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Sample records for gii-4 norovirus variant-specific

  1. Analysis of Amino Acid Variation in the P2 Domain of the GII-4 Norovirus VP1 Protein Reveals Putative Variant-Specific Epitopes

    PubMed Central

    Allen, David J.; Gray, Jim J.; Gallimore, Chris I.; Xerry, Jacqueline; Iturriza-Gómara, Miren

    2008-01-01

    Background Human noroviruses are a highly diverse group of viruses classified into three of the five currently recognised Norovirus genogroups, and contain numerous genotypes or genetic clusters. Noroviruses are the major aetiological agent of endemic gastroenteritis in all age groups, as well as the cause of periodic epidemic gastroenteritis. The noroviruses most commonly associated with outbreaks of gastroenteritis are genogroup II genotype 4 (GII-4) strains. The relationship between genotypes of noroviruses with their phenotypes and antigenic profile remains poorly understood through an inability to culture these viruses and the lack of a suitable animal model. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we describe a study of the diversity of amino acid sequences of the highly variable P2 region in the major capsid protein, VP1, of the GII-4 human noroviruses strains using sequence analysis and homology modelling techniques. Conclusions/Significance Our data identifies two sites in this region, which show significant amino acid substitutions associated with the appearance of variant strains responsible for epidemics with major public health impact. Homology modelling studies revealed the exposed nature of these sites on the capsid surface, providing supportive structural data that these two sites are likely to be associated with putative variant-specific epitopes. Furthermore, the patterns in the evolution of these viruses at these sites suggests that noroviruses follow a neutral network pattern of evolution. PMID:18213393

  2. Immunogenetic Mechanisms Driving Norovirus GII.4 Antigenic Variation

    PubMed Central

    Donaldson, Eric F.; Corti, Davide; Swanstrom, Jesica; Debbink, Kari; Lanzavecchia, Antonio; Baric, Ralph S.

    2012-01-01

    Noroviruses are the principal cause of epidemic gastroenteritis worldwide with GII.4 strains accounting for 80% of infections. The major capsid protein of GII.4 strains is evolving rapidly, resulting in new epidemic strains with altered antigenic potentials. To test if antigenic drift may contribute to GII.4 persistence, human memory B cells were immortalized and the resulting human monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) characterized for reactivity to a panel of time-ordered GII.4 virus-like particles (VLPs). Reflecting the complex exposure history of the volunteer, human anti-GII.4 mAbs grouped into three VLP reactivity patterns; ancestral (1987–1997), contemporary (2004–2009), and broad (1987–2009). NVB 114 reacted exclusively to the earliest GII.4 VLPs by EIA and blockade. NVB 97 specifically bound and blocked only contemporary GII.4 VLPs, while NBV 111 and 43.9 exclusively reacted with and blocked variants of the GII.4.2006 Minerva strain. Three mAbs had broad GII.4 reactivity. Two, NVB 37.10 and 61.3, also detected other genogroup II VLPs by EIA but did not block any VLP interactions with carbohydrate ligands. NVB 71.4 cross-neutralized the panel of time-ordered GII.4 VLPs, as measured by VLP-carbohydrate blockade assays. Using mutant VLPs designed to alter predicted antigenic epitopes, two evolving, GII.4-specific, blockade epitopes were mapped. Amino acids 294–298 and 368–372 were required for binding NVB 114, 111 and 43.9 mAbs. Amino acids 393–395 were essential for binding NVB 97, supporting earlier correlations between antibody blockade escape and carbohydrate binding variation. These data inform VLP vaccine design, provide a strategy for expanding the cross-blockade potential of chimeric VLP vaccines, and identify an antibody with broadly neutralizing therapeutic potential for the treatment of human disease. Moreover, these data support the hypothesis that GII.4 norovirus evolution is heavily influenced by antigenic variation of neutralizing epitopes

  3. Mechanisms of GII.4 Norovirus Persistence in Human Populations

    PubMed Central

    LoBue, Anna D; Cannon, Jennifer L; Zheng, Du-Ping; Vinje, Jan; Baric, Ralph S

    2008-01-01

    Background Noroviruses are the leading cause of viral acute gastroenteritis in humans, noted for causing epidemic outbreaks in communities, the military, cruise ships, hospitals, and assisted living communities. The evolutionary mechanisms governing the persistence and emergence of new norovirus strains in human populations are unknown. Primarily organized by sequence homology into two major human genogroups defined by multiple genoclusters, the majority of norovirus outbreaks are caused by viruses from the GII.4 genocluster, which was first recognized as the major epidemic strain in the mid-1990s. Previous studies by our laboratory and others indicate that some noroviruses readily infect individuals who carry a gene encoding a functional alpha-1,2-fucosyltransferase (FUT2) and are designated “secretor-positive” to indicate that they express ABH histo-blood group antigens (HBGAs), a highly heterogeneous group of related carbohydrates on mucosal surfaces. Individuals with defects in the FUT2 gene are termed secretor-negative, do not express the appropriate HBGA necessary for docking, and are resistant to Norwalk infection. These data argue that FUT2 and other genes encoding enzymes that regulate processing of the HBGA carbohydrates function as susceptibility alleles. However, secretor-negative individuals can be infected with other norovirus strains, and reinfection with the GII.4 strains is common in human populations. In this article, we analyze molecular mechanisms governing GII.4 epidemiology, susceptibility, and persistence in human populations. Methods and Findings Phylogenetic analyses of the GII.4 capsid sequences suggested an epochal evolution over the last 20 y with periods of stasis followed by rapid evolution of novel epidemic strains. The epidemic strains show a linear relationship in time, whereby serial replacements emerge from the previous cluster. Five major evolutionary clusters were identified, and representative ORF2 capsid genes for each

  4. Serological Correlates of Protection against a GII.4 Norovirus.

    PubMed

    Atmar, Robert L; Bernstein, David I; Lyon, G Marshall; Treanor, John J; Al-Ibrahim, Mohamed S; Graham, David Y; Vinjé, Jan; Jiang, Xi; Gregoricus, Nicole; Frenck, Robert W; Moe, Christine L; Chen, Wilbur H; Ferreira, Jennifer; Barrett, Jill; Opekun, Antone R; Estes, Mary K; Borkowski, Astrid; Baehner, Frank; Goodwin, Robert; Edmonds, Anthony; Mendelman, Paul M

    2015-08-01

    Noroviruses are the leading cause of acute gastroenteritis worldwide, and norovirus vaccine prevention strategies are under evaluation. The immunogenicity of two doses of bivalent genogroup 1 genotype 1 (GI.1)/GII.4 (50 μg of virus-like particles [VLPs] of each strain adjuvanted with aluminum hydroxide and 3-O-desacyl-4'monophosphoryl lipid A [MPL]) norovirus vaccine administered to healthy adults in a phase 1/2 double-blind placebo-controlled trial was determined using virus-specific serum total antibody enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), IgG, IgA, and histoblood group antigen (HBGA)-blocking assays. Trial participants subsequently received an oral live virus challenge with a GII.4 strain, and the vaccine efficacy results were reported previously (D. I. Bernstein et al., J Infect Dis 211:870-878, 2014, doi:10.1093/infdis/jiu497). This report assesses the impact of prechallenge serum antibody levels on infection and illness outcomes. Serum antibody responses were observed in vaccine recipients by all antibody assays, with first-dose seroresponse frequencies ranging from 88 to 100% for the GI.1 antigen and from 69 to 84% for the GII.4 antigen. There was little increase in antibody levels after the second vaccine dose. Among the subjects receiving the placebo, higher prechallenge serum anti-GII.4 HBGA-blocking and IgA antibody levels, but not IgG or total antibody levels, were associated with a lower frequency of virus infection and associated illness. Notably, some placebo subjects without measurable serum antibody levels prechallenge did not become infected after norovirus challenge. In vaccinees, anti-GII.4 HBGA-blocking antibody levels of >1:500 were associated with a lower frequency of moderate-to-severe vomiting or diarrheal illness. In this study, prechallenge serum HBGA antibody titers correlated with protection in subjects receiving the placebo; however, other factors may impact the likelihood of infection and illness after virus exposure. (This

  5. Complete Genome Sequence of Human Norovirus GII.4_2006b, a Variant of Minerva 2006

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhihui; Mammel, Mark K.

    2016-01-01

    In 2006, the National Calicivirus Laboratory at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) confirmed multistate outbreaks of norovirus infection and identified two new GII.4 norovirus strains (Minerva and Laurens) through partial sequencing of the major capsid (VP1) gene. Here, we report the first complete genome sequence of the GII.4 Minerva isolate. PMID:26823589

  6. Induction of homologous and cross-reactive GII.4-specific blocking antibodies in children after GII.4 New Orleans norovirus infection.

    PubMed

    Blazevic, Vesna; Malm, Maria; Vesikari, Timo

    2015-10-01

    Noroviruses (NoVs) are major causative agents of acute gastroenteritis (AGE) in children worldwide and the most common viral cause of AGE in countries where rotavirus incidence has been eliminated by vaccination. Previous infections with the dominant GII.4 NoV genotype confer only partial protection against evolving immune escape variants that emerge every few years. The objective of this work was to investigate GII.4-specific homologous and cross-reactive antibody responses in young children after NoV GII.4-2009 New Orleans (NO) infection. Virus-like particles (VLPs) representing GII.4-1999, GII.4-2009 NO, and GII.4-2012 Sydney genotypes were used in ELISA and histo-blood group antigen blocking assays to examine acute and convalescent sera of five children <2 years of age infected with GII.4-2009 NO. GII.4-2009 NO infection induced IgG seroconversion to all three tested NoV GII.4 variants. Homologous blocking antibodies to GII.4-2009 NO were detected in each convalescent sera. Fourfold increase in cross-blocking antibodies to GII.4-2012 Sydney was observed in 4/5 subjects, but no child developed cross-blocking antibodies to GII.4-1999. In conclusion, antibodies induced in young children after norovirus GII.4 infection are targeted against the causative variant and may cross-protect against strains that are closely related, but not with more distinct and earlier GII.4 genotypes. PMID:25946711

  7. Antibody Responses to Norovirus Genogroup GI.1 and GII.4 Proteases in Volunteers Administered Norwalk Virus

    PubMed Central

    Ajami, Nadim J.; Barry, Meagan A.; Carrillo, Berenice; Muhaxhiri, Zana; Neill, Frederick H.; Prasad, B. V. Venkataram; Opekun, Antone R.; Gilger, Mark A.; Graham, David Y.; Atmar, Robert L.

    2012-01-01

    An assay was developed to detect antibodies against two norovirus proteases among participants in a Norwalk virus (GI.1) challenge study. Prechallenge seroprevalence was lower against the protease from the homologous GI.1 virus than against protease from a heterologous GII.4 strain. Seroresponses were detected for 14 of 19 (74%) infected persons. PMID:23035177

  8. Resilience of norovirus GII.4 to freezing and thawing:implications for virus infectivity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genogroup II.4 norovirus (NoV) remains the predominant NoV strain in food- and water-borne outbreaks. Capsid integrity as well as viral RNA persistence were determined for GII.4 NoV by real-time RT-PCR after 1-14 freeze/thaw (F/T) cycles (-80 deg C/+22 deg C) or after -80 deg C storage for up to 12...

  9. Temporal Dynamics of Norovirus GII.4 Variants in Brazil between 2004 and 2012

    PubMed Central

    Fioretti, Julia Monassa; Bello, Gonzalo; Rocha, Mônica Simões; Victoria, Matias; Leite, José Paulo Gagliardi; Miagostovich, Marize Pereira

    2014-01-01

    Noroviruses (NoVs) are the major cause of acute gastroenteritis outbreaks, and, despite a wide genetic diversity, genotype II.4 is the most prevalent strain worldwide. Mutations and homologous recombination have been proposed as mechanisms driving the epochal evolution of the GII.4, with the emergence of new variants in 1–3-year intervals causing global epidemics. There are no data reporting the dynamics of GII.4 variants along a specific period in Brazil. Therefore, to improve the understanding of the comportment of these variants in the country, the aim of this study was to evaluate the circulation of NoV GII.4 variants during a 9-year period in 3 out of 5 Brazilian regions. A total of 147 samples were sequenced, and a phylogenetic analysis of subdomain P2 demonstrated the circulation of six GII.4 variants, Asia_2003, Hunter_2004, Den Haag_2006b, Yerseke_2006a, New Orleans_2009, and Sydney_2012, during this period. The most prevalent variant was Den Haag_2006b, circulating in different Brazilian regions from 2006 to 2011. A Bayesian coalescent analysis was used to calculate the mean evolutionary rate of subdomain P2 as 7.3×10−3 (5.85×10−3–8.82×10−3) subst./site/year. These analyses also demonstrated that clade Den Haag_2006b experienced a rapid expansion in 2005 and another in 2008 after a period of decay. The evaluation of the temporal dynamics of NoV GII.4 in Brazil revealed a similar pattern, with few exceptions, to the worldwide observation. These data highlight the importance of surveillance for monitoring the emergence of new strains of NoV GII.4 and its impact on cases of acute gastroenteritis. PMID:24667283

  10. Seroprevalence of antibodies against GII.4 norovirus among children in Pune, India.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Ruta; Lole, Kavita; Chitambar, Shobha D

    2016-09-01

    This study reports the seroprevalence of antibodies against GII.4 norovirus among children (≤5 years) in Pune, India. Of 191 serum specimens, 98 (51.3%) tested positive with 61, 34 and 3 having IgG, IgG-IgA and IgG-IgA-IgM, respectively. Histoblood group antigen (HBGA)-blocking antibodies were detected in 33 of the 54 tested positive specimens. IgG and blocking antibody prevalence and titer varied with age and was lowest among children aged 6-23 months. Antibody-positive children, suggesting past norovirus exposure, showed significantly lower faecal norovirus RNA detection rate than antibody-negative children. Further investigation of the seroepidemiology of norovirus infections in India is warranted. J. Med. Virol. 88:1636-1640, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26868418

  11. Effects and Clinical Significance of GII.4 Sydney Norovirus, United States, 2012–2013

    PubMed Central

    Wikswo, Mary; Barclay, Leslie; Brandt, Eric; Storm, William; Salehi, Ellen; DeSalvo, Traci; Davis, Tim; Saupe, Amy; Dobbins, Ginette; Booth, Hillary A.; Biggs, Christianne; Garman, Katie; Woron, Amy M.; Parashar, Umesh D.; Vinjé, Jan; Hall, Aron J.

    2013-01-01

    During 2012, global detection of a new norovirus (NoV) strain, GII.4 Sydney, raised concerns about its potential effect in the United States. We analyzed data from NoV outbreaks in 5 states and emergency department visits for gastrointestinal illness in 1 state during the 2012–13 season and compared the data with those of previous seasons. During August 2012–April 2013, a total of 637 NoV outbreaks were reported compared with 536 and 432 in 2011–2012 and 2010–2011 during the same period. The proportion of outbreaks attributed to GII.4 Sydney increased from 8% in September 2012 to 82% in March 2013. The increase in emergency department visits for gastrointestinal illness during the 2012–13 season was similar to that of previous seasons. GII.4 Sydney has become the predominant US NoV outbreak strain during the 2012–13 season, but its emergence did not cause outbreak activity to substantially increase from that of previous seasons. PMID:23886013

  12. Detection of the pandemic norovirus variant GII.4 Sydney 2012 in Rio Branco, state of Acre, northern Brazil

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Luciana Damascena; Rodrigues, Evandro Leite; de Lucena, Maria Silvia Sousa; de Lima, Ian Carlos Gomes; Oliveira, Darleise de Sousa; Soares, Luana Silva; Mascarenhas, Joana D'Arc Pereira; Linhares, Alexandre da Costa; Gabbay, Yvone Benchimol

    2013-01-01

    Noroviruses (NoVs) are important cause of gastroenteritis in humans worldwide. Genotype GII.4 is responsible for the majority of outbreaks reported to date. This study describes, for the first time in Brazil, the circulation of NoV GII.4 variant Sydney 2012 in faecal samples collected from children aged less than or equal to eight years in Rio Branco, state of Acre, northern Brazil, during July-September 2012. PMID:24141954

  13. Detection of the pandemic norovirus variant GII.4 Sydney 2012 in Rio Branco, state of Acre, northern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Silva, Luciana Damascena da; Rodrigues, Evandro Leite; Lucena, Maria Silvia Sousa da; Lima, Ian Carlos Gomes de; Oliveira, Darleise de Sousa; Soares, Luana Silva; Mascarenhas, Joana D'Arc Pereira; Linhares, Alexandre da Costa; Gabbay, Yvone Benchimol

    2013-12-01

    Noroviruses (NoVs) are important cause of gastroenteritis in humans worldwide. Genotype GII.4 is responsible for the majority of outbreaks reported to date. This study describes, for the first time in Brazil, the circulation of NoV GII.4 variant Sydney 2012 in faecal samples collected from children aged less than or equal to eight years in Rio Branco, state of Acre, northern Brazil, during July-September 2012. PMID:24141954

  14. Norovirus GII.4 Detection in Environmental Samples from Patient Rooms during Nosocomial Outbreaks

    PubMed Central

    Hannoun, Charles; Svensson, Lennart; Torén, Kjell; Andersson, Lars-Magnus; Westin, Johan; Bergström, Tomas

    2014-01-01

    Norovirus (NoV) is an important cause of nosocomial gastroenteric outbreaks. This 5-month study was designed to characterize NoV contamination and airborne dispersal in patient rooms during hospital outbreaks. Air vents, overbed tables, washbasins, dust, and virus traps designed to collect charged particles from the air were swabbed to investigate the possibility of NoV contamination in patient rooms during outbreaks in seven wards and in an outbreak-free ward. Symptomatic inpatients were also sampled. Nucleic acid extracts of the samples were examined for NoV RNA using genogroup I (GI) and GII real-time reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR). The NoV strains were characterized by RT-PCR, sequencing, and phylogenetic analysis of the RNA-dependent RNA-polymerase-N/S capsid-coding region (1,040 nucleotides [nt]). Patient strains from two outbreaks in one ward were sequenced across the RNA-dependent-RNA-polymerase major capsid-coding region (2.5 kb), including the hypervariable P2 domain. In the outbreak wards, NoV GII was detected in 48 of 101 (47%) environmental swabs and 63 of 108 patients (58%); NoV genotype II.4 was sequenced from 18 environmental samples, dust (n = 8), virus traps (n = 4), surfaces (n = 6), and 56 patients. In contrast, NoV GII was detected in 2 (GII.4) of 28 (7%) environmental samples and in 2 (GII.6 and GII.4) of 17 patients in the outbreak-free ward. Sequence analyses revealed a high degree of similarity (>99.5%, 1,040 nt) between NoV GII.4 environmental and patient strains from a given ward at a given time. The strains clustered on 11 subbranches of the phylogenetic tree, with strong correlations to time and place. The high nucleotide similarity between the NoV GII.4 strains from patients and their hospital room environment provided molecular evidence of GII.4 dispersal in the air and dust; therefore, interventional cleaning studies are justified. PMID:24759712

  15. Norovirus GII.4 detection in environmental samples from patient rooms during nosocomial outbreaks.

    PubMed

    Nenonen, Nancy P; Hannoun, Charles; Svensson, Lennart; Torén, Kjell; Andersson, Lars-Magnus; Westin, Johan; Bergström, Tomas

    2014-07-01

    Norovirus (NoV) is an important cause of nosocomial gastroenteric outbreaks. This 5-month study was designed to characterize NoV contamination and airborne dispersal in patient rooms during hospital outbreaks. Air vents, overbed tables, washbasins, dust, and virus traps designed to collect charged particles from the air were swabbed to investigate the possibility of NoV contamination in patient rooms during outbreaks in seven wards and in an outbreak-free ward. Symptomatic inpatients were also sampled. Nucleic acid extracts of the samples were examined for NoV RNA using genogroup I (GI) and GII real-time reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR). The NoV strains were characterized by RT-PCR, sequencing, and phylogenetic analysis of the RNA-dependent RNA-polymerase-N/S capsid-coding region (1,040 nucleotides [nt]). Patient strains from two outbreaks in one ward were sequenced across the RNA-dependent-RNA-polymerase major capsid-coding region (2.5 kb), including the hypervariable P2 domain. In the outbreak wards, NoV GII was detected in 48 of 101 (47%) environmental swabs and 63 of 108 patients (58%); NoV genotype II.4 was sequenced from 18 environmental samples, dust (n = 8), virus traps (n = 4), surfaces (n = 6), and 56 patients. In contrast, NoV GII was detected in 2 (GII.4) of 28 (7%) environmental samples and in 2 (GII.6 and GII.4) of 17 patients in the outbreak-free ward. Sequence analyses revealed a high degree of similarity (>99.5%, 1,040 nt) between NoV GII.4 environmental and patient strains from a given ward at a given time. The strains clustered on 11 subbranches of the phylogenetic tree, with strong correlations to time and place. The high nucleotide similarity between the NoV GII.4 strains from patients and their hospital room environment provided molecular evidence of GII.4 dispersal in the air and dust; therefore, interventional cleaning studies are justified. PMID:24759712

  16. Early Detection of Epidemic GII-4 Norovirus Strains in UK and Malawi: Role of Surveillance of Sporadic Acute Gastroenteritis in Anticipating Global Epidemics

    PubMed Central

    Callaghan, Anna; O’Brien, Sarah J.; Cunliffe, Nigel A.; Iturriza-Gómara, Miren

    2016-01-01

    Noroviruses are endemic in the human population, and are recognised as a leading cause of acute gastroenteritis worldwide. Although they are a highly diverse group of viruses, genogroup-II genotype-4 (GII-4) noroviruses are the most frequently identified strains worldwide. The predominance of GII-4 norovirus strains is driven by the periodic emergence of antigenic variants capable of evading herd protection. The global molecular epidemiology of emerging GII-4 strains is largely based on data from outbreak surveillance programmes, but the epidemiology of GII-4 strains among sporadic or community cases is far less well studied. To understand the distribution of GII-4 norovirus strains associated with gastroenteritis in the wider population, we characterised the GII-4 norovirus strains detected during studies of sporadic cases of infectious gastroenteritis collected in the UK and Malawi between 1993 and 2009. Our data shows that GII-4 norovirus strains that have emerged as strains of global epidemic importance have circulated in the community up to 18 years before their recognition as pandemic strains associated with increases in outbreaks. These data may suggest that more comprehensive surveillance programmes that incorporate strains associated with sporadic cases may provide a way for early detection of emerging strains with pandemic potential. This may be of particular relevance as vaccines become available. PMID:27115152

  17. Early Detection of Epidemic GII-4 Norovirus Strains in UK and Malawi: Role of Surveillance of Sporadic Acute Gastroenteritis in Anticipating Global Epidemics.

    PubMed

    Allen, David J; Trainor, Eamonn; Callaghan, Anna; O'Brien, Sarah J; Cunliffe, Nigel A; Iturriza-Gómara, Miren

    2016-01-01

    Noroviruses are endemic in the human population, and are recognised as a leading cause of acute gastroenteritis worldwide. Although they are a highly diverse group of viruses, genogroup-II genotype-4 (GII-4) noroviruses are the most frequently identified strains worldwide. The predominance of GII-4 norovirus strains is driven by the periodic emergence of antigenic variants capable of evading herd protection. The global molecular epidemiology of emerging GII-4 strains is largely based on data from outbreak surveillance programmes, but the epidemiology of GII-4 strains among sporadic or community cases is far less well studied. To understand the distribution of GII-4 norovirus strains associated with gastroenteritis in the wider population, we characterised the GII-4 norovirus strains detected during studies of sporadic cases of infectious gastroenteritis collected in the UK and Malawi between 1993 and 2009. Our data shows that GII-4 norovirus strains that have emerged as strains of global epidemic importance have circulated in the community up to 18 years before their recognition as pandemic strains associated with increases in outbreaks. These data may suggest that more comprehensive surveillance programmes that incorporate strains associated with sporadic cases may provide a way for early detection of emerging strains with pandemic potential. This may be of particular relevance as vaccines become available. PMID:27115152

  18. Median infectious dose of human norovirus GII.4 in gnotobiotic pigs is decreased by simvastatin treatment and increased by age

    PubMed Central

    Bui, Tammy; Kocher, Jacob; Li, Yanru; Wen, Ke; Li, Guohua; Liu, Fangning; Yang, Xingdong; LeRoith, Tanya; Tan, Ming; Xia, Ming; Zhong, Weiming; Jiang, Xi

    2013-01-01

    Human noroviruses (NoVs), a major cause of viral gastroenteritis, are difficult to study due to the lack of a cell-culture and a small-animal model. Pigs share with humans the types A and H histo-blood group antigens on the intestinal epithelium and have been suggested as a potential model for studies of NoV pathogenesis, immunity and vaccines. In this study, the effects of age and a cholesterol-lowering drug, simvastatin, on the susceptibility of pigs to NoV infection were evaluated. The median infectious dose (ID50) of a genogroup II, genotype 4 (GII.4) 2006b variant was determined. The ID50 in neonatal (4–5 days of age) pigs was ≤2.74×103 viral RNA copies. In older pigs (33–34 days of age), the ID50 was 6.43×104 but decreased to <2.74×103 in simvastatin-fed older pigs. Evidence of NoV infection was obtained by increased virus load in the intestinal contents, cytopathological changes in the small intestine, including irregular microvilli, necrosis and apoptosis, and detection of viral antigen in the tip of villi in duodenum. This GII.4 variant was isolated in 2008 from a patient from whom a large volume of stool was collected. GII.4 NoVs are continuously subjected to selective pressure by human immunity, and antigenically different GII.4 NoV variants emerge every 1–2 years. The determination of the ID50 of this challenge virus is valuable for evaluation of protection against different GII.4 variants conferred by NoV vaccines in concurrence with other GII.4 variants in the gnotobiotic pig model. PMID:23804568

  19. Norovirus diversity in children with gastroenteritis in South Africa from 2009 to 2013: GII.4 variants and recombinant strains predominate.

    PubMed

    Mans, J; Murray, T Y; Nadan, S; Netshikweta, R; Page, N A; Taylor, M B

    2016-04-01

    From 2009 to 2013 the diversity of noroviruses (NoVs) in children (⩽5 years) hospitalized with gastroenteritis in South Africa was investigated. NoVs were genotyped based on nucleotide sequence analyses of partial RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) and capsid genes. Seventeen RdRp genotypes (GI.P2, GI.P3, GI.P6, GI.P7, GI.P not assigned (NA), GI.Pb, GI.Pf, GII.P2, GII.P4, GII.P7, GII.P13, GII.P16, GII.P21, GII.Pc, GII.Pe, GII.Pg, GII.PNA) and 20 capsid genotypes (GI.1, GI.2, GI.3, GI.5, GI.6, GI.7, GI.NA, GII.1, GII.2, GII.3, GII.4, GII.6, GII.7, GII.10, GII.12, GII.13, GII.14, GII.16, GII.17, GII.21) were identified. The combined RdRp/capsid genotype was determined for 275 GII strains. Fifteen confirmed recombinant NoV strains circulated during the study period. NoV GII.P4/GII.4 (47%) and GII.Pe/GII.4 (18%) predominated, followed by GII.PNA/GII.3 (10%) and GII.P21/GII.3 (7%). Other prevalent strains included GII.Pg/GII.12 (6%) and GII.Pg/GII.1 (3%). Two novel recombinants, GII.Pg/GII.2 and GII.Pg/GII.10 were identified. In 2013 the replacement of GII.4 New Orleans 2009 and GII.P21/GII.3, which predominated during the early part of the study, with GII.4 Sydney 2012 and GII.PNA/GII.3 was observed. This study presents the most comprehensive recent data on NoV diversity in Africa. PMID:26374265

  20. Effect of Grape Seed Extract on Human Norovirus GII.4 and Murine Norovirus 1 in Viral Suspensions, on Stainless Steel Discs, and in Lettuce Wash Water

    PubMed Central

    Baert, Leen; Zhang, Dongsheng; Xia, Ming; Zhong, Weiming; Van Coillie, Els; Jiang, Xi; Uyttendaele, Mieke

    2012-01-01

    The anti-norovirus (anti-NoV) effect of grape seed extract (GSE) was examined by plaque assay for murine norovirus 1 (MNV-1), cell-binding reverse transcription-PCR for human NoV GII.4, and saliva-binding enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for human NoV GII.4 P particles, with or without the presence of interfering substances (dried milk and lettuce extract). GSE at 0.2 and 2 mg/ml was shown to reduce the infectivity of MNV-1 (>3-log PFU/ml) and the specific binding ability of NoV GII.4 to Caco-2 cells (>1-log genomic copies/ml), as well as of its P particles to salivary human histo-blood group antigen receptors (optical density at 450 nm of >0.8). These effects were decreased as increasing concentrations of dried milk (0.02 and 0.2%) or lettuce extract were added. Under an electron microscope, human NoV GII.4 virus-like particles showed inflation and deformation after treatment with GSE. Under conditions that simulated applications in the food industry, the anti-NoV effect of GSE using MNV-1 as a target organism was shown to be limited in surface disinfection (<1-log PFU/ml, analyzed in accordance with EN 13697:2001). However, a 1.5- to 2-log PFU/ml reduction in MNV-1 infectivity was noted when 2 mg of GSE/ml was used to sanitize water in the washing bath of fresh-cut lettuce, and this occurred regardless of the chemical oxygen demand (0 to 1,500 mg/ml) of the processing water. PMID:22904060

  1. Qualitative and Quantitative Analysis of the Binding of GII.4 Norovirus Variants onto Human Blood Group Antigens▿

    PubMed Central

    de Rougemont, A.; Ruvoen-Clouet, N.; Simon, B.; Estienney, M.; Elie-Caille, C.; Aho, S.; Pothier, P.; Le Pendu, J.; Boireau, W.; Belliot, G.

    2011-01-01

    Noroviruses (NoVs) are one of the leading causes of gastroenteritis in children and adults. For the last 2 decades, genogroup II genotype 4 (GII.4) NoVs have been circulating worldwide. GII.4 NoVs can be divided into variants, and since 2002 they have circulated in the population before being replaced every 2 or 3 years, which raises questions about the role of their histo-blood group antigen (HBGA) ligands in their evolution. To shed light on these questions, we performed an analysis of the interaction between representative GII.4 variants and HBGAs, and we determined the role of selected amino acids in the binding profiles. By mutagenesis, we showed that there was a strict structural requirement for the amino acids, directly implicated in interactions with HBGAs. However, the ablation of the threonine residue at position 395 (ΔT395), an epidemiological feature of the post-2002 variants, was not deleterious to the binding of the virus-like particle (VLP) to the H antigen, while binding to A and B antigens was severely hampered. Nevertheless, the ΔT395 VLPs gained the capacity to bind to the Lewis x and sialyl-Lewis x antigens in comparison with the wild-type VLP, demonstrating that amino acid residues outside the HBGA binding site can modify the binding properties of NoVs. We also analyzed the attachment of baculovirus-expressed VLPs from six variants (Bristol, US95/96, Hunter, Yerseke, Den Haag, and Osaka) that were isolated from 1987 to 2007 to phenotyped saliva samples and synthetic HBGAs. We showed that the six variants could all attach to saliva of secretors irrespective of the ABO phenotype and to oligosaccharides characteristic of the secretor phenotype. Interestingly, Den Haag and Osaka variants additionally bound to carbohydrates present in the saliva of Lewis-positive nonsecretors. The carbohydrate binding profile and the genetic and mutagenesis analysis suggested that GII.4 binding to Lewis x and sialyl-Lewis x antigens might be a by-product of the

  2. Elucidation of strain-specific interaction of a GII-4 norovirus with HBGA receptors by site-directed mutagenesis study

    SciTech Connect

    Tan Ming |; Xia Ming; Cao Sheng; Huang Pengwei; Farkas, Tibor |; Meller, Jarek |; Hegde, Rashmi S. |; Li Xuemei; Rao Zihe; Jiang Xi |

    2008-09-30

    Noroviruses interact with histo-blood group antigen (HBGA) receptors in a strain-specific manner probably detecting subtle structural differences in the carbohydrate receptors. The specific recognition of types A and B antigens by various norovirus strains is a typical example. The only difference between the types A and B antigens is the acetamide linked to the terminal galactose of the A but not to the B antigen. The crystal structure of the P dimer of a GII-4 norovirus (VA387) bound to types A and B trisaccharides has elucidated the A/B binding site on the capsid but did not explain the binding specificity of the two antigens. In this study, using site-directed mutagenesis, we have identified three residues on the VA387 capsid that are sterically close to the acetamide and are required for binding to A but not B antigens, indicating that the acetamide determines the binding specificity between the A and B antigens. Further mutational analysis showed that a nearby open cavity may also be involved in binding specificity to HBGAs. In addition, a systematic mutational analysis of residues in and around the binding interface has identified a group of amino acids that are required for binding but do not have direct contact with the carbohydrate antigens, implying that these residues may be involved in the structural integrity of the receptor binding interface. Taken together, our study provides new insights into the carbohydrate/capsid interactions which are a valuable complement to the atomic structures in understanding the virus/host interaction and in the future design of antiviral agents.

  3. Mucosal Antibodies Induced by Intranasal but Not Intramuscular Immunization Block Norovirus GII.4 Virus-Like Particle Receptor Binding.

    PubMed

    Tamminen, Kirsi; Malm, Maria; Vesikari, Timo; Blazevic, Vesna

    2016-06-01

    Noroviruses (NoVs) account for the majority of diagnosed cases of viral acute gastroenteritis worldwide. Virus-like particle (VLP)-based vaccines against NoV are currently under development. Serum antibodies that block the binding of NoV VLPs to histo-blood group antigens, the putative receptors for NoV, correlate with protection against NoV infection. The role of functional mucosal antibodies in protection is largely unknown, even though the intestinal mucosa is the entry port for NoV. Balb/c mice were immunized intramuscularly (IM) or intranasally (IN) with NoV GII.4 VLPs, and systemic and mucosal blocking antibody responses were studied. IN immunization elicited NoV-specific serum and mucosal IgG and IgA antibodies, whereas IM immunized animals completely lacked IgA. Both immunization routes induced similar blocking activity in serum but only IN route generated blocking antibodies in mucosa. The level of IgA in the mucosal (nasal) lavages strongly correlated (r = 0.841) with the blocking activity, suggesting that IgA, but not IgG, is the major NoV blocking antibody on mucosal surfaces. The results indicate that only mucosal immunization route induces the development of functional anti-NoV IgA on mucosal surface. PMID:27135874

  4. Prevailing Sydney like Norovirus GII.4 VLPs induce systemic and mucosal immune responses in mice.

    PubMed

    Huo, Yuqi; Wan, Xin; Ling, Tong; Wu, Jie; Wang, Zejun; Meng, Shengli; Shen, Shuo

    2015-12-01

    The newly emerged Norovirus (NoV) Sydney 2012 strain has been sweeping all over the world, causing acute non-bacterial gastroenteritis in adults and children. Due to a lack of cell culture system, virus like particles (VLPs) has been assembled and used as vaccine candidates in preclinical and clinical studies. Expression of the major capsid protein of NoVs using recombinant baculovirus expression system in Sf9 cells leads to formation of VLPs that are morphologically and antigenically similar to true virions. In this study, VLPs were successfully produced using the VP1 of Sydney-2012-like strain and its immunogenicity was evaluated by different routes and its capability in inducing mucosal immune responses in the presence and absence of adjuvants in BALB/c mice. Administration of NoV VLPs in the presence of Al(OH)3 or monophosphoryl lipid A (MPL-A) led to high titers of VLP-specific IgG antibodies. Administration of VLPs orally in the presence of cholera toxin subunit B (CTB) didn't enhance mucosal immune response as less fecal IgA positive mice were observed when compared with those given VLPs only. Our study represents the first immunogenicity study of VLPs derived from current pandemic Sydney 2012 strain and which might have implications in the development of NoVs vaccine in china. PMID:26375574

  5. Structural Analysis of Histo-Blood Group Antigen Binding Specificity in a Norovirus GII.4 Epidemic Variant: Implications for Epochal Evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Shanker, Sreejesh; Choi, Jae-Mun; Sankaran, Banumathi; Atmar, Robert L.; Estes, Mary K.; Prasad, B.V. Venkataram

    2012-03-23

    Susceptibility to norovirus (NoV), a major pathogen of epidemic gastroenteritis, is associated with histo-blood group antigens (HBGAs), which are also cell attachment factors for this virus. GII.4 NoV strains are predominantly associated with worldwide NoV epidemics with a periodic emergence of new variants. The sequence variations in the surface-exposed P domain of the capsid protein resulting in differential HBGA binding patterns and antigenicity are suggested to drive GII.4 epochal evolution. To understand how temporal sequence variations affect the P domain structure and contribute to epochal evolution, we determined the P domain structure of a 2004 variant with ABH and secretor Lewis HBGAs and compared it with the previously determined structure of a 1996 variant. We show that temporal sequence variations do not affect the binding of monofucosyl ABH HBGAs but that they can modulate the binding strength of difucosyl Lewis HBGAs and thus could contribute to epochal evolution by the potentiated targeting of new variants to Lewis-positive, secretor-positive individuals. The temporal variations also result in significant differences in the electrostatic landscapes, likely reflecting antigenic variations. The proximity of some of these changes to the HBGA binding sites suggests the possibility of a coordinated interplay between antigenicity and HBGA binding in epochal evolution. From the observation that the regions involved in the formation of the HBGA binding sites can be conformationally flexible, we suggest a plausible mechanism for how norovirus disassociates from salivary mucin-linked HBGA before reassociating with HBGAs linked to intestinal epithelial cells during its passage through the gastrointestinal tract.

  6. Evaluation of a Porcine Gastric Mucin and RNase A Assay for the Discrimination of Infectious and Non-infectious GI.1 and GII.4 Norovirus Following Thermal, Ethanol, or Levulinic Acid Plus Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate Treatments.

    PubMed

    Afolayan, Olamide T; Webb, Cathy C; Cannon, Jennifer L

    2016-03-01

    Human noroviruses (NoVs) are a major source of foodborne illnesses worldwide. Since human NoVs cannot be cultured in vitro, methods that discriminate infectious from non-infectious NoVs are needed. The purpose of this study was to evaluate binding of NoV genotypes GI.1 and GII.4 to histo-blood group antigens expressed in porcine gastric mucin (PGM) as a surrogate for detecting infectious virus following thermal (99 °C/5 min), 70% ethanol or 0.5% levulinic acid (LV) plus 0.01 or 0.1% sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) sanitizer treatments and to determine the limit of detection of GI.1 and GII.4 binding to PGM. Treated and control virus samples were applied to 96-well plates coated with 1 µg/ml PGM followed by RNase A (5 ng/µl) treatment for degradation of exposed RNA. Average log genome copies per ml (gc/ml) reductions and relative differences (RD) in quantification cycle (Cq) values after thermal treatment were 1.77/5.62 and 1.71/7.25 (RNase A) and 1.73/5.50 and 1.56/6.58 (no RNase A) for GI.1 and GII.4, respectively. Treatment of NoVs with 70% EtOH resulted in 0.05/0.16 (GI.1) and 3.54/10.19 (GII.4) log reductions in gc/ml and average RD in Cq value, respectively. LV (0.5%) combined with 0.1 % SDS provided a greater decrease of GI.1 and GII.4 NoVs with 8.97 and 8.13 average RD in Cq values obtained, respectively than 0.5% LV/0.01 % SDS. Virus recovery after PGM binding was variable with GII.4 > GI.1. PGM binding is a promising surrogate for identifying infectious and non-infectious NoVs after capsid destruction, however, results vary depending on virus strain and inactivation method. PMID:26514820

  7. The influence of temperature pH and water immersion on the high hydrostatic pressure inactivation of GI.1 and GII.4 human noroviruses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Detection of human norovirus (HuNoV) usually relies on molecular biology techniques, such as qRT PCR. Since histo-blood group antigens (HBGAs) are the functional receptors for HuNoV, HuNoV can bind to porcine gastric mucin (PGM), which contains HBGA-like antigens. In this study, PGM conjugated magn...

