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Sample records for gianfranco minati eliano

  1. From universe to multiverses--and back again.

    PubMed

    Tjersland, O A

    1990-12-01

    A number of concepts and ideas from constructivist and second-order cybernetic family therapy literature are presented and their implications for therapy are examined. I was inspired by and, in this article, refer to videotapes of consultations and therapy sessions shown at an international conference on constructivism and family therapy in Sulitjelma, Norway, June 1988, and to written material from the Tromsø group (Tom Andersen and Anna M. Flåm), the Milan team (Luigi Boscolo and Gianfranco Cecchin), and the Galveston team (Harlene Anderson and Harold Goolishian). The article also represents an attempt to use constructivist concepts and ideas in a reflection on the author's own professional development as a psychologist and family therapist. PMID:2286248

  2. Advances in the understanding of host response associated with tumor PDT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korbelik, Mladen

    2007-02-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is clinically established modality used for treatment of solid cancers and other conditions, which destroys lesions by localized generation of cytotoxic oxygen species mediated by administered drugs (photosensitizers) that are activated at targeted sites by exposure to light. Since over 20 years ago it has become increasingly clear that important contribution to the antitumor effect of PDT is secured by host reaction induced by this therapy and manifested as inflammatory and immune response. Presented is an overview of advances in the understanding of this host response associated with tumor PDT by tracing its evolution from initial breakthroughs and discoveries in the early 1980s, followed by advances preceding recent developments, and concluding with recently acquired knowledge and directions for clinical exploitation. Tribute is given to researchers making important contributions to this field during the last three decades including Drs. Gianfranco Canti, Julia Levy, and Barbara Henderson.

  3. Simulated electrolyte-metal interfaces -- Li3PO4 and Li

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiao; Du, Yaojun A.; Holzwarth, N. A. W.

    2007-03-01

    There has recently been a lot of interest in solid electrolyte materials such as LiPON developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory for use in Li-ion batteries and other technologies. We report on the results of our model calculations on idealized interfaces between Li3PO4 and Li metal, studying the structural stability and the ion mobility, using first-principles density functional techniques with the PWscf and pwpaw codes. Starting with a supercell constructed from Li3PO4 in its crystalline γ-phase structure and several layers of Li metal, we used optimization and molecular dynamics techniques to find several meta-stable configurations. The qualitative features of the results are consistent with experimental evidence that the electrolyte is quite stable with respect to Li metal. In addition to stability analyses, we plan to study Li-ion diffusion across the interface. J. B. Bates, N. J. Dudney, and co-workers, Solid State Ionics, 53-56, 647-654 (1992). http://www.pwscf.org and http://pwpaw.wfu.edu. N. J. Dudney in Gholam-Abbas Nazri and Gianfranco Pistoia, Eds., Lithium Batteries: Science and Technology, Chapt. 20, pp. 623-642, Kluwer Academic Publishers, 2004. ISBN 1-4020-7628-2.

  4. List of Participants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bombaci, I.; Covello, A.; Marcucci, L. E.; Rosati, S.

