Sample records for giammarco vetrocoke sulfur process

  1. Process for converting sulfur in hydrocarbon to water soluble form

    Microsoft Academic Search

    1980-01-01

    A desulfurization process is disclosed wherein a sulfur-containing hydrocarbon material is contacted with a sulfur oxide compound and an amine, a salt of an amine, or mixtures thereof. The contacting converts the sulfur component of the hydrocarbon material to water soluble form thereby allowing the sulfur components to be readily separated by water washing.

  2. Sulfur Flow Analysis for New Generation Steel Manufacturing Process

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Chang-Qing HU; Chun-Xia ZHANG; Xiao-Wei HAN; Rui-Yu YIN

    2008-01-01

    Sulfur flow for new generation steel manufacturing process is analyzed by the method of material flow analysis, and measures for SO2 emission reduction are put forward as assessment and target intervention of the results. The results of sulfur flow analysis indicate that 90% of sulfur comes from fuels. Sulfur finally discharges from the steel manufacturing route in various steps, and

  3. Catalyst for elemental sulfur recovery process

    DOEpatents

    Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, Maria (Winchester, MA); Liu, Wei (Cambridge, MA)

    1995-01-01

    A catalytic reduction process for the direct recovery of elemental sulfur from various SO.sub.2 -containing industrial gas streams. The catalytic process provides high activity and selectivity, as well as stability in the reaction atmosphere, for the reduction of SO.sub.2 to elemental sulfur product with carbon monoxide or other reducing gases. The reaction of sulfur dioxide and reducing gas takes place over a metal oxide composite catalyst having one of the following empirical formulas: [(OF.sub.2).sub.1-n (RO.sub.1)n].sub.1-k M.sub.k, [(FO.sub.2).sub.1-n (RO.sub.1.5).sub.n ].sub.1-k M.sub.k, or [Ln.sub.x Zr.sub.1-x O.sub.2-0.5x ].sub.1-k M.sub.k wherein FO.sub.2 is a fluorite-type oxide; RO represents an alkaline earth oxide; RO.sub.1.5 is a Group IIIB or rare earth oxide; Ln is a rare earth element having an atomic number from 57 to 65 or mixtures thereof; M is a transition metal or a mixture of transition metals; n is a number having a value from 0.0 to 0.35; k is a number having a value from 0.0 to about 0.5; and x is a number having a value from about 0.45 to about 0.55.

  4. Comparison of the UCB sulfur recovery process with conventional sulfur recovery technology for treating recycle gas from a crude oil residuum hydrotreater. [UCBSRP sulfur recovery process

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. Lynn; D. W. Neumann; S. F. Sciamanna; F. H. Vorhis

    1986-01-01

    The University of California, Berkeley, Sulfur Recovery Process (UCBSRP) is being developed as an alternative to conventional sulfur recovery technology for removing hydrogen sulfide from gas streams and converting it to elemental sulfur. In the UCBSRP the hydrogen sulfide is absorbed by a physical solvent and the resulting solution of HâS is mixed with a stoichiometrically equivalent amount of slulfur

  5. Process for production of synthesis gas with reduced sulfur content

    SciTech Connect

    Najjar, M.S.; Corbeels, R.J.; Kokturk, U.

    1989-07-25

    This patent describes a process for the partial oxidation of a sulfur- and silicate-containing carbonaceous fuel to produce a synthesis gas with reduced sulfur content. It comprises partial oxidizing fuel at a temperature in the range of 1800{sup 0}-2200{sup 0}F. in the presence of a temperature moderator, an oxygen-containing gas and a sulfur capture additive which comprises compound portion and a sodium-containing compound portion to produce a synthesis gas comprising H/sub 2/ and CO with a reduced sulfur content and a molten slag which comprises a sulfur-containing sodium-iron silicate phase and a sodium-iron sulfide phase. This patent describes a process for the partial oxidation of a sulfur- and silicate-containing carbonaceous fuel to produce a synthesis gas with reduced sulfur content. It comprises partially oxidizing a sulfur- and silicate-containing carbonaceous fuel at a temperature in the range of 1800{sup 0}-2200{sup 0}F in the presence of a temperature moderator, an oxygen-containing gas and a sulfur capture additive which comprises an iron-containing compound, a sodium-containing compound portion, and a copper-containing compound portion to produce a synthesis gas comprising H/sub 2/ and CO with a reduced sulfur content and a molten slag which comprises a sulfur-containing sodium-iron silicate phase and a sodium-copper-iron sulfide phase.

  6. Process for production of synthesis gas with reduced sulfur content

    DOEpatents

    Najjar, Mitri S. (Hopewell Junction, NY); Corbeels, Roger J. (Wappingers Falls, NY); Kokturk, Uygur (Wappingers Falls, NY)

    1989-01-01

    A process for the partial oxidation of a sulfur- and silicate-containing carbonaceous fuel to produce a synthesis gas with reduced sulfur content which comprises partially oxidizing said fuel at a temperature in the range of 1800.degree.-2200.degree. F. in the presence of a temperature moderator, an oxygen-containing gas and a sulfur capture additive which comprises an iron-containing compound portion and a sodium-containing compound portion to produce a synthesis gas comprising H.sub.2 and CO with a reduced sulfur content and a molten slag which comprises (i) a sulfur-containing sodium-iron silicate phase and (ii) a sodium-iron sulfide phase. The sulfur capture additive may optionally comprise a copper-containing compound portion.

  7. Process for removing pyritic sulfur from bituminous coals

    DOEpatents

    Pawlak, Wanda (Edmonton, CA); Janiak, Jerzy S. (Edmonton, CA); Turak, Ali A. (Edmonton, CA); Ignasiak, Boleslaw L. (Edmonton, CA)

    1990-01-01

    A process is provided for removing pyritic sulfur and lowering ash content of bituminous coals by grinding the feed coal, subjecting it to micro-agglomeration with a bridging liquid containing heavy oil, separating the microagglomerates and separating them to a water wash to remove suspended pyritic sulfur. In one embodiment the coal is subjected to a second micro-agglomeration step.

  8. HYBRID SULFUR RECOVERY PROCESS FOR NATURAL GAS UPGRADING

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dennis Dalrymple

    2004-01-01

    This first quarter report of 2004 describes progress on a project funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to test a hybrid sulfur recovery process for natural gas upgrading. The process concept represents a low-cost option for direct treatment of natural gas streams to remove HâS in quantities equivalent to 0.2-25 metric tons (LT) of sulfur per day. This

  9. HYBRID SULFUR RECOVERY PROCESS FOR NATURAL GAS UPGRADING

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Girish Srinivas; Steven C. Gebhard; David W. DeBerry

    2001-01-01

    This first quarter report of 2001 describes progress on a project funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to test a hybrid sulfur recovery process for natural gas upgrading. The process concept represents a low cost option for direct treatment of natural gas streams to remove HâS in quantities equivalent to 0.2-25 metric tons (LT) of sulfur per day.

  10. HYBRID SULFUR RECOVERY PROCESS FOR NATURAL GAS UPGRADING

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dennis Dalrymple

    2003-01-01

    This third quarter report of 2003 describes progress on a project funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to test a hybrid sulfur recovery process for natural gas upgrading. The process concept represents a low-cost option for direct treatment of natural gas streams to remove HâS in quantities equivalent to 0.2-25 metric tons (LT) of sulfur per day. This

  11. HYBRID SULFUR RECOVERY PROCESS FOR NATURAL GAS UPGRADING

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Girish Srinivas; Steven C. Gebhard; David W. DeBerry

    2002-01-01

    This second quarter report of 2002 describes progress on a project funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to test a hybrid sulfur recovery process for natural gas upgrading. The process concept represents a low cost option for direct treatment of natural gas streams to remove HâS in quantities equivalent to 0.2-25 metric tons (LT) of sulfur per day.

  12. HYBRID SULFUR RECOVERY PROCESS FOR NATURAL GAS UPGRADING

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Joe Lundeen; Girish Srinivas; David W. DeBerry

    2003-01-01

    This fourth quarter report of 2002 describes progress on a project funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to test a hybrid sulfur recovery process for natural gas upgrading. The process concept represents a low cost option for direct treatment of natural gas streams to remove HâS in quantities equivalent to 0.2-25 metric tons (LT) of sulfur per day.

  13. HYBRID SULFUR RECOVERY PROCESS FOR NATURAL GAS UPGRADING

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Girish Srinivas; Steven C. Gebhard; David W. DeBerry

    2002-01-01

    This first quarter report of 2002 describes progress on a project funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to test a hybrid sulfur recovery process for natural gas upgrading. The process concept represents a low cost option for direct treatment of natural gas streams to remove HâS in quantities equivalent to 0.2-25 metric tons (LT) of sulfur per day.

  14. HYBRID SULFUR RECOVERY PROCESS FOR NATURAL GAS UPGRADING

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dennis Dalrymple

    2003-01-01

    This second quarter report of 2003 describes progress on a project funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to test a hybrid sulfur recovery process for natural gas upgrading. The process concept represents a low cost option for direct treatment of natural gas streams to remove HâS in quantities equivalent to 0.2-25 metric tons (LT) of sulfur per day.

  15. HYBRID SULFUR RECOVERY PROCESS FOR NATURAL GAS UPGRADING

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dennis Dalrymple

    2003-01-01

    This first quarter report of 2003 describes progress on a project funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to test a hybrid sulfur recovery process for natural gas upgrading. The process concept represents a low cost option for direct treatment of natural gas streams to remove HâS in quantities equivalent to 0.2-25 metric tons (LT) of sulfur per day.

  16. HYBRID SULFUR RECOVERY PROCESS FOR NATURAL GAS UPGRADING

    SciTech Connect

    Dennis Dalrymple

    2003-10-01

    This third quarter report of 2003 describes progress on a project funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to test a hybrid sulfur recovery process for natural gas upgrading. The process concept represents a low-cost option for direct treatment of natural gas streams to remove H{sub 2}S in quantities equivalent to 0.2-25 metric tons (LT) of sulfur per day. This process is projected to have lower capital and operating costs than the competing technologies, amine/aqueous iron liquid redox and amine/Claus/tail gas treating, and have a smaller plant footprint, making it well suited to both on-shore and off-shore applications. CrystaSulf{reg_sign} (service mark of CrystaTech, Inc.) is a new nonaqueous sulfur recovery process that removes hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) from gas streams and converts it into elemental sulfur. CrystaSulf features high sulfur recovery similar to aqueous-iron liquid redox sulfur recovery processes, but differs from the aqueous processes in that CrystaSulf controls the location where elemental sulfur particles are formed. In the hybrid process, approximately 1/3 of the total H{sub 2}S in the natural gas is first oxidized to SO{sub 2} at low temperatures over a heterogeneous catalyst. Low temperature oxidation is done so that the H{sub 2}S can be oxidized in the presence of methane and other hydrocarbons without oxidation of the hydrocarbons. The project involves the development of a catalyst using laboratory/bench-scale catalyst testing, and then demonstration of the catalyst at CrystaTech's pilot plant site in west Texas.

  17. Comparison of the UCB sulfur recovery process with conventional sulfur recovery technology for treating recycle gas from a crude oil residuum hydrotreater. [UCBSRP sulfur recovery process

    SciTech Connect

    Lynn, S.; Neumann, D.W.; Sciamanna, S.F.; Vorhis, F.H.

    1986-03-31

    The University of California, Berkeley, Sulfur Recovery Process (UCBSRP) is being developed as an alternative to conventional sulfur recovery technology for removing hydrogen sulfide from gas streams and converting it to elemental sulfur. In the UCBSRP the hydrogen sulfide is absorbed by a physical solvent and the resulting solution of H/sub 2/S is mixed with a stoichiometrically equivalent amount of slulfur dioxide dissolved in the same solvent. The reaction between the two sulfur compounds forms water, which is miscible with the solvent, and elemental sulfur, which crystallizes from solution when its solubility is exceeded. Part of the sulfur formed in the reaction is burned to make the SO/sub 2/ needed in the process, and the heat of combustion is recovered in a waste-heat boiler. Sulfur is recovered by cooling the solution, settling the additional crystals that form, and centrifuging the slurry pumped from the bottom of the crystallizer-surge tank. In this report the UCBSRP is compared to conventional technology for the case of the removal of H/sub 2/S from the recycle gas of a high-pressure petroleum residuum hydrotreater. The conventional technology selected for this comparison consists of an absorber/stripper operation using diethanol amine as the absorbent, a Claus sulfur plant, and a SCOT tail-gas treating unit. From this comparison it is estimated that the DFC for the UCBSRP would be about 61% of that for the conventional technology. The utility costs for this application of the UCBSRP are estimated to be less than the credit for the high-pressure steam produced whereas the utility costs for the conventional process are substantially more. 6 refs., 3 figs., 9 tabs.

  18. HYBRID SULFUR RECOVERY PROCESS FOR NATURAL GAS UPGRADING

    SciTech Connect

    Dennis Dalrymple

    2003-04-01

    This first quarter report of 2003 describes progress on a project funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to test a hybrid sulfur recovery process for natural gas upgrading. The process concept represents a low cost option for direct treatment of natural gas streams to remove H{sub 2}S in quantities equivalent to 0.2-25 metric tons (LT) of sulfur per day. This process is projected to have lower capital and operating costs than the competing technologies, amine/aqueous iron liquid redox and amine/Claus/tail gas treating, and have a smaller plant footprint, making it well suited to both on-shore and off-shore applications. CrystaSulf{reg_sign} (service mark of CrystaTech, Inc.) is a new nonaqueous sulfur recovery process that removes hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) from gas streams and converts it into elemental sulfur. CrystaSulf features high sulfur recovery similar to aqueous-iron liquid redox sulfur recovery processes, but differs from the aqueous processes in that CrystaSulf controls the location where elemental sulfur particles are formed. In the hybrid process, approximately 1/3 of the total H{sub 2}S in the natural gas is first oxidized to SO{sub 2} at low temperatures over a heterogeneous catalyst. Low temperature oxidation is done so that the H{sub 2}S can be oxidized in the presence of methane and other hydrocarbons without oxidation of the hydrocarbons. The project involves the development of a catalyst using laboratory/bench-scale catalyst testing, and then demonstration of the catalyst at CrystaTech's pilot plant in west Texas. Previous reports described development of a catalyst with the required selectivity and efficiency for producing sulfur dioxide from H{sub 2}S. In the laboratory, the catalyst was shown to be robust and stable in the presence of several intentionally added contaminants, including condensate from the pilot plant site. Bench-scale catalyst testing at the CrystaSulf pilot plant using the actual pilot plant gas was successful, and a skid-mounted catalyst pilot unit has been designed for fabrication and testing at the CrystaSulf pilot site.

  19. HYBRID SULFUR RECOVERY PROCESS FOR NATURAL GAS UPGRADING

    SciTech Connect

    Dennis Dalrymple

    2003-07-01

    This second quarter report of 2003 describes progress on a project funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to test a hybrid sulfur recovery process for natural gas upgrading. The process concept represents a low cost option for direct treatment of natural gas streams to remove H{sub 2}S in quantities equivalent to 0.2-25 metric tons (LT) of sulfur per day. This process is projected to have lower capital and operating costs than the competing technologies, amine/aqueous iron liquid redox and amine/Claus/tail gas treating, and have a smaller plant footprint, making it well suited to both on-shore and off-shore applications. CrystaSulf{reg_sign} (service mark of CrystaTech, Inc.) is a new nonaqueous sulfur recovery process that removes hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) from gas streams and converts it into elemental sulfur. CrystaSulf features high sulfur recovery similar to aqueous-iron liquid redox sulfur recovery processes, but differs from the aqueous processes in that CrystaSulf controls the location where elemental sulfur particles are formed. In the hybrid process, approximately 1/3 of the total H{sub 2}S in the natural gas is first oxidized to SO{sub 2} at low temperatures over a heterogeneous catalyst. Low temperature oxidation is done so that the H{sub 2}S can be oxidized in the presence of methane and other hydrocarbons without oxidation of the hydrocarbons. The project involves the development of a catalyst using laboratory/bench-scale catalyst testing, and then demonstration of the catalyst at CrystaTech's pilot plant in west Texas. Previous reports described development of a catalyst with the required selectivity and efficiency for producing sulfur dioxide from H{sub 2}S. In the laboratory, the catalyst was shown to be robust and stable in the presence of several intentionally added contaminants, including condensate from the pilot plant site. Bench-scale catalyst testing at the CrystaSulf pilot plant using the actual pilot plant gas was successful, and a skid-mounted catalyst pilot unit has been designed for fabrication and testing at the CrystaSulf pilot site.

  20. Coal gasification: molten salt processes for sulfur emission control

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Glueck

    1973-01-01

    Two molten salt desulfurization processes are illustrated. ; Precombustion desulfurization of coal takes place in a single vessel. Pulverized ; coal, slurried with molten salt, is allowed to react with a melt that contains an ; agent with an affinity for the sulfurous compounds. The coal collects at the ; top, being less dense than the melt, and is drawn

  1. Process for removing sulfur dioxide from flue gases

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. W. Jr

    1989-01-01

    This patent describes an improvement in a dry process for the removal of sulfur dioxide from flue gases by the addition thereto of hydrated lime containing sugar in a coal combustion unit, wherein the flue gases result from the combustion of a coal in a combustion chamber, and the flue gases are treated in an electrostatic precipitator prior to discharge

  2. HYBRID SULFUR RECOVERY PROCESS FOR NATURAL GAS UPGRADING

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dennis Dalrymple

    2004-01-01

    This final report describes the objectives, technical approach, results and conclusions for a project funded by the U.S. Department of Energy to test a hybrid sulfur recovery process for natural gas upgrading. The process concept is a configuration of CrystaTech, Inc.'s CrystaSulf{reg_sign} process which utilizes a direct oxidation catalyst upstream of the absorber tower to oxidize a portion of the

  3. Performance and cost models for the direct sulfur recovery process. Task 1 Topical report, Volume 3

    SciTech Connect

    Frey, H.C. [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States); Williams, R.B. [Carneigie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    1995-09-01

    The purpose of this project is to develop performance and cost models of the Direct Sulfur Recovery Process (DSRP). The DSRP is an emerging technology for sulfur recovery from advanced power generation technologies such as Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) systems. In IGCC systems, sulfur present in the coal is captured by gas cleanup technologies to avoid creating emissions of sulfur dioxide to the atmosphere. The sulfur that is separated from the coal gas stream must be collected. Leading options for dealing with the sulfur include byproduct recovery as either sulfur or sulfuric acid. Sulfur is a preferred byproduct, because it is easier to handle and therefore does not depend as strongly upon the location of potential customers as is the case for sulfuric acid. This report describes the need for new sulfur recovery technologies.

  4. Reduction of produced elementary sulfur in denitrifying sulfide removal process

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Xu Zhou; Lihong Liu; Chuan Chen; Nanqi Ren; Aijie Wang; Duu-Jong Lee

    2011-01-01

    Denitrifying sulfide removal (DSR) processes simultaneously convert sulfide, nitrate, and chemical oxygen demand from industrial\\u000a wastewater into elemental sulfur, dinitrogen gas, and carbon dioxide, respectively. The failure of a DSR process is signaled\\u000a by high concentrations of sulfide in reactor effluent. Conventionally, DSR reactor failure is blamed for overcompetition for\\u000a heterotroph to autotroph communities. This study indicates that the elementary

  5. HYBRID SULFUR RECOVERY PROCESS FOR NATURAL GAS UPGRADING

    SciTech Connect

    Dennis Dalrymple

    2004-06-01

    This final report describes the objectives, technical approach, results and conclusions for a project funded by the U.S. Department of Energy to test a hybrid sulfur recovery process for natural gas upgrading. The process concept is a configuration of CrystaTech, Inc.'s CrystaSulf{reg_sign} process which utilizes a direct oxidation catalyst upstream of the absorber tower to oxidize a portion of the inlet hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) to sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) and elemental sulfur. This hybrid configuration of CrystaSulf has been named CrystaSulf-DO and represents a low-cost option for direct treatment of natural gas streams to remove H{sub 2}S in quantities equivalent to 0.2-25 metric tons (LT) of sulfur per day and more. This hybrid process is projected to have lower capital and operating costs than the competing technologies, amine/aqueous iron liquid redox and amine/Claus/tail gas treating, and have a smaller plant footprint, making it well suited to both onshore and offshore applications. CrystaSulf is a nonaqueous sulfur recovery process that removes H{sub 2}S from gas streams and converts it to elemental sulfur. In CrystaSulf, H{sub 2}S in the inlet gas is reacted with SO{sub 2} to make elemental sulfur according to the liquid phase Claus reaction: 2H{sub 2}S + SO{sub 2} {yields} 2H{sub 2}O + 3S. The SO{sub 2} for the reaction can be supplied from external sources by purchasing liquid SO{sub 2} and injecting it into the CrystaSulf solution, or produced internally by converting a portion of the inlet gas H{sub 2}S to SO{sub 2} or by burning a portion of the sulfur produced to make SO{sub 2}. CrystaSulf features high sulfur recovery similar to aqueous-iron liquid redox sulfur recovery processes, but differs from the aqueous processes in that CrystaSulf controls the location where elemental sulfur particles are formed. In the hybrid process, the needed SO{sub 2} is produced by placing a bed of direct oxidation catalyst in the inlet gas stream to oxidize a portion of the inlet H{sub 2}S. Oxidation catalysts may also produce some elemental sulfur under these conditions, which can be removed and recovered prior to the CrystaSulf absorber. The CrystaSulf-DO process can utilize direct oxidation catalyst from many sources. Numerous direct oxidation catalysts are available from many suppliers worldwide. They have been used for H{sub 2}S oxidation to sulfur and/or SO{sub 2} for decades. It was believed at the outset of the project that TDA Research, Inc., a subcontractor, could develop a direct oxidation catalyst that would offer advantages over other commercially available catalysts for this CrystaSulf-DO process application. This project involved the development of several of TDA's candidate proprietary direct oxidation catalysts through laboratory bench-scale testing. These catalysts were shown to be effective for conversion of H{sub 2}S to SO{sub 2} and to elemental sulfur under certain operating conditions. One of these catalysts was subsequently tested on a commercial gas stream in a bench-scale reactor at CrystaTech's pilot plant site in west Texas with good results. However, commercial developments have precluded the use of TDA catalysts in the CrystaSulf-DO process. Nonetheless, this project has advanced direct oxidation catalyst technology for H{sub 2}S control in energy industries and led to several viable paths to commercialization. TDA is commercializing the use of its direct oxidation catalyst technology in conjunction with the SulfaTreat{reg_sign} solid scavenger for natural gas applications and in conjunction with ConocoPhillips and DOE for gasification applications using ConocoPhillips gasification technology. CrystaTech is commercializing its CrystaSulf-DO process in conjunction with Gas Technology Institute for natural gas applications (using direct oxidation catalysts from other commercial sources) and in conjunction with ChevronTexaco and DOE for gasification applications using ChevronTexaco's gasification technology.

  6. A comparison of the UCB sulfur recovery process with conventional sulfur recovery technology for treating recycle gas from a crude oil residuum hydrotreater

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. Lynn; D. W. Neumann; S. F. Sciamanna; F. H. Vorhis

    1986-01-01

    The University of California, Berkeley, Sulfur Recovery Process (UCBSRP) is being developed as an alternative to conventional sulfur recovery technology for removing hydrogen sulfide from gas streams and converting it to elemental sulfur. In the UCBSRP the hydrogen sulfide is absorbed by a physical solvent and the resulting solution of HâS is mixed with a stoichiometrically equivalent amount of sulfur

  7. Sulfur by-product formation in the Stretford process. Topical report

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. W. Trofe; D. W. DeBerry

    1993-01-01

    Liquid redox sulfur recovery processes remove H2S from sour gas streams and produce elemental sulfur for sale or disposal. The Stretford Process is one of the oldest commercial liquid redox processes and it is based on a vanadium and anthraquinone redox system. Improvements in the operability and reliability of the Stretford process would be beneficial to the process user. The

  8. SULFURIC ACID REMOVAL PROCESS EVALUATION: SHORT-TERM RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    Gary M. Blythe; Richard McMillan

    2002-02-04

    The objective of this project is to demonstrate the use of alkaline reagents injected into the furnace of coal-fired boilers as a means of controlling sulfuric acid emissions. Sulfuric acid controls are becoming of increasing interest to utilities with coal-fired units for a number of reasons. Sulfuric acid is a Toxic Release Inventory species, a precursor to acid aerosol/condensable emissions, and can cause a variety of plant operation problems such as air heater plugging and fouling, back-end corrosion, and plume opacity. These issues will likely be exacerbated with the retrofit of SCR for NO{sub x} control on some coal-fired plants, as SCR catalysts are known to further oxidize a portion of the flue gas SO{sub 2} to SO{sub 3}. The project is testing the effectiveness of furnace injection of four different calcium- and/or magnesium-based alkaline sorbents on full-scale utility boilers. These reagents have been tested during four one- to two-week tests conducted on two First Energy Bruce Mansfield Plant units. One of the sorbents tested was a magnesium hydroxide slurry produced from a wet flue gas desulfurization system waste stream, from a system that employs a Thiosorbic{reg_sign} Lime scrubbing process. The other three sorbents are available commercially and include dolomite, pressure-hydrated dolomitic lime, and commercial magnesium hydroxide. The dolomite reagent was injected as a dry powder through out-of-service burners, while the other three reagents were injected as slurries through air-atomizing nozzles into the front wall of upper furnace, either across from the nose of the furnace or across from the pendant superheater tubes. After completing the four one- to two-week tests, the most promising sorbents were selected for longer-term (approximately 25-day) full-scale tests. The longer-term tests are being conducted to confirm the effectiveness of the sorbents tested over extended operation and to determine balance-of-plant impacts. This reports presents the results of the short-term tests; the long-term test results will be reported in a later document. The short-term test results showed that three of the four reagents tested, dolomite powder, commercial magnesium hydroxide slurry, and byproduct magnesium hydroxide slurry, were able to achieve 90% or greater removal of sulfuric acid compared to baseline levels. The molar ratio of alkali to flue gas sulfuric acid content (under baseline conditions) required to achieve 90% sulfuric acid removal was lowest for the byproduct magnesium hydroxide slurry. However, this result may be confounded because this was the only one of the three slurries tested with injection near the top of the furnace across from the pendant superheater platens. Injection at the higher level was demonstrated to be advantageous for this reagent over injection lower in the furnace, where the other slurries were tested.

  9. SULFURIC ACID REMOVAL PROCESS EVALUATION: SHORT-TERM RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    Gary M. Blythe; Richard McMillan

    2002-03-04

    The objective of this project is to demonstrate the use of alkaline reagents injected into the furnace of coal-fired boilers as a means of controlling sulfuric acid emissions. Sulfuric acid controls are becoming of increasing interest to utilities with coal-fired units for a number of reasons. Sulfuric acid is a Toxic Release Inventory species, a precursor to acid aerosol/condensable emissions, and can cause a variety of plant operation problems such as air heater plugging and fouling, back-end corrosion, and plume opacity. These issues will likely be exacerbated with the retrofit of SCR for NOX control on some coal-fired plants, as SCR catalysts are known to further oxidize a portion of the flue gas SO{sub 2} to SO{sub 3}. The project is testing the effectiveness of furnace injection of four different calcium- and/or magnesium-based alkaline sorbents on full-scale utility boilers. These reagents have been tested during four one- to two-week tests conducted on two FirstEnergy Bruce Mansfield Plant units. One of the sorbents tested was a magnesium hydroxide slurry produced from a wet flue gas desulfurization system waste stream, from a system that employs a Thiosorbic{reg_sign} Lime scrubbing process. The other three sorbents are available commercially and include dolomite, pressure-hydrated dolomitic lime, and commercial magnesium hydroxide. The dolomite reagent was injected as a dry powder through out-of-service burners, while the other three reagents were injected as slurries through air-atomizing nozzles into the front wall of upper furnace, either across from the nose of the furnace or across from the pendant superheater tubes. After completing the four one- to two-week tests, the most promising sorbents were selected for longer-term (approximately 25-day) full-scale tests. The longer-term tests are being conducted to confirm the effectiveness of the sorbents tested over extended operation and to determine balance-of-plant impacts. This reports presents the results of the short-term tests; the long-term test results will be reported in a later document. The short-term test results showed that three of the four reagents tested, dolomite powder, commercial magnesium hydroxide slurry, and byproduct magnesium hydroxide slurry, were able to achieve 90% or greater removal of sulfuric acid compared to baseline levels. The molar ratio of alkali to flue gas sulfuric acid content (under baseline conditions) required to achieve 90% sulfuric acid removal was lowest for the byproduct magnesium hydroxide slurry. However, this result may be confounded because this was the only one of the three slurries tested with injection near the top of the furnace across from the pendant superheater platens. Injection at the higher level was demonstrated to be advantageous for this reagent over injection lower in the furnace, where the other slurries were tested.

  10. A simple synthesis of hollow carbon nanofiber-sulfur composite via mixed-solvent process for lithium-sulfur batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qiang; Zhang, Zhian; Zhang, Kai; Fang, Jing; Lai, Yanqing; Li, Jie

    2014-06-01

    A hollow carbon nanofiber supported sulfur (HCNF-S) composite cathode material is prepared by a mixed-solvent (DMF/CS2) process in an organic solution for lithium-sulfur batteries. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM) observations show the hollow structures of the HCNF and the homogeneous distribution of sulfur in the composite. The performance of the HCNF-S cathode is evaluated in lithium-sulfur batteries using cyclic voltammetry, galvanostatic charge-discharge, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. It is found that the HCNF-S cathode shows perfect cycling stability. The results exhibit an initial discharge capacity of 1090 mAh g-1 and retains 600 mAh g-1 after 100 discharge/charge cycles at a high rate of 1 C. The excellent electrochemical properties benefit from the hollow and highly conductive network-like structure of HCNFs, which contribute to disperse sulfur and absorb polysulfides, and suppress the formation of residual Li2S layer.

  11. Sampling, preservation, and analytical methods research plan - liquid redox sulfur recovery technologies: Stretford process. Topical report

    SciTech Connect

    Trofe, T.W.

    1986-11-01

    GRI has developed a sampling, preservation, and analytical (SPandA) methods research plan for developing and validating analytical methodologies for liquid redox sulfur recovery processes (e.g., Stretford process). The document describes the technical approach which will be used to direct research activities to develop SPandA methodologies to analyze gaseous, aqueous, and solid process streams from the Stretford sulfur recovery process. The primary emphasis is on developing and validating methodologies for analyzing vanadium (IV) and vanadium (V), anthraquinone disulphonic acids (ADA), polysulfide-sulfur, sulfide-sulfur, thiosulfate, sulfate, thiocyanate, total soluble sulfur, alkalinity, pH, total dissolved solids, total suspended solids, and dissolved oxygen in aqueous process streams. The document includes descriptions of the process streams and chemical species, selection of candidate analytical methods, and technical approach for methods development and validation.

  12. Using stable isotopes to monitor forms of sulfur during desulfurization processes: A quick screening method

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Liu, Chao-Li; Hackley, Keith C.; Coleman, D.D.; Kruse, C.W.

    1987-01-01

    A method using stable isotope ratio analysis to monitor the reactivity of sulfur forms in coal during thermal and chemical desulfurization processes has been developed at the Illinois State Geological Survey. The method is based upon the fact that a significant difference exists in some coals between the 34S/32S ratios of the pyritic and organic sulfur. A screening method for determining the suitability of coal samples for use in isotope ratio analysis is described. Making these special coals available from coal sample programs would assist research groups in sorting out the complex sulfur chemistry which accompanies thermal and chemical processing of high sulfur coals. ?? 1987.

  13. Isotopic evidence for processes of sulfur retention/release in 13 forested catchments spanning a strong pollution gradient

    E-print Network

    Kirchner, James W.

    ]. Between 1975 and 1995, sulfur emissions from burning of high-sulfur coal in two dozen power plantsIsotopic evidence for processes of sulfur retention/release in 13 forested catchments spanning. [1] Sulfur isotope systematics were studied in 13 small catchments in the Czech Republic, similar

  14. Sulfur by-product formation in the Stretford process. Topical report

    SciTech Connect

    Trofe, T.W.; DeBerry, D.W.

    1993-09-01

    Liquid redox sulfur recovery processes remove H2S from sour gas streams and produce elemental sulfur for sale or disposal. The Stretford Process is one of the oldest commercial liquid redox processes and it is based on a vanadium and anthraquinone redox system. Improvements in the operability and reliability of the Stretford process would be beneficial to the process user. The report presents results of research focused on developing an understanding of the process parameters and factors that impact sulfur by-product formation (e.g., sodium thiosulfate and sodium sulfate) in the Stretford process. The information in the report can help current Stretford plant process users better understand the operations of their plants, especially with regards to sulfur by-product formation and control strategies.

  15. Wednesday, March 25, 2009 SULFUR ON MARS: ROCKS, SOILS, AND CYCLING PROCESSES

    E-print Network

    Rathbun, Julie A.

    Wednesday, March 25, 2009 SULFUR ON MARS: ROCKS, SOILS, AND CYCLING PROCESSES 1:30 p.m. Waterway and the Sulfur Cycle on Mars [#2152] Elevated S in martian mantle/crust and absence of plate tectonics results in a S-enriched sedimentary mass. The S-cycle of Mars is analogous to the Earth's C-cycle, with long

  16. Feed and process effects on the in situ reduction of sulfur in FCC gasoline

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. A. Valla; A. A. Lappas; I. A. Vasalos; C. W. Kuehler; N. J. Gudde

    2004-01-01

    In this study we investigated the effects of various types of fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) feedstocks (VGO, FCC gasoline and FCC gasoline cuts) on sulfur compound distribution in the gasoline produced from FCC process. A bench scale short contact time microactivity test unit (SCT-MAT) and an FCC pilot plant unit were found to be satisfactory for the gasoline sulfur studies.

  17. Sampling, preservation, and analytical methods research plan - liquid redox sulfur recovery technologies: Stretford process. Topical report

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Trofe

    1986-01-01

    GRI has developed a sampling, preservation, and analytical (SPandA) methods research plan for developing and validating analytical methodologies for liquid redox sulfur recovery processes (e.g., Stretford process). The document describes the technical approach which will be used to direct research activities to develop SPandA methodologies to analyze gaseous, aqueous, and solid process streams from the Stretford sulfur recovery process. The

  18. Slipstream testing of the Direct Sulfur Recovery Process

    SciTech Connect

    Gangwal, S.K.; Portzer, J.W.; Howe, G.B. [Research Triangle Inst., Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Chen, D.H. [Lamar Univ., Beaumont, TX (United States); McMillian, M.H. [USDOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center, WV (United States)

    1994-10-01

    The objective of this work is to continue further development of the zinc titanate fluidized-bed desulfurization (ZTFBD) and the Direct Sulfur Recovery Process (DSRP) technologies for hot gas cleanup in integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power generating systems. There are three main goals of this project: development of an integrated, skid-mounted, bench-scale ZTFBD/DSRP reactor system; testing the integrated system over an extended period with a slipstream of coal gas from an operating gasifier to quantify the degradation in performance, if any, caused by the trace contaminants present in coal gas (including heavy metals, chlorides, fluorides, and ammonia); and design, fabrication, and commissioning of a larger, pilot-plant scale DSRP reactor system capable of operating on a six-fold volume of gas greater than the reactors used in the bench-scale field tests. The results so far on the first phase are limited to design and construction of the test apparatus. This report describes DSRP technology and equipment that will be used to test it.

  19. Process for recovery of sulfur from acid gases

    DOEpatents

    Towler, Gavin P. (Kirkbymoorside, GB2); Lynn, Scott (Pleasant Hill, CA)

    1995-01-01

    Elemental sulfur is recovered from the H.sub.2 S present in gases derived from fossil fuels by heating the H.sub.2 S with CO.sub.2 in a high-temperature reactor in the presence of a catalyst selected as one which enhances the thermal dissociation of H.sub.2 S to H.sub.2 and S.sub.2. The equilibrium of the thermal decomposition of H.sub.2 S is shifted by the equilibration of the water-gas-shift reaction so as to favor elemental sulfur formation. The primary products of the overall reaction are S.sub.2, CO, H.sub.2 and H.sub.2 O. Small amounts of COS, SO.sub.2 and CS.sub.2 may also form. Rapid quenching of the reaction mixture results in a substantial increase in the efficiency of the conversion of H.sub.2 S to elemental sulfur. Plant economy is further advanced by treating the product gases to remove byproduct carbonyl sulfide by hydrolysis, which converts the COS back to CO.sub.2 and H.sub.2 S. Unreacted CO.sub.2 and H.sub.2 S are removed from the product gas and recycled to the reactor, leaving a gas consisting chiefly of H.sub.2 and CO, which has value either as a fuel or as a chemical feedstock and recovers the hydrogen value from the H.sub.2 S.

  20. Overview of nuclear hydrogen production research through iodine sulfur process at INET

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. Zhang; S. Z. Chen; L. J. Wang; J. M. Xu

    2010-01-01

    Thermochemical water-splitting cycle is a promising process to produce hydrogen using solar or nuclear energy. R&D on hydrogen production through iodine sulfur (IS) thermochemical cycle was initiated in 2005 at INET. Fundamental studies on the three reactions of IS cycle, i.e., Bunsen reaction, HI decomposition reaction, sulfuric acid decomposition reaction, and related techniques, such as separation, concentration and purification, were

  1. A comparison of the UCB sulfur recovery process with conventional sulfur recovery technology for treating recycle gas from a crude oil residuum hydrotreater

    SciTech Connect

    Lynn, S.; Neumann, D.W.; Sciamanna, S.F.; Vorhis, F.H.

    1986-01-01

    The University of California, Berkeley, Sulfur Recovery Process (UCBSRP) is being developed as an alternative to conventional sulfur recovery technology for removing hydrogen sulfide from gas streams and converting it to elemental sulfur. In the UCBSRP the hydrogen sulfide is absorbed by a physical solvent and the resulting solution of H/sub 2/S is mixed with a stoichiometrically equivalent amount of sulfur dioxide dissolved in the same solvent. In this paper the UCBSRP is compared to conventional technology for the case of the removal of H/sub 2/S from the recycle gas of a high-pressure petroleum residuum hydrotreater. The conventional technology selected for this comparison consists of an absorber/stripper operation using diethanol amine as the absorbent, a Claus sulfur plant, and a SCOT tail-gas treating unit. From this comparison it is estimated that the Direct Fixed Capital for the UCBSRP would be about 61% of that for the conventional technology.

  2. Sulfur Fumigation Processing of Traditional Chinese Medicinal Herbs: Beneficial or Detrimental?

    PubMed Central

    Kan, Winnie Lai Ting; Ma, Bin; Lin, Ge

    2011-01-01

    Majority of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) herbs need to undergo post-harvesting processing to convert raw material into the form readily used for prescription. In general, processing procedures are either according to China Pharmacopeia or based on traditional methods. Recently sulfur fumigation is increasingly used to replace traditional sun-drying for its pesticidal and anti-bacterial properties in a cheap and convenient manner. However, to date information on effects of sulfur fumigation on herbal safety and efficacy are limited. This article addresses potential destructive effects of sulfur fumigation on herbal efficacy and safety through reviewing currently available information. Since recently increased numbers of studies have demonstrated that sulfur fumigation-induced dramatic changes in chemical profiles of various sulfur-fumigated herbs, consequent alteration of efficacy, and/or potential incidence of toxicity are suspected. Therefore comprehensive investigations on effects of sulfur fumigation on toxicity, chemical profiles, pharmacokinetics, and bioactivities of TCM herbs are timely to provide scientific basis for standardization and regulation of this currently common but potentially harmful processing method. PMID:22207851

  3. SULFURIC ACID REMOVAL PROCESS EVALUATION: LONG-TERM RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    Gary M. Blythe; Richard McMillan

    2002-07-03

    The objective of this project is to demonstrate the use of alkaline reagents injected into the furnace of coal-fired boilers as a means of controlling sulfuric acid emissions. The project is being co-funded by the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory, under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-99FT40718, along with EPRI, the American Electric Power Company (AEP), FirstEnergy Corp., the Tennessee Valley Authority, and Dravo Lime, Inc. Sulfuric acid controls are becoming of increasing interest to power generators with coal-fired units for a number of reasons. Sulfuric acid is a Toxic Release Inventory species and can cause a variety of plant operation problems such as air heater plugging and fouling, back-end corrosion, and plume opacity. These issues will likely be exacerbated with the retrofit of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) for NO{sub x} control on many coal-fired plants, as SCR catalysts are known to further oxidize a portion of the flue gas SO{sub 2} to SO{sub 3}. The project previously tested the effectiveness of furnace injection of four different calcium-and/or magnesium-based alkaline sorbents on full-scale utility boilers. These reagents were tested during four one- to two-week tests conducted on two FirstEnergy Bruce Mansfield Plant (BMP) units. One of the sorbents tested was a magnesium hydroxide byproduct slurry produced from a modified Thiosorbic{reg_sign} Lime wet flue gas desulfurization system. The other three sorbents are available commercially and include dolomite, pressure-hydrated dolomitic lime, and commercial magnesium hydroxide. The dolomite reagent was injected as a dry powder through out-of-service burners, while the other three reagents were injected as slurries through air-atomizing nozzles inserted through the front wall of the upper furnace, either across from the nose of the furnace or across from the pendant superheater tubes. After completing the four one- to two-week tests, the most promising sorbents were selected for longer-term (approximately 25-day) full-scale tests on two different units. The longer-term tests were conducted to confirm the effectiveness of the sorbents tested over extended operation on two different boilers, and to determine balance-of-plant impacts. The first long-term test was conducted on FirstEnergy's BMP, Unit 3, and the second test was conducted on AEP's Gavin Plant, Unit 1. The Gavin Plant testing provided an opportunity to evaluate the effects of sorbent injected into the furnace on SO{sub 3} formed across an operating SCR reactor. This report presents the results from those long-term tests. The tests determined the effectiveness of injecting commercially available magnesium hydroxide slurry (Gavin Plant) and byproduct magnesium hydroxide slurry (both Gavin Plant and BMP) for sulfuric acid control. The results show that injecting either slurry could achieve up to 70 to 75% overall sulfuric acid removal. At BMP, this overall removal was limited by the need to maintain acceptable electrostatic precipitator (ESP) particulate control performance. At Gavin Plant, the overall sulfuric acid removal was limited because the furnace injected sorbent was less effective at removing SO{sub 3} formed across the SCR system installed on the unit for NOX control than at removing SO{sub 3} formed in the furnace. The long-term tests also determined balance-of-plant impacts from slurry injection during the two tests. These include impacts on boiler back-end temperatures and pressure drops, SCR catalyst properties, ESP performance, removal of other flue gas species, and flue gas opacity. For the most part the balance-of-plant impacts were neutral to positive, although adverse effects on ESP performance became an issue during the BMP test.

  4. Reducing PCDD/F formation by adding sulfur as inhibitor in waste incineration processes.

    PubMed

    Chang, Moo Been; Cheng, Yao Chiang; Chi, Kai Hsien

    2006-08-01

    The results obtained in this study indicate that addition of sulfur in incineration processes could effectively reduce PCDD/F formation. PCDD/F formation is reduced dramatically (54.1%) when S/Cl molar ratio is controlled at about 2 in a laboratory-scale system (LSS). The XRD analysis of the fly ash confirms the existence of vulcanized metals such as Cu2SO4, Cu2S, SnS and ZnS. The results suggest that the sulfur added would poison Cu-based metals and render the Deacon reaction catalyst less active, thereby reducing PCDD/F formation. In addition, the results obtained from the tests conducted in an industrial waste incinerator (IWI) indicate that the efficiency of reducing PCDD/F formation by adding sulfur was 51.6% at S/Cl mole ratio of 0.4. The results indicate that adding too much sulfur would actually increase particle concentration and also increase PCDD/F yield. This study demonstrates the effectiveness of adding sulfur as an alternative technology for reducing PCDD/F emissions from waste incineration processes. The efficiency of reducing PCDD/F formation by addition of sulfur is strongly influenced by S/Cl mole ratio. PMID:16814367

  5. Process for increasing octane and reducing sulfur content of olefinic gasolines

    SciTech Connect

    Patridge, R.D.; Schobert, M.A.; Wong, S.S.

    1991-08-20

    This patent describes a process for producing a gasoline of reduced sulfur content. It comprises contacting a catalytically cracked olefinic gasoline having an initial boiling point of at least 180{degrees} F and an initial sulfur content of at least 50 ppm and containing an initial content of olefins and aromatics and having an initial octane number with a catalyst composition comprising a noble metal component and a large pore zeolite having a framework silica alumina ratio of at least 50, at a temperature from 750{degrees} F to 1200{degrees} F, an elevated pressure up to 1435 psig and a space velocity (LHSV) of 0.1 to 20, to reduce the olefinic content of the gasoline while reducing its sulfur content to a value below the initial sulfur content without reducing the initial octane number and increasing the content of aromatics to a value above that of the initial aromatics content, and recovering a gasoline having a sulfur content lower than the initial sulfur content, an olefins content lower than the initial olefins content, and an aromatics content which exceeds the initial aromatics content.

  6. Catalytic hydrosolvation process converts coal to low-sulfur liquid fuel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Qader, S. A.

    1978-01-01

    Development of the catalytic hydrosolvation process for converting coal to low-sulfur fuel oil is described in this paper. Coal impregnated with catalyst was slurried with oil, and the mixture was hydrogenated at a temperature of 475 C, and 30 min residence time under 3600 psi pressure. A ton of coal yielded 3.5 bbl of fuel oil containing 0.2% sulfur, with naphtha and C1-C4 hydrocarbon gases as byproducts. A preliminary economic evaluation of the process indicated potential for further development.

  7. Responses to the Environmental Health and Safety (EH and S) questionnaire on liquid redox sulfur-recovery processes. Final report

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rueter

    1990-01-01

    Liquid redox sulfur recovery processes represent an important category of methods currently in use for removing H2S and recovering elemental sulfur from gaseous streams. The Gas Research Institute has been funding research on the complex chemistry of these processes in order to improve their performance and reliability and to evaluate the environmental effects of discharge streams. Since little information is

  8. DEVELOPMENT OF THE WESTVACO ACTIVATED CARBON PROCESS FOR SOX RECOVERY AS ELEMENTAL SULFUR. VOLUME II. APPENDIX

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a demonstration (in a 20,000-cfh integral pilot plant) of an all-dry, fluidized-bed process, using activated carbon for recovering SO2 as elemental sulfur. Granular carbon was recycled continuously more than 20 times between contact with flue gas from ...

  9. DEVELOPMENT OF THE WESTVACO ACTIVATED CARBON PROCESS FOR SOX RECOVERY AS ELEMENTAL SULFUR. VOLUME I

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a demonstration (in a 20,000-cfh integral pilot plant) of an all-dry, fluidized-bed process, using activated carbon for recovering SO2 as elemental sulfur. Granular carbon was recycled continuously more than 20 times between contact with flue gas from ...

  10. DEVELOPMENT OF INFRARED METHODS FOR CHARACTERIZATION OF INORGANIC SULFUR SPECIES RELATED TO INJECTION DESULFURIZATION PROCESSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Current methods designed to control and reduce the amount of sulfur dioxide emitted into the atmosphere from coal-fired power plants and factories rely upon the reaction between SO2 and alkaline earth compounds and are called flue gas desulfurization (FGD) processes. Of these met...

  11. EFFECT OF FILTRATION TEMPERATURE ON ORGANIC SULFUR REMOVAL FROM COAL BY PERCHLOROETHYLENE COAL CLEANING PROCESS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Padmakar Vishnubhatt; Sunggyu Lee

    1993-01-01

    The perchloroethylene extraction desulfurization process removes the organic sulfur in coal via a hybrid mechanism of solvent extraction and chemical reaction. The nature and extent of the reaction is controlled by the extraction time and temperature of operation. Although the extraction temperature is kept identical for all types of coals (120°C), the organosulfur extraction time still depends upon the type

  12. Finishing process for the removal of sulfur compounds from a gas steam

    SciTech Connect

    Tazuma, J.J.; Frech, K.J.

    1984-07-31

    The invention relates to a finishing process for the removal of low level concentrations of mercaptans, sulfides and disulfides from a gas stream, especially a natural gas stream. The sulfur compounds are washed from the gas stream with a solution containing hydrogen peroxide, sodium carbonate or sodium hydroxide, and ammonia or an amine.

  13. Use of nonionic surfactant to reduce sulfuric acid mist in the copper electrowinning process

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jennifer L. Sigley; Paul C. Johnson; Stephen P. Beaudoin

    2003-01-01

    During the copper electrowinning process, sulfuric acid mist is released into the air above the electrowinning tanks. This mist causes health problems for the operators in the electrowinning plant. Therefore, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has mandated that electrowinning tanks comply with new stringent regulations. This has sparked an interest by copper mines to develop new techniques to

  14. A Tire-Sulfur Hybrid Adsorption Denitrification (T-SHAD) process for decentralized wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Krayzelova, Lucie; Lynn, Thomas J; Banihani, Qais; Bartacek, Jan; Jenicek, Pavel; Ergas, Sarina J

    2014-09-15

    Nitrogen discharges from decentralized wastewater treatment (DWT) systems contribute to surface and groundwater contamination. However, the high variability in loading rates, long idle periods and lack of regular maintenance presents a challenge for biological nitrogen removal in DWT. A Tire-Sulfur Hybrid Adsorption Denitrification (T-SHAD) process was developed that combines nitrate (NO3(-)) adsorption to scrap tire chips with sulfur-oxidizing denitrification. This allows the tire chips to adsorb NO3(-) when the influent loading exceeds the denitrification capacity of the biofilm and release it when NO3(-) loading rates are low (e.g. at night). Three waste products, scrap tire chips, elemental sulfur pellets and crushed oyster shells, were used as a medium in adsorption, leaching, microcosm and up-flow packed bed bioreactor studies of NO3(-) removal from synthetic nitrified DWT wastewater. Adsorption isotherms showed that scrap tire chips have an adsorption capacity of 0.66 g NO3(-)-N kg(-1) of scrap tires. Leaching and microcosm studies showed that scrap tires leach bioavailable organic carbon that can support mixotrophic metabolism, resulting in lower effluent SO4(2-) concentrations than sulfur oxidizing denitrification alone. In column studies, the T-SHAD process achieved high NO3(-)-N removal efficiencies under steady state (90%), variable flow (89%) and variable concentration (94%) conditions. PMID:24922353

  15. Test of TDA's Direct Oxidation Process for Sulfur Recovery

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Girish Srinivas; Steven C. Gebhard; Eugene Peeples; Sandra Huzyk; Randy Welch

    2005-01-01

    This project was a Phase III pilot plant test of TDA's gas sweetening process done under realistic conditions. TDA Research Inc successfully completed the test at Whiting Petroleum's Sable San Andreas Gas Plant. The feed was approximately 228,000 standard cubic feet per day (SCFD) of gas that contained approximately 60 vol% COâ, 20 vol% CHâ and 10 vol% Câ+ and

  16. Low strength wastewater treatment under low temperature conditions by a novel sulfur redox action process.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, T; Bungo, Y; Takahashi, M; Sumino, H; Nagano, A; Araki, N; Imai, T; Yamazaki, S; Harada, H

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this research is to make a novel wastewater treatment process activated by a sulfur-redox cycle action of microbes in low temperature conditions. This action is carried out by sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) and sulfur-oxidizing bacteria (SOB). The process was comprised of a UASB reactor as pre-treatment and an aerobic downflow hanging sponge (DHS) reactor as post-treatment. As the results of reactor operation, the whole process achieved that over 90% of CODcr removal efficiency, less than 30 mgCODcr/L (less than 15 mgBOD/L) of final effluent, at 12 h of HRT and at 8 degrees C of UASB reactor temperature. Acetobacterium sp. was detected as the predominant species by PCR-DGGE method targeting 16SrDNA with band excision and sequence analysis. In the UASB reactor, various species of sulfate-reducing bacterium, Desulfobulbus sp., Desulfovibrio sp., and Desulfomicrobium sp., were found by cloning analysis. In the DHS reactor, Tetracoccus sp. presented as dominant. The proposed sulfur-redox action process was considered as an applicable process for low strength wastewater treatment in low temperature conditions. PMID:16749445

  17. [Effects of different processing methods on effective components and sulfur dioxide residue in Gastrodiae Rhizoma].

    PubMed

    Ning, Zi-Wan; Mao, Chun-Qin; Lu, Tu-Lin; Ji, De; Liu, Jing; Ji, Lin; Yang, Huan; Wang, Fa-Qin

    2014-08-01

    The contents of adenosine, gastrodin, 4-hydroxybenzyl alcohol, 4-hydroxybenzaldehyde, parishin and sulfur dioxide residue were compared in differently-processed Gastrodiae Rhizoma to provide the basis for a reasonable processing method of Gastrodiae Rhizoma. The analysis was performed on a Merck Purospher STAR column (4.6 mm x 250 mm, 5 ?m) with a mobile phase consisting of methanol and water (containing 0.1% formic acid) under gradient elution at a flow rate of 1.0 mL x min(-1). The eluates were detected at 270 nm, and the column temperature was 35°C. The content of adenosin, gastrodin, 4-hydroxybenzyl alcohol, 4-hydroxy-benzaldehyde and parishin in processing of boiling or sulfur-fumigated were lower than that of in processing of steaming. Furthermore, the sulfur dioxide residue of sulphur-fumigated groups exceed 400 mg x kg(-1). This stable and reliable method will contribute to the quality control of different processed Gastrodiae Rhizoma. PMID:25507536

  18. [Effects of different processing methods on effective components and sulfur dioxide residue in Gastrodiae Rhizoma].

    PubMed

    Ning, Zi-Wan; Mao, Chun-Qin; Lu, Tu-Lin; Ji, De; Liu, Jing; Ji, Lin; Yang, Huan; Wang, Fa-Qin

    2014-08-01

    The contents of adenosine, gastrodin, 4-hydroxybenzyl alcohol, 4-hydroxybenzaldehyde, parishin and sulfur dioxide residue were compared in differently-processed Gastrodiae Rhizoma to provide the basis for a reasonable processing method of Gastrodiae Rhizoma. The analysis was performed on a Merck Purospher STAR column (4.6 mm x 250 mm, 5 ?m) with a mobile phase consisting of methanol and water (containing 0.1% formic acid) under gradient elution at a flow rate of 1.0 mL x min(-1). The eluates were detected at 270 nm, and the column temperature was 35°C. The content of adenosin, gastrodin, 4-hydroxybenzyl alcohol, 4-hydroxy-benzaldehyde and parishin in processing of boiling or sulfur-fumigated were lower than that of in processing of steaming. Furthermore, the sulfur dioxide residue of sulphur-fumigated groups exceed 400 mg x kg(-1). This stable and reliable method will contribute to the quality control of different processed Gastrodiae Rhizoma. PMID:25423814

  19. HYBRID SULFUR RECOVERY PROCESS FOR NATURAL GAS UPGRADING LAST TECHNICAL REPORT BEFORE NOVATION FROM URS CORP. TO CRYSTATECH, INC

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Girish Srinivas; Steven C. Gebhard; David W. DeBerry

    2001-01-01

    This project was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to test a hybrid sulfur recovery process for natural gas upgrading. The process concept represents a low cost option for direct treatment of natural gas streams to remove HâS in quantities equivalent to 0.2-25 metric tons (LT) of sulfur per day. This process is projected to have lower capital

  20. Lab-scale water-splitting hydrogen production test of modified hybrid sulfur process working at around 550 °C

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Toshihide Takai; Shinji Kubo; Toshio Nakagiri; Yoshiyuki Inagaki

    2011-01-01

    A hydrogen production process based on a well-known hybrid sulfur process is under development; the process employs two electrolyzers, one of which uses a unique gaseous sulfur trioxide electrolysis. The goal is to lower the top-end reaction temperature to around the operating temperature of sodium cooled fast breeder reactors (500–550 °C). Three key engineering issues were examined using a laboratory-stage apparatus.

  1. Global warming potential of the sulfur–iodine process using life cycle assessment methodology

    Microsoft Academic Search

    William C. Lattin; Vivek P. Utgikar

    2009-01-01

    A life cycle assessment (LCA) of one proposed method of hydrogen production – thermochemical water-splitting using the sulfur–iodine cycle couple with a very high-temperature nuclear reactor – is presented in this paper. Thermochemical water-splitting theoretically offers a higher overall efficiency than high-temperature electrolysis of water because heat from the nuclear reactor is provided directly to the hydrogen generation process, instead

  2. Gasoline from natural gas by sulfur processing. Quarterly progress report, June--September 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Erekson, E.J.; Miao, F.Q.

    1993-10-01

    The overall objective of this research project is to develop a catalytic process to convert natural gas to liquid transportation fuels. The process consists of two steps that each utilize catalysts and sulfur containing intermediates: (1) to convert natural gas to CS{sub 2}, and (2) to convert CS{sub 2} to gasoline range liquids. Experimental data will be generated to demonstrate the potential of catalysts and the overall process. During this first quarter, progress in the following areas has been made. One high surface area molybdenum catalyst has been prepared. An existing unit at IGT is being modified to accommodate the sulfur feedstocks and the higher temperatures(> 1300{degrees}K) required for studying the reactions of hydrogen sulfide and methane as proposed in Tasks 2 through 5. An HP 5890 gas chromatograph with a TCD(thermal conductivity detector) for detecting fixed gases including hydrogen and an FPD(flame photometric detector) for detecting sulfur compounds was purchased using SMP funds and has been received.

  3. Processing of the Presequence of the Schizosaccharomyces pombe Rieske Iron-Sulfur Protein Occurs in a Single Step and Can Be

    E-print Network

    Trumpower, Bernard L.

    Processing of the Presequence of the Schizosaccharomyces pombe Rieske Iron-Sulfur Protein Occurs¨r Biochemie I, D-60590 Frankfurt, Germany The iron-sulfur proteins of the cytochrome bc1 com- plexes sequence the S. pombe iron-sulfur protein is processed only once during import into mitochondria, whereas

  4. Abatement of sulfur hexafluoride emissions from the semiconductor manufacturing process by atmospheric-pressure plasmas.

    PubMed

    Lee, How Ming; Chang, Moo Been; Wu, Kuan Yu

    2004-08-01

    Sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) is an important gas for plasma etching processes in the semiconductor industry. SF6 intensely absorbs infrared radiation and, consequently, aggravates global warming. This study investigates SF6 abatement by nonthermal plasma technologies under atmospheric pressure. Two kinds of nonthermal plasma processes--dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) and combined plasma catalysis (CPC)--were employed and evaluated. Experimental results indicated that as much as 91% of SF6 was removed with DBDs at 20 kV of applied voltage and 150 Hz of discharge frequency for the gas stream containing 300 ppm SF6, 12% oxygen (O2), and 40% argon (Ar), with nitrogen (N2) as the carrier gas. Four additives, including Ar, O2, ethylene (C2H4), and H2O(g), are effective in enhancing SF6 abatement in the range of conditions studied. DBD achieves a higher SF6 removal efficiency than does CPC at the same operation condition. But CPC achieves a higher electrical energy utilization compared with DBD. However, poisoning of catalysts by sulfur (S)-containing species needs further investigation. SF6 is mainly converted to SOF2, SO2F4, sulfur dioxide (SO2), oxygen difluoride (OF2), and fluoride (F2). They do not cause global warming and can be captured by either wet scrubbing or adsorption. This study indicates that DBD and CPC are feasible control technologies for reducing SF6 emissions. PMID:15373364

  5. Process for the hydroformylation of sulfur-containing thermally cracked petroleum residue and novel products thereof

    SciTech Connect

    Oswald, A.A.; Bhatia, R.N.; Mozeleski, E.J.; Glivicky, A.P.; Brueggeman, B.G.; Hooten, J.R.; Smith, C.M.; Hsu, C.S.

    1991-07-09

    This patent describes a hydroformylation-hydrogenation process comprising reacting an olefinic cracked petroleum distillate feed, produced from petroleum residue by high temperature thermal cracking, and containing C{sub 5} to C{sub 35}-1-n-alkyl olefins as the major type of olefin components, and organic sulfur compounds in concentrations exceeding 0.1% sulfur. It comprises at first with carbon monoxide and hydrogen at temperatures between about 50 and 250{degrees} C and pressures in the range of 50 to 6000 psi; in the presence of a Group VIII transition metal carbonyl complex catalyst in effective amounts to produce aldehydes of a semilinear character having an average of less than one alkyl branch per molecule and 20% by weight or more linear isomers, then with molecular hydrogen at temperatures between 100 and 250{degrees} C and pressures between 200 psi and 5000 psi (13.6 and 340 atm) in the presence of a hydrogenation catalyst in effective amounts the catalyst being sulfur resistant cobalt, molybdenum, nickel, or tungsten or a sulfide thereof to produce the corresponding alcohols of a semilinear character having an average of less than one alkyl branch per molecule and 20% by weight or more linear isomers, then with molecular hydrogen at temperatures between 100 and 250{degrees} C and pressures between 200 psi and 5000 psi (13.6 and 340 atm) in the presence of a hydrogenation catalyst in effective amounts the catalyst being sulfur resistant cobalt, molybdenum, nickel, or tungsten or a sulfide thereof to produce the corresponding alcohols of a semilinear character having an average of less than one alkyl branch per molecule.

  6. Effects of sulfur content and slab reheating temperature on the magnetic properties of fully processed nonoriented electrical steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Chun-Kan

    The effects of sulfur content and slab reheating temperature on the magnetic properties of four fully processed nonoriented electrical steels have been investigated. Four slabs of nonoriented electrical steels with sulfur content in the range of 0.0006-0.0126 wt% were reheated to 1100, 1200, and 1300 °C, respectively. Then, they were hot rolled and annealed at 700 °C, cold rolled at the same condition and annealed at 820 °C in the salt bath furnace for 1 min to simulate continuous annealing. The ac core loss, dc hysteresis loss, and ac and dc permeability were measured at 15 kG inductions. It was found that the amount of inclusions in the hot-rolled bands increased with increasing slab reheating temperature and increasing sulfur content in steels. After final annealing, grain sizes of cold-rolled steel sheets decreased with increasing sulfur content and increasing slab reheating temperature. The main preferred orientations in the final annealed steel sheets were (0 1 1) <1 0 0> and (1 1 1) < u v w> ? fiber texture. Steel sheets containing 0.0032 and 0.0060 wt% sulfur developed a more stronger (0 1 1)<1 0 0> texture than other steel sheets. However, steel sheets containing 0.0126 wt% sulfur had the weakest (1 1 1)< u v w> texture during slab reheating at temperatures higher than 1200 °C. Both ac core loss and dc hysteresis loss increased with increasing slab reheating temperature and increasing sulfur content in steel sheets. Both ac and dc permeability decreased with increasing slab reheating temperature and increasing sulfur content in steel sheets. If sulfur content decreased from 0.0060 to 0.0032 wt%, there were great improvements in ac core loss, dc hysteresis loss, and ac and dc permeability. However, eddy current loss was almost independent of the sulfur content and slab reheating temperature.

  7. Effects of process parameters on sulfur removal efficiency in a fluidized bed

    SciTech Connect

    Sahan, R.A. [Lehigh Univ., Bethlehem, PA (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering and Mechanics

    1995-12-31

    The effects of coal properties and process parameters, such as fluidized bed depth, superficial gas velocity, coal to magnetite feed weight ratio and processing time, on coal cleaning efficiency was experimentally studied in a bubbling fluidized bed separator. The coal cleaning experiments were performed with one various size fractions of Pennsylvania`s bituminous coals, Rushton coal. The performance of the coal cleaning process was measured with the aid of sulfur and ash removal efficiencies. Previous experimental results and those obtained in this study indicated that, when operated in optimum process conditions, coal particle sizes smaller than 240 {micro}m and larger than 143 {micro}m can be cleaned with high performance in the fluidized bed separator. For coal particle sizes smaller than 143 {micro}m, high interparticle cohesive forces caused slugging and channeling inside the bed. As a result of this, relatively poor cleaning performance was recorded for very fine size fraction of Rushton coal.