  8. Molecular epidemiology of norovirus in Singapore, 2004-2011.

    PubMed

    Lim, Kun Lee; Eden, John-Sebastian; Oon, Lynette L E; White, Peter A

    2013-10-01

    Norovirus (NoV) is the most common cause of sporadic and epidemic gastroenteritis, globally. This study aimed to investigate the molecular epidemiology of NoV-associated acute gastroenteritis in Singapore by classifying circulating NoV genotypes and genogroup II, genotype 4 (GII.4) variants between September 2004 and February 2011. The temporal dominance and antigenic variation within the circulating epidemic NoV GII.4 variants was also examined, in order to compare the trends in Singapore to those observed globally during the same period. A total of 312 of 1,060 fecal specimens were positive for NoV RNA, using a quantitative RT-PCR. In a subset (125 of 312) of NoV positive samples, the 5' end of ORF2 (region C) of the GI or GII NoV genome was amplified and sequenced. Subsequent phylogenetic analysis identified GII.4 was the most commonly identified genotype representing 80.8% (101/125) of NoV sequenced in this study. The predominant GII.4 variants in circulation during the 2004-2011 epidemic periods were Hunter 2004 (2004-2005), Den Haag 2006b (2006-2009), and New Orleans 2009 (2009-2011). Amino acid variation within the P2 domain of the major capsid protein, VP1, was followed longitudinally within the GII.4 lineage. A constant turnover of variant-specific amino acid change was observed, particularly within the antigenic epitopes A, C and E. In conclusion, this study has characterized the NoV strains in circulation in Singapore between 2004 and 2011. The molecular epidemiology and persistence of GII.4 pandemic NoV lineages in Singapore was similar to trends seen globally, with a noted absence of the Asia 2003 variant. PMID:23868077

  9. Norovirus

    PubMed Central

    Robilotti, Elizabeth; Deresinski, Stan

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Norovirus, an RNA virus of the family Caliciviridae, is a human enteric pathogen that causes substantial morbidity across both health care and community settings. Several factors enhance the transmissibility of norovirus, including the small inoculum required to produce infection (<100 viral particles), prolonged viral shedding, and its ability to survive in the environment. In this review, we describe the basic virology and immunology of noroviruses, the clinical disease resulting from infection and its diagnosis and management, as well as host and pathogen factors that complicate vaccine development. Additionally, we discuss overall epidemiology, infection control strategies, and global reporting efforts aimed at controlling this worldwide cause of acute gastroenteritis. Prompt implementation of infection control measures remains the mainstay of norovirus outbreak management. PMID:25567225

  10. Norovirus

    MedlinePlus

    ... of scientists at Baylor College of Medicine in Texas, who recently developed a way to grow human ... Frequently Asked Questions Norovirus Reporting in Calicinet CaliciNet Data Participating Labs References and Resources NoroSTAT NoroSTAT Data ...

  11. Norovirus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Institutes of Health NoroCORE Food Virology About Norovirus Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir ... Infection, National Institutes of Health NoroCORE Food Virology Language: English Español (Spanish) File Formats Help: How do I ...

  12. Novel Surveillance Network for Norovirus Gastroenteritis Outbreaks, United States1

    PubMed Central

    Vega, Everardo; Barclay, Leslie; Gregoricus, Nicole; Williams, Kara; Lee, David

    2011-01-01

    CaliciNet, the outbreak surveillance network for noroviruses in the United States, was launched in March 2009. As of January 2011, twenty state and local health laboratories had been certified to submit norovirus sequences and epidemiologic outbreak data to CaliciNet. During the network’s first year, 552 outbreaks were submitted to CaliciNet, of which 78 (14%) were associated with foodborne transmission. A total of 395 (72%) outbreaks were typed as GII.4, of which 298 (75%) belonged to a new variant, GII.4 New Orleans, which first emerged in October 2009. Analysis of the complete capsid and P2 region sequences confirmed that GII.4 New Orleans is distinct from previous GII.4 variants, including GII.4 Minerva (2006b). PMID:21801614

  13. Strain-Specific Virolysis Patterns of Human Noroviruses in Response to Alcohols

    PubMed Central

    Park, Geun Woo; Collins, Nikail; Barclay, Leslie; Hu, Liya; Prasad, B. V. Venkataram; Lopman, Benjamin A.; Vinjé, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Alcohol-based hand sanitizers are widely used to disinfect hands to prevent the spread of pathogens including noroviruses. Alcohols inactivate norovirus by destruction of the viral capsid, resulting in the leakage of viral RNA (virolysis). Since conflicting results have been reported on the susceptibility of human noroviruses against alcohols, we exposed a panel of 30 human norovirus strains (14 GI and 16 GII strains) to different concentrations (50%, 70%, 90%) of ethanol and isopropanol and tested the viral RNA titer by RT-qPCR. Viral RNA titers of 10 (71.4%), 14 (100%), 3 (21.4%) and 7 (50%) of the 14 GI strains were reduced by > 1 log10 RNA copies/ml after exposure to 70% and 90% ethanol, and 70% and 90% isopropanol, respectively. RNA titers of 6 of the 7 non-GII 4 strains remained unaffected after alcohol exposure. Compared to GII strains, GI strains were more susceptible to ethanol than to isopropanol. At 90%, both alcohols reduced RNA titers of 8 of the 9 GII.4 strains by ≥ 1 log10 RNA copies/ml. After exposure to 70% ethanol, RNA titers of GII.4 Den Haag and Sydney strains decreased by ≥ 1.9 log10, whereas RNA reductions for GII.4 New Orleans strains were < 0.5 log10. To explain these differences, we sequenced the complete capsid gene of the 9 GII.4 strains and identified 17 amino acid substitutions in the P2 region among the 3 GII.4 variant viruses. When comparing with an additional set of 200 GII.4 VP1 sequences, only S310 and P396 were present in all GII.4 New Orleans viruses but not in the ethanol-sensitive GII.4 Sydney and GII.4 Den Haag viruses Our data demonstrate that alcohol susceptibility patterns between different norovirus genotypes vary widely and that virolysis data for a single strain or genotype are not representative for all noroviruses. PMID:27337036

  14. Surveillance of norovirus in Portugal and the emergence of the Sydney variant, 2011-2013.

    PubMed

    Costa, I; Mesquita, J R; Veiga, E; Oleastro, M; Nascimento, M J S

    2015-09-01

    This report presents the results of the national surveillance system of diarrhea etiology of the National Institute of Health of Portugal concerning norovirus (NoV) during a two-year period, May 2011-2013. Of the total 580 stool samples collected from patients hospitalized for acute diarrhea in 13 Hospitals of Portugal, 67 (11.6%) tested positive for NoV. From May 2011 to March 2012 the GII.4 variant New Orleans 2009 was the most predominant strain having been replaced by the new GII.4 variant Sydney 2012 since then till the end of the survey. To our knowledge this is the first study showing the circulation of GII.4 as the norovirus strain most commonly associated to gastroenteritis and the first to report the replacement of GII.4 New Orleans by GII.4 Sydney 2012 variant in Portugal. PMID:26305815

  15. Prevalence and Genotypes of Human Noroviruses in Tropical Urban Surface Waters and Clinical Samples in Singapore ▿

    PubMed Central

    Aw, Tiong Gim; Gin, Karina Yew-Hoong; Ean Oon, Lynette Lin; Chen, Eileen Xueqin; Woo, Chee Hoe

    2009-01-01

    The prevalence and genotypes of norovirus genogroup I (GI) and GII in tropical urban catchment waters and an estuarine bay were studied. A comparative analysis was performed with environmental isolates of noroviruses and concurrently identified clinical isolates in Singapore during gastroenteritis outbreaks between August 2006 to January 2007. Noroviruses in environmental water samples were concentrated by using ultrafiltration techniques and then analyzed by reverse transcription-seminested PCR assay targeting the partial capsid region of noroviruses and DNA sequencing. Among the 60 water samples collected, noroviruses were detected in 43 (71.7%) of these samples. Of these 43 norovirus-positive samples, the coexistence of both GI and GII strains was identified in 23 (53.5%) water samples. The phylogenetic analysis revealed multiple genotypes of noroviruses GI and GII in environmental water samples. GI and GII strains were clustered into seven and nine (including two unclassified) genotypes, respectively. The major norovirus genotypes in environmental water samples were GI/2 and GI/4 and GII/4. Genotyping of the 21 norovirus-positive clinical samples showed that all of the strains belonged to the GII/4 cluster. The environmental and clinical norovirus GII/4 isolates showed high levels of nucleotide sequence identity to each other and to the novel GII/4 variant associated with global epidemics of gastroenteritis during 2006. This study suggests the emergence and circulation of multiple novel norovirus GI and GII genotypes in water environments. Further comprehensive surveillance of water environments for noroviruses and routine clinical reporting is warranted. PMID:19525276

  16. A bivalent virus-like particle based vaccine induces a balanced antibody response against both enterovirus 71 and norovirus in mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoli; Ku, Zhiqiang; Dai, Wenlong; Chen, Tan; Ye, Xiaohua; Zhang, Chao; Zhang, Yingyi; Liu, Qingwei; Jin, Xia; Huang, Zhong

    2015-10-26

    Noroviruses are the main cause of severe viral gastroenteritis, which results in estimated 200,000 deaths each year, primarily in children in the developing world. Genogroup II.4 (GII.4) strains are responsible for the majority of norovirus outbreaks. Enterovirus 71 (EV71), the leading causative agent of hand, foot and mouth disease, has recently been prevalent in Asia-Pacific regions, resulting in significant morbidity and mortality in young children. However, no vaccine is commercially available for either norovirus GII.4 or EV71. Recombinant virus-like particles (VLPs) derived from either GII.4 or EV71 have been shown to be promising monovalent vaccine candidates. In this study, we investigate the possibility to formulate a VLP-based bivalent vaccine for both norovirus GII.4 and EV71. The GII.4- and EV71-VLPs were produced in a baculovirus-insect cell expression system. A bivalent combination vaccine comprised of GII.4 and EV71 VLPs was formulated and compared with monovalent GII.4- and EV71-VLPs for their immunogenicity in mice. We found that the bivalent vaccine elicited durable antibody responses toward both GII.4 and EV71, and the antibody titers were comparable to that induced by the monovalent vaccines, indicating there is no immunological interference between the two antigens in the combination vaccine. More significantly, the bivalent vaccine-immunized mouse sera could efficiently neutralize EV71 infection and block GII.4-VLP binding to mucin. Together, our results demonstrate that the experimental combination vaccine comprised of GII.4 and EV71-VLPs is able to induce a balanced protective antibody response, and therefore strongly support further preclinical and clinical development of such a bivalent VLP vaccine targeting both norovirus GII.4 and EV71. PMID:26424606

  17. Evaluation of the updated RIDA®QUICK (Version N1402) immunochromatographic assay for the detection of norovirus in clinical specimens.

    PubMed

    Bruggink, Leesa D; Dunbar, Natalie L; Marshall, John A

    2015-10-01

    The sensitivity and specificity of the R-Biopharm RIDA(®)QUICK (N1402) immunochromatography assay for norovirus detection was examined using fecal material from Australian gastroenteritis incidents. The study involved the analysis of 3 groups of specimens; group 1 comprised 100 norovirus open reading frame (ORF) 1 RT-PCR positive specimens; group 2 comprised 100 ORF 1 RT-PCR norovirus negative specimens and group 3 comprised 12 specimens containing common gastroenteritis viruses other than norovirus. The RIDA(®)QUICK (N1402) assay detected both GI and GII norovirus and had an overall sensitivity of 87%. Genotype analysis of the capsid region of the genome (ORF 2) indicated the RIDA(®)QUICK (N1402) assay could detect a range of genotypes including GI.1, GI.2, GI.3, GI.4, GI.5, GII.3, GII.4 (including variants GII.4 (2009-like), GII.4 (2012), GII.4 (2012-like) and GII.4 (unknown)), GII.6, GII.13 and GII.21. The assay had good sensitivity for both GI and GII norovirus. The assay had a specificity of 97% and did not cross react with a number of common fecal viruses. However, one of eight rotavirus positive, norovirus negative specimens gave a positive result; rotavirus cannot be taken as the cause of such a false positive but cannot be excluded either. The kit was quick and easy to use and would be valuable in point-of-care testing. PMID:26248054

  18. Norovirus Infections in Symptomatic and Asymptomatic Food Handlers in Japan▿

    PubMed Central

    Ozawa, Kazuhiro; Oka, Tomoichiro; Takeda, Naokazu; Hansman, Grant S.

    2007-01-01

    Noroviruses are the leading cause of outbreaks of gastroenteritis in the world. At present, norovirus genogroup II, genotype 4 (GII/4), strains are the most prevalent in many countries. In this study we investigated 55 outbreaks and 35 sporadic cases of norovirus-associated gastroenteritis in food handlers in food-catering settings between 10 November 2005 and 9 December 2006 in Japan. Stool specimens were collected from both symptomatic and asymptomatic individuals and were examined for norovirus by real-time reverse transcription-PCR; the results were then confirmed by sequence analysis. Norovirus was detected in 449 of 2,376 (19%) specimens. Four genogroup I (GI) genotypes and 12 GII genotypes, including one new GII genotype, were detected. The GII/4 sequences were predominant, accounting for 19 of 55 (35%) outbreaks and 16 of 35 (46%) sporadic cases. Our results also showed that a large number of asymptomatic food handlers were infected with norovirus GII/4 strains. Norovirus GII had a slightly higher mean viral load (1 log unit higher) than norovirus GI, i.e., 3.81 × 108 versus 2.79 × 107 copies/g of stool. Among norovirus GI strains, GI/4 had the highest mean viral load, whereas among GII strains, GII/4 had the highest mean viral load (2.02 × 108 and 7.96 × 109 copies/g of stool, respectively). Importantly, we found that asymptomatic individuals had mean viral loads similar to those of symptomatic individuals, which may account for the increased number of infections and the predominance of an asymptomatic transmission route. PMID:17928420

  19. Norovirus - hospital

    MedlinePlus

    Gastroenteritis - norovirus; Colitis - norovirus; Hospital acquired infection - norovirus ... fluids ( dehydration ). Anyone can become infected with norovirus. Hospital patients who are very old, very young, or ...

  20. Genotypic and Epidemiologic Trends of Norovirus Outbreaks in the United States, 2009 to 2013

    PubMed Central

    Barclay, Leslie; Gregoricus, Nicole; Shirley, S. Hannah; Lee, David

    2014-01-01

    Noroviruses are the leading cause of epidemic acute gastroenteritis in the United States. From September 2009 through August 2013, 3,960 norovirus outbreaks were reported to CaliciNet. Of the 2,895 outbreaks with a known transmission route, person-to-person and food-borne transmissions were reported for 2,425 (83.7%) and 465 (16.1%) of the outbreaks, respectively. A total of 2,475 outbreaks (62.5%) occurred in long-term care facilities (LTCF), 389 (9.8%) in restaurants, and 227 (5.7%) in schools. A total of 435 outbreaks (11%) were typed as genogroup I (GI) and 3,525 (89%) as GII noroviruses. GII.4 viruses caused 2,853 (72%) of all outbreaks, of which 94% typed as either GII.4 New Orleans or GII.4 Sydney. In addition, three non-GII.4 viruses, i.e., GII.12, GII.1, and GI.6, caused 528 (13%) of all outbreaks. Several non-GII.4 genotypes (GI.3, GI.6, GI.7, GII.3, GII.6, and GII.12) were significantly more associated with food-borne transmission (odds ratio, 1.9 to 7.1; P < 0.05). Patients in LTCF and people ≥65 years of age were at higher risk for GII.4 infections than those in other settings and with other genotypes (P < 0.05). Phylogeographic analysis identified three major dispersions from two geographic locations that were responsible for the GI.6 outbreaks from 2011 to 2013. In conclusion, our data demonstrate the cyclic emergence of new (non-GII.4) norovirus strains, and several genotypes are more often associated with food-borne outbreaks. These surveillance data can be used to improve viral food-borne surveillance and to help guide studies to develop and evaluate targeted prevention methods such as norovirus vaccines, antivirals, and environmental decontamination methods. PMID:24172151

  1. Genetic characterization of norovirus strains in hospitalized children from Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Alam, Amna; Qureshi, Sohail A; Vinjé, Jan; Zaidi, Anita

    2016-02-01

    Norovirus is one of the most common causes of acute gastroenteritis among children in developing countries. No data on the prevalence and genetic variability of norovirus are available for Pakistan, where early childhood mortality due to acute gastroenteritis is common. We tested 255 fecal specimens from children under 5 years of age hospitalized between April 2006 and March 2008 with severe acute gastroenteritis in five hospitals in the four largest cities in Pakistan for norovirus by real-time RT-PCR. Positive samples were further genotyped by conventional RT-PCR targeting the 5'-end of the capsid gene followed by sequencing of the positive PCR products. Overall, 41 (16.1%) samples tested positive for norovirus with an equal frequency in rotavirus-positive and rotavirus-negative samples. Nine (22%) samples were genogroup (G)I positive, 30 (73%) GII positive and two (5%) samples contained a mixture of GI and GII viruses. Sequence analyses demonstrated co-circulation of 14 norovirus genotypes including four GI genotypes (GI.3, GI.5, GI.7, GI.8) and 10 GII genotypes (GII.2, GII.3, GII.4, GII.5, GII.6, GII.7, GII.9, GII.13, GII.16, and GII.21). The most prevalent genotypes were GI.7 and GII.4 both causing 12.2% of the infections. This report confirms the presence of multiple norovirus genotypes in hospitalized children with acute gastroenteritis in Pakistan and a lack of clear predominance of GII.4 viruses. PMID:26175018

  2. Llama Nanoantibodies with Therapeutic Potential against Human Norovirus Diarrhea

    PubMed Central

    Garaicoechea, Lorena; Aguilar, Andrea; Parra, Gabriel I.; Bok, Marina; Sosnovtsev, Stanislav V.; Canziani, Gabriela; Green, Kim Y.; Bok, Karin; Parreño, Viviana

    2015-01-01

    Noroviruses are a major cause of acute gastroenteritis, but no vaccines or therapeutic drugs are available. Llama-derived single chain antibody fragments (also called VHH) are small, recombinant monoclonal antibodies of 15 kDa with several advantages over conventional antibodies. The aim of this study was to generate recombinant monoclonal VHH specific for the two major norovirus (NoV) genogroups (GI and GII) in order to investigate their potential as immunotherapy for the treatment of NoV diarrhea. To accomplish this objective, two llamas were immunized with either GI.1 (Norwalk-1968) or GII.4 (MD2004) VLPs. After immunization, peripheral blood lymphocytes were collected and used to generate two VHH libraries. Using phage display technology, 10 VHH clones specific for GI.1, and 8 specific for GII.4 were selected for further characterization. All VHH recognized conformational epitopes in the P domain of the immunizing VP1 capsid protein, with the exception of one GII.4 VHH that recognized a linear P domain epitope. The GI.1 VHHs were highly specific for the immunizing GI.1 genotype, with only one VHH cross-reacting with GI.3 genotype. The GII.4 VHHs reacted with the immunizing GII.4 strain and showed a varying reactivity profile among different GII genotypes. One VHH specific for GI.1 and three specific for GII.4 could block the binding of homologous VLPs to synthetic HBGA carbohydrates, saliva, and pig gastric mucin, and in addition, could inhibit the hemagglutination of red blood cells by homologous VLPs. The ability of Nov-specific VHHs to perform well in these surrogate neutralization assays supports their further development as immunotherapy for NoV treatment and immunoprophylaxis. PMID:26267898

  3. Llama nanoantibodies with therapeutic potential against human norovirus diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Garaicoechea, Lorena; Aguilar, Andrea; Parra, Gabriel I; Bok, Marina; Sosnovtsev, Stanislav V; Canziani, Gabriela; Green, Kim Y; Bok, Karin; Parreño, Viviana

    2015-01-01

    Noroviruses are a major cause of acute gastroenteritis, but no vaccines or therapeutic drugs are available. Llama-derived single chain antibody fragments (also called VHH) are small, recombinant monoclonal antibodies of 15 kDa with several advantages over conventional antibodies. The aim of this study was to generate recombinant monoclonal VHH specific for the two major norovirus (NoV) genogroups (GI and GII) in order to investigate their potential as immunotherapy for the treatment of NoV diarrhea. To accomplish this objective, two llamas were immunized with either GI.1 (Norwalk-1968) or GII.4 (MD2004) VLPs. After immunization, peripheral blood lymphocytes were collected and used to generate two VHH libraries. Using phage display technology, 10 VHH clones specific for GI.1, and 8 specific for GII.4 were selected for further characterization. All VHH recognized conformational epitopes in the P domain of the immunizing VP1 capsid protein, with the exception of one GII.4 VHH that recognized a linear P domain epitope. The GI.1 VHHs were highly specific for the immunizing GI.1 genotype, with only one VHH cross-reacting with GI.3 genotype. The GII.4 VHHs reacted with the immunizing GII.4 strain and showed a varying reactivity profile among different GII genotypes. One VHH specific for GI.1 and three specific for GII.4 could block the binding of homologous VLPs to synthetic HBGA carbohydrates, saliva, and pig gastric mucin, and in addition, could inhibit the hemagglutination of red blood cells by homologous VLPs. The ability of Nov-specific VHHs to perform well in these surrogate neutralization assays supports their further development as immunotherapy for NoV treatment and immunoprophylaxis. PMID:26267898

  4. Inactivation of human norovirus in contaminated oysters and clams by high-hydrostatic pressure

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Human norovirus (NoV) is the most frequent causative agent of foodborne disease associated with shellfish consumption. In this study, the effect of high-hydrostatic pressure (HHP) on inactivation of NoV was determined. Genogroup I.1 (GI.1) or Genogroup II.4 (GII.4) NoV were inoculated into oyster ho...

  5. Rapid emergence and predominance of a broadly recognizing and fast-evolving norovirus GII.17 variant in late 2014

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Martin C. W.; Lee, Nelson; Hung, Tin-Nok; Kwok, Kirsty; Cheung, Kelton; Tin, Edith K. Y.; Lai, Raymond W. M.; Nelson, E. Anthony S.; Leung, Ting F.; Chan, Paul K. S.

    2015-01-01

    Norovirus genogroup II genotype 4 (GII.4) has been the predominant cause of viral gastroenteritis since 1996. Here we show that during the winter of 2014–2015, an emergent variant of a previously rare norovirus GII.17 genotype, Kawasaki 2014, predominated in Hong Kong and outcompeted contemporary GII.4 Sydney 2012 in hospitalized cases. GII.17 cases were significantly older than GII.4 cases. Root-to-tip and Bayesian BEAST analyses estimate GII.17 viral protein 1 (VP1) evolves one order of magnitude faster than GII.4 VP1. Residue substitutions and insertion occur in four of five inferred antigenic epitopes, suggesting immune evasion. Sequential GII.4-GII.17 infections are noted, implicating a lack of cross-protection. Virus bound to saliva of secretor histo-blood groups A, B and O, indicating broad susceptibility. This fast-evolving, broadly recognizing and probably immune-escaped emergent GII.17 variant causes severe gastroenteritis and hospitalization across all age groups, including populations who were previously less vulnerable to GII.4 variants; therefore, the global spread of GII.17 Kawasaki 2014 needs to be monitored. PMID:26625712

  6. Temporal dynamics of norovirus determined through monitoring of municipal wastewater by pyrosequencing and virological surveillance of gastroenteritis cases.

    PubMed

    Kazama, Shinobu; Masago, Yoshifumi; Tohma, Kentaro; Souma, Nao; Imagawa, Toshifumi; Suzuki, Akira; Liu, Xiaofang; Saito, Mayuko; Oshitani, Hitoshi; Omura, Tatsuo

    2016-04-01

    Norovirus is a leading etiological agent of viral gastroenteritis. Because of relatively mild disease symptoms and frequent asymptomatic infections, information on the ecology of this virus is limited. Our objective was to examine the genetic diversity of norovirus circulating in the human population by means of genotyping the virus in municipal wastewater. We investigated norovirus genogroups I and II (GI and GII) in municipal wastewater in Japan by pyrosequencing and quantitative PCR (qPCR) from November 2012 to March 2013. Virological surveillance for gastroenteritis cases was concurrently conducted in the same area. A total of fourteen distinct genotypes in total (GI.1, 3, 4, 6, 7, GII.2, 4, 5, 6, 7, 12, 13, 14, and 17), with up to eight genotypes detected per sample, were observed in wastewater using pyrosequencing; only four genotypes (GI.6, GII.4, 5, and 14) were obtained from clinical samples. Seventy-eight percent of norovirus-positive stool samples contained GII.4, but this genotype was not dominant in wastewater. The norovirus GII.4 Sydney 2012 variant, which appeared and spread during our study period, was detected in both the wastewater and clinical samples. These results suggest that an environmental approach using pyrosequencing yields a more detailed distribution of norovirus genotypes/variants. Thus, wastewater monitoring by pyrosequencing is expected to provide an effective analysis of the distribution of norovirus genotypes causing symptomatic and asymptomatic infections in human populations. PMID:26874777

  7. A waterborne norovirus gastroenteritis outbreak in a school, eastern China.

    PubMed

    Zhou, N; Zhang, H; Lin, X; Hou, P; Wang, S; Tao, Z; Bi, Z; Xu, A

    2016-04-01

    In late 2014, a gastroenteritis outbreak occurred in a school in Shandong Province, eastern China. Hundreds of individuals developed the symptoms of diarrhoea and vomiting. Epidemiological investigation showed that food consumption was not linked to this outbreak, and unboiled direct drinking water was identified as the independent risk factor with a relative risk of 1·37 (95% confidence interval 1·03-1·83). Furthermore, examination of common bacterial and viral gastroenteritis pathogens was conducted on different specimens. Norovirus GI.1, GI.2, GI.6, GII.4, GII.6 and GII.13 were detected in clinical specimens and a water sample. GII.4 sequences between clinical specimens and the water sample displayed a close relationship and belonged to GII.4 variant Sydney 2012. These results indicate that direct drinking water contaminated by norovirus was responsible for this gastroenteritis outbreak. This study enriches our knowledge of waterborne norovirus outbreaks in China, and presents valuable prevention and control practices for policy-makers. In future, strengthened surveillance and supervision of direct drinking-water systems is needed. PMID:26482884

  8. Burden of Norovirus and Rotavirus in Children After Rotavirus Vaccine Introduction, Cochabamba, Bolivia.

    PubMed

    McAtee, Casey L; Webman, Rachel; Gilman, Robert H; Mejia, Carolina; Bern, Caryn; Apaza, Sonia; Espetia, Susan; Pajuelo, Mónica; Saito, Mayuko; Challappa, Roxanna; Soria, Richard; Ribera, Jose P; Lozano, Daniel; Torrico, Faustino

    2016-01-01

    The effectiveness of rotavirus vaccine in the field may set the stage for a changing landscape of diarrheal illness affecting children worldwide. Norovirus and rotavirus are the two major viral enteropathogens of childhood. This study describes the prevalence of norovirus and rotavirus 2 years after widespread rotavirus vaccination in Cochabamba, Bolivia. Stool samples from hospitalized children with acute gastroenteritis (AGE) and outpatients aged 5-24 months without AGE were recruited from an urban hospital serving Bolivia's third largest city. Both viruses were genotyped, and norovirus GII.4 was further sequenced. Norovirus was found much more frequently than rotavirus. Norovirus was detected in 69/201 (34.3%) of specimens from children with AGE and 13/71 (18.3%) of those without diarrhea. Rotavirus was detected in 38/201 (18.9%) of diarrheal specimens and 3/71 (4.2%) of non-diarrheal specimens. Norovirus GII was identified in 97.8% of norovirus-positive samples; GII.4 was the most common genotype (71.4% of typed specimens). Rotavirus G3P[8] was the most prevalent rotavirus genotype (44.0% of typed specimens) and G2P[4] was second most prevalent (16.0% of typed specimens). This community is likely part of a trend toward norovirus predominance over rotavirus in children after widespread vaccination against rotavirus. PMID:26598569

  9. Standardized positive controls for detection of norovirus by reverse transcription PCR

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Norovirus is one of the most common causes of nonbacterial gastroenteritis in humans. Rapid spread by contaminated food and person-to-person transmission through the fecal-oral route are characteristics of norovirus epidemiology and result in high morbidity in vulnerable patient populations. Therefore, detection of norovirus is a major public health concern. Currently, the most common method for detecting and differentiating among norovirus strains in clinical and environmental samples is reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR). Standardized positive controls used in RT-PCR assays to detect norovirus are designed to overcome the problem of false-negative results due to PCR inhibitors and suboptimal reaction conditions. Results In the current study, four types of RNA transcripts were produced from plasmids: norovirus GI-5 and GII-4 capsid regions with human rotavirus (VP7 gene derived) fragment insertions, and norovirus GI-6 and GII-4 capsid regions with hepatitis A virus (VP1/P2A gene derived) fragment insertions. These size-distinguishable products were used as positive controls under the RT-PCR assay conditions used to detect NoV in stool and groundwater samples. Their reliability and reproducibility was confirmed by multiple sets of experiments. Conclusions These standardized products may contribute to the reliable and accurate diagnosis by RT-PCR of norovirus outbreaks, when conducted by laboratories located in different regions. PMID:21612660

  10. Virus Genotype Distribution and Virus Burden in Children and Adults Hospitalized for Norovirus Gastroenteritis, 2012–2014, Hong Kong

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Martin C.W.; Leung, Ting F.; Chung, Tracy W.S.; Kwok, Angela K.; Nelson, E. Anthony S.; Lee, Nelson; Chan, Paul K.S.

    2015-01-01

    We conducted a 2-year hospital-based study on norovirus gastroenteritis among children and adults between August 2012 and September 2014. A total of 1,146 norovirus cases were identified. Young children (aged ≤ 5 years) accounted for a majority (53.3%) of cases. Hospitalization incidence exhibited a U-shaped pattern with the highest rate in young children (1,475 per 100,000 person-years), followed by the elderly aged > 84 years (581 per 100,000 person-years). A subset (n = 395, 34.5%) of cases were selected for norovirus genotyping and noroviral load measurement. Non-GII.4 infections were more commonly observed in young children than in older adults (aged > 65 years) (20.5% versus 9.2%; p < 0.05). In young children, the median noroviral load of GII.4 and non-GII.4 cases was indistinguishably high (cycle threshold value, median [interquartile range]: 16.6 [15.2–19.3] versus 16.6 [14.9–21.6]; p = 0.45). Two age-specific non-GII.4 genotypes (GII.3 and GII.6) were identified among young children. These findings may have implications in norovirus vaccination strategy. PMID:26082165

  11. Preclinical dose-ranging studies of a novel dry powder norovirus vaccine formulation.

    PubMed

    Springer, Michael J; Ni, Yawei; Finger-Baker, Isaac; Ball, Jordan P; Hahn, Jessica; DiMarco, Ashley V; Kobs, Dean; Horne, Bobbi; Talton, James D; Cobb, Ronald R

    2016-03-14

    Norovirus is the primary cause of viral gastroenteritis in humans with multiple genotypes currently circulating worldwide. The development of a successful norovirus vaccine is contingent on its ability to induce both systemic and mucosal antibody responses against a wide range of norovirus genotypes. Norovirus virus-like particles (VLPs) are known to elicit systemic and mucosal immune responses when delivered intranasally. Incorporation of these VLPs into an intranasal powder vaccine offers the advantage of simplicity and induction of neutralizing systemic and mucosal antibodies. Nasal immunization, which provides the advantage of ease of administration and a mucosal delivery mechanism, faces the real issue of limited nasal residence time due to mucociliary clearance. Herein, we describe a novel dry powder (GelVac™) formulation of GI or GII.4 norovirus VLPs, two dominant circulating genotypes, to identify the optimal antigen dosages based on systemic and mucosal immune responses in guinea pigs. Systemic and mucosal immunogenicity of each of the VLPs was observed in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, a boosting effect was observed after the second dosing of each VLP antigen. With the GelVac™ formulation, a total antigen dose of ≥ 15 μg was determined to be the maximally immunogenic dose for both GI and GII.4 norovirus VLPs based on evaluation for 56 days. Taken together, these results indicate that norovirus VLPs could be used as potential vaccine candidates without using an immunostimulatory adjuvant and provide a basis for the development of a GelVac™ bivalent GI/GII.4 norovirus VLP vaccine. PMID:26873053

  12. Norovirus diarrhea in Bangladesh, 2010-2014: prevalence, clinical features, and genotypes.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Mustafizur; Rahman, Rajibur; Nahar, Shamsun; Hossain, Shakhaowat; Ahmed, Shahnawaz; Golam Faruque, Abu Syed; Azim, Tasnim

    2016-10-01

    Norovirus infections in diarrhea patients attending an urban and a rural hospital in Bangladesh were investigated. A total of 953 fecal specimens from both children and adults collected during 2010-2014 were tested for the presence of norovirus using real time PCR. One fourth (25%) of the specimens were positive for norovirus RNA which was identified both in children and adults. Norovirus was associated with short duration of diarrhea, high abdominal pain, and more moderate to severe dehydration when compared with rotavirus infections. Norovirus GII (69%) was the most prevalent genogroup followed by GI (18%), mixed GI/GII/GIV (11%), and GIV (2%). Among GII genogroup, GII.4 (42%) was the most prevalent genotype followed by GII.3 (21%), GII.6 (7%), GII.7 (6%), and GII.21 (6%). GII.4 and GII.3 strains were frequently identified (82% and 75%, respectively) in children <2 years of age and less commonly (16% and 15%) in adults more than 18 years of age. The present study reinforces the importance of norovirus-associated hospitalizations both in children and adults. The dynamic molecular epidemiology of norovirus requires routine strain surveillance to identify changes in prevailing strains. J. Med. Virol. 88:1742-1750, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27003679

  13. Human norovirus infection in Latin America.

    PubMed

    da Silva Poló, Tatiane; Peiró, Juliana R; Mendes, Luiz Cláudio Nogueira; Ludwig, Louisa F; de Oliveira-Filho, Edmilson F; Bucardo, Filemon; Huynen, Pascale; Melin, Pierrette; Thiry, Etienne; Mauroy, Axel

    2016-05-01

    Noroviruses are important enteric pathogens involved in non-bacterial gastroenteritis outbreaks worldwide. Noroviruses mainly occur from person to person via the fecal-oral route but also through contaminated food or water; indirect contamination is also possible due to the resistance of the virus in the environment. Latin American countries as a whole cover a vast North-to-South range, which is highly heterogeneous in terms of climate, ecosystem, human population distribution (urban areas with high human densities versus closed communities), economic development and genetic backgrounds resulting from each particular historical context. This review aims to present epidemiological and clinical patterns of human norovirus infections in Latin American countries. Divergent prevalences were observed depending on the country and the surveyed population. In particular, a shift in rotavirus/norovirus ratio in the etiologies of gastroenteritis was detected in some countries and could be attributed partly to rotavirus vaccine coverage in their infant population. While GII.4 noroviruses were seen to constitute the most common genotype, differences in genotype distribution were observed both in the environment (via sewage sampling proxy) and between genotypes circulating in healthy and diarrheic patients. Due to high climatic discrepancies, different patterns of seasonality were observed. Accordingly, this continent may condense the different particular epidemiological features encountered for HuNoV infections worldwide. PMID:27018574

  14. Genetic diversity of norovirus in hospitalised diarrhoeic children and asymptomatic controls in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Moyo, Sabrina; Hanevik, Kurt; Blomberg, Bjørn; Kommedal, Oyvind; Vainio, Kirsti; Maselle, Samuel; Langeland, Nina

    2014-08-01

    This study investigated and reports norovirus diarrhoea, genetic diversity and associated clinical symptoms, HIV status and seasonality in a paediatric population of Tanzania. Stool specimens and demographic/clinical information, were prospectively collected from 705 hospitalised children with diarrhoea (cases) and 561 children without diarrhoea (controls) between 2010 and 2011. Norovirus detection was done by real-time RT-PCR. Genotype was determined using Gel-based and real time RT-PCR methods and sequencing targeting the polymerase and the capsid region respectively. Norovirus was detected in 14.3%, 181/1266 children. The prevalence of norovirus was significantly higher in cases (18.3%, 129/705) than in controls, (9.2%, 52/561), P<0.05. Except for one child who had double infection with GI and GII all 129 cases had GII. Among controls, 23.1% had GI and 76.9% had GII. Norovirus GII.4 was significantly more prevalent in cases 87.9% than in controls 56.5%. Other genotypes detected in both cases and controls were GII.21, GII.16 and GII.g. The highest numbers of norovirus were detected in April 2011. The number of norovirus detected was significantly higher during the first than second year of life (109/540, 20.2% vs. 20/165, 12.1%). The prevalence of norovirus in HIV-positive and negative children was (21.2%, 7/33) and (10.3%, 40/390, P=0.05) respectively, regardless of diarrhoea symptoms. No significant difference in gender, parent's level of education or nutritional status with norovirus infection was observed within cases or controls. This study confirms the significant role of norovirus infection, especially GII.4 in diarrhoeic children who need hospitalisation and adds knowledge on norovirus epidemiology in the African region. PMID:24960396

  15. Structural Constraints on Human Norovirus Binding to Histo-Blood Group Antigens

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Bishal K.; Leuthold, Mila M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human norovirus interacts with the polymorphic human histo-blood group antigens (HBGAs), and this interaction is thought to be important for infection. The genogroup II genotype 4 (GII.4) noroviruses are the dominant cluster, evolve every other year, and are thought to modify their binding interactions with different HBGA types. Most human noroviruses bind HBGAs, while some strains were found to have minimal or no HBGA interactions. Here, we explain some possible structural constraints for several noroviruses that were found to bind poorly to HBGAs by using X-ray crystallography. We showed that one aspartic acid was flexible or positioned away from the fucose moiety of the HBGAs and this likely hindered binding, although other fucose-interacting residues were perfectly oriented. Interestingly, a neighboring loop also appeared to influence the loop hosting the aspartic acid. These new findings might explain why some human noroviruses bound HBGAs poorly, although further studies are required. PMID:27303720

  16. Structural Constraints on Human Norovirus Binding to Histo-Blood Group Antigens.

    PubMed

    Singh, Bishal K; Leuthold, Mila M; Hansman, Grant S

    2016-01-01

    Human norovirus interacts with the polymorphic human histo-blood group antigens (HBGAs), and this interaction is thought to be important for infection. The genogroup II genotype 4 (GII.4) noroviruses are the dominant cluster, evolve every other year, and are thought to modify their binding interactions with different HBGA types. Most human noroviruses bind HBGAs, while some strains were found to have minimal or no HBGA interactions. Here, we explain some possible structural constraints for several noroviruses that were found to bind poorly to HBGAs by using X-ray crystallography. We showed that one aspartic acid was flexible or positioned away from the fucose moiety of the HBGAs and this likely hindered binding, although other fucose-interacting residues were perfectly oriented. Interestingly, a neighboring loop also appeared to influence the loop hosting the aspartic acid. These new findings might explain why some human noroviruses bound HBGAs poorly, although further studies are required. PMID:27303720

  17. Predicting genotype compositions in norovirus seasons in Japan.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Yoshiyuki; Doan, Yen Hai; Kimura, Hirokazu; Shinomiya, Hiroto; Shirabe, Komei; Katayama, Kazuhiko

    2016-06-01

    Noroviruses cause acute gastroenteritis. Since multiple genotypes of norovirus co-circulate in humans, changing the genotype composition and eluding host immunity, development of a polyvalent vaccine against norovirus in which the genotypes of vaccine strains match the major strains in circulation in the target season is desirable. However, this would require prediction of changes in the genotype composition of circulating strains. A fitness model that predicts the proportion of a strain in the next season from that in the current season has been developed for influenza A virus. Here, such a fitness model that takes into account the fitness effect of herd immunity was used to predict genotype compositions in norovirus seasons in Japan. In the current study, a model that assumes a decline in the magnitude of cross immunity between norovirus strains according to an increase in the divergence of the major antigenic protein VP1 was found to be appropriate for predicting genotype composition. Although it is difficult to predict the proportions of genotypes accurately, the model is effective in predicting the direction of change in the proportions of genotypes. The model predicted that GII.3 and GII.4 may contract, whereas GII.17 may expand and predominate in the 2015-2016 season. The procedure of predicting genotype compositions in norovirus seasons described in the present study has been implemented in the norovirus forecasting system (NOROCAST). PMID:27168450