    2009-07-01

    Armani Paolo (Università di Trento) Benhar Omar (INFN Roma) Bombaci Ignazio (Università di Pisa) Bonanno Luca (Università di Ferrara) Catara Francesco (Università di Catania) Cò Giampaolo (Università di Lecce) Colonna Maria (Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, INFN Catania) Colonna Nicola (INFN Bari) Conti Francesco (Università di Pavia) Coraggio Luigi (INFN Napoli) Covello Aldo (Università di Napoli) Cristoforetti Marco (Technische Universität München, Germania) Cuofano Carmine (Università di Ferrara) Di Toro Massimo (Università di Catania) Drago Alessandro (Università di Ferrara) Faccioli Pietro (Università di Trento) Farina Nicola (INFN Roma) Finelli Paolo (Università di Bologna) Fiorentini Giovanni (Università di Ferrara) Fortunato Lorenzo (Università di Padova) Gambacurta Danilo (Università di Catania) Gandolfi Stefano (Università di Trento) Gargano Angela (INFN Napoli) Giannini Mauro (Università di Genova) Girlanda Luca (INFN Pisa) Giusti Carlotta (INFN Pavia) Illarionov Alexei (SISSA Trieste) Itaco Nunzio (Università di Napoli) Kievsky Alejandro (INFN Pisa) Lanza Edoardo (INFN Catania) Leidemann Winfried (Università di Trento) Lenzi Silvia (Università di Padova) Lipparini Enrico (Università di Trento) Lissia Marcello (Università di Cagliari) Lo Iudice Nicola (Università di Napoli) Maieron Chiara (Università di Lecce) Marcucci Laura Elisa (Università di Pisa) Matera Francesco (Università di Firenze) Millo Raffaele (Università di Trento) Orlandini Giuseppina (Università di Trento) Pacati Franco (Università di Pavia) Pastore Alessandro (Univeristy of Jyväskylä, Finlandia) Pederiva Francesco (Università di Trento) Pisent Gualtiero (Università di Padova) Prete Gianfranco (INFN Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro) Quarati Piero (Politecnico di Torino) Rosati Sergio (Università di Pisa) Salmè Giovanni (INFN Roma) Santopinto Elena (INFN Genova) Traini Marco (Università di Trento) Vigezzi Enrico (INFN Milano) Vitturi Andrea (Universit

  5. The MIT Program, Competition, and Ethics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradt, Hale V.

    2013-01-01

    The MIT program in x-ray astronomy was, and still is, diverse and productive. Bruno Rossi and later George Clark, as the nominal leaders of the “x-ray astronomy group” created a “hands-off” culture wherein individual researchers could develop their own independent programs. Walter Lewin, Claude Canizares, and I as well as those in the next academic generations, e.g., Saul Rappaport and George Ricker, were able to thrive in this environment. MIT researchers were principal investigators or providers of x-ray instruments on sounding rockets and balloons in the 1960s and then in later years on nine satellite missions, OSO-7, SAS-3, HEAO-1, Einstein, ASCA, RXTE, Chandra, HETE-2, and Suzaku. Such a diverse program involved collaborations with other institutions and of course striving for primacy in discovery and competition for NASA resources. Looking back, I see a high degree of ethical behavior among the observational x-ray community during those years. In competition, we remembered that we might well be collaborating the following year and behaved accordingly. Many of us in the x-ray community had been friends since graduate school days and did not want to lose those relationships. Am I viewing the past through rose colored glasses? I think not. A vignette on this topic: In 1967, I was debating vigorously with Herb Gursky of AS&E about which institution, MIT or AS&E, should be the lead on the fourth paper (Oda et al. 1967, ApJ 148, L5) based on data from the 1966 AS&E rocket flight which had led to Allan Sandage’s (and Japanese) identification of Sco X-1 (Sandage, et al. 1966, ApJ. 146, 316). I and my Italian colleague, Gianfranco Spada, and our Japanese colleague, Minoru Oda, both then visiting MIT, had actively supported that flight. After one rather heated discussion with Herb about this, - I was the heated one; he always remained calm - he left my office saying: “Hale, however this comes out, let’s remain friends.” I treasured that comment and

  6. PREFACE: DISCRETE 2010: Symposium on Prospects in the Physics of Discrete Symmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Domenico, Antonio; Bini, Cesare; Bloise, Caterina; Bossi, Fabio; Faccini, Riccardo; Gauzzi, Paolo; Isidori, Gino; Lipari, Paolo; Ludovici, Lucio; Silvestrini, Luca

