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Sample records for gill cd binding

  1. Interactive effects of waterborne metals in binary mixtures on short-term gill-metal binding and ion uptake in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Niyogi, Som; Nadella, Sunita R; Wood, Chris M

    2015-08-01

    Metal binding to fish gills forms the basis of the biotic ligand model (BLM) approach, which has emerged as a useful tool for conducting site-specific water quality assessments for metals. The current BLMs are designed to assess the toxicity of individual metals, and cannot account for the interactive effects of metal mixtures to aquatic organisms including fish. The present study was designed mainly to examine the interactive effects of waterborne metals (Cd, Zn, Cu, Ag, and Ni) in specific binary combinations on short-term (3h) gill-metal binding and essential ion (Ca(2+) and Na(+)) uptake (a physiological index of toxicity) in fish, using juvenile freshwater rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) as the model species. We hypothesized that binary mixtures of metals that share a common mode of uptake and toxicity (e.g., Cd and Zn - Ca(2+) antagonists, Cu and Ag - Na(+) antagonists) would reduce the gill binding of each other via competitive interactions and induce less than additive effects on ion transport. In addition, the mixture of metals that have different modes of uptake and toxicity (e.g., Cd and Cu, or Cd and Ni) would not exhibit any interactive effects either on gill-metal binding or ion transport. We found that both Zn and Cu reduced gill-Cd binding and vice versa, however, Ni did not influence gill-Cd binding in fish. Surprisingly, Ag was found to stimulate gill-Cu binding especially at high exposure concentrations, whereas, Cu had no effect on gill-Ag binding. The inhibitory effect of Cd and Zn in mixture on branchial Ca(2+) uptake was significantly greater than that of Cd or Zn alone. Similarly, the inhibitory effect of Cu and Ag in mixture on branchial Na(+) uptake was significantly greater than that of Cu or Ag alone. The inhibitory effects of Cd and Zn mixture on Ca(2+) uptake as well as Cu and Ag mixture on Na(+) uptake were found to follow the principles of simple additivity. In contrast, no significant additive effect on either Ca(2+) or Na

  2. Copper binding affinity of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) gills: Implications for assessing bioavailable metal

    SciTech Connect

    MacRae, R.K.; Smith, D.E.; Swoboda-Colberg, N.; Meyer, J.S.; Bergman, H.L. . Dept. of Zoology and Physiology)

    1999-06-01

    In this study, the authors determined the conditional stability constant (log K[prime]) of copper for the gills of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss; RBT) and brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis; BT). Using toxicity-based complexation bioassays, which measure the effect of competing organic ligands on copper toxicity, the RBT gill copper log K[prime] range was 6.4 to 7.2. Using a Scatchard analysis of gill Cu accumulation, the RBT log K[prime] was 7.50 and the BT log K[prime] was 7.25. The close agreement in RBT log K[prime] values between these two methods suggests that measurement of gill copper accumulation is an acceptable alternative for determining a toxicity-based gill copper binding affinity. The results also suggest that there is either a single gill copper binding component or, more realistically, multiple components with similar binding properties that function collectively to define a single toxicologically relevant copper conditional stability constant. These results suggest analytical approaches to measuring bioavailable metal concentrations, such as geochemical modeling where biological ligands are included in speciation calculations, may adequately simulate complex biological ligands. A method to convert gill copper accumulation to a bioavailable water criterion is also discussed.

  3. Genotoxic Effects Induced by Cd(+2), Cr(+6), Cu(+2) in the Gill and Liver of Odontesthes bonariensis (Piscies, Atherinopsidae).

    PubMed

    Gasulla, J; Picco, S J; Carriquiriborde, P; Dulout, F N; Ronco, A E; de Luca, J C

    2016-05-01

    Genotoxic effects of Cd(+2), Cr(+6), and Cu(+2) on the gill and liver of the Argentinean Silverside (Odontesthes bonariensis) were studied using the comet assay and in relation with the metal tissue accumulation. Fish were exposed to three waterborne concentrations of each metal for 2 and 16 days. Genotoxicity was assessed by the single cell gel electrophoresis (comet assay). After 2 days, significant increase of the genetic damage index (GDI) was only observed in the gill of fish exposed to Cr(+6) and Cu(+2), and the LOECs were 2160 nM and 921.1 nM, respectively. The gill LOEC for Cd(+2) by 16 days was 9.4 nM. In the liver, LOECs were obtained only for Cd(+2) and Cr(+6) and were 9.4 and 2160 nM, respectively. The three metals were able to induce genotoxic effects at environmentally relevant concentrations and the gill was the most sensitive organ. PMID:27003804

  4. DNA Damage and Transcriptional Changes in the Gills of Mytilus galloprovincialis Exposed to Nanomolar Doses of Combined Metal Salts (Cd, Cu, Hg)

    PubMed Central

    Varotto, Laura; Domeneghetti, Stefania; Rosani, Umberto; Manfrin, Chiara; Cajaraville, Miren P.; Raccanelli, Stefano; Pallavicini, Alberto; Venier, Paola

    2013-01-01

    Aiming at an integrated and mechanistic view of the early biological effects of selected metals in the marine sentinel organism Mytilus galloprovincialis, we exposed mussels for 48 hours to 50, 100 and 200 nM solutions of equimolar Cd, Cu and Hg salts and measured cytological and molecular biomarkers in parallel. Focusing on the mussel gills, first target of toxic water contaminants and actively proliferating tissue, we detected significant dose-related increases of cells with micronuclei and other nuclear abnormalities in the treated mussels, with differences in the bioconcentration of the three metals determined in the mussel flesh by atomic absorption spectrometry. Gene expression profiles, determined in the same individual gills in parallel, revealed some transcriptional changes at the 50 nM dose, and substantial increases of differentially expressed genes at the 100 and 200 nM doses, with roughly similar amounts of up- and down-regulated genes. The functional annotation of gill transcripts with consistent expression trends and significantly altered at least in one dose point disclosed the complexity of the induced cell response. The most evident transcriptional changes concerned protein synthesis and turnover, ion homeostasis, cell cycle regulation and apoptosis, and intracellular trafficking (transcript sequences denoting heat shock proteins, metal binding thioneins, sequestosome 1 and proteasome subunits, and GADD45 exemplify up-regulated genes while transcript sequences denoting actin, tubulins and the apoptosis inhibitor 1 exemplify down-regulated genes). Overall, nanomolar doses of co-occurring free metal ions have induced significant structural and functional changes in the mussel gills: the intensity of response to the stimulus measured in laboratory supports the additional validation of molecular markers of metal exposure to be used in Mussel Watch programs. PMID:23355883

  5. DNA damage and transcriptional changes in the gills of mytilus galloprovincialis exposed to nanomolar doses of combined metal salts (Cd, Cu, Hg).

    PubMed

    Varotto, Laura; Domeneghetti, Stefania; Rosani, Umberto; Manfrin, Chiara; Cajaraville, Miren P; Raccanelli, Stefano; Pallavicini, Alberto; Venier, Paola

    2013-01-01

    Aiming at an integrated and mechanistic view of the early biological effects of selected metals in the marine sentinel organism Mytilus galloprovincialis, we exposed mussels for 48 hours to 50, 100 and 200 nM solutions of equimolar Cd, Cu and Hg salts and measured cytological and molecular biomarkers in parallel. Focusing on the mussel gills, first target of toxic water contaminants and actively proliferating tissue, we detected significant dose-related increases of cells with micronuclei and other nuclear abnormalities in the treated mussels, with differences in the bioconcentration of the three metals determined in the mussel flesh by atomic absorption spectrometry. Gene expression profiles, determined in the same individual gills in parallel, revealed some transcriptional changes at the 50 nM dose, and substantial increases of differentially expressed genes at the 100 and 200 nM doses, with roughly similar amounts of up- and down-regulated genes. The functional annotation of gill transcripts with consistent expression trends and significantly altered at least in one dose point disclosed the complexity of the induced cell response. The most evident transcriptional changes concerned protein synthesis and turnover, ion homeostasis, cell cycle regulation and apoptosis, and intracellular trafficking (transcript sequences denoting heat shock proteins, metal binding thioneins, sequestosome 1 and proteasome subunits, and GADD45 exemplify up-regulated genes while transcript sequences denoting actin, tubulins and the apoptosis inhibitor 1 exemplify down-regulated genes). Overall, nanomolar doses of co-occurring free metal ions have induced significant structural and functional changes in the mussel gills: the intensity of response to the stimulus measured in laboratory supports the additional validation of molecular markers of metal exposure to be used in Mussel Watch programs. PMID:23355883

  6. Early genotoxic effects in gill cells and haemocytes of Dreissena polymorpha exposed to cadmium, B[a]P and a combination of B[a]P and Cd.

    PubMed

    Vincent-Hubert, Françoise; Arini, Adeline; Gourlay-Francé, Catherine

    2011-07-14

    The aim of this study was to assess the genotoxic potential of environmentally relevant concentrations of Cd on the zebra mussel, an important freshwater sentinel organism, and to determine the stability of DNA damage in gill cells and haemocytes. The oxidative DNA damage and the co-genotoxicity of Cd in combination with B[a]P were investigated. We measured DNA damage in haemocytes and gill cells of zebra mussels exposed for 11 days to a constant concentration of Cd (10μg/L), B[a]P (10μg/L) or the two combined chemicals (10μg/L+1μg/L). Enzymatic dissociation of gills with dispase gave the lower percentage DNA in tail, compared with collagenase/dispase or collagenase. Bioaccumulation of cadmium in the soft tissues of mussels exposed to CdCl(2) or CdCl(2)+B[a]P increased in a time-dependent manner indicating that both exposures were effective. Cd (10μg/L) is genotoxic only during the first 3 days of exposure in gill cells, while in haemocytes the genotoxicity of Cd was observed later. B[a]P (10μg/L) induced an early increase of DNA damage in gill cells (after 10h and 1 day), while in both gill cells and haemocytes, B[a]P caused a marked increase of DNA damage after 3 days of exposure. The Cd+B[a]P mixture decreased the DNA-damaging effect of Cd and B[a]P in both cell types. Cd induced an increase of DNA damage in Fpg-treated slides, indicating that Cd contributed to oxidative DNA damage. Cadmium induced a cytogenetic effect in gill cells, assessed by the number of micronuclei, throughout the duration of the exposure, while B[a]P did not induce any cytogenetic effect. B[a]P, Cd and Cd+B[a]P induced a transient increase in the number of bi-nucleated cells. Our data clearly show that gills are more sensitive to Cd and B[a]P, which makes them more suitable for future bio-monitoring studies. PMID:21453782

  7. Influence of natural organic matter source on copper speciation as demonstrated by Cu binding to fish gills, by ion selective electrode, and by DGT gel sampler

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Luider, C.D.; Crusius, J.; Playle, R.C.; Curtis, P.J.

    2004-01-01

    Rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss, 2 g) were exposed to 0-5 ??M total copper in ion-poor water for 3 h in the presence or absence of 10 mg C/L of qualitatively different natural organic matter (NOM) derived from water spanning a large gradient in hydrologic residence time. Accumulation of Cu by trout gills was compared to Cu speciation determined by ion selective electrode (ISE) and by diffusive gradients in thin films (DGT) gel sampler technology. The presence of NOM decreased Cu uptake by trout gills as well as Cu concentrations determined by ISE and DGT. Furthermore, the source of NOM influenced Cu binding by trout gills with high-color, allochthonous NOM decreasing Cu accumulation by the gills more than low-color autochthonous NOM. The pattern of Cu binding to the NOM measured by Cu ISE and by Cu accumulation by DGT samplers was similar to the fish gill results. A simple Cu-gill binding model required an NOM Cu-binding factor (F) that depended on NOM quality to account for observed Cu accumulation by trout gills; values of Fvaried by a factor of 2. Thus, NOM metal-binding quality, as well as NOM quantity, are both important when assessing the bioavailability of metals such as Cu to aquatic organisms.

  8. Rabbit CD200R binds host CD200 but not CD200-like proteins from poxviruses

    PubMed Central

    Akkaya, Munir; Kwong, Lai-Shan; Akkaya, Erdem; Hatherley, Deborah; Barclay, A. Neil

    2016-01-01

    CD200 is a widely distributed membrane protein that gives inhibitory signals through its receptor (CD200R) on myeloid cells. CD200 has been acquired by herpesviruses where it has been shown to interact with host CD200R and downmodulate the immune system. It has been hypothesized that poxviruses have acquired CD200; but the potential orthologues show less similarity to their hosts. Myxoma virus M141 protein is a potential CD200 orthologue with a potent immune modulatory function in rabbits. Here, we characterized the rabbit CD200, CD200R and tested the CD200-like sequences for binding CD200R. No binding could be detected using soluble recombinant proteins, full length protein expressed on cells or myxoma virus infected cells. Finally, using knockdown models, we showed that the inhibitory effect of M141 on RAW 264.7 cells upon myxoma virus infection is not due to CD200R. We conclude that the rabbit poxvirus CD200-like proteins cause immunomodulation without utilizing CD200R. PMID:26590792

  9. Rabbit CD200R binds host CD200 but not CD200-like proteins from poxviruses.

    PubMed

    Akkaya, Munir; Kwong, Lai-Shan; Akkaya, Erdem; Hatherley, Deborah; Barclay, A Neil

    2016-01-15

    CD200 is a widely distributed membrane protein that gives inhibitory signals through its receptor (CD200R) on myeloid cells. CD200 has been acquired by herpesviruses where it has been shown to interact with host CD200R and downmodulate the immune system. It has been hypothesized that poxviruses have acquired CD200; but the potential orthologues show less similarity to their hosts. Myxoma virus M141 protein is a potential CD200 orthologue with a potent immune modulatory function in rabbits. Here, we characterized the rabbit CD200, CD200R and tested the CD200-like sequences for binding CD200R. No binding could be detected using soluble recombinant proteins, full length protein expressed on cells or myxoma virus infected cells. Finally, using knockdown models, we showed that the inhibitory effect of M141 on RAW 264.7 cells upon myxoma virus infection is not due to CD200R. We conclude that the rabbit poxvirus CD200-like proteins cause immunomodulation without utilizing CD200R. PMID:26590792

  10. Effects of heavy metal ions (Cu2+, Pb2+ and Cd2+) on DNA damage of the gills, hemocytes and hepatopancreas of marine crab, Charybdis japonica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Luqing; Liu, Na; Zhang, Hongxia; Wang, Jing; Miao, Jingjing

    2011-06-01

    There are rising concerns about the hazardous effects of heavy metals on the environment. In this study, comet assay and DNA alkaline unwinding assay were conducted on the tissues (gills, hepatopancreas, and hemocytes) of Charybdis japonica in order to illustrate genotoxicity of three heavy metal ions (Cu2+, Pb2+, and Cd2+) on the marine crabs C. japonica. The crabs were exposed to Cu2+ (10, 50, and 100 μg.L-1), Pb2+ (50, 250, and 500 μg L-1) and Cd2+ (5, 25, and 50 μg L-1), and the tissues were sampled at days 0.5, 1, 3, 6, 9, and 15. DNA alkaline unwinding assay was used for testing the DNA single strand break in gills and hepatopancreas and comet assay was employed for testing the DNA damage in hemocytes. The results showed that the DNA damage ( F-value) of gills in the crabs exposed to the three heavy metals was decreased gradually during the exposure periods and there was a dose-time response relationship in certain time, suggesting that the levels of DNA single strand break in all the experimental groups increased significantly compared to the controls. Changes of F-value in hepatopancreas of the crabs exposed to the three heavy metals were similar to those in gills except that the peak values were found in the 500 μg L-1 Pb2+ treatment group at day 3 and the 50 μg L-1 Cd2+ treatment group at day 9. The ranks of DNA damage in gills and hepatopancreas induced by the three heavy metal ions (50 μg L-1, day 15) were Cd2+ >Pb2+ >Cu2+ and Pb2+ >Cu2+ >Cd2+. The levels of DNA damage in gills were higher than those in hepatopancreas in the same experimental group. It can be concluded that indices of DNA damage can be used as the potential biomarkers of heavy metal pollution in marine environment.

  11. CD36 Binds Oxidized Low Density Lipoprotein (LDL) in a Mechanism Dependent upon Fatty Acid Binding*

    PubMed Central

    Jay, Anthony G.; Chen, Alexander N.; Paz, Miguel A.; Hung, Justin P.; Hamilton, James A.

    2015-01-01

    The association of unesterified fatty acid (FA) with the scavenger receptor CD36 has been actively researched, with focuses on FA and oxidized low density lipoprotein (oxLDL) uptake. CD36 has been shown to bind FA, but this interaction has been poorly characterized to date. To gain new insights into the physiological relevance of binding of FA to CD36, we characterized FA binding to the ectodomain of CD36 by the biophysical method surface plasmon resonance. Five structurally distinct FAs (saturated, monounsaturated (cis and trans), polyunsaturated, and oxidized) were pulsed across surface plasmon resonance channels, generating association and dissociation binding curves. Except for the oxidized FA HODE, all FAs bound to CD36, with rapid association and dissociation kinetics similar to HSA. Next, to elucidate the role that each FA might play in CD36-mediated oxLDL uptake, we used a fluorescent oxLDL (Dii-oxLDL) live cell assay with confocal microscopy imaging. CD36-mediated uptake in serum-free medium was very low but greatly increased when serum was present. The addition of exogenous FA in serum-free medium increased oxLDL binding and uptake to levels found with serum and affected CD36 plasma membrane distribution. Binding/uptake of oxLDL was dependent upon the FA dose, except for docosahexaenoic acid, which exhibited binding to CD36 but did not activate the uptake of oxLDL. HODE also did not affect oxLDL uptake. High affinity FA binding to CD36 and the effects of each FA on oxLDL uptake have important implications for protein conformation, binding of other ligands, functional properties of CD36, and high plasma FA levels in obesity and type 2 diabetes. PMID:25555908

  12. Fusion proteins of HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein gp120 with CD4-induced antibodies showed enhanced binding to CD4 and CD4 binding site antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Weizao; Feng, Yang; Wang, Yanping; Zhu, Zhongyu; Dimitrov, Dimiter S.

    2012-09-07

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Some recombinant HIV-1 gp120s do not preserve their conformations on gp140s. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We hypothesize that CD4i antibodies could induce conformational changes in gp120. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CD4i antibodies enhance binding of CD4 and CD4bs antibodies to gp120. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CD4i antibody-gp120 fusion proteins could have potential as vaccine immunogens. -- Abstract: Development of successful AIDS vaccine immunogens continues to be a major challenge. One of the mechanisms by which HIV-1 evades antibody-mediated neutralizing responses is the remarkable conformational flexibility of its envelope glycoprotein (Env) gp120. Some recombinant gp120s do not preserve their conformations on gp140s and functional viral spikes, and exhibit decreased recognition by CD4 and neutralizing antibodies. CD4 binding induces conformational changes in gp120 leading to exposure of the coreceptor-binding site (CoRbs). In this study, we test our hypothesis that CD4-induced (CD4i) antibodies, which target the CoRbs, could also induce conformational changes in gp120 leading to better exposed conserved neutralizing antibody epitopes including the CD4-binding site (CD4bs). We found that a mixture of CD4i antibodies with gp120 only weakly enhanced CD4 binding. However, such interactions in single-chain fusion proteins resulted in gp120 conformations which bound to CD4 and CD4bs antibodies better than the original or mutagenically stabilized gp120s. Moreover, the two molecules in the fusion proteins synergized with each other in neutralizing HIV-1. Therefore, fusion proteins of gp120 with CD4i antibodies could have potential as components of HIV-1 vaccines and inhibitors of HIV-1 entry, and could be used as reagents to explore the conformational flexibility of gp120 and mechanisms of entry and immune evasion.

  13. Prolactin receptors in liver, kidney, and gill of the tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus): Characterization and effect of salinity on specific binding of iodinated ovine prolactin

    SciTech Connect

    Dauder, S.; Young, G.; Hass, L.; Bern, H.A. )

    1990-03-01

    Specific binding of {sup 125}I-ovine prolactin (oPRL) to microsomal fractions from gill, kidney, and liver of adult tilapia was determined. Specific binding varied among tissues, the highest values being displayed by kidney membranes. In the liver, the binding of oPRL was not strongly displaced by tilapia prolactins (tPRL177 and tPRL188), although tPRL177 was six times more potent than tPRL188. On the other hand, in kidney and gill membranes, the two tPRLs were equipotent. Tilapia PRLs showed low potency in competing for oPRL-binding sites when pregnant rat liver membranes were utilized. Tilapia growth hormone (tGH) and human growth hormone (hGH) displaced {sup 125}I-oPRL from liver as well as did tPRL177 but were not recognized well by renal or branchial receptors. Two {sup 125}I-oPRL-binding sites were detected in every tissue tested. These binding sites are subject to physiological regulation since adaptation to seawater resulted in a significant decrease in specific binding.

  14. Binding of nickel and copper to fish gills predicts toxicity when water hardness varies, but free-ion activity does not

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, J.S.; Bobbitt, J.P.; Debrey, L.D.; Boese, C.J.; Bergman, H.L.; Santore, R.C.; Paquin, P.R.; Ditoro, D.M.; Allen, H.E.

    1999-03-15

    Based on a biotic-ligand model (BLM), the authors hypothesized that the concentration of a transition metal bound to fish gills ([M{sub gill}]) will be a constant predictor of mortality, whereas a free-ion activity model is generally interpreted to imply that the chemical activity of the aquo (free) ion of the metal will be a constant predictor of mortality. In laboratory tests, measured [Ni{sub gill}] and calculated [Cu{sub gill}] were constant predictors of acute toxicity of Ni and Cu to fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) when water hardness varied up to 10-fold, whereas total aqueous concentrations and free-ion activities of Ni and Cu were not. Thus, the BLM, which simultaneously accounts for (a) metal speciation in the exposure water and (b) competitive binding of transition-metal ions and other cations to biotic ligands predicts acute toxicity better than does free-ion activity of Ni or Cu. Adopting a biotic-ligand modeling approach could help establish a more defensible, mechanistic basis for regulating aqueous discharges of metals.

  15. Subcellular localization of Cd and Cd-binding peptides in tobacco leaves

    SciTech Connect

    Vogeli-Lange, R.; Wagner, G.J. )

    1989-04-01

    Cd-binding peptides (CdBP's) having the general structure {gamma}-(Glu-Cys){sub n}-Gly are inducible by and have high affinity for Cd. If these peptides are involved in Cd detoxification by chelation, both metal and ligand must be localized in the same cellular compartment. To address this question, we studied the vacuolar/extravacuolar distribution of Cd and CdBP's in leaves of hydroponically grown tobacco seedlings. CdBP's were induced upon addition of 20 {mu}M CdCl{sub 2} (non-phytotoxic level) to the nutrient solution. Amino acid analysis indicated that the main components were {gamma}-(Glu-Cys){sub 3}-Gly and {gamma}-(Glu-Cys){sub 4}-Gly. Purified vacuoles isolated from protoplasts of Cd treated leaves contained most of the total CdBP's and Cd found in protoplasts (104% {plus minus}8 and 110% {plus minus}8, respectively). The probability that CdBP's are synthesized extravacuolarly and their predominant location in the vacuole suggest that these molecules may be involved in translocation of Cd to the vacuole.

  16. Metals (Ag(+) , Cd(2+) , Cr(6+) ) affect ATPase activity in the gill, kidney, and muscle of freshwater fish Oreochromis niloticus following acute and chronic exposures.

    PubMed

    Atli, Gülüzar; Canli, Mustdafa

    2013-12-01

    Freshwater fish Oreochromis niloticus were individually acutely exposed to different concentrations (0, 0.1, 0.5, 1.0, and 1.5 μg/mL) of Cd(2+) , Cr(6+) , and Ag(+) for 96 h and 0.05 μg/mL concentration of the same metals for different periods (0, 5, 10, 20, and 30 days) chronically. Following each experimental protocol, Na(+) /K(+) -ATPase, Mg(2+) -ATPase, and Ca(2+) -ATPase activities were measured in the gill, kidney, and muscle of O. niloticus. In vitro experiments were also performed to determine the direct effects of metal ions (0, 0.1, 0.5, 1.0, and 1.5 μg/mL) on ATPases. Except Ag(+) , none of the metals caused fish mortality within 30 days. Silver killed all the fishes within 16 days. Metal exposures generally decreased Na(+) /K(+) -ATPase and Ca(2+) -ATPase activities in the tissues of O. niloticus, although there were some fluctuations in Mg(2+) -ATPase activity. Ag(+) and Cd(2+) were found to be more toxic to ATPase activities than Cr(6+) . It was also observed that metal efficiency was higher in the gill than in the other tissues. Results indicated that the response of ATPases varied depending on metals, exposure types, and tissues. Because ATPases are sensitive to metal toxicity, their activity can give valuable data about fish physiology. Therefore, they may be used as a sensitive biomarker in environmental monitoring in contaminated waters. PMID:21901811

  17. Herpesvirus orthologues of CD200 bind host CD200R but not related activating receptors.

    PubMed

    Kwong, Lai Shan; Akkaya, Munir; Barclay, A Neil; Hatherley, Deborah

    2016-01-01

    Several herpesviruses have acquired the gene for the CD200 membrane protein from their hosts and can downregulate myeloid activity through interaction of this viral CD200 orthologue with the host receptor for CD200, namely CD200R, which can give inhibitory signals. This receptor is a 'paired receptor', meaning proteins related to the inhibitory CD200R are present but differ in that they can give activating signals and also give a negligible interaction with CD200. We showed that the viral orthologues e127 from rat cytomegalovirus and K14 from human herpesvirus 8 do not bind the activating CD200R-like proteins from their respective species, although they do bind the inhibitory receptors. It is thought that the activating receptors have evolved in response to pathogens targeting the inhibitory receptor. In this case, the CD200 orthologue is not trapped by the activating receptor but has maintained the specificity of the host from which it was acquired, suggesting that the activating members of the CD200R family have evolved to protect against a different pathogen. PMID:26538068

  18. IL-15 prolongs CD154 expression on human CD4 T cells via STAT5 binding to the CD154 transcriptional promoter

    PubMed Central

    Lowe, RM; Genin, A; Orgun, N; Cron, RQ

    2014-01-01

    Activation induced CD154 expression on CD4 T cells is prolonged in systemic lupus erythematosus but the mechanism(s) for its dysregulation are unknown. The studies reported herein demonstrate that IL-15 is capable of prolonging CD154 expression on PHA activated CD4 T cells. Since IL-15 signals through STAT5, predicted STAT5 binding sites in the human CD154 transcriptional promoter were identified, and STAT5 binding to the proximal CD154 promoter in vitro and in vivo following primary CD4 T cell activation was demonstrated. Moreover, overexpression of wild-type(WT) STAT5 in primary human CD4 T cells augmented CD154 transcription, whereas overexpression of a dominant negative (DN) STAT5 protein inhibited CD154 transcription. Mutation of the most proximal STAT5 binding site in the CD154 promoter resulted in diminished DNA binding and reduced CD154 transcriptional activity. Interestingly, STAT5-specific siRNA inhibited CD154 surface expression at 48 but not 24 hours after T cell activation. Thus, these findings provide some of the first evidence to support a possible mechanistic link to explain how the overexpression of IL-15 observed in lupus patients may be involved in the prolonged expression of CD154 that has also been observed on lupus CD4 T cells. PMID:24500400

  19. CD46 short consensus repeats III and IV enhance measles virus binding but impair soluble hemagglutinin binding.

    PubMed Central

    Devaux, P; Buchholz, C J; Schneider, U; Escoffier, C; Cattaneo, R; Gerlier, D

    1997-01-01

    The binding of a recombinant soluble form of the measles virus (MV) hemagglutinin (sH) to cells expressing hybrid CD46/CD4 proteins was compared to that of purified virus. For binding of both ligands, both CD46 external short consensus repeats I and II (SCR I and II) in the natural order were essential. The addition of SCR III and IV enhanced virus binding but inhibited sH binding. Accordingly, this lowered the ability of sH to compete with MV binding. Antihemagglutinin monoclonal antibodies selectively inhibited the binding of either sH or MV. Thus, sH and MV share a common binding site in SCR I and II but differ in their apparent avidity to CD46 under the influence of SCR III and IV. PMID:9094700

  20. CD4-binding site alterations in CCR5-using HIV-1 envelopes influencing gp120-CD4 interactions and fusogenicity

    SciTech Connect

    Sterjovski, Jasminka; Churchill, Melissa J.; Roche, Michael; Ellett, Anne; Farrugia, William; Wesselingh, Steven L.; Cunningham, Anthony L.; Ramsland, Paul A.; Gorry, Paul R.

    2011-02-20

    CD4-binding site (CD4bs) alterations in gp120 contribute to different pathophysiological phenotypes of CCR5-using (R5) HIV-1 strains, but the potential structural basis is unknown. Here, we characterized functionally diverse R5 envelope (Env) clones (n = 16) to elucidate potential structural alterations within the gp120 CD4bs that influence Env function. Initially, we showed that the magnitude of gp120-CD4-binding correlates with increased fusogenicity and reduced CD4 dependence. Analysis of three-dimensional gp120 structural models revealed two CD4bs variants, D279 and N362, that were associated with reduced CD4 dependence. Further structural analysis showed that a wider aperture of the predicted CD4bs cavity, as constrained by the inner-most atoms at the gp120 V1V2 stem and the V5 loop, was associated with amino acid alterations within V5 and correlated with increased gp120-CD4 binding and increased fusogenicity. Our results provide evidence that the gp120 V5 loop may alter CD4bs conformation and contribute to increased gp120-CD4 interactions and Env fusogenicity.

  1. Direct binding of hepatocyte growth factor and vascular endothelial growth factor to CD44v6

    PubMed Central

    Volz, Yvonne; Koschut, David; Matzke-Ogi, Alexandra; Dietz, Marina S.; Karathanasis, Christos; Richert, Ludovic; Wagner, Moritz G.; Mély, Yves; Heilemann, Mike; Niemann, Hartmut H.; Orian-Rousseau, Véronique

    2015-01-01

    CD44v6, a member of the CD44 family of transmembrane glycoproteins is a co-receptor for two receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs), Met and VEGFR-2 (vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2). CD44v6 is not only required for the activation of these RTKs but also for signalling. In order to understand the role of CD44v6 in Met and VEGFR-2 activation and signalling we tested whether CD44v6 binds to their ligands, HGF (hepatocyte growth factor) and VEGF (vascular endothelial growth factor), respectively. FACS analysis and cellular ELISA showed binding of HGF and VEGF only to cells expressing CD44v6. Direct binding of CD44v6 to HGF and VEGF was demonstrated in pull-down assays and the binding affinities were determined using MicroScale Thermophoresis, fluorescence correlation spectroscopy and fluorescence anisotropy. The binding affinity of CD44v6 to HGF is in the micromolar range in contrast with the high-affinity binding measured in the case of VEGF and CD44v6, which is in the nanomolar range. These data reveal a heparan sulfate-independent direct binding of CD44v6 to the ligands of Met and VEGFR-2 and suggest different roles of CD44v6 for these RTKs. PMID:26181364

  2. Unique properties of cd-binding peptides induced in fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    SciTech Connect

    Hayashi, Y.; Nakagawa, C.W.; Murasugi, A.

    1986-03-01

    Metallothioneins, a class of low molecular weight cysteine-rich proteins that bind heavy metal ions, have been found in various eucaryotic organisms. When fission yeasts are grown in the presence of high concentration of CdCl/sub 2/, large amounts of Cd-binding peptides (Cd-BP1 and Cd-BP2) are synthesized. While Cd-BP2 shows similarities to mammalian Cd-thioneins in UV and CD spectra, Cd-BP1has a characteristic shoulder at 265 nm in the UV absorption spectrum and shows two marked Cotton bands at 257 nm (negative) and 275 nm (positive). These characteristics of Cd-BP1 are not found in the other Cd-thioneins. The UV and CD spectra differences between reconstituted and native Cd-BP1 suggest the requirement for some additional molecular architecture including another peptide-Cd/sup 2 +/ interaction. Induction of cadystin synthesis is almost exclusive for Cd, but an exception is a small amount of cadystin also induced by the higher concentration of CuCl/sub 2/ (2.5 mM). The UV spectrum of the natural Cu-cadystin complex was similar to that of Cd-BP1. On the basis of these findings the models for Cd-BP1 and Cd-BP2 are proposed.

  3. Effects of natural organic matter source on reducing metal toxicity to rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and on metal binding to their gills.

    PubMed

    Richards, J G; Curtis, P J; Burnison, B K; Playle, R C

    2001-06-01

    Juvenile rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss, 3 g) were exposed for 74 h in ion-poor (soft) water to a mixed-metal solution in the presence of 4, 6, and 10 mg C/L natural organic matter (NOM). The metals were 0.2 microM Pb, 0.1 microM Hg, 0.1 microM Cd, 1.3 microM Cu, 0.05 microM Ag, and 3.5 microM Co, and the natural organic matter was isolated by reverse osmosis from three sources in southern Ontario, Canada. The six-metal solution alone was extremely toxic to the fish. Increasing concentrations of each NOM increased trout survival, but the NOM having the most allochthonous properties (from Luther Marsh) increased fish survival most, while the NOM having the most autochthonous properties (from Sanctuary Pond, Point Pelee) increased fish survival least. This pattern was reflected in the degree of reduction of Pb and Cu accumulation by the gills. Relatively simple chemical characterization of NOM, such as protein-to-carbohydrate ratios, or optical characterization, such as absorbance-to-fluorescence ratios (e.g., representing aromaticity), may adequately reflect these biologically relevant differences in organic matter quality. PMID:11392125

  4. High-Throughput Screening based Identification of Small Molecule Antagonists of Integrin CD11b/CD18 Ligand Binding

    PubMed Central

    Faridi, Mohd Hafeez; Maiguel, Dony; Brown, Brock T.; Suyama, Eigo; Barth, Constantinos J.; Hedrick, Michael; Vasile, Stefan; Sergienko, Eduard; Schürer, Stephan; Gupta, Vineet

    2010-01-01

    Binding of leukocyte specific integrin CD11b/CD18 to its physiologic ligands is important for the development of normal immune response in vivo. Integrin CD11b/CD18 is also a key cellular effector of various inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. However, small molecules selectively inhibiting the function of integrin CD11b/CD18 are currently lacking. We used a newly described cell-based high throughput screening assay to identify a number of highly potent antagonists of integrin CD11b/CD18 from chemical libraries containing >100,000 unique compounds. Computational analyses suggest that the identified compounds cluster into several different chemical classes. A number of the newly identified compounds blocked adhesion of wild-type mouse neutrophils to CD11b/CD18 ligand fibrinogen. Mapping the most active compounds against chemical fingerprints of known antagonists of related integrin CD11a/CD18 shows little structural similarity, suggesting that the newly identified compounds are novel and unique. PMID:20188705

  5. Identification and Characterization of CD44RC, a Novel Alternatively Spliced Soluble CD44 Isoform that can Potentiate the Hyaluronan Binding Activity of Cell Surface CD44

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Roland K; Carpenito, Carmine; Dougherty, Shona T; Hayes, Gregory M; Dougherty, Graeme J

    1999-01-01

    Abstract Soluble CD44 proteins generated by proteolytic cleavage or aberrant intron retention have been shown to antagonize the ligand binding activity of the corresponding cell surface receptor, inducing apoptosis and inhibiting tumor growth. Interestingly, such findings appear to contradict recent studies demonstrating a correlation between the presence of high levels of soluble CD44 in the serum of cancer patients and poor prognosis. In the present study, we report the cloning of a novel, naturally occurring, differentially expressed, soluble CD44 isoform, designated CD44RC, which, in contrast to previously described soluble CD44 proteins, can dramatically enhance the hyaluronan binding activity of cell surface CD44. Sequence analysis suggests that CD44RC is generated by an alternative splicing event in which the 3′ end of CD44 exon 2 is spliced into an internal splice acceptor site present within exon 18, altering reading frame and giving rise to a soluble protein with a unique COOH terminus. Functional studies suggest that CD44RC enhances hyaluronan binding by adhering to chondroitin sulfate side-chains attached to cell surface CD44, generating a multivalent complex with increased avidity for hyaluronan. PMID:10933060

  6. Identification of a Novel Inhibitory Actin-capping Protein Binding Motif in CD2-associated Protein*

    PubMed Central

    Bruck, Serawit; Huber, Tobias B.; Ingham, Robert J.; Kim, Kyoungtae; Niederstrasser, Hanspeter; Allen, Paul M.; Pawson, Tony; Cooper, John A.; Shaw, Andrey S.

    2008-01-01

    CD2-associated protein (CD2AP) is a scaffold molecule that plays a critical role in the maintenance of the kidney filtration barrier. Little, however, is understood about its mechanism of function. We used mass spectrometry to identify CD2AP-interacting proteins. Many of the proteins that we identified suggest a role for CD2AP in endocytosis and actin regulation. To address the role of CD2AP in regulation of the actin cytoskeleton, we focused on characterizing the interaction of CD2AP with actin-capping protein CP. We identified a novel binding motif LXHXTXXRPK(X)6P present in CD2AP that is also found in its homolog Cin85 and other capping protein-associated proteins such as CARMIL and CKIP-1. CD2AP inhibits the function of capping protein in vitro. Therefore, our results support a role of CD2AP in the regulation of the actin cytoskeleton. PMID:16707503

  7. CD36 mediates proximal tubular binding and uptake of albumin and is upregulated in proteinuric nephropathies.

    PubMed

    Baines, Richard J; Chana, Ravinder S; Hall, Matthew; Febbraio, Maria; Kennedy, David; Brunskill, Nigel J

    2012-10-01

    Dysregulation of renal tubular protein handling in proteinuria contributes to the development of chronic kidney disease. We investigated the role of CD36 as a novel candidate mediator of albumin binding and endocytosis in the kidney proximal tubule using both in vitro and in vivo approaches, and in nephrotic patient renal biopsy samples. In CD36-transfected opossum kidney proximal tubular cells, both binding and uptake of albumin were substantially enhanced. A specific CD36 inhibitor abrogated this effect, but receptor-associated protein, which blocks megalin-mediated endocytosis of albumin, did not. Mouse proximal tubular cells expressed CD36 and this was absent in CD36 null animals, whereas expression of megalin was equal in these animals. Compared with wild-type mice, CD36 null mice demonstrated a significantly increased urinary protein-to-creatinine ratio and albumin-to-creatinine ratio. Proximal tubular cells expressed increased CD36 when exposed to elevated albumin concentrations in culture medium. Expression of CD36 was studied in renal biopsy tissue obtained from adult patients with heavy proteinuria due to minimal change disease, membranous nephropathy, or focal segmental glomerulosclerosis. Proximal tubular CD36 expression was markedly increased in proteinuric individuals. We conclude that CD36 is a novel mediator influencing binding and uptake of albumin in the proximal tubule that is upregulated in proteinuric renal diseases. CD36 may represent a potential therapeutic target in proteinuric nephropathy. PMID:22791331

  8. Characterization of PROPPIN-Phosphoinositide Binding and Role of Loop 6CD in PROPPIN-Membrane Binding

    PubMed Central

    Busse, Ricarda A.; Scacioc, Andreea; Krick, Roswitha; Pérez-Lara, Ángel; Thumm, Michael; Kühnel, Karin

    2015-01-01

    PROPPINs (β-propellers that bind polyphosphoinositides) are a family of PtdIns3P- and PtdIns(3,5)P2-binding proteins that play an important role in autophagy. We analyzed PROPPIN-membrane binding through isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), stopped-flow measurements, mutagenesis studies, and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. ITC measurements showed that the yeast PROPPIN family members Atg18, Atg21, and Hsv2 bind PtdIns3P and PtdIns(3,5)P2 with high affinities in the nanomolar to low-micromolar range and have two phosphoinositide (PIP)-binding sites. Single PIP-binding site mutants have a 15- to 30-fold reduced affinity, which explains the requirement of two PIP-binding sites in PROPPINs. Hsv2 bound small unilamellar vesicles with a higher affinity than it bound large unilamellar vesicles in stopped-flow measurements. Thus, we conclude that PROPPIN membrane binding is curvature dependent. MD simulations revealed that loop 6CD is an anchor for membrane binding, as it is the region of the protein that inserts most deeply into the lipid bilayer. Mutagenesis studies showed that both hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions are required for membrane insertion of loop 6CD. We propose a model for PROPPIN-membrane binding in which PROPPINs are initially targeted to membranes through nonspecific electrostatic interactions and are then retained at the membrane through PIP binding. PMID:25954880

  9. Chondroitin sulfate addition to CD44H negatively regulates hyaluronan binding

    SciTech Connect

    Ruffell, Brian; Johnson, Pauline . E-mail: pauline@interchange.ubc.ca

    2005-08-26

    CD44 is a widely expressed cell adhesion molecule that binds hyaluronan, an extracellular matrix glycosaminoglycan, in a tightly regulated manner. This regulated interaction has been implicated in inflammation and tumor metastasis. CD44 exists in the standard form, CD44H, or as higher molecular mass isoforms due to alternative splicing. Here, we identify serine 180 in human CD44H as the site of chondroitin sulfate addition and show that lack of chondroitin sulfate addition at this site enhances hyaluronan binding by CD44. A CD44H-immunoglobulin fusion protein expressed in HEK293 cells, and CD44H expressed in murine L fibroblast cells were modified by chondroitin sulfate, as determined by reduced sulfate incorporation after chondroitinase ABC treatment. Mutation of serine 180 or glycine 181 in CD44H reduced chondroitin sulfate addition and increased hyaluronan binding, indicating that serine 180 is the site for chondroitin sulfate addition in CD44H and that this negatively regulates hyaluronan binding.

  10. CD44 Binding to Hyaluronic Acid Is Redox Regulated by a Labile Disulfide Bond in the Hyaluronic Acid Binding Site

    PubMed Central

    Kellett-Clarke, Helena; Stegmann, Monika; Barclay, A. Neil; Metcalfe, Clive

    2015-01-01

    CD44 is the primary leukocyte cell surface receptor for hyaluronic acid (HA), a component of the extracellular matrix. Enzymatic post translational cleavage of labile disulfide bonds is a mechanism by which proteins are structurally regulated by imparting an allosteric change and altering activity. We have identified one such disulfide bond in CD44 formed by Cys77 and Cys97 that stabilises the HA binding groove. This bond is labile on the surface of leukocytes treated with chemical and enzymatic reducing agents. Analysis of CD44 crystal structures reveal the disulfide bond to be solvent accessible and in the–LH hook configuration characteristic of labile disulfide bonds. Kinetic trapping and binding experiments on CD44-Fc chimeric proteins show the bond is preferentially reduced over the other disulfide bonds in CD44 and reduction inhibits the CD44-HA interaction. Furthermore cells transfected with CD44 no longer adhere to HA coated surfaces after pre-treatment with reducing agents. The implications of CD44 redox regulation are discussed in the context of immune function, disease and therapeutic strategies. PMID:26379032

  11. Streptococcal IgA-binding proteins bind in the Calpha 2-Calpha 3 interdomain region and inhibit binding of IgA to human CD89.

    PubMed

    Pleass, R J; Areschoug, T; Lindahl, G; Woof, J M

    2001-03-16

    Certain pathogenic bacteria express surface proteins that bind to the Fc part of human IgA or IgG. These bacterial proteins are important as immunochemical tools and model systems, but their biological function is still unclear. Here, we describe studies of three streptococcal proteins that bind IgA: the Sir22 and Arp4 proteins of Streptococcus pyogenes and the unrelated beta protein of group B streptococcus. Analysis of IgA domain swap and point mutants indicated that two loops at the Calpha2/Calpha3 domain interface are critical for binding of the streptococcal proteins. This region is also used in binding the human IgA receptor CD89, an important mediator of IgA effector function. In agreement with this finding, the three IgA-binding proteins and a 50-residue IgA-binding peptide derived from Sir22 blocked the ability of IgA to bind CD89. Further, the Arp4 protein inhibited the ability of IgA to trigger a neutrophil respiratory burst via CD89. Thus, we have identified residues on IgA-Fc that play a key role in binding of different streptococcal IgA-binding proteins, and we have identified a mechanism by which a bacterial IgA-binding protein may interfere with IgA effector function. PMID:11096107

  12. Ligand binding to anti-cancer target CD44 investigated by molecular simulations.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Tin Trung; Tran, Duy Phuoc; Pham Dinh Quoc Huy; Hoang, Zung; Carloni, Paolo; Van Pham, Phuc; Nguyen, Chuong; Li, Mai Suan

    2016-07-01

    CD44 is a cell-surface glycoprotein and receptor for hyaluronan, one of the major components of the tumor extracellular matrix. There is evidence that the interaction between CD44 and hyaluronan promotes breast cancer metastasis. Recently, the molecule F-19848A was shown to inhibit hyaluronan binding to receptor CD44 in a cell-based assay. In this study, we investigated the mechanism and energetics of F-19848A binding to CD44 using molecular simulation. Using the molecular mechanics/Poisson Boltzmann surface area (MM-PBSA) method, we obtained the binding free energy and inhibition constant of the complex. The van der Waals (vdW) interaction and the extended portion of F-19848A play key roles in the binding affinity. We screened natural products from a traditional Chinese medicine database to search for CD44 inhibitors. From combining pharmaceutical requirements with docking and molecular dynamics simulations, we found ten compounds that are potentially better or equal to the F-19848A ligand at binding to CD44 receptor. Therefore, we have identified new candidates of CD44 inhibitors, based on molecular simulation, which may be effective small molecules for the therapy of breast cancer. PMID:27342250

  13. MHC class II proteins contain a potential binding site for the verotoxin receptor glycolipid CD77.

    PubMed

    George, T; Boyd, B; Price, M; Lingwood, C; Maloney, M

    2001-11-01

    Globotriaosyl ceramide or CD77 functions as a cell surface receptor for toxins of the Shiga toxin/verotoxin family and as a marker for germinal center stage B-cells. The B-cell protein CD19 and the interferon-alpha receptor possess verotoxin-like amino acid sequences in their extracellular domains, and CD77 has been shown to function in CD19-mediated adhesion and interferon-induced growth inhibition. The Burkitt's lymphoma cell line, Daudi, is similar to germinal center B-cells in their expression of CD77, CD19 and MHC class II molecules. Using the multiple sequence alignment program, ClustalW, we have identified a verotoxin-like amino acid sequence on the beta-chain of human and murine MHC class II molecules. Binding of CD77 at this site could modulate the peptide-binding properties of these MHC class II molecules. Using Western blot analysis of whole cell extracts, we found that CD77-positive Daudi cells have higher levels of HLA-D proteins than VT500 cells, a Daudi-derived CD77-deficient mutant cell line. In contrast, MHC class II-mediated adhesion and surface expression are similar in the two cell lines. Therefore, CD77 could play a functional or regulatory role in MHC class II-mediated functions specifically relating to antigen presentation by B-cells to T helper cells. PMID:11838965

  14. Partial MHC class II constructs inhibit MIF/CD74 binding and downstream effects.

    PubMed

    Benedek, Gil; Meza-Romero, Roberto; Andrew, Shayne; Leng, Lin; Burrows, Gregory G; Bourdette, Dennis; Offner, Halina; Bucala, Richard; Vandenbark, Arthur A

    2013-05-01

    MIF and its receptor, CD74, are pivotal regulators of the immune system. Here, we demonstrate for the first time that partial MHC class II constructs comprised of linked β1α1 domains with covalently attached antigenic peptides (also referred to as recombinant T-cell receptor ligands - RTLs) can inhibit MIF activity by not only blocking the binding of rhMIF to immunopurified CD74, but also downregulating CD74 cell-surface expression. This bifunctional inhibition of MIF/CD74 interactions blocked downstream MIF effects, including enhanced secretion of proinflammatory cytokines, anti-apoptotic activity, and inhibition of random migration that all contribute to the reversal of clinical and histological signs of EAE. Moreover, we demonstrate that enhanced CD74 cell-surface expression on monocytes in mice with EAE and subjects with multiple sclerosis can be downregulated by humanized RTLs, resulting in reduced MIF binding to the cells. Thus, binding of partial MHC complexes to CD74 blocks both the accessibility and availability of CD74 for MIF binding and downstream inflammatory activity. PMID:23576302

  15. Partial MHC class II constructs inhibit MIF/CD74 binding and downstream effects

    PubMed Central

    Benedek, Gil; Meza-Romero, Roberto; Andrew, Shayne; Leng, Lin; Burrows, Gregory G.; Bourdette, Dennis; Offner, Halina; Bucala, Richard; Vandenbark, Arthur A.

    2013-01-01

    Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) and its receptor, CD74, are pivotal regulators of the immune system. Here we demonstrate for the first time that partial MHC class II constructs comprised of linked β1α1 domains with covalently attached antigenic peptides (also referred to as recombinant T-cell receptor ligands - RTLs) can inhibit MIF activity by not only blocking the binding of rhMIF to immunopurified CD74, but also down-regulating CD74 cell-surface expression. This bi-functional inhibition of MIF/CD74 interactions blocked downstream MIF effects, including enhanced secretion of proinflammatory cytokines, anti-apoptotic activity and inhibition of random migration that all contribute to the reversal of clinical and histological signs of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). Moreover, we demonstrate that enhanced CD74 cell surface expression on monocytes in mice with EAE and subjects with multiple sclerosis (MS) can be down-regulated by humanized RTLs, resulting in reduced MIF binding to the cells. Thus, binding of partial MHC complexes to CD74 blocks both the accessibility and availability of CD74 for MIF binding and downstream inflammatory activity. PMID:23576302

  16. Gills of antarctic fish.

    PubMed

    Rankin, J C; Tuurala, H

    1998-01-01

    We review the literature on the way the structure of icefish gills relates the physiology of these haemoglobin-less fishes. Vascular casting confirmed earlier reports that the only special feature of the gills is the large size of the blood vessels, especially the prominent and continuous marginal channels Isolated perfused gill arches were used to study the effects of changes in afferent and efferent pressure on gill resistance and tritiated water influx in Chionobathyscus dewitti. Increasing perfusion rate did not change gill resistance, but there were moderate proportional increases in water influx. Reducing efferent pressure increased gill resistance but did not affect water influx. In both C. dewitti and Cryodraco antarcticus gills perfused at constant flow rate, noradrenaline produced concentration-dependent decreases in gill resistance and, with high concentrations, increases in water influx. Fixation while perfusion continued was used to compare blood space dimensions in control, noradrenaline-treated and unperfused gills. Noradrenaline caused large increases in the thickness of the lamellar blood space and increased lamellar height, despite a greatly reduced afferent pressure. This suggests that modulation of pillar cell active tension might be involved in control of lamellar perfusion. The possible relationship between gill water fluxes and lamellar recruitment is discussed. PMID:11253779

  17. Both host and parasite MIF molecules bind to chicken macrophages via CD74 surface receptor.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sungwon; Cox, Chasity M; Jenkins, Mark C; Fetterer, Ray H; Miska, Katarzyna B; Dalloul, Rami A

    2014-12-01

    Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is recognized as a soluble protein that inhibits the random migration of macrophages and plays a pivotal immunoregulatory function in innate and adaptive immunity. Our group has identified both chicken and Eimeria MIFs, and characterized their function in enhancing innate immune responses during inflammation. In this study, we report that chicken CD74 (ChCD74), a type II transmembrane protein, functions as a macrophage surface receptor that binds to MIF molecules. First, to examine the binding of MIF to chicken monocytes/macrophages, fresh isolated chicken peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were stimulated with rChIFN-γ and then incubated with recombinant chicken MIF (rChMIF). Immunofluorescence staining with anti-ChMIF followed by flow cytometry revealed the binding of MIF to stimulated PBMCs. To verify that ChCD74 acts as a surface receptor for MIF molecules, full-length ChCD74p41 was cloned, expressed and its recombinant protein (rChCD74p41) transiently over-expressed with green fluorescent protein in chicken fibroblast DF-1 cells. Fluorescence analysis revealed a higher population of cells double positive for CD74p41 and rChMIF, indicating the binding of rChMIF to DF-1 cells via rChCD74p41. Using a similar approach, it was found that Eimeria MIF (EMIF), which is secreted by Eimeria sp. during infection, bound to chicken macrophages via ChCD74p41 as a surface receptor. Together, this study provides conclusive evidence that both host and parasite MIF molecules bind to chicken macrophages via the surface receptor ChCD74. PMID:25086294

  18. Soluble CD109 binds TGF-β and antagonizes TGF-β signalling and responses.

    PubMed

    Li, Carter; Hancock, Mark A; Sehgal, Priyanka; Zhou, Shufeng; Reinhardt, Dieter P; Philip, Anie

    2016-03-01

    Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) is a multifunctional cytokine implicated in many diseases, including tissue fibrosis and cancer. TGF-β mediates diverse biological responses by signalling through type I and II TGF-β receptors (TβRI and TβRII). We have previously identified CD109, a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored protein, as a novel TGF-β co-receptor that negatively regulates TGF-β signalling and responses and demonstrated that membrane-anchored CD109 promotes TGF-β receptor degradation via a SMAD7/Smurf2-mediated mechanism. To determine whether CD109 released from the cell surface (soluble CD109 or sCD109) also acts as a TGF-β antagonist, we determined the efficacy of recombinant sCD109 to interact with TGF-β and inhibit TGF-β signalling and responses. Our results demonstrate that sCD109 binds TGF-β with high affinity as determined by surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and cell-based radioligand binding and affinity labelling competition assays. SPR detected slow dissociation kinetics between sCD109 and TGF-β at low concentrations, indicating a stable and effective interaction. In addition, sCD109 antagonizes TGF-β-induced Smad2/3 phosphorylation, transcription and cell migration. Together, our results suggest that sCD109 can bind TGF-β, inhibit TGF-β binding to its receptors and decrease TGF-β signalling and TGF-β-induced cellular responses. PMID:26621871

  19. Comparative study of the bioaccumulation and elimination of trace metals (Cd, Pb, Zn, Mn and Fe) in the digestive gland, gills and muscle of bivalve Pinna nobilis during a field transplant experiment.

    PubMed

    Jebali, Jamel; Chouba, Lassaad; Banni, Mohamed; Boussetta, Hamadi

    2014-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the long-term bioaccumulation and elimination of Cd, Pb, Mn, Zn and Fe by Pinna nobilis tissues after their 90 day-transplantation period at Téboulba fishing harbor. During the transplantation period, the Cd, Pb, Mn, Zn and Fe concentrations in the different tissues of the mussels were measured before and after exposure period. Metal (Cd, Pb, Mn, Zn and Fe) accumulation in P. nobilis mussels varied depending on the analyzed tissue and the caging times. Notable differences in Cd, Pb, Mn, Zn and Fe accumulation patterns within the digestive gland, gills and muscle were found and may be due to the ability of each tissue to accumulate metals. During the depuration phase, the elimination of Cd, Pb, Mn, Zn and Fe depended on the target tissue and the metal speciation. Cd, Pb, Mn and Fe were eliminated rapidly from one organ and increased in other when compared to those of 90 day transplanted mussels. The increase of metal loads during the elimination phase is not clear and particularly what kind of processes is responsible for such response. However, it is reasonable to assume that metals increase is related to the existence of an accumulation/detoxification mechanism, which involves the transport of metals from an organ to another. The data obtained indicate that because of the significantly high quantities of Cd, Pb, Mn, Zn and Fe accumulated during the exposure phase, the transplanted mussels are suitable bioindicators for monitoring trace metals in marine ecosystem. PMID:24439521

  20. Yes and PI3K bind CD95 to signal invasion of glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Kleber, Susanne; Sancho-Martinez, Ignacio; Wiestler, Benedict; Beisel, Alexandra; Gieffers, Christian; Hill, Oliver; Thiemann, Meinolf; Mueller, Wolf; Sykora, Jaromir; Kuhn, Andreas; Schreglmann, Nina; Letellier, Elisabeth; Zuliani, Cecilia; Klussmann, Stefan; Teodorczyk, Marcin; Gröne, Hermann-Josef; Ganten, Tom M; Sültmann, Holger; Tüttenberg, Jochen; von Deimling, Andreas; Regnier-Vigouroux, Anne; Herold-Mende, Christel; Martin-Villalba, Ana

    2008-03-01

    Invasion of surrounding brain tissue by isolated tumor cells represents one of the main obstacles to a curative therapy of glioblastoma multiforme. Here we unravel a mechanism regulating glioma infiltration. Tumor interaction with the surrounding brain tissue induces CD95 Ligand expression. Binding of CD95 Ligand to CD95 on glioblastoma cells recruits the Src family member Yes and the p85 subunit of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase to CD95, which signal invasion via the glycogen synthase kinase 3-beta pathway and subsequent expression of matrix metalloproteinases. In a murine syngeneic model of intracranial GBM, neutralization of CD95 activity dramatically reduced the number of invading cells. Our results uncover CD95 as an activator of PI3K and, most importantly, as a crucial trigger of basal invasion of glioblastoma in vivo. PMID:18328427

  1. An X-ray absorption spectroscopy study of Cd binding onto bacterial consortia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Bhoopesh; Boyanov, Maxim I.; Bunker, Bruce A.; Kelly, Shelly D.; Kemner, Kenneth M.; Nerenberg, Robert; Read-Daily, Brenda L.; Fein, Jeremy B.

    2009-08-01

    In this study, we use extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy measurements to examine the atomic environment of Cd bound onto two experimental bacterial consortia: one grown from river water, and one grown from a manufacturing gas plant site. The experiments were conducted as a function of pH and demonstrate that the complex mixtures of bacteria, containing both Gram-positive and Gram-negative species, yield relatively simple EXAFS spectra, a result which indicates that only a limited number of functional group types contribute to Cd binding for each bacterial consortium. The EXAFS spectra indicate that the average Cd binding environment in the river water consortium varies significantly with pH, but the manufacturing gas plant consortium exhibits a Cd binding environment that remains relatively constant over the pH range examined. The EXAFS data for the river water consortium were modeled using carboxyl, phosphoryl and sulfhydryl sites. However, only carboxyl and phosphoryl sites were required to model the manufacturing gas plant consortium data under similar experimental conditions. This is the first EXAFS study to identify and quantify the relative importance of metal binding sites in bacterial consortia. Although our results indicate differences in the binding environments of the two consortia, the data suggest that there are broad similarities in the binding environments present on a wide range of bacterial cell walls.

  2. Specific binding of soluble peptidoglycan and muramyldipeptide to CD14 on human monocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Weidemann, B; Schletter, J; Dziarski, R; Kusumoto, S; Stelter, F; Rietschel, E T; Flad, H D; Ulmer, A J

    1997-01-01

    Previously, we were able to show that soluble peptidoglycan (sPG)-induced monokine production in human peripheral monocytes is inhibited by anti-CD14 monoclonal antibodies and by lipid A partial structures. This suggested but did not prove that monocytic surface protein CD14 is involved in the activation of human monocytes not only by cell wall components of gram-negative bacteria such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS) but also by cell wall components of gram-positive bacteria such as sPG. In the present study, we provide experimental evidence that CD14 indeed constitutes a binding site for sPG recognition and activation of human monocytes. The results show that fluorescein isothiocyanate-sPG (FITC-sPG) binds to human monocytes in a saturable, dose-dependent, and specific manner. For maximal binding, 2 to 3 microg of FITC-sPG per ml was sufficient, and this binding is completed within 90 min; about 40% of the binding is completed within the first 3 min. The FITC-sPG binding is considered specific because unlabeled sPG and also muramyldipeptide (MDP), the minimal bioactive structure of sPG, inhibit the binding of sPG to monocytes in a dose-dependent manner. This specific binding was also inhibited by an anti-CD14 monoclonal antibody, LPS, and lipid A partial structure compound 406. Direct evidence for an interaction of sPG with CD14 is provided by experiments involving native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis that showed a shift of the electrophoretic mobility of CD14 by LPS as well as by sPG. These results allow the conclusion that sPG binds directly to CD14, that MDP represents the active substructure of sPG, and that CD14 may be a lectin-like receptor which plays a key role in cellular stimulation by bioactive components of not only gram-negative but also gram-positive bacteria. PMID:9038288

  3. Visualization of hormone binding proteins in vivo based on Mn-doped CdTe QDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Fang fei; Yu, Ying; Lin, Bi xia; Hu, Xiao gang; Cao, Yu juan; Wu, Jian zhong

    2014-10-01

    Daminozide (B9) is a growth inhibitor with important regulatory roles in plant growth and development. Locating and quantifying B9-binding proteins in plant tissues will assist in investigating the mechanism behind the signal transduction of B9. In this study, red fluorescent Mn-doped CdTe quantum dots (CdTeMn QDs) were synthesized by a high-temperature hydrothermal process. Since CdTeMn QDs possess a maximum fluorescence emission peak at 610 nm, their fluorescence properties are more stable than those of CdTe QDs. A B9-CdTeMn probe was synthesized by coupling B9 with CdTeMn QDs. The fluorescence intensity of the probe is double that of CdTeMn QDs; its fluorescence stability is also superior under different ambient conditions. The probe retains the biological activity of B9 and is unaffected by interference from the green fluorescent protein present in plants. Therefore, we used this probe to label B9-binding proteins selectively in root tissue sections of mung bean seedlings. These proteins were observed predominantly on the surfaces of the cell membranes of the cortex and epidermal parenchyma.

  4. The CD11c antigen couples concanavalin A binding to generation of superoxide anion in human phagocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Lacal, P M; Balsinde, J; Cabañas, C; Bernabeu, C; Sánchez-Madrid, F; Mollinedo, F

    1990-01-01

    We have found that an anti-CD11c monoclonal antibody (MAb) inhibits the respiratory burst induced in phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA)-differentiated U937 cells as well as in human peripheral blood monocytes and neutrophils upon cell stimulation with concanavalin A. The MAb had no effect, however, when the added stimulus was fMet-Leu-Phe or PMA. Flow cytometry analyses indicated that concanavalin A was able to interact with CD11c. The anti-CD11c MAb inhibited significantly concanavalin A binding to differentiated U937 cells, and concanavalin A blocked binding of anti-CD11c MAb to the cells. Binding of labelled concanavalin A to membrane proteins which were separated by PAGE and transferred to nitrocellulose paper indicated that proteins with apparent molecular masses similar to those of CD11c (150 kDa) and CD18 (95 kDa) molecules were the main concanavalin A-binding proteins in differentiated U937 cells as well as in mature neutrophils. Similar experiments carried out in the presence of the anti-CD11c MAb showed a specific and significant inhibition of concanavalin A binding to the CD11c molecule. These results indicate that concanavalin A binds to the CD11c molecule and this binding is responsible for the concanavalin A-induced respiratory burst in PMA-differentiated U937 cells as well as in human mature monocytes and neutrophils. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 3. PMID:1973035

  5. Binding strength-associated toxicity reduction by birnessite and hydroxyapatite in Pb and Cd contaminated sediments.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seungbae; An, Jinsung; Kim, Young-Jin; Nam, Kyoungphile

    2011-02-28

    In situ stabilization of sediment-bound heavy metals has been proposed as an alternative to ex situ treatment due to the concerns on ecosystem disturbance and remediation cost. The present study was conducted to test the performance of birnessite, hydroxyapatite, and zeolite as stabilizing agents for Pb and Cd in sediment. The heavy metal binding capacity and strength of the stabilizing agents were determined by analyzing Langmuir model parameters. The three agents showed the similar binding capacity (i.e., maximum monolayer sorption constant, K(a)) ranging from 1.13 to 3.62×10(5) mg/kg for Pb and 1.07 to 1.33×10(5) mg/kg for Cd. In contrast, binding strength (i.e., binding energy constant, b) of birnessite and hydroxyapatite was about one order higher than that of zeolite. This is further supported by five-step sequential extraction data: more than 99 and 70% of freshly spiked Pb and Cd were present as not-readily extractable fractions in birnessite and hydroxyapatite, respectively while the fractions were 17.9 and 14.1% in zeolite. Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) test was also conducted to verify the effectiveness of the heavy metal-stabilizing ability of birnessite and hydroxyapatite. Birnessite successfully retained both Pb and Cd against the leaching solution, satisfying the TCLP extract concentration limits (i.e., 5 and 1 mg/L, respectively). However, hydroxyapatite released about 223.7 mg/L of Cd into the solution, which greatly exceeded the limit. The toxicity test with Hyalella azteca showed that their survival rate increased by 92.5-100% when birnessite or hydroxyapatite was added to Pb- or Cd-spiked sediment as a stabilizing agent. Our data demonstrate the potential use of birnessite and hydroxyapatite as an effective in situ remediation means for heavy metal-contaminated sediment with minimal risk to the aquatic ecosystem. PMID:21255927

  6. CD44 is a macrophage binding site for Mycobacterium tuberculosis that mediates macrophage recruitment and protective immunity against tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Leemans, Jaklien C.; Florquin, Sandrine; Heikens, Mirjam; Pals, Steven T.; Neut, Ronald van der; van der Poll, Tom

    2003-01-01

    Cell migration and phagocytosis are both important for controlling Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection and are critically dependent on the reorganization of the cytoskeleton. Since CD44 is an adhesion molecule involved in inflammatory responses and is connected to the actin cytoskeleton, we investigated the role of CD44 in both these processes. Macrophage (Mφ) recruitment into M. tuberculosis–infected lungs and delayed-type hypersensitivity sites was impaired in CD44-deficient (CD44–/–) mice. In addition, the number of T lymphocytes and the concentration of the protective key cytokine IFN-γ were reduced in the lungs of infected CD44–/– mice. The production of IFN-γ by splenocytes of CD44–/– mice was profoundly increased upon antigen-specific stimulation. Flow cytometry analysis revealed that soluble CD44 can directly bind to virulent M. tuberculosis. Mycobacteria also interacted with Mφ-associated CD44, as reflected by reduced binding and internalization of bacilli by CD44–/– Mφs. This suggests that CD44 is a receptor on Mφs for binding of M. tuberculosis. CD44–/– mice displayed a decreased survival and an enhanced mycobacterial outgrowth in lungs and liver during pulmonary tuberculosis. In summary, we have identified CD44 as a new Mφ binding site for M. tuberculosis that mediates mycobacterial phagocytosis, Mφ recruitment, and protective immunity against pulmonary tuberculosis. PMID:12618522

  7. Generation and characterization of a tetraspanin CD151/integrin α6β1-binding domain competitively binding monoclonal antibody for inhibition of tumor progression in HCC

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Jia-Bin; Huang, Xiao-Yong; Wu, Chao; Zhang, Lu; Kang, Qiang; Liu, Li-Xin; Xie, Nan; Shen, Zao-Zhuo; Hu, Mei-Yu; Cao, Ya; Qiu, Shuang-Jian; Sun, Hui-Chuan; Zhou, Jian; Fan, Jia; Shi, Guo-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Our previous studies revealed that tetraspanin CD151 plays multiple roles in the progression of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) by forming a functional complex with integrin α6β1. Herein, we generated a monoclonal antibody (mAb) that dissociates the CD151/integrin α6β1 complex, and we evaluated its bioactivity in HCCs. A murine mAb, tetraspanin CD151 (IgG1, called CD151 mAb 9B), was successfully generated against the CD151-integrin α6β1 binding site of CD151 extracellular domains. Co-immunoprecipitation using CD151 mAb 9B followed by Western blotting detected a 28 kDa protein. Both immunofluorescent and immunohistochemical staining showed a good reactivity of CD151 mAb 9B in the plasma membrane and cytoplasm of HCC cells, as well as in liver cells. In vitro assays demonstrated that CD151 mAb 9B could inhibit neoangiogenesis and both the mobility and the invasiveness of HCC cells. An in vivo assay showed that CD151 mAb 9B inhibited tumor growth potential and HCC cells metastasis. We successfully produced a CD151 mAb 9B targeting the CD151/integrin α6β1-binding domain, which not only can displayed good reactivity to the CD151 antigen but also prevented tumor progression in HCC. PMID:26756217

  8. Equilibrium and Kinetics of Sin Nombre Hantavirus Binding at DAF/CD55 Functionalized Bead Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Buranda, Tione; Swanson, Scarlett; Bondu, Virginie; Schaefer, Leah; Maclean, James; Mo, Zhenzhen; Wycoff, Keith; Belle, Archana; Hjelle, Brian

    2014-01-01

    Decay accelerating factor (DAF/CD55) is targeted by many pathogens for cell entry. It has been implicated as a co-receptor for hantaviruses. To examine the binding of hantaviruses to DAF, we describe the use of Protein G beads for binding human IgG Fc domain-functionalized DAF ((DAF)2-Fc). When mixed with Protein G beads the resulting DAF beads can be used as a generalizable platform for measuring kinetic and equilibrium binding constants of DAF binding targets. The hantavirus interaction has high affinity (24–30 nM; kon ~ 105 M−1s−1, koff ~ 0.0045 s−1). The bivalent (DAF)2-Fc/SNV data agree with hantavirus binding to DAF expressed on Tanoue B cells (Kd = 14.0 nM). Monovalent affinity interaction between SNV and recombinant DAF of 58.0 nM is determined from competition binding. This study serves a dual purpose of presenting a convenient and quantitative approach of measuring binding affinities between DAF and the many cognate viral and bacterial ligands and providing new data on the binding constant of DAF and Sin Nombre hantavirus. Knowledge of the equilibrium binding constant allows for the determination of the relative fractions of bound and free virus particles in cell entry assays. This is important for drug discovery assays for cell entry inhibitors. PMID:24618810

  9. The Phosphatidylserine and Phosphatidylethanolamine Receptor CD300a Binds Dengue Virus and Enhances Infection

    PubMed Central

    Carnec, Xavier; Meertens, Laurent; Dejarnac, Ophélie; Perera-Lecoin, Manuel; Hafirassou, Mohamed Lamine; Kitaura, Jiro; Ramdasi, Rasika; Schwartz, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Dengue virus (DENV) is the etiological agent of the major human arboviral disease. We previously demonstrated that the TIM and TAM families of phosphatidylserine (PtdSer) receptors involved in the phagocytosis of apoptotic cells mediate DENV entry into target cells. We show here that human CD300a, a recently identified phospholipid receptor, also binds directly DENV particles and enhances viral entry. CD300a facilitates infection of the four DENV serotypes, as well as of other mosquito-borne viruses such as West Nile virus and Chikungunya virus. CD300a acts as an attachment factor that enhances DENV internalization through clathrin-mediated endocytosis. CD300a recognizes predominantly phosphatidylethanolamine (PtdEth) and to a lesser extent PtdSer associated with viral particles. Mutation of residues in the IgV domain critical for phospholipid binding abrogate CD300a-mediated enhancement of DENV infection. Finally, we show that CD300a is expressed at the surface of primary macrophages and anti-CD300a polyclonal antibodies partially inhibited DENV infection of these cells. Overall, these data indicate that CD300a is a novel DENV binding receptor that recognizes PtdEth and PtdSer present on virions and enhance infection. IMPORTANCE Dengue disease, caused by dengue virus (DENV), has emerged as the most important mosquito-borne viral disease of humans and is a major global health concern. The molecular bases of DENV-host cell interactions during virus entry are poorly understood, hampering the discovery of new targets for antiviral intervention. We recently discovered that the TIM and TAM proteins, two receptor families involved in the phosphatidylserine (PtdSer)-dependent phagocytic removal of apoptotic cells, interact with DENV particles-associated PtdSer through a mechanism that mimics the recognition of apoptotic cells and mediate DENV infection. In this study, we show that CD300a, a novel identified phospholipid receptor, mediates DENV infection. CD300a

  10. Direct Binding of the Ligand PSG17 to CD9 Requires a CD9 Site Essential for Sperm-Egg Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Ellerman, Diego A.; Ha, Cam; Primakoff, Paul; Myles, Diana G.; Dveksler, Gabriela S.

    2003-01-01

    The function currently attributed to tetraspanins is to organize molecular complexes in the plasma membrane by using multiple cis-interactions. Additionally, the tetraspanin CD9 may be a receptor that binds the soluble ligand PSG17, a member of the immunoglobulin superfamily (IgSF)/CEA subfamily. However, previous data are also consistent with the PSG17 receptor being a CD9 cis-associated protein. In the current study, CD9 extracellular loop (EC2) specifically bound to PSG17-coated beads, indicating a direct interaction between the two proteins. However, CD9-EC2 did not bind to PSG17-coated beads if the CD9-EC2 had the mutation SFQ (173-175) to AAA, a previously studied mutation in egg CD9 that abolishes sperm-egg fusion. Also, PSG17 bound to 293 T cells transfected with wild-type CD9 but not the mutant CD9. By immunofluorescence, PSG17 bound to wild-type eggs but not to CD9 null eggs. The presence of ∼2 μM recombinant PSG17 produced a significant and reversible inhibition (60-80%) of sperm-egg fusion. Thus, we conclude that CD9 is a receptor for PSG17 and when the PSG17 binding site is mutated or occupied, sperm-egg fusion is impaired. These findings suggest that egg CD9 may function in gamete fusion by binding to a sperm IgSF/CEA subfamily member and such proteins have previously been identified on sperm. PMID:14528020

  11. Mechanism of Cd2+ toxicity: Cd2+ inhibits photoactivation of Photosystem II by competitive binding to the essential Ca2+ site.

    PubMed

    Faller, Peter; Kienzler, Katharina; Krieger-Liszkay, Anja

    2005-01-01

    Cadmium (Cd2+) is a well-known highly toxic element. The molecular mechanisms of the Cd2+ toxicity are not well understood. In photosynthetic organisms, toxic Cd2+ concentrations are often in the low-microM range. It has been proposed that low-microM Cd2+ concentrations affect photosynthesis at the level of Photosystem II by inhibiting oxygen evolution. However, in vitro studies on isolated, functional Photosystem II showed that much higher Cd2+ concentrations (mM range) were needed for inhibition. Here we show that Cd2+ in the low-microM range inhibited photoactivation (i.e., assembly of the water splitting complex) in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and in isolated Photosystem II. Photoactivation is the last step in the assembly of Photosystem II before it becomes functional. The exact Cd2+ concentration necessary for inhibition depended on the concentration of calcium. It is proposed that Cd2+ binds competitively to the essential Ca2+ site in Photosystem II during photoactivation. The low Cd2+ concentration needed to inhibit photoactivation suggests that this event is also involved in the Cd2+-induced inhibition of photosynthesis in vivo. This mechanism is likely to be important for Cd2+ toxicity towards photosynthetic organisms in general, at least in unicellular like C. reinhardtii where Cd2+ has easy access to the photosynthetic apparatus. PMID:15620376

  12. Binding of the cytoplasmic domain of CD28 to the plasma membrane inhibits Lck recruitment and signaling.

    PubMed

    Dobbins, Jessica; Gagnon, Etienne; Godec, Jernej; Pyrdol, Jason; Vignali, Dario A A; Sharpe, Arlene H; Wucherpfennig, Kai W

    2016-01-01

    The T cell costimulatory receptor CD28 is required for the full activation of naïve T cells and for the development and maintenance of Foxp3(+) regulatory T (Treg) cells. We showed that the cytoplasmic domain of CD28 was bound to the plasma membrane in resting cells and that ligand binding to CD28 resulted in its release. Membrane binding by the CD28 cytoplasmic domain required two clusters of basic amino acid residues, which interacted with the negatively charged inner leaflet of the plasma membrane. These same clusters of basic residues also served as interaction sites for Lck, a Src family kinase critical for CD28 function. This signaling complex was further stabilized by the Lck-mediated phosphorylation of CD28 Tyr(207) and the subsequent binding of the Src homology 2 (SH2) domain of Lck to this phosphorylated tyrosine. Mutation of the basic clusters in the CD28 cytoplasmic domain reduced the recruitment to the CD28-Lck complex of protein kinase Cθ (PKCθ), which serves as a key effector kinase in the CD28 signaling pathway. Consequently, mutation of either a basic cluster or Tyr(207) impaired CD28 function in mice as shown by the reduced thymic differentiation of FoxP3(+) Treg cells. On the basis of these results, we propose a previously undescribed model for the initiation of CD28 signaling. PMID:27460989

  13. GABP and PU.1 compete for binding, yet cooperate to increase CD18 (beta 2 leukocyte integrin) transcription.

    PubMed

    Rosmarin, A G; Caprio, D G; Kirsch, D G; Handa, H; Simkevich, C P

    1995-10-01

    CD18 (beta 2 leukocyte integrin) is a leukocyte-specific adhesion molecule that plays a crucial role in immune and inflammatory responses. A 79-nucleotide fragment of the CD18 promoter is sufficient to direct myeloid transcription. The CD18 promoter is bound by the B lymphocyte- and myeloid-restricted ets factor, PU.1, and disruption of the PU.1-binding sites significantly reduces promoter activity. However, PU.1 alone cannot fully account for the leukocyte-specific and myeloid-inducible transcription of CD18. We identified a ubiquitously expressed nuclear protein complex of extremely low electrophoretic mobility that also binds to this region of the CD18 promoter. This binding complex is a heterotetramer composed of GABP alpha, and ets factor, and GABP beta, a subunit with homology to Drosophila Notch. GABP alpha competes with the lineage restricted factor, PU.1, for the same critical CD18 ets sites. The CD18 promoter is activated in myeloid cells by transfection with both GABP alpha and GABP beta together, but not by either factor alone. Transfection of non-hematopoietic cells with the two GABP subunits together with PU.1 is sufficient to activate CD18 transcription in otherwise non-permissive cells. Thus, GABP and PU.1 compete for the same binding sites but cooperate to activate CD18 transcription. PMID:7559529

  14. CD4-Negative Cells Bind Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 and Efficiently Transfer Virus to T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Olinger, Gene G.; Saifuddin, Mohammed; Spear, Gregory T.

    2000-01-01

    The ability of human immunodeficiency virus strain MN (HIVMN), a T-cell line-adapted strain of HIV, and X4 and R5 primary isolates to bind to various cell types was investigated. In general, HIVMN bound to cells at higher levels than did the primary isolates. Virus bound to both CD4-positive (CD4+) and CD4-negative (CD4−) cells, including neutrophils, Raji cells, tonsil mononuclear cells, erythrocytes, platelets, and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), although virus bound at significantly higher levels to PBMC. However, there was no difference in the amount of HIV that bound to CD4-enriched or CD4-depleted PBMC. Virus bound to CD4− cells was up to 17 times more infectious for T cells in cocultures than was the same amount of cell-free virus. Virus bound to nucleated cells was significantly more infectious than virus bound to erythrocytes or platelets. The enhanced infection of T cells by virus bound to CD4− cells was not due to stimulatory signals provided by CD4− cells or infection of CD4− cells. However, anti-CD18 antibody substantially reduced the enhanced virus replication in T cells, suggesting that virus that bound to the surface of CD4− cells is efficiently passed to CD4+ T cells during cell-cell adhesion. These studies show that HIV binds at relatively high levels to CD4− cells and, once bound, is highly infectious for T cells. This suggests that virus binding to the surface of CD4− cells is an important route for infection of T cells in vivo. PMID:10954556

  15. Cadmium-binding protein (metallothionein) in carp.

    PubMed Central

    Kito, H; Ose, Y; Sato, T

    1986-01-01

    When carp (Cyprinus carpio) were exposed to 5 and 30 ppm Cd in the water, the contents of Cd-binding protein, which has low molecular weight, increased in the hepatopancreas, kidney, gills and gastrointestinal tract with the duration of exposure. This Cd-binding protein was purified from hepatopancreas, kidney, gills, and spleen of carp administered 2 mg/kg Cd (as CdCl2), intraperitoneally for 6 days. Two Cd-binding proteins were separated by DEAE-Sephadex A-25 column chromatography. These proteins had Cd-mercaptide bond, high cysteine contents (ca. 29-34%), but no aromatic amino acids or histidine. From these characteristics the Cd-binding proteins were identified as metallothionein. By using antiserum obtained from a rabbit to which carp hepatopancreas MT-II had been administered, immunological characteristics between hepatopancreas MT-I, II and kidney MT-II were studied, and a slight difference in antigenic determinant was observed among them. By immunological staining techniques with horseradish peroxidase, the localization of metallothionein was investigated. In the nontreated group, metallothionein was present in the acinar cells of hepatopancreas and renal convoluted tubules. In the Cd-treated group (2 mg/kg IP daily for 3 days), metallothionein was present in the nuclei, sinusoids, and extracellular space of hepatopancreas, in addition to the acinar cells. Carp were bred in 1 ppm Cd, 5 ppm Zn solution, and tap water for 14 days, following transfer to 15 ppm Cd solution, respectively. The survival ratio was the highest in the Zn group followed by Cd-treated and control groups. The metallothionein contents increased in hepatopancreas and kidney in the order: Zn greater than Cd greater than control group. Images FIGURE 5. FIGURE 6. PMID:3519201

  16. Identification of the estrogen receptor Cd-binding sites by chemical modification.

    PubMed

    Nesatyy, Victor J; Rutishauser, Barbara V; Eggen, Rik I L; Suter, Marc J-F

    2005-07-01

    The widely reported interactions of the estrogen receptor (ER) with endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) present in the environment gave raise to public concern and led to a number of screening and testing initiatives on the international level. Recent studies indicated that certain heavy metals, including cadmium, can mimic the effects of the endogenous estrogen receptor agonist 17beta-estradiol, and lead to estrogen receptor activation. Previous studies of the chimeric proteins, which incorporate the ligand-binding domain of the human ER, identified Cys 381, Cys 447, Glu 523, His 524 and Asp 538 as possible sites of interactions with cadmium. In the present study we utilized the rainbow trout ER ligand-binding domain fused to glutathione-S-transferase, and used Cd-shielding against various types of chemical modification of the fusion protein to study non-covalent interactions between the ER and Cd. The distribution of exposed and shielded residues allowed to identify amino acid residues involved in the interaction. Our data indicated preferential protection of Cys groups by cadmium, suggesting their involvement in the interaction. This supports data found in the literature on the strong binding affinity of the thiol group towards metals. However, not all Cys in the fusion protein sequence were protected against chemical modification, illustrating the importance of their chemical environment. In general, the location of rtER-LBD Cys residues implicated in Cd interactions did not confirm assignments made by alanine-scanning mutagenesis for the hER, probably due to differences in experimental setup and fusion proteins used. The involvement of other functional groups such as carboxylic acids in the Cd interactions, though not confirmed, can not be completely ruled out due to the general limitations of the chemical modification approach discussed in detail. Suggestions for an improved experimental setup were made. PMID:15965534

  17. Gill's 'History' restored

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurn, Mark

    2009-06-01

    Note about the restoration of the copy of Sir David Gill's 'A History and Description of the Royal Observatory, Cape of Good Hope' in the Library of the Institute of Astronomy, Cambridge. The book was restored with funds provided by the SHA in thanks for facilities for meetings provided to the Institute.

