Science.gov

Sample records for giant arachnoid granulation

  1. Giant intradiploic arachnoid cyst for 13 years

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Satish Kumar; Satyarthee, Guru Dutta; Sharma, Bhawani Shankar

    2014-01-01

    A case of intradiploic arachnoid cyst is reported. The patient presented with a progressively enlarging swelling situated over left frontal region for approximately 13-years following blunt trauma to head. Magnetic resonance imaging showed an intradiploic fluid containing cyst having intensity like cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). He underwent craniotomy and successful surgical repair. Intraoperatively CSF cyst was located in the frontal pole with a large defect over inner table and large rent in the dura. It was lined with arachnoid membrane. Pertinent literature is reviewed in brief. PMID:25250069

  2. Arachnoiditis

    MedlinePlus

    ... lead to the formation of scar tissue and adhesions, which cause the spinal nerves to “stick” together. ... paralysis of the lower limbs. Is there any treatment? Arachnoiditis remains a difficult condition to treat, and ...

  3. Extradural Giant Multiloculated Arachnoid Cyst Causing Spinal Cord Compression in a Child

    PubMed Central

    Kahraman, Serdar; Anik, Ihsan; Gocmen, Selcuk; Sirin, Sait

    2008-01-01

    Background: Spinal extradural arachnoid cysts are rare expanding lesions in the spinal canal. Enlargement may cause progressive signs and symptoms caused by spinal cord compression. They are associated with trauma, surgery, arachnoiditis, and neural tube defects. Most nontraumatic spinal extradural arachnoid cysts are thought to be congenital. Design: Case report and literature review. Findings: A 9-year-old boy with mild paraparesis was found to have an extradural multiloculated arachnoid cyst with fibrous septa at T4-L3 levels and anterior compression and displacement of the spinal cord. Conclusions: Definitive treatment of arachnoid cyst entails radical cyst removal and dura cleft repair. Formation of a postoperative cerebrospinal fluid fistula may require external lumbar drainage. PMID:18795482

  4. Rotation and Granulation of the K2 Giant alpha SER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, David F.

    2016-07-01

    The red giant α Ser was observed over 10 seasons, 2001–2010, at the Elginfield Observatory with the high-resolution coudé spectrograph. Season-mean radial velocities appear to show a small secular rise ∼11 ± 3 m s‑1 yr‑1. The absolute spectroscopic radial velocity with convective blueshifts taken into account is 2730 m s‑1. Ten line-depth ratios were investigated and show that the star's temperature is constant with any secular variation below 1.3 ± 1.0 K over the 11 years of observation. Fourier analysis of the line broadening yields v sin i = 2.0 ± 0.3 km s‑1 and a radial-tangential macroturbulence dispersion ζ RT = 4.50 ± 0.10 km s‑1. The third-granulation-signature plot shows that the granulation velocities of α Ser are only 0.55 ± 0.10 as large as the Sun's. The line bisector of Fe i λ6253 has the usual “C” shape and when mapped onto the third-signature plot results in a flux deficit that is slightly broader than seen in other measured K giants. The deficit fractional area of 12.3 ± 1.5% suggests a temperature difference between granules and lanes of 105 K as seen averaged over the stellar disk.

  5. Giant Spiders of Venus - Redefinition, Revised Population, and Implications of Formational Processes of Arachnoids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostama, V.-P.; Törmänen, T.

    2007-03-01

    The large population of volcano-tectonic structures is characteristical to the surface of Venus. In addition to the well studied coronae, there are other smaller groups of features, such as the arachnoids.

  6. Arachnoid Cysts

    MedlinePlus

    ... Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Arachnoid Cysts Information Page Synonym(s): Intracranial Cysts Table of Contents ( ... Clinical Trials Organizations Publicaciones en Español What are Arachnoid Cysts? Arachnoid cysts are cerebrospinal fluid-filled sacs that ...

  7. GRANULATION IN RED GIANTS: OBSERVATIONS BY THE KEPLER MISSION AND THREE-DIMENSIONAL CONVECTION SIMULATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Mathur, S.; Hekker, S.; Trampedach, R.; Ballot, J.; Kallinger, T.; Buzasi, D.; Garcia, R. A.; Jimenez, A.; Regulo, C.; Mosser, B.; Elsworth, Y.; Chaplin, W. J.; Hale, S. J.; De Ridder, J.; Kinemuchi, K.; Mullally, F.

    2011-11-10

    The granulation pattern that we observe on the surface of the Sun is due to hot plasma rising to the photosphere where it cools down and descends back into the interior at the edges of granules. This is the visible manifestation of convection taking place in the outer part of the solar convection zone. Because red giants have deeper convection zones than the Sun, we cannot a priori assume that their granulation is a scaled version of solar granulation. Until now, neither observations nor one-dimensional analytical convection models could put constraints on granulation in red giants. With asteroseismology, this study can now be performed. We analyze {approx}1000 red giants that have been observed by Kepler during 13 months. We fit the power spectra with Harvey-like profiles to retrieve the characteristics of the granulation (timescale {tau}{sub gran} and power P{sub gran}). We search for a correlation between these parameters and the global acoustic-mode parameter (the position of maximum power, {nu}{sub max}) as well as with stellar parameters (mass, radius, surface gravity (log g), and effective temperature (T{sub eff})). We show that {tau}{sub eff}{proportional_to}{nu}{sup -0.89}{sub max} and P{sub gran}{proportional_to}{nu}{sup -1.90}{sub max}, which is consistent with the theoretical predictions. We find that the granulation timescales of stars that belong to the red clump have similar values while the timescales of stars in the red giant branch are spread in a wider range. Finally, we show that realistic three-dimensional simulations of the surface convection in stars, spanning the (T{sub eff}, log g) range of our sample of red giants, match the Kepler observations well in terms of trends.

  8. THE THIRD SIGNATURE OF GRANULATION IN BRIGHT-GIANT AND SUPERGIANT STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, David F.; Pugh, Teznie

    2012-04-15

    We investigated third-signature granulation plots for 18 bright giants and supergiants and one giant of spectral classes G0 to M3. These plots reveal the net granulation velocities, averaged over the stellar disk, as a function of depth. Supergiants show significant differences from the 'standard' shape seen for lower-luminosity stars. Most notable is a striking reversal of slope seen for three of the nine supergiants, i.e., stronger lines are more blueshifted than weaker lines, opposite the solar case. Changes in the third-signature plot of {alpha} Sco (M1.5 Iab) with time imply granulation cells that penetrate only the lower portion of the photosphere. For those stars showing the standard shape, we derive scaling factors relative to the Sun that serve as a first-order measure of the strength of the granulation relative to the Sun. For G-type stars, the third-signature scale of the bright giants and supergiants is approximately 1.5 times as strong as in dwarfs, but for K stars, there in no discernible difference between higher-luminosity stars and dwarfs. Classical macroturbulence, a measure of the velocity dispersion of the granulation, increases with the third-signature-plot scale factors, but at different rates for different luminosity classes.

  9. A new, albino-beige mouse: giant granules in retinal pigment epithelium.

    PubMed

    Robison, W G; Kuwabara, T

    1978-04-01

    Albino-beige mice were produced in order to combine two experimentally useful characteristics, albinism and lysosomal dysfunction, in the same animal. The retinal pigment epithelium of albino-beige mice formed giant intracellular granules. Exposure of albino-beige mice to white light of 150 foot-candles for 3 to 10 hr induced marked phagocytosis of rod outer segment fragments by the retinal pigment epithelium, resulting in intracellular accumulations of undigested disk membranes within the giant granules. Additional, incompletely processed membranes accumulated as the mice aged or were exposed to 150 foot-candle light for longer periods. Such accumulations of ingested membranes were not observed in the pigment epithelium of exposed or aging albino mice heterozygous for the beige gene. Because of its altered processing of ingested outer segment membranes, this new albino mouse should be useful for studying the possible roles of the retinal pigment epithelium in the maintenance of photoreceptor cells and in their recovery from light damage and other insults. PMID:640784

  10. Granulation properties of giants, dwarfs, and white dwarfs from the CIFIST 3D model atmosphere grid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tremblay, P.-E.; Ludwig, H.-G.; Freytag, B.; Steffen, M.; Caffau, E.

    2013-09-01

    Three-dimensional model atmospheres for giants, dwarfs, and white dwarfs, computed with the CO5BOLD code and part of the CIFIST grid, have been used for spectroscopic and asteroseismic studies. Unlike existing plane-parallel 1D structures, these simulations predict the spatially and temporally resolved emergent intensity so that granulation can be analysed, which provides insights on how convective energy transfer operates in stars. The wide range of atmospheric parameters of the CIFIST 3D simulations (3600 < Teff (K) < 13 000 and 1 < log g < 9) allows the comparison of convective processes in significantly different environments. We show that the relative intensity contrast is correlated with both the Mach and Péclet numbers in the photosphere. The horizontal size of granules varies between 3 and 10 times the local pressure scale height, with a tight correlation between the factor and the Mach number of the flow. Given that convective giants, dwarfs, and white dwarfs cover the same range of Mach and Péclet numbers, we conclude that photospheric convection operates in a very similar way in those objects. Table 1 and Appendix A are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  11. GRANULATION SIGNATURES IN THE SPECTRUM OF THE VERY METAL-POOR RED GIANT HD 122563

    SciTech Connect

    RamIrez, I.; Collet, R.; Asplund, M.; Lambert, D. L.; Allende Prieto, C.

    2010-12-20

    A very high resolution (R = {lambda}/{Delta}{lambda} = 200, 000), high signal-to-noise ratio (S/N {approx_equal} 340) blue-green spectrum of the very metal-poor ([Fe/H] {approx_equal} -2.6) red giant star HD 122563 has been obtained by us at McDonald Observatory. We measure the asymmetries and core wavelengths of a set of unblended Fe I lines covering a wide range of line strength. Line bisectors exhibit the characteristic C-shape signature of surface convection (granulation) and they span from about 100 m s{sup -1} in the strongest Fe I features to 800 m s{sup -1} in the weakest ones. Core wavelength shifts range from about -100 to -900 m s{sup -1}, depending on line strength. In general, larger blueshifts are observed in weaker lines, but there is increasing scatter with increasing residual flux. Assuming local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE), we synthesize the same set of spectral lines using a state-of-the-art three-dimensional (3D) hydrodynamic simulation for a stellar atmosphere of fundamental parameters similar to those of HD 122563. We find good agreement between model predictions and observations. This allows us to infer an absolute zero point for the line shifts and radial velocity. Moreover, it indicates that the structure and dynamics of the simulation are realistic, thus providing support to previous claims of large 3D-LTE corrections to elemental abundances and fundamental parameters of very metal-poor red giant stars obtained with standard 1D-LTE spectroscopic analyses, as suggested by the hydrodynamic model used here.

  12. Arachnoid cyst spontaneous rupture.

    PubMed

    Marques, Inês Brás; Vieira Barbosa, José

    2014-01-01

    Arachnoid cysts are benign congenital cerebrospinal fluid collections, usually asymptomatic and diagnosed incidentally in children or adolescents. They may become symptomatic after enlargement or complications, frequently presenting with symptoms of intracranial hypertension. We report an unusual case of progressive refractory headache in an adult patient due to an arachnoid cyst spontaneous rupture. Although clinical improvement occurred with conservative treatment, the subdural hygroma progressively enlarged and surgical treatment was ultimately needed. Spontaneous rupture is a very rare complication of arachnoid cysts. Accumulation of cerebrospinal fluid accumulation in the subdural space causes sustained intracranial hypertension that may be life-threatening and frequently requires surgical treatment. Patients with arachnoid cysts must be informed on their small vulnerability to cyst rupture and be aware that a sudden and severe headache, especially if starting after minor trauma or a Valsalva manoeuvre, always requires medical evaluation. PMID:24581205

  13. [Intraventricular arachnoid cyst].

    PubMed

    Rico-Cotelo, María; Diaz-Cabanas, Lucía; Allut, Alfredo G; Gelabert-Gonzalez, Miguel

    2013-07-01

    INTRODUCTION. Intracranial arachnoids cysts are considered benign developmental anomalies that occur within the arachnoid membrane and generally contain clear and colourless fluid resembling cerebrospinal fluid. The prevalence of these cysts is higher in the first two decades of life, and the incidence is widely quoted as approximately 1% of all space-occupying intracranial lesions. Arachnoids cysts in the elderly person are a rare occurrence. We report the unusual presentation of a woman with an intraventricular arachnoid cyst treated with endoscopic technique. CASE REPORT. A 75-year-old woman presented with progressive hemiparesis of two years duration. Cranial MR imaging showed a right parieto-occipital intraventricular cyst with local mass effect and moderate dilatation of lateral ventricles. A right-sided burr hole was made and the arachnoids cyst was reached and cysto-ventricle shunting was realized. This was followed by a septum pellucidum fenestration. There were no complications during the surgery and the patient presented no symptoms at time of discharge. CONCLUSIONS. The neuroendoscopic approach to intraventricular arachnoid cysts was effective with few complications. PMID:23799598

  14. Final steps in exocytosis observed in a cell with giant secretory granules.

    PubMed Central

    Breckenridge, L J; Almers, W

    1987-01-01

    Secretion by single mast cells was studied in normal and beige mice, a mutant with grossly enlarged secretory vesicles or granules. During degranulation, the membrane capacitance increased in steps, as single secretory vesicles fused with the cell membrane. The average step size was 10 times larger in beige than in normal mice, in agreement with the different granule sizes measured microscopically in the two preparations. Following individual capacitance steps in beige mice, individual granules of the appropriate size were observed to swell rapidly. Capacitance steps are frequently followed by the stepwise loss of a fluorescent dye loaded into the vesicles. Stepwise capacitance increases were occasionally intermittent before they became permanent, indicating the existence of an early, reversible, and incomplete state of vesicle fusion. During such "capacitance flicker," loss of fluorescent dye from vesicles did not occur, suggesting that the earliest aqueous connection between vesicle interior and cell exterior is a narrow channel. Our results support the view that the reversible formation of such a channel, which we term the fusion pore, is an early step in exocytosis. Images PMID:3470768

  15. Syringomyelia and arachnoiditis.

    PubMed Central

    Caplan, L R; Norohna, A B; Amico, L L

    1990-01-01

    Five patients with chronic arachnoiditis and syringomyelia were studied. Three patients had early life meningitis and developed symptoms of syringomyelia eight, 21, and 23 years after the acute infection. One patient had a spinal dural thoracic AVM and developed a thoracic syrinx 11 years after spinal subarachnoid haemorrhage and five years after surgery on the AVM. A fifth patient had tuberculous meningitis with transient spinal cord dysfunction followed by development of a lumbar syrinx seven years later. Arachnoiditis can cause syrinx formation by obliterating the spinal vasculature causing ischaemia. Small cystic regions of myelomalacia coalesce to form cavities. In other patients, central cord ischaemia mimics syringomyelia but no cavitation is present. Scar formation with spinal block leads to altered dynamics of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow and contributes to the formation of spinal cord cystic cavities. Images PMID:2313296

  16. [Arachnoid cysts: Embriology and pathology].

    PubMed

    García-Conde, Mario; Martín-Viota, Lucia

    2015-01-01

    There is still great controversy surrounding the origin of the arachnoid cyst. The most accepted theory in the case of congenital cysts explains how they are formed from an anomalous development of the arachnoid membrane, which is unfolded allowing the accumulation of cerebrospinal fluid inside and creating a cyst. This theory seems to explain the origin of convexity and sylvian cistern arachnoid cysts, whereas those in other locations might be due to other mechanisms. In the anatomopathological analysis, the arachnoid cyst wall can be seen as having few differences from normal, although thickened due to an increase quantity of collagenous material. A description of the embryological development of the arachnoid layer and cyst formation is presented, describing the main anatomopathological findings. PMID:25866380

  17. Arachnoiditis ossificans after spinal surgery.

    PubMed

    Liu, Li-Di; Zhao, Song; Liu, Wan-Guo; Zhang, Shao-Kun

    2015-05-01

    This article presents an unusual case of arachnoiditis ossificans after spinal surgery. A case of arachnoiditis ossificans secondary to lumbar fixation and decompression surgery for the treatment of multilevel lumbar fractures is reported and the relevant literature is reviewed. A 29-year-old man who previously underwent posterior pedicle screw fixation and fusion for multiple lumbar spine fractures reported lower back stiffness and discomfort 23 months postoperatively. A laminectomy was performed at L2 and at L3-L4. At L2, bone fragments from the burst fracture had injured the dural sac and some nerve roots. A posterolateral fusion was performed using allogeneic bone. Postoperatively, there were no signs of fever, infection, or systemic inflammatory responses. Arachnoiditis ossificans of the thecal sac from L1-L5 was diagnosed by magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography at the 2-year follow-up. His postoperative neurological status progressively improved and he regained motor and sensory functions. Because of neurological improvements, fixation hardware was removed without further decompression. The authors report a case of arachnoiditis ossificans secondary to lumbar fixation and decompression surgery, which involved a large region. Arachnoiditis ossificans is a relatively rare disorder with unclear etiologies and limited treatment options. Spinal surgical intervention of arachnoiditis ossificans should be carefully considered because it may lead to poor outcomes and multiple revision surgeries. PMID:25970374

  18. Arachnoid cyst slit valves: the mechanism for arachnoid cyst enlargement.

    PubMed

    Halani, Sameer H; Safain, Mina G; Heilman, Carl B

    2013-07-01

    Arachnoid cysts are common, accounting for approximately 1% of intracranial mass lesions. Most are congenital, clinically silent, and remain static in size. Occasionally, they increase in size and produce symptoms due to mass effect or obstruction. The mechanism of enlargement of arachnoid cysts is controversial. One-way slit valves are often hypothesized as the mechanism for enlargement. The authors present 4 cases of suprasellar prepontine arachnoid cysts in which a slit valve was identified. The patients presented with hydrocephalus due to enlargement of the cyst. The valve was located in the arachnoid wall of the cyst directly over the basilar artery. The authors believe this slit valve was responsible for the net influx of CSF into the cyst and for its enlargement. They also present 1 case of an arachnoid cyst in the middle cranial fossa that had a small circular opening but lacked a slit valve. This cyst did not enlarge but surgery was required because of rupture and the development of a subdural hygroma. One-way slit valves exist and are a possible mechanism of enlargement of suprasellar prepontine arachnoid cysts. The valve was located directly over the basilar artery in each of these cases. Caudad-to-cephalad CSF flow during the cardiac cycle increased the opening of the valve, whereas cephalad-to-caudad CSF flow during the remainder of the cardiac cycle pushed the slit opening against the basilar artery and decreased the size of the opening. Arachnoid cysts that communicate CSF via circular, nonslit valves are probably more likely to remain stable. PMID:23662935

  19. [Rare location of arachnoid cysts. Extratemporal cysts].

    PubMed

    Martinez-Perez, Rafael; Hinojosa, José; Pascual, Beatriz; Panaderos, Teresa; Welter, Diego; Muñoz, María J

    2016-01-01

    The therapeutic management of arachnoid cysts depends largely on its location. Almost 50% of arachnoid cysts are located in the temporal fossa-Sylvian fissure, whereas the other half is distributed in different locations, sometimes exceptional. Under the name of infrequent location arachnoid cysts, a description is presented of those composed of 2 sheets of arachnoid membrane, which are not located in the temporal fossa, and are primary or congenital. PMID:26725189

  20. [Neurosurgical aspects of arachnoid cysts].

    PubMed

    Maier, F; Steube, D; Hamm, K D

    1986-01-01

    After an analysis of the patients treated in the last five years, a report is given on 9 cases of arachnoid cysts as a rare form of intracranial space occupation. The etiology of the arachnoid cysts has not been fully cleared up yet, but the semipermeability of the cyst membrane appears to be an important pathogenetic factor. Today, the diagnosis of the disease is verified by CT techniques. In case of the occurrence of clinical symptoms the treatment should always be carried out in the form of an operation. PMID:3564765

  1. Spinal Extradural Arachnoid Cyst

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Seung Won; Seong, Han Yu

    2013-01-01

    Spinal extradural arachnoid cyst (SEAC) is a rare disease and uncommon cause of compressive myelopathy. The etiology remains still unclear. We experienced 2 cases of SEACs and reviewed the cases and previous literatures. A 59-year-old man complained of both leg radiating pain and paresthesia for 4 years. His MRI showed an extradural cyst from T12 to L3 and we performed cyst fenestration and repaired the dural defect with tailored laminectomy. Another 51-year-old female patient visited our clinical with left buttock pain and paresthesia for 3 years. A large extradural cyst was found at T1-L2 level on MRI and a communication between the cyst and subarachnoid space was illustrated by CT-myelography. We performed cyst fenestration with primary repair of dural defect. Both patients' symptoms gradually subsided and follow up images taken 1-2 months postoperatively showed nearly disappeared cysts. There has been no documented recurrence in these two cases so far. Tailored laminotomy with cyst fenestration can be a safe and effective alternative choice in treating SEACs compared to traditional complete resection of cyst wall with multi-level laminectomy. PMID:24294463

  2. A comprehensive review of spinal arachnoiditis.

    PubMed

    Wright, Michael H; Denney, Leann C

    2003-01-01

    Spinal arachnoiditis is an insidious disease caused by an inflammatory process of the arachnoid membrane resulting from many possible causes, such as myelograms with oil-based radiographic contract agents and multiple back surgeries. Diagnosis is based on symptoms and magnetic resonance imaging. Arachnoiditis can also mimic the symptoms of other diseases, such as spinal cord tumors, cauda equina syndrome, arachnoiditis ossificans, and syringomyelia. Unfortunately, there is no cure, only treatment of the chronic symptoms. It is an incurable disease that can cause minor to severe symptoms from unexplained rashes to neurologic defects. PMID:12803151

  3. Dural and Arachnoid Membraneous Protection of the Abducens Nerve at the Petroclival Region

    PubMed Central

    Ozveren, M. Faik; Uchida, Koichi; Tekdemir, Ibrahim; Cobanoglu, Bengu; Akdemir, Ismail; Kawase, Takeshi; Deda, Haluk

    2002-01-01

    The goal of this study was to determine the membranous protection of the abducens nerve in the petroclival region. The petroclival portion of the abducens nerve was studied in ten dissections from five cadaveric head specimens. One of the heads was used for histological sections. Four heads were injected with colored latex for microsurgical dissections. The histological sections were prepared from petroclival dura mater, embedded in paraffin blocks, stained, sectioned in the axial, coronal, and sagittal planes, and evaluated by light microscopy. The abducens nerve was covered by a dural sleeve and arachnoidal membrane during its course within the petroclival area. Following the petrous apex, the abducens nerve was fixed by a sympathetic plexus and connective tissue extensions to the lateral wall of the cavernous segment of the internal carotid artery and to the medial wall of Meckel's cave. Fibrous trabeculations inside the venous space were attached to the dural sleeve. The lateral clival artery accompanied the dural sleeve of the abducens nerve and supplied the petroclival dura mater. The arterioles accompanying the abducens nerve through the subarachnoid space supplied the nerve within the dural sleeve. The arachnoid membrane covered the abducens nerve within the dural sleeve to the petrous apex, and arachnoid granulations found on the dural sleeve protruded into the venous space. The extension of the arachnoid membrane to the petrous apex and the presence of arachnoid granulations on the dural sleeve suggest that the subarachnoid space continues in the dural sleeve. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6 PMID:17167676

  4. Atypical cause of radiculopathy - Intradural spinal arachnoid cyst.

    PubMed

    Krstačić, Antonija; Krstačić, Goran; Butković Soldo, Silva

    2016-08-01

    Intradural spinal arachnoid cysts are a relatively uncommon lesion that may be either intra, or extradural, and intradural spinal arachnoid cysts are even less common. Arachnoid cysts are cerebrospinal fluid collections in the spine that can present with neurological symptoms. The objective of this paper is to describe a rare case of radicular pain due to a spinal arachnoid cyst. PMID:27104760

  5. Characteristics of arachnoids from Magellan data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dawson, C. B.; Crumpler, L. S.

    1993-01-01

    Current high resolution Magellan data enables more detailed geological study of arachnoids, first identified by Barsukov et al. as features characterized by a combination of radar-bright, concentric rings and radiating lineations, named 'arachnoids' on the basis of their spider and web-like appearance. Identification of arachnoids in Magellan data has been based on SAR images, in keeping with the original definition. However, there is some overlap by other workers in identification of arachnoids, corona (predominantly bright rings), and novae (predominantly radiating lineations), as all of these features share some common characteristics. Features used in this survey were chosen based on their classification as arachnoids in Head et al.'s catalog and on SAR characteristics matching Barsukov et al.'s original definition. The 259 arachnoids have been currently identified on Venus, all of which were considered in this study. Fifteen arachnoids from different regions, chosen for their 'type' characteristics and lack of deformation by other regional processes, were studied in depth, using SAR and altimetric data to map and profile these arachnoids in an attempt to better determine their geologic and altimetric characteristics and possible formation sequences.

  6. Case report: arachnoiditis following intracranial 'Thorotrast'.

    PubMed

    Pandya, P M; Keogh, A J

    1992-02-01

    A patient is reported with a painless, progressive cauda equina lesion due to arachnoiditis, the result of the contrast medium 'Thorotrast' (thorium dioxide) introduced into the brain over 30 years previously. Contrast medium introduced into the lumbar spine can give rise to aseptic adhesive inflammation (arachnoiditis). It rarely gives rise to clinical problems but, when it does so, is usually associated with back pain and only very rarely with progressive neurological deficit. PMID:1310644

  7. [Microsurgical treatment of intracraneal arachnoid cysts].

    PubMed

    Saura Rojas, J Enrique; Horcajadas Almansa, Ángel; Ros López, Bienvenido

    2016-01-01

    Craniotomy and fenestration of membranes is one of the main treatment options for symptomatic arachnoid cysts. Open surgery advantages include, direct inspection of the cyst, biopsy sampling, fenestration in multilocular cysts and, in certain locations, cyst communication to basal cisterns. The aim of this paper is to review the advantages and disadvantages of this treatment modality for arachnoid cysts taking into account the different anatomical locations. PMID:25891259

  8. Intramedullary arachnoid cyst in an adult: Case report and review.

    PubMed

    Alugolu, Rajesh; Arradi, Vamshidhar; Sahu, B P

    2016-01-01

    Arachnoid cysts in the spine are a rare entity with extradural occurrence being the commonest. Arachnoid cysts in intramedullary location are sparingly reported in elderly. We herein report a case of intramedullary arachnoid cyst in an adult female who presented with features of compressive myelopathy. PMID:26889288

  9. Intramedullary arachnoid cyst in an adult: Case report and review

    PubMed Central

    Alugolu, Rajesh; Arradi, Vamshidhar; Sahu, B. P.

    2016-01-01

    Arachnoid cysts in the spine are a rare entity with extradural occurrence being the commonest. Arachnoid cysts in intramedullary location are sparingly reported in elderly. We herein report a case of intramedullary arachnoid cyst in an adult female who presented with features of compressive myelopathy. PMID:26889288

  10. Sports participation with arachnoid cysts.

    PubMed

    Strahle, Jennifer; Selzer, Béla J; Geh, Ndi; Srinivasan, Dushyanth; Strahle, MaryKathryn; Martinez-Sosa, Meleine; Muraszko, Karin M; Garton, Hugh J L; Maher, Cormac O

    2016-04-01

    OBJECT There is currently no consensus on the safety of sports participation for patients with an intracranial arachnoid cyst (AC). The authors' goal was to define the risk of sports participation for children with this imaging finding. METHODS A survey was prospectively administered to 185 patients with ACs during a 46-month period at a single institution. Cyst size and location, treatment, sports participation, and any injuries were recorded. Eighty patients completed at least 1 subsequent survey following their initial entry into the registry, and these patients were included in a prospective registry with a mean prospective follow-up interval of 15.9 ± 8.8 months. RESULTS A total 112 patients with ACs participated in 261 sports for a cumulative duration of 4410 months or 1470 seasons. Of these, 94 patients participated in 190 contact sports for a cumulative duration of 2818 months or 939 seasons. There were no serious or catastrophic neurological injuries. Two patients presented with symptomatic subdural hygromas following minor sports injuries. In the prospective cohort, there were no neurological injuries CONCLUSIONS Permanent or catastrophic neurological injuries are very unusual in AC patients who participate in athletic activities. In most cases, sports participation by these patients is safe. PMID:26636254

  11. Children With Intracranial Arachnoid Cysts

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Zhen; Li, Yongxin; Zhu, Fengjun; Zang, Dongdong; Zhao, Cailei; Li, Cong; Tong, Dan; Zhang, Heye; Chen, Qian

    2015-01-01

    Abstract We performed a dynamic study of arachnoid cysts (ACs) using magnetic resonance cisternography (MRC) and proposed a classification of ACs. Twenty-three suitable patients in our hospital entered into this study according to our inclusion criteria. MRC images were collected in all the subjects at 1 and 24 hours after the administration of intrathecal gadolinium-diethylenetriamine penta-acetic acid (Gd-DTPA). We allocate the enrolled patients into 2 groups, MRC group and surgery group. The MRC results were considered before treatment in 1 group (MRC group, 13 patients), whereas another group was surgically treated without considering the MRC results (surgery group, 10 patients). We calculated the enhanced area of cyst using modified MacDonald Criteria from the images and measured the surrounding subarachnoid area as the reference. We found that it was practically useful to quantify 3 types of ACs, complete communicating, incomplete communicating, and noncommunicating, according to MRC results in this study. All the subjects in both groups are closely observed before the treatment and the follow-up using the MRI examination. In the surgery group, 5 patients were found that the area of cysts shrank in the follow-up stage. However, there was no significant difference in the percentage shrinkage area between the 2 groups. We concluded that MRC with Gd-DTPA as a contrast agent is of significant clinical value for the diagnosis and treatment of children with intracranial ACs. This classification based on dynamic MRC is useful for making surgical recommendations. PMID:26554773

  12. Arachnoiditis Ossificans – A Rare Cause of Progressive Myelopathy

    PubMed Central

    Steel, Christopher J; Abrames, Erik L; O’Brien, William T

    2015-01-01

    Arachnoiditis ossificans is a rare cause of chronic, progressive myelopathy. In contrast to the more common benign causes of meningeal calcification, arachnoiditis ossificans results in replacement of portions of the spinal arachnoid by bone as an end-stage complication of adhesive arachnoiditis. It is usually the sequela of prior trauma or interventional procedures. Prognosis and treatment options depend upon the location and degree of spinal stenosis with thoracic involvement being more common and more severe than lumbar spine involvement. The imaging findings on magnetic resonance imaging may be confusing; however, the findings of intraspinal ossification on computed tomography are characteristics and diagnostic. We present a classic case of arachnoiditis ossificans in an elderly man who presented with progressive myelopathy and a recent fall, along with a review of the literature. The imaging in this case not only identified the characteristic findings of arachnoiditis ossificans but also identified secondary findings of the underlying causative etiology. PMID:26401174

  13. Arachnoiditis Ossificans - A Rare Cause of Progressive Myelopathy.

    PubMed

    Steel, Christopher J; Abrames, Erik L; O'Brien, William T

    2015-01-01

    Arachnoiditis ossificans is a rare cause of chronic, progressive myelopathy. In contrast to the more common benign causes of meningeal calcification, arachnoiditis ossificans results in replacement of portions of the spinal arachnoid by bone as an end-stage complication of adhesive arachnoiditis. It is usually the sequela of prior trauma or interventional procedures. Prognosis and treatment options depend upon the location and degree of spinal stenosis with thoracic involvement being more common and more severe than lumbar spine involvement. The imaging findings on magnetic resonance imaging may be confusing; however, the findings of intraspinal ossification on computed tomography are characteristics and diagnostic. We present a classic case of arachnoiditis ossificans in an elderly man who presented with progressive myelopathy and a recent fall, along with a review of the literature. The imaging in this case not only identified the characteristic findings of arachnoiditis ossificans but also identified secondary findings of the underlying causative etiology. PMID:26401174

  14. Lumbosacral arachnoid cyst with tethered cord: A rare case report

    PubMed Central

    Jain, S. K.; Sundar, I. Vijay; Sharma, Vinod; Goel, Ravishankar S.

    2012-01-01

    Arachnoid cysts are cerebrospinal fluid collections in the spine that can present with neurological symptoms or be discovered accidentally. Intradural location of such cysts especially in the lumbosacral region is relatively rare. The association of such cysts with other congenital anomalies such as tethered cord lends evidence to the developmental origin of arachnoid cysts. We report a case of lumbosacral arachnoid cyst with tethered cord in a 6-year-old male child and discuss the etiopathogenesis and management options. PMID:24082689

  15. Global Characteristics of 'Arachnoids' on Venus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, V. E.; Stofan, E. R.