    2011-12-01

    The Symposium DISCRETE2010 on Prospects in the Physics of Discrete Symmetries was held at the Sapienza Universitàa di Roma, Italy from 6-11 December 2010. This second edition, after the successful one in Valencia in 2008, covered all theoretical and experimental progress in the field, and aimed at a thorough discussion on the latest developments. The topics covered included: T, C, P, CP symmetries; accidental symmetries (B, L conservation); CPT symmetry, decoherence, Lorentz symmetry breaking; neutrino mass and mixing; cosmology and astroparticles, dark matter searches; experimental prospects at LHC, Super flavor factories, and new facilities. The Symposium was organized in plenary sessions with a total of 23 invited talks, and parallel sessions with a total of 80 talks including both invited and selected contributions from the submitted abstracts. The speakers of the plenary sessions were: Achille Stocchi, Andreas Weiler, Kevin Pitts, Tim Gershon, Marco Sozzi, Neal Weiner, Vasiliki Mitsou, Bernard Sadoulet, Gianfranco Bertone, J. Eric Grove, Mauro Mezzetto, Alexei Yu Smirnov, Oliviero Cremonesi, Antonio Riotto, Reno Mandolesi, Brett Altschul, Jose Bernabeu, Lawrence Hall, Marco Grassi, Yannis K. Semertzidis, Riccardo Barbieri, Gigi Rolandi, Luciano Maiani. The Symposium venue was the CNR (Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche) headquarter building, close to the Sapienza University. At the end of the Symposium a special open session, devoted to a wider audience, was held at the Pontifical University of the Holy Cross, in the historical center of Rome. The symposium was attended by about 140 participants, about half coming from Italy, and the rest mainly from other European countries and United States. Among the social events was a concert at the Aula Magna of the Sapienza University, and a social dinner in the historical Palazzo Pallavicini-Rospigliosi on the Quirinale Hill. The next symposium of the series will be organised by IST, Universidade Tàecnica de Lisboa

  7. Slope instability mapping around L'Aquila (Abruzzo, Italy) with Persistent Scatterers Interferometry from ERS, ENVISAT and RADARSAT datasets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Righini, Gaia; Del Conte, Sara; Cigna, Francesca; Casagli, Nicola

    2010-05-01

    Forum. 16-19 November 2008 Tokyo Japan, 125-128. Colesanti, C., Ferretti, A., Prati, C., Rocca, F. (2003). Monitoring landslides and tectonic motions with the Permanent Scatterers Technique. Engineering Geology, 68, 3 - 14. Colesanti, C., Wasowski, J., (2006). Investigating landslides with satellite Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) interferometry. Engineering Geology, 88 (3 - 4), 173 - 199. Cruden, D.M., Varnes, D.J. (1996). Landslide types and processes. In: Turner AK, Schuster RL (eds) Landslides investigation and mitigation, Special Report 247. Transportation Research Board, National Research Council, Washington, DC, 36 - 75. Farina P., Colombo D., Fumagalli A., Marks F., Moretti S. (2006) - Permanent Scatterers for landslide investigations: outcomes from the ESA-SLAM project. Engineering Geology, v. 88, p.200-217. Farina P., Casagli N., Ferretti A. (2008) - Radar-interpretation of InSAR measurements for landslide investigations in civil protection practices. First North American Landslide Conference, June 3-8, 2007.Vail, Colorado, pp. 272-283. Hilley, G.E, Burgmann, R., Ferretti, A., Novali, F., Rocca, F. (2004). Dynamics of slow-moving landslides from Permanent Scatterer analysis. Science, 304 (5679), 1952 - 1955. Herrera G., Davalillo J.C., Mulas J., Cooksley G., Monserrat O., Pancioli V. (2009) - Mapping and monitoring geomorphological processes in mountainous areas using PSI data: Central Pyrenees case study Nat. Hazards Earth Syst. Sci., 9, 1587-1598, Meisina C., Zucca F., Fossati D., Ceriani M, Allievi J. (2006) - Ground deformations monitoring by using the Permanent Scatterers Technique: the example of the Oltrepo Pavese (Lombardia, Italy), Engineering Geology, 88, 240-259. Pancioli V., Farina P., (2007) - Analisi dei fenomeni franosi con dati InSAR satellitari: primi risultati del progetto ESA-Terrafirma. Giornale di Geologia Applicata 6-A: 101-102. Righini, G., Del Ventisette, C., Costantini, M., Malvarosa, F., Minati, F. (2008). Space-borne SAR Analysis for

