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Sample records for giant viruses infecting

  1. Epidermal multinucleated giant cells are not always a histopathologic clue to a herpes virus infection: multinucleated epithelial giant cells in the epidermis of lesional skin biopsies from patients with acantholytic dermatoses can histologically mimic a herpes virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Philip R.; Paravar, Taraneh; Lee, Robert A.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Multinucleated giant cells in the epidermis can either be epithelial or histiocytic. Epithelial multinucleated giant cells are most often associated with herpes virus infections. Purpose: To review the histologic differential diagnosis of conditions with epithelial and histiocytic multinucleated giant cells—since multinucleated giant cells in the epidermis are not always pathognomonic of a cutaneous herpes virus infection—and to summarize dermatoses in which herpes virus infection has been observed to coexist. Methods: Two individuals with acantholytic dermatoses whose initial lesional skin biopsies showed multinucleated epithelial giant cells suggestive of a herpes virus infection are reported. Using the PubMed database, an extensive literature search was performed on multinucleated giant cell (and epidermis, epithelial, and histiocytic) and herpes virus infection. Relevant papers were reviewed to discover the skin conditions with either multinucleated giant cells in the epidermis or coincident cutaneous herpes virus infection. Results: Initial skin biopsies from patients with either pemphigus vulgaris or transient acantholytic dermatosis mimicked herpes virus infection; however, laboratory studies and repeat biopsies established the correct diagnosis of their acantholytic dermatosis. Hence, epidermal multinucleated giant cells are not always a histopathologic clue to a herpes virus infection. Indeed, epithelial multinucleated giant cells in the epidermis can be observed not only in the presence of infection (herpes virus), but also acantholytic dermatoses and tumors (trichoepithelioma and pleomorphic basal cell carcinoma). Histiocytic multinucleated giant cells in the epidermis can be observed in patients with either giant cell lichenoid dermatitis or lichen nitidus of the palms. Conclusions: Epithelial and histiocytic multinucleated giant cell can occur in the epidermis. Keratinocyte-derived multinucleated giant cells are most commonly associated with herpes virus infection; yet, they can also be observed in patients with skin tumors or acantholytic dermatoses. Cutaneous herpes simplex virus infection can coexist in association with other conditions such as acantholytic dermatoses, benign skin tumors, bullous disorders, hematologic malignancies, inflammatory dermatoses, and physical therapies. However, when a herpes virus infection is suspected based upon the discovery of epithelial multinucleated giant cells in the epidermis, but either the clinic presentation or lack of response to viral therapy or absence of confirmatory laboratory studies does not support the diagnosis of a viral infection, the possibility of a primary acantholytic dermatosis should be considered and additional lesional skin biopsies performed. Also, because hematoxylin and eosin staining is not the golden standard for confirmation of autoimmune bullous dermatoses, skin biopsies for direct immunofluorescence should be performed when a primary bullous dermatosis is suspected since the histopathology observed on hematoxylin and eosin stained sections can be misleading. PMID:25396080

  2. Plant genomes enclose footprints of past infections by giant virus relatives

    PubMed Central

    Maumus, Florian; Epert, Aline; Nogué, Fabien; Blanc, Guillaume

    2014-01-01

    Nucleocytoplasmic large DNA viruses (NCLDVs) are eukaryotic viruses with large genomes (100?kb–2.5?Mb), which include giant Mimivirus, Megavirus and Pandoravirus. NCLDVs are known to infect animals, protists and phytoplankton but were never described as pathogens of land plants. Here, we show that the bryophyte Physcomitrella patens and the lycophyte Selaginella moellendorffii have open reading frames (ORFs) with high phylogenetic affinities to NCLDV homologues. The P. patens genes are clustered in DNA stretches (up to 13?kb) containing up to 16 NCLDV-like ORFs. Molecular evolution analysis suggests that the NCLDV-like regions were acquired by horizontal gene transfer from distinct but closely related viruses that possibly define a new family of NCLDVs. Transcriptomics and DNA methylation data indicate that the NCLDV-like regions are transcriptionally inactive and are highly cytosine methylated through a mechanism not relying on small RNAs. Altogether, our data show that members of NCLDV have infected land plants. PMID:24969138

  3. Characterisation of three novel giant viruses reveals huge diversity among viruses infecting Prymnesiales (Haptophyta).

    PubMed

    Johannessen, Torill Vik; Bratbak, Gunnar; Larsen, Aud; Ogata, Hiroyuki; Egge, Elianne S; Edvardsen, Bente; Eikrem, Wenche; Sandaa, Ruth-Anne

    2015-02-01

    We have isolated three novel lytic dsDNA-viruses from Raunefjorden (Norway) that are putative members of the Mimiviridae family, namely Haptolina ericina virus RF02 (HeV RF02), Prymnesium kappa virus RF01 (PkV RF01), and Prymnesium kappa virus RF02 (PkV RF02). Each of the novel haptophyte viruses challenges the common conceptions of algal viruses with respect to host range, phylogenetic affiliation and size. PkV RF01 has a capsid of ~310 nm and is the largest algal virus particle ever reported while PkV RF01 and HeV RF02 were able to infect different species, even belonging to different genera. Moreover, PkV RF01 and HeV RF02 infected the same hosts, but phylogenetic analysis placed them in different groups. Our results reveal large variation among viruses infecting closely related microalgae, and challenge the common conception that algal viruses have narrow host range, and phylogeny reflecting their host affiliation. PMID:25546253

  4. Giant virus with a remarkable complement of genes infects marine zooplankton

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Matthias G.; Allen, Michael J.; Wilson, William H.; Suttle, Curtis A.

    2010-01-01

    As major consumers of heterotrophic bacteria and phytoplankton, microzooplankton are a critical link in aquatic foodwebs. Here, we show that a major marine microflagellate grazer is infected by a giant virus, Cafeteria roenbergensis virus (CroV), which has the largest genome of any described marine virus (?730 kb of double-stranded DNA). The central 618-kb coding part of this AT-rich genome contains 544 predicted protein-coding genes; putative early and late promoter motifs have been detected and assigned to 191 and 72 of them, respectively, and at least 274 genes were expressed during infection. The diverse coding potential of CroV includes predicted translation factors, DNA repair enzymes such as DNA mismatch repair protein MutS and two photolyases, multiple ubiquitin pathway components, four intein elements, and 22 tRNAs. Many genes including isoleucyl-tRNA synthetase, eIF-2?, and an Elp3-like histone acetyltransferase are usually not found in viruses. We also discovered a 38-kb genomic region of putative bacterial origin, which encodes several predicted carbohydrate metabolizing enzymes, including an entire pathway for the biosynthesis of 3-deoxy-d-manno-octulosonate, a key component of the outer membrane in Gram-negative bacteria. Phylogenetic analysis indicates that CroV is a nucleocytoplasmic large DNA virus, with Acanthamoeba polyphaga mimivirus as its closest relative, although less than one-third of the genes of CroV have homologs in Mimivirus. CroV is a highly complex marine virus and the only virus studied in genetic detail that infects one of the major groups of predators in the oceans. PMID:20974979

  5. In-depth study of Mollivirus sibericum, a new 30,000-y-old giant virus infecting Acanthamoeba.

    PubMed

    Legendre, Matthieu; Lartigue, Audrey; Bertaux, Lionel; Jeudy, Sandra; Bartoli, Julia; Lescot, Magali; Alempic, Jean-Marie; Ramus, Claire; Bruley, Christophe; Labadie, Karine; Shmakova, Lyubov; Rivkina, Elizaveta; Couté, Yohann; Abergel, Chantal; Claverie, Jean-Michel

    2015-09-22

    Acanthamoeba species are infected by the largest known DNA viruses. These include icosahedral Mimiviruses, amphora-shaped Pandoraviruses, and Pithovirus sibericum, the latter one isolated from 30,000-y-old permafrost. Mollivirus sibericum, a fourth type of giant virus, was isolated from the same permafrost sample. Its approximately spherical virion (0.6-µm diameter) encloses a 651-kb GC-rich genome encoding 523 proteins of which 64% are ORFans; 16% have their closest homolog in Pandoraviruses and 10% in Acanthamoeba castellanii probably through horizontal gene transfer. The Mollivirus nucleocytoplasmic replication cycle was analyzed using a combination of "omic" approaches that revealed how the virus highjacks its host machinery to actively replicate. Surprisingly, the host's ribosomal proteins are packaged in the virion. Metagenomic analysis of the permafrost sample uncovered the presence of both viruses, yet in very low amount. The fact that two different viruses retain their infectivity in prehistorical permafrost layers should be of concern in a context of global warming. Giant viruses' diversity remains to be fully explored. PMID:26351664

  6. Giant virus in the sea

    PubMed Central

    Claverie, Jean-Michel

    2013-01-01

    The viral nature of the first “giant virus,” Mimivirus, was realized in 2003, 10 y after its initial isolation from the water of a cooling tower in Bradford, UK. Soon after its genome was sequenced, the mining of the Global Ocean Sampling environmental sequence database revealed that the closest relatives of Mimivirus, only known to infect Acanthamoeba, were to be found in the sea. These predicted marine Mimivirus relatives remained elusive until 2010, with the first genomic characterization of a virus infecting a heterotrophic unicellular eukaryote, the microflagellate grazer Cafeteria roenbergensis. The genome analysis of a virus (PgV) infecting the common unicellular algae Phaeocystis globosa now shows that it is a bona fide member of the Mimivirus family (i.e., the Megaviridae), extending the realm of these giant viruses to abundant blooming phytoplankton species. Despite its smaller genome size (460 kb encoding 434 proteins), PgV exhibits the most intriguing feature of the previously characterized Megaviridae: an associated virophage. However, the 19-kb virophage genome, devoid of a capsid gene, is packaged in the PgV particle and propagated as a “viral plasmid,” the first ever described. The PgV genome also exhibits the duplication of “core genes,” normally present as single copies and a putative new type of mobile element. In a DNA polymerase phylogeny including representatives of the three cellular domains, PgV and the other Megaviridae cluster into their own clade deeply branching between domains Archaea and Eukarya domains, thus exhibiting the topology of a fourth domain in the Tree of Life. PMID:24563700

  7. Evolutionary dynamics of giant viruses and their virophages

    PubMed Central

    Wodarz, Dominik

    2013-01-01

    Giant viruses contain large genomes, encode many proteins atypical for viruses, replicate in large viral factories, and tend to infect protists. The giant virus replication factories can in turn be infected by so called virophages, which are smaller viruses that negatively impact giant virus replication. An example is Mimiviruses that infect the protist Acanthamoeba and that are themselves infected by the virophage Sputnik. This study examines the evolutionary dynamics of this system, using mathematical models. While the models suggest that the virophage population will evolve to increasing degrees of giant virus inhibition, it further suggests that this renders the virophage population prone to extinction due to dynamic instabilities over wide parameter ranges. Implications and conditions required to avoid extinction are discussed. Another interesting result is that virophage presence can fundamentally alter the evolutionary course of the giant virus. While the giant virus is predicted to evolve toward increasing its basic reproductive ratio in the absence of the virophage, the opposite is true in its presence. Therefore, virophages can not only benefit the host population directly by inhibiting the giant viruses but also indirectly by causing giant viruses to evolve toward weaker phenotypes. Experimental tests for this model are suggested. PMID:23919155

  8. Evolutionary dynamics of giant viruses and their virophages.

    PubMed

    Wodarz, Dominik

    2013-07-01

    Giant viruses contain large genomes, encode many proteins atypical for viruses, replicate in large viral factories, and tend to infect protists. The giant virus replication factories can in turn be infected by so called virophages, which are smaller viruses that negatively impact giant virus replication. An example is Mimiviruses that infect the protist Acanthamoeba and that are themselves infected by the virophage Sputnik. This study examines the evolutionary dynamics of this system, using mathematical models. While the models suggest that the virophage population will evolve to increasing degrees of giant virus inhibition, it further suggests that this renders the virophage population prone to extinction due to dynamic instabilities over wide parameter ranges. Implications and conditions required to avoid extinction are discussed. Another interesting result is that virophage presence can fundamentally alter the evolutionary course of the giant virus. While the giant virus is predicted to evolve toward increasing its basic reproductive ratio in the absence of the virophage, the opposite is true in its presence. Therefore, virophages can not only benefit the host population directly by inhibiting the giant viruses but also indirectly by causing giant viruses to evolve toward weaker phenotypes. Experimental tests for this model are suggested. PMID:23919155

  9. Origin of giant viruses from smaller DNA viruses not from a fourth domain of cellular life

    PubMed Central

    Yutin, Natalya; Wolf, Yuri I.; Koonin, Eugene V.

    2015-01-01

    The numerous and diverse eukaryotic viruses with large double-stranded DNA genomes that at least partially reproduce in the cytoplasm of infected cells apparently evolved from a single virus ancestor. This major group of viruses is known as Nucleocytoplasmic Large DNA Viruses (NCLDV) or the proposed order Megavirales. Among the “Megavirales”, there are three groups of giant viruses with genomes exceeding 500 kb, namely Mimiviruses, Pithoviruses, and Pandoraviruses that hold the current record of viral genome size, about 2.5 Mb. Phylogenetic analysis of conserved, ancestral NLCDV genes clearly shows that these three groups of giant viruses have three distinct origins within the “Megavirales”. The Mimiviruses constitute a distinct family that is distantly related to Phycodnaviridae, Pandoraviruses originate from a common ancestor with Coccolithoviruses within the Phycodnaviridae family, and Pithoviruses are related to Iridoviridae and Marseilleviridae. Maximum likelihood reconstruction of gene gain and loss events during the evolution of the “Megavirales” indicates that each group of giant viruses evolved from viruses with substantially smaller and simpler gene repertoires. Initial phylogenetic analysis of universal genes, such as translation system components, encoded by some giant viruses, in particular Mimiviruses, has led to the hypothesis that giant viruses descend from a fourth, probably extinct domain of cellular life. The results of our comprehensive phylogenomic analysis of giant viruses refute the fourth domain hypothesis and instead indicate that the universal genes have been independently acquired by different giant viruses from their eukaryotic hosts. PMID:25042053

  10. Provirophages and transpovirons as the diverse mobilome of giant viruses.

    PubMed

    Desnues, Christelle; La Scola, Bernard; Yutin, Natalya; Fournous, Ghislain; Robert, Catherine; Azza, Saïd; Jardot, Priscilla; Monteil, Sonia; Campocasso, Angélique; Koonin, Eugene V; Raoult, Didier

    2012-10-30

    A distinct class of infectious agents, the virophages that infect giant viruses of the Mimiviridae family, has been recently described. Here we report the simultaneous discovery of a giant virus of Acanthamoeba polyphaga (Lentille virus) that contains an integrated genome of a virophage (Sputnik 2), and a member of a previously unknown class of mobile genetic elements, the transpovirons. The transpovirons are linear DNA elements of ~7 kb that encompass six to eight protein-coding genes, two of which are homologous to virophage genes. Fluorescence in situ hybridization showed that the free form of the transpoviron replicates within the giant virus factory and accumulates in high copy numbers inside giant virus particles, Sputnik 2 particles, and amoeba cytoplasm. Analysis of deep-sequencing data showed that the virophage and the transpoviron can integrate in nearly any place in the chromosome of the giant virus host and that, although less frequently, the transpoviron can also be linked to the virophage chromosome. In addition, integrated fragments of transpoviron DNA were detected in several giant virus and Sputnik genomes. Analysis of 19 Mimivirus strains revealed three distinct transpovirons associated with three subgroups of Mimiviruses. The virophage, the transpoviron, and the previously identified self-splicing introns and inteins constitute the complex, interconnected mobilome of the giant viruses and are likely to substantially contribute to interviral gene transfer. PMID:23071316

  11. The Giant Cafeteria roenbergensis Virus That Infects a Widespread Marine Phagocytic Protist Is a New Member of the Fourth Domain of Life

    PubMed Central

    Colson, Philippe; Gimenez, Gregory; Boyer, Mickaël; Fournous, Ghislain; Raoult, Didier

    2011-01-01

    Background A recent work has provided strong arguments in favor of a fourth domain of Life composed of nucleo-cytoplasmic large DNA viruses (NCLDVs). This hypothesis was supported by phylogenetic and phyletic analyses based on a common set of proteins conserved in Eukarya, Archaea, Bacteria, and viruses, and implicated in the functions of information storage and processing. Recently, the genome of a new NCLDV, Cafeteria roenbergensis virus (CroV), was released. The present work aimed to determine if CroV supports the fourth domain of Life hypothesis. Methods A consensus phylogenetic tree of NCLDVs including CroV was generated from a concatenated alignment of four universal proteins of NCLDVs. Some features of the gene complement of CroV and its distribution along the genome were further analyzed. Phylogenetic and phyletic analyses were performed using the previously identified common set of informational genes present in Eukarya, Archaea, Bacteria, and NCLDVs, including CroV. Findings Phylogenetic reconstructions indicated that CroV is clearly related to the Mimiviridae family. The comparison between the gene repertoires of CroV and Mimivirus showed similarities regarding the gene contents and genome organization. In addition, the phyletic clustering based on the comparison of informational gene repertoire between Eukarya, Archaea, Bacteria, and NCLDVs unambiguously classified CroV with other NCLDVs and clearly included it in a fourth domain of Life. Taken together, these data suggest that Mimiviridae, including CroV, may have inherited a common gene content probably acquired from a common Mimiviridae ancestor. Conclusions This further analysis of the gene repertoire of CroV consolidated the fourth domain of Life hypothesis and contributed to outline a functional pan-genome for giant viruses infecting phagocytic protistan grazers. PMID:21559486

  12. Hepatitis E Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Dalton, Harry R.; Abravanel, Florence; Izopet, Jacques

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection is a worldwide disease. An improved understanding of the natural history of HEV infection has been achieved within the last decade. Several reservoirs and transmission modes have been identified. Hepatitis E is an underdiagnosed disease, in part due to the use of serological assays with low sensitivity. However, diagnostic tools, including nucleic acid-based tests, have been improved. The epidemiology and clinical features of hepatitis E differ between developing and developed countries. HEV infection is usually an acute self-limiting disease, but in developed countries it causes chronic infection with rapidly progressive cirrhosis in organ transplant recipients, patients with hematological malignancy requiring chemotherapy, and individuals with HIV. HEV also causes extrahepatic manifestations, including a number of neurological syndromes and renal injury. Acute infection usually requires no treatment, but chronic infection should be treated by reducing immunosuppression in transplant patients and/or the use of antiviral therapy. In this comprehensive review, we summarize the current knowledge about the virus itself, as well as the epidemiology, diagnostics, natural history, and management of HEV infection in developing and developed countries. PMID:24396139

  13. The origins of giant viruses, virophages and their relatives in host genomes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Giant viruses have revealed a number of surprises that challenge conventions on what constitutes a virus. The Samba virus newly isolated in Brazil expands the known distribution of giant mimiviruses to a near-global scale. These viruses, together with the transposon-related virophages that infect them, pose a number of questions about their evolutionary origins that need to be considered in the light of the complex entanglement between host, virus and virophage genomes. See research article: http://www.virologyj.com/content/11/1/95. PMID:25184667

  14. Proteomic analysis of differentially expressed protein in hemocytes of wild giant freshwater prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii infected with infectious hypodermal and hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHHNV)

    PubMed Central

    Alinejad, T.; Bin, Kwong Q.; Vejayan, J.; Othman, R.Y.; Bhassu, S.

    2015-01-01

    Epizootic diseases cause huge mortality and economical loses at post larvae stages in freshwater prawn aquaculture industry. These prawns seem less susceptible to viral diseases except for infectious hypodermal and hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHHNV). During viral infection in prawns, hemocytes are the primary organ that shows immunological response within the early stages of infection. We applied proteomic approaches to understand differential expression of the proteins in hemocytes during the viral disease outbreak. To aid the goal, we collected Macrobrachium rosenbergii broodstocks from the local grow out hatchery which reported the first incidence of IHHNV viral outbreak during larvae stage. Primarily, application of the OIE primer targeting 389 bp fragments of IHHNV virus was used in identification of the infected and non-infected samples of the prawn breeding line. Analysis of two-dimensional gel electrophoresis showed specific down-regulation of Arginine kinase and Sarcoplasmic calcium-binding protein and up/down-regulation of Prophenoloxidase1 and hemocyanin isoforms. These proteins were validated using semi quantitative RT-PCR and gene transcripts at mRNA level. These identified proteins can be used as biomarkers, providing a powerful approach to better understanding of the immunity pathway of viral disease with applications in analytic and observational epidemiology diagnosis. Proteomic profiling allows deep insight into the pathogenesis of IHHNV molecular regulation and mechanism of hemocyte in freshwater prawns. PMID:26106581

  15. Proteomic analysis of differentially expressed protein in hemocytes of wild giant freshwater prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii infected with infectious hypodermal and hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHHNV).

    PubMed

    Alinejad, T; Bin, Kwong Q; Vejayan, J; Othman, R Y; Bhassu, S

    2015-09-01

    Epizootic diseases cause huge mortality and economical loses at post larvae stages in freshwater prawn aquaculture industry. These prawns seem less susceptible to viral diseases except for infectious hypodermal and hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHHNV). During viral infection in prawns, hemocytes are the primary organ that shows immunological response within the early stages of infection. We applied proteomic approaches to understand differential expression of the proteins in hemocytes during the viral disease outbreak. To aid the goal, we collected Macrobrachium rosenbergii broodstocks from the local grow out hatchery which reported the first incidence of IHHNV viral outbreak during larvae stage. Primarily, application of the OIE primer targeting 389 bp fragments of IHHNV virus was used in identification of the infected and non-infected samples of the prawn breeding line. Analysis of two-dimensional gel electrophoresis showed specific down-regulation of Arginine kinase and Sarcoplasmic calcium-binding protein and up/down-regulation of Prophenoloxidase1 and hemocyanin isoforms. These proteins were validated using semi quantitative RT-PCR and gene transcripts at mRNA level. These identified proteins can be used as biomarkers, providing a powerful approach to better understanding of the immunity pathway of viral disease with applications in analytic and observational epidemiology diagnosis. Proteomic profiling allows deep insight into the pathogenesis of IHHNV molecular regulation and mechanism of hemocyte in freshwater prawns. PMID:26106581

  16. Interferon-? Inhibits Ebola Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Rhein, Bethany A.; Powers, Linda S.; Rogers, Kai; Anantpadma, Manu; Singh, Brajesh K.; Sakurai, Yasuteru; Bair, Thomas; Miller-Hunt, Catherine; Sinn, Patrick; Davey, Robert A.

    2015-01-01

    Ebola virus outbreaks, such as the 2014 Makona epidemic in West Africa, are episodic and deadly. Filovirus antivirals are currently not clinically available. Our findings suggest interferon gamma, an FDA-approved drug, may serve as a novel and effective prophylactic or treatment option. Using mouse-adapted Ebola virus, we found that murine interferon gamma administered 24 hours before or after infection robustly protects lethally-challenged mice and reduces morbidity and serum viral titers. Furthermore, we demonstrated that interferon gamma profoundly inhibits Ebola virus infection of macrophages, an early cellular target of infection. As early as six hours following in vitro infection, Ebola virus RNA levels in interferon gamma-treated macrophages were lower than in infected, untreated cells. Addition of the protein synthesis inhibitor, cycloheximide, to interferon gamma-treated macrophages did not further reduce viral RNA levels, suggesting that interferon gamma blocks life cycle events that require protein synthesis such as virus replication. Microarray studies with interferon gamma-treated human macrophages identified more than 160 interferon-stimulated genes. Ectopic expression of a select group of these genes inhibited Ebola virus infection. These studies provide new potential avenues for antiviral targeting as these genes that have not previously appreciated to inhibit negative strand RNA viruses and specifically Ebola virus infection. As treatment of interferon gamma robustly protects mice from lethal Ebola virus infection, we propose that interferon gamma should be further evaluated for its efficacy as a prophylactic and/or therapeutic strategy against filoviruses. Use of this FDA-approved drug could rapidly be deployed during future outbreaks. PMID:26562011

  17. Soy isoflavones and virus infections

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Isoflavones and their related flavonoid compounds exert antiviral properties in vitro and in vivo against a wide range of viruses. Genistein is, by far, the most studied soy isoflavone in this regard, and it has been shown to inhibit the infectivity of enveloped or nonenveloped viruses, as well as s...

  18. Chikungunya virus infection.

    PubMed

    Simon, Fabrice; Javelle, Emilie; Oliver, Manuela; Leparc-Goffart, Isabelle; Marimoutou, Catherine

    2011-06-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is an alphavirus transmitted by mosquitoes, mostly Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus. After half a century of focal outbreaks of acute febrile polyarthralgia in Africa and Asia, the disease unexpectedly spread in the past decade with large outbreaks in Africa and around the Indian Ocean and rare autochthonous transmission in temperate areas. This emergence brought new insights on its pathogenesis, notably the role of the A226V mutation that improved CHIKV fitness in Ae. albopictus and the possible CHIKV persistence in deep tissue sanctuaries for months after infection. Massive outbreaks also revealed new aspects of the acute stage: the high number of symptomatic cases, unexpected complications, mother-to-child transmission, and low lethality in debilitated patients. The follow-up of patients in epidemic areas has identified frequent, long-lasting, rheumatic disorders, including rare inflammatory joint destruction, and common chronic mood changes associated with quality-of-life impairment. Thus, the globalization of CHIKV exposes countries with Aedes mosquitoes both to brutal outbreaks of acute incapacitating episodes and endemic long-lasting disorders. PMID:21465340

  19. Recognition of Linear B-Cell Epitope of Betanodavirus Coat Protein by RG-M18 Neutralizing mAB Inhibits Giant Grouper Nervous Necrosis Virus (GGNNV) Infection

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chien-Wen; Wu, Ming-Shan; Huang, Yi-Jen; Cheng, Chao-An; Chang, Chi-Yao

    2015-01-01

    Betanodavirus is a causative agent of viral nervous necrosis syndrome in many important aquaculture marine fish larvae, resulting in high global mortality. The coat protein of Betanodavirus is the sole structural protein, and it can assemble the virion particle by itself. In this study, we used a high-titer neutralizing mAB, RG-M18, to identify the linear B-cell epitope on the viral coat protein. By mapping a series of recombinant proteins generated using the E. coli PET expression system, we demonstrated that the linear epitope recognized by RG-M18 is located at the C-terminus of the coat protein, between amino acid residues 195 and 338. To define the minimal epitope region, a set of overlapping peptides were synthesized and evaluated for RG-M18 binding. Such analysis identified the 195VNVSVLCR202 motif as the minimal epitope. Comparative analysis of Alanine scanning mutagenesis with dot-blotting and ELISA revealed that Valine197, Valine199, and Cysteine201 are critical for antibody binding. Substitution of Leucine200 in the RGNNV, BFNNV, and TPNNV genotypes with Methionine200 (thereby simulating the SJNNV genotype) did not affect binding affinity, implying that RG-M18 can recognize all genotypes of Betanodaviruses. In competition experiments, synthetic multiple antigen peptides of this epitope dramatically suppressed giant grouper nervous necrosis virus (GGNNV) propagation in grouper brain cells. The data provide new insights into the protective mechanism of this neutralizing mAB, with broader implications for Betanodavirus vaccinology and antiviral peptide drug development. PMID:25938761

  20. Chikungunya virus infection: an overview.

    PubMed

    Caglioti, Claudia; Lalle, Eleonora; Castilletti, Concetta; Carletti, Fabrizio; Capobianchi, Maria Rosaria; Bordi, Licia

    2013-07-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is a mosquito-transmitted alphavirus belonging to the Togaviridae family, first isolated in Tanzania in 1952. The main vectors are mosquitoes from the Aedes species. Recently, the establishment of an envelope mutation increased infectivity for A. albopictus. CHIKV has recently re-emerged causing millions of infections in countries around the Indian Ocean characterized by climate conditions favourable to high vector density. Importation of human cases to European regions with high density of suitable arthropod vectors (such as A. albopictus) may trigger autochthonous outbreaks. The clinical signs of CHIKV infection include non-specific flu-like symptoms, and a characteristic rash accompanied by joint pain that may last for a long time after the resolution of the infection. The death rate is not particularly high, but excess mortality has been observed in concomitance with large CHIKV outbreaks. Deregulation of innate defense mechanisms, such as cytokine inflammatory response, may participate in the main clinical signs of CHIKV infection, and the establishment of persistent (chronic) disease. There is no specific therapy, and prevention is the main countermeasure. Prevention is based on insect control and in avoiding mosquito bites in endemic countries. Diagnosis is based on the detection of virus by molecular methods or by virus culture on the first days of infection, and by detection of an immune response in later stages. CHIKV infection must be suspected in patients with compatible clinical symptoms returning from epidemic/endemic areas. Differential diagnosis should take into account the cross-reactivity with other viruses from the same antigenic complex (i.e. O'nyong-nyong virus). PMID:23912863

  1. Neonatal Herpes Simplex Virus Infection.

    PubMed

    James, Scott H; Kimberlin, David W

    2015-09-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) 1 and HSV-2 infections are highly prevalent worldwide and are characterized by establishing lifelong infection with periods of latency interspersed with periodic episodes of reactivation. Acquisition of HSV by an infant during the peripartum or postpartum period results in neonatal HSV disease, a rare but significant infection that can be associated with severe morbidity and mortality, especially if there is dissemination or central nervous system involvement. Diagnostic and therapeutic advances have led to improvements in mortality and, to a lesser extent, neurodevelopmental outcomes, but room exists for further improvement. PMID:26154662

  2. Discrete virus infection model of hepatitis B virus.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Pengfei; Min, Lequan; Pian, Jianwei

    2015-08-17

    In 1996 Nowak and his colleagues proposed a differential equation virus infection model, which has been widely applied in the study for the dynamics of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. Biological dynamics may be described more practically by discrete events rather than continuous ones. Using discrete systems to describe biological dynamics should be reasonable. Based on one revised Nowak et al's virus infection model, this study introduces a discrete virus infection model (DVIM). Two equilibriums of this model, E1 and E2, represents infection free and infection persistent, respectively. Similar to the case of the basic virus infection model, this study deduces a basic virus reproductive number R0 independing on the number of total cells of an infected target organ. A proposed theorem proves that if the basic virus reproductive number R0<1 then the virus free equilibrium E1 is locally stable. The DVIM is more reasonable than an abstract discrete susceptible-infected-recovered model (SIRS) whose basic virus reproductive number R0 is relevant to the number of total cells of the infected target organ. As an application, this study models the clinic HBV DNA data of a patient who was accepted via anti-HBV infection therapy with drug lamivudine. The results show that the numerical simulation is good in agreement with the clinic data. PMID:26405998

  3. Pediatric human immunodeficiency virus infection.

    PubMed Central

    Domachowske, J B

    1996-01-01

    In the past decade, an increase in pediatric human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection has had a substantial impact on childhood morbidity and mortality worldwide. The vertical transmission of HIV from mother to infant accounts for the vast majority of these cases. Identification of HIV-infected pregnant women needs to be impoved so that appropriate therapy can be initiated for both mothers and infants. While recent data demonstrate a dramatic decrease in HIV transmission from a subset of women treated with zidovudine during pregnancy, further efforts at reducing transmission are desperately needed. This review focuses on vertically transmitted HIV infection in children, its epidemiology, diagnostic criteria, natural history, and clinical manifestations including infectious and noninfectious complications. An overview of the complex medical management of these children ensues, including the use of antiretroviral therapy. Opportunistic infection prophylaxis is reviewed, along with the important role of other supportive therapies. PMID:8894346

  4. Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Primary Infection

    MedlinePLUS

    newsletter | contact Share | Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Primary Infection Information for adults A A A When HIV is first contracted, there may be ... 1–6 weeks following exposure to HIV (the human immunodeficiency virus). Chronic infection with this virus can ...

  5. Getah Virus Infection among Racehorses, Japan, 2014

    PubMed Central

    Bannai, Hiroshi; Tsujimura, Koji; Kobayashi, Minoru; Kikuchi, Takuya; Yamanaka, Takashi; Kondo, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    An outbreak of Getah virus infection occurred among racehorses in Japan during September and October 2014. Of 49 febrile horses tested by reverse transcription PCR, 25 were positive for Getah virus. Viruses detected in 2014 were phylogenetically different from the virus isolated in Japan in 1978. PMID:25898181

  6. Virus Infections in the Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Koyuncu, Orkide O.; Hogue, Ian B.; Enquist, Lynn W.

    2013-01-01

    Virus infections usually begin in peripheral tissues and can invade the mammalian nervous system (NS), spreading into the peripheral (PNS) and more rarely the central nervous systems (CNS). The CNS is protected from most virus infections by effective immune responses and multi-layer barriers. However, some viruses enter the NS with high efficiency via the bloodstream or by directly infecting nerves that innervate peripheral tissues, resulting in debilitating direct and immune-mediated pathology. Most viruses in the NS are opportunistic or accidental pathogens, but a few, most notably the alpha herpesviruses and rabies virus, have evolved to enter the NS efficiently and exploit neuronal cell biology. Remarkably, the alpha herpesviruses can establish quiescent infections in the PNS, with rare but often fatal CNS pathology. Here we review how viruses gain access to and spread in the well-protected CNS, with particular emphasis on alpha herpesviruses, which establish and maintain persistent NS infections. PMID:23601101

  7. CELLULAR PATHOLOGY OF A GRANULOSIS VIRUS INFECTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nuclear and cytoplasmic ultrastructural changes were examined in Spodoptera frugiperda (SF) larval fat body cells infected with granulosis virus (GV). Soon after infection necleocapsidlike structures were observed within the nucleus associated with nuclear pores. The earliest cel...

  8. Samba virus: a novel mimivirus from a giant rain forest, the Brazilian Amazon

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The identification of novel giant viruses from the nucleocytoplasmic large DNA viruses group and their virophages has increased in the last decade and has helped to shed light on viral evolution. This study describe the discovery, isolation and characterization of Samba virus (SMBV), a novel giant virus belonging to the Mimivirus genus, which was isolated from the Negro River in the Brazilian Amazon. We also report the isolation of an SMBV-associated virophage named Rio Negro (RNV), which is the first Mimivirus virophage to be isolated in the Americas. Methods/results Based on a phylogenetic analysis, SMBV belongs to group A of the putative Megavirales order, possibly a new virus related to Acanthamoeba polyphaga mimivirus (APMV). SMBV is the largest virus isolated in Brazil, with an average particle diameter about 574 nm. The SMBV genome contains 938 ORFs, of which nine are ORFans. The 1,213.6 kb SMBV genome is one of the largest genome of any group A Mimivirus described to date. Electron microscopy showed RNV particle accumulation near SMBV and APMV factories resulting in the production of defective SMBV and APMV particles and decreasing the infectivity of these two viruses by several logs. Conclusion This discovery expands our knowledge of Mimiviridae evolution and ecology. PMID:24886672

  9. Genetic resistance to Infectious Bronchitis Virus infection 

    E-print Network

    Dzielawa, Jennifer Ann

    2001-01-01

    was the most resistant, followed by B2/B12, B2/B2, B19/B19, and B12/B12. Low levels of virus were recovered in the lungs of only the infected B2/B2 and B12/B12 haplotypes. Virus was easily detected in infected kidneys of all groups examined and levels...

  10. Influenza A Virus Infections in Land

    E-print Network

    Clayton, Dale H.

    Influenza A Virus Infections in Land Birds, People's Republic of China A. Townsend Peterson, Sarah­PCR testing of 939 Asian land birds of 153 species. Influenza A infection was found, particularly among influenza virus ecology has long regarded water- birds as a primary reservoir. Although the benchmark study

  11. Nipah virus infection: current scenario.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, D D; Tosh, C; Venkatesh, G; Senthil Kumar, D

    2013-12-01

    The emergence of Nipah virus (NiV) infection into the pig population and subsequently into the human population is believed to be due to changes in ecological conditions. In Malaysia, A major NiV outbreak occurred in pigs and humans from September 1998 to April 1999 that resulted in infection of 265 and death of 105 persons. About 1.1 million pigs had to be destroyed to control the outbreak. The disease was recorded in the form of a major outbreak in India in 2001 and then a small incidence in 2007, both the outbreaks in West Bengal only in humans without any involvement of pigs. There were series of human Nipah incidences in Bangladesh from 2001 till 2013 almost every year with mortality exceeding 70 %. The disease transmission from pigs acting as an intermediate host during Malaysian and Singapore outbreaks has changed in NIV outbreaks in India and Bangladesh, transmitting the disease directly from bats to human followed by human to human. The drinking of raw date palm sap contaminated with fruit bat urine or saliva containing NiV is the only known cause of outbreak of the disease in Bangladesh outbreaks. The virus is now known to exist in various fruit bats of Pteropus as well as bats of other genera in a wider belt from Asia to Africa. PMID:24426305

  12. Systems analysis of West Nile virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Suthar, Mehul S.; Pulendran, Bali

    2014-01-01

    Emerging and re-emerging mosquito-borne viruses continue to pose a significant threat to human health throughout the world. Over the past decade, West Nile virus (WNV), Dengue virus (DENV), and Chikungunya virus (CHIKV), have caused annual epidemics of virus-induced encephalitis, hemorrhagic fever\\shock syndromes, and arthritis, respectively. Currently, no specific antiviral therapies or vaccines exist for use in humans to combat or prevent these viral infections. Thus, there is a pressing need to define the virus-host interactions that govern immunity and infection outcome. Recent technological breakthroughs in ‘omics’ resources and high-throughput based assays are beginning to accelerate antiviral drug discovery and improve on current strategies for vaccine design. In this review, we highlight studies with WNV and discuss how traditional and systems based approaches are being used to rapidly identify novel host targets for therapeutic intervention and develop a deeper conceptual understanding of the host response to virus infection. PMID:24851811

  13. Isolation of new Brazilian giant viruses from environmental samples using a panel of protozoa

    PubMed Central

    Dornas, Fábio P.; Khalil, Jacques Y. B.; Pagnier, Isabelle; Raoult, Didier; Abrahão, Jônatas; La Scola, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    The Megavirales are a newly described order capable of infecting different types of eukaryotic hosts. For the most part, the natural host is unknown. Several methods have been used to detect these viruses, with large discrepancies between molecular methods and co-cultures. To isolate giant viruses, we propose the use of different species of amoeba as a cellular support. The aim of this work was to isolate new Brazilian giant viruses by comparing the protozoa Acanthamoeba castellanii, A. polyphaga, A. griffini, and Vermamoeba vermiformis (VV) as a platform for cellular isolation using environmental samples. One hundred samples were collected from 3 different areas in September 2014 in the Pampulha lagoon of Belo Horizonte city, Minas Gerais, Brazil. PCR was used to identify the isolated viruses, along with hemacolor staining, labelling fluorescence and electron microscopy. A total of 69 viruses were isolated. The highest ratio of isolation was found in A. polyphaga (46.38%) and the lowest in VV (0%). Mimiviruses were the most frequently isolated. One Marseillevirus and one Pandoravirus were also isolated. With Brazilian environmental samples, we demonstrated the high rate of lineage A mimiviruses. This work demonstrates how these viruses survive and circulate in nature as well the differences between protozoa as a platform for cellular isolation. PMID:26500630

  14. Immunopathogenesis of Hepatitis C Virus Infection.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, David E

    2015-12-01

    Despite advances in therapy, hepatitis C virus infection remains a major global health issue with 3 to 4 million incident cases and 170 million prevalent chronic infections. Complex, partially understood, host-virus interactions determine whether an acute infection with hepatitis C resolves, as occurs in approximately 30% of cases, or generates a persistent hepatic infection, as occurs in the remainder. Once chronic infection is established, the velocity of hepatocyte injury and resultant fibrosis is significantly modulated by immunologic as well as environmental factors. Immunomodulation has been the backbone of antiviral therapy despite poor understanding of its mechanism of action. PMID:26600217

  15. Hendra Virus Infection in Dog, Australia, 2013

    PubMed Central

    Gabor, Melinda; Poe, Ian; Neale, Kristie; Chaffey, Kim; Finlaison, Deborah S.; Gu, Xingnian; Hick, Paul M.; Read, Andrew J.; Wright, Therese; Middleton, Deborah

    2015-01-01

    Hendra virus occasionally causes severe disease in horses and humans. In Australia in 2013, infection was detected in a dog that had been in contact with an infected horse. Abnormalities and viral RNA were found in the dog’s kidney, brain, lymph nodes, spleen, and liver. Dogs should be kept away from infected horses. PMID:26583697

  16. Hendra Virus Infection in Dog, Australia, 2013.

    PubMed

    Kirkland, Peter D; Gabor, Melinda; Poe, Ian; Neale, Kristie; Chaffey, Kim; Finlaison, Deborah S; Gu, Xingnian; Hick, Paul M; Read, Andrew J; Wright, Therese; Middleton, Deborah

    2015-12-01

    Hendra virus occasionally causes severe disease in horses and humans. In Australia in 2013, infection was detected in a dog that had been in contact with an infected horse. Abnormalities and viral RNA were found in the dog's kidney, brain, lymph nodes, spleen, and liver. Dogs should be kept away from infected horses. PMID:26583697

  17. Influenza A virus infections in Chinese landbirds

    E-print Network

    Peterson, A. Townsend; Bush, Sarah E.; Spackman, Erica; Swayne, David E.; Ip, Hon S.

    2009-10-01

    stream_size 13133 stream_content_type text/plain stream_name atp.eid.influenza_a_virus_infections.2008.pdf.txt stream_source_info atp.eid.influenza_a_virus_infections.2008.pdf.txt Content-Encoding UTF-8 Content-Type text... occurrence of infl uenza viruses in diverse taxa of Emerging Infectious Diseases • www.cdc.gov/eid • Vol. 14, No. 10, October 2008 1645 Table. Prevalence of influenza A virus in avian orders and families at 5 sites, People’s Republic of China Location, no...

  18. Transcriptomic analysis of the host response to an iridovirus infection in Chinese giant salamander, Andrias davidianus.

    PubMed

    Fan, Yuding; Chang, Ming Xian; Ma, Jie; LaPatra, Scott E; Hu, Yi Wei; Huang, Lili; Nie, Pin; Zeng, Lingbing

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of an infectious viral disease caused by the Chinese giant salamander iridovirus (GSIV) has led to substantial economic losses. However, no more molecular information is available for the understanding of the mechanisms associated with virus-host interaction. In this study, de novo sequencing was used to obtain abundant high-quality ESTs and investigate differentially-expressed genes in the spleen of Chinese giant salamanders that were either infected or mock infected with GSIV. Comparative expression analysis indicated that 293 genes were down-regulated and 220 genes were up-regulated. Further enrichment analysis showed that the most enriched pathway is "complement and coagulation cascades", and significantly enriched diseases include "inherited thrombophilia", "immune system diseases", "primary immunodeficiency", "complement regulatory protein defects", and "disorders of nucleotide excision repair". Additionally, 30 678 simple sequence repeats (SSRs) from all spleen samples, 26 355 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from the spleens of uninfected animals and 36 070 SNPs from the spleens of infected animals were detected. The large amount of variation was specific for the Chinese giant salamanders that were infected with GSIV. The results reported herein provided significant and new EST information that could contribute greatly in investigations into the molecular functions of immune genes in the Chinese giant salamander. PMID:26589400

  19. Thirty-thousand-year-old distant relative of giant icosahedral DNA viruses with a pandoravirus morphology

    PubMed Central

    Legendre, Matthieu; Bartoli, Julia; Shmakova, Lyubov; Jeudy, Sandra; Labadie, Karine; Adrait, Annie; Lescot, Magali; Poirot, Olivier; Bertaux, Lionel; Bruley, Christophe; Couté, Yohann; Rivkina, Elizaveta; Abergel, Chantal; Claverie, Jean-Michel

    2014-01-01

    The largest known DNA viruses infect Acanthamoeba and belong to two markedly different families. The Megaviridae exhibit pseudo-icosahedral virions up to 0.7 ?m in diameter and adenine–thymine (AT)-rich genomes of up to 1.25 Mb encoding a thousand proteins. Like their Mimivirus prototype discovered 10 y ago, they entirely replicate within cytoplasmic virion factories. In contrast, the recently discovered Pandoraviruses exhibit larger amphora-shaped virions 1 ?m in length and guanine–cytosine-rich genomes up to 2.8 Mb long encoding up to 2,500 proteins. Their replication involves the host nucleus. Whereas the Megaviridae share some general features with the previously described icosahedral large DNA viruses, the Pandoraviruses appear unrelated to them. Here we report the discovery of a third type of giant virus combining an even larger pandoravirus-like particle 1.5 ?m in length with a surprisingly smaller 600 kb AT-rich genome, a gene content more similar to Iridoviruses and Marseillevirus, and a fully cytoplasmic replication reminiscent of the Megaviridae. This suggests that pandoravirus-like particles may be associated with a variety of virus families more diverse than previously envisioned. This giant virus, named Pithovirus sibericum, was isolated from a >30,000-y-old radiocarbon-dated sample when we initiated a survey of the virome of Siberian permafrost. The revival of such an ancestral amoeba-infecting virus used as a safe indicator of the possible presence of pathogenic DNA viruses, suggests that the thawing of permafrost either from global warming or industrial exploitation of circumpolar regions might not be exempt from future threats to human or animal health. PMID:24591590

  20. Characterization of Chinese giant salamander iridovirus tissue tropism and inflammatory response after infection.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Nan; Fan, Yuding; Zhou, Yong; Liu, Wenzhi; Ma, Jie; Meng, Yan; Xie, Congxin; Zeng, Lingbing

    2015-06-01

    The Chinese giant salamander iridovirus (GSIV), belonging to the genus Ranavirus in the family Iridoviridae, causes severe hemorrhagic lesions and nearly 100% mortality in naturally infected Chinese giant salamanders Andrias davidiamus. However, the replication and distribution of the virus has not been well characterized in vivo. Using in situ hybridization, the expression of the GSIV major capsid protein (MCP) was detected in the cytoplasm of cells of the spleen, kidney, liver and gut tissues. MCP expression in the spleen and kidney appeared to fluctuate significantly during the acute phase of infection. Using an immunofluorescence assay, GSIV antigens were abundant in the spleen and kidney tissues but appeared to be at relatively low levels in the liver and gut. Additionally, there were significant changes in the expression of the pro-inflammatory cytokines macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF), tumor necrosis factor ? (TNF-?) and interleukin-1? (IL-1?) in different tissues in response to infection with GSIV. The expression of MIF, TNF-? and IL-1? had significantly increased in the spleen at 3 d post-infection; this correlated with a decrease in virus replication in the spleen. These results suggest that the spleen and kidney are the major target tissues of GSIV, and the increased expression of MIF, TNF?? and IL-1? may contribute to a reduction of virus replication in the spleen. PMID:26036830

  1. Ebola virus infection modeling and identifiability problems

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Van Kinh; Binder, Sebastian C.; Boianelli, Alessandro; Meyer-Hermann, Michael; Hernandez-Vargas, Esteban A.

    2015-01-01

    The recent outbreaks of Ebola virus (EBOV) infections have underlined the impact of the virus as a major threat for human health. Due to the high biosafety classification of EBOV (level 4), basic research is very limited. Therefore, the development of new avenues of thinking to advance quantitative comprehension of the virus and its interaction with the host cells is urgently needed to tackle this lethal disease. Mathematical modeling of the EBOV dynamics can be instrumental to interpret Ebola infection kinetics on quantitative grounds. To the best of our knowledge, a mathematical modeling approach to unravel the interaction between EBOV and the host cells is still missing. In this paper, a mathematical model based on differential equations is used to represent the basic interactions between EBOV and wild-type Vero cells in vitro. Parameter sets that represent infectivity of pathogens are estimated for EBOV infection and compared with influenza virus infection kinetics. The average infecting time of wild-type Vero cells by EBOV is slower than in influenza infection. Simulation results suggest that the slow infecting time of EBOV could be compensated by its efficient replication. This study reveals several identifiability problems and what kind of experiments are necessary to advance the quantification of EBOV infection. A first mathematical approach of EBOV dynamics and the estimation of standard parameters in viral infections kinetics is the key contribution of this work, paving the way for future modeling works on EBOV infection. PMID:25914675

  2. Dengue Virus Infection Perturbs Lipid Homeostasis in Infected Mosquito Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Perera, Rushika M.; Riley, Catherine; Isaac, Georgis; Hopf- Jannasch, Amber; Moore, Ronald J.; Weitz, Karl K.; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Metz, Thomas O.; Adamec, Jiri; Kuhn, Richard J.

    2012-03-22

    Dengue virus causes {approx}50-100 million infections per year and thus is considered one of the most aggressive arthropod-borne human pathogen worldwide. During its replication, dengue virus induces dramatic alterations in the intracellular membranes of infected cells. This phenomenon is observed both in human and vector-derived cells. Using high-resolution mass spectrometry of mosquito cells, we show that this membrane remodeling is directly linked to a unique lipid repertoire induced by dengue virus infection. Specifically, 15% of the metabolites detected were significantly different between DENV infected and uninfected cells while 85% of the metabolites detected were significantly different in isolated replication complex membranes. Furthermore, we demonstrate that intracellular lipid redistribution induced by the inhibition of fatty acid synthase, the rate-limiting enzyme in lipid biosynthesis, is sufficient for cell survival but is inhibitory to dengue virus replication. Lipids that have the capacity to destabilize and change the curvature of membranes as well as lipids that change the permeability of membranes are enriched in dengue virus infected cells. Several sphingolipids and other bioactive signaling molecules that are involved in controlling membrane fusion, fission, and trafficking as well as molecules that influence cytoskeletal reorganization are also up regulated during dengue infection. These observations shed light on the emerging role of lipids in shaping the membrane and protein environments during viral infections and suggest membrane-organizing principles that may influence virus-induced intracellular membrane architecture.

  3. Lipid interactions during virus entry and infection

    PubMed Central

    Mazzon, Michela; Mercer, Jason

    2014-01-01

    Summary For entry and infection viruses have developed numerous strategies to subjugate indispensable cellular factors and functions. Host cell lipids and cellular lipid synthesis machinery are no exception. Not only do viruses exploit existing lipid signalling and modifications for virus entry and trafficking, they also reprogram lipid synthesis, metabolism, and compartmentalization for assembly and egress. Here we review these various concepts and highlight recent progress in understanding viral interactions with host cell lipids during entry and assembly. PMID:25131438

  4. Imported Mayaro virus infection in the Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Hassing, Robert-Jan; Leparc-Goffart, Isabelle; Blank, Sybrandus N; Thevarayan, Subashini; Tolou, Hugues; van Doornum, Gerard; van Genderen, Perry J

    2010-10-01

    A Dutch couple, presenting with persisting arthralgias, temporary fever and rash after a stay in Surinam were diagnosed with Mayaro virus infection. Mayaro virus is a relatively unknown South American Alphavirus responsible for dengue-like clinical features and persisting arthralgias. An important, but probably underappreciated cross-reactivity with other Alphaviruses like Chikungunya virus is present, which may become of clinical importance in the event the various Alphaviruses will have overlapping geographical distributions and in seroprevalence studies. PMID:20600300

  5. Life-Threatening Sochi Virus Infections, Russia.

    PubMed

    Kruger, Detlev H; Tkachenko, Evgeniy A; Morozov, Vyacheslav G; Yunicheva, Yulia V; Pilikova, Olga M; Malkin, Gennadiy; Ishmukhametov, Aydar A; Heinemann, Patrick; Witkowski, Peter T; Klempa, Boris; Dzagurova, Tamara K

    2015-12-01

    Sochi virus was recently identified as a new hantavirus genotype carried by the Black Sea field mouse, Apodemus ponticus. We evaluated 62 patients in Russia with Sochi virus infection. Most clinical cases were severe, and the case-fatality rate was as high as 14.5%. PMID:26584463

  6. Life-Threatening Sochi Virus Infections, Russia

    PubMed Central

    Tkachenko, Evgeniy A.; Morozov, Vyacheslav G.; Yunicheva, Yulia V.; Pilikova, Olga M.; Malkin, Gennadiy; Ishmukhametov, Aydar A.; Heinemann, Patrick; Witkowski, Peter T.; Klempa, Boris; Dzagurova, Tamara K.

    2015-01-01

    Sochi virus was recently identified as a new hantavirus genotype carried by the Black Sea field mouse, Apodemus ponticus. We evaluated 62 patients in Russia with Sochi virus infection. Most clinical cases were severe, and the case-fatality rate was as high as 14.5%. PMID:26584463

  7. DIESEL EXHAUST ENHANCES INFLUENZA VIRUS INFECTIONS IN RESPIRATORY EPITHELIAL CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Several factors, such as age and nutritional status can affect the susceptibility to influenza infections. Moreover, exposure to air pollutants, such as diesel exhaust (DE), has been shown to affect respiratory virus infections in rodent models. Influenza virus primarily infects ...

  8. Fatal Toxoplasma gondii infection in the giant panda

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Hongyu; Wang, Zedong; Wang, Chengdong; Li, Caiwu; Wei, Feng; Liu, Quan

    2015-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii can infect nearly all warm-blooded animals. We report an acute fatal T. gondii infection in the endangered giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) in a zoo in China, characterized by acute gastroenteritis and respiratory symptoms. T. gondii infection was confirmed by immunological and molecular methods. Multilocus nested PCR-RFLP revealed clonal type I at the SAG1 and c29-2 loci, clonal type II at the SAG2, BTUB, GRA6, c22-8, and L358 loci, and clonal type III at the alternative SAG2 and SAG3 loci, thus, a potential new genotype of T. gondii in the giant panda. Other possible pathogens were not detected. To our knowledge, this is the first report of clinical toxoplasmosis in a giant panda. PMID:26514595

  9. Gene repertoire of amoeba-associated giant viruses.

    PubMed

    Colson, Philippe; Raoult, Didier

    2010-01-01

    Acanthamoeba polyphaga mimivirus, Marseillevirus, and Sputnik, a virophage, are intra-amoebal viruses that have been isolated from water collected in cooling towers. They have provided fascinating data and have raised exciting questions about viruses definition and evolution. Mimivirus and Marseillevirus have been classified in the nucleo-cytoplasmic large DNA viruses (NCLDVs) class. Their genomes are the largest and fifth largest viral genomes sequenced so far. The gene repertoire of these amoeba-associated viruses can be divided into four groups: the core genome, genes acquired by lateral gene transfer, duplicated genes, and ORFans. Open reading frames (ORFs) that have homologs in the NCLDVs core gene set represent 2.9 and 6.1% of the Mimivirus and Marseillevirus gene contents, respectively. A substantial proportion of the Mimivirus, Marseillevirus and Sputnik ORFs exhibit sequence similarities to homologs found in bacteria, archaea, eukaryotes or viruses. The large amount of chimeric genes in these viral genomes might have resulted from acquisitions by lateral gene transfers, implicating sympatric bacteria and viruses with an intra-amoebal lifestyle. In addition, lineage-specific gene expansion may have played a major role in the genome shaping. Altogether, the data so far accumulated on amoeba-associated giant viruses are a powerful incentive to isolate and study additional strains to gain better understanding of their pangenome. PMID:20551685

  10. The Pathology of Influenza Virus Infections

    PubMed Central

    Taubenberger, Jeffery K.; Morens, David M.

    2008-01-01

    Influenza viruses are significant human respiratory pathogens that cause both seasonal, endemic infections and periodic, unpredictable pandemics. The worst pandemic on record, in 1918, killed approximately 50 million people worldwide. Human infections caused by H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses have raised concern about the emergence of another pandemic. The histopathology of fatal influenza virus pneumonias as documented over the past 120 years is reviewed here. Strikingly, the spectrum of pathologic changes described in the 1918 influenza pandemic is not significantly different from the histopathology observed in other less lethal pandemics or even in deaths occurring during seasonal influenza outbreaks. PMID:18039138

  11. Respiratory syncytial virus infection in cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bovine respiratory syncytial virus (bRSV) is a cause of respiratory disease in cattle world-wide. It has an integral role in enzootic pneumonia in young dairy calves and summer pneumonia in nursing beef calves. Furthermore, bRSV infection can predispose calves to secondary bacterial infection by org...

  12. Inhibition of enveloped viruses infectivity by curcumin.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tzu-Yen; Chen, Da-Yuan; Wen, Hsiao-Wei; Ou, Jun-Lin; Chiou, Shyan-Song; Chen, Jo-Mei; Wong, Min-Liang; Hsu, Wei-Li

    2013-01-01

    Curcumin, a natural compound and ingredient in curry, has antiinflammatory, antioxidant, and anticarcinogenic properties. Previously, we reported that curcumin abrogated influenza virus infectivity by inhibiting hemagglutination (HA) activity. This study demonstrates a novel mechanism by which curcumin inhibits the infectivity of enveloped viruses. In all analyzed enveloped viruses, including the influenza virus, curcumin inhibited plaque formation. In contrast, the nonenveloped enterovirus 71 remained unaffected by curcumin treatment. We evaluated the effects of curcumin on the membrane structure using fluorescent dye (sulforhodamine B; SRB)-containing liposomes that mimic the viral envelope. Curcumin treatment induced the leakage of SRB from these liposomes and the addition of the influenza virus reduced the leakage, indicating that curcumin disrupts the integrity of the membranes of viral envelopes and of liposomes. When testing liposomes of various diameters, we detected higher levels of SRB leakage from the smaller-sized liposomes than from the larger liposomes. Interestingly, the curcumin concentration required to reduce plaque formation was lower for the influenza virus (approximately 100 nm in diameter) than for the pseudorabies virus (approximately 180 nm) and the vaccinia virus (roughly 335 × 200 × 200 nm). These data provide insights on the molecular antiviral mechanisms of curcumin and its potential use as an antiviral agent for enveloped viruses. PMID:23658730

  13. Inhibition of Enveloped Viruses Infectivity by Curcumin

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Hsiao-Wei; Ou, Jun-Lin; Chiou, Shyan-Song; Chen, Jo-Mei; Wong, Min-Liang; Hsu, Wei-Li

    2013-01-01

    Curcumin, a natural compound and ingredient in curry, has antiinflammatory, antioxidant, and anticarcinogenic properties. Previously, we reported that curcumin abrogated influenza virus infectivity by inhibiting hemagglutination (HA) activity. This study demonstrates a novel mechanism by which curcumin inhibits the infectivity of enveloped viruses. In all analyzed enveloped viruses, including the influenza virus, curcumin inhibited plaque formation. In contrast, the nonenveloped enterovirus 71 remained unaffected by curcumin treatment. We evaluated the effects of curcumin on the membrane structure using fluorescent dye (sulforhodamine B; SRB)-containing liposomes that mimic the viral envelope. Curcumin treatment induced the leakage of SRB from these liposomes and the addition of the influenza virus reduced the leakage, indicating that curcumin disrupts the integrity of the membranes of viral envelopes and of liposomes. When testing liposomes of various diameters, we detected higher levels of SRB leakage from the smaller-sized liposomes than from the larger liposomes. Interestingly, the curcumin concentration required to reduce plaque formation was lower for the influenza virus (approximately 100 nm in diameter) than for the pseudorabies virus (approximately 180 nm) and the vaccinia virus (roughly 335 × 200 × 200 nm). These data provide insights on the molecular antiviral mechanisms of curcumin and its potential use as an antiviral agent for enveloped viruses. PMID:23658730

  14. Infection of phytoplankton by aerosolized marine viruses.

    PubMed

    Sharoni, Shlomit; Trainic, Miri; Schatz, Daniella; Lehahn, Yoav; Flores, Michel J; Bidle, Kay D; Ben-Dor, Shifra; Rudich, Yinon; Koren, Ilan; Vardi, Assaf

    2015-05-26

    Marine viruses constitute a major ecological and evolutionary driving force in the marine ecosystems. However, their dispersal mechanisms remain underexplored. Here we follow the dynamics of Emiliania huxleyi viruses (EhV) that infect the ubiquitous, bloom-forming phytoplankton E. huxleyi and show that EhV are emitted to the atmosphere as primary marine aerosols. Using a laboratory-based setup, we showed that the dynamic of EhV aerial emission is strongly coupled to the host-virus dynamic in the culture media. In addition, we recovered EhV DNA from atmospheric samples collected over an E. huxleyi bloom in the North Atlantic, providing evidence for aerosolization of marine viruses in their natural environment. Decay rate analysis in the laboratory revealed that aerosolized viruses can remain infective under meteorological conditions prevailing during E. huxleyi blooms in the ocean, allowing potential dispersal and infectivity over hundreds of kilometers. Based on the combined laboratory and in situ findings, we propose that atmospheric transport of EhV is an effective transmission mechanism for spreading viral infection over large areas in the ocean. This transmission mechanism may also have an important ecological impact on the large-scale host-virus "arms race" during bloom succession and consequently the turnover of carbon in the ocean. PMID:25964340

  15. Infection of phytoplankton by aerosolized marine viruses

    PubMed Central

    Sharoni, Shlomit; Trainic, Miri; Schatz, Daniella; Lehahn, Yoav; Flores, Michel J.; Bidle, Kay D.; Ben-Dor, Shifra; Rudich, Yinon; Vardi, Assaf

    2015-01-01

    Marine viruses constitute a major ecological and evolutionary driving force in the marine ecosystems. However, their dispersal mechanisms remain underexplored. Here we follow the dynamics of Emiliania huxleyi viruses (EhV) that infect the ubiquitous, bloom-forming phytoplankton E. huxleyi and show that EhV are emitted to the atmosphere as primary marine aerosols. Using a laboratory-based setup, we showed that the dynamic of EhV aerial emission is strongly coupled to the host–virus dynamic in the culture media. In addition, we recovered EhV DNA from atmospheric samples collected over an E. huxleyi bloom in the North Atlantic, providing evidence for aerosolization of marine viruses in their natural environment. Decay rate analysis in the laboratory revealed that aerosolized viruses can remain infective under meteorological conditions prevailing during E. huxleyi blooms in the ocean, allowing potential dispersal and infectivity over hundreds of kilometers. Based on the combined laboratory and in situ findings, we propose that atmospheric transport of EhV is an effective transmission mechanism for spreading viral infection over large areas in the ocean. This transmission mechanism may also have an important ecological impact on the large-scale host–virus “arms race” during bloom succession and consequently the turnover of carbon in the ocean. PMID:25964340

  16. Evolution of double-stranded DNA viruses of eukaryotes: from bacteriophages to transposons to giant viruses

    PubMed Central

    Koonin, Eugene V; Krupovic, Mart; Yutin, Natalya

    2015-01-01

    Diverse eukaryotes including animals and protists are hosts to a broad variety of viruses with double-stranded (ds) DNA genomes, from the largest known viruses, such as pandoraviruses and mimiviruses, to tiny polyomaviruses. Recent comparative genomic analyses have revealed many evolutionary connections between dsDNA viruses of eukaryotes, bacteriophages, transposable elements, and linear DNA plasmids. These findings provide an evolutionary scenario that derives several major groups of eukaryotic dsDNA viruses, including the proposed order “Megavirales,” adenoviruses, and virophages from a group of large virus-like transposons known as Polintons (Mavericks). The Polintons have been recently shown to encode two capsid proteins, suggesting that these elements lead a dual lifestyle with both a transposon and a viral phase and should perhaps more appropriately be named polintoviruses. Here, we describe the recently identified evolutionary relationships between bacteriophages of the family Tectiviridae, polintoviruses, adenoviruses, virophages, large and giant DNA viruses of eukaryotes of the proposed order “Megavirales,” and linear mitochondrial and cytoplasmic plasmids. We outline an evolutionary scenario under which the polintoviruses were the first group of eukaryotic dsDNA viruses that evolved from bacteriophages and became the ancestors of most large DNA viruses of eukaryotes and a variety of other selfish elements. Distinct lines of origin are detectable only for herpesviruses (from a different bacteriophage root) and polyoma/papillomaviruses (from single-stranded DNA viruses and ultimately from plasmids). Phylogenomic analysis of giant viruses provides compelling evidence of their independent origins from smaller members of the putative order “Megavirales,” refuting the speculations on the evolution of these viruses from an extinct fourth domain of cellular life. PMID:25727355

  17. The 474-Kilobase-Pair Complete Genome Sequence of CeV-01B, a Virus Infecting Haptolina (Chrysochromulina) ericina (Prymnesiophyceae)

    PubMed Central

    Gallot-Lavallée, Lucie; Pagarete, António; Legendre, Matthieu; Santini, Sebastien; Sandaa, Ruth-Anne; Himmelbauer, Heinz; Ogata, Hiroyuki; Bratbak, Gunnar

    2015-01-01

    We report the complete genome sequence of CeV-01B, a large double-stranded DNA virus infecting the unicellular marine phytoplankton Haptolina (formerly Chrysochromulina) ericina. CeV-01B and its closest relative Phaeocystis globosa virus define an emerging subclade of the Megaviridae family with smaller genomes and particles than the originally described giant Mimiviridae infecting Acanthamoeba. PMID:26634761

  18. Dynamics of Influenza Virus Infection and Pathology?

    PubMed Central

    Saenz, Roberto A.; Quinlivan, Michelle; Elton, Debra; MacRae, Shona; Blunden, Anthony S.; Mumford, Jennifer A.; Daly, Janet M.; Digard, Paul; Cullinane, Ann; Grenfell, Bryan T.; McCauley, John W.; Wood, James L. N.; Gog, Julia R.

    2010-01-01

    A key question in pandemic influenza is the relative roles of innate immunity and target cell depletion in limiting primary infection and modulating pathology. Here, we model these interactions using detailed data from equine influenza virus infection, combining viral and immune (type I interferon) kinetics with estimates of cell depletion. The resulting dynamics indicate a powerful role for innate immunity in controlling the rapid peak in virus shedding. As a corollary, cells are much less depleted than suggested by a model of human influenza based only on virus-shedding data. We then explore how differences in the influence of viral proteins on interferon kinetics can account for the observed spectrum of virus shedding, immune response, and influenza pathology. In particular, induction of high levels of interferon (“cytokine storms”), coupled with evasion of its effects, could lead to severe pathology, as hypothesized for some fatal cases of influenza. PMID:20130053

  19. Influenza virus infection in a compromised immune system 

    E-print Network

    Campbell, Gillian Mhairi

    2012-06-30

    Severe influenza virus infection, including human infection with highly pathogenic H5N1 viruses is characterised by massive pulmonary inflammation, immunopathology and excessive cytokine production, a process in ...

  20. Pathogenesis of human immunodeficiency virus infection.

    PubMed Central

    Levy, J A

    1993-01-01

    The lentivirus human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) causes AIDS by interacting with a large number of different cells in the body and escaping the host immune response against it. HIV is transmitted primarily through blood and genital fluids and to newborn infants from infected mothers. The steps occurring in infection involve an interaction of HIV not only with the CD4 molecule on cells but also with other cellular receptors recently identified. Virus-cell fusion and HIV entry subsequently take place. Following virus infection, a variety of intracellular mechanisms determine the relative expression of viral regulatory and accessory genes leading to productive or latent infection. With CD4+ lymphocytes, HIV replication can cause syncytium formation and cell death; with other cells, such as macrophages, persistent infection can occur, creating reservoirs for the virus in many cells and tissues. HIV strains are highly heterogeneous, and certain biologic and serologic properties determined by specific genetic sequences can be linked to pathogenic pathways and resistance to the immune response. The host reaction against HIV, through neutralizing antibodies and particularly through strong cellular immune responses, can keep the virus suppressed for many years. Long-term survival appears to involve infection with a relatively low-virulence strain that remains sensitive to the immune response, particularly to control by CD8+ cell antiviral activity. Several therapeutic approaches have been attempted, and others are under investigation. Vaccine development has provided some encouraging results, but the observations indicate the major challenge of preventing infection by HIV. Ongoing research is necessary to find a solution to this devastating worldwide epidemic. Images PMID:8464405

  1. Activity of andrographolide against chikungunya virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Wintachai, Phitchayapak; Kaur, Parveen; Lee, Regina Ching Hua; Ramphan, Suwipa; Kuadkitkan, Atichat; Wikan, Nitwara; Ubol, Sukathida; Roytrakul, Sittiruk; Chu, Justin Jang Hann; Smith, Duncan R.