    1996-03-01

    The term "arachnoid" has been used colloquially to describe circular to elliptical structures having a set of radiating lineaments distinctly resembling the legs of a spider. However, little is known about the origin of these features and whether or not they are genetically related to each other or to other circular structures on Venus (e.g., coronae, volcanoes, and calderas). We have conducted a global survey of these features in order to more clearly define their characteristics and determine if they are in fact a separate type of feature. In contrast to previous counts, we find a rather small global population of only 36 features that we feel we can confidently call "arachnoids". A detailed examination of these features reveals that they do not display a common set of volcanic or tectonic characteristics indicative of a single process of formation. We also find that these features do not appear to universally represent a particular stage of corona, volcano, or caldera development. _

  16. Sixth cranial nerve palsy due to arachnoid cyst.

    PubMed

    Raveenthiran, Venkatachalam; Reshma, Khajamohideen B

    2014-01-01

    Sixth cranial nerve palsy is an extremely rare complication of an arachnoid cyst. A 4-year-old boy who presented with left abducens palsy and a subdural hygroma complicating arachnoid cyst is discussed. Comprehensive review of the world literature revealed only 12 additional cases. PMID:25347081

  17. Sixth cranial nerve palsy due to arachnoid cyst.

    PubMed

    Raveenthiran, Venkatachalam; Reshma, Khajamohideen B

    2014-01-01

    Sixth cranial nerve palsy is an extremely rare complication of an arachnoid cyst. A 4-year-old boy who presented with left abducens palsy and a subdural hygroma complicating arachnoid cyst is discussed. Comprehensive review of the world literature revealed only 12 additional cases. PMID:25608227

  18. A case of organized arachnoid cyst with repeated hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Atsushi; Nagashima, Goro; Noda, Masayuki; Kato, Akihito; Morishima, Hiroyuki; Koike, Junki

    2016-03-01

    Hemorrhage sometimes occurs within arachnoid cysts, however, organized arachnoid cysts has not been reported. We speculate the previous invasive stress or some kind of infection may have triggered the formation of the organized membrane, which may have formed via a similar mechanism to that for organized chronic subdural hematomas. PMID:27014445

  19. Rapid Visual Deterioration Caused by Posterior Fossa Arachnoid Cyst.

    PubMed

    Shin, Chang Jin; Rho, Myeongho; Won, Yu Sam; Kim, Si On

    2016-05-01

    Posterior fossa is a site next to the middle fossa where arachnoid cyst frequently occurs. Generally, most arachnoid cysts are asymptomatic and are found incidentally in most cases. Although arachnoid cysts are benign and asymptomatic lesions, patients with posterior fossa arachnoid cysts often complain of headaches, gait disturbance, and ataxia due to the local mass effects on the cerebellum. We observed a patient with a posterior fossa arachnoid cyst who had visual symptoms and a headache, but did not have gait disturbance and ataxia. We recommended an emergency operation for decompression, but the patient refused for personal reasons. After 7 days, the patient revisited our hospital in a state of near-blindness. We suspected that the arachnoid cyst induced the hydrocephalus and thereby the enlarged third ventricle directly compressed optic nerves. Compressed optic nerves were rapidly aggravated during the critical seven days; consequently, the patient's vision was damaged despite the operation. Considering the results of our case, it is important to keep in mind that the aggravation of symptoms cannot be predicted; therefore, symptomatic arachnoid cysts should be treated without undue delay. PMID:27226868

  20. Rapid Visual Deterioration Caused by Posterior Fossa Arachnoid Cyst

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Chang Jin; Rho, Myeongho; Won, Yu Sam

    2016-01-01

    Posterior fossa is a site next to the middle fossa where arachnoid cyst frequently occurs. Generally, most arachnoid cysts are asymptomatic and are found incidentally in most cases. Although arachnoid cysts are benign and asymptomatic lesions, patients with posterior fossa arachnoid cysts often complain of headaches, gait disturbance, and ataxia due to the local mass effects on the cerebellum. We observed a patient with a posterior fossa arachnoid cyst who had visual symptoms and a headache, but did not have gait disturbance and ataxia. We recommended an emergency operation for decompression, but the patient refused for personal reasons. After 7 days, the patient revisited our hospital in a state of near-blindness. We suspected that the arachnoid cyst induced the hydrocephalus and thereby the enlarged third ventricle directly compressed optic nerves. Compressed optic nerves were rapidly aggravated during the critical seven days; consequently, the patient's vision was damaged despite the operation. Considering the results of our case, it is important to keep in mind that the aggravation of symptoms cannot be predicted; therefore, symptomatic arachnoid cysts should be treated without undue delay. PMID:27226868

  1. [Intradural arachnoid cyst associated with syringomyelia: a case report].

    PubMed

    Ishi, Yukitomo; Aoyama, Takeshi; Kurisu, Kota; Hida, Kazutoshi; Houkin, Kiyohiro

    2014-05-01

    An intradural arachnoid cyst is a relatively rare condition, occurring within the spinal subarachnoid space. We present the even-more rare case of an intradural arachnoid cyst associated with syringomyelia at the same spinal level. The patient was a 66-year-old man who presented with bilateral leg numbness and gait disturbance. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed an intradural arachnoid cyst located dorsal to, and compressing, the thoracic spinal cord at the level of the 7th thoracic vertebra (Th 7). In addition, syringomyelia existed at the level of Th 8, slightly caudal to the intradural arachnoid cyst. We dissected the cyst but did not perform any surgical procedures for the syringomyelia. Post-operative MRI showed that the cyst had disappeared and the syringomyelia had spontaneously shrunk. The patient was discharged with improvement in his numbness and gait disturbance. There are a few case reports of intradural arachnoid cysts associated with syringomyelia, but recent evidence suggests that its occurrence is more common than previously thought. A combination of these two diseases is thought to be caused by blockage of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow, which is also thought to cause adhesive arachnoiditis. For this reason, resection of the arachnoid cyst could improve the CSF flow and contribute to the shrinkage of syringomyelia. Furthermore, early treatment may correlate with improvement in radiological findings and neurological symptoms. PMID:24807552

  2. Aneurysm, arachnoiditis and intrathecal Au (gold)

    SciTech Connect

    Pence, D.M.; Kim, T.H.; Levitt, S.H. )

    1990-05-01

    This report is a 20-year follow-up of 14 patients treated with external beam craniospinal irradiation and intrathecal gold (10-45 mCi) for medulloblastoma. Six of the patients died within 2 years of treatment from persistent disease. No patients are alive without complications. Six of eight surviving patients developed arachnoiditis and cauda equina syndrome within 5 to 10 years of treatment. Seven of eight survivors developed aneurysms and/or cerebrovascular accidents 9 to 20 years after treatment. Four of the cerebrovascular events were fatal. Intrathecal gold pools in the basal cisterns and cauda equina delivering an extremely inhomogeneous dose throughout the neuroaxis. Its use is discouraged.

  3. Why do central arachnoid pouches expand?

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Bernard; Guthkelch, A. N.

    1974-01-01

    Three cases of progressive hydrocephalus, two occurring in infants and one in a 12 year old girl who also exhibited precocious puberty, were found to be associated with large arachnoid pouches originating within the posterior fossa. The pathogenesis of such cysts is discussed with special reference to the possibility that their progressive distension results from CSF pulsations of venous origin. Both a direct method of treatment (opening the cyst into the adjacent subarachnoid space) and an indirect one (insertion of a ventriculo-atrial shunt) have been used with success. Images PMID:4548436

  4. Quadrigeminal arachnoid cysts in a kitten and a dog.

    PubMed

    Reed, Scott; Cho, Doo Youn; Paulsen, Dan

    2009-09-01

    Two quadrigeminal arachnoid cysts with different pathogenesis are described in 2 different species. A 10-week-old male Persian kitten with a progressively decreasing level of consciousness died spontaneously. At necropsy, mild internal hydrocephalus, caudal cerebellar coning, and cerebellar herniation through the foramen magnum were associated with a congenital quadrigeminal arachnoid cyst compressing the rostral cerebellum and shifting the entire cerebellum caudally. In contrast, a possibly acquired quadrigeminal cyst was observed in a 2-year-old male neutered Yorkshire Terrier in association with necrotizing encephalitis. Quadrigeminal arachnoid cysts have been rarely reported in dogs and humans. PMID:19737770

  5. [MORPHOLOGICAL FEATURES OF NEUTROPHILS AND EOSINOPHILS GRANULES IN SAPPHIRE MINKS].

    PubMed

    Uzenbaeva, L B; Kizhina, A G; Ilyukha, V A

    2015-01-01

    It has been established that sapphire minks have abnormality of subcellular structure of blood and bone marrow neutrophils and eosinophils. The abnormality consists in forming of abnormal "giant" granules. The si- ze and the number of abnormal granules significantly change during maturation of leucocytes in bone marrow. We have found differences between abnormal granules forming in neutrophils and eosinophils that depend on the maturing stage and the cells life cycle duration as well as morphofunctional features of these granulocytes. PMID:26863773

  6. Endoscopic approach for quadrigeminal cistern arachnoid cyst.

    PubMed

    Yu, Lei; Qi, Songtao; Peng, Yuping; Fan, Jun

    2016-08-01

    Objectives Quadrigeminal cistern arachnoid cysts (QCACs), which are usually asymptomatic and may be accidental findings during radiological evaluation, are rare, comprising 5-10% of all intracranial arachnoid cysts (ACs). We report a series of eight patients with QCACs treated with neuroendoscopic intervention and try to discuss the different endoscopic approaches according to the different types of QCACs. Materials and methods Between October 2007 and January 2013, eight patients affected by QCACs were endoscopically treated. All the endoscopic procedures were completed uneventfully (infratentorial approaches in four cases and supratentorial approaches in four cases), which included ventriculocystostomy in seven cases (lateral ventriculocystostomy in one case, third ventricle cystostomy in five cases and both in one case), endoscopic third ventriculostomy in three cases and cystocisternostomy in one case. Results Five patients achieved complete cure after the endoscopic procedure alone; nevertheless, in none of the patients did the cyst totally collapse following the endoscopic procedure during follow-up. The number of episodes decreased significantly even after cessation of all medications and headache disappeared in one patient and the two patients who had unsteady gait together with visual complaints showed remarkable improvement. Conclusion QCAC is one kind of pineal region ACs and it is advisable to plan the operative approach before the endoscopic procedure according to the different types of pineal region ACs. Pineal region ACs and the associated hydrocephalus can be successfully treated with simple, minimally invasive endoscopic procedure. PMID:26744082

  7. Pediatric interhemispheric arachnoid cyst: An institutional experience

    PubMed Central

    Mankotia, Dipanker Singh; Sardana, Hardik; Sinha, Sumit; Sharma, Bhawani Shankar; Suri, Ashish; Borkar, Sachin Anil; Satyarthee, Guru Dutta; Chandra, P. Sarat

    2016-01-01

    Background: Interhemispheric arachnoid cysts (IHACs) are a rare type of congenital arachnoid cyst accounting for <5% of all cases. The optimum surgical management of symptomatic IHAC is still controversial, and there are no clear guidelines. Materials and Methods: Retrospective analysis of six pediatric patients of IHAC operated from 2012 to 2015 at our institute. There was definitive sex predisposition with all patients being males. Endoscopic cystoventriculostomy, cystocisternostomy, and cystoperitoneal shunt surgeries were performed in three patients each. Results: The median age at presentation was 13 months. The most common clinical presentations were macrocrania with rapidly increasing head size, seizures, infantile spasms, and developmental delay. The mean duration of follow-up was 24.16 months (range: 3–36 months). Cyst size decreased in all the patients on follow-up imaging. Head size stabilized in all the patients. None of the patients required a second surgical procedure till the last follow-up. Conclusions: Both endoscopic cyst fenestration and shunt surgery are safe and effective in management of IHAC. PMID:27195030

  8. Cervical spinal intradural arachnoid cysts in related, young pugs.

    PubMed

    Rohdin, C; Nyman, H T; Wohlsein, P; Hultin Jäderlund, K

    2014-04-01

    Seven related young pugs were diagnosed with cervical spinal intradural arachnoid cysts by magnetic resonance imaging (n = 6) and myelography (n = 1). All dogs were presented with skin abrasions on their thoracic limbs and non-painful neurological deficits, indicating a C1-T2 myelopathy. In all six dogs examined by magnetic resonance imaging not only the spinal arachnoid cyst but also a concomitant, most likely secondary, syringohydromyelia was confirmed. Pedigree analysis suggested a genetic predisposition for spinal arachnoid cysts in this family of pugs. Generalised proprioceptive deficits more pronounced in the thoracic limbs suggesting a focal cervical spinal cord lesion, with concomitant skin abrasions on the dorsal aspect of the thoracic limbs in a young pug, should alert veterinarians to the possibility of cervical spinal arachnoid cysts. PMID:24372140

  9. Cauda equina arachnoiditis. A correlative clinical and roentgenologic study.

    PubMed

    Brodsky, A E

    1978-03-01

    A series of 93 consecutive patients whose myelograms were reported as showing arachnoiditis were studied, and correlations between the radiographic appearance and the clinical and surgical findings were tabulated. All but 1 patient had had either lumbar disc surgery and/or Pantopaque myelography. The study led to a classification of such roentgenogram changes which revealed that the majority of patients studied did not have the usual adhesive arachnoiditis, but the picture they projected was more commonly due to spinal stenosis, extraarachnoid dye injection, extradural scar, etc. Only 1 patient of the 93 presented the classic severely disabling paraparesis, intractable pain, and loss of bowel and bladder functions commonly ascribed to adhesive arachnoiditis. The presence of such myelographic changes need not deter necessary surgery for coexisting disc pathology, nerve root entrapment, or spinal stenosis. In only a small percentage of these patients could the symptoms be attributed to the arachnoiditis changes seen in the myelogram. PMID:644393

  10. Traumatic rupture of arachnoid cyst with subdural hygroma.

    PubMed

    Rajesh, A; Bramhaprasad, V; Purohit, A K

    2012-01-01

    Intracranial arachnoid cysts developing in relation to the cerebral hemispheres and middle cranial fossa are usually incidental or asymptomatic. However, most of the clinically active cysts present with seizures because of chronic compression. Presentation as raised intracranial pressure due to cyst rupture into the subdural space is a rare clinical entity. We herein present a case of an asymptomatic arachnoid cyst with rupture into the subdural space bilaterally and presenting as raised intracranial pressure. PMID:22837775

  11. Spontaneous Rupture of the Middle Fossa Arachnoid Cyst into the Subdural Space: Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Bora, Aydın; Yokuş, Adem; Batur, Abdussamet; Bulut, Mehmet Deniz; Yavuz, Alpaslan; Gülşen, İsmail; Özgökçe, Mesut; Arslan, Mehmet

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Arachnoid cysts are congenital, benign and intra-arachnoidal lesions. A great majority of arachnoid cysts are congenital. However, to a lesser extent, they are known to develop after head trauma and brain inflammatory diseases. Arachnoid cysts are mostly asymptomatic and they can develop anywhere in the brain along the arachnoid membrane. Case Report Arachnoid cysts form 1% of the non-traumatic lesions which occupy a place and it is thought to be a congenital lesion developed as a result of meningeal development abnormalities or a lesion acquired after trauma and infection. There is a male dominance at a rate of 3/1 in arachnoid cysts which locate mostly in the middle fossa. Our patient was a 2-years-old boy. Conclusions As a conclusion, spontaneous subdural hygroma is a rare complication of the arachnoid cysts. Surgical intervention could be required in acute cases. PMID:26150904

  12. Huge Frontal-Temporal Lobe Arachnoid Cyst Presenting as an Weariness Migraine.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiang; Fan, Youwu; Li, Liwen; Gao, Yongyue; Zhou, Mengliang; Li, Jie; Wang, Handong

    2016-05-01

    To the authors' knowledge, most of intracranial arachnoid cyst located in middle cranial fossa and lateral fissure cistern. So, huge frontal-temporal lobe arachnoid cyst is rare. Symptoms of arachnoid cyst may be atypical, including headache, nausea, vomiting, epilepsy, poor memory, and so on. Of course, migraine related to weariness is a rare benign headache disorder. The authors reported a patient presenting with weariness migraine associated with large frontal-temporal lobe arachnoid cyst. PMID:26999696

  13. Cervicothoracic Arachnoid Cyst Causing Cervical Myelopathy: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kizilay, Zahir; Yilmaz, Ali; Ozkul, Ayca; Ismailoglu, Ozgur

    2015-01-01

    Several types of intraspinal cyst develop within the spinal canal from the craniovertebral junction to the sacrum. These lesions occur in both children and adults. Arachnoid cysts are one of them and are more frequent in the paediatric population, being a relatively uncommon lesion in adults. The arachnoid cyst may be located intradurally or extradurally. The intradural type may be congenital or from spinal trauma, infection or spondylosis. Although intradural arachnoid cysts are often asymptomatic, they may give early symptoms when they exist with synchronous pathologies constricting the spinal canal gradually as in cervical spondylosis. In this report, a 60-year-old man with an arachnoid cyst of the cervicothoracic spine is presented. His cyst remained undiagnosed because of the nonspecific nature of the symptoms. It was only when he developed right hemiparesis that a posterior fluid collection compressing the spinal cord was found in Magnetic resonance imaginig. An intradural extramedullary cyst was removed with successful surgery and cord compression and symptoms were reversed. We discuss radiological diagnosis and surgical treatment of an arachnoid cyst in this report. PMID:27275210

  14. Benign enlargement of sub-arachnoid spaces in infancy

    PubMed Central

    Kuruvilla, Linu Cherian

    2014-01-01

    Benign enlargement of sub-arachnoid spaces (BESS) is one of the causes of macrocephaly in infants. It is a self-limiting condition and does not require any active medical or surgical treatment. We report a case of an infant aged 4 months who was referred for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain as the head circumference of the infant had increased rapidly from the 50th percentile in the 3rd month to more than the 95th percentile in the 4th month of age. MRI revealed enlarged anterior sub-arachnoid spaces and mild prominence of all the ventricles. A possibility of BESS was suspected since the child was neurodevelopmentally normal. A follow-up MRI done at the age of 18 months showed a reduction in the size of the sub-arachnoid spaces with normal sized ventricles. PMID:25250066

  15. Chronic adhesive arachnoiditis after repeat epidural blood patch.

    PubMed

    Carlswärd, C; Darvish, B; Tunelli, J; Irestedt, L

    2015-08-01

    Epidural blood patching is an effective treatment for postdural puncture headache but has potential risks. Arachnoiditis is a very rare disabling condition and few cases have been described following an epidural blood patch. We present a case of chronic adhesive arachnoiditis in a parturient treated with a repeat epidural blood patch. A healthy 29-year-old woman had an accidental dural puncture following epidural insertion during labour. Initial treatment of postdural puncture headache with an epidural blood patch was ineffective and was therefore repeated. She gradually developed severe neurological symptoms consistent with arachnoiditis confirmed with magnetic resonance imaging. Despite intensive multimodal treatment with analgesics and physiotherapy, her neurological condition remains unresolved two years later. This serious but rare complication should encourage caution when treating parturients with postdural puncture headache with a repeat epidural blood patch. PMID:26119259

  16. Granulation of fine powder

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Ching-Fong

    2016-08-09

    A mixture of fine powder including thorium oxide was converted to granulated powder by forming a first-green-body and heat treating the first-green-body at a high temperature to strengthen the first-green-body followed by granulation by crushing or milling the heat-treated first-green-body. The granulated powder was achieved by screening through a combination of sieves to achieve the desired granule size distribution. The granulated powder relies on the thermal bonding to maintain its shape and structure. The granulated powder contains no organic binder and can be stored in a radioactive or other extreme environment. The granulated powder was pressed and sintered to form a dense compact with a higher density and more uniform pore size distribution.

  17. Arachnoid cyst of the velum interpositum originating from tela choroidea

    PubMed Central

    Funaki, Takeshi; Makino, Yasuhide; Arakawa, Yoshiki; Hojo, Masato; Kunieda, Takeharu; Takagi, Yasushi; Takahashi, Jun C.; Miyamoto, Susumu

    2012-01-01

    Background: Arachnoid cysts originating from the velum interpositum are very rare, and their existence as a clinicopathologic entity remains controversial. We report a case of a patient with an arachnoid cyst of the velum interpositum presenting with memory disturbance, focusing on the anatomical origin of the lesion and the physiological mechanisms causing memory disturbance. Case Description: A 65-year-old man with a large cystic lesion in the velum interpositum experienced progressive memory disturbance and enlargement of the lesion 6 months before referral to our institution. Neuropsychological evaluation on admission demonstrated severe memory disturbance. Radiological examination did not reveal hydrocephalus, but the bilateral fornices and thalami were compressed by the cyst. The patient underwent endoscopic cystoventriculostomy via the frontal horn of the right lateral ventricle through a frontal burr hole. Histopathology of the sample was consistent with that of an arachnoid cyst, and the endoscopic findings suggested that the cyst originated from the tela choroidea, which covers the velum interpositum. The symptoms resolved after surgery with significant improvement in neuropsychological test scores. Conclusion: Arachnoid cysts of the velum interpositum are rare but distinct clinicopathologic entities that originate from the tela choroidea. The lesions can cause memory disturbance without hydrocephalus due to compression of the fornices and thalami, but this can be reversed by surgery. PMID:23226606

  18. Petrous apex arachnoid cyst extending into Meckel's cave.

    PubMed

    Batra, Arun; Tripathi, Rajendra Prasad; Singh, Anil Kumar; Tatke, Medha

    2002-09-01

    A rare case of arachnoid cyst involving the petrous apex with an unusual clinical presentation has been described with special emphasis in the imaging features and importance of accurate presurgical diagnosis. Differentiation from the other benign lesions involving the petrous apex and the role of newer MR techniques in the diagnosis of these lesions has been highlighted. PMID:12196240

  19. Roles of granule size in over-granulation during high shear wet granulation.

    PubMed

    Shi, Limin; Feng, Yushi; Sun, Changquan Calvin

    2010-08-01

    A mechanistic understanding of the over-granulation problem during high shear wet granulation (HSWG) process can guide efficient development of robust formulation and manufacturing process. Using microcrystalline cellulose (MCC) as a model compound, we demonstrate that size enlargement is an important mechanism for over-granulation in HSWG. A higher granulation water level results in larger granules and lower tabletability. With increasing water, granules enlarge sharply when water level is higher than 65%. Granule tabletability deteriorates with increasing granule size and becomes over-granulated when more than 70% water is used. For a batch of over-granulated granule that is ground and sieved, tabletability of the sieved fractions decreases with increasing granule size. The tabletability of the finest fraction (45-90 microm) is nearly four times that of the largest fraction (300-425 microm). These results show that size reduction can be an effective strategy to address the problem of over-granulation. PMID:20232456

  20. Cranial nerve VI palsy after dural-arachnoid puncture.

    PubMed

    Hofer, Jennifer E; Scavone, Barbara M

    2015-03-01

    In this article, we provide a literature review of cranial nerve (CN) VI injury after dural-arachnoid puncture. CN VI injury is rare and ranges in severity from diplopia to complete lateral rectus palsy with deviated gaze. The proposed mechanism of injury is cerebrospinal fluid leakage causing intracranial hypotension and downward displacement of the brainstem. This results in traction on CN VI leading to stretch and neural demyelination. Symptoms may present 1 day to 3 weeks after dural-arachnoid puncture and typically are associated with a postdural puncture (spinal) headache. Resolution of symptoms may take weeks to months. Use of small-gauge, noncutting spinal needles may decrease the risk of intracranial hypotension and subsequent CN VI injury. When ocular symptoms are present, early administration of an epidural blood patch may decrease morbidity or prevent progression of ocular symptoms. PMID:25695579

  1. [Selection of surgical approach for quadrigeminal cistern arachnoid cyst].

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Nakamasa; Hamada, Hideo; Umemura, Kimiko; Kurosaki, Kunikazu; Kurimoto, Masanori; Endo, Shunro

    2005-05-01

    Preoperative magnetic resonance imaging of 4 cases of quadrigeminal cistern arachnoid cyst were retrospectively reviewed and patterns of extension to surrounding cisterns from the quadrigeminal cistern were examined. Relationship between patterns of extension to surrounding cisterns and selected surgical approach were evaluated. In 2 cases, the cyst extended anteriorly and compressed the quadrigeminal plate. These two cases had hydrocephalus due to aqueductal stenosis. The anteroirly extending cyst was treated with endoscopic ventriculocystocisternostomy via the lateral and third ventricles. In one case, the cyst extended superiorly to the velum interpositum cistern, and was treated with endoscopic ventriculocystocisternostomy via the lateral ventricle. In one case, the cyst extended laterally to the ambient cistern and compressed the posterior horn of the lateral ventricle. This case had loculated hydrocephalus of the inferior horn. The laterally extending cyst was treated with resection of the wall of the arachnoid cyst via an infratentorial supracerebellar approach assisted by endoscope. All cysts were successfully treated. Injury of the foramen of Monro occurred during a procedure using a flexible endoscope in a case with an anterior extending cyst. Exact analysis of the preoperative imaging and selection of appropriate surgical approach are key factors for successful treatment of a quadrigeminal cistern arachnoid cyst. PMID:15912765

  2. Spontaneous Arachnoid Cyst Rupture with Subdural Hygroma in a Child.

    PubMed

    Khilji, Muhammad Faisal; Jeswani, Niranjan Lal; Hamid, Rana Shoaib; Al Azri, Faisal

    2016-01-01

    Arachnoid cyst of the brain is common in children but its association with spontaneous subdural hygroma is rare. A case of a nine-year-old boy, without any preceding history of trauma, is presented here who came to the emergency department of a tertiary care hospital with complaints of headache, nausea, and vomiting for the last two weeks but more for the last two days. Examination showed a young, fully conscious oriented boy with positive Cushing's reflex and papilledema of left eye. MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) of the brain showed left temporal extra-axial cystic lesion of 5.40 × 4.10 cm in size, representing arachnoid cyst, with bilateral frontoparietal subdural hygromas. Cyst was partially drained through left temporal craniectomy and subdural hygromas were drained through bilateral frontal burr holes. Postoperatively the child recovered uneventfully and was discharged on the seventh postoperative day. Histopathology proves it to be arachnoid cyst of the brain with subdural CSF (cerebrospinal fluid) collection or hygroma. PMID:26989525

  3. Neuroendoscopy for Intracranial Arachnoid Cysts in Infants: Therapeutic Considerations.

    PubMed

    Raju, Subodh; Sharma, Renuka Satyanarayana; Moningi, Srilata; Momin, Jaleel

    2016-07-01

    Background The use of the endoscope for various cranial procedures is gradually expanding. Intracranial cystic lesions in the brain are one of the most attractive targets for this minimally invasive procedure, thus avoiding conventional craniotomy. These cystic lesions in the brain, namely arachnoid cysts, are congenital. Surgical treatment depends on clinical presentation, location, and age. Patients A total of 13 patients < 1 year of age with intracranial cysts were operated on between 2005 and 2013. Six presented with hydrocephalus, four presented with seizure, one with abnormal head movement, and two had large asymptomatic cysts. Four children had infratentorial arachnoid cysts; of these, three required a transaqueductal procedure. All the patients underwent endoscopic cystoventriculostomy and/or cystocisternostomy and third ventriculostomy in selected cases with a biopsy from the cyst wall. Results Clinically and radiologically all children showed significant improvement with an average follow-up ranging from 8 months to 6 years. There were no intraoperative complications. Three children developed subdural hygroma that subsided with conservative treatment, and one child with pseudomeningocele required a cystoperitoneal shunt at a later date. Conclusion A symptomatic intracranial arachnoid cyst or a large asymptomatic cyst are indications for neurosurgical intervention, and endoscopy is a good treatment option with the advantage of minimal invasiveness and fewer complications. Endoscopic surgery has to be tailored according to the location and presentation. PMID:26241198

  4. Spontaneous Arachnoid Cyst Rupture with Subdural Hygroma in a Child

    PubMed Central

    Khilji, Muhammad Faisal; Jeswani, Niranjan Lal; Hamid, Rana Shoaib; Al Azri, Faisal

    2016-01-01

    Arachnoid cyst of the brain is common in children but its association with spontaneous subdural hygroma is rare. A case of a nine-year-old boy, without any preceding history of trauma, is presented here who came to the emergency department of a tertiary care hospital with complaints of headache, nausea, and vomiting for the last two weeks but more for the last two days. Examination showed a young, fully conscious oriented boy with positive Cushing's reflex and papilledema of left eye. MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) of the brain showed left temporal extra-axial cystic lesion of 5.40 × 4.10 cm in size, representing arachnoid cyst, with bilateral frontoparietal subdural hygromas. Cyst was partially drained through left temporal craniectomy and subdural hygromas were drained through bilateral frontal burr holes. Postoperatively the child recovered uneventfully and was discharged on the seventh postoperative day. Histopathology proves it to be arachnoid cyst of the brain with subdural CSF (cerebrospinal fluid) collection or hygroma. PMID:26989525

  5. Understanding size enlargement and hardening of granules on tabletability of unlubricated granules prepared by dry granulation.

    PubMed

    Patel, Sarsvatkumar; Dahiya, Sandeepkumar; Sun, Changquan Calvin; Bansal, Arvind Kumar

    2011-02-01

    The mechanism of loss of "reworkability" or tabletability of dry granulated microcrystalline cellulose (MCC) was investigated in relation to both granule size enlargement and granule hardness. Slugs of MCC were prepared under three pressures (12.5, 37.5, and 93.8 MPa) and tabletability (tensile strength vs. pressure) of respective granules (three different sizes) was determined. Nominal single granule fracture strength and granule friability were measured. The reduction in tabletability was profound for harder granules, which were obtained from higher slugging pressure. This is consistent with their ability to resist granule fragmentation during tableting. Variation in granule size exhibits negligible effect on tabletability for the lowest slugging pressure and only a small effect for the middle and highest slugging pressure. This observation is again related to different tendency to granule fragmentation during compaction. The results suggest that granule-hardening negatively affects tensile strength more than that of granule size enlargement for MCC. PMID:20803605

  6. Suprasellar arachnoid cyst presenting with bobble-head doll movements: a report of 3 cases.

    PubMed

    Desai, K I; Nadkarni, T D; Muzumdar, D; Goel, A

    2003-09-01

    We report a series of three patients with suprasellar arachnoid cysts who presented with a rare 'bobble-head doll' syndrome. The abnormal head movements improved after surgical evacuation of the cysts in all the three cases. Various pathophysiological mechanisms involved in the bobble-head doll syndrome are discussed. The literature on suprasellar arachnoid cysts is briefly reviewed. PMID:14652456

  7. Scintigraphic demonstration of intracranial communication between arachnoid cyst and associated subdural hematoma

    SciTech Connect

    Yokoyama, K.; Tonami, N.; Kimura, M.; Kinoshita, A.; Aburano, T.; Hisada, K.

    1989-05-01

    An arachnoid cyst found to have a communication to an associated subdural hematoma was demonstrated with the Tc-99m DTPA brain scintigraphy. Although arachnoid cysts are known to be silent, when a patient with an arachnoid cyst develops signs of increased intracranial pressure or neurological deficits, the presence of a complication, including subdural hematoma, intracystic hemorrhage or subdural hygroma, is highly suspected. In the present case, the patient with an arachnoid cyst had a subdural hematoma following minor head injury. Tc-99m DTPA brain scintigraphy showed abnormal accumulation of the tracer not only in the hematoma but in the arachnoid cyst. This observation suggested communication of the two lesions, which was confirmed at surgery.

  8. Compressive Cervicothoracic Adhesive Arachnoiditis following Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: A Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Rahmathulla, Gazanfar; Kamian, Kambiz

    2014-08-01

    We present the case of a 55-year-old woman with diffuse adhesive arachnoiditis in the posterior fossa and cervicothoracic spine following posterior inferior cerebellar artery aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). She underwent aneurysm clipping with subsequent gradual neurologic decline associated with sensory disturbances, gait ataxia, and spastic paraparesis. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed diffuse adhesive arachnoiditis in the posterior fossa and cervicothoracic spine, syringobulbia, and multiple arachnoid cysts in the cervicothoracic spine along with syringohydromyelia. Early surgical intervention with microlysis of the adhesions and duraplasty at the clinically relevant levels resulted in clinical improvement. Although adhesive arachnoiditis, secondary arachnoid cysts, and cerebrospinal fluid flow abnormalities resulting in syrinx are rare following aneurysmal SAH, early recognition and appropriate intervention lead to good clinical outcomes. PMID:25083391

  9. PTEN deletion from adult-generated dentate granule cells disrupts granule cell mossy fiber axon structure

    PubMed Central

    LaSarge, Candi L.; Santos, Victor R; Danzer, Steve C.