  18. Refinement of the canine CD1 locus topology and investigation of antibody binding to recombinant canine CD1 isoforms.

    PubMed

    Schjaerff, Mette; Keller, Stefan M; Fass, Joseph; Froenicke, Lutz; Grahn, Robert A; Lyons, Leslie; Affolter, Verena K; Kristensen, Annemarie T; Moore, Peter F

    2016-03-01

    CD1 molecules are antigen-presenting glycoproteins primarily found on dendritic cells (DCs) responsible for lipid antigen presentation to CD1-restricted T cells. Despite their pivotal role in immunity, little is known about CD1 protein expression in dogs, notably due to lack of isoform-specific antibodies. The canine (Canis familiaris) CD1 locus was previously found to contain three functional CD1A genes: canCD1A2, canCD1A6, and canCD1A8, where two variants of canCD1A8, canCD1A8.1 and canCD1A8.2, were assumed to be allelic variants. However, we hypothesized that these rather represented two separate genes. Sequencing of three overlapping bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs) spanning the entire canine CD1 locus revealed canCD1A8.2 and canCD1A8.1 to be located in tandem between canCD1A7 and canCD1C, and canCD1A8.1 was consequently renamed canCD1A9. Green fluorescent protein (GFP)-fused canine CD1 transcripts were recombinantly expressed in 293T cells. All proteins showed a highly positive GFP expression except for canine CD1d and a splice variant of canine CD1a8 lacking exon 3. Probing with a panel of anti-CD1 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) showed that Ca13.9H11 and Ca9.AG5 only recognized canine CD1a8 and CD1a9 isoforms, and Fe1.5F4 mAb solely recognized canine CD1a6. Anti-CD1b mAbs recognized the canine CD1b protein, but also bound CD1a2, CD1a8, and CD1a9. Interestingly, Ca9.AG5 showed allele specificity based on a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) located at position 321. Our findings have refined the structure of the canine CD1 locus and available antibody specificity against canine CD1 proteins. These are important fundamentals for future investigation of the role of canine CD1 in lipid immunity. PMID:26687789

  19. The DNA-binding inhibitor Id3 regulates IL-9 production in CD4(+) T cells.

    PubMed

    Nakatsukasa, Hiroko; Zhang, Dunfang; Maruyama, Takashi; Chen, Hua; Cui, Kairong; Ishikawa, Masaki; Deng, Lisa; Zanvit, Peter; Tu, Eric; Jin, Wenwen; Abbatiello, Brittany; Goldberg, Nathan; Chen, Qianming; Sun, Lingyun; Zhao, Keji; Chen, WanJun

    2015-10-01

    The molecular mechanisms by which signaling via transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) and interleukin 4 (IL-4) control the differentiation of CD4(+) IL-9-producing helper T cells (TH9 cells) remain incompletely understood. We found here that the DNA-binding inhibitor Id3 regulated TH9 differentiation, as deletion of Id3 increased IL-9 production from CD4(+) T cells. Mechanistically, TGF-β1 and IL-4 downregulated Id3 expression, and this process required the kinase TAK1. A reduction in Id3 expression enhanced binding of the transcription factors E2A and GATA-3 to the Il9 promoter region, which promoted Il9 transcription. Notably, Id3-mediated control of TH9 differentiation regulated anti-tumor immunity in an experimental melanoma-bearing model in vivo and also in human CD4(+) T cells in vitro. Thus, our study reveals a previously unrecognized TAK1-Id3-E2A-GATA-3 pathway that regulates TH9 differentiation. PMID:26322481

  20. Specific ganglioside binding to receptor sites on T lymphocytes that couple to ganglioside-induced decrease of CD4 expression

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison, W.J. ); Offner, H. ); Vandenbark, A.A. )

    1989-01-01

    The binding of different gangliosides to rat T-helper lymphocytes was characterized under conditions that decrease CD4 expression on different mammalian T-helper lymphoctyes. Saturation binding by monosialylated ({sub 3}H)-GM{sub 1} to rat T-lymphocytes was time- and temperature-dependent, had a dissociation constant (K{sub D}) of 2.2 {plus minus} 1.4 {mu}M and a binding capacity near 2 fmoles/cell. Competitive inhibition of ({sup 3}H)- GM{sub 1} binding demonstrated a structural-activity related to the number of unconstrained sialic acid moieties on GM{sub 1}-congeneric gangliosides. A comparison between the results of these binding studies and gangliosides-induced decrease of CD4 expression demonstrated that every aspect of ({sup 3}H)-GM{sub 1} binding concurs with ganglioside modulation of CD4 expression. It is concluded that the specific decrease of CD4 expression induced by pretreatment with gangliosides involves the initial process of gangliosides binding to specific sites on CD4{sup {double dagger}} T-helper lymphocytes.

  1. Modes of metal toxicity and impaired branchial ionoregulation in rainbow trout exposed to mixtures of Pb and Cd in soft water.

    PubMed

    Birceanu, Oana; Chowdhury, M Jasim; Gillis, Patricia L; McGeer, James C; Wood, Chris M; Wilkie, Michael P

    2008-09-29

    Models such as the Biotic Ligand Model (BLM) predict how natural organic matter (NOM) and competing ions (e.g., Ca(2+), H(+) and Na(+)) affect metal bioavailability and toxicity in aquatic organisms. However, such models focus upon individual metals, not metal mixtures. This study determined whether Pb and Cd interact at the gill of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) when trout were exposed to environmentally relevant concentrations of these metals (Cd<100 nmol L(-1); Pb<500 nmol L(-1)) in soft (<100 micromol Ca(2+)L(-1)), moderately acidic (pH 6.0) water. The 96-h LC50 for Pb was 482 nmol L(-1), indicating that Pb was one-order of magnitude more toxic in soft, acidic water than in harder, circumneutral pH waters. The LC50 for Cd alone was also low, 6.7 nmol L(-1). Surprisingly, fish acclimated to soft water had multiple populations of Pb-gill and Cd-gill binding sites. A low capacity, high affinity population of Pb-gill binding sites had a B(max) of 18.2 nmol g(-1) wet weight (ww) and apparent K(Pb-gill)=7.05, but a second low affinity population could not be saturated up to free Pb concentrations approaching 4000 nmol L(-1). Two populations of Cd-gill binding sites were characterized: a high affinity, low capacity population with an apparent K(Cd-gill)=7.33 and B(max)=1.73 nmol g(-1) ww, and a low affinity, high capacity population with an apparent K(Cd-gill)=5.86, and B(max)=13.7 nmol g(-1) ww. At low concentrations, Cd plus Pb accumulation was less than additive because Cd out-competed Pb for gill binding sites, which were likely apical Ca(2+)-channels. While disturbances to Ca(2+) influx were caused by Cd alone, Pb alone had no effect. However, Pb exacerbated Cd-induced disturbances to Ca(2+) influx demonstrating that, although Pb- plus Cd-gill binding was less than additive due to competition, the effects (ionic disturbances) were more than additive (synergistic). Pb was also likely binding to intracellular targets, such as branchial carbonic anhydrase

  2. The Crystal Structure of CD8alpha,Beta in Complex With YTS156.7.7 Fab And Interaction With Other CD8 Antibodies Define the Binding Mode of CD8alpha,Beta to MHC Class I

    SciTech Connect

    Shore, D.A.; Issafras, H.; Landais, E.; Teyton, L.; Wilson, I.A.

    2009-05-27

    The CD8{alpha}{beta} heterodimer interacts with class I pMHC on antigen-presenting cells as a co-receptor for TCR-mediated activation of cytotoxic T cells. To characterize this immunologically important interaction, we used monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) specific to either CD8{alpha} or CD8{beta} to probe the mechanism of CD8{alpha}{beta} binding to pMHCI. The YTS156.7 mAb inhibits this interaction and blocks T cell activation. To elucidate the molecular basis for this inhibition, the crystal structure of the CD8{alpha}{beta} immunoglobulin-like ectodomains were determined in complex with mAb YTS156.7 Fab at 2.7 {angstrom} resolution. The YTS156.7 epitope on CD8{beta} was identified and implies that residues in the CDR1 and CDR2-equivalent loops of CD8{beta} are occluded upon binding to class I pMHC. To further characterize the pMHCI/CD8{alpha}{beta} interaction, binding of class I tetramers to CD8{alpha}{beta} on the surface of T cells was assessed in the presence of anti-CD8 mAbs. In contrast to YTS156.7, mAb YTS105.18, which is specific for CD8{alpha}, does not inhibit binding of CD8{alpha}{beta} to class I tetramers, indicating the YTS105.18 epitope is not occluded in the pMHCI/CD8{alpha}{beta} complex. Together, these data indicate a model for the pMHCI/CD8{alpha}{beta} interaction similar to that observed for CD8{alpha}{alpha} in the CD8{alpha}{alpha}/pMHCI complex, but in which CD8{alpha} occupies the lower orientation (membrane proximal to the antigen presenting cell), and CD8{beta} occupies the upper position (membrane distal). The implication of this molecular assembly for the function of CD8{alpha}{beta} in T cell activation is discussed.

  3. An enriched stable-isotope approach to determine the gill-zinc binding properties of juvenile rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) during acute zinc exposures in hard and soft waters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Todd, A.S.; Brinkman, S.; Wolf, R.E.; Lamothe, P.J.; Smith, K.S.; Ranville, J.F.

    2009-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to employ an enriched stable-isotope approach to characterize Zn uptake in the gills of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) during acute Zn exposures in hard water (???140 mg/L as CaCO 3) and soft water (???30 mg/L as CaCO3). Juvenile rainbow trout were acclimated to the test hardnesses and then exposed for up to 72 h in static exposures to a range of Zn concentrations in hard water (0-1,000 ??g/L) and soft water (0-250 ??g/L). To facilitate detection of new gill Zn from endogenous gill Zn, the exposure media was significantly enriched with 67Zn stable isotope (89.60% vs 4.1% natural abundance). Additionally, acute Zn toxicity thresholds (96-h median lethal concentration [LC50]) were determined experimentally through traditional, flow-through toxicity tests in hard water (580 ??g/L) and soft water (110 ??g/L). Following short-term (???3 h) exposures, significant differences in gill accumulation of Zn between hard and soft water treatments were observed at the three common concentrations (75, 150, and 250 ??g/L), with soft water gills accumulating more Zn than hard water gills. Short-term gill Zn accumulation at hard and soft water LC50s (45-min median lethal accumulation) was similar (0.27 and 0.20 ??g/g wet wt, respectively). Finally, comparison of experimental gill Zn accumulation, with accumulation predicted by the biotic ligand model, demonstrated that model output reflected short-term (<1 h) experimental gill Zn accumulation and predicted observed differences in accumulation between hard and soft water rainbow trout gills. Our results indicate that measurable differences exist in short-term gill Zn accumulation following acclimation and exposure in different water hardnesses and that short-term Zn accumulation appears to be predictive of Zn acute toxicity thresholds (96-h LC50s). ?? 2009 SETAC.

  4. Determination of the Exciton Binding Energy in CdSe Quantum Dots

    SciTech Connect

    Meulenberg, R; Lee, J; Wolcott, A; Zhang, J; Terminello, L; van Buuren, T

    2009-10-27

    The exciton binding energy (EBE) in CdSe quantum dots (QDs) has been determined using x-ray spectroscopy. Using x-ray absorption and photoemission spectroscopy, the conduction band (CB) and valence band (VB) edge shifts as a function of particle size have been determined and combined to obtain the true band gap of the QDs (i.e. without and exciton). These values can be compared to the excitonic gap obtained using optical spectroscopy to determine the EBE. The experimental EBE results are compared with theoretical calculations on the EBE and show excellent agreement.

  5. Trace metals in gills of fish from the Arabian Gulf

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Yakoob, S.; Bahloul, M. ); Bou-Olayan, A.H.

    1994-11-01

    Complexation of metals by coordinate linkages with appropriate organic molecules in biological tissues is an important process involved in metal accumulation by aquatic organisms. Fish respiratory systems differ from all other systems because damage to gills has immediate impacts on the rest of the fish's body. Veer et al. observed significant correlation between gill-metal concentration and whole-body weight. More nickel is accumulated in gill tissue of the catfish (Clarias batrachus) than in the liver or intestine. More cadmium is accumulated in gill tissue of the fish Heteropneustes fossilis (Bloch) and Channa punctatus (Bloch) than in the liver or kidney. When exposed to lethal and sublethal concentrations of copper, gills of the freshwater fish Labeo rohita (Hamilton) showed the highest degree of copper accumulation. Petroleum and petrochemical industry wastes contribute significantly to metal enrichment of the Arabian Gulf marine environment. Because accumulation of metal ions is significant in gills, levels of Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni and Pb were investigated in gills of fish from potentially impacted areas along the western side of the Arabian Gulf after the 1991 oil-spill. 15 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Galectin-3 binds to CD45 on diffuse large B-cell lymphoma cells to regulate susceptibility to cell death

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Mary C.; Pang, Mabel; Hsu, Daniel K.; Liu, Fu-Tong; de Vos, Sven; Gascoyne, Randy D.; Said, Jonathan

    2012-01-01

    Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is the most common non-Hodgkin lymphoma and an aggressive malignancy. Galectin-3 (gal-3), the only antiapoptotic member of the galectin family, is overexpressed in DLBCL. While gal-3 can localize to intracellular sites, gal-3 is secreted by DLBCL cells and binds back to the cell surface in a carbohydrate-dependent manner. The major counterreceptor for gal-3 on DLBCL cells was identified as the transmembrane tyrosine phosphatase CD45. Removal of cell-surface gal-3 from CD45 with the polyvalent glycan inhibitor GCS-100 rendered DLBCL cells susceptible to chemotherapeutic agents. Binding of gal-3 to CD45 modulated tyrosine phosphatase activity; removal of endogenous cell-surface gal-3 from CD45 with GCS-100 increased phosphatase activity, while addition of exogenous gal-3 reduced phosphatase activity. Moreover, the increased susceptibility of DLBCL cells to chemotherapeutic agents after removal of gal-3 by GCS-100 required CD45 phosphatase activity. Gal-3 binding to a subset of highly glycosylated CD45 glycoforms was regulated by the C2GnT-1 glycosyltransferase, indicating that specific glycosylation of CD45 is important for regulation of gal-3–mediated signaling. These data identify a novel role for cell-surface gal-3 and CD45 in DLBCL survival and suggest novel therapeutic targets to sensitize DLBCL cells to death. PMID:23065155

  7. Local changes in lipid environment of TCR microclusters regulate membrane binding by the CD3ε cytoplasmic domain

    PubMed Central

    Schubert, David A.; Gordo, Susana; Chu, H. Hamlet

    2012-01-01

    The CD3ε and ζ cytoplasmic domains of the T cell receptor bind to the inner leaflet of the plasma membrane (PM), and a previous nuclear magnetic resonance structure showed that both tyrosines of the CD3ε immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif partition into the bilayer. Electrostatic interactions between acidic phospholipids and clusters of basic CD3ε residues were previously shown to be essential for CD3ε and ζ membrane binding. Phosphatidylserine (PS) is the most abundant negatively charged lipid on the inner leaflet of the PM and makes a major contribution to membrane binding by the CD3ε cytoplasmic domain. Here, we show that TCR triggering by peptide–MHC complexes induces dissociation of the CD3ε cytoplasmic domain from the plasma membrane. Release of the CD3ε cytoplasmic domain from the membrane is accompanied by a substantial focal reduction in negative charge and available PS in TCR microclusters. These changes in the lipid composition of TCR microclusters even occur when TCR signaling is blocked with a Src kinase inhibitor. Local changes in the lipid composition of TCR microclusters thus render the CD3ε cytoplasmic domain accessible during early stages of T cell activation. PMID:23166358

  8. Peptides presenting the binding site of human CD4 for the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein gp120

    PubMed Central

    Meier, Julia; Kassler, Kristin; Sticht, Heinrich

    2012-01-01

    Summary Based on the structure of the HIV-1 glycoprotein gp120 in complex with its cellular receptor CD4, we have designed and synthesized peptides that mimic the binding site of CD4 for gp120. The ability of these peptides to bind to gp120 can be strongly enhanced by increasing their conformational stability through cyclization, as evidenced by binding assays, as well as through molecular-dynamics simulations of peptide–gp120 complexes. The specificity of the peptide–gp120 interaction was demonstrated by using peptide variants, in which key residues for the interaction with gp120 were replaced by alanine or D-amino acids. PMID:23209523

  9. CD14 Mediates Binding of High Doses of LPS but Is Dispensable for TNF-α Production

    PubMed Central

    Borzęcka, Kinga; Płóciennikowska, Agnieszka; Björkelund, Hanna; Sobota, Andrzej

    2013-01-01

    Activation of macrophages with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) involves a sequential engagement of serum LPS-binding protein (LBP), plasma membrane CD14, and TLR4/MD-2 signaling complex. We analyzed participation of CD14 in TNF-α production stimulated with 1–1000 ng/mL of smooth or rough LPS (sLPS or rLPS) and in sLPS binding to RAW264 and J744 cells. CD14 was indispensable for TNF-α generation induced by a low concentration, 1 ng/mL, of sLPS and rLPS. At higher doses of both LPS forms (100–1000 ng/mL), TNF-α release required CD14 to much lower extent. Among the two forms of LPS, rLPS-induced TNF-α production was less CD14-dependent and could proceed in the absence of serum as an LBP source. On the other hand, the involvement of CD14 was crucial for the binding of 1000 ng/mL of sLPS judging from an inhibitory effect of the anti-CD14 antibody. The binding of sLPS was also strongly inhibited by dextran sulfate, a competitive ligand of scavenger receptors (SR). In the presence of dextran sulfate, sLPS-induced production of TNF-α was upregulated about 1.6-fold. The data indicate that CD14 together with SR participates in the binding of high doses of sLPS. However, CD14 contribution to TNF-α production induced by high concentrations of sLPS and rLPS can be limited. PMID:24489448

  10. Multimeric and differential binding of CIN85/CD2AP with two atypical proline-rich sequences from CD2 and Cbl-b*.

    PubMed

    Ceregido, M Angeles; Garcia-Pino, Abel; Ortega-Roldan, Jose L; Casares, Salvador; López Mayorga, Obdulio; Bravo, Jeronimo; van Nuland, Nico A J; Azuaga, Ana I

    2013-07-01

    The CD2AP (CD2-associated protein) and CIN85 (Cbl-interacting protein of 85 kDa) adaptor proteins each employ three Src homology 3 (SH3) domains to cluster protein partners and ensure efficient signal transduction and down-regulation of tyrosine kinase receptors. Using NMR, isothermal titration calorimetry and small-angle X-ray scattering methods, we have characterized several binding modes of the N-terminal SH3 domain (SH3A) of CD2AP and CIN85 with two natural atypical proline-rich regions in CD2 (cluster of differentiation 2) and Cbl-b (Casitas B-lineage lymphoma), and compared these data with previous studies and published crystal structures. Our experiments show that the CD2AP-SH3A domain forms a type II dimer with CD2 and both type I and type II dimeric complexes with Cbl-b. Like CD2AP, the CIN85-SH3A domain forms a type II complex with CD2, but a trimeric complex with Cbl-b, whereby the type I and II interactions take place at the same time. Together, these results explain how multiple interactions among similar SH3 domains and ligands produce a high degree of diversity in tyrosine kinase, cell adhesion or T-cell signaling pathways. PMID:23663663

  11. Analyzing the effect of peptide-HLA-binding ability on the immunogenicity of potential CD8+ and CD4+ T cell epitopes in a large dataset.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shufeng; Li, Jintao; Chen, Xiaoling; Wang, Li; Liu, Wei; Wu, Yuzhang

    2016-08-01

    Immunogenicity is a key factor that influences whether a peptide presented by major histocompatibility complex (MHC) can be a T cell epitope. However, peptide immunization experiments have shown that approximately half of MHC class I-binding peptides cannot elicit a T cell response, indicating the importance of analyzing the variables affecting the immunogenicity of MHC-binding peptides. In this study, we hierarchically investigated the contribution of the binding stability and affinity of peptide-MHC complexes to immunogenicity based on the available quantitative data. We found that the immunogenicity of peptides presented by human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I molecules was still predictable using the experimental binding affinity, although approximately one-third of the peptides with a binding affinity stronger than 500 nM were non-immunogenic, whereas the immunogenicity of HLA-II-presented peptides was predicted well using the experimental affinity and even the predicted affinity. The positive correlation between the binding affinity and stability was only observed in peptide-HLA-I complexes with a binding affinity stronger than 500 nM, which suggested that the stability alone could not be used for the prediction of immunogenicity. A characterization and comparison of the 'holes' in the CD8+ and CD4+ T cell repertoire provided an explanation for the observed differences between the immunogenicity of peptides presented by HLA class I and II molecules. We also provided the optimal affinity threshold for the potential CD4+ and CD8+ T cell epitopes. Our results provide important insights into the cellular immune response and the accurate prediction of T cell epitopes. PMID:27094547

  12. Real Time Analysis of Binding between Rituximab (anti-CD20 antibody) and B Lymphoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Liang; Lin, Peiling; Chisti, Mohammad M.; Rehman, Abdul; Zeng, Xiangqun

    2013-01-01

    CD20, expressed on greater than 90% of B-lymphocytic lymphomas, is an attractive target for antibody therapy. Rituximab is a chimeric murine/human-engineered monoclonal antibody and can selectively deplete CD20-expressing cells in peripheral blood and lymphoid tissues. The immobilization of B-lymphoblast-like Burkitt's lymphoma Raji cells on the quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) gold electrode surface using RGD tripeptide was electrochemically confirmed. The real-time processes of attachment of Raji cells on the gold electrode and the subsequent binding of Rituximab to the cells were studied using QCM biosensor. The interaction between Rituximab and Raji cells led to the increased resonant frequency shifts (Δf0) in the studied antibody concentration range from 5 to 250 µg mL−1 following the Langmuir adsorption model. From these observations, the apparent binding constant between a single-layer of Rituximab and Raji cells was calculated to be 1.6×106 M−1. Control experiments using other therapeutic antibodies (i.e., Trastuzumab and Bevacizumab) and different cells (i.e., T cells and endothelial cells) proved the specific interaction between Rituximab and B cells. The effects of Ca2+ and Mn2+ ions on the Rituximab-Raji cell interaction were also studied providing the enhanced QCM signals, in particular, further indicating that CD20 is a calcium ion channel that can transport these metal ions into the cells and accelerate the cell lysis induced by Rituximab. Thus the real time capability of QCM and its simplicity of operation are highly suitable for multipurpose studies on living cells including cell-immobilization, cytotoxicity of drugs, and the cell action mechanisms. PMID:23926879

  13. Soluble CD163 masks fibronectin-binding protein A-mediated inflammatory activation of Staphylococcus aureus infected monocytes.

    PubMed

    Kneidl, Jessica; Mysore, Vijayashree; Geraci, Jennifer; Tuchscherr, Lorena; Löffler, Bettina; Holzinger, Dirk; Roth, Johannes; Barczyk-Kahlert, Katarzyna

    2014-03-01

    Binding to fibronectin (FN) is a crucial pathogenic factor of Staphylococcus aureus mediated by fibronectin-binding protein A (FnBP-A) and extracellular adherence protein (Eap). Recently, we have shown that binding of soluble CD163 (sCD163) to FN linked to these molecules exhibits anti-microbial effects by enhancing phagocytosis and killing activity of S. aureus-infected monocytes. However, it remained unclear whether sCD163 also influences the monocytic activation status. Using genetically modified staphylococcal strains we now identified FnBP-A, but not Eap, as activator of the inflammatory response of monocytes to infection. FnBP-A-mediated inflammatory activation was masked by sCD163 binding to S. aureus promoting efficient pathogen elimination. Thus, sCD163 protects monocytes from overwhelming activation upon staphylococcal infection by dampening the secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines TNFα, IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-8 and DAMP molecule MRP8/14. Moreover, sCD163 limited expression of pro-apoptotic transcription factor NR4A1 induced during S. aureus infection and inhibited induction of chemokine CXCL2promoting survival of staphylococci in vivo. sCD163-mediated effects were not due to general immunosuppression since MAP kinase activation and ROS production were unaltered during infection of monocytes with sCD163-bound bacteria. Thus, sCD163 promotes a specific defence of the immune system against FnBP-A-mediated inflammatory activation enabling successful pathogen elimination, tissue recovery and resolution of inflammation. PMID:24118665

  14. Ablation of nectin4 binding compromises CD46 usage by a hybrid vesicular stomatitis virus/measles virus.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu-Ping; Russell, Samuel P; Ayala-Breton, Camilo; Russell, Stephen J; Peng, Kah-Whye

    2014-02-01

    Measles virus (MV) immunosuppression is due to infection of SLAM-positive immune cells, whereas respiratory shedding and virus transmission are due to infection of nectin4-positive airway epithelial cells. The vaccine lineage MV strain Edmonston (MV-Edm) acquired an additional tropism for CD46 which is the basis of its oncolytic specificity. VSVFH is a vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) encoding the MV-Edm F and H entry proteins in place of G. The virus spreads faster than MV-Edm and is highly fusogenic and a potent oncolytic. To determine whether ablating nectin4 tropism from VSVFH might prevent shedding, increasing its safety profile as an oncolytic, or might have any effect on CD46 binding, we generated VSVFH viruses with H mutations that disrupt attachment to SLAM and/or nectin4. Disruption of nectin4 binding reduced release of VSVFH from the basolateral side of differentiated airway epithelia composed of Calu-3 cells. However, because nectin4 and CD46 have substantially overlapping receptor binding surfaces on H, disruption of nectin4 binding compromised CD46 binding and greatly diminished the oncolytic potency of these viruses on human cancer cells. Thus, our results support continued preclinical development of VSVFH without ablation of nectin4 binding. PMID:24335299

  15. Impaired memory CD8 T cell development in the absence of methyl-CpG-binding domain protein 2.

    PubMed

    Kersh, Ellen N

    2006-09-15

    Intracellular differentiation events that determine which cells develop into memory CD8 T cells are currently incompletely understood. Methyl-CpG-binding domain protein 2 (MBD2) is a transcriptional repressor that binds to methylated DNA and mediates the biological consequences of epigenetic gene methylation. The role of MBD2 during the differentiation of naive CD8 T cells into effector and memory cells was determined following acute infection of MBD2-deficient mice with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus. Despite rapid viral clearance and an efficient primary effector CD8 T cell response, reduced numbers of Ag-specific memory CD8 T cells were observed. Importantly, the appearance of precursor memory cells (IL-7Ralphahigh) was delayed. The remaining MBD2(-/-) memory cells were not fully protective during rechallenge, and memory cell characteristics were altered with regard to surface markers (IL-7Ralpha, KLRG-1, CD27, and others) and cytokine production. The defect was CD8 T cell intrinsic, because memory cell development was also delayed when MBD2(-/-) CD8 T cells were adoptively transferred into SCID mice. These data demonstrate that MBD2 is a previously unrecognized intracellular factor required for the efficient generation of protective memory CD8 T cells. PMID:16951344

  16. Hepatitis C Virus Induces Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Activation via CD81 Binding for Viral Internalization and Entry

    PubMed Central

    Diao, Jingyu; Pantua, Homer; Ngu, Hai; Komuves, Laszlo; Diehl, Lauri; Schaefer, Gabriele

    2012-01-01

    While epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) has been shown to be important in the entry process for multiple viruses, including hepatitis C virus (HCV), the molecular mechanisms by which EGFR facilitates HCV entry are not well understood. Using the infectious cell culture HCV model (HCVcc), we demonstrate that the binding of HCVcc particles to human hepatocyte cells induces EGFR activation that is dependent on interactions between HCV and CD81 but not claudin 1. EGFR activation can also be induced by antibody mediated cross-linking of CD81. In addition, EGFR ligands that enhance the kinetics of HCV entry induce EGFR internalization and colocalization with CD81. While EGFR kinase inhibitors inhibit HCV infection primarily by preventing EGFR endocytosis, antibodies that block EGFR ligand binding or inhibitors of EGFR downstream signaling have no effect on HCV entry. These data demonstrate that EGFR internalization is critical for HCV entry and identify a hitherto-unknown association between CD81 and EGFR. PMID:22855500

  17. Purification and characteristics of a 30 kDa Cd-binding protein from rat testis cytosol

    SciTech Connect

    Kinoshita, C.M.

    1986-01-01

    The main objective of this dissertation was to purify the 30 kDa Cd-binding protein from rat testis cytosol (Cd-testin) in a form retaining 1 or more moles of Cd per mole of protein, following the addition of /sup 109/CdCl/sub 2/ to cytosol in amounts just sufficient to saturate the 30 kDa peak. Two successful procedures were developed based on (1) ammonium sulfate fractionation, hydrophobic interaction chromatography, and gel filtration; or (2) heat treatment (90/sup 0/C, 5 min) and gel filtration. Application of Method 1 to cytosol labeled with /sup 65/ZnCL/sub 2/ showed that Zn formed a complex analogous to Cd-testin. The Cd content (moles/mole protein) in two preparations of 30 kDa protein was 2.1 to 2.6 (Method 1); Method 2 gave more variable results (1.1 to 3.4). In neither case was a 30 kDa polypeptide detected by 20 SDS PAGE, but a major subunit (22 kDa/pl 4.6) was observed in both preparations, along with smaller subunits. Method 1 gave higher purity (3 spots) but lower yield (about 4% of cytosolic 30 kDa Cd) whereas Method 2 gave a much higher yield (about 45%) but somewhat lower purity based on 2D SDS PAGE. On the basis of these results, Cd-testin consists of subunits rather than a single polypeptide chain. It is concluded that rat testis contains novel proteins binding Cd or Zn, and can be isolated in forms that retain a high Cd content. The manner in which the Cd is bound, and the subunits involved, have not been determined.

  18. The RNA-Binding Protein, Polypyrimidine Tract-Binding Protein 1 (PTBP1) Is a Key Regulator of CD4 T Cell Activation

    PubMed Central

    Valentín-Acevedo, Aníbal

    2016-01-01

    We have previously shown that the RNA binding protein, polypyrimidine tract-binding protein (PTBP1) plays a critical role in regulating the expression of CD40L in activated CD4 T cells. This is achieved mechanistically through message stabilization at late times of activation as well as by altered distribution of CD40L mRNA within distinct cellular compartments. PTBP1 has been implicated in many different processes, however whether PTBP1 plays a broader role in CD4 T cell activation is not known. To examine this question, experiments were designed to introduce shRNA into primary human CD4 T cells to achieve decreased, but not complete ablation of PTBP1 expression. Analyses of shPTB-expressing CD4 T cells revealed multiple processes including cell proliferation, activation-induced cell death and expression of activation markers and cytokines that were regulated in part by PTBP1 expression. Although there was an overall decrease in the steady-state level of several activation genes, only IL-2 and CD40L appeared to be regulated by PTBP1 at the level of RNA decay suggesting that PTBP1 is critical at different regulatory steps of expression that is gene-specific. Importantly, even though the IL-2 protein levels were reduced in cells with lowered PTBP1, the steady-state level of IL-2 mRNA was significantly higher in these cells suggesting a block at the translational level. Evaluation of T cell activation in shPTB-expressing T cells revealed that PTBP1 was linked primarily to the activation of the PLCγ1/ERK1/2 and the NF-κB pathways. Overall, our results reveal the importance of this critical RNA binding protein in multiple steps of T cell activation. PMID:27513449

  19. Titanium dioxide nanoparticles modulate the toxicological response to cadmium in the gills of Mytilus galloprovincialis.

    PubMed

    Della Torre, Camilla; Balbi, Teresa; Grassi, Giacomo; Frenzilli, Giada; Bernardeschi, Margherita; Smerilli, Arianna; Guidi, Patrizia; Canesi, Laura; Nigro, Marco; Monaci, Fabrizio; Scarcelli, Vittoria; Rocco, Lucia; Focardi, Silvano; Monopoli, Marco; Corsi, Ilaria

    2015-10-30

    We investigated the influence of titanium dioxide nanoparticles (nano-TiO2) on the response to cadmium in the gills of the marine mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis in terms of accumulation and toxicity. Mussels were in vivo exposed to nano-TiO2, CdCl2, alone and in combination. Several cellular biomarkers were investigated in gills: ABC transport proteins and metallothioneins at gene/protein (abcb1, abcc-like and mt-20) and functional level, GST activity, NO production and DNA damage (Comet assay). Accumulation of total Cd and titanium in gills as in whole soft tissue was also investigated. Significant responses to Cd exposure were observed in mussel gills as up-regulation of abcb1 and mt-20 gene transcription, increases in total MT content, P-gp efflux and GST activity, DNA damage and NO production. Nano-TiO2 alone increased P-gp efflux activity and NO production. When combined with Cd, nano-TiO2 reduced the metal-induced effects by significantly lowering abcb1 gene transcription, GST activity, and DNA damage, whereas, additive effects were observed on NO production. A lower concentration of Cd was observed in the gills upon co-exposure, whereas, Ti levels were unaffected. A competitive effect in uptake/accumulation of nano-TiO2 and Cd seems to occur in gills. A confirmation is given by the observed absence of adsorption of Cd onto nano-TiO2 in sea water media. PMID:25956639

  20. /sup 113/Cd NMR studies of a 1:1 Cd adduct with an 18-residue finger peptide from HIV-1 nucleic acid binding protein, p7

    SciTech Connect

    South, T.L.; Kim, B.; Summers, M.F.

    1989-01-04

    The Zn/sup 2+/ and Cd/sup 2+/ adducts with the 18-residue peptide comprising the amino acid sequence of the first finger (residues 13 through 30) of retroviral nucleic acid binding proteins p7 from HIV-1 (the causative agent of AIDS) have been prepared. /sup 1/H NMR data indicate that the metal adducts are 1:1 compounds that are stable in aqueous solutions for at least a month. The /sup 113/Cd NMR spectral results for the adduct are presented and analyzed. 26 references, 3 figures.

  1. Characterization of cadmium plasma membrane transport in gills of a mangrove crab Ucides cordatus.

    PubMed

    Ortega, P; Custódio, M R; Zanotto, F P

    2014-12-01

    Membrane pathway for intracellular cadmium (Cd(2+)) accumulation is not fully elucidated in many organisms and has not been studied in crab gill cells. To characterize membrane Cd(2+) transport of anterior and posterior gill cells of Ucides cordatus, a hypo-hyper-regulating crab, a change in intracellular Cd(2+) concentration under various experimental conditions was examined by using FluoZin, a fluorescent probe. The membrane Cd(2+) transport was estimated by the augmentation of FluoZin fluorescence induced by extracellular application of CdCl2 and different inhibitors. Addition of extracellular calcium (Ca(2+)) to the cells affected little the fluorescence of FluoZin, confirming that Cd(2+) was the main ion increasing intracellular fluorescence. Ca(2+) channels blockers (nimodipine and verapamil) decreased Cd(2+) influx as well as vanadate, a Ca(2+)-ATPase blocker. Chelating intracellular Ca(2+) (BAPTA) decreased Cd(2+) influx in gill cells, while increasing intracellular Ca(2+) (caffeine) augmented Cd influx. Cd(2+) and ATP added at different temporal conditions were not effective at increasing intracellular Cd(2+) accumulation. Ouabain (Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase inhibitor) increased Cd(2+) influx probably through a change in intracellular Na and/or a change in cell membrane potential. Routes of Cd(2+) influx, a non-essential metal, through the gill cell plasma membrane of crabs are suggested. PMID:25456216

  2. Envelope residue 375 substitutions in simian–human immunodeficiency viruses enhance CD4 binding and replication in rhesus macaques

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hui; Wang, Shuyi; Kong, Rui; Ding, Wenge; Lee, Fang-Hua; Parker, Zahra; Kim, Eunlim; Learn, Gerald H.; Hahn, Paul; Policicchio, Ben; Brocca-Cofano, Egidio; Deleage, Claire; Hao, Xingpei; Chuang, Gwo-Yu; Gorman, Jason; Gardner, Matthew; Lewis, Mark G.; Hatziioannou, Theodora; Santra, Sampa; Apetrei, Cristian; Pandrea, Ivona; Alam, S. Munir; Liao, Hua-Xin; Shen, Xiaoying; Tomaras, Georgia D.; Farzan, Michael; Chertova, Elena; Keele, Brandon F.; Estes, Jacob D.; Lifson, Jeffrey D.; Doms, Robert W.; Montefiori, David C.; Haynes, Barton F.; Sodroski, Joseph G.; Kwong, Peter D.; Hahn, Beatrice H.; Shaw, George M.

    2016-01-01

    Most simian–human immunodeficiency viruses (SHIVs) bearing envelope (Env) glycoproteins from primary HIV-1 strains fail to infect rhesus macaques (RMs). We hypothesized that inefficient Env binding to rhesus CD4 (rhCD4) limits virus entry and replication and could be enhanced by substituting naturally occurring simian immunodeficiency virus Env residues at position 375, which resides at a critical location in the CD4-binding pocket and is under strong positive evolutionary pressure across the broad spectrum of primate lentiviruses. SHIVs containing primary or transmitted/founder HIV-1 subtype A, B, C, or D Envs with genotypic variants at residue 375 were constructed and analyzed in vitro and in vivo. Bulky hydrophobic or basic amino acids substituted for serine-375 enhanced Env affinity for rhCD4, virus entry into cells bearing rhCD4, and virus replication in primary rhCD4 T cells without appreciably affecting antigenicity or antibody-mediated neutralization sensitivity. Twenty-four RMs inoculated with subtype A, B, C, or D SHIVs all became productively infected with different Env375 variants—S, M, Y, H, W, or F—that were differentially selected in different Env backbones. Notably, SHIVs replicated persistently at titers comparable to HIV-1 in humans and elicited autologous neutralizing antibody responses typical of HIV-1. Seven animals succumbed to AIDS. These findings identify Env–rhCD4 binding as a critical determinant for productive SHIV infection in RMs and validate a novel and generalizable strategy for constructing SHIVs with Env glycoproteins of interest, including those that in humans elicit broadly neutralizing antibodies or bind particular Ig germ-line B-cell receptors. PMID:27247400

  3. Envelope residue 375 substitutions in simian-human immunodeficiency viruses enhance CD4 binding and replication in rhesus macaques.

    PubMed

    Li, Hui; Wang, Shuyi; Kong, Rui; Ding, Wenge; Lee, Fang-Hua; Parker, Zahra; Kim, Eunlim; Learn, Gerald H; Hahn, Paul; Policicchio, Ben; Brocca-Cofano, Egidio; Deleage, Claire; Hao, Xingpei; Chuang, Gwo-Yu; Gorman, Jason; Gardner, Matthew; Lewis, Mark G; Hatziioannou, Theodora; Santra, Sampa; Apetrei, Cristian; Pandrea, Ivona; Alam, S Munir; Liao, Hua-Xin; Shen, Xiaoying; Tomaras, Georgia D; Farzan, Michael; Chertova, Elena; Keele, Brandon F; Estes, Jacob D; Lifson, Jeffrey D; Doms, Robert W; Montefiori, David C; Haynes, Barton F; Sodroski, Joseph G; Kwong, Peter D; Hahn, Beatrice H; Shaw, George M

    2016-06-14

    Most simian-human immunodeficiency viruses (SHIVs) bearing envelope (Env) glycoproteins from primary HIV-1 strains fail to infect rhesus macaques (RMs). We hypothesized that inefficient Env binding to rhesus CD4 (rhCD4) limits virus entry and replication and could be enhanced by substituting naturally occurring simian immunodeficiency virus Env residues at position 375, which resides at a critical location in the CD4-binding pocket and is under strong positive evolutionary pressure across the broad spectrum of primate lentiviruses. SHIVs containing primary or transmitted/founder HIV-1 subtype A, B, C, or D Envs with genotypic variants at residue 375 were constructed and analyzed in vitro and in vivo. Bulky hydrophobic or basic amino acids substituted for serine-375 enhanced Env affinity for rhCD4, virus entry into cells bearing rhCD4, and virus replication in primary rhCD4 T cells without appreciably affecting antigenicity or antibody-mediated neutralization sensitivity. Twenty-four RMs inoculated with subtype A, B, C, or D SHIVs all became productively infected with different Env375 variants-S, M, Y, H, W, or F-that were differentially selected in different Env backbones. Notably, SHIVs replicated persistently at titers comparable to HIV-1 in humans and elicited autologous neutralizing antibody responses typical of HIV-1. Seven animals succumbed to AIDS. These findings identify Env-rhCD4 binding as a critical determinant for productive SHIV infection in RMs and validate a novel and generalizable strategy for constructing SHIVs with Env glycoproteins of interest, including those that in humans elicit broadly neutralizing antibodies or bind particular Ig germ-line B-cell receptors. PMID:27247400

  4. γ-Tilmanocept, a New Radiopharmaceutical Tracer for Cancer Sentinel Lymph Nodes, Binds to the Mannose Receptor (CD206)

    PubMed Central

    Azad, Abul K.; Rajaram, Murugesan V. S.; Metz, Wendy L.; Cope, Frederick O.; Blue, Michael S.; Vera, David R.

    2015-01-01

    γ-Tilmanocept (99mTc-labeled-tilmanocept or [99mTc]-tilmanocept) is the first mannose-containing, receptor-directed, radiolabeled tracer for the highly sensitive imaging of sentinel lymph nodes in solid tumor staging. To elucidate the mannose-binding receptor that retains tilmanocept in this microenvironment, human macrophages were used that have high expression of the C-type lectin mannose receptor (MR; CD206). Cy3-labeled tilmanocept exhibited high specificity binding to macrophages that was nearly abolished in competitive inhibition experiments. Furthermore, Cy3-tilmanocept binding was markedly reduced on macrophages deficient in the MR by small interfering RNA treatment and was increased on MR-transfected HEK 293 cells. Finally, confocal microscopy revealed colocalization of Cy3-tilmanocept with the macrophage membrane MR and binding of labeled tilmanocept to MR+ cells (macrophages and/or dendritic cells) in human sentinel lymph node tissues. Together these data provide strong evidence that CD206 is a major binding receptor for γ-tilmanocept. Identification of CD206 as the γ-tilmanocept–binding receptor enables opportunities for designing receptor-targeted advanced imaging agents and therapeutics for cancer and other diseases. PMID:26202986

  5. Cd2+ and the N-terminal metal-binding domain protect the putative membranous CPC motif of the Cd2+-ATPase of Listeria monocytogenes.

    PubMed Central

    Bal, Nathalie; Wu, Chen Chou; Catty, Patrice; Guillain, Florent; Mintz, Elisabeth

    2003-01-01

    CadA, the Cd(2+)-ATPase of Listeria monocytogenes, contains four cysteine residues: two in the CTNC (Cys-Thr-Asn-Cys) sequence in the cytoplasmic metal-binding domain (MBD), and two in the CPC (Cys-Pro-Cys) sequence in the membrane domain. Taking advantage of DeltaMBD, a truncated version of CadA that lacks the MBD but which still acts as a functional Cd(2+)-ATPase [Bal, Mintz, Guillain and Catty (2001) FEBS Lett. 506, 249-252], we analysed the role of the membrane cysteine residues (studied using DeltaMBD) separately from that of the cysteine residues of the MBD, which were studied using full-length CadA. The role of the cysteines was assessed by reacting DeltaMBD and CadA with N -ethylmaleimide (NEM), an SH-specific reagent, in the presence or absence of Cd(2+). We show here that (i) in both DeltaMBD and CadA, the cysteine residues in the CPC motif are essential for phosphorylation; (ii) in both proteins, Cd(2+) protects against alkylation by NEM; and (iii) in the absence of Cd(2+), the MBD of CadA also protects against alkylation by NEM. Our results suggest that the CPC motif is present in the membrane Cd(2+) transport site(s) and that the MBD protects these site(s). PMID:12383056

  6. Correlation of CD2 binding and functional properties of multimeric and monomeric lymphocyte function-associated antigen 3.

    PubMed

    Dustin, M L; Olive, D; Springer, T A

    1989-02-01

    LFA-3 was purified with an intact (mLFA-3) or an enzymatically removed membrane-anchoring domain (sLFA-3). Gel filtration and sucrose gradient sedimentation showed sLFA-3 to be a single highly glycosylated polypeptide chain in solution, while mLFA-3 formed micelles of 8 LFA-3 monomers. 125I-mLFA-3 bound to Jurkat T leukemic cell surface CD2 with much higher avidity than sLFA-3. mLFA-3 binding had characteristics of a multivalent interaction with cell surface CD2 and had an avidity of 1.5 nM for Jurkat cells and 12 nM for resting T cells. Two CD2 mAbs tested did not block mLFA-3 binding: 9-1 and CD2.1. These mAbs were tested in combination with LFA-3 for their ability to activate T cells. The combination of mLFA-3 and CD2.1 mAbs induced a rapid increase in cytosolic free Ca2+ in Jurkat cells which was proportional to mLFA-3 occupation of CD2 sites. sLFA-3 showed no activity in the Ca2+ flux assay. The combination of mLFA-3 and the CD2.1 mAbs significantly stimulated proliferation of PBMC. The combination of mLFA-3 and 9-1 mAbs was weakly or not mitogenic for the same cells. The combination of CD2.1 and sLFA-3 at concentrations up to 480 nM was not consistently mitogenic. Therefore, monomeric LFA-3/CD2 interaction appears to have a relatively low affinity, while multimeric LFA-3 binds with high avidity. T cell activation by binding of LFA-3 to CD2 appears to require occupation of 10(4) to 10(5) CD2 sites, which is likely to occur during adhesion, but is rare in receptor systems with soluble ligands. PMID:2463330

  7. Does Variation of the Inter-Domain Linker Sequence Modulate the Metal Binding Behaviour of Helix pomatia Cd-Metallothionein?

    PubMed Central

    Gil-Moreno, Selene; Jiménez-Martí, Elena; Palacios, Òscar; Zerbe, Oliver; Dallinger, Reinhard; Capdevila, Mercè; Atrian, Sílvia

    2015-01-01

    Snail metallothioneins (MTs) constitute an ideal model to study structure/function relationships in these metal-binding polypeptides. Helix pomatia harbours three MT isoforms: the highly specific CdMT and CuMT, and an unspecific Cd/CuMT, which represent paralogous proteins with extremely different metal binding preferences while sharing high sequence similarity. Preceding work allowed assessing that, although, the Cys residues are responsible for metal ion coordination, metal specificity or preference is achieved by diversification of the amino acids interspersed between them. The metal-specific MT polypeptides fold into unique, energetically-optimized complexes of defined metal content, when binding their cognate metal ions, while they produce a mixture of complexes, none of them representing a clear energy minimum, with non-cognate metal ions. Another critical, and so far mostly unexplored, region is the stretch linking the individual MT domains, each of which represents an independent metal cluster. In this work, we have designed and analyzed two HpCdMT constructs with substituted linker segments, and determined their coordination behavior when exposed to both cognate and non-cognate metal ions. Results unequivocally show that neither length nor composition of the inter-domain linker alter the features of the Zn(II)- and Cd(II)-complexes, but surprisingly that they influence their ability to bind Cu(I), the non-cognate metal ion. PMID:26703589

  8. ASP2408 and ASP2409, novel CTLA4-Ig variants with CD86-selective ligand binding activity and improved immunosuppressive potency, created by directed evolution.

    PubMed

    Oshima, Shinsuke; Karrer, Erik E; Paidhungat, Madan M; Neighbors, Margaret; Chapin, Steven J; Fan, Rong A; Reed, Margaret A; Wu, Kuoting; Wong, Clifford; Chen, Yonghong; Whitlow, Marc; Anderson, Francisco A; Bam, Rujuta A; Zhang, Qian; Larsen, Brent R; Viswanathan, Sridhar; Devens, Bruce H; Bass, Steven H; Higashi, Yasuyuki

    2016-05-01

    The CTLA4-Ig therapeutics abatacept and belatacept inhibit CD28-mediated T cell activation by binding CD80 (B7-1) and CD86 (B7-2) co-stimulatory ligands. Both compounds preferentially bind CD80, yet CD86 has been implicated as the dominant co-stimulatory ligand. Using directed evolution methods, novel CTLA4-Ig variants were created with selective CD86 binding affinity, a property that confers increased immunosuppressive potency and potentially improved efficacy and safety profiles. Relative to abatacept (wild-type CTLA4-Ig), ASP2408 and ASP2409 have 83-fold and 220-fold enhanced binding affinity to CD86 while retaining 1.5-fold and 5.6-fold enhanced binding affinity to CD80, respectively. Improvements in CD86 binding affinity correlates with increased immunosuppressive potencyin vitroandin vivo Our results highlight the power of directed evolution methods to obtain non-intuitive protein engineering solutions and represent the first examples of CD86-selective CTLA4-Ig compounds that have entered clinical trials. PMID:26968452

  9. CD4 Binding Affinity Determines Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1-Induced Alpha Interferon Production in Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells ▿

    PubMed Central

    Haupt, Sabrina; Donhauser, Norbert; Chaipan, Chawaree; Schuster, Philipp; Puffer, Bridget; Daniels, Rod S.; Greenough, Thomas C.; Kirchhoff, Frank; Schmidt, Barbara

    2008-01-01

    Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (PDC) are major producers of type I interferons (IFN) in response to human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection. To better define the underlying mechanisms, we studied the magnitude of alpha IFN (IFN-α) induction by recombinant viruses containing changes in the Env protein that impair or disrupt CD4 binding or expressing primary env alleles with differential coreceptor tropism. We found that the CD4 binding affinity but not the viral coreceptor usage is critical for the attachment of autofluorescing HIV-1 to PDC and for subsequent IFN-α induction. Our results illustrate the importance of the gp120-CD4 interaction in determining HIV-1-induced immune stimulation via IFN-α production. PMID:18579609

  10. Engineering and exploitation of a fluorescent HIV-1 gp120 for live cell CD4 binding assays

    SciTech Connect

    Costantini, Lindsey M.; Irvin, Susan C.; Kennedy, Steven C.; Guo, Feng; Goldstein, Harris; Herold, Betsy C.; Snapp, Erik L.

    2015-02-15

    The HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein, gp120, binds the host cell receptor, CD4, in the initial step of HIV viral entry and infection. This process is an appealing target for the development of inhibitory drugs and neutralizing antibodies. To study gp120 binding and intracellular trafficking, we engineered a fluorescent fusion of the humanized gp120 JRFL HIV-1 variant and GFP. Gp120-sfGFP is glycosylated with human sugars, robustly expressed, and secreted from cultured human cells. Protein dynamics, quality control, and trafficking can be visualized in live cells. The fusion protein can be readily modified with different gp120 variants or fluorescent proteins. Finally, secreted gp120-sfGFP enables a sensitive and easy binding assay that can quantitatively screen potential inhibitors of gp120-CD4 binding on live cells via fluorescence imaging or laser scanning cytometry. This adaptable research tool should aid in studies of gp120 cell biology and the development of novel anti-HIV drugs. - Highlights: • Development of fluorescent protein labeled HIV-1 envelope gp120. • Imaging of gp120 dynamics and trafficking in live cells. • Quantitative visual assay of antibody-mediated inhibition of gp120 binding to CD4 on live cells.

  11. The Extracellular Domain of CD83 Inhibits Dendritic Cell–mediated T Cell Stimulation and Binds to a Ligand on Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lechmann, Matthias; Krooshoop, Daniëlle J.E.B.; Dudziak, Diana; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Kuhnt, Christine; Figdor, Carl G.; Schuler, Gerold; Steinkasserer, Alexander

    2001-01-01

    CD83 is an immunoglobulin (Ig) superfamily member that is upregulated during the maturation of dendritic cells (DCs). It has been widely used as a marker for mature DCs, but its function is still unknown. To approach its potential functional role, we have expressed the extracellular Ig domain of human CD83 (hCD83ext) as a soluble protein. Using this tool we could show that immature as well as mature DCs bind to CD83. Since CD83 binds a ligand also expressed on immature DCs, which do not express CD83, indicates that binding is not a homophilic interaction. In addition we demonstrate that hCD83ext interferes with DC maturation downmodulating the expression of CD80 and CD83, while no phenotypical effects were observed on T cells. Finally, we show that hCD83ext inhibits DC-dependent allogeneic and peptide-specific T cell proliferation in a concentration dependent manner in vitro. This is the first report regarding functional aspects of CD83 and the binding of CD83 to DCs. PMID:11748282

  12. CCR5/CD4/CXCR4 oligomerization prevents HIV-1 gp120IIIB binding to the cell surface

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Muñoz, Laura; Barroso, Rubén; Dyrhaug, Sunniva Y.; Navarro, Gemma; Lucas, Pilar; Soriano, Silvia F.; Vega, Beatriz; Costas, Coloma; Muñoz-Fernández, M. Ángeles; Santiago, César; Frade, José Miguel Rodríguez; Franco, Rafael; Mellado, Mario

    2014-01-01

    CCR5 and CXCR4, the respective cell surface coreceptors of R5 and X4 HIV-1 strains, both form heterodimers with CD4, the principal HIV-1 receptor. Using several resonance energy transfer techniques, we determined that CD4, CXCR4, and CCR5 formed heterotrimers, and that CCR5 coexpression altered the conformation of both CXCR4/CXCR4 homodimers and CD4/CXCR4 heterodimers. As a result, binding of the HIV-1 envelope protein gp120IIIB to the CD4/CXCR4/CCR5 heterooligomer was negligible, and the gp120-induced cytoskeletal rearrangements necessary for HIV-1 entry were prevented. CCR5 reduced HIV-1 envelope-induced CD4/CXCR4-mediated cell-cell fusion. In nucleofected Jurkat CD4 cells and primary human CD4+ T cells, CCR5 expression led to a reduction in X4 HIV-1 infectivity. These findings can help to understand why X4 HIV-1 strains infection affect T-cell types differently during AIDS development and indicate that receptor oligomerization might be a target for previously unidentified therapeutic approaches for AIDS intervention. PMID:24778234

  13. Colorectal Mucus Binds DC-SIGN and Inhibits HIV-1 Trans-Infection of CD4+ T-Lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    van Montfort, Thijs; Sanders, Rogier W.; de Vries, Henry J. C.; Dekker, Henk L.; Herrera, Carolina; Speijer, Dave; Pollakis, Georgios; Paxton, William A.

    2015-01-01

    Bodily secretions, including breast milk and semen, contain factors that modulate HIV-1 infection. Since anal intercourse caries one of the highest risks for HIV-1 transmission, our aim was to determine whether colorectal mucus (CM) also contains factors interfering with HIV-1 infection and replication. CM from a number of individuals was collected and tested for the capacity to bind DC-SIGN and inhibit HIV-1 cis- or trans-infection of CD4+ T-lymphocytes. To this end, a DC-SIGN binding ELISA, a gp140 trimer competition ELISA and HIV-1 capture/ transfer assays were utilized. Subsequently we aimed to identify the DC-SIGN binding component through biochemical characterization and mass spectrometry analysis. CM was shown to bind DC-SIGN and competes with HIV-1 gp140 trimer for binding. Pre-incubation of Raji-DC-SIGN cells or immature dendritic cells (iDCs) with CM potently inhibits DC-SIGN mediated trans-infection of CD4+ T-lymphocytes with CCR5 and CXCR4 using HIV-1 strains, while no effect on direct infection is observed. Preliminary biochemical characterization demonstrates that the component seems to be large (>100kDa), heat and proteinase K resistant, binds in a α1–3 mannose independent manner and is highly variant between individuals. Immunoprecipitation using DC-SIGN-Fc coated agarose beads followed by mass spectrometry indicated lactoferrin (fragments) and its receptor (intelectin-1) as candidates. Using ELISA we showed that lactoferrin levels within CM correlate with DC-SIGN binding capacity. In conclusion, CM can bind the C-type lectin DC-SIGN and block HIV-1 trans-infection of both CCR5 and CXCR4 using HIV-1 strains. Furthermore, our data indicate that lactoferrin is a DC-SIGN binding component of CM. These results indicate that CM has the potential to interfere with pathogen transmission and modulate immune responses at the colorectal mucosa. PMID:25793526

  14. High- and low-affinity binding sites for Cd on the bacterial cell walls of Bacillus subtilis and Shewanella oneidensis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Bhoopesh; Boyanov, Maxim; Bunker, Bruce A.; Kelly, Shelly D.; Kemner, Kenneth M.; Fein, Jeremy B.

    2010-08-01

    Bulk Cd adsorption isotherm experiments, thermodynamic equilibrium modeling, and Cd K edge EXAFS were used to constrain the mechanisms of proton and Cd adsorption to bacterial cells of the commonly occurring Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, Bacillus subtilis and Shewanella oneidensis, respectively. Potentiometric titrations were used to characterize the functional group reactivity of the S. oneidensis cells, and we model the titration data using the same type of non-electrostatic surface complexation approach as was applied to titrations of B. subtilis suspensions by Fein et al. (2005). Similar to the results for B. subtilis, the S. oneidensis cells exhibit buffering behavior from approximately pH 3-9 that requires the presence of four distinct sites, with p Ka values of 3.3 ± 0.2, 4.8 ± 0.2, 6.7 ± 0.4, and 9.4 ± 0.5, and site concentrations of 8.9(±2.6) × 10 -5, 1.3(±0.2) × 10 -4, 5.9(±3.3) × 10 -5, and 1.1(±0.6) × 10 -4 moles/g bacteria (wet mass), respectively. The bulk Cd isotherm adsorption data for both species, conducted at pH 5.9 as a function of Cd concentration at a fixed biomass concentration, were best modeled by reactions with a Cd:site stoichiometry of 1:1. EXAFS data were collected for both bacterial species as a function of Cd concentration at pH 5.9 and 10 g/L bacteria. The EXAFS results show that the same types of binding sites are responsible for Cd sorption to both bacterial species at all Cd loadings tested (1-200 ppm). Carboxyl sites are responsible for the binding at intermediate Cd loadings. Phosphoryl ligands are more important than carboxyl ligands for Cd binding at high Cd loadings. For the lowest Cd loadings studied here, a sulfhydryl site was found to dominate the bound Cd budgets for both species, in addition to the carboxyl and phosphoryl sites that dominate the higher loadings. The EXAFS results suggest that both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial cell walls have a low concentration of very high

  15. CD and MCD Studies of the Effects of Component B Variant Binding on the Biferrous Active Site of Methane Monooxygenase†

    PubMed Central

    Mitić, Nataša; Schwartz, Jennifer K.; Brazeau, Brian J.; Lipscomb, John D.; Solomon, Edward I.

    2008-01-01

    The multi-component soluble form of methane monooxygenase (sMMO) catalyzes the oxidation of methane through activation of O2 at a non-heme biferrous center in the hydroxylase component, MMOH. Reactivity is limited without binding of the sMMO effector protein, MMOB. Past studies show that mutations of specific MMOB surface residues cause large changes in rates of individual steps in the MMOH reaction cycle. To define the structural and mechanistic bases for these observations, CD, MCD, and VTVH MCD spectroscopies coupled with Ligand Field calculations are used to elucidate changes occurring near and at the MMOH biferrous cluster upon binding of MMOB and the MMOB variants. Perturbations to both the CD and MCD are observed upon binding wild-type MMOB and the MMOB variant that similarly increases O2 reactivity. MMOB variants that do not greatly increase O2 reactivity fail to cause one or both of these changes. LF calculations indicate that reorientation of the terminal glutamate on Fe2 reproduces the spectral perturbations in MCD. Although this structural change allows O2 to bridge the diiron site and shifts the redox active orbitals for good overlap, it is not sufficient for enhanced O2 reactivity of the enzyme. Binding of the T111Y-MMOB variant to MMOH induces the MCD, but not CD changes, and causes only a small increase in reactivity. Thus, both the geometric rearrangement at Fe2 (observed in MCD) coupled with a more global conformational change that may control O2 access (probed by CD), induced by MMOB binding, are critical factors in the reactivity of sMMO. PMID:18627173

  16. Regulation of B Cell Functions by the Sialic Acid-Binding Receptors Siglec-G and CD22

    PubMed Central

    Jellusova, Julia; Nitschke, Lars

    2011-01-01

    B cell antigen receptor (BCR) engagement can lead to many different physiologic outcomes. To achieve an appropriate response, the BCR signal is interpreted in the context of other stimuli and several additional receptors on the B cell surface participate in the modulation of the signal. Two members of the Siglec (sialic acid-binding immunoglobulin-like lectin) family, CD22 and Siglec-G have been shown to inhibit the BCR signal. Recent findings indicate that the ability of these two receptors to bind sialic acids might be important to induce tolerance to self-antigens. Sialylated glycans are usually absent on microbes but abundant in higher vertebrates and might therefore provide an important tolerogenic signal. Since the expression of the specific ligands for Siglec-G and CD22 is tightly regulated and since Siglecs are not only able to bind their ligands in trans but also on the same cell surface this might provide additional mechanisms to control the BCR signal. Although both Siglec-G and CD22 are expressed on B cells and are able to inhibit BCR mediated signaling, they also show unique biological functions. While CD22 is the dominant regulator of calcium signaling on conventional B2 cells and also seems to play a role on marginal zone B cells, Siglec-G exerts its function mainly on B1 cells and influences their lifespan and antibody production. Both Siglec-G and CD22 have also recently been linked to toll-like receptor signaling and may provide a link in the regulation of the adaptive and innate immune response of B cells. PMID:22566885

  17. Characterization of Self-Assembled Monolayers of Peptide Mimotopes of CD20 Antigen and Their Binding with Rituximab.

    PubMed

    Leo, Norman; Shang, Yuqin; Yu, Jing-jiang; Zeng, Xiangqun

    2015-12-29

    CD20, expressed in greater than 90% of B-lymphocytic lymphomas, is a target for antibody therapy. Rituximab is a chimeric therapeutic monoclonal antibody (mAb) against the protein CD20, allowing it to destroy B cells and to treat lymphoma, leukemia, transplant rejection, and autoimmune disorder. In this work, the binding of rituximab to self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of peptide mimotopes of CD20 antigen was systematically characterized. Four peptide mimotopes of CD 20 antigen were selected from the literature and redesigned to allow their SAM immobilizations on gold electrodes through a peptide linker with cysteine. The bindings of these peptides with rituximab and control mAbs (trastuzumab and bevacizumab) were characterized by quartz crystal microbalance (QCM). Among the four peptide mimotopes initially selected, the peptide designated as CN-14 (CGSGSGSWPRWLEN) was the most selective and sensitive for rituximab binding. The CN-14 SAM was further characterized by ellipsometry and atomic force microscopy. The thickness of the CN-14 SAM film was approximately 32 Å, and the CN-14 SAM is suggested to be stabilized by a salt bridge of Arg-10 and Glu-13 between CN-14 peptides. The CN-14 salt bridge was evaluated by a series of modifications to the CN-14 peptide sequence and characterized by QCM. The CN-14 amide variant produced a better affinity to rituximab than CN-14 without a significant impact on selectivity. As the pKa of the Glu residue of CN-14 increased, the affinity of the SAM to rituximab increased, whereas the selectivity decreased. This was attributed to the weakening of the salt bridge between the CN-14 Arg-10 and Glu-13 at higher pKa values for Glu-13. Our study shows that peptide mimotopes have potential benefits in sensor applications, as the peptide-peptide interactions in the SAMs can be manipulated by the addition of functional groups to the peptide to influence the binding of target proteins. PMID:26609837

  18. Kinetic and structural analysis of mutant CD4 receptors that are defective in HIV gp120 binding

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Hao; Myszka, David G.; Tendian, Susan W.; Brouillette, Christie G.; Sweet, Ray W.; Chaiken, Irwin M.; Hendrickson, Wayne A.

    1996-01-01

    The T-cell antigen coreceptor CD4 also serves as the receptor for the envelope glycoprotein gp120 of HIV. Extensive mutational analysis of CD4 has implicated residues from a portion of the extracellular amino-terminal domain (D1) in gp120 binding. However, none of these proteins has been fully characterized biophysically, and thus the precise effects on molecular structure and binding interactions are unknown. In the present study, we produced soluble versions of three mutant CD4 molecules (F43V, G47S, and A55F) and characterized their structural properties, thermostability, and ability to bind gp120. Crystallographic and thermodynamic analysis showed minimal structural alterations in the F43V and G47S mutant proteins, which have solvent-exposed mutant side chains. In contrast, some degree of disorder appears to exist in the folded state of A55F, as a result of mutating a buried side chain. Real time kinetic measurements of the interaction of the mutant proteins with gp120 showed affinity decreases of 5-fold for G47S, 50-fold for A55F, and 200-fold for F43V. Although both rate constants for the binding reaction were affected by these mutations, the loss in affinity was mainly due to a decrease in on rates, with less drastic changes occurring in the off rates. These observations suggest the involvement of conformational adaptation in the CD4–gp120 interaction. Together, the structural and kinetic data confirm that F43V is a critical residue in gp120 recognition site, which may also include main chain interactions at residue Gly-47. PMID:8986758

  19. The in vitro Biochemical Characterization of an HIV-1 Restriction Factor APOBEC3F: Importance of Loop 7 on Both CD1 and CD2 for DNA Binding and Deamination.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qihan; Xiao, Xiao; Wolfe, Aaron; Chen, Xiaojiang S

    2016-07-01

    APOBEC3F (A3F) is a member of the apolipoprotein B mRNA-editing enzyme catalytic polypeptide-like (APOBEC) family of proteins that can deaminate cytosine (C) to uracil (U) on nucleic acids. A3F is one of the four APOBEC members with two Zn-coordinated homologous cytosine deaminase (CD) domains, with the others being A3G, A3D, and A3B. Here we report the in vitro characterization of DNA binding and deaminase activities using purified wild-type and various mutant proteins of A3F from an Escherichia coli expression system. We show that even though CD1 is catalytically inactive and CD2 is the active deaminase domain, presence of CD1 on the N-terminus of CD2 enhances the deaminase activity by over an order of magnitude. This enhancement of CD2 catalytic activity is mainly through the increase of substrate single-stranded (ss) DNA binding by the N-terminal CD1 domain. We further show that the loop 7 of both CD1 and CD2 of A3F plays an important role for ssDNA binding for each individual domain, as well as for the deaminase activity of CD2 domain in the full-length A3F. PMID:27063502

  20. Honey bee odorant-binding protein 14: effects on thermal stability upon odorant binding revealed by FT-IR spectroscopy and CD measurements.

    PubMed

    Schwaighofer, Andreas; Kotlowski, Caroline; Araman, Can; Chu, Nam; Mastrogiacomo, Rosa; Becker, Christian; Pelosi, Paolo; Knoll, Wolfgang; Larisika, Melanie; Nowak, Christoph

    2014-03-01

    In the present work, we study the effect of odorant binding on the thermal stability of honey bee (Apis mellifera L.) odorant-binding protein 14. Thermal denaturation of the protein in the absence and presence of different odorant molecules was monitored by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and circular dichroism (CD). FT-IR spectra show characteristic bands for intermolecular aggregation through the formation of intermolecular β-sheets during the heating process. Transition temperatures in the FT-IR spectra were evaluated using moving-window 2D correlation maps and confirmed by CD measurements. The obtained results reveal an increase of the denaturation temperature of the protein when bound to an odorant molecule. We could also discriminate between high- and low-affinity odorants by determining transition temperatures, as demonstrated independently by the two applied methodologies. The increased thermal stability in the presence of ligands is attributed to a stabilizing effect of non-covalent interactions between odorant-binding protein 14 and the odorant molecule. PMID:24362824

  1. Simultaneous determination of Ca, Cu, Ni, Zn and Cd binding strengths with fulvic acid fractions by Schubert's method

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brown, G.K.; MacCarthy, P.; Leenheer, J.A.

    1999-01-01

    The equilibrium binding of Ca2+, Ni2+, Cd2+, Cu2+ and Zn2+ with unfractionated Suwannee river fulvic acid (SRFA) and an enhanced metal binding subfraction of SRFA was measured using Schubert's ion-exchange method at pH 6.0 and at an ionic strength (??) of 0.1 (NaNO3). The fractionation and subfractionation were directed towards obtaining an isolate with an elevated metal binding capacity or binding strength as estimated by Cu2+ potentiometry (ISE). Fractions were obtained by stepwise eluting an XAD-8 column loaded with SRFA with water eluents of pH 1.0 to pH 12.0. Subfractions were obtained by loading the fraction eluted from XAD-8 at pH 5.0 onto a silica gel column and eluting with solvents of increasing polarity. Schuberts ion exchange method was rigorously tested by measuring simultaneously the conditional stability constants (K) of citric acid complexed with the five metals at pH 3.5 and 6.0. The logK of SRFA with Ca2+, Ni2+, Cd2+, Cu2+ and Zn2+ determined simultaneously at pH 6.0 follow the sequence of Cu2+>Cd2+>Ni2+>Zn2+>Ca2+ while all logK values increased for the enhanced metal binding subfraction and followed a different sequence of Cu2+>Cd2+>Ca2+>Ni2+>Zn2+. Both fulvic acid samples and citric acid exhibited a 1:1 metal to ligand stochiometry under the relatively low metal loading conditions used here. Quantitative 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy showed increases in aromaticity and ketone content and decreases in aliphatic carbon for the elevated metal binding fraction while the carboxyl carbon, and elemental nitrogen, phosphorus, and sulfur content did not change. The more polar, elevated metal binding fraction did show a significant increase in molecular weight over the unfractionated SRFA. Copyright (C) 1999 Elsevier Science B.V.

  2. Phage randomization in a charybdotoxin scaffold leads to CD4-mimetic recognition motifs that bind HIV-1 envelope through non-aromatic sequences.

    PubMed

    Li, C; Dowd, C S; Zhang, W; Chaiken, I M

    2001-06-01

    Binding of HIV-1 gp120 to T-cell receptor CD4 initiates conformational changes in the viral envelope that trigger viral entry into host cells. Phage epitope randomization of a beta-turn loop of a charybdotoxin-based miniprotein scaffold was used to identify peptides that can bind gp120 and block the gp120-CD4 interaction. We describe here the display of the charybdotoxin scaffold on the filamentous phage fUSE5, its use to construct a beta-turn library, and miniprotein sequences identified through library panning with immobilized Env gp120. Competition enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) identified high-frequency phage selectants for which specific gp120 binding was competed by sCD4. Several of these selectants contain hydrophobic residues in place of the Phe that occurs in the gp120-binding beta-turns of both CD4 and previously identified scorpion toxin CD4 mimetics. One of these selectants, denoted TXM[24GQTL27], contains GQTL in place of the CD4 beta-turn sequence 40QGSF43. TXM[24GQTL27] peptide was prepared using solid-phase chemical synthesis, its binding to gp120 demonstrated by optical biosensor kinetics analysis and its affinity for the CD4 binding site of gp120 confirmed by competition ELISA. The results demonstrate that aromatic-less loop-containing CD4 recognition mimetics can be formed with detectable envelope protein binding within a beta-turn of the charybdotoxin miniprotein scaffold. The results of this work establish a methodology for phage display of a charybdotoxin miniprotein scaffold and point to the potential value of phage-based epitope randomization of this miniprotein for identifying novel CD4 mimetics. The latter are potentially useful in deconvoluting structural determinants of CD4-HIV envelope recognition and possibly in designing antagonists of viral entry. PMID:11437954

  3. Diphosphoryl lipid A from Rhodobacter sphaeroides inhibits complexes that form in vitro between lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-binding protein, soluble CD14, and spectrally pure LPS.

    PubMed Central

    Jarvis, B W; Lichenstein, H; Qureshi, N

    1997-01-01

    An early event in septic shock is the activation of macrophages by a complex consisting of lipopolysaccharide (LPS), LPS-binding protein (LBP), and the cell surface antigen CD14. The complexes that form between [3H]ReLPS (ReLPS is deep-rough-chemotype hexacyl LPS from E. coli D31m4), soluble CD14 (sCD14), and LBP were analyzed by two independent methods, native (nondenaturing) gel electrophoresis and size-exclusion high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). This is the first reported use of HPLC to purify and study LPS-protein complexes. The binding of [3H]ReLPS to LBP and sCD14 was inhibited by preincubation with diphosphoryl lipid A from Rhodobacter sphaeroides (RsDPLA), a potent LPS antagonist. In addition, [3H]ReLPS bound to LBP and to a truncated form of sCD14 [sCD14(1-152)] that contained the LPS binding domain. Binding to both proteins was blocked by RsDPLA. Thus, RsDPLA competes in a 1:1 ratio for the same or nearby binding sites on ReLPS complexes. Analysis by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of aggregated ReLPS eluting from the HPLC indicated that only LBP, not sCD14, was bound to the aggregated ReLPS. This finding supports the binary model of LPS complex formation with LBP and sCD14. PMID:9234747

  4. Combined application of a laser ablation-ICP-MS assay for screening and ESI-FTICR-MS for identification of a Cd-binding protein in Spinacia oleracea L. after exposure to Cd.

    PubMed

    Polatajko, Aleksandra; Feldmann, Ingo; Hayen, Heiko; Jakubowski, Norbert

    2011-10-01

    We have studied the binding of the toxic element Cd to plant proteins and have used for this purpose spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) plants treated with 50 μM Cd(II) as a model system. Laser ablation ICP-MS has been applied for the screening of Cd-binding proteins after separation by native anodal polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (AN-PAGE) and electroblotting onto membranes. The main Cd-carrying protein band was isolated and investigated by nano-electrospray ionization-Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR) mass spectrometry after tryptic digestion. By this procedure, the main Cd-binding protein was identified as ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO). The latter enzyme has been discussed in the literature to be affected in its activity by oxidative stress induced by Cd. However, in this paper it is demonstrated for the first time that RuBisCO directly binds Cd and thus may be directly altered by this toxic element. A commercially available protein standard was used to verify direct binding of Cd(II) to the protein, even without metabolisation. The resulting metal-protein complex was shown to be stable enough to survive AN-PAGE separation and electroblotting. By the use of size exclusion chromatography coupled with ICP-MS it was demonstrated that the RuBisCO protein standard shows similar metal binding properties to Cd. Furthermore, essential elements such as Mn(II), Fe(II) and Cu(II), which are known to possibly replace the RuBisCO activator Mg(II), were investigated in addition to Zn(II). Again, similar binding properties in comparison to the plant protein were observed. PMID:21850305

  5. High-affinity ligand probes of CD22 overcome the threshold set by cis ligands to allow for binding, endocytosis, and killing of B cells.

    PubMed

    Collins, Brian E; Blixt, Ola; Han, Shoufa; Duong, Bao; Li, Hongyi; Nathan, Jay K; Bovin, Nicolai; Paulson, James C

    2006-09-01

    CD22 (Siglec-2) is a key regulator of B cell signaling whose function is modulated by interaction with extracellular glycan ligands mediated through its N-terminal Ig domain. Its preferred ligand is the sequence Sia alpha2-6Gal that is abundantly expressed on N-linked glycans of B cell glycoproteins, and by binding to CD22 in cis causes CD22 to appear "masked" from binding to synthetic sialoside probes. Yet, despite the presence of cis ligands, CD22 redistributes to sites of cell contact by binding to trans ligands on neighboring cells. In this study, we demonstrate the dynamic equilibrium that exists between CD22 and its cis and trans ligands, using a high-affinity multivalent sialoside probe that competes with cis ligands and binds to CD22 on native human and murine B cells. Consistent with the constitutive endocytosis reported for CD22, the probes are internalized once bound, demonstrating that CD22 is an endocytic receptor that can carry ligand-decorated "cargo" to intracellular compartments. Conjugation of the sialoside probes to the toxin saporin resulted in toxin uptake and toxin-mediated killing of B lymphoma cell lines, suggesting an alternative approach for targeting CD22 for treatment of B cell lymphomas. PMID:16920935

  6. The c.503T>C Polymorphism in the Human KLRB1 Gene Alters Ligand Binding and Inhibitory Potential of CD161 Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Rother, Sascha; Hundrieser, Joachim; Pokoyski, Claudia; Kollrich, Sonja; Borns, Katja; Blasczyk, Rainer; Poehnert, Daniel; Klempnauer, Jürgen; Schwinzer, Reinhard

    2015-01-01

    Studying genetic diversity of immunologically relevant molecules can improve our knowledge on their functional spectrum in normal immune responses and may also uncover a possible role of different variants in diseases. We characterized the c.503T>C polymorphism in the human KLRB1 gene (Killer cell lectin-like receptor, subfamily B, member 1) coding for the cell surface receptor CD161. CD161 is expressed by subsets of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells and the great majority of CD56+ natural killer (NK) cells, acting as inhibitory receptor in the latter population. Genotyping a cohort of 118 healthy individuals revealed 40% TT homozygotes, 46% TC heterozygotes, and 14% carriers of CC. There was no difference in the frequency of CD161 expressing CD4+ and CD8+ T cells between the different genotypes. However, the frequency of CD161+ NK cells was significantly decreased in CC carriers as compared to TT homozygotes. c.503T>C causes an amino acid exchange (p.Ile168Thr) in an extracellular loop of the CD161 receptor, which is regarded to be involved in binding of its ligand Lectin-like transcript 1 (LLT1). Binding studies using soluble LLT1-Fc on 293 transfectants over-expressing CD161 receptors from TT or CC carriers suggested diminished binding to the CC variant. Furthermore, triggering of CD161 either by LLT1 or anti-CD161 antibodies inhibited NK cell activation less effectively in cells from CC individuals than cells from TT carriers. These data suggest that the c.503T>C polymorphism is associated with structural alterations of the CD161 receptor. The regulation of NK cell homeostasis and activation apparently differs between carriers of the CC and TT variant of CD161. PMID:26309225

  7. CD4 peptide-protein conjugates, but not recombinant human CD4, bind to recombinant gp120 from the human immunodeficiency virus in the presence of serum from AIDS patients.

    PubMed Central

    Ghetie, V; Slaughter, C; Wheeler, H T; Uhr, J W; Vitetta, E S

    1991-01-01

    Sera from human immunodeficiency virus-positive (HIV+; Walter Reed stage 6) individuals inhibit the interaction between recombinant human CD4 and recombinant gp120 from HIV (rCD4 and rgp120, respectively), thereby interfering with the ability of soluble rCD4 to block infection with HIV or rCD4-toxin conjugates to kill HIV-infected cells. In this report we demonstrate that the inhibitory activity of such sera is caused primarily by anti-gp120 antibodies that do not recognize the CD4 interaction site on gp120. To circumvent the problem of inhibition, we have generated a construct containing a peptide of CD4 (residues 41-84) conjugated to ovalbumin (three to five peptides per molecule). This multivalent conjugate binds to rgp120 and binding is not inhibited by antibodies in HIV+ sera. PMID:2062847

  8. Relationship of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 gp120 third variable loop to a component of the CD4 binding site in the fourth conserved region.