  8. THE EFFECT OF SULFUR ON METHANE PARTIAL OXIDATION AND REFORMING PROCESSES FOR LEAN NOX TRAP CATALYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    Parks, II, James E [ORNL; Ponnusamy, Senthil [ORNL

    2006-01-01

    Lean NOx trap catalysis has demonstrated the ability to reduce NOx emissions from lean natural gas reciprocating engines by >90%. The technology operates in a cyclic fashion where NOx is trapped on the catalyst during lean operation and released and reduced to N2 under rich exhaust conditions; the rich cleansing operation of the cycle is referred to as "regeneration" since the catalyst is reactivated for more NOx trapping after NOx purge. Creating the rich exhaust conditions for regeneration can be accomplished by catalytic partial oxidation of methane in the exhaust system. Furthermore, catalytic reforming of partial oxidation exhaust can enable increased quantities of H2 which is an excellent reductant for lean NOx trap regeneration. It is critical to maintain clean and efficient partial oxidation and reforming processes to keep the lean NOx trap functioning properly and to reduce extra fuel consumption from the regeneration process. Although most exhaust constituents do not impede partial oxidation and reforming, some exhaust constituents may negatively affect the catalysts and result in loss of catalytic efficiency. Of particular concern are common catalyst poisons sulfur, zinc, and phosphorous. These poisons form in the exhaust through combustion of fuel and oil, and although they are present at low concentrations, they can accumulate to significant levels over the life of an engine system. In the work presented here, the effects of sulfur on the partial oxidation and reforming catalytic processes were studied to determine any durability limitations on the production of reductants for lean NOx trap catalyst regeneration.

  9. Pretreatment of rice straw with combined process using dilute sulfuric acid and aqueous ammonia

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Use of lignocellulosic biomass has received attention lately because it can be converted into various versatile chemical compounds by biological processes. In this study, a two-step pretreatment with dilute sulfuric acid and aqueous ammonia was performed efficiently on rice straw to obtain fermentable sugar. The soaking in aqueous ammonia process was also optimized by a statistical method. Results Response surface methodology was employed. The determination coefficient (R2) value was found to be 0.9607 and the coefficient of variance was 6.77. The optimal pretreatment conditions were a temperature of 42.75°C, an aqueous ammonia concentration of 20.93%, and a reaction time of 48 h. The optimal enzyme concentration for saccharification was 30 filter paper units. The crystallinity index was approximately 60.23% and the Fourier transform infrared results showed the distinct peaks of glucan. Ethanol production using Saccharomyces cerevisiae K35 was performed to verify whether the glucose saccharified from rice straw was fermentable. Conclusions The combined pretreatment using dilute sulfuric acid and aqueous ammonia on rice straw efficiently yielded fermentable sugar and achieved almost the same crystallinity index as that of ?-cellulose. PMID:23898802

  10. Regenerative process and system for the simultaneous removal of particulates and the oxides of sulfur and nitrogen from a gas stream

    DOEpatents

    Cohen, Mitchell R. (Troy, NY); Gal, Eli (Lititz, PA)

    1993-01-01

    A process and system for simultaneously removing from a gaseous mixture, sulfur oxides by means of a solid sulfur oxide acceptor on a porous carrier, nitrogen oxides by means of ammonia gas and particulate matter by means of filtration and for the regeneration of loaded solid sulfur oxide acceptor. Finely-divided solid sulfur oxide acceptor is entrained in a gaseous mixture to deplete sulfur oxides from the gaseous mixture, the finely-divided solid sulfur oxide acceptor being dispersed on a porous carrier material having a particle size up to about 200 microns. In the process, the gaseous mixture is optionally pre-filtered to remove particulate matter and thereafter finely-divided solid sulfur oxide acceptor is injected into the gaseous The government of the United States of America has rights in this invention pursuant to Contract No. DE-AC21-88MC 23174 awarded by the U.S. Department of Energy.

  11. Regenerative process and system for the simultaneous removal of particulates and the oxides of sulfur and nitrogen from a gas stream

    DOEpatents

    Cohen, M.R.; Gal, E.

    1993-04-13

    A process and system are described for simultaneously removing from a gaseous mixture, sulfur oxides by means of a solid sulfur oxide acceptor on a porous carrier, nitrogen oxides by means of ammonia gas and particulate matter by means of filtration and for the regeneration of loaded solid sulfur oxide acceptor. Finely-divided solid sulfur oxide acceptor is entrained in a gaseous mixture to deplete sulfur oxides from the gaseous mixture, the finely-divided solid sulfur oxide acceptor being dispersed on a porous carrier material having a particle size up to about 200 microns. In the process, the gaseous mixture is optionally pre-filtered to remove particulate matter and thereafter finely-divided solid sulfur oxide acceptor is injected into the gaseous mixture.

  12. Process for producing low-sulfur boiler fuel by hydrotreatment of solvent deashed SRC

    DOEpatents

    Roberts, George W. (Emmaus, PA); Tao, John C. (Perkiomenville, PA)

    1985-01-01

    In this invention, a process is disclosed characterized by heating a slurry of coal in the presence of a process-derived recycle solvent and passing same to a dissolver zone, separating the resultant gases and liquid/solid products therefrom, vacuum distilling the liquid/solids products, separating the portions of the liquid/solids vacuum distillation effluent into a solid ash, unconverted coal particles and SRC material having a boiling point above 850.degree. F. and subjecting same to a critical solvent deashing step to provide an ash-free SRC product. The lighter liquid products from the vacuum distillation possess a boiling point below 850.degree. F. and are passed through a distillation tower, from which recycled solvent is recovered in addition to light distillate boiling below 400.degree. F. (overhead). The ash-free SRC product in accompanyment with at least a portion of the process derived solvent is passed in combination to a hydrotreating zone containing a hydrogenation catalyst and in the presence of hydrogen is hydroprocessed to produce a desulfurized and denitrogenized low-sulfur, low-ash boiler fuel and a process derived recycle solvent which is recycled to slurry the coal in the beginning of the process before heating.

  13. Sulfur behavior in the Sasol-Lurgi fixed-bed dry-bottom gasification process

    SciTech Connect

    M. Pat Skhonde; R. Henry Matjie; J. Reginald Bunt; A. Christien Strydom; H. Schobert [Sasol Technology R& amp; D, Sasolburg (South Africa)

    2009-01-15

    This article reports on the findings of a study regarding the sulfur behavior across a Sasol-Lurgi gasifier. This was undertaken to understand the behavior of the various sulfur-bearing components in the coal, as they are exposed to the conditions in the gasifier. In this study, conventional characterization techniques were employed to monitor the behavior of sulfur-bearing mineral matter across the gasifier. It was observed from the study that the sulfur-bearing mineral (pyrite) in the coal structure undergoes various changes with pyrite being transformed to pyrrhotite and then to various oxides of iron with the subsequent loss of sulfur to form H{sub 2}S. A low proportion of the sulfur species including the organically associated sulfur was encapsulated by a melt that was formed by the interaction between kaolinite and fluxing minerals (pyrite, calcite, and dolomite/ankerite) present in the coal at elevated temperatures and pressure, thereby ending up in the ash. The remaining small proportions of sulfur-bearing mineral matter including pyrite and organically bound sulfur in the unburned carbon in the carbonaceous shales also report to the ash. 18 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Molecular Structure of sulfur

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2002-08-26

    The discoverer of sulfur remains anonymous because of lack of records. However, one can trace back to the discovery of R.W. Wood when he used ultra-violet rays to find a sulfur deposit near the crater of Aristarchus on the moon. Sulfur is also found in meteorites. In the United States, Sulfur can be found along the Gulf Coast in wells sunk along salt domes. It is brought to the surface using the Frasch Process in which heated water is forced into the wells and melts the surface. Sulfur may also be found in volcanos or hot springs. Other uses of Sulfur include making phosphatic fertilizers, matches, and medicine. The mineral is a good insulator and takes part in bleaching dried fruit. Sulfur is a minor constitute of body fluids, fats, and skeletal minerals. It can be said that Sulfur is essential to life.

  15. Emission characteristics of nitrogen- and sulfur-containing odorous compounds during different sewage sludge chemical conditioning processes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huan; Luo, Guang-Qian; Hu, Hong-Yun; Zhang, Qiang; Yang, Jia-Kuan; Yao, Hong

    2012-10-15

    Chemical conditioners are often used to enhance sewage sludge dewaterability through altering sludge properties and flocs structure, both affect odorous compounds emissions not only during sludge conditioning but also in subsequent sludge disposal. This study was to investigate emission characteristics of ammonia (NH(3)), sulfur dioxide (SO(2)), hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S) and carbonyl sulfide (COS) generated from sewage sludge conditioned by three representative conditioners, i.e., organic polymers, iron salts and skeleton builders, F-S (Fenton's reagent and skeleton builders) composite conditioner. The results demonstrate that polyacrylamide (PAM) has an insignificant effect on emission characteristics of nitrogen- and sulfur-containing odorous compounds, because the properties, sulfur and nitrogen speciations are similar in PAM-conditioned sludge and raw sludge (RS). Significant increases of SO(2) and H(2)S emissions in the H(2)SO(4) conditioning process were observed due to the accelerated decomposition of sulfur-containing amino acids in acidic environment. Fenton peroxidation facilitates the formation of COS. CaO can reduce sulfur-containing gases emission via generation of calcium sulfate. However, under strong alkaline conditions, free ammonia or protonated amine in sludge can be easily converted to volatile ammonia, resulting in a significant release of NH(3). PMID:22902143

  16. Identification of sources and formation processes of atmospheric sulfate by sulfur isotope and scanning

    E-print Network

    Kaufman, Alan Jay

    sulfate by sulfur isotope and scanning electron microscope measurements Zhaobing Guo,1,2 Zhanqing Li,1 sulfur isotope abundances (32 S, 33 S, 34S, and 36 S) and by detailed Xray diffraction and scanning to August 2005. The comparison of SEM images from coal fly ash and the atmospheric aerosols suggests

  17. Bench-scale testing and evaluation of the Direct Sulfur Recovery Process

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. K. Gangwal; W. J. McMichael; S. K. Agarwal; D. H. Chen; J. R. Hopper

    1992-01-01

    The present work seeks to (1) demonstrate the DSRP in an integrated two-stage bench-scale unit scaled up by a factor of up to 40, for up to 99 percent or higher recovery of sulfur, (2) explain the high sulfur yield and mechanism of DSRP reactions by conducting kinetic experiments and advanced thermodynamic calculations, and (3) continue technology transfer to the

  18. Early diagenetic processes of saline meromictic Lake Kai-ike, southwest Japan: III. Sulfur speciation and isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakai, N.; Yamaguchi, K. E.; Oguri, K.

    2014-12-01

    Lake Kai-ike is a saline meromictic lake located along the coast of Kami-Koshiki Island. The lake is isolated from ocean by a gravel bar, through which seawater infiltrates by tidal pumping. The lake is permanently redox (density)-stratified with a mid-depth development of photic zone anoxia and a dense community of photosynthetic bacteria pinkish "bacterial plate". The early diagenesis of sulfur in sediments overlain by an anoxic water body was investigated using a sediment core (KAI4) from the lake. We determined abundance of various S-bearing species (i.e., Cr-reducible sulfide (= pyrite S: Spy), acid-volatile sulfide (AVS), sulfate sulfur (SSO4), elemental sulfur (S0), and organic sulfur) by an improved sequential extraction method. Here we focus on drastic and rapid changes on sulfur biogeochemistry found in the uppermost 5cm layer. With increasing depth, abundance of Spy increased but that of SSO4 and ?34S value of Spy (?34Spy) decreased. These results suggest progressive formation of bacteriogenic pyrite. The ?34S values of SSO4 (?34SSO4) ranged from 25.1 ‰ (at sediment surface) to 3.8 ‰ in the uppermost 5 cm layer. This ?34SSO4 decrease in the top 5 cm sediment suggests that SSO4 in the surface sediment inherits SO42- with elevated ?34S values (higher than typical seawater ?34S value of 21‰) in the water column, which is due to extensive bacterial sulfate reduction with preferential removal of low-?34S sulfur as sulfide. In the lower part of the uppermost 5 cm layer, SO42- formed by oxidation of S0, AVS, and/or Spy with low-?34S values by SO42--bearing seawater introduced by infiltration through the gravel bar. Increasing ?34Spy values with increasing depth suggest near complete consumption of SO42- by active bacterial sulfate reduction, and this process could be explained by Rayleigh distillation model. Early diagenesis of sulfur does occur in whole section of 25cm-long KAI4 core that accumulated for the last ~60 years (Yamaguchi et al., 2010; Palaeo3). Geochemical characteristics of sulfur in the uppermost part of Lake Kai-ike sediment were significantly modified during early diagenesis. Such diagenetic modification for sulfur isotopes should be fully taken into account to better reconstruct past anoxic environment such as Cretaceous OAEs and Archean oceans.

  19. Responses to the Environmental Health and Safety (EH and S) questionnaire on liquid redox sulfur-recovery processes. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Rueter, C.O.

    1990-06-01

    Liquid redox sulfur recovery processes represent an important category of methods currently in use for removing H2S and recovering elemental sulfur from gaseous streams. The Gas Research Institute has been funding research on the complex chemistry of these processes in order to improve their performance and reliability and to evaluate the environmental effects of discharge streams. Since little information is publicly available about the environmental, health, and safety (EH S) practices in operating plants, a questionnaire was developed to gather such information. The questionnaire addressed many of the data gaps in the literature and included five sections; general information, gaseous wastes and odors, liquid waste handling, sulfur and solid waste handling, and chemical handling/housekeeping/maintenance. The EH S questionnaire was distributed to every liquid redox plant that could be identified from literature references and lists supplied by process vendors and from contacts made at GRI-sponsored liquid redox conferences. A total of 59 questionnaires were mailed to plants, and 20 completed questionnaires were returned. Based on the survey responses, the following areas have been recommended for further research: solution blowdown and disposal, sulfur purification, health and safety practices, and regulatory issues.

  20. Contributions of organic matter and organic sulfur redox processes to electron flow in anoxic incubations of peat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    YU, Zhiguo; Peiffer, Stefan; Göttlicher, Jörg; Knorr, Klaus-Holger

    2015-04-01

    Anaerobic decomposition of peat soils involves a number of interdependent microbial processes that ultimately generate CO2 and CH4. In many peat soils, a high ratio of CO2:CH4 was reported, which presumably results from a direct or indirect role of soil organic matter serving as an electron acceptor. Therefore, in this study we intended to test the hypothesis that organic matter (OM) suppresses methanogenesis and sustains anaerobic CO2 production, serving as i) direct electron acceptor or ii) via supporting internal sulfur cycling to maintains CO2 production through bacterial sulfate reduction (BSR). We incubated peat samples of commercial bog peat, inoculated with a small amount of fresh peat to introduce an active microbial community. Samples were amended with sulfate or sulfide and incubated under anoxic conditions for 6 weeks at 30 ° C. Upon anaerobic incubation of peat virtually devoid of inorganic electron acceptors, CO2 and CH4 were produced at a ratio of 3.2. According to the electron budget, the calculated electron accepting capacity (EAC) of OM was 2.36 ?eq cm3 d-1. Addition of sulfate significantly increased CO2 production and effectively suppressed CH4 production. After subtracting the EAC provided though sulfate addition (0.97~2.81 ?eq cm-3 d-1), EACs supplied by OM reached 3.88 to 4.85 ?eq cm-3 d-1.The contribution of organic sulfur was further evaluated by XANES spectroscopy and using natural abundance of ?34S as a tracer. Results demonstrated that BSR involved both addition of H2S and sulfate to OM leading to a formation of reduced organic sulfur and partial changes of oxidized organic sulfur species. The original peat prior to incubation contained 70.5% reduced organic S (R-S-H, R-S-R, R-S-S-R), and 25.9% oxidized S (R-SO3, R-SO2-R, R-SO4-R), whereas the treatment with H2S or sulfate addition comprised 75.7~ 81.1% reduced organic S, and only 21.1~18.9 % oxidized S. Our results imply that that organic matter contributes to anaerobic respiration i) directly by electron accepting capacity of redox active functional groups ii) directly by oxidized organic sulfur and iii) indirectly by recycling of sulfide to maintain BSR. Moreover, investigating the stability of organic sulfur compounds in peat soil towards abiotic and biotic reduction and oxidation is essential for the understanding of environmental sulfur cycling in anaerobic systems. Keywords: Methanogenesis; Electron transfer; organic sulfur; Redox processes; Freshwater systems;

  1. Hydration of aircraft engine soot particles under plume conditions: Effect of sulfuric and nitric acid processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shonija, N. K.; Popovicheva, O. B.; Persiantseva, N. M.; Savel'Ev, A. M.; Starik, A. M.

    2007-01-01

    Hydration properties of original engine soot produced by burning TC1 aviation kerosene in aircraft engine combustor are studied under simulated plume conditions. Engine-generated soot demonstrates a high level of water uptake due to the existence of fraction of impurities originating within an engine. It contains 13.5 wt% water soluble compounds including 3.5 wt% organic and inorganic sulfates. Total amount of water vapor absorbed by engine soot particles increases with the temperature decrease in the exhaust plume and reaches 18 wt% at threshold contrail formation conditions. Chemical processing of soot particles in the young plume through the coagulation with sulfate aerosols and H2SO4/H2O heterogeneous nucleation leads to 0.2 wt% of H2SO4 accumulating at high fuel sulfur content. Such a small amount of additional H2SO4 cannot result in the increase of water uptake by the fraction of impurities of engine-generated soot particles but may activate the hydrophobic fraction that originally contains a negligible amount of water soluble compounds. HNO3 processing may compete with H2SO4 in respect to increase of water uptake. It is inferred that the fraction of impurities of engine-generated soot plays a key role in the CCN formation in the aircraft plume.

  2. Bench-scale testing and evaluation of the direct sulfur recovery process. Final report, February 1990--March 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Gangwal, S.K.; Chen, D.H.

    1994-05-01

    The Direct Sulfur Recovery Process (DSRP) is a two-stage catalytic reduction process for efficiently recovering up to 99% or higher amounts of elemental sulfur from SO{sub 2}-containing regeneration tail-gas produced in advanced integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power systems by reacting the tail-gas with a small slipstream of coal gas. In this project, the DSRP was demonstrated with simulated gases at bench-scale with 3-in. diameter, 1-L size catalytic reactors. Fundamental kinetic and modeling studies were conducted to explain the significantly higher than thermodynamically expected sulfur recoveries in DSRP and to enable prediction of sulfur recovery in larger reactors. Technology transfer activities to promote the DSRP consisted of publications and discussions with architectural engineering firms and industrial parties especially IGCC system developers. Toward the end of the project, an agreement was signed with an IGCC system developer to scale up the DSRP and test it with actual gases in their 10-MW (thermal) coal gasification pilot-plant under a cooperative R&D agreement with the US Department of Energy.

  3. ADVANCED SULFUR CONTROL CONCEPTS

    SciTech Connect

    Apostolos A. Nikolopoulos; Santosh K. Gangwal; William J. McMichael; Jeffrey W. Portzer

    2003-01-01

    Conventional sulfur removal in integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants involves numerous steps: COS (carbonyl sulfide) hydrolysis, amine scrubbing/regeneration, Claus process, and tail-gas treatment. Advanced sulfur removal in IGCC systems involves typically the use of zinc oxide-based sorbents. The sulfides sorbent is regenerated using dilute air to produce a dilute SO{sub 2} (sulfur dioxide) tail gas. Under previous contracts the highly effective first generation Direct Sulfur Recovery Process (DSRP) for catalytic reduction of this SO{sub 2} tail gas to elemental sulfur was developed. This process is currently undergoing field-testing. In this project, advanced concepts were evaluated to reduce the number of unit operations in sulfur removal and recovery. Substantial effort was directed towards developing sorbents that could be directly regenerated to elemental sulfur in an Advanced Hot Gas Process (AHGP). Development of this process has been described in detail in Appendices A-F. RTI began the development of the Single-step Sulfur Recovery Process (SSRP) to eliminate the use of sorbents and multiple reactors in sulfur removal and recovery. This process showed promising preliminary results and thus further process development of AHGP was abandoned in favor of SSRP. The SSRP is a direct Claus process that consists of injecting SO{sub 2} directly into the quenched coal gas from a coal gasifier, and reacting the H{sub 2}S-SO{sub 2} mixture over a selective catalyst to both remove and recover sulfur in a single step. The process is conducted at gasifier pressure and 125 to 160 C. The proposed commercial embodiment of the SSRP involves a liquid phase of molten sulfur with dispersed catalyst in a slurry bubble-column reactor (SBCR).

  4. Development of enhanced sulfur rejection processes. Final technical progress report: Seventh quarter, April 1, 1994--June 30, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, R.H.; Luttrell, G.; Adel, G.; Richardson, P.E.

    1994-09-29

    Research at Virginia Tech led to the development of two complementary concepts for improving the removal of inorganic sulfur from many eastern US coals. These concepts are referred to as Electrochemically Enhanced Sulfur Rejection (EESR) and Polymer Enhanced Sulfur Rejection (PESR). The EESR process uses electrochemical techniques to suppress the formation of hydrophobic oxidation products believed to be responsible for the floatability of coal pyrite. The PESR process uses polymeric reagents that react with pyrite and convert floatable middlings, i.e., composite particles composed of pyrite with coal inclusions, into hydrophilic particles. These new pyritic-sulfur rejection processes do not require significant modifications to existing coal preparation facilities, thereby enhancing their adoptability by the coal industry. It is believed that these processes can be used simultaneously to maximize the rejection of both well-liberated pyrite and composite coal-pyrite particles. The project was initiated on October 1, 1992, and a detailed work plan and work schedule (Task 1) were developed. During the current reporting period (April 1, 1994 to June 30, 1994), characterization of coal samples from Upper Freeport (subtask 2.1) and SEM-IPS analysis of feed samples of Illinois No. 6 and Pittsburgh No. 8 (subtask 2.2) were continued. In addition, an experimental design for research on the last phases of this research was developed, submitted to PETC`s COR, and approved, as required in the work plan. This research will employ a 3/4-inch column flotation cell for testing of both the EESR (Task 5) and the PESR (Task 6) processes.

  5. Sulfate reduction and mixotrophic sulfide-utilization denitrification integrated biofilm process for sulfate-laden wastewater treatment and sulfur recovery.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Liang, Xiao; Lin, Jianguo; Cao, Binxia; Guo, Ping; Liu, Xinyi; Wang, Zhen

    2015-01-01

    A novel and integrated biofilm process - the sulfate reduction (SR) and mixotrophic (MR) sulfide-utilization denitrification process (SMSD) - was recently proposed for sulfate treatment and sulfur recovery. The process consisted of two bioreactors: a 5.1 L anaerobic upflow reactor for SR, and a 3.5 L anaerobic upflow reactor for MR desulfurization-denitrification. The experiment was conducted for 370 days to evaluate the performance of SMSD at various sulfate concentrations and hydraulic retention times. The process successfully achieved sulfate, organics and nitrogen compound removal efficiencies of 94.1, 97.7 and 99.1%, respectively. Sulfate was predominantly converted to element sulfur, while nitrate and nitrite were finally converted to nitrogen gas. In SR, with the help of high pH and sponge cubes with various bacteria, 97.5% of sulfide conversion efficiency and 540 mgS/L of sulfide were obtained. In MR, sulfide was removed up to 100% and was partially oxidized to sulfur. The extent of heterotrophic denitrification, which ranged from 35.8 to 59.8%, depended on the categories of electron acceptors. PMID:26067506

  6. [Microbial processes of the carbon and sulfur cycles in the White Sea].

    PubMed

    Savvichev, A S; Rusanov, I I; Zakharova, E E; Veslopolova, E F; Mitskevich, I N; Kravchishina, M D; Lein, A Iu; Ivanov, M V

    2008-01-01

    The present paper contains the results of our microbiological and biogeochemical investigations carried out during a series of expeditions to the White Sea in 2002-2006. The studies were conducted in the open part of the White Sea, as well as in the Onega, Dvina, and Kandalaksha bays. In August 2006, the photosynthetic productivity in the surface water layer was low (47-145 mg C m(-2) day(-1)). Quantitative characteristics of microbial numbers and activity of the the key microbial processes occurring in the water column of the White Sea were explored. Over the 5-year period of observations, the total number of bacterial cells in the surface layer of the water column varied from 50 to 600 thousand cells ml(-1). In August 2006, bacterioplankton production (BP) was estimated to be 0.26-3.3 microg C l(-1) day(-1); the P/B coefficient varied from 0.22 to 0.93. The suspended organic matter had a lighter isotope composition (from -28.0 to -30.5 per thousand) due to the predominance of terrigenous organic matter delivered by the Northern Dvina waters. The interseasonal and interannual variation coefficients for phytoplankton production and BP numbers are compared. The bacterioplankton community of the White Sea's deep water was found to be more stable than that of the surface layer. In the surface layer of bottom sediments, methane concentration was 0.2-5.2 microl dm(-3); the rate of bacterial sulfate reduction was 18-260 microg S dm(-3) day(-1); and the rates of methane production and oxidation were 24-123 and 6-13 nl CH4 dm(-3) day(-1) respectively. We demonstrated that the rates of microbial processes of the carbon and sulfur cycles occurring in the sediments of the White Sea basin were low. PMID:19137722

  7. Removal of organic and inorganic sulfur from Ohio coal by combined physical and chemical process. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Attia, Y.A.; Zeky, M.El.; Lei, W.W.; Bavarian, F.; Yu, S. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering

    1989-04-28

    This project consisted of three sections. In the first part, the physical cleaning of Ohio coal by selective flocculation of ultrafine slurry was considered. In the second part, the mild oxidation process for removal of pyritic and organic sulfur.was investigated. Finally, in-the third part, the combined effects of these processes were studied. The physical cleaning and desulfurization of Ohio coal was achieved using selective flocculation of ultrafine coal slurry in conjunction with froth flotation as flocs separation method. The finely disseminated pyrite particles in Ohio coals, in particular Pittsburgh No.8 seam, make it necessary to use ultrafine ({minus}500 mesh) grinding to liberate the pyrite particles. Experiments were performed to identify the ``optimum`` operating conditions for selective flocculation process. The results indicated that the use of a totally hydrophobic flocculant (FR-7A) yielded the lowest levels of mineral matters and total sulfur contents. The use of a selective dispersant (PAAX) increased the rejection of pyritic sulfur further. In addition, different methods of floc separation techniques were tested. It was found that froth flotation system was the most efficient method for separation of small coal flocs.

  8. Development of a solid absorption process for removal of sulfur from fuel gas. First quarterly technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Stegen, G.E.; Olson, K.M.

    1980-05-01

    Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratories has begun to develop a project for removing sulfur compounds from fuel gases at elevated temperature (> 700/sup 0/C) based on the use of molten mixtures of alkali metal carbonates and calcium carbonate as the active reactants. The sulfur removal capacity of the molten salt mixture may be regenerated by stripping with CO/sub 2/ and steam, usually at a reduced temperature. In this process, the molten salt mixture is contained within the pores of a porous ceramic substrate material which may be used in a packed bed, moving bed, or fluidized bed absorber. The process would be used most advantageously in applications where it is desirable to reduce or eliminate any cooling of the fuel gas between the gasifier outlet and the gas user. Examples of such applications include gas turbines, high temperature fuel cells, boilers, and furnaces which operate in relatively close proximity to a coal gasifier. In these applications, reduction or elimination of the gas cooling requirements will generally improve thermal efficiency by retaining the sensible heat in the gas and may result in simplification of the process by elimination of gas cooling (and in some cases reheating) equipment and by elimination of process condensates and the equipment required for their handling and treatment. The objectives of the program are to obtain process and materials data sufficient to demonstrate feasibility of the process at bench scale and to allow preliminary economic analysis. Process data to be obtained include sorbent sulfur capacity, reaction kinetics, and other operating characteristics. Various candidate materials will be purchased or fabricated and tested for suitability as porous ceramic substrate materials.

  9. Baseline testing of the Stretford Process on the GRI 120-liter bench-scale liquid redox sulfur recovery unit. Topical report

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. W. Trofe; D. A. Dalrymple; B. M. Andrews

    1989-01-01

    Liquid redox sulfur-recovery processes are of interest to the natural gas industry for treatment of sour reserves of conventional gas and of substitute natural gas (e.g., gas produced from gasifying coal). These processes offer high HâS removal efficiency, one-step treatment, low energy requirements, the ability to handle low- and high-HâS streams, and a regenerating catalyst. Sulfur is removed as gaseous

  10. Development of enhanced sulfur rejection processes. Technical progress report, sixth quarter, 1 January 1994--31 March 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, R.H.; Luttrell, G.; Adel, G.; Richardson, P.E.

    1994-08-03

    Recent work identified two major reasons why advanced coal cleaning technologies fail to meet a 90--95% rejection of pyrite from coal. They are: superficial oxidation of pyrite as an inadvertent corrosion-type process occurring during mining and processing, and (2) incomplete liberation of pyrite from coal causing a large fraction of the pyrite to remain associated or locked with the coal as middlings. Research suggests two solutions to these problems; Electrochemically-Enhanced Sulfur Rejection (EESR) and Polymer-Enhanced Sulfur Rejection (PESR) processes. The EESR concept uses sacrificial anodes to prevent the oxidation of pyrite. This technique is flexible enough to be implemented during the process of grinding, conditioning or flotation. The PESR process is based on synthesizing polymeric organic reagents whose functional groups react with pyrite, possibly via an electrochemical mechanism, while the hydrophilic polymer chains are stretched over the coal inclusions, rendering the pyrite-coal composite particles nonfloatable. The overall objective of this research is to develop these processes into technologies for improving the rejection of pyritic sulfur from eastern US coals. The objectives of the research carried out during this report period were: to complete characterization of the {minus}100 and {minus}28 mesh Illinois No. 6 pyrite; to review all fundamental studies completed to date on pyrite; to assess the results of microflotation tests and the effectiveness of polymeric depressants for the purpose of planning the next phase of research that is directed at evaluating and optimizing the depression of pyrite using electrochemical control and polymeric depressants. The most significant and reliable results obtained from research to date are presented.

  11. Heterotrophic and elemental-sulfur-based autotrophic denitrification processes for simultaneous nitrate and Cr(VI) reduction.

    PubMed

    Sahinkaya, Erkan; Kilic, Adem

    2014-03-01

    Nitrate and chromate can be present together in water resources as nitrate is a common co-contaminant in surface and ground waters. This study aims at comparatively evaluating simultaneous chromate and nitrate reduction in heterotrophic and sulfur-based autotrophic denitrifying column bioreactors. In sulfur-based autotrophic denitrification process, elemental sulfur and nitrate act as an electron donor and an acceptor, respectively, without requirement of organic supplementation. Autotrophic denitrification was complete and not adversely affected by chromate up to 0.5 mg/L. Effluent chromate concentration was <50 ?g/L provided that influent chromate concentration was ?0.5 mg/L. Heterotrophic denitrification performance was not adversely affected even at 20 mg/L chromate and complete chromate reduction was attained up to 10 mg/L. Although autotrophic denitrification rate was much lower compared with heterotrophic one, it may be preferred in drinking water treatment due to the elimination of organic supplementation and the risk of treated effluent contamination. PMID:24384544

  12. Controlled comparison of advanced froth flotation process technology and economic evaluations for maximizing BTU recovery and pyritic sulfur rejection

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, K.E.; Ferris, D.D. (ICF Kaiser Engineers, Inc., Pittsburgh, PA (USA)); Kosky, R.M. (Consolidation Coal Co., Pittsburgh, PA (USA)); Warchol, J.J.; Musiol, W.F.; Shiao, S.Y. (Babcock and Wilcox Co., New Orleans, LA (USA)); Luttrell, G.H.; Adel, G.T.; Yoon, R.H. (Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ., Blacksburg, VA (USA))

    1990-01-01

    The overall objective of this round robin project was to select the most efficient, as determined by the efficiency index, cost effective, as determined by the annual cost per ton of SO{sub 2} removed, advanced flotation device available. This machine was to process ultra fine coal, maximize Btu recovery and maximize pyritic sulfur rejection. The device will first be installed as a one hundred pound per hour capacity unit and, subject to the outcome of Task 6 of the Engineering Development Contract, increased to a 3 ton per hour capacity unit for installation into a proof-of-concept preparation plant. All of the technical and economic results were submitted to the TST for consideration. The TST members evaluated the data and determined to rank each of the participants 50% on technical merit and 50% on economic merit. The technical merit was to be the efficiency index. The economical merit was to be the annual dollars per ton of clean coal corrected for carrying capacity and frother concentration and the results of Test No. 4. This factor does not penalize a particular technology for not meeting a 90% pyritic sulfur rejection and therefore leaves something to be desired as the only economic basis for decision. A second economic evaluation criteria was required that considered the $/ton of sulfur dioxide removed. The technical and economic factors were calculated and added together for the final evaluation ranking. The technical factor was calculated by multiplying the efficiency index for each participant by 0.5. The two economic factors were calculated by dividing 1000 by the $/ton of clean coal and multiplying by 0.5 and by dividing 10,000 by the $/ton of sulfur dioxide removed and multiply by 0.5. The 1000 and 10,000 are numbers selected such that when divided by their economic factors, respective numbers resulted in a two digit number. The results of these calculations are discussed. 4 refs., 18 figs., 27 tabs.

  13. DSRP, Direct Sulfur Production

    SciTech Connect

    Gangwal, S.K.; McMichael, W.J.; Agarwal, S.K.; Jang, B.L.; Howe, G.B. [Research Triangle Inst., Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Chen, D.H.; Hopper, J.R. [Lamar Univ., Beaumont, TX (United States)

    1993-08-01

    Hot-gas desulfurization processes for IGCC and other advanced power applications utilize regenerable mixed-metal oxide sorbents to remove hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) from raw coal gas. Regeneration of these sorbents produces an off-gas typically containing I to 3 percent sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}). Production of elemental sulfur is a highly desirable option for the ultimate disposal of the SO{sub 2} content of this off-gas. Elemental sulfur, an essential industrial commodity, is easily stored and transported. As shown in Figure 1, the DSRP consists of two catalytic reactors, each followed by a sulfur condenser. Hot regenerator off-gas is mixed with a hot coal-gas slip stream and fed to the first DSRP reactor. Approximately 95 percent of the sulfur gas in the inlet stream of the first reactor is converted to elemental sulfur. The outlet gas of the first DSRP reactor is cooled, condensing out sulfur. The gas could be recycled after the Stage I condenser. Alteratively, by adjusting the proportion of coal gas to regenerator off-gas, the effluent composition of the first reactor can be controlled to produce an H{sub 2}S-to-SO{sub 2} ratio of 2 to 1 at 95 percent sulfur conversion. The cooled gas stream is then passed to the second DSRP reactor where 80 to 90 percent of the remaining sulfur compounds are converted to elemental sulfur via the modified Claus reaction at high pressure. The total efficiency of the two reactors for the conversion of sulfur compounds to elemental sulfur is projected to be about 99.5 percent.

  14. Transition metal-catalyzed oxidation of sulfur(IV) oxides. Atmospheric-relevant processes and mechanisms

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Christian. Brandt; Rudi. van Eldik

    1995-01-01

    The transition metal-catalyzed oxidation of sulfur(IV) oxides has been known for more than 100 years. There is a significant lack of information on the actual role of the transition metal-catalyzed reactions, and much of the earlier work was performed without a detailed knowledge of the chemical system. For this reason attention is focused on the role of transition metal ions

  15. Baseline testing of the Stretford Process on the GRI 120-liter bench-scale liquid redox sulfur recovery unit. Topical report

    SciTech Connect

    Trofe, T.W.; Dalrymple, D.A.; Andrews, B.M.

    1989-03-01

    Liquid redox sulfur-recovery processes are of interest to the natural gas industry for treatment of sour reserves of conventional gas and of substitute natural gas (e.g., gas produced from gasifying coal). These processes offer high H{sub 2}S removal efficiency, one-step treatment, low energy requirements, the ability to handle low- and high-H{sub 2}S streams, and a regenerating catalyst. Sulfur is removed as gaseous H{sub 2}S and converted either to sulfur cake, a disposable waste, or to elemental sulfur which can be sold. Liquid redox processes have complex chemistries and can experience operating problems and less-than-design performance. This class of processes includes Hiperion, LO-CAT, Stretford, SulFerox, Sulfolin, and Unisulf. The Gas Research Institute's liquid redox sulfur-recovery research program has initially focussed on gaining a better understanding of the Stretford process. Stretford is the oldest of the liquid redox processes and has over 100 plants in operation. The factors examined were feedgas CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S concentrations, pH, temperature, ADA concentration, citrate, air rate, and reactor residence time. The second objective of the testing was to compare the performance of the 120-liter (32 gallon) GRI bench unit to the 500-gallon pilot unit at the Great Plains Gasification Plant (GPGP) near Beulah, North Dakota.

  16. Catalytic sulfur degassing

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, D.C.

    1988-07-05

    A process is described for the preparation of (1) synthesis gas reduced in solids and acidic gases and (2) elemental sulfur which comprises (a) treating coal, shale or tar sands with oxygen to produce a synthesis gas stream containing inorganic sulfide; (b) recovering slag particles from the treatment of coal in step (a) and selecting particles thereof suitable for use as a catalyst carrier; (c) treating the slag from step (b) with the synthesis gas substantially free of slag particles to deposit on the surface slag particles a catalytic amount of at least one metal sulfide; (d) treating the synthesis gas from step (c) to remove acidic gases suitable for sulfur production; (e) converting the acid gases from step (d) to liquid sulfur; and (f) contacting the liquid sulfur with the catalytic slag particles from step (c) to reduce the hydrogen sulfide and hydrogen polysulfide content of the sulfur.

  17. The chemical processing of gas-phase carbonyl compounds by sulfuric acid aerosols: 2,4-pentanedione

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nozière, Barbara; Riemer, Daniel D.

    This work investigates the interactions between gas-phase carbonyl compounds and sulfuric acid aerosols. It focuses on understanding the chemical processes, giving a first estimate of their importance in the atmosphere, and suggesting directions for further investigations. The solubility and reactivity of a compound with a large enolization constant, 2,4-pentanedione, in water/sulfuric acid solutions 0-96 wt% have been investigated at room temperature using the bubble column/GC-FID technique. 2,4-pentanedione was found to undergo aldol condensation at acidities as low as 20 wt% H 2SO 4, that is, well in the tropospheric range of aerosol composition. In agreement with well-established organic chemical knowledge, this reaction resulted in changes of color of the solutions of potential importance for the optical properties of the aerosols. 2,4-pentanedione was also found to undergo retroaldol reaction, specific to dicarbonyl compounds, producing acetone and acetaldehyde. The Henry's law coefficient for 2,4-pentanedione was found to be a factor 5 larger than the one of acetone over the whole range of acidity, with a value in water of H (297 K)=(155±27) M atm -1. A chemical system is proposed to describe the transformations of carbonyl compounds in sulfuric acid aerosols. Aldol condensation is likely to be the most common reaction for these compounds, probably involving a large number of the ones present in the atmosphere and a wide range of aerosol compositions. The enolization constant contributes as a proportional factor to the rate constant for aldol condensation, and is shown in this work to contribute as an additive constant to the Henry's law coefficient. In addition to the many important aspects of these reactions illustrated in this work, the rate of aldol condensation was estimated to be potentially fast enough for the losses of some compounds in acidic aerosols to compete with their gas-phase chemistry in the atmosphere.

  18. Structural insight into SoxC and SoxD interaction and their role in electron transport process in the novel global sulfur cycle in Paracoccus pantotrophus

    SciTech Connect

    Bagchi, Angshuman [Bioinformatics Center, Bose Institute, AJC Bose Centenary Building, P1/12 CIT Scheme VIIM, Kolkata 700 054 (India)]. E-mail: angshu@bic.boseinst.ernet.in; Roy, Pradosh [Department of Microbiology, Bose Institute, AJC Bose Centenary Building, P1/12 CIT Scheme VIIM, Kolkata 700 054 (India)]. E-mail: prodosh@bic.boseinst.ernet.in

    2005-06-17

    Microbial oxidation of reduced inorganic sulfur compounds mainly sulfur anions in the environment is one of the major reactions of the global sulfur cycle mediated by phylogenetically diverse prokaryotes. The sulfur oxidizing gene cluster (sox) of {alpha}-Proteobacteria comprises of at least 16 genes, which form two transcriptional units, viz., soxSRT and soxVWXYZABCDEFGH. Sequence analysis reveals that soxD gene product (SoxD) belongs to the di-heme cytochrome c family of electron transport proteins whereas soxC gene product (SoxC) is a sulfur dehydrogenase. We employed homology modeling to construct the three-dimensional structures of the SoxC and SoxD from Paracoccus pantotrophus. SoxD protein is known to interact with SoxC. With the help of docking studies we have identified the residues involved in the interaction of SoxC and SoxD. The putative active site geometries of these two proteins as well as the structural basis of the involvements of these proteins in electron transport process during the oxidation of sulfur anions are also investigated.

  19. Calcium looping process for high purity hydrogen production integrated with capture of carbon dioxide, sulfur and halides

    DOEpatents

    Ramkumar, Shwetha; Fan, Liang-Shih

    2013-07-30

    A process for producing hydrogen comprising the steps of: (i) gasifying a fuel into a raw synthesis gas comprising CO, hydrogen, steam, sulfur and halide contaminants in the form of H.sub.2S, COS, and HX, wherein X is a halide; (ii) passing the raw synthesis gas through a water gas shift reactor (WGSR) into which CaO and steam are injected, the CaO reacting with the shifted gas to remove CO.sub.2, sulfur and halides in a solid-phase calcium-containing product comprising CaCO.sub.3, CaS and CaX.sub.2; (iii) separating the solid-phase calcium-containing product from an enriched gaseous hydrogen product; and (iv) regenerating the CaO by calcining the solid-phase calcium-containing product at a condition selected from the group consisting of: in the presence of steam, in the presence of CO.sub.2, in the presence of synthesis gas, in the presence of H.sub.2 and O.sub.2, under partial vacuum, and combinations thereof.

  20. EFFECT OF ELECTROLYZER CONFIGURATION AND PERFORMANCE ON HYBRID SULFUR PROCESS NET THERMAL EFFICIENCY

    SciTech Connect

    Gorensek, M

    2007-03-16

    Hybrid Sulfur cycle is gaining popularity as a possible means for massive production of hydrogen from nuclear energy. Several different ways of carrying out the SO{sub 2}-depolarized electrolysis step are being pursued by a number of researchers. These alternatives are evaluated with complete flowsheet simulations and on a common design basis using Aspen Plus{trademark}. Sensitivity analyses are performed to assess the performance potential of each configuration, and the flowsheets are optimized for energy recovery. Net thermal efficiencies are calculated for the best set of operating conditions for each flowsheet and the results compared. This will help focus attention on the most promising electrolysis alternatives. The sensitivity analyses should also help identify those features that offer the greatest potential for improvement.

  1. Sulfur compounds in coal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Attar, A.; Corcoran, W. H.

    1977-01-01

    The literature on the chemical structure of the organic sulfur compounds (or functional groups) in coal is reviewed. Four methods were applied in the literature to study the sulfur compounds in coal: direct spectrometric and chemical analysis, depolymerization in drastic conditions, depolymerization in mild conditions, and studies on simulated coal. The data suggest that most of the organic sulfur in coal is in the form of thiophenic structures and aromatic and aliphatic sulfides. The relative abundance of the sulfur groups in bituminous coal is estimated as 50:30:20%, respectively. The ratio changes during processing and during the chemical analysis. The main effects are the transformation during processing of sulfides to the more stable thiophenic compounds and the elimination of hydrogen sulfide.

  2. Investigation on thiosulfate-involved organics and nitrogen removal by a sulfur cycle-based biological wastewater treatment process.

    PubMed

    Qian, Jin; Lu, Hui; Cui, Yanxiang; Wei, Li; Liu, Rulong; Chen, Guang-Hao

    2015-02-01

    Thiosulfate, as an intermediate of biological sulfate/sulfite reduction, can significantly improve nitrogen removal potential in a biological sulfur cycle-based process, namely the Sulfate reduction-Autotrophic denitrification-Nitrification Integrated (SANI(®)) process. However, the related thiosulfate bio-activities coupled with organics and nitrogen removal in wastewater treatment lacked detailed examinations and reports. In this study, S2O3(2-) transformation during biological SO4(2-)/SO3(2-) co-reduction coupled with organics removal as well as S2O3(2-) oxidation coupled with chemolithotrophic denitrification were extensively evaluated under different experimental conditions. Thiosulfate is produced from the co-reduction of sulfate and sulfite through biological pathway at an optimum pH of 7.5 for organics removal. And the produced S2O3(2-) may disproportionate to sulfide and sulfate during both biological S2O3(2-) reduction and oxidation most possibly carried out by Desulfovibrio-like species. Dosing the same amount of nitrate, pH was found to be the more direct factor influencing the denitritation activity than free nitrous acid (FNA) and the optimal pH for denitratation (7.0) and denitritation (8.0) activities were different. Spiking organics significantly improved both denitratation and denitritation activities while minimizing sulfide inhibition of NO3(-) reduction during thiosulfate-based denitrification. These findings in this study can improve the understanding of mechanisms of thiosulfate on organics and nitrogen removal in biological sulfur cycle-based wastewater treatment. PMID:25497428

  3. Lunar sulfur

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuck, David L.

    1991-01-01

    Ideas introduced by Vaniman, Pettit and Heiken in their 1988 Uses of Lunar Sulfur are expanded. Particular attention is given to uses of SO2 as a mineral-dressing fluid. Also introduced is the concept of using sulfide-based concrete as an alternative to the sulfur-based concretes proposed by Leonard and Johnson. Sulfur is abundant in high-Ti mare basalts, which range from 0.16 to 0.27 pct. by weight. Terrestrial basalts with 0.15 pct. S are rare. For oxygen recovery, sulfur must be driven off with other volatiles from ilmenite concentrates, before reduction. Troilite (FeS) may be oxidized to magnetite (Fe3O4) and SO2 gas, by burning concentrates in oxygen within a magnetic field, to further oxidize ilmenite before regrinding the magnetic reconcentration. SO2 is liquid at -20 C, the mean temperature underground on the Moon, at a minimum of 0.6 atm pressure. By using liquid SO2 as a mineral dressing fluid, all the techniques of terrestrial mineral separation become available for lunar ores and concentrates. Combination of sulfur and iron in an exothermic reaction, to form iron sulfides, may be used to cement grains of other minerals into an anhydrous iron-sulfide concrete. A sulfur-iron-aggregate mixture may be heated to the ignition temperature of iron with sulfur to make a concrete shape. The best iron, sulfur, and aggregate ratios need to be experimentally established. The iron and sulfur will be by-products of oxygen production from lunar minerals.

  4. Lunar sulfur

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuck, David L.

    Ideas introduced by Vaniman, Pettit and Heiken in their 1988 Uses of Lunar Sulfur are expanded. Particular attention is given to uses of SO2 as a mineral-dressing fluid. Also introduced is the concept of using sulfide-based concrete as an alternative to the sulfur-based concretes proposed by Leonard and Johnson. Sulfur is abundant in high-Ti mare basalts, which range from 0.16 to 0.27 pct. by weight. Terrestrial basalts with 0.15 pct. S are rare. For oxygen recovery, sulfur must be driven off with other volatiles from ilmenite concentrates, before reduction. Troilite (FeS) may be oxidized to magnetite (Fe3O4) and SO2 gas, by burning concentrates in oxygen within a magnetic field, to further oxidize ilmenite before regrinding the magnetic reconcentration. SO2 is liquid at -20 C, the mean temperature underground on the Moon, at a minimum of 0.6 atm pressure. By using liquid SO2 as a mineral dressing fluid, all the techniques of terrestrial mineral separation become available for lunar ores and concentrates. Combination of sulfur and iron in an exothermic reaction, to form iron sulfides, may be used to cement grains of other minerals into an anhydrous iron-sulfide concrete. A sulfur-iron-aggregate mixture may be heated to the ignition temperature of iron with sulfur to make a concrete shape. The best iron, sulfur, and aggregate ratios need to be experimentally established. The iron and sulfur will be by-products of oxygen production from lunar minerals.

  5. Two-step Processing Is Not Essential for the Import and Assembly of Functionally Active Iron-Sulfur Protein into the Cytochrome bc1

    E-print Network

    Trumpower, Bernard L.

    the respiratory defi- cient phenotype of a yeast strain in which the endoge- nous gene for the iron-sulfur proteinTwo-step Processing Is Not Essential for the Import and Assembly of Functionally Active Iron From the Department of Biochemistry, Dartmouth Medical School, Hanover, New Hampshire 03755 The iron

  6. Processing of LEU targets for {sup 99}Mo production -- Dissolution of metal foils by nitric-acid/sulfuric-acid mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Srinivasan, B.; Leonard, R.A.; Aase, S. [and others

    1995-09-01

    The first step in processing low-enriched uranium (LEU) targets for production of {sup 99}Mo is to dissolve the neutron-irradiated uranium foil coming from the reactor. Appropriate conditions for dissolving the foils were determined by measuring the dissolution rates for uranium foil over a wide range of temperatures and acid concentrations. On the basis of these dissolution rates, the process chemistry, and a model that integrates dissolution rates as a function of temperature and composition, a closed stainless-steel dissolver was designed, built, and tested for dissolving up to 18 g of uranium foil. The results were quite successful, with the uranium foil being dissolved within one hour as desired. To do this, the dissolver temperature must be in the range from 97 to 102 C, and the dissolver solution (cocktail) must have a composition of 3M nitric acid and 2M sulfuric acid. The final dissolver solution is subsequently processed to separate {sup 99}Mo from uranium, fission products, and other elements.

  7. Novel characterization of Radix Angelicae Dahuricae before and after the sulfur-fumigation process by combining high performance liquid chromatographic fingerprint and multi-ingredients determination

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiao; Liu, Jingjing; Cai, Hao; Li, Songlin; Ma, Xiaoqing; Lou, Yajing; Qin, Kunming; Guan, Hongyue; Cai, Baochang

    2014-01-01

    Background: Harmful sulfur-fumigation processing method is abused during Radix Angelicae Dahuricae preparation. However, the analytical technique characterizing Radix Angelicae Dahuricae before and after the sulfur-fumigation process is absent. Materials and Methods: The high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) technique was adopted to develop methods combining finger-print analysis and multi-ingredients simultaneous determination for quality evaluation of Radix Angelicae Dahuricae before and after the sulfur-fumigation process. The chromatographic fingerprint method was established for qualitative analysis coupled with statistical cluster analysis basing on Euclidean distance. Additionally, a determination method was developed for quantitative analysis, which was able to assay the concentrations of the major coumarins including imperatorin, isoimperatorin, xanthotoxin, xanthotoxol, isoimpinellin, oxypeucedanin, and bergapten in Radix Angelicae Dahuricae simultaneously. The separations of the two methods were both achieved on a Hypersil octadecylsilyl C18 column (250 mm × 4.6 mm, 5 ?m) at 35°C under different strategic gradient elution programs. The detection wavelength was set at 254 nm all the time. Method validation data indicated that the methods were both reliable and applicable. They were then used to assay different Radix Angelicae Dahuricae samples collected from good agricultural practice (GAP) bases and local herbal markets. Results: The successful application demonstrated that the combination of HPLC fingerprint and simultaneous quantification of multi-ingredients offers an efficient approach for quality evaluation of Radix Angelicae Dahuricae before and after the sulfur-fumigation process. Conclusion: In order to discriminate Radix Angelicae Dahuricae before and after the sulfur-fumigation process, oxypeucedanin, and xanthotoxol were the most sensitive biomarkers and should be determined. PMID:25210323

  8. IN-PROCESS CONTROL OF NITROGEN AND SULFUR IN ENTRAINED-BED GASIFERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of an evaluation of theoretical aspects and engineering considerations of in-process pollutant control of the entrained-bed slagging coal gasification process, as applied to combined cycle operation or to the retrofit of existing boilers. The pollutants o...

  9. The development of autocatalytic structural materials for use in the sulfur-iodine process for the production of hydrogen

    E-print Network

    Miu, Kevin (Kevin K.)

    2006-01-01

    The Sulfur-Iodine Cycle for the thermochemical production of hydrogen offers many benefits to traditional methods of hydrogen production. As opposed to steam methane reforming - the most prevalent method of hydrogen ...

  10. Effects of ozone and sulfur dioxide on processing tomato yields and quality. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Brewer, R.F.

    1986-03-01

    The object of the experiment was to study the effects of SO/sub 2/ and/or ozone on tomato vegetative growth, fruit yields, and fruit quality. Two varieties of processing tomatoes, UC-204-B and E-6203, were exposed to four levels of ozone and two levels of SO/sub 2/. Exposure to ambient ozone caused a 20% reduction in vine weights and 27% reduction in weight of red fruit compared to filtered air. Exposure to 0.1 ppm SO/sub 2/ produced 7% fewer vines and approximately 8% less fruit as compared with no SO/sub 2/ exposure. Fruit quality tests indicated that increasing ozone levels reduce soluble solids (Brix), and they reduce viscosity, an important indicator of processing behavior. Exposure to SO/sub 2/ in the concentrations used increased total solids but had no measurable effect on viscosity or consistency.

  11. Interfacing the tandem mirror reactor to the sulfur-iodine process for hydrogen production

    SciTech Connect

    Galloway, T.R.

    1980-06-02

    The blanket is linked to the H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ vaporization units and SO/sub 3/ decomposition reactor with either sodium or helium. The engineering and safety problems associated with these choices are discussed. This H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ step uses about 90% of the TMR heat and is best close-coupled to the nuclear island. The rest of the process we propose to be driven by steam and does not require close-coupling. The sodium loop coupling seems to be preferable at this time. We can operate with a blanket around 1200 K and the SO/sub 3/ decomposer around 1050 K. This configuration offers double-barrier protection between Li-Na and the SO/sub 3/ process gases. Heat pipes offer an attractive alternate to provide an additional barrier, added modularity for increased reliability, and tritium concentration and isolation operations with very little thermal penalty.

  12. Recovery of vanadium in deep processing of medium- and high-sulfur crude oils and bitumens

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. M. Soskind; V. V. Gribkov; N. P. Slatvinskii-Sidak; M. I. Popov; V. A. Bryukvin; A. G. Vorontnikov

    1988-01-01

    Recovery of vanadium from the products of crude oil and hit=men processing has become an active issue because of the shortage of vanadium, the rarity of vanadium ore deposits, and the low concentrations of vanadium in the richest ores (1000-1500 g\\/tonne [ppm by weight]). The vanadium concentration in many crude oils and bitumens is comparable to that in ores. For

  13. [Microbial processes of the carbon and sulfur cycles in the Chukchi Sea].

    PubMed

    Savvichev, A S; Rusanov, I I; Pimenov, N V; Zakharova, E E; Veslopolova, E F; Lein, A Iu; Crane, K; Ivanov, M V

    2007-01-01

    The research performed in August 2004 within the framework of the Russian-American Long-term Census of the Arctic (RUSALCA) resulted in the first data concerning the rates of the key microbial processes in the water column and bottom sediments of the Bering strait and the Chukchi Sea. The total bacterial counts in the water column varied from 30 x 10(3) cells ml(-1) in the northern and eastern parts to 245 x 10(3) cells ml(-1) in the southern part. The methane content in the water column of the Chukchi sea varied from 8 nmol CH4 l(-1) in the eastern part of the sea to 31 nmol CH4 l(-1) in the northern part of the Herald Canyon. Active microbial processes occurred in the upper 0-3 cm of the bottom sediments; the methane formation rate varied from 0.25 to 16 nmol CH4 dm(-3) day(-1). The rates of methane oxidation varied from 1.61 to 14.7 nmol CH4 dm(-3) day(-1). The rates of sulfate reduction varied from 1.35 to 16.2 micromol SO4(2-) dm(-3) day(-1). The rate of methane formation in the sediments increased with depth, while sulfate reduction rates decreased (less than 1 micromol SO4(2-) dm(-3) day(-1)). These high concentrations of biogenic elements and high rates of microbial processes in the upper sediment layers suggest a specific type of trophic chain in the Chukchi Sea. The approximate calculated balance of methane emission from the water column into the atmosphere is from 5.4 to 57.3 micromol CH4 m(-2) day(-1). PMID:18069330

  14. Method and system for the removal of oxides of nitrogen and sulfur from combustion processes

    DOEpatents

    Walsh, John V. (Glendora, CA)

    1987-12-15

    A process for removing oxide contaminants from combustion gas, and employing a solid electrolyte reactor, includes: (a) flowing the combustion gas into a zone containing a solid electrolyte and applying a voltage and at elevated temperature to thereby separate oxygen via the solid electrolyte, (b) removing oxygen from that zone in a first stream and removing hot effluent gas from that zone in a second stream, the effluent gas containing contaminant, (c) and pre-heating the combustion gas flowing to that zone by passing it in heat exchange relation with the hot effluent gas.

  15. Sequential nitrification-denitrification process for nitrogenous, sulfurous and phenolic compounds removal in the same bioreactor.

    PubMed

    De la Torre-Velasco, A; Beristain-Cardoso, R; Damian-Matsumura, P; Gómez, J

    2013-07-01

    The kinetic and metabolic behavior of an aerobic granular sludge to nitrify, denitrify and nitrify-denitrify was evaluated in batch cultures. In nitrification control, ammonium, 4-methylphenol and sulfide were consumed efficiently (?100%) and recovered as NO3(-), CO2, S(0) and SO4(2-), respectively. In denitrification control, S(0) and nitrate were efficiently consumed and recovered as SO4(2-) and N2, respectively. Sequential nitrification-denitrification process was evaluated by applying oxic/anoxic conditions. Ammonium, 4-methylphenol and sulfide were oxidized to nitrate, CO2 and mainly S(0), respectively, under aerobic conditions. After that, anoxic conditions were established where S(0) reduced all nitrate to N2, with molecular nitrogen yield (YN2) of 1.03 ± 0.06 mg/mg NH4(+)-N consumed. This is the first study to show the capability of an aerobic granular sludge in simultaneous removal of ammonium, 4-methylphenol and sulfide by sequential nitrification-denitrification process in the same bioreactor. PMID:23665217

  16. Rethinking the Ancient Sulfur Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fike, David A.; Bradley, Alexander S.; Rose, Catherine V.

    2015-05-01

    The sulfur biogeochemical cycle integrates the metabolic activity of multiple microbial pathways (e.g., sulfate reduction, disproportionation, and sulfide oxidation) along with abiotic reactions and geological processes that cycle sulfur through various reservoirs. The sulfur cycle impacts the global carbon cycle and climate primarily through the remineralization of organic carbon. Over geological timescales, cycling of sulfur is closely tied to the redox state of Earth's exosphere through the burial of oxidized (sulfate) and reduced (sulfide) sulfur species in marine sediments. Biological sulfur cycling is associated with isotopic fractionations that can be used to trace the fluxes through various metabolic pathways. The resulting isotopic data provide insights into sulfur cycling in both modern and ancient environments via isotopic signatures in sedimentary sulfate and sulfide phases. Here, we review the deep-time δ34S record of marine sulfates and sulfides in light of recent advances in understanding how isotopic signatures are generated by microbial activity, how these signatures are encoded in marine sediments, and how they may be altered following deposition. The resulting picture shows a sulfur cycle intimately coupled to ambient carbon cycling, where sulfur isotopic records preserved in sedimentary rocks are critically dependent on sedimentological and geochemical conditions (e.g., iron availability) during deposition.

  17. SULFUR ASSIMILATION IN PLANTS AND WEED CONTROL

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sulfur is an indispensable element for plants. It is found in sulfur-containing amino acids, cysteine and methionine, and in various other important biochemical components and processes. Inhibitors of sulfur assimilation, or cysteine and methionine synthesis, could be potential herbicides. The sulf...

  18. Synthesis and development of processes for the recovery of sulfur from acid gases. Part 1, Development of a high-temperature process for removal of H{sub 2}S from coal gas using limestone -- thermodynamic and kinetic considerations; Part 2, Development of a zero-emissions process for recovery of sulfur from acid gas streams

    SciTech Connect

    Towler, G.P.; Lynn, S.

    1993-05-01

    Limestone can be used more effectively as a sorbent for H{sub 2}S in high-temperature gas-cleaning applications if it is prevented from undergoing calcination. Sorption of H{sub 2}S by limestone is impeded by sintering of the product CaS layer. Sintering of CaS is catalyzed by CO{sub 2}, but is not affected by N{sub 2} or H{sub 2}. The kinetics of CaS sintering was determined for the temperature range 750--900{degrees}C. When hydrogen sulfide is heated above 600{degrees}C in the presence of carbon dioxide elemental sulfur is formed. The rate-limiting step of elemental sulfur formation is thermal decomposition of H{sub 2}S. Part of the hydrogen thereby produced reacts with CO{sub 2}, forming CO via the water-gas-shift reaction. The equilibrium of H{sub 2}S decomposition is therefore shifted to favor the formation of elemental sulfur. The main byproduct is COS, formed by a reaction between CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S that is analogous to the water-gas-shift reaction. Smaller amounts of SO{sub 2} and CS{sub 2} also form. Molybdenum disulfide is a strong catalyst for H{sub 2}S decomposition in the presence of CO{sub 2}. A process for recovery of sulfur from H{sub 2}S using this chemistry is as follows: Hydrogen sulfide is heated in a high-temperature reactor in the presence of CO{sub 2} and a suitable catalyst. The primary products of the overall reaction are S{sub 2}, CO, H{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O. Rapid quenching of the reaction mixture to roughly 600{degrees}C prevents loss Of S{sub 2} during cooling. Carbonyl sulfide is removed from the product gas by hydrolysis back to CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S. Unreacted CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S are removed from the product gas and recycled to the reactor, leaving a gas consisting chiefly of H{sub 2} and CO, which recovers the hydrogen value from the H{sub 2}S. This process is economically favorable compared to the existing sulfur-recovery technology and allows emissions of sulfur-containing gases to be controlled to very low levels.

  19. Sulfur-Free Selective Pulping

    E-print Network

    Dimmel, D. R.; Bozell, J. J.

    an increase in pulping rate and yields, which translates to less energy required per ton of product. Less sulfur means a simplified process, lower odor emissions, and a decrease requirement for bleaching chemicals, meaning less organics being discharged...

  20. Improved photovoltaic and grain boundary characteristics of single elementary target-sputtered Cu2ZnSnSe4 thin films by post sulfurization/selenization process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jo, Yeon Hwa; Jang, Jin Woo; Mohanty, Bhaskar Chandra; Byul Kang, Han; Cho, Yong Soo

    2015-06-01

    A potential way to improve the quality of Cu2ZnSnSe4 absorber thin film by a one step process of sputtering using a single elementary target is proposed for thin film solar cells. As critical parameters, different S/Se ratios and grain boundary characteristics are achieved by adjusting sequential sulfurization and selenization post-treatment. The simple sulfurization of as-deposited film at 530?°C in H2S is not effective in raising the performance but the additional Se annealing at a shorter duration of 5?min improves conversion efficiency from 0.12 to 3.21% with a drastic increase of the open circuit voltage. Positively-charged grain boundaries with narrow potential peaks seem to play a critical role for effective exciton separation and higher efficiency. The improvement is also understood as related to well-defined microstructures and the variable optical band gap.

  1. Palladium-Catalyzed Synthesis of Ammonium Sulfinates from Aryl Halides and a Sulfur Dioxide Surrogate: A Gas- and Reductant-Free Process**

    PubMed Central

    Emmett, Edward J; Hayter, Barry R; Willis, Michael C

    2014-01-01

    Sulfonyl-derived functional groups populate a broad range of useful molecules and materials, and despite a variety of preparative methods being available, processes which introduce the most basic sulfonyl building block, sulfur dioxide, using catalytic methods, are rare. Described herein is a simple reaction system consisting of the sulfur dioxide surrogate DABSO, triethylamine, and a palladium(0) catalyst for effective convertion of a broad range of aryl and heteroaryl halides into the corresponding ammonium sulfinates. Key features of this gas- and reductant-free reaction include the low loadings of palladium (1?mol?%) and ligand (1.5?mol?%) which can be employed, and the use of isopropyl alcohol as both a solvent and formal reductant. The ammonium sulfinate products are converted in situ into a variety of sulfonyl-containing functional groups, including sulfones, sulfonyl chlorides, and sulfonamides. PMID:25066222

  2. Palladium-catalyzed synthesis of ammonium sulfinates from aryl halides and a sulfur dioxide surrogate: a gas- and reductant-free process.