  8. COSMO 09

    SciTech Connect

    2009-09-07

    This year's edition of the annual Cosmo International Conference on Particle Physics and Cosmology -- Cosmo09 -- will be hosted by the CERN Theory Group from Monday September 7 till Friday September 11, 2009. The conference will take place at CERN, Geneva (Switzerland). The Cosmo series is one of the major venues of interaction between cosmologists and particle physicists. In the exciting LHC era, the Conference will be devoted to the modern interfaces between Fundamental and Phenomenological Particle Physics and Physical Cosmology and Astronomy. The Conference will be followed by the CERN TH Institute "Particle Cosmology" which will take place from Monday September 14 till Friday September 18, 2009. The CERN-TH Institutes are visitor programs intended to bring together scientists with similar interests and to promote scientific collaborations. If you wish to participate, please register on the Institute web page. Link to last editions: COSMO 07 (U. of Sussex), COSMO 08 (U. of Wisconsin) List of plenary speakers: Gianfranco Bertone, Pierre Binetruy, Francois Bouchet, Juerg Diemand, Jonathan Feng, Gregory Gabadadze, Francis Halzen, Steen Hannestad, Will Kinney, Johannes Knapp, Hiranya Peiris, Will Percival, Syksy Rasanen, Alexandre Refregier, Pierre Salati, Roman Scoccimarro, Michael Schubnell, Christian Spiering, Neil Spooner, Andrew Tolley, Matteo Viel. The plenary program is available on-line. Select "Preliminary programme" in the left menu and click on each plenary session to see details. Parallel sessions: Inflation, convenor: Andrew Liddle Dark matter, convenor: Marco Cirelli Dark energy and modified gravity, convenor: Kazuya Koyama CMB, LSS and cosmological parameters/models, convenor: Licia Verde String cosmology, convenor: Jim Cline Baryogenesis and leptogenesis, convenor: Mariano Quiros The submission of talk proposals is closed by now. The parallel session program is available on-line. Select "Preliminary programme" in the left menu and click on each

  9. FOREWORD: The 4th CCM International Conference on Pressure Metrology from Ultra-High Vacuum to Very High Pressures (10-9 Pa to 109 Pa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legras, Jean-Claude; Jousten, Karl; Severn, Ian

    2005-12-01

    , particularly Gianfranco Molinar who offered much advice based on experience of organizing the previous conference. Special thanks must also be made to Mitsuru Tanaka, President of the CCM, and Andrew Wallard, Director of the BIPM, for their support of the event. The event was coordinated by Jasmina Bolfek-Radovani, of the Institute of Physics, without whose tireless efforts the event would not have been as successful. The production of this issue of Metrologia would not have been possible without the help and support of its editor, Jeffrey Williams. The National Measurement System Directorate of the Department of Trade and Industry supported the conference and it was sponsored by DH Instruments and BOC Edwards. Additional financial assistance was also received from Chell Instruments Ltd, DH-Budenberg, GE Infrastructure Sensing, Hi-Pro Pressure Products Ltd, Kurt J Lesker Company Ltd and Leybold Vacuum UK Ltd. Finally we would like to thank all of the conference participants who made the event both technically stimulating and enjoyable. By the time the next CCM Pressure conference is held in Berlin in 2011, pressure science and technology will undoubtedly have moved on still further and we may see the culmination of work to realize primary pressure standards by more fundamental methods.