    PubMed Central

    Wyatt, R; Thali, M; Tilley, S; Pinter, A; Posner, M; Ho, D; Robinson, J; Sodroski, J

    1992-01-01

    Neutralizing antibodies that recognize the human immunodeficiency virus gp120 exterior envelope glycoprotein and are directed against either the third variable (V3) loop or conserved, discontinuous epitopes overlapping the CD4 binding region have been described. Here we report several observations that suggest a structural relationship between the V3 loop and amino acids in the fourth conserved (C4) gp120 region that constitute part of the CD4 binding site and the conserved neutralization epitopes. Treatment of the gp120 glycoprotein with ionic detergents resulted in a V3 loop-dependent masking of both linear C4 epitopes and discontinuous neutralization epitopes overlapping the CD4 binding site. Increased recognition of the native gp120 glycoprotein by an anti-V3 loop monoclonal antibody, 9284, resulted from from single amino acid changes either in the base of the V3 loop or in the gp120 C4 region. These amino acid changes also resulted in increased exposure of conserved epitopes overlapping the CD4 binding region. The replication-competent subset of these mutants exhibited increased sensitivity to neutralization by antibody 9284 and anti-CD4 binding site antibodies. The implied relationship of the V3 loop, which mediates post-receptor binding steps in virus entry, and components of the CD4 binding region may be important for the interaction of these functional gp120 domains and for the observed cooperativity of neutralizing antibodies directed against these regions. Images PMID:1279195

  9. Strain-Specific V3 and CD4 Binding Site Autologous HIV-1 Neutralizing Antibodies Select Neutralization-Resistant Viruses

    SciTech Connect

    Moody, M.  Anthony; Gao, Feng; Gurley, Thaddeus  C.; Amos, Joshua  D.; Kumar, Amit; Hora, Bhavna; Marshall, Dawn  J.; Whitesides, John  F.; Xia, Shi-Mao; Parks, Robert; Lloyd, Krissey  E.; Hwang, Kwan-Ki; Lu, Xiaozhi; Bonsignori, Mattia; Finzi, Andrés; Vandergrift, Nathan  A.; Alam, S.  Munir; Ferrari, Guido; Shen, Xiaoying; Tomaras, Georgia  D.; Kamanga, Gift; Cohen, Myron  S.; Sam, Noel  E.; Kapiga, Saidi; Gray, Elin S.; Tumba, Nancy  L.; Morris, Lynn; Zolla-Pazner, Susan; Gorny, Miroslaw  K.; Mascola, John  R.; Hahn, Beatrice H.; Shaw, George  M.; Sodroski, Joseph  G.; Liao, Hua-Xin; Montefiori, David C.; Hraber, Peter T.; Korber, Bette T.; Haynes, Barton F.

    2015-09-09

    The third variable (V3) loop and the CD4 binding site (CD4bs) of the viral envelope are frequently targeted by neutralizing antibodies (nAbs) in HIV-1-infected individuals. In chronic infection, virus escape mutants repopulate the plasma and V3 and CD4bs nAbs emerge that can neutralize heterologous tier 1 easy-to-neutralize, but not tier 2 difficult-to-neutralize HIV-1 isolates. However, neutralization sensitivity of autologous plasma viruses to this type of nAb response has not been studied. We describe the development and evolution in vivo of antibodies distinguished by their target specificity for V3and CD4bs epitopes on autologous tier 2 viruses but not on heterologous tier 2 viruses. A surprisingly high fraction of autologous circulating viruses was sensitive to these antibodies. These findings demonstrate a role for V3 and CD4bs antibodies in constraining the native envelope trimer in vivo to a neutralization-resistant phenotype, explaining why HIV-1 transmission generally occurs by tier 2 neutralization-resistant viruses.

  10. Strain-Specific V3 and CD4 Binding Site Autologous HIV-1 Neutralizing Antibodies Select Neutralization-Resistant Viruses

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Moody, M.  Anthony; Gao, Feng; Gurley, Thaddeus  C.; Amos, Joshua  D.; Kumar, Amit; Hora, Bhavna; Marshall, Dawn  J.; Whitesides, John  F.; Xia, Shi-Mao; Parks, Robert; et al

    2015-09-09

    The third variable (V3) loop and the CD4 binding site (CD4bs) of the viral envelope are frequently targeted by neutralizing antibodies (nAbs) in HIV-1-infected individuals. In chronic infection, virus escape mutants repopulate the plasma and V3 and CD4bs nAbs emerge that can neutralize heterologous tier 1 easy-to-neutralize, but not tier 2 difficult-to-neutralize HIV-1 isolates. However, neutralization sensitivity of autologous plasma viruses to this type of nAb response has not been studied. We describe the development and evolution in vivo of antibodies distinguished by their target specificity for V3and CD4bs epitopes on autologous tier 2 viruses but not on heterologous tiermore » 2 viruses. A surprisingly high fraction of autologous circulating viruses was sensitive to these antibodies. These findings demonstrate a role for V3 and CD4bs antibodies in constraining the native envelope trimer in vivo to a neutralization-resistant phenotype, explaining why HIV-1 transmission generally occurs by tier 2 neutralization-resistant viruses.« less

  11. Engineering and exploitation of a fluorescent HIV-1 gp120 for live cell CD4 binding assays

    PubMed Central

    Costantini, Lindsey M.; Irvin, Susan C.; Kennedy, Steven C.; Guo, Feng; Goldstein, Harris; Herold, Betsy C.; Snapp, Erik L.

    2014-01-01

    The HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein, gp120, binds the host cell receptor, CD4, in the initial step of HIV viral entry and infection. This process is an appealing target for the development of inhibitory drugs and neutralizing antibodies. To study gp120 binding and intracellular trafficking, we engineered a fluorescent fusion of the humanized gp120 JRFL HIV-1 variant and GFP. Gp120-sfGFP is glycosylated with human sugars, robustly expressed, and secreted from cultured human cells. Protein dynamics, quality control, and trafficking can be visualized in live cells. The fusion protein can be readily modified with different gp120 variants or fluorescent proteins. Finally, secreted gp120-sfGFP enables a sensitive and easy binding assay that can quantitatively screen potential inhibitors of gp120-CD4 binding on live cells via fluorescence imaging or laser scanning cytometry. This adaptable research tool should aid in studies of gp120 cell biology and the development of novel anti-HIV drugs. PMID:25555152

  12. A New Glycan-Dependent CD4-Binding Site Neutralizing Antibody Exerts Pressure on HIV-1 In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Freund, Natalia T.; Horwitz, Joshua A.; Nogueira, Lilian; Sievers, Stuart A.; Scharf, Louise; Scheid, Johannes F.; Gazumyan, Anna; Liu, Cassie; Velinzon, Klara; Goldenthal, Ariel; Sanders, Rogier W.; Moore, John P.; Bjorkman, Pamela J.; Seaman, Michael S.; Walker, Bruce D.; Klein, Florian; Nussenzweig, Michel C.

    2015-01-01

    The CD4 binding site (CD4bs) on the envelope glycoprotein is a major site of vulnerability that is conserved among different HIV-1 isolates. Many broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) to the CD4bs belong to the VRC01 class, sharing highly restricted origins, recognition mechanisms and viral escape pathways. We sought to isolate new anti-CD4bs bNAbs with different origins and mechanisms of action. Using a gp120 2CC core as bait, we isolated antibodies encoded by IGVH3-21 and IGVL3-1 genes with long CDRH3s that depend on the presence of the N-linked glycan at position-276 for activity. This binding mode is similar to the previously identified antibody HJ16, however the new antibodies identified herein are more potent and broad. The most potent variant, 179NC75, had a geometric mean IC80 value of 0.42 μg/ml against 120 Tier-2 HIV-1 pseudoviruses in the TZM.bl assay. Although this group of CD4bs glycan-dependent antibodies can be broadly and potently neutralizing in vitro, their in vivo activity has not been tested to date. Here, we report that 179NC75 is highly active when administered to HIV-1-infected humanized mice, where it selects for escape variants that lack a glycan site at position-276. The same glycan was absent from the virus isolated from the 179NC75 donor, implying that the antibody also exerts selection pressure in humans. PMID:26516768

  13. Loss of cell surface CD47 ‘clustering’ formation and binding avidity to SIRPα facilitate apoptotic cell clearance by macrophage

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Zhiyuan; Bian, Zhen; Shi, Lei; Niu, Shuo; Ha, Bin; Tremblay, Alexandra; Li, Liangwei; Zhang, Xiugen; Paluszynski, John; Liu, Ming; Zen, Ke; Liu, Yuan

    2015-01-01

    CD47, a ‘self’ recognition marker expressed on tissue cells, interacts with immunoreceptor SIRPα expressed on the surface of macrophages to initiate inhibitory signaling that prevents macrophage phagocytosis of healthy host cells. Previous studies have suggested that cells may lose the surface CD47 during aging or apoptosis to enable phagocytic clearance. In the present study, we demonstrate that the level of cell surface CD47 is not decreased but the distribution pattern of CD47 is altered during apoptosis. On non-apoptotic cells, CD47 molecules are clustered in lipid rafts forming ‘punctates’ on the surface, whereas on apoptotic cells, CD47 molecules are diffused on the cell surface following the disassembly of lipid rafts. We show that clustering of CD47 in lipid rafts provides a high binding avidity for cell surface CD47 to ligate macrophage SIRPα, which also presents as clusters, and elicit SIRPα-mediated inhibitory signaling that prevents phagocytosis. In contrast, dispersed CD47 on the apoptotic cell surface is associated a significant reduction of the binding avidity to SIRPα and failure to trigger SIRPα signal transduction. Disruption of lipid rafts with methyl-β-cyclodextrin (MβCD) disrupted CD47 cluster formation on the cell surfaces, leading to decrease of the binding avidity to SIRPα and a concomitant increase of cells being engulfed by macrophages. Taken together, our study reveals that CD47 normally is clustered in lipid rafts on non-apoptotic cells but is diffused in the plasma membrane when apoptosis occurs, and this transformation of CD47 greatly reduces the strength of CD47-SIRPα engagement, resulting in the phagocytosis of apoptotic cells. PMID:26085683

  14. An x-ray absorption spectroscopy study of Cd binding onto a halophilic archaeon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showalter, Allison R.; Szymanowski, Jennifer E. S.; Fein, Jeremy B.; Bunker, Bruce A.

    2016-05-01

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and cadmium (Cd) isotherm experiments determine how Cd adsorbs to the surface of halophilic archaeon Halobacterium noricense. This archaeon, isolated from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) near Carlsbad, New Mexico could be involved with the transport of toxic metals stored in the transuranic waste in the salt mine. The isotherm experiments show that adsorption is relatively constant across the tolerable pH range for H. noricense. The XAS results indicate that Cd adsorption occurs predominately via a sulfur site, most likely sulfhydryl, with the same site dominating all measured pH values.

  15. Sp1 binds two sites in the CD11c promoter in vivo specifically in myeloid cells and cooperates with AP1 to activate transcription.

    PubMed Central

    Noti, J D; Reinemann, B C; Petrus, M N

    1996-01-01

    The leukocyte integrin gene, CD11c, is transcriptionally regulated and is expressed predominantly on differentiated cells of the myelomonocytic lineage. In this study we have demonstrated that the regions -72 to -63 and -132 to -104 of the CD11c promoter contain elements responsible for phorbol ester-induced differentiation of the myeloid cell line HL60. DNase I footprinting analysis revealed that these regions can bind purified Sp1, and supershift analysis with Sp1 antibody confirmed that Sp1 in HL60 nuclear extracts could bind these regions. Transfection analysis of CD11c promoter-chloramphenicol acetyltransferase constructs containing deletions of these Sp1-binding sites revealed that these sites are essential for expression of the CD11c gene in HL60 cells but not in the T-cell line Molt4 or the cervical carcinoma cell line HeLa. Moreover, cotransfection of pPacSp1 along with these CD11c promoter-chloramphenicol acetyltransferase constructs into Sp1-deficient Drosophila Schneider 2 cells verified that these sites are essential for Sp1-dependent expression of the CD11c promoter. In vivo genomic footprinting revealed that Sp1 contacts the CD11c promoter within the regions -69 to -63 and -116 to -105 in phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate-differentiated HL60 cells but not in undifferentiated HL60 cells or in Molt4 or HeLa cells. Cotransfection assays in HL60 cells revealed that Sp1 acts synergistically with Ap1 to activate CD11c. Further, both Sp1 sites are capable of cooperating with AP1. In vitro DNase I footprinting analysis with purified Sp1 and c-jun proteins showed that Sp1 binding could facilitate binding of c-jun. We propose that myeloid-specific expression of the CD11c promoter and is facilitated by cooperative interaction between the Sp1- and Ap1-binding sites. PMID:8649405

  16. Induction of tumor necrosis factor production from monocytes stimulated with mannuronic acid polymers and involvement of lipopolysaccharide-binding protein, CD14, and bactericidal/permeability-increasing factor.

    PubMed Central

    Jahr, T G; Ryan, L; Sundan, A; Lichenstein, H S; Skjåk-Braek, G; Espevik, T

    1997-01-01

    Well-defined polysaccharides, such as beta1-4-linked D-mannuronic acid (poly[M]) derived from Pseudomonas aeruginosa, induce monocytes to produce tumor necrosis factor (TNF) through a pathway involving membrane CD14. In this study we have investigated the effects of soluble CD14 (sCD14), lipopolysaccharide-binding protein (LBP), and bactericidal/permeability-increasing factor (BPI) on poly(M) binding to monocytes and induction of TNF production. We show that LBP increased the TNF production from monocytes stimulated with poly(M). Addition of sCD14 alone had only minor effects, but when it was added together with LBP, a rise in TNF production was seen. BPI was found to inhibit TNF production from monocytes stimulated with poly(M) in the presence of LBP, LBP-sCD14, or 10% human serum. Binding studies showed that poly(M) bound to LBP- and BPI-coated immunowells, while no significant binding of poly(M) to sCD14-coated wells in the absence of serum was observed. Binding of poly(M) to monocytes was also examined by flow cytometry, and it was shown that the addition of LBP or 10% human serum clearly increased the binding of poly(M) to monocytes. BPI inhibited the binding of poly(M) to monocytes in the presence of LBP, LBP-sCD14, or 10% human serum. Our data demonstrate a role for LBP, LBP-sCD14, and BPI in modulating TNF responses of defined polysaccharides. PMID:8975896

  17. Binding of Full-Length HIV-1 gp120 to CD4 Induces Structural Reorientation around the gp120 Core

    SciTech Connect

    Ashish,F.; Garg, R.; Anguita, J.; Krueger, J.

    2006-01-01

    Small-angle x-ray scattering data on the unliganded full-length fully glycosylated HIV-1 gp120, the soluble CD4 (domains 1-2) receptor and their complex in solution are presented. Ab initio structure restorations using these data provides the first look at the envelope shape for the unliganded and the complexed gp120 molecule. Fitting known crystal structures of the unliganded SIV and the complexed HIV gp120 core regions within our resultant shape constraints reveals movement of the V3 loop upon binding.

  18. Effect of cadmium on protein synthesis in gill tissue of marine mollusc Mytilus edulis

    SciTech Connect

    Veldhuizen-Tsoerkan, M.B.; van der Mast, C.A.; Zandee, D.I. )

    1988-09-01

    Mussels have a high capacity to accumulate cadmium and other heavy metals without notable toxic effects. However, they have recently found that cadmium is toxic to M. edulis at a relatively low concentration, as anoxic survival time of the animals was significantly shortened after two weeks of exposure to 50 ppb Cd. Based on this finding, a research was started to study the toxic effects of cadmium at a macromolecular level (proteins, RNA). Mussels were exposed to 250 ppb Cd for short periods. Then excised gills were incubated with {sup 35}s-methionine for 4 hours. In the gill tissue of 7 and 15 days Cd-exposed animals, a significantly decrease in the incorporation rate of the introduced label was found of 30 and 37%, respectively. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis was used to analyze the de novo synthesized gill tissue proteins.

  19. A western type of bacterial gill disease

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fish, F.F.

    1935-01-01

    The first reference to a pathological condition of the gill tissues of salmonid fishes was made by Osburn in 1910. This author in describing a progressive infolding of the opercula of trout, commonly known to hatcherymen as "short gill covers," mentioned a marked proliferation on the gill epithelium as accompanying this condition. Osburn assumed that the club-like appearance of the gill filaments due to the proliferated epithelium was the result of continual irritation of the delicate gill tissue in the absence of the usual protection offered by the normal opercula. Although such a conclusion seems quite logical, it is also possible that Osburn was dealing with "short gill covers" complicated by the unknown bacterial gill disease which was subsequently described by Davis.

  20. Increasing the potency of neutralizing single-domain antibodies by functionalization with a CD11b/CD18 binding domain

    PubMed Central

    Rossotti, Martin A; González-Techera, Andrés; Guarnaschelli, Julio; Yim, Lucia; Camacho, Ximena; Fernández, Marcelo; Cabral, Pablo; Leizagoyen, Carmen; Chabalgoity, José A; González-Sapienza, Gualberto

    2015-01-01

    Recombinant single domain antibodies (nanobodies) constitute an attractive alternative for the production of neutralizing therapeutic agents. Their small size warrants rapid bioavailability and fast penetration to sites of toxin uptake, but also rapid renal clearance, which negatively affects their performance. In this work, we present a new strategy to drastically improve the neutralizing potency of single domain antibodies based on their fusion to a second nanobody specific for the complement receptor CD11b/CD18 (Mac-1). These bispecific antibodies retain a small size (˜30 kDa), but acquire effector functions that promote the elimination of the toxin-immunocomplexes. The principle was demonstrated in a mouse model of lethal toxicity with tetanus toxin. Three anti-tetanus toxin nanobodies were selected and characterized in terms of overlapping epitopes and inhibition of toxin binding to neuron gangliosides. Bispecific constructs of the most promising monodomain antibodies were built using anti Mac-1, CD45 and MHC II nanobodies. When co-administered with the toxin, all bispecific antibodies showed higher toxin-neutralizing capacity than the monomeric ones, but only their fusion to the anti-endocytic receptor Mac-1 nanobody allowed the mice to survive a 10-fold lethal dose. In a model of delayed neutralization of the toxin, the anti- Mac-1 bispecific antibodies outperformed a sheep anti-toxin polyclonal IgG that had shown similar neutralization potency in the co-administration experiments. This strategy should have widespread application in the development of nanobody-based neutralizing therapeutics, which can be produced economically and more safely than conventional antisera. PMID:26192995

  1. Human immunodeficiency virus 1 Tat binds to dipeptidyl aminopeptidase IV (CD26): a possible mechanism for Tat's immunosuppressive activity.

    PubMed

    Gutheil, W G; Subramanyam, M; Flentke, G R; Sanford, D G; Munoz, E; Huber, B T; Bachovchin, W W

    1994-07-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) Tat protein suppresses antigen-induced, but not mitogen-induced, activation of human T cells when added to T-cell cultures [Viscidi, R. P., Mayur, K., Lederman, H. M. & Frankel, A. D. (1989) Science 246, 1606-1608]. This activity is potentially pertinent to the development of AIDS because lymphocytes from HIV-infected individuals exhibit a similar antigen-specific dysfunction. Here we report that Tat binds with high affinity to the T-cell activation molecule dipeptidyl aminopeptidase IV (DP IV), also known as CD26. This molecule occurs on the surface of CD4+ cells responsible for the recall antigen response and appears to play an essential role in this response. Tat binds to both the cell surface and soluble forms of DP IV at physiological salt concentrations without inhibiting the protease activity of DP IV against small chromogenic substrates used to assay activity, but Tat markedly inhibits the activity of DP IV at lower salt concentrations. The kinetics of inhibition indicate the affinity of Tat for DP IV varies from 20 pM to 11 nM, and the activity of the Tat-DP IV complex varies from 13% to 100%, as the NaCl concentration varies from 0 to 140 mM. Cytofluorometry experiments demonstrate that Tat competes with anti-Ta1, a monoclonal antibody (mAb) specific for DP IV, for binding to cell surface DP IV, thus indicating that Tat binds DP IV at or near the Ta1 epitope. Moreover, the anti-Ta1 mAb blocks the immunosuppressive activity of Tat. The high affinity of Tat for DP IV, previous evidence implicating DP IV in antigen-specific T-cell activation events, and the ability of anti-Ta1 mAb to block the immunosuppressive effect of Tat make DP IV a plausible receptor for Tat's immunosuppressive activity. PMID:7912830

  2. CD36 Is a Novel Serum Amyloid A (SAA) Receptor Mediating SAA Binding and SAA-induced Signaling in Human and Rodent Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Baranova, Irina N.; Bocharov, Alexander V.; Vishnyakova, Tatyana G.; Kurlander, Roger; Chen, Zhigang; Fu, Dong; Arias, Irwin M.; Csako, Gyorgy; Patterson, Amy P.; Eggerman, Thomas L.

    2010-01-01

    Serum amyloid A (SAA) is a major acute phase protein involved in multiple physiological and pathological processes. This study provides experimental evidence that CD36, a phagocyte class B scavenger receptor, functions as a novel SAA receptor mediating SAA proinflammatory activity. The uptake of Alexa Fluor® 488 SAA as well as of other well established CD36 ligands was increased 5–10-fold in HeLa cells stably transfected with CD36 when compared with mock-transfected cells. Unlike other apolipoproteins that bind to CD36, only SAA induced a 10–50-fold increase of interleukin-8 secretion in CD36-overexpressing HEK293 cells when compared with control cells. SAA-mediated effects were thermolabile, inhibitable by anti-SAA antibody, and also neutralized by association with high density lipoprotein but not by association with bovine serum albumin. SAA-induced cell activation was inhibited by a CD36 peptide based on the CD36 hexarelin-binding site but not by a peptide based on the thrombospondin-1-binding site. A pronounced reduction (up to 60–75%) of SAA-induced pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion was observed in cd36−/− rat macrophages and Kupffer cells when compared with wild type rat cells. The results of the MAPK phosphorylation assay as well as of the studies with NF-κB and MAPK inhibitors revealed that two MAPKs, JNK and to a lesser extent ERK1/2, primarily contribute to elevated cytokine production in CD36-overexpressing HEK293 cells. In macrophages, four signaling pathways involving NF-κB and three MAPKs all appeared to contribute to SAA-induced cytokine release. These observations indicate that CD36 is a receptor mediating SAA binding and SAA-induced pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion predominantly through JNK- and ERK1/2-mediated signaling. PMID:20075072

  3. Interleukin-1β-induced Reduction of CD44 Ser-325 Phosphorylation in Human Epidermal Keratinocytes Promotes CD44 Homomeric Complexes, Binding to Ezrin, and Extended, Monocyte-adhesive Hyaluronan Coats*

    PubMed Central

    Jokela, Tiina; Oikari, Sanna; Takabe, Piia; Rilla, Kirsi; Kärnä, Riikka; Tammi, Markku; Tammi, Raija

    2015-01-01

    The proinflammatory cytokine interleukin-1β (IL-1β) attracts leukocytes to sites of inflammation. One of the recruitment mechanisms involves the formation of extended, hyaluronan-rich pericellular coats on local fibroblasts, endothelial cells, and epithelial cells. In the present work, we studied how IL-1β turns on the monocyte adhesion of the hyaluronan coat on human keratinocytes. IL-1β did not influence hyaluronan synthesis or increase the amount of pericellular hyaluronan in these cells. Instead, we found that the increase in the hyaluronan-dependent monocyte binding was associated with the CD44 of the keratinocytes. Although IL-1β caused a small increase in the total amount of CD44, a more marked impact was the decrease of CD44 phosphorylation at serine 325. At the same time, IL-1β increased the association of CD44 with ezrin and complex formation of CD44 with itself. Treatment of keratinocyte cultures with KN93, an inhibitor of calmodulin kinase 2, known to phosphorylate Ser-325 in CD44, caused similar effects as IL-1β (i.e. homomerization of CD44 and its association with ezrin) and resulted in increased monocyte binding to keratinocytes in a hyaluronan-dependent way. Overexpression of wild type CD44 standard form, but not a corresponding CD44 mutant mimicking the Ser-325-phosphorylated form, was able to induce monocyte binding to keratinocytes. In conclusion, treatment of human keratinocytes with IL-1β changes the structure of their hyaluronan coat by influencing the amount, post-translational modification, and cytoskeletal association of CD44, thus enhancing monocyte retention on keratinocytes. PMID:25809479

  4. Activation of human monocytes by streptococcal rhamnose glucose polymers is mediated by CD14 antigen, and mannan binding protein inhibits TNF-alpha release.

    PubMed

    Soell, M; Lett, E; Holveck, F; Schöller, M; Wachsmann, D; Klein, J P

    1995-01-15

    The present work was initiated to define mechanisms that account for the binding on human monocytes of streptococcal cell wall polysaccharides formed by rhamnose glucose polymers (RGPs), and subsequent stimulatory activities. We show here that RGPs bind to and stimulate human monocytes to produce TNF-alpha in a dose-dependent manner. To detect cell surface RGPs binding proteins, intact monocytes were biotinylated before lysis with Nonidet P-40 and solubilized proteins were incubated with RGPs Affi-Prep beads. One major membrane protein of 55 kDa was specifically detected and identified as CD14 because it reacted with anti-CD14 mAbs. Furthermore, anti-CD14 mAbs were able to perform a dose-dependent inhibition of RGPs binding, and suppressed TNF-alpha release from RGPs-stimulated monocytes. Moreover, we demonstrated that RGPs also bind to CD11b; however, this binding is not implicated in synthesis of TNF-alpha. Interestingly, RGPs binding to monocytes was enhanced by human normal serum (HNS) whereas HNS inhibits the TNF-alpha-stimulating activity of RGPs. Western blotting analysis of HNS proteins purified on RGPs Affi-prep beads revealed three specific bands of 75, 55, and 32 kDa reactive with anti-C3 Abs, anti-CD14 mAbs (TUK4), and anti-human mannan binding protein (hMBP)-derived peptide IgG, respectively. These results suggest that C3, soluble CD14, and hMBP form complexes that are probably active in enhancing the binding of RGPs to monocytes. Additional studies have shown that hMBP that recognizes RGPs prevents, unlike the LPS binding protein, TNF-alpha release by inhibiting the binding of RGPs to CD14 Ag. By incubating cells with a constant amount of RGPs-hMBP complexes in the presence or absence of increasing concentrations of C1q, we also demonstrated that C1q receptor mediates the binding and probably the uptake of RGPs-hMBP complexes by human monocytes. PMID:7529289

  5. Lubricin/Proteoglycan 4 Binding to CD44 Receptor: A Mechanism of Lubricin’s suppression of Pro-inflammatory Cytokine Induced Synoviocyte Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Al-Sharif, Afnan; Jamal, Maha; Zhang, Ling; Larson, Katherine; Schmidt, Tannin; Jay, Gregory; Elsaid, Khaled

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate recombinant human proteoglycan 4 (rhPRG4) binding to CD44 receptor and its consequence on cytokine induced synoviocyte proliferation. Methods rhPRG4 binding to CD44 and competition with high molecular weight hyaluronic acid (HMW HA) was evaluated using a direct enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and surface plasmon resonance. Sialidase-A and O-glycosidase digestion of rhPRG4 was performed and CD44 binding was evaluated using ELISA. Rheumatoid arthritis fibroblast-like synoviocytes (RA-FLS) were stimulated with interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β) or tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) for 48 hours in the presence or absence of rhPRG4 or HMW HA at 20, 40 and 80μg/ml and cell proliferation was measured. CD44 contribution was assessed by co-incubation with a CD44 antibody (IM7). The anti-proliferative effect of rhPRG4 was investigated following treatment of Prg4−/− synoviocytes with IL-1β or TNF-α in the presence or absence of IM7. Results rhPRG4 binds CD44 and interferes with HMW HA CD44 binding. Removal of sialic acid and O-glycosylations significantly increased CD44 binding by rhPRG4 (p<0.001). rhPRG4 and HMW HA at 40 and 80μg/ml significantly suppressed IL-1β induced RA-FLS proliferation (p<0.05). rhPRG4 at 20, 40 and 80μg/ml significantly suppressed TNF-α induced RA-FLS proliferation (p<0.05). CD44 neutralization reversed the effect of rhPRG4 on IL-1β and TNF-α stimulated RA-FLS and the effect of HMW HA on IL-1β stimulated RA-FLS. rhPRG4 inhibited cytokine-induced proliferation of Prg4−/− synoviocytes which could be prevented by blocking CD44. Conclusion Lubricin is a novel putative ligand for CD44 and may control synoviocyte overgrowth in inflammatory arthropathies via a CD44-mediated mechanism. PMID:25708025

  6. A CD46-binding chimpanzee adenovirus vector as a vaccine carrier.

    PubMed

    Tatsis, Nia; Blejer, Ariella; Lasaro, Marcio O; Hensley, Scott E; Cun, Ann; Tesema, Lello; Li, Yan; Gao, Guang-Ping; Xiang, Zhi Q; Zhou, Dongming; Wilson, James M; Ertl, Hildegund C J

    2007-03-01

    A replication-defective chimeric vector based on the chimpanzee adenovirus serotype C1 was developed and tested as a vaccine carrier in mice. The AdC1 virus is closely related to human adenoviruses of subgroup B2 and uses CD46 for cell attachment. To overcome poor growth of E1-deleted AdC1 vectors on cell lines that provide the E1 of adenovirus of the human serotype 5 (AdHu5) virus in trans, the inverted terminal repeats and some of the early genes of AdC1 were replaced with those from AdC5, a chimpanzee origin adenovirus of subfamily E. The chimeric AdC1/C5 vector efficiently transduces CD46-expressing mouse dendritic cells (DCs) in vitro and initiates their maturation. Transduction of DCs in vivo is inefficient in CD46 transgenic mice. The AdC1/C5 vector induces transgene product-specific B- and CD8(+) T-cell responses in mice. Responses are slightly higher in wild-type mice than in CD46 transgenic mice. Transgene product-specific T-cell responses elicited by the AdC1/C5 vector can be increased by priming or boosting with a heterologous adenovirus vector. Pre-existing immunity to adenovirus of the common human serotype 5 does not affect induction of cell-mediated immune responses by the AdC1/C5 vector. This vector provides an additional tool in a repertoire of adenovirus-based vaccine vectors. PMID:17228314

  7. Dengue virus specific dual HLA binding T cell epitopes induce CD8+ T cell responses in seropositive individuals.

    PubMed

    Comber, Joseph D; Karabudak, Aykan; Huang, Xiaofang; Piazza, Paolo A; Marques, Ernesto T A; Philip, Ramila

    2014-01-01

    Dengue virus infects an estimated 300 million people each year and even more are at risk of becoming infected as the virus continues to spread into new areas. Despite the increase in viral prevalence, no anti-viral medications or vaccines are approved for treating or preventing infection. CD8+ T cell responses play a major role in viral clearance. Therefore, effective vaccines that induce a broad, multi-functional T cell response with substantial cross-reactivity between all virus serotypes can have major impacts on reducing infection rates and infection related complications. Here, we took an immunoproteomic approach to identify novel MHC class I restricted T cell epitopes presented by dengue virus infected cells, representing the natural and authentic targets of the T cell response. Using this approach we identified 4 novel MHC-I restricted epitopes: 2 with the binding motif for HLA-A24 molecules and 2 with both HLA-A2 and HLA-A24 binding motifs. These peptides were able to activate CD8+ T cell responses in both healthy, seronegative individuals and in seropositive individuals who have previously been infected with dengue virus. Importantly, the dual binding epitopes activated pre-existing T cell precursors in PBMCs obtained from both HLA-A2+ and HLA-A24+ seropositive individuals. Together, the data indicate that these epitopes are immunologically relevant T cell activating peptides presented on infected cells during a natural infection and therefore may serve as candidate antigens for the development of effective multi-serotype specific dengue virus vaccines. PMID:25668665

  8. Dengue virus specific dual HLA binding T cell epitopes induce CD8+ T cell responses in seropositive individuals

    PubMed Central

    Comber, Joseph D; Karabudak, Aykan; Huang, Xiaofang; Piazza, Paolo A; Marques, Ernesto T A; Philip, Ramila

    2015-01-01

    Dengue virus infects an estimated 300 million people each year and even more are at risk of becoming infected as the virus continues to spread into new areas. Despite the increase in viral prevalence, no anti-viral medications or vaccines are approved for treating or preventing infection. CD8+ T cell responses play a major role in viral clearance. Therefore, effective vaccines that induce a broad, multi-functional T cell response with substantial cross-reactivity between all virus serotypes can have major impacts on reducing infection rates and infection related complications. Here, we took an immunoproteomic approach to identify novel MHC class I restricted T cell epitopes presented by dengue virus infected cells, representing the natural and authentic targets of the T cell response. Using this approach we identified 4 novel MHC-I restricted epitopes: 2 with the binding motif for HLA-A24 molecules and 2 with both HLA-A2 and HLA-A24 binding motifs. These peptides were able to activate CD8+ T cell responses in both healthy, seronegative individuals and in seropositive individuals who have previously been infected with dengue virus. Importantly, the dual binding epitopes activated pre-existing T cell precursors in PBMCs obtained from both HLA-A2+ and HLA-A24+ seropositive individuals. Together, the data indicate that these epitopes are immunologically relevant T cell activating peptides presented on infected cells during a natural infection and therefore may serve as candidate antigens for the development of effective multi-serotype specific dengue virus vaccines. PMID:25668665

  9. Heat stable antigen (mouse CD24) supports myeloid cell binding to endothelial and platelet P-selectin.

    PubMed

    Aigner, S; Ruppert, M; Hubbe, M; Sammar, M; Sthoeger, Z; Butcher, E C; Vestweber, D; Altevogt, P

    1995-10-01

    P-selectin is a Ca(2+)-dependent lectin that participates in leukocyte adhesion to vascular endothelium and platelets. Myeloid cells and a subset of T lymphocytes express carbohydrate ligands at the cell surface. Previously, we suggested that heat stable antigen (HSA/mouse CD24), an extensively glycosylated cell surface molecule on many mouse cells, is a ligand for P-selectin. Here we show that HSA mediates the binding of monocytic cells and neutrophils to P-selectin. The monocytic cell lines ESb-MP and J774, peritoneal exudate cells, and bone marrow neutrophils could bind to lipopolysaccharide-activated bend3 endothelioma cells under rotation-induced shear forces and this binding was inhibited by mAb to P-selectin and HSA. Blocking was weak at room temperature but more efficient at 4 degrees C when integrin-mediated binding was decreased. Also the adhesion of neutrophils to stimulated platelets expressing P-selectin was blocked by HSA- and P-selectin-specific mAb. Latex beads coated with purified HSA from myeloid cells bound to activated endothelioma cells or platelets, and the binding was similarly blocked by mAb to P-selectin and HSA respectively. The HSA-coated beads were stained with P-selectin-IgG, very weakly with L-selectin-IgG but not with E-selectin-IgG. The staining was dependent on divalent cations and treatment with endoglycosidase F or neuraminidase indicated that sialylated N-linked glycans were recognized. The presence of these glycans was confirmed by biosynthetic labeling studies. Our data suggest that HSA, in addition to the recently identified 160 kDa glycoprotein ligand on mouse neutrophils, belongs to a group of monospecific P-selectin ligands on myeloid cells. PMID:8562500

  10. Optimal lamellar arrangement in fish gills

    PubMed Central

    Park, Keunhwan; Kim, Wonjung; Kim, Ho-Young

    2014-01-01

    Fish respire through gills, which have evolved to extract aqueous oxygen. Fish gills consist of filaments with well-ordered lamellar structures, which play a role in maximizing oxygen diffusion. It is interesting that when we anatomically observe the gills of various fish species, gill interlamellar distances (d) vary little among them, despite large variations in body mass (Mb). Noting that the small channels formed by densely packed lamellae cause significant viscous resistance to water flow, we construct and test a model of oxygen transfer rate as a function of the lamellar dimensions and pumping pressure, which allows us to predict the optimal interlamellar distance that maximizes the oxygen transfer rate in the gill. Comparing our theory with biological data supports the hypothesis that fish gills have evolved to form the optimal interlamellar distances for maximizing oxygen transfer. This explains the weak scaling dependence of d on Mb: d ∼ Mb1/6. PMID:24847065

  11. Basigin (CD147), a multifunctional transmembrane glycoprotein with various binding partners

    PubMed Central

    Muramatsu, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Basigin, also called CD147 or EMMPRIN, is a transmembrane glycoprotein that belongs to the immunoglobulin superfamily. Basigin has isoforms; the common form (basigin or basigin-2) has two immunoglobulin domains, and the extended form (basigin-1) has three. Basigin is the receptor for cyclophilins, S100A9 and platelet glycoprotein VI, whereas basigin-1 serves as the receptor for the rod-derived cone viability factor. Basigin tightly associates with monocarboxylate transporters and is essential for their cell surface translocation and activities. In the same membrane plane, basigin also associates with other proteins including GLUT1, CD44 and CD98. The carbohydrate portion of basigin is recognized by lectins, such as galectin-3 and E-selectin. These molecular recognitions form the basis for the role of basigin in the transport of nutrients, migration of inflammatory leukocytes and induction of matrix metalloproteinases. Basigin is important in vision, spermatogenesis and other physiological phenomena, and plays significant roles in the pathogenesis of numerous diseases, including cancer. Basigin is also the receptor for an invasive protein RH5, which is present in malaria parasites. PMID:26684586

  12. Zn-, Cd-, and Pb-transcription factor IIIA: properties, DNA binding, and comparison with TFIIIA-finger 3 metal complexes

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Meilin; Krepkiy, Dmitriy; Hu, Weining; Petering, David H.

    2012-01-01

    Properties of the metal ion binding sites of Zn-transcription factor IIIA (TFIIIA) were investigated to understand the potential of this type of zinc finger to undergo reactions that remove Zn2+ from the protein. Zn–TFIIIA was purified from E. coli containing the cloned sequence for Xenopus laevis oocyte TFIIIA and its stoichiometry of bound Zn2+ was shown to depend on the details of the isolation process. The average dissociation constant of Zn2+ in Zn-TFIIIIA was 10−7. The dissociation constant for Zn-F3, the third finger from the N-terminus of TFIIIA, was 1.0 × 10−8. The reactivity of Zn–TFIIIA with a series of metal binding ligands, including 2-carboxy-2′-hydroxy-5′-sulfoformazylbenzene (zincon), 4-(2-pyridylazo)-resorcinol (PAR), and 3-ethoxy-2-oxo-butyraldehyde-bis-(N4-dimethylthiosemicarbazone) (H2KTSM2) revealed similar kinetics. The reactivity of PAR with Zn–TFIIIA declined substantially when the protein was bound to the internal control region (ICR) of the 5S ribosomal DNA. Both Cd2+ and Pb2+ disrupt TFIIIA binding to its cognate DNA sequence. The Pb2+ dissociation constant of Pb-F3 was measured as 2.5 × 10−8. According to NMR spectroscopy, F3 does not fold into a regular conformation in the presence of Pb2+. PMID:15134923

  13. An Alternative Phosphorylation Switch in Integrin β2 (CD18) Tail for Dok1 Binding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Sebanti; Chit, Joel Chia-Yeong; Feng, Chen; Bhunia, Anirban; Tan, Suet-Mien; Bhattacharjya, Surajit

    2015-06-01

    Integrins are involved in cell migration and adhesion. A large number of proteins interact with the cytoplasmic tails of integrins. Dok1 is a negative regulator of integrin activation and it binds to the phosphorylated membrane proximal NxxY motif in a number of integrin β tails. The β tail of the β2 integrins contains a non-phosphorylatable NxxF motif. Hence it is unclear how Dok1 associates with the β2 integrins. We showed in this study using NMR and cell based analyses that residues Ser745 and Ser756 in the integrin β2 tail, which are adjacent to the NxxF motif, are required for Dok1 interaction. NMR analyses detected significant chemical shift changes and higher affinity interactions between Dok1 phospho-tyrosine binding (PTB) domain and integrin β2 tail peptide containing pSer756 compared to pSer745. The phosphorylated β2 peptide occupies the canonical ligand binding pocket of Dok1 based on the docked structure of the β2 tail-Dok1 PTB complex. Taken together, our data suggest an alternate phosphorylation switch in β2 integrins that regulates Dok1 binding. This could be important for cells of the immune system and their functions.

  14. Enhanced mercury tolerance in Mytilus edulis: influence of Cu, Zn, and Cd pre-exposure and relationship to metal-binding proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Roesijadi, G.

    1983-06-01

    Experiments were conducted to determine whether exposure to Cu, Cd or Zn would induce enhanced mercury tolerance in mussels. The results indicated that enhanced tolerance can be elicited if exposure to Cu, Cd or Zn is sufficiently high that bioaccumulation of the metal and induction of metal-binding proteins will occur, and if the concentrations are below levels in which the exposure itself becomes toxic. 7 references. (ACR)

  15. A Quantitative Description of the Binding Equilibria of para-Substituted Aniline Ligands and CdSe Quantum Dots

    SciTech Connect

    Donakowski, Martin D.; Godbe, Jacqueline M.; Sknepnek, Rastko; Knowles, Kathryn E.; Olvera de la Cruz, Monica; Weiss, Emily A.

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the use of ¹H NMR spectroscopy to measure the equilibrium constants for the solution-phase binding of two para-substituted aniline molecules (R-An), p-methoxyaniline (MeO-An) and p-bromoaniline (Br-An), to colloidal 4.1 nm CdSe quantum dots (QDs). Changes in the chemical shifts of the aromatic protons located ortho to the amine group on R-An were used to construct a binding isotherm for each R-An/QD system. These isotherms fit to a Langmuir function to yield K{sub a}, the equilibrium constant for binding of the R-An ligands to the QDs; Ka ≈ 150 M-1 and ΔGads ≈ -19 kJ/mol for both R = MeO and R = Br. ³¹P NMR indicates that the native octylphosphonate ligands, which, by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy, cover 90% of the QD surface, are not displaced upon binding of R-An. The MeO-An ligand quenches the photoluminescence of the QDs at much lower concentrations than does Br-An; the observation, therefore, that Ka,MeO-An ≈ Ka,Br-An shows that this difference in quenching efficiencies is due solely to differences in the nature of the electronic interactions of the bound R-An with the excitonic state of the QD.

  16. Dextran Sulfate Suppression of Viruses in the HIV Family: Inhibition of Virion Binding to CD4+ Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitsuya, Hiroaki; Looney, David J.; Kuno, Sachiko; Ueno, Ryuji; Wong-Staal, Flossie; Broder, Samuel

    1988-04-01

    The first step in the infection of human T lymphocytes by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is attachment to the target cell receptor, the CD4 antigen. This step may be vulnerable to attack by antibodies, chemicals, or small peptides. Dextran sulfate (molecular weight approximately 8000), which has been given to patients as an anticoagulant or antilipemic agent for more than two decades, was found to block the binding of virions to various target T lymphocytes, inhibit syncytia formation, and exert a potent inhibitory effect against HIV-1 in vitro at concentrations that may be clinically attainable in human beings. This drug also suppressed the replication of HIV-2 in vitro. These observations could have theoretical and clinical implications in the strategy to develop drugs against HIV types 1 and 2.

  17. New Approach for Inhibition of HIV Entry: Modifying CD4 Binding Sites by Thiolated Pyrimidine Derivatives.

    PubMed

    Kanizsai, Szilvia; Ongrádi, József; Aradi, János; Nagy, Károly

    2016-07-01

    Thiolated pyrimidine derivatives have been synthetized and their antiretroviral effect against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1IIIB) and HIV-1 chimeric pseudovirions have been quantitatively determined in cell-based viral infectivity assays including syncytium inhibition assay as well as a single-cycle viral infection assay on HeLaCD4-LTR/ß-gal cells. Pseudotype virions prepared bearing HIV-1 envelope preference for CCR5 coreceptor, CXCR4 coreceptor or for both, respectively, with a HIV-1 core containing luciferase reporter gene were able to infect susceptible cells but are replication defective so unable to replicate in the cells . Data indicate that thiolated pyrimidine derivatives inhibited effectively virally induced cell fusion in vitro as well as infectivity of primary HIV-1IIIB strain and HIV-1 pseudovirions using chemokine receptors CCR5 or CXCR4 or both for virus entry a dose dependent manner. Inhibition was selective, depended on the pseudovirus coreceptor preference. Our results suggest that some of these sulfur containing pyrimidines interact with redoxactive -SH groups required for successful HIV entry, including a redox active disulfide in the CD4 molecule as well as -SH groups in HIV viral envelope gp120. This mode of action is unique representing a new class of potential HIV entry inhibitors. PMID:26860867

  18. Mechanism for strong binding of CdSe quantum dots to multiwall carbon nanotubes for solar energy harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azoz, Seyla; Jiang, Jie; Keskar, Gayatri; McEnally, Charles; Alkas, Alp; Ren, Fang; Marinkovic, Nebojsa; Haller, Gary L.; Ismail-Beigi, Sohrab; Pfefferle, Lisa D.

    2013-07-01

    As hybrid nanomaterials have myriad of applications in modern technology, different functionalization strategies are being intensely sought for preparing nanocomposites with tunable properties and structures. Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotube (MWNT)/CdSe Quantum Dot (QD) heterostructures serve as an important example for an active component of solar cells. The attachment mechanism of CdSe QDs and MWNTs is known to affect the charge transfer between them and consequently to alter the efficiency of solar cell devices. In this study, we present a novel method that enables the exchange of some of the organic capping agents on the QDs with carboxyl functionalized MWNTs upon ultrasonication. This produces a ligand-free covalent attachment of the QDs to the MWNTs. EXAFS characterization reveals direct bond formation between the CdSe QDs and the MWNTs. The amount of oleic acid exchanged is quantified by temperature-programmed decomposition; the results indicate that roughly half of the oleic acid is removed from the QDs upon functionalized MWNT addition. Additionally, we characterize the optical and structural properties of the QD-MWNT heterostructures and investigate how these properties are affected by the attachment. The steady state photoluminescence response of QDs is completely quenched. The lifetime of the PL of the QDs measured with time resolved photoluminescence shows a significant decrease after they are covalently bonded to functionalized MWNTs, suggesting a fast charge transfer between QDs and MWNTs. Our theoretical calculations are consistent with and support these experimental findings and provide microscopic models for the QD binding mechanisms.As hybrid nanomaterials have myriad of applications in modern technology, different functionalization strategies are being intensely sought for preparing nanocomposites with tunable properties and structures. Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotube (MWNT)/CdSe Quantum Dot (QD) heterostructures serve as an important example for an

  19. Activation of monocytes and platelets by monoclonal antibodies or malaria-infected erythrocytes binding to the CD36 surface receptor in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Ockenhouse, C F; Magowan, C; Chulay, J D

    1989-01-01

    The CD36 leukocyte differentiation antigen, recognized by MAbs OKM5 and OKM8 and found on human monocytes and endothelial cells, has been implicated as a sequestration receptor for erythrocytes infected with the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum (IRBC). CD36 is also expressed on platelets and appears to be identical to platelet glycoprotein IV. We investigated receptor activation of monocytes and platelets by anti-CD36 MAbs and by IRBC. Incubation of human monocytes with anti-CD36 MAbs or IRBC resulted in stimulation of the respiratory burst as measured by reduction of nitroblue tetrazolium and generation of chemiluminescence. Incubation of human platelets with anti-CD36 MAbs resulted in platelet activation as measured by aggregation or ATP secretion. Activation of monocytes and platelets required appropriate intracellular transmembrane signaling and was inhibited by calcium antagonists or by specific inhibitors of protein kinase C or guanine nucleotide binding proteins. Soluble CD36 inhibited binding of IRBC to both monocytes and platelets, suggesting that these interactions are mediated by the CD36 receptor. Using a cytochemical electron microscopic technique, the presence of reactive oxygen intermediates was identified at the interface between human monocytes and IRBC. These data provide support for the hypothesis that reactive oxygen intermediates produced by monocytes when IRBC ligands interact with cell surface receptors may play a role in the pathophysiology of falciparum malaria. Images PMID:2474569

  20. Lipopolysaccharide-Induced CD300b Receptor Binding to Toll-like Receptor 4 Alters Signaling to Drive Cytokine Responses that Enhance Septic Shock.

    PubMed

    Voss, Oliver H; Murakami, Yousuke; Pena, Mirna Y; Lee, Ha-Na; Tian, Linjie; Margulies, David H; Street, Jonathan M; Yuen, Peter S T; Qi, Chen-Feng; Krzewski, Konrad; Coligan, John E

    2016-06-21

    Receptor CD300b is implicated in regulating the immune response to bacterial infection by an unknown mechanism. Here, we identified CD300b as a lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-binding receptor and determined the mechanism underlying CD300b augmentation of septic shock. In vivo depletion and adoptive transfer studies identified CD300b-expressing macrophages as the key cell type augmenting sepsis. We showed that CD300b, and its adaptor DAP12, associated with Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) upon LPS binding, thereby enhancing TLR4-adaptor MyD88- and TRIF-dependent signaling that resulted in an elevated pro-inflammatory cytokine storm. LPS engagement of the CD300b-TLR4 complex led to the recruitment and activation of spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk) and phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate 3-kinase (PI3K). This resulted in an inhibition of the ERK1/2 protein kinase- and NF-κB transcription factor-mediated signaling pathways, which subsequently led to a reduced interleukin-10 (IL-10) production. Collectively, our data describe a mechanism of TLR4 signaling regulated by CD300b in myeloid cells in response to LPS. PMID:27261276

  1. Fasciola gigantica Fatty Acid Binding Protein (FABP) as a Prophylactic Agent against Schistosoma mansoni Infection in CD1 Mice

    PubMed Central

    Diab, M.; El-Amir, A. M.; Hendawy, M.; Kadry, S.

    2012-01-01

    Although schistosomicidal drugs and other control measures exist, the advent of an efficacious vaccine remains the most potentially powerful means for controlling this disease. In this study, native fatty acid binding protein (FABP) from Fasciola gigantica was purified from the adult worm's crude extract by saturation with ammonium sulphate followed by separation on DEAE-Sephadex A-50 anion exchange chromatography and gel filtration using Sephacryl HR-100, respectively. CD1 mice were immunized with the purified, native F. gigantica FABP in Freund's adjuvant and challenged subcutaneously with 120 Schistosoma mansoni cercariae. Immunization of CD1 mice with F. gigantica FABP has induced heterologous protection against S. mansoni, evidenced by the significant reduction in mean worm burden (72.3%), liver and intestinal egg counts (81.3% and 80.8%, respectively), and hepatic granuloma counts (42%). Also, it elicited mixed IgG1/IgG2b immune responses with predominant IgG1 isotype, suggesting that native F. gigantica FABP is mediated by a mixed Th1/Th2 response. However, it failed to induce any significant differences in the oogram pattern or in the mean granuloma diameter. This indicated that native F. gigantica FABP could be a promising vaccine candidate against S. mansoni infection. PMID:22451732

  2. Vaccine-Elicited Tier 2 HIV-1 Neutralizing Antibodies Bind to Quaternary Epitopes Involving Glycan-Deficient Patches Proximal to the CD4 Binding Site

    PubMed Central

    Crooks, Ema T.; Tong, Tommy; Chakrabarti, Bimal; Narayan, Kristin; Georgiev, Ivelin S.; Menis, Sergey; Huang, Xiaoxing; Kulp, Daniel; Osawa, Keiko; Muranaka, Janelle; Stewart-Jones, Guillaume; Destefano, Joanne; O’Dell, Sijy; LaBranche, Celia; Robinson, James E.; Montefiori, David C.; McKee, Krisha; Du, Sean X.; Doria-Rose, Nicole; Kwong, Peter D.; Mascola, John R.; Zhu, Ping; Schief, William R.; Wyatt, Richard T.; Whalen, Robert G.; Binley, James M.

    2015-01-01

    Eliciting broad tier 2 neutralizing antibodies (nAbs) is a major goal of HIV-1 vaccine research. Here we investigated the ability of native, membrane-expressed JR-FL Env trimers to elicit nAbs. Unusually potent nAb titers developed in 2 of 8 rabbits immunized with virus-like particles (VLPs) expressing trimers (trimer VLP sera) and in 1 of 20 rabbits immunized with DNA expressing native Env trimer, followed by a protein boost (DNA trimer sera). All 3 sera neutralized via quaternary epitopes and exploited natural gaps in the glycan defenses of the second conserved region of JR-FL gp120. Specifically, trimer VLP sera took advantage of the unusual absence of a glycan at residue 197 (present in 98.7% of Envs). Intriguingly, removing the N197 glycan (with no loss of tier 2 phenotype) rendered 50% or 16.7% (n = 18) of clade B tier 2 isolates sensitive to the two trimer VLP sera, showing broad neutralization via the surface masked by the N197 glycan. Neutralizing sera targeted epitopes that overlap with the CD4 binding site, consistent with the role of the N197 glycan in a putative “glycan fence” that limits access to this region. A bioinformatics analysis suggested shared features of one of the trimer VLP sera and monoclonal antibody PG9, consistent with its trimer-dependency. The neutralizing DNA trimer serum took advantage of the absence of a glycan at residue 230, also proximal to the CD4 binding site and suggesting an epitope similar to that of monoclonal antibody 8ANC195, albeit lacking tier 2 breadth. Taken together, our data show for the first time that strain-specific holes in the glycan fence can allow the development of tier 2 neutralizing antibodies to native spikes. Moreover, cross-neutralization can occur in the absence of protecting glycan. Overall, our observations provide new insights that may inform the future development of a neutralizing antibody vaccine. PMID:26023780

  3. Crystal structure of the receptor binding domain of the botulinum C-D mosaic neurotoxin reveals potential roles of lysines 1118 and 1136 in membrane interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yanfeng; Buchko, Garry W.; Qin, Ling; Robinson, Howard; Varnum, Susan M.

    2011-01-07

    The botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) produced by different strains of the bacterium Clostridium botulinum are responsible for the disease botulism and include a group of immunologically distinct serotypes (A, B, E, and F) that are considered to be the most lethal natural proteins known for humans. Two BoNT serotypes, C and D, while rarely associated with human infection, are responsible for deadly botulism outbreaks afflicting animals. Also associated with animal infections is the BoNT C-D mosaic protein (BoNT/CD), a BoNT subtype that is essentially a hybrid of the BoNT/C (~two-thirds) and BoNT/D (~one-third) serotypes. While the amino acid sequence of the heavy chain receptor binding (HCR) domain of BoNT/CD (BoNT/CD-HCR) is very similar to the corresponding amino acid sequence of BoNT/D, BoNT/CD-HCR binds synaptosome membranes better than BoNT/D-HCR. To obtain structural insights for the different membrane binding properties, the crystal structure of BoNT/CD-HCR (S867-E1280) was determined at 1.56 Å resolution and compared to previously reported structures for BoNT/D-HCR. Overall, the BoNT/CD-HCR structure is similar to the two sub-domain organization observed for other BoNT HCRs: an N-terminal jellyroll barrel motif and a C-terminal β-trefoil fold. Comparison of the structure of BoNT/CD-HCR with BoNT/D-HCR indicates that K1118 has a similar structural role as the equivalent residue, E1114, in BoNT/D-HCR, while K1136 has a structurally different role than the equivalent residue, G1132, in BoNT/D-HCR. Lysine-1118 forms a salt bridge with E1247 and may enhance membrane interactions by stabilizing the putative membrane binding loop (K1240-N1248). Lysine-1136 is observed on the surface of the protein. A sulfate ion bound to K1136 may mimic a natural interaction with the negatively changed phospholipid membrane surface. Liposome-binding experiments demonstrate that BoNT/CD-HCR binds phosphatidylethanolamine liposomes more tightly than BoNT/D-HCR

  4. Crystal Structure of the Receptor Binding Domain of the botulinum C-D Mosiac Neurotoxin Reveals Potential Roles of Lysines 1118 and 1136 in Membrane Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Y Zhang; G Buchko; L Qin; H Robinson; S Varnum

    2011-12-31

    The botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) produced by different strains of the bacterium Clostridium botulinum are responsible for the disease botulism and include a group of immunologically distinct serotypes (A, B, E, and F) that are considered to be the most lethal natural proteins known for humans. Two BoNT serotypes, C and D, while rarely associated with human infection, are responsible for deadly botulism outbreaks afflicting animals. Also associated with animal infections is the BoNT C-D mosaic protein (BoNT/CD), a BoNT subtype that is essentially a hybrid of the BoNT/C ({approx}two-third) and BoNT/D ({approx}one-third) serotypes. While the amino acid sequence of the heavy chain receptor binding (HCR) domain of BoNT/CD (BoNT/CD-HCR) is very similar to the corresponding amino acid sequence of BoNT/D, BoNT/CD-HCR binds synaptosome membranes better than BoNT/D-HCR. To obtain structural insights for the different membrane binding properties, the crystal structure of BoNT/CD-HCR (S867-E1280) was determined at 1.56 {angstrom} resolution and compared to previously reported structures for BoNT/D-HCR. Overall, the BoNT/CD-HCR structure is similar to the two sub-domain organization observed for other BoNT HCRs: an N-terminal jellyroll barrel motif and a C-terminal {beta}-trefoil fold. Comparison of the structure of BoNT/CD-HCR with BoNT/D-HCR indicates that K1118 has a similar structural role as the equivalent residue, E1114, in BoNT/D-HCR, while K1136 has a structurally different role than the equivalent residue, G1132, in BoNT/D-HCR. Lysine-1118 forms a salt bridge with E1247 and may enhance membrane interactions by stabilizing the putative membrane binding loop (K1240-N1248). Lysine-1136 is observed on the surface of the protein. A sulfate ion bound to K1136 may mimic a natural interaction with the negatively changed phospholipid membrane surface. Liposome-binding experiments demonstrate that BoNT/CD-HCR binds phosphatidylethanolamine liposomes more tightly than BoNT/D-HCR.

  5. Complement-mediated binding of naturally glycosylated and glycosylation-modified human immunodeficiency virus type 1 to human CR2 (CD21).

    PubMed Central

    Montefiori, D C; Stewart, K; Ahearn, J M; Zhou, J; Zhou, J

    1993-01-01

    Particulate glycoproteins lacking sialic acid, such as desialylated enveloped viruses, readily activate complement through the alternative pathway. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) contains two heavily glycosylated and partially sialylated envelope glycoproteins: a surface gp120 and a transmembrane gp41. The abilities of naturally glycosylated HIV-1 and glycosylation-modified HIV-1 to interact with the complement system were examined with a biological assay which measured the binding of whole virus particles to cells expressing CR2 (CD21), the complement receptor found naturally in abundance on follicular dendritic cells and immature B cells. HIV-1 IIIB was synthesized in the presence or absence of the mannosidase II inhibitor, swainsonine, to give rise to high-mannose-type, nonsialylated, nonfucosylated carbohydrate moieties. The virus also was treated with neuraminidase or endo-beta-galactosidase to remove terminal sialic acids. An enzyme immunoassay specific for HIV-1 p24 core protein was used to quantitate the amount of virus bound to cell surfaces. Virus particles incubated with 1:3-diluted, fresh HIV-1-negative human serum as a source of complement readily bound to MT-2 (CD4+ CR2+) and Raji-3 (CD4- CR2+) cells but not to CEM (CD4+ CR2-) cells, suggesting that the virus bound to CR2 independently of CD4. Compared with heat-inactivated or C3-deficient sera, fresh complement increased binding by as much as 62 times for naturally glycosylated virus, and 5 times more than this for glycosylation-modified virus. Similar observations were made with freshly isolated, non-mitogen-stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Additional evidence that HIV-1 bound to CR2 independently of CD4 was provided by the fact that binding was blocked by monoclonal antibody OKB7 (anti-CR2) but not by OKT4a (anti-CD4). Also, the virus bound to transfected K562 cells (CD4-) which expressed recombinant human CR2 but did not bind to untransfected K562 cells. Results obtained

  6. Cadmium-binding proteins from blue crabs (Callinectes sapidus) environmentally exposed to cadmium

    SciTech Connect

    Wiedow, M.A.; Kneip, T.J.; Garte, S.J.

    1982-06-01

    Two heat-stable (90/sup 0/C) cadmium-binding proteins were isolated from the hepatopancreas of Hudson River blue crabs (Callinectes sapidus) by Sephadex G-75 gel filtration chromatography. These proteins have molecular weights of 10,600 and 9,400, and ultraviolet absorbance ratios at 250/280 nm of 12.4 and 5.4, respectively. Repeated freezing and thawing and prolonged (3-6 weeks) storage resulted in protein degradation or loss of Cd-binding activity. These proteins were induced by laboratory injection of CdCl/sub 2/ in blue crabs from pristine (Chesapeake Bay) areas; however, injection of CdCl/sub 2/ into Hudson River animals yielded anomalous chromatography profiles. Cadmium-binding proteins were also identified in blue crab thoracic muscle and gill. The possibility is discussed that these proteins are a type of metallothionein and could contribute to the human toxicity of this cadmium-contaminated edible crustacean.

  7. Histological changes in the kidneys and gills of the stickleback, Gasterosteus aculeatus L, exposed to dissolved cadmium in hard water

    SciTech Connect

    Oronsaye, J.A.

    1989-06-01

    Damage to the kidneys and gills of the three spined stickleback Gasterosteus aculeatus have been investigated, using light microscopy after exposure of fish to 2 to 6 mg Cd2+ liter-1 hard water (299 mg liter-1 as CaCO/sub 3/). Cytological breakdown of kidneys and gill tissue appears to be the cause of death, since oxygen uptake and cadmium excretion are impaired, leading to tissue hypoxia and fish poisoning.

  8. An interim report on gill disease

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rucker, R.R.; Johnson, H.E.; Kaydas, G.M.

    1952-01-01

    GILL DISEASE among fish, a disease which is characterized by a proliferation of the gill epithelium, has been attributed to a number of different causes. Generally, there are two recognized types: the eastern or bacterial type, in which long filamentous bacteria can always be demonstrated; and the western type, in which, by definition, bacteria cannot be demonstrated.

  9. Acquired Resistance of Escherichia coli to Complement Lysis by Binding of Glycophosphoinositol-Anchored Protectin (CD59)

    PubMed Central

    Rautemaa, Riina; Jarvis, Gary A.; Marnila, Pertti; Meri, Seppo

    1998-01-01

    Protectin (CD59) is a glycophosphoinsitol (GPI)-anchored defender of human cells against lysis by the membrane attack complex of complement. In this study, we examined whether protectin released from human cell membranes can incorporate into the surface of gram-negative bacteria. Analysis by using radiolabeled protectin, immunofluorescence, flow cytometry, and whole-cell enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay demonstrated that protectin bound to nonencapsulated Escherichia coli EH237 (Re) and EH234 (Ra) in a calcium-dependent manner. The incorporation required the GPI-phospholipid moiety since no binding of a phospholipid-free soluble form of protectin was observed. Mg2+ did not enhance the binding, and a polysialic acid capsule prevented it (strain IH3080 [O18:K1:H8]). Bound protectin inhibited the C5b-9 neoantigen expression on complement-treated bacteria. Protection against complement lysis was observed in both a colony counting assay and a bioluminescence assay, where viable EH234 bacteria expressing the luciferase gene emitted green light in the presence of the luciferine substrate. In general, two- to four-times-higher serum concentrations were needed to obtain 50% lysis of protectin-coated versus noncoated bacteria. The results indicate that protectin can incorporate in a functionally active form into the cell membranes of the two nonencapsulated deep rough E. coli strains studied. PMID:9573071

  10. Expression and biological activity of genetic fusions between MalE, the maltose binding protein from Escherichia coli and portions of CD4, the T-cell receptor of the AIDS virus.

    PubMed

    Clément, J M; Jehanno, M; Popescu, O; Saurin, W; Hofnung, M

    1996-11-01

    Hybrid molecules between MalE, the periplasmic maltose binding protein of Escherichia coli, and CD4, the human T-lymphocyte receptor for the AIDS virus HIV, have been constructed and purified. We show that CD4 can be fused as multiple repeats to both ends of a single MalE molecule. Hybrid proteins are exported into the periplasm of bacteria, bind monoclonal antibodies directed against CD4, bind HIV gp160, and inhibit HIV binding to CD4+ cells. MalE has been used as a scaffold to graft portions of CD4. Deletion analysis allowed to define a minimal structural domain which folds in a way which is compatible with its biological activity. This minimal part was used to design compact hybrid molecules in which CD4 was inserted internally into MalE. PMID:8936594

  11. Why mushrooms form gills: efficiency of the lamellate morphology

    PubMed Central

    FISCHER, Mark W. F.; MONEY, Nicholas P.

    2009-01-01

    Gilled mushrooms are produced by multiple orders within the Agaricomycetes. Some species form a single array of unbranched radial gills beneath their caps, many others produce multiple files of lamellulae between the primary gills, and branched gills are also common. In this largely theoretical study we modeled the effects of different gill arrangements on the total surface area for spore production. Relative to spore production over a flat surface, gills achieve a maximum 20-fold increase in surface area. The branching of gills produces the same increase in surface area as the formation of freestanding lamellulae (short gills). The addition of lamellulae between every second gill would offer a slightly greater increase in surface area in comparison to the addition of lamellulae between every pair of opposing gills, but this morphology does not appear in nature. Analysis of photographs of mushrooms demonstrates an excellent match between natural gill arrangements and configurations predicted by our model. PMID:20965062

  12. Why mushrooms form gills: efficiency of the lamellate morphology.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Mark W F; Money, Nicholas P

    2010-01-01

    Gilled mushrooms are produced by multiple orders within the Agaricomycetes. Some species form a single array of unbranched radial gills beneath their caps, many others produce multiple files of lamellulae between the primary gills, and branched gills are also common. In this largely theoretical study we modeled the effects of different gill arrangements on the total surface area for spore production. Relative to spore production over a flat surface, gills achieve a maximum 20-fold increase in surface area. The branching of gills produces the same increase in surface area as the formation of free-standing lamellulae (short gills). The addition of lamellulae between every second gill would offer a slightly greater increase in surface area in comparison to the addition of lamellulae between every pair of opposing gills, but this morphology does not appear in nature. Analysis of photographs of mushrooms demonstrates an excellent match between natural gill arrangements and configurations predicted by our model. PMID:20965062

  13. 65Zn2+ transport by isolated gill epithelial cells of the American lobster, Homarus americanus.

    PubMed

    Sá, M G; Ahearn, G A; Zanotto, F P

    2009-07-01

    Gills are the first site of impact by metal ions in contaminated waters. Work on whole gill cells and metal uptake has not been reported before in crustaceans. In this study, gill filaments of the American lobster, Homarus americanus, were dissociated in physiological saline and separated into several cell types on a 30, 40, 50, and 80% sucrose gradient. Cells from each sucrose solution were separately resuspended in physiological saline and incubated in 65Zn2+ in order to assess the nature of metal uptake by each cell type. Characteristics of zinc accumulation by each kind of cell were investigated in the presence and absence of 10 mM calcium, variable NaCl concentrations and pH values, and 100 muM verapamil, nifedipine, and the calcium ionophore A23187. 65Zn2+ influxes were hyperbolic functions of zinc concentration (1-1,000 microM) and followed Michaelis-Menten kinetics. Calcium reduced both apparent zinc binding affinity (K (m)) and maximal transport velocity (J (max)) for 30% sucrose cells, but doubled the apparent maximal transport velocity for 80% sucrose cells. Results suggest that calcium, sodium, and protons enter gill epithelial cells by an endogenous broad-specificity cation channel and trans-stimulate metal uptake by a plasma membrane carrier system. Differences in zinc transport observed between gill epithelial cell types appear related to apparent affinity differences of the transporters in each kind of cell. Low affinity cells from 30% sucrose were inhibited by calcium, while high affinity cells from 80% sucrose were stimulated. 65Zn2+ transport was also studied by isolated, intact, gill filament tips. These intact gill fragments generally displayed the same transport properties as did cells from 80% sucrose and provided support for metal uptake processes being an apical phenomenon. A working model for zinc transport by lobster gill cells is presented. PMID:19198852

  14. Opa binding to cellular CD66 receptors mediates the transcellular traversal of Neisseria gonorrhoeae across polarized T84 epithelial cell monolayers.

    PubMed

    Wang, J; Gray-Owen, S D; Knorre, A; Meyer, T F; Dehio, C

    1998-11-01

    We have analysed the capacity of the 11 phase-variable, opacity-associated (Opa) proteins encoded by Neisseria gonorrhoeae MS11 to mediate traversal across polarized monolayers of the human colonic carcinoma T84 cell line. Gonococci expressing either the heparan sulphate proteoglycan (HSPG) binding Opa protein (Opa50) or no Opa protein (Opa-) did not interact with the apical pole of T84 monolayers, whereas the 10 variant Opa proteins previously shown to bind CD66 receptors were found to mediate efficient gonococcal adherence and transepithelial traversal. Consistent with this, T84 cells were shown by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and immunoblotting to co-express CD66a (BGP), CD66c (NCA) and CD66e (CEA). The recruitment of CD66 receptors by Opa-expressing gonococci indicates their involvement in mediating adherence to the surface of T84 cells, and these bacterial interactions could be inhibited completely using polyclonal antibodies cross-reacting with all of the CD66 proteins co-expressed on T84 cells. Consistent results were obtained when Opa proteins were expressed in Escherichia coli, suggesting that the Opa-CD66 interaction is sufficient to mediate bacterial traversal. Transcytosis of Opa-expressing N. gonorrhoeae or E. coli did not disrupt the barrier function of infected monolayers, as indicated by a sustained transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) throughout the course of infection, and confocal laser scanning and electron microscopy both suggest a transcellular rather than a paracellular route of traversal across the monolayers. Parallels between the results seen here and previous work done with organ cultures confirm that T84 monolayers provide a valid model for studying neisserial interactions with the mucosal surface, and suggest that CD66 receptors contribute to this process in vivo. PMID:9822830

  15. In vivo alteration of humoral responses to HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein gp120 by antibodies to the CD4-binding site of gp120

    PubMed Central

    Visciano, Maria Luisa; Tuen, Michael; Gorny, Miroslaw K.; Hioe, Catarina E.

    2008-01-01

    The binding of antibodies to the CD4-binding site (CD4bs) of the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein gp120 has been shown to induce gp120 to undergo conformational changes that can expose and/or shield specific epitopes on gp120. Here, we study alterations in the antigenicity and immunogenicity of gp120 when complexed with human monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) specific for the CD4bs of gp120. The data showed that gp120 bound by anti-CD4bs mAbs had enhanced reactivity with mAbs to the V3 and N-terminal regions, but not with mAb to the C terminus. Moreover, mice immunized with the gp120/anti-CD4bs mAb complexes produced higher titers of gp120-specific serum IgG and IgA than mice immunized with uncomplexed gp120 or other gp120/mAb complexes. Notably, the enhanced antibody production was directed against V3 and correlated with better exposure of V3 on the gp120/anti-CD4bs mAb complexes. The higher antibody reactivity was evident against the homologous V3LAI peptide, but not against heterologous V3 peptides. Potent neutralization activity against HIV-1LAI was also observed in the sera from mice immunized with gp120/anti-CD4bs mAb complexes, although the sera exhibited poor neutralizing activities against other viruses tested. These results indicate that the anti-CD4bs antibodies alter the antigenicity and immunogenicity of gp120, leading to enhanced production of anti-gp120 antibodies directed particularly against the V3 region. PMID:18054978

  16. Cloning of Litopenaeus vannamei CD63 and it's role in white spot syndrome virus infection.

    PubMed

    Guan, Guang-Kuo; Liu, Qing-Hui; Li, Chen; Huang, Jie

    2016-07-01

    White Spot Syndrome Virus (WSSV) is currently the most serious shrimp pathogen, which has brought huge losses to shrimp industry worldwide. CD63 of shrimp belongs to the tetraspanin superfamily, which plays an important role in signal transduction and immune process. In this paper, CD63 cDNA sequence of Litopenaeus vannamei was cloned using RACE method. The amplified sequence is 1472 bp, with its ORF 744 bp, encoding 247 amino acids. Bioinformatics analysis showed that the sequence of LvCD63 has 93% similarity with Penaeus monodon and 92% similarity with Fenneropenaeus chinensis. Real-time PCR analysis showed that the mRNA levels of LvCD63 expressed in the tissues of hemocytes, gill, epithelial tissue, heart, lymphoid, hepatopancreas, stomach, intestines, muscle and nerve. Among these tissues the highest expression level was showed in the tissue of haemolymph, followed by epithelial tissue, hepatopancreas, and nerve. The lowest expression level of LvCD63 was appeared in the muscle tissue. After WSSV challenge, the expression levels of LvCD63 were both up-regulated in the tissues of gill and epithelial. However the expression level of LvCD63 in hepatopancreas was down-regulated. Far-western blot analysis showed that LvCD63 interacts with VP28, and both VP28N and VP28C fragments interact with LvCD63. Flow cytometry analysis showed that LvCD63 was present on the surface of hemocytes and it is required for binding of WSSV virions. Neutral experiments in vivo showed that LvCD63LEL delayed WSSV infection in shrimp. PMID:26964710

  17. Identification of a complex that binds to the CD154 3' untranslated region: implications for a role in message stability during T cell activation.

    PubMed

    Barnhart, B; Kosinski, P A; Wang, Z; Ford, G S; Kiledjian, M; Covey, L R

    2000-10-15

    CD154 expression is regulated throughout a time course of CD3-dependent T cell activation by differential mRNA decay. To understand the molecular basis of the "stability" phase of this pathway, experiments were conducted to identify sequences and specific complexes important in this regulation. Gel retardation assays using extracts from both Jurkat T cells and CD3-activated CD4(+) T cells revealed a major complex (complex I) that bound a 65-bp highly CU-rich region of the CD154 3' untranslated region. The specificity of the CU-rich element for complex-I formation was confirmed by disruption of this complex by oligo(dCT) competition. Formation of complex I strongly correlated with CD154 mRNA stability across a time course of T cell activation. UV cross-linking identified a major oligo(dCT)-sensitive species at approximately 90 kDa that showed induced and increased expression in extracts from 24- and 48-hr anti-CD3-activated T cells, respectively. This protein was absent in equivalent extracts from resting or 2-h-activated T cells. Using an in vitro decay assay, we found that a CD154-specific transcript was more rapidly degraded in 2-h-activated extract and stabilized in the 24- and 48-h extracts compared to extracts from resting T cells. Disruption of complex I resulted in the rapid decay of a CD154-specific transcript demonstrating a functional role for complex I in mRNA stabilization in vitro. These studies support a model of posttranscriptional regulation of CD154 expression being controlled in part by the interaction of a poly(CU)-binding complex with a specific sequence in the 3' untranslated region. PMID:11035087

  18. Artificial mutations and natural variations in the CD46 molecules from human and monkey cells define regions important for measles virus binding.

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, E C; Dörig, R E; Sarangi, F; Marcil, A; Iorio, C; Richardson, C D

    1997-01-01

    CD46 was previously shown to be a primate-specific receptor for the Edmonston strain of measles virus. This receptor consists of four short consensus regions (SCR1 to SCR4) which normally function in complement regulation. Measles virus has recently been shown to interact with SCR1 and SCR2. In this study, receptors on different types of monkey erythrocytes were employed as "natural mutant proteins" to further define the virus binding regions of CD46. Erythrocytes from African green monkeys and rhesus macaques hemagglutinate in the presence of measles virus, while baboon erythrocytes were the least efficient of the Old World monkey cells used in these assays. Subsequent studies demonstrated that the SCR2 domain of baboon CD46 contained an Arg-to-Gln mutation at amino acid position 103 which accounted for reduced hemagglutination activity. Surprisingly, none of the New World monkey erythrocytes hemagglutinated in the presence of virus. Sequencing of cDNAs derived from the lymphocytes of these New World monkeys and analysis of their erythrocytes with SCR1-specific polyclonal antibodies indicated that the SCR1 domain was deleted in these cells. Additional experiments, which used 35 different site-specific mutations inserted into CD46, were performed to complement the preceding studies. The effects of these artificial mutations were documented with a convenient binding assay using insect cells expressing the measles virus hemagglutinin. Mutations which mimicked the change found in baboon CD46 or another which deleted the SCR2 glycosylation site reduced binding substantially. Another mutation which altered GluArg to AlaAla at positions 58 and 59, totally abolished binding. Finally, the epitopes for two monoclonal antibodies which inhibit measles virus attachment were mapped to the same regions implicated by mutagenesis. PMID:9223509

  19. Endothelial-binding, proinflammatory T cells identified by MCAM (CD146) expression: Characterization and role in human autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Dagur, Pradeep K; McCoy, J Philip

    2015-05-01

    A subset of T cells defined by the cell surface expression of MCAM (CD146) has been identified in the peripheral circulation of healthy individuals. These cells comprise approximately 3% of the pool of circulating T cells, have an effector memory phenotype, and are capable of producing several cytokines. Notably, the MCAM positive cells are enhanced for IL-17 production compared to MCAM negative effector memory T cells. These cells are committed to IL-17 production and do not require in vitro polarization with exogenous cytokines. MCAM positive T cells also demonstrate an increased ability to bind to endothelial monolayers. In numerous autoimmune diseases these cells are found at increased proportions in the peripheral circulation, and at the sites of active inflammation in patients with autoimmune disease, these cells appear in large numbers and are major contributors to IL-17 production. Studies to date have been performed with human subjects and it is uncertain if appropriate mouse models exist for this cell type. These cells could represent early components of the adaptive immune response and serve as targets of therapy in these diseases, although much work remains to be performed in order to discern the exact nature and function of these cells. PMID:25595133

  20. Design, synthesis and antiviral activity of entry inhibitors that target the CD4-binding site of HIV-1

    PubMed Central

    Curreli, Francesca; Choudhury, Spreeha; Pyatkin, Ilya; Zagorodnikov, Victor P.; Bulay, Anna Khulianova; Altieri, Andrea; Kwon, Young Do; Kwong, Peter D.; Debnath, Asim K.

    2012-01-01

    The CD4 binding site on HIV-1 gp120 has been validated as a drug target to prevent HIV-1 entry to cells. Previously, we identified two small molecule inhibitors consisting of a 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine ring linked by an oxalamide to a p-halide-substituted phenyl group, which target this site, specifically, a cavity termed “Phe43 cavity”. Here we use synthetic chemistry, functional assessment and structure-based analysis to explore variants of each region of these inhibitors for improved antiviral properties. Alterations of the phenyl group and of the oxalamide linker indicated that these regions were close to optimal in the original lead compounds. Design of a series of compounds, where the tetramethylpiperidine ring was replaced with new scaffolds, lead to improved antiviral activity. These new scaffolds provide insight into the surface chemistry at the entrance of the cavity and offer additional opportunities by which to optimize further these potential-next-generation therapeutics and microbicides against HIV-1. PMID:22524483

  1. High-and low-affinity binding sites for Cd on the bacterial cell walls of Bacillus subtilis and Shewanella oneidensis.

