigations are presented and discussed.

  12. Initial Assessment of Sulfur-Iodine Process Safety Issues and How They May Affect Pilot Plant Design and Operation

    SciTech Connect

    Robert S. Cherry

    2006-09-01

    The sulfur-iodine process to make hydrogen by the thermochemical splitting of water is under active development as part of a U.S. Department of Energy program. An integrated lab scale system is currently being designed and built. The next planned stage of development is a pilot plant with a thermal input of about 500 kW, equivalent to about 30,000 standard liters per hour of hydrogen production. The sulfur-iodine process contains a variety of hazards, including temperatures up to 850 ºC and hazardous chemical species including SO2, H2SO4, HI, I2, and of course H2. The siting and design of a pilot plant must consider these and other hazards. This report presents an initial analysis of the hazards that might affect pilot plant design and should be considered in the initial planning. The general hazards that have been identified include reactivity, flammability, toxicity, pressure, electrical hazards, and industrial hazards such as lifting and rotating equipment. Personnel exposure to these hazards could occur during normal operations, which includes not only running the process at the design conditions but also initial inventory loading, heatup, startup, shutdown, and system flushing before equipment maintenance. Because of the complexity and severity of the process, these ancillary operations are expected to be performed frequently. In addition, personnel could be exposed to the hazards during various abnormal situations which could include unplanned phase changes of liquids or solids, leaks of process fluids or cooling water into other process streams, unintentional introducion of foreign species into the process, and unexpected side reactions. Design of a pilot plant will also be affected by various codes and regulations such as the International Building Code, the International Fire Code, various National Fire Protection Association Codes, and the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act.

  13. Sulfur-oxidizing bacteria dominate the microbial diversity shift during the pyrite and low-grade pyrolusite bioleaching process.

    PubMed

    Han, Yifan; Ma, Xiaomei; Zhao, Wei; Chang, Yunkang; Zhang, Xiaoxia; Wang, Xingbiao; Wang, Jingjing; Huang, Zhiyong

    2013-10-01

    The microbial ecology of the pyrite-pyrolusite bioleaching system and its interaction with ore has not been well-described. A 16S rRNA gene clone library was created to evaluate changes in the microbial community at different stages of the pyrite-pyrolusite bioleaching process in a shaken flask. The results revealed that the bacterial community was disturbed after 5 days of the reaction. Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA sequences demonstrated that the predominant microorganisms were members of a genus of sulfur-oxidizing bacteria, Thiomonas sp., that subsequently remained dominant during the bioleaching process. Compared with iron-oxidizing bacteria, sulfur-oxidizing bacteria were more favorable to the pyrite-pyrolusite bioleaching system. Decreased pH due to microbial acid production was an important condition for bioleaching efficiency. Iron-oxidizing bacteria competed for pyrite reduction power with Mn(IV) in pyrolusite under specific conditions. These results extend our knowledge of microbial dynamics during pyrite-pyrolusite bioleaching, which is a key issue to improve commercial applications. PMID:23673133

  14. Determination of sulfur and nitrogen compounds during the processing of dry fermented sausages and their relation to amino acid generation.

    PubMed

    Corral, Sara; Leitner, Erich; Siegmund, Barbara; Flores, Mónica

    2016-01-01

    The identification of odor-active sulfur and nitrogen compounds formed during the processing of dry fermented sausages was the objective of this study. In order to elucidate their possible origin, free amino acids (FAAs) were also determined. The volatile compounds present in the dry sausages were extracted using solvent assisted flavor evaporation (SAFE) and monitored by one and two-dimensional gas chromatography with different detectors: mass spectrometry (MS), nitrogen phosphorous (NPD), flame photometric (FPD) detectors, as well as gas chromatography-olfactometry. A total of seventeen sulfur and nitrogen compounds were identified and quantified. Among them, 2-acetyl-1-pyrroline was the most potent odor active compound, followed by methional, ethylpyrazine and 2,3-dihydrothiophene characterized by toasted, cooked potato, and nutty notes. The degradation of FAAs, generated during processing, was related to the production of aroma compounds, such as methionine forming methional and benzothiazole while ornithine was the precursor compound for 2-acetyl-1-pyrroline and glycine for ethylpyrazine. PMID:26213023

  15. EFFECT OF ELECTROLYZER CONFIGURATION AND PERFORMANCE ON HYBRID SULFUR PROCESS NET THERMAL EFFICIENCY

    SciTech Connect

    Gorensek, M

    2007-03-16

    Hybrid Sulfur cycle is gaining popularity as a possible means for massive production of hydrogen from nuclear energy. Several different ways of carrying out the SO{sub 2}-depolarized electrolysis step are being pursued by a number of researchers. These alternatives are evaluated with complete flowsheet simulations and on a common design basis using Aspen Plus{trademark}. Sensitivity analyses are performed to assess the performance potential of each configuration, and the flowsheets are optimized for energy recovery. Net thermal efficiencies are calculated for the best set of operating conditions for each flowsheet and the results compared. This will help focus attention on the most promising electrolysis alternatives. The sensitivity analyses should also help identify those features that offer the greatest potential for improvement.

  16. Sulfur recovery process using metal oxide absorbent with regenerator recycle to claus catalytic reactor

    SciTech Connect

    McGovern, J.J.; Pendergraft, P.T.; Lee, M.H.

    1989-01-10

    This patent describes a method comprising: converting H/sub 2/S in an acid gas feedstream to a Claus plant to elemental sulfur by the Claus reaction and producing a Claus plant tailgas in a Claus plant comprising a Claus furnace and a Claus catalytic reactor; removing both H/sub 2/S and SO/sub 2/ in the presence of ZnO; regenerating ZnS to ZnO in the presence of O/sub 2/ producing regenerator effluent; providing a portion of acid gas feedstream withdrawn upstream of the Claus furnace to oxidation means distinct from the Claus furnace for oxidizing H/sub 2/S to SO/sub 2/ in the presence of O/sub 2/; further providing regenerator effluent to the oxidation means; and providing effluent from the oxidation means to the Claus catalytic reactor of the Claus plant.

  17. Zeolites Remove Sulfur From Fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voecks, Gerald E.; Sharma, Pramod K.

    1991-01-01

    Zeolites remove substantial amounts of sulfur compounds from diesel fuel under relatively mild conditions - atmospheric pressure below 300 degrees C. Extracts up to 60 percent of sulfur content of high-sulfur fuel. Applicable to petroleum refineries, natural-gas processors, electric powerplants, and chemical-processing plants. Method simpler and uses considerably lower pressure than current industrial method, hydro-desulfurization. Yields cleaner emissions from combustion of petroleum fuels, and protects catalysts from poisoning by sulfur.

  18. Amine-based gas sweetening and claus sulfur recovery process chemistry and waste stream survey. Topical report

    SciTech Connect

    Skinner, F.D.; McIntush, K.E.; Murff, M.C.

    1995-12-01

    A significant fraction of the natural gas produced in the U.S. contains acid gases--primarily hydrogen sulfide (H2S) and carbon dioxide (CO2)--in sufficiently high concentrations as to be considered subquality. These contaminants must be removed for the gas to be safely and economically transported. The report presents the results of a project undertaken for GRI to assemble in a single document information on: (1) the identity and characteristics of the waste streams produced by the major gas sweetening and sulfur recovery processes; (2) the possible effects of process chemistry and the nature of the gas being treated on waste characteristics; (3) currently available options for waste stream disposition; and (4) the effects of environmental regulations, both current and foreseeable, on waste stream disposition.

  19. Calcium looping process for high purity hydrogen production integrated with capture of carbon dioxide, sulfur and halides

    DOEpatents

    Ramkumar, Shwetha; Fan, Liang-Shih

    2013-07-30

    A process for producing hydrogen comprising the steps of: (i) gasifying a fuel into a raw synthesis gas comprising CO, hydrogen, steam, sulfur and halide contaminants in the form of H.sub.2S, COS, and HX, wherein X is a halide; (ii) passing the raw synthesis gas through a water gas shift reactor (WGSR) into which CaO and steam are injected, the CaO reacting with the shifted gas to remove CO.sub.2, sulfur and halides in a solid-phase calcium-containing product comprising CaCO.sub.3, CaS and CaX.sub.2; (iii) separating the solid-phase calcium-containing product from an enriched gaseous hydrogen product; and (iv) regenerating the CaO by calcining the solid-phase calcium-containing product at a condition selected from the group consisting of: in the presence of steam, in the presence of CO.sub.2, in the presence of synthesis gas, in the presence of H.sub.2 and O.sub.2, under partial vacuum, and combinations thereof.

  20. Calcium looping process for high purity hydrogen production integrated with capture of carbon dioxide, sulfur and halides

    SciTech Connect

    Ramkumar, Shwetha; Fan, Liang-Shih

    2015-11-04

    A process for producing hydrogen comprising the steps of: (i) gasifying a fuel into a raw synthesis gas comprising CO, hydrogen, steam, sulfur and halide contaminants in the form of H.sub.2S, COS, and HX, wherein X is a halide; (ii) passing the raw synthesis gas through a water gas shift reactor (WGSR) into which CaO and steam are injected, the CaO reacting with the shifted gas to remove CO.sub.2, sulfur and halides in a solid-phase calcium-containing product comprising CaCO.sub.3, CaS and CaX.sub.2; (iii) separating the solid-phase calcium-containing product from an enriched gaseous hydrogen product; and (iv) regenerating the CaO by calcining the solid-phase calcium-containing product at a condition selected from the group consisting of: in the presence of steam, in the presence of CO.sub.2, in the presence of synthesis gas, in the presence of H.sub.2 and O.sub.2, under partial vacuum, and combinations thereof.

  1. Iron dissolution of dust source materials during simulated acidic processing: the effect of sulfuric, acetic, and oxalic acids.

    PubMed

    Chen, Haihan; Grassian, Vicki H

    2013-09-17

    Atmospheric organic acids potentially display different capacities in iron (Fe) mobilization from atmospheric dust compared with inorganic acids, but few measurements have been made on this comparison. We report here a laboratory investigation of Fe mobilization of coal fly ash, a representative Fe-containing anthropogenic aerosol, and Arizona test dust, a reference source material for mineral dust, in pH 2 sulfuric acid, acetic acid, and oxalic acid, respectively. The effects of pH and solar radiation on Fe dissolution have also been explored. The relative capacities of these three acids in Fe dissolution are in the order of oxalic acid > sulfuric acid > acetic acid. Oxalate forms mononuclear bidentate ligand with surface Fe and promotes Fe dissolution to the greatest extent. Photolysis of Fe-oxalate complexes further enhances Fe dissolution with the concomitant degradation of oxalate. These results suggest that ligand-promoted dissolution of Fe may play a more significant role in mobilizing Fe from atmospheric dust compared with proton-assisted processing. The role of atmospheric organic acids should be taken into account in global-biogeochemical modeling to better access dissolved atmospheric Fe deposition flux at the ocean surface. PMID:23883276

  2. Structural insight into SoxC and SoxD interaction and their role in electron transport process in the novel global sulfur cycle in Paracoccus pantotrophus

    SciTech Connect

    Bagchi, Angshuman . E-mail: prodosh@bic.boseinst.ernet.in

    2005-06-17

    Microbial oxidation of reduced inorganic sulfur compounds mainly sulfur anions in the environment is one of the major reactions of the global sulfur cycle mediated by phylogenetically diverse prokaryotes. The sulfur oxidizing gene cluster (sox) of {alpha}-Proteobacteria comprises of at least 16 genes, which form two transcriptional units, viz., soxSRT and soxVWXYZABCDEFGH. Sequence analysis reveals that soxD gene product (SoxD) belongs to the di-heme cytochrome c family of electron transport proteins whereas soxC gene product (SoxC) is a sulfur dehydrogenase. We employed homology modeling to construct the three-dimensional structures of the SoxC and SoxD from Paracoccus pantotrophus. SoxD protein is known to interact with SoxC. With the help of docking studies we have identified the residues involved in the interaction of SoxC and SoxD. The putative active site geometries of these two proteins as well as the structural basis of the involvements of these proteins in electron transport process during the oxidation of sulfur anions are also investigated.

  3. A Summary of Experiments in Converting Copper Oxide Process Regenerator Off-Gases to Elemental Sulfur, CRADA 97-F006, Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Brian C. Cianciolo; Richard J. Oehlberg; Sidney G. Nelson

    1999-01-22

    Sorbent Technologies Corporation (Sorbtech) of Twinsburg, Ohio has developed a new technology for converting SO{sub 2}-rich gas streams directly to elemental sulfur. Key to the technology is a special catalyst that promotes the reaction of SO{sub 2} with reformed natural gas. The technology evolved from earlier flue-gas desulfurization (FGD) work that Sorbtech engineers performed in the late 1980's. In 1995, with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) support, Sorbtech designed and constructed a larger, skid-mounted pilot-test unit suitable for demonstrating the new technology in field tests. This Report summarizes months of preparation work and eight days of testing that were performed at FETC'S facilities during late September and early October, 1997. On the basis of the results of this phase of the project, the following conclusions were made: (1) The chemistry of the new technology was well proven and demonstrated at FETC. The overall S0{sub 2}-to-elemental sulfur yields were typically in the range of 93 to 98 percent. (The project goal was 95 percent, so the goal was exceeded). (2) Sulfur selectivity values, indicating the tendency of S0{sub 2} to be converted to elemental sulfur in preference to H{sub 2}S or COS, were typically in the range of 98 to 100 percent. (3) Bright yellow sulfur of high quality was produced at FETC. (4) The FETC regenerator exhaust gas presented no processing difficulties. Swings in the level of methane in the exhaust gas were handled with relative ease. (5) With the exception of the water condenser, all system components performed well. (6) Condensing of the sulfur after its production was a serious problem at FETC. Solid sulfur deposits built up in the process-gas lines at several locations in the system. Clogging of the lines necessitated terminating runs typically after 2 to 4 hours of operation. Clogging problems were most severe in the water condenser. Many planned parametric tests were not run because of the sulfur plugging problems. (7) Several suggestions were made by BP Oil Company for solving the sulfur pl ugging problems. Among the suggestions were to never allow the temperature of the process gas to fall below 118{degree}C, to increase the temperature of the sulfur condenser to 148{degree}C, and to eliminate the water condenser from the system entirely.

  4. Enhancement of the photo conversion efficiencies in Cu(In,Ga)(Se,S)2 solar cells fabricated by two-step sulfurization process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, JungYup; Nam, Junggyu; Kim, Dongseop; Kim, GeeYeong; Jo, William; Kang, Yoonmook; Lee, Dongho

    2015-11-01

    Cu(In,Ga)(Se,S)2 (CIGSS) absorber layers were fabricated by using a modified two-stage sputter and a sequential selenization/sulfurization method, and the sulfurization process is changed from one-step to two-step. The two-step sulfurization was controlled with two different H2S gas concentrations during the sulfurization treatment. This two-step process yielded remarkable improvements in the efficiency (+0.7%), open circuit voltage (+14 mV), short circuit current (+0.23 mA/cm2), and fill factor (+0.21%) of a CIGSS device with 30 × 30 cm2 in size, owing to the good passivation at the grain boundary surface, uniform material composition among the grain boundaries, and modified depth profile of Ga and S. The deterioration of the P/N junction quality was prevented by the optimized S content in the CIGSS absorber layer. The effects of the passivation quality at the grain boundary surface, the material uniformity, the compositional depth profiles, the microstructure, and the electrical characteristics were examined by Kelvin probe force microscopy, X-ray diffraction, secondary ion mass spectrometry, scanning electron microscopy, and current-voltage curves, respectively. The two-step sulfurization process is experimentally found to be useful for obtaining good surface conditions and, enhancing the efficiency, for the mass production of large CIGSS modules.

  5. Enhancement of the photo conversion efficiencies in Cu(In,Ga)(Se,S){sub 2} solar cells fabricated by two-step sulfurization process

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, JungYup; Nam, Junggyu; Kim, Dongseop; Lee, Dongho E-mail: ddang@korea.ac.kr; Kim, GeeYeong; Jo, William; Kang, Yoonmook E-mail: ddang@korea.ac.kr

    2015-11-09

    Cu(In,Ga)(Se,S){sub 2} (CIGSS) absorber layers were fabricated by using a modified two-stage sputter and a sequential selenization/sulfurization method, and the sulfurization process is changed from one-step to two-step. The two-step sulfurization was controlled with two different H{sub 2}S gas concentrations during the sulfurization treatment. This two-step process yielded remarkable improvements in the efficiency (+0.7%), open circuit voltage (+14 mV), short circuit current (+0.23 mA/cm{sup 2}), and fill factor (+0.21%) of a CIGSS device with 30 × 30 cm{sup 2} in size, owing to the good passivation at the grain boundary surface, uniform material composition among the grain boundaries, and modified depth profile of Ga and S. The deterioration of the P/N junction quality was prevented by the optimized S content in the CIGSS absorber layer. The effects of the passivation quality at the grain boundary surface, the material uniformity, the compositional depth profiles, the microstructure, and the electrical characteristics were examined by Kelvin probe force microscopy, X-ray diffraction, secondary ion mass spectrometry, scanning electron microscopy, and current-voltage curves, respectively. The two-step sulfurization process is experimentally found to be useful for obtaining good surface conditions and, enhancing the efficiency, for the mass production of large CIGSS modules.

  6. Investigation on thiosulfate-involved organics and nitrogen removal by a sulfur cycle-based biological wastewater treatment process.

    PubMed

    Qian, Jin; Lu, Hui; Cui, Yanxiang; Wei, Li; Liu, Rulong; Chen, Guang-Hao

    2015-02-01

    Thiosulfate, as an intermediate of biological sulfate/sulfite reduction, can significantly improve nitrogen removal potential in a biological sulfur cycle-based process, namely the Sulfate reduction-Autotrophic denitrification-Nitrification Integrated (SANI()) process. However, the related thiosulfate bio-activities coupled with organics and nitrogen removal in wastewater treatment lacked detailed examinations and reports. In this study, S2O3(2-) transformation during biological SO4(2-)/SO3(2-) co-reduction coupled with organics removal as well as S2O3(2-) oxidation coupled with chemolithotrophic denitrification were extensively evaluated under different experimental conditions. Thiosulfate is produced from the co-reduction of sulfate and sulfite through biological pathway at an optimum pH of 7.5 for organics removal. And the produced S2O3(2-) may disproportionate to sulfide and sulfate during both biological S2O3(2-) reduction and oxidation most possibly carried out by Desulfovibrio-like species. Dosing the same amount of nitrate, pH was found to be the more direct factor influencing the denitritation activity than free nitrous acid (FNA) and the optimal pH for denitratation (7.0) and denitritation (8.0) activities were different. Spiking organics significantly improved both denitratation and denitritation activities while minimizing sulfide inhibition of NO3(-) reduction during thiosulfate-based denitrification. These findings in this study can improve the understanding of mechanisms of thiosulfate on organics and nitrogen removal in biological sulfur cycle-based wastewater treatment. PMID:25497428

  7. Comparison of fixation and processing methods for hairless guinea pig skin following sulfur mustard exposure. (Reannouncement with new availability information)

    SciTech Connect

    Bryant, M.A.; Braue Jr, E.H.

    1992-12-31

    Ten anesthetized hairless guinea pigs Crl:IAF(HA)BR were exposed to 10 pi of neat sulfur mustard (HD) in a vapor cup on their skin for 7 min. At 24 h postexposure, the guinea pigs were euthanatized and skin sections taken for histologic evaluation. The skin was fixed using either 10% neutral buffered formalin (NBF), McDowell Trump fixative (4CF-IG), Zenker`s formol-saline (Helly`s fluid), or Zenker`s fluid. Fixed skin sections were cut in half: one half was embedded in paraffin and the other half in plastic (glycol methacrylate). Paraffin-embedded tissue was stained with hematoxylin and eosin; plastic-embedded tissue was stained with Lee`s methylene blue basic fuchsin. Skin was also frozen unfixed, sectioned by cryostat, and stained with pinacyanole. HD-exposed skin was evaluated histologically for the presence of epidermal and follicular necrosis, microblister formation, epidermitis, and intracellular edema to determine the optimal fixation and embedding method for lesion preservation. The percentage of histologic sections with lesions varied little between fixatives and was similar for both paraffin and plastic embedding material. Plastic-embedded sections were thinner, allowing better histologic evaluation, but were more difficult to stain. Plastic embedding material did not infiltrate tissue fixed in Zenker`s fluid or Zenker`s formol-saline. Frozen tissue sections were prepared in the least processing time and lesion preservation was comparable to fixed tissue. It was concluded that standard histologic processing using formalin fixation and paraffin embedding is adequate for routine histopathological evaluation of HD skin lesions in the hairless guinea pig.... Sulfur mustard, Vesicating agents, Pathology, Hairless guinea pig model, Fixation.

  8. Sulfuric Acid in the Venus Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sill, G. T.

    1972-01-01

    The visible and ultraviolet transmission features of a thin layer of elemental bromine and hydrobromic acid dissolved in sulfuric acid somewhat resemble the Venus spectrum, up to 14 microns. The chemical process postulated for forming sulfuric acid involves the oxidation of sulfur and its compounds to sulfuric acid through the agency of elemental bromine, produced by the photolytic decomposition of hydrogen bromide.

  9. Sulfur compounds in coal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Attar, A.; Corcoran, W. H.

    1977-01-01

    The literature on the chemical structure of the organic sulfur compounds (or functional groups) in coal is reviewed. Four methods were applied in the literature to study the sulfur compounds in coal: direct spectrometric and chemical analysis, depolymerization in drastic conditions, depolymerization in mild conditions, and studies on simulated coal. The data suggest that most of the organic sulfur in coal is in the form of thiophenic structures and aromatic and aliphatic sulfides. The relative abundance of the sulfur groups in bituminous coal is estimated as 50:30:20%, respectively. The ratio changes during processing and during the chemical analysis. The main effects are the transformation during processing of sulfides to the more stable thiophenic compounds and the elimination of hydrogen sulfide.

  10. Determination of sulfuric acid concentration for anti-cavitation characteristics of Al alloy by two step anodizing process to forming nano porous.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung-Jun; Kim, Seong-Kweon; Jeong, Jae-Yong; Kim, Seong-Jong

    2014-12-01

    Al alloy is a highly active metal but forms a protective oxide film having high corrosion resistance in atmosphere environment. However, the oxide film is not suitable for practical use, since the thickness of the film is not uniform and it is severly altered with formation conditions. This study focused on developing an aluminum anodizing layer having hardness, corrosion resistance and abrasion resistance equivalent to a commercial grade protective layer. Aluminum anodizing layer was produced by two-step aluminum anodizing oxide (AAO) process with different sulfuric acid concentrations, and the cavitation characteristics of the anodized coating layer was investigated. In hardness measurement, the anodized coating layer produced with 15 vol.% of sulfuric acid condition had the highest value of hardness but exhibited poor cavitation resistance due to being more brittle than those with other conditions. The 10 vol.% of sulfuric acid condition was thus considered to be the optimum condition as it had the lowest weight loss and damage depth. PMID:25971100

  11. Modelling phosphorus (P), sulfur (S) and iron (Fe) interactions for dynamic simulations of anaerobic digestion processes.

    PubMed

    Flores-Alsina, Xavier; Solon, Kimberly; Kazadi Mbamba, Christian; Tait, Stephan; Gernaey, Krist V; Jeppsson, Ulf; Batstone, Damien J

    2016-05-15

    This paper proposes a series of extensions to functionally upgrade the IWA Anaerobic Digestion Model No. 1 (ADM1) to allow for plant-wide phosphorus (P) simulation. The close interplay between the P, sulfur (S) and iron (Fe) cycles requires a substantial (and unavoidable) increase in model complexity due to the involved three-phase physico-chemical and biological transformations. The ADM1 version, implemented in the plant-wide context provided by the Benchmark Simulation Model No. 2 (BSM2), is used as the basic platform (A0). Three different model extensions (A1, A2, A3) are implemented, simulated and evaluated. The first extension (A1) considers P transformations by accounting for the kinetic decay of polyphosphates (XPP) and potential uptake of volatile fatty acids (VFA) to produce polyhydroxyalkanoates (XPHA) by phosphorus accumulating organisms (XPAO). Two variant extensions (A2,1/A2,2) describe biological production of sulfides (SIS) by means of sulfate reducing bacteria (XSRB) utilising hydrogen only (autolithotrophically) or hydrogen plus organic acids (heterorganotrophically) as electron sources, respectively. These two approaches also consider a potential hydrogen sulfide ( [Formula: see text] inhibition effect and stripping to the gas phase ( [Formula: see text] ). The third extension (A3) accounts for chemical iron (III) ( [Formula: see text] ) reduction to iron (II) ( [Formula: see text] ) using hydrogen ( [Formula: see text] ) and sulfides (SIS) as electron donors. A set of pre/post interfaces between the Activated Sludge Model No. 2d (ASM2d) and ADM1 are furthermore proposed in order to allow for plant-wide (model-based) analysis and study of the interactions between the water and sludge lines. Simulation (A1 - A3) results show that the ratio between soluble/particulate P compounds strongly depends on the pH and cationic load, which determines the capacity to form (or not) precipitation products. Implementations A1 and A2,1/A2,2 lead to a reduction in the predicted methane/biogas production (and potential energy recovery) compared to reference ADM1 predictions (A0). This reduction is attributed to two factors: (1) loss of electron equivalents due to sulfate [Formula: see text] reduction by XSRB and storage of XPHA by XPAO; and, (2) decrease of acetoclastic and hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis due to [Formula: see text] inhibition. Model A3 shows the potential for iron to remove free SIS (and consequently inhibition) and instead promote iron sulfide (XFeS) precipitation. It also reduces the quantities of struvite ( [Formula: see text] ) and calcium phosphate ( [Formula: see text] ) that are formed due to its higher affinity for phosphate anions. This study provides a detailed analysis of the different model assumptions, the effect that operational/design conditions have on the model predictions and the practical implications of the proposed model extensions in view of plant-wide modelling/development of resource recovery strategies. PMID:27107338

  12. Lunar sulfur

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuck, David L.

    1991-01-01

    Ideas introduced by Vaniman, Pettit and Heiken in their 1988 Uses of Lunar Sulfur are expanded. Particular attention is given to uses of SO2 as a mineral-dressing fluid. Also introduced is the concept of using sulfide-based concrete as an alternative to the sulfur-based concretes proposed by Leonard and Johnson. Sulfur is abundant in high-Ti mare basalts, which range from 0.16 to 0.27 pct. by weight. Terrestrial basalts with 0.15 pct. S are rare. For oxygen recovery, sulfur must be driven off with other volatiles from ilmenite concentrates, before reduction. Troilite (FeS) may be oxidized to magnetite (Fe3O4) and SO2 gas, by burning concentrates in oxygen within a magnetic field, to further oxidize ilmenite before regrinding the magnetic reconcentration. SO2 is liquid at -20 C, the mean temperature underground on the Moon, at a minimum of 0.6 atm pressure. By using liquid SO2 as a mineral dressing fluid, all the techniques of terrestrial mineral separation become available for lunar ores and concentrates. Combination of sulfur and iron in an exothermic reaction, to form iron sulfides, may be used to cement grains of other minerals into an anhydrous iron-sulfide concrete. A sulfur-iron-aggregate mixture may be heated to the ignition temperature of iron with sulfur to make a concrete shape. The best iron, sulfur, and aggregate ratios need to be experimentally established. The iron and sulfur will be by-products of oxygen production from lunar minerals.

  13. Chemistry of processes of synthesis of vanadium catalysts of the oxidation of sulfur dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Ivakin, A.A.; Yatsenko, A.P.; Glazyrin, M.P.; Malkiman, V.I.; Kruchinina, M.V.; Krasilinikov, V.N.

    1982-07-20

    The physicochemical bases for the synthesis of vanadium catalysts was the subject of this report. Reaction mechanisms are given that describe the chemical processes that occur at the hydrochemical and thermal steps of synthesis and lead to the formation of the active component of the vanadium catalyst SVS. Results were obtained using Infrared Spectral Analysis.

  14. Hydrometallurgical process for producing lead and elemental sulfur from galena concentrates

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, A.Y.; Wethington, A.M.; Cole, E.R. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    The Bureau of Mines has developed an effective hydrometallurgical method to recover high-purity Pb metal and elemental S from galena concentrates. This low-temperature process eliminates S gases and Pb emissions, in contrast to the current high-temperature smelting technology. Spent electrolyte was recycled repeatedly, with impurity buildup controlled by controlling the leach parameters.

  15. Interfacing the tandem mirror reactor to the sulfur-iodine process for hydrogen production

    SciTech Connect

    Galloway, T.R.

    1980-06-02

    The blanket is linked to the H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ vaporization units and SO/sub 3/ decomposition reactor with either sodium or helium. The engineering and safety problems associated with these choices are discussed. This H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ step uses about 90% of the TMR heat and is best close-coupled to the nuclear island. The rest of the process we propose to be driven by steam and does not require close-coupling. The sodium loop coupling seems to be preferable at this time. We can operate with a blanket around 1200 K and the SO/sub 3/ decomposer around 1050 K. This configuration offers double-barrier protection between Li-Na and the SO/sub 3/ process gases. Heat pipes offer an attractive alternate to provide an additional barrier, added modularity for increased reliability, and tritium concentration and isolation operations with very little thermal penalty.

  16. Processes for preparing carbon fibers using sulfur trioxide in a halogenated solvent

    SciTech Connect

    Patton, Jasson T.; Barton, Bryan E.; Bernius, Mark T.; Chen, Xiaoyun; Hukkanen, Eric J.; Rhoton, Christina A.; Lysenko, Zenon

    2015-12-29

    Disclosed here are processes for preparing carbonized polymers (preferably carbon fibers), comprising sulfonating a polymer with a sulfonating agent that comprises SO.sub.3 dissolved in a solvent to form a sulfonated polymer; treating the sulfonated polymer with a heated solvent, wherein the temperature of the solvent is at least 95.degree. C.; and carbonizing the resulting product by heating it to a temperature of 500-3000.degree. C. Carbon fibers made according to these methods are also disclosed herein.

  17. Method and system for the removal of oxides of nitrogen and sulfur from combustion processes

    DOEpatents

    Walsh, John V.

    1987-12-15

    A process for removing oxide contaminants from combustion gas, and employing a solid electrolyte reactor, includes: (a) flowing the combustion gas into a zone containing a solid electrolyte and applying a voltage and at elevated temperature to thereby separate oxygen via the solid electrolyte, (b) removing oxygen from that zone in a first stream and removing hot effluent gas from that zone in a second stream, the effluent gas containing contaminant, (c) and pre-heating the combustion gas flowing to that zone by passing it in heat exchange relation with the hot effluent gas.

  18. Crystallization behaviour of co-sputtered Cu2ZnSnS4 precursor prepared by sequential sulfurization processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Junhee; Shin, Seung Wook; Gil Gang, Myeong; Hyeok Kim, Jin; Lee, Jeong Yong

    2013-03-01

    Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS) thin films were prepared by the sequential sulfurization of a co-sputtered precursor with a multitarget (Cu, ZnS, and SnS2) sputtering system. In order to investigate the crystallization behaviour of the thin films, the precursors were sulfurized in a tube furnace at different temperatures for different time durations. The Raman spectra of the sulfurized thin films showed that their crystallinity gradually improved with an increase in the sulfurization temperature and duration. However, transmission electron microscopy revealed an unexpected result—the precursor thin films were not completely transformed to the CZTS phase and showed the presence of uncrystallized material when sulfurized at 250-400 °C for 60 min and at 500 °C for 30 min. Thus, the crystallization of the co-sputtered precursor thin films showed a strong dependence on the sulfurization temperature and duration. The crystallization mechanism of the precursor thin films was understood on the basis of these results and has been described in this paper. The understanding of this mechanism may improve the standard preparation method for high-quality CZTS absorber layers.

  19. An application of CAMx process analysis tools: Exploring process contributions to extreme ozone, nitrogen oxides and sulfur dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, David-anthony

    The University at Albany Air Quality Forecasting Modeling System (AQFMS) is a state-of-the-art model that generates reliable daily and "day-ahead" air quality forecasts for the Northeastern United States. The three major categories of processes which dictate regional air quality are production from emission sources, horizontal and vertical transport driven by the prevailing meteorology, and chemical transformations. The Advanced Research WRF (ARW) produces meteorological fields. The Sparse Matrix Operator for Kernel Emissions (SMOKE) processes available emission inventories for air quality modeling. The Comprehensive Air Quality Model with extension (CAMx) handles both chemical processes and the integration of ARW-WRF and SMOKE in devising separate quantitative contributions to pollutant concentrations from process categories. An AQFMS forecast, though indicative of the temporal and spatial changes in the ambient condition, does not tell us exactly how and why those changes occurred. High concentrations of criteria pollutants during "extreme" conditions could come about in many ways. Process analysis takes a step back in numerical procedures to showcase the partial contribution of 18 different processes to the predicted concentration. Area and point source make up the two emission source processes. Advection and diffusion through the west, east, south, north, bottom and top boundary make up the twelve horizontal and vertical transport processes. Gas phase and heterogeneous chemistry make up the two chemical transformation processes, with dry and wet deposition making up the two physio-chemical removal processes. A group of model defined "extreme" intra-day periods in a 12km by 12km grid spacing over The New York Botanical Gardens were evaluated for model performance at the surface and characterized by distinctive modes in which the aforementioned processes contribute to SO2, NOx and O3 concentrations in the vertical layers up to the first 4km of the model atmosphere. Trustworthy process features were highlighted for species and intra-day periods of satisfactory model performance. These features supplement AQFMS model forecasts of pollutant species concentrations for operational or regulatory pursuits with an enhanced understanding of model process interactions.

  20. Effects of processing on the transverse fatigue properties of low-sulfur AISI 4140 steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, Sunniva R.; Michal, Gary M.

    1993-12-01

    The effects of inclusions due to steelmaking processes on the fatigue life of AISI 4140 have been investigated. The test matrix consisted of three commercially produced heats of AISI 4140 of comparable cleanliness: one was conventionally cast (CC), and two were inert gas-shielded/ bottom-poured (IGS). One of the IGS heats was calcium-treated to explore the effects of inclusion shape control (IGS/SC). All heats were hot-rolled and reduced over 95 pct to produce bar stock of 127 to 152 mm (5 to 6 in.) in diameter. Transverse axial specimens conforming to ASTM E466 were machined, quenched, and tempered to approximately 40 HRC, and they were fatigue tested in tension-tension cycling ( R = 0.1). Test results and statistical analyses of the stress-life data show that the IGS grade has several times the fatigue strength of the CC grade at 107 cycles. Lower-limit fatigue strengths calculated at a 99.9 pct probability were 518.5 MPa (75.2 ksi) for IGS vs 55.6 MPa (8.1 ksi) for the CC grade. The IGS/SC grade had the best performance at all stress and life levels. The results obtained indicate that fatigue performance can be improved by choosing a processing method that reduces the incidence of exogenous oxides and by controlling the shape of the sulfides.

  1. Reaction Mechanism for m-Xylene Oxidation in the Claus Process by Sulfur Dioxide.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Sourab; Raj, Abhijeet; Al Shoaibi, Ahmed S; Chung, Suk Ho

    2015-09-24

    In the Claus process, the presence of aromatic contaminants such benzene, toluene, and xylenes (BTX), in the H2S feed stream has a detrimental effect on catalytic reactors, where BTX form soot particles and clog and deactivate the catalysts. Among BTX, xylenes are proven to be most damaging contaminant for catalysts. BTX oxidation in the Claus furnace, before they enter catalyst beds, provides a solution to this problem. A reaction kinetics study on m-xylene oxidation by SO2, an oxidant present in Claus furnace, is presented. The density functional theory is used to study the formation of m-xylene radicals (3-methylbenzyl, 2,6-dimethylphenyl, 2,4-dimethylphenyl, and 3,5-dimethylphenyl) through H-abstraction and their oxidation by SO2. The mechanism begins with SO2 addition on the radicals through an O-atom rather than the S-atom with the release of 180.0-183.1 kJ/mol of reaction energies. This exothermic reaction involves energy barriers in the range 3.9-5.2 kJ/mol for several m-xylene radicals. Thereafter, O-S bond scission takes place to release SO, and the O-atom remaining on aromatics leads to CO formation. Among four m-xylene radicals, the resonantly stabilized 3-methylbenzyl exhibited the lowest SO2 addition and SO elimination rates. The reaction rate constants are provided to facilitate Claus process simulations to find conditions suitable for BTX oxidation. PMID:26334187

  2. Sequential nitrification-denitrification process for nitrogenous, sulfurous and phenolic compounds removal in the same bioreactor.

    PubMed

    De la Torre-Velasco, A; Beristain-Cardoso, R; Damian-Matsumura, P; Gómez, J

    2013-07-01

    The kinetic and metabolic behavior of an aerobic granular sludge to nitrify, denitrify and nitrify-denitrify was evaluated in batch cultures. In nitrification control, ammonium, 4-methylphenol and sulfide were consumed efficiently (∼100%) and recovered as NO3(-), CO2, S(0) and SO4(2-), respectively. In denitrification control, S(0) and nitrate were efficiently consumed and recovered as SO4(2-) and N2, respectively. Sequential nitrification-denitrification process was evaluated by applying oxic/anoxic conditions. Ammonium, 4-methylphenol and sulfide were oxidized to nitrate, CO2 and mainly S(0), respectively, under aerobic conditions. After that, anoxic conditions were established where S(0) reduced all nitrate to N2, with molecular nitrogen yield (YN2) of 1.03 ± 0.06 mg/mg NH4(+)-N consumed. This is the first study to show the capability of an aerobic granular sludge in simultaneous removal of ammonium, 4-methylphenol and sulfide by sequential nitrification-denitrification process in the same bioreactor. PMID:23665217

  3. Sulfur production continues to rise

    SciTech Connect

    Parkinson, G.; Ondrey, G.; Moore, S.

    1994-06-01

    Sulfur is one of the world's most-popular commodities. It has another distinctive feature: most of it is produced from the effluent of chemical process plants. A lot more sulfur will have similar origins in the future as countries tighten up on sulfur emissions in a global effort to reduce acid rain. To meet such stricter controls, new sulfur recovery methods are being developed, and existing ones improved, to extract sulfur more efficiently and cheaply. Among the new developments are improvements in the Claus process--and alternatives to Claus--for the extraction of hydrogen sulfide (H[sub 2]S) from process streams; and new ways to recover elemental sulfur from sulfur dioxide (SO[sub 2]) contained in the flue gas of coal-fired plants. Currently, the common flue gas treatment is scrubbing with limestone or lime, but this produces millions of tons/yr of gypsum sludge that is mostly landfilled. Gypsum can be processed into wallboard, but that market is limited. The paper discusses the use of flue gas as a raw material; a versatile acid production process; alternative processes for H[sub 2]S extraction; and a process that recovers both sulfur and hydrogen.

  4. Sulfur recovery technology

    SciTech Connect

    Goar, B.G.

    1986-01-01

    The production of sour natural gas and the refining of higher sulfur content crude oils is increasing in the world today. The need to recover sulfur from hydrogen sulfide produced from such sources is also on the rise. In today's society there is an increased concern about the potential threat of air pollution to the well-being of mankind. Therefore, the various technologies for removing and converting hydrogen sulfide to elemental sulfur are gaining increased importance in industry. The Claus process was invented by an English scientist named Carl Friedrich Claus and a patent was issued to him in late 1883. In 1938, a German company called I.G. Fabenindustrie A.G. made a significant modification to the original Claus process; and thus, the Modified Claus Process was born. Today the majority of sour gas that is processed in the United States and throughout the world, and the majority of sour crude oil refined in the world produces hydrogen sulfide which is eventually converted to elemental sulfur by the Claus process. Other technologies have emerged down through the years; but, none have ever come close to making the impact on industry that the Claus process has achieved. It is estimated that some 90 to 95% of recovered sulfur in the world today is produced by the Claus process. There are over 380 Claus plants (specific locations) in operation throughout the world. It is estimated that when these plants are in full production, something like 60,000 long tons per day (LTPD) of sulfur can be produced from these plants.

  5. Process for measuring degradation of sulfur hexafluoride in high voltage systems

    SciTech Connect

    Sauers, I.

    1986-12-30

    A process is described for detecting by-products from electrically induced degradation of SF/sub 6/ in high voltage systems comprising: at a pressure within the reaction cell sufficient to cause electron attachment to SF/sub 6/, placing an SF/sub 6/ gas to be tested in an ion-molecule reaction cell having a cathode at a first end, an anode opposite the cathode at a second end, a pin hole aperture incorporated into the anode that opens into a negative ion mass spectrometer that is at a lower pressure than is the reaction cell; producing thermal electrons at the cathode thereby ionizing molecules of the SF/sub 6/ gas in the vicinity of the cathode to form SF/sub 6//sup -/ ions; applying an electrical field in the reaction cell to induce the transfer of the SF/sub 6//sup -/ ions from the cathode to the anode resulting in the formation of by-product ions from intervening by-product molecules having a high affinity for fluoride ions; introducing a combination of the SF/sub 6//sup -/ ions and the by-product ions into the pin hole aperture thereby effecting flow of the combination of ions from the reaction cell to the negative ion mass spectrometer; and detecting the by-product ions using negative ion mass spectrometry techniques.

  6. Effect of fuel sulfur on nitrogen oxide formation in combustion processes. Final report, January 1976-December 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Wendt, J.O.L.; Corley, T.L.; Morcomb, J.T.

    1988-05-01

    This report gives results of research that focuses on the questions: is the sulfur content of a fuel likely to have a major influence on the resulting NOx emissions; and does the presence of fuel sulfur cause major changes in mechanisms of fuel NO formation. Research results will aid in the interpretation of data on effects of fuel quality and composition on pollutant formation and will help in the development of combustion modifications for pollutant control from burning dirty fuels. The most important conclusion is that the presence of fuel sulfur will increase the ultimate conversion of fuel nitrogen to NOx under poorly mixed flame conditions that are often typical of combustion modifications. The influence of sulfur is to increase the total amount of XN species (NO + NH3 + HCN) under rich conditions, and this effect is most pronounced at high temperatures. The mechanisms occur in the post-flame or at fairly long residence times and probably involve interactions between the hydrocarbon chemistry, sulfur, and nitrogenous species.

  7. Understanding Sulfur Systematics in Large Igneous Provinces Using Sulfur Isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novikova, S.; Edmonds, M.; Turchyn, A. V.; Maclennan, J.; Svensen, H.; Frost, D. J.; Yallup, C.

    2013-12-01

    The eruption of the Siberian Traps coincided with perhaps the greatest environmental catastrophe in Earth's history, at the Permo-Triassic boundary. The source and magnitude of the volatile emissions, including sulfur, associated with the eruption remain poorly understood yet were critical in forcing environmental change. Two of the primary questions are how much sulfur gases were emitted during the eruptions and from where they were sourced. Primary melts carry dissolved sulfur from the mantle. Magmas ponding in sills and ascending through dykes may also assimilate sulfur from country rocks, as well as heat the country rocks and generate fluids through contact metamorphism. If the magmas interacted thermally, for prolonged periods, with sulfur-rich country rocks then it is probable that the sulfur budget of these eruptions might have been augmented considerably. This is exactly what we have shown recently for a basaltic sill emplaced in oil shale that fed eruptions of the British Tertiary Province, where surrounding sediments showed extensive desulfurization (Yallup et al. Geoch. Cosmochim. Acta, online, 2013). In the current study sulfur isotopes and trace element abundances are used to discriminate sulfur sources and to model magmatic processes for a suite of Siberian Traps sill and lava samples. Our bulk rock and pyrite geochemical analyses illustrate clearly their high abundance of 34S over 32S. The high 34S/32S has been noted previously and linked to assimilation of sulfur from sediments but may alternatively be inherited from the mantle plume source. With the aim of investigating the sulfur isotopic signature in the melt prior to devolatilization, we use secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), for which a specific set of glass standards was synthesised. In order to understand how sulfur isotopes fractionate during degassing we have also conducted a parallel study of well-characterized tephras from Kilauea Volcano, where sulfur degassing behavior is well known.

  8. Excess carrier generation in femtosecond-laser processed sulfur doped silicon by means of sub-bandgap illumination

    SciTech Connect

    Guenther, Kay-Michael; Gimpel, Thomas; Ruibys, Augustinas; Kontermann, Stefan; Tomm, Jens W.; Winter, Stefan; Schade, Wolfgang

    2014-01-27

    With Fourier-transform photocurrent spectroscopy and spectral response measurements, we show that silicon doped with sulfur by femtosecond laser irradiation generates excess carriers, when illuminated with infrared light above 1100 nm. Three distinct sub-bandgap photocurrent features are observed. Their onset energies are in good agreement with the known sulfur levels S{sup +}, S{sup 0}, and S{sub 2}{sup 0}. The excess carriers are separated by a pn-junction to form a significant photocurrent. Therefore, this material likely demonstrates the impurity band photovoltaic effect.

  9. Study on the destructive effect to inherent quality of Fritillaria thunbergii Miq. (Zhebeimu) by sulfur-fumigated process using chromatographic fingerprinting analysis.

    PubMed

    Duan, Baozhong; Huang, Linfang; Chen, Shilin

    2012-04-15

    The after-harvesting sun-dried processing of Fritillariae thunbergii bulbus (Zhebeimu) was the traditional treatment for commodity. Over recent decades the natural drying process for bulbus of Fritillariae has been replaced by sulfur-fumigation for reducing the drying duration and pest control. We used ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled with evaporative light scattering detection (UPLC-ELSD) fingerprinting analysis and major alkaloids determination to investigate the potential damaging effect of the sulfur-fumigating process. The experimental conditions were as follows: Chromatography was proceeded on Waters Acquity UPLC BEH C(18) column; the linear gradient elution was conducted with mobile phase prepared from acetonitrile-0.02% triethylamine; the drift tube temperature was set at 40°C with a nitrogen flow-rate of 30psi, and the spray parameter was set 40%. All calibration curves showed good linear regression (R>0.9991) within the tested range. The method was validated for precision, accuracy, limit of detection and quantification. The study also has shown that sulfur-fumigated samples had significant loss of the main active compounds and a more destructive fingerprint profile when compared to the sun-dried samples. PMID:22326548

  10. Synthesis and development of processes for the recovery of sulfur from acid gases. Part 1, Development of a high-temperature process for removal of H{sub 2}S from coal gas using limestone -- thermodynamic and kinetic considerations; Part 2, Development of a zero-emissions process for recovery of sulfur from acid gas streams

    SciTech Connect

    Towler, G.P.; Lynn, S.