  10. COSMO 09

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2011-10-06

    This year's edition of the annual Cosmo International Conference on Particle Physics and Cosmology -- Cosmo09 -- will be hosted by the CERN Theory Group from Monday September 7 till Friday September 11, 2009. The conference will take place at CERN, Geneva (Switzerland). The Cosmo series is one of the major venues of interaction between cosmologists and particle physicists. In the exciting LHC era, the Conference will be devoted to the modern interfaces between Fundamental and Phenomenological Particle Physics and Physical Cosmology and Astronomy. The Conference will be followed by the CERN TH Institute "Particle Cosmology" which will take place from Monday September 14 till Friday September 18, 2009. The CERN-TH Institutes are visitor programs intended to bring together scientists with similar interests and to promote scientific collaborations. If you wish to participate, please register on the Institute web page. Link to last editions: COSMO 07 (U. of Sussex), COSMO 08 (U. of Wisconsin) List of plenary speakers: Gianfranco Bertone, Pierre Binetruy, Francois Bouchet, Juerg Diemand, Jonathan Feng, Gregory Gabadadze, Francis Halzen, Steen Hannestad, Will Kinney, Johannes Knapp, Hiranya Peiris, Will Percival, Syksy Rasanen, Alexandre Refregier, Pierre Salati, Roman Scoccimarro, Michael Schubnell, Christian Spiering, Neil Spooner, Andrew Tolley, Matteo Viel. The plenary program is available on-line. Select "Preliminary programme" in the left menu and click on each plenary session to see details. Parallel sessions: Inflation, convenor: Andrew Liddle Dark matter, convenor: Marco Cirelli Dark energy and modified gravity, convenor: Kazuya Koyama CMB, LSS and cosmological parameters/models, convenor: Licia Verde String cosmology, convenor: Jim Cline Baryogenesis and leptogenesis, convenor: Mariano Quiros The submission of talk proposals is closed by now. The parallel session program is available on-line. Select "Preliminary programme" in the left menu and click on each

  11. PREFACE: Proceedings of the TeV Particle Astrophysics II Workshop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halzen, F.; Karle, A.; Montaruli, T.

    2007-03-01

    people from the various fields of Astroparticle Physics. Acknowledgements Due to the high quality of help that we received from them, we wish to acknowledge the conveners of the Working Groups mentioned in the text with the same numbering used above: 1) Felix Aharonian, Gus Sinnis, Frank Krennrich and Masahiro Teshima; 2) Piera Ghia and Tom Gaisser; 3) Laura Baudis and Gianfranco Bertone; 4) Lutz Koepke and Dan Hooper; 5) David Saltzberg and David Waters; 6) Ivone Albuquerque, Alexander Kusenko and Tom Weiler; and Bruce Allen and Guido Mueller. Special thanks also go to Tom Gaisser, who gave a comprehensive final summary of the conference. Throughout the Conference and the collection of these proceedings, Kim Kreiger constantly supported us. She was also responsible for the wonderful food available at coffee breaks and at the social dinner! (The PDF file lists the IceCube Collaboration) T Montaruli

  12. Memorial to Professor Antonio Barone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tafuri, Francesco; Pepe, Giampiero; Vaglio, Ruggero

    2014-04-01

    Antonio Barone prematurely passed away on 4 December 2011 at the age of 72, after a one-year battle with cancer. He left behind his wife Sveva and his two sons, Alberto and Livio. Antonio was Professor Emeritus at the University of Napoli Federico II, where he had been teaching for about 40 years. The initial research activity of Antonio was in the field of nuclear physics. In this context, almost 45 years ago, the Ge 'Lithium drift' semiconductor detectors represented a novelty, due to the high energy resolution enabled by those devices. Superconductors stimulated new approaches to radiation detection and this motivated Antonio's interest towards superconductivity. Following the birth of the Laboratorio di Cibernetica of the CNR in 1967 he was given the opportunity to work on a joint USA-Italy project (University of Wisconsin, Madison and CNR Naples) in the field of superconductivity on the peculiar subject of the superconductive 'Neuristors'. His research activity on Josephson junctions opened up a wide variety of very stimulating subjects in which he was deeply involved, ranging from the soliton propagation in 'long' Josephson structures to fluctuations phenomena, from light-sensitive junctions and proximity effect to the development of innovative superconducting devices. The strong interaction of Antonio with the Landau Institute for Theoretical Physics of the Academy of Sciences in Moscow, characterizes a long period of his research activity with a precious merging of theoretical and experimental aspects. This body of work converged into the famous monograph on the 'Physics and Applications of the Josephson Effect', written in collaboration with Gianfranco Paternò in 1982. This rapidly became the reference text for the Josephson effect, as documented by thousands of citations and the fact that it was translated into Russian, Japanese and Chinese. In 1983 Antonio was awarded the highest academic title of 'Doctor of the Physical-Mathematical Sciences' by the