    SciTech Connect

    Mishra, B.; Boyanov, M.; Bunker, B. A.; Kelly, S. D.; Kemner, K. M.; Fein, J. B.; Biosciences Division; Univ. of Notre Dame

    2010-08-01

    Bulk Cd adsorption isotherm experiments, thermodynamic equilibrium modeling, and Cd K edge EXAFS were used to constrain the mechanisms of proton and Cd adsorption to bacterial cells of the commonly occurring Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, Bacillus subtilis and Shewanella oneidensis, respectively. Potentiometric titrations were used to characterize the functional group reactivity of the S. oneidensis cells, and we model the titration data using the same type of non-electrostatic surface complexation approach as was applied to titrations of B. subtilis suspensions by Fein et al. (2005). Similar to the results for B. subtilis, the S. oneidensis cells exhibit buffering behavior from approximately pH 3-9 that requires the presence of four distinct sites, with pK{sub a} values of 3.3 {+-} 0.2, 4.8 {+-} 0.2, 6.7 {+-} 0.4, and 9.4 {+-} 0.5, and site concentrations of 8.9({+-}2.6) x 10{sup -5}, 1.3({+-}0.2) x 10{sup -4}, 5.9({+-}3.3) x 10{sup -5}, and 1.1({+-}0.6) x 10{sup -4} moles/g bacteria (wet mass), respectively. The bulk Cd isotherm adsorption data for both species, conducted at pH 5.9 as a function of Cd concentration at a fixed biomass concentration, were best modeled by reactions with a Cd:site stoichiometry of 1:1. EXAFS data were collected for both bacterial species as a function of Cd concentration at pH 5.9 and 10 g/L bacteria. The EXAFS results show that the same types of binding sites are responsible for Cd sorption to both bacterial species at all Cd loadings tested (1-200 ppm). Carboxyl sites are responsible for the binding at intermediate Cd loadings. Phosphoryl ligands are more important than carboxyl ligands for Cd binding at high Cd loadings. For the lowest Cd loadings studied here, a sulfhydryl site was found to dominate the bound Cd budgets for both species, in addition to the carboxyl and phosphoryl sites that dominate the higher loadings. The EXAFS results suggest that both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial cell walls have a low

  2. EtpE Binding to DNase X Induces Ehrlichial Entry via CD147 and hnRNP-K Recruitment, Followed by Mobilization of N-WASP and Actin

    PubMed Central

    Mohan Kumar, Dipu; Lin, Mingqun; Xiong, Qingming; Webber, Mathew James; Kural, Comert

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Obligate intracellular bacteria, such as Ehrlichia chaffeensis, perish unless they can enter eukaryotic cells. E. chaffeensis is the etiological agent of human monocytic ehrlichiosis, an emerging infectious disease. To infect cells, Ehrlichia uses the C terminus of the outer membrane invasin entry-triggering protein (EtpE) of Ehrlichia (EtpE-C), which directly binds the mammalian cell surface glycosylphosphatidyl inositol-anchored protein, DNase X. How this binding drives Ehrlichia entry is unknown. Here, using affinity pulldown of host cell lysates with recombinant EtpE-C (rEtpE-C), we identified two new human proteins that interact with EtpE-C: CD147 and heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K (hnRNP-K). The interaction of CD147 with rEtpE-C was validated by far-Western blotting and coimmunoprecipitation of native EtpE with endogenous CD147. CD147 was ubiquitous on the cell surface and also present around foci of rEtpE-C-coated-bead entry. Functional neutralization of surface-exposed CD147 with a specific antibody inhibited Ehrlichia internalization and infection but not binding. Downregulation of CD147 by short hairpin RNA (shRNA) impaired E. chaffeensis infection. Functional ablation of cytoplasmic hnRNP-K by a nanoscale intracellular antibody markedly attenuated bacterial entry and infection but not binding. EtpE-C also interacted with neuronal Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein (N-WASP), which is activated by hnRNP-K. Wiskostatin, which inhibits N-WASP activation, and cytochalasin D, which inhibits actin polymerization, inhibited Ehrlichia entry. Upon incubation with host cell lysate, EtpE-C but not an EtpE N-terminal fragment stimulated in vitro actin polymerization in an N-WASP- and DNase X-dependent manner. Time-lapse video images revealed N-WASP recruitment at EtpE-C-coated bead entry foci. Thus, EtpE-C binding to DNase X drives Ehrlichia entry by engaging CD147 and hnRNP-K and activating N-WASP-dependent actin polymerization. PMID:26530384

  3. Pseudorabies Virus US3 Protein Kinase Protects Infected Cells from NK Cell-Mediated Lysis via Increased Binding of the Inhibitory NK Cell Receptor CD300a

    PubMed Central

    Grauwet, K.; Vitale, M.; De Pelsmaeker, S.; Jacob, T.; Laval, K.; Moretta, L.; Parodi, M.; Parolini, S.; Cantoni, C.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Several reports have indicated that natural killer (NK) cells are of particular importance in the innate response against herpesvirus infections. As a consequence, herpesviruses have developed diverse mechanisms for evading NK cells, although few such mechanisms have been identified for the largest herpesvirus subfamily, the alphaherpesviruses. The antiviral activity of NK cells is regulated by a complex array of interactions between activating/inhibitory receptors on the NK cell surface and the corresponding ligands on the surfaces of virus-infected cells. Here we report that the US3 protein kinase of the alphaherpesvirus pseudorabies virus (PRV) displays previously uncharacterized immune evasion properties: it triggers the binding of the inhibitory NK cell receptor CD300a to the surface of the infected cell, thereby providing increased CD300a-mediated protection of infected cells against NK cell-mediated lysis. US3-mediated CD300a binding was found to depend on aminophospholipid ligands of CD300a and on group I p21-activated kinases. These data identify a novel alphaherpesvirus strategy for evading NK cells and demonstrate, for the first time, a role for CD300a in regulating NK cell activity upon contact with virus-infected target cells. IMPORTANCE Herpesviruses have developed fascinating mechanisms to evade elimination by key elements of the host immune system, contributing to their ability to cause lifelong infections with recurrent reactivation events. Natural killer (NK) cells are central in the innate antiviral response. Here we report that the US3 protein kinase of the alphaherpesvirus pseudorabies virus displays a previously uncharacterized capacity for evasion of NK cells. Expression of US3 protects infected cells from NK cell-mediated lysis via increased binding of the inhibitory NK cell receptor CD300a. We show that this US3-mediated increase in CD300a binding depends on aminophospholipids and on cellular p21-activated kinases (PAKs). The

  4. CTLA4Fcε, a novel soluble fusion protein that binds B7 molecules and the IgE receptors, and reduces human in vitro soluble CD23 production and lymphocyte proliferation.

    PubMed

    Perez-Witzke, Daniel; Miranda-García, María Auxiliadora; Suárez, Nuris; Becerra, Raquel; Duque, Kharelys; Porras, Verónica; Fuenmayor, Jaheli; Montano, Ramon Fernando

    2016-05-01

    Immunoglobulin E-mediated allergy and certain autoimmune diseases are characterized by the presence of a T helper type 2 (Th2) immune response and allergen-specific or self-reactive IgE. Soluble CD23 (sCD23) is a B-cell factor that fosters IgE class-switching and synthesis, suggesting that sCD23 may be a therapeutic target for these pathologies. We produced a recombinant protein, CTLA4Fcε, by fusing the ectodomain of the immunoregulatory molecule cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4 (CTLA-4) with a fragment of the IgE H-chain constant region. In SDS-PAGE/inmunoblot analyses, CTLA4Fcε appeared as a 70 000 MW polypeptide that forms homodimers. Flow cytometry showed that CTLA4Fcε binds to IgE receptors FcεRI and FcεRII/CD23, as well as to CTLA-4 counter-receptors CD80 and CD86. Binding of CTLA4Fcε to FcεRII/CD23 appeared stronger than that of IgE. Since the cells used to study CD23 binding express CD80 and CD86, simultaneous binding of CTLA4Fcε to CD23 and CD80/CD86 seems to occur and would explain this difference. As measured by a human CD23-specific ELISA, CTLA4Fcε - but not IgE - induced a concentration-dependent reduction of sCD23 in culture supernatants of RPMI-8866 cells. Our results suggest that the simultaneous binding of CTLA4Fcɛ to CD23-CD80/CD86 may cause the formation of multi-molecular complexes that are either internalized or pose a steric hindrance to enzymatic proteolysis, so blocking sCD23 generation. CTLA4Fcε caused a concentration-dependent reduction of lymphocyte proliferation in human peripheral blood mononuclear cell samples stimulated in vitro with concanavalin A. The ability to bind IgE receptors on effector cells, to regulate the production of sCD23 and to inhibit lymphocyte proliferation suggests that CTLA4Fcɛ has immunomodulatory properties on human Th2 responses. PMID:26801967

  5. Gilles vs Pugh and the lost letter.

    PubMed

    Paull, J D

    2009-07-01

    In June 1842 the wife of Lewis W Gilles, a banker in Launceston, wrote to Mrs Pugh, inviting her and her husband, Mr William Russ Pugh, to an entertainment and ball. The Pughs neither responded to the invitation, nor attended the ball. Mrs Gilles mentioned the discourtesy of their non-attendance to a friend, who the following morning brought the complaint to the attention of Dr Pugh. Pugh immediately wrote a brief note explaining that neither he nor his wife had received the invitation. Further correspondence between Gilles and Pugh ensued, becoming more and more bitter until Pugh publicly insulted Gilles. The Launceston Club, of which both men were members, ultimately became a casualty of the dispute and was dissolved. A Supreme Court defamation and libel case followed with Gilles as plaintiff and Pugh as defendant. Gilles won the case but received only token damages. And the missing letter? Too late, Mrs Pugh's maid found it tucked between the pages of a periodical on the dresser PMID:19705633

  6. A novel regulatory pathway for autoimmune disease: Binding of partial MHC class II constructs to monocytes reduces CD74 expression and induces both specific and bystander T-cell tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Andrew, Shayne; Huan, Jianya; Chou, Yuan K.; Buenafe, Abigail C.; Dahan, Rony; Reiter, Yoram; Mooney, Jeffery L.; Offner, Halina; Burrows, Gregory G.

    2012-01-01

    Treatment with partial (p)MHC class II-β1α1 constructs (also referred to as recombinant T-cell receptor ligands – RTL) linked to antigenic peptides can induce T-cell tolerance, inhibit recruitment of inflammatory cells and reverse autoimmune diseases. Here we demonstrate a novel regulatory pathway that involves RTL binding to CD11b+ mononuclear cells through a receptor comprised of MHC class II invariant chain (CD74), cell-surface histones and MHC class II itself for treatment of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). Binding of RTL constructs with CD74 involved a previously unrecognized MHC class II-α1/CD74 interaction that inhibited CD74 expression, blocked activity of its ligand, macrophage migration inhibitory factor, and reduced EAE severity. These findings implicate binding of RTL constructs to CD74 as a key step in both antigen-driven and bystander T-cell tolerance important in treatment of inflammatory diseases. PMID:23026773

  7. Marine sediment and interstitial water: Effects on bioavailability of cadmium to gills of the clam Protothaca staminea

    SciTech Connect

    Hardy, J.T.; Schmidt, R.L.; Apts, C.W.

    1981-12-01

    A study was made to determine first, the kinetics of cadmium sorption on a natural marine sediment and second, the degree to which this sorption as well as interstitial water might effect bioavailability of cadmium to gills of the clam Protothaca staminea. Surface sediment from Sequim Bay, Washington was labelled with Cd 109 and total cadmium concentration determined by radioassay. Gills were added to three types of exposures: 1) control (0.45 um filtered seawater, 2) sediment interstitial water and 3) washed sediment. Prepared samples of gills were counted in a liquid scintillation counter. Results show that addition of a small quantity of washed sediment to the exposure system reduced cadmium accumulation by gills to only 17% of the control. Interstitial water had no significant effect. 1 table, 3 figures (JMT)

  8. Engineering metal-binding sites of bacterial CusF to enhance Zn/Cd accumulation and resistance by subcellular targeting.

    PubMed

    Yu, Pengli; Yuan, Jinhong; Zhang, Hui; Deng, Xin; Ma, Mi; Zhang, Haiyan

    2016-01-25

    The periplasmic protein CusF acts as a metallochaperone to mediate Cu resistance in Escherichia coli. CusF does not contain cysteine residues and barely binds to divalent cations. Here, we addressed effects of cysteine-substitution mutant (named as mCusF) of CusF on zinc/cadmium (Zn/Cd) accumulation and resistance. We targeted mCusF to different subcellular compartments in Arabidopsis. We found that plants expressing vacuole-targeted mCusF were more resistant to excess Zn than WT and plants with cell wall-targeted or cytoplasmic mCusF. Under long-term exposure to excess Zn, all transgenic lines accumulated more Zn (up to 2.3-fold) in shoots than the untransformed plants. Importantly, plants with cytoplasmic mCusF showed higher efficiency of Zn translocation from root to shoot than plants with secretory pathway-targeted-mCusF. Furthermore, the transgenic lines exhibited enhanced resistance to Cd and significant increase in root-to-shoot Cd translocation. We also found all transgenic plants greatly improved manganese (Mn) and iron (Fe) homeostasis under Cd exposure. Our results demonstrate heterologous expression of mCusF could be used to engineer a new phytoremediation strategy for Zn/Cd and our finding also deepen our insights into mechanistic basis for relieving Cd toxicity in plants through proper root/shoot partitioning mechanism and homeostatic accumulation of Mn and Fe. PMID:26476315

  9. Analysis of reactive oxygen species, Ca²+ , and Hsp70 in the gill and mantle of clams Ruditapes philippinarum exposed in cadmium.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dongwu; Chen, Zhiwei; Liu, Zhenxing

    2013-12-01

    In this study, the probes 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein diacetate (H2 DCF-DA) and Fluo-3 AM were used to investigate the instantaneous change of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and Ca(2+) in the gill and mantle of clams Ruditapes philippinarum exposed in 0.05 mg L(-1) Cd(2+) with the laser-scanning confocal microscopy. The results indicated that Ca(2+) level was declined in the gill and slightly increased in the mantle. The level of ROS was declined in the gill, while the oscillation of ROS level was observed in the mantle. These data revealed that Ca(2+) could stimulate mitochondrial activity and enhance the respiratory chain in the gill and mantle. In addition, the expression of Hsp70 was increased in the gill and mantle of clams exposed in 0.05 mg L(-1) Cd(2+) . The change of Ca(2+) and ROS level affected the expression of Hsp70 in the gill and mantle. An appropriate method was established to analyze the effects of Cd(2+) on ROS, Ca(2+) , and Hsp70 in the gill and mantle of clams with confocal microscopy. Both confocal microscopy and chemical fluorescent are valuable tools for measurement of time-dependent intracellular ROS and Ca(2+) signals. PMID:24166874

  10. Negative Factor from SIV Binds to the Catalytic Subunit of the V-ATPase to Internalize CD4 and to Increase Viral Infectivity

    PubMed Central

    Mandic, Robert; Fackler, Oliver T.; Geyer, Matthias; Linnemann, Thomas; Zheng, Yong-Hui; Peterlin, B. Matija

    2001-01-01

    The accessory protein negative factor (Nef) from human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) is required for optimal viral infectivity and the progression to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Nef interacts with the endocytic machinery, resulting in the down-regulation of cluster of differentiation antigen 4 (CD4) and major histocompatibility complex class I (MHCI) molecules on the surface of infected cells. Mutations in the C-terminal flexible loop of Nef result in a lower rate of internalization by this viral protein. However, no loop-dependent binding of Nef to adaptor protein-2 (AP-2), which is the adaptor protein complex that is required for the internalization of proteins from the plasma membrane, could be demonstrated. In this study we investigated the relevance of different motifs in Nef from SIVmac239 for its internalization, CD4 down-regulation, binding to components of the trafficking machinery, and viral infectivity. Our data suggest that the binding of Nef to the catalytic subunit H of the vacuolar membrane ATPase (V-ATPase) facilitates its internalization. This binding depends on the integrity of the whole flexible loop. Subsequent studies on Nef mutant viruses revealed that the flexible loop is essential for optimal viral infectivity. Therefore, our data demonstrate how Nef contacts the endocytic machinery in the absence of its direct binding to AP-2 and suggest an important role for subunit H of the V-ATPase in viral infectivity. PMID:11179428

  11. Interstrand loops CD and EF act as pH-dependent gates to regulate fatty acid ligand binding in tear lipocalin.

    PubMed

    Gasymov, Oktay K; Abduragimov, Adil R; Yusifov, Taleh N; Glasgow, Ben J

    2004-10-12

    Tear lipocalin (TL), a major component of human tears, shows pH-dependent endogenous ligand binding. The structural and conformational changes associated with ligand release in the pH range of 7.5-3.0 are monitored by circular dichroism spectroscopy and site-directed tryptophan fluorescence. In the transition from pH 7.5 to pH 5.5, the ligand affinity for 16-(9-anthroyloxy)palmitic acid (16AP) and 8-anilino-1-naphthalenesulfonic acid is reduced. At pH 4.0 these ligands no longer bind within the TL calyx. From pH 7.3 to pH 3.0, the residues on loops CD and EF, which overhang the calyx entrance, show reduced accessibility to acrylamide. In addition resonance energy transfer is enhanced between residues on the two loops; the distance between the loops narrows. These findings suggest that apposition of the loops at low pH excludes the ligand from the intracavitary binding site. The conformational changes observed in transition from pH 7.3 to pH 3.0 for loops CD and EF are quite different. The CD loop shows less population reshuffling than the EF loop with an acidic environment, probably because backbone motion is restrained by the adjacent disulfide bond. The Trp fluorescence wavelength maximum (lambda(max)) reflects internal electrostatic interactions for positions on loops CD and EF. The titration curves of lambda(max) for mutants on the EF loop fit the Hendersen-Hasselbalch equation for two apparent pK(a) values, while the CD loop positions fit satisfactorily with one pK(a) value. Midpoints of transition for the binding affinity of TL tryptophan mutants to 16AP occur at pH 5.5-6.1. Replacement of each amino acid on either loop by single tryptophan mutation does not disrupt the pH-dependent binding affinity to 16AP. Taken together the data suggest that pH-driven ligand release involves ionization changes in several titratable residues associated with CD and EF loop apposition and occlusion of the calyx. PMID:15461462

  12. Targeting HIV Reservoir in Infected CD4 T Cells by Dual-Affinity Re-targeting Molecules (DARTs) that Bind HIV Envelope and Recruit Cytotoxic T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sloan, Derek D.; Lam, Chia-Ying Kao; Irrinki, Alivelu; Liu, Liqin; Tsai, Angela; Pace, Craig S.; Kaur, Jasmine; Murry, Jeffrey P.; Balakrishnan, Mini; Moore, Paul A.; Johnson, Syd; Nordstrom, Jeffrey L.; Cihlar, Tomas; Koenig, Scott

    2015-01-01

    HIV reservoirs and production of viral antigens are not eliminated in chronically infected participants treated with combination antiretroviral therapy (cART). Novel therapeutic strategies aiming at viral reservoir elimination are needed to address chronic immune dysfunction and non-AIDS morbidities that exist despite effective cART. The HIV envelope protein (Env) is emerging as a highly specific viral target for therapeutic elimination of the persistent HIV-infected reservoirs via antibody-mediated cell killing. Dual-Affinity Re-Targeting (DART) molecules exhibit a distinct mechanism of action via binding the cell surface target antigen and simultaneously engaging CD3 on cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs). We designed and evaluated Env-specific DARTs (HIVxCD3 DARTs) derived from known antibodies recognizing diverse Env epitopes with or without broadly neutralizing activity. HIVxCD3 DARTs derived from PGT121, PGT145, A32, and 7B2, but not VRC01 or 10E8 antibodies, mediated potent CTL-dependent killing of quiescent primary CD4 T cells infected with diverse HIV isolates. Similar killing activity was also observed with DARTs structurally modified for in vivo half-life extension. In an ex vivo model using cells isolated from HIV-infected participants on cART, combinations of the most potent HIVxCD3 DARTs reduced HIV expression both in quiescent and activated peripheral blood mononuclear cell cultures isolated from HIV-infected participants on suppressive cART. Importantly, HIVxCD3 DARTs did not induce cell-to-cell virus spread in resting or activated CD4 T cell cultures. Collectively, these results provide support for further development of HIVxCD3 DARTs as a promising therapeutic strategy for targeting HIV reservoirs. PMID:26539983

  13. The BDLF3 gene product of Epstein-Barr virus, gp150, mediates non-productive binding to heparan sulfate on epithelial cells and only the binding domain of CD21 is required for infection.

    PubMed

    Chesnokova, Liudmila S; Valencia, Sarah M; Hutt-Fletcher, Lindsey M

    2016-07-01

    The cell surface molecules used by Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) to attach to epithelial cells are not well-defined, although when CD21, the B cell receptor for EBV is expressed epithelial cell infection increases disproportionately to the increase in virus bound. Many herpesviruses use low affinity charge interactions with molecules such as heparan sulfate to attach to cells. We report here that the EBV glycoprotein gp150 binds to heparan sulfate proteoglycans, but that attachment via this glycoprotein is not productive of infection. We also report that only the aminoterminal two short consensus repeats of CD21 are required for efficient infection, This supports the hypothesis that, when expressed on an epithelial cell CD21 serves primarily to cluster the major attachment protein gp350 in the virus membrane and enhance access of other important glycoproteins to the epithelial cell surface. PMID:27061054

  14. Ceramide-CD300f binding suppresses experimental colitis by inhibiting ATP-mediated mast cell activation

    PubMed Central

    Matsukawa, Toshihiro; Izawa, Kumi; Isobe, Masamichi; Takahashi, Mariko; Maehara, Akie; Yamanishi, Yoshinori; Kaitani, Ayako; Okumura, Ko; Teshima, Takanori; Kitamura, Toshio; Kitaura, Jiro

    2016-01-01

    Objective Extracellular ATP mediates mast cell-dependent intestinal inflammation via P2X7 purinoceptors. We have previously shown that CD300f (also called the leucocyte mono-immunoglobulin-like receptor 3 (LMIR3)) suppresses immunoglobulin E-dependent and mast cell-dependent allergic responses by binding to ceramide. The aim of the present study was to clarify the role of ceramide–LMIR3 interaction in the development of IBD. Design The dextran sodium sulfate (DSS)-induced colitis model was used in wild-type (WT), LMIR3−/−, mast cell-deficient KitW-sh/W-sh, KitW-sh/W-shLMIR3−/− or KitW-sh/W-sh mice engrafted with WT or LMIR3−/− bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMCs). The severity of colitis was determined by clinical and histological criteria. Lamina propria cell populations were assessed by flow cytometry. Production of chemical mediators from lamina propria cells was measured by real-time reverse transcription PCR. Production of chemical mediators from ATP-stimulated BMMCs in the presence or absence of ceramide was measured by ELISA. The severity of DSS-induced colitis was assessed in mice given either an Fc fusion protein containing an extracellular domain of LMIR3, and anticeramide antibody, or ceramide liposomes. Results LMIR3 deficiency exacerbated DSS-induced colitis in mice. KitW-sh/W-sh mice harbouring LMIR3−/− mast cells exhibited more severe colitis than those harbouring WT mast cells. Ceramide–LMIR3 interaction inhibited ATP-stimulated activation of BMMCs. DSS-induced colitis was aggravated by disrupting the ceramide–LMIR3 interaction, whereas it was suppressed by treating with ceramide liposomes. Conclusions LMIR3-deficient colonic mast cells were pivotal in the exacerbation of DSS-induced colitis in LMIR3−/− mice. Ceramide liposomes attenuated DSS-induced colitis by inhibiting ATP-mediated activation of colonic mast cells through ceraimide–LMIR3 binding. PMID:25673319

  15. Interplay between T Cell Receptor Binding Kinetics and the Level of Cognate Peptide Presented by Major Histocompatibility Complexes Governs CD8+ T Cell Responsiveness*

    PubMed Central

    Irving, Melita; Zoete, Vincent; Hebeisen, Michael; Schmid, Daphné; Baumgartner, Petra; Guillaume, Philippe; Romero, Pedro; Speiser, Daniel; Luescher, Immanuel; Rufer, Nathalie; Michielin, Olivier

    2012-01-01

    Through a rational design approach, we generated a panel of HLA-A*0201/NY-ESO-1157–165-specific T cell receptors (TCR) with increasing affinities of up to 150-fold from the wild-type TCR. Using these TCR variants which extend just beyond the natural affinity range, along with an extreme supraphysiologic one having 1400-fold enhanced affinity, and a low-binding one, we sought to determine the effect of TCR binding properties along with cognate peptide concentration on CD8+ T cell responsiveness. Major histocompatibility complexes (MHC) expressed on the surface of various antigen presenting cells were peptide-pulsed and used to stimulate human CD8+ T cells expressing the different TCR via lentiviral transduction. At intermediate peptide concentration we measured maximum cytokine/chemokine secretion, cytotoxicity, and Ca2+ flux for CD8+ T cells expressing TCR within a dissociation constant (KD) range of ∼1–5 μm. Under these same conditions there was a gradual attenuation in activity for supraphysiologic affinity TCR with KD < ∼1 μm, irrespective of CD8 co-engagement and of half-life (t1/2 = ln 2/koff) values. With increased peptide concentration, however, the activity levels of CD8+ T cells expressing supraphysiologic affinity TCR were gradually restored. Together our data support the productive hit rate model of T cell activation arguing that it is not the absolute number of TCR/pMHC complexes formed at equilibrium, but rather their productive turnover, that controls levels of biological activity. Our findings have important implications for various immunotherapies under development such as adoptive cell transfer of TCR-engineered CD8+ T cells, as well as for peptide vaccination strategies. PMID:22549784

  16. Generation and characterization of monoclonal antibodies to the putative CD4-binding domain of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 gp120.

    PubMed Central

    Sun, N C; Ho, D D; Sun, C R; Liou, R S; Gordon, W; Fung, M S; Li, X L; Ting, R C; Lee, T H; Chang, N T

    1989-01-01

    A panel of seven monoclonal antibodies against the relatively conserved CD4-binding domain on human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) gp120 was generated by immunizing mice with purified gp120. These monoclonal antibodies reacted specifically with gp120 in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and Western blots (immunoblots). By using synthetic peptides as antigens in the immunosorbent assay, the epitopes of these seven monoclonal antibodies were mapped to amino acid residues 423 to 437 of gp120. Further studies with radioimmunoprecipitation assays showed that they cross-reacted with both gp120 and gp160 of diverse HIV-1 isolates (HTLV-IIIB, HTLV-IIIRF, HTLV-IIIAL, and HTLV-IIIWMJ). They also bound specifically to H9 cells infected with HTLV-IIIB, HTLV-IIIRF, HTLV-IIIAL, HTLV-IIIZ84, and HTLV-IIIZ34 in indirect immunofluorescence studies. In addition, they blocked effectively the binding of HIV-1 to CD4+ C8166 cells. Despite the similarity of these properties, the monoclonal antibodies differed in neutralizing activity against HTLV-IIIB, HTLV-IIIRF, and HTLV-IIIAL, as demonstrated in both syncytium-forming assays and infectivity assays. Our findings suggest that these group-specific monoclonal antibodies to the putative CD4-binding domain on gp120 are potential candidates for development of therapeutic agents against acquired immunodeficiency disease syndrome. PMID:2474670

  17. Homodimerization and Heterodimerization of Minimal Zinc(II)-Binding Domain Peptides of T-cell Proteins CD4, CD8α, and Lck

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Alisa M.; Berg, Jeremy M.

    2009-01-01

    Metal-mediated protein oligomerization is an emerging mode of protein-protein interaction. The C-terminal cytosolic domains of T-cell coreceptors CD4 and CD8α form zinc-bridged heterodimers with the N-terminal region of the kinase Lck, with each protein contributing two cysteinate ligands to the complex. Using size exclusion chromatography, 1H NMR, and UV/visible absorption spectroscopy with cobalt(II) as a spectroscopic probe, we demonstrate that small peptides derived from these regions form metal-bridged heterodimers but also homodimers, in contrast to previous reports. The Lck-CD4 and Lck-CD8α cobalt(II)-bridged heterodimer complexes are more stable than the corresponding (Lck)2cobalt(II) complex by factors of 11 ± 4 and 22 ± 9, respectively. These studies were aided by the discovery that cobalt(II) complexes with a cobalt(II)(-Cys-X-X-Cys-)(-Cys-X-Cys-) chromophore show unusual optical spectra with one component of the visible d to d (4A2 to 4T1(P)) transition red-shifted and well separated from the other components. These results provide insights into the basis of specificity of metal-bridged complex formation and on the potential biological significance of metal-bridged homodimers in T-cells. PMID:19624124

  18. Metal-binding properties and structural characterization of a self-assembled coiled coil: formation of a polynuclear Cd-thiolate cluster.

    PubMed

    Zaytsev, Daniil V; Morozov, Vasily A; Fan, Jiufeng; Zhu, Xianchun; Mukherjee, Madhumita; Ni, Shuisong; Kennedy, Michael A; Ogawa, Michael Y

    2013-02-01

    This paper describes the design, characterization, and metal-binding properties of a 32-residue polypeptide called AQ-C16C19. The sequence of this peptide is composed of four repeats of the seven residue sequence Ile-Ala-Ala-Leu-Glu-Gln-Lys but with a Cys-X-X-Cys metal-binding motif substituted at positions 16-19. Size exclusion chromatography with multiangle light scattering detection (SEC-MALS) and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy studies showed that the apo peptide exhibits a pH-dependent oligomerization state in which a three-stranded α-helical coiled coil is dominant between pH5.4 and 8.5. The Cd(2+)-binding properties of the AQ-C16C19 peptide were studied by ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy (UV-vis), electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI MS), and (113)Cd NMR techniques. The holoprotein was found to contain a polynuclear cadmium-thiolate center formed within the hydrophobic core of the triple-stranded α-helical coiled-coil structure. The X-ray crystal structure of the Cd-loaded peptide, resolved at 1.85Å resolution, revealed an adamantane-like configuration of the polynuclear metal center consisting of four cadmium ions, six thiolate sulfur ligands from cysteine residues and four oxygen-donor ligands. Three of these are from glutamic acid residues and one is from an exogenous water molecule. Thus, each cadmium ion is coordinated in a distorted tetrahedral S(3)O geometry. The metal cluster was found to form cooperatively at pH5.4 but in a stepwise fashion at pH>7. The results demonstrate that synthetic coiled-coils can be designed to incorporate multinuclear metal clusters, a proof-of-concept for their potential use in developing synthetic metalloenzymes and multi-electron redox agents. PMID:23160144

  19. Binding of HCV E2 to CD81 induces RANTES secretion and internalization of CC chemokine receptor 5.

    PubMed

    Nattermann, J; Nischalke, H D; Feldmann, G; Ahlenstiel, G; Sauerbruch, T; Spengler, U

    2004-11-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection has been shown to be associated with reduced expression of the CC chemokine receptor (CCR) 5, and reduced responsiveness of lymphocytes to chemokines. However, the mechanism by which HCV alters CCR5 expression remains unclear. Here, we investigated whether altered CCR5 expression in hepatitis C results from interactions of CD81 with the HCV E2 protein. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from HCV-negative individuals were prepared by Ficoll density gradient separation. PBMC subpopulations (CD4+, CD8+ lymphocytes, CD19+ B cells, natural killer (NK) cells and monocyte-derived dendritic cells) were isolated and stimulated with immobilized HCV E2, and changes in CCR5 expression and CC-chemokine secretion were determined. Migration assays were performed using a 5-microm nitrocellulose filter microchamber system according to the manufacturer's recommendations. Exposure of PBMC to HCV E2 induced a dose-dependent release of regulated on activation normal T-cell-expressed and secreted (RANTES), down-regulation of CCR5 expression and intracellular accumulation of CCR5. This effect was blocked by preincubation of PBMC with anti-CD81. RANTES release following exposure to HCV E2 was mainly attributable to CD8+ cells. After exposure to HCV E2 markedly fewer CD8-positive lymphocytes were attracted by RANTES when compared with CD8+ cells that were studied in the absence of HCV E2. Our results suggest that interaction of HCV E2 with CD81 leads to increased RANTES secretion by CD8+ lymphocytes which induces down-regulation of CCR5 surface via receptor internalization resulting in altered lymphocyte migration. PMID:15500552

  20. Gill diseases of cultured salmonids in Ontario.

    PubMed Central

    Daoust, P Y; Ferguson, H W

    1983-01-01

    Between 1977 and 1981, the Fish Pathology Laboratory of the Ontario Veterinary College received 239 cases from trout farms of southern Ontario, 51 (21.3%) of which had diseased gills. Branchial lesions in 86.3% of these 51 cases were characterized by marked lamellar epithelial hyperplasia with epithelial hypertrophy and lamellar fusion. Filamentous bacteria were seen on the surface of the branchial filaments and lamellae in 68.6% of the cases. Our observations highlight the importance of gill diseases as a production problem of farmed salmonids in southern Ontario. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. Fig. 7. Fig. 8. Fig. 9. PMID:6416657

  1. Isolating the Epstein-Barr virus gp350/220 binding site on complement receptor type 2 (CR2/CD21).

    PubMed

    Young, Kendra A; Chen, Xiaojiang S; Holers, V Michael; Hannan, Jonathan P

    2007-12-14

    Complement receptor type 2 (CR2/CD21) is essential for the attachment of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) to the surface of B-lymphocytes in an interaction mediated by the viral envelope glycoprotein gp350. The heavily glycosylated structure of EBV gp350 has recently been elucidated by x-ray crystallography, and the CR2 binding site on this protein has been characterized. To identify the corresponding gp350 binding site on CR2, we have undertaken a site-directed mutagenesis study targeting regions of CR2 that have previously been implicated in the binding of CR2 to the C3d/C3dg fragments of complement component C3. Wild-type or mutant forms of CR2 were expressed on K562 cells, and the ability of these CR2-expressing cells to bind gp350 was measured using flow cytometry. Mutations directed toward the two N-terminal extracellular domains of CR2 (SCR1-2) reveal that a large contiguous surface of CR2 SCR1-2 is involved in gp350 binding, including a number of positively charged residues (Arg-13, (Arg-28, (Arg-36, Lys-41, Lys-57, Lys-67, and Arg-83). These data appear to complement the CR2 binding site on gp350, which is characterized by a preponderance of negative charge. In addition to identifying the importance of charge in the formation of a CR2-gp350 complex, we also provide evidence that both SCR1 and SCR2 make contact with gp350. Specifically, two anti-CR2 monoclonal antibodies, designated as monoclonal antibodies 171 and 1048 whose primary epitopes are located within SCR2, inhibit binding of wild-type CR2 to EBV gp350; with regard to SCR1, both K562 cells expressing an S15P mutation and recombinant S15P CR2 proteins exhibit diminished gp350 binding. PMID:17925391

  2. Cadmium kinetics in freshwater clams. Uptake of cadmium by the excised gill of Anodonta anatina

    SciTech Connect

    Holwerda, D.A.; de Knecht, J.A.; Hemelraad, J.; Veenhof, P.R.

    1989-03-01

    There are several, and sometimes conflicting, reports on metal interaction during bioaccumulation from a mixture of heavy metals by marine or estuarine organisms. Concerning the influence of zinc on Cd uptake, it was found in a previous study with the freshwater clam Anodonta cygnea that zinc retarded the accumulation of cadmium when present in a hundred-fold excess over the latter metal. In the only in vitro investigation known, it was shown that the uptake of cadmium by the excised gills of the seal mussel Mytilus edulis was not affected by co-exposure with other metal ions or by the presence of metabolic inhibitors. By contrast, bioaccumulation of cadmium in M. edulis was strongly reduced by co-exposure to zinc in a hundred-fold excess over cadmium. The clear effect of zinc on Cd accumulation in A. cygnea prompted the authors to investigate this phenomenon in an in vitro model. The primary aim was to detect whether the in vivo effect of zinc is caused by a direct influence on the gill epithelium or is sustained by a behavioral response of the animal. At the same time, the possible effect of some other exogenous factors on Cd uptake was examined. In addition, it was investigated whether the rate of in vitro uptake is a function of gill size.

  3. Thymic pathogenicity of an HIV-1 envelope is associated with increased CXCR4 binding efficiency and V5-gp41-dependent activity, but not V1/V2-associated CD4 binding efficiency and viral entry

    SciTech Connect

    Meissner, Eric G.; Coffield, Vernon M.; Su Lishan . E-mail: lsu@med.unc.edu

    2005-06-05

    We previously described a thymus-tropic HIV-1 envelope (R3A Env) from a rapid progressor obtained at the time of transmission. An HIV-1 molecular recombinant with the R3A Env supported extensive replication and pathogenesis in the thymus and did not require Nef. Another Env from the same patient did not display the same thymus-tropic pathogenesis (R3B Env). Here, we show that relative to R3B Env, R3A Env enhances viral entry of T cells, increases fusion-induced cytopathicity, and shows elevated binding efficiency for both CD4 and CXCR4, but not CCR5, in vitro. We created chimeric envelopes to determine the region(s) responsible for each in vitro phenotype and for thymic pathogenesis. Surprisingly, while V1/V2 contributed to enhanced viral entry, CD4 binding efficiency, and cytopathicity in vitro, it made no contribution to thymic pathogenesis. Rather, CXCR4 binding efficiency and V5-gp41-associated activity appear to independently contribute to thymic pathogenesis of the R3A Env. These data highlight the contribution of unique HIV pathogenic factors in the thymic microenvironment and suggest that novel mechanisms may be involved in Env pathogenic activity in vivo.

  4. Mechanical force effect on the two-state equilibrium of the hyaluronan-binding domain of CD44 in cell rolling.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Takashi; Suzuki, Miho; Ogino, Shinji; Umemoto, Ryo; Nishida, Noritaka; Shimada, Ichio

    2015-06-01

    CD44 is the receptor for hyaluronan (HA) and mediates cell rolling under fluid shear stress. The HA-binding domain (HABD) of CD44 interconverts between a low-affinity, ordered (O) state and a high-affinity, partially disordered (PD) state, by the conformational change of the C-terminal region, which is connected to the plasma membrane. To examine the role of tensile force on CD44-mediated rolling, we used a cell-free rolling system, in which recombinant HABDs were attached to beads through a C-terminal or N-terminal tag. We found that the rolling behavior was stabilized only at high shear stress, when the HABD was attached through the C-terminal tag. In contrast, no difference was observed for the beads coated with HABD mutants that constitutively adopt either the O state or the PD state. Steered molecular dynamics simulations suggested that the force from the C terminus disrupts the interaction between the C-terminal region and the core of the domain, thus providing structural insights into how the mechanical force triggers the allosteric O-to-PD transition. Based on these results, we propose that the force applied from the C terminus enhances the HABD-HA interactions by inducing the conformational change to the high-affinity PD transition more rapidly, thereby enabling CD44 to mediate lymphocyte trafficking and hematopoietic progenitor cell homing under high-shear conditions. PMID:26038553

  5. Food and Gill Exchange of Toxic Substances

    EPA Science Inventory

    Food and Gill Exchange of Toxic Substances (FGETS) is a FORTRAN simulation model that predicts temporal dynamics of fish whole body concentration (ug chemical/(g live weight fish)) of non ionic, non metabolized, organic chemicals that are bioaccumulated from either: (a) water onl...

  6. Structural requirements for C3d,g/Epstein-Barr virus receptor (CR2/CD21) ligand binding, internalization, and viral infection.

    PubMed

    Carel, J C; Myones, B L; Frazier, B; Holers, V M

    1990-07-25

    The structure of CR2, the human C3d,g/EBV receptor (CR2/CD21) consists of 15 or 16 60-70 amino acid repeats called short consensus repeats (SCRs) followed by a transmembrane and a 34-amino acid intracytoplasmic domain. Functions of CR2 include binding the human complement component C3d,g when it is covalently attached to targets or cross-linked in the fluid phase. In addition, CR2 binds the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and mediates internalization of EBV and subsequent infection of cells. In order to explore functional roles of the repetitive extracytoplasmic SCR structure and the intracytoplasmic domain of CR2, we have created truncated CR2 (rCR2) mutants bearing serial deletions of extracytoplasmic SCRs and also the intracytoplasmic tail. We then stably transfected these rCR2 mutants into two cell lines, murine fibroblast L cells and human erythroleukemic K562 cells. Phenotypic analysis of these expressed mutants revealed that 1) The C3d,g- and EBV-binding sites are found in the two amino-terminal SCRs of CR2, 2) expression of SCRs 3 and 4 is further required for high affinity binding to soluble cross-linked C3d,g, 3) the intracytoplasmic domain of CR2 is not required for binding C3d,g or EBV but is necessary for internalization of cross-linked C3d,g as well as for EBV infection of cells, 4) monoclonal anti-CR2 antibodies with similar activities react with single widely separated epitopes, and 5) no functional roles can yet be clearly assigned to SCRs 5-15, as rCR2 mutants not containing these SCRs show no major differences from wild-type rCR2 in binding or internalizing cross-linked C3d,g or mediating EBV binding and infection. PMID:1695627

  7. Sunflower metallothionein family characterisation. Study of the Zn(II)- and Cd(II)-binding abilities of the HaMT1 and HaMT2 isoforms.

    PubMed

    Tomas, M; Pagani, M A; Andreo, C S; Capdevila, M; Atrian, S; Bofill, R

    2015-07-01

    Plant metallothioneins (MTs) constitute a family of small Cys-rich proteins capable of coordinating metal ions, significantly differing from microbial and animal MTs. They are divided into four subfamilies depending on the Cys pattern in their sequence. In this work, the MT system of the sunflower plant (Helianthus annuus) has been defined, with ten genes coding for MTs (HaMT) belonging to the four plant MT subfamilies; three HaMT1, four HaMT2, one HaMT3 and two HaMT4 isoforms. The gene expression pattern and capacity to confer metal resistance to yeast cells have been analysed for at least one member of each subfamily. The divalent metal ion-binding abilities of HaMT1-2 and HaMT2-1 (the isoforms encoded by the most abundantly expressed HaMT1 and HaMT2 isogenes) have been characterised, as HaMT3 and HaMT4 were previously studied. Those isoforms constitute an optimum material to study the effect of Cys number variability on their coordination abilities, as they exhibit additional Cys residues regarding the canonical Cys pattern of each subfamily. Our results show that the variation in the number of Cys does not drastically modify their M(II)-binding abilities, but instead modulates the degree of heterogeneity of the corresponding recombinant syntheses. Significantly, the Zn(II)-HaMT1 complexes were highly susceptible to proteolytic cleavage. The recombinant Cd-MT preparations of both isoforms exhibit significant acid-labile sulphide content-Cd6S8 or Cd7S7 species. Overall results suggest that HaMT2-1 is probably associated with Cd(II) detoxification, in contrast to HaMT1-2, which may be more related to physiological functions, such as metal ion transport and delivery. PMID:25770010

  8. Neuroepithelial oxygen chemoreceptors of the zebrafish gill

    PubMed Central

    Jonz, Michael G; Fearon, Ian M; Nurse, Colin A

    2004-01-01

    In aquatic vertebrates, hypoxia induces physiological changes that arise principally from O2 chemoreceptors of the gill. Neuroepithelial cells (NECs) of the zebrafish gill are morphologically similar to mammalian O2 chemoreceptors (e.g. carotid body), suggesting that they may play a role in initiating the hypoxia response in fish. We describe morphological changes of zebrafish gill NECs following in vivo exposure to chronic hypoxia, and characterize the cellular mechanisms of O2 sensing in isolated NECs using patch-clamp electrophysiology. Confocal immunofluorescence studies indicated that chronic hypoxia (PO2 = 35 mmHg, 60 days) induced hypertrophy, proliferation and process extension in NECs immunoreactive for serotonin or synaptic vesicle protein (SV2). Under voltage clamp, NECs responded to hypoxia (PO2 = 25–140 mmHg) with a dose-dependent decrease in K+ current. The current–voltage relationship of the O2-sensitive current (IKO2) reversed near EK and displayed open rectification. Pharmacological characterization indicated that IKO2 was resistant to 20 mm tetraethylammonium (TEA) and 5 mm 4-aminopyridine (4-AP), but was sensitive to 1 mm quinidine. In current-clamp recordings, hypoxia produced membrane depolarization associated with a conductance decrease; this depolarization was blocked by quinidine, but was insensitive to TEA and 4-AP. These biophysical and pharmacological characteristics suggest that hypoxia sensing in zebrafish gill NECs is mediated by inhibition of a background K+ conductance, which generates a receptor potential necessary for neurosecretion and activation of sensory pathways in the gill. This appears to be a fundamental mechanism of O2 sensing that arose early in vertebrate evolution, and was adopted later in mammalian O2 chemoreceptors. PMID:15331683

  9. Colocalization of a CD1d-Binding Glycolipid with a Radiation-Attenuated Sporozoite Vaccine in Lymph Node-Resident Dendritic Cells for a Robust Adjuvant Effect.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiangming; Kawamura, Akira; Andrews, Chasity D; Miller, Jessica L; Wu, Douglass; Tsao, Tiffany; Zhang, Min; Oren, Deena; Padte, Neal N; Porcelli, Steven A; Wong, Chi-Huey; Kappe, Stefan H I; Ho, David D; Tsuji, Moriya

    2015-09-15

    A CD1d-binding glycolipid, α-Galactosylceramide (αGalCer), activates invariant NK T cells and acts as an adjuvant. We previously identified a fluorinated phenyl ring-modified αGalCer analog, 7DW8-5, displaying nearly 100-fold stronger CD1d binding affinity. In the current study, 7DW8-5 was found to exert a more potent adjuvant effect than αGalCer for a vaccine based on radiation-attenuated sporozoites of a rodent malaria parasite, Plasmodium yoelii, also referred to as irradiated P. yoelii sporozoites (IrPySpz). 7DW8-5 had a superb adjuvant effect only when the glycolipid and IrPySpz were conjointly administered i.m. Therefore, we evaluated the effect of distinctly different biodistribution patterns of αGalCer and 7DW8-5 on their respective adjuvant activities. Although both glycolipids induce a similar cytokine response in sera of mice injected i.v., after i.m. injection, αGalCer induces a systemic cytokine response, whereas 7DW8-5 is locally trapped by CD1d expressed by dendritic cells (DCs) in draining lymph nodes (dLNs). Moreover, the i.m. coadministration of 7DW8-5 with IrPySpz results in the recruitment of DCs to dLNs and the activation and maturation of DCs. These events cause the potent adjuvant effect of 7DW8-5, resulting in the enhancement of the CD8(+) T cell response induced by IrPySpz and, ultimately, improved protection against malaria. Our study is the first to show that the colocalization of a CD1d-binding invariant NK T cell-stimulatory glycolipid and a vaccine, like radiation-attenuated sporozoites, in dLN-resident DCs upon i.m. conjoint administration governs the potency of the adjuvant effect of the glycolipid. PMID:26254338

  10. Comprehensive Analysis of Contributions from Protein Conformational Stability and Major Histocompatibility Complex Class II-Peptide Binding Affinity to CD4+ Epitope Immunogenicity in HIV-1 Envelope Glycoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tingfeng; Steede, N. Kalaya; Nguyen, Hong-Nam P.; Freytag, Lucy C.; McLachlan, James B.; Mettu, Ramgopal R.; Robinson, James E.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Helper T-cell epitope dominance in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) envelope glycoprotein gp120 is not adequately explained by peptide binding to major histocompatibility complex (MHC) proteins. Antigen processing potentially influences epitope dominance, but few, if any, studies have attempted to reconcile the influences of antigen processing and MHC protein binding for all helper T-cell epitopes of an antigen. Epitopes of gp120 identified in both humans and mice occur on the C-terminal flanks of flexible segments that are likely to be proteolytic cleavage sites. In this study, the influence of gp120 conformation on the dominance pattern in gp120 from HIV strain 89.6 was examined in CBA mice, whose MHC class II protein has one of the most well defined peptide-binding preferences. Only one of six dominant epitopes contained the most conserved element of the I-Ak binding motif, an aspartic acid. Destabilization of the gp120 conformation by deletion of single disulfide bonds preferentially enhanced responses to the cryptic I-Ak motif-containing sequences, as reported by T-cell proliferation or cytokine secretion. Conversely, inclusion of CpG in the adjuvant with gp120 enhanced responses to the dominant CD4+ T-cell epitopes. The gp120 destabilization affected secretion of some cytokines more than others, suggesting that antigen conformation could modulate T-cell functions through mechanisms of antigen processing. IMPORTANCE CD4+ helper T cells play an essential role in protection against HIV and other pathogens. Thus, the sites of helper T-cell recognition, the dominant epitopes, are targets for vaccine design; and the corresponding T cells may provide markers for monitoring infection and immunity. However, T-cell epitopes are difficult to identify and predict. It is also unclear whether CD4+ T cells specific for one epitope are more protective than T cells specific for other epitopes. This work shows that the three-dimensional (3D) structure of an

  11. NeutrAvidin Functionalization of CdSe/CdS Quantum Nanorods and Quantification of Biotin Binding Sites using Biotin-4-Fluorescein Fluorescence Quenching.

    PubMed

    Lippert, Lisa G; Hallock, Jeffrey T; Dadosh, Tali; Diroll, Benjamin T; Murray, Christopher B; Goldman, Yale E

    2016-03-16

    We developed methods to solubilize, coat, and functionalize with NeutrAvidin elongated semiconductor nanocrystals (quantum nanorods, QRs) for use in single molecule polarized fluorescence microscopy. Three different ligands were compared with regard to efficacy for attaching NeutrAvidin using the "zero-length cross-linker" 1-ethyl-3-[3-(dimethylamino)propyl]carbodiimide (EDC). Biotin-4-fluorescene (B4F), a fluorophore that is quenched when bound to avidin proteins, was used to quantify biotin binding activity of the NeutrAvidin coated QRs and biotin binding activity of commercially available streptavidin coated quantum dots (QDs). All three coating methods produced QRs with NeutrAvidin coating density comparable to the streptavidin coating density of the commercially available quantum dots (QDs) in the B4F assay. One type of QD available from the supplier (ITK QDs) exhibited ∼5-fold higher streptavidin surface density compared to our QRs, whereas the other type of QD (PEG QDs) had 5-fold lower density. The number of streptavidins per QD increased from ∼7 streptavidin tetramers for the smallest QDs emitting fluorescence at 525 nm (QD525) to ∼20 tetramers for larger, longer wavelength QDs (QD655, QD705, and QD800). QRs coated with NeutrAvidin using mercaptoundecanoicacid (MUA) and QDs coated with streptavidin bound to biotinylated cytoplasmic dynein in single molecule TIRF microscopy assays, whereas Poly(maleic anhydride-alt-1-ocatdecene) (PMAOD) or glutathione (GSH) QRs did not bind cytoplasmic dynein. The coating methods require optimization of conditions and concentrations to balance between substantial NeutrAvidin binding vs tendency of QRs to aggregate and degrade over time. PMID:26722835

  12. Resistance of a human serum-selected human immunodeficiency virus type 1 escape mutant to neutralization by CD4 binding site monoclonal antibodies is conferred by a single amino acid change in gp120.

    PubMed Central

    McKeating, J A; Bennett, J; Zolla-Pazner, S; Schutten, M; Ashelford, S; Brown, A L; Balfe, P

    1993-01-01

    We have selected an HXB2 variant which can replicate in the presence of a neutralizing human serum. Sequencing of the gp120 region of the env gene from the variant and parental viruses identified a single amino acid substitution in the third conserved region of gp120 at residue 375 (AGT-->AAT, Ser-->Asn; designated 375 S/N). The escape mutant was found to be resistant to neutralization by soluble CD4 (sCD4) and four monoclonal antibodies (MAbs), 39.13g, 1.5e, G13, and 448, binding to epitopes overlapping that of the CD4 binding site (CD4 b.s.). Introduction of the 375 S/N mutation into HXB2 by site-directed mutagenesis confirmed that this mutation is responsible for the neutralization-resistant phenotype. Both sCD4 and three of the CD4 b.s. MAbs (39.13g, 1.5e, and G13) demonstrated reduced binding to the native 375 S/N mutant gp120. The ability to select for an escape variant resistant to multiple independent CD4 b.s. MAbs by a human serum confirms the reports that antibodies to the discontinuous CD4 b.s. are a major component of the group-specific neutralizing activity in human sera. PMID:7688820

  13. Joint effects of crude oil and heavy metals on the gill filament EROD activity of marbled rockfish Sebastiscus marmoratus.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Ronghui; Chen, Huanbin; Bo, Jun; Xie, Qing; Hong, Fukun; Zhang, Yusheng

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize dose- and time-dependent responses of gill 7-ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase (EROD) activity from Juvenile marbled rockfish (Sebastiscus marmoratus) exposed to the water-accommodated fraction (WAF) of crude oil and heavy metal Cd(Ⅱ) or Pb(Ⅱ) alone or in mixture. Compared to the control group, gill filament EROD activity in S. marmoratus was significantly induced after exposure to the WAF from 80 to 320μg/L for 5 days in dose response experiment and after exposure to 40μg/L WAF for 6-10 days in time course experiment, respectively. In the other hand, gill filament EROD activity were not significantly affected compared to the control group or related WAF groups no matter in the dose response experiment or in the time course experiment of Cd(Ⅱ), Pb(Ⅱ) or its mixture with WAF. The results suggest the use of gill filament EROD activity as a biomarker of exposure to waterborne AhR agonists in marine ecosystems while simultaneously being exposed to environmental concentrations of Cd(Ⅱ) or Pb(Ⅱ). PMID:27290642

  14. The adapter protein CD2AP binds to p53 protein in the cytoplasm and can discriminate its polymorphic variants P72R.

    PubMed

    Panni, Simona; Salvioli, Stefano; Santonico, Elena; Langone, Francesca; Storino, Francesca; Altilia, Serena; Franceschi, Claudio; Cesareni, Gianni; Castagnoli, Luisa

    2015-02-01

    Proline-rich motifs are widely distributed in eukaryotic proteomes and are usually involved in the assembly of functional complexes through interaction with specific binding modules. The tumour-suppressor p53 protein presents a proline-rich region that is crucial for regulating apoptosis by connecting the p53 with a complex protein network. In humans, a common polymorphism determines the identity of residue 72, either proline or arginine, and affects the features of the motifs present in the polyproline domain. The two isoforms have different biochemical properties and markedly influence cancer onset and progression. In this article, we analyse the binding of the p53 proline-rich region with a pool of selected polyproline binding domains (i.e. SH3 and WW), and we present the first demonstration that the purified SH3 domains of the CD2AP/Cin85 protein family are able to directly bind the p53 protein, and to discriminate between the two polymorphic variants P72R. PMID:25261582

  15. Binding of human leukocytes to fibronectin is augmented by an anti-CD44 mAb (TL-1) and blocked by another anti-CD44 mAb (Hermes-3) but not by anti-VLA-4/VLA-5 mAbs.

    PubMed

    Cao, L; Yoshino, T; Kawasaki, N; Yanai, H; Kawahara, K; Kondo, E; Omonishi, K; Takahashi, K; Akagi, T

    Fibronectin (FN) forms meshworks in extracellular spaces, and it plays an important role in cellular trafficking. Lymphoid cells are activated by binding to FN of the VLA-4 and VLA-5 receptors. CD44 also acts as a receptor of FN, but the mechanism and physiologic regulation of their binding are poorly understood. We have developed an anti-CD44 monoclonal antibody (mAb) (TL-1) in which lymphoid cells are activated and form homotypic cell aggregation. In this study, we found that the adhesion of CEM, HSB2, and LAD lymphoid cells to FN was augmented by TL-1 treatment and was apparently blocked by another anti-CD44 mAb (Hermes-3), but TL-1 Fab' fragments treatment did not induce FN-binding. A similar phenomenon is reported in the binding of the CD44 molecule to HA. This augmentation was not inhibited by the CS1 and RGD peptides of FN or by anti-VLA-4 and -VLA-5 mAbs; it was energy-dependent and associated with cytoplasmic actin filaments. Tl-1 treatment did not alter the cell surface expression of CD44 molecules. These findings above suggested that activated and/or altered cell surface distribution of CD44 molecules via a conformational change augmented the avidity of its binding to FN, which may be similar to lymphocyte-hyaluronate and lymphocyte-endothelial cell binding. As the Hermes-3 binding site is also involved in the interaction between lymphocytes and endothelial cells, activation of lymphocytes via CD44 molecules may facilitate the binding of lymphocytes to endothelial cells, extravasation, and migration to inflammatory sites rich in FN. PMID:9145328

  16. Dynamic regulation of permissive histone modifications and GATA3 binding underpin acquisition of granzyme A expression by virus-specific CD8(+) T cells.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Michelle L T; Hatton, Lauren; Li, Jasmine; Olshansky, Moshe; Kelso, Anne; Russ, Brendan E; Turner, Stephen J

    2016-02-01

    Numerous studies have focused on the molecular regulation of perforin (PFP) and granzyme B (GZMB) expression by activated cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs), but little is known about the molecular factors that underpin granzyme A (GZMA) expression. In vitro activation of naïve CD8(+) T cells, in the presence of IL-4, enhanced STAT6-dependent GZMA expression and was associated with GATA3 binding and enrichment of transcriptionally permissive histone posttranslational modifications (PTMs) across the Gzma gene locus. While GZMA expression by effector influenza A virus specific CTLs was also associated with a similar permissive epigenetic signature, memory CTL lacked enrichment of permissive histone PTMs at the Gzma locus, although this was restored within recalled secondary effector CTLs. Importantly, GZMA expression by virus-specific CTLs was associated with GATA3 binding at the Gzma locus, and independent of STAT6-mediated signaling. This suggests regulation of GZMA expression is underpinned by differentiation-dependent regulation of chromatin composition at the Gzma locus and that, given GATA3 is key for CTL differentiation in response to infection, GATA3 expression is regulated by a distinct, IL-4 independent, signaling pathway. Overall, this study provides insights into the molecular mechanisms that control transcription of Gzma during virus-induced CD8(+) T-cell differentiation. PMID:26519105

  17. The assessment of trace metals at gill, muscle and liver tissue in Mugil cephalus.

    PubMed

    Engin, Mehmet Soner

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, concentrations of trace metals such as Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, As, Se, Ag, Cd and Pb were determined in Mugil cephalus of the middle Black Sea coasts by employing inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and microwave digestion technique. Different parts of fish samples were analysed separately such as the gill, muscle and liver. The accuracy of the results has been checked by using a certified reference material (DORM-4). The highest trace metal values determined in different parts of fish were Cr in muscle tissue (0.416 μg/g), Mn in gill tissue (52.246 μg/g), Fe in muscle tissue (11.899 μg/g), Ni in muscle tissue (108.057 μg/g), Cu in liver tissue (261.911 μg/g), As in liver tissue (4.162 μg/g), Se in liver tissue (11.418 μg/g), Ag in liver tissue (0.323 μg/g), Cd in liver tissue (1.11 μg/g) and Pb in gill tissue (3.047 μg/g). These results were also compared with various relevant literature and guidelines. PMID:25877641

  18. Histopathological changes in gill and liver of Capoeta capoeta living in the Karasu River, Erzurum.

    PubMed

    Dane, Hatice; Şişman, Turgay

    2015-07-01

    The contamination of surface waters by different pollutants is an important problem worldwide. In this study, the histopathological effects of water pollution were investigated on freshwater fish species Capoeta capoeta caught from the Karasu River. Fish were caught at three different sites in the Karasu River, namely, Aşkale, Dumlu, and Serçeme. The histological changes in gill and liver of fish were detected microscopically and evaluated with quantitative analyses. In addition, heavy metals have also been determined in surface water samples from these sites. Results showed that the Aşkale site was polluted by different kinds of heavy metals. In Aşkale site, some heavy metals such as Cd, Al, As, Pb, and Mn levels were mostly detected at concentrations above than the accepted values by the Turkish Standards Institute. The presence of gill and liver histological alterations were assessed by the degree of tissue change (DTC). In gill filaments, hypertrophy and hyperplasia of the gill epithelium, lamellar epithelial lifting, lamellae shortening, vasodilatation, lamellar disorganization, blood congestion, fusion, and aneurysm were observed. In the liver, the changes included an increase in the number and size of melanomacrophage aggregates, nonhomogenous parenchyma, proliferation of the hepatopancreas, sinusoidal dilatation, vacuolization, hypertrophy of the hepatocytes, congestion and degeneration of central vein, blood congestion, pyknotic nucleus, focal necrosis, and hepatic granuloma. The histological lesions were comparatively most severe in liver. The DTC means were varied from slight to moderate of gill and moderate to severe of liver tissue in the Aşkale site, thus the site is considered to be of low quality. Some pathological alterations were observed in the Serçeme site, although their distribution was lower than sites Dumlu and especially Aşkale. The least DTC means of the Serçeme site demonstrated their good environmental quality. The results

  19. Broadly Neutralizing Antibody PGT121 Allosterically Modulates CD4 Binding via Recognition of the HIV-1 gp120 V3 Base and Multiple Surrounding Glycans

    PubMed Central

    Julien, Jean-Philippe; Sok, Devin; Khayat, Reza; Lee, Jeong Hyun; Doores, Katie J.; Walker, Laura M.; Ramos, Alejandra; Diwanji, Devan C.; Pejchal, Robert; Cupo, Albert; Katpally, Umesh; Depetris, Rafael S.; Stanfield, Robyn L.; McBride, Ryan; Marozsan, Andre J.; Paulson, James C.; Sanders, Rogier W.; Moore, John P.; Burton, Dennis R.; Poignard, Pascal; Ward, Andrew B.; Wilson, Ian A.

    2013-01-01

    New broad and potent neutralizing HIV-1 antibodies have recently been described that are largely dependent on the gp120 N332 glycan for Env recognition. Members of the PGT121 family of antibodies, isolated from an African donor, neutralize ∼70% of circulating isolates with a median IC50 less than 0.05 µg ml−1. Here, we show that three family members, PGT121, PGT122 and PGT123, have very similar crystal structures. A long 24-residue HCDR3 divides the antibody binding site into two functional surfaces, consisting of an open face, formed by the heavy chain CDRs, and an elongated face, formed by LCDR1, LCDR3 and the tip of the HCDR3. Alanine scanning mutagenesis of the antibody paratope reveals a crucial role in neutralization for residues on the elongated face, whereas the open face, which accommodates a complex biantennary glycan in the PGT121 structure, appears to play a more secondary role. Negative-stain EM reconstructions of an engineered recombinant Env gp140 trimer (SOSIP.664) reveal that PGT122 interacts with the gp120 outer domain at a more vertical angle with respect to the top surface of the spike than the previously characterized antibody PGT128, which is also dependent on the N332 glycan. We then used ITC and FACS to demonstrate that the PGT121 antibodies inhibit CD4 binding to gp120 despite the epitope being distal from the CD4 binding site. Together, these structural, functional and biophysical results suggest that the PGT121 antibodies may interfere with Env receptor engagement by an allosteric mechanism in which key structural elements, such as the V3 base, the N332 oligomannose glycan and surrounding glycans, including a putative V1/V2 complex biantennary glycan, are conformationally constrained. PMID:23658524

  20. Broadly neutralizing antibody PGT121 allosterically modulates CD4 binding via recognition of the HIV-1 gp120 V3 base and multiple surrounding glycans.

    PubMed

    Julien, Jean-Philippe; Sok, Devin; Khayat, Reza; Lee, Jeong Hyun; Doores, Katie J; Walker, Laura M; Ramos, Alejandra; Diwanji, Devan C; Pejchal, Robert; Cupo, Albert; Katpally, Umesh; Depetris, Rafael S; Stanfield, Robyn L; McBride, Ryan; Marozsan, Andre J; Paulson, James C; Sanders, Rogier W; Moore, John P; Burton, Dennis R; Poignard, Pascal; Ward, Andrew B; Wilson, Ian A

    2013-01-01

    New broad and potent neutralizing HIV-1 antibodies have recently been described that are largely dependent on the gp120 N332 glycan for Env recognition. Members of the PGT121 family of antibodies, isolated from an African donor, neutralize ∼70% of circulating isolates with a median IC50 less than 0.05 µg ml(-1). Here, we show that three family members, PGT121, PGT122 and PGT123, have very similar crystal structures. A long 24-residue HCDR3 divides the antibody binding site into two functional surfaces, consisting of an open face, formed by the heavy chain CDRs, and an elongated face, formed by LCDR1, LCDR3 and the tip of the HCDR3. Alanine scanning mutagenesis of the antibody paratope reveals a crucial role in neutralization for residues on the elongated face, whereas the open face, which accommodates a complex biantennary glycan in the PGT121 structure, appears to play a more secondary role. Negative-stain EM reconstructions of an engineered recombinant Env gp140 trimer (SOSIP.664) reveal that PGT122 interacts with the gp120 outer domain at a more vertical angle with respect to the top surface of the spike than the previously characterized antibody PGT128, which is also dependent on the N332 glycan. We then used ITC and FACS to demonstrate that the PGT121 antibodies inhibit CD4 binding to gp120 despite the epitope being distal from the CD4 binding site. Together, these structural, functional and biophysical results suggest that the PGT121 antibodies may interfere with Env receptor engagement by an allosteric mechanism in which key structural elements, such as the V3 base, the N332 oligomannose glycan and surrounding glycans, including a putative V1/V2 complex biantennary glycan, are conformationally constrained. PMID:23658524

  1. Signature amino acids enable the archaeal L7Ae box C/D RNP core protein to recognize and bind the K-loop RNA motif

    PubMed Central

    Gagnon, Keith T.; Zhang, Xinxin; Qu, Guosheng; Biswas, Shyamasri; Suryadi, Jimmy; Brown, Bernard A.; Maxwell, E. Stuart

    2010-01-01

    The archaeal L7Ae and eukaryotic 15.5kD protein homologs are members of the L7Ae/15.5kD protein family that characteristically recognize K-turn motifs found in both archaeal and eukaryotic RNAs. In Archaea, the L7Ae protein uniquely binds the K-loop motif found in box C/D and H/ACA sRNAs, whereas the eukaryotic 15.5kD homolog is unable to recognize this variant K-turn RNA. Comparative sequence and structural analyses, coupled with amino acid replacement experiments, have demonstrated that five amino acids enable the archaeal L7Ae core protein to recognize and bind the K-loop motif. These signature residues are highly conserved in the archaeal L7Ae and eukaryotic 15.5kD homologs, but differ between the two domains of life. Interestingly, loss of K-loop binding by archaeal L7Ae does not disrupt C′/D′ RNP formation or RNA-guided nucleotide modification. L7Ae is still incorporated into the C′/D′ RNP despite its inability to bind the K-loop, thus indicating the importance of protein–protein interactions for RNP assembly and function. Finally, these five signature amino acids are distinct for each of the L7Ae/L30 family members, suggesting an evolutionary continuum of these RNA-binding proteins for recognition of the various K-turn motifs contained in their cognate RNAs. PMID:19926724

  2. Cd, Cu, Zn, Se, and metallothioneins in two amphibians, Necturus maculosus (Amphibia, Caudata) and Bufo bufo (Amphibia, Anura).

    PubMed

    Dobrovoljc, Katarina; Falnoga, Ingrid; Žnidarič, Magda Tušek; Mazej, Darja; Ščančar, Janez; Bulog, Boris

    2012-12-01

    The accumulation of cadmium, its affinity for metallothioneins (MTs), and its relation to copper, zinc, and selenium were investigated in the experimental mudpuppy Necturus maculosus and the common toad Bufo bufo captured in nature. Specimens of N. maculosus were exposed to waterborne Cd (85 μg/L) for up to 40 days. Exposure resulted in tissue-dependent accumulation of Cd in the order kidney, gills > intestine, liver, brain > pancreas, skin, spleen, and gonads. During the 40-day exposure, concentrations increased close to 1 μg/g in kidneys and gills (0.64-0.95 and 0.52-0.76; n = 4), whereas the levels stayed below 0.5 in liver (0.14-0.29; n = 4) and other organs. Cd exposure was accompanied by an increase of Zn and Cu in kidneys and Zn in skin, while a decrease of Cu was observed in muscles and skin. Cytosol metallothioneins (MTs) were detected as Cu,Zn-thioneins in liver and Zn,Cu-thioneins in gills and kidney, with the presence of Se in all cases. After exposure, Cd binding to MTs was clearly observed in cytosol of gills as Zn,Cu,Cd-thionein and in pellet extract of kidneys as Zn,Cu,Cd-thioneins. The results indicate low Cd storage in liver with almost undetectable Cd in liver MT fractions. In field trapped Bufo bufo (spring and autumn animals), Cd levels were followed in four organs and found to be in the order kidney > liver (0.56-5.0 μg/g >0.03-0.72 μg/g; n = 11, spring and autumn animals), with no detectable Cd in muscle and skin. At the tissue level, high positive correlations between Cd, Cu, and Se were found in liver (all r > 0.80; α = 0.05, n = 5), and between Cd and Se in kidney (r = 0.76; n = 5) of autumn animals, possibly connected with the storage of excess elements in biologically inert forms. In the liver of spring animals, having higher tissue level of Cd than autumn ones, part of the Cd was identified as Cu,Zn,Cd-thioneins with traces of Se. As both species are special in having liver Cu levels higher than

  3. Thermodynamic Switch in Binding of Adhesion/Growth Regulatory Human Galectin-3 to Tumor-Associated TF Antigen (CD176) and MUC1 Glycopeptides

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    A shift to short-chain glycans is an observed change in mucin-type O-glycosylation in premalignant and malignant epithelia. Given the evidence that human galectin-3 can interact with mucins and also weakly with free tumor-associated Thomsen-Friedenreich (TF) antigen (CD176), the study of its interaction with MUC1 (glyco)peptides is of biomedical relevance. Glycosylated MUC1 fragments that carry the TF antigen attached through either Thr or Ser side chains were synthesized using standard Fmoc-based automated solid-phase peptide chemistry. The dissociation constants (Kd) for interaction of galectin-3 and the glycosylated MUC1 fragments measured by isothermal titration calorimetry decreased up to 10 times in comparison to that of the free TF disaccharide. No binding was observed for the nonglycosylated control version of the MUC1 peptide. The most notable feature of the binding of MUC1 glycopeptides to galectin-3 was a shift from a favorable enthalpy to an entropy-driven binding process. The comparatively diminished enthalpy contribution to the free energy (ΔG) was compensated by a considerable gain in the entropic term. 1H–15N heteronuclear single-quantum coherence spectroscopy nuclear magnetic resonance data reveal contact at the canonical site mainly by the glycan moiety of the MUC1 glycopeptide. Ligand-dependent differences in binding affinities were also confirmed by a novel assay for screening of low-affinity glycan–lectin interactions based on AlphaScreen technology. Another key finding is that the glycosylated MUC1 peptides exhibited activity in a concentration-dependent manner in cell-based assays revealing selectivity among human galectins. Thus, the presentation of this tumor-associated carbohydrate ligand by the natural peptide scaffold enhances its affinity, highlighting the significance of model studies of human lectins with synthetic glycopeptides. PMID:26129647

  4. A review of infectious gill disease in marine salmonid fish.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, S O; Rodger, H D

    2011-06-01

    Infectious gill diseases of marine salmonid fish present a significant challenge in salmon-farming regions. Infectious syndromes or disease conditions affecting marine-farmed salmonids include amoebic gill disease (AGD), proliferative gill inflammation (PGI) and tenacibaculosis. Pathogens involved include parasites, such as Neoparamoeba perurans, bacteria, such as Piscichlamydia salmonis and Tenacibaculum maritimum, and viruses, such as the Atlantic salmon paramyxovirus (ASPV). The present level of understanding of these is reviewed with regard to risk factors, potential impacting factors, methods of best practice to mitigate infectious gill disease, as well as knowledge gaps and avenues for future research. PMID:21401646

  5. Attenuation of microglial RANTES by NEMO-binding domain peptide inhibits the infiltration of CD8(+) T cells in the nigra of hemiparkinsonian monkey.

    PubMed

    Roy, A; Mondal, S; Kordower, J H; Pahan, K

    2015-08-27

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease characterized by the loss of dopaminergic (DA) neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc). Despite intense investigations, little is known about its pathological mediators. Here, we report the marked upregulation of RANTES (regulated on activation, normal T cell expressed and secreted) and eotaxin, chemokines that are involved in T cell trafficking, in the serum of hemiparkinsonian monkeys. Interestingly, 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP(+)), a Parkinsonian toxin, increased the expression of RANTES and eotaxin in mouse microglial cells. The presence of NF-κB binding sites in promoters of RANTES and eotaxin and down-regulation of these genes by NEMO-binding domain (NBD) peptide, selective inhibitor of induced NF-κB activation, in MPP(+)-stimulated microglial cells suggest that the activation of NF-κB plays an important role in the upregulation of these two chemokines. Consistently, serum enzyme-linked immuno assay (ELISA) and nigral immunohistochemistry further confirmed that these chemokines were strongly upregulated in MPTP-induced hemiparkinsonian monkeys and that treatment with NBD peptides effectively inhibited the level of these chemokines. Furthermore, the microglial upregulation of RANTES in the nigra of hemiparkinsonian monkeys could be involved in the altered adaptive immune response in the brain as we observed greater infiltration of CD8(+) T cells around the perivascular niche and deep brain parenchyma of hemiparkinsonian monkeys as compared to control. The treatment of hemiparkinsonian monkeys with NBD peptides decreased the microglial expression of RANTES and attenuated the infiltration of CD8(+) T cells in nigra. These results indicate the possible involvement of chemokine-dependent adaptive immune response in Parkinsonism. PMID:25783477

  6. Differential Gene Expression in Liver, Gill, and Olfactory Rosettes of Coho Salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) After Acclimation to Salinity

    PubMed Central

    Lavado, Ramon; Bammler, Theo K.; Gallagher, Evan P.; Stapleton, Patricia L.; Beyer, Richard P.; Farin, Federico M.; Hardiman, Gary; Schlenk, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Most Pacific salmonids undergo smoltification and transition from freshwater to saltwater, making various adjustments in metabolism, catabolism, osmotic, and ion regulation. The molecular mechanisms underlying this transition are largely unknown. In the present study, we acclimated coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) to four different salinities and assessed gene expression through microarray analysis of gills, liver, and olfactory rosettes. Gills are involved in osmotic regulation, liver plays a role in energetics, and olfactory rosettes are involved in behavior. Between all salinity treatments, liver had the highest number of differentially expressed genes at 1616, gills had 1074, and olfactory rosettes had 924, using a 1.5-fold cutoff and a false discovery rate of 0.5. Higher responsiveness of liver to metabolic changes after salinity acclimation to provide energy for other osmoregulatory tissues such as the gills may explain the differences in number of differentially expressed genes. Differentially expressed genes were tissue- and salinity-dependent. There were no known genes differentially expressed that were common to all salinity treatments and all tissues. Gene ontology term analysis revealed biological processes, molecular functions, and cellular components that were significantly affected by salinity, a majority of which were tissue-dependent. For liver, oxygen binding and transport terms were highlighted. For gills, muscle, and cytoskeleton-related terms predominated and for olfactory rosettes, immune response-related genes were accentuated. Interaction networks were examined in combination with GO terms and determined similarities between tissues for potential osmosensors, signal transduction cascades, and transcription factors. PMID:26260986

  7. Differential Gene Expression in Liver, Gill, and Olfactory Rosettes of Coho Salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) After Acclimation to Salinity.

    PubMed

    Maryoung, Lindley A; Lavado, Ramon; Bammler, Theo K; Gallagher, Evan P; Stapleton, Patricia L; Beyer, Richard P; Farin, Federico M; Hardiman, Gary; Schlenk, Daniel

    2015-12-01

    Most Pacific salmonids undergo smoltification and transition from freshwater to saltwater, making various adjustments in metabolism, catabolism, osmotic, and ion regulation. The molecular mechanisms underlying this transition are largely unknown. In the present study, we acclimated coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) to four different salinities and assessed gene expression through microarray analysis of gills, liver, and olfactory rosettes. Gills are involved in osmotic regulation, liver plays a role in energetics, and olfactory rosettes are involved in behavior. Between all salinity treatments, liver had the highest number of differentially expressed genes at 1616, gills had 1074, and olfactory rosettes had 924, using a 1.5-fold cutoff and a false discovery rate of 0.5. Higher responsiveness of liver to metabolic changes after salinity acclimation to provide energy for other osmoregulatory tissues such as the gills may explain the differences in number of differentially expressed genes. Differentially expressed genes were tissue- and salinity-dependent. There were no known genes differentially expressed that were common to all salinity treatments and all tissues. Gene ontology term analysis revealed biological processes, molecular functions, and cellular components that were significantly affected by salinity, a majority of which were tissue-dependent. For liver, oxygen binding and transport terms were highlighted. For gills, muscle, and cytoskeleton-related terms predominated and for olfactory rosettes, immune response-related genes were accentuated. Interaction networks were examined in combination with GO terms and determined similarities between tissues for potential osmosensors, signal transduction cascades, and transcription factors. PMID:26260986

  8. Purification and characterization studies of cadmium-binding proteins from the American oyster, Crassostrea virginica

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, B.A.; Engel, D.W.; Brouwer, M.

    1986-03-01

    The previously reported low molecular weight cadmium-binding protein (CdBP) from the American oyster, Crassostrea virginica, has been further purified and characterized by improved technical methods. The internal organ distribution of the protein within the oyster and effects of life cycle/season on CdBP production also have been evaluated. CdBP isolated by extended ion-exchange gradients or double ion-exchange chromatography followed by HPLC analysis possesses an electrophoretic R/sub f/ of about 0.7 and contains relatively little Zn. Cysteine, lysine, and glycine are the dominant amino acids. When ion-exchange columns are developed with NaCl gradients, the aromatic residues tryptophan, tyrosine, and phenylalanine are found to be present. The ultraviolet absorption spectrum of CdBP also was variable, with 250/280 nm ratios ranging from 17:1 immediately after ion-exchange chromatography to 2:1 following concentration procedures. Internal organ distribution studies showed that the visceral mass contained most of the Cd present with lesser amounts in the gills and mantle. Relative oyster dormancy during the winter also reduces CdBP production in response to Cd, and the protein is obtained most readily during the fall and spring.

  9. Measurement of phenotype and absolute number of circulating heparin-binding hemagglutinin, ESAT-6 and CFP-10, and purified protein derivative antigen-specific CD4 T cells can discriminate active from latent tuberculosis infection.

    PubMed

    Hutchinson, Paul; Barkham, Timothy M S; Tang, Wenying; Kemeny, David M; Chee, Cynthia Bin-Eng; Wang, Yee T

    2015-02-01

    The tuberculin skin test (TST) and interferon gamma (IFN-γ) release assays (IGRAs) are used as adjunctive tests for the evaluation of suspected cases of active tuberculosis (TB). However, a positive test does not differentiate latent from active TB. We investigated whether flow cytometric measurement of novel combinations of intracellular cytokines and surface makers on CD4 T cells could differentiate between active and latent TB after stimulation with Mycobacterium tuberculosis-specific proteins. Blood samples from 60 patients referred to the Singapore Tuberculosis Control Unit for evaluation for active TB or as TB contacts were stimulated with purified protein derivative (PPD), ESAT-6 and CFP-10, or heparin-binding hemagglutinin (HBHA). The CD4 T cell cytokine response (IFN-γ, interleukin-2 [IL-2], interleukin-17A [IL-17A], interleukin-22 [IL-22], granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor [GM-CSF], and tumor necrosis factor alpha [TNF-α]) and surface marker expression (CD27, CXCR3, and CD154) were then measured. We found that the proportion of PPD-specific CD4 T cells, defined as CD154(+) TNF-α(+) cells that were negative for CD27 and positive for GM-CSF, gave the strongest discrimination between subjects with latent and those with active TB (area under the receiver operator characteristic [ROC] curve of 0.9277; P < 0.0001). Also, the proportions and absolute numbers of HBHA-specific CD4 T cells were significantly higher in those with latent TB infection, particularly CD154(+) TNF-α(+) IFN-γ(+) IL-2(+) and CD154(+) TNF-α(+) CXCR3(+). Finally, we found that the ratio of ESAT-6- and CFP-10-responding to HBHA-responding CD4 T cells was significantly different between the two study populations. In conclusion, we found novel markers of M. tuberculosis-specific CD4 cells which differentiate between active and latent TB. PMID:25520147

  10. Assignment of the DPP4 gene encoding adenosine deaminase binding protein (CD26/dipeptidylpeptidase IV) to 2q23

    SciTech Connect

    Mathew, S.; Morrison, M.E.; Murty, V.V.V.S.

    1994-07-01

    FISH was performed on chromosome preparations obtained from phytohemagglutinin-stimulated human blood lymphocytes. cDNA encoding ADAbp was isolated from the SK-RC-28 human renal cell carcinomas cell line using PCR technique and was cloned in pSVK3 plasmid for use as a probe. The PCR primers were constructed from the known nucleotide sequence of CD26, and the cDNA product was extracted from nucleotides 1 to 2344. The vector containing the probe was labeled by nick-translation with biotin-11-dUTP. Hybridization to chromosome spreads, washings, detection with FITC-conjugated avidin, selection and photography of metaphases, analysis of signals, and banding were performed according to the described method.

  11. Measles virus attachment proteins with impaired ability to bind CD46 interact more efficiently with the homologous fusion protein

    SciTech Connect

    Corey, Elizabeth A.; Iorio, Ronald M.

    2009-01-05

    Fusion promotion by measles virus (MV) depends on an interaction between the hemagglutinin (H) and fusion (F) glycoproteins. Amino acid substitutions in MV H that drastically reduce hemagglutinating activity result in an increase in the amount of H (primarily the 74 kDa isoform) detectable in a complex with F at the cell surface. This is in direct contrast to the loss of the ability to detect a complex between the fusion protein of Newcastle disease virus and most attachment proteins that lack receptor binding activity. These opposing results provide support for the existence of different mechanisms for the regulation of fusion by these two paramyxoviruses.