    2015-01-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is a re-emerging mosquito-borne alphavirus that has recently engendered large epidemics around the world. There is no specific antiviral for treatment of patients infected with CHIKV, and development of compounds with significant anti-CHIKV activity that can be further developed to a practical therapy is urgently required. Andrographolide is derived from Andrographis paniculata, a herb traditionally used to treat a number of conditions including infections. This study sought to determine the potential of andrographolide as an inhibitor of CHIKV infection. Andrographolide showed good inhibition of CHIKV infection and reduced virus production by approximately 3log10 with a 50% effective concentration (EC50) of 77??M without cytotoxicity. Time-of-addition and RNA transfection studies showed that andrographolide affected CHIKV replication and the activity of andrographolide was shown to be cell type independent. This study suggests that andrographolide has the potential to be developed further as an anti-CHIKV therapeutic agent. PMID:26384169

  2. Activity of andrographolide against chikungunya virus infection.

    PubMed

    Wintachai, Phitchayapak; Kaur, Parveen; Lee, Regina Ching Hua; Ramphan, Suwipa; Kuadkitkan, Atichat; Wikan, Nitwara; Ubol, Sukathida; Roytrakul, Sittiruk; Chu, Justin Jang Hann; Smith, Duncan R

    2015-01-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is a re-emerging mosquito-borne alphavirus that has recently engendered large epidemics around the world. There is no specific antiviral for treatment of patients infected with CHIKV, and development of compounds with significant anti-CHIKV activity that can be further developed to a practical therapy is urgently required. Andrographolide is derived from Andrographis paniculata, a herb traditionally used to treat a number of conditions including infections. This study sought to determine the potential of andrographolide as an inhibitor of CHIKV infection. Andrographolide showed good inhibition of CHIKV infection and reduced virus production by approximately 3log10 with a 50% effective concentration (EC50) of 77 ?M without cytotoxicity. Time-of-addition and RNA transfection studies showed that andrographolide affected CHIKV replication and the activity of andrographolide was shown to be cell type independent. This study suggests that andrographolide has the potential to be developed further as an anti-CHIKV therapeutic agent. PMID:26384169

  3. Pseudorabies virus infection in Oklahoma hunting dogs.

    PubMed

    Cramer, Sarah D; Campbell, Gregory A; Njaa, Bradley L; Morgan, Sandra E; Smith, Stephen K; McLin, William R; Brodersen, Bruce W; Wise, Annabel G; Scherba, Gail; Langohr, Ingeborg M; Maes, Roger K

    2011-09-01

    Pseudorabies is caused by Suid herpesvirus 1, a member of the Alphaherpesvirinae subfamily. Although pigs are the natural host of Pseudorabies virus (PRV), the virus has a broad host range and may cause fatal encephalitis in many species. The United States obtained PRV-free status in 2004 after the virus was eradicated from domestic swineherds, but the virus is still present in feral swine populations. The current report describes PRV infection in 3 dogs that were used to hunt feral swine. The dogs developed clinical signs including facial pruritus with facial abrasions, dyspnea, vomiting, diarrhea, ataxia, muscle stiffness, and death. Two were euthanized, and 1 died within approximately 48 hr after onset of clinical signs. The salient histologic changes consisted of neutrophilic trigeminal ganglioneuritis with neuronophagia and equivocal intranuclear inclusion bodies. Pseudorabies virus was isolated from fresh tissues from 2 of the dogs, and immunohistochemistry detected the virus in the third dog. Virus sequencing and phylogeny, based upon available GenBank sequences, revealed that the virus was likely a field strain that was closely related to a cluster of PRV strains previously identified in Illinois. Though eradicated from domestic swine in the United States, PRV is present in populations of feral swine, and should therefore continue to be considered a possible cause of disease in dogs and other domestic animals with compatible clinical history and signs. Continued surveillance is necessary to prevent reintroduction of PRV into domestic swine. PMID:21908347

  4. Mimiviridae: clusters of orthologous genes, reconstruction of gene repertoire evolution and proposed expansion of the giant virus family

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The family Mimiviridae belongs to the large monophyletic group of Nucleo-Cytoplasmic Large DNA Viruses (NCLDV; proposed order Megavirales) and encompasses giant viruses infecting amoeba and probably other unicellular eukaryotes. The recent discovery of the Cafeteria roenbergensis virus (CroV), a distant relative of the prototype mimiviruses, led to a substantial expansion of the genetic variance within the family Mimiviridae. In the light of these findings, a reassessment of the relationships between the mimiviruses and other NCLDV and reconstruction of the evolution of giant virus genomes emerge as interesting and timely goals. Results Database searches for the protein sequences encoded in the genomes of several viruses originally classified as members of the family Phycodnaviridae, in particular Organic Lake phycodnaviruses and Phaeocystis globosa viruses (OLPG), revealed a greater number of highly similar homologs in members of the Mimiviridae than in phycodnaviruses. We constructed a collection of 898 Clusters of Orthologous Genes for the putative expanded family Mimiviridae (MimiCOGs) and used these clusters for a comprehensive phylogenetic analysis of the genes that are conserved in most of the NCLDV. The topologies of the phylogenetic trees for these conserved viral genes strongly support the monophyly of the OLPG and the mimiviruses. The same tree topology was obtained by analysis of the phyletic patterns of conserved viral genes. We further employed the mimiCOGs to obtain a maximum likelihood reconstruction of the history of genes losses and gains among the giant viruses. The results reveal massive gene gain in the mimivirus branch and modest gene gain in the OLPG branch. Conclusions These phylogenomic results reported here suggest a substantial expansion of the family Mimiviridae. The proposed expanded family encompasses a greater diversity of viruses including a group of viruses with much smaller genomes than those of the original members of the Mimiviridae. If the OLPG group is included in an expanded family Mimiviridae, it becomes the only family of giant viruses currently shown to host virophages. The mimiCOGs are expected to become a key resource for phylogenomics of giant viruses. PMID:23557328

  5. Cellular Scent of Influenza Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Aksenov, Alexander A.; Sandrock, Christian E.; Zhao, Weixiang; Sankaran, Shankar; Schivo, Michael; Harper, Richart; Cardona, Carol J.; Xing, Zheng; Davis, Cristina E.

    2014-01-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emanating from humans have the potential to revolutionize non-invasive diagnostics. Yet, little is known about how these compounds are generated by complex biological systems, and even less is known about how these compounds are reflective of a particular physiological state. In this proof-of-concept study, we examined VOCs produced directly at the cellular level from B lymphoblastoid cells upon infection with three live influenza virus subtypes: H9N2 (avian), H6N2 (avian), and H1N1 (human). Using a single cell line helped to alleviate some of the complexity and variability when studying VOC production by an entire organism, and it allowed us to discern marked differences in VOC production upon infection of the cells. The patterns of VOCs produced in response to infection were unique for each virus subtype, while several other non-specific VOCs were produced after infections with all three strains. Also, there was a specific time course of VOC release post infection. Among emitted VOCs, production of esters and other oxygenated compounds was particularly notable, and these may be attributed to increased oxidative stress resulting from infection. Elucidating VOC signatures that result from the host cells response to infection may yield an avenue for non-invasive diagnostics and therapy of influenza and other viral infections. PMID:24719290

  6. Previous infection with a mesogenic strain of Newcastle disease virus affects infection with highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses in chickens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Avian influenza virus (AIV) and Newcastle disease virus (NDV) are two of the most important viruses affecting poultry worldwide, but little is known on the interactions between these two viruses when infecting birds. In a previous study we found that infection of chickens with a mesogenic strain of...

  7. Pathogenesis of Machupo virus infection in primates*

    PubMed Central

    Eddy, G. A.; Scott, S. K.; Wagner, F. S.; Brand, O. M.

    1975-01-01

    Experimental Machupo virus infection of rhesus and cynomolgus monkeys produced a severe illness consisting of an initial clinical phase and a later neurological phase. Cumulative mortality during the two phases was 80% and 95% respectively. Attempts to alter the pathogenesis with decomplementation or immunosuppression resulted in earlier deaths of the monkeys. PMID:182402

  8. DAMPs and influenza virus infection in ageing.

    PubMed

    Samy, Ramar Perumal; Lim, Lina H K

    2015-11-01

    Influenza A virus (IAV) is a serious global health problem worldwide due to frequent and severe outbreaks. IAV causes significant morbidity and mortality in the elderly population, due to the ineffectiveness of the vaccine and the alteration of T cell immunity with ageing. The cellular and molecular link between ageing and virus infection is unclear and it is possible that damage associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) may play a role in the raised severity and susceptibility of virus infections in the elderly. DAMPs which are released from damaged cells following activation, injury or cell death can activate the immune response through the stimulation of the inflammasome through several types of receptors found on the plasma membrane, inside endosomes after endocytosis as well as in the cytosol. In this review, the detriment in the immune system during ageing and the links between influenza virus infection and ageing will be discussed. In addition, the role of DAMPs such as HMGB1 and S100/Annexin in ageing, and the enhanced morbidity and mortality to severe influenza infection in ageing will be highlighted. PMID:26200296

  9. The neurobiology of varicella zoster virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Gilden, D.; Mahalingam, R.; Nagel, M. A.; Pugazhenthi, S.; Cohrs, R. J.

    2011-01-01

    Varicella zoster virus (VZV) is a neurotropic herpesvirus that infects nearly all humans. Primary infection usually causes chickenpox (varicella), after which virus becomes latent in cranial nerve ganglia, dorsal root ganglia and autonomic ganglia along the entire neuraxis. Although VZV cannot be isolated from human ganglia, nucleic acid hybridization and, later, polymerase chain reaction proved that VZV is latent in ganglia. Declining VZV-specific host immunity decades after primary infection allows virus to reactivate spontaneously, resulting in shingles (zoster) characterized by pain and rash restricted to 1-3 dermatomes. Multiple other serious neurological and ocular disorders also result from VZV reactivation. This review summarizes the current state of knowledge of the clinical and pathological complications of neurological and ocular disease produced by VZV reactivation, molecular aspects of VZV latency, VZV virology and VZV-specific immunity, the role of apoptosis in VZV-induced cell death, and the development of an animal model provided by simian varicella virus infection of monkeys. PMID:21342215

  10. Transmission of human infection with Nipah Virus

    PubMed Central

    Luby, Stephen P.; Gurley, Emily S.; Hossain, M. Jahangir

    2009-01-01

    Nipah virus (NiV) is a paramyxovirus whose reservoir host is fruit bats of the genus Pteropus. Occasionally the virus is introduced into human populations and causes severe illness characterized by encephalitis or respiratory disease. The first outbreak of NiV was recognized in Malaysia, but since 2001 eight outbreaks have been reported from Bangladesh. The primary pathways of transmission from bats to people in Bangladesh are through contamination of raw date palm sap by bats with subsequent consumption by humans and through infection of domestic animals (cattle, pigs, and goats), presumably from consumption of food contaminated with bat saliva or urine with subsequent transmission to people. Approximately half of recognized Nipah cases in Bangladesh developed their disease following person to person transmission of the virus. Efforts to prevent transmission should focus on decreasing bat access to date palm sap and reducing family members' and friends' exposure to infected patients' saliva. PMID:19886791

  11. Transmission of human infection with Nipah virus.

    PubMed

    Luby, Stephen P; Gurley, Emily S; Hossain, M Jahangir

    2009-12-01

    Nipah virus (NiV) is a paramyxovirus whose reservoir host is fruit bats of the genus Pteropus. Occasionally the virus is introduced into human populations and causes severe illness characterized by encephalitis or respiratory disease. The first outbreak of NiV was recognized in Malaysia, but 8 outbreaks have been reported from Bangladesh since 2001. The primary pathways of transmission from bats to people in Bangladesh are through contamination of raw date palm sap by bats with subsequent consumption by humans and through infection of domestic animals (cattle, pigs, and goats), presumably from consumption of food contaminated with bat saliva or urine with subsequent transmission to people. Approximately one-half of recognized Nipah case patients in Bangladesh developed their disease following person-to-person transmission of the virus. Efforts to prevent transmission should focus on decreasing bat access to date palm sap and reducing family members' and friends' exposure to infected patients' saliva. PMID:19886791

  12. Orf virus infection in sheep or goats.

    PubMed

    Spyrou, V; Valiakos, G

    2015-12-14

    Orf virus, a member of the genus Parapoxvirus, is the causative agent of contagious ecthyma ('Orf'). It is a pathogen with worldwide distribution, causing significant financial losses in livestock production. The disease mainly affects sheep and goats, but various other ruminants and mammals have been reported to be infected as well. It is also a zoonotic disease, affecting mainly people who come in direct or indirect contact with infected animals (e.g. farmers, veterinarians). The disease is usually benign and self-limiting, although in many cases, especially in young animals, it can be persistent and even fatal. Production losses caused by Orf virus are believed to be underestimated, as it is not a notifiable disease. This review of literature presents all latest information regarding the virus; considerations regarding treatment and prevention will be also discussed. PMID:26315771

  13. Bovine model of respiratory syncytial virus infection.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Geraldine

    2013-01-01

    Bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV), which is an important cause of respiratory disease in young calves, is genetically and antigenically closely related to human (H)RSV. The epidemiology and pathogenesis of infection with these viruses are similar. The viruses are host-specific and infection produces a spectrum of disease ranging from subclinical to severe bronchiolitis and pneumonia, with the peak incidence of severe disease in individuals less than 6 months of age. BRSV infection in calves reproduces many of the clinical signs associated with HRSV in infants, including fever, rhinorrhoea, coughing, harsh breath sounds and rapid breathing. Although BRSV vaccines have been commercially available for decades, there is a need for greater efficacy. The development of effective BRSV and HRSV vaccines face similar challenges, such as the need to vaccinate at an early age in the presence of maternal antibodies, the failure of natural infection to prevent reinfection, and a history of vaccine-augmented disease. Neutralising monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) to the fusion (F) protein of HRSV, which can protect infants from severe HRSV disease, recognise the F protein of BRSV, and vice versa. Furthermore, bovine and human CD8(+) T-cells, which are known to be important in recovery from RSV infection, recognise similar proteins that are conserved between HRSV and BRSV. Therefore, not only can the bovine model of RSV be used to evaluate vaccine concepts, it can also be used as part of the preclinical assessment of certain HRSV candidate vaccines. PMID:24362697

  14. The cell biology of Chikungunya virus infection.

    PubMed

    Tang, Bor Luen

    2012-09-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) infection causes a disease which appears to affect multiple cell types and tissues. The acute phase is manifested by a non-fatal febrile illness, polyarthralgia and maculopapular rashes in adults, but with recurrent arthralgia that may linger for months during convalescence. The issue of cellular and tissue tropism of CHIKV has elicited interest primarily because of this lingering incapacitating chronic joint pain, as well as clear encephalopathy in severe cases among neonates during the re-emergence of the virus in recent epidemics. The principle cell types productively infected by CHIKV are skin fibroblasts, epithelial cells and lymphoid tissues. There is controversy as to whether CHIKV productively infects haematopoietic cells and neurones/glia. CHIKV infection triggers rapid and robust innate immune responses which quickly clears the acute phase infection. However, significant acute as well as chronic infection of less obvious cell types, such as monocytes, neurones/glia or even CNS neural progenitors may conceivably occur. There is therefore a need to ascertain the full range potential of CHIKV tropism, fully understand the cellular responses triggered during the acute the convalescent phases, and explore possible cell types that might be the source of chronic problems associated with CHIKV infection. PMID:22686853

  15. Giant Virus Megavirus chilensis Encodes the Biosynthetic Pathway for Uncommon Acetamido Sugars*

    PubMed Central

    Piacente, Francesco; De Castro, Cristina; Jeudy, Sandra; Molinaro, Antonio; Salis, Annalisa; Damonte, Gianluca; Bernardi, Cinzia; Abergel, Chantal; Tonetti, Michela G.

    2014-01-01

    Giant viruses mimicking microbes, by the sizes of their particles and the heavily glycosylated fibrils surrounding their capsids, infect Acanthamoeba sp., which are ubiquitous unicellular eukaryotes. The glycans on fibrils are produced by virally encoded enzymes, organized in gene clusters. Like Mimivirus, Megavirus glycans are mainly composed of virally synthesized N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc). They also contain N-acetylrhamnosamine (RhaNAc), a rare sugar; the enzymes involved in its synthesis are encoded by a gene cluster specific to Megavirus close relatives. We combined activity assays on two enzymes of the pathway with mass spectrometry and NMR studies to characterize their specificities. Mg534 is a 4,6-dehydratase 5-epimerase; its three-dimensional structure suggests that it belongs to a third subfamily of inverting dehydratases. Mg535, next in the pathway, is a bifunctional 3-epimerase 4-reductase. The sequential activity of the two enzymes leads to the formation of UDP-l-RhaNAc. This study is another example of giant viruses performing their glycan synthesis using enzymes different from their cellular counterparts, raising again the question of the origin of these pathways. PMID:25035429

  16. Zebrafish: Modeling for Herpes Simplex Virus Infections

    PubMed Central

    Antoine, Thessicar Evadney; Jones, Kevin S.; Dale, Rodney M.; Shukla, Deepak

    2014-01-01

    Abstract For many years, zebrafish have been the prototypical model for studies in developmental biology. In recent years, zebrafish has emerged as a powerful model system to study infectious diseases, including viral infections. Experiments conducted with herpes simplex virus type-1 in adult zebrafish or in embryo models are encouraging as they establish proof of concept with viral-host tropism and possible screening of antiviral compounds. In addition, the presence of human homologs of viral entry receptors in zebrafish such as 3-O sulfated heparan sulfate, nectins, and tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily member 14-like receptor bring strong rationale for virologists to test their in vivo significance in viral entry in a zebrafish model and compare the structure–function basis of virus zebrafish receptor interaction for viral entry. On the other end, a zebrafish model is already being used for studying inflammation and angiogenesis, with or without genetic manipulations, and therefore can be exploited to study viral infection-associated pathologies. The major advantage with zebrafish is low cost, easy breeding and maintenance, rapid lifecycle, and a transparent nature, which allows visualizing dissemination of fluorescently labeled virus infection in real time either at a localized region or the whole body. Further, the availability of multiple transgenic lines that express fluorescently tagged immune cells for in vivo imaging of virus infected animals is extremely attractive. In addition, a fully developed immune system and potential for receptor-specific knockouts further advocate the use of zebrafish as a new tool to study viral infections. In this review, we focus on expanding the potential of zebrafish model system in understanding human infectious diseases and future benefits. PMID:24266790

  17. A single vertebrate DNA virus protein disarms invertebrate immunity to RNA virus infection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Virus-host interactions drive a remarkable diversity of immune responses and countermeasures. While investigating virus-invertebrate host interactions we found that two RNA viruses with broad host ranges, vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) and Sindbis virus (SINV), were unable to infect certain Lepido...

  18. West Nile virus infection in children.

    PubMed

    Barzon, Luisa; Pacenti, Monia; Sinigaglia, Alessandro; Berto, Alessandro; Trevisan, Marta; Palù, Giorgio

    2015-11-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) is an emerging flavivirus responsible for an increasing number of outbreaks of neuroinvasive disease in North America, Europe, and neighboring countries. Almost all WNV infections in humans are transmitted through the bite of infected mosquitoes. Transmission during pregnancy and through breastfeeding has been reported, but the risk seems to be very low. West Nile disease in children is less common (1-5% of all WNV cases) and associated with milder symptoms and better outcome than in elderly individuals, even though severe neuroinvasive disease and death have been reported also among children. However, the incidence of WNV infection and disease in children is probably underestimated and the disease spectrum is not fully understood because of lack of reporting and underdiagnosis in children. Infection is diagnosed by detection of WNV-specific antibodies in serum and WNV RNA in plasma and urine. Since no effective WNV-specific drugs are available, therapy is mainly supportive. PMID:26325613

  19. Hepatitis C virus infection in nephrology patients

    PubMed Central

    Rostaing, Lionel; Izopet, Jacques; Kamar, Nassim

    2013-01-01

    Context: Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection leads to chronic liver disease, but also to extra-hepatic manifestations. Evidence Acquisitions: Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ), Google Scholar, Pubmed (NLM), LISTA (EBSCO) and Web of Science have been searched. Results: Herein, we provide an overview of renal diseases related to HCV and their therapies, as well as the treatment options available for HCV (+)/RNA (+) dialysis patients. We will not mention, however, HCV infection-related complications in the post-kidney transplantation setting. Conclusions: Extra-hepatic manifestations of HCV infection include mixed cryoglobulinemia, lymphoproliferative disorders, and renal disease. HCV infection has been reported in association with distinct histological patterns of glomerulonephritis in native kidneys. PMID:24475454

  20. ANALYSIS OF HEPATITIS C VIRUS INFECTION MODELS WITH HEPATOCYTE HOMEOSTASIS

    E-print Network

    Reluga, Tim

    ANALYSIS OF HEPATITIS C VIRUS INFECTION MODELS WITH HEPATOCYTE HOMEOSTASIS TIMOTHY C. RELUGA ALAMOS NATIONAL LABORATORY LOS ALAMOS, NM 87545 Abstract. Recently, we developed a model for hepatitis C infections with hepatotropic viruses, such as hepatitis B virus. Key words. HCV, viral dynamics, bifurcation

  1. Animal Models of Varicella Zoster Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Haberthur, Kristen; Messaoudi, Ilhem

    2013-01-01

    Primary infection with varicella zoster virus (VZV) results in varicella (chickenpox) followed by the establishment of latency in sensory ganglia. Declining T cell immunity due to aging or immune suppressive treatments can lead to VZV reactivation and the development of herpes zoster (HZ, shingles). HZ is often associated with significant morbidity and occasionally mortality in elderly and immune compromised patients. There are currently two FDA-approved vaccines for the prevention of VZV: Varivax® (for varicella) and Zostavax® (for HZ). Both vaccines contain the live-attenuated Oka strain of VZV. Although highly immunogenic, a two-dose regimen is required to achieve a 99% seroconversion rate. Zostavax vaccination reduces the incidence of HZ by 51% within a 3-year period, but a significant reduction in vaccine-induced immunity is observed within the first year after vaccination. Developing more efficacious vaccines and therapeutics requires a better understanding of the host response to VZV. These studies have been hampered by the scarcity of animal models that recapitulate all aspects of VZV infections in humans. In this review, we describe different animal models of VZV infection as well as an alternative animal model that leverages the infection of Old World macaques with the highly related simian varicella virus (SVV) and discuss their contributions to our understanding of pathogenesis and immunity during VZV infection. PMID:25437040

  2. Endemic mycosis complicating human immunodeficiency virus infection.

    PubMed Central

    Sarosi, G A; DAvies, S F

    1996-01-01

    Persons infected with the human immunodeficiency virus are prone to the development of many fungal diseases. Normal hosts with intact immunity usually recover from infection by these less-invasive fungi. In persons with compromised T-cell-mediated immunity, however, widespread dissemination from a pulmonary focus occurs. In this review, we discuss the epidemiology, clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and treatment of the three major North American mycoses, histoplasmosis, blastomycosis, and coccidioidomycosis. In most cases, amphotericin B is the initial drug of choice, followed by one of the azoles for lifelong maintenance therapy. PMID:8732733

  3. Vaccinia Virus Infection Requires Maturation of Macropinosomes.

    PubMed

    Rizopoulos, Zaira; Balistreri, Giuseppe; Kilcher, Samuel; Martin, Caroline K; Syedbasha, Mohammedyaseen; Helenius, Ari; Mercer, Jason

    2015-08-01

    The prototypic poxvirus, vaccinia virus (VACV), occurs in two infectious forms, mature virions (MVs) and extracellular virions (EVs). Both enter HeLa cells by inducing macropinocytic uptake. Using confocal microscopy, live-cell imaging, targeted RNAi screening and perturbants of endosome maturation, we analyzed the properties and maturation pathway of the macropinocytic vacuoles containing VACV MVs in HeLa cells. The vacuoles first acquired markers of early endosomes [Rab5, early endosome antigen 1 and phosphatidylinositol(3)P]. Prior to release of virus cores into the cytoplasm, they contained markers of late endosomes and lysosomes (Rab7a, lysosome-associated membrane protein 1 and sorting nexin 3). RNAi screening of endocytic cell factors emphasized the importance of late compartments for VACV infection. Follow-up perturbation analysis showed that infection required Rab7a and PIKfyve, confirming that VACV is a late-penetrating virus dependent on macropinosome maturation. VACV EV infection was inhibited by depletion of many of the same factors, indicating that both infectious particle forms share the need for late vacuolar conditions for penetration. PMID:25869659

  4. Interferon production and virus replication in lymphoblastoid cells infected with different viruses.

    PubMed

    Heremans, H; de Ley, M; Volckaert-Vervliet, G; Billiau, A

    1980-01-01

    A semicontinuous infection system was used to test viral replication and interferon induction in lymphoblastoid cells: measles virus, Newcastle disease virus (NDV), Sendai virus, human parainfluenza virus (type II and III), Semliki forest virus (SFV) and Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV). With the exception of Sendai virus, all viruses replicated in the Namalva cell line. Only measles virus was able to induce high levels of interferon. Three other cell lines, NC37, Raji (TK+-variant) and Raji (TK--variant) were tested using measles virus as inducer. The interferon yields from these cells were inferior to those obtained from Namalva cells. PMID:6243928

  5. Structural Insight into African Horsesickness Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Manole, Violeta; Laurinmäki, Pasi; Van Wyngaardt, Wouter; Potgieter, Christiaan A.; Wright, Isabella M.; Venter, Gert J.; van Dijk, Alberdina A.; Sewell, B. Trevor

    2012-01-01

    African horsesickness (AHS) is a devastating disease of horses. The disease is caused by the double-stranded RNA-containing African horsesickness virus (AHSV). Using electron cryomicroscopy and three-dimensional image reconstruction, we determined the architecture of an AHSV serotype 4 (AHSV-4) reference strain. The structure revealed triple-layered AHS virions enclosing the segmented genome and transcriptase complex. The innermost protein layer contains 120 copies of VP3, with the viral polymerase, capping enzyme, and helicase attached to the inner surface of the VP3 layer on the 5-fold axis, surrounded by double-stranded RNA. VP7 trimers form a second, T=13 layer on top of VP3. Comparative analyses of the structures of bluetongue virus and AHSV-4 confirmed that VP5 trimers form globular domains and VP2 trimers form triskelions, on the virion surface. We also identified an AHSV-7 strain with a truncated VP2 protein (AHSV-7 tVP2) which outgrows AHSV-4 in culture. Comparison of AHSV-7 tVP2 to bluetongue virus and AHSV-4 allowed mapping of two domains in AHSV-4 VP2, and one in bluetongue virus VP2, that are important in infection. We also revealed a protein plugging the 5-fold vertices in AHSV-4. These results shed light on virus-host interactions in an economically important orbivirus to help the informed design of new vaccines. PMID:22593166

  6. Human Jamestown canyon virus infection --- Montana, 2009.

    PubMed

    2011-05-27

    Jamestown Canyon virus (JCV) is a mosquito-borne zoonotic pathogen belonging to the California serogroup of bunyaviruses. Although JCV is widely distributed throughout temperate North America, reports of human JCV infection in the United States are rare. This is the first report of human JCV infection detected in Montana, one of only 15 cases reported in the United States since 2004, when JCV became reportable. On May 26, 2009, a man aged 51 years with no travel history outside of Montana went to a local emergency department immediately following onset of fever, severe frontal headache, dizziness, left-sided numbness, and tingling. His blood pressure was elevated. Stroke was ruled out, oxygen was administered, medication was prescribed for hypertension, and the patient was sent home. One week later, the patient visited his primary-care physician complaining of continued neurologic symptoms consistent with acute febrile encephalitis and recent mosquito bites. Although West Nile virus (WNV) disease was diagnosed based on detection of WNV-immunoglobulin M (IgM) and G (IgG) antibodies, subsequent testing indicated that the WNV antibodies were from a past infection and that his illness was caused by JCV. The final diagnosis of JCV infection was based on positive JCV-specific IgM enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) results and a fourfold rise in paired sample JCV plaque reduction neutralization test (PRNT) titers. This finding represents a previously unrecognized risk for JCV infection in Montana; clinicians should consider JCV infection when assessing patients for suspected arboviral infections. PMID:21617630

  7. KINETIC PROFILE OF INFLUENZA VIRUS INFECTION IN THREE RAT STRAINS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract

    Influenza infection is a respiratory disease of viral origin that can cause major epidemics in man. The influenza virus infects and damages epithelial cells of the respiratory tract and causes pneumonia. Lung lesions of mice infected with influenza virus resembl...

  8. Chronic hepatitis B virus infection.

    PubMed

    McMahon, Brian J

    2014-01-01

    All providers, regardless of specialty, should perform screening for HBV on high-risk persons, especially those born in endemic countries. The primary care physician can perform the initial evaluation and follow-up of patients with chronic HBV by following the algorithm in this article and consulting with specialists when appropriate. Chronically infected patients should be followed on a regular basis, preferably every 6 months, with liver function tests, and when appropriate, HBV DNA levels. Those who meet the criteria for high risk for HCC should undergo liver ultrasound every 6 months. Powerful antiviral medications are available that can suppress but not cure HBV and result in resolution of liver inflammation and fibrosis, even cirrhosis, as well as decrease the risk of developing HCC. They should be used in those patients who meet the criteria outlined in the practice guidelines of the major liver societies. PMID:24266913

  9. Pathogenesis of human immunodeficiency virus infection and prospects for control.

    PubMed Central

    Ho, D. D.; Kaplan, J. C.

    1987-01-01

    In just six years after the initial description of the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, much has been learned about the etiologic agent, the human immunodeficiency virus. The pathogenic mechanisms utilized by this virus to infect selectively and persistently T4+ lymphocytes and monocyte/macrophages, leading to immunodeficiency and neurologic dysfunction, are slowly becoming clear. Better understanding of the pathogenesis of human immunodeficiency virus infection is essential for the rational design of therapeutic and preventive strategies to combat this deadly virus. PMID:3324508

  10. Hepatitis B virus infection in immigrant populations

    PubMed Central

    Coppola, Nicola; Alessio, Loredana; Pisaturo, Mariantonietta; Macera, Margherita; Sagnelli, Caterina; Zampino, Rosa; Sagnelli, Evangelista

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is the most common cause of hepatitis worldwide, with nearly 350 million people chronically infected and 600000 deaths per year due to acute liver failure occurring during acute hepatitis or, more frequently, in HBV-related liver cirrhosis or hepatocellular carcinoma. Ongoing immigration from countries with a high HBV endemicity to those with a low HBV endemicity warrants particular attention to prevent the spread of HBV infection to the native population. This review article analyzes the epidemiology and virological and clinical characteristics of HBV infection in immigrant populations and in their host countries, and suggests prophylactic measures to prevent the spread of this infection. Among the immigrants from different geographical areas, those from South East Asia and sub-Saharan Africa show the highest prevalences of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) carriers, in accordance with the high endemicity of the countries of origin. The molecular characteristics of HBV infection in immigrants reflect those of the geographical areas of origin: HBV genotype A and D predominate in immigrants from Eastern Europe, B and C in those from Asia and genotype E in those from Africa. The literature data on the clinical course and treatment of HBsAg-positive immigrants are scanty. The management of HBV infection in immigrant populations is difficult and requires expert personnel and dedicated structures for their assistance. The social services, voluntary operators and cultural mediators are essential to achieve optimized psychological and clinical intervention.

  11. Previously Unknown Virus Infects Marine Diatom

    PubMed Central

    Nagasaki, Keizo; Tomaru, Yuji; Takao, Yoshitake; Nishida, Kensho; Shirai, Yoko; Suzuki, Hidekazu; Nagumo, Tamotsu

    2005-01-01

    Diatoms are a major phytoplankton group that play important roles in maintaining oxygen levels in the atmosphere and sustaining the primary nutritional production of the aquatic environment. Among diatoms, the genus Chaetoceros is one of the most abundant and widespread. Temperature, climate, salinity, nutrients, and predators were regarded as important factors controlling the abundance and population dynamics of diatoms. Here we show that a viral infection can occur in the genus Chaetoceros and should therefore be considered as a potential mortality source. Chaetoceros salsugineum nuclear inclusion virus (CsNIV) is a 38-nm icosahedral virus that replicates within the nucleus of C. salsugineum. The latent period was estimated to be between 12 and 24 h, with a burst size of 325 infectious units per host cell. CsNIV has a genome structure unlike that of other viruses that have been described. It consists of a single molecule of covalently closed circular single-stranded DNA (ssDNA; 6,005 nucleotides), as well as a segment of linear ssDNA (997 nucleotides). The linear segment is complementary to a portion of the closed circle creating a partially double-stranded genome. Sequence analysis reveals a low but significant similarity to the replicase of circoviruses that have a covalently closed circular ssDNA genome. This new host-virus system will be useful for investigating the ecological relationships between bloom-forming diatoms and other viruses in the marine system. Our study supports the view that, given the diversity and abundance of plankton, the ocean is a treasury of undiscovered viruses. PMID:16000758

  12. [Skin symptoms associated with human immunodeficiency virus infection].

    PubMed

    Tamási, Béla; Marschalkó, Márta; Kárpáti, Sarolta

    2015-01-01

    The recently observed accelerated increase of human immunodeficiency virus infection in Hungary poses a major public concern for the healthcare system. Given the effective only but not the curative therapy, prevention should be emphasized. Current statistics estimate that about 50% of the infected persons are not aware of their human immunodeficiency virus-positivity. Thus, early diagnosis of the infection by serological screening and timely recognition of the disease-associated symptoms are crucial. The authors' intention is to facilitate early infection detection with this review on human immunodeficiency virus-associated skin symptoms, and highlight the significance of human immunodeficiency virus care in the everyday medical practice. PMID:25544049

  13. Autophagic flux without a block differentiates varicella-zoster virus infection from herpes simplex virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Buckingham, Erin M.; Carpenter, John E.; Jackson, Wallen; Zerboni, Leigh; Arvin, Ann M.; Grose, Charles

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy is a process by which misfolded and damaged proteins are sequestered into autophagosomes, before degradation in and recycling from lysosomes. We have extensively studied the role of autophagy in varicella-zoster virus (VZV) infection, and have observed that vesicular cells are filled with >100 autophagosomes that are easily detectable after immunolabeling for the LC3 protein. To confirm our hypothesis that increased autophagosome formation was not secondary to a block, we examined all conditions of VZV infection as well as carrying out two assessments of autophagic flux. We first investigated autophagy in human skin xenografts in the severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mouse model of VZV pathogenesis, and observed that autophagosomes were abundant in infected human skin tissues. We next investigated autophagy following infection with sonically prepared cell-free virus in cultured cells. Under these conditions, autophagy was detected in a majority of infected cells, but was much less than that seen after an infected-cell inoculum. In other words, inoculation with lower-titered cell-free virus did not reflect the level of stress to the VZV-infected cell that was seen after inoculation of human skin in the SCID mouse model or monolayers with higher-titered infected cells. Finally, we investigated VZV-induced autophagic flux by two different methods (radiolabeling proteins and a dual-colored LC3 plasmid); both showed no evidence of a block in autophagy. Overall, therefore, autophagy within a VZV-infected cell was remarkably different from autophagy within an HSV-infected cell, whose genome contains two modifiers of autophagy, ICP34.5 and US11, not present in VZV. PMID:25535384

  14. Immunological alterations in hepatitis C virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Calvaruso, Vincenza; Craxì, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    A higher prevalence of immunological processes has recently been reported in patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, focusing the attention of physicians and researchers on the close association between HCV and immune disorders. HCV lymphotropism represents the most important step in the pathogenesis of virus-related immunological diseases and experimental, virologic, and clinical evidence has demonstrated a trigger role for HCV both in systemic autoimmune diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis, Sjögren syndrome, hemolytic anemia and severe thrombocytopenia, and in organ-specific autoimmune diseases, such as autoimmune hepatitis, thyroid disorders and diabetes. This review will outline the principal aspects of such HCV-induced immunological alterations, focusing on the prevalence of these less characterized HCV extrahepatic manifestations. PMID:24379616

  15. Inhibition of Virus Production in JC Virus-Infected Cells by Postinfection RNA Interference

    PubMed Central

    Orba, Yasuko; Sawa, Hirofumi; Iwata, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Shinya; Nagashima, Kazuo

    2004-01-01

    RNA interference has been applied for the prevention of virus infections in mammalian cells but has not succeeded in eliminating infections from already infected cells. We now show that the transfection of JC virus-infected SVG-A human glial cells with small interfering RNAs that target late viral proteins, including agnoprotein and VP1, results in a marked inhibition both of viral protein expression and of virus production. RNA interference directed against JC virus genes may thus provide a basis for the development of new strategies to control infections with this polyomavirus. PMID:15194803

  16. Edinburgh Research Explorer Highly pathogenic avian influenza virus infection in chickens but

    E-print Network

    Millar, Andrew J.

    Edinburgh Research Explorer Highly pathogenic avian influenza virus infection in chickens, IH, Dunham, SP & Chang, K 2014, 'Highly pathogenic avian influenza virus infection in chickens date: 05. Jul. 2015 #12;RESEARCH Open Access Highly pathogenic avian influenza virus infection

  17. Emerging drugs for respiratory syncytial virus infection.

    PubMed

    Olszewska, Wieslawa; Openshaw, Peter

    2009-06-01

    Although respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) was discovered > 40 years ago, treatment remains largely supportive. There are no safe and effective vaccines or specific treatments other than prophylaxis with passive antibody therapy (palivizumab). However, there are good reasons to think that the scene may soon change. As the pace of development of anti-viral drugs accelerates and optimism over vaccines increases, novel therapies are set to make a major impact in the management of this very common infection. The use and effect of such interventions are not easy to anticipate, but could ultimately include the interruption of RSV's transmission resulting in profound changes to the impact of RSV on human health. PMID:19453286

  18. Hepatitis B virus infection in Indonesia

    PubMed Central

    Yano, Yoshihiko; Utsumi, Takako; Lusida, Maria Inge; Hayashi, Yoshitake

    2015-01-01

    Approximately 240 million people are chronically infected with hepatitis B virus (HBV), 75% of whom reside in Asia. Approximately 600000 of infected patients die each year due to HBV-related diseases or hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The endemicity of hepatitis surface antigen in Indonesia is intermediate to high with a geographical difference. The risk of HBV infection is high in hemodialysis (HD) patients, men having sex with men, and health care workers. Occult HBV infection has been detected in various groups such as blood donors, HD patients, and HIV-infected individuals and children. The most common HBV subgenotype in Indonesia is B3 followed by C1. Various novel subgenotypes of HBV have been identified throughout Indonesia, with the novel HBV subgenotypes C6-C16 and D6 being successfully isolated. Although a number of HBV subgenotypes have been discovered in Indonesia, genotype-related pathogenicity has not yet been elucidated in detail. Therefore, genotype-related differences in the prognosis of liver disease and their effects on treatments need to be determined. A previous study conducted in Indonesia revealed that hepatic steatosis was associated with disease progression. Pre-S2 mutations and mutations at C1638T and T1753V in HBV/B3 have been associated with advanced liver diseases including HCC. However, drug resistance to lamivudine, which is prominent in Indonesia, remains obscure. Although the number of studies on HBV in Indonesia has been increasing, adequate databases on HBV infection are limited. We herein provided an overview of the epidemiology and clinical characteristics of HBV infection in Indonesia. PMID:26478663

  19. African swine fever virus infection of the bushpig (Potamochoerus porcus) and its significance in the epidemiology of the disease.

    PubMed

    Anderson, E C; Hutchings, G H; Mukarati, N; Wilkinson, P J

    1998-04-30

    Warthog (Phacochoerus aethiopicus), giant forest hog (Hylochoerus meinertzhageni) and bushpig (Potamochoerus porcus) are known to be susceptible to infection with African swine fever (ASF) virus. Little however, is known about the ecology of the disease in the bushpig. This study has shown that the bushpig remains viraemic for between 35 and 91 days following infection during which time it is able to infect the tick vector O. moubata. These ticks were able to transmit the disease to pigs. The virus persists in the lymphatic tissues for less than 34 weeks. Bushpigs infected with LIL 20/l virus but not VIC T90/l virus transmitted infection to in-contact pigs. Infected domestic pigs did not transmit the infection to in-contact bushpigs. ASF virus was able to replicate in in vitro cultures of bushpig leucocytes and endothelial cells. Recovered bushpigs could be reinfected with some strains of virus but not others. While it has been demonstrated that bushpigs remain carriers of ASFV following infection a complete understanding of their significance in the epidemiology of the disease awaits further investigations of their association with O. moubata. PMID:9659687

  20. Acanthamoeba polyphaga mimivirus and other giant viruses: an open field to outstanding discoveries

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    In 2003, Acanthamoeba polyphaga mimivirus (APMV) was first described and began to impact researchers around the world, due to its structural and genetic complexity. This virus founded the family Mimiviridae. In recent years, several new giant viruses have been isolated from different environments and specimens. Giant virus research is in its initial phase and information that may arise in the coming years may change current conceptions of life, diversity and evolution. Thus, this review aims to condense the studies conducted so far about the features and peculiarities of APMV, from its discovery to its clinical relevance. PMID:24976356

  1. Arthritis after infection with Chikungunya virus.

    PubMed

    Ali Ou Alla, Sanae; Combe, Bernard

    2011-06-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is an emerging alphavirus responsible for several infectious outbreaks in the world. After an acute stage of illness characterised by a fever-arthralgia syndrome and rash, joint disorders due to CHIKV infection can sometimes persist for several months or years. Chronic arthritis after this emerging disease is well documented, and similarities to rheumatoid arthritis have been described. Knowledge of the geographical epidemiology of CHIKV infection is crucial for better control of the disease. Thus, recent outbreaks have led to several studies, which have highlighted the need for a better understanding of the clinical features of Chikungunya (CHIK) and beginning knowledge of the pathophysiogenesis, which can lead to further research. PMID:22100284

  2. Hepatitis C virus infection in the human immunodeficiency virus infected patient

    PubMed Central

    Clausen, Louise Nygaard; Lundbo, Lene Fogt; Benfield, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) share the same transmission routes; therefore, coinfection is frequent. An estimated 5-10 million individuals alone in the western world are infected with both viruses. The majority of people acquire HCV by injection drug use and, to a lesser extent, through blood transfusion and blood products. Recently, there has been an increase in HCV infections among men who have sex with men. In the context of effective antiretroviral treatment, liver-related deaths are now more common than Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome-related deaths among HIV-HCV coinfected individuals. Morbidity and mortality rates from chronic HCV infection will increase because the infection incidence peaked in the mid-1980s and because liver disease progresses slowly and is clinically silent to cirrhosis and end-stage-liver disease over a 15-20 year time period for 15%-20% of chronically infected individuals. HCV treatment has rapidly changed with the development of new direct-acting antiviral agents; therefore, cure rates have greatly improved because the new treatment regimens target different parts of the HCV life cycle. In this review, we focus on the epidemiology, diagnosis and the natural course of HCV as well as current and future strategies for HCV therapy in the context of HIV-HCV coinfection in the western world. PMID:25232248

  3. ENHANCED AND PROLONGED PULMONARY INFLUENZA VIRUS INFECTION FOLLOWING PHOSGENE INHALATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Animal infectivity models have been important in the demonstration of enhanced susceptibility to viral and bacterial infection as a result of low level toxicant exposure. his study demonstrated an enhanced and prolonged viral infection using an influenza virus infectivity model i...

  4. Simultaneous multiplex PCR detection of seven cucurbit-infecting viruses.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Ji Yeon; Hong, Jin Sung; Kim, Min Jea; Choi, Sun Hee; Min, Byeong Eun; Song, Eun Gyeong; Kim, Hyun Hee; Ryu, Ki Hyun

    2014-09-01

    Two multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) systems using dual priming oligonucleotide (DPO) primers were developed for the simultaneous detection of seven cucurbit-infecting viruses. One system allows for the detection of papaya ringspot virus, watermelon mosaic virus, and zucchini yellow mosaic virus, whereas the other permits the detection of cucumber green mottle mosaic virus, cucumber fruit mottle mosaic virus, kyuri green mottle mosaic virus, and zucchini green mottle mosaic virus. Viral species-specific DPO primers developed in this study detected as little as 10 fg/?l of viral RNA under monoplex conditions and 10 pg/?l of viral RNA under multiplex conditions. Multiplex PCR using the DPO primer sets was capable of amplifying viral genes at annealing temperatures ranging from 53 °C to 63 °C. Whereas the use of conventional primers gave rise to non-specific bands, the DPO primers detected target viral genes in the absence of non-specific amplification. When these DPO multiplex primer sets were applied to virus-infected cucurbit samples obtained in the field, multiple infection as well as single infection was accurately identified. This novel approach could also detect multiple viruses in infected seeds. The reliability of multiplex PCR systems using DPO primers for plant virus detection is discussed. PMID:24937806

  5. Evidence that hepatitis C virus genome partly controls infection outcome

    PubMed Central

    Hartfield, Matthew; Bull, Rowena; White, Peter A; Lloyd, Andrew; Luciani, Fabio; Alizon, Samuel

    2014-01-01

    Infection by hepatitis C virus (HCV) leads to one of two outcomes; either the infection resolves within approximately 6 months or the virus can persist indefinitely. Host genetics are known to affect the likelihood of clearance or persistence. By contrast, the importance of the virus genotype in determining infection outcome is unknown, as quantifying this effect traditionally requires well-characterized transmission networks, which are rare. Extending phylogenetic approaches previously developed to estimate the virus control over set-point viral load in HIV-1 infections, we simulate inheritance of a binary trait along a phylogenetic tree, use this data to quantify how infection outcomes cluster and ascertain the effect of virus genotype on these. We apply our method to the Hepatitis C Incidence and Transmission Study in prisons (HITS-p) data set from Australia, as this cohort prospectively identified incident cases including viraemic subjects who ultimately clear the virus, thus providing us with a unique collection of sequences from clearing infections. We detect significant correlations between infection outcome and virus distance in the phylogeny for viruses of Genotype 1, with estimates lying at around 67%. No statistically significant estimates were obtained for viruses of Genotype 3a. PMID:24944567

  6. Comparative pathology of select agent influenza A virus infections

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Influenza A virus infections may spread rapidly in human populations and cause acute respiratory disease with variable mortality. Two of these influenza viruses have been designated as select agents because of the high case fatality rate: 1918 H1N1 virus and highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) ...

  7. Pathobiology of avian influenza virus infections in wild birds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Individual avian Influenza (AI) viruses vary in their ability to produce infection, disease and death in different bird species. Based on the pathobiological features in chickens, AI viruses (AIV) are categorized as low pathogenicity (LPAI) or high pathogenicity (HPAI) viruses, and can be of any of...

  8. Honey Bee Infecting Lake Sinai Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Daughenbaugh, Katie F.; Martin, Madison; Brutscher, Laura M.; Cavigli, Ian; Garcia, Emma; Lavin, Matt; Flenniken, Michelle L.

    2015-01-01

    Honey bees are critical pollinators of important agricultural crops. Recently, high annual losses of honey bee colonies have prompted further investigation of honey bee infecting viruses. To better characterize the recently discovered and very prevalent Lake Sinai virus (LSV) group, we sequenced currently circulating LSVs, performed phylogenetic analysis, and obtained images of LSV2. Sequence analysis resulted in extension of the LSV1 and LSV2 genomes, the first detection of LSV4 in the US, and the discovery of LSV6 and LSV7. We detected LSV1 and LSV2 in the Varroa destructor mite, and determined that a large proportion of LSV2 is found in the honey bee gut, suggesting that vector-mediated, food-associated, and/or fecal-oral routes may be important for LSV dissemination. Pathogen-specific quantitative PCR data, obtained from samples collected during a small-scale monitoring project, revealed that LSV2, LSV1, Black queen cell virus (BQCV), and Nosema ceranae were more abundant in weak colonies than strong colonies within this sample cohort. Together, these results enhance our current understanding of LSVs and illustrate the importance of future studies aimed at investigating the role of LSVs and other pathogens on honey bee health at both the individual and colony levels. PMID:26110586

  9. Honey Bee Infecting Lake Sinai Viruses.

    PubMed

    Daughenbaugh, Katie F; Martin, Madison; Brutscher, Laura M; Cavigli, Ian; Garcia, Emma; Lavin, Matt; Flenniken, Michelle L

    2015-06-01

    Honey bees are critical pollinators of important agricultural crops. Recently, high annual losses of honey bee colonies have prompted further investigation of honey bee infecting viruses. To better characterize the recently discovered and very prevalent Lake Sinai virus (LSV) group, we sequenced currently circulating LSVs, performed phylogenetic analysis, and obtained images of LSV2. Sequence analysis resulted in extension of the LSV1 and LSV2 genomes, the first detection of LSV4 in the US, and the discovery of LSV6 and LSV7. We detected LSV1 and LSV2 in the Varroa destructor mite, and determined that a large proportion of LSV2 is found in the honey bee gut, suggesting that vector-mediated, food-associated, and/or fecal-oral routes may be important for LSV dissemination. Pathogen-specific quantitative PCR data, obtained from samples collected during a small-scale monitoring project, revealed that LSV2, LSV1, Black queen cell virus (BQCV), and Nosema ceranae were more abundant in weak colonies than strong colonies within this sample cohort. Together, these results enhance our current understanding of LSVs and illustrate the importance of future studies aimed at investigating the role of LSVs and other pathogens on honey bee health at both the individual and colony levels. PMID:26110586

  10. Zika virus infection acquired during brief travel to Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Kwong, Jason C; Druce, Julian D; Leder, Karin

    2013-09-01

    Zika virus infection closely resembles dengue fever. It is possible that many cases are misdiagnosed or missed. We report a case of Zika virus infection in an Australian traveler who returned from Indonesia with fever and rash. Further case identification is required to determine the evolving epidemiology of this disease. PMID:23878182

  11. Zika Virus Infection Acquired During Brief Travel to Indonesia

    PubMed Central

    Kwong, Jason C.; Druce, Julian D.; Leder, Karin

    2013-01-01

    Zika virus infection closely resembles dengue fever. It is possible that many cases are misdiagnosed or missed. We report a case of Zika virus infection in an Australian traveler who returned from Indonesia with fever and rash. Further case identification is required to determine the evolving epidemiology of this disease. PMID:23878182

  12. Mayaro virus infection, Amazon Basin region, Peru, 2010-2013.

    PubMed

    Halsey, Eric S; Siles, Crystyan; Guevara, Carolina; Vilcarromero, Stalin; Jhonston, Erik J; Ramal, Cesar; Aguilar, Patricia V; Ampuero, Julia S

    2013-11-01

    During 2010-2013, we recruited 16 persons with confirmed Mayaro virus infection in the Peruvian Amazon to prospectively follow clinical symptoms and serologic response over a 12-month period. Mayaro virus infection caused long-term arthralgia in more than half, similar to reports of other arthritogenic alphaviruses. PMID:24210165

  13. Mayaro Virus Infection, Amazon Basin Region, Peru, 2010–2013

    PubMed Central

    Siles, Crystyan; Guevara, Carolina; Vilcarromero, Stalin; Jhonston, Erik J.; Ramal, Cesar; Aguilar, Patricia V.; Ampuero, Julia S.

    2013-01-01

    During 2010–2013, we recruited 16 persons with confirmed Mayaro virus infection in the Peruvian Amazon to prospectively follow clinical symptoms and serologic response over a 12-month period. Mayaro virus infection caused long-term arthralgia in more than half, similar to reports of other arthritogenic alphaviruses. PMID:24210165

  14. The Mannose Receptor Mediates Dengue Virus Infection of Macrophages

    E-print Network

    The Mannose Receptor Mediates Dengue Virus Infection of Macrophages Joanna L. Miller1 , Barend J. M haemorrhagic fever in humans. To our knowledge, we show for the first time that the MØ mannose receptor (MR. (2008) The mannose receptor mediates dengue virus infection of macrophages. PLoS Pathog 4(2): e17. doi

  15. Control of immunopathology during chikungunya virus infection.

    PubMed

    Petitdemange, Caroline; Wauquier, Nadia; Vieillard, Vincent

    2015-04-01

    After several decades of epidemiologic silence, chikungunya virus (CHIKV) has recently re-emerged, causing explosive outbreaks and reaching the 5 continents. Transmitted through the bite of Aedes species mosquitoes, CHIKV is responsible for an acute febrile illness accompanied by several characteristic symptoms, including cutaneous rash, myalgia, and arthralgia, with the latter sometimes persisting for months or years. Although CHIKV has previously been known as a relatively benign disease, more recent epidemic events have brought waves of increased morbidity and fatality, leading it to become a serious public health problem. The host's immune response plays a crucial role in controlling the infection, but it might also contribute to the promotion of viral spread and immunopathology. This review focuses on the immune responses to CHIKV in human subjects with an emphasis on early antiviral immune responses. We assess recent developments in the understanding of their possible Janus-faced effects in the control of viral infection and pathogenesis. Although preventive vaccination and specific therapies are yet to be developed, exploring this interesting model of virus-host interactions might have a strong effect on the design of novel therapeutic options to minimize immunopathology without impairing beneficial host defenses. PMID:25843597

  16. Virus-induced secondary bacterial infection: a concise review

    PubMed Central

    Hendaus, Mohamed A; Jomha, Fatima A; Alhammadi, Ahmed H

    2015-01-01

    Respiratory diseases are a very common source of morbidity and mortality among children. Health care providers often face a dilemma when encountering a febrile infant or child with respiratory tract infection. The reason expressed by many clinicians is the trouble to confirm whether the fever is caused by a virus or a bacterium. The aim of this review is to update the current evidence on the virus-induced bacterial infection. We present several clinical as well in vitro studies that support the correlation between virus and secondary bacterial infections. In addition, we discuss the pathophysiology and prevention modes of the virus–bacterium coexistence. A search of the PubMed and MEDLINE databases was carried out for published articles covering bacterial infections associated with respiratory viruses. This review should provide clinicians with a comprehensive idea of the range of bacterial and viral coinfections or secondary infections that could present with viral respiratory illness. PMID:26345407

  17. Paramecium bursaria Chlorella Virus 1 Proteome Reveals Novel Architectural and Regulatory Features of a Giant Virus

    PubMed Central

    Cerny, Ronald L.; Bauman, Andrew T.; Roach, Jared C.; Lane, Leslie C.; Agarkova, Irina V.; Wulser, Kurt; Yanai-Balser, Giane M.; Gurnon, James R.; Vitek, Jason C.; Kronschnabel, Bernard J.; Jeanniard, Adrien; Blanc, Guillaume; Upton, Chris; Duncan, Garry A.; McClung, O. William; Ma, Fangrui

    2012-01-01

    The 331-kbp chlorovirus Paramecium bursaria chlorella virus 1 (PBCV-1) genome was resequenced and annotated to correct errors in the original 15-year-old sequence; 40 codons was considered the minimum protein size of an open reading frame. PBCV-1 has 416 predicted protein-encoding sequences and 11 tRNAs. A proteome analysis was also conducted on highly purified PBCV-1 virions using two mass spectrometry-based protocols. The mass spectrometry-derived data were compared to PBCV-1 and its host Chlorella variabilis NC64A predicted proteomes. Combined, these analyses revealed 148 unique virus-encoded proteins associated with the virion (about 35% of the coding capacity of the virus) and 1 host protein. Some of these proteins appear to be structural/architectural, whereas others have enzymatic, chromatin modification, and signal transduction functions. Most (106) of the proteins have no known function or homologs in the existing gene databases except as orthologs with proteins of other chloroviruses, phycodnaviruses, and nuclear-cytoplasmic large DNA viruses. The genes encoding these proteins are dispersed throughout the virus genome, and most are transcribed late or early-late in the infection cycle, which is consistent with virion morphogenesis. PMID:22696644

  18. Human immunodeficiency virus can productively infect cultured human glial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Cheng-Mayer, C; Rutka, J T; Rosenblum, M L; McHugh, T; Stites, D P; Levy, J A

    1987-01-01

    Six isolates of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) showed differences in their ability to productively infect glioma-derived cell lines and early-passage human brain cell cultures. Susceptibility to HIV infection correlated well with the expression of the astrocyte marker glial fibrillary acidic protein. The CD4 molecule was expressed on some, but not all, of the brain-derived cells; however, no correlation was observed between CD4 protein expression and susceptibility to virus infection. The results show that HIV can productively infect human brain cells, particularly those of glial origin, and suggest that these cell types in the brain can harbor the virus. Images PMID:3472222

  19. Identification of type I IFN in Chinese giant salamander (Andrias davidianus) and the response to an iridovirus infection.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qian; Ma, Jie; Fan, Yuding; Meng, Yan; Xu, Jin; Zhou, Yong; Liu, Wenzhi; Zeng, Xianhui; Zeng, Lingbing

    2015-06-01

    The type I IFNs play a major role in the first line of defense against virus infections. In this study, the type I IFN gene designated gsIFN was identified and characterized in the Chinese giant salamander (Andrias davidianus). The genomic DNA of gsIFN contains 5 exons and 4 introns and has a total length of 5622 bp. The full-length cDNA sequence of gsIFN is 1113 bp and encodes a putative protein of 186 amino acids that has a 43% identity to type I IFN of Xenopus tropicalis. The deduced amino acid sequence has the C-terminal CAWE motif, that is mostly conserved in the higher vertebrate type I IFNs. Real-time fluorescence quantitative RT-PCR analysis revealed broad expression of gsIFN in vivo and the highest level expression in blood, kidney and spleen. Additionally, the expression of gsIFN at the mRNA level was significantly induced in peripheral blood leucocytes after stimulation with poly I:C and after infection with the Chinese giant salamander iridovirus (GSIV). A plasmid expressing gsIFN was constructed and transfected into the Chinese giant salamander muscle cell line. Expression of the IFN-inducible gene Mx was up-regulated in the gsIFN-overexpressing cells after GSIV infection. The virus load and titer were significantly reduced compared with that in control cells. Additionally, a lower level of virus major capsid protein synthesis was confirmed by immunofluorescence assay compared to the control cells. These results suggest that the gsIFN gene plays an important role in the antiviral innate immune response. PMID:25733388

  20. Bovine respiratory disease model based on dual infections with infection with bovine viral diarrhea virus and bovine corona virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bovine respiratory disease complex (BRDC) is the leading cause of economic loss in the U.S. cattle industry. BRDC likely results from simultaneous or sequential infections with multiple pathogens including both viruses and bacteria. Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) and bovine corona virus (BoCV...

  1. Chikungunya Virus Infection during Pregnancy, Réunion, France, 2006

    PubMed Central

    Rollot, Olivier; Gérardin, Patrick; Gaüzère, Bernard-Alex; Bideault, Jacques; Lagarde, Louis; Dhuime, Barbara; Orvain, Eric; Cuillier, Fabrice; Ramful, Duksha; Sampériz, Sylvain; Jaffar-Bandjee, Marie-Christine; Michault, Alain; Cotte, Liliane; Kaminski, Monique; Fourmaintraux, Alain

    2010-01-01

    Mother-to-child transmission of chikungunya virus was reported during the 2005–2006 outbreak on Réunion Island, France. To determine the effects of this virus on pregnancy outcomes, we conducted a study of pregnant women in Réunion in 2006. The study population was composed of 1,400 pregnant women (628 uninfected, 658 infected during pregnancy, 27 infected before pregnancy, and 87 infected on unknown dates). We compared pregnancy outcomes for 655 (628 + 27) women not infected during pregnancy with 658 who were infected during pregnancy. Infection occurred during the first trimester for 15% of the infected women, the second for 59%, and the third for 26%. Only hospital admission during pregnancy differed between infected and uninfected women (40% vs. 29%). Other outcomes (cesarean deliveries, obstetric hemorrhaging, preterm births, stillbirths after 22 weeks, birthweight, congenital malformations, and newborn admissions) were similar. This virus had no observable effect on pregnancy outcomes. PMID:20202416

  2. Simian immunodeficiency virus infection of chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) shares features of both pathogenic and non-pathogenic infections

    E-print Network

    Greenwood, Edward J. D.; Schmidt, Fabian; Kondova, Ivanela; Niphuis, Henk; Hodara, Vida L.; Clissold, Leah; McLay, Kirsten; Guerra, Bernadette; Redrobe, Sharon; Giavedoni, Luis D.; Lanford, Robert E.; Murthy, Krishna K.; Rouet, François; Heeney, Jonathan L.

    2015-09-11

    The virus-host relationship in simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) infected chimpanzees is thought to be different from that found in other SIV infected African primates. However, studies of captive SIVcpz infected chimpanzees are limited...

  3. Experimental simian varicella virus infection of St. Kitts vervet monkeys.

    PubMed

    Gray, W L; Williams, R J; Chang, R; Soike, K F

    1998-08-01

    Experimental simian varicella virus (SVV) infection of St. Kitts vervet monkeys was evaluated as an animal model to investigate human varicella-zoster virus (VZV) infections. During the incubation period, viremia disseminated infectious virus throughout the body via infected peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs). A vesicular skin rash in the inguinal area, and on the abdomen, extremities, and face appeared on day 7-10 postinfection. Necrosis and hemorrhage in lung and liver tissues from acutely infected monkeys were evident upon histologic analysis. Recovery from simian varicella was accompanied by a rise in the serum neutralizing antibody response to the virus. SVV latency was established in trigeminal ganglia of monkeys which resolved the acute infection. This study indicates that experimental SVV infection of St. Kitts vervets is a useful animal model to investigate SVV and VZV pathogenesis and to evaluate potential antiviral agents and vaccines. PMID:9879858

  4. Neuralgic amyotrophy and hepatitis E virus infection

    PubMed Central

    van Eijk, Jeroen J.J.; Madden, Richie G.; van der Eijk, Annemiek A.; Hunter, Jeremy G.; Reimerink, Johan H.J.; Bendall, Richard P.; Pas, Suzan D.; Ellis, Vic; van Alfen, Nens; Beynon, Laura; Southwell, Lucy; McLean, Brendan; Jacobs, Bart C.; van Engelen, Baziel G.M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine whether there is an association between an acute preceding hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection and neuralgic amyotrophy (NA), and if so, whether patients with HEV-related NA differ from patients without an associated HEV infection. Methods: HEV testing was conducted in a retrospective cohort of 28 Cornish patients with NA (2011–2013) and a prospective cohort of 38 consecutive Dutch patients with NA (2004–2007). Acute-phase serum samples were analyzed for the presence of anti-HEV immunoglobulin (Ig) M and IgG and HEV RNA (quantitative real-time PCR). Results: Five cases (10.6%) of acute hepatitis E infection were identified in a total group of 47 patients with NA of whom serum samples were available. In 4 patients, HEV RNA was detected in serum samples taken at presentation. All patients with HEV-associated NA had clinical and electrophysiologic evidence of bilateral brachial plexus involvement. Anti-HEV IgM positivity was not related to age, sex, disease severity, disease course, or outcome. Conclusions: Acute hepatitis E is found in 10% of patients with NA from the United Kingdom and the Netherlands. Further research is required to investigate the role of HEV in NA in other geographical locations and to determine pathophysiologic mechanisms. PMID:24401685

  5. Suramin inhibits in vitro infection by duck hepatitis B virus, Rous sarcoma virus, and hepatitis delta virus.

    PubMed

    Petcu, D J; Aldrich, C E; Coates, L; Taylor, J M; Mason, W S

    1988-12-01

    Suramin blocked in vitro infection by duck hepatitis B virus, a hepadnavirus, and Rous sarcoma virus, a retrovirus. Although suramin was able to inhibit the virus-encoded reverse transcriptase activities of these two viruses, this inhibition did not appear to account for the anti-viral effect of the drug. In particular, suramin was unable to block synthesis within cells of full-length viral DNAs when added subsequent to infection. The results are consistent with the hypothesis that suramin acted by blocking virus uptake or uncoating. As further support of this hypothesis, we found that suramin also blocked infection by hepatitis delta virus, an RNA virus that is not known to employ reverse transcriptase during the initiation of infection. PMID:2462306

  6. The rapidly expanding universe of giant viruses: Mimivirus, Pandoravirus, Pithovirus and Mollivirus.

    PubMed

    Abergel, Chantal; Legendre, Matthieu; Claverie, Jean-Michel

    2015-11-01

    More than a century ago, the term 'virus' was introduced to describe infectious agents that are invisible by light microscopy and capable of passing through sterilizing filters. In addition to their extremely small size, most viruses have minimal genomes and gene contents, and rely almost entirely on host cell-encoded functions to multiply. Unexpectedly, four different families of eukaryotic 'giant viruses' have been discovered over the past 10 years with genome sizes, gene contents and particle dimensions overlapping with that of cellular microbes. Their ongoing analyses are challenging accepted ideas about the diversity, evolution and origin of DNA viruses. PMID:26391910

  7. Neonatal herpes simplex virus infection: epidemiology and treatment.

    PubMed

    James, Scott H; Kimberlin, David W

    2015-03-01

    Herpes simplex virus types 1 (HSV-1) and 2 (HSV-2) are highly prevalent viruses capable of establishing lifelong infection. Genital herpes in women of childbearing age represents a major risk for mother-to-child transmission (MTCT) of HSV infection, with primary and first-episode genital HSV infections posing the highest risk. The advent of antiviral therapy with parenteral acyclovir has led to significant improvement in neonatal HSV disease mortality. Further studies are needed to improve the clinician's ability to identify infants at increased risk for HSV infection and prevent MTCT, and to develop novel antiviral agents with increased efficacy in infants with HSV infection. PMID:25677996

  8. Emerging therapies for hepatitis C virus infection.

    PubMed

    Dymock, B W

    2001-04-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) has infected millions of people worldwide and has emerged as a global health crisis. The currently available therapy is interferon (IFN) either alone or in combination with ribavirin. However, the disappointing efficacy of IFN has led to the considerable need for improved treatments and a number of new therapies are under evaluation in clinical trials. These include pegylated IFNs, which have altered physiochemical characteristics allowing once-weekly dosing. Combination of pegylated IFN with ribavirin should further improve sustained response rates. However, not all patients are successfully treated with IFNs, particularly those infected with genotype 1 of the virus, and it is likely that potent, specific drugs will be required. The majority of new approaches currently trying to combat this viral disease are aimed at inhibition of viral targets. Most effort has been directed towards inhibition of the NS3 serine protease, and potent inhibitors have now been described. However, a clinical candidate is yet to emerge against this difficult target. Considerable work by leading researchers has provided crystal structures of the key replicative enzymes, NS3 protease, NS3 helicase, NS5B polymerase and full-length NS3 protease-helicase, and there is much hope that such structural information will bear fruit. More recently, inhibition of host targets, particularly inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH), has become of interest and there are on-going clinical trials with such inhibitors. Research aimed at novel treatments for HCV disease is gathering pace and very recent developments in cell-based assay systems can only hasten the discovery of improved therapies. PMID:15989494

  9. Early Dengue Virus Infection in Human Skin: A Cycle of Inflammation and Infectivity.

    PubMed

    Ivory, Matthew O; Birchall, James C; Piguet, Vincent

    2015-07-01

    Early events during dengue virus (DENV) infection remain poorly understood. In this issue, Schaeffer and colleagues employ ex vivo human skin cells to investigate viral infection. They show that skin-resident immune cells are infected by DENV and that their infectability is increased in the inflammatory skin conditions (especially those in which IL-4 is released) that accompany the mosquito bites transmitting the virus. PMID:26066889

  10. HIGH VIRUS TITER IN FEATHER PULP OF CHICKENS INFECTED WITH SUBGROUP J AVIAN LEUKOSIS VIRUS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Subgroup J avian leukosis viruses (ALVs), which are a recombinant virus between exogenous and endogenous ALVs, can spread by either vertical or horizontal transmission. Exogenous and endogenous ALVs, can be detected in feather pulp. In this study, virus titers in feather pulp of chickens infected w...

  11. Prevalence of Hepatitis Virus Infections in an Institution for Persons with Developmental Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodruff, Bradley A.; Vazquez, Elizabeth

    2002-01-01

    A study involving 1,235 residents of Sonoma Developmental Center found 3 residents had hepatitis C virus infections, and 633 had past or current hepatitis B virus infections. The prevalence of hepatitis B virus infection rose rapidly with longer residence in institutions. Hepatitis A virus infection had occurred in 494 residents. (Contains…

  12. Reference gene selection for quantitative real-time PCR analysis in virus infected cells: SARS corona virus, Yellow fever virus, Human Herpesvirus-6, Camelpox virus and Cytomegalovirus infections

    PubMed Central

    Radoni?, Aleksandar; Thulke, Stefanie; Bae, Hi-Gung; Müller, Marcel A; Siegert, Wolfgang; Nitsche, Andreas

    2005-01-01

    Ten potential reference genes were compared for their use in experiments investigating cellular mRNA expression of virus infected cells. Human cell lines were infected with Cytomegalovirus, Human Herpesvirus-6, Camelpox virus, SARS coronavirus or Yellow fever virus. The expression levels of these genes and the viral replication were determined by real-time PCR. Genes were ranked by the BestKeeper tool, the GeNorm tool and by criteria we reported previously. Ranking lists of the genes tested were tool dependent. However, over all, ?-actin is an unsuitable as reference gene, whereas TATA-Box binding protein and peptidyl-prolyl-isomerase A are stable reference genes for expression studies in virus infected cells. PMID:15705200

  13. Hepatitis C virus infection in hemodialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Vallet-Pichard, Anais; Pol, Stanislas

    2013-09-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is observed in around 20% of dialysis patients and in allograft recipients and results in a significant morbidity and mortality, especially after transplantation. Its prevalence has markedly decreased in patients who are candidates for transplantation since the introduction of screening, hygiene and prevention measures, including systematic screening of blood and organ donations, use of erythropoietin, and compliance with universal hygiene rules. A liver biopsy is preferable to non-invasive biochemical and/or morphological tests of fibrosis to evaluate liver fibrosis before and even after transplantation. In HCV-infected dialyzed patients who are not candidates for renal transplantation, the indication for antiviral therapy is limited to significant fibrosis (fibrosis ? 2 on the METAVIR scale). Antiviral treatment should be proposed to any HCV-infected candidate for renal transplantation, whatever the baseline histopathology. The recommendation is to use standard interferon-? as monotherapy, but pegylated interferon can be used, resulting in sustained virological response, while low doses of combined ribavirin may enhance the antiviral efficacy. After transplantation, interferon-? is contra-indicated but may be used in patients for whom the benefits of antiviral treatment clearly outweigh the risks, especially that of allograft rejection. All cirrhotic patients should be screened for hepatocellular carcinoma, whose risk is enhanced by immunosuppressive regimens. Sustained suppression of necro-inflammation may result in the reversal of cirrhosis, which reduces liver-related morbidity and improves patient and allograft survival. Finally, due to the high mortality after renal transplantation, active cirrhosis must be considered to be a contraindication to kidney transplantation, but an indication to combined liver-kidney transplantation; on the contrary, inactive compensated cirrhosis may permit renal transplantation alone. PMID:23933193

  14. JC Virus Antibody Status Underestimates Infection Rates

    PubMed Central

    Berger, Joseph R.; Houff, Sidney A.; Gurwell, Julie; Vega, Nubia; Miller, Craig S.; Danaher, Robert J.