  13. EDITORIAL: Focus on Dark Matter and Particle Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aprile, Elena; Profumo, Stefano

    2009-10-01

    Doetinchem, H Gast, T Kirn and S Schael Axion searches with helioscopes and astrophysical signatures for axion(-like) particles K Zioutas, M Tsagri, Y Semertzidis, T Papaevangelou, T Dafni and V Anastassopoulos The indirect search for dark matter with IceCube Francis Halzen and Dan Hooper DIRECT DARK MATTER SEARCHES:EXPERIMENTS Gaseous dark matter detectors G Sciolla and C J Martoff Search for dark matter with CRESST Rafael F Lang and Wolfgang Seidel DIRECT AND INDIRECT PARTICLE DARK MATTER SEARCHES:THEORY Dark matter annihilation around intermediate mass black holes: an update Gianfranco Bertone, Mattia Fornasa, Marco Taoso and Andrew R Zentner Update on the direct detection of dark matter in MSSM models with non-universal Higgs masses John Ellis, Keith A Olive and Pearl Sandick Dark stars: a new study of the first stars in the Universe Katherine Freese, Peter Bodenheimer, Paolo Gondolo and Douglas Spolyar Determining the mass of dark matter particles with direct detection experiments Chung-Lin Shan The detection of subsolar mass dark matter halos Savvas M Koushiappas Neutrino coherent scattering rates at direct dark matter detectors Louis E Strigari Gamma rays from dark matter annihilation in the central region of the Galaxy Pasquale Dario Serpico and Dan Hooper DARK MATTER MODELS The dark matter interpretation of the 511 keV line Céline Boehm Axions as dark matter particles Leanne D Duffy and Karl van Bibber Sterile neutrinos Alexander Kusenko Dark matter candidates Lars Bergström Minimal dark matter: model and results Marco Cirelli and Alessandro Strumia Shedding light on the dark sector with direct WIMP production Partha Konar, Kyoungchul Kong, Konstantin T Matchev and Maxim Perelstein Axinos as dark matter particles Laura Covi and Jihn E Kim

  14. Ghostly Glow Reveals a Hidden Class of Long-Wavelength Radio Emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-10-01

    Chandra X-ray Observatory. X-ray Chandra X-ray Image The X-ray emission comes from hot thermal gas, a well-known sign-post of massive galaxy clusters. Furthermore, its elongated shape indicates that the cluster has undergone a recent violent collision or "merger event" in which another group or cluster of galaxies was swallowed up by the gravitational potential of the main cluster. Interferometrics Inc. and NRL scientist Tracy Clarke, who is also the LWA System Scientist, notes "In addition to teaching us about the nature of Dark Matter, merging clusters are also important in studies of the mysterious nature of Dark Energy. Understanding these two strange components of the Universe will help us understand its ultimate destiny." In the radio image there is a strong, oblong source of emission located on the lower left periphery of the X-ray gas detected by Chandra; this is a separate source. In the center of the cluster, within the region indicated by a dashed circle, there is radio emission which changes significantly with wavelength. At the longest wavelength (125 cm, shown) it is clearly detected, but at a wavelength of 49 cm it is much fainter, and it is almost entirely gone at 21 cm wavelength. This multi-wavelength picture of the diffuse emission is in good agreement with theoretical predictions for particle acceleration by turbulent waves generated by a violent collision. People Who Read This Also Read... Black Holes Have Simple Feeding Habits NASA’s Swift Satellite Catches First Supernova in The Act of Exploding Oldest Known Objects Are Surprisingly Immature Chandra Data Reveal Rapidly Whirling Black Holes In a broader astrophysical context, galaxy clusters are the largest gravitationally bound systems in the Universe and their collisions are the most energetic events since the Big Bang. Says team leader Gianfranco Brunetti (Instituto di Radioastronomia, Bologna, Italy), "The A521 system provides evidence that turbulence acts as a source of particle acceleration