    1993-05-01

    Limestone can be used more effectively as a sorbent for H{sub 2}S in high-temperature gas-cleaning applications if it is prevented from undergoing calcination. Sorption of H{sub 2}S by limestone is impeded by sintering of the product CaS layer. Sintering of CaS is catalyzed by CO{sub 2}, but is not affected by N{sub 2} or H{sub 2}. The kinetics of CaS sintering was determined for the temperature range 750--900{degrees}C. When hydrogen sulfide is heated above 600{degrees}C in the presence of carbon dioxide elemental sulfur is formed. The rate-limiting step of elemental sulfur formation is thermal decomposition of H{sub 2}S. Part of the hydrogen thereby produced reacts with CO{sub 2}, forming CO via the water-gas-shift reaction. The equilibrium of H{sub 2}S decomposition is therefore shifted to favor the formation of elemental sulfur. The main byproduct is COS, formed by a reaction between CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S that is analogous to the water-gas-shift reaction. Smaller amounts of SO{sub 2} and CS{sub 2} also form. Molybdenum disulfide is a strong catalyst for H{sub 2}S decomposition in the presence of CO{sub 2}. A process for recovery of sulfur from H{sub 2}S using this chemistry is as follows: Hydrogen sulfide is heated in a high-temperature reactor in the presence of CO{sub 2} and a suitable catalyst. The primary products of the overall reaction are S{sub 2}, CO, H{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O. Rapid quenching of the reaction mixture to roughly 600{degrees}C prevents loss Of S{sub 2} during cooling. Carbonyl sulfide is removed from the product gas by hydrolysis back to CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S. Unreacted CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S are removed from the product gas and recycled to the reactor, leaving a gas consisting chiefly of H{sub 2} and CO, which recovers the hydrogen value from the H{sub 2}S. This process is economically favorable compared to the existing sulfur-recovery technology and allows emissions of sulfur-containing gases to be controlled to very low levels.

  11. Sulfur condensation in Claus catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Schoffs, G.R.

    1985-02-01

    The heterogeneous reactions in which catalyst deactivation by pore plugging occur are listed and include: coke formation in petroleum processing, especially hydrocracking and hydrodesulfurization catalysts; steam reforming and methnation catalysts; ammonia synthesis catalyst; and automobile exhause catalysts. The authors explain how the Claus process converts hydrogen sulfide produced by petroleum desulfurization units and gas treatment processes into elemental sulfur and water. More than 15 million tons of sulfur are recovered annually by this process. Commercial Claus plants appear to operate at thermodynamic equilibrium. Depending on the H2S content of the feed and the number of reactors, total H2S conversion to elemental sulfur can exceed 95%.

  12. Rethinking the Ancient Sulfur Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fike, David A.; Bradley, Alexander S.; Rose, Catherine V.

    2015-05-01

    The sulfur biogeochemical cycle integrates the metabolic activity of multiple microbial pathways (e.g., sulfate reduction, disproportionation, and sulfide oxidation) along with abiotic reactions and geological processes that cycle sulfur through various reservoirs. The sulfur cycle impacts the global carbon cycle and climate primarily through the remineralization of organic carbon. Over geological timescales, cycling of sulfur is closely tied to the redox state of Earth's exosphere through the burial of oxidized (sulfate) and reduced (sulfide) sulfur species in marine sediments. Biological sulfur cycling is associated with isotopic fractionations that can be used to trace the fluxes through various metabolic pathways. The resulting isotopic data provide insights into sulfur cycling in both modern and ancient environments via isotopic signatures in sedimentary sulfate and sulfide phases. Here, we review the deep-time δ34S record of marine sulfates and sulfides in light of recent advances in understanding how isotopic signatures are generated by microbial activity, how these signatures are encoded in marine sediments, and how they may be altered following deposition. The resulting picture shows a sulfur cycle intimately coupled to ambient carbon cycling, where sulfur isotopic records preserved in sedimentary rocks are critically dependent on sedimentological and geochemical conditions (e.g., iron availability) during deposition.

  13. Experimental Behavior of Sulfur Under Primitive Planetary Differentiation Processes, the Sulfide Formations in Enstatite Meteorites and Implications for Mercury.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malavergne, V.; Brunet, F.; Righter, K.; Zanda, B.; Avril, C.; Borensztajn, S.; Berthet, S.

    2012-01-01

    Enstatite meteorites are the most reduced naturally-occuring materials of the solar system. The cubic monosulfide series with the general formula (Mg,Mn,Ca,Fe)S are common phases in these meteorite groups. The importance of such minerals, their formation, composition and textural relationships for understanding the genesis of enstatite chondrites (EC) and aubrites, has long been recognized (e.g. [1]). However, the mechanisms of formation of these sulfides is still not well constrained certainly because of possible multiple ways to produce them. We propose to simulate different models of formation in order to check their mineralogical, chemical and textural relevancies. The solubility of sulfur in silicate melts is of primary interest for planetary mantles, particularly for the Earth and Mercury. Indeed, these two planets could have formed, at least partly, from EC materials (e.g. [2, 3, 4]). The sulfur content in silicate melts depends on the melt composition but also on pressure (P), temperature (T) and oxygen fugacity fO2. Unfortunately, there is no model of general validity in a wide range of P-T-fO2-composition which describes precisely the evolution of sulfur content in silicate melts, even if the main trends are now known. The second goal of this study is to constrain the sulfur content in silicate melts under reducing conditions and different temperatures.

  14. Effect of dissolved oxygen on elemental sulfur generation in sulfide and nitrate removal process: characterization, pathway, and microbial community analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaowei; Zhang, Yu; Zhang, Tingting; Zhou, Jiti

    2016-03-01

    Microaerobic bioreactor treatment for enriched sulfide and nitrate has been demonstrated as an effective strategy to improve the efficiencies of elemental sulfur (S(0)) generation, sulfide oxidation, and nitrate reduction. However, there is little detailed information for the effect and mechanism of dissolved oxygen (DO) on the variations of microbial community in sulfur generation, sulfide oxidation, and nitrate reduction systems. Polymerase chain reaction denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) was employed to evaluate the variations of microbial community structures in a sulfide oxidation and nitrate reduction reactor under different DO conditions (DO 0-0.7 mg · L(-1)). Experimental results revealed that the activity of sulfide-oxidizing bacteria (SOB) and nitrate-reducing bacteria (NRB) could be greatly stimulated in 0.1-0.3 mg-DO · L(-1). However, when the DO concentration was further elevated to more than 0.5 mg · L(-1), the abundance of NRB was markedly decreased, while the heterotrophic microorganisms, especially carbon degradation species, were enriched. The reaction pathways for sulfide and nitrate removal under microaerobic conditions were also deduced by combining batch experiments with functional species analysis. It was likely that the oxidation of sulfide to sulfur could be performed by both aerobic heterotrophic SOB and sulfur-based autotrophic denitrification bacteria with oxygen and nitrate as terminal electron acceptor, respectively. The nitrate could be reduced to nitrite by both autotrophic and heterotrophic denitrification, and then the generated nitrite could be completely converted to nitrogen gas via heterotrophic denitrification. This study provides new insights into the impacts of microaerobic conditions on the microbial community functional structures of sulfide-oxidizing, nitrate-reducing, and sulfur-producing bioreactors, which revealing the potential linkage between functional microbial communities and reactor performance. PMID:26603764

  15. Genetic engineering of sulfur-degrading Sulfolobus

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, N.W.Y.

    1991-01-01

    The objectives of the proposed research is to first establish a plasmid-mediated genetic transformation system for the sulfur degrading Sulfolobus, and then to clone and overexpress the genes encoding the organic-sulfur-degrading enzymes from Sulfolobus- as well as from other microorganisms, to develop a Sulfolobus-based microbial process for the removal of both organic and inorganic sulfur from coal.

  16. SULFUR ASSIMILATION IN PLANTS AND WEED CONTROL

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sulfur is an indispensable element for plants. It is found in sulfur-containing amino acids, cysteine and methionine, and in various other important biochemical components and processes. Inhibitors of sulfur assimilation, or cysteine and methionine synthesis, could be potential herbicides. The sulf...

  17. Method for removing sulfur oxide from waste gases and recovering elemental sulfur

    DOEpatents

    Moore, Raymond H.

    1977-01-01

    A continuous catalytic fused salt extraction process is described for removing sulfur oxides from gaseous streams. The gaseous stream is contacted with a molten potassium sulfate salt mixture having a dissolved catalyst to oxidize sulfur dioxide to sulfur trioxide and molten potassium normal sulfate to solvate the sulfur trioxide to remove the sulfur trioxide from the gaseous stream. A portion of the sulfur trioxide loaded salt mixture is then dissociated to produce sulfur trioxide gas and thereby regenerate potassium normal sulfate. The evolved sulfur trioxide is reacted with hydrogen sulfide as in a Claus reactor to produce elemental sulfur. The process may be advantageously used to clean waste stack gas from industrial plants, such as copper smelters, where a supply of hydrogen sulfide is readily available.

  18. Thermodynamic characterization of metal dissolution and inhibitor adsorption processes in the low carbon steel/mimosa tannin/sulfuric acid system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, Sanja; Stern, Ivica

    2002-10-01

    The corrosion rates in the presence of mimosa tannin as a low carbon steel corrosion inhibitor in sulfuric acid media, were measured by the weight loss method, in the range of temperatures from 20 to 60 °C. The Temkin, Frumkin and Freundlich isotherms were tested for their fit to the experimental data. The free energies and enthalpies for the adsorption process and the apparent activation energies, enthalpies and entropies of the dissolution process were determined. The fundamental thermodynamic functions were used to glean important information about the mimosa tannin inhibitory behavior. The results were explained in terms of chemical thermodynamics.

  19. Instrumental methods of analysis of sulfur compounds in synfuel process streams. Quarterly technical progress report for April-June 1984. [Sulfidic, polysulfidic, thiosulfate, sulfite, sulfate, thiocyanate

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, J.; Sexton, E.; Talbott, J.; Yakupkovic, J.

    1984-07-01

    Task 1: methods development for the speciation of the polysulfides. Work on this task has been completed in December 1983 and reported accordingly in DOE/PC/40783-T13. Task 2: methods development for the speciation of dithionite and polythionates. Electrochemical reduction of tetrathionate and pentathionate at the dropping mercury electrode (DME) proceeds through a mechanism involving specific adsorption of the reactant at the DME surface and yielding polarographic waves at -0.2 volt (versus the saturated calomel electrode) in aqueous solution. Ethanol interferes with the specific adsorption of tetrathionate and pentathionate in a range of potentials between 0.0 and -1.1 volt, because EtOH is preferentially adsorbed. This results in a shift of the polarographic half-wave potentials of tetrathionate and pentathionate, which facilitates their determination in polythionate mixtures. On the other hand, the polarographic reduction of trithionate is unaffected by ethanol, because it occurs at -1.5 volt where ethanol is not adsorbed at the surface of the DME. Task 3: total accounting of the sulfur balance in representative samples of synfuel process streams. Analyses of two aqueous gasifier effluents from Grand Forks, ND, were performed. An untreated specimen contained sulfidic and polysulfidic sulfur, thiosulfate and thiocyanate. On the other hand, sulfite, sulfate, and thiocyanate were the only sulfur moieties observed in the Grand Forks sample which had been stripped at PETC. 7 references, 1 figure, 3 tables.

  20. Effect of Sulfurization Temperature on Solution-Processed Cu2ZnSnS4 Thin Films.

    PubMed

    Park, Si-Nae; Sung, Shi-Joon; Son, Dae-Ho; Kim, Dae-Hwan; Sim, Jun-Hyoung; Kang, Jin-Kyu

    2015-03-01

    Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS) solar cells are attracting significant attention as an alternative to CIGS (Culn1-xGa(x)S2) solar cells because of the non-toxic and inexpensive constituent elements of CZTS. Recently, solution-based deposition methods are being developed because they have advantages such as suitability for use in large-area deposition, high-throughput manufacturing, and a very short energy payback time with drastically lower manufacturing costs. In this work, we fabricated solution-based CZTS thin films and investigated them in order to observe the effects of sulfurization temperature on CZTS thin films. We confirmed the grain size, morphology, chemical composition, crystallinity, and electrical properties of CZTS thin films depending on various sulfurization temperatures. PMID:26413693

  1. Elucidating microbial processes in nitrate- and sulfate-reducing systems using sulfur and oxygen isotope ratios: The example of oil reservoir souring control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubert, Casey; Voordouw, Gerrit; Mayer, Bernhard

    2009-07-01

    Sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) are ubiquitous in anoxic environments where they couple the oxidation of organic compounds to the production of hydrogen sulfide. This can be problematic for various industries including oil production where reservoir "souring" (the generation of H 2S) requires corrective actions. Nitrate or nitrite injection into sour oil fields can promote SRB control by stimulating organotrophic nitrate- or nitrite-reducing bacteria (O-NRB) that out-compete SRB for electron donors (biocompetitive exclusion), and/or by lithotrophic nitrate- or nitrite-reducing sulfide oxidizing bacteria (NR-SOB) that remove H 2S directly. Sulfur and oxygen isotope ratios of sulfide and sulfate were monitored in batch cultures and sulfidic bioreactors to evaluate mitigation of SRB activities by nitrate or nitrite injection. Sulfate reduction in batch cultures of Desulfovibrio sp. strain Lac15 indicated typical Rayleigh-type fractionation of sulfur isotopes during bacterial sulfate reduction (BSR) with lactate, whereas oxygen isotope ratios in unreacted sulfate remained constant. Sulfur isotope fractionation in batch cultures of the NR-SOB Thiomicrospira sp. strain CVO was minimal during the oxidation of sulfide to sulfate, which had δ18O SO4 values similar to that of the water-oxygen. Treating an up-flow bioreactor with increasing doses of nitrate to eliminate sulfide resulted in changes in sulfur isotope ratios of sulfate and sulfide but very little variation in oxygen isotope ratios of sulfate. These observations were similar to results obtained from SRB-only, but different from those of NR-SOB-only pure culture control experiments. This suggests that biocompetitive exclusion of SRB took place in the nitrate-injected bioreactor. In two replicate bioreactors treated with nitrite, less pronounced sulfur isotope fractionation and a slight decrease in δ18O SO4 were observed. This indicated that NR-SOB played a minor role during dosing with low nitrite and that biocompetitive exclusion was the major process. The results demonstrate that stable isotope data can contribute unique information for understanding complex microbial processes in nitrate- and sulfate-reducing systems, and offer important information for the management of H 2S problems in oil reservoirs and elsewhere.

  2. Isotopic evidence for processes of sulfur retention/release in 13 forested catchments spanning a strong pollution gradient (Czech Republic, central Europe)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    NovK, Martin; Kirchner, James W.; Fottov, Daniela; Prechov, Eva; J?Ckov, Iva; KrM, Pavel; Hruska, Jakub

    2005-12-01

    Sulfur isotope systematics were studied in 13 small catchments in the Czech Republic, similar in topography (V-shaped valley) and vegetation (Norway spruce). The sites differed in elevation, rainfall, bedrock, soil type and S pollution. Across the sites, ?34S values decreased in the order: bulk deposition > runoff > spruce throughfall > C-horizon soil > A/B-horizon soil > O-horizon soil > bedrock (means of 5.5, 4.8, 4.7, 4.6, 4.2, 3.1 and 1.5, respectively). Some of the sites had a net export of S, while others accumulated S. Sites exporting S were located in the polluted north where atmospheric S input started to decrease in 1987. Sites retaining S were located in the relatively unpolluted south. Sulfur isotope composition of runoff depended on whether the catchment accumulated or released S. Sites releasing S had runoff ?34S values lower than deposition. In contrast, sites retaining S had runoff ?34S values higher than deposition. Across the sites, the ?34S values of runoff were not correlated with ?34S values of bedrock, indicating that the contribution of bedrock to S in runoff was negligible. The ?34S values of runoff were strongly positively correlated with the ?34S values of soil. Sulfur present in the C-horizon of soils was mainly derived from atmospheric deposition, not bedrock. Sulfur isotope mass balances were constructed for each catchment, making it possible to quantify the difference between ?34S values of the within-catchment source/sink of S and runoff S. Sulfur isotope mass balances indicated that the sink for the retained S at unpolluted sites and the source of the released S at polluted sites were isotopically fractionated by the same amount relative to runoff S. Inorganic and organic processes were considered as possible causes for this observation. Biological S cycling involves a variety of reactions, some of which fractionate S isotopes. In contrast, adsorption/desorption of inorganic sulfate in soil and weathering of S-containing minerals do not fractionate S isotopes. Therefore the within-catchment source/sink of S must be largely a result of biological S cycling. Organic S cycling played an important role over a wide range of atmospheric S inputs from 13 to 130 kg S ha-1 yr-1.

  3. Options for small-scale sulfur recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Royan, T.; Wichert, E.

    1997-11-01

    With the issuance by the Alberta Energy Resources Conservation Board and Alberta Environment of their report entitled Sulphur Recovery Guidelines for Sour Gas Plants in Alberta in August of 1988, the requirement in Alberta to recover sulfur was broadened to a sulfur content of 1 ton/D or greater in the inlet gas to a new sour-gas treating plant. This paper reviews the processes in use for recovering sulfur from sour-natural-gas streams that have a total sulfur content of 5 ton/D or less. These processes are the modified Claus process, the recycle Selectox process, and the reduction/oxidation processes LO-CAT and SulFerox. While the modified Claus process is used in large sulfur-recovery plants, the other processes may be more economical for sulfur recovery on a small scale. A description of the sour-gas treating and sulfur-recovery processes is given, and a comparison of estimated capital and operating costs for typical sour-gas streams is provided. All of the above processes are in operation in North America. Operating experiences with these processes in Alberta are discussed. The quality of the end-product sulfur varies among these processes, and the options for sulfur disposal are reviewed.

  4. Role of RIS/APC for manufacturing RFG/LSD. [Refinery Information Systems/Advanced Process Control, ReFormulated Gasoline/Low Sulfur Diesels

    SciTech Connect

    Latour, P.R. )

    1994-01-01

    Revolutionary changes in quality specifications (number, complexity, uncertainty, economic sensitivity) for reformulated gasolines (RFG) and low-sulfur diesels (LSD) are being addressed by powerful, new, computer-integrated manufacturing technology for Refinery Information Systems and Advanced Process Control (RIS/APC). This paper shows how the five active RIS/APC functions: performance measurement, optimization, scheduling, control and integration are used to manufacture new, clean fuels competitively. With current industry spending for this field averaging 2 to 3 cents/bbl crude, many refineries can capture 50 to 100 cents/bbl if the technology is properly employed and sustained throughout refining operations, organizations, and businesses.

  5. Development of enhanced sulfur rejection processes. Third quarterly technical progress report, April 1, 1993--June 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, R.H.; Luttrell, G.H.; Adel, G.T.; Richardson, P.E.

    1993-10-12

    Conclusions: Release analyses of Pittsburgh No. 8 and Illinois No. 6 coals show that the {minus}28 mesh size fraction is fine enough to liberate ash and pyrite. Galvanic coupling with sacrificial anodes such as zinc, manganese and aluminum can effectively lower the potential of pyrite. This effect is more significant at pH 4.6 than at pH 9.2. The most negative pyrite potential is achieved when the surface area ratio of anode to pyrite is approximately 4:1. When coupled with pyrite at pH 9.2, the zinc anode exhibited unique potential vs time behavior which is different from that observed with manganese and aluminum. This is believed to be related to the build- up and break-down of zinc hydroxides on the surface. Voltammograms of pyrite at pH 9.2 and 4.6 demonstrated that pyrite surfaces can be significantly changed by galvanic coupling with sacrificial anodes. In flotation tests, metal powders were used as galvanic contactors to reduce the potential and depress pyrite. The potenial may be low enough to remove sulfur species from the surface. Stirred solutions are preferred for the removal of oxidized sulfur species by galvanic coupling; oxygen in solution must to be depleted prior to the addition of sacrificial anodes to effectively lower the pyrite potential. Microflotation studies show that zinc, manganese and iron all depress pyrite. Zinc appears to be the most effective, followed by manganese and then iron. Voltammetry studies indicated that coupling pyrite with zinc, manganese and aluminum reduces and desorbs hydrophobic sulfur products on the surface of pyrite.

  6. Geochemical processes controlling sulfur, carbon, and metals in Pennsylvanian source rocks of the Paradox basin, Utah and Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Tuttle, M.L.; Klett, T.R. ); Richardson, M. )

    1993-08-01

    During the Pennsylvanian Period, marine evaporate-carbonate-shale units were cyclically deposited in the Paradox basin, Utah and Colorado. To understand the formation and preservation of petroleum source rocks in these cycles, the authors chemically, mineralogy, and isotopically analyzed 100 shale samples from cores penetrating cycles 3 and 5 of the Paradox Formation. The geochemistry of sulfur, carbon, and metals in these carbonaceous shales records the heterogeneity of depositional and diagenetic conditions during formation of these rocks. Variations in sulfur, carbon, and metal geochemistry between and within shale units reflect differences in organic matter source, source of clastic material and its potential for iron sulfidization, salinity, sedimentation rates, and redox conditions, during deposition. Tentative conclusions are that: (1) organic matter production and preservation was enhanced in areas with low clastic input and a stable water column (hydrogen index values increase away from clastic source); (2) large amounts of hydrocarbon-rich organic matter (hydrogen index value of up to 440) and sulfate-enriched brines maximized sulfate reduction by bacteria in the anoxic sediment in the northern part of the basin; (3) sulfide-mineral formation was limited by the abundance of iron-oxyhydroxide coating on fine-grained particles; (4) during long-term stratification of the water column, anoxic bottom water promoted isotopic evolution of sulfur reservoirs ([delta][sup 34]S of sulfide increased from [minus]36% to [minus]17%) and increased accumulation of Cr and Ni (up to 450 ppm and 150 ppm, respectively); and (5) euxinic conditions within the water column were unlikely during stratification.

  7. SULFUR POLYMER ENCAPSULATION.

    SciTech Connect

    KALB, P.

    2001-08-22

    Sulfur polymer cement (SPC) is a thermoplastic polymer consisting of 95 wt% elemental sulfur and 5 wt% organic modifiers to enhance long-term durability. SPC was originally developed by the U.S. Bureau of Mines as an alternative to hydraulic cement for construction applications. Previous attempts to use elemental sulfur as a construction material in the chemical industry failed due to premature degradation. These failures were caused by the internal stresses that result from changes in crystalline structure upon cooling of the material. By reacting elemental sulfur with organic polymers, the Bureau of Mines developed a product that successfully suppresses the solid phase transition and significantly improves the stability of the product. SPC, originally named modified sulfur cement, is produced from readily available, inexpensive waste sulfur derived from desulfurization of both flue gases and petroleum. The commercial production of SPC is licensed in the United States by Martin Resources (Odessa, Texas) and is marketed under the trade name Chement 2000. It is sold in granular form and is relatively inexpensive ({approx}$0.10 to 0.12/lb). Application of SPC for the treatment of radioactive, hazardous, and mixed wastes was initially developed and patented by Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) in the mid-1980s (Kalb and Colombo, 1985; Colombo et al., 1997). The process was subsequently investigated by the Commission of the European Communities (Van Dalen and Rijpkema, 1989), Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (Darnell, 1991), and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (Mattus and Mattus, 1994). SPC has been used primarily in microencapsulation applications but can also be used for macroencapsulation of waste. SPC microencapsulation has been demonstrated to be an effective treatment for a wide variety of wastes, including incinerator hearth and fly ash; aqueous concentrates such as sulfates, borates, and chlorides; blowdown solutions; soils; and sludges. It is not recommended for treatment of wastes containing high concentrations of nitrates because of potentially dangerous reactions between sulfur, nitrate, and trace quantities of organics. Recently, the process has been adapted for the treatment of liquid elemental mercury and mercury contaminated soil and debris.

  8. [Sulfur isotopic ratios indicating sulfur cycling in slope soils of karst areas].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Liu, Cong-qiang; Li, Xiao-dong; Liu, Tao-ze; Zhang, Li-li

    2010-02-01

    Sequential extraction methods for soil sulfur were used to determine delta34 S ratios and sulfur contents of total sulfur, organic sulfur, SO4(21) and FeS2 in slope soils of karst areas. In general, FeS2 has the lowest delta34 S ratios, ranging from -6.86% per hundred to -4.229% per hundred, followed in ascending order by SO4(2-) (-2.64% per hundred - -1.34% per hundred), total sulfur (-3.25% per hundred - -1.03% per hundred) and organic sulfur (-1.63% per hundred -0.50% per hundred) in surface soils of profiles, and delta34 S ratios in different sulfur forms all show increasing trend with profiles deepening. Covariations of delta34 S ratios of SO4(2-) and FeS2 with increasing depth are related to SO4(2-) dissimilatory reduction, while the increase in parallel of delta34 S ratios of total sulfur and organic sulfur could be resulted from organic sulfur cycling. delta34 S ratios have been extensively used to indicate sulfur sources, moreover, SO4(2-) dissimilatory reduction and organic sulfur mineralization result in significant sulfur isotopic fractionation, and sulfides oxidation and SO4(2-) assimilation have no isotopic fractionation occurred, the vertical variations of delta34 S ratios in different sulfur forms can therefore be good records for depth-dependant sulfur cycling processes. Furthermore, by comparing depth distributions of sulfur contents and delta34 S ratios in different sulfur forms, it is easily to discuss the migration of SO4(-1) and organic sulfur fractions in soil profiles. PMID:20391712

  9. Sulfur isotopic systematics of granitoids from southwestern New Brunswick, Canada: implications for magmatic-hydrothermal processes, redox conditions, and gold mineralization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xue-Ming; Lentz, David R.

    2010-12-01

    Bulk δ 34Srock values, sulfur contents, and magnetic susceptibility were determined for 12 gold-related granitoid intrusions in southwestern New Brunswick, the Canadian Appalachians. The sulfur isotope compositions of sulfide minerals in some of the granitoid samples were also analyzed. This new dataset was used to characterize two distinctive groups of granitoids: (1) a Late Devonian granitic series (GS) and (2) a Late Silurian to Early Devonian granodioritic to monzogranitic series (GMS). The GS rocks have a large range in δ 34S values of -7.1‰ to +13‰ with an average of 2.2 ± 5.0‰ (1σ), low bulk-S contents (33 to 7,710 ppm) and low magnetic susceptibility values (<10-4 SI), consistent with reduced ilmenite-series granites. The GMS rocks have a relatively narrower variation in δ 34S values of -4.4‰ to +7.3‰ with an average 1.2 ± 2.9‰ but with larger ranges in bulk-S contents (45 to 11,100 ppm) and high magnetic susceptibility values (>10-3 SI), indicative of oxidized magnetite-series granites. The exceptions for the GMS rocks are the Lake George granodiorite and Tower Hill granite that display reduced characteristics, which may have resulted from interaction of the magmas forming these intrusions with graphite- or organic carbon-bearing sedimentary rocks. The bulk δ 34S values and S contents of the GMS rocks are interpreted in terms of selective assimilation-fractional crystallization (SAFC) processes. Degassing processes may account for the δ 34S values and S contents of some GS rocks. The characteristics of our sulfur isotope and abundance data suggest that mineralizing components S and Au in intrusion-related gold systems are dominantly derived from magmatic sources, although minor contaminants derived from country rocks are evident. In addition, the molar sulfate to sulfide ratio in a granitic rock sample can be calculated from the δ 34Srock value of the whole-rock sample and the δ 34Ssulfide (or δ 34Ssulfate) value of sulfide and/or sulfate mineral in the sample on the basis of S-isotope fractionation and mass balance under the condition of magmatic equilibrium. This may be used to predict the speciation of sulfur in granitic rocks, which can be a potential exploration tool for intrusion-related gold systems.

  10. Uses of lunar sulfur

    SciTech Connect

    Vaniman, D.T.; Pettit, D.R.; Heiken, G.

    1988-01-01

    Sulfur and sulfur compounds have a wide range of applications for their fluid, electrical, chemical and biochemical properties. Although low in abundance on the Moon (/approximately/0.1% in mare soils), sulfur is surface-correlated and relatively extractable. Co-production of sulfur during oxygen extraction from ilmenite-rich soils could yield sulfur in masses up to 10% of the mass of oxygen produced. Sulfur deserves serious consideration as a lunar resource. 29 refs., 3 figs.

  11. Uses of lunar sulfur

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaniman, D.; Pettit, D.; Heiken, G.

    1992-01-01

    Sulfur and sulfur compounds have a wide range of applications for their fluid, electrical, chemical, and biochemical properties. Although known abundances on the Moon are limited (approximately 0.1 percent in mare soils), sulfur is relatively extractable by heating. Coproduction of sulfur during oxygen extraction from ilmenite-rich mare soils could yield sulfur in masses up to 10 percent of the mass of oxygen produced. Sulfur deserves serious consideration as a lunar resource.

  12. Production of elemental sulfur and methane from H{sub 2}S and CO{sub 2} derived from a coal desulfurization process. Quaterly technical progress report, October 1, 1996--December 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Xueyu; Khang, Soon-Jai; Keener, T.C.

    1997-06-01

    During the thirteenth quarter of the project, the catalytic reaction of H{sub 2}S and CO{sub 2} was carried out around the temperature of 450 to 550{degrees}C to explore the possibility of sulfur removal by solid adsorbents. The experiments combined two unit operations of catalysis and adsorption. A thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA) and a total sulfur analyzer (TSA) were used to investigate the effectiveness of the selected adsorbents used in the H{sub 2}S decomposition process. Three adsorbents, activated carbon, iron sulfide and sulfided Co-Mo-alumina catalyst in the form of powder, were selected for the experiments. The results showed that activated carbon and Co-Mo-Alumina catalyst powder could adsorb up to 9 percent of sulfur in weight. However, the experimental results indicated that there were only trace amount of elemental sulfur produced during the desorption test for the adsorbents.

  13. Comparison between pre-fractionation and fractionation process of heavy gas oil for determination of sulfur compounds using comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Machado, Maria Elisabete; Bregles, Lucas Panizzi; de Menezes, Eliana Weber; Caramão, Elina Bastos; Benvenutti, Edilson Valmir; Zini, Cláudia Alcaraz

    2013-01-25

    The separation of the organic sulfur compounds (OSC) of petroleum or its heavy fractions is a critical step and is essential for the correct characterization of these compounds, especially due to similar physical and chemical properties of polycyclic aromatic sulfur heterocycles (PASH) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH). This similarity results in coelutions among PAH and PASH and for this reason former steps of fractionation are required before gas chromatographic analysis. The objective of this study was to evaluate the potential of GC×GC for the separation and identification of OSC in a heavy gas oil sample without fractionation, after pre-fractionation in an alumina column and also after fractionation process. This last one was performed with a modified stationary phase manufactured and characterized in the laboratory, called Pd(II)-MPSG, where palladium is chemically linked to silica through mercaptopropyl groups. The fractions obtained from both procedures were analyzed by GC×GC/TOFMS, which was effective to separate and identify various classes of OSC. A hundred and thirty-five compounds were tentatively identified in the sample that was only pre-fractionated. However, when the fractionation was also performed with the Pd(II)-MPSG phase, a larger number of sulfur compounds were found (317). Results have shown that the analysis of a pre-fractionated sample by GC×GC/TOFMS is suitable when the goal is a general characterization of classes of compounds in the sample, while a more detailed analysis of PASH can be performed, using also the fractionation Pd(II)-MPSG phase. GC×GC/TOFMS played a major role in the comparison of samples obtained from pre-fractionation and fractionation steps due to its high peak capacity, selectivity, organized distribution of chromatographic peaks and resolution. PMID:23298843

  14. Stable isotope compositions of serpentinite seamounts in the Mariana forearc: Serpentinization processes, fluid sources and sulfur metasomatism

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Alt, J.C.; Shanks, Wayne C., III

    2006-01-01

    The Mariana and Izu-Bonin arcs in the western Pacific are characterized by serpentinite seamounts in the forearc that provide unique windows into the mantle wedge. We present stable isotope (O, H, S, and C) data for serpentinites from Conical seamount in the Mariana forearc and S isotope data for Torishima seamount in the Izu-Bonin forearc in order to understand the compositions of fluids and temperatures of serpentinization in the mantle wedge, and to investigate the transport of sulfur from the slab to the mantle wedge. Six serpentine mineral separates have a restricted range of ??18O (6.5-8.5???). Antigorite separates have ??D values of -29.5??? to -45.5??? that reflect serpentinization within the mantle wedge whereas chrysotile has low ??D values (-51.8??? to -84.0???) as the result of re-equilibration with fluids at low temperatures. Fractionation of oxygen isotopes between serpentine and magnetite indicate serpentinization temperatures of 300-375 ??C. Two late cross-fiber chrysotile veins have higher ??18O values of 8.9??? to 10.8??? and formed at lower temperatures (as low as ???100 ??C). Aqueous fluids in equilibrium with serpentine at 300-375 ??C had ??18O = 6.5-9??? and ??D = -4??? to -26???, consistent with sediment dehydration reactions at temperatures <200 ??C in the subducting slab rather than a basaltic slab source. Three aragonite veins in metabasalt and siltstone clasts within the serpentinite flows have ??18O = 16.7-24.5???, consistent with the serpentinizing fluids at temperatures <250 ??C. ??13C values of 0.1-2.5??? suggest a source in subducting carbonate sediments. The ??34S values of sulfide in serpentinites on Conical Seamount (-6.7??? to 9.8???) result from metasomatism through variable reduction of aqueous sulfate (??34S = 14???) derived from slab sediments. Despite sulfur metasomatism, serpentinites have low sulfur contents (generally < 164 ppm) that reflect the highly depleted nature of the mantle wedge. The serpentinites are mostly enriched in 34S (median ??34Ssulfide = 4.5???), consistent with a 34S-enriched mantle wedge as inferred from arc lavas. ?? 2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Lunar Sulfur Capture System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berggren, Mark; Zubrin, Robert; Bostwick-White, Emily

    2013-01-01

    The Lunar Sulfur Capture System (LSCS) protects in situ resource utilization (ISRU) hardware from corrosion, and reduces contaminant levels in water condensed for electrolysis. The LSCS uses a lunar soil sorbent to trap over 98 percent of sulfur gases and about two-thirds of halide gases evolved during hydrogen reduction of lunar soils. LSCS soil sorbent is based on lunar minerals containing iron and calcium compounds that trap sulfur and halide gas contaminants in a fixed-bed reactor held at temperatures between 250 and 400 C, allowing moisture produced during reduction to pass through in vapor phase. Small amounts of Earth-based polishing sorbents consisting of zinc oxide and sodium aluminate are used to reduce contaminant concentrations to one ppm or less. The preferred LSCS configuration employs lunar soil beneficiation to boost concentrations of reactive sorbent minerals. Lunar soils contain sulfur in concentrations of about 0.1 percent, and halogen compounds including chlorine and fluorine in concentrations of about 0.01 percent. These contaminants are released as gases such as H2S, COS, CS2,HCl, and HF during thermal ISRU processing with hydrogen or other reducing gases. Removal of contaminant gases is required during ISRU processing to prevent hardware corrosion, electrolyzer damage, and catalyst poisoning. The use of Earth-supplied, single-use consumables to entirely remove contaminants at the levels existing in lunar soils would make many ISRU processes unattractive due to the large mass of consumables relative to the mass of oxygen produced. The LSCS concept of using a primary sorbent prepared from lunar soil was identified as a method by which the majority of contaminants could be removed from process gas streams, thereby substantially reducing the required mass of Earth-supplied consumables. The LSCS takes advantage of minerals containing iron and calcium compounds that are present in lunar soil to trap sulfur and halide gases in a fixedbed reactor downstream of an in-ISRU process such as hydrogen reduction. The lunar-soil-sorbent trap is held at a temperature significantly lower than the operating temperature of the hydrogen reduction or other ISRU process in order to maximize capture of contaminants, but is held at a high enough temperature to allow moisture to pass through without condensing. The lunar soil benefits from physical beneficiation to remove ultrafine particles (to reduce pressure drop through a fixed bed reactor) and to upgrade concentrations of iron and/or calcium compounds (to improve reactivity with gaseous contaminants).

  16. Enhanced elementary sulfur recovery with sequential sulfate-reducing, denitrifying sulfide-oxidizing processes in a cylindrical-type anaerobic baffled reactor.

    PubMed

    Huang, Cong; Zhao, Youkang; Li, Zhiling; Yuan, Ye; Chen, Chuan; Tan, Wenbo; Gao, Shuang; Gao, Lingfang; Zhou, Jizhong; Wang, Aijie

    2015-09-01

    Simultaneous removal of COD, SO4(2-) and NO3(-) and recovery of elemental sulfur (S(0)) were evaluated in a four-compartment anaerobic baffled reactor (ABR) with separated functional units of sulfate reduction (SR) and denitrifying sulfide removal (DSR). Optimal SO4(2-)-S/NO3(-)-N ratio was evaluated as 5:5, with a substantial improvement of S(0) recovery maintained at 79.1%, one of the highest level ever reported; meanwhile, removal rates of COD, SO4(2-) and NO3(-) were approached at 71.9%, 92.9% and 98.6%, respectively. Nitrate served as a key factor to control the shift of SR and DSR related populations, with the possible involvement of Thauera sp. during SR and Sulfurovum sp. or Acidiferrobacter sp. during DSR, respectively. DsrB and aprA genes were the most abundant during SR and DSR processes, respectively. Cylindrical-type ABR with the improved elemental sulfur recovery was recommended to deal with sulfate and nitrate-laden wastewater under the optimized SO4(2-)/NO3(-) ratio. PMID:26080105

  17. Acidophilic sulfur disproportionation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardisty, Dalton S.; Olyphant, Greg A.; Bell, Jonathan B.; Johnson, Adam P.; Pratt, Lisa M.

    2013-07-01

    Bacterial disproportionation of elemental sulfur (S0) is a well-studied metabolism and is not previously reported to occur at pH values less than 4.5. In this study, a sediment core from an abandoned-coal-mine-waste deposit in Southwest Indiana revealed sulfur isotope fractionations between S0 and pyrite (Δ34Ses-py) of up to -35‰, inferred to indicate intense recycling of S0 via bacterial disproportionation and sulfide oxidation. Additionally, the chemistry of seasonally collected pore-water profiles were found to vary, with pore-water pH ranging from 2.2 to 3.8 and observed seasonal redox shifts expressed as abrupt transitions from Fe(III) to Fe(II) dominated conditions, often controlled by fluctuating water table depths. S0 is a common product during the oxidation of pyrite, a process known to generate acidic waters during weathering and production of acid mine drainage. The H2S product of S0 disproportionation, fractionated by up to -8.6‰, is rapidly oxidized to S0 near redox gradients via reaction with Fe(III) allowing for the accumulation of isotopically light S0 that can then become subject to further sulfur disproportionation. A mass-balance model for S0 incorporating pyrite oxidation, S0 disproportionation, and S0 oxidation readily explains the range of observed Δ34Ses-py and emphasizes the necessity of seasonally varying pyrite weathering and metabolic rates, as indicated by the pore water chemistry. The findings of this research suggest that S0 disproportionation is potentially a common microbial process at a pH < 4.5 and can create large sulfur isotope fractionations, even in the absence of sulfate reduction.

  18. Sulfur minimization in bacterial leaching

    SciTech Connect

    Seth, R.; Prasad, D.; Henry, J.G.

    1996-11-01

    The production of sewage biosolids in Ontario in 1989 was estimated to be 7 million m{sup 3} of wet sludge per year. Of this amount, land application accounts for between 20 and 30% of the total. Unfortunately, the use of sewage biosolids on agricultural land is often prohibited because of heavy metal contamination of the biosolids. High cost and operational problems have made chemical methods of metal extraction unattractive. Consequently, microbiological methods of leaching of heavy metals have been studied for over a decade. A relatively simple microbiological process has been investigated in recent years in flask level experiments and recently in a semicontinuous system. The process exploits nonacidophilic and acidophilic indigenous thiobacilli to extract heavy metals from sewage biosolids. These thiobacilli use elemental sulfur as the energy source, producing sulfuric acid. However, the resulting decontaminated biosolids can cause environmental problems like acidification of the soil, when acid is generated from the residual sulfur in the biosolids. The present study examines the possibility of reducing the amount of sulfur added in batch and semicontinuous bacterial leaching systems, and maximizing sulfur oxidation efficiency, thereby reducing the residual sulfur in leached biosolids.

  19. Effect of sulfidogenesis cycling on the biogeochemical process in arsenic-enriched aquifers in the Lanyang Plain of Taiwan: Evidence from a sulfur isotope study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kao, Yu-Hsuan; Liu, Chen-Wuing; Wang, Pei-Ling; Liao, Chung-Min

    2015-09-01

    This study evaluated the biogeochemical interactions between arsenic (As) and sulfur (S) in groundwater to understand the natural and anthropogenic influences of S redox processes on As mobilization in the Lanyang Plain, Taiwan. Cl- and the sulfate isotopic composition (δ34S[SO4]) were selected as conservative tracers. River water and saline seawater were considered as end members in the binary mixing model. Thirty-two groundwater samples were divided into four types of groundwater (I, pyrite-oxidation; II, iron- and sulfate-reducing; III, sulfate-reducing; and IV, anthropogenic and others). The binary mixing model coupled with discriminant analysis was applied to yield a classification with 97% correctness, indicating that the DO/ORP values and δ34S[SO4] and Fe2+ concentrations are effective redox-sensitive indicators. Type I groundwater is mostly located in a mountainous recharge area where pyrite oxidation is the major geochemical process. A high 18O enrichment factor (ε[SO4-H2O]) and high 34S enrichment factor (ε34S[FeS2-SO4]) indicate that disproportionation and dissimilatory sulfate reduction are both involved in Type II and Type III groundwater. The process of bacterial sulfate reduction may coprecipitate and sequester As, a mechanism that is unlikely to occur in Type II groundwater. The presence of high As and Fe2+ concentrations and enriched δ34S[SO4] in Type II groundwater suggest that biogeochemical reactions occurred under anaerobic conditions. The reductive dissolution of As-bearing Fe oxyhydroxides together with microbial disproportionation of sulfur explains the substantial correlations among the high As concentration and enriched δ34S[SO4] and Fe2+ concentrations in the iron- and sulfate-reducing zone (Type II). The As concentration in Type III groundwater (sulfate-reducing) is lower than that in Type II groundwater because of bacterial sulfate reduction and coprecipitation with As. Furthermore, the dissolution of sulfate minerals is not the major source of aqueous SO4, based on the sulfur isotopic composition of solid-phase sulfate (δ34S[sulfate mineral]). Finally, the anthropogenic influence of fertilizers with wide S isotopic ranges is proposed as the plausible sulfate budget in Type IV groundwater. The results of this study suggest that the As release into groundwater involves the reductive dissolution of As-bearing Fe-hydroxides, bacterial sulfate reduction, and microbial disproportionation in the Lanyang Plain.

  20. Production of elemental sulfur and methane from H{sub 2}S and CO{sub 2} derived from a coal desulfurization process. First quarterly report, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Gong, Sung-Yong; Jiang, Xueyu; Khang, Soon-Jai; Keener, T.C.

    1997-09-01

    During the tenth quarter of the project, bench scale experiments were performed to investigate the adsorption ability of different kinds of materials within sulfur vapor environment. Four kinds of adsorbents have been tested. The experimental results indicated that activated carbon was the beet of four adsorbents tested. In addition to the baseline tests, several designs of activated carbon feed system have been tested. Under an inert environment, bench scale experiments were performed to investigate the characteristics and efficiency of activated carbon passing through the Co-Mo-Alumina catalyst bed. The results showed that activated carbon powder could easily be transported through the catalytic bed. The adsorption process may be applicable to promote conversion of H{sub 2}S in the H{sub 2}S and CO{sub 2} rea system.

  1. A New Use for High-Sulfur Coal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawson, D. D.; England, C.

    1982-01-01

    New process recovers some of economic value of high-sulfur coal. Although high-sulfur content is undesirable in most coal-utilization schemes (such as simple burning), proposed process prefers high-sulfur coal to produce electrical power or hydrogen. Potential exists for widespread application in energy industry.

  2. Solubility of Sulfur Dioxide in Sulfuric Acid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, K. K.; Compton, L. E.; Lawson, D. D.

    1982-01-01

    The solubility of sulfur dioxide in 50% (wt./wt.) sulfuric acid was evaluated by regular solution theory, and the results verified by experimental measurements in the temperature range of 25 C to 70 C at pressures of 60 to 200 PSIA. The percent (wt./wt.) of sulfur dioxide in 50% (wt./wt.) sulfuric acid is given by the equation %SO2 = 2.2350 + 0.0903P - 0.00026P 10 to the 2nd power with P in PSIA.

  3. System evaluation and microbial analysis of a sulfur cycle-based wastewater treatment process for Co-treatment of simple wet flue gas desulfurization wastes with freshwater sewage.

    PubMed

    Qian, Jin; Liu, Rulong; Wei, Li; Lu, Hui; Chen, Guang-Hao

    2015-09-01

    A sulfur cycle-based wastewater treatment process, namely the Sulfate reduction, Autotrophic denitrification and Nitrification Integrated process (SANI(®) process) has been recently developed for organics and nitrogen removal with 90% sludge minimization and 35% energy reduction in the biological treatment of saline sewage from seawater toilet flushing practice in Hong Kong. In this study, sulfate- and sulfite-rich wastes from simple wet flue gas desulfurization (WFGD) were considered as a potential low-cost sulfur source to achieve beneficial co-treatment with non-saline (freshwater) sewage in continental areas, through a Mixed Denitrification (MD)-SANI process trialed with synthetic mixture of simple WFGD wastes and freshwater sewage. The system showed 80% COD removal efficiency (specific COD removal rate of 0.26 kg COD/kg VSS/d) at an optimal pH of 7.5 and complete denitrification through MD (specific nitrogen removal rate of 0.33 kg N/kg VSS/d). Among the electron donors in MD, organics and thiosulfate could induce a much higher denitrifying activity than sulfide in terms of both NO3(-) reduction and NO2(-) reduction, suggesting a much higher nitrogen removal rate in organics-, thiosulfate- and sulfide-based MD in MD-SANI compared to sulfide alone-based autotrophic denitrification in conventional SANI(®). Diverse sulfate/sulfite-reducing bacteria (SRB) genera dominated in the bacterial community of sulfate/sulfite-reducing up-flow sludge bed (SRUSB) sludge without methane producing bacteria detected. Desulfomicrobium-like species possibly for sulfite reduction and Desulfobulbus-like species possibly for sulfate reduction are the two dominant groups with respective abundance of 24.03 and 14.91% in the SRB genera. Diverse denitrifying genera were identified in the bacterial community of anoxic up-flow sludge bed (AnUSB) sludge and the Thauera- and Thiobacillus-like species were the major taxa. These results well explained the successful operation of the lab-scale MD-SANI process. PMID:26001823

  4. Estimating Effects of Atmospheric Deposition and Peat Decomposition Processes on Mercury and Sulfur Accumulation and Retention in Northern Peatlands, Minnesota

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furman, O.; Nater, E.; Toner, B. M.; Sebestyen, S. D.; Tfaily, M. M.; Chanton, J.; Kolka, R. K.