    2013-01-01

    Background JC virus (JCV) seropositivity is a risk factor for progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) in patients on natalizumab. Accordingly, the JCV serological antibody test is of paramount importance in determining disease risk. Methods We tested the accuracy of the JCV serum antibody test by comparing the results of JCV serology to JC viruria and viremia in 67 patients enrolled in a single-center, retrospective cohort study. Bodily fluids (urine and blood) were assessed for JCV DNA by real time quantitative polymerase chain reaction 6 to 47 months earlier (mean 26.1 months) before JCV antibody testing. In 10 individuals, blood and urine samples were obtained on two separate occasions at 6 month intervals. Results Forty (59.7%) of the 67 patients were JCV seropositive. Of 27 JCV seronegative patients, 10 (37%) had JC viruria. Urine JCV DNA copy numbers were significantly higher in the seropositive group (mean log copy number: 5.93; range 1.85 – 9.21) than the seronegative group (mean log copy number: 2.41; range 1.85 – 5.43) (p=0.0026). Considering all body fluid test results, 50 (74.6%) of the 67 patients were previously infected with JCV. Conclusions The false negative rate of the JCV serology in this study was 37%; therefore, JCV serostatus does not appear to identify all patients infected with JCV. Thus, a negative JCV antibody result should not be conflated with absence of JCV infection. This discordance may be important in understanding JCV biology, risk for PML and PML pathogenesis. PMID:23526716

  15. Role of oxidative stress in rabies virus infection.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Alan C; Kammouni, Wafa; Fernyhough, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Recent studies in an experimental model of rabies indicated that there are major structural changes in the brain involving neuronal processes that are associated with severe clinical disease. Cultured adult mouse dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons are a good in vitro model for studying the mechanisms involved in rabies virus-induced degeneration of neurites (axons) because, unlike other neuronal cell types, these neurons are fairly permissive to rabies virus infection. DRG neurons infected with the challenge virus standard-11 (CVS) strain of rabies virus show axonal swellings and immunostaining for 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (4-HNE), indicating evidence of lipid peroxidation associated with oxidative stress, and also reduced axonal growth in comparison with mock-infected DRG neurons. Treatment with the antioxidant N-acetyl cysteine prevented the reduction in axonal outgrowth that occurred with CVS infection. The axonal swellings with 4-HNE-labeled puncta were found to be associated with aggregations of actively respiring mitochondria. We postulate that rabies virus infection likely induces mitochondrial dysfunction resulting in oxidative stress and degenerative changes involving neuronal processes. This mitochondrial dysfunction may be the result of either direct or indirect effects of the virus on the mitochondrial electron-transport chain or it may occur through other mechanisms. Further investigations are needed to gain a better understanding of the basic mechanisms involved in the oxidative damage associated with rabies virus infection. This information may prove helpful in the design of future therapeutic effects for this dreaded ancient disease. PMID:21601046

  16. Infectivity of the DNA from four isolates of JC virus.

    PubMed Central

    Frisque, R J; Martin, J D; Padgett, B L; Walker, D L

    1979-01-01

    The infectivity of JC virus DNA was demonstrated in its most permissive cell culture, primary human fetal glial cells. The amount of infectivity observed in these heterogeneous cultures varied considerably between batches of cells. Contrary to results obtained with the papovaviruses simian virus 40 and BK virus, the calcium technique (F. L. Graham and A. J. van der Eb, Virology 52:456--467, 1973) was found to be more efficient at promoting JC virus DNA infectivity than the DEAE-dextran method (J. H. McCutchan and J. S. Pagano, J. Natl. Cancer Inst. 41:351--357, 1968): maximum infectivity titers of 4 x 10-(4) and 6 x 10(3) fluorescent cell units per microgram of DNA, respectively. These values represent an approximate recovery of infectivity from virus of between 0.02 and 0.14%. Comparisons of infectivity of DNAs obtained from four isolates of JC virus and which differed in their degrees of heterogeneity did not reveal significant differences. The JC virus DNA was not infectious in primary human fetal lung and kidney cells. Images PMID:228071

  17. Detection, pathogenesis, and therapy of respiratory syncytial virus infections.

    PubMed Central

    Welliver, R C

    1988-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection is a major cause of serious lower respiratory disease in infancy and early childhood. The unique pathogenesis of lower respiratory illness due to RSV offers some intriguing clues to the role of the human immune system in both protection against and development of respiratory illness. More than any other virus, rapid diagnostic techniques have been especially successful in identifying RSV infection. Many of these techniques could be easily adaptable to diagnosis of influenza virus infection and other agents. Finally, ribavirin therapy of RSV infection represents one of the few instances in which antiviral therapy has been shown to be effective for respiratory illnesses. Fundamental observations in these areas in the case of RSV infection open up new and exciting pathways for investigation of respiratory infection due to other viral, chlamydial, and mycoplasmal agents. PMID:3060243

  18. Maternal Effects of Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection during Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Wheeler, Sarahn M.; Dotters-Katz, Sarah; Heine, R. Phillip; Grotegut, Chad A.

    2015-01-01

    Given the illness and deaths caused by respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection during the first year of life, preventing infant RSV infections through maternal vaccination is intriguing. However, little is known about the extent and maternal effects of RSV infection during pregnancy. We describe 3 cases of maternal RSV infection diagnosed at a US center during winter 2014. Case-patient 1 (26 years old, week 33 of gestation) received a diagnosis of RSV infection and required mechanical ventilation. Case-patient 2 (27 years old, week 34 of gestation) received a diagnosis of infection with influenza A(H1N1) virus and RSV and required mechanical ventilation. Case-patient 3 (21 years old, week 32 of gestation) received a diagnosis of group A streptococcus pharyngitis and RSV infection and was monitored as an outpatient. Clarifying the effects of maternal RSV infection could yield valuable insights into potential maternal and fetal benefits of an effective RSV vaccination program. PMID:26485575

  19. Maternal Effects of Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection during Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, Sarahn M; Dotters-Katz, Sarah; Heine, R Phillip; Grotegut, Chad A; Swamy, Geeta K

    2015-11-01

    Given the illness and deaths caused by respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection during the first year of life, preventing infant RSV infections through maternal vaccination is intriguing. However, little is known about the extent and maternal effects of RSV infection during pregnancy. We describe 3 cases of maternal RSV infection diagnosed at a US center during winter 2014. Case-patient 1 (26 years old, week 33 of gestation) received a diagnosis of RSV infection and required mechanical ventilation. Case-patient 2 (27 years old, week 34 of gestation) received a diagnosis of infection with influenza A(H1N1) virus and RSV and required mechanical ventilation. Case-patient 3 (21 years old, week 32 of gestation) received a diagnosis of group A streptococcus pharyngitis and RSV infection and was monitored as an outpatient. Clarifying the effects of maternal RSV infection could yield valuable insights into potential maternal and fetal benefits of an effective RSV vaccination program. PMID:26485575

  20. Immune responses of infants to infection with respiratory viruses and live attenuated respiratory virus candidate vaccines.

    PubMed

    Crowe, J E

    1998-01-01

    Respiratory viruses such as respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), the parainfluenza viruses (PIV), and the influenza viruses cause severe lower respiratory tract diseases in infants and children throughout the world. Experimental live attenuated vaccines for each of these viruses are being developed for intranasal administration in the first weeks or months of life. A variety of promising RSV, PIV-3, and influenza virus vaccine strains have been developed by classical biological methods, evaluated extensively in preclinical and clinical studies, and shown to be attenuated and genetically stable. The ongoing clinical evaluation of these vaccine candidates, coupled with recent major advances in the ability to develop genetically engineered viruses with specified mutations, may allow the rapid development of respiratory virus strains that possess ideal levels of replicative capacity and genetic stability in vivo. A major remaining obstacle to successful immunization of infants against respiratory virus associated disease may be the relatively poor immune response of very young infants to primary virus infection. This paper reviews the immune correlates of protection against disease caused by these viruses, immune responses of infants to naturally-acquired infection, and immune responses of infants to experimental infection with candidate vaccine viruses. PMID:9711783

  1. The Impact of Wolbachia on Virus Infection in Mosquitoes

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Karyn N.

    2015-01-01

    Mosquito-borne viruses such as dengue, West Nile and chikungunya viruses cause significant morbidity and mortality in human populations. Since current methods are not sufficient to control disease occurrence, novel methods to control transmission of arboviruses would be beneficial. Recent studies have shown that virus infection and transmission in insects can be impeded by co-infection with the bacterium Wolbachia pipientis. Wolbachia is a maternally inherited endosymbiont that is commonly found in insects, including a number of mosquito vector species. In Drosophila, Wolbachia mediates antiviral protection against a broad range of RNA viruses. This discovery pointed to a potential strategy to interfere with mosquito transmission of arboviruses by artificially infecting mosquitoes with Wolbachia. This review outlines research on the prevalence of Wolbachia in mosquito vector species and the impact of antiviral effects in both naturally and artificially Wolbachia-infected mosquitoes. PMID:26556361

  2. Mosquito-Borne Virus May Cause Fatal Brain Infection

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Brain Infection Chikungunya outbreak on Reunion Island finds encephalitis more common than previously believed To use the ... serious demonstration of the virus' ability to cause encephalitis, researchers report online Nov. 25 in the journal ...

  3. The Impact of Wolbachia on Virus Infection in Mosquitoes.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Karyn N

    2015-01-01

    Mosquito-borne viruses such as dengue, West Nile and chikungunya viruses cause significant morbidity and mortality in human populations. Since current methods are not sufficient to control disease occurrence, novel methods to control transmission of arboviruses would be beneficial. Recent studies have shown that virus infection and transmission in insects can be impeded by co-infection with the bacterium Wolbachia pipientis. Wolbachia is a maternally inherited endosymbiont that is commonly found in insects, including a number of mosquito vector species. In Drosophila, Wolbachia mediates antiviral protection against a broad range of RNA viruses. This discovery pointed to a potential strategy to interfere with mosquito transmission of arboviruses by artificially infecting mosquitoes with Wolbachia. This review outlines research on the prevalence of Wolbachia in mosquito vector species and the impact of antiviral effects in both naturally and artificially Wolbachia-infected mosquitoes. PMID:26556361

  4. Auxiliary metabolic genes in viruses infecting marine cyanobacteria

    E-print Network

    Thompson, Luke Richard

    2010-01-01

    Marine viruses shape the diversity and biogeochemical role of their microbial hosts. Cyanophages that infect the cyanobacteria Prochlorococcus and Synechococcus often carry metabolic genes not found in other bacteriophages. ...

  5. Mammalian cell stress responses during Semliki Forest virus infection 

    E-print Network

    Ferguson, Mhairi Catriona

    2013-07-06

    Virus infection of mammalian cells induces several stress mechanisms, including autophagy and type-I interferon (IFN). Autophagy, a cellular homeostatic mechanism in which intracellular materials are sequestered into ...

  6. Experimental sialodacryoadenitis virus infection in severe combined immunodeficient mice.

    PubMed Central

    Percy, D H; Williams, K L; Croy, B A

    1991-01-01

    Mice with a severe combined immunodeficiency in B and T lymphocytes and natural killer cells (SCID-beige) were inoculated intranasally with sialodacryoadenitis (SDA) virus, a coronavirus of rats. Animals were killed at designated intervals and tissues were examined for evidence of viral infection by light microscopy and immunofluorescence microscopy. Based on these criteria, there was no evidence that these immunodeficient mice were susceptible to infection with SDA virus. PMID:1653101

  7. The naming of Potato virus Y strains infecting potato

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Potato virus Y (PVY) strain groups are based on host-response and resistance-gene interactions. The strain groups PVYO, PVYC and PVYN are well-established for the isolates infecting potato in the field. A switch in the emphasis from host response to nucleotide sequence differences in the virus genom...

  8. EFFECT OF CHLORINE TREATMENT ON INFECTIVITY OF HEPATITIS A VIRUS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study examined the effect of chlorine treatment on the infectivity of hepatitis A virus (HAV). Prodromal chimpanzee feces, shown to induce hepatitis in marmosets (Saguinus sp.), was clarified, and the virus was precipitated with 7% polyethylene glycol 6000, harvested and res...

  9. The Human Immunodeficiency Virus: Infectivity and Mechanisms of Pathogenesis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fauci, Anthony S.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses how the infection of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) results in a profound immunosuppression due predominantly to a selective depletion of helper/inducer T lymphocytes that express the receptor for the virus, as well as neuropsychiatric abnormalities in the brain. (TW)

  10. Whitefly Transmission of a New Virus Infecting Cucurbits in Florida

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A virus isolated from squash collected in Hillsborough County, FL in 2003, which was subsequently determined to be an ipomovirus, was transmitted by the silverleaf whitefly, Bemisia tabaci B strain in laboratory experiments. The virus was acquired by whiteflies after a 3-h access period on infected ...

  11. 78 FR 33848 - Draft Guidance for Industry on Human Immunodeficiency Virus-1 Infection: Developing...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-05

    ...Immunodeficiency Virus-1 Infection: Developing Antiretroviral...Immunodeficiency Virus-1 Infection: Developing Antiretroviral...early virologic changes for studies in heavily treatment-experienced...for the treatment of HIV-1 infection. It does not create or...

  12. Easy and Rapid Detection of Mumps Virus by Live Fluorescent Visualization of Virus-Infected Cells

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Tadanobu; Agarikuchi, Takashi; Kurebayashi, Yuuki; Shibahara, Nona; Suzuki, Chihiro; Kishikawa, Akiko; Fukushima, Keijo; Takano, Maiko; Suzuki, Fumie; Wada, Hirohisa; Otsubo, Tadamune; Ikeda, Kiyoshi; Minami, Akira; Suzuki, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    Mumps viruses show diverse cytopathic effects (CPEs) of infected cells and viral plaque formation (no CPE or no plaque formation in some cases) depending on the viral strain, highlighting the difficulty in mumps laboratory studies. In our previous study, a new sialidase substrate, 2-(benzothiazol-2-yl)-4-bromophenyl 5-acetamido-3,5-dideoxy-?-D-glycero-D-galacto-2-nonulopyranosidonic acid (BTP3-Neu5Ac), was developed for visualization of sialidase activity. BTP3-Neu5Ac can easily and rapidly perform histochemical fluorescent visualization of influenza viruses and virus-infected cells without an antiviral antibody and cell fixation. In the present study, the potential utility of BTP3-Neu5Ac for rapid detection of mumps virus was demonstrated. BTP3-Neu5Ac could visualize dot-blotted mumps virus, virus-infected cells, and plaques (plaques should be called focuses due to staining of infected cells in this study), even if a CPE was not observed. Furthermore, virus cultivation was possible by direct pick-up from a fluorescent focus. In conventional methods, visible appearance of the CPE and focuses often requires more than 6 days after infection, but the new method with BTP3-Neu5Ac clearly visualized infected cells after 2 days and focuses after 4 days. The BTP3-Neu5Ac assay is a precise, easy, and rapid assay for confirmation and titration of mumps virus. PMID:26629699

  13. Analysis of resistance and tolerance to virus infection in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Merkling, Sarah H; van Rij, Ronald P

    2015-07-01

    Host defense to virus infection involves both resistance mechanisms that reduce viral burden and tolerance mechanisms that limit detrimental effects of infection. The fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, has emerged as a model for identifying and characterizing the genetic basis of resistance and tolerance. This protocol describes how to analyze host responses to virus infection in Drosophila, and it covers the preparation of virus stocks, experimental inoculation of flies and assessment of host survival and virus production, which are indicative of resistance or tolerance. It also provides guidance on how to account for recently identified confounding factors, including natural genetic variation in the pastrel locus and contamination of fly stocks with persistent viruses and the symbiotic bacterium Wolbachia. Our protocol aims to be accessible to newcomers to the field and, although optimized for virus research using Drosophila, some of the techniques could be adapted to other host organisms and/or other microbial pathogens. Preparation of fly stocks requires ?1 month, virus stock preparation requires 17-20 d, virus injection and survival assays require 10-15 d and virus titration requires 14 d. PMID:26110714

  14. Infectious salmon anaemia virus (ISAV) mucosal infection in Atlantic salmon.

    PubMed

    Aamelfot, Maria; McBeath, Alastair; Christiansen, Debes H; Matejusova, Iveta; Falk, Knut

    2015-01-01

    All viruses infecting fish must cross the surface mucosal barrier to successfully enter a host. Infectious salmon anaemia virus (ISAV), the causative agent of the economically important infectious salmon anaemia (ISA) in Atlantic salmon, Salmo salar L., has been shown to use the gills as its entry point. However, other entry ports have not been investigated despite the expression of virus receptors on the surface of epithelial cells in the skin, the gastrointestinal (GI) tract and the conjunctiva. Here we investigate the ISAV mucosal infection in Atlantic salmon after experimental immersion (bath) challenge and in farmed fish collected from a confirmed outbreak of ISA in Norway. We show for the first time evidence of early replication in several mucosal surfaces in addition to the gills, including the pectoral fin, skin and GI tract suggesting several potential entry points for the virus. Initially, the infection is localized and primarily infecting epithelial cells, however at later stages it becomes systemic, infecting the endothelial cells lining the circulatory system. Viruses of low and high virulence used in the challenge revealed possible variation in virus progression during infection at the mucosal surfaces. PMID:26490835

  15. Neutralizing Antibodies after Infection with Dengue 1 Virus

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez, Mayling; Rodriguez-Roche, Rosmari; Bernardo, Lídice; Montes, Tibaire; Vazquez, Susana; Morier, Luis; Alvarez, Angel; Gould, Ernest A; Halstead, Scott B

    2007-01-01

    Severity of disease is markedly increased when infection with dengue virus type 2 (DENV-2) follows infection with DENV-1. Studies have shown that heterologous neutralizing antibody titers are inversely correlated with severity of a second infection. If this mechanism controlled disease severity in Cuba, heterotypic antibody titers should have declined over time. To determine whether phenotypic changes in dengue antibodies occur over time, we analyzed serum samples collected 4–8 and 20–22 years after DENV-1 infection. We found a significant increase in mean titer of homologous DENV-1 neutralizing antibodies and a significant decrease in heterologous antibodies to 1 of 2 genotypes of DENV-2 virus (the American genotype). Asian DENV-2 viruses were not neutralized during either interval; however, the American genotype underwent phenotypic changes in heterotypic viral neutralizing antibodies in the predicted direction. This finding may be related to the time-dependent changes in severity of disease found with secondary dengue infection. PMID:17479892

  16. Experimental co-infection studies with avian influenza viruses and Newcastle Disease viruses in chickens, turkeys and domestic ducks

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Co-infections of poultry with Newcastle Disease viruses (NDVs) and Avian Influenza viruses (AIVs) present a problem both from the clinical point of view and the diagnosis of these viruses. Little has been done to understand the interactions between these two viruses when infecting poultry. Exposur...

  17. Reduced Risk of Disease During Postsecondary Dengue Virus Infections

    PubMed Central

    Olkowski, Sandra; Forshey, Brett M.; Morrison, Amy C.; Rocha, Claudio; Vilcarromero, Stalin; Halsey, Eric S.; Kochel, Tadeusz J.; Scott, Thomas W.; Stoddard, Steven T.

    2013-01-01

    Background.?Antibodies induced by infection with any 1 of 4 dengue virus (DENV) serotypes (DENV-1–4) may influence the clinical outcome of subsequent heterologous infections. To quantify potential cross-protective effects, we estimated disease risk as a function of DENV infection, using data from longitudinal studies performed from September 2006 through February 2011 in Iquitos, Peru, during periods of DENV-3 and DENV-4 transmission. Methods.?DENV infections before and during the study period were determined by analysis of serial serum samples with virus neutralization tests. Third and fourth infections were classified as postsecondary infections. Dengue fever cases were detected by door-to-door surveillance for acute febrile illness. Results.?Among susceptible participants, 39% (420/1077) and 53% (1595/2997) seroconverted to DENV-3 and DENV-4, respectively. Disease was detected in 7% of DENV-3 infections and 10% of DENV-4 infections. Disease during postsecondary infections was reduced by 93% for DENV-3 and 64% for DENV-4, compared with primary and secondary infections. Despite lower disease rates, postsecondary infections constituted a significant proportion of apparent infections (14% [for DENV-3 infections], 45% [for DENV-4 infections]). Conclusions.?Preexisting heterotypic antibodies markedly reduced but did not eliminate the risk of disease in this study population. These results improve understanding of how preinfection history can be associated with dengue outcomes and DENV transmission dynamics. PMID:23776195

  18. Drosophila C Virus Systemic Infection Leads to Intestinal Obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Chtarbanova, Stanislava; Lamiable, Olivier; Lee, Kwang-Zin; Galiana, Delphine; Troxler, Laurent; Meignin, Carine; Hetru, Charles; Hoffmann, Jules A.; Daeffler, Laurent

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Drosophila C virus (DCV) is a positive-sense RNA virus belonging to the Dicistroviridae family. This natural pathogen of the model organism Drosophila melanogaster is commonly used to investigate antiviral host defense in flies, which involves both RNA interference and inducible responses. Although lethality is used routinely as a readout for the efficiency of the antiviral immune response in these studies, virus-induced pathologies in flies still are poorly understood. Here, we characterize the pathogenesis associated with systemic DCV infection. Comparison of the transcriptome of flies infected with DCV or two other positive-sense RNA viruses, Flock House virus and Sindbis virus, reveals that DCV infection, unlike those of the other two viruses, represses the expression of a large number of genes. Several of these genes are expressed specifically in the midgut and also are repressed by starvation. We show that systemic DCV infection triggers a nutritional stress in Drosophila which results from intestinal obstruction with the accumulation of peritrophic matrix at the entry of the midgut and the accumulation of the food ingested in the crop, a blind muscular food storage organ. The related virus cricket paralysis virus (CrPV), which efficiently grows in Drosophila, does not trigger this pathology. We show that DCV, but not CrPV, infects the smooth muscles surrounding the crop, causing extensive cytopathology and strongly reducing the rate of contractions. We conclude that the pathogenesis associated with systemic DCV infection results from the tropism of the virus for an important organ within the foregut of dipteran insects, the crop. IMPORTANCE DCV is one of the few identified natural viral pathogens affecting the model organism Drosophila melanogaster. As such, it is an important virus for the deciphering of host-virus interactions in insects. We characterize here the pathogenesis associated with DCV infection in flies and show that it results from the tropism of the virus for an essential but poorly characterized organ in the digestive tract, the crop. Our results may have relevance for other members of the Dicistroviridae, some of which are pathogenic to beneficial or pest insect species. PMID:25253354

  19. Natural infection of turkeys by infectious laryngotracheitis virus.

    PubMed

    Portz, Cristiana; Beltrão, Nilzane; Furian, Thales Quedi; Júnior, Alfredo Bianco; Macagnan, Marisa; Griebeler, Josiane; Lima Rosa, Carlos André Veiga; Colodel, Edson Moleta; Driemeier, David; Back, Alberto; Barth Schatzmayr, Ortrud Monika; Canal, Cláudio Wageck

    2008-09-18

    The infectious laryngotracheitis virus (ILTV) is an important respiratory pathogen of chickens that also infects pheasants and peafowl. Epidemiologically non-related commercial turkey flocks with clinical signs such as tracheitis, swollen sinuses, conjunctivitis and expectoration of bloody mucus were examined for the presence of the virus. Laboratory ILTV detection was performed by virus isolation in embryonated eggs and cell cultures, PCR and sequencing of amplification products, histopathology, indirect immunofluorescence and electron microscopy. One ILTV turkey isolate was also experimentally inoculated into susceptible chickens and turkeys, reproducing a mild respiratory disease. This is the first description of natural infections with ILTV in turkeys. PMID:18436397

  20. ROLE OF MONOCYTES IN RESPIRATORY SYNCTIAL VIRUS (RSV) INFECTION.

    EPA Science Inventory

    ROLE OF MONOCYTES IN RESPIRATORY SYNCYTIAL VIRUS (RSV) INFECTION.
    Joleen M. Soukup and Susanne Becker, National Health and Environmental Effects Research
    Laboratory, US EPA, Research Traingle Park, NC USA.

    RSV infection in airway epithelial cells (EC) results i...

  1. Heart and Skeletal Muscle Are Targets of Dengue Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Salgado, Doris Martha; Eltit, José Miguel; Mansfield, Keith; Panqueba, César; Castro, Dolly; Vega, Martha Rocio; Xhaja, Kris; Schmidt, Diane; Martin, Katherine J.; Allen, Paul D.; Rodriguez, Jairo Antonio; Dinsmore, Jonathan H.; López, José Rafael; Bosch, Irene

    2010-01-01

    Background Dengue fever is one of the most significant re-emerging tropical diseases, despite our expanding knowledge of the disease, viral tropism is still not known to target heart tissues or muscle. Methods A prospective pediatric clinical cohort of 102 dengue hemorrhagic fever patients from Colombia, South America, was followed for 1 year. Clinical diagnosis of myocarditis was routinely performed. Electrocardiograph and echocardiograph analysis were performed to confirm those cases. Immunohistochemistry for detection of dengue virus and inflammatory markers was performed on autopsied heart tissue. In vitro studies of human striated skeletal fibers (myotubes) infected with dengue virus were used as a model for myocyte infection. Measurements of intracellular Ca2+ concentration as well as immunodetection of dengue virus and inflammation markers in infected myotubes were performed. Results Eleven children with dengue hemorrhagic fever presented with symptoms of myocarditis. Widespread viral infection of the heart, myocardial endothelium, and cardiomyocytes, accompanied by inflammation was observed in 1 fatal case. Immunofluorescence confocal microscopy showed that myotubes were infected by dengue virus and had increased expression of the inflammatory genes and protein IP-10. The infected myotubes also had increases in intracellular Ca2+ concentration. Conclusions Vigorous infection of heart tissues in vivo and striated skeletal cells in vitro are demonstrated. Derangements of Ca2+ storage in the infected cells may directly contribute to the presentation of myocarditis in pediatric patients. PMID:20032806

  2. Antibody landscapes after influenza virus infection or vaccination

    E-print Network

    Fonville, J. M.; Wilks, S. H.; James, S. L.; Fox, A.; Ventresca, M.; Aban, M.; Xue, L.; Jones, T. C.; Le, N. M. H.; Pham, Q. T.; Tran, N. D.; Wong, Y.; Mosterin, A.; Katzelnick, L. C.; Labonte, D.; Le, T. T.; van der Net, G.; Skepner, E.; Russell, C. A.; Kaplan, T. D.; Rimmelzwaan, G. F.; Masurel, N.; de Jong, J. C.; Palache, A.; Beyer, W. E. P.; Le, Q. M.; Nguyen, T. H.; Wertheim, H. F. L.; Hurt, A. C.; Osterhaus, A. D. M. E.; Barr, I. G.; Fouchier, R. A. M.; Horby, P. W.; Smith, D. J.

    2014-11-21

    to study immune profiles covering 43 years of influenza A/H3N2 virus evolution for 69 individuals monitored for infection over six years and for 225 individuals pre- and post-vaccination. On infection and vaccination titers increased broadly, including...

  3. Human Infection with Orf Virus from Goats in China, 2012

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Keshan; Liu, Yongjie; Kong, Hanjin; Shang, Youjun

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Orf virus, which belongs to the Parapoxvirus genus, induces a zoonotic infectious disease characterized by acute, highly vascularized cutaneous pustular lesions in sheep and goats. A number of Orf outbreaks have been reported in sheep and goats in recent years, but no reports have described an Orf virus strain from humans in China. In this study, we diagnosed Orf virus infection in two people, a mother and son, in the Gansu province of China. The human Orf virus was isolated and its phylogenetic characterization was analyzed based on a complete B2L gene. The results are useful for developing prospective programs to control Orf virus infections in both goats and humans PMID:24745915

  4. Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection (RSV): Infection and Incidence

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Links Unexplained Respiratory Disease Outbreaks Red Book® Online Infection and Incidence Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir RSV can cause upper respiratory infections (such as colds) and lower respiratory tract infections ( ...

  5. Interferon Response in Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) Infection: Lessons from Cell Culture Systems of HCV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Pil Soo; Shin, Eui-Cheol; Yoon, Seung Kew

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a positive-stranded RNA virus that infects approximately 130–170 million people worldwide. In 2005, the first HCV infection system in cell culture was established using clone JFH-1, which was isolated from a Japanese patient with fulminant HCV infection. JFH-1 replicates efficiently in hepatoma cells and infectious virion particles are released into the culture supernatant. The development of cell culture-derived HCV (HCVcc) systems has allowed us to understand how hosts respond to HCV infection and how HCV evades host responses. Although the mechanisms underlying the different outcomes of HCV infection are not fully understood, innate immune responses seem to have a critical impact on the outcome of HCV infection, as demonstrated by the prognostic value of IFN-? gene polymorphisms among patients with chronic HCV infection. Herein, we review recent research on interferon response in HCV infection, particularly studies using HCVcc infection systems. PMID:26457705

  6. The chimpanzee model for hepatitis B virus infection.

    PubMed

    Wieland, Stefan F

    2015-06-01

    Even before the discovery of hepatitis B virus (HBV), it was known that chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) are susceptible to human hepatitis viruses. The chimpanzee is the only primate animal model for HBV infections. Much like HBV-infected human patients, chimpanzees can develop acute and chronic HBV infections and consequent hepatitis. Chimpanzees also develop a cellular immune response similar to that observed in humans. For these reasons, the chimpanzee has proven to be an invaluable model for investigations on HBV-driven disease pathogenesis and also the testing of novel antiviral therapies and prophylactic approaches. PMID:26033082

  7. A Case of Graves' Disease Combined with Hantaan Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Heung Yong; Kang, Seon Mee; Kim, So Young; Park, Ji Hyun; Baek, Hong Sun

    2009-01-01

    Graves' disease (GD) is generally presented by thyrotoxicosis with hyperthyroidism, and it is an organ-specific autoimmune disease induced by thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor autoantibodies. However, among diverse etiologies, viral infections have been suggested to trigger or to be involved in the pathogenesis of GD. Hantaan virus infection causing hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) is common in South Korea and its pathogenesis is suggested to be an immunologic mechanism. We have experienced a patient who was diagnosed as HFRS with thyrotoxicosis. So we herein report the case as GD combined with the hantaan virus infection. PMID:19270831

  8. Domestic Pigs Are Susceptible to Infection with Influenza B Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Ran, Zhiguang; Shen, Huigang; Lang, Yuekun; Kolb, Elizabeth A.; Turan, Nuri; Zhu, Laihua; Ma, Jingjiao; Bawa, Bhupinder; Liu, Qinfang; Liu, Haixia; Quast, Megan; Sexton, Gabriel; Krammer, Florian; Hause, Ben M.; Christopher-Hennings, Jane; Nelson, Eric A.; Richt, Juergen

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Influenza B virus (IBV) causes seasonal epidemics in humans. Although IBV has been isolated from seals, humans are considered the primary host and reservoir of this important pathogen. It is unclear whether other animal species can support the replication of IBV and serve as a reservoir. Swine are naturally infected with both influenza A and C viruses. To determine the susceptibility of pigs to IBV infection, we conducted a serological survey for U.S. Midwest domestic swine herds from 2010 to 2012. Results of this study showed that antibodies to IBVs were detected in 38.5% (20/52) of sampled farms, and 7.3% (41/560) of tested swine serum samples were positive for IBV antibodies. Furthermore, swine herds infected with porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) showed a higher prevalence of IBV antibodies in our 2014 survey. In addition, IBV was detected in 3 nasal swabs collected from PRRSV-seropositive pigs by real-time RT-PCR and sequencing. Finally, an experimental infection in pigs, via intranasal and intratracheal routes, was performed using one representative virus from each of the two genetically and antigenically distinct lineages of IBVs: B/Brisbane/60/2008 (Victoria lineage) and B/Yamagata/16/1988 (Yamagata lineage). Pigs developed influenza-like symptoms and lung lesions, and they seroconverted after virus inoculation. Pigs infected with B/Brisbane/60/2008 virus successfully transmitted the virus to sentinel animals. Taken together, our data demonstrate that pigs are susceptible to IBV infection; therefore, they warrant further surveillance and investigation of swine as a potential host for human IBV. IMPORTANCE IBV is an important human pathogen, but its ability to infect other species, for example, pigs, is not well understood. We showed serological evidence that antibodies to two genetically and antigenically distinct lineages of IBVs were present among domestic pigs, especially in swine herds previously infected with PRRSV, an immunosuppressive virus. IBV was detected in 3 nasal swabs from PRRSV-seropositive pigs by real-time reverse transcription-PCR and sequencing. Moreover, both lineages of IBV were able to infect pigs under experimental conditions, with transmissibility of influenza B/Victoria lineage virus among pigs being observed. Our results demonstrate that pigs are susceptible to IBV infections, indicating that IBV is a swine pathogen, and swine may serve as a natural reservoir of IBVs. In addition, pigs may serve as a model to study the mechanisms of transmission and pathogenesis of IBVs. PMID:25673727

  9. Multiple Epstein-Barr virus infections in healthy individuals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walling, Dennis M.; Brown, Abigail L.; Etienne, Wiguins; Keitel, Wendy A.; Ling, Paul D.; Butel, J. S. (Principal Investigator)

    2003-01-01

    We employed a newly developed genotyping technique with direct representational detection of LMP-1 gene sequences to study the molecular epidemiology of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection in healthy individuals. Infections with up to five different EBV genotypes were found in two of nine individuals studied. These results support the hypothesis that multiple EBV infections of healthy individuals are common. The implications for the development of an EBV vaccine are discussed.

  10. Simian Virus 40 Infection in the Spinal Cord of Simian Immunodeficiency Virus-Immunosuppressed Rhesus Macaques.

    PubMed

    Kaliyaperumal, Saravanan; Wüthrich, Christian; Westmoreland, Susan V; Koralnik, Igor J

    2015-11-01

    Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) is an often-fatal demyelinating disease of the CNS that usually develops in immunocompromised individuals because of reactivation of quiescent JC virus (JCV). There are only a few reports of JCV infection in the human spinal cord. Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy-like demyelinating lesions have been documented in the brains of simian immunodeficiency virus-infected macaques. To determine whether simian virus 40 (SV40) can infect and cause PML lesions in spinal cords of immunosuppressed macaques, we examined archival spinal cord samples from 15 simian immunodeficiency virus-infected rhesus monkeys with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome and SV40 infection of the brain. Among those, 6 (40%) had SV40-infected cells in the spinal cord, including 1 with PML-like lesions, 1 with PML-like lesions and meningoencephalitis, 2 with meningoencephalitis, 1 with gray matter gliosis, and 1 with no lesions. One animal with a large PML-like lesion had extensive demyelination and SV40 infection of astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, and meningeal cells. None of the 6 animals had SV40-infected spinal cord neurons. These observations indicate that, like JCV in immunosuppressed humans, SV40 can infect glial cells and cause PML-like lesions in the spinal cord of immunosuppressed rhesus macaques. Rhesus macaques could serve as an animal model to study polyomavirus infection and pathogenesis in the spinal cord. PMID:26469249

  11. Early Events in Chikungunya Virus Infection—From Virus Cell Binding to Membrane Fusion

    PubMed Central

    van Duijl-Richter, Mareike K. S.; Hoornweg, Tabitha E.; Rodenhuis-Zybert, Izabela A.; Smit, Jolanda M.

    2015-01-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is a rapidly emerging mosquito-borne alphavirus causing millions of infections in the tropical and subtropical regions of the world. CHIKV infection often leads to an acute self-limited febrile illness with debilitating myalgia and arthralgia. A potential long-term complication of CHIKV infection is severe joint pain, which can last for months to years. There are no vaccines or specific therapeutics available to prevent or treat infection. This review describes the critical steps in CHIKV cell entry. We summarize the latest studies on the virus-cell tropism, virus-receptor binding, internalization, membrane fusion and review the molecules and compounds that have been described to interfere with virus cell entry. The aim of the review is to give the reader a state-of-the-art overview on CHIKV cell entry and to provide an outlook on potential new avenues in CHIKV research. PMID:26198242

  12. Antigen-Specific Expansion of Cytotoxic T Lymphocytes in Acute Measles Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Mongkolsapaya, Juthathip; Jaye, Assan; Callan, Margaret F. C.; Magnusen, Albert F.; McMichael, Andrew J.; Whittle, Hilton C.

    1999-01-01

    Skewing of the T-cell receptor repertoire of CD8+ T cells has been shown in some persistent infections with viruses, such as human immunodeficiency virus, simian immunodeficiency virus, and Epstein-Barr virus. We have demonstrated that similar distortions also occur in nonpersistent measles virus infection. In addition, two of four children immunized with live, attenuated measles virus showed larger and more persistent CD8+ T-cell expansions than their naturally infected counterparts. The expanded lymphocyte populations were monoclonal or oligoclonal and lysed target cells infected with recombinant vaccinia virus expressing measles virus protein. These results demonstrate that the expansions of CD8+ T lymphocytes are antigen driven. PMID:9847308

  13. Virus Enrichment for Single Virus Infection by Using 3D Insulator Based Dielectrophoresis

    PubMed Central

    Masuda, Taisuke; Maruyama, Hisataka; Honda, Ayae; Arai, Fumihito

    2014-01-01

    We developed an active virus filter (AVF) that enables virus enrichment for single virus infection, by using insulator-based dielectrophoresis (iDEP). A 3D-constricted flow channel design enabled the production of an iDEP force in the microfluidic chip. iDEP using a chip with multiple active virus filters (AVFs) was more accurate and faster than using a chip with a single AVF, and improved the efficiency of virus trapping. We utilized maskless photolithography to achieve the precise 3D gray-scale exposure required for fabrication of constricted flow channel. Influenza virus (A PR/8) was enriched by a negative DEP force when sinusoidal wave was applied to the electrodes within an amplitude range of 20 Vp-p and a frequency of 10 MHz. AVF-mediated virus enrichment can be repeated simply by turning the current ON or OFF. Furthermore, the negative AVF can inhibit virus adhesion onto the glass substrate. We then trapped and transported one of the enriched viruses by using optical tweezers. This microfluidic chip facilitated the effective transport of a single virus from AVFs towards the cell-containing chamber without crossing an electrode. We successfully transported the virus to the cell chamber (v?=?10 µm/s) and brought it infected with a selected single H292 cell. PMID:24918921

  14. Hepatitis E Virus Infection among Solid Organ Transplant Recipients, the Netherlands

    PubMed Central

    Pas, Suzan D.; de Man, Rob A.; Mulders, Claudia; Balk, Aggie H.M.M.; van Hal, Peter T.W.; Weimar, Willem; Koopmans, Marion P.G.; Osterhaus, Albert D.M.E.

    2012-01-01

    We screened 1,200 living heart, lung, liver, and kidney transplant recipients for hepatitis E virus infection by reverse transcription PCR. In 12 (1%) patients, hepatitis E virus infection was identified; in 11 patients, chronic infection developed. This immunocompromised population is at risk for hepatitis E virus infection. PMID:22516170

  15. Metabolic stress in infected cells may represent a therapeutic target for human immunodeficiency virus infection.

    PubMed

    Alonso-Villaverde, Carlos; Menéndez, Javier A; Joven, Jorge

    2013-07-01

    Worldwide, there are thousands of new cases of human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) infection per day. The effectiveness of current combination antiretroviral therapy (ART) is relative; to prioritize finding vaccines and/or cure-oriented initiatives should be reinforced because there is little room, if any, for procrastination. Basic and clinical findings on HIV-1 reservoirs suggest that disruption of virus latency is feasible. Because the goal is curing HIV-1 infection, we should be aware that the challenge is to eradicate the viruses of every single infected cell and consequently acting upon virus latency is necessary but not sufficient. The large majority of the virus reservoir, CD4(+) T lymphocytes, is readily accessible but other minor reservoirs, where ART does not diffuse, require innovative strategies. The situation closely resembles that currently faced in the treatment of cancer. Exploiting the fact that histone deacetylase inhibitors, mainly vorinostat, may disrupt the latency of HIV-1, we propose to supplement this effect with a programmed interference in the metabolic stress of infected cells. Metformin and chloroquine are cheap and accessible modulators of pro-survival mechanisms to which viruses are constantly confronted to generate alternative energy sources and maximize virus production. Metformin restrains the use of the usurped cellular biosynthetic machinery by viral genes and chloroquine contributes to death of infected cells. We suggest that the combination of vorinostat, chloroquine and metformin should be combined with ART to pursue viral eradication in infected cells. PMID:23639282

  16. Secondary dengue virus type 4 infections in Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Buchy, Philippe; Vo, Van Luong; Bui, Khanh Toan; Trinh, Thi Xuan Mai; Glaziou, Philippe; Le, Thi Thu Ha; Le, Viet Lo; Bui, Trong Chien

    2005-01-01

    This study was designated to describe clinical and biological features of patients with a suspected diagnosis of dengue fever/dengue hemorrhagic fever during an outbreak in Central Vietnam. One hundred and twenty-five consecutive patients hospitalized at Khanh Hoa and Binh Thuan Provincial hospitals between November 2001 and January 2002 with a diagnosis of suspected dengue infection were included in the present study. Viruses were isolated in C6/36 and VERO E6 cell cultures or detected by RT-PCR. A hemagglutination-inhibition test (HI) was done on each paired sera using dengue antigens type 1-4, Japanese encephalitis (JE) virus antigen, Chickungunya virus antigen and Sindbis virus antigen. Anti-dengue and anti-JE virus IgM were measured by a capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (MAC-ELISA). Anti-dengue and anti-JE virus IgG were measured by an ELISA test. Dengue viruses were isolated in cell culture and/or detected by RT-PCR in 20.8% of blood samples. DEN-4 and DEN-2 serotypes were found in 18.4% and 2.4% of the patients, respectively. A total of 86.4% of individuals had a diagnosis of acute dengue fever by using the HI test and/or dengue virus-specific IgM capture-ELISA and/or virus isolation and/or RT-PCR. The prevalence of primary and secondary acute dengue infection was 4% and 78.4%, respectively. Anti-dengue IgG ELISA test was positive in 88.8% of the patients. In 5 cases (4%), Japanese encephalitis virus infection was positive by serology but the cell culture was negative. No Chickungunya virus or Sindbis virus infection was detected by the HI test. In patients with acute dengue virus infection, the most common presenting symptom was headache, followed by conjunctivitis, petechial rash, muscle and joint pain, nausea and abdominal pain. Four percent of hospitalized patients were classified as dengue hemorrhagic fever. The clinical presentation and blood cell counts were similar between patients hospitalized with acute dengue fever and patients with other febrile illnesses. PMID:15906664

  17. Infection of cells by Sindbis virus at low temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Gongbo; Hernandez, Raquel; Weninger, Keith; Brown, Dennis T. . E-mail: dennis_brown@ncsu.edu

    2007-06-05

    Sindbis virus, which belongs to the family Togaviridae genus Alphavirus infects a variety of vertebrate and invertebrate cells. The initial steps of Sindbis virus infection involve attachment, penetration and uncoating. Two different pathways of infection have been proposed for Alphaviruses. One proposed mechanism involves receptor mediated virion endocytosis followed by membrane fusion triggered by endosome acidification. This virus-host membrane fusion model, well established by influenza virus, has been applied to other unrelated membrane-containing viruses including Alphaviruses. The other mechanism proposes direct penetration of the cell plasma membrane by the virus glycoproteins in the absence of membrane fusion. This alternate model is supported by both ultrastructural [Paredes, A.M., Ferreira, D., Horton, M., Saad, A., Tsuruta, H., Johnston, R., Klimstra, W., Ryman, K., Hernandez, R., Chiu, W., Brown, D.T., 2004. Conformational changes in Sindbis virions resulting from exposure to low pH and interactions with cells suggest that cell penetration may occur at the cell surface in the absence of membrane fusion. Virology 324(2), 373-386] and biochemical [Koschinski, A., Wengler, G., Wengler, G., and Repp, H., 2005. Rare earth ions block the ion pores generated by the class II fusion proteins of alphaviruses and allow analysis of the biological functions of these pores. J. Gen. Virol. 86(Pt. 12), 3311-3320] studies. We have examined the ability of Sindbis virus to infect Baby Hamster Kidney (BHK) cells at temperatures which block endocytosis. We have found that under these conditions Sindbis virus infects cells in a temperature- and time-dependent fashion.

  18. Epidemiology, surveillance and control of Nipah virus infections in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Chua, K B

    2010-12-01

    The outbreak of Nipah virus, affecting pigs and pig-farm workers, was first noted in September 1998 in the north-western part of peninsular Malaysia. By March 1999, the outbreak had spread to other pig-farming areas of the country, inclusive of the neighbouring country, Singapore. A total of 283 human cases of viral encephalitis with 109 deaths were recorded in Malaysia from 29 September 1998 to December 1999. During the outbreak period, a number of surveillances under three broad groups; Surveillance in Human Health Sector, Surveillance in Animal Health Sector, and Surveillance for the Reservoir Hosts, were carried out to determine the prevalence, risk of virus infections and transmission in human and swine populations as well as the source and reservoir hosts of Nipah virus. Surveillance data showed that the virus spread rapidly among pigs within infected farms and transmission was attributed to direct contact with infective excretions and secretions. The spread of the virus among pig farms within and between states of peninsular Malaysia was due to movement of pigs. The transmission of the virus to humans was through close contact with infected pigs. Human to human transmission was considered a rare event though the Nipah virus could be isolated from saliva, urine, nasal and pharyngeal secretions of patients. Field investigations identified fruitbats of the Pteropid species as the natural reservoir hosts of the viruses. The outbreak was effectively brought under control following the discovery of the virus and institution of correct control measures through a combined effort of multi-ministerial and multidisciplinary teams working in close co-operation and collaboration with other international agencies. PMID:21329176

  19. Cholesterol is required for infection by Semliki Forest virus

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    Semliki Forest virus (SFV) and many other enveloped animal viruses enter cells by a membrane fusion reaction triggered by the low pH within the endocytic pathway. In vitro, SFV fusion requires cholesterol in the target membrane, but the role of cholesterol in vivo is unknown. In this paper, the infection pathway of SFV was studied in mammalian and inset cells substantially depleted of sterol. Cholesterol-depleted cells were unaltered in their ability to bind, internalize, and acidify virus, but were blocked in SFV fusion and subsequent virus replication. Depleted cells could be infected by the cholesterol-independent vesicular stomatitis virus, which also enters cells via endocytosis and low pH-mediated fusion. The block in SFV infection was specifically reversed by cholesterol but not by cholestenone, which lacks the critical 3 beta-hydroxyl group. Cholesterol thus is central in the infection pathway of SFV, and may act in vivo to modulate infection by SFV and other pathogens. PMID:1671572

  20. Evidence for negative-strand RNA virus infection in fungi.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Hideki; Chiba, Sotaro; Toyoda, Kazuhiro; Suzuki, Nobuhiro

    2013-01-20

    Fungal viruses comprise two groups: a major group of five families with double-stranded RNA genomes and a minor group with positive-sense single-stranded (ss)RNA genomes. Although many fungal viruses have been identified, no negative-stranded (-)ssRNA mycoviruses have been reported. Here we present two lines of evidence suggesting the presence of (-)ssRNA viruses in filamentous fungi based on an exhaustive search using extant (-)ssRNA viruses as queries. This revealed (-)ssRNA virus L protein-like sequences in the genome of a phytopathogenic obligate ascomycete, Erysiphe pisi. A similar search for (-)ssRNA viruses in fungal transcriptome shotgun assembly libraries demonstrated that two independent libraries from Sclerotinia homoeocarpa, another phytopathogenic ascomycete, contained several sequences considered to correspond to the entire mononegavirus L gene and likely originating from an infecting (-)ssRNA virus. These results provide strong evidence for both ancient and extant (-)ssRNA virus infections in fungi. PMID:23099204

  1. Viruses infecting Passiflora species in Florida

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This report documents multiple viruses in Passiflora spp. in Florida. It also reiterates the risk of movement of vegetatively-propagated plant material. This report provides an overview of this virus for growers, extension workers, crop consultants and research and regulatory scientists....

  2. Suppression of influenza virus infection by the orf virus isolated in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    LIN, Fong-Yuan; TSENG, Yeu-Yang; CHAN, Kun-Wei; KUO, Shu-Ting; YANG, Cheng-Hsiung; WANG, Chi-Young; TAKASU, Masaki; HSU, Wei-Li; WONG, Min-Liang

    2015-01-01

    Orf virus (ORFV), a member of parapoxvirus, is an enveloped virus with genome of double-stranded DNA. ORFV causes contagious pustular dermatitis or contagious ecthyma in sheep and goats worldwide. In general, detection of viral DNA and observing ORFV virion in tissues of afflicted animals are two methods commonly used for diagnosis of orf infection; however, isolation of the ORFV in cell culture using virus-containing tissue as inoculum is known to be difficult. In this work, the ORFV (Hoping strain) isolated in central Taiwan was successfully grown in cell culture. We further examined the biochemical characteristic of our isolate, including viral genotyping, viral mRNA and protein expression. By electron microscopy, one unique form of viral particle from ORFV infected cellular lysate was demonstrated in the negative-stained field. Moreover, immunomodulating and anti-influenza virus properties of this ORFV were investigated. ORFV stimulated human monocytes (THP-1) secreting proinflammatory cytokines IL-8 and TNF-?. And, pre-treatment of ORFV-infected cell medium prevents A549 cells from subsequent type A influenza virus (IAV) infection. Similarly, mice infected with ORFV via both intramuscular and subcutaneous routes at two days prior to IAV infection significantly decreased the replication of IAV. In summary, the results of a current study indicated our Hoping strain harbors the immune modulator property; with such a bio-adjuvanticity, we further proved that pre-exposure of ORFV protects animals from subsequent IAV infection. PMID:25855509

  3. Finding balance: Virus populations reach equilibrium during the infection process.

    PubMed

    Harper, S J; Cowell, S J; Dawson, W O

    2015-11-01

    Virus populations, mixtures of viral strains or species, are a common feature of viral infection, and influence many viral processes including infection, transmission, and the induction of disease. Yet, little is known of the rules that define the composition and structure of these populations. In this study, we used three distinct strains of Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) to examine the effect of inoculum composition, titer, and order, on the virus population. We found that CTV populations stabilized at the same equilibrium irrespective of how that population was introduced into a host. In addition, both field and experimental observations showed that these equilibria were relatively uniform between individual hosts of the same species and under the same conditions. We observed that the structure of the equilibria reached is determined primarily by the host, with the same inoculum reaching different equilibria in different species, and by the fitness of individual virus variants. PMID:26291064

  4. [Influenza type A (H5N1) virus infection].

    PubMed

    Engin, Aynur

    2007-07-01

    Influenza type A viruses have conserved their actuality and importance during history with their special respect of genetic variations and global pandemics. In recent years their significance has increased because of the appearence of "bird flu" caused by a highly virulent strain H5N1 subtype. Although influenza type A viruses that cause infections in the birds (avian influenza) are species-specific, some may cross the species barrier to infect humans. Previously, it was thought that direct transmission of virus from bird to human could not take place, but it came to be true in 1997, in Hong Kong. Since avian influenza virus A (H5N1) produces human infections with high morbidity and mortality rates, the probability of human-to-human transmission and its consequences attract a great deal of attention, recently. According to World Health Organization data up until January 2007, the number of confirmed human cases was 270 (164 death). This number was 12 cases for Turkey with 4 deaths, however the real number was thought to be higher. The transmission of H5N1 virus to humans is by direct contact with infected birds and poultry, close contact with their secretions or contaminated fomites. There is no evidence that people have been infected with bird flu by eating safely handled and properly cooked poultry. After a mean incubation period of 2-5 days, infection onsets with high fever, lower respiratory tract symptoms and diarrhea. In severe cases death occurs due to acute respiratory distress syndrome and multiple organ involvement. The diagnosis is confirmed by viral isolation, detection of H5-specific RNA with pharyngeal specimens (throat swabs), or serology. Neuraminidase inhibitors are effective in the treatment of avian influenza especially when given early, in the first 48 hours of infection. Although a vaccine against H5N1 virus is under development, no vaccine is ready for a commercial production. Recently, the Food and Drug Administration has announced the first approval in the United States of a vaccine for humans against the H5N1 influenza virus on April 17h, 2007, however the manufacturer (Sanofi Pasteur) won't sell the vaccine commercially; instead, the vaccine has been purchased by the federal government for inclusion within the National Stockpile (http://www.fda.gov/bbs/topics/NEWS/2007/NEW01611.htm). The major prevention is then mainly based on continous public education about the tranmission routes, early symptoms and signs of the infection, and warning people to obey preventive measures without any panic. In this review article influenza virus A (H5N1) infections, epidemiology and protection have been discussed. PMID:17933264

  5. Mitochondrial dysfunction in rabies virus infection of neurons.

    PubMed

    Alandijany, Thamir; Kammouni, Wafa; Roy Chowdhury, Subir K; Fernyhough, Paul; Jackson, Alan C

    2013-12-01

    Infection with the challenge virus standard-11 (CVS) strain of fixed rabies virus induces neuronal process degeneration in adult mice after hindlimb footpad inoculation. CVS-induced axonal swellings of primary rodent dorsal root ganglion neurons are associated with 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal protein adduct staining, indicating a critical role of oxidative stress. Mitochondrial dysfunction is the major cause of oxidative stress. We hypothesized that CVS infection induces mitochondrial dysfunction leading to oxidative stress. We investigated the effects of CVS infection on several mitochondrial parameters in different cell types. CVS infection significantly increased maximal uncoupled respiration and complex IV respiration and complex I and complex IV activities, but did not affect complex II-III or citrate synthase activities. Increases in complex I activity, but not complex IV activity, correlated with susceptibility of the cells to CVS infection. CVS infection maintained coupled respiration and rate of proton leak, indicating a tight mitochondrial coupling. Possibly as a result of enhanced complex activity and efficient coupling, a high mitochondrial membrane potential was generated. CVS infection reduced the intracellular ATP level and altered the cellular redox state as indicated by a high NADH/NAD+ ratio. The basal production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was not affected in CVS-infected neurons. However, a higher rate of ROS generation occurred in CVS-infected neurons in the presence of mitochondrial substrates and inhibitors. We conclude that CVS infection induces mitochondrial dysfunction leading to ROS overgeneration and oxidative stress. PMID:24277436

  6. Human trophoblasts confer resistance to viruses implicated in perinatal infection.

    TOXLINE Toxicology Bibliographic Information

    Bayer A; Delorme-Axford E; Sleigher C; Frey TK; Trobaugh DW; Klimstra WB; Emert-Sedlak LA; Smithgall TE; Kinchington PR; Vadia S; Seveau S; Boyle JP; Coyne CB; Sadovsky Y

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Primary human trophoblasts were previously shown to be resistant to viral infection, and able to confer this resistance to nontrophoblast cells. Can trophoblasts protect nontrophoblastic cells from infection by viruses or other intracellular pathogens that are implicated in perinatal infection?STUDY DESIGN: Isolated primary term human trophoblasts were cultured for 48-72 hours. Diverse nonplacental human cell lines (U2OS, human foreskin fibroblast, TZM-bl, MeWo, and Caco-2) were preexposed to either trophoblast conditioned medium, nonconditioned medium, or miR-517-3p for 24 hours. Cells were infected with several viral and nonviral pathogens known to be associated with perinatal infections. Cellular infection was defined and quantified by plaque assays, luciferase assays, microscopy, and/or colonization assays. Differences in infection were assessed by Student t test or analysis of variance with Bonferroni correction.RESULTS: Infection by rubella and other togaviruses, human immunodeficiency virus-1, and varicella zoster was attenuated in cells preexposed to trophoblast-conditioned medium (P < .05), and a partial effect by the chromosome 19 microRNA miR-517-3p on specific pathogens. The conditioned medium had no effect on infection by Toxoplasma gondii or Listeria monocytogenes.CONCLUSION: Our findings indicate that medium conditioned by primary human trophoblasts attenuates viral infection in nontrophoblastic cells. Our data point to a trophoblast-specific antiviral effect that may be exploited therapeutically.

  7. A Review on JC Virus Infection in Kidney Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Delbue, Serena; Ferraresso, Mariano; Ghio, Luciana; Carloni, Camilla; Carluccio, Silvia; Belingheri, Mirco; Edefonti, Alberto; Ferrante, Pasquale

    2013-01-01

    The polyomavirus (PyV), JC virus (JCV), is a small nonenveloped DNA virus that asymptomatically infects about 80% of healthy adults and establishes latency in the kidney tissue. In case of immunodeficient hosts, JCV can lytically infect the oligodendrocytes, causing a fatal demyelinating disease, known as progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML). Although the reactivation of another human PyV, BK virus (BKV), is relatively common and its association with the polyomavirus associated nephropathy (PyVAN) following renal transplantation is proven, JCV replication and its impact on graft function and survival are less well studied. Here we describe the biology of JCV and its pathological features and we review the literature regarding the JCV infection analyzed in the setting of transplantations. PMID:23424601

  8. The First Imported Case Infected with Chikungunya Virus in Korea

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Chikungunya is caused by an arbovirus transmitted by Aedes mosquito vector. With the increase of habitat of mosquito by global warming and frequent international travel and interchange, chikungunya reemerged and showed global distribution recently. Until now there has not been reported any case infected with chikungunya virus in Korea. A 23-year-old man has been the Republic of the Philippines for 1 week, and visited our emergency center due to fever and back pain. Chikungunya viral infection was diagnosed by specific IgM for chickungunya virus by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assayin Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. His clinical course was self limited. We introduce the first imported case infected with chikungunya virus in Korea. PMID:25844264

  9. Antibody landscapes after influenza virus infection or vaccination

    PubMed Central

    James, S. L.; Fox, A.; Ventresca, M.; Aban, M.; Xue, L.; Jones, T. C.; Le, N. M. H.; Pham, Q. T.; Tran, N. D.; Wong, Y.; Mosterin, A.; Katzelnick, L. C.; Labonte, D.; Le, T. T.; van der Net, G.; Skepner, E.; Russell, C. A.; Kaplan, T. D.; Rimmelzwaan, G. F.; de Jong, J. C.; Palache, A.; Beyer, W. E. P.; Le, Q. M.; Nguyen, T. H.; Wertheim, H. F. L.; Hurt, A. C.; Osterhaus, A. D. M. E.; Barr, I. G.; Fouchier, R. A. M.; Horby, P. W.; Smith, D. J.

    2014-01-01

    We introduce the antibody landscape, a method for the quantitative analysis of antibody-mediated immunity to antigenically variable pathogens, achieved by accounting for antigenic variation among pathogen strains. We generated antibody landscapes to study immune profiles covering 43 years of influenza A/H3N2 virus evolution for 69 individuals monitored for infection over six years and for 225 individuals pre- and post-vaccination. On infection and vaccination titers increased broadly, including previously encountered viruses far beyond the extent of cross-reactivity observed after a primary infection. We explored implications for vaccination, and found that use of an antigenically advanced virus had the dual benefit of inducing antibodies against both advanced and previous antigenic clusters. These results indicate that pre-emptive vaccine updates may improve influenza vaccine efficacy in previously-exposed individuals. PMID:25414313

  10. Insights into human immunodeficiency virus-hepatitis B virus co-infection in India

    PubMed Central

    Chakravarty, Runu; Pal, Ananya

    2015-01-01

    Shared routes of transmission lead to frequent human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-hepatitis B virus (HBV) co-infection in a host which results in about 10% of HIV positive individuals to have chronic hepatitis B infection worldwide. In post-antiretroviral therapy era, liver diseases have emerged as the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in HIV-infected individuals and HBV co-infection have become the major health issue among this population particularly from the regions with endemic HBV infection. In setting of HIV-HBV co-infection, HIV significantly impacts the natural history of HBV infection, its disease profile and the treatment outcome in negative manner. Moreover, the epidemiological pattern of HBV infection and the diversity in HBV genome (genotypic and phenotypic) are also varied in HIV co-infected subjects as compared to HBV mono-infected individuals. Several reports on the abovementioned issues are available from developed parts of the world as well as from sub-Saharan African countries. In contrast, most of these research areas remained unexplored in India despite having considerable burden of HIV and HBV infections. This review discusses present knowledge from the studies on HIV-HBV co-infection in India and relevant reports from different parts of the world. Issues needed for the future research relevant to HIV-HBV co-infection in India are also highlighted here, including a call for further investigations on this field of study. PMID:26279986

  11. In vitro infection of woodchuck hepatocytes with woodchuck hepatitis virus and ground squirrel hepatitis virus.

    PubMed

    Aldrich, C E; Coates, L; Wu, T T; Newbold, J; Tennant, B C; Summers, J; Seeger, C; Mason, W S

    1989-09-01

    Primary cultures of woodchuck hepatocytes were demonstrated to be susceptible to in vitro infection by both woodchuck hepatitis virus and ground squirrel hepatitis virus, as evidenced by the appearance of DNA species characteristic of hepadnavirus replication. Initiation of infection by woodchuck hepatitis virus was blocked by the presence of suramin, polybrene, or dideoxycytidine. Viral CCC DNA, the putative template for viral RNA transcription, was detected at 2 days postinfection. Accumulation of intracellular intermediates in virion DNA synthesis was negligible until 7-10 days postinfection, but these DNA intermediates then increased dramatically in amount over the next few weeks. Results were obtained which suggested that the prolonged accumulation of intermediates in virion DNA synthesis was an intrinsic property of the infection of individual cells, and not the result of a slow spread of virus through the cultures. PMID:2549713

  12. Permissive and restricted virus infection of murine embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Wash, Rachael; Calabressi, Sabrina; Franz, Stephanie; Griffiths, Samantha J; Goulding, David; Tan, E-Pien; Wise, Helen; Digard, Paul; Haas, Jürgen; Efstathiou, Stacey; Kellam, Paul

    2012-10-01

    Recent RNA interference (RNAi) studies have identified many host proteins that modulate virus infection, but small interfering RNA 'off-target' effects and the use of transformed cell lines limit their conclusiveness. As murine embryonic stem (mES) cells can be genetically modified and resources exist where many and eventually all known mouse genes are insertionally inactivated, it was reasoned that mES cells would provide a useful alternative to RNAi screens. Beyond allowing investigation of host-pathogen interactions in vitro, mES cells have the potential to differentiate into other primary cell types, as well as being used to generate knockout mice for in vivo studies. However, mES cells are poorly characterized for virus infection. To investigate whether ES cells can be used to explore host-virus interactions, this study characterized the responses of mES cells following infection by herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) and influenza A virus. HSV-1 replicated lytically in mES cells, although mES cells were less permissive than most other cell types tested. Influenza virus was able to enter mES cells and express some viral proteins, but the replication cycle was incomplete and no infectious virus was produced. Knockdown of the host protein AHCYL1 in mES cells reduced HSV-1 replication, showing the potential for using mES cells to study host-virus interactions. Transcriptional profiling, however, indicated the lack of an efficient innate immune response in these cells. mES cells may thus be useful to identify host proteins that play a role in virus replication, but they are not suitable to determine factors that are involved in innate host defence. PMID:22815272

  13. African swine fever virus infection in Ornithodoros ticks.

    PubMed

    Burrage, Thomas G

    2013-04-01

    African swine fever virus (ASFV) is an arbovirus which is vectored by soft ticks of the Ornithodoros spp. and in the sylvatic cycle infects wart hogs and bush pigs. ASFV infection of domestic swine causes a high mortality disease. On the other hand, ASFV infection of the tick can result in a high-titered and persistent infection depending upon the ASFV isolate and the tick combination. Recently, morphological, classical virology (titration) and recombinant ASFV have been used to study the cellular, molecular and genetic interactions that occur between ASFV and its host tick. PMID:23085123

  14. Visualizing hepatitis C virus infection in humanized mice

    PubMed Central

    von Schaewen, Markus; Ding, Qiang; Ploss, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) establishes frequently persistent infections. Chronic carriers can develop severe liver disease. HCV has been intensely studied in a variety of cell culture systems. However, commonly used cell lines and primary hepatocyte cultures do not or only in part recapitulate the intricate host environment HCV faces in the liver. HCV infects readily only humans and chimpanzees, which poses challenges in studying HCV infection in vivo. Consequently, tractable small animal models are needed that are not only suitable for analyzing HCV infection but also for testing novel therapeutics. Here, we will focus our discussion on humanized mice, i.e. mice engrafted with human tissues or expressing human genes, which support HCV infection. We will further highlight novel methods that can be used to unambiguously detect HCV infected cells in situ, thereby facilitating a spatio-temporal dissection of HCV infection in the three dimensional context of the liver. PMID:24642425

  15. Cowpea viruses: Effect of single and mixed infections on symptomatology and virus concentration

    PubMed Central

    Taiwo, Moni A; Kareem, Kehinde T; Nsa, Imade Y; D'A Hughes, Jackies

    2007-01-01

    Natural multiple viral infections of cultivated cowpeas have been reported in Nigeria. In this study, three Nigerian commercial cowpea cultivars ("Olo 11", "Oloyin" and "White") and two lines from the IITA (IT86D- 719 and TVU 76) were mechanically inoculated with Cowpea aphid-borne mosaic virus (CABMV), Bean southern mosaic virus (SBMV) and Cowpea mottle virus (CMeV) singly, as well as in all possible combinations at 10, 20 and 30 days after planting (DAP). Samples of leaves or stems were collected at 10, 20 and 30 days after inoculation (DAI) and analyzed for relative virus concentration by Enzyme-Linked Immunosrbent Assay. All the cultivars and lines {CVS/L} were susceptible to the viruses but the commercial CVS showed more severe symptoms and had relatively higher viral concentration. In single virus infections, CABMV which induced the most severe symptoms had absorbance values (at 405 nm) of 0.11 to 0.46 while SBMV and CMeV which induced moderate symptoms had virus titre of 0.74 to 1.99 and 0.11 to 0.90 respectively. Plants inoculated 10 DAP had significantly higher virus concentration than those inoculated 30 DAP. In mixed infections involving CABMV (10 DAP) apical necrosis and death were observed in commercial cultivars "Olo 11" and "White". Enhancement of CMeV titers were observed in plants infected with CMeV + CABMV. Multiple viral infections of cowpeas may result in complete yield loss, hence, the availability of seeds of cultivars with a high level of multiple virus resistance is recommended as a means of control. PMID:17900355

  16. Plasticity and Virus Specificity of the Airway Epithelial Cell Immune Response during Respiratory Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Ioannidis, Ioannis; McNally, Beth; Willette, Meredith; Peeples, Mark E.; Chaussabel, Damien; Durbin, Joan E.; Ramilo, Octavio

    2012-01-01

    Airway epithelial cells (AECs) provide the first line of defense in the respiratory tract and are the main target of respiratory viruses. Here, using oligonucleotide and protein arrays, we analyze the infection of primary polarized human AEC cultures with influenza virus and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), and we show that the immune response of AECs is quantitatively and qualitatively virus specific. Differentially expressed genes (DEGs) specifically induced by influenza virus and not by RSV included those encoding interferon B1 (IFN-B1), type III interferons (interleukin 28A [IL-28A], IL-28B, and IL-29), interleukins (IL-6, IL-1A, IL-1B, IL-23A, IL-17C, and IL-32), and chemokines (CCL2, CCL8, and CXCL5). Lack of type I interferon or STAT1 signaling decreased the expression and secretion of cytokines and chemokines by the airway epithelium. We also observed strong basolateral polarization of the secretion of cytokines and chemokines by human and murine AECs during infection. Importantly, the antiviral response of human AECs to influenza virus or to RSV correlated with the infection signature obtained from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) isolated from patients with acute influenza or RSV bronchiolitis, respectively. IFI27 (also known as ISG12) was identified as a biomarker of respiratory virus infection in both AECs and PBMCs. In addition, the extent of the transcriptional perturbation in PBMCs correlated with the clinical disease severity. Our results demonstrate that the human airway epithelium mounts virus-specific immune responses that are likely to determine the subsequent systemic immune responses and suggest that the absence of epithelial immune mediators after RSV infection may contribute to explaining the inadequacy of systemic immunity to the virus. PMID:22398282

  17. Amoebae as battlefields for bacteria, giant viruses, and virophages.

    PubMed

    Slimani, Meriem; Pagnier, Isabelle; Raoult, Didier; La Scola, Bernard

    2013-04-01

    When amoebae are simultaneously infected with Acanthamoeba polyphaga Mimivirus (APM) and the strictly intracellular BABL1 bacterium, the latter is always lost after serial subculturing. We showed that the virophage Sputnik 1, by reducing APM fitness, preserved BABL1 growth in acute and chronic models. This capability of a virophage to modulate the virulence of mimiviruses highlights the competition that occurs between them during natural host infection. PMID:23388714

  18. Amoebae as Battlefields for Bacteria, Giant Viruses, and Virophages

    PubMed Central

    Slimani, Meriem; Pagnier, Isabelle; Raoult, Didier

    2013-01-01

    When amoebae are simultaneously infected with Acanthamoeba polyphaga Mimivirus (APM) and the strictly intracellular BABL1 bacterium, the latter is always lost after serial subculturing. We showed that the virophage Sputnik 1, by reducing APM fitness, preserved BABL1 growth in acute and chronic models. This capability of a virophage to modulate the virulence of mimiviruses highlights the competition that occurs between them during natural host infection. PMID:23388714

  19. Effect of cacao husk extract on human immunodeficiency virus infection.

    PubMed

    Unten, S; Ushijima, H; Shimizu, H; Tsuchie, H; Kitamura, T; Moritome, N; Sakagami, H

    1991-12-01

    A sodium hydroxide extract from cacao husk inhibited the cytopathic effect of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) against HTLV-1-transformed T-cell lines MT-2 and MT-4. It also inhibited syncytium formation between HIV-infected and uninfected lymphoblastoid T-cell line, MOLT-4. The anti-HIV activity was concentrated by membrane filter fractionation to a fraction with molecular weight of 100-300 KDa. Anti-HIV activity of the extract was attributable to interference with the virus adsorption, rather than to inhibition of the virus replication after adsorption. PMID:1367748

  20. Avian Influenza A Virus Infections in Humans

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Vaccine Virus Related Links Influenza Types Seasonal Avian Swine Variant Pandemic Other Get Email Updates To receive ... setting. Top of Page Influenza Types Seasonal Avian Swine Variant Pandemic Other Get Email Updates To receive ...