    2015-01-01

    Dysregulation of the mTOR-signaling pathway is implicated in the development of temporal lobe epilepsy. In mice, deletion of PTEN from hippocampal dentate granule cells leads to mTOR hyperactivation and promotes the rapid onset of spontaneous seizures. The mechanism by which these abnormal cells initiate epileptogenesis, however, is unclear. PTEN-knockout granule cells develop abnormally, exhibiting morphological features indicative of increased excitatory input. If these cells are directly responsible for seizure genesis, it follows that they should also possess increased output. To test this prediction, dentate granule cell axon morphology was quantified in control and PTEN-knockout mice. Unexpectedly, PTEN deletion increased giant mossy fiber bouton spacing along the axon length, suggesting reduced innervation of CA3. Increased width of the mossy fiber axon pathway in stratum lucidum, however, which likely reflects an unusual increase in mossy fiber axon collateralization in this region, offset the reduction in boutons per axon length. These morphological changes predicts a net increase in granule cell >> CA3 innervation. Increased diameter of axons from PTEN-knockout cells would further enhance granule cell >> CA3 communication. Altogether, these findings suggest that amplified information flow through the hippocampal circuit contributes to seizure occurrence in the PTEN-knockout mouse model of temporal lobe epilepsy. PMID:25600212

  10. Prevalence and symptoms of intracranial arachnoid cysts: a population-based study.

    PubMed

    Rabiei, Katrin; Jaraj, Daniel; Marlow, Thomas; Jensen, Christer; Skoog, Ingmar; Wikkelsø, Carsten

    2016-04-01

    To investigate the prevalence of intracranial arachnoid cysts in a large population-based sample. We also aimed to assess the association between arachnoid cysts and cognitive impairment, depression, epilepsy, headache, dizziness, previous head trauma, hip fractures, and mortality. A population-based cohort and nested case-control study. The sample comprised representative populations (n = 1235) aged ≥ 70 years. All participants underwent baseline neuropsychiatric examinations, including computed tomography (CT) of the brain, between 1986 and 2000. All CT scans were examined for arachnoid cysts. Headache, dizziness, history of head trauma, dementia, depression, epilepsy, and hip fracture were assessed using data from clinical examinations, interviews and the Swedish hospital discharge register. Cognition was assessed using the Mini-Mental Status Examination, and depressive symptoms using the Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale. Date of death was obtained from the National Swedish Death Registry. The prevalence of arachnoid cysts was 2.3 % (n = 29), with no significant difference between men and women. Probands with and without cysts had the same frequency of headache, dizziness, previous head trauma, cognitive impairment, and depressive symptoms. Furthermore, there were no differences regarding the prevalence of dementia, depression, epilepsy, or previous hip fracture. Arachnoid cysts were not associated with increased mortality. Arachnoid cysts are common incidental finding, with the same rate in men and women, and are probably asymptomatic. The lack of relation with symptoms like headache, dizziness and cognitive impairment suggest caution in ascribing symptoms to incidentally discovered arachnoid cysts and a restrictive attitude to treatment. PMID:26860092

  11. Verbal laterality and handedness in patients with intracranial arachnoid cysts.

    PubMed

    Wester, Knut; Hugdahl, Kenneth

    2003-01-01

    Left-handedness is most often genetic, but may also follow early, localised damage to the developing brain. This so-called "pathological" left-handedness syndrome is often associated with right hemisphere speech dominance. To find out whether verbal laterality or handedness were affected by congenital, intracranial arachnoid cysts, 51 consecutive patients with temporal or frontal arachnoid cysts were tested for handedness and verbal laterality, as measured with the dichotic listening (DL) technique. Handedness was normal in all subgroups of patients. In the preoperative DL test, only 51 % of the patients showed the normal superiority of the right ear (Right Ear Advantage - REA), significantly different from the REA frequency (74 %) in a normal reference group. Patients with a left temporal, or a frontal cyst had significantly lower preoperative REA frequencies than the reference group, whereas patients with a right temporal cyst did not differ from the reference group. Three to six months after decompressive surgery, the REA frequency (73 %) in the cyst patients was no longer different from that of the reference group. This postoperative normalization was seen both in patients with a left temporal or a frontal cyst. It is concluded that arachnoid cysts may suppress cognitive, cortical functions, and that this suppression can be reversed by surgical decompression of the cyst, even in adults. In our opinion, this cognitive "normalization" may in itself be an indication for decompressive surgery. It is further concluded that, although such cysts are congenital, the pressure from the cyst on the adjacent brain is not strong, nor persistent enough to cause a pathological left-handedness. PMID:12527990

  12. [Suprasellar arachnoid cyst--report of a case (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Takahashi, T; Kawai, S; Kaminoh, T; Hiramatsu, K; Maekawa, M; Yuasa, T; Miyamoto, N; Hattori, Y

    1982-04-01

    A 4-year-old boy with suprasellar arachnoid cyst was reported. At the age of 30-month-old his aunt was aware of his squint. During the observation by ophthalmologists from the age of 1y. to 3y., enlargement of the head and impairment of the visual acuity were manifested. Cranial CT scan revealed the enlargement of the ventricular system and a round low density area located superior to the sella. Absorption coefficient of the lesion was similar to that of the cerebrospinal fluid. No abnormal contrast enhancement was seen. Examination revealed the head circumference of 53.3 cm larger than doubled standard deviation, the right external strabismus, impaired vision (R:0.03, L:0.3) and optic atrophy but no other neurological signs. Cerebral angiography showed suprasellar mass lesion. After the ventriculography with water-soluble contrast medium, V-P shunt operation was performed and then the patient was transferred to the CT room. CSF enhanced CT scan showed no communication between the ventricles and the cyst. By frontotemporal approach, microsurgical removal of the cystwall was performed and the histological diagnosis was arachnoid membrane. Several days after the operation, bilateral subdural effusion was seen on CT scan and was treated with bilateral S-P shunt and the removal of V-P shunt. Follow up CT scan disclosed the disappearance of the subdural effusion and the suprasellar cyst. The visual acuity was improved well and the endocrinological study was normal. Analysis of the 45 reported cases of suprasellar arachnoid cyst suggested that direct removal of the cyst wall is better than the V-P shunt operation and the cyst shunting is advisable for repeat recurrence of the cyst. Removal of the ventricular shunting system may be effective for the prevention of the subdural effusion as a complication after direct operation. PMID:7099383

  13. Symptomatic ecchordosis physaliphora mimicking as an intracranial arachnoid cyst.

    PubMed

    Filis, Andreas; Kalakoti, Piyush; Nanda, Anil

    2016-06-01

    Ecchordosis physaliphora (EP) is a rare, benign tumor derived from the notochordal remnants. Usually slow growing with an indolent course, most cases are incidental findings on autopsy. Limited data exists on symptomatic patients with EP. Diagnosis mainly relies on correlating histopathologic findings confirming the notochordal elements with MRI. We herein present a middle aged woman with symptomatic EP in the pre-pontine cistern that mimicked an arachnoid cyst on preoperative scans. Additionally, we emphasize the pathological and radiological characteristics of EP that could aid in prompt diagnosis of the lesion with emphasis on considering EP as a differential for mass lesions localized in the pre-pontine cistern. PMID:26778354

  14. [Suprasellar arachnoid cyst associated with syringomyelia. Case report].

    PubMed

    Sleiman, M; Assaker, R; Bourgeois, P; Lejeune, J P; Soto-Ares, G

    2000-02-01

    We present a case of suprasellar arachnoid cyst which was revealed by visual impairement and hypopituitarism. Neuroradiological imaging showed the peculiar association of the suprasellar cyst with cerebellar tonsillar herniation and a large asymptomatic cervical syringomyelic cavity. Surgical treatment of the suprasellar cyst allowed the reduction of both the cyst and the syrinx. A common pathophysiological mechanism of these lesions is discussed. We suggest the possibility that an initial obstruction of the basal cisterns caused the suprasellar cyst formation which led to medullar cavity formation. PMID:10790641

  15. Inferred properties of stellar granulation

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, D.F.; Toner, C.G.

    1985-06-01

    Apparent characteristics of stellar granulation in F and G main-sequence stars are inferred directly from observed spectral-line asymmetries and from comparisons of numerical simulations with the observations: (1) the apparent granulation velocity increases with effective temperature, (2) the dispersion of granule velocities about their mean velocity of rise increases with the apparent granulation velocity, (3) the mean velocity of rise of granules must be less than the total line broadening, (4) the apparent velocity difference between granules and dark lanes corresponds to the granulation velocity deduced from stellar line bisectors, (5) the dark lanes show velocities of fall approximately twice as large as the granule rise velocities, (6) the light contributed to the stellar flux by the granules is four to ten times more than the light from the dark lanes. Stellar rotation is predicted to produce distortions in the line bisectors which may give information on the absolute velocity displacements of the line bisectors. 37 references.

  16. A refractory arachnoid cyst presenting with tremor, expressive dysphasia, and cognitive decline

    PubMed Central

    Zwagerman, Nathan T.; Pardini, Jamie; Mousavi, Seyed H.; Friedlander, Robert M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Arachnoid cysts are common incidental findings on intracranial imaging, although they are rarely symptomatic. Case Description: We present a case of a 49 year-old woman with a recurrent left supraorbital arachnoid cyst who developed staring spells, expressive dysphasia, and tremor after cyst fenestration and cystoperitoneal shunting. Her symptoms resolved after removing the shunt valve and creating a valveless system. The case is discussed and the literature reviewed. Conclusion: We present a case of a recurrent arachnoid cyst that developed worsening and new symptoms after cysto-peritoneal shunting with a programmable valve, which reducing the pressure in the cyst resulted in remarkable resolution of her symptoms. PMID:27308091

  17. Iatrogenic intradural arachnoid cyst following tethered cord release in a child.

    PubMed

    Glenn, Chad A; Bonney, Phillip; Cheema, Ahmed A; Conner, Andrew K; Gross, Naina L; Yaun, Amanda L

    2016-02-01

    Iatrogenic arachnoid cysts represent uncommon complications of intradural spinal procedures. Here we present the case of a 7-year-old girl who was found to have a symptomatic, pathologically proven, intradural arachnoid cyst 3 years following tethered cord release. The patient originally presented with abnormal urodynamics testing and was found to have fatty infiltration in her filum terminale. She underwent sectioning of the filum terminale without complications. The patient presented 3 years later with pain and neurogenic claudication. The patient was successfully treated with subarachnoid cyst fenestration with resolution of her bilateral lower extremity pain. Spinal intradural arachnoid cysts represent an important, though rare, postoperative complication of dural opening. PMID:26602801

  18. Heading injury precipitating subdural hematoma associated with arachnoid cysts--two case reports.

    PubMed

    Kawanishi, A; Nakayama, M; Kadota, K

    1999-03-01

    A 14-year-old boy and a 11-year-old boy presented with subdural hematomas as complications of preexisting arachnoid cysts in the middle cranial fossa, manifesting as symptoms of raised intracranial pressure. Both had a history of heading the ball in a soccer game about 7 weeks and 2 days before the symptom occurred. There was no other head trauma, so these cases could be described as "heading injury." Arachnoid cysts in the middle cranial fossa are often associated with subdural hematomas. We emphasize that mild trauma such as heading of the ball in a soccer game may cause subdural hematomas in patients with arachnoid cysts. PMID:10344112

  19. mRNP granules

    PubMed Central

    Buchan, J Ross

    2014-01-01

    Messenger ribonucleoprotein (mRNP) granules are dynamic, self-assembling structures that harbor non-translating mRNAs bound by various proteins that regulate mRNA translation, localization, and turnover. Their importance in gene expression regulation is far reaching, ranging from precise spatial-temporal control of mRNAs that drive developmental programs in oocytes and embryos, to similarly exquisite control of mRNAs in neurons that underpin synaptic plasticity, and thus, memory formation. Analysis of mRNP granules in their various contexts has revealed common themes of assembly, disassembly, and modes of mRNA regulation, yet new studies continue to reveal unexpected and important findings, such as links between aberrant mRNP granule assembly and neurodegenerative disease. Continued study of these enigmatic structures thus promises fascinating new insights into cellular function, and may also suggest novel therapeutic strategies in various disease states. PMID:25531407

  20. [Arachnoid cyst associated with pyloric stenosis in a young boy].

    PubMed

    Diaconescu, Smaranda; Păduraru, Gabriela; Bărbuţă, O; Vâscu, B; Lupu, V V; Burlea, M; Aprodu, G

    2010-01-01

    An unusual association between an arachnoid cyst and a decompensated pyloric stenosis in a three years-old boy is presented. The little patient was admitted into hospital with haematemesis, melena, influenced generally condition and acute posthemorrhagic anaemia following aspirin intake for hypertermia. Specific intensive care was successful and the little patient was discharged but without an upper digestive endoscopy(parents refusal, technical reasons). After one week he returned with progressive worsening vomitings and an intracranial hypertension was suspected. CT documented an arachnoid cyst in the right middle cranial fossa and the patient is directed to the Neurosurgical Clinic where a cyst fenestration was done. Subsequent to operation the vomitings reinstaled with severe dehydration and an upper GI series showed a decompensated pyloric stenosis. He was operated on underwenting an antrectomy. Finally the child recovered with good short and long-term evolution. The coincidental presence of an intracranial congenital mass and a complicated aspirin-induced peptic ulcer in this young patient, misleaded us and in the lack of an early endoscopy an intempestive neurosurgical operation was initially done. PMID:21500459

  1. Intrasellar arachnoid cyst: A case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Güdük, Mustafa; HamitAytar, Murat; Sav, Aydın; Berkman, Zafer

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Arachnoid cysts (ACs) are frequently found on intracranial imaging studies but intrasellar arachnoid cysts are rarely encountered. Presentation of case We present a 49-year old patient who had headaches for 6 months and cystic sellar mass was found in his cranial imaging. We operated him by transnasal transsphenoidal route. Our intraoperative diagnosis was an arachnoid cyst and pathologic studies verified our observation. He did well postoperatively and after a 1 year follow-up he was left free from future follow-ups. Discussion As common cystic lesions occupying the sellar region can simulate ACs both clinically and radiologically, neurosurgeon can fail to include ACs in making the initial diagnosis preoperatively. Conclusion Although a rare entity, arachnoid cysts should be considered in the differential diagnosis of sellar region. PMID:27107306

  2. Tectonic Structure, Classification, and Evolution of Arachnoids on Venus: Preliminary Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krassilnikov, A. S.

    2002-09-01

    An analysis has been done of the topography and geologic structure of arachnoids-specific radial/concentric volcannic-tectonic structures on the surface of Venus. A representative sample (53 arachnoids) from 265 structures of this type, which are listed in the catalog of volcanic structures of the surface of Venus (Crumpler and Aubele, 2000), has been studied. The overwhelming majority of arachnoids are shown to be depressions that are commonly outlined by concentric extensional structures. Following Head et al. (1992) and Aittola and Kostama (2001), the assumption is confirmed and substantiated that arachnoids are formed by gravitational relaxation of small magmatic diapirs. Several types of arachnoids are identified on the basis of an analysis of structural patterns characteristic of such structures. It is also shown that the formation of different types of arachnoids depends on the depth of the magmatic diapir under the surface, on the thickness and reologic properties of the structures superposed on the evolving magmatic diapir, and on the character of regional stress fields that arise in the process of formation of such structures. The conclusion is drawn that most of the arachnoids were formed due to the gravitational relaxation of magmatic diapirs within the brittle part of the lithosphere, and some of them appeared as a result of the gravitational relaxation of radially fractured centers-novae. It is also shown that arachnoids are long-lived and multistep structures. At least some of them began to evolve before the formation of regional plains with wrinkle ridges, and their development ended after this event.

  3. Petrous apex arachnoid cyst: a case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Achilli, V; Danesi, G; Caverni, L; Richichi, M

    2005-01-01

    Summary Cholesterol granuloma and cholesteatoma are the two most common destructive lesions of the petrous apex. Arachnoid cyst is much less common. These three expansile lesions are often indistinguishable on clinical grounds. Accurate pre-operative radiological diagnosis on computed tomography scan and magnetic resonance imaging is important in order to plan the appropriate treatment. Pre-operative radiological differential diagnosis between primary cholesteatoma of petrous apex and a intrapetrous arachnoid cyst remains a significant problem. The following aspects need evaluation for recognition of intrapetrous arachnoid cysts: 1) an awareness of their existence, 2) homogeneous signal on T1 and T2 weighted images, closely resembling cerebro-spinal fluid signal, 3) special heavily weighted T2 images on magnetic resonance imaging: fluid-attenuated inversion recovery imaging, 4) careful correlation of clinical-radiological data. Symptomatic arachnoid cysts are best treated with conservative drainage surgery through middle cranial fossa. A case of a petrous apex arachnoid cyst is reported which has been radiologically mistaken for a primary cholesteatoma and operated through an infratemporal fossa approach type B. The patient (40-year-old female) came to our attention with right trigeminal pain which had been present for one year and dizziness. Neurotologist and skull-base surgeons should include arachnoid cyst as a rare possibility in the evaluation and treatment of petrous apex cystic lesions. PMID:16602329

  4. Syringomyelia secondary to "occult" dorsal arachnoid webs: Report of two cases with review of literature.

    PubMed

    Sayal, Parag P; Zafar, Arif; Carroll, Thomas A

    2016-01-01

    In a certain group of patients with syringomyelia, even with the advent of sophisticated magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), no associated abnormality or cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) block is easily identified. This type of syringomyelia is often termed idiopathic. Current literature has less than 10 reports of arachnoid webs to be the causative factor. We present our experience in the management of two cases of syringomyelia secondary to arachnoid webs. Both our patients presented with progressive neurological deterioration with MRI scans demonstrating cervical/thoracic syrinx without Chiari malformation or low-lying cord. There was no history of previous meningitis or trauma. Both patients underwent myelography that demonstrated dorsal flow block implying CSF obstruction. Cord displacement/change in caliber was also noted and this was not evident on MRI scans. Both patients underwent thoracic laminectomy. After opening the dura, thickened/abnormal arachnoid tissue was found that was resected thus widely communicating the dorsal subarachnoid space. Postoperatively at 6 months, both patients had significant symptomatic improvement with follow-up MRI scans demonstrating significant resolution of the syrinx. In patients with presumed idiopathic syringomyelia, imaging studies should be closely inspected for the presence of a transverse arachnoid web. We believe that all patients with idiopathic symptomatic syringomyelia should have MRI CSF flow studies and/or computed tomography (CT) myelography to identify such arachnoid abnormalities that are often underdiagnosed. Subsequent surgery should be directed at the establishment of normal CSF flow by laminectomy and excision of the offending arachnoid tissue. PMID:27217656

  5. Review: granulation and fluidized beds

    SciTech Connect

    Kono, H.

    1981-01-01

    The history of granulation techniques is very long; however, the systematic study of the granulation phenomenon began only after 1950. The first, distinguished paper treating the fundamental binding mechanism of granules was published by Rumpf in 1958. Although there are several binding forces, the discussion in this paper is confined to granulation involving the capillary energy of a liquid-particle system. This technique has been applied widely and successfully to various fields of powder technology because of its advantages of simplicity and economy (ref. 2). Granules with diameters larger than 5 mm can be prepared efficiently by rotating-type granulators, such as a pan or a trommel (ref. 3, 4, 5). On the other hand, the purpose of fluidized-bed granulators (hereafter abbreviated as FBG) is to produce small granules with diameters from 0.3 to 3 mm (ref. 6). Because it contains a small amount of liquid, a fluidized-bed granulator has a fluidization state differing significantly from that of an ordinary fluidized bed. The dispersion of liquid and powder in the bed plays an important role in the granulation mechanism. This mechanism is compared to that of pan granulators, and the differences in characteristics are discussed.

  6. Posterior fossa arachnoid cysts in adults: Surgical strategy: Case series

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Uddanapalli Sreeramulu; Lawrence, Radhi

    2015-01-01

    Introduction and Aim: The management of posterior fossa arachnoid cyst (PFAC) in adults is controversial. To review our cases and literature, propose a practically useful surgical strategy, which gives excellent long-term outcome in management of PFAC. Materials and Methods: We analyzed our case records of 26 large intracranial arachnoid cysts in adults treated over 12 years. Of them, we had 7 patients with symptomatic PFAC. Reviewed the literature of 174 PFAC cases (1973–2012) and added 7 of our new cases with a follow-up ranging from 3 to 12 years. Results: In 6 cases the PFAC was located in the midline. In the 7th case, it was located laterally in the cerebello-pontine (CP) angle. All patients were treated surgically. Excision of the cyst was performed in 5 of these cases. Among the two intra-fourth ventricular cysts, in both the cases cysto-peritoneal shunt was performed. Postoperative computed tomography/magnetic resonance imaging showed variable decrease in size of the cyst even though clinically all patients improved. We propose a surgical strategy for the management of these cases which would aid the surgeon in decision making. Discussion: We observed that these PFACs can occur either in the midline within the fourth ventricle or retroclival region or extra-fourth ventricular region. It can also develop laterally in the CP angle or behind the cerebellum or as intracerebellar cyst. Importance of this is except for Midline Intra-fourth ventricular cyst/retroclival cyst, the rest all can be safely excised with excellent long term outcome. The treatment strategy for Midline Intra-fourth ventricular cyst/retroclival cyst can be either cysto-peritoneal shunt or endoscopic fenestration of the cyst. PMID:25767579

  7. Isolation of neuromelanin granules.

    PubMed

    Tribl, Florian

    2008-12-01

    Neuromelanin granules are pigmented organelles in the human midbrain that give name to a brain area, substantia nigra pars compacta, which macroscopically appears as a dark brown region in the midbrain due to the insoluble pigment neuromelanin. The substantia nigra pars compacta massively degenerates in Parkinson's disease and gives rise to severely disabling movement symptoms. It has been suggested that neuromelanin granules play an important role in the neurodegenerative events in Parkinson's disease: redox-active iron is bound to neuromelanin and thereby retained within this compartment, but in Parkinson's disease it is thought to be increasingly released into the cytosol, promoting oxidative stress. This unit includes a methodological workflow for the isolation of neuromelanin granules from the human midbrain. This top-down approach (describes an approach that reduces the complexity of the sample stepwise from the level of tissue to cell, and from cell to organelle) encompasses the organelle isolation by sequential density gradient centrifugation and the assessment of the isolation efficacy by western blotting. PMID:19085988

  8. Granulation of increasingly hydrophobic formulations using a twin screw granulator.

    PubMed

    Yu, Shen; Reynolds, Gavin K; Huang, Zhenyu; de Matas, Marcel; Salman, Agba D

    2014-11-20

    The application of twin screw granulation in the pharmaceutical industry has generated increasing interest due to its suitability for continuous processing. However, an understanding of the impact of formulation properties such as hydrophobicity on intermediate and finished product quality has not yet been established. Hence, the current work investigated the granulation behaviour of three formulations containing increasing amounts of hydrophobic components using a Consigma™-1 twin screw granulator. Process conditions including powder feed rate, liquid to solid ratio, granulation liquid composition and screw configuration were also evaluated. The size of the wet granules was measured in order to enable exploration of granulation behaviour in isolation without confounding effects from downstream processes such as drying. The experimental observations indicated that the granulation process was not sensitive to the powder feed rate. The hydrophobicity led to heterogeneous liquid distribution and hence a relatively large proportion of un-wetted particles. Increasing numbers of kneading elements led to high shear and prolonged residence time, which acted to enhance the distribution of liquid and feeding materials. The bimodal size distributions considered to be characteristic of twin screw granulation were primarily ascribed to the breakage of relatively large granules by the kneading elements. PMID:25124058

  9. Arachnoid cell involvement in the mechanism of coagulation-initiated inflammation in the subarachnoid space after subarachnoid hemorrhage*

    PubMed Central

    Xin, Zhao-liang; Wu, Xiao-kang; Xu, Jian-rong; Li, Xi

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To assess if arachnoid cells have the capability to present antigen and activate T-lymphocytes after stimulation by bloody cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), and to illuminate the mechanism of coagulation-initiated inflammation in the subarachnoid space after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Methods: Arachnoid cells were cultured, characterized, and examined by immunofluorescence for the basal expression of human leukocyte antigen-DR (HLA-DR). Expression of HLA-DR, after co-culturing arachnoid cells in vitro with bloody CSF, was investigated by immunofluorescence and flow cytometry (FCM). The variation of arachnoid cells’ ultrastructure was observed by transmission electron microscope (TEM). Arachnoid cells were co-cultured with peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). The content of soluble interleukin-2 receptor (sIL-2r) in culture medium was detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Results: (1) Arachnoid cells were successfully cultured for many passages. The immunofluorescent staining was positive for HLA-DR in over 95% of the human arachnoid cells. The punctate HLA-DR was distributed in cytoplasm and not in the karyon. (2) After co-culturing arachnoid cells in vitro with bloody CSF, numerous particles with strong fluorescence appeared in the cytoplasm on Day 6. On Day 8, the quantity of particles and fluorescent intensity were maximal. FCM showed that the percentage of HLA-DR expressing cells was (2.5±0.4)% at the first 5 d, increasing to (60.8±3.6)% on Day 7. (3) After co-culturing arachnoid cells in vitro with bloody CSF, many lysosome and secondary lysosome particles were present in the cytoplasm. Hyperplasia of rough endoplasmic reticulum and enlarged cysts were observed, with numerous phagocytizing vesicles also observed at the edge of the arachnoid cells. (4) Arachnoid cells stimulated by bloody CSF were co-cultured in vitro with PBMCs. The content of sIL-2r in the culture medium, having been maintained at around 1.30 ng/ml during

  10. Middle fossa arachnoid cysts and inner ear symptoms: Are they related?

    PubMed Central

    Proimos, E; Chimona, TS; Memtsas, Z; Papadakis, CE

    2014-01-01

    Background: Arachnoid cysts most frequently occur in the middle cranial fossa and when they are symptomatic, patients present with central nervous symptoms. Nevertheless, a large proportion of arachnoid cysts are incidentally diagnosed during neuroimaging in cases with nonspecific symptoms. Report of cases: The cases of two males with middle cranial fossa arachnoid cysts with nonspecific inner ear symptoms were retrospectively reviewed. The first patient presented with mild headache, nausea, vertigo, unsteadiness, and tinnitus on the left ear while the second patient’s main complaint was left sided tinnitus. Both patients (initially managed for peripheral disorders) underwent a thorough clinical and electrophysiological evaluation. Because of the patients’ persistent clinical symptoms, and indications of CNS disorder in the first case, neuroimaging by brain MRI was performed revealing a middle cranial fossa arachnoid cyst in both patients. Conclusion: Occasionally, patients with arachnoid cysts may present with mild, atypical or intermittent and irrelevant symptoms which can mislead diagnosis. Otorhinolaryngologists should be aware of the fact that atypical, recurrent or intermittent symptoms may masquerade a CNS disorder. Hippokratia 2014; 18 (2):168-171. PMID:25336883

  11. [A case of suprasellar arachnoid cyst followed up for a long time].

    PubMed

    Kaisho, Y; Miyazaki, S; Shimo-oku, M; Hayashi, T; Tani, E

    1995-01-01

    We followed a case of suprasellar arachnoid cyst for 12 years. The patient was a sixteen-year-old girl without particular problems in her general condition. She showed optic atrophy in both eyes and optic nerve hypoplasia with an inferotemporal quandranopsia in the left eye. A suprasellar arachnoid cyst communicating with the tubarachnoid space was found to extend into the sella turcica as an empty sella. A cyst wall was resected and a cyst-peritoneal shunt performed. After 12 years from the operation, sensitivity was slightly depressed in the visual field where it had already been disturbed. Although there are few reports in the literature on involvement of the optic nerves and chiasma by suprasellar arachnoid cysts, papilledema and optic atrophy are often found in children, and infero-temporal quandranopsia or homonymous hemianopsia have been reported. Visual field defects were most likely caused by compression of the optic nerve by cyst or prolonged papilledema. We also suspect that some kind of disturbance to the optic nerve occurred during extension of the arachnoid cyst as an empty sella, or during formation of arachnoid cyst in the fetus stage. PMID:7887322

  12. RNA Granules in Germ Cells

    PubMed Central

    Voronina, Ekaterina; Seydoux, Geraldine; Sassone-Corsi, Paolo; Nagamori, Ippei

    2011-01-01

    “Germ granules” are cytoplasmic, nonmembrane-bound organelles unique to germline. Germ granules share components with the P bodies and stress granules of somatic cells, but also contain proteins and RNAs uniquely required for germ cell development. In this review, we focus on recent advances in our understanding of germ granule assembly, dynamics, and function. One hypothesis is that germ granules operate as hubs for the posttranscriptional control of gene expression, a function at the core of the germ cell differentiation program. PMID:21768607

  13. Spontaneous chronic subdural hematoma associated with arachnoid cyst in children and young adults

    PubMed Central

    Shrestha, Rajendra; You, Chao

    2014-01-01

    Arachnoid cysts are clear, colorless fluid-filled cysts that arise during brain and skull development from the splitting of the arachnoid membrane. Chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) is an encapsulated collection of old blood, mostly or totally liquefied and located between the dura mater and the arachnoid mater. Trauma is an important factor in the development of CSDH. Here, we report four patients, previously asymptomatic, revealing CSDH with AC on computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain. All patients underwent craniotomy with evacuation of hematoma and resection of the cystic membrane that was then connected to the basal cistern under the operating microscope. Postoperatively, all patients were symptom-free. Presentation of an AC with chronic subdural hematoma in the absence of preceding head trauma is considered to be rare in children and young adults. PMID:25685210

  14. Tuberculous lumbar arachnoiditis mimicking conus cauda tumor: A case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Konar, Subhas K; Rao, KVL Narasinga; Mahadevan, Anita; Devi, B Indira

    2011-01-01

    Tuberculous spinal arachnoiditis involving cauda equina is rare. A patient with lumbar tuberculous arachnoiditis in the absence of both vertebral and meningeal tuberculosis, which was mimicking spinal intradural extramedullary tumor is described here. Diagnosis was made based on intraoperative findings and was confirmed by histopathology. Surgical decompression along with a combination of steroid and antitubercular therapy resulted in a good outcome. At 3 months follow-up, the patient regained bladder control and was able to walk with support. Clinical features, magnetic resonance imaging, and intraoperative findings are described. Pathology and the relevant literature are discussed. Based on the patient's clinical and radiologic findings, it was believed that the patient had a conus cauda tumor and was operated on. Histologic examination of the mass revealed tuberculoma. Surgical decompression followed by antituberculosis medication resulted in good outcome. Hence tuberculous arachnoiditis should be considered in differential diagnosis of conus cauda tumors. PMID:21716842

  15. Granulation techniques and technologies: recent progresses.

    PubMed

    Shanmugam, Srinivasan

    2015-01-01

    Granulation, the process of particle enlargement by agglomeration technique, is one of the most significant unit operations in the production of pharmaceutical dosage forms, mostly tablets and capsules. Granulation process transforms fine powders into free-flowing, dust-free granules that are easy to compress. Nevertheless, granulation poses numerous challenges due to high quality requirement of the formed granules in terms of content uniformity and physicochemical properties such as granule size, bulk density, porosity, hardness, moisture, compressibility, etc. together with physical and chemical stability of the drug. Granulation process can be divided into two types: wet granulation that utilize a liquid in the process and dry granulation that requires no liquid. The type of process selection requires thorough knowledge of physicochemical properties of the drug, excipients, required flow and release properties, to name a few. Among currently available technologies, spray drying, roller compaction, high shear mixing, and fluid bed granulation are worth of note. Like any other scientific field, pharmaceutical granulation technology also continues to change, and arrival of novel and innovative technologies are inevitable. This review focuses on the recent progress in the granulation techniques and technologies such as pneumatic dry granulation, reverse wet granulation, steam granulation, moisture-activated dry granulation, thermal adhesion granulation, freeze granulation, and foamed binder or foam granulation. This review gives an overview of these with a short description about each development along with its significance and limitations. PMID:25901297

  16. Granulation techniques and technologies: recent progresses

    PubMed Central

    Shanmugam, Srinivasan

    2015-01-01

    Granulation, the process of particle enlargement by agglomeration technique, is one of the most significant unit operations in the production of pharmaceutical dosage forms, mostly tablets and capsules. Granulation process transforms fine powders into free-flowing, dust-free granules that are easy to compress. Nevertheless, granulation poses numerous challenges due to high quality requirement of the formed granules in terms of content uniformity and physicochemical properties such as granule size, bulk density, porosity, hardness, moisture, compressibility, etc. together with physical and chemical stability of the drug. Granulation process can be divided into two types: wet granulation that utilize a liquid in the process and dry granulation that requires no liquid. The type of process selection requires thorough knowledge of physicochemical properties of the drug, excipients, required flow and release properties, to name a few. Among currently available technologies, spray drying, roller compaction, high shear mixing, and fluid bed granulation are worth of note. Like any other scientific field, pharmaceutical granulation technology also continues to change, and arrival of novel and innovative technologies are inevitable. This review focuses on the recent progress in the granulation techniques and technologies such as pneumatic dry granulation, reverse wet granulation, steam granulation, moisture-activated dry granulation, thermal adhesion granulation, freeze granulation, and foamed binder or foam granulation. This review gives an overview of these with a short description about each development along with its significance and limitations. PMID:25901297

  17. Development of maize starch granules

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Maize kernels of self-pollinated inbred line B73 harvested on various days after pollination (DAP) were subjected for starch granule development studies. Starch in endosperms was first observed on 6 DAP. A small amount of starch granules (<2% of dry weight) was found in the endosperm on 12 DAP. S...