    2013-12-01

    Northern peatland ecosystems play an important role in mercury (Hg) and sulfur (S) co-cycling. Peatlands are sinks for total Hg and sources for methyl Hg through the activity of sulfate-reducing bacteria. These ecosystems are vulnerable to environmental change, and projected changes in climate for the north-central U.S. have the potential to affect Hg and S stores and cycling in the subsurface, which may stimulate the release of bioaccumulative methyl Hg to receiving water bodies. SPRUCE (Spruce and Peatland Responses under Climate and Environmental change experiment) is an interdisciplinary study of the effects of temperature and enriched carbon dioxide on the responses of northern peatland ecosystems at the Marcell Experimental Forest, Minnesota. In the first year of SPRUCE, we are investigating Hg and S accumulation rates in 12-m diameter experimental plots on a black spruce bog before peatland heating experiments start in 2014. Understanding Hg and S accumulation rates and their retention mechanisms in the subsurface are needed in order to reconstruct historical trends in Hg and S deposition, and predict peatland responses to climate change. In this study, we will attempt to separate the effects of atmospheric deposition vs peat humification on Hg and S retention. As such, peat cores were sampled from sixteen experimental SPRUCE plots in August 2012. These 'Time 0' peat subsamples have been analyzed for total Hg, methyl Hg and total S, and bulk density as a function of depth (<2 m). In addition, peat subsamples have been analyzed for 14C and 13C to determine the age of peat and derive peat, Hg and S accumulation rates. Our preliminary results indicate that both total and methyl Hg, and total S concentrations reached the peak value in the 20-40 cm peat section, which is the transition zone between transiently oxidized acrotelm and permanently saturated anaerobic catotelm. Total and methyl Hg concentrations were several times lower in deeper profiles (>50 cm), and showed lower variability. Changes in Hg and S over depth seem to be associated with the variation in humification of soil organic matter. These findings are critical to better conceptualization as well as parameterization of models that project how climate change will affect the accumulation, cycling, and export of toxic methylmercury from peatlands.

  5. Micro-textures and in situ sulfur isotopic analysis of spheroidal and zonal sulfides in the giant Jinding Zn-Pb deposit, Yunnan, China: Implications for biogenic processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Chunji; Chi, Guoxiang; Fayek, Mostafa

    2015-05-01

    The Jinding deposit in Yunnan, southwest China, is the largest sandstone- and conglomerate-hosted Zn-Pb deposit in the world. In this paper, we report various micro-textures of spheroidal and zonal sulfides, such as pellet-shaped and colloform aggregates of pyrite and sphalerite, from the deposit and interpret them to be possibly related to micro-colonies of sulfate reducing bacteria, probably supporting an in situ BSR hypothesis. Micro-scale sulfur isotope analysis in different parts of the spheroidal and zonal sulfide aggregates, using secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), revealed δ34S (VCDT) values as low as -48.4‰ for sulfides formed in the early-main stage disseminated ores in the western part of the deposit, possibly suggesting maximum sulfur isotopic fractionation through BSR. Relatively elevated δ34S (VCDT) values (-7.7‰ to -34.8‰, mainly from -10‰ to -20‰) for the late-stage, cavity-filling ores in the eastern part of the deposit, are interpreted to be possibly related to elevated temperatures close to the hydrothermal conduit and elevated δ34S values of the remaining sulfates resulting from the preceding BSR processes. The apparent discrepancy between the low temperatures required for BSR and the high temperatures indicated by fluid inclusions (>120 °C) may be reconciled through invoking episodic influx of ore-forming hydrothermal fluids into a shallow, relatively cool environment. It is proposed that the host rocks of the Jinding deposit have not been buried to great depths (⩽1 km), which, combined with the availability of hydrocarbons in the Jinding dome (a paleo-oil and gas reservoir), provides an ideal environment for BSR. Episodic influx of metal-carrying hydrothermal fluids temporarily and locally suppressed BSR and promoted thermo-chemical sulfate reduction (TSR), resulting in deposit- and micro-scale variations of δ34S.

  6. Elemental sulfur in Eddy County, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hinds, Jim S.; Cunningham, Richard R.

    1970-01-01

    Sulfur has been reported in Eddy County, N. Mex., in rocks ranging from Silurian to Holocene in age at depths of 0-15,020 feet. Targets of present exploration are Permian formations in the Delaware Basin and northwest shelf areas at depths of less than 4,000 feet. Most of the reported sulfur occurrences in the shelf area are in the 'Abo' (as used by some subsurface geologists), Yeso, and San Andres Formations and the Artesia Group. Sulfur deposition in the dense dolomites of the 'Abo,' Yeso, and San Andres Formations is attributed to the reduction of ionic sulfate by hydrogen sulfide in formation waters in zones of preexisting porosity and permeability. A similar origin accounts for most of the sulfur deposits in the formations of the Artesia Group, but some of the sulfur in these formations may have originated in place through the alteration of anhydrite to carbonate and sulfur by the metabolic processes of bacteria in the presence of hydrocarbons. Exploration in the Delaware Basin area is directed primarily toward the Castile Formation. Sulfur deposits in the Castile Formation are found in irregular masses of cavernous brecciated secondary carbonate rock enveloped by impermeable anhydrite. The carbonate masses, or 'castiles,' probably originated as collapse features resulting from subsurface solution and upward stopping. Formation of carbonate rock and sulfur in the castiles is attributed to the reduction of brecciated anhydrite by bacteria and hydrocarbons in the same process ascribed to the formation of carbonate and sulfur in the caprocks of salt domes.

  7. A primer on sulfur for the planetary geologist

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Theilig, E.

    1982-01-01

    Sulfur has been proposed as the dominant composition for the volcanic material on Io. Sulfur is a complex element which forms many intramolecular and intermolecular allotropes exhibiting a variety of physical properties. Cyclo-S8 sulfur is the most abundant and stable molecular form. The important molecular species within liquid sulfur change in concentration with temperature. Concentrations of the allotropes control the physical properties of the melt. Discontinuities in density, viscosity, and thermal properties reflect the polymerization process within liquid sulfur. Variations in the melting point are related to autodissociation of the liquid. Many solids forms of sulfur have been identified but only orthorhombic alpha and monoclinic beta sulfur, both composed of cyclo-S8 sulfur, are stable under terrestrial conditions. Physical properties of solid sulfur are dependent on the allotrope and, in some cases, the thermal history. Three natural terrestrial sulfur flows are described: (1) Siretoko-Iosan, Japan; (2) Volcan Azufre, Galapagos Islands; and (3) Mauna Loa, Hawaii. All of the flows are associated with fumarolic areas and are considered to have formed by the melting and mobilization of sulfur deposits. Surface textures of the flows indicate a behavior of molten sulfur similar to that of silicate lava. Channels, rivulets, and lobate edges were described for the flows. The solidification of man-made sulfur flows formed as part of the Frasch mining process by which sulfur is removed from the subsurface in a liquid state is described.

  8. MVC: A user-based on-line optimal control system for gas processing and treating plants. Development and results for claus sulfur recovery and sweetening modules. Topical report, June 1992-September 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Berkowitz, P.N.; Papadopoulos, M.N.; Colwell, L.W.; Poe, W.; Yiu, Y.

    1993-09-01

    The objective of this project was to develop and field validate modular, on-line, advanced control systems to optimize the operation of Claus sulfur recovery and sweetening in gas processing plants with emphasis on small and mid-sized facilities.

  9. The Sulfur Cycle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kellogg, W. W.; And Others

    1972-01-01

    A model estimating the contributions of sulfur compounds by natural and human activities, and the rate of removal of sulfur from the atmosphere, is based on a review of the existing literature. Areas requiring additional research are identified. (AL)

  10. How to cope with your sulfur problems. [COPE process; use of oxygen enriched air to increase capacity

    SciTech Connect

    Goar, B.G.; Hegarty, W.P.; Thew, T.W.

    1986-01-01

    COPE (Claus Oxygen-based Process Expansion) technology presents an improvement to the modified Claus process that replaces air with up to 100% oxygen to debottleneck Claus Sulphur Recovery Unit's (SRU's). The major equipment requirements of the COPE process are the installation of an acid gas recycle blower and a proprietary burner. The recycle stream acts as a coolant to moderate reaction furnace temperature, effectively replacing nitrogen as a diluent. The specially designed burner allows for the safe and effective handling of the four feed streams: air, oxygen, acid gas, and recycle gas. Co-licensed by Goar, Arrington and Associates, Inc. (GAA) and Air Products and Chemicals, Inc., the COPE process presents an economically attractive means of expanding the capacity of an SRU. The first two COPE units are in commercial operation at a major gulf Coast refinery in the USA and have demonstrated an 85% increase in capacity by enriching to the 55% O/sub 2/ level.

  11. Thiophenic Sulfur Compounds Released During Coal Pyrolysis.

    PubMed

    Xing, Mengwen; Kong, Jiao; Dong, Jie; Jiao, Haili; Li, Fan

    2013-06-01

    Thiophenic sulfur compounds are released during coal gasification, carbonization, and combustion. Previous studies indicate that thiophenic sulfur compounds degrade very slowly in the environment, and are more carcinogenic than polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and nitrogenous compounds. Therefore, it is very important to study the principle of thiophenic sulfur compounds during coal conversion, in order to control their emission and promote clean coal utilization. To realize this goal and understand the formation mechanism of thiophenic sulfur compounds, this study focused on the release behavior of thiophenic sulfur compounds during coal pyrolysis, which is an important phase for all coal thermal conversion processes. The pyrolyzer (CDS-5250) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (Focus GC-DSQII) were used to analyze thiophenic sulfur compounds in situ. Several coals with different coal ranks and sulfur contents were chosen as experimental samples, and thiophenic sulfur compounds of the gas produced during pyrolysis under different temperatures and heating rates were investigated. Levels of benzothiophene and dibenzothiophene were obtained during pyrolysis at temperatures ranging from 200°C to 1300°C, and heating rates ranging from 6°C/ms to 14°C/ms and 6°C/s to 14°C/s. Moreover, the relationship between the total amount of benzothiophene and dibenzothiophene released during coal pyrolysis and the organic sulfur content in coal was also discussed. This study is beneficial for understanding the formation and control of thiophenic sulfur compounds, since it provides a series of significant results that show the impact that operation conditions and organic sulfur content in coal have on the amount and species of thiophenic sulfur compounds produced during coal pyrolysis. PMID:23781126

  12. Thiophenic Sulfur Compounds Released During Coal Pyrolysis

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Mengwen; Kong, Jiao; Dong, Jie; Jiao, Haili; Li, Fan

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Thiophenic sulfur compounds are released during coal gasification, carbonization, and combustion. Previous studies indicate that thiophenic sulfur compounds degrade very slowly in the environment, and are more carcinogenic than polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and nitrogenous compounds. Therefore, it is very important to study the principle of thiophenic sulfur compounds during coal conversion, in order to control their emission and promote clean coal utilization. To realize this goal and understand the formation mechanism of thiophenic sulfur compounds, this study focused on the release behavior of thiophenic sulfur compounds during coal pyrolysis, which is an important phase for all coal thermal conversion processes. The pyrolyzer (CDS-5250) and gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (Focus GC-DSQII) were used to analyze thiophenic sulfur compounds in situ. Several coals with different coal ranks and sulfur contents were chosen as experimental samples, and thiophenic sulfur compounds of the gas produced during pyrolysis under different temperatures and heating rates were investigated. Levels of benzothiophene and dibenzothiophene were obtained during pyrolysis at temperatures ranging from 200°C to 1300°C, and heating rates ranging from 6°C/ms to 14°C/ms and 6°C/s to 14°C/s. Moreover, the relationship between the total amount of benzothiophene and dibenzothiophene released during coal pyrolysis and the organic sulfur content in coal was also discussed. This study is beneficial for understanding the formation and control of thiophenic sulfur compounds, since it provides a series of significant results that show the impact that operation conditions and organic sulfur content in coal have on the amount and species of thiophenic sulfur compounds produced during coal pyrolysis. PMID:23781126

  13. Effect of sulfur content in a sulfur-activated carbon composite on the electrochemical properties of a lithium/sulfur battery

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Jin-Woo; Kim, Changhyeon; Ryu, Ho-Suk; Cho, Gyu-Bong; Cho, Kwon-Koo; Kim, Ki-Won; Ahn, Jou-Hyeon; Wang, Guoxiu; Ahn, Jae-Pyeung; Ahn, Hyo-Jun

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • The content of sulfur in activated carbon was controlled by solution process. • The sulfur electrode with low sulfur content shows the best performance. • The Li/S battery has capacity of 1360 mAh/g at 1 C and 702 mAh/g at 10 C. - Abstract: The content of sulfur in sulfur/activated carbon composite is controlled from 32.37 wt.% to 55.33 wt.% by a one-step solution-based process. When the sulfur content is limited to 41.21 wt.%, it can be loaded into the pores of an activated carbon matrix in a highly dispersed state. On the contrary, when the sulfur content is 55.33 wt.%, crystalline sulfur can be detected on the surface of the activated carbon matrix. The best electrochemical performance can be obtained for a sulfur electrode with the lowest sulfur content. The sulfur/activated carbon composite with 32.37 wt.% sulfur afforded the highest first discharge capacity of 1360 mAh g{sup −1} at 1 C rate and a large reversible capacity of 702 mAh g{sup −1} at 10 C (16.75 A/g)

  14. 40 CFR 60.642 - Standards for sulfur dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Standards for sulfur dioxide. 60.642... Gas Processing: SO2 Emissions § 60.642 Standards for sulfur dioxide. (a) During the initial... reduction efficiency (Zi) to be determined from table 1 based on the sulfur feed rate (X) and the...

  15. 40 CFR 60.642 - Standards for sulfur dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Standards for sulfur dioxide. 60.642... Gas Processing: SO2 Emissions § 60.642 Standards for sulfur dioxide. (a) During the initial... reduction efficiency (Zi) to be determined from table 1 based on the sulfur feed rate (X) and the...

  16. 40 CFR 60.642 - Standards for sulfur dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Standards for sulfur dioxide. 60.642... Gas Processing: SO2 Emissions § 60.642 Standards for sulfur dioxide. (a) During the initial... reduction efficiency (Zi) to be determined from table 1 based on the sulfur feed rate (X) and the...

  17. FEASIBILITY OF PRODUCING ELEMENTAL SULFUR FROM MAGNESIUM SULFITE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a study to extend potential applications of MgO flue gas desulfurization processes by allowing the sulfur to be recovered as elemental sulfur as well as sulfuric acid. The study considered the feasibility of combining the exothermic SO2 reduction react...

  18. Biochemistry of sulfur

    SciTech Connect

    Huxtable, R.J.; LaFranconi, W.M.

    1986-01-01

    This book presents information on the following topics: the chemistry of sulfur; the oxidation states of sulfur; the reduction of sulfate and the oxidation of sulfide; the sulfur cycle; oxidation of inorganic sulfide; the metabolism and functions of methionine; taurine and the oxidative metabolism of cysteine; thiols, disulfides, and thioesters; thioethers; thiamine; biotin; sulfates; inherited disorders of sulfur metabolism; cystinuria; sulfur and the metabolism of xenobiotics; general aspects of xenobiotic metabolism; glutathione and sulfation of xenobiotics; and metabolic activation as a result of sulfate conjugation.

  19. Evaluation of the Cell Voltage of Electrolytic HI Concentration for Thermochemical Water-Splitting Iodine-Sulfur Process

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Nobuyuki; Yoshida, Mitsunori; Okuda, Hiroyuki; Sato, Hiroyuki; Kubo, Shinji; Onuki, Kaoru

    2007-07-01

    Breakdown of the cell voltage in the electro-dialysis process for concentrating HIx solution (HI-H{sub 2}O-I{sub 2} mixture) was preliminarily examined in an effort to clarify the optimal operation condition as well as to optimize the cell design for the application to the thermochemical water-splitting IS process for large-scale hydrogen production. Basic data such as electric resistance of HIx solution, overvoltage of the iodine-iodide ion redox reaction at graphite electrode, and the membrane voltage drop, were measured using HIx solution with composition of interest. Also, a methodology for estimating the cell voltage was discussed. The calculated cell voltage agreed well with the experimental one indicating the validity of the procedure adopted. (authors)

  20. Recovering sulfur from gas streams

    SciTech Connect

    1997-11-01

    Linde AG (Hoellriegeiskreuth, Germany) has developed ClinSulf-SDP process, a two-reactor system that offers better than 99.5% sulfur recovery at low capital and operating costs. In a traditional Claus plant, sulfur-recovery rates of 99.3% can be achieved by combining a two- or three-stage Claus plant with a separate tail-gas cleanup unit (TGCU). Common TGCU methods include H{sub 2}S scrubbing, subdewpoint condensation and direct oxidation. Such combined units are not only costly and complicated to build and maintain, but many of today`s operators require higher sulfur-recovery rates--on the order of 99.3%--99.8%. The Clin-Sulf-SDP combines several catalytic stages of a Claus plant with a subdewpoint, tailgas-treatment system, and the process uses only two reactors. At the heart of the process are two identical, internally cooled reactors. Two four-way valves periodically reverse the sequence of the matching reactors, allowing them to alternate between sulfur-adsorption and catalyst-regeneration modes.

  1. A mesoporous carbon–sulfur composite as cathode material for high rate lithium sulfur batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Hyunji; Zhao, Xiaohui; Kim, Dul-Sun; Ahn, Hyo-Jun; Kim, Ki-Won; Cho, Kwon-Koo; Ahn, Jou-Hyeon

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • CMK-3 mesoporous carbon was synthesized as conducting reservoir for housing sulfur. • Sulfur/CMK-3 composites were prepared by two-stage thermal treatment. • The composite at 300 °C for 20 h shows improved electrochemical properties. - Abstract: Sulfur composite was prepared by encapsulating sulfur into CMK-3 mesoporous carbon with different heating times and then used as the cathode material for lithium sulfur batteries. Thermal treatment at 300 °C plays an important role in the sulfur encapsulation process. With 20 h of heating time, a portion of sulfur remained on the surface of carbon, whereas with 60 h of heating time, sulfur is confined deeply in the small pores of carbon that cannot be fully exploited in the redox reaction, thus causing low capacity. The S/CMK-3 composite with thermal treatment for 40 h at 300 °C contained 51.3 wt.% sulfur and delivered a high initial capacity of 1375 mA h g{sup −1} at 0.1 C. Moreover, it showed good capacity retention of 704 mA h g{sup −1} at 0.1 C and 578 mA h g{sup −1} at 2 C even after 100 cycles, which proves its potential as a cathode material for high capability lithium sulfur batteries.

  2. Tailoring Pore Size of Nitrogen-Doped Hollow Carbon Nanospheres for Confi ning Sulfur in Lithium–Sulfur Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Weidong; Wang, Chong M.; Zhang, Quiglin; Abruna, Hector D.; He, Yang; Wang, Jiangwei; Mao, Scott X.; Xiao, Xingcheng

    2015-08-19

    Three types of nitrogen-doped hollow carbon spheres with different pore sized porous shells are prepared to investigate the performance of sulfur confinement. The reason that why no sulfur is observed in previous research is determined and it is successfully demonstrated that the sulfur/polysulfide will overflow the porous carbon during the lithiation process.

  3. An integrated biodesulfurization process, including inoculum preparation, desulfurization and sulfate removal in a single step, for removing sulfur from oils.

    SciTech Connect

    Tangaromsuk, Jantana; Borole, Abhijeet P; Kruatrachue, Maleeya; Pokethitiyook, Prayad

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A single-stage reactor, in which the growth of bacterial culture, induction of desulfurizing enzymes, and desulfurization reaction are carried out in a single step, was adopted to investigate desulfurization of DBT at high cell densities. IGTS8 was used as the biocatalyst. Optimal condition for the bacterial growth and DBT desulfurization were also investigated. RESULTS: Optimization of fermentation conditions was necessary to obtain high cell densities including controlling accumulation of acetate. Under optimal operating conditions, the maximum OD600 was measured to be 26.6 at 118 h of cultivation. When biodesulfurization of DBT in model oil with a high cell density culture of IGTS8 was investigated, accumulation of sulfate was found to limit the extent of desulfurization. A sulfate removal step was added to obtain a single-stage integrated biodesulfurization process. Sulfate removal was achieved via an aqueous bleed stream and use of a separation unit to recycle the organic phase. CONCLUSION : A proof of principle of a complete system capable of biocatalyst growth, induction, desulfurization and by-product separation was demonstrated. This system enables simplification of the biodesulfurization process and has potential to lower the operating cost of the bioprocess.

  4. Development of a solid absorption process for removal of sulfur from fuel gas. Second quarterly technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Stegen, G.E.

    1980-05-01

    Progress on development of the Solid Supported Molten Salt (SSMS) Process is reported. Absorption and regeneration reaction rate data were obtained using a gravimetric technique. Durability and salt impregnation tests were also performed on a number of commercially available and custom fabricated ceramic samples. Results to date indicate that lithium aluminate, magnesium oxide, and zirconium oxide may all be suitable ceramic support materials. Gravimetric reaction rate data has been developed which gives an estimate of reaction rates expected with the solid supported molten salt sorbent. Soaking the ceramic in a bath of the molten salt has been shown to be effective in filling the pores with salt. With some materials it is necessary to draw a vacuum on the bath during soaking in order to remove trapped gases.

  5. Implications for eruptive processes as indicated by sulfur dioxide emissions from Kilauea Volcano, Hawai'i, 1979-1997

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sutton, A.J.; Elias, T.; Gerlach, T.M.; Stokes, J.B.

    2001-01-01

    Ki??lauea Volcano, Hawai'i, currently hosts the longest running SO2 emission-rate data set on the planet, starting with initial surveys done in 1975 by Stoiber and his colleagues. The 17.5-year record of summit emissions, starting in 1979, shows the effects of summit and east rift eruptive processes, which define seven distinctly different periods of SO2 release. Summit emissions jumped nearly 40% with the onset (3 January 1983) of the Pu'u 'O??'o??-Ku??paianaha eruption on the east rift zone (ERZ). Summit SO2 emissions from Ki??lauea showed a strong positive correlation with short-period, shallow, caldera events, rather than with long-period seismicity as in more silicious systems. This correlation suggests a maturation process in the summit magma-transport system from 1986 through 1993. During a steady-state throughput-equilibrium interval of the summit magma reservoir, integration of summit-caldera and ERZ SO2 emissions reveals an undegassed volume rate of effusion of 2.1 ?? 105 m3/d. This value corroborates the volume-rate determined by geophysical methods, demonstrating that, for Ki??lauea, SO2 emission rates can be used to monitor effusion rate, supporting and supplementing other, more established geophysical methods. For the 17.5 years of continuous emission rate records at Ki??lauea, the volcano has released 9.7 ?? 106 t (metric tonnes) of SO2, 1.7 ?? 106 t from the summit and 8.0 ?? 106 t from the east rift zone. On an annual basis, the average SO2 release from Ki??lauea is 4.6 ?? 105 t/y, compared to the global annual volcanic emission rate of 1.2 ?? 107 t/y. ?? 2001 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. CATALYST EVALUATION FOR A SULFUR DIOXIDE-DEPOLARIZED ELECTROLYZER

    SciTech Connect

    Hobbs, D; Hector Colon-Mercado, H

    2007-01-31

    Thermochemical processes are being developed to provide global-scale quantities of hydrogen. A variant on sulfur-based thermochemical cycles is the Hybrid Sulfur (HyS) Process which uses a sulfur dioxide depolarized electrolyzer (SDE) to produce the hydrogen. Testing examined the activity and stability of platinum and palladium as the electrocatalyst for the SDE in sulfuric acid solutions. Cyclic and linear sweep voltammetry revealed that platinum provided better catalytic activity with much lower potentials and higher currents than palladium. Testing also showed that the catalyst activity is strongly influenced by the concentration of the sulfuric acid electrolyte.

  7. Definition of Non-Conventional Sulfur Utilization in Western Kazakhstan for Sulfur Concrete (Phase 1)

    SciTech Connect

    Kalb, Paul

    2007-05-31

    Battelle received a contract from Agip-KCO, on behalf a consortium of international oil and gas companies with exploration rights in the North Caspian Sea, Kazakhstan. The objective of the work was to identify and help develop new techniques for sulfur concrete products from waste, by-product sulfur that will be generated in large quantitites as drilling operations begin in the near future. BNL has significant expertise in the development and use of sulfur concrete products and has direct experience collaborating with the Russian and Kazakh partners that participated. Feasibility testing was successfully conducted for a new process to produce cost-effective sulfur polymer cement that has broad commerical applications.

  8. Biostimulation of Oil Sands Process-Affected Water with Phosphate Yields Removal of Sulfur-Containing Organics and Detoxification.

    PubMed

    Quesnel, Dean M; Oldenburg, Thomas B P; Larter, Stephen R; Gieg, Lisa M; Chua, Gordon

    2015-11-01

    The ability to mitigate toxicity of oil sands process-affected water (OSPW) for return into the environment is an important issue for effective tailings management in Alberta, Canada. OSPW toxicity has been linked to classical naphthenic acids (NAs), but the toxic contribution of other acid-extractable organics (AEOs) remains unknown. Here, we examine the potential for in situ bioremediation of OSPW AEOs by indigenous algae. Phosphate biostimulation was performed in OSPW to promote the growth of indigenous photosynthetic microorganisms and subsequent toxicity and chemical changes were determined. After 12 weeks, the AEO fraction of phosphate-biostimulated OSPW was significantly less toxic to the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe than unstimulated OSPW. Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTICR-MS) analysis of the AEO fraction in phosphate-biostimulated OSPW showed decreased levels of SO3 class compounds, including a subset that may represent linear arylsulfonates. A screen with S. pombe transcription factor mutant strains for growth sensitivity to the AEO fraction or sodium dodecylbenzenesulfonate revealed a mode of toxic action consistent with oxidative stress and detrimental effects on cellular membranes. These findings demonstrate a potential algal-based in situ bioremediation strategy for OSPW AEOs and uncover a link between toxicity and AEOs other than classical NAs. PMID:26448451

  9. Development of lysozyme-combined antibacterial system to reduce sulfur dioxide and to stabilize Italian Riesling ice wine during aging process

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Kai; Han, Shun-yu; Zhang, Bo; Li, Min; Sheng, Wen-jun

    2015-01-01

    For the purpose of SO2 reduction and stabilizing ice wine, a new antibacterial technique was developed and verified in order to reduce the content of sulfur dioxide (SO2) and simultaneously maintain protein stability during ice wine aging process. Hazardous bacterial strain (lactic acid bacteria, LAB) and protein stability of Italian Riesling ice wine were evaluated in terms of different amounts of lysozyme, SO2, polyphenols, and wine pH by single-factor experiments. Subsequently, a quadratic rotation-orthogonal composite design with four variables was conducted to establish the multiple linear regression model that demonstrated the influence of different treatments on synthesis score between LAB inhibition and protein stability of ice wine. The results showed that, synthesis score can be influenced by lysozyme and SO2 concentrations on an extremely significant level (P < 0.01). Furthermore, the lysozyme-combined antibacterial system, which is specially designed for ice wine aging, was optimized step by step by response surface methodology and ridge analysis. As a result, the optimal proportion should be control in ice wine as follows: 179.31 mg L−1 lysozyme, 177.14 mg L−1 SO2, 0.60 g L−1 polyphenols, and 4.01 ice wine pH. Based on this system, the normalized synthesis score between LAB inhibition and protein stability can reach the highest point 0.920. Finally, by the experiments of verification and comparison, it was indicated that lysozyme-combined antibacterial system, which was a practical and prospective method to reduce SO2 concentration and effectively prevent contamination from hazardous LAB, can be used to stabilize ice wine during aging process. PMID:26405531

  10. Functional bacteria and process metabolism of the Denitrifying Sulfur conversion-associated Enhanced Biological Phosphorus Removal (DS-EBPR) system: An investigation by operating the system from deterioration to restoration.

    PubMed

    Guo, Gang; Wu, Di; Hao, Tianwei; Mackey, Hamish Robert; Wei, Li; Wang, Haiguang; Chen, Guanghao

    2016-05-15

    A sulfur conversion-associated Enhanced Biological Phosphorus (P) Removal (EBPR) system is being developed to cater for the increasing needs to treat saline/brackish wastewater resulting from seawater intrusion into groundwater and sewers and frequent use of sulfate coagulants during drinking water treatment, as well as to meet the demand for eutrophication control in warm climate regions. However, the major functional bacteria and metabolism in this emerging biological nutrient removal system are still poorly understood. This study was thus designed to explore the functional microbes and metabolism in this new EBPR system by manipulating the deterioration, failure and restoration of a lab-scale system. This was achieved by changing the mixed liquor suspended solids (MLSS) concentration to monitor and evaluate the relationships among sulfur conversion (including sulfate reduction and sulfate production), P removal, variation in microbial community structures, and stoichiometric parameters. The results show that the stable Denitrifying Sulfur conversion-associated EBPR (DS-EBPR) system was enriched by sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) and sulfide-oxidizing bacteria (SOB). These bacteria synergistically participated in this new EBPR process, thereby inducing an appropriate level of sulfur conversion crucial for achieving a stable DS-EBPR performance, i.e. maintaining sulfur conversion intensity at 15-40 mg S/L, corresponding to an optimal sludge concentration of 6.5 g/L. This range of sulfur conversion favors microbial community competition and various energy flows from internal polymers (i.e. polysulfide or elemental sulfur (poly-S(2-)/S(0)) and poly-β-hydroxyalkanoates (PHA)) for P removal. If this range was exceeded, the system might deteriorate or even fail due to enrichment of glycogen-accumulating organisms (GAOs). Four methods of restoring the failed system were investigated: increasing the sludge concentration, lowering the salinity or doubling the COD loading, non of which restored SRB and SOB activities for DS-EBPR; only the final novel approach of adding 25 ± 5 mg S/L of external sulfide into the reactor at the beginning of the anoxic phase could efficiently restore the DS-EBPR system from failure. The present study represents a step towards understanding the DS-EBPR metabolism and provides an effective remedial measure for recovering a deteriorating or failed DS-EBPR system. PMID:27010789

  11. Production of elemental sulfur and methane from H{sub 2}S and CO{sub 2} derived from a coal desulfurization process. Quarterly technical progress report, October 1, 1995--December 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Gong, S.-Y.; Jiang, X.; Khang, S.-J.; Keener, T.C.

    1995-12-31

    During the ninth quarter of the project, bench scale experiments were performed to investigate the adsorption ability of different kinds of materials within sulfur vapor environment. Four kinds of adsorbents have been tested. The experiment results indicated that activated carbon was the best of four adsorbents tested. The adsorption process may be applicable to promote conversion of H{sub 2}S in the H{sub 2}S and SO{sub 2} reaction system.

  12. Neutralization and biodegradation of sulfur mustard. Final report, October 1995-June 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Harvey, S.P.; Szafraniec, L.L.; Beaudry, W.T.; Earley, J.T.; Irvine, R.L.

    1997-02-01

    The chemical warfare agent sulfur mustard was hydrolyzed to products that were biologically mineralized in sequencing batch reactors seeded with activated sludge. Greater than 90% carbon removal was achieved using laboratory scale bioreactors processing hydrolyzed munitions grade sulfur mustard obtained directly from the U.S. Chemical Stockpile. The bioreactor effluent was nontoxic and contained no detectable sulfur mustard or priority pollutants. The sulfur mustard hydrolysis biodegradation process has potential application to the congressionally mandated disposal of sulfur mustard stockpiles.

  13. 40 CFR 436.190 - Applicability; description of the Frasch sulfur subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Frasch sulfur subcategory. 436.190 Section 436.190 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... Frasch Sulfur Subcategory § 436.190 Applicability; description of the Frasch sulfur subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to the processing of sulfur on shore and in marshes and...

  14. 40 CFR 436.190 - Applicability; description of the Frasch sulfur subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Frasch sulfur subcategory. 436.190 Section 436.190 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... Frasch Sulfur Subcategory § 436.190 Applicability; description of the Frasch sulfur subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to the processing of sulfur on shore and in marshes and...

  15. 40 CFR 436.190 - Applicability; description of the Frasch sulfur subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Frasch sulfur subcategory. 436.190 Section 436.190 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... SOURCE CATEGORY Frasch Sulfur Subcategory § 436.190 Applicability; description of the Frasch sulfur subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to the processing of sulfur on shore and in...

  16. 40 CFR 436.190 - Applicability; description of the Frasch sulfur subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Frasch sulfur subcategory. 436.190 Section 436.190 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... SOURCE CATEGORY Frasch Sulfur Subcategory § 436.190 Applicability; description of the Frasch sulfur subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to the processing of sulfur on shore and in...

  17. 40 CFR 436.190 - Applicability; description of the Frasch sulfur subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Frasch sulfur subcategory. 436.190 Section 436.190 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... SOURCE CATEGORY Frasch Sulfur Subcategory § 436.190 Applicability; description of the Frasch sulfur subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to the processing of sulfur on shore and in...

  18. Economic feasibility of biochemical processes for the upgrading of crudes and the removal of sulfur, nitrogen, and trace metals from crude oil -- Benchmark cost establishment of biochemical processes on the basis of conventional downstream technologies. Final report FY95

    SciTech Connect

    Premuzic, E.T.

    1996-08-01

    During the past several years, a considerable amount of work has been carried out showing that microbially enhanced oil recovery (MEOR) is promising and the resulting biotechnology may be deliverable. At Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), systematic studies have been conducted which dealt with the effects of thermophilic and thermoadapted bacteria on the chemical and physical properties of selected types of crude oils at elevated temperatures and pressures. Current studies indicate that during the biotreatment several chemical and physical properties of crude oils are affected. The oils are (1) emulsified; (2) acidified; (3) there is a qualitative and quantitative change in light and heavy fractions of the crudes; (4) there are chemical changes in fractions containing sulfur compounds; (5) there is an apparent reduction in the concentration of trace metals; and (6) the qualitative and quantitative changes appear to be microbial species dependent; and (7) there is a distinction between biodegraded and biotreated oils. The downstream biotechnological crude oil processing research performed thus far is of laboratory scale and has focused on demonstrating the technical feasibility of downstream processing with different types of biocatalysts under a variety of processing conditions. Quantitative economic analysis is the topic of the present project which investigates the economic feasibility of the various biochemical downstream processes which hold promise in upgrading of heavy crudes, such as those found in California, e.g., Monterey-type, Midway Sunset, Honda crudes, and others.

  19. Relationship between corrosion and the biological sulfur cycle: A review

    SciTech Connect

    Little, B.J.; Ray, R.I.; Pope, R.K.

    2000-04-01

    Sulfur and sulfur compounds can produce pitting, crevice corrosion, dealloying, stress corrosion cracking, and stress-oriented hydrogen-induced cracking of susceptible metals and alloys. Even though the metabolic by-products of the biological sulfur cycle are extremely corrosive, there are no correlations between numbers and types of sulfur-related organisms and the probability or rate of corrosion, Determination of specific mechanisms for corrosion caused by microbiologically mediated oxidation and reduction of sulfur and sulfur compounds is complicated by the variety of potential metabolic-energy sources and by-products; the coexistence of reduced and oxidized sulfur species; competing reactions with inorganic and organic compounds; and the versatility and adaptability of microorganisms in biofilms. The microbial ecology of sulfur-rich environments is poorly understood because of the association of aerobes and anaerobes and the mutualism or succession of heterotrophs to autotrophs. The physical scale over which the sulfur cycle influences corrosion varies with the environment. The complete sulfur cycle of oxidation and reduction reactions can take place in macroenvironments, including sewers and polluted harbors, or within the microenvironment of biofilms. In this review, reactions of sulfur and sulfur compounds resulting in corrosion were discussed in the context of environmental processes important to corrosion.

  20. Future Sulfur Dioxide Emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Steven J.; Pitcher, Hugh M.; Wigley, Tom M.

    2005-12-01

    The importance of sulfur dioxide emissions for climate change is now established, although substantial uncertainties remain. This paper presents projections for future sulfur dioxide emissions using the MiniCAM integrated assessment model. A new income-based parameterization for future sulfur dioxide emissions controls is developed based on purchasing power parity (PPP) income estimates and historical trends related to the implementation of sulfur emissions limitations. This parameterization is then used to produce sulfur dioxide emissions trajectories for the set of scenarios developed for the Special Report on Emission Scenarios (SRES). We use the SRES methodology to produce harmonized SRES scenarios using the latest version of the MiniCAM model. The implications, and requirements, for IA modeling of sulfur dioxide emissions are discussed. We find that sulfur emissions eventually decline over the next century under a wide set of assumptions. These emission reductions result from a combination of emission controls, the adoption of advanced electric technologies, and a shift away from the direct end use of coal with increasing income levels. Only under a scenario where incomes in developing regions increase slowly do global emission levels remain at close to present levels over the next century. Under a climate policy that limits emissions of carbon dioxide, sulfur dioxide emissions fall in a relatively narrow range. In all cases, the relative climatic effect of sulfur dioxide emissions decreases dramatically to a point where sulfur dioxide is only a minor component of climate forcing by the end of the century. Ecological effects of sulfur dioxide, however, could be significant in some developing regions for many decades to come.

  1. Electrostatic self-assembly of graphene oxide wrapped sulfur particles for lithium–sulfur batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Haiwei; Huang, Ying Zong, Meng; Ding, Xiao; Ding, Juan; Sun, Xu

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: • Researched graphene oxide wrapped sulfur particles for lithium–sulfur batteries. • New approach for core–shell GO/S composites by electrostatic self-assembly method. • Both core–shell structure and the GO support help to retard the diffusion of polysulfides during the electrochemical cycling process of GO/S cathode. - Abstract: A novel graphene oxide (GO)/sulfur (S) composite is developed by electrostatic self-assembly method. Remarkably, the core–shell structure of the composite and the GO support helps to retard the diffusion of polysulfides during the electrochemical cycling process. The GO/sulfur cathode presents enhanced cycling ability. Specific discharge capacities up to 494.7 mAh g{sup −1} over 200 cycles at 0.1 C is achieved with enhanced columbic efficiency around 95%, representing a good cathode material for lithium–sulfur batteries.

  2. The Phases of Sulfur.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Birdwhistell, Kurt R.

    1995-01-01

    Presents a demonstration that illustrates the dramatic changes that sulfur undergoes upon heating to 200 degrees centigrade and then cooling to room temperature. Supplements the demonstration of the rubberlike properties of catenasulfur made by rapid cooling of the sulfur melt in ice water. (JRH)

  3. Sulfur isotopic data

    SciTech Connect

    Rye, R.O.

    1987-01-01

    Preliminary sulfur isotope data have been determined for samples of the Vermillion Creek coal bed and associated rocks in the Vermillion Creek basin and for samples of evaporites collected from Jurassic and Triassic formations that crop out in the nearby Uinta Mountains. The data are inconclusive, but it is likely that the sulfur in the coal was derived from the evaporites.

  4. 40 CFR 80.585 - What is the process for approval of a test method for determining the sulfur content of diesel or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Techniques to Evaluate Analytical Measurement System Performance, as prescribed in 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR... test method for determining the sulfur content of diesel or ECA marine fuel? 80.585 Section 80.585... FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Motor Vehicle Diesel Fuel; Nonroad, Locomotive, and Marine Diesel Fuel; and...

  5. 40 CFR 80.585 - What is the process for approval of a test method for determining the sulfur content of diesel or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Techniques to Evaluate Analytical Measurement System Performance, as prescribed in 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR... test method for determining the sulfur content of diesel or ECA marine fuel? 80.585 Section 80.585... FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Motor Vehicle Diesel Fuel; Nonroad, Locomotive, and Marine Diesel Fuel; and...

  6. 40 CFR 80.585 - What is the process for approval of a test method for determining the sulfur content of diesel or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Techniques to Evaluate Analytical Measurement System Performance, as prescribed in 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR... test method for determining the sulfur content of diesel or ECA marine fuel? 80.585 Section 80.585... FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Motor Vehicle Diesel Fuel; Nonroad, Locomotive, and Marine Diesel Fuel; and...

  7. ENGINEERING/ECONOMIC ANALYSES OF COAL PREPARATION WITH SO2 CLEANUP PROCESSES FOR KEEPING HIGHER SULFUR COALS IN THE ENERGY MARKET

    EPA Science Inventory

    For purposes of this study, higher sulfur coals from the Northern Appalachian and Eastern Interior Regions were selected since they have been shown to have reasonable physical cleaning potential. Then, possible users of these coals in the electric power generating industry were e...

  8. Nanostructured sulfur cathodes.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yuan; Zheng, Guangyuan; Cui, Yi

    2013-04-01

    Rechargeable Li/S batteries have attracted significant attention lately due to their high specific energy and low cost. They are promising candidates for applications, including portable electronics, electric vehicles and grid-level energy storage. However, poor cycle life and low power capability are major technical obstacles. Various nanostructured sulfur cathodes have been developed to address these issues, as they provide greater resistance to pulverization, faster reaction kinetics and better trapping of soluble polysulfides. In this review, recent developments on nanostructured sulfur cathodes and mechanisms behind their operation are presented and discussed. Moreover, progress on novel characterization of sulfur cathodes is also summarized, as it has deepened the understanding of sulfur cathodes and will guide further rational design of sulfur electrodes. PMID:23325336

  9. Aircraft exhaust sulfur emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, R. C.; Anderson, M. R.; Miake-Lye, R. C.; Kolb, C. E.; Sorokin, A. A.; Buriko, Y. Y.

    The conversion of fuel sulfur to S(VI) (SO3 + H2SO4) in supersonic and subsonic aircraft engines is estimated numerically. Model results indicate between 2% and 10% of the fuel sulfur is emitted as S(VI). It is also shown that, for a high sulfur mass loading, conversion in the turbine is kinetically limited by the level of atomic oxygen. This results in a higher oxidation efficiency at lower sulfur loadings. SO3 is the primary S(VI) oxidation product and calculated H2SO4 emission levels were less than 1% of the total fuel sulfur. This source of S(VI) can exceed the S(VI) source due to gas phase oxidation in the exhaust wake.

  10. Regional river sulfur runoff

    SciTech Connect

    Husar, R.B.; Husar, J.D.

    1985-01-20

    The water and sulfur runoff data for 54 large river basins were assembled, covering 65% of the nondesert land area of the world. The sulfur concentration ranges from 0.5 mg S/L for the West African rivers Niger and Volta to 100 mg S/L in the Colorado River; the world average is 3.2 mg S/L. The concentrations in central and eastern Europe as well as central and eastern North America exceed 8 mg S/L. The sulfur runoff density is also highest in the river basins over these industrialized regions, exceeding 2 g S/m/sup 2//yr. However, high sulfur runoff density in excess of 3 g S/m/sup 2//yr is also measured over the Pacific islands New Zealand and New Guinea and the archipelagos of Indonesia and the Philippines. The natural background sulfur runoff was estimated by assuming that South America, Africa, Australia, and the Pacific Islands are unperturbed by man and that the average river sulfur concentration is in the range 1--3 mg S/L. Taking these background concentration values, the man-induced sulfur runoff for Europe ranges between 2 and 8 times the natural flow, and over North America, man's contribution ranges between 1 and 5 times the natural runoff. The global sulfur flow from nondesert land to the oceans and the Caspian Sea is estimated as 131 Tg S/yr, of which 46--85 Tg S/yr is attributed to natural causes. The regional river sulfur runoff pattern discussed in this paper does not have enough spatial resolution to be directly applicable to studies of the environmental effects of man-induced sulfur flows. However, it points to the continental-size regions where those perturbations are most evident and to the magnitude of the perturbations as expressed in units of the natural flows.

  11. Sulfur recovery from low hydrogen sulfide gases

    SciTech Connect

    Chute, A.E.

    1982-10-01

    Describes processes for recovering sulfur from acid gases containing less hydrogen sulfide than can be processed satisfactorily in a typical Claus sulfur recovery unit (as shown in diagram). One feature of the Recycle Selectox process is that the circulating gas acts like a flywheel to maintain steady operating conditions, even when the acid gas feed fluctuates. When the acid gas concentration falls below that which can be handled in a Claus or Selectox plant, direct conversion in a Stretford of similar process such as Unisulf is indicated. When the acid gases are weak in hydrogen sulfide, there are several considerations in conditioning the feed gas. Most of the hydrocarbons entering a Clause plant are oxidized to water and oxides of carbon. The weaker the acid gas feed, the greater is the advantage in using the Recycle Selectox process. Below 30%, the sulfur-burning Claus process can be applied. At 30% and lower, or even at higher concentrations, the Recycle Selectox or Selectox process offers a simpler yet effective means of converting and recovering sulfur. Concludes that simple modifications to the Claus process are adequate to convert hydrogen sulfide to elemental sulfur from reasonably prepared acid gases (CO/sub 2/ + H/sub 2/S) having hydrogen sulfide concentrations as low as 30%.

  12. Recovery of elemental sulfur from sour gas

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, R.L.

    1984-07-31

    Excess heat generated in a thermal reaction zone of a Claus sulfur recovery plant is used, by means of a high boiling point heat transfer medium, to reheat the Claus plant process stream prior to high temperature Claus catalytic conversion, and/or to regenerate Claus catalyst on which sulfur is deposited, or for other functions. In another aspect, low temperature Claus catalytic converters are operated at equivalent pressures during a cycle comprising an adsorption phase, a regeneration phase, and a cooling phase.

  13. Io's Sulfur: Surface Distribution and Chemical Nature of Impurities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kargel, J. S.; MacIntyre, T.; Dalton, B.; Clark, R.

    2000-10-01

    Galileo SSI and NIMS data have returned a wealth of information on the surface composition of Io. Our analysis suggests that elemental sulfur and sulfur dioxide are nearly ubiquitous but that the ratio of these two materials varies widely. Some of the most spectacular concentrations of elemental sulfur occur near major volcanoes and hotspots. In these areas the color and spectral signature of sulfur and any other materials present varies widely, in some cases forming concentrically zoned deposits around calderas. The spectral variability of sulfur may be due to many mechanisms; inclusion of minor impurities is among the possible controls. We have made some tentative identifications of possible impurities-- iron (as opaque inclusions of FeS disseminated in sulfur) appears to cause the green coloration of some deposits on Io-- including Io's so-called "golf courses." Arsenic, selenium, and tellurium (dissolved in quenched sulfur polymers and/or bonded in stoichiometric compounds with sulfur) may contribute to reddish coloration of other deposits. As little as one percent of these impurities may produce marked changes in the spectral reflectance and color of sulfur. However, other mechanisms can account for Io's reds; Io's green deposits are harder to explain in the absence of pyrite or other metallic sulfide inclusions in elemental sulfur; the logical alternative, ultramafic silicates, has fallen out of favor with the Galileo team due to absence of a diagnostic band near 0.9 microns. These colored forms of impure sulfur have been observed both in nature (in terrestrial volcanogenic native sulfur) and in recent lab specimens quenched from the molten state and containing controlled quantities of impurities (cf abstract by MacIntyre et al., this volume). Evidence for impurities in Io's sulfur will be presented, and we will offer a glimpse into possible geological process implications of the distribution of sulfur on Io and the impurities that may be present in Io's sulfur.