  1. Screening for Hepatitis B Virus Infection in Nonpregnant Adolescents and Adults

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Screening for Hepatitis B Virus Infection in Nonpregnant Adolescents and Adults The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force ( ... Screening for Hepatitis B Virus Infection in Nonpregnant Adolescents and Adults. This final recommendation statement applies only ...

  2. The Human Immunodeficiency Virus: Infectivity and Mechanisms of Pathogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fauci, Anthony S.

    1988-02-01

    Infection with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) results in a profound immunosuppression due predominantly to a selective depletion of helper/inducer T lymphocytes that express the receptor for the virus (the CD4 molecule). HIV also has tropism for the brain leading to neuropsychiatric abnormalities. Besides inducing cell death, HIV can interfere with T4 cell function by various mechanisms. The monocyte serves as a reservoir for HIV and is relatively refractory to its cytopathic effects. HIV can exist in a latent or chronic form which can be converted to a productive infection by a variety of inductive signals.

  3. Ultrastructural characterization of the giant volcano-like virus factory of Acanthamoeba polyphaga Mimivirus.

    PubMed

    Suzan-Monti, Marie; La Scola, Bernard; Barrassi, Lina; Espinosa, Leon; Raoult, Didier

    2007-01-01

    Acanthamoeba polyphaga Mimivirus is a giant double-stranded DNA virus defining a new genus, the Mimiviridae, among the Nucleo-Cytoplasmic Large DNA Viruses (NCLDV). We used utrastructural studies to shed light on the different steps of the Mimivirus replication cycle: entry via phagocytosis, release of viral DNA into the cell cytoplasm through fusion of viral and vacuolar membranes, and finally viral morphogenesis in an extraordinary giant cytoplasmic virus factory (VF). Fluorescent staining of the AT-rich Mimivirus DNA showed that it enters the host nucleus prior to the generation of a cytoplasmic independent replication centre that forms the core of the VF. Assembly and filling of viral capsids were observed within the replication centre, before release into the cell cytoplasm where progeny virions accumulated. 3D reconstruction from fluorescent and differential contrast interference images revealed the VF emerging from the cell surface as a volcano-like structure. Its size dramatically grew during the 24 h infectious lytic cycle. Our results showed that Mimivirus replication is an extremely efficient process that results from a rapid takeover of cellular machinery, and takes place in a unique and autonomous giant assembly centre, leading to the release of a large number of complex virions through amoebal lysis. PMID:17389919

  4. A single vertebrate DNA virus protein disarms invertebrate immunity to RNA virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Gammon, Don B; Duraffour, Sophie; Rozelle, Daniel K; Hehnly, Heidi; Sharma, Rita; Sparks, Michael E; West, Cara C; Chen, Ying; Moresco, James J; Andrei, Graciela; Connor, John H; Conte, Darryl; Gundersen-Rindal, Dawn E; Marshall, William L; Yates, John R; Silverman, Neal; Mello, Craig C

    2014-01-01

    Virus-host interactions drive a remarkable diversity of immune responses and countermeasures. We found that two RNA viruses with broad host ranges, vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) and Sindbis virus (SINV), are completely restricted in their replication after entry into Lepidopteran cells. This restriction is overcome when cells are co-infected with vaccinia virus (VACV), a vertebrate DNA virus. Using RNAi screening, we show that Lepidopteran RNAi, Nuclear Factor-?B, and ubiquitin-proteasome pathways restrict RNA virus infection. Surprisingly, a highly conserved, uncharacterized VACV protein, A51R, can partially overcome this virus restriction. We show that A51R is also critical for VACV replication in vertebrate cells and for pathogenesis in mice. Interestingly, A51R colocalizes with, and stabilizes, host microtubules and also associates with ubiquitin. We show that A51R promotes viral protein stability, possibly by preventing ubiquitin-dependent targeting of viral proteins for destruction. Importantly, our studies reveal exciting new opportunities to study virus-host interactions in experimentally-tractable Lepidopteran systems. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02910.001 PMID:24966209

  5. The heat shock response restricts virus infection in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Merkling, Sarah H.; Overheul, Gijs J.; van Mierlo, Joël T.; Arends, Daan; Gilissen, Christian; van Rij, Ronald P.

    2015-01-01

    Innate immunity is the first line of defence against pathogens and is essential for survival of the infected host. The fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster is an emerging model to study viral pathogenesis, yet antiviral defence responses remain poorly understood. Here, we describe the heat shock response, a cellular mechanism that prevents proteotoxicity, as a component of the antiviral immune response in Drosophila. Transcriptome analyses of Drosophila S2 cells and adult flies revealed strong induction of the heat shock response upon RNA virus infection. Dynamic induction patterns of heat shock pathway components were characterized in vitro and in vivo following infection with different classes of viruses. The heat shock transcription factor (Hsf), as well as active viral replication, were necessary for the induction of the response. Hsf-deficient adult flies were hypersensitive to virus infection, indicating a role of the heat shock response in antiviral defence. In accordance, transgenic activation of the heat shock response prolonged survival time after infection and enabled long-term control of virus replication to undetectable levels. Together, our results establish the heat shock response as an important constituent of innate antiviral immunity in Drosophila. PMID:26234525

  6. Cd4+ T Cell Subsets during Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Maloy, Kevin J.; Burkhart, Christoph; Junt, Tobias M.; Odermatt, Bernhard; Oxenius, Annette; Piali, Luca; Zinkernagel, Rolf M.; Hengartner, Hans

    2000-01-01

    To analyze the antiviral protective capacities of CD4+ T helper (Th) cell subsets, we used transgenic T cells expressing an I-Ab–restricted T cell receptor specific for an epitope of vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein (VSV-G). After polarization into Th1 or Th2 effectors and adoptive transfer into T cell–deficient recipients, protective capacities were assessed after infection with different types of viruses expressing the VSV-G. Both Th1 and Th2 CD4+ T cells could transfer protection against systemic VSV infection, by stimulating the production of neutralizing immunoglobulin G antibodies. However, only Th1 CD4+ T cells were able to mediate protection against infection with recombinant vaccinia virus expressing the VSV-G (Vacc-IND-G). Similarly, only Th1 CD4+ T cells were able to rapidly eradicate Vacc-IND-G from peripheral organs, to mediate delayed-type hypersensitivity responses against VSV-G and to protect against lethal intranasal infection with VSV. Protective capacity correlated with the ability of Th1 CD4+ T cells to rapidly migrate to peripheral inflammatory sites in vivo and to respond to inflammatory chemokines that were induced after virus infection of peripheral tissues. Therefore, the antiviral protective capacity of a given CD4+ T cell is governed by the effector cytokines it produces and by its migratory capability. PMID:10859340

  7. Tahyna virus genetics, infectivity, and immunogenicity in mice and monkeys

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Tahyna virus (TAHV) is a human pathogen of the California encephalitis virus (CEV) serogroup (Bunyaviridae) endemic to Europe, Asia, and Africa. TAHV maintains an enzootic life cycle with several species of mosquito vectors and hares, rabbits, hedgehogs, and rodents serving as small mammal amplifying hosts. Human TAHV infection occurs in summer and early fall with symptoms of fever, headache, malaise, conjunctivitis, pharyngitis, and nausea. TAHV disease can progress to CNS involvement, although unlike related La Crosse virus (LACV), fatalities have not been reported. Human infections are frequent with neutralizing antibodies present in 60-80% of the elderly population in endemic areas. Results In order to determine the genomic sequence of wild-type TAHV, we chose three TAHV isolates collected over a 26-year period from mosquitoes. Here we present the first complete sequence of the TAHV S, M, and L segments. The three TAHV isolates maintained a highly conserved genome with both nucleotide and amino acid sequence identity greater than 99%. In order to determine the extent of genetic relatedness to other members of the CEV serogroup, we compared protein sequences of TAHV with LACV, Snowshoe Hare virus (SSHV), Jamestown Canyon virus (JCV), and Inkoo virus (INKV). By amino acid comparison, TAHV was most similar to SSHV followed by LACV, JCV, and INKV. The sequence of the GN protein is most conserved followed by L, N, GC, NSS, and NSM. In a weanling Swiss Webster mouse model, all three TAHV isolates were uniformly neurovirulent, but only one virus was neuroinvasive. In rhesus monkeys, the virus was highly immunogenic even in the absence of viremia. Cross neutralization studies utilizing monkey immune serum demonstrated that TAHV is antigenically distinct from North American viruses LACV and JCV. Conclusions Here we report the first complete sequence of TAHV and present genetic analysis of new-world viruses, LACV, SSHV, and JCV with old-world viruses, TAHV and INKV. Using immune serum generated in monkeys against TAHV, LACV, and JCV, we have demonstrated cross-neutralization within the CEV serogroup. Such cross reactivity may complicate virus identification, especially following JCV infection which elicited antibodies that cross neutralized both LACV and TAHV. These data also suggest that a single vaccine could generate a cross-neutralizing antibody response which may provide protection against CEV serogroup viruses from a wide geographic range. PMID:21435229

  8. Occupational hepatitis B virus infection in sewage workers.

    PubMed

    Arvanitidou, M; Constantinidis, T C; Doutsos, J; Mandraveli, K; Katsouyannopoulos, V

    1998-01-01

    In a cross-sectional study the employees of a Sewage Company were tested for hepatitis B virus (HBV) markers--HBsAg, anti-HBs, anti-HBc--to determine the prevalence of HBV infection and assess the risk of exposed sewage workers becoming infected, so as to evaluate the necessity for appropriate vaccination. The overall prevalence of HBV markers was 43.9% and 6.6% of the employees were HBsAg carriers. In the univariate analysis the prevalence of past and current infection was significantly associated with exposure to sewage (p < 0.001), age (p < 0.001) and with educational level (p < 0.001). However, the logistic regression analysis confirmed that only exposure to sewage was independently associated with positivity for HBV infection (p < 0.001). Workers exposed to sewage should therefore be considered for vaccination against hepatitis B virus. PMID:10064948

  9. PRRSV receptors and their roles in virus infection.

    PubMed

    Shi, Chongxu; Liu, Yali; Ding, Yaozhong; Zhang, Yongguang; Zhang, Jie

    2015-05-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) has a restricted cell tropism and prefers to invade well-differentiated cells of the monocyte/macrophage lineage, such as pulmonary alveolar macrophages and African green monkey kidney cell line MA-104 and its derivatives, such as Marc-145, Vero and CL-2621. PRRSV infection of the host cells actually is a receptor-mediated endocytosis and replication process. The presence and absence of the cellular receptors decide whether the cell lines are permissive or non-permissive to PRRSV infection. Several PRRSV non-permissive cell lines, such as BHK-21, PK-15 and CHO-K1, have been shown to become sensitive to the virus infection upon expression of the recombinant receptor proteins. Up to now, heparin sulfate, sialoadhesin, CD163, CD151 and vimentin have been identified as the important PRRSV receptors via their involvement in virus attachment, internalization or uncoating. Each receptor is characterized by the distribution in different cells, the function in virus different infection stages and the interaction model with the viral proteins or genes. Joint forces of the receptors recently attract attentions due to the specific function. PRRSV receptors have become the targets for designing the new anti-viral reagents or the recombinant cell lines used for isolating the viruses or developing more effective vaccines due to their more conserved sequences compared with the genetic variation of the virus. In this paper, the role of PRRSV receptors and the molecular mechanism of the interaction between the virus and the receptors are reviewed. PMID:25666932

  10. Previous infection with a mesogenic strain of newcastle disease virus prevents infection with a highly pathogenic avian influenza virus in chickens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Avian influenza virus (AIV) and Newcastle disease virus (NDV) are two of the most important viruses affecting poultry worldwide. Co-infections of poultry with AIV and NDV are a problem from both the clinical point of view and the diagnosis of these viruses, but little is known on the interactions b...

  11. Vaccinia virus infection & temporal analysis of virus gene expression: part 1.

    PubMed

    Yen, Judy; Golan, Ron; Rubins, Kathleen

    2009-01-01

    The family Poxviridae consists of large double-stranded DNA containing viruses that replicate exclusively in the cytoplasm of infected cells. Members of the orthopox genus include variola, the causative agent of human small pox, monkeypox, and vaccinia (VAC), the prototypic member of the virus family. Within the relatively large (approximately 200 kb) vaccinia genome, three classes of genes are encoded: early, intermediate, and late. While all three classes are transcribed by virally-encoded RNA polymerases, each class serves a different function in the life cycle of the virus. Poxviruses utilize multiple strategies for modulation of the host cellular environment during infection. In order to understand regulation of both host and virus gene expression, we have utilized genome-wide approaches to analyze transcript abundance from both virus and host cells. Here, we demonstrate time course infections of HeLa cells with Vaccinia virus and sampling RNA at several time points post-infection. Both host and viral total RNA is isolated and amplified for hybridization to microarrays for analysis of gene expression. PMID:19488021

  12. Vaccinia virus infection & temporal analysis of virus gene expression: Part 3.

    PubMed

    Yen, Judy; Golan, Ron; Rubins, Kathleen

    2009-01-01

    The family Poxviridae consists of large double-stranded DNA containing viruses that replicate exclusively in the cytoplasm of infected cells. Members of the orthopox genus include variola, the causative agent of human small pox, monkeypox, and vaccinia (VAC), the prototypic member of the virus family. Within the relatively large (approximately 200 kb) vaccinia genome, three classes of genes are encoded: early, intermediate, and late. While all three classes are transcribed by virally-encoded RNA polymerases, each class serves a different function in the life cycle of the virus. Poxviruses utilize multiple strategies for modulation of the host cellular environment during infection. In order to understand regulation of both host and virus gene expression, we have utilized genome-wide approaches to analyze transcript abundance from both virus and host cells. Here, we demonstrate time course infections of HeLa cells with Vaccinia virus and sampling RNA at several time points post-infection. Both host and viral total RNA is isolated and amplified for hybridization to microarrays for analysis of gene expression. PMID:19365326

  13. Vaccinia virus infection & temporal analysis of virus gene expression: Part 2.

    PubMed

    Yen, Judy; Golan, Ron; Rubins, Kathleen

    2009-01-01

    The family Poxviridae consists of large double-stranded DNA containing viruses that replicate exclusively in the cytoplasm of infected cells. Members of the orthopox genus include variola, the causative agent of human small pox, monkeypox, and vaccinia (VAC), the prototypic member of the virus family. Within the relatively large (approximately 200 kb) vaccinia genome, three classes of genes are encoded: early, intermediate, and late. While all three classes are transcribed by virally-encoded RNA polymerases, each class serves a different function in the life cycle of the virus. Poxviruses utilize multiple strategies for modulation of the host cellular environment during infection. In order to understand regulation of both host and virus gene expression, we have utilized genome-wide approaches to analyze transcript abundance from both virus and host cells. Here, we demonstrate time course infections of HeLa cells with Vaccinia virus and sampling RNA at several time points post-infection. Both host and viral total RNA is isolated and amplified for hybridization to microarrays for analysis of gene expression. PMID:19363464

  14. Neutralizing Antibodies and Pathogenesis of Hepatitis C Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Fafi-Kremer, Samira; Fauvelle, Catherine; Felmlee, Daniel J.; Zeisel, Mirjam B.; Lepiller, Quentin; Fofana, Isabel; Heydmann, Laura; Stoll-Keller, Françoise; Baumert, Thomas F.

    2012-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a major cause of chronic liver disease worldwide. The interplay between the virus and host innate and adaptive immune responses determines the outcome of infection. There is increasing evidence that host neutralizing responses play a relevant role in the resulting pathogenesis. Furthermore, viral evasion from host neutralizing antibodies has been revealed to be an important contributor in leading both to viral persistence in acute liver graft infection following liver transplantation, and to chronic viral infection. The development of novel model systems to study HCV entry and neutralization has allowed a detailed understanding of the molecular mechanisms of virus-host interactions during antibody-mediated neutralization. The understanding of these mechanisms will ultimately contribute to the development of novel antiviral preventive strategies for liver graft infection and an urgently needed vaccine. This review summarizes recent concepts of the role of neutralizing antibodies in viral clearance and protection, and highlights consequences of viral escape from neutralizing antibodies in the pathogenesis of HCV infection. PMID:23202451

  15. Mayaro virus infection cycle relies on casein kinase 2 activity.

    PubMed

    Barroso, Madalena M S; Lima, Carla S; Silva-Neto, Mário A C; Da Poian, Andrea T

    2002-09-01

    Replication of Mayaro virus in Vero cells induces dramatic cytopathic effects and cell death. In this study, we have evaluated the role of casein kinase 2 (CK2) during Mayaro virus infection cycle. We found that CK2 was activated during the initial stages of infection ( approximately 36% after 4h). This activation was further confirmed when the enzyme was partially purified from the cellular lysate either by Mono Q 5/5Hr column or heparin-agarose column. Using this later column, we found that the elution profile of CK2 activity from infected cells was different from that obtained for control cell enzyme, suggesting a structural modification of CK2 after infection. Treatment of infected cells with a cell-permeable inhibitor of CK2, dichloro-1-(beta-D-ribofuranosyl)benzimidazole (DRB), abolished the cytopathic effect in a dose-dependent manner. Together this set of data demonstrates for the first time that CK2 activity in host cells is required in Mayaro virus infection cycle. PMID:12207921

  16. Management of hepatitis C virus infection in HIV/HCV co-infected patients: Clinical review

    PubMed Central

    Singal, Ashwani K; Anand, Bhupinderjit S

    2009-01-01

    Nearly one fourth of individuals with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection have hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection in the US and Western Europe. With the availability of highly active antiretroviral therapy and the consequent reduction in opportunistic infections, resulting in the prolongation of the life span of HIV-infected patients, HCV co-infection has emerged as a significant factor influencing the survival of HIV patients. Patients with HIV/HCV co-infection have a faster rate of fibrosis progression resulting in more frequent occurrences of cirrhosis, end-stage liver disease, and hepatocellular carcinoma. However, the mechanism of interaction between the two viruses is not completely understood. The treatment for HCV in co-infected patients is similar to that of HCV mono-infection; i.e., a combination of pegylated interferon and ribavirin. The presence of any barriers to anti-HCV therapy should be identified and eliminated in order to recruit all eligible patients. The response to treatment in co-infected patients is inferior compared to the response in patients with HCV mono-infection. The sustained virologic response rate is only 38% for genotype-1 and 75% for genotype-2 and -3 infections. Liver transplantation is no longer considered a contraindication for end-stage liver disease in co-infected patients. However, the 5 year survival rate is lower in co-infected patients compared to patients with HCV mono-infection (33% vs 72%, P = 0.07). A better understanding of liver disease in co-infected patients is needed to derive new strategies for improving outcome and survival. PMID:19673011

  17. First Isolation of a Giant Virus from Wild Hirudo medicinalis Leech: Mimiviridae isolation in Hirudo medicinalis

    PubMed Central

    Boughalmi, Mondher; Pagnier, Isabelle; Aherfi, Sarah; Colson, Philippe; Raoult, Didier; La Scola, Bernard

    2013-01-01

    Giant viruses and amoebae are common in freshwater, where they can coexist with other living multicellular organisms. We screened leeches from the species Hirudo medicinalis for giant viruses. We analyzed five H. medicinalis obtained from Tunisia (3) and France (2). The leeches were decontaminated and then dissected to remove internal parts for co-culture with Acanthamoeba polyphaga. The genomes of isolated viruses were sequenced on a 454 Roche instrument, and a comparative genomics analysis was performed. One Mimivirus was isolated and the strain was named Hirudovirus. The genome assembly generated two scaffolds, which were 1,155,382 and 25,660 base pairs in length. Functional annotations were identified for 47% of the genes, which corresponds to 466 proteins. The presence of Mimividae in the same ecological niche as wild Hirudo may explain the presence of the mimivirus in the digestive tract of the leech, and several studies have already shown that viruses can persist in the digestive tracts of leeches fed contaminated blood. As leeches can be used medically and Mimiviruses have the potential to be an infectious agent in humans, patients treated with leeches should be surveyed to investigate a possible connection. PMID:24287596

  18. Animal Models of Chronic Hepatitis Delta Virus Infection Host–Virus Immunologic Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Aldabe, Rafael; Suárez-Amarán, Lester; Usai, Carla; González-Aseguinolaza, Gloria

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis delta virus (HDV) is a defective RNA virus that has an absolute requirement for a virus belonging to the hepadnaviridae family like hepatitis B virus (HBV) for its replication and formation of new virions. HDV infection is usually associated with a worsening of HBV-induced liver pathogenesis, which leads to more frequent cirrhosis, increased risk of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), and fulminant hepatitis. Importantly, no selective therapies are available for HDV infection. The mainstay of treatment for HDV infection is pegylated interferon alpha; however, response rates to this therapy are poor. A better knowledge of HDV–host cell interaction will help with the identification of novel therapeutic targets, which are urgently needed. Animal models like hepadnavirus-infected chimpanzees or the eastern woodchuck have been of great value for the characterization of HDV chronic infection. Recently, more practical animal models in which to perform a deeper study of host virus interactions and to evaluate new therapeutic strategies have been developed. Therefore, the main focus of this review is to discuss the current knowledge about HDV host interactions obtained from cell culture and animal models. PMID:25686091

  19. Epidemiology and natural history of hepatitis C virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Mei-Hsuan; Yang, Hwai-I; Yuan, Yong; L’Italien, Gilbert; Chen, Chien-Jen

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) affects 130-210 million people worldwide and is one of the major risk factors for hepatocellular carcinoma. Globally, at least one third of hepatocellular carcinoma cases are attributed to HCV infection, and 350000 people died from HCV related diseases per year. There is a great geographical variation of HCV infection globally, with risk factors for the HCV infection differing in various countries. The progression of chronic hepatitis C to end-stage liver disease also varies in different study populations. A long-term follow-up cohort enrolling participants with asymptomatic HCV infection is essential for elucidating the natural history of HCV-caused hepatocellular carcinoma, and for exploring potential seromarkers that have high predictability for risk of hepatocellular carcinoma. However, prospective cohorts comprising individuals with HCV infection are still uncommon. The risk evaluation of viral load elevation and associated liver disease/cancer in HCV (REVEAL-HCV) study has followed a cohort of 1095 residents seropositive for antibodies against hepatitis C virus living in seven townships in Taiwan for more than fifteen years. Most of them have acquired HCV infection through iatrogenic transmission routes. As the participants in the REVEAL-HCV study rarely receive antiviral therapies, it provides a unique opportunity to study the natural history of chronic HCV infection. In this review, the prevalence, risk factors and natural history of HCV infection are comprehensively reviewed. The study cohort, data collection, and findings on liver disease progression of the REVEAL-HCV study are described. PMID:25071320

  20. Global Reprogramming of Host SUMOylation during Influenza Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Domingues, Patricia; Golebiowski, Filip; Tatham, Michael H.; Lopes, Antonio M.; Taggart, Aislynn; Hay, Ronald T.; Hale, Benjamin G.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Dynamic nuclear SUMO modifications play essential roles in orchestrating cellular responses to proteotoxic stress, DNA damage, and DNA virus infection. Here, we describe a non-canonical host SUMOylation response to the nuclear-replicating RNA pathogen, influenza virus, and identify viral RNA polymerase activity as a major contributor to SUMO proteome remodeling. Using quantitative proteomics to compare stress-induced SUMOylation responses, we reveal that influenza virus infection triggers unique re-targeting of SUMO to 63 host proteins involved in transcription, mRNA processing, RNA quality control, and DNA damage repair. This is paralleled by widespread host deSUMOylation. Depletion screening identified ten virus-induced SUMO targets as potential antiviral factors, including C18orf25 and the SMC5/6 and PAF1 complexes. Mechanistic studies further uncovered a role for SUMOylation of the PAF1 complex component, parafibromin (CDC73), in potentiating antiviral gene expression. Our global characterization of influenza virus-triggered SUMO redistribution provides a proteomic resource to understand host nuclear SUMOylation responses to infection. PMID:26549460

  1. Physiological effects of Squash vein yellowing virus infection on watermelon

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Squash vein yellowing virus (SqVYV) is the cause of viral watermelon vine decline. In this study, watermelon plants of different ages were inoculated with SqVYV to characterize the physiological response to infection and provide new insights into watermelon vine decline. Physiological responses to...

  2. WEST NILE VIRUS INFECTION IN REINDEER (RANGIFER TARANDUS)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    West Nile virus (WNV) is a mosquito-borne member of the Flaviviridae family (genus Flavivirus) transmitted among bird populations by mosquitoes and incidentally infecting mammals. First recognized in the United States in 1999, WNV has spread across the United States in subsequent years. Numerous cas...

  3. The mortality of neonatal herpes simplex virus infection.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Medina, Eduardo; Cantey, Joseph B; Sánchez, Pablo J

    2015-06-01

    This retrospective study characterized the clinical course of 13 neonates who died with herpes simplex virus infection from 2001 to 2011, representing a 26% case-fatality rate. Fatal disease developed at ? 48 hours of age in one-third of infants, was mostly disseminated disease, and occurred despite early administration of high-dose acyclovir therapy. PMID:25868428

  4. Emergence of virulent pseudorabies virus infection in Northern China

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Rui; Bai, Chaoyong; Sun, Jinzhong; Chang, Shengke

    2013-01-01

    Our investigation was conducted in order to verify a recent severe epidemic at several swine farms in northern China that indicated a newly emerging disease. Evidence confirmed that the epidemic was caused by a virulent Pseudorabies virus infection in swine herds. PMID:23820207

  5. Influenza A virus and secondary bacterial infection in swine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Influenza A virus (IAV) infection alone causes significant disease characterized by respiratory distress and poor growth in pigs. Endemic strains of IAV in North America pigs consist of the subtypes H1N1, H1N2, and H3N2. These circulating strains contain the triple reassortant internal gene (TRIG) c...

  6. Inhibition of Mayaro virus infection by bovine lactoferrin.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Carlos A M; Sousa, Ivanildo P; Silva, Jerson L; Oliveira, Andréa C; Gonçalves, Rafael B; Gomes, Andre M O

    2014-03-01

    Mayaro virus (MAYV) is an arbovirus linked to several sporadic outbreaks of a highly debilitating febrile illness in many regions of South America. MAYV is on the verge of urbanization from the Amazon region and no effective antiviral intervention is available against human infections. Our aim was to investigate whether bovine lactoferrin (bLf), an iron-binding glycoprotein, could hinder MAYV infection. We show that bLf promotes a strong inhibition of virus infection with no cytotoxic effects. Monitoring the effect of bLf on different stages of infection, we observed that virus entry into the cell is the heavily compromised event. Moreover, we found that binding of bLf to the cell is highly dependent on the sulfation of glycosaminoglycans, suggesting that bLf impairs virus entry by blocking these molecules. Our findings highlight the antiviral potential of bLf and reveal an effective strategy against one of the major emerging human pathogens in the neotropics. PMID:24606707

  7. Equine influenza A(H3N8) virus infection in cats.

    PubMed

    Su, Shuo; Wang, Lifang; Fu, Xinliang; He, Shuyi; Hong, Malin; Zhou, Pei; Lai, Alexander; Gray, Gregory; Li, Shoujun

    2014-12-01

    Interspecies transmission of equine influenza A(H3N8) virus has resulted in establishment of a canine influenza virus. To determine if something similar could happen with cats, we experimentally infected 14 cats with the equine influenza A(H3N8) virus. All showed clinical signs, shed virus, and transmitted the virus to a contact cohort. PMID:25417790

  8. The Variegate Neurological Manifestations of Varicella Zoster Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Nagel, Maria A.; Cohrs, Randall J.; Mahalingam, Ravi

    2014-01-01

    Varicella zoster virus (VZV) is an exclusively human neurotropic alphaherpesvirus. Primary infection causes varicella (chickenpox), after which the virus becomes latent in ganglionic neurons along the entire neuraxis. With advancing age or immunosuppression, cell-mediated immunity to VZV declines, and the virus reactivates to cause zoster (shingles), dermatomal distribution, pain, and rash. Zoster is often followed by chronic pain (postherpetic neuralgia), cranial nerve palsies, zoster paresis, vasculopathy, meningoencephalitis, and multiple ocular disorders. This review covers clinical, laboratory, and pathological features of neurological complications of VZV reactivation, including diagnostic testing to verify active VZV infection in the nervous system. Additional perspectives are provided by discussions of VZV latency, animal models to study varicella pathogenesis and immunity, and of the value of vaccination of elderly individuals to boost cell-mediated immunity to VZV and prevent VZV reactivation. PMID:23884722

  9. Association of Inconclusive Sera for Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection with Malaria and Epstein-Barr Virus Infection in Central Africa

    PubMed Central

    Ndjoyi-Mbiguino, Angélique; Talla, Frédéric; Péré, Hélène; Kebe, Khady; Matta, Mathieu; Sosso, Maurice Aurelien; Bélec, Laurent

    2014-01-01

    Among 464 sera from adults in Cameroon, 56 (12.1%) gave inconclusive HIV serology. All were negative for HIV-1 DNA; 44.6% (n = 25) were significantly associated with Plasmodium (42.8%) or Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) (17.8%) infections. In Central Africa, sera giving inconclusive results for HIV are frequently associated with malaria, EBV infection, or both. PMID:24478507

  10. Astrocytic infection in canine distemper virus-induced demyelination.

    PubMed

    Mutinelli, F; Vandevelde, M; Griot, C; Richard, A

    1989-01-01

    Acute canine distemper virus (CDV)-induced demyelinating lesions were examined with double-labelling immunocytochemistry simultaneously demonstrating CDV antigen and glial fibrillary acidid protein (GFAP) as marker for astrocytes. It was shown that 64% of all astrocytes within the demyelinating lesions were infected and that 95% of all infected cells counted in the lesions were astrocytes. These results suggest that the astrocyte is the main target for CDV and that astroglial infection may play an important role in the mechanism of demyelination. PMID:2922996

  11. A conservation law for virus infection kinetics in vitro.

    PubMed

    Kakizoe, Yusuke; Morita, Satoru; Nakaoka, Shinji; Takeuchi, Yasuhiro; Sato, Kei; Miura, Tomoyuki; Beauchemin, Catherine A A; Iwami, Shingo

    2015-07-01

    Conservation laws are among the most important properties of a physical system, but are not commonplace in biology. We derived a conservation law from the basic model for viral infections which consists in a small set of ordinary differential equations. We challenged the conservation law experimentally for the case of a virus infection in a cell culture. We found that the derived, conserved quantity remained almost constant throughout the infection period, implying that the derived conservation law holds in this biological system. We also suggest a potential use for the conservation law in evaluating the accuracy of experimental measurements. PMID:25882746

  12. Chronic social stress impairs virus specific adaptive immunity during acute Theiler’s virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Young, Erin E.; Vichaya, Elisabeth G.; Reusser, Nicole M.; Cook, Jennifer L.; Steelman, Andrew R.; Welsh, C. Jane R.; Meagher, Mary W.

    2012-01-01

    Prior exposure to social disruption (SDR) stress exacerbates Theiler’s murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV) infection, a model of multiple sclerosis. Here we examined the impact of SDR on T cell responses to TMEV infection in SJL mice. SDR impaired viral clearance and exacerbated acute disease. Moreover, TMEV infection alone increased CD4 and CD8 mRNA expression in brain and spleen while SDR impaired this response. SDR decreased both CD4+ and CD8+ virus-specific T cells in CNS, but not spleen. These findings suggest that SDR-induced suppression of virus-specific T cell responses contributes to impairments in viral clearance and exacerbation of acute disease. PMID:23021485

  13. Immune responses of ducks infected with duck Tembusu virus

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ning; Wang, Yao; Li, Rong; Liu, Jiyuan; Zhang, Jinzhou; Cai, Yumei; Liu, Sidang; Chai, Tongjie; Wei, Liangmeng

    2015-01-01

    Duck Tembusu virus (DTMUV) can cause serious disease in ducks, characterized by reduced egg production. Although the virus has been isolated and detection methods developed, the host immune responses to DTMUV infection are unclear. Therefore, we systematically examined the expression of immune-related genes and the viral distribution in DTMUV-infected ducks, using quantitative real-time PCR. Our results show that DTMUV replicates quickly in many tissues early in infection, with the highest viral titers in the spleen 1 day after infection. Rig-1, Mda5, and Tlr3 are involved in the host immune response to DTMUV, and the expression of proinflammatory cytokines (Il-1?, –2, –6, Cxcl8) and antiviral proteins (Mx, Oas, etc.) are also upregulated early in infection. The expression of Il-6 increased most significantly in the tissues tested. The upregulation of Mhc-I was observed in the brain and spleen, but the expression of Mhc-II was upregulated in the brain and downregulated in the spleen. The expression of the interferons was also upregulated to different degrees in the spleen but that of the brain was various. Our study suggests that DTMUV replicates rapidly in various tissues and that the host immune responses are activated early in infection. However, the overexpression of cytokines may damage the host. These results extend our understanding of the immune responses of ducks to DTMUV infection, and provide insight into the pathogenesis of DTMUV attributable to host factors. PMID:26005441

  14. Hepatitis B virus infection and primary hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed Central

    Feitelson, M

    1992-01-01

    For many years, epidemiological studies have demonstrated a strong link between chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection and the development of primary hepatocellular carcinoma (PHC). Other hepatocarcinogens such as hepatitis C virus and aflatoxin also contribute to hepatocarcinogenesis either in conjunction with HBV infection or alone. Cellular and molecular biological studies are providing explanations for the HBV-PHC relationship, and models are now being formulated to further test the relative importance of various factors such as viral DNA integration, activation of oncogenes, genetic instability, loss of tumor suppressor genes, and trans-activating properties of HBV to the pathogenesis of PHC. Further research will probably define more than a single mechanism whereby chronic HBV infection results in PHC. PMID:1323384

  15. Lethal experimental infections of rhesus monkeys by aerosolized Ebola virus.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, E.; Jaax, N.; White, J.; Jahrling, P.

    1995-01-01

    The potential of aerogenic infection by Ebola virus was established by using a head-only exposure aerosol system. Virus-containing droplets of 0.8-1.2 microns were generated and administered into the respiratory tract of rhesus monkeys via inhalation. Inhalation of viral doses as low as 400 plaque-forming units of virus caused a rapidly fatal disease in 4-5 days. The illness was clinically identical to that reported for parenteral virus inoculation, except for the occurrence of subcutaneous and venipuncture site bleeding and serosanguineous nasal discharge. Immunocytochemistry revealed cell-associated Ebola virus antigens present in airway epithelium, alveolar pneumocytes, and macrophages in the lung and pulmonary lymph nodes; extracellular antigen was present on mucosal surfaces of the nose, oropharynx and airways. Aggregates of characteristic filamentous virus were present within type I pneumocytes, macrophages, and air spaces of the lung by electron microscopy. Demonstration of fatal aerosol transmission of this virus in monkeys reinforces the importance of taking appropriate precautions to prevent its potential aerosol transmission to humans. Images Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:7547435

  16. Human trophoblasts confer resistance to viruses implicated in perinatal infection

    PubMed Central

    BAYER, Avraham; DELORME-AXFORD, Elizabeth; SLEIGHER, Christie; FREY, Teryl K.; TROBAUGH, Derek W.; KLIMSTRA, William B.; EMERT-SEDLAK, Lori A.; SMITHGALL, Thomas E.; KINCHINGTON, Paul R.; VADIA, Stephen; SEVEAU, Stephanie; Boyle, Jon P.

    2014-01-01

    Objective(s) Primary human trophoblasts were previously shown to be resistant to viral infection, and able to confer this resistance to non-trophoblast cells. Can trophoblasts protect non-trophoblastic cells from infection by viruses or other intracellular pathogens that are implicated in perinatal infection? Study Design Isolated primary term human trophoblasts were cultured for 72 h. Diverse non-placental human cell lines (U2OS, HFF, TZM-bl, MeWo, and Caco-2) were pre-exposed to either trophoblast conditioned, non-conditioned medium, or miR-517-3p for 24 h. Cells were infected with several viral and non-viral pathogens known to be associated with perinatal infections. Cellular infection was defined and quantified by plaque assays, luciferase assays, microscopy, and/or colonization assays. Differences in infection were assessed by Student's t-test or ANOVA with Bonferroni's correction. Results Infection by rubella and other togaviruses, HIV-1, and varicella zoster, was attenuated in cells pre-exposed to trophoblast conditioned medium (p <0.05), and a partial effect by the Ch.19 microRNA miR-517-3p on specific pathogens. The conditioned medium had no effect on infection by Toxoplasma gondii or Listeria monocytogenes. Conclusion Our findings indicate that medium conditioned by primary human trophoblasts attenuate viral infection in non-trophoblastic cells. Our data point to a trophoblast-specific antiviral effect that may be exploited therapeutically. PMID:25108145

  17. Disease course and viral shedding in experimental Norwalk virus and Snow Mountain virus infection.

    PubMed

    Kirby, A E; Shi, J; Montes, J; Lichtenstein, M; Moe, C L

    2014-12-01

    Norovirus is the most common cause of acute infectious gastroenteritis, causing approximately 21 million cases annually in the USA. The virus is highly contagious and resistant to decontamination, making outbreaks difficult to control. To facilitate the development of better control methods, this study characterized the viral shedding patterns in stools from subjects experimentally infected with genogroup I or II norovirus. Viral stool titers were determined by quantitative real-time RT-PCR for all stools produced in the first 7 days post-challenge and representative stools through day 35 post-challenge. The shedding titers and disease course were analyzed with respect to virus type, illness, and subject demographics. Infection with GII.2 Snow Mountain (SMV) resulted in more symptoms and a higher frequency of painful symptoms compared to GI.1 Norwalk (NV) infection. However, NV infection produced stool viral titers approximately 2 logs higher than those seen in SMV infections. Both NV and SMV were shed in stools for up to 3 weeks after the resolution of symptoms, but long shedding durations were more common in NV infections. For each challenge virus, shedding titers and patterns were not correlated with subject demographics or clinical course. This is the first study to report shedding dynamics in experimental GII norovirus infection. PMID:24531909

  18. Hepatitis C Virus Infection and Its Rheumatologic Implications

    PubMed Central

    Sayiner, Zeynel A.; Haque, Uzma; Malik, Mohammad U.

    2014-01-01

    Extrahepatic manifestations are frequently encountered among patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. Many of these manifestations are autoimmune disorders, with added mortality and morbidity due to involvement of multiple organ systems. Symptoms of HCV infection and rheumatic diseases may be similar and include arthralgia, myalgia, arthritis, and vasculitis. Also, serologic abnormalities may be found in both cases. Some treatment modalities for HCV infection, including interferon therapy, may aggravate the symptoms of rheumatic diseases, thus confounding clinical presentation. It is imperative to distinguish whether symptoms such as arthralgia, myalgia, and arthritis occur in patients with HCV infection due to primary chronic HCV infection or to a newly developed rheumatologic disease process. PMID:24987312

  19. Antiviral activity of ginseng extract against respiratory syncytial virus infection

    PubMed Central

    LEE, JONG SEOK; KO, EUN-JU; HWANG, HYE SUK; LEE, YU-NA; KWON, YOUNG-MAN; KIM, MIN-CHUL; KANG, SANG-MOO

    2014-01-01

    Panax ginseng has been known to have a number of immuno-modulatory effects. In this study, we investigated whether Panax Korean red ginseng extract (KRGE) has in vitro and in vivo antiviral effects on respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection. KRGE improved the survival of human lung epithelial cells against RSV infection and inhibited RSV replication. In addition, KRGE treatment suppressed the expression of RSV-induced inflammatory cytokine genes (IL-6 and IL-8) and the formation of reactive oxygen species in epithelial cell cultures. Oral administration of mice with KRGE resulted in lowering lung viral loads after RSV infection. Additionally, the in vivo effects of KRGE showed an enhanced level of interferon-? (IFN-?) producing dendritic cells subsequent to RSV infection. Taken together, these results suggested that KRGE has antiviral activity against RSV infection. PMID:24756136

  20. Cutaneous manifestations of opportunistic infections in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed Central

    Tappero, J W; Perkins, B A; Wenger, J D; Berger, T G

    1995-01-01

    Bacillary angiomatosis (BA) presents most commonly as a cutaneous disease and is caused by two organisms. Bartonella (Rochalimaea) henselae and Bartonella (Rochalimaea) quintana. Biopsy confirmation of cutaneous BA is essential because lesions can mimic nodular Kaposi's sarcoma in appearance. Although the vast majority of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients with BA have CD4 lymphocyte counts of less than 100 cells per mm3, the disease responds well to antimicrobial therapy. Staphylococcus aureus is the most common bacterial skin pathogen affecting HIV-infected patients. The prevalence of skin disease due to S. aureus may be explained by high nasal carriage rates for the organism ( > or = 50%) and altered immune function in conjunction with an impaired cutaneous barrier. Herpes simplex virus causes mucocutaneous disease early in the course HIV infection and ulcerative lesions at any site in advanced HIV infection. Herpes zoster is common early in the course of HIV infection; recurrent and disseminated herpes zoster infections are characteristic of patients with advanced HIV disease. Acyclovir resistance is usually seen in patients with large, untreated, ulcerative lesions of herpes simplex virus and in patients with chronic, verrucous lesions of varicella-zoster virus. Cutaneous cryptococcosis, histoplasmosis, and coccidiomycosis are markers of disseminated disease and require biopsy confirmation. Scabies is easily diagnosed but may be atypical in presentation and difficult to eradicate in advanced HIV disease. PMID:7553576

  1. Health care-associated hepatitis C virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Pozzetto, Bruno; Memmi, Meriam; Garraud, Olivier; Roblin, Xavier; Berthelot, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a blood-borne pathogen that has a worldwide distribution and infects millions of people. Care-associated HCV infections represented a huge part of hepatitis C burden in the past via contaminated blood and unsafe injections and continue to be a serious problem of public health. The present review proposes a panorama of health care-associated HCV infections via the three mode of contamination that have been identified: (1) infected patient to non-infected patient; (2) infected patient to non-infected health care worker (HCW); and (3) infected HCW to non infected patient. For each condition, the circumstances of contamination are described together with the means to prevent them. As a whole, the more important risk is represented by unsafe practices regarding injections, notably with the improper use of multidose vials used for multiple patients. The questions of occupational exposures and infected HCWs are also discussed. In terms of prevention and surveillance, the main arm for combating care-associated HCV infections is the implementation of standard precautions in all the fields of cares, with training programs and audits to verify their good application. HCWs must be sensitized to the risk of blood-borne pathogens, notably by the use of safety devices for injections and good hygiene practices in the operating theatre and in all the invasive procedures. The providers performing exposed-prone procedures must monitor their HCV serology regularly in order to detect early any primary infection and to treat it without delay. With the need to stay vigilant because HCV infection is often a hidden risk, it can be hoped that the number of people infected by HCV via health care will decrease very significantly in the next years. PMID:25516637

  2. In vitro establishment of lytic and nonproductive infection by herpes simplex virus type 1 in three-dimensional keratinocyte culture.

    PubMed Central

    Syrjänen, S; Mikola, H; Nykänen, M; Hukkanen, V

    1996-01-01

    The F strain of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) was tested for its ability to produce lytic or nonproductive infection in squamous epithelial cells cultured in a three-dimensional organotypic tissue culture. For the tissue culture, we used HaCat cells (immortalized skin keratinocytes) and normal fibroblasts derived from the skin. The cultures were infected with HSV-1 (5 PFU) either when the epithelial cells had grown as a monolayer with a confluence of 80% on the collagen fibroblast gel or 30 min after lifting of the epithelial cells into the air-liquid interface. The cultures were collected 1 week after inoculation. Typical cytopathic effects of HSV infection (ballooning and reticular degeneration with multinucleate giant cells) were seen only in those cultures in which the epithelial cells were infected before lifting. The presence of HSV was confirmed by DNA and RNA in situ hybridization and PCR. No morphological changes were found in cultures infected after lifting into the air-liquid interface. No infectious virus was recovered either from cells or culture supernatant. However, these cultures were positive for HSV DNA on PCR and showed expression of the LAT gene by in situ hybridization and Northern blot (RNA) hybridization. The present results indicate that both nonproductive and lytic HSV infection can be produced in vitro and the outcome of the infection depends on the time of viral inoculation in relation to epithelial maturation. PMID:8709294

  3. Dynamics of influenza A virus infections in permanently infected pig farms: evidence of recurrent infections, circulation of several swine influenza viruses and reassortment events

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Concomitant infections by different influenza A virus subtypes within pig farms increase the risk of new reassortant virus emergence. The aims of this study were to characterize the epidemiology of recurrent swine influenza virus infections and identify their main determinants. A follow-up study was carried out in 3 selected farms known to be affected by repeated influenza infections. Three batches of pigs were followed within each farm from birth to slaughter through a representative sample of 40 piglets per batch. Piglets were monitored individually on a monthly basis for serology and clinical parameters. When a flu outbreak occurred, daily virological and clinical investigations were carried out for two weeks. Influenza outbreaks, confirmed by influenza A virus detection, were reported at least once in each batch. These outbreaks occurred at a constant age within farms and were correlated with an increased frequency of sneezing and coughing fits. H1N1 and H1N2 viruses from European enzootic subtypes and reassortants between viruses from these lineages were consecutively and sometimes simultaneously identified depending on the batch, suggesting virus co-circulations at the farm, batch and sometimes individual levels. The estimated reproduction ratio R of influenza outbreaks ranged between 2.5 [1.9-2.9] and 6.9 [4.1-10.5] according to the age at infection-time and serological status of infected piglets. Duration of shedding was influenced by the age at infection time, the serological status of the dam and mingling practices. An impaired humoral response was identified in piglets infected at a time when they still presented maternally-derived antibodies. PMID:24007505

  4. Interval Between Infections and Viral Hierarchy Are Determinants of Viral Interference Following Influenza Virus Infection in a Ferret Model

    PubMed Central

    Laurie, Karen L.; Guarnaccia, Teagan A.; Carolan, Louise A.; Yan, Ada W. C.; Aban, Malet; Petrie, Stephen; Cao, Pengxing; Heffernan, Jane M.; McVernon, Jodie; Mosse, Jennifer; Kelso, Anne; McCaw, James M.; Barr, Ian G.

    2015-01-01

    Background.?Epidemiological studies suggest that, following infection with influenza virus, there is a short period during which a host experiences a lower susceptibility to infection with other influenza viruses. This viral interference appears to be independent of any antigenic similarities between the viruses. We used the ferret model of human influenza to systematically investigate viral interference. Methods.?Ferrets were first infected then challenged 1–14 days later with pairs of influenza A(H1N1)pdm09, influenza A(H3N2), and influenza B viruses circulating in 2009 and 2010. Results.?Viral interference was observed when the interval between initiation of primary infection and subsequent challenge was <1 week. This effect was virus specific and occurred between antigenically related and unrelated viruses. Coinfections occurred when 1 or 3 days separated infections. Ongoing shedding from the primary virus infection was associated with viral interference after the secondary challenge. Conclusions.?The interval between infections and the sequential combination of viruses were important determinants of viral interference. The influenza viruses in this study appear to have an ordered hierarchy according to their ability to block or delay infection, which may contribute to the dominance of different viruses often seen in an influenza season. PMID:25943206

  5. Proteasome Inhibition Suppresses Dengue Virus Egress in Antibody Dependent Infection.

    PubMed

    Choy, Milly M; Zhang, Summer L; Costa, Vivian V; Tan, Hwee Cheng; Horrevorts, Sophie; Ooi, Eng Eong

    2015-11-01

    The mosquito-borne dengue virus (DENV) is a cause of significant global health burden, with an estimated 390 million infections occurring annually. However, no licensed vaccine or specific antiviral treatment for dengue is available. DENV interacts with host cell factors to complete its life cycle although this virus-host interplay remains to be fully elucidated. Many studies have identified the ubiquitin proteasome pathway (UPP) to be important for successful DENV production, but how the UPP contributes to DENV life cycle as host factors remains ill defined. We show here that proteasome inhibition decouples infectious virus production from viral RNA replication in antibody-dependent infection of THP-1 cells. Molecular and imaging analyses in ?-lactone treated THP-1 cells suggest that proteasome function does not prevent virus assembly but rather DENV egress. Intriguingly, the licensed proteasome inhibitor, bortezomib, is able to inhibit DENV titers at low nanomolar drug concentrations for different strains of all four serotypes of DENV in primary monocytes. Furthermore, bortezomib treatment of DENV-infected mice inhibited the spread of DENV in the spleen as well as the overall pathological changes. Our findings suggest that preventing DENV egress through proteasome inhibition could be a suitable therapeutic strategy against dengue. PMID:26565697

  6. Proteasome Inhibition Suppresses Dengue Virus Egress in Antibody Dependent Infection

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Vivian V.; Tan, Hwee Cheng; Horrevorts, Sophie; Ooi, Eng Eong

    2015-01-01

    The mosquito-borne dengue virus (DENV) is a cause of significant global health burden, with an estimated 390 million infections occurring annually. However, no licensed vaccine or specific antiviral treatment for dengue is available. DENV interacts with host cell factors to complete its life cycle although this virus-host interplay remains to be fully elucidated. Many studies have identified the ubiquitin proteasome pathway (UPP) to be important for successful DENV production, but how the UPP contributes to DENV life cycle as host factors remains ill defined. We show here that proteasome inhibition decouples infectious virus production from viral RNA replication in antibody-dependent infection of THP-1 cells. Molecular and imaging analyses in ?-lactone treated THP-1 cells suggest that proteasome function does not prevent virus assembly but rather DENV egress. Intriguingly, the licensed proteasome inhibitor, bortezomib, is able to inhibit DENV titers at low nanomolar drug concentrations for different strains of all four serotypes of DENV in primary monocytes. Furthermore, bortezomib treatment of DENV-infected mice inhibited the spread of DENV in the spleen as well as the overall pathological changes. Our findings suggest that preventing DENV egress through proteasome inhibition could be a suitable therapeutic strategy against dengue. PMID:26565697

  7. Hepatitis B Virus / Human Immunodeficiency Virus Co-Infection and Its Hepatocarcinogenic Potential in Sub-Saharan Black Africans

    PubMed Central

    Kew, Michael C.

    2012-01-01

    Context Since the introduction of highly active anti-retroviral regimen for human immunodeficiency virus-1 infection, a significant increase in the incidence of hepatocellular carcinoma has been reported in patients already chronically infected with hepatitis B virus and then given this form of regimen for their retroviral infection. Evidence Acquisition This phenomenon was initially attributed to the far more prolonged survival of those patients who received this new regimen, which provided sufficient time, allowing hepatitis B virus-induced hepatocellular carcinoma to develop. Results The current belief is that the increased incidence of hepatocellular carcinoma is because of co-infection with the two viruses, one known to be hepatocarcinogenic and the other suspected to increase the carcinogenic potential of the other. Because both hepatitis B virus and human immunodeficiency virus -1 are endemic in the Black population of sub-Saharan Africa and are transmitted in similar ways, as many as 20% of this population are co-infected with the two viruses. In this way, the already high risk of Black African patients developing hepatitis B virus-induced hepatocellular carcinoma is further increased. Conclusions The pathogenetic mechanism or mechanisms involved in the carcinogenic interaction between the hepatitis B virus and the human immunodeficiency virus-1 in sub-Saharan Black Africans and other populations co-infected with these viruses have yet to be determined. PMID:23166538

  8. Kinetics and Immunodominance of Virus-Specific T Cell Responses During Hantaan Virus Infection.

    PubMed

    Wang, Meiliang; Wang, Jiuping; Kang, Zhenhua; Zhao, Qiuling; Wang, Xiaohui; Hui, Ling

    2015-06-01

    Immunodominant T cell responses are important for protection against virus challenge. However, studies screening for the immunodominant T cell responses and following their kinetics in acute Hantaan virus (HTNV) infection are very limited. Herein, the HTNV nucleocapsid protein-specific T cell responses were longitudinally screened in 15 patients with acute HTNV infection, eight of whom had a particularly severe hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS). An extremely impaired IFN-?-producing T cell response was observed in patients with severe HFRS at the early stage of infection, especially to the immunodominant epitopes detected in the mild to moderate group, namely peptides N127-141, N139-153, N241-255, and N355-369. The initially insufficient T cell response to the immunodominant epitopes may play a role in influencing the severity of HTNV infection. These findings provide information that may aid the design of future vaccines against hantaviruses. PMID:25945718

  9. Giant viruses coexisted with the cellular ancestors and represent a distinct supergroup along with superkingdoms Archaea, Bacteria and Eukarya

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The discovery of giant viruses with genome and physical size comparable to cellular organisms, remnants of protein translation machinery and virus-specific parasites (virophages) have raised intriguing questions about their origin. Evidence advocates for their inclusion into global phylogenomic studies and their consideration as a distinct and ancient form of life. Results Here we reconstruct phylogenies describing the evolution of proteomes and protein domain structures of cellular organisms and double-stranded DNA viruses with medium-to-very-large proteomes (giant viruses). Trees of proteomes define viruses as a ‘fourth supergroup’ along with superkingdoms Archaea, Bacteria, and Eukarya. Trees of domains indicate they have evolved via massive and primordial reductive evolutionary processes. The distribution of domain structures suggests giant viruses harbor a significant number of protein domains including those with no cellular representation. The genomic and structural diversity embedded in the viral proteomes is comparable to the cellular proteomes of organisms with parasitic lifestyles. Since viral domains are widespread among cellular species, we propose that viruses mediate gene transfer between cells and crucially enhance biodiversity. Conclusions Results call for a change in the way viruses are perceived. They likely represent a distinct form of life that either predated or coexisted with the last universal common ancestor (LUCA) and constitute a very crucial part of our planet’s biosphere. PMID:22920653

  10. High doses of highly pathogenic avian influenza virus in chicken meat are required to infect ferrets

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    High pathogenicity avian influenza viruses (HPAIV) have caused fatal infections in mammals through consumption of infected bird carcasses or meat, but scarce information exists on the dose of virus required and the diversity of HPAIV subtypes involved. Ferrets were exposed to different HPAIV (H5 and H7 subtypes) through consumption of infected chicken meat. The dose of virus needed to infect ferrets through consumption was much higher than via respiratory exposure and varied with the virus strain. In addition, H5N1 HPAIV produced higher titers in the meat of infected chickens and more easily infected ferrets than the H7N3 or H7N7 HPAIV. PMID:24894438

  11. Detection of virus-specific antigen in the nuclei or nucleoli of cells infected with Zika or Langat virus.

    PubMed

    Buckley, A; Gould, E A

    1988-08-01

    Two monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) with molecular specificities for either the viral envelope glycoprotein (MAb 541) or the non-structural NS1 glycoprotein (MAb 109) were derived using West Nile and yellow fever (YF) viruses respectively. Their antigenic reactivity with a large number of flaviviruses was tested by indirect immunofluorescence microscopy. Both produced cytoplasmic fluorescent staining patterns with the homologous virus against which they were raised. Additionally, MAb 541 reacted with two substrains of YF virus whereas MAb 109 reacted with Bussuquara, YF and Ntaya viruses. These reactions were exclusively cytoplasmic. Two unexpected patterns of fluorescent labelling were observed when the antibodies were tested with Zika and Langat viruses. MAb 541 produced fluorescent staining of the nuclei, but not the cytoplasm, of cells infected with Zika virus and MAb 109 labelled only the nucleoli of cells infected with Langat virus. Double-labelling experiments showed that the nuclear fluorescent label was confined to virus-infected cells, and antibody absorption experiments with virus-infected cell packs confirmed the virus specificity of the nuclear antigen. The unexpected presence of virus-specific antigen in the nuclei or nucleoli of Zika or Langat virus-infected cells brings into question the role of the nucleus in flavivirus replication. PMID:2841406

  12. 75 FR 55797 - Draft Guidance for Industry on Chronic Hepatitis C Virus Infection: Developing Direct-Acting...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-14

    ...Draft Guidance for Industry on Chronic Hepatitis C Virus Infection: Developing Direct-Acting...guidance for industry entitled ``Chronic Hepatitis C Virus Infection: Developing Direct-Acting...interfere with specific steps in the hepatitis C virus (HCV) replication cycle....

  13. Oligodendroglial pathology in canine distemper virus infection in vitro.

    PubMed

    Zurbriggen, A; Vandevelde, M; Dumas, M; Griot, C; Bollo, E

    1987-01-01

    Dog brain cell cultures were infected with different canine distemper virus (CDV) strains to study the oligodendrocytes, which were characterized with eight different antibodies to cover the whole oligodendroglial population in the culture. A few weeks after infection all oligodendroglial cell types started to degenerate and disappeared from the culture. However, since no CDV protein could be demonstrated in the degenerating oligodendrocytes with extensive double-labelling studies, this lesion can not be explained as being a result of cytolytic infection. This conclusion was further supported in experiments with plaque-forming CDV, in which viral replication is restricted to the cytolytic areas only; oligodendrocytes also degenerated in virus-free areas between the plaques. The hypothesis of toxic factors released by other infected cell types in the culture leading to secondary damage of the oligodendrocyte could not be confirmed by transferring supernatants from infected to normal cultures. Whereas the presence of toxic factors can not be completely excluded, the possibility of an abortive infection of the oligodendrocytes with no or very limited viral protein synthesis is discussed. PMID:3687388

  14. Multiple roles of the coagulation protease cascade during virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Antoniak, Silvio

    2014-01-01

    The coagulation cascade is activated during viral infections. This response may be part of the host defense system to limit spread of the pathogen. However, excessive activation of the coagulation cascade can be deleterious. In fact, inhibition of the tissue factor/factor VIIa complex reduced mortality in a monkey model of Ebola hemorrhagic fever. Other studies showed that incorporation of tissue factor into the envelope of herpes simplex virus increases infection of endothelial cells and mice. Furthermore, binding of factor X to adenovirus serotype 5 enhances infection of hepatocytes but also increases the activation of the innate immune response to the virus. Coagulation proteases activate protease-activated receptors (PARs). Interestingly, we and others found that PAR1 and PAR2 modulate the immune response to viral infection. For instance, PAR1 positively regulates TLR3-dependent expression of the antiviral protein interferon ?, whereas PAR2 negatively regulates expression during coxsackievirus group B infection. These studies indicate that the coagulation cascade plays multiple roles during viral infections. PMID:24632711

  15. In vivo infection of sheep by bovine leukemia virus mutants.

    PubMed Central

    Willems, L; Kettmann, R; Dequiedt, F; Portetelle, D; Vonèche, V; Cornil, I; Kerkhofs, P; Burny, A; Mammerickx, M

    1993-01-01

    Direct inoculation of a cloned bovine leukemia virus (BLV) provirus into sheep has allowed study of the viral infectivity of genetic mutants in vivo. Three BLV variants cloned from BLV-induced tumors and 12 in vitro-modified proviruses were isolated and analyzed for viral expression in cell culture. The proviruses were then inoculated into sheep in order to assess viral infectivity in vivo. Of three variants cloned from BLV-induced tumors (344, 395, and 1345), one (344) was found infectious in vivo. This particular provirus was used to engineer 12 BLV mutants. A hybrid between the 5' region of the complete but noninfectious provirus 395 and the 3' end of mutant 344 was infectious in vivo, suggesting that the tax/rex sequences were altered in virus 395. As expected, several regions of the BLV genome appeared to be essential for viral infection: the protease, pol, and env genes. Even discrete modifications in the fusion peptide located at the NH2 end of the transmembrane gp30 glycoprotein destroyed the infectious potential. In contrast, mutations and deletions in the X3 region present between the env gene and the 3' tax/rex region did not interfere with viral infection in vivo. This region of unknown function could thus be used to introduce foreign sequences. A BLV recombinant carrying a ribozyme directed against the tax/rex sequences was still infectious in vivo. Cotransfection of two noninfectious mutants carrying deletions led to infection in two of four independent injections, the infectious virus being then a recombinant between the two deletants. The experimental approach described here should help to gain insight into essential mechanisms such as in vivo viral replication, cooperation between deletants for viral infectivity, and viral superinfections. The gene products in the X3 and X4 region which are dispensable for in vivo infection could be involved in leukemogenesis, and thus proviruses deleted in these sequences could constitute the basis for a live attenuated vaccine. Images PMID:8389918

  16. Naturally Occurring Animal Models of Human Hepatitis E Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Yugo, Danielle M.; Cossaboom, Caitlin M.; Meng, Xiang-Jin

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is a single-stranded, positive-sense RNA virus in the family Hepeviridae. Hepatitis E caused by HEV is a clinically important global disease. There are currently four well-characterized genotypes of HEV in mammalian species, although numerous novel strains of HEV likely belonging to either new genotypes or species have recently been identified from several other animal species. HEV genotypes 1 and 2 are limited to infection in humans, whereas genotypes 3 and 4 infect an expanding host range of animal species and are zoonotic to humans. Historical animal models include various species of nonhuman primates, which have been indispensable for the discovery of human HEV and for understanding its pathogenesis and course of infection. With the genetic identification and characterization of animal strains of HEV, a number of naturally occurring animal models such as swine, chicken, and rabbit have recently been developed for various aspects of HEV research, including vaccine trials, pathogenicity, cross-species infection, mechanism of virus replication, and molecular biology studies. Unfortunately, the current available animal models for HEV are still inadequate for certain aspects of HEV research. For instance, an animal model is still lacking to study the underlying mechanism of severe and fulminant hepatitis E during pregnancy. Also, an animal model that can mimic chronic HEV infection is critically needed to study the mechanism leading to chronicity in immunocompromised individuals. Genetic identification of additional novel animal strains of HEV may lead to the development of better naturally occurring animal models for HEV. This article reviews the current understanding of animal models of HEV infection in both natural and experimental infection settings and identifies key research needs and limitations. PMID:24936039

  17. Virus-neutralizing antibody response of mice to consecutive infection with human and avian influenza A viruses.

    PubMed

    Janulíková, J; Stropkovská, A; Bobišová, Z; Košík, I; Mucha, V; Kostolanský, F; Vare?ková, E

    2015-06-01

    In this work we simulated in a mouse model a naturally occurring situation of humans, who overcame an infection with epidemic strains of influenza A, and were subsequently exposed to avian influenza A viruses (IAV). The antibody response to avian IAV in mice previously infected with human IAV was analyzed. We used two avian IAV (A/Duck/Czechoslovakia/1956 (H4N6) and the attenuated virus rA/Viet Nam/1203-2004 (H5N1)) as well as two human IAV isolates (virus A/Mississippi/1/1985 (H3N2) of medium virulence and A/Puerto Rico/8/1934 (H1N1) of high virulence). Two repeated doses of IAV of H4 or of H5 virus elicited virus-specific neutralizing antibodies in mice. Exposure of animals previously infected with human IAV (of H3 or H1 subtype) to IAV of H4 subtype led to the production of antibodies neutralizing H4 virus in a level comparable with the level of antibodies against the human IAV used for primary infection. In contrast, no measurable levels of virus-neutralizing (VN) antibodies specific to H5 virus were detected in mice infected with H5 virus following a previous infection with human IAV. In both cases the secondary infection with avian IAV led to a significant increase of the titer of VN antibodies specific to the corresponding human virus used for primary infection. Moreover, cross-reactive HA2-specific antibodies were also induced by sequential infection. By virtue of these results we suggest that the differences in the ability of avian IAV to induce specific antibodies inhibiting virus replication after previous infection of mice with human viruses can have an impact on the interspecies transmission and spread of avian IAV in the human population. PMID:26104333

  18. Humoral Immune Response to Primary Rubella Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Kim M.; Di Camillo, Carlie; Doughty, Larissa; Dax, Elizabeth M.