    PubMed

    Emmett, Edward J; Hayter, Barry R; Willis, Michael C

    2014-09-15

    Sulfonyl-derived functional groups populate a broad range of useful molecules and materials, and despite a variety of preparative methods being available, processes which introduce the most basic sulfonyl building block, sulfur dioxide, using catalytic methods, are rare. Described herein is a simple reaction system consisting of the sulfur dioxide surrogate DABSO, triethylamine, and a palladium(0) catalyst for effective convertion of a broad range of aryl and heteroaryl halides into the corresponding ammonium sulfinates. Key features of this gas- and reductant-free reaction include the low loadings of palladium (1?mol%) and ligand (1.5?mol%) which can be employed, and the use of isopropyl alcohol as both a solvent and formal reductant. The ammonium sulfinate products are converted in situ into a variety of sulfonyl-containing functional groups, including sulfones, sulfonyl chlorides, and sulfonamides. PMID:25066222

  3. Recovery of sulfur from native ores

    SciTech Connect

    Womack, J.T.; Wiewiorowski, T.K.; Astley, V.C.; Perez, J.W.; Headington, T.A.

    1992-03-17

    This patent describes a process for removing elemental sulfur from ores containing elemental sulfur. It comprises crushing a sulfur-containing ore to a coarse particle size wherein ore particles produced during crushing enable substantially all of the sulfur to be liberated during a heating step and to produce an ore gangue that is substantially not susceptible to flotation: forming an aqueous ore slurry containing about 50-80% by weight of solids from the crushed ore and adjusting the pH to at least a pH of about 8.0; heating the aqueous ore slurry formed in step (b) under elevated pressure to a temperature of about 240{degrees} - 315{degrees} F. for sufficient time to melt and liberate elemental sulfur contained in the ore to produce liberated molten sulfur and ore gangue, wherein the slurry is heated while agitating the slurry at sufficient velocity to substantially maintain the ore, ore gangue and liberated molten sulfur in suspension; cooling the heated slurry sufficiently to resolidify the liberated molten sulfur; conditioning the aqueous slurry of step (d) with a flotation aid; separating the condition aqueous slurry of ore gangue and resolidified sulfur in a flotation unit to produce a sulfur-rich flotation concentrate overstream; and recovering the sulfur-rich flotation concentrate and separating the sulfur therefrom.

  4. SULFUR POLYMER ENCAPSULATION.

    SciTech Connect

    KALB, P.

    2001-08-22

    Sulfur polymer cement (SPC) is a thermoplastic polymer consisting of 95 wt% elemental sulfur and 5 wt% organic modifiers to enhance long-term durability. SPC was originally developed by the U.S. Bureau of Mines as an alternative to hydraulic cement for construction applications. Previous attempts to use elemental sulfur as a construction material in the chemical industry failed due to premature degradation. These failures were caused by the internal stresses that result from changes in crystalline structure upon cooling of the material. By reacting elemental sulfur with organic polymers, the Bureau of Mines developed a product that successfully suppresses the solid phase transition and significantly improves the stability of the product. SPC, originally named modified sulfur cement, is produced from readily available, inexpensive waste sulfur derived from desulfurization of both flue gases and petroleum. The commercial production of SPC is licensed in the United States by Martin Resources (Odessa, Texas) and is marketed under the trade name Chement 2000. It is sold in granular form and is relatively inexpensive ({approx}$0.10 to 0.12/lb). Application of SPC for the treatment of radioactive, hazardous, and mixed wastes was initially developed and patented by Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) in the mid-1980s (Kalb and Colombo, 1985; Colombo et al., 1997). The process was subsequently investigated by the Commission of the European Communities (Van Dalen and Rijpkema, 1989), Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (Darnell, 1991), and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (Mattus and Mattus, 1994). SPC has been used primarily in microencapsulation applications but can also be used for macroencapsulation of waste. SPC microencapsulation has been demonstrated to be an effective treatment for a wide variety of wastes, including incinerator hearth and fly ash; aqueous concentrates such as sulfates, borates, and chlorides; blowdown solutions; soils; and sludges. It is not recommended for treatment of wastes containing high concentrations of nitrates because of potentially dangerous reactions between sulfur, nitrate, and trace quantities of organics. Recently, the process has been adapted for the treatment of liquid elemental mercury and mercury contaminated soil and debris.

  5. Elucidating microbial processes in nitrate- and sulfate-reducing systems using sulfur and oxygen isotope ratios: The example of oil reservoir souring control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubert, Casey; Voordouw, Gerrit; Mayer, Bernhard

    2009-07-01

    Sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) are ubiquitous in anoxic environments where they couple the oxidation of organic compounds to the production of hydrogen sulfide. This can be problematic for various industries including oil production where reservoir "souring" (the generation of H 2S) requires corrective actions. Nitrate or nitrite injection into sour oil fields can promote SRB control by stimulating organotrophic nitrate- or nitrite-reducing bacteria (O-NRB) that out-compete SRB for electron donors (biocompetitive exclusion), and/or by lithotrophic nitrate- or nitrite-reducing sulfide oxidizing bacteria (NR-SOB) that remove H 2S directly. Sulfur and oxygen isotope ratios of sulfide and sulfate were monitored in batch cultures and sulfidic bioreactors to evaluate mitigation of SRB activities by nitrate or nitrite injection. Sulfate reduction in batch cultures of Desulfovibrio sp. strain Lac15 indicated typical Rayleigh-type fractionation of sulfur isotopes during bacterial sulfate reduction (BSR) with lactate, whereas oxygen isotope ratios in unreacted sulfate remained constant. Sulfur isotope fractionation in batch cultures of the NR-SOB Thiomicrospira sp. strain CVO was minimal during the oxidation of sulfide to sulfate, which had ?18O SO4 values similar to that of the water-oxygen. Treating an up-flow bioreactor with increasing doses of nitrate to eliminate sulfide resulted in changes in sulfur isotope ratios of sulfate and sulfide but very little variation in oxygen isotope ratios of sulfate. These observations were similar to results obtained from SRB-only, but different from those of NR-SOB-only pure culture control experiments. This suggests that biocompetitive exclusion of SRB took place in the nitrate-injected bioreactor. In two replicate bioreactors treated with nitrite, less pronounced sulfur isotope fractionation and a slight decrease in ?18O SO4 were observed. This indicated that NR-SOB played a minor role during dosing with low nitrite and that biocompetitive exclusion was the major process. The results demonstrate that stable isotope data can contribute unique information for understanding complex microbial processes in nitrate- and sulfate-reducing systems, and offer important information for the management of H 2S problems in oil reservoirs and elsewhere.

  6. Recovery of iron oxide concentrate from high-sulfur and low-grade pyrite cinder using an innovative beneficiating process

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Binbin He; Xike Tian; Yan Sun; Chao Yang; Yanglin Zeng; Yanxin Wang; Suxin Zhang; Zhenbang Pi

    2010-01-01

    A high quality iron oxide concentrate, suitable as a feed for blast and electric reduction furnaces was recovered from high-sulfur and low-grade pyrite cinder. Pyrite cinder was treated with a hot strong alkali solution which dissolved most of the silica and alumina, leaving a solid residue and forming a precipitate which was an acid-soluble salt of aluminosilicate hydrate. The residue

  7. An overview of liquid redox sulfur recovery

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. A. Dalrymple; T. W. Trofe; J. M. Evans

    1989-01-01

    Liquid redox sulfur recovery processes absorb HâS from gas streams and produce elemental sulfur for sale or disposal. These processes, which involve the overall reaction of HâS with oxygen to form elemental sulfur and water can be used in a wide variety of applications where HâS removal and recovery are required. They can be used to desulfurize natural gas, either

  8. Role of RIS/APC for manufacturing RFG/LSD. [Refinery Information Systems/Advanced Process Control, ReFormulated Gasoline/Low Sulfur Diesels

    SciTech Connect

    Latour, P.R. (SETPOINT, Inc., Houston, TX (United States))

    1994-01-01

    Revolutionary changes in quality specifications (number, complexity, uncertainty, economic sensitivity) for reformulated gasolines (RFG) and low-sulfur diesels (LSD) are being addressed by powerful, new, computer-integrated manufacturing technology for Refinery Information Systems and Advanced Process Control (RIS/APC). This paper shows how the five active RIS/APC functions: performance measurement, optimization, scheduling, control and integration are used to manufacture new, clean fuels competitively. With current industry spending for this field averaging 2 to 3 cents/bbl crude, many refineries can capture 50 to 100 cents/bbl if the technology is properly employed and sustained throughout refining operations, organizations, and businesses.

  9. On-line sulfur analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-02-01

    Field gas processing plants take great care to remove sulfur compounds from the gas coming in through the gathering system to reduce the toxicity and corrosivity of the gas. Then, at key points along the transportation and distribution networks, sulfur-based odorant compounds are added to the gas for safety and to comply with governmental regulations. As a result, a wide range of sulfides may be present in the gas stream, presenting a difficult measurement and separation task for even well-equipped laboratories. Field requirements are even more demanding of time and instrument reliability. Specificity in sulfur compound analysis is becoming more and more important, transcending the traditional ''grains of sulfur per cubit ft'' and, in some instances, regulatory requirements.

  10. Sulfur distribution within coal pyrolysis products

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Andrzej Czaplicki; Wojciech Smo?ka

    1998-01-01

    The pyrolysis of coal leads to distribution of sulfur compounds in pyrolysis gas, char and tar generated during the process. The effect of the process parameters of autothermal coal pyrolysis in the circulating fluidized bed reactor on total sulfur distribution has been investigated. Several experimental tests were performed at the temperature of 920°C. Non-coking coal from the Wieczorek Mine (Upper

  11. Sulfur removal from a gas stream

    SciTech Connect

    Frech, K.J.; Tazuma, J.J.

    1984-03-06

    There is disclosed a process for removing sulfur compounds from a gas stream. The process involves passing the gas stream containing the sulfur compounds through a mass of porous material that has deposited upon it a metal oxide, the improvement comprises the continuous or intermittent addition of an oxidizing agent and an amine.

  12. Effects of sulfur forms on heavy metals bioleaching from contaminated sediments

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. Fang; L. Zhao; L. X. Zhou; H. X. Shan

    2009-01-01

    The use of recyclable forms of sulfur will exclude the risk of sediment reacidification and reduce the cost of bioleaching process. Three different forms of sulfur (namely sulfur powder, prills and pieces) were used to examine the utilization and recycle of sulfur, used as energy substrate for sulfur-oxidizing bacteria (SOB) in the bioleaching of heavy metal-contaminated sediments. The results showed

  13. Microbial stabilization of sulfur-laden sorbents. [Quarterly] technical report, March 1, 1993May 31, 1993

    Microsoft Academic Search

    1993-01-01

    Clean coal technologies that involve limestone for in situ sulfur capture generate lime\\/limestone products laden with sulfur at various oxidation states. If sulfur is completely stabilized as sulfate, the spent sorbent is ready for commercial utilization as gypsum. However, the presence of reduced sulfur species requires additional processing. Thermal oxidation of reduced sulfur frequently results in undesirable release of SOâ.

  14. Production of sulfur from sulfur dioxide obtained from flue gas

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, R.

    1989-06-06

    This patent describes a regenerable process for recovery of elemental sulfur from a gas containing sulfur dioxide comprising the steps of: contacting the gas with an aqueous, alkaline reaction medium containing sodium sulfite in concentration sufficient so that a slurry containing solid sodium sulfide is formed to react sulfur dioxide with sodium sulfite to form a solution containing dissolved sodium pyrosulfite and sodium sulfite; separating sulfur dioxide from the solution produced to leave a residual mixture containing water, sodium sulfite and a sodium pyrosulfite, the amount of sulfur dioxide separated being equal to about one-third the amount of sulfur dioxide which reacted with sodium sulfite; adding, in substantial absence of air, sufficient water and sodium bicarbonate to the residual mixture to react with the dissolved sodium pyrsulfide and form a slurry of solid sodium sulfite suspended in the resulting aqueous, alkaline reaction medium and gaseous carbon dioxide; separating the gaseous carbon dioxide; separating the solid sodium sulfite from the aqueous alkaline reaction medium and recycling the separated reaction medium; reducing the separated sodium sulfite to sodium sulfide; adding the sodium sulfide to an aqueous reaction medium containing sodium bicarbonate and, in the substantial absence of air, carbonating the resulting mixture with the gaseous carbon dioxide to form a slurry of solid particles of sodium bicarbonate dispersed in an aqueous reactor medium containing sodium bicarbonate, along with a gas composed primarily of hydrogen sulfide.

  15. Theoretical investigation of the anomalous equilibrium fractionation of multiple sulfur isotopes during adsorption

    E-print Network

    Cartigny, Pierre

    Theoretical investigation of the anomalous equilibrium fractionation of multiple sulfur isotopes, the equilibrium isotopic fractionation of sulfur during adsorption is investigated using a similar 1-dimensional-independent isotopic fractionation Adsorption Sulfur Morse potential Adsorption processes of gaseous molecules

  16. Stable isotope compositions of serpentinite seamounts in the Mariana forearc: Serpentinization processes, fluid sources and sulfur metasomatism

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Alt, J.C.; Shanks, Wayne C., III

    2006-01-01

    The Mariana and Izu-Bonin arcs in the western Pacific are characterized by serpentinite seamounts in the forearc that provide unique windows into the mantle wedge. We present stable isotope (O, H, S, and C) data for serpentinites from Conical seamount in the Mariana forearc and S isotope data for Torishima seamount in the Izu-Bonin forearc in order to understand the compositions of fluids and temperatures of serpentinization in the mantle wedge, and to investigate the transport of sulfur from the slab to the mantle wedge. Six serpentine mineral separates have a restricted range of ??18O (6.5-8.5???). Antigorite separates have ??D values of -29.5??? to -45.5??? that reflect serpentinization within the mantle wedge whereas chrysotile has low ??D values (-51.8??? to -84.0???) as the result of re-equilibration with fluids at low temperatures. Fractionation of oxygen isotopes between serpentine and magnetite indicate serpentinization temperatures of 300-375 ??C. Two late cross-fiber chrysotile veins have higher ??18O values of 8.9??? to 10.8??? and formed at lower temperatures (as low as ???100 ??C). Aqueous fluids in equilibrium with serpentine at 300-375 ??C had ??18O = 6.5-9??? and ??D = -4??? to -26???, consistent with sediment dehydration reactions at temperatures <200 ??C in the subducting slab rather than a basaltic slab source. Three aragonite veins in metabasalt and siltstone clasts within the serpentinite flows have ??18O = 16.7-24.5???, consistent with the serpentinizing fluids at temperatures <250 ??C. ??13C values of 0.1-2.5??? suggest a source in subducting carbonate sediments. The ??34S values of sulfide in serpentinites on Conical Seamount (-6.7??? to 9.8???) result from metasomatism through variable reduction of aqueous sulfate (??34S = 14???) derived from slab sediments. Despite sulfur metasomatism, serpentinites have low sulfur contents (generally < 164 ppm) that reflect the highly depleted nature of the mantle wedge. The serpentinites are mostly enriched in 34S (median ??34Ssulfide = 4.5???), consistent with a 34S-enriched mantle wedge as inferred from arc lavas. ?? 2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Stratospheric sulfur oxidation kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Jayne, J.T.; Worsnop, D.R.; Kolb, C.E. [Aerodyne Research, Inc., Billerica, MA (United States)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    Oxidation of SO2 to H2SO4 in the atmosphere is believed to involve the reaction of SO3 with water. It is commonly assumed that this is an important step leading to homogeneous nucleation of H2SO4 aerosol particles. Heterogeneous chemistry on sulfuric acid aerosols regulate much of the ozone photochemistry in the lower stratosphere and are also believed to have significant effect on the climate. Understanding aerosol loading requires a detailed knowledge of the stratospheric sulfur budget, including its oxidation kinetics. Here we present results of a laboratory project studying a key step in the oxidation process, the homogeneous reaction between SO3 and H2O vapor. Kinetic measurements are performed in a high-pressure turbulent fast-flow reactor (fabricated at MIT) which minimizes heterogeneous loss of SO3 on reactorwalls. The rate of decay of SO3 and the appearance of H2SO4 is monitored in the presence of excess water vapor. Gas phase reactants and products are detected via an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometer which is coupled to the exit of the flow reactor. Sulfuric acid nucleation studies can also be performed using the turbulent flow reactor. Initial measurements using a particle detector (based on Mie scattering) showed that aerosol formation and particle size distribution are controlled by varying the SO3/H2O gas ratio and the reactor temperature. Results for the reaction SO3J+ H2O show a second order dependence in water vapor density and a strong negative temperature dependence. The results, measured in the range -30C to +95C, imply that an SO3.H2O adduct and/or a water dimer species is likely involved in the reaction mechanism. Results of recent theoretical calculations on the SO3 + H2O system also support the finding that two water molecules are involved. Implications for the gas phase production of sulfuric acid in the atmosphere will be discussed.

  18. Enhanced elementary sulfur recovery with sequential sulfate-reducing, denitrifying sulfide-oxidizing processes in a cylindrical-type anaerobic baffled reactor.

    PubMed

    Huang, Cong; Zhao, Youkang; Li, Zhiling; Yuan, Ye; Chen, Chuan; Tan, Wenbo; Gao, Shuang; Gao, Lingfang; Zhou, Jizhong; Wang, Aijie

    2015-09-01

    Simultaneous removal of COD, SO4(2-) and NO3(-) and recovery of elemental sulfur (S(0)) were evaluated in a four-compartment anaerobic baffled reactor (ABR) with separated functional units of sulfate reduction (SR) and denitrifying sulfide removal (DSR). Optimal SO4(2-)-S/NO3(-)-N ratio was evaluated as 5:5, with a substantial improvement of S(0) recovery maintained at 79.1%, one of the highest level ever reported; meanwhile, removal rates of COD, SO4(2-) and NO3(-) were approached at 71.9%, 92.9% and 98.6%, respectively. Nitrate served as a key factor to control the shift of SR and DSR related populations, with the possible involvement of Thauera sp. during SR and Sulfurovum sp. or Acidiferrobacter sp. during DSR, respectively. DsrB and aprA genes were the most abundant during SR and DSR processes, respectively. Cylindrical-type ABR with the improved elemental sulfur recovery was recommended to deal with sulfate and nitrate-laden wastewater under the optimized SO4(2-)/NO3(-) ratio. PMID:26080105

  19. Production of Low-Sulfur Converter Steel

    Microsoft Academic Search

    É. N. Shebanits; A. A. Larionov; B. V. Neboga; A. V. Pobegailo; M. N. Yakin; S. A. Ovsyannikov

    2000-01-01

    The production of low-sulfur (sulfur content of 0.005% or less) tube steel for pipelines, which has been successfully introduced at the Mariupol’ Metallurgical Combine, requires desulfurization of the pig iron and steel at the corresponding stages of the production process. The decision on an efficient method of desulfurization must be made on the basis of economic as well as technical

  20. Evaluation of advanced separation techniques for application to flue gas cleanup processes for the simultaneous removal of sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, R.J.; Drummond, C.J.; Ekmann, J.M.

    1985-06-01

    Thirteen advanced separation techniques were reviewed in detail for application to flue gas cleanup processes. Of these, the three most promising for application to systems for simultaneous removal of sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides from flue gas are solvent extraction, electrodialysis, and inverse thermal phase separation. Gas separation membranes would also be promising if a membrane could be developed that would be selective for SO/sub 2/ and NO/sub x/. Specific utility or industrial systems incorporating some of these processes are suggested. Preliminary estimates of annual revenue requirements for three gas-separation-membrane flue gas cleanup systems and an electrodialysis system are compared with an estimate for a limestone system with selective catalytic reduction. In addition, fourteen wet simultaneous SO/sub 2//NO/sub x/ flue gas cleanup processes that have progressed beyond bench scale were reviewed for possible modification to incorporate advanced separation techniques. It appeared that in processes where modifications were possible, either such modification would result in marginal improvement, or the process would no longer be recognizable. 147 refs., 10 figs., 9 tabs.

  1. Selective catalytic reduction of sulfur dioxide to elemental sulfur

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Wei; Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, M.; Sarofim, A.F.

    1992-01-01

    Elemental sulfur recovery from SO[sub 2]-containing gas streams is highly attractive as it produces a saleable. Product and no waste to dispose of. However, commercially available schemes are complex and involve multi-stage reactors, such as, most notably in the Resox (reduction of SO[sub 2] with coke) and Claus plants(reaction of SO[sub 2] with H[sub 2]S over catalyst). This project win investigate a cerium oxide catalyst for the single-stage selective reduction SO[sub 2] to elemental sulfur by a reductant, such as carbon monoxide. Cerium oxide has been identified as a superior catalyst for SO[sub 2] reduction by CO to elemental sulfur because of its high activity and high selectivity to sulfur over COS over a wide temperature range(400--650C). Kinetic and parametric studies of SO[sub 2] reduction planned over various CeO[sub 2]-formulations will provide the necessary basis for development of a simplified process, a single-stage elemental sulfur recovery scheme from variable concentration gas streams. A first apparent application is treatment of regenerator off-gases in power plants using regenerative flue gas desulfurization. Such a simple catalytic converter may offer the long-sought Claus-alternative'' for coal-fired power plant applications.

  2. Thiophenic Sulfur Compounds Released During Coal Pyrolysis.

    PubMed

    Xing, Mengwen; Kong, Jiao; Dong, Jie; Jiao, Haili; Li, Fan

    2013-06-01

    Thiophenic sulfur compounds are released during coal gasification, carbonization, and combustion. Previous studies indicate that thiophenic sulfur compounds degrade very slowly in the environment, and are more carcinogenic than polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and nitrogenous compounds. Therefore, it is very important to study the principle of thiophenic sulfur compounds during coal conversion, in order to control their emission and promote clean coal utilization. To realize this goal and understand the formation mechanism of thiophenic sulfur compounds, this study focused on the release behavior of thiophenic sulfur compounds during coal pyrolysis, which is an important phase for all coal thermal conversion processes. The pyrolyzer (CDS-5250) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (Focus GC-DSQII) were used to analyze thiophenic sulfur compounds in situ. Several coals with different coal ranks and sulfur contents were chosen as experimental samples, and thiophenic sulfur compounds of the gas produced during pyrolysis under different temperatures and heating rates were investigated. Levels of benzothiophene and dibenzothiophene were obtained during pyrolysis at temperatures ranging from 200°C to 1300°C, and heating rates ranging from 6°C/ms to 14°C/ms and 6°C/s to 14°C/s. Moreover, the relationship between the total amount of benzothiophene and dibenzothiophene released during coal pyrolysis and the organic sulfur content in coal was also discussed. This study is beneficial for understanding the formation and control of thiophenic sulfur compounds, since it provides a series of significant results that show the impact that operation conditions and organic sulfur content in coal have on the amount and species of thiophenic sulfur compounds produced during coal pyrolysis. PMID:23781126

  3. Thiophenic Sulfur Compounds Released During Coal Pyrolysis

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Mengwen; Kong, Jiao; Dong, Jie; Jiao, Haili; Li, Fan

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Thiophenic sulfur compounds are released during coal gasification, carbonization, and combustion. Previous studies indicate that thiophenic sulfur compounds degrade very slowly in the environment, and are more carcinogenic than polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and nitrogenous compounds. Therefore, it is very important to study the principle of thiophenic sulfur compounds during coal conversion, in order to control their emission and promote clean coal utilization. To realize this goal and understand the formation mechanism of thiophenic sulfur compounds, this study focused on the release behavior of thiophenic sulfur compounds during coal pyrolysis, which is an important phase for all coal thermal conversion processes. The pyrolyzer (CDS-5250) and gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (Focus GC-DSQII) were used to analyze thiophenic sulfur compounds in situ. Several coals with different coal ranks and sulfur contents were chosen as experimental samples, and thiophenic sulfur compounds of the gas produced during pyrolysis under different temperatures and heating rates were investigated. Levels of benzothiophene and dibenzothiophene were obtained during pyrolysis at temperatures ranging from 200°C to 1300°C, and heating rates ranging from 6°C/ms to 14°C/ms and 6°C/s to 14°C/s. Moreover, the relationship between the total amount of benzothiophene and dibenzothiophene released during coal pyrolysis and the organic sulfur content in coal was also discussed. This study is beneficial for understanding the formation and control of thiophenic sulfur compounds, since it provides a series of significant results that show the impact that operation conditions and organic sulfur content in coal have on the amount and species of thiophenic sulfur compounds produced during coal pyrolysis. PMID:23781126

  4. System evaluation and microbial analysis of a sulfur cycle-based wastewater treatment process for Co-treatment of simple wet flue gas desulfurization wastes with freshwater sewage.

    PubMed

    Qian, Jin; Liu, Rulong; Wei, Li; Lu, Hui; Chen, Guang-Hao

    2015-09-01

    A sulfur cycle-based wastewater treatment process, namely the Sulfate reduction, Autotrophic denitrification and Nitrification Integrated process (SANI(®) process) has been recently developed for organics and nitrogen removal with 90% sludge minimization and 35% energy reduction in the biological treatment of saline sewage from seawater toilet flushing practice in Hong Kong. In this study, sulfate- and sulfite-rich wastes from simple wet flue gas desulfurization (WFGD) were considered as a potential low-cost sulfur source to achieve beneficial co-treatment with non-saline (freshwater) sewage in continental areas, through a Mixed Denitrification (MD)-SANI process trialed with synthetic mixture of simple WFGD wastes and freshwater sewage. The system showed 80% COD removal efficiency (specific COD removal rate of 0.26 kg COD/kg VSS/d) at an optimal pH of 7.5 and complete denitrification through MD (specific nitrogen removal rate of 0.33 kg N/kg VSS/d). Among the electron donors in MD, organics and thiosulfate could induce a much higher denitrifying activity than sulfide in terms of both NO3(-) reduction and NO2(-) reduction, suggesting a much higher nitrogen removal rate in organics-, thiosulfate- and sulfide-based MD in MD-SANI compared to sulfide alone-based autotrophic denitrification in conventional SANI(®). Diverse sulfate/sulfite-reducing bacteria (SRB) genera dominated in the bacterial community of sulfate/sulfite-reducing up-flow sludge bed (SRUSB) sludge without methane producing bacteria detected. Desulfomicrobium-like species possibly for sulfite reduction and Desulfobulbus-like species possibly for sulfate reduction are the two dominant groups with respective abundance of 24.03 and 14.91% in the SRB genera. Diverse denitrifying genera were identified in the bacterial community of anoxic up-flow sludge bed (AnUSB) sludge and the Thauera- and Thiobacillus-like species were the major taxa. These results well explained the successful operation of the lab-scale MD-SANI process. PMID:26001823

  5. World sulfur production: As of Jan. 1, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-06-13

    The article consists of a table which lists company and location, source of sulfur, type of process used, design capacity, and sulfur production for 42 countries. Sources of sulfur include refinery gases, natural gas, acid gases, crude oil, shale gas, oil sands, coke oven gas, and hydrogen sulfide.

  6. FEASIBILITY OF PRODUCING ELEMENTAL SULFUR FROM MAGNESIUM SULFITE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a study to extend potential applications of MgO flue gas desulfurization processes by allowing the sulfur to be recovered as elemental sulfur as well as sulfuric acid. The study considered the feasibility of combining the exothermic SO2 reduction react...

  7. Historical Sulfur Dioxide Emissions 1850-2000: Methods and Results

    E-print Network

    Hultman, Nathan E.

    due to our use of emissions factors that vary with time to account for sulfur removals from fossil fuels and industrial smelting processes. 1. INTRODUCTION Sulfur is ubiquitous in the biosphere and often increased sulfur deposition and atmospheric sulfate loadings near most industrialized areas. Sulfate acid

  8. MVC: A user-based on-line optimal control system for gas processing and treating plants. Development and results for claus sulfur recovery and sweetening modules. Topical report, June 1992-September 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Berkowitz, P.N.; Papadopoulos, M.N.; Colwell, L.W.; Poe, W.; Yiu, Y.

    1993-09-01

    The objective of this project was to develop and field validate modular, on-line, advanced control systems to optimize the operation of Claus sulfur recovery and sweetening in gas processing plants with emphasis on small and mid-sized facilities.

  9. Process for the elimination of waste water produced upon the desulfurization of coking oven gas by means of wash solution containing organic oxygen-carrier, with simultaneous recovery of elemental sulfur

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. Diemer; W. Brake; R. Dittmer

    1985-01-01

    A process is disclosed for the elimination of waste water falling out with the desulfurization of coking oven gas by means of an organic oxygen carrier-containing washing solution with simultaneous recovery of elemental sulfur. The waste water is decomposed in a combustion chamber in a reducing atmosphere at temperatures between about 1000° and 1100° C. under such conditions that the

  10. How to cope with your sulfur problems. [COPE process; use of oxygen enriched air to increase capacity

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. G. Goar; W. P. Hegarty; T. W. Thew

    1986-01-01

    COPE (Claus Oxygen-based Process Expansion) technology presents an improvement to the modified Claus process that replaces air with up to 100% oxygen to debottleneck Claus Sulphur Recovery Unit's (SRU's). The major equipment requirements of the COPE process are the installation of an acid gas recycle blower and a proprietary burner. The recycle stream acts as a coolant to moderate reaction

  11. Sulfur tolerant anode materials

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-02-01

    The goal of this program is the development of a molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) anode which is more tolerant of sulfur contaminants in the fuel than the current state-of-the-art nickel-based anode structures. This program addresses two different but related aspects of the sulfur contamination problem. The primary aspect is concerned with the development of a sulfur tolerant electrocatalyst for the fuel oxidation reaction. A secondary issue is the development of a sulfur tolerant water-gas-shift reaction catalyst and an investigation of potential steam reforming catalysts which also have some sulfur tolerant capabilities. These two aspects are being addressed as two separate tasks.

  12. Expand sulfur plant capacity

    SciTech Connect

    Hull, R. [BOC Gases, Murray Hill, NJ (United States); Watson, R. [BOC Gases, Guildford (United Kingdom); Chow, T.K. [Ralph M Parsons Co., Pasadena, CA (United States)] [and others

    1995-09-01

    Interest in oxygen use to expand existing Claus sulfur plants in refineries has been building ever since high oxygen concentrations were successfully used at the Conoco, Lake Charles La., refinery, and the KOA, Kawasaki refinery in Japan. This interest increased recently due to the demand created by numerous refinery hydrotreater projects, driven by more stringent fuel quality and sulfur emission standards, as well as the economic incentive to process low-cost heavy, sour crudes. Various approaches that introduce low oxygen levels have resulted in moderate capacity increases. Oxygen can be added to the air supply stream for concentrations up to 30% oxygen. Beyond the 30% oxygen level, oxygen must be introduced into the reaction furnace through a burner specifically designed to accommodate oxygen, or through a separate oxygen lance. However, higher oxygen concentrations result in higher temperatures, which rapidly approach the furnace refractory design limits. Methods must be employed to mitigate the reaction furnace temperature whenever high oxygen levels are necessary to coincide with significant capacity increases in refinery operations. Three proprietary technologies are in commercial operation that successfully address this issue.

  13. Definition of Non-Conventional Sulfur Utilization in Western Kazakhstan for Sulfur Concrete (Phase 1)

    SciTech Connect

    Kalb, Paul

    2007-05-31

    Battelle received a contract from Agip-KCO, on behalf a consortium of international oil and gas companies with exploration rights in the North Caspian Sea, Kazakhstan. The objective of the work was to identify and help develop new techniques for sulfur concrete products from waste, by-product sulfur that will be generated in large quantitites as drilling operations begin in the near future. BNL has significant expertise in the development and use of sulfur concrete products and has direct experience collaborating with the Russian and Kazakh partners that participated. Feasibility testing was successfully conducted for a new process to produce cost-effective sulfur polymer cement that has broad commerical applications.

  14. Biologically produced sulfur particles and polysulfide ions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    W. E. Kleinjan

    2005-01-01

    This thesis deals with the effects of particles of biologically produced sulfur (or 'biosulfur<\\/span>') on a biotechnological process for the removal of hydrogen sulfide from gas streams. Particular emphasis is given to the role of polysulfide ions in such a process. These polysulfide ions are formed from reaction of sulfide with biologically produced sulfur. The basic concepts of this

  15. Neutralization and biodegradation of sulfur mustard. Final report, October 1995-June 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Harvey, S.P.; Szafraniec, L.L.; Beaudry, W.T.; Earley, J.T.; Irvine, R.L.

    1997-02-01

    The chemical warfare agent sulfur mustard was hydrolyzed to products that were biologically mineralized in sequencing batch reactors seeded with activated sludge. Greater than 90% carbon removal was achieved using laboratory scale bioreactors processing hydrolyzed munitions grade sulfur mustard obtained directly from the U.S. Chemical Stockpile. The bioreactor effluent was nontoxic and contained no detectable sulfur mustard or priority pollutants. The sulfur mustard hydrolysis biodegradation process has potential application to the congressionally mandated disposal of sulfur mustard stockpiles.

  16. An investigation of sulfur distribution during thermal plasma pyrolysis of used tires

    Microsoft Academic Search

    L. Tang; H. Huang

    2004-01-01

    Plasma pyrolysis of used tires leads to the distribution of sulfur compounds in gas and char generated during the process. Sulfur transformation and distribution were investigated by analyzing the gas and char at different conditions. Sulfides in the gaseous product were analyzed using photometric method. It was found that hydrogen sulfide was the main compound containing sulfur. The sulfur content

  17. System for recovering sulfur from gases, especially natural gas

    SciTech Connect

    Gryka, G.E.

    1992-09-01

    The objective of this project is to design, construct and operate a laboratory reactor to convert hydrogen sulfide into liquid sulfur, using a patented PIPco process as a basis. Reaction conditions will be studied, continuous regenerative operation demonstrated, and data necessary to design a field test system will be collected. The subject process is a regenerative buffered water circulating system with two primary steps: (1) loading of the solution with SO[sub 2] (which can be generated by buming sulfur or H[sub 2]S), and (2) H[sub 2]S separation - reaction to form sulfur - and sulfur separation. Many regenerative liquid redox sulfur recovery systems offer potential for combining H[sub 2]S separation and sulfur formation into one step. PIPco's data and engineering study suggest the process may have advantages over other liquid systems: Use of potassiurti citrate buffer increases sulfur dioxide (oxidizing agent) loading by a factor of 8 or more, up to 160 grams SO[sub 2]/liter of solution can be carried to the separator - reactor, thereby reducing liquid circulating rates and equipment size. The separator - reactor is operated at a temperature above 120[degrees]C (the melting point of elemental sulfur). Therefore, sulfur is produced and separated in liquid form. This eliminates sulfur plugging and separation problems by avoiding the production of solid sulfur.

  18. Io - Geochemistry of sulfur

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, J. S.

    1982-01-01

    The evidence from Voyager imaging, Earth-based spectral reflectivity studies, and thermal emission measurements combine to suggest an extremely fresh, volcanically recycled sulfur-rich crust for Io, with very shallow large-scale melting. Two present styles of volcanism are possible, depending on the thickness of local deposits of sulfur: shallow liquid sulfur magma generation with quiescent flooding, and high-temperature volcanism with violet eruption of a sulfur-iron magma driven by SO2. Evolutionary considerations preclude direct derivation of Io's lithosphere from any metal-bearing chondritic source material. Metal-free C3V- or C2M-type parent material of either primary or secondary origin is the most plausible direct antecedent of the present sulfur-rich crust. Sulfates are almost certainly important constituents of the mantle, and can participate in the recycling of reduced, dense sulfide species to prevent total extraction of sulfur into the core.

  19. Sulfur isotopic systematics of granitoids from southwestern New Brunswick, Canada: implications for magmatic-hydrothermal processes, redox conditions, and gold mineralization

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Xue-Ming Yang; David R. Lentz

    2010-01-01

    Bulk ?\\u000a 34Srock values, sulfur contents, and magnetic susceptibility were determined for 12 gold-related granitoid intrusions in southwestern\\u000a New Brunswick, the Canadian Appalachians. The sulfur isotope compositions of sulfide minerals in some of the granitoid samples\\u000a were also analyzed. This new dataset was used to characterize two distinctive groups of granitoids: (1) a Late Devonian granitic\\u000a series (GS) and (2)

  20. Dual protection of sulfur by carbon nanospheres and graphene sheets for lithium-sulfur batteries.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bei; Wen, Yanfen; Ye, Delai; Yu, Hua; Sun, Bing; Wang, Guoxiu; Hulicova-Jurcakova, Denisa; Wang, Lianzhou

    2014-04-25

    Well-confined elemental sulfur was implanted into a stacked block of carbon nanospheres and graphene sheets through a simple solution process to create a new type of composite cathode material for lithium-sulfur batteries. Transmission electron microscopy and elemental mapping analysis confirm that the as-prepared composite material consists of graphene-wrapped carbon nanospheres with sulfur uniformly distributed in between, where the carbon nanospheres act as the sulfur carriers. With this structural design, the graphene contributes to direct coverage of sulfur to inhibit the mobility of polysulfides, whereas the carbon nanospheres undertake the role of carrying the sulfur into the carbon network. This composite achieves a high loading of sulfur (64.2?wt?%) and gives a stable electrochemical performance with a maximum discharge capacity of 1394?mAh?g(-1) at a current rate of 0.1?C as well as excellent rate capability at 1?C and 2?C. The improved electrochemical properties of this composite material are attributed to the dual functions of the carbon components, which effectively restrain the sulfur inside the carbon nano-network for use in lithium-sulfur rechargeable batteries. PMID:24692070

  1. Sulfur and olefin management in the gasoline

    SciTech Connect

    Nocca, J.L.; Gialella, R.M. [IFP Enterprises, Inc., Houston, TX (United States); Cosyns, J.; Burzynski, J.P. [IFP, Rueil Malmaison (France)

    1995-09-01

    As transportation fuel composition is fine-tuned, sulfur and olefin concentration in the gasoline will come under increased scrutiny. This paper presents various options to limit sulfur and olefins with special emphasis on FCC Gasoline Desulfurization and C{sub 5} Skeletal Isomerization. Hydrodesulfurization of the C{sub 6} + FCC gasoline and processing of the FCC C{sub 5} cut in a Tame/Skeletal Isomerization complex is shown to meet the most stringent olefin and sulfur specifications while substantially reducing RVP and increasing refinery based oxygenates production.

  2. Implications for eruptive processes as indicated by sulfur dioxide emissions from Kilauea Volcano, Hawai'i, 1979-1997

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sutton, A.J.; Elias, T.; Gerlach, T.M.; Stokes, J.B.

    2001-01-01

    Ki??lauea Volcano, Hawai'i, currently hosts the longest running SO2 emission-rate data set on the planet, starting with initial surveys done in 1975 by Stoiber and his colleagues. The 17.5-year record of summit emissions, starting in 1979, shows the effects of summit and east rift eruptive processes, which define seven distinctly different periods of SO2 release. Summit emissions jumped nearly 40% with the onset (3 January 1983) of the Pu'u 'O??'o??-Ku??paianaha eruption on the east rift zone (ERZ). Summit SO2 emissions from Ki??lauea showed a strong positive correlation with short-period, shallow, caldera events, rather than with long-period seismicity as in more silicious systems. This correlation suggests a maturation process in the summit magma-transport system from 1986 through 1993. During a steady-state throughput-equilibrium interval of the summit magma reservoir, integration of summit-caldera and ERZ SO2 emissions reveals an undegassed volume rate of effusion of 2.1 ?? 105 m3/d. This value corroborates the volume-rate determined by geophysical methods, demonstrating that, for Ki??lauea, SO2 emission rates can be used to monitor effusion rate, supporting and supplementing other, more established geophysical methods. For the 17.5 years of continuous emission rate records at Ki??lauea, the volcano has released 9.7 ?? 106 t (metric tonnes) of SO2, 1.7 ?? 106 t from the summit and 8.0 ?? 106 t from the east rift zone. On an annual basis, the average SO2 release from Ki??lauea is 4.6 ?? 105 t/y, compared to the global annual volcanic emission rate of 1.2 ?? 107 t/y. ?? 2001 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Corrosivity of sulfur-bearing diesel fuels

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. P. Sobolev; E. S. Churshukov; I. V. Rozhkov; I. A. Rubinshtein

    1966-01-01

    1.The corrosivity of sulfur-bearing diesel fuels is directly dependent on the chemical structure of the organic sulfur compounds present in the fuels.2.Mercaptans, especially aromatic mercaptans, exhibit the greatest effect on the process of steel corrosion. Fuels containing mercaptans give three to four times the amount of corrosion shown by fuels containing sulfides or thiophenes in concentrations 80 times the mercaptan

  4. Sulfur recovery system

    Microsoft Academic Search

    1977-01-01

    Recovery of chemicals from a sodium sulfide containing pulping liquor which is cycled from a digester through a recovery system is effected by separating hydrogen sulfide gas, either from the cooking liquor or from various points in the recovery system, to provide a source of sulfide sulfur which is oxidized to sulfur. When separated from the cooking liquor, it is

  5. Aircraft exhaust sulfur emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, R. C.; Anderson, M. R.; Miake-Lye, R. C.; Kolb, C. E.; Sorokin, A. A.; Buriko, Y. Y.

    The conversion of fuel sulfur to S(VI) (SO3 + H2SO4) in supersonic and subsonic aircraft engines is estimated numerically. Model results indicate between 2% and 10% of the fuel sulfur is emitted as S(VI). It is also shown that, for a high sulfur mass loading, conversion in the turbine is kinetically limited by the level of atomic oxygen. This results in a higher oxidation efficiency at lower sulfur loadings. SO3 is the primary S(VI) oxidation product and calculated H2SO4 emission levels were less than 1% of the total fuel sulfur. This source of S(VI) can exceed the S(VI) source due to gas phase oxidation in the exhaust wake.

  6. Regional river sulfur runoff

    SciTech Connect

    Husar, R.B.; Husar, J.D.

    1985-01-20

    The water and sulfur runoff data for 54 large river basins were assembled, covering 65% of the nondesert land area of the world. The sulfur concentration ranges from 0.5 mg S/L for the West African rivers Niger and Volta to 100 mg S/L in the Colorado River; the world average is 3.2 mg S/L. The concentrations in central and eastern Europe as well as central and eastern North America exceed 8 mg S/L. The sulfur runoff density is also highest in the river basins over these industrialized regions, exceeding 2 g S/m/sup 2//yr. However, high sulfur runoff density in excess of 3 g S/m/sup 2//yr is also measured over the Pacific islands New Zealand and New Guinea and the archipelagos of Indonesia and the Philippines. The natural background sulfur runoff was estimated by assuming that South America, Africa, Australia, and the Pacific Islands are unperturbed by man and that the average river sulfur concentration is in the range 1--3 mg S/L. Taking these background concentration values, the man-induced sulfur runoff for Europe ranges between 2 and 8 times the natural flow, and over North America, man's contribution ranges between 1 and 5 times the natural runoff. The global sulfur flow from nondesert land to the oceans and the Caspian Sea is estimated as 131 Tg S/yr, of which 46--85 Tg S/yr is attributed to natural causes. The regional river sulfur runoff pattern discussed in this paper does not have enough spatial resolution to be directly applicable to studies of the environmental effects of man-induced sulfur flows. However, it points to the continental-size regions where those perturbations are most evident and to the magnitude of the perturbations as expressed in units of the natural flows.

  7. Direct Observation of Sulfur Radicals as Reaction Media in Lithium Sulfur Batteries

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wang, Qiang; Zheng, Jianming; Walter, Eric; Pan, Huilin; Lv, Dongping; Zuo, Pengjian; Chen, Honghao; Deng, Z. D.; Liaw, Bor Y.; Yu, Xiqian; et al

    2014-12-09

    Lithium sulfur (Li-S) battery has been regaining tremendous interest in recent years because of its attractive attributes such as high gravimetric energy, low cost and environmental benignity. However, it is still not conclusively known how polysulfide ring/chain participates in the whole cycling and whether the discharge and charge processes follow the same pathway. Herein, we demonstrate the direct observation of sulfur radicals by using in situ electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) technique. Based on the concentration changes of sulfur radicals at different potentials and the electrochemical characteristics of the cell, it is revealed that the chemical and electrochemical reactions in Li-Smore »cell are driving each other to proceed through sulfur radicals, leading to two completely different reaction pathways during discharge and charge. The proposed radical mechanism may provide new perspectives to investigate the interactions between sulfur species and the electrolyte, inspiring novel strategies to develop Li-S battery technology.« less

  8. Direct Observation of Sulfur Radicals as Reaction Media in lithium Sulfur Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Qiang; Zheng, Jianming; Walter, Eric D.; Pan, Huilin; Lu, Dongping; Zuo, Pengjian; Chen, Honghao; Deng, Zhiqun; Liaw, Bor Yann; Yu, Xiqian; Yang, Xiaoning; Zhang, Jiguang; Liu, Jun; Xiao, Jie

    2014-12-09

    Lithium sulfur (Li-S) battery has been regaining tremendous interest in recent years because of its attractive attributes such as high gravimetric energy, low cost and environmental benignity. However, it is still not conclusively known how polysulfide ring/chain participates in the whole cycling and whether the discharge and charge process follow the same pathway. Herein, we demonstrate the direct observation of sulfur radicals by using in situ electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) technique. Based on the concentration changes of sulfur radicals at different potentials, it is revealed that the chemical and electrochemical reactions in Li-S cell are driven each other to proceed through sulfur radicals, leading to two completely different reaction pathways during discharge and charge. The proposed radical mechanism may provide new insights to investigate the interactions between sulfur species and the electrolyte, inspiring novel strategies to develop Li-S battery technology.

  9. H2S(g) removal using a modified, low-ph liquid redox sulfur recovery (LRSR) process with electrochemical regeneration of the Fe catalyst couple.

    PubMed

    Gendel, Youri; Levi, No'omi; Lahav, Ori

    2009-11-01

    A modified pH 1.0 liquid redox sulfur recovery (LRSR) process, based on reactive absorption of H(2)S((g)) in an acidic (pH 1.0) iron solution ([Fe(III)] = 9-8 g L(-1), [Fe(II)] = 1-2 g L(-1)) and electrochemical regeneration of the Fe(III)/Fe(II) catalyst couple, is introduced. Fe(II) was oxidized in a flow-through electrolytic cell by Cl(2(aq)) formed on a Ti/RuO(2) anode. pH 1.0 was applied to retard the potential precipitation of predominantly jarosite group Fe(III) species. At pH 1.0, the presence of chloride ions at [Cl(-)] = 30 g L(-1) allows for both efficient (indirect) electrochemical oxidation of Fe(II) and efficient H(2)S((g)) reactive absorption. The latter observation was hypothesized to be associated with higher concentrations of Fe(III)-Cl complexes that are more highly reactive toward H(2)S((aq)) than are free Fe(III) ions and Fe-SO(4) complexes that otherwise dominate pH 1.0 Fe(III) solutions in the absence of a significant Cl(-) concentration. At the described operational conditions the rate of Fe(II) oxidation in the experimental system was 0.793 kg Fe h(-1) per m(2) anode surface area, at a current efficiency of 58%. Electricity cost within the electrochemical step was approximated at $0.9 per kg H(2)S((g)) removed. PMID:19924962

  10. The fate of sulfur during rapid pyrolysis of scrap tires.

    PubMed

    Hu, Hongyun; Fang, Yuan; Liu, Huan; Yu, Ren; Luo, Guangqian; Liu, Wenqiang; Li, Aijun; Yao, Hong

    2014-02-01

    The fate of sulfur during rapid pyrolysis of scrap tires at temperatures from 673 to 1073K was investigated. Sulfur was predominant in the forms of thiophenic and inorganic sulfides in raw scrap tires. In the pyrolysis process, sulfur in organic forms was unstable and decomposed, leading to the sulfur release into tar and gases. At 673 and 773K, a considerable amount of sulfur was distributed in tar. Temperature increasing from 773 to 973K promoted tar decomposition and facilitated sulfur release into gases. At 1073K, the interactions between volatiles and char stimulated the formation of high-molecular-weight sulfur-containing compounds. After pyrolysis, almost half of the total content of sulfur in raw scrap tires still remained in the char and was mostly in the form of sulfides. Moreover, at temperatures higher than 873K, part of sulfur in the char was immobilized in the sulfates. In the pyrolysis gases, H2S was the main sulfur-containing gas. Increasing temperature stimulated the decomposition of organic polymers in scrap tires and more H2S was formed. Besides H2S, other sulfur-containing gases such as CH3SH, COS and SO2 were produced during the rapid pyrolysis of scrap tires. PMID:24238304

  11. Economic feasibility of biochemical processes for the upgrading of crudes and the removal of sulfur, nitrogen, and trace metals from crude oil -- Benchmark cost establishment of biochemical processes on the basis of conventional downstream technologies. Final report FY95

    SciTech Connect

    Premuzic, E.T.

    1996-08-01

    During the past several years, a considerable amount of work has been carried out showing that microbially enhanced oil recovery (MEOR) is promising and the resulting biotechnology may be deliverable. At Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), systematic studies have been conducted which dealt with the effects of thermophilic and thermoadapted bacteria on the chemical and physical properties of selected types of crude oils at elevated temperatures and pressures. Current studies indicate that during the biotreatment several chemical and physical properties of crude oils are affected. The oils are (1) emulsified; (2) acidified; (3) there is a qualitative and quantitative change in light and heavy fractions of the crudes; (4) there are chemical changes in fractions containing sulfur compounds; (5) there is an apparent reduction in the concentration of trace metals; and (6) the qualitative and quantitative changes appear to be microbial species dependent; and (7) there is a distinction between biodegraded and biotreated oils. The downstream biotechnological crude oil processing research performed thus far is of laboratory scale and has focused on demonstrating the technical feasibility of downstream processing with different types of biocatalysts under a variety of processing conditions. Quantitative economic analysis is the topic of the present project which investigates the economic feasibility of the various biochemical downstream processes which hold promise in upgrading of heavy crudes, such as those found in California, e.g., Monterey-type, Midway Sunset, Honda crudes, and others.

  12. Sulfuric Acid on Europa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Frozen sulfuric acid on Jupiter's moon Europa is depicted in this image produced from data gathered by NASA's Galileo spacecraft. The brightest areas, where the yellow is most intense, represent regions of high frozen sulfuric acid concentration. Sulfuric acid is found in battery acid and in Earth's acid rain.

    This image is based on data gathered by Galileo's near infrared mapping spectrometer.

    Europa's leading hemisphere is toward the bottom right, and there are enhanced concentrations of sulfuric acid in the trailing side of Europa (the upper left side of the image). This is the face of Europa that is struck by sulfur ions coming from Jupiter's innermost moon, Io. The long, narrow features that crisscross Europa also show sulfuric acid that may be from sulfurous material extruded in cracks.

    Galileo, launched in 1989, has been orbiting Jupiter and its moons since December 1995. JPL manages the Galileo mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington DC. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA.

  13. Basic sulfur recovery research. Annual technical report, January 31, 1991

    Microsoft Academic Search

    DeBerry

    1991-01-01

    The fundamentals of chemical interactions between chemical reagents and reduced sulfur compounds in the liquid redox and other sulfur recovery processes are explored in order to use the information to target the most effective options in processing steps for the gas industry. Methods for following concentration of an intermediate chemical species in the reaction of iron chelates and hydrogen sulfide

  14. Design and development of a novel gas desulfurization process using hollow fiber membranes to stimulate the utilization of high sulfur Ohio coal

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. E. LeBlanc; S. Varanasi

    1990-01-01

    The objective of this proposed research was to carry out a detailed theoretical and experimental study of SO[sub 2] absorption in bench-scale hollow fiber absorbers (HFAs) under conditions representative of industrial flue gas desulfurization, and to use this knowledge to develop design criteria necessary for replacing conventional packed towers with industrial scale HFAS. If the use of high sulfur coal

  15. Design and development of a novel gas desulfurization process using hollow fiber membranes to stimulate the utilization of high sulfur Ohio coal. Final report

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. E. LeBlanc; S. Varanasi

    1990-01-01

    The objective of this proposed research was to carry out a detailed theoretical and experimental study of SOâ absorption in bench-scale hollow fiber absorbers (HFAs) under conditions representative of industrial flue gas desulfurization, and to use this knowledge to develop design criteria necessary for replacing conventional packed towers with industrial scale HFAS. If the use of high sulfur coal is

  16. Production of elemental sulfur and methane from HâS and COâ derived from a coal desulfurization process. Final report, September 1, 1993March 31, 1997

    Microsoft Academic Search

    X. Jiang; S. J. Khang; T. C. Keener

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to experimentally and theoretically investigate the feasibility of producing elemental sulfur, carbon monoxide, hydrogen and possible methane from hydrogen sulfide and carbon dioxide through catalytic reactions. A novel experimental system that could evaluate potential catalysts and adsorbents under controlled laboratory conditions was designed and constructed. Additionally an effective simulation program capable of providing valuable

  17. Optimization of wastewater feeding for single-cell protein production in an anaerobic wastewater treatment process utilizing purple non-sulfur bacteria in mixed culture condition

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ryo Honda; Kensuke Fukushi; Kazuo Yamamoto

    2006-01-01

    Impacts of operation timing of feeding and withdrawal on anaerobic wastewater treatment utilizing purple non-sulfur bacteria have been investigated in mixed culture condition with acidogenic bacteria. Simulated wastewater containing glucose was treated in a laboratory-scale chemostat reactor, changing the timing of wastewater feeding and withdrawal. Rhodopseudomonas palustris, which does not utilize glucose as a substrate, was inoculated in the reactor.

  18. Sulfur isotope signatures in gypsiferous sediments of the Estancia and Tularosa Basins as indicators of sulfate sources, hydrological processes, and microbial activity

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Anna Szynkiewicz; Craig H. Moore; Mihaela Glamoclija; Lisa M. Pratt

    2009-01-01

    In order to reconstruct paleo-environmental conditions for the saline playa lakes of the Rio Grande Rift, we investigated sediment sulfate sources using sulfur isotope compositions of dissolved SO42- ions in modern surface water, groundwater, and SO42- precipitated in the form of gypsum sediments deposited during the Pleistocene and Holocene in the Tularosa and Estancia Basins. The major sulfate sources are

  19. Determination of free sulfites (SO3-2) in dried fruits processed with sulfur dioxide by ion chromatography through anion exchange column and conductivity detection.

    PubMed

    Liao, Benjamin S; Sram, Jacqueline C; Files, Darin J

    2013-01-01

    A simple and effective anion ion chromatography (IC) method with anion exchange column and conductivity detector has been developed to determine free sulfites (SO3-2) in dried fruits processed with sulfur dioxide. No oxidation agent, such as hydrogen peroxide, is used to convert sulfites to sulfates for IC analysis. In addition, no stabilizing agent, such as formaldehyde, fructose or EDTA, is required during the sample extraction. This method uses aqueous 0.2 N NaOH as the solvent for standard preparation and sample extraction. The sulfites, either prepared from standard sodium sulfite powder or extracted from food samples, are presumed to be unbound SO3-2 in aqueous 0.2 N NaOH (pH > 13), because the bound sulfites in the sample matrix are released at pH > 10. In this study, sulfites in the standard solutions were stable at room temperature (i.e., 15-25 degrees C) for up to 12 days. The lowest standard of the linear calibration curve is set at 1.59 microg/mL SO3-2 (equivalent to 6.36 microg/g sample with no dilution) for analysis of processed dried fruits that would contain high levels (>1000 microg/g) of sulfites. As a consequence, this method typically requires significant dilution of the sample extract. Samples are prepared with a simple procedure of sample compositing, extraction with aqueous 0.2 N NaOH, centrifugation, dilution as needed, and filtration prior to IC. The sulfites in these sample extracts are stable at room temperature for up to 20 h. Using anion IC, the sulfites are eluted under isocratic conditions with 10 mM aqueous sodium carbonate solution as the mobile phase passing through an anion exchange column. The sulfites are easily separated, with an analysis run time of 18 min, regardless of the dried fruit matrix. Recoveries from samples spiked with sodium sulfites were demonstrated to be between 81 and 105% for five different fruit matrixes (apricot, golden grape, white peach, fig, and mango). Overall, this method is simple to perform and effective for the determination of high levels of sulfites in dried fruits. PMID:24282955

  20. Deep sulfur cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, N.; Mandeville, C. W.

    2009-12-01

    Geochemical cycle of sulfur in near-surface reservoirs has been a subject of intense studies for decades. It has been shown that sulfur isotopic compositions of sedimentary sulfides and sulfates record interactions of the atmosphere, hydrosphere, biosphere and lithosphere, with ?34S of sedimentary sulfides continuously decreasing from 0‰ toward present-day values of ~-30 to -40‰ over the Phanerozoic (e.g., Canfield, 2004). It has also been shown that microbial reduction of the present-day seawater sulfate (?34S=+21‰) results in large shifts in isotopic compositions of secondary pyrites in altered oceanic crust (to ?34S=-70‰: Rouxel et al., 2009). How much of these near surface isotopic variations survive during deep geochemical cycle of sulfur interacting with the mantle infinite reservoir with ?34S=0‰? Could extent of their survival be used as a tracer of processes and dynamics involved in deep geochemical cycle? As a first step toward answering these questions, ?34S was determined in-situ using a Cameca IMS 1280 ion microprobe at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution in materials representing various domains of deep geochemical cycle. They include pyrites in altered MORB as potential subducting materials and pyrites in UHP eclogites as samples that have experienced subduction zone processes, and mantle-derived melts are represented by olivine-hosted melt inclusions in MORB and those in IAB, and undegassed submarine OIB glasses. Salient features of the results include: (1) pyrites in altered MORB (with O. Rouxel; from ODP site 801 and ODP Hole 1301B) range from -70 to +19‰, (2) pyrites in UHP eclogites from the Western Gneiss Region, Norway (with B. Hacker and A. Kylander-Clark) show a limited overall range from -3.4 to + 2.8‰ among five samples, with one of them covering almost the entire range, indicating limited scale lengths of isotopic equilibration during subduction, (3) olivine-hosted melt inclusions in arc basalts from Galunggung (-2.8 - +5.2‰ with majority between +3 and +5), Krakatau (+1.5 - +8.6‰ with a cluster around +3 - +5), and Augustine (+8 - +12‰) show larger variations among arc magmas than previously known, (4) olivine-hosted melt inclusions from a FAMOUS lava (519-4-1) range from -9.5 to +10.5‰, and (5) undegassed submarine glasses from Samoa (with M. Jackson) appear to show separate ranges for individual islands, including Vailulu clustering around -1.9 to +2.1‰ and Malumalu ranging from -0.9 to -12.1‰. Overall, the results clearly show that low temperature signatures are not completely erased during recycling and isotopic exchange with the mantle infinite reservoir, and that mantle-derived melts still display large isotopic variations for small sampling scales, similar to observations on other isotope systems. Canfield, D. E. (2004) Amer. Jour. Sci., 304, 839-861. Rouxel, O. et al., (2009) Goldschmidt Conf. Abstract.

  1. Are we getting enough sulfur in our diet?

    PubMed Central

    Nimni, Marcel E; Han, Bo; Cordoba, Fabiola

    2007-01-01

    Sulfur, after calcium and phosphorus, is the most abundant mineral element found in our body. It is available to us in our diets, derived almost exclusively from proteins, and yet only 2 of the 20 amino acids normally present in proteins contains sulfur. One of these amino acids, methionine, cannot be synthesized by our bodies and therefore has to be supplied by the diet. Cysteine, another sulfur containing amino acid, and a large number of key metabolic intermediates essential for life, are synthesized by us, but the process requires a steady supply of sulfur. Proteins contain between 3 and 6% of sulfur amino acids. A very small percentage of sulfur comes in the form of inorganic sulfates and other forms of organic sulfur present in foods such as garlic, onion, broccoli, etc. The minimal requirements (RDA) for all the essential amino acids have always been estimated in terms of their ability to maintain a nitrogen balance. This method asses amino acid requirements for protein synthesis, only one of the pathways that methionine follows after ingestion. To adequately evaluate the RDA for methionine, one should perform, together with a nitrogen balance a sulfur balance, something never done, neither in humans nor animals. With this in mind we decided to evaluate the dietary intake of sulfur (as sulfur amino acids) in a random population and perform sulfur balance studies in a limited number of human volunteers. Initially this was done to try and gain some information on the possible mode of action of a variety of sulfur containing compounds (chondroitin sulfate, glucosamine sulfate, and others, ) used as dietary supplements to treat diseases of the joints. Out of this study came information that suggested that a significant proportion of the population that included disproportionally the aged, may not be receiving sufficient sulfur and that these dietary supplements, were very likely exhibiting their pharmacological actions by supplying inorganic sulfur. PMID:17986345

  2. Radiolysis of Sulfuric Acid, Sulfuric Acid Monohydrate, and Sulfuric Acid Tetrahydrate and Its Relevance to Europa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loeffler, M. J.; Hudson, R. L.; Moore, M. H.; Carlson, R. W.

    2011-01-01

    We report laboratory studies on the 0.8 MeV proton irradiation of ices composed of sulfuric acid (H2SO4), sulfuric acid monohydrate (H2SO4 H2O), and sulfuric acid tetrahydrate (H2SO4 4H2O) between 10 and 180 K. Using infrared spectroscopy, we identify the main radiation products as H2O, SO2, (S2O3)x, H3O+, HSO4(exp -), and SO4(exp 2-). At high radiation doses, we find that H2SO4 molecules are destroyed completely and that H2SO4 H2O is formed on subsequent warming. This hydrate is significantly more stable to radiolytic destruction than pure H2SO4, falling to an equilibrium relative abundance of 50% of its original value on prolonged irradiation. Unlike either pure H2SO4 or H2SO4 H2O, the loss of H2SO4 4H2O exhibits a strong temperature dependence, as the tetrahydrate is essentially unchanged at the highest irradiation temperatures and completely destroyed at the lowest ones, which we speculate is due to a combination of radiolytic destruction and amorphization. Furthermore, at the lower temperatures it is clear that irradiation causes the tetrahydrate spectrum to transition to one that closely resembles the monohydrate spectrum. Extrapolating our results to Europa s surface, we speculate that the variations in SO2 concentrations observed in the chaotic terrains are a result of radiation processing of lower hydration states of sulfuric acid and that the monohydrate will remain stable on the surface over geological times, while the tetrahydrate will remain stable in the warmer regions but be destroyed in the colder regions, unless it can be reformed by other processes, such as thermal reactions induced by diurnal cycling.

  3. Gaseous Sulfur Pollutants from Urban and Natural Sources

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Elmer Robinson; Robert C. Robbins

    1970-01-01

    Major aspects of the circulation through the atmospheric environment of sulfur pollutants have been estimated, including source magnitudes, residual atmospheric concentrations, and scavenging processes. The compounds considered include SO2 and H2S, as well as sulfates. One-third of the sulfur reaching the atmosphere comes from pollutant sources, mainly as SO2. Within the atmosphere there is a net transfer of sulfur from

  4. An overview of liquid redox sulfur recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Dalrymple, D.A.; Trofe, T.W.; Evans, J.M.

    1989-03-01

    Liquid redox sulfur recovery processes absorb H/sub 2/S from gas streams and produce elemental sulfur for sale or disposal. These processes, which involve the overall reaction of H/sub 2/S with oxygen to form elemental sulfur and water can be used in a wide variety of applications where H/sub 2/S removal and recovery are required. They can be used to desulfurize natural gas, either directly or by desulfurizing acid gas removal process off gas; refinery and chemical plant fuel gases and sour off gases; process and off-gas streams in coal gasification plants; geothermal vent gas; shale oil plant and underground coal gasification plant gases; Claus tail gas; and enhanced oil recovery vent gas. For many applications, liquid redox processes offer: excellent sulfur removal, often reducing H/sub 2/S levels to 10 ppm or less; one-step conversion of H/sub 2/S gas to elemental sulfur; ambient temperature and pressure operation; the ability to handle fluctuating inlet gas flow rates and H/sub 2/S concentrations; the capability of treating both low- and high-H/sub 2/S gas streams; and regenerating catalysts. This article summarizes information on six liquid redox sulfur recovery processes that are offered commercially today, and it gives an overview of research sponsored by the Gas Research Institute (GRI) in this area. To date, this research has focused primarily on the original technology - the Stretford process. Stretford has the greatest number of plants and the widest variety of applications experience.

  5. No sulfur flows on Io

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, A. T.

    1984-01-01

    Physical and chemical properties of elemental sulfur are incompatible with the suggestion that the colored flows associated with volcanoes on Io are quenched unstable allotropes of sulfur. Either the volcanic flows are not sulfur, or some mechanism other than quenching is required to produce colored forms of sulfur in them. The properties of sulfur are unsuited to the production and survival of colored unstable allotropes on Io. The color of this object is probably due to some other material, possibly iron compounds.