  12. Simple and sensitive progesterone detection in human serum using a CdSe/ZnS quantum dot-based direct binding assay.

    PubMed

    Oh, Sung-Duk; Duong, Hong Dinh; Rhee, Jong Il

    2015-08-15

    In this study, we developed a CdSe/ZnS quantum dot (QD)-based immunoassay for use in determining the presence of progesterone (P4) in human serum. Hydrophilic QDs were conjugated to anti-progesterone antibody (P4Ab) via ethyl-3-(dimethylaminopropyl)carbodiimide (EDC) and N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS) as coupling reagents. After purification, the P4Ab-QD conjugates were immobilized onto the wells of a 96-well microtiter plate, and a direct-binding immunoassay based on the binding of P4 to immobilized P4Ab-QD conjugates had a detection limit of 0.21 ng/ml and a sensitivity of 1.37 ng/ml, with a linear range of 0.385 to 4.55 ng/ml. The proposed immunoassay was successfully used to determine the P4 concentration in real human serum, and the results showed a good correlation with the accredited radioimmunoassay (RIA). PMID:25963894

  13. Atomistic tight-binding computations in structural and optical properties of CdSe/ZnSe/ZnS core/multi-shell nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukkabot, Worasak

    2016-07-01

    In the present paper, I attempt to theoretically describe, analyze and compare the structural and optical properties in the core/multi-shell nanocrystal structure of a cadmium selenide (CdSe) core surrounded by zinc selenide (ZnSe) inner and zinc sulphide (ZnS) external growth shells. The atomistic tight-binding model (TB) and a configuration interaction method (CI) are implemented to calculate the single-particle spectra, optical band gaps, ground-state wave function overlaps, ground-state oscillation strengths, ground-state coulomb energies, ground-state exchange energies and Stokes shift as a function of ZnS external growth shell thicknesses. I underline that these computations are principally sensitive with the ZnS external growth shell thickness. The reduction of the optical band gaps, overlaps of ground electron-hole wave function, electron-hole interactions and Stokes shift is realized with the increasing ZnS external growth shell thickness. The improvement of the optical intensities is mainly achieved by including the ZnS exterior growth shell encapsulation. Importantly, the optical band gaps based on atomistic tight-binding theory are in a good agreement with the experiment. Finally, this emphasizes that the external passivation shell can now be engineered in a defined way, thus leading to manipulate the natural behaviors of nanodevices based on the scrutinized core/multi-shell nanocrystals.

  14. Histopathological biomarkers in gills and liver of Oreochromis niloticus from polluted wetland environments, Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Moneim, Ashraf M; Al-Kahtani, Mohamed A; Elmenshawy, Omar M

    2012-08-01

    Fish live in direct contact with their immediate external environment and, therefore, are highly vulnerable to aquatic pollutants. In this study, Oreochromis niloticus were caught at three different sites in Al-Hassa irrigation channels, namely Al-Jawhariya, Um-Sabah and Al-Khadoud. The histological changes in gills and liver were detected microscopically and evaluated with semi-quantitative analyses. Also, heavy metals have been determined in the water samples in these sites. Results showed that all sites were polluted by different kinds of heavy metals. Cd and Pb were mostly detected at concentrations above the WHO reference values. Meanwhile, various histopathological abnormalities were observed in gills and liver of fish specimens. In the gill filaments, cell proliferation, lamellar cell hyperplasia, lamellar fusion, lifting of the respiratory epithelium, and the presence of aneurysmal areas were observed. In the liver, there was vacuolization of the hepatocytes, sinusoidal congestion, necrosis of the parenchyma tissue, nuclear pyknosis, eosinophilic hepatocellular degeneration, pigment accumulation, an increase in the number and size of melanomacrophage centers. Liver tumors with severe chronic inflammation were occasionally found in fish at Al-Khadoud area (first-time report). The histological lesions were comparatively most severe in the liver. Despite heavy metals assessment did not show marked differences among sites, histopathological biomarkers indicated that the surveyed fish are living under stressful environmental conditions. So, we suggest use those biomarkers in future monitoring of aquatic systems. PMID:22546634

  15. PROCEDURES FOR MEASURING COUGH (GILL PURGE) RATES OF FISH

    EPA Science Inventory

    The cough (gill purge) is an interruption in the normal ventilatory cycle of fish that serves to clean the gills of accumulated particulate matter. A review of the literature shows that the cough occurs in a variety of freshwater and marine fish; that both mechanical and chemical...

  16. Human Lipopolysaccharide-binding Protein (LBP) and CD14 Independently Deliver Triacylated Lipoproteins to Toll-like Receptor 1 (TLR1) and TLR2 and Enhance Formation of the Ternary Signaling Complex*

    PubMed Central

    Ranoa, Diana Rose E.; Kelley, Stacy L.; Tapping, Richard I.

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial lipoproteins are the most potent microbial agonists for the Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) subfamily, and this pattern recognition event induces cellular activation, leading to host immune responses. Triacylated bacterial lipoproteins coordinately bind TLR1 and TLR2, resulting in a stable ternary complex that drives intracellular signaling. The sensitivity of TLR-expressing cells to lipoproteins is greatly enhanced by two lipid-binding serum proteins known as lipopolysaccharide-binding protein (LBP) and soluble CD14 (sCD14); however, the physical mechanism that underlies this increased sensitivity is not known. To address this, we measured the ability of LBP and sCD14 to drive ternary complex formation between soluble extracellular domains of TLR1 and TLR2 and a synthetic triacylated lipopeptide agonist. Importantly, addition of substoichiometric amounts of either LBP or sCD14 significantly enhanced formation of a TLR1·TLR2 lipopeptide ternary complex as measured by size exclusion chromatography. However, neither LBP nor sCD14 was physically associated with the final ternary complex. Similar results were obtained using outer surface protein A (OspA), a naturally occurring triacylated lipoprotein agonist from Borrelia burgdorferi. Activation studies revealed that either LBP or sCD14 sensitized TLR-expressing cells to nanogram levels of either the synthetic lipopeptide or OspA lipoprotein agonist. Together, our results show that either LBP or sCD14 can drive ternary complex formation and TLR activation by acting as mobile carriers of triacylated lipopeptides or lipoproteins. PMID:23430250

  17. Transcriptome profiling analysis of rare minnow (Gobiocypris rarus) gills after waterborne cadmium exposure.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhi-Jian; Liu, Xiao-Hong; Jin, Li; Pu, De-Yong; Huang, Jing; Zhang, Yao-Guang

    2016-09-01

    Rare minnow (Gobiocypris rarus) is a widely used experimental fish in risk assessments of aquatic pollutants in China. Cadmium (Cd) is one of the most toxic heavy metals in the world; however, few studies have used fish gills, a multi-functional organ. In this study, we characterized the differential expression of adult female rare minnow gills after sub-chronic waterborne Cd (75μg/L CdCl2) exposure for 35d. A total of 452 genes (209 up-regulated and 243 down-regulated) were identified by gene expression profiling using RNA-Seq before and after treatment. Of these differentially expressed genes, 75, 21, and 54 differentially expressed genes are related to ion transport, oxidation-reduction processes, and the immune response, respectively. The results of GO and KEGG enrichment analyses, together with the altered transcript levels of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I and class II molecules and the significant increases in the levels of serum tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α), interleukin 1β (IL1β) and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), indicated a disruption of the immune system, particularly the induction of inflammation and autoimmunity. The significant down-regulation of coagulation factor XIII A1 polypeptide (F13A1), tripartite motif-containing protein 21 (TRIM21), and Golgi-associated plant pathogenesis-related protein (GAPr) during both acute (≤96h) and sub-chronic (35d) waterborne Cd exposure, as well as their dosage dependence, suggested that these three genes could be used as sensitive biomarkers for aquatic Cd risk assessment. PMID:27292131

  18. Adrian E. Gill 1937”1986

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarke, Allan J.

    On April 19, Adrian Gill, FRS, my former thesis advisor and distinguished friend, died suddenly of cancer. My sadness and disbelief are more strongly felt because the life of this gifted and generous man ended so early.Born in Melbourne, Australia, Adrian was granted his Ph.D. at Cambridge University, Cambridge, U.K., in 1963. After a year at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (Cambridge, Mass.), he returned to Cambridge in Britain, where he spent most of the rest of his life. In 1984, he left Cambridge to become director and cofounder of the Hooke Institute in Oxford, U.K. During his career he enjoyed many summers working in the United States.

  19. The Arg279Glu Substitution in the Adenovirus Type 11p (Ad11p) Fiber Knob Abolishes EDTA-Resistant Binding to A549 and CHO-CD46 Cells, Converting the Phenotype to That of Ad7p

    PubMed Central

    Gustafsson, Dan J.; Segerman, Anna; Lindman, Kristina; Mei, Ya-Fang; Wadell, Göran

    2006-01-01

    The major determinant of adenovirus (Ad) attachment to host cells is the C-terminal knob domain of the trimeric fiber protein. Ad type 11p (Ad11p; species B2) in contrast to Ad7p (species B1) utilizes at least two different cellular attachment receptors, designated sBAR (species B adenovirus receptor) and sB2AR (species B2 adenovirus receptor). CD46 has recently been identified as one of the Ad11p attachment receptors. However, CD46 did not seem to constitute a functional receptor for Ad7p. Although Ad7p shares high knob amino acid identity with Ad11p, Ad7p is deficient in binding to both sB2AR and CD46. To determine what regions of the Ad11p fiber knob are necessary for sB2AR-CD46 interaction, we constructed recombinant fiber knobs (rFK) with Ad11p/Ad7p chimeras and Ad11p sequences having a single amino acid substitution from Ad7p. Binding of the constructs to A549 and CHO-CD46 BC1 isoform-expressing cells was analyzed by flow cytometry. Our results indicate that an Arg279Glu substitution is sufficient to convert the Ad11p receptor-interaction phenotype to that of Ad7p and abolish sB2AR and CD46 interaction. Also a Glu279Arg substitution in Ad7p rFKs increases CD46 binding. Thus, the lateral HI loop of the Ad11p fiber knob seems to be the key determinant for Ad11p sB2AR-CD46 interaction. This result is comparable to another non-coxsackie-adenovirus receptor binding Ad (Ad37p), where substitution of one amino acid abolishes virus-cell interaction. In conjunction with previous results, our findings also strongly suggest that sB2AR is equivalent to CD46. PMID:16439545

  20. Different modes of dipeptidyl peptidase IV (CD26) inhibition by oligopeptides derived from the N-terminus of HIV-1 Tat indicate at least two inhibitor binding sites.

    PubMed

    Lorey, Susan; Stöckel-Maschek, Angela; Faust, Jürgen; Brandt, Wolfgang; Stiebitz, Beate; Gorrell, Mark D; Kähne, Thilo; Mrestani-Klaus, Carmen; Wrenger, Sabine; Reinhold, Dirk; Ansorge, Siegfried; Neubert, Klaus

    2003-05-01

    Dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DP IV, CD26) plays an essential role in the activation and proliferation of lymphocytes, which is shown by the immunosuppressive effects of synthetic DP IV inhibitors. Similarly, both human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) Tat protein and the N-terminal peptide Tat(1-9) inhibit DP IV activity and T cell proliferation. Therefore, the N-terminal amino acid sequence of HIV-1 Tat is important for the inhibition of DP IV. Recently, we characterized the thromboxane A2 receptor peptide TXA2-R(1-9), bearing the N-terminal MWP sequence motif, as a potent DP IV inhibitor possibly playing a functional role during antigen presentation by inhibiting T cell-expressed DP IV [Wrenger, S., Faust, J., Mrestani-Klaus, C., Fengler, A., Stöckel-Maschek, A., Lorey, S., Kähne, T., Brandt, W., Neubert, K., Ansorge, S. & Reinhold, D. (2000) J. Biol. Chem.275, 22180-22186]. Here, we demonstrate that amino acid substitutions at different positions of Tat(1-9) can result in a change of the inhibition type. Certain Tat(1-9)-related peptides are found to be competitive, and others linear mixed-type or parabolic mixed-type inhibitors indicating different inhibitor binding sites on DP IV, at the active site and out of the active site. The parabolic mixed-type mechanism, attributed to both non-mutually exclusive inhibitor binding sites of the enzyme, is described in detail. From the kinetic investigations and molecular modeling experiments, possible interactions of the oligopeptides with specified amino acids of DP IV are suggested. These findings give new insights for the development of more potent and specific peptide-based DP IV inhibitors. Such inhibitors could be useful for the treatment of autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. PMID:12752434

  1. HbAHP-25, an In-Silico Designed Peptide, Inhibits HIV-1 Entry by Blocking gp120 Binding to CD4 Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Bashir, Tahir; Patgaonkar, Mandar; Kumar C, Selvaa; Pasi, Achhelal; Reddy, Kudumula Venkata Rami

    2015-01-01

    Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV-1) poses a serious threat to the developing world and sexual transmission continues to be the major source of new infections. Therefore, the development of molecules, which prevent new HIV-1 infections, is highly warranted. In the present study, a panel of human hemoglobin (Hb)-α subunit derived peptides and their analogues, with an ability to bind gp120, were designed in-silico and their anti-HIV-1 activity was evaluated. Of these peptides, HbAHP-25, an analogue of Hb-α derived peptide, demonstrated significant anti-HIV-1 activity. HbAHP-25 was found to be active against CCR5-tropic HIV-1 strains (ADA5 and BaL) and CXCR4-tropic HIV-1 strains (IIIB and NL4-3). Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and ELISA revealed direct interaction between HbAHP-25 and HIV-1 envelope protein, gp120. The peptide prevented binding of CD4 to gp120 and blocked subsequent steps leading to entry and/or fusion or both. Anti-HIV activity of HbAHP-25 appeared to be specific as it failed to inhibit the entry of HIV-1 pseudotyped virus (HIV-1 VSV). Further, HbAHP-25 was found to be non-cytotoxic to TZM-bl cells, VK2/E6E7 cells, CEM-GFP cells and PBMCs, even at higher concentrations. Moreover, HbAHP-25 retained its anti-HIV activity in presence of seminal plasma and vaginal fluid. In brief, the study identified HbAHP-25, a novel anti-HIV peptide, which directly interacts with gp120 and thus has a potential to inhibit early stages of HIV-1 infection. PMID:25915507

  2. HbAHP-25, an In-Silico Designed Peptide, Inhibits HIV-1 Entry by Blocking gp120 Binding to CD4 Receptor.

    PubMed

    Bashir, Tahir; Patgaonkar, Mandar; Kumar, Selvaa C; Pasi, Achhelal; Reddy, Kudumula Venkata Rami

    2015-01-01

    Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV-1) poses a serious threat to the developing world and sexual transmission continues to be the major source of new infections. Therefore, the development of molecules, which prevent new HIV-1 infections, is highly warranted. In the present study, a panel of human hemoglobin (Hb)-α subunit derived peptides and their analogues, with an ability to bind gp120, were designed in-silico and their anti-HIV-1 activity was evaluated. Of these peptides, HbAHP-25, an analogue of Hb-α derived peptide, demonstrated significant anti-HIV-1 activity. HbAHP-25 was found to be active against CCR5-tropic HIV-1 strains (ADA5 and BaL) and CXCR4-tropic HIV-1 strains (IIIB and NL4-3). Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and ELISA revealed direct interaction between HbAHP-25 and HIV-1 envelope protein, gp120. The peptide prevented binding of CD4 to gp120 and blocked subsequent steps leading to entry and/or fusion or both. Anti-HIV activity of HbAHP-25 appeared to be specific as it failed to inhibit the entry of HIV-1 pseudotyped virus (HIV-1 VSV). Further, HbAHP-25 was found to be non-cytotoxic to TZM-bl cells, VK2/E6E7 cells, CEM-GFP cells and PBMCs, even at higher concentrations. Moreover, HbAHP-25 retained its anti-HIV activity in presence of seminal plasma and vaginal fluid. In brief, the study identified HbAHP-25, a novel anti-HIV peptide, which directly interacts with gp120 and thus has a potential to inhibit early stages of HIV-1 infection. PMID:25915507

  3. A CD36-related Transmembrane Protein Is Coordinated with an Intracellular Lipid-binding Protein in Selective Carotenoid Transport for Cocoon Coloration*

    PubMed Central

    Sakudoh, Takashi; Iizuka, Tetsuya; Narukawa, Junko; Sezutsu, Hideki; Kobayashi, Isao; Kuwazaki, Seigo; Banno, Yutaka; Kitamura, Akitoshi; Sugiyama, Hiromu; Takada, Naoko; Fujimoto, Hirofumi; Kadono-Okuda, Keiko; Mita, Kazuei; Tamura, Toshiki; Yamamoto, Kimiko; Tsuchida, Kozo

    2010-01-01

    The transport pathway of specific dietary carotenoids from the midgut lumen to the silk gland in the silkworm, Bombyx mori, is a model system for selective carotenoid transport because several genetic mutants with defects in parts of this pathway have been identified that manifest altered cocoon pigmentation. In the wild-type silkworm, which has both genes, Yellow blood (Y) and Yellow cocoon (C), lutein is transferred selectively from the hemolymph lipoprotein to the silk gland cells where it is accumulated into the cocoon. The Y gene encodes an intracellular carotenoid-binding protein (CBP) containing a lipid-binding domain known as the steroidogenic acute regulatory protein-related lipid transfer domain. Positional cloning and transgenic rescue experiments revealed that the C gene encodes Cameo2, a transmembrane protein gene belonging to the CD36 family genes, some of which, such as the mammalian SR-BI and the fruit fly ninaD, are reported as lipoprotein receptors or implicated in carotenoid transport for visual system. In C mutant larvae, Cameo2 expression was strongly repressed in the silk gland in a specific manner, resulting in colorless silk glands and white cocoons. The developmental profile of Cameo2 expression, CBP expression, and lutein pigmentation in the silk gland of the yellow cocoon strain were correlated. We hypothesize that selective delivery of lutein to specific tissue requires the combination of two components: 1) CBP as a carotenoid transporter in cytosol and 2) Cameo2 as a transmembrane receptor on the surface of the cells. PMID:20053988

  4. Intraparticulate speciation analysis of soft nanoparticulate metal complexes. The impact of electric condensation on the binding of Cd(2+)/Pb(2+)/Cu(2+) by humic acids.

    PubMed

    Town, Raewyn M; van Leeuwen, Herman P

    2016-04-21

    In aqueous dispersions of soft, charged nanoparticles, the physicochemical conditions prevailing within the particle body generally differ substantially from those in the bulk medium. Accordingly it is necessary to define intrinsic descriptors that appropriately reflect the chemical speciation inside the particle's microenvironment. Herein the speciation of divalent metal ions within the body of negatively charged soft nanoparticulate complexants is elaborated for the example case of humic acid association with Cd(ii), Pb(ii) and Cu(ii). The electrostatic effects are described by a two-state model that accounts for counterion condensation in the intraparticulate double layer shell at the particle/medium interface and Donnan partitioning within the bulk of the particle body. Inner-sphere complex formation is defined by an intrinsic binding constant expressed in terms of local reactant concentrations as controlled by the pertinent electrostatic conditions. For the high particle charge density case (Debye length smaller than charged site separation), three distinct intraparticulate metal species are identified, namely free hydrated ions, electrostatically condensed ions, and inner-sphere metal-humic complexes. For all metal ions studied, the electrostatic contribution to the association of the metal ion with the oppositely charged particle is found to account for a substantial fraction of the total metal bound. PMID:27004844

  5. The CEA/CD3-Bispecific Antibody MEDI-565 (MT111) Binds a Nonlinear Epitope in the Full-Length but Not a Short Splice Variant of CEA

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jiaqi; Brohawn, Philip; Morehouse, Chris; Lekstrom, Kristen; Baeuerle, Patrick A.; Wu, Herren; Yao, Yihong; Coats, Steven R.; Dall’Acqua, William; Damschroder, Melissa; Hammond, Scott A.

    2012-01-01

    MEDI-565 (also known as MT111) is a bispecific T-cell engager (BiTE®) antibody in development for the treatment of patients with cancers expressing carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA). MEDI-565 binds CEA on cancer cells and CD3 on T cells to induce T-cell mediated killing of cancer cells. To understand the molecular basis of human CEA recognition by MEDI-565 and how polymorphisms and spliced forms of CEA may affect MEDI-565 activity, we mapped the epitope of MEDI-565 on CEA using mutagenesis and homology modeling approaches. We found that MEDI-565 recognized a conformational epitope in the A2 domain comprised of amino acids 326–349 and 388–410, with critical residues F326, T328, N333, V388, G389, P390, E392, I408, and N410. Two non-synonymous single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) (rs10407503, rs7249230) were identified in the epitope region, but they are found at low homozygosity rates. Searching the National Center for Biotechnology Information GenBank® database, we further identified a single, previously uncharacterized mRNA splice variant of CEA that lacks a portion of the N-terminal domain, the A1 and B1 domains, and a large portion of the A2 domain. Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis of multiple cancers showed widespread expression of full-length CEA in these tumors, with less frequent but concordant expression of the CEA splice variant. Because the epitope was largely absent from the CEA splice variant, MEDI-565 did not bind or mediate T-cell killing of cells solely expressing this form of CEA. In addition, the splice variant did not interfere with MEDI-565 binding or activity when co-expressed with full-length CEA. Thus MEDI-565 may broadly target CEA-positive tumors without regard for expression of the short splice variant of CEA. Together our data suggest that MEDI-565 activity will neither be impacted by SNPs nor by a splice variant of CEA. PMID:22574157

  6. Metal detoxification and gene expression regulation after a Cd and Zn contamination: an experimental study on Danio rerio.

    PubMed

    Arini, A; Gourves, P Y; Gonzalez, P; Baudrimont, M

    2015-06-01

    This study aimed to demonstrate the recovery potential of Danio rerio after Cd and Zn contaminations. Fish demonstrated high accumulation capacities of Cd with concentrations reaching 3716.4±578.6 μg Cd/kg FW in gills after 15 d of contamination. The 75-day decontamination failed to completely eliminate Cd (93.4% and 82.2% eliminated respectively in the gills of fish exposed to Cd and Cd/Zn) whereas Zn, poorly accumulated, was quickly depurated. The fast Cd depuration in the gills likely resulted from a metal transfer to the liver. MT response was clearly correlated to the Zn contamination, while genetic responses were more pronounced in case of Cd contamination. Cd induced over-expressions of genes involved against oxidative stress (sod, sodmt), and involved in detoxification mechanisms (mt1, mt2), mitochondrial mechanisms (cox1) and DNA repair (rad51 and gadd45). Zn binary contamination with Cd was demonstrated to provide protective effects on Cd-induced toxicity in D.rerio. Results highlighted that the genetic response was metal- and tissue-dependent. The brain and the muscles showed very few genetic responses, probably due to the low bioaccumulations measured in these tissues. Conversely, genes expressed in gills and liver of fish exposed to Cd were strongly affected (sod×3 and×12, mt1×11 and ×30 at T3 respectively in gills and liver). However, after 14-30 d of depuration, genes were no longer over expressed in response to Cd contamination in gills and liver of fish exposed to Cd and Cd/Zn conditions, suggesting an gene expression regulation of fish to the residual Cd contamination. PMID:25698290

  7. Concentrations of metals and potential metal-binding compounds and speciation of Cd, Zn and Cu in phloem and xylem saps from castor bean plants (Ricinus communis) treated with four levels of cadmium.

    PubMed

    Hazama, Kenji; Nagata, Shinji; Fujimori, Tamaki; Yanagisawa, Shuichi; Yoneyama, Tadakatsu

    2015-06-01

    We examined the concentrations of metals (Cd, Zn, Cu, Fe and Mn) and potential metal-binding compounds [nicotianamine (NA), thiol compounds and citrate] in xylem and phloem saps from 4-week-old castor bean plants (Ricinus communis) treated with 0 (control), 0.1, 1.0, and 10 μM Cd for 3 weeks. Treatment with 0.1 and 1 μM Cd produced no visible damage, while 10 μM Cd retarded growth. Cadmium concentrations in both saps were higher than those in the culture solution at 0.1 μM, similar at 1.0 μM and lower at 10 μM. Cd at 10 μM reduced Cu and Fe concentrations in both saps. NA concentrations measured by capillary electrophoresis-mass spectrometry (MS) in xylem sap (20 μM) were higher than the Cu concentrations, and those in phloem sap (150 μM) were higher than those of Zn, Fe and Cu combined. Reduced glutathione concentrations differed in xylem and phloem saps (1-2 and 30-150 μM, respectively), but oxidized glutathione concentrations were similar. Phloem sap phytochelatin 2 concentration increased from 0.8 μM in controls to 8 μM in 10 μM Cd. Free citrate was 2-4 μM in xylem sap and 70-100 μM in phloem sap. Total bound forms of Cd in phloem and xylem saps from 1 μM Cd-treated plants were 54 and 8%, respectively. Treatment of phloem sap with proteinaseK reduced high-molecular compounds while increasing fractions of low-molecular Cd-thiol complexes. Zinc-NA, Fe-NA and Cu-NA were identified in the phloem sap fraction of control plants by electrospray ionization time-of-flight MS, and the xylem sap contained Cu-NA. PMID:25403762

  8. Gill morphometrics of the thresher sharks (Genus Alopias): Correlation of gill dimensions with aerobic demand and environmental oxygen.

    PubMed

    Wootton, Thomas P; Sepulveda, Chugey A; Wegner, Nicholas C

    2015-05-01

    Gill morphometrics of the three thresher shark species (genus Alopias) were determined to examine how metabolism and habitat correlate with respiratory specialization for increased gas exchange. Thresher sharks have large gill surface areas, short water-blood barrier distances, and thin lamellae. Their large gill areas are derived from long total filament lengths and large lamellae, a morphometric configuration documented for other active elasmobranchs (i.e., lamnid sharks, Lamnidae) that augments respiratory surface area while limiting increases in branchial resistance to ventilatory flow. The bigeye thresher, Alopias superciliosus, which can experience prolonged exposure to hypoxia during diel vertical migrations, has the largest gill surface area documented for any elasmobranch species studied to date. The pelagic thresher shark, A. pelagicus, a warm-water epi-pelagic species, has a gill surface area comparable to that of the common thresher shark, A. vulpinus, despite the latter's expected higher aerobic requirements associated with regional endothermy. In addition, A. vulpinus has a significantly longer water-blood barrier distance than A. pelagicus and A. superciliosus, which likely reflects its cold, well-oxygenated habitat relative to the two other Alopias species. In fast-swimming fishes (such as A. vulpinus and A. pelagicus) cranial streamlining may impose morphological constraints on gill size. However, such constraints may be relaxed in hypoxia-dwelling species (such as A. superciliosus) that are likely less dependent on streamlining and can therefore accommodate larger branchial chambers and gills. PMID:25703507

  9. The immunodominant CD8+ T cell epitope region of Theiler’s virus in resistant C57BL/6 mice is critical for anti-viral immune responses, viral persistence, and binding to the host cells.

    PubMed Central

    Myoung, Jinjong; Hou, Wanqiu; Kang, Bongsu; Lyman, Michael A.; Kang, Jeong-Ah; Kim, Byung S.

    2007-01-01

    Theiler’s virus infection induces an immune-mediated demyelinating disease, providing a relevant animal model of human multiple sclerosis. VP2121–130-specific CD8+ T cells in resistant H-2b mice account for the majority of CNS-infiltrating CD8+ T cells. To further study the role of the CD8+ T cells, we generated a panel of mutant viruses substituted with L, G, or T at the anchor residue (M130) of the VP2121–130 epitope. M130L virus (M130L-V) with a substitution of M with L displayed similar properties as wild-type virus (WT-V). However, M130G-V and M130T-V could not establish a persistent infection in the CNS. The level of both virus-specific CD8+ and CD4+ T cell responses is significantly reduced in mice infected with these variant viruses. While all mutant and wild-type viruses replicate comparably in BHK cells, replication of M130G-V and M130T-V in macrophages was significantly lower compared to those infected with WT-V and M130L-V. Interestingly, these mutant viruses deficient in replication in primary mouse cells showed drastically reduced binding ability to the cells. These results suggest that the anchor residue of the predominant CD8+ T cell epitope of TMEV in resistant mice is critical for the virus to infect target cells and this deficiency may result in poor viral persistence leading to correspondingly low T cell responses in the periphery and CNS. Thus, selection of the cellular binding region of the virus as the predominant epitope for CD8+ T cells in resistant mice may provide a distinct advantage in controlling viral persistence by preventing escape mutations. PMID:17095033

  10. The Symptomatology and Diagnosis of Gilles de la Tourette's Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shapiro, Arthur; And Others

    1973-01-01

    The symptomatology of 34 patients with Gilles de la Tourette's syndrome was described in detail. The purpose was to clarify the diagnostic criteria for Tourette's syndrome by describing the type, variety, and frequency of symptoms in this illness. (Author)

  11. 20. Historic American Buildings Survey M. Diggs, Draftsman of Gill ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. Historic American Buildings Survey M. Diggs, Draftsman of Gill and Mead, Architects September 20, 1907 ORIGINAL DRAWING OF ROOF DETAILS From the Collection of Mr. Allan Klauber - Melville Klauber House, 3060 Sixth Avenue, San Diego, San Diego County, CA

  12. McGill's Integrated Civil and Common Law Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morissette, Yves-Marie

    2002-01-01

    Describes the bijural program of McGill University Faculty of Law. The program educates all first-degree law students in both the common law and civil law traditions, preparing them for the increasing globalization of legal practice. (EV)

  13. Gill trematodes (flukes) in wild-caught killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus).

    PubMed

    Goulding, David R; Blankenship-Paris, Terry L; Lewbart, Gregory A; Myers, Page H; Demianenko, Tracy K; Clark, James A; Forsythe, Diane B

    2004-03-01

    Three wild caught killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus) on an Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee-approved protocol were found dead within 2 days after being received. The fish were housed in two separate aquaria. Aquarium water was evaluated, and pH, salinity, ammonia, nitrate, and nitrite levels were within acceptable parameters. Several remaining fish appeared to be slow-moving and were presented for necropsy. Multiple, scattered, ulcerated skin lesions (diameter, 1 to 5 mm) were noted at necropsy and were cultured. No pathogenic bacteria were isolated. Wet-mount samples of the gills revealed multiple cysts at the gill margins, each containing a motile organism. No other gill parasites were detected. A diagnosis of trematodiasis was made. The cysts were identified as encysted metacercariae of a digenetic trematode. We surmise that the large numbers of gill flukes combined with the stress of recent shipment likely caused the observed morbidity and mortality. PMID:15053506

  14. Structural Insights into the Functional Role of the Hcn Sub-domain of the Receptor-Binding Domain of the Botulinum Neurotoxin Mosaic Serotype C/D

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yanfeng; Gardberg, Anna; Edwards, Tom E.; Sankaran, Banumathi; Robinson, Howard; Varnum, Susan M.; Buchko, Garry W.

    2013-07-01

    Botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT), the causative agent of the deadly neuroparalytic disease botulism, is the most poisonous protein known for humans. Produced by different strains of the anaerobic bacterium Clostridium botulinum, BoNT effects cellular intoxication via a multistep mechanism executed by the three modules of the activated protein. Endocytosis, the first step of cellular intoxication, is triggered by the ~50 kDa, heavy-chain receptor-binding module (HCR) that is specific for a ganglioside and a protein receptor on neuronal cell surfaces. This dual receptor recognition mechanism between BoNT and the host cell’s membrane is well documented and occurs via specific intermolecular interactions with the C-terminal sub-domain, Hcc, of BoNT-HCR. The N-terminal sub-domain of BoNT-HCR, Hcn, comprises ~50% of BoNT-HCR and adopts a B-sheet jelly roll fold. While suspected in assisting cell surface recognition, no unambiguous function for the Hcn sub-domain in BoNT has been indentified. To obtain insights into the potential function of the Hcn sub-domain in BoNT, the first crystal structure of a BoNT with an organic ligand bound to the Hcn sub-domain has been obtained. Here, we describe the crystal structure of BoNT/CD-HCR determined at 1.70 Å resolution with a tetraethylene glycol (PG4) molecule bound in an hydrophobic cleft between B-strands in the B-sheet jelly fold roll of the Hcn sub-domain. The molecule is completely engulfed in the cleft, making numerous hydrophobic (Y932, S959, W966, and D1042) and hydrophilic (S935, W977, L979, N1013, and I1066) contacts with the protein’s side chain and backbone that may mimic in vivo interactions with the phospholipid membranes on neuronal cell surfaces. A sulfate ion was also observed bound to residues T1176, D1177, K1196, and R1243 in the Hcc sub-domain of BoNT/CD-HCR. In the crystal structure of a similar protein, BoNT/D-HCR, a sialic acid

  15. Correction factors for the directional response of Gill propeller anemometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowen, A. J.; Teunissen, H. W.

    1986-12-01

    This note briefly summarizes some recent wind-tunnel tests carried out at the Atmospheric Environment Service, Canada, to investigate the directional response of Gill (1975) propeller anemometers with two specific models of propeller. Tables of optimum noncosine-response correction factors are presented for both propeller types, and results of some field intercomparisons between the Gill and sonic anemometer measurements of turbulence statistics are summarized.

  16. Extracellular membrane-proximal domain of HAb18G/CD147 binds to metal ion-dependent adhesion site (MIDAS) motif of integrin β1 to modulate malignant properties of hepatoma cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Yong; Wu, Jiao; Song, Fei; Tang, Juan; Wang, Shi-Jie; Yu, Xiao-Ling; Chen, Zhi-Nan; Jiang, Jian-Li

    2012-02-10

    Several lines of evidence suggest that HAb18G/CD147 interacts with the integrin variants α3β1 and α6β1. However, the mechanism of the interaction remains largely unknown. In this study, mammalian protein-protein interaction trap (MAPPIT), a mammalian two-hybrid method, was used to study the CD147-integrin β1 subunit interaction. CD147 in human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells was interfered with by small hairpin RNA. Nude mouse xenograft model and metastatic model of HCC were used to detect the role of CD147 in carcinogenesis and metastasis. We found that the extracellular membrane-proximal domain of HAb18G/CD147 (I-type domain) binds at the metal ion-dependent adhesion site in the βA domain of the integrin β1 subunit, and Asp(179) in the I-type domain of HAb18G/CD147 plays an important role in the interaction. The levels of the proteins that act downstream of integrin, including focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and phospho-FAK, were decreased, and the cytoskeletal structures of HCC cells were rearranged bearing the HAb18G/CD147 deletion. Simultaneously, the migration and invasion capacities, secretion of matrix metalloproteinases, colony formation rate in vitro, and tumor growth and metastatic potential in vivo were decreased. These results indicate that the interaction of HAb18G/CD147 extracellular I-type domain with the integrin β1 metal ion-dependent adhesion site motif activates the downstream FAK signaling pathway, subsequently enhancing the malignant properties of HCC cells. PMID:22130661

  17. Extracellular Membrane-proximal Domain of HAb18G/CD147 Binds to Metal Ion-dependent Adhesion Site (MIDAS) Motif of Integrin β1 to Modulate Malignant Properties of Hepatoma Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yong; Wu, Jiao; Song, Fei; Tang, Juan; Wang, Shi-Jie; Yu, Xiao-Ling; Chen, Zhi-Nan; Jiang, Jian-Li

    2012-01-01

    Several lines of evidence suggest that HAb18G/CD147 interacts with the integrin variants α3β1 and α6β1. However, the mechanism of the interaction remains largely unknown. In this study, mammalian protein-protein interaction trap (MAPPIT), a mammalian two-hybrid method, was used to study the CD147-integrin β1 subunit interaction. CD147 in human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells was interfered with by small hairpin RNA. Nude mouse xenograft model and metastatic model of HCC were used to detect the role of CD147 in carcinogenesis and metastasis. We found that the extracellular membrane-proximal domain of HAb18G/CD147 (I-type domain) binds at the metal ion-dependent adhesion site in the βA domain of the integrin β1 subunit, and Asp179 in the I-type domain of HAb18G/CD147 plays an important role in the interaction. The levels of the proteins that act downstream of integrin, including focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and phospho-FAK, were decreased, and the cytoskeletal structures of HCC cells were rearranged bearing the HAb18G/CD147 deletion. Simultaneously, the migration and invasion capacities, secretion of matrix metalloproteinases, colony formation rate in vitro, and tumor growth and metastatic potential in vivo were decreased. These results indicate that the interaction of HAb18G/CD147 extracellular I-type domain with the integrin β1 metal ion-dependent adhesion site motif activates the downstream FAK signaling pathway, subsequently enhancing the malignant properties of HCC cells. PMID:22130661

  18. Study of antibody repertoires to the CD4 binding site of gp120 of a Chinese HIV-1-infected elite neutralizer, using 454 sequencing and single-cell sorting.

    PubMed

    Li, Dan; Wang, Zheng; Ren, Li; Zhang, Jing; Feng, Guangda; Hong, Kunxue; Hao, Yanling; Qi, Zhi; Liang, Hua; Shao, Yiming

    2016-04-01

    Broadly neutralizing antibodies (NAbs) against the CD4 binding site of HIV gp120 (CD4bs) have provided important information for vaccine design. In this study, we combined deep sequencing and single memory B cell sorting to isolate CD4bs-directed NAbs from a Chinese HIV-1-infected elite neutralizer. We first performed 454 pyrosequencing to capture the IGHV1, IGKV, and IGLV germline gene families. IGHV1-2*02, the heavy chain germline V gene (VH) of the CD4bs-directed bNAb VRC01, was found to have a relatively low somatic mutation rate. When an identity/divergence plot was used to interrogate the 454 sequencing data, no VRC01-like sequences were found within the dataset. We next used a pair of CD4bs-specific probes (RSC3/ΔRSC3) to sort the B cells from this Chinese donor and identified a CD4bs-directed Ab that showed limited neutralization capability. Interestingly, the VH gene of this weak NAb belongs to the IGHV5-51 lineage, with a somatic mutation rate of 7.99 %. Our study thus demonstrates that CD4bs-directed NAbs can be produced by rearrangement from other VH genes, such as IGHV5-51 in this donor, rather than IGHV1-2*02. The 454 sequencing data and NAb obtained from this study will provide useful insights into the CD4bs-directed B-cell response during HIV-1 infection as well as the diversity of neutralizing antibodies. PMID:26671829

  19. Tregs utilize beta-galactoside-binding protein to transiently inhibit PI3K/p21ras activity of human CD8+ T cells to block their TCR-mediated ERK activity and proliferation.

    PubMed

    Baatar, Dolgor; Olkhanud, Purevdorj B; Wells, Valerie; Indig, Fred E; Mallucci, Livio; Biragyn, Arya

    2009-10-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) and beta-galactoside-binding protein (betaGBP), a regulatory protein often found expressed at sites of immunological privilege, have similar functions. Their presence affects the outcome of harmful autoimmunity and cancers, including experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis and malignant gliomas. Here we report a novel pathway by which Tregs express and utilize betaGBP to control CD8(+) T cell responses partially activating TCR signaling but blocking PI3K activity. As a result, this leads to a loss of p21(ras), ERK and Akt activities despite activation of TCR proximal signals, such as phosphorylation of CD3zeta, Zap70, Lat and PKCtheta. Although non-processive TCR signaling often leads to cell anergy, Tregs/betaGBP did not affect cell viability. Instead, betaGBP/Tregs transiently prevented activation of CD8(+) T cells with self-antigens, while keeping their responses to xenogeneic antigens unaffected. PMID:19520156

  20. The role of charge and multiple faces of the CD8 alpha/alpha homodimer in binding to major histocompatibility complex class I molecules: support for a bivalent model.

    PubMed Central

    Giblin, P A; Leahy, D J; Mennone, J; Kavathas, P B

    1994-01-01

    The CD8 dimer interacts with the alpha 3 domain of major histocompatibility complex class I molecules through two immunoglobulin variable-like domains. In this study a crystal structure-informed mutational analysis has been performed to identify amino acids in the CD8 alpha/alpha homodimer that are likely to be involved in binding to class I. Several key residues are situated on the top face of the dimer within loops analogous to the complementarity-determining regions (CDRs) of immunoglobulin. In addition, other important amino acids are located in the A and B beta-strands on the sides of the dimer. The potential involvement of amino acids on both the top and the side faces of the molecule is consistent with a bivalent model for the interaction between a single CD8 alpha/alpha homodimer and two class I molecules and may have important implications for signal transduction in class I-expressing cells. This study also demonstrates a role for the positive surface potential of CD8 in class I binding and complements previous work demonstrating the importance of a negatively charged loop on the alpha 3 domain of class I for CD8 alpha/alpha-class I interaction. We propose a model whereby residues located on the CDR-like loops of the CD8 homodimer interact with the alpha 3 domain of MHC class I while amino acids on the side of the molecule containing the A and B beta-strands contact the alpha 2 domain of class I. Images PMID:8127870

  1. Enhancement of antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity by endowing IgG with FcαRI (CD89) binding.

    PubMed

    Borrok, M Jack; Luheshi, Nadia M; Beyaz, Nurten; Davies, Gareth C; Legg, James W; Wu, Herren; Dall'Acqua, William F; Tsui, Ping

    2015-01-01

    Fc effector functions such as antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) and antibody-dependent cell-mediated phagocytosis (ADCP) are crucial to the efficacy of many antibody therapeutics. In addition to IgG, antibodies of the IgA isotype can also promote cell killing through engagement of myeloid lineage cells via interactions between the IgA-Fc and FcαRI (CD89). Herein, we describe a unique, tandem IgG1/IgA2 antibody format in the context of a trastuzumab variable domain that exhibits enhanced ADCC and ADCP capabilities. The IgG1/IgA2 tandem Fc format retains IgG1 FcγR binding as well as FcRn-mediated serum persistence, yet is augmented with myeloid cell-mediated effector functions via FcαRI/IgA Fc interactions. In this work, we demonstrate anti-human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 antibodies with the unique tandem IgG1/IgA2 Fc can better recruit and engage cytotoxic polymorphonuclear (PMN) cells than either the parental IgG1 or IgA2. Pharmacokinetics of IgG1/IgA2 in BALB/c mice are similar to the parental IgG, and far surpass the poor serum persistence of IgA2. The IgG1/IgA2 format is expressed at similar levels and with similar thermal stability to IgG1, and can be purified via standard protein A chromatography. The tandem IgG1/IgA2 format could potentially augment IgG-based immunotherapeutics with enhanced PMN-mediated cytotoxicity while avoiding many of the problems associated with developing IgAs. PMID:25970007

  2. Inhibition of CD4+ T lymphocyte binding to fibronectin and immune-cell accumulation in inflammatory sites by non-peptidic mimetics of Arg-Gly-Asp.

    PubMed

    Hershkoviz, R; Greenspoon, N; Mekori, Y A; Hadari, R; Alon, R; Kapustina, G; Lider, O

    1994-02-01

    The Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) cell adhesion motif has been demonstrated in various studies to play a pivotal role in leucocyte and platelet interactions with plasma and extracellular matrix (ECM) glycoproteins. The recognition of the RGD sequence is mediated by heterodimeric receptors designated integrins of the beta 1 subfamily, expressed on distinct cell types, including T lymphocytes. We have recently shown that flexible non-peptidic mimetics of RGD, in which the two ionic side groups were separated by a linear spacer of 11 atoms, bound specifically to the platelet integrin alpha 11b beta 3, and inhibited T cell-mediated immune responses. The present study was designed to (i) further characterize the structural requirements for RGD interactions with CD4+ T cells, and (ii) examine the mechanisms by which the RGD mimetics interfere with immune cell reactivity in vivo. We now report that freezing the conformational degrees of freedom in the spacer chain, which fixes the relative orientation of the guanidinium and carboxylate side groups in a favourable manner, results in a higher level of inhibition of T cell binding to immobilized fibronectin, an RGD-containing ECM glycoprotein. In vivo, treatment of mice with relatively low doses of the RGD mimetics, but not the RGD peptide, inhibited the elicitation of an adoptively transferred DTH reaction. This inhibition was achieved by direct impairment of the ability of antigen-primed lymph node cells to migrate and accumulate in inflammatory sites. Hence, we suggest that the design and production of non-peptidic mimetics of RGD offers a novel approach to study defined parameters related to the structure-function requirements of small adhesion epitopes. Furthermore, this approach could be used therapeutically to inhibit pathological processes which depend on RGD recognition. PMID:7905794

  3. Local connected fractal dimension analysis in gill of fish experimentally exposed to toxicants.

    PubMed

    Manera, Maurizio; Giari, Luisa; De Pasquale, Joseph A; Sayyaf Dezfuli, Bahram

    2016-06-01

    An operator-neutral method was implemented to objectively assess European seabass, Dicentrarchus labrax (Linnaeus, 1758) gill pathology after experimental exposure to cadmium (Cd) and terbuthylazine (TBA) for 24 and 48h. An algorithm-derived local connected fractal dimension (LCFD) frequency measure was used in this comparative analysis. Canonical variates (CVA) and linear discriminant analysis (LDA) were used to evaluate the discrimination power of the method among exposure classes (unexposed, Cd exposed, TBA exposed). Misclassification, sensitivity and specificity, both with original and cross-validated cases, were determined. LCFDs frequencies enhanced the differences among classes which were visually selected after their means, respective variances and the differences between Cd and TBA exposed means, with respect to unexposed mean, were analyzed by scatter plots. Selected frequencies were then scanned by means of LDA, stepwise analysis, and Mahalanobis distance to detect the most discriminative frequencies out of ten originally selected. Discrimination resulted in 91.7% of cross-validated cases correctly classified (22 out of 24 total cases), with sensitivity and specificity, respectively, of 95.5% (1 false negative with respect to 21 really positive cases) and 75% (1 false positive with respect to 3 really negative cases). CVA with convex hull polygons ensured prompt, visually intuitive discrimination among exposure classes and graphically supported the false positive case. The combined use of semithin sections, which enhanced the visual evaluation of the overall lamellar structure; of LCFD analysis, which objectively detected local variation in complexity, without the possible bias connected to human personnel; and of CVA/LDA, could be an objective, sensitive and specific approach to study fish gill lamellar pathology. Furthermore this approach enabled discrimination with sufficient confidence between exposure classes or pathological states and avoided

  4. Bioconcentration of zinc and its effect on the biochemical constituents of the gill tissues of Labeo rohita: An FT-IR study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palaniappan, PL. RM.; Nishanth, T.; Renju, V. B.

    2010-03-01

    In the present work, an attempt has been made to assess the bioconcentration and distribution of zinc on the selected organs of Labeo rohita and to study the effect of zinc exposure on the biochemical constitutions of gill tissues of L. rohita by using FT-IR Spectroscopy. The concentration pattern in the organs reveals that the liver is the prime site of metal binding and muscle accumulates least metal concentration. The accumulation profile is in the order: liver > gill > kidney > brain > bone > muscle. It has also been observed that the administration of chelating agent D-Penicillamine (DPA) reduces the zinc concentration in all tissues more effectively than the administration of the chelating agent Ethylene Diamine Tetra Acetic acid. The FT-IR spectra reveal that zinc exposure causes significant changes in the biochemical constitutions of the gill tissues. It causes an alteration in the protein secondary structures by decreasing the α-helix and increasing the β-sheet contents. Further, it has been observed that the administration of chelating agent DPA improves the protein and lipid contents in the gill tissues compared to zinc exposed tissues. This result shows that DPA is the effective chelator of zinc in reducing the body burden of L. rohita fingerlings. In conclusion, the findings of the current study suggest that zinc exposure causes significant changes in both lipids and proteins of the gill tissues, and changes the protein profile in favour of β-sheet structure.

  5. Sodium polyacrylate as a binding agent in diffusive gradients in thin-films technique for the measurement of Cu2+ and Cd2+ in waters.

    PubMed

    Fan, Hongtao; Sun, Ting; Li, Weijia; Sui, Dianpeng; Jin, Shuang; Lian, Xiaojing

    2009-10-15

    An aqueous solution containing sodium polyacrylate (PA, 0.0030M) was used in diffusive gradients in thin-films technique (DGT) to measure DGT-labile Cu(2+) and Cd(2+) concentrations. The DGT devices (PA DGT) were validated in four types of solutions, including synthetic river waters containing metal ions with or without complexing EDTA, natural river water (Hun River, Shenyang, China) spiked with Cu(2+) and Cd(2+), and an industrial wastewater (Shenyang, China). Results showed that only free metal ions were measured by PA DGT, recovery=98.79% for Cu(2+) and recovery=97.80% for Cd(2+) in solutions containing only free metal ions, recovery=51.02% for Cu(2+) and recovery=51.92% for Cd(2+) in solution with metal/EDTA molar ratio of 2:1 and recovery=0 in solutions with metal/EDTA molar ratio of 1:1 and 1:2. These indicated that the complexes of Cu-EDTA and Cd-EDTA were DGT-inert or not DGT-labile. The DGT performance in spiked river water (recovery=8.47% for Cu(2+) and recovery=27.48% for Cd(2+)) and in industrial wastewater (recovery=14.16% for Cd(2+)) were also investigated. Conditional stability constants (logK) of PA-Cu and PA-Cd complexes were determined as 6.98 and 5.61, respectively, indicating strong interaction between PA and the metals. PMID:19635351

  6. The nephridial hypothesis of the gill slit origin.

    PubMed

    Ezhova, Olga V; Malakhov, Vladimir V

    2015-12-01

    Metameric gill slits are mysterious structures, unique for Chordata and Hemichordata, and also, perhaps, for the extinct Cambrian Calcichordata. There is a discussed hypothesis of the gill slits origin from the metameric nephridia. According to the hypothesis, the hypothetical metameric deuterostome ancestor had in each segment a pair of coelomoducts and a pair of intestinal pockets. In the anterior segments, the coelomoducts have fused with the intestinal pockets. As a result, each nephridium opened both into the gut and into the environment. Then the dissepiments and funnels reduced in all segments except the collar one. Thus, in recent enteropneusts, only the first pair of gill slits keeps the ancestral arrangement communicating at the same time with the gut, with the environment, and with the coelom of the preceding (collar) segment. In the anterior part of the branchio-genital trunk region of enteropneusts, the metameric intestinal pockets remained, as well as the metameric coelomoducts functioning as the ducts of the metameric gonads, i.e., as the gonoducts. The consequence of the hypothesis is that the metameric gill pores originate from the metameric excreting pores, and the metameric branchial sacs originate from the metameric endodermal pockets of the gut fused with the coelomoducts. The metameric gill slits by themselves correspond with metameric openings connecting the gut with metameric intestinal pockets. J. Exp. Zool. (Mol. Dev. Evol.) 324B: 647-652, 2015. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26227807

  7. Development of oxygen sensing in the gills of zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Jonz, Michael G; Nurse, Colin A

    2005-04-01

    Previous studies have described the morphology, innervation and O(2)-chemoreceptive properties of neuroepithelial cells (NECs) of the zebrafish gill filaments. The present work describes the ontogenesis of these cells, and the formation of functional O(2)-sensing pathways in developing zebrafish. Confocal immunofluorescence was performed on whole-mount gill preparations using antibodies against serotonin (5-HT) and a zebrafish-derived neuronal marker (zn-12) to identify the appearance and innervation of gill NECs during larval stages. NECs were first expressed in gill filament primordia of larvae at 5 days postfertilization (d.p.f.) and were fully innervated by 7 d.p.f. In vivo ventilation frequency analysis revealed that a behavioural response to hypoxia (11.2+/-2.8 min(-1)) developed in embryos as early as 2 d.p.f., and a significant increase (P<0.05) in the ventilatory response to hypoxia (200.8+/-23.0 min(-1)) coincided with innervation of NECs of the filaments. In addition, exogenous application of quinidine, a blocker of O(2)-sensitive background K(+) channels in NECs, induced hyperventilation in adults in a dose-dependent manner and revealed the development of a quinidine-sensitive ventilatory response in 7 d.p.f. larvae. This study shows that NEC innervation in the gill filaments may account for the development of a functional O(2)-sensing pathway and the hyperventilatory response to hypoxia in zebrafish larvae. At earlier stages, however, O(2)-sensing must occur through another pathway. The possibility that a new type of 5-HT-positive NEC of the gill arches may account for this earlier hypoxic response is discussed. PMID:15802677

  8. 1,25D3 prevents CD8(+)Tc2 skewing and asthma development through VDR binding changes to the Cyp11a1 promoter.

    PubMed

    Schedel, Michaela; Jia, Yi; Michel, Sven; Takeda, Katsuyuki; Domenico, Joanne; Joetham, Anthony; Ning, Fangkun; Strand, Matthew; Han, Junyan; Wang, Meiqin; Lucas, Joseph J; Vogelberg, Christian; Kabesch, Michael; O'Connor, Brian P; Gelfand, Erwin W

    2016-01-01

    Effector CD8(+) T cells convert from IFN-γ(+) (Tc1) to IL-13(+) (Tc2) cells in the presence of IL-4. Underlying regulatory mechanisms are not fully defined. Here, we show that addition of 1,25D3, the active form of vitamin D3, during CD8(+) T-cell differentiation prevents IL-4-induced conversion to IL-13-producers. Transfer of 1,25D3-treated CD8(+) T cells into sensitized and challenged CD8(+)-deficient recipients fails to restore development of lung allergic responses. 1,25D3 alters vitamin D receptor (VDR) recruitment to the Cyp11a1 promoter in vitro and in vivo in the presence of IL-4. As a result, protein levels and enzymatic activity of CYP11A1, a steroidogenic enzyme regulating CD8(+) T-cell conversion, are decreased. An epistatic effect between CYP11A1 and VDR polymorphisms may contribute to the predisposition to childhood asthma. These data identify a role for 1,25D3 in the molecular programming of CD8(+) T-cell conversion to an IL-13-secreting phenotype through regulation of steroidogenesis, potentially governing asthma susceptibility. PMID:26750596

  9. 1,25D3 prevents CD8+Tc2 skewing and asthma development through VDR binding changes to the Cyp11a1 promoter

    PubMed Central

    Schedel, Michaela; Jia, Yi; Michel, Sven; Takeda, Katsuyuki; Domenico, Joanne; Joetham, Anthony; Ning, Fangkun; Strand, Matthew; Han, Junyan; Wang, Meiqin; Lucas, Joseph J.; Vogelberg, Christian; Kabesch, Michael; O'Connor, Brian P.; Gelfand, Erwin W.

    2016-01-01

    Effector CD8+ T cells convert from IFN-γ+ (Tc1) to IL-13+ (Tc2) cells in the presence of IL-4. Underlying regulatory mechanisms are not fully defined. Here, we show that addition of 1,25D3, the active form of vitamin D3, during CD8+ T-cell differentiation prevents IL-4-induced conversion to IL-13-producers. Transfer of 1,25D3-treated CD8+ T cells into sensitized and challenged CD8+-deficient recipients fails to restore development of lung allergic responses. 1,25D3 alters vitamin D receptor (VDR) recruitment to the Cyp11a1 promoter in vitro and in vivo in the presence of IL-4. As a result, protein levels and enzymatic activity of CYP11A1, a steroidogenic enzyme regulating CD8+ T-cell conversion, are decreased. An epistatic effect between CYP11A1 and VDR polymorphisms may contribute to the predisposition to childhood asthma. These data identify a role for 1,25D3 in the molecular programming of CD8+ T-cell conversion to an IL-13-secreting phenotype through regulation of steroidogenesis, potentially governing asthma susceptibility. PMID:26750596

  10. Host-guest inclusion systems of daidzein with 2-hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (HP-β-CD) and sulfobutyl ether-β-cyclodextrin (SBE-β-CD): Preparation, binding behaviors and water solubility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Yinghui; Pang, Yanhua; Guo, Yafei; Ren, Yufeng; Wang, Fen; Liao, Xiali; Yang, Bo

    2016-08-01

    Daidzein is an isoflavone of naturally abundance existing in plants and foods which has attracted much attention for its significant benefits on human health. However, its application was severely limited by its poor solubilities, instability and low bioavailability. To overcome these drawbacks, inclusion complexes of daidzein with two cyclodextrin (CD) derivatives, i.e., 2-hydropropyl-β-cyclodextrin (HP-β-CD) and sulfobutyl ether-β-cyclodextrin (SBE-β-CD) were prepared and characterized both in solution and solid state by 1D and 2D NMR, XRD, SEM and elemental analyses. Fluorescence spectroscopy and the Job plot were used to demonstrate a mainly 1:1 inclusion mode between daidzein and CDs. Their thermal stabilities were evaluated with TG and DSC experiments. Moreover, water solubility of daidzein was significantly improved by inclusion complexation with CDs. These results might suggest valuable approaches to developments of new pharmaceutical formulations of daidzein.

  11. Effects of Pb plus Cd mixtures on toxicity, and internal electrolyte and osmotic balance in the rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Clemow, Yvonne H; Wilkie, Michael P

    2015-04-01

    The physiological and toxicological effects of Cd and Pb have been thoroughly studied, but relatively little work has been done to determine how mixtures of these metals affect fishes in soft (<100 μmol L(-1)Ca(2+)) slightly acidic (pH ∼6) waters typical of many lakes in the Canadian Shield and other regions. Recently, it has been suggested that acute exposure to Cd plus Pb mixtures (3h) had greater than additive effects on both Ca(2+) and Na(+) influx, which could potentially exacerbate disturbances to ion balance and result in greater toxicity in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). The goal of the present study was to test this hypothesis by assessing the physiological and toxicological effects of Cd plus Pb mixtures over longer time periods (3-5 days), but at relatively low, more environmentally relevant concentrations of these metals. Accordingly, toxicity and measurements of blood acid-base regulation (PaO2, pHa), hematology (Ht, Hb, MCHC, and Protein), ionic composition (body ions and plasma Ca(2+), Na(+), Cl(-), osmolality), unidirectional Na(+) fluxes and branchial Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase activity were measured in rainbow trout exposed to Cd plus Pb mixtures. Experiments on rainbow trout, implanted with dorsal aortic catheters for repetitive blood sampling, demonstrated that exposure to Pb alone (26 nmol PbL(-1)) was less toxic than Cd alone (6 nmol CdL(-1)), which was much less toxic to the fish than a Cd plus Pb mixture (7 nmol CdL(-1) plus 45 nmol PbL(-1)), which led to greater than additive 80% mortality by 5d. Both Cd and Pb inhibited Na(+) influx over 3d exposure to the metals, which was partially offset by decreases in the diffusive efflux (outflux) of Na(+) across the gill. Despite an absence of detectable effects of Pb alone on plasma ion balance, Cd plus Pb mixtures exacerbated Cd-induced reductions in plasma Ca(2+) concentration, and resulted in pronounced reductions in plasma Na(+), Cl(-), and osmolality. No effects on Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase activity

  12. Biomolecular interaction study of hydralazine with bovine serum albumin and effect of β-cyclodextrin on binding by fluorescence, 3D, synchronous, CD, and Raman spectroscopic methods.

    PubMed

    Bolattin, Mallavva B; Nandibewoor, Sharanappa T; Chimatadar, Shivamurti A

    2016-07-01

    Spectrofluoremetric technique was employed to study the binding behavior of hydralazine with bovine serum albumin (BSA) at different temperatures. Binding study of bovine serum albumin with hydralazine has been studied by ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy and confirmed by three-dimensional, synchronous, circular dichroism, and Raman spectroscopic methods. Effect of β-cyclodextrin on binding was studied. The experimental results showed a static quenching mechanism in the interaction of hydralazine with bovine serum albumin. The binding constant and the number of binding sites are calculated according to Stern-Volmer equation. The thermodynamic parameters ∆H(o) , ∆G(o) , ∆S(o) at different temperatures were calculated. These indicated that the hydrogen bonding and weak van der Waals forces played an important role in the interaction. Based on the Förster's theory of non-radiation energy transfer, the binding average distance, r, between the donor (BSA) and acceptor (hydralazine) was evaluated and found to be 3.95 nm. Spectral results showed that the binding of hydralazine to BSA induced conformational changes in BSA. The effect of common ions on the binding of hydralazine to BSA was also examined. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26785703

  13. Psychological Aspects of Gilles De La Tourette Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grossman, Hildreth Youkilis; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Evaluated the psychopathological features that may underlie or accompany Gilles de la Tourette Syndrome. Univariate analyses indicated that Tourette subjects scored higher on the following scales of the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory: Schizophrenia, Depression, Psychopathic Deviate, Psychasthenia and Hypochondriasis. The results…

  14. Matter in Motion: The Educational Materialism of Gilles Deleuze

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cole, David R.

    2012-01-01

    This paper critically examines the materialism that Gilles Deleuze espouses in his oeuvre to the benefit of educational theory. In "Difference and Repetition", he presented transcendental empiricism by underwriting Kant with realism (Deleuze, 1994). Later, in "Capitalism & Schizophrenia I & II" that were co-written with Felix Guattari (1984, 1988)…

  15. A case of Gilles de la Tourette's syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, Jyoti; Singh, Pragnya; Bhat, P. S.; Srivastava, K.; Gupta, Vikash

    2015-01-01

    Gilles de la Tourette's syndrome is an uncommon illness associated with repetitive un-voluntary abnormal movements and utterance. It is often associated with other psychiatric morbidities. Management requires awareness of this uncommon illness, keen observation, relevant evaluation, and combination of pharmacology and psychotherapy for an optimal outcome. This case is brought out here for florid presentation and nuances of management. PMID:27212827

  16. Identifying the Child with Gilles de la Tourette Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Donna J.

    1993-01-01

    This article presents a brief introduction to Gilles de la Tourette Syndrome (a neuropsychiatric disorder characterized by motor and vocal tics and obsessive-compulsive behaviors). It describes the nature of the disorder, treatment, and service provision (evaluation and assessment and the Individual Education Plan). (DB)

  17. A case of Gilles de la Tourette's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Prakash, Jyoti; Singh, Pragnya; Bhat, P S; Srivastava, K; Gupta, Vikash

    2015-01-01

    Gilles de la Tourette's syndrome is an uncommon illness associated with repetitive un-voluntary abnormal movements and utterance. It is often associated with other psychiatric morbidities. Management requires awareness of this uncommon illness, keen observation, relevant evaluation, and combination of pharmacology and psychotherapy for an optimal outcome. This case is brought out here for florid presentation and nuances of management. PMID:27212827

  18. Simulated Conversations: The McGill Negotiation Simulator.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roston, John

    The ability to successfully conduct specialized conversations in stressful situations is an essential part of professional competence in a number of subject areas; however, there are few opportunities for students to practice the required skills in a realistic environment. The McGill Negotiation Simulator project was established to investigate the…

  19. Binding of copper(II) ions to the polyproline II helices of PEVK modules of the giant elastic protein titin as revealed by ESI-MS, CD, and NMR.

    PubMed

    Ma, Kan; Wang, Kuan

    2003-10-01

    Titin, a family of giant elastic proteins, constitutes an elastic sarcomere matrix in striated muscle. In the I-band region of the sarcomere, the titin PEVK segment acts as a molecular spring to generate elasticity as well as sites of adhesion with parallel thin filaments. Previously, we reported that PEVK consists of tandem repeats of 28 residue modules and that the "polyproline II-coil" motif is the fundamental conformational motif of the PEVK module. In order to characterize the factors that may affect and alter the PPII-coil conformational motifs, we have initiated a systematic study of the interaction with divalent cations (Cu2+, Ca2+, Zn2+, and Ni2+) and a conformational profile of PEVK peptides (a representative 28-mer peptide PR: PEPPKEVVPEKKAPVAPPKKPEVPPVKV and its subfragments PR1: kvPEPPKEVVPE, PR2: VPEKKAPVAPPK, PR3: KPEVPPVKV). UV-Vis absorption difference spectra and CD spectra showed that Cu2+ bound to PR1 with high affinity (20 microM), while its binding to PR2 and PR3 as well as the binding of other cations to all four peptides were of lower affinity (>100 microM). Conformational studies by CD revealed that Cu2+ binding to PR1 resulted in a polyproline II to turn transition up to a 1:2 PR1/Cu2+ ratio and a coil to turn transition at higher Cu2+ concentration. ESI-MS provided the stoichiometry of PEVK peptide-Cu2+ complexes at both low and high ion strength, confirming the specific high affinity binding of Cu2+ to PR1 and PR. Furthermore, NMR and ESI-MS/MS fragmentation analysis elucidated the binding sites of the PEVK peptide-Cu2+ complexes at (-2)KVPE2, 8VPE10, 13APV15, and 22EVP24. A potential application of Cu2+ binding in peptide sequencing by mass spectrometry was also revealed. We conclude that Cu2+ binds and bends PEVK peptides to a beta-turn-like structure at specific sites. The specific targeting of Cu2+ towards PPII is likely to be of significant value in elucidating the roles of PPII in titin elasticity as well as in interactions of

  20. Myxosporean hyperparasites of gill monogeneans are basal to the Multivalvulida

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Myxosporeans are known from aquatic annelids but parasitism of platyhelminths by myxosporeans has not been widely reported. Hyperparasitism of gill monogeneans by Myxidium giardi has been reported from the European eel and Myxidium-like hyperparasites have also been observed during studies of gill monogeneans from Malaysia and Japan. The present study aimed to collect new hyperparasite material from Malaysia for morphological and molecular descriptions. In addition, PCR screening of host fish was undertaken to determine whether they are also hosts for the myxosporean. Results Heavy myxosporean infections were observed in monogeneans from two out of 14 fish and were detected from a further five fish using specific PCRs and pooled monogenean DNA. Positive DNA isolates were sequenced and were from a single species of myxosporean. Myxospore morphology was consistent with Myxidium with histozoic development in the parenchymal tissues of the monogenean. Simultaneous infections in the fish could not be confirmed microscopically; however, identical myxosporean DNA could be amplified from kidney, spleen and intestinal tract tissues using the specific PCR. Small subunit (SSU) rDNA for the myxosporean was amplified and was found to be most similar (92%) to that of another hyperparasitic myxosporean from a gill monogenean from Japan and to numerous multivalvulidan myxosporeans from the genus Kudoa (89-91%). Phylogenetic analyses placed the hyperparasite sequence basally to clades containing Kudoa, Unicapsula and Sphaerospora. Conclusions The myxosporean infecting the gill monogenean, Diplectanocotyla gracilis, from the Indo-Pacific tarpon, Megalops cyprinoides, is described as a new species, Myxidium incomptavermi, based on a histozoic development in the monogenean host and its phylogenetic placement. We have demonstrated for the first time that a myxosporean hyperparasite of gill monogeneans is detectable in the fish host. However, myxospores could not be isolated

  1. A polymorphism in a phosphotyrosine signalling motif of CD229 (Ly9, SLAMF3) alters SH2 domain binding and T-cell activation.

    PubMed

    Margraf, Stefanie; Garner, Lee I; Wilson, Timothy J; Brown, Marion H

    2015-11-01

    Signalling lymphocyte activation molecule (SLAM) family members regulate activation and inhibition in the innate and adaptive immune systems. Genome-wide association studies identified their genetic locus (1q23) as highly polymorphic and associated with susceptibility to systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Here we show that the Val602 variant of the non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs509749 in the SLAM family member CD229 (Ly9, SLAMF3) has a two-fold lower affinity compared with the SLE-associated Met602 variant for the small adaptor protein SAP. Comparison of the two variants in T-cell lines revealed the Val602 variant to be significantly more highly expressed than CD229 Met602 . Activation was diminished in cells expressing CD229 Val602 compared with CD229 Met602 as measured by up-regulation of CD69. There was no correlation between homozygosity at rs509749 and activation in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from healthy donors. These findings identify potential mechanisms by which a single SNP can perturb fine-tuning in the immune system with significant functional consequences. PMID:26221972

  2. Prognostic Significance of CREB-Binding Protein and CD81 Expression in Primary High Grade Non-Muscle Invasive Bladder Cancer: Identification of Novel Biomarkers for Bladder Cancer Using Antibody Microarray.

    PubMed

    Lee, Myung-Shin; Kim, Joo Heon; Lee, Ji-Su; Yun, Seok Joong; Kim, Wun-Jae; Ahn, Hanjong; Park, Jinsung

    2015-01-01

    High-grade (HG) bladder cancers (BCs) are genetically unstable and have an unpredictable course. The identification of prognostic factors in HG non-muscle invasive BC (NMIBC) is crucial for improving patients' quality of life and preventing BC-specific mortality. Here, we used an antibody microarray (AbM) to identify novel candidate biomarkers in primary HG NMIBC and validated the prognostic significance of the candidate biomarkers. Three pairs of tissue samples from primary HG NMIBC and normal urothelium were analyzed using an AbM kit containing 656 antibodies, and differentially expressed proteins were identified. Among the 42 upregulated and 14 downregulated proteins with statistical significance in BC tissues, CREB-binding protein and CD81 were selected as representative upregulated and downregulated candidate biomarkers, respectively. We then validated the expression of these candidate biomarkers in primary human urothelial cells and BC cell lines by western blotting and immunofluorescence assays, and the results were consistent with the AbM expression profiles. Additionally, Kaplan-Meier survival using immunohistochemical data from an independent primary HG NMIBC cohort comprising 113 patients showed that expression of the 2 biomarkers was significantly associated with recurrence-free and progression-free survival. In multivariate analysis, the 2 biomarkers remained significant predictors for recurrence-free survival. Taken together, our findings suggest that expression of CREB-binding protein and CD81 in BC tissue specimens may have prognostic value in patients with primary HG NMIBC. PMID:25915404

  3. Heavy metals distribution in muscle, liver, kidney and gill of European catfish (Silurus glanis) from Italian Rivers.

    PubMed

    Squadrone, S; Prearo, M; Brizio, P; Gavinelli, S; Pellegrino, M; Scanzio, T; Guarise, S; Benedetto, A; Abete, M C

    2013-01-01

    The accumulation of heavy metals in freshwaters has direct consequences to man and ecosystem. Thus, in this study, the concentrations of mercury, cadmium, lead, arsenic and chromium in organs of the predator European catfish (Silurus glanis) were investigated. Samples were collected annually in five sites covering the area of the Po River (North Italy) between 2007 and 2009. Metals were differently distributed in the various organs, the highest concentrations of Hg were found in muscle and liver, Cd in kidney, Pb in gill and liver, as in muscle, and of Cr in gill and liver. Our survey found Hg exceeding the Maximum Levels (MLs) of 0.5 ppm in 18% of samples, while Pb and Cd were lower than the MLs set by European regulations in muscle tissues (1881/2006/EC and 629/2008/EC). Hg concentrations were significantly related to sampling stations studied, according to the presence of many industrial activities in the catchment area of Bormida and Tanaro Rivers. The finding that Hg did not fit food fish legislation limits indicated that S. glanis flesh might not be utilised for human consumption. A close monitoring of metals pollution is strongly recommended especially in piscivorous fish, cause their bioaccumulation capacity. PMID:22901372

  4. Binding of sperm protein Izumo1 and its egg receptor Juno drives Cd9 accumulation in the intercellular contact area prior to fusion during mammalian fertilization.

    PubMed

    Chalbi, Myriam; Barraud-Lange, Virginie; Ravaux, Benjamin; Howan, Kevin; Rodriguez, Nicolas; Soule, Pierre; Ndzoudi, Arnaud; Boucheix, Claude; Rubinstein, Eric; Wolf, Jean Philippe; Ziyyat, Ahmed; Perez, Eric; Pincet, Frédéric; Gourier, Christine

    2014-10-01

    Little is known about the molecular mechanisms that induce gamete fusion during mammalian fertilization. After initial contact, adhesion between gametes only leads to fusion in the presence of three membrane proteins that are necessary, but insufficient, for fusion: Izumo1 on sperm, its receptor Juno on egg and Cd9 on egg. What happens during this adhesion phase is a crucial issue. Here, we demonstrate that the intercellular adhesion that Izumo1 creates with Juno is conserved in mouse and human eggs. We show that, along with Izumo1, egg Cd9 concomitantly accumulates in the adhesion area. Without egg Cd9, the recruitment kinetics of Izumo1 are accelerated. Our results suggest that this process is conserved across species, as the adhesion partners, Izumo1 and its receptor, are interchangeable between mouse and human. Our findings suggest that Cd9 is a partner of Juno, and these discoveries allow us to propose a new model of the molecular mechanisms leading to gamete fusion, in which the adhesion-induced membrane organization assembles all key players of the fusion machinery. PMID:25209248

  5. Analysis of FcR non-binding anti-CD3 mAb in humanized mice identifies novel human gut tropic cells with regulatory function that are found in patients

    PubMed Central

    Waldron-Lynch, Frank; Henegariu, Octavian; Deng, Songyan; Preston-Hurlburt, Paula; Tooley, James; Flavell, Richard; Herold, Kevan C.

    2014-01-01

    The development and optimization of immune therapies in patients has been hampered by the lack of preclinical models in which their effects on human immune cells can be studied. As a result, observations that have been made in preclinical studies have suggested mechanisms of drug action in murine models that may not be confirmed in clinical studies. We have utilized a humanized mouse reconstituted with human hematopoetic stem cells to circumvent these limitations. We have studied the effects of teplizumab in this model, a Fc receptor non-binding humanized monoclonal anti-CD3 antibody that has been used to treat patients with Type 1 diabetes mellitus. A novel mechanism of action was identified where human gut tropic CCR6+ T cells leave the circulation and secondary lymph organs and migrate to the small intestine. They become producers of IL-10 which can be detected in the peripheral circulation. Blockade of migration of T cells to the small intestine by natalizumab abolishes the treatment effects of teplizumab. Direct translation of these findings was possible in patients with Type 1 diabetes treated with teplizumab since we found there is increased expression of IL-10 by CD4+CD25highCCR6+FoxP3 cells when they emerge into the peripheral circulation. These findings demonstrate that humanized mice may be used to identify novel immunologic mechanisms that occur in patients treated with immune modulators. PMID:22277969

  6. Modulation of HIV Binding to Epithelial Cells and HIV Transfer from Immature Dendritic Cells to CD4 T Lymphocytes by Human Lactoferrin and its Major Exposed LF-33 Peptide

    PubMed Central

    Carthagena, Laetitia; Becquart, Pierre; Hocini, Hakim; Kazatchkine, Michel D; Bouhlal, Hicham; Belec, Laurent

    2011-01-01

    Lactoferrin (LF), a multifunctional molecule present in human secretions, has potent inhibitory activities against human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). The aim of the study was to evaluate whether human LF (hLF) and its exposed domain LF-33 represented by the peptide (LF-33-GRRRRSVQWCAVSQPEATKCFQWQRNMRKVRGP) involved in LF-HIV gag binding and endotoxines neutralization, may inhibit early steps of HIV mucosal transmission. Human LF and the peptide LF-33 inhibited the attachment of primary X4-tropic HIV-1NDK and R5-tropic HIV-1JR-CSF strains to human endometrial (HEC-1) and colorectal (HT-29) CD4-negative epithelial cells, the purified hLF being more potent (up to 80%) than the LF-33 peptide. In addition, the hLF, but not the LF-33 peptide, inhibited up to 40% the transfer in trans of HIV-1JR-CSF and HIV-1NDK, from immature dendritic cells to CD4 T lymphocytes, likely in a DC-SIGN-dependent manner. Altogether, these findings demonstrate that hLF can interfere with HIV-1 mucosal transmission by blocking virus attachment to epithelial cells and by inhibiting virus transfer from dendritic cells to CD4 T cells, two crucial steps of HIV dissemination from mucosae to lymphoid tissue. PMID:21660187

  7. Inhibition of CD62L+ T-cell response in vitro via a novel sulfo-glycolipid, beta-SQAG9 liposome that binds to CD62L molecule on the cell surface.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Yoshiteru; Sahara, Hiroeki; Takenouchi, Mika; Matsumoto, Yoshitaka; Imai, Akihito; Fujita, Tatsuya; Tamura, Yasuaki; Takahashi, Nobuaki; Gasa, Shinsei; Matsumoto, Kenjiro; Ohta, Keisuke; Sugawara, Fumio; Sakaguchi, Kengo; Jimbow, Kowichi; Sato, Noriyuki

    2004-01-01

    We previously reported that synthetic sulfo-glycolipid, 3-O-(6-deoxy-6-sulfono-beta-D-glucopyranosyl)-1,2-di-O-acylglycerol (beta-SQDG(18:0)) which was deduced from sulfonoquinovosyl-diacylglycerols of sea urchin possessed immunosuppressive effects, such as human mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR) and skin allograft in rat, and that these effects were caused by contact inhibition between T-cells and antigen presenting cells (APCs). Here, we investigated the mechanism of these immunosuppressive effects on human MLR by beta-SQAG9 which had been newly synthesized from beta-SQDG(18:0) to improve structural stability in water solution. CD62L+ T-cells in peripheral blood predominantly respond to APCs, and beta-SQAG9 inhibited the response of CD62L+ T-cell subset in human allogeneic MLR. Surprisingly, it was demonstrated that beta-SQAG9 bound to L- and P-selectin (CD62L and P) molecule in vitro. Meanwhile, beta-SQAG9 efficiently formed liposome structure and bound to L-selectin on the cell surface of CD62L+ T-cell subset but might not be incorporated into the cells. Because the immunosuppressive effects of beta-SQAG9 disappeared when beta-SQAG9 liposome was changed to soluble form by detergent, the liposome structure of beta-SQAG9 was presumed to be essential for these effects. These findings suggested beta-SQAG9 to be a novel drug with a unique immunosuppressive action. PMID:15922721

  8. Aluminum bioconcentration at the gill surface of juvenile Atlantic salmon in acidic media

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkinson, K.J.; Campbell, P.G.C. . INRS-Eau)

    1993-11-01

    Aluminum uptake by Atlantic salmon was examined in the laboratory at pH 4.5, under conditions similar to those found in running waters on the Canadian Precambrian Shield during spring snowmelt. Gill uptake of Al was slow, approaching steady state only after 3 d of exposure. The greatest fraction of gill-associated Al was sorbed not to the gill surface itself, but to the gill mucus. Mucus appears to retard Al transport from solution to the membrane surface, thus delaying the acute biological response of the fish. Strongly associated gill [Al] was never greater than 10% of total gill Al in the early stages of the experiment indicated that this Al fraction could eventually exceed 50% of the total gill Al. In contrast to uptake, depuration of Al was extremely rapid; total gill [Al] of fish exposed to Al (pH 4.5) for 2 d decreased by 60% after only 2 h in an Al-free medium. The effect of fluoride complexation on Al bioconcentration was also examined. For equivalent Al[sup 3]+ concentrations, sorption of Al to the gill surface was higher in the presence of fluoride than in its absence, which suggests the formation of mixed ligand [F-Al-L-gill] complexes at the gill surface.

  9. Salmon Gill Poxvirus, the Deepest Representative of the Chordopoxvirinae

    PubMed Central

    Yutin, Natalya; Tengs, Torstein; Senkevich, Tania; Koonin, Eugene; Rønning, Hans Petter; Alarcon, Marta; Ylving, Sonja; Lie, Kai-Inge; Saure, Britt; Tran, Linh; Dale, Ole Bendik

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Poxviruses are large DNA viruses of vertebrates and insects causing disease in many animal species, including reptiles, birds, and mammals. Although poxvirus-like particles were detected in diseased farmed koi carp, ayu, and Atlantic salmon, their genetic relationships to poxviruses were not established. Here, we provide the first genome sequence of a fish poxvirus, which was isolated from farmed Atlantic salmon. In the present study, we used quantitative PCR and immunohistochemistry to determine aspects of salmon gill poxvirus disease, which are described here. The gill was the main target organ where immature and mature poxvirus particles were detected. The particles were detected in detaching, apoptotic respiratory epithelial cells preceding clinical disease in the form of lethargy, respiratory distress, and mortality. In moribund salmon, blocking of gas exchange would likely be caused by the adherence of respiratory lamellae and epithelial proliferation obstructing respiratory surfaces. The virus was not found in healthy salmon or in control fish with gill disease without apoptotic cells, although transmission remains to be demonstrated. PCR of archival tissue confirmed virus infection in 14 cases with gill apoptosis in Norway starting from 1995. Phylogenomic analyses showed that the fish poxvirus is the deepest available branch of chordopoxviruses. The virus genome encompasses most key chordopoxvirus genes that are required for genome replication and expression, although the gene order is substantially different from that in other chordopoxviruses. Nevertheless, many highly conserved chordopoxvirus genes involved in viral membrane biogenesis or virus-host interactions are missing. Instead, the salmon poxvirus carries numerous genes encoding unknown proteins, many of which have low sequence complexity and contain simple repeats suggestive of intrinsic disorder or distinct protein structures. IMPORTANCE Aquaculture is an increasingly important global

  10. Procedures for the reconstruction, primary culture and experimental use of rainbow trout gill epithelia.

    PubMed

    Schnell, Sabine; Stott, Lucy C; Hogstrand, Christer; Wood, Chris M; Kelly, Scott P; Pärt, Peter; Owen, Stewart F; Bury, Nic R

    2016-03-01

    This protocol describes how to reconstruct and culture the freshwater rainbow trout gill epithelium on flat permeable membrane supports within cell culture inserts. The protocol describes gill cell isolation, cultured gill epithelium formation, maintenance, monitoring and preparation for use in experimental procedures. To produce a heterogeneous gill epithelium, as seen in vivo, seeding of isolated gill cells twice over a 2-d period is required. As a consequence, this is termed the double-seeded insert technique. Approximately 5-12 d after cell isolation and seeding, preparations develop electrically tight gill epithelia that can withstand freshwater on the apical cell surface. The system can be used to study freshwater gill physiology, and it is a humane alternative for toxicity testing, bioaccumulation studies and environmental water quality monitoring. PMID:26866792

  11. Light microscopic characterization of glycoconjugates in secretory cells of the carp (Cyprinus carpio) gill epithelium.

    PubMed

    Hidalgo, J; Velasco, A; Sánchez Aguayo, I; Amores, P

    1987-01-01

    Secretory products of granular and mucous cells in the gill epithelium of the carp, Cyprinus carpio, were distinguished by their cytochemical reactions with peroxidase-labelled lectins and with the galactose oxidase (GO)-Schiff reagents. Secretory products of granular cells reacted with lectins from Triticum vulgaris (WGA), Arachis hypogaea (PNA), Dolichos biflorus (DBA), Glycine max (SAB), and Lotus tetragonolobus (LTA). They also reacted with GO-Schiff reagents. After sialic acid cleavage with HCl, new binding sites for DBA and SBA appeared, suggesting the terminal sequence sialic acid-N-acetylgalactosamine (SA-GalNAc) for the secretion of this cell type. In mucous cells, binding sites for WGA, DBA, and SBA and, after acid hydrolysis, binding sites for PNA and a positive GO-Schiff reaction were detected. The terminal trisaccharide sialic acid-galactose (beta 1-3)-N-acetylgalactosamine (SA-Gal-GalNAc) is proposed for the secretion of mucous cells. These cytochemical differences are discussed in light of the involvement of both cell types in fish mucus elaboration. PMID:2449406

  12. An improved girthometer for studies of gill net selectivity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wydoski, Richard S.; Wolfert, David R.

    1968-01-01

    Gill nets are effective for collecting samples of many fish species. These nets may be highly selective in their catch, depending on the mesh size or sizes used and on the size distribution and body shape of the fish in the population. Early studies related mesh selectivity to length or, in a few instances, to length and weight. Later studies showed that the selectivity of gill nets was related more closely to the girth of the fish than to the length, weight, or a combination of these. The girthometer presented here was designed for rapid and accurate measurement of the fish girth. Both speed and accuracy are important when very large numbers of fish are sampled for mesh-selectivity studies. It is also important that a girthometer be sturdy and rigid enough to provide accurate measurements in spite of rough handling and difficult working conditions.

  13. Novel humanized anti-CD20 antibody BM-ca binds to a unique epitope and exerts stronger cellular activity than others

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Hideaki; Matsunaga, Yuka; Uchiyama, Yumiko; Nagura, Kenji; Komatsu, Yasuhiko

    2013-01-01

    Cellular activity of BM-ca, a novel humanized anti-CD20 antibody, was quantitatively compared with that of two other anti-CD20 antibodies used for clinical practice, rituximab and ofatumumab. The results of a complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC) assay revealed that the strongest antibody was ofatumumab, followed by BM-ca, with rituximab being the weakest. Ofatumumab and BM-ca were effective not only against rituximab-sensitive SU-DHL-4 cells but also against rituximab-resistant RC-K8 cells. In an antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) assay, although the effective concentrations against SU-DHL-4 cells were almost the same among these three antibodies, the maximum cytotoxic level was the highest for BM-ca. In an anti-cell proliferation assay using SU-DHL-4 cells, BM-ca was the most effective and ofatumumab, the weakest. Against RC-K8 cells, only BM-ca was effective. When combined with each of four cancer chemotherapeutics (prednisolone, vincristine, hydroxydaunorubicin, and cisplatin), BM-ca exerted the most effective combinatorial anti-cell proliferation activity. To assess the in vivo effect of BM-ca, we intravenously administered BM-ca into cynomolgus monkeys and found that the peripheral B-cell levels did not decrease in half of the animals. Sequencing of cDNA encoding CD20 of cynomolgus monkeys revealed that the responders and nonresponders had Leu/Pro (hetero) and Leu/Leu (homo) at amino acid (a.a.) position 160, respectively, suggesting that the epitope recognized by BM-ca was around this a.a. By analyzing reactivity to synthetic peptides, the epitope recognized by BM-ca was estimated to be a.a.'s 156–166, not shared with rituximab and ofatumumab. These results suggest BM-ca to be a promising anti-CD20 antibody having superior properties and recognizing a unique epitope. PMID:23634281

  14. Synthetic, structural and kinetic studies on the binding of cyclohexane-1,2-bis(4-methyl-3-thiosemicarbazone) to divalent metal ions (Co, Ni, Cu, Zn or Cd).

    PubMed

    Al-Karawi, Ahmed Jasim M; Clegg, William; Harrington, Ross W; Henderson, Richard A

    2009-01-21

    The reactions of cyclohexane-1,2-bis(4-methyl-3-thiosemicarbazone) (CHMTSC) with MCl2 (M = Co, Ni, Cu or Zn) and Cd(NO3)2 have been shown to produce complexes in which the thiosemicarbazone has been doubly deprotonated [[M(CHMTSC - 2H+)] (M = Co, Ni or Ni)], analogous to those reported earlier with other Schiff base thiosemicarbazones. However, with ZnCl2 and Cd(NO3)2, the complexes isolated are [ZnCl(CHMTSC)]Cl and [Cd(NO3)(CHMTSC)]NO3, containing the protonated forms of the ligand, which have been characterised by X-ray crystallography, as has free CHMTSC. The kinetics of the reactions between CHMTSC and all the various metal salts have been determined by stopped-flow spectrophotometry. In all cases, the reactions are complete on the seconds timescale. The reactions exhibit a first-order dependence on the concentration of metal salt and a first-order dependence on the concentration of CHMTSC. The thermodynamic and kinetic factors influencing the protonation state of the coordinated thiosemicarbazone are discussed. PMID:19122915

  15. Metal (Ag, Cd, Cu, Ni, Tl, and Zn) Binding to Cytosolic Biomolecules in Field-Collected Larvae of the Insect Chaoborus.

    PubMed

    Rosabal, Maikel; Mounicou, Sandra; Hare, Landis; Campbell, Peter G C

    2016-03-15

    We characterized the biomolecules involved in handling cytosolic metals in larvae of the phantom midge (Chaoborus) collected from five mining-impacted lakes by determining the distribution of Ag, Cd, Cu, Ni, Tl, and Zn among pools of various molecular weights (HMW: high molecular weight, >670-40 kDa; MMW: medium molecular weight, 40-<1.3 kDa; LMW: low molecular weight, <1.3 kDa). Appreciable concentrations of nonessential metals were found in the potentially metal-sensitive HMW (Ag and Ni) and LMW (Tl) pools, whereas the MMW pool, which includes metallothioneins (MTs) and metallothionein-like proteins and peptides (MTLPs), appears to be involved in Ag and Cd detoxification. Higher-resolution fractionation of the heat-stable protein (HSP) fraction revealed further differences in the partitioning of nonessential metals (i.e., Ag = Cd ≠ Ni ≠ Tl). These results provide unprecedented details about the metal-handling strategies employed by a metal-tolerant, freshwater animal in a field situation. PMID:26886407

  16. Analysis of human CD36 gene sequence alterations in the oxidized low-density lipoprotein-binding region using denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Rać, Monika Ewa; Suchy, Janina; Kurzawski, Grzegorz; Safranow, Krzysztof; Jakubowska, Katarzyna; Olszewska, Maria; Garanty-Bogacka, Barbara; Rać, Michał; Poncyljusz, Wojciech; Chlubek, Dariusz

    2010-08-01

    Denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography (DHPLC) has been employed as a prescreening tool to reduce the amount of DNA sequencing. It could be a simple and cost-effective screening method for mutations and polymorphisms in exons 4, 5, and 6 of the CD36 gene, which encode the protein region responsible for the removal of oxidized low-density lipoprotein. Genomic DNA was isolated from 306 Caucasian infants of Polish origin. Six single-nucleotide substitutions were detected by DHPLC and confirmed by direct sequencing. The A591T, G550A, and C572T alterations have not been described so far. Each of two nonsynonymous substitutions (Asp184Asn, Pro191Leu) was found in one subject (0.2% minor allele frequency). The results suggest that nonsynonymous alterations in the analyzed CD36 region are rare in Caucasians. DHPLC is a specific and cost-effective technique that may prove to be particularly useful for the identification of polymorphisms and mutations in the CD36 gene. PMID:20722468

  17. Enhanced habit formation in Gilles de la Tourette syndrome.

    PubMed

    Delorme, Cécile; Salvador, Alexandre; Valabrègue, Romain; Roze, Emmanuel; Palminteri, Stefano; Vidailhet, Marie; de Wit, Sanne; Robbins, Trevor; Hartmann, Andreas; Worbe, Yulia

    2016-02-01

    Tics are sometimes described as voluntary movements performed in an automatic or habitual way. Here, we addressed the question of balance between goal-directed and habitual behavioural control in Gilles de la Tourette syndrome and formally tested the hypothesis of enhanced habit formation in these patients. To this aim, we administered a three-stage instrumental learning paradigm to 17 unmedicated and 17 antipsychotic-medicated patients with Gilles de la Tourette syndrome and matched controls. In the first stage of the task, participants learned stimulus-response-outcome associations. The subsequent outcome devaluation and 'slip-of-action' tests allowed evaluation of the participants' capacity to flexibly adjust their behaviour to changes in action outcome value. In this task, unmedicated patients relied predominantly on habitual, outcome-insensitive behavioural control. Moreover, in these patients, the engagement in habitual responses correlated with more severe tics. Medicated patients performed at an intermediate level between unmedicated patients and controls. Using diffusion tensor imaging on a subset of patients, we also addressed whether the engagement in habitual responding was related to structural connectivity within cortico-striatal networks. We showed that engagement in habitual behaviour in patients with Gilles de la Tourette syndrome correlated with greater structural connectivity within the right motor cortico-striatal network. In unmedicated patients, stronger structural connectivity of the supplementary motor cortex with the sensorimotor putamen predicted more severe tics. Overall, our results indicate enhanced habit formation in unmedicated patients with Gilles de la Tourette syndrome. Aberrant reinforcement signals to the sensorimotor striatum may be fundamental for the formation of stimulus-response associations and may contribute to the habitual behaviour and tics of this syndrome. PMID:26490329

  18. Sex-response differences of immunological and histopathological biomarkers in gill of Prochilodus argenteus from a polluted river in southeast Brazil.

    PubMed

    Procópio, Marcela Santos; Ribeiro, Heder José; Pereira, Luciano Almeida; Oliveira Lopes, Gabriel Augusto; Castro, Antônio Carlos Santana; Rizzo, Elizete; Sato, Yoshimi; Russo, Remo Castro; Corrêa, José Dias

    2014-07-01

    The fish gill is in direct and standing contact with the immediate external environment and, therefore, is highly vulnerable to aquatic pollutants. In this study, Prochilodus argenteus were caught at two different points in São Francisco river. The first point is located near Três Marias dam, while the second is placed downstream the Abaeté river. Chemical approaches showed the presence of metals contamination in the first point. Thus, the main goal of this study was to investigate the possible toxic effects of these contaminants and the likely use of biomarkers on fish gills. Biometric data of length and weight of fish were obtained in order to calculate the condition factor as an organismal biomarker. The histological changes in gills and alterations in mucous and rodlet cells occurrence were detected microscopically and evaluated with quantitative analyses. Myeloperoxidase (MPO) and Eosinophil Peroxidase (EPO) were also assessed in fish gill. The analysis of the water and sediment samples revealed the presence of metals at the two points. As and Cd were detected at higher concentrations at point 1. The presence of lamellar cell hyperplasia, lamellar fusion, lamellar edema and inflammatory foci varied according to the point. Additionally, mucous and rodlet cells and MPO and EPO activities showed variability according to the environmental conditions. Furthermore, with exception of lamellar hyperplasia and eosinophil peroxidase activity, all others parameters showed sex-variation responses. At the first point, male fish showed a chronical inflammation in gills due to the lowest activity of MPO and EPO, as well as low occurrence of inflammatory foci and glycoprotein secretion by mucous cells, while female fish presented an opposite pattern of response to the same environmental conditions. Therefore, we suggest the use of such biomarkers in future monitoring of aquatic systems, taking into account the sex-variation responses. PMID:24795082

  19. Famous people with Gilles de la Tourette syndrome?

    PubMed

    Monaco, Francesco; Servo, Serena; Cavanna, Andrea Eugenio

    2009-12-01

    Virtually no neurologist nor psychiatrist today can be unaware of the diagnosis of Gilles de la Tourette syndrome (GTS). Although the eponymous description by Dr. Georges Gilles de la Tourette was published in 1885, familiarity with this syndrome has been achieved only recently. In this article, the two most renown accounts of exceptional individuals retrospectively diagnosed with GTS are critically analyzed: British lexicographer Samuel Johnson and Austrian musician Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart. In both cases, clinical descriptions have been retrieved from written documents predating Gilles de la Tourette's original publication. The case for Samuel Johnson having GTS is strong, mainly based on Boswell's extensive biographical account. Johnson was reported to have a great range of tics and compulsions, including involuntary utterances, repetitive ejaculations, and echo-phenomena. On the other hand, there is circumstantial evidence that Mozart may have had hyperactivity, restlessness, sudden impulses, odd motor behaviors, echo/palilalia, love of nonsense words, and scatology, the latter being documented in autograph letters ("coprographia"). However, the evidence supporting the core features of GTS, i.e., motor and vocal tics, is rather inconsistent. Thus, GTS seems to be an implausible diagnosis in Mozart's medical history and completely unrelated to his undisputed musical genius. PMID:19913652

  20. Reynolds number effects on gill pumping mechanics in mayfly nymphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sensenig, Andrew; Shultz, Jeffrey; Kiger, Ken

    2006-11-01

    Mayfly nymphs have an entirely aquatic life stage in which they frequently inhabit stagnant water. Nymphs have the capability to generate a ventilation current to compensate for the low oxygen level of the water by beating two linear arrays of plate-like gills that typically line the lateral edge of the abdomen. The characteristic Reynolds number associated with the gill motion changes with animal size, varying over a span of Re = 5 to 100 depending on age and species. The assumption that the system maintains optimal energetic efficiency leads to the prediction that animals transition from rowing to flapping mechanisms with increasing Re, while possibly utilizing a squeeze mechanism to a greater extent at lower Re. To investigate this hypothesis, we capture the motion of the gills through 3D imaging to investigate the effect of Reynolds number on the stroke patterns. PIV is utilized to assess flow rates and viscous dissipation. The effectiveness of the ventilation mechanism at each size has important consequences for the range of oxygen levels, and hence the habitat range, that can be tolerated by that size.

  1. Intracellular Oceanospirillales bacteria inhabit gills of Acesta bivalves.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Sigmund; Duperron, Sébastien; Birkeland, Nils-Kåre; Hovland, Martin

    2010-12-01

    A novel bacterium was discovered in the gills of the large bivalve Acesta excavata (Limidae) from coral reefs on the northeast Atlantic margin near the shelf break of the fishing ground Haltenbanken of Norway, and confirmed present in A. excavata from a rock-wall in the Trondheimsfjord. Purified gill DNA contained one dominant bacterial rRNA operon as indicated from analysis of broad range bacterial PCR amplicons in denaturant gradient gels, in clone libraries and by direct sequencing. The sequences originated from an unknown member of the order Oceanospirillales and its 16S rRNA gene fell within a clade of strictly marine invertebrate-associated Gammaproteobacteria. Visual inspection by fluorescent in situ hybridization and transmission electron microscopy indicated a pleomorphic bacterium with no visible cell wall, located in aggregates inside vacuoles scattered within the gill cells cytoplasm. Intracellular Oceanospirillales exist in bathymodiolin mussels (parasites), Osedax worms and whiteflies (symbionts). This bacterium apparently lives in a specific association with the Acesta. PMID:21044098

  2. GETS (GILL EXCHANGE OF TOXIC SUBSTANCES), A SIMULATION MODEL FOR DYNAMIC BIOACCUMULATION OF NONPOLAR ORGANICS BY GILL EXCHANGE: A USER'S GUIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    A Fortran program that estimates the absorption and depuration of a chemical across fish gills is described. The program is based on a set of diffusion and forced convection differential equations. Gill morphometric parameters are computed by the program via its own internal data...

  3. Main features of the oxidative metabolism in gills and liver of Odontesthes nigricans Richardson (Pisces, Atherinopsidae).

    PubMed

    Lattuca, M E; Malanga, G; Aguilar Hurtado, C; Pérez, A F; Calvo, J; Puntarulo, S

    2009-12-01

    The aim of this work was to study comparatively the oxidative metabolism in gills and liver of a silverside, Odontesthes nigricans, in their natural environment, the Beagle Channel. Oxidative damage to lipids was evaluated by assessing TBARS and lipid radical content, in gills and liver. Gills showed a significantly higher degree of damage than liver. The content of alpha-tocopherol, beta-carotene and catalase activity showed significantly higher values in the liver than in the gills. The ascorbyl radical (A(*)) content showed no significant differences between gills and liver. The ascorbate (AH(-)) content was 12+/-2 and 159+/-28 nmol/mg FW in gills and liver, respectively. Oxidative metabolism at the hydrophilic level was assessed as the ratio A(*)/AH(-). The ratio A(*)/AH(-) was significantly different between organs, (6+/-2)10(-5) and (5+/-2)10(-6), for the gills and the liver, respectively. Both, lipid radical content/alpha-tocopherol content and lipid radical content/beta-carotene content ratios were significantly higher in gills as compared to the values recorded for the liver, suggesting an increased situation of oxidative stress condition in the lipid phase of the gills. Taken as a whole, the O. nigricans liver exhibited a better control of oxidative damage than the gills, allowing minimization of intracellular damage when exposed to environmental stressing conditions. PMID:19706336

  4. Morphology and ventilatory function of gills in the carpet shark family Parascylliidae (Elasmobranchii, Orectolobiformes).

    PubMed

    Goto, Tomoaki; Shiba, Yojiro; Shibagaki, Kazuhiro; Nakaya, Kazuhiro

    2013-06-01

    We examined gill morphology and ventilatory function in the carpet shark family Parascylliidae using 14 preserved specimens of Parascyllium ferrugineum, P. variolatum, P. collare and Cirrhoscyllium japonicum, and two live specimens of P. ferrugineum and P. variolatum. Morphological examinations revealed eight morphological characteristics related to the fifth gill, based on comparisons with other elasmobranchs, viz. large fifth gill slit without gill filaments, anatomical modifications in the fourth ceratobranchial cartilage and coraco-branchialis muscle, and the hypaxialis muscle associated with the fifth gill arch. Ventilation examinations using dyed seawater and prey items showed different water flows through the gill slits for respiration and prey-capture actions. For respiration, water sucked into the mouth was expelled equally through the first to fourth gill slits via a "double-pump" action, there being no involvement of the fifth gill slit. In prey-capture, however, water sucked into the mouth was discharged only via the widely opened fifth gill slit. This form of water flow is similar to that in other benthic suction-feeding sharks (e.g., Chiloscyllium plagiosum), except for the active water discharge by wide expansion and contraction of the fifth parabranchial cavity. The latter is dependent upon the morphological modifications of the fourth and fifth gill arches, derived phylogenetically as a mechanistic suction specialization in Parascylliidae. PMID:23721470

  5. Functional morphology of the gills of the shortfin mako, Isurus oxyrinchus, a lamnid shark.

    PubMed

    Wegner, Nicholas C; Sepulveda, Chugey A; Olson, Kenneth R; Hyndman, Kelly A; Graham, Jeffrey B

    2010-08-01

    This study examines the functional gill morphology of the shortfin mako, Isurus oxyrinchus, to determine the extent to which its gill structure is convergent with that of tunas for specializations required to increase gas exchange and withstand the forceful branchial flow induced by ram ventilation. Mako gill structure is also compared to that of the blue shark, Prionace glauca, an epipelagic species with lower metabolic requirements and a reduced dependence on fast, continuous swimming to ventilate the gills. The gill surface area of the mako is about one-half that of a comparably sized tuna, but more than twice that of the blue shark and other nonlamnid shark species. Mako gills are also distinguished from those of other sharks by shorter diffusion distances and a more fully developed diagonal blood-flow pattern through the gill lamellae, which is similar to that found in tunas. Although the mako lacks the filament and lamellar fusions of tunas and other ram-ventilating teleosts, its gill filaments are stiffened by the elasmobranch interbranchial septum, and the lamellae appear to be stabilized by one to two vascular sacs that protrude from the lamellar surface and abut sacs of adjacent lamellae. Vasoactive agents and changes in vascular pressure potentially influence sac size, consequently effecting lamellar rigidity and both the volume and speed of water through the interlamellar channels. However, vascular sacs also occur in the blue shark, and no other structural elements of the mako gill appear specialized for ram ventilation. Rather, the basic elasmobranch gill design and pattern of branchial circulation are both conserved. Despite specializations that increase mako gill area and efficacy relative to other sharks, the basic features of the elasmobranch gill design appear to have limited selection for a larger gill surface area, and this may ultimately constrain mako aerobic performance in comparison to tunas. PMID:20623624

  6. Pioneers of movement disorders: Georges Gilles de la Tourette.

    PubMed

    Krämer, H; Daniels, C

    2004-06-01

    Georges Albert Edouard Brutus Gilles de la Tourette (1857-1904), a French neurologist and pupil of Jean Martin Charcot at the Salpêtrière hospital in Paris, has gained common recognition through his description of the 'Maladie des Tics'. This complex neuropsychiatric disorder, later known as the 'Tourette's syndrome', nowadays is accepted as a specific entity of movement disorders. Gilles had started working under Charcot (1825-1893), the first physician to occupy a designated chair of neurology of neuropsychiatric history, in 1884. Then the Salpêtrière hospital was a centre of intensive research with an emphasis on hysteria and hypnosis. Tourette took an interest in hysteria, but also dedicated himself to various other neuropsychiatric disorders and to neuropathology. He published scientific works on epilepsia, neurasthenia and syphilitic myelitis. Although he devoted much time to his neuropsychiatric research and the publication of articles in medical journals, his career did not make significant progress, despite Charcot's unrestricted support. One reason was, that he disregarded questions, answers and problems, which were outside his interest fields. Hence, he was accused for having acquired an extremely filtered and one-sided knowledge. Also, his alienated and critical behaviour, which had not helped him to find many friends over the years, prevented him from professional promotion. In 1893 an assassination attempt on Gilles de la Tourette raised considerable public interest: Gilles was shot in his appartement in the Rue de l'Université 39 by a young woman, who had been his patient in the Salpêtrière and who claimed that she had been hypnotized without her agreement and thereby had lost her mental health. However, the patient was diagnosed with a disease nowadays called paranoid schizophrenia and therefore hypnosis was not attributed to any part of the disease. Due to episodes of melancholia and phases of delusions of grandeur and megalomania Gilles de

  7. Cell signaling and ion transport across the fish gill epithelium.

    PubMed

    Evans, David H

    2002-08-01

    A large array of circulating and local signaling agents modulate transport of ions across the gill epithelium of fishes by either affecting transport directly or by altering the size and distribution of transporting cells in the epithelium. In some cases, these transport effects are in addition to cardiovascular effects of the same agents, which may affect the perfusion pathways in the gill vasculature and, in turn, affect epithelial transport indirectly. Prolactin is generally considered to function in freshwater, because it is the only agent that allows survival of some hypophysectomized fish species in freshwater. It appears to function by either reducing branchial permeability, Na,K-activated ATPase activity, or reducing the density of chloride cells. Cortisol was initially considered to produce virtually opposite effects (e.g., stimulation of Na,K-activated ATPase and of chloride cell size and density), but more recent studies have found that this steroid stimulates ionic uptake in freshwater fishes, as well as the activity of H-ATPase, an enzyme thought to be central to ionic uptake. Thus, cortisol may function in both high and low salinities. Growth hormone and insulin-like growth factor appear to act synergistically to affect ion regulation in seawater fishes, stimulating both Na,K-activated ATPase and Na-K-2Cl co-transporter activity, and chloride cell size, independent of their effects on growth. Some of the effects of the GH-IGF axis may be via stimulation of the number of cortisol receptors. Thyroid hormones appear to affect seawater ion regulation indirectly, by stimulating the GH-IGF axis. Natriuretic peptides were initially thought to stimulate gill ionic extrusion, but recent studies have not corroborated this finding, so it appears that the major mode of action of these peptides may be reduction of salt loading by inhibition of oral ingestion and intestinal ionic uptake. Receptors for both arginine vasotocin and angiotensin have been described in

  8. Silver nanoparticles inhibit fish gill cell proliferation in protein-free culture medium.

    PubMed

    Yue, Yang; Behra, Renata; Sigg, Laura; Schirmer, Kristin

    2016-10-01

    While short-term exposures of vertebrate cells, such as from fish, can be performed in defined, serum-free media, long-term cultures generally require addition of growth factors and proteins, normally supplied with a serum supplement. However, proteins are known to alter nanoparticle properties by binding to nanoparticles. Therefore, in order to be able to study nanoparticle-cell interactions for extended periods, the rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) gill cell line, RTgill-W1, was adapted to proliferate in a commercial, serum-free medium, InVitrus VP-6. The newly adapted cell strain was named RTgill-W1-pf (protein free). These cells proliferate at a speed similar to the RTgill-W1 cells cultured in a fully supplemented medium containing 5% fetal bovine serum. As well, they were successfully cryopreserved in liquid nitrogen and fully recovered after thawing. Yet, senescence set in after about 10 passages in InVitrus VP-6 medium, revealing that this medium cannot fully support long-term culture of the RTgill-W1 strain. The RTgill-W1-pf cell line was subsequently applied to investigate the effect of silver nanoparticles (AgNP) on cell proliferation over a period of 12 days. Indeed, cell proliferation was inhibited by 10 μM AgNP. This effect correlated with high levels of silver being associated with the cells. The new cell line, RTgill-W1-pf, can serve as a unique representation of the gill cell-environment interface, offering novel opportunities to study nanoparticle-cell interactions without serum protein interference. PMID:27030289

  9. Sequential binding of αvβ3 and ICAM-1 determines fibrin-mediated melanoma capture and stable adhesion to CD11b/CD18 on neutrophils1

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Pu; Ozdemir, Tugba; Chung, Chin-Ying; Robertson, Gavin P.; Dong, Cheng

    2010-01-01

    Fibrin (Fn) deposition defines several type 1 immune responses, including delayed-type hypersensitivity and autoimmunity in which PMNs are involved. Fn monomer and fibrinogen (Fg) are multivalent ligands for a variety of cell receptors during cell adhesion. These cell receptors provide critical linkage between thrombosis, inflammation and cancer metastasis under venous flow conditions. However, the mechanisms of Fn-mediated interactions among immune cells and circulating tumor cells remain elusive. By using a cone-plate viscometer shear assay and dual-color flow cytometry, we demonstrated that soluble Fg and Fn had different abilities to enhance heterotypic aggregation between polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) and Lu1205 melanoma cells in a shear flow, regulated by thrombin levels. In addition, the involvement of integrin αvβ3, Intercellular Adhesion Molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and CD11b/CD18 (Mac-1) in fibrin(ogen)-mediated melanoma-PMN aggregations was explored. Kinetic studies provided evidences that ICAM-1 mediated initial capture of melanoma cells by PMNs, while αvβ3 played a role in sustained adhesion of the two cell types at a shear rate of 62.5 s-1. Quantitative analysis of the melanoma-PMN interactions conducted by a parallel-plate flow chamber assay further revealed that at a shear rate of 20 s-1, αvβ3 had enough contact time to form bonds with Mac-1 via Fn, which could not otherwise occur at a shear rate higher than 62.5 s-1. Our studies have captured a novel finding that leukocytes could be recruited to tumor cells via thrombin-mediated Fn formation within a tumor microenvironment, and αvβ3 and ICAM-1 may participate in multi-step fibrin(ogen)-mediated melanoma cell adhesion within the circulation. PMID:21135163

  10. Binding of recombinant T cell receptor ligands (RTL) to antigen presenting cells prevents upregulation of CD11b and inhibits T cell activation and transfer of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Sushmita; Miller, Lisa; Subramanian, Sandhya; McCarty, Owen J T; Proctor, Thomas; Meza-Romero, Roberto; Huan, Jianya; Burrows, Gregory G; Vandenbark, Arthur A; Offner, Halina

    2010-08-25

    Recombinant T cell ligands (RTLs) ameliorate experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) in an antigen-specific manner. We evaluated effects of RTL401 (I-A(s) alpha1beta1+PLP-139-151) on splenocytes from SJL/J mice with EAE to study RTL-T cell tolerance-inducing mechanisms. RTLs bound to B, macrophages and DCs, through RTL-MHC-alpha1beta1 moiety. RTL binding reduced CD11b expression on splenic macrophages/DC, and RTL401-conditioned macrophages/DC, not B cells, inhibited T cell activation. Reduced ability of RTL- incubated splenocytes to transfer EAE was likely mediated through macrophages/DC, since B cells were unnecessary for RTL treatment of EAE. These results demonstrate a novel pathway of T cell regulation by RTL-bound APCs. PMID:20546940

  11. Binding of recombinant T cell receptor ligands (RTL) to antigen presenting cells prevents upregulation of CD11b and inhibits T cell activation and transfer of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Sushmita; Miller, Lisa; Subramanian, Sandhya; McCarty, Owen; Proctor, Thomas; Meza-Romero, Roberto; Burrows, Gregory G.; Vandenbark, Arthur A.; Offner, Halina

    2010-01-01

    Recombinant T cell ligands (RTLs) ameliorate experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) in antigen specific manner. We evaluated effects of RTL401 (I-As α1β1 + PLP-139-151) on splenocytes from mice with EAE to study RTL- T cell-tolerance-inducing mechanisms. RTLs bound to B, macrophages and DCs, through RTL-MHC-α1β1 moiety. RTL binding reduced CD11b expression on splenic macrophages/DC, and RTL401-conditioned macrophages/DC, not B cells, inhibited T cell activation. Reduced ability of RTL- incubated splenocytes to transfer EAE was likely mediated through macrophages/DC, since B cells were unnecessary for RTL treatment of EAE. These results demonstrate novel pathway of T cell regulation by RTL bound APCs. PMID:20546940

  12. Characterization of CD200 Ectodomain Shedding

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Fang; Khatri, Ismat; Huo, Qiang; Spaner, David E.; Gorczynski, Reginald M.

    2016-01-01

    We have previously reported the existence of a soluble form of CD200 (sCD200) in human plasma, and found sCD200 to be elevated in the plasma of Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL) patients. CLL cells release CD200 at a constitutive level, which could be attenuated partially by ADAM28 silencing. In this study, we further explored mechanisms of CD200 shedding beyond that of ADAM28, and performed biochemical analysis of sCD200 using materials derived from purified CLL cells and Hek293 cells stably transfected with CD200, and antibodies generated specifically against either the extracellular or cytoplasmic regions of CD200. CD200 shedding was enhanced by PMA stimulation, and the loss of cell surface CD200 could be monitored as a reduction in CD200 cell surface expression by flow cytometry, in parallel with an increase in the detection of sCD200 in the supernatant. Western blot analyses and functional studies using CD200R1 expressing Hek293 cells showed that the shed CD200 detected in CLL and Hek293-hCD200 supernatants lacked the cytoplasmic domain of CD200 but retained the functional extracellular domain required for binding to, and phosphorylation of, CD200R. These data confirms that a functionally active CD200 extracellular moiety can be cleaved from the surface of CD200 expressing cells following ectodomain shedding. PMID:27111430

  13. PI3Kδ promotes CD4+ T-cell interactions with antigen-presenting cells by increasing LFA-1 binding to ICAM-1

    PubMed Central

    Garçon, Fabien; Okkenhaug, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Activation of T lymphocytes by peptide/major histocompatibility complex on antigen-presenting cells (APCs) involves dynamic contacts between the two cells, during which T cells undergo marked morphological changes. These interactions are facilitated by integrins. Activation of the T cells increases the binding of the integrin lymphocyte function-associated antigen 1 (LFA-1) expressed by T cells to intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1 and ICAM-2 expressed by APCs. The signalling pathways that control integrin affinities are incompletely defined. The phosphoinositide 3-kinases (PI3Ks) generate second-messenger signalling molecules that control cell growth, proliferation, differentiation and trafficking. Here we show that in T cells, PI3Kδ attenuates the activation of Rac1, but sustains the activation of Rap1. Consequently, PI3Kδ increases LFA-1-dependent adhesion to form stable conjugates with APCs. Increased Rap1 activity and LFA-1 adhesion were only in part mediated by the downstream kinase Akt, suggesting the involvement of additional phosphatidylinositol(3,4,5)P3-binding proteins. These results establish a link between PI3K activity, cytoskeletal changes and integrin binding and help explain the impaired T-cell-dependent immune responses in PI3Kδ-deficient mice. PMID:26740009

  14. PI3Kδ promotes CD4(+) T-cell interactions with antigen-presenting cells by increasing LFA-1 binding to ICAM-1.

    PubMed

    Garçon, Fabien; Okkenhaug, Klaus

    2016-05-01

    Activation of T lymphocytes by peptide/major histocompatibility complex on antigen-presenting cells (APCs) involves dynamic contacts between the two cells, during which T cells undergo marked morphological changes. These interactions are facilitated by integrins. Activation of the T cells increases the binding of the integrin lymphocyte function-associated antigen 1 (LFA-1) expressed by T cells to intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1 and ICAM-2 expressed by APCs. The signalling pathways that control integrin affinities are incompletely defined. The phosphoinositide 3-kinases (PI3Ks) generate second-messenger signalling molecules that control cell growth, proliferation, differentiation and trafficking. Here we show that in T cells, PI3Kδ attenuates the activation of Rac1, but sustains the activation of Rap1. Consequently, PI3Kδ increases LFA-1-dependent adhesion to form stable conjugates with APCs. Increased Rap1 activity and LFA-1 adhesion were only in part mediated by the downstream kinase Akt, suggesting the involvement of additional phosphatidylinositol(3,4,5)P3-binding proteins. These results establish a link between PI3K activity, cytoskeletal changes and integrin binding and help explain the impaired T-cell-dependent immune responses in PI3Kδ-deficient mice. PMID:26740009

  15. Structural characterization of a 39-residue synthetic peptide containing the two zinc binding domains from the HIV-1 p7 nucleocapsid protein by CD and NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Omichinski, J G; Clore, G M; Sakaguchi, K; Appella, E; Gronenborn, A M

    1991-11-01

    A 39-residue peptide (p7-DF) containing the two zinc binding domains of the p7 nucleocapsid protein was prepared by solid-phase peptide synthesis. The solution structure of the peptide was characterized using circular dichroic and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy in both the presence and absence of zinc ions. Circular dichroic spectroscopy indicates that the peptide exhibits a random coil conformation in the absence of zinc but appears to form an ordered structure in the presence of zinc. Two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy indicates that the two zinc binding domains within the peptide form stable, but independent, units upon the addition of 2 equivalents of ZnCl2 per equivalent of peptide. Structure calculations on the basis of nuclear Overhauser (NOE) data indicate that the two zinc binding domains have the same polypeptide fold within the errors of the coordinates (approximately 0.5 A for the backbone atoms, the zinc atoms and the coordinating cysteine and histidine ligands). The linker region (Arg17-Gly23) is characterized by a very limited number of sequential NOEs and the absence of any non-sequential NOEs suggest that this region of polypeptide chain is highly flexible. The latter coupled with the occurrence of a large number of basic residues (four out of seven) in the linker region suggests that it may serve to allow adaptable positioning of the nucleic acid recognition sequences within the protein. PMID:1959614

  16. Production of a complete binary toxin (actin-specific ADP-ribosyltransferase) by Clostridium difficile CD196.

    PubMed Central

    Perelle, S; Gibert, M; Bourlioux, P; Corthier, G; Popoff, M R

    1997-01-01

    A Clostridium difficile isolate was found to produce an actin-specific ADP-ribosyltransferase (CDT) homologous to the enzymatic components of Clostridium perfringens iota toxin and Clostridium spiroforme toxin (M. R. Popoff, E. J. Rubin, D. M. Gill, and P. Boquet, Infect. Immun. 56:2299-2306, 1988). The CDT locus from C. difficile CD196 was cloned and sequenced. It contained two genes (cdtA and cdtB) which display organizations and sequences similar to those of the iota toxin gene. The deduced enzymatic (CDTa) and binding (CDTb) components have 81 and 84% identity, respectively, with the corresponding components of iota toxin. CDTa and CDTb induced actin cytoskeleton alterations similar to those caused by other clostridial binary toxins. The lower level of production of binary toxin by CD196 than of iota toxin by C. perfringens was related to a lower transcript level, possibly due to a promoter region different from that of iota toxin genes. The cdtA and cdtB genes have been detected in 3 of 24 clinical isolates examined, and cdtB alone was found in 2 additional strains. One strain (in addition to CD196) was shown by Western blotting to produce CDTa and CDTb. These results indicate that some C. difficile strains synthesize a binary toxin that could be an additional virulence factor. PMID:9119480

  17. A single amino acid substitution in the C4 region in gp120 confers enhanced neutralization of HIV-1 by modulating CD4 binding sites and V3 loop.

    PubMed

    Ringe, Rajesh; Sharma, Deepak; Zolla-Pazner, Susan; Phogat, Sanjay; Risbud, Arun; Thakar, Madhuri; Paranjape, Ramesh; Bhattacharya, Jayanta

    2011-09-30

    Identification of vulnerability in the HIV-1 envelope (Env) will aid in Env-based vaccine design. We recently found an HIV-1 clade C Env clone (4-2.J45) amplified from a recently infected Indian patient showing exceptional neutralization sensitivity to autologous plasma in contrast to other autologous Envs obtained at the same time point. By constructing chimeric Envs and fine mapping between sensitive and resistant Env clones, we found that substitution of highly conserved isoleucine (I) with methionine (M) (ATA to ATG) at position 424 in the C4 domain conferred enhanced neutralization sensitivity of Env-pseudotyped viruses to autologous and heterologous plasma antibodies. When tested against monoclonal antibodies targeting different sites in gp120 and gp41, Envs expressing M424 showed significant sensitivity to anti-V3 monoclonal antibodies and modestly to sCD4 and b12. Substitution of I424M in unrelated Envs also showed similar neutralization phenotype, indicating that M424 in C4 region induces exposure of neutralizing epitopes particularly in CD4 binding sites and V3 loop. PMID:21851958

  18. Two-iron rubredoxin of Pseudomonas oleovorans: production, stability and characterization of the individual iron-binding domains by optical, CD and NMR spectroscopies.

    PubMed

    Perry, A; Lian, L Y; Scrutton, N S

    2001-02-15

    A minigene encoding the C-terminal domain of the 2Fe rubredoxin of Pseudomonas oleovorans was created from the parental alk G gene contained in the expression plasmid pKK223-3. The vector directed the high-level production of the C-terminal domain of this rubredoxin; a simple procedure was used to purify the recombinant domain in the 1Fe form. The 1Fe form of the C-terminal domain was readily converted into the apoprotein and cadmium forms after precipitation with trichloroacetic acid and resolubilization in the presence or absence of cadmium chloride respectively. In steady-state assays, the recombinant 1Fe C-terminal domain is redox-active and able to transfer electrons from reduced rubredoxin reductase to cytochrome c. The absorption spectrum and dichroic features of the CD spectrum for the iron- and cadmium-substituted C-terminal domain are similar to those reported for the iron- and cadmium-substituted Desulfovibrio gigas rubredoxin [Henehen, Pountney, Zerbe and Vasak (1993) Protein Sci. 2, 1756-1764]. Difference absorption spectroscopy of the cadmium-substituted C-terminal domain revealed the presence of four Gaussian-resolved maxima at 202, 225, 240 and 276 nm; from Jørgensen's electronegativity theory, the 240 nm band is attributable to a CysS-Cd(II) charge-transfer excitation. Attempts to express the N-terminal domain of the 2Fe rubredoxin directly from a minigene were unsuccessful. However, the N-terminal domain was isolated through cleavage of an engineered 2Fe rubredoxin in which a factor Xa proteolysis site had been introduced into the putative interdomain linker. The N-terminal domain is characterized by absorption spectra typical of the 1Fe rubredoxins. The domain is folded as determined by CD and NMR spectroscopies and is redox-active. However, the N-terminal domain is less stable than the isolated C-terminal domain, a finding consistent with the known properties of the full-length 2Fe and cadmium-substituted Ps. oleovorans rubredoxin. PMID

  19. Rapid activation of gill Na+,K+-ATPase in the euryhaline teleost Fundulus heteroclitus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mancera, J.M.; McCormick, S.D.

    2000-01-01

    The rapid activation of gill Na+,K+-ATPase was analyzed in the mummichog (Fundulus heteroclitus) and Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) transferred from low salinity (0.1 ppt) to high salinity (25-35 ppt). In parr and presmolt, Salmo salar gill Na+,K+-ATPase activity started to increase 3 days after transfer. Exposure of Fundulus heteroclitus to 35 ppt seawater (SW) induced a rise in gill Na+,K+-ATPase activity 3 hr after transfer. After 12 hr, the values dropped to initial levels but showed a second significant increase 3 days after transfer. The absence of detergent in the enzyme assay resulted in lower values of gill Na+,K+-ATPase, and the rapid increase after transfer to SW was not observed. Na+,K+-ATPase activity of gill filaments in vitro for 3 hr increased proportionally to the osmolality of the culture medium (600 mosm/kg > 500 mosm/kg > 300 mosm/kg). Osmolality of 800 mosm/kg resulted in lower gill Na+,K+-ATPase activity relative to 600 mosm/kg. Increasing medium osmolality to 600 mosm/kg with mannitol also increased gill Na+,K+-ATPase. Cycloheximide inhibited the increase in gill Na+,K+-ATPase activity observed in hyperosmotic medium in a dose-dependent manner (10-4 M > 10-5 M > 10-6 M). Actinomycin D or bumetanide in the culture (doses of 10-4 M, 10-5 M, and 10-6 M) did not affect gill Na+,K+-ATPase. Injection of fish with actinomycin D prior to gill organ culture, however, prevented the increase in gill Na+,K+-ATPase activity in hyperosmotic media. The results show a very rapid and transitory increase in gill Na+,K+-ATPase activity in the first hours after the transfer of Fundulus heteroclitus to SW that is dependent on translational and transcriptional processes. (C) 2000 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  20. Lagrangian approach to understanding the origin of the gill-kinematics switch in mayfly nymphs.

    PubMed

    Chabreyrie, R; Balaras, E; Abdelaziz, K; Kiger, K

    2014-12-01

    The mayfly nymph breathes under water through an oscillating array of plate-shaped tracheal gills. As the nymph grows, the kinematics of these gills change abruptly from rowing to flapping. The classical fluid dynamics approach to consider the mayfly nymph as a pumping device fails in giving clear reasons for this switch. In order to shed some light on this switch between the two distinct kinematics, we analyze the problem under a Lagrangian viewpoint. We consider that a good Lagrangian transport that effectively distributes and stirs water and dissolved oxygen between and around the gills is the main goal of the gill motion. Using this Lagrangian approach, we are able to provide possible reasons behind the observed switch from rowing to flapping. More precisely, we conduct a series of in silico mayfly nymph experiments, where body shape, as well as gill shapes, structures, and kinematics are matched to those from in vivo. In this paper, we show both qualitatively and quantitatively how the change of kinematics enables better attraction, confinement, and stirring of water charged of dissolved oxygen inside the gills area. We reveal the attracting barriers to transport, i.e., attracting Lagrangian coherent structures, that form the transport skeleton between and around the gills. In addition, we quantify how well the fluid particles are stirred inside the gills area, which by extension leads us to conclude that it will increase the proneness of molecules of dissolved oxygen to be close enough to the gills for extraction. PMID:25615123

  1. Lagrangian approach to understanding the origin of the gill-kinematics switch in mayfly nymphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chabreyrie, R.; Balaras, E.; Abdelaziz, K.; Kiger, K.

    2014-12-01

    The mayfly nymph breathes under water through an oscillating array of plate-shaped tracheal gills. As the nymph grows, the kinematics of these gills change abruptly from rowing to flapping. The classical fluid dynamics approach to consider the mayfly nymph as a pumping device fails in giving clear reasons for this switch. In order to shed some light on this switch between the two distinct kinematics, we analyze the problem under a Lagrangian viewpoint. We consider that a good Lagrangian transport that effectively distributes and stirs water and dissolved oxygen between and around the gills is the main goal of the gill motion. Using this Lagrangian approach, we are able to provide possible reasons behind the observed switch from rowing to flapping. More precisely, we conduct a series of in silico mayfly nymph experiments, where body shape, as well as gill shapes, structures, and kinematics are matched to those from in vivo. In this paper, we show both qualitatively and quantitatively how the change of kinematics enables better attraction, confinement, and stirring of water charged of dissolved oxygen inside the gills area. We reveal the attracting barriers to transport, i.e., attracting Lagrangian coherent structures, that form the transport skeleton between and around the gills. In addition, we quantify how well the fluid particles are stirred inside the gills area, which by extension leads us to conclude that it will increase the proneness of molecules of dissolved oxygen to be close enough to the gills for extraction.

  2. Ca2+ Binding/Permeation via Calcium Channel, CaV1.1, Regulates the Intracellular Distribution of the Fatty Acid Transport Protein, CD36, and Fatty Acid Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Georgiou, Dimitra K; Dagnino-Acosta, Adan; Lee, Chang Seok; Griffin, Deric M; Wang, Hui; Lagor, William R; Pautler, Robia G; Dirksen, Robert T; Hamilton, Susan L

    2015-09-25

    Ca(2+) permeation and/or binding to the skeletal muscle L-type Ca(2+) channel (CaV1.1) facilitates activation of Ca(2+)/calmodulin kinase type II (CaMKII) and Ca(2+) store refilling to reduce muscle fatigue and atrophy (Lee, C. S., Dagnino-Acosta, A., Yarotskyy, V., Hanna, A., Lyfenko, A., Knoblauch, M., Georgiou, D. K., Poché, R. A., Swank, M. W., Long, C., Ismailov, I. I., Lanner, J., Tran, T., Dong, K., Rodney, G. G., Dickinson, M. E., Beeton, C., Zhang, P., Dirksen, R. T., and Hamilton, S. L. (2015) Skelet. Muscle 5, 4). Mice with a mutation (E1014K) in the Cacna1s (α1 subunit of CaV1.1) gene that abolishes Ca(2+) binding within the CaV1.1 pore gain more body weight and fat on a chow diet than control mice, without changes in food intake or activity, suggesting that CaV1.1-mediated CaMKII activation impacts muscle energy expenditure. We delineate a pathway (Cav1.1→ CaMKII→ NOS) in normal skeletal muscle that regulates the intracellular distribution of the fatty acid transport protein, CD36, altering fatty acid metabolism. The consequences of blocking this pathway are decreased mitochondrial β-oxidation and decreased energy expenditure. This study delineates a previously uncharacterized CaV1.1-mediated pathway that regulates energy utilization in skeletal muscle. PMID:26245899

  3. The expression of CD8α discriminates distinct T cell subsets in teleost fish.

    PubMed

    Takizawa, Fumio; Dijkstra, Johannes Martinus; Kotterba, Paul; Korytář, Tomáš; Kock, Holger; Köllner, Bernd; Jaureguiberry, Beltran; Nakanishi, Teruyuki; Fischer, Uwe

    2011-07-01

    CD8, belonging to the TCR complex, is the main marker molecule of CTLs. Although CD8 genes have been detected in many fish species, the analysis of teleost CD8+ cells has been limited because of the lack of antibodies. Using newly established mAbs against rainbow trout CD8α, we found high ratios of CD8α+ cells in trout thymus, gill and intestine, but relatively low abundance in pronephros, spleen and blood. Accordingly, tissue sections revealed many CD8α+ cells in thymus, numerous intra- and subepithelial CD8α+ cells in intestine and gill and few scattered CD8α+ cells in spleen and pronephros. In secondary lymphoid tissues, CD8α+ lymphocytes, which did not react with anti-thrombocyte or anti-IgM mAbs, expressed CD8α, CD8β and TCRα, while Ig and CD4 transcripts were found in CD8α⁻ lymphocytes. In contrast, considerable CD4 expression in CD8α+ thymocytes suggests the presence of double-positive early T cells. Highly expressed TCRγ, LAG3 and CTLA4 in CD8α+ lymphocytes imply that they constitute a heterogeneous population different from found in non-mucosal tissues. PHA stimulation resulted in an up-regulation of CTL effector genes (perforin, granulysin and IFN-γ) in CD8α+ pronephrocytes, while both Th1 (IFN-γ) and Th2 (IL-4/13A) cytokines were up-regulated in CD8α⁻ pronephrocytes. Although the basic characteristics of CD8α+ lymphocytes seem similar in teleost and mammals, features such as the low proportion of teleost CD8α+ lymphocytes in blood and their high abundance in respiratory tissue reveal a unique dynamics and distribution. PMID:21352850

  4. Effects of gill abrasion and experimental infection with Tenacibaculum maritimum on the respiratory physiology of Atlantic salmon Salmo salar affected by amoebic gill disease.

    PubMed

    Powell, Mark D; Harris, James O; Carson, Jeremy; Hill, Jonathan V

    2005-02-28

    The effects of gill abrasion and experimental infection with Tenacibaculum maritimum were assessed in Atlantic salmon Salmo salar with underlying amoebic gill disease. The respiratory and acid-base parameters arterial oxygen tension (P(a)O2), arterial whole blood oxygen content (C(a)O2), arterial pH (pHa), haematocrit and haemoglobin concentrations were measured at intervals over a 48 h recovery period following surgical cannulation of the dorsal aorta. Mortality rates over the recovery period were variable, with gill abrasion and inoculation with T. maritimum causing the highest initial mortality rate and unabraded, uninoculated controls showing the lowest overall mortality rate. Fish with abraded gills tended to show reduced P(a)O2 and lower C(a)O2 compared with unabraded fish. Infection with T. maritimum had no effect on P(a)O2 or C(a)O2. All fish showed an initial alkalosis at 24 h post-surgery/inoculation which was more pronounced in fish inoculated with T. maritimum. There were no significant effects of gill abrasion or infection upon the ratio of oxygen specifically bound to haemoglobin or mean cellular haemoglobin concentration. Histologically, 48 h following surgery, abraded gills showed multifocal hyperplastic lesions with pronounced branchial congestion and telangiectasis, and those inoculated with T. maritimum exhibited focal areas of branchial necrosis and erosion associated with filamentous bacterial mats. All fish examined showed signs of amoebic gill disease with multifocal hyperplastic and spongious lesions with parasome-containing amoeba associated with the gill epithelium. The results suggest that respiratory compromise occurred as a consequence of gill abrasion rather than infection with T. maritimum. PMID:15819432

  5. Six cases of Gilles de la Tourette's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Fernando, S J

    1976-05-01

    Six cases of Gilles de la Tourette's syndrome are discussed in the light of conflicting views on the aetiology of the condition. It is hypothesized that the onset of coprolalia in patients with persistent childhood tics indicates a disturbances of the normal balance between a need for tension relief by swearing and a capacity to control such vocal activity. Some conclusions are drawn on the management of the syndrome by the use of butyrophenones, massed practice of tics, and the promotion of personality development. A flexible approach geared to the individual patient's particular needs is recommended. PMID:1064460

  6. Redox proteomic analysis of mytilus edulis gills: effects of the pharmaceutical diclofenac on a non-target organism.

    PubMed

    Jaafar, Siti Nur Tahirah; Coelho, Ana Varela; Sheehan, David

    2015-10-01

    Veterinary and human pharmaceuticals are an emerging category of chemical pollutants with potential to cause serious toxicity to non-target organisms. Filter-feeding aquatic organisms such as mussels are especially threatened. In this study, the blue mussel, Mytilus edulis, was exposed to two doses (0.2 mg/L and 1 mg/L) of the anti-inflammatory diclofenac. Effects on the gill, the principal feeding organ of mussels, were investigated. It was noted that, while no effect was evident on gill glutathione transferase or catalase activities, there was a tissue-specific increase in glutathione reductase activity and reduction in total protein thiol groups. Two dimensional electrophoresis was performed and some affected proteins identified by in-gel tryptic digestion and peptide mass fingerprinting. Of these, four unique proteins (caspase 3/7-4, heat-shock cognate protein 70, a predicted enolase-like protein, arginine kinase) were found to be oxidized whilst eight unique proteins (β-tubulin, actin, isocitrate dehydrogenase, arginine kinase, heavy metal-binding HIP, cytosolic malate dehydrogenase, proteasome subunit alpha type 2, Mg: bb02e05 (glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase) and superoxide dismutase) were found to have altered abundance. In addition, bioinformatic analysis suggested putative identities for six hypothetical proteins which either were oxidized or decreased in abundance. These were; 78 kDa glucose-regulated protein precursor, α-enolase, calreticulin, mitochondrial H + -ATPase, palmitoyl protein thioesterase 1 and initiation factor 5a. It is concluded that diclofenac causes significant oxidative stress to gills and that this affects key structural, metabolic and stress-response proteins. PMID:25833337

  7. Molecular cloning and expression of chitin deacetylase 1 gene from the gills of Penaeus monodon (black tiger shrimp).

    PubMed

    Sarmiento, Katreena P; Panes, Vivian A; Santos, Mudjekeewis D

    2016-08-01

    Chitin deacetylases have been identified and studied in several fungi and insects but not in crustaceans. These glycoproteins function in catalyzing the conversion of chitin to chitosan by the hydrolysis of N-acetamido bonds of chitin. Here, for the first time, the full length cDNA of chitin deacetylase (CDA) gene from crustaceans was fully cloned using a partial fragment obtained from a transcriptome database of the gills of black tiger shrimp Penaeus monodon that survived White Spot Syndrome Virus (WSSV) infection employing Rapid Amplification of cDNA Ends (RACE) PCR. The shrimp CDA, named PmCDA1, was further characterized by in silico analysis, and its constitutive expression determined in apparently healthy shrimp through reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR). Results revealed that the P. monodon chitin deacetylase (PmCDA1) is 2176 bp-long gene with an open reading frame (ORF) of 1596 bp encoding for 532 amino acids. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that PmCDA1 belongs to Group I CDAs together with CDA1 and CDA2 proteins found in insects. Moreover, PmCDA1 is composed of a conserved chitin-binding peritrophin-A domain (CBD), a low-density lipoprotein receptor class A domain (LDL-A) and a catalytic domain that is part of CE4 superfamily, all found in group I CDAs, which are known to serve critical immune function against WSSV. Finally, high expression of PmCDA1 gene in the gills of apparently healthy P. monodon was observed suggesting important basal function of the gene in this tissue. Taken together, this is a first report of the full chitin deacetylase 1 (CDA1) gene in crustaceans particularly in shrimp that exhibits putative immune function against WSSV and is distinctly highly expressed in the gills of shrimp. PMID:27335260

  8. Identification of a Novel Nonstructural Protein, VP9, from White Spot Syndrome Virus: Its Structure Reveals a Ferredoxin Fold with Specific Metal Binding Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Liu,Y.; Wu, J.; Song, J.; Sivaraman, J.; Hew, C.

    2006-01-01

    White spot syndrome virus (WSSV) is a major pathogen in shrimp aquaculture. VP9, a full-length protein of WSSV, encoded by open reading frame wsv230, was identified for the first time in the infected Penaeus monodon shrimp tissues, gill, and stomach as a novel, nonstructural protein by Western blotting, mass spectrometry, and immunoelectron microscopy. Real-time reverse transcription-PCR demonstrated that the transcription of VP9 started from the early to the late stage of WSSV infection as a major mRNA species. The structure of full-length VP9 was determined by both X-ray and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques. It is the first structure to be reported for WSSV proteins. The crystal structure of VP9 revealed a ferredoxin fold with divalent metal ion binding sites. Cadmium sulfate was found to be essential for crystallization. The Cd2+ ions were bound between the monomer interfaces of the homodimer. Various divalent metal ions have been titrated against VP9, and their interactions were analyzed using NMR spectroscopy. The titration data indicated that VP9 binds with both Zn2+ and Cd2+. VP9 adopts a similar fold as the DNA binding domain of the papillomavirus E2 protein. Based on our present investigations, we hypothesize that VP9 might be involved in the transcriptional regulation of WSSV, a function similar to that of the E2 protein during papillomavirus infection of the host cells.

  9. Effects of Soluble CD4 on Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Infection of CD4-Positive and CD4-Negative Cells

    PubMed Central

    Schenten, Dominik; Marcon, Luisa; Karlsson, Gunilla B.; Parolin, Cristina; Kodama, Toshiaki; Gerard, Norma; Sodroski, Joseph

    1999-01-01

    A soluble form of the CD4 receptor (sCD4) can either enhance or inhibit the infection of cells by simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) and human immunodeficiency virus. We investigated the basis for these varying effects by studying the entry of three SIV isolates into CD4-positive and CD4-negative cells expressing different chemokine receptors. Infection of CD4-negative cells depended upon the viral envelope glycoproteins and upon the chemokine receptor, with CCR5 and gpr15 being more efficient than STRL33. Likewise, enhancement of infection by sCD4 was observed when CCR5- and gpr15-expressing target cells were used but not when those expressing STRL33 were used. The sCD4-mediated enhancement of virus infection of CD4-negative, CCR5-positive cells was related to the sCD4-induced increase in binding of the viral gp120 envelope glycoprotein to CCR5. Inhibitory effects of sCD4 could largely be explained by competition for virus attachment to cellular CD4 rather than other detrimental effects on virus infectivity (e.g., disruption of the envelope glycoprotein spike). Consistent with this, the sCD4-activated SIV envelope glycoprotein intermediate on the virus was long-lived. Thus, the net effect of sCD4 on SIV infectivity appears to depend upon the degree of enhancement of chemokine receptor binding and upon the efficiency of competition for cellular CD4. PMID:10364284

  10. Element ratios between digestive gland and gill tissues of the Antarctic bivalve Laternula elliptica as a proxy for element uptake from different environmental sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poigner, H.; Monien, D.; Monien, P.; Kriews, M.; Brumsack, H.-J.; Wilhelms-Dick, D.; Abele, D.

    2012-04-01

    Trace metals in bivalve carbonate shells are frequently used as environmental or paleoclimate proxies. Carbonate mineralogy and animals' physiology affect the incorporation of elements from different environmental sources into bivalve shells. Generally, metals from particulate matter are assimilated via the digestive tract; whereas dissolved metals are absorbed via gills. Therefore, measurements of element concentrations deposited in the shell matrix do not necessarily allow inference with respect to the assimilation pathways. In this study, we used element ratios between digestive gland (DG) and gills (cDG/cGill) of the Circum-Antarctic clam Laternula elliptica to identify predominating assimilation pathways and potential sources of bio-available metals. This normalization between tissues of each individual eliminates the effects of individual age and physiological condition (e.g. accumulation over lifetime, metabolic activity) on metal assimilation. These effects also minimize the reproducibility, when absolute element concentrations are compared between individuals from different locations. Therefore, an additional normalization is required. We favored "ellipsoid shell volume" over shell length or soft tissue weight as more conservative approximation for intra- and intersite comparisons. Metal concentrations in DG, gills, and hemolymph of the bivalve L. elliptica, collected at Potter Cove (King George Island, Antarctic Peninsula), were analyzed by means of inductively coupled plasma - optical emission spectroscopy and mass spectrometry after total acid digestion. The element ratios (cDG/cGill) indicate a predominant assimilation of Al, Ca, Fe, K, Mn, and Mg from the dissolved phase. These high Al and Fe concentrations in gill tissues and hemolymph are in contrast to the low solubility of Al and Fe in seawater. But high dissolved Fe concentrations in pore waters (up to 1400 μg L-1 due to suboxic sediment conditions) and glacial melt waters enriched in dissolved

  11. The toxicological impacts of some heavy metals on carbonic anhydrase from gilthead sea bream (Sparus aurata) gills.

    PubMed

    Kaya, Elif Duygu; Söyüt, Hakan; Beydemir, Şükrü

    2015-03-01

    It is known that heavy metals have toxic effects on fish. Insufficient measures are a serious problem in our country and around the world. This problem can threaten human health in areas where it is common for people to obtain nutrition from local bodies of water. In this study, the toxicological impacts of some heavy metals were investigated on carbonic anhydrase activity in gilthead gills. Carbonic anhydrase (CA) was purified from gilthead sea bream (Sparus aurata) gills with a specific activity of 2872.92 EU mg(-1) and a yield of 32.84% using affinity chromatography. The overall purification was approximately ∼ 84-fold. SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis showed a single band, and the MW was approximately 30.5 kDa (Soyut et al., 2008, 2012; Soyut and Beydemir, 2008, 2012; Kaya et al., 2013). The kinetic and characteristic properties of CA such as the optimum pH, stable pH, optimum temperature, activation energy (Ea), activation enthalpy (ΔH), Q10, Km and Vmax were determined. Cadmium (Cd(2+)), copper (Cu(2+)), nickel (Ni(2+)) and silver (Ag(+)) inhibited CA activity in in vitro conditions. Ki values were calculated for these metals. Ki values were 31.20mM for cadmium (Cd(2+)), 161.96 mM for copper (Cu(2+)), 10.79 mM for nickel (Ni(2+)) and 0.0082 mM for silver (Ag(+)) based on Lineweaver-Burk plots. Except for cadmium, heavy metals had the same inhibition mechanism. Cadmium was competitive, and the others were noncompetitive. PMID:25769102

  12. Can the evolution of Cd resistance in prey alter Cd bioavailability to a predator?

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, W.G.; Lopez, G.R.

    1995-12-31

    The deposit feeding oligochaete, Limnodrilus hoffmeisteri, inhabiting a Cd polluted cove on the Hudson River (Foundry Cove) has evolved resistance to Cd. The worms` resistance is attributed to the binding of Cd to metallothionein-like proteins (MT) and metal-rich granules (MRG). Their research focuses on determining whether Cd detoxification by oligochaetes alters Cd bioavailability and trophic transfer to a representative predator, the omnivorous grass shrimp Palaemonetes. Cd resistant and nonresistant worms were radiolabeled with the radioisotope Cd-109. After exposure to the metal, worm subcellular Cd-109 distributions were determined through differential centrifugation and biochemical fractionation. Absorption of Cd-109 by shrimp fed the radiolabeled worms was also determined. The authors show that Cd resistant worms have 30% of their Cd stored in MRG and 11% in the cytosol; nonresistant worms have 2% and 56% stored respectively. Both populations have about 65% of the Cd in the cytosol bound to a heat-stable (MT) fraction. The authors demonstrate that differences in worm subcellular Cd distributions translate into large differences in Cd trophic transfer. Shrimp fed Cd resistant worms absorb 22% of the ingested Cd; shrimp fed nonresistant worms absorb 76%. Their research demonstrates that through the efficient storage of Cd into insoluble-unbioavailable MRG, evolution of Cd resistance has effectively suppressed the bioavailability and trophic transfer of Cd.

  13. ULTRASTRUCTURAL STUDY OF LESIONS IN GILLS OF A MARINE SHRIMP EXPOSED TO CADMIUM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pathologic black gills of pink shrimp, Penaeus duorarum, exposed to 763 micrograms/l of cadmium chloride for 15 days were studied with transmission electron microscopy and were compared with normal gills of control pink shrimp. Local as well as extensive areas of cell death and n...

  14. Training Researchers in Cultural Psychiatry: The McGill-CIHR Strategic Training Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirmayer, Laurence J.; Rousseau, Cecile; Corin, Ellen; Groleau, Danielle

    2008-01-01

    Objectives: The authors aim to summarize the pedagogical approaches and curriculum used in the training of researchers in cultural psychiatry at the Division of Social and Transcultural Psychiatry at McGill University. Method: We reviewed available published and unpublished reports on the history and development of the McGill cultural psychiatry…

  15. Urotensin II and its receptor in the killifish gill: regulators of NaCl extrusion.

    PubMed

    Evans, David H; Hyndman, Kelly A; Cornwell, Emily; Buchanan, Patrick

    2011-12-01

    The peptide urotensin II (UII) and its receptor (UT) mediate cardiovascular and renal effects in both mammals and fishes. In both groups, vasopressor and diuretic responses predominate, although, in mammals, some secondary vasodilatation is found, mediated by secondary release of nitric oxide or prostacyclin. In fishes, gill extrusion of NaCl is inhibited by UII, but a single study has determined that UT is expressed in gill vasculature, not on the epithelium that mediates the transport. To begin to clarify the pathways involved in UII inhibition of gill transport, we have cloned the cDNA encoding UII and UT from the euryhaline killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus L.) gill and spinal cord, quantified UT mRNA expression in various tissues and measured relative expression in gill tissue from fish acclimated to seawater (SW) vs fresh water (FW). We have also localized UT in the gill epithelium, and measured the effect of UII on ion transport across the opercular epithelium. We found that both UII and UT are synthesized in the gill of F. heteroclitus and that gill UT mRNA levels are ~80% higher in SW- vs FW-acclimated individuals. In addition, UII inhibits NaCl transport across the opercular epithelium in a concentration-dependent manner, and this inhibition is at least partially mediated by both nitric oxide and a prostanoid. PMID:22071190

  16. ANALYTICAL METHOD FOR THE DETERMINATION OF PHENYLGLUCURONIDE IN RAINBOW TROUT GILL WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Phenylglucuronide (PG), a primary phase II metabolite of phenol, can be excreted by fish through urine and feces, similar to mammals. In addition, it may also be possible to eliminate it through a fish's gills. In order to assess the significance of gill water elimination, analyt...

  17. Characterization of copper transport in gill cells of a mangrove crab Ucides cordatus.

    PubMed

    Sá, M G; Zanotto, F P

    2013-11-15

    The branchial epithelium of crustaceans is exposed to the environment and is the first site affected by metal pollution. The aim of this work was to characterize copper (Cu) transport using a fluorescent dye, Phen Green, in gill cells of a hypo-hyper-regulator mangrove crab Ucides cordatus. The results showed that added extracellular CuCl2 (0, 0.025, 0.150, 0.275, 0.550 and 1.110 μM) showed typical Michaelis-Menten transport for Cu in anterior and posterior gill cells (Vmax for anterior and posterior gills: 0.41 ± 0.12 and 1.76 ± 0.27 intracellular Cu in μM × 22.10(4)cells(-1)× 300 s(-1) respectively and Km values: 0.44 ± 0.04 and 0.32 ± 0.13 μM, respectively). Intracellular Cu was significantly higher for posterior gill cells compared to anterior gill cells, suggesting differential accumulation for each gill type. Extracellular Ca at 20mM decreased cellular Cu transport for both anterior and posterior gill cells. Nifedipine and verapamil, calcium channel inhibitors from plasma membrane, decreased Cu transport and affected Km for both gills. These results could be due to a competition between Cu and Ca. Amiloride, a Na/Ca exchanger inhibitor, as well as bafilomycin, a proton pump inhibitor, caused a decrease of intracellular Cu compared to control. Ouabain and KB-R 7943, acting on Na homeostasis, similarly decreased intracellular Cu in both gill cells. Besides that, gill cells exposed to ATP and Cu simultaneously, showed an increase in intracellular copper, which was inhibited by vanadate, an inhibitor of P-type ATPase. These results suggest either the presence of a Cu-ATPase in crab gill cells, responsible for Cu influx, or the effect of a change in electrochemical membrane potential that could also drive Cu to the gill cell interior. Caffeine increased intracellular Cu, suggesting that intracellular Ca could be affecting Cu uptake. Overall the results show that copper uptake in gill cells of crabs is regulated by intracellular Ca, Ca channels and by Na

  18. Morphological changes in the gills of Heteropneustes fossilis (Bloch) exposed to coal mining effluent water.

    PubMed

    Mylliemngap, B K; Ramanujam, S N

    2012-07-01

    Ultrastructural changes in the gills of cat fish Heteropneustes fossilis exposed to coal mining effluent water collected from Rymbai river in Jaintia hills, Meghalaya, India was investigated under scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The pH of effluent water in the river was significantly low (2.5-3.0) due to coal mining activity in the adjacent areas. The dissolved oxygen (DO) was 7.7 mg l(-1) and conductivity 0.93 mS. Morphological changes like dissociation of the epithelium (E) of branchial arches and gill filaments, hypertrophy and disorientation in the array of lamellae were observed in the treated fish, leading to fish death. The primary and secondary gill lamellae (PL and SL) exhibited fusion, distortion and loss of alignment. Some of the gill rackers showed necrosis at certain places. The morphological features of the gills as revealed through SEM were highly deteriorated when compared to control. PMID:23360000

  19. Gill (Na+ +K+)-ATPase involvement and regulation during salmonid adaptation to salt water.

    PubMed

    Borgatti, A R; Pagliarani, A; Ventrella, V

    1992-08-01

    1. The involvement of gill (Na+ +K+)-ATPase in salmonid adaptation to salt water (SW) is discussed. 2. Gill (Na+ +K+)-ATPase increase during SW adaptation is mainly related to the increased number and complexity of chloride cells deputed to salt extrusion. 3. The temporal relationships between serum peaks of thyroid hormones, cortisol, growth hormone, prolactin and gill (Na+ +K+)-ATPase rise during salmonid smoltification, suggest a hormonal involvement in the enzyme stimulation and thus in the acquirement of SW tolerance. 4. Literature on gill (Na+ +K+)-ATPase response to hormonal treatment is reviewed. The effects produced on gill (Na+ +K+)-ATPase and chloride cells by exogenous hormones point out a complex inter-relationship between the hormones considered. The mechanisms involved in hormonal regulation of the enzyme remain a matter of debate. PMID:1355028

  20. A shared role for sonic hedgehog signalling in patterning chondrichthyan gill arch appendages and tetrapod limbs.

    PubMed

    Gillis, J Andrew; Hall, Brian K

    2016-04-15

    Chondrichthyans (sharks, skates, rays and holocephalans) possess paired appendages that project laterally from their gill arches, known as branchial rays. This led Carl Gegenbaur to propose that paired fins (and hence tetrapod limbs) originally evolved via transformation of gill arches. Tetrapod limbs are patterned by asonic hedgehog(Shh)-expressing signalling centre known as the zone of polarising activity, which establishes the anteroposterior axis of the limb bud and maintains proliferative expansion of limb endoskeletal progenitors. Here, we use loss-of-function, label-retention and fate-mapping approaches in the little skate to demonstrate that Shh secretion from a signalling centre in the developing gill arches establishes gill arch anteroposterior polarity and maintains the proliferative expansion of branchial ray endoskeletal progenitor cells. These findings highlight striking parallels in the axial patterning mechanisms employed by chondrichthyan branchial rays and paired fins/limbs, and provide mechanistic insight into the anatomical foundation of Gegenbaur's gill arch hypothesis. PMID:27095494

  1. CD16 surface molecules regulate the cytolytic function of CD3CD16+ human natural killer cells.

    PubMed

    Moretta, A; Tambussi, G; Ciccone, E; Pende, D; Melioli, G; Moretta, L

    1989-10-15

    Monoclonal (IgG) antibodies (MAbs) directed to CD16 molecules efficiently induced lysis of the IgG-binding P815 target cells. A similar effect was observed with selected anti-CD2 MAbs. While combinations of 2 appropriate anti-CD2 MAbs were required for induction of T lymphocyte activation, single stimulatory anti-CD2 MAbs were sufficient for inducing cytolytic function in CD3- CD16+ lymphocytes. In order to study possible regulatory mechanisms existing in the process of activation and induction of the cytolytic machinery of CD3- CD16+ effector cells, we utilized the anti-CD16 OKNK MAb. Being of IgM isotype, the OKNK MAb does not allow cross-linking between CD3- D16+ lymphocytes and target cells. Pre-treatment of effector cells with OKNK MAb sharply inhibited the target cell lysis induced by either anti-CD16 (IgG) MAbs or stimulatory anti-CD2 MAb. Moreover, a strong inhibitory activity of PHA-induced target cell lysis and even of "spontaneous" lysis (at high effector:target ratio) was observed. In contrast, in CD3+ CD16+ clones, OKNK MAb selectively inhibited the cell triggering induced by anti-CD16 MAbs (but not by anti-CD3, anti-CD2 MAbs or PHA). Our data indicate that CD16 receptor molecules expressed by CD3- CD16+ lymphocytes down-regulate cell responses to anti-CD2 MAbs or PHA, and then exert a regulatory role in the cytolytic function of these cells. PMID:2793244

  2. Environmental and developmental effects on external gill loss in the red-eyed tree frog, Agalychnis callidryas.

    PubMed

    Warkentin, K M

    2000-01-01

    I examined the effects of development, hatching, and oxygen availability on external gill loss in red-eyed tree frogs, Agalychnis callidryas. Under natural conditions, the arboreal embryos maintained large external gills until hatching, which occurred from 5-8 d after oviposition. At hatching, when tadpoles entered the water, external gills began to regress. In older hatchlings this process was extremely rapid. Gill circulation was lost on average within 16 min and sometimes within 5 min. Gills often regressed completely in under 2 h. Younger hatchlings reduced gill circulation, shortened and adducted their gills, then resumed normal circulation for some time after hatching; half had completely lost external gills within 24 h. Experimentally increasing the area of egg surface exposed to the air induced loss of external gills in unhatched embryos. Older hatchlings in hypoxic water without access to air maintained their external gills. This suggests that loss of external gills is a response to increased oxygen availability, rather than a response to hatching per se. Extended maintenance of external gills by large, late-hatching embryos may facilitate continued rapid development in closely packed eggs. PMID:11073790

  3. Gill cell culture systems as models for aquatic environmental monitoring.

    PubMed

    Bury, Nic R; Schnell, Sabine; Hogstrand, Christer

    2014-03-01

    A vast number of chemicals require environmental safety assessments for market authorisation. To ensure acceptable water quality, effluents and natural waters are monitored for their potential harmful effects. Tests for market authorisation and environmental monitoring usually involve the use of large numbers of organisms and, for ethical, cost and logistic reasons, there is a drive to develop alternative methods that can predict toxicity to fish without the need to expose any animals. There is therefore a great interest in the potential to use cultured fish cells in chemical toxicity testing. This review summarises the advances made in the area and focuses in particular on a system of cultured fish gill cells grown into an epithelium that permits direct treatment with water samples. PMID:24574380

  4. CD300c is uniquely expressed on CD56bright Natural Killer Cells and differs from CD300a upon ligand recognition

    PubMed Central

    Dimitrova, Milena; Zenarruzabeitia, Olatz; Borrego, Francisco; Simhadri, Venkateswara R.

    2016-01-01

    Paired receptors on NK cells recognize similar ligands with varied strength of binding ability and perform different functions. The CD300 molecules are emerging as novel immune regulators in health and disease due to their interaction with their lipid-nature ligands. Particularly, the paired receptors CD300c and CD300a have been shown to elicit activating and inhibitory capabilities, respectively. In the current study, we seek to investigate the expression and function of CD300c on human NK cells. We demonstrate that IL-2 and IL-15 treatment significantly induce CD300c expression exclusively on CD56bright NK cells. CD300c up-regulation requires STAT5 and its expression is inhibited by IL-4. Consistently, IL-2 secreted from activated CD4+ T cells specifically induces the expression of CD300c on CD56bright NK cells. Crosslinking CD300c with a specific antibody enhances the proficiency of CD56bright NK cells to degranulate and induce chemokine and cytokine secretion. We also show the differential binding of CD300a and CD300c to their ligands phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) and phosphatidylserine (PS) and their differential ability to affect CD56bright NK cell functions. Our results provide an insight into the novel set of paired receptors CD300a and CD300c that are distinctively expressed on CD56bright NK cells with varied effector functions. PMID:27040328

  5. Temporal variation in the antioxidant defence system and lipid peroxidation in the gills and mantle of hydrothermal vent mussel Bathymodiolus azoricus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Company, Rui; Serafim, Angela; Cosson, Richard; Fiala-Médioni, Aline; Dixon, David; João Bebianno, Maria

    2006-07-01

    Hydrothermal vent mussels are exposed continually to toxic compounds, including high metal concentrations and other substances like dissolved sulphide, methane and natural radioactivity. Fluctuations in these parameters appear to be common because of the characteristic instability of the hydrothermal environment. Temporal variation in the antioxidant enzymes (superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), total glutathione peroxidases (Total GPx), selenium dependent glutathione peroxidases (Se-GPx)), metallothioneins and lipid peroxidation (LPO) in the gills and mantle of the mussel Bathymodiolus azoricus from Menez-Gwen hydrothermal vent site was evaluated and related to the accumulated metal concentrations (Ag, Cu, Cd, Fe, Mn and Zn) in the tissues. Maximum antioxidant enzyme activities in the gills were detected in the beginning of summer, followed by a gradual decrease throughout the following months. One year after, the levels of antioxidant enzyme activities were similar to those reported one year before. LPO in this tissue exhibited a similar temporal variation trend. A different pattern of temporal variation in antioxidant enzyme activities was observed in the mantle, with a gradual increase from summer to the end of autumn (November). LPO in the mantle exhibited an almost reverse trend of temporal variation to that of antioxidant enzyme activities in this tissue. Antioxidant defences in the gills of B. azoricus were significantly enhanced with increasing concentrations of Ag, Cu and Mn, while negative relationships between antioxidant enzymes and Cd, Cu, Mn and Zn concentrations in the mantle were observed, suggesting different pathways of reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and that these tissues responded differently to the metal accumulation. However, temporal variation in biomarkers of defence and damage were in general similar to coastal bivalve species and can be associated with temporal variations of the physiological status due to reproduction

  6. Trout gill cells in primary culture on solid and permeable supports.

    PubMed

    Leguen, I; Cauty, C; Odjo, N; Corlu, A; Prunet, P

    2007-12-01

    Trout gill cells in primary culture on solid and permeable supports were compared. Cultures were carried out by directly seeding cells on each support after gill dissociation. Most of the cell types present in culture were similar, regardless of culture support (pavement cells, mucous cells (3-4%), but no mitochondria-rich cells). However, insertion of mucous cells in cultured epithelium on permeable support presented a morphology more similar to gills in situ. Gene expression of ion transporters and hormonal receptors indicated similar mRNA levels in both systems. Cortisol inhibited cell proliferation on both supports and maintained or increased the total cell number on solid and permeable membranes, respectively. This inhibition of mitosis associated with an increase or maintenance of total gill cells suggests that cortisol reduced cell degeneration. In the presence of cortisol, transepithelial resistance of cultured gill cells on permeable membranes was increased and maintained for a longer time in culture. In conclusion, gill cells in primary culture on permeable support present: (i) a morphology more similar to epithelium in situ; and (ii) specific responses to cortisol treatment. New findings and differences with previous studies on primary cultures of trout gill cells on permeable membrane are discussed. PMID:17977040

  7. Intraspecific variation in gill morphology of juvenile Nile perch, Lates niloticus, in Lake Nabugabo, Uganda

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paterson, Jaclyn A.; Chapman, Lauren J.; Schofield, Pamela J.

    2010-01-01

    Several studies have demonstrated intraspecific variation in fish gill size that relates to variation in dissolved oxygen (DO) availability across habitats. In Lake Nabugabo, East Africa, ecological change over the past 12 years has coincided with a shift in the distribution of introduced Nile perch such that a larger proportion of the population now inhabits waters in or near wetland ecotones where DO is lower than in open waters of the lake. In this study, we compared gill size of juvenile Nile perch between wetland and exposed (open-water) habitats of Lake Nabugabo in 2007, as well as between Nile perch collected in 1996 and 2007. For Nile perch of Lake Nabugabo [<20 cm total length (TL)], there was a significant habitat effect on some gill traits. In general, fish from wetland habitats were characterized by a longer total gill filament length and average gill filament length than conspecifics from exposed habitats. Nile perch collected from wetland areas in 2007 had significantly larger gills (total gill filament length) than Nile perch collected in 1996, but there was no difference detected between Nile perch collected from exposed sites in 2007 and conspecifics collected in 1996.

  8. Microbial proliferation on gill structures of juvenile European lobster ( Homarus gammarus) during a moult cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Middlemiss, Karen L.; Urbina, Mauricio A.; Wilson, Rod W.

    2015-12-01

    The morphology of gill-cleaning structures is not well described in European lobster ( Homarus gammarus). Furthermore, the magnitude and time scale of microbial proliferation on gill structures is unknown to date. Scanning electron microscopy was used to investigate development of setae in zoea, megalopa and juvenile stages (I-V). Microbes were classified and quantified on gill structures throughout a moult cycle from megalopa (stage IV) to juvenile (stage V). Epipodial serrulate setae, consisting of a naked proximal setal shaft with the distal portion possessing scale-like outgrowths (setules), occur only after zoea stage III. After moulting to megalopa (stage IV), gill structures were completely clean and no microbes were visible on days 1 or 5 postmoult. Microbial proliferation was first evident on day 10 postmoult, with a significant 16-fold increase from day 10 to 15. Rod-shaped bacteria were initially predominant (by day 10); however, by day 15 the microbial community was dominated by cocci-shaped bacteria. This research provides new insights into the morphology of gill-grooming structures, the timing of their development, and the magnitude, timescale and characteristics of gill microbial proliferation during a moult cycle. To some degree, the exponential growth of epibionts on gills found during a moult cycle will likely impair respiratory (gas exchange) and ion regulatory function, yet further research is needed to evaluate the physiological effects of the exponential bacterial proliferation documented here.

  9. Hatching timing, oxygen availability, and external gill regression in the tree frog, Agalychnis callidryas.

    PubMed

    Warkentin, Karen M

    2002-01-01

    The physiological role of the embryonic external gills in anurans is equivocal. In some species, diffusion alone is clearly sufficient to supply oxygen throughout the embryonic period. In others, morphological elaboration and environmental regulation of the external gills suggest functional importance. Since oxygen stress is a common trigger of hatching, I examined the relationships among hatching timing, oxygen stress, and external gill loss. I worked with the red-eyed tree frog, Agalychnis callidryas, a species with arboreal eggs and aquatic tadpoles in which gill regression is associated with hatching, and hatching timing affects posthatching survival with aquatic predators. Both exposure to a hypoxic gas mixture and submergence in water, a natural context in which hypoxic stress can occur, induced early hatching. Exposure to hyperoxic gas mixtures induced regression of external gills, and subsequent exposure to air induced early hatching. Prostaglandin-induced external gill regression also induced hatching, and this effect was partially ameliorated by exposure to hyperoxic gas. Together, these results suggest that external gills enhance the oxygen uptake of embryos and are necessary to extend embryonic development past the onset of hatching competence. PMID:12024291

  10. Cortisol differentially alters claudin isoforms in cultured puffer fish gill epithelia.

    PubMed

    Bui, Phuong; Bagherie-Lachidan, Mazdak; Kelly, Scott P

    2010-04-12

    A primary cultured gill epithelium from the puffer fish Tetraodon nigroviridis was developed to examine the corticosteroid regulation of claudin isoform mRNA abundance in fish gills. Preparations were composed of polygonal epithelial cells exhibiting concentric apical microridges and zonula occludens-1 immunoreactivity along cell margins. No evidence was found to indicate the presence of Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase-immunoreactive or mitochondria-rich cells in cultured preparations. Therefore, epithelia appear to be composed of gill pavement cells (PVCs) only. An RT-PCR profile of 12 salinity responsive gill claudin tight junction (TJ) proteins (Tncldn3a, -3c, -6, -8d, -10d, -10e, -11a, -23b, -27a, -27c, -32a, and -33b) revealed the absence of Tncldn6, -10d and -10e in cultured epithelia, suggesting that these isoforms are not associated with gill PVCs. Cortisol treatment of cultured epithelia dose-dependently increased or decreased mRNA abundance of select claudin isoforms. Transcript abundance of several claudin isoforms was unaffected by cortisol treatment. These data provide evidence for the cell specific distribution of claudins in fish gills and suggest that heterogeneous alterations in the abundance of select claudin isoforms contribute to the corticosteroid regulation of gill permeability. PMID:19969041

  11. Structural changes in gill DNA reveal the effects of contaminants on Puget Sound fish.

    PubMed Central

    Malins, Donald C; Stegeman, John J; Anderson, Jack W; Johnson, Paul M; Gold, Jordan; Anderson, Katie M

    2004-01-01

    Structural differences were identified in gill DNA from two groups of English sole collected from Puget Sound, Washington, in October 2000. One group was from the industrialized Duwamish River (DR) in Seattle and the other from relatively clean Quartermaster Harbor (QMH). Chemical markers of sediment contamination [e.g., polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs)] established that the DR was substantially more contaminated than QMH. The levels of these chemicals in the sediments of both sites were consistent with levels of cytochrome P450 1A (CYP1A) expression in the gills of English sole from the same sites. Structural differences in gill DNA between the groups were evinced via statistical models of Fourier transform-infrared (FT-IR) spectra. Marked structural damage was found in the gill DNA of the DR fish as reflected in differences in base functional groups (e.g., C-O and NH2) and conformational properties (e.g., arising from perturbations in vertical base stacking interactions). These DNA differences were used to discriminate between the two fish groups through principal components analysis of mean FT-IR spectra. In addition, logistic regression analysis allowed for the development of a "DNA damage index" to assess the effects of contaminants on the gill. The evidence implies that environmental chemicals contribute to the DNA changes in the gill. The damaged DNA is a promising marker for identifying, through gill biopsies, contaminant effects on fish. PMID:15064153

  12. Characterization of abalone Haliotis tuberculata-Vibrio harveyi interactions in gill primary cultures.

    PubMed

    Pichon, Delphine; Cudennec, Benoit; Huchette, Sylvain; Djediat, Chakib; Renault, Tristan; Paillard, Christine; Auzoux-Bordenave, Stéphanie

    2013-10-01

    The decline of European abalone Haliotis tuberculata populations has been associated with various pathogens including bacteria of the genus Vibrio. Following the summer mortality outbreaks reported in France between 1998 and 2000, Vibrio harveyi strains were isolated from moribund abalones, allowing in vivo and in vitro studies on the interactions between abalone H. tuberculata and V. harveyi. This work reports the development of primary cell cultures from abalone gill tissue, a target tissue for bacterial colonisation, and their use for in vitro study of host cell-V. harveyi interactions. Gill cells originated from four-day-old explant primary cultures were successfully sub-cultured in multi-well plates and maintained in vitro for up to 24 days. Cytological parameters, cell morphology and viability were monitored over time using flow cytometry analysis and semi-quantitative assay (XTT). Then, gill cell cultures were used to investigate in vitro the interactions with V. harveyi. The effects of two bacterial strains were evaluated on gill cells: a pathogenic bacterial strain ORM4 which is responsible for abalone mortalities and LMG7890 which is a non-pathogenic strain. Cellular responses of gill cells exposed to increasing concentrations of bacteria were evaluated by measuring mitochondrial activity (XTT assay) and phenoloxidase activity, an enzyme which is strongly involved in immune response. The ability of gill cells to phagocyte GFP-tagged V. harveyi was evaluated by flow cytometry and gill cells-V. harveyi interactions were characterized using fluorescence microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. During phagocytosis process we evidenced that V. harveyi bacteria induced significant changes in gill cells metabolism and immune response. Together, the results showed that primary cell cultures from abalone gills are suitable for in vitro study of host-pathogen interactions, providing complementary assays to in vivo experiments. PMID:23756730

  13. Evolution of the branchiostegal membrane and restricted gill openings in Actinopterygian fishes.

    PubMed

    Farina, Stacy C; Near, Thomas J; Bemis, William E

    2015-06-01

    A phylogenetic survey is a powerful approach for investigating the evolutionary history of a morphological characteristic that has evolved numerous times without obvious functional implications. Restricted gill openings, an extreme modification of the branchiostegal membrane, are an example of such a characteristic. We examine the evolution of branchiostegal membrane morphology and highlight convergent evolution of restricted gill openings. We surveyed specimens from 433 families of actinopterygians for branchiostegal membrane morphology and measured head and body dimensions. We inferred a relaxed molecular clock phylogeny with branch length estimates based on nine nuclear genes sampled from 285 species that include all major lineages of Actinopterygii. We calculated marginal state reconstructions of four branchiostegal membrane conditions and found that restricted gill openings have evolved independently in at least 11 major actinopterygian clades, and the total number of independent origins of the trait is likely much higher. A principal component analysis revealed that fishes with restricted gill openings occupy a larger morphospace, as defined by our linear measurements, than do fishes with nonrestricted openings. We used a decision tree analysis of ecological data to determine if restricted gill openings are linked to certain environments. We found that fishes with restricted gill openings repeatedly occur under a variety of ecological conditions, although they are rare in open-ocean pelagic environments. We also tested seven ratios for their utility in distinguishing between fishes with and without restricted gill openings, and we propose a simple metric for quantifying restricted gill openings (RGO), defined as a ratio of the distance from the ventral midline to the gill opening relative to half the circumference of the head. Functional explanations for this specialized morphology likely differ within each clade, but its repeated evolution indicates a need

  14. CD Recorders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Falk, Howard

    1998-01-01

    Discussion of CD (compact disc) recorders describes recording applications, including storing large graphic files, creating audio CDs, and storing material downloaded from the Internet; backing up files; lifespan; CD recording formats; continuous recording; recording software; recorder media; vulnerability of CDs; basic computer requirements; and…

  15. CD Rainbows

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ouseph, P. J.

    2007-01-01

    Several papers have been published on the use of a CD as a grating for undergraduate laboratories and/or for high school and college class demonstrations. Four years ago "The Physics Teacher" had a spectacular cover picture showing emission spectrum as viewed through a CD with no coating. That picture gave the impetus to develop a system that can…

  16. Agonist Leukadherin-1 Increases CD11b/CD18-Dependent Adhesion Via Membrane Tethers

    PubMed Central

    Celik, Emrah; Faridi, Mohd. Hafeez; Kumar, Vinay; Deep, Shashank; Moy, Vincent T.; Gupta, Vineet

    2013-01-01

    Integrin CD11b/CD18 is a key adhesion receptor that mediates leukocyte migration and immune functions. Leukadherin-1 (LA1) is a small molecule agonist that enhances CD11b/CD18-dependent cell adhesion to its ligand ICAM-1. Here, we used single-molecule force spectroscopy to investigate the biophysical mechanism by which LA1-activated CD11b/CD18 mediates leukocyte adhesion. Between the two distinct populations of CD11b/CD18:ICAM-1 complex that participate in cell adhesion, the cytoskeleton(CSK)-anchored elastic elements and the membrane tethers, we found that LA1 enhanced binding of CD11b/CD18 on K562 cells to ICAM-1 via the formation of long membrane tethers, whereas Mn2+ additionally increased ICAM-1 binding via CSK-anchored bonds. LA1 activated wild-type and LFA1−/− neutrophils also showed longer detachment distances and time from ICAM-1-coated atomic force microscopy tips, but significantly lower detachment force, as compared to the Mn2+-activated cells, confirming that LA1 primarily increased membrane-tether bonds to enhance CD11b/CD18:ICAM-1 binding, whereas Mn2+ induced additional CSK-anchored bond formation. The results suggest that the two types of agonists differentially activate integrins and couple them to the cellular machinery, providing what we feel are new insights into signal mechanotransduction by such agents. PMID:24314082

  17. Effect of cadmium on glutathione S-transferase and metallothionein gene expression in coho salmon liver, gill and olfactory tissues

    PubMed Central

    Espinoza, Herbert M.; Williams, Chase R.; Gallagher, Evan P.

    2012-01-01

    The glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) are a multifunctional family of phase II enzymes that detoxify a variety of environmental chemicals, reactive intermediates, and secondary products of oxidative damage. GST mRNA expression and catalytic activity have been used as biomarkers of exposure to environmental chemicals. However, factors such as species differences in induction, partial analyses of multiple GST isoforms, and lack of understanding of fish GST gene regulation, have confounded the use of GST as markers of pollutant exposure. In the present study, we examined the effect of exposure to cadmium (Cd), a prototypical environmental contaminant and inducer of mammalian GST, on GST mRNA expression in coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) liver, gill, and olfactory tissues. GST expression data were compared to those for metallothionein (MT), a prototypical biomarker of metal exposure. Data mining of genomic databases led to the development of quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) assays for salmon GST isoforms encompassing 9 subfamilies, including alpha, mu, pi, theta, omega, kappa, rho, zeta and microsomal GST. In vivo acute (8-48 hr) exposures to low (3.7 ppb) and high (347 ppb) levels of Cd relevant to environmental scenarios elicited a variety of transient, albeit minor changes (<2.5-fold) in tissue GST profiles, including some reductions in GST mRNA expression. In general, olfactory GSTs were the earliest to respond to cadmium, whereas, more pronounced effects in olfactory and gill GST expression were observed at 48 hr relative to earlier time points. Although evaluation of GSTs reflected a cadmium-associated oxidative stress response, there was no clear GST isoform in any tissue that could serve as a reliable biomarker of acute cadmium exposure. By contrast, metallothionein (MT) mRNA was consistently and markedly induced in all three tissues by cadmium, and among the tissues examined, olfactory MT was the most sensitive marker of cadmium exposures. In summary, coho

  18. Age Associated Increase of Low Avidity CMV-Specific CD8+ T Cells That Re-Express CD45RA

    PubMed Central

    Griffiths, Stephen J.; Riddell, Natalie E.; Masters, Joanne; Libri, Valentina; Henson, Sian M.; Wertheimer, Anne; Wallace, Diana; Sims, Stuart; Rivino, Laura; Larbi, Anis; Kemeny, David M.; Nikolich-Zugich, Janko; Kern, Florian; Klenerman, Paul; Emery, Vince C.; Akbar, Arne N.

    2013-01-01

    The mechanisms regulating memory CD8+ T cell function and homeostasis during ageing are unclear. CD8+ effector memory T cells that re-express CD45RA (EMRA T cells) increase considerably in older humans and both ageing and persistent cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection are independent factors in this process. We used MHC class I tetrameric complexes that were mutated in the CD8 binding domain to identify CMV-specific CD8+ T cells with high antigen binding avidity. In individuals who were HLA-A*0201, CD8+ T cells that expressed CD45RA and were specific for the pp65 protein (NLV epitope) had lower avidity than those that expressed CD45RO and demonstrated decreased cytokine secretion and cytolytic potential after specific activation. Furthermore, low avidity NLV-specific CD8+ T cells were significantly increased in older individuals. The stimulation of blood leukocytes with CMV lysate induced high levels of IFNα that in turn induced IL-15 production. Moreover, the addition of IL-15 to CD45RA−CD45RO+ CMV-specific CD8+ T cells induced CD45RA expression while antigen activated cells remained CD45RO+. This raises the possibility that non-specific cytokine driven accumulation of CMV-specific CD8+ CD45RA+ T cells with lower antigen binding avidity may exacerbate the effects of viral re-activation on skewing the T cell repertoire in CMV infected individuals during ageing. PMID:23636061

  19. Cadmium affects the mitochondrial viability and the acid soluble thiols concentration in liver, kidney, heart and gills of Ancistrus brevifilis (Eigenmann, 1920).

    PubMed

    Velasquez-Vottelerd, P; Anton, Y; Salazar-Lugo, R

    2015-01-01

    The freshwater fish Ancistrus brevifilis, which is found in Venezuelan rivers, is considered a potential sentinel fish in ecotoxicological studies. The cadmium (Cd) effect on the mitochondrial viability (MV) and acid soluble thiols levels (AST) in A. brevifilis tissues (liver, kidney, heart, and gill) was evaluated. Forty-two fish with similar sizes and weights were randomly selected, of which 7 fish (with their respective replicate) were exposed for 7 and 30 days to a Cd sublethal concentration (0.1 mg.l(-1)). We determined the MV through a Janus Green B colorimetric assay and we obtained the concentration of AST by Ellman's method. Mitochondrial viability decreased in fish exposed to Cd for 30 days with the liver being the most affected tissue. We also detected a significant decrease in AST levels was in fishes exposed to Cd for 7 days in liver and kidney tissues; these results suggests that AST levels are elevated in some tissues may act as cytoprotective and adaptive alternative mechanism related to the ROS detoxification, maintenance redox status and mitochondrial viability. Organ-specifics variations were observed in both assays. We conclude that the Cd exposure effect on AST levels and MV, vary across fish tissues and is related to the exposure duration, the molecule dynamics in different tissues, the organism and environmental conditions. PMID:26623384

  20. Cadmium affects the mitochondrial viability and the acid soluble thiols concentration in liver, kidney, heart and gills of Ancistrus brevifilis (Eigenmann, 1920)

    PubMed Central

    Velasquez-Vottelerd, P.; Anton, Y.; Salazar-Lugo, R.

    2015-01-01

    The freshwater fish Ancistrus brevifilis, which is found in Venezuelan rivers, is considered a potential sentinel fish in ecotoxicological studies. The cadmium (Cd) effect on the mitochondrial viability (MV) and acid soluble thiols levels (AST) in A. brevifilis tissues (liver, kidney, heart, and gill) was evaluated. Forty-two fish with similar sizes and weights were randomly selected, of which 7 fish (with their respective replicate) were exposed for 7 and 30 days to a Cd sublethal concentration (0.1 mg.l-1). We determined the MV through a Janus Green B colorimetric assay and we obtained the concentration of AST by Ellman’s method. Mitochondrial viability decreased in fish exposed to Cd for 30 days with the liver being the most affected tissue. We also detected a significant decrease in AST levels was in fishes exposed to Cd for 7 days in liver and kidney tissues; these results suggests that AST levels are elevated in some tissues may act as cytoprotective and adaptive alternative mechanism related to the ROS detoxification, maintenance redox status and mitochondrial viability. Organ-specifics variations were observed in both assays. We conclude that the Cd exposure effect on AST levels and MV, vary across fish tissues and is related to the exposure duration, the molecule dynamics in different tissues, the organism and environmental conditions. PMID:26623384

  1. Predicted structure of MIF/CD74 and RTL1000/CD74 complexes.

    PubMed

    Meza-Romero, Roberto; Benedek, Gil; Leng, Lin; Bucala, Richard; Vandenbark, Arthur A

    2016-04-01

    Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is a key cytokine in autoimmune and inflammatory diseases that attracts and then retains activated immune cells from the periphery to the tissues. MIF exists as a homotrimer and its effects are mediated through its primary receptor, CD74 (the class II invariant chain that exhibits a highly structured trimerization domain), present on class II expressing cells. Although a number of binding residues have been identified between MIF and CD74 trimers, their spatial orientation has not been established. Using a docking program in silico, we have modeled binding interactions between CD74 and MIF as well as CD74 and a competitive MIF inhibitor, RTL1000, a partial MHC class II construct that is currently in clinical trials for multiple sclerosis. These analyses revealed 3 binding sites on the MIF trimer that each were predicted to bind one CD74 trimer through interactions with two distinct 5 amino acid determinants. Surprisingly, predicted binding of one CD74 trimer to a single RTL1000 antagonist utilized the same two 5 residue determinants, providing strong suggestive evidence in support of the MIF binding regions on CD74. Taken together, our structural modeling predicts a new MIF(CD74)3 dodecamer that may provide the basis for increased MIF potency and the requirement for ~3-fold excess RTL1000 to achieve full antagonism. PMID:26851955

  2. Structural elements of the gills of the shore crab Carcinus mediterraneus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venezia, L. Dalla; Zago, C.; Siebers, D.; Menetto, A.

    1992-12-01

    Fine structural studies were conducted on the gills of the shore crab Carcinus mediterraneus using scanning electron microscopic techniques. The results obtained show the structural organization of crab gills from whole gills including spiny elements over the 150 lamellae to lamellar components such as cuticles, median shaft, marginal canal, afferent and efferent lamellar vessels and hemolymph cells. Enormous surface enlargement is accomplished by a variety of structural elements which allow rapid circulation of hemolymph. In the form of a relatively small organ, the gills fulfill all the necessary exchanges of specific molecules between the crab and its environment. Aggregations of ca 1-μm particles covering the outer cuticular surfaces are considered to be bacterial colonies of unknown properties and functions.

  3. Tonic, phasic and cortical arousal in Gilles de la Tourette's syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Bock, R D; Goldberger, L

    1985-01-01

    This study explored the hypothesis that Gilles de la Tourette's syndrome involves a disturbance in arousal modulation. The experimental group consisted of 20 unmedicated subjects with the Gilles de la Tourette's syndrome, and the control group of 20 subjects with chronic medical illnesses (haemophilia, von Willebrandt's disease and diabetes). There were differences between groups in the manner in which log conductance level changed over time during sound and light habituation experiments involving mild levels of stimulation with the Gilles de la Tourette group showing less change in arousal level over trials than the control group. No group differences were found in measures of phasic arousal, rate of spontaneous fluctuations and performance on two tasks that have been related to cortical arousal. It is suggested that the slower change in log conductance level in the Gilles de la Tourette group during the sound and light habituation experiments indicates that reticular activity is more persistent in these patients. PMID:3859582

  4. Amoebic gill infection in coho salmon Oncorhynchus kisutch farmed in Korea.

    PubMed

    Kim, Wi-Sik; Kong, Kyoung-Hui; Kim, Jong-Oh; Oh, Myung-Joo

    2016-08-31

    About 70% mortality occurred in cultured coho salmon Oncorhynchus kisutch at a marine farm in the South Sea of Korea in 2014. Diseased fish showed greyish or pale patches on the gills, with no internal signs of disease. No bacteria or viruses were isolated from diseased fish, but numerous amoebae were found on the gills. Histopathological examinations revealed extensive hyperplastic epithelium and lamellar fusion in the gills. Numerous amoebae were seen between gill filaments. The amoebae had a 630 bp partial 18S rRNA gene fragment specific to Neoparamoeba perurans. Phylogenetic analysis based on partial 18S rRNA gene nucleotide sequences revealed that this Korean amoeba belonged to the N. perurans group. This is the first report of N. perurans infection in Korea. PMID:27596862

  5. Gilles de la Tourette Syndrome: A Review and Implications for Educators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lemons, Laurie A.; Barber, William H.

    1991-01-01

    Gilles de la Tourette syndrome is a disorder characterized by multiple involuntary motor and verbal tics. This review covers the history, symptoms, diagnostic criteria, past and present treatments, associated disorders, and various educational techniques. (Author/DB)

  6. Ultrastructural effects on gill tissues induced in red tilapia Oreochromis sp. by a waterborne lead exposure.

    PubMed

    Aldoghachi, Mohammed A; Azirun, Mohd Sofian; Yusoff, Ismail; Ashraf, Muhammad Aqeel

    2016-09-01

    Experiments on hybrid red tilapia Oreochromis sp. were conducted to assess histopathological effects induced in gill tissues of 96 h exposure to waterborne lead (5.5 mg/L). These tissues were investigated by light and scanning electron microscopy. Results showed that structural design of gill tissues was noticeably disrupted. Major symptoms were changes of epithelial cells, fusion in adjacent secondary lamellae, hypertrophy and hyperplasia of chloride cells and coagulate necrosis in pavement cells with disappearance of its microridges. Electron microscopic X-ray microanalysis of fish gills exposed to sublethal lead revealed that lead accumulated on the surface of the gill lamella. This study confirmed that lead exposure incited a difference of histological impairment in fish, supporting environmental watch over aquatic systems when polluted by lead. PMID:27579014

  7. Artificial gills for robots: MFC behaviour in water.

    PubMed

    Ieropoulos, Ioannis; Melhuish, Chris; Greenman, John

    2007-09-01

    This paper reports on the first stage in developing microbial fuel cells (MFCs) which can operate underwater by utilizing dissolved oxygen. In this context, the cathodic half-cell is likened to an artificial gill. Such an underwater power generator has obvious potential for autonomous underwater robots. The electrical power from these devices increased proportionately with water flow rate, temperature and salinity. The current output at ambient temperature (null condition) was 32 microA and this increased by 200% (approximately 100 microA) as a result of a corresponding temperature increase (DeltaT) of 52 degrees C. Similarly, the effect of increasing the water flow rate resulted in an increase in the MFC output ranging from 135% to 150%. Furthermore, the same positive effect was recorded when artificial seawater was used instead, in which case the increase in the MFC current output was >100% (from 32 to 65 microA). There was a distinct difference in the MFC performance when operated under low turbulent as opposed to high turbulent flow rates. These findings can be advantageous in the design of underwater autonomous robots. PMID:17848787

  8. Motor-Cortical Interaction in Gilles de la Tourette Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Franzkowiak, Stephanie; Pollok, Bettina; Biermann-Ruben, Katja; Südmeyer, Martin; Paszek, Jennifer; Thomalla, Götz; Jonas, Melanie; Orth, Michael; Münchau, Alexander; Schnitzler, Alfons

    2012-01-01

    Background In Gilles de la Tourette syndrome (GTS) increased activation of the primary motor cortex (M1) before and during movement execution followed by increased inhibition after movement termination was reported. The present study aimed at investigating, whether this activation pattern is due to altered functional interaction between motor cortical areas. Methodology/Principal Findings 10 GTS-patients and 10 control subjects performed a self-paced finger movement task while neuromagnetic brain activity was recorded using Magnetoencephalography (MEG). Cerebro-cerebral coherence as a measure of functional interaction was calculated. During movement preparation and execution coherence between contralateral M1 and supplementary motor area (SMA) was significantly increased at beta-frequency in GTS-patients. After movement termination no significant differences between groups were evident. Conclusions/Significance The present data suggest that increased M1 activation in GTS-patients might be due to increased functional interaction between SMA and M1 most likely reflecting a pathophysiological marker of GTS. The data extend previous findings of motor-cortical alterations in GTS by showing that local activation changes are associated with alterations of functional networks between premotor and primary motor areas. Interestingly enough, alterations were evident during preparation and execution of voluntary movements, which implies a general theme of increased motor-cortical interaction in GTS. PMID:22238571

  9. A second glutamine synthetase gene with expression in the gills of the gulf toadfish (opsanus beta)

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, Patrick J.; Mayer, Gregory D.; Medina, Monica; Bernstein, Matthew L.; Barimo, John F.; Mommsen, Thomas P.

    2003-05-08

    Enzyme and molecular biology approaches were used to more completely characterize the expression of the nitrogen metabolism enzyme glutamine synthetase [GSase; L-glutamate: ammonia ligase (ADP-forming), E.C. 6.3.1.2] in a variety of tissues of the gulf toadfish (Opsanus beta) subjected to unconfined (ammonotelic) and confined (ureotelic) conditions. Enzymological results demonstrate that while weight-specific GSase activities rank in the order of brain > liver > stomach {approx} kidney > intestine > gill> heart/spleen > muscle, when tissue mass is used to calculate a glutamine synthetic potential, the liver has the greatest, followed by muscle > stomach and intestine with minor contributions from the remaining tissues. Additionally, during confinement stress, GSase activity only increases significantly in liver (5-fold) and muscle (2-fold), tissues which previously showed significant expression of the other enzymes of urea synthesis. RT PCR and RACE PCR revealed the presence of a second GSas e cDNA from gill tissue that appears to share relatively low nucleotide and amino acid sequence similarity ({approx}73 percent) with the original GSase cloned from liver, and furthermore lacks a mitochondrial leader targeting sequence. RT PCR and restriction digestion experiments demonstrated that mRNA from the original ''liver'' GSase is expressed in all tissues examined (liver, gill, stomach, intestine, kidney, brain and muscle), whereas the new ''gill'' form shows expression primarily in the gill. Enzyme activities of gill GSase also exhibit a different subcellular compartmentation with apparent exclusive expression in the soluble compartment, whereas other tissues expressing the ''liver'' form show both cytoplasmic and mitochondrial activities. Finally, phylogenetic analysis of a number of GSases demonstrates that the toadfish gill GSase has a greater affinity for a clade that includes the Xenopus GSase genes and one of two Fugu GSase genes, than it has for a clade

  10. Life science experiments during parabolic flight: The McGill experience

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watt, D. G. D.

    1988-01-01

    Over the past twelve years, members of the Aerospace Medical Research Unit of McGill University have carried out a wide variety of tests and experiments in the weightless condition created by parabolic flight. This paper discusses the pros and cons of that environment for the life scientist, and uses examples from the McGill program of the types of activities which can be carried out in a transport aircraft such as the NASA KC-135.

  11. Pathomorphological changes in gills of fish fingerlings (Cirrhina mrigala) by linear alkyl benzene sulfonate

    SciTech Connect

    Misra, V.; Lal, H.; Chawla, G.; Viswanathan, P.N.

    1985-12-01

    Fish fingerlings (Cirrhina mrigala) exposed to 0.005 ppm (25% of LC50) concentration to detergents (linear alkyl benzene sulfonate) showed marked behavioral changes and distorted appearance of primary and secondary lamellae along with damage to gill epithelium under scanning electron microscopy at various magnifications. Mucosal cells of gills were found to secrete mucus showing primary reactions for membrane damage leading to dysfunction in respiration and osmoregulation.

  12. Respiratory toxicity of cyanobacterial aphantoxins from Aphanizomenon flos-aquae DC-1 in the zebrafish gill.

    PubMed

    Zhang, De Lu; Liu, Si Yi; Zhang, Jing; Zhang, Jian Kun; Hu, Chun Xiang; Liu, Yong Ding

    2016-07-01

    Aphantoxins from Aphanizomenon flos-aquae are frequently identified in eutrophic waterbodies worldwide. These toxins severely endanger environmental safety and human health due to the production of paralytic shellfish poisons (PSPs). Although the molecular mechanisms of aphantoxin neurotoxicity have been studied, many questions remain to be resolved such as in vivo alterations in branchial histology and neurotransmitter inactivation induced by these neurotoxins. Aphantoxins extracted from a naturally isolated strain of A. flos-aquae DC-1 were determined by high performance liquid chromatography. The basic components of the isolated aphantoxins identified were gonyautoxin 1 (GTX1), gonyautoxin 5 (GTX5), and neosaxitoxin (neoSTX), which comprised 34.04, 21.28, and 12.77% of the total, respectively. Zebrafish (Danio rerio) was administrated 5.3 or 7.61mg STX equivalents (eq)/kg (low and high doses, respectively) of the A. flos-aquae DC-1 aphantoxins by intraperitoneal injection. Histological alterations and changes in neurotransmitter inactivation in the gills of zebrafish were investigated for 24h following exposure. Aphantoxin exposure significantly increased the activities of gill alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and resulted in histological alterations in the gills during the first 12h of exposure, indicating the induction of functional and structural damage. Gill acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and monoamine oxidase (MAO) activities were inhibited significantly, suggesting an alteration of neurotransmitter inactivation in zebrafish gills. The observed alterations in gill structure and function followed a time- and dose-dependent pattern. The results demonstrate that aphantoxins or PSPs lead to structural damage and altered function in the gills of zebrafish, including changes in histological structure and increases in the activities of AST and ALT. The inhibition of the activities of AChE and MAO suggest that aphantoxins or PSPs

  13. Seasonal control of particle clearance by isolated gills from the clam Mercenaria mercenaria.

    PubMed

    Gainey, Louis F

    2007-07-01

    Pieces of gill isolated from the clam Mercenaria mercenaria clear colloidal graphite from seawater, and the clearance rates are measurable. 5-Hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) had a biphasic effect on clearance rates: concentrations from 10(-6) to 10(-5) mol l(-1) 5-HT increased clearance, but higher concentrations reduced it. During the summer, the gills were less responsive to 5-HT: the threshold increased from 1 x 10(-6) to 5 x 10(-6) mol l(-1), and although the rate was still maximal at 10(-5) mol l(-1), it was significantly lower than the maximal rate in the winter. At 10(-5) mol l(-1) 5-HT, which maximized clearance, the lateral cilia were active, the interfilament space decreased and the diameter of the water tubes increased. Higher concentrations of 5-HT contracted the gill musculature, which inhibited the lateral cilia, decreased the interfilament space even more and decreased the diameter of the water tubes. The nitric oxide (NO) generator DEANO stimulated clearance in the winter but had no effect during the summer. L-NAME, an inhibitor of NO synthesis, diminished the effect of 5-HT during the winter but was ineffective during the summer. The diminished response to 5-HT of winter gills treated with L-NAME was statistically equal to the response of the gills to 5-HT during the summer. Dopamine (DA) inhibited clearance, and the gills were more sensitive to DA in winter than in summer. Microscopic examination of untreated gills revealed little or no lateral ciliary activity, and clearance was minimal. Thus, clearance rates of isolated gills behave in a manner consistent with the seasonality and pharmacology of the lateral cilia and branchial musculature. PMID:17601956

  14. Structures of CD6 and Its Ligand CD166 Give Insight into Their Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Chappell, Paul E.; Garner, Lee I.; Yan, Jun; Metcalfe, Clive; Hatherley, Deborah; Johnson, Steven; Robinson, Carol V.; Lea, Susan M.; Brown, Marion H.

    2015-01-01

    Summary CD6 is a transmembrane protein with an extracellular region containing three scavenger receptor cysteine rich (SRCR) domains. The membrane proximal domain of CD6 binds the N-terminal immunoglobulin superfamily (IgSF) domain of another cell surface receptor, CD166, which also engages in homophilic interactions. CD6 expression is mainly restricted to T cells, and the interaction between CD6 and CD166 regulates T-cell activation. We have solved the X-ray crystal structures of the three SRCR domains of CD6 and two N-terminal domains of CD166. This first structure of consecutive SRCR domains reveals a nonlinear organization. We characterized the binding sites on CD6 and CD166 and showed that a SNP in CD6 causes glycosylation that hinders the CD6/CD166 interaction. Native mass spectrometry analysis showed that there is competition between the heterophilic and homophilic interactions. These data give insight into how interactions of consecutive SRCR domains are perturbed by SNPs and potential therapeutic reagents. PMID:26146185

  15. The CD1 size problem: lipid antigens, ligands, and scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Ly, Dalam

    2014-01-01

    Whereas research on CD1d has emphasized a few glycosyl ceramides, the broader family of four human CD1 antigen-presenting molecules binds hundreds of distinct self-lipids. Individual lipid types bind within CD1 grooves in different ways, such that they partially fill the groove, match the groove volume, or protrude substantially from the groove. These differing modes of binding can now be connected to differing immunological functions, as individual lipids can act as stimulatory antigens, inhibitory ligands, or space-filling scaffolds. Because each type of CD1 protein folds to produce antigen-binding grooves with differing sizes and shapes, CD1a, CD1b, CD1c, CD1d, and CD1e have distinct mechanisms of capturing self-lipids and exchanging them for foreign lipids. The size discrepancy between endogeneous lipids and groove volume is most pronounced for CD1b. Recent studies show that the large CD1b cavity can simultaneously bind two self-lipids, the antigen, and its scaffold lipid, which can be exchanged for one large bacterial lipid. In this review, we will highlight recent studies showing how cells regulate lipid antigen loading and the roles CD1 groove structures have in control of the presentation of chemically diverse lipids to T cells. PMID:24658584

  16. Prevalence, site and tissue preference of myxozoan parasites infecting gills of cultured fish in Punjab (India).

    PubMed

    Kaur, Harpreet; Katoch, Anu

    2016-02-25

    Native carp species cultured in Indian farms in Punjab (catla Catla catla, rohu Labeo rohita, mrigal Cirrhinus mrigala, exotic carps such as silver carp Hypophthalmichthys molitrix, grass carp Ctenopharyngodon idella, common carp Cyprinus carpio and a catfish Sperata seenghala) were examined for the presence of myxozoan parasites infecting gills. Firstly, the gills were examined under a zoom-stereomicroscope for the presence of plasmodia. The number of plasmodia per gill was counted to determine the index for the intensity of infection. Infected tissues were processed for histology, and 3-4 µm sections of infected gills were stained with haematoxylin & eosin and Luna's method. A total of 19 species of myxosporean were found infecting various cell types in the gills. Of these, 14 species belonged to the genus Myxobolus, 3 species to the genus Thelohanellus and 2 species to the genus Henneguya. Species belonging to the genus Myxobolus formed the interlamellar and intralamellar vascular (LV) type plasmodia, and species belonging to the genus Thelohanellus and Henneguya formed intrafilamental vascular (FV) type plasmodia. Mixed infections comprising 2, 3 or 4 different myxozoan species were noted in individual fish. The most common type of parasitism was polyparasitism due to 4 myxobolids co-occuring in fish with an infection rate of 23.16%. All species caused mild to severe haemorrhagic gill disease with little clinical symptomatology. PMID:26912043

  17. Developmental evidence for serial homology of the vertebrate jaw and gill arch skeleton

    PubMed Central

    Gillis, J. Andrew; Modrell, Melinda S.; Baker, Clare V. H.

    2013-01-01

    Gegenbaur’s classical hypothesis of jaw-gill arch serial homology is widely cited, but remains unsupported by either paleontological evidence (e.g. a series of fossils reflecting the stepwise transformation of a gill arch into a jaw) or developmental genetic data (e.g. shared molecular mechanisms underlying segment identity in the mandibular, hyoid and gill arch endoskeletons). Here we show that nested expression of Dlx genes – the “Dlx code” that specifies upper and lower jaw identity in mammals and teleosts – is a primitive feature of the mandibular, hyoid and gill arches of jawed vertebrates. Using fate-mapping techniques, we demonstrate that the principal dorsal and ventral endoskeletal segments of the jaw, hyoid and gill arches of the skate Leucoraja erinacea derive from molecularly equivalent mesenchymal domains of combinatorial Dlx gene expression. Our data suggest that vertebrate jaw, hyoid and gill arch cartilages are serially homologous, and were primitively patterned dorsoventrally by a common Dlx blueprint. PMID:23385581

  18. From catchment to fish: Impact of anthropogenic pressures on gill histopathology.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, A R; Sanches Fernandes, L F; Fontainhas-Fernandes, A; Monteiro, S M; Pacheco, F A L

    2016-04-15

    Gill histopathology was investigated in barbel (Luciobarbus bocagei) and nase (Pseudochondrostoma sp.) in sub-catchments of Paiva River (Portugal) located upstream and downstream of a Waste Water Treatment Plant (WWTP). Multivariate statistical analyses were performed to set up correlations between the species sample (n=24) and injury types (8). The results discriminate well edema and vasodilatation between reference (upstream) and disturbed (downstream) samples. Using a watershed model, time series of physico-chemical parameters and heavy metal concentrations were calibrated and validated for the entire Paiva River basin as to investigate the relationship between water quality and the gill histopathology results. Increased concentrations of heavy metal downstream, specifically of zinc and lead, coincided with a higher severity of histopathological alterations in the fish gills. Significant but less evident relationship between water quality parameters and severity of gill injuries in the analyzed fish species were also observed for fecal coliforms, water temperature and manganese. Notwithstanding the location of the samples upstream and downstream of the WWTP, contamination of Paiva River and its effect on gill injuries cannot be disconnected from other punctual and diffuse pollution sources acting in different sectors within the watershed, namely agriculture and forest management. The severity of histopathological alterations in the fish gills reflected differences in the type and concentration of contaminants in Paiva River, and consequently can be viewed as valuable indicator of water quality. PMID:26851883

  19. Identification of Methanotrophic Biomarker Lipids in the Symbiont-Containing Gills of Seep Mussels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jahnke, L. L.; Zahiralis, K. D.; Klein, H. P.; Morrison, David (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Mussels collected from hydrocarbon seeps in the Gulf of Mexico grow with methane as sole carbon and energy source due to a symbiotic association with methane-oxidizing bacteria. Transmission electron micrographs of mussel gills show cells with stacked intracytoplasmic membranes similar to type I methanotrophic bacteria. Methanotrophs are known to synthesize several types of cyclic triterpenes, hopanoids and methyl sterols, as well as unique monounsaturated fatty acid, double bond positional isomers that serve as biomarkers for this group. Lipid analysis of dissected mussels demonstrated the presence of these biomarkers predominantly in the gill tissue with much smaller amounts in mantle and remaining body tissues. Gill tissue contained 1150 micrograms/g dry wt. of hopanepolyol derivatives and diplopterol while the mantle tissue contained only 17 micrograms/g. The C16 monounsaturated fatty acids (16:1) characteristic of type I methanotrophic membranes dominated the gill tissue making up 53% of the total while only 5% 16:1 was present in the mantle tissue. The methyl sterol distribution was more dispersed. The predominant sterol in all tissues was cholesterol with lesser amounts of other desmethyl and 4-methyl sterols. The gill and mantle tissues contained 3461 micrograms (17% methyl) and 2750 micrograms (5% methyl) sterol per gm dry wt., respectively. Methyl sterol accounted for 44% of the sterol esters isolated from the gill, suggesting active demethylation of the methanotrophic sterols in this tissue. The use of lipid biomarkers could provide an effective means for identifying host-symbiont relationships.

  20. Active urea transport and an unusual basolateral membrane composition in the gills of a marine elasmobranch.

    PubMed

    Fines, G A; Ballantyne, J S; Wright, P A

    2001-01-01

    In elasmobranch fishes, urea occurs at high concentrations (350-600 mM) in the body fluids and tissues, where it plays an important role in osmoregulation. Retention of urea by the gill against this huge blood-to-water diffusion gradient requires specialized adaptations to the epithelial cell membranes. Experiments were performed to determine the mechanisms and structural features that facilitate urea retention by the gill of the spiny dogfish Squalus acanthias. Analysis of urea uptake by gill basolateral membrane vesicles revealed the presence of a phloretin-sensitive (half inhibition 0.09 mM), sodium-coupled, secondary active urea transporter (Michaelis constant = 10.1 mM, maximal velocity = 0.34 micromol. h(-1). mg protein(-1)). We propose that this system actively transports urea out of the gill epithelial cells back into the blood against the urea concentration gradient. Lipid analyses of the basolateral membrane revealed high levels of cholesterol contributing to the highest reported cholesterol-to-phospholipid molar ratio (3.68). This unique combination of active urea transport and modification of the phospholipid bilayer membrane is responsible for decreasing the gill permeability to urea and facilitating urea retention by the gill of Squalus acanthias. PMID:11124129

  1. Ultrastructural alterations in the gills of Labeo rohita fingerlings exposed to thermal extremes.

    PubMed

    Das, T; Sahu, N P; Chakraborty, S K; Chatterjee, N; Mohammed, M S; Dalvi, R S; Baruah, K; Pal, A K

    2014-02-01

    This study aimed to determine the cellular alterations in the gill of Labeo rohita exposed to lethal temperature maxima (LTM ax ) and lethal temperature minima (LTM in ) by means of transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Acclimation of advanced fingerlings of L. rohita was carried out at 26°C for 30 days. Acclimated fish were subjected to a constant rate of increase or decrease in temperature (0.3°C/min) until the LTM ax and LTM in values were reached. Dissected gills were processed for TEM, both at the end of acclimation period at ambient temperature (26°C) and at lethal temperatures. Results indicated that at ambient temperature, the gill tissues appeared normal. However, significant changes were observed at lethal temperatures. The gill tissues at lethal temperature maxima showed severely damaged lamellae, with more vacuolated space. At lethal temperature minima, gill tissues showed increased density of mitochondria. Our prima-facie report indicated that L. rohita exposed to lethal temperatures exhibited marked ultrastructural changes in the gills. PMID:23480531

  2. Characterization of the CD200 receptor family in mice and humans and their interactions with CD200.

    PubMed

    Wright, Gavin J; Cherwinski, Holly; Foster-Cuevas, Mildred; Brooke, Gary; Puklavec, Michael J; Bigler, Mike; Song, Yaoli; Jenmalm, Maria; Gorman, Dan; McClanahan, Terri; Liu, Man-Ru; Brown, Marion H; Sedgwick, Jonathon D; Phillips, Joseph H; Barclay, A Neil

    2003-09-15

    CD200 (OX2) is a broadly distributed cell surface glycoprotein that interacts with a structurally related receptor (CD200R) expressed on rodent myeloid cells and is involved in regulation of macrophage function. We report the first characterization of human CD200R (hCD200R) and define its binding characteristics to hCD200. We also report the identification of a closely related gene to hCD200R, designated hCD200RLa, and four mouse CD200R-related genes (termed mCD200RLa-d). CD200, CD200R, and CD200R-related genes were closely linked in humans and mice, suggesting that these genes arose by gene duplication. The distributions of the receptor genes were determined by quantitative RT-PCR, and protein expression was confirmed by a set of novel mAbs. The distribution of mouse and human CD200R was similar, with strongest labeling of macrophages and neutrophils, but also other leukocytes, including monocytes, mast cells, and T lymphocytes. Two mCD200 receptor-like family members, designated mCD200RLa and mCD200RLb, were shown to pair with the activatory adaptor protein, DAP12, suggesting that these receptors would transmit strong activating signals in contrast to the apparent inhibitory signal delivered by triggering the CD200R. Despite substantial sequence homology with mCD200R, mCD200RLa and mCD200RLb did not bind mCD200, and presently have unknown ligands. The CD200 receptor gene family resembles the signal regulatory proteins and killer Ig-related receptors in having receptor family members with potential activatory and inhibitory functions that may play important roles in immune regulation and balance. Because manipulation of the CD200-CD200R interaction affects the outcome of rodent disease models, targeting of this pathway may have therapeutic utility. PMID:12960329

  3. Oxidative stress response in gill and liver of Liza saliens, from the Esmoriz-Paramos coastal lagoon, Portugal.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, C; Fontaínhas-Fernandes, A; Ferreira, M; Salgado, M A

    2008-08-01

    Tissue-specific responses against oxidative stress and lipid peroxidation were analyzed in wild adult mullet (Liza saliens) caught in the Portuguese coastal lagoon Esmoriz-Paramos. Parameters measured were catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and glutathione-S-transferase (GST) activities in liver and gill tissues and lipid peroxidation. The enzyme activities were related to gill histopathological alterations, as well as to heavy metals (Cu and Zn) concentrations in these tissues. Gill epithelium of L. saliens showed histological alterations, such as epithelial hyperplasia resulting in lamellar fusion, epithelial lifting, vasodilatation, and lamellar aneurisms, with a prevalence ranging from 62% to 92%. The highest Cu content was found in liver (379 mg x kg(-1)), while the highest Zn content was observed in gill (119 mg x kg(-1)). SOD and CAT activities showed differences between gill and liver. The highest activities found were SOD in gill (10.1 U/mg protein) and CAT in liver (39.2 mmol/min/mg protein). In gill, CAT activity was negatively related to both Cu levels and gill lifting, while a positive relationship was found between SOD activity and fish age. The positive relationship between Cu and CAT activity in liver suggests that an increase in metabolic level is related to Cu-induced oxidative stress. The decrease in gill CAT activity can be due to osmotic stress caused by damaged gill epithelium. CAT activity in liver is an appropriate biomarker of oxidative stress in the Esmoriz-Paramos lagoon. PMID:18196193

  4. Origin and differentiation of ionocytes in gill epithelium of teleost fish.

    PubMed

    Conte, Frank P

    2012-01-01

    This paper focuses on the environmental cues that transform the gills of euryhaline teleost fish from an oxygen exchange structure into a bifunctional organ that can control both gaseous movement and water/ion transport. The cellular development that allows this structure to accomplish these tasks begins shortly after fertilization of the egg. It involves alterations of structure and function of embryonic cells [ionoblasts (IB)] that are shed from the pharyngeal anlage area of the embryo. These IB contain unique protein-receptor domains in the plasma membrane. These receptors respond specifically to the environmental cues effecting a calcium-binding protein receptor [calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR)]. The CaSR containing IB act as stem cells and are acted upon by isotocin, a heteroprotein regulator which induces them to form progenitor ionocytes (pIC). The pIC form two types of cells. The first type becomes an aquaphilic ionocyte which regulates uptake of ions and through aquaporin molecules transports water out of the cell and controls body fluids of the fish. This mechanism is essential for freshwater living. The second type becomes a halophilic ionocyte and transports ions out of the cell and controls cell shrinkage by uptake of water via aquaporin molecules. This mechanism is essential for seawater living. These differentiating events in the pIC are controlled by the cross talking of genomic mechanisms found in the precursor IB. To unravel the cross talking events it is necessary to uncover how these genetic pathways are regulated by transcriptional and translational events coming from complementary DNA. Various gene families are involved such as those found in apoptosis mechanisms, regulatory volume regulators and ionic transport systems (cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator). PMID:22959300

  5. Impact of ocean acidification on antimicrobial activity in gills of the blue mussel (Mytilus edulis).

    PubMed

    Hernroth, B; Baden, S; Tassidis, H; Hörnaeus, K; Guillemant, J; Bergström Lind, S; Bergquist, J

    2016-08-01

    Here, we aimed to investigate potential effects of ocean acidification on antimicrobial peptide (AMP) activity in the gills of Mytilus edulis, as gills are directly facing seawater and the changing pH (predicted to be reduced from ∼8.1 to ∼7.7 by 2100). The AMP activity of gill and haemocyte extracts was compared at pH 6.0, 7.7 and 8.1, with a radial diffusion assay against Escherichia coli. The activity of the gill extracts was not affected by pH, while it was significantly reduced with increasing pH in the haemocyte extracts. Gill extracts were also tested against different species of Vibrio (V. parahaemolyticus, V. tubiashii, V. splendidus, V. alginolyticus) at pH 7.7 and 8.1. The metabolic activity of the bacteria decreased by ∼65-90%, depending on species of bacteria, but was, as in the radial diffusion assay, not affected by pH. The results indicated that AMPs from gills are efficient in a broad pH-range. However, when mussels were pre-exposed for pH 7.7 for four month the gill extracts presented significantly lower inhibit of bacterial growth. A full in-depth proteome investigation of gill extracts, using LC-Orbitrap MS/MS technique, showed that among previously described AMPs from haemocytes of Mytilus, myticin A was found up-regulated in response to lipopolysaccharide, 3 h post injection. Sporadic occurrence of other immune related peptides/proteins also pointed to a rapid response (0.5-3 h p.i.). Altogether, our results indicate that the gills of blue mussels constitute an important first line defence adapted to act at the pH of seawater. The antimicrobial activity of the gills is however modulated when mussels are under the pressure of ocean acidification, which may give future advantages for invading pathogens. PMID:27288994

  6. Simulation of acid-base condition and copper speciation in the fish gill microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Tao, S; Wen, Y; Long, A; Dawson, R; Cao, J; Xu, F

    2001-05-01

    pH, alkalinity, and mucus content in the fish gill microenvironment of carp (Cyprinus carpio) were measured by exposing fish to copper at various water pH levels using an apparatus which separates inspired and expired water. The relationship between pH levels inside and outside of the gill microenvironment, between pH and alkalinity, and between mucus secretion, pH, and copper exposure concentration were modeled. Copper speciation in the surrounding water and in the fish gill microenvironment was simulated using MINTEQA2 chemical equilibrium calculation software. The results of the modeling for pH, alkalinity, and mucus calculation were then adopted as inputs for purposes of parameter identification in the speciation modeling. The differences observed in the copper species distribution between that of the fish gill microenvironment and the surrounding water were based on the speciation modeling. The change in copper bioavailability for fish uptake was also examined. The results indicate the presence of an experimental pH balance point at 6.9, where the pH in the fish gill microenvironment is identical to that of the surrounding water. The observed deviation range in pH levels between that found at the gills and that of the surrounding water varied from -0.4 to 0.8 units. A sinusoidal model was developed for calculation of gill pH based on the pH of the surrounding water. Models calculating alkalinity either in the gill microenvironment or in the surrounding water and for estimating mucus secretion were also developed. The results of the chemical equilibrium calculations demonstrate that, within a pH range of 6-9, the dominant species of copper in bulk solution shifted from free ions to that of the hydroxo complex. With respect to the fish gill microenvironment, the dominant species found under acidic conditions were the mucus copper complex and free ions. Because of the influence of mucus complexation and pH change, bioavailable copper species in the fish gill

  7. McPHAC: McGill Planar Hydrogen Atmosphere Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haakonsen, Christian Bernt; Turner, Monica L.; Tacik, Nick A.; Rutledge, Robert E.

    2012-10-01

    The McGill Planar Hydrogen Atmosphere Code (McPHAC) v1.1 calculates the hydrostatic equilibrium structure and emergent spectrum of an unmagnetized hydrogen atmosphere in the plane-parallel approximation at surface gravities appropriate for neutron stars. McPHAC incorporates several improvements over previous codes for which tabulated model spectra are available: (1) Thomson scattering is treated anisotropically, which is shown to result in a 0.2%-3% correction in the emergent spectral flux across the 0.1-5 keV passband; (2) the McPHAC source code is made available to the community, allowing it to be scrutinized and modified by other researchers wishing to study or extend its capabilities; and (3) the numerical uncertainty resulting from the discrete and iterative solution is studied as a function of photon energy, indicating that McPHAC is capable of producing spectra with numerical uncertainties <0.01%. The accuracy of the spectra may at present be limited to ~1%, but McPHAC enables researchers to study the impact of uncertain inputs and additional physical effects, thereby supporting future efforts to reduce those inaccuracies. Comparison of McPHAC results with spectra from one of the previous model atmosphere codes (NSA) shows agreement to lsim1% near the peaks of the emergent spectra. However, in the Wien tail a significant deficit of flux in the spectra of the previous model is revealed, determined to be due to the previous work not considering large enough optical depths at the highest photon frequencies. The deficit is most significant for spectra with T eff < 105.6 K, though even there it may not be of much practical importance for most observations.

  8. [Psychopathological study on Gilles de la Tourette's Syndrome].

    PubMed

    Suzuki, M

    1996-01-01

    Ten cases of Gilles de la Tourette's Syndrome (GTS) are reported. Average age of onset of the syndrome was 6.3 years old. Many of them were eldest children. 40% of them were caused by hereditary factor, and 40% of them had some abnormalities at their birth, for verbal tics including coprolalia. The GTS were classified into two types, Type I and Type II, from psychopathological point of view. Type I is "sadistic self-conversion type" and Type II is "masochistic personality type." Type I have an experience of attacks from others first, and, then, the desire of sadism aroused by the others converts to themselves after the others are abandoned from their mind, but it remains the stage of self-injurious. Principal mechanisms of Type I are "turning round the desire upon oneself" and "identification of oneself to the aggression." Type II have basically masochistic personality. They desire to be loved by others, but frustration that they feel they are not loved by others arouse the tic symptoms that violate the prohibition. With the tic symptoms, they can gain "punishment" and "pleasure" at the same time. Their symptoms of tics have the meaning of "masochistic provocation." They have the mechanism of "avoidance of anxiety by demanding to be loved by others." Both types have a common psychopathology, that is, they can not grasp objects (self or others) as a whole. It is suggested that patients with the GTS stopped their growth at pre-sexual stage. There exists a phase of self-injurious tics and that of other-injurious (provocately) tics during the progress of the symptoms of complex motor tics and verbal tics (coprolalia). The phase when both tics turn over each other was also observed. Echo-phenomena were seen only for patients of Type I. It is suggested that the degree of organic dysfunction of the brain and spectrum of masochism are almost coincident. PMID:8935828

  9. Genome scan for linkage to Gilles de la Tourette syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Barr, C.L.; Livingston, J.; Williamson, R.

    1994-09-01

    Gilles de la Tourette Syndrome (TS) is a familial, neuropsychiatric disorder characterized by chronic, intermittent motor and vocal tics. In addition to tics, affected individuals frequently display symptoms such as attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder and/or obsessive compulsive disorder. Genetic analyses of family data have suggested that susceptibility to the disorder is most likely due to a single genetic locus with a dominant mode of transmission and reduced penetrance. In the search for genetic linkage for TS, we have collected well-characterized pedigrees with multiple affected individuals on whom extensive diagnostic evaluations have been done. The first stage of our study is to scan the genome systematically using a panel of uniformly spaced (10 to 20 cM), highly polymorphic, microsatellite markers on 5 families segregating TS. To date, 290 markers have been typed and 3,660 non-overlapping cM of the genome have been excluded for possible linkage under the assumption of genetic homogeneity. Because of the possibility of locus heterogeneity overall summed exclusion is not considered tantamount to absolute exclusion of a disease locus in that region. The results from each family are carefully evaluated and a positive lod score in a single family is followed up by typing closely linked markers. Linkage to TS was examined by two-point analysis using the following genetic model: single autosomal dominant gene with gene frequency .003 and maximum penetrance of .99. An age-of-onset correction is included using a linear function increasing from age 2 years to 21 years. A small rate of phenocopies is also incorporated into the model. Only individuals with TS or CMT according to DSM III-R criteria were regarded as affected for the purposes of this summary. Additional markers are being tested to provide coverage at 5 cM intervals. Moreover, we are currently analyzing the data non-parametrically using the Affected-Pedigree-Member Method of linkage analysis.

  10. In vitro effect of various xenobiotics on trout gill cell volume regulation after hypotonic shock.

    PubMed

    Leguen, I; Prunet, P

    2001-08-01

    Their functions and localisation can expose gill cells to volume changes. To maintain their vital functions, these gill cells must regulate their own volume after cellular swelling or shrinkage. Recently, we showed that rainbow trout pavement gill cells in primary culture have the capacity to regulate their own volume after cellular swelling induced by hypotonic shock. This so-called regulatory volume decrease (RVD) is associated with intracellular calcium increase, which occurs as a transient peak followed by a plateau when maintained a hypotonic condition. Return to an isotonic medium restores baseline [Ca2+]i level. In this study, the effect of different xenobiotics on cellular swelling induced RVD and its calcium signal was investigated in trout pavement gill cells in primary culture. These cells were exposed to different pollutants after confluent epithelium was obtained. After 36 h in xenobiotics exposure in vitro, cellular volume and intracellular calcium concentration were measured. Nonylphenol poly- and di-ethoxylate were lethal at concentrations of 10 and 100 microM, respectively. With 10 microM of the diethoxylate form, cells did not die but, unlike non-treated cells, burst during hypotonic shock (2/3rd strength Ringer solution). With 1 microM nonylphenol polyethoxylate (NPnEO), RVD and [Ca2+]i were reduced. Copper (10 and 100 microM) had no significant effect on gill cell volume regulation. However, the heavy metal modified calcium response to hypotonic shock by inhibiting return to baseline level under isotonic conditions. 10 microM prochloraz and 2,4-dichloroaniline had no effect on cell morphology, volume and [Ca2+]i concentration. With 100 microM, however, prochloraz was lethal and dichloroaniline increased baseline [Ca2+]i. These results indicate that the effects observed on gill cells are consistent with the known toxic properties of the molecules tested, thus confirming the validity of primary culture to investigate the toxic effects of

  11. Gill Morphology and Oxygen Diffusion Distance in Juvenile Striped Killifish, Fundulus majalis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McEnroe, M.; Rivera, L.; La Fortune, B.; Miller, A.

    2010-12-01

    Striped killifish (Fundulus majalis) are an important estuarine forage fish. Larvae and juveniles utilize shallow marsh pools which become warm (>30 C) and hypoxic (DO < 2mg/l) in summer. To investigate potential morphological adaptations to this environment we studied gill morphology. Gill surface area (GSA) and oxygen diffusion distance are important parameters for oxygen uptake, as expressed by Fick's Equation for diffusion. To measure these parameters fish (N=20, 20-50 mm TL) were collected from marsh pools and adjacent Long Island Sound in late summer, weighed, and measured. The gills were fixed in Karnovsky’s solution. For scanning electron microscopy (SEM) they were rinsed, dehydrated in a graded ETOH series, and critically point dried, sputter-coated and were observed with ISR-SR-50 SEM. Gill morphology (number of filaments, filament length, lamellar density, and lamellar size) were quantified using SEM. Total gill surface area (GSA) was calculated using the method of Hughes (1984); GSA = L* n* bl where L = sum of filament lengths, n = number of lamellae/mm, and bl = bilateral lamellar surface area. To measure oxygen diffusion distance from water to blood, samples were embedded in Araldite 502/Embed 812 TM plastic medium for transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Stained (uranyl acetate and calcinated lead citrate) thin sections were examined using a FEI/Philips Morgagni 268 transmission electron microscope (TEM). Gill lamellar diffusion distance was measured using the technique of Matey et al., 2008 and found to be low (1.0 µm ± 0.4; mean ± SD; N= 17). Gill structure and oxygen diffusion distance will be compared to other fishes from normoxic and hypoxic environments.

  12. Alterations in gill structure in tropical reef fishes as a result of elevated temperatures.

    PubMed

    Bowden, A J; Gardiner, N M; Couturier, C S; Stecyk, J A W; Nilsson, G E; Munday, P L; Rummer, J L

    2014-09-01

    Tropical regions are expected to be some of the most affected by rising sea surface temperatures (SSTs) because seasonal temperature variations are minimal. As temperatures rise, less oxygen dissolves in water, but metabolic requirements of fish and thus, the demand for effective oxygen uptake, increase. Gill remodelling is an acclimation strategy well documented in freshwater cyprinids experiencing large seasonal variations in temperature and oxygen as well as an amphibious killifish upon air exposure. However, no study has investigated whether tropical reef fishes remodel their gills to allow for increased oxygen demands at elevated temperatures. We tested for gill remodelling in five coral reef species (Acanthochromis polyacanthus, Chromis atripectoralis, Pomacentrus moluccensis, Dascyllus melanurus and Cheilodipterus quinquelineatus) from populations in northern Papua New Guinea (2° 35.765' S; 150° 46.193' E). Fishes were acclimated for 12-14 days to 29 and 31°C (representing their seasonal range) and 33 and 34°C to account for end-of-century predicted temperatures. We measured lamellar perimeter, cross-sectional area, base thickness, and length for five filaments on the 2nd gill arches and qualitatively assessed 3rd gill arches via scanning electron microscopy (SEM). All species exhibited significant differences in the quantitative measurements made on the lamellae, but no consistent trends with temperature were observed. SEM only revealed alterations in gill morphology in P. moluccensis. The overall lack of changes in gill morphology with increasing temperature suggests that these near-equatorial reef fishes may fail to maintain adequate O2 uptake under future climate scenarios unless other adaptive mechanisms are employed. PMID:24862962

  13. Gill remodeling in fish--a new fashion or an ancient secret?

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Göran E

    2007-07-01

    While a large respiratory surface area is good for gas exchange, it also poses several problems, including energetically unfavorable fluxes of water and ions. As a result, fishes appear to have a respiratory surface area that is matched to their oxygen demands. When faced with changes in their need for oxygen uptake, e.g. through altered physical activity or altered ambient oxygen levels, fishes have long been known to make two different adjustments: (1) to change the water flow over the gills or (2) to change the blood flow inside the gills. It has recently become clear that at least some teleosts have a third option: to reversibly remodel the gill morphology. Studies have shown that the lamellae of crucian carp Carassius carassius gills are embedded in a cell mass during normoxic conditions or at low temperature, while much of this cell mass dies off in hypoxia and at higher temperatures, thereby exposing a much larger respiratory surface area. Gill remodeling has subsequently been seen in two more cyprinids and in the mangrove killifish Kryptolebias marmoratus. In the latter case it appears to be an adaptation to periods of air exposure. Gill remodeling in response to changing respiratory requirements could be an ancient mechanism, occurring in many more teleosts than presently known. It is tempting to suggest that gill remodeling has been overlooked in many fishes, either because it is relatively subtle in some species, or because fishes are often kept at the warmer end of their temperature range where they need fully protruding lamellae. PMID:17601943

  14. Quantitative Molecular Phenotyping of Gill Remodeling in a Cichlid Fish Responding to Salinity Stress*

    PubMed Central

    Kültz, Dietmar; Li, Johnathon; Gardell, Alison; Sacchi, Romina

    2013-01-01

    A two-tiered label-free quantitative (LFQ) proteomics workflow was used to elucidate how salinity affects the molecular phenotype, i.e. proteome, of gills from a cichlid fish, the euryhaline tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus). The workflow consists of initial global profiling of relative tryptic peptide abundances in treated versus control samples followed by targeted identification (by MS/MS) and quantitation (by chromatographic peak area integration) of validated peptides for each protein of interest. Fresh water acclimated tilapia were independently exposed in separate experiments to acute short-term (34 ppt) and gradual long-term (70 ppt, 90 ppt) salinity stress followed by molecular phenotyping of the gill proteome. The severity of salinity stress can be deduced with high technical reproducibility from the initial global label-free quantitative profiling step alone at both peptide and protein levels. However, an accurate regulation ratio can only be determined by targeted label-free quantitative profiling because not all peptides used for protein identification are also valid for quantitation. Of the three salinity challenges, gradual acclimation to 90 ppt has the most pronounced effect on gill molecular phenotype. Known salinity effects on tilapia gills, including an increase in the size and number of mitochondria-rich ionocytes, activities of specific ion transporters, and induction of specific molecular chaperones are reflected in the regulation of abundances of the corresponding proteins. Moreover, specific protein isoforms that are responsive to environmental salinity change are resolved and it is revealed that salinity effects on the mitochondrial proteome are nonuniform. Furthermore, protein NDRG1 has been identified as a novel key component of molecular phenotype restructuring during salinity-induced gill remodeling. In conclusion, besides confirming known effects of salinity on gills of euryhaline fish, molecular phenotyping reveals novel insight into

  15. Impact of detergents on the protein histochemistry of various cell types of the gill epithelium of Rita rita.

    PubMed

    Roy, D

    1988-04-01

    Fish, Rita rita, were exposed to an anionic detergent, dodecylbenzene sodium sulfonate, 6.9 mg per litre of tap water (96-hr LC50 of the detergent). A gradual decrease in the protein constituents of the major cell types, viz, the epithelial cells and the goblet mucous cells in the epithelium lining the gill arch, gill filament, and club cells present only in the gill arch epithelium has been observed by using a series of histochemical techniques. PMID:3378537

  16. Secretion of interleukin-17 by CD8+ T cells expressing CD146 (MCAM).

    PubMed

    Dagur, Pradeep K; Biancotto, Angélique; Stansky, Elena; Sen, H Nida; Nussenblatt, Robert B; McCoy, J Philip

    2014-01-01

    Interleukin-17 (IL-17) has been associated with the pathogenesis of numerous autoimmune diseases. CD4+ T cells secreting IL-17 are termed Th17 cells. CD8+ T cells, designated Tc17 cells, are also capable of secreting IL-17. Here we describe a population of Tc17 cells characterized by the expression of surface CD146, an endothelial adhesion molecule. These cells display signatures of a human Tc17 genotype and phenotype. Circulating CD8+CD146+ T cells are present in low levels in healthy adults. Elevations in CD8+CD146+ T cells are found in Behcet's disease and birdshot retinochoroidopathy, which have been reported to have HLA class I associations. Sarcoidosis does not have a class I association and displays an increase in CD4+ CD146+ T cells but not in CD8+CD146+ T cells. CD146 on these cells may facilitate their ability to bind to, and migrate through, endothelium, as has been reported for CD4+CD146+ T cells. PMID:24681356

  17. Molecular dissection of the CD2-CD58 counter-receptor interface identifies CD2 Tyr86 and CD58 Lys34 residues as the functional "hot spot".

    PubMed

    Kim, M; Sun, Z Y; Byron, O; Campbell, G; Wagner, G; Wang, J; Reinherz, E L

    2001-09-28

    The heterophilic CD2-CD58 adhesion interface contains interdigitating residues that impart high specificity and rapid binding kinetics. To define the hot spot of this counter-receptor interaction, we characterized CD2 adhesion domain variants harboring a single mutation of the central Tyr86 or of each amino acid residue forming a salt link/hydrogen bond. Alanine mutations at D31, D32 and K34 on the C strand and K43 and R48 on the C' strand reduce affinity for CD58 by 47-127-fold as measured by isothermal titration calorimetry. The Y86A mutant reduces affinity by approximately 1000-fold, whereas Y86F is virtually without effect, underscoring the importance of the phenyl ring rather than the hydroxyl moiety. The CD2-CD58 crystal structure offers a detailed view of this key functional epitope: CD2 D31 and D32 orient the side-chain of CD58 K34 such that CD2 Y86 makes hydrophobic contact with the extended aliphatic component of CD58 K34 between CD2 Y86 and CD58 F46. The elucidation of this hot spot provides a new target for rational design of immunosuppressive compounds and suggests a general approach for other receptors. PMID:11575926

  18. Altered structural connectivity of cortico-striato-pallido-thalamic networks in Gilles de la Tourette syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Marrakchi-Kacem, Linda; Lecomte, Sophie; Valabregue, Romain; Poupon, Fabrice; Guevara, Pamela; Tucholka, Alan; Mangin, Jean-François; Vidailhet, Marie; Lehericy, Stephane; Hartmann, Andreas; Poupon, Cyril

    2015-01-01

    Gilles de la Tourette syndrome is a childhood-onset syndrome characterized by the presence and persistence of motor and vocal tics. A dysfunction of cortico-striato-pallido-thalamo-cortical networks in this syndrome has been supported by convergent data from neuro-pathological, electrophysiological as well as structural and functional neuroimaging studies. Here, we addressed the question of structural integration of cortico-striato-pallido-thalamo-cortical networks in Gilles de la Tourette syndrome. We specifically tested the hypothesis that deviant brain development in Gilles de la Tourette syndrome could affect structural connectivity within the input and output basal ganglia structures and thalamus. To this aim, we acquired data on 49 adult patients and 28 gender and age-matched control subjects on a 3 T magnetic resonance imaging scanner. We used and further implemented streamline probabilistic tractography algorithms that allowed us to quantify the structural integration of cortico-striato-pallido-thalamo-cortical networks. To further investigate the microstructure of white matter in patients with Gilles de la Tourette syndrome, we also evaluated fractional anisotropy and radial diffusivity in these pathways, which are both sensitive to axonal package and to myelin ensheathment. In patients with Gilles de la Tourette syndrome compared to control subjects, we found white matter abnormalities in neuronal pathways connecting the cerebral cortex, the basal ganglia and the thalamus. Specifically, striatum and thalamus had abnormally enhanced structural connectivity with primary motor and sensory cortices, as well as paracentral lobule, supplementary motor area and parietal cortices. This enhanced connectivity of motor cortex positively correlated with severity of tics measured by the Yale Global Tics Severity Scale and was not influenced by current medication status, age or gender of patients. Independently of the severity of tics, lateral and medial orbito

  19. Molecular characterization of CD9 and CD63, two tetraspanin family members expressed in trout B lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Castro, Rosario; Abós, Beatriz; González, Lucia; Aquilino, Carolina; Pignatelli, Jaime; Tafalla, Carolina

    2015-07-01

    Tetraspanins are a family of membrane-organizing proteins, characterized by the presence of four highly conserved transmembrane regions that mediate diverse physiological functions. In the current study, we have identified two novel tetraspanin members in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), homologs to mammalian CD9 and CD63. Both genes were expressed in muscle, skin, gills, hindgut, gonad, liver, spleen, head kidney, thymus and peripheral blood leukocytes. Throughout the early life cycle stages, CD9 mRNA levels significantly increased after first feeding, whereas CD63 transcription remained constant during all the developmental stages analyzed. In response to an experimental bath infection with viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV), CD9 transcription was down-regulated in the gills, while CD63 mRNA levels were down-regulated in the head kidney. Instead, when the virus was intraperitoneally injected, the transcription of both genes was significantly up-regulated in peritoneal cells at several days post-infection. Additionally, both genes were transcriptionally up-regulated in the muscle of trout injected with a VHSV DNA vaccine. To gain insight on the relation of these tetraspanins with B cell activity we determined their constitutive expression in naive IgM(+) populations from different sources and observed that both molecules were being transcribed by IgM(+) cells in different tissues. Furthermore, CD9 transcription was significantly down-regulated in splenic IgM(+) cells in response to in vitro VHSV exposure. Our results provide insights on the potential role of these tetraspanins on teleost B cell and antiviral immunity. PMID:25769915

  20. Hagfish: Champions of CO2 tolerance question the origins of vertebrate gill function

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Daniel W.; Sardella, Brian; Rummer, Jodie L.; Sackville, Michael; Brauner, Colin J.

    2015-01-01

    The gill is widely accepted to have played a key role in the adaptive radiation of early vertebrates by supplanting the skin as the dominant site of gas exchange. However, in the most basal extant craniates, the hagfishes, gills play only a minor role in gas exchange. In contrast, we found hagfish gills to be associated with a tremendous capacity for acid-base regulation. Indeed, Pacific hagfish exposed acutely to severe sustained hypercarbia tolerated among the most severe blood acidoses ever reported (1.2 pH unit reduction) and subsequently exhibited the greatest degree of acid-base compensation ever observed in an aquatic chordate. This was accomplished through an unprecedented increase in plasma [HCO3−] (>75 mM) in exchange for [Cl−]. We thus propose that the first physiological function of the ancestral gill was acid-base regulation, and that the gill was later co-opted for its central role in gas exchange in more derived aquatic vertebrates. PMID:26057989

  1. Effects of gill-net trauma, barotrauma, and deep release on postrelease mortality of Lake Trout

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ng, Elizabeth L.; Fredericks, Jim P.; Quist, Michael C.

    2015-01-01

    Unaccounted postrelease mortality violates assumptions of many fisheries studies, thereby biasing parameter estimates and reducing efficiency. We evaluated effects of gill-net trauma, barotrauma, and deep-release treatment on postrelease mortality of lake trout Salvelinus namaycush. Lake trout were captured at depths up to 65 m with gill nets in Priest Lake, Idaho, and held in a large enclosure for 10–12 d. Postrelease mortality was the same for surface-release–and deep-release–treated fish (41%). Mixed-effects logistic regression models were used to evaluate effects of intrinsic and environmental factors on the probability of mortality. Presence of gill-net trauma and degree of barotrauma were associated with increased probability of postrelease mortality. Smaller fish were also more likely to suffer postrelease mortality. On average, deep-release treatment did not reduce postrelease mortality, but effectiveness of treatment increased with fish length. Of the environmental factors evaluated, only elapsed time between lifting the first and last anchors of a gill-net gang (i.e., lift time) was significantly related to postrelease mortality. Longer lift times, which may allow ascending lake trout to acclimate to depressurization, were associated with lower postrelease mortality rates. Our study suggests that postrelease mortality may be higher than previously assumed for lake trout because mortality continues after 48 h. In future studies, postrelease mortality could be reduced by increasing gill-net lift times and increasing mesh size used to increase length of fish captured.

  2. Gills of hydrothermal vent annelids: Structure, ultrastructure and functional implications in two alvinellid species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jouin, Claude; Gaill, Françoise

    The anatomy, fine structure, diffusion distances and respiratory surface areas of the gills of two species of the polychaete family Alvinellidae have been investigated. Each gill consists of a stem on which are inserted two opposite rows of respiratory elements: flat sickle-shaped lamellae in Alvinella pompejana and cylindrical filaments in Paralvinella grasslei. Both lamellae and filaments have a ciliated mucous epidermis, a central layer of supporting and muscle cells and are devoid of coelomic cavity. Each respiratory element possesses one afferent and one efferent marginal vessel, united to each other distally, and connected proximally to separate longitudinal vessels running in the stem. Superficial parallel blood spaces connect the marginal vessels across the lamella or filament. Deeper, between the basal laminae of the epidermis and that of the central cell layer, a blood sinus is also present. The marginal vessels and the superficial blood spaces actually are intraepidermal extensions of this deep blood sinus. The diffusion distances are very small owing to the intraepidermal position of the respiratory blood spaces. The specific gill surface areas in A. pompejana and P. grasslei are the largest known today in polychaetes, respectively 12 and 47 cm 2 per g wet weight. The distinctive features of the gills are possibly related to a low oxygen content of the ambient seawater. Numerous crystalline granules scattered in the gill epidermis suggest that this epithelium has a detoxifying function.

  3. Experimental induction of gill disease in Atlantic salmon Salmo salar smolts with Tenacibaculum maritimum.

    PubMed

    Powell, Mark; Carson, Jeremy; van Gelderen, Rebecca

    2004-11-01

    An experimentally induced bacterial infection of marine Atlantic salmon Salmo salar smolt gills was developed using strains of Tenacibaculum maritimum originally isolated from disease outbreaks in Tasmania. The gills of salmon were inoculated with a high concentration of bacteria (4 x 10(11) cells per fish) of either strain 00/3280 or 89/4747 T. maritimum. Gentle abrasion of the gills was used to enhance the progression of gill disease. One strain (00/3280) was highly pathogenic, causing morbidity and mortality within 24 h post-inoculation, and produced acute focal branchial necrosis associated with significant increases in plasma osmolality and lactate concentration compared with controls (non-inoculated) or strain 89/4747-inoculated fish. There were no differences in the whole body net ammonium flux between control (non-inoculated) and strain 00/3820-inoculated fish. Gill abrasion resulted in acute telangiectasis and focal lamellar hyperplasia in all fish regardless of bacterial inoculation. This work provides the basis of a challenge model suitable for investigating the pathophysiological processes associated with acute branchial necrosis in marine fish, suggesting that osmoregulatory and possibly respiratory dysfunction are the primary consequences of infection. PMID:15609873

  4. Divergent immunity and energetic programs in the gills of migratory and resident Oncorhynchus mykiss.

    PubMed

    Sutherland, Ben J G; Hanson, Kyle C; Jantzen, Johanna R; Koop, Ben F; Smith, Christian T

    2014-04-01

    Divergent life history strategies occur in steelhead or rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss, and many populations produce both migrant (anadromous fish that move to the ocean after rearing) and resident (do not migrate and remain in fresh water) individuals. Mechanisms leading to each type are only partially understood; while the general tendency of a population is heritable, individual tendency may be plastic, influenced by local environment. Steelhead hatchery programmes aim to mitigate losses in wild stocks by producing trout that will migrate to the ocean and not compete with wild trout for limited freshwater resources. To increase our understanding of gill function in these migratory or resident phenotypes, here we compare gill transcriptome profiles of hatchery-released fish either at the release site (residents) or five river kilometres downstream while still in full fresh water (migrants). To test whether any of these genes can be used as predictive markers for smoltification, we compared these genes between migrant-like and undifferentiated trout while still in the hatchery in a common environment (prerelease). Results confirmed the gradual process of smoltification, and the importance of energetics, gill remodelling and ion transport capacity for migrants. Additionally, residents overexpressed transcripts involved in antiviral defences, potentially for immune surveillance via dendritic cells in the gills. The best smoltification marker candidate was protein s100a4, expression of which was highly correlated with Na(+) , K(+) ATPase (NKA) activity and smolt-like morphology in pre- and postrelease trout gills. PMID:24612010

  5. Prolactin regulates transcription of the ion uptake Na+/Cl− cotransporter (ncc) gene in zebrafish gill

    PubMed Central

    Breves, Jason P.; Serizier, Sandy B.; Goffin, Vincent; McCormick, Stephen D.; Karlstrom, Rolf O.

    2013-01-01

    Prolactin (PRL) is a well-known regulator of ion and water transport within osmoregulatory tissues across vertebrate species, yet how PRL acts on some of its target tissues remains poorly understood. Using zebrafish as a model, we show that ionocytes in the gill directly respond to systemic PRL to regulate mechanisms of ion uptake. Ion-poor conditions led to increases in the expression of PRL receptor (prlra), Na+/Cl− cotransporter (ncc; slc12a10.2), Na+/H+ exchanger (nhe3b; slc9a3.2), and epithelial Ca2+ channel (ecac; trpv6) transcripts within the gill. Intraperitoneal injection of ovine PRL (oPRL) increased ncc and prlra transcripts, but did not affect nhe3b or ecac. Consistent with direct PRL action in the gill, addition of oPRL to cultured gill filaments stimulated ncc in a concentration-dependent manner, an effect blocked by a pure human PRL receptor antagonist (Δ1-9-G129R-hPRL). These results suggest that PRL signaling through PRL receptors in the gill regulates the expression of ncc, thereby linking this pituitary hormone with an effector of Cl− uptake in zebrafish for the first time. PMID:23395804

  6. Prolactin regulates transcription of the ion uptake Na+/Cl- cotransporter (ncc) gene in zebrafish gill

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Breves, Jason P.; Serizier, Sandy B.; Goffin, Vincent; McCormick, Stephen D.; Karlstrom, Rolf O.