    2006-01-01

    An assay capable of distinguishing between the immune response generated by recent exposure to rubella virus and the immune response existing as a result of past exposure or immunization is required for the diagnosis of primary rubella virus infection, especially in pregnant women. Avidity assays, which are based on the premise that chaotropic agents can be used to selectively dissociate the low-avidity antibodies generated early in the course of infection, have become routinely used in an effort to accomplish this. We have thoroughly investigated the immunological basis of an avidity assay using a viral lysate-based assay and an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) based on a peptide analogue of the putative immunodominant region of the E1 glycoprotein (E1208-239). The relative affinities of the antibodies directed against E1208-239 were measured by surface plasmon resonance and were found to correlate well with the avidity index calculated from the ELISA results. We found that the immune response generated during primary rubella virus infection consists of an initial low-affinity peak of immunoglobulin M (IgM) reactivity followed by transient peaks of low-avidity IgG3 and IgA reactivity. The predominant response is an IgG1 response which increases in concentration and affinity progressively over the course of infection. Incubation with the chaotropic agent used in the avidity assay abolished the detection of the early low-affinity peaks of IgM, IgA, and IgG3 reactivity while leaving the high-affinity IgG1 response relatively unaffected. The present study supported the premise that avidity assays based on appropriate antigens can be useful to confirm primary rubella virus infection. PMID:16522781

  19. Infection with strains of Citrus tristeza virus does not exclude superinfection by other strains of the virus.

    PubMed

    Folimonova, Svetlana Y; Robertson, Cecile J; Shilts, Turksen; Folimonov, Alexey S; Hilf, Mark E; Garnsey, Stephen M; Dawson, William O

    2010-02-01

    Superinfection exclusion or homologous interference, a phenomenon in which a primary viral infection prevents a secondary infection with the same or closely related virus, has been observed commonly for viruses in various systems, including viruses of bacteria, plants, and animals. With plant viruses, homologous interference initially was used as a test of virus relatedness to define whether two virus isolates were "strains" of the same virus or represented different viruses, and subsequently purposeful infection with a mild isolate was implemented as a protective measure against isolates of the virus causing severe disease. In this study we examined superinfection exclusion of Citrus tristeza virus (CTV), a positive-sense RNA closterovirus. Thirteen naturally occurring isolates of CTV representing five different virus strains and a set of isolates originated from virus constructs engineered based on an infectious cDNA clone of T36 isolate of CTV, including hybrids containing sequences from different isolates, were examined for their ability to prevent superinfection by another isolate of the virus. We show that superinfection exclusion occurred only between isolates of the same strain and not between isolates of different strains. When isolates of the same strain were used for sequential plant inoculation, the primary infection provided complete exclusion of the challenge isolate, whereas isolates from heterologous strains appeared to have no effect on replication, movement or systemic infection by the challenge virus. Surprisingly, substitution of extended cognate sequences from isolates of the T68 or T30 strains into T36 did not confer the ability of resulting hybrid viruses to exclude superinfection by those donor strains. Overall, these results do not appear to be explained by mechanisms proposed previously for other viruses. Moreover, these observations bring an understanding of some previously unexplained fundamental features of CTV biology and, most importantly, build a foundation for the strategy of selecting mild isolates that would efficiently exclude severe virus isolates as a practical means to control CTV diseases. PMID:19923189

  20. Hepatitis B virus coinfection in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients: A review

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Hsin-Yun; Sheng, Wang-Huei; Tsai, Mao-Song; Lee, Kuan-Yeh; Chang, Sui-Yuan; Hung, Chien-Ching

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is a leading cause of chronic hepatitis, liver cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma worldwide. Due to the shared modes of transmission, coinfection with HBV and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is not uncommon. It is estimated that 10% of HIV-infected patients worldwide are coinfected with HBV. In areas where an HBV vaccination program is implemented, the HBV seroprevalence has declined significantly. In HIV/HBV-coinfected patients, HBV coinfection accelerates immunologic and clinical progression of HIV infection and increases the risk of hepatotoxicity when combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) is initiated, while HIV infection increases the risk of hepatitis events, cirrhosis, and end-stage liver disease related to chronic HBV infection. With the advances in antiviral therapy, concurrent, successful long-term suppression of HIV and HBV replication can be achieved in the cART era. To reduce the disease burden of HBV infection among HIV-infected patients, adoption of safe sex practices, avoidance of sharing needles and diluent, HBV vaccination and use of cART containing tenofovir disoproxil fumarate plus emtricitabine or lamivudine are the most effective approaches. However, due to HIV-related immunosuppression, using increased doses of HBV vaccine and novel approaches to HBV vaccination are needed to improve the immunogenicity of HBV vaccine among HIV-infected patients. PMID:25356024

  1. Varicella Zoster Virus in Temporal Arteries of Patients With Giant Cell Arteritis.

    PubMed

    Gilden, Don; Nagel, Maria

    2015-07-15

    Giant cell arteritis (GCA) is an immune-mediated disease of unknown etiology. Varicella zoster virus (VZV) antigen was found in all of 4 GCA-positive temporal arteries (TAs) but was not present in any of 13 normal TAs. All 4 GCA-positive TAs contained viral antigen in skip areas, mostly in the adventitia and media and least in the intima. Despite formalin fixation, VZV DNA was detected in 2 of 4 GCA-positive, VZV antigen-positive TAs. Skeletal muscle was attached to 3 of 4 TAs, and VZV antigen was found in 2 and VZV DNA in 1. VZV may cause GCA. PMID:26116729

  2. Considerations in the Use of Nonhuman Primate Models of Ebola Virus and Marburg Virus Infection.

    PubMed

    Geisbert, Thomas W; Strong, James E; Feldmann, Heinz

    2015-10-01

    The filoviruses, Ebola virus and Marburg virus, are zoonotic pathogens that cause severe hemorrhagic fever in humans and nonhuman primates (NHPs), with case-fatality rates ranging from 23% to 90%. The current outbreak of Ebola virus infection in West Africa, with >26 000 cases, demonstrates the long-underestimated public health danger that filoviruses pose as natural human pathogens. Currently, there are no vaccines or treatments licensed for human use. Licensure of any medical countermeasure may require demonstration of efficacy in the gold standard cynomolgus or rhesus macaque models of filovirus infection. Substantial progress has been made over the last decade in characterizing the filovirus NHP models. However, there is considerable debate over a variety of experimental conditions, including differences among filovirus isolates used, routes and doses of exposure, and euthanasia criteria, all of which may contribute to variability of results among different laboratories. As an example of the importance of understanding these differences, recent data with Ebola virus shows that an addition of a single uridine residue in the glycoprotein gene at the editing site attenuates the virus. Here, we draw on decades of experience working with filovirus-infected NHPs to provide a perspective on the importance of various experimental conditions. PMID:26063223

  3. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection of human placenta: potential route for fetal infection.

    PubMed Central

    Amirhessami-Aghili, N; Spector, S A

    1991-01-01

    To determine the potential role of the placenta in transmission of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) from mother to fetus, the ability of human placental tissue to support HIV type 1 (HIV-1) infection was examined. HIV-1-seronegative first-trimester placentas were maintained in culture and infected with HIV-1. Virus production, measured by HIV-1 antigen release into the supernatant, and HIV-1 DNA, identified by polymerase chain reaction, were detected for at least 12 days postinfection. Western immunoblot analysis showed Gag proteins, precursor p55, and cleavage products p24 and p17 in HIV-1-infected tissues. Double labeling of placental villi with antibodies to CD4 and placental trophoblast-specific alkaline phosphatase indicated that trophoblasts express CD4 antigen. Additionally, immunostaining of HIV-1-infected tissues with anti-p24 antibodies demonstrated HIV-1 protein expression in placental trophoblasts. Evaluation of human chorionic gonadotropin and progesterone production by the placental cultures indicated that there was a 90% decrease in human chorionic gonadotropin and a 70% decrease in progesterone production in HIV-1-infected cultures in comparison with controls. These data demonstrate that trophoblastic cells of human placenta tissue express CD4 and are susceptible to HIV-1 infection; also, placental endocrine function is decreased by HIV-1 infection. Thus, the placenta may serve as a reservoir of HIV-1 infection during pregnancy contributing to infection of the fetus, and decreased placental hormone production may result in impaired fetal development. Images PMID:2016757

  4. Antiviral therapy for human immunodeficiency virus infections.

    PubMed Central

    De Clercq, E

    1995-01-01

    Depending on the stage of their intervention with the viral replicative cycle, human immunodeficiency virus inhibitors could be divided into the following groups: (i) adsorption inhibitors (i.e., CD4 constructs, polysulfates, polysulfonates, polycarboxylates, and polyoxometalates), (ii) fusion inhibitors (i.e., plant lectins, succinylated or aconitylated albumins, and betulinic acid derivatives), (iii) uncoating inhibitors (i.e., bicyclams), (iv) reverse transcription inhibitors acting either competitively with the substrate binding site (i.e., dideoxynucleoside analogs and acyclic nucleoside phosphonates) or allosterically with a nonsubstrate binding site (i.e., non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors), (v) integration inhibitors, (vi) DNA replication inhibitors, (vii) transcription inhibitors (i.e., antisense oligodeoxynucleotides and Tat antagonists), (viii) translation inhibitors (i.e., antisense oligodeoxynucleotides and ribozymes), (ix) maturation inhibitors (i.e., protease inhibitors, myristoylation inhibitors, and glycosylation inhibitors), and finally, (x) budding (assembly/release) inhibitors. Current knowledge, including the therapeutic potential, of these various inhibitors is discussed. In view of their potential clinical the utility, the problem of virus-drug resistance and possible strategies to circumvent this problem are also addressed. PMID:7542558

  5. Heterosubtypic Immunity to Influenza A Virus Infections in Mallards May Explain Existence of Multiple Virus

    E-print Network

    Lazzaro, Brian

    diversity is generated and maintained is lacking. To address this, 18,679 samples from 7728 Mallard ducksHeterosubtypic Immunity to Influenza A Virus Infections in Mallards May Explain Existence, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden Abstract Wild birds, particularly duck species, are the main reservoir

  6. Synaptic pathology in Borna disease virus persistent infection.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Dunia, D; Watanabe, M; Syan, S; Mallory, M; Masliah, E; De La Torre, J C

    2000-04-01

    Borna disease virus (BDV) infection of newborn rats leads to a persistent infection of the brain, which is associated with behavioral and neuroanatonomical abnormalities. These disorders occur in the absence of lymphoid cell infiltrates, and BDV-induced cell damage is restricted to defined brain areas. To investigate if damage to synaptic structures anteceded neuronal loss in BDV neonatally infected rats, we analyzed at different times postinfection the expression levels of growth-associated protein 43 and synaptophysin, two molecules involved in neuroplasticity processes. We found that BDV induced a progressive and marked decrease in the expression of these synaptic markers, which was followed by a significant loss of cortical neurons. Our findings suggest that BDV persistent infection interferes with neuroplasticity processes in specific cell populations. This, in turn, could affect the proper supply of growth factors and other molecules required for survival of selective neuronal populations within the cortex and limbic system structures. PMID:10729116

  7. mRNA maturation in giant viruses: variation on a theme

    PubMed Central

    Priet, Stéphane; Lartigue, Audrey; Debart, Françoise; Claverie, Jean-Michel; Abergel, Chantal

    2015-01-01

    Giant viruses from the Mimiviridae family replicate entirely in their host cytoplasm where their genes are transcribed by a viral transcription apparatus. mRNA polyadenylation uniquely occurs at hairpin-forming palindromic sequences terminating viral transcripts. Here we show that a conserved gene cluster both encode the enzyme responsible for the hairpin cleavage and the viral polyA polymerases (vPAP). Unexpectedly, the vPAPs are homodimeric and uniquely self-processive. The vPAP backbone structures exhibit a symmetrical architecture with two subdomains sharing a nucleotidyltransferase topology, suggesting that vPAPs originate from an ancestral duplication. A Poxvirus processivity factor homologue encoded by Megavirus chilensis displays a conserved 5?-GpppA 2?O methyltransferase activity but is also able to internally methylate the mRNAs’ polyA tails. These findings elucidate how the arm wrestling between hosts and their viruses to access the translation machinery is taking place in Mimiviridae. PMID:25779049

  8. Respiratory syncytial virus infection increases chlorine-induced airway hyperresponsiveness.

    PubMed

    Song, Weifeng; Yu, Zhihong; Doran, Stephen F; Ambalavanan, Namasivayam; Steele, Chad; Garantziotis, Stavros; Matalon, Sadis

    2015-08-01

    Exposure to chlorine (Cl2) damages airway and alveolar epithelia resulting in acute lung injury and reactive airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) to methacholine. However, little is known about the effect of preexisting respiratory disease on Cl2-induced lung injury. By using a murine respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection model, we found that preexisting RSV infection increases Cl2 (187 ppm for 30 min)-induced lung inflammation and airway AHR at 24 h after exposure (5 days after infection). RSV infection and Cl2 exposure synergistically induced oxygen desaturation and neutrophil infiltration and increased MCP-1, MIP-1?, IL-10, IFN-?, and RANTES concentrations in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF). In contrast, levels of type 2 cytokines (i.e., IL-4, IL-5, IL-9, and IL-13) were not significantly affected by either RSV infection or Cl2 exposure. Cl2 exposure, but not RSV infection, induced AHR to methacholine challenge as measured by flexiVent. Moreover, preexisting RSV infection amplified BALF levels of hyaluronan (HA) and AHR. The Cl2-induced AHR was mitigated by treatment with inter-?-trypsin inhibitor antibody, which inhibits HA signaling, suggesting a mechanism of HA-mediated AHR from exacerbated oxidative injury. Our results show for the first time that preexisting RSV infection predisposes the lung to Cl2-induced injury. These data emphasize the necessity for further research on the effects of Cl2 in vulnerable populations and the development of appropriate treatments. PMID:26071553

  9. Modeling Influenza Virus Infection: A Roadmap for Influenza Research

    PubMed Central

    Boianelli, Alessandro; Nguyen, Van Kinh; Ebensen, Thomas; Schulze, Kai; Wilk, Esther; Sharma, Niharika; Stegemann-Koniszewski, Sabine; Bruder, Dunja; Toapanta, Franklin R.; Guzmán, Carlos A.; Meyer-Hermann, Michael; Hernandez-Vargas, Esteban A.

    2015-01-01

    Influenza A virus (IAV) infection represents a global threat causing seasonal outbreaks and pandemics. Additionally, secondary bacterial infections, caused mainly by Streptococcus pneumoniae, are one of the main complications and responsible for the enhanced morbidity and mortality associated with IAV infections. In spite of the significant advances in our knowledge of IAV infections, holistic comprehension of the interplay between IAV and the host immune response (IR) remains largely fragmented. During the last decade, mathematical modeling has been instrumental to explain and quantify IAV dynamics. In this paper, we review not only the state of the art of mathematical models of IAV infection but also the methodologies exploited for parameter estimation. We focus on the adaptive IR control of IAV infection and the possible mechanisms that could promote a secondary bacterial coinfection. To exemplify IAV dynamics and identifiability issues, a mathematical model to explain the interactions between adaptive IR and IAV infection is considered. Furthermore, in this paper we propose a roadmap for future influenza research. The development of a mathematical modeling framework with a secondary bacterial coinfection, immunosenescence, host genetic factors and responsiveness to vaccination will be pivotal to advance IAV infection understanding and treatment optimization. PMID:26473911

  10. Effects of Aging on Influenza Virus Infection Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez-Vargas, Esteban A.; Wilk, Esther; Canini, Laetitia; Toapanta, Franklin R.; Binder, Sebastian C.; Uvarovskii, Alexey; Ross, Ted M.; Guzmán, Carlos A.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The consequences of influenza virus infection are generally more severe in individuals over 65 years of age (the elderly). Immunosenescence enhances the susceptibility to viral infections and renders vaccination less effective. Understanding age-related changes in the immune system is crucial in order to design prophylactic and immunomodulatory strategies to reduce morbidity and mortality in the elderly. Here, we propose different mathematical models to provide a quantitative understanding of the immune strategies in the course of influenza virus infection using experimental data from young and aged mice. Simulation results suggested a central role of CD8+ T cells for adequate viral clearance kinetics in young and aged mice. Adding the removal of infected cells by natural killer cells did not improve the model fit in either young or aged animals. We separately examined the infection-resistant state of cells promoted by the cytokines alpha/beta interferon (IFN-?/?), IFN-?, and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-?). The combination of activated CD8+ T cells with any of the cytokines provided the best fits in young and aged animals. During the first 3 days after infection, the basic reproductive number for aged mice was 1.5-fold lower than that for young mice (P < 0.05). IMPORTANCE The fits of our models to the experimental data suggest that the increased levels of IFN-?/?, IFN-?, and TNF-? (the “inflammaging” state) promote slower viral growth in aged mice, which consequently limits the stimulation of immune cells and contributes to the reported impaired responses in the elderly. A quantitative understanding of influenza virus pathogenesis and its shift in the elderly is the key contribution of this work. PMID:24478442

  11. Gene expression responses to highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1 virus infections in ducks

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Differences in host response to infection with avian influenza (AI) viruses were investigated by identifying genes differentially expressed in tissues of infected ducks. Clear differences in pathogenicity were observed among ducks inoculated with five H5N1 HPAI viruses. Virus titers in tissues cor...

  12. Cross-species infection of Deformed Wing virus poses a new threat to pollinator conservation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Here we provide the evidence that Deformed Wing Virus (DWV), one of the most prevalent and common viruses in honey bees Apis mellifera, could cause an infection in bumble bees, Bombus huntii and that the virus infection could spread over the entire body of B. huntii. Our results showed that gut of...

  13. Virus Competition for Shedding and Tumor Formation Over Time in Marek's Disease Virus Dual-infected Chickens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study was designed to determine what effect multiple virulent Marek’s disease viruses have on each other over time during dual-infection. Serotype 1 viruses able to be differentiated were administered either simultaneously or with a short (24 hours) or long (13 days) interval. Virus frequency ...

  14. Viruses infecting marine picoplancton encode functional potassium ion channels.

    PubMed

    Siotto, Fenja; Martin, Corinna; Rauh, Oliver; Van Etten, James L; Schroeder, Indra; Moroni, Anna; Thiel, Gerhard

    2014-10-01

    Phycodnaviruses are dsDNA viruses, which infect algae. Their large genomes encode many gene products, like small K(+) channels, with homologs in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Screening for K(+) channels revealed their abundance in viruses from fresh-water habitats. Recent sequencing of viruses from marine algae or from salt water in Antarctica revealed sequences with the predicted characteristics of K(+) channels but with some unexpected features. Two genes encode either 78 or 79 amino acid proteins, which are the smallest known K(+) channels. Also of interest is an unusual sequence in the canonical ?-helixes in K(+) channels. Structural prediction algorithms indicate that the new channels have the conserved ?-helix folds but the algorithms failed to identify the expected transmembrane domains flanking the K(+) channel pores. In spite of these unexpected properties electophysiological studies confirmed that the new proteins are functional K(+) channels. PMID:25441713

  15. NTCP opens the door for hepatitis B virus infection.

    PubMed

    Yan, Huan; Liu, Yang; Sui, Jianhua; Li, Wenhui

    2015-09-01

    A liver bile acids transporter, sodium taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide (NTCP, encoded by SLC10A1) was recently identified as a functional receptor for hepatitis B virus (HBV) and its satellite hepatitis D virus (HDV). NTCP-complemented human hepatoma HepG2 cells (HepG2-NTCP) were shown to support infection of HBV and HDV in vitro, providing a much-needed and convenient cell culture system for the viruses. Identification of NTCP as a functional receptor for HBV has significantly advanced our understanding of the viral life cycle and opened new opportunities for developing anti-HBV interventions. This article forms part of a symposium in Antiviral Research on "An unfinished story: from the discovery of the Australia antigen to the development of new curative therapies for hepatitis B". PMID:26071008

  16. Predictors for Early Identification of Hepatitis C Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Mei-Hua; Lin, Kuei-Hsiang; Lin, Kuan-Tsou; Hung, Chi-Ming; Cheng, Hung-Shiang; Tyan, Yu-Chang; Huang, Hui-Wen; Sanno-Duanda, Bintou; Yang, Ming-Hui; Yuan, Shyng-Shiou; Chu, Pei-Yu

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection can cause permanent liver damage and hepatocellular carcinoma, and deaths related to HCV deaths have recently increased. Chronic HCV infection is often undiagnosed such that the virus remains infective and transmissible. Identifying HCV infection early is essential for limiting its spread, but distinguishing individuals who require further HCV tests is very challenging. Besides identifying high-risk populations, an optimal subset of indices for routine examination is needed to identify HCV screening candidates. Therefore, this study analyzed data from 312 randomly chosen blood donors, including 144 anti-HCV-positive donors and 168 anti-HCV-negative donors. The HCV viral load in each sample was measured by real-time polymerase chain reaction method. Receiver operating characteristic curves were used to find the optimal cell blood counts and thrombopoietin measurements for screening purposes. Correlations with values for key indices and viral load were also determined. Strong predictors of HCV infection were found by using receiver operating characteristics curves to analyze the optimal subsets among red blood cells, monocytes, platelet counts, platelet large cell ratios, and mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentrations. Sensitivity, specificity, and area under the receiver operator characteristic curve (P < 0.0001) were 75.6%, 78.5%, and 0.859, respectively. PMID:26413522

  17. Burden of respiratory syncytial virus infection in young children

    PubMed Central

    Resch, Bernhard

    2012-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the most frequent and important cause of lower respiratory tract infection in infants and children. It is a seasonal virus, with peak rates of infection occurring annually in the cold season in temperate climates, and in the rainy season, as temperatures fall, in tropical climates. High risk groups for severe RSV disease include infants below six mo of age, premature infants with or without chronic lung disease, infants with hemodynamically significant congenital heart disease, infants with immunodeficiency or cystic fibrosis, and infants with neuromuscular diseases. Mortality rates associated with RSV infection are generally low in previous healthy infants (below 1%), but increase significantly in children with underlying chronic conditions and comorbidities. Following early RSV lower respiratory tract infection, some patients experience recurrent episodes of wheezing mimicking early childhood asthma with persistence of lung function abnormalities until adolescence. There is currently no RSV vaccine available, but promising candidate vaccines are in development. Palivizumab, a monoclonal RSV antibody that is the only tool for immunoprophylaxis in high-risk infants, lowers the burden of RSV infection in certain carefully selected patient groups. PMID:25254161

  18. West Nile Virus Infection of Birds, Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Guerrero-Sánchez, Sergio; Cuevas-Romero, Sandra; Nemeth, Nicole M.; Trujillo-Olivera, María Teresa Jesús; Worwa, Gabriella; Dupuis, Alan; Brault, Aaron C.; Kramer, Laura D.; Komar, Nicholas

    2011-01-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) has caused disease in humans, equids, and birds at lower frequency in Mexico than in the United States. We hypothesized that the seemingly reduced virulence in Mexico was caused by attenuation of the Tabasco strain from southeastern Mexico, resulting in lower viremia than that caused by the Tecate strain from the more northern location of Baja California. During 2006–2008, we tested this hypothesis in candidate avian amplifying hosts: domestic chickens, rock pigeons, house sparrows, great-tailed grackles, and clay-colored thrushes. Only great-tailed grackles and house sparrows were competent amplifying hosts for both strains, and deaths occurred in each species. Tecate strain viremia levels were higher for thrushes. Both strains produced low-level viremia in pigeons and chickens. Our results suggest that certain avian hosts within Mexico are competent for efficient amplification of both northern and southern WNV strains and that both strains likely contribute to bird deaths. PMID:22172633

  19. Bluetongue virus infection in India: a review.

    PubMed

    Prasad, G; Jain, N C; Gupta, Y

    1992-09-01

    The history and epizootiology of bluetongue (BT) in India are reviewed. BT has become endemic in India. The first outbreak of BT in sheep and goats in the country was recorded in 1964 in Maharashtra State. Since then, several outbreaks of BT have been reported in sheep. Exotic sheep are more susceptible than indigenous and cross-bred sheep. A serological survey has indicated the presence of bluetongue virus (BTV) antibodies in cattle and buffalo in several states in India. However, clinical BT has not been observed in cattle or buffalo to date. Of the 24 known serotypes of BTV, 18 have been reported in India. Although BTV has been isolated from Culicoides midges, the particular species responsible for transmission has not yet been identified. PMID:1335304

  20. Indigenous West Nile virus infections in horses in Albania.

    PubMed

    Berxholi, K; Ziegler, U; Rexhepi, A; Schmidt, K; Mertens, M; Korro, K; Cuko, A; Angenvoort, J; Groschup, M H

    2013-11-01

    Serum samples collected from 167 equines of 12 districts in Albania were tested for West Nile virus-specific antibodies by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and virus neutralization assay, using WNV lineage 1 and 2. In addition, 95 bird serum samples from Albania and 29 horse samples from Kosovo were tested in ELISA. An overall seroprevalence rate of 22% was found in horses from Albania, whereas no specific antibodies were found in the equine samples from Kosovo and the bird samples. This is the first report indicating WNV infections in animals in Albania, and the first reported seroprevalence study conducted for Kosovo. These results provide evidence for widespread infections of WNV in Albania. PMID:24589101

  1. Noninvasive coronary imaging for atherosclerosis in human immunodeficiency virus infection.

    PubMed

    Gharib, Ahmed M; Abd-Elmoniem, Khaled Z; Pettigrew, Roderic I; Hadigan, Colleen

    2011-01-01

    Coronary artery disease is increasingly recognized as an important contributor to morbidity and mortality among persons living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Traditional cardiovascular disease risk factors as well as aspects of HIV infection and its therapy contribute to the increased coronary artery disease observed in HIV. Advances in noninvasive imaging methodologies in both computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging provide opportunities to evaluate coronary artery atherosclerosis in ways not possible by conventional invasive x-ray angiography. Application of these techniques may prove very useful in the study of atherosclerosis in many diseases, such as HIV. PMID:21939819

  2. Association between Celiac Disease and Chronic Hepatitis C Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Ashish; Reddy, Chandrasekhar; Duseja, Ajay; Chawla, Yogesh; Dhiman, Radha K

    2011-01-01

    Celiac disease affects the proximal small intestine and is caused by a local immune response to dietary gluten. Celiac disease usually presents with chronic diarrhea; however, presentations with elevated hepatic transaminase levels in blood or with iron-deficiency anemia have been described. Celiac disease has been reported to be associated with autoimmune liver diseases. Hepatitis C virus (HCV) can also initiate autoimmune disease process. Therefore, HCV infection and celiac disease may occur together. Here, we describe 4 cases of celiac disease associated with chronic hepatitis C. This small case series indicates that chronic HCV infection and celiac disease are not causally associated. PMID:25755310

  3. Detection of Zika Virus Infection in Thailand, 2012-2014.

    PubMed

    Buathong, Rome; Hermann, Laura; Thaisomboonsuk, Butsaya; Rutvisuttinunt, Wiriya; Klungthong, Chonticha; Chinnawirotpisan, Piyawan; Manasatienkij, Wudtichai; Nisalak, Ananda; Fernandez, Stefan; Yoon, In-Kyu; Akrasewi, Passakorn; Plipat, Tanarak

    2015-08-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV) is an emerging mosquito-borne pathogen with reported cases in Africa, Asia, and large outbreaks in the Pacific. No autochthonous ZIKV infections have been confirmed in Thailand. However, there have been several cases reported in travelers returning from Thailand. Here we report seven cases of acute ZIKV infection in Thai residents across the country confirmed by molecular or serological testing including sequence data. These endemic cases, combined with previous reports in travelers, provide evidence that ZIKV is widespread throughout Thailand. PMID:26101272

  4. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection: The Spectrum Beyond AIDS

    PubMed Central

    Willoughby, Brain C.

    1987-01-01

    Since 1981, the Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) has emerged as the major infectious epidemic of our time. It is the most profound manifestation of infection with the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV). Since 1984, serologic methods have existed to detect antibody to HIV. Several other clinical entities have been detected and are attributable to HIV infection. Appropriate counsel must accompany antibody testing. The author discusses the acute seroconversion event, as well as asymptomatic carrier status, including generalized lymphadenopathy. He also reviews the symptomatic states that do not meet the surveillance definition of AIDS, including treatments where available. PMID:21263801

  5. Detection of Zika Virus Infection in Thailand, 2012–2014

    PubMed Central

    Buathong, Rome; Hermann, Laura; Thaisomboonsuk, Butsaya; Rutvisuttinunt, Wiriya; Klungthong, Chonticha; Chinnawirotpisan, Piyawan; Manasatienkij, Wudtichai; Nisalak, Ananda; Fernandez, Stefan; Yoon, In-Kyu; Akrasewi, Passakorn; Plipat, Tanarak

    2015-01-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV) is an emerging mosquito-borne pathogen with reported cases in Africa, Asia, and large outbreaks in the Pacific. No autochthonous ZIKV infections have been confirmed in Thailand. However, there have been several cases reported in travelers returning from Thailand. Here we report seven cases of acute ZIKV infection in Thai residents across the country confirmed by molecular or serological testing including sequence data. These endemic cases, combined with previous reports in travelers, provide evidence that ZIKV is widespread throughout Thailand. PMID:26101272

  6. 38 CFR 1.486 - Disclosure of information related to infection with the human immunodeficiency virus to public...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Disclosure of information related to infection with the human immunodeficiency virus... Disclosure of information related to infection with the human immunodeficiency virus...of any program or activity relating to infection with the HIV, information...

  7. BOVINE VIRAL DIARRHEA VIRUS PERSISTENT INFECTIONS IN BEEF BREEDING HERDS: UTILIZATION OF IMMUNOHISTOCHEMISTRY AND ANTIGEN CAPTIVE ELISA ON EAR NOTCHES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) infections represent significant disease manifestations in cattle. Persistently infected (PI) cattle resulting from fetal infections are considered the major reservoir of virus for susceptible cattle. Beef cattle in stocker and feedlot operations are often where ...

  8. Lessons for tuberculosis vaccines from respiratory virus infection.

    PubMed

    Beverley, Peter Charles Leonard; Tchilian, Elma Zaven

    2008-10-01

    There is a worldwide epidemic of increasingly drug-resistant TB. Bacillus Calmette-Guérin vaccination provides partial protection against disseminated disease in infants but poor protection against later pulmonary TB. Cell-mediated protection against respiratory virus infections requires the presence of T cells in lung tissues, and the most effective prime-boost immunizations for Mycobacterium tuberculosis also induce lung-resident lymphocytes. These observations need to be taken into account when designing future vaccines against M. tuberculosis. PMID:18844591

  9. Haemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis in inflammatory bowel disease with virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yuan; Xia, Xuefeng; Zhang, Jing; Song, Zhiqiang; Zhou, Liya; Zhang, Yaopeng; Huang, Yonghui; Shi, Yanyan; Quigley, Eamonn M.M.

    2015-01-01

    Patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are at risk of developing haemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) because of chronic systemic inflammation as well as exposure to immunosuppressive medications. The two main causes of HLH in IBD patients are infection with cytomegalovirus and Epstein-Barr virus. Patients with Crohn's disease are more susceptible to HLH than those with ulcerative colitis. The majority of cases are seen in people receiving an immunosuppressive regimen that included thiopurines. PMID:26557937

  10. [Epidemiology of hepatitis E virus infection in Spain].

    PubMed

    Echevarría, José Manuel; Fogeda, Marta; Avellón, Ana

    2015-04-01

    The general features of the epidemiology and ecology of hepatitis E virus in Spain are already known after 20 years of investigations. Genotype 3 strains, mainly from sub-genotype 3f, circulated among swine livestock and certain wild mammals, and would be sporadically transmitted to humans through direct contact with the reservoirs or by consumption of foods derived from them. Bivalve shellfish contaminated by hepatitis E virus from sewage could also play a role in transmission. Although the interpretation of results from seroprevalence studies in low endemic settings is still controversial, antibody to hepatitis E virus displays an overall prevalence less than 10% among the population of Spain, increasing significantly with age. From the, approximately, 150 cases of acute hepatitis E recorded in the international literature, males older than 40 years, suffering a mild, locally acquired disease predominate. In addition, hepatitis E might be more frequent in the North of the country than in other regions. Although the disease does not usually have a great clinical relevance, the occasional finding of cases of fulminant hepatitis, and of ribavirin-resistant, chronic hepatitis E virus infections among the immunocompromised would recommend the surveillance of the infection by the public health authority and a better implementation of specific diagnostic procedures in clinical laboratories. PMID:24447919

  11. A Bacteriophage-Related Chimeric Marine Virus Infecting Abalone

    PubMed Central

    Zhuang, Jun; Cai, Guiqin; Lin, Qiying; Wu, Zujian; Xie, Lianhui

    2010-01-01

    Marine viruses shape microbial communities with the most genetic diversity in the sea by multiple genetic exchanges and infect multiple marine organisms. Here we provide proof from experimental infection that abalone shriveling syndrome-associated virus (AbSV) can cause abalone shriveling syndrome. This malady produces histological necrosis and abnormally modified macromolecules (hemocyanin and ferritin). The AbSV genome is a 34.952-kilobase circular double-stranded DNA, containing putative genes with similarity to bacteriophages, eukaryotic viruses, bacteria and endosymbionts. Of the 28 predicted open reading frames (ORFs), eight ORF-encoded proteins have identifiable functional homologues. The 4 ORF products correspond to a predicted terminase large subunit and an endonuclease in bacteriophage, and both an integrase and an exonuclease from bacteria. The other four proteins are homologous to an endosymbiont-derived helicase, primase, single-stranded binding (SSB) protein, and thymidylate kinase, individually. Additionally, AbSV exhibits a common gene arrangement similar to the majority of bacteriophages. Unique to AbSV, the viral genome also contains genes associated with bacterial outer membrane proteins and may lack the structural protein-encoding ORFs. Genomic characterization of AbSV indicates that it may represent a transitional form of microbial evolution from viruses to bacteria. PMID:21079776

  12. Small RNA profiles from virus-infected fresh market vegetables.

    PubMed

    Frizzi, Alessandra; Zhang, Yuanji; Kao, John; Hagen, Charles; Huang, Shihshieh

    2014-12-10

    Functional small RNAs, such as short interfering RNAs (siRNAs) and microRNAs (miRNAs), exist in freshly consumed fruits and vegetables. These siRNAs can be derived either from endogenous sequences or from viruses that infect them. Symptomatic tomatoes, watermelons, zucchini, and onions were purchased from grocery stores and investigated by small RNA sequencing. By aligning the obtained small RNA sequences to sequences of known viruses, four different viruses were identified as infecting these fruits and vegetables. Many of these virally derived small RNAs along with endogenous small RNAs were found to be highly complementary to human genes. However, the established history of safe consumption of these vegetables suggests that this sequence homology has little biological relevance. By extension, these results provide evidence for the safe use by humans and animals of genetically engineered crops using RNA-based suppression technologies, especially vegetable crops with virus resistance conferred by expression of siRNAs or miRNAs derived from viral sequences. PMID:25389086

  13. Simian immunodeficiency virus infection of CD8+ lymphocytes in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Dean, G A; Reubel, G H; Pedersen, N C

    1996-01-01

    To determine the lymphoid target cells of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) in vivo, peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) and lymph node lymphocytes (LNL) were positively selected (>97% purity) for surface expression of CD4, CD8, or CD20 and then analyzed for SIV provirus using semiquantitative DNA amplification. We found provirus in CD4+ and CD8+ lymphocytes but none in CD20+ lymphocytes. During acute SIV infection (< or = 214 days postinoculation), the percentage of PBL and LNL CD4+ cells containing proviral DNA ranged from 0.2 to 20% and from 0.2 to 2%, respectively. Proviral burden in the CD8+ population of either PBL or LNL ranged from 0.01 to 0.2%. Virus isolation by cocultivation was positive for both CD4+ and CD8+ purified populations. No difference in proviral burden was observed between PBL and LNL subsets during acute SIV infection. Up to 19.4% of positively selected CD8+ cells also expressed CD4, and thus the provirus may reside within a dual-positive population. This dual-positive population may represent activated lymphocytes that are particularly susceptible to infection and may provide an opportunity for virus entry into the CD8+ CD4- lymphocytes in vivo. PMID:8764081

  14. Emergence of CD4 Independence Envelopes and Astrocyte Infection in R5 Simian-Human Immunodeficiency Virus Model of Encephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Zhuang, Ke; Leda, Ana Rachel; Tsai, Lily; Knight, Heather; Harbison, Carole; Gettie, Agegnehu; Blanchard, James; Westmoreland, Susan

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection in the central nervous system (CNS) is characterized by replication in macrophages or brain microglia that express low levels of the CD4 receptor and is the cause of HIV-associated dementia and related cognitive and motor disorders that affect 20 to 30% of treatment-naive patients with AIDS. Independent viral envelope evolution in the brain has been reported, with the need for robust replication in resident CD4low cells, as well as CD4-negative cells, such as astrocytes, proposed as a major selective pressure. We previously reported giant-cell encephalitis in subtype B and C R5 simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV)-infected macaques (SHIV-induced encephalitis [SHIVE]) that experienced very high chronic viral loads and progressed rapidly to AIDS, with varying degrees of macrophage or microglia infection and activation of these immune cells, as well as astrocytes, in the CNS. In this study, we characterized envelopes (Env) amplified from the brains of subtype B and C R5 SHIVE macaques. We obtained data in support of an association between severe neuropathological changes, robust macrophage and microglia infection, and evolution to CD4 independence. Moreover, the degree of Env CD4 independence appeared to correlate with the extent of astrocyte infection in vivo. These findings further our knowledge of the CNS viral population phenotypes that are associated with the severity of HIV/SHIV-induced neurological injury and improve our understanding of the mechanism of HIV-1 cellular tropism and persistence in the brain. IMPORTANCE Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection of astrocytes in the brain has been suggested to be important in HIV persistence and neuropathogenesis but has not been definitively demonstrated in an animal model of HIV-induced encephalitis (HIVE). Here, we describe a new nonhuman primate (NHP) model of R5 simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV)-induced encephalitis (SHIVE) with several classical HIVE features that include astrocyte infection. We further show an association between severe neuropathological changes, robust resident microglia infection, and evolution to CD4 independence of viruses in the central nervous system (CNS), with expansion to infection of truly CD4-negative cells in vivo. These findings support the use of the R5 SHIVE models to study the contribution of the HIV envelope and viral clades to neurovirulence and residual virus replication in the CNS, providing information that should guide efforts to eradicate HIV from the body. PMID:24829360

  15. Presence of Aujeszky's disease virus in organs and materials from experimentally infected dogs.

    PubMed

    Biancifiori, F; Gialletti, L; Frescura, T; Morozzi, A

    1977-01-01

    The presence of Aujeszky's disease virus was investigated in various organs and materials from experimentally infected dogs, employing the fluorescent antibody test (FAT), tissue culture and biological tests in rabbits. The FAT appeared less sensitive for virus detection than virus isolation in cell culture and rabbit tests. The virus distribution in the central nervous system was related to the site of inoculation. PMID:201547

  16. Experimental co-infection of chickens and turkeys with avian influenza and newcastle disease viruses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Avian influenza virus (AIV) and Newcastle disease virus (NDV) are the two most important viruses affecting poultry worldwide. Co-infections of poultry with AIV and NDV are a problem from both the clinical point of view and the diagnosis of these viruses. The goal of this study was to examine the i...

  17. Hepatitis B Virus Infection and Immunizations among Asian American College Students: Infection, Exposure, and Immunity Rates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Haeok; Kiang, Peter; Watanabe, Paul; Halon, Patricia; Shi, Ling; Church, Daniel R.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the prevalence of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection, exposure, and immunity among Asian American college students as a basis for evaluating HBV screening and vaccination policy. Participants and Methods: Self-identified Asian American college students aged 18 years or older were examined. Serological tests of HBV surface…

  18. Rethinking the pathogenesis of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong-Yuan; Hu, Ke-Qin

    2015-12-01

    Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection affects approximately 375 million people worldwide. Current antiviral treatment effectively controls, but rarely clears chronic HBV infection. In addition, a significant portion of chronic HBV infected patients are not suitable for currently available antiviral therapy, and still face higher risk for cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. The poorly understood pathogenesis of HBV infection is the main barrier for developing more effective treatment strategies. HBV has long been viewed as non-cytopathic and the central hypothesis for HBV pathogenesis lies in the belief that hepatitis B is a host specific immunity-mediated liver disease. However, this view has been challenged by the accumulating experimental and clinical data that support a model of cytopathic HBV replication. In this article we systematically review the pathogenic role of HBV replication in hepatitis B and suggest possible HBV replication related mechanisms for HBV-mediated liver injury. We propose that a full understanding of HBV pathogenesis should consider the following elements. I. Liver injury can be caused by high levels of HBV replication and accumulation of viral products in the infected hepatocytes. II. HBV infection can be either directly cytopathic, non-cytopathic, or a mix of both in an individual patient depending upon accumulation levels of viral products that are usually associated with HBV replication activity in individual infected hepatocytes. J. Med. Virol. 87:1989-1999, 2015. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:25989114

  19. Oral lesions in infection with human immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed Central

    Coogan, Maeve M.; Greenspan, John; Challacombe, Stephen J.

    2005-01-01

    This paper discusses the importance of oral lesions as indicators of infection with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and as predictors of progression of HIV disease to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Oral manifestations are among the earliest and most important indicators of infection with HIV. Seven cardinal lesions, oral candidiasis, hairy leukoplakia, Kaposi sarcoma, linear gingival erythema, necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis, necrotizing ulcerative periodontitis and non-Hodgkin lymphoma, which are strongly associated with HIV infection, have been identified and internationally calibrated, and are seen in both developed and developing countries. They may provide a strong indication of HIV infection and be present in the majority of HIV-infected people. Antiretroviral therapy may affect the prevalence of HIV-related lesions. The presence of oral lesions can have a significant impact on health-related quality of life. Oral health is strongly associated with physical and mental health and there are significant increases in oral health needs in people with HIV infection, especially in children, and in adults particularly in relation to periodontal diseases. International collaboration is needed to ensure that oral aspects of HIV disease are taken into account in medical programmes and to integrate oral health care with the general care of the patient. It is important that all health care workers receive education and training on the relevance of oral health needs and the use of oral lesions as surrogate markers in HIV infection. PMID:16211162

  20. Infection of Murine Macrophages by Salmonella enterica Serovar Heidelberg Blocks Murine Norovirus Infectivity and Virus-induced Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Agnihothram, Sudhakar S.; Basco, Maria D. S.; Mullis, Lisa; Foley, Steven L.; Hart, Mark E.; Sung, Kidon; Azevedo, Marli P.

    2015-01-01

    Gastroenteritis caused by bacterial and viral pathogens constitutes a major public health threat in the United States accounting for 35% of hospitalizations. In particular, Salmonella enterica and noroviruses cause the majority of gastroenteritis infections, with emergence of sporadic outbreaks and incidence of increased infections. Although mechanisms underlying infections by these pathogens have been individually studied, little is known about the mechanisms regulating co-infection by these pathogens. In this study, we utilized RAW 264.7 murine macrophage cells to investigate the mechanisms governing co-infection with S. enterica serovar Heidelberg and murine norovirus (MNV). We demonstrate that infection of RAW 264.7 cells with S. enterica reduces the replication of MNV, in part by blocking virus entry early in the virus life cycle, and inducing antiviral cytokines later in the infection cycle. In particular, bacterial infection prior to, or during MNV infection affected virus entry, whereas MNV entry remained unaltered when the virus infection preceded bacterial invasion. This block in virus entry resulted in reduced virus replication, with the highest impact on replication observed during conditions of co-infection. In contrast, bacterial replication showed a threefold increase in MNV-infected cells, despite the presence of antibiotic in the medium. Most importantly, we present evidence that the infection of MNV-infected macrophages by S. enterica blocked MNV-induced apoptosis, despite allowing efficient virus replication. This apoptosis blockade was evidenced by reduction in DNA fragmentation and absence of poly-ADP ribose polymerase (PARP), caspase 3 and caspase 9 cleavage events. Our study suggests a novel mechanism of pathogenesis whereby initial co-infection with these pathogens could result in prolonged infection by either of these pathogens or both together. PMID:26658916

  1. Hepatitis C virus infection of neuroepithelioma cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Fletcher, Nicola F; Yang, Jian Ping; Farquhar, Michelle J; Hu, Ke; Davis, Christopher; He, Qiuchen; Dowd, Kimberly; Ray, Stuart C; Krieger, Sophie E; Neyts, Johan; Baumert, Thomas F; Balfe, Peter; McKeating, Jane A; Wong-Staal, Flossie

    2012-01-01

    Background & Aims Hepatitis C virus (HCV) establishes chronic infections in 3% of the world's population. Infection leads to progressive liver disease; hepatocytes are the major site of viral replication in vivo. However, chronic infection is associated with a variety of extrahepatic syndromes, including central nervous system (CNS) abnormalities. We therefore screened a series of neural and brain-derived cell lines for their ability to support HCV entry and replication. Methods We used a panel of neural-derived cell lines, HCV pseudoparticles (HCVpp), and an infectious, HCV JFH-1 cell-culture system (HCVcc) to assess viral tropism. Results Two independently derived neuroepithelioma cell lines (SK-N-MC and SK-PN-DW) permitted HCVpp entry. In contrast, several neuroblastoma, glioma, and astrocytoma cell lines were refractory to HCVpp infection. HCVcc infected the neuroepithelioma cell lines and established a productive infection. Permissive neuroepithelioma cells expressed CD81, scavenger receptor BI (SR-BI), and the tight junction proteins Claudin-1 (CLDN1) and occludin, whereas non-permissive neural cell lines lacked CLDN1 and in some cases SR-BI. HCVpp infection of the neuroepithelioma cells was neutralized by antibodies to CD81, SR-BI, CLDN1 and HCV E2. Furthermore, anti-CD81, interferon and the anti-NS3 protease inhibitor VX-950 significantly reduced HCVcc infection of neuroepithelioma and hepatoma cells. Conclusions Neuroepithelioma-derived cell lines express functional receptors that support HCV entry at comparable levels to that of hepatoma cells. HCV infection in vitro is not restricted to hepatic-derived cells, so HCV might infect cells of the CNS in vivo. PMID:20538002

  2. Activation of the Murine Sarcoma Virus Genome After Infection with the Murine Leukemia Virus as Determined by Cell Agglutination

    PubMed Central

    Salzberg, Samuel; Green, Maurice

    1974-01-01

    Non-virus-producing NIH/3T3 cells transformed by the murine sarcoma virus are agglutinated by conconavalin A to the same low level as normal NIH/3T3 cells. Infection with the murine leukemia virus greatly increases the agglutination of transformed cells but not that of normal cells. These data suggest that the morphological expression of cell transformation and the surface alterations associated with increased cell agglutination are controlled by the expressions of different sarcoma virus genes. PMID:4363245

  3. Seroepidemiology of infection with hepatitis A and B viruses in an isolated Pacific population.

    PubMed

    Gust, I D; Lehmann, N I; Dimitrakakis, M; Zimmet, P

    1979-05-01

    To determine the prevalence of infection with hepatitis A virus and hepatitis B virus in an isolated population, samples of serum were collected from 574 healthy subjects living on the remote Pacific Island of Funafuti. Each specimen was tested for antibody to hepatitis A virus, hepatitis B surface antigen, and antibody to hepatitis B surface antigen by solid-phase radioimmunoassay. Overall, 79.8% of the population showed evidence of previous infection with hepatitis A virus, and 72.5% with hepatitis B virus; the high prevalence of antibody to both viruses in young adults suggested that the majority of infections were acquired in the first decade of life. Although it is known that hepatitis B virus maintains itself in isolated populations through a reservoir of chronic carriers, the reason for the persistently high rate of infection with hepatitis A virus is unknown. PMID:438552

  4. Antigen-specific B-cell receptor sensitizes B cells to infection by influenza virus

    E-print Network

    Dougan, Stephanie K.

    Influenza A virus-specific B lymphocytes and the antibodies they produce protect against infection. However, the outcome of interactions between an influenza haemagglutinin-specific B cell via its receptor (BCR) and virus ...

  5. Platforms for exploring host-pathogen interactions in hepatitis C virus infection

    E-print Network

    Trehan, Kartik

    2012-01-01

    Afflicting almost 200 million worldwide, hepatitis C virus (HCV) mounts a chronic infection of liver hepatocytes that causes substantial morbidity and mortality. An understanding of host-virus interactions will drive the ...

  6. Host Immune Status and Response to Hepatitis E Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Krain, Lisa J.; Nelson, Kenrad E.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Hepatitis E virus (HEV), identified over 30 years ago, remains a serious threat to life, health, and productivity in developing countries where access to clean water is limited. Recognition that HEV also circulates as a zoonotic and food-borne pathogen in developed countries is more recent. Even without treatment, most cases of HEV-related acute viral hepatitis (with or without jaundice) resolve within 1 to 2 months. However, HEV sometimes leads to acute liver failure, chronic infection, or extrahepatic symptoms. The mechanisms of pathogenesis appear to be substantially immune mediated. This review covers the epidemiology of HEV infection worldwide, the humoral and cellular immune responses to HEV, and the persistence and protection of antibodies produced in response to both natural infection and vaccines. We focus on the contributions of altered immune states (associated with pregnancy, human immunodeficiency virus [HIV], and immunosuppressive agents used in cancer and transplant medicine) to the elevated risks of chronic infection (in immunosuppressed/immunocompromised patients) and acute liver failure and mortality (among pregnant women). We conclude by discussing outstanding questions about the immune response to HEV and interactions with hormones and comorbid conditions. These questions take on heightened importance now that a vaccine is available. PMID:24396140

  7. Autochthonous Dobrava-Belgrade virus infection in Eastern Germany.

    PubMed

    Rasche, Franz Maximilian; Schmidt, Sabrina; Kretzschmar, Christian; Mertens, Marc; Thiel, Jörg; Groschup, Martin H; Schlegel, Mathias; Mayer, Christof; Lindner, Tom H; Schiekofer, Stephan; Ulrich, Rainer G

    2015-02-01

    A 21-year-old male patient from Borna, Saxony, in Eastern Germany, suffered from acute kidney injury (AKI) and symptoms typical for a hantavirus infection. These symptoms included nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, diarrhea, and acute renal failure. Serological investigations by indirect IgM and IgG in-house ELISAs, commercial immunofluorescence and line assays, as well as chemiluminescence focus reduction neutralization assay confirmed an acute Dobrava-Belgrade virus (DOBV) infection of the patient. Serological and RT-PCR analyses of striped field mouse (Apodemus agrarius) trapped in a neighboring region of the residence of the patient identified an infection by DOBV, genotype Kurkino. This is the first report of an autochthonous DOBV infection in a German patient living far from the known endemic region in the north of the country. This finding has implications for the awareness of physicians in areas which are not recognized as hantavirus endemic regions but where the reservoir host of the virus is present. PMID:24495905

  8. Diagnostic strategy for occult hepatitis B virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Ocana, Sara; Casas, Maria Luisa; Buhigas, Ingrid; Lledo, Jose Luis

    2011-01-01

    In 2008, the European Association for the study of the liver (EASL) defined occult hepatitis B virus infection (OBI) as the “presence of hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA in the liver (with detectable or undetectable HBV DNA in the serum) of individuals testing hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) negative by currently available assays”. Several aspects of occult HBV infection are still poorly understood, including the definition itself and a standardized approach for laboratory-based detection, which is the purpose of this review. The clinical significance of OBI has not yet been established; however, in terms of public health, the clinical importance arises from the risk of HBV transmission. Consequently, it is important to detect high-risk groups for occult HBV infection to prevent transmission. The main issue is, perhaps, to identify the target population for screening OBI. Viremia is very low or undetectable in occult HBV infection, even when the most sensitive methods are used, and the detection of the viral DNA reservoir in hepatocytes would provide the best evaluation of occult HBV prevalence in a defined set of patients. However, this diagnostic approach is obviously unsuitable: blood detection of occult hepatitis B requires assays of the highest sensitivity and specificity with a lower limit of detection < 10 IU/mL for HBV DNA and < 0.1 ng/mL for HBsAg. PMID:21472120

  9. Sharka: how do plants respond to Plum pox virus infection?

    PubMed

    Clemente-Moreno, María J; Hernández, José A; Diaz-Vivancos, Pedro

    2015-01-01

    Plum pox virus (PPV), the causal agent of sharka disease, is one of the most studied plant viruses, and major advances in detection techniques, genome characterization and organization, gene expression, transmission, and the description of candidate genes involved in PPV resistance have been described. However, information concerning the plant response to PPV infection is very scarce. In this review, we provide an updated summary of the research carried out to date in order to elucidate how plants cope with PPV infection and their response at different levels, including the physiological, biochemical, proteomic, and genetic levels. Knowledge about how plants respond to PPV infection can contribute to the development of new strategies to cope with this disease. Due to the fact that PPV induces an oxidative stress in plants, the bio-fortification of the antioxidative defences, by classical or biotechnological approaches, would be a useful tool to cope with PPV infection. Nevertheless, there are still some gaps in knowledge related to PPV-plant interaction that remain to be filled, such as the effect of PPV on the hormonal profile of the plant or on the plant metabolome. PMID:25336685

  10. Chronic, relapsing encephalomyelitis associated with experimental measles virus infection.

    PubMed

    Carrigan, D R

    1987-03-01

    An experimental central nervous system (CNS) disease that bears some similarity to human multiple sclerosis and that is associated with infection by measles virus has been induced in hamsters. This disease has been described previously (Carrigan and Johnson: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 77:4297-4300, 1980). At that time, it was believed that the disease was restricted to the spinal cords of affected animals. The present work demonstrates that the disease can also affect the brain, describes in more complete detail the types of clinical disease that occur, illustrates the histopathological changes found in diseased CNS tissues, and documents more accurately the incidence of the disease in the virally infected animals. In summary, the disease, which has now been termed chronic, relapsing encephalomyelitis (CRE) is associated with neonatal CNS infection of hamsters with a particular strain of measles virus. CRE occurs in approximately 12% of animals that survive the acute viral infection, and of these affected animals about half develop detectable clinical signs of neurological disease. The balance of the animals have subclinical disease detectable only by histopathologic changes within the CNS. These lesions are composed of varying degrees of demyelination, necrosis, mononuclear cell inflammation, and gliosis. PMID:3559527

  11. Hepatitis C virus infection of cholangiocarcinoma cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Fletcher, Nicola F.; Humphreys, Elizabeth; Jennings, Elliott; Osburn, William; Lissauer, Samantha; Wilson, Garrick K.; van IJzendoorn, Sven C. D.; Baumert, Thomas F.; Balfe, Peter; Afford, Simon

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infects the liver and hepatocytes are the major cell type supporting viral replication. Hepatocytes and cholangiocytes derive from a common hepatic progenitor cell that proliferates during inflammatory conditions, raising the possibility that cholangiocytes may support HCV replication and contribute to the hepatic reservoir. We screened cholangiocytes along with a panel of cholangiocarcinoma-derived cell lines for their ability to support HCV entry and replication. While primary cholangiocytes were refractory to infection and lacked expression of several entry factors, two cholangiocarcinoma lines, CC-LP-1 and Sk-ChA-1, supported efficient HCV entry; furthermore, Sk-ChA-1 cells supported full virus replication. In vivo cholangiocarcinomas expressed all of the essential HCV entry factors; however, cholangiocytes adjacent to the tumour and in normal tissue showed a similar pattern of receptor expression to ex vivo isolated cholangiocytes, lacking SR-BI expression, explaining their inability to support infection. This study provides the first report that HCV can infect cholangiocarcinoma cells and suggests that these heterogeneous tumours may provide a reservoir for HCV replication in vivo. PMID:25701818

  12. Proteomic Analysis of HepaRG Cells: A Novel Cell Line That Supports Hepatitis B Virus Infection

    E-print Network

    Proteomic Analysis of HepaRG Cells: A Novel Cell Line That Supports Hepatitis B Virus Infection, the only cell line that is susceptible to hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection and supports a complete virus cellular response to HBV infection. Keywords: Hepatitis B virus · HepaRG cell line · Two dimensional

  13. Chicken anaemia virus infection: molecular basis of pathogenicity.

    PubMed

    Noteborn, M H; Koch, G

    1995-03-01

    Chicken anaemia virus (CAV) is a small virus of a unique type with a particle diameter of 23 to 25 nm and a genome consisting of a circular single-stranded (minus-strand) DNA. This DNA multiplies in infected cells via a circular double-stranded replicative intermediate, which was recently cloned. DNA analysis of CAV strains isolated in different continents revealed only minor differences among the various isolates. Apparently, all CAV isolates belong to a single serotype. CAV is not related to other known animal single-stranded circular-DNA viruses, such as porcine circovirus and psittacine beak-and-feather-disease virus. The major transcript from the CAV genome is an unspliced polycistronic mRNA of about 2100 nucleotides encoding three proteins of 51.6 kDa (VP1), 24.0 kDa (VP2) and 13.6 kDa (VP3 or apoptin). All three predicted CAV proteins are synthesized in CAV-infected cells. Immunization with (recombinant) VP1 and VP2 synchronously synthesized in the same cells elicits a protective response and can be used as subunit vaccine against chicken infectious anaemia. CAV causes clinical and subclinical disease in chickens, and is recognized as an important avian pathogen worldwide. In young chickens, CAV causes a transient severe anaemia due to destruction of erythroblastoid cells in the bone marrow and immunodeficiency due to depletion of cortical thymocytes. The depletion of the cortical thymocytes is considered to cause a (transient) immunodeficiency resulting in enhanced concurrent infections and to vaccination failures. The depletion of thymocytes and most likely also of erythroblastoid cells occurs via CAV-induced apoptosis. The CAV-encoded protein apoptin is the main inducer of this phenomenon. PMID:18645763

  14. Crystal structure of a nematode-infecting virus.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yusong R; Hryc, Corey F; Jakana, Joanita; Jiang, Hongbing; Wang, David; Chiu, Wah; Zhong, Weiwei; Tao, Yizhi J

    2014-09-01

    Orsay, the first virus discovered to naturally infect Caenorhabditis elegans or any nematode, has a bipartite, positive-sense RNA genome. Sequence analyses show that Orsay is related to nodaviruses, but molecular characterizations of Orsay reveal several unique features, such as the expression of a capsid-? fusion protein and the use of an ATG-independent mechanism for translation initiation. Here we report the crystal structure of an Orsay virus-like particle assembled from recombinant capsid protein (CP). Orsay capsid has a T = 3 icosahedral symmetry with 60 trimeric surface spikes. Each CP can be divided into three regions: an N-terminal arm that forms an extended protein interaction network at the capsid interior, an S domain with a jelly-roll, ?-barrel fold forming the continuous capsid, and a P domain that forms surface spike projections. The structure of the Orsay S domain is best aligned to T = 3 plant RNA viruses but exhibits substantial differences compared with the insect-infecting alphanodaviruses, which also lack the P domain in their CPs. The Orsay P domain is remotely related to the P1 domain in calicivirus and hepatitis E virus, suggesting a possible evolutionary relationship. Removing the N-terminal arm produced a slightly expanded capsid with fewer nucleic acids packaged, suggesting that the arm is important for capsid stability and genome packaging. Because C. elegans-Orsay serves as a highly tractable model for studying viral pathogenesis, our results should provide a valuable structural framework for further studies of Orsay replication and infection. PMID:25136116

  15. Detection of Norwalk virus or Norwalk-like virus infections in Finnish infants and young children.

    PubMed

    Lew, J F; Valdesuso, J; Vesikari, T; Kapikian, A Z; Jiang, X; Estes, M K; Green, K Y

    1994-06-01

    Norwalk virus (NV) and Norwalk-like viruses are important causes of epidemic nonbacterial gastroenteritis in older children and adults. Serologic responses to NV of 154 Finnish infants and young children participating in a rotavirus vaccine study were examined by ELISA with a recently available baculovirus-expressed recombinant NV capsid protein. In 4 serially collected sera (at the median ages of 3, 4, 14, and 23 months), 49% of children had at least one NV infection over the approximately 2-year study period. Children with low NV-specific IgG titers (< 1:50) at the median age of 4 or 14 months were significantly more likely to acquire an NV infection by the median age of 14 or 23 months, respectively, than children who had higher NV IgG titers (> 1:50) (P < .05). Thus, NV or Norwalk-like virus infections are more common in infants and young children than previously believed, and antibody to NV may be protective against such infections. PMID:8195618

  16. Transient immunodeficiency during asymptomatic Epstein-Barr virus infection.

    PubMed

    Bowen, T J; Wedgwood, R J; Ochs, H D; Henle, W

    1983-06-01

    In vivo and in vitro humoral and cellular immune responses were studied in a 2 1/2-year-old girl immediately before, during, and after an asymptomatic infection with Epstein-Barr virus. During the acute EBV infection, the patient's peripheral blood mononuclear cells were deficient in immunoglobulin synthesis and suppressed the in vitro immunoglobulin synthesis of normal allogeneic cells. In vitro mitogen transformation of lymphocytes was reduced. In vivo antibody responses to the T cell-dependent antigens bacteriophage phi X 174 and Keyhole limpet hemocyanin were markedly depressed. These studies suggest that suppressor cells induced during acute EBV infection not only suppress immunoglobulin synthesis in vitro, but also interfere with in vivo antibody synthesis. PMID:6304613

  17. Molecular evidence of simian virus 40 infections in children

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butel, J. S.; Arrington, A. S.; Wong, C.; Lednicky, J. A.; Finegold, M. J.

    1999-01-01

    Recent studies have detected simian virus 40 (SV40) DNA in certain human tumors and normal tissues. The significance of human infections by SV40, which was first discovered as a contaminant of poliovirus vaccines used between 1955 and 1963, remains unknown. The occurrence of SV40 infections in unselected hospitalized children was evaluated. Polymerase chain reaction and DNA sequence analyses were done on archival tissue specimens from patients positive for SV40 neutralizing antibody. SV40 DNA was identified in samples from 4 of 20 children (1 Wilms' tumor, 3 transplanted kidney samples). Sequence variation among SV40 regulatory regions ruled out laboratory contamination of specimens. This study shows the presence of SV40 infections in pediatric patients born after 1982.

  18. Experimental Infections of Wild Birds with West Nile Virus

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Ramírez, Elisa; Llorente, Francisco; Jiménez-Clavero, Miguel Ángel

    2014-01-01

    Avian models of West Nile virus (WNV) disease have become pivotal in the study of infection pathogenesis and transmission, despite the intrinsic constraints that represents this type of experimental research that needs to be conducted in biosecurity level 3 (BSL3) facilities. This review summarizes the main achievements of WNV experimental research carried out in wild birds, highlighting advantages and limitations of this model. Viral and host factors that determine the infection outcome are analyzed in detail, as well as recent discoveries about avian immunity, viral transmission, and persistence achieved through experimental research. Studies of laboratory infections in the natural host will help to understand variations in susceptibility and reservoir competence among bird species, as well as in the epidemiological patterns found in different affected areas. PMID:24531334

  19. Animal-associated opportunistic infections among persons infected with the human immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed

    Glaser, C A; Angulo, F J; Rooney, J A

    1994-01-01

    A number of animal-associated infections occur in persons infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), including those due to Toxoplasma gondii, Cryptosporidium, Microsporida, Salmonella, Campylo-bacter, Giardia, Rhodococcus equi, Rochalimaea, and Listeria monocytogenes. Most of these infections, with the exception of those due to Rochalimaea, appear to be acquired by the immunosuppressed individual from sources other than exposure to animals. Drs. Glaser and colleagues review our current understanding of the role of exposure to animals, especially pets, in the natural history of these opportunistic infections. They suggest that the risk of zoonotic transmission is small and offer practical suggestions designed to reduce this low risk. They conclude that the benefits of animal companionship outweigh the risks to patients and that prohibition of pet ownership by individuals infected with HIV is not warranted. PMID:8054433

  20. Mouse models of dengue virus infection for vaccine testing.

    PubMed

    Sarathy, Vanessa V; Milligan, Gregg N; Bourne, Nigel; Barrett, Alan D T

    2015-12-10

    Dengue is a mosquito-borne disease caused by four serologically and genetically related viruses termed DENV-1 to DENV-4. With an annual global burden of approximately 390 million infections occurring in the tropics and subtropics worldwide, an effective vaccine to combat dengue is urgently needed. Historically, a major impediment to dengue research has been development of a suitable small animal infection model that mimics the features of human illness in the absence of neurologic disease that was the hallmark of earlier mouse models. Recent advances in immunocompromised murine infection models have resulted in development of lethal DENV-2, DENV-3 and DENV-4 models in AG129 mice that are deficient in both the interferon-?/? receptor (IFN-?/? R) and the interferon-? receptor (IFN-?R). These models mimic many hallmark features of dengue disease in humans, such as viremia, thrombocytopenia, vascular leakage, and cytokine storm. Importantly AG129 mice develop lethal, acute, disseminated infection with systemic viral loads, which is characteristic of typical dengue illness. Infected AG129 mice generate an antibody response to DENV, and antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE) models have been established by both passive and maternal transfer of DENV-immune sera. Several steps have been taken to refine DENV mouse models. Viruses generated by peripheral in vivo passages incur substitutions that provide a virulent phenotype using smaller inocula. Because IFN signaling has a major role in immunity to DENV, mice that generate a cellular immune response are desired, but striking the balance between susceptibility to DENV and intact immunity is complicated. Great strides have been made using single-deficient IFN-?/?R mice for DENV-2 infection, and conditional knockdowns may offer additional approaches to provide a panoramic view that includes viral virulence and host immunity. Ultimately, the DENV AG129 mouse models result in reproducible lethality and offer multiple disease parameters to evaluate protection by candidate vaccines. PMID:26478201

  1. Activation Mechanisms of Natural Killer Cells during Influenza Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Ilwoong; Scott, Jeannine M.; Kakarla, Tejaswi; Duriancik, David M.; Choi, Seohyun; Cho, Chunghwan; Lee, Taehyung; Park, Hyojin; French, Anthony R.; Beli, Eleni; Gardner, Elizabeth; Kim, Sungjin

    2012-01-01

    During early viral infection, activation of natural killer (NK) cells elicits the effector functions of target cell lysis and cytokine production. However, the cellular and molecular mechanisms leading to NK cell activation during viral infections are incompletely understood. In this study, using a model of acute viral infection, we investigated the mechanisms controlling cytotoxic activity and cytokine production in response to influenza (flu) virus. Analysis of cytokine receptor deficient mice demonstrated that type I interferons (IFNs), but not IL-12 or IL-18, were critical for the NK cell expression of both IFN-? and granzyme B in response to flu infection. Further, adoptive transfer experiments revealed that NK cell activation was mediated by type I IFNs acting directly on NK cells. Analysis of signal transduction molecules showed that during flu infection, STAT1 activation in NK cells was completely dependent on direct type I IFN signaling, whereas STAT4 activation was only partially dependent. In addition, granzyme B induction in NK cells was mediated by signaling primarily through STAT1, but not STAT4, while IFN-? production was mediated by signaling through STAT4, but not STAT1. Therefore, our findings demonstrate the importance of direct action of type I IFNs on NK cells to mount effective NK cell responses in the context of flu infection and delineate NK cell signaling pathways responsible for controlling cytotoxic activity and cytokine production. PMID:23300570

  2. Inhibition of lytic infection of pseudorabies virus by arginine depletion

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, H.-C.; Kao, Y.-C.; Chang, T-J.; Wong, M.-L. . E-mail: mlwong@dragon.nchu.edu.tw

    2005-08-26

    Pseudorabies virus (PRV) is a member of Alphahepesviruses; it is an enveloped virus with a double-stranded DNA genome. Polyamines (such as spermine and spermidine) are ubiquitous in animal cells and participate in cellular proliferation and differentiation. Previous results of our laboratory showed that the PRV can accomplish lytic infection either in the presence of exogenous spermine (or spermidine) or depletion of cellular polyamines. The amino acid arginine is a precursor of polyamine biosynthesis. In this work, we investigated the role of arginine in PRV infection. It was found that the plaque formation of PRV was inhibited by arginase (enzyme catalyzing the conversion of arginine into ornithine and urea) treatment whereas this inhibition can be reversed by exogenous arginine, suggesting that arginine is essential for PRV proliferation. Western blotting was conducted to study the effect of arginine depletion on the levels of structural proteins of PRV in virus-infected cells. Four PRV structural proteins (gB, gE, UL47, and UL48) were chosen for examination, and results revealed that the levels of viral proteins were obviously reduced in long time arginase treatment. However, the overall protein synthesis machinery was apparently not influenced by arginase treatment either in mock or PRV-infected cells. Analyzing with native gel, we found that arginase treatment affected the mobility of PRV structural proteins, suggesting the conformational change of viral proteins by arginine depletion. Heat shock proteins, acting as molecular chaperons, participate in protein folding and translocation. Our results demonstrated that long time arginase treatment could reduce the expression of cellular heat shock proteins 70 (hsc70 and hsp70), and transcriptional suppression of heat shock protein 70 gene promoter was one of the mechanisms involved in this reduced expression.

  3. A herpes-like virus infects a non-ostreid bivalve species: virus replication in Ruditapes philippinarum larvae.

    PubMed

    Renault, T; Lipart, C; Arzul, I

    2001-05-01

    Sporadic high mortalities were reported in June 1997 among hatchery-reared larval Manila clam Ruditapes philippinarum in a French commercial hatchery. Cellular abnormalities were observed in semi-thin sections in affected animals. Transmission electron microscopy revealed the presence of herpes-like virus particles in larvae. This is the first description of a herpes-like virus infection in larval R. philippinarum, a non-ostreid bivalve species. Virus particles were similar to other herpes-like viruses described from different oyster species with respect to ultrastructure and morphogenesis. Electron microscopic examination also demonstrated cells with condensed chromatin and extensive perinuclear fragmentation of chromatin. Like viruses infecting oysters, the herpes-like virus detected in clams may induce apoptosis in infected animals. PMID:11411639

  4. Virus interference between H7N2 low pathogenic avian influenza virus and lentogenic Newcastle disease virus in experimental co-infections in chickens and turkeys

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Avian influenza virus (AIV) and Newcastle disease virus (NDV) are two of the most important viruses affecting poultry worldwide. Exposure to lentogenic NDV, either from live vaccines or field strains, is nearly unavoidable for poultry, and co-infections with low pathogenic (LP) AIV are expected to ...

  5. Within-Host Spatiotemporal Dynamics of Plant Virus Infection at the Cellular Level

    PubMed Central

    Lafforgue, Guillaume; Elena, Santiago F.

    2014-01-01

    A multicellular organism is not a monolayer of cells in a flask; it is a complex, spatially structured environment, offering both challenges and opportunities for viruses to thrive. Whereas virus infection dynamics at the host and within-cell levels have been documented, the intermediate between-cell level remains poorly understood. Here, we used flow cytometry to measure the infection status of thousands of individual cells in virus-infected plants. This approach allowed us to determine accurately the number of cells infected by two virus variants in the same host, over space and time as the virus colonizes the host. We found a low overall frequency of cellular infection (<0.3), and few cells were coinfected by both virus variants (<0.1). We then estimated the cellular contagion rate (R), the number of secondary infections per infected cell per day. R ranged from 2.43 to values not significantly different from zero, and generally decreased over time. Estimates of the cellular multiplicity of infection (MOI), the number of virions infecting a cell, were low (<1.5). Variance of virus-genotype frequencies increased strongly from leaf to cell levels, in agreement with a low MOI. Finally, there were leaf-dependent differences in the ease with which a leaf could be colonized, and the number of virions effectively colonizing a leaf. The modeling of infection patterns suggests that the aggregation of virus-infected cells plays a key role in limiting spread; matching the observation that cell-to-cell movement of plant viruses can result in patches of infection. Our results show that virus expansion at the between-cell level is restricted, probably due to the host environment and virus infection itself. PMID:24586207

  6. Clinical and molecular aspects of varicella zoster virus infection.

    PubMed

    Gilden, Don; Nagel, Maria A; Mahalingam, Ravi; Mueller, Niklaus H; Brazeau, Elizabeth A; Pugazhenthi, Subbiah; Cohrs, Randall J

    2009-01-01

    A declining cell-mediated immunity to varicella zoster virus (VZV) with advancing age or immunosuppression results in virus reactivation from latently infected human ganglia anywhere along the neuraxis. Virus reactivation produces zoster, often followed by chronic pain (postherpetic neuralgia or PHN) as well as vasculopathy, myelopathy, retinal necrosis and cerebellitis. VZV reactivation also produces pain without rash (zoster sine herpete). Vaccination after age 60 reduces the incidence of shingles by 51%, PHN by 66% and the burden of illness by 61%. However, even if every healthy adult over age 60 years is vaccinated, there would still be about 500,000 zoster cases annually in the United States alone, about 200,000 of whom will experience PHN. Analyses of viral nucleic acid and gene expression in latently infected human ganglia and in an animal model of varicella latency in primates are serving to determine the mechanism(s) of VZV reactivation with the aim of preventing reactivation and the clinical sequelae. PMID:19946620

  7. Clinical and molecular aspects of varicella zoster virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Gilden, Don; Nagel, Maria A.; Mahalingam, Ravi; Mueller, Niklaus H.; Brazeau, Elizabeth A.; Pugazhenthi, Subbiah; Cohrs, Randall J.