  18. [Research of aerobic granule characteristics with different granule age].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Man; Yang, Chang-Zhu; Pu, Wen-Hong; Luo, Ying-Dong; Gong, Jian-Yu

    2012-03-01

    In the SBR reactor, we studied the different style, physicochemical characteristic, pollutants removal and microbial activity between the short age and long age aerobic granule, respectively. The short age aerobic granule was cultivated from activated floccules sludge and the other was gotten from aerobic granular sludge which was operated stably more than one year. The results indicated that the wet density, the specific gravity and integrated coefficient (IC) of the short age aerobic granule were 1.066 g x cm(-1), 1.013 g x cm(-3) and 98.7%, respectively. And that of long age were 1.026 g x cm(-3), 1.010 g x cm(-3) and 98.4%, respectively. All of them were higher than the long age aerobic granule. The mean diameters of them were 1.9 mm and 2.2 mm, respectively. The settling velocity of short age and long age aerobic granule were 0.005-0.032 m x s(-1) and 0.003-0.028 m x s(-1), respectively, and two kinds of aerobic granule settling velocity increased with the diameter increased. SVI of the former was lower. The COD removal rates of two aerobic granules were above 90%, and the NH4(+) -N removal rates of them were about 85%. The results of the COD effluent concentration, NH4(+) -N effluent concentration and the pollutants concentration in a typical cycle indicated that the short age aerobic granule had better pollutants removal efficiency. The TP removal rates of them were between 40% -90% and 32% -85%, respectively. The TN removal rates of them were about 80%. The SOUR(H) SOUR(NH4) and SOUR(NO2) of the short age aerobic granule were 26.4, 14.8 and 11.2 mg x (h x g)(-1), respectively. And that of long age were 25.2, 14.4 and 8.4 mg x (h x g)(-1), respectively. In summary, the aerobic granule had significantly different physical and chemical characteristics because of different granule age, and the short age aerobic granule exhibited better pollutants removal ability, higher microbial activity and more stability than the long age aerobic granule. PMID:22624385

  19. Suprasellar arachnoid cyst presenting with bobble-head doll syndrome: Report of three cases

    PubMed Central

    Ramesh, Shighakolli; Raju, Subodh

    2015-01-01

    Suprasellar arachnoid cysts can have varied presentations with signs and symptoms of obstructive hydrocephalus, visual impairment, endocrinal dysfunction, gait ataxia and rarely bobble-head doll movement. The bobble-head doll movement is a rare movement disorder characterized by antero-posterior bobbling of the head and neck on the trunk every 2–3 seconds. We present three cases with bobble-head doll syndrome associated with a large suprasellar arachnoid cyst and obstructive hydrocephalus, which were treated with endoscopic cystoventriculocisternostomy and marsupialization of the cyst. PMID:25878736

  20. Suprasellar arachnoid cyst presenting with bobble-head doll syndrome: Report of three cases.

    PubMed

    Ramesh, Shighakolli; Raju, Subodh

    2015-01-01

    Suprasellar arachnoid cysts can have varied presentations with signs and symptoms of obstructive hydrocephalus, visual impairment, endocrinal dysfunction, gait ataxia and rarely bobble-head doll movement. The bobble-head doll movement is a rare movement disorder characterized by antero-posterior bobbling of the head and neck on the trunk every 2-3 seconds. We present three cases with bobble-head doll syndrome associated with a large suprasellar arachnoid cyst and obstructive hydrocephalus, which were treated with endoscopic cystoventriculocisternostomy and marsupialization of the cyst. PMID:25878736

  1. Intramedullary cyst formation after removal of multiple intradural spinal arachnoid cysts: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Zekaj, Edvin; Saleh, Christian; Servello, Domenico

    2016-01-01

    Background: A rare cause of spinal cord compression is spinal arachnoid cysts. Symptoms are caused by spinal cord compression, however, asymptomatic patients have been also reported. Treatment options depend upon symptom severity and clinical course. Case Description: We report the case of a 47-year-old patient who developed an intramedullary arachnoid cyst after removal of an intradural extramedullary cyst. Conclusion: Surgery should be considered early in a symptomatic disease course. Longstanding medullary compression may reduce the possibility of neurological recovery as well as secondary complications such as intramedullary cyst formation. PMID:27512608

  2. Coexistence of epileptic nocturnal wanderings and an arachnoid cyst.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Genchi, Alejandro; Díaz-Galviz, John L; García-Reyna, Juan Carlos; Avila-Ordoñez, Mario U

    2007-06-15

    Episodic nocturnal wanderings (ENWs) have rarely been associated with gross abnormalities of brain structures. We describe the case of a patient with ENWs in coexistence with an arachnoid cyst (AC). The patient was a 15-year-old boy who presented with nocturnal attacks characterized by complex motor behaviors. An MRI revealed a left temporal cyst and a SPECT Tc99 scan showed left temporal hypoperfusion and bilateral frontal hyperperfusion, more evident on the right side. During an all-night polysomnographic recording with audiovisual monitoring, dystonic posture followed by sleepwalking-like behavior was documented. The sleepwalking-like behavior was preceded by a spike discharge over the left frontocentral region with contralateral projection and secondary generalization during stage 2 sleep. Treatment with levetiracetam produced a striking remission of seizures. This supports a conservative management of an AC, considering that it may be an incidental finding. In epileptic patients, an AC may not necessarily be related to the location of the seizure focus. PMID:17694730

  3. A Symptomatic Spinal Extradural Arachnoid Cyst with Lumbar Disc Herniation

    PubMed Central

    Kadono, Yoshinori; Yuguchi, Takamichi; Ohnishi, Yu-ichiro; Iwatsuki, Koichi; Yoshimine, Toshiki

    2015-01-01

    Spinal epidural arachnoid cyst (EAC) is a rare, usually asymptomatic condition of unknown origin, which typically involves the lower thoracic spine. We report a case of posttraumatic symptomatic EAC with lumbar disc herniation. A 22-year-old man experienced back pain and sciatica after a traffic accident. Neurological examination revealed a right L5 radiculopathy. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a cystic lesion at the L3 to L5 level and an L4-5 disc herniation; computed tomography myelography showed that the right L5 root was sandwiched between the cyst and the herniation. A dural defect was identified during surgery. The cyst was excised completely and the defect was repaired. A herniation was excised beside the dural sac. Histology showed that the cyst wall consisted of collagen and meningothelial cells. Postoperatively the symptoms resolved. Lumbar spinal EACs are rare; such cysts may arise from a congenital dural crack and grow gradually. The 6 cases of symptomatic lumbar EAC reported in the literature were not associated with disc herniation or trauma. In this case, the comorbid disc herniation was involved in symptom progression. Although many EACs are asymptomatic, comorbid spinal disorders such as disc herniation or trauma can result in symptom progression. PMID:25861499

  4. Retrospective analysis of spinal arachnoid cysts in 14 dogs.

    PubMed

    Rylander, Helena; Lipsitz, David; Berry, Wayne L; Sturges, Beverly K; Vernau, Karen M; Dickinson, Peter J; Añor, Sonia A; Higgins, Robert J; LeCouteur, Richard A

    2002-01-01

    Spinal cord dysfunction secondary to spinal arachnoid cysts (SACs) has been reported previously in dogs. This retrospective study reviews the clinical signs, radiographic findings, and outcome after surgical resection of SACs in 14 dogs. Plain vertebral column radiographs and myelography were done in all dogs. Computed tomography (CT) was done in 7 dogs and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in 3 dogs. Affected dogs were between 1 and 12 years of age, and 8 of 14 were Rottweilers. Abnormalities detected on neurological examination depended on the location of the SAC. Five dogs had bilobed or multiple SACs. SACs were located in the cervical vertebral column in 11 dogs and in the thoracic vertebral column in 4 dogs. All dogs had dorsally or dorsolaterally located SACs. Two dogs also had additional ventrally located SACs. Spinal cord compression secondary to intervertebral disc extrusion or protrusion was demonstrated at the site of the SACs in 2 dogs. Surgical resection of the SACs was completed in all dogs. Eleven dogs were available for follow-up. Five weeks postoperatively, 7 dogs improved in neurological function, with some residual ataxia and paresis in 6 of these dogs. Neurological function had deteriorated in 4 dogs. It was concluded from this study that Rottweilers have a higher incidence of SACs than other breeds of dog. Furthermore, bilobed or multiple SACs can occur commonly, and myelography effectively localized SACs in dogs. Surgical resection of SACs resulted in improvement in neurological function in the majority of treated dogs. PMID:12465766

  5. Symptomatic Large Spinal Extradural Arachnoid Cyst: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Ho-Yeon; Lee, Sun-Ho; Kim, Eun-Sang

    2015-01-01

    Spinal extradural arachnoid cysts (SEACs) are relatively rare cause of compressive myelopathy. SEACs can be either congenital or acquired, but the etiology and the mechanism for their development are still unclear. A number of cases have been reported in the literature, and the one-way valve mechanism is the most widely accepted theory which explains the expansion of cysts and spinal cord compression. We report two cases of SEAC in this article. Patients had intermittent, progressive cord compressing symptoms. MRI image showed large SEAC which caused compression of the spinal cord. Pre-operative cystography and CT myelography were performed to identify the communicating tract. Pre-operative epidural cystography showed a fistulous tract. The patients underwent primary closure of the dural defect which was a communicating tract. The operative finding (nerve root herniation through the tract) suggested that the SEAC developed through a checkvalve mechanism. Postoperatively, the patients had no surgical complications and symptoms were relieved. Based on our experience, preoperative identification of the communicating tract is important in surgical planning. Although surgical excision is the standard surgical treatment, primary closure of the dural defect which was a communicating tract can be an acceptable surgical strategy. PMID:26512289

  6. Post-operative spinal subdural extra-arachnoid hygroma causing cauda equina compression: a report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Singleton, William G B; Ramnarine, Devindra; Patel, Nitin; Wigfield, Crispin

    2012-06-01

    We present two cases of symptomatic, post-lumbar surgery cauda equina compression due to formation of a dissecting subdural extra-arachnoid cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) collection (hygroma) under tension. In both cases, a small inadvertent durotomy was sustained during the initial surgery. Surgical re-exploration confirmed a tension subdural extra-arachnoid hygroma due to one-way flow of CSF through a pinhole puncture in the arachnoid. The mechanism and clinico-radiological features of this rare post-operative complication are discussed. PMID:22085250

  7. Extensive arachnoid ossification with associated syringomyelia presenting as thoracic myelopathy. Case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Slavin, K V; Nixon, R R; Nesbit, G M; Burchiel, K J

    1999-10-01

    The authors present the case of progressive thoracic myelopathy caused by the extensive ossification of the arachnoid membrane and associated intramedullary syrinx. Based on their findings and results of the literature search, they describe a pathological basis for this rare condition, discuss its incidence and symptomatology, and suggest a simple classification for various types of the arachnoid ossification. They also discuss the magnetic resonance imaging features of arachnoid ossification and associated spinal cord changes. The particular value of plain computerized tomography, which is highly sensitive in revealing intraspinal calcifications and ossifications, in the diagnostic evaluation of patients with a clinical picture of progressive myelopathy is emphasized. PMID:10505510

  8. A quantitative method for estimation of volume changes in arachnoid foveae with age.

    PubMed

    Duray, Stephen M; Martel, Stacie S

    2006-03-01

    Age-related changes of arachnoid foveae have been described, but objective, quantitative analyses are lacking. A new quantitative method is presented for estimation of change in total volume of arachnoid foveae with age. The pilot sample consisted of nine skulls from the Palmer Anatomy Laboratory. Arachnoid foveae were filled with sand, which was extracted using a vacuum pump. Mass was determined with an analytical balance and converted to volume. A reliability analysis was performed using intraclass correlation coefficients. The method was found to be highly reliable (intraobserver ICC = 0.9935, interobserver ICC = 0.9878). The relationship between total volume and age was then examined in a sample of 63 males of accurately known age from the Hamann-Todd collection. Linear regression analysis revealed no statistically significant relationship between total volume and age, or foveae frequency and age (alpha = 0.05). Development of arachnoid foveae may be influenced by health factors, which could limit its usefulness in aging. PMID:16566755

  9. Arachnoid Membrane Suturing for Prevention of Subdural Fluid Collection in Extracranial-intracranial Bypass Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Gun Woo; Kim, Tae Sun; Moon, Hyung Sik; Jang, Jae Won; Seo, Bo Ra; Lee, Jung Kil; Kim, Jae Hyoo; Kim, Soo Han

    2014-01-01

    Objective Water-tight closure of the dura in extracranial-intracranial (EC-IC) bypass is impossible because the superficial temporal artery (STA) must run through the dural defect. Consequently, subdural hygroma and subcutaneous cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) collection frequently occur postoperatively. To reduce these complications, we prospectively performed suturing of the arachnoid membrane after STA-middle cerebral artery (STA-MCA) and evaluated the clinical usefulness. Materials and Methods Between Mar. 2005 and Oct. 2010, extracranial-intracranial arterial bypass (EIAB) with/without encephalo-myo-synangiosis was performed in 88 cases (male : female = 53 : 35). As a control group, 51 patients (57 sides) underwent conventional bypass surgery without closure of the arachnoid membrane. Postoperative computed tomography (CT) scan was performed twice in three days and seven days later, respectively, for evaluation of the presence of subdural fluid collection and other mass lesions. Results The surgical result was excellent, with no newly developing ischemic event until recent follow-up. The additional time needed for arachnoid suture was five to ten minutes, when three to eight sutures were required. Post-operative subdural fluid collection was not seen on follow-up computed tomography scans in all patients. Conclusion Arachnoid suturing is simple, safe, and effective for prevention of subdural fluid collection in EC-IC bypass surgery, especially the vulnerable ischemic hemisphere. PMID:25045645

  10. [Postoperative lumbar extradural arachnoid cyst. Report of two cases and review of the literature].

    PubMed

    Uchibori, M; Kinuta, Y; Koyama, T

    1984-04-01

    Two cases of postoperative extradural arachnoid cyst in the lumbar region were reported. The symptoms such as lumbago, sciatica and paresis of foot which were perfectly cured at discharge relapsed after several months of daily business. The two patients were readmitted and reexamined by myelography and computer assisted tomography. In the two patients a cystic pooling of metrizamide having a connection with the subarachnoid space was noted in the same way. At the second operation a small dural tear and an extradural arachnoid cyst were recognized similarly. Burres and coworkers reported that an extradural arachnoid cyst would easily grow through a small dural defect in the lumbar region, because the hydrostatic pressure is higher than that of the cervical level. Our two cases might well coincident with their theory. In consequence of the experience of the two postoperative extradural arachnoid cyst, we give emphasis that even though the dural tear would be small, especially in the lumbar region, it should not be overlooked and be closed carefully with fine sutures. PMID:6235458

  11. Children With Intracranial Arachnoid Cysts: Classification and Treatment.

    PubMed

    Tan, Zhen; Li, Yongxin; Zhu, Fengjun; Zang, Dongdong; Zhao, Cailei; Li, Cong; Tong, Dan; Zhang, Heye; Chen, Qian

    2015-11-01

    We performed a dynamic study of arachnoid cysts (ACs) using magnetic resonance cisternography (MRC) and proposed a classification of ACs.Twenty-three suitable patients in our hospital entered into this study according to our inclusion criteria. MRC images were collected in all the subjects at 1 and 24 hours after the administration of intrathecal gadolinium-diethylenetriamine penta-acetic acid (Gd-DTPA). We allocate the enrolled patients into 2 groups, MRC group and surgery group. The MRC results were considered before treatment in 1 group (MRC group, 13 patients), whereas another group was surgically treated without considering the MRC results (surgery group, 10 patients). We calculated the enhanced area of cyst using modified MacDonald Criteria from the images and measured the surrounding subarachnoid area as the reference.We found that it was practically useful to quantify 3 types of ACs, complete communicating, incomplete communicating, and noncommunicating, according to MRC results in this study. All the subjects in both groups are closely observed before the treatment and the follow-up using the MRI examination. In the surgery group, 5 patients were found that the area of cysts shrank in the follow-up stage. However, there was no significant difference in the percentage shrinkage area between the 2 groups.We concluded that MRC with Gd-DTPA as a contrast agent is of significant clinical value for the diagnosis and treatment of children with intracranial ACs. This classification based on dynamic MRC is useful for making surgical recommendations. PMID:26554773

  12. Granule consolidation during compaction.

    PubMed

    Rubinstein, M H

    1976-03-01

    The deformation of small cylindrical aggregates of dibasic calcium phosphate was measured during compaction. An analogy between these aggregates and cylindrical granules was proposed. No change in the original shape of the aggregates occurred; the cylindrical shape was maintained even at high compaction pressures. Relaxation of the aggregates occurred at pressures higher than 420 MNm-2 (60.9 x 10(3) lb in.-2) when removed from the compacts, but no relaxation took place at pressures below this value. In addition, the aggregates relaxed by an increase in thickness only; there was no corresponding change in diameter. Up to a pressure of 200 MNm-2 (29.0 x 10(3) lb in.-2), an increase in aggregate diameter occurred, which was accompanied by a reduction in thickness. This change produced only a small reduction in volume, which was attributable to interparticulate slippage resulting in a closer packed arrangement. At a pressure of 200 MNm-2, the aggregate diameter no longer increased because solid bridges were formed between the particles and the die wall, preventing further spreading. From 200 to 420 MNm-2, failure of the material occurred by plastic deformation, which produced only a decrease in aggregate thickness. From 420 to 800 MNm-2 (116.0 x 10(3) lb in.-2), a structure was formed that could support the applied load without further reduction of thickness, and this structure was shown to behave elastically. PMID:1263085

  13. Granulopoiesis and granules of human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Cowland, Jack B; Borregaard, Niels

    2016-09-01

    Granules are essential for the ability of neutrophils to fulfill their role in innate immunity. Granule membranes contain proteins that react to environmental cues directing neutrophils to sites of infection and initiate generation of bactericidal oxygen species. Granules are densely packed with proteins that contribute to microbial killing when liberated to the phagosome or extracellularly. Granules are, however, highly heterogeneous and are traditionally subdivided into azurophil granules, specific granules, and gelatinase granules in addition to secretory vesicles. This review will address issues pertinent to formation of granules, which is a process intimately connected to maturation of neutrophils from their precursors in the bone marrow. We further discuss possible mechanisms by which decisions are made regarding sorting of proteins to constitutive secretion or storage in granules and how degranulation of granule subsets is regulated. PMID:27558325

  14. The terms ``Arachnoids" and ``Novae" are valid in the Venusian context.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostama, V.-P.; Aittola, M.; Raitala, J.

    2000-10-01

    The terms ``arachnoid" and ``nova" (``spider" and ``new" in Latin) are used for a special group of Venusian structures with circular-radial and stellate fracture patterns, respectively. Although arachnoids and novae clearly differ from each other, many earlier studies have classified them to belong to the same class of corona-like features. While they may somehow reflect certain corona-like formation phases, either as subtypes of coronae or stages of corona development, our studies show, that these three, coronae, arachnoids, and novae, should be considered separately. All these features have typical and very different morphologies, extents of volcanism and distributions on Venus. Based on the morphologies of the features, these terms are very descriptive to the structural formations in question. Even if the basic morphologies are rather simple, the main differences between all arachnoids and novae make them clearly distinctive from each other in an amount which allows both of them to be classified into several subtypes based on their own characteristics. The terms ``arachnoid" and ``nova" are short and their definitions in the Venusian context are well established. If taken too literally, the terms may cause some confusion, but they have survived long enough time to be exactly as acceptable as is the term ``corona". Actually, these short descriptive terms can be favored as long as there are not any generic terms to state the phenomena actually essential for their formation. These simple terms are convenient, readily characterize the specified features, and can be successfully used for further classification and characterization studies. Acknowledgements: We would like to thank the Finnish Academy for providing funds for the study.

  15. Linking granulation performance with residence time and granulation liquid distributions in twin-screw granulation: An experimental investigation.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ashish; Alakarjula, Maija; Vanhoorne, Valérie; Toiviainen, Maunu; De Leersnyder, Fien; Vercruysse, Jurgen; Juuti, Mikko; Ketolainen, Jarkko; Vervaet, Chris; Remon, Jean Paul; Gernaey, Krist V; De Beer, Thomas; Nopens, Ingmar

    2016-07-30

    Twin-screw granulation is a promising wet granulation technique for the continuous manufacturing of pharmaceutical solid dosage forms. A twin screw granulator displays a short residence time. Thus, the solid-liquid mixing must be achieved quickly by appropriate arrangement of transport and kneading elements in the granulator screw allowing the production of granules with a size distribution appropriate for tableting. The distribution of residence time and granulation liquid is governed by the field conditions (such as location and length of mixing zones) in the twin-screw granulator, thus contain interesting information on granulation time, mixing and resulting sub-processes such as wetting, aggregation and breakage. In this study, the impact of process (feed rate, screw speed and liquid-to-solid ratio) and equipment parameters (number of kneading discs and stagger angle) on the residence time (distribution), the granulation liquid-powder mixing and the resulting granule size distributions during twin-screw granulation were investigated. Residence time and axial mixing data was extracted from tracer maps and the solid-liquid mixing was quantified from moisture maps, obtained by monitoring the granules at the granulator outlet using near infra-red chemical imaging (NIR-CI). The granule size distribution was measured using the sieving method. An increasing screw speed dominantly reduced the mean residence time. Interaction of material throughput with the screw speed and with the number of kneading discs led to most variation in the studied responses including residence time and mixing capacity. At a high screw speed, granulation yield improved due to high axial mixing. However, increasing material throughput quickly lowers the yield due to insufficient mixing of liquid and powder. Moreover, increasing liquid-to-solid ratio resulted in more oversized granules, and the fraction of oversized granules further increased at higher throughput. Although an increasing number

  16. Pial and arachnoid welding for restoration of normal cord anatomy after excision of intramedullary spinal cord tumors.

    PubMed

    Chacko, Ari George; Daniel, Roy Thomas; Chacko, Geeta; Babu, Krothapalli Srinivasa

    2007-08-01

    A significant postoperative problem in patients undergoing excision of intramedullary tumors is painful dysesthesiae, attributed to various causes, including edema, arachnoid scarring and cord tethering. The authors describe a technique of welding the pia and arachnoid after the excision of intramedullary spinal cord tumors used in seven cases. Using a fine bipolar forcep and a low current, the pial edges of the myelotomy were brought together and welded under saline irrigation. A similar method was used for closing the arachnoid while the dura was closed with a running 5-0 vicryl suture. Closing the pia and arachnoid restores normal cord anatomy after tumor excision and may reduce the incidence of postoperative painful dysesthesiae. PMID:17532219

  17. Syringomyelia secondary to “occult” dorsal arachnoid webs: Report of two cases with review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Sayal, Parag P; Zafar, Arif; Carroll, Thomas A

    2016-01-01

    In a certain group of patients with syringomyelia, even with the advent of sophisticated magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), no associated abnormality or cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) block is easily identified. This type of syringomyelia is often termed idiopathic. Current literature has less than 10 reports of arachnoid webs to be the causative factor. We present our experience in the management of two cases of syringomyelia secondary to arachnoid webs. Both our patients presented with progressive neurological deterioration with MRI scans demonstrating cervical/thoracic syrinx without Chiari malformation or low-lying cord. There was no history of previous meningitis or trauma. Both patients underwent myelography that demonstrated dorsal flow block implying CSF obstruction. Cord displacement/change in caliber was also noted and this was not evident on MRI scans. Both patients underwent thoracic laminectomy. After opening the dura, thickened/abnormal arachnoid tissue was found that was resected thus widely communicating the dorsal subarachnoid space. Postoperatively at 6 months, both patients had significant symptomatic improvement with follow-up MRI scans demonstrating significant resolution of the syrinx. In patients with presumed idiopathic syringomyelia, imaging studies should be closely inspected for the presence of a transverse arachnoid web. We believe that all patients with idiopathic symptomatic syringomyelia should have MRI CSF flow studies and/or computed tomography (CT) myelography to identify such arachnoid abnormalities that are often underdiagnosed. Subsequent surgery should be directed at the establishment of normal CSF flow by laminectomy and excision of the offending arachnoid tissue. PMID:27217656

  18. Small-sized granules of biphasic bone substitutes support fast implant bed vascularization

    PubMed Central

    Barbeck, M; Dard, M; Kokkinopoulou, M; Markl, J; Booms, P; Sader, RA; Kirkpatrick, CJ; Ghanaati, S

    2015-01-01

    The present study investigated the influence of granule size of 2 biphasic bone substitutes (BoneCeramic® 400–700 μm and 500–1000 μm) on the induction of multinucleated giant cells (MNGCs) and implant bed vascularization in a subcutaneous implantation model in rats. Furthermore, degradation mechanisms and particle phagocytosis of both materials were examined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Both granule types induced tissue reactions involving primarily mononuclear cells and only small numbers of MNGCs. Higher numbers of MNGCs were detected in the group with small granules starting on day 30, while higher vascularization was observed only at day 10 in this group. TEM analysis revealed that both mono- and multinucleated cells were involved in the phagocytosis of the materials. Additionally, the results allowed recognition of the MNGCs as the foreign body giant cell phenotype. Histomorphometrical analysis of the size of phagocytosed particles showed no differences between the 2 granule types. The results indicate that granule size seems to have impact on early implant bed vascularization and also on the induction of MNGCs in the late phase of the tissue reaction. Furthermore, the results revealed that a synthetic bone substitute material can induce tissue reactions similar to those of some xenogeneic materials, thus pointing to a need to elucidate their “ideal” physical characteristics. The results also show that granule size in the range studied did not alter phagocytosis by mononuclear cells. Finally, the investigation substantiates the differentiation of material-induced MNGCs, which are of the foreign body giant cell type. PMID:26083163

  19. Surface structure and biocompatibility of demineralized dentin matrix granules soaked in a simulated body fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akazawa, Toshiyuki; Murata, Masaru; Hino, Jun; Nagano, Futami; Shigyo, Tatsuhiro; Nomura, Takafumi; Inano, Hiroyuki; Itabashi, Kohji; Yamagishi, Tohru; Nakamura, Katsuo; Takahashi, Touru; Iida, Shunji; Kashiwazaki, Haruhiko

    2012-12-01

    Demineralized dentin matrix (DDM) granules with excellent biocompatibility were easily prepared using unnecessary human teeth by a new cooling-pulverizing and demineralizing technique. Extracted human teeth were pulverized together with saline ice at 12,000 rpm-rotation number of a ZrO2 blade for 30 s in a ZrO2 vessel. The pulverized granules exhibited the particle size distribution of 0.5-2 mm that was efficient for regeneration of alveolar bone. The (Ca/P) ratios of the granules were 1.60-1.66, which were close to the stoichiometric value of 1.67 for standard hydroxyapatite (HAp). Small amounts of Na+ and Mg2+ ions present at less than 1% were detected. The pulverized granules were dissolved with stirring under 500 rpm for 10-60 min in 2.0%-HNO3 solutions to obtain partial or complete DDM granules. As the dissolution time increased, crystallinity of HAp phase lowered and asperity on surfaces of the granules became outstanding due to elution of mineral components. At the dissolution of 60 min, the pulverizing granules were completely demineralized and the weight decreased to about one-fifth. To improve surface activity of the DDM granules without denaturation of bone growth factors, the DDM granules were soaked at 309.5 K and pH 7.40 in a simulated body fluid (SBF). HAp microcrystals were gradually precipitated on surfaces of the DDM granules with increasing the soaking time. Different morphology of the precipitates was observed, depending on the demineralization situation of the pulverized granules. For the DDM with low dissolution efficiency of 42%, porous bone-like apatites at 24 h after the soaking and fiber-oriented aggregates at 144 h were recognized. The bioactive DDM granules were implanted into the subcutaneous tissues of the back region of rats. At 4 weeks after the implantation, bio-absorption by comparatively small amounts of multi-giant cells was recognized around the surface layers of DDM granules.

  20. Giant Axonal Neuropathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Giant Axonal Neuropathy Information Page Table of Contents (click to jump ... done? Clinical Trials Organizations What is Giant Axonal Neuropathy? Giant axonal neuropathy (GAN) is a rare inherited ...

  1. Case report: "auditory neuropathy" in a newborn caused by a cerebellopontine angle arachnoid cyst.

    PubMed

    Boudewyns, A N; Declau, F; De Ridder, D; Parizel, P M; van den Ende, J; Van de Heyning, P H

    2008-06-01

    We present a 6-week-old girl, referred because of failed newborn hearing screening in the right ear. Click-evoked oto-acoustic emissions were present in both ears, auditory brainstem responses (ABR) were present in the left but totally absent in the right ear. A magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) study revealed a large arachnoid cyst in the right cerebellopontine angle (CPA) and a diagnosis of "auditory neuropathy/auditory dyssynchrony" was established. A microsurgical resection of the cyst wall and fenestration was performed by a retro sigmoid approach. This is the first case in the literature of auditory neuropathy (AN) in an infant caused by a cerebellopontine angle arachnoid cyst. PMID:18355927

  2. Endoscopic Fenestration of Twenty-Six Patients With Middle Fossa Arachnoid Cyst.

    PubMed

    Xu, Siyi; Wang, Yong; Luo, Qizhong; Jiang, Jiyao; Zhong, Chunlong

    2016-06-01

    Middle fossa arachnoid cyst (MFAC) is the most common kind of arachnoid cyst. The objective of this study was to assess the efficacy of endoscopic fenestration for MFACs. The authors report 26 patients of MFAC with variety symptoms such as macrocrania, epilepsy, headache, and development delay. The authors performed surgery with a neuroendoscope to drain and fenestrate the cyst to obtain nearby cystocisternal communications under general anesthesia. All of the 26 patients had a successful fenestration, most of them had an improvement of at least 1 of their pretreatment symptoms with the substantial reduction of the cyst postoperatively. The authors conclude that endoscopic fenestration may be an acceptable and minimally invasive option for the management of symptomatic MFACs. PMID:27171964

  3. Ventriculoscopic surgery for arachnoid cysts in the lateral ventricle: a comparative study of 21 consecutive cases

    PubMed Central

    Shou, Xuefei; Zhao, Yao; Li, Shiqi; Wang, Yongfei

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate neuronavigation-guided ventriculoscopic technique in the treatment of arachnoid cysts in the lateral ventricle. Methods: Between January 2008 to November 2011, twenty-one neuronavigationguided ventriculoscopic surgery were performed for the treatment of symptomatic arachnoid cysts in 21 patients (14 male and 7 female patients, mean age 24.1 years [ranged 1.5-61 years]) Clinical presentations varied from headache, vomiting, hemiparesis and seizure. The trajectory of ventriculoscopy was dynamically monitored and guided in real time by neuronavigation system. Cysts fenestrations were performed in fourteen cases, and cysts resection in seven cases, respectively. All patients were prospectively had a regular follow-up. Results: After operation, all patients achieved symptom resolution without surgical mortality and morbidity. Aseptic meningitis was noted in four cases with cyst resection, and all recovered quickly without advanced treatments. However, a later ependymal adhesion, occurred in one case during follow-up period. Conclusion: The combination of ventriculoscopy and neuronavigation is an accurate, effective and safe approach for the treatment of the patients with arachnoid cysts in the lateral ventricle, especially, for overcoming the topographic variation caused by intraventricular pathologies. Cystoventriculostomy is the best choice. PMID:26885002

  4. Technical Considerations to Prevent Postoperative Endocrine Dysfunction after the Fenestration of Suprasellar Arachnoid Cyst

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Ki-Young; Kang, Sam-Suk; Kim, In-Young; Jung, Tae-Young; Jang, Woo-Yeol

    2011-01-01

    Objective The endocrine dysfunction after the operation for suprasellar arachnoid cysts is not rare. The careful operation to prevent structures can prevent this complication, but it is not enough and effective to prevent it. Authors present technical surgical considerations to prevent this complication with a review of our suprasellar arachnoid cyst patients who had postoperative endocrine dysfunction. Methods From January 2002 to December 2009, eight patients who had suprasellar arachnoid cysts with visual impairment underwent surgery. The mean age was 57.1 years (range, 33-77). Preoperatively, their endocrine function was clinically normal, and laboratory hormonal levels were within normal ranges. Cyst fenestration was performed by craniotomy (n=6) or by a neuro-endoscopic procedure (n=2), and, simultaneously, along with a cyst wall biopsy. Results The surgery was uneventful in all eight patients, and there were no neurological morbidities. However, in four patients, endocrine dysfunction occurred postoperatively. We compared these four patients (group A) to the other 4 patients without endocrine dysfunction (group B) with intraoperative findings and with the histopathological findings of the cyst wall biopsy. The group A patients had more abundant vasculature on the cystic wall than the group B patients according to both the intraoperative findings and the histopathological findings. Conclusion When performing a surgical cyst wall fenestration, surgeons should try to minimize the destruction of the cystic wall vasculature and not to make the fenestration at a site that contains many vascular striae. PMID:21716897

  5. Arachnoiditis following caudal epidural injections for the lumbo-sacral radicular pain.

    PubMed

    Nanjayan, Shashi Kumar; Swamy, Girish Nanjunda; Yallappa, Sachin; Bommireddy, Rajendra

    2013-12-01

    Caudal epidural steroid injection is a very common intervention in treatment of low back pain and sciatica symptoms. Although extensively used, it is not devoid of complications. A few reports of chemical and infective arachnoiditis exist following lumbar epidural anaesthesia, but none following a caudal epidural steroid injection.We report a case of arachnoiditis following caudal epidural steroid injections for lumbar radiculopathy. The patient presented with contralateral sciatica, worsening low back pain and urinary retention few days following the injection, followed by worsening motor functions in L4/L5/S1 myotomes with resultant dense foot drop. Gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging suggested infective arachnoiditis with diffuse enhancement and clumping of the nerve roots within the lumbar and sacral thecal sac. As the number of injections in the management of back pain and lumbo-sacral radicular pain is increasing annually, it is imperative to have a thorough understanding of this potentially dangerous complication and educate the patients appropriately. PMID:24353855

  6. The presence of arachnoiditis affects the characteristics of CSF flow in the spinal subarachnoid space: a modelling study.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Shaokoon; Stoodley, Marcus A; Wong, Johnny; Hemley, Sarah; Fletcher, David F; Bilston, Lynne E

    2012-04-30

    Syringomyelia is a neurological disorder characterised by high pressure fluid-filled cysts within the spinal cord. As syringomyelia is associated with abnormalities of the central nervous system that obstruct cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow, it is thought that changes in CSF dynamics play an important role in its pathogenesis. Using three-dimensional computational models of the spinal subarachnoid space (SAS), this study aims to determine SAS obstructions, such as arachnoiditis, change in CSF dynamics in the SAS. The geometry of the SAS was reconstructed from a series of MRI images. CSF is modelled as an incompressible Newtonian fluid with a dynamic viscosity of 1 mPa s. Three computational models simulated CSF flow in either the unobstructed SAS, or with the SAS obstructed by a porous region simulating dorsal or circumferential arachnoiditis. The permeability of this porous obstruction was varied for the model with dorsal arachnoiditis. The results show that arachnoiditis increases flow resistance in the SAS and this is accompanied by a modest increase in magnitude and/or shift in timing (with respect to the cardiac cycle) of the CSF pressure drop across the region of arachnoiditis. This study suggests that syrinx formation may be related to a change in temporal CSF pulse pressure dynamics. PMID:22386041

  7. Process optimization for continuous extrusion wet granulation.

    PubMed

    Tan, Li; Carella, Anthony J; Ren, Yukun; Lo, Julian B

    2011-08-01

    Three granulating binders in high drug-load acetaminophen blends were evaluated using high shear granulation and extrusion granulation. A polymethacrylate binder enhanced tablet tensile strength with rapid disintegration in simulated gastric fluid, whereas polyvinylpyrrolidone and hydroxypropyl cellulose binders produced less desirable tablets. Using the polymethacrylate binder, the extrusion granulation process was studied regarding the effects of granulating liquid, injection rate and screw speed on granule properties. A full factorial experimental design was conducted to allow the statistical analysis of interactions between extrusion process parameters. Response variables considered in the study included extruder power consumption (screw loading), granule bulk/tapped density, particle size distribution, tablet hardness, friability, disintegration time and dissolution. PMID:20367553

  8. Drying and recovery of aerobic granules.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jianjun; Zhang, Quanguo; Chen, Yu-You; Lee, Duu-Jong

    2016-10-01

    To dehydrate aerobic granules to bone-dry form was proposed as a promising option for long-term storage of aerobic granules. This study cultivated aerobic granules with high proteins/polysaccharide ratio and then dried these granules using seven protocols: drying at 37°C, 60°C, 4°C, under sunlight, in dark, in a flowing air stream or in concentrated acetone solutions. All dried granules experienced volume shrinkage of over 80% without major structural breakdown. After three recovery batches, although with loss of part of the volatile suspended solids, all dried granules were restored most of their original size and organic matter degradation capabilities. The strains that can survive over the drying and storage periods were also identified. Once the granules were dried, they can be stored over long period of time, with minimal impact yielded by the applied drying protocols. PMID:27392096

  9. Selective sorting of alpha-granule proteins

    PubMed Central

    Italiano, J.E.; Battinelli, E. M.

    2010-01-01

    Summary One of the main functions of blood platelets is to secrete a variety of substances that can modify a developing thrombus, regulate the growth of the vasculature, promote wound repair, and contribute to cell-adhesive events. The majority of this vast array of secreted proteins is stored in alpha-granules. Until recently, it was assumed that platelets contained one homogeneous population of alpha-granules that undergo complete de-granulation during platelet activation. This review focuses on the mechanisms of alpha-granule biogenesis and secretion, with a particular emphasis on recent findings that clearly demonstrate that platelets contain distinct subpopulations of alpha-granules that undergo differential release during activation. We consider the implications of this new paradigm of platelet secretion, discuss mechanisms of alpha-granule biogenesis, and review the molecular basis of transport and delivery of alpha-granules to assembling platelets. PMID:19630794

  10. [Hemocompatibility of various synthetic granulates].

    PubMed

    Jung, F; Mrowietz, C; Seyfert, U T; Franke, R P

    1997-06-01

    The adherence of platelets to different polymer granulates was examined in a perfusion chamber filled with platelet-rich plasma. The surface area of each of the granulates was of a standardised size. The results were compared with those found for a non-thrombogenic and a highly thrombogenic foreign-body surface. The three polymers examined-Cryolite, Styrolux and Zylar-must be considered non-thrombogenic. Platelet adherence to these substances is significantly less (3%) than that to a highly thrombogenic surface such as glass (95%). The three materials did not differ in terms of platelet adherence, and would appear to be suitable potential materials for use in cell separators. PMID:9312306

  11. Iron granules in plasma cells.

    PubMed Central

    Cook, M K; Madden, M

    1982-01-01

    The curious and unusual finding of coarse iron granules in marrow plasma cells is reported in 13 patients, in whom the finding was incidental. In 10 of these patients there was known alcohol abuse and serious medical complications of that abuse. Previous reports of the finding are reviewed. Haematological data of the 13 patients are presented. A hypothesis is outlined which may account for the finding. Images PMID:7068907

  12. A proposed aerobic granules size development scheme for aerobic granulation process.

    PubMed

    Dahalan, Farrah Aini; Abdullah, Norhayati; Yuzir, Ali; Olsson, Gustaf; Salmiati; Hamdzah, Myzairah; Din, Mohd Fadhil Mohd; Ahmad, Siti Aqlima; Khalil, Khalilah Abdul; Anuar, Aznah Nor; Noor, Zainura Zainon; Ujang, Zaini

    2015-04-01

    Aerobic granulation is increasingly used in wastewater treatment due to its unique physical properties and microbial functionalities. Granule size defines the physical properties of granules based on biomass accumulation. This study aims to determine the profile of size development under two physicochemical conditions. Two identical bioreactors namely Rnp and Rp were operated under non-phototrophic and phototrophic conditions, respectively. An illustrative scheme was developed to comprehend the mechanism of size development that delineates the granular size throughout the granulation. Observations on granules' size variation have shown that activated sludge revolutionised into the form of aerobic granules through the increase of biomass concentration in bioreactors which also determined the changes of granule size. Both reactors demonstrated that size transformed in a similar trend when tested with and without illumination. Thus, different types of aerobic granules may increase in size in the same way as recommended in the aerobic granule size development scheme. PMID:25661308

  13. [Papilledema and echographically detectable retro-orbital dilatation of the sub-arachnoidal space with open fontanelle - six case reports].

    PubMed

    Gusek-Schneider, G C; Mardin, C Y; Trollmann, R; Eyüpoglu, I Y; Ganslandt, O

    2011-11-01

    This paper analyses the case reports for three children in which a papilledema occurred before the age of one year. Furthermore, an analysis is also given of three further case reports for children aged less than one year in which, in spite of open fontanelle, no papilledema was found, however, a dilatation of the sub-arachnoidal space was demonstrated echographically. Even in children less than one year of age in which an open fontanelle still exists and in whom a neuro-paediatric clarification of internal hydrocepalus is made, in spite of opththalmoscopically inconspicuous findings for the papilla an echography is indispensable for the evaluation of the sub-arachnoidal space. Here, the early recognition of a dilatation of the retro-bulbar sub-arachnoidal space can possibly prevent the occurrence of a consecutive optic atrophy. At the present time, the data available do not allow the recommendation of an upper age limit for an echographic examination. PMID:21901662

  14. Does degenerative disease of the lumbar spine cause arachnoiditis? A magnetic resonance study and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Jackson, A; Isherwood, I

    1994-09-01

    The magnetic resonance appearances in 165 patients with symptoms suggestive of degenerative lumbar spine disease were reviewed. The aim of the study was to evaluate the relationship between abnormalities of nerve root distribution and degenerative disease of the lumbar spine in the absence of other known risk factors for arachnoiditis. Central clumping of nerve roots was present in 16 patients (9.7%) and was associated with spinal stenosis at one of the affected levels in all (p < 0.001). Spinal stenosis was present in 44 patients giving an incidence of abnormal nerve root distribution of 36% in this group. Nerve root clumping occurred in association with pure spinal stenosis (10 cases), stenosis secondary to disc prolapse (four cases) and degenerative spondylolisthesis (two cases). Nerve root clumping was confined to one vertebral level in nine cases and extended over two to four levels in seven. In five of the latter spinal stenosis was present at multiple levels. The appearance of nerve root clumping described here may result entirely from mechanical apposition of nerve roots but is indistinguishable from the central pattern of nerve root adhesions which occurs in adhesive lumbar arachnoiditis. No abnormalities of nerve root distribution were seen in association with any indicator of degenerative disk disease in the absence of stenosis. We have been unable to demonstrate the previously reported relationship between lumbar disk degeneration and arachnoiditis and discuss this with a critical review of the literature. Abnormal central clumping of nerve roots as described in arachnoiditis may occur in association with spinal stenosis in the absence of other risk factors although the cause for this appearance remains unexplained. Arachnoiditis-like changes extending over more than one vertebral level are rare (7%) except in the presence of spinal stenosis at multiple levels (29%). Awareness of this appearance may avoid a possibly incorrect diagnosis of arachnoiditis

  15. Giant Magnons Meet Giant Gravitons

    SciTech Connect

    Hofman, Diego M.

    2008-07-28

    We study the worldsheet reflection matrix of a string attached to a D-brane in AdS{sub 5}xS{sup 5}. The D-brane corresponds to a maximal giant graviton that wraps an S{sup 3} inside S{sup 5}. In the gauge theory, the open string is described by a spin chain with boundaries. We focus on open strings with a large SO(6) charge and define an asymptotic boundary reflection matrix. Using the symmetries of the problem, we review the computation of the boundary reflection matrix, up to a phase. We also discuss weak and strong coupling computations where we obtain the overall phase factor and test our exact results.

  16. Protein mobility within secretory granules.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Annita Ngatchou; Bittner, Mary A; Holz, Ronald W; Axelrod, Daniel

    2014-07-01

    We investigated the basis for previous observations that fluorescent-labeled neuropeptide Y (NPY) is usually released within 200 ms after fusion, whereas labeled tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) is often discharged over many seconds. We found that tPA and NPY are endogenously expressed in small and different subpopulations of bovine chromaffin cells in culture. We measured the mobility of these proteins (tagged with fluorophore) within the lumen of individual secretory granules in living chromaffin cells, and related their mobilities to postfusion release kinetics. A method was developed that is not limited by standard optical resolution, in which a bright flash of strongly decaying evanescent field (∼64 nm exponential decay constant) produced by total internal reflection (TIR) selectively bleaches cerulean-labeled protein proximal to the glass coverslip within individual granules. Fluorescence recovery occurred as unbleached protein from distal regions within the 300 nm granule diffused into the bleached proximal regions. The fractional bleaching of tPA-cerulean (tPA-cer) was greater when subsequently probed with TIR excitation than with epifluorescence, indicating that tPA-cer mobility was low. The almost equal NPY-cer bleaching when probed with TIR and epifluorescence indicated that NPY-cer equilibrated within the 300 ms bleach pulse, and therefore had a greater mobility than tPA-cer. TIR-fluorescence recovery after photobleaching revealed a significant recovery of tPA-cer (but not NPY-cer) fluorescence within several hundred milliseconds after bleaching. Numerical simulations, which take into account bleach duration, granule diameter, and the limited number of fluorophores in a granule, are consistent with tPA-cer being 100% mobile, with a diffusion coefficient of 2 × 10(-10) cm(2)/s (∼1/3000 of that for a protein of similar size in aqueous solution). However, the low diffusive mobility of tPA cannot alone explain its slow postfusion release. In the

  17. Arachnoid Cyst of the Cavum Velum Interpositum in a Septuagenarian: Radiological Features and Differential Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Rajesh, S; Bhatnagar, Shorav; Chauhan, Udit; Gupta, Shailesh; Agarwal, Nitesh; Kasana, Vivek

    2014-01-01

    Summary The cavum velum interpositum (CVI) is a thin, triangular-shaped cerebrospinal fluid (CSF)-filled space between the lateral ventricles that lies below the fornices and above the third ventricle. It is a normal variant seen in premature and newborn infants and usually disappears with brain maturation. CVI is rarely seen in adults as a persistent primitive structure. Although moderate cystic dilatation of the CVI may sometimes be observed, a true large cyst is extremely rare with only a handful of reported cases, mostly in children and adolescents. We describe the case of CVI arachnoid cyst diagnosed on imaging in a septuagenarian with the complaint of occasional headaches. PMID:24750701

  18. Arachnoid cyst of the cavum velum interpositum in a septuagenarian: radiological features and differential diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Rajesh, S; Bhatnagar, Shorav; Chauhan, Udit; Gupta, Shailesh; Agarwal, Nitesh; Kasana, Vivek

    2014-04-01

    The cavum velum interpositum (CVI) is a thin, triangular-shaped cerebrospinal fluid (CSF)-filled space between the lateral ventricles that lies below the fornices and above the third ventricle. It is a normal variant seen in premature and newborn infants and usually disappears with brain maturation. CVI is rarely seen in adults as a persistent primitive structure. Although moderate cystic dilatation of the CVI may sometimes be observed, a true large cyst is extremely rare with only a handful of reported cases, mostly in children and adolescents. We describe the case of CVI arachnoid cyst diagnosed on imaging in a septuagenarian with the complaint of occasional headaches. PMID:24750701

  19. Scalloping Sacral Arachnoid Cyst as a Cause of Perianal Pain- A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Tyagi, Himanshu Ravindra; Kalra, Kashmiri Lal; Acharya, Shankar; Singh, Rupinder Pal

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Scalloping sacral arachnoid cyst though a rare condition, should be suspected in cases of persistent perianal pain without any obvious urological or anorectal pathology. Such difficult cases justify ordering an M.R.I of spine as plain X-Rays and clinical examination may come out to be inconclusive. X-ray in later stages may show changes corresponding to scalloping of bone due pressure effect of cyst on surrounding tissue. Diagnosis may further be confirmed by doing contrast MRI which differentiates arachnoid cyst from other intradural and extradural pathologies. Though anatomically spinal arachnoid cysts are just an out pouching from the spinal meningeal sac or nerve root sheath they may be extradural or intradural in their location, communicating to main C.S.F column through their pedicle or an ostium leading to continuous enlargement in size. Case Report: A 32 year old female was admitted under our spine unit with 1.5 year history of chronic pain, swelling and reduced sensation in perianal region. On examination she had tenderness and hypoesthesia over lower sacral region. The pain was continuous, dull aching in nature, not related to activity, localized over lower sacrum and perianal area. The neurological examination of her both lower limbs were unremarkable. Anal tone and anal reflex were normal. No sign of inflammation or tenderness was found over coccyx. Since the X-rays were inconclusive an MRI scan was done which showed a cystic lesion in the sacral area extending from S2 to S4 region with mechanical scalloping effect on the surrounding bone. The lesion had same intensity as C.S.F in both T1 &T2 weighted images. The treatment was done by way of surgical decompression with complete excision of cyst and obliteration of space by a posterior midline approach. Presently the patient is 1 year post operative and no sign of recurrence is there. Conclusion: Sacral arachnoid cysts should be considered as a differential diagnosis of perianal pain. Large

  20. Imaging diagnosis--Vertebral canal porcupine quill with presumptive secondary arachnoid diverticulum.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Adam R; Chen, Annie V; Tucker, Russell L

    2010-01-01

    A 3-year-old Gordon Setter developed cervical hyperesthesia and a stiff gait. Upon magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, an arachnoid diverticulum was detected at the C1 level. Upon surgical resection, a porcupine quill was identified within the vertebral canal in the area of the cyst. At a retrospective review of the MR images, the quill appeared as a circular well-demarcated T2-hypointense lesion. Porcupine quill migrations are common in the dog but migration into the central nervous system is rare. PMID:20402400

  1. Dialysis-induced Subdural Hematoma in an Arachnoid Cyst Associated with Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Takata, Tadayuki; Kokudo, Yohei; Kume, Kodai; Ikeda, Kazuyo; Kamada, Masaki; Touge, Tetsuo; Deguchi, Kazushi; Masaki, Tsutomu

    2016-01-01

    Arachnoid cyst (AC) is a neurological complication of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). Although an AC can increase the risk of a subdural hematoma, the clinical presentation of bleeding into an AC associated with ADPKD is not well known. We herein report the case of a 59-year-old woman in whom the initiation of hemodialysis for renal failure led to AC bleeding. A change of anticoagulant from heparin to nafamostat mesilate allowed dialysis to continue without rebleeding. These findings suggest that hemodialysis in patients with an AC associated with ADPKD may increase the risk of bleeding. Nafamostat mesilate may be useful in such cases. PMID:27477416

  2. Intracranial Intra-arachnoid Diverticula and Cyst-like Abnormalities of the Brain.

    PubMed

    Platt, Simon; Hicks, Jill; Matiasek, Lara

    2016-03-01

    Primary intracranial cystic or cyst-like lesions include intra-arachnoid, epidermoid, dermoid, and choroid plexus cysts. Differentiation of these cystic lesions can usually be accomplished by imaging studies alone; however, some cysts are similar in appearance and require histopathology for definitive diagnosis. Clinical signs often reflect the location of the cysts within the intracranial cavity rather than the type of cyst. If clinical signs are significant and progressive, surgical removal is warranted and may be successful, although cystic contents could be harmful if allowed to contact surrounding brain parenchyma or meninges. PMID:26704659

  3. Paroxysmal kinesigenic choreoathetosis associated with frontotemporal arachnoid cyst--case report.

    PubMed

    Urasaki, E; Tokimura, T; Genmoto, T; Yokota, A

    1999-02-01

    A 17-year-old male presented with paroxysmal kinesigenic choreoathetosis (PKC) associated with frontotemporal arachnoid cyst. Xenon-133 single photon emission computed tomography detected a slight but equivocal decrease in regional cerebral blood flow in the vicinity of basal ganglia associated with the PKC episodes. PKC continued after surgical removal of the cyst but was well controlled by oral administration of carbamazepine. Whether the pathogenesis of symptomatic PKC was associated with the cortical lesion could not be determined in the present case. PMID:10193153

  4. Association of Heterotopic Neuroglial Tissue with an Arachnoid Cyst in the Internal Auditory Canal

    PubMed Central

    Francis, Howard W.; Nager, George T.; Holliday, Michael J.; Long, Donlin M.

    1995-01-01

    An arachnoid cyst arising within the internal auditory canal, or within the cerebellopontine angle and subsequently extending into the internal meatus and enlarging it, is a rare occurrence. Nevertheless, the neurootologist and the neurosurgeon have an interest in its existence because its clinical manifestations are identical with the ones produced by a schwannoma, involving overwhelmingly the cochleovestibular nerve in that region. An equally rare observation in that location is the presence of ectopic neuroglial tissue. The two can occur independently or in combination. Examples of such lesions are presented, and their possible pathogenesis is discussed. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 3Figure 3Figure 5Figure 6 PMID:17171156

  5. Balloon-borne imagery of the solar granulation. II - The lifetime of solar granulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehltretter, J. P.

    1978-01-01

    Phenomenological aspects of the temporal evolution of photospheric granulation are reported as derived from time series of granulation photographs obtained during a flight of a balloon-borne telescope. The distribution of granule lifetime probabilities is determined, and it is found that the data can be represented by an exponential decrease with a 'decay constant' of 5.9 min. The general properties of granular evolution are described along with the way individual granules evolve with time. The most common type of granule is shown to be a medium-sized or small fragment, and it is suggested that all granules are produced by fragmentation of preexisting granules. The relative frequencies of granule destruction by fragmentation, fading, and merging are determined to be 51%, 21%, and 28%, respectively. An average radial velocity of 0.8 km/s is computed for conglomerates with an average diameter of 2.25 arcsec.

  6. Calcium spatial distribution in aerobic granules and its effects on granule structure, strength and bioactivity.

    PubMed

    Ren, Ting-Ting; Liu, Li; Sheng, Guo-Ping; Liu, Xian-Wei; Yu, Han-Qing; Zhang, Ming-Chuan; Zhu, Jian-Rong

    2008-07-01

    Calcium-rich aerobic granules were cultivated after 3-month operation. The chemical form and spatial distribution of calcium in the granules and their physicochemical characteristics were explored. Examination with a scanning electron microscope combined energy dispersive X-ray detector (SEM-EDX) shows that Ca was mainly accumulated in the core of the granules. CaCO(3) was found to be the main calcium precipitate in the granules. The fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis shows that the cells were crowded in the outer layer and gathered in clusters. Compared with the granules without Ca accumulation, the Ca-rich granules had more rigid structure and a higher strength. However, their specific oxygen uptake rate (SOUR) reduced after the Ca accumulation inside them. Comparison between the SOUR values of the granules with and without Ca accumulation suggests that Ca accumulated in the aerobic granules might have a negative effect on their bioactivity. PMID:18514253

  7. Carbon granule probe microphone for leak detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parthasarathy, S. P.

    1985-02-01

    A microphone which is not subject to corrosion is provided by employing carbon granules to sense sound waves. The granules are packed into a ceramic tube and no diaphragm is used. A pair of electrodes is located in the tube adjacent the carbon granules and are coupled to a sensing circuit. Sound waves cause pressure changes on the carbon granules which results in a change in resistance in the electrical path between the electrodes. This change in resistance is detected by the sensing circuit. The microphone is suitable for use as a leak detection probe in recovery boilers, where it provides reliable operation without corrosion problems associated with conventional microphones.

  8. Giant Cell Arteritis

    MedlinePlus

    Giant cell arteritis is a disorder that causes inflammation of your arteries, usually in the scalp, neck, and arms. ... arteries, which keeps blood from flowing well. Giant cell arteritis often occurs with another disorder called polymyalgia ...

  9. Giant impacts on giant planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Pater, Imke

    2012-10-01

    The 2009 impact on Jupiter caught the world by surprise and cast doubt on impactor flux estimates for the outer solar system. Enhanced amateur planetary imaging techniques yield both high spatial resolution {enabling the 2009 impact debris field detection} and rapid frame rates {enabling the 2010 impact flash detections and lightcurve measurements}.We propose a Target of Opportunity program to image future impacts on Jupiter and Saturn. To remove the possibility of impact cloud non-detections, the program will be triggered only if an existing impact debris field is seen, an object on a collision course with Jupiter or Saturn is discovered, or an impact light curve is measured with an estimated total energy large enough to generate an impact cloud in a giant planet atmosphere.HST provides the only way to image these events in the ultraviolet, providing information on aerosol altitudes and on smaller particles that are less visible to ground-based infrared observations. High-resolution imaging with proper timing {not achievable from the ground} is required to measure precisely both the velocity fields of impact sites and the optical spectrum of impact debris. HST observations of past impacts on Jupiter have also served both as cornerstones of science investigations at other wavelengths and as vehicles for effective public outreach.Large outer solar system impacts are governed by the same physics as in the terrestrial events that dominate the impact threat to humans. Studying the behavior of impactors of various sizes and compositions, as they enter the atmosphere at varying angles and speeds, will better quantify terrestrial impact hazards.

  10. Giant impacts on giant planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Pater, Imke

    2014-10-01

    The 2009 impact and recent superbolides on Jupiter caught the world by surprise and cast doubt on impactor flux estimates for the outer solar system. Enhanced amateur planetary imaging techniques yield both high spatial resolution (enabling the 2009 impact debris field detection) and rapid frame rates (enabling the 2010/2012 impact flash detections and lightcurve measurements).We propose a ToO program to image future impacts on Jupiter and Saturn. To remove the possibility of impact cloud non-detections, the program will be triggered only if an existing impact debris field is seen, an object on a collision course with Jupiter or Saturn is discovered, or an impact light curve is measured with an estimated total energy large enough to generate an impact cloud in a giant planet atmosphere (10^20 J).HST provides the only way to image these events in the ultraviolet, providing information on aerosol altitudes and on smaller particles that are less visible to ground-based infrared observations. High-resolution imaging with proper timing (not achievable from the ground) is required to measure precisely both the velocity fields of impact sites and the optical spectrum of impact debris. HST observations of past impacts on Jupiter have also served both as cornerstones of science investigations at other wavelengths and as vehicles for effective public outreach.Large outer solar system impacts are governed by the same physics as in the terrestrial events that dominate the impact threat to humans. Studying the behavior of impactors of various sizes and compositions, as they enter the atmosphere at varying angles and speeds, will better quantify terrestrial impact hazards.

  11. Giant impacts on giant planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Pater, Imke

    2013-10-01

    The 2009 impact and recent superbolides on Jupiter caught the world by surprise and cast doubt on impactor flux estimates for the outer solar system. Enhanced amateur planetary imaging techniques yield both high spatial resolution {enabling the 2009 impact debris field detection} and rapid frame rates {enabling the 2010/2012 impact flash detections and lightcurve measurements}.We propose a ToO program to image future impacts on Jupiter and Saturn. To remove the possibility of impact cloud non-detections, the program will be triggered only if an existing impact debris field is seen, an object on a collision course with Jupiter or Saturn is discovered, or an impact light curve is measured with an estimated total energy large enough to generate an impact cloud in a giant planet atmosphere {10^20 J}.HST provides the only way to image these events in the ultraviolet, providing information on aerosol altitudes and on smaller particles that are less visible to ground-based infrared observations. High-resolution imaging with proper timing {not achievable from the ground} is required to measure precisely both the velocity fields of impact sites and the optical spectrum of impact debris. HST observations of past impacts on Jupiter have also served both as cornerstones of science investigations at other wavelengths and as vehicles for effective public outreach.Large outer solar system impacts are governed by the same physics as in the terrestrial events that dominate the impact threat to humans. Studying the behavior of impactors of various sizes and compositions, as they enter the atmosphere at varying angles and speeds, will better quantify terrestrial impact hazards.

  12. [Intrasellar arachnoid cyst. A case report and review of the literature].

    PubMed

    Zieliński, Grzegorz; Podgórski, Jan Krzysztof; Koziarski, Andrzej; Potakiewicz, Ziemowit

    2006-01-01

    Intrasellar arachnoid cyst (IAC) is a very rare pathological lesion occurring in 5 of 1000 autopsy cases, and constitutes 9% of all arachnoid cysts. As a space-occupying mass, IAC may cause headaches, visual disturbances, hypopituitarism, precocious puberty, and the "bobble-head doll" syndrome. The pathogenesis of IAC remains controversial. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the neurodiagnostic tool of choice to evaluate IAC. The authors presented a 38 year-old woman suffering from severe chronic headaches, dysmenorrhea, and visual disturbance. MRI revealed an intrasellar cystic lesion that had compressed the optic chiasma. Preoperative endocrinological assessment revealed hyperprolactinemia and hypogonadotropic hypogonadism. The patient underwent transsphenoidal surgery. The cyst membrane was opened and clear, serous fluid was evacuated. The postoperative course was complicated by CSF leakage, which was corrected by an autologous fat graft placement. Visual field defects improved immediately after surgery but a transient panhypopituitarism and diabetes insipidus occurred. Postoperative MRI revealed no recurrence of the lesion during the four-year follow-up. PMID:16967358

  13. [Management of arachnoid cysts of the middle cranial fossa accompanied by subdural effusions].

    PubMed

    Abderrahmen, K; Saadaoui, K; Bouhoula, A; Boubaker, A; Jemel, H

    2012-10-01

    Subdural effusions are uncommon but known complications of arachnoid cysts of the middle cranial fossa. They mainly occur after minor head traumas in young patients. Here, we report eight cases of arachnoid cyst of the middle cranial fossa associated with subdural hematoma in five cases and hygroma in three cases. Major symptoms are signs of raised intracranial pressure. CT scan and MRI showed the cyst and the subdural effusion. An excellent therapeutic result was achieved with evacuation of the subdural fluid via burr holes in the five cases of subdural hematoma while in the two cases of hygroma a subduro-peritoneal shunt was necessary. In the last case, a temporal craniotomy was performed with evacuation of the hygroma and fenestration of the cyst. We suggest treating only the complicating event in the case of a subdural hematoma via burr holes evacuation. Whereas, in the case of hygroma we think that craniotomy with fenestration of the cyst or the use of a subdural shunt are more often needed. PMID:22749080

  14. Digital Subtraction Cystography for Detection of Communicating Holes of Spinal Extradural Arachnoid Cysts

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Kyowon; Kim, Eun-Sang

    2016-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the usefulness of digital subtraction cystography to identify communicating holes between a spinal extradural arachnoid cyst (SEAC) and the subarachnoid space prior to cyst removal and hole closure. Materials and Methods Six patients with SEAC were enrolled in this retrospective study. Digital subtraction cystography and subsequent CT myelography were performed for every patient. The presence and location of the communicating holes on cystography were documented. We evaluated the MRI characteristics of the cysts, including location, size, and associated spinal cord compression; furthermore, we reviewed cystographic images, CT myelograms, procedural reports, and medical records for analysis. If surgery was performed after cystography, intraoperative findings were compared with preoperative cystography. Results The location of the communicating hole between the arachnoid cyst and the subarachnoid space was identified by digital subtraction cystography in all cases (n = 6). Surgical resection of SEAC was performed in 4 patients, and intraoperative location of the communicating hole exactly corresponded to the preoperative identification. Conclusion Fluoroscopic-guided cystography for SEAC accurately demonstrates the presence and location of dural defects. Preoperative digital subtraction cystography is useful for detection of a communicating hole between a cyst and the subarachnoid space. PMID:26798223

  15. Severe adhesive arachnoiditis resulting in progressive paraplegia following obstetric spinal anaesthesia: a case report and review.

    PubMed

    Killeen, T; Kamat, A; Walsh, D; Parker, A; Aliashkevich, A

    2012-12-01

    A 27-year-old woman developed severe adhesive arachnoiditis after an obstetric spinal anaesthetic with bupivacaine and fentanyl, complicated by back pain and headache. No other precipitating cause could be identified. She presented one week postpartum with communicating hydrocephalus and syringomyelia and underwent ventriculoperitoneal shunting and foramen magnum decompression. Two months later, she developed rapid, progressive paraplegia and sphincter dysfunction. Attempted treatments included exploratory laminectomy, external drainage of the syrinx and intravenous steroids, but these were unsuccessful and the patient remains significantly disabled 21 months later. We discuss the pathophysiology of adhesive arachnoiditis following central neuraxial anaesthesia and possible causative factors, including contamination of the injectate, intrathecal blood and local anaesthetic neurotoxicity, with reference to other published cases. In the absence of more conclusive data, practitioners of central neuraxial anaesthesia can only continue to ensure meticulous, aseptic, atraumatic technique and avoid all potential sources of contamination. It seems appropriate to discuss with patients the possibility of delayed, permanent neurological deficit while taking informed consent. PMID:23061983

  16. Twin screw wet granulation: Binder delivery.

    PubMed

    Saleh, Mohammed F; Dhenge, Ranjit M; Cartwright, James J; Hounslow, Michael J; Salman, Agba D

    2015-06-20

    The effects of three ways of binder delivery into the twin screw granulator (TSG) on the residence time, torque, properties of granules (size, shape, strength) and binder distribution were studied. The binder distribution was visualised through the transparent barrel using high speed imaging as well as quantified using offline technique. Furthermore, the effect of binder delivery and the change of screw configuration (conveying elements only and conveying elements with kneading elements) on the surface velocity of granules across the screw channel were investigated using particle image velocimetry (PIV). The binder was delivered in three ways; all solid binder incorporated with powder mixture, 50% of solid binder mixed with powder mixture and 50% mixed with water, all the solid binder dissolved in water. Incorporation of all solid binder with powder mixture resulted in the relatively longer residence time and higher torque, narrower granule size distribution, more spherical granules, weaker big-sized granules, stronger small-sized granules and better binder distribution compared to that in other two ways. The surface velocity of granules showed variation from one screw to another as a result of uneven liquid distribution as well as shown a reduction while introducing the kneading elements into the screw configuration. PMID:25869451

  17. Ceramic granule strength variability and compaction behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Glass, S.J.; Ewsuk, K.G.; Readey, M.J.

    1995-08-01

    Diametral compression strength distributions and the compaction behavior and of irregular shape 150--200 {mu}m ceramic granules and uniform-size 210 {mu}m glass spheres were measured to determine how granule strength variability relates to compaction behavior of granular assemblies. High variability in strength, represented by low Weibull modulus values (m<3) was observed for ceramic granules having a distribution of sizes and shapes, and for uniform-size glass spheres. Compaction pressure data were also analyzed using a Weibull distribution function, and the results were very similar to those obtained from the diametral compression strength tests for the same material. This similarity suggests that it may be possible to model granule compaction using a weakest link theory, whereby an assemblage of granules is viewed as the links of a chain, and failure of the weakest granule (i.e., the weakest link) leads to rearrangement and compaction. Additionally, with the use of Weibull statistics, it appears to be possible to infer the variability in strength of individual granules from a simple pressure compaction test, circumventing the tedious task of testing individual granules.

  18. Continuous twin screw granulation: influence of process variables on granule and tablet quality.

    PubMed

    Vercruysse, J; Córdoba Díaz, D; Peeters, E; Fonteyne, M; Delaet, U; Van Assche, I; De Beer, T; Remon, J P; Vervaet, C

    2012-09-01

    The aim of the current study was to screen theophylline (125 mg) tablets manufactured via twin screw granulation in order to improve process understanding and knowledge of process variables that determine granule and tablet quality. A premix of theophylline anhydrate, α-lactose monohydrate and PVP (ratio: 30/67.5/2.5,w/w) was granulated with demineralized water. Experiments were done using the high-shear wet granulation module (based on twin screw granulation) of the ConsiGma™-25 unit (a continuous tablet manufacturing system) for particle size enlargement. After drying, granules were compressed using a MODUL™ P tablet press (compression force: 10 kN, tablet diameter: 12 mm). Using a D-optimal experimental design, the effect of several process variables (throughput (10-25 kg/h), screw speed (600-950 rpm), screw configuration (number (2, 4, 6 and 12) and angle (30°, 60° and 90°) of kneading elements), barrel temperature (25-40°C) and method of binder addition (dry versus wet)) on the granulation process (torque and temperature increase in barrel wall), granule (particle size distribution, friability and flowability) and tablet (tensile strength, porosity, friability, disintegration time and dissolution) quality was evaluated. The results showed that the quality of granules and tablets can be optimized by adjusting specific process variables (number of kneading elements, barrel temperature and binder addition method) during a granulation process using a continuous twin screw granulator. PMID:22687571

  19. Mast cell secretory granules: armed for battle.

    PubMed

    Wernersson, Sara; Pejler, Gunnar

    2014-07-01

    Mast cells are important effector cells of the immune system and recent studies show that they have immunomodulatory roles in diverse processes in both health and disease. Mast cells are distinguished by their high content of electron-dense secretory granules, which are filled with large amounts of preformed and pre-activated immunomodulatory compounds. When appropriately activated, mast cells undergo degranulation, a process by which these preformed granule compounds are rapidly released into the surroundings. In many cases, the effects that mast cells have on an immune response are closely associated with the biological actions of the granule compounds that they release, as exemplified by the recent studies showing that mast cell granule proteases account for many of the protective and detrimental effects of mast cells in various inflammatory settings. In this Review, we discuss the current knowledge of mast cell secretory granules. PMID:24903914

  20. Electrochemical performance of granulated titania nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilhelm, O.; Pratsinis, S. E.; de Chambrier, E.; Crouzet, M.; Exnar, I.

    The electrochemical performance of Li-ion insertion into electrodes made of various sizes of anatase titania nanoparticles embedded in larger granulated entities (1-10 μm) is investigated. The granules are formed by spray drying of a suspension containing titania nanoparticles made by hydrolyzing titanium tetraisopropoxide (TTIP). Depending on the three process steps, i.e. hydrolysis-condensation, hydrothermal processing and spray drying, different properties for the electrode made from these granules can be achieved in terms of phase composition, specific surface area (SSA) and specific charge capacity. Hydrothermally processed (HP) particles are more resistant to calcination than sol-gel precipitated (SGP) ones and have a higher SSA which leads to a better performance with respect to specific charge capacity. Electrodes made from granulated nanoparticles have superior specific charge capacity than from non-granulated ones as the former have more inter-particle contacts.

  1. [Correlation of dry granulation process parameters and granule quality based on multiple regression analysis].