  18. Nationwide Groundwater Surveillance of Noroviruses in South Korea, 2008▿

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sung-Geun; Jheong, Weon-Hwa; Suh, Chang-Il; Kim, Sang-Hyun; Lee, Joong-Bok; Jeong, Yong-Seok; Ko, GwangPyo; Jang, Kyung Lib; Lee, Gyu-Cheol; Paik, Soon-Young

    2011-01-01

    To inspect the norovirus contamination of groundwater in South Korea, a nationwide study was performed in the summer (June to August) and winter (October to December) of 2008. Three-hundred sites designated by the government ministry were inspected. Water samples were collected for analysis of water quality, microorganism content, and viral content. Water quality was assessed by temperature, pH, turbidity, residual chlorine, and nitrite nitrogen content. Microorganism contents were analyzed bacteria, total coliforms, Escherichia coli, and bacteriophage. Virus analyses included panenterovirus and norovirus. Two primer sets were used for the detection of norovirus genotypes GI and GII, respectively. Of 300 samples, 65 (21.7%) were norovirus positive in the summer and in 52 (17.3%) were norovirus positive in the winter. The genogroup GI noroviruses that were identified were GI-1, GI-2, GI-3, GI-4, GI-5, GI-6, and GI-8 genotypes; those in the GII genogroup were GII-4 and GII-Yuri genotypes. The analytic data showed correlative relationships between the norovirus detection rate and the following parameters: water temperature and turbidity in physical-chemical parameters and somatic phage in microbial parameters. It is necessary to periodically monitor waterborne viruses that frequently cause epidemic food poisoning in South Korea for better public health and sanitary conditions. PMID:21183642

  19. Norovirus Gastroenteritis in a Birth Cohort in Southern India

    PubMed Central

    Menon, Vipin Kumar; George, Santosh; Sarkar, Rajiv; Giri, Sidhartha; Samuel, Prasanna; Vivek, Rosario; Saravanabavan, Anuradha; Liakath, Farzana Begum; Ramani, Sasirekha; Iturriza-Gomara, Miren; Gray, James J.; Brown, David W.; Estes, Mary K.; Kang, Gagandeep

    2016-01-01

    Background Noroviruses are an important cause of gastroenteritis but little is known about disease and re-infection rates in community settings in Asia. Methods Disease, re-infection rates, strain prevalence and genetic susceptibility to noroviruses were investigated in a birth cohort of 373 Indian children followed up for three years. Stool samples from 1856 diarrheal episodes and 147 vomiting only episodes were screened for norovirus by RT-PCR. Norovirus positivity was correlated with clinical data, secretor status and ABO blood group. Results Of 1856 diarrheal episodes, 207 (11.2%) were associated with norovirus, of which 49(2.6%) were norovirus GI, 150(8.1%) norovirus GII, and 8 (0.4%) were mixed infections with both norovirus GI and GII. Of the 147 vomiting only episodes, 30 (20.4%) were positive for norovirus in stool, of which 7 (4.8%) were norovirus GI and 23 (15.6%) GII. At least a third of the children developed norovirus associated diarrhea, with the first episode at a median age of 5 and 8 months for norovirus GI and GII, respectively. Norovirus GI.3 and GII.4 were the predominant genotypes (40.3% and 53.0%) with strain diversity and change in the predominant sub-cluster over time observed among GII viruses. A second episode of norovirus gastroenteritis was documented in 44/174 (25.3%) ever-infected children. Children with the G428A homozygous mutation for inactivation of the FUT2 enzyme (se428se428) were at a significantly lower risk (48/190) of infection with norovirus (p = 0.01). Conclusions This is the first report of norovirus documenting disease, re-infection and genetic susceptibility in an Asian birth cohort. The high incidence and apparent lack of genogroupII specific immunity indicate the need for careful studies on further characterization of strains, asymptomatic infection and shedding and immune response to further our understanding of norovirus infection and disease. PMID:27284939

  20. Norovirus Recombinant Strains Isolated from Gastroenteritis Outbreaks in Southern Brazil, 2004–2011

    PubMed Central

    Leite, José Paulo Gagliardi; Miagostovich, Marize Pereira

    2016-01-01

    Noroviruses are recognized as one of the leading causes of viral acute gastroenteritis, responsible for almost 50% of acute gastroenteritis outbreaks worldwide. The positive single-strand RNA genome of noroviruses presents a high mutation rate and these viruses are constantly evolving by nucleotide mutation and genome recombination. Norovirus recombinant strains have been detected as causing acute gastroenteritis outbreaks in several countries. However, in Brazil, only one report of a norovirus recombinant strain (GII.P7/GII.20) has been described in the northern region so far. For this study, 38 norovirus strains representative of outbreaks, 11 GII.4 and 27 non-GII.4, were randomly selected and amplified at the ORF1/ORF2 junction. Genetic recombination was identified by constructing phylogenetic trees of the polymerase and capsid genes, and further SimPlot and Bootscan analysis of the ORF1/ORF2 overlap. Sequence analysis revealed that 23 out of 27 (85%) non-GII.4 noroviruses were recombinant strains, characterized as: GII.P7/GII.6 (n = 9); GIIP.g/GII.12 (n = 4); GII.P16/GII.3 (n = 4); GII.Pe/GII.17 (n = 2); GII.P7/GII.14 (n = 1); GII.P13/GII.17 (n = 1); GII.P21/GII.3 (n = 1); and GII.P21/GII.13 (n = 1). On the other hand, among the GII.4 variants analyzed (Den Haag_2006b and New Orleans_2009) no recombination was observed. These data revealed the great diversity of norovirus recombinant strains associated with outbreaks, and describe for the first time these recombinant types circulating in Brazil. Our results obtained in southern Brazil corroborate the previous report for the northern region, demonstrating that norovirus recombinant strains are circulating more frequently than we expected. In addition, these results emphasize the relevance of including ORF1/ORF2-based analysis in surveillance studies as well as the importance of characterizing strains from other Brazilian regions to obtain epidemiological data for norovirus recombinant strains circulating in the

  1. Norovirus Infection

    MedlinePlus

    ... About NIAID News & Events Volunteer NIAID > Health & Research Topics > Norovirus Infection Skip Website Tools Website Tools Print this page Get email updates Order publications Volunteer for Clinical ...

  2. Prevalence and Molecular Genotyping of Noroviruses in Market Oysters, Mussels, and Cockles in Bangkok, Thailand.

    PubMed

    Kittigul, Leera; Thamjaroen, Anyarat; Chiawchan, Suwat; Chavalitshewinkoon-Petmitr, Porntip; Pombubpa, Kannika; Diraphat, Pornphan

    2016-06-01

    Noroviruses are the most common cause of acute gastroenteritis associated with bivalve shellfish consumption. This study aimed to detect and characterize noroviruses in three bivalve shellfish species: oysters (Saccostrea forskali), cockles (Anadara nodifera), and mussels (Perna viridis). The virus concentration procedure (adsorption-twice elution-extraction) and a molecular method were employed to identify noroviruses in shellfish. RT-nested PCR was able to detect known norovirus GII.4 of 8.8 × 10(-2) genome copies/g of digestive tissues from oyster and cockle concentrates, whereas in mussel concentrates, the positive result was seen at 8.8 × 10(2) copies/g of digestive tissues. From August 2011 to July 2012, a total of 300 shellfish samples, including each of 100 samples from oysters, cockles, and mussels were collected and tested for noroviruses. Norovirus RNA was detected in 12.3 % of shellfish samples. Of the noroviruses, 7.7 % were of the genogroup (G) I, 2.6 % GII, and 2.0 % were mixed GI and GII. The detection rate of norovirus GI was 2.1 times higher than GII. With regards to the different shellfish species, 17 % of the oyster samples were positive, while 14.0 and 6.0 % were positive for noroviruses found in mussels and cockles, respectively. Norovirus contamination in the shellfish occurred throughout the year with the highest peak in September. Seventeen norovirus-positive PCR products were characterized upon a partial sequence analysis of the capsid gene. Based on phylogenetic analysis, five different genotypes of norovirus GI (GI.2, GI.3, GI.4, GI.5, and GI.9) and four different genotypes of GII (GII.1, GII.2, GII.3, and GII.4) were identified. These findings indicate the prevalence and distribution of noroviruses in three shellfish species. The high prevalence of noroviruses in oysters contributes to the optimization of monitoring plans to improve the preventive strategies of acute gastroenteritis. PMID:26872638

  3. Norovirus Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Norovirus Infection, National Institutes of Health NoroCORE Food Virology Treatment Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook ... Norovirus Infection, National Institutes of Health NoroCORE Food Virology Language: English Español (Spanish) File Formats Help: How ...

  4. An efficient method of noroviruses recovery from oysters and clams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Deqing; Ma, Liping; Zhao, Feng; Yao, Lin; Su, Laijin; Li, Xinguang

    2013-03-01

    Noroviruses (NoVs) are widespread causes of nonbacterial gastroenteritis. Outbreaks of NoVs caused diseases are commonly ascribed to the consumption of contaminated shellfish. The concentration and RNA extraction of NoVs are crucial steps of detecting NoVs in shellfish. This study aimed to select a simple, rapid and highly efficient recovery method of NoVs detection with real-time RT-PCR. Four methods of recovering GI.3 and GII.4 NoVs from spiked digestive tissues of oysters and clams, respectively, were compared, of them, the method involving proteinase K and PEG 8000 was found the most efficient. With this method, 9.3% and 13.1% of GI.3 and GII.4 NoVs were recovered from oysters and 9.6% and 12.3% of GI.3 and GII.4 NoVs were recovered from clams, respectively. This method was further used to detect NoVs in 84 oysters ( Crassostrea gigas) and 86 clams ( Ruditapes philippinarum) collected from 10 coastal cities in China from Jan. 2011 to Feb. 2012. The NoVs isolation rates were 10.47% of clams (9/86) and 7.14% of oysters (6/84). All the detected NoVs belonged to genotype GII. The NoVs recovery method selected is efficient for NoVs detection in oysters and clams.

  5. Norovirus: Food Handlers

    MedlinePlus

    ... sector alimentario Norovirus and Working With Food CDC Vital Signs Report Preventing Norovirus Outbreaks, Food Service has a ... norovirus Overview Symptoms Transmission Prevention Treatment Resources CDC Vital Signs — Preventing Norovirus Outbreaks, Food Service has a ...

  6. Outbreak of Norovirus GII.P17-GII.17 in the Canadian Province of Nova Scotia

    PubMed Central

    LeBlanc, Jason J.; Pettipas, Janice; Gaston, Daniel; Taylor, Robin; Hatchette, Todd F.; Booth, Tim F.; Mandes, Russell; McDermid, Andrew; Grudeski, Elsie

    2016-01-01

    Background. Norovirus is the leading cause of viral gastroenteritis, with GII.4 being the most common circulating genotype. Recently, outbreaks in China revealed that norovirus GII.17 GII.P17 had become predominant. Objective. This study aimed to characterize the distribution of norovirus genotypes circulating in Nova Scotia. Methods. Stool specimens were collected from gastrointestinal outbreaks in Nova Scotia between Jan 2014 and June 2015 and subjected to real-time RT-PCR. Norovirus-positive specimens were referred to the National Microbiology Laboratory for sequence-based genotyping. Results. The first norovirus GII.P17-GII.17 outbreak in Canada was identified, but no widespread activity was observed in Nova Scotia. Discussion. It is unknown whether GII.P17-GII.17 is more widespread in Canada since contributions to Canadian surveillance are too sparse to effectively monitor the epidemiology of emerging norovirus genotypes. Conclusions. Presence of norovirus GII.17:P17 in Canada highlights the need for more systematic surveillance to ensure that molecular targets used for laboratory detection are effective and help understand norovirus evolution, epidemiology, and pathogenesis. PMID:27366155

  7. Norovirus Infections

    MedlinePlus

    Noroviruses are a group of related viruses. Infection with these viruses causes an illness called gastroenteritis, an inflammation of the stomach and intestines. It can spread from person to person, or ...

  8. Binding to histo-blood group antigen-expressing bacteria protects human norovirus from acute heat stress

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dan; Breiman, Adrien; le Pendu, Jacques; Uyttendaele, Mieke

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to investigate if histo-blood group antigen (HBGA) expressing bacteria have any protective role on human norovirus (NoV) from acute heat stress. Eleven bacterial strains were included, belonging to Escherichia coli, Enterobacter cloacae, Enterobacter aerogenes, Clostridium difficile, Bifidobacterium adolescentis, and B. longum. HBGA expression of the bacteria as well as binding of human NoV virus-like particles (VLPs, GI.1, and GII.4 strains) to the bacteria were detected by flow cytometry. NoV VLPs pre-incubated with HBGA expressing or non-HBGA expressing bacteria were heated and detected by both direct ELISA and porcine gastric mucin-binding assay. The NoV-binding abilities of the bacteria correlated well with their HBGA expression profiles. Two HBGA expressing E. coli (LMG8223 and LFMFP861, both GI.1 and GII.4 binders) and one non-HBGA expressing E. coli (ATCC8739, neither GI.1 nor GII.4 binder) were selected for the heat treatment test with NoV VLPs. Compared with the same cell numbers of non-HBGA expressing E. coli, the presence of HBGA-expressing E. coli could always maintain higher antigen integrity, as well as mucin-binding ability of NoV VLPs of both GI.1 and GII.4 after heat-treatment at 90°C for 2 min. These results indicate that HBGA-expressing bacteria may protect NoVs during the food processing treatments, thereby facilitating their transmission. PMID:26191052

  9. Norovirus Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... include fever, headache or body aches. Treatment includes bed rest and lots of liquids to prevent dehydration. There is no specific medicine to treat norovirus infections. Proper hand washing and safe food preparation may help prevent infections. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

  10. Molecular identification of emergent GII.P17-GII.17 norovirus genotype, Romania, 2015.

    PubMed

    Dinu, Sorin; Nagy, Mariana; Negru, Dana Gabriela; Popovici, Emilian Damian; Zota, Lavinia; Oprișan, Gabriela

    2016-01-01

    The novel GII.P17-GII.17 norovirus genotype has been reported as cause of gastroenteritis outbreaks in China and Japan since the winter season 2014/15, replacing the pandemic strain GII.4 Sydney 2012. These emergent strains have also been sporadically reported on other continents than Asia. GII.P17-GII.17 isolates, similar to Kawasaki308 2015, were identified in three patients during a large outbreak of acute gastroenteritis affecting 328 people in Romania, in neighbouring localities, in 2015. PMID:26924169

  11. Development and maturation of norovirus antibodies in childhood.

    PubMed

    Blazevic, Vesna; Malm, Maria; Honkanen, Hanna; Knip, Mikael; Hyöty, Heikki; Vesikari, Timo

    2016-04-01

    The burden of norovirus (NoV) gastroenteritis is substantial in young children. Maternal antibodies are thought to protect a child from NoV infection in early infancy but subsequent development of NoV-specific protective immunity in children is still largely unexplored. We have determined NoV-specific antibody seroconversion to GII.4 virus-like particles as an indicator of NoV infection in two children prospectively followed from birth to eight years of age. Blocking activity and affinity maturation of maternal and serum IgG antibodies were evaluated. Our results show that multiple infections occur in children up to eight years of age. The titer, blocking activity and avidity of maternal antibodies determined susceptibility of an infant to NoV infection. NoV GII.4-specific antibodies with high blocking potential and avidity were developed at two to three years of age and were retained throughout the follow-up. Subsequent NoV infections may have contributed to the duration of protective NoV-specific immune responses that lasted for several years. This study adds to current understanding of the duration of passive protection by maternal antibodies and the duration and quality of acquired immunity following primary and subsequent NoV infections in infants and young children, who are the main target group for NoV vaccine development. PMID:26724451

  12. A Multi-Site Study of Norovirus Molecular Epidemiology in Australia and New Zealand, 2013-2014

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Kun Lee; Hewitt, Joanne; Sitabkhan, Alefiya; Eden, John-Sebastian; Lun, Jennifer; Levy, Avram; Merif, Juan; Smith, David; Rawlinson, William D.; White, Peter A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Norovirus (NoV) is the major cause of acute gastroenteritis across all age groups. In particular, variants of genogroup II, genotype 4 (GII.4) have been associated with epidemics globally, occurring approximately every three years. The pandemic GII.4 variant, Sydney 2012, was first reported in early 2012 and soon became the predominant circulating NoV strain globally. Despite its broad impact, both clinically and economically, our understanding of the fundamental diversity and mechanisms by which new NoV strains emerge remains limited. In this study, we describe the molecular epidemiological trends of NoV-associated acute gastroenteritis in Australia and New Zealand between January 2013 and June 2014. Methodology Overall, 647 NoV-positive clinical faecal samples from 409 outbreaks and 238 unlinked cases of acute gastroenteritis were examined by RT-PCR and sequencing. Phylogenetic analysis was then performed to identify NoV capsid genotypes and to establish the temporal dominance of circulating pandemic GII.4 variants. Recombinant viruses were also identified based on analysis of the ORF1/2 overlapping region. Findings Peaks in NoV activity were observed, however the timing of these epidemics varied between different regions. Overall, GII.4 NoVs were the dominant cause of both outbreaks and cases of NoV-associated acute gastroenteritis (63.1%, n = 408/647), with Sydney 2012 being the most common GII.4 variant identified (98.8%, n = 403/408). Of the 409 reported NoV outbreaks, aged-care facilities were the most common setting in both Western Australia (87%, n = 20/23) and New Zealand (58.1%, n = 200/344) while most of the NoV outbreaks were reported from hospitals (38%, n = 16/42) in New South Wales, Australia. An analysis of a subset of non-GII.4 viruses from all locations (125/239) showed the majority (56.8%, n = 71/125) were inter-genotype recombinants. These recombinants were surprisingly diverse and could be classified into 18 distinct recombinant

  13. Norovirus vaccines: Correlates of protection, challenges and limitations.

    PubMed

    Melhem, Nada M

    2016-07-01

    Norovirus (NoV) is responsible for at least 50% of all gastroenteritis outbreaks worldwide. NoVs are classified into 6 different genogroups (GGI- GGVI) based on the viral capsid protein with NoV genogroup II genotype 4 (GII.4) being the predominant strain causing human diseases. Supportive therapy involving reversal of dehydration and electrolyte deficiency is the main treatment of NoV gastroenteritis. However, the worldwide increased recognition of NoV as an important agent of diarrheal gastroenteritis prompted researchers to focus on establishing preventive strategies conferring long-lasting immunity. This review describes the current status of animal and human vaccine models/studies targeting NoV and addresses the factors hampering the development of a broadly effective vaccine. PMID:26836766

  14. Epidemiological and molecular analysis of human norovirus infections in Taiwan during 2011 and 2012

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The human norovirus (NV) circulates worldwide and is a major cause of epidemics, which have increased in Taiwan since 2002. NV in acute gastroenteritis (AGE) and non-acute gastroenteritis (asymptomatic) patients, including children and adults, have not been previously examined in Taiwan; therefore, we examined the epidemiology and phylogeny of NV in AGE and asymptomatic patients of all ages. Methods 253 stool samples were collected from August 2011 to July 2012 (including 155 AGE and 98 asymptomatic samples in Taiwan) and analyzed using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) for NV. Primers targeting the RNA-polymerase gene were used for RT-PCR to allow DNA sequencing of Taiwan NV strains and phylogenetic analyses. Results NV was detected in 24 (9.5%) of 253 stool specimens using RT-PCR. NV was isolated from all age groups (1 to 86 y) and those NV-positive samples were major identified from inpatients (79.2%, 19/24). Statistical analysis showed that the NV infectious rate of AGE patients was statistically significant (P < 0.05) for age, season and water type, respectively. Phylogenetic analyses of the RdRp region sequence showed that 24 NV isolates belonged to Genogroup II Genotype 4 (GII.4). They were closely related to the epidemic strain in Taiwan in 2006, the GII.4-2006b pandemic strain in 2006, and the GII.4-New Orleans strain in 2010. Conclusion This study is the first to examine NV in sporadic AGE and asymptomatic patients in Taiwan. Furthermore, epidemic strains of isolated GII.4 were predominant in Taiwan during 2011 and 2012. PMID:23875971

  15. Emergence of Norovirus GII.17 Variants among Children with Acute Gastroenteritis in South Korea

    PubMed Central

    Dang Thanh, Hien; Than, Van Thai; Nguyen, Tinh Huu; Lim, Inseok; Kim, Wonyong

    2016-01-01

    Of 1,050 fecal specimens collected from January 2013 to August 2015 from children with acute gastroenteritis, 149 (14.2%) were found to be positive for norovirus. Norovirus GII was the most predominant genogroup (98.65%; 147 of 149). The genotypes detected in this study were GI (2; 1.3%), GII.Pe-GII.4 (109; 73.1%), GII.P17-GII.17 (16; 10.7%), GII.P12-GII.3 (8; 5.4%), GII.P12-GII.12 (8; 5.4%), GII.P4-GII.4 (5; 3.4%), and the recombinant GII.Pe-GII.17 (1; 0.7%). Of these, the novel GII.17 strain was the second most predominant, and the number of affected children appeared to continuously increase over time (2013 [2; 4.4%], 2014 [4; 9.3%], and 2015 [10; 16.4%]). Phylogenetic analysis of the full genome and ORF1, ORF2, and ORF3 nucleotide sequences showed that GII.17 was grouped in cluster III with other strains isolated from 2013 to 2015 and had a different evolutionary history from strains collected in 1978 to 2002 and 2005 to 2009 formed clusters I and II. However, the phylogenetic trees also showed that cluster III was divided into subclusters IIIa (CAU-55 and CAU-85) and IIIb (Kawasaki 2014) (CAU-193, CAU-265, CAU-267, CAU-283, and CAU-289). Comparative analysis of the VP1 capsid protein using 15 complete amino acid sequences from noroviruses isolated from 1978 to 2015 showed 99 amino acid changes. These results could be helpful for epidemiological studies to understand circulating norovirus genotypes in population. PMID:27148739

  16. Norovirus Contamination Levels in Ground Water Treatment Systems Used for Food-Catering Facilities in South Korea

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Bo-Ram; Lee, Sung-Geun; Park, Jong-Hyun; Kim, Kwang-Yup; Ryu, Sang-Ryeol; Rhee, Ok-Jae; Park, Jeong-Woong; Lee, Jeong-Su; Paik, Soon-Young

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to inspect norovirus contamination of groundwater treatment systems used in food-catering facilities located in South Korea. A nationwide study was performed in 2010. Water samples were collected and, for the analysis of water quality, the temperature, pH, turbidity, and residual chlorine content were assessed. To detect norovirus genotypes GI and GII, RT-PCR and semi-nested PCR were performed with specific NV-GI and NV-GII primer sets, respectively. The PCR products amplified from the detected strains were then subjected to sequence analyses. Of 1,090 samples collected in 2010, seven (0.64%) were found to be norovirus-positive. Specifically, one norovirus strain was identified to have the GI-6 genotype, and six GII strains had the GII, GII-3, GII-4, and GII-17 genotypes. The very low detection rate of norovirus most likely reflects the preventative measures used. However, this virus can spread rapidly from person to person in crowded, enclosed places such as the schools investigated in this study. To promote better public health and sanitary conditions, it is necessary to periodically monitor noroviruses that frequently cause epidemic food poisoning in South Korea. PMID:23820792

  17. Norovirus infection in children admitted to hospital for acute gastroenteritis in Belém, Pará, Northern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Siqueira, Jones Anderson Monteiro; Linhares, Alexandre da Costa; de Carvalho, Thaís Cristina Nascimento; Aragão, Glicélia Cruz; Oliveira, Darleise de Souza; Dos Santos, Mirleide Cordeiro; de Sousa, Maisa Silva; Justino, Maria Cleonice Aguiar; Mascarenhas, Joana D'Arc Pereira; Gabbay, Yvone Benchimol

    2013-04-01

    Noroviruses are the leading cause of epidemic, non-bacterial outbreaks of acute gastroenteritis, and are also a major cause of sporadic acute gastroenteritis in infants. The aim of the present study was to identify norovirus infections in children not infected by rotavirus admitted to hospital for acute gastroenteritis in Belém. A total of 348 fecal specimens were obtained from children with diarrhea aged less than 5 years, all of whom had tested negative for rotavirus, between May 2008 and April 2010. Fecal samples were screened for norovirus antigen using enzyme-immunoassay (EIA). Specimens were subjected to reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) using the primers Mon432/434-Mon431/433 for detection of the GI and GII norovirus strains, respectively. Based on both methods, the overall norovirus positivity rate was 36.5% (127/348). Of the 169 samples collected in the first year, 44.4% (n = 75) tested positive for norovirus using both methods, 35.5% (n = 60) by EIA and 40.8% (n = 69) by RT-PCR. Using RT-PCR as a reference standard, a sensitivity of 78.3%, specificity of 94%, and agreement of 87.6% were recorded. Genome sequencing was obtained for 22 (31.9%) of the 69 positive samples, of which 90.9% (20/22) were genotype GII.4d and 9.1% (2/22) were genotype GII.b. Norovirus infection was most frequent in children under 2 years of age (41.5%-115/277). The peak incidence (62.1%) of norovirus-related acute gastroenteritis in these patients (not infected by rotavirus) was observed in February 2010. These findings emphasize the importance of norovirus as a cause of severe acute gastroenteritis among children in Belém, Pará, Northern Brazil. PMID:23359323

  18. Norovirus Epidemiology in Africa: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Mans, Janet; Armah, George E.; Steele, A. Duncan; Taylor, Maureen B.

    2016-01-01

    Norovirus (NoV) is recognised as a leading cause of gastroenteritis worldwide across all age groups. The prevalence and diversity of NoVs in many African countries is still unknown, although early sero-prevalence studies indicated widespread early infection. Reports on NoVs in Africa vary widely in terms of study duration, population groups and size, inclusion of asymptomatic controls, as well as genotyping information. This review provides an estimate of NoV prevalence and distribution of genotypes of NoVs in Africa. Inclusion criteria for the review were study duration of at least 6 months, population size of >50 and diagnosis by RT-PCR. As regions used for genotyping varied, or genotyping was not always performed, this was not considered as an inclusion criteria. A literature search containing the terms norovirus+Africa yielded 74 publications. Of these 19 studies from 14 out of the 54 countries in Africa met the inclusion criteria. Data from studies not meeting the inclusion criteria, based on sample size or short duration, were included as discussion points. The majority of studies published focused on children, under five years of age, hospitalised with acute gastroenteritis. The mean overall prevalence was 13.5% (range 0.8–25.5%) in children with gastroenteritis and 9.7% (range 7–31%) in asymptomatic controls, where tested. NoV GII.4 was the predominant genotype identified in most of the studies that presented genotyping data. Other prevalent genotypes detected included GII.3 and GII.6. In conclusion, NoV is a common pathogen in children with diarrhoea in Africa, with considerable carriage in asymptomatic children. There is however, a paucity of data on NoV infection in adults. PMID:27116615

  19. Human norovirus culture in B cells

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Melissa K; Grau, Katrina R; Costantini, Veronica; Kolawole, Abimbola O; de Graaf, Miranda; Freiden, Pamela; Graves, Christina L; Koopmans, Marion; Wallet, Shannon M; Tibbetts, Scott A; Schultz-Cherry, Stacey; Wobus, Christiane E; Vinjé, Jan; Karst, Stephanie M

    2015-01-01

    Human noroviruses (HunoVs) are a leading cause of foodborne disease and severe childhood diarrhea, and they cause a majority of the gastroenteritis outbreaks worldwide. However, the development of effective and long-lasting HunoV vaccines and therapeutics has been greatly hindered by their uncultivability. We recently demonstrated that a HunoV replicates in human B cells, and that commensal bacteria serve as a cofactor for this infection. In this protocol, we provide detailed methods for culturing the GII.4-sydney HunoV strain directly in human B cells, and in a coculture system in which the virus must cross a confluent epithelial barrier to access underlying B cells. We also describe methods for bacterial stimulation of HunoV B cell infection and for measuring viral attachment to the surface of B cells. Finally, we highlight variables that contribute to the efficiency of viral replication in this system. Infection assays require 3 d and attachment assays require 3 h. analysis of infection or attachment samples, including rna extraction and rt-qpcr, requires ~6 h. PMID:26513671

  20. Human norovirus culture in B cells.

    PubMed

    Jones, Melissa K; Grau, Katrina R; Costantini, Veronica; Kolawole, Abimbola O; de Graaf, Miranda; Freiden, Pamela; Graves, Christina L; Koopmans, Marion; Wallet, Shannon M; Tibbetts, Scott A; Schultz-Cherry, Stacey; Wobus, Christiane E; Vinjé, Jan; Karst, Stephanie M

    2015-12-01

    Human noroviruses (HuNoVs) are a leading cause of foodborne disease and severe childhood diarrhea, and they cause a majority of the gastroenteritis outbreaks worldwide. However, the development of effective and long-lasting HuNoV vaccines and therapeutics has been greatly hindered by their uncultivability. We recently demonstrated that a HuNoV replicates in human B cells, and that commensal bacteria serve as a cofactor for this infection. In this protocol, we provide detailed methods for culturing the GII.4-Sydney HuNoV strain directly in human B cells, and in a coculture system in which the virus must cross a confluent epithelial barrier to access underlying B cells. We also describe methods for bacterial stimulation of HuNoV B cell infection and for measuring viral attachment to the surface of B cells. Finally, we highlight variables that contribute to the efficiency of viral replication in this system. Infection assays require 3 d and attachment assays require 3 h. Analysis of infection or attachment samples, including RNA extraction and RT-qPCR, requires ∼6 h. PMID:26513671

  1. Molecular epidemiology of genogroup II norovirus infection among hospitalized children with acute gastroenteritis in Suzhou (Jiangsu, China) from 2010 to 2013.

    PubMed

    Fu, Jian-Guang; Ai, Jing; Zhang, Jun; Wu, Qing-Bin; Qi, Xian; Ji, Hong; Jin, Miao; Liu, Cheng; Wang, Shen-Jiao; Shan, Jun; Bao, Chang-Jun; Tang, Fen-Yang; Zhu, Ye-Fei

    2016-06-01

    Noroviruses (NoVs) are the most common cause of acute gastroenteritis in both sporadic and outbreak cases. Genotyping and recombination analyses were performed in order to help getting more knowledge of the distribution and genetic diversity of NoVs in Suzhou, located in Jiangsu province of China. All stool samples were collected from hospitalized children younger than 5 years old with acute gastroenteritis. For genotyping, the open reading frame (ORF) 1 and ORF2 were partially amplified and sequenced. 26.9% of stool samples were positive for genogroup II NoVs. The most common genotype was GII.4 and its variants included Den Haag-2006b, New Orleans-2009, and Sydney-2012. The Den Haag-2006b variants predominated during 2010-2012. In 2013, it was replaced by the Sydney-2012 variant. The second most common genotype was GII.12/GII.3. NoVs could be detected throughout the year, with GII.4 and GII.12/GII.3 coexisting during the cold months, and GII.4 was the main genotype during the warm months. The highest prevalence of NoV was detected in young children aged <24 months. Patients infected with GII.4 had a higher chance of getting moderate fever than other NoV-positive patients, while those infected with GII.12/GII.3 tended to have a mild degree of fever. NoV is an important pathogen responsible for viral gastroenteritis among children in Suzhou. Analyses of NoV circulating between 2010 and 2013 revealed a change of predominant variant of NoV GII.4 in each epidemic season and intergenotype recombinant strains represented an important part. PMID:26547266

  2. Norovirus in Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Angarone, Michael P; Sheahan, Anna; Kamboj, Mini

    2016-06-01

    Noroviruses are among the most common cause of diarrhea in transplant recipients. The clinical spectrum of norovirus infection after transplant is increasingly being recognized. As substantial morbidity is now associated with norovirus infections in this population; the quest for rapid diagnostic modalities and newer therapies has expanded. Transplant recipients with norovirus infection are at risk for several complications, including protracted illness with malnutrition, organ failure, and chronic viral shedding. This review summarizes the current knowledge on the epidemiology, complications, diagnosis, and treatment of norovirus infection in the transplant setting. PMID:27115700

  3. Stability of Secondary and Tertiary Structures of Virus-Like Particles Representing Noroviruses: Effects of pH, Ionic Strength, and Temperature and Implications for Adhesion to Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Samandoulgou, Idrissa; Hammami, Riadh; Morales Rayas, Rocio; Fliss, Ismail

    2015-01-01

    Loss of ordered molecular structure in proteins is known to increase their adhesion to surfaces. The aim of this work was to study the stability of norovirus secondary and tertiary structures and its implications for viral adhesion to fresh foods and agrifood surfaces. The pH, ionic strength, and temperature conditions studied correspond to those prevalent in the principal vehicles of viral transmission (vomit and feces) and in the food processing and handling environment (pasteurization and refrigeration). The structures of virus-like particles representing GI.1, GII.4, and feline calicivirus (FCV) were studied using circular dichroism and intrinsic UV fluorescence. The particles were remarkably stable under most of the conditions. However, heating to 65°C caused losses of β-strand structure, notably in GI.1 and FCV, while at 75°C the α-helix content of GII.4 and FCV decreased and tertiary structures unfolded in all three cases. Combining temperature with pH or ionic strength caused variable losses of structure depending on the particle type. Regardless of pH, heating to pasteurization temperatures or higher would be required to increase GII.4 and FCV adhesion, while either low or high temperatures would favor GI.1 adhesion. Regardless of temperature, increased ionic strength would increase GII.4 adhesion but would decrease GI.1 adhesion. FCV adsorption would be greater at refrigeration, pasteurization, or high temperature combined with a low salt concentration or at a higher NaCl concentration regardless of temperature. Norovirus adhesion mediated by hydrophobic interaction may depend on hydrophobic residues normally exposed on the capsid surface at pH 3, pH 8, physiological ionic strength, and low temperature, while at pasteurization temperatures it may rely more on buried hydrophobic residues exposed upon structural rearrangement. PMID:26296729

  4. Strain-Dependent Norovirus Bioaccumulation in Oysters ▿

    PubMed Central

    Maalouf, Haifa; Schaeffer, Julien; Parnaudeau, Sylvain; Le Pendu, Jacques; Atmar, Robert L.; Crawford, Sue E.; Le Guyader, Françoise S.

    2011-01-01

    Noroviruses (NoVs) are the main agents of gastroenteritis in humans and the primary pathogens of shellfish-related outbreaks. Some NoV strains bind to shellfish tissues by using carbohydrate structures similar to their human ligands, leading to the hypothesis that such ligands may influence bioaccumulation. This study compares the bioaccumulation efficiencies and tissue distributions in oysters (Crassostrea gigas) of three strains from the two principal human norovirus genogroups. Clear differences between strains were observed. The GI.1 strain was the most efficiently concentrated strain. Bioaccumulation specifically occurred in digestive tissues in a dose-dependent manner, and its efficiency paralleled ligand expression, which was highest during the cold months. In comparison, the GII.4 strain was very poorly bioaccumulated and was recovered in almost all tissues without seasonal influence. The GII.3 strain presented an intermediate behavior, without seasonal effect and with less bioaccumulation efficiency than that of the GI.1 strain during the cold months. In addition, the GII.3 strain was transiently concentrated in gills and mantle before being almost specifically accumulated in digestive tissues. Carbohydrate ligand specificities of the strains at least partly explain the strain-dependent bioaccumulation characteristics. In particular, binding to the digestive-tube-specific ligand should contribute to bioaccumulation, whereas we hypothesize that binding to the sialic acid-containing ligand present in all tissues would contribute to retain virus particles in the gills or mantle and lead to rapid destruction. PMID:21441327

  5. Anti-viral Effect of Bifidobacterium adolescentis against Noroviruses

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dan; Breiman, Adrien; le Pendu, Jacques; Uyttendaele, Mieke

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the effect of Bifidobacterium adolescentis against noroviruses (NoVs). Murine norovirus-1 (MNV-1) used as a surrogate was detected by plaque assay and RT-qPCR. Human NoV virus like particles (VLPs) were detected by cell-binding assay. It was shown that the presence of B. adolescentis could inhibit the multiplication of MNV-1 on RAW 264.7 cells within 48 h of co-incubation period at 37°C. This inhibition did not occur at the viral binding stage, as no difference was observed in MNV-1 genomic copies collected from washed RAW 264.7 cells without and with B. adolescentis after co-incubation for 1 h at room temperature. Meanwhile, the presence of B. adolescentis decreased the binding of human NoV GI.1 VLPs to both Caco-2 cells and HT-29 cells, while no reduction was induced for the binding of human NoV GII.4 VLPs to Caco-2 cells. PMID:27375585

  6. Norovirus in Healthcare Settings

    MedlinePlus

    ... Guideline for Isolation Precautions: Preventing Transmission of Infectious Agents in Healthcare Settings Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) Fact Sheet on Noroviruses [PDF - 61 ...