  6. Two-step rapid sulfur capture. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1994-04-01

    The primary goal of this program was to test the technical and economic feasibility of a novel dry sorbent injection process called the Two-Step Rapid Sulfur Capture process for several advanced coal utilization systems. The Two-Step Rapid Sulfur Capture process consists of limestone activation in a high temperature auxiliary burner for short times followed by sorbent quenching in a lower temperature sulfur containing coal combustion gas. The Two-Step Rapid Sulfur Capture process is based on the Non-Equilibrium Sulfur Capture process developed by the Energy Technology Office of Textron Defense Systems (ETO/TDS). Based on the Non-Equilibrium Sulfur Capture studies the range of conditions for optimum sorbent activation were thought to be: activation temperature > 2,200 K for activation times in the range of 10--30 ms. Therefore, the aim of the Two-Step process is to create a very active sorbent (under conditions similar to the bomb reactor) and complete the sulfur reaction under thermodynamically favorable conditions. A flow facility was designed and assembled to simulate the temperature, time, stoichiometry, and sulfur gas concentration prevalent in the advanced coal utilization systems such as gasifiers, fluidized bed combustors, mixed-metal oxide desulfurization systems, diesel engines, and gas turbines.

  7. Sedimentary sulfur geochemistry of the Paleogene Green River Formation, western USA: Implications for interpreting depositional and diagenetic processes in saline alkaline lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tuttle, M.L.; Goldhaber, M.B.

    1993-01-01

    The sulfur geochemistry of the lacustrine Paleogene Green River Formation (Colorado, Utah, and Wyoming, USA) is unlike that of most marine and other lacustrine rocks. Distinctive chemical, isotopic, and mineralogical characteristics of the formation are pyrrhotite and marcasite, high contents of iron mineral sulfides strikingly enriched in 34S, cyclical trends in sulfur abundance and ??34S values, and long-term evolutionary trends in ??34S values. Analyses that identified and quantified these characteristics include carbonate-free abundance of organic carbon (0.13-47 wt%), total iron (0.31-13 wt%), reactive iron (>70% of total iron), total sulfur (0.02-16 wt%), acid-volatile monosulfide (SAv), disulfide (SDi > 70% of total sulfur), sulfate (SSO4) and organosulfur (SOrg); isotopic composition of separated sulfur phases (??34SDi,Av up to +49???); and mineralogy, morphology and paragenesis of sulfide minerals. Mineralogy, morphology, ??34SDi,Av, and ??34SOrg have a distinctive relation, reflecting variable and unique depositional and early diagenetic conditions in the Green River lakes. When the lakes were brackish, dissimilatory sulfate-reducing bacteria in the sediment produced H2S, which initially reacted with labile iron to form pyrite framboids and more gradually with organic matter to form organosulfur compounds. During a long-lived stage of saline lake water, the amount of sulfate supplied by inflow decreased and alkalinity and pH of lake waters increased substantially. Extensive bacterial sulfate reduction in the water column kept lake waters undersaturated with sulfate minerals. A very high H2S:SO4 ratio developed in stagnant bottom water aided by the high pH that kinetically inhibited iron sulfidization. Progressive removal of H2S by coeval formation of iron sulfides and organosulfur compounds caused the isotopic composition of the entire dissolved sulfur reservoir to evolve to ??34S values much greater than that of inflow sulfate, which is estimated to have been +20??? A six-million-year interval within Lake Uinta cores records this evolution as well as smaller systematic changes in ??34S, interpreted to reflect ~ 100,000-year lake-level cycles. When porewater was exceptionally reducing, unstable FeS phases eventually recrystallized to pyrrhotite during diagenesis. A much later reaction related to weathering altered pyrrhotite to marcasite. ?? 1993.

  8. Multiple sulfur isotopes fractionations associated with abiotic sulfur transformations in Yellowstone National Park geothermal springs

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The paper presents a quantification of main (hydrogen sulfide and sulfate), as well as of intermediate sulfur species (zero-valent sulfur (ZVS), thiosulfate, sulfite, thiocyanate) in the Yellowstone National Park (YNP) hydrothermal springs and pools. We combined these measurements with the measurements of quadruple sulfur isotope composition of sulfate, hydrogen sulfide and zero-valent sulfur. The main goal of this research is to understand multiple sulfur isotope fractionation in the system, which is dominated by complex, mostly abiotic, sulfur cycling. Results Water samples from six springs and pools in the Yellowstone National Park were characterized by pH, chloride to sulfate ratios, sulfide and intermediate sulfur species concentrations. Concentrations of sulfate in pools indicate either oxidation of sulfide by mixing of deep parent water with shallow oxic water, or surface oxidation of sulfide with atmospheric oxygen. Thiosulfate concentrations are low (<6 ?mol L-1) in the pools with low pH due to fast disproportionation of thiosulfate. In the pools with higher pH, the concentration of thiosulfate varies, depending on different geochemical pathways of thiosulfate formation. The ?34S values of sulfate in four systems were close to those calculated using a mixing line of the model based on dilution and boiling of a deep hot parent water body. In two pools ?34S values of sulfate varied significantly from the values calculated from this model. Sulfur isotope fractionation between ZVS and hydrogen sulfide was close to zero at pH?sulfur is slightly heavier than hydrogen sulfide due to equilibration in the rhombic sulfur–polysulfide – hydrogen sulfide system. Triple sulfur isotope (32S, 33S, 34S) fractionation patterns in waters of hydrothermal pools are more consistent with redox processes involving intermediate sulfur species than with bacterial sulfate reduction. Small but resolved differences in ?33S among species and between pools are observed. Conclusions The variation of sulfate isotopic composition, the origin of differences in isotopic composition of sulfide and zero–valent sulfur, as well as differences in ?33S of sulfide and sulfate are likely due to a complex network of abiotic redox reactions, including disproportionation pathways. PMID:24959098

  9. Hydrogen and Sulfur Production from Hydrogen Sulfide Wastes 

    E-print Network

    Harkness, J.; Doctor, R. D.

    1993-01-01

    A new hydrogen sulfide waste-treatment process that uses microwave plasma-chemical technology is currently under development in the Soviet Union and in the United States. Whereas the present waste treatment process only recovers sulfur at best...

  10. Are sulfur isotope ratios sufficient to determine the antiquity of sulfate reduction. [implications for chemical evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashendorf, D.

    1980-01-01

    Possible limitations on the use of sulfur isotope ratios in sedimentary sulfides to infer the evolution of microbial sulfate reduction are discussed. Current knowledge of the ways in which stable sulfur isotope ratios are altered by chemical and biological processes is examined, with attention given to the marine sulfur cycle involving various microbial populations, and sulfur reduction processes, and it is noted that satisfactory explanations of sulfur isotope ratios observed in live organisms and in sediments are not yet available. It is furthermore pointed out that all members of the same genus of sulfate reducing bacteria do not always fractionate sulfur to the same extent, that the extent of sulfur fractionation by many sulfate-reducing organisms has not yet been determined, and that inorganic processes can also affect sulfur isotope fractionation values. The information currently available is thus concluded to be insufficient to determine the time of initial appearance of biological sulfate reduction.

  11. Comparative Aspects of Sulfur Mineralization in Sediments of a Eutrophic Lake Basin †

    PubMed Central

    King, Gary M.; Klug, M. J.

    1982-01-01

    The net mineralization of organic sulfur compounds in surface sediments of Wintergreen Lake was estimated from a mass-balance budget of sulfur inputs and sediment sulfur concentrations. The net mineralization of organic sulfur inputs is <50% complete, which is consistent with the dominance of organic sulfur (>80% of total sulfur) in sediment. Although sediment sulfur is predominantly organic, sulfate reduction is the most significant process in terms of the quantities of sulfur transformed in surface sediments. Rates of sulfate reduction in these sediments average 7 mmol/m2 per day. On an annual basis, this rate is 19-fold greater than net rates of organic sulfur mineralization and 65-fold greater than sulfate ester hydrolysis. PMID:16346037

  12. Method for removal of sulfur compounds from a gas stream

    SciTech Connect

    Frech, K.J.; Tazuma, J.J.

    1982-01-19

    This invention relates to a process for the removal of sulfur compounds from a gas stream. More specifically, this invention relates to an improvement in the iron oxide method of sulfur removal from a gas stream through the use of hydrogen peroxide.

  13. Analytical method for the evaluation of sulfur functionalities in American coals. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Attar, A.

    1983-05-01

    This investigation consisted of the following 6 tasks: (1) improve the instrumentation for the sulfur functional groups analysis and make it more reliable. (2) create a set of reference standards of sulfur-containing compounds. (3) examine the sulfur groups distribution in untreated and desulfurized coals. (4) examine the sulfur functionalities in raw and processed coals, i.e., liquefied coals. (5) determine the distribution of sulfur functionalities in modified coals. (6) prepare computer programs for calculations related to the distribution of sulfur functional groups in coal. Each task is discussed and results are presented. Appendix A contains the computer program used to interpret the data. 31 references, 56 figures, 17 tables.

  14. Molecular Spectra of Sulfur Molecules and Solid Sulfur Allotropes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bodo Eckert; Ralf Steudel

    Molecular spectroscopy is one of the most important means to characterize the various species in solid, liquid and gaseous elemental sulfur. In this chapter the vibrational, UV-Vis and mass spectra of sulfur molecules with between 2 and 20 atoms are critically reviewed together with the spectra of liquid sulfur and of solid allotropes including polymeric and high-pressure phases. In particular,

  15. Microbial stabilization of sulfur-laden sorbents. Final technical report, September 1, 1992--August 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, K.W. [Illinois State Univ., Normal, IL (United States); Hillyer, D.

    1993-12-31

    Clean coal technologies that involve limestone for sulfur capture generate lime/limestone products laden with sulfur at various oxidation states. If sulfur is completely stabilized as sulfate, the spent sorbent is ready for commercial utilization as gypsum. However, the presence of reduced sulfur species requires additional processing. Thermal oxidation of reduced sulfur can result in undesirable release of SO{sub 2}. Microbial oxidation might provide an inexpensive and effective alternative. Sorbents laden with reduced forms of sulfur such as sulfide or sulfite can serve as growth substrates for sulfur-oxidizing bacteria, which convert all sulfur to sulfate. The goals of this project are the following: (1) to optimize conditions for sulfate generation from sulfide, thiosulfate, and sulfite; (2) to test and optimize the effectiveness of microbial processing on spent sorbents from flue gas desulfurization, coal gasification, and fluidized bed combustion; (3) to search for hyperalkalinophilic thiobacilli, which would be effective up to pH 11.

  16. Regeneration of Sulfur Deactivated Ni-based Biomass Syngas Cleaning Catalysts

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Liyu Li; Christopher J. Howard; David L. King; Mark A. Gerber; Robert A. Dagle; Don J. Stevens

    2010-01-01

    Nickel-based catalysts have been widely tested in decomposing tar and methane in hot biomass syngas cleanup researches. However these catalysts can be easily deactivated by the sulfur compounds in syngas due to the strong sulfur adsorption effect on the Ni surface. Here we report on a new regeneration process, which can effectively and efficiently regenerate the sulfur-poisoned Ni reforming catalysts.

  17. Sulfur removal at high temperature during coal combustion in furnaces: a review

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jun Cheng; Junhu Zhou; Jianzhong Liu; Zhijun Zhou; Zhenyu Huang; Xinyu Cao; Xiang Zhao; Kefa Cen

    2003-01-01

    This paper focuses on sulfur removal technologies in industrial grate furnaces (IGF) and pulverized coal fired boilers (PCFB) with high flame temperature of 1200–1600 °C. The SO2 reduction without sorbents during coal combustion, thermal stabilities of sulfation products, kinetics of sulfur retention reactions of sorbents, desulfurization processes, and sulfur removal under unconventional atmospheres at high temperature are reviewed. It is

  18. Ssq1, a Mitochondrial Hsp70 Involved in Iron-Sulfur (Fe/S) Center Biogenesis

    E-print Network

    Craig, Elizabeth A

    Ssq1, a Mitochondrial Hsp70 Involved in Iron-Sulfur (Fe/S) Center Biogenesis SIMILARITIES function together to assist in the biogenesis of iron- sulfur (Fe/S) centers in the mitochondrial matrix chaperones work to- gether, along with other proteins, in the processes of iron- sulfur center biogenesis

  19. Vapor phase elemental sulfur amendment for sequestering mercury in contaminated soil

    DOEpatents

    Looney, Brian B.; Denham, Miles E.; Jackson, Dennis G.

    2014-07-08

    The process of treating elemental mercury within the soil is provided by introducing into the soil a heated vapor phase of elemental sulfur. As the vapor phase of elemental sulfur cools, sulfur is precipitated within the soil and then reacts with any elemental mercury thereby producing a reaction product that is less hazardous than elemental mercury.

  20. Sulfur 'Concrete' for Lunar Applications - Environmental Considerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grugel, R. N.

    2008-01-01

    Commercial use of sulfur concrete on Earth is well established, particularly in corrosive, e.g., acid and salt, environments. Having found troilite (FeS) on the Moon raises the question of using extracted sulfur as a lunar construction material, an attractive alternative to conventional concrete as it does not require water. For the purpose of this Technical Memorandum, it is assumed that lunar ore is mined, refined, and the raw sulfur processed with appropriate lunar regolith to form, for example, bricks. With this stipulation, it is then noted that the viability of sulfur concrete in a lunar environment, which is characterized by lack of an atmosphere and extreme temperatures, is not well understood. The work presented here evaluates two sets of small sulfur concrete samples that have been prepared using JSC-1 lunar simulant as an aggregate addition. One set was subjected to extended periods in high vacuum to evaluate sublimation issues, and the other was cycled between room and liquid nitrogen temperatures to investigate their subsequent mechanical integrity. Results are presented from both investigations, discussed, and put into the context of the lunar environment.

  1. Sulfuric acid in the Venus clouds.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sill, G. T.

    1972-01-01

    The extremely dry nature of the Venus upper atmosphere appears to demand the presence of an efficient desiccating agent as the chief constituent of the clouds of Venus. On the basis of polarization measures it is to be expected that this substance is present as spherical droplets, 1 to 2 microns in diameter, with a refractive index n of 1.46 plus or minus 0.02 at 3500A in the observed region of the atmosphere, with T about equal to 235 K. This substance must have ultraviolet, visible, and infrared reflection properties not inconsistent with the observed spectrum of Venus. Sulfuric acid, of about 86% by weight composition, roughly fulfills the first of these properties. The visible and ultraviolet transmission features of a thin layer of elemental bromine and hydrobromic acid dissolved in sulfuric acid somewhat resemble the Venus spectrum, up to 14 microns. The chemical process postulated for forming sulfuric acid involves the oxidation of sulfur and its compounds to sulfuric acid through the agency of elemental bromine produced by the photolytic decomposition of hydrogen bromide.

  2. Alkali metal-sulfur cells

    SciTech Connect

    Auborn, J.J.; Granstaff, S.M.

    1982-11-02

    An alkali metal, such as sodium, sulfur cell having an alkali metal anode, a solid ionic electrolyte, such as sodium beta alumina, and a liquid catholyte formed by sulfur, a halosulfane, such as sulfur monochloride and a haloacid, such as aluminum chloride, is described.

  3. Measurement and prediction of the resistivity of ash/sorbent mixtures produced by sulfur oxide control processes. Final report, Sep 86-Jun 88

    SciTech Connect

    Young, R.P.

    1991-12-01

    The report describes the development of (1) a modified procedure for obtaining consistent and reproducible laboratory resistivity values for mixtures of coal fly ash and partially spent sorbent, and (2) an approach for predicting resistivity based on the chemical composition of the sample and the resistivities of the key compounds in the sample that are derived from the sorbent. Furnace and cold-side sorbent injection technologies for reducing the emission of sulfur oxides from electric generating plants firing medium- to high-sulfur coal are under development for retrofit applications. The particulate resulting from injecting this sorbent will be a mixture of coal fly ash and partially spent sorbent. The presence of this sorbent causes the resistivity of the mixture to be significantly higher than that of the fly ash alone. Since higher resistivity dusts are more difficult to collect in an electrostatic precipitator (ESP), accurate knowledge of the resistivity of the mixture is needed to determine if the ESP will operate within an acceptable efficiency range.

  4. Sulfurization induced surface constitution and its correlation to the performance of solution-processed Cu2ZnSn(S,Se)4 solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Jie; Xia, Zhe; Luo, Miao; Zhao, Juan; Chen, Jie; Wang, Liang; Liu, Xinsheng; Xue, Ding-Jiang; Cheng, Yi-Bing; Song, Haisheng; Tang, Jiang

    2014-09-01

    To obtain high photovoltaic performances for the emerging copper zinc tin sulfide/selenide (CZTSSe) thin film solar cells, much effort has deservedly been placed on CZTSSe phase purification and CZTSSe grain size enhancement. Another highly crucial but less explored factor for device performance is the elemental constitution of CZTSSe surface, which is at the heart of p-n junction where major photogenerated carriers generate and separate. In this work we demonstrate that, despite the well-built phase and large grained films are observed by common phases and morphology characterization (XRD, Raman and SEM), prominent device efficiency variations from short circuited to 6.4% are obtained. Insight study highlights that the surface (0-250 nm) compositions variation results in different bulk defect depths and doping densities in the depletion zone. We propose that suitable sulfurization (at ~10 kPa sulfur pressure) drives optimization of surface constitution by managing the Cu, Zn and Sn diffusion and surface reaction. Therefore, our study reveals that the balance of elemental diffusion and interface reactions is the key to tuning the surface quality CZTSSe film and thus the performance of as resulted devices.

  5. Sulfurization induced surface constitution and its correlation to the performance of solution-processed Cu2ZnSn(S,Se)4 solar cells.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Jie; Xia, Zhe; Luo, Miao; Zhao, Juan; Chen, Jie; Wang, Liang; Liu, Xinsheng; Xue, Ding-Jiang; Cheng, Yi-Bing; Song, Haisheng; Tang, Jiang

    2014-01-01

    To obtain high photovoltaic performances for the emerging copper zinc tin sulfide/selenide (CZTSSe) thin film solar cells, much effort has deservedly been placed on CZTSSe phase purification and CZTSSe grain size enhancement. Another highly crucial but less explored factor for device performance is the elemental constitution of CZTSSe surface, which is at the heart of p-n junction where major photogenerated carriers generate and separate. In this work we demonstrate that, despite the well-built phase and large grained films are observed by common phases and morphology characterization (XRD, Raman and SEM), prominent device efficiency variations from short circuited to 6.4% are obtained. Insight study highlights that the surface (0-250 nm) compositions variation results in different bulk defect depths and doping densities in the depletion zone. We propose that suitable sulfurization (at ~ 10 kPa sulfur pressure) drives optimization of surface constitution by managing the Cu, Zn and Sn diffusion and surface reaction. Therefore, our study reveals that the balance of elemental diffusion and interface reactions is the key to tuning the surface quality CZTSSe film and thus the performance of as resulted devices. PMID:25190491

  6. CONTROLLING SULFUR OXIDES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This Research Summary describes EPA's program to develop new and improve existing technologies for sulfur oxides control. As we increasingly turn to coal as the primary utility and industrial fuel, while trying to deal with the problems of acid precipitation, visibility degradati...

  7. Sulfur in basaltic magmas

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Paul Wallace; Ian S. E. Carmichael

    1992-01-01

    The concentration of S in basaltic magmas at 1 atm pressure is strongly dependent on temperature, the fugacities of oxygen ( f O 2 ) and sulfur ( f S 2 ), and bulk composition. Microprobe analyses of total S in rapidly quenched, submarine basalt glasses, used in conjunction with wet chemical analyses of Fe 2 O 3 \\/ FeO

  8. Preparation of Carbonaceous Heavy Metal Adsorbent from Coal Using Sulfur Impregnation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. Wajima; K. Murakami; T. Kato; K. Sugawara

    2010-01-01

    We attempted to prepare sulfur-impregnated adsorbent from coal for removal of heavy metals. A two-step process (pyrolysis and sulfur impregnation) was used. Raw coal was rapidly pyrolyzed to prepare char with a high specific surface area. It was sulfurized by H2S impregnation to obtain sulfur-impregnated char that could adsorb heavy metals. Pyrolysis char with high specific surface area can be

  9. An Aerosol Condensation Model for Sulfur Trioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Grant, K E

    2008-02-07

    This document describes a model for condensation of sulfuric acid aerosol given an initial concentration and/or source of gaseous sulfur trioxide (e.g. fuming from oleum). The model includes the thermochemical effects on aerosol condensation and air parcel buoyancy. Condensation is assumed to occur heterogeneously onto a preexisting background aerosol distribution. The model development is both a revisiting of research initially presented at the Fall 2001 American Geophysical Union Meeting [1] and a further extension to provide new capabilities for current atmospheric dispersion modeling efforts [2]. Sulfuric acid is one of the most widely used of all industrial chemicals. In 1992, world consumption of sulfuric acid was 145 million metric tons, with 42.4 Mt (mega-tons) consumed in the United States [10]. In 2001, of 37.5 Mt consumed in the U.S., 74% went into producing phosphate fertilizers [11]. Another significant use is in mining industries. Lawuyi and Fingas [7] estimate that, in 1996, 68% of use was for fertilizers and 5.8% was for mining. They note that H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} use has been and should continue to be very stable. In the United States, the elimination of MTBE (methyl tertiary-butyl ether) and the use of ethanol for gasoline production are further increasing the demand for petroleum alkylate. Alkylate producers have a choice of either a hydrofluoric acid or sulfuric acid process. Both processes are widely used today. Concerns, however, over the safety or potential regulation of hydrofluoric acid are likely to result in most of the growth being for the sulfuric acid process, further increasing demand [11]. The implication of sulfuric acid being a pervasive industrial chemical is that transport is also pervasive. Often, this is in the form of oleum tankers, having around 30% free sulfur trioxide. Although sulfuric acid itself is not a volatile substance, fuming sulfuric acid (referred to as oleum) is [7], the volatile product being sulfur trioxide. Sulfate aerosols and mist may form in the atmosphere on tank rupture. From chemical spill data from 1990-1996, Lawuyi02 and Fingas [7] prioritize sulfuric acid as sixth most serious. During this period, they note 155 spills totaling 13 Mt, out of a supply volume of 3700 Mt. Lawuyi and Fingas [7] summarize information on three major sulfuric acid spills. On 12 February 1984, 93 tons of sulfuric acid were spilled when 14 railroad cars derailed near MacTier, Parry Sound, Ontario. On 13 December 1978, 51 railroad cars derailed near Springhill, Nova Scotia. One car, containing 93% sulfuric acid, ruptured, spilling nearly its entire contents. In July 1993, 20 to 50 tons of fuming sulfuric acid spilled at the General Chemical Corp. plant in Richmond, California, a major industrial center near San Francisco. The release occurred when oleum was being loaded into a nonfuming acid railroad tank car that contained only a rupture disk as a safety device. The tank car was overheated and this rupture disk blew. The resulting cloud of sulfuric acid drifted northeast with prevailing winds over a number of populated areas. More than 3,000 people subsequently sought medical attention for burning eyes, coughing, headaches, and nausea. Almost all were treated and released on the day of the spill. By the day after the release, another 5,000 people had sought medical attention. The spill forced the closure of five freeways in the region as well as some Bay Area Rapid Transit System stations. Apart from corrosive toxicity, there is the additional hazard that the reactions of sulfur trioxide and sulfuric acid vapors with water are extremely exothermic [10, 11]. While the vapors are intrinsically denser than air, there is thus the likelihood of strong, warming-induced buoyancy from reactions with ambient water vapor, water-containing aerosol droplets, and wet environmental surface. Nordin [12] relates just such an occurrence following the Richmond, CA spill, with the plume observed to rise to 300 m. For all practical purposes, sulfur trioxide was the constituent released from the heated tank

  10. Preparation and electrochemical performance of sulfur-alumina cathode material for lithium-sulfur batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, Kang [Faculty of Material Science and Chemistry, China University of Geosciences, 388 Lumo Road, 430074 Wuhan (China); Wang, Shengping, E-mail: spwang@cug.edu.cn [Faculty of Material Science and Chemistry, China University of Geosciences, 388 Lumo Road, 430074 Wuhan (China); Zhang, Hanyu; Wu, Jinping [Faculty of Material Science and Chemistry, China University of Geosciences, 388 Lumo Road, 430074 Wuhan (China)

    2013-06-01

    Highlights: ? Micron-sized alumina was synthesized as adsorbent for lithium-sulfur batteries. ? Sulfur-alumina material was synthesized via crystallizing nucleation. ? The Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} can provide surface area for the deposition of Li{sub 2}S and Li{sub 2}S{sub 2}. ? The discharge capacity of the battery is improved during the first several cycles. - Abstract: Nano-sized sulfur particles exhibiting good adhesion with conducting acetylene black and alumina composite materials were synthesized by means of an evaporated solvent and a concentrated crystallization method for use as the cathodes of lithium-sulfur batteries. The composites were characterized and examined by X-ray diffraction, environmental scanning electron microscopy and electrochemical methods, such as cyclic voltammetry, electrical impedance spectroscopy and charge–discharge tests. Micron-sized flaky alumina was employed as an adsorbent for the cathode material. The initial discharge capacity of the cathode with the added alumina was 1171 mAh g{sup ?1}, and the remaining capacity was 585 mAh g{sup ?1} after 50 cycles at 0.25 mA cm{sup ?2}. Compared with bare sulfur electrodes, the electrodes containing alumina showed an obviously superior cycle performance, confirming that alumina can contribute to reducing the dissolution of polysulfides into electrolytes during the sulfur charge–discharge process.

  11. Reactivity of elemental sulfur nanoparticles and their role on the formation of sulfur intermediates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kafantaris, F. C. A.; Druschel, G.

    2014-12-01

    Sulfur biogeochemical cycling involves a vast network of chemical reactions including oxidation, reduction and disproportionation, polymerization (S-S bonding), and aggregation that leads to nanoparticulate elemental sulfur (S8(nano)) and eventually the most stable bulk mineral form, a-S8. These reactions can occur in aqueous systems inorganically, intracellularly as assimilatory or dissimilatory reactions in microbial cells, or in presence of microbial organic exudates (e.g. surfactants). Elemental sulfur participates in nucleophilic and hydrolysis reactions to form sulfur intermediates, such as polysulfide ions. The nucleophilic reaction with sulfide (as H2S or HS-, reaction 1), is a key process in the dissolution of elemental sulfur: xS8 + H2S = Sx2- + 2 H+ (1) Polysulfides are inherently unstable in acidic conditions, experiencing a series of chain elongation reactions to form the S8 ring form of molecular elemental sulfur (overall this is the reverse of reaction 1). S8 rings are also inherently insoluble in water and undergo a very rapid coarsening process to form S8nano that then coarsens more slowly via an Ostwald ripening process to form colloidal particles of a-S8. Coarsening kinetics are influenced by temperature, and the presence/absence and type of surfactants [1]. The amount of polysulfide at any point is thus a balance between the forward and reverse overall reactions represented in reaction 1, and influenced by microbial generation of reduced sulfide and/or microbial production of organic surfactants, and the size of the elemental sulfur particles. Here we present some preliminary data on the kinetics of elemental sulfur consumption (reaction 1) that have been tested in various sizes and surface properties of the sulfur nanoparticles. The surface area and presence (or absence) of surfactant molecules influences the kinetics of polysulfide formation. The cycling of that reaction may play a significant role to the element's bioavailability to microorganisms, which incorporate the nanoparticulate (rather than the bulk a-S8) form of elemental sulfur or polysulfides in their specific metabolisms [2]. 1. Garcia and Druschel (2014) Submitted Manuscript 2. Boyd and Druschel (2013) Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 79 (6) 2061-2068

  12. Correlation for the total sulfur content in char after devolatilization

    SciTech Connect

    Vasilije Manovic; Borislav Grubor [University of Belgrade, Belgrade (Serbia & Montenegro)

    2006-02-01

    The overall process of coal combustion takes place in two successive steps: devolatilization and char combustion. The fate of sulfur during the devolatilization of coal of different rank was investigated. The significance of the investigation is in fact that a major part of sulfur release occurs during devolatilization of coal, (i.e., emission of sulfur oxides during combustion of coal largely depends on sulfur release during devolatilization). The experimental investigations were conducted to obtain the data about the quantitative relation between sulfur content in the coal and sulfur content in the char. Standard procedures were used for obtaining the chars in a laboratory oven and determining the sulfur forms in the coal and char samples. The experiments were done with ground coal samples ({lt}0.2 mm), at the temperatures in the range of 500-1000{sup o}C. We showed that the amount of sulfur remaining in the char decreases, but not significantly in the temperature range 600-900{sup o}C. On the basis of the theoretical consideration of behavior of sulfur forms during devolatilization, certain simplifying assumptions, and obtained experimental data, we propose two correlations to associate the content of sulfur in the coal and in the char. The correlations are based on the results of the proximate analysis and sulfur forms in coal. Good agreement was found when the proposed correlations were compared with the experimental results obtained for investigated coals. Moreover, the correlations were verified by results found in the literature for numerous Polish, Albanian, and Turkish coals. Significant correlations (P {lt}0.05) between observed and calculated data with correlation coefficient, R {gt}0.9, were noticed in the case of all coals. 25 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. The evolution of infalling sulfur species in Titan's atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hickson, K. M.; Loison, J. C.; Cavalié, T.; Hébrard, E.; Dobrijevic, M.

    2014-12-01

    Aims: We studied the hypothesis that micrometeorites and Enceladus' plume activity could carry sulfur-bearing species into the upper atmosphere of Titan, in a manner similar to oxygen-bearing species. Methods: We have developed a detailed photochemical model of sulfur compounds in the atmosphere of Titan that couples hydrocarbon, nitrogen, oxygen, and sulfur chemistries. Results: Photochemical processes produce mainly CS and H2CS in the upper atmosphere of Titan and C3S, H2S and CH3SH in the lower atmosphere. Mole fractions of these compounds depend significantly on the source of sulfur species. Conclusions: A possible future detection of CS (or the determination of a low upper limit) could be used to distinguish the two scenarios for the origin of sulfur species, which then could help to differentiate the various scenarios for the origin of H2O, CO, and CO2 in the stratosphere of Titan.

  14. Method for removal of sulfur compounds from a gas

    SciTech Connect

    Frech, K.J.; Tazuma, J.J.

    1981-08-11

    This invention relates to a process for the removal of sulfur compounds from a gas stream which consists of contacting said gas stream with alkali metal salts of sulfonamides or resins containing sulfonamide functionalities.

  15. Sulfur dichloride, SCl2

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This month's molecule is sulfur dichloride, SCl2. This and other small inorganic molecules are discussed in the article by Matta and Gillespie. They describe electron density in molecules and how to analyze it to obtain information about molecular bonding and structure. Different depictions of electron density in SCl2 and other small molecules emphasize different aspects of their electron density and of the structures of the molecules.

  16. Sulfur mobility in peat

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Martin Novák; Marie Adamová; R. Kelman Wieder; Simon H. Bottrell

    2005-01-01

    Lead-210 chronologies, vertical S concentration gradients and ?34S values are presented for 5 Sphagnum-dominated peat bogs located in Central Europe (Rybarenska slat and Ocean Bog; Czech Republic) and the British Isles (Thorne Moors, England; Connemara, Ireland; and Mull, Scotland). Sulfur concentrations were measured in three 40-cm deep peat cores per site, sectioned into 2-cm segments. The coefficient of variation in

  17. Effects of sulfur forms on heavy metals bioleaching from contaminated sediments.

    PubMed

    Fang, D; Zhao, L; Zhou, L X; Shan, H X

    2009-06-01

    The use of recyclable forms of sulfur will exclude the risk of sediment reacidification and reduce the cost of bioleaching process. Three different forms of sulfur (namely sulfur powder, prills and pieces) were used to examine the utilization and recycle of sulfur, used as energy substrate for sulfur-oxidizing bacteria (SOB) in the bioleaching of heavy metal-contaminated sediments. The results showed that despite their relatively smaller surface areas, the efficiency of metal bioleaching with sulfur prills and pieces were comparable to that with sulfur powder. After 13 days of bioleaching, 71-74% of Zn, 58-62% of Cu, and 22-31% of Cr could be leached from the sediments, respectively. During bioleaching, most of the oxidizable and reducible forms of metals were transformed to acid soluble, posing a favorable condition for final metals removal. Sulfur recycling experiments showed that the recovered sulfur prills and pieces were as the same effective in pH reduction as fresh sulfur, revealing the feasibility of eventual reuse of the recycled sulfur in the bioleaching process. Further studies are required to testify the performance of these recyclable forms of sulfur in future large-scale bioleaching reactor. PMID:19412854

  18. Method of desulfurizing and deodorizing sulfur bearing hydrocarbon feedstocks

    SciTech Connect

    Kutty, K.K.; James, V.A.

    1988-11-22

    This patent describes a process for producing a substantially sulfur-free liquid hydrocarbon having a boiling range of about 150/sup 0/-200/sup 0/C, an aromatic content between about 15-18 percent by weight, and a flash point of 38/sup 0/-43/sup 0/C, from sulfur-bearing hydrocarbon liquid boiling in the kerosene range, which comprises the steps of: (a) contacting the sulfur-bearing liquid hydrocarbon with sodium hydride in an amount ranging from about 0.01 to about 5 percent by weight based on the weight of the sulfur-bearing liquid hydrocarbon, in the liquid phase and in a hydrogen free environment at normal atmospheric pressure, and heating the mixture to boiling to form an insoluble sulfide sludge and a hydrocarbon liquid having a reduced sulfur content; (b) distilling the hydrocarbon liquid formed in step (a) and collecting a fraction boiling in the range of about 150/sup 0/-200/sup 0/C; (c) contacting the hydrocarbon fraction from step (b) with sulfuric acid and permitting the mixture of the hydrocarbon and the acid to separate into an acid fraction and hydrocarbon fraction, the contacting being conducted at normal atmospheric pressure; (d) contacting the hydrocarbon fraction from step (c) sequentially with an alkaline oxidizing agent, a strong alkaline neutralizing agent, and a hot wash water to form a substantially sulfur-free hydrocarbon fraction and an aqueous fraction; and, (e) recovering the sulfur-free hydrocarbon fraction.

  19. Sulfur unit control in a DCS

    SciTech Connect

    Reif, D.R. (Rosemount, Inc., Eden Prairie, MN (USA))

    1989-08-01

    Sulfur Recovery Units (SRUs) traditionally have been operated with basic regulatory control strategies implemented through a process control system. Many modern DCSs have enough calculation power to execute advanced control strategies at the controller level without the need for a process computer. Included in this article is a discussion of some control schemes that can be implemented at the controller level in a DCS resulting in tighter control and increased operating margins.

  20. Lignosulfonate-modified calcium hydroxide for sulfur dioxide control

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David A. Kirchgessner; Jeffrey M. Lorrain

    1987-01-01

    This article discusses the use of lignosulfonate-modified calcium hydroxide Ca(OH)â for sulfur dioxide (SOâ) control. The limestone injection multistage burner (LIMB) process is currently being developed at the U.S. EPA as a low cost retrofittable technology for controlling oxides of sulfur and nitrogen from coal-burning utility boilers. The most effective commercial calcium-based sorbent for this process is Ca(OH)â, with SOâ

  1. Mössbauer study of the inorganic sulfur removal from coals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reyes Caballero, F.; Martínez Ovalle, S. A.

    2014-01-01

    Mössbauer Spectroscopy (MS) was applied to study the occurrence and behavior of the iron-sulfur-containing minerals in coal and coal fractions obtained by different separation methods: hydrocyclonic, flotation and chemical removal process. Samples of one high sulfur coal from Guachinte mine (Valle, Colombia) and three low sulfur coals from the El Salitre zone (Paipa-Boyacá, Colombia) were analyzed. MS evidenced only the presence of pyrite in Esmeralda and Las Casitas coals, while it identified pyrite and siderite on Cerezo coal. MS and SEM- EDX confirm the inorganic sulfur removal on Guachinte coal submitted to hydrocyclonic removal process. MS of the precipitated coal fraction from Las Casitas mine obtained by flotation in water showed the presence of ferrous sulfate because of coal-weathering process. Treatment with hot diluted HNO3 equal to 27 acid on raw coal sample from Las Casitas mine showed that almost all of the pyrite in raw coal was removed.

  2. System for recovering sulfur from gases, especially natural gas. Final report, February 1991--July 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Gryka, G.E.

    1992-09-01

    The objective of this project is to design, construct and operate a laboratory reactor to convert hydrogen sulfide into liquid sulfur, using a patented PIPco process as a basis. Reaction conditions will be studied, continuous regenerative operation demonstrated, and data necessary to design a field test system will be collected. The subject process is a regenerative buffered water circulating system with two primary steps: (1) loading of the solution with SO{sub 2} (which can be generated by buming sulfur or H{sub 2}S), and (2) H{sub 2}S separation - reaction to form sulfur - and sulfur separation. Many regenerative liquid redox sulfur recovery systems offer potential for combining H{sub 2}S separation and sulfur formation into one step. PIPco`s data and engineering study suggest the process may have advantages over other liquid systems: Use of potassiurti citrate buffer increases sulfur dioxide (oxidizing agent) loading by a factor of 8 or more, up to 160 grams SO{sub 2}/liter of solution can be carried to the separator - reactor, thereby reducing liquid circulating rates and equipment size. The separator - reactor is operated at a temperature above 120{degrees}C (the melting point of elemental sulfur). Therefore, sulfur is produced and separated in liquid form. This eliminates sulfur plugging and separation problems by avoiding the production of solid sulfur.

  3. Identification of sulfur fumed Pinelliae Rhizoma using an electronic nose

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xia; Wan, Jun; Chu, Liang; Liu, Wengang; Jing, Yafeng; Wu, Chunjie

    2014-01-01

    Background: Pinelliae Rhizoma is a commonly used Chinese herb which will change brown during the natural drying process. However, sulfur fumed Pinelliae Rhizoma will get a better appearance than naturally dried one. Sulfur fumed Pinelliae Rhizoma is potentially toxical due to sulfur dioxide and sulfites formed during the fuming procedures. The odor components in sulfur fumed Pinelliae Rhizoma is complex. At present, there is no analytical method available to determine sulfur fumed Pinelliae Rhizoma simply and rapidly. To ensure medication safety, it is highly desirable to have an effective and simple method to identify sulfur fumed Pinelliae Rhizoma. Materials and Methods: This paper presents a novel approach using an electronic nose based on metal oxide sensors to identify whether Pinelliae Rhizoma was fumed with sulfur, and to predict the fuming degree of Pinelliae Rhizoma. Multivariate statistical methods such as principal components analysis (PCA), discriminant factorial analysis (DFA) and partial least squares (PLS) were used for data analyzing and identification. The use of the electronic nose to discriminate between different fuming degrees Pinelliae Rhizoma and naturally dried Pinelliae Rhizoma was demonstrated. Results: The electronic nose was also successfully applied to identify unknown samples including sulfur fumed samples and naturally dried samples, high recognition value was obtained. Quantitative analysis of fuming degree of Pinelliae Rhizoma was also demonstrated. The method developed is simple and fast, which provides a new quality control method of Chinese herbs from the aspect of odor. Conclusion: It has shown that this electronic nose based metal oxide sensor is sensitive to sulfur and sulfides. We suggest that it can serve as a supportive method to detect residual sulfur and sulfides. PMID:24914293

  4. Sodium sulfur storage battery

    SciTech Connect

    Kagawa, H.; Matsui, K.

    1985-04-09

    The present invention discloses a sodium-sulfur storage battery utilizing an inside of a sodium-ion conductive solid electrolyte tube as a negative chamber, comprising an a-alumina ring jointed with solder glass to an open end of said electrolyte tube, a flange aluminum housing having a fine hole at its bottom incorporated in said solid electrolyte tube, a negative auxiliary cover thermo-compressively jointed through a flange of said aluminum housing to an upper surface of said a-aluminum ring, and a negative cover provided with a negative current collector terminal welded to said negative auxiliary cover.

  5. Identification of sulfur sources and isotopic equilibria in submarine hot-springs using multiple sulfur isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDermott, Jill M.; Ono, Shuhei; Tivey, Margaret K.; Seewald, Jeffrey S.; Shanks, Wayne C.; Solow, Andrew R.

    2015-07-01

    Multiple sulfur isotopes were measured in metal sulfide deposits, elemental sulfur, and aqueous hydrogen sulfide to constrain sulfur sources and the isotopic systematics of precipitation in seafloor hydrothermal vents. Areas studied include the Eastern Manus Basin and Lau Basin back-arc spreading centers and the unsedimented basalt-hosted Southern East Pacific Rise (SEPR) and sediment-hosted Guaymas Basin mid-ocean ridge spreading centers. Chalcopyrite and dissolved hydrogen sulfide (H2S) ?34S values range from -5.5‰ to +5.6‰ in Manus Basin samples, +2.4‰ to +6.1‰ in Lau Basin samples, and +3.7‰ to +5.7‰ in SEPR samples. Values of ?34S for cubic cubanite and H2S range from -1.4‰ to +4.7‰ in Guaymas Basin samples. Multiple sulfur isotope systematics in fluid-mineral pairs from the SEPR and Lau Basin show that crustal host rock and thermochemical reduction of seawater-derived dissolved sulfate (SO4) are the primary sources of sulfur in mid-ocean ridge and some back-arc systems. At PACMANUS and SuSu Knolls hydrothermal systems in the Eastern Manus Basin, a significant contribution of sulfur is derived from disproportionation of magmatic sulfur dioxide (SO2), while the remaining sulfur is derived from crustal host rocks and SO4 reduction. At the sedimented Guaymas Basin hydrothermal system, sulfur sources include crustal host rock, reduced seawater SO4, and biogenic sulfide. Vent fluid flow through fresher, less-mature sediment supplies an increased quantity of reactant organic compounds that may reduce 34S-enriched SO4, while fluid interaction with more highly-altered sediments results in H2S characterized by a small, but isotopically-significant input of 34S-depleted biogenic sulfides. Near-zero ?33S values in all samples implicate the abiotic processes of SO4 reduction and leaching of host rock as the major contributors to sulfur content at a high temperature unsedimented mid-ocean ridge and at a back-arc system. ?33S values indicate that SO2 disproportionation is an additional process that contributes sulfur to a different back-arc system and to acid spring-type hydrothermal fluid circulation. At the sedimented Guaymus Basin, near-zero ?33S values are also observed, despite negative ?34S values that indicate inputs of biogenic pyrite for some samples. In contrast with previous studies reporting isotope disequilibrium between H2S and chalcopyrite, the ?34S values of chalcopyrite sampled from the inner 1-2 mm of a chimney wall are within ±1‰ of ?34S values for H2S in the paired vent fluid, suggesting equilibrium fluid-mineral sulfur isotope exchange at 300-400 °C. Isotopic equilibrium between hydrothermal fluid H2S and precipitating chalcopyrite implies that sulfur isotopes in the chalcopyrite lining across a chimney wall may accurately record past hydrothermal activity.

  6. Biotic and abiotic carbon to sulfur bond cleavage. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Frost, J.W.

    1994-05-01

    The microbial desulfurization of organosulfur compounds occurs by unprecedented and largely unexplored biochemical processes. A study of such biotic desulfurizations can be expected to give rise to new and useful chemistry and enzymology. The potential value of understanding and harnessing these processes is seen in relation to the need for methods for the removal of organically bound sulfur from coal and the degradation of organic sulfur-containing pollutants. This research effort has been directed towards an examination of desulfurization ability in well characterized microorganisms, the isolation of bacteria with desulfurization ability from natural sources, the characterization and mechanistic evaluation of the observed biocatalytic processes, the development of biomimetic synthetic organic chemistry based on biotic desulfurization mechanisms and the design and preparation of improved coal model compounds for use in microbial selection processes. A systematic approach to studying biodesulfurizations was undertaken in which organosulfur compounds have been broken down into classes based on the oxidation state of the sulfur atom and the structure of the rest of the organic material. Microbes have been evaluated in terms of ability to degrade organosulfur compounds with sulfur in its sulfonic acid oxidation state. These compounds are likely intermediates in coal desulfurization and are present in the environment as persistent pollutants in the form of detergents. It is known that oxygen bonded to sulfur lowers the carbon-sulfur bond energy, providing a thermodynamic basis for starting with this class of compounds.

  7. Desulfurization of Gaseous Fuels with Recovery of Elemental Sulfur: An Overview

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. A. Pandey; S. Malhotra

    1999-01-01

    Emphasis on environmental concerns due to emission of sulfur species through utilization of gaseous fuels containing high sulfur constituents has led to the development of a number of physicochemical and biological processes for desulfurization of gaseous fuels. This article summarizes information on the development of liquid and gaseous redox processes and biological processes for desulfurization of gaseous fuels with concomitant

  8. Influence of different sulfur to selenium ratios on the structural and electronic properties of Cu(In,Ga)(S,Se){sub 2} thin films and solar cells formed by the stacked elemental layer process

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, B. J., E-mail: bjm.mueller@web.de [Robert Bosch GmbH, Corporate Research and Advance Engineering, Advanced Functional Materials and Microsystems, D-70839 Gerlingen (Germany); Institute of Micro- and Nanomaterials, University of Ulm, D-89081 Ulm (Germany); Zimmermann, C.; Haug, V., E-mail: veronika.haug@de.bosch.com; Koehler, T.; Zweigart, S. [Robert Bosch GmbH, Corporate Research and Advance Engineering, Advanced Functional Materials and Microsystems, D-70839 Gerlingen (Germany); Hergert, F. [Bosch Solar CISTech GmbH, D-14772 Brandenburg (Germany); Herr, U., E-mail: ulrich.herr@uni-ulm.de [Institute of Micro- and Nanomaterials, University of Ulm, D-89081 Ulm (Germany)

    2014-11-07

    In this study, we investigate the effect of different elemental selenium to elemental sulfur ratios on the chalcopyrite phase formation in Cu(In,Ga)(S,Se){sub 2} thin films. The films are formed by the stacked elemental layer process. The structural and electronic properties of the thin films and solar cells are analyzed by means of scanning electron microscopy, glow discharge optical emission spectrometry, X-ray diffraction, X-ray fluorescence, Raman spectroscopy, spectral photoluminescence as well as current-voltage, and quantum efficiency measurements. The influence of different S/(S+Se) ratios on the anion incorporation and on the Ga/In distribution is investigated. We find a homogenous sulfur concentration profile inside the film from the top surface to the bottom. External quantum efficiency measurements show that the band edge of the solar cell device is shifted to shorter wavelength, which enhances the open-circuit voltages. The relative increase of the open-circuit voltage with S/(S+Se) ratio is lower than expected from the band gap energy trend, which is attributed to the presence of S-induced defects. We also observe a linear decrease of the short-circuit current density with increasing S/(S+Se) ratio which can be explained by a reduced absorption. Above a critical S/(S+Se) ratio of around 0.61, the fill factor drops drastically, which is accompanied by a strong series resistance increase which may be attributed to changes in the back contact or p-n junction properties.

  9. Influence of different sulfur to selenium ratios on the structural and electronic properties of Cu(In,Ga)(S,Se)2 thin films and solar cells formed by the stacked elemental layer process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, B. J.; Zimmermann, C.; Haug, V.; Hergert, F.; Koehler, T.; Zweigart, S.; Herr, U.

    2014-11-01

    In this study, we investigate the effect of different elemental selenium to elemental sulfur ratios on the chalcopyrite phase formation in Cu(In,Ga)(S,Se)2 thin films. The films are formed by the stacked elemental layer process. The structural and electronic properties of the thin films and solar cells are analyzed by means of scanning electron microscopy, glow discharge optical emission spectrometry, X-ray diffraction, X-ray fluorescence, Raman spectroscopy, spectral photoluminescence as well as current-voltage, and quantum efficiency measurements. The influence of different S/(S+Se) ratios on the anion incorporation and on the Ga/In distribution is investigated. We find a homogenous sulfur concentration profile inside the film from the top surface to the bottom. External quantum efficiency measurements show that the band edge of the solar cell device is shifted to shorter wavelength, which enhances the open-circuit voltages. The relative increase of the open-circuit voltage with S/(S+Se) ratio is lower than expected from the band gap energy trend, which is attributed to the presence of S-induced defects. We also observe a linear decrease of the short-circuit current density with increasing S/(S+Se) ratio which can be explained by a reduced absorption. Above a critical S/(S+Se) ratio of around 0.61, the fill factor drops drastically, which is accompanied by a strong series resistance increase which may be attributed to changes in the back contact or p-n junction properties.

  10. Microbial influence on sulfur speciation in Lower Kane Cave, WY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mabin, K.; Bennett, P.; Stern, L.; Engel, A.

    2003-12-01

    A distinctive microbial community is being studied within Lower Kane Cave (LKC) of the Madison Limestone, near Lovell, WY, where the cave forming process is principally sulfuric acid replacement of limestone with gypsum. The aquatic microbial mat includes a consortium of both S-reducing and S-oxidizing bacterial communities, which cycle sulfur along the reach of the cave stream. Multiple techniques are being employed to characterize the speciation and distribution of sulfur within LKC in order to identify the individual metabolic pathways, and to what degree sulfur chemistry within the cave is controlled by microbial processes. Aqueous sulfide levels were determined immediately in the field using colorimetric methods and volatilization was directly measured by field GC. Dissolved sulfide levels generally decrease with distance from the stream source, ranging from 0.85 to 0.03 ppm. Volatilization increases over the microbial mats however due to local sulfide production by sulfate reducing bacteria. Cave water, sediment and microbial biomass were sampled from the cave and characterized for major element and sulfur chemistry. Laboratory HPLC determination of transient aqueous sulfoxy species was done to characterize intermediate species, and low concentrations of thiosulfate and trace polythionates were detected. Sediment samples were analyzed for total sulfur and operational sulfur fractions, including acid volatile sulfur (AVS), total reducible sulfur, pyrite and elemental S. Elemental analysis was used to determine the distribution of total S within sediment and biomass to identify potential sulfur storage within the system. Total S ranges from 0.35% dry weight in sediment to 51% dry weight in mats. Operational sulfur fractions were isolated using a modified Johnson-Nishita method, and AVS fractions range up to 0.2% (wt/wt). The presence of microbial mats appears to enhance volatilization of sulfur gases by mechanisms as yet unknown. Correlation of S distribution and speciation with the current microbial communities and stream morphology within LKC indicates influences from both biotic and abiotic processes. The results from this study, however, suggest that microbial consumption dominates over abiotic auto-oxidation and volatilization of dissolved sulfides, while the anaerobic community provides an additional source of reduced S.

  11. 21 CFR 184.1095 - Sulfuric acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...colorless, oily liquid. It is prepared by reacting sulfur dioxide (SO2 ) with oxygen and mixing the resultant sulfur trioxide (SO3 ) with water, or by reacting nitric oxide (NO) with sulfur dioxide and water. (b) The ingredient meets the...

  12. 21 CFR 184.1095 - Sulfuric acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...colorless, oily liquid. It is prepared by reacting sulfur dioxide (SO2 ) with oxygen and mixing the resultant sulfur trioxide (SO3 ) with water, or by reacting nitric oxide (NO) with sulfur dioxide and water. (b) The ingredient meets the...

  13. 21 CFR 184.1095 - Sulfuric acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...colorless, oily liquid. It is prepared by reacting sulfur dioxide (SO2 ) with oxygen and mixing the resultant sulfur trioxide (SO3 ) with water, or by reacting nitric oxide (NO) with sulfur dioxide and water. (b) The ingredient meets the...

  14. 21 CFR 184.1095 - Sulfuric acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...colorless, oily liquid. It is prepared by reacting sulfur dioxide (SO2 ) with oxygen and mixing the resultant sulfur trioxide (SO3 ) with water, or by reacting nitric oxide (NO) with sulfur dioxide and water. (b) The ingredient meets the...

  15. 21 CFR 184.1095 - Sulfuric acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...colorless, oily liquid. It is prepared by reacting sulfur dioxide (SO2 ) with oxygen and mixing the resultant sulfur trioxide (SO3 ) with water, or by reacting nitric oxide (NO) with sulfur dioxide and water. (b) The ingredient meets the...

  16. SYNTHESIS OF SULFUR-BASED WATER TREATMENT AGENT FROM SULFUR DIOXIDE WASTE STREAMS

    SciTech Connect

    Robert C. Brown; Maohong Fan

    2001-12-01

    We propose a process that uses sulfur dioxide from coal combustion as a raw material to synthesize polymeric ferric sulfate (PFS), a water treatment agent. The process uses sodium chlorate as an oxidant and ferrous sulfate as an absorbent. The major chemical mechanisms in this reaction system include oxidation, hydrolysis, and polymerization. Oxidation determines sulfur conversion efficiency while hydrolysis and polymerization control the quality of product. Many factors, including SO{sub 2} inlet concentration, flow rate of simulated flue gas, reaction temperature, addition rate of oxidant and stirring rate, may affect the efficiencies of SO{sub 2} removal. Currently, the effects of SO{sub 2} inlet concentration, the flow rate of simulated flue gas and addition rate of flue gas on removal efficiencies of SO{sub 2}, are being investigated. Experiments shown in this report have demonstrated that the conversion efficiencies of sulfur dioxide with ferrous sulfate as an absorbent are in the range of 60-80% under the adopted process conditions. However, the conversion efficiency of sulfur dioxide may be improved by optimizing reaction conditions to be investigated. Partial quality indices of the synthesized products, including Fe{sup 2+} concentration and total iron concentration, have been evaluated.

  17. Effectiveness of high temperature pyrolysis in sulfur removal from coal

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gra?yna Gryglewicz

    1996-01-01

    A series of Polish hard coals of different rank that contained sulfur in the quantity from 0.37 to 4.90 wt% was investigated in this study. The coals were subjected to pyrolysis at 1000°C in an atmosphere of the gases evolved during the pyrolysis process. Results have shown a decreasing trend in the degree of sulfur removal by high temperature pyrolysis

  18. Partial oxidation of sulfur-containing solid carbonaceous fuel

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. S. Najjar; R. J. Corbeels

    1988-01-01

    This patent describes a process for the simultaneous partial oxidation and desulfurization of a sulfur and silicate-containing comminuted solid carbonaceous fuel comprising (basis solid fuel) 0.2 to 0.6 wt. % sulfur and 0.1 to 30 wt. % of silicate compounds including iron silicate the improvement comprising: (1) reacting in the reaction zone of a partial oxidation gas generator a feed

  19. Membranes for the Sulfur-Iodine Integrated Laboratory Scale Demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Frederick F. Stewart

    2007-08-01

    INL has developed polymeric membrane-based chemical separations to enable the thermochemical production of hydrogen. Major activities included studies of sulfuric acid concentration membranes, hydriodic acid concentration membranes, SO2/O2 separation membranes, potential applications of a catalyst reactor system for the decomposition of HI, and evaluation of the chemical separation needs for alternate thermochemical cycles. Membranes for the concentration of sulfuric acid were studied using pervaporation. The goal of this task was to offer the sulfur-iodine (S-I) and the hybrid sulfur (HyS) cycles a method to concentrate the sulfuric acid containing effluent from the decomposer without boiling. In this work, sulfuric acid decomposer effluent needs to be concentrated from ~50 % acid to 80 %. This task continued FY 2006 efforts to characterize water selective membranes for use in sulfuric acid concentration. In FY 2007, experiments were conducted to provide specific information, including transmembrane fluxes, separation factors, and membrane durability, necessary for proper decision making on the potential inclusion of this process into the S-I or HyS Integrated Laboratory Scale demonstration.

  20. Sulfur removal from natural gas

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hakka

    1974-01-01

    Elemental sulfur entrained in natural gas at the well is removed by first contacting the natural gas with an aqueous solution of 5 to 50 wt % of monoethanolamine and then separating the sulfur-containing aqueous solution from the natural gas.

  1. Microbially Mediated Kinetic Sulfur Isotope Fractionation: Reactive Transport Modeling Benchmark

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wanner, C.; Druhan, J. L.; Cheng, Y.; Amos, R. T.; Steefel, C. I.; Ajo Franklin, J. B.

    2014-12-01

    Microbially mediated sulfate reduction is a ubiquitous process in many subsurface systems. Isotopic fractionation is characteristic of this anaerobic process, since sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) favor the reduction of the lighter sulfate isotopologue (S32O42-) over the heavier isotopologue (S34O42-). Detection of isotopic shifts have been utilized as a proxy for the onset of sulfate reduction in subsurface systems such as oil reservoirs and aquifers undergoing uranium bioremediation. Reactive transport modeling (RTM) of kinetic sulfur isotope fractionation has been applied to field and laboratory studies. These RTM approaches employ different mathematical formulations in the representation of kinetic sulfur isotope fractionation. In order to test the various formulations, we propose a benchmark problem set for the simulation of kinetic sulfur isotope fractionation during microbially mediated sulfate reduction. The benchmark problem set is comprised of four problem levels and is based on a recent laboratory column experimental study of sulfur isotope fractionation. Pertinent processes impacting sulfur isotopic composition such as microbial sulfate reduction and dispersion are included in the problem set. To date, participating RTM codes are: CRUNCHTOPE, TOUGHREACT, MIN3P and THE GEOCHEMIST'S WORKBENCH. Preliminary results from various codes show reasonable agreement for the problem levels simulating sulfur isotope fractionation in 1D.

  2. 21 CFR 582.3862 - Sulfur dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Chemical Preservatives § 582.3862 Sulfur dioxide. (a) Product. Sulfur dioxide. (b) [Reserved] (c) Limitations,...

  3. 21 CFR 582.3862 - Sulfur dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Chemical Preservatives § 582.3862 Sulfur dioxide. (a) Product. Sulfur dioxide. (b) [Reserved] (c) Limitations,...

  4. 21 CFR 582.3862 - Sulfur dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Chemical Preservatives § 582.3862 Sulfur dioxide. (a) Product. Sulfur dioxide. (b) [Reserved] (c) Limitations,...

  5. 21 CFR 582.3862 - Sulfur dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Chemical Preservatives § 582.3862 Sulfur dioxide. (a) Product. Sulfur dioxide. (b) [Reserved] (c) Limitations,...

  6. Formation of insoluble, nonhydrolyzable, sulfur-rich macromolecules via incorporation of inorganic sulfur species into algal carbohydrates

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Marika D. Kok; Stefan Schouten; Jaap S. Sinninghe Damsté

    2000-01-01

    The process of sulfur incorporation into organic matter was simulated in the laboratory by sulfurization of cell material of the prymnesiophyte alga Phaeocystis in sea water with inorganic polysulfides at 50°C. Flash pyrolysis of the residue, obtained after extraction and several hydrolysis steps, yielded mainly C1–C4 alkylbenzenes and C1–C4 alkylphenols and, in contrast to control and blank experiments, relatively high

  7. Formation of insoluble, non-hydrolyzable, sulfur-rich macromolecules via incorporation of inorganic sulfur species into algal carbohydrates

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. S. Sinninghe Damsté; M. D. Kok; S. Schouten

    2000-01-01

    The process of sulfur incorporation into organic matter was simulated in the laboratory by sulfurization of cell material of the prymnesiophyte alga Phaeocystis in sea water with inorganic polysulfides at 50°C. Flash pyrolysis of the residue, obtained after extraction and several hydrolysis steps, yielded mainly C1?C4 alkylbenzenes and C1?C4 alkylphenols and, in contrast to control and blank experiments, relatively high

  8. Behavior of sulfur and chlorine in coal during combustion and boiler corrosion. Technical report, December 1, 1992February 28, 1993

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. L. Chou; K. C. Hackley; J. Cao; R. R. Frost; R. R. Ruch; W. P. Pan; M. L. Upchurch; H. B. Cao; D. Shao; H. H. Ho

    1993-01-01

    The goals of this project is to investigate the behavior of sulfur and chlorine during pyrolysis and combustion of Illinois coals, the chemistry of boiler deposits and the process of ash formation, and remedial measures to reduce the sulfur and chlorine compounds in combustion gases. The chemistry of boiler deposits provides information about the behavior of sulfur, chlorine, and ash

  9. Sulfur: The plankton/climate connection

    SciTech Connect

    Malin, G.; Turner, S.M.; Liss, P.S. (Univ. of East Anglia, Norwich (United Kingdom))

    1992-10-01

    A key process in the global sulfur cycle is the transfer of volatile forms of the element from sea to land via the atmosphere. Early budgets calculated the amount of sulfur required to balance the cycle and generally assumed that this flux was achieved by formation of hydrogen sulfide (H[sub 2]S) in coastal waters, mud flats, etc. However, Lovelock et al. (1972) made the first field measurements of dimethylsulfide (DMS) in seawater and suggested that it represented the missing link in the S cycle. Other sulfur gases, such as carbonylsulfide (COS), carbon disulfide (CS[sub 2]), methylmercaptan (CH[sub 3]SH), and dimethyldisulfide (CH[sub 3]SSCH[sub 3]), are also often observed, but DMS is usually dominant (Andreae et al. 1983, Cline and Bates 1983, Turner and Liss 1985). Over the past decade or so thousands of analyses have been made covering coastal, shelf, and open ocean environments, which show that DMS is ubiquitous in seawater but that considerable spatial and temporal variability occurs (see Cooper and Matrai 1989). In this review the authors consider processes leading to the formation of DMS in seawater, its emission to the atmosphere, and transformations therein, the possible role of DMS oxidation products in climate regulation as proposed by Charlson et al. (1987), and how global changes might affect DMS production. 80 refs., 2 figs.

  10. Sulfur in the Apollo 17 basalts and their source regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, E. K., Jr.; Morris, R. V.; Usselman, T. M.

    1976-01-01

    Thirty-two Apollo 17 mare basalts have been analyzed for their total sulfur and metallic iron abundances. Sulfur abundances range from 1580 to 2770 microgram S/g with a median value of 1860 microgram S/g. Metallic iron abundances ranged from 0.033 to 0.21 wt.% Fe, with a mean value of 0.13 wt% Fe. The coarse-grained basalts contain more metallic iron than the fine-grained basalts. The metallic iron and sulfur abundances are not apparently related to the cooling rates of the basalts. A slight negative correlation exists between the concentrations of metallic iron and total sulfur for the Apollo 17 basalts. Sulfur content of the mare basalts increases with increasing degrees of fractionation whereas the metallic iron content decreases. Metallic iron in mare basalts may be ascribed to a variety of processes; at present the dominant process is unknown. The source regions for the Apollo 17 and 11 basalts were saturated with sulfur as compared to the Apollo 12 and 15 low titanium basalts which were not saturated.

  11. Sulfur passivation techniques for III-V wafer bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Michael James

    The use of direct wafer bonding in a multijunction III-V solar cell structure requires the formation of a low resistance bonded interface with minimal thermal treatment. A wafer bonded interface behaves as two independent surfaces in close proximity, hence a major source of resistance is Fermi level pinning common in III-V surfaces. This study demonstrates the use of sulfur passivation in III-V wafer bonding to reduce the energy barrier at the interface. Two different sulfur passivation processes are addressed. A dry sulfur passivation method that utilizes elemental sulfur vapor activated by ultraviolet light in vacuum is compared with aqueous sulfide and native oxide etch treatments. Through the addition of a sulfur desorption step in vacuum, the UV-S treatment achieves bondable surfaces free of particles contamination or surface roughening. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements of the sulfur treated GaAs surfaces find lower levels of oxide and the appearance of sulfide species. After 4 hrs of air exposure, the UV-S treated GaAs actually showed an increase in the amount of sulfide bonded to the semiconductor, resulting in less oxidation compared to the aqueous sulfide treatment. Large area bonding is achieved for sulfur treated GaAs / GaAs and InP / InP with bulk fracture strength achieved after annealing at 400 °C and 300 °C respectively, without large compressive forces. The electrical conductivity across a sulfur treated 400 °C bonded n-GaAs/n-GaAs interface significantly increased with a short anneal (1-2 minutes) at elevated temperatures (50--600 °C). Interfaces treated with the NH4OH oxide etch, on the other hand, exhibited only mild improvement in accordance with previously published studies in this area. TEM and STEM images revealed similar interfacial microstructure changes with annealing for both sulfur treated and NH4OH interfaces, whereby some areas have direct semiconductor-semiconductor contact without any interfacial layer. Fitting the observed temperature dependence of zero bias conductance using a model for tunneling through a grain boundary reveals that the addition of sulfur at the interface lowered the interfacial energy barrier by 0.2 eV. The interface resistance for these sulfur-treated structures is less than 0.03 O·cm 2 at room temperature. These results emphasize that sulfur passivation techniques reduce interface states that otherwise limit the implementation of wafer bonding for high efficiency solar cells and other devices.