  14. Sedimentary sulfur geochemistry of the Paleogene Green River Formation, western USA: Implications for interpreting depositional and diagenetic processes in saline alkaline lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tuttle, M.L.; Goldhaber, M.B.

    1993-01-01

    The sulfur geochemistry of the lacustrine Paleogene Green River Formation (Colorado, Utah, and Wyoming, USA) is unlike that of most marine and other lacustrine rocks. Distinctive chemical, isotopic, and mineralogical characteristics of the formation are pyrrhotite and marcasite, high contents of iron mineral sulfides strikingly enriched in 34S, cyclical trends in sulfur abundance and ??34S values, and long-term evolutionary trends in ??34S values. Analyses that identified and quantified these characteristics include carbonate-free abundance of organic carbon (0.13-47 wt%), total iron (0.31-13 wt%), reactive iron (>70% of total iron), total sulfur (0.02-16 wt%), acid-volatile monosulfide (SAv), disulfide (SDi > 70% of total sulfur), sulfate (SSO4) and organosulfur (SOrg); isotopic composition of separated sulfur phases (??34SDi,Av up to +49???); and mineralogy, morphology and paragenesis of sulfide minerals. Mineralogy, morphology, ??34SDi,Av, and ??34SOrg have a distinctive relation, reflecting variable and unique depositional and early diagenetic conditions in the Green River lakes. When the lakes were brackish, dissimilatory sulfate-reducing bacteria in the sediment produced H2S, which initially reacted with labile iron to form pyrite framboids and more gradually with organic matter to form organosulfur compounds. During a long-lived stage of saline lake water, the amount of sulfate supplied by inflow decreased and alkalinity and pH of lake waters increased substantially. Extensive bacterial sulfate reduction in the water column kept lake waters undersaturated with sulfate minerals. A very high H2S:SO4 ratio developed in stagnant bottom water aided by the high pH that kinetically inhibited iron sulfidization. Progressive removal of H2S by coeval formation of iron sulfides and organosulfur compounds caused the isotopic composition of the entire dissolved sulfur reservoir to evolve to ??34S values much greater than that of inflow sulfate, which is estimated to have been +20??? A six-million-year interval within Lake Uinta cores records this evolution as well as smaller systematic changes in ??34S, interpreted to reflect ~ 100,000-year lake-level cycles. When porewater was exceptionally reducing, unstable FeS phases eventually recrystallized to pyrrhotite during diagenesis. A much later reaction related to weathering altered pyrrhotite to marcasite. ?? 1993.

  15. Sedimentary sulfur geochemistry of the Paleogene Green River Formation, western USA: Implications for interpreting depositional and diagenetic processes in saline alkaline lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuttle, Michele L.; Goldhaber, Martin B.

    1993-07-01

    The sulfur geochemistry of the lacustrine Paleogene Green River Formation (Colorado, Utah, and Wyoming, USA) is unlike that of most marine and other lacustrine rocks. Distinctive chemical, isotopic, and mineralogical characteristics of the formation are pyrrhotite and marcasite, high contents of iron mineral sulfides strikingly enriched in 34S, cyclical trends in sulfur abundance and δ 34S values, and long-term evolutionary trends in δ 34S values. Analyses that identified and quantified these characteristics include carbonate-free abundance of organic carbon (0.13-47 wt%), total iron (0.31-13 wt%), reactive iron (>70% of total iron), total sulfur (0.02-16 wt%), acid-volatile monosulfide (S Av), disulfide (S Di > 70% of total sulfur), sulfate (S SO4) and organosulfur (S Org); isotopic composition of separated sulfur phases (δ 34S Di,Av up to +49‰); and mineralogy, morphology and paragenesis of sulfide minerals. Mineralogy, morphology, δ 34S Di,Av, and δ 34S Org have a distinctive relation, reflecting variable and unique depositional and early diagenetic conditions in the Green River lakes. When the lakes were brackish, dissimilatory sulfate-reducing bacteria in the sediment produced H 2S, which initially reacted with labile iron to form pyrite framboids and more gradually with organic matter to form organosulfur compounds. During a long-lived stage of saline lake water, the amount of sulfate supplied by inflow decreased and alkalinity and pH of lake waters increased substantially. Extensive bacterial sulfate reduction in the water column kept lake waters undersaturated with sulfate minerals. A very high H 2S:SO 4 ratio developed in stagnant bottom water aided by the high pH that kinetically inhibited iron sulfidization. Progressive removal of H 2S by coeval formation of iron sulfides and organosulfur compounds caused the isotopic composition of the entire dissolved sulfur reservoir to evolve to δ 34S values much greater than that of inflow sulfate, which is estimated to have been +20‰ A six-million-year interval within Lake Uinta cores records this evolution as well as smaller systematic changes in δ 34S, interpreted to reflect ~ 100,000-year lake-level cycles. When porewater was exceptionally reducing, unstable FeS phases eventually recrystallized to pyrrhotite during diagenesis. A much later reaction related to weathering altered pyrrhotite to marcasite.

  16. Direct Observation of Sulfur Radicals as Reaction Media in lithium Sulfur Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Qiang; Zheng, Jianming; Walter, Eric D.; Pan, Huilin; Lu, Dongping; Zuo, Pengjian; Chen, Honghao; Deng, Zhiqun; Liaw, Bor Yann; Yu, Xiqian; Yang, Xiaoning; Zhang, Jiguang; Liu, Jun; Xiao, Jie

    2014-12-09

    Lithium sulfur (Li-S) battery has been regaining tremendous interest in recent years because of its attractive attributes such as high gravimetric energy, low cost and environmental benignity. However, it is still not conclusively known how polysulfide ring/chain participates in the whole cycling and whether the discharge and charge process follow the same pathway. Herein, we demonstrate the direct observation of sulfur radicals by using in situ electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) technique. Based on the concentration changes of sulfur radicals at different potentials, it is revealed that the chemical and electrochemical reactions in Li-S cell are driven each other to proceed through sulfur radicals, leading to two completely different reaction pathways during discharge and charge. The proposed radical mechanism may provide new insights to investigate the interactions between sulfur species and the electrolyte, inspiring novel strategies to develop Li-S battery technology.

  17. Direct Observation of Sulfur Radicals as Reaction Media in Lithium Sulfur Batteries

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wang, Qiang; Zheng, Jianming; Walter, Eric; Pan, Huilin; Lv, Dongping; Zuo, Pengjian; Chen, Honghao; Deng, Z. D.; Liaw, Bor Y.; Yu, Xiqian; et al

    2015-01-09

    Lithium sulfur (Li-S) battery has been regaining tremendous interest in recent years because of its attractive attributes such as high gravimetric energy, low cost and environmental benignity. However, it is still not conclusively known how polysulfide ring/chain participates in the whole cycling and whether the discharge and charge processes follow the same pathway. Herein, we demonstrate the direct observation of sulfur radicals by using in situ electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) technique. Based on the concentration changes of sulfur radicals at different potentials and the electrochemical characteristics of the cell, it is revealed that the chemical and electrochemical reactions in Li-Smore » cell are driving each other to proceed through sulfur radicals, leading to two completely different reaction pathways during discharge and charge. The proposed radical mechanism may provide new perspectives to investigate the interactions between sulfur species and the electrolyte, inspiring novel strategies to develop Li-S battery technology.« less

  18. Direct Observation of Sulfur Radicals as Reaction Media in Lithium Sulfur Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Qiang; Zheng, Jianming; Walter, Eric; Pan, Huilin; Lv, Dongping; Zuo, Pengjian; Chen, Honghao; Deng, Z. D.; Liaw, Bor Y.; Yu, Xiqian; Yang, Xiao-Qing; Zhang, Ji-Guang; Liu, Jun; Xiao, Jie

    2015-01-09

    Lithium sulfur (Li-S) battery has been regaining tremendous interest in recent years because of its attractive attributes such as high gravimetric energy, low cost and environmental benignity. However, it is still not conclusively known how polysulfide ring/chain participates in the whole cycling and whether the discharge and charge processes follow the same pathway. Herein, we demonstrate the direct observation of sulfur radicals by using in situ electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) technique. Based on the concentration changes of sulfur radicals at different potentials and the electrochemical characteristics of the cell, it is revealed that the chemical and electrochemical reactions in Li-S cell are driving each other to proceed through sulfur radicals, leading to two completely different reaction pathways during discharge and charge. The proposed radical mechanism may provide new perspectives to investigate the interactions between sulfur species and the electrolyte, inspiring novel strategies to develop Li-S battery technology.

  19. Sulfuric Acid on Europa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Frozen sulfuric acid on Jupiter's moon Europa is depicted in this image produced from data gathered by NASA's Galileo spacecraft. The brightest areas, where the yellow is most intense, represent regions of high frozen sulfuric acid concentration. Sulfuric acid is found in battery acid and in Earth's acid rain.

    This image is based on data gathered by Galileo's near infrared mapping spectrometer.

    Europa's leading hemisphere is toward the bottom right, and there are enhanced concentrations of sulfuric acid in the trailing side of Europa (the upper left side of the image). This is the face of Europa that is struck by sulfur ions coming from Jupiter's innermost moon, Io. The long, narrow features that crisscross Europa also show sulfuric acid that may be from sulfurous material extruded in cracks.

    Galileo, launched in 1989, has been orbiting Jupiter and its moons since December 1995. JPL manages the Galileo mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington DC. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA.

  20. Metal-Sulfur Battery Cathodes Based on PAN-Sulfur Composites.

    PubMed

    Wei, Shuya; Ma, Lin; Hendrickson, Kenville E; Tu, Zhengyuan; Archer, Lynden A

    2015-09-23

    Sulfur/polyacrylonitrile composites provide a promising route toward cathode materials that overcome multiple, stubborn technical barriers to high-energy, rechargeable lithium-sulfur (Li-S) cells. Using a facile thermal synthesis procedure in which sulfur and polyacrylonitrile (PAN) are the only reactants, we create a family of sulfur/PAN (SPAN) nanocomposites in which sulfur is maintained as S3/S2 during all stages of the redox process. By entrapping these smaller molecular sulfur species in the cathode through covalent bonding to and physical confinement in a conductive host, these materials are shown to completely eliminate polysulfide dissolution and shuttling between lithium anode and sulfur cathode. We also show that, in the absence of any of the usual salt additives required to stabilize the anode in traditional Li-S cells, Li-SPAN cells cycle trouble free and at high Coulombic efficiencies in simple carbonate electrolytes. Electrochemical and spectroscopic analysis of the SPAN cathodes at various stages of charge and discharge further show a full and reversible reduction and oxidation between elemental sulfur and Li-ions in the electrolyte to produce Li2S as the only discharge product over hundreds of cycles of charge and discharge at fixed current densities. PMID:26325146

  1. Deep sulfur cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, N.; Mandeville, C. W.

    2009-12-01

    Geochemical cycle of sulfur in near-surface reservoirs has been a subject of intense studies for decades. It has been shown that sulfur isotopic compositions of sedimentary sulfides and sulfates record interactions of the atmosphere, hydrosphere, biosphere and lithosphere, with δ34S of sedimentary sulfides continuously decreasing from 0‰ toward present-day values of ~-30 to -40‰ over the Phanerozoic (e.g., Canfield, 2004). It has also been shown that microbial reduction of the present-day seawater sulfate (δ34S=+21‰) results in large shifts in isotopic compositions of secondary pyrites in altered oceanic crust (to δ34S=-70‰: Rouxel et al., 2009). How much of these near surface isotopic variations survive during deep geochemical cycle of sulfur interacting with the mantle infinite reservoir with δ34S=0‰? Could extent of their survival be used as a tracer of processes and dynamics involved in deep geochemical cycle? As a first step toward answering these questions, δ34S was determined in-situ using a Cameca IMS 1280 ion microprobe at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution in materials representing various domains of deep geochemical cycle. They include pyrites in altered MORB as potential subducting materials and pyrites in UHP eclogites as samples that have experienced subduction zone processes, and mantle-derived melts are represented by olivine-hosted melt inclusions in MORB and those in IAB, and undegassed submarine OIB glasses. Salient features of the results include: (1) pyrites in altered MORB (with O. Rouxel; from ODP site 801 and ODP Hole 1301B) range from -70 to +19‰, (2) pyrites in UHP eclogites from the Western Gneiss Region, Norway (with B. Hacker and A. Kylander-Clark) show a limited overall range from -3.4 to + 2.8‰ among five samples, with one of them covering almost the entire range, indicating limited scale lengths of isotopic equilibration during subduction, (3) olivine-hosted melt inclusions in arc basalts from Galunggung (-2.8 - +5.2‰ with majority between +3 and +5), Krakatau (+1.5 - +8.6‰ with a cluster around +3 - +5), and Augustine (+8 - +12‰) show larger variations among arc magmas than previously known, (4) olivine-hosted melt inclusions from a FAMOUS lava (519-4-1) range from -9.5 to +10.5‰, and (5) undegassed submarine glasses from Samoa (with M. Jackson) appear to show separate ranges for individual islands, including Vailulu clustering around -1.9 to +2.1‰ and Malumalu ranging from -0.9 to -12.1‰. Overall, the results clearly show that low temperature signatures are not completely erased during recycling and isotopic exchange with the mantle infinite reservoir, and that mantle-derived melts still display large isotopic variations for small sampling scales, similar to observations on other isotope systems. Canfield, D. E. (2004) Amer. Jour. Sci., 304, 839-861. Rouxel, O. et al., (2009) Goldschmidt Conf. Abstract.

  2. Are we getting enough sulfur in our diet?

    PubMed

    Nimni, Marcel E; Han, Bo; Cordoba, Fabiola

    2007-01-01

    Sulfur, after calcium and phosphorus, is the most abundant mineral element found in our body. It is available to us in our diets, derived almost exclusively from proteins, and yet only 2 of the 20 amino acids normally present in proteins contains sulfur. One of these amino acids, methionine, cannot be synthesized by our bodies and therefore has to be supplied by the diet. Cysteine, another sulfur containing amino acid, and a large number of key metabolic intermediates essential for life, are synthesized by us, but the process requires a steady supply of sulfur.Proteins contain between 3 and 6% of sulfur amino acids. A very small percentage of sulfur comes in the form of inorganic sulfates and other forms of organic sulfur present in foods such as garlic, onion, broccoli, etc.The minimal requirements (RDA) for all the essential amino acids have always been estimated in terms of their ability to maintain a nitrogen balance. This method asses amino acid requirements for protein synthesis, only one of the pathways that methionine follows after ingestion. To adequately evaluate the RDA for methionine, one should perform, together with a nitrogen balance a sulfur balance, something never done, neither in humans nor animals.With this in mind we decided to evaluate the dietary intake of sulfur (as sulfur amino acids) in a random population and perform sulfur balance studies in a limited number of human volunteers. Initially this was done to try and gain some information on the possible mode of action of a variety of sulfur containing compounds (chondroitin sulfate, glucosamine sulfate, and others, ) used as dietary supplements to treat diseases of the joints. Out of this study came information that suggested that a significant proportion of the population that included disproportionally the aged, may not be receiving sufficient sulfur and that these dietary supplements, were very likely exhibiting their pharmacological actions by supplying inorganic sulfur. PMID:17986345

  3. Are we getting enough sulfur in our diet?

    PubMed Central

    Nimni, Marcel E; Han, Bo; Cordoba, Fabiola

    2007-01-01

    Sulfur, after calcium and phosphorus, is the most abundant mineral element found in our body. It is available to us in our diets, derived almost exclusively from proteins, and yet only 2 of the 20 amino acids normally present in proteins contains sulfur. One of these amino acids, methionine, cannot be synthesized by our bodies and therefore has to be supplied by the diet. Cysteine, another sulfur containing amino acid, and a large number of key metabolic intermediates essential for life, are synthesized by us, but the process requires a steady supply of sulfur. Proteins contain between 3 and 6% of sulfur amino acids. A very small percentage of sulfur comes in the form of inorganic sulfates and other forms of organic sulfur present in foods such as garlic, onion, broccoli, etc. The minimal requirements (RDA) for all the essential amino acids have always been estimated in terms of their ability to maintain a nitrogen balance. This method asses amino acid requirements for protein synthesis, only one of the pathways that methionine follows after ingestion. To adequately evaluate the RDA for methionine, one should perform, together with a nitrogen balance a sulfur balance, something never done, neither in humans nor animals. With this in mind we decided to evaluate the dietary intake of sulfur (as sulfur amino acids) in a random population and perform sulfur balance studies in a limited number of human volunteers. Initially this was done to try and gain some information on the possible mode of action of a variety of sulfur containing compounds (chondroitin sulfate, glucosamine sulfate, and others, ) used as dietary supplements to treat diseases of the joints. Out of this study came information that suggested that a significant proportion of the population that included disproportionally the aged, may not be receiving sufficient sulfur and that these dietary supplements, were very likely exhibiting their pharmacological actions by supplying inorganic sulfur. PMID:17986345

  4. Sodium sulfur cell

    SciTech Connect

    Mitoff, S.P.; Roth, W.L.

    1980-09-02

    In a sodium sulfur cell, including a beta-alumina separator between the sodium and sulfur compartments, high surface area gettering means, e.g., beta-alumina or beta''-alumina, for potassium and alkali earth metal ion impurities are included in the sodium to protect the separator. The gettering means is disposed in the sodium container in the form of particles or a continous porous shell or porous solid plug adjacent to the separator.

  5. Radiolysis of Sulfuric Acid, Sulfuric Acid Monohydrate, and Sulfuric Acid Tetrahydrate and Its Relevance to Europa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loeffler, M. J.; Hudson, R. L.; Moore, M. H.; Carlson, R. W.

    2011-01-01

    We report laboratory studies on the 0.8 MeV proton irradiation of ices composed of sulfuric acid (H2SO4), sulfuric acid monohydrate (H2SO4 H2O), and sulfuric acid tetrahydrate (H2SO4 4H2O) between 10 and 180 K. Using infrared spectroscopy, we identify the main radiation products as H2O, SO2, (S2O3)x, H3O+, HSO4(exp -), and SO4(exp 2-). At high radiation doses, we find that H2SO4 molecules are destroyed completely and that H2SO4 H2O is formed on subsequent warming. This hydrate is significantly more stable to radiolytic destruction than pure H2SO4, falling to an equilibrium relative abundance of 50% of its original value on prolonged irradiation. Unlike either pure H2SO4 or H2SO4 H2O, the loss of H2SO4 4H2O exhibits a strong temperature dependence, as the tetrahydrate is essentially unchanged at the highest irradiation temperatures and completely destroyed at the lowest ones, which we speculate is due to a combination of radiolytic destruction and amorphization. Furthermore, at the lower temperatures it is clear that irradiation causes the tetrahydrate spectrum to transition to one that closely resembles the monohydrate spectrum. Extrapolating our results to Europa s surface, we speculate that the variations in SO2 concentrations observed in the chaotic terrains are a result of radiation processing of lower hydration states of sulfuric acid and that the monohydrate will remain stable on the surface over geological times, while the tetrahydrate will remain stable in the warmer regions but be destroyed in the colder regions, unless it can be reformed by other processes, such as thermal reactions induced by diurnal cycling.

  6. Separation of sulfur isotopes

    DOEpatents

    DeWitt, Robert; Jepson, Bernhart E.; Schwind, Roger A.

    1976-06-22

    Sulfur isotopes are continuously separated and enriched using a closed loop reflux system wherein sulfur dioxide (SO.sub.2) is reacted with sodium hydroxide (NaOH) or the like to form sodium hydrogen sulfite (NaHSO.sub.3). Heavier sulfur isotopes are preferentially attracted to the NaHSO.sub.3, and subsequently reacted with sulfuric acid (H.sub.2 SO.sub.4) forming sodium hydrogen sulfate (NaHSO.sub.4) and SO.sub.2 gas which contains increased concentrations of the heavier sulfur isotopes. This heavy isotope enriched SO.sub.2 gas is subsequently separated and the NaHSO.sub.4 is reacted with NaOH to form sodium sulfate (Na.sub.2 SO.sub.4) which is subsequently decomposed in an electrodialysis unit to form the NaOH and H.sub.2 SO.sub.4 components which are used in the aforesaid reactions thereby effecting sulfur isotope separation and enrichment without objectionable loss of feed materials.

  7. Liquid and Emulsified Sulfur in Submarine Solfatara Fields of two Northern Mariana Arc Volcanoes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, K.; Embley, R. W.; Chadwick, W. W.; Butterfield, D. A.; Takano, B.; Resing, J. A.; de Ronde, C. E.; Lilley, M. D.; Lupton, J. E.; Merle, S. G.; Inagaki, F.

    2006-12-01

    Because elemental sulfur melting point is ca 100 deg C (depend on allotropes and heating rate, S8 triple point temperature: 115 deg C), the evidence of liquid sulfur has been known for many subaerial crater lakes and small ponds in geothermal regions throughout the world. But the milky nature of water (sulfur-in- water emulsion in limited water mass) prohibited the direct observation of on-going processes at the bottom of these subaerial lakes. In the passive degassing environment at the summit craters of Daikoku and Nikko Seamounts of the northern Mariana Arc, the continuous flushing of sulfur emulsion by seawater allowed us to observe on- going submarine solfatara processes and associated chemistry through dives with ROVs during the NT05-18 cruise (JAMSTEC R/V Natsushima and ROV hyper-Dolphin) and the Submarine Ring of Fire 2006 cruise (R/V Melville and ROV JASON II). A higher viscosity for liquid elemental sulfur relative to that of seawater, as well as a limited stability of sulfur emulsion (aqueous sulfur sol) at high temperatures in electrolyte solution (seawater), ensures limited mobility of liquid sulfur in the conduits of hydrothermal vents. The subseafloor boiling depth of hydrothermal fluid limits the locus of any liquid sulfur reservoir. It was observed in an exposed liquid sulfur pond that the penetration of gas bubbles (mostly CO2) created sulfur emulsion while collapsing liquid sulfur film between seawater and gas bubbles. Liquid sulfur pits, encrusted sulfur, liquid sulfur fountain structure, sulfur stalactites and stalagmites, mini-pillow lava-like sulfur flows, accretionary sulfur lapilli and sulfur deltas were also observed at the summits of two volcanoes. Note: Solfatara: Italian. A type of fumarole, the gases of which are characteristically sulfurous. In 'Glossary of geology.'

  8. Comparative analysis of the mechanisms of sulfur anion oxidation and reduction by dsr operon to maintain environmental sulfur balance.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Semanti; Bagchi, Angshuman

    2015-12-01

    Sulfur metabolism is one of the oldest known redox geochemical cycles in our atmosphere. These redox processes utilize different sulfur anions and the reactions are performed by the gene products of dsr operon from phylogenetically diverse sets of microorganisms. The operon is involved in the maintenance of environmental sulfur balance. Interestingly, the dsr operon is found to be present in both sulfur anion oxidizing and reducing microorganisms and in both types of organisms DsrAB protein complex plays a vital role. Though there are various reports regarding the genetics of dsr operon there are practically no reports dealing with the structural aspects of sulfur metabolism by dsr operon. In our present study, we tried to compare the mechanisms of sulfur anion oxidation and reduction by Allochromatium vinosum and Desulfovibrio vulgaris respectively through DsrAB protein complex. We analyzed the modes of bindings of sulfur anions to the DsrAB protein complex and observed that for sulfur anion oxidizers, sulfide and thiosulfate are the best substrates whereas for reducers sulfate and sulfite have the best binding abilities. We analyzed the binding interaction pattern of the DsrA and DsrB proteins while forming the DsrAB protein complexes in Desulfovibrio vulgaris and Allochromatium vinosum. To our knowledge this is the first report that analyzes the differences in binding patterns of sulfur substrates with DsrAB protein from these two microorganisms. This study would therefore be essential to predict the biochemical mechanism of sulfur anion oxidation and reduction by these two microorganisms i.e., Desulfovibrio vulgaris (sulfur anion reducer) and Allochromatium vinosum (sulfur anion oxidizer). Our observations also highlight the mechanism of sulfur geochemical cycle which has important implications in future study of sulfur metabolism as it has a huge application in waste remediation and production of industrial bio-products viz. vitamins, bio-polyesters and bio-hydrogen. PMID:26551237

  9. Removal of sulfur compounds from combustion product exhaust

    DOEpatents

    Cheng, Dah Y.

    1982-01-01

    A method and device are disclosed for removing sulfur containing contaminents from a combustion product exhaust. The removal process is carried out in two stages wherein the combustion product exhaust is dissolved in water, the water being then heated to drive off the sulfur containing contaminents. The sulfur containing gases are then resolublized in a cold water trap to form a concentrated solution which can then be used as a commercial product.

  10. Sulfur removal from high-sulfur Illinois coal by low-temperature perchloroethylene (PCE) extraction. Final technical report, 1 September, 1992--31 August, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, M.I.M.; Lytle, J.M.; Ruch, R.R.; Kruse, C.W.; Chaven, C.; Hackley, K.C.; Hughes, R.E.; Harvey, R.D.; Frost, J.K.; Buchanan, D.H.; Stucki, J.W.; Huffman, G.P.; Huggins, F.E.

    1993-12-31

    The Midwest Ore Processing Co. (MWOPC) has reported a precombustion coal desulfurization process using perchloroethylene (PCE) at 120 C to remove up to 70% of the organic sulfur. The purposes of this research were to independently confirm and possibly to improve the organic sulfur removal from Illinois coals with the PCE desulfurization and to verify the ASTM forms-of-sulfur determination for evaluation of the process. An additional goal was to develop a dechlorination procedure to remove excess PCE from the PCE-treated coal. A laboratory scale operation of the MWOPC PCE desulfurization process was demonstrated, and a dechlorination procedure to remove excess PCE from the PCE-treated coal was developed. The authors have determined that PCE desulfurization removed mainly elemental sulfur from coal. The higher the level of coal oxidization, the larger the amount of elemental sulfur that is removed by PCE extraction. The increased elemental sulfur during short-term preoxidation is found to be pH dependent and is attributed to coal pyrite oxidation under acidic (pH < 2) conditions. The non-ASTM sulfur analyses confirmed the hypothesis that the elemental sulfur produced by oxidation of pyrite complicates the interpretation of analytical data for PCE process evaluations when only the ASTM forms-of-sulfur is used. When the ASTM method is used alone, the elemental sulfur removed during PCE desulfurization is counted as organic sulfur. A study using model compounds suggests that mild preoxidation treatment of coal described by MWOPC for removal of organic sulfur does not produce enough oxidized organic sulfur to account for the amounts of sulfur removal reported. Furthermore, when oxidation of coal-like organosulfur compounds does occur, the products are inconsistent with production of elemental sulfur, the product reported by MWOPC. Overall, it is demonstrated that the PCE process is not suitable for organic sulfur removal.

  11. The Biogeochemistry of Sulfur in Hydrothermal Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schulte, Mitchell; Rogers, K. L.; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The incorporation of sulfur into many biomolecules likely dates back to the development of the earliest metabolic strategies. Sulfur is common in enzymes and co-enzymes and is an indispensable structural component in many peptides and proteins. Early metabolism may have been heavily influenced by the abundance of sulfide minerals in hydrothermal systems. The incorporation of sulfur into many biomolecules likely dates back to the development of the earliest metabolic strategies. Sulfur is common in enzymes and co-enzymes and is an indispensable structural component in many peptides and proteins. Early metabolism may have been heavily influenced by the abundance of sulfide minerals in hydrothermal systems. Understanding how sulfur became prevalent in biochemical processes and many biomolecules requires knowledge of the reaction properties of sulfur-bearing compounds. We have previously estimated thermodynamic data for thiols, the simplest organic sulfur compounds, at elevated temperatures and pressures. If life began in hydrothermal environments, it is especially important to understand reactions at elevated temperatures among sulfur-bearing compounds and other organic molecules essential for the origin and persistence of life. Here we examine reactions that may have formed amino acids with thiols as reaction intermediates in hypothetical early Earth hydrothermal environments. (There are two amino acids, cysteine and methionine, that contain sulfur.) Our calculations suggest that significant amounts of some amino acids were produced in early Earth hydrothermal fluids, given reasonable concentrations H2, NH3, H2S and CO. For example, preliminary results indicate that glycine activities as high as 1 mmol can be reached in these systems at 100 C. Alanine formation from propanethiol is also a favorable reaction. On the other hand, the calculated equilibrium log activities of cysteine and serine from propanethiol are -21 and -19, respectively, at 100 C. These results indicate that while amino acid formation with thiols as intermediates is favored in some cases, other mechanisms may have been necessary to produce significant amounts of other amino acids. Coupled with our previous results for thiols, these studies imply that sulfur may have been easily incorporated into the organic geochemistry of early Earth hydrothermal systems, leading to its widespread use in biomolecules. Formation of more complex biomolecules in hydrothermal systems may have required sulfur-bearing organic compounds as reaction intermediates.

  12. An Aerosol Condensation Model for Sulfur Trioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Grant, K E

    2008-02-07

    This document describes a model for condensation of sulfuric acid aerosol given an initial concentration and/or source of gaseous sulfur trioxide (e.g. fuming from oleum). The model includes the thermochemical effects on aerosol condensation and air parcel buoyancy. Condensation is assumed to occur heterogeneously onto a preexisting background aerosol distribution. The model development is both a revisiting of research initially presented at the Fall 2001 American Geophysical Union Meeting [1] and a further extension to provide new capabilities for current atmospheric dispersion modeling efforts [2]. Sulfuric acid is one of the most widely used of all industrial chemicals. In 1992, world consumption of sulfuric acid was 145 million metric tons, with 42.4 Mt (mega-tons) consumed in the United States [10]. In 2001, of 37.5 Mt consumed in the U.S., 74% went into producing phosphate fertilizers [11]. Another significant use is in mining industries. Lawuyi and Fingas [7] estimate that, in 1996, 68% of use was for fertilizers and 5.8% was for mining. They note that H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} use has been and should continue to be very stable. In the United States, the elimination of MTBE (methyl tertiary-butyl ether) and the use of ethanol for gasoline production are further increasing the demand for petroleum alkylate. Alkylate producers have a choice of either a hydrofluoric acid or sulfuric acid process. Both processes are widely used today. Concerns, however, over the safety or potential regulation of hydrofluoric acid are likely to result in most of the growth being for the sulfuric acid process, further increasing demand [11]. The implication of sulfuric acid being a pervasive industrial chemical is that transport is also pervasive. Often, this is in the form of oleum tankers, having around 30% free sulfur trioxide. Although sulfuric acid itself is not a volatile substance, fuming sulfuric acid (referred to as oleum) is [7], the volatile product being sulfur trioxide. Sulfate aerosols and mist may form in the atmosphere on tank rupture. From chemical spill data from 1990-1996, Lawuyi02 and Fingas [7] prioritize sulfuric acid as sixth most serious. During this period, they note 155 spills totaling 13 Mt, out of a supply volume of 3700 Mt. Lawuyi and Fingas [7] summarize information on three major sulfuric acid spills. On 12 February 1984, 93 tons of sulfuric acid were spilled when 14 railroad cars derailed near MacTier, Parry Sound, Ontario. On 13 December 1978, 51 railroad cars derailed near Springhill, Nova Scotia. One car, containing 93% sulfuric acid, ruptured, spilling nearly its entire contents. In July 1993, 20 to 50 tons of fuming sulfuric acid spilled at the General Chemical Corp. plant in Richmond, California, a major industrial center near San Francisco. The release occurred when oleum was being loaded into a nonfuming acid railroad tank car that contained only a rupture disk as a safety device. The tank car was overheated and this rupture disk blew. The resulting cloud of sulfuric acid drifted northeast with prevailing winds over a number of populated areas. More than 3,000 people subsequently sought medical attention for burning eyes, coughing, headaches, and nausea. Almost all were treated and released on the day of the spill. By the day after the release, another 5,000 people had sought medical attention. The spill forced the closure of five freeways in the region as well as some Bay Area Rapid Transit System stations. Apart from corrosive toxicity, there is the additional hazard that the reactions of sulfur trioxide and sulfuric acid vapors with water are extremely exothermic [10, 11]. While the vapors are intrinsically denser than air, there is thus the likelihood of strong, warming-induced buoyancy from reactions with ambient water vapor, water-containing aerosol droplets, and wet environmental surface. Nordin [12] relates just such an occurrence following the Richmond, CA spill, with the plume observed to rise to 300 m. For all practical purposes, sulfur trioxide was the constituent released from the heated tank car. The behavior of the resulting plume suggested that initially sulfur trioxide behaved as a dense gas, but the chemical reacted with air humidity, producing sulfuric acid and heat. The heat caused the plume to rise. Eventually the plume cooled, resulting in sulfuric acid descending towards people on the ground. This kind of behavior is not accounted for in the popular gas dispersion models. In the presence of complex terrain, such heat induced buoyancy could enable a sulfur trioxide cloud to leap local drainage boundaries with a single bound. Unless there were insufficient water/humidity to fully react with the SO{sub 3} and H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} on the first ascent, no secondary bounds would be expected, the cloud then behaving as a heavy tracer until sufficiently diluted.

  13. Two-step rapid sulfur capture. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1994-04-01

    The primary goal of this program was to test the technical and economic feasibility of a novel dry sorbent injection process called the Two-Step Rapid Sulfur Capture process for several advanced coal utilization systems. The Two-Step Rapid Sulfur Capture process consists of limestone activation in a high temperature auxiliary burner for short times followed by sorbent quenching in a lower temperature sulfur containing coal combustion gas. The Two-Step Rapid Sulfur Capture process is based on the Non-Equilibrium Sulfur Capture process developed by the Energy Technology Office of Textron Defense Systems (ETO/TDS). Based on the Non-Equilibrium Sulfur Capture studies the range of conditions for optimum sorbent activation were thought to be: activation temperature > 2,200 K for activation times in the range of 10--30 ms. Therefore, the aim of the Two-Step process is to create a very active sorbent (under conditions similar to the bomb reactor) and complete the sulfur reaction under thermodynamically favorable conditions. A flow facility was designed and assembled to simulate the temperature, time, stoichiometry, and sulfur gas concentration prevalent in the advanced coal utilization systems such as gasifiers, fluidized bed combustors, mixed-metal oxide desulfurization systems, diesel engines, and gas turbines.

  14. Sulfurization induced surface constitution and its correlation to the performance of solution-processed Cu2ZnSn(S,Se)4 solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Jie; Xia, Zhe; Luo, Miao; Zhao, Juan; Chen, Jie; Wang, Liang; Liu, Xinsheng; Xue, Ding-Jiang; Cheng, Yi-Bing; Song, Haisheng; Tang, Jiang

    2014-09-01

    To obtain high photovoltaic performances for the emerging copper zinc tin sulfide/selenide (CZTSSe) thin film solar cells, much effort has deservedly been placed on CZTSSe phase purification and CZTSSe grain size enhancement. Another highly crucial but less explored factor for device performance is the elemental constitution of CZTSSe surface, which is at the heart of p-n junction where major photogenerated carriers generate and separate. In this work we demonstrate that, despite the well-built phase and large grained films are observed by common phases and morphology characterization (XRD, Raman and SEM), prominent device efficiency variations from short circuited to 6.4% are obtained. Insight study highlights that the surface (0-250 nm) compositions variation results in different bulk defect depths and doping densities in the depletion zone. We propose that suitable sulfurization (at ~10 kPa sulfur pressure) drives optimization of surface constitution by managing the Cu, Zn and Sn diffusion and surface reaction. Therefore, our study reveals that the balance of elemental diffusion and interface reactions is the key to tuning the surface quality CZTSSe film and thus the performance of as resulted devices.

  15. Sulfurization induced surface constitution and its correlation to the performance of solution-processed Cu2ZnSn(S,Se)4 solar cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Jie; Xia, Zhe; Luo, Miao; Zhao, Juan; Chen, Jie; Wang, Liang; Liu, Xinsheng; Xue, Ding-Jiang; Cheng, Yi-Bing; Song, Haisheng; Tang, Jiang

    2014-01-01

    To obtain high photovoltaic performances for the emerging copper zinc tin sulfide/selenide (CZTSSe) thin film solar cells, much effort has deservedly been placed on CZTSSe phase purification and CZTSSe grain size enhancement. Another highly crucial but less explored factor for device performance is the elemental constitution of CZTSSe surface, which is at the heart of p-n junction where major photogenerated carriers generate and separate. In this work we demonstrate that, despite the well-built phase and large grained films are observed by common phases and morphology characterization (XRD, Raman and SEM), prominent device efficiency variations from short circuited to 6.4% are obtained. Insight study highlights that the surface (0–250 nm) compositions variation results in different bulk defect depths and doping densities in the depletion zone. We propose that suitable sulfurization (at ~10 kPa sulfur pressure) drives optimization of surface constitution by managing the Cu, Zn and Sn diffusion and surface reaction. Therefore, our study reveals that the balance of elemental diffusion and interface reactions is the key to tuning the surface quality CZTSSe film and thus the performance of as resulted devices. PMID:25190491

  16. Measurement and prediction of the resistivity of ash/sorbent mixtures produced by sulfur oxide control processes. Final report, Sep 86-Jun 88

    SciTech Connect

    Young, R.P.

    1991-12-01

    The report describes the development of (1) a modified procedure for obtaining consistent and reproducible laboratory resistivity values for mixtures of coal fly ash and partially spent sorbent, and (2) an approach for predicting resistivity based on the chemical composition of the sample and the resistivities of the key compounds in the sample that are derived from the sorbent. Furnace and cold-side sorbent injection technologies for reducing the emission of sulfur oxides from electric generating plants firing medium- to high-sulfur coal are under development for retrofit applications. The particulate resulting from injecting this sorbent will be a mixture of coal fly ash and partially spent sorbent. The presence of this sorbent causes the resistivity of the mixture to be significantly higher than that of the fly ash alone. Since higher resistivity dusts are more difficult to collect in an electrostatic precipitator (ESP), accurate knowledge of the resistivity of the mixture is needed to determine if the ESP will operate within an acceptable efficiency range.

  17. Sulfurization induced surface constitution and its correlation to the performance of solution-processed Cu2ZnSn(S,Se)4 solar cells.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Jie; Xia, Zhe; Luo, Miao; Zhao, Juan; Chen, Jie; Wang, Liang; Liu, Xinsheng; Xue, Ding-Jiang; Cheng, Yi-Bing; Song, Haisheng; Tang, Jiang

    2014-01-01

    To obtain high photovoltaic performances for the emerging copper zinc tin sulfide/selenide (CZTSSe) thin film solar cells, much effort has deservedly been placed on CZTSSe phase purification and CZTSSe grain size enhancement. Another highly crucial but less explored factor for device performance is the elemental constitution of CZTSSe surface, which is at the heart of p-n junction where major photogenerated carriers generate and separate. In this work we demonstrate that, despite the well-built phase and large grained films are observed by common phases and morphology characterization (XRD, Raman and SEM), prominent device efficiency variations from short circuited to 6.4% are obtained. Insight study highlights that the surface (0-250 nm) compositions variation results in different bulk defect depths and doping densities in the depletion zone. We propose that suitable sulfurization (at ~ 10 kPa sulfur pressure) drives optimization of surface constitution by managing the Cu, Zn and Sn diffusion and surface reaction. Therefore, our study reveals that the balance of elemental diffusion and interface reactions is the key to tuning the surface quality CZTSSe film and thus the performance of as resulted devices. PMID:25190491

  18. Biological and abiological sulfur reduction at high temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Belkin, S.; Wirsen, C.O.; Jannasch, H.W.

    1985-05-01

    Reduction of elemental sulfur was studied in the presence and absence of thermophilic sulfur-reducing bacteria, at temperatures ranging from 65 to 110/sup 0/C, in anoxic artificial seawater media. Above 80/sup 0/C, significant amounts of sulfide were produced abiologically at linear rates, presumably by the disproportionation of sulfur. These rates increased with increasing temperature and pH and were enhanced by yeast extract. In the same medium, the sulfur respiration of two recent thermophilic isolates, a eubacterium and an archaebacterium, resulted in sulfide production at exponential rates. Although not essential for growth, sulfur increased the cell yield in both strains up to fourfold. It is suggested that sulfur respiration is favored at high temperatures and that this process is not limited to archaebacteria, but is shared by others extreme thermophiles.

  19. Biotic and abiotic carbon to sulfur bond cleavage

    SciTech Connect

    Frost, J.W.

    1991-01-01

    Cleavage of aliphatic organosulfonate carbon to sulfur (C-S) bonds, a critical link in the global biogeochemical sulfur cycle, has been identified in Escherichia coli K-12. Enormous quantities of inorganic sulfate are continuously converted (Scheme I) into methanesulfonic acid 1 and acylated 3-(6-sulfo-{alpha}-D-quinovopyranosyl)-L-glycerol 2. Biocatalytic desulfurization (Scheme I) of 1 and 2, which share the structural feature of an aliphatic carbon bonded to a sulfonic acid sulfur, completes the cycle, Discovery of this desulfurization in E. coli provides an invaluable paradigm for study of a biotic process which, via the biogeochemical cycle, significantly influences the atmospheric concentration of sulfur-containing molecules.

  20. Sulfurized metal borohydrides.

    PubMed

    Paskevicius, M; Richter, B; Polański, M; Thompson, S P; Jensen, T R

    2016-01-14

    The reactions between metal borohydrides and elemental sulfur are investigated in situ during thermal treatment and are found to be highly exothermic (up to 700 J g(-1)). These reactions are exceptionally rapid, occurring below 200 °C, also resulting in the sudden release of substantial quantities of hydrogen gas. For NaBH4 this hydrogen release is pure, with no detectable levels of H2S or B2H6. The reaction results in the formation of an array of metal-boron-sulfur compounds. These MBH4-S compounds are interesting for possible uses in high energy applications (fuels or explosives), hydrogen generation, and metal-boron-sulfur precursors. PMID:26615897

  1. Sulfur activation in Hiroshima

    SciTech Connect

    Kerr, G.D.; Pace, J.V. III

    1987-01-01

    In 1979, we attempted to establish the validity of source terms for the Hiroshima and Nagasaki bombs using experimental data on sulfur activation. Close agreement was observed between measured and calculated values for test firings of Nagasaki-type bombs. The calculated values were based on source terms developed by W.E. Preeg at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). A discrepancy was found, however, when we compared calculated values for the two bombs because a 1956 report by R.R. Wilson stated that sulfur acitvation by fast neutrons in Hiroshima was approximately three times greater than in Nagasaki. Our calculations based on Preeg's source-term data predicted about equal sulfur activation in the two cities.

  2. Sodium sulfur battery seal

    DOEpatents

    Mikkor, Mati

    1981-01-01

    This disclosure is directed to an improvement in a sodium sulfur battery construction in which a seal between various battery compartments is made by a structure in which a soft metal seal member is held in a sealing position by holding structure. A pressure applying structure is used to apply pressure on the soft metal seal member when it is being held in sealing relationship to a surface of a container member of the sodium sulfur battery by the holding structure. The improvement comprises including a thin, well-adhered, soft metal layer on the surface of the container member of the sodium sulfur battery to which the soft metal seal member is to be bonded.

  3. Interstellar sulfur chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prasad, S. S.; Huntress, W. T., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    The results of a chemical model of SO, CS, and OCS chemistry in dense clouds are summarized. The results are obtained from a theoretical study of sulfur chemistry in dense interstellar clouds using a large-scale time-dependent model of gas-phase chemistry. Among the results are the following: (1) owing to activation energy, the reaction of CS with O atoms is efficient as a loss mechanism of CS during the early phases of cloud evolution or in hot and oxygen-rich sources such as the KL nebula; (2) if sulfur is not abnormally depleted in dense clouds, then the observed abundances of SO, SO2, H2S, CS, OCS, H2CS, and SiS indicate that sulfur is mostly atomic in dense clouds; and (3) OCS is stable against reactions with neutral atoms and radicals in dense clouds.

  4. Catalyst for the reduction of sulfur dioxide to elemental sulfur

    DOEpatents

    Jin, Yun; Yu, Qiquan; Chang, Shih-Ger

    1996-01-01

    The inventive catalysts allow for the reduction of sulfur dioxide to elemental sulfur in smokestack scrubber environments. The catalysts have a very high sulfur yield of over 90% and space velocity of 10,000 h.sup.-1. They also have the capacity to convert waste gases generated during the initial conversion into elemental sulfur. The catalysts have inexpensive components, and are inexpensive to produce. The net impact of the invention is to make this technology practically available to industrial applications.

  5. Microbial stabilization of sulfur-landen sorbents; Technical report, September 1--November 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, K.W.

    1993-12-31

    Clean coal technologies that involve limestone for sulfur capture generate lime/limestone products laden with sulfur at various oxidation states. If sulfur is completely stabilized as sulfate, the spent sorbent is ready for commercial utilization as gypsum. However, the presence of reduced sulfur species requires additional processing. Thermal oxidation of reduced sulfur can result in undesirable release of SO{sub 2}. Microbial oxidation might provide an inexpensive and effective alternative. Sorbents laden with reduced forms of sulfur such as sulfide, sulfite, or various polythionate species serve as growth substrates for sulfur-oxidizing bacteria, which have the potential to convert all sulfur to sulfate. This quarter, efforts focused on determining the combined effects of dibasic acids (DBA) and Ca{sup +2} concentration on several strains of neutrophilic thiobacilli, including Thiobacillus neapolitanus ATCC 23639 and ATCC 23641, and an isolate, TQ1, which was obtained from a commercial sulfur dioxide scrubber that utilizes DBA.

  6. [Research development of harmful substances and its harm of traditional Chinese medicine after sulfur fumigation].

    PubMed

    Mao, Chun-Qin; Ji, Lin; Lu, Tu-Lin; Shan, Xin; Li, Lin; Liu, Hui-Zhen; Ning, Zi-Wan; Song, Yan; Zhu, Jun-Jie

    2014-08-01

    Sulfur fumigation, which is traditional method for preservation, pest control, insecticide and sterilization, has long been widely used in processing and storage and played a positive role of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM). As some businesses sided pursuit of profit, abused and repeated use of sulfur fumigation, have resulted in a large number of harmful residues, such as sulf dioxide (SO2) and harmful heavy metals, which brings a significant impact and danger on human health. This article summarizes the sulfur species and the sulfur fumigation methods and analyzes the harmful substances in TCM after sulfur fumigation, to provide a reference of the choice of species for the sulfur, the optimization of sulfur fumigation process and the standardized processing of TCM after sulfur fumigation. PMID:25423812

  7. Are sulfur isotope ratios sufficient to determine the antiquity of sulfate reduction. [implications for chemical evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashendorf, D.