  7. Genotype Considerations for Virus-Like Particle-Based Bivalent Norovirus Vaccine Composition

    PubMed Central

    Malm, Maria; Tamminen, Kirsi; Lappalainen, Suvi; Uusi-Kerttula, Hanni; Vesikari, Timo

    2015-01-01

    Norovirus (NoV) genogroup I (GI) and GII are responsible for most human infections with NoV. Because of the high genetic variability of NoV, natural infection does not induce sufficient protective immunity to different genotypes or to variants of the same genotype and there is little or no cross-protection against different genogroups. NoV-derived virus-like particles (VLPs) are promising vaccine candidates that induce high levels of NoV-specific humoral and cellular immune responses. It is believed that a bivalent NoV vaccine consisting of a representative VLP from GI and GII is a minimum requirement for an effective vaccine. Here, we compared the abilities of monovalent immunizations with NoV GI.1-2001, GI.3-2002, GII.4-1999, and GII.4-2010 New Orleans VLPs to induce NoV type-specific and cross-reactive immune responses and protective blocking antibody responses in BALB/c mice. All of the VLPs induced comparable levels of type-specific serum IgG antibodies, as well as blocking antibodies to the VLPs used for immunization. However, the abilities of different VLP genotypes to induce cross-reactive IgG and cross-blocking antibodies varied remarkably. Our results confirm previous findings of a lack of cross-protective immune responses between GI and GII NoVs. These data support the rationale for including NoV GI.3 and GII.4-1999 VLPs in the bivalent vaccine formulation, which could be sufficient to induce protective immune responses across NoV genotypes in the two common genogroups in humans. PMID:25903355

  8. Predominance of Norovirus and Sapovirus in Nicaragua after Implementation of Universal Rotavirus Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Bucardo, Filemón; Reyes, Yaoska; Svensson, Lennart; Nordgren, Johan

    2014-01-01

    Background Despite significant reduction of rotavirus (RV) infections following implementation of RotaTeq vaccination in Nicaragua, a large burden of patients with diarrhea persists. Methods We conducted a community- and hospital-based study of the burden of RV, norovirus (NV) and sapovirus (SV) infections as cause of sporadic acute gastroenteritis (GE) among 330 children ≤ 5 years of age between September 2009 and October 2010 in two major cities of Nicaragua with a RotaTeq coverage rate of 95%. Results We found that NV, SV and RV infections altogether accounted for 45% of cases of GE. Notably, NV was found in 24% (79/330) of the children, followed by SV (17%, 57/330) and RV (8%, 25/330). The detection rate in the hospital setting was 27%, 15% and 14% for NV, SV and RV respectively, whereas in the community setting the detection rate of RV was < 1%. Among each of the investigated viruses one particular genogroup or genotype was dominant; GII.4 (82%) for NV, GI (46%) for SV and G1P[8] (64%) in RV. These variants were also found in higher proportions in the hospital setting compared to the community setting. The GII.4.2006 Minerva strain circulating globally since 2006 was the most common among genotyped NV in this study, with the GII.4-2010 New Orleans emerging in 2010. Conclusions This study shows that NV has become the leading viral cause of gastroenteritis at hospital and community settings in Nicaragua after implementation of RV vaccination. PMID:24849288

  9. Development of a Practical Method to Detect Noroviruses Contamination in Composite Meals.

    PubMed

    Saito, Hiroyuki; Toho, Miho; Tanaka, Tomoyuki; Noda, Mamoru

    2015-09-01

    Various methods to detect foodborne viruses including norovirus (NoV) in contaminated food have been developed. However, a practical method suitable for routine examination that can be applied for the detection of NoVs in oily, fatty, or emulsive food has not been established. In this study, we developed a new extraction and concentration method for detecting NoVs in contaminated composite meals. We spiked NoV-GI.4 or -GII.4 stool suspension into potato salad and stir-fried noodles. The food samples were suspended in homogenizing buffer and centrifuged to obtain a food emulsion. Then, anti-NoV-GI.4 or anti-NoV-GII.4 rabbit serum raised against recombinant virus-like particles or commercially available human gamma globulin and Staphylococcus aureus fixed with formalin as a source of protein A were added to the food emulsion. NoV-IgG-protein A-containing bacterial complexes were collected by centrifugation, and viral RNA was extracted. The detection limits of NoV RNA were 10-35 copies/g food for spiked NoVs in potato salad and stir-fried noodles. Human gamma globulin could also concentrate other NoV genotypes as well as other foodborne viruses, including sapovirus, hepatitis A virus, and adenovirus. This newly developed method can be used as to identify NoV contamination in composite foods and is also possibly applicable to other foodborne viruses. PMID:25796206

  10. Human norovirus infection of caco-2 cells grown as a three-dimensional tissue structure.

    PubMed

    Straub, Timothy M; Bartholomew, Rachel A; Valdez, Catherine O; Valentine, Nancy B; Dohnalkova, Alice; Ozanich, Richard M; Bruckner-Lea, Cynthia J; Call, Douglas R

    2011-06-01

    Human norovirus (hNoV) infectivity was studied using a three-dimensional model of large intestinal epithelium. Large intestine Caco-2 cells were grown in rotating wall vessel bioreactors for 18-21 days at 37 degrees C and then transferred to 24-well tissue culture plates where they were infected with GI.1 and GII.4 human noroviruses collected from human challenge trials and various outbreak settings, respectively. Compared with uninfected cells, transmission micrographs of norovirus-infected cells displayed evidence of shortening or total loss of apical microvilli, and vacuolization. Quantitative reverse transcription real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) indicated an approximate 2-3 log10 increase in viral RNA copies for the infected cells. A passage experiment examined both the ability for continued viral RNA and viral antigen detection. In the passaged samples 1.01x10(6) copies ml(-1) were detected by qRT-PCR. Immune electron microscopy using primary antibody to hNoV GI.1 capsids in conjunction with 6 nm gold-labelled secondary antibodies was performed on crude cellular lysates. Localization of antibody was observed in infected but not for uninfected cells. Our present findings, coupled with earlier work with the three-dimensional small intestinal INT407 model, demonstrate the utility of 3-D cell culture methods to develop infectivity assays for enteric viruses that do not readily infect mammalian cell cultures. PMID:21942189

  11. Detection and molecular characterization of norovirus from oysters implicated in outbreaks in the US.

    PubMed

    Woods, Jacquelina W; Calci, Kevin R; Marchant-Tambone, Joey G; Burkhardt, William

    2016-10-01

    Human noroviruses are the leading cause of non-bacterial shellfish associated gastroenteritis. Here we report on the detection and characterization of norovirus (NoV) in shellfish associated outbreaks. Requests were received from state and federal officials for technical assistance in the analysis of shellfish for NoV and male specific coliphage (MSC; an enteric virus surrogate) during the years 2009 thru 2014. In outbreaks where NoV was detected, genogroup II (GII) levels ranged from 2.4 to 82.0 RT-qPCR U/g of digestive diverticula (DD) while NoV genogroup I (GI) levels ranged from 1.5 to 29.8 RT-qPCR U/g of DD. Murine norovirus extraction efficiencies ranged between 50 and 85%. MSC levels ranged from <6 to 80 PFU/100 g. Phylogenetic analysis of the outbreak sequences revealed strains clustering with GI.8, GI.4, GII.3, GII.4, GII.7, and GII.21. There was 100% homology between the shellfish and clinical strains occurring in 2 of 8 outbreaks. Known shellfish consumption data demonstrated probable infectious particles ingested as low as 12. These investigations demonstrate effective detection, quantification, and characterization of NoV in shellfish associated with illness. PMID:27375246

  12. Noroviruses associated with acute gastroenteritis in a children's day care facility in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Gallimore, C I; Barreiros, M A B; Brown, D W G; Nascimento, J P; Leite, J P G

    2004-03-01

    Noroviruses (Norwalk-like viruses) are an important cause of gastroenteritis worldwide. They are the most common cause of outbreaks of gastroenteritis in the adult population and occur in nursing homes for the elderly, geriatric wards, medical wards, and in hotel and restaurant settings. Food-borne outbreaks have also occurred following consumption of contaminated oysters. This study describes the application of a reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay using random primers (PdN6) and specific Ni and E3 primers, directed at a small region of the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase-coding region of the norovirus genome, and DNA sequencing for the detection and preliminary characterisation of noroviruses in outbreaks of gastroenteritis in children in Brazil. The outbreak samples were collected from children <5 years of age at the Bertha Lutz children's day care facility at Oswaldo Cruz Foundation (Fiocruz), Rio de Janeiro, that occurred between 1996 and 1998, where no pathogen had been identified. At the Bertha Lutz day care center facility, only Fiocruz's employee children are provided for, and they come from different social, economic and cultural backgrounds. Three distinct genogroup II strains were detected in three outbreaks in 1997/98 and were most closely related to genotypes GII-3 (Mexico virus) and GII-4 (Grimsby virus), both of which have been detected in paediatric and adult outbreaks of gastroenteritis worldwide. PMID:15060697

  13. Prevalence and molecular characterization of human noroviruses and sapoviruses in Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Sisay, Zufan; Djikeng, Appolinaire; Berhe, Nega; Belay, Gurja; Gebreyes, Wondwossen; Abegaz, Woldaregay Erku; Njahira, Moses N; Wang, Q H; Saif, Linda J

    2016-08-01

    Viral gastroenteritis is a major public health problem worldwide. In Ethiopia, very limited studies have been done on the epidemiology of enteropathogenic viruses. The aim of this study was to detect and characterize noroviruses (NoVs) and sapoviruses (SaVs) from acute gastroenteritis patients of all ages. Fecal samples were collected from diarrheic patients (n = 213) in five different health centers in Addis Ababa during June-September 2013. The samples were screened for caliciviruses by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) using universal and genogroup-specific primer pairs. Phylogenetic analyses were conducted using the sequences of the PCR products. Of the clinical samples, 25.3 % and 4.2 % were positive for NoV and SaV RNA, respectively. Among the norovirus positives, 22 were sequenced further, and diverse norovirus strains were identified: GI (n = 4), GII (n = 17) and GIV (n = 1). Most strains were GII (n = 17/22: 77.2 %), which were further divided into three different genotypes (GII.4, GII.12/GII.g recombinant-like and GII.17), with GII.17 being the dominant (7/17) strain detected. GI noroviruses, in particular GI.4 (n = 1), GI.5 (n = 2) and GI.8 (n = 1), were also detected and characterized. The GIV strain detected is the first from East Africa. The sapoviruses sequenced were also the first reported from Ethiopia. Collectively, this study showed the high burden and diversity of noroviruses and circulation of sapoviruses in diarrheic patients in Ethiopia. Continued surveillance to assess their association with diarrhea is needed to define their epidemiology, disease burden, and impact on public health. PMID:27193022

  14. Broad Blockade Antibody Responses in Human Volunteers after Immunization with a Multivalent Norovirus VLP Candidate Vaccine: Immunological Analyses from a Phase I Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Lindesmith, Lisa C.; Ferris, Martin T.; Mullan, Clancy W.; Ferreira, Jennifer; Debbink, Kari; Swanstrom, Jesica; Richardson, Charles; Goodwin, Robert R.; Baehner, Frank; Mendelman, Paul M.; Bargatze, Robert F.; Baric, Ralph S.

    2015-01-01

    Background Human noroviruses (NoVs) are the primary cause of acute gastroenteritis and are characterized by antigenic variation between genogroups and genotypes and antigenic drift of strains within the predominant GII.4 genotype. In the context of this diversity, an effective NoV vaccine must elicit broadly protective immunity. We used an antibody (Ab) binding blockade assay to measure the potential cross-strain protection provided by a multivalent NoV virus-like particle (VLP) candidate vaccine in human volunteers. Methods and Findings Sera from ten human volunteers immunized with a multivalent NoV VLP vaccine (genotypes GI.1/GII.4) were analyzed for IgG and Ab blockade of VLP interaction with carbohydrate ligand, a potential correlate of protective immunity to NoV infection and illness. Immunization resulted in rapid rises in IgG and blockade Ab titers against both vaccine components and additional VLPs representing diverse strains and genotypes not represented in the vaccine. Importantly, vaccination induced blockade Ab to two novel GII.4 strains not in circulation at the time of vaccination or sample collection. GII.4 cross-reactive blockade Ab titers were more potent than responses against non-GII.4 VLPs, suggesting that previous exposure history to this dominant circulating genotype may impact the vaccine Ab response. Further, antigenic cartography indicated that vaccination preferentially activated preexisting Ab responses to epitopes associated with GII.4.1997. Study interpretations may be limited by the relevance of the surrogate neutralization assay and the number of immunized participants evaluated. Conclusions Vaccination with a multivalent NoV VLP vaccine induces a broadly blocking Ab response to multiple epitopes within vaccine and non-vaccine NoV strains and to novel antigenic variants not yet circulating at the time of vaccination. These data reveal new information about complex NoV immune responses to both natural exposure and to vaccination, and

  15. Surveillance of pathogens causing gastroenteritis and characterization of norovirus and sapovirus strains in Shenzhen, China, during 2011.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wei; Yang, Hong; Zhang, Hai-long; Xian, Hui-Xia; Yao, Xiang-Jie; Zhao, De-Jian; Chen, Long; Shu, Bai-hua; Zhou, Yi-kai; He, Ya-Qing

    2014-08-01

    Viral gastroenteritis is one of the most common diseases in humans, and it is primarily caused by rotaviruses (RVs), astroviruses (AstVs), adenoviruses (AdVs), noroviruses (NoVs), and sapoviruses (SaVs). In this study, we determined the distribution of viral gastroenteritis and human calicivirus (HuCVs) in acute gastroenteritis patients in Shenzhen, China, during 2011. Real-time RT-PCR was used to detect norovirus (NoV), group A rotavirus (RV), adenovirus (AdV), and astrovirus (AstV). From a total of 983 fecal samples, NoV was detected in 210 (21.4 %); RoV in 173 (17.6 %); AstV in 10 (1.0 %); and AdV in 15 (1.5 %). Mixed infections involving two NoVs were found in 21 of the 387 pathogen-positive stool specimens. NoV and SaV genotypes were further tested using RT-PCRs and molecular typing and phylogenetic analysis were then performed based on the ORF1-ORF2 region for NoV and a conserved nucleotide sequence in the capsid gene for SaV. Of the 68 typed strains that were sequenced and genotyped, five were NoV G1 (7.5 %) and 63 were NoV GII (96.6 %). GII strains were clustered into five genotypes, including GII.4 (65.1 %; 36 GII.4 2006b and five GII.4 New Orleans), GII.3 (28.6 %), GII.2 (3.2 %), GII.6 (1.6 %), and GII.1 (1.6 %). While all fecal specimens were tested for SaVs, 15 (1.5 %) were positive, and of these, 12 isolates belonged to G1.2, and the remaining three SaV strains belonged to the SaV GII genogroup. Although various HuCVs were detected in acute gastroenteritis patients, NoV GII.4 2006b was more prevalent than the other HuCVs. PMID:24610551

  16. Application of Long-Range and Binding Reverse Transcription-Quantitative PCR To Indicate the Viral Integrities of Noroviruses

    PubMed Central

    De Keuckelaere, Ann; Uyttendaele, Mieke

    2014-01-01

    This study intends to establish and apply methods evaluating both viral capsid and genome integrities of human noroviruses (NoVs), which thus far remain nonculturable. Murine norovirus 1 (MNV-1) and human NoV GII.4 in phosphate-buffered saline suspensions were treated with heat, UV light, or ethanol and detected by reverse transcription-quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR), long-range RT-qPCR, binding RT-qPCR, and binding long-range RT-qPCR. For MNV-1 heated at 60°C for 2 and 30 min, limited reductions of genomic copies (<0.3-log) were obtained by RT-qPCR and long-range RT-qPCR, while the cell-binding pretreatments obtained higher reductions (>1.89-log reduction after 60°C for 30 min by binding long-range RT-qPCR). The human NoV GII.4 was found to be more heat resistant than MNV-1. For both MNV-1 and human NoV GII.4 after UV treatments of 20 and 200 mJ/cm2, no significant difference (P > 0.05) was observed between the dose-dependent reductions obtained by the four detection methodologies. Treatment of 70% ethanol for 1 min was shown to be more effective for inactivation of both MNV-1 and human NoV GII.4 than the heat and UV treatments used in this study. Subsequently, eight raspberry and four shellfish samples previously shown to be naturally contaminated with human NoVs by RT-qPCR (GI and GII; thus, 24 RT-qPCR signals) were subjected to comparison by this method. RT-qPCR, long-range RT-qPCR, binding RT-qPCR, and binding long-range RT-qPCR detected 20/24, 14/24, 24/24, and 23/24 positive signals, respectively, indicating the abundant presence of intact NoV particles. PMID:25107982

  17. Crystal Structures of GII.10 and GII.12 Norovirus Protruding Domains in Complex with Histo-Blood Group Antigens Reveal Details for a Potential Site of Vulnerability

    SciTech Connect

    Hansman, Grant S.; Biertümpfel, Christian; Georgiev, Ivelin; McLellan, Jason S.; Chen, Lei; Zhou, Tongqing; Katayama, Kazuhiko; Kwong, Peter D.

    2011-10-10

    Noroviruses are the dominant cause of outbreaks of gastroenteritis worldwide, and interactions with human histo-blood group antigens (HBGAs) are thought to play a critical role in their entry mechanism. Structures of noroviruses from genogroups GI and GII in complex with HBGAs, however, reveal different modes of interaction. To gain insight into norovirus recognition of HBGAs, we determined crystal structures of norovirus protruding domains from two rarely detected GII genotypes, GII.10 and GII.12, alone and in complex with a panel of HBGAs, and analyzed structure-function implications related to conservation of the HBGA binding pocket. The GII.10- and GII.12-apo structures as well as the previously solved GII.4-apo structure resembled each other more closely than the GI.1-derived structure, and all three GII structures showed similar modes of HBGA recognition. The primary GII norovirus-HBGA interaction involved six hydrogen bonds between a terminal {alpha}fucose1-2 of the HBGAs and a dimeric capsid interface, which was composed of elements from two protruding subdomains. Norovirus interactions with other saccharide units of the HBGAs were variable and involved fewer hydrogen bonds. Sequence analysis revealed a site of GII norovirus sequence conservation to reside under the critical {alpha}fucose1-2 and to be one of the few patches of conserved residues on the outer virion-capsid surface. The site was smaller than that involved in full HBGA recognition, a consequence of variable recognition of peripheral saccharides. Despite this evasion tactic, the HBGA site of viral vulnerability may provide a viable target for small molecule- and antibody-mediated neutralization of GII norovirus.

  18. Molecular characterization of new emerging GII.17 norovirus strains from South China.

    PubMed

    Xue, Liang; Wu, Qingping; Cai, Weicheng; Zhang, Jumei; Guo, Weipeng

    2016-06-01

    Noroviruses are still the primary cause of non-bacterial acute gastroenteritis worldwide. Recently, a novel GII.17 norovirus variant emerged and caused an infection peak in the cold season of 2014/2015 in some Asian countries, including China. In this study, in order to understand the evolutionary advantage of the novel variant, complete genomic sequences of GII.17 NoV strains from South China were comprehensively analyzed. Pairwise alignments of new GII.17 genomes with representative sequences of each GII genotype were performed. Inconsistent homology was observed between different protein-encoding regions, of which VPg (NS5) and P2 were found to be the most conserved and variable ones, respectively. The differences between new sequences and other reported GII.17 genomes were also compared, and 84 mismatched nucleotides were found, resulting in 15 amino acid changes. Then, all capsid sequences of different GII.17 NoV variants were collected for multiple alignments, and a total of 87 spots were identified during their evolution process. Homology modeling of capsid proteins of four GII.17 variants was carried out based on comparison with GII.4 VA387 strain, and structural differences were mainly embodied in five extended loops. Furthermore, positions of potential conformational epitope regions of new GII.17 variants were found more similar or adjacent to those of GII.4 rather than those of the former GII.17 variants. In summary, nine GII.17 strains from South China were extensively characterized based on their complete genomes, and a different distribution pattern of epitope residues was predicted on the new GII.17 variant capsid from that of the former ones. PMID:26923075

  19. Advances in Norovirus Biology

    PubMed Central

    Karst, Stephanie M.; Wobus, Christiane E.; Goodfellow, Ian G.; Green, Kim Y.

    2014-01-01

    Human noroviruses are a major cause of epidemic and sporadic gastroenteritis worldwide, and can chronically infect immunocompromised patients. Efforts to develop effective vaccines and antivirals have been hindered by the uncultivable nature and extreme genetic diversity of human noroviruses. Although they remain a particularly challenging pathogen to study, recent advances in norovirus animal models and in vitro cultivation systems have led to an increased understanding of norovirus molecular biology and replication, pathogenesis, cell tropism, and innate and adaptive immunity. Furthermore, clinical trials of vaccines consisting of nonreplicating virus-like particles have shown promise. In this review, we summarize these recent advances and discuss controversies in the field, which is rapidly progressing towards generation of antiviral agents and increasingly effective vaccines. PMID:24922570

  20. Norovirus a Costly Bug

    MedlinePlus

    ... to be the first to assess the global economic impact of the highly contagious virus, which is ... a lot more attention. Our study presents an economic argument for greater consideration of norovirus. It has ...

  1. Characterization of virus-like particles derived from a GII.3 norovirus strain distantly related with current dominating strains.

    PubMed

    Huo, Yuqi; Chen, Xuhui; Zheng, Lijun; Huo, Jinling; Zhang, Shanfeng; Wang, Mingchen; Wang, Yumei

    2016-10-01

    Genogroup II, genotype 3 noroviruses (GII.3 NoVs) are secondary to GII.4 NoVs in causing acute non-bacterial gastroenteritis worldwide. In our previous study, we found that virus-like particles (VLPs) derived from a GII.3 NoV strain exhibited no binding activity to any salivary and synthetic histo-blood group antigens (HBGAs) tested. In this study, the nucleotide sequence encoding the major capsid protein of another documented GII.3 NoV strain was codon-optimized and synthesized, and the major capsid protein was expressed using recombinant baculovirus virus expression system. The assembly of VLPs was verified by electron microscopy, and the binding profiles of the assembled VLPs to salivary HBGAs were determined, and in vitro VLP-salivary HBGAs binding blockade assay was used to test the cross-blocking effects of hyperimmune sera produced against different genotypes (GI.2, GII.3, and GII.4). The expression of the major capsid proteins led to the successful assembly of VLPs, and in vitro VLP-salivary HBGAs binding assay indicated that the assembled VLPs bound to salivary HBGAs from blood type A, B, AB, and O individuals, with the highest binding capacity to type A salivary HBGAs. In vitro VLP-salivary HBGAs binding blockade assay demonstrated the absence of blocking activities for hyperimmune sera produced against GI.2and GII.4 VLPs and the presence of blocking activity for that against GII.3 VLPs. Our results suggest the absence of cross-blocking activities among different genotypes and the presence of blocking activities between GII.3 NoVs from different clusters, which might have implications for the design of multivalent NoV vaccines. PMID:27234312

  2. Infection control for norovirus

    PubMed Central

    Barclay, L.; Park, G. W.; Vega, E.; Hall, A.; Parashar, U.; Vinjé, J.; Lopman, B.

    2015-01-01

    Norovirus infections are notoriously difficult to prevent and control, owing to their low infectious dose, high shedding titre, and environmental stability. The virus can spread through multiple transmission routes, of which person-to-person and foodborne are the most important. Recent advances in molecular diagnostics have helped to establish norovirus as the most common cause of sporadic gastroenteritis and the most common cause of outbreaks of acute gastroenteritis across all ages. In this article, we review the epidemiology and virology of noroviruses, and prevention and control guidelines, with a focus on the principles of disinfection and decontamination. Outbreak management relies on sound infection control principles, including hand hygiene, limiting exposure to infectious individuals, and thorough environmental decontamination. Ideally, all infection control recommendations would rely on empirical evidence, but a number of challenges, including the inability to culture noroviruses in the laboratory and the challenges of outbreak management in complex environments, has made it difficult to garner clear evidence of efficacy in certain areas of infection control. New experimental data on cultivable surrogates for human norovirus and on environmental survivability and relative resistance to commonly used disinfectants are providing new insights for further refinining disinfection practices. Finally, clinical trials are underway to evaluate the efficacy of vaccines, which may shift the current infection control principles to more targeted interventions. PMID:24813073

  3. The Application of New Molecular Methods in the Investigation of a Waterborne Outbreak of Norovirus in Denmark, 2012

    PubMed Central

    Schultz, Anna Charlotte; Fonager, Jannik; Ethelberg, Steen; Dalgaard, Camilla; Adelhardt, Marianne; Engberg, Jørgen H.; Fischer, Thea Kølsen; Lassen, Sofie Gillesberg

    2014-01-01

    In December 2012, an outbreak of acute gastrointestinal illness occurred in a geographical distinct area in Denmark covering 368 households. A combined microbiological, epidemiological and environmental investigation was initiated to understand the outbreak magnitude, pathogen(s) and vehicle in order to control the outbreak. Norovirus GII.4 New Orleans 2009 variant was detected in 15 of 17 individual stool samples from 14 households. Norovirus genomic material from water samples was detected and quantified and sequencing of longer parts of the viral capsid region (>1000 nt) were applied to patient and water samples. All five purposely selected water samples tested positive for norovirus GII in levels up to 1.8×104 genomic units per 200 ml. Identical norovirus sequences were found in all 5 sequenced stool samples and 1 sequenced water sample, a second sequenced water sample showed 1 nt (<0.1%) difference. In a cohort study, including 256 participants, cases were defined as residents of the area experiencing diarrhoea or vomiting onset on 12–14 December 2012. We found an attack rate of 51%. Being a case was associated with drinking tap-water on 12–13 December (relative risk = 6.0, 95%CI: 1.6–22) and a dose-response relation for the mean glasses of tap-water consumed was observed. Environmental investigations suggested contamination from a sewage pipe to the drinking water due to fall in pressure during water supply system renovations. The combined microbiological, epidemiological and environmental investigations strongly indicates the outbreak was caused by norovirus contamination of the water supply system. PMID:25222495

  4. Food-Borne Noroviruses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Noroviruses have emerged as the number one cause of food-borne illness in the United States. In this book chapter, the current molecular classification criteria are described as well as the current information regarding the molecular biology of the virus and its putative gene functions. Identifica...

  5. Noroviruses in Archival Samples

    PubMed Central

    Skraber, Sylvain; Italiaander, Ronald; Lodder, Willemijn J.

    2005-01-01

    Application of recent techniques to detect current pathogens in archival effluent samples collected and concentrated in 1987 lead to the characterization of norovirus GGII.6 Seacroft, unrecognized until 1990 in a clinical sample. Retrospective studies will likely increase our knowledge about waterborne transmission of emerging pathogens. PMID:15757575

  6. Norovirus a Costly Bug

    MedlinePlus

    ... You only seem to hear about it when people get sick on a cruise ship or at a restaurant, but norovirus is everywhere," said study leader Sarah Bartsch, a research associate at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, in Baltimore. "It doesn't matter how old you are or if you're in a ...

  7. Evaluation of the Porcine Gastric Mucin Binding Assay for High-Pressure-Inactivation Studies Using Murine Norovirus and Tulane Virus

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xinhui

    2014-01-01

    We compared the results of high-hydrostatic-pressure (HHP) inactivation of murine norovirus type 1 (MNV-1) and Tulane virus (TV) obtained by a porcine gastric mucin binding assay followed by quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (referred to here as the PGM-MB/PCR assay) and a plaque assay and evaluated HHP inactivation of a human norovirus (HuNoV) genogroup I genotype 1 (GI.1) strain and a HuNoV GII.4 strain by using the PGM-MB/PCR assay. Viruses were treated at different pressure levels for 2 min at 4 or 21°C in culture medium of neutral pH and in culture medium of pH 4 at 21°C. The log reductions of infectious MNV-1 and TV particles caused by HHP were assessed using the PGM-MB/PCR and plaque assays, while the log reductions of HuNoVs were assessed by the PGM-MB/PCR assay only. For TV and MNV-1, the two pressure inactivation curves obtained using the plaque and PGM-MB/PCR assays were almost identical at ≤2-log-reduction levels regardless of the treatment temperature and pH. Further increasing the pressure over the 2-log-reduction level resulted in higher log reductions of TV and MNV-1, as assessed by the plaque assay, but did not increase the log reductions, as assessed by the PGM-MB/PCR assay. HHP treatments could achieve maximum reductions of ∼3 and 3.5 log units for GI.1 and GII.4, respectively, as assessed by the PGM-MB/PCR assay. On the basis of these results, it can reasonably be concluded that the PGM-MB/PCR assay would very likely be able to estimate HHP inactivation of HuNoV at ≤2-log-reduction levels. It would also likely conservatively quantify HHP inactivation of the GI.1 strain at 2- to 3-log-reduction levels and the GII.4 strain at 2- to 3.5-log-reduction levels. PMID:25362063

  8. Inhibition of Histo-blood Group Antigen Binding as a Novel Strategy to Block Norovirus Infections

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xu-Fu; Tan, Ming; Chhabra, Monica; Dai, Ying-Chun; Meller, Jarek; Jiang, Xi

    2013-01-01

    Noroviruses (NoVs) are the most important viral pathogens that cause epidemic acute gastroenteritis. NoVs recognize human histo-blood group antigens (HBGAs) as receptors or attachment factors. The elucidation of crystal structures of the HBGA-binding interfaces of a number of human NoVs representing different HBGA binding patterns opens a new strategy for the development of antiviral compounds against NoVs through rational drug design and computer-aided virtual screening methods. In this study, docking simulations and virtual screening were used to identify hit compounds targeting the A and B antigens binding sites on the surface of the capsid P protein of a GII.4 NoV (VA387). Following validation by re-docking of the A and B ligands, these structural models and AutoDock suite of programs were used to screen a large drug-like compound library (derived from ZINC library) for inhibitors blocking GII.4 binding to HBGAs. After screening >2 million compounds using multistage protocol, 160 hit compounds with best predicted binding affinities and representing a number of distinct chemical classes have been selected for subsequent experimental validation. Twenty of the 160 compounds were found to be able to block the VA387 P dimers binding to the A and/or B HBGAs at an IC50<40.0 µM, with top 5 compounds blocking the HBGA binding at an IC50<10.0 µM in both oligosaccharide- and saliva-based blocking assays. Interestingly, 4 of the top-5 compounds shared the basic structure of cyclopenta [a] dimethyl phenanthren, indicating a promising structural template for further improvement by rational design. PMID:23894462

  9. Trivalent Combination Vaccine Induces Broad Heterologous Immune Responses to Norovirus and Rotavirus in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Tamminen, Kirsi; Lappalainen, Suvi; Huhti, Leena; Vesikari, Timo; Blazevic, Vesna

    2013-01-01

    Rotavirus (RV) and norovirus (NoV) are the two major causes of viral gastroenteritis (GE) in children worldwide. We have developed an injectable vaccine design to prevent infection or GE induced with these enteric viruses. The trivalent combination vaccine consists of NoV capsid (VP1) derived virus-like particles (VLPs) of GI-3 and GII-4 representing the two major NoV genogroups and tubular RV recombinant VP6 (rVP6), the most conserved and abundant RV protein. Each component was produced in insect cells by a recombinant baculovirus expression system and combined in vitro. The vaccine components were administered intramuscularly to BALB/c mice either separately or in the trivalent combination. High levels of NoV and RV type specific serum IgGs with high avidity (>50%) as well as intestinal IgGs were detected in the immunized mice. Cross-reactive IgG antibodies were also elicited against heterologous NoV VLPs not used for immunization (GII-4 NO, GII-12 and GI-1 VLPs) and to different RVs from cell cultures. NoV-specific serum antibodies blocked binding of homologous and heterologous VLPs to the putative receptors, histo-blood group antigens, suggesting broad NoV neutralizing activity of the sera. Mucosal antibodies of mice immunized with the trivalent combination vaccine inhibited RV infection in vitro. In addition, cross-reactive T cell immune responses to NoV and RV-specific antigens were detected. All the responses were sustained for up to six months. No mutual inhibition of the components in the trivalent vaccine combination was observed. In conclusion, the NoV GI and GII VLPs combination induced broader cross-reactive and potentially neutralizing immune responses than either of the VLPs alone. Therefore, trivalent vaccine might induce protective immune responses to the vast majority of circulating NoV and RV genotypes. PMID:23922988

  10. Inhibition of histo-blood group antigen binding as a novel strategy to block norovirus infections.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xu-Fu; Tan, Ming; Chhabra, Monica; Dai, Ying-Chun; Meller, Jarek; Jiang, Xi

    2013-01-01

    Noroviruses (NoVs) are the most important viral pathogens that cause epidemic acute gastroenteritis. NoVs recognize human histo-blood group antigens (HBGAs) as receptors or attachment factors. The elucidation of crystal structures of the HBGA-binding interfaces of a number of human NoVs representing different HBGA binding patterns opens a new strategy for the development of antiviral compounds against NoVs through rational drug design and computer-aided virtual screening methods. In this study, docking simulations and virtual screening were used to identify hit compounds targeting the A and B antigens binding sites on the surface of the capsid P protein of a GII.4 NoV (VA387). Following validation by re-docking of the A and B ligands, these structural models and AutoDock suite of programs were used to screen a large drug-like compound library (derived from ZINC library) for inhibitors blocking GII.4 binding to HBGAs. After screening >2 million compounds using multistage protocol, 160 hit compounds with best predicted binding affinities and representing a number of distinct chemical classes have been selected for subsequent experimental validation. Twenty of the 160 compounds were found to be able to block the VA387 P dimers binding to the A and/or B HBGAs at an IC50<40.0 µM, with top 5 compounds blocking the HBGA binding at an IC50<10.0 µM in both oligosaccharide- and saliva-based blocking assays. Interestingly, 4 of the top-5 compounds shared the basic structure of cyclopenta [a] dimethyl phenanthren, indicating a promising structural template for further improvement by rational design. PMID:23894462

  11. A Gnotobiotic Pig Model for Determining Human Norovirus Inactivation by High-Pressure Processing

    PubMed Central

    Lou, Fangfei; Ye, Mu; Ma, Yuanmei; Li, Xinhui; DiCaprio, Erin; Chen, Haiqiang; Krakowka, Steven; Hughes, John; Kingsley, David

    2015-01-01

    Human norovirus (NoV) is responsible for over 90% of outbreaks of acute nonbacterial gastroenteritis worldwide and accounts for 60% of cases of foodborne illness in the United States. Currently, the infectivity of human NoVs is poorly understood due to the lack of a cell culture system. In this study, we determined the survival of a human NoV genogroup II, genotype 4 (GII.4) strain in seeded oyster homogenates after high-pressure processing (HPP) using a novel receptor binding assay and a gnotobiotic pig model. Pressure conditions of 350 MPa at 0°C for 2 min led to a 3.7-log10 reduction in the number of viral RNA copies in oysters, as measured by the porcine gastric mucin-conjugated magnetic bead (PGM-MB) binding assay and real-time RT-PCR, whereas pressure conditions of 350 MPa at 35°C for 2 min achieved only a 1-log10 reduction in the number of RNA copies. Newborn gnotobiotic piglets orally fed oyster homogenate treated at 350 MPa and 0°C for 2 min did not have viral RNA shedding in feces, histologic lesions, or viral replication in the small intestine. In contrast, gnotobiotic piglets fed oysters treated at 350 MPa and 35°C for 2 min had high levels of viral shedding in feces and exhibited significant histologic lesions and viral replication in the small intestine. Collectively, these data demonstrate that (i) human NoV survival estimated by an in vitro PGM-MB virus binding assay is consistent with the infectivity determined by an in vivo gnotobiotic piglet model and (ii) HPP is capable of inactivating a human NoV GII.4 strain at commercially acceptable pressure levels. PMID:26187968

  12. Host Genetic Factors Affect Susceptibility to Norovirus Infections in Burkina Faso

    PubMed Central

    Nordgren, Johan; Nitiema, Léon W.; Ouermi, Djeneba; Simpore, Jacques; Svensson, Lennart

    2013-01-01

    Norovirus (NoV) constitutes the second most common viral pathogen causing pediatric diarrhea after rotavirus. In Africa, diarrhea is a major health problem in children, and yet few studies have been performed regarding NoV. The association of histo-blood group antigens (HBGA) and susceptibility to NoV infection is well established in Caucasian populations with non-secretors being resistant to many common NoV strains. No study regarding HBGA and NoV susceptibility has yet been performed in Africa. We collected 309 stool and 208 saliva samples from diarrheal children in Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso; May 2009 to March 2010. NoV was detected using real-time PCR, and genotyped by sequencing. Saliva samples were ABO, Lewis and secretor phenotyped using in house ELISA assays. NoV was detected in 12% (n = 37) of the samples. The genotype diversity was unusually large; overall the 37 positive samples belonged to 14 genotypes. Only children <2 years of age were NoV positive and the GII.4 NoVs were more frequent in the late dry season (Jan-May). NoV infections were observed less in children with the secretor-negative phenotype or blood group A (OR 0.18; p = 0.012 and OR 0.31; p = 0.054; respectively), with two non-secretors infected with genotypes GII.7 and GII.4 respectively. Lewis-negative (Lea−b−) children, representing 32% of the study population, were susceptible to GII, but were not infected with any NoV GI. GII.4 strains preferentially infected children with blood group B whereas secretor-positive children with blood group O were infected with the largest variety of genotypes. This is the first study identifying host genetic factors associated with susceptibility to NoV in an African population, and suggests that while the non-secretor phenotype provides protection; the Lewis b antigen is not necessary for GII infection. PMID:23894502

  13. Absolute Humidity Influences the Seasonal Persistence and Infectivity of Human Norovirus.

    PubMed

    Colas de la Noue, Alexandre; Estienney, Marie; Aho, Serge; Perrier-Cornet, Jean-Marie; de Rougemont, Alexis; Pothier, Pierre; Gervais, Patrick; Belliot, Gaël

    2014-12-01

    Norovirus (NoV) is one of the main causative agents of acute gastroenteritis worldwide. In temperate climates, outbreaks peak during the winter season. The mechanism by which climatic factors influence the occurrence of NoV outbreaks is unknown. We hypothesized that humidity is linked to NoV seasonality. Human NoV is not cultivatable, so we used cultivatable murine norovirus (MNV) as a surrogate to study its persistence when exposed to various levels of relative humidity (RH) from low (10% RH) to saturated (100% RH) conditions at 9 and 25°C. In addition, we conducted similar experiments with virus-like particles (VLPs) from the predominant GII-4 norovirus and studied changes in binding patterns to A, B, and O group carbohydrates that might reflect capsid alterations. The responses of MNV and VLP to humidity were somewhat similar, with 10 and 100% RH exhibiting a strong conserving effect for both models, whereas 50% RH was detrimental for MNV infectivity and VLP binding capacity. The data analysis suggested that absolute humidity (AH) rather than RH is the critical factor for keeping NoV infectious, with an AH below 0.007 kg water/kg air being favorable to NoV survival. Retrospective surveys of the meteorological data in Paris for the last 14 years showed that AH average values have almost always been below 0.007 kg water/kg air during the winter (i.e., 0.0046 ± 0.0014 kg water/kg air), and this finding supports the fact that low AH provides an ideal condition for NoV persistence and transmission during cold months. PMID:25217015

  14. Absolute Humidity Influences the Seasonal Persistence and Infectivity of Human Norovirus

    PubMed Central

    Colas de la Noue, Alexandre; Estienney, Marie; Aho, Serge; Perrier-Cornet, Jean-Marie; de Rougemont, Alexis; Pothier, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    Norovirus (NoV) is one of the main causative agents of acute gastroenteritis worldwide. In temperate climates, outbreaks peak during the winter season. The mechanism by which climatic factors influence the occurrence of NoV outbreaks is unknown. We hypothesized that humidity is linked to NoV seasonality. Human NoV is not cultivatable, so we used cultivatable murine norovirus (MNV) as a surrogate to study its persistence when exposed to various levels of relative humidity (RH) from low (10% RH) to saturated (100% RH) conditions at 9 and 25°C. In addition, we conducted similar experiments with virus-like particles (VLPs) from the predominant GII-4 norovirus and studied changes in binding patterns to A, B, and O group carbohydrates that might reflect capsid alterations. The responses of MNV and VLP to humidity were somewhat similar, with 10 and 100% RH exhibiting a strong conserving effect for both models, whereas 50% RH was detrimental for MNV infectivity and VLP binding capacity. The data analysis suggested that absolute humidity (AH) rather than RH is the critical factor for keeping NoV infectious, with an AH below 0.007 kg water/kg air being favorable to NoV survival. Retrospective surveys of the meteorological data in Paris for the last 14 years showed that AH average values have almost always been below 0.007 kg water/kg air during the winter (i.e., 0.0046 ± 0.0014 kg water/kg air), and this finding supports the fact that low AH provides an ideal condition for NoV persistence and transmission during cold months. PMID:25217015

  15. Bacterial histo-blood group antigens contributing to genotype-dependent removal of human noroviruses with a microfiltration membrane.