  15. The Project Serapis: High Resolution Seismic Imagingof The Campi Flegrei Caldera Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zollo, A.; Virieux, J.; Capuano, P.; Chiarabba, C.; de Franco, R.; Makris, J.; Michelini, A.; Musacchio, G.; Serapis Group

    , Iannaccone Giovanni, La Rocca Mario, Saccorotti Gilberto, Cattaneo Marco, De Mar- tin Martina , Colasanti Gianfranco, Moretti Milena, Marcello Silvestri, Edoardo Gian- domenico, Raffaele Stefano, Graziano Boniolo, Maria Rosaria Tondi, Maistrello Mar- iano, Gomez Antonio, Piccareda Carlo, Paolo Di Bartolomeo, Marco Romanelli, So- phie Peyrat, Christophe Larroque, Claude Pambrun, Tony Monfret, Stephane Gaffet, Mark Noble, Sylvain Nguyen 2

  16. Ghostly Glow Reveals a Hidden Class of Long-Wavelength Radio Emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-10-01

    Chandra X-ray Observatory. X-ray Chandra X-ray Image The X-ray emission comes from hot thermal gas, a well-known sign-post of massive galaxy clusters. Furthermore, its elongated shape indicates that the cluster has undergone a recent violent collision or "merger event" in which another group or cluster of galaxies was swallowed up by the gravitational potential of the main cluster. Interferometrics Inc. and NRL scientist Tracy Clarke, who is also the LWA System Scientist, notes "In addition to teaching us about the nature of Dark Matter, merging clusters are also important in studies of the mysterious nature of Dark Energy. Understanding these two strange components of the Universe will help us understand its ultimate destiny." In the radio image there is a strong, oblong source of emission located on the lower left periphery of the X-ray gas detected by Chandra; this is a separate source. In the center of the cluster, within the region indicated by a dashed circle, there is radio emission which changes significantly with wavelength. At the longest wavelength (125 cm, shown) it is clearly detected, but at a wavelength of 49 cm it is much fainter, and it is almost entirely gone at 21 cm wavelength. This multi-wavelength picture of the diffuse emission is in good agreement with theoretical predictions for particle acceleration by turbulent waves generated by a violent collision. People Who Read This Also Read... Black Holes Have Simple Feeding Habits NASA’s Swift Satellite Catches First Supernova in The Act of Exploding Oldest Known Objects Are Surprisingly Immature Chandra Data Reveal Rapidly Whirling Black Holes In a broader astrophysical context, galaxy clusters are the largest gravitationally bound systems in the Universe and their collisions are the most energetic events since the Big Bang. Says team leader Gianfranco Brunetti (Instituto di Radioastronomia, Bologna, Italy), "The A521 system provides evidence that turbulence acts as a source of particle acceleration

  17. Hot Spot Cosmic Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2002-11-01

    cosmic objects. Notes [1]: The new results are described in a research paper, "Particle Accelerators in the Hot Spots of Radio Galaxy 3C 445, Imaged with the VLT" by M. Almudena Prieto (ESO, Garching, Germany), Gianfranco Brunetti (Istituto de Radioastronomia del CNR, Bologna, Italy) and Karl-Heinz Mack (Istituto de Radioastronomia del CNR, Bologna, Italy; ASTRON/NFRA, Dwingeloo, The Netherlands; Radioastronomisches Institut der Universität Bonn, Germany), that recently appeared in the research journal Science (Vol. 298, pp. 193-195). [2]: When electrons - which are electrically charged - move through a magnetic field, they spiral along the lines of force. Electrons of high energy spiral very rapidly, at speeds near the speed of light. Under such conditions, the electrons emit highly polarized electromagnetic radiation. The intensity of this radiation is related to the strength of the magnetic field and the number and energy distribution of the electrons caught in this field. Many cosmic radio sources have been found to emit synchrotron radiation - one of the best examples is the famous Crab Nebula, depicted in ESO PR Photo 40f/99. ESO PR Photo 26/02 may be reproduced, if credit is given to the European Southern Observatory (ESO) and the US National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO).