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Sample records for giant proteoglycan molecules

  1. A Bifurcated Proteoglycan Binding Small Molecule Carrier for siRNA Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Gooding, Matt; Adigbli, Derick; Edith Chan, A W; Melander, Roberta J; MacRobert, Alexander J; Selwood, David L

    2014-01-01

    A wider application of siRNA- and miRNA- based therapeutics is restricted by the currently available delivery systems. We have designed a new type of small molecule carrier (SMoC) system for siRNA modeled to interact with cell surface proteoglycans. This bifurcated SMoC has similar affinity for the model proteoglycan heparin to an equivalent polyarginine peptide and exhibits significant mRNA knockdown of protein levels comparable to lipofectamine and the previously reported linear SMoC. PMID:24472581

  2. The neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) heparin binding domain binds to cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycans.

    PubMed

    Kallapur, S G; Akeson, R A

    1992-12-01

    The neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) has been strongly implicated in several aspects of neural development. NCAM mediated adhesion has been proposed to involve a homophilic interaction between NCAMs on adjacent cells. The heparin binding domain (HBD) is an amino acid sequence within NCAM and has been shown to be involved in NCAM mediated adhesion but the relationship of this domain to NCAM segments mediating homophilic adhesion has not been defined. In the present study, a synthetic peptide corresponding to the HBD has been used as a substrate to determine its role in NCAM mediated adhesion. A neural cell line expressing NCAM (B35) and its derived clone which does not express NCAM (B35 clone 3) adhered similarly to plates coated with HBD peptide. A polyclonal antiserum to NCAM inhibited B35 cell-HBD peptide adhesion by only 10%, a value not statistically different from inhibition caused by preimmune serum. Both these experiments suggested no direct NCAM-HBD interactions. To test whether the HBD peptide bound to cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPG), HSPG synthesis was inhibited using beta-D-xyloside. After treatment, B35 cell adhesion to the HBD peptide, but not to control substrates, was significantly decreased. B35 cell adhesion to the HBD peptide could be inhibited by 10(-7) M heparin but not chondroitin sulfate. Preincubation of the substrate (HBD peptide) with heparin caused dramatic reduction of B35 cell-HBD peptide adhesion whereas preincubation of B35 cells with heparin caused only modest reductions in cell-HBD adhesion. Furthermore, inhibition of HSPG sulfation with sodium chlorate also decreased the adhesion of B35 cells to the HBD peptide. These results strongly suggest that, within the assay system, the NCAM HBD does not participate in homophilic interactions but binds to cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycan. This interaction potentially represents an important mechanism of NCAM adhesion and further supports the view that NCAM has

  3. A Proteoglycan-Like Molecule Offers Insights Into Ground Substance Changes During Holothurian Intestinal Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Vázquez-Vélez, Gabriel E; Rodríguez-Molina, José F; Quiñones-Frías, Mónica C; Pagán, María; García-Arrarás, José E

    2016-06-01

    Extracellular matrix remodeling is an essential component of regenerative processes in metazoans. Among these animals, holothurians (sea cucumbers) are distinguished by their great regenerative capacities. We have previously shown that fibrous collagen as well as other fibrous components disappear from the connective tissue (CT) early during intestinal regeneration, and later return as the organ primordia form. We now report on changes of the nonfibrous component of the CT. We have used Alcian Blue staining and an antibody, Proteoglycan Like-1 (PGL-1), that recognizes a proteoglycan-like antigen to identify the presence of proteoglycans in normal and regenerating intestines. Our results show that early in regeneration, the ground substance resembles that of the mesentery, the structure from where the new intestine originates. As regeneration proceeds, Alcian Blue staining and PGL-1 labeling reorganize, so that by 4 weeks the normal intestinal CT pattern is achieved. Together with our previous findings, the data suggest that CT components that might be detrimental to regeneration disappear early on, while those that might be beneficial to regeneration, such as proteoglycans, are present throughout the regenerative process. PMID:27126824

  4. Morphometry of cupromeronic blue-stained proteoglycan molecules in animal corneas, versus that of purified proteoglycans stained in vitro, implies that tertiary structures contribute to corneal ultrastructure.

    PubMed Central

    Scott, J E

    1992-01-01

    Isolated, purified small chondroitin (dermatan) sulphate proteoglycans from corneas of cow and rabbit and cow sclera were stained with Cupromeronic blue in 'model' experiments. The lengths and thicknesses of the images were compared with those of the same proteoglycans stained in the tissue, using the critical electrolyte concentration principle to give specificity for sulphated proteoglycans, and keratanase 1 or chondroitinase ABC digestion to distinguish between chondroitin and keratan sulphate. Corrections for orientation of the stained glycan filaments within the section plane were made to convert the observed lengths to true average lengths. Observed lengths of stained chondroitin (dermatan) sulphate were greater than those of keratan sulphate, both in models and tissues, in agreement with published data from biochemical and rotary-shadowing studies, in both species. Corrected (true) average lengths of stained isolated chondroitin (dermatan) sulphate proteoglycans were slightly, but not significantly, longer than expected from rotary shadowing or biochemical measurements. Keratan sulphate lengths were similarly somewhat longer. The data support the idea that Cupromeronic blue acts as a scaffold that helps maintain polyanion shape against distortion on staining. Stained filaments in tissues were sometimes over twice the length of isolated stained proteoglycans, suggesting that 2 glycan chains were aligned end-to-end. Thicknesses of proteoglycan filaments suggested that at least 2 glycan chains were aligned side-by-side, both in models and in tissues. A scheme for proteoglycan tertiary structure in cornea is proposed, in which glycan chains may bridge collagen fibrils in duplexed forms similar to those observed in rotary shadowed preparations. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:1452471

  5. 4f wavefunction collapse and giant resonances in molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robin, M. B.

    1985-08-01

    The effective potential for an f orbital in an atom reflects both the attractive Coulomb and repulsive centrifugal forces, resulting in a double-well potential. Transitions from nd orbitals to f¯ orbitals bound in the inner well of the effective potential are unique in their frequency, intensity and response to external perturbations, and are known as "giant resonances". In molecules, the role of the repulsive centrifugal force is played instead by orthogonality to bonding valence orbitals, in which case the inner-well wavefunctions then become antibonding valence MOs. In general, the expected molecular giant resonances resulting from transitions between d-like MOs and antibonding valence MOs of f symmetry are not seen because of strong valence/Rydberg mixing. However, in certain molecules having high symmetries and the proper electronic configurations, this upper-state mixing is symmetry forbidden, and so molecular giant resonances can appear. These d → f¯ molecular giant resonances are identified for the first time in the vacuum-ultraviolet spectra of cyclopropane, cyclohexane, neopentane and uranium hexafluoride.

  6. Proteoglycans in liver cancer.

    PubMed

    Baghy, Kornélia; Tátrai, Péter; Regős, Eszter; Kovalszky, Ilona

    2016-01-01

    Proteoglycans are a group of molecules that contain at least one glycosaminoglycan chain, such as a heparan, dermatan, chondroitin, or keratan sulfate, covalently attached to the protein core. These molecules are categorized based on their structure, localization, and function, and can be found in the extracellular matrix, on the cell surface, and in the cytoplasm. Cell-surface heparan sulfate proteoglycans, such as syndecans, are the primary type present in healthy liver tissue. However, deterioration of the liver results in overproduction of other proteoglycan types. The purpose of this article is to provide a current summary of the most relevant data implicating proteoglycans in the development and progression of human and experimental liver cancer. A review of our work and other studies in the literature indicate that deterioration of liver function is accompanied by an increase in the amount of chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans. The alteration of proteoglycan composition interferes with the physiologic function of the liver on several levels. This article details and discusses the roles of syndecan-1, glypicans, agrin, perlecan, collagen XVIII/endostatin, endocan, serglycin, decorin, biglycan, asporin, fibromodulin, lumican, and versican in liver function. Specifically, glypicans, agrin, and versican play significant roles in the development of liver cancer. Conversely, the presence of decorin could potentially provide protective effects. PMID:26755884

  7. Proteoglycans in liver cancer

    PubMed Central

    Baghy, Kornélia; Tátrai, Péter; Regős, Eszter; Kovalszky, Ilona

    2016-01-01

    Proteoglycans are a group of molecules that contain at least one glycosaminoglycan chain, such as a heparan, dermatan, chondroitin, or keratan sulfate, covalently attached to the protein core. These molecules are categorized based on their structure, localization, and function, and can be found in the extracellular matrix, on the cell surface, and in the cytoplasm. Cell-surface heparan sulfate proteoglycans, such as syndecans, are the primary type present in healthy liver tissue. However, deterioration of the liver results in overproduction of other proteoglycan types. The purpose of this article is to provide a current summary of the most relevant data implicating proteoglycans in the development and progression of human and experimental liver cancer. A review of our work and other studies in the literature indicate that deterioration of liver function is accompanied by an increase in the amount of chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans. The alteration of proteoglycan composition interferes with the physiologic function of the liver on several levels. This article details and discusses the roles of syndecan-1, glypicans, agrin, perlecan, collagen XVIII/endostatin, endocan, serglycin, decorin, biglycan, asporin, fibromodulin, lumican, and versican in liver function. Specifically, glypicans, agrin, and versican play significant roles in the development of liver cancer. Conversely, the presence of decorin could potentially provide protective effects. PMID:26755884

  8. Giant molecules composed of polar molecules and atoms in mixed dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Ran; Tan, Shina

    2014-05-01

    Two or three polar molecules, confined to one or two dimensions, can form stable bound states with a single atom living in three dimensions, if the molecule and the atom can interact resonantly such that their mixed dimensional scattering length is large. We call these bound states ``giant molecules'' since it's a molecule composed of smaller molecules and atoms. We study their properties using techniques including exact numerical solution, exact qunatum diffusion Monte Carlo (QMC), Born-Oppenheimer approximation (BOA), and semiclassical approximation. These bound states have a hierarchical structure reminiscent of the celestial systems.

  9. Proteoglycans and brain repair.

    PubMed

    Properzi, Francesca; Fawcett, James W

    2004-02-01

    Proteoglycans are complex molecules composed of long, unbranched sugar chains attached to a protein core. In the mammalian central nervous system, they are a major component of the extracellular matrix and of the cellular surface. After a central nervous system injury, their expression in the lesion area changes strongly and contributes to the inhibition of axon regrowth and brain repair. PMID:14739401

  10. Giant single-molecule anisotropic magnetoresistance at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Li, Ji-Jun; Bai, Mei-Lin; Chen, Zhao-Bin; Zhou, Xiao-Shun; Shi, Zhan; Zhang, Meng; Ding, Song-Yuan; Hou, Shi-Min; Schwarzacher, Walther; Nichols, Richard J; Mao, Bing-Wei

    2015-05-13

    We report an electrochemically assisted jump-to-contact scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) break junction approach to create reproducible and well-defined single-molecule spintronic junctions. The STM break junction is equipped with an external magnetic field either parallel or perpendicular to the electron transport direction. The conductance of Fe-terephthalic acid (TPA)-Fe single-molecule junctions is measured and a giant single-molecule tunneling anisotropic magnetoresistance (T-AMR) up to 53% is observed at room temperature. Theoretical calculations based on first-principles quantum simulations show that the observed AMR of Fe-TPA-Fe junctions originates from electronic coupling at the TPA-Fe interfaces modified by the magnetic orientation of the Fe electrodes with respect to the direction of current flow. The present study highlights new opportunities for obtaining detailed understanding of mechanisms of charge and spin transport in molecular junctions and the role of interfaces in determining the MR of single-molecule junctions. PMID:25894840

  11. Behavior of Giant Vesicles with Anchored DNA Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Nikolov, Vesselin; Lipowsky, Reinhard; Dimova, Rumiana

    2007-01-01

    We study changes in curvature and elastic properties of lipid membranes induced by anchoring of long hydrophilic polymers at low polymer surface concentrations (corresponding to the mushroom regime). The effect of anchored polymers on the membrane spontaneous curvature is characterized by monitoring the changes in the fluctuation spectra and the morphology of giant unilamellar vesicles. The polymers used in our study are fluorescently labeled and biotinylated λ-phage DNA molecules which bind to biotinylated giant unilamellar vesicles via a biotin-avidin-biotin linkage. By varying the amount of biotinylated lipid in the membrane, we control the surface concentration of anchors. At low anchor concentrations, the spontaneous curvature of the membrane increases linearly with the DNA concentration. The linear increase is consistent with theoretical predictions for polymer surface concentrations in the mushroom regime. At higher anchor concentrations, which should still belong to the mushroom regime, the vesicles undergo budding transitions. In this latter regime, the bud size is used to estimate the polymer-induced membrane curvature. PMID:17384074

  12. Intracellular proteoglycans.

    PubMed Central

    Kolset, Svein Olav; Prydz, Kristian; Pejler, Gunnar

    2004-01-01

    Proteoglycans (PGs) are proteins with glycosaminoglycan chains, are ubiquitously expressed and have a wide range of functions. PGs in the extracellular matrix and on the cell surface have been the subject of extensive structural and functional studies. Less attention has so far been given to PGs located in intracellular compartments, although several reports suggest that these have biological functions in storage granules, the nucleus and other intracellular organelles. The purpose of this review is, therefore, to present some of these studies and to discuss possible functions linked to PGs located in different intracellular compartments. Reference will be made to publications relevant for the topics we present. It is beyond the scope of this review to cover all publications on PGs in intracellular locations. PMID:14759226

  13. Matrix molecule influence on chondrocyte phenotype and proteoglycan 4 expression by alginate-embedded zonal chondrocytes and mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Coates, Emily E; Riggin, Corinne N; Fisher, John P

    2012-12-01

    Articular cartilage resists load and provides frictionless movement at joint surfaces. The tissue is organized into the superficial, middle, deep, and calcified zones throughout its depth, each which serve distinct functions. Proteoglycan 4 (PRG4), found in the superficial zone, is a critical component of the joint's lubricating mechanisms. Maintenance of both the chondrocyte and zonal chondrocyte phenotype remain challenges for in vitro culture and tissue engineering. Here we investigate the expression of PRG4 mRNA and protein by primary bovine superficial zone chondrocytes, middle/deep zone chondrocytes, and mesenchymal stem cells encapsulated in alginate hydrogels with hyaluronic acid (HA) and chondroitin sulfate (CS) additives. Chondrogenic phenotype and differentiation markers are evaluated by mRNA expression, histochemical, and immunohistochemical staining. Results show middle/deep cells express no measurable PRG4 mRNA by day 7. In contrast, superficial zone cells express elevated PRG4 mRNA throughout culture time. This expression can be significantly enhanced up to 15-fold by addition of both HA and CS to scaffolds. Conversely, PRG4 mRNA expression is downregulated (up to 5-fold) by CS and HA in differentiating MSCs, possibly due to build up of entrapped protein. HA and CS demonstrate favorable effects on chondrogenesis by upregulating transcription factor Sox9 mRNA (up to 4.6-fold) and downregulating type I collagen mRNA (up to 18-fold). Results highlight the important relationship between matrix components and expression of critical lubricating proteins in an engineered cartilage scaffold. PMID:22674584

  14. Giant Kerr nonlinearity via tunneling induced double dark resonances in triangular quantum dot molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Si-Cong; Wan, Ren-Gang; Tong, Cun-Zhu; Fu, Xi-Hong; Cao, Jun-Sheng; Ning, Yong-Qiang

    2015-12-01

    A scheme for giant Kerr nonlinearity via tunneling in triangular triple quantum dot molecules is proposed. In such a system, the linear absorption and the Kerr nonlinearity depend critically on the energy splitting of the excited states and the tunneling intensity. With proper parameters, giant Kerr nonlinearity accompanied by vanishing absorption can be realized. The enhancement of Kerr nonlinearity is attributed to the interacting double dark resonances induced by the tunneling between the quantum dots, requiring no extra coupling laser fields.

  15. Precise Tetrahedral Giant Molecules Based on Polyhedral Oligosilsesquioxane (POSS) Nano-atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Mingjun; Hsu, Chih-Hao; Mei, Shan; Zhang, Wen-Bin; Cheng, Stephen Z. D.

    2014-03-01

    The assembly of building blocks with specific shape and symmetry in 3D space is a long-lasting topic in scientific research. If ``nano-atoms'' are placed on the apexes of a rigid polyhedron linker to form a larger faceted giant molecule, such molecules would amplify the symmetry of the linkers and result in giant polyhedra molecules. When four POSS cages are linked to the apex of a tetrahedron, we obtain a giant tetrahedron. Depending on the linkers, it can be a semi-rigid or a rigid giant polyhedron. An interesting approach is to utilize the sp3-carbon or adamantane core to introduce the Td symmetry, and utilize ``click reaction'' to connect four hydrophobic isobutyl-POSS (BPOSS) at four corners. Our preliminary results show that the giant tetrahedron Tetra-4BPOSS forms an interdigitated diamondoid structure. In these giant polyhedra, we can use different ``nano-atoms'' with different functional groups, which may also act as an additional factor to affect the final ordered structures. The progresses of our research lead to three hydrophobic and one hydrophilic HPOSS (HPOSS represents seven hydroxyl group functionalized POSS), and two hydrophobic BPOSS and two hydrophilic HPOSS.

  16. Toward Controlled Hierarchical Heterogeneities in Giant Molecules with Precisely Arranged Nano Building Blocks.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Huang, Mingjun; Su, Hao; Zhang, Siyu; Yue, Kan; Dong, Xue-Hui; Li, Xiaopeng; Liu, Hao; Zhang, Shuo; Wesdemiotis, Chrys; Lotz, Bernard; Zhang, Wen-Bin; Li, Yiwen; Cheng, Stephen Z D

    2016-01-27

    Herein we introduce a unique synthetic methodology to prepare a library of giant molecules with multiple, precisely arranged nano building blocks, and illustrate the influence of minute structural differences on their self-assembly behaviors. The T8 polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS) nanoparticles are orthogonally functionalized and sequentially attached onto the end of a hydrophobic polymer chain in either linear or branched configuration. The heterogeneity of primary chemical structure in terms of composition, surface functionality, sequence, and topology can be precisely controlled and is reflected in the self-assembled supramolecular structures of these giant molecules in the condensed state. This strategy offers promising opportunities to manipulate the hierarchical heterogeneities of giant molecules via precise and modular assemblies of various nano building blocks. PMID:27163025

  17. Toward Controlled Hierarchical Heterogeneities in Giant Molecules with Precisely Arranged Nano Building Blocks

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Herein we introduce a unique synthetic methodology to prepare a library of giant molecules with multiple, precisely arranged nano building blocks, and illustrate the influence of minute structural differences on their self-assembly behaviors. The T8 polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS) nanoparticles are orthogonally functionalized and sequentially attached onto the end of a hydrophobic polymer chain in either linear or branched configuration. The heterogeneity of primary chemical structure in terms of composition, surface functionality, sequence, and topology can be precisely controlled and is reflected in the self-assembled supramolecular structures of these giant molecules in the condensed state. This strategy offers promising opportunities to manipulate the hierarchical heterogeneities of giant molecules via precise and modular assemblies of various nano building blocks. PMID:27163025

  18. Dependence of proteoglycan induced arthritis in BALB/c mice on the development of autoantibodies to high density proteoglycans.

    PubMed Central

    Wooley, P H; Siegner, S W; Whalen, J D; Karvonen, R L; Fernández-Madrid, F

    1992-01-01

    BALB/c mice were immunised with high or low density native human cartilage proteoglycans, or the respective core proteins obtained from chondroitin ABC lyase digestion. Mice injected with high density native proteoglycans developed arthritis whereas mice injected with low density proteoglycans or with core proteins did not. Analysis of the immune response by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and western blot showed a stronger and more polyspecific response in animals injected with low density proteoglycans compared with mice with arthritis which had been injected with high density proteoglycans. Autoantibodies to mouse high density proteoglycans were only present in mice injected with native human high density proteoglycans, however. The data suggest that an arthritogenic epitope lies within the glycosaminoglycan rich region of the native proteoglycan molecule, which may induce an autoantibody response and subsequently arthritis in BALB/c mice. Images PMID:1417126

  19. The hyaluronan and proteoglycan link proteins: Organizers of the brain extracellular matrix and key molecules for neuronal function and plasticity.

    PubMed

    Oohashi, Toshitaka; Edamatsu, Midori; Bekku, Yoko; Carulli, Daniela

    2015-12-01

    The hyaluronan and proteoglycanbinding link protein (Hapln) is a key molecule in the formation and control of hyaluronan-based condensed perineuronal matrix in the adult brain. This review summarizes the recent advances in understanding the role of Haplns in the formation and control of two distinct types of perineuronal matrices, one for "classical" PNN and the other for the specialized extracellular matrix (ECM) at the node of Ranvier in the central nervous system (CNS). We introduce the structural components of each ECM organization including the basic concept of supramolecular structure named "HLT model". We furthermore summarize the developmental and physiological role of perineuronal ECMs from the studies of Haplns and related molecules. Finally, we also discuss the potential mechanism modulating PNNs in the adult CNS. This layer of organized matrices may exert a direct effect via core protein or sugar moiety from the structure or by acting as a binding site for biologically active molecules, which are important for neuronal plasticity and saltatory conduction. PMID:26387938

  20. Proteoglycans in Normal and Healing Skin

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Margaret Mary; Melrose, James

    2015-01-01

    Significance: Proteoglycans have a distinct spatial localization in normal skin and are essential for the correct structural development, organization, hydration, and functional properties of this tissue. The extracellular matrix (ECM) is no longer considered to be just an inert supportive material but is a source of directive, spatial and temporal, contextual information to the cells via components such as the proteoglycans. There is a pressing need to improve our understanding of how these important molecules functionally interact with other matrix structures, cells and cellular mediators in normal skin and during wound healing. Recent Advances: New antibodies to glycosaminoglycan side chain components of skin proteoglycans have facilitated the elucidation of detailed localization patterns within skin. Other studies have revealed important proliferative activities of proteinase-generated fragments of proteoglycans and other ECM components (matricryptins). Knockout mice have further established the functional importance of skin proteoglycans in the assembly and homeostasis of the normal skin ECM. Critical Issues: Our comprehension of the molecular and structural complexity of skin as a complex, dynamic, constantly renewing, layered connective tissue is incomplete. The impact of changes in proteoglycans on skin pathology and the wound healing process is recognized as an important area of pathobiology and is an area of intense investigation. Future Directions: Advanced technology is allowing the development of new artificial skins. Recent knowledge on skin proteoglycans can be used to incorporate these molecules into useful adjunct therapies for wound healing and for maintenance of optimal tissue homeostasis in aging skin. PMID:25785238

  1. Heparan Sulfate Proteoglycans

    PubMed Central

    Sarrazin, Stephane; Lamanna, William C.; Esko, Jeffrey D.

    2011-01-01

    Heparan sulfate proteoglycans are found at the cell surface and in the extracellular matrix, where they interact with a plethora of ligands. Over the last decade, new insights have emerged regarding the mechanism and biological significance of these interactions. Here, we discuss changing views on the specificity of protein–heparan sulfate binding and the activity of HSPGs as receptors and coreceptors. Although few in number, heparan sulfate proteoglycans have profound effects at the cellular, tissue, and organismal level. PMID:21690215

  2. Small hydrocarbon molecules in cloud-forming brown dwarf and giant gas planet atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilger, C.; Rimmer, P.; Helling, Ch.

    2013-11-01

    We study the abundances of complex carbon-bearing molecules in the oxygen-rich dust-forming atmospheres of brown dwarfs and giant gas planets. The inner atmospheric regions that form the inner boundary for thermochemical gas-phase models are investigated. Results from DRIFT-PHOENIX atmosphere simulations, which include the feedback of phase-non-equilibrium dust cloud formation on the atmospheric structure and the gas-phase abundances, are utilized. The resulting element depletion leads to a shift in the carbon-to-oxygen ratio such that several hydrocarbon molecules and cyanopolyyne molecules can be present. An increase in surface gravity and/or a decrease in metallicity support the increase in the partial pressures of these species. CO, CO2, CH4 and HCN contain the largest fraction of carbon. In the upper atmosphere of low-metallicity objects, more carbon is contained in C4H than in CO, and also CH3 and C2H2 play an increasingly important role as carbon sink. We determine chemical relaxation time-scales to evaluate if hydrocarbon molecules can be affected by transport-induced quenching. Our results suggest that a considerable amount of C2H6 and C2H2 could be expected in the upper atmospheres not only of giant gas planets, but also of brown dwarfs. However, the exact quenching height strongly depends on the data source used. These results will have an impact on future thermokinetic studies, as they change the inner boundary condition for those simulations.

  3. Differential extraction of axonally transported proteoglycans

    SciTech Connect

    Elam, J.S. )

    1990-10-01

    Axonally transported proteoglycans were differentially solubilized by a sequence of extractions designed to infer their relationship to nerve terminal membranes. Groups of goldfish were injected unilaterally with 35SO4 and contralateral optic tecta containing axonally transported molecules were removed 16 h later. Tecta were homogenized in isotonic buffer and centrifuged at 100,000 g for 60 min to create a total supernatant fraction. Subsequent homogenizations followed by recentrifugation were with hypotonic buffer (lysis extract), 1 M NaCl, Triton X-100 or alternatively Triton-1 M NaCl. Populations of proteoglycans in each extract were isolated on DEAE ion exchange columns and evaluated for content of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). Results show the distribution of transported proteoglycans to be 26.3% total soluble, 13.7% lysis extract, 13.8% NaCl extract, 12.2% Triton extract, and 46.2% Triton-NaCl extract. Proteoglycans from all fractions contained heparan sulfate as the predominant GAG, with lesser amounts of chondroitin (4 or 6) sulfate. The possible localizations of transported proteoglycans suggested by the extraction results are discussed.

  4. Isolation of mouse cell proteoglycan mutants

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, K.M.; Keller, J.M.

    1986-05-01

    The sulfated proteoglycans on the surface of cultured mammalian cells have been implicated in a variety of phenomena. To obtain more direct evidence for the role of these molecules in specific cellular functions, they are isolating mutants that produce altered sulfated proteoglycans from a cloned line of Swiss mouse 3T3 cells. This cell type was selected because it exhibits contact inhibition of growth and there is extensive information on its' cell surface and extracellular proteoglycans and other glycoproteins. Cells were chemically mutagenized and subjected to one or more cycles of radiation suicide in the presence of /sup 35/S-sulfate. By replica plating, 150 clones, which appear to incorporate abnormal amounts of /sup 35/S-sulfate, have been selected. After recloning three times via the replica plating technique, the proteoglycans of 29 clones have thus far been analyzed. They have identified four clones which appear to make altered amounts of either cell surface heparan sulfate or chondroitin sulfate. The biochemical bases for the altered levels of the proteoglycans are under study. Of particular interest, however, is the fact that in this limited collection of mutants the chemical alterations correlate with specific altered cellular morphologies.

  5. Giant pumping of single-file water molecules in a carbon nanotube.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y; Zhao, Y J; Huang, J P

    2011-11-17

    Achieving a fast, unidirectional flow of single-file water molecules (UFSWM) across nanochannels is important for membrane-based water purification or seawater desalination. For this purpose, electro-osmosis methods are recognized as a very promising approach and have been extensively discussed in the literature. Utilizing molecular dynamics simulations, here we propose a design for pumping water molecules in a single-walled carbon nanotube in the presence of a linearly gradient electric (GE) field. Such a GE field is inspired by GE fields generated from charged ions located adjacent to biological membrane water nanochannels that can conduct water in and out of cells and can be experimentally achieved by using the charged tip of an atomic force microscope. As a result, the maximum speed of the UFSWM can be 1 or 2 orders of magnitude larger than that in a uniform electric (UE) field. Also, inverse transportation of water molecules does not exist in case of the GE field but can appear for the UE field. Thus, the GE field yields a much more efficient UFSWM than the UE field. The giant pumping ability as revealed is attributed to the nonzero net electrostatic force acting on each water molecule confined in the nanotube. These observations have significance for the design of nanoscale devices for readily achieving controllable UFSWM at high speed. PMID:21977917

  6. Frank-Kasper and other superlattice formations in a set of giant molecules having ABn type of Janus particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Xueyan; Li, Yiwen; Huang, Mingjun; Hsu, Chi-Hao; Cheng, Stephen Z. D.

    2015-03-01

    A novel serial of precisely defined giant molecules having ABn type of Janus particles has been designed and synthesized. They are consisted of one functionalized hydrophilic polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS) (A) connected with different number of hydrophobic POSS cages (B, n =2-6). With variation of the interaction functional groups on A and the number of the coordinated hydrophobic POSS B, different superlattice structures could be formed at a sub-10-nm scale. For example, the superlattice structure of DPOSS-BPOSS2 (DPOSS represents seven hydroxyl group functionalized POSS and BPOSS represents isobutyl POSS) could change from a double-dyroids phase to a hexagonally packed cylinder phase with increasing temperature, due to an order-order transition in the weak segregation region. For DPOSS-BPOSS3 and DPOSS-BPOSS4, both of these giant molecules could form A15 phase, which is a Frank-Kasper phase. With deep understanding of this set of model ABn type giant molecules based on the POSS nano atoms, it may be promising to construct new generations of giant molecules for further development of functional materials with desired structures and macroscopic properties.

  7. Surface Proteoglycans as Mediators in Bacterial Pathogens Infections

    PubMed Central

    García, Beatriz; Merayo-Lloves, Jesús; Martin, Carla; Alcalde, Ignacio; Quirós, Luis M.; Vazquez, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Infectious diseases remain an important global health problem. The interaction of a wide range of pathogen bacteria with host cells from many different tissues is frequently mediated by proteoglycans. These compounds are ubiquitous complex molecules which are not only involved in adherence and colonization, but can also participate in other steps of pathogenesis. To overcome the problem of microbial resistance to antibiotics new therapeutic agents could be developed based on the characteristics of the interaction of pathogens with proteoglycans. PMID:26941735

  8. Synthesis of extremely large mesoporous activated carbon and its unique adsorption for giant molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Tamai, Hisashi; Kakii, Takuhiro; Hirota, Yoshifumi

    1996-02-01

    The steam invigoration of pitches (softening points 85 and 280{degrees}C) homogenized with 1-3 wt% of organo rare0earth metal complexes such as Ln(C{sub 5}H{sub 5}){sub 3} or Ln(acac) (Ln=Y, Yb) at 930{degrees}C provided activated carbons with an extremely high mesopore ration, >70%. The resulted activated carbon selectively adsorbs giant molecules such as Vitamin B{sub 12}, blue acid 90 dye, dextran, nystatin, and humic acid, reflecting their large mesopore volumes. To understand what kind of carbon skeleton in pitch is suited for generation of high mesopore ration, the steam invigoration of a series of condensed polynuclear aromatics (COPNA) resins prepared from naphthlene, anthracene, phenanthrene, pyrene, or perylene and p-xylene-{alpha},{alpha}{prime}-diol were conducted in the presence of rare-earth metal complexes. As a result, COPNA resins containing phenanthrene, perylene, and pyrene generated large mesopore volume. 35 refs., 16 figs., 11 tabs.

  9. Proteoglycans and neuronal migration in the cerebral cortex during development and disease

    PubMed Central

    Maeda, Nobuaki

    2015-01-01

    Chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans and heparan sulfate proteoglycans are major constituents of the extracellular matrix and the cell surface in the brain. Proteoglycans bind with many proteins including growth factors, chemokines, axon guidance molecules, and cell adhesion molecules through both the glycosaminoglycan and the core protein portions. The functions of proteoglycans are flexibly regulated due to the structural variability of glycosaminoglycans, which are generated by multiple glycosaminoglycan synthesis and modifying enzymes. Neuronal cell surface proteoglycans such as PTPζ, neuroglycan C and syndecan-3 function as direct receptors for heparin-binding growth factors that induce neuronal migration. The lectican family, secreted chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans, forms large aggregates with hyaluronic acid and tenascins, in which many signaling molecules and enzymes including matrix proteases are preserved. In the developing cerebrum, secreted chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans such as neurocan, versican and phosphacan are richly expressed in the areas that are strategically important for neuronal migration such as the striatum, marginal zone, subplate and subventricular zone in the neocortex. These proteoglycans may anchor various attractive and/or repulsive cues, regulating the migration routes of inhibitory neurons. Recent studies demonstrated that the genes encoding proteoglycan core proteins and glycosaminoglycan synthesis and modifying enzymes are associated with various psychiatric and intellectual disorders, which may be related to the defects of neuronal migration. PMID:25852466

  10. Matricryptins derived from collagens and proteoglycans.

    PubMed

    Ricard-Blum, Sylvie; Ballut, Lionel

    2011-01-01

    Controlled proteolysis of extracellular matrix components releases bioactive fragments or unmasks cryptic sites that play key roles in controlling various physio-pathological processes including angiogenesis, tissue remodeling, wound healing, inflammation, tumor growth, and metastasis. We review here the structure and mechanisms of release of i) the proteolytic fragments (matricryptins) cleaved from collagens, proteoglycans and glycosaminoglycans, and ii) the matricryptic sites existing in these molecules. The cell surface receptors and the signaling pathways they trigger to exert their biological activities is discussed with the major physio-pathological processes they control. Their involvement in autoimmune and inherited diseases is reported. Most matricryptins issued from collagens, proteoglycans and glycosaminoglycans exhibit anti-angiogenic and anti-tumor properties and their use as potential drugs and as potential disease markers is discussed. Perspectives for identifying the common structural features, if any, of the matricryptins and their use in combination with chemotherapy and radiotherapy in the treatment of cancer are presented. PMID:21196195

  11. Proteoglycan form and function: A comprehensive nomenclature of proteoglycans

    PubMed Central

    Iozzo, Renato V.; Schaefer, Liliana

    2016-01-01

    We provide a comprehensive classification of the proteoglycan gene families and respective protein cores. This updated nomenclature is based on three criteria: Cellular and subcellular location, overall gene/protein homology, and the utilization of specific protein modules within their respective protein cores. These three signatures were utilized to design four major classes of proteoglycans with distinct forms and functions: the intracellular, cell-surface, pericellular and extracellular proteoglycans. The proposed nomenclature encompasses forty-three distinct proteoglycan-encoding genes and many alternatively-spliced variants. The biological functions of these four proteoglycan families are critically assessed in development, cancer and angiogenesis, and in various acquired and genetic diseases where their expression is aberrant. PMID:25701227

  12. EDTA-insoluble, calcium-binding proteoglycan in bovine bone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hashimoto, Y.; Lester, G. E.; Caterson, B.; Yamauchi, M.

    1995-01-01

    A calcium ion precipitable, trypsin-generated proteoglycan fragment has been isolated from the demineralized, EDTA-insoluble matrices of bone. The demineralized matrix was completely digested with trypsin, increasing concentrations of CaCl2 were added to the supernatant, and the resulting precipitates were analyzed. The amount of precipitate gradually increased with higher concentrations of calcium and was reversibly solubilized by EDTA. After molecular sieve and anion exchange chromatography, a proteoglycan-containing peak was obtained. Immunochemical analysis showed that this peak contained chondroitin 4-sulfate and possibly keratan sulfate. Amino acid analysis showed that this proteoglycan contained high amounts of aspartic acid/asparagine (Asx), serine (Ser), glutamic acid/glutamine (Glx), proline (Pro), and glycine (Gly); however, it contained little leucine (Leu) which suggests that it is not a member of the leucine-rich small proteoglycan family. In addition, significant amounts of phosphoserine (P-Ser) and hydroxyproline (Hyp) were identified in hydrolysates of this fraction. A single band (M(r) 59 kDa) was obtained on SDS-PAGE that stained with Stains-all but not with Coomassie Brilliant Blue R-250. If bone powder was trypsinized prior to demineralization, this proteoglycan-containing fraction was not liberated. Collectively, these results indicate that a proteoglycan occurs in the demineralized matrix that is precipitated with CaCl2 and is closely associated with both mineral and collagen matrices. Such a molecule might facilitate the structural network for the induction of mineralization in bone.

  13. Proteoglycans and cartilage repair.

    PubMed

    Ouzzine, Mohamed; Venkatesan, Narayanan; Fournel-Gigleux, Sylvie

    2012-01-01

    Repair of damaged articular cartilage in osteoarthritis (OA) is a clinical challenge. Because cartilage is an avascular and aneural tissue, normal mechanisms of tissue repair through recruitment of cells to the site of tissue destruction are not feasible. Proteoglycan (PG) depletion induced by the proinflammatory cytokine interleukin-1β, a principal mediator in OA, is a major factor in the onset and progression of joint destruction. Current symptomatic treatments of OA by anti-inflammatory drugs do not alter the progression of the disease. Various therapeutic strategies have been developed to antagonize the effect of proinflammatory cytokines. However, relatively few studies were conducted to stimulate anabolic activity, in an attempt to enhance cartilage repair. To this aim, a nonviral gene transfer strategy of glycosyltransferases responsible for PG synthesis has been developed and tested for its capacity to promote cartilage PG synthesis and deposition. Transfection of chondrocytes or cartilage explants by the expression vector for the glycosyltransferase β-1,3-glucuronosyltransferase-I (GlcAT-I) enhanced PG synthesis and deposition in the ECM by promoting the synthesis of chondroitin sulfate GAG chains of the cartilage matrix. This indicates that therapy mediated through GT gene delivery may constitute a new strategy for the treatment of OA. PMID:22252645

  14. Traffic lights for axon growth: proteoglycans and their neuronal receptors

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Yingjie

    2014-01-01

    Axon growth is a central event in the development and post-injury plasticity of the nervous system. Growing axons encounter a wide variety of environmental instructions. Much like traffic lights in controlling the migrating axons, chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPGs) and heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs) often lead to “stop” and “go” growth responses in the axons, respectively. Recently, the LAR family and NgR family molecules were identified as neuronal receptors for CSPGs and HSPGs. These discoveries provided molecular tools for further study of mechanisms underlying axon growth regulation. More importantly, the identification of these proteoglycan receptors offered potential therapeutic targets for promoting post-injury axon regeneration. PMID:25206823

  15. Proteoglycans support proper granule formation in pancreatic acinar cells.

    PubMed

    Aroso, Miguel; Agricola, Brigitte; Hacker, Christian; Schrader, Michael

    2015-10-01

    Zymogen granules (ZG) are specialized organelles in the exocrine pancreas which allow digestive enzyme storage and regulated secretion. The molecular mechanisms of their biogenesis and the sorting of zymogens are still incompletely understood. Here, we investigated the role of proteoglycans in granule formation and secretion of zymogens in pancreatic AR42J cells, an acinar model system. Cupromeronic Blue cytochemistry and biochemical studies revealed an association of proteoglycans primarily with the granule membrane. Removal of proteoglycans by carbonate treatment led to a loss of membrane curvature indicating a supportive role in the maintenance of membrane shape and stability. Chemical inhibition of proteoglycan synthesis impaired the formation of normal electron-dense granules in AR42J cells and resulted in the formation of unusually small granule structures. These structures still contained the zymogen carboxypeptidase, a cargo molecule of secretory granules, but migrated to lighter fractions after density gradient centrifugation. Furthermore, the basal secretion of amylase was increased in AR42J cells after inhibitor treatment. In addition, irregular-shaped granules appeared in pancreatic lobules. We conclude that the assembly of a proteoglycan scaffold at the ZG membrane is supporting efficient packaging of zymogens and the proper formation of stimulus-competent storage granules in acinar cells of the pancreas. PMID:26105026

  16. [Proteoglycans and pathology--new aspects].

    PubMed

    Kolset, S O; Drevon, C A; Prydz, K

    1997-03-10

    It is well documented that proteoglycans are involved in a wide range of pathological conditions. Recently published results in international journals provide new information on the role of proteoglycans in such conditions. A mutation in the gene encoding for a cell surface proteoglycan has been demonstrated in overgrowth syndromes. A proteoglycan has been isolated from urine and shown to induce cachexia in cancer patients. Furthermore, in both achondrogenesis and colon cancer, the reduced ability to sulphate proteoglycans is due to genetic defects in cellular sulfate transporters. Finally, fibrosis has been inhibited in glomerulonephritic mice by transferring the gene for decorin, a transforming growth factor beta-1 binding proteoglycan, into muscle tissue. PMID:9103006

  17. Molecules at the Quantum-Classical Nanoparticle Interface: Giant Mn70 Single-Molecule Magnets of ∼4 nm Diameter.

    PubMed

    Vinslava, Alina; Tasiopoulos, Anastasios J; Wernsdorfer, Wolfgang; Abboud, Khalil A; Christou, George

    2016-04-01

    Two Mn70 torus-like molecules have been obtained from the alcoholysis in EtOH and 2-ClC2H4OH of [Mn12O12(O2CMe)16(H2O)4]·4H2O·2MeCO2H (1) in the presence of NBu(n)4MnO4 and an excess of MeCO2H. The reaction in EtOH afforded [Mn70O60(O2CMe)70(OEt)20(EtOH)16(H2O)22] (2), whereas the reaction in ClC2H4OH gave [Mn70O60(O2CMe)70(OC2H4Cl)20(ClC2H4OH)18(H2O)22] (3). The complexes are nearly isostructural, each possessing a Mn70 torus structure consisting of alternating near-linear [Mn3(μ3-O)4] and cubic [Mn4(μ3-O)2(μ3-OR)2] (R = OEt, 2; R = OC2H4Cl, 3) subunits, linked together via syn,syn-μ-bridging MeCO2(-) and μ3-bridging O(2-) groups. 2 and 3 have an overall diameter of ∼4 nm and crystallize as highly ordered supramolecular nanotubes. Alternating current (ac) magnetic susceptibility measurements, performed on microcrystalline samples in the 1.8-10 K range and a 3.5 G ac field with oscillation frequencies in the 5-1500 Hz range, revealed frequency-dependent out-of-phase signals below ∼2.4 K for both molecules indicative of the slow magnetization relaxation of single-molecule magnets (SMMs). Single-crystal, magnetization vs field studies on both complexes revealed hysteresis loops below 1.5 K, thus confirming 2 and 3 to be new SMMs. The hysteresis loops do not show the steps that are characteristic of quantum tunneling of magnetization (QTM). However, low-temperature studies revealed temperature-independent relaxation rates below ∼0.2 K for both compounds, the signature of ground state QTM. Fitting of relaxation data to the Arrhenius equation gave effective barriers for magnetization reversal (Ueff) of 23 and 18 K for 2 and 3, respectively. Because the Mn70 molecule is close to the classical limit, it was also studied using a method based on the Néel-Brown model of thermally activated magnetization reversal in a classical single-domain magnetic nanoparticle. The field and sweep-rate dependence of the coercive field was investigated and yielded the energy

  18. Glycosaminoglycan and proteoglycan in skin aging.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong Hun; Oh, Jang-Hee; Chung, Jin Ho

    2016-09-01

    Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) and proteoglycans (PGs) are abundant structural components of the extracellular matrix in addition to collagen fibers. Hyaluronic acid (HA), one of GAGs, forms proteoglycan aggregates, which are large complexes of HA and HA-binding PGs. Their crosslinking to other matrix proteins such as the collagen network results in the formation of supermolecular structures and functions to increase tissue stiffness. Skin aging can be classified as intrinsic aging and photoaging based on the phenotypes and putative mechanism. While intrinsic aging is characterized by a thinned epidermis and fine wrinkles caused by advancing age, photoaging is characterized by deep wrinkles, skin laxity, telangiectasias, and appearance of lentigines and is mainly caused by chronic sun exposure. The major molecular mechanism governing skin aging processes has been attributed to the loss of mature collagen and increased matrix metalloproteinase expression. However, various strategies focusing on collagen turnover remain unsatisfactory for the reversal or prevention of skin aging. Although the expression of GAGs and PGs in the skin and their regulatory mechanisms are not fully understood, we and others have elucidated various changes in GAGs and PGs in aged skin, suggesting that these molecules are important contributors to skin aging. In this review, we focus on skin-abundant GAGs and PGs and their changes in human skin during the skin aging process. PMID:27378089

  19. Giant Hysteresis of Single-Molecule Magnets Adsorbed on a Nonmagnetic Insulator.

    PubMed

    Wäckerlin, Christian; Donati, Fabio; Singha, Aparajita; Baltic, Romana; Rusponi, Stefano; Diller, Katharina; Patthey, François; Pivetta, Marina; Lan, Yanhua; Klyatskaya, Svetlana; Ruben, Mario; Brune, Harald; Dreiser, Jan

    2016-07-01

    TbPc2 single-molecule magnets adsorbed on a magnesium oxide tunnel barrier exhibit record magnetic remanence, record hysteresis opening, perfect out-of-plane alignment of the magnetic easy axes, and self-assembly into a well-ordered layer. PMID:27159732

  20. Axonal transport of proteoglycans to the goldfish optic tectum

    SciTech Connect

    Ripellino, J.A.; Elam, J.S.

    1988-05-01

    The study addressed the question of whether /sup 35/SO/sub 4/ labeled molecules that have been delivered to the goldfish optic nerve terminals by rapid axonal transport include soluble proteoglycans. For analysis, tectal homogenates were subfractionated into a soluble fraction (soluble after centrifugation at 105,000 g), a lysis fraction (soluble after treatment with hypotonic buffer followed by centrifugation at 105,000 g) and a final 105,000 g pellet fraction. The soluble fraction contained 25.7% of incorporated radioactivity and upon DEAE chromatography was resolved into a fraction of sulfated glycoproteins eluting at 0-0.32 M NaCl and containing 39.5% of total soluble label and a fraction eluting at 0.32-0.60 M NaCl containing 53.9% of soluble label. This latter fraction was included on columns of Sepharose CL-6B with or without 4 M guanidine and after pronase digestion was found to have 51% of its radioactivity contained in the glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) heparan sulfate and chondroitin (4 or 6) sulfate in the ratio of 70% to 30%. Mobility of both intact proteoglycans and constituent GAGs on Sepharose CL-6B indicated a size distribution that is smaller than has been observed for proteoglycans and GAGs from cultured neuronal cell lines. Similar analysis of lysis fraction, containing 11.5% of incorporated /sup 35/SO/sub 4/, showed a mixture of heparan sulfate and chondroitin sulfate containing proteoglycans, apparent free heparan sulfate and few, if any, sulfated glycoproteins. Overall, the results support the hypothesis that soluble proteoglycans are among the molecules axonally transported in the visual system.

  1. The abalone egg vitelline envelope receptor for sperm lysin is a giant multivalent molecule

    PubMed Central

    Swanson, Willie J.; Vacquier, Victor D.

    1997-01-01

    Abalone sperm lysin is a 16-kDa acrosomal protein, which nonenzymatically and species selectively creates a hole in the egg vitelline envelope (VE) through which the sperm passes to reach the egg cell membrane. The crystal structures of both monomeric and dimeric lysins have been solved and the sequences of lysins from 20 abalone species have been determined. As a first step in understanding the molecular mechanism by which lysin creates a hole in the VE, its VE receptor was isolated. The VE receptor for lysin (VERL) is an unbranched, rod-like molecule with an approximate relative molecular mass of 2 million; half the mass being carbohydrate. Fluorescence polarization studies showed positive cooperativity in the binding of lysin to VERL (EC50 ≈9 nM) and were consistent with the species selectivity of lysin in dissolving VEs. Each molecule of VERL bound between 126 and 142 molecules of monomeric lysin (two independent assays), showing that VERL possesses repetitive lysin-binding motifs. PMID:9192632

  2. Giant factory caught contaminating the environment - Dust and molecules expelled by eta Carinae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loinard, Laurent; Menten, Karl; Urquhart, James

    2014-04-01

    eta Carinae is one of the most massive stellar sources in the Milky Way and, in many respects, a remarkable astronomical object. It entered the hall of fame of astronomy in the mid 19th century when it underwent a major outburst, temporarily becoming the second brightest star at visible wavelengths in the entire sky. Known as the Great Eruption, this event led to the ejection of at least ten solar masses of material, now distributed in a bipolar nebula called the Homunculus. The material in the Homunculus provides us with a rare example of an ejecta that has not yet mixed with the ambient interstellar medium. Dust and molecules have formed out of this ejected material, and recent APEX and Herschel observations have shown that the chemical composition of the molecular component reflects the peculiar elemental abundances in the Homunuculus. Thus, eta Carinae provides us a unique opportunity to study directly the material injected into the interstellar medium by an evolved massive star, as well as the processes of dust and molecule formation occurring in situ in the ejecta. Here, we propose to constrain the spatial distribution and the physical conditions of the molecular components using sensitive H52 ATCA observations of the N2H+(1-0) line. These ATCA observations will constitute an important step toward a complete understanding of the origin of the molecular component around eta Carinae, that will have important repercussions for our comprehension of the latest phases of massive stellar evolution in general.

  3. Reactivating mutant p53 using small molecules as zinc metallochaperones: awakening a sleeping giant in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Blanden, Adam R.; Yu, Xin; Loh, Stewart N.; Levine, Arnold J.; Carpizo, Darren R.

    2016-01-01

    Tumor protein p53 (TP53) is the most commonly mutated gene in human cancer. The majority of mutations are missense, and generate a defective protein that is druggable. Yet, for decades, the small-molecule restoration of wild-type (WT) p53 function in mutant p53 tumors (so-called p53 mutant ‘reactivation’) has been elusive to researchers. The p53 protein requires the binding of a single zinc ion for proper folding, and impairing zinc binding is a major mechanism for loss of function in missense mutant p53. Here, we describe recent work defining a new class of drugs termed zinc metallochaperones that restore WT p53 structure and function by restoring Zn2+ to Zn2+-deficient mutant p53. PMID:26205328

  4. Deciphering the origin of giant magnetic anisotropy and fast quantum tunnelling in Rhenium(IV) single-molecule magnets.

    PubMed

    Singh, Saurabh Kumar; Rajaraman, Gopalan

    2016-01-01

    Single-molecule magnets represent a promising route to achieve potential applications such as high-density information storage and spintronics devices. Among others, 4d/5d elements such as Re(IV) ion are found to exhibit very large magnetic anisotropy, and inclusion of this ion-aggregated clusters yields several attractive molecular magnets. Here, using ab intio calculations, we unravel the source of giant magnetic anisotropy associated with the Re(IV) ions by studying a series of mononuclear Re(IV) six coordinate complexes. The low-lying doublet states are found to be responsible for large magnetic anisotropy and the sign of the axial zero-field splitting parameter (D) can be categorically predicted based on the position of the ligand coordination. Large transverse anisotropy along with large hyperfine interactions opens up multiple relaxation channels leading to a fast quantum tunnelling of the magnetization (QTM) process. Enhancing the Re-ligand covalency is found to significantly quench the QTM process. PMID:26883278

  5. Comparison of Magnetization Tunneling in the Giant-Spin and Multi-Spin Descriptions of Single-Molecule Magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Junjie; Del Barco, Enrique; Hill, Stephen

    2010-03-01

    We perform a mapping of the spectrum obtained for a triangular Mn3 single-molecule magnet (SMM) with idealized C3 symmetry via exact diagonalization of a multi-spin (MS) Hamiltonian onto that of a giant-spin (GS) model which assumes strong ferromagnetic coupling and a spin S = 6 ground state. Magnetic hysteresis measurements on this Mn3 SMM reveal clear evidence that the steps in magnetization due to magnetization tunneling obey the expected quantum mechanical selection rules [J. Henderson et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 017202 (2009)]. High-frequency EPR and magnetization data are first fit to the MS model. The tunnel splittings obtained via the two models are then compared in order to find a relationship between the sixth order transverse anisotropy term B6^6 in GS model and the exchange constant J coupling the Mn^III ions in the MS model. We also find that the fourth order transverse term B4^3 in the GS model is related to the orientation of JahnTeller axes of Mn^III ions, as well as J

  6. Deciphering the origin of giant magnetic anisotropy and fast quantum tunnelling in Rhenium(IV) single-molecule magnets

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Saurabh Kumar; Rajaraman, Gopalan

    2016-01-01

    Single-molecule magnets represent a promising route to achieve potential applications such as high-density information storage and spintronics devices. Among others, 4d/5d elements such as Re(IV) ion are found to exhibit very large magnetic anisotropy, and inclusion of this ion-aggregated clusters yields several attractive molecular magnets. Here, using ab intio calculations, we unravel the source of giant magnetic anisotropy associated with the Re(IV) ions by studying a series of mononuclear Re(IV) six coordinate complexes. The low-lying doublet states are found to be responsible for large magnetic anisotropy and the sign of the axial zero-field splitting parameter (D) can be categorically predicted based on the position of the ligand coordination. Large transverse anisotropy along with large hyperfine interactions opens up multiple relaxation channels leading to a fast quantum tunnelling of the magnetization (QTM) process. Enhancing the Re-ligand covalency is found to significantly quench the QTM process. PMID:26883278

  7. Deciphering the origin of giant magnetic anisotropy and fast quantum tunnelling in Rhenium(IV) single-molecule magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Saurabh Kumar; Rajaraman, Gopalan

    2016-02-01

    Single-molecule magnets represent a promising route to achieve potential applications such as high-density information storage and spintronics devices. Among others, 4d/5d elements such as Re(IV) ion are found to exhibit very large magnetic anisotropy, and inclusion of this ion-aggregated clusters yields several attractive molecular magnets. Here, using ab intio calculations, we unravel the source of giant magnetic anisotropy associated with the Re(IV) ions by studying a series of mononuclear Re(IV) six coordinate complexes. The low-lying doublet states are found to be responsible for large magnetic anisotropy and the sign of the axial zero-field splitting parameter (D) can be categorically predicted based on the position of the ligand coordination. Large transverse anisotropy along with large hyperfine interactions opens up multiple relaxation channels leading to a fast quantum tunnelling of the magnetization (QTM) process. Enhancing the Re-ligand covalency is found to significantly quench the QTM process.

  8. Self-Assembly of a Giant Tetrahedral 3 d-4 f Single-Molecule Magnet within a Polyoxometalate System.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Masooma; Mereacre, Valeriu; Leblanc, Nicolas; Wernsdorfer, Wolfgang; Anson, Christopher E; Powell, Annie K

    2015-12-14

    A giant tetrahedral heterometallic polyoxometalate (POM) [Dy30 Co8 Ge12 W108 O408 (OH)42 (OH2 )30 ](56-) , which shows single-molecule magnet (SMM) behavior, is described. This hybrid contains the largest number of 4f ions of any polyoxometalate (POM) reported to date and is the first to incorporate two different 3d-4f and 4f coordination cluster assemblies within same POM framework. PMID:26390858

  9. Auxiliary and Autonomous Proteoglycan Signaling Networks

    PubMed Central

    Elfenbein, Arye; Simons, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Proteoglycans represent a structurally heterogeneous family of proteins that typically undergo extensive posttranslational modification with sulfated sugar chains. Although historically believed to affect signaling pathways exclusively as growth factor coreceptors, proteoglycans are now understood to initiate and modulate signal transduction cascades independently of other receptors. From within the extracellular matrix, proteoglycans are able to shield protein growth factors from circulating proteases and establish gradients that guide cell migration. Extracellular proteoglycans are also critical in the maintenance of growth factor stores and are thus instrumental in modulating paracrine signaling. At the cell membrane, proteoglycans stabilize ligand–receptor interactions, creating potentiated ternary signaling complexes that regulate cell proliferation, endocytosis, migration, growth factor sensitivity, and matrix adhesion. In some cases, proteoglycans are able to independently activate various signaling cascades, attenuate the signaling of growth factors, or orchestrate multimeric intracellular signaling complexes. Signaling between cells is also modulated by proteoglycan activity at the cell membrane, as exemplified by the proteoglycan requirement for effective synaptogenesis between neurons. Finally, proteoglycans are able to regulate signaling from intracellular compartments, particularly in the context of storage granule formation and maintenance. These proteoglycans are also major determinants of exocytic vesicle fate and other vesicular trafficking pathways. In contrast to the mechanisms underlying classical ligand-receptor signaling, proteoglycan signaling is frequently characterized by ligand promiscuity and low-affinity binding; likewise, these events commonly do not exhibit the same degree of reliance on intermolecular structure or charge configurations as other ligand-receptor interactions. Such unique features often defy conventional mechanisms of

  10. The collaggrecan: Synthesis and visualization of an artificial proteoglycan.

    PubMed

    Raspanti, Mario; Caravà, Elena; Sgambato, Antonella; Natalello, Antonino; Russo, Laura; Cipolla, Laura

    2016-05-01

    An artificial aggrecan-like proteoglycan has been designed and synthesized in vitro. At variance with natural proteoglycans, whose glycosaminoglycan chains are always O-linked via a tetrasaccharide bridge to the serine residues of a specific protein core, the present structure consists of chondroitin-6-sulfate chains directly bound to the lysine and hydroxylysine residues of a collagen molecule backbone. The resulting macromolecule has been characterized by histochemistry, atomic force microscopy and FTIR. The number of variables involved (e.g., length and type of the collagen backbone, glycosaminoglycan species, sulfation type and pattern, molecular weight, number and length of side chains, etc.) makes possible to conceive an almost endless variety of artificial proteoglycans, each precisely tailored to a specific functional role. In addition to their use as biomaterials, glycated collagens interact with cells in complex ways and a previous study has already shown the ability of a glycated collagen to redirect fibroblastoma cells from proliferation to differentiation. The research is still underway. PMID:26797224

  11. Multiple domains of the large fibroblast proteoglycan, versican.

    PubMed Central

    Zimmermann, D R; Ruoslahti, E

    1989-01-01

    The primary structure of a large chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan expressed by human fibroblasts has been determined. Overlapping cDNA clones code for the entire 2389 amino acid long core protein and the 20-residue signal peptide. The sequence predicts a potential hyaluronic acid-binding domain in the amino-terminal portion. This domain contains sequences virtually identical to partial peptide sequences from a glial hyaluronate-binding protein. Putative glycosaminoglycan attachment sites are located in the middle of the protein. The carboxy-terminal portion includes two epidermal growth factor (EGF)-like repeats, a lectin-like sequence and a complement regulatory protein-like domain. The same set of binding elements has also been identified in a new class of cell adhesion molecules. Amino- and carboxy-terminal portions of the fibroblast core protein are closely related to the core protein of a large chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan of chondrosarcoma cells. However, the glycosaminoglycan attachment regions in the middle of the core proteins are different and only the fibroblast core protein contains EGF-like repeats. Based on the similarities of its domains with various binding elements of other proteins, we suggest that the large fibroblast proteoglycan, herein referred to as versican, may function in cell recognition, possibly by connecting extracellular matrix components and cell surface glycoproteins. Images PMID:2583089

  12. Proteoglycans from human umbilical vein endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Griesmacher, A; Hennes, R; Keller, R; Greiling, H

    1987-10-01

    Human umbilical vein endothelial cells were incubated with [35S]sulphate and investigated for their proteoglycan production. By gel chromatography, ion-exchange chromatography and CsCl density-gradient centrifugation we obtained preparative amounts of the endothelial proteoheparan sulphate HSI and of proteochondroitin sulphate from the conditioned medium of mass-cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Approximately 90% of the 35S-labeled material in the endothelial cell conditioned medium was proteochondroitin sulphate. This molecule, with a molecular mass of 180-200 kDa, contains four side-chains of 35-40 kDa and a core protein of 35-40 kDa. Two proteoheparan sulphate forms (HSI and HSII) from the conditioned medium were distinguished by molecular mass and transport kinetics from the cell layer to the medium in pulse-chase experiments. One major form (HSI), with an approximate molecular mass of 160-200 kDa a core protein of 55-60 kDa and three to four polysaccharide side-chains of 35 kDa each, was found enriched in the cellular membrane pellet. Another proteoheparan sulphate (HSII), with polysaccharide moieties of 20 kDa, is enriched in the subendothelial matrix (substratum). PMID:2959475

  13. Single-Molecule Magnets: Giant Hysteresis of Single-Molecule Magnets Adsorbed on a Nonmagnetic Insulator (Adv. Mater. 26/2016).

    PubMed

    Wäckerlin, Christian; Donati, Fabio; Singha, Aparajita; Baltic, Romana; Rusponi, Stefano; Diller, Katharina; Patthey, François; Pivetta, Marina; Lan, Yanhua; Klyatskaya, Svetlana; Ruben, Mario; Brune, Harald; Dreiser, Jan

    2016-07-01

    In Tb(Pc)2 single-molecule magnets, where Pc is phthalocyanine, adsorbed on magnesium oxide, the fluctuations of the terbium magnetic moment are strongly suppressed in contrast to the adsorption on silver. On page 5195, J. Dreiser and co-workers investigate that the molecules are perfectly organized by self-assembly, as seen in the scanning tunnelling microscopy image (top part of the design). The molecules are probed by circularly polarized X-rays depicted as green spirals. PMID:27383020

  14. Cell Surface Access Is Modulated by Tethered Bottlebrush Proteoglycans.

    PubMed

    Chang, Patrick S; McLane, Louis T; Fogg, Ruth; Scrimgeour, Jan; Temenoff, Johnna S; Granqvist, Anna; Curtis, Jennifer E

    2016-06-21

    The hyaluronan-rich pericellular matrix (PCM) plays physical and chemical roles in biological processes ranging from brain plasticity, to adhesion-dependent phenomena such as cell migration, to the onset of cancer. This study investigates how the spatial distribution of the large negatively charged bottlebrush proteoglycan, aggrecan, impacts PCM morphology and cell surface access. The highly localized pericellular milieu limits transport of nanoparticles in a size-dependent fashion and sequesters positively charged molecules on the highly sulfated side chains of aggrecan. Both rat chondrocyte and human mesenchymal stem cell PCMs possess many unused binding sites for aggrecan, showing a 2.5x increase in PCM thickness from ∼7 to ∼18 μm when provided exogenous aggrecan. Yet, full extension of the PCM occurs well below aggrecan saturation. Hence, cells equipped with hyaluronan-rich PCM can in principle manipulate surface accessibility or sequestration of molecules by tuning the bottlebrush proteoglycan content to alter PCM porosity and the number of electrostatic binding sites. PMID:27332132

  15. Roles of Proteoglycans and Glycosaminoglycans in Wound Healing and Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Ghatak, Shibnath; Maytin, Edward V.; Mack, Judith A.; Hascall, Vincent C.; Atanelishvili, Ilia; Moreno Rodriguez, Ricardo; Markwald, Roger R.; Misra, Suniti

    2015-01-01

    A wound is a type of injury that damages living tissues. In this review, we will be referring mainly to healing responses in the organs including skin and the lungs. Fibrosis is a process of dysregulated extracellular matrix (ECM) production that leads to a dense and functionally abnormal connective tissue compartment (dermis). In tissues such as the skin, the repair of the dermis after wounding requires not only the fibroblasts that produce the ECM molecules, but also the overlying epithelial layer (keratinocytes), the endothelial cells, and smooth muscle cells of the blood vessel and white blood cells such as neutrophils and macrophages, which together orchestrate the cytokine-mediated signaling and paracrine interactions that are required to regulate the proper extent and timing of the repair process. This review will focus on the importance of extracellular molecules in the microenvironment, primarily the proteoglycans and glycosaminoglycan hyaluronan, and their roles in wound healing. First, we will briefly summarize the physiological, cellular, and biochemical elements of wound healing, including the importance of cytokine cross-talk between cell types. Second, we will discuss the role of proteoglycans and hyaluronan in regulating these processes. Finally, approaches that utilize these concepts as potential therapies for fibrosis are discussed. PMID:26448760

  16. Corneal proteoglycan changes under vitamin A deficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Twining, S.S.; Wilson, P.M.

    1986-05-01

    The vitamin A-deficient keratinized cornea is very susceptible to ulceration possibly due to altered stromal components. In this study the proteoglycans present in the corneal stroma of vitamin A-deficient, pair-fed and normal rabbits were compared. Rabbits after weaning were placed on a vitamin A deficient diet, the same diet with retinyl palmitate added (pair-fed) or normal rabbit chow. After 5 months, the corneas of the vitamin A-deficient animals became keratinized. The corneal components were then labeled by injection of /sup 3/H-leucine and Na/sup 35/SO/sub 4/ into the anterior chamber of the eyes on 3 successive days. On the 4th day the animals were sacrificed the corneas removed and dissected. The labeled corneal stromas were extracted with 4 M GuHCl and the components separated on a DEAE-Sepharose column. The proteoglycans were eluted with 0.5 M and 1.0 M NaCl. The 1.0 M NaCl fraction (mainly keratin sulfate proteoglycans) was increased 25% in the vitamin A-deficient corneas over that for the pair-fed and normal corneas. These proteoglycans from the deficient corneas gave a different elution pattern on Octyl-Sepharose eluted with a Triton X-100 gradient than those from the pair-fed corneas. The total labeled proteoglycans were similar in the stromas from the 3 types of rabbits. These results indicate the various corneal proteoglycan ratios differ under vitamin A deficiency conditions.

  17. Molecular-size-dependent variations in the proportions of chains with high binding affinities for antithrombin in rat skin heparin proteoglycans.

    PubMed Central

    Horner, A A

    1989-01-01

    Approximately half of all rat skin heparin proteoglycans have polysaccharide chains that have no sites with high binding affinity for antithrombin. The rest have chains with high-affinity antithrombin-binding-site densities ranging from zero to five sites per chain, with a high degree of variation. Proteoglycans vary in size because of diversity in the number of chains per molecule; the relationship between proteoglycan size and high-affinity antithrombin-binding-site density has not been studied previously. Polydisperse heparin proteoglycans from rat skin, labelled biosynthetically with 35S, were fractionated by gel filtration on Bio-Gel A-150m and arbitrarily divided into five fractions of decreasing average molecular size. Fractionation of these products on antithrombin-agarose showed that the proportion of proteoglycans with high affinity for antithrombin decreased from 39% to 25% as molecular size decreased. However, as the molecular size of high-affinity proteoglycans decreased, the proportion of their chains that had high affinity increased from 29% to 59%. Therefore molecular size is a significant factor in determining the proportion of high-affinity chains in heparin proteoglycans. A model of heparin biosynthesis is proposed in which areas of specific enzyme activity that control the synthesis of the antithrombin-binding-site sequence are sparsely and nonrandomly distributed on mast-cell Golgi membranes. It is postulated that the likelihood of a developing proteoglycan encountering one of these hypothetical areas is molecular-size-dependent. Images Fig. 1. PMID:2590178

  18. Construction of Giant-Spin Hamiltonians from Many-Spin Hamiltonians by Third-Order Perturbation Theory and Application to an Fe3 Cr Single-Molecule Magnet.

    PubMed

    Tabrizi, Shadan Ghassemi; Arbuznikov, Alexei V; Kaupp, Martin

    2016-05-10

    A general giant-spin Hamiltonian (GSH) describing an effective spin multiplet of an exchange-coupled metal cluster with dominant Heisenberg interactions was derived from a many-spin Hamiltonian (MSH) by treating anisotropic interactions at the third order of perturbation theory. Going beyond the existing second-order perturbation treatment allows irreducible tensor operators of rank six (or corresponding Stevens operator equivalents) in the GSH to be obtained. Such terms were found to be of crucial importance for the fitting of high-field EPR spectra of a number of single-molecule magnets (SMMs). Also, recent magnetization measurements on trigonal and tetragonal SMMs have found the inclusion of such high-rank axial and transverse terms to be necessary to account for experimental data in terms of giant-spin models. While mixing of spin multiplets by local zero-field splitting interactions was identified as the major origin of these contributions to the GSH, a direct and efficient microscopic explanation had been lacking. The third-order approach developed in this work is used to illustrate the mapping of an MSH onto a GSH for an S=6 trigonal Fe3 Cr complex that was recently investigated by high-field EPR spectroscopy. Comparisons between MSH and GSH consider the simulation of EPR data with both Hamiltonians, as well as locations of diabolical points (conical intersections) in magnetic-field space. The results question the ability of present high-field EPR techniques to determine high-rank zero-field splitting terms uniquely, and lead to a revision of the experimental GSH parameters of the Fe3 Cr SMM. Indeed, a bidirectional mapping between MSH and GSH effectively constrains the number of free parameters in the GSH. This notion may in the future facilitate spectral fitting for highly symmetric SMMs. PMID:27062248

  19. Utilization of Glycosaminoglycans/Proteoglycans as Carriers for Targeted Therapy Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Misra, Suniti; Hascall, Vincent C.; Atanelishvili, Ilia; Moreno Rodriguez, Ricardo; Markwald, Roger R.; Ghatak, Shibnath

    2015-01-01

    The outcome of patients with cancer has improved significantly in the past decade with the incorporation of drugs targeting cell surface adhesive receptors, receptor tyrosine kinases, and modulation of several molecules of extracellular matrices (ECMs), the complex composite of collagens, glycoproteins, proteoglycans, and glycosaminoglycans that dictates tissue architecture. Cancer tissue invasive processes progress by various oncogenic strategies, including interfering with ECM molecules and their interactions with invasive cells. In this review, we describe how the ECM components, proteoglycans and glycosaminoglycans, influence tumor cell signaling. In particular this review describes how the glycosaminoglycan hyaluronan (HA) and its major receptor CD44 impact invasive behavior of tumor cells, and provides useful insight when designing new therapeutic strategies in the treatment of cancer. PMID:26448753

  20. Chemical evolution of the HC3N and N2H+ molecules in dense cores of the Vela C giant molecular cloud complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohashi, Satoshi; Tatematsu, Ken'ichi; Fujii, Kosuke; Sanhueza, Patricio; Nguyen Luong, Quang; Choi, Minho; Hirota, Tomoya; Mizuno, Norikazu

    2016-02-01

    We have observed the HC3N(J = 10-9) and N2H+ (J = 1-0) lines toward the Vela C molecular clouds with the Mopra 22 m telescope to study the chemical characteristics of dense cores. The intensity distributions of these molecules are similar to each other at an angular resolution of 53″, corresponding to 0.19 pc, suggesting that these molecules trace the same dense cores. We identified 25 local peaks in the velocity-integrated intensity maps of the HC3N and/or N2H+ emission. Assuming local thermodynamic equilibrium conditions, we calculated the column densities of these molecules and found a tendency for the N2H+/HC3N abundance ratio to be low in starless regions while it seems to be high in star-forming regions, similar to the tendencies in the NH3/CCS, NH3/HC3N, and N2H+/CCS abundance ratios found in previous studies of dark clouds and the Orion A giant molecular cloud (GMC). We suggest that carbon chain molecules, including HC3N, may trace chemically young molecular gas, and that N-bearing molecules, such as N2H+, may trace later stages of chemical evolution in the Vela C molecular clouds. It may be possible that the N2H+/HC3N abundance ratio of ˜1.4 divides the star-forming and starless peaks in Vela C, although it is not as clear as those in NH3/CCS, NH3/HC3N, and N2H+/CCS for the Orion A GMC. This less clear separation may be caused by our lower spatial resolution or the misclassification of star-forming and starless peaks due to the larger distance of Vela C. It might also be possible that the HC3N (J = 10-9) transition is not a good chemical evolution tracer compared with CCS (J = 4-3 and 7-6) transitions.

  1. Bone Proteoglycan Changes During Skeletal Unloading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamauchi, M.; Uzawa, K.; Pornprasertsuk, S.; Arnaud, S.; Grindeland, R.; Grzesik, W.

    1999-01-01

    Skeletal adaptability to mechanical loads is well known since the last century. Disuse osteopenia due to the microgravity environment is one of the major concerns for space travelers. Several studies have indicated that a retardation of the mineralization process and a delay in matrix maturation occur during the space flight. Mineralizing fibrillar type I collagen possesses distinct cross-linking chemistries and their dynamic changes during mineralization correlate well with its function as a mineral organizer. Our previous studies suggested that a certain group of matrix proteoglycans in bone play an inhibitory role in the mineralization process through their interaction with collagen. Based on these studies, we hypothesized that the altered mineralization during spaceflight is due in part to changes in matrix components secreted by cells in response to microgravity. In this study, we employed hindlimb elevation (tail suspension) rat model to study the effects of skeletal unloading on matrix proteoglycans in bone.

  2. Recent Insights into Cell Surface Heparan Sulphate Proteoglycans and Cancer.

    PubMed

    Couchman, John R; Multhaupt, Hinke; Sanderson, Ralph D

    2016-01-01

    A small group of cell surface receptors are proteoglycans, possessing a core protein with one or more covalently attached glycosaminoglycan chains. They are virtually ubiquitous and their chains are major sites at which protein ligands of many types interact. These proteoglycans can signal and regulate important cell processes, such as adhesion, migration, proliferation, and differentiation. Since many protein ligands, such as growth factors, morphogens, and cytokines, are also implicated in tumour progression, it is increasingly apparent that cell surface proteoglycans impact tumour cell behaviour. Here, we review some recent advances, emphasising that many tumour-related functions of proteoglycans are revealed only after their modification in processes subsequent to synthesis and export to the cell surface. These include enzymes that modify heparan sulphate structure, recycling of whole or fragmented proteoglycans into exosomes that can be paracrine effectors or biomarkers, and lateral interactions between some proteoglycans and calcium channels that impact the actin cytoskeleton. PMID:27408707

  3. Recent Insights into Cell Surface Heparan Sulphate Proteoglycans and Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Couchman, John R; Multhaupt, Hinke; Sanderson, Ralph D.

    2016-01-01

    A small group of cell surface receptors are proteoglycans, possessing a core protein with one or more covalently attached glycosaminoglycan chains. They are virtually ubiquitous and their chains are major sites at which protein ligands of many types interact. These proteoglycans can signal and regulate important cell processes, such as adhesion, migration, proliferation, and differentiation. Since many protein ligands, such as growth factors, morphogens, and cytokines, are also implicated in tumour progression, it is increasingly apparent that cell surface proteoglycans impact tumour cell behaviour. Here, we review some recent advances, emphasising that many tumour-related functions of proteoglycans are revealed only after their modification in processes subsequent to synthesis and export to the cell surface. These include enzymes that modify heparan sulphate structure, recycling of whole or fragmented proteoglycans into exosomes that can be paracrine effectors or biomarkers, and lateral interactions between some proteoglycans and calcium channels that impact the actin cytoskeleton. PMID:27408707

  4. Biochemical and cytological characterization of DROP-1: a widely distributed proteoglycan in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Graner, M; Stupka, K; Karr, T L

    1994-06-01

    Using Drosophila testis as a source of antigen, 12 monoclonal antibodies were isolated that all recognize a set of three high molecular weight molecules present on Drosophila sperm and also in the fertilized egg. Among these antibodies, one is highly specific for sperm, while the remaining 11 detect epitopes present not only on sperm, but also in yolk spheres or in a punctate distribution in the egg. Here we cytologically and biochemically characterize the (common) antigens to five of these antibodies. Several biochemical properties suggest that these antibodies recognize a family of glycosaminoglycan-containing proteoglycans: (1) three diffuse, poorly focused high molecular weight bands, all in excess of 200,000 Da were observed on Western blots of denaturing SDS gels; (2) all three bands have a pI in the range of 3.0-3.5; (3) the molecules are strongly resistant to proteolysis; (4) mild periodate oxidation renders the molecules reactive towards the derivatizing agent digoxygenin-hydrazide, indicating the likely presence of saccharide moieties; (5) trifluoromethyl sulfonic acid treatment, which removes saccharide moieties, shifts the pI to 7.0; (6) beta-elimination increases electrophoretic mobility of the antigens on SDS gels; (7) nitrous acid treatment, which cleaves N-sulfated glycosaminoglycans, also increases the electrophoretic mobility of the antigens on SDS gels. We conclude that the antigens recognized by these antibodies are likely to be heparan sulfate proteoglycans. These results indicate that DROP-1 may represent a family of proteoglycans present during embryogenesis and later stages of development in Drosophila. DROP-1 represents the third proteoglycan to be characterized in Drosophila. PMID:8044173

  5. Proteoglycans in cancer biology, tumour microenvironment and angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Iozzo, Renato V; Sanderson, Ralph D

    2011-01-01

    Proteoglycans, key molecular effectors of cell surface and pericellular microenvironments, perform multiple functions in cancer and angiogenesis by virtue of their polyhedric nature and their ability to interact with both ligands and receptors that regulate neoplastic growth and neovascularization. Some proteoglycans such as perlecan, have pro- and anti-angiogenic activities, whereas other proteoglycans, such as syndecans and glypicans, can also directly affect cancer growth by modulating key signalling pathways. The bioactivity of these proteoglycans is further modulated by several classes of enzymes within the tumour microenvironment: (i) sheddases that cleave transmembrane or cell-associated syndecans and glypicans, (ii) various proteinases that cleave the protein core of pericellular proteoglycans and (iii) heparanases and endosulfatases which modify the structure and bioactivity of various heparan sulphate proteoglycans and their bound growth factors. In contrast, some of the small leucine-rich proteoglycans, such as decorin and lumican, act as tumour repressors by physically antagonizing receptor tyrosine kinases including the epidermal growth factor and the Met receptors or integrin receptors thereby evoking anti-survival and pro-apoptotic pathways. In this review we will critically assess the expanding repertoire of molecular interactions attributed to various proteoglycans and will discuss novel proteoglycan functions modulating cancer progression, invasion and metastasis and how these factors regulate the tumour microenvironment. PMID:21155971

  6. Study of Large Multimeric Biomolecules by Single-Molecule Manipulation and Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lou, Kai; Wijeratne, Sitara S.; Martinez, Jerahme; Yeh, Hui-Chun; Moake, Joel; Dong, Jing-Fei; Farach-Carson, Mary C.; Kiang, Ching-Hwa

    2012-02-01

    Single-molecule manipulation enables us to study the properties of long chain, multimeric biomolecules. Perlecan, a giant secreted heparin sulfate proteoglycan, is a major component of basement membrane, bone stroma and blood vessels. It is involved in processes such as cell adhesion, migration and modulation of apoptosis. The changes in its synthesis and function are closely associated with many diseases, including cancer. Von Willebrand factor is a large multimeric protein circulating in blood, and is crucial for initiation of blood coagulation. We use atomic force microscope to obtain force curves and images of these proteins. We characterized the mechanical property of perlecan as well as the domain conformational changes of von Willebrand factor. The results demonstrate that single-molecule manipulation can probe directly the dynamics of large biomolecules that are usually not accessible with other methods.

  7. Dermatan sulphate proteoglycans of human articular cartilage. The properties of dermatan sulphate proteoglycans I and II.

    PubMed Central

    Roughley, P J; White, R J

    1989-01-01

    Dermatan sulphate proteoglycans were purified from juvenile human articular cartilage, with a yield of about 2 mg/g wet wt. of cartilage. Both dermatan sulphate proteoglycan I (DS-PGI) and dermatan sulphate proteoglycan II (DS-PGII) were identified and the former was present in greater abundance. The two proteoglycans could not be resolved by agarose/polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis, but could be resolved by SDS/polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis, which indicated average Mr values of 200,000 and 98,000 for DS-PGI and DS-PGII respectively. After digestion with chondroitin ABC lyase the Mr values of the core proteins were 44,000 for DS-PGI and 43,000 and 47,000 for DS-PGII, with the smaller core protein being predominant in DS-PGII. Sequence analysis of the N-terminal 20 amino acid residues reveals the presence of a single site for the potential substitution of dermatan sulphate at residue 4 of DS-PGII and two such sites at residues 5 and 10 for DS-PGI. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. PMID:2590169

  8. Chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan expression during neuronal development.

    PubMed

    Hennig, A; Krueger, R; Mangoura, D; Schwartz, N B

    1992-01-01

    Proteoglycans of developing chick brain were distinguished on the basis of reactivity with four well characterized antibody reagents (S103L, to the CS-rich domain; HNK-1, to 6-sulfated glucuronic acid; 1-C-3, to the HABr region and 5-D-4, to KS chains). One chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan reacted exclusively with S103L and 1-C-3 and not with the other two antibodies, hence is designated the S103L reactive brain CSPG. The other proteoglycan reacted exclusively with HNK-1 and 5-D-4 and not with S103L and 1-C-3, hence it is designated the HNK-1 reactive brain CSPG. In addition to these immunological distinctions, the S103L and HNK-1 CSPGs exhibited significant biochemical differences at both the protein and carbohydrate levels. Most interestingly, both CSPGs were found in all regions of the brain, and were expressed in a developmentally regulated pattern. The S103L CSPG was not detectable prior to embryonic day 7, increased to a maximum at day 13-15 and declined by day 20 in most brain regions examined. In contrast, the HNK-1 CSPG was present as early as embryonic day 4 and remained constant through hatching. Neuronal cultures established from embryonic day 6 (E6) cerebral hemispheres represent an in vitro paradigm that mimics in vivo neuronal development and differentiation. In this culture system we found that the expression of the S103L and HNK-1 CSPG followed a pattern similar to that observed in developing brain and further, that neurons are probably the sole source of S103L CSPG in cerebral cortex during neuroembryogenesis. PMID:1282844

  9. Special issue: Proteoglycans: signaling, targeting and therapeutics: introduction.

    PubMed

    Karamanos, Nikos K; Linhardt, Robert J

    2013-05-01

    This special issue of FEBS Journal contains 31 review and primary research articles reflecting the advancements covered at the 2012 Proteoglycans Gordon Research Conference and novel aspects from experts in the field. It is mainly focused on current status of the extracellular and cell surface proteoglycans' regulatory roles in cell signaling, molecular targeting, engineering attempts and potential therapeutic approaches. PMID:23530537

  10. Proteoglycans and glycosaminoglycans improve toughness of biocompatible double network hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yu; Nakajima, Tasuku; Yang, Jing Jing; Kurokawa, Takayuki; Liu, Jian; Lu, Jishun; Mizumoto, Shuji; Sugahara, Kazuyuki; Kitamura, Nobuto; Yasuda, Kazunori; Daniels, A U D; Gong, Jian Ping

    2014-01-22

    Based on the molecular stent concept, a series of tough double-network hydrogels (St-DN gels) made from the components of proteoglycan aggregates - chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (1), chondroitin sulfate (2), and sodium hyaluronate (3) - are successfully developed in combination with a neutral biocompatible polymer. This work demonstrates a promising method to create biopolymer-based tough hydrogels for biomedical applications. PMID:24431128

  11. Immunohistochemical identification of heparan sulphate proteoglycan in secondary systemic amyloidosis.

    PubMed Central

    Norling, B; Westermark, G T; Westermark, P

    1988-01-01

    The distribution of proteoglycans in kidneys from patients with secondary (AA) systemic amyloidosis was investigated. Antisera reacting with the protein cores of chondroitin sulphate proteoglycan (CSPG), dermatan sulphate proteoglycan (DSPG) and heparan sulphate proteoglycan (HSPG) were used in conjunction with the peroxidase-antiperoxidase (PAP) method. HSPG was the only proteoglycan found to be specifically localized to the amyloid deposits. The staining was most intense on the endothelial side of the deposits in both the glomeruli and in the vessel walls. No staining was observed after absorption of the HSPG antiserum with a fraction of the amyloid preparations, corresponding in size to that reported for glomerular HSPG. The possible role of HSPG and endothelial cells in the pathogenesis of the amyloid deposits is discussed. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:3052949

  12. Structure and biological functions of keratan sulfate proteoglycans.

    PubMed

    Greiling, H

    1994-01-01

    The skeletal and corneal keratan sulfate proteoglycans show a different metabolic and structural heterogeneity. The domain structure of the carbohydrate chain has been shown to be different in various animal species. There are two major types of skeletal keratan sulfate proteoglycans with and without fucose. The protein cores of the corneal chicken keratan sulfate proteoglycan (lumican) and those of another small keratan sulfate proteoglycan (fibromodulin) have been sequenced. Keratan sulfate oligosaccharides belong to the members of an antigen family of the poly-N-acetyllactosamine series. Monoclonal antibodies and immunoassay procedures for keratan sulfate proteoglycans have been prepared. In osteoarthritis, no significant specific increase of keratan sulfate has been found. Keratan sulfate is a functional substitute for chondroitin sulfate in O2-deficient tissues. PMID:8298243

  13. Borrelia burgdorferi bind to epithelial cell proteoglycans.

    PubMed Central

    Isaacs, R D

    1994-01-01

    Borrelia burgdorferi adhere to mammalian cells in vitro but neither the ligand(s) nor the receptor(s) has (have) been clearly established. Using an in vitro attachment-inhibition assay, a B. burgdorferi attachment mechanism has been identified. Heparin, heparan sulfate, and dermatan sulfate reduced the attachment of virulent B. burgdorferi strain 297 to HeLa cells by approximately 60%. In addition, virulent, but not avirulent, B. burgdorferi strains B31, N40, and HB19 demonstrated heparin attachment-inhibition. Attachment to Chinese hamster ovary cells deficient in heparan sulfate proteoglycans was reduced by 68% compared to attachment to wild-type cells and was identical to attachment at maximum heparin inhibition to the wild-type cells. Pretreatment of HeLa cell monolayers with heparitinase, heparinase, and chondroitinase ABC, but not with chondroitinase AC, reduced borrelial attachment by approximately 50%. A moderately high affinity, low copy number, promiscuous B. burgdorferi glycosaminoglycan receptor was demonstrated by equilibrium binding studies. A 39-kD polypeptide, purified by heparin affinity chromatography from Triton X-100 extracts derived from virulent borrelia, was a candidate for this receptor. These studies indicate that one mode of B. burgdorferi attachment to eukaryotic cells is mediated by a borrelial glycosaminoglycan receptor attaching to surface-exposed proteoglycans on mammalian cells. Images PMID:8113413

  14. Decreased glomerular basement membrane heparan sulfate proteoglycan in essential hypertension.

    PubMed

    Heintz, B; Stöcker, G; Mrowka, C; Rentz, U; Melzer, H; Stickeler, E; Sieberth, H G; Greiling, H; Haubeck, H D

    1995-03-01

    Heparan sulfate proteoglycans are major components of the glomerular basement membrane and play a key role in the molecular organization and function of the basement membrane. Moreover, their presence is essential for maintenance of the selective permeability of the glomerular basement membrane. Recently, we isolated and characterized a novel small basement membrane-associated heparan sulfate proteoglycan from human aorta and kidney. Partial amino acid sequence data clearly show that this heparan sulfate proteoglycan is distinct from the large basement membrane-associated heparan sulfate proteoglycan (perlecan). Using specific monoclonal antibodies, we have shown that the novel heparan sulfate proteoglycan is located predominantly in the glomerular basement membrane and, to a lesser extent, in the basement membrane of tubuli. Turnover or, in the course of kidney diseases, degradation of heparan sulfate proteoglycan from glomerular basement membranes may lead to urinary excretion of heparan sulfate proteoglycan, which can be measured by a sensitive enzyme immunoassay. The aim of the present study was to analyze whether changes in the structure and function of glomerular basement membranes can be directly detected by measurement of the excretion of a component of this basement membrane, eg, heparan sulfate proteoglycan into urine. The excretion of this small heparan sulfate proteoglycan was compared after physical exercise in normotensive and hypertensive subjects. Normotensive subjects and treated, essential hypertensive patients underwent a standardized workload on a bicycle ergometer. Biochemical characterization of the urinary proteins and heparan sulfate proteoglycan was performed before and 15 and 45 minutes after exercises.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7875766

  15. Purification and characterization of heparan sulphate proteoglycan from bovine brain.

    PubMed Central

    Park, Y; Yu, G; Gunay, N S; Linhardt, R J

    1999-01-01

    A heparan sulphate proteoglycan was purified from adult bovine brain tissues and its structure was characterized. The major heparan sulphate proteoglycan from whole bovine brain had a molecular mass of >200 kDa on denaturing SDS/PAGE and a core protein size of 66 kDa following the removal of glycosaminoglycan chains. Fractionation on DEAE-Sephacel showed that this proteoglycan consisted of three major forms having high, intermediate and low overall charge. All core proteins were identical in size and reacted with heparan sulphate proteoglycan-stub antibody and an antibody made to a synthetic peptide based on rat glypican. The three forms of proteoglycans had identical peptide maps and their amino acid compositional analysis did not match any of the known glypicans. The internal sequence of a major peptide showed only 37.5% sequence similarity with human glypican 5. The glycosaminoglycan chain sizes of the three forms of this proteoglycan, determined after beta-elimination by PAGE, were identical. The disaccharide compositional analysis on the heparan sulphate chains from the three forms of the proteoglycan, determined by treatment with a mixture of heparin lyases followed by high-resolution capillary electrophoresis, showed that they differed primarily by degree of sulphation. The most highly sulphated proteoglycan isolated had a disaccharide composition similar to heparan sulphate glycosaminoglycans found in brain tissue. Based on their sensitivity to low pH nitrous acid treatment, the N-sulphate groups in these proteoglycans were found to be primarily in the smaller glycosaminoglycan chains. The heparan sulphate proteoglycans were also heavily glycosylated with O-linked glycans and no glycosylphosphatidylinositol anchor could be detected. PMID:10585858

  16. A novel keratan sulphate proteoglycan from a human embryonal carcinoma cell line.

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, S; Pera, M F; Bennett, W; Finch, J T

    1992-01-01

    We describe here the purification and partial characterization of a 200 kDa keratan sulphate proteoglycan found in the pericellular matrix of human embryonal carcinoma cells. Previously we have shown that this molecule is recognized by a monoclonal antibody (GCTM-2). The antigen was isolated using ion-exchange chromatography and gel filtration, purification being monitored by e.l.i.s.a. using GCTM-2. Metabolic labelling of GCT 27 C-4 embryonal carcinoma cells with sodium [35S]sulphate resulted in the incorporation of [35S]sulphate into the purified molecule. Throughout the purification procedure, the peaks of 35S radioactivity were coincident with the peaks of immunoreactivity, and this label was released both by digestion with keratanase and chondroitinase, confirming the proteoglycan nature of the antigen. The intact molecule ran as a single broad band of 200 kDa, which has been identified by silver staining and immunoblotting following gel electrophoresis. Amino acid analysis of the purified antigen indicated a high content of serine, glycine and aspartic acid/asparagine residues. Visualization by rotary-shadowing electron microscopy suggests that the purified material forms large aggregates, even under denaturing conditions. Deglycosylation of this preparation with trifluoromethanesulphonic acid yielded a major band of 55 kDa and a minor band of 48 kDa. The biochemical nature of the molecule described here, along with tissue distribution studies using GCTM-2, indicates that the antigen is not related to previously described keratan sulphate proteoglycans. Images Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 6. Fig. 7. Fig. 8. Fig. 9. PMID:1417756

  17. Proteoglycan synthesis in human and murine haematopoietic progenitor cell lines: isolation and characterization of a heparan sulphate proteoglycan as a major proteoglycan from the human haematopoietic cell line TF-1.

    PubMed

    Stöcker, G; Drzeniek, Z; Just, U; Ostertag, W; Siebertz, B; Greiling, H; Haubeck, H D

    1996-07-01

    Proteoglycans of bone-marrow stromal cells and their extracellular matrix are important components of the microenvironment of haematopoietic tissues. Proteoglycans might also be involved in the interaction of haematopoietic stem and stromal cells. Recently, several studies have been reported on the proteoglycan synthesis of stromal cells, but little is known about the proteoglycan synthesis of haematopoietic stem or progenitor cells. Here we report on the isolation and characterization of proteoglycans from two haematopoietic progenitor cell lines, the murine FDCP-Mix A4 and the human TF-1 cell line. Proteoglycans were isolated from metabolically labelled cells and purified by several chromatographic steps, including anion-exchange and size-exclusion chromatography. Biochemical characterization was performed by electrophoresis or gel-filtration chromatography before and after digestion with glycosaminoglycan-specific enzymes or HNO2 treatment. Whereas FDCP-Mix A4 cells synthesize a homogeneous chondroitin 4-sulphate proteoglycan, isolation and characterization of proteoglycans from the human cell line TF-1 revealed, that TF-1 cells synthesize, in addition to a chondroitin sulphate proteoglycan, a heparan sulphate proteoglycan as major proteoglycan. For this heparan sulphate proteoglycan a core protein size of approx. 59 kDa was determined. Immunochemical analysis of this heparan sulphate proteoglycan revealed that it is not related to the syndecan family nor to glypican. PMID:8694765

  18. Proteoglycan synthesis in human and murine haematopoietic progenitor cell lines: isolation and characterization of a heparan sulphate proteoglycan as a major proteoglycan from the human haematopoietic cell line TF-1.

    PubMed Central

    Stöcker, G; Drzeniek, Z; Just, U; Ostertag, W; Siebertz, B; Greiling, H; Haubeck, H D

    1996-01-01

    Proteoglycans of bone-marrow stromal cells and their extracellular matrix are important components of the microenvironment of haematopoietic tissues. Proteoglycans might also be involved in the interaction of haematopoietic stem and stromal cells. Recently, several studies have been reported on the proteoglycan synthesis of stromal cells, but little is known about the proteoglycan synthesis of haematopoietic stem or progenitor cells. Here we report on the isolation and characterization of proteoglycans from two haematopoietic progenitor cell lines, the murine FDCP-Mix A4 and the human TF-1 cell line. Proteoglycans were isolated from metabolically labelled cells and purified by several chromatographic steps, including anion-exchange and size-exclusion chromatography. Biochemical characterization was performed by electrophoresis or gel-filtration chromatography before and after digestion with glycosaminoglycan-specific enzymes or HNO2 treatment. Whereas FDCP-Mix A4 cells synthesize a homogeneous chondroitin 4-sulphate proteoglycan, isolation and characterization of proteoglycans from the human cell line TF-1 revealed, that TF-1 cells synthesize, in addition to a chondroitin sulphate proteoglycan, a heparan sulphate proteoglycan as major proteoglycan. For this heparan sulphate proteoglycan a core protein size of approx. 59 kDa was determined. Immunochemical analysis of this heparan sulphate proteoglycan revealed that it is not related to the syndecan family nor to glypican. PMID:8694765

  19. Decoding the matrix: Instructive roles of proteoglycan receptors

    PubMed Central

    Neill, Thomas; Schaefer, Liliana; Iozzo, Renato V.

    2016-01-01

    The extracellular matrix is a dynamic repository harboring instructive cues that embody substantial regulatory dominance over many evolutionarily conserved intracellular activities including proliferation, apoptosis, migration, motility, and autophagy. The matrix also coordinates and parses hierarchical information, such as angiogenesis, tumorigenesis, and immunological responses, typically providing the critical determinants driving each outcome. We provide the first comprehensive review focused on proteoglycan receptors, that is, signaling transmembrane proteins that use secreted proteoglycans as ligands, in addition to their natural ligands. The majority of these receptors belong to an exclusive subset of receptor tyrosine kinases and assorted cell surface receptors that specifically bind, transduce, and modulate fundamental cellular processes following interactions with proteoglycans. The class of small leucine-rich proteoglycans is the most studied so far, and constitutes the best understood example of proteoglycan/receptor interactions. Decorin and biglycan evoke autophagy and immunological responses that deter, suppress, or exacerbate pathological conditions such as tumorigenesis, angiogenesis, and chronic inflammatory disease. Basement membrane-associated heparan sulfate proteoglycans - perlecan, agrin and collagen XVIII - represent a unique cohort and provide proteolytically-cleaved bioactive fragments for modulating cellular behavior. The receptors that bind the genuinely multifactorial and multivalent proteoglycans represent a nexus in understanding basic biological pathways and opens new avenues for therapeutic and pharmacological intervention. PMID:26177309

  20. Renal glomerular proteoglycans. An investigation of their synthesis in vivo using a technique for fixation in situ.

    PubMed Central

    Beavan, L A; Davies, M; Mason, R M

    1988-01-01

    Newly synthesized rat glomerular [35S]proteoglycans were labelled in vivo after injecting Na2[35S]SO4 intraperitoneally. At the end of the labelling period (7 h) the kidneys were perfused in situ with 0.01% (w/v) cetylpyridinium chloride. This fixed proteoglycans in the tissue and increased their recovery 2-3-fold during subsequent isolation of glomeruli from the renal cortex. The glomeruli were fractionated by a modified osmotic lysis and detergent extraction procedure [Meezan, Brendel, Hjelle & Carlson (1978) in The Biology and Chemistry of Basement Membranes (Kefalides, N.A., ed.), Academic Press, New York; Kanwar & Farquhar (1979) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 76, 4493-4497] to obtain a basement membrane preparation. The proteoglycans released at each stage of the procedure were characterized using DEAE-Sephacel ion-exchange chromatography, chondroitinase ABC and HNO2 digestion and Sepharose CL-4B gel-permeation chromatography. About 85% of the [35S]proteoglycans synthesized were of the heparan sulphate variety, the remainder being chondroitin sulphate proteoglycans. Three sizes of heparan sulphate proteoglycans were identified. The largest (HS1, Kav. 0.47) accounts for 44% of the total extractable heparan sulphates. About one third of HS1 were extracted from the glomerular basement-membrane fraction with 8 M-urea and 4 M-guanidine hydrochloride but the remainder were released from the glomerulus during preparation of the fraction. The two smaller molecules (HS2, Kav. 0.56 and HS3, Kav. 0.68) accounted for 27% and 28% of the extractable heparan sulphate respectively and were not associated with the basement membrane fraction. HS1, HS2 and HS3 were also isolated from non-fixed glomeruli labelled in vivo but with much lower recovery. In glomeruli labelled in vitro, heparan sulphate accounted for only 35% of the proteoglycans, the remainder being of the chondroitin sulphate type. Proteoglycans similar to HS1, HS2 and HS3 were present in glomeruli labelled in vitro

  1. Presentation of cartilage proteoglycan to a T cell hybridoma derived from a mouse with proteoglycan-induced arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Brennan, F R; Negroiu, G; Buzás, E I; Fülöp, C; Holló, K; Mikecz, K; Glant, T T

    1995-01-01

    Immunization of BALB/c mice with human fetal cartilage proteoglycan (PG) produces progressive polyarthritis, and T cells play key roles in the development of the disease. To gain an understanding of how PG is presented to autoreactive T cells by synovial antigen-presenting cells (APC), we examined the abilities of various syngeneic APC in presenting PG to a specific T cell hybridoma 5/4E8, derived from a mouse with PG-induced arthritis. A20 B lymphoma cells and spleen cells were strong presenters of PG, but synoviocytes and P388D1 macrophages could only present PG effectively after stimulation with interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma). The IFN-gamma exerted its effect by up-regulating both MHC class II and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) expression by these cells as neutralizing antibodies to Ia, LFA-1 and ICAM-1 inhibited presentation. Our studies also showed that synoviocytes and spleen cells took up and processed PG more rapidly than the cell lines. Cysteine and serine protease-dependent antigen presentation of PG was blocked at 4 degrees C, 18 degrees C and by chloroquine treatment, indicating that presentation required active uptake and processing in an acidic compartment, probably in lysosomes. Also, keratan sulphate-depleted and cyanogen bromide (CNBr) and 2-nitro-5-thiocyanobenzoic acid (NTCB)-cleaved PG elicited stronger T cell responses, as they were more easily processed than the native molecule. Furthermore, CNBr-generated peptides were presented by fixed APC, indicating that core protein fragments of cartilage PG can be presented directly by APC in context with MHC class II molecules. PMID:7697908

  2. Heparan Sulfate Proteoglycans May Promote or Inhibit Cancer Progression by Interacting with Integrins and Affecting Cell Migration

    PubMed Central

    Soares, Mariana A.; Teixeira, Felipe C. O. B.; Fontes, Miguel; Arêas, Ana Lúcia; Leal, Marcelo G.; Pavão, Mauro S. G.; Stelling, Mariana P.

    2015-01-01

    The metastatic disease is one of the main consequences of tumor progression, being responsible for most cancer-related deaths worldwide. This review intends to present and discuss data on the relationship between integrins and heparan sulfate proteoglycans in health and cancer progression. Integrins are a family of cell surface transmembrane receptors, responsible for cell-matrix and cell-cell adhesion. Integrins' main functions include cell adhesion, migration, and survival. Heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs) are cell surface molecules that play important roles as cell receptors, cofactors, and overall direct or indirect contributors to cell organization. Both molecules can act in conjunction to modulate cell behavior and affect malignancy. In this review, we will discuss the different contexts in which various integrins, such as α5, αV, β1, and β3, interact with HSPGs species, such as syndecans and perlecans, affecting tissue homeostasis. PMID:26558271

  3. Proteoglycans and their heterogeneous glycosaminoglycans at the atomic scale

    PubMed Central

    Sattelle, Benedict M.; Shakeri, Javad; Cliff, Matthew J.; Almond, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Proteoglycan spatiotemporal organization underpins extracellular matrix biology but atomic scale glimpses of this microarchitecture are obscured by glycosaminoglycan size and complexity. To overcome this, multi-microsecond aqueous simulations of chondroitin and dermatan sulfates were abstracted into a prior coarse-grained model, which was extended to heterogeneous glycosaminoglycans and small leucine-rich proteoglycans. Exploration of relationships between sequence and shape led to hypotheses that proteoglycan size is dependent on glycosaminoglycan unit composition but independent of sequence permutation. Uronic acid conformational equilibria were modulated by adjacent hexosamine sulfonation and iduronic acid increased glycosaminoglycan chain volume and rigidity, while glucuronic acid imparted chain plasticity. Consequently, block copolymeric glycosaminoglycans contained microarchitectures capable of multivalent binding to growth factors and collagen, with potential for interactional synergy at greater chain number. The described atomic scale views of proteoglycans and heterogeneous glycosaminoglycans provide structural routes to understanding their fundamental signaling and mechanical biological roles and development of new biomaterials. PMID:25645947

  4. Characteristic Formation of Hyaluronan-Cartilage Link Protein-Proteoglycan Complex in Salivary Gland Tumors.

    PubMed

    Kuwabara, Hiroko; Nishikado, Akira; Hayasaki, Hana; Isogai, Zenzo; Yoneda, Masahiko; Kawata, Ryo; Hirose, Yoshinobu

    2016-01-01

    Hyaluronan (HA) and its binding molecules, cartilage link protein (LP) and proteoglycan (PG), are structural components of the hydrated extracellular matrix. Because these molecules play important roles in the tumor microenvironment, we examined the distribution of HA, LP, versican, and aggrecan in salivary gland tumors using histochemical and immunohistochemical methods, including double staining. LP was present in pleomorphic adenoma (PA) and adenoid cystic carcinoma (ACC) tissues, and aggrecan was absent in the malignant tumors that we investigated. LP colocalized with both HA and aggrecan in the chondromyxoid matrix of PA, suggesting the presence of a HA-LP-aggrecan complex. Furthermore, the HA-LP-versican complex could be observed in the pseudocystic space of the cribriform structures in ACC. The characteristic HA-LP-PG complex in PA and ACC might play a role in the behavior of tumors, and immunohistochemical analysis of these molecules could represent a diagnostic adjunct for salivary gland tumors. PMID:26067139

  5. Antithetic roles of proteoglycans in cancer.

    PubMed

    Garusi, Elena; Rossi, Silvia; Perris, Roberto

    2012-02-01

    Proteoglycans (PGs), a family of complex post-translationally sculptured macromolecules, are fundamental regulators of most normal and aberrant cellular functions. The unparalleled structural-functional diversity of PGs endows them with the ability to serve as critical mediators of the tumor cells' interaction with the host microenvironment, while directly contributing to the organization and dynamic remodeling of this milieu. Despite their indisputable importance during embryonic development and in the adult organism, and their frequent dysregulation in tumor lesions, their precise involvement in tumorigenesis awaits a more decisive demonstration. Particularly challenging is to ascertain to what extent selected PGs may catalyze tumor progression and to what extent they may inhibit it, implying antithetic functions of individual PGs. Integrated efforts are needed to consolidate the routine use of PGs in the clinical monitoring of cancer patients and to broaden the exploitation of these macromolecules as therapeutic targets. Several PGs have the required attributes to be contemplated as effective antigens for immunotherapeutic approaches, while the tangible results obtained in recent clinical trials targeting the NG2/CSPG4 transmembrane PG urge further development of PG-based cancer treatment modalities. PMID:21964924

  6. Proteoglycan modifications by granulation tissue in culture.

    PubMed

    Quintner, M I; Kollar, E J; Rossomando, E F

    1982-01-01

    To study the process of tissue remodeling that occurs during wound healing, radioactive proteoglycan ([35S]-PGS) was used to assay for enzymatic activities present in the extracellular fluid of healing tissue. Mice, wounded by removal of a 2 x 1.5 cm patch of skin from the dorsal surface, were sacrificed after 3 days of healing. Granulation tissue (1 cm2) was removed, spread onto a sterile wire mesh support and placed in the center well of an organ culture dish. To each well was added 1 ml MCDB medium supplemented with 10% fetal calf serum and antibiotics and 5-20 microliters of [35S]-PGS (100,000 cpm/10 microliters). Medium, removed from the well by aspiration after 24 and 48 h of culture, was boiled 5 min at 100 degrees C and stored frozen at -20 degrees C. Alterations of the PGS were assayed with a Sepharose 4B column (1 x 50 cm) which had an excluded and included volume of 17 and 46 ml, respectively. PGS, incubated without cells or with tissues from unwounded animals, eluted at 26 ml. PGS, incubated with granulation tissue and cultured for either 24 or 48 h, eluted from the Sepharose 4B at 29 ml, a 10% increase in elution volume, suggesting that the size or shape of the PGS has been altered by enzymes secreted by the cells of the granulation tissue. In contrast, PGS incubated with tissues from unwounded animals or without granulation tissue showed no changes. These data suggest that enzymatic activities secreted by cells of granulation tissue may be involved in remodeling during healing. PMID:6749574

  7. Role of proteoglycans in the onset of calcification

    SciTech Connect

    Tellone, C.I.

    1985-01-01

    The objective of this investigation was to inquire if the presence or absence of proteoglycans or their chemical subunits had a direct effect on the onset of calcification. High density spot cultures of limb bud mesenchyme obtained from mouse embryos on the 12th day of gestation were exposed to medium containing 30 mM phosphate. Calcium deposits observed after staining by the von Kossa method were confined to the non-cartilagenous intenodular areas. Electron microscopy illustrated that a large proportion of the calcium deposits were associated with collagen fibrils. A significant increase in the uptake of /sup 45/Ca was observed in cultures supplemented with 30 mM phosphate. Atomic absorption analysis of the cultures showed that they contained 2.00 ng calcium/ug DNA. Incorporation of /sup 3/H-glucosamine into glycosaminoglycans (GAG) was significantly reduced by phosphate and both extruded and cell associated GAG were affected. Exposure of mineralizing cultures to a biologically active anticalculus agent, ethane-1-hydroxy-1,1-diphosphonate, resulted in a significant reduction in /sup 45/Ca uptake, providing confidence that the culture did response as a biological system. These data suggest that under the conditions employed, proteoglycans in the extracellular environment of limb bud mesenchyme inhibit calcium deposition. The inhibitory effect was observed only when proteoglycans were added as polymeric aggregates. The culture system employed was unable to detect the inhibitory effects, if any, of proteoglycan monomers or the subunits of proteoglycans, hyaluronic acid or chondroitin sulfate.

  8. Studies on the hyaluronate binding properties of newly synthesized proteoglycans purified from articular chondrocyte cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Sandy, J.D.; Plaas, A.H.

    1989-06-01

    Primary cultures of rabbit articular chondrocytes have been maintained for 10 days and labeled with (35S)sulfate, (3H)leucine, and (35S)cysteine in pulse-chase protocols to study the structure and hyaluronate binding properties of newly synthesized proteoglycan monomers. Radiolabeled monomers were purified from medium and cell-layer fractions by dissociative CsCl gradient centrifugation with bovine carrier monomer, and analyzed for hyaluronate binding affinity on Sepharose CL-2B in 0.5 M Na acetate, 0.1% Triton X-100, pH 6.8. Detergent was necessary to prevent self-association of newly synthesized monomers during chromatography. Monomers secreted during a 30-min pulse labeling with (35S)sulfate had a low affinity relative to carrier. Those molecules released into the medium during the first 12 h of chase remained in the low affinity form whereas those retained by the cell layer rapidly acquired high affinity. In cultures where more than 90% of the preformed cell-layer proteoglycan was removed by hyaluronidase digestion before radiolabeling the newly synthesized low affinity monomers also rapidly acquired high affinity if retained in the cell layer. Cultures labeled with amino acid precursors were used to establish the purity of monomer preparations and to isolate core proteins for study. Leucine- or cysteine-labeled core proteins derived from either low or high affinity monomer preparations migrated as a single major species on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis with electrophoretic mobility very similar to that of core protein derived from extracted proteoglycan monomer. Purified low affinity monomers were converted to the high affinity form by treatment at pH 8.6; however, this change was prevented by guanidinium-HCl at concentrations above 0.8 M.

  9. Ultrastructural, immunohistochemical and biochemical analysis of glycosaminoglycans and proteoglycans in the mouse pubic symphysis during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Pinheiro, M C; Mora, O A; Caldini, E G; Battlehner, C N; Joazeiro, P P; Toledo, O M S

    2005-06-01

    During pregnancy, an interpubic ligament is formed in the mouse pubic symphysis. In late stages, this ligament undergoes "relaxation" to allow proper delivery, which is expected on the 19th day. Proteoglycans and hyaluronic acid play an important role in the remodeling of the extracellular matrix in these tissues. Glycosaminoglycans and proteoglycans were studied by electron microscopic, immunohistochemical and biochemical methods in samples of mouse pubic symphysis from the 12th to 18th day of pregnancy. At the ultrastructural level, using cuprolinic blue and enzymatic digestion by chondroitin lyases, two types of proteoglycan filaments were observed in the fibrocartilage on the 12th day, as well as in D 15, D 17 and D 18 pubic ligaments. The only sulfated glycosaminoglycan in these filaments was chondroitin sulfate, as shown by chondroitin lyase treatment. Their electrophoretic mobility, before and after enzymatic degradation, corroborated this inference. The ratio of chondroitin sulfate/dry weight of symphysis showed two phases of increase: between D12 and D 15, and between D 17 and D 18. We suggest that the first corresponds mainly to an increase in decorin when the ligament is formed, and the second to versican, during "relaxation". Versican and hyaluronic acid, working as water holding molecules would be responsible for the hydration of the ligament at the end of pregnancy, allowing an increase in resiliency. The presence of hyaluronic acid was confirmed by labeling with HA-probe in the perichondrium, fibrocartilage and ligament. The role of collagen fibers as physical restrictors of the complete expansion of glycosaminoglycans and hyaluronic acid in tissue is discussed. PMID:15951206

  10. Chronic barium intoxication disrupts sulphated proteoglycan synthesis: a hypothesis for the origins of multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Purdey, Mark

    2004-01-01

    High level contamination by natural and industrial sources of the alkali earth metal, barium (Ba) has been identified in the ecosystems/workplaces that are associated with high incidence clustering of multiple sclerosis (MS) and other neurodegenerative diseases such as the transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Analyses of ecosystems supporting the most renowned MS clusters in Saskatchewan, Sardinia, Massachusetts, Colorado, Guam, NE Scotland demonstrated consistently elevated levels of Ba in soils (mean: 1428 ppm) and vegetation (mean: 74 ppm) in relation to mean levels of 345 and 19 ppm recorded in MS-free regions adjoining. The high levels of Ba stemmed from local quarrying for Ba ores and/or use of Ba in paper/foundry/welding/textile/oil and gas well related industries, as well as from the use of Ba as an atmospheric aerosol spray for enhancing/refracting the signalling of radio/radar waves along military jet flight paths, missile test ranges, etc. It is proposed that chronic contamination of the biosystem with the reactive types of Ba salts can initiate the pathogenesis of MS; due to the conjugation of Ba with free sulphate, which subsequently deprives the endogenous sulphated proteoglycan molecules (heparan sulfates) of their sulphate co partner, thereby disrupting synthesis of S-proteoglycans and their crucial role in the fibroblast growth factor (FGF) signalling which induces oligodendrocyte progenitors to maintain the growth and structural integrity of the myelin sheath. Loss of S-proteoglycan activity explains other key facets of MS pathogenesis; such as the aggregation of platelets and the proliferation of superoxide generated oxidative stress. Ba intoxications disturb the sodium-potassium ion pump--another key feature of the MS profile. The co-clustering of various neurodegenerative diseases in these Ba-contaminated ecosystems suggests that the pathogenesis of all of these diseases could pivot upon a

  11. Studies on the hyaluronate binding properties of newly synthesized proteoglycans purified from articular chondrocyte cultures.

    PubMed

    Sandy, J D; Plaas, A H

    1989-06-01

    Primary cultures of rabbit articular chondrocytes have been maintained for 10 days and labeled with [35S]sulfate, [3H]leucine, and [35S]cysteine in pulse-chase protocols to study the structure and hyaluronate binding properties of newly synthesized proteoglycan monomers. Radiolabeled monomers were purified from medium and cell-layer fractions by dissociative CsCl gradient centrifugation with bovine carrier monomer, and analyzed for hyaluronate binding affinity on Sepharose CL-2B in 0.5 M Na acetate, 0.1% Triton X-100, pH 6.8. Detergent was necessary to prevent self-association of newly synthesized monomers during chromatography. Monomers secreted during a 30-min pulse labeling with [35S]sulfate had a low affinity relative to carrier. Those molecules released into the medium during the first 12 h of chase (about 40% of the total) remained in the low affinity form whereas those retained by the cell layer rapidly acquired high affinity. In cultures where more than 90% of the preformed cell-layer proteoglycan was removed by hyaluronidase digestion before radiolabeling the newly synthesized low affinity monomers also rapidly acquired high affinity if retained in the cell layer. Cultures labeled with amino acid precursors were used to establish the purity of monomer preparations and to isolate core proteins for study. Leucine- or cysteine-labeled core proteins derived from either low or high affinity monomer preparations migrated as a single major species on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis with electrophoretic mobility very similar to that of core protein derived from extracted proteoglycan monomer. Purified low affinity monomers were converted to the high affinity form by treatment at pH 8.6; however, this change was prevented by guanidinium-HCl at concentrations above 0.8 M. Conversion to high affinity was also achieved by incubation of monomers in aggregate with hyaluronic acid (HA) at pH 6.8 followed by dissociative reisolation of monomer

  12. Effect of reactive oxygen species on the biosynthesis and structure of newly synthesized proteoglycans.

    PubMed

    Panasyuk, A; Frati, E; Ribault, D; Mitrovic, D

    1994-02-01

    The effect of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated by a xanthine oxidase hypoxanthine system (mainly H2O2) on proteoglycan (PG) metabolism and structure was investigated in vitro, using cell monolayers of cultured rabbit articular chondrocytes and purified resident and newly synthesized proteoglycans. It was shown that ROS generated in this system frequently stimulate (at low concentrations), and consistently inhibit (at higher concentrations), the incorporation of 35SO4 and 3H-glucosamine into PG molecules synthesized by cultured chondrocytes. The inhibition of isotopes' incorporation at higher enzyme concentrations was suppressed completely by heating xanthine oxidase and allopurinol with superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase. ROS at high concentration also inhibited 3H-uridine incorporation but had no effect on 35SO4 and 3H-uridine uptake by the cells. They also alter hyaluronan (HA) and PG monomers by fragmenting the core protein moiety and destroying the hyaluronic acid binding region. Altered PG monomers do not interact with HA to form complexes, but fragmented HA still retain a significant PG monomer-binding capacity. PG-HA complexes are easily and irreversibly destroyed by ROS. These results suggest that ROS may at low fluxes stimulate PG-synthesis under physiological conditions and alter cartilage metabolism and structure in conditions where they are overproduced, such as in rheumatoid arthritis, and in hemochromatosis and other iron storage diseases. PMID:8005511

  13. Unconventional T-cell recognition of an arthritogenic epitope of proteoglycan aggrecan released from degrading cartilage.

    PubMed

    Falconer, Jane; Mahida, Rahul; Venkatesh, Divya; Pearson, Jeffrey; Robinson, John H

    2016-04-01

    It has been proposed that peptide epitopes bind to MHC class II molecules to form distinct structural conformers of the same MHC II-peptide complex termed type A and type B, and that the two conformers of the same peptide-MHC II complex are recognized by distinct CD4 T cells, termed type A and type B T cells. Both types recognize short synthetic peptides but only type A recognize endosomally processed intact antigen. Type B T cells that recognize self peptides from exogenously degraded proteins have been shown to escape negative selection during thymic development and so have the potential to contribute to the pathogenesis of autoimmunity. We generated and characterized mouse CD4 T cells specific for an arthritogenic epitope of the candidate joint autoantigen proteoglycan aggrecan. Cloned T-cell hybridomas specific for a synthetic peptide containing the aggrecan epitope showed two distinct response patterns based on whether they could recognize processed intact aggrecan. Fine mapping demonstrated that both types of T-cell recognized the same core epitope. The results are consistent with the generation of aggrecan-specific type A and type B T cells. Type B T cells were activated by supernatants released from degrading cartilage, indicating the presence of antigenic extracellular peptides or fragments of aggrecan. Type B T cells could play a role in the pathogenesis of proteoglycan-induced arthritis in mice, a model for rheumatoid arthritis, by recognizing extracellular peptides or protein fragments of joint autoantigens released by inflamed cartilage. PMID:26581676

  14. Binding of oligosaccharides of hyaluronic acid to proteoglycans (Short Communication)

    PubMed Central

    Hardingham, Timothy E.; Muir, Helen

    1973-01-01

    Oligosaccharides derived from hyaluronic acid were shown to inhibit proteoglycan–hyaluronic acid interaction, as measured in a viscometer. The relative inhibition increased with the size of the oligosaccharide and the results suggested that decasaccharides were the smallest fragments able to bind strongly to the proteoglycan. PMID:4273187

  15. Analysis of the proteolytic degradation products of hyaline cartilage proteoglycans.

    PubMed

    Liszt, F; Schnittker-Schulze, K; Stuhlsatz, H W; Greiling, H

    1990-01-01

    The proteolytic degradation products of nasal hyaline cartilage proteoglycans produced by polymorphonuclear leukocyte lysosomal enzymes were investigated. The protein content of the degradation products is 7.0-8.6% corresponding to a peptide chain of 24-28 amino acids and the relative molecular mass of the total fragment is M(r) = 37,600-39,200. On an average, each proteoglycan fragment contains two chondroitin-sulphate chains (M(r) = 22,000-22,400), every fourth fragment contains a keratan sulphate chain (M(r) = 7000-7200) and every seventh to eighth contains an O-glycosidic oligosaccharide. The results of the disaccharide analysis show that the galactosaminoglycan chains contain 76.2-83.6% chondroitin-4-sulphate, 12.9-19.4% chondroitin-6-sulphate, 3.5-3.8% chondroitin and no dermatan sulphate. Since composition and relative molecular mass of the chondroitin sulphate and keratan sulphate chains from the degradation products resemble those from native proteoglycans, it is suggested that the degradation of the proteoglycans occurs by proteinases that attack preferably the chondroitin sulphate region of the core protein. PMID:1726643

  16. The role of proteoglycans in idiopathic carpal tunnel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tucci, Michelle; Freeland, Alan; Mohamed, Adel; Benghuzzi, Ham

    2005-01-01

    Decompression of the carpal canal is the most common hand surgery performed in the United States. Hand surgeons perform 460,000 carpal tunnel releases (CTR) each year, which cost the medical industry in excess of two billion dollars per year. The focus of this investigation was to identify the changes, which occur in the flexor tenosynovium of patients undergoing CTR at the connective tissue level. The connective tissues determine the amount and arrangement of macromolecules (fibers, proteoglycans, and glycoproteins) in the extracellular matrix. The proteoglycans are soluble macromolecules that have both structural and metabolic roles. Glycoproteins help to form the interstitial space, basement membrane and function as cell surface receptors. The mechanical function of the proteoglycans includes stabilization of the collagen fibers as well as function in the hydration of the tissues. It has been previous shown that changes in the oxygen concentration at the tissue level can alter the proteoglycans profile of the tissue. During periods of hypoxia, such as those obtained during repetitive motion CTS; the glycolytic pathway acts as the energy source for the tissue. Productions of chondroitin sulfates are a process consumes NAD and would be potentially toxic to the cells under anaerobic conditions. Production of keratan sulfate is NAD sparing product, and may act as a survival pathway for cells under adverse conditions. The disruption in the proteoglycan balance will allow for alterations in the ECM and changes in hydration status of the tissues may have serious implication in CTS because the carpal canal is anatomically very narrow and increases in volume within the canal can result in further compression of the nerve. Flexor tenosyioum was obtained from patients undergoing CTR and compared with control tissue for dermatan, keratan and chondroitin sulfate. The results show a greater density of keratan reactivity in CTS tissues identified by immunostaining. In addition

  17. Proteoglycan expression is influenced by mechanical load in TMJ discs.

    PubMed

    Nakao, Y; Konno-Nagasaka, M; Toriya, N; Arakawa, T; Kashio, H; Takuma, T; Mizoguchi, I

    2015-01-01

    The expression and assembly of the extracellular matrix are profoundly associated with adaptive and pathological responses of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). To better understand the adaptive responses of the TMJ disc to mechanical loading, we examined the expression of 2 modular proteoglycans and 10 small leucine-rich proteoglycans (SLRPs) at the mRNA and protein levels and determined the contents of proteoglycan-related glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) in rat TMJ discs in response to altered mechanical loading caused by an incisal bite plane. One hundred thirty 7-week-old male Wistar rats were assigned to control and bite plane groups. TMJ disc thickness and the intensity of toluidine blue staining of metachromasia increased in the posterior band after 2 weeks of wearing the bite plane. GAG content increased significantly in the bite plane group after 2 weeks. Quantitative real-time RT-PCR (reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction) analysis indicated that biglycan and chondroadherin mRNA levels increased after 2 weeks and that the level of decorin mRNA increased at 4 weeks. Versican mRNA levels increased after 3 weeks, particularly for the V0 and V1 versican isoforms, which carry more GAG attachment sites than do the V2 and V3 isoforms. Western analysis demonstrated a corresponding increase in the levels of versican, biglycan, and decorin core proteins at 4 weeks in the bite plane group. These results indicate that mechanical loading differentially influences proteoglycan mRNA expression and protein accumulation in the TMJ disc. The change in proteoglycan mRNA and protein levels may lead to the modulation of matrix-matrix and cell-matrix interactions and has important biological significance for adaptation to complicated biomechanical requirements and for tissue maintenance in the TMJ disc. PMID:25348543

  18. 'Giant' multishell CdSe nanocrystal quantum dots with supporessed blinking: novel fluorescent probes for real-time detection of single-molecule events

    SciTech Connect

    Hollingsworth, Jennifer A; Vela, Javier; Htoon, Han; Klimov, Victor I; Casson, Amy R; Chen, Yongfen

    2009-01-01

    We reported for the first time that key nanocrystal quantum dot (NQD) optical properties-quantum yield, photobleaching and blinking-can be rendered independent ofNQD surface chemistry and environment by growth of a very thick, defect-free inorganic shell. Here, we show the precise shell-thickness dependence of these effects. We demonstrate that 'giant-shell' NQDs can be largely non-blinking for observation times as long as 54 minutes and lhat on-time fractions are independent of experimental time-resolution from 1-200 ms. These effects are primarily demonstrated on (CdSe)CdS (core)shell NQDs, but we also show that alloyed shells comprising Cd.Znl.'S and terminated with a non-cytotoxic ZnS layer exhibit similar properties. The mechanism for suppressed blinking and dramatically enhanced stability is attributed to both effective isolation of the NQD core excitonic wavefunction from the NQD surface, as well as a quasi-Type II electronic structure. The unusual electronic structure provides for effective spatial separation of the electron and hole into the shell and core, respectively, and, thereby, for reduced efficiencies in non-radiative Auger recombination.

  19. Source of peritoneal proteoglycans. Human peritoneal mesothelial cells synthesize and secrete mainly small dermatan sulfate proteoglycans.

    PubMed Central

    Yung, S.; Thomas, G. J.; Stylianou, E.; Williams, J. D.; Coles, G. A.; Davies, M.

    1995-01-01

    This study describes experiments that compare the proteoglycans (PGs) extracted from the dialysate from patients receiving continuous peritoneal ambulatory dialysis (CAPD) with those secreted by metabolically labeled human peritoneal mesothelial cells in vitro. The PGs isolated from both sources were predominantly small chondroitin sulfate/dermatan sulfate PGs. Western blot of the core proteins obtained after chondroitin ABC lyase treatment with specific antibodies identified decorin and biglycan. With [35S]sulfate and [35S]methionine as labeling precursors it was shown that dermatan sulfate rather than chondroitin sulfate were the major glycosaminoglycan chains and that decorin was the predominant species. These data provide the first evidence that human peritoneal mesothelial cells may be the principal source of PGs in the peritoneum. Given the proposed functions of decorin and biglycan, the results suggest that these PGs may be involved in the control of transforming growth factor-beta activity and collagen fibril formation in the peritoneum. Images Figure 2 Figure 7 Figure 8 PMID:7856761

  20. NG2 proteoglycan increases mesangial cell proliferation and extracellular matrix production

    SciTech Connect

    Xiong Jing; Wang Yang; Zhu, Zhonghua; Liu Jianshe; Wang Yumei; Zhang Chun; Hammes, Hans-Peter; Lang, Florian; Feng Yuxi

    2007-10-05

    As a membrane-spanning protein, NG2 chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan interacts with molecules on both sides of plasma membrane. The present study explored the role of NG2 in the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy. In the normal kidneys, NG2 was observed predominantly in glomerular mesangium, Bowman's capsule and interstitial vessels. Both mRNA and protein expression in kidneys was significantly higher in strepozotocin-induced diabetic rats than that in normal rats. In the cultured rat mesangial cell line HBZY-1, overexpression of NG2 promoted mesangial cell proliferation and extracellular matrix (ECM) production, such as type VI collagen and laminin. Furthermore, target knockdown of NG2 resulted in decreased cell proliferation and ECM formation. The observations suggest that NG2 is up-regulated in diabetic nephropathy. It actively participates in the development and progression of glomerulosclerosis by stimulating proliferation of mesangial cells and deposition of ECM.

  1. Functions of Heparan Sulfate Proteoglycans in Development: Insights From Drosophila Models.

    PubMed

    Nakato, H; Li, J-P

    2016-01-01

    Heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs) are a class of carbohydrate-modified proteins involved in key biological processes, including growth factor signaling, cell adhesion, and enzymatic catalysis. HSPGs serve as coreceptors for a number of ligand molecules to regulate their signaling and distribution. These HS-dependent factors include fibroblast growth factors, bone morphogenetic proteins, Wnt-related factors, hedgehog, and cytokines. Several classes of HSPGs are evolutionarily conserved from humans to the genetically tractable model organism Drosophila. Sophisticated molecular genetic tools available in Drosophila provide for a powerful system to address unanswered questions regarding in vivo functions of HSPGs. These studies have highlighted the functions of HSPGs in the regulation of significant developmental events, such as morphogen gradient formation, nervous system formation, and the stem cell niche. Drosophila genetics has also established HSPGs as key factors in feedback controls that ensure robustness in developmental systems. PMID:27241223

  2. A study on the interactions between Heparan Sulfate Proteoglycans and Wnt proteins

    PubMed Central

    Fuerer, Christophe; Habib, Shukry J.; Nusse, Roel

    2010-01-01

    The Wnt signaling pathway plays key roles in development and adult homeostasis. Wnt proteins are secreted, lipid-modified glycoproteins. They can form morphogen gradients that are regulated at the level of protein secretion, diffusion, and internalization. These gradients can only exist if the hydrophobic Wnt proteins are prevented from aggregating in the extracellular environment. Heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs) are necessary for proper activity of Wnt proteins and influence their distribution along the morphogenetic gradient. In this study, we show that HSPGs are able to maintain the solubility of Wnt proteins, thus stabilizing their signaling activity. Our results suggest that the role of HSPGs is not only to concentrate Wnt molecules at the cell surface but also to prevent them from aggregating in the extracellular environment. PMID:19705435

  3. Evidence for the presence of a large keratan sulphate proteoglycan in the human uterine cervix.

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, D C; Henning, A; Winkler, M; Rath, W; Haubeck, H D; Greiling, H

    1996-01-01

    Profound changes occur in the uterine cervix during pregnancy. In particular, the extracellular matrix of the connective tissue is remodelled extensively. To elucidate the mechanisms involved in this process, we have analysed the proteoglycan pattern in the human cervix from pregnant and non-pregnant women. Proteoglycans of the cervix tissue specimen were extracted with 4 M guanidine hydrochloride and precipitated with 80% ethanol. Purification of proteoglycans was performed by several chromatographic steps. Characterization of proteoglycans was done by SDS/PAGE before and after digestion with glycosaminoglycan-specific enzymes. Proteoglycans were detected by combined Alcian Blue/silver staining or, after blotting of biotin-labelled proteoglycans on to poly(vinylidene difluoride) membrane, with peroxidase-conjugated avidin or by the use of keratan sulphate- or decorin-specific monoclonal antibodies. In contrast with previous reports, where only chondroitin/dermatan sulphate proteoglycans have been found in the uterine cervix, we have shown in the present study the existence of a large keratan sulphate proteoglycan with an M(r) > 220,000 in cervix samples from non-pregnant and pregnant women. This proteoglycan showed a strong reaction with the keratan sulphate-specific monoclonal antibody 5D4 and could be degraded by keratanases. The size of the core protein of this keratan sulphate proteoglycan was estimated to be about M(r) 220,000. PMID:8973545

  4. Evidence for the presence of a large keratan sulphate proteoglycan in the human uterine cervix.

    PubMed

    Fischer, D C; Henning, A; Winkler, M; Rath, W; Haubeck, H D; Greiling, H

    1996-12-01

    Profound changes occur in the uterine cervix during pregnancy. In particular, the extracellular matrix of the connective tissue is remodelled extensively. To elucidate the mechanisms involved in this process, we have analysed the proteoglycan pattern in the human cervix from pregnant and non-pregnant women. Proteoglycans of the cervix tissue specimen were extracted with 4 M guanidine hydrochloride and precipitated with 80% ethanol. Purification of proteoglycans was performed by several chromatographic steps. Characterization of proteoglycans was done by SDS/PAGE before and after digestion with glycosaminoglycan-specific enzymes. Proteoglycans were detected by combined Alcian Blue/silver staining or, after blotting of biotin-labelled proteoglycans on to poly(vinylidene difluoride) membrane, with peroxidase-conjugated avidin or by the use of keratan sulphate- or decorin-specific monoclonal antibodies. In contrast with previous reports, where only chondroitin/dermatan sulphate proteoglycans have been found in the uterine cervix, we have shown in the present study the existence of a large keratan sulphate proteoglycan with an M(r) > 220,000 in cervix samples from non-pregnant and pregnant women. This proteoglycan showed a strong reaction with the keratan sulphate-specific monoclonal antibody 5D4 and could be degraded by keratanases. The size of the core protein of this keratan sulphate proteoglycan was estimated to be about M(r) 220,000. PMID:8973545

  5. Proteoglycan synthesis in haematopoietic cells: isolation and characterization of heparan sulphate proteoglycans expressed by the bone-marrow stromal cell line MS-5.

    PubMed

    Drzeniek, Z; Siebertz, B; Stöcker, G; Just, U; Ostertag, W; Greiling, H; Haubeck, H D

    1997-10-15

    Proteoglycans of bone-marrow stromal cells and their extracellular matrix are important components of the haematopoietic microenvironment. Recently, several studies have indicated that they are involved in the interaction of haematopoietic stem and stromal cells. However, a detailed characterization of the heparan sulphate proteoglycans synthesized by bone-marrow stromal cells is still lacking. Here we report on the isolation and characterization of proteoglycans from the haematopoietic stromal cell line MS-5, that efficiently supports the growth and differentiation of human and murine haematopoietic progenitor cells. Biochemical characterization of purified proteoglycans revealed that the haematopoietic stromal cell line MS-5 synthesizes, in addition to chondroitin sulphate proteoglycans, several different heparan sulphate proteoglycans. Immunochemical analysis, using specific antibodies against the different members of the syndecan family, glypican, betaglycan and perlecan, showed that MS-5 cells synthesize all these different heparan sulphate proteoglycans. These data were further supported by reverse-transcriptase PCR and confirmed by sequence and Northern blot analysis. The relative abundance of the different heparan sulphate proteoglycans was estimated on the protein and mRNA levels. PMID:9359418

  6. Proteoglycan synthesis in haematopoietic cells: isolation and characterization of heparan sulphate proteoglycans expressed by the bone-marrow stromal cell line MS-5.

    PubMed Central

    Drzeniek, Z; Siebertz, B; Stöcker, G; Just, U; Ostertag, W; Greiling, H; Haubeck, H D

    1997-01-01

    Proteoglycans of bone-marrow stromal cells and their extracellular matrix are important components of the haematopoietic microenvironment. Recently, several studies have indicated that they are involved in the interaction of haematopoietic stem and stromal cells. However, a detailed characterization of the heparan sulphate proteoglycans synthesized by bone-marrow stromal cells is still lacking. Here we report on the isolation and characterization of proteoglycans from the haematopoietic stromal cell line MS-5, that efficiently supports the growth and differentiation of human and murine haematopoietic progenitor cells. Biochemical characterization of purified proteoglycans revealed that the haematopoietic stromal cell line MS-5 synthesizes, in addition to chondroitin sulphate proteoglycans, several different heparan sulphate proteoglycans. Immunochemical analysis, using specific antibodies against the different members of the syndecan family, glypican, betaglycan and perlecan, showed that MS-5 cells synthesize all these different heparan sulphate proteoglycans. These data were further supported by reverse-transcriptase PCR and confirmed by sequence and Northern blot analysis. The relative abundance of the different heparan sulphate proteoglycans was estimated on the protein and mRNA levels. PMID:9359418

  7. The Role of NG2 Proteoglycan in Glioma

    PubMed Central

    Yadavilli, Sridevi; Hwang, Eugene I.; Packer, Roger J.; Nazarian, Javad

    2016-01-01

    Neuron glia antigen-2 ((NG2), also known as chondroitin sulphate proteoglycan 4, or melanoma-associated chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan) is a type-1 membrane protein expressed by many central nervous system (CNS) cells during development and differentiation and plays a critical role in proliferation and angiogenesis. ‘NG2’ often references either the protein itself or the highly proliferative and undifferentiated glial cells expressing high levels of NG2 protein. NG2 glia represent the fourth major type of neuroglia in the mammalian nervous system and are classified as oligodendrocyte progenitor cells by virtue of their committed oligodendrocyte generation in developing and adult brain. Here, we discuss NG2 glial cells as well as NG2 protein and its expression and role with regards to CNS neoplasms as well as its potential as a therapeutic target for treating childhood CNS cancers. PMID:26947882

  8. Alterations in proteoglycan synthesis common to healing wounds and tumors.

    PubMed Central

    Yeo, T. K.; Brown, L.; Dvorak, H. F.

    1991-01-01

    Wound healing and tumor stroma generation share several important properties, including hyperpermeable blood vessels, extravasation of fibrinogen, and extravascular clotting. In both, the deposits of fibrin gel serve initially as provisional stroma and later are replaced by granulation tissue. Proteoglycans (PG) are also important constituents of the extracellular matrix, but their composition and role in healing wounds and tumor stroma generation are poorly understood. The authors used immunohistochemical and biochemical methods to investigate the dermatan sulfate proteoglycan (DSPG) and chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan (CSPG) composition of healing skin wounds and solid tumors. By immunohistochemistry, the great majority of normal guinea pig and human dermis stained weakly for CSPG and strongly for decorin. In contrast, the granulation tissue of healing skin wounds and scars stained intensely for CSPG and weakly or not at all for decorin; however decorin staining was restored to normal intensity after digestion with chondroitin ABC lyase, suggesting that decorin antigenic sites had been masked by glycosaminoglycan (GAG) chains. Like wounds, the stroma of several carcinomas (line 1 guinea pig, human breast, colon, basal cell, and squamous) stained strongly for CSPG and weakly or not at all for decorin, but decorin staining developed after chondroitin ABC lyase digestion. Thus healing wounds and tumor stroma express a common pattern of altered PG staining, adding another to the properties these pathologic entities share. Proteoglycans extracted from healing wounds after in situ labelling with [35S] Na sulfate contained more CSPG than normal dermis with significantly longer GAG chains. Granulation tissue also synthesized more DSPG than normal skin, with greater heterogeneity and longer GAG chains. These alterations in PG synthesis correlate with the cell proliferation, migration, and collagen synthesis that accompany wound healing and may provide clues to the

  9. Expression of proteoglycan core proteins in human bone marrow stroma.

    PubMed Central

    Schofield, K P; Gallagher, J T; David, G

    1999-01-01

    Heparan sulphate proteoglycans (HSPGs) present on the surface of bone marrow stromal cells and in the extracellular matrix (ECM) have important roles in the control of adhesion and growth of haemopoietic stem and progenitor cells. The two main groups of proteoglycans which contain heparan sulphate chains are members of the syndecan and glypican families. In this study we have identified the main surface membrane and matrix-associated HSPGs present in normal human bone marrow stroma formed in long-term culture. Proteoglycans were extracted from the adherent stromal layers and treated with heparitinase and chondroitinase ABC. The core proteins were detected by Western blotting using antibodies directed against syndecans-1-4, glypican-1 and the ECM HSPG, perlecan. Stromal cell expression at the RNA level was detected by Northern blotting and by reverse transcription PCR. Glypican-1, syndecan-3 and syndecan-4 were the major cell-membrane HSPG species and perlecan was the major ECM proteoglycan. There was no evidence for expression of syndecan-1 protein. Syndecan-3 was expressed mainly as a variant or processed 50-55 kDa core protein and in lower amounts as the characteristic 125 kDa core protein. These results suggest that syndecan-3, syndecan-4 and glypican-1 present on the surface of marrow stromal cells, together with perlecan in the ECM, may be responsible for creating the correct stromal 'niche' for the maintenance and development of haemopoietic stem and progenitor cells. The detection of a variant form of syndecan-3 as a major stromal HSPG suggests a specific role for this syndecan in haemopoiesis. PMID:10527946

  10. Austromegabalanus psittacus barnacle shell structure and proteoglycan localization and functionality.

    PubMed

    Fernández, M S; Arias, J I; Neira-Carrillo, A; Arias, J L

    2015-09-01

    Comparative analyzes of biomineralization models have being crucial for the understanding of the functional properties of biominerals and the elucidation of the processes through which biomacromolecules control the synthesis and structural organization of inorganic mineral-based biomaterials. Among calcium carbonate-containing bioceramics, egg, mollusk and echinoderm shells, and crustacean carapaces, have being fairly well characterized. However, Thoraceca barnacles, although being crustacea, showing molting cycle, build a quite stable and heavily mineralized shell that completely surround the animal, which is for life firmly cemented to the substratum. This makes barnacles an interesting model for studying processes of biomineralization. Here we studied the main microstructural and ultrastructural features of Austromegabalanus psittacus barnacle shell, characterize the occurrence of specific proteoglycans (keratan-, dermatan- and chondroitin-6-sulfate proteoglycans) in different soluble and insoluble organic fractions extracted from the shell, and tested them for their ability to crystallize calcium carbonate in vitro. Our results indicate that, in the barnacle model, proteoglycans are good candidates for the modification of the calcite crystal morphology, although the cooperative effect of some additional proteins in the shell could not be excluded. PMID:26276577

  11. Proteoglycan synthesis in normal and Lowe syndrome fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Harper, G.S.; Hascall, V.C.; Yanagishita, M.; Gahl, W.A.

    1987-04-25

    Lowe (oculocerebrorenal) syndrome (LS) is an X-linked disorder characterized by congenital cataracts, generalized hypotonia, mental retardation, and renal Fanconi syndrome. The basic defect remains unknown, but the possibility that fibroblasts express reduced sulfation of glycosaminoglycans has been studied in several laboratories. A mechanism involving overproduction of an enzyme (nucleotide pyrophosphatase) active against adenosine 3'-phosphate, 5'-phosphosulfate (PAPS) has been postulated. Decreased synthesis of normally sulfated glycosaminoglycans was also reported. We measured the synthesis of proteoglycans and glycosaminoglycans by incorporation of (/sup 3/H)glucosamine and Na/sub 2/(/sup 35/)SO/sub 4/ into cultured fibroblasts from four LS patients and related it directly to the synthesis in six normal fibroblast cultures. We found that the rate of synthesis varied greatly among the normal cultures (cv, 30%), but not significantly between LS and the normal. The LS fibroblasts' ability to sulfate glycosaminoglycans was assayed as the amount of /sup 3/H-glycosaminoglycan eluting at low ionic strength on anion exchange chromatography, the amount of non-sulfated disaccharide present in chondroitinase digests of labeled proteoglycans, and the ratio of /sup 35/S to 3H incorporation into proteoglycans. Each parameter suggested that the LS cells were synthesizing normally sulfated glycosaminoglycans (e.g. % delta Di-0S, 21 +/- 6 in normal; 27 +/- 6 in LS). The cells' ability to sulfate glycosaminoglycans was tested under conditions of markedly stimulated glycosaminoglycan synthesis, by treating the cultures with a beta-D-xyloside.

  12. Border patrol: insights into the unique role of perlecan/heparan sulfate proteoglycan 2 at cell and tissue borders.

    PubMed

    Farach-Carson, Mary C; Warren, Curtis R; Harrington, Daniel A; Carson, Daniel D

    2014-02-01

    The extracellular matrix proteoglycan (ECM) perlecan, also known as heparan sulfate proteoglycan 2 or HSPG2, is one of the largest (>200 nm) and oldest (>550 M years) extracellular matrix molecules. In vertebrates, perlecan's five-domain structure contains numerous independently folding modules with sequence similarities to other ECM proteins, all connected like cars into one long, diverse complex train following a unique N-terminal domain I decorated with three long glycosaminoglycan chains, and an additional glycosaminoglycan attachment site in the C-terminal domain V. In lower invertebrates, perlecan is not typically a proteoglycan, possessing the majority of the core protein modules, but lacking domain I where the attachment sites for glycosaminoglycan chains are located. This suggests that uniting the heparan sulfate binding growth factor functions of domain I and the core protein functions of the rest of the molecule in domains II-V occurred later in evolution for a new functional purpose. In this review, we surveyed several decades of pertinent literature to ask a fundamental question: Why did nature design this protein uniquely as an extraordinarily long multifunctional proteoglycan with a single promoter regulating expression, rather than separating these functions into individual proteins that could be independently regulated? We arrived at the conclusion that the concentration of perlecan at functional borders separating tissues and tissue layers is an ancient key function of the core protein. The addition of the heparan sulfate chains in domain I likely occurred as an additional means of binding the core protein to other ECM proteins in territorial matrices and basement membranes, and as a means to reserve growth factors in an on-site depot to assist with rapid repair of those borders when compromised, such as would occur during wounding. We propose a function for perlecan that extends its role from that of an extracellular scaffold, as we previously

  13. Border Patrol: Insights into the Unique Role of Perlecan/Heparan Sulfate Proteoglycan2 at Cell and Tissue Borders

    PubMed Central

    Farach-Carson, Mary C.; Warren, Curtis R.; Harrington, Daniel A.; Carson, Daniel D.

    2013-01-01

    The extracellular matrix proteoglycan (ECM) perlecan, also known as heparan sulfate proteoglycan 2 or HSPG2, is one of the largest (>200 nm) and oldest (>550M years) extracellular matrix molecules. In vertebrates, perlecan’s five-domain structure contains numerous independently folding modules with sequence similarities to other ECM proteins, all connected like cars into one long, diverse complex train following a unique N-terminal domain I decorated with three long glycosaminoglycan chains, and an additional glycosaminoglycan attachment site in the C-terminal domain V. In lower invertebrates, perlecan is not typically a proteoglycan, possessing the majority of the core protein modules, but lacking domain I where the attachment sites for glycosaminoglycan chains are located. This suggests that uniting the heparan sulfate binding growth factor functions of domain I and the core protein functions of the rest of the molecule in domains II-V occurred later in evolution for a new functional purpose. In this review, we surveyed several decades of pertinent literature to ask a fundamental question: Why did nature design this protein uniquely as an extraordinarily long multifunctional proteoglycan with a single promoter regulating expression, rather than separating these functions into individual proteins that could be independently regulated? We arrived at the conclusion that the concentration of perlecan at functional borders separating tissues and tissue layers is an ancient key function of the core protein. The addition of the heparan sulfate chains in domain I likely occurred as an additional means of binding the core protein to other ECM proteins in territorial matrices and basement membranes, and as a means to reserve growth factors in an on-site depot to assist with rapid repair of those borders when compromised, such as would occur during wounding. We propose a function for perlecan that extends its role from that of an extracellular scaffold, as we previously

  14. The structures of N- and O-glycosidic carbohydrate chains of a chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan isolated from the media of the human aorta.

    PubMed

    Akiyama, F; Stevens, R L; Hayashi, S; Swann, D A; Binette, J P; Caterson, B; Schmid, K; Van Halbeek, H; Mutsaers, J H; Gerwig, G J

    1987-02-01

    A large Mr chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan was extracted from the media of human aorta under dissociative conditions and purified by density-gradient centrifugation, ion-exchange chromatography, and gel filtration chromatography. Removal of a contaminating dermatan sulfate proteoglycan was accomplished by reduction, alkylation and rechromatography on the gel filtration column. After chondroitinase ABC treatment, the proteoglycan core was separated from a residual heparan sulfate proteoglycan by a third gel filtration chromatography step. As assessed by radioimmunoassay, the isolated proteoglycan core was free of link protein, but possessed epitopes that were recognized by antisera against the hyaluronic acid binding region of bovine cartilage proteoglycan as well as those that were weakly recognized by anti-keratan sulfate antisera. Following beta-elimination of the protein core, the liberated low Mr oligosaccharides were partially resolved by Sephadex G-50 chromatography, and their primary structure was determined by 500-MHz1H NMR spectroscopy in combination with compositional sugar analysis. The N-glycosidic carbohydrate chains, which were obtained as glycopeptides, were all biantennary glycans containing NeuAc and Fuc; microheterogeneity in the NeuAc----Gal linkage was detected in one of the branches. The N-glycosidic glycans have the following overall structure: (Formula: see text). The majority of the O-glycosidic carbohydrate chains bound to the protein core were found to be of the mucin type. They were obtained as glycopeptides and oligosaccharide alditols, and possessed the following structures: NeuAc alpha(2----3)Gal beta(1----3)GalNAc-ol, [NeuAc alpha(2----3)Gal beta(1----3)[NeuAc alpha(2----6)]GalNAc-ol, and NeuAc alpha-(2----3) Gal beta(1----3)[NeuAc alpha(2----3)Gal beta(1----4)GlcNAc beta(1----6)] GalNAc-ol. The remainder of the O-glycosidic carbohydrate chains bound to the isolated proteoglycan were the hexasaccharide link regions of the chondroitin

  15. The estrous cycle modulates small leucine-rich proteoglycans expression in mouse uterine tissues.

    PubMed

    Salgado, Renato M; Favaro, Rodolfo R; Martin, Sebastian San; Zorn, Telma M T

    2009-01-01

    In the pregnant mouse uterus, small leucine-rich proteoglycans (SLRPs) are drastically remodeled within a few hours after fertilization, suggesting that ovarian hormone levels modulate their synthesis and degradation. In this study, we followed by immunoperoxidase approach, the presence of four members of the SLRP family (decorin, lumican, biglycan, and fibromodulin) in the uterine tissues along the estrous cycle of the mouse. All molecules except fibromodulin, which predominates in the myometrium, showed a striking modulation in their distribution in the endometrial stroma, following the rise in the level of estrogen. Moreover, notable differences in the distribution of SLRPs were observed between superficial and deep stroma, as well as between the internal and external layers of the myometrium. Only biglycan and fibromodulin were expressed in the luminal and glandular epithelia. All four SLRPs were found in cytoplasmic granules of mononucleated cells. The pattern of distribution of the immunoreaction for these molecules in the uterine tissues was found to be estrous cycle-stage dependent, suggesting that these molecules undergo ovarian hormonal control and probably participate in the preparation of the uterus for decidualization and embryo implantation. In addition, this and previous results from our laboratory suggest the existence of two subpopulations of endometrial fibroblasts that may be related to the centrifugal development of the decidua. Anat Rec, 2008. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc. PMID:18951514

  16. Association of cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycans of Schwann cells with extracellular matrix proteins.

    PubMed

    Carey, D J; Crumbling, D M; Stahl, R C; Evans, D M

    1990-11-25

    The terminal differentiation of Schwann cells is dependent on contact with basement membrane. The present study was undertaken to investigate the role of cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs) in mediating Schwann cell responses to extracellular matrix contact. Phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C-releasable cell surface HSPGs purified from cultures of neonatal rat Schwann cells were subjected to affinity chromatography on immobilized laminin and fibronectin. Binding of the HSPG to both affinity matrices was observed. The strength of the association, however, was sensitive to the ionic strength of the buffer. In 0.1 M Tris-HCl, HSPG binding was essentially irreversible whereas in physiological ionic strength buffer (e.g. 0.142 M NaCl, 10 mM Tris), weaker binding was detected as a delay in elution of the HSPG from the affinity columns. Further studies of HSPG-laminin binding suggested that the binding was mediated by the glycosaminoglycan chains of the proteoglycans. Results of equilibrium gel filtration chromatography provided additional evidence for a reversible association of the HSPG and laminin with a Kd of approximately 1 x 10(-6) M. When Schwann cells were plated on plastic dishes coated with laminin, the cells attached and extended long slender processes. Inclusion of heparin, but not chondroitin sulfate, in the assay medium resulted in partial inhibition of process extension, but at concentrations of heparin which were higher than that needed to disrupt laminin-HSPG association in vitro. Addition of anti-integrin receptor antibodies resulted in more extensive inhibition of laminin-dependent process extension. Anti-integrin antibodies plus heparin essentially totally inhibited laminin-dependent process extension. These results demonstrate that cell surface HSPGs are capable of reversible association with extracellular matrix molecules and suggest that HSPG-laminin interactions play a role in laminin-dependent Schwann cell spreading. PMID

  17. Structure of newly synthesized (/sup 35/S)-proteoglycans and (/sup 35/S)-proteoglycan turnover products of cartilage explant cultures from dogs with experimental osteoarthritis

    SciTech Connect

    Carney, S.L.; Billingham, M.E.; Muir, H.; Sandy, J.D.

    1985-01-01

    The structure of newly synthesized proteoglycans from explant cultures of cartilage from joints subjected to transection of the anterior cruciate ligament (osteoarthritic) and from normal (non- or sham-operated) joints was examined. The structure of the products of proteoglycan turnover was also examined using explants of normal and osteoarthritic cartilage maintained in culture for a 48 h chase period. The findings were as follows: Newly synthesized (/sup 35/S)-proteoglycans extracted from cartilage explants from osteoarthritic joints whether examined 3 weeks, 3 months, or 6 months after surgery were larger than those from corresponding normal cartilage. This can be explained by the synthesis in osteoarthritic cartilage of abnormally long chondroitin sulfate chains on newly synthesised proteoglycans. The extracts also contained a newly formed small proteoglycan species that was unable to interact with hyaluronic acid. The proportion of this species was higher in osteoarthritic cartilage compared with normal, examined 3 weeks after surgery, but was generally absent from cartilage obtained 3 and 6 months after surgery. Compared with controls, a smaller proportion of the (/sup 35/S)-proteoglycans released into the maintenance medium of explant cultures of osteoarthritic cartilage during a 48 h chase period was able to interact with hyaluronic acid. However, although furnished with longer (/sup 35/S)-glycosaminoglycan chains, these proteoglycans were smaller than those from control explants.

  18. Giant Axonal Neuropathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Giant Axonal Neuropathy Information Page Table of Contents (click to jump ... done? Clinical Trials Organizations What is Giant Axonal Neuropathy? Giant axonal neuropathy (GAN) is a rare inherited ...

  19. Proteoglycans nondissociatively extracted from different zones of canine normal articular cartilage: variations in the sedimentation profile of aggregates with degree of physiological stress.

    PubMed

    Manicourt, D H; Pita, J C; Thonar, E J; Howell, D S

    1991-01-01

    Proteoglycans were extracted and purified without dissociation (a-A1 preparations) from superficial and deeper layers of high weight-bearing (HWA) and low weight-bearing (LWA) areas of dog normal articular cartilage. These proteoglycans were then characterized by velocity gradient centrifugation. In each of the 4 different topographical regions, the weight average sedimentation coefficients related strongly with total hexuronate content of the tissue. In the superficial layers, almost all aggregates had low sedimentation coefficients: the aggregates were smaller and less abundant in LWA than in HWA. The deeper layers contained an additional population of faster sedimenting aggregates which appeared smaller and less abundant in LWA than in HWA. Quantification and functional characterization of aggregates as well as in vitro aggregating studies showed that the topographical differences in size and content of aggregates were related to differences in content of hyaluronate and link protein in the a-A1 preparations. Superficial a-A1 specimens contained twice as much hyaluronate as deeper a-A1 preparations and their hyaluronate content increased with degree of physiological stress. Deeper a-A1 specimens from weight-bearing areas did not differ in their hyaluronate content but experiments assessing the saturation with link protein of these different a-A1 preparations suggested that specimens from HWA contained more active link than those from LWA. In contrast, the capacity of aggregation of a-A1D1D1 proteoglycan monomers as well as the molecular weight (Mr = 5 x 10(5) and aggregating capacity of hyluronate molecules appeared very similar in all a-A1 preparations from areas of articular cartilage. It is hypothesized that the synthesis of the three constituents necessary for aggregate formation (i.e. proteoglycan monomers as well as hyaluronate and link protein molecules) increases with degree of physiological load and that aggregation helps to maintain within cartilage

  20. Proteoglycans maintain lung stability in an elastase-treated mouse model of emphysema.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Ayuko; Majumdar, Arnab; Parameswaran, Harikrishnan; Bartolák-Suki, Erzsébet; Suki, Béla

    2014-07-01

    Extracellular matrix remodeling and tissue rupture contribute to the progression of emphysema. Lung tissue elasticity is governed by the tensile stiffness of fibers and the compressive stiffness of proteoglycans. It is not known how proteoglycan remodeling affects tissue stability and destruction in emphysema. The objective of this study was to characterize the role of remodeled proteoglycans in alveolar stability and tissue destruction in emphysema. At 30 days after treatment with porcine pancreatic elastase, mouse lung tissue stiffness and alveolar deformation were evaluated under varying tonicity conditions that affect the stiffness of proteoglycans. Proteoglycans were stained and measured in the alveolar walls. Computational models of alveolar stability and rupture incorporating the mechanical properties of fibers and proteoglycans were developed. Although absolute tissue stiffness was only 24% of normal, changes in relative stiffness and alveolar shape distortion due to changes in tonicity were increased in emphysema (P < 0.01 and P < 0.001). Glycosaminoglycan amount per unit alveolar wall length, which is responsible for proteoglycan stiffness, was higher in emphysema (P < 0.001). Versican expression increased in the tissue, but decorin decreased. Our network model predicted that the rate of tissue deterioration locally governed by mechanical forces was reduced when proteoglycan stiffness was increased. Consequently, this general network model explains why increasing proteoglycan deposition protects the alveolar walls from rupture in emphysema. Our results suggest that the loss of proteoglycans observed in human emphysema contributes to disease progression, whereas treatments that promote proteoglycan deposition in the extracellular matrix should slow the progression of emphysema. PMID:24450478

  1. Macrophage secretory products selectively stimulate dermatan sulfate proteoglycan production in cultured arterial smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, I. J.; Wagner, W. D.; Owens, R. T.

    1990-01-01

    Arterial dermatan sulfate proteoglycan has been shown to increase with atherosclerosis progression, but factors responsible for this increase are unknown. To test the hypothesis that smooth muscle cell proteoglycan synthesis may be modified by macrophage products, pigeon arterial smooth muscle cells were exposed to the media of either cholesteryl ester-loaded pigeon peritoneal macrophages or a macrophage cell line P388D1. Proteoglycans radiolabeled with [35S]sulfate and [3H]serine were isolated from culture media and smooth muscle cells and purified following precipitation with 1-hexadecylpyridinium chloride and chromatography. Increasing concentrations of macrophage-conditioned media were associated with a dose-response increase in [35S]sulfate incorporation into secreted proteoglycans, but there was no change in cell-associated proteoglycans. Incorporation of [3H]serine into total proteoglycan core proteins was not significantly different (5.2 X 10(5) dpm and 5.5 X 10(5) disintegrations per minute (dpm) in control and conditioned media-treated cultures, respectively), but selective effects were observed on individual proteoglycan types. Twofold increases in dermatan sulfate proteoglycan and limited degradation of chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan were apparent based on core proteins separated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Immunoinhibition studies indicated that interleukin-1 was involved in the modulation of proteoglycan synthesis by macrophage-conditioned media. These data provide support for the role of macrophages in alteration of the matrix proteoglycans synthesized by smooth muscle cells and provide a mechanism to account for the reported increased dermatan sulfate/chondroitin sulfate ratios in the developing atherosclerotic lesion. Images Figure 6 PMID:2316626

  2. Proteoglycans Maintain Lung Stability in an Elastase-Treated Mouse Model of Emphysema

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Ayuko; Majumdar, Arnab; Parameswaran, Harikrishnan; Bartolák-Suki, Erzsébet

    2014-01-01

    Extracellular matrix remodeling and tissue rupture contribute to the progression of emphysema. Lung tissue elasticity is governed by the tensile stiffness of fibers and the compressive stiffness of proteoglycans. It is not known how proteoglycan remodeling affects tissue stability and destruction in emphysema. The objective of this study was to characterize the role of remodeled proteoglycans in alveolar stability and tissue destruction in emphysema. At 30 days after treatment with porcine pancreatic elastase, mouse lung tissue stiffness and alveolar deformation were evaluated under varying tonicity conditions that affect the stiffness of proteoglycans. Proteoglycans were stained and measured in the alveolar walls. Computational models of alveolar stability and rupture incorporating the mechanical properties of fibers and proteoglycans were developed. Although absolute tissue stiffness was only 24% of normal, changes in relative stiffness and alveolar shape distortion due to changes in tonicity were increased in emphysema (P < 0.01 and P < 0.001). Glycosaminoglycan amount per unit alveolar wall length, which is responsible for proteoglycan stiffness, was higher in emphysema (P < 0.001). Versican expression increased in the tissue, but decorin decreased. Our network model predicted that the rate of tissue deterioration locally governed by mechanical forces was reduced when proteoglycan stiffness was increased. Consequently, this general network model explains why increasing proteoglycan deposition protects the alveolar walls from rupture in emphysema. Our results suggest that the loss of proteoglycans observed in human emphysema contributes to disease progression, whereas treatments that promote proteoglycan deposition in the extracellular matrix should slow the progression of emphysema. PMID:24450478

  3. A novel low-molecular weight chondroitin sulphate proteoglycan isolated from cartilage.

    PubMed Central

    Heinegård, D; Paulsson, M; Inerot, S; Carlström, C

    1981-01-01

    Proteoglycans were isolated from cartilage by extraction with 4M-guanidinium chloride followed by direct centrifugation in 4M-guanidinium chloride/CsCl at a low starting density, 1.34 g/ml. N-Ethylmaleimide was included in the extraction solvent as a precaution against contamination of proteoglycans with unrelated proteins mediated by disulphide exchange. A novel, discrete, low-buoyant-density proteoglycan (1.40--1.35 g/ml) was demonstrated by sodium dodecyl sulphate/polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis. Its proteoglycan nature was revealed by the shift in the molecular size observed on gel electrophoresis after treatment with chondroitinase ABC. The core protein was monodisperse. The proteoglycan was further purified by gel chromatography with and without addition of hyaluronate. The proteoglycan constitutes less than 2% (by weight) of the total extracted proteoglycans and is not capable of interacting with hyaluronate. The same proteoglycan was purified in larger quantities by sequential associative and dissociative CsCl-density-gradient centrifugation, zonal rate sedimentation in a sucrose gradient and gel chromatography on Sepharose CL-4B. The pure proteoglycan had a molecular weight of 76 300 determined by sedimentation-equilibrium centrifugation and an apparent partial specific volume of 0.59 ml/g. It contained about 25% protein (of dry weight) and had remarkably high contents of leucine and cysteine as compared with other proteoglycans. The proteoglycan contained two to three large chondroitin sulphate chains and some oligosaccharides. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. Fig. 7. PMID:6798963

  4. Identity of the core proteins of the large chondroitin sulphate proteoglycans synthesized by skeletal muscle and prechondrogenic mesenchyme.

    PubMed Central

    Carrino, D A; Dennis, J E; Drushel, R F; Haynesworth, S E; Caplan, A I

    1994-01-01

    Large, chondroitin sulphate-containing proteoglycans are synthesized by three prominent tissue in the embryonic chick limb. One of these proteoglycans is aggrecan, the phenotype-specific proteoglycan of cartilage. Another, PG-M, is produced by prechondrogenic mesenchymal cells. The third, M-CSPG, is made by developing skeletal muscle cells. While the carbohydrate components of PG-M and M-CSPG share some similarities, both of these proteoglycans clearly have different carbohydrate moieties from those of aggrecan. To compare these three proteoglycans at another level, their core protein structures were analysed in three ways: by the presence or absence of monoclonal antibody epitopes, by one-dimensional peptide display of the cyanogen bromide-cleaved core proteins and by electron microscopic imaging of the molecules. Monoclonal antibodies whose epitopes are present in aggrecan core protein were tested with core protein preparations from M-CSPG and PG-M. One of these, 7D1, recognizes both PG-M and M-CSPG, while another, 1C6, shows no reactivity for the non-cartilage proteoglycans. The absence of 1C6 reactivity is of interest, as its epitope is in a region of the aggrecan core protein known to have a functional homologue in the core proteins of PG-M and M-CSPG. The cyanogen bromide-fragmented peptide pattern of M-CSPG is the same as that of PG-M, and both are different from that of aggrecan. The aggrecan pattern has one prominent large band (molecular mass 130 kDa), some less prominent large bands (molecular mass 70-100 kDa) and several smaller bands. In contrast, the PG-M and M-CSPG patterns show no bands with molecular masses > 73 kDa, and the smaller bands (molecular mass < 40 kDa) have a different pattern to that of the smaller bands from aggrecan. The electron microscopic images of aggrecan show a core protein with one end having two globular regions separated by a short linear segment; adjacent to this is a long linear segment, which sometimes contains a third

  5. A Large Chondroitin Sulfate Proteoglycan, Versican, in Porcine Predentin.

    PubMed

    Okahata, Saori; Yamamoto, Ryuji; Yamakoshi, Yasuo; Fukae, Makoto

    2011-01-01

    Proteoglycans and their constituent glycosaminoglycan (GAG) have been proposed to be involved in the inhibition of mineralization in unmineralized tissue, predentin. Among the proteoglycans secreted by odontoblasts, we focused on the large chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan, versican, for its large binding capacity for calcium ions. The aims of this study were the determination of the full-length sequence and splicing variants of the porcine versican, and the detection of versican in the porcine predentin. The complete coding sequence of the porcine versican mRNA was cloned to be 11,775 nucleotides long and encode 3,924 amino acids, and four splicing variants, V0, V1, V2 and V3, were characterized in the isolated porcine cartilage cells. The number of potential GAG attachment sites was 15 in the V0 variant, 13 in the V1 variant, 2 in the V2 variant and 0 in the V3 variant. They were deposited in DDBJ. The V1 variant was determined by RT-PCR in the odontoblasts, dental papilla cells, dental follicle cells, periodontal ligament cells, dental pulp cells, and gingival cells of pigs, although a small amount of the V0 valiant was found in the dental papilla cells. The predentin was prepared from developing porcine permanent incisor tooth germs and its soluble proteins were extracted in order to be partially characterized by protein and proteinase profiles. The versican V1 cleavage products were detected in the predentin extract by Western blotting analysis. These results suggested that the versican splice variant V1 implicates both the control of the mineralization and the activities of the predentin metalloproteinases, because it has 13 GAG chains that bind a large amount of calcium. PMID:22200993

  6. Alteration of proteoglycan sulfation affects bone growth and remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Gualeni, Benedetta; de Vernejoul, Marie-Christine; Marty-Morieux, Caroline; De Leonardis, Fabio; Franchi, Marco; Monti, Luca; Forlino, Antonella; Houillier, Pascal; Rossi, Antonio; Geoffroy, Valerie

    2013-01-01

    Diastrophic dysplasia (DTD) is a chondrodysplasia caused by mutations in the SLC26A2 gene, leading to reduced intracellular sulfate pool in chondrocytes, osteoblasts and fibroblasts. Hence, proteoglycans are undersulfated in the cartilage and bone of DTD patients. To characterize the bone phenotype of this skeletal dysplasia we used the Slc26a2 knock-in mouse (dtd mouse), that was previously validated as an animal model of DTD in humans. X-rays, bone densitometry, static and dynamic histomorphometry, and in vitro studies revealed a primary bone defect in the dtd mouse model. We showed in vivo that this primary bone defect in dtd mice is due to decreased bone accrual associated with a decreased trabecular and periosteal appositional rate at the cell level in one month-old mice. Although the osteoclast number evaluated by histomorphometry was not different in dtd compared to wild-type mice, urine analysis of deoxypyridinoline cross-links and serum levels of type I collagen C-terminal telopeptides showed a higher resorption rate in dtd mice compared to wild-type littermates. Electron microscopy studies showed that collagen fibrils in bone were thinner and less organized in dtd compared to wild-type mice. These data suggest that the low bone mass observed in mutant mice could possibly be linked to the different bone matrix compositions/organizations in dtd mice triggering changes in osteoblast and osteoclast activities. Overall, these results suggest that proteoglycan undersulfation not only affects the properties of hyaline cartilage, but can also lead to unbalanced bone modeling and remodeling activities, demonstrating the importance of proteoglycan sulfation in bone homeostasis. PMID:23369989

  7. Chondroitin Sulfate Proteoglycans in the Nervous System: Inhibitors to Repair

    PubMed Central

    Siebert, Justin R.; Conta Steencken, Amanda; Osterhout, Donna J.

    2014-01-01

    Chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPGs) are widely expressed in the normal central nervous system, serving as guidance cues during development and modulating synaptic connections in the adult. With injury or disease, an increase in CSPG expression is commonly observed close to lesioned areas. However, these CSPG deposits form a substantial barrier to regeneration and are largely responsible for the inability to repair damage in the brain and spinal cord. This review discusses the role of CSPGs as inhibitors, the role of inflammation in stimulating CSPG expression near site of injury, and therapeutic strategies for overcoming the inhibitory effects of CSPGs and creating an environment conducive to nerve regeneration. PMID:25309928

  8. HEPARAN SULFATE PROTEOGLYCAN-MEDIATED ENTRY PATHWAY FOR CHARGED TRI-PLATINUM COMPOUNDS. DIFFERENTIAL CELLULAR ACCUMULATION MECHANISMS FOR PLATINUM

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Heveline; Frézard, Frédéric; Peterson, Erica J.; Kabolizadeh, Peyman; Ryan, John J.; Farrell, Nicholas P.

    2012-01-01

    We examined the mechanism of accumulation of charged polynuclear platinum complexes (PPCs), based on analogy of polyarginine interactions with the cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycan (HSPG) family of protein-linked glycosoaminoglycan polysaccharides (GAGs). GAGS such as heparan sulfate (HS) and chondroitin sulfate (CS) mediate the cellular entry of many charged molecules. Fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry showed that PPCs, but not the neutral cisplatin or oxaliplatin, blocked the cellular entry of TAMRA-R9 (a nonarginine peptide, R9) coupled to the TAMRA fluorescent label 5-(and 6-)carboxytetramethylrhodamine) in Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO), human colon carcinoma (HCT116), and osteosarcoma (SAOS-2) cells. Furthermore, detection of platinum accumulation in wt CHO, mutant CHO-pgsD-677 (lacking HS), and CHO-pgsA (lacking HS/CS) cells confirms that HSPG-mediated interactions are an important mechanism for PPC internalization, but not so for uncharged cisplatin and oxaliplatin. Endocytosis inhibitor studies show that macropinocytosis, a mechanism of cell entry for heparan sulfate GAGs and arginine-rich peptides, is important in the cellular accumulation of “non-covalent” TriplatinNC, and to a lesser degree, the covalently-binding BBR3464. Clathrin-mediated endocytosis, however, was not involved in either case. Overall the results suggest a new proteoglycan-mediated mechanism for cellular accumulation of PPCs not shared by cisplatin or oxaliplatin. The results have significant implications for rational design of platinum antitumor drugs with distinct biological profiles in comparison to the clinically-used agents as well as expanding the chemotypes for HS proteoglycan-dependent receptors. PMID:22494465

  9. Statin-exposed vascular smooth muscle cells secrete proteoglycans with decreased binding affinity for LDL.

    PubMed

    Meyers, C Daniel; Tannock, Lisa R; Wight, Thomas N; Chait, Alan

    2003-11-01

    Retention of LDL in the artery intima is mediated by extracellular matrix proteoglycans and plays an important role in the initiation of atherosclerosis. Compared with quiescent cells, proliferating smooth muscle cells secrete proteoglycans with elongated glycosaminoglycan side chains, which have an increased binding affinity to LDL. Because 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins) decrease smooth muscle cell proliferation, we hypothesized that statin exposure would decrease both the size and LDL binding affinity of vascular proteoglycans. Monkey aortic smooth muscle cells grown in culture were exposed to simvastatin (10 and 100 microM) and cerivastatin (0.1 and 1 microM), and newly secreted proteoglycans were quantified and characterized. Both simvastatin and cerivastatin caused a concentration-dependent reduction in cell growth and reduced 35SO4 incorporation into secreted proteoglycans, on both an absolute and a per cell basis. Interestingly, statin exposure increased the apparent molecular weight and hydrodynamic size of secreted proteoglycans. However, proteoglycans secreted from statin-exposed cells demonstrated a reduction in binding affinity to LDL. Thus, statins may induce atheroprotective changes in vascular proteoglycans and lower LDL retention in the vessel wall. These findings suggest a mechanism whereby statins may benefit atherosclerosis in a manner unrelated to serum LDL lowering. PMID:12923222

  10. Patterns of proteoglycan degradation by a neutral protease from human growth-plate epiphyseal cartilage

    SciTech Connect

    Ehrlich, M.G.; Armstrong, A.L.; Neuman, R.G.; Davis, M.W.; Mankin, H.J.

    1982-12-01

    The hypothesis is widely held that proteolytic degradation of proteoglycans in the lower hypertrophic zone of the growth plate may be involved in the initiation of mineralization in the zone of provisional calcification. However, a neutral protease that is responsible for the degradation of proteoglycans in the growth plate has not been identified, isolated, and characterized. In the work reported here, neutral protease activity in the growth plate is demonstrated for the first time, and some of the properties of the enzyme are described. Proteoglycans subunits were prepared from bovine nasal cartilage and calf costal cartilage by equilibrium density-gradient centrifugation under dissociative conditions. The proteoglycan subunits were labeled with /sup 14/C-formaldehyde. Homogenates from human growth plates were examined for neutral protease activity using the proteoglycan subunits as substrates. Following incubation of the proteoglycan subunits with growth-plate homogenates at pH 5.3 and at pH 7.5 in the presence and absence of ten-millimolar magnesium chloride and calcium chloride, the digestion products were examined by gel chromatography on Sepharose-2B and 6B columns. Column eluants containing proteoglycan-subunit degradation products were monitored for uronic acid, hexose, and radio-activity. Maximum extensive degradation of proteoglycan subunits occurred at pH 7.5 in the presence of ten-millimolar magnesium chloride and calcium chloride.

  11. Detection and quantitation of proteoglycans extracted from cell culture medium and cultured cartilage slices

    SciTech Connect

    Hronowski, L.J.; Anastassiades, T.P.

    1988-11-01

    Detection and quantitation of extracted proteoglycans, by staining with the dye Alcian blue on cellulose acetate followed by dissolution of the stained cellulose acetate strips in dimethyl sulfoxide containing 0.5% (v/v) sulfuric acid for absorbance measurement, is described. It is shown that, in the present system, the dye uptake by the proteoglycan is dependent only on the glycosaminoglycan content of the proteoglycan. The method is applied to the quantitation and characterization of proteoglycans and glycosaminoglycans, which have been extracted from radiolabeled bovine ankle cartilage and from mononuclear cell supernatant and which have been separated by DEAE-Sephacel column chromatography. The high sensitivity of the method allows detection of proteoglycans in 25-microliters samples of solutions containing as little as 1 microgram of glycosaminoglycan per milliliter of solution.

  12. Secretion of macrophage urokinase plasminogen activator is dependent on proteoglycans.

    PubMed

    Pejler, Gunnar; Winberg, Jan-Olof; Vuong, Tram T; Henningsson, Frida; Uhlin-Hansen, Lars; Kimata, Koji; Kolset, Svein O

    2003-10-01

    The importance of proteoglycans for secretion of proteolytic enzymes was studied in the murine macrophage cell line J774. Untreated or 4beta-phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA)-stimulated macrophages were treated with hexyl-beta-d-thioxyloside to interfere with the attachment of glycosaminoglycan chains to their respective protein cores. Activation of the J774 macrophages with PMA resulted in increased secretion of trypsin-like serine proteinase activity. This activity was completely inhibited by plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 and by amiloride, identifying the activity as urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA). Treatment of both the unstimulated or PMA-stimulated macrophages with xyloside resulted in decreased uPA activity and Western blotting analysis revealed an almost complete absence of secreted uPA protein after xyloside treatment of either control- or PMA-treated cells. Zymography analyses with gels containing both gelatin and plasminogen confirmed these findings. The xyloside treatment did not reduce the mRNA levels for uPA, indicating that the effect was at the post-translational level. Treatment of the macrophages with xylosides did also reduce the levels of secreted matrix metalloproteinase 9. Taken together, these findings indicate a role for proteoglycans in the secretion of uPA and MMP-9. PMID:14511379

  13. Perisynaptic barrier of proteoglycans in the mature brain and spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Takuro; Ohtsuka, Aiji

    2003-08-01

    Cell bodies and their dendrites of motor neurons, motor-related neurons, and certain other subsets of neurons such as GABAergic interneurons in the mature brain and spinal cord possess intensely negatively charged perineuronal or perisynaptic nets of proteoglycans which are linked to the nerve cell surface glycoproteins. These perineuronal nets of proteoglycans are digested by chondroitinase ABC, hyaluronidase, or collagenase, but not by endo-alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminidase, which is reactive to the nerve cell surface glycoproteins. Aggrecan, versican, neurocan, and brevican are members of a family of chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans that bind to hyaluronan. Neurocan- or brevican-deficient mice showed a regionally heterogeneous composition of proteoglycans in perineuronal nets. Aggrecan glycoforms contribute to the molecular heterogeneity of the perineuronal nets. Proteoglycans such as phosphacan are included in matrix-associated proteoglycans. The extracellular matrix glycoprotein tenascin-R is accumulated in the perineuronal nets. The perineuronal proteoglycans are produced by associated satellite astrocytes just before weaning, while the nerve cell surface glycoproteins are produced by the associated nerve cells at earlier stages after birth. The perineuronal proteoglycans may entrap the tissue fluid and form a perineuronal gel layer which protects the synapses as a "perisynaptic barrier". Degradation of the perineuronal proteoglycans or perisynaptic barrier by treatment with chondroitinase ABC or hyaluronidase reactivates the neuronal plasticity or promotes the functional recovery of a severed nervous system. Another set of perineuronal nets occurs, which are intensely positively charged and contain guanidino compounds. It is considered that these intensely positively charged nets are intermingled with the intensely negatively charged ones of proteoglycans. PMID:14527161

  14. Rheology of giant micelles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cates, M. E.; Fielding, S. M.

    2006-12-01

    Giant micelles are elongated, polymer-like objects created by the self-assembly of amphiphilic molecules (such as detergents) in solution. Giant micelles are typically flexible, and can become highly entangled even at modest concentrations. The resulting viscoelastic solutions show fascinating flow behaviour (rheology) which we address theoretically in this article at two levels. First, we summarize advances in understanding linear viscoelastic spectra and steady-state nonlinear flows, based on microscopic constitutive models that combine the physics of polymer entanglement with the reversible kinetics of self-assembly. Such models were first introduced two decades ago, and since then have been shown to explain robustly several distinctive features of the rheology in the strongly entangled regime, including extreme shear thinning. We then turn to more complex rheological phenomena, particularly involving spatial heterogeneity, spontaneous oscillation, instability and chaos. Recent understanding of these complex flows is based largely on grossly simplified models which capture in outline just a few pertinent microscopic features, such as coupling between stresses and other order parameters such as concentration. The role of ‘structural memory’ (the dependence of structural parameters such as the micellar length distribution on the flow history) in explaining these highly nonlinear phenomena is addressed. Structural memory also plays an intriguing role in the little-understood shear thickening regime, which occurs in a concentration regime close to but below the onset of strong entanglement, and which is marked by a shear-induced transformation from an inviscid to a gelatinous state.

  15. Proteoglycan metabolism in the connective tissue of pregnant and non-pregnant human cervix. An in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Norman, M; Ekman, G; Ulmsten, U; Barchan, K; Malmström, A

    1991-04-15

    Profound changes occur in the cervix during pregnancy. In particular, the connective tissue is remodelled. To elucidate the mechanisms behind this process, the metabolism of cervical connective tissue was studied using tissue cultures. Cervical biopsies from non-pregnant and pregnant women were incubated with [35S]sulphate. The proteoglycans of the tissue specimens were purified by ion-exchange and gel chromatography and characterized by SDS/PAGE and by enzymic degradation. In the non-pregnant cervix, the incorporation of [35S]sulphate into the proteoglycans was linear for 48 h. During the first 6 h of incubation the accumulation of chiefly one small labelled proteoglycan (apparent Mr 110,000) substituted with dermatan sulphate was recorded. This is in accordance with the known proteoglycan composition of non-pregnant cervical tissue. In addition, small amounts of two larger radioactive dermatan/chondroitin sulphate proteoglycans (apparent Mr values 220,000 and greater than 500,000) were recorded. After longer periods of incubation the proportion of heparan sulphate proteoglycans increased considerably. The pregnant tissue showed a clearly different composition of labelled proteoglycans. An increased accumulation of the two larger dermatan/chondroitin sulphate proteoglycans was seen in addition to the dominant small dermatan sulphate proteoglycan of the non-pregnant cervix. The rate of accumulation of these two proteoglycans was about 3 times higher in the pregnant tissue, whereas that of the small dermatan sulphate proteoglycan was only increased 2-fold. The fact that the concentration of proteoglycans in the pregnant cervix is approximately one-half of that in the non-pregnant cervix indicates that the turnover of proteoglycans in pregnant cervical tissue is significantly increased. The major effect of this profound change of metabolism was a 50% decrease in proteoglycan content and a 2-fold increased proportion of a dermatan sulphate proteoglycan with an

  16. Proteoglycan metabolism in the connective tissue of pregnant and non-pregnant human cervix. An in vitro study.

    PubMed Central

    Norman, M; Ekman, G; Ulmsten, U; Barchan, K; Malmström, A

    1991-01-01

    Profound changes occur in the cervix during pregnancy. In particular, the connective tissue is remodelled. To elucidate the mechanisms behind this process, the metabolism of cervical connective tissue was studied using tissue cultures. Cervical biopsies from non-pregnant and pregnant women were incubated with [35S]sulphate. The proteoglycans of the tissue specimens were purified by ion-exchange and gel chromatography and characterized by SDS/PAGE and by enzymic degradation. In the non-pregnant cervix, the incorporation of [35S]sulphate into the proteoglycans was linear for 48 h. During the first 6 h of incubation the accumulation of chiefly one small labelled proteoglycan (apparent Mr 110,000) substituted with dermatan sulphate was recorded. This is in accordance with the known proteoglycan composition of non-pregnant cervical tissue. In addition, small amounts of two larger radioactive dermatan/chondroitin sulphate proteoglycans (apparent Mr values 220,000 and greater than 500,000) were recorded. After longer periods of incubation the proportion of heparan sulphate proteoglycans increased considerably. The pregnant tissue showed a clearly different composition of labelled proteoglycans. An increased accumulation of the two larger dermatan/chondroitin sulphate proteoglycans was seen in addition to the dominant small dermatan sulphate proteoglycan of the non-pregnant cervix. The rate of accumulation of these two proteoglycans was about 3 times higher in the pregnant tissue, whereas that of the small dermatan sulphate proteoglycan was only increased 2-fold. The fact that the concentration of proteoglycans in the pregnant cervix is approximately one-half of that in the non-pregnant cervix indicates that the turnover of proteoglycans in pregnant cervical tissue is significantly increased. The major effect of this profound change of metabolism was a 50% decrease in proteoglycan content and a 2-fold increased proportion of a dermatan sulphate proteoglycan with an

  17. Giant Magnons Meet Giant Gravitons

    SciTech Connect

    Hofman, Diego M.

    2008-07-28

    We study the worldsheet reflection matrix of a string attached to a D-brane in AdS{sub 5}xS{sup 5}. The D-brane corresponds to a maximal giant graviton that wraps an S{sup 3} inside S{sup 5}. In the gauge theory, the open string is described by a spin chain with boundaries. We focus on open strings with a large SO(6) charge and define an asymptotic boundary reflection matrix. Using the symmetries of the problem, we review the computation of the boundary reflection matrix, up to a phase. We also discuss weak and strong coupling computations where we obtain the overall phase factor and test our exact results.

  18. The synthesis of dermatan sulphate proteoglycans by fetal and adult human articular cartilage.

    PubMed Central

    Melching, L I; Roughley, P J

    1989-01-01

    Non-aggregating dermatan sulphate proteoglycans can be extracted from both fetal and adult human articular cartilage. The dermatan sulphate proteoglycans appear to be smaller in the adult, this presumably being due to shorter glycosaminoglycan chains, and these chains contain a greater proportion of their uronic acid residues as iduronate. Both the adult and fetal dermatan sulphate proteoglycans contain a greater amount of 4-sulphation than 6-sulphation of the N-acetylgalactosamine residues, in contrast with the aggregating proteoglycans, which always show more 6-sulphation on their chondroitin sulphate chains. In the fetus the major dermatan sulphate proteoglycan to be synthesized is DS-PGI, though DS-PGII is synthesized in reasonable amounts. In the adult, however, DS-PGI synthesis is barely detectable relative to DS-PGII, which is still synthesized in substantial amounts. Purification of the dermatan sulphate proteoglycans from adult cartilage is hampered by the presence of degradation products derived from the large aggregating proteoglycans, which possess similar charge, size and density properties, but which can be distinguished by their ability to interact with hyaluronic acid. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. Fig. 7. Fig. 8. PMID:2775229

  19. Insights into the key roles of proteoglycans in breast cancer biology and translational medicine

    PubMed Central

    Theocharis, Achilleas D.; Skandalis, Spyros S.; Neill, Thomas; Multhaupt, Hinke A. B.; Hubo, Mario; Frey, Helena; Gopal, Sandeep; Gomes, Angélica; Afratis, Nikos; Lim, Hooi Ching; Couchman, John R.; Filmus, Jorge; Sanderson, Ralph D.; Schaefer, Liliana; Iozzo, Renato V.; Karamanos, Nikos K.

    2015-01-01

    Proteoglycans control numerous normal and pathological processes, among which are morphogenesis, tissue repair, inflammation, vascularization and cancer metastasis. During tumor development and growth, proteoglycan expression is markedly modified in the tumor microenvironment. Altered expression of proteoglycans on tumor and stromal cell membranes affects cancer cell signaling, growth and survival, cell adhesion, migration and angiogenesis. Despite the high complexity and heterogeneity of breast cancer, the rapid evolution in our knowledge that proteoglycans are among the key players in the breast tumor microenvironment suggests their potential as pharmacological targets in this type of cancer. It has been recently suggested that pharmacological treatment may target proteoglycan metabolism, their utilization as targets for immunotherapy or their direct use as therapeutic agents. The diversity inherent in the proteoglycans that will be presented herein provides the potential for multiple layers of regulation of breast tumor behavior. This review summarizes recent developments concerning the biology of selected proteoglycans in breast cancer, and presents potential targeted therapeutic approaches based on their novel key roles in breast cancer. PMID:25829250

  20. Dermatan sulphate proteoglycans from sclera examined by rotary shadowing and electron microscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Ward, N P; Scott, J E; Cöster, L

    1987-01-01

    Two dermatan sulphate-containing proteoglycans from bovine sclera were examined by rotary shadowing and electron microscopy, and the results were compared with previous biochemical findings. Both the large iduronate-poor proteoglycan (PGI) and the small iduronate-rich proteoglycan (PGII) possessed a globular proteinaceous region. Whereas PGI had a branched extension from the globular region, with five to eight side chains attached to it, PGII had only a single tail, which was of glycosaminoglycuronan. PGII aggregated via globular-region interactions, which were much diminished by reduction and alkylation. PGI aggregated via side chains and globular-region interactions. Although a few PGI aggregates were large, and similar to the hyaluronan-cartilage proteoglycan aggregates [Weidemann, Paulsson, Timpl, Engel & Heinegård (1984) Biochem. J. 224, 331-333], hyaluronan did not cause enhanced aggregation. PGII is very similar in shape to the small cartilage chondroitin sulphate proteoglycan, whereas PGI somewhat resembles the large cartilage chondroitin sulphate proteoglycan, although with many fewer glycosaminoglycan side chains, and probably only one globular region as opposed to two in the cartilage proteoglycan. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. PMID:3593274

  1. Proteoglycan biosynthesis in murine monocytic leukemic (M1) cells before and after differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    McQuillan, D.J.; Yanagishita, M.; Hascall, V.C.; Bickel, M. )

    1989-08-05

    Murine monocytic leukemic (M1) cells were cultured in the presence of ({sup 3}H)glucosamine and ({sup 35}S)sulfate. Labeled proteoglycans were purified by anion exchange chromatography and characterized by gel filtration and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in combination with chemical and enzymatic degradation. M1 cells synthesize a single predominant species of proteoglycan which distributes almost equally between the cell and medium after 17 h labeling. The cell-associated proteoglycan has an overall size of about 135 kDa and contains three to five chondroitin sulfate chains (28-31 kDa each) attached to a chondroitinase-generated core protein of 28 kDa. The synthesis and subsequent secretion of this proteoglycan was enhanced 4-5-fold in cells induced to differentiate into macrophages. This was not a phenomenon of arrest in the G0/G1 stage of the cell cycle, since density inhibited undifferentiated cells arrested at this stage did not increase proteoglycan synthesis. The chondroitin sulfate chains contained exclusively chondroitin 4- and 6-sulfate; however, the ratio of these two disaccharides differed between the medium- and cell-associated proteoglycans, and changed during progression of the cells into a fully differentiated phenotype. Pulse-chase kinetics indicate the presence of two distinct pools of proteoglycan; one that is secreted very rapidly from the cell after a approximately 1-h lag, and a second pool that is turned over in the cell with a half-time of approximately 3.5 h. Subtle differences in the glycosylation patterns of the medium- and cell-associated species are consistent with synthesis of two pools. Papain digestion suggests that the chondroitin sulfate chains are clustered on a small protease resistant peptide. The data suggest that this proteoglycan is similar to the serglycin proteoglycan family.

  2. Heparan sulfate proteoglycans: a sugar code for vertebrate development?

    PubMed

    Poulain, Fabienne E; Yost, H Joseph

    2015-10-15

    Heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs) have long been implicated in a wide range of cell-cell signaling and cell-matrix interactions, both in vitro and in vivo in invertebrate models. Although many of the genes that encode HSPG core proteins and the biosynthetic enzymes that generate and modify HSPG sugar chains have not yet been analyzed by genetics in vertebrates, recent studies have shown that HSPGs do indeed mediate a wide range of functions in early vertebrate development, for example during left-right patterning and in cardiovascular and neural development. Here, we provide a comprehensive overview of the various roles of HSPGs in these systems and explore the concept of an instructive heparan sulfate sugar code for modulating vertebrate development. PMID:26487777

  3. The Motile Breast Cancer Phenotype Roles of Proteoglycans/Glycosaminoglycans

    PubMed Central

    Nikitovic, Dragana; Kouvidi, Katerina; Voudouri, Kallirroi; Berdiaki, Aikaterini; Karousou, Evgenia; Passi, Alberto; Tzanakakis, George N.

    2014-01-01

    The consecutive stages of cancer growth and dissemination are obligatorily perpetrated through specific interactions of the tumor cells with their microenvironment. Importantly, cell-associated and tumor microenvironment glycosaminoglycans (GAGs)/proteoglycan (PG) content and distribution are markedly altered during tumor pathogenesis and progression. GAGs and PGs perform multiple functions in specific stages of the metastatic cascade due to their defined structure and ability to interact with both ligands and receptors regulating cancer pathogenesis. Thus, GAGs/PGs may modulate downstream signaling of key cellular mediators including insulin growth factor receptor (IGFR), epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), estrogen receptors (ERs), or Wnt members. In the present review we will focus on breast cancer motility in correlation with their GAG/PG content and critically discuss mechanisms involved. Furthermore, new approaches involving GAGs/PGs as potential prognostic/diagnostic markers or as therapeutic agents for cancer-related pathologies are being proposed. PMID:25140302

  4. MOLECULAR RESURFACING OF CARTILAGE WITH PROTEOGLYCAN 4 (PRG4)

    PubMed Central

    Chawla, Kanika; Ham, Hyun Ok; Nguyen, Trung; Messersmith, Phillip B.

    2010-01-01

    Early loss of proteoglycan 4 (PRG4), a lubricating glycoprotein implicated in boundary lubrication, from the cartilage surface has been associated with degeneration of cartilage and early onset of osteoarthritis. Viscosupplementation with hyaluronic acid and other macromolecules has been proposed as a treatment of osteoarthritis, however efficacy of viscosupplementation is variable and may be influenced by the short residence time of lubricant in the knee joint after injection. Recent studies have demonstrated the use of aldehyde (CHO) modified extracellular matrix proteins for targeted adherence to a biological tissue surface. We hypothesized that CHO could be exploited to enhance binding of lubricating proteoglycans to the surface of PRG4 depleted cartilage. The objective of this study was to determine the feasibility of molecular resurfacing of cartilage with aldehyde modified PRG4. PRG4 was chemically functionalized with aldehyde (PRG4-CHO), and aldehyde plus Oregon Green (OG) fluorophore (PRG4-OG-CHO) to allow for differentiation of endogenous and exogenous PRG4. Cartilage disks depleted of native PRG4 were then treated with solutions of PRG4, PRG4-CHO, or PRG4-OG-CHO and then assayed for the presence of PRG4 by immunohistochemistry, ELISA, and fluorescence imaging. Repletion of cartilage surfaces was significantly enhanced with the inclusion of CHO compared to repletion with unmodified PRG4. These findings suggest a generalized approach that may be used for molecular resurfacing of tissue surfaces with PRG4 and other lubricating biomolecules, perhaps leading in the future to a convenient method for overcoming loss of lubrication during the early stages of osteoarthritis. PMID:20338268

  5. Chondroitin sulphate proteoglycans in the central nervous system: changes and synthesis after injury.

    PubMed

    Properzi, F; Asher, R A; Fawcett, J W

    2003-04-01

    Chondroitin sulphate proteoglycans (CSPGs) are up-regulated in the central nervous system after injury, specifically around the lesion site where the glial scar forms. This structure contains astrocytes, oligodendrocyte precursor cells, microglia and meningeal cells, and forms an inhibitory substrate for axon re-growth. CSPGs have been shown to be closely involved in this neuronal growth inhibition, specifically through their sugar chains. These chains are composed of repeats of the same disaccharide unit carrying sulphate groups in different positions. The sulphation pattern directly influences the CSPG binding properties and function; the specific sulphation pattern required for the inhibitory activity of these molecules on axon growth is unknown at present. The expression of the chondroitin sulphotransferases, which sulphate the disaccharide residues of CSPGs and thus are responsible for the structural diversity of the chondroitin sulphate sugar chains, is regulated differently in central nervous system during development and after injury, suggesting the implication of a specific sulphation pattern in the inhibitory activity of CSPGs. PMID:12653631

  6. Differences in gene expression of human xylosyltransferases and determination of acceptor specificities for various proteoglycans

    SciTech Connect

    Roch, Christina; Kuhn, Joachim; Kleesiek, Knut; Goetting, Christian

    2010-01-01

    The xylosyltransferase (XT) isoforms XT-I and XT-II initiate the posttranslational glycosaminoglycan (GAG) synthesis. Here, we determined the relative expression of both isoforms in 33 human cell lines. The majority of tested cell lines showed dominant XYLT2 gene expression, while only in 23132/87, JAR, NCI-H510A and THP-1 was the XT-I mRNA expression higher. Nearly equal expression levels were detected in six cell lines. Additionally, to shed light on putative differences in acceptor specificities the acceptor properties of potential acceptor sequences were determined. Peptides were expressed as glutathione-S-transferase fusion proteins containing putative or known GAG attachment sites of in vivo proteoglycans. Kinetic analysis showed that K{sub m} and V{sub max} values for XT-I mediated xylosylation were slightly higher than those for XT-II, and that XT-I showed a lesser stringency concerning the acceptor sequence. Mutagenesis of the bikunin peptide sequence in the G-S-G attachment site and flanking regions generated potential acceptor molecules. Here, mutations on the N-terminal side and the attachment site were found to be more susceptible to a loss of acceptor function than mutations in the C-terminus. Altogether the known consensus sequence a-a-a-a-G-S-G-a-a/G-a ('a' representing Asp or Glu) for XT-I mediated xylosylation could be approved and additionally extended to apply to XT-II as well.

  7. Key roles for the small leucine-rich proteoglycans in renal and pulmonary pathophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Nastase, Madalina V.; Iozzo, Renato V.; Schaefer, Liliana

    2014-01-01

    Background Small leucine-rich proteoglycans (SLRPs) are molecules that have signaling roles in a multitude of biological processes. In this respect, SLRPs play key roles in the evolution of a variety of diseases throughout the human body. Scope of Review We will critically review current developments in the roles of SLRPs in several types of disease of the kidney and lungs. Particular emphasis will be given to the roles of decorin and biglycan, the best characterized members of the SLRP gene family. Major Conclusions In both renal and pulmonary disorders, SLRPs are essential elements that regulate several pathophysiological processes including fibrosis, inflammation and tumor progression. Decorin has remarkable antifibrotic and antitumorigenic properties and is considered a valuable potential treatment of these diseases. Biglycan can modulate inflammatory processes in lung and renal inflammation and is a potential target in the treatment of inflammatory conditions. General significance SLRPs can serve as either treatment targets or as potential treatment in renal or lung disease. PMID:24508120

  8. Heparan Sulfate Proteoglycans Promote Telomerase Internalization and MHC Class II Presentation on Dendritic Cells.

    PubMed

    Galaine, Jeanne; Kellermann, Guillaume; Guillaume, Yves; Boidot, Romain; Picard, Emilie; Loyon, Romain; Queiroz, Lise; Boullerot, Laura; Beziaud, Laurent; Jary, Marine; Mansi, Laura; André, Claire; Lethier, Lydie; Ségal-Bendirdjian, Evelyne; Borg, Christophe; Godet, Yann; Adotévi, Olivier

    2016-09-01

    Telomerase is a prototype-shared tumor Ag and represents an attractive target for anticancer immunotherapy. We have previously described promiscuous and immunogenic HLA-DR-restricted peptides derived from human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) and referred as universal cancer peptide (UCP). In nonsmall cell lung cancer, the presence of spontaneous UCP-specific CD4 T cell responses increases the survival of chemotherapy-responding patients. However, the precise mechanisms of hTERT's uptake, processing, and presentation on MHC-II molecules to stimulate CD4 T cells are poorly understood. In this work, by using well-characterized UCP-specific CD4 T cell clones, we showed that hTERT processing and presentation on MHC-II involve both classical endolysosomal and nonclassical cytosolic pathways. Furthermore, to our knowledge, we demonstrated for the first time that hTERT's internalization by dendritic cells requires its interaction with surface heparan sulfate proteoglycans. Altogether, our findings provide a novel mechanism of tumor-specific CD4 T cell activation and will be useful for the development of novel cancer immunotherapies that harness CD4 T cells. PMID:27481844

  9. Heparan sulfate proteoglycan syndecan-3 is a novel receptor for GDNF, neurturin, and artemin

    PubMed Central

    Bespalov, Maxim M.; Sidorova, Yulia A.; Tumova, Sarka; Ahonen-Bishopp, Anni; Magalhães, Ana Cathia; Kulesskiy, Evgeny; Paveliev, Mikhail; Rivera, Claudio; Rauvala, Heikki

    2011-01-01

    Glial cell line–derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) family ligands (GFLs) are potent survival factors for dopaminergic neurons and motoneurons with therapeutic potential for Parkinson’s disease. Soluble GFLs bind to a ligand-specific glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored coreceptor (GDNF family receptor α) and signal through the receptor tyrosine kinase RET. In this paper, we show that all immobilized matrix-bound GFLs, except persephin, use a fundamentally different receptor. They interact with syndecan-3, a transmembrane heparan sulfate (HS) proteoglycan, by binding to its HS chains with high affinity. GFL–syndecan-3 interaction mediates both cell spreading and neurite outgrowth with the involvement of Src kinase activation. GDNF promotes migration of cortical neurons in a syndecan-3–dependent manner, and in agreement, mice lacking syndecan-3 or GDNF have a reduced number of cortical γ-aminobutyric acid–releasing neurons, suggesting a central role for the two molecules in cortical development. Collectively, syndecan-3 may directly transduce GFL signals or serve as a coreceptor, presenting GFLs to the signaling receptor RET. PMID:21200028

  10. Proteoglycans of human articular cartilage. Identification of several populations of large and small proteoglycans and of hyaluronic acid-binding proteins in successive cartilage extracts.

    PubMed Central

    Vilim, V; Krajickova, J

    1991-01-01

    Two specimens of human articulage were successively extracted with solutions of phosphate-buffered saline (PBS), 7 M-urea and 4 M-guanidine hydrochloride (Gdn-HCl). Proteoglycans from individual extracts were fractionated by DEAE-Sephacel chromatography and gel chromatography on Sephacryl S-400. The presence of three populations of large proteoglycans was demonstrated in all three extracts by composite agarose/polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis (CAPAGE). The population corresponding to the fastest CAPAGE band of aggregating proteoglycans was shown to be extremely polydisperse, having Mr (as estimated by SDS/PAGE) decreasing continuously from more than 300,000 to the size corresponding to 'free' hyaluronic acid-binding region (HABR) (about 70,000). A rather polydisperse set of HABR-containing fragments which spanned a broad range of sizes, and also differed in their keratan sulphate contents, was isolated from both 7 M-urea and 4 M-Gdn-HCl extracts. PBS and 7 M-urea extracts, but not the Gdn-HCl extract, further contained small proteoglycans, identified as fast-migrating bands on CAPAGE electrophoretograms. One of those small species was recognized with an antibody against the small proteoglycan PG II; the other two remain to be positively identified. However, the glycosaminoglycan of the small species which was present exclusively in the PBS extract was identified as keratan sulphate; this species may thus belong to the family of small keratan sulphate-containing proteolygans. Images Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. Fig. 7. PMID:1705114

  11. Giant Cell Arteritis

    MedlinePlus

    Giant cell arteritis is a disorder that causes inflammation of your arteries, usually in the scalp, neck, and arms. ... arteries, which keeps blood from flowing well. Giant cell arteritis often occurs with another disorder called polymyalgia ...

  12. Distribution of proteoglycans in the trabecular tissue of eyes with neovascular glaucoma.

    PubMed

    Kubota, T; Tawara, A; Khalil, A; Honda, M; Inomata, H

    1996-11-01

    We investigated histo-chemically the composition and distribution of proteoglycans in the trabecular tissue of eyes with neovascular glaucoma. Cupromeronic blue in combination with a series of enzyme digestions and nitrous acid treatment were used. The spaces between the trabecular beams were lined by a single layer of vascular endothelium and were filled with red blood cells. A basal lamina and microfibrils were detected just beneath the newly formed vascular endothelial cells. Chondroitin-sulfate- and dermatan-sulfate-type proteoglycans were present in association with collagen fibrils in the extracellular matrix. Heparan-sulfate-type proteoglycans were present in association with the basal lamina of both the vascular endothelial cells and the trabecular cells. It is unlikely that these abnormalities in the type or distribution of proteoglycans in the trabecular meshwork have a major role in the pathogenesis of glaucoma. PMID:9479524

  13. Human Coronavirus NL63 Utilizes Heparan Sulfate Proteoglycans for Attachment to Target Cells

    PubMed Central

    Milewska, Aleksandra; Zarebski, Miroslaw; Nowak, Paulina; Stozek, Karol; Potempa, Jan

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human coronavirus NL63 (HCoV-NL63) is an alphacoronavirus that was first identified in 2004 in the nasopharyngeal aspirate from a 7-month-old patient with a respiratory tract infection. Previous studies showed that HCoV-NL63 and the genetically distant severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS)-CoV employ the same receptor for host cell entry, angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2), but it is largely unclear whether ACE2 interactions are sufficient to allow HCoV-NL63 binding to cells. The present study showed that directed expression of angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) on cells previously resistant to HCoV-NL63 renders them susceptible, showing that ACE2 protein acts as a functional receptor and that its expression is required for infection. However, comparative analysis showed that directed expression or selective scission of the ACE2 protein had no measurable effect on virus adhesion. In contrast, binding of HCoV-NL63 to heparan sulfates was required for viral attachment and infection of target cells, showing that these molecules serve as attachment receptors for HCoV-NL63. IMPORTANCE ACE2 protein was proposed as a receptor for HCoV-NL63 already in 2005, but an in-depth analysis of early events during virus infection had not been performed thus far. Here, we show that the ACE2 protein is required for viral entry but that it is not the primary binding site on the cell surface. Conducted research showed that heparan sulfate proteoglycans function as adhesion molecules, increasing the virus density on cell surface and possibly facilitating the interaction between HCoV-NL63 and its receptor. Obtained results show that the initial events during HCoV-NL63 infection are more complex than anticipated and that a newly described interaction may be essential for understanding the infection process and, possibly, also assist in drug design. PMID:25187545

  14. Inhibition of scleral proteoglycan synthesis blocks deprivation-induced axial elongation in chicks.

    PubMed

    Rada, J A; Johnson, J M; Achen, V R; Rada, K G

    2002-02-01

    A specific inhibitor of proteoglycan synthesis was administered to chicks undergoing the development of form deprivation myopia in order to test the hypothesis that increases in proteoglycan synthesis are responsible for normal and/or deprivation-induced ocular elongation in chicks. Chicks undergoing monocular form deprivation were treated with p-nitrophenyl-beta-D-xylopyranoside (beta-xyloside) via i.p. injection every 8 hr for 5-11 days. Ocular measurements were made at the end of the experiment using high frequency A-scan ultrasound in conjunction with a LabView (v. 5.0) analysis program. Following ultrasound measurements, sclera were isolated and proteoglycans characterized by Sepharose CL-2B and Western blot analyses. Preliminary studies indicated that i.p. administration of beta-xyloside maximally inhibited sulfate incorporation into proteoglycans 8 hr after administration. Beta-xyloside treatment resulted in a significant reduction in the axial length, vitreous chamber depth, and rate of axial elongation of form deprived eyes as compared with form deprived eyes from vehicle treated chicks (P < 0.01, P < 0.05, P < 0.05, respectively). No significant differences were detected in anterior chamber depth, lens thickness, choroid thickness or retina thickness in form deprived eyes of beta-xyloside treated chicks as compared with that of vehicle controls. No significant differences were detected in contralateral non-deprived fellow eyes between beta-xyloside treated and vehicle treated chicks for any ocular measurement. Analysis of proteoglycans indicated that the xyloside treatment resulted in the accumulation of smaller proteoglycans due, in part, to the presence of underglycosylated aggrecan within the scleral matrix. These results indicate that interruption of normal scleral proteoglycan synthesis inhibits form deprivation-induced ocular elongation, supporting the hypothesis that scleral proteoglycan synthesis and accumulation are largely responsible for

  15. Stimulation by concanavalin A of cartilage-matrix proteoglycan synthesis in chondrocyte cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, W.Q.; Nakashima, K.; Iwamoto, M.; Kato, Y. )

    1990-06-15

    The effect of concanavalin A on proteoglycan synthesis by rabbit costal and articular chondrocytes was examined. Chondrocytes were seeded at low density and grown to confluency in medium supplemented with 10% fetal bovine serum, and then the serum concentration was reduced to 0.3%. At the low serum concentration, chondrocytes adopted a fibroblastic morphology. Addition of concanavalin A to the culture medium induced a morphologic alteration of the fibroblastic cells to spherical chondrocytes and increased by 3- to 4-fold incorporation of (35S)sulfate and (3H)glucosamine into large chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan that was characteristically found in cartilage. The stimulation of incorporation of labeled precursors reflected real increases in proteoglycan synthesis, as chemical analyses showed a 4-fold increase in the accumulation of macromolecules containing hexuronic acid in concanavalin A-maintained cultures. Furthermore, the effect of concanavalin A on (35S)sulfate incorporation into proteoglycans was greater than that of various growth factors or hormones. However, concanavalin A had smaller effects on (35S)sulfate incorporation into small proteoglycans and (3H)glucosamine incorporation into hyaluronic acid and chondroitinase AC-resistant glycosaminoglycans. Since other lectins tested, such as wheat germ agglutinin, lentil lectin, and phytohemagglutinin, had little effect on (35S)sulfate incorporation into proteoglycans, the concanavalin A action on chondrocytes seems specific. Although concanavalin A decreased (3H)thymidine incorporation in chondrocytes, the stimulation of proteoglycan synthesis could be observed in chondrocytes exposed to the inhibitor of DNA synthesis, cytosine arabinoside. These results indicate that concanavalin A is a potent modulator of proteoglycan synthesis by chondrocytes.

  16. Composition of proteoglycan fragments from hyaline cartilage produced by granulocytes in a model of frustrated phagocytosis.

    PubMed

    Liszt, F; Schnittker-Schulze, K; Stuhlsatz, H W; Greiling, H

    1991-02-01

    An in vitro model of frustrated phagocytosis was developed in which granulocytes interact with well-defined slices of hyaline cartilage. The composition of the purified proteoglycan fragments released from the cartilage slices by N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine-stimulated granulocytes was studied after 30, 60 and 90 min incubation time. It was shown that the proteoglycan fragments do not change their composition during incubation. The only change observed during incubation was an increase in the quantity of the fragments. The protein content of the proteoglycan fragments is 7.0-8.6%, corresponding to a peptide chain of 24-28 amino acids, and the relative molecular mass of the total fragment is Mr = 37,600-39,200. On average, each proteoglycan fragment contains two chondroitin sulphate chains (Mr = 22,000-22,400), every fourth fragment contains a keratan sulphate chain (Mr = 7000-7200) and every seventh to eighth contains an O-glycosidic oligosaccharide, whereas no N-glycosidic oligosaccharide could be detected. The results of the disaccharide analysis show that the galactosaminoglycan chains contain 76.2-83.6% chondroitin 4-sulphate, 12.9-19.4% chondroitin 6-sulphate, 3.5-3.8% chondroitin and no dermatan sulphate. Since composition and relative molecular mass of the chondroitin sulphate and keratan sulphate chains from the proteoglycan fragments resemble those of native proteoglycans, the conclusion may be drawn that the degeneration of the proteoglycans occurs by proteases that attack preferably the chondroitin sulphate-rich region of the core protein. This is the first inflammation model of joint destruction, which demonstrates the elution of soluble specific proteoglycan degradation products of defined size. PMID:1904780

  17. Giant impacts on giant planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Pater, Imke

    2012-10-01

    The 2009 impact on Jupiter caught the world by surprise and cast doubt on impactor flux estimates for the outer solar system. Enhanced amateur planetary imaging techniques yield both high spatial resolution {enabling the 2009 impact debris field detection} and rapid frame rates {enabling the 2010 impact flash detections and lightcurve measurements}.We propose a Target of Opportunity program to image future impacts on Jupiter and Saturn. To remove the possibility of impact cloud non-detections, the program will be triggered only if an existing impact debris field is seen, an object on a collision course with Jupiter or Saturn is discovered, or an impact light curve is measured with an estimated total energy large enough to generate an impact cloud in a giant planet atmosphere.HST provides the only way to image these events in the ultraviolet, providing information on aerosol altitudes and on smaller particles that are less visible to ground-based infrared observations. High-resolution imaging with proper timing {not achievable from the ground} is required to measure precisely both the velocity fields of impact sites and the optical spectrum of impact debris. HST observations of past impacts on Jupiter have also served both as cornerstones of science investigations at other wavelengths and as vehicles for effective public outreach.Large outer solar system impacts are governed by the same physics as in the terrestrial events that dominate the impact threat to humans. Studying the behavior of impactors of various sizes and compositions, as they enter the atmosphere at varying angles and speeds, will better quantify terrestrial impact hazards.

  18. Giant impacts on giant planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Pater, Imke

    2014-10-01

    The 2009 impact and recent superbolides on Jupiter caught the world by surprise and cast doubt on impactor flux estimates for the outer solar system. Enhanced amateur planetary imaging techniques yield both high spatial resolution (enabling the 2009 impact debris field detection) and rapid frame rates (enabling the 2010/2012 impact flash detections and lightcurve measurements).We propose a ToO program to image future impacts on Jupiter and Saturn. To remove the possibility of impact cloud non-detections, the program will be triggered only if an existing impact debris field is seen, an object on a collision course with Jupiter or Saturn is discovered, or an impact light curve is measured with an estimated total energy large enough to generate an impact cloud in a giant planet atmosphere (10^20 J).HST provides the only way to image these events in the ultraviolet, providing information on aerosol altitudes and on smaller particles that are less visible to ground-based infrared observations. High-resolution imaging with proper timing (not achievable from the ground) is required to measure precisely both the velocity fields of impact sites and the optical spectrum of impact debris. HST observations of past impacts on Jupiter have also served both as cornerstones of science investigations at other wavelengths and as vehicles for effective public outreach.Large outer solar system impacts are governed by the same physics as in the terrestrial events that dominate the impact threat to humans. Studying the behavior of impactors of various sizes and compositions, as they enter the atmosphere at varying angles and speeds, will better quantify terrestrial impact hazards.

  19. Giant impacts on giant planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Pater, Imke

    2013-10-01

    The 2009 impact and recent superbolides on Jupiter caught the world by surprise and cast doubt on impactor flux estimates for the outer solar system. Enhanced amateur planetary imaging techniques yield both high spatial resolution {enabling the 2009 impact debris field detection} and rapid frame rates {enabling the 2010/2012 impact flash detections and lightcurve measurements}.We propose a ToO program to image future impacts on Jupiter and Saturn. To remove the possibility of impact cloud non-detections, the program will be triggered only if an existing impact debris field is seen, an object on a collision course with Jupiter or Saturn is discovered, or an impact light curve is measured with an estimated total energy large enough to generate an impact cloud in a giant planet atmosphere {10^20 J}.HST provides the only way to image these events in the ultraviolet, providing information on aerosol altitudes and on smaller particles that are less visible to ground-based infrared observations. High-resolution imaging with proper timing {not achievable from the ground} is required to measure precisely both the velocity fields of impact sites and the optical spectrum of impact debris. HST observations of past impacts on Jupiter have also served both as cornerstones of science investigations at other wavelengths and as vehicles for effective public outreach.Large outer solar system impacts are governed by the same physics as in the terrestrial events that dominate the impact threat to humans. Studying the behavior of impactors of various sizes and compositions, as they enter the atmosphere at varying angles and speeds, will better quantify terrestrial impact hazards.

  20. Endocytosis of a small dermatan sulphate proteoglycan. Identification of binding proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Hausser, H; Hoppe, W; Rauch, U; Kresse, H

    1989-01-01

    Endosomal preparations from human osteosarcoma cells and from fibroblasts contain 51,000- and 26,000-Mr proteins which bind a small dermatan sulphate proteoglycan after SDS/polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis and Western blotting. Binding can be inhibited by unlabelled proteoglycan core protein. The proteins co-precipitate with a proteoglycan core protein-antibody complex. Scatchard analysis of immobilized endosomal proteins yielded a KD of about 37 nM for the proteoglycan. In intact cells proteins of the same size can be found. They are sensitive to trypsinization. A 51,000-Mr protein is the predominant membrane protein with strong binding to immobilized dermatan sulphate proteoglycan. There are additional proteoglycan-binding proteins with Mr values of around 30,000 and 14,000 which are insensitive to trypsin treatment. In contrast with the 51,000- and 26,000-Mr proteins, they resist deoxycholate/Triton X-100 extraction several days after subcultivation. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 3. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. PMID:2604692

  1. Significantly reduced expression of the proteoglycan decorin in Alzheimer's disease fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Brandan, Enrique; Melo, Francisco; García, María; Contreras, Maribel

    1996-01-01

    Aims—To investigate whether proteoglycan synthesis is altered in skin fibroblasts in patients with Alzheimer's disease compared with normal subjects. Methods—Cell lines obtained from donors with Alzheimer's disease and healthy controls were incubated with radioactive sulphate. The proteoglycans synthesised were determined and analysed by chromatographic, sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and glycosaminoglycans-lyase treatment. The amount of decorin synthesised by each cell line was quantified using western blot analysis. Transcripts for human decorin were determined using northern blot analysis. Results—No significant changes in total sulphate incorporation and glycos-aminoglycan (GAG) composition were detected in the incubation media of these cells. However, chromatographic and SDS-PAGE analysis of the proteoglycans secreted by the cell lines showed that a dermatan sulphate proteoglycan of 150-125 kilodaltons was substantially reduced in Alzheimer's disease fibroblasts. The molecular characteristics of this proteoglycan correspond to decorin. Western blot analysis indicated that decorin was reduced in Alzheimer's disease incubation medium compared with normal medium. Northern blotting indicated that in Alzheimer's disease fibroblasts decorin transcripts were significantly reduced compared with normal fibroblasts. Glypican concentrations, a cell surface heparan sulphate proteoglycan, remained the same. Conclusions—These results strongly suggest that the expression and synthesis of decorin is affected in Alzheimer's disease skin fibroblasts. Images PMID:16696102

  2. Theranostic impact of NG2/CSPG4 proteoglycan in cancer.

    PubMed

    Nicolosi, Pier Andrea; Dallatomasina, Alice; Perris, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    NG2/CSPG4 is an unusual cell-membrane integral proteoglycan widely recognized to be a prognostic factor, a valuable tool for ex vivo and non-invasive molecular diagnostics and, by virtue of its tight association with malignancy, a tantalizing therapeutic target in several tumour types. Although the biology behind its involvement in cancer progression needs to be better understood, implementation of NG2/CSPG4 in the routine clinical practice is attainable and has the potential to contribute to an improved individualized management of cancer patients. In this context, its polymorphic nature seems to be particularly valuable in the effort to standardize informative diagnostic procedures and consolidate forcible immunotherapeutic treatment strategies. We discuss here the underpinnings for this potential and highlight the benefits of taking advantage of the intra-tumour and inter-patient variability in the regulation of NG2/CSPG4 expression. We envision that NG2/CSPG4 may effectively be exploited in therapeutic interventions aimed at averting resistance to target therapy agents and at interfering with secondary lesion formation and/or tumour recurrence. PMID:25767619

  3. The use of mushroom glucans and proteoglycans in cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Kidd, P M

    2000-02-01

    Immunoceuticals can be considered as substances having immunotherapeutic efficacy when taken orally. More than 50 mushroom species have yielded potential immunoceuticals that exhibit anticancer activity in vitro or in animal models and of these, six have been investigated in human cancers. All are non-toxic and very well tolerated. Lentinan and schizophyllan have little oral activity. Active Hexose Correlated Compound (AHCC) is poorly defined but has shown early clinical promise. Maitake D-Fraction has limited proof of clinical efficacy to date, but controlled research is underway. Two proteoglycans from Coriolus versicolor - PSK (Polysaccharide-K) and PSP (Polysaccharide-Peptide - have demonstrated the most promise. In Japanese trials since 1970, PSK significantly extended survival at five years or beyond in cancers of the stomach, colon-rectum, esophagus, nasopharynx, and lung (non-small cell types), and in a HLA B40-positive breast cancer subset. PSP was subjected to Phase II and Phase III trials in China. In double-blind trials, PSP significantly extended five-year survival in esophageal cancer. PSP significantly improved quality of life, provided substantial pain relief, and enhanced immune status in 70-97 percent of patients with cancers of the stomach, esophagus, lung, ovary, and cervix. PSK and PSP boosted immune cell production, ameliorated chemotherapy symptoms, and enhanced tumor infiltration by dendritic and cytotoxic T-cells. Their extremely high tolerability, proven benefits to survival and quality of life, and compatibility with chemotherapy and radiation therapy makes them well suited for cancer management regimens. PMID:10696116

  4. PROTEOGLYCAN 4 EXPRESSION PROTECTS AGAINST THE DEVELOPMENT OF OSTEOARTHRITIS

    PubMed Central

    Ruan, Merry ZC; Erez, Ayelet; Guse, Kilian; Dawson, Brian; Bertin, Terry; Chen, Yuqing; Jiang, Ming-Ming; Yustein, Jason; Gannon, Francis; Lee, Brendan HL

    2013-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a common degenerative condition that afflicts more than 70% of the population between 55 and 77 years of age (1). Although its prevalence is rising globally with aging of the population, current therapy is limited to symptomatic relief and in severe cases, joint replacement surgery. Here we report intra-articular expression of proteoglycan 4 (Prg4) in mice protects against development of osteoarthritis. Long-term Prg4 expression under the type II collagen promoter (Col2a1) does not adversely affect skeletal development but protects from developing signs of age-related osteoarthritis. The protective effect is also shown in a model of post-traumatic osteoarthritis created by cruciate ligament transection (CLT)(2). Moreover, intra-articular injection of helper-dependent adenoviral virus (HDV) expressing Prg4 protected against the development of post-traumatic osteoarthritis when administered either before or after injury. Gene expression profiling of mouse articular cartilage and in vitro cell studies show that Prg4 expression inhibits the transcriptional programs that promote cartilage catabolism and hypertrophy through the up-regulation of hypoxia inducible factor 3α (HIF3α). Analyses of available human OA datasets are consistent with the predictions of this model. Hence, our data provide insight into the mechanisms for OA development and offer a potential chondroprotective approach to its treatment. PMID:23486780

  5. Heparan Sulfate Proteoglycan Metabolism and the Fate of Grafted Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Wrenshall, Lucile E.; Johnson, Geoffrey B.; Cascalho, Marilia

    2016-01-01

    Tissue and organ transplants between genetically distinct individuals are always or nearly always rejected. The universality and speed of transplant rejection distinguishes this immune response from all others. Although this distinction is incompletely understood, some efforts to shed light on transplant rejection have revealed broader insights, including a relationship between activation of complement in grafted tissues, the metabolism of heparan sulfate proteoglycan and the nature of immune and inflammatory responses that ensue. Complement activation on cell surfaces, especially on endothelial cell surfaces, causes the shedding heparan sulfate, an acidic saccharide, from the cell surface and neighboring extracellular matrix. Solubilized in this way, heparan sulfate can activate leukocytes via toll like receptor-4, triggering inflammatory responses and activating dendritic cells, which migrate to regional lymphoid organs where they spark and to some extent govern cellular immune responses. In this way local ischemia, tissue injury and infection, exert systemic impact on immunity. Whether or in what circumstances this series of events explains the distinct characteristics of the immune response to transplants is still unclear but the events offer insight into the inception of immunity under the sub-optimal conditions accompanying infection and mechanisms by which infection and tissue injury engender systemic inflammation. PMID:26306447

  6. Emerging tools to study proteoglycan function during skeletal development.

    PubMed

    Brown, D S; Eames, B F

    2016-01-01

    In the past 20years, appreciation for the varied roles of proteoglycans (PGs), which are specific types of sugar-coated proteins, has increased dramatically. PGs in the extracellular matrix were long known to impart structural functions to many tissues, especially articular cartilage, which cushions bones and allows mobility at skeletal joints. Indeed, osteoarthritis is a debilitating disease associated with loss of PGs in articular cartilage. Today, however, PGs have a demonstrated role in cell biological processes, such as growth factor signalling, prompting new perspectives on the etiology of PG-associated diseases. Here, we review diseases associated with defects in PG synthesis and sulfation, also highlighting current understanding of the underlying genetics, biochemistry, and cell biology. Since most research has analyzed a class of PGs called heparan sulfate PGs, more attention is paid here to studies of chondroitin sulfate PGs (CSPGs), which are abundant in cartilage. Interestingly, CSPG synthesis is tightly linked to the cell biological processes of secretion and lysosomal degradation, suggesting that these systems may be linked genetically. Animal models of loss of CSPG function have revealed CSPGs to impact skeletal development. Specifically, our work from a mutagenesis screen in zebrafish led to the hypothesis that cartilage PGs normally delay the timing of endochondral ossification. Finally, we outline emerging approaches in zebrafish that may revolutionize the study of cartilage PG function, including transgenic methods and novel imaging techniques. Our recent work with X-ray fluorescent imaging, for example, enables direct correlation of PG function with PG-dependent biological processes. PMID:27312503

  7. Theranostic Impact of NG2/CSPG4 Proteoglycan in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Nicolosi, Pier Andrea; Dallatomasina, Alice; Perris, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    NG2/CSPG4 is an unusual cell-membrane integral proteoglycan widely recognized to be a prognostic factor, a valuable tool for ex vivo and non-invasive molecular diagnostics and, by virtue of its tight association with malignancy, a tantalizing therapeutic target in several tumour types. Although the biology behind its involvement in cancer progression needs to be better understood, implementation of NG2/CSPG4 in the routine clinical practice is attainable and has the potential to contribute to an improved individualized management of cancer patients. In this context, its polymorphic nature seems to be particularly valuable in the effort to standardize informative diagnostic procedures and consolidate forcible immunotherapeutic treatment strategies. We discuss here the underpinnings for this potential and highlight the benefits of taking advantage of the intra-tumour and inter-patient variability in the regulation of NG2/CSPG4 expression. We envision that NG2/CSPG4 may effectively be exploited in therapeutic interventions aimed at averting resistance to target therapy agents and at interfering with secondary lesion formation and/or tumour recurrence. PMID:25767619

  8. Proteoglycans contain a 4.6 A repeat in muscular dystrophy corneas: x-ray diffraction evidence.

    PubMed Central

    Quantock, A J; Klintworth, G K; Schanzlin, D J; Capel, M S; Lenz, M E; Thonar, E J

    1996-01-01

    Synchrotron x-ray diffraction patterns from macular corneal dystrophy (MCD) corneas contain an unusual reflection that arises because of an undefined ultrastructure with a periodic repeat in the region of 4.6 A. In this study, we compared with wide-angle x-ray diffraction patterns obtained from four normal human corneas and four MCD corneas. Moreover, portions of two of the MCD corneas were pretreated with a specific glycosidase to shed light on the origin of the 4.6 A reflection. None of the normal corneas produced an x-ray reflection in the region of 4.6 A, whereas all four of the MCD corneas did (MCD type I at 4.65 A and 4.63 A, MCD type II at 4.63 A and 4.67 A). This reflection was diminished after incubation of the MCD tissues with either chondroitinase ABC or N-glycanase. The findings indicate that glycosaminoglycans or proteoglycans contribute to the unusual MCD x-ray reflection and hence most likely contain a periodic 4.6 A ultrastructure. Furthermore, the results imply that periodic 4.6 A MCD ultrastructures reside in either intact, unsulfated lumican molecules and regions of the CS/DS-containing molecules or in a region of a hybrid macromolecular aggregate formed by the interaction of the two molecules. PMID:8785355

  9. Production of proteoglycans by human lung fibroblasts (IMR-90) maintained in a low concentration of serum.

    PubMed Central

    Vogel, K G; Sapién, R E

    1982-01-01

    Maintenance of fibroblasts in 0.5% serum results in viable but non-proliferative cells that may be analogous to fibroblasts in vivo. The synthesis of proteoglycans by human embryo lung fibroblasts in Eagle's minimal essential medium with 0.5% newborn-bovine serum or with 10% serum has been compared. A similar amount of [35S]sulphate-labelled glycosaminoglycan per cell was secreted by fibroblasts in 10% or 0.5% serum. 35SO42-incorporation into sulphated glycosaminoglycans was enhanced in 0.5% serum when expressed per mg of cell protein, but [3H]glucosamine incorporation was decreased. The charge density of these glycosaminoglycans was not changed as determined by ion-exchange chromatography. It was concluded that decreased protein/ cell resulted in an apparent increase in 35S-labelled glycosaminoglycan synthesis/mg of cell protein, whereas decreased uptake of [3H]glucosamine resulted in a decrease in their glucosamine labelling. The proteoglycans secreted by fibroblasts in 0.5% serum were similar in glycosaminoglycan composition, chain length and buoyant density to the dermatan sulphate proteoglycan, which is the major secreted component of cells in 10% serum. Larger heparan sulphate and chondroitin sulphate proteoglycans, which comprise about 40% of the total secreted proteoglycans of cultures in 10% serum, were greatly diminished in the medium of cultures in 0.5% serum. The proteoglycan profile of medium from density-inhibited cultures in 10% serum resembles that of proliferating cultures, indicating that lack of proliferation was not responsible for the alteration. The dermatan sulphate proteoglycan, participating in extracellular matrix structure, may be the primary tissue product of lung fibroblasts in vivo. Images Fig. 1. PMID:7165697

  10. Effect of exercise on the proteoglycan metabolism of articular cartilage in growing foals.

    PubMed

    van den Hoogen, B M; van den Lest, C H; van Weeren, P R; van Golde, L M; Barneveld, A

    1999-11-01

    In this study, the effect of different exercise regimens on proteoglycan metabolism of articular cartilage was examined in 43 newborn foals randomly divided into 3 groups: a) box-rest, b) box-rest with training and c) free pasture exercise. They were subjected to these exercise regimens from ages 1 week to 5 months and at 5 months, 24 foals (8 from each group) were sacrificed to assess short-term exercise effects. The remaining 19 foals were subjected to the same regimen of light exercise for an additional 6 months before being sacrificed to evaluate possible long-term effects. Articular cartilage explants were cultured and proteoglycan synthesis, both ex vivo and after 4 days of serum stimulation, release of endogenous and newly synthesised proteoglycans, and DNA- and GAG contents were measured to determine the metabolic state of the cartilage. Cartilage metabolic parameters in the box-rest group at 5 months indicated a retardation in development of the cartilage but, after an additional 6 months, this retardation had almost completely disappeared. The training regimen induced an increase in proteoglycan synthesis at 5 months in cartilage that was, however, accompanied by an increase in proteoglycan release. In the training group at the long-term, the ability of cartilage to increase proteoglycan synthesis when stimulated was severely reduced. We consider this extra proteoglycan synthesis capacity of great importance to repair small injuries and hence as essential to prevent an early onset of degenerative disorders such as osteoarthritis. Therefore, although extrapolation of in vitro data to the in vivo situation always should be done with the utmost care, it is concluded that pasture exercise is best for the development of healthy cartilage resistant to injury and other exercise protocols may carry harmful long-term effects. PMID:10999662

  11. Hairpin Furans and Giant Biaryls.

    PubMed

    Geng, Xin; Mague, Joel T; Donahue, James P; Pascal, Robert A

    2016-05-01

    The thermal reaction of two cyclopentadienones with 5,5'-binaphthoquinone or 6,6'-dimethoxy-5,5'-binaphthoquinone in refluxing nitrobenzene (210 °C) gives, in a single synthetic step that includes two Diels-Alder additions, two decarbonylations, and two dehydrogenations, giant biaryl bisquinones (compounds 13, 14, 15, 18, and 21). However, when two cyclopentadienones react with 6,6'-dimethoxy-5,5'-binaphthoquinone in nitrobenzene at higher temperatures (250-260 °C), the resulting products are molecular ribbons composed of two twisted aromatic systems fused to a heteropentahelicene (19, 20, and 22). These molecules are representatives of a new class of chiral polycyclic aromatic compounds, the "hairpin furans". Interestingly, reheating a dimethoxy-substituted giant biaryl (e.g., 21) in nitrobenzene at 260 °C does not yield the corresponding hairpin furan (22), and mechanistic studies indicate that some intermediate or byproduct of the synthesis of the giant biaryls is a reagent or catalyst necessary for the conversion of the dimethoxybiaryl to the furan. PMID:27040596

  12. Altered Signaling in the G1 Phase Deregulates Chondrocyte Growth in a Mouse Model With Proteoglycan Undersulfation

    PubMed Central

    Leonardis, Fabio De; Monti, Luca; Gualeni, Benedetta; Tenni, Ruggero; Forlino, Antonella; Rossi, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    In several skeletal dysplasias defects in extracellular matrix molecules affect not only the structural and mechanical properties of cartilage, but also the complex network of signaling pathways involved in cell proliferation and differentiation. Sulfated proteoglycans, besides playing an important structural role in cartilage, are crucial in modulating the transport, diffusion, and interactions of growth factors with their specific targets, taking part in the regulation of signaling pathways involved in skeletal development and growth. In this work, we investigated by real time PCR and Western blots of the microdissected growth plate and by immunohistochemistry the molecular basis of reduced chondrocyte proliferation in the growth plate of the dtd mouse, a chondrodysplastic model with defective chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan sulfation of articular and growth plate cartilage. We detected activation of the Wnt pathway, leading to an increase in the non-phosphorylated form of nuclear β-catenin and subsequent up-regulation of cyclin D1 expression in the G1 phase of the cell cycle. β-Catenin was further stabilized by up-regulation of Smad3 expression through TGF-β pathway synergistic activation. We demonstrate that notwithstanding cyclin D1 expression increase, cell cycle progression is compromised in the G1 phase due to reduced phosphorylation of the pocket protein p130 leading to inhibition of transcription factors of the E2F family which are crucial for cell cycle progression and DNA replication. These data, together with altered Indian hedgehox signaling detected previously, explain at the molecular level the reduced chondrocyte proliferation rate of the dtd growth plate leading to reduced skeletal growth. J. Cell. Biochem. 115: 1779–1786, 2014. PMID:24820054

  13. Basement membrane of mouse bone marrow sinusoids shows distinctive structure and proteoglycan composition: a high resolution ultrastructural study.

    PubMed

    Inoue, S; Osmond, D G

    2001-11-01

    Venous sinusoids in bone marrow are the site of a large-scale traffic of cells between the extravascular hemopoietic compartment and the blood stream. The wall of the sinusoids consists solely of a basement membrane interposed between a layer of endothelial cells and an incomplete covering of adventitial cells. To examine its possible structural specialization, the basement membrane of bone marrow sinusoids has now been examined by high resolution electron microscopy of perfusion-fixed mouse bone marrow. The basement membrane layer was discontinuous, consisting of irregular masses of amorphous material within a uniform 60-nm-wide space between apposing endothelial cells and adventitial cell processes. At maximal magnifications, the material was resolved as a random arrangement of components lacking the "cord network" formation seen in basement membranes elsewhere. Individual components exhibited distinctive ultrastructural features whose molecular identity has previously been established. By these morphological criteria, the basement membrane contained unusually abundant chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan (CSPG) revealed by 3-nm-wide "double tracks," and moderate amounts of both laminin as dense irregular coils and type IV collagen as 1-1.5-nm-wide filaments, together with less conspicuous amounts of amyloid P forming pentagonal frames. In contrast, 4.5-5-nm-wide "double tracks" characteristic of heparan sulfate proteoglycan (HSPG) were absent. The findings demonstrate that, in comparison with "typical" basement membranes in other tissues, the bone marrow sinusoidal basement membrane is uniquely specialized in several respects. Its discontinuous nature, lack of network organization, and absence of HSPG, a molecule that normally helps to maintain membrane integrity, may facilitate disassembly and reassembly of basement membrane material in concert with movements of adventitial cell processes as maturing hemopoietic cells pass through the sinusoidal wall: the

  14. Traumatic Brain Injury Results in Disparate Regions of Chondroitin Sulfate Proteoglycan Expression That Are Temporally Limited

    PubMed Central

    Harris, N.G.; Carmichael, S.T.; Hovda, D.A.; Sutton, R.L.

    2010-01-01

    Axonal injury is a major hallmark of traumatic brain injury (TBI), and it seems likely that therapies directed toward enhancing axon repair could potentially improve functional outcomes. One potential target is chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPGs), which are major axon growth inhibitory molecules that are generally, but not always, up-regulated after central nervous system injury. The current study was designed to determine temporal changes in cerebral cortical mRNA or protein expression levels of CSPGs and to determine their regional localization and cellular association by using immunohistochemistry in a controlled cortical impact model of TBI. The results showed significant increases in versican mRNA at 4 and 14 days after TBI but no change in neurocan, aggrecan, or phosphacan. Semiquantitative Western blot (WB) analysis of cortical CSPG protein expression revealed a significant ipsilateral decrease of all CSPGs at 1 day after TBI. Lower CSPG protein levels were sustained until at least 14 days, after which the levels began to normalize. Immunohistochemistry data confirm previous reports of regional increases in CSPG proteins after CNS injury, seen primarily within the developing glial scar after TBI, but also corroborate the WB data by revealing wide areas of pericontusional tissue that are deficient in both extracellular and perineuronal net-associated CSPGs. Given the evidence that CSPGs are largely inhibitory to axonal growth, we interpret these data to indicate a potential for regional spontaneous plasticity after TBI. If this were the case, the gradual normalization of CSPG proteins over time postinjury would suggest that this may be temporally as well as regionally limited. PMID:19437549

  15. Complex Cooperative Functions of Heparan Sulfate Proteoglycans Shape Nervous System Development in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Díaz-Balzac, Carlos A.; Lázaro-Peña, María I.; Tecle, Eillen; Gomez, Nathali; Bülow, Hannes E.

    2014-01-01

    The development of the nervous system is a complex process requiring the integration of numerous molecular cues to form functional circuits. Many cues are regulated by heparan sulfates, a class of linear glycosaminoglycan polysaccharides. These sugars contain distinct modification patterns that regulate protein–protein interactions. Misexpressing the homolog of KAL-1/anosmin-1, a neural cell adhesion molecule mutant in Kallmann syndrome, in Caenorhabditis elegans causes a highly penetrant, heparan sulfate–dependent axonal branching phenotype in AIY interneurons. In an extended forward genetic screen for modifiers of this phenotype, we identified alleles in new as well as previously identified genes involved in HS biosynthesis and modification, namely the xylosyltransferase sqv-6, the HS-6-O-sulfotransferase hst-6, and the HS-3-O-sulfotransferase hst-3.2. Cell-specific rescue experiments showed that different HS biosynthetic and modification enzymes can be provided cell-nonautonomously by different tissues to allow kal-1-dependent branching of AIY. In addition, we show that heparan sulfate proteoglycan core proteins that carry the heparan sulfate chains act genetically in a highly redundant fashion to mediate kal-1-dependent branching in AIY neurons. Specifically, lon-2/glypican and unc-52/perlecan act in parallel genetic pathways and display synergistic interactions with sdn-1/syndecan to mediate kal-1 function. Because all of these heparan sulfate core proteins have been shown to act in different tissues, these studies indicate that KAL-1/anosmin-1 requires heparan sulfate with distinct modification patterns of different cellular origin for function. Our results support a model in which a three-dimensional scaffold of heparan sulfate mediates KAL-1/anosmin-1 and intercellular communication through complex and cooperative interactions. In addition, the genes we have identified could contribute to the etiology of Kallmann syndrome in humans. PMID:25098771

  16. Effects of Decorin Proteoglycan on Fibrillogenesis, Ultrastructure, and Mechanics of Type I Collagen Gels

    PubMed Central

    Reese, Shawn P.; Underwood, Clayton J.; Weiss, Jeffrey A.

    2013-01-01

    The proteoglycan decorin is known to affect both the fibrillogenesis and the resulting ultrastructure of in vitro polymerized collagen gels. However, little is known about its effects on mechanical properties. In this study, 3D collagen gels were polymerized into tensile test specimens in the presence of decorin proteoglycan, decorin core protein, or dermatan sulfate (DS). Collagen fibrillogenesis, ultrastructure, and mechanical properties were then quantified using a turbidity assay, 2 forms of microscopy (SEM and confocal), and tensile testing. The presence of decorin proteoglycan or core protein decreased the rate and ultimate turbidity during fibrillogenesis and decreased the number of fibril aggregates (fibers) compared to control gels. The addition of decorin and core protein increased the linear modulus by a factor of 2 compared to controls, while the addition of DS reduced the linear modulus by a factor of 3. Adding decorin after fibrillogenesis had no effect, suggesting that decorin must be present during fibrillogenesis to increase the mechanical properties of the resulting gels. These results show that the inclusion of decorin proteoglycan during fibrillogenesis of Type I collagen increases the modulus and tensile strength of resulting collagen gels. The increase in mechanical properties when polymerization occurs in the presence of the decorin proteoglycan is due to a reduction in the aggregation of fibrils into larger order structures such as fibers and fiber bundles. PMID:23608680

  17. Salubrinal inhibits the expression of proteoglycans and favors neurite outgrowth from cortical neurons in vitro.

    PubMed

    Barreda-Manso, M Asunción; Yanguas-Casás, Natalia; Nieto-Sampedro, Manuel; Romero-Ramírez, Lorenzo

    2015-07-01

    After CNS injury, astrocytes and mesenchymal cells attempt to restore the disrupted glia limitans by secreting proteoglycans and extracellular matrix proteins (ECMs), forming the so-called glial scar. Although the glial scar is important in sealing the lesion, it is also a physical and functional barrier that prevents axonal regeneration. The synthesis of secretory proteins in the RER is under the control of the initiation factor of translation eIF2α. Inhibiting the synthesis of secretory proteins by increasing the phosphorylation of eIF2α, might be a pharmacologically efficient way of reducing proteoglycans and other profibrotic proteins present in the glial scar. Salubrinal, a neuroprotective drug, decreased the expression and secretion of proteoglycans and other profibrotic proteins induced by EGF or TGFβ, maintaining eIF2α phosphorylated. Besides, Salubrinal also reduced the transcription of proteoglycans and other profibrotic proteins, suggesting that it induced the degradation of non-translated mRNA. In a model in vitro of the glial scar, cortical neurons grown on cocultures of astrocytes and fibroblasts with TGFβ treated with Salubrinal, showed increased neurite outgrowth compared to untreated cells. Our results suggest that Salubrinal may be considered of therapeutic value facilitating axonal regeneration, by reducing overproduction and secretion of proteoglycans and profibrotic protein inhibitors of axonal growth. PMID:25882497

  18. Selective decreased de novo synthesis of glomerular proteoglycans under the influence of reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed Central

    Kashihara, N; Watanabe, Y; Makino, H; Wallner, E I; Kanwar, Y S

    1992-01-01

    The effect of reactive oxygen species on de novo synthesis of heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs) of the renal glomerulus was investigated in an organ perfusion system. Isolated kidneys were perfused for 7 hr with a medium containing [35S]sulfate to label sulfated proteoglycans or [35S]methionine to label total glomerular glycoproteins. For the generation of reactive oxygen species, xanthine and xanthine oxidase were included in the perfusion medium, and catalase and superoxide dismutase were used as scavenging agents. Proteoglycans were characterized by Sepharose CL-6B and DEAE-Sephacel chromatographies and SDS/PAGE analysis. The labeled glycoproteins were immunoprecipitated with anti-HSPG, anti-type IV collagen, and anti-laminin, and their specific radioactivities were determined. With exposure to reactive oxygen species, a drastic dose-dependent decrease in de novo synthesis of proteoglycans was seen, and that effect was reversible by catalase treatment. No alterations in the biochemical characteristics of proteoglycans were noted. Immunoprecipitation studies revealed a 16-fold decrease in the synthesis of nascent core peptide of HSPGs, while at comparable concentrations of xanthine and xanthine oxidase, synthesis of type IV collagen and laminin slightly decreased (approximately 15%). Morphologic studies revealed a 14-fold decrease in [35S]sulfate-associated autoradiographic grains overlying the glomerular basement membrane, a critical component of the ultrafiltration apparatus. Relevance of the selective decreased de novo synthesis of HSPGs of the glomerular basement membrane is discussed in terms of increased glomerular permeability to plasma proteins. Images PMID:1631123

  19. Benoxaprofen stimulates proteoglycan synthesis in normal canine knee cartilage in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Palmoski, M.J.; Brandt, K.D.

    1983-06-01

    Several nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs which are cyclooxygenase inhibitors (e.g., salicylates, fenoprofen, ibuprofen) have been shown to suppress proteoglycan synthesis by normal joint cartilage in vitro. We examined the effect of benoxaprofen, a long-acting proprionic acid derivative which inhibits lipoxygenase in addition to causing moderate cyclooxygenase inhibition. When added to the culture medium in concentrations comparable with those obtainable in serum of patients treated with the drug (e.g., 10 and 50 micrograms/ml), benoxaprofen increased proteoglycan synthesis in slices of normal canine knee cartilage to 126% and 135%, respectively, of control levels. These concentrations of the drug augmented net protein synthesis to 154% and 123%, respectively, of control levels. Incorporation of /sup 3/H glucosamine into 9-aminoacridine precipitable material was increased by benoxaprofen, showing that it stimulates net proteoglycan synthesis, and not merely sulfation. At concentrations of either 10 or 50 micrograms/ml, the drug had no effect on proteoglycan catabolism or on the ability of proteoglycans to interact with cartilage hyaluronic acid to form macromolecular aggregates. Nordihydroguaiaretic acid, a free radical scavenger which, like benoxaprofen, inhibits the lipoxygenase as well as cyclooxygenase pathways of arachidonic acid metabolism, also increased /sup 35/S glycosaminoglycan synthesis in cartilage slices. The stimulation of glycosaminoglycan and protein synthesis by benoxaprofen suggests that its action on the chondrocyte may be different from that of most other nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs.

  20. Purification and partial characterization of glycosaminoglycans and proteoglycans from cultured rabbit smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sabatino, R.D.

    1985-01-01

    Glycosaminoglycans synthesized by cultured rabbit smooth muscle cells were isolated after incorporation of (/sup 3/H)-glucosamine into glycosaminoglycans in the presence or absence of 10% fetal bovine serum. Glycosaminoglycans were quantitated by two-dimensional electrophoresis after proteolytic digestion of the cell layers and media. The results show that the presence of serum has no effect on the chondroitin sulfate, heparan sulfate and dermatan sulfate content of the cell layers. The incorporation of (/sup 3/H)-glucosamine into hyaluronic acid of the cell layers was three times higher in the presence of serum. In the medium , the quantity of hyaluronic was two times higher in the presence of serum while the other glycosaminoglycans remained unchanged. The incorporation of (/sup 3/H)-glucosamine into hyaluronic acid was unaffected by the presence of serum. Specific proteoglycans were isolated from medium after with (/sup 35/S)-sulfate and (/sup 3/H)-serine by isopycnic ultracentrifugation and chromatography on Sepharose CL-4B and DEAE-cellulose. Preparations contained a chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan, a condroitin sulfate-dermatan sulfate proteoglycan and a heparan sulfate proteoglycan. Glycosaminoglycans and proteoglycans synthesized by rabbit aorta smooth muscle cells are similar to those from human aorta.

  1. Embryonic lung morphogenesis in organ culture: experimental evidence for a proteoglycan function in the extracellular matrix

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spooner, B. S.; Bassett, K. E.; Spooner, B. S. Jr

    1993-01-01

    The lung rudiment, isolated from mid-gestation (11 day) mouse embryos, can undergo morphogenesis in organ culture. Observation of living rudiments, in culture, reveals both growth and ongoing bronchiolar branching activity. To detect proteoglycan (PG) biosynthesis, and deposition in the extracellular matrix, rudiments were metabolically labeled with radioactive sulfate, then fixed, embedded, sectioned and processed for autoradiography. The sulfated glycosaminoglycan (GAG) types, composing the carbohydrate component of the proteoglycans, were evaluated by selective GAG degradative approaches that showed chondroitin sulfate PG principally associated with the interstitial matrix, and heparan sulfate PG principally associated with the basement membrane. Experiments using the proteoglycan biosynthesis disrupter, beta-xyloside, suggest that when chondroitin sulfate PG deposition into the ECM is perturbed, branching morphogenesis is compromised.

  2. Small-angle neutron scattering studies from solutions of bovine nasal cartilage proteoglycan

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, A.; Stivala, S.S.; Damle, S.P.; Gregory, J.D.; Bunick, G.J.; Uberbacher, E.C.

    1985-08-01

    Small-angle neutron scattering, SANS, of the proteoglycan subunit of bovine nasal cartilage in 0.15N LiCl at 25/sup 0/C yielded the radius of gyration, R/sub g/, radius of gyration of the cross-section, R/sub q/, persistence length, a, and the molecular weight, M. The following values were obtained: M = 3.9 x 10/sup 6/, R/sub g/ = 745 A, R/sub q/ = 34.6 A and a = 35.2 A. These values compare favorably with those that were obtained from small angle x-ray scattering, SAXS, of a similar extract. The scattering curve of the proteoglycan subunit in D/sub 2/O showed a characteristic broad peak in the specified angular range similar to that observed from SAXS, thus confirming the polyelectrolyte nature of the proteoglycan. 15 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab. (DT)

  3. Sweet on Hedgehogs: regulatory roles of heparan sulfate proteoglycans in Hedgehog-dependent cell proliferation and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Bandari, Shyam; Exner, Sebastian; Ortmann, Corinna; Bachvarova, Velina; Vortkamp, Andrea; Grobe, Kay

    2015-01-01

    Morphogens exert their effects over long distances, typically by spreading from cell to cell to activate signal transduction in surrounding tissues in concentration-dependent manner. One example of a morphogen is the signaling molecule Hedgehog (Hh), which controls growth and patterning during development and has also been implicated in the progression of numerous cancers. To this end, accessory mechanisms that release, transport, and receive Hhs are required to elicit temporally and spatially specific responses in cells and tissues. The Hh spreading mechanism is especially intriguing, because all Hhs are released from the producing cells despite being synthesized as dually lipidated, membrane-tethered molecules. In addition to this cellular association, Hhs bind strongly to extracellular heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs), which is expected to further reduce their spreading. Paradoxically, several lines of evidence suggest that Hh gradient formation actually requires HSPG expression, and that HSPGs act as both positive and negative regulators of Hh function. This article reviews the multiple roles that HSPGs play in Hh morphogen function, and discusses their congruity with proposed mechanisms of Hh solubilization, transport, and signal reception in vertebrate and invertebrate tissues. PMID:25692848

  4. Peripheral giant cell granuloma.

    PubMed

    Adlakha, V K; Chandna, P; Rehani, U; Rana, V; Malik, P

    2010-01-01

    Peripheral giant cell granuloma is a benign reactive lesion of gingiva. It manifests as a firm, soft, bright nodule or as a sessile or pedunculate mass. This article reports the management of peripheral giant cell granuloma in a 12-year-old boy by surgical excision. PMID:21273719

  5. Biosynthesis of proteoglycan in vitro by cartilage from human osteochondrophytic spurs

    PubMed Central

    Malemud, Charles J.; Goldberg, Victor M.; Moskowitz, Roland W.; Getzy, Lee L.; Papay, Robert S.; Norby, David P.

    1982-01-01

    Proteoglycan biosynthesis by human osteochondrophytic spurs (osteophytes) obtained from osteoarthritic femoral heads at the time of surgical joint replacement was studied under defined culture conditions in vitro. Osteophytes were primarily present in two anatomic locations, marginal and epi-articular. Minced tissue slices were incubated in the presence of [35S]sulphate or [14C]glucosamine. Osteophytes incorporated both labelled precursors into proteoglycan, which was subsequently characterized by CsCl-isopycnic-density-gradient ultracentrifugation and chromatography on Sepharose CL-2B. The material extracted with 0.5m-guanidinium chloride showed 78.1% of [35S]sulphate in the A1 fraction after centrifugation. Only 23.0% of the [35S]sulphate in this A1 fraction was eluted in the void volume of Sepharose CL-2B under associative conditions. About 60–80% of the [35S]sulphate in the tissue 4m-guanidinium chloride extract was associated with monomeric proteoglycan (fraction D1). The average partition coefficient (Kav.) of the proteoglycan monomer on Sepharose CL-2B was 0.28–0.33. Approx. 12.4% of this monomer formed stable aggregates with high-molecular-weight hyaluronic acid in vitro. Sepharose CL-2B chromatography of fractions with lower buoyant densities (fractions D2–D4) demonstrated elution profiles on Sepharose CL-2B substantially different than that of fraction D1, indicative of the polydisperse nature of the newly synthesized proteoglycan. Analysis of the composition and chain size of the glycosaminoglycans showed the following: (1) preferential elution of both [35S]sulphate and [14C]glucosamine in the 0.5m-LiCl fraction on DEAE-cellulose; (2) the predominant sulphated glycosaminoglycan was chondroitin 6-sulphate (60–70%), with 9–11% keratan sulphate in the monomer proteoglycan; (3) Kav. values of 0.38 on Sephadex G-200 and 0.48 on Sepharose CL-6B were obtained with papain-digested and NaBH4-treated D1 monomer respectively. A comparison of the synthetic

  6. Immune Recognition of Citrullinated Proteoglycan Aggrecan Epitopes in Mice with Proteoglycan-Induced Arthritis and in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Markovics, Adrienn; Ocskó, Tímea; Katz, Robert S.; Buzás, Edit I.; Glant, Tibor T.

    2016-01-01

    Background Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune inflammatory disease affecting the joints. Anti-citrullinated protein antibodies (ACPA) are frequently found in RA. Previous studies identified a citrullinated epitope in cartilage proteoglycan (PG) aggrecan that elicited pro-inflammatory cytokine production by RA T cells. We recently reported the presence of ACPA-reactive (citrullinated) PG in RA cartilage. Herein, we sought to identify additional citrullinated epitopes in human PG that are recognized by T cells or antibodies from RA patients. Methods We used mice with PG-induced arthritis (PGIA) as a screening tool to select citrulline (Cit)-containing PG peptides that were more immunogenic than the arginine (R)-containing counterparts. The selected peptide pairs were tested for induction of pro-inflammatory T-cell cytokine production in RA and healthy control peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) cultures using ELISA and flow cytometry. Anti-Cit and anti-R peptide antibodies were detected by ELISA. Results Splenocytes from mice with PGIA exhibited greater T-cell cytokine secretion in response to the Cit than the R version of PG peptide 49 (P49) and anti-P49 antibodies were found in PGIA serum. PBMC from ACPA+ and ACPA- RA patients, but not from healthy controls, responded to Cit49 with robust cytokine production. High levels of anti-Cit49 antibodies were found in the plasma of a subset of ACPA+ RA patients. Another PG peptide (Cit13) similar to the previously described T-cell epitope induced greater cytokine responses than R13 by control (but not RA) PBMC, however, anti-Cit13 antibodies were rarely detected in human plasma. Conclusions We identified a novel citrullinated PG epitope (Cit49) that is highly immunogenic in mice with PGIA and in RA patients. We also describe T-cell and antibody reactivity with Cit49 in ACPA+ RA. As citrullinated PG might be present in RA articular cartilage, Cit PG epitope-induced T-cell activation or antibody deposition may

  7. Testican-3: a brain-specific proteoglycan member of the BM-40/SPARC/osteonectin family.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Ursula; Hülsmann, Hanni; Seul, Judith; Röll, Sandra; Midani, Heven; Breloy, Isabelle; Hechler, Daniel; Müller, Regina; Paulsson, Mats

    2013-05-01

    The testicans are a three-member family of secreted proteoglycans structurally related to the BM-40/secreted protein acidic and rich in cystein (SPARC) osteonectin family of extracellular calcium-binding proteins. In vitro studies have indicated that testicans are involved in the regulation of extracellular protease cascades and in neuronal function. Here, we describe the biochemical characterization and tissue distribution of mouse testican-3 as well as the inactivation of the corresponding gene. The expression of testican-3 in adult mice is restricted to the brain, where it is located diffusely within the extracellular matrix, as well as associated with cells. Brain-derived testican-3 is a heparan sulphate proteoglycan. In cell culture, the core protein is detected in the supernatant and the extracellular matrix, whereas the proteoglycan form is restricted to the supernatant. This indicates possible interactions of the testican-3 core protein with components of the extracellular matrix which are blocked by addition of the glycosaminoglycan chains. Mice deficient in testican-3 are viable and fertile and do not show an obvious phenotype. This points to a functional redundancy among the different members of the testican family or between testican-3 and other brain heparan sulphate proteoglycans. PMID:23418755

  8. Chondroitin Sulfate Accelerates Trans-Golgi-to-Surface Transport of Proteoglycan Amyloid Precursor Protein.

    PubMed

    Mihov, Deyan; Raja, Eva; Spiess, Martin

    2015-08-01

    The amyloid precursor protein (APP) is a membrane protein implicated in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. APP is a part-time proteoglycan, as splice variants lacking exon 15 are modified by a chondroitin sulfate glycosaminoglycan (GAG) chain. Investigating the effect of the GAG chain on the trafficking of APP in non-polarized cells, we found it to increase the steady-state surface-to-intracellular distribution, to reduce the rate of endocytosis and to accelerate transport kinetics from the trans-Golgi network (TGN) to the plasma membrane. Deletion of the cytosolic domain resulted in delayed surface arrival of GAG-free APP, but did not affect the rapid export kinetics of the proteoglycan form. Protein-free GAG chains showed the same TGN-to-cell surface transport kinetics as proteoglycan APP. Endosome ablation experiments were performed to distinguish between indirect endosomal and direct pathways to the cell surface. Surprisingly, TGN-to-cell surface transport of both GAG-free and proteoglycan APP was found to be indirect via transferrin-positive endosomes. Our results show that GAGs act as alternative sorting determinants in cellular APP transport that are dominant over cytoplasmic signals and involve distinct sorting mechanisms. PMID:25951880

  9. Heparan sulfate proteoglycan is present in basement membrane as a double-tracked structure.

    PubMed

    Inoue, S; Grant, D; Leblond, C P

    1989-05-01

    Basement membranes contain 4.5-nm wide sets of two parallel lines, along which short prongs called "spikes" occur at regular intervals. The nature of this structure, referred to as "double tracks," was investigated in Lowicryl sections of mouse kidney and rat Reichert's membrane immunolabeled for basement membrane components using secondary antibodies conjugated to 5-nm gold particles. When the mouse glomerular basement membrane and rat Reichert's membrane were exposed to antibodies directed to the core protein of heparan sulfate proteoglycan, 95% or more of the gold particles were over double tracks, whereas after exposure of Reichert's membrane to antisera against laminin, collagen IV, or entactin, labeling of the double tracks remained at the random level. When heparan sulfate proteoglycan was incubated in Tris buffer, pH 7.4, at 35 degrees C for 1 hr, a precipitate resulted which, on electron microscopic examination, was found to consist of 5- to 6-nm wide sets of two parallel lines along which densities were observed. Immunolabeling confirmed the presence of the proteoglycan's core protein in the sets. Since double tracks were closely similar to this structure and were labeled with the same antibodies, they were likely to be also composed of heparan sulfate proteoglycan. PMID:2522961

  10. Changes in proteoglycans of cultured pig aortic smooth muscle cells during subculture

    SciTech Connect

    Breton, M.; Berrou, E.; Deudon, E.; Picard, J. )

    1990-02-01

    Smooth muscle cells were cultured from pig aorta. Changes in both the growth and the properties of sulfated proteoglycans were observed during passage. The population doubling time during log phase growth was 34 h from Passages 3 to 7-8 but 20 h at the Passage 11, and the cell density at the stationary phase, was 86,000 and 136,000 cells/cm{sup 2} at Passages 3 and 11, respectively. Structural characteristics of sulfated proteoglycans secreted into the medium were investigated after metabolic labeling with ({sup 35}S)-sulfate. Significant differences were observed with age in vitro: (a) ({sup 35}S)proteoglycan complexes were in a greater amount at Passage 10 than at Passage 3; (b) the hydrodynamic size of at least 45% of subunits and about 90% of monomers decreased with in vitro aging; (c) this decrease in the size of proteoglycans was partly due to a decrease in the size of their glycanic chains; (d) an increase of 15% in the proportion of dermatan sulfate was observed when cells were subjected to 10 passages.

  11. Unstable giant gravitons

    SciTech Connect

    Mello Koch, Robert de; Ives, Norman; Smolic, Jelena; Smolic, Milena

    2006-03-15

    We find giant graviton solutions in Frolov's three parameter generalization of the Lunin-Maldacena background. The background we study has {gamma}-tilde{sub 1}=0 and {gamma}-tilde{sub 2}={gamma}-tilde{sub 3}={gamma}-tilde. This class of backgrounds provides a nonsupersymmetric example of the gauge theory/gravity correspondence that can be tested quantitatively, as recently shown by Frolov, Roiban, and Tseytlin. The giant graviton solutions we find have a greater energy than the point gravitons, making them unstable states. Despite this, we find striking quantitative agreement between the gauge theory and gravity descriptions of open strings attached to the giant.

  12. Interaction of strain and interleukin-1 in articular cartilage: effects, on proteoglycan synthesis in chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Gassner, Robert J.; Buckley, Michael J.; Studer, Rebecca K.; Evans, Chris H.; Agarwal, Sudha

    2016-01-01

    In temporomandibular joint disorders, the release of proinflammatory cytokines such as interleukin-1 (IL-1) initiates an inflammatory process disrupting cartilage homeostasis, ultimately leading to cartilage destruction. Additionally, mechanical stimuli affect articular chondrocyte metabolism. While articular chondrocytes generate nitric oxide (NO) in the presence of IL-1 proteoglycan synthesis is consecutively suppressed. The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of proinflammatory cytokines and mechanical strain in the form of cyclic tensile stretch on proteoglycan synthesis in chondrocytes, as compared to the NO competitive inhibitor L-N-monomethyl arginine (LMA), and to assess whether this effect is secondarily related to the activity of growth factors such as transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β). Lapine articular chondrocytes were exposed to one of four different treatment regimens: no cyclic tensile stretch, IL-1, cyclic tensile stretch, or IL-1 plus cyclic tensile stretch. NO production was determined as medium nitrite accumulation. TGF-β-bioactivity in chondrocyte conditioned medium was measured with the mink-lung epithelial cell bioassay. Proteoglycan synthesis was measured as the incorporation of 35-[S]-sodium sulfate into macromolecules separated from unincorporated label by gel filtration on PD-10 columns. In resting chondrocyte cultures, only baseline levels of NO were measured and the application of stretch for 24 h did not affect NO production. Addition of IL-1 provoked a large increase in NO synthesis which was abrogated in the presence of LMA. Application of stretch decreased the IL-1 induced NO synthesis, but did not modify the effect of LMA (being a competitive inhibitor of the inducible NO synthase) inhibiting IL-1 induced NO production. Glucosaminoglycan production was noted as proteoglycan synthesis showing almost no effect of cyclic stretch alone in comparison to the control condition, which correlates with the missing NO

  13. Intestinal mucosal mast cells from rats infected with Nippostrongylus brasiliensis contain protease-resistant chondroitin sulfate di-B proteoglycans

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, R.L.; Lee, T.D.G.; Seldin, D.C.; Austen, K.F.; Befus, A.D.; Bienenstock, J.

    1986-07-01

    Rats infected with the helminth Nippostrongylus brasiliensis were injected i.p. with 2 mCi of (/sup 35/S) sulfate on days 13, 15, 17, and 19 after infection. The intestines were removed from animals on day 20 or 21 after infection, the intestinal cells were obtained by collagenase treatment and mechanical dispersion of the tissue, and the /sup 35/S-labeled mucosal mast cells (MMC) were enriched to 60 to 65% purity by Percoll centrifugation. The isolated proteoglycans were of approx. 150,000 m.w., were resistant to pronase degradation, and contained highly sulfated chondroitin sulfate side chains. The presence in normal mammalian cells of chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans that contain a high percentage of the unusual disulfated di-B disaccharide has not been previously reported. The rat intestinal MMC proteoglycans are the first chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans that have been isolated from an enriched populations of normal mast cells. They are homologous to the chondroitin sulfate-rich proteoglycans of the transformed rat basophilic leumekia-1 cell and the cultured interleukin 3-dependent mouse bone marrow-derived mast cell, in that these chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans are all highly sulfated, protease-resistant proteoglycans.

  14. Transforming growth factor-beta 1 stimulates synthesis of proteoglycan aggregates in calf articular cartilage organ cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Morales, T.I. )

    1991-04-01

    Previous work showed that transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-beta 1), added alone to bovine cartilage organ cultures, stimulated (35S)sulfate incorporation into macromolecular material but did not investigate the fidelity of the stimulated system to maintain synthesis of cartilage-type proteoglycans. This paper provides evidence that chondrocytes synthesize the appropriate proteoglycan matrix under TGF-beta 1 stimulation: (1) there is a coordinated increase in hyaluronic acid and proteoglycan monomer synthesis, (2) link-stable proteoglycan aggregates are assembled, (3) the hybrid chondroitin sulfate/keratan sulfate monomeric species is synthesized, and (4) there is an increase in protein core synthesis. Some variation in glycosylation patterns was observed when proteoglycans synthesized under TGF-beta 1 stimulation were compared to those synthesized under basal conditions. Thus comparing TGF-beta 1 to basal samples respectively, the monomers were larger (Kav on Sepharose CL-2B = 0.29 vs 0.41), the chondroitin sulfate chains were longer by approximately 3.5 kDa, the percentage of total glycosaminoglycan in keratan sulfate increased slightly from approximately 4% (basal) to approximately 6%, and the unsulfated disaccharide decreased from 28% (basal) to 12%. All of these variations are in the direction of a more anionic proteoglycan. Since the ability of proteoglycans to confer resiliency to the cartilage matrix is directly related to their anionic nature, these changes would presumably have a beneficial effect on tissue function.

  15. Characterization and Localization of Citrullinated Proteoglycan Aggrecan in Human Articular Cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Glant, Tibor T.; Ocsko, Timea; Markovics, Adrienn; Szekanecz, Zoltan; Katz, Robert S.; Rauch, Tibor A.; Mikecz, Katalin

    2016-01-01

    Background Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disease of the synovial joints. The autoimmune character of RA is underscored by prominent production of autoantibodies such as those against IgG (rheumatoid factor), and a broad array of joint tissue-specific and other endogenous citrullinated proteins. Anti-citrullinated protein antibodies (ACPA) can be detected in the sera and synovial fluids of RA patients and ACPA seropositivity is one of the diagnostic criteria of RA. Studies have demonstrated that RA T cells respond to citrullinated peptides (epitopes) of proteoglycan (PG) aggrecan, which is one of the most abundant macromolecules of articular cartilage. However, it is not known if the PG molecule is citrullinated in vivo in human cartilage, and if so, whether citrulline-containing neoepitopes of PG (CitPG) can contribute to autoimmunity in RA. Methods CitPG was detected in human cartilage extracts using ACPA+ RA sera in dot blot and Western blot. Citrullination status of in vitro citrullinated recombinant G1 domain of human PG (rhG1) was confirmed by antibody-based and chemical methods, and potential sites of citrullination in rhG1 were explored by molecular modeling. CitPG-specific serum autoantibodies were quantified by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, and CitPG was localized in osteoarthritic (OA) and RA cartilage using immunohistochemistry. Findings Sera from ACPA+ RA patients reacted with PG purified from normal human cartilage specimens. PG fragments (mainly those containing the G1 domain) from OA or RA cartilage extracts were recognized by ACPA+ sera but not by serum from ACPA- individuals. ACPA+ sera also reacted with in vitro citrullinated rhG1 and G3 domain-containing fragment(s) of PG. Molecular modeling suggested multiple sites of potential citrullination within the G1 domain. The immunohistochemical localization of CitPG was different in OA and RA cartilage. Conclusions CitPG is a new member of citrullinated proteins identified in human

  16. Giant Subclavian Artery Aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Counts, Sarah; Zeeshan, Ahmad; Elefteriades, John

    2016-06-01

    We report the case of a 37-year-old construction executive presenting with chest pain, shortness of breath, and dizziness on exertion secondary to a giant left subclavian artery aneurysm and aortic valvular disease. PMID:27231430

  17. Giant distal humeral geode.

    PubMed

    Maher, M M; Kennedy, J; Hynes, D; Murray, J G; O'Connell, D

    2000-03-01

    We describe the imaging features of a giant geode of the distal humerus in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis, which presented initially as a pathological fracture. The value of magnetic resonance imaging in establishing this diagnosis is emphasized. PMID:10794554

  18. The Giant Cell.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stockdale, Dennis

    1998-01-01

    Provides directions for the construction of giant plastic cells, including details for building and installing the organelles. Also contains instructions for preparing the ribosomes, nucleolus, nucleus, and mitochondria. (DDR)

  19. The Next Giant Step

    NASA Video Gallery

    Artist Robert McCall painted "The Next Giant Step" in 1979 to commemorate the heroism and courage of spaceflight pioneers. Located in the lobby of Johnson's building 2, the mural depicts America's ...

  20. Short technical reports. Modification of the TRI reagent procedure for isolation of RNA from polysaccharide- and proteoglycan-rich sources.

    PubMed

    Chomczynski, P; Mackey, K

    1995-12-01

    A modification of the TRI Reagent procedure has been elaborated for isolation of RNA from polysaccharide- and proteoglycan-rich material. In the modified procedure, RNA is precipitated from the aqueous phase by the combined action of isopropanol and a high-salt concentration. Under these conditions, RNA is effectively precipitated while contaminating polysaccharides and proteoglycans remain in the soluble form. The modified precipitation does not prolong or increase the complexity of the TRI Reagent procedure. The new procedure was tested by isolation of RNA from polysaccharide- and proteoglycan-rich tissues such as rat liver and aorta. PMID:8747660

  1. The Wingless morphogen gradient is established by the cooperative action of Frizzled and Heparan Sulfate Proteoglycan receptors.

    PubMed

    Baeg, Gyeong-Hun; Selva, Erica M; Goodman, Robyn M; Dasgupta, Ramanuj; Perrimon, Norbert

    2004-12-01

    We have examined the respective contribution of Heparan Sulfate Proteoglycans (HSPGs) and Frizzled (Fz) proteins in the establishment of the Wingless (Wg) morphogen gradient. From the analysis of mutant clones of sulfateless/N-deacetylase-sulphotransferase in the wing imaginal disc, we find that lack of Heparan Sulfate (HS) causes a dramatic reduction of both extracellular and intracellular Wg in receiving cells. Our studies, together with others [Kirkpatrick, C.A., Dimitroff, B.D., Rawson, J.M., Selleck, S.B., 2004. Spatial regulation of Wingless morphogen distribution and signalling by Dally-like protein. Dev. Cell (in press)], reveals that the Glypican molecule Dally-like Protein (Dlp) is associated with both negative and positive roles in Wg short- and long-range signaling, respectively. In addition, analyses of the two Fz proteins indicate that the Fz and DFz2 receptors, in addition to transducing the signal, modulate the slope of the Wg gradient by regulating the amount of extracellular Wg. Taken together, our analysis illustrates how the coordinated activities of HSPGs and Fz/DFz2 shape the Wg morphogen gradient. PMID:15531366

  2. Transcriptional regulation of Proteoglycan 4 (PRG4) by 17β-estradiol in immortalized baboon temporomandibular joint disc cells

    PubMed Central

    McDaniel, Jennifer S.; Babu, Ramya Akula Suresh; Navarro, Mary M.; LeBaron, Richard G.

    2015-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint disorders (TMDs) affect a significant portion of the U.S. population with the majority seeking treatment being women of childbearing age. Due to this striking sexual dimorphism it has been postulated that there is a role for sex hormones in the maintenance of normal temporomandibular joint (TMJ) function. Proteoglycan 4 (PRG4) is a secreted lubricating molecule required for maintaining low frictional levels within articular joints, however its role in the TMJ is not well characterized. In this study we describe the development of immortalized baboon cells isolated from specific regions of the TMJ disc and their use in the investigation of PRG4 expression and localization patterns in the TMJ. We identified conserved estrogen response elements within the 5′ flanking region of the PRG4 gene of several species, and found that treatment of baboon TMJ disc cells with estrogen led to reduced PRG4 promoter activity and mRNA expression in vitro. The observed negative regulation of PRG4 by estrogen could lead to increased friction and degradation of joint components over time. This study, for the first time, provides evidence of the regulatory potential of estrogen on PRG4 gene expression and suggests a novel etiology for the gender disparity observed among TMD patients. PMID:24621258

  3. Basement membrane heparan sulfate proteoglycan (perlecan) synthesized by ACC3, adenoid cystic carcinoma cells of human salivary gland origin.

    PubMed

    Kimura, S; Cheng, J; Toyoshima, K; Oda, K; Saku, T

    1999-02-01

    The biosynthesis of basement membrane heparan sulfate proteoglycan (HSPG), known as perlecan, in ACC3 cells established from a adenoid cystic carcinoma of the human salivary gland was studied using metabolic labeling and immunoprecipitation with discriminative antibodies specific for HSPG core protein. Treatment of immunoprecipitated HSPG with HNO2, heparitinase, and chondroitinase ABC revealed that ACC3 cells synthesized HSPG molecules composed of 470-kDa core protein and heparan sulfate but not of chondroitin sulfate. The core protein was shown to contain complex type N-linked oligosaccharides by digestion with N-glycanase and endoglycosidase H. Pulse-chase experiments showed that the mature form of HSPG was formed in the cells in 30 min and released into the medium thereafter. Degradation of HSPG was also found in the chase period of 3 h. In time course experiments, HSPG was found to be synthesized maximally at day 4 after plating, deposited in the cell layer maximally at day 6, and secreted maximally at day 8. This was also confirmed by immunofluorescence, Northern blotting, and in-situ hybridization. The results indicate that ACC3 cells synthesize, secrete and degrade basement membrane type HSPG, which is analogous to those produced by other cell types, and that the biosynthesis and secretion of HSPG in ACC3 cells are strictly regulated by the cell growth, that may be reflected in the characteristic histology of adenoid cystic carcinomas. PMID:9990141

  4. Fatal canine distemper virus infection of giant pandas in China.

    PubMed

    Feng, Na; Yu, Yicong; Wang, Tiecheng; Wilker, Peter; Wang, Jianzhong; Li, Yuanguo; Sun, Zhe; Gao, Yuwei; Xia, Xianzhu

    2016-01-01

    We report an outbreak of canine distemper virus (CDV) infection among endangered giant pandas (Ailuropoda melanoleuca). Five of six CDV infected giant pandas died. The surviving giant panda was previously vaccinated against CDV. Genomic sequencing of CDV isolated from one of the infected pandas (giant panda/SX/2014) suggests it belongs to the Asia-1 cluster. The hemagglutinin protein of the isolated virus and virus sequenced from lung samples originating from deceased giant pandas all possessed the substitutions V26M, T213A, K281R, S300N, P340Q, and Y549H. The presence of the Y549H substitution is notable as it is found at the signaling lymphocytic activation molecule (SLAM) receptor-binding site and has been implicated in the emergence of highly pathogenic CDV and host switching. These findings demonstrate that giant pandas are susceptible to CDV and suggest that surveillance and vaccination among all captive giant pandas are warranted to support conservation efforts for this endangered species. PMID:27310722

  5. Fatal canine distemper virus infection of giant pandas in China

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Na; Yu, Yicong; Wang, Tiecheng; Wilker, Peter; Wang, Jianzhong; Li, Yuanguo; Sun, Zhe; Gao, Yuwei; Xia, Xianzhu

    2016-01-01

    We report an outbreak of canine distemper virus (CDV) infection among endangered giant pandas (Ailuropoda melanoleuca). Five of six CDV infected giant pandas died. The surviving giant panda was previously vaccinated against CDV. Genomic sequencing of CDV isolated from one of the infected pandas (giant panda/SX/2014) suggests it belongs to the Asia-1 cluster. The hemagglutinin protein of the isolated virus and virus sequenced from lung samples originating from deceased giant pandas all possessed the substitutions V26M, T213A, K281R, S300N, P340Q, and Y549H. The presence of the Y549H substitution is notable as it is found at the signaling lymphocytic activation molecule (SLAM) receptor-binding site and has been implicated in the emergence of highly pathogenic CDV and host switching. These findings demonstrate that giant pandas are susceptible to CDV and suggest that surveillance and vaccination among all captive giant pandas are warranted to support conservation efforts for this endangered species. PMID:27310722

  6. Decreased elastic fibers and increased proteoglycans in the ligamentum flavum of patients with lumbar spinal canal stenosis.

    PubMed

    Yabe, Yutaka; Hagiwara, Yoshihiro; Tsuchiya, Masahiro; Honda, Masahito; Hatori, Kouki; Sonofuchi, Kazuaki; Kanazawa, Kenji; Koide, Masashi; Sekiguchi, Takuya; Itaya, Nobuyuki; Itoi, Eiji

    2016-07-01

    Elastic fibers and proteoglycans are major components of the extracellular matrix and their changes have been reported in some pathological conditions. Further, recent studies have indicated that some glycosaminoglycans and proteoglycans inhibit elastic fiber assembly. The purpose of this study was to investigate changes of the elastic fibers and proteoglycans in the ligamentum flavum and analyze their relationships to thickening of the ligamentum flavum from lumbar spinal canal stenosis (LSCS). Ligamentum flavum samples were collected from 20 patients with LSCS (thickened flavum group) and 10 patients with lumbar disc herniation (non-thickened flavum group) as a control. Elastica-Masson staining and alcian blue staining were used to compare the relationship between the changes in the elastic fibers and proteoglycans. Gene and protein expressions of the elastic fibers and proteoglycans were analyzed by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry. Histological changes indicated that proteoglycans mainly increased on the dorsal side of the ligamentum flavum in accordance with the decreased elastic fibers in the thickened flavum group. The gene and protein expressions of fibrillin-2 and DANCE were significantly lower and decorin, lumican, osteoglycin, and versican were significantly higher in the thickened flavum group. Our study shows that elastic fibers decrease and proteoglycans increase in the thickened ligamentum flavum. Decreased gene expression of elastogenesis and disrupted elastic fiber assembly caused by increased proteoglycans may lead to a loss of elasticity in the thickened ligamentum flavum. Decreased elasticity may cause buckling of the tissue, which leads to thickening of the ligamentum flavum. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 34:1241-1247, 2016. PMID:26679090

  7. Distinct Secondary Structures of the Leucine-Rich Repeat Proteoglycans Decorin and Biglycan: Glycosylation-Dependent Conformational Stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krishnan, Priya; Hocking, Anne M.; Scholtz, J. Martin; Pace, C. Nick; Holik, Kimberly K.; McQuillan, David J.

    1998-01-01

    Biglycan and decorin, closely related small leucine-rich repeat proteoglycans, have been overexpressed in eukaryotic cers and two major glycoforms isolated under native conditions: a proteoglycan substituted with glycosaminoglycan chains; and a core protein form secreted devoid of glycosaminoglycans. A comparative biophysical study of these glycoforms has revealed that the overall secondary structures of biglycan and decorin are different. Far-UV Circular Dichroism (CD) spectroscopy of decorin and biglycan proteoglycans indicates that, although they are predominantly Beta-sheet, biglycan has a significantly higher content of alpha-helical structure. Decorin proteoglycan and core protein are very similar, whereas the biglycan core protein exhibits closer similarity to the decorin glycoforms than to. the biglycan proteoglycan form. However, enzymatic removal of the chondroitin sulfate chains from biglycan proteoglycan does not induce a shift to the core protein structure, suggesting that the fmal form is influenced by polysaccharide addition only during biosynthesis. Fluorescence emission spectroscopy demonstrated that the single tryptophan residue, which is at a conserved position at the C-terminal domain of both biglycan and decorin, is found in similar microenvironments. This indicates that at least in this specific domain, the different glycoforms do exhibit apparent conservation of structure. Exposure of decorin and biglycan to 10 M urea resulted in an increase in fluorescent intensity, which indicates that the emission from tryptophan in the native state is quenched. Comparison of urea-induced protein unfolding curves provided further evidence that decorin and biglycan assume different structures in solution. Decorin proteoglycan and core protein unfold in a manner similar to a classic two-state model, in which there is a steep transition to an unfolded state between 1-2 M urea. The biglycan core protein also shows a similar steep transition. However, biglycan

  8. Transmembrane proteoglycans control stretch-activated channels to set cytosolic calcium levels

    PubMed Central

    Gopal, Sandeep; Søgaard, Pernille; Multhaupt, Hinke A.B.; Pataki, Csilla; Okina, Elena; Xian, Xiaojie; Pedersen, Mikael E.; Stevens, Troy; Griesbeck, Oliver; Park, Pyong Woo; Pocock, Roger

    2015-01-01

    Transmembrane heparan sulfate proteoglycans regulate multiple aspects of cell behavior, but the molecular basis of their signaling is unresolved. The major family of transmembrane proteoglycans is the syndecans, present in virtually all nucleated cells, but with mostly unknown functions. Here, we show that syndecans regulate transient receptor potential canonical (TRPCs) channels to control cytosolic calcium equilibria and consequent cell behavior. In fibroblasts, ligand interactions with heparan sulfate of syndecan-4 recruit cytoplasmic protein kinase C to target serine714 of TRPC7 with subsequent control of the cytoskeleton and the myofibroblast phenotype. In epidermal keratinocytes a syndecan–TRPC4 complex controls adhesion, adherens junction composition, and early differentiation in vivo and in vitro. In Caenorhabditis elegans, the TRPC orthologues TRP-1 and -2 genetically complement the loss of syndecan by suppressing neuronal guidance and locomotory defects related to increases in neuronal calcium levels. The widespread and conserved syndecan–TRPC axis therefore fine tunes cytoskeletal organization and cell behavior. PMID:26391658

  9. Concentration profiles of collagen and proteoglycan in articular cartilage by Fourier transform infrared imaging and principal component regression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Jianhua; Xia, Yang; Lu, Mei

    2012-03-01

    Fourier-transform infrared imaging (FT-IRI) technique with the principal component regression (PCR) method was used to quantitatively determine the 2D images and the depth-dependent concentration profiles of two principal macromolecular components (collagen and proteoglycan) in articular cartilage. Ten 6 μm thick sections of canine humeral cartilage were imaged at a pixel size of 6.25 μm in FT-IRI. The infrared spectra extracted from FT-IRI experiments were imported into a PCR program to calculate the quantitative distributions of both collagen and proteoglycan in dry cartilage, which were subsequently converted into the wet-weight based concentration profiles. The proteoglycan profiles by FT-IRI and PCR significantly correlated in linear regression with the proteoglycan profiles by the non-destructive μMRI (the goodness-of-fit 0.96 and the Pearson coefficient 0.98). Based on these concentration relationships, the concentration images of collagen and proteoglycan in both healthy and lesioned articular cartilage were successfully constructed two dimensionally. The simultaneous construction of both collagen and proteoglycan concentration images demonstrates that this combined imaging and chemometrics approach could be used as a sensitive tool to accurately resolve and visualize the concentration distributions of macromolecules in biological tissues.

  10. Salmon cartilage proteoglycan suppresses mouse experimental colitis through induction of Foxp3{sup +} regulatory T cells

    SciTech Connect

    Mitsui, Toshihito; Sashinami, Hiroshi; Sato, Fuyuki; Kijima, Hiroshi; Ishiguro, Yoh; Fukuda, Shinsaku; Yoshihara, Shuichi; Hakamada, Ken-Ichi; Nakane, Akio

    2010-11-12

    Research highlights: {yields} Salmon proteoglycan suppresses IL-10{sup -/-} cell transfer-induced colitis progression. {yields} Salmon proteoglycan suppresses Th1- and Th17-related factors in colitis mice. {yields} Salmon proteoglycan enhances Foxp3 expression. -- Abstract: Proteoglycans (PGs) are complex glycohydrates which are widely distributed in extracellular matrix (ECM). PGs are involved in the construction of ECM, cell proliferation and differentiation. ECM components are involved in transduction of proinflammatory responses, but it is still unknown whether PGs are involved in inflammatory response. In this study, we investigated the effect of PG extracted from salmon cartilage on the progression of experimental colitis-induced in severe combined immunodeficiency mice by cell transfer from interleukin-10 (IL-10){sup -/-} mice. IL-10{sup -/-} cell-transferred mice showed weight loss, colon shortening and histological appearance of mild colitis. Daily oral administration of PG attenuated the clinical progression of colitis in a dose-dependent manner. Colitis-induced mice showed the elevated expression of IFN-{gamma}, IL-12, TNF-{alpha}, IL-21, IL-23p19, IL-6, IL-17A and retinoic acid-related orphan receptor {gamma}t (ROR{gamma}t) in lamina propria mononuclear cells (LPMCs) and oral administration of PG suppressed the expression of these factors. Conversely, expression of Foxp3 that induces CD4{sup +}CD25{sup +} regulatory T cells in LPMCs was enhanced by PG administration. These findings suggested that salmon PG attenuated the progression of colitis due to suppression of inflammatory response by enhancement of regulatory T cell induction.

  11. Preservation of the Structure of Enzymatically-Degraded Bovine Vitreous Using Synthetic Proteoglycan Mimics

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qianru; Filas, Benjamen A.; Roth, Robyn; Heuser, John; Ma, Nan; Sharma, Shaili; Panitch, Alyssa; Beebe, David C.; Shui, Ying-Bo

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. Vitreous liquefaction and subsequent posterior vitreous detachment can lead to several sight-threatening diseases, including retinal detachment, macular hole and macular traction syndrome, nuclear cataracts, and possibly, open-angle glaucoma. In this study, we tested the ability of three novel synthetic chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan mimics to preserve the structure and physical properties of enzymatically-degraded bovine vitreous. Methods. Chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan mimics, designed to bind to type II collagen, hyaluronic acid, or both, were applied to trypsin- or collagenase-treated bovine vitreous in situ and in vitro. Rheology and liquefaction tests were performed to determine the physical properties of the vitreous, while Western blots were used to detect the presence and degradation of soluble collagen II (α1). Deep-etch electron microscopy (DEEM) identified the ultrastructure of mimic-treated and untreated enzyme-degraded bovine vitreous. Results. Proteoglycan mimics preserved the physical properties of trypsin-degraded bovine vitreous and protected against vitreous liquefaction. Although the collagen-binding mimic maintained the physical properties of collagenase-treated vitreous, liquefaction still occurred. Western blots indicated that the mimic provided only marginal protective ability against soluble collagen degradation. Deep-etch electron microscopy, however, showed increased density and isotropy of microstructural components in mimic-treated vitreous, supporting the initial result that vitreous structure was preserved. Conclusions. Proteoglycan mimics preserved bovine vitreous physical properties after enzymatic degradation. These compounds may be useful in delaying or preventing the pathological effects of age-related, or enzymatically-induced, degradation of the vitreous body. PMID:25342623

  12. Characterization of proteoglycans isolated from associative extracts of human articular cartilage.

    PubMed Central

    Vilím, V; Fosang, A J

    1993-01-01

    Approx. 10% of the total proteoglycan content of normal young human articular cartilage was extracted under associative conditions with Dulbecco's PBS. Proteoglycans isolated from the extract by Q-Sepharose chromatography were separated by gel chromatography and characterized by gradient gel SDS/PAGE and immunoblotting. Three species of small proteoglycans, two main populations of aggrecan and a population of its smaller fragments were identified. The major populations of aggrecan contained chondroitin sulphate chains, all or part of the N-terminal G1 and G2 domains and, therefore, intact keratan sulphate domains. The larger population was estimated by gradient SDS/PAGE to have a molecular mass of approx. 600 kDa or greater. The second population had an apparent molecular mass of approx. 300-600 kDa. Core proteins derived from these populations of proteoglycans separated on SDS/PAGE into several clusters of bands in the range from 120 to approx. 360 kDa. The extract further contained smaller fragments which lacked chondroitin sulphate but reacted with antibodies against keratan sulphate, and against epitopes present in the G2 domain of aggrecan. The presence of the G2 domain in a broad range of populations of decreasing size indicated extensive cleavage of the aggrecan core protein within its chondroitin sulphate domain. These findings suggest that fragmentation of aggrecan probably occurs in vivo in normal articular cartilage of young individuals. Associative extracts also contained decorin, biglycan and fibromodulin. These were resolved from aggrecan by gel chromatography and identified by immunodetection. Images Figure 2 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:8328959

  13. Ultrastructure of unstained, hydrated proteoglycan aggregates and monomer: a new method of imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Panessa, B J; Hoffman, P; Warren, J B; McCorkle, R A; Coleman, G

    1980-01-01

    The application of a new method for imaging delicate hydrated biological materials is reported, and the structure of isolated proteoglycan aggregates and monomer is demonstrated at better than 30 nm resolution. This new method for high resolution examination of labile hydrated biological materials, employing a wet cell and pulsed plasma x-ray source, permits short exposure times, minimal specimen damage, and sufficient radiation dosages for imaging. (ERB)

  14. Diabetes induces stromal remodelling and increase in chondroitin sulphate proteoglycans of the rat ventral prostate

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, Daniele Lisboa; Taboga, Sebastião Roberto; Góes, Rejane Maira

    2009-01-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) remodelling is an important process involved in prostate cancer progression. Alterations in ECM caused by diabetes in different tissues such as kidney is well described; however, it is poorly investigated in prostate. The aim of this study was to evaluate changes in ECM of rat prostate showing gland atrophy caused by diabetes and their implications in development of malignant lesions. Diabetes was induced in Wistar rats using alloxan (45 mg/kg bw). After 90 days of diabetes onset, animals were killed and ventral prostate was removed and prepared for light microscopy following immunoreaction for fibronectin, chondroitin sulphate and Picrossirius staining for collagen fibres. Proteoglycans (PG) were identified at transmission electron microscopy after fixation with Cuprolinic Blue. Diabetes led to a thickening of 25% in the acinar basement membrane accompanied by increase and disorganization of its proteoglycans (P1). Three additional populations of prostatic stromal PGs were identified: collagen fibril linked (P2) and interstitial (P3) and (P4) PGs. Diabetes increased P3 and mainly P4 which had higher dimension and accumulated around the smooth muscle cells. In addition, an increase in chondrotin sulphate (33%, mainly in sites where P4 were noted) and collagen (44%) was noted in diabetic rats, whereas fibronectin did not change. Atrophic changes observed in rat ventral prostate after diabetes are accompanied by stromal remodelation related to increase in collagen and chondroitin sulphate proteoglycans. Thus, diabetes can promote a stromal microenvironment rich in elements that could favour cell migration, proliferation and pathological process. PMID:19659898

  15. An Innocent Giant

    PubMed Central

    Solanki, Lakhan Singh; Dhingra, Mandeep; Raghubanshi, Gunjan; Thami, Gurvinder Pal

    2014-01-01

    A cutaneous horn (cornu cutaneum) is a protrusion from the skin composed of a cornified material. It may be associated with a benign, premalignant, or malignant lesion at the base, masking numerous dermatoses. In a 24-year-old female, a giant cutaneous horn arising from a seborrheic keratosis located on the leg is presented. This case has been reported to emphasize that a giant cutaneous horn may also occur in young patients, even in photoprotected areas, and are not always associated with malignancy. PMID:25484426

  16. Giant perigenital seborrheic keratosis.

    PubMed

    Bandyopadhyay, Debabrata; Saha, Abanti; Mishra, Vivek

    2015-01-01

    Seborrheic keratosis (SK) is a very common benign epidermal proliferation that is prevalent in all races. Most commonly occurring on the trunk, face, scalp, and the extremities, they can occur anywhere on the body except the palms and soles. The most common appearance is that of a very superficial verrucous plaque which appears to be stuck on the surface. Giant lesions are very rare, and their location on the genital area is rarer still. We report here a case of multiple giant SK lesions in a 59-year-old man. PMID:25657917

  17. Giant perigenital seborrheic keratosis

    PubMed Central

    Bandyopadhyay, Debabrata; Saha, Abanti; Mishra, Vivek

    2015-01-01

    Seborrheic keratosis (SK) is a very common benign epidermal proliferation that is prevalent in all races. Most commonly occurring on the trunk, face, scalp, and the extremities, they can occur anywhere on the body except the palms and soles. The most common appearance is that of a very superficial verrucous plaque which appears to be stuck on the surface. Giant lesions are very rare, and their location on the genital area is rarer still. We report here a case of multiple giant SK lesions in a 59-year-old man. PMID:25657917

  18. Molecule nanoweaver

    DOEpatents

    Gerald, II; Rex E.; Klingler, Robert J.; Rathke, Jerome W.; Diaz, Rocio; Vukovic, Lela

    2009-03-10

    A method, apparatus, and system for constructing uniform macroscopic films with tailored geometric assemblies of molecules on the nanometer scale. The method, apparatus, and system include providing starting molecules of selected character, applying one or more force fields to the molecules to cause them to order and condense with NMR spectra and images being used to monitor progress in creating the desired geometrical assembly and functionality of molecules that comprise the films.

  19. Characterization of epiphycan, a small proteoglycan with a leucine-rich repeat core protein.

    PubMed

    Johnson, H J; Rosenberg, L; Choi, H U; Garza, S; Höök, M; Neame, P J

    1997-07-25

    The epiphysis of developing bones is a cartilaginous structure that is eventually replaced by bone during skeletal maturation. We have separated a dermatan sulfate proteoglycan, epiphycan, from decorin and biglycan by using dissociative extraction of bovine fetal epiphyseal cartilage, followed by sequential ion-exchange, gel permeation, hydrophobic, and Zn2+ chelate chromatographic steps. Epiphycan is a member of the small leucine-rich proteoglycan family, contains seven leucine-rich repeats (LRRs), is related to osteoglycin (osteoinductive factor) (Bentz, H., Nathan, R. M., Rosen, D. M., Armstrong, R. M., Thompson, A. Y., Segarini, P. R., Mathews, M. C., Dasch, J., Piez, K. A., and Seyedin, S. M. (1989) J. Biol. Chem. 264, 20805-20810), and appears to be the bovine equivalent of the chick proteoglycan PG-Lb (Shinomura, T., and Kimata, K. (1992) J. Biol. Chem. 267, 1265-1270). The intact proteoglycan had a median size of approximately 133 kDa. The core protein was 46 kDa by electrophoretic analysis, had a calculated size of 34,271 Da, and had two approximately equimolar N termini (APTLES ... and ETYDAT ... ) separated by 11 amino acids. There were at least three O-linked oligosaccharides in the N-terminal region of the protein, based on blank cycles in Edman degradation and corresponding serine or threonine residues in the translated cDNA sequence. The glycosaminoglycans ranged in size from 23 to 34 kDa were more heterogeneous than those in other dermatan sulfate small leucine-rich proteoglycans and were found in the acidic N-terminal region of the protein core, N-terminal to the LRRs. A four-cysteine cluster was present at the N terminus of the LRRs, and a disulfide-bonded cysteine pair was present at the C terminus of the protein core. The seventh LRR and an N-linked oligosaccharide were between the two C-terminal cysteines. An additional potential N-glycosylation site near the C terminus did not appear to be substituted at a significant level. PMID:9228042

  20. Electroluminescence of Giant Stretchability.

    PubMed

    Yang, Can Hui; Chen, Baohong; Zhou, Jinxiong; Chen, Yong Mei; Suo, Zhigang

    2016-06-01

    A new type of electroluminescent device achieves giant stretchability by integrating electronic and ionic components. The device uses phosphor powders as electroluminescent materials, and hydrogels as stretchable and transparent ionic conductors. Subject to cyclic voltage, the phosphor powders luminesce, but the ionic conductors do not electrolyze. The device produces constant luminance when stretched up to an area strain of 1500%. PMID:26610277

  1. A giant ureteric calculus

    PubMed Central

    Rathod, Rajiv; Bansal, Prashant; Gutta, Srinivas

    2013-01-01

    Ureteric stones are usually small and symptomatic. We present a case of a 35-year old female who presented with minimally symptomatic right distal ureteric calculus with proximal hydroureteronephrosis. Laparoscopic right ureterolithotomy was performed and a giant ureteric calculus measuring 11 cm Χ 1.5 cm, weighing 40 g was retrieved. PMID:24082453

  2. Giant urethral calculus

    PubMed Central

    Kotkar, Kunal; Thakkar, Ravi; Songra, MC

    2011-01-01

    Primary urethral calculus is rarely seen and is usually encountered in men with urethral stricture or diverticulum. We present a case of giant urethral calculus secondary to a urethral stricture in a man. The patient was treated with calculus extraction with end to end urethroplasty. PMID:24950400

  3. Juvenile giant fibroadenoma

    PubMed Central

    Yagnik, Vipul D.

    2011-01-01

    Fibroadenomas are benign solid tumor associated with aberration of normal lobular development. Juvenile giant fibroadenoma is usually single and >5 cm in size /or >500 gms in weight. Important differential diagnoses are: phyllodes tumor and juvenile gigantomastia. Simple excision is the treatment of choice. PMID:24765310

  4. A giant ureteric calculus.

    PubMed

    Rathod, Rajiv; Bansal, Prashant; Gutta, Srinivas

    2013-07-01

    Ureteric stones are usually small and symptomatic. We present a case of a 35-year old female who presented with minimally symptomatic right distal ureteric calculus with proximal hydroureteronephrosis. Laparoscopic right ureterolithotomy was performed and a giant ureteric calculus measuring 11 cm Χ 1.5 cm, weighing 40 g was retrieved. PMID:24082453

  5. High-oleic canola oil consumption enriches LDL particle cholesteryl oleate content and reduces LDL proteoglycan binding in humans

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Peter J. H.; MacKay, Dylan. S.; Senanayake, Vijitha K.; Pu, Shuaihua; Jenkins, David J. A.; Connelly, Philip W.; Lamarche, Benoît; Couture, Patrick; Kris-Etherton, Penny M.; West, Sheila G.; Liu, Xiaoran; Fleming, Jennifer A.; Hantgan, Roy R.; Rudel, Lawrence L.

    2015-01-01

    Oleic acid consumption is considered cardio-protective according to studies conducted examining effects of the Mediterranean diet. However, animal models have shown that oleic acid consumption increases LDL particle cholesteryl oleate content which is associated with increased LDL-proteoglycan binding and atherosclerosis. The objective was to examine effects of varying oleic, linoleic and docosahexaenoic acid consumption on human LDL-proteoglycan binding in a non-random subset of the Canola Oil Multi-center Intervention Trial (COMIT) participants. COMIT employed a randomized, double-blind, five-period, cross-over trial design. Three of the treatment oil diets; 1) a blend of corn/safflower oil (25:75); 2) high oleic canola oil; and 3) DHA-enriched high oleic canola oil were selected for analysis of LDL-proteoglycan binding in 50 participants exhibiting good compliance. LDL particles were isolated from frozen plasma by gel filtration chromatography and LDL cholesteryl esters quantified by mass-spectrometry. LDL-proteoglycan binding was assessed using surface plasmon resonance. LDL particle cholesterol ester fatty acid composition was sensitive to the treatment fatty acid compositions, with the main fatty acids in the treatments increasing in the LDL cholesterol esters. The corn/safflower oil and high-oleic canola oil diets lowered LDL-proteoglycan binding relative to their baseline values (p=0.0005 and p=0.0012, respectively). At endpoint, high-oleic canola oil feeding resulted in lower LDL-proteoglycan binding than corn/safflower oil (p=0.0243) and DHA-enriched high oleic canola oil (p=0.0249), although high-oleic canola oil had the lowest binding at baseline (p=0.0344). Our findings suggest that high-oleic canola oil consumption in humans increases cholesteryl oleate percentage in LDL, but in a manner not associated with a rise in LDL-proteoglycan binding. PMID:25528432

  6. High-oleic canola oil consumption enriches LDL particle cholesteryl oleate content and reduces LDL proteoglycan binding in humans.

    PubMed

    Jones, Peter J H; MacKay, Dylan S; Senanayake, Vijitha K; Pu, Shuaihua; Jenkins, David J A; Connelly, Philip W; Lamarche, Benoît; Couture, Patrick; Kris-Etherton, Penny M; West, Sheila G; Liu, Xiaoran; Fleming, Jennifer A; Hantgan, Roy R; Rudel, Lawrence L

    2015-02-01

    Oleic acid consumption is considered cardio-protective according to studies conducted examining effects of the Mediterranean diet. However, animal models have shown that oleic acid consumption increases LDL particle cholesteryl oleate content which is associated with increased LDL-proteoglycan binding and atherosclerosis. The objective was to examine effects of varying oleic, linoleic and docosahexaenoic acid consumption on human LDL-proteoglycan binding in a non-random subset of the Canola Oil Multi-center Intervention Trial (COMIT) participants. COMIT employed a randomized, double-blind, five-period, cross-over trial design. Three of the treatment oil diets: 1) a blend of corn/safflower oil (25:75); 2) high oleic canola oil; and 3) DHA-enriched high oleic canola oil were selected for analysis of LDL-proteoglycan binding in 50 participants exhibiting good compliance. LDL particles were isolated from frozen plasma by gel filtration chromatography and LDL cholesteryl esters quantified by mass-spectrometry. LDL-proteoglycan binding was assessed using surface plasmon resonance. LDL particle cholesterol ester fatty acid composition was sensitive to the treatment fatty acid compositions, with the main fatty acids in the treatments increasing in the LDL cholesterol esters. The corn/safflower oil and high-oleic canola oil diets lowered LDL-proteoglycan binding relative to their baseline values (p = 0.0005 and p = 0.0012, respectively). At endpoint, high-oleic canola oil feeding resulted in lower LDL-proteoglycan binding than corn/safflower oil (p = 0.0243) and DHA-enriched high oleic canola oil (p = 0.0249), although high-oleic canola oil had the lowest binding at baseline (p = 0.0344). Our findings suggest that high-oleic canola oil consumption in humans increases cholesteryl oleate percentage in LDL, but in a manner not associated with a rise in LDL-proteoglycan binding. PMID:25528432

  7. Development of an enzyme immunoassay specific for a core protein epitope of a novel small basement membrane associated heparan sulphate proteoglycan from human kidney.

    PubMed

    Stöcker, G; Stickeler, E; Switalla, S; Fischer, D C; Greiling, H; Haubeck, H D

    1997-02-01

    Heparan sulphate proteoglycans are major components of the glomerular basement membrane and play a key role in their molecular organization and function. Moreover, their presence is essential for the maintenance of the selective permeability of the glomerular basement membrane. Recently, we have isolated and characterized a novel, small basement membrane associated heparan sulphate proteoglycan from human aorta and kidney. Using specific monoclonal antibodies we have shown that the novel heparan sulphate proteoglycan is predominantly located in the glomerular basement membrane, to a lesser extent in the basement membrane of tubuli, and also in the mesangium. Turnover or, in the course of kidney diseases, degradation of heparan sulphate proteoglycan from glomerular basement membranes may lead to urinary excretion of heparan sulphate proteoglycan. Therefore, changes in the structure and function of glomerular basement membranes may be directly detected by measuring the excretion of a component of this basement menbrane, e. g. heparan sulphate proteoglycan into urine. Here we describe the establishment of an enzyme immunoassay for the sensitive detection of the novel, small heparan sulphate proteoglycan in urine. In this assay the specific monoclonal antibody 1F10/B8, which recognizes a core protein epitope, was used to detect the polyanionic heparan sulphate proteoglycan bound to the surface of a cationic charge modified microtitre plate. This assay allows the sensitive and specific detection of the small heparan sulphate proteoglycan, which is released from the glomerular basement membrane into urine during normal turnover and also in the course of kidney diseases. PMID:9056750

  8. Heparan sulphate proteoglycans in glia and in the normal and injured CNS: expression of sulphotransferases and changes in sulphation.

    PubMed

    Properzi, Francesca; Lin, Rachel; Kwok, Jessica; Naidu, Murali; van Kuppevelt, Toin H; Ten Dam, Gerdy B; Camargo, Luiz M; Raha-Chowdhury, Ruma; Furukawa, Yoko; Mikami, Tadahisa; Sugahara, Kazuyuki; Fawcett, James W

    2008-02-01

    Heparan sulphate proteoglycans (HSPGs) have multiple functions relevant to the control of the CNS injury response, particularly in modulating the effects of growth factors and localizing molecules that affect axon growth. We examined the pattern of expression and glycanation of HSPGs in the normal and damaged CNS, and in astrocytes and oligodendrocyte precursors because of their participation in the injury reaction. The composition of HS glycosaminoglycan (GAG) chains was analysed by biochemical analysis and by the binding of antibodies that recognize sulphated epitopes. We also measured levels of HS sulphotransferases and syndecans. Compared with oligodendrocytes, oligodendrocyte precursors have more 2-O-sulphation in their HS GAG. This is accompanied by higher expression of the enzyme responsible for 2-O-sulphation, HS 2-O-sulphotransferase (HS2ST) and a fall in syndecan-1. Astrocytes treated with tumour growth factor (TGF)alpha or TGFbeta to mimic the injury response showed upregulation of syndecan-1 and HS2ST correlating with an increase in 2-O-sulphate residues in their HS GAGs. This also correlated with increased staining with AO4B08 anti-GAG antibody that recognizes high sulphation, and reduced staining with RB4EA12 recognizing low sulphation. After injury to the adult rat brain there was an overall increase in the quantity of HSPG around the injury site, mRNA for HS2ST was increased, and the changes in staining with sulphation-specific antibodies were consistent with an increase in 2-O-sulphated HS. Syndecan-1 was upregulated in astrocytes. The major injury-related change, seen in injured brain and cultured glia, was an increase in 2-O-sulphated HS and increased syndecan-1, suggesting novel approaches to modulating scar formation. PMID:18279312

  9. Metabolic and structural changes in newly synthesized proteoglycans induced by implantation of a polyethylene sheet in the rabbit knee joint.

    PubMed

    Ribault, D; Garcia, F; Riera, H; Mritovic, D R

    1993-07-01

    A sheet of polyethylene was surgically implanted in a rabbit right patello-femoral joint and changes in the structure and chemical composition of newly synthesized articular cartilage proteoglycans (PGs) were studied 1 month after surgery. The articular cartilage from implanted and sham-operated control knee joints was labeled in vitro with 3H-glycine and 35S-SO4 and then extracted with 4 M guanidinium chloride (GuHCl) solution. Labeled extracts were analyzed by dissociative CsCl gradient centrifugation and by Sepharose CL-2B column chromatography. The labeled glycosaminoglycan side chains were analyzed by Sephadex G-200 column chromatography and specific enzymatic digestions. Compared with sham-operation, the trochlear articular cartilage of operated joints incorporated more 35S-SO4 and 3H-glycine into newly synthesized PGs and proteins. It also synthesized a higher proportion of extractable, hydrodynamically large and high density 35S-PG monomers with increased proportion of molecules, able to interact with exogeneous hyaluronan (HA). The fibro-cartilagenous 'osteo-chondrophytic' spurs, compared with trochlear hyaline articular cartilages, incorporated less 35S-SO4 and 3H-glycine and synthesized less extractable high density 35S-PG monomers able to interact with exogenous HA. Their 35S-GAG side chains were more heterogeneous and segregated into three distinct peaks as shown by Sephadex G-200 column chromatography. The results of the present studies demonstrate that, in response to the implant, there was an increase in the biosynthetic capacity of chondrocytes which synthetized larger PG monomers able to interact wih HA. PMID:15449426

  10. Alterations in chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan expression occur both at and far from the site of spinal contusion injury

    PubMed Central

    Andrews, Ellen M.; Richards, Rebekah J.; Yin, Feng Q.; Viapiano, Mariano S.; Jakeman, Lyn B.

    2011-01-01

    Chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPGs) present an inhibitory barrier to axonal growth and plasticity after trauma to the central nervous system. These extracellular and membrane bound molecules are altered after spinal cord injuries, but the magnitude, time course, and patterns of expression following contusion injury have not been fully described. Western blots and immunohistochemistry were combined to assess the expression of four classically inhibitory CSPGs, aggrecan, neurocan, brevican and NG2, at the lesion site and in distal segments of cervical and thoracic spinal cord at 3, 7, 14 and 28 days following a severe mid-thoracic spinal contusion. Total neurocan and the full-length (250 kDa) isoform were strongly upregulated both at the lesion epicenter and in cervical and lumbar segments. In contrast, aggrecan and brevican were sharply reduced at the injury site and were unchanged in distal segments. Total NG2 protein was unchanged across the injury site, while NG2+ profiles were distributed throughout the lesion site by 14 days post-injury (dpi). Far from the lesion, NG2 expression was increased at lumbar, but not cervical spinal cord levels. To determine if the robust increase in neurocan at the distal spinal cord levels corresponded to regions of increased astrogliosis, neurocan and GFAP immunoreactivity were measured in gray and white matter regions of the spinal enlargements. GFAP antibodies revealed a transient increase in reactive astrocyte staining in cervical and lumbar cord, peaking at 14 dpi. In contrast, neurocan immunoreactivity was specifically elevated in the cervical dorsal columns and in the lumbar ventral horn and remained high through 28 dpi. The long lasting increase of neurocan in gray matter regions at distal levels of the spinal cord may contribute to the restriction of plasticity in the chronic phase after SCI. Thus, therapies targeted at altering this CSPG both at and far from the lesion site may represent a reasonable addition to

  11. Molecules in interstellar clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irvine, W. M.; Hjalmarson, A.; Rydbeck, O. E. H.

    The physical conditions and chemical compositions of the gas in interstellar clouds are reviewed in light of the importance of interstellar clouds for star formation and the origin of life. The Orion A region is discussed as an example of a giant molecular cloud where massive stars are being formed, and it is pointed out that conditions in the core of the cloud, with a kinetic temperature of about 75 K and a density of 100,000-1,000,000 molecules/cu cm, may support gas phase ion-molecule chemistry. The Taurus Molecular Clouds are then considered as examples of cold, dark, relatively dense interstellar clouds which may be the birthplaces of solar-type stars and which have been found to contain the heaviest interstellar molecules yet discovered. The molecular species identified in each of these regions are tabulated, including such building blocks of biological monomers as H2O, NH3, H2CO, CO, H2S, CH3CN and H2, and more complex species such as HCOOCH3 and CH3CH2CN.

  12. Mechanical strain induces specific changes in the synthesis and organization of proteoglycans by vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, R T; Yamamoto, C; Feng, Y; Potter-Perigo, S; Briggs, W H; Landschulz, K T; Turi, T G; Thompson, J F; Libby, P; Wight, T N

    2001-04-27

    In the mechanically active environment of the artery, cells sense mechanical stimuli and regulate extracellular matrix structure. In this study, we explored the changes in synthesis of proteoglycans by vascular smooth muscle cells in response to precisely controlled mechanical strains. Strain increased mRNA for versican (3.2-fold), biglycan (2.0-fold), and perlecan (2.0-fold), whereas decorin mRNA levels decreased to a third of control levels. Strain also increased versican, biglycan, and perlecan core proteins, with a concomitant decrease in decorin core protein. Deformation did not alter the hydrodynamic size of proteoglycans as evidenced by molecular sieve chromatography but increased sulfate incorporation in both chondroitin/dermatan sulfate proteoglycans and heparan sulfate proteoglycans (p < 0.05 for both). Using DNA microarrays, we also identified the gene for the hyaluronan-linking protein TSG6 as mechanically induced in smooth muscle cells. Northern analysis confirmed a 4.0-fold increase in steady state mRNA for TSG6 following deformation. Size exclusion chromatography under associative conditions showed that versican-hyaluronan aggregation was enhanced following deformation. These data demonstrate that mechanical deformation increases specific vascular smooth muscle cell proteoglycan synthesis and aggregation, indicating a highly coordinated extracellular matrix response to biomechanical stimulation. PMID:11278699

  13. Mapping proteoglycan-bound water in cartilage: improved specificity of matrix assessment using multiexponential transverse relaxation analysis

    PubMed Central

    Reiter, David A.; Roque, Remigio A.; Lin, Ping-Chang; Irrechukwu, Onyi; Doty, Stephen; Longo, Dan; Pleshko, Nancy; Spencer, Richard G.

    2012-01-01

    Association of MR parameters with cartilage matrix components remains an area of ongoing investigation. Multiexponential analysis of non-localized transverse relaxation data has previously been used to quantify water compartments associated with matrix macromolecules in cartilage. We extend this to mapping the proteoglycan-bound water fraction (wPG) in cartilage, using mature and young bovine nasal cartilage model systems, towards the goal of matrix component-specific imaging. wPG from mature and young bovine nasal cartilage was 0.3±0.04 and 0.22±0.06, respectively, in agreement with biochemically-derived proteoglycan content and proteoglycan-to-water weight ratios. Fourier transform infrared imaging spectroscopic-derived proteoglycan maps normalized by water content (IR-PGww) showed spatial correspondence with wPG maps. Extensive simulation analysis demonstrated that the accuracy and precision of our determination of wPG was within 2%, which is substantially smaller than the observed tissue differences. Our results demonstrate the feasibility of performing imaging-based multiexponential analysis of transverse relaxation data to map proteoglycan in cartilage. PMID:21264931

  14. [Molecular heterogeneity of proteoglycan aggregates of human hyalin cartilage in normal conditions and in systemic bone dysplasia].

    PubMed

    Feshchenko, S P; Krasnopol'skaia, K D; Rebrin, I A; Rudakov, S S

    1989-01-01

    Components of proteoglycan aggregates of human hyalin cartilage were studied under conditions of normal state and in some forms of osteochondrodysplasia. Extraction of uronic acids and protein from the tissue, amount of fractions and electrophoretic mobility of proteoglycan monomers, rations protein/glycosaminoglycans, keratan sulfate/chondroitin sulfate, a level and type of sulfatation as well as molecular mass of chondroitin sulfate, amino acid composition of rod protein, heterogeneity of binding proteins (concerning their isoelectric points and molecular masses) and immunoreactivity of protein moiety in proteoglycan aggregates were studied in rib cartilage, knee joint and ala ossis ilii. Structural parameters of proteoglycan aggregates proved to be dissimilar and depended on cartilage localization and age of the donors. Impairments in the rate of chondroitin sulfate sulfatation were detected in achondrogenesis of the II type and in diastrophic dysplasia; an extraction ability and amount of proteoglycan fractions, relative content of glycosaminoglycans and binding proteins were altered in some other forms of osteochondrodysplasias. Numerous biochemical markers of extracellular matrix deterioration were detected, which are typical for various morphofunctional alterations in hyalin cartilage--hyperproliferative reactions, tissue prematuration, persistence of the embryonal type of metabolism. PMID:2472707

  15. A giant vesical calculus.

    PubMed

    Rahman, M; Uddin, A; Das, G C; Akanda, N I

    2007-07-01

    Massive or giant vesical calculus is a rare entity in the recent urological practice. Males are affected more than the females. Vesical calculi are usually secondary to bladder outlet obstruction. These patients present with recurrent urinary tract infection, haematuria or with retention of urine. We report a young male patient who presented with defaecatory problems along with other urinary symptoms. The patient having an average built, non diabetic but hypertensive. The stone could be palpated by physical examination. His urea levels were within normal limits but urine examination shows infection. USG reveals bilateral hydronephrosis with multiple stones in both kidneys along with a giant vesical calculus. After controlling urinary infection and hypertention he underwent an open cystolithotomy. During operation digital rectal help was needed to remove the stone as it was adherent with bladder mucosa. Post operative period was uneventful. His urinary output was quite normal and had no defaecatory problems. Patient left the hospital 10 days after operation. PMID:17917633

  16. Release of glomerular heparan-/sup 35/SO/sub 4/ proteoglycan by heparin from glomeruli of streptozocin-induced diabetic rats

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, D.J.; Oegema, T.R. Jr.; Brown, D.M.

    1989-01-01

    Abnormalities in the incorporation of heparan sulfate proteoglycan into the glomerular basement membrane have been implicated in the pathogenesis of various proteinuric states, including diabetes mellitus. To understand further the interactions between proteoglycans and glomerular extracellular matrices, glomeruli were isolated from normal and streptozocin-induced diabetic rats after in vivo exposure to 35S-labeled sulfate and were treated with heparin in vitro. Heparin treatment released a unique heparan sulfate proteoglycan from glomerular cell surface or extracellular matrix proteoglycan receptors. Another, smaller heparan sulfate proteoglycan was the most abundant proteoglycan released into medium and was released constitutively in medium with or without added heparin. While the two heparin-extracted proteoglycans copurified on anion-exchange and gel-filtration chromatographic columns, they were resolved by composite 0.6% agarose--1.8% polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Glomeruli from diabetic rats contained decreased proportions of the heparin-releasable heparan sulfate proteoglycan and more constitutively released heparan sulfate proteoglycan. The apparent molecular weight and intrinsic charge of the heparin-released proteoglycan mixture and the apparent molecular weight and sulfation pattern of their 35S-labeled glycosaminoglycan chains after nitrous acid deaminative cleavage were similar in the two groups. A brief trypsin digestion of heparin-treated glomeruli released proportionately less integral membrane and extracellular matrix 35S-labeled proteoglycans and 35S-labeled glycopeptides from diabetic glomeruli than form control glomeruli. Elution of these 35S-labeled macromolecules from anion-exchange columns and migration in agarose-polyacrylamide gels were similar in the two groups.

  17. Giant cell arteritis

    PubMed Central

    Calvo-Romero, J

    2003-01-01

    Giant cell arteritis (GCA), temporal arteritis or Horton's arteritis, is a systemic vasculitis which involves large and medium sized vessels, especially the extracranial branches of the carotid arteries, in persons usually older than 50 years. Permanent visual loss, ischaemic strokes, and thoracic and abdominal aortic aneurysms are feared complications of GCA. The treatment consists of high dose steroids. Mortality, with a correct treatment, in patients with GCA seems to be similar that of controls. PMID:13679546

  18. Giant dedifferentiated retroperitoneal liposarcoma.

    PubMed

    Dominguez, Elias; Lopez de Cenarruzabeitia, Iñigo; Martinez, Manuel; Rueda, J C; Lede, A; Barreiro, Erica; Diz, Susana

    2008-01-01

    Liposarcoma tumors only represent 0.1% of all cancers, but they are the more common of retroperitoneal sarcomas. It has a great tendency for local recurrence, mainly the dedifferentiated variety, but its complete resection can provide a 5-year survival of 70%. In this report, we present a case of a giant dedifferentiated retroperitoneal liposarcoma that did not affect any neighboring organ and that was successfully treated by means of complete surgical resection. PMID:19731863

  19. Ice Giant Exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rymer, A. M.; Arridge, C. S.; Masters, A.; Turtle, E. P.; Simon, A. A.; Hofstadter, M. D.; Turrini, D.; Politi, R.

    2015-12-01

    The Ice Giants in our solar system, Uranus and Neptune, are fundamentally different from their Gas Giant siblings Jupiter and Saturn, from the different proportions of rock and ice to the configuration of their planetary magnetic fields. Kepler space telescope discoveries of exo-planets indicate that planets of this type are among the most ubiquitous universally and therefore a future mission to explore the nature of the Ice Giants in our own solar system will provide insights into the nature of extra-solar system objects in general. Uranus has the smallest self- luminosity of all the planets, potentially related to catastrophic events early in the planet's history, which also may explain Uranus' large obliquity. Uranus' atmosphere is subject to extreme seasonal forcing making it unique in the Solar System. Neptune is also unique in a number of ways, notably its large moon Triton which is likely a captured Kuiper Belt Object and one of only two moons in the solar system with a robustly collisional atmosphere. Similar to Uranus, the angle between the solar wind and the magnetic dipole axis is subject to large-amplitude variations on both diurnal and seasonal timescales, but peculiarly it has one of the quietest magnetospheres of the solar system, at least according to Voyager 2, the only spacecraft to encounter Neptune to date. A comprehensive mission, as advocated in the Decadal Survey, would provide enormous science return but is also challenging and expensive. In this presentation we will discuss mission scenarios and suggest how collaboration between disciplines and internationally can help us to pursue a mission that includes Ice Giant exploration.

  20. Giant thymic carcinoid.

    PubMed

    John, L C; Hornick, P; Lang, S; Wallis, J; Edmondson, S J

    1991-05-01

    Thymic carcinoid is a rare tumour. It may present with ectopic endocrine secretion or with symptoms of compression as a result of its size. A case is reported which presented with symptoms of compression where the size of the tumour was uniquely large such as to warrant the term giant thymic carcinoid. The typical histological features are described, together with its possible origin and its likely prognosis. PMID:1852667

  1. Giant rodlike reversed micelles

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Z.J.; Neuman, R.D. )

    1994-05-04

    Herein we report that sodium bis(2-ethylhexyl)phosphate, which is similar in structure to the classical surfactant sodium bis(2-ethylhexyl)sulfosuccinate (AOT), forms very large rodlike reversed micelles and that their size can be even much larger if water is removed from the apolar solution. We further suggest that long-range electrostatic interactions are the primary driving force for the formation of giant reversed micelles. 19 refs., 3 figs.

  2. Red giants seismology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosser, B.; Samadi, R.; Belkacem, K.

    2013-11-01

    The space-borne missions CoRoT and Kepler are indiscreet. With their asteroseismic programs, they tell us what is hidden deep inside the stars. Waves excited just below the stellar surface travel throughout the stellar interior and unveil many secrets: how old is the star, how big, how massive, how fast (or slow) its core is dancing. This paper intends to paparazze the red giants according to the seismic pictures we have from their interiors.

  3. Microstructural modeling of collagen network mechanics and interactions with the proteoglycan gel in articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Quinn, T M; Morel, V

    2007-01-01

    Cartilage matrix mechanical function is largely determined by interactions between the collagen fibrillar network and the proteoglycan gel. Although the molecular physics of these matrix constituents have been characterized and modern imaging methods are capable of localized measurement of molecular densities and orientation distributions, theoretical tools for using this information for prediction of cartilage mechanical behavior are lacking. We introduce a means to model collagen network contributions to cartilage mechanics based upon accessible microstructural information (fibril density and orientation distributions) and which self-consistently follows changes in microstructural geometry with matrix deformations. The interplay between the molecular physics of the collagen network and the proteoglycan gel is scaled up to determine matrix material properties, with features such as collagen fibril pre-stress in free-swelling cartilage emerging naturally and without introduction of ad hoc parameters. Methods are developed for theoretical treatment of the collagen network as a continuum-like distribution of fibrils, such that mechanical analysis of the network may be simplified by consideration of the spherical harmonic components of functions of the fibril orientation, strain, and stress distributions. Expressions for the collagen network contributions to matrix stress and stiffness tensors are derived, illustrating that only spherical harmonic components of orders 0 and 2 contribute to the stress, while orders 0, 2, and 4 contribute to the stiffness. Depth- and compression-dependent equilibrium mechanical properties of cartilage matrix are modeled, and advantages of the approach are illustrated by exploration of orientation and strain distributions of collagen fibrils in compressed cartilage. Results highlight collagen-proteoglycan interactions, especially for very small physiological strains where experimental data are relatively sparse. These methods for

  4. In vivo contribution of amino acid sulfur to cartilage proteoglycan sulfation

    PubMed Central

    Pecora, Fabio; Gualeni, Benedetta; Forlino, Antonella; Superti-Furga, Andrea; Tenni, Ruggero; Cetta, Giuseppe; Rossi, Antonio

    2006-01-01

    Cytoplasmic sulfate for sulfation reactions may be derived either from extracellular fluids or from catabolism of sulfur-containing amino acids and other thiols. In vitro studies have pointed out the potential relevance of sulfur-containing amino acids as sources for sulfation when extracellular sulfate concentration is low or when its transport is impaired such as in DTDST [DTD (diastrophic dysplasia) sulfate transporter] chondrodysplasias. In the present study, we have considered the contribution of cysteine and cysteine derivatives to in vivo macromolecular sulfation of cartilage by using the mouse model of DTD we have recently generated [Forlino, Piazza, Tiveron, Della Torre, Tatangelo, Bonafe, Gualeni, Romano, Pecora, Superti-Furga et al. (2005) Hum. Mol. Genet. 14, 859–871]. By intraperitoneal injection of [35S]cysteine in wild-type and mutant mice and determination of the specific activity of the chondroitin 4-sulfated disaccharide in cartilage, we demonstrated that the pathway by which sulfate is recruited from the intracellular oxidation of thiols is active in vivo. To check whether cysteine derivatives play a role, sulfation of cartilage proteoglycans was measured after treatment for 1 week of newborn mutant and wild-type mice with hypodermic NAC (N-acetyl-L-cysteine). The relative amount of sulfated disaccharides increased in mutant mice treated with NAC compared with the placebo group, indicating an increase in proteoglycan sulfation due to NAC catabolism, although pharmacokinetic studies demonstrated that the drug was rapidly removed from the bloodstream. In conclusion, cysteine contribution to cartilage proteoglycan sulfation in vivo is minimal under physiological conditions even if extracellular sulfate availability is low; however, the contribution of thiols to sulfation becomes significant by increasing their plasma concentration. PMID:16719839

  5. The study of optical properties and proteoglycan content of tendons by PS-OCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ying; Rupani, Asha; Weightman, Alan; Wimpenny, Ian; Bagnaninchi, Pierre; Ahearne, Mark

    2011-03-01

    Tendons are load-bearing collagenous tissues consisting mainly of type I collagen and various proteoglycans (PGs) including decorin and versican. It is widely accepted that highly orientated collagen fibers in tendons a play critical role for transferring tensile stress and demonstrate birefringent optical properties. However, the influence that proteoglycans have on the optical properties of tendons is yet to be fully elucidated. Tendinopathy (defined as a syndrome of tendon pain, tenderness and swelling that affects the normal function of the tissue) is a common disease associated with sporting injuries or degeneration. PG's are the essential components of the tendon extracellular matrix; changes in their quantities and compositions have been associated with tendinopathy. In this study, polarization sensitive optical coherence tomography (PS-OCT) has been used to reveal the relationship between proteoglycan content/location and birefringent properties of tendons. Tendons dissected from freshly slaughtered chickens were imaged at regular intervals by PS-OCT and polarizing light microscope during the extraction of PGs or glycosaminoglycans using established protocols (guanidine hydrochloride (GuHCl) or proteinase K solution). The macroscopic and microscopic time lapsed images are complimentary; mutually demonstrating that there was a higher concentration of PG's in the outer sheath region than in the fascicles; and the integrity of the sheath affected extraction process and the OCT birefringence bands. Extraction of PGs using GuHCl disturbed the organization of local collagen bundles, which corresponded to a reduction in the frequency of birefringence bands and the band width by PS-OCT. The feature of OCT penetration depth helped us to define the heterogeneous distribution of PG's in tendon, which was complimented by polarizing light microscopy. The results provide new insight of tendon structure and also demonstrate a great potential for using PS-OCT as a

  6. Cell-surface proteoglycan in sea urchin primary mesenchyme cell migration

    SciTech Connect

    Lane, M.C.

    1989-01-01

    Early in the development of the sea urchin embryo, the primary mesenchyme cells (PMC) migrate along the basal lamina of the blastocoel. Migration is inhibited in L. pictus embryos cultured in sulfate-free seawater and in S. purpuratus embryos exposed to exogenous {beta}-D-xylosides. An in vitro assay was developed to test the migratory capacity of normal PMC on normal and treated blastocoelic matrix. Sulfate deprivation and exposure to exogenous xyloside render PMC nonmotile on either matrix. Materials removed from the surface of normal PMC by treatment with 1 M urea restored migratory ability to defective cells, whereas a similar preparation isolated from the surface of epithelial cells at the same stage did not. Migration also resumed when cells were removed from the xyloside or returned to normal seawater. The urea extract was partially purified and characterized by radiolabeling, gel electrophoresis, fluorography, ion exchange chromatography, and western blotting. The PMC synthesize a large chondroitin sulfate/dermatan sulfate proteoglycan that is present in an active fraction isolated by chromatography. Chondroitinase ABC digestion of live cells blocked migration reversibly, further supporting the identification of the chondroitin sulfate/dermatan sulfate proteoglycan as the active component in the urea extract. Much of the incorporated sulfate was distributed along the filopodia in {sup 35}SO{sub 4}-labelled PMC by autoradiography. The morphology of normal and treated S. purpuratus PMC was examined by scanning electron microscopy, and differences in spreading, particularly of the extensive filopodia present on the cells, was observed. A model for the role of the chondroitin sulfate/dermatan sulfate proteoglycan in cell detachment during migration is proposed.

  7. Multitasking Human Lectin Galectin-3 Interacts with Sulfated Glycosaminoglycans and Chondroitin Sulfate Proteoglycans.

    PubMed

    Talaga, Melanie L; Fan, Ni; Fueri, Ashli L; Brown, Robert K; Bandyopadhyay, Purnima; Dam, Tarun K

    2016-08-16

    Glycosaminoglycan (GAG) binding proteins (GAGBPs), including growth factors, cytokines, morphogens, and extracellular matrix proteins, interact with both free GAGs and those covalently linked to proteoglycans. Such interactions modulate a variety of cellular and extracellular events, such as cell growth, metastasis, morphogenesis, neural development, and inflammation. GAGBPs are structurally and evolutionarily unrelated proteins that typically recognize internal sequences of sulfated GAGs. GAGBPs are distinct from the other major group of glycan binding proteins, lectins. The multifunctional human galectin-3 (Gal-3) is a β-galactoside binding lectin that preferentially binds to N-acetyllactosamine moieties on glycoconjugates. Here, we demonstrate through microcalorimetric and spectroscopic data that Gal-3 possesses the characteristics of a GAGBP. Gal-3 interacts with unmodified heparin, chondroitin sulfate-A (CSA), -B (CSB), and -C (CSC) as well as chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPGs). While heparin, CSA, and CSC bind with micromolar affinity, the affinity of CSPGs is nanomolar. Significantly, CSA, CSC, and a bovine CSPG were engaged in multivalent binding with Gal-3 and formed noncovalent cross-linked complexes with the lectin. Binding of sulfated GAGs was completely abolished when Gal-3 was preincubated with β-lactose. Cross-linking of Gal-3 by CSA, CSC, and the bovine CSPG was reversed by β-lactose. Both observations strongly suggest that GAGs primarily occupy the lactose/LacNAc binding site of Gal-3. Hill plot analysis of calorimetric data reveals that the binding of CSA, CSC, and a bovine CSPG to Gal-3 is associated with progressive negative cooperativity effects. Identification of Gal-3 as a GAGBP should help to reveal new functions of Gal-3 mediated by GAGs and proteoglycans. PMID:27427828

  8. Giant radio pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondratiev, Vladislav

    Rotation-powered radio pulsars exhibit a remarkably diverse spectrum of variability with characteristic time scales from days and even years (intermittent pulsars) to minutes-seconds (nulling) and (sub-)microseconds. The latter time scales are associated with the phenomenon of giant pulses (GPs) and micropulses. The story of GPs started in 1968, when Staelin and Reifenstein discovered the Crab pulsar through its spectacularly bright radio pulses. To date, only seven pulsars out of more than 2200 are known to show GP emission, namely the pulsars B0531+21, B1937+21, B0540-69, B1821-24, B1957+20, J0218+4232, and B1820-30A. Giant pulses are characterized by large energies (more than ten times of the energy of the average pulse), short durations, power-law energy distribution, specific rotational phase of occurrence, high degree of polarization, and accompanying high-energy radiation. Large energies of GPs and coincidence of their phase of occurrence with peaks of high-energy profiles hint at the same mechanism of radio GP and high-energy emission. The correlation of Crab pulsar GPs with optical, X-ray and gamma-ray photons was studied for the past 20 years, with only radio/optical link confirmed so far. In my talk I will present the summary of the observational evidence of radio GPs and give an overview of theoretical advances on giant-pulse emission mechanism.

  9. Unusual Giant Prostatic Urethral Calculus

    PubMed Central

    Bello, A.; Maitama, H. Y.; Mbibu, N. H.; Kalayi, G. D.; Ahmed, A.

    2010-01-01

    Giant vesico-prostatic urethral calculus is uncommon. Urethral stones rarely form primarily in the urethra, and they are usually associated with urethral strictures, posterior urethral valve or diverticula. We report a case of a 32-year-old man with giant vesico-prostatic (collar-stud) urethral stone presenting with sepsis and bladder outlet obstruction. The clinical presentation, management, and outcome of the giant prostatic urethral calculus are reviewed. PMID:22091328

  10. Apolipoprotein AV Accelerates Plasma Hydrolysis OfTriglyceride-Rich Lipoproteins By Interaction With Proteoglycan BoundLipoprotein Lipase

    SciTech Connect

    Merkel, Martin; Loeffler, Britta; Kluger, Malte; Fabig, Nathalie; Geppert, Gesa; Pennacchio, Len A.; Laatsch, Alexander; Heeren, Joerg

    2005-02-22

    Apolipoprotein A5 (APOA5) is associated with differences intriglyceride levels and familial combined hyperlipidemia. In genetically engineered mice, apoAV plasma levels are inversely correlated with plasmatriglycerides. To elucidate the mechanism by which apoAV influences plasma triglycerides, metabolic studies and in vitro assays resembling physiological conditions were performed. In hAPOA5 transgenic mice(hAPOA5tr), catabolism of chylomicrons and VLDL was accelerated due to a faster plasma hydrolysis of triglycerides by lipoprotein lipase (LPL).Hepatic VLDL and intestinal chylomicron production were not affected. The functional interplay between apoAV and LPL was further investigated by crossbreeding a human LPL transgene with the apoa5 knockout, and the hAPOA5tr to an LPL deficient background. Increased LPL activity completely normalized hypertriglyceridemia of apoa5 deficient mice,however, over expression of human apoAV modulated triglyceride levels only slightly when LPL was reduced. To reflect the physiological situation in which LPL is bound to cell surface proteoglycans, we examined hydrolysis in the presence or absence of proteoglycans. Without proteoglycans, apoAV derived either from triglyceride-rich lipoproteins, hAPOA5tr HDL, or a recombinant source did not alter the LPL hydrolysis rate. In the presence of proteoglycans, however, apoAV led to a significant and dose-dependent increase in LPL mediated hydrolysis of VLDL triglycerides. These results were confirmed in cell culture using a proteoglycan-deficient cell line.A direct interaction between LPL and apoAV was found by ligand blotting.It is proposed, that apoAV reduces triglyceride levels by guiding VLDL and chylomicrons to proteoglycans bound LPL for lipolysis.