    PubMed

    Amarasiri, Mohan; Hashiba, Satoshi; Miura, Takayuki; Nakagomi, Toyoko; Nakagomi, Osamu; Ishii, Satoshi; Okabe, Satoshi; Sano, Daisuke

    2016-05-15

    We demonstrated the genotype-dependent removal of human norovirus particles with a microfiltration (MF) membrane in the presence of bacteria bearing histo-blood group antigens (HBGAs). Three genotypes (GII.3, GII.4, and GII.6) of norovirus-like particles (NoVLPs) were mixed with three bacterial strains (Enterobacter sp. SENG-6, Escherichia coli O86:K61:B7, and Staphylococcus epidermidis), respectively, and the mixture was filtered with an MF membrane having a nominal pore size of 0.45 μm. All NoVLP genotypes were rejected by the MF membrane in the presence of Enterobacter sp. SENG-6, which excreted HBGAs as extracellular polymeric substances (EPS). This MF membrane removal of NoVLPs was not significant when EPS was removed from cells of Enterobacter sp. SENG-6. GII.6 NoVLP was not rejected with the MF membrane in the presence of E. coli O86:K61:B7, but the removal of EPS of E. coli O86:K61:B7 increased the removal efficiency due to the interaction of NoVLPs with the exposed B-antigen in lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of E. coli O86:K61:B7. No MF membrane removal of all three genotypes was observed when S. epidermidis, an HBGA-negative strain, was mixed with NoVLPs. These results demonstrate that the location of HBGAs on bacterial cells is an important factor in determining the genotype-dependent removal efficiency of norovirus particles with the MF membrane. The presence of HBGAs in mixed liquor suspended solids from a membrane bioreactor (MBR) pilot plant was confirmed by immune-transmission electron microscopy, which implies that bacterial HBGAs can contribute to the genotype-dependent removal of human noroviruses with MBR using MF membrane. PMID:27095709

  16. Inactivation of a Foodborne Norovirus Outbreak Strain with Nonthermal Atmospheric Pressure Plasma

    PubMed Central

    Ahlfeld, Birte; Li, Yangfang; Boulaaba, Annika; Binder, Alfred; Schotte, Ulrich; Zimmermann, Julia L.; Morfill, Gregor

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT  Human norovirus (NoV) is the most frequent cause of epidemic nonbacterial acute gastroenteritis worldwide. We investigated the impact of nonthermal or cold atmospheric pressure plasma (CAPP) on the inactivation of a clinical human outbreak NoV, GII.4. Three different dilutions of a NoV-positive stool sample were prepared and subsequently treated with CAPP for various lengths of time, up to 15 min. NoV viral loads were quantified by quantitative real-time reverse transcription PCR (RT-qPCR). Increased CAPP treatment time led to increased NoV reduction; samples treated for the longest time had the lowest viral load. From the initial starting quantity of 2.36 × 104 genomic equivalents/ml, sample exposure to CAPP reduced this value by 1.23 log10 and 1.69 log10 genomic equivalents/ml after 10 and 15 min, respectively (P < 0.01). CAPP treatment of surfaces carrying a lower viral load reduced NoV by at least 1 log10 after CAPP exposure for 2 min (P < 0.05) and 1 min (P < 0.05), respectively. Our results suggest that NoV can be inactivated by CAPP treatment. The lack of cell culture assays prevents our ability to estimate infectivity. It is possible that some detectable, intact virus particles were rendered noninfectious. We conclude that CAPP treatment of surfaces may be a useful strategy to reduce the risk of NoV transmission in crowded environments. Importance  Human gastroenteritis is most frequently caused by noroviruses, which are spread person to person and via surfaces, often in facilities with crowds of people. Disinfection of surfaces that come into contact with infected humans is critical for the prevention of cross-contamination and further transmission of the virus. However, effective disinfection cannot be done easily in mass catering environments or health care facilities. We evaluated the efficacy of cold atmospheric pressure plasma, an innovative airborne disinfection method, on surfaces inoculated with norovirus. We used a clinically

  17. Pattern of Circulation of Norovirus GII Strains during Natural Infection

    PubMed Central

    Fobisong, Cajetan; Tah, Ferdinand; Lindh, Magnus; Nkuo-Akenji, Theresia; Bergström, Tomas

    2014-01-01

    Norovirus (NoV) is considered a major cause of nonbacterial gastroenteritis among people of all ages worldwide, but the natural course of infection is incompletely known. In this study, the pattern of circulation of NoVs was studied among 146 children and 137 adults in a small community in southwestern Cameroon. The participants provided monthly fecal samples during a year. NoV RNA was detected in at least one sample from 82 (29%) of the participants. The partial VP1 region could be sequenced in 36 NoV GII-positive samples. Three different genotypes were identified (GII.1, GII.4, and GII.17), with each genotype circulating within 2 to 3 months and reappearing after a relapse period of 2 to 3 months. Most infections occurred once, and 2 episodes at most within a year were detected. No difference in the frequency of NoV infection between children and adults was recorded. The same genotype was detected for a maximum of 2 consecutive months in 3 children only, suggesting that a less than 30-day duration of viral shedding in natural infection was common. Reinfection within a year with the same genotype was not observed, consistent with short-term homotypic immune protection. The study revealed that NoV strains are circulating with a limited duration of viral shedding both in the individuals and the population as part of their natural infection. The results also provide evidence of cross-protective immunity of limited duration between genotypes of the same genogroup. PMID:25274996

  18. Application of next-generation sequencing to investigation of norovirus diversity in shellfish collected from two coastal sites in Japan from 2013 to 2014.

    PubMed

    Imamura, Saiki; Haruna, Mika; Goshima, Tomoko; Kanezashi, Hiromi; Okada, Tsukasa; Akimoto, Keiko

    2016-05-01

    A better understanding of the role played by shellfish regarding the manner of pathogen contamination, persistence, and selection may help considering epidemiology of noroviruses. Thus, norovirus genotype profiles in shellfish (Crassostrea gigas and Mitilus galloprovincialis) were investigated by using Next-generation sequencing (NGS) technology. In genogroup I (GI), 7 genotypes (abbreviated as GI.2 to GI.7, and GI.9) were detected from C. gigas, whereas 9 genotypes (GI.1 to GI.9) were detected from M. galloprovincialis. The genotype with the highest proportion found in both C. gigas and M. galloprovincialis was GI.4, and the second highest was GI.3. In genogroup II (GII), 17 genotypes (GII.1 to GII.9, GII.11 to GII.17, GII.21 and GI.22) were detected from C. gigas, whereas 16 genotypes (GII.1 to GII.8, GII.11 to GII.17, GII.21 and GI.22) were detected from M. galloprovincialis. The genotype with the highest proportion in both C. gigas and M. galloprovincialis was GII.4, the next highest differed between C. gigas and M. galloprovincialis. To our knowledge, this study may be the first trial to utilize the latest technology in this field, and reveal the diversity of norovirus genotypes present in shellfish. PMID:27506085

  19. Nonnucleoside inhibitors of norovirus RNA polymerase: scaffolds for rational drug design.

    PubMed

    Eltahla, Auda A; Lim, Kun Lee; Eden, John-Sebastian; Kelly, Andrew G; Mackenzie, Jason M; White, Peter A

    2014-06-01

    Norovirus (NoV) is the leading cause of acute gastroenteritis worldwide, causing over 200,000 deaths a year. NoV is nonenveloped, with a single-stranded RNA genome, and is primarily transmitted person to person. The viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) is critical for the production of genomic and subgenomic RNA and is therefore a prime target for antiviral therapies. Using high-throughput screening, nearly 20,000 "lead-like" compounds were tested for inhibitory activity against the NoV genogroup II, genotype 4 (GII.4) RdRp. The four most potent hits demonstrated half-maximal inhibitory concentrations (IC50s) between 5.0 μM and 9.8 μM against the target RdRp. Compounds NIC02 and NIC04 revealed a mixed mode of inhibition, while NIC10 and NIC12 were uncompetitive RdRp inhibitors. When examined using enzymes from related viruses, NIC02 demonstrated broad inhibitory activity while NIC04 was the most specific GII.4 RdRp inhibitor. The antiviral activity was examined using available NoV cell culture models; the GI.1 replicon and the infectious GV.1 murine norovirus (MNV). NIC02 and NIC04 inhibited the replication of the GI.1 replicon, with 50% effective concentrations (EC50s) of 30.1 μM and 71.1 μM, respectively, while NIC10 and NIC12 had no observable effect on the NoV GI.1 replicon. In the MNV model, NIC02 reduced plaque numbers, size, and viral RNA levels in a dose-dependent manner (EC50s between 2.3 μM and 4.8 μM). The remaining three compounds also reduced MNV replication, although with higher EC50s, ranging from 32 μM to 38 μM. In summary, we have identified novel nonnucleoside inhibitor scaffolds that will provide a starting framework for the development and future optimization of targeted antivirals against NoV. PMID:24637690

  20. Nonnucleoside Inhibitors of Norovirus RNA Polymerase: Scaffolds for Rational Drug Design

    PubMed Central

    Eltahla, Auda A.; Lim, Kun Lee; Eden, John-Sebastian; Kelly, Andrew G.; Mackenzie, Jason M.

    2014-01-01

    Norovirus (NoV) is the leading cause of acute gastroenteritis worldwide, causing over 200,000 deaths a year. NoV is nonenveloped, with a single-stranded RNA genome, and is primarily transmitted person to person. The viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) is critical for the production of genomic and subgenomic RNA and is therefore a prime target for antiviral therapies. Using high-throughput screening, nearly 20,000 “lead-like” compounds were tested for inhibitory activity against the NoV genogroup II, genotype 4 (GII.4) RdRp. The four most potent hits demonstrated half-maximal inhibitory concentrations (IC50s) between 5.0 μM and 9.8 μM against the target RdRp. Compounds NIC02 and NIC04 revealed a mixed mode of inhibition, while NIC10 and NIC12 were uncompetitive RdRp inhibitors. When examined using enzymes from related viruses, NIC02 demonstrated broad inhibitory activity while NIC04 was the most specific GII.4 RdRp inhibitor. The antiviral activity was examined using available NoV cell culture models; the GI.1 replicon and the infectious GV.1 murine norovirus (MNV). NIC02 and NIC04 inhibited the replication of the GI.1 replicon, with 50% effective concentrations (EC50s) of 30.1 μM and 71.1 μM, respectively, while NIC10 and NIC12 had no observable effect on the NoV GI.1 replicon. In the MNV model, NIC02 reduced plaque numbers, size, and viral RNA levels in a dose-dependent manner (EC50s between 2.3 μM and 4.8 μM). The remaining three compounds also reduced MNV replication, although with higher EC50s, ranging from 32 μM to 38 μM. In summary, we have identified novel nonnucleoside inhibitor scaffolds that will provide a starting framework for the development and future optimization of targeted antivirals against NoV. PMID:24637690

  1. Norovirus mechanisms of immune antagonism.

    PubMed

    Roth, Alexa N; Karst, Stephanie M

    2016-02-01

    Noroviruses are a leading cause of gastroenteritis outbreaks globally. Several lines of evidence indicate that noroviruses can antagonize or evade host immune responses, including the absence of long-lasting immunity elicited during a primary norovirus exposure and the ability of noroviruses to establish prolonged infections that are associated with protracted viral shedding. Specific norovirus proteins possessing immune antagonist activity have been described in recent years although mechanistic insight in most cases is limited. In this review, we discuss these emerging strategies used by noroviruses to subvert the immune response, including the actions of two nonstructural proteins (p48 and p22) to impair cellular protein trafficking and secretory pathways; the ability of the VF1 protein to inhibit cytokine induction; and the ability of the minor structural protein VP2 to regulate antigen presentation. We also discuss the current state of the understanding of host and viral factors regulating the establishment of persistent norovirus infections along the gastrointestinal tract. A more detailed understanding of immune antagonism by pathogenic viruses will inform prevention and treatment of disease. PMID:26673810

  2. Recent advances in understanding norovirus pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Karst, Stephanie M; Tibbetts, Scott A

    2016-11-01

    Noroviruses constitute a family of ubiquitous and highly efficient human pathogens. In spite of decades of dedicated research, human noroviruses remain a major cause of gastroenteritis and severe diarrheal disease around the world. Recent findings have begun to unravel the complex mechanisms that regulate norovirus pathogenesis and persistent infection, including the important interplay between the virus, the host immune system, and commensal bacteria. Herein, we will summarize recent research developments regarding norovirus cell tropism, the use of M cells, and commensal bacteria to facilitate norovirus infection, and virus, host, and bacterial determinants of persistent norovirus infections. J. Med. Virol. 88:1837-1843, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27110852

  3. The State of Norovirus Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Debbink, Kari; Lindesmith, Lisa C.; Baric, Ralph S.

    2014-01-01

    Noroviruses represent the most important cause of acute gastroenteritis worldwide; however, currently no licensed vaccine exists. Widespread vaccination that minimizes overall norovirus disease burden would benefit the entire population, but targeted vaccination of specific populations such as healthcare workers may further mitigate the risk of severe disease and death in vulnerable populations. While a few obstacles hinder the rapid development of efficacious vaccines, human trials for virus-like particle (VLP)-based vaccines show promise in both immune response and protection studies, with availability of vaccines being targeted over the next 5–10 years. Ongoing work including identification of important norovirus capsid antigenic sites, development of improved model systems, and continued studies in humans will allow improvement of future vaccines. In the meantime, a better understanding of norovirus disease course and transmission patterns can aid healthcare workers as they take steps to protect high-risk populations such as the elderly and immunocompromised individuals from chronic and severe disease. PMID:24585561

  4. Molecular epidemiology of norovirus in South Korea.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sung-Geun; Cho, Han-Gil; Paik, Soon-Young

    2015-02-01

    Norovirus is a major cause of viral gastroenteritis and a common cause of foodborne and waterborne outbreaks. Norovirus outbreaks are responsible for economic losses, most notably to the public health and food industry field. Norovirus has characteristics such as low infectious dose, prolonged shedding period, strong stability, great diversity, and frequent genome mutations. Besides these characteristics, they are known for rapid and extensive spread in closed settings such as hospitals, hotels, and schools. Norovirus is well known as a major agent of food-poisoning in diverse settings in South Korea. For these reasons, nationwide surveillance for norovirus is active in both clinical and environmental settings in South Korea. Recent studies have reported the emergence of variants and novel recombinants of norovirus. In this review, we summarized studies on the molecular epidemiology and nationwide surveillance of norovirus in South Korea. This review will provide information for vaccine development and prediction of new emerging variants of norovirus in South Korea. PMID:25441425

  5. Norovirus: U.S. Trends and Outbreaks

    MedlinePlus

    ... Norovirus outbreaks can also occur from fecal (stool) contamination of certain foods at their source. For example, ... may also result from infected crew or environmental contamination. This is because norovirus can persist on surfaces ...

  6. Effects of High-Hydrostatic Pressure on Inactivation of Human Norovirus and Physical and Sensory Characteristics of Oysters.

    PubMed

    Ye, Mu; Lingham, Talaysha; Huang, Yaoxin; Ozbay, Gulnihal; Ji, Lin; Karwe, Mukund; Chen, Haiqiang

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine the effect of high-hydrostatic pressure (HHP) on inactivation of human norovirus (HuNoV) in oysters and to evaluate organoleptic characteristics of oysters treated at pressure levels required for HuNoV inactivation. Genogroup I.1 (GI.1) or Genogroup II.4 (GII.4) HuNoV was inoculated into oysters and treated at 300 to 600 MPa at 25 and 0 °C for 2 min. After HHP, viral particles were extracted by porcine gastric mucin-conjugated magnetic beads (PGM-MBs) and viral RNA was quantified by real-time RT-PCR. Lower initial temperature (0 °C) significantly enhanced HHP inactivation of HuNoV compared to ambient temperature (25 °C; P < 0.05). HHP at 350 and 500 MPa at 0 °C could achieve more than 4 log10 reduction of GII.4 and GI.1 HuNoV in oysters, respectively. HHP treatments did not significantly change color or texture of oyster tissue. A 1- to 5-scale hedonic sensory evaluation on appearance, aroma, color, and overall acceptability showed that pressure-treated oysters received significantly higher quality scores than the untreated control (P < 0.05). Elevated pressure levels at 450 and 500 MPa did not significantly affect scores compared to 300 MPa at 0 °C, indicating increasing pressure level did not affect sensory acceptability of oysters. Oysters treated at 0 °C had slightly lower acceptability than the group treated at room temperature on day 1 (P < 0.05), but after 1 wk storage, no significant difference in sensory attributes and consumer desirability was observed (P > 0.05). PMID:25943304

  7. Evaluation of high hydrostatic pressure inactivation of human norovirus on strawberries, blueberries, raspberries and in their purees.

    PubMed

    Huang, Runze; Ye, Mu; Li, Xinhui; Ji, Lin; Karwe, Mukund; Chen, Haiqiang

    2016-04-16

    Human norovirus (HuNoV) has been an increasing concern of foodborne illness related to fresh and frozen berries. In this study, high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) inactivation of HuNoV on fresh strawberries, blueberries, and raspberries and in their purees was investigated. Porcine gastric mucin (PGM)-conjugated magnetic beads (PGM-MBs) and real-time reverse transcriptional polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) were utilized for infectious HuNoV discrimination and quantification. Strawberry puree inoculated with HuNoV genogroup I.1 (GI.1) strain was HHP-treated at 450, 500 and 550 MPa for 2 min each at initial sample temperatures of 0, 4 and 20 °C. HuNoV GI.1 strain became more sensitive to HHP treatment as the temperature decreased from 20 to 0 °C. HuNoV GI.1 or genogroup II.4 (GII.4) strains were inoculated into three types of berries and their purees and treated at pressure levels from 250 to 650 MPa for 2 min at initial sample temperature of 0 °C. For the purees, the HHP condition needed to achieve >2.9 log reduction of HuNoV GI.1 strain and >4.0 log reduction of HuNoV GII.4 strain was found to be ≥ 550 MPa for 2 min at 0 °C. HHP treatment showed better inactivation effect of HuNoV on blueberries than on strawberry quarters and raspberries. HuNoV GI.1 strain was more resistant to HHP treatment than HuNoV GII.4 strain under different temperatures and environment. The physical properties and sensory qualities of HHP-treated and untreated blueberries and the three types of berry purees were evaluated. Color, pH and viscosity of blueberries and three berry purees showed no or slight changes after HHP treatment. Sensory evaluation demonstrated that HHP treatment of 550 MPa for 2 min at 0 °C did not significantly reduced the sensory qualities of three berry purees. The results demonstrated that the HHP treatment of 550 MPa for 2 min at 0 °C could be a potential nonthermal intervention for HuNoV in berry purees without adversely affecting their sensory qualities

  8. Natural Norovirus Infections in Rhesus Macaques.

    PubMed

    Farkas, Tibor

    2016-07-01

    Using a recently developed real-time reverse transcription PCR, I retested 500 fecal samples from rhesus macaques collected in 2008. Previous conventional reverse transcription PCR testing identified 1 isolate of GII norovirus; retesting found GI, GII, and possible GIV noroviruses in the samples, indicating the natural circulation of noroviruses in nonhuman primate colonies. PMID:27314565

  9. Natural Norovirus Infections in Rhesus Macaques

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Using a recently developed real-time reverse transcription PCR, I retested 500 fecal samples from rhesus macaques collected in 2008. Previous conventional reverse transcription PCR testing identified 1 isolate of GII norovirus; retesting found GI, GII, and possible GIV noroviruses in the samples, indicating the natural circulation of noroviruses in nonhuman primate colonies. PMID:27314565

  10. Wipes coated with a singlet-oxygen-producing photosensitizer are effective against human influenza virus but not against norovirus.

    PubMed

    Verhaelen, Katharina; Bouwknegt, Martijn; Rutjes, Saskia; de Roda Husman, Ana Maria; Duizer, Erwin

    2014-07-01

    Transmission of enteric and respiratory viruses, including human norovirus (hNoV) and human influenza virus, may involve surfaces. In food preparation and health care settings, surfaces are cleaned with wipes; however, wiping may not efficiently reduce contamination or may even spread viruses, increasing a potential public health risk. The virucidal properties of wipes with a singlet-oxygen-generating immobilized photosensitizer (IPS) coating were compared to those of similar but uncoated wipes (non-IPS) and of commonly used viscose wipes. Wipes were spiked with hNoV GI.4 and GII.4, murine norovirus 1 (MNV-1), human adenovirus type 5 (hAdV-5), and influenza virus H1N1 to study viral persistence. We also determined residual and transferred virus proportions on steel carriers after successively wiping a contaminated and an uncontaminated steel carrier. On IPS wipes only, influenza viruses were promptly inactivated with a 5-log10 reduction. D values of infectious MNV-1 and hAdV-5 were 8.7 and 7.0 h on IPS wipes, 11.6 and 9.3 h on non-IPS wipes, and 10.2 and 8.2 h on viscose wipes, respectively. Independently of the type of wipe, dry cleaning removed, or drastically reduced, initial spot contamination of hNoV on surfaces. All wipes transferred hNoV to an uncontaminated carrier; however, the risk of continued transmission by reuse of wipes after 6 and 24 h was limited for all viruses. We conclude that cleaning wet spots with dry wipes efficiently reduced spot contamination on surfaces but that cross-contamination with noroviruses by wiping may result in an increased public health risk at high initial virus loads. For influenza virus, IPS wipes present an efficient one-step procedure for cleaning and disinfecting contaminated surfaces. PMID:24814795

  11. Attachment and localization of human norovirus and animal caliciviruses in fresh produce.

    PubMed

    DiCaprio, Erin; Purgianto, Anastasia; Ma, Yuanmei; Hughes, John; Dai, Xiangjun; Li, Jianrong

    2015-10-15

    Fresh produce is a high risk food for human norovirus (NoV) contamination. To help control this pathogen in fresh produce, a better understanding of the interaction of human NoV and fresh produce needs to be established. In this study the attachment of human NoV and animal caliciviruses (murine norovirus, MNV-1; Tulane virus, TV) to fresh produce was evaluated, using both visualization and viral enumeration techniques. It was found that a human NoV GII.4 strain attached efficiently to the Romaine lettuce leaves and roots and green onion shoots, and that washing with PBS or 200 ppm of chlorine removed less than 0.4 log of viral RNA copies from the tissues. In contrast, TV and MNV-1 bound more efficiently to Romaine lettuce leaves than to the roots, and simple washing removed less than 1 log of viruses from the lettuce leaves and 1-4 log PFU of viruses from roots. Subsequently, the location of virus particles in fresh produce was visualized using a fluorescence-based Quantum Dots (Q-Dots) assay and confocal microscopy. It was found that human NoV virus-like particles (VLPs), TV, and MNV-1 associated with the surface of Romaine lettuce and were found aggregating in and around the stomata. In green onions, human NoV VLPs were found between the cells of the epidermis and cell walls of both the shoots and roots. However, TV and MNV-1 were found to be covering the surface of the epidermal cells in both the shoots and roots of green onions. Collectively, these results demonstrate that (i) washing with 200 ppm chlorine is ineffective in removing human NoV from fresh produce; and (ii) different viruses vary in their localization patterns to different varieties of fresh produce. PMID:26188496

  12. Internalization and Dissemination of Human Norovirus and Animal Caliciviruses in Hydroponically Grown Romaine Lettuce

    PubMed Central

    DiCaprio, Erin; Ma, Yuanmei; Purgianto, Anastasia; Hughes, John

    2012-01-01

    Fresh produce is a major vehicle for the transmission of human norovirus (NoV) because it is easily contaminated during both pre- and postharvest stages. However, the ecology of human NoV in fresh produce is poorly understood. In this study, we determined whether human NoV and its surrogates can be internalized via roots and disseminated to edible portions of the plant. The roots of romaine lettuce growing in hydroponic feed water were inoculated with 1 × 106 RNA copies/ml of a human NoV genogroup II genotype 4 (GII.4) strain or 1 × 106 to 2 × 106 PFU/ml of animal caliciviruses (Tulane virus [TV] and murine norovirus [MNV-1]), and plants were allowed to grow for 2 weeks. Leaves, shoots, and roots were homogenized, and viral titers and/or RNA copies were determined by plaque assay and/or real-time reverse transcription (RT)-PCR. For human NoV, high levels of viral-genome RNA (105 to 106 RNA copies/g) were detected in leaves, shoots, and roots at day 1 postinoculation and remained stable over the 14-day study period. For MNV-1 and TV, relatively low levels of infectious virus particles (101 to 103 PFU/g) were detected in leaves and shoots at days 1 and 2 postinoculation, but virus reached a peak titer (105 to 106 PFU/g) at day 3 or 7 postinoculation. In addition, human NoV had a rate of internalization comparable with that of TV as determined by real-time RT-PCR, whereas TV was more efficiently internalized than MNV-1 as determined by plaque assay. Taken together, these results demonstrated that human NoV and animal caliciviruses became internalized via roots and efficiently disseminated to the shoots and leaves of the lettuce. PMID:22729543

  13. Norovirus Surveillance: An Epidemiological Perspective.

    PubMed

    Harris, John P

    2016-02-01

    Surveillance for norovirus is challenging because the nature of illness due to norovirus is such that the majority of people who are infected will not have any contact with medical services and are highly unlikely to have a sample collected for diagnosis. Public health advice urges people to not visit hospitals or their family physicians, to prevent the risk further spread. The recognition of the importance of this pathogen was quickly established following the introduction of surveillance of outbreaks of gastrointestinal infection in England and Wales in 1992. This period saw >1800 outbreaks of norovirus infection reported in hospitals in England, affecting >45 000 patients and staff. A new system for reporting outbreaks of norovirus infection in hospitals, the Hospital Norovirus outbreak Reporting Scheme (HNORS), began in January 2009. Summary information on outbreaks is provided by infection control staff at hospitals and includes questions on the date the first and last person in the outbreak became symptomatic and whether closure of a bay or ward was needed. In the first 3 years (2009-2011) of the HNORS surveillance scheme, 4000 outbreaks were reported, affecting 40 000 patients and 10 000 staff. Over the last 3 years, these outbreaks have been associated with an average of 13 000 patients and 3400 staff becoming ill, with 15 000 lost bed-days annually. With the possible introduction of a vaccine on the horizon, targeted research with a more integrated approach to laboratory testing and outbreak reporting is essential to a greater understanding of the epidemiology of norovirus. PMID:26744431

  14. Molecular Characterization of Noroviruses and HBGA from Infected Quilombola Children in Espirito Santo State, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Vicentini, Fernando; Denadai, Wilson; Gomes, Yohanna Mayelle; Rose, Tatiana L.; Ferreira, Mônica S. R.; Le Moullac-Vaidye, Beatrice; Le Pendu, Jacques; Leite, José Paulo Gagliardi; Miagostovich, Marize Pereira; Spano, Liliana Cruz

    2013-01-01

    Noroviruses (NoV) are the main etiological agents of gastroenteritis outbreaks worldwide and susceptibility to NoV infection has been related to the histo-blood group antigen (HBGA). This study aimed to determine the prevalence of NoV strains and to evaluate the HBGA phenotype and genotype of children from semi-isolated Quilombola communities, descendents of black slaves in Brazil. A total of 397 children up to eleven years old, with and without diarrhea, from Quilombola Communities in the Espirito Santo State, Brazil, were investigated for the presence of NoV from August 2007 to September 2009. Feces were collected from all the children, and blood from the NoV positive children. NoV was screened by reverse transcription-PCR with primers for the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase region; genogroup was determined by PCR with primers for the C and D regions and genotyped by sequencing. HBGA phenotype was performed by gel-spinning and FUT2 and FUT3 were analyzed by PCR or sequencing analysis. NoV were detected in 9.2% (12/131) of diarrheic and 1.5% (4/266) of non-diarrheic children (p<0.05, Fisher’s exact test). GI and GII genogroups were present in 12.5% and 87.5% of the samples, respectively. The following genotypes were characterized: GII.4 (25%), GII.12 (25%), GII.6 (12.5%) and GI.1 (6.3%), GI.3 (12.5%) and GI.4 (6.3%). Children infected with NoV showed the A (n = 6), O (n = 6), and B (n = 2) HBGA phenotypes, and 13 of them were classified as secretors (Se) and one as a non secretor (se). Mutations of Se40, 171,216,357,428,739,960 were found for the FUT2 gene and mutations of Le59, 202, 314 for the FUT3 gene. The only se child was infected by NoV GI, whereas the Se children were indiscriminately infected by GI or GII. This study showed rates of NoV infection in symptomatic and asymptomatic Quilombola children consistent with other studies. However, children under 12 months were seven times more affected than those between 1 and 5 years old. GII.12 was as

  15. Comparing human norovirus surrogates: murine norovirus and Tulane virus.

    PubMed

    Hirneisen, Kirsten A; Kniel, Kalmia E

    2013-01-01

    Viral surrogates are widely used by researchers to predict human norovirus behavior. Murine norovirus (MNV) is currently accepted as the best surrogate and is assumed to mimic the survival and inactivation of human noroviruses. Recently, a new calicivirus, the Tulane virus (TV), was discovered, and its potential as a human norovirus surrogate is being explored. This study aimed to compare the behavior of the two potential surrogates under varying treatments of pH (2.0 to 10.0), chlorine (0.2 to 2,000 ppm), heat (50 to 75°C), and survival in tap water at room (20°C) and refrigeration (4°C) temperatures for up to 30 days. Viral infectivity was determined by the plaque assay for both MNV and TV. There was no significant difference between the inactivation of MNV and TV in all heat treatments, and for both MNV and TV survival in tap water at 20°C over 30 days. At 4°C, MNV remained infectious over 30 days at a titer of approximately 5 log PFU/ml, whereas TV titers decreased significantly by 5 days. MNV was more pH stable, as TV titers were reduced significantly at pH 2.0, 9.0, and 10.0, as compared with pH 7.0, whereas MNV titers were only significantly reduced at pH 10.0. After chlorine treatment, there was no significant difference in virus with the exception of at 2 ppm, where TV decreased significantly compared with MNV. Compared with TV, MNV is likely a better surrogate for human noroviruses, as MNV persisted over a wider range of pH values, at 2 ppm of chlorine, and without a loss of titer at 4°C. PMID:23317870

  16. Engineering Bacterial Surface Displayed Human Norovirus Capsid Proteins: A Novel System to Explore Interaction Between Norovirus and Ligands

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Mengya; Yu, Qianqian; Tian, Peng; Gao, Zhiyong; Wang, Dapeng; Shi, Xianming

    2015-01-01

    Human noroviruses (HuNoVs) are major contributors to acute nonbacterial gastroenteritis outbreaks. Many aspects of HuNoVs are poorly understood due to both the current inability to culture HuNoVs, and the lack of efficient small animal models. Surrogates for HuNoVs, such as recombinant viral like particles (VLPs) expressed in eukaryotic system or P particles expressed in prokaryotic system, have been used for studies in immunology and interaction between the virus and its receptors. However, it is difficult to use VLPs or P particles to collect or isolate potential ligands binding to these recombinant capsid proteins. In this study, a new strategy was used to collect HuNoVs binding ligands through the use of ice nucleation protein (INP) to display recombinant capsid proteins of HuNoVs on bacterial surfaces. The viral protein-ligand complex could be easily separated by a low speed centrifugation step. This system was also used to explore interaction between recombinant capsid proteins of HuNoVs and their receptors. In this system, the VP1 capsid encoding gene (ORF2) and the protruding domain (P domain) encoding gene (3′ terminal fragment of ORF2) of HuNoVs GI.1 and GII.4 were fused with 5′ terminal fragment of INP encoding gene (inaQn). The results demonstrated that the recombinant VP1 and P domains of HuNoVs were expressed and anchored on the surface of Escherichia coli BL21 cells after the bacteria were transformed with the corresponding plasmids. Both cell surface displayed VP1 and P domains could be recognized by HuNoVs specific antibodies and interact with the viral histo-blood group antigens receptors. In both cases, displayed P domains had better binding abilities than VP1. This new strategy of using displayed HuNoVs capsid proteins on the bacterial surface could be utilized to separate HuNoVs binding components from complex samples, to investigate interaction between the virus and its receptors, as well as to develop an oral vaccine for HuNoVs. PMID

  17. Treatment of norovirus particles with citrate.

    PubMed

    Koromyslova, Anna D; White, Peter A; Hansman, Grant S

    2015-11-01

    Human norovirus is a dominant cause of acute gastroenteritis around the world. Several norovirus disinfectants label citric acid as an active ingredient. In this study, we showed that norovirus virus-like particles (VLPs) treated with citrate buffer caused the particles to alter their morphology, including increased diameters associated with a new ring-like structure. We also found that epitopes on the protruding (P) domain on these particles were more readily accessible to antibodies after the citrate treatment. These results suggested that citrate had a direct effect on the norovirus particles. Using X-ray crystallography, we showed that the P domain bound citrate from lemon juice and a disinfectant containing citric acid. Importantly, citrate binds at the histo-blood group antigen binding pocket, which are attachment factors for norovirus infections. Taken together, these new findings suggested that it might be possible to treat/reduce norovirus infections with citrate, although further studies are needed. PMID:26295280

  18. Norovirus Genotypes Present in Oysters and in Effluent from a Wastewater Treatment Plant during the Seasonal Peak of Infections in Ireland in 2010

    PubMed Central

    Waters, Allison; Keaveney, Sinéad; Flannery, John; Tuite, Gráinne; Coughlan, Suzie; O'Flaherty, Vincent; Doré, William

    2013-01-01

    We determined norovirus (NoV) concentrations in effluent from a wastewater treatment plant and in oysters during the peak period of laboratory-confirmed cases of NoV infection in Ireland in 2010 (January to March). Weekly samples of influent, secondary treated effluent, and oysters were analyzed using real-time quantitative reverse transcription-PCR for NoV genogroup I (GI) and genogroup II (GII). The mean concentration of NoV GII (5.87 × 104 genome copies 100 ml−1) in influent wastewater was significantly higher than the mean concentration of NoV GI (1.40 × 104 genome copies 100 ml−1). The highest concentration of NoV GII (2.20 × 105 genome copies 100 ml−1) was detected in influent wastewater during week 6. Over the study period, a total of 931 laboratory-confirmed cases of NoV GII infection were recorded, with the peak (n = 171) occurring in week 7. In comparison, 16 cases of NoV GI-associated illness were reported during the study period. In addition, the NoV capsid N/S domain was molecularly characterized for selected samples. Multiple genotypes of NoV GI (GI.1, GI.4, GI.5, GI.6, and GI.7) and GII (GII.3, GII.4, GII.6, GII.7, GII.12, GII.13, and GII.17), as well as 4 putative recombinant strains, were detected in the environmental samples. The NoV GII.4 variant 2010 was detected in wastewater and oyster samples and was the dominant strain detected in NoV outbreaks at that time. This study demonstrates the diversity of NoV genotypes present in wastewater during a period of high rates of NoV infection in the community and highlights the potential for the environmental spread of multiple NoV genotypes. PMID:23396337

  19. A novel norovirus GII.17 lineage contributed to adult gastroenteritis in Shanghai, China, during the winter of 2014–2015

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Haili; Qian, Fangxing; Xu, Jin; Chan, Martin; Shen, Zhen; Zai, Shubei; Shan, Menglin; Cai, Jinfeng; Zhang, Wanju; He, Jing; Liu, Yi; Zhang, Jun; Yuan, Zhenghong; Zhu, Zhaoqin; Hu, Yunwen

    2015-01-01

    Norovirus (NoV) is now recognized as a leading cause of nonbacterial acute gastroenteritis; however, the NoV GII.17 genotype has rarely been reported as the predominant genotype in clinical diarrhea cases. During the winter of 2014–2015, the GII.17 genotype, together with the NoV GII.4 genotype, dominated in sporadic adult patients with gastroenteritis in Shanghai. Phylogenetic analysis based on full-length VP1 amino acid sequences showed that the GII.17 strains that emerged in Shanghai have close evolutionary relationships with strains recently collected in the Hong Kong area, Guangdong province of China, and Japan during the same period. This cluster in the phylogenetic tree may represent a novel NoV GII.17 lineage recently circulating in East Asia. Pairwise distances between clusters also revealed the evolution of the NoV GII.17 genotype in previous decades. Our study emphasizes the importance of combined surveillance of NoV-associated infections. PMID:26975060

  20. Identifying Carbohydrate Ligands of a Norovirus P Particle using a Catch and Release Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry Assay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Ling; Kitova, Elena N.; Tan, Ming; Jiang, Xi; Klassen, John S.

    2014-01-01

    Noroviruses (NoVs), the major cause of epidemic acute gastroenteritis, recognize human histo-blood group antigens (HBGAs), which are present as free oligosaccharides in bodily fluid or glycolipids and glycoproteins on the surfaces of cells. The subviral P particle formed by the protruding (P) domain of the NoV capsid protein serves as a useful model for the study NoV-HBGA interactions. Here, we demonstrate the application of a catch-and-release electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (CaR-ESI-MS) assay for screening carbohydrate libraries against the P particle to rapidly identify NoV ligands and potential inhibitors. Carbohydrate libraries of 50 and 146 compounds, which included 18 and 24 analogs of HBGA receptors, respectively, were screened against the P particle of VA387, a member of the predominant GII.4 NoVs. Deprotonated ions corresponding to the P particle bound to carbohydrates were isolated and subjected to collision-induced dissociation to release the ligands in their deprotonated forms. The released ligands were identified by ion mobility separation followed by mass analysis. All 13 and 16 HBGA ligands with intrinsic affinities >500 M-1 were identified in the 50 and the 146 compound libraries, respectively. Furthermore, screening revealed interactions with a series of oligosaccharides with structures found in the cell wall of mycobacteria and human milk. The affinities of these newly discovered ligands are comparable to those of the HBGA receptors, as estimated from the relative abundance of released ligand ions.

  1. Analysis of norovirus contamination of seafood

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The study of human norovirus (NoVs) replication in vitro would be a highly useful tool to virologists and immunologists. For this reason, we have searched for new approaches to determine viability of noroviruses in food samples (especially sea food). Our research team has multiple years of experie...