  12. Sulfur abundances and distributions in mare basalts and their source magmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, E. K., Jr.; Chang, S.; Lennon, K.; Moore, G. W.; Pearce, G. W.

    1975-01-01

    An inverse correlation between metallic iron content and total sulfur abundances was observed by Gibson and Moore (1974) for five Apollo 17 and six Apollo 15 basalts. An investigation was conducted with the objective to distinguish between two processes leading to the inverse metallic iron and total sulfur correlation. The investigation included analyses of ten Apollo 15 and five Apollo 17 basalts for their sulfur and metallic iron abundances along with carbon and hydrogen. The sulfur isotopic compositions were measured for a possible identification of the fractionation processes which might have occurred during volatilization of the basalts.

  13. PILOT PLANT STUDY OF CONVERSION OF COAL TO LOW SULFUR FUEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a program to develop, on bench and pilot scales, operating conditions for the key step in the IGT process to desulfurize coal by thermal and chemical treatment. This process, to date, uses the 'sulfur-getter' concept. (A sulfur-getter is a material tha...

  14. Novel Sulfur-Tolerant Anodes for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lei Yang; Meilin Liu

    2008-12-31

    One of the unique advantages of SOFCs over other types of fuel cells is the potential for direct utilization of hydrocarbon fuels (it may involve internal reforming). Unfortunately, most hydrocarbon fuels contain sulfur, which would dramatically degrade SOFC performance at parts-per-million (ppm) levels. Low concentration of sulfur (ppm or below) is difficult to remove efficiently and cost-effectively. Therefore, knowing the exact poisoning process for state-of-the-art anode-supported SOFCs with Ni-YSZ cermet anodes, understanding the detailed anode poisoning mechanism, and developing new sulfur-tolerant anodes are essential to the promotion of SOFCs that run on hydrocarbon fuels. The effect of cell operating conditions (including temperature, H{sub 2}S concentration, cell voltage/current density, etc.) on sulfur poisoning and recovery of nickel-based anode in SOFCs was investigated. It was found that sulfur poisoning is more severe at lower temperature, higher H{sub 2}S concentration or lower cell current density (higher cell voltage). In-situ Raman spectroscopy identified the nickel sulfide formation process on the surface of a Ni-YSZ electrode and the corresponding morphology change as the sample was cooled in H{sub 2}S-containing fuel. Quantum chemical calculations predicted a new S-Ni phase diagram with a region of sulfur adsorption on Ni surfaces, corresponding to sulfur poisoning of Ni-YSZ anodes under typical SOFC operating conditions. Further, quantum chemical calculations were used to predict the adsorption energy and bond length for sulfur and hydrogen atoms on various metal surfaces. Surface modification of Ni-YSZ anode by thin Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5} coating was utilized to enhance the sulfur tolerance. A multi-cell testing system was designed and constructed which is capable of simultaneously performing electrochemical tests of 12 button cells in fuels with four different concentrations of H{sub 2}S. Through systematical study of state-of-the-art anode-supported SOFC button cells, it is seen that the long-term sulfur poisoning behavior of those cells indicate that there might be a second-stage slower degradation due to sulfur poisoning, which would last for a thousand hour or even longer. However, when using G-18 sealant from PNNL, the 2nd stage poisoning was effectively prohibited.

  15. Advanced Byproduct Recovery: Direct Catalytic Reduction of Sulfur Dioxide to Elemental Sulfur.

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1997-06-01

    More than 170 wet scrubber systems applied, to 72,000 MW of U.S., coal-fired, utility boilers are in operation or under construction. In these systems, the sulfur dioxide removed from the boiler flue gas is permanently bound to a sorbent material, such as lime or limestone. The sulfated sorbent must be disposed of as a waste product or, in some cases, sold as a byproduct (e.g. gypsum). Due to the abundance and low cost of naturally occurring gypsum, and the costs associated with producing an industrial quality product, less than 7% of these scrubbers are configured to produce usable gypsum (and only 1% of all units actually sell the byproduct). The disposal of solid waste from each of these scrubbers requires a landfill area of approximately 200 to 400 acres. In the U.S., a total of 19 million tons of disposable FGD byproduct are produced, transported and disposed of in landfills annually. The use of regenerable sorbent technologies has the potential to reduce or eliminate solid waste production, transportation and disposal. In a regenerable sorbent system, the sulfur dioxide in the boiler flue gas is removed by the sorbent in an adsorber. The S0{sub 2}s subsequently released, in higher concentration, in a regenerator. All regenerable systems produce an off-gas stream from the regenerator that must be processed further in order to obtain a salable byproduct, such as elemental sulfur, sulfuric acid or liquid S0{sub 2}.

  16. Toxicology of sulfur in ruminants: review

    SciTech Connect

    Kandylis, K.

    1984-10-01

    This review deals with the toxicology of sulfur in ruminants including toxicity, neurotoxic effects, and mechanism of toxic action of hydrogen sulfide, clinical signs, and treatment. It will report effects of excessive intake of sulfur by ruminants on feed intake, animal performance, ruminal digestion and motility, rumination, and other physiological functions. Poisoning of animals with sulfur from industrial emissions (sulfur dioxide) also is discussed. Excessive quantities of dietary sulfur (above .3 to .4%) as sulfate or elemental sulfur may cause toxic effects and in extreme cases can be fatal. The means is discussed whereby consumption of excessive amounts of sulfur leads to toxic effects. 53 references, 1 table.

  17. Sulfur doping of GaAs with (NH4)2Sx solution

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jong-Lam Lee

    1999-01-01

    A novel technique for sulfur doping to GaAs was demonstrated. The surface of GaAs was treated with (NH4)2Sx solution, subsequent to annealing using either furnace or rapid thermal processing. Sulfur atoms adsorbed at the surface of GaAs during the (NH4)2Sx treatment diffuse into GaAs during the annealing. The diffusion profiles of sulfur in both types of annealing treatments show a

  18. Photometric properties of powdered sulfur

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gradie, J.; Veverka, J.

    1984-05-01

    Particle size, temperature, thermal history, and scattering geometry are shown by the present laboratory investigation of the spectrophotometric properties of three particle-size fractions of sulfur to influence the spectral reflectance of both normal and quenched molten samples of sulfur. A scattering law that consists of a linear combination of lunar-like and Lambertian terms adequately describes the data for all particle sizes. Near opposition, sulfur particles closely follow a Minnaert limb darkening law except where the reflectance is low, as in the strong UV absorption band of the larger particle size fractions. The present data indicate that quantitative comparisons between disk-integrated observations of Io and laboratory measurements of flat sulfur samples are inadequate unless temperature effects and scattering geometry changes are included.

  19. Zirconium in sulfuric acid applications

    SciTech Connect

    Webster, R.T.; Yau, T.L.

    1986-02-01

    Zirconium is one of the few metals that resists attack by sulfuric acid at concentrations up to 75% and temperatures to boiling and above. This capability makes zirconium a good structural metal for use in 40 to 65% H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ up to boiling temperatures and for weak acid concentrations at elevated temperatures. Zirconium's corrosion properties in sulfuric acid solutions are compared with nickel base alloys. Examples of applications and limitations in the use of zirconium are presented.

  20. Discovery of practical production processes for arylsulfur pentafluorides and their higher homologues, bis- and tris(sulfur pentafluorides): Beginning of a new era of “super-trifluoromethyl” arene chemistry and its industry

    PubMed Central

    Garrick, Lloyd M; Saito, Norimichi

    2012-01-01

    Summary Various arylsulfur pentafluorides, ArSF5, have long been desired in both academic and industrial areas, and ArSF5 compounds have attracted considerable interest in many areas such as medicines, agrochemicals, and other new materials, since the highly stable SF5 group is considered a “super-trifluoromethyl group” due to its significantly higher electronegativity and lipophilicity. This article describes the first practical method for the production of various arylsulfur pentafluorides and their higher homologues, bis- and tris(sulfur pentafluorides), from the corresponding diaryl disulfides or aryl thiols. The method consists of two steps: (Step 1) treatment of a diaryl disulfide or an aryl thiol with chlorine in the presence of an alkali metal fluoride, and (step 2) treatment of the resulting arylsulfur chlorotetrafluoride with a fluoride source, such as ZnF2, HF, and Sb(III/V) fluorides. The intermediate arylsulfur chlorotetrafluorides were isolated by distillation or recrystallization and characterized. The aspects of these new reactions are revealed and reaction mechanisms are discussed. As the method offers considerable improvement over previous methods in cost, yield, practicality, applicability, and large-scale production, the new processes described here can be employed as the first practical methods for the economical production of various arylsulfur pentafluorides and their higher homologues, which could then open up a new era of “super-trifluoromethyl” arene chemistry and its applications in many areas. PMID:22509218

  1. Sulfur-induced greenhouse warming on early Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Sarah Stewart; Mischna, Michael A.; Grove, Timothy L.; Zuber, Maria T.

    2008-08-01

    Mineralogical, geological, geophysical, and isotopic data recently returned from Mars suggest that the delivery of sulfur gases to the atmosphere may have played a significant role in the planet's early evolution. Using the Gusev Crater basalt composition and a batch melting model, we obtain a high sulfur solubility, approximately 1400 ppm, in Martian mantle melts. We proceed to explore different scenarios for the pulsed degassing of sulfur volatiles associated with the emplacement of near-surface dikes during the late Noachian or early Hesperian, when surface pressures are thought to be substantially higher than present. We investigate background Martian atmospheres of 50 and 500 mbar CO2 with varying abundances of H2O and sulfur volatiles (H2S and SO2 mixing ratios of 10-3 to 10-6). Results suggest that these sulfur volatile influxes, alone, could have been responsible for greenhouse warming up to 25 K above that caused by CO2. Including additional water vapor feedback, this process could have raised the early surface temperature above the freezing point for brines and possibly allowed transient liquid water on the Martian surface. Each temperature rise was likely to have been short-lived, however, due to brief residence times for sulfur volatiles in an optically thin atmosphere.

  2. ENGINEERING EVALUATION OF HOT-GAS DESULFURIZATION WITH SULFUR RECOVERY

    SciTech Connect

    G.W. ROBERTS; J.W. PORTZER; S.C. KOZUP; S.K. GANGWAL

    1998-05-31

    Engineering evaluations and economic comparisons of two hot-gas desulfurization (HGD) processes with elemental sulfur recovery, being developed by Research Triangle Institute, are presented. In the first process, known as the Direct Sulfur Recovery Process (DSRP), the SO{sub 2} tail gas from air regeneration of zinc-based HGD sorbent is catalytically reduced to elemental sulfur with high selectivity using a small slipstream of coal gas. DSRP is a highly efficient first-generation process, promising sulfur recoveries as high as 99% in a single reaction stage. In the second process, known as the Advanced Hot Gas Process (AHGP), the zinc-based HGD sorbent is modified with iron so that the iron portion of the sorbent can be regenerated using SO{sub 2} . This is followed by air regeneration to fully regenerate the sorbent and provide the required SO{sub 2} for iron regeneration. This second-generation process uses less coal gas than DSRP. Commercial embodiments of both processes were developed. Process simulations with mass and energy balances were conducted using ASPEN Plus. Results show that AHGP is a more complex process to operate and may require more labor cost than the DSRP. Also capital costs for the AHGP are higher than those for the DSRP. However, annual operating costs for the AHGP appear to be considerably less than those for the DSRP with a potential break-even point between the two processes after just 2 years of operation for an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plant using 3 to 5 wt% sulfur coal. Thus, despite its complexity, the potential savings with the AHGP encourage further development and scaleup of this advanced process.

  3. System for recovering sulfur from gases, especially natural gas

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gryka

    1992-01-01

    The objective of this project is to design, construct and operate a laboratory reactor to convert hydrogen sulfide into liquid sulfur, using a patented PIPco process as a basis. Reaction conditions will be studied, continuous regenerative operation demonstrated, and data necessary to design a field test system will be collected. The subject process is a regenerative buffered water circulating system

  4. Sulfur recovery hiked in Claus/ Sulfreen units at Ram River

    SciTech Connect

    Coward, R.S.; Skaret, W.M.

    1985-04-08

    Extensive work at the Ram River gas plant has been directed at increasing sulfur-recovery efficiency. Recently, emphasis has been on reducing the emission contribution of COS/CS/sub 2/ and improving Sulfreen plant operation. In 1983, recovery efficiency reached 98.7%. Present contribution by residual sulfur components to plant emissions are: H/sub 2/S/SO/sub 2/ 39%, COS/CS/sub 2/ 28%, ratio upsets 17%, sulfur vapor 12%, and the Sulfreen regeneration process 4%. The Ram River plant processes sour natural gas from 12 different pools, with a maximum H/sub 2/S content of 39%. Inlet capacity is 17.7 million cu m/day of raw gas, with an output of 12 million cu m/day of sales gas, 300 cu m/day of pentanes plus, and 4,600 tons/day of sulfur from the diethanolamine (DEA) sweetening process. The plant facility comprises two stages, each consisting of two highpressure DEA gas sweetening trains, two 1,150-ton/day sulfur plants, a Sulfreen tail gas clean-up unit, and an incinerator. Effluent from both Sulfreen incinerators is released through a common stack. A low-pressure gas sweetening unit was added in 1980 to handle increased flash gas due to a 50% increase in the load on the high-pressure DEA units.

  5. Optimizing stratospheric sulfur geoengineering by seasonally changing sulfur injections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laakso, Anton; Partanen, Antti-Ilari; Kokkola, Harri; Lehtinen, Kari; Korhonen, Hannele

    2015-04-01

    Solar radiation management (SRM) by stratospheric sulfur injection has been shown to have potential in counteracting global warming if reducing of greenhouse gases has not been achieved fast enough and if climate warming will continue. Injecting large amounts of sulfate particles to the stratosphere would increase the reflectivity of the atmosphere and less sunlight would reach the surface. However, the effectivity (per injected sulphur mass unit) of this kind of geoengineering would decrease when amount of injected sulfur is increased. When sulfur concentration increases, stratospheric particles would grow to larger sizes which have larger gravitational settling velocity and which do not reflect radiation as efficiently as smaller particles. In many previous studies, sulfur has been assumed to be injected along the equator where yearly mean solar intensity is the highest and from where sulfur is spread equally to both hemispheres. However, the solar intensity will change locally during the year and sulfate has been assumed to be injected and spread to the hemisphere also during winter time, when the solar intensity is low. Thus sulfate injection could be expected to be more effective, if sulfur injection area is changed seasonally. Here we study effects of the different SRM injection scenarios by using two versions of the MPI climate models. First, aerosol spatial and temporal distributions as well as the resulting radiative properties from the SRM are defined by using the global aerosol-climate model ECHAM6.1-HAM2.2-SALSA. After that, the global and regional climate effects from different injection scenarios are predicted by using the Max Planck Institute's Earth System Model (MPI-ESM). We carried out simulations, where 8 Tg of sulfur is injected as SO2 to the stratosphere at height of 20-22 km in an area ranging over a 20 degree wide latitude band. Results show that changing the sulfur injection area seasonally would lead to similar global mean shortwave radiative forcing (-4.41 W/m2 at top of atmosphere) as if sulfur is injected only to the equator (-4.40 W/m2). However zonal mean distribution would be different and forcing is concentrated relatively more to the midlatitudes and less to the equator. Cooling effect from the geoengineering and warming effect from the increased greenhouse gas has been shown in many studies to lead to cooling in the equator and warming in the poles compared the preindustrial conditions. Changing the injection area seasonally might prevent this from happening and lead globally to more homogeneous temperature change.

  6. Hydration of pure and base-Containing sulfuric acid clusters studied by computational chemistry methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henschel, Henning; Ortega, Ismael K.; Kupiainen, Oona; Olenius, Tinja; Kurtén, Theo; Vehkamäki, Hanna

    2013-05-01

    The formation of hydrates of small molecular sulfuric acid clusters and cluster containing both sulfuric acid and base (ammonia or dimethylamine) has been studied by means of computational chemistry. Using a combined ab initio/density functional approach, formation energies of clusters with up to four sulfuric acid molecules, and up to two base molecules, have been calculated. Consequences for the hydration level of the corresponding clusters have been modelled. While the majority of pure sulfuric acid cluster are comparatively strongly hydrated, base containing cluster were found to be less hydrophilic. Dimethylamine is particularly effective in lowering the hydrophilicity of the cluster. Implications of the hydration profiles on atmospheric processes are discussed.

  7. Variation of organic sulfur in macerals of selected Illinois Basin coals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Demir, I.; Harvey, R.D.

    1991-01-01

    An electron microbeam technique was used to determine the distribution of organic sulfur in the main macerals of five Illinois Basin coals. On average, sporinites are the highest, inertinites the lowest, and vitrinites intermediate in organic sulfur for each coal. The observed differences are likely due to varying affinities of the different pre-maceral materials for sulfur and/or local variation in the production of H2S primarily during the peat stage. Investigation of molecular structures of individual macerals in relation to the findings of this study may delineate the relative abundance of organic sulfur in various organic compounds and thus lead to the development of efficient desulfurization processes. ?? 1991.

  8. Gas scrubbing process

    Microsoft Academic Search

    L. E. Hakka; J. N. Sarlis

    1991-01-01

    This patent describes a process for the removal of sulfur dioxide from a sulfur dioxide-containing gas stream. It comprises contacting the gas stream in a substantially horizontal contact zone with finely-divided droplets of absorbing medium which comprises water in an amount of at least about 1 mole for each mole of sulfur to be absorbed up to about 80 weight

  9. Basic sulfur recovery research. Annual technical report, January 31, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    DeBerry, D.W.

    1991-01-31

    The fundamentals of chemical interactions between chemical reagents and reduced sulfur compounds in the liquid redox and other sulfur recovery processes are explored in order to use the information to target the most effective options in processing steps for the gas industry. Methods for following concentration of an intermediate chemical species in the reaction of iron chelates and hydrogen sulfide were developed. Additional kinetic methods involving ultraviolet spectroscopy and sulfide ion selective electrode measurements were developed for following the chemical reactants during key stages of the reactions.

  10. Hydrogen and sulfur recovery from hydrogen sulfide wastes

    DOEpatents

    Harkness, John B. L. (Naperville, IL); Gorski, Anthony J. (Woodridge, IL); Daniels, Edward J. (Oak Lawn, IL)

    1993-01-01

    A process for generating hydrogen and elemental sulfur from hydrogen sulfide waste in which the hydrogen sulfide is associated under plasma conditions and a portion of the hydrogen output is used in a catalytic reduction unit to convert sulfur-containing impurities to hydrogen sulfide for recycle, the process also including the addition of an ionizing gas such as argon to initiate the plasma reaction at lower energy, a preheater for the input to the reactor and an internal adjustable choke in the reactor for enhanced coupling with the microwave energy input.

  11. Improving sulfur recovery at GPM`s Goldsmith Gas Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Grigson, S.M.; Rambo, C.L.; Hudson, H.M. [Ortloff Engineers, Ltd., Midland, TX (United States); Hahn, P.R. [GPM Gas Corp., Odessa, TX (United States)

    1997-12-31

    A conventional 3-stage Claus sulfur recovery unit located in GPM Gas Corporation`s Goldsmith Gas Plant was successfully converted to a sub-dewpoint process plant using Amoco`s Cold Bed Adsorption (CBA) technology. The sulfur recovery efficiency was raised from about 96% to more than 98%. This allowed plant throughput to nearly double without increasing sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) emissions. Essentially all existing equipment items were reused in the CBA process retrofit. The conversion required the addition of a new reactor, modification of the existing third bed to serve as a CBA reactor, replacement of the last sulfur condenser, and the addition of a unique, cost-effective heater to regenerate the CBA beds. Some existing equipment items were modified and/or replaced to improve the overall economics and reliability of the operation, and the sulfur recovery unit instrumentation was converted to distributed control system (DCS) control. Proven, highly reliable sulfur vapor valve assemblies were added to allow the existing third bed and the new reactor to cycle as CBA beds, with the DCS controlling these switching valves. The project team included Ortloff Engineers, LTD, area contractors, and GPM`s technical, purchasing, inspection, and maintenance personnel. Time from project approval and kickoff through startup was less than 12 months. Careful coordination of the conceptual design, detailed design, procurement, HAZOP, operator training, shutdown, and startup phases resulted in a very successful fast-track project. The Goldsmith Gas Plant is no longer capacity-limited by the SO{sub 2} emission rate from the sulfur recovery unit.

  12. Microbial stabilization of sulfur-laden sorbents. Technical report, December 1, 1992--February 29, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, K.W. [Illinois State Univ., Normal, IL (United States); Banerjee, D. [Illinois Clean Coal Inst., Carterville, IL (United States)

    1993-05-01

    Clean coal technologies that involve limestone for in situ sulfur capture generate lime/limestone products laden with sulfur at various oxidation states. If sulfur is completely stabilized as sulfate, the spent sorbent is ready for commercial utilization as gypsum. However, the presence of reduced sulfur species requires additional processing. Thermal oxidation of reduced sulfur frequently results in undesirable release of SO{sub 2}. Microbial oxidation may provide an inexpensive and effective alternative. Sorbents laden with reduced forms of sulfur such as sulfide or sulfite can serve as growth substrates for sulfur-oxidizing bacteria, which convert all sulfur to sulfate. The goals of this project are to optimize conditions for sulfate generation from sulfide and sulfite on prepared lime/limestone mixtures; to test and optimize the effectiveness of microbial processing on spent sorbents from coal gasification, in-duct sorbent injection, and fluidized bed combustion; and to search for hyperalkalinophilic thiobacilli, which would be effective up to pH 11. We report here progress toward controlling the pH of culture media, and determining the highest pH at which several environmental isolates and named strains could initiate sulfur oxidation.

  13. Coal Liquefaction desulfurization process

    DOEpatents

    Givens, Edwin N. (Bethlehem, PA)

    1983-01-01

    In a solvent refined coal liquefaction process, more effective desulfurization of the high boiling point components is effected by first stripping the solvent-coal reacted slurry of lower boiling point components, particularly including hydrogen sulfide and low molecular weight sulfur compounds, and then reacting the slurry with a solid sulfur getter material, such as iron. The sulfur getter compound, with reacted sulfur included, is then removed with other solids in the slurry.

  14. ADVANCED SULFUR CONTROL CONCEPTS FOR HOT-GAS DESULFURIZATION TECHNOLOGY

    SciTech Connect

    A. LOPEZ ORTIZ; D.P. HARRISON; F.R. GROVES; J.D. WHITE; S. ZHANG; W.-N. HUANG; Y. ZENG

    1998-10-31

    This research project examined the feasibility of a second generation high-temperature coal gas desulfurization process in which elemental sulfur is produced directly during the sorbent regeneration phase. Two concepts were evaluated experimentally. In the first, FeS was regenerated in a H2O-O2 mixture. Large fractions of the sulfur were liberated in elemental form when the H2O-O2 ratio was large. However, the mole percent of elemental sulfur in the product was always quite small (<<1%) and a process based on this concept was judged to be impractical because of the low temperature and high energy requirements associated with condensing the sulfur. The second concept involved desulfurization using CeO2 and regeneration of the sulfided sorbent, Ce2O2S, using SO2 to produce elemental sulfur directly. No significant side reactions were observed and the reaction was found to be quite rapid over the temperature range of 500°C to 700°C. Elemental sulfur concentrations (as S2) as large as 20 mol% were produced. Limitations associated with the cerium sorbent process are concentrated in the desulfurization phase. High temperature and highly reducing coal gas such as produced in the Shell gasification process are required if high sulfur removal efficiencies are to be achieved. For example, the equilibrium H2S concentration at 800°C from a Shell gas in contact with CeO2 is about 300 ppmv, well above the allowable IGCC specification. In this case, a two-stage desulfurization process using CeO2 for bulk H2S removal following by a zinc sorbent polishing step would be required. Under appropriate conditions, however, CeO2 can be reduced to non-stoichiometric CeOn (n<2) which has significantly greater affinity for H2S. Pre-breakthrough H2S concentrations in the range of 1 ppmv to 5 ppmv were measured in sulfidation tests using CeOn at 700°C in highly reducing gases, as measured by equilibrium O2 concentration, comparable to the Shell gas. Good sorbent durability was indicated in a twenty-five-cycle test. The sorbent was exposed for 58 consecutive days to temperatures between 600°C and 800°C and gas atmospheres from highly reducing to highly oxidizing without measurable loss of sulfur capacity or reactivity. In the process analysis phase of this study, a two-stage desulfurization process using cerium sorbent with SO2 regeneration followed by zinc sorbent with dilute O2 regeneration was compared to a single-stage process using zinc sorbent and O2 regeneration with SO2 in the regeneration product gas converted to elemental sulfur using the direct sulfur recovery process (DSRP). Material and energy balances were calculated using the process simulation package PRO/II. Major process equipment was sized and a preliminary economic analysis completed. Sorbent replacement rate, which is determined by the multicycle sorbent durability, was found to be the most significant factor in both processes. For large replacement rates corresponding to average sorbent lifetimes of 250 cycles or less, the single-stage zinc sorbent process with DSRP was estimated to be less costly. However, the cost of the two-stage cerium sorbent process was more sensitive to sorbent replacement rate, and, as the required replacement rate decreased, the economics of the two-stage process improved. For small sorbent replacement rates corresponding to average sorbent lifetimes of 1000 cycles or more, the two-stage cerium process was estimated to be less costly. In the relatively wide middle range of sorbent replacement rates, the relative economics of the two processes depends on other factors such as the unit cost of sorbents, oxygen, nitrogen, and the relative capital costs.

  15. Influence of different sulfur compounds on corrosion due to naphthenic acid

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Omar Yépez

    2005-01-01

    The influence of different sulfur compounds on corrosion due to naphthenic acid was studied by means of the new method FeNCOR™. It was found that such influence occurs after the reduction of the given sulfur compound by the cathodic reaction of the overall process of naphthenic acid corrosion. When the reduction product is H2S the formation of a potentially protective

  16. EFFECT OF SILICA FUME AND NATURAL POZZOLANAS ON SULFURIC ACID RESISTANCE OF DENSE CONCRETES

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. Rahmani; A. A. Ramzanianpour

    Biogenic sulfuric acid corrosion is often a problem in sewer environments. Also in certain industrial activities sulfuric acid is used during the production process. ?t can lead to a fast degradation of the concrete structures. Therefore there is a substaintial need for construction of durable concrete structures in such environments. The porosity of concretes plays an important role in harsh

  17. Specific gravity and API gravity of biodiesel and ultra-low sulfur diesel (ULSD) blends

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Biodiesel is an alternative fuel made from vegetable oils and animal fats. In 2006, the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency mandated a maximum sulfur content of 15 ppm in on-road diesel fuels. Processing to produce the new ultra-low sulfur petrodiesel (ULSD) alters specific gravity (SG) and othe...

  18. Production of elemental sulfur from H{sub 2}S and CO{sub 2} derived from a coal desulfurization process. Quarterly technical process report, April 1, 1994--June 30, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Longsheng; Jiang, Xueyu; Khang, Soon-Jai

    1994-08-01

    During the third quarter of this project, by using the apparatus previously setup for preparation of catalysts, the CoO-MoO{sub 3}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst was prepared and the thermal stability of the catalyst was tested. Efforts were made on the calibration and the programming of the two column GC of a Perkin Elmer Gas Chromatograph. Column A was used for detecting sulfur related substances such as H{sub 2}S, COS and CS{sub 2}, and column B was for CO, CH{sub 4} and H{sub 2}. All of the GC standard curves were obtained. Non-catalytic experiments were carried out by using the packed bed reactor system with blank, filled only with quartz wool and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} support for future reference. A modified new reactor was designed to quickly quench the reaction and to prohibit the occurrence of re-equilibration of reaction products. Further thermodynamic analyses for the reaction of H{sub 2}S and CO, were performed using the Stanjan method.

  19. Advanced byproduct recovery: Direct catalytic reduction of sulfur dioxide to elemental sulfur. Fourth quarterly technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1997-01-01

    The team of Arthur D. Little, Tufts University and Engelhard Corporation are conducting Phase 1 of a four and a half year, two-phase effort to develop and scale-up an advanced byproduct recovery technology that is a direct, single-stage, catalytic process for converting sulfur dioxide to elemental sulfur. This catalytic process reduces SO{sub 2} over a fluorite-type oxide (such as ceria and zirconia). The catalytic activity can be significantly promoted by active transition metals, such as copper. More than 95% elemental sulfur yield, corresponding to almost complete sulfur dioxide conversion, was obtained over a Cu-Ce-O oxide catalyst as part of an on-going DOE-sponsored, University Coal Research Program. This type of mixed metal oxide catalyst has stable activity, high selectivity for sulfur production, and is resistant to water and carbon dioxide poisoning. Tests with CO and CH{sub 4} reducing gases indicate that the catalyst has the potential for flexibility with regard to the composition of the reducing gas, making it attractive for utility use. The performance of the catalyst is consistently good over a range of SO{sub 2} inlet concentration (0.1 to 10%) indicating its flexibility in treating SO{sub 2} tail gases as well as high concentration streams.

  20. 46 CFR 153.1046 - Sulfuric acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...LIQUEFIED GAS, OR COMPRESSED GAS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Operations Special Cargo Procedures § 153.1046 Sulfuric acid. No person may liquefy frozen or congealed sulfuric acid other than by external tank heating...

  1. 46 CFR 153.1046 - Sulfuric acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...LIQUEFIED GAS, OR COMPRESSED GAS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Operations Special Cargo Procedures § 153.1046 Sulfuric acid. No person may liquefy frozen or congealed sulfuric acid other than by external tank heating...

  2. 46 CFR 153.1046 - Sulfuric acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...LIQUEFIED GAS, OR COMPRESSED GAS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Operations Special Cargo Procedures § 153.1046 Sulfuric acid. No person may liquefy frozen or congealed sulfuric acid other than by external tank heating...

  3. 46 CFR 153.1046 - Sulfuric acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...LIQUEFIED GAS, OR COMPRESSED GAS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Operations Special Cargo Procedures § 153.1046 Sulfuric acid. No person may liquefy frozen or congealed sulfuric acid other than by external tank heating...

  4. 46 CFR 153.1046 - Sulfuric acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...LIQUEFIED GAS, OR COMPRESSED GAS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Operations Special Cargo Procedures § 153.1046 Sulfuric acid. No person may liquefy frozen or congealed sulfuric acid other than by external tank heating...

  5. Aqueous Mercury-Sulfur and Gold-Sulfur Complexes: An In-situ EXAFS Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lennie, A. R.; Pattrick, R. A.; Charnock, J. M.

    2001-12-01

    Mineral and ore formation processes which involve mercury or gold often depend on aqueous speciation of these metals, and bioavailability of mercury is also affected by aqueous complexes. The nature of coordination by sulfur of these metals in aqueous solution is important for understanding the geochemical behaviour of these metals. The principal difficulty in using spectroscopy to study these heavy metal-sulfur complexes is that dissolved concentrations in sulfidic natural waters are very low. However, it is well known that Hg(II) is soluble in high sulfide concentrations and that Au(I) forms aqueous complexes with thiosulfate. Au(I) thiosulfate complexes have been proposed as sources of secondary enrichment of gold in supergene environments (Webster and Mann, 1984). We exploit these sulfur complexes to determine metal-sulfur bond distances and coordination numbers in aqueous solution. An internally heated titanium spectroscopic cell was designed for experiments on the high X-ray flux dynamic focussing EXAFS Station 16.5 at the Daresbury Synchrotron. Gold thiosulfate solutions (10 mM) were prepared from sodium bis(thiosulfate) aurate(I) dihydrate. Mercury sulfide solutions were prepared by dissolving metacinnabar in 50 mM Na2S solutions. X-ray fluorescence spectroscopic measurements were taken over the Au L(III)-edge at 11.918 keV and the Hg L(III)-edge at 12.284 keV to obtain the extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) data. At room temperature, the best fit to EXAFS experimental data gives Au(I) coordinated by two S's at 2.30Å. No significant changes in Au-S distance are observed upon heating to 75° C. Above 100° C, the gold-thiosulfate complex decomposes. Au-S distances in the gold thiosulfate salt obtained from EXAFS are 2.28Å. Hg is also coordinated by 2 S's at 2.30Å at room temperature and at 75° C in the aqueous solution examined. These bond distances are shorter than Hg coordinated by 2 S's in cinnabar, 2.368Å, and much shorter than Hg coordinated by 4 S's in metacinnabar, 2.535Å [distances here from X-ray diffraction data]. These experimental results provide new data suitable for refining computational models of metal-sulfur complexes, and enhance our understanding of the aqueous sulfur geochemistry of mercury and gold. Reference: Webster JG and Mann AW (1984) The influence of climate, geomorphology and primary geology on the supergene migration of gold and silver. J. Geochem. Explor. 22, 21-42.

  6. Inhibition of lignifying processes by sulfur dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Pfanz, H.; Oppmann, B.

    1991-05-01

    Intercellular washing fluids (IWF) from spruce needles (Picea abies L. Karst.) contain peroxidases 1-2% of total IWF protein. These apoplastic enzymes show the ability to polymerize monophenols or phenylpropanes to form lignin precursors in vitro. In the presence of potentially acidic air pollutants like NO{sub 2}, HF(20 mM of salts in solution), and in the presence of Pb-, Cd- (0.5 mM) or Al-salts (8 mM) no inhibitory effect on the polymerization reactions examined was detectable. In contrast, the anions of SO{sub 2} (sulfite and bisulfite) revealed a strong inhibition on the dimerization of ferulic and caffeic acid (Ki ca. 1 mM), and on the dehydration of syringaldazine (Ki ca. 8 {mu}M). Polymerization of coniferyl alcohol, on the other hand, seemed to be enhanced. Maier-Maercker and Koch (1986) demonstrated that the cell walls of guard cells from undamaged spruce needles are properly lignified, whereas those of damaged needles seem to be affected. It is therefore assumed that cell wall lignification, and concomitantly stomatal regulation of coniferous needles are disturbed in regions with high atmospheric SO{sub 2} pollution (e.g. Ore Mountains in CSFR).

  7. Grapevine & Sulfur: Old Partners, New Achievements

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. Amâncio; S. Tavares; J. C. Fernandes; C. Sousa

    The central role of sulfur in biological functions Sulfur (S) is the 14th more abundant element on earth crust (Charlson et\\u000a al. 1992), the 9th and least abundant essential macronutrient in plants (Saito 2004) and the 6th element in the cytoplasm\\u000a (Xavier and LeGall 2007). The interconversion of oxidized and reduced sulfur states, the biogeochemical sulfur cycle, depends\\u000a mainly on

  8. Chemistry of ascorbic acid and sulfur dioxide as an antioxidant system relevant to white wine.

    PubMed

    Barril, Célia; Clark, Andrew C; Scollary, Geoffrey R

    2012-06-30

    The impact of the combined ascorbic acid and sulfur dioxide antioxidants on white wine oxidation processes was investigated using a range of analytical techniques, including flow injection analysis for free and total sulfur dioxide and two chromatographic methods for ascorbic acid, its oxidative degradation products and phenolic compounds. The combination of different analytical techniques provided a fast and simultaneous means for the monitoring of oxidation processes in a model wine system. In addition, the initial mole ratio of sulfur dioxide to ascorbic acid was varied and the model wine complexity was increased by the inclusion of metal ions (copper(II) and iron(II)). Sulfur dioxide was found not to be a significant binder of ascorbic acid oxidative degradation products and could not prevent the formation of certain phenolic pigment precursors. The results provide a detailed insight into the ascorbic acid/sulfur dioxide antioxidant system in wine conditions. PMID:22688051

  9. Transition metal-catalyzed oxidation of atmospheric sulfur: Global implications for the sulfur budget

    E-print Network

    Alexander, Becky

    Transition metal-catalyzed oxidation of atmospheric sulfur: Global implications for the sulfur(IV)) oxidation by O2 catalyzed by transition metals. Due to the lack of photochemically produced OH and H2O2), Transition metal-catalyzed oxidation of atmospheric sulfur: Global implications for the sulfur budget, J

  10. Factors to consider for using zirconium in sulfuric acid services

    SciTech Connect

    Fitzgerald, B.J. [Exxon Chemical Co., Baytown, TX (United States); Webber, R.G. [Exxon Chemical Co., Baton Rouge, LA (United States); Frechem, B.S. [Rohm and Haas Co., Spring House, PA (United States); Briegel, K.F. [Rohm and Haas Texas Co., Deer Park, TX (United States); Yau, T.L. [Teledyne Wah Chang, Albany, OR (United States)

    1995-10-01

    Zirconium is a pivotal material often specified for process equipment that handles highly corrosive sulfuric acid solutions. Because of the complicated nature of sulfuric acid, several factors should be addressed to ensure the durability of zirconium equipment. These factors include acid concentration, temperature, pressure, impurity, stress, crevices, welding, and surfaces condition. Depending on the situation, certain potential hazards to zirconium equipment can be prevented by applying control measures such as heat treatment, proper design and operating, inhibitor, surface conditioning and/or shot peening.

  11. Significance of ? 34S and evaluation of its imprint on sedimentary organic matter: I. The role of reduced sulfur species in the diagenetic stage: A conceptual review

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Zeev Aizenshtat; Alon Amrani

    2004-01-01

    Both carbon and sulfur cycles in the geosphere are biogenically and chemically interwoven. Sulfate is the main source for sulfur in marine sediments. The incorporation of sulfur into biogenic organic matter (OM) via the assimilatory process has very little isotopic discrimination. The pioneering work by Kaplan and Rittenberg showed that sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) oxidize organic carbon to CO2 while producing

  12. Gas phase reaction of sulfur trioxide with water vapor

    SciTech Connect

    Kolb, C.E.; Molina, M.J.; Jayne, J.T.; Meads, R.F.; Worsnop, D.R.

    1994-12-31

    Sulfur trioxide (SO3) has long been known to react with water to produce sulfuric acid (H2S04). It has been commonly assumed that the gas phase reaction in the Earth`s atmosphere between SO3 and water vapor to produce sulfuric acid vapor is an important step in the production of sulfuric acid aerosol particles. The kinetics of the gas phase reaction of SO3 with water vapor have previously been studied by Castleman and co-workers, Wang et al and Reiner and Arnold. Each of these studies was carried out in a flow reactor, with the first two studies performed at low pressure (1-10 Torr) and the latter from approx. 30 to 260 Torr. Each of these studies measured SO3 decays over a range of H2O vapor levels, obtaining data consistent with interpreting the reaction of gaseous SO3 and H2O as a bimolecular process. It is not clear why previous experimental studies failed to observe a nonlinear dependence of SO3 consumption on water vapor concentration. It is probable that sufficient water dimer exists in much of the Earth`s atmosphere to allow dimer reactions to participate in sulfuric acid vapor formation.

  13. COAL GASIFICATION ENVIRONMENTAL DATA SUMMARY: SULFUR AND NITROGEN SPECIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report summarizes data on sulfur and nitrogen species from the source test and environmental assessment studies of low- and medium-Btu gasification processes which were sponsored by the EPA between 1977 and 1981. The data are focused on the composition and distribution of the...

  14. Sulfur isotope geochemistry of gypsiferous Aridisols from central Iran

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. Khademi; A. R. Mermut; H. R. Krouse

    1997-01-01

    Gypsum accumulation is one of the prominent pedogenic processes occurring in many and regions of the world. Gypsiferous soils occur in large areas of the Iranian central plateau. The origin of gypsum in the Aridisols of central Iran and its distribution in different landscapes were studied using sulfur and oxygen isotopic composition of both solid and dissolved sulfates. The results

  15. Sulfur Hexaflouride Tracer Gas Evaluations on Hood Exhaust Reductions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    John A. Mosovsky

    1995-01-01

    Proposed facility energy reductions, which include exhaust fan speed and corresponding exhaust volume reductions, demand evaluations of exhaust hoods to ensure adequate containment efficiencies. Sulfur hexafluoride tracer tests were conducted on various designs of exhaust hoods in order to evaluate their performance in an exhaust-reduction mode. Performance tests were conducted on semiconductor-type wet process stations and plating tools operating in

  16. SULFUR DIOXIDE SOURCES IN AK

    EPA Science Inventory

    This map shows industrial plants which emit 100 tons/year or more of sulfur dioxide (SO2) in Alaska. The SO2 sources are plotted on a background map of cities and county boundaries. Data Sources: SO2 Sites: U.S. EPA AIRS System, County Outlines: 1990 Census Tiger Line Files 1:1...

  17. Preliminary Investigation of Sulfur Loading in Hanford LAW Glass

    SciTech Connect

    Vienna, John D.; Hrma, Pavel R.; Buchmiller, William C.; Ricklefs, Joel S.

    2004-04-01

    A preliminary estimate was developed for loading limits for high-sulfur low-activity waste (LAW) feeds that will be vitrified into borosilicate glass at the Hanford Site in the waste-cleanup effort. Previous studies reported in the literature were consulted to provide a basis for the estimate. The examination of previous studies led to questions about sulfur loading in Hanford LAW glass, and scoping tests were performed to help answer these questions. These results of these tests indicated that a formulation approach developed by Vienna and colleagues shows promise for maximizing LAW loading in glass. However, there is a clear need for follow-on work. The potential for significantly lowering the amount of LAW glass produced at Hanford (after the initial phase of processing) because of higher sulfur tolerances may outweigh the cost and effort required to perform the necessary testing.

  18. Quantification of Trace Volatile Sulfur Compounds in Milk by SolidPhase Microextraction and Gas Chromatography–Pulsed Flame Photometric Detection

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. A. Vazquez-Landaverde; J. A. Torres; M. C. Qian

    2006-01-01

    Volatile sulfur compounds have been reported to be responsible for the sulfurous off-flavors generated dur- ing the thermal processing of milk; however, their anal- ysis has been a challenge due to their high reactivity, highvolatility,andlowsensorythreshold.Inthisstudy, reactive thiols were stabilized and the volatile sulfur compounds in milk were extracted by headspace solid- phase microextraction, and analyzed by gas chromatog- raphyandpulsed-flamephotometricdetection.Calibra- tioncurvesfor7sulfur-containingcompoundswerecon-

  19. Formation of volatile sulfur compounds and metabolism of methionine and other sulfur compounds in fermented food.

    PubMed

    Landaud, Sophie; Helinck, Sandra; Bonnarme, Pascal

    2008-01-01

    The formation of volatile sulfur compounds (VSC) in fermented food is a subject of interest. Such compounds are essential for the aroma of many food products like cheeses or fermented beverages, in which they can play an attractive or a repulsive role, depending on their identity and their concentration. VSC essentially arise from common sulfur-bearing precursors, methionine being the most commonly found. In the first section of this paper, the main VSC found in cheese, wine, and beer are reviewed. It is shown that a wide variety of VSC has been evidenced in these food products. Because of their low odor threshold and flavor notes, these compounds impart essential sensorial properties to the final product. In the second section of this review, the main (bio)chemical pathways leading to VSC synthesis are presented. Attention is focused on the microbial/enzymatic phenomena-which initiate sulfur bearing precursors degradation-leading to VSC production. Although chemical reactions could also play an important role in this process, this aspect is not fully developed in our review. The main catabolic pathways leading to VSC from the precursor methionine are presented. PMID:18064452

  20. Determination of total sulfur content via sulfur-specific chemiluminescence detection

    SciTech Connect

    Kubala, S.W.; Campbell, D.N. [Fluid Data, Inc., Angleton, TX (United States); DiSanzo, F.P. [Paulsboro Research Lab., NJ (United States)

    1995-12-31

    A specially designed system, based upon sulfur-specific chemiluminescence detection (SSCD), was developed to permit the determination of total sulfur content in a variety of samples. This type of detection system possesses several advantages such as excellent linearity and selectivity, low minimum detectable levels, and an equimolar response to various sulfur compounds. This paper will focus on the design and application of a sulfur-specific chemiluminescence detection system for use in determining total sulfur content in gasoline.

  1. The interaction of atmospheric and soil sulfur on the sulfur and selenium concentration of range plants

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. G. Milchunas; W. K. Lauenroth; J. L. Dodd

    1983-01-01

    Summary A native northern mixed prairie, Montana, U.S.A., was exposed to three controlled levels of sulfur dioxide and subplots fertilized with sulfur and\\/or selenium. Plant species that accumulated relatively greater quantities of soil sulfur did not necessarily accumulate relatively greater quantities of atmospheric sulfur, andvisa versa. Plant-sulfur concentrations increased with increasing time and level of exposure, but the rate of

  2. Sulfur-oxidizing Bacteria: A Novel Bioinoculant for Sulfur Nutrition and Crop Production

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. Anandham; P. Indira Gandhi; M. SenthilKumar; R. Sridar; P. Nalayini; Tong-Min Sa

    \\u000a Sulfur is an essential nutrient for plant growth as sulfur-deficient conditions cause severe losses in crop yield. Sulfur\\u000a nutrition has received little attention for many years, since fertilizers and atmospheric inputs have provided adequate amounts.\\u000a However, recent reductions in sulfur inputs from atmospheric depositions have resulted in a negative sulfur balance in agricultural\\u000a soils, making crop plants increasingly dependent on

  3. Selective catalytic reduction of sulfur dioxide to elemental sulfur. Quarterly technical progress report No. 10, October 1994--December 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, W.; Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, M.; Sarofim, A.F.

    1995-03-01

    Elemental sulfur recovery from SO{sub 2}-containing gas stream is highly attractive as it produces a salable product and no waste. However, commercially available schemes are complex and involve multi-stage reactors, such as, most notably in the Resox (reduction of SO{sub 2} with coke) and Claus plant (reaction of SO{sub 2} with H{sub 2}S over catalyst). This project will investigate a cerium oxide catalyst for the single stage selective reduction of SO{sub 2} to elemental sulfur by a reductant, such as carbon monoxide. Cerium oxide has been identified in recent work at MIT as a superior catalyst for SO{sub 2} reduction by CO to elemental sulfur because its high activity and high selectivity to sulfur over COS over a wide temperature range (400-650{degrees}C). The detailed kinetic and parametric studies of SO{sub 2} reduction planned in this work over various CeO{sub 2}-formulations will provide the necessary basis for development of a very simplified process, namely that of a single-stage elemental sulfur recovery scheme from variable concentration gas streams. The potential cost- and energy-efficiency benefits from this approach cannot be overstated. A first apparent application is treatment of a regenerator off-gases in power plants using regenerative flue gas desulfurization. Such a simple catalytic converter may offer the long-sought {open_quotes}Claus-alternative{close_quotes} for coal-fired power plant applications.

  4. Selective catalytic reduction of sulfur dioxide to elemental sulfur. Quarterly technical progress report No. 2, October--December 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Wei; Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, M.; Sarofim, A.F.

    1992-12-31

    Elemental sulfur recovery from SO{sub 2}-containing gas streams is highly attractive as it produces a saleable. Product and no waste to dispose of. However, commercially available schemes are complex and involve multi-stage reactors, such as, most notably in the Resox (reduction of SO{sub 2} with coke) and Claus plants(reaction of SO{sub 2} with H{sub 2}S over catalyst). This project win investigate a cerium oxide catalyst for the single-stage selective reduction SO{sub 2} to elemental sulfur by a reductant, such as carbon monoxide. Cerium oxide has been identified as a superior catalyst for SO{sub 2} reduction by CO to elemental sulfur because of its high activity and high selectivity to sulfur over COS over a wide temperature range(400--650C). Kinetic and parametric studies of SO{sub 2} reduction planned over various CeO{sub 2}-formulations will provide the necessary basis for development of a simplified process, a single-stage elemental sulfur recovery scheme from variable concentration gas streams. A first apparent application is treatment of regenerator off-gases in power plants using regenerative flue gas desulfurization. Such a simple catalytic converter may offer the long-sought ``Claus-alternative`` for coal-fired power plant applications.

  5. Selective catalytic reduction of sulfur dioxide to elemental sulfur. Quarterly technical progress report No. 4, April--June 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Wei; Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, M.; Sarofim, A.F.; Williams, R.S.

    1993-12-31

    Elemental sulfur recovery from SO{sub 2}-containing gas stream is highly attractive as it produces a salable product and no waste to dispose of. However, commercially available schemes are complex and involve multi-stage reactors, such as, most notably in the Resox (reduction of SO{sub 2} with coke) and Claus plant(reaction of SO{sub 2} with H{sub 2}S over catalyst). This project will investigate a cerium oxide catalyst for the single stage selective reduction of SO{sub 2} to elemental sulfur by a reductant, such as carbon monoxide. Cerium oxide has been identified in recent work at MIT as a superior catalyst for SO{sub 2} reduction by CO to elemental sulfur because its high activity and high selectivity to sulfur over COS over a wide temperature range(400--650{degrees}C). The detailed kinetic and parametric studies of SO{sub 2} reduction planned in this work over various CeO{sub 2}-formulations will provide the necessary basis for development of a very simplified process, namely that of a single-stage elemental sulfur recovery scheme from variable concentration gas streams, The potential cost- and energy-efficiency benefits from this approach can not be overstated. A first apparent application is treatment of a regenerator off-gases in power plants using regenerative flue gas desulfurization. Such a simple catalytic converter may offer the long-sought ``Claus-alternative`` for coal-fired power plant applications.

  6. Selective catalytic reduction of sulfur dioxide to elemental sulfur. Quarterly technical progress report No. 6, October--December 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, W.; Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, M.; Sarofim, A.F.

    1993-12-31

    Elemental sulfur recovery from SO{sub 2}-containing gas stream is highly attractive as it produces a salable product and no waste to dispose of. However, commercially available schemes are complex and involve multi-stage reactors, such as, most notably in the Resox (reduction of SO{sub 2} with coke) and Claus plant (reaction of SO{sub 2} with H{sub 2}S over catalyst). This project will investigate a cerium oxide catalyst for the single stage selective reduction of SO{sub 2} to elemental sulfur by a reductant, such as carbon monoxide. Cerium oxide has been identified in recent work at MIT as a superior catalyst for SO{sub 2} reduction by CO to elemental sulfur because its high activity and high selectivity to sulfur over COS over a wide temperature range (400--650{degree}C). The detailed kinetic and parametric studies of SO{sub 2} reduction planned in this work over various CeO{sub 2} formulations will provide the necessary basis for development of a very simplified process, namely that of a single-stage elemental sulfur recovery scheme from variable concentration gas streams. The potential cost- and energy-efficiency benefits from this approach can not be overstated. A first apparent application is treatment of a regenerator off-gases in power plants using regenerative flue gas desulfurization. Such a simple catalytic converter may offer the long-sought ``Claus-alternative`` for coal-fired power plant applications.

  7. Microbial stabilization of sulfur-laden sorbents. [Quarterly] technical report, March 1, 1993--May 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, K.W. [Illinois State Univ., Normal, IL (United States)

    1993-09-01

    Clean coal technologies that involve limestone for in situ sulfur capture generate lime/limestone products laden with sulfur at various oxidation states. If sulfur is completely stabilized as sulfate, the spent sorbent is ready for commercial utilization as gypsum. However, the presence of reduced sulfur species requires additional processing. Thermal oxidation of reduced sulfur frequently results in undesirable release of SO{sub 2}. Microbial oxidation might provide an inexpensive and effective alternative. Sorbents laden with reduced forms of sulfur such as sulfide or sulfite can serve as growth substrates for sulfur-oxidizing bacteria, which convert all sulfur to sulfate. The goals of this project are the following: (1) to optimize conditions for sulfate generation from sulfide, thiosulfate, and sulfite; (2) to test and optimize the effectiveness of microbial processing on spent sorbents from flue gas desulfurization, coal gasification, and fluidized bed combustion; (3) to search for hyperalkalinophilic thiobacilli, which would be effective up to pH 11. This quarter, temperature, nitrogen, and phosphate requirements for sulfate generation on thiosulfate were optimized with respect to two named strains and two promising isolates. Spent sorbents from three different power plants were tested for sulfite and thiosulfate contents, in preparation for bioprocessing.

  8. Heterogeneous Photochemical Oxidation of Sulfur Dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Zanan, H. S.; Stockwell, W. R.

    2007-12-01

    The gas phase oxidation of sulfur dioxide by the hydroxyl radical is a significant source of sulfate aerosol in the troposphere and stratosphere. Stockwell and Calvert (1983) performed fifteen chamber experiments where mixtures of HONO, NO, NO2, H2O, SO2 and CO were photolyzed in synthetic air or in nitrogen containing approximately 50 ppm oxygen. They found that the atmospheric oxidation of SO2 by hydroxyl radical was a chain process that occurs through the production of an HO2 radical followed by reaction with NO to reproduce HO. We have reanalyzed this dataset and we have found that a very large amount of the observed SO2 oxidation (70.0 ± 9.1 %) is not explained through the HO + SO2 reaction alone. The Regional Atmospheric Chemistry Mechanism (RACM2) was used to investigate additional chemical pathways for the oxidation of SO2. A mechanism consisting of photochemical heterogeneous reactions is proposed to account for the observed additional sulfur dioxide oxidation not accounted for by gas phase oxidation. The analysis showed that the measured time dependent SO2, CO2 and nitrogenous compound concentrations could be simulated by the photochemical heterogeneous mechanism in conjunction with the RACM2 mechanism.

  9. Pilot studies on novel catalyst for sulfur removal from cracked naphthas with minimal octane loss

    SciTech Connect

    Sherwood, D.E. Jr.; Gripka, P.J.; Clausen, M.F.; Nelson, R.G. [Texaco Research and Development, Port Arthur, TX (United States)

    1996-12-31

    Oil companies are expecting wider mandated use of reformulated gasolines and further environmental mandates to lower sulfur contents of reformulated gasolines in the near future. Environmental agencies currently believe that lower sulfur contents will significantly upgrade the quality of automotive exhaust gases. Most of the sulfur in a typical refinery gasoline pool comes from {open_quotes}cracked naphthas,{close_quotes} e.g. from Fluid Catalyst Cracking Units (FCCU`s). Cracked naphthas also have high olefin contents, and thus, high octane numbers. Although it is relatively easy to remove sulfur from a cracked naphtha in a low severity hydrotreating operation, at the same time, significant olefin saturation and octane reduction occur. Clearly, a selective hydrodesulfurization (HDS) process with minimal olefin reduction is required to produce low sulfur, high octane cracked naphthas. 2 refs., 5 tabs.

  10. Protein-Protein Interactions of the Human Iron Sulfur Cluster Biosynthesis Complex 

    E-print Network

    Levy, Michaella J

    2014-06-05

    Iron sulfur (Fe-S) clusters are integral cofactors responsible for a number of cellular processes including electron transfer, catalyzing substrate turnover, sensing small molecules, and regulating gene expression or enzymatic activity. Elaborate...

  11. First-principles molecular dynamics simulations of (sulfuric acid)1(dimethylamine)1 cluster formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loukonen, Ville; Bork, Nicolai; Vehkamäki, Hanna

    2013-05-01

    The clustering process (sulfuric acid) + (base)?(sulfuric acid)1(base)1 is of fundamental importance in the atmospheric new-particle formation. Especially interesting are the collisions where a proton transfer reaction can happen, as the reaction often leads to relatively strongly bound clusters. Here, we studied the clustering process of (sulfuric acid) + (dimethylamine) ? (sulfuric acid)1(dimethylamine)1 using first-principles molecular dynamics simulations. The collision of the two molecules was simulated starting with various spatial orientations and the evolution of the cluster was followed in the NVE ensemble. The simulations suggest that the proton transfer reaction takes place regardless of the intial collision orientation. However, due to the energy released in the process, the newly-formed cluster is not able to reach the minimun energy configuration, which might affect the following growth processes.

  12. Soluble sulfur species extracted from coal by chemical leaching. [MS thesis; mineral and coal-derived pyrite; 114 references

    SciTech Connect

    Stephenson, M.D.

    1982-07-01

    The nature of the soluble sulfur-containing reaction products from the desulfurization of pyrite was studied. The rate of oxydesulfurization of the two varieties of pyrite was studied under the leaching conditions of the Ames process. Concentrations of soluble sulfur species were determined for oxydesulfurization using leach solutions of sodium carbonate, sodium bicarbonate, distilled water, and dilute sulfuric acid and for alkaline leaching without oxygen using sodium carbonate. Mineral grade pyrite was found to be much less reactive towards oxydesulfurization than coal-derived pyrite, although the mechanism of sulfur removal was apparently the same. The sulfur containing products of oxydesulfurization were found to be thiosulfate, sulfite, and sulfate for alkaline leach solutions, and elemental sulfur and sulfuric acid when neutral or acidic solutions were used. For the Ames process, thiosulfate was usually the major sulfur containing product, although oxidation to sulfite and sulfate was found to take place. Oxidation of thiosulfate did not occur with oxygen alone, but did occur in the presence of oxygen and partially reacted pyrite. Higher temperatures and higher oxygen partial pressures favored formation of sulfate at the expense of both thiosulfate and sulfite. With neutral and acidic leach solutions, sulfuric acid accounted for most of the sulfur, although measurable quantities of elemental sulfur were present.Higher oxygen partial pressures and higher temperatures favored the formation of sulfuric acid at the expense of elemental sulfur. Pyrite oxidized faster under alkaline conditions than under neutral or acidic conditions. Pyrite was also leached at high temperatures in a sodium carbonate solution in the absence of oxygen.

  13. Modulation of volatile sulfur compounds by wine yeast.

    PubMed

    Swiegers, J H; Pretorius, I S

    2007-04-01

    Sulfur compounds in wine can be a 'double-edged sword'. On the one hand, certain sulfur-containing volatile compounds such as hydrogen sulfide, imparting a rotten egg-like aroma, can have a negative impact on the perceived quality of the wine, and on the other hand, some sulfur compounds such as 3-mercaptohexanol, imparting fruitiness, can have a positive impact on wine flavor and aroma. Furthermore, these compounds can become less or more attractive or repulsive depending on their absolute and relative concentrations. This presents an interesting challenge to the winemaker to modulate the concentrations of these quality-determining compounds in wine in accordance with consumer preferences. The wine yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae plays a central role in the production of volatile sulfur compounds. Through the sulfate reduction sequence pathway, the HS(-) is formed, which can lead to the formation of hydrogen sulfide and various mercaptan compounds. Therefore, limiting the formation of the HS(-) ion is an important target in metabolic engineering of wine yeast. The wine yeast is also responsible for the transformation of non-volatile sulfur precursors, present in the grape, to volatile, flavor-active thiol compounds. In particular, 4-mercapto-4-methylpentan-2-one, 3-mercaptohexanol, and 3-mercaptohexyl acetate are the most important volatile thiols adding fruitiness to wine. This paper briefly reviews the metabolic processes involved in the production of important volatile sulfur compounds and the latest strategies in the pursuit of developing wine yeast strains as tools to adjust wine aroma to market specifications. PMID:17262212

  14. Assembly of Deletion Mutants of the Rieske Iron–Sulfur Protein into the Cytochrome bc 1 Complex of Yeast Mitochondria

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. S. Ramabadran; Shanker Japa; Diana S. Beattie

    1997-01-01

    The assembly of two deletion mutants of the Rieske iron-sulfur protein into the cytochrome bc1 complex was investigated after import in vitro into mitochondria isolated from a strain of yeast, JPJ1, from which the iron-sulfur protein gene (RIP) had been deleted. The assembly process was investigated by immunoprecipitation of the labeled iron-sulfur protein or the two deletion mutants from detergent-solubilized

  15. Determination of Sulfur in High-Level Waste Sludge by Inductively Coupled Plasma-Atomic Emission Spectroscopy and Ion Chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    COLEMAN, CJ

    2004-04-22

    Significant differences (approximately 30 percent) have been observed in the sulfur measurements in high-level waste sludge by the Analytical Development Section (ADS) using the inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) method compared with the ADS ion chromatography (IC) method. Since the measured concentrations of sulfur in the sludge approached the maximum concentration that can be processed in the DWPF, experiments were performed to determine the source of the differences and assess the true accuracy of sulfur measurements.

  16. Crystalline structure of sulfur nanowires.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvajal, Eliel; Santiago, Patricia; Mendoza, Doroteo

    2001-03-01

    Sulfur nanowires have been synthesized by a nanoporous alumina template approach. Two types of wires were obtained, some of them straight and very long but the most of them curly. The diameter was 15nm, typically more than 1000nm of length and the longest of these wires seems to be almost monocrystalline.A first sight on them by electron microscopy showed differences, on the crystalline structure, compared to the most stable bulk allotrope. Studying carefully the wires' structure by X-ray diffraction on the confined wires, and by high resolution electron microscopy and electron diffraction, on the released ones, we found that the cell parameters are near the ones for ? bulk sulfur.

  17. Performance of a pilot-scale sewage treatment: An up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) and a down-flow hanging sponge (DHS) reactors combined system by sulfur-redox reaction process under low-temperature conditions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Masanobu Takahashi; Takashi Yamaguchi; Yoshiharu Kuramoto; Akihiro Nagano; Satoshi Shimozaki; Haruhiko Sumino; Nobuo Araki; Shinichi Yamazaki; Shuji Kawakami; Hideki Harada

    2011-01-01

    Performance of a wastewater treatment system utilizing a sulfur-redox reaction of microbes was investigated using a pilot-scale reactor that was fed with actual sewage. The system consisted of an up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor and a down-flow hanging sponge (DHS) reactor with a recirculation line. Consequently, the total CODCr (465±147mgL?1; total BOD of 207±68mgL?1) at the influent was reduced

  18. Sulfur emissions from Mt. Etna

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Wolfgang Jaeschke; Harald Berresheim; Hans-W. Georgii

    1982-01-01

    In the course of three measuring trips to the Mt. Etna volcano (Sicily), field measurements and measurements by aircraft were carried out in the plume of the volcano to determine the concentration distributions and emission rates for the sulfur compounds H2S, SO2, and SO42-. Furthermore, the removal of H2S and SO2 and the production of SO42- in the dispersing plume

  19. Sodium Sulfur Technology Program Nastec

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Highley, Bob; Somerville, W. Andrew

    1992-01-01

    The NaSTEC program focuses on developing currently available sodium sulfur cells for use in space applications and investigating the operational parameters of the cells. The specific goals of the program are to determine the operational parameters and verify safety limits of Na/S technology battery cells; test long term zero-g operation; and create a life test database. The program approach and ground and flight test objectives are described in textual and graphic form.

  20. Sulfur bacteria in wastewater stabilization ponds periodically affected by the 'red-water' phenomenon.

    PubMed

    Belila, Abdelaziz; Abbas, Ben; Fazaa, Imed; Saidi, Neila; Snoussi, Mejdi; Hassen, Abdennaceur; Muyzer, Gerard

    2013-01-01

    Several wastewater stabilization ponds (WSP) in Tunisia suffer periodically from the 'red-water' phenomenon due to blooming of purple sulfur bacteria, indicating that sulfur cycle is one of the main element cycles in these ponds. In this study, we investigated the microbial diversity of the El Menzeh WSP and focused in particular on the different functional groups of sulfur bacteria. For this purpose, we used denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis of PCR-amplified fragments of the 16S rRNA gene and of different functional genes involved in microbial sulfur metabolism (dsrB, aprA, and pufM). Analyses of the 16S rRNA revealed a relatively high microbial diversity where Proteobacteria, Chlorobi, Bacteroidetes, and Cyanobacteria constitute the major bacterial groups. The dsrB and aprA gene analysis revealed the presence of deltaproteobacterial sulfate-reducing bacteria (i.e., Desulfobacter and Desulfobulbus), while the analysis of 16S rRNA, aprA, and pufM genes assigned the sulfur-oxidizing bacteria community to the photosynthetic representatives belonging to the Chlorobi (green sulfur bacteria) and the Proteobacteria (purple sulfur and non sulfur bacteria) phyla. These results point on the diversity of the metabolic processes within this wastewater plant and/or the availability of sulfate and diverse electron donors. PMID:22354366

  1. Nutritional essentiality of sulfur in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Ingenbleek, Yves; Kimura, Hideo

    2013-07-01

    Sulfur is the seventh most abundant element measurable in the human body and is supplied mainly by the intake of methionine (Met), an indispensable amino acid found in plant and animal proteins. Met controls the initiation of protein synthesis, governs major metabolic and catalytic activities, and may undergo reversible redox processes safeguarding protein integrity. Withdrawal of Met from customary diets causes the greatest downsizing of lean body mass following either unachieved replenishment (malnutrition) or excessive losses (inflammation). These physiopathologically unrelated morbidities nevertheless stimulate comparable remethylation reactions from homocysteine, indicating that Met homeostasis benefits from high metabolic priority. Inhibition of cystathionine-?-synthase activity causes the upstream sequestration of homocysteine and the downstream drop in cysteine and glutathione. Consequently, the enzymatic production of hydrogen sulfide and the nonenzymatic reduction of elemental sulfur to hydrogen sulfide are impaired. Sulfur operates as cofactor of several enzymes critically involved in the regulation of oxidative processes. A combination of malnutrition and nutritional deprivation of sulfur maximizes the risk of cardiovascular disorders and stroke, constituting a novel clinical entity that threatens plant-eating population groups. PMID:23815141

  2. Influence of sulfur in coals on char morphology and combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Marsh, H.