    1980-01-01

    Possible limitations on the use of sulfur isotope ratios in sedimentary sulfides to infer the evolution of microbial sulfate reduction are discussed. Current knowledge of the ways in which stable sulfur isotope ratios are altered by chemical and biological processes is examined, with attention given to the marine sulfur cycle involving various microbial populations, and sulfur reduction processes, and it is noted that satisfactory explanations of sulfur isotope ratios observed in live organisms and in sediments are not yet available. It is furthermore pointed out that all members of the same genus of sulfate reducing bacteria do not always fractionate sulfur to the same extent, that the extent of sulfur fractionation by many sulfate-reducing organisms has not yet been determined, and that inorganic processes can also affect sulfur isotope fractionation values. The information currently available is thus concluded to be insufficient to determine the time of initial appearance of biological sulfate reduction.

  8. Phase transformations and the spectral reflectance of solid sulfur - Can metastable sulfur allotropes exist on Io

    SciTech Connect

    Moses, J.I.; Nash, D.B. San Juan Capistrano Research Institute, CA )

    1991-02-01

    Laboratory investigations have been conducted on the effects of variations in sulfur sample histories on their solid-state transformation rate and the corresponding spectral variation of freshly frozen sulfur. The temporal variations in question may be due to differences in the amount and type of metastable allotropes present in the sulfur after solidification, as well as to the physics of the phase-transformation process itself. The results obtained are pertinent to the physical behavior and spectral variation of such freshly solidified sulfur as may exist on the Jupiter moon Io; this would initially solidify into a glassy solid or monoclinic crystalline lattice, then approach ambient dayside temperatures. Laboratory results imply that the monoclinic or polymeric allotropes can in these circumstances be maintained, and will take years to convert to the stable orthorhombic crystalline form. 114 refs.

  9. Phase transformations and the spectral reflectance of solid sulfur - Can metastable sulfur allotropes exist on Io?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moses, Julianne I.; Nash, Douglas B.

    1991-01-01

    Laboratory investigations have been conducted on the effects of variations in sulfur sample histories on their solid-state transformation rate and the corresponding spectral variation of freshly frozen sulfur. The temporal variations in question may be due to differences in the amount and type of metastable allotropes present in the sulfur after solidification, as well as to the physics of the phase-transformation process itself. The results obtained are pertinent to the physical behavior and spectral variation of such freshly solidified sulfur as may exist on the Jupiter moon Io; this would initially solidify into a glassy solid or monoclinic crystalline lattice, then approach ambient dayside temperatures. Laboratory results imply that the monoclinic or polymeric allotropes can in these circumstances be maintained, and will take years to convert to the stable orthorhombic crystalline form.

  10. Analytical method for the evaluation of sulfur functionalities in American coals. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Attar, A.

    1983-05-01

    This investigation consisted of the following 6 tasks: (1) improve the instrumentation for the sulfur functional groups analysis and make it more reliable. (2) create a set of reference standards of sulfur-containing compounds. (3) examine the sulfur groups distribution in untreated and desulfurized coals. (4) examine the sulfur functionalities in raw and processed coals, i.e., liquefied coals. (5) determine the distribution of sulfur functionalities in modified coals. (6) prepare computer programs for calculations related to the distribution of sulfur functional groups in coal. Each task is discussed and results are presented. Appendix A contains the computer program used to interpret the data. 31 references, 56 figures, 17 tables.

  11. Io's theothermal (sulfur) - Lithosphere cycle inferred from sulfur solubility modeling of Pele's magma supply

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battaglia, Steven M.; Stewart, Michael A.; Kieffer, Susan W.

    2014-06-01

    Surface deposits of volatile compounds such as water (Earth) or sulfur (Io) on volcanically active bodies suggest that a magmatic distillation process works to concentrate volatiles in surface reservoirs. On Earth, this is the combined hydrologic and tectonic cycle. On Io, sulfurous compounds are transferred from the interior to the surface reservoirs through a combination of a mantle-sourced magmatic system, vertical cycling of the lithosphere, and a sulfur-dominated crustal thermal system that we here call the "theothermal" system. We present a geochemical analysis of this process using previously inferred temperature and oxygen fugacity constraints of Pele's basaltic magma to determine the behavior of sulfur in the ionian magmas. Sulfate to sulfide ratios of Pele's magma are -4.084 ± 0.6 and -6.442 ± 0.7 log10 units, comparable to or lower than those of mid-ocean ridge basalts. This reflects the similarity of Io's oxidation state with Earth's depleted mantle as previously suggested by Zolotov and Fegley (Zolotov, M.Y., Fegley, B. [2000]. Geophys. Res. Lett. 27, 2789-2792). Our calculated limits of sulfur solubility in melts from Pele's patera (˜1100-1140 ppm) are also comparable to terrestrial mid-ocean ridge basalts, reflecting a compositional similarity of mantle sources. We propose that the excess sulfur obvious on Io's surface comes from two sources: (1) an insoluble sulfide liquid phase in the magma and (2) theothermal near-surface recycling.

  12. Multiple sulfur isotopes fractionations associated with abiotic sulfur transformations in Yellowstone National Park geothermal springs

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The paper presents a quantification of main (hydrogen sulfide and sulfate), as well as of intermediate sulfur species (zero-valent sulfur (ZVS), thiosulfate, sulfite, thiocyanate) in the Yellowstone National Park (YNP) hydrothermal springs and pools. We combined these measurements with the measurements of quadruple sulfur isotope composition of sulfate, hydrogen sulfide and zero-valent sulfur. The main goal of this research is to understand multiple sulfur isotope fractionation in the system, which is dominated by complex, mostly abiotic, sulfur cycling. Results Water samples from six springs and pools in the Yellowstone National Park were characterized by pH, chloride to sulfate ratios, sulfide and intermediate sulfur species concentrations. Concentrations of sulfate in pools indicate either oxidation of sulfide by mixing of deep parent water with shallow oxic water, or surface oxidation of sulfide with atmospheric oxygen. Thiosulfate concentrations are low (<6 μmol L-1) in the pools with low pH due to fast disproportionation of thiosulfate. In the pools with higher pH, the concentration of thiosulfate varies, depending on different geochemical pathways of thiosulfate formation. The δ34S values of sulfate in four systems were close to those calculated using a mixing line of the model based on dilution and boiling of a deep hot parent water body. In two pools δ34S values of sulfate varied significantly from the values calculated from this model. Sulfur isotope fractionation between ZVS and hydrogen sulfide was close to zero at pH < 4. At higher pH zero-valent sulfur is slightly heavier than hydrogen sulfide due to equilibration in the rhombic sulfur–polysulfide – hydrogen sulfide system. Triple sulfur isotope (32S, 33S, 34S) fractionation patterns in waters of hydrothermal pools are more consistent with redox processes involving intermediate sulfur species than with bacterial sulfate reduction. Small but resolved differences in ∆33S among species and between pools are observed. Conclusions The variation of sulfate isotopic composition, the origin of differences in isotopic composition of sulfide and zero–valent sulfur, as well as differences in ∆33S of sulfide and sulfate are likely due to a complex network of abiotic redox reactions, including disproportionation pathways. PMID:24959098

  13. In Situ EQCM Study Examining Irreversible Changes the Sulfur-Carbon Cathode in Lithium-Sulfur Batteries.

    PubMed

    Wu, Heng-Liang; Huff, Laura A; Esbenshade, Jennifer L; Gewirth, Andrew A

    2015-09-23

    In situ EQCM experiments were used to investigate the stability and roughness changes occurring in a sulfur-carbon cathode utilized for a Li-S battery during the charge-discharge process. Results show that the sulfur-carbon cathode gains mass during the first discharge plateau (∼2.4 V) due to the formation of the long chain polysulfides during the discharge (lithiation) process. However, further discharge to below 2.4 V yields an increase in the crystal resistance (Rc) suggesting the sulfur-carbon cathode becomes rougher. During the charge (delithiation) process, the roughness of the sulfur-carbon cathode decreases. Time dependent measurements show that the electrode surface becomes rougher with the deeper discharge, with the change occurring following a step to 1.5 V. The sulfur-carbon cathode exhibits stable Rc and frequency behavior initially, but then becomes rougher in subsequent following cycles. PMID:26317893

  14. Sulfur Dioxide Pollution Monitor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Bureau of Standards (DOC), Washington, DC.

    The sulfur dioxide pollution monitor described in this document is a government-owed invention that is available for licensing. The background of the invention is outlined, and drawings of the monitor together with a detailed description of its function are provided. A sample stream of air, smokestack gas or the like is flowed through a…

  15. COAL SULFUR MEASUREMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report describes a new technique for sulfur forms analysis based on low-temperature oxygen plasma ashing. The technique involves analyzing the low-temperature plasma ash by modified ASTM techniques after selectively removing the organic material. The procedure has been tested...

  16. Meteoritic Sulfur Isotopic Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thiemens, Mark H.

    1996-01-01

    Funds were requested to continue our program in meteoritic sulfur isotopic analysis. We have recently detected a potential nucleosynthetic sulfur isotopic anomaly. We will search for potential carriers. The documentation of bulk systematics and the possible relation to nebular chemistry and oxygen isotopes will be explored. Analytical techniques for delta(sup 33), delta(sup 34)S, delta(sup 36)S isotopic analysis were improved. Analysis of sub milligram samples is now possible. A possible relation between sulfur isotopes and oxygen was detected, with similar group systematics noted, particularly in the case of aubrites, ureilites and entstatite chondrites. A possible nucleosynthetic excess S-33 has been noted in bulk ureilites and an oldhamite separate from Norton County. High energy proton (approximately 1 GeV) bombardments of iron foils were done to experimentally determine S-33, S-36 spallogenic yields for quantitation of isotopic measurements in iron meteorites. Techniques for measurement of mineral separates were perfected and an analysis program initiated. The systematic behavior of bulk sulfur isotopes will continue to be explored.

  17. Sulfur Dioxide Pollution Monitor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Bureau of Standards (DOC), Washington, DC.

    The sulfur dioxide pollution monitor described in this document is a government-owed invention that is available for licensing. The background of the invention is outlined, and drawings of the monitor together with a detailed description of its function are provided. A sample stream of air, smokestack gas or the like is flowed through a

  18. Sodium sulfur battery seal

    DOEpatents

    Topouzian, Armenag

    1980-01-01

    This invention is directed to a seal for a sodium sulfur battery in which a flexible diaphragm sealing elements respectively engage opposite sides of a ceramic component of the battery which separates an anode compartment from a cathode compartment of the battery.

  19. Microbial desulfurization of organic sulfur compounds in petroleum.

    PubMed

    Ohshiro, T; Izumi, Y

    1999-01-01

    Sulfur removal from petroleum is important from the standpoint of the global environment because the combustion of sulfur compounds leads to the production of sulfur oxides, which are the source of acid rain. As the regulations for sulfur in fuels become more stringent, the existing chemical desulfurizations are coming inadequate for the "deeper desulfurization" to produce lower-sulfur fuels without new and innovative processes. Biodesulfurization is rising as one of the candidates. Several microorganisms were found to desulfurize dibenzothiophene (DBT), a representative of the organic sulfur compounds in petroleum, forming a sulfur-free compound, 2-hydroxybiphenyl. They are promising as biocatalysts in the microbial desulfurization of petroleum because without assimilation of the carbon content, they remove only sulfur from the heterocyclic compounds which is refractory to conventional chemical desulfurization. Both enzymological and molecular genetic studies are now in progress for the purpose of obtaining improved desulfurization activity of organisms. The genes involved in the sulfur-specific DBT desulfurization were identified and the corresponding enzymes have been investigated. From the practical point of view, it has been proved that the microbial desulfurization proceeds in the presence of high concentrations of hydrocarbons, and more complicated DBT analogs are also desulfurized by the microorganisms. This review outlines the progress in the studies of the microbial desulfurization from the basic and practical point of view. PMID:10052116

  20. Sulfur Reduction in Acid Rock Drainage Environments.

    PubMed

    Florentino, Anna P; Weijma, Jan; Stams, Alfons J M; Sánchez-Andrea, Irene

    2015-10-01

    Microbiological suitability of acidophilic sulfur reduction for metal recovery was explored by enriching sulfur reducers from acidic sediments at low pH (from 2 to 5) with hydrogen, glycerol, methanol and acetate as electron donors at 30 °C. The highest levels of sulfide in the enrichments were detected at pH 3 with hydrogen and pH 4 with acetate. Cloning and sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene showed dominance of the deltaproteobacterial sulfur-reducing genus Desulfurella in all the enrichments and subsequently an acidophilic strain (TR1) was isolated. Strain TR1 grew at a broad range of pH (3-7) and temperature (20-50 °C) and showed good metal tolerance (Pb(2+), Zn(2+), Cu(2+), Ni(2+)), especially for Ni(2+) and Pb(2+), with maximal tolerated concentrations of 0.09 and 0.03 mM, respectively. Different sources of sulfur were tested in the enrichments, from which biosulfur showed fastest growth (doubling time of 1.9 days), followed by colloidal, chemical and sublimated sulfur (doubling times of 2.2, 2.5, and 3.6 days, respectively). Strain TR1's physiological traits make it a good candidate to cope with low pH and high metal concentration in biotechnological processes for treatment of metal-laden acidic streams at low and moderately high temperature. PMID:26356416

  1. Sulfur 'Concrete' for Lunar Applications - Environmental Considerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grugel, R. N.

    2008-01-01

    Commercial use of sulfur concrete on Earth is well established, particularly in corrosive, e.g., acid and salt, environments. Having found troilite (FeS) on the Moon raises the question of using extracted sulfur as a lunar construction material, an attractive alternative to conventional concrete as it does not require water. For the purpose of this Technical Memorandum, it is assumed that lunar ore is mined, refined, and the raw sulfur processed with appropriate lunar regolith to form, for example, bricks. With this stipulation, it is then noted that the viability of sulfur concrete in a lunar environment, which is characterized by lack of an atmosphere and extreme temperatures, is not well understood. The work presented here evaluates two sets of small sulfur concrete samples that have been prepared using JSC-1 lunar simulant as an aggregate addition. One set was subjected to extended periods in high vacuum to evaluate sublimation issues, and the other was cycled between room and liquid nitrogen temperatures to investigate their subsequent mechanical integrity. Results are presented from both investigations, discussed, and put into the context of the lunar environment.

  2. Sulfuric acid in the Venus clouds.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sill, G. T.

    1972-01-01

    The extremely dry nature of the Venus upper atmosphere appears to demand the presence of an efficient desiccating agent as the chief constituent of the clouds of Venus. On the basis of polarization measures it is to be expected that this substance is present as spherical droplets, 1 to 2 microns in diameter, with a refractive index n of 1.46 plus or minus 0.02 at 3500A in the observed region of the atmosphere, with T about equal to 235 K. This substance must have ultraviolet, visible, and infrared reflection properties not inconsistent with the observed spectrum of Venus. Sulfuric acid, of about 86% by weight composition, roughly fulfills the first of these properties. The visible and ultraviolet transmission features of a thin layer of elemental bromine and hydrobromic acid dissolved in sulfuric acid somewhat resemble the Venus spectrum, up to 14 microns. The chemical process postulated for forming sulfuric acid involves the oxidation of sulfur and its compounds to sulfuric acid through the agency of elemental bromine produced by the photolytic decomposition of hydrogen bromide.

  3. Thermophilic Carbon-Sulfur-Bond-Targeted Biodesulfurization

    PubMed Central

    Konishi, J.; Ishii, Y.; Onaka, T.; Okumura, K.; Suzuki, M.

    1997-01-01

    Petroleum contains many heterocyclic organosulfur compounds refractory to conventional hydrodesulfurization carried out with chemical catalysts. Among these, dibenzothiophene (DBT) and DBTs bearing alkyl substitutions are representative compounds. Two bacterial strains, which have been identified as Paenibacillus strains and which are capable of efficiently cleaving carbon-sulfur (C--S) bonds in DBT at high temperatures, have been isolated for the first time. Upon attacking DBT and its various methylated derivatives at temperatures up to 60(deg)C, both growing and resting cells of these bacteria can release sulfur atoms as sulfate ions and leave the monohydroxylated hydrocarbon moieties intact. Moreover, when either of these paenibacilli was incubated at 50(deg)C with light gas oil previously processed through hydrodesulfurization, the total sulfur content in the oil phase clearly decreased. PMID:16535672

  4. Microbial stabilization of sulfur-laden sorbents. Final technical report, September 1, 1992--August 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, K.W.; Hillyer, D.

    1993-12-31

    Clean coal technologies that involve limestone for sulfur capture generate lime/limestone products laden with sulfur at various oxidation states. If sulfur is completely stabilized as sulfate, the spent sorbent is ready for commercial utilization as gypsum. However, the presence of reduced sulfur species requires additional processing. Thermal oxidation of reduced sulfur can result in undesirable release of SO{sub 2}. Microbial oxidation might provide an inexpensive and effective alternative. Sorbents laden with reduced forms of sulfur such as sulfide or sulfite can serve as growth substrates for sulfur-oxidizing bacteria, which convert all sulfur to sulfate. The goals of this project are the following: (1) to optimize conditions for sulfate generation from sulfide, thiosulfate, and sulfite; (2) to test and optimize the effectiveness of microbial processing on spent sorbents from flue gas desulfurization, coal gasification, and fluidized bed combustion; (3) to search for hyperalkalinophilic thiobacilli, which would be effective up to pH 11.

  5. Enhanced electrochemical performance of a crosslinked polyaniline-coated graphene oxide-sulfur composite for rechargeable lithium-sulfur batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, San; Jung, Young Hwa; Kim, Do Kyung

    2015-10-01

    Due to the extraordinarily high theoretical capacity of sulfur (1675 mAh g-1), the lithium-sulfur (Li-S) battery has been considered a promising candidate for future high-energy battery applications. Li-S batteries, however, have suffered from limited cycle lives, mainly due to the formation of soluble polysulfides, which prevent the practical application of this attractive technology. The encapsulation of sulfur with various conductive materials has addressed this issue to some extent. Nevertheless, most approaches still present partial encapsulation of sulfur and moreover require a large quantity of conductive material (typically, >30 wt%), making the use of sulfur less desirable from the viewpoint of capacity. Here, we address these chronic issues of Li-S cells by developing a graphene oxide-sulfur composite with a thin crosslinked polyaniline (PANI) layer. Graphene oxide nanosheets with large surface area, high conductivity and a uniform conductive PANI layer, which are synthesized by a layer-by-layer method, have a synergetic interaction with a large portion of the sulfur in the active material. Furthermore, a simple crosslinking process efficiently prevents polysulfide dissolution, resulting in unprecedented electrochemical performance, even with a high sulfur content (∼75%): a high capacity retention of ∼80% is observed, in addition to 97.53% of the average Coulombic efficiency being retained after 500 cycles. The performance we demonstrate represents an advance in the field of lithium-sulfur batteries for applications such as power tools.

  6. Genetic engineering of sulfur-degrading Sulfolobus. Final technical report, September 1, 1990--August 31, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, N.W.Y.

    1991-12-31

    The objectives of the proposed research is to first establish a plasmid-mediated genetic transformation system for the sulfur degrading Sulfolobus, and then to clone and overexpress the genes encoding the organic-sulfur-degrading enzymes from Sulfolobus- as well as from other microorganisms, to develop a Sulfolobus-based microbial process for the removal of both organic and inorganic sulfur from coal.

  7. Vapor phase elemental sulfur amendment for sequestering mercury in contaminated soil

    DOEpatents

    Looney, Brian B.; Denham, Miles E.; Jackson, Dennis G.

    2014-07-08

    The process of treating elemental mercury within the soil is provided by introducing into the soil a heated vapor phase of elemental sulfur. As the vapor phase of elemental sulfur cools, sulfur is precipitated within the soil and then reacts with any elemental mercury thereby producing a reaction product that is less hazardous than elemental mercury.

  8. Preparation and electrochemical performance of sulfur-alumina cathode material for lithium-sulfur batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, Kang; Wang, Shengping; Zhang, Hanyu; Wu, Jinping

    2013-06-01

    Highlights: ► Micron-sized alumina was synthesized as adsorbent for lithium-sulfur batteries. ► Sulfur-alumina material was synthesized via crystallizing nucleation. ► The Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} can provide surface area for the deposition of Li{sub 2}S and Li{sub 2}S{sub 2}. ► The discharge capacity of the battery is improved during the first several cycles. - Abstract: Nano-sized sulfur particles exhibiting good adhesion with conducting acetylene black and alumina composite materials were synthesized by means of an evaporated solvent and a concentrated crystallization method for use as the cathodes of lithium-sulfur batteries. The composites were characterized and examined by X-ray diffraction, environmental scanning electron microscopy and electrochemical methods, such as cyclic voltammetry, electrical impedance spectroscopy and charge–discharge tests. Micron-sized flaky alumina was employed as an adsorbent for the cathode material. The initial discharge capacity of the cathode with the added alumina was 1171 mAh g{sup −1}, and the remaining capacity was 585 mAh g{sup −1} after 50 cycles at 0.25 mA cm{sup −2}. Compared with bare sulfur electrodes, the electrodes containing alumina showed an obviously superior cycle performance, confirming that alumina can contribute to reducing the dissolution of polysulfides into electrolytes during the sulfur charge–discharge process.

  9. Porous spherical polyacrylonitrile-carbon nanocomposite with high loading of sulfur for lithium-sulfur batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohn, Hiesang; Gordin, Mikhail L.; Regula, Michael; Kim, Dong Hyeon; Jung, Yoon Seok; Song, Jiangxuan; Wang, Donghai

    2016-01-01

    Pyrolyzed porous spherical composites of polyacrylonitrile-Ketjenblack carbon and sulfur (pPAN-KB/S) with a high sulfur content (ca. 72%) and enhanced conductivity and porosity (pore volume: 1.42 cm3/g; BET surface area: 727 m2/g) were prepared by an aerosol-assisted process and applied as cathode for lithium-sulfur batteries. Electrochemical tests showed that the pPAN-KB/S composite exhibited a high capacity of 866 mAh/g (based on sulfur) after 100 cycles at 0.5C (1C = 1.68 A/g) and a good rate performance at high current density (431 mAh/g at 5C). In addition, a pPAN-KB/S composite electrode with high sulfur loading (ca. 4.4 mg-S/cm2) exhibited impressive electrochemical performance with a reversible capacity of 513 mAh/g and 576 mAh/cm3 (based on sulfur) and a coulombic efficiency >99% after 100 cycles at 0.5C.

  10. Reactivity of elemental sulfur nanoparticles and their role on the formation of sulfur intermediates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kafantaris, F. C. A.; Druschel, G.

    2014-12-01

    Sulfur biogeochemical cycling involves a vast network of chemical reactions including oxidation, reduction and disproportionation, polymerization (S-S bonding), and aggregation that leads to nanoparticulate elemental sulfur (S8(nano)) and eventually the most stable bulk mineral form, a-S8. These reactions can occur in aqueous systems inorganically, intracellularly as assimilatory or dissimilatory reactions in microbial cells, or in presence of microbial organic exudates (e.g. surfactants). Elemental sulfur participates in nucleophilic and hydrolysis reactions to form sulfur intermediates, such as polysulfide ions. The nucleophilic reaction with sulfide (as H2S or HS-, reaction 1), is a key process in the dissolution of elemental sulfur: xS8 + H2S = Sx2- + 2 H+ (1) Polysulfides are inherently unstable in acidic conditions, experiencing a series of chain elongation reactions to form the S8 ring form of molecular elemental sulfur (overall this is the reverse of reaction 1). S8 rings are also inherently insoluble in water and undergo a very rapid coarsening process to form S8nano that then coarsens more slowly via an Ostwald ripening process to form colloidal particles of a-S8. Coarsening kinetics are influenced by temperature, and the presence/absence and type of surfactants [1]. The amount of polysulfide at any point is thus a balance between the forward and reverse overall reactions represented in reaction 1, and influenced by microbial generation of reduced sulfide and/or microbial production of organic surfactants, and the size of the elemental sulfur particles. Here we present some preliminary data on the kinetics of elemental sulfur consumption (reaction 1) that have been tested in various sizes and surface properties of the sulfur nanoparticles. The surface area and presence (or absence) of surfactant molecules influences the kinetics of polysulfide formation. The cycling of that reaction may play a significant role to the element's bioavailability to microorganisms, which incorporate the nanoparticulate (rather than the bulk a-S8) form of elemental sulfur or polysulfides in their specific metabolisms [2]. 1. Garcia and Druschel (2014) Submitted Manuscript 2. Boyd and Druschel (2013) Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 79 (6) 2061-2068

  11. Evolution of insoluble eutectic Si particles in anodic oxidation films during adipic-sulfuric acid anodizing processes of ZL114A aluminum alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hua, Lei; Liu, Jian-hua; Li, Song-mei; Yu, Mei; Wang, Lei; Cui, Yong-xin

    2015-03-01

    The effects of insoluble eutectic Si particles on the growth of anodic oxide films on ZL114A aluminum alloy substrates were investigated by optical microscopy (OM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The anodic oxidation was performed at 25°C and a constant voltage of 15 V in a solution containing 50 g/L sulfuric acid and 10 g/L adipic acid. The thickness of the formed anodic oxidation film was approximately 7.13 μm. The interpore distance and the diameters of the major pores in the porous layer of the film were within the approximate ranges of 10-20 nm and 5-10 nm, respectively. Insoluble eutectic Si particles strongly influenced the morphology of the anodic oxidation films. The anodic oxidation films exhibited minimal defects and a uniform thickness on the ZL114A substrates; in contrast, when the front of the oxide oxidation films encountered eutectic Si particles, defects such as pits and non-uniform thickness were observed, and pits were observed in the films.

  12. Process for removing sulfur from sulfur-containing gases

    DOEpatents

    Rochelle, Gary T.; Jozewicz, Wojciech

    1990-01-01

    The present disclosure relates to i The government may own certain rights in the present invention pursuant to EPA Cooperative Agreement CR 81-1531. This is a continuation of U.S. Ser. No. 928,337, filed Nov. 7, 1986, now U.S. Pat. No. 4,804,521.

  13. The use of elemental sulfur as an alternative feedstock for polymeric materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Woo Jin; Griebel, Jared J.; Kim, Eui Tae; Yoon, Hyunsik; Simmonds, Adam G.; Ji, Hyun Jun; Dirlam, Philip T.; Glass, Richard S.; Wie, Jeong Jae; Nguyen, Ngoc A.; Guralnick, Brett W.; Park, Jungjin; Somogyi, Árpád; Theato, Patrick; Mackay, Michael E.; Sung, Yung-Eun; Char, Kookheon; Pyun, Jeffrey

    2013-06-01

    An excess of elemental sulfur is generated annually from hydrodesulfurization in petroleum refining processes; however, it has a limited number of uses, of which one example is the production of sulfuric acid. Despite this excess, the development of synthetic and processing methods to convert elemental sulfur into useful chemical substances has not been investigated widely. Here we report a facile method (termed ‘inverse vulcanization’) to prepare chemically stable and processable polymeric materials through the direct copolymerization of elemental sulfur with vinylic monomers. This methodology enabled the modification of sulfur into processable copolymer forms with tunable thermomechanical properties, which leads to well-defined sulfur-rich micropatterned films created by imprint lithography. We also demonstrate that these copolymers exhibit comparable electrochemical properties to elemental sulfur and could serve as the active material in Li-S batteries, exhibiting high specific capacity (823 mA h g-1 at 100 cycles) and enhanced capacity retention.

  14. The use of elemental sulfur as an alternative feedstock for polymeric materials.

    PubMed

    Chung, Woo Jin; Griebel, Jared J; Kim, Eui Tae; Yoon, Hyunsik; Simmonds, Adam G; Ji, Hyun Jun; Dirlam, Philip T; Glass, Richard S; Wie, Jeong Jae; Nguyen, Ngoc A; Guralnick, Brett W; Park, Jungjin; Somogyi, Arpád; Theato, Patrick; Mackay, Michael E; Sung, Yung-Eun; Char, Kookheon; Pyun, Jeffrey

    2013-06-01

    An excess of elemental sulfur is generated annually from hydrodesulfurization in petroleum refining processes; however, it has a limited number of uses, of which one example is the production of sulfuric acid. Despite this excess, the development of synthetic and processing methods to convert elemental sulfur into useful chemical substances has not been investigated widely. Here we report a facile method (termed 'inverse vulcanization') to prepare chemically stable and processable polymeric materials through the direct copolymerization of elemental sulfur with vinylic monomers. This methodology enabled the modification of sulfur into processable copolymer forms with tunable thermomechanical properties, which leads to well-defined sulfur-rich micropatterned films created by imprint lithography. We also demonstrate that these copolymers exhibit comparable electrochemical properties to elemental sulfur and could serve as the active material in Li-S batteries, exhibiting high specific capacity (823 mA h g(-1) at 100 cycles) and enhanced capacity retention. PMID:23695634

  15. Production of elemental sulfur and methane from H{sub 2}S and CO{sub 2} derived from a coal desulfurization process. Quarterly technical progress report, January 1--March 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Gong, S.Y.; Jiang, X.; Khang, S.J.; Keener, T.C.

    1996-12-31

    During the tenth quarter of the project, bench scale experiments were performed to investigate the adsorption ability of different kinds of materials within sulfur vapor environment. Four kinds of adsorbents have been tested. The experimental results indicated that activated carbon was the best of four adsorbents tested. In addition to the baseline tests, several designs of activated carbon feed system have been tested. Under an inert environment, bench scale experiments were performed to investigate the characteristics and efficiency of activated carbon passing through the Co-Mo-Alumina catalyst bed. The results showed that activated carbon powder could easily be transported through the catalytic bed. The adsorption process may be applicable to promote conversion of H{sub 2}S in the H{sub 2}S and CO{sub 2} reaction system.

  16. Sulfur plumes off Namibia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Sulfur plumes rising up from the bottom of the ocean floor produce colorful swirls in the waters off the coast of Namibia in southern Africa. The plumes come from the breakdown of marine plant matter by anaerobic bacteria that do not need oxygen to live. This image was acquired by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on the Terra satellite on April 24, 2002 Credit: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

  17. Correlation for the total sulfur content in char after devolatilization

    SciTech Connect

    Vasilije Manovic; Borislav Grubor

    2006-02-01

    The overall process of coal combustion takes place in two successive steps: devolatilization and char combustion. The fate of sulfur during the devolatilization of coal of different rank was investigated. The significance of the investigation is in fact that a major part of sulfur release occurs during devolatilization of coal, (i.e., emission of sulfur oxides during combustion of coal largely depends on sulfur release during devolatilization). The experimental investigations were conducted to obtain the data about the quantitative relation between sulfur content in the coal and sulfur content in the char. Standard procedures were used for obtaining the chars in a laboratory oven and determining the sulfur forms in the coal and char samples. The experiments were done with ground coal samples ({lt}0.2 mm), at the temperatures in the range of 500-1000{sup o}C. We showed that the amount of sulfur remaining in the char decreases, but not significantly in the temperature range 600-900{sup o}C. On the basis of the theoretical consideration of behavior of sulfur forms during devolatilization, certain simplifying assumptions, and obtained experimental data, we propose two correlations to associate the content of sulfur in the coal and in the char. The correlations are based on the results of the proximate analysis and sulfur forms in coal. Good agreement was found when the proposed correlations were compared with the experimental results obtained for investigated coals. Moreover, the correlations were verified by results found in the literature for numerous Polish, Albanian, and Turkish coals. Significant correlations (P {lt}0.05) between observed and calculated data with correlation coefficient, R {gt}0.9, were noticed in the case of all coals. 25 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Atmospheric sulfur in Archean komatiite-hosted nickel deposits.

    PubMed

    Bekker, Andrey; Barley, Mark E; Fiorentini, Marco L; Rouxel, Olivier J; Rumble, Douglas; Beresford, Stephen W

    2009-11-20

    Some of Earth's largest iron-nickel (Fe-Ni) sulfide ore deposits formed during the Archean and early Proterozoic. Establishing the origin of the metals and sulfur in these deposits is critical for understanding their genesis. Here, we present multiple sulfur isotope data implying that the sulfur in Archean komatiite-hosted Fe-Ni sulfide deposits was previously processed through the atmosphere and then accumulated on the ocean floor. High-temperature, mantle-derived komatiite magmas were then able to incorporate the sulfur from seafloor hydrothermal sulfide accumulations and sulfidic shales to form Neoarchean komatiite-hosted Fe-Ni sulfide deposits at a time when the oceans were sulfur-poor. PMID:19965423

  19. Method for removal of sulfur compounds from a gas

    SciTech Connect

    Frech, K.J.; Tazuma, J.J.

    1981-08-11

    This invention relates to a process for the removal of sulfur compounds from a gas stream which consists of contacting said gas stream with alkali metal salts of sulfonamides or resins containing sulfonamide functionalities.

  20. Immobilization of sulfur in microgels for lithium-sulfur battery.

    PubMed

    Chang, Aiping; Wu, Qingshi; Du, Xue; Chen, Shoumin; Shen, Jing; Song, Qiuyi; Xie, Jianda; Wu, Weitai

    2016-03-15

    Immobilization of sulfur in microgels is achieved via free radical polymerization of commercial poly(ethylene glycol) dimethacrylate in the solution of sulfur-terminated poly(3-oligo(ethylene oxide)4-thiophene), a copolymer prepared by the inverse vulcanization of S8 with allyl-terminated poly(3-oligo(ethylene oxide)4-thiophene). This microgelation leads to enhanced Li-S battery performance over the sulfur-terminated polymer. PMID:26936016

  1. Isotope Dilution Mass Spectrometry for the Quantification of Sulfane Sulfurs

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chunrong; Zhang, Faya; Munske, Gerhard; Zhang, Hui

    2014-01-01

    Sulfane sulfurs are one type of important reactive sulfur species. These molecules have unique reactivity that can attach reversibly to other sulfur atoms and exhibit regulatory effects in diverse biological systems. Recent studies have suggested that sulfane sulfurs are involved in signal transduction processes regulated by hydrogen sulfide (H2S). Accurate and reliable measurements of sulfane sulfurs in biological samples are thus needed to reveal their production and mechanisms of actions. Herein we report a convenient and accurate method for the determination of sulfane sulfurs concentrations. The method employs a triphenylphosphine derivative (P2) to capture sulfane sulfurs as a stable phosphine sulphide product PS2. The concentration of PS2 was then determined by isotope dilution mass spectrometry, using a 13C3-labelled phosphine sulfide PS1 as the internal standard. The specificity and efficiency of the method were proved by model reactions. It was also applied in the measurement of sulfane sulfurs in mice tissues including brain, kidney, lung, liver, heart, spleen, and blood. PMID:25152234

  2. Catalyst for the reduction of sulfur dioxide to elemental sulfur

    DOEpatents

    Jin, Y.; Yu, Q.; Chang, S.G.

    1996-02-27

    The inventive catalysts allow for the reduction of sulfur dioxide to elemental sulfur in smokestack scrubber environments. The catalysts have a very high sulfur yield of over 90% and space velocity of 10,000 h{sup {minus}1}. They also have the capacity to convert waste gases generated during the initial conversion into elemental sulfur. The catalysts have inexpensive components, and are inexpensive to produce. The net impact of the invention is to make this technology practically available to industrial applications. 21 figs.

  3. Petrographic and SIMS pyrite sulfur isotope analyses of Ediacaran chert nodules: Implications for microbial processes in pyrite rim formation, silicification, and exceptional fossil preservation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Shuhai; Schiffbauer, James D.; McFadden, Kathleen A.; Hunter, Jerry

    2010-09-01

    The lower Ediacaran Doushantuo Formation in the Yangtze Gorges area contains exceptionally preserved microfossils, including the earliest known animal resting eggs and embryos. These fossils are preserved in cm-sized chert nodules, which typically have a microbial mat fragment in the center, a silica cortex, a pyrite rim, and an outer rim of blocky calcite. Petrographic analysis indicates that the formation of the blocky calcite rim postdates that of the pyrite rim and silica cortex. The pyrite rim grew centripetally during early diagenesis, representing a reaction front that was determined by the dynamics between ambient Fe 2+ and H 2S, the latter of which was derived from bacterial sulfate reduction (BSR) of mat fragment in nodule center. The silica cortex was formed pervasively through replacement of carbonate sediments prior to compaction. Secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) sulfur isotopes of individual pyrite crystals (δ 34S py - SIMS) in pyrite rims and matrices show highly positive values (15.2-39.8‰). The pyrite rims do not show an isotopic gradient between small crystals formed in outer rim during early diagenesis and large crystals formed in inner rim during subsequent overgrowth. Although rim pyrite in the same chert nodule has consistent δ 34S py - SIMS values, there are significant spatial and stratigraphic variations in δ 34S py - SIMS values of both matrix and rim pyrite. Overall, isotopic fractionation between pyrite and carbonate associated sulfate (CAS) is small (< 22‰). The isotopic and petrographic data can be interpreted as evidence for rapid BSR of highly metabolizable organic matter in a diagenetic environment with limited sulfate availability, local anoxia, high Fe 2+ concentration, and low sedimentation rate. The embryonic nodules nucleated on microbial mat fragments and stayed in the BSR zone during early diagenesis, when rapid BSR in the nodule center generated outward-diffusing H 2S that was confined by readily available Fe 2+ to precipitate the pyrite rim. The precipitation of the silica cortex was facilitated by localized pH change related to BSR and pyrite precipitation, with silica sourced from silica-rich Precambrian seawater and from microbially mediated clay diagenesis. Like the pyrite rim, the silica cortex was also formed rapidly during early diagenesis, leading to the exceptional preservation of microfossils within these nodules.

  4. Multiple sulfur isotope fractionation and mass transfer processes during pyrite precipitation and recrystallization: An experimental study at 300 and 350 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syverson, Drew D.; Ono, Shuhei; Shanks, Wayne C.; Seyfried, William E.

    2015-09-01

    Equilibrium multiple sulfur isotope fractionation factors (33S/32S and 34S/32S) between aqueous SO4, H2S, and coexisting pyrite under hydrothermal conditions were determined experimentally at 300-350 °C and 500 bars. Two different experimental techniques were used to determine the fractionation factors and the rate of S isotope exchange between pyrite and constituent aqueous species, H2S and SO4; (1) closed system gold capsule pyrite-H2S exchange experiments and (2) complimentary time-series experiments at 300 and 350 °C, 500 bars using flexible gold cell hydrothermal equipment, which allowed monitoring the multiple S isotope composition of dissolved S species during pyrite precipitation and subsequent recrystallization. The three isotope technique was applied to the multiple S isotope data to demonstrate equilibrium S isotope fractionation between pyrite and H2S. Results at 350 °C indicate ln34αPyrite/H2S = -1.9‰ and ln33αPyrite/H2S = -1.0‰. The ln34αPyrite/H2S is not only different in magnitude but also in sign from the commonly used value of 1‰ from Ohmoto and Rye (1979). This experimental study also demonstrated initial S isotope disequilibrium amongst the aqueous S-species and pyrite during rapid precipitation, despite aqueous speciation indicating pyrite saturation at all stages. Textural, crystallographic, and S isotope interpretations suggest that pyrite formed by means of the FeS pathway. The initial S isotope disequilibrium between formed pyrite and dissolved S-species was effectively erased and approached isotopic equilibrium upon recrystallization during the course of 4297 h. Interpretation of seafloor hydrothermal vent sulfides using the revised equilibrium 34S/32S fractionation between pyrite and H2S suggests that pyrite is close to S isotope equilibrium with vent H2S, contrary to previous conclusions. The experimental data reported here broaden the range of pyrite formation mechanisms at seafloor hydrothermal vents, in that mineral formation pathway and equilibration rates need to be considered to account for the well-recognized S isotope variability that often characterizes these systems.

  5. Influence of different sulfur to selenium ratios on the structural and electronic properties of Cu(In,Ga)(S,Se){sub 2} thin films and solar cells formed by the stacked elemental layer process

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, B. J.; Zimmermann, C.; Haug, V. Koehler, T.; Zweigart, S.; Hergert, F.; Herr, U.

    2014-11-07

    In this study, we investigate the effect of different elemental selenium to elemental sulfur ratios on the chalcopyrite phase formation in Cu(In,Ga)(S,Se){sub 2} thin films. The films are formed by the stacked elemental layer process. The structural and electronic properties of the thin films and solar cells are analyzed by means of scanning electron microscopy, glow discharge optical emission spectrometry, X-ray diffraction, X-ray fluorescence, Raman spectroscopy, spectral photoluminescence as well as current-voltage, and quantum efficiency measurements. The influence of different S/(S+Se) ratios on the anion incorporation and on the Ga/In distribution is investigated. We find a homogenous sulfur concentration profile inside the film from the top surface to the bottom. External quantum efficiency measurements show that the band edge of the solar cell device is shifted to shorter wavelength, which enhances the open-circuit voltages. The relative increase of the open-circuit voltage with S/(S+Se) ratio is lower than expected from the band gap energy trend, which is attributed to the presence of S-induced defects. We also observe a linear decrease of the short-circuit current density with increasing S/(S+Se) ratio which can be explained by a reduced absorption. Above a critical S/(S+Se) ratio of around 0.61, the fill factor drops drastically, which is accompanied by a strong series resistance increase which may be attributed to changes in the back contact or p-n junction properties.

  6. Sodium sulfur storage battery

    SciTech Connect

    Kagawa, H.; Matsui, K.

    1985-04-09

    The present invention discloses a sodium-sulfur storage battery utilizing an inside of a sodium-ion conductive solid electrolyte tube as a negative chamber, comprising an a-alumina ring jointed with solder glass to an open end of said electrolyte tube, a flange aluminum housing having a fine hole at its bottom incorporated in said solid electrolyte tube, a negative auxiliary cover thermo-compressively jointed through a flange of said aluminum housing to an upper surface of said a-aluminum ring, and a negative cover provided with a negative current collector terminal welded to said negative auxiliary cover.

  7. Method of removing and recovering elemental sulfur from highly reducing gas streams containing sulfur gases

    DOEpatents

    Gangwal, Santosh K.; Nikolopoulos, Apostolos A.; Dorchak, Thomas P.; Dorchak, Mary Anne

    2005-11-08

    A method is provided for removal of sulfur gases and recovery of elemental sulfur from sulfur gas containing supply streams, such as syngas or coal gas, by contacting the supply stream with a catalyst, that is either an activated carbon or an oxide based catalyst, and an oxidant, such as sulfur dioxide, in a reaction medium such as molten sulfur, to convert the sulfur gases in the supply stream to elemental sulfur, and recovering the elemental sulfur by separation from the reaction medium.

  8. [Transformation of sulfur forms during coal pyrolysis and partial gasification in a fixed bed reactor].

    PubMed

    Li, Bin; Cao, Yan; Zhang, Jianmin; Huang, Jiejie; Wang, Yang; Chen, Fuyan

    2003-03-01

    The development of various process to the pre-desulfurization of coal was drawn more attention. In present study, the transformation of sulfur forms of three different ranks high sulfur coals during coal pyrolysis and partial gasification were investigated in a fixed bed reactor. The sulfur and carbon content analysis of original coal and coal char produced were determined by LECO SC-444 and wet chemical analysis according to Sugawara's method. The results showed that half of inorganic sulfur and partial of organic sulfur were removed during coal pyrolysis. And the sulfur removal was much more than carbon during pyrolysis process; and the sulfur in the coal char, especially the sulfide sulfur was removed completely during partial gasification process for both Datong coal and Xishan coal, the degree of sulfide sulfur removal could be increased with increasing temperature. At the same time, the results of Yima coal showed that the effect of fixed-sulfur by alkaline metals increased when the temperature was higher than 700 degrees C, which attribute to the increase of the fixed sulfur reaction rate and the decrease of mass-transfer limitation. PMID:12800660

  9. Sulfur/three-dimensional graphene composite for high performance lithium-sulfur batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Chunmei; Wu, Yishan; Zhao, Xuyang; Wang, Xiuli; Du, Gaohui; Zhang, Jun; Tu, Jiangping

    2015-02-01

    A sulfur/graphene composite is prepared by loading elemental sulfur into three-dimensional graphene (3D graphene), which is assembled using a metal ions assisted hydrothermal method. When used as cathode materials for lithium-sulfur (Li-S) batteries, the sulfur/graphene composite (S@3D-graphene) with 73 wt % sulfur shows a significantly enhanced cycling performance (>700 mAh g-1 after 100 cycles at 0.1C rate with a Coulombic efficiency > 96%) as well as high rate capability with a capacity up to 500 mAh g-1 at 2C rate (3.35 A g-1). The superior electrochemical performance could be attributed to the highly porous structure of three-dimensional graphene that not only enables stable and continue pathway for rapid electron and ion transportation, but also restrain soluble polysulfides and suppress the "shuttle effect". Moreover, the robust structure of 3D graphene can keep cathode integrity and accommodate the volume change during high-rate charge/discharge processes, making it a promising candidate as cathode for high performance Li-S batteries.

  10. Transcriptional and Proteomic Profiling of Aspergillus flavipes in Response to Sulfur Starvation

    PubMed Central

    El-Sayed, Ashraf S. A.; Yassin, Marwa A.; Ali, Gul Shad

    2015-01-01

    Aspergillus flavipes has received considerable interest due to its potential to produce therapeutic enzymes involved in sulfur amino acid metabolism. In natural habitats, A. flavipes survives under sulfur limitations by mobilizing endogenous and exogenous sulfur to operate diverse cellular processes. Sulfur limitation affects virulence and pathogenicity, and modulates proteome of sulfur assimilating enzymes of several fungi. However, there are no previous reports aimed at exploring effects of sulfur limitation on the regulation of A. flavipes sulfur metabolism enzymes at the transcriptional, post-transcriptional and proteomic levels. In this report, we show that sulfur limitation affects morphological and physiological responses of A. flavipes. Transcription and enzymatic activities of several key sulfur metabolism genes, ATP-sulfurylase, sulfite reductase, methionine permease, cysteine synthase, cystathionine β- and γ-lyase, glutathione reductase and glutathione peroxidase were increased under sulfur starvation conditions. A 50 kDa protein band was strongly induced by sulfur starvation, and the proteomic analyses of this protein band using LC-MS/MS revealed similarity to many proteins involved in the sulfur metabolism pathway. PMID:26633307

  11. Identification of sulfur sources and isotopic equilibria in submarine hot-springs using multiple sulfur isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDermott, Jill M.; Ono, Shuhei; Tivey, Margaret K.; Seewald, Jeffrey S.; Shanks, Wayne C.; Solow, Andrew R.