    2009-01-01

    Summary A declining cell-mediated immunity to varicella zoster virus (VZV) with advancing age or immunosuppression results in virus reactivation from latently infected human ganglia anywhere along the neuraxis. Virus reactivation produces zoster, often followed by chronic pain (postherpetic neuralgia or PHN) as well as vasculopathy, myelopathy, retinal necrosis and cerebellitis. VZV reactivation also produces pain without rash (zoster sine herpete). Vaccination after age 60 reduces the incidence of shingles by 51%, PHN by 66% and the burden of illness by 61%. However, even if every healthy adult over age 60 years is vaccinated, there would still be about 500,000 zoster cases annually in the United States alone, about 200,000 of whom will experience PHN. Analyses of viral nucleic acid and gene expression in latently infected human ganglia and in an animal model of varicella latency in primates are serving to determine the mechanism(s) of VZV reactivation with the aim of preventing reactivation and the clinical sequelae. PMID:19946620

  8. Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza Virus (H5N1) Infection in Red Foxes Fed Infected Bird Carcasses

    PubMed Central

    Reperant, Leslie A.; van Amerongen, Geert; van de Bildt, Marco W.G.; Rimmelzwaan, Guus F.; Dobson, Andrew P.; Osterhaus, Albert D.M.E.

    2008-01-01

    Eating infected wild birds may put wild carnivores at high risk for infection with highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) virus (H5N1). To determine whether red foxes (Vulpes vulpes) are susceptible to infection with HPAI virus (H5N1), we infected 3 foxes intratracheally. They excreted virus pharyngeally for 3–7 days at peak titers of 103.5–105.2 median tissue culture infective dose (TCID50) per mL and had severe pneumonia, myocarditis, and encephalitis. To determine whether foxes can become infected by the presumed natural route, we fed infected bird carcasses to 3 other red foxes. These foxes excreted virus pharyngeally for 3–5 days at peak titers of 104.2–104.5 TCID50/mL, but only mild or no pneumonia developed. This study demonstrates that red foxes fed bird carcasses infected with HPAI virus (H5N1) can excrete virus while remaining free of severe disease, thereby potentially playing a role in virus dispersal. PMID:19046504

  9. Ascorbic acid inhibits replication and infectivity of avian RNA tumor virus

    SciTech Connect

    BISSELL, MINA J; HATIE, CARROLL; FARSON, DEBORAH A.; SCHWARZ, RICHARD I.; SOO, WHAI-JEN

    1980-04-01

    Ascorbic acid, at nontoxic concentrations, causes a substantial reduction in the ability of avian tumor viruses to replicate in both primary avian tendon cells and chicken embryo fibroblasts. The virus-infected cultures appear to be less transformed in the presence of ascorbic acid by the criteria of morphology, reduced glucose uptake, and increased collagen synthesis. The vitamin does not act by altering the susceptibility of the cells to initial infection and transformation, but instead appears to interfere with the spread of infection through a reduction in virus replication and virus infectivity. The effect is reversible and requires the continuous presence of the vitamin in the culture medium.

  10. Immune Protection against Virus Challenge in Aging Mice Is Not Affected by Latent Herpesviral Infections.

    PubMed

    Marandu, Thomas F; Oduro, Jennifer D; Borkner, Lisa; Dekhtiarenko, Iryna; Uhrlaub, Jennifer L; Drabig, Anja; Kröger, Andrea; Nikolich-Zugich, Janko; Cicin-Sain, Luka

    2015-11-15

    Latent herpesvirus infections alter immune homeostasis. To understand if this results in aging-related loss of immune protection against emerging infections, we challenged old mice carrying latent mouse cytomegalovirus (CMV), herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1), and/or murine gammaherpesvirus 68 (MHV-68) with influenza virus, West Nile virus (WNV), or vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV). We observed no increase in mortality or weight loss compared to results seen with herpesvirus-negative counterparts and a relative but not absolute reduction in CD8 responses to acute infections. Therefore, the presence of herpesviruses does not appear to increase susceptibility to emerging infections in aging patients. PMID:26339051

  11. Establishment of a new cell line from the heart of giant grouper, Epinephelus lanceolatus (Bloch), and its application in toxicology and virus susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Guo, C Y; Huang, Y H; Wei, S N; Ouyang, Z L; Yan, Y; Huang, X H; Qin, Q W

    2015-02-01

    A new marine fish cell line, derived from the heart of giant grouper, Epinephelus lanceolatus (Bloch), was established and characterized. The cell line was designated as ELGH and subcultured with more than 60 passages. The ELGH cells were mainly composed of fibroblast-like cells and multiplied well in Leibovitz's L-15 medium supplemented with 10% foetal bovine serum (FBS) at 28 °C. Chromosome analysis indicated that the modal chromosome number was 48. The fluorescent signals were detected in ELGH when transfected with green fluorescent protein reporter plasmids. The 50% cytotoxic concentration (CC50 ) of the extracellular products (ECPs) from Streptococcus iniae and Vibrio alginolyticus E333 on ELGH cells was 60.02 and 12.49 ?g mL(-1), respectively. Moreover, the ELGH cells showed susceptibility to Singapore grouper iridovirus (SGIV), but not to soft-shelled turtle iridovirus (STIV), red-spotted grouper nervous necrosis virus (RGNNV) and spring viremia of carp virus (SVCV), which was demonstrated by the presence of a severe cytopathic effect (CPE) and increased viral titres. In addition, electron microscopy observation showed that abundant virus particles were present in the infected cells. Taken together, our data above provided the potential utility of ELGH cells for transgenic and genetic manipulation, as well as cytotoxicity testing and virus pathogenesis. PMID:24372271

  12. Additive interactions of unrelated viruses in mixed infections of cowpea (Vigna unguiculata L. Walp)

    PubMed Central

    Nsa, Imade Y.; Kareem, Kehinde T.

    2015-01-01

    This study was carried out to determine the effects of single infections and co-infections of three unrelated viruses on three cowpea cultivars (one commercial cowpea cultivar “White” and 2 IITA lines; IT81D-985 and TVu 76). The plants were inoculated with Cowpea aphid-borne mosaic virus (CABMV), genus Potyvirus, Cowpea mottle virus (CMeV), genus Carmovirus and Southern bean mosaic virus (SBMV), genus Sobemovirus singly and in mixture (double and triple) at 10, 20, and 30 days after planting (DAP). The treated plants were assessed for susceptibility to the viruses, growth, and yield. In all cases of infection, early inoculation resulted in higher disease severity compared with late infection. The virus treated cowpea plants were relatively shorter than buffer inoculated control plants except the IT81D-985 plants that were taller and produced more foliage. Single infections by CABMV, CMeV, and SBMV led to a complete loss of seeds in the three cowpea cultivars at 10 DAP; only cultivar White produced some seeds at 30 DAP. Double and triple virus infections led to a total loss of seeds in all three cowpea cultivars. None of the virus infected IITA lines produced any seeds except IT81D-985 plants co-infected with CABMV and SBMV at 30 DAP with a reduction of 80%. Overall, the commercial cultivar “White” was the least susceptible to the virus treatments and produced the most yield (flowers, pods, and seeds). CABMV was the most aggressive of these viruses and early single inoculations with this virus resulted in the premature death of some of the seedlings. The presence of the Potyvirus, CABMV in the double virus infections did not appear to increase disease severity or yield loss. There was no strong evidence for synergistic interactions between the viruses in the double virus mixtures. PMID:26483824

  13. Additive interactions of unrelated viruses in mixed infections of cowpea (Vigna unguiculata L. Walp).

    PubMed

    Nsa, Imade Y; Kareem, Kehinde T

    2015-01-01

    This study was carried out to determine the effects of single infections and co-infections of three unrelated viruses on three cowpea cultivars (one commercial cowpea cultivar "White" and 2 IITA lines; IT81D-985 and TVu 76). The plants were inoculated with Cowpea aphid-borne mosaic virus (CABMV), genus Potyvirus, Cowpea mottle virus (CMeV), genus Carmovirus and Southern bean mosaic virus (SBMV), genus Sobemovirus singly and in mixture (double and triple) at 10, 20, and 30 days after planting (DAP). The treated plants were assessed for susceptibility to the viruses, growth, and yield. In all cases of infection, early inoculation resulted in higher disease severity compared with late infection. The virus treated cowpea plants were relatively shorter than buffer inoculated control plants except the IT81D-985 plants that were taller and produced more foliage. Single infections by CABMV, CMeV, and SBMV led to a complete loss of seeds in the three cowpea cultivars at 10 DAP; only cultivar White produced some seeds at 30 DAP. Double and triple virus infections led to a total loss of seeds in all three cowpea cultivars. None of the virus infected IITA lines produced any seeds except IT81D-985 plants co-infected with CABMV and SBMV at 30 DAP with a reduction of 80%. Overall, the commercial cultivar "White" was the least susceptible to the virus treatments and produced the most yield (flowers, pods, and seeds). CABMV was the most aggressive of these viruses and early single inoculations with this virus resulted in the premature death of some of the seedlings. The presence of the Potyvirus, CABMV in the double virus infections did not appear to increase disease severity or yield loss. There was no strong evidence for synergistic interactions between the viruses in the double virus mixtures. PMID:26483824

  14. Interference to human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection in the absence of downmodulation of the principal virus receptor, CD4.

    PubMed Central

    Volsky, D J; Simm, M; Shahabuddin, M; Li, G; Chao, W; Potash, M J

    1996-01-01

    It is thought that interference during human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection is established by downmodulation of the principal virus receptor, CD4. Here we present evidence to the contrary. At various times after primary infection, we superinfected T cells in vitro by exposure to a genetically distinct viral clone or to a virus carrying the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase gene. Replication of each virus strain was determined by restriction enzyme analysis of total cellular DNA, by PCR amplification of viral DNA, or by assay of cell extracts for chloramphenicol acetyltransferase activity. We found that efficient viral interference is established within 24 h of infection at a multiplicity of infection of 1. At that time, expression of viral structural proteins was low and infected cells displayed undiminished levels of surface CD4 and were fully susceptible to virus binding and fusion. Superinfection by either cell-free HIV-1 or cocultivation was blocked. Cells resistant to superinfection by HIV-1 remained susceptible to Moloney murine leukemia and vaccinia viruses. No interference was observed 4 h after primary infection or in cells infected with either UV-inactivated HIV-1 or a mutant virus defective in virus-cell fusion activity, indicating that binding of primary virus to CD4 is insufficient to prevent superinfection. The minimum viral requirements for this interference are that HIV-1 must be able to enter cells and synthesize viral DNA; Tat-mediated transcription is dispensable. Our results support the existence of a novel pathway to interference to HIV-1 infection, which we term postentry interference, which blocks superinfection during intracellular phases of the virus life cycle. PMID:8648718

  15. Natural and Experimental Infection of Caenorhabditis Nematodes by Novel Viruses Related to Nodaviruses

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Guang; Nuez, Isabelle; Bélicard, Tony; Jiang, Yanfang; Zhao, Guoyan; Franz, Carl J.; Goldstein, Leonard D.; Sanroman, Mabel; Miska, Eric A.; Wang, David

    2011-01-01

    An ideal model system to study antiviral immunity and host-pathogen co-evolution would combine a genetically tractable small animal with a virus capable of naturally infecting the host organism. The use of C. elegans as a model to define host-viral interactions has been limited by the lack of viruses known to infect nematodes. From wild isolates of C. elegans and C. briggsae with unusual morphological phenotypes in intestinal cells, we identified two novel RNA viruses distantly related to known nodaviruses, one infecting specifically C. elegans (Orsay virus), the other C. briggsae (Santeuil virus). Bleaching of embryos cured infected cultures demonstrating that the viruses are neither stably integrated in the host genome nor transmitted vertically. 0.2 µm filtrates of the infected cultures could infect cured animals. Infected animals continuously maintained viral infection for 6 mo (?50 generations), demonstrating that natural cycles of horizontal virus transmission were faithfully recapitulated in laboratory culture. In addition to infecting the natural C. elegans isolate, Orsay virus readily infected laboratory C. elegans mutants defective in RNAi and yielded higher levels of viral RNA and infection symptoms as compared to infection of the corresponding wild-type N2 strain. These results demonstrated a clear role for RNAi in the defense against this virus. Furthermore, different wild C. elegans isolates displayed differential susceptibility to infection by Orsay virus, thereby affording genetic approaches to defining antiviral loci. This discovery establishes a bona fide viral infection system to explore the natural ecology of nematodes, host-pathogen co-evolution, the evolution of small RNA responses, and innate antiviral mechanisms. PMID:21283608

  16. Heterosubtypic immunity to influenza A virus infections in mallards may explain existence of multiple virus subtypes.

    PubMed

    Latorre-Margalef, Neus; Grosbois, Vladimir; Wahlgren, John; Munster, Vincent J; Tolf, Conny; Fouchier, Ron A M; Osterhaus, Albert D M E; Olsen, Björn; Waldenström, Jonas

    2013-01-01

    Wild birds, particularly duck species, are the main reservoir of influenza A virus (IAV) in nature. However, knowledge of IAV infection dynamics in the wild bird reservoir, and the development of immune responses, are essentially absent. Importantly, a detailed understanding of how subtype diversity is generated and maintained is lacking. To address this, 18,679 samples from 7728 Mallard ducks captured between 2002 and 2009 at a single stopover site in Sweden were screened for IAV infections, and the resulting 1081 virus isolates were analyzed for patterns of immunity. We found support for development of homosubtypic hemagglutinin (HA) immunity during the peak of IAV infections in the fall. Moreover, re-infections with the same HA subtype and related prevalent HA subtypes were uncommon, suggesting the development of natural homosubtypic and heterosubtypic immunity (p-value = 0.02). Heterosubtypic immunity followed phylogenetic relatedness of HA subtypes, both at the level of HA clades (p-value = 0.04) and the level of HA groups (p-value = 0.05). In contrast, infection patterns did not support specific immunity for neuraminidase (NA) subtypes. For the H1 and H3 Clades, heterosubtypic immunity showed a clear temporal pattern and we estimated within-clade immunity to last at least 30 days. The strength and duration of heterosubtypic immunity has important implications for transmission dynamics of IAV in the natural reservoir, where immune escape and disruptive selection may increase HA antigenic variation and explain IAV subtype diversity. PMID:23818849

  17. Virus and Host Factors Affecting the Clinical Outcome of Bluetongue Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Caporale, Marco; Di Gialleonorado, Luigina; Janowicz, Anna; Wilkie, Gavin; Shaw, Andrew; Savini, Giovanni; Van Rijn, Piet A.; Mertens, Peter; Di Ventura, Mauro

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bluetongue is a major infectious disease of ruminants caused by bluetongue virus (BTV), an arbovirus transmitted by Culicoides. Here, we assessed virus and host factors influencing the clinical outcome of BTV infection using a single experimental framework. We investigated how mammalian host species, breed, age, BTV serotypes, and strains within a serotype affect the clinical course of bluetongue. Results obtained indicate that in small ruminants, there is a marked difference in the susceptibility to clinical disease induced by BTV at the host species level but less so at the breed level. No major differences in virulence were found between divergent serotypes (BTV-8 and BTV-2). However, we observed striking differences in virulence between closely related strains of the same serotype collected toward the beginning and the end of the European BTV-8 outbreak. As observed previously, differences in disease severity were also observed when animals were infected with either blood from a BTV-infected animal or from the same virus isolated in cell culture. Interestingly, with the exception of two silent mutations, full viral genome sequencing showed identical consensus sequences of the virus before and after cell culture isolation. However, deep sequencing analysis revealed a marked decrease in the genetic diversity of the viral population after passaging in mammalian cells. In contrast, passaging in Culicoides cells increased the overall number of low-frequency variants compared to virus never passaged in cell culture. Thus, Culicoides might be a source of new viral variants, and viral population diversity can be another factor influencing BTV virulence. IMPORTANCE Bluetongue is one of the major infectious diseases of ruminants. It is caused by an arbovirus known as bluetongue virus (BTV). The clinical outcome of BTV infection is extremely variable. We show that there are clear links between the severity of bluetongue and the mammalian host species infected, while at the breed level differences were less evident. No differences were observed in the virulence of two different BTV serotypes (BTV-8 and BTV-2). In contrast, we show that the European BTV-8 strain isolated at the beginning of the bluetongue outbreak in 2006 was more virulent than a strain isolated toward the end of the outbreak. In addition, we show that there is a link between the variability of the BTV population as a whole and virulence, and our data also suggest that Culicoides cells might function as an “incubator” of viral variants. PMID:24991012

  18. Stability of the gorilla microbiome despite simian immunodeficiency virus infection.

    PubMed

    Moeller, Andrew H; Peeters, Martine; Ayouba, Ahidjo; Ngole, Eitel Mpoudi; Esteban, Amadine; Hahn, Beatrice H; Ochman, Howard

    2015-02-01

    Simian immunodeficiency viruses (SIVs) have been discovered in over 45 primate species; however, the pathogenic potential of most SIV strains remains unknown due to difficulties inherent in observing wild populations. Because those SIV infections that are pathogenic have been shown to induce changes in the host's gut microbiome, monitoring the microbiota present in faecal samples can provide a noninvasive means for studying the effects of SIV infection on the health of wild-living primates. Here, we examine the effects of SIVgor, a close relative of SIVcpz of chimpanzees and HIV-1 of humans, on the gut bacterial communities residing within wild gorillas, revealing that gorilla gut microbiomes are exceptionally robust to SIV infection. In contrast to the microbiomes of HIV-1-infected humans and SIVcpz-infected chimpanzees, SIVgor-infected gorilla microbiomes exhibit neither rises in the frequencies of opportunistic pathogens nor elevated rates of microbial turnover within individual hosts. Regardless of SIV infection status, gorilla microbiomes assort into enterotypes, one of which is compositionally analogous to those identified in humans and chimpanzees. The other gorilla enterotype appears specialized for a leaf-based diet and is enriched in environmentally derived bacterial genera. We hypothesize that the acquisition of this gorilla-specific enterotype was enabled by lowered immune system control over the composition of the microbiome. Our results indicate differences between the pathology of SIVgor and SIVcpz/HIV-1 infections, demonstrating the utility of investigating host microbial ecology as a means for studying disease in wild primates of high conservation priority. PMID:25545295

  19. Cellular Chaperonin CCT? Contributes to Rabies Virus Replication during Infection

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jinyang; Wu, Xiaopeng; Zan, Jie; Wu, Yongping; Ye, Chengjin; Ruan, Xizhen

    2013-01-01

    Rabies, as the oldest known infectious disease, remains a serious threat to public health worldwide. The eukaryotic cytosolic chaperonin TRiC/CCT complex facilitates the folding of proteins through ATP hydrolysis. Here, we investigated the expression, cellular localization, and function of neuronal CCT? during neurotropic rabies virus (RABV) infection using mouse N2a cells as a model. Following RABV infection, 24 altered proteins were identified by using two-dimensional electrophoresis and mass spectrometry, including 20 upregulated proteins and 4 downregulated proteins. In mouse N2a cells infected with RABV or cotransfected with RABV genes encoding nucleoprotein (N) and phosphoprotein (P), confocal microscopy demonstrated that upregulated cellular CCT? was colocalized with viral proteins N and P, which formed a hollow cricoid inclusion within the region around the nucleus. These inclusions, which correspond to Negri bodies (NBs), did not form in mouse N2a cells only expressing the viral protein N or P. Knockdown of CCT? by lentivirus-mediated RNA interference led to significant inhibition of RABV replication. These results demonstrate that the complex consisting of viral proteins N and P recruits CCT? to NBs and identify the chaperonin CCT? as a host factor that facilitates intracellular RABV replication. This work illustrates how viruses can utilize cellular chaperonins and compartmentalization for their own benefit. PMID:23637400

  20. Antibodies Targeting Novel Neutralizing Epitopes of Hepatitis C Virus Glycoprotein Preclude Genotype 2 Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Huiying; Jiang, Dong; Wang, Jianghua; Xie, Xingwang; Wei, Lai

    2015-01-01

    Currently, there is no effective vaccine to prevent hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, partly due to our insufficient understanding of the virus glycoprotein immunology. Most neutralizing antibodies (nAbs) were identified using glycoprotein immunogens, such as recombinant E1E2, HCV pseudoparticles or cell culture derived HCV. However, the fact that in the HCV acute infection phase, only a small proportion of patients are self-resolved accompanied with the emergence of nAbs, indicates the limited immunogenicity of glycoprotein itself to induce effective antibodies against a highly evolved virus. Secondly, in previous reports, the immunogen sequence was mostly the genotype of the 1a H77 strain. Rarely, other genotypes/subtypes have been studied, although theoretically one genotype/subtype immunogen is able to induce cross-genotype neutralizing antibodies. To overcome these drawbacks and find potential novel neutralizing epitopes, 57 overlapping peptides encompassing the full-length glycoprotein E1E2 of subtype 1b were synthesized to immunize BALB/c mice, and the neutralizing reactive of the induced antisera against HCVpp genotypes 1–6 was determined. We defined a domain comprising amino acids (aa) 192–221, 232–251, 262–281 and 292–331 of E1, and 421–543, 564–583, 594–618 and 634–673 of E2, as the neutralizing regions of HCV glycoprotein. Peptides PUHI26 (aa 444–463) and PUHI45 (aa 604–618)-induced antisera displayed the most potent broad neutralizing reactive. Two monoclonal antibodies recognizing the PUHI26 and PUHI45 epitopes efficiently precluded genotype 2 viral (HCVcc JFH and J6 strains) infection, but they did not neutralize other genotypes. Our study mapped a neutralizing epitope region of HCV glycoprotein using a novel immunization strategy, and identified two monoclonal antibodies effective in preventing genotype 2 virus infection. PMID:26406225

  1. Influenza A Virus Infection Kinetics: Quantitative Data and Models

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Amber M.; Perelson, Alan S.

    2011-01-01

    Influenza A virus is an important respiratory pathogen that poses a considerable threat to public health each year during seasonal epidemics and even more so when a pandemic strain emerges. Understanding the mechanisms involved in controlling an influenza infection within a host is important and could result in new and effective treatment strategies. Kinetic models of influenza viral growth and decay can summarize data and evaluate the biological parameters governing interactions between the virus and the host. Here we discuss recent viral kinetic models for influenza. We show how these models have been used to provide insight into influenza pathogenesis and treatment, and we highlight the challenges of viral kinetic analysis, including accurate model formulation, estimation of important parameters, and the collection of detailed data sets that measure multiple variables simultaneously. PMID:21197654

  2. Chikungunya virus infection, a threat to public health.

    PubMed

    Islam, M N; Hossain, M A; Khaleque, M A; Karim, M R; Khan, M R; Mia, A H; Ali, M S

    2012-04-01

    Many countries in the world have reported human infections by chikungunya virus (CHIKV) a mosquito-borne togavirus belonging to the genus alpha virus. After half a century of focal out breaks of acute febrile poly arthralgia, the disease had spread unexpectedly in the past decade with large outbreaks in Africa around the Indian Ocean and in Bangladesh. In Asia, CHIKV is thought to be transmitted by the same mosquito as dengue, Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus. Due to similarities in clinical presentation with dengue, limited awareness and a lack of laboratory diagnostic facilities, CHIKV is probably often under diagnosed or misdiagnosed as dengue. Treatment is supportive. The prognosis is generally good although some patients experience chronic arthritis. There is no vaccine or antiviral therapy against CHIKV. Early identification of disease and control of vector will prevent the spread of disease. PMID:22561790

  3. Susceptibility of bone marrow-derived macrophages to influenza virus infection is dependent on macrophage phenotype.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Gillian M; Nicol, Marlynne Q; Dransfield, Ian; Shaw, Darren J; Nash, Anthony A; Dutia, Bernadette M

    2015-10-01

    The role of the macrophage in influenza virus infection is complex. Macrophages are critical for resolution of influenza virus infections but implicated in morbidity and mortality in severe infections. They can be infected with influenza virus and consequently macrophage infection is likely to have an impact on the host immune response. Macrophages display a range of functional phenotypes, from the prototypical pro-inflammatory classically activated cell to alternatively activated anti-inflammatory macrophages involved in immune regulation and wound healing. We were interested in how macrophages of different phenotype respond to influenza virus infection and therefore studied the infection of bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDMs) of classical and alternative phenotype in vitro. Our results show that alternatively activated macrophages are more readily infected and killed by the virus than classically activated. Classically activated BMDMs express the pro-inflammatory markers inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and TNF-?, and TNF-? expression was further upregulated following infection. Alternatively activated macrophages express Arginase-1 and CD206; however, following infection, expression of these markers was downregulated whilst expression of iNOS and TNF-? was upregulated. Thus, infection can override the anti-inflammatory state of alternatively activated macrophages. Importantly, however, this results in lower levels of pro-inflammatory markers than those produced by classically activated cells. Our results showed that macrophage phenotype affects the inflammatory macrophage response following infection, and indicated that modulating the macrophage phenotype may provide a route to develop novel strategies to prevent and treat influenza virus infection. PMID:26297234

  4. Susceptibility of bone marrow-derived macrophages to influenza virus infection is dependent on macrophage phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Gillian M.; Nicol, Marlynne Q.; Dransfield, Ian; Shaw, Darren J.; Nash, Anthony A.

    2015-01-01

    The role of the macrophage in influenza virus infection is complex. Macrophages are critical for resolution of influenza virus infections but implicated in morbidity and mortality in severe infections. They can be infected with influenza virus and consequently macrophage infection is likely to have an impact on the host immune response. Macrophages display a range of functional phenotypes, from the prototypical pro-inflammatory classically activated cell to alternatively activated anti-inflammatory macrophages involved in immune regulation and wound healing. We were interested in how macrophages of different phenotype respond to influenza virus infection and therefore studied the infection of bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDMs) of classical and alternative phenotype in vitro. Our results show that alternatively activated macrophages are more readily infected and killed by the virus than classically activated. Classically activated BMDMs express the pro-inflammatory markers inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and TNF-?, and TNF-? expression was further upregulated following infection. Alternatively activated macrophages express Arginase-1 and CD206; however, following infection, expression of these markers was downregulated whilst expression of iNOS and TNF-? was upregulated. Thus, infection can override the anti-inflammatory state of alternatively activated macrophages. Importantly, however, this results in lower levels of pro-inflammatory markers than those produced by classically activated cells. Our results showed that macrophage phenotype affects the inflammatory macrophage response following infection, and indicated that modulating the macrophage phenotype may provide a route to develop novel strategies to prevent and treat influenza virus infection. PMID:26297234

  5. Differential tropism in roots and shoots infected by Citrus tristeza virus.

    PubMed

    Harper, S J; Cowell, S J; Robertson, C J; Dawson, W O

    2014-07-01

    Virus tropism is a result of interactions between virus, host and vector species, and determines the fate of an infection. In this study, we examined the infection process of Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) in susceptible and resistant species, and found that the tropism of CTV is not simply phloem limited, but tissue specific. In resistant species, virus infection was not prevented, but mostly restricted to the roots. This phenomenon was also observed after partial replacement of genes of one CTV strain from another, despite both parental strains being capable of systemic infection. Finally, the roots remained susceptible in the absence of viral gene products needed for systemic infection of shoots. Our results suggest that all phloem cells within a plant are not equally susceptible and that changes in host or virus may produce a novel tropism: restriction by the host to a location where further virus spread is prevented. PMID:25010274

  6. What's new in hepatitis C virus infections in children?

    PubMed

    Pawlowska, Malgorzata; Domagalski, Krzysztof; Pniewska, Anna; Smok, Beata; Halota, Waldemar; Tretyn, Andrzej

    2015-10-14

    The number of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection cases is relatively low in children. This low number may be connected with the lack of screening tests and the asymptomatic course of infection. Currently, mother-to-infant transmission is the most common cause of HCV infection amongst children in developed countries. It is important to introduce routine screening tests for HCV in pregnant women. The risk of vertical transmission of HCV is estimated at approximately 5% (3%-10%). Currently, we do not have HCV transmission prevention methods. Some factors could potentially be eliminated by elective caesarean section. Currently, the method of prevention of perinatal HCV infection is the early identification and effective treatment of infections in young women in the preconception period. We describe genetic tests (IL-28B single nucleotide polymorphisms) to identify children with an increased chance of spontaneous clearance or sustained virologic response achievement and vitamin D level as a potential predictor of treatment response in children. It is also important to develop non-invasive tests that can predict liver fibrosis. The existence of differences in the mechanisms leading to liver injury between children and adults creates new perspectives of action to reduce liver disease progression in children in the early years of life. PMID:26478670

  7. Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections in Infants Affected by Primary Immunodeficiency

    PubMed Central

    Capretti, Maria Grazia; Lazzarotto, Tiziana; Faldella, Giacomo

    2014-01-01

    Primary immunodeficiencies are rare inherited disorders that may lead to frequent and often severe acute respiratory infections. Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is one of the most frequent pathogens during early infancy and the infection is more severe in immunocompromised infants than in healthy infants, as a result of impaired T- and B-cell immune response unable to efficaciously neutralize viral replication, with subsequent increased viral shedding and potentially lethal lower respiratory tract infection. Several authors have reported a severe clinical course after RSV infections in infants and children with primary and acquired immunodeficiencies. Environmental prophylaxis is essential in order to reduce the infection during the epidemic season in hospitalized immunocompromised infants. Prophylaxis with palivizumab, a humanized monoclonal antibody against the RSV F protein, is currently recommended in high-risk infants born prematurely, with chronic lung disease or congenital heart disease. Currently however the prophylaxis is not routinely recommended in infants with primary immunodeficiency, although some authors propose the extension of prophylaxis to this high risk population. PMID:25089282

  8. Management of Hepatitis B virus infection during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Vodkin, I; Patton, H

    2014-12-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infects over 2 billion people worldwide, with approximately 360 million chronically infected. It results in substantial morbidity and mortality, with an estimated 600,000 deaths per year. In endemic areas, mother to child transmission (MTCT) is the most important source of new infections, but even in areas with low endemicity, over 1/3 of infections can still be attributed to this route. Although very effective active-passive immunoprophylaxis with hepatitis B immune globulin (HBIG) and HBV vaccine is available, even with full compliance, failure can be seen in highly viremic mothers who are positive for hepatitis B e antigen. Potential means of reducing the risk of MTCT include nucleotide/nucleoside antiviral agents, interferon in very select cases, and mode of delivery. Determining the optimal therapy and its timing, and preventing both obstetric and liver related complications remains a challenge, but is also an important opportunity to reduce chronic hepatitis B infection. In this review, we provide an overview of issues associated with hepatitis B and its treatment during pregnancy, and suggest an algorithm for management. PMID:25275811

  9. Optimal management of hepatitis B virus infection - EASL Special Conference.

    PubMed

    Lampertico, Pietro; Maini, Mala; Papatheodoridis, George

    2015-11-01

    There have been great strides in the management of chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection, but considerable challenges remain. The European Association for the Study of the Liver (EASL) convened a special conference focusing on all clinical aspects of the management of this disease. Immigration patterns are having a huge effect on the incidence, prevalence and genotype predominance of HBV in many European countries. In recent years there has been significant progress in our understanding of the virology and immunopathology of HBV, particularly the identification of the entry receptor for HBV conferring its hepatotropism, sodium taurocholate co-transporting polypeptide, and a better understanding of the regulation of the covalently closed circular DNA form of HBV - the major barrier to cure. However, more fundamental scientific research is needed. Serum biomarkers and transient elastography offer equivalent performance in the grading of disease stage and progression and monitoring of treatment. Occult HBV infection is often overlooked, but has many important implications for e.g., immuno-suppression, liver transplantation and the progression and severity of liver diseases from other causes. Hepatitis B e antigen positive immunotolerant patients, who are a significant source of horizontal and vertical transmission, are at risk for developing active chronic hepatitis B, but current treatment options are ineffective. Pegylated interferon therapy, given for a finite duration, offers sustained off-treatment responses in a minority of patients. Nucleos(t)ide analogues suppress the virus, improve liver histological lesions, reverse cirrhosis in the majority of cases, and improve survival, but 'cure' cannot be achieved. There is also a pressing need for novel HBV/hepatitis D virus co-infection therapies. Novel therapeutic strategies, e.g. immunomodulation, RNA interference and viral entry inhibition have demonstrated promising early results. PMID:26150256

  10. BOVINE VIRAL DIARRHEA VIRUS PERSISTENTLY INFECTED AND ACUTELY INFECTED CALVES: ASSAYS FOR VIRAL INFECTIVITY, POLYMERASE CHAIN REACTION ANALYSIS, AND ANTIGEN DETECTION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There are numerous assays for bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) detecting infectious virus, nucleic material, and antigen. Persistently infected (PI) and acutely/transiently infected calves with BVDV represent two different manifestations. Diagnostic test results impact on differentiation of PI o...

  11. Virus-induced immunosuppression: immune system-mediated destruction of virus-infected dendritic cells results in generalized immune suppression.

    PubMed Central

    Borrow, P; Evans, C F; Oldstone, M B

    1995-01-01

    Despite the clinical importance of virus-induced immunosuppression, how virus infection may lead to a generalized suppression of the host immune response is poorly understood. To elucidate the principles involved, we analyzed the mechanism by which a lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) variant produces a generalized immune suppression in its natural host, the mouse. Whereas adult mice inoculated intravenously with LCMV Armstrong rapidly clear the infection and remain immunocompetent, inoculation with the Armstrong-derived LCMV variant clone 13, which differs from its parent virus at only two amino acid positions, by contrast results in persistent infection and a generalized deficit in responsiveness to subsequent immune challenge. Here we show that the immune suppression induced by LCMV clone 13 is associated with a CD8-dependent loss of interdigitating dendritic cells from periarteriolar lymphoid sheaths in the spleen and, functionally, with a deficit in the ability of splenocytes from infected mice to stimulate the proliferation of naive T cells in a primary mixed lymphocyte reaction. Dendritic cells are not depleted in immunocompetent Armstrong-infected mice. LCMV Armstrong and clone 13 exhibit differences in their tropism within the spleen, with clone 13 causing a higher level of infection of antigen-presenting cells in the white pulp, including periarterial interdigitating dendritic cells, than Armstrong, thereby rendering these cells targets for destruction by the antiviral CD8+ cytotoxic T-lymphocyte response which is induced at early times following infection with either virus. Our findings illustrate the key role that virus tropism may play in determining pathogenicity and, further, document a mechanism for virus-induced immunosuppression which may contribute to the clinically important immune suppression associated with many virus infections, including human immunodeficiency virus type 1. PMID:7815484

  12. Long-term survival of influenza virus infected club cells drives immunopathology

    PubMed Central

    Heaton, Nicholas S.; Langlois, Ryan A.; Sachs, David; Lim, Jean K.

    2014-01-01

    Respiratory infection of influenza A virus (IAV) is frequently characterized by extensive immunopathology and proinflammatory signaling that can persist after virus clearance. In this report, we identify cells that become infected, but survive, acute influenza virus infection. We demonstrate that these cells, known as club cells, elicit a robust transcriptional response to virus infection, show increased interferon stimulation, and induce high levels of proinflammatory cytokines after successful viral clearance. Specific depletion of these surviving cells leads to a reduction in lung tissue damage associated with IAV infection. We propose a model in which infected, surviving club cells establish a proinflammatory environment aimed at controlling virus levels, but at the same time contribute to lung pathology. PMID:25135297

  13. Inactivation of the infectivity of two highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses and a virulent Newcastle disease virus by ultraviolet radiation.

    PubMed

    Sutton, David; Aldous, Elizabeth W; Warren, Caroline J; Fuller, Chad M; Alexander, Dennis J; Brown, Ian H

    2013-12-01

    Exposure of a virulent isolate of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) and two highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) viruses, one of H7N1 subtype and the other H5N1 subtype, to a continuous ultraviolet B flux of approximately 90µW/cm(2), which models solar ultraviolet radiation, resulted in an exponential decline in infectivity with time. The time taken for a reduction in titre of 1 log10 median tissue culture infectious dose for each virus was: NDV, 69 min; H7N1 HPAI virus, 158 min; and H5N1 HPAI, virus 167 min. PMID:24188498

  14. Risk factors for hepatitis C virus infection among street youths

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Élise; Haley, Nancy; Leclerc, Pascale; Boivin, Jean-François; Cédras, Lyne; Vincelette, Jean

    2001-01-01

    Background The relative contributions to risk of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection resulting from unsafe sexual behaviours and exposures to blood (e.g., tattooing, body piercing and injection drug use) among youths at risk are not well known. We interviewed street youths about risk factors for HCV infection and documented their HCV antibody status. Methods From December 1995 to September 1996 we recruited 437 youths aged 14 to 25 years who met specific criteria for itinerancy. Data on sociodemographic characteristics and lifetime risk factors were obtained during a structured interview, and a venous blood sample was taken for HCV antibody testing. Results Many of the subjects reported behaviours that put them at risk for bloodborne diseases: 45.8% had injected drugs, 56.5% had at least 1 tattoo, and 78.3% had body piercing. The overall prevalence of HCV infection was 12.6% (95% confidence interval [CI] 9.7%–15.9%). In a multivariate logistic regression analysis, injecting drugs (adjusted odds ratio [OR] 28.4 [95% CI 6.6–121.4]), being over 18 years of age (adjusted OR 3.3 [95% CI 1.6–7.0]) and using crack cocaine (adjusted OR 2.3 [95% CI 1.0–5.3]) were independent risk factors for HCV infection. Having more than 1 tattoo (adjusted OR 1.8 [95% CI 0.95–3.6]) was marginally associated with HCV infection, and body piercing was not. Interpretation Drug injection was the factor most strongly associated with HCV infection among street youths. Given that injection drug users are the driving force of the HCV infection epidemic in Canada, increased intervention efforts to prevent initiation of drug injection are urgently needed to curb the epidemic. PMID:11563207

  15. Dengue Virus Infection Triggering Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura in Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Deepanjali, Surendran; Naik, Raghuramulu R; Mailankody, Sharada; Kalaimani, Sivamani; Kadhiravan, Tamilarasu

    2015-11-01

    We report a case of thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) that immediately followed symptomatic dengue virus infection in a pregnant lady. The patient developed dengue fever at 16 weeks of gestation, resulting in spontaneous abortion. Subsequently, fever reappeared with persistent thrombocytopenia and jaundice. Investigations revealed microangiopathic hemolysis; there was no evidence of disseminated intravascular coagulation. The TTP episode resolved after six cycles of therapeutic plasma exchange with fresh-frozen plasma. An ADAMTS13 (a disintegrin and metalloprotease with thrombospondin type 1 motif 13 repeats) activity assay, done during convalescence, showed normal activity. The patient had an uneventful second pregnancy and has remained free of TTP recurrence for more than 2 years now. We review the pathophysiological basis of TTP in dengue infection, and suggest that jaundice with disproportionate elevation of serum aspartate aminotransferase level in a patient with dengue should arouse the suspicion of TTP. PMID:26283741

  16. Congenital Chikungunya Virus Infection in Sincelejo, Colombia: A Case Series.

    PubMed

    Villamil-Gómez, Wilmer; Alba-Silvera, Luz; Menco-Ramos, Antonio; Gonzalez-Vergara, Alfonso; Molinares-Palacios, Tatiana; Barrios-Corrales, María; Rodríguez-Morales, Alfonso J

    2015-10-01

    Congenital chikungunya virus (CHIK) infection has been infrequently reported, even more so during the current 2013-15 outbreak in Latin America. In this study, the consequences of CHIK on pregnancy outcomes and particularly consequences in infants born to infected women were assessed in a case series from a single private institution in the north of Colombia. During September 2014 to February 2015, seven pregnant women with serological and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction-positive test for CHIK delivered eight infants with CHIK. These newborns required admission to pediatric intensive care, and related support, owing to severe clinical manifestations, which included respiratory distress, sepsis, necrotizing enterocolitis, meningoencephalitis, myocarditis, edema, bullous dermatitis and pericarditis. There were three deaths (case fatality rate of 37.5%). Pregnant women and newborns with CHIK long term should be followed up, given the implications of chronic sequelae (e.g. chronic inflammatory rheumatism in women) as well as recently described neurocognitive impairment in infants. PMID:26246086

  17. Eosinophilia in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed

    Chou, Andrew; Serpa, Jose A

    2015-09-01

    Eosinophilia is not uncommonly encountered in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), particularly at initiation of care or among those with advanced disease. The clinical manifestation most commonly associated with eosinophilia in this patient population is skin rash. Management of these patients is challenging due to a paucity of data evaluating diagnostic testing and therapeutic strategies. Patients born in or with significant travel to parasite-endemic countries are more likely to have tissue-invasive helminthes, such as Strongyloides or Schistosoma. Patients without such risk factors are unlikely to have parasitic infections and frequently will have self-resolution of eosinophilia. When a detailed history, physical exam, and diagnostic work-up are unrevealing, we sometimes consider empirical therapy with ivermectin. Praziquantel may also be considered for those at risk for schistosomiasis. PMID:26126686

  18. Lichen planus pemphigoides associated with chronic hepatitis B virus infection.

    PubMed

    Jang, S H; Yun, S J; Lee, S C; Lee, J B

    2015-12-01

    Lichen planus pemphigoides (LPP) is a rare autoimmune dermatosis with the features of both lichen planus (LP) and bullous pemphigoid (BP). Although in rare cases, LPP has been associated with several medications and conditions, it is generally considered an idiopathic disorder, and its pathogenesis remains uncertain. We report a 56-year-old woman who presented with a 2-year history of flat-topped, polygonal, violaceous-colored papules and some bullae. She was diagnosed with chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection, which had been treated intermittently with entecavir. Histopathological examination showed the typical features of LP with subepidermal blisters, and with linear deposits of IgG along the basement membrane zone on direct immunofluorescence. Immunoblotting revealed antibodies directed at the BP180 and BP230 antigens. We diagnosed the patient with LPP, and treated the condition with systemic steroids and dapsone. To our knowledge, this is the first report of LPP in a patient with chronic HBV infection. PMID:25546603

  19. La prévention des infections par le virus respiratoire syncytial

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, JL

    2011-01-01

    RÉSUMÉ L’infection par le virus respiratoire syncytial (VRS) est la principale cause d’infections des voies respiratoires inférieures chez les jeunes enfants. Le palivizumab, un anticorps monoclonal anti-VRS, réduit le taux d’hospitalisation des enfants à haut risque mais est très coûteux. Le présent document de principes remplace les trois précédents documents de principes de la Société canadienne de pédiatrie sur le sujet et est mis à jour principalement pour traiter des récentes modifications aux lignes directrices de l’American Academy of Pediatrics dans le contexte canadien. Il contient une analyse des publications ainsi que des recommandations au sujet de l’utilisation du palivizumab chez les enfants à haut risque

  20. Progressive outer retinal necrosis: manifestation of human immunodeficiency virus infection.

    PubMed

    Lo, Phey Feng; Lim, Rongxuan; Antonakis, Serafeim N; Almeida, Goncalo C

    2015-01-01

    We present the case of a 54-year-old man who developed progressive outer retinal necrosis (PORN) as an initial manifestation of HIV infection without any significant risk factors for infection with HIV. PORN is usually found as a manifestation of known AIDS late in the disease. Our patient presented with transient visual loss followed by decrease in visual acuity and facial rash. Subsequent investigation revealed anterior chamber tap positive for varicella zoster virus (VZV), as well as HIV positivity, with an initial CD4 count of 48 cells/µL. Systemic and intravitreal antivirals against VZV, and highly active antiretroviral therapy against HIV were started, which halted further progression of retinal necrosis. This case highlights the importance of suspecting PORN where there is a rapidly progressive retinitis, and also testing the patient for HIV, so appropriate treatment can be started. PMID:25948844

  1. Evidence for endemic chikungunya virus infections in Bandung, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Kosasih, Herman; de Mast, Quirijn; Widjaja, Susana; Sudjana, Primal; Antonjaya, Ungke; Ma'roef, Chairin; Riswari, Silvita Fitri; Porter, Kevin R; Burgess, Timothy H; Alisjahbana, Bachti; van der Ven, Andre; Williams, Maya

    2013-01-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is known to cause sporadic or explosive outbreaks. However, little is known about the endemic transmission of CHIKV. To ascertain the endemic occurrence of CHIKV transmission, we tested blood samples from patients with a non-dengue febrile illness who participated in a prospective cohort study of factory workers in Bandung, Indonesia. From August 2000 to June 2004, and September 2006 to April 2008, 1901 febrile episodes occurred and 231 (12.2%) dengue cases were identified. The remaining febrile cases were evaluated for possible CHIKV infection by measuring anti-CHIKV IgM and IgG antibodies in acute and convalescent samples. Acute samples of serologically positive cases were subsequently tested for the presence of CHIKV RNA by RT-PCR and/or virus isolation. A total of 135 (7.1%) CHIKV infections were identified, providing an incidence rate of 10.1/1,000 person years. CHIKV infections were identified all year round and tended to increase during the rainy season (January to March). Severe illness was not found and severe arthralgia was not a prominently reported symptom. Serial post-illness samples from nine cases were tested to obtain a kinetic picture of IgM and IgG anti-CHIKV antibodies. Anti-CHIKV IgM antibodies were persistently detected in high titers for approximately one year. Three patients demonstrated evidence of possible sequential CHIKV infections. The high incidence rate and continuous chikungunya cases in this adult cohort suggests that CHIKV is endemically transmitted in Bandung. Further characterization of the circulating strains and surveillance in larger areas are needed to better understand CHIKV epidemiology in Indonesia. PMID:24205417

  2. Prevalence and risk factors for encephalomyocarditis virus infection in Peru.

    PubMed

    Czechowicz, Josephine; Huaman, Jose Luis; Forshey, Brett M; Morrison, Amy C; Castillo, Roger; Huaman, Alfredo; Caceda, Roxana; Eza, Dominique; Rocha, Claudio; Blair, Patrick J; Olson, James G; Kochel, Tadeusz J

    2011-04-01

    Although encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV) infection has been commonly documented among domestic animals, less is known about EMCV transmission among humans. Recently, we described the isolation of EMCV from two febrile patients in Peru. To further investigate EMCV transmission in Peru, we screened febrile patients reporting to health clinics in Peru for serological evidence of recent EMCV infection. We also conducted a serological survey for EMCV-neutralizing antibodies in the city of Iquitos, located in the Amazon basin department of Loreto, Peru. Additionally, we screened serum from rodents collected from 10 departments in Peru for evidence of EMCV exposure. EMCV infection was found to be only rarely associated with acute febrile disease in Peru, accounting for <1% of febrile episodes analyzed. Despite the low acute disease burden associated with the virus, human exposure was quite common, as prevalence of EMCV-neutralizing antibodies ranged between 6.0% in the coastal city of Tumbes and >17% in cities in the tropical rainforest of northeastern Peru (Iquitos and Yurimaguas). On the basis of the serological survey conducted in Iquitos, risk factors for past infection include increased age, socioeconomic indicators such as residence construction materials and neighborhood, and swine ownership. Evidence from the rodent survey indicates that EMCV exposure is common among Murinae subfamily rodents in Peru (9.4% EMCV IgG positive), but less common among Sigmodontinae rodents (1.0% positive). Further studies are necessary to more precisely delineate the mode of EMCV transmission to humans, other potential disease manifestations, and the economic impact of EMCV transmission among swine in Peru. PMID:21395427

  3. In ovo and in vitro susceptibility of American alligators (Alligator mississippiensis) to avian influenza virus infection.

    PubMed

    Temple, Bradley L; Finger, John W; Jones, Cheryl A; Gabbard, Jon D; Jelesijevic, Tomislav; Uhl, Elizabeth W; Hogan, Robert J; Glenn, Travis C; Tompkins, S Mark

    2015-01-01

    Avian influenza has emerged as one of the most ubiquitous viruses within our biosphere. Wild aquatic birds are believed to be the primary reservoir of all influenza viruses; however, the spillover of H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) and the recent swine-origin pandemic H1N1 viruses have sparked increased interest in identifying and understanding which and how many species can be infected. Moreover, novel influenza virus sequences were recently isolated from New World bats. Crocodilians have a slow rate of molecular evolution and are the sister group to birds; thus they are a logical reptilian group to explore susceptibility to influenza virus infection and they provide a link between birds and mammals. A primary American alligator (Alligator mississippiensis) cell line, and embryos, were infected with four, low pathogenic avian influenza (LPAI) strains to assess susceptibility to infection. Embryonated alligator eggs supported virus replication, as evidenced by the influenza virus M gene and infectious virus detected in allantoic fluid and by virus antigen staining in embryo tissues. Primary alligator cells were also inoculated with the LPAI viruses and showed susceptibility based upon antigen staining; however, the requirement for trypsin to support replication in cell culture limited replication. To assess influenza virus replication in culture, primary alligator cells were inoculated with H1N1 human influenza or H5N1 HPAI viruses that replicate independent of trypsin. Both viruses replicated efficiently in culture, even at the 30 C temperature preferred by the alligator cells. This research demonstrates the ability of wild-type influenza viruses to infect and replicate within two crocodilian substrates and suggests the need for further research to assess crocodilians as a species potentially susceptible to influenza virus infection. PMID:25380354

  4. Early virological and immunological events in Epstein-Barr virus infection.

    PubMed

    Hislop, Andrew D

    2015-12-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is a ?-herpesvirus which establishes a chronic yet asymptomatic infection in humans. This saliva transmitted virus has a tropism for B lymphocytes, in which it establishes a latent infection, and epithelial cells where the virus replicates to produce infectious particles. Although the majority of infections are apparently benign, primary EBV infection can be associated with an acute febrile syndrome, infectious mononucleosis, while infection is also associated with the development of malignancies of B lymphocyte and epithelial origin. A better understanding how the virus replicates initially in the host and its control at this stage will lead to the development of rationally targeted interventions which potentially would prevent infection or modify infection associated disease. PMID:26322696

  5. A ceramide analogue stimulates dendritic cells to promote T cell responses upon virus infections.

    PubMed

    Pritzl, Curtis J; Seo, Young-Jin; Xia, Chuan; Vijayan, Madhuvanthi; Stokes, Zachary D; Hahm, Bumsuk

    2015-05-01

    The ceramide family of lipids plays important roles in both cell structure and signaling in a diverse array of cell types, including immune cells. However, very little is known regarding how ceramide affects the activation of dendritic cells (DCs) in response to viral infection. In this study, we demonstrate that a synthetic ceramide analog (C8) stimulates DCs to increase the expansion of virus-specific T cells upon virus infection. Exogenously supplied C8 ceramide elevated the expression of DC maturation markers such as MHC class I and costimulatory molecules following infection with the clone 13 strain of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) or influenza virus. Importantly, ceramide-conditioned, LCMV-infected DCs displayed an increased ability to promote expansion of virus-specific CD8(+) T cells when compared with virus-infected DCs. Furthermore, a locally instilled ceramide analog significantly increased virus-reactive T cell responses in vivo to both LCMV and influenza virus infections. Collectively, these findings provide new insights into ceramide-mediated regulation of DC responses against virus infection and help us establish a foundation for novel immune-stimulatory therapeutics. PMID:25810392

  6. Effect of oral infection with Kashmir bee virus and Israeli acute paralysis virus on bumblebee (Bombus terrestris) reproductive success.

    PubMed

    Meeus, Ivan; de Miranda, Joachim R; de Graaf, Dirk C; Wäckers, Felix; Smagghe, Guy

    2014-09-01

    Israeli acute paralysis virus (IAPV) together with Acute bee paralysis virus (ABPV) and Kashmir bee virus (KBV) constitute a complex of closely related dicistroviruses. They are infamous for their high mortality after injection in honeybees. These viruses have also been reported in non-Apis hymenopteran pollinators such as bumblebees, which got infected with IAPV when placed in the same greenhouse with IAPV infected honeybee hives. Here we orally infected Bombus terrestris workers with different doses of either IAPV or KBV viral particles. The success of the infection was established by analysis of the bumblebees after the impact studies: 50days after infection. Doses of 0.5×10(7) and 1×10(7) virus particles per bee were infectious over this period, for IAPV and KBV respectively, while a dose of 0.5×10(6) IAPV particles per bee was not infectious. The impact of virus infection was studied in micro-colonies consisting of 5 bumblebees, one of which becomes a pseudo-queen which proceeds to lay unfertilized (drone) eggs. The impact parameters studied were: the establishment of a laying pseudo-queen, the timing of egg-laying, the number of drones produced, the weight of these drones and worker mortality. In this setup KBV infection resulted in a significant slower colony startup and offspring production, while only the latter can be reported for IAPV. Neither virus increased worker mortality, at the oral doses used. We recommend further studies on how these viruses transmit between different pollinator species. It is also vital to understand how viral prevalence can affect wild bee populations because disturbance of the natural host-virus association may deteriorate the already critically endangered status of many bumblebee species. PMID:25004171

  7. Association between metabolic factors and chronic hepatitis B virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Chien-Hsieh; Huang, Kuo-Chin

    2014-01-01

    There are limited data regarding the relationship between chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection and metabolic factors. This article aims to highlight the link of metabolic factors with hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) serostatus, HBV load, and HBV-related hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Although HBsAg-positive serostatus was positively correlated with a high risk of metabolic syndrome in students, chronic HBV-infected individuals have high serum adiponectin levels. The androgen pathway in HBV carriers with a low body mass index is more triggered which leads to enhanced HBV replication. High HBV load was inversely associated with obesity in hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg)-seropositive HBV carriers; while in HBeAg-seronegative HBV carriers, high HBV load was inversely related to hypertriglyceridemia rather than obesity. For overweight and obese HBV-infected patients, high HBV load was positively associated with serum adiponectin levels. Several large cohort studies have revealed a positive link of diabetes with incidence of HBV-related HCC. However, the association between incidence of HCC and metabolic factors other than diabetes is still inconclusive. More long-term prospective studies should elucidate the association of chronic HBV infection and its outcomes with metabolic factors in clinical practice. PMID:24966591

  8. Prevalence of Hepatitis B Virus Infection in Isfahan Province

    PubMed Central

    Nokhodian, Zary; Adibi, Peyman; Ataei, Behrooz

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is a serious global health problem. It is estimated that 1.5–2.5 million people are suffering from this infection in Iran. A review on HBV infection prevalence in Isfahan, Iran is conducted in this article. It will help researchers for further studies and also will be helpful for control the infection. Medline, Embase, Ovid, Google Scholar, Scientific Information Database, Iranmedex, Magiran and Scientific Journal of Iran Blood Transfusion Organization and also students’ thesis and projects of Isfahan and Kashan universities of medical sciences were searched for key words “HBV,” “HBsAg,” “prevalence,” “Isfahan,” “Esfahan,” and “Kashan in titles and/or abstracts. Overall, 24 articles, including 4, 14, 5 and 1 were assessed in Isfahan province, and Isfahan, Kashan, and Foulad-shahr cities, respectively. The highest and lowest participants were 542705 and 73, respectively. The highest prevalence of HBsAg was reported in HIV-infected patients and the lowest one was seen in the thalassemic patients. We collected the articles about the prevalence of HBV in Isfahan to help researchers and determine prevalence HBV in Isfahan province. The similar studies in other province of Iran are necessary for marking decision. PMID:26622989

  9. Hepatitis C virus infection and prisoners: Epidemiology, outcome and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Zampino, Rosa; Coppola, Nicola; Sagnelli, Caterina; Di Caprio, Giovanni; Sagnelli, Evangelista

    2015-01-01

    The studies on hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection in prison populations are few and mostly cross-sectional. We analyzed prevalently the articles appearing on PubMed in the last ten years. HCV infection is frequent in prisoners, prevalences ranging from 3.1% to 38% according to the HCV endemicity in the geographical location of the prison and in the countries of origin of the foreign prisoners and to the prevalence of intravenous drug use, which is the most important risk factor for HCV infection, followed by an older age of prisoners and previous prison terms. HCV replication in anti-HCV-positive cases varies from 45% to 90% in different studies, and the most common HCV genotypes are generally 1 and 3. The response to antiviral treatment is similar in prisoners to that of the general population. Unfortunately, treatment is administered less frequently to prisoners because of the difficulties in management and follow-up. The new directly acting antivirals offer a good therapy option for inmates because of their good efficacy, short duration of treatment and low incidence of side effects. The efforts of the prison authorities and medical staff should be focused on reducing the spread of HCV infection in prisons by extending the possibility of follow-up and treatment to more prisoners with chronic hepatitis C. PMID:26413221

  10. Impaired learning resulting from Respiratory Syncytial Virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Espinoza, Janyra A.; Bohmwald, Karen; Céspedes, Pablo F.; Gómez, Roberto S.; Riquelme, Sebastián A.; Cortés, Claudia M.; Valenzuela, Javier A.; Sandoval, Rodrigo A.; Pancetti, Floria C.; Bueno, Susan M.; Riedel, Claudia A.; Kalergis, Alexis M.

    2013-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the major cause of respiratory illness in infants worldwide. Neurologic alterations, such as seizures and ataxia, have been associated with RSV infection. We demonstrate the presence of RSV proteins and RNA in zones of the brain—such as the hippocampus, ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus, and brainstem—of infected mice. One month after disease resolution, rodents showed behavioral and cognitive impairment in marble burying (MB) and Morris water maze (MWM) tests. Our data indicate that the learning impairment caused by RSV is a result of a deficient induction of long-term potentiation in the hippocampus of infected animals. In addition, immunization with recombinant bacillus Calmette–Guérin (BCG) expressing RSV nucleoprotein prevented behavioral disorders, corroborating the specific effect of RSV infection over the central nervous system. Our findings provide evidence that RSV can spread from the airways to the central nervous system and cause functional alterations to the brain, both of which can be prevented by proper immunization against RSV. PMID:23650398

  11. Skin diseases associated with hepatitis C virus infection.

    PubMed

    Hadziyannis, S J

    1998-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a bloodborne agent transmitted by apparent and inapparent parenteral procedures representing a frequent cause of liver disease world-wide. Both acute and chronic HCV infection may affect the liver as well as various non-hepatic tissues. Numerous extrahepatic disorders have been recognised in association with HCV infection among which dermatological diseases occupy a central part. Cutaneous necrotising vasculitis, mixed cryoglobulinemia, porphyria cutanea tarda and lichen planus are the major skin diseases frequently associated with HCV infection, but other skin disorders, such as Adamantiadis-Behçet syndrome, erythema multiforme and nodosum, malacoplakia, urticaria and pruritus, may also be linked to hepatitis C. Further studies are necessary to establish or refute an aetiopathogenetic role of HCV in these conditions. Skin manifestations are also part of the clinical picture of other extrahepatic disorders associated with HCV infection, such as thyroid dysfunction and HCV-related thrombocytopenia. The response to interferon alpha (alpha-IFN) therapy in skin diseases is unpredictable with some patients ameliorating, others remaining stationary and others deteriorating. PMID:9552752

  12. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection of the brain.

    PubMed Central

    Atwood, W J; Berger, J R; Kaderman, R; Tornatore, C S; Major, E O

    1993-01-01

    Direct infection of the central nervous system by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), the causative agent of AIDS, was not appreciated in the early years of the AIDS epidemic. Neurological complications associated with AIDS were largely attributed to opportunistic infections that arose as a result of the immunocompromised state of the patient and to depression. In 1985, several groups succeeded in isolating HIV-1 directly from brain tissue. Also that year, the viral genome was completely sequenced, and HIV-1 was found to belong to a neurotropic subfamily of retrovirus known as the Lentivirinae. These findings clearly indicated that direct HIV-1 infection of the central nervous system played a role in the development of AIDS-related neurological disease. This review summarizes the clinical manifestations of HIV-1 infection of the central nervous system and the related neuropathology, the tropism of HIV-1 for specific cell types both within and outside of the nervous system, the possible mechanisms by which HIV-1 damages the nervous system, and the current strategies for diagnosis and treatment of HIV-1-associated neuropathology. Images PMID:8269391

  13. Hepatitis E virus infection: Epidemiology and treatment implications.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ga Young; Poovorawan, Kittiyod; Intharasongkroh, Duangnapa; Sa-Nguanmoo, Pattaratida; Vongpunsawad, Sompong; Chirathaworn, Chintana; Poovorawan, Yong

    2015-11-12

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection is now established as an emerging enteric viral hepatitis. Standard treatments in acute and chronic hepatitis E remain to be established. This study undertakes a review of the epidemiology, treatment implication and vaccine prevention from published literature. HEV infection is a worldwide public health problem and can cause acute and chronic hepatitis E. HEV genotypes 1 and 2 are primarily found in developing countries due to waterborne transmission, while the zoonotic potential of genotypes 3 and 4 affects mostly industrialized countries. An awareness of HEV transmission through blood donation, especially in the immunocompromised and solid organ transplant patients, merits an effective anti-viral therapy. There are currently no clear indications for the treatment of acute hepatitis E. Despite concerns for side effects, ribavirin monotherapy or in combination with pegylated interferon alpha for at least 3 mo appeared to show significant efficacy in the treatment of chronic hepatitis E. However, there are no available treatment options for specific patient population groups, such as women who are pregnant. Vaccination and screening of HEV in blood donors are currently a global priority in managing infection. New strategies for the treatment and control of hepatitis E are required for both acute and chronic infections, such as prophylactic use of medications, controlling large outbreaks, and finding acceptable antiviral therapy for pregnant women and other patient groups for whom the current options of treatment are not viable. PMID:26568916

  14. Proteinuria in paediatric patients with human immunodeficiency virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Giacomet, Vania; Erba, Paola; Di Nello, Francesca; Coletto, Sonia; Viganò, Alessandra; Zuccotti, GianVincenzo

    2013-01-01

    In human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected people kidney disease is as an important cause of morbidity and mortality. Clinical features of kidney damage in HIV-infected patients range from asymptomatic microalbuminuria to nephrotic syndrome. The lack of specific clinical features despite the presence of heavy proteinuria may mask the renal involvement. Indeed, it is important in HIV patients to monitor renal function to early discover a possible kidney injury. After the introduction of antiretroviral therapy, mortality and morbidity associated to HIV-infection have shown a substantial reduction, although a variety of side effects for long-term use of highly active antiretroviral therapy, including renal toxicity, has emerged. Among more than 20 currently available antiretroviral agents, many of them can occasionally cause reversible or irreversible nephrotoxicity. At now, three antiretroviral agents, i.e., indinavir, atazanavir and tenofovir disoproxil fumarate have a well established association with direct nephrotoxicity. This review focuses on major causes of proteinuria and other pathological findings related to kidney disease in HIV-infected children and adolescents. PMID:24303454

  15. Hepatitis E virus infection: Epidemiology and treatment implications

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ga Young; Poovorawan, Kittiyod; Intharasongkroh, Duangnapa; Sa-nguanmoo, Pattaratida; Vongpunsawad, Sompong; Chirathaworn, Chintana; Poovorawan, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection is now established as an emerging enteric viral hepatitis. Standard treatments in acute and chronic hepatitis E remain to be established. This study undertakes a review of the epidemiology, treatment implication and vaccine prevention from published literature. HEV infection is a worldwide public health problem and can cause acute and chronic hepatitis E. HEV genotypes 1 and 2 are primarily found in developing countries due to waterborne transmission, while the zoonotic potential of genotypes 3 and 4 affects mostly industrialized countries. An awareness of HEV transmission through blood donation, especially in the immunocompromised and solid organ transplant patients, merits an effective anti-viral therapy. There are currently no clear indications for the treatment of acute hepatitis E. Despite concerns for side effects, ribavirin monotherapy or in combination with pegylated interferon alpha for at least 3 mo appeared to show significant efficacy in the treatment of chronic hepatitis E. However, there are no available treatment options for specific patient population groups, such as women who are pregnant. Vaccination and screening of HEV in blood donors are currently a global priority in managing infection. New strategies for the treatment and control of hepatitis E are required for both acute and chronic infections, such as prophylactic use of medications, controlling large outbreaks, and finding acceptable antiviral therapy for pregnant women and other patient groups for whom the current options of treatment are not viable. PMID:26568916

  16. Response of Ferrets and Monkeys to Intranasal Infection with Human, Equine and Avian Influenza Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Marois, P.; Boudreault, A.; DiFranco, E.; Pavilanis, V.

    1971-01-01

    Rhesus monkeys and ferrets were exposed to intranasal inoculation of several strains of egg-adapted avian, equine and human influenza viruses and to strains of mouse-adapted equine influenza viruses. Local replication of virus and seroconversion were observed in the majority of these animals. However, clinical infection was observed only in ferrets. PMID:4251419

  17. Influenza virus respiratory infection and transmission following ocular inoculation in ferrets

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    While influenza viruses are a common respiratory pathogen, sporadic reports of conjunctivitis following human infection demonstrates the ability of this virus to cause disease outside of the respiratory tract. The ocular surface represents both a potential site of virus replication and a portal of e...

  18. Identification of the source of A (H10N8) virus causing human infection.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yifei; Cao, Huabin; Liu, Hongyan; Sun, Hailiang; Martin, Brigitte; Zhao, Yulong; Wang, Qi; Deng, Guangfu; Xue, Jianli; Zong, Yibo; Zhu, Jing; Wen, Feng; Long, Li-Ping; Wong, Sook-San; Zhao, Nan; Fu, Xiaoshan; Liao, Ming; Hu, Guoliang; Webby, Richard; Gao, George F; Wan, Xiu-Feng

    2015-03-01

    A novel H10N8 influenza A virus has been detected in three humans in China since December 2013. Although this virus was hypothesized to be a novel reassortant among influenza viruses from wild birds and domestic poultry, its evolutionary path leading to human infection is unknown. Sporadic surveillance at the live poultry market (LPM) suspected to be the source of infection for the first H10N8 patient has shown a gradual increase in influenza virus prevalence culminating with a predominance of H10N8 viruses. Influenza viruses detected in the LPM up to 8 months prior to human infection contributed genetic components to the zoonotic virus. These H10N8 viruses have continued to evolve within this LPM subsequent to the human infection, and continuous assessments of these H10N8 viruses will be necessary. Serological surveillance showed that the virus appears to have been present throughout the LPM system in Nanchang, China. Reduction of the influenza virus burden in LPMs is essential in preventing future emergence of novel influenza viruses with zoonotic and pandemic potential. PMID:25550151

  19. Reduction of the infectivity of hepatitis C virus pseudoparticles by incorporation of misfolded

    E-print Network

    , as has been well documented for human immunodeficiency virus and hepatitis B virus therapies (Johnson etReduction of the infectivity of hepatitis C virus pseudoparticles by incorporation of misfolded Accepted 18 December 2006 Folding and assembly into complexes of some viral glycoproteins are exquisitely

  20. Honeybee Sacbrood virus infects adult small hive beetles, Aethina tumida (Coleoptera: Nitidulidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Small Hive Beetle (SHB) is a recently discovered pest that invades honey bee colonies and causes damage to comb, stored honey and pollen. A laboratory experiment was conducted to investigate whether SHB could harbor honey bee virus(es) via feeding on virus infected brood and thereby serving as ...