  2. Murine Norovirus: Propagation, Quantification and Genetic Manipulation

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Seungmin; Alhatlani, Bader; Arias, Armando; Caddy, Sarah L; Christodoulou, Constantina; Cunha, Juliana; Emmott, Ed; Gonzalez-Hernandez, Marta; Kolawole, Abimbola; Lu, Jia; Rippinger, Christine; Sorgeloos, Frédéric; Thorne, Lucy; Vashist, Surender; Goodfellow, Ian

    2014-01-01

    Murine norovirus (MNV) is a positive-sense, plus-stranded RNA virus in the Caliciviridae family. It is the most common pathogen in biomedical research colonies. MNV is also related to the human noroviruses, which cause the majority of non-bacterial gastroenteritis worldwide. Like the human noroviruses, MNV is an enteric virus that replicates in the intestine and is transmitted by the fecal-oral route. MNV replicates in murine macrophages and dendritic cells in cells in culture and in the murine host. This virus is often used to study mechanisms in norovirus biology, because the human noroviruses are refractory to growth in cell culture. MNV combines the availability of a cell culture and reverse genetics system with the ability to study infection in the native host. Herein, we describe a panel of techniques that are commonly used to study MNV biology. PMID:24789596

  3. Marked Genomic Diversity of Norovirus Genogroup I Strains in a Waterborne Outbreak

    PubMed Central

    Hannoun, Charles; Larsson, Charlotte U.; Bergström, Tomas

    2012-01-01

    Marked norovirus (NoV) diversity was detected in patient samples from a large community outbreak of gastroenteritis with waterborne epidemiology affecting approximately 2,400 people. NoV was detected in 33 of 50 patient samples examined by group-specific real-time reverse transcription-PCR. NoV genotype I (GI) strains predominated in 31 patients, with mixed GI infections occurring in 5 of these patients. Sequence analysis of RNA-dependent polymerase-N/S capsid-coding regions (∼900 nucleotides in length) confirmed the dominance of the GI strains (n = 36). Strains of NoV GI.4 (n = 21) and GI.7 (n = 9) were identified, but six strains required full capsid amino acid analyses (530 to 550 amino acids) based on control sequencing of cloned amplicons before the virus genotype could be determined. Three strains were assigned to a new NoV GI genotype, proposed as GI.9, based on capsid amino acid analyses showing 26% dissimilarity from the established genotypes GI.1 to GI.8. Three other strains grouped in a sub-branch of GI.3 with 13 to 15% amino acid dissimilarity to GI.3 GenBank reference strains. Phylogenetic analysis (2.1 kb) of 10 representative strains confirmed these genotype clusters. Strains of NoV GII.4 (n = 1), NoV GII.6 (n = 2), sapovirus GII.2 (n = 1), rotavirus (n = 3), adenovirus (n = 1), and Campylobacter spp. (n = 2) were detected as single infections or as mixtures with NoV GI. Marked NoV GI diversity detected in patients was consistent with epidemiologic evidence of waterborne NoV infections, suggesting human fecal contamination of the water supply. Recognition of NoV diversity in a cluster of patients provided a useful warning marker of waterborne contamination in the Lilla Edet outbreak. PMID:22247153

  4. Affinities of recombinant norovirus P dimers for human blood group antigens

    PubMed Central

    Han, Ling; Kitov, Pavel I; Kitova, Elena N; Tan, Ming; Wang, Leyi; Xia, Ming; Jiang, Xi; Klassen, John S

    2013-01-01

    Noroviruses (NoVs), the major cause of viral acute gastroenteritis, recognize histo-blood group antigens (HBGAs) as receptors or attachment factors. To gain a deeper understanding of the interplay between NoVs and their hosts, the affinities of recombinant P dimers (P2's) of a GII.4 NoV (VA387) to a library of 41 soluble analogs of HBGAs were measured using the direct electrospray ionization mass spectrometry assay. The HBGAs contained the A, B, H and Lewis epitopes, with variable sizes (2–6 residues) and different types (1–6). The results reveal that the P2's exhibit a broad specificity for the HBGAs and bind to all of the oligosaccharides tested. Overall, the affinities are relatively low, ranging from 400 to 3000 M−1 and are influenced by the chain type: 3 > 1 ≈ 2 ≈ 4 ≈ 5 ≈ 6 for H antigens; 6 > 1 ≈ 3 ≈ 4 ≈ 5 > 2 for A antigens; 3 > 1 ≈ 4 ≈ 5 ≈ 6 > 2 for B antigens, but not by chain length. The highest-affinity ligands are B type 3 (3000 ± 300 M−1) and A type 6 (2350 ± 60 M−1). While the higher affinity to the type 3 H antigen was previously observed, preferential binding to the types 6 and 3 antigens with A and B epitopes, respectively, has not been previously reported. A truncated P domain dimer (lacking the C-terminal arginine cluster) exhibits similar binding. The central-binding motifs in the HBGAs were identified by molecular-docking simulations. PMID:23118206

  5. Evaluation of third-generation RIDASCREEN enzyme immunoassay for the detection of norovirus antigens in stool samples of hospitalized children in Belém, Pará, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Siqueira, Jones Anderson Monteiro; Linhares, Alexandre da Costa; Oliveira, Darleise de Souza; Soares, Luana da Silva; Lucena, Maria Silvia Sousa; Wanzeller, Ana Lúcia Monteiro; Mascarenhas, Joana D'Arc Pereira; Gabbay, Yvone Benchimol

    2011-12-01

    Noroviruses (NoVs) are major agents of gastroenteritis outbreaks and hospitalization worldwide. This study evaluated the sensitivity and specificity of the commercially available third-generation RIDASCREEN® Norovirus Enzyme Immunoassay (EIA) kit in comparison to the reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) to detect NoVs in hospitalized children with gastroenteritis. An agreement of 88% (81/92) was observed when comparing EIA with RT-PCR. A sensitivity of 92% and a specificity of 83.3% were demonstrated. Eleven samples were positive by 1 method only (4 RT-PCR/7 EIA). Fourteen samples were sequenced and all classified as NoV genogroup GII-4. The 7 positive only by EIA were also evaluated by electron microscopy, and in 3 (42.9%) samples viral particles with a suggestive morphology of NoVs were visualized. These same samples were tested by seminested-RT-PCR with a positivity of 85.7%. The results obtained in this study demonstrated a significant improvement in the sensitivity and specificity of this updated assay. PMID:22001621

  6. Norovirus Diversity in Diarrheic Children from an African-Descendant Settlement in Belém, Northern Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Aragão, Glicélia Cruz; Mascarenhas, Joana D'Arc Pereira; Kaiano, Jane Haruko Lima; de Lucena, Maria Silvia Sousa; Siqueira, Jones Anderson Monteiro; Fumian, Túlio Machado; Hernandez, Juliana das Mercês; de Oliveira, Consuelo Silva; Oliveira, Darleise de Souza; Araújo, Eliete da Cunha; Soares, Luana da Silva; Linhares, Alexandre Costa; Gabbay, Yvone Benchimol

    2013-01-01

    Norovirus (NoV), sapovirus (SaV) and human astrovirus (HAstV) are viral pathogens that are associated with outbreaks and sporadic cases of gastroenteritis. However, little is known about the occurrence of these pathogens in relatively isolated communities, such as the remnants of African-descendant villages (“Quilombola”). The objective of this study was the frequency determination of these viruses in children under 10 years, with and without gastroenteritis, from a “Quilombola” Community, Northern Brazil. A total of 159 stool samples were obtained from April/2008 to July/2010 and tested by an enzyme immunoassay (EIA) and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) to detect NoV, SaV and HAstV, and further molecular characterization was performed. These viruses were detected only in the diarrheic group. NoV was the most frequent viral agent detected (19.7%-16/81), followed by SaV (2.5%-2/81) and HAstV (1.2%-1/81). Of the 16 NoV-positive samples, 14 were sequenced with primers targeting the B region of the polymerase (ORF1) and the D region of the capsid (ORF2). The results showed a broad genetic diversity of NoV, with 12 strains being classified as GII-4 (5–41.7%), GII-6 (3–25%), GII-7 (2–16.7%), GII-17 (1–8.3%) and GI-2 (1–8.3%), as based on the polymerase region; 12 samples were classified, based on the capsid region, as GII-4 (6–50%, being 3–2006b variant and 3–2010 variant), GII-6 (3–25%), GII-17 (2–16.7%) and GII-20 (1–8.3%). One NoV-strain showed dual genotype specificity, based on the polymerase and capsid region (GII-7/GII-20). This study provides, for the first time, epidemiological and molecular information on the circulation of NoV, SaV and HAstV in African-descendant communities in Northern Brazil and identifies NoV genotypes that were different from those detected previously in studies conducted in the urban area of Belém. It remains to be determined why a broader NoV diversity was observed in such a semi

  7. Norovirus diversity in diarrheic children from an African-descendant settlement in Belém, Northern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Aragão, Glicélia Cruz; Mascarenhas, Joana D'Arc Pereira; Kaiano, Jane Haruko Lima; de Lucena, Maria Silvia Sousa; Siqueira, Jones Anderson Monteiro; Fumian, Túlio Machado; Hernandez, Juliana das Mercês; de Oliveira, Consuelo Silva; Oliveira, Darleise de Souza; Araújo, Eliete da Cunha; Soares, Luana da Silva; Linhares, Alexandre Costa; Gabbay, Yvone Benchimol

    2013-01-01

    Norovirus (NoV), sapovirus (SaV) and human astrovirus (HAstV) are viral pathogens that are associated with outbreaks and sporadic cases of gastroenteritis. However, little is known about the occurrence of these pathogens in relatively isolated communities, such as the remnants of African-descendant villages ("Quilombola"). The objective of this study was the frequency determination of these viruses in children under 10 years, with and without gastroenteritis, from a "Quilombola" Community, Northern Brazil. A total of 159 stool samples were obtained from April/2008 to July/2010 and tested by an enzyme immunoassay (EIA) and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) to detect NoV, SaV and HAstV, and further molecular characterization was performed. These viruses were detected only in the diarrheic group. NoV was the most frequent viral agent detected (19.7%-16/81), followed by SaV (2.5%-2/81) and HAstV (1.2%-1/81). Of the 16 NoV-positive samples, 14 were sequenced with primers targeting the B region of the polymerase (ORF1) and the D region of the capsid (ORF2). The results showed a broad genetic diversity of NoV, with 12 strains being classified as GII-4 (5-41.7%), GII-6 (3-25%), GII-7 (2-16.7%), GII-17 (1-8.3%) and GI-2 (1-8.3%), as based on the polymerase region; 12 samples were classified, based on the capsid region, as GII-4 (6-50%, being 3-2006b variant and 3-2010 variant), GII-6 (3-25%), GII-17 (2-16.7%) and GII-20 (1-8.3%). One NoV-strain showed dual genotype specificity, based on the polymerase and capsid region (GII-7/GII-20). This study provides, for the first time, epidemiological and molecular information on the circulation of NoV, SaV and HAstV in African-descendant communities in Northern Brazil and identifies NoV genotypes that were different from those detected previously in studies conducted in the urban area of Belém. It remains to be determined why a broader NoV diversity was observed in such a semi-isolated community. PMID:23457593

  8. Antiviral targets of human noroviruses.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Bv Venkataram; Shanker, Sreejesh; Muhaxhiri, Zana; Deng, Lisheng; Choi, Jae-Mun; Estes, Mary K; Song, Yongcheng; Palzkill, Timothy; Atmar, Robert L

    2016-06-01

    Human noroviruses are major causative agents of sporadic and epidemic gastroenteritis both in children and adults. Currently there are no licensed therapeutic intervention measures either in terms of vaccines or drugs available for these highly contagious human pathogens. Genetic and antigenic diversity of these viruses, rapid emergence of new strains, and their ability to infect a broad population by using polymorphic histo-blood group antigens for cell attachment, pose significant challenges for the development of effective antiviral agents. Despite these impediments, there is progress in the design and development of therapeutic agents. These include capsid-based candidate vaccines, and potential antivirals either in the form of glycomimetics or designer antibodies that block HBGA binding, as well as those that target essential non-structural proteins such as the viral protease and RNA-dependent RNA polymerase. In addition to these classical approaches, recent studies suggest the possibility of interferons and targeting host cell factors as viable approaches to counter norovirus infection. This review provides a brief overview of this progress. PMID:27318434

  9. Enterovirus and Norovirus Monitoring under UCMR3

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation describes the Unregulated Contaminant Monitoring Rule round 3 (UCMR3) monitoring program for enterovirus and norovirus in groundwater. It provides the data on microbial indicators and virus occurrence during the monitoring period. Enteric virus occurrence was ab...

  10. Ultrasensitive Norovirus Detection Using DNA Aptasensor Technology

    PubMed Central

    Giamberardino, Amanda; Labib, Mahmoud; Hassan, Eman M.; Tetro, Jason A.; Springthorpe, Susan; Sattar, Syed A.; Berezovski, Maxim V.; DeRosa, Maria C.

    2013-01-01

    DNA aptamers were developed against murine norovirus (MNV) using SELEX (Systematic Evolution of Ligands by EXponential enrichment). Nine rounds of SELEX led to the discovery of AG3, a promising aptamer with very high affinity for MNV as well as for lab-synthesized capsids of a common human norovirus (HuNoV) outbreak strain (GII.3). Using fluorescence anisotropy, AG3 was found to bind with MNV with affinity in the low picomolar range. The aptamer could cross-react with HuNoV though it was selected against MNV. As compared to a non-specific DNA control sequence, the norovirus-binding affinity of AG3 was about a million-fold higher. In further tests, the aptamer also showed nearly a million-fold higher affinity for the noroviruses than for the feline calicivirus (FCV), a virus similar in size and structure to noroviruses. AG3 was incorporated into a simple electrochemical sensor using a gold nanoparticle-modified screen-printed carbon electrode (GNPs-SPCE). The aptasensor could detect MNV with a limit of detection of approximately 180 virus particles, for possible on-site applications. The lead aptamer candidate and the aptasensor platform show promise for the rapid detection and identification of noroviruses in environmental and clinical samples. PMID:24244426

  11. The makings of a good human norovirus surrogate.

    PubMed

    Kniel, Kalmia E

    2014-02-01

    Norovirus is undoubtedly a leading cause of acute gastroenteritis. A large limitation to the study of human norovirus is the lack of consensus research using norovirus surrogates. Over two decades of research have included vast comparisons of norovirus surrogates within the Calicivirus family. A discussion on the continued use of norovirus surrogates includes use of surrogates to adequately assess environmental persistence and food preservation technologies. Choice of proper surrogate may be influenced by a myriad of issues, including ease of propagation, genetic similarities, and binding properties. While it remains impossible to routinely culture human norovirus in vitro the continued use of a variety of norovirus surrogates remains crucial to facilitate an understanding of norovirus in order to reduce the public health impact of the disease. PMID:24492067

  12. Variant-specific surface proteins of Giardia lamblia are zinc-binding proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Nash, T E; Mowatt, M R

    1993-01-01

    Giardia lamblia undergoes surface antigenic variation. The variant-specific surface proteins (VSPs) are a distinct family of cysteine-rich proteins. Characteristically, cysteine residues occur mostly as CXXC tetrapeptides. Four of the reported five VSPs contain a putative metal-binding domain that resembles other metal-binding motifs; the fifth is closely related but lacks an essential histidine. Three different native VSPs bound Zn2+. Co2+, Cu2+, and Cd2+ inhibited Zn2+ binding. Analysis of recombinant VSP fusion proteins showed that the putative binding motif bound Zn2+. Surprisingly, peptide fragments from other regions of the VSP contain numerous CXXCXnCXXC motifs that also bound Zn2+. Analysis of deduced amino acid sequences showed well-conserved CXXC spacing in three out of five VSPs, suggesting conservation of structure despite amino acid sequence divergence. The function of VSPs is unknown, but by binding Zn2+ or other metals in the intestine, VSPs may contribute to Zn2+ malnutrition or inhibition of metal-dependent intestinal enzymes, which would lead to malabsorption, a well-known consequence of giardiasis. Images Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:8516291

  13. Delayed norovirus epidemic in the 2009-2010 season in Japan: potential relationship with intensive hand sanitizer use for pandemic influenza.

    PubMed

    Inaida, S; Shobugawa, Y; Matsuno, S; Saito, R; Suzuki, H

    2016-09-01

    Norovirus (NoV) epidemics normally peak in December in Japan; however, the peak in the 2009-2010 season was delayed until the fourth week of January 2010. We suspected intensive hand hygiene that was conducted for a previous pandemic influenza in 2009 as the cause of this delay. We analysed the NoV epidemic trend, based on national surveillance data, and its associations with monthly output data for hand hygiene products, including alcohol-based skin antiseptics and hand soap. The delayed peak in the NoV incidence in the 2009-2010 season had the lowest number of recorded cases of the five seasons studied (2006-2007 to 2010-2011). GII.4 was the most commonly occurring genotype. The monthly relative risk of NoV and monthly output of both alcohol-based skin antiseptics and hand soap were significantly and negatively correlated. Our findings suggest an association between hand hygiene using these products and prevention of NoV transmission. PMID:27301793

  14. Rapid detection of norovirus in naturally contaminated food: foodborne gastroenteritis outbreak on a cruise ship in Brazil, 2010.

    PubMed

    Morillo, Simone Guadagnucci; Luchs, Adriana; Cilli, Audrey; do Carmo Sampaio Tavares Timenetsky, Maria

    2012-09-01

    Norovirus (NoV) is a prevalent pathogen of foodborne diseases; however, its detection in foods other than shellfish is often time consuming and unsuccessful. In 2010, an outbreak of acute gastroenteritis occurred on a cruise ship in Brazil, and NoV was the etiologic agent suspected. The objectives of this study were to report that a handy in-house methodology was suitable for NoV detection in naturally contaminated food, and perform the molecular characterization of food strains. Food samples (blue cheese, Indian sauce, herbal butter, soup, and white sauce) were analyzed by ELISA, two methods of RNA extraction, TRIzol(®) and QIAamp(®), following conventional RT-PCR. The qPCR was used in order to confirm the NoV genogroups. GI and GII NoV genogroups were identified by conventional RT-PCR after RNA extraction by means of the TRIzol(®) method. Two GII NoV samples were successfully sequenced, classified as GII.4; and they displayed a genetic relationship with strains from the Asian continent also isolated in 2010. GII and GI NoV were identified in distinct food matrices suggesting that it was not a common source of contamination. TRIzol(®) extraction followed by conventional RT-PCR was a suitable methodology in order to identify NoV in naturally contaminated food. Moreover, food samples could be processed within 8 h indicating the value of the method used for NoV detection, and its potential to identify foodborne gastroenteritis outbreaks in food products other than shellfish. This is the first description in Brazil of NoV detection in naturally contaminated food other than shellfish involved in a foodborne outbreak. PMID:23412839

  15. Inactivation of human norovirus and Tulane virus in simple media and fresh whole strawberries by ionizing radiation.

    PubMed

    DiCaprio, Erin; Phantkankum, Nuttapong; Culbertson, Doug; Ma, Yuanmei; Hughes, John H; Kingsley, David; Uribe, Roberto M; Li, Jianrong

    2016-09-01

    Human norovirus (NoV) is a major cause of fresh produce-associated outbreaks and human NoV in irrigation water can potentially lead to viral internalization in fresh produce. Therefore, there is a need to develop novel intervention strategies to target internalized viral pathogens while maintaining fresh produce quality. In this study electron beam (E-beam) and gamma radiation were evaluated for efficacy against a human NoV GII.4 strain and Tulane virus (TV). Virus survival following ionizing radiation treatments was determined using direct quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-qPCR), the porcine gastric mucin magnetic bead (PGM-MB) binding assay followed by RT-qPCR, and plaque assay. In simple media, a high dose of E-beam treatment was required to completely abolish the receptor binding ability of human NoV (35.3kGy) and TV (19.5-24.1kGy), as assessed using the PGM-MB binding assay. Both human NoV and TV were more susceptible to gamma irradiation than E-beam, requiring 22.4kGy to achieve complete inactivation. In whole strawberries, no human NoV or TV RNA was detected following 28.7kGy of E-beam treatment using the PGM-MB binding assay. Overall, human NoV and TV are highly resistant to ionizing radiation and therefore the technology may not be suitable to eliminate viruses in fresh produce at the currently approved levels. In addition, the PGM-MB binding assay is an improved method to detect viral infectivity compared to direct RT-qPCR. PMID:27240219

  16. Noroviral P-Particles as an In Vitro Model to Assess the Interactions of Noroviruses with Probiotics

    PubMed Central

    Rubio-del-Campo, Antonio; Coll-Marqués, José M.; Yebra, María J.; Buesa, Javier; Pérez-Martínez, Gaspar; Monedero, Vicente; Rodríguez-Díaz, Jesús

    2014-01-01

    Noroviruses (NoVs) are the main etiologic agents of acute epidemic gastroenteritis and probiotic bacteria have been reported to exert a positive effect on viral diarrhea. The protruding (P) domain from NoVs VP1 capsid protein has the ability to assemble into the so-called P-particles, which retain the binding ability to host receptors. We purified the P-domains from NoVs genotypes GI.1 and GII.4 as 6X(His)-tagged proteins and determined that, similar to native domains, they were structured into P-particles that were functional in the recognition of the specific glycoconjugated receptors, as established by surface plasmon resonance experiments. We showed that several lactic acid bacteria (probiotic and non-probiotic) and a Gram-negative probiotic strain have the ability to bind P-particles on their surfaces irrespective of their probiotic status. The binding of P-particles (GI.1) to HT-29 cells in the presence of selected strains showed that bacteria can inhibit P-particle attachment in competitive exclusion experiments. However, pre-treatment of cells with bacteria or adding bacteria to cells with already attached P-particles enhanced the retention of the particles. Although direct viral binding and blocking of viral receptors have been postulated as mechanisms of protection against viral infection by probiotic bacteria, these results highlight the need for a careful evaluation of this hypothesis. The work presented here investigates for the first time the probiotic-NoVs-host interactions and points up the NoVs P-particles as useful tools to overcome the absence of in vitro cellular models to propagate these viruses. PMID:24586892

  17. Failure of propagation of human norovirus in intestinal epithelial cells with microvilli grown in three-dimensional cultures

    PubMed Central

    Takanashi, Sayaka; Saif, Linda J.; Hughes, John H.; Meulia, Tea; Jung, Kwonil; Scheuer, Kelly A.; Wang, Qiuhong

    2013-01-01

    Human noroviruses (HuNoVs) are a leading cause of acute gastroenteritis. Establishment of a cell culture system for in vitro HuNoV growth remains challenging. Replication of HuNoVs in human intestinal cell lines (INT-407 and Caco-2) that differentiate to produce microvilli in rotation wall vessel (RWV) three-dimensional cultures has been reported (Straub et al., Emerg Infect Dis 13:396–403 2007, J Water Health 9:225–240 2011, and Water Sci Technol 67:863–868 2013). We used a similar RWV system, intestinal cell lines, and the same (Genogroup [G] I.1) plus additional (GII.4 and GII.12) HuNoV strains to test the system’s reproducibility and to expand the earlier findings. Apical microvilli were observed on the surface of both cell lines by light and electron microscopy. However, none of the cell types tested resulted in productive viral replication of any of the HuNoV strains, as confirmed by plateau or declining viral RNA titers in the supernatants and cell lysates of HuNoV-infected cells, determined by real-time reverse transcription PCR. These trends were the same when culture supplements were added that have been reported to be effective for replication of other fastidious enteric viruses in vitro. Additionally, by confocal microscopy and orthoslice analysis, viral capsid proteins were mainly observed above the actin filament signals, which suggested that the majority of viral antigens were on the cell surface. We conclude that even intestinal cells displaying microvilli were not sufficient to support HuNoV replication under the conditions tested. PMID:23974469

  18. [Current topics on inactivation of norovirus].

    PubMed

    Noda, Mamoru; Uema, Masashi

    2011-01-01

    Human norovirus is the most important foodborne virus in Japan. According to the statistics of food poisoning by the Ministry of Health, Labour, and Welfare (MHLW), the number of patients infected with norovirus has accounted for half of all the patients with food poisoning in recent years. One of the most important measures for the control of infectious diseases is establishing of techniques for inactivating pathogens. For the prevention of food poisoning caused by norovirus, MHLW recommends that foods be subjected to heat treatment at 85 degrees C for 1 min or more; moreover, it recommends the use of sodium hypochlorite to inactivate (disinfect) this virus. However, application of these treatments is not always feasible because heat results in denaturation and sodium hypochlorite can be toxic to the human body and can cause discoloration. Therefore, it is necessary to develop and improve the efficacy of disinfectants and physiochemical treatments against the virus. Human norovirus cannot be propagated in cell culture or in a small animal. This matter is the greatest hindrance for testing the stability of this virus in environments or for evaluating the efficacy of disinfectants, heat treatment, pH treatment, ultraviolet or gamma irradiation, high hydrostatic pressure treatment, and other methods for the inactivation of the virus. Hence, some viruses such as human enterovirus, feline calicivirus, or mouse norovirus have been used as surrogates of human norovirus. The data on inactivation and stability of surrogate viruses are exclusively used as the data of human noroviruses. In recent years, some attempts to distinguish between infectious and noninfectious virus particles by genetic methods such as polymerase chain reaction have been made. These methods include pretreatments by RNase for digesting viral RNAs from non-intact or destroyed virus particles, or addition of a reagent such as ethidium monoazide for inhibiting PCR amplification of viral RNAs from them

  19. Isoform and Splice-Variant Specific Functions of Dynamin-2 Revealed by Analysis of Conditional Knock-Out Cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ya-Wen; Surka, Mark C.; Schroeter, Thomas; Lukiyanchuk, Vasyl

    2008-01-01

    Dynamin (Dyn) is a multifunctional GTPase implicated in several cellular events, including endocytosis, intracellular trafficking, cell signaling, and cytokinesis. The mammalian genome encodes three isoforms, Dyn1, Dyn2, and Dyn3, and several splice variants of each, leading to the suggestion that distinct isoforms and/or distinct splice variants might mediate distinct cellular functions. We generated a conditional Dyn2 KO cell line and performed knockout and reconstitution experiments to explore the isoform- and splice variant specific cellular functions of ubiquitously expressed Dyn2. We find that Dyn2 is required for clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME), p75 export from the Golgi, and PDGF-stimulated macropinocytosis and cytokinesis, but not for other endocytic pathways. Surprisingly, CME and p75 exocytosis were efficiently rescued by reintroduction of Dyn2, but not Dyn1, suggesting that these two isoforms function differentially in vesicular trafficking in nonneuronal cells. Both isoforms rescued macropinocytosis and cytokinesis, suggesting that dynamin function in these processes might be mechanistically distinct from its role in CME. Although all four Dyn2 splice variants could equally restore CME, Dyn2ba and -bb were more effective at restoring p75 exocytosis. This splice variant specificity correlated with their differential targeting to the Golgi. These studies reveal isoform and splice-variant specific functions for Dyn2. PMID:18923138

  20. Isoform and splice-variant specific functions of dynamin-2 revealed by analysis of conditional knock-out cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ya-Wen; Surka, Mark C; Schroeter, Thomas; Lukiyanchuk, Vasyl; Schmid, Sandra L

    2008-12-01

    Dynamin (Dyn) is a multifunctional GTPase implicated in several cellular events, including endocytosis, intracellular trafficking, cell signaling, and cytokinesis. The mammalian genome encodes three isoforms, Dyn1, Dyn2, and Dyn3, and several splice variants of each, leading to the suggestion that distinct isoforms and/or distinct splice variants might mediate distinct cellular functions. We generated a conditional Dyn2 KO cell line and performed knockout and reconstitution experiments to explore the isoform- and splice variant specific cellular functions of ubiquitously expressed Dyn2. We find that Dyn2 is required for clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME), p75 export from the Golgi, and PDGF-stimulated macropinocytosis and cytokinesis, but not for other endocytic pathways. Surprisingly, CME and p75 exocytosis were efficiently rescued by reintroduction of Dyn2, but not Dyn1, suggesting that these two isoforms function differentially in vesicular trafficking in nonneuronal cells. Both isoforms rescued macropinocytosis and cytokinesis, suggesting that dynamin function in these processes might be mechanistically distinct from its role in CME. Although all four Dyn2 splice variants could equally restore CME, Dyn2ba and -bb were more effective at restoring p75 exocytosis. This splice variant specificity correlated with their differential targeting to the Golgi. These studies reveal isoform and splice-variant specific functions for Dyn2. PMID:18923138

  1. Evaluation of a Microarray for Genotyping Noroviruses

    EPA Science Inventory

    Noroviruses that infect humans are divided into three genogroups based upon their sequence diversity. Of these, genogroups I and II have been identified as leading causes of waterborne disease outbreaks worldwide and are frequently found in rivers and lakes that serve as drinkin...

  2. Outbreak of norovirus gastroenteritis infection, Thailand.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Katie S; Guntapong, Ratigorn; Thattiyaphong, Aree; Wangroongsarb, Piyada; Hall, Aron J; Olsen, Sonja J; Holtz, Timothy H

    2013-05-01

    Norovirus is a leading cause of gastrointestinal illness worldwide. We investigated an outbreak of gastrointestinal illness in Pattaya, Thailand, among participants of a course. We asked participants and family members to complete a questionnaire asking about symptoms, meals eaten, and foods consumed during the course. We collected stool samples from persons reporting illness and analyzed specimens for several viruses and enteropathogenic bacteria. We defined a case as a person having one or more episodes of diarrhea, with onset between 30 August and 1 September 2010, in a participant or family member who attended the course. Of 56 people who attended, 95% completed the questionnaire: nine met the case definition (attack rate, 17%). Common symptoms included abdominal cramps, nausea, fatigue, headache, and vomiting. Food items with elevated risk ratios included: crispy fish maw, dried squid, and cashew nut salad [risk ratio (RR) 5.1; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.7-37]; assorted salad bar with dressing (RR 3.0; 95% CI 0.9-11); and seafood kebab (RR 5.8; 95% CI 0.8-43). Among ill persons, four (44%) provided stool samples and two (50%) were positive for norovirus. Our data suggest a foodborne outbreak of norovirus. Increased use of norovirus diagnostics as well as measures to prevent transmission may help identify additional outbreaks and improve control measures to limit the spread of outbreaks. PMID:24050072

  3. Inactivation of human norovirus using chemical sanitizers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The porcine gastric mucin binding magnetic bead (PGM-MB) assay was used to evaluate the ability of chlorine, chlorine dioxide, peroxyacetic acid, hydrogen peroxide, and trisodium phosphate to inactivate human norovirus within 10 percent stool filtrate. One min free chlorine treatments at concentrat...

  4. Global Economic Burden of Norovirus Gastroenteritis

    PubMed Central

    Bartsch, Sarah M.; Lopman, Benjamin A.; Ozawa, Sachiko; Hall, Aron J.; Lee, Bruce Y.

    2016-01-01

    Background Despite accounting for approximately one fifth of all acute gastroenteritis illnesses, norovirus has received comparatively less attention than other infectious pathogens. With several candidate vaccines under development, characterizing the global economic burden of norovirus could help funders, policy makers, public health officials, and product developers determine how much attention and resources to allocate to advancing these technologies to prevent and control norovirus. Methods We developed a computational simulation model to estimate the economic burden of norovirus in every country/area (233 total) stratified by WHO region and globally, from the health system and societal perspectives. We considered direct costs of illness (e.g., clinic visits and hospitalization) and productivity losses. Results Globally, norovirus resulted in a total of $4.2 billion (95% UI: $3.2–5.7 billion) in direct health system costs and $60.3 billion (95% UI: $44.4–83.4 billion) in societal costs per year. Disease amongst children <5 years cost society $39.8 billion, compared to $20.4 billion for all other age groups combined. Costs per norovirus illness varied by both region and age and was highest among adults ≥55 years. Productivity losses represented 84–99% of total costs varying by region. While low and middle income countries and high income countries had similar disease incidence (10,148 vs. 9,935 illness per 100,000 persons), high income countries generated 62% of global health system costs. In sensitivity analysis, the probability of hospitalization had the largest impact on health system cost estimates ($2.8 billion globally, assuming no hospitalization costs), while the probability of missing productive days had the largest impact on societal cost estimates ($35.9 billion globally, with a 25% probability of missing productive days). Conclusions The total economic burden is greatest in young children but the highest cost per illness is among older age

  5. The scenario of norovirus contamination in food and food handlers.

    PubMed

    Tuan Zainazor, C; Hidayah, M S Noor; Chai, L C; Tunung, R; Ghazali, F Mohamad; Son, R

    2010-02-01

    Recently, many cases related to viral gastroenteritis outbreaks have been reported all over the world. Noroviruses are found to be leading as the major cause of outbreaks of acute gastroenteritis. Patients with the acute gastroenteritis normally found to be positive with norovirus when stools and vomit were analyzed. This paper reviews various activities and previous reports that describe norovirus contaminated in various food matrixes and relationship between food handlers. Lately, a numbers of norovirus outbreaks have been reported which are involved fresh produce (such as vegetables, fruits), shellfish and prepared food. Food produces by infected food handlers may therefore easily contaminated. In addition, food that required much handling and have been eaten without heat treatment gave the high risk for getting foodborne illnesses. The standard method for detection of norovirus has already been available for stool samples. However, only few methods for detection of norovirus in food samples have been developed until now. PMID:20208424

  6. Human norovirus transmission and evolution in a changing world.

    PubMed

    de Graaf, Miranda; van Beek, Janko; Koopmans, Marion P G

    2016-07-01

    Norovirus infections are a major cause of gastroenteritis, and outbreaks occur frequently. Several factors are currently increasing the challenge posed by norovirus infections to global health, notably the increasing number of infections in immunocompromised individuals, who are more susceptible to disease, and the globalization of the food industry, which enables large norovirus outbreaks to occur on an international scale. Furthermore, the rapid rate of the genetic and antigenic evolution of circulating noroviruses complicates the development of vaccines and therapies that are required to counter these challenges. In this Review, we describe recent advances in the study of the transmission, pathogenesis and evolution of human noroviruses, and consider the ongoing risk of norovirus outbreaks, together with the future prospects for therapeutics, in a rapidly changing world. PMID:27211790

  7. Inactivation of human norovirus using chemical sanitizers.

    PubMed

    Kingsley, David H; Vincent, Emily M; Meade, Gloria K; Watson, Clytrice L; Fan, Xuetong

    2014-02-01

    The porcine gastric mucin binding magnetic bead (PGM-MB) assay was used to evaluate the ability of chlorine, chlorine dioxide, peroxyacetic acid, hydrogen peroxide, and trisodium phosphate to inactivate human norovirus within 10% stool filtrate. One-minute free chlorine treatments at concentrations of 33 and 189 ppm reduced virus binding in the PGM-MB assay by 1.48 and 4.14 log₁₀, respectively, suggesting that chlorine is an efficient sanitizer for inactivation of human norovirus (HuNoV). Five minute treatments with 5% trisodium phosphate (pH~12) reduced HuNoV binding by 1.6 log₁₀, suggesting that TSP, or some other high pH buffer, could be used to treat food and food contact surfaces to reduce HuNoV. One minute treatments with 350 ppm chlorine dioxide dissolved in water did not reduce PGM-MB binding, suggesting that the sanitizer may not be suitable for HuNoV inactivation in liquid form. However a 60-min treatment with 350 ppm chlorine dioxide did reduce human norovirus by 2.8 log₁₀, indicating that chlorine dioxide had some, albeit limited, activity against HuNoV. Results also suggest that peroxyacetic acid has limited effectiveness against human norovirus, since 1-min treatments with up to 195 ppm reduced human norovirus binding by <1 log₁₀. Hydrogen peroxide (4%) treatment of up to 60 min resulted in minimal binding reduction (~0.1 log₁₀) suggesting that H₂O₂ is not a good liquid sanitizer for HuNoV. Overall this study suggests that HuNoV is remarkably resistant to several commonly used disinfectants and advocates for the use of chlorine (sodium hypochlorite) as a HuNoV disinfectant wherever possible. PMID:24334094

  8. Status of vaccine research and development for norovirus.

    PubMed

    Riddle, Mark S; Walker, Richard I

    2016-06-01

    The global health community is beginning to gain an understanding of the global burden of norovirus-associated disease, which appears to have significant burden in both developed- and developing-country populations. Of particular importance is the growing recognition of norovirus as a leading cause of gastroenteritis and diarrhea in countries where rotavirus vaccine has been introduced. While not as severe as rotavirus disease, the sheer number of norovirus infections not limited to early childhood makes norovirus a formidable global health problem. This article provides a landscape review of norovirus vaccine development efforts. Multiple vaccine strategies, mostly relying on virus-like particle antigens, are under development and have demonstrated proof of efficacy in human challenge studies. Several are entering phase 2 clinical development. Norovirus vaccine development challenges include, but are not limited to: valency, induction of adequate immune responses in pediatric and elderly populations, and potential for vaccine-strain mismatch. Given current strategies and global health interest, the outlook for a norovirus vaccine is promising. Because a norovirus vaccine is expected to have a dual market in both developed and developing countries, there would likely be scale-up advantages for commercial development and global distribution. Combination with or expression by another enteric pathogen, such as rotavirus, could also enhance uptake of a norovirus vaccine. PMID:27036510

  9. Structural Basis for Norovirus Inhibition and Fucose Mimicry by Citrate

    SciTech Connect

    Hansman, Grant S.; Shahzad-ul-Hussan, Syed; McLellan, Jason S.; Chuang, Gwo-Yu; Georgiev, Ivelin; Shimoike, Takashi; Katayama, Kazuhiko; Bewley, Carole A.; Kwong, Peter D.

    2012-01-20

    Human noroviruses bind with their capsid-protruding domains to histo-blood-group antigens (HBGAs), an interaction thought to direct their entry into cells. Although human noroviruses are the major cause of gastroenteritis outbreaks, development of antivirals has been lacking, mainly because human noroviruses cannot be cultivated. Here we use X-ray crystallography and saturation transfer difference nuclear magnetic resonance (STD NMR) to analyze the interaction of citrate with genogroup II (GII) noroviruses. Crystals of citrate in complex with the protruding domain from norovirus GII.10 Vietnam026 diffracted to 1.4 {angstrom} and showed a single citrate bound at the site of HBGA interaction. The citrate interaction was coordinated with a set of capsid interactions almost identical to that involved in recognizing the terminal HBGA fucose, the saccharide which forms the primary conserved interaction between HBGAs and GII noroviruses. Citrate and a water molecule formed a ring-like structure that mimicked the pyranoside ring of fucose. STD NMR showed the protruding domain to have weak affinity for citrate (460 {mu}M). This affinity, however, was similar to the affinities of the protruding domain for fucose (460 {mu}M) and H type 2 trisaccharide (390 {mu}M), an HBGA shown previously to be specifically recognized by human noroviruses. Importantly, competition STD NMR showed that citrate could compete with HBGA for norovirus binding. Together, the results suggest that citrate and other glycomimetics have the potential to block human noroviruses from binding to HBGAs.

  10. Heat-Denatured Lysozyme Inactivates Murine Norovirus as a Surrogate Human Norovirus

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Hajime; Nakazawa, Moemi; Ohshima, Chihiro; Sato, Miki; Tsuchiya, Tomoki; Takeuchi, Akira; Kunou, Masaaki; Kuda, Takashi; Kimura, Bon

    2015-01-01

    Human norovirus infects humans through the consumption of contaminated food, contact with the excrement or vomit of an infected person, and through airborne droplets that scatter the virus through the air. Being highly infectious and highly viable in the environment, inactivation of the norovirus requires a highly effective inactivating agent. In this study, we have discovered the thermal denaturing capacity of a lysozyme with known antimicrobial activity against gram-positive bacteria, as well as its inactivating effect on murine norovirus. This study is the first report on the norovirus-inactivating effects of a thermally denatured lysozyme. We observed that lysozymes heat-treated for 40 min at 100 °C caused a 4.5 log reduction in infectivity of norovirus. Transmission electron microscope analysis showed that virus particles exposed to thermally denatured lysozymes were expanded, compared to the virus before exposure. The amino acid sequence of the lysozyme was divided into three sections and the peptides of each artificially synthesised, in order to determine the region responsible for the inactivating effect. These results suggest that thermal denaturation of the lysozyme changes the protein structure, activating the region responsible for imparting an inactivating effect against the virus. PMID:26134436

  11. Inactivation of a Norovirus by High Pressure Processing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Murine norovirus (strain MNV-1), a propagable norovirus, was evaluated for susceptibility to high pressure processing. Experiments with virus stocks in DMEM media demonstrated that at room temperature (20 degree C), the virus was inactivated over a pressure range of 350 to 450 MegaPascals (MPa), wi...

  12. High pressure processing inactivates human norovirus within oysters

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Consumption of raw bivalve mollusks can result in norovirus infection. One potential intervention for virus-contaminated shellfish is high pressure processing (HPP). Currently HPP is known to inactivate Vibrio bacteria, hepatitis A virus, and murine norovirus within oysters. To evaluate the potentia...

  13. EVALUATION OF A GENERIC ARRAY APPROACH FOR GENOTYPING NOROVIRUSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Noroviruses are the leading cause of nonbacterial gastroenteritis outbreaks in the United States. Because of their potential to contaminate drinking water, the U.S Environmental Protection Agency has included noroviruses on the Contaminant Candidate List (CCL) to assess the publi...

  14. Lessons Learned from an Elementary School Norovirus Outbreak

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gomez, Eileen Button

    2008-01-01

    Outbreaks of norovirus have been on the increase. The virus often spreads quickly through schools and similar institutions. The school nurse may be able to minimize the impact of a school norovirus outbreak by providing accurate information about the disease, the scope of the local situation, and instruction on infection control measures. This…

  15. Enhanced Hygiene Measures and Norovirus Transmission during an Outbreak

    PubMed Central

    Teunis, Peter; Morroy, Gabriella; Wijkmans, Clementine; Oostveen, Sandy; Duizer, Erwin; Kretzschmar, Mirjam; Wallinga, Jacco

    2009-01-01

    Control of norovirus outbreaks relies on enhanced hygiene measures, such as handwashing, surface cleaning, using disposable paper towels, and using separate toilets for sick and well persons. However, little is known about their effectiveness in limiting further spread of norovirus infections. We analyzed norovirus outbreaks in 7 camps at an international scouting jamboree in the Netherlands during 2004. Implementation of hygiene measures coincided with an 84.8% (95% predictive interval 81.2%–86.6%) reduction in reproduction number. This reduction was unexpectedly large but still below the reduction needed to contain a norovirus outbreak. Even more stringent control measures are required to break the chain of transmission of norovirus. PMID:19116045

  16. Noroviruses: The Principal Cause of Foodborne Disease Worldwide

    PubMed Central

    Koo, Hoonmo L.; Ajami, Nadim; Atmar, Robert L.; DuPont, Herbert L.

    2011-01-01

    Noroviruses are the leading cause of foodborne disease outbreaks worldwide, and may soon eclipse rotaviruses as the most common cause of severe pediatric gastroenteritis, as the use of rotavirus vaccines becomes more widespread. Genetic mutations and recombinations contribute to the broad heterogeneity of noroviruses and the emergence of new epidemic strains. Although typically a self-limited disease, norovirus gastroenteritis can cause significant morbidity and mortality among children, the elderly, and the immunocompromised. The lack of a cell culture or small animal model has hindered norovirus research and the development of novel therapeutic and preventative interventions. However, vaccines based on norovirus capsid protein virus-like particles are promising and may one day become widely available through transgenic expression in plants. PMID:20670600

  17. Multicenter Evaluation of the Xpert Norovirus Assay for Detection of Norovirus Genogroups I and II in Fecal Specimens.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Mark D; Langley, L Claire; Buchan, Blake W; Faron, Matthew L; Maier, Melanie; Templeton, Kate; Walker, Kimberly; Popowitch, Elena B; Miller, Melissa B; Rao, Arundhati; Liebert, Uwe G; Ledeboer, Nathan A; Vinjé, Jan; Burnham, C A

    2016-01-01

    Norovirus is the most common cause of sporadic gastroenteritis and outbreaks worldwide. The rapid identification of norovirus has important implications for infection prevention measures and may reduce the need for additional diagnostic testing. The Xpert Norovirus assay recently received FDA clearance for the detection and differentiation of norovirus genogroups I and II (GI and GII), which account for the vast majority of infections. In this study, we evaluated the performance of the Xpert Norovirus assay with both fresh, prospectively collected (n = 914) and frozen, archived (n = 489) fecal specimens. A Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) composite reference method was used as the gold standard for comparison. For both prospective and frozen specimens, the Xpert Norovirus assay showed positive percent agreement (PPA) and negative percent agreement (NPA) values of 98.3% and 98.1% for GI and of 99.4% and 98.2% for GII, respectively. Norovirus prevalence in the prospective specimens (collected from March to May of 2014) was 9.9% (n = 90), with the majority of positives caused by genogroup II (82%, n = 74). The positive predictive value (PPV) of the Xpert Norovirus assay was 75% for GI-positive specimens, whereas it was 86.5% for GII-positive specimens. The negative predictive values (NPV) for GI and GII were 100% and 99.9%, respectively. PMID:26560532

  18. Performance of a one-step quantitative duplex RT-PCR for detection of rotavirus A and noroviruses GII during two periods of high viral circulation.