    2015-07-01

    Multiple sulfur isotopes were measured in metal sulfide deposits, elemental sulfur, and aqueous hydrogen sulfide to constrain sulfur sources and the isotopic systematics of precipitation in seafloor hydrothermal vents. Areas studied include the Eastern Manus Basin and Lau Basin back-arc spreading centers and the unsedimented basalt-hosted Southern East Pacific Rise (SEPR) and sediment-hosted Guaymas Basin mid-ocean ridge spreading centers. Chalcopyrite and dissolved hydrogen sulfide (H2S) δ34S values range from -5.5‰ to +5.6‰ in Manus Basin samples, +2.4‰ to +6.1‰ in Lau Basin samples, and +3.7‰ to +5.7‰ in SEPR samples. Values of δ34S for cubic cubanite and H2S range from -1.4‰ to +4.7‰ in Guaymas Basin samples. Multiple sulfur isotope systematics in fluid-mineral pairs from the SEPR and Lau Basin show that crustal host rock and thermochemical reduction of seawater-derived dissolved sulfate (SO4) are the primary sources of sulfur in mid-ocean ridge and some back-arc systems. At PACMANUS and SuSu Knolls hydrothermal systems in the Eastern Manus Basin, a significant contribution of sulfur is derived from disproportionation of magmatic sulfur dioxide (SO2), while the remaining sulfur is derived from crustal host rocks and SO4 reduction. At the sedimented Guaymas Basin hydrothermal system, sulfur sources include crustal host rock, reduced seawater SO4, and biogenic sulfide. Vent fluid flow through fresher, less-mature sediment supplies an increased quantity of reactant organic compounds that may reduce 34S-enriched SO4, while fluid interaction with more highly-altered sediments results in H2S characterized by a small, but isotopically-significant input of 34S-depleted biogenic sulfides. Near-zero Δ33S values in all samples implicate the abiotic processes of SO4 reduction and leaching of host rock as the major contributors to sulfur content at a high temperature unsedimented mid-ocean ridge and at a back-arc system. Δ33S values indicate that SO2 disproportionation is an additional process that contributes sulfur to a different back-arc system and to acid spring-type hydrothermal fluid circulation. At the sedimented Guaymus Basin, near-zero Δ33S values are also observed, despite negative δ34S values that indicate inputs of biogenic pyrite for some samples. In contrast with previous studies reporting isotope disequilibrium between H2S and chalcopyrite, the δ34S values of chalcopyrite sampled from the inner 1-2 mm of a chimney wall are within ±1‰ of δ34S values for H2S in the paired vent fluid, suggesting equilibrium fluid-mineral sulfur isotope exchange at 300-400 °C. Isotopic equilibrium between hydrothermal fluid H2S and precipitating chalcopyrite implies that sulfur isotopes in the chalcopyrite lining across a chimney wall may accurately record past hydrothermal activity.

  12. Liquid sulfur mustard exposure.

    PubMed

    Newmark, Jonathan; Langer, Janice M; Capacio, Benedict; Barr, John; McIntosh, Roger G

    2007-02-01

    A 35-year-old active duty service member sustained a 6.5% body surface area burn as a result of exposure to the chemical warfare agent sulfur mustard, which is the most severe mustard exposure of a U.S. military member since World War II that is known to us. New techniques were used to demonstrate the detectable persistence of mustard metabolites in the patient's blood for at least 41 days after exposure, validating these techniques for the first time for a human mustard patient; they were also used for the first time with human mustard blister fluid. The techniques extend eightfold the period of time that mustard exposure can be definitively diagnosed, compared with previous techniques. Although this patient's lesions were never life-threatening, he required 2 weeks of intensive burn care. He has been left with ongoing posttraumatic stress disorder and has had an incomplete dermatological recovery. In a major terrorist attack involving many patients exposed to sulfur mustard, care resources would be depleted quickly. PMID:17357776

  13. Sulfur in Cometary Dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fomenkova, M. N.

    1997-01-01

    The computer-intensive project consisted of the analysis and synthesis of existing data on composition of comet Halley dust particles. The main objective was to obtain a complete inventory of sulfur containing compounds in the comet Halley dust by building upon the existing classification of organic and inorganic compounds and applying a variety of statistical techniques for cluster and cross-correlational analyses. A student hired for this project wrote and tested the software to perform cluster analysis. The following tasks were carried out: (1) selecting the data from existing database for the proposed project; (2) finding access to a standard library of statistical routines for cluster analysis; (3) reformatting the data as necessary for input into the library routines; (4) performing cluster analysis and constructing hierarchical cluster trees using three methods to define the proximity of clusters; (5) presenting the output results in different formats to facilitate the interpretation of the obtained cluster trees; (6) selecting groups of data points common for all three trees as stable clusters. We have also considered the chemistry of sulfur in inorganic compounds.

  14. 40 CFR 50.4 - National primary ambient air quality standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). 50.4 Section 50.4 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....4 National primary ambient air quality standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). (a) The level...). (c) Sulfur oxides shall be measured in the ambient air as sulfur dioxide by the reference...

  15. 40 CFR 50.4 - National primary ambient air quality standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). 50.4 Section 50.4 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....4 National primary ambient air quality standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). (a) The level...). (c) Sulfur oxides shall be measured in the ambient air as sulfur dioxide by the reference...

  16. 40 CFR 50.4 - National primary ambient air quality standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). 50.4 Section 50.4 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....4 National primary ambient air quality standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). (a) The level...). (c) Sulfur oxides shall be measured in the ambient air as sulfur dioxide by the reference...

  17. 40 CFR 50.4 - National primary ambient air quality standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). 50.4 Section 50.4 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....4 National primary ambient air quality standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). (a) The level...). (c) Sulfur oxides shall be measured in the ambient air as sulfur dioxide by the reference...

  18. Processing and thermodynamics research. Volume II. Quarterly technical report, April 1-June 30, 1984. [Polycyclic compounds containing oxygen, nitrogen and sulfur

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-08-29

    Volume II contains the following progress reports in the areas of processing and thermodynamics: (1) thermodynamic properties of organic nitrogen compounds that occur in shale oil and heavy petroleum; (2) thermophysical and thermochemical properties of organic compounds derived from fossil substances; (3) stability and processing research for crudes, intermediate process streams, and finished fuels; (4) chemical characterization of heavy ends of light petroleum, of heavy petroleum, and of liquids derived from other fossil sources; (5) thermophysical properties of real and synthetic fluid mixtures derived from fossil substances; (6) fuel trends and analyses; and (7) chemistry of contaminated petroleum fuels.

  19. Quadruple sulfur isotope constraints on the origin and cycling of volatile organic sulfur compounds in a stratified sulfidic lake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oduro, Harry; Kamyshny, Alexey; Zerkle, Aubrey L.; Li, Yue; Farquhar, James

    2013-11-01

    We have quantified the major forms of volatile organic sulfur compounds (VOSCs) distributed in the water column of stratified freshwater Fayetteville Green Lake (FGL), to evaluate the biogeochemical pathways involved in their production. The lake's anoxic deep waters contain high concentrations of sulfate (12-16 mmol L-1) and sulfide (0.12 μmol L-1 to 1.5 mmol L-1) with relatively low VOSC concentrations, ranging from 0.1 nmol L-1 to 2.8 μmol L-1. Sulfur isotope measurements of combined volatile organic sulfur compounds demonstrate that VOSC species are formed primarily from reduced sulfur (H2S/HS-) and zero-valent sulfur (ZVS), with little input from sulfate. Thedata support a role of a combination of biological and abiotic processes in formation of carbon-sulfur bonds between reactive sulfur species and methyl groups of lignin components. These processes are responsible for very fast turnover of VOSC species, maintaining their low levels in FGL. No dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP) was detected by Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry (ESI-MS) in the lake water column or in planktonic extracts. These observations indicate a pathway distinct from oceanic and coastal marine environments, where dimethylsulfide (DMS) and other VOSC species are principally produced via the breakdown of DMSP by plankton species.

  20. Mass-dependent sulfur isotope fractionation during reoxidative sulfur cycling: A case study from Mangrove Lake, Bermuda

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pellerin, André; Bui, Thi Hao; Rough, Mikaella; Mucci, Alfonso; Canfield, Donald E.; Wing, Boswell A.

    2015-01-01

    The multiple sulfur isotope composition of porewater sulfate from the anoxic marine sapropel of Mangrove Lake, Bermuda was measured in order to establish how multiple sulfur isotopes are fractionated during reoxidative sulfur cycling. The porewater-sulfate δ34S and Δ33S dataset exhibits the distinct isotopic signatures of microbial sulfate reduction and sulfur reoxidation. We reproduced the measurements with a simple diagenetic model that yielded fractionation factors for net sulfate removal of between -29.2‰ and -32.5‰. A new approach to isotopic modeling of the sulfate profiles, informed by the chemistry of sulfur intermediate compounds in Mangrove Lake, reveals that sulfate reduction produces a relatively small intrinsic fractionation and that an active reoxidative sulfur cycle increases the fractionation of the measured values. Based on the model results, the reoxidative cycle of Mangrove Lake appears to include sulfide oxidation to elemental sulfur followed by the disproportionation of the elemental sulfur to sulfate and sulfide. This model also indicates that the reoxidative sulfur cycle of Mangrove Lake turns over from 50 to 80% of the sulfide produced by microbial sulfate reduction. The Mangrove Lake case study shows how sulfur isotope fractionations can be separated into three different "domains" in Δ33S-δ34S space based on their ability to resolve reductive and reoxidative sulfur transformations. The first domain that differentiates reductive and reoxidative sulfur cycling is well illustrated by previous studies and requires 34S-32S fractionations more negative than ≈-70‰, beyond the fractionation limit of microbial sulfate reduction at earth surface temperatures. The second domain that distinguishes reductive and reoxidative processes is between 34S-32S fractionations of -40‰ and 0‰, where the 33S-32S fractionations of sulfate reduction and reoxidation are significantly different. In the remaining domain (between 34S-32S fractionations -70‰ and -40‰), the similarity of the multiple sulfur isotope signals from microbial sulfate reduction and disproportionation means that the two processes cannot be discriminated from each other.

  1. Volume efficient sodium sulfur battery

    DOEpatents

    Mikkor, Mati

    1980-01-01

    In accordance with the teachings of this specification, a sodium sulfur battery is formed as follows. A plurality of box shaped sulfur electrodes are provided, the outer surfaces of which are defined by an electrolyte material. Each of the electrodes have length and width dimensions substantially greater than the thicknesses thereof as well as upwardly facing surface and a downwardly facing surface. An electrode structure is contained in each of the sulfur electrodes. A holding structure is provided for holding the plurality of sulfur electrodes in a stacked condition with the upwardly facing surface of one sulfur electrode in facing relationship to the downwardly facing surface of another sulfur electrode thereabove. A small thickness dimension separates each of the stacked electrodes thereby defining between each pair of sulfur electrodes a volume which receives the sodium reactant. A reservoir is provided for containing sodium. A manifold structure interconnects the volumes between the sulfur electrodes and the reservoir. A metering structure controls the flow of sodium between the reservoir and the manifold structure.

  2. Demonstrating Allotropic Modifications of Sulfur.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCarty, Jillian L.; Dragojlovic, Veljko

    2002-01-01

    Shows how a common demonstration that consists of slowly heating sulfur powder in a test tube to illustrate sulfur's allotropic modifications can convince students of conclusions about the moon Io which they often find surprising. Describes the demonstration in full. (Author/MM)

  3. SULFUR RETENTION IN COAL ASH

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of an analytical study to assess the potential for sulfur retention in various types of coal-fired boilers. Results of a field test of 10 industrial coal-fired boilers were used to evaluate the impact on sulfur retention of the operating variables (load a...

  4. Biotic and abiotic carbon to sulfur bond cleavage. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Frost, J.W.

    1994-05-01

    The microbial desulfurization of organosulfur compounds occurs by unprecedented and largely unexplored biochemical processes. A study of such biotic desulfurizations can be expected to give rise to new and useful chemistry and enzymology. The potential value of understanding and harnessing these processes is seen in relation to the need for methods for the removal of organically bound sulfur from coal and the degradation of organic sulfur-containing pollutants. This research effort has been directed towards an examination of desulfurization ability in well characterized microorganisms, the isolation of bacteria with desulfurization ability from natural sources, the characterization and mechanistic evaluation of the observed biocatalytic processes, the development of biomimetic synthetic organic chemistry based on biotic desulfurization mechanisms and the design and preparation of improved coal model compounds for use in microbial selection processes. A systematic approach to studying biodesulfurizations was undertaken in which organosulfur compounds have been broken down into classes based on the oxidation state of the sulfur atom and the structure of the rest of the organic material. Microbes have been evaluated in terms of ability to degrade organosulfur compounds with sulfur in its sulfonic acid oxidation state. These compounds are likely intermediates in coal desulfurization and are present in the environment as persistent pollutants in the form of detergents. It is known that oxygen bonded to sulfur lowers the carbon-sulfur bond energy, providing a thermodynamic basis for starting with this class of compounds.

  5. Selective catalytic reduction system and process for control of NO.sub.x emissions in a sulfur-containing gas stream

    DOEpatents

    Sobolevskiy, Anatoly

    2015-08-11

    An exhaust gas treatment process, apparatus, and system for reducing the concentration of NOx, CO and hydrocarbons in a gas stream, such as an exhaust stream (29), via selective catalytic reduction with ammonia is provided. The process, apparatus and system include a catalytic bed (32) having a reducing only catalyst portion (34) and a downstream reducing-plus-oxidizing portion (36). Each portion (34, 36) includes an amount of tungsten. The reducing-plus-oxidizing catalyst portion (36) advantageously includes a greater amount of tungsten than the reducing catalyst portion (36) to markedly limit ammonia salt formation.

  6. SYNTHESIS OF SULFUR-BASED WATER TREATMENT AGENT FROM SULFUR DIOXIDE WASTE STREAMS

    SciTech Connect

    Robert C. Brown; Maohong Fan

    2001-12-01

    We propose a process that uses sulfur dioxide from coal combustion as a raw material to synthesize polymeric ferric sulfate (PFS), a water treatment agent. The process uses sodium chlorate as an oxidant and ferrous sulfate as an absorbent. The major chemical mechanisms in this reaction system include oxidation, hydrolysis, and polymerization. Oxidation determines sulfur conversion efficiency while hydrolysis and polymerization control the quality of product. Many factors, including SO{sub 2} inlet concentration, flow rate of simulated flue gas, reaction temperature, addition rate of oxidant and stirring rate, may affect the efficiencies of SO{sub 2} removal. Currently, the effects of SO{sub 2} inlet concentration, the flow rate of simulated flue gas and addition rate of flue gas on removal efficiencies of SO{sub 2}, are being investigated. Experiments shown in this report have demonstrated that the conversion efficiencies of sulfur dioxide with ferrous sulfate as an absorbent are in the range of 60-80% under the adopted process conditions. However, the conversion efficiency of sulfur dioxide may be improved by optimizing reaction conditions to be investigated. Partial quality indices of the synthesized products, including Fe{sup 2+} concentration and total iron concentration, have been evaluated.

  7. In situ Raman spectroscopy of sulfur speciation in lithium-sulfur batteries.

    PubMed

    Wu, Heng-Liang; Huff, Laura A; Gewirth, Andrew A

    2015-01-28

    In situ Raman spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry were used to investigate the mechanism of sulfur reduction in lithium-sulfur battery slurry cathodes with 1 M lithium bis(trifluoromethane sulfonyl)imide (LiTFSI) and tetraethylene glycol dimethyl ether (TEGDME)/1,3-dioxolane (DIOX) (1/1, v/v). Raman spectroscopy shows that long-chain polysulfides (S8(2-)) were formed via S8 ring opening in the first reduction process at ∼2.4 V vs Li/Li(+) and short-chain polysulfides such as S4(2-), S4(-), S3(•-), and S2O4(2-) were observed with continued discharge at ∼2.3 V vs Li/Li(+) in the second reduction process. Elemental sulfur can be reformed in the end of the charge process. Rate constants obtained for the appearance and disappearance polysulfide species shows that short-chain polysulfides are directly formed from S8 decomposition. The rate constants for S8 reappearance and polysulfide disappearance on charge were likewise similar. The formation of polysulfide mixtures at partial discharge was found to be quite stable. The CS2 additive was found to inhibit the sulfur reduction mechanism allowing the formation of long-chain polysulfides during discharge only and stabilizing the S8(2-) product. PMID:25543831

  8. Membranes for the Sulfur-Iodine Integrated Laboratory Scale Demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Frederick F. Stewart

    2007-08-01

    INL has developed polymeric membrane-based chemical separations to enable the thermochemical production of hydrogen. Major activities included studies of sulfuric acid concentration membranes, hydriodic acid concentration membranes, SO2/O2 separation membranes, potential applications of a catalyst reactor system for the decomposition of HI, and evaluation of the chemical separation needs for alternate thermochemical cycles. Membranes for the concentration of sulfuric acid were studied using pervaporation. The goal of this task was to offer the sulfur-iodine (S-I) and the hybrid sulfur (HyS) cycles a method to concentrate the sulfuric acid containing effluent from the decomposer without boiling. In this work, sulfuric acid decomposer effluent needs to be concentrated from ~50 % acid to 80 %. This task continued FY 2006 efforts to characterize water selective membranes for use in sulfuric acid concentration. In FY 2007, experiments were conducted to provide specific information, including transmembrane fluxes, separation factors, and membrane durability, necessary for proper decision making on the potential inclusion of this process into the S-I or HyS Integrated Laboratory Scale demonstration.

  9. The shadow price of substitutable sulfur in the US electric power plant: a distance function approach.

    TOXLINE Toxicology Bibliographic Information

    Lee M

    2005-10-01

    Given restrictions on sulfur dioxide emissions, a feasible long-run response could involve either an investment in improving boiler fuel-efficiency or a shift to a production process that is effective in removing sulfur dioxide. To allow for the possibility of substitution between sulfur and productive capital, we measure the shadow price of sulfur dioxide as the opportunity cost of lowering sulfur emissions in terms of forgone capital. The input distance function is estimated with data from 51 coal-fired US power units operating between 1977 and 1986. The indirect Morishima elasticities of substitution indicate that the substitutability of capital for sulfur is relatively high. The overall weighted average estimate of the shadow price of sulfur is -0.076 dollars per pound in constant 1976 dollars.

  10. The shadow price of substitutable sulfur in the US electric power plant: a distance function approach.

    PubMed

    Lee, Myunghun

    2005-10-01

    Given restrictions on sulfur dioxide emissions, a feasible long-run response could involve either an investment in improving boiler fuel-efficiency or a shift to a production process that is effective in removing sulfur dioxide. To allow for the possibility of substitution between sulfur and productive capital, we measure the shadow price of sulfur dioxide as the opportunity cost of lowering sulfur emissions in terms of forgone capital. The input distance function is estimated with data from 51 coal-fired US power units operating between 1977 and 1986. The indirect Morishima elasticities of substitution indicate that the substitutability of capital for sulfur is relatively high. The overall weighted average estimate of the shadow price of sulfur is -0.076 dollars per pound in constant 1976 dollars. PMID:15993533

  11. Microbially Mediated Kinetic Sulfur Isotope Fractionation: Reactive Transport Modeling Benchmark

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wanner, C.; Druhan, J. L.; Cheng, Y.; Amos, R. T.; Steefel, C. I.; Ajo Franklin, J. B.

    2014-12-01

    Microbially mediated sulfate reduction is a ubiquitous process in many subsurface systems. Isotopic fractionation is characteristic of this anaerobic process, since sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) favor the reduction of the lighter sulfate isotopologue (S32O42-) over the heavier isotopologue (S34O42-). Detection of isotopic shifts have been utilized as a proxy for the onset of sulfate reduction in subsurface systems such as oil reservoirs and aquifers undergoing uranium bioremediation. Reactive transport modeling (RTM) of kinetic sulfur isotope fractionation has been applied to field and laboratory studies. These RTM approaches employ different mathematical formulations in the representation of kinetic sulfur isotope fractionation. In order to test the various formulations, we propose a benchmark problem set for the simulation of kinetic sulfur isotope fractionation during microbially mediated sulfate reduction. The benchmark problem set is comprised of four problem levels and is based on a recent laboratory column experimental study of sulfur isotope fractionation. Pertinent processes impacting sulfur isotopic composition such as microbial sulfate reduction and dispersion are included in the problem set. To date, participating RTM codes are: CRUNCHTOPE, TOUGHREACT, MIN3P and THE GEOCHEMIST'S WORKBENCH. Preliminary results from various codes show reasonable agreement for the problem levels simulating sulfur isotope fractionation in 1D.

  12. Cycling of sulfur in subduction zones: The geochemistry of sulfur in the Mariana Island Arc and back-arc trough

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Alt, J.C.; Shanks, Wayne C., III; Jackson, M.C.

    1993-01-01

    The sulfur contents and sulfur isotopic compositions of 24 glassy submarine volcanics from the Mariana Island Arc and back-arc Mariana Trough were determined in order to investigate the hypothesis that subducted seawater sulfur (??34S = 21???) is recycled through arc volcanism. Our results for sulfur are similar to those for subaerial arc volcanics: Mariana Arc glasses are enriched in 34S (??34S = up to 10.3???, mean = 3.8???) and depleted in S (20-290 ppm, mean = 100 ppm) relative to MORB (850 ppm S, ??34S = 0.1 ?? 0.5???). The back-arc trough basalts contain 200-930 ppm S and have ??34S values of 1.1 ?? 0.5???, which overlap those for the arc and MORB. The low sulfur contents of the arc and some of the trough glasses are attributed to (1) early loss of small amounts of sulfur through separation of immiscible sulfide and (2) later vapor-melt equilibrium control of sulfur contents and loss of sulfur in a vapor phase from sulfide-undersaturated melts near the minimum in sulfur solubility at f{hook}O2 ??? NNO (nickel-nickel oxide). Although these processes removed sulfur from the melts their effects on the sulfur isotopic compositions of the melts were minimal. Positive trends of ??34S with 87Sr 86Sr, LILE and LREE contents of the arc volcanics are consistent with a metasomatic seawater sulfur component in the depleted sub-arc mantle source. The lack of a 34S-rich slab signature in the trough lavas may be attributed to equilibration of metasomatic fluid with mantle material along the longer pathway from the slab to the source of the trough volcanics. Sulfur is likely to have been transported into the mantle wedge by metasomatic fluid derived from subducted sediments and pore fluids. Gases extracted from vesicles in arc and back-arc samples are predominantly H2O, with minor CO2 and traces of H2S and SO2. CO2 in the arc and back-arc rocks has ??13C values of -2.1 to -13.1???, similar to MORB. These data suggest that degassing of CO2 could explain the slightly lower ??13C values for some Mariana Trough volcanic glasses, and that incorporation of subduction-derived organic carbon into the Mariana Trough mantle source may not be necessary. More analyses are required to resolve this question, however. ?? 1993.

  13. Oxidation of Elemental Sulfur by Sulfolobus acidocaldarius

    PubMed Central

    Shivvers, Douglas W.; Brock, Thomas D.

    1973-01-01

    Oxidation of elemental sulfur by Sulfolobus acidocaldarius, an autotroph which grows at high temperatures and low pH, was examined by use of 35S-labeled elemental sulfur. When cultured at pH 3.2 and 70 C, S. acidocaldarius oxidized elemental sulfur essentially quantitatively to sulfuric acid. Oxidation rate paralleled growth rate and decrease in pH of the culture medium. Elemental sulfur was not oxidized under these conditions if the culture was poisoned with formaldehyde. During the growth phase, the proportion of cells attached to the sulfur crystals increased progressively, and in the later phases of growth over 10 times more cells were attached to sulfur than were free. Doubling times for eight strains growing on elemental sulfur varied from 37 to 55 h. The organism grows much more rapidly on yeast extract than on sulfur. In a medium containing both sulfur and yeast extract, sulfur oxidation was partially inhibited, although growth was excellent. PMID:4706192

  14. Low temperature claus process with water removal

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, R.L.; Goddin, C.S. Jr.; Petty, L.E.

    1984-02-07

    Claus process sulfur recovery can be improved by performing a Claus conversion under low temperature and low water concentration conditions. The process treats a feed stream containing sulfur compounds by conversion of all sulfur components to hydrogen sulfide, water removal to low water concentrations, creation of a Claus reaction mixture, and then low temperature catalytic conversion to sulfur and water.

  15. Discovery of practical production processes for arylsulfur pentafluorides and their higher homologues, bis- and tris(sulfur pentafluorides): Beginning of a new era of “super-trifluoromethyl” arene chemistry and its industry

    PubMed Central

    Garrick, Lloyd M; Saito, Norimichi

    2012-01-01

    Summary Various arylsulfur pentafluorides, ArSF5, have long been desired in both academic and industrial areas, and ArSF5 compounds have attracted considerable interest in many areas such as medicines, agrochemicals, and other new materials, since the highly stable SF5 group is considered a “super-trifluoromethyl group” due to its significantly higher electronegativity and lipophilicity. This article describes the first practical method for the production of various arylsulfur pentafluorides and their higher homologues, bis- and tris(sulfur pentafluorides), from the corresponding diaryl disulfides or aryl thiols. The method consists of two steps: (Step 1) treatment of a diaryl disulfide or an aryl thiol with chlorine in the presence of an alkali metal fluoride, and (step 2) treatment of the resulting arylsulfur chlorotetrafluoride with a fluoride source, such as ZnF2, HF, and Sb(III/V) fluorides. The intermediate arylsulfur chlorotetrafluorides were isolated by distillation or recrystallization and characterized. The aspects of these new reactions are revealed and reaction mechanisms are discussed. As the method offers considerable improvement over previous methods in cost, yield, practicality, applicability, and large-scale production, the new processes described here can be employed as the first practical methods for the economical production of various arylsulfur pentafluorides and their higher homologues, which could then open up a new era of “super-trifluoromethyl” arene chemistry and its applications in many areas. PMID:22509218

  16. Sulfur speciation in hard coal by means of a thermal decomposition method.

    PubMed

    Spiewok, W; Ciba, J; Trojanowska, J

    2002-02-01

    A new method for the determination of organic and pyritic sulfur in hard coal is presented. The method is based on controlled thermal decomposition of coal sample in oxygen-free and oxygen atmospheres. The results for sulfur liberated in an argon atmosphere at temperatures up to 773 K were close to organic sulfur contents (Sorg), although owing to the definition of 'organic sulfur' the values were not directly comparable. Sorg contents are calculated from the difference between total sulfur content in coal and contents of this element in the form of sulfides, sulfates and pyrites. Sulfur contents, found in the second stage of analysis, were close to pyritic sulfur contents. The difference between total sulfur content and the sum of sulfur values obtained in stages I and II corresponded to sulfur contents in those samples which were neither decomposed nor oxidized at temperatures up to 1173 K. Although not comparable with such conventional concepts for industrial purposes these data are attractive due to the ease and rapidity of the new method for the control of sulfur streams in industrial processes. PMID:11939541

  17. Quaternary Marine Sulfur Cycle Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markovic, S.; Paytan, A.; Wortmann, U. G.

    2011-12-01

    Published data show a -0.8% change in marine sulfate δ34S ratios in the past 2 Ma. Prior to this period it was stable at ~ 22% for ~ 50Ma since the Eocene. Compared to the residence time of sulfate (>10 Ma) the observed change is large and implies a major disturbance of the marine sulfur cycle. However, the cause of the disturbance, as well as the timing of its onset are poorly constrained. Here we present a new set of δ34S ratios of marine sulfate for the last 3 Ma with a temporal resolution of ~300ka, which shows a linear decline from 22 to ~21% in the past 1.75Ma. This may represent a change in volcanic and hydrothermal activity, pyrite burial or erosion and weathering of exposed evaporites and sulfides, which are the main processes affecting sulfate δ34S. However, during this period there is no geological evidence for exceptional volcanic and hydrothermal activity and consequently, the observed negative shift reflects either a change in isotopic composition and volume of erosional input of sulfate to the ocean, or a decrease in pyrite burial. The isotopic composition of the input flux depends on the relative proportion of sulfide vs. sulfate weathering. Sedimentary sulfides are mostly concentrated in organic rich sediments on continental shelves. Existing sea level records suggest periodic sea level drops during glacial stages related to the formation of ice sheets. This could affect sulfur cycling in two ways: a) exposure to surface weathering and erosion agents of large parts of continental shelves increased global sulfide oxidation and thus the input flux of sulfate to the ocean and/or b) the reduction of shelf areas resulted in decreased pyrite burial. We explore the effects of these changes with a simple box model. The modeling results indicate that the observed isotopic shift requires a 150% increase of pyrite weathering or a 90% reduction of pyrite burial over the past 1.75Ma. When both of these processes change in concert the same effect is produced with the doubling of pyrite weathering and 50% decrease of pyrite burial. As pyrite burial and organic matter burial are intimately linked, a drastic decrease in pyrite burial should leave its mark in the carbon isotopic record which shows no evidence of a major change in carbon cycling. We thus propose that increased sulfide weathering, either from subaerial exposure, or as a result of increased winnowing might be the principal cause of the negative δ34S shift in the Quaternary.

  18. Efficient regulation of elemental sulfur recovery through optimizing working height of upflow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor during denitrifying sulfide removal process.

    PubMed

    Huang, Cong; Li, Zhi-Ling; Chen, Fan; Liu, Qian; Zhao, You-Kang; Gao, Ling-Fang; Chen, Chuan; Zhou, Ji-Zhong; Wang, Ai-Jie

    2016-01-01

    In this study, two lab-scale UASB reactors were established to testify S(0) recovery efficiency, and one of which (M-UASB) was improved from the previous T-UASB by shortening reactor height once S(2-) over oxidation was observed. After the height was shortened from 60 to 30cm, S(0) recovery rate was improved from 7.4% to 78.8%, and while, complete removal of acetate, nitrate and S(2-) was simultaneously maintained. Meanwhile, bacterial community distribution was homogenous throughout the reactor, with denitrifying sulfide oxidization bacteria predominant, such as Thauera and Azoarcus spp., indicating the optimized condition for S(0) recovery. The effective control of working height/volume in reactors plays important roles for the efficient regulation of S(0) recovery during DSR process. PMID:26497112

  19. Petroleum and diesel sulfur degradation under gamma radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrade, Luana dos Santos; Calvo, Wilson Aparecido Parejo; Sato, Ivone Mulako; Duarte, Celina Lopes

    2015-10-01

    Hydrodesulfurization (HDS) is currently the most common method used by refineries to remove sulfur compounds from petroleum fractions. However, it is not highly effective for removing thiophene compounds such as benzothiophene. Additionally, this process generates high costs for the oil industry. In the present work, ionizing radiation was used in order to study the effect on the degradation of petroleum and diesel sulfur compounds. Crude oil and diesel fuel samples were studied, without any pretreatment, and irradiated using a cobalt-60 gamma cell in a batch system at absorbed doses of 30 kGy and 50 kGy. The sulfur compounds were extracted and then analyzed by gas chromatography associated with mass spectrometry (GCMS). A high efficiency of ionizing radiation was observed regarding the degradation of sulfur compounds such as benzothiophene and benzenethiol and the formation of fragments, for example 1.2-dimethylbenzene and toluene.

  20. Elemental sulfur recovery from desulfurization sorbents in advanced power systems

    SciTech Connect

    Dorchak, T.P.; Gangwal, S.K.; Turk, B.S.

    1995-12-31

    Regenerable metal oxide sorbents, such as zinc titanate, are being developed to efficiently remove hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) from coal gas in advanced power systems. Dilute air regeneration of the sorbents produces a tailgas containing a few percent sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}). Catalytic reduction of the SO{sub 2} to elemental sulfur with a coal gas slipstream using the Direct Sulfur Recovery Process (DSRP) is a leading first-generation technology. Currently the DSRP is undergoing field testing at gasifier sites. The objective of this study is to develop second-generation processes that produce elemental sulfur with limited use of coal gas. Novel approaches that were evaluated to produce elemental sulfur from sulfided sorbents include (1) SO{sub 2} regeneration, (2) substoichiometric oxidation, (3) steam regeneration followed by H{sub 2}S oxidation, and (4) steam-air regeneration. Experimental results at high temperature and high pressure demonstrate that, with simple sorbent modifications, direct regeneration to elemental sulfur is feasible without the use of coal gas.

  1. The role of plasma-surface interactions in process chemistry: Mechanistic studies of a-carbon nitride deposition and sulfur fluoride/oxygen etching of silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stillahn, Joshua M.

    The molecular level chemistry of a-CNx deposition in plasma discharges was studied with emphasis on the use of CH 3CN and BrCN as single source precursors for these films. Characterization of the global deposition behavior in these systems indicates that the resulting films are relatively smooth and contain significant levels of N-content, with N/C > 0.3. Notably, films obtained from BrCN plasmas are observed to delaminate upon their exposure to atmosphere, and preliminary investigation of this behavior is presented. Detailed chemical investigation of the deposition process focuses primarily on the contributions of CN radicals, which were characterized from their origin in the gas phase to their reaction at the a-CNx film surface. Laser-induced fluorescence studies suggest that CN is formed through electron impact dissociation of the precursor species and that this breakdown process produces CN with high internal energies, having rotational and vibrational temperatures on the order of 1000 K and 5000 K, respectively. Measurement of CN surface reactivity coefficients in CH3CN plasmas show that CN reacts with a probability of ˜94%, irrespective of the deposition conditions; this information, combined with gas phase and film characterization data, leads to the conclusion that CN internal energies exert a strong influence on their surface reactivity and that these surface reactions favor their incorporation into the a-CN x film. Moreover, this correlation is shown to hold for several other plasma radicals studied in our lab, suggesting the potential for developing a general model for predicting surface interactions of activated gas phase species. This dissertation also presents results from studies of SF6/O 2 etching of Si. Addition of O2 to the feed gas leads to the generation of SO2, among other species, and gas phase characterization data suggest that SO2 may act as a sink for atomic S, preventing the reformation of SOxFy (y > 0) and thus promoting generation of atomic F. The surface scatter coefficient of SO2 was also measured in an effort to understand its role in the formation of gas phase species. These measurements suggest that SO2 does not undergo surface reaction during etching and therefore does not contribute to the generation of gaseous SOxF y species.

  2. An economic analysis of microbial reduction of sulfur dioxide as a means of byproduct recovery from regenerable processes for flue gas desulfurization

    SciTech Connect

    Sublette, K.L.; Gwozdz, K.J.

    1991-12-31

    We have previously demonstrated that the sulfate-reducing bacterium, Desulfovibrio desulfuricans, may be grown in mixed culture with fermentative heterotrophs in a medium in which glucose served as the only carbon source. Beneficial cross-feeding resulted in vigorous growth of D. desulfuricans, which used SO{sub 2} (1% SO{sub 2}, 5% CO{sub 2}, balance N{sub 2}) as a terminal electron acceptor with complete reduction of SO{sub 2} to H{sub 2}S with only 1-2 s of contact time. Sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) cannot use simple sugars (such as glucose) as carbon and energy sources. However, the fermentative heterotrophs that developed in these cultures as a result of septic operation utilized glucose and produced fermentative end products (ethanol and lactic acid), which served as carbon and energy sources for D. desulfuricans. Sulfate-reducing bacteria are also strict anaerobes; mere exclusion of oxygen is not sufficient to support growth of pure cultures. Redox-poising agents are generally required to maintain a redox potential in the medium of - 150 to - 250 mV. However, in D. desulfuricans working cultures, no redox-poising agents were required. This report compares the process economics of microbial desulfurization with conventional desulfurization techniques.

  3. 46 CFR 148.04-20 - Sulfur.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Sulfur. 148.04-20 Section 148.04-20 Shipping COAST GUARD... Special Additional Requirements for Certain Material § 148.04-20 Sulfur. (a) When sulfur is loaded in a deep hold with general cargo in the 'tween deck hold above the sulfur, a dust proof wooden...

  4. Production of elemental sulfur from H{sub 2}S and CO{sub 2} derived from a coal desulfurization process. Quarterly technical process report, April 1, 1994--June 30, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Longsheng; Jiang, Xueyu; Khang, Soon-Jai

    1994-08-01

    During the third quarter of this project, by using the apparatus previously setup for preparation of catalysts, the CoO-MoO{sub 3}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst was prepared and the thermal stability of the catalyst was tested. Efforts were made on the calibration and the programming of the two column GC of a Perkin Elmer Gas Chromatograph. Column A was used for detecting sulfur related substances such as H{sub 2}S, COS and CS{sub 2}, and column B was for CO, CH{sub 4} and H{sub 2}. All of the GC standard curves were obtained. Non-catalytic experiments were carried out by using the packed bed reactor system with blank, filled only with quartz wool and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} support for future reference. A modified new reactor was designed to quickly quench the reaction and to prohibit the occurrence of re-equilibration of reaction products. Further thermodynamic analyses for the reaction of H{sub 2}S and CO, were performed using the Stanjan method.

  5. Method of preparing graphene-sulfur nanocomposites for rechargeable lithium-sulfur battery electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Jun; Lemmon, John P; Yang, Zhenguo; Cao, Yuliang; Li, Xiaolin

    2015-04-07

    A method of preparing a graphene-sulfur nanocomposite for a cathode in a rechargeable lithium-sulfur battery comprising thermally expanding graphite oxide to yield graphene layers, mixing the graphene layers with a first solution comprising sulfur and carbon disulfide, evaporating the carbon disulfide to yield a solid nanocomposite, and grinding the solid nanocomposite to yield the graphene-sulfur nanocomposite. Rechargeable-lithium-sulfur batteries having a cathode that includes a graphene-sulfur nanocomposite can exhibit improved characteristics. The graphene-sulfur nanocomposite can be characterized by graphene sheets with particles of sulfur adsorbed to the graphene sheets. The sulfur particles have an average diameter of less than 50 nm.

  6. Experimental study on sulfur removal from ladle furnace refining slag in hot state by blowing air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Li-hua; Lin, Lu; Wu, Qi-fan

    2016-01-01

    In view of the present problem of sulfur enrichment in the metallurgical recycling process of ladle furnace (LF) refining slag, a simple and efficient method of removing sulfur from this slag was proposed. The proposed method is compatible with current steelmaking processes. Sulfur removal from LF refining slag for SPHC steel (manufactured at a certain steel plant in China) by blowing air in the hot state was studied by using hot-state experiments in a laboratory. The FactSage software, a carbon/sulfur analyzer, and scanning electron microscopy in conjunction with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy were used to test and analyze the sulfur removal effect and to investigate factors influencing sulfur removal rate. The results show that sulfur ions in LF refining slag can be oxidized into SO2 by O2 at high temperature by blowing air into molten slag; SO2 production was observed to reach a maximum with a small amount of blown O2 when the temperature exceeded 1350°C. At 1370°C and 1400°C, experimental LF refining slag is in the liquid state and exhibits good fluidity; under these conditions, the sulfur removal effect by blowing air is greater than 90wt% after 60 min. High temperature and large air flow rate are beneficial for removing sulfur from LF refining slag; compared with air flow rate, temperature has a greater strongly influences on the sulfur removal.

  7. Tandem sulfur chemiluminescence and flame ionization detection with planar microfluidic devices for the characterization of sulfur compounds in hydrocarbon matrices.

    PubMed

    Luong, J; Gras, R; Shellie, R A; Cortes, H J

    2013-07-01

    The detection of sulfur compounds in different hydrocarbon matrices, from light hydrocarbon feedstocks to medium synthetic crude oil feeds provides meaningful information for optimization of refining processes as well as demonstration of compliance with petroleum product specifications. With the incorporation of planar microfluidic devices in a novel chromatographic configuration, sulfur compounds from hydrogen sulfide to alkyl dibenzothiophenes and heavier distributions of sulfur compounds over a wide range of matrices spanning across a boiling point range of more than 650°C can be characterized, using one single analytical configuration in less than 25min. In tandem with a sulfur chemiluminescence detector for sulfur analysis is a flame ionization detector. The flame ionization detector can be used to establish the boiling point range of the sulfur compounds in various hydrocarbon fractions for elemental specific simulated distillation analysis as well as profiling the hydrocarbon matrices for process optimization. Repeatability of less than 3% RSD (n=20) over a range of 0.5-1000 parts per million (v/v) was obtained with a limit of detection of 50 parts per billion and a linear range of 0.5-1000 parts per million with a correlation co-efficient of 0.998. PMID:23726084

  8. Toxicology of sulfur in ruminants: review

    SciTech Connect

    Kandylis, K.

    1984-10-01

    This review deals with the toxicology of sulfur in ruminants including toxicity, neurotoxic effects, and mechanism of toxic action of hydrogen sulfide, clinical signs, and treatment. It will report effects of excessive intake of sulfur by ruminants on feed intake, animal performance, ruminal digestion and motility, rumination, and other physiological functions. Poisoning of animals with sulfur from industrial emissions (sulfur dioxide) also is discussed. Excessive quantities of dietary sulfur (above .3 to .4%) as sulfate or elemental sulfur may cause toxic effects and in extreme cases can be fatal. The means is discussed whereby consumption of excessive amounts of sulfur leads to toxic effects. 53 references, 1 table.

  9. Numerical Study of Sulfur Outgassing in Response to Decompression and Crystallization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachmann, O.; Su, Y.; Huber, C.; Zajacz, Z.

    2013-12-01

    Volcanic sulfur emissions impact climate over regional and sometimes global scales. In most explosive eruptions, sulfur emissions are greatly in excess of estimates based on sulfur content in melt at magma chamber pressure; it is commonly referred to as excess sulfur degassing. One of the possible explanations for this phenomenon is that sulfur is stored in an exsolved gas phase in the upper crustal reservoir. In order to test this hypothesis, we implemented a model for the growth of volatile bubbles from a silicate melt based on the work of Lensky et al. (2004) and Forestier-Coste et al. (2012). Our model includes the diffusion and partitioning of sulfur from the melt to bubbles. Basically, there are two processes for bubbles to grow, and retain sulfur, from the melt: (1) degassing during magmas ascent in conduits (first boiling) and (2) bubble nucleation and growth as magma cools and crystallizes (second boiling). We present calculations of diffusion under different decompression rates to simulate first boiling. Our results suggest that the sulfur uptake by bubbles during decompression driven degassing in volcanic conduits is typically not efficient. For most decompression rates, a much smaller amount of sulfur than predicted from equilibrium partitioning is found in bubbles. Thus, a balanced sulfur budget requires sulfur enrichment in bubbles prior to eruption. To test the efficiency of sulfur uptake by bubbles during the thermal maturation of magmas in shallow reservoirs, we have also developed a model for bubble growth and sulfur uptake during second boiling. Results show that efficient sulfur extraction into the magmatic volatile phase requires a crystallization-driven exsolution stage.

  10. Alkali metal/sulfur battery

    DOEpatents

    Anand, Joginder N.

    1978-01-01

    Alkali metal/sulfur batteries in which the electrolyte-separator is a relatively fragile membrane are improved by providing means for separating the molten sulfur/sulfide catholyte from contact with the membrane prior to cooling the cell to temperatures at which the catholyte will solidify. If the catholyte is permitted to solidify while in contact with the membrane, the latter may be damaged. The improvement permits such batteries to be prefilled with catholyte and shipped, at ordinary temperatures.

  11. Novel Sulfur-Tolerant Anodes for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lei Yang; Meilin Liu

    2008-12-31

    One of the unique advantages of SOFCs over other types of fuel cells is the potential for direct utilization of hydrocarbon fuels (it may involve internal reforming). Unfortunately, most hydrocarbon fuels contain sulfur, which would dramatically degrade SOFC performance at parts-per-million (ppm) levels. Low concentration of sulfur (ppm or below) is difficult to remove efficiently and cost-effectively. Therefore, knowing the exact poisoning process for state-of-the-art anode-supported SOFCs with Ni-YSZ cermet anodes, understanding the detailed anode poisoning mechanism, and developing new sulfur-tolerant anodes are essential to the promotion of SOFCs that run on hydrocarbon fuels. The effect of cell operating conditions (including temperature, H{sub 2}S concentration, cell voltage/current density, etc.) on sulfur poisoning and recovery of nickel-based anode in SOFCs was investigated. It was found that sulfur poisoning is more severe at lower temperature, higher H{sub 2}S concentration or lower cell current density (higher cell voltage). In-situ Raman spectroscopy identified the nickel sulfide formation process on the surface of a Ni-YSZ electrode and the corresponding morphology change as the sample was cooled in H{sub 2}S-containing fuel. Quantum chemical calculations predicted a new S-Ni phase diagram with a region of sulfur adsorption on Ni surfaces, corresponding to sulfur poisoning of Ni-YSZ anodes under typical SOFC operating conditions. Further, quantum chemical calculations were used to predict the adsorption energy and bond length for sulfur and hydrogen atoms on various metal surfaces. Surface modification of Ni-YSZ anode by thin Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5} coating was utilized to enhance the sulfur tolerance. A multi-cell testing system was designed and constructed which is capable of simultaneously performing electrochemical tests of 12 button cells in fuels with four different concentrations of H{sub 2}S. Through systematical study of state-of-the-art anode-supported SOFC button cells, it is seen that the long-term sulfur poisoning behavior of those cells indicate that there might be a second-stage slower degradation due to sulfur poisoning, which would last for a thousand hour or even longer. However, when using G-18 sealant from PNNL, the 2nd stage poisoning was effectively prohibited.

  12. 40 CFR 50.4 - National primary ambient air quality standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). 50.4 Section 50.4 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....4 National primary ambient air quality standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). Link to an... to or greater than 0.005 ppm shall be rounded up). (c) Sulfur oxides shall be measured in the...

  13. 40 CFR 50.5 - National secondary ambient air quality standard for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... standard for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). 50.5 Section 50.5 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....5 National secondary ambient air quality standard for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). (a) The level... than 0.05 ppm shall be rounded up). (b) Sulfur oxides shall be measured in the ambient air as...

  14. 40 CFR 50.17 - National primary ambient air quality standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). 50.17 Section 50.17 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....17 National primary ambient air quality standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). (a) The level of the national primary 1-hour annual ambient air quality standard for oxides of sulfur is 75...

  15. 40 CFR 50.5 - National secondary ambient air quality standard for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... standard for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). 50.5 Section 50.5 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....5 National secondary ambient air quality standard for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). (a) The level... than 0.05 ppm shall be rounded up). (b) Sulfur oxides shall be measured in the ambient air as...

  16. 40 CFR 50.17 - National primary ambient air quality standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). 50.17 Section 50.17 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....17 National primary ambient air quality standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). (a) The level of the national primary 1-hour annual ambient air quality standard for oxides of sulfur is 75...

  17. 40 CFR 50.5 - National secondary ambient air quality standard for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... standard for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). 50.5 Section 50.5 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....5 National secondary ambient air quality standard for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). (a) The level... than 0.05 ppm shall be rounded up). (b) Sulfur oxides shall be measured in the ambient air as...