    PubMed

    Cao, Han-Han; Du, Ruo-Fei; Yang, Jia-Ning; Feng, Yi

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, microcrystalline cellulose WJ101 was used as a model material to investigate the effect of various process parameters on granule yield and friability after dry granulation with a single factor and the effect of comprehensive inspection process parameters on the effect of granule yield and friability, then the correlation between process parameters and granule quality was established. The regress equation was established between process parameters and granule yield and friability by multiple regression analysis, the affecting the order of the size of the order of the process parameters on granule yield and friability was: rollers speed > rollers pressure > speed of horizontal feed. Granule yield was positively correlated with pressure and speed of horizontal feed and negatively correlated rollers speed, while friability was on the contrary. By comparison, fitted value and real value, fitted and real value are basically the same of no significant differences (P > 0.05) and with high precision and reliability. PMID:24961115

  2. Retrocerebellar arachnoid cyst resulting in syringomyelia in a patient without tonsillar herniation: successful surgical treatment with reconstruction of CSF flow in the foramen magnum region.

    PubMed

    Sun, Liyong; Emich, Stephan; Fu, Wenzhuo; Chen, Zan; Hao, Wu; Ling, Feng; Jian, Fengzeng

    2016-04-01

    A retrocerebellar arachnoid cyst causing syringomyelia is extremely rare without tonsillar herniation. The authors present a 44-year-old woman with symptoms of foramen magnum compression and syringomyelia. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a large retrocerebellar arachnoid cyst with a large cervicothoracic syrinx but no signs of tonsillar herniation or hydrocephalus. The patient underwent a foramen magnum decompression with C1 laminectomy, microsurgical fenestration of the cyst, and duraplasty. After successful reconstruction of CSF flow, the patient experienced a relief of symptoms and a significant reduction of the syrinx. The intraoperative findings support the theory of a piston mechanism in the development of syringomyelia. Additional arachnoidal adhesions may also obstruct the CSF flow around the craniocervical junction. We recommend the surgical treatment should consist of an adequate decompression of the foramen magnum, wide microsurgical arachnoidal debridement, and duraplasty with autologous grafts sutured in a watertight way. PMID:26728365

  3. Influence of metronidazole particle properties on granules prepared in a high-shear mixer-granulator.

    PubMed

    Di Martino, Piera; Censi, Roberta; Malaj, Ledjan; Martelli, Sante; Joiris, Etienne; Barthélémy, Christine

    2007-02-01

    Metronidazole is a good example of high-dose drug substance with poor granulating and tableting properties. Tablets are generally produced by liquid granulation; however, the technological process failure is quite frequent. In order to verify how the metronidazole particle characteristics can influence granule properties, three metronidazole batches differing for crystal habit, mean particle size, BET surface area and wettability were selected, primarily designed according to their different elongation ratio: needle-shaped, stick-shaped, and isodimensional. In the presence of lactose monohydrate and pregelatinized maize starch, respectively as diluent and binder, they were included in a formula for wet granulation in a high-shear mixer-granulator. In order to render the process comparable as far as possible, all parameters and experimental conditions were maintained constant. Four granule batches were obtained: granules from placebo (G-placebo), granules from needle-shaped crystals (G-needle-shaped), granules from stick-shaped crystals (G-stick-shaped), and granules from isodimensional crystals (G-isodimensional). Different granule properties were considered, in particular concerning porosity, friability, loss on drying (LOD), and flowability. In order to study their tabletability and compressibility, the different granules obtained were then compressed in a rotary press. The best tabletability was obtained with the isodimensional batch, while the poorest was exhibited by the stick-shaped one. Differences in tabletability are in good accordance with compressibility results: to a better tabletability corresponds an important granule ability to undergo a volume reduction as a result of an applied pressure. In particular, it was proposed that the greatest compressibility of the G-isodimensional must be related to the greatest granule porosity percentage. PMID:17454043

  4. NEDDylation promotes stress granule assembly

    PubMed Central

    Jayabalan, Aravinth Kumar; Sanchez, Anthony; Park, Ra Young; Yoon, Sang Pil; Kang, Gum-Yong; Baek, Je-Hyun; Anderson, Paul; Kee, Younghoon; Ohn, Takbum

    2016-01-01

    Stress granules (SGs) harbour translationally stalled messenger ribonucleoproteins and play important roles in regulating gene expression and cell fate. Here we show that neddylation promotes SG assembly in response to arsenite-induced oxidative stress. Inhibition or depletion of key components of the neddylation machinery concomitantly inhibits stress-induced polysome disassembly and SG assembly. Affinity purification and subsequent mass-spectrometric analysis of Nedd8-conjugated proteins from translationally stalled ribosomal fractions identified ribosomal proteins, translation factors and RNA-binding proteins (RBPs), including SRSF3, a previously known SG regulator. We show that SRSF3 is selectively neddylated at Lys85 in response to arsenite. A non-neddylatable SRSF3 (K85R) mutant do not prevent arsenite-induced polysome disassembly, but fails to support the SG assembly, suggesting that the neddylation pathway plays an important role in SG assembly. PMID:27381497

  5. PDGF activation in PGDS-positive arachnoid cells induces meningioma formation in mice promoting tumor progression in combination with Nf2 and Cdkn2ab loss.

    PubMed

    Peyre, Matthieu; Salaud, Céline; Clermont-Taranchon, Estelle; Niwa-Kawakita, Michiko; Goutagny, Stephane; Mawrin, Christian; Giovannini, Marco; Kalamarides, Michel

    2015-10-20

    The role of PDGF-B and its receptor in meningeal tumorigenesis is not clear. We investigated the role of PDGF-B in mouse meningioma development by generating autocrine stimulation of the arachnoid through the platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR) using the RCAStv-a system. To specifically target arachnoid cells, the cells of origin of meningioma, we generated the PGDStv-a mouse (Prostaglandin D synthase). Forced expression of PDGF-B in arachnoid cells in vivo induced the formation of Grade I meningiomas in 27% of mice by 8 months of age. In vitro, PDGF-B overexpression in PGDS-positive arachnoid cells lead to increased proliferation.We found a correlation of PDGFR-B expression and NF2 inactivation in a cohort of human meningiomas, and we showed that, in mice, Nf2 loss and PDGF over-expression in arachnoid cells induced meningioma malignant transformation, with 40% of Grade II meningiomas. In these mice, additional loss of Cdkn2ab resulted in a higher incidence of malignant meningiomas with 60% of Grade II and 30% of Grade III meningiomas. These data suggest that chronic autocrine PDGF signaling can promote proliferation of arachnoid cells and is potentially sufficient to induce meningiomagenesis. Loss of Nf2 and Cdkn2ab have synergistic effects with PDGF-B overexpression promoting meningioma malignant transformation. PMID:26418719

  6. Impact of screw configuration on the particle size distribution of granules produced by twin screw granulation.

    PubMed

    Vercruysse, J; Burggraeve, A; Fonteyne, M; Cappuyns, P; Delaet, U; Van Assche, I; De Beer, T; Remon, J P; Vervaet, C

    2015-02-01

    Twin screw granulation (TSG) has been reported by different research groups as an attractive technology for continuous wet granulation. However, in contrast to fluidized bed granulation, granules produced via this technique typically have a wide and multimodal particle size distribution (PSD), resulting in suboptimal flow properties. The aim of the current study was to evaluate the impact of granulator screw configuration on the PSD of granules produced by TSG. Experiments were performed using a 25 mm co-rotating twin screw granulator, being part of the ConsiGma™-25 system (a fully continuous from-powder-to-tablet manufacturing line from GEA Pharma Systems). Besides the screw elements conventionally used for TSG (conveying and kneading elements), alternative designs of screw elements (tooth-mixing-elements (TME), screw mixing elements (SME) and cutters) were investigated using an α-lactose monohydrate formulation granulated with distilled water. Granulation with only conveying elements resulted in wide and multimodal PSD. Using kneading elements, the width of the PSD could be partially narrowed and the liquid distribution was more homogeneous. However, still a significant fraction of oversized agglomerates was obtained. Implementing additional kneading elements or cutters in the final section of the screw configuration was not beneficial. Furthermore, granulation with only TME or SME had limited impact on the width of the PSD. Promising results were obtained by combining kneading elements with SME, as for these configurations the PSD was narrower and shifted to the size fractions suitable for tableting. PMID:25562758

  7. Reduced tabletability of roller compacted granules as a result of granule size enlargement.

    PubMed

    Sun, Changquan Calvin; Himmelspach, Micah W

    2006-01-01

    The mechanism for the frequently observed "loss of reworkability or tabletability" of dry-granulated (DG) powders was investigated in detail using microcrystalline cellulose (MCC). It was hypothesized that granule size enlargement is the primary mechanism to the phenomenon. Detrimental effects of size enlargement on tabletability of plastic materials are predictable based on the physical model of interparticulate bonding within a tablet. In absence of extensive fracture of particles/granules, larger particles/granules exhibit lower surface area available for bonding thus lower tensile strength when compressed under identical conditions. Size effects were first demonstrated using different grades of MCC powders, both whole and sieved, of different particle size distributions. Regardless grade and sieve fraction, larger particles always resulted in lower tabletability, that is, lower tensile strength at the same compaction pressure. It was subsequently shown that enlargement of granules also reduced powder tabletability regardless grade of MCC. Tabletability of sieved granules after roller compacted for one, two, and four times decreased monotonically with increasing granule size but independent of the total number of roller compaction. Moreover, tabletability of fine granules (44-106 microm) was higher than that of coarse MCC powder (Avicel PH-200). These results suggest that the primary mechanism for reduced tabletabilty of DG granules of MCC is granule size enlargement rather than "work-hardening." PMID:16315244

  8. Polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) Granules Have no Phospholipids

    PubMed Central

    Bresan, Stephanie; Sznajder, Anna; Hauf, Waldemar; Forchhammer, Karl; Pfeiffer, Daniel; Jendrossek, Dieter

    2016-01-01

    Polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) granules, also designated as carbonosomes, are supra-molecular complexes in prokaryotes consisting of a PHB polymer core and a surface layer of structural and functional proteins. The presence of suspected phospholipids in the surface layer is based on in vitro data of isolated PHB granules and is often shown in cartoons of the PHB granule structure in reviews on PHB metabolism. However, the in vivo presence of a phospholipid layer has never been demonstrated. We addressed this topic by the expression of fusion proteins of DsRed2EC and other fluorescent proteins with the phospholipid-binding domain (LactC2) of lactadherin in three model organisms. The fusion proteins specifically localized at the cell membrane of Ralstonia eutropha but did not co-localize with PHB granules. The same result was obtained for Pseudomonas putida, a species that accumulates another type of polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) granules related to PHB. Notably, DsRed2EC-LactC2 expressed in Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense was detected at the position of membrane-enclosed magnetosome chains and at the cytoplasmic membrane but not at PHB granules. In conclusion, the carbonosomes of representatives of α-proteobacteria, β-proteobacteria and γ-proteobacteria have no phospholipids in vivo and we postulate that the PHB/PHA granule surface layers in natural producers generally are free of phospholipids and consist of proteins only. PMID:27222167

  9. Polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) Granules Have no Phospholipids.

    PubMed

    Bresan, Stephanie; Sznajder, Anna; Hauf, Waldemar; Forchhammer, Karl; Pfeiffer, Daniel; Jendrossek, Dieter

    2016-01-01

    Polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) granules, also designated as carbonosomes, are supra-molecular complexes in prokaryotes consisting of a PHB polymer core and a surface layer of structural and functional proteins. The presence of suspected phospholipids in the surface layer is based on in vitro data of isolated PHB granules and is often shown in cartoons of the PHB granule structure in reviews on PHB metabolism. However, the in vivo presence of a phospholipid layer has never been demonstrated. We addressed this topic by the expression of fusion proteins of DsRed2EC and other fluorescent proteins with the phospholipid-binding domain (LactC2) of lactadherin in three model organisms. The fusion proteins specifically localized at the cell membrane of Ralstonia eutropha but did not co-localize with PHB granules. The same result was obtained for Pseudomonas putida, a species that accumulates another type of polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) granules related to PHB. Notably, DsRed2EC-LactC2 expressed in Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense was detected at the position of membrane-enclosed magnetosome chains and at the cytoplasmic membrane but not at PHB granules. In conclusion, the carbonosomes of representatives of α-proteobacteria, β-proteobacteria and γ-proteobacteria have no phospholipids in vivo and we postulate that the PHB/PHA granule surface layers in natural producers generally are free of phospholipids and consist of proteins only. PMID:27222167

  10. Asymmetric distribution in twin screw granulation.

    PubMed

    Chan Seem, Tim; Rowson, Neil A; Gabbott, Ian; de Matas, Marcel; Reynolds, Gavin K; Ingram, Andy

    2016-09-01

    Positron Emission Particle Tracking (PEPT) was successfully employed to validate measured transverse asymmetry in material distribution in the conveying zones of a Twin Screw Granulator (TSG). Flow asymmetry was established to be a property of the granulator geometry and dependent on fill level. The liquid distribution of granules as a function of fill level was determined. High flow asymmetry at low fill level negatively affects granule nucleation leading to high variance in final uniformity. Wetting of material during nucleation was identified as a critical parameter in determining final granule uniformity and fill level is highlighted as a crucial control factor in achieving this. Flow asymmetry of dry material in conveying zones upstream of binder fluid injection leads to poor non-uniform wetting at nucleation and results in heterogeneous final product. The granule formation mechanism of 60°F kneading blocks is suggested to be primarily breakage of agglomerates formed during nucleation. Optimisation of screw configuration would be required to provide secondary growth. This work shows how fill dependent flow regimes affect granulation mechanisms. PMID:26820919

  11. Giant dielectric and magnetoelectric responses in insulating nanogranular films at room temperature

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Nobukiyo; Masumoto, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Saburo; Maekawa, Sadamichi

    2014-01-01

    The electric and magnetic properties of matter are of great interest for materials science and their use in electronic applications. Large dielectric and magnetoelectric responses of materials at room temperature are a great advantage for electromagnetic device applications. Here we present a study of FeCo-MgF nanogranular films exhibiting giant dielectric and magnetoelectric responses at room temperature; with dielectric constant ε′=490 and magnetoelectric response Δε′/ε′0=3%. In these films, Fe-Co alloy-based nanometer-sized magnetic granules are dispersed in a Mg-fluoride-based insulator matrix. Insulating nanogranular films are a new class of multifunctional materials. The giant responses are caused by spin-dependent charge oscillation between magnetic granules via quantum-mechanical tunnelling. A possible application of such insulating nanogranular materials with giant response is in the construction of a tunable device, in which impedance components such as capacitance and inductance are tunable at room temperature. PMID:25048805

  12. Analysis of the release process of phenylpropanolamine hydrochloride from ethylcellulose matrix granules V. Release properties of ethylcellulose layered matrix granules.

    PubMed

    Fukui, Atsuko; Fujii, Ryuta; Yonezawa, Yorinobu; Sunada, Hisakazu

    2008-04-01

    In the pharmaceutical preparation of a controlled release drug, it is very important and necessary to understand the release properties. In previous papers, a combination of the square-root time law and cube-root law equations was confirmed to be a useful equation for qualitative treatment. It was also confirmed that the combination equation could analyze the release properties of layered granules as well as matrix granules. The drug release property from layered granules is different from that of matrix granules. A time lag occurs before release, and the entire release property of layered granules was analyzed using the combination of the square-root time law and cube-root law equations. It is considered that the analysis method is very useful and efficient for both matrix and layered granules. Comparing the granulation methods, it is easier to control the manufacturing process by tumbling granulation (method B) than by tumbling-fluidized bed granulation (method C). Ethylcellulose (EC) layered granulation by a fluidized bed granulator might be convenient for the preparation of controlled release dosage forms as compared with a tumbling granulator, because the layered granules prepared by the fluidized bed granulator can granulate and dry at the same time. The time required for drying by the fluidized bed granulator is shorter than that by the tumbling granulator, so the fluidized bed granulator is convenient for preparation of granules in handling and shorter processing time than the tumbling granulator. It was also suggested that the EC layered granules prepared by the fluidized bed granulator were suitable for a controlled release system as well as the EC matrix granules. PMID:18379102

  13. [Optimization of dry granulating technique of Qibai Pingfei granule through response surface methodology].

    PubMed

    Li, Xue-feng; Li, Yun-xiao; Xu, Zhen-qiu; Meng, Jin; Yan, Ming; Jin, Rui-ting; Xiao, Wei

    2015-08-01

    To determine the optimum process conditions for dry granulating technique of Qibai Pingfei granule, granule excipient type, rolling wheel speed and pressure and feeding speed were studied. Taking shaping rate at a time, moisture absorption and dissolubility as index, the type and amount of granule excipient were determined. In addition, taking shaping rate at a time as index, parameters of rolling wheel speed and pressure and feeding speed were researched through single factor test and response surface methodology. The optimum parameters were as follows: lactose as excipient, dry extract powder to excipient at 1:2, rolling wheel speed and pressure at 10.9 Hz and 6.4 MPa and feeding speed at 7.2 Hz. After validation of three batches pilot-scale production, the optimum processing parameters for dry granulating technique of Qibai Pingfei granule is reasonable and feasible, which can provide reliable basis for production. PMID:26677695

  14. [Arachnoid cysts of the central nervous system. Algorithms and recommendations for management].

    PubMed

    Ros López, Bienvenido; Martín Gallego, Álvaro; Iglesias Moroño, Sara

    2016-01-01

    The symptoms related to the presence of arachnoid cysts in the Central Nervous System depend on the size of the cyst and its growth rate, its location and, in some cases, the associated CSF dynamic disorder. Sometimes there is acute clinical presentation due to cyst rupture or acute bleeding. Although it is generally accepted that asymptomatic or paucisymptomatic cysts do not require surgical treatment, there is no consensus on the therapeutic approach of choice in symptomatic cases. The aim of this paper is to review the literature, analyzing the pros and cons of the three main surgical options (microsurgery, neuroendoscopy, and CSF shunt) based primarily on the location of the cyst. Although treatment must be always individualized, basic management recommendations may be offered. PMID:25861895

  15. Insulin Granule Biogenesis, Trafficking and Exocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Hou, June Chunqiu; Min, Le; Pessin, Jeffrey E.

    2015-01-01

    It is becoming increasingly apparent that beta cell dysfunction resulting in abnormal insulin secretion is the essential element in the progression of patients from a state of impaired glucose tolerance to frank type 2 diabetes (Del Prato, 2003; Del Prato and Tiengo, 2001). Although extensive studies have examined the molecular, cellular and physiologic mechanisms of insulin granule biogenesis, sorting, and exocytosis the precise mechanisms controlling these processes and their dysregulation in the developed of diabetes remains an area of important investigation. We now know that insulin biogenesis initiates with the synthesis of preproinsulin in rough endoplastic reticulum and conversion of preproinsulin to proinsulin. Proinsulin begins to be packaged in the Trans-Golgi Network and is sorting into immature secretory granules. These immature granules become acidic via ATP-dependent proton pump and proinsulin undergoes proteolytic cleavage resulting the formation of insulin and C-peptide. During the granule maturation process, insulin is crystallized with zinc and calcium in the form of dense-core granules and unwanted cargo and membrane proteins undergo selective retrograde trafficking to either the constitutive trafficking pathway for secretion or to degradative pathways. The newly formed mature dense-core insulin granules populate two different intracellular pools, the readily releasable pools (RRP) and the reserved pool. These two distinct populations are thought to be responsible for the biphasic nature of insulin release in which the RRP granules are associated with the plasma membrane and undergo an acute calcium-dependent release accounting for first phase insulin secretion. In contrast, second phase insulin secretion requires the trafficking of the reserved granule pool to the plasma membrane. The initial trigger for insulin granule fusion with the plasma membrane is a rise in intracellular calcium and in the case of glucose stimulation results from

  16. Test of a new method for seismic indices and granulation parameters extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peralta, R. A.; Samadi, R.; Michel, E.

    2015-09-01

    In the framework of the data base project SSI (Stellar Seismic Indices, we have developed and tested a new method aiming at optimizing the simultaneous measurement of both the seismic indices characterizing the oscillations (Δν, νmax) and the indices characterizing the granulation signature. Here, we describe this method which is intended to take advantage of the MLE (maximum likelihood estimate) algorithm combined with the parametrized representation of the red giants pulsation spectrum following the Universal Pattern [6]. We report its performances tested on Monte Carlo simulations.

  17. Twin screw granulation - review of current progress.

    PubMed

    Thompson, M R

    2015-01-01

    Twin screw granulation (TSG) is a new process of interest to the pharmaceutical community that can continuously wet granulate powders, doing so at lower liquid concentrations and with better product consistency than found by a high shear batch mixer. A considerable body of research has evolved over the short time since this process was introduced but generally with little comparison of results. A certain degree of confidence has been developed through these studies related to how process variables and many attributes of machinery configuration will affect granulation but some major challenges still lay ahead related to scalability, variations in the processing regimes related to degree of channel fill and the impact of wetting and granulation of complex powder formulations. This review examines the current literature for wet granulation processes studied in twin screw extrusion machinery, summarizing the influences of operational and system parameters affecting granule properties as well as strives to provide some practical observations to newly interested users of the technique. PMID:25402966

  18. Process analysis of fluidized bed granulation.

    PubMed

    Rantanen, J; Jørgensen, A; Räsänen, E; Luukkonen, P; Airaksinen, S; Raiman, J; Hänninen, K; Antikainen, O; Yliruusi, J

    2001-01-01

    This study assesses the fluidized bed granulation process for the optimization of a model formulation using in-line near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy for moisture determination. The granulation process was analyzed using an automated granulator and optimization of the verapamil hydrochloride formulation was performed using a mixture design. The NIR setup with a fixed wavelength detector was applied for moisture measurement. Information from other process measurements, temperature difference between process inlet air and granules (T(diff)), and water content of process air (AH), was also analyzed. The application of in-line NIR provided information related to the amount of water throughout the whole granulation process. This information combined with trend charts of T(diff) and AH enabled the analysis of the different process phases. By this means, we can obtain in-line documentation from all the steps of the processing. The choice of the excipient affected the nature of the solid-water interactions; this resulted in varying process times. NIR moisture measurement combined with temperature and humidity measurements provides a tool for the control of water during fluid bed granulation. PMID:14727858

  19. Role of Microtubules in Stress Granule Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Chernov, Konstantin G.; Barbet, Aurélie; Hamon, Loic; Ovchinnikov, Lev P.; Curmi, Patrick A.; Pastré, David

    2009-01-01

    Following exposure to various stresses (arsenite, UV, hyperthermia, and hypoxia), mRNAs are assembled into large cytoplasmic bodies known as “stress granules,” in which mRNAs and associated proteins may be processed by specific enzymes for different purposes like transient storing, sorting, silencing, or other still unknown processes. To limit mRNA damage during stress, the assembly of micrometric granules has to be rapid, and, indeed, it takes only ∼10–20 min in living cells. However, such a rapid assembly breaks the rules of hindered diffusion in the cytoplasm, which states that large cytoplasmic bodies are almost immobile. In the present work, using HeLa cells and YB-1 protein as a stress granule marker, we studied three hypotheses to understand how cells overcome the limitation of hindered diffusion: shuttling of small messenger ribonucleoprotein particles from small to large stress granules, sliding of messenger ribonucleoprotein particles along microtubules, microtubule-mediated stirring of large stress granules. Our data favor the two last hypotheses and underline that microtubule dynamic instability favors the formation of micrometric stress granules. PMID:19843517

  20. [Modeling formation of aerobic granule and influence of hydrodynamic shear forces on granule diameter].

    PubMed

    Dong, Feng; Zhang, Han-Min; Yang, Feng-Lin

    2012-01-01

    A one-dimension aerobic granule mathematical model was established, basing on mathematical biofilm model and activated sludge model. The model was used to simulate simple aerobic granule process such as nutrients removal, granule diameter evolution, cycle performance as well as depth profiles of DO and biomass. The effluent NH4(+) -N concentration decreased as the modeling processed. The simulation effluent NO3(-)-N concentration decreased to 3 mg x L(-1) as the granules grew. While the granule diameter increased from 1.1 mm on day 30 to 2.5 mm on day 100, the TN removal efficiency increased from less than 10% to 91%. The denitrification capacity was believed to enhance because the anoxic zone would be enlarged with the increasing granule diameter. The simultaneous nitrification and denitrification occurred inside the big aerobic granules. The oxygen permeating depth increased with the consumption of substrate. It was about 100-200 microm at the beginning of the aeration phase, and it turned to near 800 microm at the end of reaction. The autotrophs (AOB and NOB) were mostly located at the out layer where the DO concentration was high. The heterotrophic bacteria were distributed through the whole granule. As hydrodynamic shear coefficient k(de) increased from 0.25 (m x d)(-1) to 5 (m x d)(-1), the granule diameter under steady state decreased form 3.5 mm to 1.8 mm. The granule size under the dynamic steady-state decreased with the increasing hydrodynamic shear force. The granule size could be controlled by adjusting aeration intensity. PMID:22452208

  1. Peripheral giant cell granuloma.

    PubMed

    Adlakha, V K; Chandna, P; Rehani, U; Rana, V; Malik, P

    2010-01-01

    Peripheral giant cell granuloma is a benign reactive lesion of gingiva. It manifests as a firm, soft, bright nodule or as a sessile or pedunculate mass. This article reports the management of peripheral giant cell granuloma in a 12-year-old boy by surgical excision. PMID:21273719

  2. The evolution of granule fracture strength as a function of impeller tip speed and granule size for a novel reverse-phase wet granulation process.

    PubMed

    Wade, J B; Martin, G P; Long, D F

    2015-07-01

    The feasibility of a novel reverse-phase wet granulation process has been established previously and several potential advantages over the conventional process have been highlighted (Wade et al., 2014a,b,b). Due to fundamental differences in the growth mechanism and granule consolidation behaviour between the two processes the reverse-phase approach generally formed granules with a greater mass mean diameter and a lower intragranular porosity than those formed by the conventional granulation process under the same liquid saturation and impeller tip speed conditions. The lower intragranular porosity was hypothesised to result in an increase in the granule strength and subsequent decrease in tablet tensile strength. Consequently, the aim of this study was to compare the effect of impeller tip speed and granule size on the strength and compaction properties of granules prepared using both the reverse-phase and conventional granulation processes. For the conventional granulation process an increase in the impeller tip speed from 1.57 to 4.71 ms(-1) (200-600 RPM) resulted in an increase in the mean granule strength (p<0.05) for all granule size fractions and as the granule size fraction increased from 425-600 to 2000-3350 μm the mean fracture strength decreased (p<0.05). For the reverse-phase process an increase in impeller tip speed had no effect (p>0.05) on mean granule strength whereas, like the conventional process, an increase in granule size fraction from 425-600 to 2000-3350 μm resulted in a decrease (p<0.05) in the mean fracture strength. No correlation was found between mean granule fracture strength and the tablet tensile strength (p>0.05) for either granulation approach. These data support the rejection of the original hypothesis which stated that an increase in granule strength may result in a decrease in the tablet tensile strength. The similar tablet tensile strength observed between the conventional and reverse-phase granulation processes indicated that

  3. Strengthening aerobic granule by salt precipitation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu-You; Pan, Xiangliang; Li, Jun; Lee, Duu-Jong

    2016-10-01

    Structural stability of aerobic granules is generally poor during long-term operation. This study precipitated seven salts inside aerobic granules using supersaturated solutions of (NH4)3PO4, CaCO3, CaSO4, MgCO3, Mg3(PO4)2, Ca3(PO4)2 or SiO2 to enhance their structural stability. All precipitated granules have higher interior strength at ultrasonic field and reveal minimal loss in organic matter degradation capability at 160-d sequential batch reactor tests. The strength enhancement followed: Mg3(PO4)2=CaSO4>SiO2>(NH4)3PO4>MgCO3>CaCO3=Ca3(PO4)2>original. Also, the intra-granular solution environment can be buffered by the precipitate MgCO3 to make the aerobic granules capable of degradation of organic matters at pH 3. Salt precipitation is confirmed a simple and cost-effective modification method to extend the applicability of aerobic granules for wastewater treatments. PMID:27377228

  4. Formation of volutin granules in Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    PubMed

    Pallerla, Srinivas Reddy; Knebel, Sandra; Polen, Tino; Klauth, Peter; Hollender, Juliane; Wendisch, Volker F; Schoberth, Siegfried M

    2005-02-01

    Volutin granules are intracellular storages of complexed inorganic polyphosphate (poly P). Histochemical staining procedures differentiate between pathogenic corynebacteria such as Corynebacterum diphtheriae (containing volutin) and non-pathogenic species, such as C. glutamicum. Here we report that strains ATCC13032 and MH20-22B of the non-pathogenic C. glutamicum also formed subcellular entities (18-37% of the total cell volume) that had the typical characteristics of volutin granules: (i) volutin staining, (ii) green UV fluorescence when stained with 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole, (iii) electron-dense and rich in phosphorus when determined with transmission electron microscopy and X-ray microanalysis, and (iv) 31P NMR poly P resonances of isolated granules dissolved in EDTA. MgCl2 addition to the growth medium stimulated granule formation but did not effect expression of genes involved in poly P metabolism. Granular volutin fractions from lysed cells contained polyphosphate glucokinase as detected by SDS-PAGE/MALDI-TOF, indicating that this poly P metabolizing enzyme is present also in intact poly P granules. The results suggest that formation of volutin is a more widespread phenomenon than generally accepted. PMID:15668011

  5. Denitrification in USB reactor with granulated biomass.

    PubMed

    Pagácová, P; Galbová, K; Drtil, M; Jonatová, I

    2010-01-01

    Denitrification of low concentrations of NO(3)-N (20 mg L(-1)), with methanol as an organic carbon source (COD:NO(3)-N=6) in laboratory upflow sludge bed reactor (USB), was tested as a possibility for wastewater post-treatment. By gradual increase of volumetric loading (Bv) and hydraulic loading (gamma), anoxic biomass spontaneously granulated out even from flocculate activated sludge and from anaerobic granulated sludge as well. Anaerobic granulated biomass derived from high-rate anaerobic IC reactor was a far better inoculum for anoxic granulation and for denitrification in the USB reactor. The maximum level of Bv and gamma was remarkably higher with the use of anaerobic granulated inoculum, (19-22 kg COD m(-3)d(-1); 3.2-3.7 kg NO(3)-Nm(-3)d(-1); 2.8-3.2m(3)m(-2)h(-1); SVI=15 mL g(-1)) in comparison to inoculum from flocculate activated sludge (4.2-8.1 kg CO Dm(-3)d(-1); 0.7-1.4 kg NO(3)-Nm(-3)d(-1); 0.7-1.15m(3)m(-2)h(-1); SVI=40-95 mL g(-1)). PMID:19716692

  6. Granulation in saturnian rings and atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochemasov, G. G.

    2008-09-01

    The third theorem of the wave planetary tectonics [1-3 & others] states: "Celestial bodies are granular". It means that inertia-gravity waves appearing in bodies due to their movements in non-circular keplerian orbits and propagating in them in four interfering orthogonal and diagonal directions produce tectonic granules. They are of three kinds: uprising (+), subsiding (-) and neutral (0). Their sizes are inversely proportional to bodies orbital frequencies. Higher frequency - smaller granule, lower frequency - larger granule. The inertia-gravity waves warp all spheres of celestial bodies: solid, liquid, gaseous, and act in stars, planets, asteroids, comets and satellites. The Cassini data provide numerous excellent images of saturnian rings and show that wave processes are ordinary also in them - in disperse solid environment. To illustrate dependence between orbital frequencies and granule sizes we provide the following geometrical representation of the planetary row starting from the solar photosphere also having a certain orbital frequency about the center of the Solar system (Fig. 1). This row can be extended in domain of the outer planets by the same algorithm: Jupiter 3πR, Saturn 7.5πR, Uranus 21πR, Neptune 41πR, Pluto 62πR. One cannot directly observe these huge waves in the planets but they are needed for wave modulation procedures very important for satellites and rings having two orbital frequencies: around the star and planets. A recent support for the wave structurization in the Solar system came from Saturn where 22 year long ground-based temperature observations discovered a wave-like oscillation: hotcold pattern switches every Saturn half-year = 15 Earth's years [4]. Like in the radio-wave physics the lower orbiting frequency of the Saturn's system around Sun modulates the higher orbiting frequencies of the system satellites, rings and the planet's upper atmosphere about the Saturn `s system center. . The higher frequency is multiplied and

  7. The combined effect of wet granulation process parameters and dried granule moisture content on tablet quality attributes.

    PubMed

    Gabbott, Ian P; Al Husban, Farhan; Reynolds, Gavin K

    2016-09-01

    A pharmaceutical compound was used to study the effect of batch wet granulation process parameters in combination with the residual moisture content remaining after drying on granule and tablet quality attributes. The effect of three batch wet granulation process parameters was evaluated using a multivariate experimental design, with a novel constrained design space. Batches were characterised for moisture content, granule density, crushing strength, porosity, disintegration time and dissolution. Mechanisms of the effect of the process parameters on the granule and tablet quality attributes are proposed. Water quantity added during granulation showed a significant effect on granule density and tablet dissolution rate. Mixing time showed a significant effect on tablet crushing strength, and mixing speed showed a significant effect on the distribution of tablet crushing strengths obtained. The residual moisture content remaining after granule drying showed a significant effect on tablet crushing strength. The effect of moisture on tablet tensile strength has been reported before, but not in combination with granulation parameters and granule properties, and the impact on tablet dissolution was not assessed. Correlations between the energy input during granulation, the density of granules produced, and the quality attributes of the final tablets were also identified. Understanding the impact of the granulation and drying process parameters on granule and tablet properties provides a basis for process optimisation and scaling. PMID:27016211

  8. Antimicrobial-Coated Granules for Disinfecting Water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akse, James R.; Holtsnider, John T.; Kliestik, Helen

    2011-01-01

    Methods of preparing antimicrobialcoated granules for disinfecting flowing potable water have been developed. Like the methods reported in the immediately preceding article, these methods involve chemical preparation of substrate surfaces (in this case, the surfaces of granules) to enable attachment of antimicrobial molecules to the surfaces via covalent bonds. A variety of granular materials have been coated with a variety of antimicrobial agents that include antibiotics, bacteriocins, enzymes, bactericides, and fungicides. When employed in packed beds in flowing water, these antimicrobial-coated granules have been proven effective against gram-positive bacteria, gram-negative bacteria, fungi, and viruses. Composite beds, consisting of multiple layers containing different granular antimicrobial media, have proven particularly effective against a broad spectrum of microorganisms. These media have also proven effective in enhancing or potentiating the biocidal effects of in-line iodinated resins and of very low levels of dissolved elemental iodine.