    PubMed

    Fumian, Tulio M; Leite, José Paulo G; Rocha, Mônica S; de Andrade, Juliana S R; Fioretti, Julia M; de Assis, Rosane M S; Assis, Matheus R S; Fialho, Alexandre M; Miagostovich, Marize P

    2016-02-01

    Rotavirus A (RVA) and noroviruses (NoV) are the major viral agents of acute gastroenteritis (AGE) worldwide. In the present study, we aimed to evaluate the performance of a one-step duplex quantitative RT-PCR (dRT-qPCR) assay, established for detection and quantification of RVA and NoV genogroup II (GII) using a single DNA standard curve (SC), as well as to investigate the association between fecal viral load and optical density (OD) values, and viruses' genotyping. The results obtained by dRT-qPCR in 530 fecal samples from AGE cases were compared with methods employed for the diagnosis of those viruses as follows: enzyme immunoassay (EIA) and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) for RVA; and qualitative PCR for NoV. By using dRT-qPCR, we detected RVA and NoV in 353 (66%), increasing the positivity rate by 22.5% for RVA and 11.5% NoV, comparing the number of positive samples. RVA and NoV GII were detected in a range of 5.17 × 10(3) to 6.56 × 10(9) and 3.76 × 10(3) to 9.13 × 10(10) genome copies per gram of feces, respectively. We observed a significant direct correlation between genome copies values and optical density, using dRT-qPCR and EIA assays, respectively (Spearman ρ=0.41; p<0.0001). Viruses characterization demonstrated a predominance of NoV GII.4 Sidney 2012 variant during October 2013 to February 2014, followed by the emergence of RVA genotype G12P[8] in 2014. The established assay using a single SC provides an early feedback concerning detection and quantification, with the advantage of detecting simultaneously RVA and NoV GII, reducing time and reagent costs. PMID:26611226

  19. Rotavirus capsid VP6 protein acts as an adjuvant in vivo for norovirus virus-like particles in a combination vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Blazevic, Vesna; Malm, Maria; Arinobu, Daisuke; Lappalainen, Suvi; Vesikari, Timo

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Rotavirus (RV) and norovirus (NoV) are the 2 leading causes of acute viral gastroenteritis worldwide. We have developed a non-live NoV and RV vaccine candidate consisting of NoV virus-like particles (VLPs) and recombinant polymeric RV VP6 protein produced in baculovirus-insect cell expression system. Both components have been shown to induce strong potentially protective immune responses. As VP6 nanotubes are highly immunogenic, we investigated here a possible adjuvant effect of these structures on NoV-specific immune responses in vivo. BALB/c mice were immunized intramuscularly with a suboptimal dose (0.3 μg) of GII.4 or GI.3 VLPs either alone or in a combination with 10 μg dose of VP6 and induction of NoV-specific antibodies in sera of experimental animals were measured. Blocking assay using human saliva or synthetic histo-blood group antigens was employed to test NoV blocking antibodies. Suboptimal doses of the VLPs alone did not induce substantial anti-NoV antibodies. When co-administered with the VP6, considerable titers of not only type-specific but also cross-reactive IgG antibodies against NoV VLP genotypes not included in the vaccine composition were induced. Most importantly, NoV-specific blocking antibodies, a surrogate for neutralizing antibodies, were generated. Our results show that RV VP6 protein has an in vivo adjuvant effect on NoV-specific antibody responses and support the use of VP6 protein as a part of the NoV-RV combination vaccine, especially when addition of external adjuvants is not desirable. PMID:26467630

  20. Rotavirus capsid VP6 protein acts as an adjuvant in vivo for norovirus virus-like particles in a combination vaccine.

    PubMed

    Blazevic, Vesna; Malm, Maria; Arinobu, Daisuke; Lappalainen, Suvi; Vesikari, Timo

    2016-03-01

    Rotavirus (RV) and norovirus (NoV) are the 2 leading causes of acute viral gastroenteritis worldwide. We have developed a non-live NoV and RV vaccine candidate consisting of NoV virus-like particles (VLPs) and recombinant polymeric RV VP6 protein produced in baculovirus-insect cell expression system. Both components have been shown to induce strong potentially protective immune responses. As VP6 nanotubes are highly immunogenic, we investigated here a possible adjuvant effect of these structures on NoV-specific immune responses in vivo. BALB/c mice were immunized intramuscularly with a suboptimal dose (0.3 μg) of GII.4 or GI.3 VLPs either alone or in a combination with 10 μg dose of VP6 and induction of NoV-specific antibodies in sera of experimental animals were measured. Blocking assay using human saliva or synthetic histo-blood group antigens was employed to test NoV blocking antibodies. Suboptimal doses of the VLPs alone did not induce substantial anti-NoV antibodies. When co-administered with the VP6, considerable titers of not only type-specific but also cross-reactive IgG antibodies against NoV VLP genotypes not included in the vaccine composition were induced. Most importantly, NoV-specific blocking antibodies, a surrogate for neutralizing antibodies, were generated. Our results show that RV VP6 protein has an in vivo adjuvant effect on NoV-specific antibody responses and support the use of VP6 protein as a part of the NoV-RV combination vaccine, especially when addition of external adjuvants is not desirable. PMID:26467630

  1. Caliciviruses in hospitalized children, São Luís, Maranhão, 1997-1999: detection of norovirus GII.12.

    PubMed

    Portal, Thayara Morais; Siqueira, Jones Anderson Monteiro; Costa, Larissa Cristina Prado das Neves; Lima, Ian Carlos Gomes de; Lucena, Maria Silvia Sousa de; Bandeira, Renato da Silva; Linhares, Alexandre da Costa; Luz, Claudia Regina Nunes Eloi da; Gabbay, Yvone Benchimol; Resque, Hugo Reis

    2016-01-01

    Gastroenteritis is one of the most common diseases during childhood, with norovirus (NoV) and sapovirus (SaV) being two of its main causes. This study reports for the first time the incidence of these viruses in hospitalized children with and without gastroenteritis in São Luís, Maranhão. A total of 136 fecal samples were tested by enzyme immunoassays (EIA) for the detection of NoV and by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) for detection of both NoV and SaV. Positive samples for both agents were subjected to sequencing. The overall frequency of NoV as detected by EIA and RT-PCR was 17.6% (24/136) and 32.6% (15/46), respectively in diarrheic patients and 10.0% (9/90) in non-diarrheic patients (p<0.01). Of the diarrheic patients, 17% had fever, vomiting and anorexia, and 13% developed fever, vomiting and abdominal pain. Of the 24 NoV-positive samples, 50% (12/24) were sequenced and classified as genotypes GII.3 (n=1), GII.4 (6), GII.5 (1), GII.7 (2), GII.12 (1) and GII.16 (1). SaV frequency was 9.8% (11/112), with 22.6% (7/31) in diarrheic patients and 4.9% (4/81) in nondiarrheic (p=0.04) ones. In diarrheic cases, 27.3% had fever, vomiting and anorexia, whereas 18.2% had fever, anorexia and abdominal pain. One SaV-positive sample was sequenced and classified as GII.1. These results show a high genetic diversity of NoV and higher prevalence of NoV compared to SaV. Our data highlight the importance of NoV and SaV as enteropathogens in São Luís, Maranhão. PMID:27161199

  2. Norovirus contamination on French marketed oysters

    PubMed Central

    Schaeffer, Julien; Le Saux, Jean-Claude; Lora, Monica; Atmar, Robert L.; Le Guyader, Françoise S.

    2014-01-01

    Contaminated shellfish have been implicated in gastroenteritis outbreaks in different countries. As no regulation has been set up yet regarding viral contamination of food, very few data are available on the prevalence of contaminated products on the market. This study presents data obtained from oysters collected on the French market in one producing area over a 16 month period of time. Noroviruses were detected in 9% of samples with a seasonal impact and influence of climatic events. Contamination levels were low and, surprisingly, oysters sampled directly from the producer were found to have less contamination than oysters from supermarkets. PMID:23973835

  3. Norovirus contamination on French marketed oysters.

    PubMed

    Schaeffer, Julien; Le Saux, Jean-Claude; Lora, Monica; Atmar, Robert L; Le Guyader, Françoise S

    2013-09-01

    Contaminated shellfish have been implicated in gastroenteritis outbreaks in different countries. As no regulation has been set up yet regarding viral contamination of food, very few data are available on the prevalence of contaminated products on the market. This study presents data obtained from oysters collected on the French market in one producing area over a 16 month period of time. Noroviruses were detected in 9% of samples with a seasonal impact and influence of climatic events. Contamination levels were low and, surprisingly, oysters sampled directly from the producer were found to have less contamination than oysters from supermarkets. PMID:23973835

  4. Tropical and travel-associated norovirus: current concepts

    PubMed Central

    Ballard, Sarah-Blythe; Saito, Mayuko; Mirelman, Andrew J.; Bern, Caryn; Gilman, Robert H.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review We highlight recent advances relevant to understanding norovirus infections in the tropics, both in populations living in developing settings and travelers to these regions. Recent findings Because of the decrease in diarrheal disease associated with the global rollout of vaccines against rotavirus, norovirus is emerging as the predominant cause of diarrhea morbidity among children in the tropics, and evidence suggests that it contributes to adult disease in endemic populations and travelers. In addition to identifying potential target populations for preventive measures, we provide an update on norovirus vaccine development and concepts related to their implementation in low-income and middle-income countries. Summary These current concepts related to norovirus-attributable disease burden, clinical significance, and economic impact can potentially be applied to tailoring efforts to prevent and mitigate the effects of this important enteropathogen. PMID:26237546

  5. Molecular Diagnostic Methods for Detection and Characterization of Human Noroviruses.

    PubMed

    Chen, Haifeng; Hu, Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Human noroviruses are a group of viral agents that afflict people of all age groups. The viruses are now recognized as the most common causative agent of nonbacterial acute gastroenteritis and foodborne viral illness worldwide. However, they have been considered to play insignificant roles in the disease burden of acute gastroenteritis for the past decades until the recent advent of new and more sensitive molecular diagnostic methods. The availability and application of the molecular diagnostic methods have led to enhanced detection of noroviruses in clinical, food and environmental samples, significantly increasing the recognition of noroviruses as an etiologic agent of epidemic and sporadic acute gastroenteritis. This article aims to summarize recent efforts made for the development of molecular methods for the detection and characterization of human noroviruses. PMID:27335620

  6. Molecular Diagnostic Methods for Detection and Characterization of Human Noroviruses

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Haifeng; Hu, Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Human noroviruses are a group of viral agents that afflict people of all age groups. The viruses are now recognized as the most common causative agent of nonbacterial acute gastroenteritis and foodborne viral illness worldwide. However, they have been considered to play insignificant roles in the disease burden of acute gastroenteritis for the past decades until the recent advent of new and more sensitive molecular diagnostic methods. The availability and application of the molecular diagnostic methods have led to enhanced detection of noroviruses in clinical, food and environmental samples, significantly increasing the recognition of noroviruses as an etiologic agent of epidemic and sporadic acute gastroenteritis. This article aims to summarize recent efforts made for the development of molecular methods for the detection and characterization of human noroviruses. PMID:27335620

  7. Allelic Diversity of the Plasmodium falciparum Erythrocyte Membrane Protein 1 Entails Variant-Specific Red Cell Surface Epitopes

    PubMed Central

    Vigan-Womas, Inès; Guillotte, Micheline; Juillerat, Alexandre; Vallieres, Cindy; Lewit-Bentley, Anita; Tall, Adama; Baril, Laurence; Bentley, Graham A.; Mercereau-Puijalon, Odile

    2011-01-01

    The clonally variant Plasmodium falciparum PfEMP1 adhesin is a virulence factor and a prime target of humoral immunity. It is encoded by a repertoire of functionally differentiated var genes, which display architectural diversity and allelic polymorphism. Their serological relationship is key to understanding the evolutionary constraints on this gene family and rational vaccine design. Here, we investigated the Palo Alto/VarO and IT4/R29 and 3D7/PF13_003 parasites lines. VarO and R29 form rosettes with uninfected erythrocytes, a phenotype associated with severe malaria. They express an allelic Cys2/group A NTS-DBL1α1 PfEMP1 domain implicated in rosetting, whose 3D7 ortholog is encoded by PF13_0003. Using these three recombinant NTS-DBL1α1 domains, we elicited antibodies in mice that were used to develop monovariant cultures by panning selection. The 3D7/PF13_0003 parasites formed rosettes, revealing a correlation between sequence identity and virulence phenotype. The antibodies cross-reacted with the allelic domains in ELISA but only minimally with the Cys4/group B/C PFL1955w NTS-DBL1α. By contrast, they were variant-specific in surface seroreactivity of the monovariant-infected red cells by FACS analysis and in rosette-disruption assays. Thus, while ELISA can differentiate serogroups, surface reactivity assays define the more restrictive serotypes. Irrespective of cumulated exposure to infection, antibodies acquired by humans living in a malaria-endemic area also displayed a variant-specific surface reactivity. Although seroprevalence exceeded 90% for each rosetting line, the kinetics of acquistion of surface-reactive antibodies differed in the younger age groups. These data indicate that humans acquire an antibody repertoire to non-overlapping serotypes within a serogroup, consistent with an antibody-driven diversification pressure at the population level. In addition, the data provide important information for vaccine design, as production of a vaccine

  8. Norovirus in 2016-Emesis Aplenty but Clear Signs of Progress.

    PubMed

    Head, Michael G; Lopman, Benjamin A

    2016-02-01

    The key theme emerging from the articles in this supplement is that burden of norovirus in the United Kingdom and elsewhere is substantial and that new tools for prevention, diagnosis, and treatment are required. Basic understanding of norovirus biology continues to accelerate, but parallel increases in capacity and research funding are going to be needed to translate this knowledge into clinical trials and translational research that can result in public health gains. PMID:26744425

  9. 75 FR 34146 - Draft Guideline for the Prevention and Control of Norovirus Gastroenteritis Outbreaks in...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-16

    ... of Norovirus Gastroenteritis Outbreaks in Healthcare Settings AGENCY: Centers for Disease Control and... for the Prevention and Control of Norovirus Gastroenteritis Outbreaks in Healthcare Settings... control programs for healthcare settings across the continuum of care. This guideline provides...

  10. [Research Progress in Norovirus Bioaccumulation in Shellfish].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Deqing; Su, Laijin; Zhao, Feng; Ma, Liping

    2015-05-01

    Noroviruses (NoVs) are one of the most important foodborne viral pathogens worldwide. Shellfish are the most common carriers of NoVs as they can concentrate and accumulate large amounts of the virus through filter feeding from seawater. Shellfish may selectively accumulate NoVs with different genotypes, and this bioaccumulation may depend on the season and location. Our previous studies found various histo-blood group antigens (HBGAs) in shellfish tissues. While HBGAs might be the main reason that NoVs are accumulated in shellfish, the detailed mechanism behind NoV concentration and bioaccumulation in shellfish is not clear. Here we review current research into NoV bioaccumulation, tissue distribution, seasonal variation, and binding mechanism in shellfish. This paper may provide insight into controlling NoV transmission and decreasing the risks associated with shellfish consumption. PMID:26470540

  11. Role of Cholesterol Pathways in Norovirus Replication▿

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Kyeong-Ok

    2009-01-01

    Norwalk virus (NV) is a prototype strain of the noroviruses (family Caliciviridae) that have emerged as major causes of acute gastroenteritis worldwide. I have developed NV replicon systems using reporter proteins such as a neomycin-resistant protein (NV replicon-bearing cells) and a green fluorescent protein (pNV-GFP) and demonstrated that these systems were excellent tools to study virus replication in cell culture. In the present study, I first performed DNA microarray analysis of the replicon-bearing cells to identify cellular factors associated with NV replication. The analysis demonstrated that genes in lipid (cholesterol) or carbohydrate metabolic pathways were significantly (P < 0.001) changed by the gene ontology analysis. Among genes in the cholesterol pathways, I found that mRNA levels of hydroxymethylglutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) synthase, squalene epoxidase, and acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT), ACAT2, small heterodimer partner, and low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR)-related proteins were significantly changed in the cells. I also found that the inhibition of cholesterol biosynthesis using statins (an HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor) significantly increased the levels of NV proteins and RNA, whereas inhibitors of ACAT significantly reduced the replication of NV in replicon-bearing cells. Up- or downregulation of virus replication with these agents significantly correlated with the mRNA level of LDLR in replicon-bearing cells. Finally, I found that the expression of LDLR promoted NV replication in trans by transfection study with pNV-GFP. I conclude that the cholesterol pathways such as LDLR expression and ACAT activity may be crucial in the replication of noroviruses in cells, which may provide potential therapeutic targets for viral infection. PMID:19515767

  12. Norovirus prevalence in ‘pathogen negative’ gastroenteritis in children from periurban areas in Lima, Peru

    PubMed Central

    Rivera, Fulton P.; Ochoa, Theresa J.; Ruiz, Joaquim; Medina, Anicia M.; Ecker, Lucie; Mercado, Erik; Gil, Ana I.; Huicho, Luis; Lanata, Claudio F.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Norovirus was detected in 17.4% of 224 diarrhoeal samples from children younger than 24 months of age in Lima, in whom all common pathogens had been excluded (pathogen negative). Norovirus was identified more frequently in children older than 12 months of age than in younger children (34% vs 8%, P<0.001). Among norovirus-positive samples, genogroup II was the predominant group (92%). Compared with rotavirus, norovirus episodes tended to be of shorter duration and less severe. The role of norovirus as a cause of diarrhoea and the ascertainment of its severity in developing countries needs further confirmation by future epidemiological studies. PMID:21962615

  13. Viability and heat resistance of murine norovirus on bread.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Michiko; Takahashi, Hajime; Kuda, Takashi; Kimura, Bon

    2016-01-01

    Contaminated bread was the cause of a large-scale outbreak of norovirus disease in Japan in 2014. Contamination of seafood and uncooked food products by norovirus has been reported several times in the past; however the outbreak resulting from the contamination of bread products was unusual. A few reports on the presence of norovirus on bread products are available; however there have been no studies on the viability and heat resistance of norovirus on breads, which were investigated in this study. ce:italic>/ce:italic> strain 1 (MNV-1), a surrogate for human norovirus, was inoculated directly on 3 types of bread, but the infectivity of MNV-1 on bread samples was almost unchanged after 5days at 20°C. MNV-1 was inoculated on white bread that was subsequently heated in a toaster for a maximum of 2min. The results showed that MNV-1 remained viable if the heating period was insufficient to inactivate. In addition, bread dough contaminated with MNV-1 was baked in the oven. Our results indicated that MNV-1 may remain viable on breads if the heating duration or temperature is insufficient. PMID:26485672

  14. An outbreak of norovirus linked to oysters in Tasmania.

    PubMed

    Lodo, Kerryn L; Veitch, Mark G K; Green, Michelle L

    2014-03-01

    Norovirus is the most commonly reported virus in shellfish related gastroenteritis outbreaks. In March 2013 an investigation was conducted following the receipt of reports of gastroenteritis after the consumption of oysters at private functions in Tasmania. Cases were ascertained through general practitioners, emergency departments, media releases and self-reporting. Of the 306 cases identified in Tasmania, ten faecal specimens were collected for laboratory testing and eight were positive for norovirus (GII.g). The most common symptoms were vomiting (87%), diarrhoea (85%), myalgia (82%) and fever (56%). The implicated oysters were traced to a single lease from which they were harvested and distributed locally and interstate. Nationally 525 cases were identified from Tasmania (306), Victoria (209), New South Wales (8) and Queensland (2). This report highlights the consequences of norovirus outbreaks in shellfish, even with rapid identification, trace back and removal of the implicated product from the market. PMID:25409349

  15. Genogroup IV and VI Canine Noroviruses Interact with Histo-Blood Group Antigens

    PubMed Central

    Breiman, Adrien; le Pendu, Jacques

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human noroviruses (HuNV) are a significant cause of viral gastroenteritis in humans worldwide. HuNV attaches to cell surface carbohydrate structures known as histo-blood group antigens (HBGAs) prior to internalization, and HBGA polymorphism among human populations is closely linked to susceptibility to HuNV. Noroviruses are divided into 6 genogroups, with human strains grouped into genogroups I (GI), II, and IV. Canine norovirus (CNV) is a recently discovered pathogen in dogs, with strains classified into genogroups IV and VI. Whereas it is known that GI to GIII noroviruses bind to HBGAs and GV noroviruses recognize terminal sialic acid residues, the attachment factors for GIV and GVI noroviruses have not been reported. This study sought to determine the carbohydrate binding specificity of CNV and to compare it to the binding specificities of noroviruses from other genogroups. A panel of synthetic oligosaccharides were used to assess the binding specificity of CNV virus-like particles (VLPs) and identified α1,2-fucose as a key attachment factor. CNV VLP binding to canine saliva and tissue samples using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) and immunohistochemistry confirmed that α1,2-fucose-containing H and A antigens of the HBGA family were recognized by CNV. Phenotyping studies demonstrated expression of these antigens in a population of dogs. The virus-ligand interaction was further characterized using blockade studies, cell lines expressing HBGAs, and enzymatic removal of candidate carbohydrates from tissue sections. Recognition of HBGAs by CNV provides new insights into the evolution of noroviruses and raises concerns regarding the potential for zoonotic transmission of CNV to humans. IMPORTANCE Infections with human norovirus cause acute gastroenteritis in millions of people each year worldwide. Noroviruses can also affect nonhuman species and are divided into 6 different groups based on their capsid sequences. Human noroviruses in genogroups

  16. Infectious Diarrhea: Norovirus and Clostridium difficile in Older Adults.

    PubMed

    White, Mary B; Rajagopalan, Shobita; Yoshikawa, Thomas T

    2016-08-01

    Norovirus infection usually results in acute gastroenteritis, often with incapacitating nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. It is highly contagious and resistant to eradication with alcohol-based hand sanitizer. Appropriate preventative and infection control measures can mitigate the morbidity and mortality associated with norovirus infection. Clostridium difficile infection is the leading cause of health care-associated diarrhea in the United States. Antibiotic use is by far the most common risk factor for C difficile colonization and infection. Appropriate preventive measures and judicious use of antibiotics can help mitigate the morbidity and mortality associated with C difficile infection. PMID:27394020

  17. Selection tool for foodborne norovirus outbreaks.

    PubMed

    Verhoef, Linda P B; Kroneman, Annelies; van Duynhoven, Yvonne; Boshuizen, Hendriek; van Pelt, Wilfrid; Koopmans, Marion

    2009-01-01

    Detection of pathogens in the food chain is limited mainly to bacteria, and the globalization of the food industry enables international viral foodborne outbreaks to occur. Outbreaks from 2002 through 2006 recorded in a European norovirus surveillance database were investigated for virologic and epidemiologic indicators of food relatedness. The resulting validated multivariate logistic regression model comparing foodborne (n = 224) and person-to-person (n = 654) outbreaks was used to create a practical web-based tool that can be limited to epidemiologic parameters for nongenotyping countries. Non-genogroup-II.4 outbreaks, higher numbers of cases, and outbreaks in restaurants or households characterized (sensitivity = 0.80, specificity = 0.86) foodborne outbreaks and reduced the percentage of outbreaks requiring source-tracing to 31%. The selection tool enabled prospectively focused follow-up. Use of this tool is likely to improve data quality and strain typing in current surveillance systems, which is necessary for identification of potential international foodborne outbreaks. PMID:19116046

  18. Eliminating Murine Norovirus by Cross-Fostering

    PubMed Central

    Buxbaum, Laurence U.; DeRitis, Pierina C.; Chu, Niansheng; Conti, Pierre A.

    2011-01-01

    Murine norovirus (MNV) is a newly discovered and extremely prevalent pathogen of laboratory mouse colonies. MNV causes severe disease in some immunocompromised mouse strains and can cause persistent infections even in immunocompetent mice. Despite the fact that immunocompetent mice are generally asymptomatic, the possibility that MNV infection might alter immune responses makes its eradication a potentially useful goal for many facilities. Initial attempts by others to use a strategy of testing and culling were unsuccessful, whereas complete depopulation and facility decontamination was successful. However, these measures may be impractical, and finding less drastic approaches seemed prudent. Based on a report that cross-fostering of pups from MNV-positive mothers to MNV-negative ones could be successful in experimental MNV infection, we undertook a comprehensive fostering program using Swiss Webster mothers, careful sanitary measures, and fecal PCR testing to eradicate the virus from a mouse colony recently infected with MNV. We successfully decontaminated 17 of 18 (94%) litters and managed to prevent spread when a new MNV-infected mouse strain entered quarantine at our facility. These results suggest that cross-fostering, when performed in a setting of excellent sanitary procedures, may be practical for the large number of mouse facilities in which MNV is endemic. PMID:21838978

  19. Inactivation of a Human Norovirus Surrogate, Human Norovirus Virus-Like Particles, and Vesicular Stomatitis Virus by Gamma Irradiation ▿

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Kurtis; Divers, Erin; Ma, Yuanmei; Li, Jianrong

    2011-01-01

    Gamma irradiation is a nonthermal processing technology that has been used for the preservation of a variety of food products. This technology has been shown to effectively inactivate bacterial pathogens. Currently, the FDA has approved doses of up to 4.0 kGy to control food-borne pathogens in fresh iceberg lettuce and spinach. However, whether this dose range effectively inactivates food-borne viruses is less understood. We have performed a systematic study on the inactivation of a human norovirus surrogate (murine norovirus 1 [MNV-1]), human norovirus virus-like particles (VLPs), and vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) by gamma irradiation. We demonstrated that MNV-1 and human norovirus VLPs were resistant to gamma irradiation. For MNV-1, only a 1.7- to 2.4-log virus reduction in fresh produce at the dose of 5.6 kGy was observed. However, VSV was more susceptible to gamma irradiation, and a 3.3-log virus reduction at a dose of 5.6 kGy in Dulbecco's modified Eagle medium (DMEM) was achieved. We further demonstrated that gamma irradiation disrupted virion structure and degraded viral proteins and genomic RNA, which resulted in virus inactivation. Using human norovirus VLPs as a model, we provide the first evidence that the capsid of human norovirus has stability similar to that of MNV-1 after exposure to gamma irradiation. Overall, our results suggest that viruses are much more resistant to irradiation than bacterial pathogens. Although gamma irradiation used to eliminate the virus contaminants in fresh produce by the FDA-approved irradiation dose limits seems impractical, this technology may be practical to inactivate viruses for other purposes, such as sterilization of medical equipment. PMID:21441330

  20. Norovirus Infections in Long-Term Care Facilities.

    PubMed

    Rajagopalan, Shobita; Yoshikawa, Thomas T

    2016-05-01

    Noroviruses have emerged as one of the leading causes of viral gastroenteritis worldwide, affecting community-dwelling and institutionalized older adults. Recent global epidemics present a growing challenge to the healthcare system and to long-term care facilities. Noroviruses spread readily and rapidly through multiple routes (e.g., person-to-person contact, contact with contaminated surfaces, airborne dissemination of vomitus) and thus are able to sustain an epidemic efficiently and successfully. Although norovirus gastroenteritis is a short self-limited illness in healthy immunocompetent individuals, it can result in significant morbidity and mortality in vulnerable compromised persons such as frail elderly persons and older residents of nursing homes. Diagnosis is made by clinical assessment and confirmed primarily by stool evaluation using polymerase chain reaction. Treatment is confined to supportive measures. Public health prevention and control strategies provide guidance regarding surveillance and the necessary steps to curb the clinical effect and spread of norovirus infections in various settings, including long-term care. PMID:27225361

  1. Inactivation of Tulane virus, a novel surrogate for human norovirus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Human noroviruses (HuNoVs) are the major cause of non-bacterial epidemics of gastroenteritis. Due to the inability to cultivate HuNoVs and the lack of an efficient small animal model, surrogates are used to study HuNoV biology. Two such surrogates, the feline calicivirus (FCV) and the murine norovir...

  2. Low-Density microarray technologies for rapid human norovirus genotyping

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Human noroviruses (HuNoV) are the most common cause of food borne disease and viruses are likely responsible for a large proportion of foodborne diseases of unknown etiology. Recent advancements in molecular biology, bioinformatics, epidemiology, and risk analysis have aided the study of these agent...

  3. Epidemiology of Foodborne Norovirus Outbreak in Incheon, Korea

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Na-Yeon; Koh, Yeon-Ja; Lee, Hun-Jae

    2010-01-01

    On June 14, 2008, an outbreak of gastroenteritis occurred among elementary school students in Incheon. We conducted an investigation to identify the source and described the extent of the outbreak. We performed a retrospective cohort study among students, teachers and food handlers exposed to canteen food in the elementary school. Using self-administered questionnaires we collected information on symptoms, days of canteen food eaten, food items consumed. Stool samples were collected from 131 symptomatic people and 11 food handlers. The catering kitchen was inspected and food samples were taken. Of the 1,560 people who ate canteen food, 117 were symptomatic cases, and the attack rate was 7.5%. Consumption of cucumber-crown daisy salad (RR=2.71), fresh cabbage mix (RR=2.23), dried radish salad (RR=3.04) and young radish kimchi (RR=2.52) were associated with illness. Sixty-four (45%) of the 142 stool specimens were positive for Norovirus. Norovirus was detected in 2 food handlers. Interviews with kitchen staff indicated the likelihood of contamination from an infected food handler to the dried radish salad during food processing. The excretion of Norovirus from asymptomatic food handlers may be an infection source of Norovirus outbreaks. PMID:20676321

  4. Variable high pressure processing sensitivities for GII human noroviruses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Human norovirus (HuNoV) is the leading cause of foodborne diseases worldwide. High pressure processing (HPP) is one of the most promising non-thermal technologies for decontamination of viral pathogens in foods. However, the survival of HuNoVs by HPP is poorly understood because these viruses cann...

  5. Genotype GI.6 Norovirus, United States, 2010–2012

    PubMed Central

    Barclay, Leslie; Wikswo, Mary; Vega, Everardo; Gregoricus, Nicole; Parashar, Umesh D.; Vinjé, Jan; Hall, Aron J.

    2013-01-01

    We report an increase in the proportion of genotype GI.6 norovirus outbreaks in the United States from 1.4% in 2010 to 7.7% in 2012 (p<0.001). Compared with non-GI.6 outbreaks, GI.6 outbreaks were characterized by summer seasonality, foodborne transmission, and non–health care settings. PMID:23876252

  6. Serum Immunoglobulin A Cross-Strain Blockade of Human Noroviruses

    PubMed Central

    Lindesmith, Lisa C.; Beltramello, Martina; Swanstrom, Jesica; Jones, Taylor A.; Corti, Davide; Lanzavecchia, Antonio; Baric, Ralph S.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Human noroviruses are the leading cause of acute viral gastroenteritis, justifying vaccine development despite a limited understanding of strain immunity. After genogroup I (GI).1 norovirus infection and immunization, blockade antibody titers to multiple virus-like particles (VLPs) increase, suggesting that GI cross-protection may occur. Methods. Immunoglobulin (Ig)A was purified from sera collected from GI.1-infected participants, and potential neutralization activity was measured using a surrogate neutralization assay based on antibody blockade of ligand binding. Human and mouse monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) were produced to multiple GI VLPs to characterize GI epitopes. Results. Immunoglobulin A purified from day 14 post-GI.1 challenge sera blocked binding of GI.1, GI.3, and GI.4 to carbohydrate ligands. In some subjects, purified IgA preferentially blocked binding of other GI VLPs compared with GI.1, supporting observations that the immune response to GI.1 infection may be influenced by pre-exposure history. For other subjects, IgA equivalently blocked multiple GI VLPs. Only strain-specific mAbs recognized blockade epitopes, whereas strain cross-reactive mAbs recognized nonblockade epitopes. Conclusions. These studies are the first to describe a functional role for serum IgA in norovirus immunity and the first to characterize human monoclonal antibodies to GI strains, expanding our understanding of norovirus immunobiology. PMID:26180833

  7. 21 CFR 866.3395 - Norovirus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Norovirus serological reagents. 866.3395 Section 866.3395 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3395...

  8. 21 CFR 866.3395 - Norovirus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Norovirus serological reagents. 866.3395 Section 866.3395 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3395...

  9. 21 CFR 866.3395 - Norovirus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Norovirus serological reagents. 866.3395 Section 866.3395 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3395...

  10. Low-density microarray technologies for rapid human norovirus genotyping

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Human noroviruses cause up to 21 million cases of foodborne disease in the United States annually and are the most common cause of acute gastroenteritis in industrialized countries. To reduce the burden of foodborne disease associated with viruses, the use of low density DNA microarrays in conjuncti...

  11. Norovirus: Human Health and Food-borne Implications

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Norovirus (NV) infection is a significant human health issue. The CDC estimates that there are approximately 22 million cases of NV illness per annum in the United States. Of these, approximately 40% are acquired via a food-borne route. Common foods that are consumed uncooked such as raw vegetabl...

  12. Inaccuracies in predicting human norovirus inactivation using surrogate viruses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Human norovirus (NoV) cannot be propagated in cell culture, so virus inactivation studies, including processing interventions, are generally performed on virus surrogates that may be readily quantified in the laboratory. However, there are fundamental differences in many closely related viruses, di...

  13. Reverse genetics mediated recovery of infectious murine norovirus.

    PubMed

    Arias, Armando; Ureña, Luis; Thorne, Lucy; Yunus, Muhammad A; Goodfellow, Ian

    2012-01-01

    Human noroviruses are responsible for most cases of human gastroenteritis (GE) worldwide and are recurrent problem in environments where close person-to-person contact cannot be avoided (1, 2). During the last few years an increase in the incidence of outbreaks in hospitals has been reported, causing significant disruptions to their operational capacity as well as large economic losses. The identification of new antiviral approaches has been limited due to the inability of human noroviruses to complete a productive infection in cell culture (3). The recent isolation of a murine norovirus (MNV), closely related to human norovirus (4) but which can be propagated in cells (5) has opened new avenues for the investigation of these pathogens (6, 7). MNV replication results in the synthesis of new positive sense genomic and subgenomic RNA molecules, the latter of which corresponds to the last third of the viral genome (Figure 1). MNV contains four different open reading frames (ORFs), of which ORF1 occupies most of the genome and encodes seven non-structural proteins (NS1-7) released from a polyprotein precursor. ORF2 and ORF3 are contained within the subgenomic RNA region and encode the capsid proteins (VP1 and VP2, respectively) (Figure 1). Recently, we have identified that additional ORF4 overlapping ORF2 but in a different reading frame is functional and encodes for a mitochondrial localised virulence factor (VF1) (8). Replication for positive sense RNA viruses, including noroviruses, takes place in the cytoplasm resulting in the synthesis of new uncapped RNA genomes. To promote viral translation, viruses exploit different strategies aimed at recruiting the cellular protein synthesis machinery (9-11). Interestingly, norovirus translation is driven by the multifunctional viral protein-primer VPg covalently linked to the 5' end of both genomic and subgenomic RNAs (12-14). This sophisticated mechanism of translation is likely to be a major factor in the limited

  14. Cell Culture Assay for Human Noroviruses [response

    SciTech Connect

    Straub, Tim M.; Honer Zu Bentrup, Kerstin; Orosz Coghlan, Patricia; Dohnalkova, Alice; Mayer, Brooke K.; Bartholomew, Rachel A.; Valdez, Catherine O.; Bruckner-Lea, Cindy J.; Gerba, Charles P.; Abbaszadegan, Morteza A.; Nickerson, Cheryl A.

    2007-07-01

    We appreciate the comments provided by Leung et al., in response to our recently published article “In Vitro Cell Culture Infectivity Assay for Human Noroviruses” by Straub et al. (1). The specific aim of our project was to develop an in vitro cell culture infectivity assay for human noroviruses (hNoV) to enhance risk assessments when they are detected in water supplies. Reverse transcription (RT) qualitative or quantitative PCR are the primary assays for waterborne NoV monitoring. However, these assays cannot distinguish between infectious vs. non-infectious virions. When hNoV is detected in water supplies, information provided by our infectivity assay will significantly improve risk assessment models and protect human health, regardless of whether we are propagating NoV. Indeed, in vitro cell culture infectivity assays for the waterborne pathogen Cryptosporidium parvum that supplement approved fluorescent microscopy assays, do not result in amplification of the environmentally resistant hard-walled oocysts (2). However, identification of life cycle stages in cell culture provides evidence of infectious oocysts in a water supply. Nonetheless, Leung et al.’s assertion regarding the suitability of our method for the in vitro propagation of high titers of NoV is valid for the medical research community. In this case, well-characterized challenge pools of virus would be useful for developing and testing diagnostics, therapeutics, and vaccines. As further validation of our published findings, we have now optimized RT quantitative PCR to assess the level of viral production in cell culture, where we are indeed finding significant increases in viral titer. The magnitude and time course of these increases is dependent on both virus strain and multiplicity of infection. We are currently preparing a manuscript that will discuss these findings in greater detail, and the implications this may have for creating viral challenge pools

  15. Comparative Virucidal Efficacy of Seven Disinfectants Against Murine Norovirus and Feline Calicivirus, Surrogates of Human Norovirus.