  18. 40 CFR 50.17 - National primary ambient air quality standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). 50.17 Section 50.17 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....17 National primary ambient air quality standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). (a) The level of the national primary 1-hour annual ambient air quality standard for oxides of sulfur is 75...

  19. 40 CFR 50.17 - National primary ambient air quality standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). 50.17 Section 50.17 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....17 National primary ambient air quality standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). (a) The level of the national primary 1-hour annual ambient air quality standard for oxides of sulfur is 75...

  20. 40 CFR 50.5 - National secondary ambient air quality standard for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... standard for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). 50.5 Section 50.5 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....5 National secondary ambient air quality standard for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). (a) The level... than 0.05 ppm shall be rounded up). (b) Sulfur oxides shall be measured in the ambient air as...

  1. 40 CFR 50.5 - National secondary ambient air quality standard for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... standard for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). 50.5 Section 50.5 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....5 National secondary ambient air quality standard for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). (a) The level... than 0.05 ppm shall be rounded up). (b) Sulfur oxides shall be measured in the ambient air as...

  2. 40 CFR 50.17 - National primary ambient air quality standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). 50.17 Section 50.17 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....17 National primary ambient air quality standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). (a) The level of the national primary 1-hour annual ambient air quality standard for oxides of sulfur is 75...

  3. Graphene-sulfur nanocomposites for rechargeable lithium-sulfur battery electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Jun; Lemmon, John P; Yang, Zhenguo; Cao, Yuiliang; Li, Xiaolin

    2014-06-17

    Rechargeable lithium-sulfur batteries having a cathode that includes a graphene-sulfur nanocomposite can exhibit improved characteristics. The graphene-sulfur nanocomposite can be characterized by graphene sheets with particles of sulfur adsorbed to the graphene sheets. The sulfur particles have an average diameter less than 50 nm..

  4. PILOT PLANT STUDY OF CONVERSION OF COAL TO LOW SULFUR FUEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a program to develop, on bench and pilot scales, operating conditions for the key step in the IGT process to desulfurize coal by thermal and chemical treatment. This process, to date, uses the 'sulfur-getter' concept. (A sulfur-getter is a material tha...

  5. SiO2-coated sulfur particles with mildly reduced graphene oxide as a cathode material for lithium-sulfur batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Brennan; Bell, Jeffrey; Hosseini Bay, Hamed; Favors, Zachary; Ionescu, Robert; Ozkan, Cengiz S.; Ozkan, Mihrimah

    2015-04-01

    For the first time, SiO2-coated sulfur particles (SCSPs) were fabricated via a facile two-step wet chemical process for application as a novel lithium-sulfur cathode material. With the addition of mildly reduced graphene oxide (mrGO), SCSPs demonstrate even greater cycling stability, maintaining over 700 mA h g-1 after the 50th cycle.

  6. Advanced Byproduct Recovery: Direct Catalytic Reduction of Sulfur Dioxide to Elemental Sulfur.

    SciTech Connect

    1997-06-01

    More than 170 wet scrubber systems applied, to 72,000 MW of U.S., coal-fired, utility boilers are in operation or under construction. In these systems, the sulfur dioxide removed from the boiler flue gas is permanently bound to a sorbent material, such as lime or limestone. The sulfated sorbent must be disposed of as a waste product or, in some cases, sold as a byproduct (e.g. gypsum). Due to the abundance and low cost of naturally occurring gypsum, and the costs associated with producing an industrial quality product, less than 7% of these scrubbers are configured to produce usable gypsum (and only 1% of all units actually sell the byproduct). The disposal of solid waste from each of these scrubbers requires a landfill area of approximately 200 to 400 acres. In the U.S., a total of 19 million tons of disposable FGD byproduct are produced, transported and disposed of in landfills annually. The use of regenerable sorbent technologies has the potential to reduce or eliminate solid waste production, transportation and disposal. In a regenerable sorbent system, the sulfur dioxide in the boiler flue gas is removed by the sorbent in an adsorber. The S0{sub 2}s subsequently released, in higher concentration, in a regenerator. All regenerable systems produce an off-gas stream from the regenerator that must be processed further in order to obtain a salable byproduct, such as elemental sulfur, sulfuric acid or liquid S0{sub 2}.

  7. Coal Liquefaction desulfurization process

    DOEpatents

    Givens, Edwin N.

    1983-01-01

    In a solvent refined coal liquefaction process, more effective desulfurization of the high boiling point components is effected by first stripping the solvent-coal reacted slurry of lower boiling point components, particularly including hydrogen sulfide and low molecular weight sulfur compounds, and then reacting the slurry with a solid sulfur getter material, such as iron. The sulfur getter compound, with reacted sulfur included, is then removed with other solids in the slurry.

  8. Kamacite Sulfurization in the Solar Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauretta, D. S.; Lodders, K.; Fegley, B., Jr.

    1998-07-01

    The kinetics and mechanisms of kamacite sulfurization were studied experimentally at temperatures and H2S/H2 ratios relevant to the solar nebula. Pieces of the Canyon Diablo meteorite were heated at 558 K, 613 K, and 643 K in 50 ppmv H2S-H2 gas mixtures for up to one month. Optical microscopy and X-ray diffraction analyses show that the morphology and crystal orientation of the resulting sulfide layers vary with both time and temperature. Electron microprobe analyses reveal three distinct phases in the reaction products: monosulfide solid solution (mss), (Fe,Ni,Co)1-xS, pentlandite (Fe,Ni,Co)9-xS8, and a P-rich phase. The bulk composition of the remnant metal was not significantly changed by sulfurization. Kamacite sulfurization at 558 K followed parabolic kinetics for the entire duration of the experiments. Sulfide layers that formed at 613 K grew linearly with time while those that formed at 643 K initially grew linearly with time then switched to parabolic kinetics upon reaching a critical thickness. The experimental results suggest that a variety of thermodynamic, kinetic, and physical processes control the final composition and morphology of the sulfide layers. We combine morphological, X-ray diffraction, electron microprobe, and kinetic data to produce a comprehensive model of sulfide formation in the solar nebula. We then present a set of criteria to assist in the identification of solar nebula condensate sulfides in primitive meteorites.

  9. Microbial desulfurization of organic sulfur in coal

    SciTech Connect

    Klubek, B.; Ochman, M.; Clark, D.

    1985-05-01

    Microbial desulfurization of coal before combustion has lower operating costs and is more energy efficient than high-temperature chemical processes. At present, both Thiobacillus and Sulfolobus have been shown capable of converting the inorganic sulfur in coal into a soluble sulfate, which can be washed out. This paper discusses research to developing bacteria able to degrade organic sulfur components. Three groups of organosulfur decomposers have been isolated. The first group isolates is capable of a partial degradation of dibenzothiophene to 3-hydroxy-2-formyl-benzothiophene, but sulfur is not liberated from this compound. The second group is capable of decomposing thiophene acetic acid and produces small amounts of H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/. The third group degrades thiophene carboxylic acid but produces large amounts of H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/. The third group degrades thiophene carboxylic acid but produces large amounts of H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/. Research on the use of Escherichia coli is also discussed.

  10. Sulfur Dioxide variability in the Venus Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandaele, Ann C.; Esposito, Larry W.; Lefevre, Franck; Mills, Franklin; Limaye, Sanjay; Mahieux, Arnaud; Belyaev, Denis; Encrenaz, Therese; Marcq, Emmanuel; Korablev, Oleg; Parkinson, Christopher; Wilson, Colin; Wilquet, Valérie; Chamberlain, Sarah; Jessup, Kandis Lea; Stolzenbach, Aurelien

    The recent observations of SO _{2} by SOIR and SPICAV-UV on board Venus Express and ground-based observations of SO _{2} and SO have provoked much reaction in the scientific community. SO _{2} is strongly related to the formation of the clouds and haze on Venus, which are composed of sulfuric acid combined to water complexes. Presence and variations of SO _{2} could be the proof of a possible volcanism on Venus. The most intriguing are discrepancies among different observations, and the suspected long-term variations of the SO _{2} abundance observed on the scales of several years, in particular during Pioneer Venus Orbiter and Venus Express missions. Similar trends are also observed in the super-rotation period and circulation patterns, which suggest that these aspects may be more strongly coupled than expected. An ISSI international team has been built in view of considering different aspects of sulfur chemistry on Venus. This includes comparison and validation of observations, from past missions, from Venus Express, from the Earth, and from Hubble Space Telescope, modeling of photochemistry and of other processes in which the sulfur family is involved. We will consider not only SO _{2}, but also SO and other constituents involved in its cycle. Reference density and vmr fields will be constructed from the detailed analysis and comparison of data. These will be included into the next generation of the VIRA references atmosphere.

  11. Production of elemental sulfur from H{sub 2}S and CO{sub 2} derived from a coal desulfurization process. Quarterly technical process report, December 1, 1993--March 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, L.; Jiang, X.; Khang, S.J.

    1994-05-01

    During the second quarter of the project, an experimental apparatus was setup for catalyst screening studies. Sulfided Co-Mo-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst was prepared and a thermodynamic study for the reaction of H{sub 2}S and CO{sub 2} was performed. A packed bed reactor made of quartz tube was setup for catalyst screening studies. This reactor was also used for the H{sub 2} reduction of catalyst. Temperature profile in the reactor was measured and results indicated that in the middle of the reactor (5 to 6 inches in length) the temperature profile may be regarded as isothermal. Sulfided Co-Mo catalyst was prepared by first reducing (using H{sub 2}) and sulfiding (using H{sub 2}S) a commercially available CoO-MoO{sub 3}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst. Thermodynamic analysis for the reaction of H{sub 2}S and CO{sub 2} was performed by using the JANAF thermochemic table and the STANJAN method. The results indicated that the following reaction mechanism might be suitable for the reaction of H{sub 2}S and CO{sub 2} to produce elemental sulfur and methane: (1) 2H{sub 2}S = 2H{sub 2}+S{sub 2}, (2) CO{sub 2}+H{sub 2}=CO+H{sub 2}O, (3) CO{sub 2}+4H{sub 2}=CH{sub 4}+2H{sub 2}O, and (4) CO+3H{sub 2}=CH{sub 4}+2H{sub 2}O.

  12. High pressure-low pressure steam system for extended Claus sulfur recovery plant

    SciTech Connect

    Pendergraft, P.T.

    1991-05-14

    This patent describes an improvement in an extended Claus process having at least first, second and third Claus catalytic reactors providing process gas respectively to first, second and third sulfur condensers, the first, second, and third condensers being connected to a steam delivery system. The improvement comprises: producing first pressure steam by directing process gas effective for producing steam at the first pressure from first, second and third catalytic reactors to first, second and third sulfur condensers respectively; producing second pressure steam by directing process gas periodically from one of the first, second and third sulfur condensers to a fourth sulfur condenser; providing cooled process gas from the fourth sulfur condenser to a final position Claus catalytic reactor operated under effective cold bed adsorption conditions.

  13. Transition metal-mediated desulfurization of aromatic sulfur compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Eisch, J.J.; Im, K.R.; Hallenbeck, L.E.

    1980-03-01

    The presence of organic sulfur in various coals and crude petroleum stocks constitutes a serious problem in producing environmentally acceptable fuels. Accordingly, a worthy objective of fuel research would be to discover energy-efficient ways of cleaving organic sulfur bonds in coal, petroleum or ther derived liquids, so as to minimize atmospheric pollution caused by organic sulfide or mercaptan contaminants in fuels. Since existing desulfurization procedures generally require elevated temperatures, high pressures of hydrogen and the use of heterogeneous catalysts, a search has been launched for desulfurization processes effective under milder conditions, namely those involving homogeneous transition-metal agents. In order to learn more about the fundamental chemistry of carbon-sulfur bond cleavages by transition metals, we have chosen as substrates those aromatic sulfur compounds that are typical of the stable organic sulfur constituents found in coal tar or petroleum stocks, namely dibenzothiophene (Ia), phenoxathiin (Ib), phenothiazine (Ic) and thianthrene (Id), as well as various open-chain sulfides (Ar-S-Ar) and mercaptans (ArSH). Although some soluble nickel (O) complexes, such as bis (1,5-cyclooctadiene) nickel (O), are unreactive in desulfurization, a change of the ligands about nickel causes a striking rise in reactivity. With the aromatic sulfur heterocycles (Ib-Id), either desulfurization with ring contraction or hydrodesulfurization could be achieved, depending on the reaction conditions (1,2). Recent findings on the mechanisms of these unusual desulfurizations are reported.

  14. METHOD TO PREVENT SULFUR ACCUMULATION INSIDE MEMBRANE ELECTRODE ASSEMBLY

    SciTech Connect

    Steimke, J.; Steeper, T.; Herman, D.; Colon-Mercado, H.; Elvington, M.

    2009-06-22

    HyS is conceptually the simplest of the thermochemical cycles and involves only sulfur chemistry. In the HyS Cycle hydrogen gas (H{sub 2}) is produced at the cathode of the electrochemical cell (or electrolyzer). Sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) is oxidized at the anode to form sulfuric acid (H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}) and protons (H{sup +}) as illustrated below. A separate high temperature reaction decomposes the sulfuric acid to water and sulfur dioxide which are recycled to the electrolyzers, and oxygen which is separated out as a secondary product. The electrolyzer includes a membrane that will allow hydrogen ions to pass through but block the flow of hydrogen gas. The membrane is also intended to prevent other chemical species from migrating between electrodes and undergoing undesired reactions that could poison the cathode or reduce overall process efficiency. In conventional water electrolysis, water is oxidized at the anode to produce protons and oxygen. The standard cell potential for conventional water electrolysis is 1.23 volts at 25 C. However, commercial electrolyzers typically require higher voltages ranging from 1.8 V to 2.6 V [Kirk-Othmer, 1991]. The oxidation of sulfur dioxide instead of water in the HyS electrolyzer occurs at a much lower potential. For example, the standard cell potential for sulfur dioxide oxidation at 25 C in 50 wt % sulfuric acid is 0.29 V [Westinghouse, 1980]. Since power consumption by the electrolyzers is equal to voltage times current, and current is proportional to hydrogen production, a large reduction in voltage results in a large reduction in electrical power cost per unit of hydrogen generated.

  15. Optimizing stratospheric sulfur geoengineering by seasonally changing sulfur injections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laakso, Anton; Partanen, Antti-Ilari; Kokkola, Harri; Lehtinen, Kari; Korhonen, Hannele

    2015-04-01

    Solar radiation management (SRM) by stratospheric sulfur injection has been shown to have potential in counteracting global warming if reducing of greenhouse gases has not been achieved fast enough and if climate warming will continue. Injecting large amounts of sulfate particles to the stratosphere would increase the reflectivity of the atmosphere and less sunlight would reach the surface. However, the effectivity (per injected sulphur mass unit) of this kind of geoengineering would decrease when amount of injected sulfur is increased. When sulfur concentration increases, stratospheric particles would grow to larger sizes which have larger gravitational settling velocity and which do not reflect radiation as efficiently as smaller particles. In many previous studies, sulfur has been assumed to be injected along the equator where yearly mean solar intensity is the highest and from where sulfur is spread equally to both hemispheres. However, the solar intensity will change locally during the year and sulfate has been assumed to be injected and spread to the hemisphere also during winter time, when the solar intensity is low. Thus sulfate injection could be expected to be more effective, if sulfur injection area is changed seasonally. Here we study effects of the different SRM injection scenarios by using two versions of the MPI climate models. First, aerosol spatial and temporal distributions as well as the resulting radiative properties from the SRM are defined by using the global aerosol-climate model ECHAM6.1-HAM2.2-SALSA. After that, the global and regional climate effects from different injection scenarios are predicted by using the Max Planck Institute's Earth System Model (MPI-ESM). We carried out simulations, where 8 Tg of sulfur is injected as SO2 to the stratosphere at height of 20-22 km in an area ranging over a 20 degree wide latitude band. Results show that changing the sulfur injection area seasonally would lead to similar global mean shortwave radiative forcing (-4.41 W/m2 at top of atmosphere) as if sulfur is injected only to the equator (-4.40 W/m2). However zonal mean distribution would be different and forcing is concentrated relatively more to the midlatitudes and less to the equator. Cooling effect from the geoengineering and warming effect from the increased greenhouse gas has been shown in many studies to lead to cooling in the equator and warming in the poles compared the preindustrial conditions. Changing the injection area seasonally might prevent this from happening and lead globally to more homogeneous temperature change.

  16. Low temperature Claus process with water removal

    SciTech Connect

    Palm, J.W.

    1984-01-17

    Claus process sulfur recovery can be improved by performing a Claus conversion under low temperature and low water concentration conditions. The process treats a feed stream containing sulfur compounds by converting all sulfur compounds in the stream to a single sulfur species, reducing water content to low water concentrations, creation of a Claus reaction mixture, and then low temperature catalytic conversion to sulfur and water.

  17. Inhibition of lignifying processes by sulfur dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Pfanz, H.; Oppmann, B.

    1991-05-01

    Intercellular washing fluids (IWF) from spruce needles (Picea abies L. Karst.) contain peroxidases 1-2% of total IWF protein. These apoplastic enzymes show the ability to polymerize monophenols or phenylpropanes to form lignin precursors in vitro. In the presence of potentially acidic air pollutants like NO{sub 2}, HF(20 mM of salts in solution), and in the presence of Pb-, Cd- (0.5 mM) or Al-salts (8 mM) no inhibitory effect on the polymerization reactions examined was detectable. In contrast, the anions of SO{sub 2} (sulfite and bisulfite) revealed a strong inhibition on the dimerization of ferulic and caffeic acid (Ki ca. 1 mM), and on the dehydration of syringaldazine (Ki ca. 8 {mu}M). Polymerization of coniferyl alcohol, on the other hand, seemed to be enhanced. Maier-Maercker and Koch (1986) demonstrated that the cell walls of guard cells from undamaged spruce needles are properly lignified, whereas those of damaged needles seem to be affected. It is therefore assumed that cell wall lignification, and concomitantly stomatal regulation of coniferous needles are disturbed in regions with high atmospheric SO{sub 2} pollution (e.g. Ore Mountains in CSFR).

  18. ENGINEERING EVALUATION OF HOT-GAS DESULFURIZATION WITH SULFUR RECOVERY

    SciTech Connect

    G.W. ROBERTS; J.W. PORTZER; S.C. KOZUP; S.K. GANGWAL

    1998-05-31

    Engineering evaluations and economic comparisons of two hot-gas desulfurization (HGD) processes with elemental sulfur recovery, being developed by Research Triangle Institute, are presented. In the first process, known as the Direct Sulfur Recovery Process (DSRP), the SO{sub 2} tail gas from air regeneration of zinc-based HGD sorbent is catalytically reduced to elemental sulfur with high selectivity using a small slipstream of coal gas. DSRP is a highly efficient first-generation process, promising sulfur recoveries as high as 99% in a single reaction stage. In the second process, known as the Advanced Hot Gas Process (AHGP), the zinc-based HGD sorbent is modified with iron so that the iron portion of the sorbent can be regenerated using SO{sub 2} . This is followed by air regeneration to fully regenerate the sorbent and provide the required SO{sub 2} for iron regeneration. This second-generation process uses less coal gas than DSRP. Commercial embodiments of both processes were developed. Process simulations with mass and energy balances were conducted using ASPEN Plus. Results show that AHGP is a more complex process to operate and may require more labor cost than the DSRP. Also capital costs for the AHGP are higher than those for the DSRP. However, annual operating costs for the AHGP appear to be considerably less than those for the DSRP with a potential break-even point between the two processes after just 2 years of operation for an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plant using 3 to 5 wt% sulfur coal. Thus, despite its complexity, the potential savings with the AHGP encourage further development and scaleup of this advanced process.

  19. RECOVERY OF CALCIUM CARBONATE AND SULFUR FROM FGD SCRUBBER WASTE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a demonstration of key process steps in the proprietary Kel-S process for recovering calcium carbonate and sulfur from lime/limestone flue gas desulfurization (FGD) scrubber waste. The steps are: reduction of the waste to calcium sulfide (using coal as...

  20. Abundances of sulfur, chlorine, and trace elements in Illinois Basin coals, USA

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, C.L.

    1997-12-31

    Abundances of sulfur, chlorine and 52 trace elements in 220 channel and drill-core samples of high volatile bituminous coals (Pennsylvanian age) from the Illinois Basin, USA, are evaluated for the purpose of better understanding geologic processes affecting trace element variation in the coal seams. Mean elemental abundances in Illinois Basin coals are listed in a table. Most Illinois Basin coals are high-sulfur (> 3% total sulfur). Peat was influenced by seawater during early diagenesis. However, low-medium sulfur coal (<3% total sulfur) occurs in restricted areas along the Walshville Channel, which is a contemporaneous river in the peat swamp. A comparison of trace element abundances between high-sulfur and low-medium sulfur coals showed that only seven elements (boron, sulfur, iron, molybdenum, mercury, thallium, and uranium) are clearly more abundant in high-sulfur coal than in low-medium sulfur coal. Apparently, boron, sulfur, molybdenum, and uranium in high-sulfur coals were derived from seawater that inundated the peat swamp and terminated peat accumulation. Iron, mercury, and thallium had a terrestrial source and were incorporated in pyrite during diagenesis. Their enrichment in high-sulfur coal is related to pyrite formation in a reducing environment. The chlorine content in Illinois Basin coals, including channel and drill core samples, varies from 0.01% to 0.8% (on a dry basis). Coal samples from surface mines (< 50 meter depth) are usually low in chlorine content (<0.1%). Samples from underground mines (> 50 meter depth) have a chlorine content ranging between 0.1% to 0.5%. Variation of chlorine content in each of the two coal seams shows that chlorine content increases with depth because the chloride in coal is in equilibrium with the chloride in the groundwater, which is also depth dependent. A low chlorine content in shallow regions of a coal seam is a result of leaching by fresh groundwater.

  1. Hydrogen and sulfur recovery from hydrogen sulfide wastes

    DOEpatents

    Harkness, J.B.L.; Gorski, A.J.; Daniels, E.J.

    1993-05-18

    A process is described for generating hydrogen and elemental sulfur from hydrogen sulfide waste in which the hydrogen sulfide is [dis]associated under plasma conditions and a portion of the hydrogen output is used in a catalytic reduction unit to convert sulfur-containing impurities to hydrogen sulfide for recycle, the process also including the addition of an ionizing gas such as argon to initiate the plasma reaction at lower energy, a preheater for the input to the reactor and an internal adjustable choke in the reactor for enhanced coupling with the microwave energy input.

  2. Hydrogen and sulfur recovery from hydrogen sulfide wastes

    DOEpatents

    Harkness, John B. L.; Gorski, Anthony J.; Daniels, Edward J.

    1993-01-01

    A process for generating hydrogen and elemental sulfur from hydrogen sulfide waste in which the hydrogen sulfide is associated under plasma conditions and a portion of the hydrogen output is used in a catalytic reduction unit to convert sulfur-containing impurities to hydrogen sulfide for recycle, the process also including the addition of an ionizing gas such as argon to initiate the plasma reaction at lower energy, a preheater for the input to the reactor and an internal adjustable choke in the reactor for enhanced coupling with the microwave energy input.

  3. Sulfur-doped ordered mesoporous carbons: A stability-improving sulfur host for lithium-sulfur battery cathodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nitze, Florian; Fossum, Kjell; Xiong, Shizhao; Matic, Aleksandar; Palmqvist, Anders E. C.

    2016-06-01

    We report on sulfur-functionalized ordered mesoporous carbons aimed for lithium-sulfur battery electrode applications with improved charge capacity retention. The carbons were obtained by a hard-template strategy using a mixture of furfuryl alcohol and furfuryl mercaptan. For the application as electrode material in lithium-sulfur batteries, the carbons were additionally loaded with sulfur following a traditional melt-diffusion approach. It was found that the sulfur interacts stronger with the sulfur-functionalized carbon matrix than with the non-functionalized material. Electrodes showed very high capacity in the second discharge-charge cycle amounting to approximately 1500, 1200 and 1400 mAh/g (sulfur) for carbon materials with no, medium and high degrees of sulfur functionalization, respectively. More importantly, the sulfur-functionalization of the carbon was found to increase the capacity retention after 50 discharge-charge cycles by 8 and 5% for the carbons with medium and high degrees of sulfur-functionalization, respectively, compared to carbon with no sulfur-functionalization. We attribute this significant improvement to the presence of covalently bound sulfur groups at the internal surface of the functionalized carbon providing efficient anchoring sites for catenation to the sulfur loaded into the pores of the carbons and provide experimental support for this in the form of results from cyclic voltammetry and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.

  4. Hydration of pure and base-Containing sulfuric acid clusters studied by computational chemistry methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henschel, Henning; Ortega, Ismael K.; Kupiainen, Oona; Olenius, Tinja; Kurtén, Theo; Vehkamäki, Hanna

    2013-05-01

    The formation of hydrates of small molecular sulfuric acid clusters and cluster containing both sulfuric acid and base (ammonia or dimethylamine) has been studied by means of computational chemistry. Using a combined ab initio/density functional approach, formation energies of clusters with up to four sulfuric acid molecules, and up to two base molecules, have been calculated. Consequences for the hydration level of the corresponding clusters have been modelled. While the majority of pure sulfuric acid cluster are comparatively strongly hydrated, base containing cluster were found to be less hydrophilic. Dimethylamine is particularly effective in lowering the hydrophilicity of the cluster. Implications of the hydration profiles on atmospheric processes are discussed.

  5. Biotic and abiotic carbon to sulfur bond cleavage. Technical report, July 1, 1991--September 30, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Frost, J.W.

    1991-12-31

    Cleavage of aliphatic organosulfonate carbon to sulfur (C-S) bonds, a critical link in the global biogeochemical sulfur cycle, has been identified in Escherichia coli K-12. Enormous quantities of inorganic sulfate are continuously converted (Scheme I) into methanesulfonic acid 1 and acylated 3-(6-sulfo-{alpha}-D-quinovopyranosyl)-L-glycerol 2. Biocatalytic desulfurization (Scheme I) of 1 and 2, which share the structural feature of an aliphatic carbon bonded to a sulfonic acid sulfur, completes the cycle, Discovery of this desulfurization in E. coli provides an invaluable paradigm for study of a biotic process which, via the biogeochemical cycle, significantly influences the atmospheric concentration of sulfur-containing molecules.

  6. Sulfur dioxide removal from gas streams

    SciTech Connect

    Urban, P.; Ginger, E.A.

    1986-11-11

    A process is described for removal of sulfur dioxide pollutant gas from gas stream which comprises contacting the gas stream with pretreated shale in the form of an aqueous solution of aluminum sulfate including from about 0.1 to about 2.0% by weight of the pretreated shale. The pretreatment of the shale comprises the heating of the shale in the presence of a gas unable to support combustion at a temperature in a range of from about 340/sup 0/C. to about 480/sup 0/C.

  7. Microbial stabilization of sulfur-laden sorbents. Technical report, December 1, 1992--February 29, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, K.W.; Banerjee, D.

    1993-05-01

    Clean coal technologies that involve limestone for in situ sulfur capture generate lime/limestone products laden with sulfur at various oxidation states. If sulfur is completely stabilized as sulfate, the spent sorbent is ready for commercial utilization as gypsum. However, the presence of reduced sulfur species requires additional processing. Thermal oxidation of reduced sulfur frequently results in undesirable release of SO{sub 2}. Microbial oxidation may provide an inexpensive and effective alternative. Sorbents laden with reduced forms of sulfur such as sulfide or sulfite can serve as growth substrates for sulfur-oxidizing bacteria, which convert all sulfur to sulfate. The goals of this project are to optimize conditions for sulfate generation from sulfide and sulfite on prepared lime/limestone mixtures; to test and optimize the effectiveness of microbial processing on spent sorbents from coal gasification, in-duct sorbent injection, and fluidized bed combustion; and to search for hyperalkalinophilic thiobacilli, which would be effective up to pH 11. We report here progress toward controlling the pH of culture media, and determining the highest pH at which several environmental isolates and named strains could initiate sulfur oxidation.

  8. Volcanogenic Sulfur on Earth and Io: Composition and Spectroscopy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kargel, J.S.; Delmelle, P.; Nash, D.B.

    1999-01-01

    The causes of Io's variegated surface, especially the roles of sulfur, and the geochemical history of sulfur compounds on Io are not well understood. Suspecting that minor impurities in sulfur might be important, we have investigated the major and trace element chemistry and spectroscopic reflectance of natural sulfur from a variety of terrestrial volcanic-hydrothermal environments. Evidence suggests that Io may be substantially coated with impure sulfur. On Earth, a few tenths of a percent to a few percent of chalcophile trace elements (e.g., As and Se) comonly occur in sulfur and appear to stabilize material of yellow, brown, orange, and red hues, which may persist even at low temperatures. Percentage levels of chalcophile impurities are reasonably expected to occur on Io in vapor sublimate deposits and flows derived from such deposits. Such impurities join a host of other mechanisms that might explain Io's reds and yellows. Two-tenths to two percent opaque crystalline impurities, particularly pyrite (FeS2), commonly produces green, gray, and black volcanic sulfur on Earth and might explain areas of Io having deposits of these colors. Pyrite produces a broad absorption near 1 ??m that gradually diminishes out to 1.6 ??m - similar but not identical to the spectrum of Io seen in Galileo NIMS data. Percentage amounts of carbonaceous impurities and tens of percent SiO2 (as silicates) also strongly affect the spectral properties of Earth's sulfur. Io's broad absorption between 0.52 and 0.64 ??m remains unexplained by these data but could be due to sodium sulfides, as suggested previously by others, or to As, Se, or other impurities. These impurities and others, such as P and Cl (which could exist on Io's surface in amounts over 1% that of sulfur), greatly alter the molecular structure of molten and solid sulfur. Minor impurities could impact Io's geology, such as the morphology of sulfur lava flows and the ability of sulfur to sustain high relief. We have not found any natural sulfur containing significant Na beyond that attributable to silicate inclusions. In sum, the unique physical-chemical properties of S-rich systems and the strong affinity of certain elements for S may have broad implications for the appearance, spectroscopic interpretation, and geologic processes of Io. Identification of impurities in sulfur may be helpful in tracing the geochemical evolution of surface deposits on Io. Perhaps foretelling of new areas of investigation, Cl has recently been reported in the Io torus (M. Kueppers and N. M. Schneider 1999, Eos Trans.80, 5207), suggesting the presence on Io of either salts, such as halite, or sulfur chlorides. Further evidence of minor iogenic impurities should be sought in Io's neutral cloud and plasma torus as well as in further scrutiny of Io's reflectance spectra. ?? 1999 Academic Press.

  9. ADVANCED SULFUR CONTROL CONCEPTS FOR HOT-GAS DESULFURIZATION TECHNOLOGY

    SciTech Connect

    A. LOPEZ ORTIZ; D.P. HARRISON; F.R. GROVES; J.D. WHITE; S. ZHANG; W.-N. HUANG; Y. ZENG

    1998-10-31

    This research project examined the feasibility of a second generation high-temperature coal gas desulfurization process in which elemental sulfur is produced directly during the sorbent regeneration phase. Two concepts were evaluated experimentally. In the first, FeS was regenerated in a H2O-O2 mixture. Large fractions of the sulfur were liberated in elemental form when the H2O-O2 ratio was large. However, the mole percent of elemental sulfur in the product was always quite small (<<1%) and a process based on this concept was judged to be impractical because of the low temperature and high energy requirements associated with condensing the sulfur. The second concept involved desulfurization using CeO2 and regeneration of the sulfided sorbent, Ce2O2S, using SO2 to produce elemental sulfur directly. No significant side reactions were observed and the reaction was found to be quite rapid over the temperature range of 500°C to 700°C. Elemental sulfur concentrations (as S2) as large as 20 mol% were produced. Limitations associated with the cerium sorbent process are concentrated in the desulfurization phase. High temperature and highly reducing coal gas such as produced in the Shell gasification process are required if high sulfur removal efficiencies are to be achieved. For example, the equilibrium H2S concentration at 800°C from a Shell gas in contact with CeO2 is about 300 ppmv, well above the allowable IGCC specification. In this case, a two-stage desulfurization process using CeO2 for bulk H2S removal following by a zinc sorbent polishing step would be required. Under appropriate conditions, however, CeO2 can be reduced to non-stoichiometric CeOn (n<2) which has significantly greater affinity for H2S. Pre-breakthrough H2S concentrations in the range of 1 ppmv to 5 ppmv were measured in sulfidation tests using CeOn at 700°C in highly reducing gases, as measured by equilibrium O2 concentration, comparable to the Shell gas. Good sorbent durability was indicated in a twenty-five-cycle test. The sorbent was exposed for 58 consecutive days to temperatures between 600°C and 800°C and gas atmospheres from highly reducing to highly oxidizing without measurable loss of sulfur capacity or reactivity. In the process analysis phase of this study, a two-stage desulfurization process using cerium sorbent with SO2 regeneration followed by zinc sorbent with dilute O2 regeneration was compared to a single-stage process using zinc sorbent and O2 regeneration with SO2 in the regeneration product gas converted to elemental sulfur using the direct sulfur recovery process (DSRP). Material and energy balances were calculated using the process simulation package PRO/II. Major process equipment was sized and a preliminary economic analysis completed. Sorbent replacement rate, which is determined by the multicycle sorbent durability, was found to be the most significant factor in both processes. For large replacement rates corresponding to average sorbent lifetimes of 250 cycles or less, the single-stage zinc sorbent process with DSRP was estimated to be less costly. However, the cost of the two-stage cerium sorbent process was more sensitive to sorbent replacement rate, and, as the required replacement rate decreased, the economics of the two-stage process improved. For small sorbent replacement rates corresponding to average sorbent lifetimes of 1000 cycles or more, the two-stage cerium process was estimated to be less costly. In the relatively wide middle range of sorbent replacement rates, the relative economics of the two processes depends on other factors such as the unit cost of sorbents, oxygen, nitrogen, and the relative capital costs.

  10. Sulfur Chemistry in the Early and Present Atmosphere of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, Joel S.; Summers, M. E.

    2011-01-01

    Atmospheric sulfur species resulting from volcanic emissions impact the composition and chemistry of the atmosphere, impact the climate, and hence, the habitability of Mars and impact the mineralogy and composition of the surface of Mars. The geochemical/ photochemical cycling of sulfur species between the interior (via volcanism), the atmosphere (atmospheric photochemical and chemical processes) and the deposition of sulfuric acid on the surface of Mars is an important, but as yet poorly understood geochemical/ photochemical cycle on Mars. There is no observational evidence to indicate that Mars is volcanically active at the present time, however, there is strong evidence that volcanism was an important and widespread process on early Mars. The chemistry and photochemistry of sulfur species in the early and present atmosphere of Mars will be assessed using a one-dimensional photochemical model. Since it is generally assumed that the atmosphere of early Mars was significantly denser than the present 6-millibar atmosphere, photochemical calculations were performed for the present atmosphere and for the atmosphere of early Mars with assumed surface pressures of 60 and 350-millibars, where higher surface pressure resulted from enhanced atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO2). The following sections include the results of earlier modeling studies, a summary of the one-dimensional photochemical model used in this study, a summary of the photochemistry and chemistry of sulfur species in the atmosphere of Mars and some of the results of the calculations.

  11. Genetic engineering of sulfur-degrading Sulfolobus

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, N.W.Y. . Lab. of Renewable Resources Engineering)

    1991-01-01

    An effective microbial process would be economical for the removal or organic sulfur and the finely dispersed inorganic sulfur in coal, particularly the former. However, some microoganisms may have the enzymes to degrade organic sulfur but themselves are not suitable to be cultured under the conditions best for coal desulfurization. On the other hand, some microorganisms can grow very well under the conditions most suitable for coal desulfurization but do not contain the enzymes most suitable for coal desulfurization. We believe that we can adopt a new approach to solve this problem. In this approach, a microorganism that can grow vigorously under the conditions most suitable for coal desulfurization will be chosen as the host for actively carrying out the desulfurization process. An effective gene cloning system is expected to be established for the chosen species so that heterologous and homologous genes encoding most of the effective enzymes for coal desulfurization can be cloned on the highly copy-number plasmid or plasmid-like molecules. Species of Sulfolobus are microorganisms that can be actively cultured under the condition most favorable for coal desulfurization. In particular, one of the Sulfolobus species, S. shibatae B12, contains a double-stranded DNA virus which might be easily converted into a gene cloning system. The objective of this project is to develop an effective gene cloning system for some of the Sulfolobus species. During the first two quarters of this year, we have shown that gene cloning systems might be able to be established for at least two of the Sulfolobus species; S. acidocaldarius and S. shibatae B12. In this quarter, we report on: (1) The construction of potential cloning vectors for the transformation of both S. acidocaldarius and S. shibatae B12; (2) the isolation of promoters from S. Shibatae and S. acidocaldarius, which can also function as promoters in E. coli.

  12. Sulfur Isotope Fractionation During Magmatic Degassing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, K. A.; Wing, B.; Baker, D. R.

    2009-05-01

    The study of volatiles is integral to a better understanding of volcanism. Sulfur is one of the volatile constituents in volcanic eruptions, yet the full picture of sulfur behaviour prior to, and during, eruptions remains unknown. Because magma chambers are inaccessible to direct observation, the S isotopic consequences of phenomena such as degassing and diffusion may be used to indirectly constrain processes occurring in magmatic systems. In order to achieve this goal, however, laboratory calibration of S isotope fractionation during magmatic processes is needed. We experimentally studied the effects of rapid sulfur degassing from a melt of the same composition as the 122 BC plinian eruption of Mt. Etna, one of the few recorded basaltic plinian eruptions. All experiments in this study were preformed with this basaltic glass as the starting material, to which was added powdered gypsum (CaSO4 · 2H2O) to create a starting material with approximately 2000 ppm dissolved S. Experiments were performed at an average oxygen fugacity of NNO +1.2. Samples were synthesized by hydrating aliquots of basaltic glass + gypsum + 4-11 wt % H2O at 550 MPa and 1225oC for two hours. These samples were either isobarically quenched to room temperature to provide starting material for degassing experiments at 1 bar, or degassed by lowering the pressure at isothermal conditions. Degassing experiments at 1 bar involved heating the quenched glass to 1200oC, allowing the formation of bubbles and gas loss from the melt. We measured the S contents of the resulting twenty-three experimental run products by electron microprobe analysis in order to quantify sulfur loss during degassing (fraction lost = 1 -S(ppm)final/S(ppm)initial). Estimates of S loss were used in a simple model of open-system Rayleigh isotopic fractionation under equilibrium conditions to predict the S isotopic composition of each degassed experimental glass. In this presentation we will compare these predictions to the measured S isotopic compositions of the experimental run products, and discuss our results in terms of fundamental processes of degassing (e.g., nucleation, diffusion, and growth).

  13. The beauty of frost: nano-sulfur assembly via low pressure vapour deposition.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu; Chen, Lu; Scudiero, Louis; Zhong, Wei-Hong

    2015-11-14

    A low pressure vapour deposition (LPVD) technique is proposed as an environmentally friendly, cost-effective and versatile strategy for fabrication of sulfur nanomaterials. By controlling the characteristics of the deposit substrate for the LPVD, various sulfur-based nanomaterials have been obtained through a substrate-induced self-assembly process. PMID:26383233

  14. Specific gravity and API gravity of biodiesel and ultra-low sulfur diesel (ULSD) blends

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Biodiesel is an alternative fuel made from vegetable oils and animal fats. In 2006, the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency mandated a maximum sulfur content of 15 ppm in on-road diesel fuels. Processing to produce the new ultra-low sulfur petrodiesel (ULSD) alters specific gravity (SG) and othe...

  15. Reduction mechanism of sulfur in lithium-sulfur battery: From elemental sulfur to polysulfide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Dong; Zhang, Xuran; Wang, Jiankun; Qu, Deyu; Yang, Xiaoqing; Qu, Deyang

    2016-01-01

    The polysulfide ions formed during the first reduction wave of sulfur in Li-S battery were determined through both in-situ and ex-situ derivatization of polysulfides. By comparing the cyclic voltammetric results with and without the derivatization reagent (methyl triflate) as well as the in-situ and ex-situ derivatization results under potentiostatic condition, in-situ derivatization was found to be more appropriate than its ex-situ counterpart, since subsequent fast chemical reactions between the polysulfides and sulfur may occur during the timeframe of ex-situ procedures. It was found that the major polysulfide ions formed at the first reduction wave of elemental sulfur were the S4 2 - and S5 2 - species, while the widely accepted reduction products of S8 2 - and S6 2 - for the first reduction wave were in low abundance.

  16. Multiple sulfur isotope evidence for surface-derived sulfur in the Bushveld Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penniston-Dorland, Sarah C.; Mathez, Edmond A.; Wing, Boswell A.; Farquhar, James; Kinnaird, Judith A.

    2012-07-01

    The Rustenberg Layered Suite of the Bushveld Complex originated in the mantle, but is characterized by variably radiogenic strontium, neodymium, lead and osmium initial isotope ratios and more elevated δ18O values than expected from a partial melt of primitive mantle. It is not clear whether Bushveld magmas assimilated material from the crust, or whether they were instead generated from an eclogitic mantle source that contained crustal material. Here we report the Δ33S of fifteen whole-rock and sulfide separate samples from both the Main and Critical Zones of the Bushveld, including the UG2 Chromitite and the Merensky Reef. All samples have positive Δ33S values (0.11±0.02‰, 1σ) and δ34S values (2.2±0.6‰, 1σ). Non-zero Δ33S is fundamentally a surface process. Since high-temperature processes are not known to produce significant change in Δ33S, the positive Δ33S indicates that the Bushveld sulfur contains a sedimentary or surface-derived component. The homogeneity of Δ33S values for this suite of samples contrasts with the heterogeneity displayed by strontium, neodymium, lead and osmium initial isotope ratios of the Bushveld and requires that the sulfur contamination occurred prior to the emplacement of the Bushveld in the upper crust. Possible sources of contamination include lower crust and sub-continental lithospheric mantle. Limited multiple sulfur isotopic measurements of these reservoirs exist; more work needs to be done to constrain whether they contain surface-derived sulfur with non-zero Δ33S, and if they do, whether the concentrations and isotopic compositions of these reservoirs can explain the measured Δ33S of the Bushveld.

  17. Advanced byproduct recovery: Direct catalytic reduction of sulfur dioxide to elemental sulfur. Fourth quarterly technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    1997-01-01

    The team of Arthur D. Little, Tufts University and Engelhard Corporation are conducting Phase 1 of a four and a half year, two-phase effort to develop and scale-up an advanced byproduct recovery technology that is a direct, single-stage, catalytic process for converting sulfur dioxide to elemental sulfur. This catalytic process reduces SO{sub 2} over a fluorite-type oxide (such as ceria and zirconia). The catalytic activity can be significantly promoted by active transition metals, such as copper. More than 95% elemental sulfur yield, corresponding to almost complete sulfur dioxide conversion, was obtained over a Cu-Ce-O oxide catalyst as part of an on-going DOE-sponsored, University Coal Research Program. This type of mixed metal oxide catalyst has stable activity, high selectivity for sulfur production, and is resistant to water and carbon dioxide poisoning. Tests with CO and CH{sub 4} reducing gases indicate that the catalyst has the potential for flexibility with regard to the composition of the reducing gas, making it attractive for utility use. The performance of the catalyst is consistently good over a range of SO{sub 2} inlet concentration (0.1 to 10%) indicating its flexibility in treating SO{sub 2} tail gases as well as high concentration streams.

  18. Bioleaching of heavy metals from contaminated sediment by indigenous sulfur-oxidizing bacteria in an air-lift bioreactor: effects of sulfur concentration.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shen-Yi; Lin, Jih-Gaw

    2004-01-01

    The effects of sulfur concentration on the bioleaching of heavy metals from the sediment by indigenous sulfur-oxidizing bacteria were investigated in an air-lift reactor. Increasing the sulfur concentration from 0.5 to 5 g/l enhanced the rates of pH reduction, sulfate production and metal solubilization. A Michaelis-Menten type equation was used to explain the relationships between sulfur concentration, sulfate production and metal solubilization in the bioleaching process. After 8 days of bioleaching, 97-99% of Cu, 96-98% of Zn, 62-68% of Mn, 73-87% of Ni and 31-50% of Pb were solubilized from the sediment, respectively. The efficiency of metal solubilization was found to be related to the speciation of metal in the sediment. From economical consideration, the recommended sulfur dosage for the bioleaching of metals from the sediment is 3g/l. PMID:15276736

  19. Behavior of sulfur during coal pyrolysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shao, D.; Hutchinson, E.J.; Heidbrink, J.; Pan, W.-P.; Chou, C.-L.

    1994-01-01

    The behavior of sulfur in Illinois coals during pyrolysis was evaluated by thermogravimetry/ Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy (TG/FT-IR) techniques. SO2, COS, and H2S were major gaseous sulfur-containing products observed during coal pyrolysis. The release rates of the gaseous sulfur species showed several peaks within the temperature ranges, which were due to the emission of different forms of sulfur in coal. ?? 1994.

  20. Sulfur isotope systematics of basaltic lavas from Indonesia: implications for the sulfur cycle in subduction zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Hoog, J. C. M.; Taylor, B. E.; van Bergen, M. J.

    2001-07-01

    We report sulfur isotope compositions of basaltic and basaltic andesite lavas from selected volcanoes in the Indonesian arc system covering the spectrum from low-K tholeiitic to high-K calc-alkaline compositions. The results of 25 samples from seven volcanoes, which are associated with different subduction regimes, show a range in δ34S values of +2.0-+7.8‰ (VCDT) with an average of +4.7±1.4‰ (1σ). Averages and within-suite variations of two larger sets of samples from Batur and Soputan volcanoes (+4.2±1.3‰ with n=9 and +5.7±1.4‰ with n=7, respectively) are comparable to those of the entire sample set. Sulfur concentrations are low (mostly between 2 and 74 ppm, average=19 ppm) and do not show correlations with sulfur isotope composition and whole-rock chemistry, or systematic changes with time in any of the lava suites. From model calculations we infer that basaltic magmas will undergo sulfur isotope fractionation during degassing, most commonly towards lower δ34S values, but that the extent is limited at P-T conditions and oxidation states of interest. Hence, δ34S signatures of basaltic lavas will generally be within a few permil from primary magmatic values, even in cases of extensive sulfur loss. Consequently, magmas in the Indonesian arc system originate from mantle sources that are enriched in 34S relative to MORB and OIB sources and are likely to have δ34S values of about +5-+7‰. The enrichment in 34S is considered to reflect addition of slab-derived material, presumably from sediments rather than altered oceanic crust, with fluids being the most likely transport medium. Absence of correlation between δ34S values of Indonesian basalts and chemical proxies for source components or processes at the slab-wedge interface suggests that sulfur isotopes are relatively insensitive to variations in subduction setting and dynamics. This is supported by the modest range in δ34S of the Indonesian volcanoes studied despite significant variations in the nature and amount of subducted material, and by the similarity with average 34S enrichments in other oceanic arc systems.