    1991-01-01

    During coal carbonization (pyrolysis), as during the combustion process of pulverized coal in a combustor, not all of the sulfur is released. Significant proportions become pat of the structure of the resultant coke and char. The combustion process of the char within the flames of the combustor in influenced dominantly by char morphology. This, in turn, controls the accessibility of oxidizing gases to the surfaces of the carbonaceous substance of the char. Mineral matter content, its extent and state of distribution, also exerts an influence on char morphology created during pyrolysis/carbonization. This complexity of coal renders it a very difficult material to study, systematically, to distinguish and separate out the contributing factors which influence combustion characteristics. Therefore, in such circumstances, it is necessary to simplify the systems by making use of model chars/cokes/carbons which can be made progressively more complex, but in a controlled way. In this way complicating influence in chars from coals can be eliminated, so enabling specific influences to be studied independently. It is important to note that preliminary work by Marsh and Gryglewicz (1990) indicated that levels of sulfur of about 3 to 5 wt % can reduce reactivities by 10 to 25%. The overall purpose of the study is to provide meaningful kinetic data to establish, quantitatively, the influence of organically-bound sulfur on the reactivity of carbons, and to ascertain if gasification catalysts are effective in the preferential removal of sulfur from the chars.

  3. Advanced byproduct recovery: Direct catalytic reduction of sulfur dioxide to elemental sulfur. Quarterly report, April 1--June 30, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1997-12-31

    The team of Arthur D. Little, Tufts University and Engelhard Corporation are conducting Phase 1 of a four and a half year, two-phase effort to develop and scale-up an advanced byproduct recovery technology that is a direct, single-stage, catalytic process for converting sulfur dioxide to elemental sulfur. This catalytic process reduces SO{sub 2} over a fluorite-type oxide (such as ceria and zirconia). The catalytic activity can be significantly promoted by active transition metals, such as copper. More than 95% elemental sulfur yield, corresponding to almost complete sulfur dioxide conversion, was obtained over a Cu-Ce-O oxide catalyst as part of an on-going DOE-sponsored, University Coal Research Program. This type of mixed metal oxide catalyst has stable activity, high selectivity for sulfur production, and is resistant to water and carbon dioxide poisoning. Tests with CO and CH{sub 4} reducing gases indicate that the catalyst has the potential for flexibility with regard to the composition of the reducing gas, making it attractive for utility use. The performance of the catalyst is consistently good over a range of SO{sub 2} inlet concentration (0.1 to 10%) indicating its flexibility in treating SO{sub 2} tail gases as well as high concentration streams. The principal objective of the Phase 1 program is to identify and evaluate the performance of a catalyst which is robust and flexible with regard to choice of reducing gas. In order to achieve this goal, the authors have planned a structured program including: Market/process/cost/evaluation; Lab-scale catalyst preparation/optimization studies; Lab-scale, bulk/supported catalyst kinetic studies; Bench-scale catalyst/process studies; and Utility review. Progress is reported from all three organizations.

  4. Development of Efficient Flowsheet and Transient Modeling for Nuclear Heat Coupled Sulfur Iodine Cyclefor Hydrogen Production

    SciTech Connect

    Shripad T. Revankar; Nicholas R. Brown; Cheikhou Kane; Seungmin Oh

    2010-05-01

    The realization of the hydrogen as an energy carrier for future power sources relies on a practical method of producing hydrogen in large scale with no emission of green house gases. Hydrogen is an energy carrier which can be produced by a thermochemical water splitting process. The Sulfur-Iodine (SI) process is an example of a water splitting method using iodine and sulfur as recycling agents.

  5. Metabolism of sulfur amino acids in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, D; Surdin-Kerjan, Y

    1997-01-01

    Sulfur amino acid biosynthesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae involves a large number of enzymes required for the de novo biosynthesis of methionine and cysteine and the recycling of organic sulfur metabolites. This review summarizes the details of these processes and analyzes the molecular data which have been acquired in this metabolic area. Sulfur biochemistry appears not to be unique through terrestrial life, and S. cerevisiae is one of the species of sulfate-assimilatory organisms possessing a larger set of enzymes for sulfur metabolism. The review also deals with several enzyme deficiencies that lead to a nutritional requirement for organic sulfur, although they do not correspond to defects within the biosynthetic pathway. In S. cerevisiae, the sulfur amino acid biosynthetic pathway is tightly controlled: in response to an increase in the amount of intracellular S-adenosylmethionine (AdoMet), transcription of the coregulated genes is turned off. The second part of the review is devoted to the molecular mechanisms underlying this regulation. The coordinated response to AdoMet requires two cis-acting promoter elements. One centers on the sequence TCACGTG, which also constitutes a component of all S. cerevisiae centromeres. Situated upstream of the sulfur genes, this element is the binding site of a transcription activation complex consisting of a basic helix-loop-helix factor, Cbf1p, and two basic leucine zipper factors, Met4p and Met28p. Molecular studies have unraveled the specific functions for each subunit of the Cbf1p-Met4p-Met28p complex as well as the modalities of its assembly on the DNA. The Cbf1p-Met4p-Met28p complex contains only one transcription activation module, the Met4p subunit. Detailed mutational analysis of Met4p has elucidated its functional organization. In addition to its activation and bZIP domains, Met4p contains two regulatory domains, called the inhibitory region and the auxiliary domain. When the level of intracellular AdoMet increases, the transcription activation function of Met4 is prevented by Met30p, which binds to the Met4 inhibitory region. In addition to the Cbf1p-Met4p-Met28p complex, transcriptional regulation involves two zinc finger-containing proteins, Met31p and Met32p. The AdoMet-mediated control of the sulfur amino acid pathway illustrates the molecular strategies used by eucaryotic cells to couple gene expression to metabolic changes. PMID:9409150

  6. Pressure-Induced Phase Transitions, Amorphization and Metallization in Sulfur.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Huan

    Physical and chemical properties of molecular system of sulfur have been studied under high pressures up to 212 GPa using a variety of modern experimental techniques, including energy-dispersive x-ray diffraction (EDXD) using a synchrotron source, micro-Raman spectroscopy, optical absorption and optical reflection in combination with the diamond anvil cell techniques. This work studies pressure -induced crystallographic structural transitions, electronic band structure changes, amorphization, metallization and molecular dissociation, as well as the physical reasons for these changes. This thesis brings the following results on sulfur (initially S_8) to the public: an orthorhombic to monoclinic phase transition at 5.3 GPa, a crystal to amorphous transition at 25 GPa, a recrystallization process starting at 37 GPa and completing at 78 GPa, an insulator to metal transition at 95 GPa accompanied by a first-order structural transition to a base-centered orthorhombic structure with 4 atom per unit cell, and finally, a transition to a 6-fold coordinated monatomic beta-Po phase at 162 GPa with one atom per unit cell. The mechanisms of pressure-induced amorphization and metallization have been proposed. A puzzling problem with sulfur in which a weak conducting behavior was observed in the resistivity vs temperature experiments around 50 GPa, although the present optical data showed no metallic behavior until 95 GPa, has been explained. The micro-Raman spectroscopic experiments on sulfur using very low laser power have demonstrated the laser heating and photo-reaction problems in sulfur and their relation to the previously reported phase transitions. The physical reason for the phase transition in sulfur caused by laser heating was first proposed in this thesis work. The phase transition to the beta-Po structure in sulfur at 162 GPa is the first experimental result in which a structural determination has been made for the low-atomic -number materials above 100 GPa. With the observation of the beta-Po phase in sulfur, the similarity in the transition sequence among the Group VIb elements S, Se and Te in their metallic phases is confirmed up to the beta-Po phase. Also included in the thesis work are the theoretical calculations on the mechanical properties of diamond, diamond anvil and carbon-carbon bond under compression. Through calculations the states of stress and strain in a loaded diamond anvil have been approximately obtained which are used to study the ultimate yield strength of diamond at ultra high pressures. Using finite elastic strain energy theory, potentials for stretching and bending of the aliphatic carbon bonds are obtained and compared with that of the molecular mechanics force field theory.

  7. Nitrogen-sulfur compounds in stratospheric aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farlow, N. H.; Snetsinger, K. G.; Hayes, D. M.; Lem, H. Y.; Tooper, B. M.

    1978-01-01

    Two forms of nitrosyl sulfuric acid (NOHSO4 and NOHS2O7) have been tentatively identified in stratospheric aerosols. The first of these can be formed either directly from gas reactions of NO2 with SO2 or by gas-particle interactions between NO2 and H2SO4. The second product may form when SO3 is involved. Estimates based on these reactions suggest that the maximum quantity of NO that might be absorbed in stratospheric aerosols could vary from one-third to twice the amount of NO in the surrounding air. If these reactions occur in the stratosphere, then a mechanism exists for removing nitrogen oxides from that region by aerosol particle fallout. This process may typify another natural means that helps cleanse the lower stratosphere of excessive pollutants.

  8. Need total sulfur content? Use chemiluminescence

    SciTech Connect

    Kubala, S.W.; Campbell, D.N. [Fluid Data, Inc., Angleton, TX (United States); DiSanzo, F.P. [Mobil Technology Co., Paulsboro, NJ (United States)

    1996-09-01

    Regulations issued by the United States Environmental Protection Agency require petroleum refineries to reduce or control the amount of total sulfur present in their refined products. These legislative requirements have led many refineries to search for online instrumentation that can produce accurate and repeatable total sulfur measurements within allowed levels. Several analytical methods currently exist to measure total sulfur content. They include X-ray fluorescence (XRF), microcoulometry, lead acetate tape, and pyrofluorescence techniques. Sulfur-specific chemiluminescence detection (SSCD) has recently received much attention due to its linearity, selectivity, sensitivity, and equimolar response. However, its use has been largely confined to the area of gas chromatography. This article focuses on the special design considerations and analytical utility of an SSCD system developed to determine total sulfur content in gasoline. The system exhibits excellent linearity and selectivity, the ability to detect low minimum levels, and an equimolar response to various sulfur compounds. 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Reduction of sulfuric acid by natural gas

    SciTech Connect

    Kogtev, S.E.; Nikandrov, I.S.

    1987-12-01

    The reduction of sulfuric acid to sulfur dioxide was studied to obtain a higher yield of sulfur dioxide. The reactions which take place in the presence of excess methane were listed. Gibbs energy reactions were presented showing the thermodynamic probability for the occurrence of the reactions within a wide temperature range. Gas analysis for the content of sulfur and carbon dioxides, methane hydrogen, hydrogen sulfate, and carbon monoxide was performed chromatographically using a katharometer and sequential columns packed with Polysorb 1 and NaX zeolite. It was shown that through high-temperature reduction of sulfuric acid by natural gas, the yield of sulfur dioxide could be raised to 100% at 1173 K.

  10. Oxygen and sulfur interactions with a clean iron surface and the effect of rubbing contact on these interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, D. H.

    1973-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to determine the nature of the chemical interactions of oxygen and sulfur with iron when surfaces are stationary and also during sliding in a vacuum environment. Various gases that contained sulfur, oxygen, or both were adsorbed to iron at 23 C. The gases included oxygen, hydrogen sulfide, methyl mercaptan, and sulfur dioxide. Friction experiments were conducted with a hemispherical rider sliding on a rotating disk. An Auger cylindrical mirror analyzer was used to monitor the iron surface chemistry. The results of this study indicate that oxygen will completely displace sulfide films from iron surfaces. Organic thiols containing sulfur, such as methyl mercaptan, adsorb to an iron surface dissociatively. Only sulfur is detected on the iron surface. Sliding inhibits the formation of sulfide films on iron with the adsorption of hydrogen sulfide and methyl mercaptan. With oxygen and sulfur dioxide, the sliding process does not affect adsorption behavior.

  11. A combined proteomic and transcriptomic analysis on sulfur metabolism pathways of Arabidopsis thaliana under simulated acid rain.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tingwu; Chen, Juan A; Wang, Wenhua; Simon, Martin; Wu, Feihua; Hu, Wenjun; Chen, Juan B; Zheng, Hailei

    2014-01-01

    With rapid economic development, most regions in southern China have suffered acid rain (AR) pollution. In our study, we analyzed the changes in sulfur metabolism in Arabidopsis under simulated AR stress which provide one of the first case studies, in which the systematic responses in sulfur metabolism were characterized by high-throughput methods at different levels including proteomic, genomic and physiological approaches. Generally, we found that all of the processes related to sulfur metabolism responded to AR stress, including sulfur uptake, activation and also synthesis of sulfur-containing amino acid and other secondary metabolites. Finally, we provided a catalogue of the detected sulfur metabolic changes and reconstructed the coordinating network of their mutual influences. This study can help us to understand the mechanisms of plants to adapt to AR stress. PMID:24595051

  12. Sulfur Contents of Planetary and Protoplanetary Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, A. J.

    2009-12-01

    Sulfur is an important component of protoplanetary cores, as indicated by the presence of sulfides in iron meteorites, as well as the trace element distributions within iron groups that indicate a fractional crystallization process between metal and coexisting sulfide melt. However, sulfur in the Earth’s core is expected to be limited to 2 percent or lower, as indicated by the volatility trend of elements in the bulk Earth (Dreibus and Palme, 1996; McDonough, 2003). This follows an assumption that the order of element volatilities determined in condensation calculations for the solar nebula is also appropriate to the devolatilization of planetary bodies such as the Earth, although planets may have devolatilized by non-nebular processes. The assumption can be evaluated by applying the same logic to the iron meteorites as has been applied to the Earth; the irons exhibit volatility depletions among trace siderophile elements that are similar or greater than the volatile depletions in Earth. Estimates of S content in parent metallic melts have been reported for the IIAB, IID, IIIAB, IVA, and IVB iron meteorite groups (e.g., Chabot, 2004; Wasson and Huber, 2006). Although there are discrepancies between some models, in most cases one finds that the cosmochemical estimates of S abundance in these protoplanetary cores are significantly higher than would be expected on the basis of their volatility trends. For example, CI-normalized S/Ge ratios exceed 100 in some cases. Unless the crystallization models applied to the iron meteorite groups are inaccurate, the assumptions behind the construction of the volatility trends appear to be violated for S in protoplanets (and by extension larger planets, including Earth). Hence, it remains plausible on cosmochemical grounds that Earth’s core is S-rich. Gas speciation and partial pressures in the impact plumes produced during planet formation are very different than those in the low-density, hydrogen-rich solar nebula, and should generate a different volatilization-condensation sequence.

  13. Project for laboratory study for removal of organic sulfur from coal

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-01-15

    Major accomplishments are listed: 1. It was found that molten sodium hydroxide (in place of mixed sodium and potassium hydroxides) followed by dilute sulfuric acid wash gave Gravimelt coal with the usual amount of sulfur and mineral matter removal but there was no MAF heat content loss over the small amount required for replacement of sulfur atoms by oxygen atoms in the coal structure - e.g., these samples had both measured heat content and MAF heat content in excess of 1400 Btu/lb. Therefore, the selectivity of the Gravimelt Process appears to be very high. 2. It was found that demineralized and desulfurizd Gravimelt coal has significantly less alkali metals content than the input coal. 3. Kentucky No. 11 coal was reduced in sulfur content to a level of 0.10 lbs of sulfur (0.20 lbs of sulfur dioxide)/10/sup 6/ Btu with an ash content of 0.21% in a cumulative reaction time of 60 minutes. This represents a 96% reduction in sulfur and a 97% reduction in ash. This product is significantly lower in sulfur content and ash than are typical synthetic or conventional liquid boiler fuels. 4. The Gravimelt Process was tested on Illinois No. 6 coal giving essentially identical results to those previously obtained for the Kentucky No. 11 coal under the same conditions (89% reduction in sulfur and 97% reduction in ash). 5. A technology for the regeneration of spent caustic has been identified within the tanning industry which corresponds to most of our Gravimelt Process requirements.

  14. Ceramic-metal seals for advanced battery systems. [sodium sulfur and lithium sulfur batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, L.

    1978-01-01

    The search for materials which are electrochemically compatible with the lithium sulfur and sodium sulfur systems is discussed. The use liquid or braze alloys, titanium hydrite coatings, and tungsten yttria for bonding beryllium with ceramic is examined.

  15. HYDROCARBON AND SULFUR SENSORS FOR SOFC SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    A.M. Azad; Chris Holt; Todd Lesousky; Scott Swartz

    2003-11-01

    The following report summarizes work conducted during the Phase I program Hydrocarbon and Sulfur Sensors for SOFC Systems under contract No. DE-FC26-02NT41576. For the SOFC application, sensors are required to monitor hydrocarbons and sulfur in order to increase the operation life of SOFC components. This report discusses the development of two such sensors, one based on thick film approach for sulfur monitoring and the second galvanic based for hydrocarbon monitoring.

  16. Pyrolysis of high sulfur Indian coals

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. P. Baruah; Puja Khare

    2007-01-01

    Pyrolysis experiments under laboratory conditions for five numbers of high sulfur coal samples from the states of Meghalaya and Nagaland, India, were carried out at temperatures of 450, 600, 850, and 1000{sup o}C, respectively. The yield of products and thermal release of sulfur from these coals are investigated. The distribution of sulfur in the pyrolyzed products, i.e., char\\/coke, gas, and

  17. The use of sulfur in dermatology.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Aditya K; Nicol, Karyn

    2004-01-01

    Sulfur has antifungal, antibacterial, and keratolytic activity. In the past, its use was widespread in dermatological disorders such as acne vulgaris, rosacea, seborrheic dermatitis, dandruff, pityriasis versicolor, scabies, and warts. Adverse events associated with topically applied sulfur are rare and mainly involve mild application site reactions. Sulfur, used alone or in combination with agents such as sodium sulfacetamide or salicylic acid, has demonstrated efficacy in the treatment of many dermatological conditions. PMID:15303787

  18. Structural insight into the mode of interactions of SoxL from Allochromatium vinosum in the global sulfur oxidation cycle.

    PubMed

    Bagchi, Angshuman

    2012-12-01

    Microbial redox reactions of inorganic sulfur compounds are one of the important reactions for the recycling of sulfur to maintain the environmental sulfur balance. These reactions are carried out by phylogenetically diverse microorganisms. The sulfur oxidizing gene cluster (sox) of ?-proteobacteria, Allochromatium vinosum comprises two divergently transcribed units. The central players of this process are SoxY, SoxZ and SoxL. SoxY is sulfur compound binder which binds to sulfur anions with the help of SoxZ. SoxL is a rhodanese like protein, which then cleaves off the sulfur substrate from the SoxYZ complex to recycle the SoxY and SoxZ. In the present work, homology modeling has been employed to build the three dimensional structures of SoxY, SoxZ and SoxL. With the help of docking simulations the amino acid residues of these proteins involved in the interactions have been identified. The interactions between the SoxY, SoxZ and SoxL proteins are mediated mainly through hydrogen bonding. Strong positive fields created by the SoxZ and SoxL proteins are found to be responsible for the binding and removal of the sulfur anion. The probable biochemical mechanism of sulfur anion oxidation process has been identified. PMID:23053932

  19. New correlations predict physical properties of elemental sulfur

    SciTech Connect

    Shuai, X.; Meisen, A. [Univ. of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada)

    1995-10-16

    Until now, elemental sulfur`s physical properties have not been systematically correlated. Simple tools for predicting these properties are necessary, especially for engineering calculations, because sulfur is widely used industrially. Newly developed correlations use temperature to estimate sulfur`s density, specific heat, vapor pressure, viscosity, and thermal conductivity.

  20. Bioleaching of metals from sewage sludge: Elemental sulfur recovery

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. R. Ravishankar; J. F. Blais; H. Benmoussa; R. D. Tyagi

    2009-01-01

    Heavy metal leaching by sulfur-oxidizing bacteria, one of the most promising sludge detoxification methods, uses elemental sulfur as a microbial energy substrate. The addition of elemental sulfur in a powdered form makes it impossible to recover unused sulfur and can promote microbial reacidification of disposed sludge. Hence, recoverable forms of sulfur are preferred. The purpose of the present study was

  1. SELECTIVE REMOVAL OF ORGANIC SULFUR FROM COAL BY PERCHLOROETHYLENE EXTRACTION

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sunggyu Lee; Sunil K. Kesavan; Byung G. Lee; Amit Ghosh; Conrad J. Kulik

    1989-01-01

    Desulfurization of coal involves the removal of both the inorganic and organic forms of sulfur. Several physical methods are available for the removal of inorganic sulfur which is normally represented by pyritic and sulfatic sulfur. Removal of organic sulfur requires the use of chemical cleaning methods. This paper presents the results of an organic sulfur removal technique which employs an

  2. Sulfur metabolism in higher plants: potential for phytoremediation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Wilfried H. O. Ernst

    1998-01-01

    Sulfur is a major nutrient for all organisms. Plant species have a high biodiversity in uptake, metabolization and accumulation of sulfur so that there are potentials to use plants for phytoremediation of sulfur-enriched sites. A survey of soils enriched with sulfur either naturally or by human activities shows that a surplus of sulfur is mostly accompanied with a surplus of

  3. Control of Sulfur Dioxide Emissions from Pulverized Coal-Fired Boilers by Dry Removal with Lime and Limestone Sorbants

    E-print Network

    Schwartz, M. H.

    1979-01-01

    pulverized coal-fired boiler equipment. These are: (1) coal cleaning to remove pyritic sulfur, (2) conventional wet, nonregenerable scrubbing with alkaline slurry and solution processes, and (3) dry processes which involve direct introduction of lime...

  4. Control of Sulfur Dioxide Emissions from Pulverized Coal-Fired Boilers by Dry Removal with Lime and Limestone Sorbants 

    E-print Network

    Schwartz, M. H.

    1979-01-01

    pulverized coal-fired boiler equipment. These are: (1) coal cleaning to remove pyritic sulfur, (2) conventional wet, nonregenerable scrubbing with alkaline slurry and solution processes, and (3) dry processes which involve direct introduction of lime...

  5. Application of electrochemical investigation methods in high sulfur coal flotation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu Hong; Ou Zeshen; Shi Xiuping; Shen Yanchun [China Univ. of Mining and Technology (China)

    1997-12-31

    More and more attention has been paid to sulfur dioxide pollution caused by coal burning. It is important that sulfur in coal should be reduced before combustion. Flotation is an important method for the removal of pyrite from high sulfur coal. Many chemicals have been tested as a pyrite depressant. In recent years many tests have been done in the laboratory on the flotation behavior of pyrite, and the results have confirmed that the hydrophobicity of the pyrite surface is dependent on the redox potential of the pulp. The mechanism and the reaction products on the pyrite surface are discussed under various conditions. And pyrite depression in coal flotation by electrochemical control are further studied on the basis of what has been achieved. There are two methods in electrochemical control: chemical reagent and control potential by electrochemical instrument (``control potential`` for short). This paper studies pyrite depression in coal flotation by electrochemical control. The influence of sulfur removal in coal flotation has been probed by chemical reagent and control potential. Experiment shows that at low pulp potential the pyrite flotation is generally suppressed. This is new, efficient and simple method of pyrite depression without environmental pollution. The following main conclusions can be drawn from this study: (1) The control of pulp potential can regulate and lead to electrochemical reaction of the hydrophobicity or hydrophilicity on the pyrite surface; and (2) The characteristics of electrochemical methods are normal atmospheric temperature, simple technological process and strong selection.

  6. Control of Oxidative Sulfur Metabolism of Chlorobium limicola forma thiosulfatophilum.

    PubMed

    Cork, D; Mathers, J; Maka, A; Srnak, A

    1985-02-01

    A metered blend of anaerobic-grade N(2), CO(2), and H(2)S gases was introduced into an illuminated, 800-ml liquid volume, continuously stirred tank reactor. The system, described as an anaerobic gas-to-liquid phase fed-batch reactor, was used to investigate the effects of H(2)S flow rate and light energy on the accumulation of oxidized sulfur compounds formed by the photoautotroph Chlorobium limicola forma thiosulfatophilum during growth. Elemental sulfur was formed and accumulated in stoichiometric quantities when light energy and H(2)S molar flow rate levels were optimally adjusted in the presence of nonlimiting CO(2). Deviation from the optimal H(2)S and light energy levels resulted in either oxidation of sulfur or complete inhibition of sulfide oxidation. Based on these observations, a model of sulfide and sulfur oxidases electrochemically coupled to the photosynthetic reaction center of Chlorobium spp. is presented. The dynamic deregulation of oxidative pathways may be a mechanism for supplying the photosynthetic reaction center with a continuous source of electrons during periods of varying light and substrate availability, as in pond ecosystems where Chlorobium spp. are found. Possible applications for a sulfide gas removal process are discussed. PMID:16346713

  7. Chemical desulfurization of coal: Partitioning sulfur to gas as H{sub 2}S

    SciTech Connect

    Stencel, J.M.; Neathery, J.K.; Yang, J. [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States)

    1994-12-31

    The yields and characteristics of products from mild temperature gasification or pyrolysis of coal have been evaluated extensively in fundamental and process development efforts. At 500{degrees}C, the following has been presented as representing the sulfur product distribution from US bituminous coals: (1) Total sulfur in gas = 0 31 x S{sub coal}. Total sulfur in tar = 0:06 x S{sub coal}. Total sulfur in solid = 0.61 x S{sub coal}. This type of distribution is affected by factors such as coal type, sulfur content and form, particle size, heating rates, temperature of pyrolysis, reactor and process design, and the type of reactants to which the coal is subjected. For example, increasing the pyrolysis residence time usually decreases the sulfur content in the char and increases the tar and gas yields and their sulfur content. As indicated above, and in other mild temperature gasification studies of low-to-high sulfur coals at temperatures between 400-825{degrees}C, the coal sulfur was distributed nonselectively to all products. As a consequence, the upgrading required to meet environmental regulations has to be applied to more diverse products than the coal from which the products were derived. The severity of such upgrading, and the severity to which coal has to be treated to release all of its sulfur, depends on the chemical form of the sulfur. Recent analytical efforts have begun to define these sulfur forms in coal, the most refractory organic species of which are thiophenic in nature. In the current study, the mild temperature pyrolysis of Illinois basin coals mixed with phosphoric acid under continuous-feed, bench-scale fluidized bed conditions at 500{degrees}C is reported. The extent of sulfur removal and its partitioning to gas as H{sub 2}S are discussed in relation to its chemical form in the coal. Swilling characteristics of coal/acid mixtures are also discussed relative to operation of the fluidized bed reactor.

  8. Sulfur in lunar mare basalts as a function of bulk composition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, E. K., Jr.; Brett, R.; Andrawes, F.

    1977-01-01

    Sulfur abundances and metallic iron abundances in 18 Apollo 12 mare basalts were determined. No correlation between sulfur abundance and metallic iron content was detected; metallic iron abundances are not primarily caused by S loss. Sulfur abundances, directly related to the bulk composition of the rocks and especially to the TiO2 content, increase with increasing degrees of fractionation and appear to result from S concentration in the melts during fractionation. Unlike the Apollo 17 melts, the Apollo 12 melts were unsaturated with respect to sulfide. Composition appears to control S content for Apollo 17 basalts, and cumulus processes may cause Fe-FeS enrichment.

  9. Chemistry of Sulfur Oxides on Transition Metals. II. Thermodynamics of Sulfur Oxides on Platinum(111)

    E-print Network

    Lin, Xi

    Chemistry of Sulfur Oxides on Transition Metals. II. Thermodynamics of Sulfur Oxides on Platinum-containing molecules on transition metal catalysts has been of interest to scientists for more than 2 decades.1. How- ever, sulfur chemistry on transition metal surfaces is so complicated that it remains far from

  10. In situ desulfurization during combustion of high-sulfur coals added with sulfur capture sorbents

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lian Zhang; Atsushi Sato; Yoshihiko Ninomiya; Eiji Sasaoka

    2003-01-01

    Two Chinese coals, added with two types of sulfur capture sorbents, were combusted in a drop tube furnace to investigate effect of reaction temperature on sulfur removal during coal combustion. Limestone was used as sorbent and mixed with coal physically for sulfur removal. In addition, another sorbent, calcium acetate, synthesized from natural limestone, was also used for in situ removal

  11. Stable Sulfur Isotopic Evidence for Historical Changes of Sulfur Cycling in Estuarine Sediments from Northern Florida

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Volker Brüchert; Lisa M. Pratt

    1999-01-01

    Data on abundance and isotopic composition of porewater and sedimentary sulfur species are reported for relatively uncontaminated and highly contaminated fine-grained anoxic sediments of St. Andrew Bay, Florida. A strong contrast in amount and composition of sedimentary organic matter at the two sites allows a comparative study of the historical effects of increased organic loading on sulfur cycling and sulfur

  12. Liquid redox sulfur recovery options, costs, and environmental considerations for the natural gas industry

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. A. Dalrymple; W. Trofe

    1988-01-01

    Liquid redox chemistry has been employed for sulfur removal and recovery applications since the 1950's. The first process to be used commercially was the Stretford process, which was used extensively in the United States in the 1960's as a replacement for the iron sponge process in the treatment of sour town gas. In recent years, the Stretford process has been

  13. ECONOMICS OF NITROGEN OXIDES, SULFUR OXIDES, AND ASH CONTROL SYSTEMS FOR COAL-FIRED UTILITY POWER PLANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of an EPA-sponsored economic evaluation of three processes to reduce NOx, SO2, and ash emissions from coal-fired utility power plants: one based on 3.5% sulfur eastern bituminous coal; and the other, on 0.7% sulfur western subbituminous coal. NOx control ...

  14. Control of air pollution emissions from molybdenum roasting. Volume 2. Alternatives for control of weak sulfur dioxide emissions. Final report

    Microsoft Academic Search

    N. H. Masarky; R. D. Delleney; K. Schwitzgebel; T. P. Nelson; R. L. Glover

    1983-01-01

    This report covers the second phase of a three phase effort evaluating (1) characterization of particulate control of a molybdenum sulfide roasters, (2) assessment of sulfur dioxide abatement alternatives for nonferrous smelting and, in particular, for molybdenum roasting, and (3) pilot testing of the magnesia slurry process for sulfur dioxide control. It describes the results of a survey and evaluation

  15. Contemporaneous early diagenetic formation of organic and inorganic sulfur in estuarine sediments from St. Andrew Bay, Florida, USA

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Volker Brüchert; Lisa M. Pratt

    1996-01-01

    Estuarine sediment samples were collected from nine stations in St. Andrew Bay near Panama City, Florida, USA. Contrasting grain size and varying concentration of organic carbon allowed a comparative study of the relationships among organic degradation processes, sulfur cycling, and diagenetic removal of dissolved sulfide produced by bacterial sulfate reduction. Abundance and sulfur isotopic composition were determined for dissolved sulfide,

  16. Advanced Byproduct Recovery: Direct Catalytic Reduction of Sulfur Dioxide to Elemental Sulfur. Sixth quarterly technical progress report, January - March 1997

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1997-03-01

    More than 170 wet scrubber systems applied, to 72,000 MW of U.S., coal-fired, utility boilers are in operation or under construction. In these systems, the sulfur dioxide removed from the boiler flue gas is permanently bound to a sorbent material, such as lime or limestone. The sulfated sorbent must be disposed of as a waste product or, in some cases, sold as a byproduct (e.g. gypsum). Due to the abundance and low cost of naturally occurring gypsum, and the costs associated with producing an industrial quality product, less than 7% of these scrubbers are configured to produce usable gypsum (and only 1% of all units actually sell the byproduct). The disposal of solid waste from each of these scrubbers requires a landfill area of approximately 200 to 400 acres. In the U.S., a total of 19 million tons of disposable FGD byproduct are produced, transported and disposed of in landfills annually. The use of regenerable sorbent technologies has the potential to reduce or eliminate solid waste production, transportation and disposal. In a regenerable sorbent system, the sulfur dioxide in the boiler flue gas is removed by the sorbent in an adsorber. The S0{sub 2}s subsequently released, in higher concentration, in a regenerator. All regenerable systems produce an off-gas stream from the regenerator that must be processed further in order to obtain a salable byproduct, such as elemental sulfur, sulfuric acid or liquid S0{sub 2}.

  17. Advanced Byproduct Recovery: Direct Catalytic Reduction of Sulfur Dioxide to Elemental Sulfur. Fifth quarterly technical progress report, December 1996

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1996-12-01

    More than 170 wet scrubber systems applied, to 72,000 MW of U.S., coal-fired, utility boilers are in operation or under construction. In these systems, the sulfur dioxide removed from the boiler flue gas is permanently bound to a sorbent material, such as lime or limestone. The sulfated sorbent must be disposed of as a waste product or, in some cases, sold as a byproduct (e.g. gypsum). Due to the abundance and low cost of naturally occurring gypsum, and the costs associated with producing an industrial quality product, less than 7% of these scrubbers are configured to produce usable gypsum (and only 1% of all units actually sell the byproduct). The disposal of solid waste from each of these scrubbers requires a landfill area of approximately 200 to 400 acres. In the U.S., a total of 19 million tons of disposable FGD byproduct are produced, transported and disposed of in landfills annually. The use of regenerable sorbent technologies has the potential to reduce or eliminate solid waste production, transportation and disposal. In a regenerable sorbent system, the sulfur dioxide in the boiler flue gas is removed by the sorbent in an adsorber. The S0{sub 2}s subsequently released, in higher concentration, in a regenerator. All regenerable systems produce an off-gas stream from the regenerator that must be processed further in order to obtain a salable byproduct, such as elemental sulfur, sulfuric acid or liquid S0{sub 2}.

  18. Design and operation of the coke-oven gas sulfur removal facility at Geneva Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Havili, M.U.; Fraser-Smyth, L.L.; Wood, B.W. [Geneva Steel, Provo, UT (United States)

    1996-02-01

    The coke-oven gas sulfur removal facility at Geneva Steel utilizes a combination of two technologies which had never been used together. These two technologies had proven effective separately and now in combination. However, it brought unique operational considerations which has never been considered previously. The front end of the facility is a Sulfiban process. This monoethanolamine (MEA) process effectively absorbs hydrogen sulfide and other acid gases from coke-oven gas. The final step in sulfur removal uses a Lo-Cat II. The Lo-Cat process absorbs and subsequently oxidizes H{sub 2}S to elemental sulfur. These two processes have been effective in reducing sulfur dioxide emissions from coke-oven gas by 95%. Since the end of the start-up and optimization phase, emission rate has stayed below the 104.5 lb/hr limit of equivalent SO{sub 2} (based on a 24-hr average). In Jan. 1995, the emission rate from the sulfur removal facility averaged 86.7 lb/hr with less than 20 lb/hr from the Econobator exhaust. The challenges yet to be met are decreasing the operating expenses of the sulfur removal facility, notably chemical costs, and minimizing the impact of the heating system on unit reliability.

  19. A Thermodynamic Model of Sulfur Distribution Ratio between CaO-SiO2-MgO-FeO-MnO-Al2O3 Slags and Molten Steel during LF Refining Process Based on the Ion and Molecule Coexistence Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xue-Min; Shi, Cheng-Bin; Zhang, Meng; Chai, Guo-Ming; Wang, Fei

    2011-12-01

    A thermodynamic model for calculating the sulfur distribution ratio between ladle furnace (LF) refining slags and molten steel has been developed by coupling with a developed thermodynamic model for calculating the mass action concentrations of structural units in LF refining slags, i.e., CaO-SiO2-MgO-FeO-MnO-Al2O3 hexabasic slags, based on the ion and molecule coexistence theory (IMCT). The calculated mass action concentrations of structural units in CaO-SiO2-MgO-FeO-Al2O3-MnO slags equilibrated or reacted with molten steel show that the calculated equilibrium mole numbers or mass action concentrations of structural units or ion couples, rather than mass percentage of components, in the slags can represent their reaction abilities. The calculated total sulfur distribution ratio shows a reliable agreement with the measured or the calculated sulfur distribution ratio between the slags and molten steel by other models under the condition of choosing oxygen activity based on (FeO)-[O] equilibrium. Meanwhile, the developed thermodynamic model for calculating sulfur distribution ratio can quantitatively determine the respective contribution of free CaO, MgO, FeO, and MnO in the LF refining slags. A significant difference of desulfurization ability among free component as CaO, MgO, FeO, and MnO has been found with approximately 87-93 pct, 11.43-5.85 pct, 0.81-0.60 pct and 0.30-0.27 pct at both middle and final stages during LF refining process, respectively. A large difference of oxygen activity is found in molten steel at the slag-metal interface and in bulk molten steel. The oxygen activity in molten steel at the slag-metal interface is controlled by (FeO)-[O] equilibrium, whereas the oxygen activity in bulk molten steel is controlled by [Al]-[O] equilibrium. Decreasing the high-oxygen-activity boundary layer beneath the slag-metal interface can promote the desulfurization reaction rate effectively or shorten the refining period during the LF refining process.

  20. UHPLC UHD Q-TOF MS/MS analysis of the impact of sulfur fumigation on the chemical profile of Codonopsis Radix (Dangshen).

    PubMed

    Ma, Xiao-qing; Leung, Alexander Kai Man; Chan, Chi Leung; Su, Tao; Li, Wei-dong; Li, Su-mei; Fong, David Wang Fun; Yu, Zhi-Ling

    2014-01-21

    Over recent decades sulfur fumigation has been becoming abused in processing some freshly harvested Chinese medicinal herbs, although it is questioned whether sulfur fumigation can result in changes in efficacy and safety of the herbs. One of the herbs commonly processed by sulfur fumigation is Codonopsis Radix (Dangshen). A report showed that lobetyolin content in sulfur-fumigated Dangshen was lower than in air-dried Dangshen. Whereas there is no investigation designed to compare the chemical profiles of the sulfur-fumigated Dangshen and the air-dried Dangshen. In the present study, a rapid and versatile ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with ultra-high resolution quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UHPLC UHD Q-TOF MS/MS) method was developed for comprehensive analysis of the chemical profiles of sulfur-fumigated and air-dried Dangshen samples. Principal component analysis (PCA) and partial least squares-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) demonstrated that there were significant chemical differences between sulfur-fumigated and air-dried Dangshen samples. Among the changed components, 57 compounds were identified, in which 15 sulfur-containing compounds were detected only in sulfur-fumigated samples. The established methods were successfully applied to discriminate sulfur-fumigated Dangshen among commercial samples. Whether the chemical changes caused by sulfur fumigation affect the clinical efficacy and safety of Dangshen needs to be further investigated. PMID:24286102

  1. Sulfur species as redox partners and electron shuttles for ferrihydrite reduction by Sulfurospirillum deleyianum.

    PubMed

    Lohmayer, Regina; Kappler, Andreas; Lösekann-Behrens, Tina; Planer-Friedrich, Britta

    2014-05-01

    Iron(III) (oxyhydr)oxides can represent the dominant microbial electron acceptors under anoxic conditions in many aquatic environments, which makes understanding the mechanisms and processes regulating their dissolution and transformation particularly important. In a previous laboratory-based study, it has been shown that 0.05 mM thiosulfate can reduce 6 mM ferrihydrite indirectly via enzymatic reduction of thiosulfate to sulfide by the sulfur-reducing bacterium Sulfurospirillum deleyianum, followed by abiotic reduction of ferrihydrite coupled to reoxidation of sulfide. Thiosulfate, elemental sulfur, and polysulfides were proposed as reoxidized sulfur species functioning as electron shuttles. However, the exact electron transfer pathway remained unknown. Here, we present a detailed analysis of the sulfur species involved. Apart from thiosulfate, substoichiometric amounts of sulfite, tetrathionate, sulfide, or polysulfides also initiated ferrihydrite reduction. The portion of thiosulfate produced during abiotic ferrihydrite-dependent reoxidation of sulfide was about 10% of the total sulfur at maximum. The main abiotic oxidation product was elemental sulfur attached to the iron mineral surface, which indicates that direct contact between microorganisms and ferrihydrite is necessary to maintain the iron reduction process. Polysulfides were not detected in the liquid phase. Minor amounts were found associated either with microorganisms or the mineral phase. The abiotic oxidation of sulfide in the reaction with ferrihydrite was identified as rate determining. Cysteine, added as a sulfur source and a reducing agent, also led to abiotic ferrihydrite reduction and therefore should be eliminated when sulfur redox reactions are investigated. Overall, we could demonstrate the large impact of intermediate sulfur species on biogeochemical iron transformations. PMID:24632263

  2. Toward Understanding the Effect of Nuclear Waste Glass Composition on Sulfur Solubility

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Vienna, John D.; Kim, Dong-Sang; Muller, I. S.; Kruger, Albert A.; Piepel, Gregory F.

    2014-10-01

    The concentration of sulfur in nuclear waste glass melter feed must be maintained below the point where salt accumulates on the melt surface. The allowable concentrations may range from 0.37 to over 2.05 weight percent (of SO3 on a calcined oxide basis) depending on the composition of the melter feed and processing conditions. If the amount of sulfur exceeds the melt tolerance level, a molten salt will accumulate, which may upset melter operations and potentially shorten the useful life of the melter. At the Hanford site, relatively conservative limits have been placed on sulfur loading in melter feed, which inmore »turn significantly increases the amount of glass that will be produced. Crucible-scale sulfur solubility data and scaled melter sulfur tolerance data have been collected on simulated Hanford waste glasses over the last 15 years. These data were compiled and analyzed. A model was developed to predict the solubility of SO3 in glass based on 252 simulated Hanford low-activity waste (LAW) glass compositions. This model represents the data well, accounting for over 85% of the variation in data, and was well validated. The model was also found to accurately predict the tolerance for sulfur in melter feed for 13 scaled melter tests of simulated LAW glasses. The model can be used to help estimate glass volumes and make informed decisions on process options. The model also gives quantitative estimates of component concentration effects on sulfur solubility. The components that most increase sulfur solubility are Li2O > V2O5> CaO ? P2O5 > Na2O ? B2O3 > K2O. The components that most decrease sulfur solubility are Cl > Cr2O3 > Al2O3 > ZrO2 ? SnO2 > Others ? SiO2. The order of component effects is similar to previous literature data, in most cases.« less

  3. NONEQUILIBRIUM SULFUR CAPTURE & RETENTION IN AN AIR COOLED SLAGGING COAL COMBUSTOR

    SciTech Connect

    Bert Zauderer

    2003-04-21

    Calcium oxide injected in a slagging combustor reacts with the sulfur from coal combustion to form sulfur-bearing particles. The reacted particles impact and melt in the liquid slag layer on the combustor wall by the centrifugal force of the swirling combustion gases. Due to the low solubility of sulfur in slag, it must be rapidly drained from the combustor to limit sulfur gas re-evolution. Prior analyses and laboratory scale data indicated that for Coal Tech's 20 MMBtu/hour, air-cooled, slagging coal combustor slag mass flow rates in excess of 400 lb/hr should limit sulfur re-evolution. The objective of this 42-month project was to validate this sulfur-in-slag model in a group of combustor tests. A total of 36 days of testing on the combustor were completed during the period of performance of this project. This was more that double the 16 test days that were required in the original work statement. The extra tests were made possible by cost saving innovations that were made in the operation of the combustor test facility and in additional investment of Coal Tech resources in the test effort. The original project plan called for two groups of tests. The first group of tests involved the injection of calcium sulfate particles in the form of gypsum or plaster of Paris with the coal into the 20 MMBtu/hour-combustor. The second group of tests consisted of the entire two-step process, in which lime or limestone is co-injected with coal and reacts with the sulfur gas released during combustion to form calcium sulfate particles that impact and dissolve in the slag layer. Since this sulfur capture process has been validated in numerous prior tests in this combustor, the primary effort in the present project was on achieving the high slag flow rates needed to retain the sulfur in the slag.

  4. Sulfur Species as Redox Partners and Electron Shuttles for Ferrihydrite Reduction by Sulfurospirillum deleyianum

    PubMed Central

    Lohmayer, Regina; Kappler, Andreas; Lösekann-Behrens, Tina

    2014-01-01

    Iron(III) (oxyhydr)oxides can represent the dominant microbial electron acceptors under anoxic conditions in many aquatic environments, which makes understanding the mechanisms and processes regulating their dissolution and transformation particularly important. In a previous laboratory-based study, it has been shown that 0.05 mM thiosulfate can reduce 6 mM ferrihydrite indirectly via enzymatic reduction of thiosulfate to sulfide by the sulfur-reducing bacterium Sulfurospirillum deleyianum, followed by abiotic reduction of ferrihydrite coupled to reoxidation of sulfide. Thiosulfate, elemental sulfur, and polysulfides were proposed as reoxidized sulfur species functioning as electron shuttles. However, the exact electron transfer pathway remained unknown. Here, we present a detailed analysis of the sulfur species involved. Apart from thiosulfate, substoichiometric amounts of sulfite, tetrathionate, sulfide, or polysulfides also initiated ferrihydrite reduction. The portion of thiosulfate produced during abiotic ferrihydrite-dependent reoxidation of sulfide was about 10% of the total sulfur at maximum. The main abiotic oxidation product was elemental sulfur attached to the iron mineral surface, which indicates that direct contact between microorganisms and ferrihydrite is necessary to maintain the iron reduction process. Polysulfides were not detected in the liquid phase. Minor amounts were found associated either with microorganisms or the mineral phase. The abiotic oxidation of sulfide in the reaction with ferrihydrite was identified as rate determining. Cysteine, added as a sulfur source and a reducing agent, also led to abiotic ferrihydrite reduction and therefore should be eliminated when sulfur redox reactions are investigated. Overall, we could demonstrate the large impact of intermediate sulfur species on biogeochemical iron transformations. PMID:24632263

  5. New method of regenerating spent vacuum-carbonate sulfur removal liquor

    SciTech Connect

    Popov, A.A.; Dovgopol, A.P.; Goncharova, Z.S.; Belitskii, A.N,.; Gorokhov, N.N.; Grigorash, A.S.; Yaroshenko, A.K.

    1980-01-01

    A three-stage method is proposed for processing the ballast salts in the wash liquor from vacuum-carbonate removal of sulfur from coke-oven gas. The method is based on successive treatment of the liquor with sulfur dioxide, hydrogen sulfide and 95% sulfuric acid in the presence of hydrogen sulfide. The products of the process are thiosulfate, sulfate and elemental sulfur, at yields of 99.8%, 99.5% and 99.7% respectively. These investigations of a waste-free vacuum-carbonate method of removing hydrogen sulfide from coke-oven gas convincingly show that it is possible in principle to efficiently utilize the spent liquors both as a feedstock and as an absorbent and to obtain commercial products as a result.

  6. The first laboratory measurements of sulfur ions sputtering water ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galli, André; Pommerol, Antoine; Vorburger, Audrey; Wurz, Peter; Tulej, Marek; Scheer, Jürgen; Thomas, Nicolas; Wieser, Martin; Barabash, Stas

    2015-04-01

    The upcoming JUpiter ICy moons Explorer mission to Europa, Ganymede, and Callisto has renewed the interest in the interaction of plasma with an icy surface. In particular, the surface release processes on which exosphere models of icy moons rely should be tested with realistic laboratory experiments. We therefore use an existing laboratory facility for space hardware calibration in vacuum to measure the sputtering of water ice due to hydrogen, oxygen, and sulfur ions at energies from 1 keV to 100 keV. Pressure and temperature are comparable to surface conditions encountered on Jupiter's icy moons. The sputter target is a 1cm deep layer of porous, salty water ice. Our results confirm theoretical predictions that the sputter yield from oxygen and sulfur ions should be similar. Thanks to the modular set-up of our experiment we can add further surface processes relevant for icy moons, such as electron sputtering, sublimation, and photodesorption due to UV light.

  7. Sulfate- and Sulfur-Reducing Bacteria as Terrestrial Analogs for Microbial Life on Jupiter's Satellite Io

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pikuta, Elena V.; Hoover, Richard B.; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Observations from the Voyager and Galileo spacecraft have revealed Jupiter's moon Io to be the most volcanically active body of our Solar System. The Galileo Near Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (NIMS) detected extensive deposits of sulfur compounds, elemental sulfur and SO2 frost on the surface of Io. There are extreme temperature variations on Io's surface, ranging from -130 C to over 2000 C at the Pillan Patera volcanic vent. The active volcanoes, fumaroles, calderas, and lava lakes and vast sulfur deposits on this frozen moon indicate that analogs of sulfur- and sulfate-reducing bacteria might inhabit Io. Hence Io may have great significance to Astrobiology. Earth's life forms that depend on sulfur respiration are members of two domains: Bacteria and Archaea. Two basic links of the biogeochemical sulfur cycle of Earth have been studied: 1) the sulfur oxidizing process (occurring at aerobic conditions) and 2) the process of sulfur-reduction to hydrogen sulfide (anaerobic conditions). Sulfate-reducing bacteria (StRB) and sulfur-reducing bacteria (SrRB) are responsible for anaerobic reducing processes. At the present time the systematics of StRB include over 112 species distributed into 35 genera of Bacteria and Archaea. Moderately thermophilic and mesophilic SrRB belong to the Bacteria. The hyperthermophilic SrRB predominately belong to the domain Archaea and are included in the genera: Pyrodictium, Thermoproteus, Pyrobaculum, Thermophilum, Desulfurococcus, and Thermodiscus. The StRB and SrRB use a wide spectrum of substrates as electron donors for lithotrophic and heterotrophic type nutrition. The electron acceptors for the StRB include: sulfate, thiosulfate, sulfite, sulfur, arsenate, dithionite, tetrathionate, sulfur monoxide, iron, nitrite, selenite, fumarate, oxygen, carbon dioxide, and chlorine-containing phenol compounds. The Sulfate- and Sulfur-reducing bacteria are widely distributed in anaerobic ecosystems, including extreme environments like hot springs, deepsea hydrothermal vents, soda and high salinity lakes, and cryo-environments. Furthermore, the StRB and SrRB have Astrobiological significance as these anaerobic extremophiles may represent the dominant relic life forms that inhabited our planet during the extensive volcanic activity in the Earth's early evolutionary period.

  8. Performance of a pilot-scale sewage treatment: an up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) and a down-flow hanging sponge (DHS) reactors combined system by sulfur-redox reaction process under low-temperature conditions.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Masanobu; Yamaguchi, Takashi; Kuramoto, Yoshiharu; Nagano, Akihiro; Shimozaki, Satoshi; Sumino, Haruhiko; Araki, Nobuo; Yamazaki, Shinichi; Kawakami, Shuji; Harada, Hideki

    2011-01-01

    Performance of a wastewater treatment system utilizing a sulfur-redox reaction of microbes was investigated using a pilot-scale reactor that was fed with actual sewage. The system consisted of an up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor and a down-flow hanging sponge (DHS) reactor with a recirculation line. Consequently, the total CODCr (465±147 mg L(-1); total BOD of 207±68 mg L(-1)) at the influent was reduced (70±14 mg L(-1); total BOD of 9±2 mg L(-1)) at the DHS effluent under the conditions of an overall hydraulic retention time of 12 h, a recirculation ratio of 2, and a low-sewage temperature of 7.0±2.8 °C. A microbial analysis revealed that sulfate-reducing bacteria contributed to the degradation of organic matter in the UASB reactor even in low temperatures. The utilized sulfur-redox reaction is applicable for low-strength wastewater treatment under low-temperature conditions. PMID:20888756

  9. The role of sulfur in the cell division of chlorella

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Eiji Hase; Yuji Morimura; Sayoko Mihara; Hiroshi Tamiya

    1958-01-01

    1.The role of sulfur in the process of cell division of Chlorella was studied using the technique of synchronous culture. When the “dark cells” (smaller and strongly photosynthesizing cells), which had been grown in a normal nutrient medium, were further cultured in an S-deficient medium under photosynthesizing conditions, the cells grew up to some extent, showing about two-fold increase of

  10. Sulfur and oxygen isotope insights into sulfur cycling in shallow-sea hydrothermal vents, Milos, Greece

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Shallow-sea (5 m depth) hydrothermal venting off Milos Island provides an ideal opportunity to target transitions between igneous abiogenic sulfide inputs and biogenic sulfide production during microbial sulfate reduction. Seafloor vent features include large (>1 m2) white patches containing hydrothermal minerals (elemental sulfur and orange/yellow patches of arsenic-sulfides) and cells of sulfur oxidizing and reducing microorganisms. Sulfide-sensitive film deployed in the vent and non-vent sediments captured strong geochemical spatial patterns that varied from advective to diffusive sulfide transport from the subsurface. Despite clear visual evidence for the close association of vent organisms and hydrothermalism, the sulfur and oxygen isotope composition of pore fluids did not permit delineation of a biotic signal separate from an abiotic signal. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) in the free gas had uniform ?34S values (2.5?±?0.28‰, n?=?4) that were nearly identical to pore water H2S (2.7?±?0.36‰, n?=?21). In pore water sulfate, there were no paired increases in ?34SSO4 and ?18OSO4 as expected of microbial sulfate reduction. Instead, pore water ?34SSO4 values decreased (from approximately 21‰ to 17‰) as temperature increased (up to 97.4°C) across each hydrothermal feature. We interpret the inverse relationship between temperature and ?34SSO4 as a mixing process between oxic seawater and 34S-depleted hydrothermal inputs that are oxidized during seawater entrainment. An isotope mass balance model suggests secondary sulfate from sulfide oxidation provides at least 15% of the bulk sulfate pool. Coincident with this trend in ?34SSO4, the oxygen isotope composition of sulfate tended to be 18O-enriched in low pH (<5), high temperature (>75°C) pore waters. The shift toward high ?18OSO4 is consistent with equilibrium isotope exchange under acidic and high temperature conditions. The source of H2S contained in hydrothermal fluids could not be determined with the present dataset; however, the end-member ?34S value of H2S discharged to the seafloor is consistent with equilibrium isotope exchange with subsurface anhydrite veins at a temperature of ~300°C. Any biological sulfur cycling within these hydrothermal systems is masked by abiotic chemical reactions driven by mixing between low-sulfate, H2S-rich hydrothermal fluids and oxic, sulfate-rich seawater. PMID:25183951

  11. Human Nbp35 Is Essential for both Cytosolic Iron-Sulfur Protein Assembly and Iron Homeostasis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Oliver Stehling; Daili J. A. Netz; Brigitte Niggemeyer; Ralf Rosser; Richard S. Eisenstein; Helene Puccio; Antonio J. Pierik; Roland Lill

    2008-01-01

    The maturation of cytosolic iron-sulfur (Fe\\/S) proteins in mammalian cells requires components of the mitochondrial iron-sulfur cluster assembly and export machineries. Little is known about the cytosolic com- ponents that may facilitate the assembly process. Here, we identified the cytosolic soluble P-loop NTPase termed huNbp35 (also known as Nubp1) as an Fe\\/S protein, and we defined its role in the

  12. Fuel Properties of Biodiesel\\/Ultra-Low Sulfur Diesel (ULSD) Blends

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robert O. Dunn

    Biodiesel is an alternative fuel and fuel extender easily derived from vegetable oil or animal fat. In 2006, the US Environmental\\u000a Protection Agency mandated that maximum sulfur content of diesel fuels be reduced to 15 ppm to protect catalysts employed\\u000a in exhaust after-treatment devices. Processing to produce this ultra-low sulfur petrodiesel (ULSD) alters fuel lubricity,\\u000a density, cold flow, viscosity, and other

  13. Modeling sucrose hydrolysis in dilute sulfuric acid solutions at pretreatment conditions for lignocellulosic biomass

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Shane Bower; Ranil Wickramasinghe; Nicholas J. Nagle; Daniel J. Schell

    2008-01-01

    Agricultural and herbaceous feedstocks may contain appreciable levels of sucrose. The goal of this study was to evaluate the survivability of sucrose and its hydrolysis products, fructose and glucose, during dilute sulfuric acid processing at conditions typically used to pretreat lignocellulose biomass. Solutions containing 25g\\/l sucrose with 0.1–2.0% (w\\/w) sulfuric acid concentrations were treated at temperatures of 160–200°C for 3–12min.

  14. Tribological behavior of near-frictionless carbon coatings in high- and low-sulfur diesel fuels.

    SciTech Connect

    Alzoubi, M. F.; Ajayi, O. O.; Eryilmaz, O. L.; Ozturk, O.; Erdemir, A.; Fenske, G.

    2000-01-19

    The sulfur content in diesel fuel has a significant effect on diesel engine emissions, which are currently subject to environmental regulations. It has been observed that engine particulate and gaseous emissions are directly proportional to fuel sulfur content. With the introduction of low-sulfur fuels, significant reductions in emissions are expected. The process of sulfur reduction in petroleum-based diesel fuels also reduces the lubricity of the fuel, resulting in premature failure of fuel injectors. Thus, another means of preventing injector failures is needed for engines operating with low-sulfur diesel fuels. In this study, the authors evaluated a near-frictionless carbon (NFC) coating (developed at Argonne National Laboratory) as a possible solution to the problems associated with fuel injector failures in low-lubricity fuels. Tribological tests were conducted with NFC-coated and uncoated H13 and 52100 steels lubricated with high- and low- sulfur diesel fuels in a high-frequency reciprocating test machine. The test results showed that the NFC coatings reduced wear rates by a factor of 10 over those of uncoated steel surfaces. In low-sulfur diesel fuel, the reduction in wear rate was even greater (i.e., by a factor of 12 compared to that of uncoated test pairs), indicating that the NFC coating holds promise as a potential solution to wear problems associated with the use of low-lubricity diesel fuels.

  15. Experimental evidence for sulfur induced loss of ductility in copper shaped-charge jets

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, D.K.; Lassila, D.H.; King, W.E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Baker, E.L. [ARDEC, Picatinny, NJ (United States)

    1996-12-01

    The authors have observed that a change in the bulk sulfur content of oxygen-free electronic copper markedly affects its high temperature (400--1,000 C), high strain-rate (>10{sup 3} s{sup {minus}1}) deformation and fracture behavior. These conditions are typical of those found in jets formed from the explosive deformation of copper shaped-charge liners. Specifically, an increase in the bulk sulfur concentration from 4 ppm to 8 ppm shortens the breakup time, t{sub b}, of the copper jets by nearly 10% as measured using flash x-ray radiographs recorded during breakup of the jets. At bulk concentrations of 4 ppm, the jet was observed to be uniform and axisymmetric with a breakup time of 186 {micro}s. Jet particles exhibited length-to-diameter ratios of roughly 8:1. The addition of sulfur transformed the jet breakup behavior to non-uniform, non-axisymmetric rupture and reduced the breakup time to 147 {micro}s. The length-to-diameter ratios decreased to roughly 5:1 in the sulfur-doped samples. Previously measured sulfur solubilities and diffusivities in copper at the temperatures where this material was processed indicates nearly all of the sulfur was localized to grain boundaries. Therefore, the authors infer that the increase in sulfur content at grain boundaries is directly responsible for the change in breakup performance of the shaped-charge jets.

  16. Photon and Water Mediated Sulfur Oxide and Acid Chemistry in the Atmosphere of Venus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroll, Jay A.; Vaida, Veronica

    2014-06-01

    Sulfur compounds have been observed in the atmospheres of a number of planetary bodies in our solar system including Venus, Earth, Mars, Io, Europa, and Callisto. The global cloud cover on Venus located at an altitude between 50 and 80 kilometers is composed primarily of sulfuric acid (H_2SO_4) and water. Planetary photochemical models have attempted to explain observations of sulfuric acid and sulfur oxides with significant discrepancies remaining between models and observation. In particular, high SO_2 mixing ratios are observed above 90 km which exceed model predictions by orders of magnitude. Work recently done in the Vaida lab has shown red light can drive photochemistry through overtone pumping for acids like H_2SO_4 and has been successful in explaining much of the sulfur chemistry in Earth's atmosphere. Water can have a number of interesting effects such as catalysis, suppression, and anti-catalysis of thermal and photochemical processes. We investigate the role of water complexes in the hydration of sulfur oxides and dehydration of sulfur acids and present spectroscopic studies to document such effects. We investigate these reactions using FTIR and UV/Vis spectroscopy and will report on our findings.

  17. Sulfuric Acid and Water: Paradoxes of Dilution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leenson, I. A.

    2004-01-01

    On equilibrium properties of aqueous solutions of sulfuric acid, Julius Thomsen has marked that the heat evolved on diluting liquid sulfuric acid with water is a continuous function of the water used, and excluded absolutely the acceptance of definite hydrates as existing in the solution. Information about thermochemical measurement, a discussion…

  18. Sulfur in Distillers Grains for Dairy Cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sulfur is an essential element needed by animals for many functions. About 0.15% of the body weight is sulfur. It is found in the amino acids methionine, cysteine, cystine, homocysteine, and taurine; in chondroitin sulfate of cartilage; and in the B-vitamins, thiamin and biotin. Methionine, thiam...

  19. Phosphine-catalyzed construction of sulfur heterocycles.

    PubMed

    Gabillet, Sandra; Lecerclé, Delphine; Loreau, Olivier; Carboni, Michael; Dézard, Sophie; Gomis, Jean-Marie; Taran, Frédéric

    2007-09-27

    A simple and efficient method for constructing sulfur heterocycles was developed using a phosphine-catalyzed tandem umpolung addition and intramolecular cyclization of bifunctional sulfur pronucleophiles on arylpropiolates. The reaction offers a promising route to synthetically useful as well as biologically active heterocycles under neutral conditions. PMID:17803312

  20. Pyrolysis of high sulfur Indian coals

    SciTech Connect

    B.P. Baruah; Puja Khare [RRL Jorhat, Assam (India). Coal Chemistry Division

    2007-12-15

    Pyrolysis experiments under laboratory conditions for five numbers of high sulfur coal samples from the states of Meghalaya and Nagaland, India, were carried out at temperatures of 450, 600, 850, and 1000{sup o}C, respectively. The yield of products and thermal release of sulfur from these coals are investigated. The distribution of sulfur in the pyrolyzed products, i.e., char/coke, gas, and tar, is also reported. Hydrocarbon and sulfurous gases released at different temperatures were analyzed by a gas chromatograph (GC) with an FID (flame ionized detector) and an FPD (flame photometric detector), respectively. H{sub 2}S evolution during coal pyrolysis was found to be a function of temperature up to 850{sup o}C. The low concentration of SO{sub 2} detected for some of the samples is due to decomposition of inorganic sulphates present. Evolution of methane for the coals tested increases with the increase of temperature. Maximum sulfur release was found in the range of 600-850{sup o}C and has a decreasing tendency from 850-1000{sup o}C, which might be due to the incorporation of sulfur released into the coal matrix. Activation energies for sulfur release were found in the range of 38-228 kJ mol{sup -1}, which were higher than the reported activation energies for lignites and bituminous coals mainly due to highly stable organic sulfur functionalities. 52 refs., 9 figs., 6 tabs.

  1. Novel aqueous aluminum/sulfur batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Licht, S.; Peramunage, D. (Clark Univ., Worcester, MA (United States))

    1993-01-01

    Aluminum sulfur batteries based on concentrated polysulfide catholytes and an alkaline aluminum anode are introduced and investigated. The new battery is expressed by aluminum oxidation and aqueous sulfur reduction for an overall battery discharge consisting of 2Al + S[sub 4][sup 2[minus

  2. Detangling the Web of Sulfur Metabolisms in Santa Barbara Basin with High-Resolution ?34S and Genomic Profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raven, M. R.; Adkins, J. F.; Sessions, A. L.; Dawson, K.; Connon, S. A.; Orphan, V. J.