  9. Unstable giant gravitons

    SciTech Connect

    Mello Koch, Robert de; Ives, Norman; Smolic, Jelena; Smolic, Milena

    2006-03-15

    We find giant graviton solutions in Frolov's three parameter generalization of the Lunin-Maldacena background. The background we study has {gamma}-tilde{sub 1}=0 and {gamma}-tilde{sub 2}={gamma}-tilde{sub 3}={gamma}-tilde. This class of backgrounds provides a nonsupersymmetric example of the gauge theory/gravity correspondence that can be tested quantitatively, as recently shown by Frolov, Roiban, and Tseytlin. The giant graviton solutions we find have a greater energy than the point gravitons, making them unstable states. Despite this, we find striking quantitative agreement between the gauge theory and gravity descriptions of open strings attached to the giant.

  10. Solar/Stellar Granulation as the Key Lower Boundary Condition for Coronal Heating and Wind Acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cranmer, Steven R.

    2014-06-01

    Much of the hot plasma that eventually becomes the supersonic solar wind appears to have its origin in small (100 km diameter) magnetic flux tubes that sit in the downflowing lanes between convective granules in the Sun's photosphere. Convective overturning motions jostle these flux tubes and induce kink-mode oscillations that can grow into Alfven waves in the corona. A great deal of recent work has been done to explore how these Alfvenic fluctuations may drive a turbulent cascade, heat the plasma by gradual dissipation, and provide direct acceleration to a wind via wave pressure gradients. This presentation will outline this work and show how an accurate description of granulation is a key input to self-consistent models of coronal heating and solar wind acceleration. These self-consistent models have also been applied successfully to predicting: (1) high-energy emission from accreting T Tauri stars, (2) the mass loss rates of cool dwarfs and red giants, and (3) the combined X-ray, radio, and submillimeter emission from a young nearby M dwarf. In addition, a recent analysis of stellar granulation with Kepler photometry has shown that our understanding of the shallow convection zones of F-type stars still requires additional refinement. In all cases, the combination of multiple types of observational data has been crucial to improving our understanding. For the Sun, the next-generation capabilities of ATST/DKIST are expected to provide much more precise knowledge about this important lower boundary condition to the heliosphere.

  11. Formulation of custom sized LX-15 granules

    SciTech Connect

    Stull, T.W.

    1980-04-01

    LX-15 is a booster explosive formulation consisting of 95% HNS I and 5% Kel F-800 developed by Lawrence Livermore Laboratory. The purpose of this effort was to develop formulation techniques for the production of custom size granules that are amenable for processing in automatic weighing equipment. This report details processes whereby 0.4 and 1.5 kg size batches are produced, meeting those requirements. Efforts to date have found that granule size is dependent on batch/vessel size, water-to-solvent ratio and the degree of vessel agitation.

  12. Process for producing zirconium based granules

    SciTech Connect

    Jade, S.S.

    1990-05-22

    This patent describes a process for the production f amorphous zirconium based granules. It comprises: adding about 2--15 wt % of a suitable phase stabilizer to an aqueous solutio, based upon the total weight of ZrO{sub 2} in solution, to produce an aqueous solution having a pH in the range of about 4 to 7 comprising a zirconium based complex and phase stabilizer and thereafter; drying the aqueous solution comprising the zirconium based complex and the phase stabilizer at a temperature below about 180{degrees} C. for a time sufficient to evaporate the aqueous solution thereby forming amorphous zirconium based granules containing the phase stabilizer.

  13. Toxoplasma secretory granules: one population or more?

    PubMed

    Mercier, Corinne; Cesbron-Delauw, Marie-France

    2015-02-01

    In Toxoplasma gondii, dense granules are known as the storage secretory organelles of the so-called GRA proteins (for dense granule proteins), which are destined to the parasitophorous vacuole (PV) and the PV-derived cyst wall. Recently, newly annotated GRA proteins targeted to the host cell nucleus have enlarged this view. Here we provide an update on the latest developments on the Toxoplasma secreted proteins, which to date have been mainly studied at both the tachyzoite and bradyzoite stages, and we point out that recent discoveries could open the issue of a possible, yet uncharacterized, distinct secretory pathway in Toxoplasma. PMID:25599584

  14. Navigated laser-assisted endoscopic fenestration of a suprasellar arachnoid cyst in a 2-year-old child with bobble-head doll syndrome. Case report.

    PubMed

    Van Beijnum, Janneke; Hanlo, Patrick W; Han, K Sen; Ludo Van der Pol, W; Verdaasdonk, Rudolf M; Van Nieuwenhuizen, Onno

    2006-05-01

    The authors present the case of a 2-year-old boy with bobble-head doll syndrome (BHDS) associated with a large suprasellar arachnoid cyst and enlarged ventricles, who was successfully treated with neuronavigated laser-assisted endoscopic ventriculocystocisternostomy. The clinical history, surgical treatment, and clinical follow up of the patient are described. A navigated laser-assisted endoscopic ventriculocystocisternostomy of the suprasellar arachnoid cyst led to cessation of the head bobbing, and notable reduction of the cyst and ventricles was visible on the postoperative magnetic resonance images. Caused by a suprasellar arachnoid cyst, BHDS can be successfully treated with navigated laser-assisted endoscopic ventriculocystocisternostomy. The advantages of this procedure are minimal invasiveness and facilitated guidance of the neuronavigation system to the target area when normal anatomical landmarks are not visible. PMID:16848093

  15. Granule size distributions after twin-screw granulation - Do not forget the feeding systems.

    PubMed

    Meier, R; Thommes, M; Rasenack, N; Moll, K-P; Krumme, M; Kleinebudde, P

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of qualitatively different powder feeder performances on resulting granule size distributions after twin-screw granulation of a highly drug loaded, hydrophobic mixture and a mannitol powder. It was shown that powder feeder related problems usually cannot be identified by trusting in the values given by the feeder. Therefore, a newly developed model for the evaluation of the performance of powder feeders was introduced and it was tried to connect this model to residence time distributions in twin-screw granulation processes. The influence of feeder performances on resulting granule size distributions varied, depending on the applied screw configuration and the used powder. Regarding the hydrophobic and highly drug loaded formulation, which was granulated at an L/S-ratio of 0.5, a pure conveying screw and a medium kneading configuration, consisting of 60° kneading blocks were negatively influenced by poor feeder settings. For optimal settings more narrow distributions could be obtained. For an extensive kneading configuration good and poor settings resulted in mono-modal granule size distributions but were differing in the overall size. Mannitol, a model substance for a liquid sensitive formulation was granulated at an L/S-ratio of 0.075. It was even more important to maintain optimal feeding as mannitol was highly affected by poor feeder performances. Even an extensive kneading configuration could not level the errors in powder feeder performance, resulting in qualitatively different granule size distributions. The results of this study demonstrate the importance of detailed knowledge about applied feeding systems to gain optimal performance in twin-screw granulation. PMID:27224854

  16. Continuous melt granulation: Influence of process and formulation parameters upon granule and tablet properties.

    PubMed

    Monteyne, Tinne; Vancoillie, Jochem; Remon, Jean-Paul; Vervaet, Chris; De Beer, Thomas

    2016-10-01

    The pharmaceutical industry has a growing interest in alternative manufacturing models allowing automation and continuous production in order to improve process efficiency and reduce costs. Implementing a switch from batch to continuous processing requires fundamental process understanding and the implementation of quality-by-design (QbD) principles. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between formulation-parameters (type binder, binder concentration, drug-binder miscibility), process-parameters (screw speed, powder feed rate and granulation temperature), granule properties (size, size distribution, shape, friability, true density, flowability) and tablet properties (tensile strength, friability, dissolution rate) of four different drug-binder formulations using Design of experiments (DOE). Two binders (polyethylene glycol (PEG) and Soluplus®) with a different solid state, semi-crystalline vs amorphous respectively, were combined with two model-drugs, metoprolol tartrate (MPT) and caffeine anhydrous (CAF), both having a contrasting miscibility with the binders. This research revealed that the granule properties of miscible drug-binder systems depended on the powder feed rate and barrel filling degree of the granulator whereas the granule properties of immiscible systems were mainly influenced by binder concentration. Using an amorphous binder, the tablet tensile strength depended on the granule size. In contrast, granule friability was more important for tablet quality using a brittle binder. However, this was not the case for caffeine-containing blends, since these phenomena were dominated by the enhanced compression properties of caffeine Form I, which was formed during granulation. Hence, it is important to gain knowledge about formulation behavior during processing since this influences the effect of process parameters onto the granule and tablet properties. PMID:27449628

  17. Giant Subclavian Artery Aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Counts, Sarah; Zeeshan, Ahmad; Elefteriades, John

    2016-06-01

    We report the case of a 37-year-old construction executive presenting with chest pain, shortness of breath, and dizziness on exertion secondary to a giant left subclavian artery aneurysm and aortic valvular disease. PMID:27231430

  18. Giant distal humeral geode.

    PubMed

    Maher, M M; Kennedy, J; Hynes, D; Murray, J G; O'Connell, D

    2000-03-01

    We describe the imaging features of a giant geode of the distal humerus in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis, which presented initially as a pathological fracture. The value of magnetic resonance imaging in establishing this diagnosis is emphasized. PMID:10794554

  19. The Giant Cell.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stockdale, Dennis

    1998-01-01

    Provides directions for the construction of giant plastic cells, including details for building and installing the organelles. Also contains instructions for preparing the ribosomes, nucleolus, nucleus, and mitochondria. (DDR)

  20. The Next Giant Step

    NASA Video Gallery

    Artist Robert McCall painted "The Next Giant Step" in 1979 to commemorate the heroism and courage of spaceflight pioneers. Located in the lobby of Johnson's building 2, the mural depicts America's ...

  1. Vaccine adjuvants: Tailor-made mast-cell granules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunzer, Matthias

    2012-03-01

    Mast cells induce protective immune responses through secretion of stimulatory granules. Microparticles modelled after mast-cell granules are now shown to replicate and enhance the functions of their natural counterparts and to direct the character of the resulting immunity.

  2. Unusual case of spinal epidermoid cyst and a concomitant spinal arachnoid cyst.

    PubMed

    Celik, Ahmet Orhan; Baris, Mustafa Mahmut; Demirtas, Hakan; Umul, Ayşe

    2016-01-01

    A 38-year-old woman presented with a 12-month history of subjective weakness and pain in her legs. Thoracolumbar MRI revealed two spinal intradural cystic lesions at T5-6 and T11 levels, respectively. The lesion located at the T5-6 level was heterogeneously hyperintense on T2-weighted images and heterogeneously hypointense on T1-weighted images. This lesion showed high signal intensity on diffusion weighted MRI (DWI) and low signal intensity on apparent diffusion coefficient images (ADC). According to the MRI findings, we reported this tumour as a spinal epidermoid cyst. The pathology result suggested that the lesion was an epidermoid cyst. The second intradural lesion, at the T11 level, showed a hypointense signal on T1 and hyperintense signal on T2 images. However, in contrast to the superior lesion, this lesion was hypointense on DWI and hyperintense on ADC. We evaluated the second lesion as an arachnoid cyst according to the MRI findings. PMID:26907820

  3. A Novel Bilateral Approach for Suprasellar Arachnoid Cysts: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Fujio, Shingo; Bunyamin, Jacob; Hirano, Hirofumi; Oyoshi, Tatsuki; Sadamura, Yuko; Bohara, Manoj; Arita, Kazunori

    2016-01-01

    The endoscopic method is used to treat suprasellar arachnoid cysts (SACs) but it is sometimes difficult to make sufficiently sized fenestrations. Creating a larger fenestration on the cyst wall is preferable to prevent closure of the stoma. In this paper, we report a novel endoscopic approach for SAC treatment in which we use bilateral burr holes to achieve a more extensive cyst fenestration. A 7-year-old girl was referred to our hospital because of incidentally detected hydrocephalus by computed tomography scans. Physical examination did not show any signs of intracranial hypertension, but a digital impression of her skull on X-ray implied chronic intracranial hypertension. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed enlargement of both lateral ventricles and a cystic mass occupying the third ventricle. We performed cyst wall fenestration using a bilateral approach in which we created two burr holes to introduce a flexible endoscope and a rigid endoscope. The cyst wall was held by forceps with the flexible endoscope, and resection of the cyst wall was achieved by using a pair of scissors with the rigid endoscope. There were no postoperative complications, and MRI performed 1 year after treatment showed disappearance of the superior part of the cyst wall. PMID:26509420

  4. α-granules: a story in the making.

    PubMed

    Flaumenhaft, Robert

    2012-12-13

    α-granules are by far the most abundant platelet granules. Yet little is known about how they are formed. In this issue of Blood, Urban et al now characterize platelets from patients with an inheritable α-granule defect, demonstrating a role for VPS16B in α-granule biogenesis and taking us one step closer to understanding how these elusive organelles are formed. PMID:23243155

  5. Starch Granule Variability in Wild Solanum Species

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Because most of the dry matter of potato tubers is starch, an understanding of starch properties is important in potato improvement programs. Starch granule size is considered to influence tuber processing quality parameters such as gelatinization temperature, viscosity, and water holding capacity. ...

  6. Mitochondrial RNA granules: Compartmentalizing mitochondrial gene expression.

    PubMed

    Jourdain, Alexis A; Boehm, Erik; Maundrell, Kinsey; Martinou, Jean-Claude

    2016-03-14

    In mitochondria, DNA replication, gene expression, and RNA degradation machineries coexist within a common nondelimited space, raising the question of how functional compartmentalization of gene expression is achieved. Here, we discuss the recently characterized "mitochondrial RNA granules," mitochondrial subdomains with an emerging role in the regulation of gene expression. PMID:26953349

  7. Next generation fluidized bed granulator automation.

    PubMed

    Rantanen, J; Känsäkoski, M; Suhonen, J; Tenhunen, J; Lehtonen, S; Rajalahti, T; Mannermaa, J P; Yliruusi, J

    2000-01-01

    A system for fluidized bed granulator automation with in-line multichannel near infrared (NIR) moisture measurement and a unique air flow rate measurement design was assembled, and the information gained was investigated. The multivariate process data collected was analyzed using principal component analysis (PCA). The test materials (theophylline and microcrystalline cellulose) were granulated and the calibration behavior of the multichannel NIR set-up was evaluated against full Fourier Transform (FT) NIR spectra. Accurate and reliable process air flow rate measurement proved critical in controlling the granulation process. The process data describing the state of the process was projected in two dimensions, and the information from various trend charts was outlined simultaneously. The absorbence of test material at correction wavelengths (NIR region) and the nature of material-water interactions affected the detected in-line NIR water signal. This resulted in different calibration models for the test materials. Development of process analytical methods together with new data visualization algorithms creates new tools for in-process control of the fluidized bed granulation. PMID:14727843

  8. Microbial degradation of polyacrylamide by aerobic granules.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lili; Wang, Zhiping; Lin, Kuangfei; Cai, Weimin

    2012-01-01

    To deal with polyacrylamide (PAM) wastewater, granular sludge formed in glucose-fed sequencing batch reactors (SBR) was employed to cultivate PAM-degrading granules. Three replicated SBRs were operated with increasing PAM concentration in the influent from 67 to 670 mg L(-1), and the hydraulic retention time was increased at the same time from 1 d to 6 d during the six-phase of the 43 d acclimation period. The well-acclimated PAM-degrading granules were different from the seeding granules in colour, mean diameter, biomass density and settle ability, and could use PAM as the sole carbon and nitrogen source. In the batch experiments, PAM degradation rate by granules was determined as 2.23 mg PAM g(-1) MLSS h(-1). According to the analysis of the intermediates of PAM biodegradation, PAM was degraded initially through hydrolysis of the amide group, and no acrylamide monomer was detected. With the help of LC/MS, the main intermediate was identified as polyacrylic acid with a low molecular weight. Therefore, the PAM-degrading granular sludge may be employed for removing PAM in the wastewater produced from tertiary oil recovery that uses polymeric flooding technology. PMID:22720433

  9. Imaging of zymogen granules in fully wet cells: evidence for restricted mechanism of granule growth.

    PubMed

    Hammel, Ilan; Anaby, Debbie

    2007-09-01

    The introduction of wet SEM imaging technology permits electron microscopy of wet samples. Samples are placed in sealed specimen capsules and are insulated from the vacuum in the SEM chamber by an impermeable, electron-transparent membrane. The complete insulation of the sample from the vacuum allows direct imaging of fully hydrated, whole-mount tissue. In the current work, we demonstrate direct inspection of thick pancreatic tissue slices (above 400 mum). In the case of scanning of the pancreatic surface, the boundaries of intracellular features are seen directly. Thus no unfolding is required to ascertain the actual particle size distribution based on the sizes of the sections. This method enabled us to investigate the true granule size distribution and confirm early studies of improved conformity to a Poisson-like distribution, suggesting that the homotypic granule growth results from a mechanism, which favors the addition of a single unit granule to mature granules. PMID:17557275

  10. Proteoglycan modifications by granulation tissue in culture.

    PubMed

    Quintner, M I; Kollar, E J; Rossomando, E F

    1982-01-01

    To study the process of tissue remodeling that occurs during wound healing, radioactive proteoglycan ([35S]-PGS) was used to assay for enzymatic activities present in the extracellular fluid of healing tissue. Mice, wounded by removal of a 2 x 1.5 cm patch of skin from the dorsal surface, were sacrificed after 3 days of healing. Granulation tissue (1 cm2) was removed, spread onto a sterile wire mesh support and placed in the center well of an organ culture dish. To each well was added 1 ml MCDB medium supplemented with 10% fetal calf serum and antibiotics and 5-20 microliters of [35S]-PGS (100,000 cpm/10 microliters). Medium, removed from the well by aspiration after 24 and 48 h of culture, was boiled 5 min at 100 degrees C and stored frozen at -20 degrees C. Alterations of the PGS were assayed with a Sepharose 4B column (1 x 50 cm) which had an excluded and included volume of 17 and 46 ml, respectively. PGS, incubated without cells or with tissues from unwounded animals, eluted at 26 ml. PGS, incubated with granulation tissue and cultured for either 24 or 48 h, eluted from the Sepharose 4B at 29 ml, a 10% increase in elution volume, suggesting that the size or shape of the PGS has been altered by enzymes secreted by the cells of the granulation tissue. In contrast, PGS incubated with tissues from unwounded animals or without granulation tissue showed no changes. These data suggest that enzymatic activities secreted by cells of granulation tissue may be involved in remodeling during healing. PMID:6749574

  11. The stable K0 giant star β Gem

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, David F.

    2014-12-01

    A nine-season spectroscopic study of the photosphere of β Gem (K0 III) shows this low-luminosity giant to be stable, with no effective temperature variations above ∼2 K, and no secular temperature variations over the 2002-2010 time span above 0.2 K per year. The radial-velocity variations are consistent with an orbital variation of ∼40 m s{sup –1}. The projected rotation rate is found to be 1.70 ± 0.20 km s{sup –1} with a macroturbulence dispersion of 4.53 ± 0.10 km s{sup –1}. The third-signature plot is also invariant and shows a granulation velocity gradient 20% smaller than the solar gradient. The absolute shift of the third-signature plot gives a blueshift-corrected radial velocity of 3385 ± 70 m s{sup –1}. Bisector mapping of the Fe I λ6253 line yields a flux deficit of 12% ± 1% in area, somewhat smaller than for other giants, but the shape and the position of the peak at 4.8 km s{sup –1} is consistent with other giants. All of the investigated photospheric parameters are consistent with β Gem being a low-luminosity giant in agreement with its absolute magnitude.

  12. Experimental investigation of granule size and shape dynamics in twin-screw granulation.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ashish; Vercruysse, Jurgen; Bellandi, Giacomo; Gernaey, Krist V; Vervaet, Chris; Remon, Jean Paul; De Beer, Thomas; Nopens, Ingmar

    2014-11-20

    A twin-screw granulator (TSG), a promising equipment for continuous high shear wet granulation (HSWG), achieves the desired level of mixing by a combination of the appropriate screw configuration and a suitable set of process settings (e.g. feed rate, screw speed, etc.), thus producing a certain granule size and shape distribution (GSSD). However, the primary sizing and shaping mechanism behind the resulting distribution is not well understood due to the opacity of the multiphase system in the granulator. This study experimentally characterised the GSSD dynamics along the TSG barrel length in order to understand the function of individual screw modules and process settings, as well as their interaction. Particle size analysis of granules collected at the outlet of the TSG suggested significant interaction between the process and screw configuration parameters influencing the heterogeneity in the GSSD. By characterising the samples collected along the screw length, a variable influence of the screw modules at different process conditions was observed. At low liquid-to-solid ratio (L/S), the first kneading module seemed to play a significant role in mixing, whereas the second kneading module was found to be more involved in reshaping the granules. At high L/S and high throughput, aggregation mainly took place in the second kneading module changing the GSSD. The results obtained from this study will be further used for the calibration and validation of a mechanistic model and, hence, support future development of a more detailed understanding of the HSWG process in a TSG. PMID:25234863

  13. Aerobic granulation of protein-rich granules from nitrogen-lean wastewaters.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu-You; Ju, Sheau-Pyng; Lee, Duu-Jong

    2016-10-01

    Proteins (PN)-rich granules are stable in structure in long-term reactor operations. This study proposed to cultivate PN-rich granules with PN/polysaccharides (PS) >20 from nitrogen lean wastewater, with ammonia-nitrogen as sole nitrogen source at chemical oxygen demand (COD)/N of 153.8. The yielded granules can sustain their structural stability in sequencing batch reactor mode for sufficient treatment of wastewaters up to 7000mg/L COD and with COD/N<500 and in continuous-flow reactor for successful 216-d treatment of wastewaters up to organic loading rate (OLR) of 39kg/m(3)-d. The produced granules were enriched with Firmicutes and β-proteobacteria as dominating strains. More than 58% of the nitrogen fed in the nitrogen-lean wastewater is converted to the PN in the granules. The replacement of ammonia by nitrate as sole nitrogen source led to granules enriched with γ-proteobacteria which are easily deteriorated at low OLR. PMID:27394992

  14. Amylolytic hydrolysis of native starch granules affected by granule surface area.

    PubMed

    Kim, J C; Kong, B W; Kim, M J; Lee, S H

    2008-11-01

    Initial stage of hydrolysis of native starch granules with various amylolytic enzymes, alpha-amylase from Bacillus subtilis, glucoamylase I (GA-I) and II (GA-II) from Aspergillus niger, and beta-amylase from sweet potato showed that the reaction was apparently affected by a specific surface area of the starch granules. The ratios of the reciprocal of initial velocity of each amylolytic hydrolysis for native potato and maize starch to that for rice with the amylolytic enzymes were nearly equivalent to the ratio of surface area per mass of the 2 starch granules to that of rice, that is, 6.94 and 2.25, respectively. Thus, the reciprocal of initial velocity of each enzymatic hydrolysis as expressed in a Lineweaver-Burk plot was a linear function of the reciprocal of surface area for each starch granule. As a result, it is concluded that amylolytic hydrolysis of native starch granules is governed by the specific surface area, not by the mass concentration, of each granule. PMID:19021791

  15. Wave granulation in the Venus' atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochemasov, G.

    2007-08-01

    In unique venusian planetary system the solid body rotates very slowly and the detached massive atmosphere very rapidly. However both together orbit Sun and their characteristic orbital frequency -1/ 0.62 year - places them in the regular row of planets assigning them characteristic only for Venus wave produced granulation with a granule size πR/6 [1& others]. Remind other bodies in the row with their granule sizes inversely proportional to their orbital frequencies: solar photosphere πR/60, Mercury πR/16, Venus πR/6, Earth πR/4, Mars πR/2, asteroids πR/1 (R-a body radius). Three planets have atmospheres with wave granulations having sizes equal to their lithospheric granules. But Venus, unlike Earth and Mars, has the detached atmosphere that can be considered as a separate body with its own orbital frequency around the center of the Venus' system. According to the correlation between an orbital frequency and a wave granule size the venusian wave granule will be πR/338 (a scale can be Earth: orbital frequency 1/ 1year, granule size πR/4 or Sun: frequency 1/1month, granule size πR/60). So, πR/338 = 57 km. This theoretical size is rather close to that observed by Galileo SC through a violet filter "the filamentary dark features. . . are here revealed to be composed of several dark nodules, like beads on a string, each about 60 miles across" (PIA00072). Actually all Venus' disc seen from a distance ~1.7mln.miles is peppered with these fine features seen on a limit of resolution. So, the Venus' atmosphere has two main frequencies in the solar system with corresponding wave granulations: around Sun 1/225 days (granule πR/6) and around Venus 1/ 4 days (granule πR/338). As was done for the Moon, Phobos, Titan and other icy satellites of Saturn [2, 3, 4 & others] one can apply the wave modulation technique also for the atmosphere of Venus. The lower frequency modulates the higher one by dividing and multiplying it thus getting two side frequencies and

  16. Wave granulation in the Venus' atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochemasov, G.

    2007-08-01

    In unique venusian planetary system the solid body rotates very slowly and the detached massive atmosphere very rapidly. However both together orbit Sun and their characteristic orbital frequency -1/ 0.62 year - places them in the regular row of planets assigning them characteristic only for Venus wave produced granulation with a granule size πR/6 [1& others]. Remind other bodies in the row with their granule sizes inversely proportional to their orbital frequencies: solar photosphere πR/60, Mercury πR/16, Venus πR/6, Earth πR/4, Mars πR/2, asteroids πR/1 (R-a body radius). Three planets have atmospheres with wave granulations having sizes equal to their lithospheric granules. But Venus, unlike Earth and Mars, has the detached atmosphere that can be considered as a separate body with its own orbital frequency around the center of the Venus' system. According to the correlation between an orbital frequency and a wave granule size the venusian wave granule will be πR/338 (a scale can be Earth: orbital frequency 1/ 1year, granule size πR/4 or Sun: frequency 1/1month, granule size πR/60). So, πR/338 = 57 km. This theoretical size is rather close to that observed by Galileo SC through a violet filter "the filamentary dark features. . . are here revealed to be composed of several dark nodules, like beads on a string, each about 60 miles across" (PIA00072). Actually all Venus' disc seen from a distance π1.7mln.miles is peppered with these fine features seen on a limit of resolution. So, the Venus' atmosphere has two main frequencies in the solar system with corresponding wave granulations: around Sun 1/225 days (granule πR/6) and around Venus 1/ 4 days (granule πR/338). As was done for the Moon, Phobos, Titan and other icy satellites of Saturn [2, 3, 4 & others] one can apply the wave modulation technique also for the atmosphere of Venus. The lower frequency modulates the higher one by dividing and multiplying it thus getting two side frequencies and

  17. Value of systematic analysis of the olfactory cleft in case of cerebrospinal rhinorrhea: incidence of olfactory arachnoid dilatation.

    PubMed

    Gharzouli, Imen; Verillaud, Benjamin; Tran, Hugo; Blancal, Jean-Philippe; Sauvaget, Elisabeth; Kania, Romain; Guichard, Jean-Pierre; Herman, Philippe

    2016-07-01

    To report on the presence of olfactory arachnoid dilatations (OAD), a previously undescribed radiologic feature of spontaneous cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) rhinorrhea originating from the cribriform plate of the ethmoid bone. The medical records of all patients treated between 2001 and 2011 at a tertiary care center for a spontaneous CSF rhinorrhea originating from the cribriform plate were retrospectively reviewed. The radiological work-up included high-resolution computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging with at least the following sequences: T1, T2, and T2 with fast imaging employing steady state acquisition (FIESTA). Thirty cases were identified. The mean age at diagnosis was 49. Fourteen patients (47 %) had a body mass index (BMI) of 30 or more and 3 patients (10 %) had a BMI between 25 and 29.9. Five patients had a history of meningitis. The imaging work-up revealed a bone defect of the cribriform plate in 6 cases (20 %), associated to a typical meningocele in 14 cases (47 %). In ten patients (33 %), there was no defect of the cribriform plate, but ultrathin coronal T2-FIESTA sequences revealed an OAD, i.e. a dilatation of the arachnoid sheath of the olfactory fibers, in nine cases (30 %), or a "pseudo-polyp" outlined by a thin layer of arachnoid (1 patient, 3 %). Preoperative imaging should be carefully analyzed for the presence of OAD or "pseudo-polyp" in patients presenting with a CSF rhinorrhea without bony defect of the cribriform plate. PMID:25784182

  18. Spinal extradural arachnoid cyst causing cord compression in a 15-year-old girl: a case report.

    PubMed

    Novak, L; Dobai, J; Nemeth, T; Fekete, M; Prinzinger, A; Csecsei, G I

    2005-02-01

    The authors describe the case of a fifteen-year-old girl with progressive paraparesis of the lower limbs that was caused by an intraspinal extradural dorsal arachnoid cyst at the level of Th 3-6. Diagnosis was established with MRI and MRI myelography. The latter revealed the CSF-like content of the cyst. The patient underwent laminotomy and en bloc resection of the cyst. Ligation of the pedicle of the cyst was done with laminoplasty. Quick and complete recovery was observed after surgery. PMID:15744629

  19. Effect of suspension property on granule morphology and compaction behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Hae-Weon Lee, Guesup Song, In-Sik Suk

    1995-12-31

    Granule morphology is an important factor during dry pressing, since it has great influences on die flowability, compaction ratio, and resulting green microstructure. Granule morphology and packing structure of ultrafine Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} particles in the granule were optimized during spray drying by adjusting the suspension structure. The particle packing structure of spray-dried granule was investigated with suspension structure. The effects of granule morphology and its particle packing structure on compaction and resultant sintering behavior were evaluated.

  20. Characteristics of aerobic granulation at mesophilic temperatures in wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Cui, Fenghao; Park, Seyong; Kim, Moonil

    2014-01-01

    Compact and structurally stable aerobic granules were developed in a sequencing batch reactor (SBR) at mesophilic temperatures (35°C). The morphological, biological and chemical characteristics of the aerobic granulation were investigated and a theoretical granulation mechanism was proposed according to the results of the investigation. The mature aerobic granules had compact structure, small size (mean diameter of 0.24 mm), excellent settleability and diverse microbial structures, and were effective for the removal of organics and nitrification. The growth kinetics demonstrated that the biomass growth depended on coexistence and interactions between heterotrophs and autotrophs in the granules. The functions of heterotrophs and autotrophs created a compact and secure layer on the outside of the granules, protecting the inside sludge containing environmentally sensitive and slow growing microorganisms. The mechanism and the reactor performance may promise feasibility and efficiency for treating industry effluents at mesophilic temperatures using aerobic granulation. PMID:24211486

  1. Shigella flexneri modulates stress granule composition and inhibits stress granule aggregation.

    PubMed

    Vonaesch, Pascale; Campbell-Valois, François-Xavier; Dufour, Alexandre; Sansonetti, Philippe J; Schnupf, Pamela

    2016-07-01

    Invasion and multiplication of the facultative, cytosolic, enteropathogen Shigella flexneri within the colonic epithelial lining leads to an acute inflammatory response, fever and diarrhea. During the inflammatory process, infected cells are subjected to numerous stresses including heat, oxidative stress and genotoxic stress. The evolutionarily conserved pathway of cellular stress management is the formation of stress granules that store translationally inactive cellular mRNAs and interfere with cellular signalling pathways by sequestering signalling components. In this study, we investigated the ability of S. flexneri-infected cells to form stress granules in response to exogenous stresses. We found that S. flexneri infection inhibits movement of the stress granule markers eIF3 and eIF4B into stress granules and prevents the aggregation of G3BP1 and eIF4G-containing stress granules. This inhibition occurred only with invasive, but not with non-invasive bacteria and occurred in response to stresses that induce translational arrest through the phosphorylation of eIF2α and by treating cells with pateamine A, a drug that induces stress granules by inhibiting the eIF4A helicase. The S. flexneri-mediated stress granule inhibition could be largely phenocopied by the microtubule-destabilizing drug nocodazole and while S. flexneri infection did not lead to microtubule depolymerization, infection greatly enhanced acetylation of alpha-tubulin. Our data suggest that qualitative differences in the microtubule network or subversion of the microtubule-transport machinery by S. flexneri may be involved in preventing the full execution of this cellular stress response. PMID:27282465

  2. Profilin 1 Associates with Stress Granules and ALS-Linked Mutations Alter Stress Granule Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Figley, Matthew D.; Bieri, Gregor; Kolaitis, Regina-Maria; Taylor, J. Paul

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in the PFN1 gene encoding profilin 1 are a rare cause of familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Profilin 1 is a well studied actin-binding protein but how PFN1 mutations cause ALS is unknown. The budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, has one PFN1 ortholog. We expressed the ALS-linked profilin 1 mutant proteins in yeast, demonstrating a loss of protein stability and failure to restore growth to profilin mutant cells, without exhibiting gain-of-function toxicity. This model provides for simple and rapid screening of novel ALS-linked PFN1 variants. To gain insight into potential novel roles for profilin 1, we performed an unbiased, genome-wide synthetic lethal screen with yeast cells lacking profilin (pfy1Δ). Unexpectedly, deletion of several stress granule and processing body genes, including pbp1Δ, were found to be synthetic lethal with pfy1Δ. Mutations in ATXN2, the human ortholog of PBP1, are a known ALS genetic risk factor and ataxin 2 is a stress granule component in mammalian cells. Given this genetic interaction and recent evidence linking stress granule dynamics to ALS pathogenesis, we hypothesized that profilin 1 might also associate with stress granules. Here we report that profilin 1 and related protein profilin 2 are novel stress granule-associated proteins in mouse primary cortical neurons and in human cell lines and that ALS-linked mutations in profilin 1 alter stress granule dynamics, providing further evidence for the potential role of stress granules in ALS pathogenesis. PMID:24920614

  3. The connection between stellar granulation and oscillation as seen by the Kepler mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kallinger, T.; De Ridder, J.; Hekker, S.; Mathur, S.; Mosser, B.; Gruberbauer, M.; García, R. A.; Karoff, C.; Ballot, J.