  1. Complete Genome Sequence of a Hop Latent Virus Infecting Hop Plants

    PubMed Central

    Jo, Yeonhwa; Choi, Hoseong

    2015-01-01

    The hop latent virus is a single-stranded RNA virus that mainly infects hop plants. Here, we report the complete genome sequence of a hop latent virus, which was de novo assembled by RNA sequencing (RNA-seq). Our study indicates that transcriptome data are useful for identifying a complete viral genome. PMID:25908127

  2. Human Infection with Highly Pathogenic A(H7N7) Avian Influenza Virus, Italy, 2013

    PubMed Central

    Rossini, Giada; Facchini, Marzia; Vaccari, Gabriele; Di Trani, Livia; Di Martino, Angela; Gaibani, Paolo; Vocale, Caterina; Cattoli, Giovanni; Bennett, Michael; McCauley, John W.; Rezza, Giovanni; Moro, Maria Luisa; Rangoni, Roberto; Finarelli, Alba Carola; Landini, Maria Paola; Castrucci, Maria Rita; Donatelli, Isabella

    2014-01-01

    During an influenza A(H7N7) virus outbreak among poultry in Italy during August–September 2013, infection with a highly pathogenic A(H7N7) avian influenza virus was diagnosed for 3 poultry workers with conjunctivitis. Genetic analyses revealed that the viruses from the humans were closely related to those from chickens on affected farms. PMID:25271444

  3. Genetic Characterization of Simian Foamy Viruses Infecting Humans

    PubMed Central

    Rua, Réjane; Betsem, Edouard; Calattini, Sara; Saib, Ali

    2012-01-01

    Simian foamy viruses (SFVs) are retroviruses that are widespread among nonhuman primates (NHPs). SFVs actively replicate in their oral cavity and can be transmitted to humans after NHP bites, giving rise to a persistent infection even decades after primary infection. Very few data on the genetic structure of such SFVs found in humans are available. In the framework of ongoing studies searching for SFV-infected humans in south Cameroon rainforest villages, we studied 38 SFV-infected hunters whose times of infection had presumably been determined. By long-term cocultures of peripheral blood mononuclear cells with BHK-21 cells, we isolated five new SFV strains and obtained complete genomes of SFV strains from chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes troglodytes; strains BAD327 and AG15), monkey (Cercopithecus nictitans; strain AG16), and gorilla (Gorilla gorilla; strains BAK74 and BAD468). These zoonotic strains share a very high degree of similarity with their NHP counterparts and have a high degree of conservation of the genetic elements important for viral replication. Interestingly, analysis of FV DNA sequences obtained before cultivation revealed variants with deletions in both the U3 region and tas that may correlate with in vivo chronicity in humans. Genomic changes in bet (a premature stop codon) and gag were also observed. To determine if such changes were specific to zoonotic strains, we studied local SFV-infected chimpanzees and found the same genomic changes. Our study reveals that natural polymorphism of SFV strains does exist at both the intersubspecies level (gag, bet) and the intrasubspecies (U3, tas) levels but does not seem to reflect a viral adaptation specific to zoonotic SFV strains. PMID:23015714

  4. 78 FR 63218 - Draft Guidance for Industry on Chronic Hepatitis C Virus Infection: Developing Direct-Acting...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-23

    ...Draft Guidance for Industry on Chronic Hepatitis C Virus Infection: Developing Direct-Acting...guidance for industry entitled ``Chronic Hepatitis C Virus Infection: Developing Direct-Acting...drugs for the treatment of chronic hepatitis C. This guidance revises and...

  5. Oxidative stress modulation in hepatitis C virus infected cells

    PubMed Central

    Lozano-Sepulveda, Sonia A; Bryan-Marrugo, Owen L; Cordova-Fletes, Carlos; Gutierrez-Ruiz, Maria C; Rivas-Estilla, Ana M

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) replication is associated with the endoplasmic reticulum, where the virus can induce cellular stress. Oxidative cell damage plays an important role in HCV physiopathology. Oxidative stress is triggered when the concentration of oxygen species in the extracellular or intracellular environment exceeds antioxidant defenses. Cells are protected and modulate oxidative stress through the interplay of intracellular antioxidant agents, mainly glutathione system (GSH) and thioredoxin; and antioxidant enzyme systems such as superoxide dismutase, catalase, GSH peroxidase, and heme oxygenase-1. Also, the use of natural and synthetic antioxidants (vitamin C and E, N-acetylcysteine, glycyrrhizin, polyenylphosphatidyl choline, mitoquinone, quercetin, S-adenosylmethionine and silymarin) has already shown promising results as co-adjuvants in HCV therapy. Despite all the available information, it is not known how different agents with antiviral activity can interfere with the modulation of the cell redox state induced by HCV and decrease viral replication. This review describes an evidence-based consensus on molecular mechanisms involved in HCV replication and their relationship with cell damage induced by oxidative stress generated by the virus itself and cell antiviral machinery. It also describes some molecules that modify the levels of oxidative stress in HCV-infected cells. PMID:26692473

  6. Homogeneity of Powassan virus populations in naturally infected Ixodes scapularis

    SciTech Connect

    Brackney, Doug E.; Brown, Ivy K.; Nofchissey, Robert A.; Fitzpatrick, Kelly A.; Ebel, Gregory D.

    2010-07-05

    Powassan virus (POWV, Flaviviridae: Flavivirus) is the sole North American member of the tick-borne encephalitis complex and consists of two distinct lineages that are maintained in ecologically discrete enzootic transmission cycles. The underlying genetic mechanisms that lead to niche partitioning in arboviruses are poorly understood. Therefore, intra- and interhost genetic diversity was analyzed to determine if POWV exists as a quasispecies in nature and quantify selective pressures within and between hosts. In contrast to previous reports for West Nile virus (WNV), significant intrahost genetic diversity was not observed. However, pN (0.238) and d{sub N}/d{sub S} ratios (0.092) for interhost diversity were similar to those of WNV. Combined, these data suggest that purifying selection and/or population bottlenecks constrain quasispecies diversity within ticks. These same selective and stochastic mechanisms appear to drive minor sequence changes between ticks. Moreover, Powassan virus populations seem not to be structured as quasispecies in naturally infected adult deer ticks.

  7. Oxidative stress modulation in hepatitis C virus infected cells.

    PubMed

    Lozano-Sepulveda, Sonia A; Bryan-Marrugo, Owen L; Cordova-Fletes, Carlos; Gutierrez-Ruiz, Maria C; Rivas-Estilla, Ana M

    2015-12-18

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) replication is associated with the endoplasmic reticulum, where the virus can induce cellular stress. Oxidative cell damage plays an important role in HCV physiopathology. Oxidative stress is triggered when the concentration of oxygen species in the extracellular or intracellular environment exceeds antioxidant defenses. Cells are protected and modulate oxidative stress through the interplay of intracellular antioxidant agents, mainly glutathione system (GSH) and thioredoxin; and antioxidant enzyme systems such as superoxide dismutase, catalase, GSH peroxidase, and heme oxygenase-1. Also, the use of natural and synthetic antioxidants (vitamin C and E, N-acetylcysteine, glycyrrhizin, polyenylphosphatidyl choline, mitoquinone, quercetin, S-adenosylmethionine and silymarin) has already shown promising results as co-adjuvants in HCV therapy. Despite all the available information, it is not known how different agents with antiviral activity can interfere with the modulation of the cell redox state induced by HCV and decrease viral replication. This review describes an evidence-based consensus on molecular mechanisms involved in HCV replication and their relationship with cell damage induced by oxidative stress generated by the virus itself and cell antiviral machinery. It also describes some molecules that modify the levels of oxidative stress in HCV-infected cells. PMID:26692473

  8. Swine Influenza A(H3N2) Virus Infection in Immunocompromised Man, Italy, 2014.

    PubMed

    Piralla, Antonio; Moreno, Ana; Orlandi, Maria Ester; Percivalle, Elena; Chiapponi, Chiara; Vezzoli, Fausto; Baldanti, Fausto

    2015-07-01

    Because swine influenza virus infection is seldom diagnosed in humans, its frequency might be underestimated. We report a immunocompromised hematologic patient with swine influenza A(H3N2) virus in 2014 in Italy. Local pigs were the source of this human infection. PMID:26079745

  9. Swine Influenza A(H3N2) Virus Infection in Immunocompromised Man, Italy, 2014

    PubMed Central

    Piralla, Antonio; Moreno, Ana; Orlandi, Maria Ester; Percivalle, Elena; Chiapponi, Chiara; Vezzoli, Fausto

    2015-01-01

    Because swine influenza virus infection is seldom diagnosed in humans, its frequency might be underestimated. We report a immunocompromised hematologic patient with swine influenza A(H3N2) virus in 2014 in Italy. Local pigs were the source of this human infection. PMID:26079745

  10. PROVIDENCE VIRUS: A NEW MEMBER OF THE TETRAVIRIDAE THAT INFECTS CULTURED INSECT CELLS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We identified a new member of the Tetraviridae, Providence virus (PrV), persistently infecting a cell line derived from the midgut of Helicoverpa zea (corn earworm). Virus purified from these cells also productively infected a H. zea fat body cell line and a cell line from whole embryos of the beet...

  11. Modeling Immune Response to BK Virus Infection and Donor Kidney in Renal

    E-print Network

    Modeling Immune Response to BK Virus Infection and Donor Kidney in Renal Transplant Recipients H to both BK virus infection and a donor kidney based on known and hypothesized mechanisms in the literature [15], 17,604 kidney transplants were performed in the United States between 2010 and 2011. Overall

  12. Identification of gene biomarkers for respiratory synctial virus infection in a bronchical epithelial cell line

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract: Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection involves complex virus-host interplay. In this study, we analyzed gene expression in RSV-infected BEAS-2B cells to discover novel signaling pathways and biomarkers. We hybridized RNAs from RSV- or vehicle-treated BEAS-2B to ...

  13. Host responses are induced in feathers of chickens infected with Marek's disease virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Control measures are effective in curtailing Marek’s disease virus (MDV) infection and replication in the feather follicle epithelium (FFE). Therefore, vaccinated birds, which subsequently become infected with MDV, shed the virulent virus although they remain protected against disease. The present...

  14. Virus-host interactions in persistently FMDV-infected cells derived from bovine pharynx

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) produces a disease in cattle characterized by vesicular lesions and a persistent infection with asymptomatic low-level production of virus. Here we describe the establishment of a persistently infected primary cell culture derived from bovine pharynx tissue (PBPT)...

  15. ELEVATED ?-GLOBULIN AND INCREASED ANTIBODY PRODUCTION IN MICE INFECTED WITH LACTIC DEHYDROGENASE VIRUS

    PubMed Central

    Notkins, Abner Louis; Mergenhagen, Stephan E.; Rizzo, Anthony A.; Scheele, Christina; Waldmann, Thomas A.

    1966-01-01

    Infection of mice with the lactic dehydrogenase virus (LDV) resulted in an elevated level of ?-globulin. Histologic examination of the spleen and lymph nodes revealed that the number of germinal centers was greatly increased. Immunization with human ?-globulin showed that the capacity of the virus-infected animal to produce anti-human ?-globulin was greatly enhanced and that the virus acted as an adjuvant. From these experiments it is concluded that a virus infection (LDV) can affect the immunologic response of the host to a heterologous antigen. PMID:4159522

  16. Immune surveillance and response to JC virus infection and PML

    PubMed Central

    Beltrami, Sarah; Gordon, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    The ubiquitous human polyomavirus JC virus (JCV) is the established etiological agent of the debilitating and often fatal demyelinating disease, progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML). Most healthy individuals have been infected with JCV and generate an immune response to the virus, yet remain persistently infected at subclinical levels. The onset of PML is rare in the general population, but has become an increasing concern in immunocompromised patients, where reactivation of JCV leads to uncontrolled replication in the CNS. Understanding viral persistence and the normal immune response to JCV provides insight into the circumstances which could lead to viral resurgence. Further, clues on the potential mechanisms of reactivation may be gleaned from the crosstalk among JCV and HIV-1, as well as the impact of monoclonal antibody therapies used for the treatment of autoimmune disorders, including multiple sclerosis, on the development of PML. In this review, we will discuss what is known about viral persistence and the immune response to JCV replication in immunocompromised individuals to elucidate the deficiencies in viral containment that permit viral reactivation and spread. PMID:24297501

  17. Musca domestica Salivary Gland Hypertrophy Virus, a Globally Distributed Insect Virus that Infects and Sterilizes Female Houseflies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The house fly, Musca domestica, is a cosmopolitan pest of livestock and poultry that is of economic, veterinary, and public health importance. Populations of M. domestica are naturally infected with salivary gland hypertrophy virus (MdSGHV), a non-occluded dsDNA virus that inhibits egg production in...

  18. A white spot syndrome virus microRNA promotes the virus infection by targeting the host STAT

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Qian; Huang, Ying; He, Yaodong; Wang, Wen; Zhang, Xiaobo

    2015-01-01

    JAK/STAT pathway plays an important role in invertebrates during virus infection. However the microRNA (miRNA)-mediated regulation of JAK/STAT is not intensively investigated. Viral miRNAs, encoded by virus genome, have emerged as important regulators in the virus-host interactions. In this study, a WSSV (white spot syndrome virus)-encoded miRNA (WSSV-miR-22) was characterized in shrimp during virus infection. The results showed that the viral miRNA could promote WSSV infection in shrimp by targeting the host STAT gene. When the expression of JAK or STAT was knocked down by sequence-specific siRNA, the WSSV copies in shrimp were significantly increased, indicating that the JAK/STAT played positive roles in the antiviral immunity of shrimp. The further findings revealed that TEP1 and TEP2 were the effectors of JAK-STAT signaling pathway. The silencing of TEP1 or TEP2 led to an increase of WSSV copies in shrimp, showing TEP1 and TEP2 were involved in the shrimp immune response against virus infection. Therefore our study presented a novel viral miRNA-mediated JAK/STAT-TEP1/TEP2 signaling pathway in virus infection. PMID:26671453

  19. A white spot syndrome virus microRNA promotes the virus infection by targeting the host STAT.

    PubMed

    Ren, Qian; Huang, Ying; He, Yaodong; Wang, Wen; Zhang, Xiaobo

    2015-01-01

    JAK/STAT pathway plays an important role in invertebrates during virus infection. However the microRNA (miRNA)-mediated regulation of JAK/STAT is not intensively investigated. Viral miRNAs, encoded by virus genome, have emerged as important regulators in the virus-host interactions. In this study, a WSSV (white spot syndrome virus)-encoded miRNA (WSSV-miR-22) was characterized in shrimp during virus infection. The results showed that the viral miRNA could promote WSSV infection in shrimp by targeting the host STAT gene. When the expression of JAK or STAT was knocked down by sequence-specific siRNA, the WSSV copies in shrimp were significantly increased, indicating that the JAK/STAT played positive roles in the antiviral immunity of shrimp. The further findings revealed that TEP1 and TEP2 were the effectors of JAK-STAT signaling pathway. The silencing of TEP1 or TEP2 led to an increase of WSSV copies in shrimp, showing TEP1 and TEP2 were involved in the shrimp immune response against virus infection. Therefore our study presented a novel viral miRNA-mediated JAK/STAT-TEP1/TEP2 signaling pathway in virus infection. PMID:26671453

  20. Hepatitis B and Delta Virus: Advances on Studies about Interactions between the Two Viruses and the Infected Hepatocyte

    PubMed Central

    Giersch, Katja; Dandri, Maura

    2015-01-01

    The mechanisms determining persistence of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection and long-term pathogenesis of HBV-associated liver disease appear to be multifactorial. Although viral replication can be efficiently suppressed by the antiviral treatments currently available, viral clearance is generally not achieved since HBV has developed unique replication strategies, enabling persistence of its genome within the infected hepatocytes. Moreover, no direct antiviral therapy exists for the more than 15 million people worldwide that are also coinfected with the hepatitis delta virus (HDV), a defective virus that needs the HBV envelope proteins for propagation. The limited availability of robust HBV and HDV infection systems has hindered the understanding of the complex network of virus-virus and virus-host interactions that are established in the course of infection and slowed down progress in drug development. Since chronic HBV/HDV coinfection leads to the most severe form of chronic viral hepatitis, elucidation of the molecular mechanisms regulating virus-host interplay and pathogenesis are urgently needed. This article summarizes the current knowledge regarding the interactions among HBV, HDV, and the infected target cell and discusses the dependence of HDV on HBV activity and possible future therapeutic approaches.

  1. In Vitro Activation of Feline Immunodeficiency Virus in Ramified Microglial Cells from Asymptomatically Infected Cats

    PubMed Central

    Hein, Andreas; Martin, Jean-Pierre; Dörries, Rüdiger

    2001-01-01

    Intravenous infection of cats with feline immunodeficiency virus was used as a model system to study activation of virus replication in brain-resident microglial cells in vitro. Virus release by ramified microglial cells isolated from subclinically infected animals was detectable in cell-free tissue culture supernatant only by reverse transcription and nested PCR of gag-specific RNA sequences and not by virion-associated reverse transcriptase activity. In contrast, cocultivation of in vivo-infected microglial cells with mitogen-activated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) regularly allows detection of high virus yields in cell-free tissue culture fluid. Besides uptake and multiplication of microglia-derived virus in PBMC, release of virus from microglia is stimulated by cell contact with PBMC. The data suggest that T lymphocytes patrolling the central nervous system could reactivate the semilatent state of lentiviruses in microglial cells in the course of clinically silent central nervous system infection. PMID:11483754

  2. Genomic comparison of closely related Giant Viruses supports an accordion-like model of evolution

    PubMed Central

    Filée, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Genome gigantism occurs so far in Phycodnaviridae and Mimiviridae (order Megavirales). Origin and evolution of these Giant Viruses (GVs) remain open questions. Interestingly, availability of a collection of closely related GV genomes enabling genomic comparisons offer the opportunity to better understand the different evolutionary forces acting on these genomes. Whole genome alignment for five groups of viruses belonging to the Mimiviridae and Phycodnaviridae families show that there is no trend of genome expansion or general tendency of genome contraction. Instead, GV genomes accumulated genomic mutations over the time with gene gains compensating the different losses. In addition, each lineage displays specific patterns of genome evolution. Mimiviridae (megaviruses and mimiviruses) and Chlorella Phycodnaviruses evolved mainly by duplications and losses of genes belonging to large paralogous families (including movements of diverse mobiles genetic elements), whereas Micromonas and Ostreococcus Phycodnaviruses derive most of their genetic novelties thought lateral gene transfers. Taken together, these data support an accordion-like model of evolution in which GV genomes have undergone successive steps of gene gain and gene loss, accrediting the hypothesis that genome gigantism appears early, before the diversification of the different GV lineages. PMID:26136734

  3. The effect of infected external computers on the spread of viruses: A compartment modeling study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Lu-Xing; Yang, Xiaofan

    2013-12-01

    Inevitably, there exist infected computers outside of the Internet. This paper aims to understand how infected external computers affect the spread of computer viruses. For that purpose, a new virus-antivirus spreading model, which takes into account the effect of infected/immune external computers, is established. A systematic study shows that, unlike most previous models, the proposed model admits no virus-free equilibrium and admits a globally asymptotically stable viral equilibrium. This result implies that it would be practically impossible to eradicate viruses on the Internet. As a result, inhibiting the virus prevalence to below an acceptable level would be the next best thing. A theoretical study reveals the effect of different parameters on the steady virus prevalence. On this basis, a number of suggestions are made so as to contain virus spreading.

  4. Protection against experimental infection with influenza virus A/equine/Miami/63 (H3N8) provided by inactivated whole virus vaccines containing homologous virus.

    PubMed Central

    Mumford, J. A.; Wood, J. M.; Folkers, C.; Schild, G. C.

    1988-01-01

    Thirty-one ponies immunized with inactivated virus vaccine containing A/equine/Miami/63 (H3N8) virus and six seronegative ponies were experimentally challenged with the homologous virus strain. All 6 unvaccinated ponies and 11 out of 31 vaccinated ponies became infected. A clear relationship between pre-challenge antibody, measured by single radial haemolysis (SRH), and protection was demonstrated as judged by virus excretion, febrile responses and antibody responses. Those ponies with SRH antibody levels greater than 74 mm2 were completely protected against challenge infection by the intranasal route. PMID:2837409

  5. Callithrix penicillata: a feasible experimental model for dengue virus infection.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Milene Silveira; de Castro, Paulo Henrique Gomes; Silva, Gilmara Abreu; Casseb, Samir Mansur Moraes; Dias Júnior, Antônio Gregório; Rodrigues, Sueli Guerreiros; Azevedo, Raimunda do Socorro da Silva; Costa e Silva, Matheus Fernandes; Zauli, Danielle Alves Gomes; Araújo, Márcio Sobreira Silva; Béla, Samantha Ribeiro; Teixeira-Carvalho, Andréa; Martins-Filho, Olindo Assis; Vasconcelos, Pedro Fernando da Costa

    2014-01-01

    Although the murine models have the feasibility to reproduce some signs of dengue Virus (DENV) infection, the use of isogenic hosts with polarized immune response patterns does not reproduce the particularities of human disease. Our goal was to investigate the kinetics of peripheral blood biomarkers in immunocompetent Callithrix penicillata non-human primates subcutaneously infected with DENV-3. The viral load of infected animals was determinated by quantitative real time PCR. Measurements of DENV-3/IgM were performed, and several parameters were assessed by hemogram: red blood cells count, hemoglobin, hematocrit, white blood cells count, neutrophils, monocytes, lymphocytes, and platelets count. The coagulogram was performed by prothrombin time (PT), and activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) assays. The renal function was monitored by urea and creatinine, and the liver function by the aspartate (AST), and alanine (ALT) aminotransferases. Also, the level of the cytokines IL-6, TNF-?, IL-2, IFN-?, IL-4 and IL-5 was quantified during the experimental study. Data analysis was performed considering relevant differences when baseline fold changes were found outside from 0.75 to 1.5 range. Our data demonstrated that infected animals presented relevant signs of dengue disease, including peaks of viremia at 5 days-post-infection (dpi), peaks of anti-DENV-3 IgM at 15 dpi and hemaglutination inhibition assay (HIA) from 15 to at 60 dpi. Despite early monocytosis, slight neutrophilia and lymphocytosis, animals developed persistent leucopenia starting at 4 dpi. Anemia episodes were steady at 3-4 dpi. Patent thrombocytopenia was observed from 1 to 15 dpi with sporadic decrease of APTT. A substantial increase of ALT and AST was observed with higher peak at 4 dpi. Moreover, early increases of TNF-alpha and IFN-gamma besides late increase of IFN-gamma were observed. The analysis of biomarkers network pointed out two relevant strong axes during early stages of dengue fever, a protective axes TNF-alpha/Lymphocytes/Platelets, and a pathological IL-2/IL-6/Viremia/Monocyte/PT bond. Later on, the biomarker network highlighted the interaction IFN-gamma/PLT/DENV-3(IgM;HAI)/PT, and the involvement of type-2 cytokines (IL-4; IL-5). Our findings demonstrated that C. penicillata is a feasible experimental model for dengue virus infection, which could be useful to pathogenesis studies, discovery of novel antiviral drugs as well as to evaluate vaccine candidates against DENV. PMID:24361035

  6. Atomic Force Microscopy in Imaging of Viruses and Virus-Infected Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kuznetsov, Yurii G.; McPherson, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    Summary: Atomic force microscopy (AFM) can visualize almost everything pertinent to structural virology and at resolutions that approach those for electron microscopy (EM). Membranes have been identified, RNA and DNA have been visualized, and large protein assemblies have been resolved into component substructures. Capsids of icosahedral viruses and the icosahedral capsids of enveloped viruses have been seen at high resolution, in some cases sufficiently high to deduce the arrangement of proteins in the capsomeres as well as the triangulation number (T). Viruses have been recorded budding from infected cells and suffering the consequences of a variety of stresses. Mutant viruses have been examined and phenotypes described. Unusual structural features have appeared, and the unexpectedly great amount of structural nonconformity within populations of particles has been documented. Samples may be imaged in air or in fluids (including culture medium or buffer), in situ on cell surfaces, or after histological procedures. AFM is nonintrusive and nondestructive, and it can be applied to soft biological samples, particularly when the tapping mode is employed. In principle, only a single cell or virion need be imaged to learn of its structure, though normally images of as many as is practical are collected. While lateral resolution, limited by the width of the cantilever tip, is a few nanometers, height resolution is exceptional, at approximately 0.5 nm. AFM produces three-dimensional, topological images that accurately depict the surface features of the virus or cell under study. The images resemble common light photographic images and require little interpretation. The structures of viruses observed by AFM are consistent with models derived by X-ray crystallography and cryo-EM. PMID:21646429

  7. [The very severe sensorineural deafness patients caused by rubella virus infection: two cases report].

    PubMed

    Ma, Jing; Wan, Lang; Xu, Fen

    2015-09-01

    To explore the audiological features in children who were sever sensorineural hearing loss infected with rubella virus. There were two cases of rubella virus infection in children who were deaf, they conducted the distortion product otoacoustic emission, ABR and auditory steady-state evoked response (ASSR) examination, then analyzed the results comprehensively. Two patients' mothers were prompted to have infected rubella virus during the early three months pregnant period by history and laboratory tests. The two patients were not detected deafness gene mutation. Audiology results implied the two patients were very severe binaural sensorineural deafness, so they were recommended to equipped with hearing aids and cochlear implant surgery. Early pregnancy women infected with rubella virus can cause very severe offspring sensorineural deafness. The crowd whose mother were suspected to infect with rubella virus in early pregnancy, that should be tracked and detected hearing in order to achieve early detection, early intervention and early treatment. PMID:26647548

  8. Inactivation of the MAPK signaling pathway by Listeria monocytogenes infection promotes trophoblast giant cell death

    PubMed Central

    Hashino, Masanori; Tachibana, Masato; Nishida, Takashi; Hara, Hideki; Tsuchiya, Kohsuke; Mitsuyama, Masao; Watanabe, Kenta; Shimizu, Takashi; Watarai, Masahisa

    2015-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes has a well-characterized ability to cross the placental barrier, resulting in spontaneous abortion and fetal infections. However, the mechanisms resulting in infection-associated abortion are not fully understood. In this study, we demonstrate that the dephosphorylation of MAPK family proteins caused by L. monocytogenes infection of trophoblast giant (TG) cells, which are placental immune cells, contributes to infectious abortion. Dephosphorylation of c-Jun, p38, and ERK1/2 was observed in infected TG cells, causing the downregulation of cytoprotective heme oxygenase (HO)-1. Blocking the dephosphorylation of proteins, including MAPK family proteins, inhibited the decrease in HO-1 expression. Treatment with MAPK inhibitors inhibited bacterial internalization into TG cells. Moreover, Toll-like receptor 2 involved in the expression of MAPK family proteins. Infection with a listeriolysin O-deleted mutant impaired dephosphorylation of MAPK family proteins in TG cells and did not induce infectious abortion in a mouse model. These results suggest that inactivation of the MAPK pathway by L. monocytogenes induces TG cell death and causes infectious abortion. PMID:26528279

  9. In vivo infection of IgG-containing cells by Jembrana disease virus during acute infection

    SciTech Connect

    Desport, Moira; Tenaya, I.W. Masa; McLachlan, Alexander; McNab, Tegan J.; Rachmat, Judhi; Hartaningsih, Nining; Wilcox, Graham E.

    2009-10-25

    Jembrana disease virus (JDV) is an unusual bovine lentivirus which causes a non-follicular proliferation of lymphocytes, a transient immunosuppression and a delayed humoral response in infected Bali cattle in Indonesia. A double-immunofluorescent labeling method was developed to identify the subset of mononuclear cells in which the viral capsid protein could be detected. Viral antigen was present in pleomorphic centroblast-like cells which were identified as IgG-containing cells, including plasma cells, in lymphoid tissues. There was no evidence of infection of CD3{sup +} T-cells or MAC387{sup +} monocytes in tissues but large vacuolated cells with a macrophage-like morphology in the lung were found to contain viral antigen although they could not be shown conclusively to be infected. The tropism of JDV for mature IgG-containing cells may be relevant to understanding the pathogenesis of Jembrana disease, the delayed antibody responses and the genetic composition of this atypical lentivirus.

  10. Hepatitis C virus infection: a risk factor for Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Wu, W Y-Y; Kang, K-H; Chen, S L-S; Chiu, S Y-H; Yen, A M-F; Fann, J C-Y; Su, C-W; Liu, H-C; Lee, C-Z; Fu, W-M; Chen, H-H; Liou, H-H

    2015-10-01

    Recent studies found that hepatitis C virus (HCV) may invade the central nervous system, and both HCV and Parkinson's disease (PD) have in common the overexpression of inflammatory biomarkers. We analysed data from a community-based integrated screening programme based on a total of 62,276 subjects. We used logistic regression models to investigate association between HCV infection and PD. The neurotoxicity of HCV was evaluated in the midbrain neuron-glia coculture system in rats. The cytokine/chemokine array was performed to measure the differences of amounts of cytokines released from midbrain in the presence and absence of HCV. The crude odds ratios (ORs) for having PD were 0.62 [95% confidence interval (CI), 0.48-0.81] and 1.91 (95% CI, 1.48-2.47) for hepatitis B virus (HBV) and HCV. After controlling for potential confounders, the association between HCV and PD remained statistically significant (adjusted OR = 1.39; 95% CI, 1.07-1.80), but not significantly different between HBV and PD. The HCV induced 60% dopaminergic neuron death in the midbrain neuron-glia coculture system in rats, similar to that of 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP(+) ) but not caused by HBV. This link was further supported by the finding that HCV infection may release the inflammatory cytokines, which may play a role in the pathogenesis of PD. In conclusion, our study demonstrated a significantly positive epidemiological association between HCV infection and PD and corroborated the dopaminergic toxicity of HCV similar to that of MPP(+) . PMID:25608223

  11. Specificity of skin test with varicella-zoster virus antigen in varicella-zoster and herpes simplex virus infections.

    PubMed Central

    Baba, K; Shiraki, K; Kanesaki, T; Yamanishi, K; Ogra, P L; Yabuuchi, H; Takahashi, M

    1987-01-01

    Specificity of the skin test with varicella-zoster virus (VZV) antigen was examined in guinea pigs infected with herpes simplex virus (HSV) type 1 or VZV and in children with a history of HSV infection who developed varicella. Infected guinea pigs responded positively only to homologous virus. No cross-reaction between HSV and VZV was detected in the skin test, as well as in the neutralization test in infected guinea pigs, suggesting that the VZV skin test is specific for immunity to VZV infection. Twelve children were infected with HSV during an HSV epidemic and subsequently developed varicella in institutional settings. During the 2.5-month period between the HSV and VZV infections, the immune status of the children to VZV was negative both in the skin test and in the antibody test, although antibody to HSV was detected by an immune adherence hemagglutination test. After VZV infection, all responded positively both in the skin test and in the antibody test (immune adherence hemagglutination test) to VZV. These results suggest that the VZV skin test is specific for immunity to VZV infection, not cross-reactive to HSV infection in humans. This specificity will be of value in screening susceptibility or immunity to VZV, irrespective of prior HSV infection. PMID:2826535

  12. Superinfection exclusion is absent during acute Junin virus infection of Vero and A549 cells

    PubMed Central

    Gaudin, Raphaël; Kirchhausen, Tomas

    2015-01-01

    Many viruses have evolved strategies of so-called “superinfection exclusion” to prevent re-infection of a cell that the same virus has already infected. Although Old World arenavirus infection results in down-regulation of its viral receptor and thus superinfection exclusion, whether New World arenaviruses have evolved such a mechanism remains unclear. Here we show that acute infection by the New World Junin virus (JUNV) failed to down-regulate the transferrin receptor and did not induce superinfection exclusion. We observed that Vero cells infected by a first round of JUNV (Candid1 strain) preserve an ability to internalize new incoming JUNV particles that is comparable to that of non-infected cells. Moreover, we developed a dual infection assay with the wild-type Candid1 JUNV and a recombinant JUNV-GFP virus to discriminate between first and second infections at the transcriptional and translational levels. We found that Vero and A549 cells already infected by JUNV were fully competent to transcribe viral RNA from a second round of infection. Furthermore, flow cytometry analysis of viral protein expression indicated that viral translation was normal, regardless of whether cells were previously infected or not. We conclude that in acutely infected cells, Junin virus lacks a superinfection exclusion mechanism. PMID:26549784

  13. Co-infection of mallards with low-virulence Newcastle disease virus and low-pathogenic avian influenza virus.

    PubMed

    França, M; Howerth, E W; Carter, D; Byas, A; Poulson, R; Afonso, C L; Stallknecht, D E

    2014-01-01

    Waterfowl are considered the natural reservoir of low-virulence Newcastle disease viruses (loNDVs) and low-pathogenic avian influenza viruses (LPAIVs). The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of co-infections with loNDV and LPAIV on the infectivity and excretion of these viruses in mallards. One-month-old mallards were inoculated intranasally with 10(6) median embryo infectious doses of a wild-bird-origin loNDV and A/Mallard/MN/199106/99 (H3N8) LPAIV on the same day or received the LPAIV 2 or 5 days after loNDV inoculation. All mallards became infected with both viruses based on detection of seroconversion and viral shedding. Co-infection resulted in a higher number of cloacal swabs detected positive for LPAIV and a lower number of cloacal swabs detected positive for loNDV in some groups, although differences between groups were not statistically significant. Co-infection did not affect replication of LPAIV in epithelial cells of the lower intestine and bursa of Fabricius. In summary, the results of this study indicate that co-infection with LPAIV and loNDV does not affect the ability of mallards to be infected with either virus although it may have minimal effects on patterns (source and timing) of viral shedding. PMID:24467249

  14. Prevalence of hepatitis C virus infection among human immunodeficiency virus-1-infected pregnant women in Malawi: The BAN study?

    PubMed Central

    Chasela, Charles S.; Wall, Patrick; Drobeniuc, Jan; King, Caroline C.; Teshale, Eyasu; Hosseinipour, Mina C.; Ellington, Sascha R.; Codd, Mary; Jamieson, Denise J.; Knight, Rodney J.; Fitzpatrick, Patricia; Kourtis, Athena P.; Hoffman, Irving F.; Kayira, Dumbani; Mumba, Noel; Kamwendo, Deborah D.; Martinson, Francis; Powderly, William; van der Horst, Charles; Kamili, Saleem

    2013-01-01

    Background In Sub-Saharan Africa, prevalence estimates of hepatitis C virus (HCV) vary widely. Objectives To assess the prevalence of HCV infection among HIV-infected, pregnant women screened for a large clinical trial in Lilongwe, Malawi. Study design Plasma from 2041 HIV-infected, pregnant women was screened for anti-HCV IgG using a chemiluminiscent immunometric assay (CIA). Specimens with a signal-cut-off ratio ? 1.00 were considered reactive and those with S/Co ratio < 1.00 non-reactive. All CIA-reactive specimens were tested by a recombinant immunoblot assay (RIBA) for anti-HCV and by PCR for HCV RNA. Results Of 2041 specimens, 110 (5.3%, 95% CI: 4.5–6.5%) were CIA reactive. Of the 109 CIA reactive specimens available for RIBA testing, 2 (1.8%) were positive, 28 (25.7%) were indeterminate, and 79 (72.5%) were negative. All CIA-reactive specimens were HCV RNA negative (n = 110). The estimated HCV prevalence based on the screening assay alone was 5.3%; based on supplemental RIBA testing, the status of HCV infection remained indeterminate in 1.4% (28/2040, 95% CI: 0.1–2.0) and the prevalence of confirmed HCV infections was 0.1% (2/2040, 95% CI: 0–0.4%). Conclusions HCV seroprevalence among HIV-infected, pregnant women in Malawi confirmed by supplemental RIBA HCV 3.0 is low (0.1%); CIA showed a high false-reactivity rate in this population. PMID:22658797

  15. Human Infection with Influenza Virus A(H10N8) from Live Poultry Markets, China, 2014

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Tao; Bi, Yuhai; Tian, Huaiyu; Li, Xiaowen; Liu, Di; Wu, Ying; Jin, Tao; Wang, Yong; Chen, Quanjiao; Chen, Ze; Chang, Jianyu; Gao, George F.

    2014-01-01

    Human infection with avian influenza virus A(H10N8) was initially reported in China in December 2013. We characterized H10N8 strains from a human patient and from poultry in live markets that infected persons had visited. Results of genome sequencing and virus characterization suggest that the virus strains that infected humans originated from these markets. PMID:25425075

  16. Influence of body condition on influenza A virus infection in mallard ducks: Experimental infection data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Arsnoe, Dustin M.; Ip, Hon S.; Owen, Jennifer C.

    2011-01-01

    Migrating waterfowl are implicated in the global spread of influenza A viruses (IAVs), and mallards (Anas platyrhynchos) are considered a particularly important IAV reservoir. Prevalence of IAV infection in waterfowl peaks during autumn pre-migration staging and then declines as birds reach wintering areas. Migration is energetically costly and birds often experience declines in body condition that may suppress immune function. We assessed how body condition affects susceptibility to infection, viral shedding and antibody production in wild-caught and captive-bred juvenile mallards challenged with low pathogenic avian influenza virus (LPAIV) H5N9. Wild mallards (n = 30) were separated into three experimental groups; each manipulated through food availability to a different condition level (-20%, -10%, and normal ±5% original body condition), and captive-bred mallards (n = 10) were maintained at normal condition. We found that wild mallards in normal condition were more susceptible to LPAIV infection, shed higher peak viral loads and shed viral RNA more frequently compared to birds in poor condition. Antibody production did not differ according to condition. We found that wild mallards did not differ from captive-bred mallards in viral intensity and duration of infection, but they did exhibit lower antibody titers and greater variation in viral load. Our findings suggest that reduced body condition negatively influences waterfowl host competence to LPAIV infection. This observation is contradictory to the recently proposed condition-dependent hypothesis, according to which birds in reduced condition would be more susceptible to IAV infection. The mechanisms responsible for reducing host competency among birds in poor condition remain unknown. Our research indicates body condition may influence the maintenance and spread of LPAIV by migrating waterfowl.

  17. Influence of body condition on influenza a virus infection in mallard ducks: Experimental infection data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Arsnoe, D.M.; Ip, H.S.; Owen, J.C.

    2011-01-01

    Migrating waterfowl are implicated in the global spread of influenza A viruses (IAVs), and mallards (Anas platyrhynchos) are considered a particularly important IAV reservoir. Prevalence of IAV infection in waterfowl peaks during autumn pre-migration staging and then declines as birds reach wintering areas. Migration is energetically costly and birds often experience declines in body condition that may suppress immune function. We assessed how body condition affects susceptibility to infection, viral shedding and antibody production in wild-caught and captive-bred juvenile mallards challenged with low pathogenic avian influenza virus (LPAIV) H5N9. Wild mallards (n = 30) were separated into three experimental groups; each manipulated through food availability to a different condition level (-20%, -10%, and normal ??5% original body condition), and captive-bred mallards (n = 10) were maintained at normal condition. We found that wild mallards in normal condition were more susceptible to LPAIV infection, shed higher peak viral loads and shed viral RNA more frequently compared to birds in poor condition. Antibody production did not differ according to condition. We found that wild mallards did not differ from captive-bred mallards in viral intensity and duration of infection, but they did exhibit lower antibody titers and greater variation in viral load. Our findings suggest that reduced body condition negatively influences waterfowl host competence to LPAIV infection. This observation is contradictory to the recently proposed condition-dependent hypothesis, according to which birds in reduced condition would be more susceptible to IAV infection. The mechanisms responsible for reducing host competency among birds in poor condition remain unknown. Our research indicates body condition may influence the maintenance and spread of LPAIV by migrating waterfowl. ?? 2011 Arsnoe et al.

  18. NATIONAL PRESS RELEASE I PARIS I 09 NOVEMBER 2015 An international team of chemists has developed an ultra-rapid method to synthesize giant

    E-print Network

    Matias, Catherine

    , these mega-molecules are highly effective in inhibiting the entry of Ebola virus into cells in culture viruses (HIV, Ebola, dengue viruses, etc.) which use it to infect cells: binding of these pathogens operate under numerous conditions. A giant molecule to fight Ebola virus? #12;The ability of these mega

  19. Simultaneous influenza and respiratory syncytial virus infection in human respiratory tract

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinky, Lubna Jahan Rashid; Dobrovolny, Hana

    2015-03-01

    Studies have shown that simultaneous infection of the respiratory tract with at least two viruses is not uncommon in hospitalized patients, although it is not clear whether these infections are more or less severe than single infections. We use mathematical models to study the dynamics of simultaneous influenza (flu) and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection, two of the more common respiratory viruses, in an effort to understand simultaneous infections. We examine the roles of initial viral inoculum, relative starting time, and cell regeneration on the severity of the infection. We also study the effect of antiviral treatment on the course of the infection. This study shows that, unless treated with antivirals, flu always takes over the infection no matter how small the initial dose and how delayed it starts with respect to RSV.

  20. Hepatitis B virus infection among street youths in Montreal

    PubMed Central

    Roy, E; Haley, N; Lemire, N; Boivin, J F; Leclerc, P; Vincelette, J

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Street youths are at high risk for many health problems, including sexually transmitted diseases and bloodborne infections. The authors conducted a cross-sectional anonymous study from December 1995 to September 1996 involving street youths in Montreal to estimate the prevalence of risk behaviours for hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection and of markers of past and present HBV infection. METHODS: Participants were 437 youths aged 14 to 25 meeting specific criteria for itinerancy who were recruited in collaboration with the 20 major street youth agencies in Montreal. Sociodemographic and lifetime risk factor data were obtained during a structured interview, and a blood sample was taken to test for HBV markers (hepatitis B surface antigen and antibodies to the hepatitis B core antigen). Univariate analyses and multivariate logistic regressions were conducted. RESULTS: The mean age of the subjects was 19.5 years; 69.3% (303/437) were males. Many subjects had high-risk behaviours: 45.8% (200/437) had injected drugs, 24.5% (107/436) had engaged in prostitution, and 8.7% (38/437) reported having a sexual partner with a history of unspecified hepatitis. The prevalence rate for one or both HBV markers was 9.2% (40/434) (95% confidence interval [CI] 6.7%-12.3%). Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that being over 18 years of age (adjusted odds ratio [OR] 4.5, 95% CI 1.8-11.7), having injected drugs (adjusted OR 3.5, 95% CI 1.5-8.3) and having had a sexual partner who had unspecified hepatitis (adjusted OR 3.2, 95% CI 1.3-7.5) were all associated with HBV infection. INTERPRETATION: Street youths are at high risk for HBV infection. Early and complete HBV vaccination among this vulnerable population is urgently needed. PMID:10513274

  1. The Epigenetic Regulator G9a Mediates Tolerance to RNA Virus Infection in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Merkling, Sarah H.; Bronkhorst, Alfred W.; Kramer, Jamie M.; Overheul, Gijs J.; Schenck, Annette; Van Rij, Ronald P.

    2015-01-01

    Little is known about the tolerance mechanisms that reduce the negative effects of microbial infection on host fitness. Here, we demonstrate that the histone H3 lysine 9 methyltransferase G9a regulates tolerance to virus infection by shaping the response of the evolutionary conserved Jak-Stat pathway in Drosophila. G9a-deficient mutants are more sensitive to RNA virus infection and succumb faster to infection than wild-type controls, which was associated with strongly increased Jak-Stat dependent responses, but not with major differences in viral load. Genetic experiments indicate that hyperactivated Jak-Stat responses are associated with early lethality in virus-infected flies. Our results identify an essential epigenetic mechanism underlying tolerance to virus infection. PMID:25880195

  2. Genetic diversity of hepatitis B virus and hepatitis C virus in human immunodeficiency virus type 1-co-infected patients from Venezuela.

    PubMed

    Jaspe, Rossana C; Sulbarán, Yoneira F; Loureiro, Carmen L; Martínez, Nahir; Devesa, Marisol; Rodríguez, Yesseima; Torres, Jaime R; Rangel, Héctor R; Pujol, Flor H

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence and genetic diversity of hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-co-infected Venezuelan patients. The prevalence of HBV and HCV markers of infection in HIV-1 patients was 14% for anti-hepatitis B core antigen, 3% for hepatitis B surface antigen and 0.7% for anti-HCV, respectively. HBV prevalence was higher than HCV, as expected for a country where sexual intercourse, not intravenous drug use, is the main mode of HIV-1 transmission. The HCV genotype distribution in HIV-1-co-infected patients was similar to that obtained in HCV-mono-infected patients, but genotype 1a was more frequent in HIV-1-infected patients. The HBV genotype distribution exhibited differences between mono-infected and HIV-1-co-infected individuals. HBV F3 was the most common subgenotype in both groups, followed by F1b in HIV-1 co-infection and F2 in HBV mono-infection. In addition, genotype G (single infection) was found in an HIV-1-co-infected individual. A high prevalence of occult HBV infection was detected in HIV-1-co-infected naïve patients (18%), with F2 being the most common genotype (75%). To the best of our knowledge, these results correspond to the first description of frequency and molecular characterization of HBV and HCV in HIV-1 Venezuelan patients. PMID:24895404

  3. Adaptive immunity and histopathology in frog virus 3-infected Xenopus

    SciTech Connect

    Robert, Jacques . E-mail: robert@mail.rochester.edu; Morales, Heidi; Buck, Wayne; Cohen, Nicholas; Marr, Shauna; Gantress, Jennifer

    2005-02-20

    Xenopus has been used as an experimental model to evaluate the contribution of adaptive cellular immunity in amphibian host susceptibility to the emerging ranavirus FV3. Conventional histology and immunohistochemistry reveal that FV3 has a strong tropism for the proximal tubular epithelium of the kidney and is rarely disseminated elsewhere in Xenopus hosts unless their immune defenses are impaired or developmentally immature as in larvae. In such cases, virus is found widespread in most tissues. Adults, immunocompromised by depletion of CD8{sup +} T cells or by sub-lethal {gamma}-irradiation, show increased susceptibility to FV3 infection. Larvae and irradiated (but not normal) adults can be cross-infected through water by infected adult conspecifics (irradiated or not). The natural MHC class I deficiency and the absence of effect of anti-CD8 treatment on both larval CD8{sup +} T cells and larval susceptibility to FV3 are consistent with an inefficient CD8{sup +} T cell effector function during this developmental period.

  4. Oral Manifestations of Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Patients

    PubMed Central

    Pakfetrat, Atessa; Falaki, Farnaz; Delavarian, Zahra; Dalirsani, Zohreh; Sanatkhani, Majid; Zabihi Marani, Mahsa

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Oral lesions are among the earliest clinical manifestations of human immunodeficiency (HIV) infection and are important in early diagnosis and for monitoring the progression to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of oral lesions and their relationship with a number of factors in HIV/AIDS patients attending an HIV center. Materials and Methods: A total of 110 HIV-positive patients were examined to investigate the prevalence of oral lesions according to the criteria established by the European Community Clearing House on Oral Problems Related to HIV Infection. An independent T-test was used for correlation of oral lesions with CD4+ count and a ?2 test was used for analysis of the relationship of co-infection with hepatitis B virus (HBV), sexual contact, route of transmission, history of drug abuse, and history of incarceration. Results: Most of the cases were male patients (82.7%). The mean age across all participants was 36.2±8.1 years. Rampant carries, severe periodontitis and oral candidiasis were the most notable oral lesions. Oral lesions were more prevalent in patients between 26–35 years of age. There was a significant difference between patients with and without pseudomembranous candidiasis and angular cheilitis according to mean level of CD4+. Conclusion: The most common oral presentations were severe periodontitis, pseudomembranous candidiasis and xerostomia. PMID:25745611

  5. Apparent helper-independent infection of woodchucks by hepatitis delta virus and subsequent rescue with woodchuck hepatitis virus.

    PubMed

    Netter, H J; Gerin, J L; Tennant, B C; Taylor, J M

    1994-09-01

    Hepatitis delta virus (HDV) is a subviral agent of humans which is dependent upon hepatitis B virus as a helper for transmission. HDV can be experimentally transmitted to woodchucks by using woodchuck hepatitis virus (WHV) as the helper. We used this model system to study two types of HDV infections: those of animals already chronically infected with WHV and those of animals without any evidence of prior exposure to WHV. At 5 to 10 days after infection with HDV, liver biopsies of these two groups of animals indicated that around 1% of the hepatocytes were infected (HDV antigen positive). Moreover, similar amounts of replicative forms of HDV RNA were detected. In contrast, by 20 days postinfection, the two groups of animals were quite different in the extent of the HDV infection. The animals chronically infected with WHV showed spread of the infection within the liver and the release of high titers of HDV into the serum. In contrast, the animals not previously exposed to WHV showed a progressive reduction in liver involvement, and at no time up to 165 days postinfection could we detect HDV particles in the serum. However, if these animals were inoculated with a relatively high titer of WHV at either 7 or even 33 days after the HDV infection, HDV viremia was observed. Our data support the interpretation that in these animals, hepatocytes were initially infected in the absence of helper virus, HDV genome replication took place, and ultimately these replicating genomes were rescued by the secondary WHV infection. The observation that HDV can survive in the liver for at least 33 days in the absence of coinfecting helper virus may be relevant to the reemergence of HDV infection following liver transplantation. PMID:8057418

  6. Atypical oral presentation of herpes simplex virus infection in a patient after orthotopic liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Burke, E M; Karp, D L; Wu, T C; Corio, R L

    1994-01-01

    An atypical oral presentation of herpes simplex virus infection in a 49-year-old woman after orthotopic liver transplantation is reported. Clinically, the differential diagnosis included chronic hyperplastic candidiasis, nodular leukoplakia of undetermined etiology, and malignant neoplasm. An excisional biopsy revealed herpesvirus infection, and immunoperoxidase staining confirmed herpes simplex virus infection. This report describes the clinical and histologic appearance of these lesions and the course and treatment of the patient. PMID:7986503

  7. Zika virus infection complicated by Guillain-Barre syndrome--case report, French Polynesia, December 2013.

    PubMed

    Oehler, E; Watrin, L; Larre, P; Leparc-Goffart, I; Lastere, S; Valour, F; Baudouin, L; Mallet, Hp; Musso, D; Ghawche, F

    2014-01-01

    Zika fever, considered as an emerging disease of arboviral origin, because of its expanding geographic area, is known as a benign infection usually presenting as an influenza-like illness with cutaneous rash. So far, Zika virus infection has never led to hospitalisation. We describe the first case of Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) occurring immediately after a Zika virus infection, during the current Zika and type 1 and 3 dengue fever co-epidemics in French Polynesia. PMID:24626205

  8. Neutralization Properties of Simian Immunodeficiency Viruses Infecting Chimpanzees and Gorillas

    PubMed Central

    Barbian, Hannah J.; Decker, Julie M.; Bibollet-Ruche, Frederic; Galimidi, Rachel P.; West, Anthony P.; Learn, Gerald H.; Parrish, Nicholas F.; Iyer, Shilpa S.; Li, Yingying; Pace, Craig S.; Song, Ruijiang; Huang, Yaoxing; Denny, Thomas N.; Mouquet, Hugo; Martin, Loic; Acharya, Priyamvada; Zhang, Baoshan; Kwong, Peter D.; Mascola, John R.; Verrips, C. Theo; Strokappe, Nika M.; Rutten, Lucy; McCoy, Laura E.; Weiss, Robin A.; Brown, Corrine S.; Jackson, Raven; Silvestri, Guido; Connors, Mark; Burton, Dennis R.; Shaw, George M.; Nussenzweig, Michel C.; Bjorkman, Pamela J.; Ho, David D.; Farzan, Michael

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Broadly cross-reactive neutralizing antibodies (bNabs) represent powerful tools to combat human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection. Here, we examined whether HIV-1-specific bNabs are capable of cross-neutralizing distantly related simian immunodeficiency viruses (SIVs) infecting central (Pan troglodytes troglodytes) (SIVcpzPtt) and eastern (Pan troglodytes schweinfurthii) (SIVcpzPts) chimpanzees (n = 11) as well as western gorillas (Gorilla gorilla gorilla) (SIVgor) (n = 1). We found that bNabs directed against the CD4 binding site (n = 10), peptidoglycans at the base of variable loop 3 (V3) (n = 5), and epitopes at the interface of surface (gp120) and membrane-bound (gp41) envelope glycoproteins (n = 5) failed to neutralize SIVcpz and SIVgor strains. In addition, apex V2-directed bNabs (n = 3) as well as llama-derived (heavy chain only) antibodies (n = 6) recognizing both the CD4 binding site and gp41 epitopes were either completely inactive or neutralized only a fraction of SIVcpzPtt strains. In contrast, one antibody targeting the membrane-proximal external region (MPER) of gp41 (10E8), functional CD4 and CCR5 receptor mimetics (eCD4-Ig, eCD4-Igmim2, CD4-218.3-E51, and CD4-218.3-E51-mim2), as well as mono- and bispecific anti-human CD4 (iMab and LM52) and CCR5 (PRO140, PRO140-10E8) receptor antibodies neutralized >90% of SIVcpz and SIVgor strains with low-nanomolar (0.13 to 8.4 nM) potency. Importantly, the latter antibodies blocked virus entry not only in TZM-bl cells but also in Cf2Th cells expressing chimpanzee CD4 and CCR5 and neutralized SIVcpz in chimpanzee CD4+ T cells, with 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC50s) ranging from 3.6 to 40.5 nM. These findings provide new insight into the protective capacity of anti-HIV-1 bNabs and identify candidates for further development to combat SIVcpz infection. PMID:25900654

  9. Impairment of Cd4+ T Cell Responses during Chronic Virus Infection Prevents Neutralizing Antibody Responses against Virus Escape Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Ciurea, Adrian; Hunziker, Lukas; Klenerman, Paul; Hengartner, Hans; Zinkernagel, Rolf M.

    2001-01-01

    We have shown previously that neutralizing antibodies (nAbs) are important contributors to the long-term immune control of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus infection, particularly if cytotoxic T cell responses are low or absent. Nevertheless, virus escape from the nAb response due to mutations within the surface glycoprotein gene may subsequently allow the virus to persist. Here we show that most of the antibody-escape viral mutants retain their immunogenicity. We present evidence that the failure of the infected host to mount effective humoral responses against emerging neutralization-escape mutants correlates with the rapid loss of CD4+ T cell responsiveness during the establishment of viral persistence. Similar mechanisms may contribute to the persistence of some human pathogens such as hepatitis B and C viruses, and human immunodeficiency virus. PMID:11157050

  10. Experimental West Nile Virus Infection in Rabbits: An Alternative Model for Studying Induction of Disease and Virus Control

    PubMed Central

    Suen, Willy W.; Uddin, Muhammad J.; Wang, Wenqi; Brown, Vienna; Adney, Danielle R.; Broad, Nicole; Prow, Natalie A.; Bowen, Richard A.; Hall, Roy A.; Bielefeldt-Ohmann, Helle

    2015-01-01

    The economic impact of non-lethal human and equine West Nile virus (WNV) disease is substantial, since it is the most common presentation of the infection. Experimental infection with virulent WNV strains in the mouse and hamster models frequently results in severe neural infection and moderate to high mortality, both of which are not representative features of most human and equine infections. We have established a rabbit model for investigating pathogenesis and immune response of non-lethal WNV infection. Two species of rabbits, New Zealand White (Oryctolagus cuniculus) and North American cottontail (Sylvilagus sp.), were experimentally infected with virulent WNV and Murray Valley encephalitis virus strains. Infected rabbits exhibited a consistently resistant phenotype, with evidence of low viremia, minimal-absent neural infection, mild-moderate neuropathology, and the lack of mortality, even though productive virus replication occurred in the draining lymph node. The kinetics of anti-WNV neutralizing antibody response was comparable to that commonly seen in infected horses and humans. This may be explained by the early IFN?/? and/or ? response evident in the draining popliteal lymph node. Given this similarity to the human and equine disease, immunocompetent rabbits are, therefore, a valuable animal model for investigating various aspects of non-lethal WNV infections. PMID:26184326

  11. Androgen-independent proliferation of LNCaP prostate cancer cells infected by xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus

    SciTech Connect

    Kakoki, Katsura; Kamiyama, Haruka; Izumida, Mai; Yashima, Yuka; Hayashi, Hideki; Yamamoto, Naoki; Matsuyama, Toshifumi; Igawa, Tsukasa; Sakai, Hideki; Kubo, Yoshinao

    2014-04-25

    Highlights: • XMRV infection induces androgen-independent growth in LNCaP cells. • XMRV infection reduces expression of androgen receptor. • XMRV promotes appearance of androgen blocker-resistant prostate cancer cells. - Abstract: Xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus (XMRV) is a novel gammaretrovirus that was originally isolated from human prostate cancer. It is now believed that XMRV is not the etiologic agent of prostate cancer. An analysis of murine leukemia virus (MLV) infection in various human cell lines revealed that prostate cancer cell lines are preferentially infected by XMRV, and this suggested that XMRV infection may confer some sort of growth advantage to prostate cancer cell lines. To examine this hypothesis, androgen-dependent LNCaP cells were infected with XMRV and tested for changes in certain cell growth properties. We found that XMRV-infected LNCaP cells can proliferate in the absence of the androgen dihydrotestosterone. Moreover, androgen receptor expression is significantly reduced in XMRV-infected LNCaP cells. Such alterations were not observed in uninfected and amphotropic MLV-infected LNCaP cells. This finding explains why prostate cancer cell lines are preferentially infected with XMRV.

  12. Experimental West Nile Virus Infection in Rabbits: An Alternative Model for Studying Induction of Disease and Virus Control.

    PubMed

    Suen, Willy W; Uddin, Muhammad J; Wang, Wenqi; Brown, Vienna; Adney, Danielle R; Broad, Nicole; Prow, Natalie A; Bowen, Richard A; Hall, Roy A; Bielefeldt-Ohmann, Helle

    2015-01-01

    The economic impact of non-lethal human and equine West Nile virus (WNV) disease is substantial, since it is the most common presentation of the infection. Experimental infection with virulent WNV strains in the mouse and hamster models frequently results in severe neural infection and moderate to high mortality, both of which are not representative features of most human and equine infections. We have established a rabbit model for investigating pathogenesis and immune response of non-lethal WNV infection. Two species of rabbits, New Zealand White (Oryctolagus cuniculus) and North American cottontail (Sylvilagus sp.), were experimentally infected with virulent WNV and Murray Valley encephalitis virus strains. Infected rabbits exhibited a consistently resistant phenotype, with evidence of low viremia, minimal-absent neural infection, mild-moderate neuropathology, and the lack of mortality, even though productive virus replication occurred in the draining lymph node. The kinetics of anti-WNV neutralizing antibody response was comparable to that commonly seen in infected horses and humans. This may be explained by the early IFN?/? and/or ? response evident in the draining popliteal lymph node. Given this similarity to the human and equine disease, immunocompetent rabbits are, therefore, a valuable animal model for investigating various aspects of non-lethal WNV infections. PMID:26184326

  13. Porcine macrophage Cdelta2+ and Cdelta2- cell lines support influenza virus infection and replication and Cdelta2+ cells mount innate immune responses to influenza virus infection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Respiratory epithelial cells are the first cells which are infected with influenza virus and these cells play a major role in influenza pathogenesis. However, many studies have shown that alveolar macrophages also play a very important role in the pathogenesis and immunity to influenza infection. Un...

  14. In-cell infection: a novel pathway for Epstein-Barr virus infection mediated by cell-in-cell structures.

    PubMed

    Ni, Chao; Chen, Yuhui; Zeng, Musheng; Pei, Rongjuan; Du, Yong; Tang, Linquan; Wang, Mengyi; Hu, Yazhuo; Zhu, Hanyu; He, Meifang; Wei, Xiawei; Wang, Shan; Ning, Xiangkai; Wang, Manna; Wang, Jufang; Ma, Li; Chen, Xinwen; Sun, Qiang; Tang, Hong; Wang, Ying; Wang, Xiaoning

    2015-07-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) can infect both susceptible B lymphocytes and non-susceptible epithelial cells (ECs). Viral tropism analyses have revealed two intriguing means of EBV infection, either by a receptor-mediated infection of B cells or by a cell-to-cell contact-mediated infection of non-susceptible ECs. Herein, we report a novel "in-cell infection" mechanism for EBV infection of non-susceptible ECs through the formation of cell-in-cell structures. Epithelial CNE-2 cells were invaded by EBV-infected Akata B cells to form cell-in-cell structures in vitro. Such unique cellular structures could be readily observed in the specimens of nasopharyngeal carcinoma. Importantly, the formation of cell-in-cell structures led to the autonomous activation of EBV within Akata cells and subsequent viral transmission to CNE-2 cells, as evidenced by the expression of viral genes and the presence of virion particles in CNE-2 cells. Significantly, EBV generated from in-cell infected ECs displayed altered tropism with higher infection efficacy to both B cells and ECs. In addition to CNE-2 tumor cells, cell-in-cell structure formation could also mediate EBV infection of NPEC1-Bmi1 cells, an immortalized nasopharyngeal epithelial cell line. Furthermore, efficient infection by this mechanism involved the activation of the PI3K/AKT signaling pathway. Thus, our study identified "in-cell infection" as a novel mechanism for EBV infection. Given the diversity of virus-infected cells and the prevalence of cell-in-cell structures during chronic infection, we speculate that "in-cell infection" is likely a general mechanism for EBV and other viruses to infect non-susceptible ECs. PMID:25916549

  15. The effect of dietary bovine colostrum on respiratory syncytial virus infection and immune responses following the infection in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Xu, Mei Ling; Kim, Hyoung Jin; Wi, Ga Ram; Kim, Hong-Jin

    2015-09-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV) is the most common cause of respiratory tract infection among young children because of immature T cell immunity of them against hRSV. CD8 T cells play a pivotal role in clearing hRSV and preventing subsequent infection. We examined the effects of dietary bovine colostrum on virus infection and CD8 T cell responses following hRSV infection in the mouse model. Mice received bovine colostrum for 14 days prior to hRSV challenge, and lung indexes (severity of symptom) and lung virus titers were analyzed. In addition, the activation of CD8 T cells in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluids (BALFs) of mice receiving bovine colostrum were compared with those in the BALFs of mice receiving phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) or ribavirin, post virus challenge. The severity of infection and lung virus titers were reduced in the mice receiving bovine colostrum, compared to those receiving PBS. Moreover CD8 T cell responses were selectively enhanced in the former. Our results suggest that dietary bovine colostrum exerts the effects to inhibit hRSV and ameliorate the symptom by hRSV infection, and enhances the CD8 T cell response during the hRSV infection. PMID:26310306

  16. Woodchuck hepatitis virus infections: very rapid recovery after a prolonged viremia and infection of virtually every hepatocyte.

    PubMed

    Kajino, K; Jilbert, A R; Saputelli, J; Aldrich, C E; Cullen, J; Mason, W S

    1994-09-01

    Earlier studies have suggested that transient hepadnavirus infections in mammals are associated with virus replication in a large fraction of hepatocytes. Although the viremia that occurred during transient infections in some individuals would presumably lead to virus replication in all hepatocytes, these studies did not reveal if this was the case. The question of the extent of hepatocyte infection was therefore reinvestigated because of the implications of the results for the mechanisms of virus clearance. Woodchucks were inoculated with woodchuck hepatitis virus, and the course of hepatic infection was determined. These studies indicated that essentially 100% of the hepatocytes became infected in the majority of woodchucks. In 7 of 10 woodchucks, the viral infection was then rapidly cleared from the liver, generally in less than 4 weeks. In another three woodchucks, though productive infection was just as rapidly cleared, viral covalently closed circular DNA remained for weeks to months after other indicators of virus infection had disappeared from the liver. Bromodeoxyuridine labeling and anti-proliferating cell nuclear antigen staining to detect hepatocytes passing through S phase indicated an increase in hepatocyte proliferation during the recovery phase of infection. The rate of cell division appeared to be sufficient to replace no more than 2 to 3% of the hepatocytes per day, at the times at which the biopsies were performed. Histopathologic evaluation of the biopsy samples did not provide evidence for a massive amount of liver regeneration. Models to explain virus clearance, with or without massive immune system-mediated destruction of infected hepatocytes, are reviewed. PMID:7914548

  17. Giant magnetoimpedance-based microchannel system for quick and parallel genotyping of human papilloma virus type 16/18

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hao; Chen, Lei; Lei, Chong; Zhang, Ju; Li, Ding; Zhou, Zhi-Min; Bao, Chen-Chen; Hu, Heng-Yao; Chen, Xiang; Cui, Feng; Zhang, Shuang-Xi; Zhou, Yong; Cui, Da-Xiang

    2010-07-01

    Quick and parallel genotyping of human papilloma virus (HPV) type 16/18 is carried out by a specially designed giant magnetoimpedance (GMI) based microchannel system. Micropatterned soft magnetic ribbon exhibiting large GMI ratio serves as the biosensor element. HPV genotyping can be determined by the changes in GMI ratio in corresponding detection region after hybridization. The result shows that this system has great potential in future clinical diagnostics and can be easily extended to other biomedical applications based on molecular recognition.

  18. Experimental co-infections of domestic ducks with a virulent Newcastle disease virus and low or highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Infections with Avian influenza viruses (AIV) of low and high pathogenicity (LP and HP), and Newcastle disease virus (NDV) are commonly reported in domestic ducks in parts of the world. However, it’s not clear if co-infections with these viruses affect the severity of the diseases they produce, the ...

  19. Wheat streak mosaic virus lacking HC-Pro is competent to produce disease synergism in mixed infections with Maize chlorotic mottle virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Single infections of maize plants with the tritimovirus Wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV) or the machlomovirus Maize chlorotic mottle virus (MCMV) are characterized by systemic chlorosis but not necrosis. Co-infection of maize with both viruses results in disease synergism and induction of corn leth...

  20. Wheat streak mosaic virus lacking HC-Pro is competent to produce disease synergism in double infections with maize chlorotic mottle virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Single infections of maize plants with the tritimovirus Wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV) or the machlomovirus Maize chlorotic mottle virus (MCMV) are characterized by systemic chlorosis but not necrosis. Co-infection of maize with both viruses results in disease synergism and induction of corn leth...

  1. Influenza virus directly infects human natural killer cells and induces cell apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Mao, Huawei; Tu, Wenwei; Qin, Gang; Law, Helen Ka Wai; Sia, Sin Fun; Chan, Ping-Lung; Liu, Yinping; Lam, Kwok-Tai; Zheng, Jian; Peiris, Malik; Lau, Yu-Lung

    2009-09-01

    Influenza is an acute respiratory viral disease that is transmitted in the first few days of infection. Evasion of host innate immune defenses, including natural killer (NK) cells, is important for the virus's success as a pathogen of humans and other animals. NK cells encounter influenza viruses within the microenvironment of infected cells and are important for host innate immunity during influenza virus infection. It is therefore important to investigate the direct effects of influenza virus on NK cells. In this study, we demonstrated for the first time that influenza virus directly infects and replicates in primary human NK cells. Viral entry into NK cells was mediated by both clathrin- and caveolin-dependent endocytosis rather than through macropinocytosis and was dependent on the sialic acids on cell surfaces. In addition, influenza virus infection induced a marked apoptosis of NK cells. Our findings suggest that influenza virus can directly target and kill NK cells, a potential novel strategy of influenza virus to evade the NK cell innate immune defense that is likely to facilitate viral transmission and may also contribute to virus pathogenesis. PMID:19587043

  2. A Bivalent Vaccine Based on a Replication-Incompetent Influenza Virus Protects against Streptococcus pneumoniae and Influenza Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Katsura, Hiroaki; Piao, Zhenyu; Iwatsuki-Horimoto, Kiyoko; Akeda, Yukihiro; Watanabe, Shinji; Horimoto, Taisuke

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Streptococcus pneumoniae is a major causative pathogen in community-acquired pneumonia; together with influenza virus, it represents an important public health burden. Although vaccination is the most effective prophylaxis against these infectious agents, no single vaccine simultaneously provides protective immunity against both S. pneumoniae and influenza virus. Previously, we demonstrated that several replication-incompetent influenza viruses efficiently elicit IgG in serum and IgA in the upper and lower respiratory tracts. Here, we generated a replication-incompetent hemagglutinin knockout (HA-KO) influenza virus possessing the sequence for the antigenic region of pneumococcal surface protein A (PspA). Although this virus (HA-KO/PspA virus) could replicate only in an HA-expressing cell line, it infected wild-type cells and expressed both viral proteins and PspA. PspA- and influenza virus-specific antibodies were detected in nasal wash and bronchoalveolar lavage fluids and in sera from mice intranasally inoculated with HA-KO/PspA virus, and mice inoculated with HA-KO/PspA virus were completely protected from lethal challenge with either S. pneumoniae or influenza virus. Further, bacterial colonization of the nasopharynx was prevented in mice immunized with HA-KO/PspA virus. These results indicate that HA-KO/PspA virus is a promising bivalent vaccine candidate that simultaneously confers protective immunity against both S. pneumoniae and influenza virus. We believe that this strategy offers a platform for the development of bivalent vaccines, based on replication-incompetent influenza virus, against pathogens that cause respiratory infectious diseases. IMPORTANCE Streptococcus pneumoniae and influenza viruses cause contagious diseases, but no single vaccine can simultaneously provide protective immunity against both pathogens. Here, we used reverse genetics to generate a replication-incompetent influenza virus carrying the sequence for the antigenic region of pneumococcal surface protein A and demonstrated that mice immunized with this virus were completely protected from lethal doses of infection with either influenza virus or Streptococcus pneumoniae. We believe that this strategy, which is based on a replication-incompetent influenza virus possessing the antigenic region of other respiratory pathogens, offers a platform for the development of bivalent vaccines. PMID:25210171

  3. NAC transcription factor family genes are differentially expressed in rice during infections with Rice dwarf virus, Rice black-streaked dwarf virus, Rice grassy stunt virus, Rice ragged stunt virus, and Rice transitory yellowing virus

    PubMed Central

    Nuruzzaman, Mohammed; Sharoni, Akhter M.; Satoh, Kouji; Karim, Mohammad Rezaul; Harikrishna, Jennifer A.; Shimizu, Takumi; Sasaya, Takahide; Omura, Toshihiro; Haque, Mohammad A.; Hasan, Sayed M. Z.; Ahmad, Aziz; Kikuchi, Shoshi

    2015-01-01

    Expression levels of the NAC gene family were studied in rice infected with Rice dwarf virus (RDV), Rice black-streaked dwarf virus (RBSDV), Rice grassy stunt virus (RGSV), Rice ragged stunt virus (RRSV), and Rice transitory yellowing virus (RTYV). Microarray analysis showed that 75 (68%) OsNAC genes were differentially regulated during infection with RDV, RBSDV, RGSV, and RRSV compared with the control. The number of OsNAC genes up-regulated was highest during RGSV infection, while the lowest number was found during RTYV infection. These phenomena correlate with the severity of the syndromes induced by the virus infections. Most of the genes in the NAC subgroups NAC22, SND, ONAC2, ANAC34, and ONAC3 were down-regulated for all virus infections. These OsNAC genes might be related to the health stage maintenance of the host plants. Interestingly, most of the genes in the subgroups TIP and SNAC were more highly expressed during RBSDV and RGSV infections. These results suggested that OsNAC genes might be related to the responses induced by the virus infection. All of the genes assigned to the TIP subgroups were highly expressed during RGSV infection when compared with the control. For RDV infection, the number of activated genes was greatest during infection with the S-strain, followed by the D84-strain and the O-strain, with seven OsNAC genes up-regulated during infection by all three strains. The Os12g03050 and Os11g05614 genes showed higher expression during infection with four of the five viruses, and Os11g03310, Os11g03370, and Os07g37920 genes showed high expression during at least three viral infections. We identified some duplicate genes that are classified as neofunctional and subfunctional according to their expression levels in different viral infections. A number of putative cis-elements were identified, which may help to clarify the function of these key genes in network pathways. PMID:26442000

  4. Worldwide occurrence of virus-infections in filamentous marine brown algae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, D. G.; Stache, B.