    2014-12-01

    Sulfur metabolisms are major drivers of organic matter remineralization and microbial growth in marine sediments. Sulfur-isotope systematics are particularly powerful for interrogating metabolic processes in these systems due to the large sulfur-isotope fractionations associated with bacterial sulfate reduction (BSR) and some other metabolic reactions. Recent analytical advancements have made it possible to measure ?34S values of very small samples (>50 nmol), including aqueous sulfate and sulfide as well as pyrite, elemental sulfur, and multiple fractions of sedimentary organic matter. We have generated comprehensive 2.5 cm-resolution depth profiles of these sulfur pools over a 2-m core from Santa Barbara Basin, a sub-oxic environment off the California coast. We find that the porewater sulfide ?34S values appear to be strongly influenced by anaerobic sulfide oxidation and sulfur disproportionation in addition to BSR. These sulfur-isotope signals can be tracked over the course of several thousand years of sediment diagenesis, moving from the oxic-anoxic transition at the sediment-water interface to the sulfate-methane transition zone in deeper sediments. Shifts in ?34S relationships among sulfur pools correlate with changes in microbial community composition as shown in TAG genomic data, which supports the existence of the metabolisms indicated by ?34S profiles. Our results suggest that the existence and activity of multiple microbial communities and coexisting sulfur metabolisms have the potential to be recorded in sedimentary ?34S records.

  3. Mitigation of Sulfur Effects on a Lean NOx Trap Catalyst by Sorbate Reapplication

    SciTech Connect

    Parks, II, James E [ORNL

    2007-01-01

    Lean NOx trap catalysis has demonstrated the ability to reduce NOx emissions from lean natural gas reciprocating engines by >90%. The technology operates in a cyclic fashion where NOx is trapped on the catalyst during lean operation and released and reduced to N2 under rich exhaust conditions; the rich cleansing operation of the cycle is referred to as "regeneration" since the catalyst is reactivated for more NOx trapping. Natural gas combusted over partial oxidation catalysts in the exhaust can be used to obtain the rich exhaust conditions necessary for catalyst regeneration. Thus, the lean NOx trap technology is well suited for lean natural gas engine applications. One potential limitation of the lean NOx trap technology is sulfur poisoning. Sulfur compounds directly bond to the NOx trapping sites of the catalyst and render them ineffective; over time, the sulfur poisoning leads to degradation in overall NOx reduction performance. In order to mitigate the effects of sulfur poisoning, a process has been developed to restore catalyst activity after sulfur poisoning has occurred. The process is an aqueous-based wash process that removes the poisoned sorbate component of the catalyst. A new sorbate component is reapplied after removal of the poisoned sorbate. The process is low cost and does not involve reapplication of precious metal components of the catalyst. Experiments were conducted to investigate the feasibility of the washing process on a lean 8.3-liter natural gas engine on a dynamometer platform. The catalyst was rapidly sulfur poisoned with bottled SO2 gas; then, the catalyst sorbate was washed and reapplied and performance was re-evaluated. Results show that the sorbate reapplication process is effective at restoring lost performance due to sulfur poisoning. Specific details relative to the implementation of the process for large stationary natural gas engines will be discussed.

  4. A solid sulfur cathode for aqueous batteries.

    PubMed

    Peramunage, D; Licht, S

    1993-08-20

    Because of its high resistivity and subsequent low electroactivity, sulfur is not normally considered a room-temperature battery cathode. An elemental sulfur cathode has been made with a measured capacity of over 900 ampere.hours per kilogram, more than 90 percent of the theoretical storage capacity of solid sulfur at room temperature, accessed by means of a lightweight, highly conductive, aqueous polysulfide interface through the electrocatalyzed reaction S + H(2)O + 2e(-) --> HS(-) + OH(-). This solid sulfur cathode was first used in a battery with an aluminum anode for an overall discharge reaction 2Al + 3S + 3OH(-) + 3H(2)O --> 2Al(OH)(3) + 3HS(-), giving a cell potential of 1.3 volts. The theoretical specific energy of the aluminum-sulfur battery (based on potassium salts) is 910 watt.hours per kilogram with an experimental specific energy of up to 220 watt.hours per kilogram. PMID:17739624

  5. Selective catalytic reduction of sulfur dioxide to elemental sulfur. Quarterly technical progress report No. 6, October 1993--December 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, W.; Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, M.; Sarofim, A.F.

    1996-01-01

    Elemental sulfur recovery from SO{sub 2}-containing gas stream is highly attractive as it produces a salable product and no waste to dispose of. However, commercially available schemes are complex and involve multi-stage reactors, such as, most notably in the Resox (reduction of SO{sub 2} with coke) and Claus plant (reaction of SO{sub 2} with H{sub 2}S over catalyst). This project will investigate a cerium oxide catalyst for the single stage selective reduction of SO{sub 2} to elemental sulfur by a reductant, such as carbon monoxide. Cerium oxide has been identified in recent work at MIT as a superior catalyst for SO{sub 2} reduction by CO to elemental sulfur because its high activity and high selectivity to sulfur over COS over a wide temperature range(400-650 {degrees}C). The detailed kinetic and parametric studies of SO{sub 2} reduction planned in this work over various CeO{sub 2}-formulations will provide the necessary basis for development of a very simplified process, namely that of a single-stage elemental sulfur recovery scheme from variable concentration gas streams. The potential cost- and energy-efficiency benefits from this approach can not be overstated. A first apparent application is treatment of a regenerator off-gases in power plants using regenerative flue gas desulfurization. Such a simple catalytic converter may offer the long-sought {open_quotes}Claus-alternative{close_quotes} for coal-fired power plant applications.

  6. Advanced product recovery: Direct catalytic reduction of sulfur dioxide to elemental sulfur. Third quarterly technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1996-07-01

    More than 170 wet scrubber systems applied to 72,000 MW of US, coal-fired, utility boilers are in operation or under construction. In these systems, the sulfur dioxide removed form the boiler flue gas is permanently bound to a sorbent material, such as lime or limestone. The sulfated sorbent must be disposed of as a waste product or, in some cases, sold as a byproduct (e.g. gypsum). The use of regenerable sorbent technologies has the potential to reduce or eliminate solid waste production, transportation and disposal. Arthur D. Little, Inc., together with its industry and commercialization advisor, Engelhard Corporation, and its university partner, Tufts, plans to develop and scale-up an advanced, byproduct recovery technology that is a direct, catalytic process for reducing sulfur dioxide to elemental sulfur. The principal objective of the Phase 1 program is to identify and evaluate the performance of a catalyst which is robust and flexible with regard to choice of reducing gas. In order to achieve this goal, they have planned a structured program including: market/process/cost/evaluation; lab-scale catalyst preparation/optimization studies; lab-scale, bulk/supported catalyst kinetic studies; bench-scale catalyst/process studies; and utility review. This catalytic process reduces SO{sub 2} over a fluorite-type oxide (such as ceria and zirconia). The catalytic activity can be significantly promoted by active transition metals, such as copper. This type of mixed metal oxide catalyst has stable activity, high selectivity for sulfur production, and is resistant to water and carbon dioxide poisoning.

  7. Electron backscatter diffraction on femtosecond laser sulfur hyperdoped silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gimpel, Thomas; Höger, Ingmar; Falk, Fritz; Schade, Wolfgang; Kontermann, Stefan

    2012-09-01

    This paper analyzes the impact of femtosecond laser pulse irradiation on the crystallinity of silicon wafers by means of electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) measurements. EBSD based image quality maps and orientation imaging microscopy maps are correlated to the grade of the silicon crystallinity. We analyze the impact of accumulated net laser irradiation originating from a laser spot overlap that is necessary to process macroscopic areas, e.g., for sulfur doping of semiconductor devices. Furthermore, we demonstrate that post processing annealing recovers crystallinity and therefore allows fs-laser processed silicon to be used in semiconductor device manufacturing.

  8. Exogenic controls on sulfuric acid hydrate production at the surface of Europa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalton, J. B.; Cassidy, T.; Paranicas, C.; Shirley, J. H.; Prockter, L. M.; Kamp, L. W.

    2013-03-01

    External agents have heavily weathered the visible surface of Europa. Internal and external drivers competing to produce the surface we see include, but are not limited to: aqueous alteration of materials within the icy shell, initial emplacement of endogenic material by geologic activity, implantation of exogenic ions and neutrals from Jupiter's magnetosphere, alteration of surface chemistry by radiolysis and photolysis, impact gardening of upper surface layers, and redeposition of sputtered volatiles. Separating the influences of these processes is critical to understanding the surface and subsurface compositions at Europa. Recent investigations have applied cryogenic reflectance spectroscopy to Galileo Near-Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (NIMS) observations to derive abundances of surface materials including water ice, hydrated sulfuric acid, and hydrated sulfate salts. Here we compare derived sulfuric acid hydrate (H2SO4·nH2O) abundance with weathering patterns and intensities associated with charged particles from Jupiter's magnetosphere. We present models of electron energy, ion energy, and sulfur ion number flux as well as the total combined electron and ion energy flux at the surface to estimate the influence of these processes on surface concentrations, as a function of location. We found that correlations exist linking both electron energy flux (r?0.75) and sulfur ion flux (r=0.93) with the observed abundance of sulfuric acid hydrate on Europa. Sulfuric acid hydrate production on Europa appears to be limited in some regions by a reduced availability of sulfur ions, and in others by insufficient levels of electron energy. The energy delivered by sulfur and other ions has a much less significant role. Surface deposits in regions of limited exogenic processing are likely to bear closest resemblance to oceanic composition. These results will assist future efforts to separate the relative influence of endogenic and exogenic sources in establishing the surface composition.

  9. Production of elemental sulfur and methane from H{sub 2}S and CO{sub 2} derived from a coal desulfurization process. Final report, September 1, 1993--March 31, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, X.; Khang, S.J.; Keener, T.C.

    1997-12-31

    The purpose of this study was to experimentally and theoretically investigate the feasibility of producing elemental sulfur, carbon monoxide, hydrogen and possible methane from hydrogen sulfide and carbon dioxide through catalytic reactions. A novel experimental system that could evaluate potential catalysts and adsorbents under controlled laboratory conditions was designed and constructed. Additionally an effective simulation program capable of providing valuable thermodynamic information on the reaction system was compiled. The following tasks have been performed: (1) design and construction of an experimental system for the catalyst preparation and catalyst screening studies including frequent modifications of the experimental setup to meet specific application needs; (2) installation and calibration of related analytical instruments, and investigation of the temperature distribution profile inside the reactor; (3) preparation, reduction, sulfidation of potential catalysts, and measurements of specific surface area of catalysts; (4) decomposition of H{sub 2}S under both non-catalytic condition and catalytic condition with the CoO-MoO{sub 3}-alumina catalyst at moderate temperatures around 550 C. Analyses of the product gas by gas chromatograph; and (5) thermodynamic studies on the theoretical conversions of H{sub 2}S for various temperatures, pressures and ratios of H{sub 2}S to CO{sub 2}. Based on the results of the above tasks, bench scale experiments were performed with the CoO-MoO{sub 3}-alumina catalyst at moderate temperatures around 550 C to investigate the adsorption effects of solid sorbents in order to remove sulfur from the reaction environment. Four kinds of adsorbents have been tested along with several designs of solid adsorbent feed systems.

  10. Deactivation of metastable single-crystal silicon hyperdoped with sulfur

    SciTech Connect

    Simmons, C. B.; Akey, Austin J.; Sullivan, Joseph T.; Buonassisi, Tonio [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)] [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Krich, Jacob J. [University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario K1N 6N5 (Canada)] [University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario K1N 6N5 (Canada); Recht, Daniel; Aziz, Michael J. [Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States)] [Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States)

    2013-12-28

    Silicon supersaturated with sulfur by ion implantation and pulsed laser melting exhibits broadband optical absorption of photons with energies less than silicon's band gap. However, this metastable, hyperdoped material loses its ability to absorb sub-band gap light after subsequent thermal treatment. We explore this deactivation process through optical absorption and electronic transport measurements of sulfur-hyperdoped silicon subject to anneals at a range of durations and temperatures. The deactivation process is well described by the Johnson-Mehl-Avrami-Kolmogorov framework for the diffusion-mediated transformation of a metastable supersaturated solid solution, and we find that this transformation is characterized by an apparent activation energy of E{sub A}=1.7 ± 0.1 eV. Using this activation energy, the evolution of the optical and electronic properties for all anneal duration-temperature combinations collapse onto distinct curves as a function of the extent of reaction. We provide a mechanistic interpretation of this deactivation based on short-range thermally activated atomic movements of the dopants to form sulfur complexes.

  11. Partial oxidation of sulfur-containing solid carbonaceous fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Najjar, M.S.; Corbeels, R.J.

    1989-01-31

    This patent describes a process for the simultaneous partial oxidation and desulfurization of a sulfur and silicate-containing comminuted solid carbonaceous fuel comprising, basis solid fuel, 0.2 to 6.0 wt. % sulfur and 0.1 to 30 wt. % of silicate compounds including iron silicate. The improvements consist of (1) reacting in the free-flow unobstructed down-flowing vertical refractory lined reaction zone of a partial oxidation gas generator a feed mixture comprising the solid carbonaceous fuel and first and second types of supplemental calcium-containing material with a controlled amount of free-oxygen containing gas and a temperature moderator so that an equilibrium oxygen concentration is provided in the gas phase in the reaction zone with a partial pressure which is less than about 10/sup -9/ atmospheres; (2) cooling and cleaning the hot raw effluent gas mixture from (1) by contacting the effluent gas mixture with a liquid hydrocarbonaceous fuel cooling and scrubbing agent, thereby producing a slurry comprising slag and calcium sulfide in liquid hydrocarbonaceous fuel, (3) steam stripping the slurry and separating a gaseous mixture comprising steam and H/sub 2/S; and (4) recycling the sulfur-depleted slurry to the front end of the process for use in preparation of fresh feed mixture to the partial oxidation gas generator.

  12. Sulfidation of 310 stainless steel at sulfur potentials encountered in coal conversion systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, D. B.; Nelson, H. G.

    1976-01-01

    The sulfidation of SAE 310 stainless steel was carried out in gas mixtures of hydrogen and hydrogen sulfide over a range of sulfur potentials anticipated in advanced coal gasification processes. The kinetics, composition, and morphology of sulfide scale formation were studied at a fixed temperature of 1065 K over a range of sulfur potentials from .00015N/sqm to 900N/sqm. At all sulfur potentials investigated, the sulfide scales were found to be multilayered. The relative thickness of the individual layers as well as the composition was found to depend on the sulfur potential. The reaction was found to obey the parabolic rate law after an initial transient period. Considerably longer transient periods were found to be due to unsteady state conditions resulting from compositional variations in the spinel layer.

  13. Solubility, stability, and electrochemical studies of sulfur-sulfide solutions in organic solvents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fielder, W. L.; Singer, J.

    1978-01-01

    A preliminary study of the sulfur electrode in organic solvents suggests that the system warrants further investigation for use in a low temperature (100 deg to 120 C) Na-S secondary battery. A qualitative screening was undertaken at 120 C to determine the solubilities and stabilities of Na2S and Na2S2 in representatives of many classes of organic solvents. From the screening and quantitative studies, two classes of solvents were selected for work; amides and cyclic polyalcohols. Voltammetric and Na-S cell charge discharge studies of sulfide solutions in organic solvents (e.g., N, N-dimethylformamide) at 120 C suggested that the reversibilities of the reactions on Pt or high density graphite were moderately poor. However, the sulfur electrode was indeed reducible (and oxidizable) through the range of elemental sulfur to Na2S. Reactions and mechanisms are proposed for the oxidation reduction processes occurring at the sulfur electrode.

  14. Sensing Free Sulfur Dioxide in Wine

    PubMed Central

    Monro, Tanya M.; Moore, Rachel L.; Nguyen, Mai-Chi; Ebendorff-Heidepriem, Heike; Skouroumounis, George K.; Elsey, Gordon M.; Taylor, Dennis K.

    2012-01-01

    Sulfur dioxide (SO2) is important in the winemaking process as it aids in preventing microbial growth and the oxidation of wine. These processes and others consume the SO2 over time, resulting in wines with little SO2 protection. Furthermore, SO2 and sulfiting agents are known to be allergens to many individuals and for that reason their levels need to be monitored and regulated in final wine products. Many of the current techniques for monitoring SO2 in wine require the SO2 to be separated from the wine prior to analysis. This investigation demonstrates a technique capable of measuring free sulfite concentrations in low volume liquid samples in white wine. This approach adapts a known colorimetric reaction to a suspended core optical fiber sensing platform, and exploits the interaction between guided light located within the fiber voids and a mixture of the wine sample and a colorimetric analyte. We have shown that this technique enables measurements to be made without dilution of the wine samples, thus paving the way towards real time in situ wine monitoring. PMID:23112627

  15. Synthesis of thiocarbamate salts from amines, sulfur, and carbon monoxide

    SciTech Connect

    Manov-Yuvenskii, V.I.; Kuznetsov, S.L.

    1992-05-20

    Sulfur reacts with carbon monoxide and amines without a catalyst at 100-160{degrees}C and 10-100 atm for 1-4 h. The reaction products of primary amines are symmetric ureas. Under the same conditions, secondary amines form thiocarbamic acid salts, which are not converted to tetrasubstituted ureas. In the presence of primary amines at 100-160{degrees}C, they afford trisubstituted ureas, some of whose representatives are pesticides. The same products are formed directly in the carbonylation of a mixture of primary and secondary amines without isolation of intermediate thiocarbamic acid salts. In the presence of catalytic amounts of selenium, the reaction of sulfur with carbon monoxide and amines occurs at atmospheric pressure and affords N-substituted thiocarbamic acid salts from both secondary and primary amines. In the current work the authors present some of the characteristics of these processes. 10 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Thermal Regeneration of Sulfuric Acid Hydrates after Irradiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loeffler, Mark J.; Hudson, Reggie L.

    2012-01-01

    In an attempt to more completely understand the surface chemistry of the jovian icy satellites, we have investigated the effect of heating on two irradiated crystalline sulfuric acid hydrates, H2SO4 4H2O and H2SO4 H2O. At temperatures relevant to Europa and the warmer jovian satellites, post-irradiation heating recrystallized the amorphized samples and increased the intensities of the remaining hydrate's infrared absorptions. This thermal regeneration of the original hydrates was nearly 100% efficient, indicating that over geological times, thermally-induced phase transitions enhanced by temperature fluctuations will reform a large fraction of crystalline hydrated sulfuric acid that is destroyed by radiation processing. The work described is the first demonstration of the competition between radiation-induced amorphization and thermally-induced recrystallization in icy ionic solids relevant to the outer Solar System.

  17. Biocatalytic sulfur removal from fuels: applicability for producing low sulfur gasoline.

    PubMed

    McFarland, B L; Boron, D J; Deever, W; Meyer, J A; Johnson, A R; Atlas, R M

    1998-01-01

    Environmental regulations are driving R&D efforts to produce low sulfur fuels, including diesel fuel and gasoline for motor vehicles. Biocatalytic sulfur removal from fuels has potential applicability for producing low sulfur gasoline. Microbial biocatalysts have been identified that can biotransform sulfur compounds found in fuels, including ones that selectively remove sulfur from dibenzothiophene heterocyclic compounds. Most attention is give to the 4S pathway of Rhodococcus, which can remove sulfur from substituted and unsubstituted dibenzothiophenes, including sulfur compounds that hinder chemical catalysis and that resist removal by mild hydrotreatment. Various bioreactor and bioprocess designs are being tested for use with biocatalysts, including recombinant biocatalysts, for use in removing sulfur from fuels and feedstocks within the petroleum refinery stream. With bioprocess improvements that enhance biocatalyst stability, achieve faster kinetics, improve mass transfer limitations, temperature and solvent tolerance, as well as broaden substrate specificity to attack a greater range of heterocyclic compounds, biocatalysis may be a cost-effective approach to achieve the production of low sulfur gasoline. The challenge will be to accomplish these improvements by the time the regulations for low sulfur gasoline and other vehicle fuels go into effect in order to be competitive with emerging nonbiological desulfurization technologies. PMID:9675512

  18. Phanerozoic cycles of sedimentary carbon and sulfur

    PubMed Central

    Garrels, Robert M.; Lerman, Abraham

    1981-01-01

    A reservoir model of a Recent steady-state sedimentary system in which the reduced sulfur and oxidized sulfur reservoirs were coupled with the oxidized carbon and reduced carbon reservoirs was constructed. The time curve of the sulfur isotope ratios of the sedimentary sulfate reservoir was used to drive the model back to the beginning of Cambrian time (600 million years ago), producing the reservoir sizes and isotope values and material fluxes of the carbon-sulfur system. The predicted values of carbon isotope ratios of the carbonate reservoir agree well with observed values, showing that the model is basically sound. Some general conclusions from this success are (i) material flux rates in the carbon-oxygen-sulfur system of the geologic past (averaged over tens of millions of years) lie within about a factor of 2 of Recent rates. (ii) The oxidation-reduction balances of Phanerozoic time were dominated by reciprocal relationships between carbon and sulfur compounds. (iii) The rate of production of atmospheric oxygen by storage in sediments of organic carbon of photosynthetic origin increased from the Cambrian Period to the Permian Period and declined somewhat from the Permian Period to the Present. (iv) The storage of oxygen in oxidized sulfur compounds kept pace (within the limits of the data) with oxygen production. (v) Transfer of oxygen from CO2 to SO4 from the Cambrian to the Permian Period was several times the Recent free oxygen content of the atmosphere. PMID:16593066

  19. Sodium sulfur battery flight experiment definition study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Rebecca R.; Minck, Robert

    1989-01-01

    Sodium-sulfur batteries were identified as the most likely successor to nickel-hydrogen batteries for space applications. One advantage of the Na/S battery system is that the usable specific energy is two to three times that of nickel-hydrogen batteries. This represents a significant launch cost savings or increased payload mass capabilities. Sodium-sulfur batteries support NASA OAST's proposed Civil Space Technology Initiative goal of a factor of two improvement in spacecraft power system performance, as well as the proposed Spacecraft 2000 initiative. The sodium-sulfur battery operates at between 300 and 400 C, using liquid sodium and sulfur/polysulfide electrodes and solid ceramic electrolyte. The transport of the electrode materials to the surface of the electrolyte is through wicking/capillary forces. These critical transport functions must be demonstrated under actual microgravity conditions before sodium-sulfur batteries can be confidently utilized in space. Ford Aerospace Corporation, under contract to NASA Lewis Research Center, is currently working on the sodium-sulfur battery space flight experiment definition study. The objective is to design the experiment that will demonstrate operation of the sodium-sulfur battery/cell in the space environment with particular emphasis on evaluation of microgravity effects. Experimental payload definitions were completed and preliminary designs of the experiment were defined.

  20. Steep spatial gradients of volcanic and marine sulfur in Hawaiian rainfall and ecosystems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bern, Carleton R.; Chadwick, Oliver A.; Kendall, Carol; Pribil, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Sulfur, a nutrient required by terrestrial ecosystems, is likely to be regulated by atmospheric processes in well-drained, upland settings because of its low concentration in most bedrock and generally poor retention by inorganic reactions within soils. Environmental controls on sulfur sources in unpolluted ecosystems have seldom been investigated in detail, even though the possibility of sulfur limiting primary production is much greater where atmospheric deposition of anthropogenic sulfur is low. Here we measure sulfur isotopic compositions of soils, vegetation and bulk atmospheric deposition from the Hawaiian Islands for the purpose of tracing sources of ecosystem sulfur. Hawaiian lava has a mantle-derived sulfur isotopic composition (?34S VCDT) of ? 0.8‰. Bulk deposition on the island of Maui had a ?34S VCDT that varied temporally, spanned a range from + 8.2 to + 19.7‰, and reflected isotopic mixing from three sources: sea-salt (+ 21.1‰), marine biogenic emissions (+ 15.6‰), and volcanic emissions from active vents on Kilauea Volcano (+ 0.8‰). A straightforward, weathering-driven transition in ecosystem sulfur sources could be interpreted in the shift from relatively low (0.0 to + 2.7‰) to relatively high (+ 17.8 to + 19.3‰) soil ?34S values along a 0.3 to 4100 ka soil age-gradient, and similar patterns in associated vegetation. However, sub-kilometer scale spatial variation in soil sulfur isotopic composition was found along soil transects assumed by age and mass balance to be dominated by atmospheric sulfur inputs. Soil sulfur isotopic compositions ranged from + 8.1 to + 20.3‰ and generally decreased with increasing elevation (0–2000 m), distance from the coast (0–12 km), and annual rainfall (180–5000 mm). Such trends reflect the spatial variation in marine versus volcanic inputs from atmospheric deposition. Broadly, these results illustrate how the sources and magnitude of atmospheric deposition can exert controls over ecosystem sulfur biogeochemistry across relatively small spatial scales.

  1. Reduction in environmental impact of sulfuric acid hydrolysis of bamboo for production of fuel ethanol.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhao-Yong; Tang, Yue-Qin; Morimura, Shigeru; Kida, Kenji

    2013-01-01

    Fuel ethanol can be produced from bamboo by concentrated sulfuric acid hydrolysis followed by continuous ethanol fermentation. To reduce the environmental impact of this process, treatment of the stillage, reuse of the sulfuric acid and reduction of the process water used were studied. The total organic carbon (TOC) concentration of stillage decreased from 29,688 to 269 mg/l by thermophilic methane fermentation followed by aerobic treatment. Washing the solid residue from acid hydrolysis with effluent from the biological treatment increased the sugar recovery from 69.3% to 79.3%. Sulfuric acid recovered during the acid-sugar separation process was condensed and reused for hydrolysis, resulting in a sugar recovery efficiency of 76.8%, compared to 80.1% when fresh sulfuric acid was used. After acetate removal, the condensate could be reused as elution water in the acid-sugar separation process. As much as 86.3% of the process water and 77.6% of the sulfuric acid could be recycled. PMID:23196226

  2. Sulfuric acid/hydrogen peroxide rinsing study

    SciTech Connect

    Clews, P.J.; Nelson, G.C.; Matlock, C.A. [and others

    1995-12-01

    Sulfuric acid hydrogen peroxide mixtures (SPM) are commonly used in the semiconductor industry to remove organic contaminants from wafer surfaces. This viscous solution is very difficult to rinse off water surfaces. Various rinsing conditions were tested and the resulting residual acid left on the water surface was measured. Particle growth resulting from incomplete rinse is correlated with the amount of sulfur on the wafer surface measured by Time of Flight Secondary Ion Mass Spectroscopy (TOF-SIMS). The amount of sulfur on the wafer structure after the rinse step is strongly affected by the wafer film type and contact angle prior to the SPM clean.

  3. New sulfur-containing corrosion inhibitor

    SciTech Connect

    Prince, P.

    2000-04-01

    No corrosion inhibitor available today is ideal in every way, but a new class of sulfur-containing compounds promises to address many field requirements. This article describes the performance characteristics of these compounds and discusses possible inhibition mechanisms. The emphasis in this work was on better understanding corrosion inhibition by sulfur-containing inhibitors under high shear-stress conditions, with special focus on localized (pitting) corrosion. The results indicate that the new sulfur-containing inhibitors (e.g., mercaptoalcohol [MA]) could be more effective in the field than currently available inhibitors.

  4. Triple sulfur isotope composition of Late Archean seawater sulfate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paris, G.; Fischer, W. W.; Sessions, A. L.; Adkins, J. F.

    2013-12-01

    Multiple sulfur isotope ratios in Archean sedimentary rocks have provided powerful insights into the behavior of the ancient sulfur cycle, the redox state of fluid Earth, and the timing of the rise of atmospheric oxygen [1]. Most processes fractionate sulfur isotopes in proportion to their mass differences, but the Archean sulfur isotope record is marked by pronounced mass-independent fractionation (MIF, ?33S?0). The origin of these signatures has been traditionally interpreted as the result of photolysis of SO2 from short wavelength UV light, with positive ?33S values recorded in pyrite and negative ?33S values in sulfate-bearing phases [2]. This long-held hypothesis rests on observations of negative ?33S from enigmatic barite occurrences from mixed volcanic sedimentary strata in Mesoarchean greenstone terrains. Despite forming the framework for understanding Archean sulfur cycle processes [3], it is largely untested [3]. It is largely untested. Consequently, the biggest challenge to our current understanding of the early sulfur cycle is a poor understanding of the isotopic composition of seawater sulfate. Sulfate evaporite minerals are absent from Archean strata and the sulfur isotope record is written entirely by measurements of pyrite. Carbonate associated sulfate (CAS) provides an important archive for assaying the isotopic composition of ancient seawater sulfate It has been exploited in many studies of Phanerozoic and Proterozoic sulfate but have been only marginally used thus far for Archean samples because of the extremely low concentration of CAS in limestones and dolomites from this era. We have developed a novel MC-ICP-MS approach to solve this problem [4]. This new method lowers the detection limit by up to three orders of magnitude for ?34S and ?33S measurements, enabling to work on a few nmols of sulfate which represent only tens of mg of sample powders micromilled from specific carbonate textures. Two stratigraphic sections from the 2.60-2.52 Ga Campbellsrand carbonate platform of the Transvaal Supergroup, South Africa, were collected, sampled, and measured targeting lithologies rich in early marine calcite cements. We observe ?34S values ranging from 3.80 ‰ to 16.71 ‰. The ?33S values range from -0.26 and 10.41‰, changing with stratigraphic height but also within a sample. Correlations exist between both values. These observations are opposite of the general expectation that seawater sulfate carried a negative ?33S signature, and require reevaluation of hypotheses for sulfur cycle mass balance. Our observations also suggest that processes other than photolysis may play an important role in the origin of MIF. We hypothesize that photooxidation of SO2 at longer wavelength light also played a role in creating the unusual fractionations in Archean rocks. This interpretation is supported by a range of experimental data [1; 5]. [1] Farquhar et al.,2000, Science, v. 289, p. 756-758. [2] Farquhar, J.et al., 2001, Journal of Geophysical Research: Planets, v. 106, p. 32829-32839. [3] Halevy, I. et al., 2010, Science, v. 329, p. 204-207. [4] Paris, G.et al., 2013, Chemical Geology, v. 345, p. 50-61. [5] Whitehill, A. R. et al., 2013, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

  5. Sulfur-graphene nanostructured cathodes via ball-milling for high-performance lithium-sulfur batteries.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jiantie; Shui, Jianglan; Wang, Jianli; Wang, Min; Liu, Hua-Kun; Dou, Shi Xue; Jeon, In-Yup; Seo, Jeong-Min; Baek, Jong-Beom; Dai, Liming

    2014-10-28

    Although much progress has been made to develop high-performance lithium-sulfur batteries (LSBs), the reported physical or chemical routes to sulfur cathode materials are often multistep/complex and even involve environmentally hazardous reagents, and hence are infeasible for mass production. Here, we report a simple ball-milling technique to combine both the physical and chemical routes into a one-step process for low-cost, scalable, and eco-friendly production of graphene nanoplatelets (GnPs) edge-functionalized with sulfur (S-GnPs) as highly efficient LSB cathode materials of practical significance. LSBs based on the S-GnP cathode materials, produced by ball-milling 70 wt % sulfur and 30 wt % graphite, delivered a high initial reversible capacity of 1265.3 mAh g(-1) at 0.1 C in the voltage range of 1.5-3.0 V with an excellent rate capability, followed by a high reversible capacity of 966.1 mAh g(-1) at 2 C with a low capacity decay rate of 0.099% per cycle over 500 cycles, outperformed the current state-of-the-art cathode materials for LSBs. The observed excellent electrochemical performance can be attributed to a 3D "sandwich-like" structure of S-GnPs with an enhanced ionic conductivity and lithium insertion/extraction capacity during the discharge-charge process. Furthermore, a low-cost porous carbon paper pyrolyzed from common filter paper was inserted between the 0.7S-0.3GnP electrode and porous polypropylene film separator to reduce/eliminate the dissolution of physically adsorbed polysulfide into the electrolyte and subsequent cross-deposition on the anode, leading to further improved capacity and cycling stability. PMID:25290080

  6. CONSTRUCTION OF A PROTOTYPE SULFURIC ACID MIST MONITOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    A prototype sulfuric acid mist monitor has been constructed for the purpose of detecting sulfuric acid-sulfur trioxide. The monitor utilized the selective condensation method with subsequent determination of sulfuric acid by measuring the conductivity of an aqueous isopropanol so...

  7. Determination of sulfur heterocycles in coal liquids and shale oils

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Cherylyn. Willey; Masatomo. Iwao; Raymond N. Castle; Milton L. Lee

    1981-01-01

    Sulfur heterocycles are found in low concentrations in most coal-derived liquids and shale oils, and therefore, isolation of the heterocyclic sulfur fraction is necessary for individual compound identification. A new methodology for the isolation and subsequent separation and identification of sulfur heterocycles is described and applied to selected coal liquids and shale oils. Identification was accomplished by sulfur-selective flame photometric

  8. Degradation of oil shale by sulfur-oxidizing bacteria.

    PubMed

    Findley, J; Appleman, M D; Yen, T F

    1974-09-01

    Approximately 40% of oil shale can be solubilized by the action of sulfur-oxidizing bacteria. Thiobacillus thiooxidans and Thiobacillus concretivorous are equally effective in solubilization. Continuous leaching experiments show that this process can be completed within 14 days. The growth of Thiobacillus and the production of acid were measured under several conditions. Almost all of the CaMg(CO(3))(2) was removed by this process, leaving a complex of silica and kerogen that could be burned as low-energy fuel. The silica-kerogen complex had not yet been biologically degraded. PMID:4370628

  9. Advanced sulfur control concepts in hot-gas desulfurization technology. Quarterly report, April--June 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, D.P.

    1994-07-01

    The primary objective of this research project is the direct production of elemental sulfur during the regeneration of known high temperature desulfurization sorbents. The contract was awarded to LSU on April 12, 1994, and this quarterly report covers accomplishments during the first 2 1/2 months of the project. Effort during the initial 2 1/2 month period has been limited to Tasks 1 and 2, and involves a search of the literature to identify concepts for producing elemental sulfur during regeneration of known metal oxide sorbents and a thermodynamic evaluation of these concepts. While searching and evaluating the literature is a continuing process, concentrated effort on that phase is now complete and a detailed summary is included in this report. Three possible concepts for the direct production of elemental sulfur were identified in the LSU proposal, and the literature search has not uncovered any additional concepts. Thus, the three concepts being investigated involve: (1) regeneration with SO{sub 2}, (2) regeneration with mixtures Of 02 and H{sub 2}O, and (3) regeneration with H{sub 2}O. While concept (3) directly produces H{sub 2}S instead of elemental sulfur, the concept is included because the possibility exists for converting H{sub 2}S to elemental sulfur using the Claus process. Each of the concepts will ultimately be compared to the Direct Sulfur Recovery Process (DSRP) under development by RTI. DSRP involves initial sorbent regeneration to SO{sub 2}, and the inclusion of additional processing steps to reduce the SO{sub 2} to elemental sulfur.

  10. Sulfur transformations during pyrolysis of a high sulfur Polish coking coal

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gra?yna Gryglewicz

    1995-01-01

    A coking coal containing 4.9 wt%, db, of sulfur was subjected to pyrolysis at 330–1700°C in an atmosphere of evolved gases. The changes in the forms of sulfur were determined by wet chemical analysis. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) combined with X-ray microanalysis were used to monitor the reduction of pyrite during coal pyrolysis and the retention of sulfur by the

  11. X-ray absorption spectroscopic investigation of sulfur sites in coal: organic sulfur identification

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. L. Spiro; J. Wong; F. W. Lytle; R. B. Greegor; D. H. Maylotte; S. H. Lamson

    1984-01-01

    High-resolution x-ray absorption spectroscopy was used to probe the chemical and structural environments of sulfur in coal. Measurement of the sulfur K-edge spectra down to 2472.0 electron volts under nonvacuum conditions was made possible in an all-helium path, and a Stern-Heald type ion chamber was used for fluorescence detection. For a number of selected sulfur-containing minerals and organic model compounds,

  12. Sulfur Speciation in Peat: a Time-zero Signature for the " Spruce and Peatland Responses Under Climate and Environmental Change" Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furman, O.; Toner, B. M.; Sebestyen, S. D.; Kolka, R. K.; Nater, E. A.

    2014-12-01

    As part of the "Spruce and Peatland Responses Under Climate and Environmental Change" (SPRUCE) experiment, we made initial measurements of sulfur speciation in peat. These observations represent a "time-zero" relative to the intended soil warming experiment which begins in 2015. Total sulfur and sulfur speciation were measured in peat cores (solid phase) from nine plots (hollows and hummocks) to a depth of 2 m. Peat samples were packed under nitrogen and frozen in the field immediately after collection. All subsequent sample storage, handling, and processing were conducted under inert gas. Sulfur speciation was measured using bulk sulfur 1s X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy at the SXRMB instrument at the Canadian Light Source, Saskatoon, SK, Canada and at the 9-BM instrument, Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, IL, USA. Total sulfur concentrations ranged from 968 to 4077 mg sulfur / kg dry peat. Sulfur content increased with depth from 2 g sulfur / m2 in the 0-10 cm increment to a maximum value of 38 g sulfur / m2 in the 50-60 cm increment. These sulfur loadings produced high quality XANES spectra. The nine cores exhibited reproducible trends with depth in both total sulfur and specific sulfur species; however, variability in sulfur speciation was greatest in the top 40 cm. All sulfur detected within the peat solids was in an organic form. The most abundant sulfur species group was composed of organic mono-sulfide and thiol forms, representing approximately half of the total sulfur at all depths. Sulfonate and ester-sulfate species were 10-15 mol% of sulfur and exhibited low variability with depth. A subsurface maximum in organic di-sulfide was observed in the 20-30 cm depth increment, which is the transition zone between transiently oxidized acrotelm and permanently saturated anaerobic catotelm. Quantification of major sulfur pools is important for the SPRUCE experiment as they are likely to be indicators of changes in the oxidation-reduction (redox) status, and mercury methylation potential, of the peat in response to warming and enhanced carbon dioxide.

  13. Use of stable isotopes of carbon, nitrogen, and sulfur to identify sources of nitrogen in surface waters in the lower Susquehanna River basin, Pennsylvania

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cravotta, Charles A., III

    2002-01-01

    With the exception of sewage and septic effluents, most nitrogen sources and soils contain larger proportions of organic and reduced forms of carbon, nitrogen, and sulfur than inorganic, oxidized forms. In contrast, most surface water and ground water contains larger proportions of dissolved inorganic carbon, nitrogen, and sulfur forms than organic forms. Data indicate that carbon, nitrogen, and sulfur are extensively processed in soils and streams.

  14. Sodium-sulfur batteries for satellite applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolanczyk, Stephan M.; Vukson, Stephen P.

    1990-04-01

    A development status evaluation is presented for the USAF's various efforts to advance sodium-sulfur battery technology as a basis for GEO and LEO satellite energy storage systems. These efforts encompass the High Energy Density Rechargeable Battery program, the LEO Sodium-Sulfur Cell Development program, the Improved Sodium-Sulfur Electrolyte program, and the Lightweight Aerospace Battery (LAB) program. An especially taxing requirement for batteries of this type is the substantial number of charge/discharge cycles typical of LEO satellite applications. The LAB program, which will extend to 1993, is intended to develop a bipolar, flat-plate sodium-sulfur satellite battery with 7-10 year service life in LEO and 15 years in GEO.

  15. Sulfur Hexafluoride Tracer Dispersion within Cherry Orchard

    E-print Network

    Collins, Gary S.

    Sulfur Hexafluoride Tracer Dispersion within Cherry Orchard Zeyuan Chen, S. Edburg, and B. Lamb the correspondence between tracer gas concentration and atmospheric stability. Within the Tukey Cherry Orchard, we

  16. Method for reducing the sulfur content of a sulfur-containing hydrocarbon stream

    DOEpatents

    Mahajan, Devinder

    2004-12-28

    The sulfur content of a liquid hydrocarbon stream is reduced under mild conditions by contracting a sulfur-containing liquid hydrocarbon stream with transition metal particles containing the transition metal in a zero oxidation state under conditions sufficient to provide a hydrocarbon product having a reduced sulfur content and metal sulfide particles. The transition metal particles can be produced in situ by adding a transition metal precursor, e.g., a transition metal carbonyl compound, to the sulfur-containing liquid feed stream and sonicating the feed steam/transition metal precursor combination under conditions sufficient to produce the transition metal particles.

  17. Effects of variation of dietary sulfur on movement of sulfur in sheep rumen

    SciTech Connect

    Kandylis, K.; Bray, A.C.

    1987-01-01

    Effects of variations in dietary sulfur on rumen sulfur dynamics were studied under steady state conditions. In the first experimental period, three sheep were given 33.3 g of a pelleted diet hourly containing 1.59 g sulfur/kg (low) and in the second period the sulfur content was increased to 3.21 g/kg (high) by the addition of sodium sulfate. The daily sulfur intake was 1.158 g on the low sulfur diet and .545 g of this passed from the rumen in protein, .614 g was calculated to be absorbed from the rumen as sulfide, and .052 g was estimated to be recycled to the rumen. For sheep with daily intakes of 2.317 g sulfur, 1.212 g passed from the rumen in protein, 1.078 g was absorbed from the rumen, and .093 g was estimated to be recycled. It was estimated that 127 and 165 g microbial protein were synthesized/kg organic matter truly digested in the rumen for low and high sulfur diets, respectively. A simple model using simultaneous equations was proposed to describe rumen sulfur metabolism.

  18. Sulfur Nutrition and Assimilation in Crop Plants

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Avtar Singh Bimbraw

    Sulfur (S) deficiency has become common in agricultural soils and has resulted in crop yield loss. Agricultural soils are\\u000a further at risk from S-deficiency in cereals and oilseed crops. The present paper discusses the effects of sulfur on plant\\u000a growth and crop quality in various crops associated with S-deficiency and increase in the environment (Air pollution). Plant\\u000a responses to S-supply

  19. Polymer Electrolytes for Lithium/Sulfur Batteries

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yan; Zhang, Yongguang; Gosselink, Denise; Doan, The Nam Long; Sadhu, Mikhail; Cheang, Ho-Jae; Chen, Pu

    2012-01-01

    This review evaluates the characteristics and advantages of employing polymer electrolytes in lithium/sulfur (Li/S) batteries. The main highlights of this study constitute detailed information on the advanced developments for solid polymer electrolytes and gel polymer electrolytes, used in the lithium/sulfur battery. This includes an in-depth analysis conducted on the preparation and electrochemical characteristics of the Li/S batteries based on these polymer electrolytes. PMID:24958296

  20. Sulfuric Acid Intercalated Graphite Oxide for Graphene Preparation

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Yanzhong; Wang, Zhiyong; Jin, Xianbo

    2013-01-01

    Graphene has shown enormous potential for innovation in various research fields. The current chemical approaches based on exfoliation of graphite via graphite oxide (GO) are potential for large-scale synthesis of graphene but suffer from high cost, great operation difficulties, and serious waste discharge. We report a facile preparation of graphene by rapid reduction and expansion exfoliation of sulfuric acid intercalated graphite oxide (SIGO) at temperature just above 100°C in ambient atmosphere, noting that SIGO is easily available as the immediate oxidation descendent of graphite in sulfuric acid. The oxygenic and hydric groups in SIGO are mainly removed through dehydration as catalyzed by the intercalated sulfuric acid (ISA). The resultant consists of mostly single layer graphene sheets with a mean diameter of 1.07??m after dispersion in DMF. This SIGO process is reductant free, easy operation, low-energy, environmental friendly and generates graphene with low oxygen content, less defect and high conductivity. The provided synthesis route from graphite to graphene via SIGO is compact and readily scalable. PMID:24310650

  1. A highly efficient polysulfide mediator for lithium-sulfur batteries.

    PubMed

    Liang, Xiao; Hart, Connor; Pang, Quan; Garsuch, Arnd; Weiss, Thomas; Nazar, Linda F

    2015-01-01

    The lithium-sulfur battery is receiving intense interest because its theoretical energy density exceeds that of lithium-ion batteries at much lower cost, but practical applications are still hindered by capacity decay caused by the polysulfide shuttle. Here we report a strategy to entrap polysulfides in the cathode that relies on a chemical process, whereby a host--manganese dioxide nanosheets serve as the prototype--reacts with initially formed lithium polysulfides to form surface-bound intermediates. These function as a redox shuttle to catenate and bind 'higher' polysulfides, and convert them on reduction to insoluble lithium sulfide via disproportionation. The sulfur/manganese dioxide nanosheet composite with 75 wt% sulfur exhibits a reversible capacity of 1,300 mA h g(-1) at moderate rates and a fade rate over 2,000 cycles of 0.036%/cycle, among the best reported to date. We furthermore show that this mechanism extends to graphene oxide and suggest it can be employed more widely. PMID:25562485

  2. Sulfur nutrition of deciduous trees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herschbach, Cornelia; Rennenberg, Heinz

    2001-01-01

    Sulfur in its reduced form (-II) is an essential nutrient for growth and development, but is mainly available to plants in its oxidised form as sulfate. Deciduous trees take up sulfate by the roots from the soil solution and reduce sulfate to sulfide via assimilatory sulfate reduction in both roots and leaves. For reduction in the leaves, sulfate is loaded into the xylem and transported to the shoot. The surplus of sulfate not reduced in the chloroplast or stored in the vacuole and the surplus of reduced S not used for protein synthesis in the leaves is loaded into the phloem and transported back to the roots. Along the transport path, sulfate and glutathione (GSH) is unloaded from the phloem for storage in xylem and phloem parenchyma as well as in pit and ray cells. Re-mobilised S from storage tissues is loaded into the xylem during spring, but a phloem to xylem exchange does not appear to exist later in the season. As a consequence, a cycling pool of S was only found during the change of the seasons. The sulfate:glutathione ratio in the phloem seems to be involved in the regulation of S nutrition. This picture of S nutrition is discussed in relation to the different growth patterns of deciduous trees from the temperate climate zone, i.e. (1) terminated, (2) periodic and (3) indeterminate growth patterns, and in relation to environmental changes.

  3. Diffusion of Sulfur in Sphalerite and Sulfate Minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherniak, D. J.; Watson, H. C.; Sausville, K.

    2013-12-01

    Sulfur isotope ratios can be used to gain insight into geochemical cycling within Earth's lithosphere, as well as conditions on the Martian surface and early solar system processes. In addition, sulfur isotope signatures within minerals may be a useful biomarker in some situations. In order to evaulate the reliability of S isotope signatures as they persist through geologic time, accurate knowledge of S diffusion within pertinent minerals at relevant conditions is required. Self-diffusion of sulfur in sphalerite (ZnS) and sulfate minerals barite (BaSO4) and celestine (SrSO4) has been characterized at ~1 bar pressure by immersing natural specimens in molten elemental 34S inside sealed silica ampoules and annealing in 1-atm furnaces. The resulting 34S diffusive-exchange profiles were measured with Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS), or Nuclear reaction analysis (NRA) using the reaction 34S(p,?)35Cl. Over the temperature range 575-850°C, we obtain the following Arrhenius relation for S diffusion in sphalerite: DS-sphal = 4.0x10-8 exp (-244 × 20 kJ mol-1/RT) m2sec-1 The activation energy for S diffusion in sphalerite is significantly greater than that previously determined for S diffusion in pyrite (132 kJ mol-1; Watson et al., 2009), indicating that sphalerite will have greater retentivity of S isotopic signatures than pyrite at lower temperature (< 500°C) conditions. Preliminary results suggest relatively rapid diffusivities for S in sulfate minerals compared with those for pyrite and sphalerite; for example, at 700°C, sulfur diffusion in sphalerite is about two orders of magnitude slower than in barite, and about an order of magnitude slower than in celestine. Work is currently in progress on further measurements to constrain the activation energy for S diffusion in barite, and to explore potential differences in S diffusivities among sulfate minerals. E. B. Watson, D. J. Cherniak, E. A. Frank (2009) GCA 73, 4792-4802

  4. The Chicxulub event - sulfur-bearing minerals and lithologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strauss, H.; Deutsch, A.

    2003-04-01

    Evaporates form a major target lithology at the Chicxulub impact site. One of the postulated effects of the impact event at the Cretaceous/Tertiary boundary is the impact-induced dissociation of anhydrite to form sulfur-oxides and a solid residue; large isotope fractionation effects in sulfur should accompany this process. We have analyzed the sulfur isotope composition of (i) annealed anhydrite clasts in impact melt breccias of PEMEX core Yucatan-6 N 19, (ii) unshocked anhydrite from the CSDP well Yaxcopoil-1, which belong to the megabreccia below the suevite layer (YAX-1 1369, and 1376 m depth), and (iii) sulfide grains of hydrothermal origin in a finest-grained breccia, which transects a large limestone block of this megabreccia at a depth of 1369 m. Samples of groups (i) and (ii) yielded ?34S values between 18.0 and 19.8 ppm CDT (unweighted mean is 18.3 ppm, n=7), with one slightly lower value of 15.3 ppm for an anhydrite clast in Y-6 N19/Part 6. These data are in agreement with the ?34S value for the Late Cretaceous seawater (Strauss 1999). The ?34S obviously remained unchanged despite the fact that textural features indicate a severe annealing of the clasts in the impact melt. Sulfides of group (iii) show ?34S values around 41 ppm CDT (n=7), which are quite unusual values if these minerals are of non-biogenic origin. In contrast, ?34S for the yellow glass from the K/T boundary at Haiti range from 1.5 to 13.2 ppm (Chaussidon et al. 1996). Using this preliminary evidence, we conclude that only distant ejecta lithologies, and probably secondary material inside the crater, may display impact-related fractionation of sulfur isotopes. This observation is consistent with petrologic data, modeling results as well as of shock recovery and annealing experiments: anhydrite obviously is quite resistant to shock-related dissociation.

  5. Sulfur "Concrete" for Lunar Applications - Sublimation Concerns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grugel, Richard N.; Toutanji, Houssam

    2006-01-01

    Melting sulfur and mixing it with an aggregate to form "concrete" is commercially well established and constitutes a material that is particularly well-suited for use in corrosive environments. Discovery of the mineral troilite (FeS) on the moon poses the question of extracting the sulfur for use as a lunar construction material. This would be an attractive alternative to conventional concrete as it does not require water. However, the viability of sulfur concrete in a lunar environment, which is characterized by lack of an atmosphere and extreme temperatures, is not well understood. Here it is assumed that the lunar ore can be mined, refined, and the raw sulfur melded with appropriate lunar regolith to form, for example, bricks. This study evaluates pure sulfur and two sets of small sulfur concrete samples that have been prepared using JSC-1 lunar stimulant and SiO2 powder as aggregate additions. Each set was subjected to extended periods in a vacuum environment to evaluate sublimation issues. Results from these experiments are presented and discussed within the context of the lunar environment.

  6. Improved Chromatographic Techniques for Sulfur Pollutants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartmann, C. H.

    1971-01-01

    This paper describes several improvements in instrumental techniques for the analysis of low ppb concentrations of sulfur gases using gas chromatography (G.C.). This work has focused on the analytical problem of ambient air monitoring of the two main sulfur gas pollutants, hydrogen sulfide and sulfur dioxide. The most significant technical improvement that will be reported here is the newly developed silica gel column for ppb concentrations of the light sulfur gases (COS, H2S, CS2, SO2, CH3SH). A simplified inlet system will be described which improves reliability of the GC system. The flame photometric detector is used as the means of selectively and sensitively detecting the low concentrations of sulfur gases. Improvements will be described which have yielded better performance than previously reported for this application of the detector. Also included in this paper will be a report of field monitoring using this improved GC system. Reliability and repeatability of performance at the low ppb concentrations of sulfur gases will be demonstrated.

  7. Micromechanism of sulfurizing activated carbon and its ability to adsorb mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Guofang; Xu, Minren; Liu, Qingcai; Yang, Jian; Ma, Dongran; Lu, Cunfang; Lan, Yuanpei

    2013-11-01

    To eliminate mercury from coal-fired flue gas, sulfurization of carbons has been found to be the most inexpensive approach to solve the problem of environment contamination by mercury. This study focuses on improving the adsorption capacity of activate carbon loaded with elemental sulfur as an active phase and further use in the removal of mercury vapors from fuel gas. In this paper, equipment such as the scanning electron microscope, specific surface area test machine and fluorescence spectrophotometer are employed to study the ability of the S-loaded activated carbon. The results show that unmodified activate carbon has smooth hole surface and uneven distributed hole size. Pore walls of activate carbon modified became rougher and the hole size distribution is asymmetrical. Sulfur is uniformly distributed and is mainly bonded on the surface of the skeleton of activate carbon. In addition, a small amount of granular sulfur was loaded on the surface of the pore walls. Higher temperature creates smaller pore size and larger microporous volume. Improving the process temperature is conducive to the development of micropore and the distribution of sulfur, and a larger amount of small molecular weight sulfur are created, which is helpful in the removal of HgO through chemical adsorption. The optimum modification temperature and holding time is 550 °C and 60 min, which creates the adsorbents of the max absorption capability of 1227.5 ?g Hg/g.

  8. The unique regulation of iron-sulfur cluster biogenesis in a Gram-positive bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Joana A.; Alonso-García, Noelia; Macedo-Ribeiro, Sandra; Pereira, Pedro José Barbosa

    2014-01-01

    Iron-sulfur clusters function as cofactors of a wide range of proteins, with diverse molecular roles in both prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. Dedicated machineries assemble the clusters and deliver them to the final acceptor molecules in a tightly regulated process. In the prototypical Gram-negative bacterium Escherichia coli, the two existing iron-sulfur cluster assembly systems, iron-sulfur cluster (ISC) and sulfur assimilation (SUF) pathways, are closely interconnected. The ISC pathway regulator, IscR, is a transcription factor of the helix-turn-helix type that can coordinate a [2Fe-2S] cluster. Redox conditions and iron or sulfur availability modulate the ligation status of the labile IscR cluster, which in turn determines a switch in DNA sequence specificity of the regulator: cluster-containing IscR can bind to a family of gene promoters (type-1) whereas the clusterless form recognizes only a second group of sequences (type-2). However, iron-sulfur cluster biogenesis in Gram-positive bacteria is not so well characterized, and most organisms of this group display only one of the iron-sulfur cluster assembly systems. A notable exception is the unique Gram-positive dissimilatory metal reducing bacterium Thermincola potens, where genes from both systems could be identified, albeit with a diverging organization from that of Gram-negative bacteria. We demonstrated that one of these genes encodes a functional IscR homolog and is likely involved in the regulation of iron-sulfur cluster biogenesis in T. potens. Structural and biochemical characterization of T. potens and E. coli IscR revealed a strikingly similar architecture and unveiled an unforeseen conservation of the unique mechanism of sequence discrimination characteristic of this distinctive group of transcription regulators. PMID:24847070

  9. Regeneration of Sulfur Deactivated Ni-based Biomass Syngas Cleaning Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Liyu; Howard, Christopher J.; King, David L.; Gerber, Mark A.; Dagle, Robert A.; Stevens, Don J.

    2010-09-14

    Nickel-based catalysts have been widely tested in decomposing tar and methane in hot biomass syngas cleanup researches. However these catalysts can be easily deactivated by the sulfur compounds in syngas due to the strong sulfur adsorption effect on the Ni surface. Here we report on a new regeneration process, which can effectively and efficiently regenerate the sulfur-poisoned Ni reforming catalysts. This process consists of four sequential treatments: 1) controlled oxidation at 750oC in 1% O2, 2) decomposition at 900oC in Ar, 3) reduction at 900oC in 2% H2, and 4) reaction at 900oC under reforming condition. The duration of this 4-step regeneration process is only about 8 hours, which is shorter than that of the conventional steaming regeneration treatment.

  10. Design and operation of the coke-oven gas sulfur removal facility at Geneva Steel

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. U. Havili; L. L. Fraser-Smyth; B. W. Wood

    1996-01-01

    The coke-oven gas sulfur removal facility at Geneva Steel utilizes a combination of two technologies which had never been used together. These two technologies had proven effective separately and now in combination. However, it brought unique operational considerations which has never been considered previously. The front end of the facility is a Sulfiban process. This monoethanolamine (MEA) process effectively absorbs

  11. Biogeochemistry of Iron and Sulfur in Sediments of an Acidic Mining Lake in Lusatia, Germany

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. Friese; K. Wendt-Potthoff; D. W. Zachmann; A. Fauville; B. Mayer; J. Veizer

    1998-01-01

    Chemical, microbiological and stable isotope analyses of sediments from an acidic mining lake were used to evaluate whether biogeochemical processes, such as iron and sulfate reduction, are extant, because such processes can potentially generate alkalinity. Sediment cores were sliced in cm intervals to achieve a high resolution for spatial distribution of organic and inorganic components. Iron, sulfur, carbon, nitrogen and

  12. System for recovering sulfur from gases, especially natural gas. Final report, February 1991July 1992

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gryka

    1992-01-01

    The objective of this project is to design, construct and operate a laboratory reactor to convert hydrogen sulfide into liquid sulfur, using a patented PIPco process as a basis. Reaction conditions will be studied, continuous regenerative operation demonstrated, and data necessary to design a field test system will be collected. The subject process is a regenerative buffered water circulating system

  13. A review on removal of sulfur components from gasoline by pervaporation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hamid Reza Mortaheb; Farnoosh Ghaemmaghami; Babak Mokhtarani

    Desulfurization of gasoline has gained growing importance because of tighter limits of less than 10ppm sulfur in gasoline in recent regulations. On the other hand, preserving octane rating in gasoline is the most concern subject of the manufacturers. This review focuses on the desulfurization of gasoline by means of pervaporation (PV) process. The process as a new technology has drawn

  14. Investigations into the interactions between sulfur and anodes for solid oxide fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Zhe

    Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) are electrochemical devices based on solid oxide electrolytes that convert chemical energy in fuels directly into electricity via electrode reactions. SOFCs have the advantages of high energy efficiency and low emissions and hold the potential to be the power of the future especially for small power generation systems (1-10 kW). Another unique advantage of SOFCs is the potential to directly utilize hydrocarbon fuels such as natural gas through internal reforming. However, all hydrocarbon fuels contain some sulfur compounds, which transform to hydrogen sulfide (H2S) in the reforming process and dramatically degrade the performance of the existing SOFCs. In this study, the interactions between sulfur contaminant (in the form of H2S) and the anodes for SOFCs were systematically investigated in order to gain a fundamental understanding of the mechanism of sulfur poisoning and ultimately to achieve rational design of sulfur-tolerant anodes. The sulfur poisoning behavior of the state-of-the-art Ni-YSZ cermet anodes was characterized using electrochemical measurements performed on button cells (of different structures) under various operating conditions, including H2S concentration, temperature, cell current density/terminal voltage, and cell structure. Also, the mechanisms of interactions between sulfur and the Ni-YSZ cermet anode were investigated using both ex situ and in situ characterization techniques such as Raman spectroscopy. Results suggest that the sulfur poisoning of Ni-YSZ cermet anodes at high temperatures in fuels with ppm-level H2S is due not to the formation of multi-layer conventional nickel sulfides but to the adsorption of sulfur on the nickel surface. In addition, new sulfur-tolerant anode materials were explored in this study. Thermodynamic principles were applied to predict the stability of candidate sulfur-tolerant anode materials and explain complex phenomena concerning the reactivity of candidate materials with hydrogen sulfide. The enhanced sulfur tolerance for some candidate anode materials such as (Gd2Ti1.4Mo0.6 O7) is attributed to the transition of the surface from metal oxides to sulfides (i.e., MoS2), which enhances the catalytic activity and increases the number of reaction sites.

  15. Kinetic Study and Mathematical Model of Hemimorphite Dissolution in Low Sulfuric Acid Solution at High Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Hongsheng; Wei, Chang; Li, Cunxiong; Deng, Zhigan; Li, Minting; Li, Xingbin

    2014-10-01

    The dissolution kinetics of hemimorphite with low sulfuric acid solution was investigated at high temperature. The dissolution rate of zinc was obtained as a function of dissolution time under the experimental conditions where the effects of sulfuric acid concentration, temperature, and particle size were studied. The results showed that zinc extraction increased with an increase in temperature and sulfuric acid concentration and with a decrease in particle size. A mathematical model able to describe the process kinetics was developed from the shrinking core model, considering the change of the sulfuric acid concentration during dissolution. It was found that the dissolution process followed a shrinking core model with "ash" layer diffusion as the main rate-controlling step. This finding was supported with a linear relationship between the apparent rate constant and the reciprocal of squared particle radius. The reaction order with respect to sulfuric acid concentration was determined to be 0.7993. The apparent activation energy for the dissolution process was determined to be 44.9 kJ/mol in the temperature range of 373 K to 413 K (100 °C to 140 °C). Based on the shrinking core model, the following equation was established:

  16. Direct determination of sulfur species in coals from the Argonne premium sample program by solid sampling electrothermal vaporization inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Daniela; Vogt, Thomas; Klinger, Mathias; Masset, Patrick Joseph; Otto, Matthias

    2014-10-21

    A new direct solid sampling method for speciation of sulfur in coals by electrothermal vaporization inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ETV-ICP OES) is presented. On the basis of the controlled thermal decomposition of coal in an argon atmosphere, it is possible to determine the different sulfur species in addition to elemental sulfur in coals. For the assignment of the obtained peaks from the sulfur transient emission signal, several analytical techniques (reflected light microscopy, scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction) were used. The developed direct solid sampling method enables a good accuracy (relative standard deviation ? 6%), precision and was applied to determine the sulfur forms in the Argonne premium coals, varying in rank. The generated method is time- and cost-effective and well suited for the fast characterization of sulfur species in coal. It can be automated to a large extent and is applicable for process-accompanying analyses. PMID:25242109

  17. Porous Hollow Carbon@Sulfur Composites for High-Power Lithium–Sulfur Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Navaneedhakrishnan, Jayaprakash [School of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States); Shen, Jingguo [School of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States); Moganty, Surya S. [School of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States); Corona, Alexandra [School of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States); Archer, Lynden A. [School of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States)

    2011-06-20

    C @ S nanocomposites based on mesoporous hollow carbon capsules were prepared by a template approach. Their excellent properties as a cathode material in a lithium secondary battery of S-sequestration of elemental sulfur in the carbon capsules, a restricted polysulfide shuttling and an improved electron transport on sulfur are attributed.

  18. COULOMETRIC DETERMINATION OF TOTAL SULFUR AND REDUCED INORGANIC SULFUR FRACTIONS IN ENVIRONMENTAL SAMPLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Evaluation of the solid-phase partitioning of sulfur is frequently an important analytical component of risk assessments at hazardous waste sites because minerals containing reduced-sulfur can significantly affect the transport and fate of organic and inorganic contaminants in na...

  19. Modification of Sulfur Dioxide Injury to Tobacco and Tomato by Varying Nitrogen and Sulfur Nutrition

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ida A. Leone; Eileen Brennan

    1972-01-01

    The body of information presented in this paper is directed to plant scientists who are concerned with factors which modify the susceptibility of plants to air pollutants.Tobacco and tomato plants grown in sand-solution culture with varying levels of nitrogen or sulfur were exposed to injurious levels of sulfur dioxide. Plants of both species which were deficient in either nutrient exhibited

  20. Sugar yields from dilute sulfuric acid and sulfur dioxide pretreatments and subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis of switchgrass

    E-print Network

    California at Riverside, University of

    Sugar yields from dilute sulfuric acid and sulfur dioxide pretreatments and subsequent enzymatic%, and 10% wt.% of dry biomass were also tested at 180 °C for 10 min. Sugar yields were tracked for pretreatment and subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis to identify conditions for the highest total sugar yields

  1. Seawater sulfate reduction and sulfur isotope fractionation in basaltic systems: interaction of seawater with fayalite and magnetite at 200–350°C

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shanks, Wayne C., III; Bischoff, James L.; Rosenbauer, Robert J.

    1981-01-01

    Systematics of sulfur isotopes in the 250 and 350°C experiments indicate that isotopic equilibrium is reached, and can be modeled as a Rayleigh distillation process. Isotopic composition of hydrothermally produced H2S in natural systems is strongly dependent upon the seawater/basalt ratio in the geothermal system, which controls the relative sulfide contributions from the two important sulfur sources, seawater sulfate and sulfide phases in basalt. Anhydrite precipitation during geothermal heating severely limits sulfate ingress into high temperature interaction zones. Quantitative sulfate reduction can thus be accomplished without producing strongly oxidized rocks and resultant sulfide sulfur isotope values represent a mixture of seawater and basaltic sulfur.