  1. Limits to Sulfur Accumulation in Transgenic Lupin Seeds Expressing a Foreign Sulfur-Rich Protein

    PubMed Central

    Tabe, Linda M.; Droux, Michel

    2002-01-01

    The low sulfur amino acid content of legume seeds restricts their nutritive value for animals. We have investigated the limitations to the accumulation of sulfur amino acids in the storage proteins of narrow leaf lupin (Lupinus angustifolius) seeds. Variation in sulfur supply to lupin plants affected the sulfur amino acid accumulation in the mature seed. However, when sulfur was in abundant supply, it accumulated to a large extent in oxidized form, rather than reduced form, in the seeds. At all but severely limiting sulfur supply, addition of a transgenic (Tg) sink for organic sulfur resulted in an increase in seed sulfur amino acid content. We hypothesize that demand, or sink strength for organic sulfur, which is itself responsive to environmental sulfur supply, was the first limit to the methionine (Met) and cysteine (Cys) content of wild-type lupin seed protein under most growing conditions. In Tg, soil-grown seeds expressing a foreign Met- and Cys-rich protein, decreased pools of free Met, free Cys, and glutathione indicated that the rate of synthesis of sulfur amino acids in the cotyledon had become limiting. Homeostatic mechanisms similar to those mediating the responses of plants to environmental sulfur stress resulted in an adjustment of endogenous protein composition in Tg seeds, even when grown at adequate sulfur supply. Uptake of sulfur by lupin cotyledons, as indicated by total seed sulfur at maturity, responded positively to increased sulfur supply, but not to increased demand in the Tg seeds. PMID:11891268

  2. Sulfur Dioxide and Material Damage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillette, Donald G.

    1975-01-01

    This study relates sulfur dioxide levels with material damage in heavily populated or polluted areas. Estimates of loss were determined from increased maintenance and replacement costs. The data indicate a decrease in losses during the past five years probably due to decline in pollution levels established by air quality standards. (MR)

  3. SULFUR DIOXIDE SOURCES IN AK

    EPA Science Inventory

    This map shows industrial plants which emit 100 tons/year or more of sulfur dioxide (SO2) in Alaska. The SO2 sources are plotted on a background map of cities and county boundaries. Data Sources: SO2 Sites: U.S. EPA AIRS System, County Outlines: 1990 Census Tiger Line Files 1:1...

  4. Sulfur hexafluoride as a surrogate

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, P.H.; Chadbourne, J.F.

    1987-06-01

    A viable chemical surrogate for monitoring the effectiveness of hazardous waste incinerators must include high thermal stability and low toxicity among its characteristics. The relationship between sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) and hazardous constituent thermal stability for a mixture of chlorinated hydrocarbons indicates that SF6 has the potential to satisfy the basic requirements of a chemical surrogate for hazardous waste incineration.

  5. TRENDS IN RURAL SULFUR CONCENTRATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper presents an analysis of regional trends in atmospheric concentrations in sulfur dioxide (502) and particulate sulfate (50~- ) at rural monitoring sites in the Clean Air Act Status and Trends Monitoring Network (CAsTNet) from 1990 to 1999. A two-stage approach is used t...

  6. Nutrient cyling in soils: Sulfur

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sulfur (S) is an essential element required for normal plant growth, a fact that has been recognized since the nineteenth century. It is considered a secondary macronutrient, following the primary macronutrients nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P), and potassium (K), but is needed by plants at levels compa...

  7. Biochemistry of dissimilatory sulfur oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Blake, R. II.

    1992-01-01

    Our goals of this research are to define the substrate oxidation pathways, the electron transport mechanisms, and the modes of energy conservation employed during the dissimilatory oxidation of sulfur by thiobacilli. We have purified APS reductase to electrophoratic homogeneity from cell-free extracts of Thiobacillus denitrificans. Sufficient protein is available to initiate the production of polyclonal antibodies and to perform the kinetic experiments.

  8. Sulfur monochloride in organic synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konstantinova, L. S.; Rakitin, O. A.

    2014-03-01

    The data on the reactivity of sulfur monochloride published in the past 15 years have been reviewed and systematized. The review focuses on the synthesis of acyclic and heterocyclic compounds with the use of S2Cl2. The bibliography includes 154 references.

  9. Seal for sodium sulfur battery

    DOEpatents

    Topouzian, Armenag; Minck, Robert W.; Williams, William J.

    1980-01-01

    This invention is directed to a seal for a sodium sulfur battery in which the sealing is accomplished by a radial compression seal made on a ceramic component of the battery which separates an anode compartment from a cathode compartment of the battery.

  10. Commercial Alloys for Sulfuric Acid Vaporization in Thermochemical Hydrogen Cycles

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas M. Lillo; Karen M. Delezene-Briggs

    2005-10-01

    Most thermochemical cycles being considered for producing hydrogen include a processing stream in which dilute sulfuric acid is concentrated, vaporized and then decomposed over a catalyst. The sulfuric acid vaporizer is exposed to highly aggressive conditions. Liquid sulfuric acid will be present at a concentration of >96 wt% (>90 mol %) H2SO4 and temperatures exceeding 400oC [Brown, et. al, 2003]. The system will also be pressurized, 0.7-3.5 MPa, to keep the sulfuric acid in the liquid state at this temperature and acid concentration. These conditions far exceed those found in the commercial sulfuric acid generation, regeneration and handling industries. Exotic materials, e.g. ceramics, precious metals, clad materials, etc., have been proposed for this application [Wong, et. al., 2005]. However, development time, costs, reliability, safety concerns and/or certification issues plague such solutions and should be considered as relatively long-term, optimum solutions. A more cost-effective (and relatively near-term) solution would be to use commercially-available metallic alloys to demonstrate the cycle and study process variables. However, the corrosion behavior of commercial alloys in sulfuric acid is rarely characterized above the natural boiling point of concentrated sulfuric acid (~250oC at 1 atm). Therefore a screening study was undertaken to evaluate the suitability of various commercial alloys for concentration and vaporization of high-temperature sulfuric acid. Initially alloys were subjected to static corrosion tests in concentrated sulfuric acid (~95-97% H2SO4) at temperatures and exposure times up to 200oC and 480 hours, respectively. Alloys with a corrosion rate of less than 5 mm/year were then subjected to static corrosion tests at a pressure of 1.4 MPa and temperatures up to 375oC. Exposure times were shorter due to safety concerns and ranged from as short as 5 hours up to 144 hours. The materials evaluated included nickel-, iron- and cobalt-based commercial alloys. The corrosion rates in these tests are reported and how they may or may not relate to the corrosion behavior in an operating thermochemical cycle is discussed.

  11. Sulfur Isotope Effects of Dissimilatory Sulfite Reductase

    PubMed Central

    Leavitt, William D.; Bradley, Alexander S.; Santos, André A.; Pereira, Inês A. C.; Johnston, David T.

    2015-01-01

    The precise interpretation of environmental sulfur isotope records requires a quantitative understanding of the biochemical controls on sulfur isotope fractionation by the principle isotope-fractionating process within the S cycle, microbial sulfate reduction (MSR). Here we provide the only direct observation of the major (34S/32S) and minor (33S/32S, 36S/32S) sulfur isotope fractionations imparted by a central enzyme in the energy metabolism of sulfate reducers, dissimilatory sulfite reductase (DsrAB). Results from in vitro sulfite reduction experiments allow us to calculate the in vitro DsrAB isotope effect in 34S/32S (hereafter, 34εDsrAB) to be 15.3 ± 2‰, 2σ. The accompanying minor isotope effect in 33S, described as 33λDsrAB, is calculated to be 0.5150 ± 0.0012, 2σ. These observations facilitate a rigorous evaluation of the isotopic fractionation associated with the dissimilatory MSR pathway, as well as of the environmental variables that govern the overall magnitude of fractionation by natural communities of sulfate reducers. The isotope effect induced by DsrAB upon sulfite reduction is a factor of 0.3–0.6 times prior indirect estimates, which have ranged from 25 to 53‰ in 34εDsrAB. The minor isotope fractionation observed from DsrAB is consistent with a kinetic or equilibrium effect. Our in vitro constraints on the magnitude of 34εDsrAB is similar to the median value of experimental observations compiled from all known published work, where 34εr−p = 16.1‰ (r–p indicates reactant vs. product, n = 648). This value closely matches those of MSR operating at high sulfate reduction rates in both laboratory chemostat experiments (34εSO4−H2S =  17.3 ± 1.5‰, 2σ) and in modern marine sediments (34εSO4−H2S =  17.3 ± 3.8‰). Targeting the direct isotopic consequences of a specific enzymatic processes is a fundamental step toward a biochemical foundation for reinterpreting the biogeochemical and geobiological sulfur isotope records in modern and ancient environments. PMID:26733949

  12. CE IGCC Repowering plant sulfuric acid plant. Topical report, June 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Chester, A.M.

    1993-12-01

    A goal of the CE IGCC Repowering project is to demonstrate a hot gas clean-up system (HGCU), for the removal of sulfur from the product gas stream exiting the gasifier island. Combustion Engineering, Inc. (ABB CE) intends to use a HGCU developed by General Electric Environmental Services (GEESI). The original design of this system called for the installation of the HGCU, with a conventional cold gas clean-up system included as a full-load operational back-up. Each of these systems removes sulfur compounds and converts them into an acid off-gas. This report deals with the investigation of equipment to treat this off-gas, recovering these sulfur compounds as elemental sulfur, sulfuric acid or some other form. ABB CE contracted ABB Lummus Crest Inc. (ABB LCI) to perform an engineering evaluation to compare several such process options. This study concluded that the installation of a sulfuric acid plant represented the best option from both a technical and economic point of view. Based on this evaluation, ABB CE specified that a sulfuric acid plant be installed to remove sulfur from off-gas exiling the gas clean-up system. ABB LCI prepared a request for quotation (RFQ) for the construction of a sulfuric acid production plant. Monsanto Enviro-Chem Inc. presented the only proposal, and was eventually selected as the EPC contractor for this system.

  13. Microbial stabilization of sulfur-laden sorbents. Technical report, March 1, 1994--May 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, K.W.

    1994-09-01

    Clean coal technologies that involve limestone for sulfur capture generate lime/limestone products laden with sulfur at various oxidation states. If sulfur is completely stabilized as sulfate, the spent sorbent is ready for commercial utilization as gypsum. However, the presence of reduced sulfur species requires additional processing. Thermal oxidation of reduced sulfur can result in undesirable release of SO{sub 2}. Microbial oxidation might provide an inexpensive and effective alternative. Sorbents laden with reduced forms of sulfur such as sulfide, sulfite, or various polythionate species serve as growth substrates for sulfur-oxidizing bacteria, which have the potential to convert all sulfur to sulfate. This quarter work continued with the solid phase of a spent slurry from an inhibited scrubber. The material was primarily CaSO{sub 3}{center_dot}1/2H{sub 2}O. The authors did not detect growth of any bacterial strain in salts medium with the solid phase as the source of sulfur. However, unlike strains of Thiobacillus neapolitanus, the isolate TQ, was not inhibited by the solid phase. Evidence suggests that this organism grows slowly on low concentrations of sulfite.

  14. The Seasonality of Sulfur transport and deposition to a Western Pennsylvania Watershed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snow, J. A.; Livingston, J.

    2005-12-01

    Watersheds in the eastern U.S., particularly in western PA, are impacted by elevated acidity that is often attributed to acid mine drainage. However, atmospheric sources of acidity, such as sulfur deposition, may also affect watershed acidity. The Connoquenessing watershed (CW), which incorporates the major metropolitan area of Pittsburgh and surrounding communities, is particularly impacted by these processes. An analysis of atmospheric wind and precipitation patterns were determined using NOAA HYSPLIT back trajectories for 2004. These trajectories were clustered using GIS and matched with sulfur deposition data from the National Atmospheric Deposition Program and sulfur emission data from the Environmental Protection Agency. The goal of this study was three-fold: to determine the seasonality and spatial variability of atmospheric transport patterns that contribute to possible deposition into the CW; to determine the relationship between atmospheric transport patterns and emission inventories; and to determine the relationship between atmospheric transport patterns and sulfur deposition to the CW. Results indicate three major pathways that produced high sulfur levels in atmospheric samples. First, sulfur is transported via westerly winds from sources in Ohio to the eastern United States. Second, sulfur increased in concentration during high pressure systems; however precipitation was relatively low suggesting little actual wet deposition. And last, high sulfur concentrations were associated with strong boundary layer inversions, which presumably trapped local emissions near the surface. The three transport pathways identified in this study show sulfur deposition is a potentially significant source of increased acidity to the CW.

  15. 21 CFR 182.3862 - Sulfur dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Sulfur dioxide. 182.3862 Section 182.3862 Food and... CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Chemical Preservatives § 182.3862 Sulfur dioxide. (a) Product. Sulfur dioxide. (b) (c) Limitations, restrictions, or explanation. This substance...

  16. 21 CFR 582.3862 - Sulfur dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Sulfur dioxide. 582.3862 Section 582.3862 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS... Sulfur dioxide. (a) Product. Sulfur dioxide. (b) (c) Limitations, restrictions, or explanation....

  17. 21 CFR 182.3862 - Sulfur dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Sulfur dioxide. 182.3862 Section 182.3862 Food and... CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Chemical Preservatives § 182.3862 Sulfur dioxide. (a) Product. Sulfur dioxide. (b) (c) Limitations, restrictions, or explanation. This substance...

  18. 21 CFR 582.3862 - Sulfur dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Sulfur dioxide. 582.3862 Section 582.3862 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS... Sulfur dioxide. (a) Product. Sulfur dioxide. (b) (c) Limitations, restrictions, or explanation....

  19. Air Quality Criteria for Sulfur Oxides.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Air Pollution Control Administration (DHEW), Washington, DC.

    Included is a literature review which comprehensively discusses knowledge of the sulfur oxides commonly found in the atmosphere. The subject content is represented by the 10 chapter titles: Physical and Chemical Properties and the Atmospheric Reactions of the Oxides of Sulfur; Sources and Methods of Measurements of Sulfur Oxides in the Atmosphere;…

  20. Two stage sorption of sulfur compounds

    DOEpatents

    Moore, William E.

    1992-01-01

    A two stage method for reducing the sulfur content of exhaust gases is disclosed. Alkali- or alkaline-earth-based sorbent is totally or partially vaporized and introduced into a sulfur-containing gas stream. The activated sorbent can be introduced in the reaction zone or the exhaust gases of a combustor or a gasifier. High efficiencies of sulfur removal can be achieved.

  1. 21 CFR 182.3862 - Sulfur dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Sulfur dioxide. 182.3862 Section 182.3862 Food and... CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Chemical Preservatives § 182.3862 Sulfur dioxide. (a) Product. Sulfur dioxide. (b) (c) Limitations, restrictions, or explanation. This substance...

  2. 21 CFR 582.3862 - Sulfur dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Sulfur dioxide. 582.3862 Section 582.3862 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS... Sulfur dioxide. (a) Product. Sulfur dioxide. (b) (c) Limitations, restrictions, or explanation....

  3. 21 CFR 582.3862 - Sulfur dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Sulfur dioxide. 582.3862 Section 582.3862 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS... Sulfur dioxide. (a) Product. Sulfur dioxide. (b) (c) Limitations, restrictions, or explanation....

  4. 21 CFR 182.3862 - Sulfur dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Sulfur dioxide. 182.3862 Section 182.3862 Food and... CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Chemical Preservatives § 182.3862 Sulfur dioxide. (a) Product. Sulfur dioxide. (b) (c) Limitations, restrictions, or explanation. This substance...

  5. 21 CFR 182.3862 - Sulfur dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Sulfur dioxide. 182.3862 Section 182.3862 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Chemical Preservatives § 182.3862 Sulfur dioxide. (a) Product. Sulfur...

  6. 21 CFR 582.3862 - Sulfur dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Sulfur dioxide. 582.3862 Section 582.3862 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS... Sulfur dioxide. (a) Product. Sulfur dioxide. (b) (c) Limitations, restrictions, or explanation....

  7. 46 CFR 153.1046 - Sulfuric acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Sulfuric acid. 153.1046 Section 153.1046 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SHIPS CARRYING BULK....1046 Sulfuric acid. No person may liquefy frozen or congealed sulfuric acid other than by external...

  8. 21 CFR 582.1095 - Sulfuric acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Sulfuric acid. 582.1095 Section 582.1095 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS....1095 Sulfuric acid. (a) Product. Sulfuric acid. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  9. 21 CFR 184.1095 - Sulfuric acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Sulfuric acid. 184.1095 Section 184.1095 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1095 Sulfuric acid. (a) Sulfuric acid (H2SO4, CAS Reg. No. 7664-93-9),...

  10. 46 CFR 153.1046 - Sulfuric acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Sulfuric acid. 153.1046 Section 153.1046 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SHIPS CARRYING BULK....1046 Sulfuric acid. No person may liquefy frozen or congealed sulfuric acid other than by external...

  11. 46 CFR 153.1046 - Sulfuric acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Sulfuric acid. 153.1046 Section 153.1046 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SHIPS CARRYING BULK....1046 Sulfuric acid. No person may liquefy frozen or congealed sulfuric acid other than by external...

  12. 21 CFR 184.1095 - Sulfuric acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Sulfuric acid. 184.1095 Section 184.1095 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DIRECT FOOD....1095 Sulfuric acid. (a) Sulfuric acid (H2SO4, CAS Reg. No. 7664-93-9), also known as oil of vitriol,...

  13. 46 CFR 153.1046 - Sulfuric acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Sulfuric acid. 153.1046 Section 153.1046 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SHIPS CARRYING BULK....1046 Sulfuric acid. No person may liquefy frozen or congealed sulfuric acid other than by external...

  14. Sulfur: its clinical and toxicologic aspects.

    PubMed

    Komarnisky, Lioudmila A; Christopherson, Robert J; Basu, Tapan K

    2003-01-01

    Although there is no known dietary requirement for inorganic sulfur, it is an essential element for all animal species in as much as they all require the sulfur-containing amino acid methionine. There are three predominate forms of organic sulfur in animals and humans: 1). the thiomethyl of methionine residues in protein; 2). the sulfhydryl disulfides of protein; and 3). the compounds containing ester or amide bound sulfates of glycosaminoglycans, steroids, and many xenobiotic metabolites. Thus, sulfur becomes an important constituent of amino acids, proteins, enzymes, vitamins and other biomolecules. Unlike mammalian species, plants can use inorganic sulfur and synthesize methionine from which are synthesized all the other important sulfur compounds. Hence, sulfur deficiency occurs mainly when plants are grown in sulfur-depleted soils and when humans and animals consume low-protein diets. In recent times, however, the increasing prevalence of refining petroleum and smelting sulfur compounds of metallic minerals into free metals are having a large impact on the balance of sulfur in the environment. Sulfur toxicity is associated mainly with high levels of the element and its toxic volatile substances in the environment. Sulfur dioxide (SO(2)), a major air pollutant, may adversely affect animal and human health by causing bronchitis, bronchoconstriction, and increased pulmonary resistance. PMID:12507640

  15. 21 CFR 184.1095 - Sulfuric acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Sulfuric acid. 184.1095 Section 184.1095 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1095 Sulfuric acid. (a) Sulfuric acid (H2SO4, CAS Reg. No. 7664-93-9),...

  16. 21 CFR 582.1095 - Sulfuric acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Sulfuric acid. 582.1095 Section 582.1095 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS....1095 Sulfuric acid. (a) Product. Sulfuric acid. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  17. 21 CFR 582.1095 - Sulfuric acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Sulfuric acid. 582.1095 Section 582.1095 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS....1095 Sulfuric acid. (a) Product. Sulfuric acid. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  18. Synthesis of sulfur nanoparticles in aqueous surfactant solutions.

    PubMed

    Chaudhuri, Rajib Ghosh; Paria, Santanu

    2010-03-15

    Sulfur is a widely used element in different applications such as fertilizers, pharmaceuticals, rubber, fiber industries, bioleaching processes, anti microbial agents, insecticides, and fumigants, etc. Nanosize sulfur particles are useful for pharmaceuticals, modification of carbon nano tubes, and synthesis of nano composites for lithium batteries. In this study we report a surfactant assisted route for the synthesis of sulfur nanoparticles by an acid catalyzed precipitation of sodium thiosulphate. We use both the inorganic and organic acids, and find that organic acid gives lower size sulfur particles. The size of the particles also depends on the reactant concentration and acid to reactant ratio. The effect of different surfactants (TX-100, CTAB, SDBS, and SDS) on particle size shows that the surfactant can significantly reduce the particle size without changing the shape. The size reducing ability is not same for all the surfactants, depending on the type of surfactant. The anionic surfactant SDBS is more effective for obtaining a uniform size in both the acid media. Whereas, the lowest size (30 nm) particles were obtained in a certain reactant concentration range using CTAB surfactant. The objective of this study is to synthesize sulfur nanoparticles in aqueous media and also study the effect of different surfactants on particle size. PMID:20038467

  19. Polarographic analysis of sulfur species in marine porewaters

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-07-01

    A schematic is described to determine the major sulfur species found in marine porewaters. With polarographic techniques, it is possible to measure thiosulfate, sulfite, bisulfide, and polysulfide ions at a mercury electrode. Polysulfide ions, S/sub x//sup 2 -/, can be considered to be composed of one sulfur in the 2- oxidation state, S(2-), and the remaining (x-1) sulfurs in the zero-valent oxidation state, S(0). The number of sulfur atoms in each is measurable. Tetrathionate and other polythionates can be measured as well but have not been detected in porewaters studied to date. Salt marsh and subtidal porewater profiles contain significant concentrations of thiosulfate, bisulfide, and polysulfide. The ratio of S(2-) to S(0) is higher in subtidal porewaters than in salt marsh porewaters and indicates the importance of zero-valent sulfur to the biogeochemical processes prevalent in the salt marsh ecosystem. The S(0) concentrations in porewaters from salt marsh sediments are greater than those predicted from equilibrium calculations.

  20. Origin of the {lambda} Transition in Liquid Sulfur

    SciTech Connect

    Scopigno, T.; Yannopoulos, S. N.; Andrikopoulos, K. S.; Fioretto, D.; Ruocco, G.

    2007-07-13

    Developing a novel experimental technique, we applied photon correlation spectroscopy using infrared radiation in liquid sulfur around T{sub {lambda}}, i.e., in the temperature range where an abrupt increase in viscosity by 4 orders of magnitude is observed upon heating within few degrees. This allowed us--overcoming photoinduced and absorption effects at visible wavelengths--to reveal a chain relaxation process with characteristic time in the millisecond range. These results do rehabilitate the validity of the Maxwell relation in sulfur from an apparent failure, allowing rationalizing of the mechanical and thermodynamic behavior of this system within a viscoelastic scenario.

  1. Percentage depletion of sulfur extracted from oil and gas wells

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-09-01

    Private Letter Ruling 8501008 of the Internal Revenue Service concluded that sulfur obtained as a by-product from hydrogen sulfide removed from crude oil and natural gas is treated as a component of the oil and gas produced. This makes the sulfur subject to the 15% depletion allowance under Code Section 613A rather than the 22% rate of Code Section 613(b)(1)(a). The note explains that the costs attributable to the separation are part of the gas-sweetening process and associated with the production of hydrocarbon gas. Any value attributable to the hydrogen sulfide represents a component of the total value of the sour natural gas.

  2. Wet Chemistry Synthesis of Multidimensional Nanocarbon-Sulfur Hybrid Materials with Ultrahigh Sulfur Loading for Lithium-Sulfur Batteries.

    PubMed

    Du, Wen-Cheng; Yin, Ya-Xia; Zeng, Xian-Xiang; Shi, Ji-Lei; Zhang, Shuai-Feng; Wan, Li-Jun; Guo, Yu-Guo

    2016-02-17

    An optimized nanocarbon-sulfur cathode material with ultrahigh sulfur loading of up to 90 wt % is realized in the form of sulfur nanolayer-coated three-dimensional (3D) conducting network. This 3D nanocarbon-sulfur network combines three different nanocarbons, as follows: zero-dimensional carbon nanoparticle, one-dimensional carbon nanotube, and two-dimensional graphene. This 3D nanocarbon-sulfur network is synthesized by using a method based on soluble chemistry of elemental sulfur and three types of nanocarbons in well-chosen solvents. The resultant sulfur-carbon material shows a high specific capacity of 1115 mA h g(-1) at 0.02C and good rate performance of 551 mA h g(-1) at 1C based on the mass of sulfur-carbon composite. Good battery performance can be attributed to the homogeneous compositing of sulfur with the 3D hierarchical hybrid nanocarbon networks at nanometer scale, which provides efficient multidimensional transport pathways for electrons and ions. Wet chemical method developed here provides an easy and cost-effective way to prepare sulfur-carbon cathode materials with high sulfur loading for application in high-energy Li-S batteries. PMID:26378622

  3. LIGNOSULFONATE-MODIFIED CALCIUM HYDROXIDE FOR SULFUR DIOXIDE CONTROL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The article discusses the use of lignosulfonate-modified calcium hydroxide Ca(OH)2 for sulfur dioxide (SO2) control. The limestone injection multistage burner (LIMB) process is currently being developed at the U.S. EPA as a low cost retrofittable technology for controlling oxides...

  4. CONTROL OF SULFUR EMISSIONS FROM OIL SHALE RETORTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objectives of this study were to determine the best available control technology (BACT) for control of sulfur emissions from oil shale processing facilities and then to develop a design for a mobile slipstream pilot plant that could be used to test and demonstrate that techno...

  5. The Hybrid Sulfur Cycle for Nuclear Hydrogen Production

    SciTech Connect

    Summers, William A.; Gorensek, Maximilian B.; Buckner, Melvin R.

    2005-09-08

    Two Sulfur-based cycles--the Sulfur-Iodine (SI) and the Hybrid Sulfur (HyS)--have emerged as the leading thermochemical water-splitting processes for producing hydrogen utilizing the heat from advanced nuclear reactors. Numerous international efforts have been underway for several years to develop the SI Cycle, but development of the HyS Cycle has lagged. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the background, current status, recent development results, and the future potential for this thermochemical process. Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has been supported by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy, Science, and Technology since 2004 to evaluate and to conduct research and development for the HyS Cycle. Process design studies and flowsheet optimization have shown that an overall plant efficiency (based on nuclear heat converted to hydrogen product, higher heating value basis) of over 50% is possible with this cycle. Economic studies indicate that a nuclear hydrogen plant based on this process can be economically competitive, assuming that the key component, the sulfur dioxide-depolarized electrolyzer, can be successfully developed. SRNL has recently demonstrated the use of a proton-exchange-membrane electrochemical cell to perform this function, thus holding promise for economical and efficient hydrogen production.

  6. Slipstream testing of hot-gas desulfurization with sulfur recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Gangwal, S.K.; Porter, J.W.

    1995-11-01

    The objective of this work is to further the development of zinc titanate fluidized-bed desulfurization (ZTFBD), and the Direct Sulfur Recovery Process (DSRP) for hot gas cleanup of coal gas used in integrated gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) power generation systems. Results are described.

  7. Preliminary Investigation of Sulfur Loading in Hanford LAW Glass

    SciTech Connect

    Vienna, John D.; Hrma, Pavel R.; Buchmiller, William C.; Ricklefs, Joel S.

    2004-04-01

    A preliminary estimate was developed for loading limits for high-sulfur low-activity waste (LAW) feeds that will be vitrified into borosilicate glass at the Hanford Site in the waste-cleanup effort. Previous studies reported in the literature were consulted to provide a basis for the estimate. The examination of previous studies led to questions about sulfur loading in Hanford LAW glass, and scoping tests were performed to help answer these questions. These results of these tests indicated that a formulation approach developed by Vienna and colleagues shows promise for maximizing LAW loading in glass. However, there is a clear need for follow-on work. The potential for significantly lowering the amount of LAW glass produced at Hanford (after the initial phase of processing) because of higher sulfur tolerances may outweigh the cost and effort required to perform the necessary testing.

  8. HYBRID SULFUR ELECTROLYZER DEVELOPMENT FY09 SECOND QUARTER REPORT

    SciTech Connect

    Herman, D; David Hobbs, D; Hector Colon-Mercado, H; Timothy Steeper, T; John Steimke, J; Mark Elvington, M

    2009-04-15

    The primary objective of the DOE-NE Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative (NHI) is to develop the nuclear hydrogen production technologies necessary to produce hydrogen at a cost competitive with other alternative transportation fuels. The focus of the NHI is on thermochemical cycles and high temperature electrolysis that can be powered by heat from high temperature gas reactors. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has been tasked with the primary responsibility to perform research and development in order to characterize, evaluate and develop the Hybrid Sulfur (HyS) thermochemical process. This report documents work during the first quarter of Fiscal Year 2009, for the period between January 1, 2009 and March 31, 2009. The HyS Process is a two-step hybrid thermochemical cycle that is part of the 'Sulfur Family' of cycles. As a sulfur cycle, it uses high temperature thermal decomposition of sulfuric acid to produce oxygen and to regenerate the sulfur dioxide reactant. The second step of the process uses a sulfur dioxide depolarized electrolyzer (SDE) to split water and produce hydrogen by electrochemically reacting sulfur dioxide with H{sub 2}O. The SDE produces sulfuric acid, which is then sent to the acid decomposer to complete the cycle. The DOE NHI program is developing the acid decomposer at Sandia National Laboratory for application to both the HyS Process and the Sulfur Iodine Cycle. The SDE is being developed at SRNL. During FY05 and FY06, SRNL designed and conducted proof-of-concept testing for a SDE using a low temperature, PEM fuel cell-type design concept. The advantages of this design concept include high electrochemical efficiency, small footprint and potential for low capital cost, characteristics that are crucial for successful implementation on a commercial scale. During FY07, SRNL extended the range of testing of the SDE to higher temperature and pressure, conducted a 100-hour longevity test with a 60-cm{sup 2} single cell electrolyzer, and designed and built a larger, multi-cell stack electrolyzer. During FY08, SRNL continued SDE development, including development and successful testing of a three-cell electrolyzer stack with a rated capacity of 100 liters per hour. The HyS program for FY09 program will address improving SDE performance by focusing on preventing or minimizing sulfur deposition inside the cell caused by SO{sub 2} crossover, reduction of cell voltage for improved efficiency, an extension of cell operating lifetime. During FY09 a baseline technology development program is being conducted to address each of these issues. Button-cell (2-cm{sup 2}) and single cell (60-cm{sup 2}) SDEs will be fabricated and tested. A pressurized button-cell test facility will be designed and constructed to facilitate addition testing. The single cell test facility will be upgraded for unattended operation, and later for operation at higher temperature and pressure. Work will continue on development of the Gas Diffusion Electrode (GDE), or Gap Cell, as an alternative electrolyzer design approach that is being developed under subcontract with industry partner Giner Electrochemical Systems. If successful, it could provide an alternative means of preventing sulfur crossover through the proton exchange membrane, as well as the possibility for higher current density operation based on more rapid mass transfer in a gas-phase anode. Promising cell components will be assembled into membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs) and tested in the single cell test facility. Upon modification for unattended operation, test will be conducted for 200 hours or more. Both the button-cell and modified single cell facility will be utilized to demonstrate electrolyzer operation without sulfur build-up limitations, which is a Level 1 Milestone.

  9. Historical Sulfur Dioxide Emissions 1850-2000: Methods and Results

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Steven J.; Andres, Robert; Conception , Elvira; Lurz, Joshua

    2004-01-25

    A global, self-consistent estimate of sulfur dioxide emissions over the last one and a half century were estimated by using a combination of bottom-up and best available inventory methods including all anthropogenic sources. We find that global sulfur dioxide emissions peaked about 1980 and have generally declined since this time. Emissions were extrapolated to a 1{sup o} x 1{sup o} grid for the time period 1850-2000 at annual resolution with two emission height levels and by season. Emissions are somewhat higher in the recent past in this new work as compared with some comprehensive estimates. This difference is largely due to our use of emissions factors that vary with time to account for sulfur removals from fossil fuels and industrial smelting processes.

  10. High pressure sulfuric acid decomposition experiments for the sulfur-iodine thermochemical cycle.

    SciTech Connect

    Velasquez, Carlos E; Reay, Andrew R.; Andazola, James C.; Naranjo, Gerald E.; Gelbard, Fred

    2005-09-01

    A series of three pressurized sulfuric acid decomposition tests were performed to (1) obtain data on the fraction of sulfuric acid catalytically converted to sulfur dioxide, oxygen, and water as a function of temperature and pressure, (2) demonstrate real-time measurements of acid conversion for use as process control, (3) obtain multiple measurements of conversion as a function of temperature within a single experiment, and (4) assess rapid quenching to minimize corrosion of metallic components by undecomposed acid. All four of these objectives were successfully accomplished. This report documents the completion of the NHI milestone on high pressure H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} decomposition tests for the Sulfur-Iodine (SI) thermochemical cycle project. All heated sections of the apparatus, (i.e. the boiler, decomposer, and condenser) were fabricated from Hastelloy C276. A ceramic acid injection tube and a ceramic-sheathed thermocouple were used to minimize corrosion of hot liquid acid on the boiler surfaces. Negligible fracturing of the platinum on zirconia catalyst was observed in the high temperature decomposer. Temperature measurements at the exit of the decomposer and at the entry of the condenser indicated that the hot acid vapors were rapidly quenched from about 400 C to less than 20 C within a 14 cm length of the flow path. Real-time gas flow rate measurements of the decomposition products provided a direct measurement of acid conversion. Pressure in the apparatus was preset by a pressure-relief valve that worked well at controlling the system pressure. However, these valves sometimes underwent abrupt transitions that resulted in rapidly varying gas flow rates with concomitant variations in the acid conversion fraction.

  11. Direct sulfur recovery during sorbent regeneration. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, S.G.; Little, R.C.

    1993-08-01

    The objective of this research project was to improve the direct elemental sulfur yields that occur during the regeneration of SO{sub 2}-saturated MgO-vermiculite sorbents (MagSorbents) by examining three approaches or strategies. The three approaches were regeneration-gas recycle, high-pressure regeneration, and catalytic reduction of the SO{sub 2} gas using a new catalyst developed by Research Triangle Institute (RTI). Prior to the project, Sorbent Technologies Corporation (Sorbtech) had developed a sorbent-regeneration process that yielded directly a pure elemental sulfur product. In the process, typically about 25 to 35 percent of the liberated S0{sub 2} was converted directly to elemental sulfur. The goal of this project was to achieve a conversion rate of over 90 percent. Good success was attained in the project. About 90 percent or more conversion was achieved with two of the approaches that were examined, regeneration-gas recycle and use of the RTI catalyst. Of these approaches, regeneration-gas recycle gave the best results (essentially 100 percent conversion in some cases). In the regeneration-gas recycle approach, saturated sorbent is simply heated to about 750{degree}C in a reducing gas (methane) atmosphere. During heating, a gas containing elemental sulfur, water vapor, H{sub 2}S, S0{sub 2}, and C0{sub 2} is evolved. The elemental sulfur and water vapor in the gas stream are condensed and removed, and the remaining gas is recycled back through the sorbent bed. After several recycles, the S0{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S completely disappear from the gas stream, and the stream contains only elemental sulfur, water vapor and C0{sub 2}.

  12. Microwave investigation of sulfuric acid monohydrate.

    PubMed

    Fiacco, Denise L; Hunt, Sherri W; Leopold, Kenneth R

    2002-04-24

    The complex H2SO4-H2O has been observed by rotational spectroscopy in a supersonic jet. A-type spectra for 18 isotopic forms have been analyzed, and the vibrationally averaged structure of the system has been determined. The complex forms a distorted, six-membered ring with the water unit acting as both a hydrogen bond donor and a hydrogen bond acceptor toward the sulfuric acid. One of the H2SO4 protons forms a short, direct hydrogen bond to the water oxygen, with an H...O distance of 1.645(5) A and an O-H...O angle of 165.2(4) degrees. Additionally, the orientation of the water suggests a weaker, secondary hydrogen bond between one of the H2O hydrogens and a nearby S=O oxygen on the sulfuric acid, with an O...H distance of 2.05(1) A and an O-H...O angle of 130.3(5) degrees. The experimentally determined structure is in excellent agreement with previously published DFT studies. Experiments with HOD in the jet reveal the formation of only isotopomers involving deuterium in the secondary hydrogen bond, providing direct experimental evidence for the secondary H...O interaction. Extensive isotopic substitution has also permitted a re-determination of the structure of the H2SO4 unit within the complex. The hydrogen-bonding OH bond of the sulfuric acid elongates by 0.07(2) A relative to that in free H2SO4, and the S=O bond involved in the secondary interaction stretches by 0.04(1) A. These changes reflect substantial distortion of the H2SO4 moiety in response to only a single water molecule, and prior to the proton transfer event. Spectral data indicate that the complex undergoes at least one, and probably more than one type of internal motion. Although the sulfuric acid in this work was produced from direct reaction of SO3 and water in the jet, experiments with H2(18)O indicate that about 2-3% of the acid is formed via processes not normally associated with the gas-phase hydration of SO3. PMID:11960481

  13. Microbial stabilization of sulfur-laden sorbents. [Quarterly] technical report, March 1, 1993--May 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, K.W.

    1993-09-01

    Clean coal technologies that involve limestone for in situ sulfur capture generate lime/limestone products laden with sulfur at various oxidation states. If sulfur is completely stabilized as sulfate, the spent sorbent is ready for commercial utilization as gypsum. However, the presence of reduced sulfur species requires additional processing. Thermal oxidation of reduced sulfur frequently results in undesirable release of SO{sub 2}. Microbial oxidation might provide an inexpensive and effective alternative. Sorbents laden with reduced forms of sulfur such as sulfide or sulfite can serve as growth substrates for sulfur-oxidizing bacteria, which convert all sulfur to sulfate. The goals of this project are the following: (1) to optimize conditions for sulfate generation from sulfide, thiosulfate, and sulfite; (2) to test and optimize the effectiveness of microbial processing on spent sorbents from flue gas desulfurization, coal gasification, and fluidized bed combustion; (3) to search for hyperalkalinophilic thiobacilli, which would be effective up to pH 11. This quarter, temperature, nitrogen, and phosphate requirements for sulfate generation on thiosulfate were optimized with respect to two named strains and two promising isolates. Spent sorbents from three different power plants were tested for sulfite and thiosulfate contents, in preparation for bioprocessing.

  14. Microbial stabilization of sulfur-laden sorbents. Technical report, 1 December 1993--28 February 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, K.W.

    1994-06-01

    Clean coal technologies that involve limestone for sulfur capture generate lime/limestone products laden with sulfur at various oxidation states. If sulfur is completely stabilized as sulfate, the spend sorbent is ready for commercial utilization as gypsum. However, the presence of reduced sulfur species required additional processing. Thermal oxidation of reduced sulfur can result in undesirable release of SO{sub 2}. Microbial oxidation might provide an inexpensive and effective alternative. Sorbents laden with reduced forms of sulfur such as sulfide, sulfite, or various polythionate species serve as growth substrates for sulfur-oxidizing bacteria, which have the potential to convert all sulfur to sulfate. This quarter, efforts focused on treating the aqueous phase of a waste sorbent obtained from an inhibited wet scrubbing process. Although two named strains, Thiobacillus neapolitanus ATCC 23639 and ATCC 23641, failed; the isolate TQ1 rapidly oxidized thiosalts, producing sulfate. The Virtis Fermentor arrived, so that experiments with TQ1 have been scaled up to 1.5 liters with temperature, aeration, and pH control.

  15. Sulfur Embedded in a Mesoporous Carbon Nanotube Network as a Binder-Free Electrode for High-Performance Lithium-Sulfur Batteries.

    PubMed

    Sun, Li; Wang, Datao; Luo, Yufeng; Wang, Ke; Kong, Weibang; Wu, Yang; Zhang, Lina; Jiang, Kaili; Li, Qunqing; Zhang, Yihe; Wang, Jiaping; Fan, Shoushan

    2016-01-26

    Sulfur-porous carbon nanotube (S-PCNT) composites are proposed as cathode materials for advanced lithium-sulfur (Li-S) batteries. Abundant mesopores are introduced to superaligned carbon nanotubes (SACNTs) through controlled oxidation in air to obtain porous carbon nanotubes (PCNTs). Compared to original SACNTs, improved dispersive behavior, enhanced conductivity, and higher mechanical strength are demonstrated in PCNTs. Meanwhile, high flexibility and sufficient intertube interaction are preserved in PCNTs to support binder-free and flexible electrodes. Additionally, several attractive features, including high surface area and abundant adsorption points on tubes, are introduced, which allow high sulfur loading, provide dual protection to sulfur cathode materials, and consequently alleviate the capacity fade especially during slow charge/discharge processes. When used as cathodes for Li-S batteries, a high sulfur loading of 60 wt % is achieved, with excellent reversible capacities of 866 and 526 mAh g(-1) based on the weights of sulfur and electrode, respectively, after 100 cycles at a slow charge/discharge rate of 0.1C, revealing efficient suppression of polysulfide dissolution. Even with a high sulfur loading of 70 wt %, the S-PCNT composite maintains capacities of 760 and 528 mAh g(-1) based on the weights of sulfur and electrode, respectively, after 100 cycles at 0.1C, outperforming the current state-of-the-art sulfur cathodes. Improved high-rate capability is also delivered by the S-PCNT composites, revealing their potentials as high-performance carbon-sulfur composite cathodes for Li-S batteries. PMID:26695394

  16. Multiple heteroatom containing sulfur compounds in coals

    SciTech Connect

    Winans, R.E.; Neill, P.H.

    1989-01-01

    Flash vacuum pyrolysis of a high sulfur coal has been combined with high resolution mass spectrometry information on aromatic sulfur compounds containing an additional heteroatom. Sulfur emission from coal utilization is a critical problem and in order to devise efficient methods for removing organic sulfur, it is important to know what types of molecules contain sulfur. A high sulfur Illinois No. 6 bituminous coal (Argonne Premium Coal Sample No. 3) was pyrolyzed on a platinum grid using a quartz probe inserted into a modified all glass heated inlet system, and the products characterized by High Resolution Mass Spectrometry (HRMS). A significant number of products were identified which contained both sulfur and an additional heteroatom. In some cases two additional heteroatoms were observed. These results are compared to those found in coal extracted and liquefaction products. 25 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  17. The removal of sulfur dioxide from flue gases

    PubMed Central

    Kettner, Helmut

    1965-01-01

    The growth of industrialization makes it imperative to reduce the amounts of sulfur dioxide emitted into the atmosphere. This article describes various processes for cleaning flue gases, and gives details of new methods being investigated. Wet scrubbing with water, though widely practised, has many disadvantages. Scrubbing with zinc oxide, feasible in zinc works, is more satisfactory. Dry methods use a solid absorbent; they have the advantage of a high emission temperature. Other methods are based on the addition to the fuel or the flue gases of substances such as activated metal oxides, which react with the sulfur to form compounds less harmful than sulfur dioxide. Also being investigated are a two-stage combustion system, in which the sulfur dioxide is removed in the first stage, and the injection of activated powdered dolomite into burning fuel; the resulting sulfates being removed by electrostatic precipitation. A wet catalysis process has recently been developed. Most of the cleaning processes are not yet technically mature, but first results show good efficiency and relatively low cost. PMID:14315714

  18. Heterogeneous Photochemical Oxidation of Sulfur Dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Zanan, H. S.; Stockwell, W. R.

    2007-12-01

    The gas phase oxidation of sulfur dioxide by the hydroxyl radical is a significant source of sulfate aerosol in the troposphere and stratosphere. Stockwell and Calvert (1983) performed fifteen chamber experiments where mixtures of HONO, NO, NO2, H2O, SO2 and CO were photolyzed in synthetic air or in nitrogen containing approximately 50 ppm oxygen. They found that the atmospheric oxidation of SO2 by hydroxyl radical was a chain process that occurs through the production of an HO2 radical followed by reaction with NO to reproduce HO. We have reanalyzed this dataset and we have found that a very large amount of the observed SO2 oxidation (70.0 ± 9.1 %) is not explained through the HO + SO2 reaction alone. The Regional Atmospheric Chemistry Mechanism (RACM2) was used to investigate additional chemical pathways for the oxidation of SO2. A mechanism consisting of photochemical heterogeneous reactions is proposed to account for the observed additional sulfur dioxide oxidation not accounted for by gas phase oxidation. The analysis showed that the measured time dependent SO2, CO2 and nitrogenous compound concentrations could be simulated by the photochemical heterogeneous mechanism in conjunction with the RACM2 mechanism.

  19. Transporters in plant sulfur metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Gigolashvili, Tamara; Kopriva, Stanislav

    2014-01-01

    Sulfur is an essential nutrient, necessary for synthesis of many metabolites. The uptake of sulfate, primary and secondary assimilation, the biosynthesis, storage, and final utilization of sulfur (S) containing compounds requires a lot of movement between organs, cells, and organelles. Efficient transport systems of S-containing compounds across the internal barriers or the plasma membrane and organellar membranes are therefore required. Here, we review a current state of knowledge of the transport of a range of S-containing metabolites within and between the cells as well as of their long distance transport. An improved understanding of mechanisms and regulation of transport will facilitate successful engineering of the respective pathways, to improve the plant yield, biotic interaction and nutritional properties of crops. PMID:25250037

  20. Process for desulfurizing Claus tail-gas

    SciTech Connect

    Buchanan, J.S.; Stern, D.L.; Sodomin, J.F.; Teman, G.J.

    1993-07-20

    In a process where a solid absorbent is used to remove sulfur oxides wherein said absorbent is regenerated with a reducing gas and off gas is passed to a Claus sulfur recovery process, the improvement is described comprising: (a) introducing an oxygen containing gas and a tail-gas into an incinerator under conditions sufficient to convert substantially all of the sulfur therein to sulfur oxides; (b) directing gas with sulfur oxides therein from the incinerator into an absorber operated so that substantially all of the sulfur oxides are absorbed on a solid absorber; (c) allowing sufficient time for a desired amount of sulfur oxides to be absorbed on said solid absorber; (d) ceasing absorption of sulfur oxides on said absorber; (e) regenerating the solid absorbent by contacting it with a hydrocarbon or hydrogen reducing gas under conditions sufficient to cause the absorbed sulfur oxides to be released, thereby forming a sulfur dioxide and hydrogen sulfide off gas and a regenerated solid absorbent whereby sulfur dioxide and hydrogen sulfide contained in the off gas is in an amount sufficient to be removed by a Claus sulfur recovery process; and (f) directing the off gas into a Claus sulfur recovery process where this gas is converted to elemental sulfur.