    1992-03-01

    Virus infections were detected in Ectocarpus siliculosus and Ectocarpus fasciculatus on the coasts of Ireland, California, Peru, southern South America, Australia and New Zealand; in three Feldmannia species on the coasts of Ireland, continental Chile and Archipelago Juan Fernandez (Chile); and in Leptonematella from Antarctica. Natural populations on the Irish coast contained 3% infected plants in E. fasciculatus, and less than 1% in Feldmannia simplex. On the Californian coast, 15 to 25% of Ectocarpus isolates were infected. Virus symptoms were absent in E. siliculosus from Peru, but appeared after meiosis in laboratory cultures. The virus particles in E. fasciculatus are identical in size and capsid structure to those reported for E. siliculosus, while the virus in F. simplex is smaller and has a different envelope. Our findings suggest that virus infections are a common and worldwide phenomenon in filamentous brown algae.

  5. Incidence, risk factors, and implemented prophylaxis of varicella zoster virus infection, including complicated varicella zoster virus and herpes simplex virus infections, in lenalidomide-treated multiple myeloma patients.

    PubMed

    König, C; Kleber, M; Reinhardt, H; Knop, S; Wäsch, R; Engelhardt, M

    2014-03-01

    In the era of high-dose chemotherapy and novel antimyeloma agents, the survival of multiple myeloma (MM) patients has substantially improved. Adverse effects, including infections, may however arise in the era of combination antimyeloma therapies. In general, MM patients have shown a risk of varicella zoster virus (VZV) infection of 1-4 %, increasing with bortezomib treatment or transplants, but whether immunomodulatory drugs also bear a risk of VZV/complicated herpes simplex virus (HSV) (e.g., VZV-encephalitis [VZV-E], disseminated VZV-infection [d-VZV-i], or conus-cauda syndrome [CCS]) has not been elucidated. We here assessed VZV, VZV-E, d-VZV-i, and CCS in 93 lenalidomide-treated MM patients, consecutively seen and treated in our department. Patients' data were analyzed via electronic medical record retrieval within our research data warehouse as described previously. Of the 93 MM patients receiving lenalidomide, 10 showed VZV or other complicated VZV/HSV infections. These VZV patients showed defined risk factors as meticulously assessed, including suppressed lymphocyte subsets, substantial cell-mediated immune defects, and compromised humoral immune response. Due to our findings-and in line with an aciclovir prophylaxis in bortezomib and stem cell transplant protocols-we introduced a routine aciclovir prophylaxis in our lenalidomide protocols in May 2012 to minimize adverse events and to avoid discontinuation of lenalidomide treatment. Since then, we have observed no case of VZV/complicated HSV infection. Based on our data, we encourage other centers to also focus on these observations, assess viral infections, and-in those centers facilitating a research data warehouse-advocate an analogue data review as an appropriate multicenter approach. PMID:24318541

  6. Suppression of shrimp melanization during white spot syndrome virus infection.

    PubMed

    Sutthangkul, Jantiwan; Amparyup, Piti; Charoensapsri, Walaiporn; Senapin, Saengchan; Phiwsaiya, Kornsunee; Tassanakajon, Anchalee

    2015-03-01

    The melanization cascade, activated by the prophenoloxidase (proPO) system, plays a key role in the production of cytotoxic intermediates, as well as melanin products for microbial sequestration in invertebrates. Here, we show that the proPO system is an important component of the Penaeus monodon shrimp immune defense toward a major viral pathogen, white spot syndrome virus (WSSV). Gene silencing of PmproPO(s) resulted in increased cumulative shrimp mortality after WSSV infection, whereas incubation of WSSV with an in vitro melanization reaction prior to injection into shrimp significantly increased the shrimp survival rate. The hemolymph phenoloxidase (PO) activity of WSSV-infected shrimp was extremely reduced at days 2 and 3 post-injection compared with uninfected shrimp but was fully restored after the addition of exogenous trypsin, suggesting that WSSV probably inhibits the activity of some proteinases in the proPO cascade. Using yeast two-hybrid screening and co-immunoprecipitation assays, the viral protein WSSV453 was found to interact with the proPO-activating enzyme 2 (PmPPAE2) of P. monodon. Gene silencing of WSSV453 showed a significant increase of PO activity in WSSV-infected shrimp, whereas co-silencing of WSSV453 and PmPPAE2 did not, suggesting that silencing of WSSV453 partially restored the PO activity via PmPPAE2 in WSSV-infected shrimp. Moreover, the activation of PO activity in shrimp plasma by PmPPAE2 was significantly decreased by preincubation with recombinant WSSV453. These results suggest that the inhibition of the shrimp proPO system by WSSV partly occurs via the PmPPAE2-inhibiting activity of WSSV453. PMID:25572398

  7. Simeprevir for the treatment of hepatitis C virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Izquierdo, Laure; Helle, François; François, Catherine; Castelain, Sandrine; Duverlie, Gilles; Brochot, Etienne

    2014-01-01

    Simeprevir (TMC435, Olysio™), a second-generation hepatitis C virus (HCV) protease inhibitor, has been recently approved for the treatment of genotype 1 chronic hepatitis C in combination with pegylated interferon and ribavirin. This molecule has very different characteristics from first-generation protease inhibitors. Results from trials show that simeprevir is highly effective and safe, with few adverse events. We discuss the specific features of this new treatment option for HCV infection, in terms of in vitro data, pharmacological data, and clinical trials. We also discuss the impact of Q80K polymorphism at baseline. Studies evaluating interferon-free regimens with simeprevir are ongoing. Future combinations of two or more direct-acting antiviral agents, targeting different viral enzymes and with synergistic antiviral effects, will be approved, allowing treatment of pan-genotypic HCV with optimized sustained virologic responses. Simeprevir will undoubtedly be part of future treatment strategies. PMID:25206310

  8. An epidemiological investigation of Norwalk virus infection in South Africa.

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, M. B.; Parker, S.; Grabow, W. O.; Cubitt, W. D.

    1996-01-01

    A study was carried out to determine the incidence and seroprevalence of Norwalk virus (NV) in the Pretoria area, South Africa, using a recombinant NV (rNV) immunoassay for the detection of serum IgG antibodies. Maternal antibody was detectable in infants' sera up to approximately 6 months of age. Infection with NV was detected serologically in the second year of life and the seroprevalence of NV IgG rose from 37.1% at 7-11 months of age to 62.1% by the age of 40 years. No significant differences in seroprevalence of NV IgG antibody was evident between subjects of European or African ethnic origin, where overall seroprevalence rates were 56.4% and 53.9% respectively. PMID:8620912

  9. Direct Correlation between Sialic Acid Binding and Infection of Cells by Two Human Polyomaviruses (JC Virus and BK Virus)?

    PubMed Central

    Dugan, Aisling S.; Gasparovic, Megan L.; Atwood, Walter J.

    2008-01-01

    For the human polyomaviruses JC virus (JCV) and BK virus (BKV), the first step to a successful infection involves binding to sialic acid moieties located on the surfaces of host cells. By stripping and then reconstituting specific sialic acid linkages on host cells, we show that JCV uses both ?(2,3)-linked and ?(2,6)-linked sialic acids on N-linked glycoproteins to infect cells. For both JCV and BKV, the sialic acid linkages required for cell surface binding directly correlate with the linkages required for infection. In addition to sialic acid linkage data, these data suggest that the third sugar from the carbohydrate chain terminus is important for virus binding and infection. PMID:18094176

  10. Factors predicting kidney damage in Puumala virus infected patients in Southern Denmark.

    PubMed

    Skarphedinsson, S; Thiesson, H C; Shakar, S A; Tepel, M

    2015-10-01

    In Europe, infections with Puumala hantavirus cause nephropathia epidemica. Presently the risk factors predicting severe kidney damage after Puumala virus infection are not well known. The objective of the study was to investigate environmental and individual factors predicting severe kidney damage caused by serologically established Puumala infections. In a nationwide cohort study we investigated all serologically established Puumala infections in Southern Denmark from 1996 to 2012. A total of 184 patients had serologically verified Puumala virus infection. In patients with Puumala virus infections the decrease of platelet counts preceded acute kidney failure. Multivariable logistic regression demonstrated that recent activities in the forest, platelet counts, and flu-like symptoms predicted estimated glomerular filtration rates less than 30 mL/min/1.73 m(²), but not age, gender, fever, nor abdominal pain. Severe kidney damage in Puumala infections in Southern Denmark is associated with the risk of recent activities in the forest. PMID:26205664

  11. Lytic JC virus infection in the kidneys of AIDS subjects.

    PubMed

    Boldorini, Renzo; Omodeo-Zorini, Elisabetta; Nebuloni, Manuela; Benigni, Elisabetta; Vago, Luca; Ferri, Angelita; Monga, Guido

    2003-01-01

    Our objective was to investigate the role of the human polyomavirus JC virus as a possible cause of renal damage in AIDS subjects. Histology, immunohistochemistry, and molecular biology were used to evaluate the frequency of viral infection, genotypes, viral status, and the presence of rearrangements or point mutations in specific genomic regions of strains isolated from renal tissue. Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded sections of postmortem renal specimens obtained from 111 unselected AIDS patients were stained for routine histology and with anti-SV40 antibody. The immunohistochemically positive specimens were further investigated by means of nested polymerase chain reaction for different polyomavirus genomic regions (large T, transcriptional control region, and viral protein 1). Furthermore, the sequences of transcriptional control region and viral protein 1 were also analyzed. Immunohistochemistry was positive in seven cases (6.3%), four of which showed morphological evidence of viral replication (intranuclear inclusion bodies and/or intratubular cellular casts): in all seven cases, only epithelial tubular cells (with and without inclusion bodies) and cellular casts were stained. The JC virus genome was identified by polymerase chain reaction in five of the seven immunohistochemically positive cases; transcriptional control region and viral protein 1 were amplified in, respectively, three and four cases. Transcriptional control region sequence analysis revealed major rearrangements in all three cases, with duplications of all the transcriptional factor-binding sites, whereas no point mutations were found in the viral protein 1 region, which was characterized as Type 1A in all cases. For the first time in AIDS subjects, this study shows that although rarely, JC virus can replicate in renal tissue. Molecular biology revealed major rearrangements in the transcriptional control region that, together with other unknown factors, could justify the increased pathogenicity of this human polyomavirus. PMID:12527711

  12. Chronic hepatitis C virus infection and lipoprotein metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Aizawa, Yoshio; Seki, Nobuyoshi; Nagano, Tomohisa; Abe, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a hepatotrophic virus and a major cause of chronic liver disease, including hepatocellular carcinoma, worldwide. The life cycle of HCV is closely associated with the metabolism of lipids and lipoproteins. The main function of lipoproteins is transporting lipids throughout the body. Triglycerides, free cholesterol, cholesteryl esters, and phospholipids are the major components of the transported lipids. The pathway of HCV assembly and secretion is closely linked to lipoprotein production and secretion, and the infectivity of HCV particles largely depends on the interaction of lipoproteins. Moreover, HCV entry into hepatocytes is strongly influenced by lipoproteins. The key lipoprotein molecules mediating these interactions are apolipoproteins. Apolipoproteins are amphipathic proteins on the surface of a lipoprotein particle, which help stabilize lipoprotein structure. They perform a key role in lipoprotein metabolism by serving as receptor ligands, enzyme co-factors, and lipid transport carriers. Understanding the association between the life cycle of HCV and lipoprotein metabolism is important because each step of the life cycle of HCV that is associated with lipoprotein metabolism is a potential target for anti-HCV therapy. In this article, we first concisely review the nature of lipoprotein and its metabolism to better understand the complicated interaction of HCV with lipoprotein. Then, we review the outline of the processes of HCV assembly, secretion, and entry into hepatocytes, focusing on the association with lipoproteins. Finally, we discuss the clinical aspects of disturbed lipid/lipoprotein metabolism and the significance of dyslipoproteinemia in chronic HCV infection with regard to abnormal apolipoproteins. PMID:26420957

  13. Avian Influenza Virus Infection Risk in Humans with Chronic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Yaogang; Qin, Yannan; Yu, Hanjie; Yu, Jingmin; Wu, Haoxiang; Chen, Lin; Zhang, Peixin; Wang, Xiurong; Jia, Zhansheng; Guo, Yonghong; Zhang, Hua; Shan, Junjie; Wang, Yuxia; Xie, Hailong; Li, Xiaojie; Li, Zheng

    2015-01-01

    Saliva proteins may protect older people from influenza, however, it is often noted that hospitalizations and deaths after an influenza infection mainly occur in the elderly population living with chronic diseases, such as diabetes and cancer. Our objective was to investigate the expression level of the terminal ?2-3- and ?2-6-linked sialic acids in human saliva from type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), liver disease and gastric cancer (GC) patients and assess the binding activity of these linked sialic acids against influenza A viruses (IAV). We observed that the expression level of the terminal ?2-3-linked sialic acids of elderly individuals with T2DM and liver disease were down-regulated significantly, and the terminal ?2-6 linked sialic acids were up-regulated slightly or had no significant alteration. However, in the saliva of patients with GC, neither sialic acid was significantly altered. These findings may reveal that elderly individuals with chronic diseases, such as diabetes and liver disease, might be more susceptible to the avian influenza virus due to the decreased expression of terminal ?2-3-linked sialic acids in their saliva. PMID:25754427

  14. West Nile virus infection in Eastern fox squirrels (Sciurus niger).

    PubMed

    Kiupel, M; Simmons, H A; Fitzgerald, S D; Wise, A; Sikarskie, J G; Cooley, T M; Hollamby, S R; Maes, R

    2003-11-01

    Since the initial outbreak of West Nile virus (WNV) in the northeastern United States in 1999, the virus has rapidly spread westward and southward across the USA, causing high mortality in crows as well as sporadic mortality in horses, humans, and a wide variety of birds. In 2002 the epidemic widened as hundreds of equine and human cases and sporadic cases in other mammalian species were reported. This is the first report of WNV infection in three Eastern fox squirrels (Sciurus niger). Neurologic signs included head tilt, uncoordinated movement, paralysis, and tremors. Gross lesions were absent. Microscopic lesions consisted of lymphoplasmacytic inflammation involving the brain, heart, kidney, and liver. Formalin-fixed tissues from the three squirrels were tested for WNV antigen by immunohistochemical staining and for WNV-specific RNA by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The kidneys of all three squirrels stained positive with immunohistochemistry for WNV, whereas the brain and heart were positive in only one animal. Two of the three squirrels were positive for WNV by RT-PCR. PMID:14608026

  15. Effects of cell culture and laboratory conditions on type 2 dengue virus infectivity.

    PubMed Central

    Manning, J S; Collins, J K

    1979-01-01

    The stability of type 2 dengue virus to exposure to a variety of laboratory conditions was determined. Suckling mouse brain passage virus was adapted for growth in BHK-21 cells, and plaque assays were performed using a tragacanth gum overlay. A three- to fourfold increase in plaque size could be obtained if monolayers were subconfluent at time of inoculation. Incubation of virus for 24 h at 37 degrees C, pH 6.5, or in buffer containing 1 mM ethylenediaminetetraacetate considerably reduced virus infectivity as compared with virus incubated for the same period at 4 degrees C, pH 8.0, or in buffer with or without 1 mM CaCl2 and 1 mM MgCl2. Multiple freezing and thawing of virus tissue culture medium containing 10% fetal calf serum did not reduce virus infectivity. Images PMID:41848

  16. Host antiviral defenses induced by a mesogenic strain of Newcastle disease virus prevents infection with a highly pathogenic avian influenza virus in chickens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Avian influenza virus (AIV) and Newcastle disease virus (NDV) are two of the most important viruses affecting poultry worldwide. Co-infections of poultry with AIV and NDV are a problem from both the clinical point of view and the diagnosis of these viruses. To evaluate the dynamics of AIV-NDV co-i...

  17. Experimental co-infection of chickens with lentogenic, mesogenic and velogenic strains of Newcastle disease viruses and highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Avian influenza virus (AIV) and Newcastle disease virus (NDV) are two of the most economically important viruses affecting poultry worldwide. Co-infections of poultry with AIV and NDV are a problem from the clinical point of view and diagnosis of these viruses, but little is known on t...

  18. Lymphadenopathy in Patients With Chikungunya Virus Infection Imported From Hispaniola: Case Reports.

    PubMed

    Norman, Francesca F; Monge-Maillo, Begoña; Perez-Molina, Jose-Antonio; de Ory, Fernando; Franco, Leticia; Sánchez-Seco, María-Paz; López-Vélez, Rogelio

    2015-01-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is currently spreading in the Caribbean and America. Lymphadenopathy, described in infections with other alphaviruses, is not commonly reported in CHIKV infections. Painful lymphadenopathy was found in three of the first six CHIKV infections from the current outbreak diagnosed at a reference center in Madrid, Spain. PMID:25828151

  19. West Nile Virus and Greater Sage-Grouse: Estimating Infection Rate in a Wild Bird Population

    E-print Network

    Naugle, Dave

    Pre PrintIn Press West Nile Virus and Greater Sage-Grouse: Estimating Infection Rate in a Wild Bird of the population that is infected. Greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) in western North America and seroprevalence from radiomarked females to estimate infection rates in a wild greater sage-grouse population

  20. Experimental infection of pregnant goats with bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV)1 or 2

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Infections with bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) of the genus pestivirus, family Flaviviridae, are not limited to cattle but occur in various artiodactyls. Persistently infected (PI) cattle are the main source of BVDV. Persistent infections also occur in heterologous hosts such as sheep and deer. ...

  1. Acute infection with venezuelan equine encephalitis virus replicon particles catalyzes a systemic antiviral state and protects from lethal virus challenge.

    PubMed

    Konopka, Jennifer L; Thompson, Joseph M; Whitmore, Alan C; Webb, Drue L; Johnston, Robert E

    2009-12-01

    The host innate immune response provides a critical first line of defense against invading pathogens, inducing an antiviral state to impede the spread of infection. While numerous studies have documented antiviral responses within actively infected tissues, few have described the earliest innate response induced systemically by infection. Here, utilizing Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEE) replicon particles (VRP) to limit infection to the initially infected cells in vivo, a rapid activation of the antiviral response was demonstrated not only within the murine draining lymph node, where replication was confined, but also within distal tissues. In the liver and brain, expression of interferon-stimulated genes was detected by 1 to 3 h following VRP footpad inoculation, reaching peak expression of >100-fold over that in mock-infected animals. Moreover, mice receiving a VRP footpad inoculation 6, 12, or 24 h prior to an otherwise lethal VEE footpad challenge were completely protected from death, including a drastic reduction in challenge virus titers. VRP pretreatment also provided protection from intranasal VEE challenge and extended the average survival time following intracranial challenge. Signaling through the interferon receptor was necessary for antiviral gene induction and protection from VEE challenge. However, VRP pretreatment failed to protect mice from a heterologous, lethal challenge with vesicular stomatitis virus, yet conferred protection following challenge with influenza virus. Collectively, these results document a rapid modulation of the host innate response within hours of infection, capable of rapidly alerting the entire animal to pathogen invasion and leading to protection from viral disease. PMID:19793821

  2. Cutthroat trout virus as a surrogate in vitro infection model for testing inhibitors of hepatitis E virus replication

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Debing, Yannick; Winton, James; Neyts, Johan; Dallmeier, Kai

    2013-01-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is one of the most important causes of acute hepatitis worldwide. Although most infections are self-limiting, mortality is particularly high in pregnant women. Chronic infections can occur in transplant and other immune-compromised patients. Successful treatment of chronic hepatitis E has been reported with ribavirin and pegylated interferon-alpha, however severe side effects were observed. We employed the cutthroat trout virus (CTV), a non-pathogenic fish virus with remarkable similarities to HEV, as a potential surrogate for HEV and established an antiviral assay against this virus using the Chinook salmon embryo (CHSE-214) cell line. Ribavirin and the respective trout interferon were found to efficiently inhibit CTV replication. Other known broad-spectrum inhibitors of RNA virus replication such as the nucleoside analog 2?-C-methylcytidine resulted only in a moderate antiviral activity. In its natural fish host, CTV levels largely fluctuate during the reproductive cycle with the virus detected mainly during spawning. We wondered whether this aspect of CTV infection may serve as a surrogate model for the peculiar pathogenesis of HEV in pregnant women. To that end the effect of three sex steroids on in vitro CTV replication was evaluated. Whereas progesterone resulted in marked inhibition of virus replication, testosterone and 17?-estradiol stimulated viral growth. Our data thus indicate that CTV may serve as a surrogate model for HEV, both for antiviral experiments and studies on the replication biology of the Hepeviridae.

  3. Cutthroat trout virus as a surrogate in vitro infection model for testing inhibitors of hepatitis E virus replication.

    PubMed

    Debing, Yannick; Winton, James; Neyts, Johan; Dallmeier, Kai

    2013-10-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is one of the most important causes of acute hepatitis worldwide. Although most infections are self-limiting, mortality is particularly high in pregnant women. Chronic infections can occur in transplant and other immune-compromised patients. Successful treatment of chronic hepatitis E has been reported with ribavirin and pegylated interferon-alpha, however severe side effects were observed. We employed the cutthroat trout virus (CTV), a non-pathogenic fish virus with remarkable similarities to HEV, as a potential surrogate for HEV and established an antiviral assay against this virus using the Chinook salmon embryo (CHSE-214) cell line. Ribavirin and the respective trout interferon were found to efficiently inhibit CTV replication. Other known broad-spectrum inhibitors of RNA virus replication such as the nucleoside analog 2'-C-methylcytidine resulted only in a moderate antiviral activity. In its natural fish host, CTV levels largely fluctuate during the reproductive cycle with the virus detected mainly during spawning. We wondered whether this aspect of CTV infection may serve as a surrogate model for the peculiar pathogenesis of HEV in pregnant women. To that end the effect of three sex steroids on in vitro CTV replication was evaluated. Whereas progesterone resulted in marked inhibition of virus replication, testosterone and 17?-estradiol stimulated viral growth. Our data thus indicate that CTV may serve as a surrogate model for HEV, both for antiviral experiments and studies on the replication biology of the Hepeviridae. PMID:23916729

  4. Visualization of the African swine fever virus infection in living cells by incorporation into the virus particle of green fluorescent protein-p54 membrane protein chimera

    SciTech Connect

    Hernaez, Bruno . E-mail: hernaez@inia.es; Escribano, Jose M. . E-mail: escriban@inia.es; Alonso, Covadonga . E-mail: calonso@inia.es

    2006-06-20

    Many stages of African swine fever virus infection have not yet been studied in detail. To track the behavior of African swine fever virus (ASFV) in the infected cells in real time, we produced an infectious recombinant ASFV (B54GFP-2) that expresses and incorporates into the virus particle a chimera of the p54 envelope protein fused to the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP). The incorporation of the fusion protein into the virus particle was confirmed immunologically and it was determined that p54-EGFP was fully functional by confirmation that the recombinant virus made normal-sized plaques and presented similar growth curves to the wild-type virus. The tagged virus was visualized as individual fluorescent particles during the first stages of infection and allowed to visualize the infection progression in living cells through the viral life cycle by confocal microscopy. In this work, diverse potential applications of B54GFP-2 to study different aspects of ASFV infection are shown. By using this recombinant virus it was possible to determine the trajectory and speed of intracellular virus movement. Additionally, we have been able to visualize for first time the ASFV factory formation dynamics and the cytophatic effect of the virus in live infected cells. Finally, we have analyzed virus progression along the infection cycle and infected cell death as time-lapse animations.

  5. Determination of natural versus laboratory human infection with Mayaro virus by molecular analysis.

    PubMed

    Junt, T; Heraud, J M; Lelarge, J; Labeau, B; Talarmin, A

    1999-12-01

    A laboratory worker developed clinical signs of infection with Mayaro virus (Togaviridae), an arbovirus of South and Central America, 6 days after preparation of Mayaro viral antigen and 10 days after a trip to a rain forest. There was no evidence of skin lesions during the antigen preparation, and level 3 containment safety measures were followed. Therefore, molecular characterization of the virus was undertaken to identify the source of infection. RT-PCR and DNA sequence comparisons proved the infection was with the laboratory strain. Airborne Mayaro virus contamination is thus a hazard to laboratory personnel. PMID:10694165

  6. Natural Bagaza virus infection in game birds in southern Spain

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    In late summer 2010 a mosquito born flavivirus not previously reported in Europe called Bagaza virus (BAGV) caused high mortality in red-legged partridges (Alectoris rufa) and ring-necked pheasants (Phasianus colchicus). We studied clinical findings, lesions and viral antigen distribution in naturally BAGV infected game birds in order to understand the apparently higher impact on red-legged partridges. The disease induced neurologic signs in the two galliform species and, to a lesser extent, in common wood pigeons (Columba palumbus). In red-legged partridges infection by BAGV caused severe haemosiderosis in the liver and spleen that was absent in pheasants and less evident in common wood pigeons. Also, BAGV antigen was present in vascular endothelium in multiple organs in red-legged partridges, and in the spleen in common wood pigeons, while in ring-necked pheasants it was only detected in neurons and glial cells in the brain. These findings indicate tropism of BAGV for endothelial cells and a severe haemolytic process in red-legged partridges in addition to the central nervous lesions that were found in all three species. PMID:22966904

  7. Incident Hepatitis C Virus Infection among US HIV-Infected Men Enrolled in Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Holubar, Marisa; Wu, Kunling; Bosch, Ronald J.; Wyles, David L.; Davis, John A.; Mayer, Kenneth H.; Sherman, Kenneth E.; Tashima, Karen T.

    2011-01-01

    Background.?Outbreaks of sexually transmitted hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection have been reported among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)–infected men who have sex with men in Europe, Australia, and New York. Whether this is occurring across the United States is unknown. Methods.?We determined incidence of HCV infection during 1996–2008 among male participants of the AIDS Clinical Trial Group Longitudinal Linked Randomized Trials cohort, a long-term study of HIV-infected persons randomized into selected US-based clinical trials. We evaluated associations with self-reported injection drug use (IDU), time-varying CD4+ cell count, and HIV RNA level with use of multivariate Poisson regression. No sexual or non-IDU risk factor data was available. Results.?A total of 1830 men had an initial negative HCV antibody test result and at least 1 subsequent HCV antibody test result, contributing >7000 person-years. At the time of the initial negative HCV antibody test result, 94% of men were receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) and 6% reported current or prior IDU. Thirty-six seroconverted, with overall incidence of .51 cases per 100 person-years (95% confidence interval, .36–.70). Mean age at seroconversion was 46 years. Seroconversion was associated with IDU (25% of seroconverters reported IDU history vs 5% of nonseroconverters; P < .001), whereas 75% (n = 27) of seroconverters reported no IDU (incidence, 2.67 cases per 100 person-years among IDUs, .40 cases per 100 person-years among non-IDUs). Seroconversion was associated with HIV RNA level >400 copies/mL (44% at time of antibody positivity vs 21% at time of last negative antibody test result; P = .02) but not with CD4+ cell count. Conclusions.?Incident HCV infection occurs in HIV-infected men involved in US HIV therapeutic trials, primarily through nonparenteral means, despite engagement in care and HAART. HCV antibody development was not related to immune status but was associated with inadequate HIV suppression. At-risk HIV-infected persons should have access to HCV surveillance. PMID:21282184

  8. Influenza A virus infection in zebrafish recapitulates mammalian infection and sensitivity to anti-influenza drug treatment

    PubMed Central

    Gabor, Kristin A.; Goody, Michelle F.; Mowel, Walter K.; Breitbach, Meghan E.; Gratacap, Remi L.; Witten, P. Eckhard; Kim, Carol H.

    2014-01-01

    Seasonal influenza virus infections cause annual epidemics and sporadic pandemics. These present a global health concern, resulting in substantial morbidity, mortality and economic burdens. Prevention and treatment of influenza illness is difficult due to the high mutation rate of the virus, the emergence of new virus strains and increasing antiviral resistance. Animal models of influenza infection are crucial to our gaining a better understanding of the pathogenesis of and host response to influenza infection, and for screening antiviral compounds. However, the current animal models used for influenza research are not amenable to visualization of host-pathogen interactions or high-throughput drug screening. The zebrafish is widely recognized as a valuable model system for infectious disease research and therapeutic drug testing. Here, we describe a zebrafish model for human influenza A virus (IAV) infection and show that zebrafish embryos are susceptible to challenge with both influenza A strains APR8 and X-31 (Aichi). Influenza-infected zebrafish show an increase in viral burden and mortality over time. The expression of innate antiviral genes, the gross pathology and the histopathology in infected zebrafish recapitulate clinical symptoms of influenza infections in humans. This is the first time that zebrafish embryos have been infected with a fluorescent IAV in order to visualize infection in a live vertebrate host, revealing a pattern of vascular endothelial infection. Treatment of infected zebrafish with a known anti-influenza compound, Zanamivir, reduced mortality and the expression of a fluorescent viral gene product, demonstrating the validity of this model to screen for potential antiviral drugs. The zebrafish model system has provided invaluable insights into host-pathogen interactions for a range of infectious diseases. Here, we demonstrate a novel use of this species for IAV research. This model has great potential to advance our understanding of influenza infection and the associated host innate immune response. PMID:25190709

  9. Molecular Characterization of Adeno-Associated Viruses Infecting Children

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chun-Liang; Jensen, Ryan L.; Schnepp, Bruce C.; Connell, Mary J.; Shell, Richard; Sferra, Thomas J.; Bartlett, Jeffrey S.; Clark, K. Reed; Johnson, Philip R.

    2005-01-01

    Although adeno-associated virus (AAV) infection is common in humans, the biology of natural infection is poorly understood. Since it is likely that many primary AAV infections occur during childhood, we set out to characterize the frequency and complexity of circulating AAV isolates in fresh and archived frozen human pediatric tissues. Total cellular DNA was isolated from 175 tissue samples including freshly collected tonsils (n = 101) and archived frozen samples representing spleen (n = 21), lung (n = 16), muscle (n = 15), liver (n?= 19), and heart (n = 3). Samples were screened for the presence of AAV and adenovirus sequences by PCR using degenerate primers. AAV DNA was detected in 7 of 101 (7%) tonsil samples and two of 74 other tissues (one spleen and one lung). Adenovirus sequences were identified in 19 of 101 tonsils (19%), but not in any other tissues. Complete capsid gene sequences were recovered from all nine AAV-positive tissues. Sequence analyses showed that eight of the capsid sequences were AAV2-like (?98% amino acid identity), while the single spleen isolate was intermediate between serotypes 2 and 3. Comparison to the available AAV2 crystal structure revealed that the majority of the amino acid substitutions mapped to surface-exposed hypervariable domains. To further characterize the AAV capsid structure in these samples, we used a novel linear rolling-circle amplification method to amplify episomal AAV DNA and isolate infectious molecular clones from several human tissues. Serotype 2-like viruses were generated from these DNA clones and interestingly, failed to bind to a heparin sulfate column. Inspection of the capsid sequence from these two clones (and the other six AAV2-like isolates) revealed that they lacked arginine residues at positions 585 and 588 of the capsid protein, which are thought to be essential for interaction with the heparin sulfate proteoglycan coreceptor. These data provide a framework with which to explore wild-type AAV persistence in vivo and provide additional tools to further define the biodistribution and form of AAV in human tissues. PMID:16282478

  10. Replication Inhibition of Hepatitis B Virus and Hepatitis C Virus in Co-Infected Patients in Chinese Population

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Ruihong; Wang, Xiaomei; Gao, Xiuzhu; Kong, Fei; Feng, Xiangwei; Gao, Yuanda; Huang, Xinxing; Jin, Jinglan; Qi, Yue; Tu, Zhengkun; Sun, Bing; Zhong, Jin; Pan, Yu; Niu, Junqi

    2015-01-01

    Background Hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) co-infections contributes to a substantial proportion of liver disease worldwide. The aim of this study was to assess the clinical and virological features of HBV-HCV co-infection. Methods Demographic data were collected for 3238 high-risk people from an HCV-endemic region in China. Laboratory tests included HCV antibody and HBV serological markers, liver function tests, and routine blood analysis. Anti-HCV positive samples were analyzed for HCV RNA levels and subgenotypes. HBsAg-positive samples were tested for HBV DNA. Results A total of 1468 patients had chronic HCV and/or HBV infections. Among them, 1200 individuals were classified as HCV mono-infected, 161 were classified as HBV mono-infected, and 107 were classified as co-infected. The HBV-HCV co-infected patients not only had a lower HBV DNA positive rate compared to HBV mono-infected patients (84.1% versus 94.4%, respectively; P<0.001). The median HCV RNA levels in HBV-HCV co-infected patients were significantly lower than those in the HCV mono-infected patients (1.18[Interquartile range (IQR) 0–5.57] versus 5.87[IQR, 3.54–6.71] Log10 IU/mL, respectively; P<0.001). Furthermore, co-infected patients were less likely to have detectable HCV RNA levels than HCV mono-infected patients (23.4% versus 56.5%, respectively; P<0.001). Those HBV-HCV co-infected patients had significantly lower median HBV DNA levels than those mono-infected with HBV (1.97[IQR, 1.3–3.43] versus 3.06[IQR, 2–4.28] Log10 IU/mL, respectively; P<0.001). The HBV-HCV co-infection group had higher ALT, AST, ALP, GGT, APRI and FIB-4 levels, but lower ALB and total platelet compared to the HBV mono-infection group, and similar to that of the HCV mono-infected group. Conclusion These results suggest that co-infection with HCV and HBV inhibits the replication of both viruses. The serologic results of HBV-HCV co-infection in patients suggests more liver injury compared to HBV mono-infected patients, but is similar to HCV mono-infection. PMID:26422607

  11. Retrospective Serology Study of Respiratory Virus Infections in Captive Great Apes

    PubMed Central

    Buitendijk, Hester; Fagrouch, Zahra; Niphuis, Henk; Bogers, Willy M.; Warren, Kristin S.; Verschoor, Ernst J.

    2014-01-01

    Great apes are extremely sensitive to infections with human respiratory viruses. In this study, we retrospectively analyzed sera from captive chimpanzees, gorillas and orang-utans. More than 1000 sera (403 chimpanzee, 77 gorilla, and 535 orang-utan sera) were analyzed for antibodies to the human respiratory viruses RSV (respiratory syncytial virus, hMPV (human metapneumovirus), H1N1 and H3N2 influenza A viruses, and influenza B virus. In all ape species high seroprevalences were found for RSV, hMPV, and influenza B virus. A high percentage of captive chimpanzees also showed evidence of influenza A H1N1 infections, and had low levels of H3N2 antibodies, while in sera from gorillas and orang-utans antibody levels to influenza A and B viruses were much lower or practically absent. Transmission of respiratory viruses was examined in longitudinal sera of young chimpanzees, and in chimpanzee sera taken during health checks. In young animals isolated cases of influenza infections were monitored, but evidence was found for single introductions followed by a rapid dissemination of RSV and hMPV within the group. Implementation of strict guidelines for handling and housing of nonhuman primates was shown to be an efficient method to reduce the introduction of respiratory infections in colonies of captive animals. RSV seroprevalence rates of chimpanzees remained high, probably due to circulating virus in the chimpanzee colony. PMID:24662675

  12. Determination of Baylisascaris schroederi Infection in Wild Giant Pandas by an Accurate and Sensitive PCR/CE-SSCP Method

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wenping; Yie, Shangmian; Yue, Bisong; Zhou, Jielong; An, Renxiong; Yang, Jiangdong; Chen, Wangli; Wang, Chengdong; Zhang, Liang; Shen, Fujun; Yang, Guangyou; Hou, Rong; Zhang, Zhihe

    2012-01-01

    It has been recognized that other than habitat loss, degradation and fragmentation, the infection of the roundworm Baylisascaris schroederi (B. schroederi) is one of the major causes of death in wild giant pandas. However, the prevalence and intensity of the parasite infection has been inconsistently reported through a method that uses sedimentation-floatation followed by a microscope examination. This method fails to accurately determine infection because there are many bamboo residues and/or few B. schroederi eggs in the examined fecal samples. In the present study, we adopted a method that uses PCR and capillary electrophoresis combined with a single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis (PCR/CE-SSCP) to detect B. schroederi infection in wild giant pandas at a nature reserve, and compared it to the traditional microscope approach. The PCR specifically amplified a single band of 279-bp from both fecal samples and positive controls, which was confirmed by sequence analysis to correspond to the mitochondrial COII gene of B. schroederi. Moreover, it was demonstrated that the amount of genomic DNA was linearly correlated with the peak area of the CE-SSCP analysis. Thus, our adopted method can reliably detect the infectious prevalence and intensity of B. schroederi in wild giant pandas. The prevalence of B. schroederi was found to be 54% in the 91 fecal samples examined, and 48% in the fecal samples of 31 identified individual giant pandas. Infectious intensities of the 91 fecal samples were detected to range from 2.8 to 959.2 units/gram, and from 4.8 to 959.2 units/gram in the fecal samples of the 31 identified giant pandas. For comparison, by using the traditional microscope method, the prevalence of B. schroederi was found to be only 33% in the 91 fecal samples, 32% in the fecal samples of the 31 identified giant pandas, and no reliable infectious intensity was observed. PMID:22911871

  13. The cationic cytokine IL-26 differentially modulates virus infection in culture.

    PubMed

    Braum, Oliver; Klages, Michael; Fickenscher, Helmut

    2013-01-01

    Interleukin-26 (IL-26) belongs to the IL-10 cytokine family, is produced by activated T cells, and targets epithelial target cells for signal transduction. Here, we describe the IL-26 effects on the infection of culture cells with recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV), human cytomegalovirus (HCMV), and herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) expressing green fluorescent protein. After pre-incubation with recombinant IL-26 and at low multiplicity of infection, VSV showed strongly enhanced infection and replication rates as measured for infectivity, for transcript levels, and for protein expression. Control proteins did not affect VSV infection. The IL-26 effect was independent of the IL-26 receptor and neutralized by anti-IL-26 serum. Pre-incubation of VSV was much more efficient than pre-incubation of the target cells to enhance virus infection. IL-26 increased virus adsorption to target cells as shown by quantitative reverse-transcription PCR. In contrast, the infection of IL-26-treated human fibroblasts with HCMV was inhibited and the infection by HSV-1 was not altered by IL-26. Thus, IL-26 differentially modulates the infection by different enveloped viruses. PMID:23875025

  14. The Cationic Cytokine IL-26 Differentially Modulates Virus Infection in Culture

    PubMed Central

    Braum, Oliver; Klages, Michael; Fickenscher, Helmut

    2013-01-01

    Interleukin-26 (IL-26) belongs to the IL-10 cytokine family, is produced by activated T cells, and targets epithelial target cells for signal transduction. Here, we describe the IL-26 effects on the infection of culture cells with recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV), human cytomegalovirus (HCMV), and herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) expressing green fluorescent protein. After pre-incubation with recombinant IL-26 and at low multiplicity of infection, VSV showed strongly enhanced infection and replication rates as measured for infectivity, for transcript levels, and for protein expression. Control proteins did not affect VSV infection. The IL-26 effect was independent of the IL-26 receptor and neutralized by anti-IL-26 serum. Pre-incubation of VSV was much more efficient than pre-incubation of the target cells to enhance virus infection. IL-26 increased virus adsorption to target cells as shown by quantitative reverse-transcription PCR. In contrast, the infection of IL-26-treated human fibroblasts with HCMV was inhibited and the infection by HSV-1 was not altered by IL-26. Thus, IL-26 differentially modulates the infection by different enveloped viruses. PMID:23875025

  15. Current and future directions for treating hepatitis B virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Tawada, Akinobu; Kanda, Tatsuo; Yokosuka, Osamu

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) persistently infects approximately 350 million people, and approximately 600000 liver-related deaths are observed per year worldwide. HBV infection is also one of the major risk factors for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The persistence of serum hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg) and high level of serum HBV DNA are thought to reflect a high HBV replication status in hepatocytes, causing cirrhosis, HCC and liver-related deaths. It has been reported that antiviral therapy, such as peginterferon and nucleos(t)ide analogues (NUCs), could suppress liver-related death by inhibiting the HBV DNA levels and inducing seroconversion from HBeAg to antibody to HBe antigen. Currently, peginterferon is widely used, but there are also several disadvantages in the use of peginterferon, such as various adverse events, the administration route and duration. It is difficult to predict the effects of treatment and interferon is contraindicated for the patients with advanced fibrosis of the liver and cirrhosis. With respect to NUCs, entecavir and tenofovir disoproxil fumarate are current the first-choice drugs. NUCs can be administered orally, and their anti-viral effects are stronger than that of peginterferon. However, because cessation of NUC administration leads to high levels of viral replication and causes severe hepatitis, they must be administered for a long time. On the other hand, the use of both interferon and NUCs cannot eliminate covalently closed circular DNA of HBV. In this review, we evaluate the natural course of chronic HBV infection and then provide an outline of these representative drugs, such as peginterferon, entecavir and tenofovir disoproxil fumarate. PMID:26085913

  16. Exercise and Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV-1) Infection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawless, DeSales; Jackson, Catherine G. R.; Greenleaf, John E.

    1995-01-01

    The human immune system is highly efficient and remarkably protective when functioning properly. Similar to other physiological systems, it functions best when the body is maintained with a balanced diet, sufficient rest and a moderately stress-free lifestyle. It can be disrupted by inappropriate drug use and extreme emotion or exertion. The functioning of normal or compromised immune systems can be enhanced by properly prescribed moderate exercise conditioning regimens in healthy people, and in some human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1)-infected patients but not in others who unable to complete an interval training program. Regular exercise conditioning in healthy people reduces cardiovascular risk factors, increases stamina, facilitates bodyweight control, and reduces stress by engendering positive feelings of well-being. Certain types of cancer may also be suppressed by appropriate exercise conditioning. Various exercise regimens are being evaluated as adjunct treatments for medicated patients with the HIV-1 syndrome. Limited anecdotal evidence from patients suggests that moderate exercise conditioning is per se responsible for their survival well beyond expectancy. HIV-1-infected patients respond positively, both physiologically and psychologically, to moderate exercise conditioning. However, the effectiveness of any exercise treatment programme depends on its mode, frequency, intensity and duration when prescribed o complement the pathological condition of the patient. The effectiveness of exercise conditioning regimens in patients with HIV-1 infection is reviewed in this article. In addition, we discuss mechanisms and pathways, involving the interplay of psychological and physiological factors, through which the suppressed immune system can be enhanced. The immune modulators discussed are endogenous opioids, cytokines, neurotransmitters and other hormones. Exercise conditioning treatment appears to be more effective when combined with other stress management procedures.

  17. Construction and Characterization of an Infectious Vaccinia Virus Recombinant That Expresses the Influenza Hemagglutinin Gene and Induces Resistance to Influenza Virus Infection in Hamsters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Geoffrey L.; Murphy, Brian R.; Moss, Bernard

    1983-12-01

    A DNA copy of the influenza virus hemagglutinin gene, derived from influenza virus A/Jap/305/57 (H2N2) was inserted into the genome of vaccinia virus under the control of an early vaccinia virus promoter. Tissue culture cells infected with the purified recombinant virus synthesized influenza hemagglutinin, which was glycosylated and transported to the cell surface where it could be cleaved with trypsin into HA1 and HA2 subunits. Rabbits and hamsters inoculated intradermally with recombinant virus produced circulating antibodies that inhibited hemagglutination by influenza virus. Furthermore, vaccinated hamsters achieved levels of antibody similar to those obtained upon primary infection with influenza virus and were protected against respiratory infection with the A/Jap/305/57 influenza virus.

  18. Recombination Every Day: Abundant Recombination in a Virus during a Single Multi-Cellular Host Infection

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Viral recombination can dramatically impact evolution and epidemiology. In viruses, the recombination rate depends on the frequency of genetic exchange between different viral genomes within an infected host cell and on the frequency at which such co-infections occur. While the recombination rate has been recently evaluated in experimentally co-infected cell cultures for several viruses, direct quantification at the most biologically significant level, that of a host infection, is still lacking. This study fills this gap using the cauliflower mosaic virus as a model. We distributed four neutral markers along the viral genome, and co-inoculated host plants with marker-containing and wild-type viruses. The frequency of recombinant genomes was evaluated 21 d post-inoculation. On average, over 50% of viral genomes recovered after a single host infection were recombinants, clearly indicating that recombination is very frequent in this virus. Estimates of the recombination rate show that all regions of the genome are equally affected by this process. Assuming that ten viral replication cycles occurred during our experiment—based on data on the timing of coat protein detection—the per base and replication cycle recombination rate was on the order of 2 × 10?5 to 4 × 10?5. This first determination of a virus recombination rate during a single multi-cellular host infection indicates that recombination is very frequent in the everyday life of this virus. PMID:15737066

  19. Mirabilis jalapa mottle virus: a new carlavirus infecting four o'clocks.

    PubMed

    Hatlestad, Gregory J; Elam, Lee; Gonzalez, Antonio; Lloyd, Alan M

    2011-11-01

    Analysis of a next-generation sequence dataset from Mirabilis jalapa resulted in the discovery of a novel virus in the genus Carlavirus (family Betaflexiviridae), mirabilis jalapa mottle virus (MjMV). The complete genome of MjMV was determined to consist of 8315 nucleotides (nt), with the six open reading frames indicative of carlaviruses. MjMV is most similar to kalanchoe latent virus (60% identity) and lily symptomless virus (59% identity). The virus can be transmitted mechanically to Mirabilis, but thus far MjMV has only been shown to infect Mirabilis jalapa, causing a slight leaf mottling and leaf wrinkling phenotype. PMID:21915718

  20. Cutaneous and diphtheritic avian poxvirus infection in a nestling Southern Giant Petrel (Macronectes giganteus) from Antarctica

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shearn-Bochsler, Valerie; Green, David Earl; Converse, K.A.; Docherty, D.E.; Thiel, T.; Geisz, H.N.; Fraser, William R.; Patterson-Fraser, Donna L.

    2008-01-01

    The Southern giant petrel (Macronectes giganteus) is declining over much of its range and currently is listed as vulnerable to extinction by the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN). Island-specific breeding colonies near Palmer Station, Antarctica, have been monitored for over 30 years, and because this population continues to increase, it is critically important to conservation. In austral summer 2004, six diseased giant petrel chicks were observed in four of these colonies. Diseased chicks were 6a??9 weeks old and had multiple proliferative nodules on their bills and skin. One severely affected chick was found dead on the nest and was salvaged for necropsy. Histopathological examination of nodules from the dead chick revealed epithelial cell hyperplasia and hypertrophy with numerous eosinophilic intracytoplasmic inclusions (B??llinger bodies). A poxvirus was isolated from multiple nodules. Poxviral infection has not been reported in this species, and the reason for its emergence and its potential impact on the population are not yet known.

  1. Clearance of persistent hepatitis C virus infection using a claudin-1-targeting monoclonal antibody

    PubMed Central

    Mailly, Laurent; Wilson, Garrick K.; Aubert, Philippe; Duong, François H. T.; Calabrese, Diego; Leboeuf, Céline; Fofana, Isabel; Thumann, Christine; Bandiera, Simonetta; Lütgehetmann, Marc; Volz, Tassilo; Davis, Christopher; Harris, Helen J.; Mee, Christopher J.; Girardi, Erika; Chane-Woon-Ming, Béatrice; Ericsson, Maria; Fletcher, Nicola; Bartenschlager, Ralf; Pessaux, Patrick; Vercauteren, Koen; Meuleman, Philip; Villa, Pascal; Kaderali, Lars; Pfeffer, Sébastien; Heim, Markus H.; Neunlist, Michel; Zeisel, Mirjam B.; Dandri, Maura; McKeating, Jane A.; Robinet, Eric; Baumert, Thomas F.

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a leading cause of liver cirrhosis and cancer1. Cell entry of HCV2 and other pathogens3-5 is mediated by tight junction (TJ) proteins, but successful therapeutic targeting of TJ proteins has not been reported yet. Using a human liver-chimeric mouse model6 we show that a monoclonal antibody specific for TJ protein claudin-17 eliminates chronic HCV infection without detectable toxicity. This antibody inhibits HCV entry, cell-cell transmission and virus-induced signaling events. Antibody treatment reduces the number of HCV-infected hepatocytes in vivo, highlighting the need for de novo infection via host entry factors to maintain chronic infection. In summary, we demonstrate that an antibody targeting a virus receptor can cure chronic viral infection and uncover TJ proteins as targets for antiviral therapy. PMID:25798937

  2. Endogenous Murine BST-2/Tetherin Is Not a Major Restriction Factor of Influenza A Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Job, Emma R.; Moffat, Jessica M.; Wakim, Linda M.; Gonelli, Christopher A.; Purcell, Damien F. J.; Brooks, Andrew G.; Villadangos, Jose A.; Reading, Patrick C.; Mintern, Justine D.

    2015-01-01

    BST-2 (tetherin, CD317, HM1.24) restricts virus growth by tethering enveloped viruses to the cell surface. The role of BST-2 during influenza A virus infection (IAV) is controversial. Here, we assessed the capacity of endogenous BST-2 to restrict IAV in primary murine cells. IAV infection increased BST-2 surface expression by primary macrophages, but not alveolar epithelial cells (AEC). BST-2-deficient AEC and macrophages displayed no difference in susceptibility to IAV infection relative to wild type cells. Furthermore, BST-2 played little role in infectious IAV release from either AEC or macrophages. To examine BST-2 during IAV infection in vivo, we infected BST-2-deficient mice. No difference in weight loss or in viral loads in the lungs and/or nasal tissues were detected between BST-2-deficient and wild type animals. This study rules out a major role for endogenous BST-2 in modulating IAV in the mouse model of infection. PMID:26566124

  3. Relationship between airborne detection of influenza A virus and the number of infected pigs

    PubMed Central

    Corzo, Cesar A.; Romagosa, Anna; Dee, Scott; Gramer, Marie; Morrison, Robert B; Torremorell, Montserrat

    2012-01-01

    Influenza A virus infects a wide range of species including both birds and mammals (including humans). One of the key routes by which the virus can infect populations of animals is by aerosol transmission. This study explored the relationship between number of infected pigs and the probability of detecting influenza virus RNA in bioaerosols through the course of an acute infection. Bioaerosols were collected using a cyclonic collector in two groups of 7 week-old pigs that were experimentally infected by exposure with a contact infected pig (seeder pig). After contact exposure, individual pig nasal swab samples were collected daily and air samples were collected three times per day for 8 days. All samples were tested for influenza by real-time reverse transcriptase (RRT)-PCR targeting the influenza virus matrix gene. All pigs' nasal swabs became influenza virus RRT-PCR positive upon exposure to the infected seeder pig. Airborne influenza was detected in 28/43 (65%) air samples. The temporal dynamics of influenza virus detection in air samples was in close agreement with the nasal shedding pattern in the infected pigs. First detection of positive bioaerosols happened at 1 day post contact (DPC). Positive bioaerosols were consistently detected between 3 and 6 DPC, a time when most pigs were also shedding virus in nasal secretions. Overall, the odds of detecting a positive air sample increased 2.2 times for every additional nasal swab positive pig in the group. In summary, there was a strong relationship between the number of pigs shedding influenza virus in nasal secretions and the generation of bioaerosols during the course of an acute infection. PMID:23164957

  4. Herpes-like virus detection in infected Crassostrea gigas spat using DIG-labelled probes.

    PubMed

    Lipart, C; Renault, T

    2002-03-01

    An in situ hybridization protocol for detecting the herpes-like virus which infects French Pacific oysters, Crassostrea gigas, was developed. Two DNA probes were synthesized by incorporation of digoxigenin 11-dUTP during PCR. Two oyster herpes-like virus specific primer pairs, A5/A6 and C1/C6, were used. Both DIG-labelled probes were able to detect 50 pg of herpes-like virus PCR amplified DNA in Southern blot hybridizations. The probes hybridized with viral DNA in paraffin sections of infected C. gigas spat. No non-specific binding was observed. The ability of the defined in situ hybridization technique to diagnose herpes-like virus infections in oysters was compared with light and transmission electron microscopy techniques in infected and non-infected spat. In situ hybridization assays were also conducted on paraffin sections to determine virus distribution within the host and to study the pathogenesis infection. In situ hybridization confirmed that the expression pattern of the herpes-like virus was restricted to connective tissues as described previously by light and transmission electron microscopy. However, this technique also allowed the detection of viral DNA in the oyster nervous system. Some labelled cells were observed in the visceral ganglion of infected oyster spat. PMID:11849678

  5. Dynamics of virus excretion via different routes in pigs experimentally infected with classical swine fever virus strains of high, moderate or low virulence.

    PubMed

    Weesendorp, Eefke; Stegeman, Arjan; Loeffen, Willie

    2009-01-01

    Classical swine fever virus (CSFV) is transmitted via secretions and excretions of infected pigs. The efficiency and speed of the transmission depends on a multitude of parameters, like quantities of virus excreted by infected pigs. This study provides quantitative data on excretion of CSFV over time from pigs infected with a highly, moderately or low virulent strain. For each strain, five individually housed pigs were infected. Virus excretion was quantified in oropharyngeal fluid, saliva, nasal fluid, lacrimal fluid, faeces, urine and skin scraping by virus titration and quantitative Real-Time Reverse Transcription Polymerase Chain Reaction (qRRT-PCR). Infectious virus was excreted in all secretions and excretions of pigs infected with the highly and moderately virulent strain, while excretion from pigs infected with the low virulent strain was mostly restricted to the oronasal route. Pigs infected with the highly virulent strain excreted significantly more virus in all their secretions and excretions over the entire infectious period than pigs infected with the moderately or low virulent strains. An exception were the pigs that developed the chronic form of infection after inoculation with the moderately virulent strain. During the entire infectious period, they excreted the largest amounts of virus via most secretions and excretions, as they excreted virus continuously and for a long duration. This study highlights the crucial role chronically infected pigs may play in the transmission of CSFV. Furthermore, it demonstrates the importance of discriminating between strains and the clinical appearance of infection when using excretion data for modelling. PMID:18635323

  6. Free-virus and cell-to-cell transmission in models of equine infectious anemia virus infection.

    PubMed

    Allen, Linda J S; Schwartz, Elissa J

    2015-12-01

    Equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) is a lentivirus in the retrovirus family that infects horses and ponies. Two strains, referred to as the sensitive strain and the resistant strain, have been isolated from an experimentally-infected pony. The sensitive strain is vulnerable to neutralization by antibodies whereas the resistant strain is neutralization-insensitive. The sensitive strain mutates to the resistant strain. EIAV may infect healthy target cells via free virus or alternatively, directly from an infected target cell through cell-to-cell transfer. The proportion of transmission from free-virus or from cell-to-cell transmission is unknown. A system of ordinary differential equations (ODEs) is formulated for the virus-cell dynamics of EIAV. In addition, a Markov chain model and a branching process approximation near the infection-free equilibrium (IFE) are formulated. The basic reproduction number R0 is defined as the maximum of two reproduction numbers, R0s and R0r, one for the sensitive strain and one for the resistant strain. The IFE is shown to be globally asymptotically stable for the ODE model in a special case when the basic reproduction number is less than one. In addition, two endemic equilibria exist, a coexistence equilibrium and a resistant strain equilibrium. It is shown that if R0>1, the infection persists with at least one of the two strains. However, for small infectious doses, the sensitive strain and the resistant strain may not persist in the Markov chain model. Parameter values applicable to EIAV are used to illustrate the dynamics of the ODE and the Markov chain models. The examples highlight the importance of the proportion of cell-to-cell versus free-virus transmission that either leads to infection clearance or to infection persistence with either coexistence of both strains or to dominance by the resistant strain. PMID:25865935

  7. Perinatally infected adolescents living with human immunodeficiency virus (perinatally human immunodeficiency virus)

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, Maria Leticia S; Cardoso, Claudete A

    2015-01-01

    The availability of highly potent antiretroviral treatment during the last decades has transformed human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection into a chronic disease. Children that were diagnosed during the first months or years of life and received treatment, are living longer and better and are presently reaching adolescence and adulthood. Perinatally HIV-infected adolescents (PHIV) and young adults may present specific clinical, behavior and social characteristics and demands. We have performed a literature review about different aspects that have to be considered in the care and follow-up of PHIV. The search included papers in the MEDLINE database via PubMed, located using the keywords “perinatally HIV-infected” AND “adolescents”. Only articles published in English or Portuguese from 2003 to 2014 were selected. The types of articles included original research, systematic reviews, and quantitative or qualitative studies; case reports and case series were excluded. Results are presented in the following topics: “Puberal development and sexual maturation”, “Growth in weight and height”, “Bone metabolism during adolescence”, “Metabolic complications”, “Brain development, cognition and mental health”, “Reproductive health”, “Viral drug resistance” and “Transition to adult outpatient care”. We hope that this review will support the work of pediatricians, clinicians and infectious diseases specialists that are receiving these subjects to continue treatment. PMID:26279988

  8. Immunization against Genital Herpes with a Vaccine Virus That has Defects in Productive and Latent Infection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Costa, Xavier J.; Jones, Cheryl A.; Knipe, David M.

    1999-06-01

    An effective vaccine for genital herpes has been difficult to achieve because of the limited efficacy of subunit vaccines and the safety concerns about live viruses. As an alternative approach, mutant herpes simplex virus strains that are replication-defective can induce protective immunity. To increase the level of safety and to prove that replication was not needed for immunization, we constructed a mutant herpes simplex virus 2 strain containing two deletion mutations, each of which eliminated viral replication. The double-mutant virus induces protective immunity that can reduce acute viral shedding and latent infection in a mouse genital model, but importantly, the double-mutant virus shows a phenotypic defect in latent infection. This herpes vaccine strain, which is immunogenic but has defects in both productive and latent infection, provides a paradigm for the design of vaccines and vaccine vectors for other sexually transmitted diseases, such as AIDS.

  9. West Nile virus infection in the golden hamster (Mesocricetus auratus): a model for West Nile encephalitis.

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, S. Y.; Guzman, H.; Zhang, H.; Travassos da Rosa, A. P.; Tesh, R. B.

    2001-01-01

    This report describes a new hamster model for West Nile (WN) virus encephalitis. Following intraperitoneal inoculation of a New York isolate of WN virus, hamsters had moderate viremia of 5 to 6 days in duration, followed by the development of humoral antibodies. Encephalitic symptoms began 6 days after infection; about half the animals died between the seventh and 14th days. The appearance of viral antigen in the brain and neuronal degeneration also began on the sixth day. WN virus was cultured from the brains of convalescent hamsters up to 53 days after initial infection, suggesting that persistent virus infection occurs. Hamsters offer an inexpensive model for studying the pathogenesis and treatment of WN virus encephalitis. PMID:11585537

  10. Reactive astrogliosis in response to hemorrhagic fever virus: microarray profile of Junin virus-infected human astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Arenavirus Junin is the causative agent of Argentine hemorrhagic fever. Limited information is available concerning the pathogenesis of this human disease, especially the pathogenesis of acute and late neurological symptoms. Methods In our study we present for the first time cDNA microarray profile of human astrocytes infected with the virulent strain of Junin virus. Transcriptional profiling was confirmed by quantitative real-time RT-PCR and cytokine/chemokine/growth factor assay. Results We demonstrated the impact of virus infection on immune/inflammatory response/interferon signaling and apoptosis. Pro-apoptotic response and amplification with time of pro-inflammatory cascade of human astrocytes suggested neurodegenerative dysfunctional reactive astrogliosis in response to Junin virus infection. Conclusion Our results suggest potential pathogenic role of astroglial cells in the development of neurological symptoms and late neurological syndrome during Argentine hemorrhagic fever. PMID:25015256

  11. Ionizing air affects influenza virus infectivity and prevents airborne-transmission

    PubMed Central

    Hagbom, Marie; Nordgren, Johan; Nybom, Rolf; Hedlund, Kjell-Olof; Wigzell, Hans; Svensson, Lennart

    2015-01-01

    By the use of a modified ionizer device we describe effective prevention of airborne transmitted influenza A (strain Panama 99) virus infection between animals and inactivation of virus (>97%). Active ionizer prevented 100% (4/4) of guinea pigs from infection. Moreover, the device effectively captured airborne transmitted calicivirus, rotavirus and influenza virus, with recovery rates up to 21% after 40?min in a 19?m3 room. The ionizer generates negative ions, rendering airborne particles/aerosol droplets negatively charged and electrostatically attracts them to a positively charged collector plate. Trapped viruses are then identified by reverse transcription quantitative real-time PCR. The device enables unique possibilities for rapid and simple removal of virus from air and offers possibilities to simultaneously identify and prevent airborne transmission of viruses. PMID:26101102

  12. Identifying patients infected with hepatitis B virus in sub-Saharan Africa: potential for misclassification.

    PubMed

    Boyd, Anders; Maylin, Sarah; Moh, Raoul; Gabillard, Delphine; Menan, Hervé; Mahjoub, Nadia; Danel, Christine; Anglaret, Xavier; Eholié, Serge Paul; Girard, Pierre-Marie; Zoulim, Fabien; Delaugerre, Constance; Lacombe, Karine

    2015-11-01

    Most research in sub-Saharan Africa establishes hepatitis B infection via one-time hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) testing. Of 237 HIV-infected patients from two clinical trials testing HBsAg positive (MiniVidas®), 206 (86.9%) had validated serological tests using another assay (Architect). Discrepancies could be due to inactive infection, highlighting the importance of assessing hepatitis B virus infection phase. PMID:26283522

  13. Chicken and Duck Myotubes Are Highly Susceptible and Permissive to Influenza Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Baquero-Perez, Belinda; Kuchipudi, Suresh V.; Ho, Jemima; Sebastian, Sujith; Puranik, Anita; Howard, Wendy; Brookes, Sharon M.; Brown, Ian H.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Skeletal muscle, at 30 to 40% of body mass, is the most abundant soft tissue in the body. Besides its primary function in movement and posture, skeletal muscle is a significant innate immune organ with the capacity to produce cytokines and chemokines and respond to proinflammatory cytokines. Little is known about the role of skeletal muscle during systemic influenza A virus infection in any host and particularly avian species. Here we used primary chicken and duck multinucleated myotubes to examine their susceptibility and innate immune response to influenza virus infections. Both chicken and duck myotubes expressed avian and human sialic acid receptors and were readily susceptible to low-pathogenicity (H2N3 A/mallard duck/England/7277/06) and high-pathogenicity (H5N1 A/turkey/England/50-92/91 and H5N1 A/turkey/Turkey/1/05) avian and human H1N1 (A/USSR/77) influenza viruses. Both avian host species produced comparable levels of progeny H5N1 A/turkey/Turkey/1/05 virus. Notably, the rapid accumulation of viral nucleoprotein and matrix (M) gene RNA in chicken and duck myotubes was accompanied by extensive cytopathic damage with marked myotube apoptosis (widespread microscopic blebs, caspase 3/7 activation, and annexin V binding at the plasma membrane). Infected chicken myotubes produced significantly higher levels of proinflammatory cytokines than did the corresponding duck cells. Additionally, in chicken myotubes infected with H5N1 viruses, the induction of interferon beta (IFN-?) and IFN-inducible genes, including the melanoma differentiation-associated protein 5 (MDA-5) gene, was relatively weak compared to infection with the corresponding H2N3 virus. Our findings highlight that avian skeletal muscle fibers are capable of productive influenza virus replication and are a potential tissue source of infection. IMPORTANCE Infection with high-pathogenicity H5N1 viruses in ducks is often asymptomatic, and skeletal muscle from such birds could be a source of infection of humans and animals. Little is known about the ability of influenza A viruses to replicate in avian skeletal muscle fibers. We show here that cultured chicken and duck myotubes were highly susceptible to infection with both low- and high-pathogenicity avian influenza viruses. Infected myotubes of both avian species displayed rapid virus accumulation, apoptosis, and extensive cellular damage. Our results indicate that avian skeletal muscle fibers of chicken and duck could be significant contributors to progeny production of highly pathogenic H5N1 viruses. PMID:25540384

  14. The Role of Regulatory T cells in Primary Infection with Epstein-Barr Virus 

    E-print Network

    Wingate, Phoebe J

    2008-01-01

    Infection with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) during adolescence results in an immunopathological disease, Infectious Mononucleosis (IM), in around 25% of cases. A role for Regulatory T cells (Treg) in IM has yet to be ...

  15. New insights into the immunopathology and control of dengue virus infection.

    PubMed

    Screaton, Gavin; Mongkolsapaya, Juthathip; Yacoub, Sophie; Roberts, Catherine

    2015-11-25

    Dengue virus poses a major threat to global public health: two-thirds of the world's population is now at risk from infection by this mosquito-borne virus. Dengue virus causes a range of diseases with a small proportion of infected patients developing severe plasma leakage that leads to dengue shock syndrome, organ impairment and bleeding. Infection with one of the four viral serotypes results in the development of homotypic immunity to that serotype. However, subsequent infection with a different serotype is associated with an increased risk of developing severe disease, which has led to the suggestion that severe disease is triggered by immunopathology. This Review outlines recent advances in the understanding of immunopathology, vaccine development and human monoclonal antibodies produced against dengue virus. PMID:26603900

  16. Persistent hepatitis C virus infection in microscale primary human hepatocyte cultures

    E-print Network

    Khetani, Salman R.

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) remains a major public health problem, affecting approximately 130 million people worldwide. HCV infection can lead to cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma, and end-stage liver disease, as well as ...

  17. Infected Lives: A Heideggerian Phenomenological Study of Young African American Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Positive Women

    E-print Network

    Peltzer, Jill Nicole

    2012-05-31

    Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infection continues to be a significant health concern for African American women, as they comprise 64% of HIV-positive women in the US. The purpose of this Heideggerian phenomenological study was to explore...

  18. Cytokine Expression in the Tracheobronchial Lymph Nodes of Pigs Infected with Pseudorabies Virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pseudorabies virus (PRV) is a neurotropic alphaherpesvirus that produces fatal encephalitis in newborn pigs, respiratory disorders in fattening pigs and reproductive failure in sows. Infection of the respiratory tract by PRV, involves mononuclear cells in draining tracheobronchial lymph nodes (TBLN)...

  19. 77 FR 30293 - Recommendations for the Identification of Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) Chronic Infection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-22

    ...Recommendations for the Identification of Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) Chronic Infection AGENCY...comments. Mail: Division of Viral Hepatitis, National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention, Centers...

  20. Altered expression of cell cycle and apoptotic proteins in chronic hepatitis C virus infection

    E-print Network

    Sarfraz, Saira; Hamid, Saeed; Siddiqui, Anwar; Hussain, Snawar; Pervez, Shahid; Alexander, Graeme

    2008-08-05

    Abstract Background A disrupted cell cycle progression of hepatocytes was reported in chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, which can contribute significantly in the associated pathogenesis. The present study aimed to further elaborate...