  2. Stable sulfur isotope partitioning during simulated petroleum formation as determined by hydrous pyrolysis of Ghareb Limestone, Israel

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Amrani, A.; Lewan, M.D.; Aizenshtat, Zeev

    2005-01-01

    Hydrous pyrolysis experiments at 200 to 365??C were carried out on a thermally immature organic-rich limestone containing Type-IIS kerogen from the Ghareb Limestone in North Negev, Israel. This work focuses on the thermal behavior of both organic and inorganic sulfur species and the partitioning of their stable sulfur isotopes among organic and inorganic phases generated during hydrous pyrolyses. Most of the sulfur in the rock (85%) is organic sulfur. The most dominant sulfur transformation is cleavage of organic-bound sulfur to form H2 S(gas). Up to 70% of this organic sulfur is released as H2S(gas) that is isotopically lighter than the sulfur in the kerogen. Organic sulfur is enriched by up to 2??? in 34S during thermal maturation compared with the initial ??34S values. The ??34S values of the three main organic fractions (kerogen, bitumen and expelled oil) are within 1??? of one another. No thermochemical sulfate reduction or sulfate formation was observed during the experiments. The early released sulfur reacted with available iron to form secondary pyrite and is the most 34S depleted phase, which is 21??? lighter than the bulk organic sulfur. The large isotopic fractionation for the early formed H2S is a result of the system not being in equilibrium. As partial pressure of H2S(gas) increases, retro reactions with the organic sulfur in the closed system may cause isotope exchange and isotopic homogenization. Part of the ??34S-enriched secondary pyrite decomposes above 300??C resulting in a corresponding decrease in the ??34S of the remaining pyrite. These results are relevant to interpreting thermal maturation processes and their effect on kerogen-oil-H2S-pyrite correlations. In particular, the use of pyrite-kerogen ??34S relations in reconstructing diagenetic conditions of thermally mature rocks is questionable because formation of secondary pyrite during thermal maturation can mask the isotopic signature and quantity of the original diagenetic pyrite. The main transformations of kerogen to bitumen and bitumen to oil can be recorded by using both sulfur content and ??34S of each phase including the H2S(gas). H2S generated in association with oil should be isotopically lighter or similar to oil. It is concluded that small isotopic differentiation obtained between organic and inorganic sulfur species suggests closed-system conditions. Conversely, open-system conditions may cause significant isotopic discrimination between the oil and its source kerogen. The magnitude of this discrimination is suggested to be highly dependent on the availability of iron in a source rock resulting in secondary formation of pyrite. Copyright ?? 2005 Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Nonequilibrium sulfur capture and retention in an air cooled slagging coal combustor. Quarterly technical progress report, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Zauderer, B.

    1996-11-01

    The objective of this 24 month project is to determine the degree of sulfur retention in slag in a full scale cyclone coal combustor with sulfur capture by calcium oxide sorbent injection into the combustor. This sulfur capture process consists of two steps: Capture of sulfur with calcined calcium oxide followed by impact of the reacted sulfur-calcium particles on the liquid slag lining the combustor. The sulfur bearing slag must be removed within several minutes from the combustor to prevent re-evolution of the sulfur from the slag. To accomplish this requires slag mass flow rates in the range of several 100 lb/hr. To study this two step process in the combustor, two groups of tests are being implemented. In the first group, calcium sulfate in the form of gypsum, or plaster of Paris, was injected in the combustor to determine sulfur evolution from slag. In the second group, the entire process is tested with limestone and/or calcium hydrate injected into the combustor. This entire effort consists of a series of up to 16 parametric tests in a 20 MMtu/hr slagging, air cooled, cyclone combustor. During the present quarterly reporting period ending September 30,1996, three tests in this project were implemented, bringing the total tests to 5. In addition, a total of 10 test days were completed during this quarter on the parallel project that utilizes the same 20 MMtu/hr combustor. The results of that project, especially those related to improved slagging performance, have a direct bearing on this project in assuring proper operation at the high slag flow rates that may be necessary to achieve high sulfur retention in slag.

  4. Status report on sulfur iodine thermochemical water-splitting cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Besenbruch, G.E.; Brown, L.C.; Yoshimoto, M.; Norman, J.H.; O'Keefe, D.R.; Endo, M.; Allen, C.L.; Kelly, M.L.; Trester, P.W.

    1981-11-01

    Major process improvements which had been identified in an earlier phase of this program were investigated and their feasibility demonstrated. The engineering process flowsheet was revised to incorporate the newest process improvements. It is now being used for an estimate of hydrogen production cost from the General Atomic Company (GAC) cycle. An energy storage cycle for a solar adaptation of the sulfur-iodine cycle has been identified and is being evaluated along with features particularly concerning the availability and level of insolation and how it affects engineering design of the chemical plant. Efforts are also underway with Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to design the sulfur-iodine cycle around the Tandem Mirror Fusion Reactor. Potential systems for HI purification are being investigated which could eliminate the need for the present phosphoric acid treatment completely and could result in significant savings in capital cost for this part of the process. Potential catalysts for the liquid HI decomposition step were evaluated. Noble metals appear to have highest activity; however, attrition of the catalyst occurs.

  5. Sulfur isotope fractionation during the reduction of elemental sulfur and thiosulfate by Dethiosulfovibrio spp.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surkov, A. V.; Böttcher, M. E.; Kuever, J.

    2009-04-01

    Thiosulfate and elemental sulfur are typical by-products of the oxidation of dissolved sulfide and important sulfur intermediates in the biogeochemical sulfur cycle of natural sediments where they can be further transformed by microbial or chemical oxidation, reduction, or disproportionation. Due to the often superimposing reaction pathways of the sulfur intermediates in natural environments specific tracers are needed to better resolve the complex microbial and biogeochemical reactions. An important fingerprint for sulfur cycling is provided by the microbial fractionation of the stable sulfur isotopes S-34 and S-32. Proper interpretation of isotope signals in nature, however, is only possible by the calibration with results obtained with pure cultures under defined experimental conditions. In addition, sulfur isotope discrimination may provide informations about specific encymatic biochemical pathways within the bacterial cells. In this study, we report the results for the discrimination of stable sulfur isotopes S-32 and S-34 during reduction of thiosulfate and elemental sulfur by non-sulfate, but sulfur- and thiosulfate-reducing bacteria which are phylogenetically not related to sulfate-reducing bacteria. Experiments with were conducted at known cell-specific thiosulfate reduction rates. Stable sulfur isotope fractionation was investigated during reduction of thiosulfate and elemental sulfur at 28°C by growing batch cultures of Dethiosulfovibrio marinus WS100 (type strain DSM 12537) and Dethiosulfovibrio russensis (type strain DSM 12538) using citrate as carbon and energy source. The cell-specific reduction rates were 0.3 to 2.4 fmol cell-1 d-1 (thiosulfate) and 31 to 38 fmol cell-1 d-1 (elemental sulphur), respectively. The sulfide produced was depleted in S-34 by 12 per mil compared to total thiosulfate sulfur, close to previous results observed for sulfate-reducing bacteria, indicating that the thiosulfate-reducing mechanism of sulfate reducers is similar to that of the investigated thiosulfate-reducing strains. Elemental sulfur reduction yields sulfide depleted in S-34 and isotope fractionation effects between 1.3 and 5.2 per mil for Dethiosulfovibrio russensis and 1.7 and 5.1 per mil Dethiosulfovibrio marinus, with the smaller fractionation effects observed in the exponential growth phase and enhanced discrimination under conditions of citrate depletion and cell lysis.

  6. Examination of sulfur forms in coal by direct pyrolysis and flameless ozone-sulfur chemiluminescence detection

    SciTech Connect

    Glinski, R.J.; Xu, Xiaoyang; McGowan, C.W. [Tennessee Technological Univ., Cookeville, TN (United States)

    1995-12-31

    The extremely high selectivity of the newly developed ozone-sulfur chemiluminescence detector (SCD) has been coupled with controlled-temperature pyrolysis to allow qualitative and semiquantitative determination of sulfur forms in coal. Pyrolysis products from the heating of a sulfur containing solid sample were swept directly through a high-temperature conversion tube and into the SCD to yield a strong signal. Upon heating the pyrolysis tube from room temperature to 700 degrees C, several distinct peaks were observed by the SCD, identified as being due to aliphatic sulfides and thiols, elemental sulfur, simple thiophenes, pyrite, and complex thiophenes. Standard addition of the pure inorganic substances provided semiquantitative determinations. Three coals were examined and could be quickly and easily distinguished by their sulfur forms. The results are compared with those of other pyrolysis methods.

  7. The reaction kinetics of gasoline sulfur compounds: Catalytic mechanisms for sulfur reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Harding, R.H.; Gatte, R.R.; Albro, T.G.; Wormsbecher, R.F. [W.R. Grace & Co. Conn, Columbia, MD (United States)

    1993-12-31

    One of the key elements of reformulated gasoline is the reduction of the sulfur compounds produced by fluid catalytic cracking. This paper probes the reaction kinetics of refractory gasoline-range thiophene derivatives (thiophene, tetrahydrothiophene, and alkylthiophenes) in an effort to determine the mechanisms of sulfur compound cracking in the FCC unit. The gasoline-range sulfur compounds were analyzed using gas chromatography with an atomic emission detector. The authors` results show that the FCC catalysts affects the cracking of sulfur compounds through both hydrogen transfer and zeolite pore restriction mechanisms. An experimental FCC catalyst is shown to reduce gasoline sulfur content in the Davidson Circulating Riser (DCR{sup TM}) pilot unit. Model compound tests show that the activity of the catalyst is due to both its catalytic and adsorptive properties. Tetrahydrothiophene, which is produced from thiophenes by hydrogen transfer, is completely removed by the experimental catalyst.

  8. Insights into the iron and sulfur energetic metabolism of Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans by microarray transcriptome profiling

    SciTech Connect

    R. Quatrini; C. Appia-Ayme; Y. Denis; J. Ratouchniak; F. Veloso; J. Valdes; C. Lefimil; S. Silver; F. Roberto; O. Orellana; F. Denizot; E. Jedlicki; D. Holmes; V. Bonnefoy

    2006-09-01

    Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans is a well known acidophilic, chemolithoautotrophic, Gram negative, bacterium involved in bioleaching and acid mine drainage. In aerobic conditions, it gains energy mainly from the oxidation of ferrous iron and/or reduced sulfur compounds present in ores. After initial oxidation of the substrate, electrons from ferrous iron or sulfur enter respiratory chains and are transported through several redox proteins to oxygen. However, the oxidation of ferrous iron and reduced sulfur compounds has also to provide electrons for the reduction of NAD(P) that is subsequently required for many metabolic processes including CO2 fixation. To help to unravel the enzymatic pathways and the electron transfer chains involved in these processes, a genome-wide microarray transcript profiling analysis was carried out. Oligonucleotides corresponding to approximately 3000 genes of the A. ferrooxidans type strain ATCC23270 were spotted onto glass-slides and hybridized with cDNA retrotranscribed from RNA extracted from ferrous iron and sulfur grown cells. The genes which are preferentially transcribed in ferrous iron conditions and those preferentially transcribed in sulfur conditions were analyzed. The expression of a substantial number of these genes has been validated by real-time PCR, Northern blot hybridization and/or immunodetection analysis. Our results support and extend certain models of iron and sulfur oxidation and highlight previous observations regarding the possible presence of alternate electron pathways. Our findings also suggest ways in which iron and sulfur oxidation may be co-ordinately regulated. An accompanying paper (Appia-Ayme et al.) describes results pertaining to other metabolic functions.

  9. The effecting factors of sulfur evolution during coal combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Zechang; Yu Hongguan; Wang Li [Shandong Inst. of Mining and Technology, Ji`nan (China). Dept. of Coal Chemical Engineering

    1997-12-31

    Three kinds of bituminous coal and one kind of anthracite have been used to investigate the factors affecting sulfur evolution during coal combustion by means of improved automatic sulfur analyzer. In this paper the sulfur evolution index, that is, the relative quantity of sulfur evolution (Vs), the final quantity of sulfur evolution (Va), the rate of sulfur evolution and delay time, are selected to describe the sulfur evolution. The results show that the rate and quantity of sulfur evolution is affected by the temperature, retention time, type of coal, sulfur forms, calcium-based content in coal, oxygen concentration and flow velocity of air. The study can provide some knowledge for selecting sorbent for coal combustion.

  10. Isotopic insights into microbial sulfur cycling in oil reservoirs.

    PubMed

    Hubbard, Christopher G; Cheng, Yiwei; Engelbrekston, Anna; Druhan, Jennifer L; Li, Li; Ajo-Franklin, Jonathan B; Coates, John D; Conrad, Mark E

    2014-01-01

    Microbial sulfate reduction in oil reservoirs (biosouring) is often associated with secondary oil production where seawater containing high sulfate concentrations (~28 mM) is injected into a reservoir to maintain pressure and displace oil. The sulfide generated from biosouring can cause corrosion of infrastructure, health exposure risks, and higher production costs. Isotope monitoring is a promising approach for understanding microbial sulfur cycling in reservoirs, enabling early detection of biosouring, and understanding the impact of souring. Microbial sulfate reduction is known to result in large shifts in the sulfur and oxygen isotope compositions of the residual sulfate, which can be distinguished from other processes that may be occurring in oil reservoirs, such as precipitation of sulfate and sulfide minerals. Key to the success of this method is using the appropriate isotopic fractionation factors for the conditions and processes being monitored. For a set of batch incubation experiments using a mixed microbial culture with crude oil as the electron donor, we measured a sulfur fractionation factor for sulfate reduction of -30‰. We have incorporated this result into a simplified 1D reservoir reactive transport model to highlight how isotopes can help discriminate between biotic and abiotic processes affecting sulfate and sulfide concentrations. Modeling results suggest that monitoring sulfate isotopes can provide an early indication of souring for reservoirs with reactive iron minerals that can remove the produced sulfide, especially when sulfate reduction occurs in the mixing zone between formation waters (FW) containing elevated concentrations of volatile fatty acids (VFAs) and injection water (IW) containing elevated sulfate. In addition, we examine the role of reservoir thermal, geochemical, hydrological, operational and microbiological conditions in determining microbial souring dynamics and hence the anticipated isotopic signatures. PMID:25285094

  11. Particle size distributions in Arctic polar stratospheric clouds, growth and freezing of sulfuric acid droplets, and implications for cloud formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dye, James E.; Baumgardner, D.; Gandrud, B. W.; Kawa, S. R.; Kelly, K. K.; Loewenstein, M.; Ferry, G. V.; Chan, K. R.; Gary, B. L.

    1992-01-01

    The paper uses particle size and volume measurements obtained with the forward scattering spectrometer probe model 300 during January and February 1989 in the Airborne Arctic Stratospheric Experiment to investigate processes important in the formation and growth of polar stratospheric cloud (PSC) particles. It is suggested on the basis of comparisons of the observations with expected sulfuric acid droplet deliquescence that in the Arctic a major fraction of the sulfuric acid droplets remain liquid until temperatures at least as low as 193 K. It is proposed that homogeneous freezing of the sulfuric acid droplets might occur near 190 K and might play a role in the formation of PSCs.

  12. Glutamate synthase: a complex iron-sulfur flavoprotein

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. A. Vanoni; B. Curti

    1999-01-01

    .   Glutamate synthase is a complex iron-sulfur flavoprotein that forms l-glutamate from l-glutamine and 2-oxoglutarate. It participates\\u000a with glutamine synthetase in ammonia assimilation processes. The known structural and biochemical properties of glutamate\\u000a synthase from Azospirillum brasilense, a nitrogen-fixing bacterium, will be discussed in comparison to those of the ferredoxin-dependent enzyme from photosynthetic\\u000a tissues and of the eukaryotic reduced pyridine nucleotide-dependent

  13. Catalytic hydrodesulfurization of an organic sulfur compound contained in gasoline

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, M.M.; Nowack, G.P.

    1982-02-09

    The catalytic hydrodesulfurization of an organic sulfur compound contained in gasoline is carried out in the presence of a catalyst composition comprising catalytic grade alumina and a catalytic component at least one member of which is selected from the group consisting of molybdenum and tungsten. A catalytic promoter may also be present in the catalyst composition with at least one member of the catalytic promoter being selected from the group consisting of iron, cobalt and nickel. A suitable nitrogen compound is also contacted with the catalyst composition to at least partially suppress the saturation of olefins in the gasoline during the hydrodesulfurization process.

  14. Control of oxidative sulfur metabolism in Chlorobium

    SciTech Connect

    Maka, A.

    1986-01-01

    The photosynthetic, anaerobic microorganism Chlorobium limicola forma sp. thiosulfatophilum is being investigated as a possible biocatalyst for the removal of acid gases (primarily H/sub 2/S) generated by the hydroprocessing of fossil fuels. The organism was grown in an anaerobic, fed-batch photobioreactor which was continuously supplied with N/sub 2/, CO/sub 2/ and H/sub 2/S. The effect of light intensity, surface area of illuminated bioreactor, H/sub 2/S flow rate and various wavelength regions of light on oxidative sulfur metabolism by Chlorobium was examined. Light intensity, surface area of illuminated bioreactor, and H/sub 2/S flow rate regulated oxidative sulfur metabolism. The H/sub 2/S utilization rate increased with a corresponding increase in light intensity. The photoautotroph grew in any selected wavelength region with production of the various sulfur compounds, i.e., thiosulfate, sulfate, and sulfur. However, the rate of H/sub 2/S oxidation was wavelength dependent. The photosynthetic quantum efficiency (which is the molecules of sulfur (S/sup 0/) produced per photon utilized) was determined for this system. It is possible that the quantum efficiency can be used as a sufficiency factor for a photobioreactor. The sufficiency factor would be a unique characteristic of the reactor and demonstrate the relationship between light intensity and the rate of the light driven reaction. This sufficiency factor could be used for the determination of a light efficient photobioreactor.

  15. Sulfur isotope fractionation during the evolutionary adaptation of a sulfate-reducing bacterium.

    PubMed

    Pellerin, André; Anderson-Trocmé, Luke; Whyte, Lyle G; Zane, Grant M; Wall, Judy D; Wing, Boswell A

    2015-04-01

    Dissimilatory sulfate reduction is a microbial catabolic pathway that preferentially processes less massive sulfur isotopes relative to their heavier counterparts. This sulfur isotope fractionation is recorded in ancient sedimentary rocks and generally is considered to reflect a phenotypic response to environmental variations rather than to evolutionary adaptation. Modern sulfate-reducing microorganisms isolated from similar environments can exhibit a wide range of sulfur isotope fractionations, suggesting that adaptive processes influence the sulfur isotope phenotype. To date, the relationship between evolutionary adaptation and isotopic phenotypes has not been explored. We addressed this by studying the covariation of fitness, sulfur isotope fractionation, and growth characteristics in Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough in a microbial evolution experiment. After 560 generations, the mean fitness of the evolved lineages relative to the starting isogenic population had increased by ? 17%. After 927 generations, the mean fitness relative to the initial ancestral population had increased by ? 20%. Growth rate in exponential phase increased during the course of the experiment, suggesting that this was a primary influence behind the fitness increases. Consistent changes were observed within different selection intervals between fractionation and fitness. Fitness changes were associated with changes in exponential growth rate but changes in fractionation were not. Instead, they appeared to be a response to changes in the parameters that govern growth rate: yield and cell-specific sulfate respiration rate. We hypothesize that cell-specific sulfate respiration rate, in particular, provides a bridge that allows physiological controls on fractionation to cross over to the adaptive realm. PMID:25662968

  16. Pressurized fluidized-bed hydroretorting of Eastern oil shales -- Sulfur control

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, M.J.; Abbasian, J.; Akin, C.; Lau, F.S.; Maka, A.; Mensinger, M.C.; Punwani, D.V.; Rue, D.M. (Institute of Gas Technology, Chicago, IL (United States)); Gidaspow, D.; Gupta, R.; Wasan, D.T. (Illinois Inst. of Tech., Chicago, IL (United States)); Pfister, R.M.: Krieger, E.J. (Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States))

    1992-05-01

    This topical report on Sulfur Control'' presents the results of work conducted by the Institute of Gas Technology (IGT), the Illinois Institute of Technology (IIT), and the Ohio State University (OSU) to develop three novel approaches for desulfurization that have shown good potential with coal and could be cost-effective for oil shales. These are (1) In-Bed Sulfur Capture using different sorbents (IGT), (2) Electrostatic Desulfurization (IIT), and (3) Microbial Desulfurization and Denitrification (OSU and IGT). The objective of the task on In-Bed Sulfur Capture was to determine the effectiveness of different sorbents (that is, limestone, calcined limestone, dolomite, and siderite) for capturing sulfur (as H{sub 2}S) in the reactor during hydroretorting. The objective of the task on Electrostatic Desulfurization was to determine the operating conditions necessary to achieve a high degree of sulfur removal and kerogen recovery in IIT's electrostatic separator. The objectives of the task on Microbial Desulfurization and Denitrification were to (1) isolate microbial cultures and evaluate their ability to desulfurize and denitrify shale, (2) conduct laboratory-scale batch and continuous tests to improve and enhance microbial removal of these components, and (3) determine the effects of processing parameters, such as shale slurry concentration, solids settling characteristics, agitation rate, and pH on the process.

  17. Combined chemical and microbiological removal of organic sulfur from coal

    SciTech Connect

    Raphaelian, L.A.

    1991-01-01

    The objective of this work is to investigate techniques for chemically converting the sulfur containing organic compounds in coal to compounds that can be treated microbiologically to remove the organically bound sulfur. The goal is to achieve an economically feasible mild chemical oxidation of the organic sulfur in a representative Illinois Basin coal by converting the sulfur to sulfoxides and sulfones; the carbon sulfur bond in the sulfoxides and sulfones would then be broken microbiologically and the sulfur removed from the coal as sulfate.

  18. Sonic enhanced ash agglomeration and sulfur capture. Quarterly technical progress report, April--June 1995

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1995-08-01

    A major concern with the utilization of coal in directly fired gas turbines is the control of particulate emissions and reduction of sulfur dioxide, and alkali vapor from combustion of coal, upstream of the gas turbine. Much research and development has been sponsored on methods for particulate emissions control and the direct injection of calcium-based sorbents to reduce SO{sub 2} emission levels. The results of this research and development indicate that both acoustic agglomeration of particulates and direct injection of sorbents have the potential to become a significant emissions control strategy. The Sonic Enhanced Ash Agglomeration and Sulfur Capture program focuses upon the application of an MTCI proprietary invention (Patent No. 5,197,399) for simultaneously enhancing sulfur capture and particulate agglomeration of the combustor effluent. This application can be adapted as either a {open_quotes}hot flue gas cleanup{close_quotes} subsystem for the current concepts for combustor islands or as an alternative primary pulse combustor island in which slagging, sulfur capture, particulate agglomeration and control, and alkali gettering as well as NO{sub x} control processes become an integral part of the pulse combustion process. The goal of the program is to support the DOE mission in developing coal-fired combustion gas turbines. In particular, the MTCI proprietary process for bimodal ash agglomeration and simultaneous sulfur capture will be evaluated and developed. The technology embodiment of the invention provides for the use of standard grind, moderately beneficiated coal and WEM for firing the gas turbine with efficient sulfur capture and particulate emission control upstream of the turbine. The process also accommodates injection of alkali gettering material if necessary. The proposed technology provides for practical, reliable, and capital (and O&M) cost-effective means of protection for the gas turbine from impurities in the coal combustor effluent.

  19. [Sonic Enhanced Ash Agglomeration and Sulfur Capture]. [Quarterly technical progress report, September 27, 1993--January 2, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-12-31

    A major concern with the utilization of coal in directly fired gas turbines is the control of particulate emissions and reduction of sulfur dioxide, and alkali vapor from combustion of coal, upstream of the gas turbine. The Sonic Enhanced Ash Agglomeration and Sulfur Capture program focuses upon the application of an MTCI proprietary invention (Patent No. 5,197,399) for simultaneously enhancing sulfur capture and particulate agglomeration of the combustor effluent. This application can be adapted as either a ``hot flue gas cleanup`` subsystem for the current concepts for combustor islands or as an alternative primary pulse combustor island in which slagging, sulfur capture, particulate agglomeration and control, and alkali gettering as well as NO{sub x} control processes become an integral part of the pulse combustion process. The goal of the program is to support the DOE mission in developing coal-fired combustion gas turbines. In particular, the MTCI proprietary process for bimodal ash agglomeration and simultaneous sulfur capture will be evaluated and developed. The technology embodiment of the invention provides for the use of standard grind, moderately beneficiated coal and WEM for firing the gas turbine with efficient sulfur capture and particulate emission control upstream of the turbine. The process also accommodates injection of alkali gettering material if necessary. This is aimed at utilization of relatively inexpensive coal fuels, thus realizing the primary benefit being sought by direct firing of coal in such gas turbine systems.

  20. Self-weaving sulfur-carbon composite cathodes for high rate lithium-sulfur batteries.

    PubMed

    Su, Yu-Sheng; Fu, Yongzhu; Manthiram, Arumugam

    2012-11-14

    Realization of a ubiquitous clean energy future depends critically on the efficient storage and utilization of renewable energies. Lithium-ion batteries are appealing in this regard, but low-cost, abundant, safe, high energy-density electrode materials need to be developed to adopt them. Here we present a sulfur-multi-wall carbon nanotube (MWCNT) composite cathode with high-rate cyclability by a facile binder/current collector-free fabrication process. The composite cathode exhibits high capacities of 1352 mAh g(-1) at 1C rate and 1012 mAh g(-1) at 4C rate. Due to the self-weaving behavior of MWCNTs, extra cell components such as binders and current collectors are rendered unnecessary, thereby streamlining the electrode manufacturing process and decreasing the cell weight. While the highly conductive MWCNTs improve the active material utilization at high rates, the absorption ability of the cathode framework localizes the electrolyte and suppresses the migration of soluble polysulfides. The cathode design and facile synthesis enhance the feasibility of practical high rate Li-S batteries. PMID:23033056

  1. Application of a sodium sulfur cell with dynamic sulfur electrode to a battery system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokoi, H.; Takahashi, K.; Shimoyashiki, S.

    1992-01-01

    The construction and performance of a sodium sulfur battery system with dynamic sulfur electrodes are described. Three cells were first connected in parallel, then two such groups were connected in series. Each cell included a liquid sodium-filled beta-double-prime-alumina tube and a system to feed liquid sulfur into the annular cathode. Low-resistance graphite felt was tightly packed around the beta-double-prime-alumina tube. Sodium pentasulfide was removed from the sulfur electrode. The battery was operated automatically and stably charged and discharged in the two-phase region. The discharged energy was 4372 Wh (capacity 1170 Ah) during a continuous operation of 19.5 h. The discharge/charge energy efficiency of the battery was 82 percent at an averaged current density of 100 mA/sq cm and operating temperature of 350 C. The deviation of the cell current in a parallel chain was less than 7 percent, and this was induced by the difference in internal resistance. In the daily charge/discharge cycle, cell capacity with the dynamic sulfur electrode was 1.5 times higher than that with the static sulfur electrode using the same active surface of beta-double-prime-alumina, because the internal resistance of the former cell was constant regardless of cell capacity. This battery system with a dynamic sulfur electrode can be applied to energy storage systems,such as large scale load leveling systems, electric vehicle batteries, and solar energy systems.

  2. Production of Lunar Concrete Using Molten Sulfur

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Omar, Husam A.

    1993-01-01

    The United States has made a commitment to go back to the moon to stay in the early part of the next century. In order to achieve this objective it became evident to NASA that a Lunar Outpost will be needed to house scientists and astronauts who will be living on the moon for extended periods of time. A study has been undertaken by the authors and supported by NASA to study the feasibility of using lunar regolith with different binders such as molten sulfur, epoxy or hydraulic cement as a construction material for different lunar structures. The basic premise of this study is that it will be more logical and cost effective to manufacture lunar construction materials utilizing indigenous resources rather than transporting needed materials from earth. Lunar concrete (made from Hydraulic Cement and lunar soil) has been studied and suggested as the construction material of choice for some of the lunar projects. Unfortunately, its hydration requires water which is going to be a precious commodity on the moon. Therefore this study explores the feasibility of using binders other than hydraulic cement such as sulfur or epoxy with lunar regolith as a construction material. This report describes findings of this study which deals specifically with using molten sulfur as a binder for Lunar concrete. It describes laboratory experiments in which the sulfur to lunar soil simulant ratios by weight were varied to study the minimum amount of sulfur required to produce a particular strength. The compressive and tensile strengths of these mixes were evaluated. Metal and fiber glass fibers were added to some of the mixes to study their effects on the compressive and tensile strengths. This report also describes experiments where the sulfur is melted and mixed with the lunar regolith in a specially designed vacuum chamber. The properties of the produced concrete were compared to those of concrete produced under normal pressure.

  3. Electrochemical evaluation of sulfur poisoning in a methane-fuelled solid oxide fuel cell: Effect of current density and sulfur concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagen, Anke; Johnson, Gregory B.; Hjalmarsson, Per

    2014-12-01

    A Ni/ScYSZ based SOFC was tested at 1, 0.5, 0.25, and 0 (OCV) A cm-2 in methane fuel containing 0-100 ppm H2S. Analysis of cell voltage loss during short-term H2S poisoning showed that SOFC performance loss was generally larger at higher current loads. Separating the effect of H2S on catalytic reforming and electrochemical activity by evaluating the relevant area specific resistances and charge transfer processes based on impedance spectroscopy revealed that the poisoning of electrochemical activity was not dependent on current density. Two major anode processes were significantly affected by the presence of H2S in the fuel; the lower frequency mass transfer/fuel reforming processes and higher frequency charge transfer/triple phase boundary (TPB) processes. At high current densities (0.5 and 1 A cm-2), mass transfer/fuel reforming processes were the most sensitive to sulfur poisoning. At OCV, the effect of sulfur was less pronounced on mass transfer/fuel reforming processes but quite significant on the charge transfer/TPB processes. Overall, sulfur related performance loss was more severe at the highest current density (1 A cm-2), due to the deactivation of catalytic fuel reforming reactions in the anode, leading to less available fuel and a higher fuel utilization. All poisoning effects were reversible after removing H2S from the fuel.

  4. Variation in sulfur and selenium accumulation is controlled by naturally occurring isoforms of the key sulfur assimilation enzyme ADENOSINE 5'-PHOSPHOSULFATE REDUCTASE2 across the Arabidopsis species range.

    PubMed

    Chao, Dai-Yin; Baraniecka, Patrycja; Danku, John; Koprivova, Anna; Lahner, Brett; Luo, Hongbing; Yakubova, Elena; Dilkes, Brian; Kopriva, Stanislav; Salt, David E

    2014-11-01

    Natural variation allows the investigation of both the fundamental functions of genes and their role in local adaptation. As one of the essential macronutrients, sulfur is vital for plant growth and development and also for crop yield and quality. Selenium and sulfur are assimilated by the same process, and although plants do not require selenium, plant-based selenium is an important source of this essential element for animals. Here, we report the use of linkage mapping in synthetic F2 populations and complementation to investigate the genetic architecture of variation in total leaf sulfur and selenium concentrations in a diverse set of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) accessions. We identify in accessions collected from Sweden and the Czech Republic two variants of the enzyme ADENOSINE 5'-PHOSPHOSULFATE REDUCTASE2 (APR2) with strongly diminished catalytic capacity. APR2 is a key enzyme in both sulfate and selenate reduction, and its reduced activity in the loss-of-function allele apr2-1 and the two Arabidopsis accessions Hodonín and Shahdara leads to a lowering of sulfur flux from sulfate into the reduced sulfur compounds, cysteine and glutathione, and into proteins, concomitant with an increase in the accumulation of sulfate in leaves. We conclude from our observation, and the previously identified weak allele of APR2 from the Shahdara accession collected in Tadjikistan, that the catalytic capacity of APR2 varies by 4 orders of magnitude across the Arabidopsis species range, driving significant differences in sulfur and selenium metabolism. The selective benefit, if any, of this large variation remains to be explored. PMID:25245030

  5. Sulfur-carbon cycling in a temperate tidal system from Pleistocene to modern time: Evidence from sedimentary sulfur and carbon isotopes, and pyrite textures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böttcher, M. E.; Köster, J.; Rullkötter, J.; Freund, H.; Al-Raei, A. M.; Kowalski, N.; Escher, P.; Bahlo, R.

    2012-04-01

    Little is known about biogeochemical carbon-sulfur(-metal) cycling in organic matter- and/or iron-limited tidal coastal environments and the formation of corresponding sedimentary geochemical signatures. In the present study, we analyzed two 20 m-long cores that were recovered from the tidal backbarrier area of Spiekeroog Island, NW Germany. The drill sites were selected within a close distance of 900 m allowing comparison of two depositional settings: A palaeo-channel filled with Holocene sediments is compared to a mainly Pleistocene sedimentary succession. Here we report on new results characterizing the stable isotope composition of pyrite sulfur and organic matter (OM) as well as the textures of sedimentary sulfides. Corresponding results for pore water composition and microbiological studies were already presented in Beck et al. (2011). The carbon isotope signature of organic matter follows sedimentological changes and is essentially controlled by the sources of organic matter and therefore the paleo-environmental conditions. Additionally, the original signatures may have been superimposed by diagenetic degradation reactions. The stable isotope composition of inorganic sulfur (essentially pyrite) between about -30 and +20 per mil vs. V-CDT reflects changes in the sedimentary conditions like sulfate availability (salinity) and activity of sulfate-reducing bacteria. This is in line with the occurrence of framboidal textures indicating that most of the pyrite was formed close to the sediment-water interface. Irregular framboids, clusters, and euhedral pyrite indicate different zones of iron sulfide formation. The heavy sulfur isotope signatures point to zones in which primary signatures are overprinted diagenetically by in-situ processes. They may have been caused by transport of dissolved sulfur species formed by microbial activity (e.g., AOM). Results from the drilled cores are compared to and calibrated by seasonal studies on the development of sulfur and carbon cycling and corresponding stable isotope signatures in recent intertidal sandy and muddy surface sediments.

  6. The sulfur budget of the troposphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tiwari, S. N.; Augustsson, T. R.

    1981-01-01

    A one dimensional photochemical tropospheric model was used to calculate the vertical profiles of tropospheric species. Particular attention is focused on the recent inclusion of the chemistry of the sulfur group, which consists of 13 species involving a total of 45 chemical reactions. It is found that the chemistry of the sulfur species, because it is largely anthropogenic, plays an increasingly important role in the distribution of tropospheric gases. The calculated vertical profiles were compared to available measurements and generally found to be in good agreement.

  7. Method of making a sodium sulfur battery

    DOEpatents

    Elkins, P. E.

    1981-09-22

    A method of making a portion of a sodium sulfur battery is disclosed. The battery portion made is a portion of the container which defines the volume for the cathodic reactant materials which are sulfur and sodium polysulfide materials. The container portion is defined by an outer metal casing with a graphite liner contained therein, the graphite liner having a coating on its internal diameter for sealing off the porosity thereof. The steel outer container and graphite pipe are united by a method which insures that at the operating temperature of the battery, relatively low electrical resistance exists between the two materials because they are in intimate contact with one another. 3 figs.

  8. Modified sulfur isotopic compositions of sulfides in the nakhlites and Chassigny

    SciTech Connect

    Greenwood, J.P.; Riciputi, L.R.; McSween, H.Y. Jr.; Taylor, L.A.

    2000-03-01

    Variable sulfur isotopic ratios of sulfide minerals in the nakhlites and Chassigny have been measured by ion microprobe. The ranges and means of {delta}{sup 34}S values of pyrrhotite and pyrite in nakhlites become more negative in the sequence Nakhla > Governador Valadares > Lafayette. This is also the sequence of increasing degrees of subsolidus re-equilibration, suggesting that {sup 32}S enrichment may be related to the subsolidus thermal history. A chalcopyrite vein cross cutting a pyrrhotite in Nakhla, coupled with chalcopyrite having slightly lighter {delta}{sup 34}S values, suggests that subsolidus fluids may have become isotopically lighter (with respect to sulfur) in Nakhla with time. Pyrite has replaced pyrrhotite in Lafayette, suggesting that {line_integral}O{sub 2} and/or {line_integral}S{sub 2} increased after pyrrhotite crystallization. A model involving subsolidus hydrothermal modification of igneous sulfide minerals (with {delta}{sup 34}S {approximately} 0{degree}) due to late-stage oxidation of fluids provides a reasonable explanation for the sulfur isotopic systematics of the nakhlites and Chassigny. Sulfur isotopic alteration is believed to have occurred during the waning stages of nakhlite magmatism, rather than during a much later low-temperature (<100 C) iddingsite formation event, based on the ineffectiveness of abiogenic sulfur isotopic fractionation below 200 C. Variable mixing of two isotopically different fluids also could have produced the observed fractionations, although an isotopically light reservoir of sulfur is problematic. Other possible mechanisms evaluated to explain the sulfur isotopic values of the sulfide minerals include martial mantle heterogeneity, possible influence of martial biological processes, and magmatic degassing of SO{sub 2}.

  9. Sulfur reactions and cryptic cross-linkages to oxygen, iron, and carbon cyclin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Druschel, G.; Kafantaris, F. C. A.; Fike, D. A.; Schmitt-Kopplin, P.; Dvorski, S.; Oduro, H.

    2014-12-01

    Sulfur speciation in any setting is controlled by a complex series of redox reactions, polymerization, and complexation reactions that are affected by both biotic and abiotic processes. Additionally there are several crossroads of reactions with oxygen, carbon, and iron in which polysulfide molecules serve as a key reaction component that affects not only sulfur speciation, but the speciation, solubility, and bioavailability of these elements as well. Utilizing a combination of analytical approaches including electrochemistry, spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, and chromatography, we have started to unravel the interconnections between sulfur and other key elements, and how microorganisms may be either direct or indirect contributors to these chemical and mineralogical signatures. In microbial mats, we have observed microbial production of significant hydrogen peroxide under UV-stressed conditions. This peroxide interaction with hydrogen sulfide changes the kinetics and the pathways of abiotic sulfur reactions, potentially affecting the overall bioavailability and isotopic fractionations for specific reactions via a change in the linkage between oxygen and sulfur cycling. In systems containing significant iron, we have observed the production of an electroactive form of ferrous iron and sulfide (FeS(aq)) that is of a size that can be described between a dissolved molecular cluster and a small nanoparticle. This FeS(aq) can be a significant fraction of the dissolved iron or sulfide in a system, and is a key part of both the solubility of iron and sulfur and the pathways potentially important for pyritization reactions. In systems where we investigate the links between sulfur and carbon, laboratory and field experiments indicate a wide range of large and more reduced organic compounds are highly reactive towards polysulfide. Utilizing Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry in conjunction with electrochemistry and chromatography, we are seeing a range of key reactions that occur over seconds between polysulifdes and organic compounds found in different organic matrices including Suwannee River natural organic matter and extracts of pine needles.

  10. Effects of sulfur on lead partitioning during sludge incineration based on experiments and thermodynamic calculations.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing-yong; Huang, Shu-jie; Sun, Shui-yu; Ning, Xun-an; He, Rui-zhe; Li, Xiao-ming; Chen, Tao; Luo, Guang-qian; Xie, Wu-ming; Wang, Yu-Jie; Zhuo, Zhong-xu; Fu, Jie-wen

    2015-04-01

    Experiments in a tubular furnace reactor and thermodynamic equilibrium calculations were conducted to investigate the impact of sulfur compounds on the migration of lead (Pb) during sludge incineration. Representative samples of typical sludge with and without the addition of sulfur compounds were combusted at 850 °C, and the partitioning of Pb in the solid phase (bottom ash) and gas phase (fly ash and flue gas) was quantified. The results indicate that three types of sulfur compounds (S, Na2S and Na2SO4) added to the sludge could facilitate the volatilization of Pb in the gas phase (fly ash and flue gas) into metal sulfates displacing its sulfides and some of its oxides. The effect of promoting Pb volatilization by adding Na2SO4 and Na2S was superior to that of the addition of S. In bottom ash, different metallic sulfides were found in the forms of lead sulfide, aluminosilicate minerals, and polymetallic-sulfides, which were minimally volatilized. The chemical equilibrium calculations indicated that sulfur stabilizes Pb in the form of PbSO4(s) at low temperatures (<1000 K). The equilibrium calculation prediction also suggested that SiO2, CaO, TiO2, and Al2O3 containing materials function as condensed phase solids in the temperature range of 800-1100 K as sorbents to stabilize Pb. However, in the presence of sulfur or chlorine or the co-existence of sulfur and chlorine, these sorbents were inactive. The effect of sulfur on Pb partitioning in the sludge incineration process mainly depended on the gas phase reaction, the surface reaction, the volatilization of products, and the concentration of Si, Ca and Al-containing compounds in the sludge. These findings provide useful information for understanding the partitioning behavior of Pb, facilitating the development of strategies to control the volatilization of Pb during sludge incineration. PMID:25554470

  11. Chemical species of sulfur in prostate cancer cells studied by XANES spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czapla, Joanna; Kwiatek, Wojciech M.; Lekki, Janusz; Duli?ska-Litewka, Joanna; Steininger, Ralph; Göttlicher, Jörg

    2013-12-01

    The role of sulfur in prostate cancer progression may be significant for understanding the process of carcinogenesis. This work, based on X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES) spectroscopy, is focused on determination of sulfur chemical species occurring in prostate cancer cell lines. The experimental material consisted of four commercially available cell lines: three from metastasized prostate cancer (PC3, LNCaP, and DU145) and one, used as a control, from the non-tumourigenic peripheral zone of the prostate (PZ-HPV-7). The experiment was performed at the SUL-X beamline of the synchrotron radiation source ANKA, Karlsruhe (Germany). The K-edge XANES spectra of sulfur were analyzed by deconvolution in order to establish sulfur species that occur in prostate cancer cells and to find out whether there are any differences in their content between various cell lines. Experimental spectra were fitted in two ways: with two Gaussian peaks and one arctangent step function, and additionally by a Linear Combination Fit with spectra of reference compounds in order to obtain quantitative chemical information. All fitting procedures were performed with the Athena code (Ravel and Newville, 2005) and the results of deconvolution were used to determine the fraction of each sulfur form. The results of data analysis showed that cell lines from different metastasis had different ratio of reduced to oxidized sulfur species. The LCF analysis demonstrated that the highest content of GSH, one of the most important sulfur-bearing compounds in cells, was observed in DU145 cells. These findings may confirm the hypothesis of changes in redox balance in case of cancer initiation and progression.

  12. An integrated method incorporating sulfur-oxidizing bacteria and electrokinetics to enhance removal of copper from contaminated soil

    SciTech Connect

    Maini, G.; Sharman, A.K.; Sunderland, G.; Knowles, C.J.; Jackman, S.A.

    2000-03-15

    The combination of bioleaching and electrokinetics for the remediation of metal contaminated land has been investigated. In bioleaching, bacteria convert reduced sulfur compounds to sulfuric acid, acidifying soil and mobilizing metal ions. In electrokinetics, DC current acidifies soil, and mobilized metals are transported to the cathode by electromigration. When bioleaching was applied to silt soil artificially contaminated with seven metals and amended with sulfur, bacterial activity was partially inhibited and limited acidification occurred. Electrokinetic treatment of silt soil contaminated solely with 1000 mg/kg copper nitrate showed 89% removal of copper from the soil within 15 days. To combine bioleaching and electrokinetics sequentially, preliminary partial acidification was performed by amending copper-contaminated soil with sulfur (to 5% w/w) and incubating at constant moisture (30% w/w) and temperature (20 C) for 90 days. Indigenous sulfur oxidizing bacteria partially acidified the soil from pH 8.1 to 5.4. This soil was then treated by electrokinetics yielding 86% copper removal in 16 days. In the combined process, electrokinetics stimulated sulfur oxidation, by removing inhibitory factors, yielding a 5.1-fold increase in soil sulfate concentration. Preacidification by sulfur-oxidizing bacteria increased the cost-effectiveness of the electrokinetic treatment by reducing the power requirement by 66%.

  13. Direct night-time ejection of particle-phase reduced biogenic sulfur compounds from the ocean to the atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Gaston, Cassandra J; Furutani, Hiroshi; Guazzotti, Sergio A; Coffee, Keith R; Jung, Jinyoung; Uematsu, Mitsuo; Prather, Kimberly A

    2015-04-21

    The influence of oceanic biological activity on sea spray aerosol composition, clouds, and climate remains poorly understood. The emission of organic material and gaseous dimethyl sulfide (DMS) from the ocean represents well-documented biogenic processes that influence particle chemistry in marine environments. However, the direct emission of particle-phase biogenic sulfur from the ocean remains largely unexplored. Here we present measurements of ocean-derived particles containing reduced sulfur, detected as elemental sulfur ions (e.g., (32)S(+), (64)S2(+)), in seven different marine environments using real-time, single particle mass spectrometry; these particles have not been detected outside of the marine environment. These reduced sulfur compounds were associated with primary marine particle types and wind speeds typically between 5 and 10 m/s suggesting that these particles themselves are a primary emission. In studies with measurements of seawater properties, chlorophyll-a and atmospheric DMS concentrations were typically elevated in these same locations suggesting a biogenic source for these sulfur-containing particles. Interestingly, these sulfur-containing particles only appeared at night, likely due to rapid photochemical destruction during the daytime, and comprised up to ?67% of the aerosol number fraction, particularly in the supermicrometer size range. These sulfur-containing particles were detected along the California coast, across the Pacific Ocean, and in the southern Indian Ocean suggesting that these particles represent a globally significant biogenic contribution to the marine aerosol burden. PMID:25835033

  14. Sulfur isotope geochemistry of ore and gangue minerals from the Silesian-Cracow Mississippi Valley-type ore district, Poland

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leach, D.L.; Vets, J.G.; Gent, C.A.

    1996-01-01

    Studies of the sulfur isotopic composition of ore and gangue minerals from the Silesian-Cracow Zn-Pb district were conducted to gain insights into processes that controlled the location and distribution of the ore deposits. Results of this study show that minerals from the Silesian-Cracow ore district have the largest range of sulfur isotope compositions in sulfides observed from any Mississippi Valley-type ore district in the world. The ??34S values for sulfide minerals range from +38 to -32 per mil for the entire paragenetic sequence but individual stages exhibit smaller ranges. There is a well developed correlation between the sulfur isotope composition and paragenetic stage of ore deposition. The first important ore stage contains mostly positive ??34S values, around 5 per mil. The second stage of ore formation are lower, with a median value of around -5 to -15 per mil, and with some values as low as -32 per mil. Late stage barite contains isotopically heavy sulfur around +32 per mil. The range in sulfur isotope compositions can be explained by contributions of sulfur from a variety of source rocks together with sulfur isotope fractionations produced by the reaction paths for sulfate reduction. Much of the variation in sulfur isotope compositions can be explained by bacterial reduction of sedimentary sulfate and disequilibrium reactions by intermediate-valency sulfur species, especially in the late-stage pyrite and sphalerite. Organic reduction of sulfate and thermal release of sulfur from coals in the Upper Silesian Coal Basin may have been important contributors to sulfur in the ore minerals. The sulfur isotopic data, ore mineral textures, and fluid inclusion data, are consistent with the hypothesis that fluid mixing was the dominant ore forming mechanism. The rather distinct lowering of ?? 34S values in sulfides from stage 2 to stage 3 is believed to reflect some fundamental change in the source of reduced sulfur and/or hydrology of the ore-forming environment. A change in the hydrology of the ore forming environment could be accomplished by extensional faulting that was coeval with ore formation. Late stage barite contains high values of ??34S which may reflect the final collapse of the hydrothermal system.

  15. Reduction of the potential energy barrier and resistance at wafer-bonded n-GaAs/n-GaAs interfaces by sulfur passivation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Michael J.; Jackson, Biyun L.; Goorsky, Mark S.

    2011-11-01

    Sulfur passivation and subsequent wafer-bonding treatments are demonstrated for III-V semiconductor applications using GaAs-GaAs direct wafer-bonded structures. Two different sulfur passivation processes are addressed. A dry sulfur passivation method that utilizes elemental sulfur vapor activated by ultraviolet light in vacuum is compared with aqueous sulfide and native-oxide-etch treatments. The electrical conductivity across a sulfur-treated 400 - °C-bonded n-GaAs/n-GaAs interface significantly increased with a short anneal (1-2 min) at elevated temperatures (500-600 °C). Interfaces treated with the NH4OH oxide etch, on the other hand, exhibited only mild improvement in accordance with previously published studies in this area. TEM and STEM images revealed similar interfacial microstructure changes with annealing for both sulfur-treated and NH4OH interfaces, whereby some areas have direct semiconductor-semiconductor contact without any interfacial layer. Fitting the observed temperature dependence of zero-bias conductance using a model for tunneling through a grain boundary reveals that the addition of sulfur at the interface lowered the interfacial energy barrier by 0.2 eV. The interface resistance for these sulfur-treated structures is 0.03 ?.cm at room temperature. These results emphasize that sulfur-passivation techniques reduce interface states that otherwise limit the implementation of wafer bonding for high-efficiency solar cells and other devices.

  16. 46 CFR 153.556 - Special requirements for sulfuric acid and oleum.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...false Special requirements for sulfuric acid and oleum. 153.556 Section 153...556 Special requirements for sulfuric acid and oleum. (a) Except as prescribed...containment systems carrying sulfuric acid, oleum, or contaminated sulfuric...

  17. 46 CFR 153.556 - Special requirements for sulfuric acid and oleum.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...false Special requirements for sulfuric acid and oleum. 153.556 Section 153...556 Special requirements for sulfuric acid and oleum. (a) Except as prescribed...containment systems carrying sulfuric acid, oleum, or contaminated sulfuric...

  18. 46 CFR 153.556 - Special requirements for sulfuric acid and oleum.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...false Special requirements for sulfuric acid and oleum. 153.556 Section 153...556 Special requirements for sulfuric acid and oleum. (a) Except as prescribed...containment systems carrying sulfuric acid, oleum, or contaminated sulfuric...

  19. 46 CFR 153.556 - Special requirements for sulfuric acid and oleum.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...false Special requirements for sulfuric acid and oleum. 153.556 Section 153...556 Special requirements for sulfuric acid and oleum. (a) Except as prescribed...containment systems carrying sulfuric acid, oleum, or contaminated sulfuric...

  20. 46 CFR 153.556 - Special requirements for sulfuric acid and oleum.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...false Special requirements for sulfuric acid and oleum. 153.556 Section 153...556 Special requirements for sulfuric acid and oleum. (a) Except as prescribed...containment systems carrying sulfuric acid, oleum, or contaminated sulfuric...

  1. 40 CFR 52.928 - Control strategy: Sulfur oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 false Control strategy: Sulfur oxides. 52.928 Section 52.928...Kentucky § 52.928 Control strategy: Sulfur oxides. The revised SO2 emission limit for large coal-fired boilers in Bell, Clark,...

  2. Developments for the precombustion removal of inorganic sulfur from coal

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Travis Thoms

    1995-01-01

    As precombustion sulfur removal becomes an attractive alternative to flue gas scrubbers, scientists have explored several methods of removing inorganic sulfur from coal and coal chars. Microbial desulfurization, halogenation, pyrolysis, electrochemical oxidation, and irradiation are all avenues now under investigation.

  3. 40 CFR 52.928 - Control strategy: Sulfur oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 false Control strategy: Sulfur oxides. 52.928 Section 52.928...Kentucky § 52.928 Control strategy: Sulfur oxides. The revised SO2 emission limit for large coal-fired boilers in Bell, Clark,...

  4. 40 CFR 52.928 - Control strategy: Sulfur oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 false Control strategy: Sulfur oxides. 52.928 Section 52.928...Kentucky § 52.928 Control strategy: Sulfur oxides. The revised SO2 emission limit for large coal-fired boilers in Bell, Clark,...

  5. 40 CFR 52.928 - Control strategy: Sulfur oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 false Control strategy: Sulfur oxides. 52.928 Section 52.928...Kentucky § 52.928 Control strategy: Sulfur oxides. The revised SO2 emission limit for large coal-fired boilers in Bell, Clark,...

  6. 40 CFR 52.928 - Control strategy: Sulfur oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 false Control strategy: Sulfur oxides. 52.928 Section 52.928...Kentucky § 52.928 Control strategy: Sulfur oxides. The revised SO2 emission limit for large coal-fired boilers in Bell, Clark,...

  7. Choline as a fuel sweetener and sulfur antagonist

    SciTech Connect

    Roof, G.L.; Porlier, B.W.; Cravey, W.E.

    1986-06-10

    A method is described of sweetening petroleum hydrocarbon fuels and, at the same time, reducing the sulfur content thereof which comprises treating such fuels with a sweetening and sulfur-removing amount of choline.

  8. Liquid redox sulfur recovery options, costs, and environmental considerations for the natural gas industry

    SciTech Connect

    Dalrymple, D.A.; Trofe, W. (Radian Corp. (US)); (Evans, J.M. (Gas Research Inst., Chicago, IL (USA)))

    1988-01-01

    Liquid redox chemistry has been employed for sulfur removal and recovery applications since the 1950's. The first process to be used commercially was the Stretford process, which was used extensively in the United States in the 1960's as a replacement for the iron sponge process in the treatment of sour town gas. In recent years, the Stretford process has been joined in the United State' marketplace by several other liquid redox processes including the Unisulf, Sulfolin, LO-CAT, SulFerox, and Hiperion processes. This paper describes the chemistry and engineering options available with each process, as well as the environmental and cost considerations associated with these processes.

  9. Sulfur and Selenium in Chondritic Meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dreibus, G.; Palme, H.; Spettel, B.; Wanke, H.

    1993-07-01

    Selenium is the only truly chalcophile element in chondritic meteorites. It has no other host phases except sulfides. Since Se-volatility is similar to S-volatility one may expect constant S/Se ratios. To test this hypothesis chondritic meteorites were analyzed for Se and S. To avoid problems from inhomogeneous distribution of sulfides the same samples that had been analyzed for Se by INAA were analyzed for S (see Table 1) using a Leybold Heraeus Carbon and Sulfur Analyser (CSA 2002). Solar System Abundances of S and Se: The average S-content of CI- meteorites is with 5.41% in agreement with an earlier average of 5.25% for Orgueil [1], but not with higher S-contents for Ivuna, Alais, and Tonk. Inclusion of these data led to an average CI- content of 6.25% in the Anders and Grevesse compilation [2]. The essentially constant average S/Se ratio in all groups of carbonaceous chondrites of 2563 +- 190 suggests that our Orgueil S-content provides a reliable estimate for the average solar system. The new solar S/Se ratio and the CI-value of Se of 21.3 ppm [3] yield an atomic S/Se ratio of 6200 +- 170, 24% below that calculated from [2]. Weathering Effects: Some of the carbonaceous chondrite finds have similar S/Se ratios as falls (see Table 1). However the badly- weathered Arch (CVR) and Colony (CO) and the two C4-chondrites Mulga West and Maralinga have much lower S and somewhat lower Se contents compared to unweathered meteorites. Their S/Se ratios of 1000-230 indicate higher losses of S--probably by oxidation--as of Se. The low Na-contents in Arch and Colony rel. to CV3 and CO3 may also reflect weathering. Low S/Se ratios in the Sahara meteorites are also indicative of weathering processes. The depletion factors for the CV3- chondrite Acfer086 are, relative to average CV, 10 (S), 5 (Se), 6 (Na), and 4 (Ni). Lower absolute depletions, but the same depletion sequence are found for the CO-meteorite Acfer 202. In the CO/CM Acfer 094 only S and Na are depleted. The influence of weathering in the two CR-types Acfer 097 and Acfer 270 is less obvious. Although Se does not appear to be depleted in these meteorites [4] the lower S/Se ratios of 1660 res. 1970 rel. to CI and the low Na-contents indicate weathering related losses of S and Na. Losses of Ni by weathering are more pronounced in meteorites containing Ni-rich sulfides, whereas metallic Ni is apparently less affected (CR-meteorites). A high depletion of S and Ni but none for Se and Na is found in the Carlisle Lake-type, Acfer 217. In summary, weathering effects in the carbonaceous chondrites result in losses of S, Se, Na, and Ni. Sulfur is in all cases significantly more affected by weathering than Se resulting in low S/Se ratio rel. to CI. References: [1] Mason B. (1962) Space Sci. Rev., 1, 621-646. [2] Anders E. and Grevesse N. (1989) GCA, 53, 197-214. [3] Spettel B. et al. (1993) this volume. [4] Bischoff A. et al. (1993) GCA, 57, in press.

  10. X-ray absorption spectroscopy of bacterial sulfur globules

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Graham N

    2002-01-01

    Sulfur K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy is a powerful in situ probe of sulfur biochemistry in intact cells and tissues. Under favorable circumstances the technique can provide quantitative information on the chemical identify of the sulfur species that are present in a sample. Prange et al. have recently reported an X-ray absorption spectroscopic study of bacterial sulfur storage globules. Unfortunately there

  11. Iron-sulfur proteins: ancient structures, still full of surprises

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. Beinert

    2000-01-01

    This article is a survey of the properties and functions of Fe-S proteins under the following headings: sulfur and iron; iron-sulfur clusters; evolution of cofactor use; early observations; complex and extended clusters; sulfur exchange and core interconversions; synthesis and biosynthesis of Fe-S clusters; functions of Fe-S clusters: electron transfer, electron delocalization, spin states and magnetism, covalency of sulfur bonds; non-electron

  12. The problem of sulfur content in calcined petroleum coke

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogt, M. Franz; Waller, James H.; Zabreznik, Rodney D.

    1990-07-01

    The sulfur content of petroleum coke has steadily increased in recent years, and forecasts show levels will rise even further. This increase in sulfur content comes at a time when environmental awareness is at a peak, and regulatory restrictions are likely to place limits on the amount of sulfur permitted. Fortunately for aluminum smelters, several methods of reducing the sulfur content in petroleum coke appear to be viable.

  13. Relationship Between Corrosion and the Biological Sulfur Cycle: A Review

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. J. Little; R. K. Pope; R. I. Ray

    2000-01-01

    Sulfur and sulfur compounds can produce pitting, crevice corrosion, dealloying, stress corrosion cracking, and stress-oriented hydrogen-induced cracking of susceptible metals and alloys. Even though the metabolic by-products of the biological sulfur cycle are extremely corrosive, there are no correlations between numbers and types of sulfur-related organisms and the probability or rate of corrosion, Determination of specific mechanisms for corrosion caused

  14. Discovery of self-combusting volcanic sulfur flows

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Andrew J. L. Harris; Sarah B. Sherman; Robert Wright

    2000-01-01

    Hitherto sulfur flows have been recognized as lobate features similar in form to basaltic lava flows. However, we have discovered a self-combusting sulfur-flow mode that leaves an entirely different and unexpected deposit. In this mode, the flow is emplaced in a combusting state, so that all sulfur is burned away to leave a sulfur-free, thermally eroded trough. During the 4-hr-long

  15. Bioprocessing of High-sulfur Crudes Via Appliaction of Critical Fluid Biocatalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Ginosar, Daniel Michael; Bala, Greg Alan; Anderson, Raymond Paul; Fox, Sandra Lynn; Stanescue, Marina A.

    2002-05-01

    This experimental research project investigated protein-based biocatalysis in supercritical fluid solvents as an integrated process approach to catalyze the removal of sulfur atoms from crude oils and fuels. The work focused on the oxidation of model sulfur-containing compounds in supercritical reaction media and included three major tasks: microbiological induction experiments, proteincatalyzed biooxidation in supercritical solvents, and a work-in-kind cooperative research and development agreement (CRADA). This work demonstrated that the biooxidation reaction could be improved by an order-of-magnitude by carrying out the reaction in emulsions in supercritical fluids.

  16. Metabolic responses to sulfur dioxide in grapevine (Vitis vinifera L.): photosynthetic tissues and berries.

    PubMed

    Considine, Michael J; Foyer, Christine H

    2015-01-01

    Research on sulfur metabolism in plants has historically been undertaken within the context of industrial pollution. Resolution of the problem of sulfur pollution has led to sulfur deficiency in many soils. Key questions remain concerning how different plant organs deal with reactive and potentially toxic sulfur metabolites. In this review, we discuss sulfur dioxide/sulfite assimilation in grape berries in relation to gene expression and quality traits, features that remain significant to the food industry. We consider the intrinsic metabolism of sulfite and its consequences for fruit biology and postharvest physiology, comparing the different responses in fruit and leaves. We also highlight inconsistencies in what is considered the "ambient" environmental or industrial exposures to SO2. We discuss these findings in relation to the persistent threat to the table grape industry that intergovernmental agencies will revoke the industry's exemption to the worldwide ban on the use of SO2 for preservation of fresh foods. Transcriptome profiling studies on fruit suggest that added value may accrue from effects of SO2 fumigation on the expression of genes encoding components involved in processes that underpin traits related to customer satisfaction, particularly in table grapes, where SO2 fumigation may extend for several months. PMID:25750643

  17. Metabolic responses to sulfur dioxide in grapevine (Vitis vinifera L.): photosynthetic tissues and berries

    PubMed Central

    Considine, Michael J.; Foyer, Christine H.

    2015-01-01

    Research on sulfur metabolism in plants has historically been undertaken within the context of industrial pollution. Resolution of the problem of sulfur pollution has led to sulfur deficiency in many soils. Key questions remain concerning how different plant organs deal with reactive and potentially toxic sulfur metabolites. In this review, we discuss sulfur dioxide/sulfite assimilation in grape berries in relation to gene expression and quality traits, features that remain significant to the food industry. We consider the intrinsic metabolism of sulfite and its consequences for fruit biology and postharvest physiology, comparing the different responses in fruit and leaves. We also highlight inconsistencies in what is considered the “ambient” environmental or industrial exposures to SO2. We discuss these findings in relation to the persistent threat to the table grape industry that intergovernmental agencies will revoke the industry’s exemption to the worldwide ban on the use of SO2 for preservation of fresh foods. Transcriptome profiling studies on fruit suggest that added value may accrue from effects of SO2 fumigation on the expression of genes encoding components involved in processes that underpin traits related to customer satisfaction, particularly in table grapes, where SO2 fumigation may extend for several months. PMID:25750643

  18. Sulfidation of 310 stainless steel at sulfur potentials encountered in coal conversion systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, D. B.; Nelson, H. G.

    1976-01-01

    The sulfidation of SAE 310 stainless steel was carried out in gas mixtures of hydrogen and hydrogen sulfide over a range of sulfur potentials anticipated in advanced coal gasification processes. The kinetics, composition, and morphology of sulfide scale formation were studied at a fixed temperature of 1,065 K over a range of sulfur potentials from .00015 Nm to the -2nd power to 900 Nm to the -2nd power. At all sulfur potentials investigated, the sulfide scales were found to be multilayered. The relative thickness of the individual layers as well as the composition was found to depend on the sulfur potential. The reaction was found to obey the parabolic rate law after an initial transient period. Considerably longer transient periods were found to be due to unsteady state conditions resulting from compositional variations in the spinel layer. The sulfur pressure dependence on the parabolic rate constant was found to best fit the equation K sub p equals const. (P sub S2) to the 1/nth power, where n equals 3.7. The growth of the outer layers was found to be primarily due to the diffusion of metal ions, iron being the predominant species. The inner layer growth was due to the dissociation of the primary product at the alloy scale interface and depended on the activity of chromium.

  19. Sulfur-controlled iron isotope fractionation experiments of core formation in planetary bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahar, A.; Hillgren, V. J.; Horan, M. F.; Mesa-Garcia, J.; Kaufman, L. A.; Mock, T. D.

    2015-02-01

    A series of high pressure and temperature experiments were conducted to better constrain the Fe isotope fractionation during core-mantle differentiation in planetesimal and planetary bodies. Synthetic mixtures of oxides and metal having varying amounts of sulfur, approximating terrestrial and Martian compositions, were melted at 1-2 GPa and 1650 °C. Iron isotopic equilibrium between the resulting metal and glass run products was verified for all experiments using the three-isotope technique. Purified Fe from metal and glass was analyzed by multiple-collector ICP-MS in high resolution mode. Iron alloy and silicate glass show a well-resolved ?57Femetal-silicate of +0.12 ± 0.04‰ in a sulfur-free system. Isotope fractionation increases with sulfur content to +0.43 ± 0.03‰ at 18 wt.% sulfur in the metal. These results cannot be easily interpreted within the context of known Fe isotope ratios in most natural samples of planetary and asteroidal mantles and therefore suggest more complex processes affected the Fe isotope fractionation therein. However, to reconcile Martian meteorite iron isotopic signatures with geophysical models using this new experimental data requires a smaller amount of sulfur in the Martian core than previous estimates, with an upper limit of ?8 wt.%.

  20. MULTIMEDIA ASSESSMENT OF POLLUTION POTENTIALS OF NON-SULFUR CHEMICAL PULPING TECHNOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report gives an estimate of the air, water, and solid waste pollution generated by developing and existing non-sulfur pulping techniques that are potentially competitive with kraft pulping. Also developed were energy use and needs estimates for these pulping processes. Proce...