    2014-10-01

    Context. The long and almost continuous observations by Kepler show clear evidence of a granulation background signal in a large sample of stars, which is interpreted as the surface manifestation of convection. It has been shown that its characteristic timescale and rms intensity fluctuation scale with the peak frequency (νmax) of the solar-like oscillations. Various attempts have been made to quantify the observed signal, to determine scaling relations for its characteristic parameters, and to compare them to theoretical predictions. Even though they are consistent on a global scale, large systematic differences of an unknown origin remain between different methods, as well as between the observations and simulations. Aims: We aim to study different approaches to quantifying the signature of stellar granulation and to search for a unified model that reproduces the observed signal best in a wide variety of stars. We then aim to define empirical scaling relations between the granulation properties and νmax and various other stellar parameters. Methods: We use a probabilistic method to compare different approaches to extracting the granulation signal. We fit the power density spectra of a large set of Kepler targets, determine the granulation and global oscillation parameter, and quantify scaling relations between them. Results: We establish that a depression in power at about νmax/2, known from the Sun and a few other main-sequence stars, is also statistically significant in red giants and that a super-Lorentzian function with two components is best suited to reproducing the granulation signal in the broader vicinity of the pulsation power excess. We also establish that the specific choice of the background model can affect the determination of νmax, introducing systematic uncertainties that can significantly exceed the random uncertainties. We find the characteristic frequency (i.e., inverse timescale) and amplitude of both background components to tightly

  4. Sport-related structural brain injury associated with arachnoid cysts: a systematic review and quantitative analysis.

    PubMed

    Zuckerman, Scott L; Prather, Colin T; Yengo-Kahn, Aaron M; Solomon, Gary S; Sills, Allen K; Bonfield, Christopher M

    2016-04-01

    OBJECTIVE Arachnoid cysts (ACs) are congenital lesions bordered by an arachnoid membrane. Researchers have postulated that individuals with an AC demonstrate a higher rate of structural brain injury after trauma. Given the potential neurological consequences of a structural brain injury requiring neurosurgical intervention, the authors sought to perform a systematic review of sport-related structural-brain injury associated with ACs with a corresponding quantitative analysis. METHODS Titles and abstracts were searched systematically across the following databases: PubMed, Embase, CINAHL, and PsycINFO. The review was conducted in accordance with the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) statement. Peer-reviewed case reports, case series, or observational studies that reported a structural brain injury due to a sport or recreational activity (hereafter referred to as sport-related) with an associated AC were included. Patients were excluded if they did not have an AC, suffered a concussion without structural brain injury, or sustained the injury during a non-sport-related activity (e.g., fall, motor vehicle collision). Descriptive statistical analysis and time to presentation data were summarized. Univariate logistic regression models to assess predictors of neurological deficit, open craniotomy, and cystoperitoneal shunt were completed. RESULTS After an initial search of 994 original articles, 52 studies were found that reported 65 cases of sport-related structural brain injury associated with an AC. The median age at presentation was 16 years (range 4-75 years). Headache was the most common presenting symptom (98%), followed by nausea and vomiting in 49%. Thirteen patients (21%) presented with a neurological deficit, most commonly hemiparesis. Open craniotomy was the most common form of treatment (49%). Bur holes and cyst fenestration were performed in 29 (45%) and 31 (48%) patients, respectively. Seven patients (11%) received

  5. Chronic Subdural Hematomas Associated with Arachnoid Cysts: Significance in Young Patients with Chronic Subdural Hematomas

    PubMed Central

    TAKIZAWA, Ken; SORIMACHI, Takatoshi; HONDA, Yumie; ISHIZAKA, Hideo; BABA, Tanefumi; OSADA, Takahiro; NISHIYAMA, Jun; INOUE, Go; MATSUMAE, Mitsunori

    2015-01-01

    Although arachnoid cysts (ACs) are associated with chronic subdural hematomas (CSDHs), especially in young patients, the detailed features of CSDHs associated with ACs remain poorly understood. The objective of this study was to clarify the relationship between the location of CSDHs and ACs and the significance of ACs in young patients with CSDHs. We retrospectively assessed 605 consecutive patients 7 years of age and older who were diagnosed with a CSDH between 2002 and 2014. Twelve patients (2%) had ACs, and 10 of the 12 patients were 7–40 years of age. Patients with ACs as a complication of CSDHs were significantly younger than those without ACs (p < 0.05). Three different relationships between the location of CSDHs and ACs were found: a CSDH contacting an AC, an ipsilateral CSDH apart from an AC, and a CSDH contralateral to an AC. In 21 patients with CSDHs who were 7–40 years of age, 10 (47.6%) had ACs (AC group) and 7 (33.3%) had no associated illnesses (non-AC group). All 10 young patients with ACs showed ipsilateral CSDHs including a CSDH apart from an AC. All 17 patients in both the AC and non-AC groups showed headache but no paresis at admission. The pathogenesis of CSDHs associated with ACs may be different among the three types of locations. The clinical characteristics of patients with a combination of a CSDH and an AC including headache as a major symptom may be attributed to young age in the majority of patients with ACs. PMID:26345665

  6. An Innocent Giant

    PubMed Central

    Solanki, Lakhan Singh; Dhingra, Mandeep; Raghubanshi, Gunjan; Thami, Gurvinder Pal

    2014-01-01

    A cutaneous horn (cornu cutaneum) is a protrusion from the skin composed of a cornified material. It may be associated with a benign, premalignant, or malignant lesion at the base, masking numerous dermatoses. In a 24-year-old female, a giant cutaneous horn arising from a seborrheic keratosis located on the leg is presented. This case has been reported to emphasize that a giant cutaneous horn may also occur in young patients, even in photoprotected areas, and are not always associated with malignancy. PMID:25484426

  7. Giant perigenital seborrheic keratosis.

    PubMed

    Bandyopadhyay, Debabrata; Saha, Abanti; Mishra, Vivek

    2015-01-01

    Seborrheic keratosis (SK) is a very common benign epidermal proliferation that is prevalent in all races. Most commonly occurring on the trunk, face, scalp, and the extremities, they can occur anywhere on the body except the palms and soles. The most common appearance is that of a very superficial verrucous plaque which appears to be stuck on the surface. Giant lesions are very rare, and their location on the genital area is rarer still. We report here a case of multiple giant SK lesions in a 59-year-old man. PMID:25657917

  8. Giant perigenital seborrheic keratosis

    PubMed Central

    Bandyopadhyay, Debabrata; Saha, Abanti; Mishra, Vivek

    2015-01-01

    Seborrheic keratosis (SK) is a very common benign epidermal proliferation that is prevalent in all races. Most commonly occurring on the trunk, face, scalp, and the extremities, they can occur anywhere on the body except the palms and soles. The most common appearance is that of a very superficial verrucous plaque which appears to be stuck on the surface. Giant lesions are very rare, and their location on the genital area is rarer still. We report here a case of multiple giant SK lesions in a 59-year-old man. PMID:25657917

  9. Biogenic calcite granules--are brachiopods different?

    PubMed

    Pérez-Huerta, Alberto; Dauphin, Yannicke; Cusack, Maggie

    2013-01-01

    Brachiopods are still one of the least studied groups of organisms in terms of biomineralization despite recent studies indicating the presence of highly complex biomineral structures, particularly in taxa with calcitic shells. Here, we analyze the nanostructure of calcite biominerals, fibers and semi-nacre tablets, in brachiopod shells by high-resolution scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). We demonstrate that basic mechanisms of carbonate biomineralization are not uniform within the phylum, with semi-nacre tablets composed of spherical aggregates with sub-rounded granules and fibers composed of large, triangular or rod-like particles composed of small sub-rounded granules (40-60 nm). Additionally, proteinaceous envelopes surrounding calcite fibers have been shown for the first time to have a dual function: providing a micro-environment in which granules are produced and acting as the organic template for particle orientation as fiber components. In summary, these new findings in brachiopod shells reveal a complex and distinctive style of biomineralization among carbonate-producing organisms. PMID:23026148

  10. Granule-bound starch synthase I in isolated starch granules elongates malto-oligosaccharides processively.

    PubMed Central

    Denyer, K; Waite, D; Motawia, S; Møller, B L; Smith, A M

    1999-01-01

    Isoforms of starch synthase belonging to the granule-bound starch synthase I (GBSSI) class synthesize the amylose component of starch in plants. Other granule-bound isoforms of starch synthase, such as starch synthase II (SSII), are unable to synthesize amylose. The kinetic properties of GBSSI and SSII that are responsible for these functional differences have been investigated using starch granules from embryos of wild-type peas and rug5 and lam mutant peas, which contain, respectively, both GBSSI and SSII, GBSSI but not SSII and SSII but not GBSSI. We show that GBSSI in isolated granules elongates malto-oligosaccharides processively, adding more than one glucose molecule for each enzyme-glucan encounter. Granule-bound SSII can elongate malto-oligosaccharides, but has a lower affinity for these than GBSSI and does not elongate processively. As a result of these properties GBSSI synthesizes longer malto-oligosaccharides than SSII. The significance of these results with respect to the roles of GBSSI and SSII in vivo is discussed. PMID:10229673

  11. Methylmercury differentially affects GABAA receptor-mediated spontaneous IPSCs in Purkinje and granule cells of rat cerebellar slices

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Yukun; Atchison, William D

    2003-01-01

    Using whole-cell recording techniques we compared effects of the environmental cerebellar neurotoxicant methylmercury (MeHg) on spontaneous IPSCs (sIPSCs) of both Purkinje and granule cells in cerebellar slices of the rat. In Purkinje cells, bath application of 10, 20 or 100 μM MeHg initially increased then suppressed the frequency of sIPSCs to zero. In granule cells, the initial increase in frequency was not observed in ≈50 % of cells examined, but suppression of sIPSCs by MeHg occurred in every cell tested. For both cells, time to onset of effects of MeHg was inversely related to the concentration; moreover, the pattern of changes in mIPSCs induced by MeHg in the presence of tetrodotoxin was similar to that in sIPSCs. For each concentration of MeHg, it took 2–3 times longer to block sIPSCs in Purkinje cells than it did in granule cells. MeHg also initially increased then decreased amplitudes of sIPSCs to block in both cells; again the response was more variable in granule cells. In most Purkinje and some granule cells, MeHg induced a giant, slow inward current during the late stages of exposure. Appearance of this current appeared to be MeHg concentration dependent, and the direction of current flow was reversed by changing the holding potentials. Reduction of the [Cl−] in the internal solution caused inwardly directed, but not outwardly directed giant currents to disappear, suggesting that this current is a Cl−-mediated response. However, bicuculline and picrotoxin failed to block it. MeHg apparently acts at both presynaptic and postsynaptic sites to alter GABAA receptor-mediated inhibitory synaptic transmission. GABAA receptors in granule cells appear to be more sensitive to block by MeHg than are those in Purkinje cells, although the general patterns of effects on the two cells are similar. PMID:12879869

  12. Second Harmonic Generation Mediated by Aligned Water in Starch Granules.

    PubMed

    Cisek, Richard; Tokarz, Danielle; Krouglov, Serguei; Steup, Martin; Emes, Michael J; Tetlow, Ian J; Barzda, Virginijus

    2014-12-26

    The origin of second harmonic generation (SHG) in starch granules was investigated using ab initio quantum mechanical modeling and experimentally examined using polarization-in, polarization-out (PIPO) second harmonic generation microscopy. Ab initio calculations revealed that the largest contribution to the SHG signal from A- and B-type allomorphs of starch originates from the anisotropic organization of hydroxide and hydrogen bonds mediated by aligned water found in the polymers. The hypothesis was experimentally tested by imaging maize starch granules under various hydration and heat treatment conditions that alter the hydrogen bond network. The highest SHG intensity was found in fully hydrated starch granules, and heat treatment diminished the SHG intensity. The PIPO SHG imaging showed that dried starch granules have a much higher nonlinear optical susceptibility component ratio than fully hydrated granules. In contrast, deuterated starch granules showed a smaller susceptibility component ratio demonstrating that SHG is highly sensitive to the organization of the hydroxyl and hydrogen bond network. The polarization SHG imaging results of potato starch granules, representing starch allomorph B, were compared to those of maize starch granules representing allomorph A. The results showed that the amount of aligned water was higher in the maize granules. Nonlinear microscopy of starch granules provides evidence that varying hydration conditions leads to significant changes in the nonlinear susceptibility ratio as well as the SHG intensity, supporting the hypothesis from ab initio calculations that the dominant contribution to SHG is due to the ordered hydroxide and hydrogen bond network. PMID:25427055

  13. Platelet α–granules: Basic biology and clinical correlates

    PubMed Central

    Blair, Price; Flaumenhaft, Robert

    2009-01-01

    Summary α–Granules are essential to normal platelet activity. These unusual secretory granules derive their cargo from both regulated secretory and endocytotic pathways in megakaryocytes. Rare, inheritable defects of α–granule formation in mice and man have enabled identification of proteins that mediate cargo trafficking and α–granule formation. In platelets, α–granules fuse with the plasma membrane upon activation, releasing their cargo and increasing platelet surface area. The mechanisms that control α–granule membrane fusion have begun to be elucidated at the molecular level. SNAREs and SNARE accessory proteins that control α–granule secretion have been identified. Proteomic studies demonstrate that hundreds of bioactive proteins are released from α–granules. This breadth of proteins implies a versatile functionality. While initially known primarily for their participation in thrombosis and hemostasis, the role of α–granules in inflammation, atherosclerosis, antimicrobial host defense, wound healing, angiogenesis, and malignancy has become increasingly appreciated as the function of platelets in the pathophysiology of these processes has been defined. This review will consider the formation, release, and physiologic roles of α–granules with special emphasis on work performed over the last decade. PMID:19450911

  14. Electroluminescence of Giant Stretchability.

    PubMed

    Yang, Can Hui; Chen, Baohong; Zhou, Jinxiong; Chen, Yong Mei; Suo, Zhigang

    2016-06-01

    A new type of electroluminescent device achieves giant stretchability by integrating electronic and ionic components. The device uses phosphor powders as electroluminescent materials, and hydrogels as stretchable and transparent ionic conductors. Subject to cyclic voltage, the phosphor powders luminesce, but the ionic conductors do not electrolyze. The device produces constant luminance when stretched up to an area strain of 1500%. PMID:26610277

  15. A giant ureteric calculus

    PubMed Central

    Rathod, Rajiv; Bansal, Prashant; Gutta, Srinivas

    2013-01-01

    Ureteric stones are usually small and symptomatic. We present a case of a 35-year old female who presented with minimally symptomatic right distal ureteric calculus with proximal hydroureteronephrosis. Laparoscopic right ureterolithotomy was performed and a giant ureteric calculus measuring 11 cm Χ 1.5 cm, weighing 40 g was retrieved. PMID:24082453

  16. Giant urethral calculus

    PubMed Central

    Kotkar, Kunal; Thakkar, Ravi; Songra, MC

    2011-01-01

    Primary urethral calculus is rarely seen and is usually encountered in men with urethral stricture or diverticulum. We present a case of giant urethral calculus secondary to a urethral stricture in a man. The patient was treated with calculus extraction with end to end urethroplasty. PMID:24950400

  17. Juvenile giant fibroadenoma

    PubMed Central

    Yagnik, Vipul D.

    2011-01-01

    Fibroadenomas are benign solid tumor associated with aberration of normal lobular development. Juvenile giant fibroadenoma is usually single and >5 cm in size /or >500 gms in weight. Important differential diagnoses are: phyllodes tumor and juvenile gigantomastia. Simple excision is the treatment of choice. PMID:24765310

  18. A giant ureteric calculus.

    PubMed

    Rathod, Rajiv; Bansal, Prashant; Gutta, Srinivas

    2013-07-01

    Ureteric stones are usually small and symptomatic. We present a case of a 35-year old female who presented with minimally symptomatic right distal ureteric calculus with proximal hydroureteronephrosis. Laparoscopic right ureterolithotomy was performed and a giant ureteric calculus measuring 11 cm Χ 1.5 cm, weighing 40 g was retrieved. PMID:24082453

  19. Evolution of structure and properties of granules containing microcrystalline cellulose and polyvinylpyrrolidone during high-shear wet granulation.

    PubMed

    Osei-Yeboah, Frederick; Feng, Yushi; Sun, Changquan Calvin

    2014-01-01

    Granulation behavior of microcrystalline cellulose (MCC) in the presence of 2.5% polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) was systematically studied. Complex changes in flowability and tabletability of lubricated MCC granules are correlated to changes in intragranular porosity, morphology, surface smoothness, size distribution, and specific surface area (SSA). With 2.5% PVP, the use of 45% granulation water leads to 84% reduction in tablet tensile strength and 76% improvement in powder flow factor. The changes in powder performance are explained by granule densification and surface smoothing. The granulating water level corresponding to the onset of overgranulation, 45%, is significantly lower than the 70% water required for unlubricated MCC granules without PVP. At more than 45% water levels, MCC-PVP granules flow well but cannot be compressed into intact tablets. Such changes in powder performance correspond to the rapid growth into large and dense spheres with smooth surface. Compared with MCC alone, the onset of the phase of fast granule size enlargement occurs at a lower water level when 2.5% PVP is used. Although the use of 2.5% PVP hastens granule nucleation and growth rate, the mechanisms of overgranulation are the same, that is, size enlargement, granule densification, surface smoothing, and particle rounding in both systems. PMID:24218097

  20. Visualization and understanding of the granulation liquid mixing and distribution during continuous twin screw granulation using NIR chemical imaging.

    PubMed

    Vercruysse, Jurgen; Toiviainen, Maunu; Fonteyne, Margot; Helkimo, Niko; Ketolainen, Jarkko; Juuti, Mikko; Delaet, Urbain; Van Assche, Ivo; Remon, Jean Paul; Vervaet, Chris; De Beer, Thomas

    2014-04-01

    Over the last decade, there has been increased interest in the application of twin screw granulation as a continuous wet granulation technique for pharmaceutical drug formulations. However, the mixing of granulation liquid and powder material during the short residence time inside the screw chamber and the atypical particle size distribution (PSD) of granules produced by twin screw granulation is not yet fully understood. Therefore, this study aims at visualizing the granulation liquid mixing and distribution during continuous twin screw granulation using NIR chemical imaging. In first instance, the residence time of material inside the barrel was investigated as function of screw speed and moisture content followed by the visualization of the granulation liquid distribution as function of different formulation and process parameters (liquid feed rate, liquid addition method, screw configuration, moisture content and barrel filling degree). The link between moisture uniformity and granule size distributions was also studied. For residence time analysis, increased screw speed and lower moisture content resulted to a shorter mean residence time and narrower residence time distribution. Besides, the distribution of granulation liquid was more homogenous at higher moisture content and with more kneading zones on the granulator screws. After optimization of the screw configuration, a two-level full factorial experimental design was performed to evaluate the influence of moisture content, screw speed and powder feed rate on the mixing efficiency of the powder and liquid phase. From these results, it was concluded that only increasing the moisture content significantly improved the granulation liquid distribution. This study demonstrates that NIR chemical imaging is a fast and adequate measurement tool for allowing process visualization and hence for providing better process understanding of a continuous twin screw granulation system. PMID:24211658

  1. Distinct stages in stress granule assembly and disassembly.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, Joshua R; Matheny, Tyler; Jain, Saumya; Abrisch, Robert; Parker, Roy

    2016-01-01

    Stress granules are non-membrane bound RNA-protein (RNP) assemblies that form when translation initiation is limited and contain a biphasic structure with stable core structures surrounded by a less concentrated shell. The order of assembly and disassembly of these two structures remains unknown. Time course analysis of granule assembly suggests that core formation is an early event in granule assembly. Stress granule disassembly is also a stepwise process with shell dissipation followed by core clearance. Perturbations that alter liquid-liquid phase separations (LLPS) driven by intrinsically disordered protein regions (IDR) of RNA binding proteins in vitro have the opposite effect on stress granule assembly in vivo. Taken together, these observations argue that stress granules assemble through a multistep process initiated by stable assembly of untranslated mRNPs into core structures, which could provide sufficient high local concentrations to allow for a localized LLPS driven by IDRs on RNA binding proteins. PMID:27602576

  2. Fabrication and mechanical testing of porous calcium phosphate bioceramic granules.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Y H; Turner, I G; Miles, A W

    2007-10-01

    Porous hydroxyapatite/tricalcium phosphate (HA/TCP) granules were fabricated by a novel technique of vacuum impregnation of reticulated polyurethane (PU) foams with ceramic slip. The resultant granules had 5-10% interconnected porosity with controlled pore sizes necessary to allow bone ingrowth combined with good mechanical properties. Using PU foams with a different number of pores per inch (ppi), porous HA/TCP granules in the size range of 2-8 mm were successfully manufactured. Dieplunger tests were used to compare the compression and relaxation properties of the granules with those of a commercially available bone graft product, BoneSave. The results of the die-plunger testing showed that the experimental granules were stiffer than the BoneSave materials and had less of a tendency to crumble to powder after testing. This therefore suggests that these experimental granules would be useful for impaction grafting and space filling applications. PMID:17554596

  3. Age-Dependent Labeling and Imaging of Insulin Secretory Granules

    PubMed Central

    Ivanova, Anna; Kalaidzidis, Yannis; Dirkx, Ronald; Sarov, Mihail; Gerlach, Michael; Schroth-Diez, Britta; Müller, Andreas; Liu, Yanmei; Andree, Cordula; Mulligan, Bernard; Münster, Carla; Kurth, Thomas; Bickle, Marc; Speier, Stephan; Anastassiadis, Konstantinos; Solimena, Michele

    2013-01-01

    Insulin is stored within the secretory granules of pancreatic β-cells, and impairment of its release is the hallmark of type 2 diabetes. Preferential exocytosis of newly synthesized insulin suggests that granule aging is a key factor influencing insulin secretion. Here, we illustrate a technology that enables the study of granule aging in insulinoma cells and β-cells of knock-in mice through the conditional and unequivocal labeling of insulin fused to the SNAP tag. This approach, which overcomes the limits encountered with previous strategies based on radiolabeling or fluorescence timer proteins, allowed us to formally demonstrate the preferential release of newly synthesized insulin and reveal that the motility of cortical granules significantly changes over time. Exploitation of this approach may enable the identification of molecular signatures associated with granule aging and unravel possible alterations of granule turnover in diabetic β-cells. Furthermore, the method is of general interest for the study of membrane traffic and aging. PMID:23929935

  4. Age-dependent labeling and imaging of insulin secretory granules.

    PubMed

    Ivanova, Anna; Kalaidzidis, Yannis; Dirkx, Ronald; Sarov, Mihail; Gerlach, Michael; Schroth-Diez, Britta; Müller, Andreas; Liu, Yanmei; Andree, Cordula; Mulligan, Bernard; Münster, Carla; Kurth, Thomas; Bickle, Marc; Speier, Stephan; Anastassiadis, Konstantinos; Solimena, Michele

    2013-11-01

    Insulin is stored within the secretory granules of pancreatic β-cells, and impairment of its release is the hallmark of type 2 diabetes. Preferential exocytosis of newly synthesized insulin suggests that granule aging is a key factor influencing insulin secretion. Here, we illustrate a technology that enables the study of granule aging in insulinoma cells and β-cells of knock-in mice through the conditional and unequivocal labeling of insulin fused to the SNAP tag. This approach, which overcomes the limits encountered with previous strategies based on radiolabeling or fluorescence timer proteins, allowed us to formally demonstrate the preferential release of newly synthesized insulin and reveal that the motility of cortical granules significantly changes over time. Exploitation of this approach may enable the identification of molecular signatures associated with granule aging and unravel possible alterations of granule turnover in diabetic β-cells. Furthermore, the method is of general interest for the study of membrane traffic and aging. PMID:23929935

  5. Aerobic granules: microbial landscape and architecture, stages, and practical implications.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Gil, Graciela; Holliger, Christof

    2014-06-01

    For the successful application of aerobic granules in wastewater treatment, granules containing an appropriate microbial assembly able to remove contaminants should be retained and propagated within the reactor. To manipulate and/or optimize this process, a good understanding of the formation and dynamic architecture of the granules is desirable. Models of granules often assume a spherical shape with an outer layer and an inner core, but limited information is available regarding the extent of deviations from such assumptions. We report on new imaging approaches to gain detailed insights into the structural characteristics of aerobic granules. Our approach stained all components of the granule to obtain a high quality contrast in the images; hence limitations due to thresholding in the image analysis were overcome. A three-dimensional reconstruction of the granular structure was obtained that revealed the mesoscopic impression of the cavernlike interior of the structure, showing channels and dead-end paths in detail. In "old" granules, large cavities allowed for the irrigation and growth of dense microbial colonies along the path of the channels. Hence, in some areas, paradoxically higher biomass content was observed in the inner part of the granule compared to the outer part. Microbial clusters "rooting" from the interior of the mature granule structure indicate that granules mainly grow via biomass outgrowth and not by aggregation of small particles. We identify and discuss phenomena contributing to the life cycle of aerobic granules. With our approach, volumetric tetrahedral grids are generated that may be used to validate complex models of granule formation. PMID:24657859

  6. Aerobic Granules: Microbial Landscape and Architecture, Stages, and Practical Implications

    PubMed Central

    Holliger, Christof

    2014-01-01

    For the successful application of aerobic granules in wastewater treatment, granules containing an appropriate microbial assembly able to remove contaminants should be retained and propagated within the reactor. To manipulate and/or optimize this process, a good understanding of the formation and dynamic architecture of the granules is desirable. Models of granules often assume a spherical shape with an outer layer and an inner core, but limited information is available regarding the extent of deviations from such assumptions. We report on new imaging approaches to gain detailed insights into the structural characteristics of aerobic granules. Our approach stained all components of the granule to obtain a high quality contrast in the images; hence limitations due to thresholding in the image analysis were overcome. A three-dimensional reconstruction of the granular structure was obtained that revealed the mesoscopic impression of the cavernlike interior of the structure, showing channels and dead-end paths in detail. In “old” granules, large cavities allowed for the irrigation and growth of dense microbial colonies along the path of the channels. Hence, in some areas, paradoxically higher biomass content was observed in the inner part of the granule compared to the outer part. Microbial clusters “rooting” from the interior of the mature granule structure indicate that granules mainly grow via biomass outgrowth and not by aggregation of small particles. We identify and discuss phenomena contributing to the life cycle of aerobic granules. With our approach, volumetric tetrahedral grids are generated that may be used to validate complex models of granule formation. PMID:24657859

  7. Analysis on clinical characteristics of intracranial Arachnoid Cysts in 488 pediatric cases

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jian-Huang; Mei, Wen-Zhong; Chen, Yao; Chen, Jian-Wu; Lin, Zhi-Xiong

    2015-01-01

    To summarize the clinical characteristics of intracranial arachnoid cysts (IACs) in pediatric cases. A retrospective analysis was carried out on clinical characteristics of IACs in 488 pediatric cases who were treated at our hospital from January 2003 to September 2013. There were 342 males and 146 females (male-to-female ratio, 2.34:1), aged 5.61±3.25 years on average. 221 cases (45.29%) were diagnosed accidentally, 267 cases had clinical complaints (54.71%), among which relationships between clinical complaints and IACs were identified in 123 (46.07%). Simple IACs occurred in 364 cases (4.59%), and concurrent congenital abnormalities occurred in 124 cases (4.59%). In terms of location, 355 had IACs in middle cranial fossa (72.75%), 82 cases in posterior cranial fossa (16.80%), 20 cases in anterior cranial fossa (4.10%), 12 cases in dorsolateral surface (2.46%), 7 cases in suprasellar cistern (1.43%), 5 cases in cerebral ventricle (1.02%), 5 cases in quadrigeminal cistern (1.02%), and 2 cases in interhemispheric region (0.41%). There were 449 cases with single IAC (92.01%) and 39 cases with multiple IACs (7.99%). On MRI, the cysts produced tension in 127 cases (26.02%), but not in the remaining 361 cases (73.98%). Surgery was performed on 76 of 488 cases (15.57%), while conservative observation was accepted in 412 cases (84.43%). For the former, the symptoms and the cyst volume were improved to varying extent; for the latter, the follow-up lasting for 3-72 months (average 32.43±8.92 months) showed that the cyst volume remained stable in 407 cases (98.78%), enlarged with aggravated symptoms in 3 cases (0.73%), and shrank in 2 cases (0.49%). Clinical complaints of IACs varied in pediatric cases, and the relationships between clinical complaints and IACs were established only partially. Some pediatric cases were combined with other congenital abnormalities. The cyst volume largely remained stable during the disease course, and surgery was required for only a few

  8. Multiple Poliovirus Proteins Repress Cytoplasmic RNA Granules

    PubMed Central

    Dougherty, Jonathan D.; Tsai, Wei-Chih; Lloyd, Richard E.

    2015-01-01

    We have previously shown that poliovirus (PV) infection induces stress granule (SG) formation early in infection and then inhibits the formation of SG and disperses processing bodies (PBs) by the mid-phase of infection. Loss of SG was linked to cleavage of G3BP1 by viral 3C proteinase (3Cpro), however dispersal of PBs was not strongly linked to cleavage of specific factors by viral proteinases, suggesting other viral proteins may play roles in inhibition of SG or PB formation. Here we have screened all viral proteins for roles in inducing or inhibiting the formation of RNA granules by creating fusions with mCherry and expressing them individually in cells. Expression of viral proteins separately revealed that the capsid region P1, 2Apro, 3A, 3Cpro, the protease precursor 3CD and 3D polymerase all affect RNA granules to varying extents, whereas 2BC does not. 2Apro, which cleaves eIF4GI, induced SGs as expected, and entered novel foci containing the SG nucleating protein G3BP1. Of the two forms of G3BP, only G3BP1 is cleaved by a virus proteinase, 3Cpro, whereas G3BP2 is not cleaved by 3Cpro or 2Apro. Surprisingly, 3CD, which contains proteinase activity, differentially repressed PBs but not SGs. Further, both 2Apro and 3Cpro expression dispersed PBs, however molecular targets were different since PB dispersal due to 2Apro and heat shock protein (Hsp)90 inhibition but not 3Cpro, could be rescued by application of oxidative stress to cells. The data indicate that PV repression of SGs and PBs is multifactorial, though protease function is dominant. PMID:26610553

  9. Microbial granulation for lactic acid production.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong-Hoon; Lee, Mo-Kwon; Hwang, Yuhoon; Im, Wan-Taek; Yun, Yeo-Myeong; Park, Chul; Kim, Mi-Sun

    2016-01-01

    This work investigated the formation of microbial granules to boost the productivity of lactic acid (LA). The flocculated form of LA-producing microbial consortium, dominated by Lactobacillus sp. (91.5% of total sequence), was initially obtained in a continuous stirred-tank reactor (CSTR), which was fed with 2% glucose and operated at a hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 12 h and pH 5.0 ± 0.1 under a thermophilic condition (50°C). The mixed liquor in the CSTR was then transferred to an up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor (UASB). The fermentation performance and granulation process were monitored with a gradual decrease of HRT from 8.0 to 0.17 h, corresponding to an increase in the substrate loading from 60 to 2,880 g glucose L(-1) d(-1) . As the operation continued, the accumulation of biomass in the UASB was clearly observed, which changed from flocculent to granular form with decrease in HRT. Up to the HRT decrease to 0.5 h, the LA concentration was maintained at 19-20 g L(-1) with over 90% of substrate removal efficiency. However, further decrease of HRT resulted in a decrease of LA concentration with increase in residual glucose. Nevertheless, the volumetric LA productivity continuously increased, reaching 67 g L-fermenter (-1) h(-1) at HRT 0.17 h. The size of LA-producing granules and hydrophobicity gradually increased with decrease in HRT, reaching 6.0 mm and 60%, respectively. These biogranules were also found to have high settling velocities and low porosities, ranging 2.69-4.73 cm s(-1) and 0.39-0.92, respectively. PMID:25925200

  10. Granuphilin exclusively mediates functional granule docking to the plasma membrane

    PubMed Central

    Mizuno, Kouichi; Fujita, Takuji; Gomi, Hiroshi; Izumi, Tetsuro

    2016-01-01

    In regulated exocytosis, it is generally assumed that vesicles must stably “dock” at the plasma membrane before they are primed to become fusion-competent. However, recent biophysical analyses in living cells that visualize fluorescent secretory granules have revealed that exocytic behaviors are not necessarily uniform: some granules beneath the plasma membrane are resistant to Ca2+ -triggered release, while others are accelerated to fuse without a pause for stable docking. These findings suggest that stable docking is unnecessary, and can even be inhibitory or nonfunctional, for fusion. Consistently, pancreatic β cells deficient in the Rab27 effector, granuphilin, lack insulin granules directly attached to the plasma membrane in electron micrographs but nevertheless exhibit augmented exocytosis. Here we directly compare the exocytic behaviors between granuphilin-positive and -negative insulin granules. Although granuphilin makes granules immobile and fusion-reluctant beneath the plasma membrane, those granuphilin-positive, docked granules release a portion of granuphilin upon fusion, and fuse at a frequency and time course similar to those of granuphilin-negative undocked granules. Furthermore, granuphilin forms a 180-nm cluster at the site of each docked granule, along with granuphilin-interacting Rab27a and Munc18-1 clusters. These findings indicate that granuphilin is an exclusive component of the functional and fusion-inhibitory docking machinery of secretory granules. PMID:27032672