    PubMed

    Zonta, William; Mauroy, Axel; Farnir, Frederic; Thiry, Etienne

    2016-03-01

    Human noroviruses (HuNoV) are the leading cause of acute non-bacterial gastroenteritis in humans and can be transmitted either by person-to-person contact or by consumption of contaminated food. A knowledge of an efficient disinfection for both hands and food-contact surfaces is helpful for the food sector and provides precious information for public health. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of seven disinfectants belonging to different groups of biocides (alcohol, halogen, oxidizing agents, quaternary ammonium compounds, aldehyde and biguanide) on infectious viral titre and on genomic copy number. Due to the absence of a cell culture system for HuNoV, two HuNoV surrogates, such as murine norovirus and feline calicivirus, were used and the tests were performed in suspension, on gloves and on stainless steel discs. When, as criteria of efficacy, a log reduction >3 of the infectious viral titre on both surrogates and in the three tests is used, the most efficacious disinfectants in this study appear to be biocidal products B, C and D, representing the halogens, the oxidizing agents group and a mix of QAC, alcohol and aldehyde, respectively. In addition, these three disinfectants also elicited a significant effect on genomic copy number for both surrogate viruses and in all three tests. The results of this study demonstrate that a halogen compound, oxidizing agents and a mix of QAC, alcohol and aldehyde are advisable for HuNoV disinfection of either potentially contaminated surfaces or materials in contact with foodstuffs. PMID:26445948

  16. Human Norovirus Detection and Production, Quantification, and Storage of Virus-Like Particles

    PubMed Central

    Debbink, Kari; Costantini, Veronica; Swanstrom, Jesica; Agnihothram, Sudhakar; Vinjé, Jan; Baric, Ralph

    2014-01-01

    Human noroviruses constitute a significant worldwide disease burden. Each year noroviruses cause over 267 million infections, deaths in over 200,000 children under the age of five, and over 50% of U.S. food borne illness. Due to the absence of a tissue culture model or small animal model to study human norovirus, virus-like particles (VLPs) and ELISA-based biological assays have been used to answer questions about norovirus evolution and immunity as well provide a potential vaccine platform. This chapter outlines the protocols on norovirus detection in stool and norovirus VLP design, production, purification, and storage using a Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEE)-based VRP expression system. PMID:24510290

  17. Acute gastroenteritis outbreak caused by a GII.6 norovirus

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Ling-Fei; Qiao, Kun; Wang, Xiao-Guang; Ding, Ke-Ying; Su, Hua-Ling; Li, Cui-Zhen; Yan, Hong-Jing

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To report an acute gastroenteritis outbreak caused by a genogroup 2 genotype 6 (GII.6) strain norovirus in Shanghai, China. METHODS: Noroviruses are responsible for approximately half of all reported gastroenteritis outbreaks in many countries. Genogroup 2 genotype 4 strains are the most prevalent. Rare outbreaks caused by GII.6 strains have been reported. An acute gastroenteritis outbreak occurred in an elementary school in Shanghai in December of 2013. Field and molecular epidemiologic investigations were conducted. RESULTS: The outbreak was limited to one class in an elementary school located in southwest Shanghai. The age of the students ranged from 9 to 10 years. The first case emerged on December 10, 2013, and the last case emerged on December 14, 2013. The cases peaked on December 11, 2013, with 21 new cases. Of 45 students in the class, 32 were affected. The main symptom was gastroenteritis, and 15.6% (5/32) of the cases exhibited a fever. A field epidemiologic investigation showed the pathogen may have been transmitted to the elementary school from employees in a delicatessen via the first case student, who had eaten food from the delicatessen one day before the gastroenteritis episodes began. A molecular epidemiologic investigation identified the cause of the gastroenteritis as norovirus strain GII.6; the viral sequence of the student cases showed 100% homology with that of the shop employees. Genetic relatedness analyses showed that the new viral strain is closely related to previously reported GII.6 sequences, especially to a strain reported in Japan. CONCLUSION: This is the first report to show that norovirus strain GII.6 can cause a gastroenteritis outbreak. Thus, the prevalence of GII.6 noroviruses requires attention. PMID:25954103

  18. Does spatial proximity drive norovirus transmission during outbreaks in hospitals?

    PubMed Central

    Harris, John P; Lopman, Ben A; Cooper, Ben S; O'Brien, Sarah J

    2013-01-01

    Objective To assess the role of spatial proximity, defined as patients sharing bays, in the spread of norovirus during outbreaks in hospitals. Design Enhanced surveillance of norovirus outbreaks between November 2009 and November 2011. Methods Data were gathered during 149 outbreaks of norovirus in hospital wards from five hospitals in two major cities in England serving a population of two million. We used the time between the first two cases of each outbreak to estimate the serial interval for norovirus in this setting. This distribution and dates of illness onset were used to calculate epidemic trees for each outbreak. We then used a permutation test to assess whether proximity, for all outbreaks, was more extreme than would be expected by chance under the null hypothesis that proximity was not associated with transmission risk. Results 65 outbreaks contained complete data on both onset dates and ward position. We estimated the serial interval to be 1.86 days (95% CI 1.6 to 2.2 days), and with this value found strong evidence to reject the null hypothesis that proximity was not significant (p<0.001). Sensitivity analysis using different values of the serial interval showed that there was evidence to reject the null hypothesis provided the assumed serial interval was less than 2.5 days. Conclusions Our results provide evidence that patients occupying the same bay as patients with symptomatic norovirus infection are at an increased risk of becoming infected by these patients compared with patients elsewhere in the same ward. PMID:23852138

  19. High pressure inactivation of human norovirus-like particles: evidence that the capsid of human norovirus is highly pressure resistant

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    High pressure processing (HPP) is a promising non-thermal technology to inactivate foodborne viruses. However, the effectiveness of HPP on inactivating human norovirus (HuNoV), the leading cause of acute gastroenteritis, is unknown because it cannot be propagated in cell culture. Therefore, developi...

  20. Noroviruses as a Cause of Diarrhea in Immunocompromised Pediatric Hematopoietic Stem Cell and Solid Organ Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Xunyan; Van, John N.; Munoz, Flor M.; Revell, Paula A.; Kozinetz, Claudia A; Krance, Robert A.; Atmar, Robert L.; Estes, Mary K.; Koo, Hoonmo L.

    2016-01-01

    Case reports describe significant norovirus gastroenteritis morbidity in immunocompromised patients. We evaluated norovirus pathogenesis in prospectively enrolled solid organ (SOT) and hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) patients with diarrhea who presented to Texas Children’s Hospital and submitted stool for enteric testing. Noroviruses were detected by real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Clinical outcomes of norovirus diarrhea and non-norovirus diarrhea patients, matched by transplanted organ type, were compared. Norovirus infection was identified in 25 (22%) of 116 patients, more frequently than other enteropathogens. Fifty percent of norovirus patients experienced diarrhea lasting ≥14 days, with median duration of 12.5 days (range 1 – 324 days); 29% developed diarrhea recurrence. Fifty-five percent of norovirus patients were hospitalized for diarrhea, with 27% requiring intensive care unit (ICU) admission. One HSCT recipient developed pneumatosis intestinalis. Three HSCT patients expired ≤6 months of norovirus diarrhea onset. Compared to non-norovirus diarrhea patients, norovirus patients experienced significantly more frequent ICU admission (27% vs. 0%, p = 0.02), greater serum creatinine rise (median 0.3 vs. 0.2 mg/dL, p = 0.01), and more weight loss (median 1.6 vs. 0.6 kg, p < 0.01). Noroviruses are an important cause of diarrhea in pediatric transplant patients and are associated with significant clinical complications. PMID:25788003

  1. Resolution of diarrhea in an immunocompromised patient with chronic norovirus gastroenteritis correlates with constitution of specific antibody blockade titer.

    PubMed

    Knoll, Bettina M; Lindesmith, Lisa C; Yount, Boyd L; Baric, Ralph S; Marty, Francisco M

    2016-08-01

    Norovirus gastroenteritis in immunocompromised hosts can result in a serious and prolonged diarrheal illness. We present a case of chronic norovirus disease during rituximab-bendamustine chemotherapy for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. We show for the first time a correlation between norovirus strain-specific antibody blockade titers and symptom improvement in an immunocompromised host. PMID:26825307

  2. Noroviruses as a Cause of Diarrhea in Immunocompromised Pediatric Hematopoietic Stem Cell and Solid Organ Transplant Recipients.

    PubMed

    Ye, X; Van, J N; Munoz, F M; Revell, P A; Kozinetz, C A; Krance, R A; Atmar, R L; Estes, M K; Koo, H L

    2015-07-01

    Case reports describe significant norovirus gastroenteritis morbidity in immunocompromised patients. We evaluated norovirus pathogenesis in prospectively enrolled solid organ (SOT) and hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) patients with diarrhea who presented to Texas Children's Hospital and submitted stool for enteric testing. Noroviruses were detected by real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Clinical outcomes of norovirus diarrhea and non-norovirus diarrhea patients, matched by transplanted organ type, were compared. Norovirus infection was identified in 25 (22%) of 116 patients, more frequently than other enteropathogens. Fifty percent of norovirus patients experienced diarrhea lasting ≥14 days, with median duration of 12.5 days (range 1-324 days); 29% developed diarrhea recurrence. Fifty-five percent of norovirus patients were hospitalized for diarrhea, with 27% requiring intensive care unit (ICU) admission. One HSCT recipient developed pneumatosis intestinalis. Three HSCT patients expired ≤6 months of norovirus diarrhea onset. Compared to non-norovirus diarrhea patients, norovirus patients experienced significantly more frequent ICU admission (27% vs. 0%, p = 0.02), greater serum creatinine rise (median 0.3 vs. 0.2 mg/dL, p = 0.01), and more weight loss (median 1.6 vs. 0.6 kg, p < 0.01). Noroviruses are an important cause of diarrhea in pediatric transplant patients and are associated with significant clinical complications. PMID:25788003

  3. Detection and forecasting of oyster norovirus outbreaks: recent advances and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiao; Deng, Zhiqiang

    2012-09-01

    Norovirus is a highly infectious pathogen that is commonly found in oysters growing in fecally contaminated waters. Norovirus outbreaks can cause the closure of oyster harvesting waters and acute gastroenteritis in humans associated with consumption of contaminated raw oysters. Extensive efforts and progresses have been made in detection and forecasting of oyster norovirus outbreaks over the past decades. The main objective of this paper is to provide a literature review of methods and techniques for detecting and forecasting oyster norovirus outbreaks and thereby to identify the future directions for improving the detection and forecasting of norovirus outbreaks. It is found that (1) norovirus outbreaks display strong seasonality with the outbreak peak occurring commonly in December-March in the U.S. and April-May in the Europe; (2) norovirus outbreaks are affected by multiple environmental factors, including but not limited to precipitation, temperature, solar radiation, wind, and salinity; (3) various modeling approaches may be employed to forecast norovirus outbreaks, including Bayesian models, regression models, Artificial Neural Networks, and process-based models; and (4) diverse techniques are available for near real-time detection of norovirus outbreaks, including multiplex PCR, seminested PCR, real-time PCR, quantitative PCR, and satellite remote sensing. The findings are important to the management of oyster growing waters and to future investigations into norovirus outbreaks. It is recommended that a combined approach of sensor-assisted real time monitoring and modeling-based forecasting should be utilized for an efficient and effective detection and forecasting of norovirus outbreaks caused by consumption of contaminated oysters. PMID:22841883

  4. Evaluation of Xpert® Norovirus Assay performance in comparison with real-time RT-PCR in hospitalized adult patients with acute gastroenteritis.

    PubMed

    Rovida, Francesca; Premoli, Marta; Campanini, Giulia; Sarasini, Antonella; Baldanti, Fausto

    2016-08-01

    Xpert® Norovirus Assay (Cepheid, Sunnyvale, CA) was compared with a laboratory-developed real-time RT-PCR assay for the detection of Norovirus GI and GII in hospitalized patients with acute gastroenteritis. The two assays showed a high level of concordance but Xpert® Norovirus Assay allowed faster detection of Norovirus and a simpler sample handling. PMID:27233425

  5. Bioinformatics analysis of the epitope regions for norovirus capsid protein

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Norovirus is the major cause of nonbacterial epidemic gastroenteritis, being highly prevalent in both developing and developed countries. Despite of the available monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) for different sub-genogroups, a comprehensive epitope analysis based on various bioinformatics technology is highly desired for future potential antibody development in clinical diagonosis and treatment. Methods A total of 18 full-length human norovirus capsid protein sequences were downloaded from GenBank. Protein modeling was performed with program Modeller 9.9. The modeled 3D structures of capsid protein of norovirus were submitted to the protein antigen spatial epitope prediction webserver (SEPPA) for predicting the possible spatial epitopes with the default threshold. The results were processed using the Biosoftware. Results Compared with GI, we found that the GII genogroup had four deletions and two special insertions in the VP1 region. The predicted conformational epitope regions mainly concentrated on N-terminal (1~96), Middle Part (298~305, 355~375) and C-terminal (560~570). We find two common epitope regions on sequences for GI and GII genogroup, and also found an exclusive epitope region for GII genogroup. Conclusions The predicted conformational epitope regions of norovirus VP1 mainly concentrated on N-terminal, Middle Part and C-terminal. We find two common epitope regions on sequences for GI and GII genogroup, and also found an exclusive epitope region for GII genogroup. The overlapping with experimental epitopes indicates the important role of latest computational technologies. With the fast development of computational immunology tools, the bioinformatics pipeline will be more and more critical to vaccine design. PMID:23514273

  6. Viruses in Rodent Colonies: Lessons Learned from Murine Noroviruses.

    PubMed

    Karst, Stephanie M; Wobus, Christiane E

    2015-11-01

    Noroviruses (NoVs) are highly prevalent, positive-sense RNA viruses that infect a range of mammals, including humans and mice. Murine noroviruses (MuNoVs) are the most prevalent pathogens in biomedical research colonies, and they have been used extensively as a model system for human noroviruses (HuNoVs). Despite recent successes in culturing HuNoVs in the laboratory and a small animal host, studies of human viruses have inherent limitations. Thus, owing to its versatility, the MuNoV system-with its native host, reverse genetics, and cell culture systems-will continue to provide important insights into NoV and enteric virus biology. In the current review, we summarize recent findings from MuNoVs that increase our understanding of enteric virus pathogenesis and highlight similarities between human and murine NoVs that underscore the value of MuNoVs to inform studies of HuNoV biology. We also discuss the potential of endemic MuNoV infections to impact other disease models. PMID:26958927

  7. Novel Platform Technologies for Analysis of Norovirus Contamination of Sea Food

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The study of human norovirus (NoVs) replication in vitro would be a highly useful tool to virologists and immunologists. For this reason, we have searched for new approaches to determine viability of noroviruses in food samples (especially seafood). Our research team has multiple years of experien...

  8. Inactivation of HAV and norovirus surrogates within raw shellfish and other foods

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    High pressure processing can inactivate hepatitis A virus, (HAV) and the human norovirus surrogates, feline calicivirus (FCV) and murine norovirus (MNV), in foods such as oysters, strawberries, and green onions. A 5-min 400-Megapascals (MPa) treatment at 5 degrees C and a 1–min 400-MPa treatment at ...

  9. Atmospheric cold plasma iactivation of norovirus surrogates and native microbiota on blueberries

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cold plasma (CP) is an emerging, novel, nonthermal technology that can be used for surface decontamination of foods. This study investigated CP technology for the nonthermal inactivation of the human norovirus surrogates, Tulane virus (TV) and Murine Norovirus (MNV), as well as for background microb...

  10. Critical review of norovirus surrogates in food safety research: rationale for considering volunteer studies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The inability to propagate human norovirus (NoV) or to clearly differentiate infectious from noninfectious virus particles have led to the use of surrogate viruses, like feline calicivirus (FCV) and murine norovirus-1 (MNV), which are propagatable in cell culture. The use of surrogates is predicate...

  11. Complete Genome Sequence of a GII.17 Norovirus Isolated from a Rhesus Monkey in China.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bo; Tao, Yufen; Li, Chao; Li, Xintong; Liu, Jiansheng; He, Zhanlong; Xia, Ming; Jiang, Xi; Tan, Ming; Liu, Hongqi

    2016-01-01

    The previously silent GII.17 norovirus was found to be the predominant genotype causing major epidemics in China in the 2014-2015 winter epidemic season. We report here the complete genomic sequence of a GII.17 norovirus (mky/GII.17/KM1509/CHN/2015) that infected rhesus monkeys at a monkey farm in southwestern China. PMID:27609911

  12. Surface plasmon resonance biosensor for detection of feline calicivirus, a surrogate for norovirus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The human noroviruses are the most common non-bacterial cause of gastroenteritis and are responsible for as much as 50% of all gastroenteritis outbreaks worldwide. Norovirus (NoV), a single stranded RNA virus, is highly contagious with an infectious dose of less than 100 viral particles. While techn...

  13. High Prevalence and Increased Severity of Norovirus Mixed Infections Among Children 12-24 Months of Age Living in the Suburban Areas of Lima, Peru.

    PubMed

    Zambruni, Mara; Luna, Giannina; Silva, Maria; Bausch, Daniel G; Rivera, Fulton P; Velapatino, Grace; Campos, Miguel; Chea-Woo, Elsa; Baiocchi, Nelly; Cleary, Thomas G; Ochoa, Theresa J

    2016-09-01

    In an active diarrhea surveillance study of children aged 12-24 months in Lima, Peru, norovirus was the most common pathogen identified. The percentage of mixed (bacterial and noroviral) infections was significantly higher among norovirus-positive samples (53%) than among norovirus-negative samples (12%). The combination of norovirus with the most common bacterial pathogens was associated with increased clinical severity over that of either single-pathogen norovirus or single-pathogen bacterial infections. PMID:27534674

  14. Comparative Evaluation of Real-Time PCR Methods for Human Noroviruses in Wastewater and Human Stool

    PubMed Central

    Konta, Yoshimitsu; Kazama, Shinobu; Inaba, Manami; Imagawa, Toshifumi; Tohma, Kentaro; Saito, Mayuko; Suzuki, Akira; Oshitani, Hitoshi; Omura, Tatsuo

    2016-01-01

    Selecting the best quantitative PCR assay is essential to detect human norovirus genome effectively from clinical and environmental samples because no cell lines have been developed to propagate this virus. The real-time PCR methods for noroviruses GI (4 assays) and GII (3 assays) were evaluated using wastewater (n = 70) and norovirus-positive stool (n = 77) samples collected in Japan between 2012 and 2013. Standard quantitative PCR assays recommended by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, International Organization for Standardization, and Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare, Japan, together with recently reported assays were included. Significant differences in positive rates and quantification cycles were observed by non-parametric analysis. The present study identifies the best assay for norovirus GI and GII to amplify norovirus genomes efficiently. PMID:27525654

  15. Comparative Evaluation of Real-Time PCR Methods for Human Noroviruses in Wastewater and Human Stool.

    PubMed

    Masago, Yoshifumi; Konta, Yoshimitsu; Kazama, Shinobu; Inaba, Manami; Imagawa, Toshifumi; Tohma, Kentaro; Saito, Mayuko; Suzuki, Akira; Oshitani, Hitoshi; Omura, Tatsuo

    2016-01-01

    Selecting the best quantitative PCR assay is essential to detect human norovirus genome effectively from clinical and environmental samples because no cell lines have been developed to propagate this virus. The real-time PCR methods for noroviruses GI (4 assays) and GII (3 assays) were evaluated using wastewater (n = 70) and norovirus-positive stool (n = 77) samples collected in Japan between 2012 and 2013. Standard quantitative PCR assays recommended by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, International Organization for Standardization, and Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare, Japan, together with recently reported assays were included. Significant differences in positive rates and quantification cycles were observed by non-parametric analysis. The present study identifies the best assay for norovirus GI and GII to amplify norovirus genomes efficiently. PMID:27525654

  16. Sanitizer Efficacy against Murine Norovirus, a Surrogate for Human Norovirus, on Stainless Steel Surfaces when Using Three Application Methods

    PubMed Central

    Kotwal, Grishma; Harrison, Mark A.; Law, S. Edward; Harrison, Judy A.

    2013-01-01

    Human noroviruses are major etiologic agents of epidemic gastroenteritis. Outbreaks are often accompanied by contamination of environmental surfaces, but since these viruses cannot be routinely propagated in laboratory cultures, their response to surface disinfectants is predicted by using surrogates, such as murine norovirus 1 (MNV-1). This study compared the virucidal efficacies of various liquid treatments (three sanitizer liquids, 5% levulinic acid plus 2% SDS [LEV/SDS], 200 ppm chlorine, and an isopropanol-based quaternary ammonium compound [Alpet D2], and two control liquids, sterile tap water and sterile tap water plus 2% SDS) when delivered to MNV-1-inoculated stainless steel surfaces by conventional hydraulic or air-assisted, induction-charged (AAIC) electrostatic spraying or by wiping with impregnated towelettes. For the spray treatments, LEV/SDS proved effective when applied with hydraulic and AAIC electrostatic spraying, providing virus reductions of 2.71 and 1.66 log PFU/ml, respectively. Alpet D2 provided a 2.23-log PFU/ml reduction with hydraulic spraying, outperforming chlorine (1.16-log PFU/ml reduction). Chlorine and LEV/SDS were equally effective as wipes, reducing the viral load by 7.05 log PFU/ml. Controls reduced the viral load by <1 log with spraying applications and by >3 log PFU/ml with wiping. Results indicated that both sanitizer type and application methods should be carefully considered when choosing a surface disinfectant to best prevent and control environmental contamination by noroviruses. PMID:23263949

  17. Hydrogen Peroxide Vapor Decontamination in a Patient Room Using Feline Calicivirus and Murine Norovirus as Surrogate Markers for Human Norovirus.

    PubMed

    Holmdahl, Torsten; Walder, Mats; Uzcátegui, Nathalie; Odenholt, Inga; Lanbeck, Peter; Medstrand, Patrik; Widell, Anders

    2016-05-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine whether hydrogen peroxide vapor (HPV) could be used to decontaminate caliciviruses from surfaces in a patient room. DESIGN Feline calicivirus (FCV) and murine norovirus (MNV) were used as surrogate viability markers to mimic the noncultivable human norovirus. Cell culture supernatants of FCV and MNV were dried in triplicate 35-mm wells of 6-well plastic plates. These plates were placed in various positions in a nonoccupied patient room that was subsequently exposed to HPV. Control plates were positioned in a similar room but were never exposed to HPV. METHODS Virucidal activity was measured in cell culture by reduction in 50% tissue culture infective dose titer for FCV and by both 50% tissue culture infective dose titer and plaque reduction for MNV. RESULTS Neither viable FCV nor viable MNV could be detected in the test room after HPV treatment. At least 3.65 log reduction for FCV and at least 3.67 log reduction for MNV were found by 50% tissue culture infective dose. With plaque assay, measurable reduction for MNV was at least 2.85 log units. CONCLUSIONS The successful inactivation of both surrogate viruses indicates that HPV could be a useful tool for surface decontamination of a patient room contaminated by norovirus. Hence nosocomial spread to subsequent patients can be avoided. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2016;37:561-566. PMID:26861195

  18. Modeling and Prediction of Oyster Norovirus Outbreaks along Gulf of Mexico Coast

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jiao; Deng, Zhiqiang

    2015-01-01

    Background: Oyster norovirus outbreaks often pose high risks to human health. However, little is known about environmental factors controlling the outbreaks, and little can be done to prevent the outbreaks because they are generally considered to be unpredictable. Objective: We sought to develop a mathematical model for predicting risks of oyster norovirus outbreaks using environmental predictors. Methods: We developed a novel probability-based Artificial Neural Network model, called NORF model, using 21 years of environmental and norovirus outbreak data collected from Louisiana oyster harvesting areas along the Gulf of Mexico coast, USA. The NORF model involves six input variables that were selected through stepwise regression analysis and sensitivity analysis. Results: We found that the model-based probability of norovirus outbreaks was most sensitive to gage height (the depth of water in an oyster bed) and water temperature, followed by wind, rainfall, and salinity, respectively. The NORF model predicted all historical oyster norovirus outbreaks from 1994 through 2014. Specifically, norovirus outbreaks occurred when the NORF model probability estimate was > 0.6, whereas no outbreaks occurred when the estimated probability was < 0.5. Outbreaks may also occur when the estimated probability is 0.5–0.6. Conclusions: Our findings require further confirmation, but they suggest that oyster norovirus outbreaks may be predictable using the NORF model. The ability to predict oyster norovirus outbreaks at their onset may make it possible to prevent or at least reduce the risk of norovirus outbreaks by closing potentially affected oyster beds. Citation: Wang J, Deng Z. 2016. Modeling and prediction of oyster norovirus outbreaks along Gulf of Mexico coast. Environ Health Perspect 124:627–633; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1509764 PMID:26528621

  19. Generic and sequence-variant specific molecular assays for the detection of the highly variable Grapevine leafroll-associated virus 3.

    PubMed

    Chooi, Kar Mun; Cohen, Daniel; Pearson, Michael N

    2013-04-01

    Grapevine leafroll-associated virus 3 (GLRaV-3) is an economically important virus, which is found in all grapevine growing regions worldwide. Its accurate detection in nursery and field samples is of high importance for certification schemes and disease management programmes. To reduce false negatives that can be caused by sequence variability, a new universal primer pair was designed against a divergent sequence data set, targeting the open reading frame 4 (heat shock protein 70 homologue gene), and optimised for conventional one-step RT-PCR and one-step SYBR Green real-time RT-PCR assays. In addition, primer pairs for the simultaneous detection of specific GLRaV-3 variants from groups 1, 2, 6 (specifically NZ-1) and the outlier NZ2 variant, and the generic detection of variants from groups 1 to 5 were designed and optimised as a conventional one-step multiplex RT-PCR assay using the plant nad5 gene as an internal control (i.e. one-step hexaplex RT-PCR). Results showed that the generic and variant specific assays detected in vitro RNA transcripts from a range of 1×10(1)-1×10(8) copies of amplicon per μl diluted in healthy total RNA from Vitis vinifera cv. Cabernet Sauvignon. Furthermore, the assays were employed effectively to screen 157 germplasm and 159 commercial field samples. Thus results demonstrate that the GLRaV-3 generic and variant-specific assays are prospective tools that will be beneficial for certification schemes and disease management programmes, as well as biological and epidemiological studies of the divergent GLRaV-3 populations. PMID:23313884

  20. Norovirus Infection and Acquired Immunity in 8 Countries: Results From the MAL-ED Study

    PubMed Central

    Rouhani, Saba; Peñataro Yori, Pablo; Paredes Olortegui, Maribel; Siguas Salas, Mery; Rengifo Trigoso, Dixner; Mondal, Dinesh; Bodhidatta, Ladaporn; Platts-Mills, James; Samie, Amidou; Kabir, Furqan; Lima, Aldo; Babji, Sudhir; Mason, Carl J.; Kalam, Adil; Bessong, Pascal; Ahmed, Tahmeed; Mduma, Estomih; Bhutta, Zulfiqar A.; Lima, Ila; Ramdass, Rakhi; Lang, Dennis; George, Ajila; Zaidi, Anita K. M.; Kang, Gagandeep; Houpt, Eric; Kosek, Margaret N.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Norovirus is an important cause of childhood diarrhea. We present data from a longitudinal, multicountry study describing norovirus epidemiology during the first 2 years of life. Methods. A birth cohort of 1457 children across 8 countries contributed 7077 diarrheal stools for norovirus testing. A subset of 199 children contributed additional asymptomatic samples (2307) and diarrheal stools (770), which were used to derive incidence rates and evaluate evidence for acquired immunity. Results. Across sites, 89% of children experienced at least 1 norovirus infection before 24 months, and 22.7% of all diarrheal stools were norovirus positive. Severity of norovirus-positive diarrhea was comparable to other enteropathogens, with the exception of rotavirus. Incidence of genogroup II (GII) infection was higher than genogroup I and peaked at 6–11 months across sites. Undernutrition was a risk factor for symptomatic norovirus infection, with an increase in 1 standard deviation of length-for-age z score associated with a 17% reduction (odds ratio, 0.83 [95% confidence interval, .72–.97]; P = .011) in the odds of experiencing diarrhea when norovirus was present, after accounting for genogroup, rotavirus vaccine, and age. Evidence of acquired immunity was observed among GII infections only: Children with prior GII infection were found to have a 27% reduction in the hazard of subsequent infection (hazard ratio, 0.727; P = .010). Conclusions. The high prevalence of norovirus across 8 sites in highly variable epidemiologic settings and demonstration of protective immunity for GII infections provide support for investment in vaccine development. PMID:27013692

  1. Modelling Estimates of Norovirus Disease in Patients with Chronic Medical Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Verstraeten, Thomas; Jiang, Baoguo; Weil, John G.; Lin, Jennifer H.

    2016-01-01

    Background The burden of disease due to norovirus infection has been well described in the general United States population, but studies of norovirus occurrence among persons with chronic medical conditions have been limited mostly to the immunocompromised. We assessed the impact of norovirus gastroenteritis on health care utilization in US subjects with a range of chronic medical conditions. Methods We performed a retrospective cohort study using MarketScan data from July 2002 to December 2013, comparing the rates of emergency department visits, outpatient visits and hospitalizations among patients with chronic conditions (renal, cardiovascular, respiratory, immunocompromising, gastrointestinal, hepatic/pancreatic and neurological conditions and diabetes) with those in a healthy population. We estimated the rates of these outcomes due to norovirus gastroenteritis using an indirect modelling approach whereby cases of gastroenteritis of unknown cause and not attributed to a range of other causes were assumed to be due to norovirus. Results Hospitalization rates for norovirus gastroenteritis were higher in all of the risk groups analyzed compared with data in otherwise healthy subjects, ranging from 3.2 per 10,000 person-years in persons with chronic respiratory conditions, to 23.1 per 10,000 person-years in persons with chronic renal conditions, compared to 2.1 per 10,000 among persons without chronic conditions. Over 51% of all norovirus hospitalizations occurred in the 37% of the population with some form of chronic medical condition. Outpatient visits for norovirus gastroenteritis were also increased in persons with chronic gastrointestinal or immunocompromising conditions. Conclusion Norovirus gastroenteritis leads to significantly higher rates of healthcare utilization in patients with a chronic medical condition compared to patients without any such condition. PMID:27438335

  2. Mechanisms of Antiviral Action of Plant Antimicrobials against Murine Norovirus

    PubMed Central

    Gilling, Damian H.; Kitajima, Masaaki; Torrey, Jason R.

    2014-01-01

    Numerous plant compounds have antibacterial or antiviral properties; however, limited research has been conducted with nonenveloped viruses. The efficacies of allspice oil, lemongrass oil, and citral were evaluated against the nonenveloped murine norovirus (MNV), a human norovirus surrogate. The antiviral mechanisms of action were also examined using an RNase I protection assay, a host cell binding assay, and transmission electron microscopy. All three antimicrobials produced significant reductions (P ≤ 0.05) in viral infectivity within 6 h of exposure (0.90 log10 to 1.88 log10). After 24 h, the reductions were 2.74, 3.00, and 3.41 log10 for lemongrass oil, citral, and allspice oil, respectively. The antiviral effect of allspice oil was both time and concentration dependent; the effects of lemongrass oil and citral were time dependent. Based on the RNase I assay, allspice oil appeared to act directly upon the viral capsid and RNA. The capsids enlarged from ≤35 nm to up to 75 nm following treatment. MNV adsorption to host cells was not significantly affected. Alternatively, the capsid remained intact following exposure to lemongrass oil and citral, which appeared to coat the capsid, causing nonspecific and nonproductive binding to host cells that did not lead to successful infection. Such contrasting effects between allspice oil and both lemongrass oil and citral suggest that though different plant compounds may yield similar reductions in virus infectivity, the mechanisms of inactivation may be highly varied and specific to the antimicrobial. This study demonstrates the antiviral properties of allspice oil, lemongrass oil, and citral against MNV and thus indicates their potential as natural food and surface sanitizers to control noroviruses. PMID:24907316

  3. Quantification of Human Norovirus GII on Hands of Mothers with Children Under the Age of Five Years in Bagamoyo, Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Mattioli, Mia Catharine M; Davis, Jennifer; Mrisho, Mwifadhi; Boehm, Alexandria B

    2015-09-01

    Human noroviruses are the most common cause of viral gastroenteritis worldwide and one of the leading causes of viral diarrhea in children under the age of 5 years. Hands have been shown to play an important role in norovirus transmission. Norovirus outbreaks tend to exhibit strong seasonality, most often occurring during cold, dry months, but recently have also been documented during hot, dry winter months in the southern hemisphere. Other research suggests that rainfall is an important factor in norovirus outbreaks. This study examines the prevalence and concentration of human norovirus GII on the hands of mothers in Bagamoyo, Tanzania, during the rainy and dry seasons. Norovirus GII was detected in approximately 5% of hand rinse samples during both the rainy and dry seasons. Fecal indicator bacteria levels, Escherichia coli and enterococci, in hand rinse samples were not associated with norovirus hand contamination. Turbidity of the hand rinses was found to be associated with norovirus presence on mothers' hands; however, this relationship was only observed during the rainy season. The results suggest mothers' hands serve as a source of norovirus exposure for young children in Tanzanian households, and further work is needed to determine better indicators of norovirus contamination in these environments. PMID:26149861

  4. Two-Year Systematic Study To Assess Norovirus Contamination in Oysters from Commercial Harvesting Areas in the United Kingdom

    PubMed Central

    Gustar, Nicole E.; Powell, Andrew L.; Hartnell, Rachel E.; Lees, David N.

    2012-01-01

    The contamination of bivalve shellfish with norovirus from human fecal sources is recognized as an important human health risk. Standardized quantitative methods for the detection of norovirus in molluscan shellfish are now available, and viral standards are being considered in the European Union and internationally. This 2-year systematic study aimed to investigate the impact of the application of these methods to the monitoring of norovirus contamination in oyster production areas in the United Kingdom. Twenty-four monthly samples of oysters from 39 United Kingdom production areas, chosen to represent a range of potential contamination risk, were tested for norovirus genogroups I and II by using a quantitative real-time reverse transcription (RT)-PCR method. Norovirus was detected in 76.2% (643/844) of samples, with all sites returning at least one positive result. Both prevalences (presence or absence) and norovirus levels varied markedly between sites. However, overall, a marked winter seasonality of contamination by both prevalence and quantity was observed. Correlations were found between norovirus contamination and potential risk indicators, including harvesting area classifications, Escherichia coli scores, and environmental temperatures. A predictive risk score for norovirus contamination was developed by using a combination of these factors. In summary, this study, the largest of its type undertaken to date, provides a systematic analysis of norovirus contamination in commercial oyster production areas in the United Kingdom. The data should assist risk managers to develop control strategies to reduce the risk of human illness resulting from norovirus contamination of bivalve molluscs. PMID:22685151

  5. Quantification of Human Norovirus GII on Hands of Mothers with Children under the Age of Five Years in Bagamoyo, Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    Mattioli, Mia Catharine M.; Davis, Jennifer; Mrisho, Mwifadhi; Boehm, Alexandria B.

    2015-01-01

    Human noroviruses are the most common cause of viral gastroenteritis worldwide and one of the leading causes of viral diarrhea in children under the age of 5 years. Hands have been shown to play an important role in norovirus transmission. Norovirus outbreaks tend to exhibit strong seasonality, most often occurring during cold, dry months, but recently have also been documented during hot, dry winter months in the southern hemisphere. Other research suggests that rainfall is an important factor in norovirus outbreaks. This study examines the prevalence and concentration of human norovirus GII on the hands of mothers in Bagamoyo, Tanzania, during the rainy and dry seasons. Norovirus GII was detected in approximately 5% of hand rinse samples during both the rainy and dry seasons. Fecal indicator bacteria levels, Escherichia coli and enterococci, in hand rinse samples were not associated with norovirus hand contamination. Turbidity of the hand rinses was found to be associated with norovirus presence on mothers' hands; however, this relationship was only observed during the rainy season. The results suggest mothers' hands serve as a source of norovirus exposure for young children in Tanzanian households, and further work is needed to determine better indicators of norovirus contamination in these environments. PMID:26149861

  6. Protective role of murine norovirus against Pseudomonas aeruginosa acute pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Thépaut, Marion; Grandjean, Teddy; Hober, Didier; Lobert, Pierre-Emmanuel; Bortolotti, Perrine; Faure, Karine; Dessein, Rodrigue; Kipnis, Eric; Guery, Benoit

    2015-01-01

    The murine norovirus (MNV) is a recently discovered mouse pathogen, representing the most common contaminant in laboratory mouse colonies. Nevertheless, the effects of MNV infection on biomedical research are still unclear. We tested the hypothesis that MNV infection could alter immune response in mice with acute lung infection. Here we report that co-infection with MNV increases survival of mice with Pseudomonas aeruginosa acute lung injury and decreases in vivo production of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Our results suggest that MNV infection can deeply modify the parameters studied in conventional models of infection and lead to false conclusions in experimental models. PMID:26338794

  7. Viability of murine norovirus in salads and dressings and its inactivation using heat-denatured lysozyme.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Hajime; Tsuchiya, Tomoki; Takahashi, Michiko; Nakazawa, Moemi; Watanabe, Tomoka; Takeuchi, Akira; Kuda, Takashi; Kimura, Bon

    2016-09-16

    In recent years, a number of food poisoning outbreaks due to the contamination of norovirus in ready-to-eat (RTE) foods such as salads have been reported, and this issue is regarded as a global problem. The risk of contamination of fresh vegetables with norovirus has been previously reported, but the survivability of norovirus that contaminates salads remains unknown. In addition, there have been limited reports on the control of norovirus in food products by using inactivating agents. In this study, the viability of norovirus in various types of salads and dressings was examined using murine norovirus strain 1 (MNV-1) as a surrogate for the closely related human norovirus. In addition, the inactivation of MNV-1 in salads was examined using heat-denatured lysozyme, which had been reported to inactivate norovirus. MNV-1 was inoculated in 4 types of salads (coleslaw, thousand island salad, vinaigrette salad, egg salad) and 3 types of dressings (mayonnaise, thousand island dressing, vinaigrette dressing), stored at 4°C for 5days. The results revealed that in the vinaigrette dressing, the infectivity of MNV-1 decreased by 2.6logPFU/mL in 5days, whereas in the other dressings and salads, the infectivity of MNV-1 did not show any significant decrease. Next, 1% heat-denatured lysozyme was added to the 4 types of salads, and subsequently it was found that in 2 types of salads (thousand island salad, vinaigrette salad), the infectivity of MNV-1 decreased by >4.0logPFU/g, whereas in coleslaw salad, a decrease of 3.0logPFU/g was shown. However, in egg salads, the infectivity of MNV-1 did not show such decrease. These results suggest that norovirus can survive for 5days in contaminated salads. Further, these findings also indicated that heat-denatured lysozyme had an inactivating effect on norovirus, even in salads. In the future, heat-denatured lysozyme can be used as a novel norovirus-inactivating agent, although it is essential to investigate the mechanism of inactivating

  8. A Point-Source Norovirus Outbreak Caused by Exposure to Fomites

    PubMed Central

    Repp, Kimberly K.; Keene, William E.

    2012-01-01

    We investigated a norovirus outbreak (genotype GII.2) affecting 9 members of a soccer team. Illness was associated with touching a reusable grocery bag or consuming its packaged food contents (risk difference, 0.636; P < .01). By polymerase chain reaction, GII norovirus was recovered from the bag, which had been stored in a bathroom used before the outbreak by a person with norovirus-like illness. Airborne contamination of fomites can lead to subsequent point-source outbreaks. When feasible, we recommend dedicated bathrooms for sick persons and informing cleaning staff (professional or otherwise) about the need for adequate environmental sanitation of surfaces and fomites to prevent spread. PMID:22573873

  9. Norovirus and other human enteric viruses in moroccan shellfish.

    PubMed

    Benabbes, Laila; Ollivier, Joanna; Schaeffer, Julien; Parnaudeau, Sylvain; Rhaissi, Houria; Nourlil, Jalal; Le Guyader, Françoise S

    2013-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the presence of human enteric viruses in shellfish collected along the Mediterranean Sea and Atlantic Coast of Morocco. A total of 77 samples were collected from areas potentially contaminated by human sewage. Noroviruses were detected in 30 % of samples, with an equal representation of GI and GII strains, but were much more frequently found in cockles or clams than in oysters. The method used, including extraction efficiency controls, allowed the quantification of virus concentration. As in previous reports, results showed levels of contamination between 100 and 1,000 copies/g of digestive tissues. Sapoviruses were detected in 13 % of samples mainly in oyster and clam samples. Hepatitis A virus was detected in two samples, with concentrations around 100 RNA copies/g of digestive tissues. Only two samples were contaminated with enterovirus and none with norovirus GIV or Aichi virus. This study highlights the interest of studying shellfish samples from different countries and different production areas. A better knowledge of shellfish contamination helps us to understand virus levels in shellfish and to improve shellfish safety, thus protecting consumers. PMID:23412717

  10. Ozone inactivation of norovirus surrogates on fresh produce.

    PubMed

    Hirneisen, K A; Markland, S M; Kniel, K E

    2011-05-01

    Preharvest contamination of produce by foodborne viruses can occur through a variety of agents, including animal feces/manures, soil, irrigation water, animals, and human handling. Problems of contamination are magnified by potential countrywide distribution. Postharvest processing of produce can involve spraying, washing, or immersion into water with disinfectants; however, disinfectants, including chlorine, have varying effects on viruses and harmful by-products pose a concern. The use of ozone as a disinfectant in produce washes has shown great promise for bacterial pathogens, but limited research exists on its efficacy on viruses. This study compares ozone inactivation of human norovirus surrogates (feline calicivirus [FCV] and murine norovirus [MNV]) on produce (green onions and lettuce) and in sterile water. Green onions and lettuce inoculated with FCV or MNV were treated with ozone (6.25 ppm) for 0.5- to 10-min time intervals. Infectivity was determined by 50% tissue culture infectious dose (TCID(50)) and plaque assay for FCV and MNV, respectively. After 5 min of ozone treatment, >6 log TCID(50)/ml of FCV was inactivated in water and ∼2-log TCID(50)/ml on lettuce and green onions. MNV inoculated onto green onions and lettuce showed a >2-log reduction after 1 min of ozone treatment. The food matrix played the largest role in protection against ozone inactivation. These results indicate that ozone is an alternative method to reduce viral contamination on the surface of fresh produce. PMID:21549058