    2013-01-01

    Prolactin (PRL) is a well-known regulator of ion and water transport within osmoregulatory tissues across vertebrate species, yet how PRL acts on some of its target tissues remains poorly understood. Using zebrafish as a model, we show that ionocytes in the gill directly respond to systemic PRL to regulate mechanisms of ion uptake. Ion-poor conditions led to increases in the expression of PRL receptor (prlra), Na+/Cl− cotransporter (ncc; slc12a10.2), Na+/H+ exchanger (nhe3b; slc9a3.2), and epithelial Ca2+ channel (ecac; trpv6) transcripts within the gill. Intraperitoneal injection of ovine PRL (oPRL) increased ncc and prlra transcripts, but did not affect nhe3b or ecac. Consistent with direct PRL action in the gill, addition of oPRL to cultured gill filaments stimulated ncc in a concentration-dependent manner, an effect blocked by a pure human PRL receptor antagonist (Δ1-9-G129R-hPRL). These results suggest that PRL signaling through PRL receptors in the gill regulates the expression of ncc, thereby linking this pituitary hormone with an effector of Cl− uptake in zebrafish for the first time.

  7. Gill histopathology of Maria-da-toca Hypleurochilus fissicornis by metacercariae of Bucephalus margaritae (Digenea: Bucephalidae).

    PubMed

    Silva, Renato Z; da Costa Marchiori, Natalia; Magalhães, Aimê Rachel M; Cousin, João Carlos B; Romano, Luis Alberto; Pereira, Joaber

    2016-06-01

    Gills of Maria-da-toca Hypleurochilus fissicornis collected at Ponta do Sambaqui-Florianópolis island-Brazil, were analyzed to describe the histopathology caused by metacercaria of Bucephalus margaritae. Gills were submitted to the routine histological techniques for embedding in paraffin and permanent mounting in Balsam and stereoscopic analysis. Metacercariae showed a branchial infection site pattern for encystations. The branchial infection site pattern is half-basalward in the primary branchial filament with amplitude of the infection of 1-3 metacercaria. Cysts occurred within branchial abductor muscle and cartilaginous and osseous tissues of the gills. Each metacercariae had a contentional hyaline parasitic capsule and melanin-like pigmentation. The half-apicalward region of the primary branchial filaments showed several dysplasia degrees, cartilage and osseous degeneration (pyknosis), thrombosis and immune exudated cells (mainly lymphocytes). Cytopathologies as thickening of the epithelium lining of the secondary branchial filaments were a response of the branchial infection site pattern of the metacercaria. Interlamellar obliteration and fusion of the lamellae due to the hypertrophy and hyperplasia of the epithelial lining as well as chloride cells occurred. Pyknosis of pillar cells and epithelial lining cells from the secondary branchial filaments were also present. Bucephalosis in H. fissicornis gills is no-hemorrhagic and no-fatal branchitis, but could compromises the gill functions and could permits the secondary opportunistic infections. PMID:27413297

  8. Cadmium resistance in Drosophila: a small cadmium binding substance

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobson, K.B.; Williams, M.W.; Richter, L.J.; Holt, S.E.; Hook, G.J.; Knoop, S.M.; Sloop, F.V.; Faust, J.B.

    1985-01-01

    A small cadmium-binding substance (CdBS) has been observed in adult Drosophila melanogaster that were raised for their entire growth cycle on a diet that contained 0.15 mM CdCl/sub 2/. Induction of CdBS was observed in strains that differed widely in their sensitivity of CdCl/sub 2/. This report describes the induction of CdBS and some of its characteristics. 17 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Soluble CD44 interacts with intermediate filament protein vimentin on endothelial cell surface.

    PubMed

    Päll, Taavi; Pink, Anne; Kasak, Lagle; Turkina, Marina; Anderson, Wally; Valkna, Andres; Kogerman, Priit

    2011-01-01

    CD44 is a cell surface glycoprotein that functions as hyaluronan receptor. Mouse and human serum contain substantial amounts of soluble CD44, generated either by shedding or alternative splicing. During inflammation and in cancer patients serum levels of soluble CD44 are significantly increased. Experimentally, soluble CD44 overexpression blocks cancer cell adhesion to HA. We have previously found that recombinant CD44 hyaluronan binding domain (CD44HABD) and its non-HA-binding mutant inhibited tumor xenograft growth, angiogenesis, and endothelial cell proliferation. These data suggested an additional target other than HA for CD44HABD. By using non-HA-binding CD44HABD Arg41Ala, Arg78Ser, and Tyr79Ser-triple mutant (CD443MUT) we have identified intermediate filament protein vimentin as a novel interaction partner of CD44. We found that vimentin is expressed on the cell surface of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). Endogenous CD44 and vimentin coprecipitate from HUVECs, and when overexpressed in vimentin-negative MCF-7 cells. By using deletion mutants, we found that CD44HABD and CD443MUT bind vimentin N-terminal head domain. CD443MUT binds vimentin in solution with a Kd in range of 12-37 nM, and immobilised vimentin with Kd of 74 nM. CD443MUT binds to HUVEC and recombinant vimentin displaces CD443MUT from its binding sites. CD44HABD and CD443MUT were internalized by wild-type endothelial cells, but not by lung endothelial cells isolated from vimentin knock-out mice. Together, these data suggest that vimentin provides a specific binding site for soluble CD44 on endothelial cells. PMID:22216242

  10. The Gilles de la Tourette syndrome: the current status.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Mary May

    2012-10-01

    Gilles de la Tourette syndrome (GTS) is characterised by multiple motor and one or more vocal/phonic tics. GTS was once thought to be rare, but many relatively recent studies suggest that the prevalence is about 1% of the worldwide community, apart from in Sub-Saharan Black Africa. Comorbidity and coexistent psychopathology are common, occurring in about 90% of clinical cohorts and individuals in the community. The most common comorbidities are attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, obsessive-compulsive behaviours, and disorder, and autistic spectrum disorders, while the most common coexisting psychopathologies are depression, anxiety and behavioural disorders such as oppositional defiant and conduct disorder. There has been an increasing amount of evidence to show that the quality of life in young people is reduced when compared with normative data or healthy control populations. It is widely accepted that most cases of GTS are inherited, but the genetic mechanisms appear much more complex than previously understood, as evidenced by many recent studies; indeed, there have been suggestions of 'general neurodevelopmental genes' which affect the brain development after which the 'specific GTS gene(s)' may further affect the phenotype. Other aetiopathogenetic suggestions have included environmental factors such as neuro-immunological factors, infections, prenatal and peri-natal difficulties and androgen influences. Few studies have addressed aetiology and phenotype, but initial results are exciting. The search for endophenotypes has followed subsequently. Intriguing neuroanatomical and brain circuitry abnormalities have now been suggested in GTS; the most evidence is for cortical thinning and a reduction in the size of the caudate nucleus. Thorough assessment is imperative and multidisciplinary management is the ideal. Treatment should be 'symptom targeted', and in mild cases, psycho-education and reassurance for the patient and the family may be sufficient

  11. Immunosuppression by Co-stimulatory Molecules: Inhibition of CD2-CD48/CD58 Interaction by Peptides from CD2 to Suppress Progression of Collagen-induced Arthritis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Gokhale, Ameya; Kanthala, Shanthi; Latendresse, John; Taneja, Veena; Satyanarayanajois, Seetharama

    2013-01-01

    Targeting co-stimulatory molecules to modulate the immune response has been shown to have useful therapeutic effects for autoimmune diseases. Among the co-stimulatory molecules, CD2 and CD58 are very important in the early stages of generation of an immune response. Our goal was to utilize CD2-derived peptides to modulate protein-protein interactions between CD2 and CD58, thereby modulating the immune response. Several peptides were designed based on the structure of the CD58 binding domain of CD2 protein. Among the CD2-derived peptides, peptide 6 from the F and C β-strand region of CD2 protein exhibited inhibition of cell-cell adhesion in the nanomolar concentration range. Peptide 6 was evaluated for its ability to bind to CD58 in Caco-2 cells and to CD48 in T cells from rodents. A molecular model was proposed for binding a peptide to CD58 and CD48 using docking studies. Furthermore, in vivo studies were carried out to evaluate the therapeutic ability of the peptide to modulate the immune response in the collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) mouse model. In vivo studies indicated that peptide 6 was able to suppress the progression of CIA. Evaluation of the antigenicity of peptides in CIA and transgenic animal models indicated that this peptide is not immunogenic. PMID:23530775

  12. Mercury-binding proteins of Mytilus edulis

    SciTech Connect

    Roesijadi, G.; Morris, J.E.; Calabrese, A.

    1981-11-01

    Mytilus edulis possesses low molecular weight, mercury-binding proteins. The predominant protein isolated from gill tissue is enriched in cysteinyl residues (8%) and possesses an amino acid composition similar to cadmium-binding proteins of mussels and oysters. Continuous exposure of mussels to 5 ..mu..g/l mercury results in spillover of mercury from these proteins to high molecular weight proteins. Antibodies to these proteins have been isolated, and development of immunoassays is presently underway. Preliminary studies to determine whether exposure of adult mussels to mercury will result in induction of mercury-binding proteins in offspring suggest that such proteins occur in larvae although additional studies are indicated for a conclusive demonstration.

  13. An unbalanced PD-L1/CD86 ratio in CD14(++)CD16(+) monocytes is correlated with HCV viremia during chronic HCV infection.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jiajia; Liang, Hua; Xu, Chunhui; Xu, Qiang; Zhang, Ting; Shen, Tao; Lu, Fengmin

    2014-05-01

    Circulating monocyte subsets with distinct functions play important roles in hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. However, the mechanisms have not been well studied. In this study, we analyzed the distributions and phenotypic characteristics of three circulating monocyte subsets-CD14(++)CD16(-), CD14(++)CD16(+) and CD14(+/dim)CD16(+)-in chronic HCV-infected patients, HCV spontaneous resolvers and healthy controls, and we evaluated the possible link between HCV viremia and disease progression. Our results indicated that the frequency of the CD14(++)CD16(+) monocyte subset was decreased, and negatively correlated with HCV RNA and core antigen levels during chronic HCV infection. PD-L1 expression and the PD-L1/CD86 ratio in CD14(++)CD16(+) monocytes were higher during chronic HCV infection than in spontaneous HCV resolvers and healthy controls. The PD-L1/CD86 ratio positively correlated with HCV viral load and core antigen levels. Finally, PD-L1 was significantly increased, while cytokine secretions were dramatically decreased upon Toll-like receptor (TLR) ligand binding and HCV JFH-1stimulation. These findings indicates the compromised immune status of the CD14(++)CD16(+) monocytes during chronic HCV infection and provides new insights into the specific role of the CD14(++)CD16(+) monocytes and their significance in chronic HCV infection. PMID:24531620

  14. CD44/CD24 immunophenotypes on clinicopathologic features of salivary glands malignant neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Salivary Glands Malignant Neoplasms (SGMNs) account for 3-6% of head and neck cancers and 0.3% of all cancers. Tumor cells that express CD44 and CD24 exhibit a stem-cell-like behavior. CD44 is the binding site for hyaluronic acid, and CD24 is a receptor that interacts with P-selectin to induce metastasis and tumor progression. The present study aims to evaluate the expression of CD44 and CD24 on SGMNs and correlated these data with several clinicopathologic features. Methods Immunohistochemical stains for CD44 and CD24 were performed on tissue microarrays containing SGMN samples from 69 patients. The CD44, CD24 and CD44/CD24 expression phenotypes were correlated to patient clinicopathologic features and outcome. Results CD44 expression was associated with the primary site of neoplasm (p = 0.046). CD24 was associated with clinical stage III/IV (p = 0.008), T stage (p = 0,27) and lymph node (p = 0,001). The CD44/CD24 profiles were associated with the primary site of injury (p = 0.005), lymph node (p = 0.011) and T stage (p = 0.023). Univariate analysis showed a significant relationship between clinical staging and disease- free survival (p = 0.009), and the overall survival presents relation with male gender (p = 0.011) and metastasis (p = 0.027). Conclusion In summary, our investigation confirms that the clinical stage, in accordance with the literature, is the main prognostic factor for SGMN. Additionally, we have presented some evidence that the analysis of isolated CD44 and CD24 immunoexpression or the two combined markers could give prognostic information associated to clinicopathologic features in SGMN. Virtual Slides The virtual slide(s) for this article can be found here: http://www.diagnosticpathology.diagnomx.eu/vs/1284611098470676. PMID:23419168

  15. Reexamination of the gill withdrawal reflex of Aplysia californica Cooper (Gastropoda; Opisthobranchia).

    PubMed

    Leonard, J L; Edstrom, J; Lukowiak, K

    1989-06-01

    The gill withdrawal reflex (GWR), an important model system for neural mechanisms of learning, varies in form and amplitude within as well as between preparations and is therefore a heterogeneous collection of action patterns, not a reflex. At least 4 action patterns occur in response to mechanical stimulation of the siphon. It is often impossible to categorize a particular movement unambiguously. All may occur spontaneously. Gill movements may be described as combinations of 10 actions; 4 involving vein movements are described here. All actions and action patterns can occur in preparations lacking the central nervous system. Some vein movements may generate considerable force without markedly altering gill area. It is suggested that this explains why some early studies failed to identify the important role of the peripheral nervous system in the GWR. Studies based on the assumption that the GWR involves a single type of movement controlled by cells of the parietovisceral ganglion require reevaluation. PMID:2544202

  16. Ultrastructural observations on feeding appendages and gills of Alvinella pompejana (Annelida, Polychaeta)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Storch, V.; Gaill, F.

    1986-09-01

    The feeding appendages of Alvinella pompejana obtained from a deep-sea hydrothermal vent environment are described. They are characterized by a ciliated groove, the cells of which have a very distinctive ultrastructure, by groups of bipolar receptor cells and by several kinds of gland cells. Among these, one cell type is in an upside down position suggesting a function completely different from other epidermal secretory cells. The gills differ considerably from the feeding appendages on the basis of their ultrastructure. Their epidermis is very irregular in height; basal infoldings give the blood access to a space coming very near to the external medium. The blood vascular system is open. On the other hand, the gills of Amphicteis gunneri are not effective sites of gas exchange, since their columnar epithelium is underlain with muscle cells. The cells composing the feeding appendages and gills of Alvinella pompejana are characterized by ultrastructurally very different mitochondria.

  17. Cytokine Responses in Gills of Capoeta umbla as Biomarkers of Environmental Pollution.

    PubMed

    Danabas, Durali; Yildirim, Nuran Cikcikoglu; Yildirim, Numan; Onal, Ayten Oztufekci; Uslu, Gulsad; Unlu, Erhan; Danabas, Seval; Ergin, Cemil; Tayhan, Nilgun

    2016-03-01

    Immunological biomarkers reflect the effects of exposure to environmental contaminants. In this study, the suitability and sensitivity of cytokine responses, interleukin1β (IL-1β), interleukin-6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) in gill tissues of Capoeta umbla (Heckel, 1843), collected from different regions, as early warning indices of environmental pollution and ecosystem health was evaluated. Fish and water samples were taken from ten stations in March and September 2011 and 2012. Tumor necrosis factor-α, IL-1β and IL-6 levels were determined in samples of the gill tissues by using an ELISA kit. Significant variations of TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6 levels observed between stations and seasons. The results of this study show that seasonal variations of cytokine responses in gills of Capoeta umbla are sensitive to the contaminants present in Uzuncayir Dam Lake (Tunceli, Turkey) water and are valuable biomarkers for environmental pollution and ecosystem health. PMID:26931532

  18. Histopathological effects of atrazine on gills of Caspian kutum Rutilus frisii kutum fingerlings.

    PubMed

    Khoshnood, Zahra; Jamili, Shahla; Khodabandeh, Saber

    2015-04-01

    The use of chemical pesticides has increased environmental pollution and affects fishes as non-target organisms. To investigate the toxic effects of the widely used herbicide atrazine on Caspian kutum Rutilus frisii kutum fingerlings, fish were exposed to a sublethal concentration of half LC50 for 96 h. The main alterations visible in the gill tissue were detachment of the epithelium of the lamellae, necrosis, lamellar fusion, hyperplasia, club shaped lamellae, collapse of the lamellae, shrinkage and curling of the lamellae, and ultrastructural alterations such as necrosis of the apical microridges of the pavement cells. Results also showed that the gill ionocytes were fewer in number and larger in size in the atrazine-exposed fish. Atrazine appears to be highly toxic to Caspian kutum fingerlings even at a sublethal concentration (12.47 mg l(-1)) and acute exposure. This toxicity could affect gill respiration and ion regulation function of fingerlings by damaging tissue, pavement cells, and ionocytes. PMID:25850400

  19. Gill ectoparasites of Barbus martorelli (Teleostean: Cyprinidae) from a tropical watercourse (Cameroon, Africa): conflict or coexistence?

    PubMed Central

    Tombi, J.; Bilong Bilong, C.F.; Morand, S.

    2011-01-01

    The structure and stability of parasite communities have been mainly explained by high diversity and strong interactions among parasite species. During 16 months, 558 Barbus martorelli gill infracommunities were studied in a tropical zone to determine whether parasite infrapopulations interact. Three levels were retained: the infracommunity level, the gill filament level, and the filament fraction level. Single species infections in Barbus martorelli were very rare and only concerned the core species: Dactylogyrus bopeleti, D. insolitus, D. simplex and Myxobolus barbi. Mixed infections appeared as a general rule in this fish species. Interspecific interactions at all three levels were statistically non significant. Our results suggest that Barbus martorelli gill parasites are non interactive (isolationist). PMID:21395208

  20. Structures of CD200/CD200 Receptor Family and Implications for Topology, Regulation, and Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Hatherley, Deborah; Lea, Susan M.; Johnson, Steven; Barclay, A. Neil

    2013-01-01

    Summary CD200 is a widely distributed membrane glycoprotein that regulates myeloid cell activity through its interaction with an inhibitory receptor (CD200R). The interaction is of interest as a target for treating excessive inflammation and for treating leukemia. There are closely related proteins to CD200R that give activating signals making this a “paired receptor.” We report X-ray crystallography structures for the inhibitory CD200R, the activating receptor CD200RLa, and a complex between CD200R and CD200. Both CD200 and CD200R contain two Ig-like domains and interact through their NH2 terminal domains compatible with immunological synapse-like interactions occurring between myeloid cells and other CD200-expressing cells. The failure of the activating receptor to bind CD200 resides in subtle changes around the interface. CD200 has been acquired by herpes viruses to mimic the host interaction. CD200R has evolved rapidly presumably driven by pathogen pressure but it may also be important in homeostasis through interactions with commensal bacteria. PMID:23602662

  1. Intracellular Domain Fragment of CD44 Alters CD44 Function in Chondrocytes*

    PubMed Central

    Mellor, Liliana; Knudson, Cheryl B.; Hida, Daisuke; Askew, Emily B.; Knudson, Warren

    2013-01-01

    The hyaluronan receptor CD44 undergoes sequential proteolytic cleavage at the cell surface. The initial cleavage of the CD44 extracellular domain is followed by a second intramembranous cleavage of the residual CD44 fragment, liberating the C-terminal cytoplasmic tail of CD44. In this study conditions that promote CD44 cleavage resulted in a diminished capacity to assemble and retain pericellular matrices even though sufficient non-degraded full-length CD44 remained. Using stable and transient overexpression of the cytoplasmic domain of CD44, we determined that the intracellular domain interfered with anchoring of the full-length CD44 to the cytoskeleton and disrupted the ability of the cells to bind hyaluronan and assemble a pericellular matrix. Co-immunoprecipitation assays were used to determine whether the mechanism of this interference was due to competition with actin adaptor proteins. CD44 of control chondrocytes was found to interact and co-immunoprecipitate with both the 65- and 130-kDa isoforms of ankyrin-3. Moreover, this interaction with ankyrin-3 proteins was diminished in cells overexpressing the CD44 intracellular domain. Mutating the putative ankyrin binding site of the transiently transfected CD44 intracellular domain diminished the inhibitory effects of this protein on matrix retention. Although CD44 in other cells types has been shown to interact with members of the ezrin/radixin/moesin (ERM) family of adaptor proteins, only modest interactions between CD44 and moesin could be demonstrated in chondrocytes. The data suggest that release of the CD44 intracellular domain into the cytoplasm of cells such as chondrocytes exerts a competitive or dominant-negative effect on the function of full-length CD44. PMID:23884413

  2. Endosulfan acute toxicity in Bufo bufo gills: ultrastructural changes and nitric oxide synthase localization.

    PubMed

    Bernabò, Ilaria; Brunelli, Elvira; Berg, Cecilia; Bonacci, Antonella; Tripepi, Sandro

    2008-02-18

    Endosulfan is an organochlorine pesticide used in agriculture for a wide range of crops. Endosulfan concentrations of up to 0.7 mg/L can be found in ponds and streams near sprayed agricultural fields. We investigated the short-term toxicity of endosulfan in common toad (Bufo bufo) tadpoles after 24, 48, and 96 h of exposure. Acute toxicity was evaluated at nominal concentrations ranging from 0.01 to 0.6 mg/L: concentrations that could be found after the application of pesticide. Our results show that 0.43 mg/L of endosulfan caused 50% mortality (LC(50)). The effects of a sublethal endosulfan concentration (0.2mg/L) on gill apparatus morphology were evaluated by scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Immunohistochemical methods were also applied to detect the expression pattern of the inducible isoform of nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in the gills using the confocal laser scanner microscope. Exposure to 0.2mg/L of endosulfan caused an apparent increase in mucus production, the occurrence of secretory vesicles and lamellar bodies, a widening of intercellular spaces and additionally there was evidence of an inflammatory response in the gill apparatus. The morphological alterations occurred after 24h and were more pronounced after 48 and 96 h of exposure. Altered morphology and increased mucus secretion indicate impaired gas exchange and osmoregulation in the gills. In addition, there was an increase of iNOS expression after 24 and 48 h which may reflect hypoxia and inflammation in the gill epithelium. Our results clearly indicate that short-term exposure to a sublethal concentration of endosulfan, near the high end of the environmental range, disrupts gill morphology and function in B. bufo tadpoles. PMID:18243363

  3. Non-electrolyte permeability of trout gills: effect of temperature and adrenaline

    PubMed Central

    Isaia, J.

    1979-01-01

    1. The gill permeability to various non-electrolytes (Ps) was measured in fresh-water and sea-water adapted trout (Salmo gairdneri). This study was performed in vitro using a `head-perfused' preparation. The influence of temperature and adrenaline (10-6 M) on permeability to non-electrolytes was also investigated. 2. During salt adaptation Pbutanol and Pwater decrease, Pmannitol rises and Pdextran stays constant. In view of recently acquired morphological data these results back up the hypothesis of different pathways across the gill epithelium (transcellular, vesicular and paracellular) according to the physico-chemical characteristics of the molecules. The low selectivity of the gill epithelium as a function of the liposolubility of the molecules used testifies to the hydrophilic nature of diffusion across this epithelium, a feature becoming more pronounced during salt adaptation. 3. The activation energies are about 4 kcal/mol, an energy comparable to diffusion in water for most of the substances tested, exceptions being butanol for fresh-water adapted gills and water for fresh-water and sea-water adapted gills. Arrhenius plots for butanol in fresh water gills show a transition temperature at 15 °C, suggesting an increased membrane lipid fluidity above this temperature. 4. Adrenaline has no effect on Pmannitol and Pdextran, but increases Pbutanol and Pwater selectively according to the adaptation medium (+ 160% and + 100% in fresh water and + 25% and + 20% in sea water respectively). These results point to an effect of this catecholamine on the membrane lipid fluidity. PMID:439031

  4. Antioxidant deficit in gills of Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas) exposed to chlorodinitrobenzene increases menadione toxicity.

    PubMed

    Trevisan, Rafael; Arl, Miriam; Sacchet, Cássia Lopes; Engel, Cristiano Severino; Danielli, Naissa Maria; Mello, Danielle Ferraz; Brocardo, Caroline; Maris, Angelica Francesca; Dafre, Alcir Luiz

    2012-02-01

    Disturbances in antioxidant defenses decrease cellular protection against oxidative stress and jeopardize cellular homeostasis. To knock down the antioxidant defenses of Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas, animals were pre-treated with 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB) and further challenged with pro-oxidant menadione (MEN). CDNB pre-treatment (10 μM for 18 h) was able to consume cellular thiols in gills, decreasing GSH (53%) and decrease protein thiols (25%). CDNB pre-treatment also disrupted glutathione reductase and thioredoxin reductase activity in the gills, but likewise strongly induced glutathione S-transferase activity (270% increase). Surprisingly, hemocyte viability was greatly affected 24 h after CDNB removal, indicating a possible vulnerability of the oyster immune system to electrophilic attack. New in vivo approaches were established, allowing the identification of higher rates of GSH-CDNB conjugate export to the seawater and enabling the measurement of the organic peroxide consumption rate. CDNB-induced impairment in antioxidant defenses decreased the peroxide removal rate from seawater. After showing that CDNB decreased gill antioxidant defenses and increased DNA damage in hemocytes, oysters were further challenged with 1 mM MEN over 24 h. MEN treatment did not affect thiol homeostasis in gills, while CDNB pre-treated animals recovered GSH and PSH to the control level after 24 h of depuration. Interestingly, MEN intensified GSH and PSH loss and mortality in CDNB-pre-treated animals, showing a clear synergistic effect. The superoxide-generating one-electron reduction of MEN was predominant in gills and may have contributed to MEN toxicity. These results support the idea that antioxidant-depleted animals are more susceptible to oxidative attack, which can compromise survival. Data also corroborate the idea that gills are an important detoxifying organ, able to dispose of organic peroxides, induce phase II enzymes, and efficiently export GSH

  5. Xenobiotic and steroid biotransformation activities in rainbow trout gill epithelial cells in culture.

    PubMed

    Leguen; Carlsson; Perdu-Durand; Prunet; Pärt; Cravedi

    2000-03-01

    The biotransformation of xenobiotics and steroids was investigated in cultured respiratory epithelial cells from rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) gills. As a first approach, ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (EROD), chosen as a marker of CYP1A activity, was measured in monolayers of adherent cells. The induction of this enzyme was studied in cells exposed to beta-naphthoflavone (BNF) or 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) in concentrations ranging from 10(-6) to 10(-12) M. After 24 h, TCDD showed a maximal induction at a concentration of 10(-9) M while BNF showed a maximal induction at a concentration of 10(-7) M. Concurrently, a variety of substrates involved in cytochrome P450-dependent metabolism as well as phase II reactions, namely ethoxycoumarin, aniline and testosterone were incubated with cultured gill cells for 2 or 8 h and with freshly isolated hepatocytes for comparison. Our results revealed a significant cytochrome P450-dependent activity in gill cells with ethoxycoumarin and aniline, but no hydroxylation was observed with testosterone as substrate. No trace of sulfate conjugate was detected. With 2.5 µM aniline as substrate, 2-hydroxyaniline accounted for 32.1% of the radioactivity after 2 h incubation whereas acetanilide amounted to 6.4%. Significant differences were found between gill cells and isolated hepatocytes in the capacity of these systems to conduct oxidative and conjugating metabolic pathways. Qualitatively, the main difference was observed for testosterone which is hydroxylated in position 6beta and 16beta and conjugated to glucuronic acid in liver cells, whereas reductive biotransformation giving rise to dihydrotestosterone and androstanediol and traces of androstenedione were observed in gill cells. Quantitatively, the biotransformation activity in gill epithelial cells, expressed as pmol/h per mg protein, was between 1.5 and 14% of the activity level observed in isolated hepatocytes, depending on the substrate. PMID:10686323

  6. Aspects of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 binding sites in fish: an autoradiographic study.

    PubMed

    Bidman, H J; Radu, I; Stumpf, W E

    1997-01-01

    The distribution of specific binding sites for vitamin D3 in adult female and male Xiphophorus helleri is studies after injection of tritiated 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (vitamin D) by thaw-mount autoradiography. Five hours after injection of labeled vitamin D specific nuclear binding is present in brain, pituitary, skin, gills, cartilage, gut, liver, pancreas, spleen, kidney, muscle, ovary, and testis. Cytoplasmic binding exists strongest in gills, gut, and kidney while it is comparatively weak in hepatocytes. In reproductive organs cytoplasmic retention of radioactivity is also present in oocytes. Weak nuclear labeling exists in interstitial cells in ovary. Conspicuous nuclear labeling exists in active lobules of testis, while inactive lobules show occasionally a few labeled cells. The results demonstrate specific binding and retention of vitamin D in many target organs of teleost fish, suggesting an extensive and multifunctional regulatory role of this steroid hormone of sunlight. PMID:9747110

  7. Autoantibodies to CD59, CD55, CD46 or CD35 are not associated with atypical haemolytic uraemic syndrome (aHUS)

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Rachael; Wearmouth, Emma; McLoughlin, Amy-Claire; Jackson, Arthur; Ward, Sophie; Bertram, Paula; Bennaceur, Karim; Barker, Catriona E.; Pappworth, Isabel Y.; Kavanagh, David; Lea, Susan M.; Atkinson, John P.; Goodship, Timothy H.J.; Marchbank, Kevin J.

    2015-01-01

    Autoantibody formation against Factor H (FH) is found in 7–10% of patients who are diagnosed with atypical haemolytic uraemic syndrome (aHUS). These autoantibodies predominately target the C-terminal cell binding recognition domain of FH and are associated with absence of FHR1. Additional autoantibodies have also been identified in association with aHUS, for example autoantibodies to Factor I. Based on this, and that there are genetic mutations in other complement regulators and activators associated with aHUS, we hypothesised that other complement regulator proteins, particularly surface bound regulators in the kidney, might be the target for autoantibody formation in aHUS. Therefore, we assayed serum derived from 89 patients in the Newcastle aHUS cohort for the presence of autoantibodies to CD46 (membrane cofactor protein, MCP), CD55 (decay accelerating factor, DAF), CD35 (complement receptor type 1, CR1; TP10) and CD59. We also assayed 100 healthy blood donors to establish the normal levels of reactivity towards these proteins in the general population. Recombinant proteins CD46 and CD55 (purified from Escherichia coli) as well as soluble CR1 (CD35) and oligomeric C4BP-CD59 (purified from eukaryotic cell media) were used in ELISA to detect high responders. False positive results were established though Western blot and flow cytometric analysis. After excluding false positive responders to bacterial proteins in the CD46 and CD55 preparations, and responses to blood group antigens in CD35, we found no significant level of patient serum IgG reactivity with CD46, CD55, CD35 or CD59 above that detected in the normal population. These results suggest that membrane anchored complement regulators are not a target for autoantibody generation in aHUS. PMID:25150608

  8. Copper exposure and ciliary function in gill tissue of Mytilus californianus

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, J.R.

    1985-10-01

    In this study, the biological effects of chronic, sublethal exposure to a metal (copper) on a marine bivalve, Mytilus californianus, were investigated. The biological unit of interest was the function of cilia associated with gill structures. Effects of copper exposure on ciliary activity were assessed using three parameters: 1) the ability of intact animals to remove suspended algae from seawater; 2) cilioregulatory neurotransmitter levels, dopamine (DA) and serotonin (5HT), in the visceral ganglia; and 3) characteristics of putative receptor sites for DA and 5HT in gill tissue.

  9. Dr Anthony Dobell, Legendary McGill Trailblazer: May 7, 1927, to June 17, 2015.

    PubMed

    Mulder, David S

    2015-12-01

    Anthony R. C. Dobell died on June 17, 2015, at the age of 88. Dobell was the first Canadian president of the Society of Thoracic Surgeons. He was a pioneer in the development of pediatric and adult cardiac surgery at McGill University. He was inspired by Dr John Gibbon during his residency training at Jefferson Medical College in Philadelphia. He developed a McGill-based residency in Cardiothoracic Surgery and always took pride in the legacy of more than 40 residents scattered throughout North America. PMID:26652547

  10. Hyperparasitism of trichodinid ciliates on monogenean gill flukes of two marine fish.

    PubMed

    Colorni, A; Diamant, A

    2005-06-01

    Two unusual cases of hyperparasitism of trichodinid ciliates on monogenean gill flukes are described from southern Israel (Red Sea). The first case occurred in cultured European sea bass Dicentrarchus labrax infected by Diplectanum aequans, while the second was observed in a feral devil firefish Pterois miles infected by Haliotrema sp. In both cases, the trichodinids heavily co-infested the host fish gills. The flukes were completely coated by the ciliates, which gave them a cobblestone appearance, but no damage to their tegument was apparent. Both cases are most likely a result of accidental hyperparasitism, brought about by perturbed environmental conditions. PMID:16060271

  11. Living his writings: the example of neurologist G. Gilles de la Tourette.

    PubMed

    Walusinski, Olivier; Duncan, Gregory

    2010-10-30

    Gilles de la Tourette is known for the disease which now bears his name. As one of the closest followers of Jean-Martin Charcot, he always remained faithful to his mentor's views and was one of the most vehement defenders of La Salpêtrière. His activities in the management of hysterics and in hypnotism helped build his reputation during his lifetime, but are now largely forgotten. Gilles de la Tourette had an unusual personality, with hypomanic and histrionic traits. We present some ignored aspects of his life based on the discovery of personal letters which illuminate the hidden side of this famous neurologist. PMID:20672344

  12. CD83 and GRASP55 interact in human dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Stein, Marcello F; Blume, Katja; Heilingloh, Christiane S; Kummer, Mirko; Biesinger, Brigitte; Sticht, Heinrich; Steinkasserer, Alexander

    2015-03-27

    CD83 is one of the best known surface markers for mature human dendritic cells (DCs). The full-length 45 kDa type-I membrane-bound form (mbCD83) is strongly glycosylated upon DCs maturation. As co-stimulatory properties of CD83 are attributed to mbCD83 surface expression is required for efficient T-cell stimulation by mature DCs. By yeast two-hybrid screening, we were able to identify GRASP55 as interaction partner of CD83. DCs maturation induces endogenous CD83 protein expression with simultaneous regulation of CD83 glycosylation, interaction and co-localization with GRASP55 and CD83 surface exposure. GRASP55 is especially known for its role in maintaining Golgi architecture, but also plays a role in Golgi transport of specific cargo proteins bearing a C-terminal valine residue. Here we additionally demonstrate that binding of CD83 and GRASP55 rely on the C-terminal TELV-motif of CD83. Mutation of this TELV-motif not only disrupted binding to GRASP55, but also altered the glycosylation pattern of CD83 and reduced its membrane expression. Here we show for the first time that GRASP55 interacts with CD83 shortly after induction of DC maturation and that this interaction plays a role in CD83 glycosylation as well as in surface expression of CD83 on DCs. PMID:25701785

  13. Metal accumulation and differentially expressed proteins in gill of oyster (Crassostrea hongkongensis) exposed to long-term heavy metal-contaminated estuary.

    PubMed

    Luo, Lianzhong; Ke, Caihuan; Guo, Xiaoyu; Shi, Bo; Huang, Miaoqin

    2014-06-01

    Bio-accumulation and bio-transmission of toxic metals and the toxicological responses of organisms exposed to toxic metals have been focused, due to heavy metal contaminations have critically threatened the ecosystem and food security. However, still few investigations focused on the responses of certain organisms exposed to the long term and severe heavy metal contamination in specific environments. In present investigation, the Hong Kong oyster, Crassostrea hongkongensis were obtained from 3 sites which were contaminated by different concentrations of heavy metals (such as zinc, copper, manganese and lead etc.), respectively. Heavy metal concentrations in the sea water samples collected from the 3 sites and the dissected tissues of the oysters with blue visceral mass were determinated to estimate the metal contamination levels in environments and the bio-accumulation ratios of the heavy metals in the different tissues of oysters. Moreover, Proteomic methods were employed to analyze the differentially expressed proteins in the gills of oysters exposed to long-term heavy metal contaminations. Results indicated that the Jiulong River estuary has been severely contaminated by Cu, Zn and slightly with Cr, Ni, Mn, etc, moreover, Zn and Cu were the major metals accumulated by oysters to phenomenally high concentrations (more than 3.0% of Zn and about 2.0% of Cu against what the dry weight of tissues were accumulated), and Cr, Ni, Mn, etc were also significantly accumulated. The differentially expressed proteins in the gills of oysters exposed to heavy metals participate in several cell processes, such as metal binding, transporting and saving, oxidative-reduction balance maintaining, stress response, signal transduction, etc. Significantly up-regulated expression (about 10 folds) of an important metal binding protein, metallothionein (MT) and granular cells was observed in the gills of oysters exposed to long-term and severely heavy-metal-contaminated estuary, it

  14. Prolactin and cortisol mediate the maintenance of hyperosmoregulatory ionocytes in gills of Mozambique tilapia: Exploring with an improved gill incubation system.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Soichi; Itoh, Kohei; Kaneko, Toyoji

    2016-06-01

    Endocrine control of osmoregulation is essential for teleosts to adapt to various aquatic environments. Prolactin (PRL) is known as a fundamental endocrine factor for hyperosmoregulation in teleost fishes, acting on ionocytes in the gills to maintain ion concentrations of body fluid within narrow physiological ranges in freshwater conditions. Cortisol is also known as an osmoregulation-related steroid in teleosts; however, its precise function is still controversial. Here, we investigated more detailed effects of PRL and roles of cortisol on ionocytes of Mozambique tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus) in freshwater, using an improved gill filament incubation system. This incubation system resulted in enhanced cell viability, as evaluated using the dead cell marker propidium iodide. PRL was shown to maintain the density of freshwater-type ionocytes in isolated gill filaments; this effect of PRL is not achieved by the activation of cell proliferation, but by the maintenance of existing ionocytes. Cortisol alone did not show any distinct effect on ionocyte density in isolated gill filaments. We also assessed effects of PRL and cortisol on relative mRNA levels of NCC2, NHE3, NKAa1a, and NKAa1b. PRL maintained relative NCC2 and NKAa1a mRNA abundance, and cortisol showed a stimulatory effect on relative NCC2 and NKAa1a mRNA levels in combination with PRL, though cortisol alone exerted no effect on these genes. An increase in NKAa1b mRNA abundance was detected in cortisol-treated groups. PRL treatment also maintained normal NCC2 localization at the apical membrane of the ionocytes. These results indicate that PRL maintains freshwater-type ionocytes, and that cortisol stimulates the function of ionocytes maintained by PRL. PMID:27118703

  15. Characterization of rabbit CD5 isoforms.

    PubMed

    Pospisil, Richard; Kabat, Juraj; Mage, Rose G

    2009-08-01

    Previously described polyclonal or monoclonal antibodies (mAb) to rabbit CD5, raised against expressed recombinant protein or peptides, recognize CD5 on most rabbit B cells. The mAb KEN-5 was originally reported to recognize rabbit CD5. However, KEN-5 binds almost exclusively to T cells and only to a minor population of B cells. We show here that by Enzyme-linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA), KEN-5 binds to recombinant rabbit CD5. This interaction is partially inhibited by polyclonal goat anti-CD5 antibody. In addition, immunoprecipitations from lysates of surface biotinylated rabbit lymphocytes with KEN-5 or our anti-CD5 mAb isolate molecules that migrate identically on gels with the same approximate relative molecular mass of 67,000 M(r). By flow cytometric analyses of individual cells from spleen, thymus and appendix, KEN-5 recognizes CD5-like molecules mainly on T cells and on 3-6% of IgM(+) B cells. Immunohistochemical staining of splenic and appendix tissues and confocal immunofluorescent imaging confirm and extend results from flow cytometric analyses. Quantitation of fluorescent colocalization indicates that staining by KEN-5 colocalizes with staining by anti-CD5 on small percentage lymphocytes in splenic tissue sections. As CD5 has both N- and O-linked glycosylation, we hypothesised that differential binding of KEN-5 to T cells and B-cells may be explained by different glycan structures on the CD5 present on T compared to B cells. This hypothesis is supported by ELISA data that show that deglycosylation diminishes the binding of KEN-5 to recombinant rabbit CD5. Screening KEN-5 on an array with 406 glycans was inconclusive. Although we did not identify a strongly binding glycan structure, the data are suggestive that the epitope recognized by KEN-5 may be influenced by glycan structures. The epitope this mAb recognizes may either be the glycan itself, or more likely, is influenced by neighboring glycan structure. Our findings suggest that development

  16. CD8αα Expression Marks Terminally Differentiated Human CD8+ T Cells Expanded in Chronic Viral Infection

    PubMed Central

    Walker, L. J.; Marrinan, E.; Muenchhoff, M.; Ferguson, J.; Kloverpris, H.; Cheroutre, H.; Barnes, E.; Goulder, P.; Klenerman, Paul

    2013-01-01

    The T cell co-receptor CD8αβ enhances T cell sensitivity to antigen, however studies indicate CD8αα has the converse effect and acts as a co-repressor. Using a combination of Thymic Leukemia (TL) antigen tetramer, which directly binds CD8αα, anti-CD161, and anti-Vα7.2 antibodies we have been able for the first time to clearly define CD8αα expression on human CD8 T cells subsets. In healthy controls CD8αα is most highly expressed by CD161 “bright” (CD161++) mucosal associated invariant T (MAIT) cells, with CD8αα expression highly restricted to the TCR Vα7.2+ cells of this subset. We also identified CD8αα-expressing populations within the CD161 “mid” (CD161+) and “negative” (CD161−) non-MAIT CD8 T cell subsets and show TL-tetramer binding to correlate with expression of CD8β at low levels in the context of maintained CD8α expression (CD8α+CD8βlow). In addition, we found CD161−CD8α+CD8βlow populations to be significantly expanded in the peripheral blood of HIV-1 and hepatitis B (mean of 47 and 40% of CD161− T cells respectively) infected individuals. Such CD8αα expressing T cells are an effector-memory population (CD45RA−, CCR7−, CD62L−) that express markers of activation and maturation (HLA-DR+, CD28−, CD27−, CD57+) and are functionally distinct, expressing greater levels of TNF-α and IFN-γ on stimulation and perforin at rest than their CD8α+CD8βhigh counterparts. Antigen-specific T cells in HLA-B∗4201+HIV-1 infected patients are found within both the CD161−CD8α+CD8βhigh and CD161−CD8α+CD8βlow populations. Overall we have clearly defined CD8αα expressing human T cell subsets using the TL-tetramer, and have demonstrated CD161−CD8α+CD8βlow populations, highly expanded in disease settings, to co-express CD8αβ and CD8αα. Co-expression of CD8αα on CD8αβ T cells may impact on their overall function in vivo and contribute to the distinctive phenotype of highly differentiated populations in HBV

  17. ROSETTE GLANDS IN THE GILLS OF THE GRASS SHRIMP, 'PALAEMONETES PUGIO' I. COMPARATIVE MORPHOLOGY, CYCLICAL ACTIVITY, AND INNERVATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Two types of exocrine rosette glands (type A and type B), located in the gill axes of the grass shrimp, Palaemonetes pugio, are described. The type A glands are embedded within the longitudinal median spetum of the gill axes, whereas the type B glands typically project into the e...

  18. Effects of salinity on the accumulation of hemocyte aggregates and bacteria in the gills of Callinectes sapidus, the Atlantic blue crab, injected with Vibrio campbellii.

    PubMed

    Ikerd, Jennifer L; Burnett, Karen G; Burnett, Louis E

    2015-05-01

    In addition to respiration and ion regulation, crustacean gills accumulate and eliminate injected particles, along with hemocyte aggregates that form in response to those particles. Here we report that the dose of Vibrio campbellii previously shown to induce a decrease in respiration and hemolymph flow across the gill in the Atlantic blue crab, Callinectes sapidus, also triggered the formation of aggregates containing four or more hemocytes in the gills, compared with saline-injected controls. More bacteria were trapped and rendered non-culturable per unit weight by anterior respiratory gills than posterior gills specialized for ion regulation. Further, more bacteria accumulated in the anterior gills of animals held at 30 ppt than those at 10 ppt. Thus, the role of the gills in immune defense comes at an energetic cost to this and likely to other crustaceans; this cost is influenced by acclimation salinity and the position and specialized function of individual gills. PMID:25541183

  19. Permeability properties and occludin expression in a primary cultured model gill epithelium from the stenohaline freshwater goldfish.

    PubMed

    Chasiotis, Helen; Kelly, Scott P

    2011-05-01

    Techniques for the primary culture of fish gill epithelia on permeable supports have provided 'reconstructed' gill models appropriate for the study of gill permeability characteristics in vitro. Models developed thus far have been derived from euryhaline fish species that can tolerate a wide range of environmental salinity. This study reports on procedures for the primary culture of a model gill epithelium derived from goldfish, a stenohaline freshwater (FW) fish that cannot tolerate high environmental salt concentrations. The reconstructed goldfish gill epithelium was cultured on permeable filter inserts and using electron microscopy and immunocytochemical techniques, was determined to be composed exclusively of gill pavement cells. When cultured under symmetrical conditions (i.e. with culture medium bathing both apical and basolateral surfaces), epithelial preparations generated appreciable transepithelial resistance (TER) (e.g. 1,150 ± 46 Ωcm(2)) within 36-42 h post-seeding in inserts. When apical medium was replaced with FW (asymmetrical conditions to mimic conditions that occur in vivo), epithelia exhibited increased TER and elevated paracellular permeability. Changes in permeability occurred in association with altered occludin-immunoreactive band position by western blot and no change in occludin mRNA abundance. We contend that the goldfish gill model will provide a useful in vitro tool for examining the molecular components of a stenohaline fish gill epithelium that participate in the regulation of gill permeability. The model will allow molecular observations to be made together with assessment of changing physiological properties that relate to permeability. Together, this will allow further insight into mechanisms that regulate gill permeability in fishes. PMID:21085969

  20. Demonstrating Theory in Practice: Examples of the McGill Model of Nursing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaudine, Alice P.

    2001-01-01

    A workshop on the McGill Model of Nursing, which depicts nurses' role in developing and maintaining family health, was attended by 147 nurses. Increases in self-efficacy, behavior, and performance related to implementing the model were evident 6 months after the workshop. (SK)

  1. Morphological diversity of Paramoeba perurans trophozoites and their interaction with Atlantic salmon, Salmo salar L., gills.

    PubMed

    Wiik-Nielsen, J; Mo, T A; Kolstad, H; Mohammad, S N; Hytterød, S; Powell, M D

    2016-09-01

    Amoebic gill disease (AGD) caused by the ectoparasite Paramoeba perurans affects several cultured marine fish species worldwide. In this study, the morphology and ultrastructure of P. perurans in vitro and in vivo was investigated using scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM and TEM, respectively). Amoebae cultures contained several different morphologies ranging from a distinct rounded cell structure and polymorphic cells with pseudopodia of different lengths and shapes. SEM studies of the gills of AGD-affected Atlantic salmon, Salmo salar L., revealed the presence of enlarged swellings in affected gill filaments and fusion of adjacent lamellae. Spherical amoebae appeared to embed within the epithelium, and subsequently leave hemispherical indentations with visible fenestrations in the basolateral surface following their departure. These fenestrated structures corresponded to the presence of pseudopodia which could be seen by TEM to penetrate into the epithelium. The membrane-membrane interface contained an amorphous and slightly fibrous matrix. This suggests the existence of cellular glycocalyces and a role for extracellular products in mediating pathological changes in amoebic gill disease. PMID:26775899

  2. Isolation and characterization of bioactive fungi from shark Carcharodon carcharias' gill with biopharmaceutical prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yi; Han, Jinyuan; Feng, Yan; Mu, Jun; Bao, Haiyan; Kulik, Andreas; Grond, Stephanie

    2016-01-01

    Until recently, little was known about the fungi found in shark gills and their biomedicinal potential. In this article, we described the isolation, bioactivity, diversity, and secondary metabolites of bioactive fungi from the gill of a shark ( Carcharodon carcharias). A total of 115 isolates were obtained and grown in 12 culture media. Fifty-eight of these isolates demonstrated significant activity in four antimicrobial, pesticidal, and cytotoxic bioassay models. Four randomly selected bioactive isolates inhibited human cancer cell proliferation during re-screening. These active isolates were segregated into 6 genera using the internal transcribed spacer-large subunit (ITS-LSU) rDNA-sequence BLAST comparison. Four genera, Penicillium, Aspergillus, Mucor, and Chaetomium were the dominant taxa. A phylogenic tree illustrated their intergenera and intragenera genetic diversity. HPLC-DAD-HRMS analysis and subsequent database searching revealed that nine representative strains produced diverse bioactive compound profiles. These results detail the broad range of bioactive fungi found in a shark's gills, revealing their biopharmaceutical potential. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study characterizing shark gill fungi and their bioactivity.

  3. ALPHA METHYLGLUCOSIDE TRANSPORT BY THE GILL OF THE OYSTER 'OSTREA EDULIS'

    EPA Science Inventory

    The present study defines the mechanism of glucose transport in the isolated gill of oysters, using the European flat oyster, Ostrea edulis, as a representative species. The specific objectives were: (1) identify a non-metabolized transport analog, (2) determine the effects of kn...

  4. 78 FR 53666 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Wolf River, Gills Landing and Winneconne, WI

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-30

    ... Operation Regulation; Wolf River, Gills Landing and Winneconne, WI'' in the Federal Register (78 FR 27336... Acronyms CFR Code of Federal Regulations DHS Department of Homeland Security FR Federal Register NPRM... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 RIN 1625-AA09 Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Wolf River,...

  5. Gill net saturation by lake trout in Michigan waters of Lake Superior

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hansen, Michael J.; Schorfhaar, Richard G.; Selgeby, James H.

    1998-01-01

    We conducted experimental fishing for lake trout Salvelinus namaycush in Michigan waters of Lake Superior to determine the importance of soak time on catch per effort (CPE) in numbers per kilometer of standard gill net. We modeled CPE as a nonlinear function of the number of nights between setting and lifting (soak time), in which the nets fill at a certain rate toward some maximum after which the nets cannot hold more fish. We found that lake trout CPE increased with soak time at a rate that varied with lake trout density toward a saturation level that was independent of lake trout density. The CPE values of nets soaked 2–5 nights divided by the CPE of nets soaked 1 night were significantly lower than would be expected had CPE increased as a linear function of the number of nights soaked. We derived a means for correcting gill-net CPE values for differing soak times to a common base of 1 night soaked. We concluded that it is inappropriate to assume lake trout catches in gill nets will increase in direct proportion to the number of nights soaked and recommend that CPE of lake trout in gill nets be corrected for soak time.

  6. Electronic Thesis Initiative: Pilot Project of McGill University, Montreal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, Eun G.; Zou, Qing; McKnight, David

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To set up a protocol for electronic thesis and dissertation (ETD) submission for the electronic thesis initiative pilot project at McGill University in Montreal, Canada. Design/methodology/approach: An electronic thesis and dissertation submission protocol was implemented and tested. To test authoring tools, we had 50 students submit…

  7. Increased daylength stimulates plasma growth hormone and gill Na+, K+ and -ATPase Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar )

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCormick, S.D.; Bjornsson, Bjorn Thrandur; Sheridan, M.; Eilertson, C.; Carey, J.B.; O'Dea, M.

    1995-01-01

    Atlantic salmon juveniles reared at constant temperature (9–10°C) were exposed to four photoperiod treatment and sampled every 2 weeks from January through May. Fish reared under normal photoperiod exhibited eight-and three fold increases in plasma growth hormone and gill Na+, K+-ATPase activity, respectively, between January and April. Fish exposed to abrupt increases in daylength (LD 15:9) in February or March responded with earlier increases in plasma growth hormone and gill Na+, K+-ATPase activity, and earlier decreases in condition factor relative to fish in the normal photoperiod group. Fish maintained under short daylength (LD 9:15) from January to May exhibited delayed and muted increases in plasma growth hormone and gill Na+, K+-ATPase activity. Plasma thyroxine exhibited a 2.5-fold increase from February to late March in the normal photoperiod group, was generally lower in the LD 9:15 group, but exhibited no obvious response to abrupt increases in daylength. There was an increase in plasma 3,5,3′-triiodo-l-thyronine with time in all groups (43–80%) but no significant response to photoperiod. Plasma levels of somatostatin-25 were highest in the LD 9:15 group, but there was no detectable response to increased daylength in any of the photoperiod treatments. The results indicate that plasma growth hormone is responsive to increased daylength and may be causally related to subsequent increases in gill Na+, K+-ATPase.

  8. Biomemetic pumping by gill plate arrays: Reynolds number effects in mayfly nymphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sensenig, Andrew; Shultz, Jeffrey; Kiger, Ken

    2007-11-01

    Mayfly nymphs are entirely aquatic and must alter behavior and metabolism to accommodate changes in ambient dissolved oxygen levels. Many species can generate a ventilation current to compensate for low oxygen levels by beating two linear arrays of plate-like gills that line the lateral edge of the abdomen. The characteristic Reynolds number associated with the gill motion changes with animal size, varying over a span of Re = 5 to 100 depending on age and species. Thus mayflies provide a novel system model for studying ontological changes in pumping mechanisms associated with transitions from a viscous- to inertia-dominated flow. Indeed, observation of other animals and theoretical analysis[1] indicate that a bifurcation should exist for inertial thrust generation by a reciprocal flapper for Reynolds numbers on the order of 10-20. In the ongoing work, the gill kinematics and resulting fluid motion is recorded experimentally through the use of high-speed stereo imaging and cinematographic planar PIV. Results show that the gills transition from a strongly asymmetric motion at Re=5 to a more reciprocal motion by Re=21. Details of the hydrodynamic mechanisms and pumping effectiveness will be discussed. [1] Childress, S. & Dudley, R. (2004), J. Fluid Mech. 498, 257--288.

  9. We Walked Very Warily. A History of Women at McGill.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillett, Margaret

    Nineteenth-century assumptions about the nature of women, her educability, her role in society, and debates about coeducation are examined in this record of the efforts of the first women students to gain entrance in McGill University in Canada. The introduction offers historical background, ideas of women, and the opening of higher education to…

  10. RESPIRATORY-CARDIOVASCULAR PHYSIOLOGY AND CHLOROETHANE GILL FLUX IN THE CHANNEL CATFISH ICTALRUS PUNCTATUS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A fish respirometer-metabolism chamber was used to obtain in ivo respiratory-cardiovascular and chloroethane gill flux data on transected channel catfish (Ictalrus punctatus). ethods used for spinal transection, attachment of an oral membrane (respiratory mask), placement and att...

  11. Evolution of gilled mushrooms and puffballs inferred from ribosomal DNA sequences

    PubMed Central

    Hibbett, David S.; Pine, Elizabeth M.; Langer, Ewald; Langer, Gitta; Donoghue, Michael J.

    1997-01-01

    Homobasidiomycete fungi display many complex fruiting body morphologies, including mushrooms and puffballs, but their anatomical simplicity has confounded efforts to understand the evolution of these forms. We performed a comprehensive phylogenetic analysis of homobasidiomycetes, using sequences from nuclear and mitochondrial ribosomal DNA, with an emphasis on understanding evolutionary relationships of gilled mushrooms and puffballs. Parsimony-based optimization of character states on our phylogenetic trees suggested that strikingly similar gilled mushrooms evolved at least six times, from morphologically diverse precursors. Approximately 87% of gilled mushrooms are in a single lineage, which we call the “euagarics.” Recently discovered 90 million-year-old fossil mushrooms are probably euagarics, suggesting that (i) the origin of this clade must have occurred no later than the mid-Cretaceous and (ii) the gilled mushroom morphology has been maintained in certain lineages for tens of millions of years. Puffballs and other forms with enclosed spore-bearing structures (Gasteromycetes) evolved at least four times. Derivation of Gasteromycetes from forms with exposed spore-bearing structures (Hymenomycetes) is correlated with repeated loss of forcible spore discharge (ballistospory). Diverse fruiting body forms and spore dispersal mechanisms have evolved among Gasteromycetes. Nevertheless, it appears that Hymenomycetes have never been secondarily derived from Gasteromycetes, which suggests that the loss of ballistospory has constrained evolution in these lineages. PMID:9342352

  12. Structural Changes in the Somatosensory System Correlate with Tic Severity in Gilles de la Tourette Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomalla, Gotz; Siebner, Hartwig R.; Jonas, Melanie; Baumer, Tobias; Biermann-Ruben, Katja; Hummel, Friedhelm; Gerloff, Christian; Muller-Vahl, Kirsten; Schnitzler, Alfons; Orth, Michael; Munchau, Alexander

    2009-01-01

    Gilles de la Tourette syndrome (GTS) is a neuropsychiatric disorder characterized by multiple motor and vocal tics. Previous structural MRI studies have identified regional abnormalities in grey matter, especially in the basal ganglia. These findings are consistent with the assumption of alterations in cortico-striato-thalamo-cortical circuits and…

  13. RESPIRATORY-CARDIOVASCULAR PHYSIOLOGY AND XENOBIOTIC GILL FLUX IN THE LAKE TROUT (SALVELINUS NAMAYCUSH)

    EPA Science Inventory

    An in vivo respirometer-metabolism chamber was used to obtain respiratory-cardiovascular physiology under normoxic and hypoxic conditions, and xenobiotic gill absorption (flux) data on adult lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) over a 48-h exposure period at 11? 1?C.

  14. Nonlethal gill biopsy does not affect juvenile chinook salmon implanted with radio transmitters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Martinelli-Liedtke, T. L.; Shively, R.S.; Holmberg, G.S.; Sheer, M.B.; Schrock, R.M.

    1999-01-01

    Using gastric and surgical transmitter implantation, we compared radio-tagged juvenile chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha (T(O)) with tagged fish also having a gill biopsy (T(B)) to determine biopsy effects on fish implanted with radio transmitters. We found no evidence during the 21-d period to suggest that a gill biopsy reduced survival, growth, or gross condition of the tagged-biopsy group, regardless of transmitter implantation technique. We recorded 100% survival of all treatment groups. Relative growth rates of T(O) and T(B) fish did not differ significantly. Leukocrit and lysozyme levels were not significantly different among groups, suggesting that no signs of infection were present. Our findings suggest that small chinook salmon can tolerate the combination of transmitter implantation and gill biopsy without compromising condition relative to fish receiving only the transmitter. We believe a gill biopsy can be used in field telemetry studies, especially when physiological data are needed in addition to behavioral data.

  15. Calcium transport and homeostasis in gill cells of a freshwater crab Dilocarcinus pagei.

    PubMed

    Granado e Sá, Marina; Baptista, B B; Farah, L S; Leite, V P; Zanotto, F P

    2010-03-01

    Crustaceans present a very interesting model system to study the process of calcification and calcium (Ca(2+)) transport because of molting-related events and the deposition of CaCO(3) in the new exoskeleton. Dilocarcinus pagei, a freshwater crab endemic to Brazil, was studied to understand Ca(2+) transport in whole gill cells using a fluorescent probe. Cells were dissociated, all of the gill cell types were loaded with fluo-3 and intracellular Ca(2+) change was monitored by adding Ca as CaCl(2) (0, 0.1, 0.25, 0.50, 1.0 and 5 mM), with a series of different inhibitors. For control gill cells, Ca(2+) transport followed Michaelis-Menten kinetics with K(m) = 0.42 +/- 0.04 mM and V(max) = 0.50 +/- 0.02 microM (Ca(2+) change x initial intracellular Ca(-1) x 180 s(-1); N = 14, r (2) = 0.99). Verapamil (a Ca(2+) channel inhibitor) and amiloride (a Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger [NCX] inhibitor) completely reduced intracellular Ca(2+) transport, while nifedipine, another Ca(2+) channel inhibitor, did not. Vanadate, a plasma membrane Ca(2+)-ATPase inhibitor (PMCA), increased intracellular Ca(2+) in gill cells through a decrease in the efflux of Ca(2+). Ouabain increased intracellular Ca(2+), similar to the effect of KB-R, a specific NCX inhibitor for Ca(2+) in the influx mode. Alterations in extracellular [Na] in the saline did not affect intracellular Ca(2+) transport. Caffeine, responsible for inducing Ca release from sarcoplasmic reticulum in vertebrate muscle, increased intracellular Ca(2+) compared to control, suggesting an effect of this inhibitor in gill epithelial cells of Dilocarcinus pagei, probably through release of intracellular stores. We also demonstrate here that intracellular Ca(2+) in gill cells of Dilocarcinus pagei was kept relatively constant in face of an extracellular Ca concentration of 50-fold, suggesting that crustaceans are able to display Ca(2+) homeostasis through various Ca(2+) intracellular sequestration mechanisms and/or plasma membrane Ca(2+) influx

  16. Masking of CD22 by cis ligands does not prevent redistribution of CD22 to sites of cell contact.

    PubMed

    Collins, Brian E; Blixt, Ola; DeSieno, Alexis R; Bovin, Nicolai; Marth, Jamey D; Paulson, James C

    2004-04-20

    CD22, a negative regulator of B cell signaling, is a member of the siglec family that binds to alpha2-6-linked sialic acids on glycoproteins. Previous reports demonstrated that binding of multivalent sialoside probes to CD22 is blocked, or "masked," by endogenous (cis) ligands, unless they are first destroyed by sialidase treatment. These results suggest that cis ligands on B cells make CD22 functionally unavailable for binding to ligands in trans. Through immunofluorescence microscopy, however, we observed that CD22 on resting B cells redistributes to the site of contact with other B or T lymphocytes. Redistribution is mediated by interaction with trans ligands on the opposing cell because it does not occur with ligand-deficient lymphocytes from ST6GalI-null mice. Surprisingly, CD45, proposed as both a cis and trans ligand of CD22, was not required for redistribution to sites of cell contact, given that redistribution of CD22 was independent of CD45 and was observed with lymphocytes from CD45-deficient mice. Furthermore, CD45 is not required for CD22 masking as similar levels of masking were observed in the WT and null mice. Comparison of the widely used sialoside-polyacrylamide probe with a sialoside-streptavidin probe revealed that the latter bound a subset of B cells without sialidase treatment, suggesting that cis ligands differentially impacted the binding of these two probes in trans. The combined results suggest that equilibrium binding to cis ligands does not preclude binding of CD22 to ligands in trans, and allows for its redistribution to sites of contact between lymphocytes. PMID:15079087

  17. Regulation of gill claudin paralogs by salinity, cortisol and prolactin in Mozambique tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus).

    PubMed

    Tipsmark, Christian K; Breves, Jason P; Rabeneck, D Brett; Trubitt, Rebecca T; Lerner, Darren T; Grau, E Gordon

    2016-09-01

    In euryhaline teleosts, reorganization of gill tight junctions during salinity acclimation involves dynamic expression of specific claudin (Cldn) paralogs. We identified four transcripts encoding Cldn tight junction proteins in the tilapia gill transcriptome: cldn10c, cldn10e, cldn28a and cldn30. A tissue distribution experiment found cldn10c and cldn10e expression levels in the gill to be 100-fold higher than any other tissues examined. cldn28a and cldn30 levels in the gill were 10-fold greater than levels in other tissues. Expression of these genes in Mozambique tilapia was examined during acclimation to fresh water (FW), seawater (SW), and in response to hormone treatments. Transfer of tilapia from FW to SW elevated cldn10c and cldn10e, while cldn28a and cldn30 were stimulated following transfer from SW to FW. In hypophysectomized tilapia transferred to FW, pituitary extirpation induced reduced expression of cldn10c, cldn10e and cldn28a; these effects were mitigated equally by either prolactin or cortisol replacement. In vitro experiments with gill filaments showed that cortisol stimulated expression of all four cldns examined, suggesting a direct action of cortisol in situ. Our data indicate that elevated cldn10c and cldn10e expression is important during acclimation of tilapia to SW possibly by conferring ion specific paracellular permeability. On the other hand, expression of cldn28a and cldn30 appears to contribute to reorganization of branchial epithelium during FW acclimation. Hormone treatment experiments showed that particular FW- and SW-induced cldns are controlled by cortisol and prolactin. PMID:27210417

  18. Identification of Methanotrophic Lipid Biomarkers in Cold-Seep Mussel Gills: Chemical and Isotopic Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jahnke, Linda L.; Summons, Roger E.; Dowling, Lesley M.; Zahiralis, Karen D.

    1995-01-01

    A lipid analysis of the tissues of a cold-seep mytilid mussel collected from the Louisiana slope of the Gulf of Mexico was used in conjunction with a compound-specific isotope analysis to demonstrate the presence of methanotrophic symbionts in the mussel gill tissue and to demonstrate the host's dependence on bacterially synthesized metabolic intermediates. The gill tissue contained large amounts of group-specific methanotrophic biomarkers, bacteriohopanoids, 4-methylsterols, lipopolysaccharide-associated hydroxy fatty acids, and type I-specific 16:1 fatty acid isomers with bond positions at delta-8, delta-10, and delta-ll. Only small amounts of these compounds were detected in the mantle or other tissues of the host animal. A variety of cholesterol and 4-methylsterol isomers were identified as both free and steryl esters, and the sterol double bond positions suggested that the major bacterially derived gill sterol(11.0% 4(alpha)-methyl-cholesta-8(14), 24-dien-3(beta)-ol) was converted to host cholesterol (64.2% of the gill sterol was cholest-5-en-3(beta)-ol). The stable carbon isotope values for gill and mantle preparations were, respectively, -59.0 and -60.4 per thousand for total tissue, -60.6 and -62.4 per thousand for total lipids, -60.2 and -63.9 per thousand for phospholipid fatty acids, and -71.8 and -73.8 per thousand for sterols. These stable carbon isotope values revealed that the relative fractionation pattern was similar to the patterns obtained in pure culture experiments with methanotrophic bacteria further supporting the conversion of the bacterial methyl-sterol pool.

  19. [Histology of gill, liver and kidney in juvenile fish Colossoma macropomum exposed to three temperatures].

    PubMed

    Rojas, Luz-Marina; Mata, Claunis; Oliveros, Aridays; Salazar-Lugo, Raquel

    2013-06-01

    Abstract: Histology of gill, liver and kidney in juvenile fish Colossoma macropomum exposed to three temperatures. Water temperature is an important factor that affects growth and antioxidant enzyme activities in fish, and when adverse, it may trigger diseases in fish populations. C. macropomum is a freshwater neotropical fish widely distributed in South America and abundant in river basins as the Amazon and Orinoco. It is highly used for intensive aquaculture development and is a very important product for the local riverside economy in Venezuela. The purpose of our study was to examine the water temperature effect on gills, liver and kidneys of juvenile fishes of C macropomum. Eighteen juveniles with biometrical index of 17.87 +/- 7.88 cm and 87.69 +/- 34.23 g were respectively exposed to three culture temperatures (T18, T29 and T35 degrees C) during a period of 21 days. Histological analyses on gills, liver and kidney were made according to standard methodologies. Our results showed that these tissues exhibited normal citoarchitecture at T29. On the contrary, T18-gills displayed brachiallipid droplets inside brachial epithelium; and disorganization in the brachial tissue was observed at T35. Furthermore, we observed two kinds of hepatocytes (dark and light) on T180 degrees C-liver. The T35-liver samples showed cytoplasmatic granulation and damages in cytoplasmatic membrane. Kidney samples from T18 observed alterations in the cellular distribution of the hematopoietic tissue; while, at T35, the most important feature observed was the disorganization of the glomerular structure. We concluded that T18 and T35 are respectively critical and severe temperatures to C. macropomum; besides, the most sensible tissues to changes induced by temperature in this species were the liver and gills. PMID:23885590

  20. Cd(2+) extrusion by P-type Cd(2+)-ATPase of Staphylococcus aureus 17810R via energy-dependent Cd(2+)/H(+) exchange mechanism.

    PubMed

    Tynecka, Zofia; Malm, Anna; Goś-Szcześniak, Zofia

    2016-08-01

    Cd(2+) is highly toxic to Staphylococcus aureus since it blocks dithiols in cytoplasmic 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase complex (ODHC) participating in energy conservation process. However, S. aureus 17810R is Cd(2+)-resistant due to possession of cadA-coded Cd(2+) efflux system, recognized here as P-type Cd(2+)-ATPase. This Cd(2+) pump utilizing cellular energy-ATP, ∆μ H (+) (electrochemical proton potential) and respiratory protons, extrudes Cd(2+) from cytoplasm to protect dithiols in ODHC, but the mechanism of Cd(2+) extrusion remains unknown. Here we propose that two Cd(2+) taken up by strain 17810R via Mn(2+) uniporter down membrane potential (∆ψ) generated during glutamate oxidation in 100 mM phosphate buffer (high PiB) are trapped probably by high affinity sites in cytoplasmic domain of Cd(2+)-ATPase, forming SCdS. This stops Cd(2+) transport towards dithiols in ODHC, allowing undisturbed NADH production, its oxidation and energy conservation, while ATP could change orientation of SCdS towards facing transmembrane channel. Now, increased number of Pi-dependent protons pumped electrogenically via respiratory chain and countertransported through the channel down ∆ψ, extrude two trapped cytoplasmic Cd(2+), which move to low affinity sites, being then extruded into extracellular space via ∆ψ-dependent Cd(2+)/H(+) exchange. In 1 mM phosphate buffer (low PiB), external Cd(2+) competing with decreased number of Pi-dependent protons, binds to ψs of Cd(2+)-ATPase channel, enters cytoplasm through the channel down ∆ψ via Cd(2+)/Cd(2+) exchange and blocks dithiols in ODHC. However, Mg(2+) pretreatment preventing external Cd(2+) countertransport through the channel down ∆ψ, allowed undisturbed NADH production, its oxidation and extrusion of two cytoplasmic Cd(2+) via Cd(2+)/H(+) exchange, despite low PiB. PMID:27323956

  1. Human monocyte CD14 is upregulated by lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed Central

    Landmann, R; Knopf, H P; Link, S; Sansano, S; Schumann, R; Zimmerli, W

    1996-01-01

    Membrane CD14 is involved in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced monocyte activation; it binds LPS, and antibodies against CD14 block the effects of low-dose LPS. It is unknown how LPS regulates its own receptor CD14 in vitro. Therefore, we investigated the effects of LPS on CD14 mRNA and membrane and soluble CD14 (mCD14 and sCD14, respectively) in human monocytes and macrophages. No changes were observed during the first 3 h of LPS stimulation. After 6 to 15 h, LPS weakly reduced CD14 mRNA and mCD14 and transiently enhanced sCD14 release. A 2-day incubation with LPS caused increases in the levels of CD14 mRNA (2-fold), mCD14 (2-fold), sCD14 (1.5-fold), and LPS-fluorescein isothiocyanate binding (1.5-fold); a 5-h incubation with LPS was sufficient to induce the late effects on mCD14 and sCD14. The maximal effect on mCD14 and sCD14 was reached with > or = 1 ng of LPS per ml; the proportional distribution of the two sCD14 isoforms was not modified by LPS. Besides rough and smooth LPS, lipid A, heat-killed Escherichia coli, lipoteichoic acid, and Staphylococcus aureus cell wall extract (10 micrograms/ml) caused similar increases of mCD14. The LPS effect was blocked by polymyxin B but not by anti-tumor necrosis factor alpha, anti-interleukin-6, anti-gamma interferon, and anti-LPS-binding protein. LPS-induced tumor necrosis factor alpha production was abolished after a second 4-h challenge. In contrast, the LPS-induced increases CD14 mRNA, mCD14, and sCD14 were stronger and appeared earlier after a second LPS challenge. In conclusion, CD14 is transcriptionally upregulated by LPS and other bacterial cell wall constituents. PMID:8613389

  2. L-rhamnose-binding lectins (RBLs) in channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus: Characterization and expression profiling in mucosal tissues

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rhamnose binding-lectins (RBLs) have recently emerged as important molecules in the context of innate immunity in teleost fishes. Previously, using RNA-seq technology, we observed marked up-regulation of a RBL in channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) gill following a challenge with the bacterial pat...

  3. Hypoxia-induced soluble CD137 in malignant cells blocks CD137L-costimulation as an immune escape mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Labiano, Sara; Palazón, Asis; Bolaños, Elixabet; Azpilikueta, Arantza; Sánchez-Paulete, Alfonso R.; Morales-Kastresana, Aizea; Quetglas, Jose I.; Perez-Gracia, José L.; Gúrpide, Alfonso; Rodriguez-Ruiz, Maria; Aznar, M. Angela; Jure-Kunkel, Maria; Berraondo, Pedro; Melero, Ignacio

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Hypoxia is a common feature in solid tumors that has been implicated in immune evasion. Previous studies from our group have shown that hypoxia upregulates the co-stimulatory receptor CD137 on activated T lymphocytes and on vascular endothelial cells. In this study, we show that exposure of mouse and human tumor cell lines to hypoxic conditions (1% O2) promotes CD137 transcription. However, the resulting mRNA is predominantly an alternatively spliced form that encodes for a soluble variant, lacking the transmembrane domain. Accordingly, soluble CD137 (sCD137) is detectable by ELISA in the supernatant of hypoxia-exposed cell lines and in the serum of tumor-bearing mice. sCD137, as secreted by tumor cells, is able to bind to CD137-Ligand (CD137L). Our studies on primed T lymphocytes in co-culture with stable transfectants for CD137L demonstrate that tumor-secreted sCD137 prevents co-stimulation of T lymphocytes. Such an effect results from preventing the interaction of CD137L with the transmembrane forms of CD137 expressed on T lymphocytes undergoing activation. Indeed, silencing CD137 with shRNA renders more immunogenic tumor-cell variants upon inoculation to immunocompetent mice but which readily grafted on immunodeficient or CD8+ T-cell-depleted mice. These mechanisms are interpreted as a molecular strategy deployed by tumors to repress lymphocyte co-stimulation via CD137/CD137L. PMID:26942078

  4. Claudins in a primary cultured puffer fish (Tetraodon nigroviridis) gill epithelium model alter in response to acute seawater exposure.

    PubMed

    Bui, Phuong; Kelly, Scott P

    2015-11-01

    Gill epithelium permeability and qualitative/quantitative aspects of gill claudin (cldn) tight junction (TJ) protein transcriptomics were examined with a primary cultured model gill epithelium developed using euryhaline puffer fish (Tetraodon nigroviridis) gills. The model was prepared using seawater-acclimated fish gills and was cultured on permeable cell culture filter supports. The model is composed of 1-2 confluent layers of gill pavement cells (PVCs), with the outer layer exhibiting prominent apical surface microridges and TJs between adjacent cells. During development of electrophysiological characteristics, the model exhibits a sigmoidal increase in transpithelial resistance (TER) and plateaus around 30 kΩcm(2). At this point paracellular movement of [(3)H]polyethylene glycol (PEG) 4000 was low at ~1.75 cm s(-1)×10(-7). When exposed to apical seawater (SW) epithelia exhibit a marked decrease in TER while PEG flux remained unchanged for at least 6 h. In association with this, transcript encoding cldn TJ proteins cldn3c, -23b, -27a, -27c, -32a and -33b increased during the first 6 h while cldn11a decreased. This suggests that these proteins are involved in maintaining barrier properties between gill PVCs of SW fishes. Gill cldn mRNA abundance also altered 6 and 12 h following abrupt SW exposure of puffer fish, but in a manner that differed qualitatively and quantitatively from the cultured model. This most likely reflects the cellular heterogeneity of whole tissue and/or the contribution of the endocrine system in intact fish. The current study provides insight into the physiological and transcriptomic response of euryhaline fish gill cells to a hyperosmotic environment. PMID:26239219

  5. Oxygen utilization and the branchial pressure gradient during ram ventilation of the shortfin mako, Isurus oxyrinchus: is lamnid shark-tuna convergence constrained by elasmobranch gill morphology?

    PubMed

    Wegner, Nicholas C; Lai, N Chin; Bull, Kristina B; Graham, Jeffrey B

    2012-01-01

    Ram ventilation and gill function in a lamnid shark, the shortfin mako, Isurus oxyrinchus, were studied to assess how gill structure may affect the lamnid-tuna convergence for high-performance swimming. Despite differences in mako and tuna gill morphology, mouth gape and basal swimming speeds, measurements of mako O(2) utilization at the gills (53.4±4.2%) and the pressure gradient driving branchial flow (96.8±26.1 Pa at a mean swimming speed of 38.8±5.8 cm s(-1)) are similar to values reported for tunas. Also comparable to tunas are estimates of the velocity (0.22±0.03 cm s(-1)) and residence time (0.79±0.14 s) of water though the interlamellar channels of the mako gill. However, mako and tuna gills differ in the sites of primary branchial resistance. In the mako, approximately 80% of the total branchial resistance resides in the septal channels, structures inherent to the elasmobranch gill that are not present in tunas. The added resistance at this location is compensated by a correspondingly lower resistance at the gill lamellae accomplished through wider interlamellar channels. Although greater interlamellar spacing minimizes branchial resistance, it also limits lamellar number and results in a lower total gill surface area for the mako relative to tunas. The morphology of the elasmobranch gill thus appears to constrain gill area and, consequently, limit mako aerobic performance to less than that of tunas. PMID:22162850

  6. Description of two new gill myxozoans from smallmouth (Micropterus dolomieu) and largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walsh, Heather L.; Iwanowicz, Luke R.; Glenney, Gavin W.; Iwanowicz, Deborah D.; Blazer, Vicki

    2012-01-01

    Two previously undescribed species of myxozoan parasites were observed in the gills of bass inhabiting the Potomac and James River basins. They are described using morphological characteristics and small-subunit (SSU) rDNA gene sequences. Both were taxonomically identified as new species of Myxobolus; Myxobolus branchiarum n. sp. was found exclusively in smallmouth bass, and Myxobolus micropterii n. sp. was found in largemouth and smallmouth bass. Small, spherical, white plasmodia of M. branchiarum from smallmouth bass were observed grossly in the gills; these plasmodia had an average length of 320.3 µm and width of 246.1 µm. The development of the plasmodia is intralamellar in the secondary lamellae of the gills. Mature spores were pyriform in shape with a length of 12.8 ± 1.4 (8.1–15.1) µm and width of 6.9 ± 1.1 (4.0–9.0) µm. Analysis of SSU rDNA identified M. branchiarum in a sister-group to 3 species of Henneguya, although morphologically caudal appendages were absent. Myxobolus micropterii observed in the gills of largemouth and smallmouth bass had larger, ovoid, cream-colored plasmodia with an average length of 568.1 µm and width of 148.1 µm. The cysts developed at the distal end of the gill filament within the primary lamellae. The mature spores were ovoid in shape with a length of 10.8 ± 0.7 (9.2–12.2) µm and width of 10.6 ± 0.6 (9.0–11.8) µm. SSU rDNA analysis placed M. micropterii in a sister group with Henneguya lobosa and Myxobolus oliveirai. The highest prevalence of M. branchiarum was observed in the gills of bass collected from the Cowpasture River (50.9%). Prevalence was 44.6% in bass from the Potomac River and only 4.3% in bass collected from the Shenandoah River. A seasonal study of M. branchiarum, which included both infected and uninfected smallmouth bass, determined that a significantly higher intensity was observed in the spring than in the summer (P < 0.001) or fall (P  =  0.004). In an analysis excluding uninfected

  7. Description of two new gill myxozoans from smallmouth (Micropterus dolomieu) and largemouth (Micropterus salmoides) bass.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Heather L; Iwanowicz, Luke R; Glenney, Gavin W; Iwanowicz, Deborah D; Blazer, Vicki S

    2012-04-01

    Two previously undescribed species of myxozoan parasites were observed in the gills of bass inhabiting the Potomac and James River basins. They are described using morphological characteristics and small-subunit (SSU) rDNA gene sequences. Both were taxonomically identified as new species of Myxobolus; Myxobolus branchiarum n. sp. was found exclusively in smallmouth bass, and Myxobolus micropterii n. sp. was found in largemouth and smallmouth bass. Small, spherical, white plasmodia of M. branchiarum from smallmouth bass were observed grossly in the gills; these plasmodia had an average length of 320.3 µm and width of 246.1 µm. The development of the plasmodia is intralamellar in the secondary lamellae of the gills. Mature spores were pyriform in shape with a length of 12.8 ± 1.4 (8.1-15.1) µm and width of 6.9 ± 1.1 (4.0-9.0) µm. Analysis of SSU rDNA identified M. branchiarum in a sister-group to 3 species of Henneguya , although morphologically caudal appendages were absent. Myxobolus micropterii observed in the gills of largemouth and smallmouth bass had larger, ovoid, cream-colored plasmodia with an average length of 568.1 µm and width of 148.1 µm. The cysts developed at the distal end of the gill filament within the primary lamellae. The mature spores were ovoid in shape with a length of 10.8 ± 0.7 (9.2-12.2) µm and width of 10.6 ± 0.6 (9.0-11.8) µm. SSU rDNA analysis placed M. micropterii in a sister group with Henneguya lobosa and Myxobolus oliveirai . The highest prevalence of M. branchiarum was observed in the gills of bass collected from the Cowpasture River (50.9%). Prevalence was 44.6% in bass from the Potomac River and only 4.3% in bass collected from the Shenandoah River. A seasonal study of M. branchiarum , which included both infected and uninfected smallmouth bass, determined that a significantly higher intensity was observed in the spring than in the summer (P < 0.001) or fall (P  =  0.004). In an analysis excluding uninfected bass, a

  8. Gill transcriptome response to changes in environmental calcium in the green spotted puffer fish

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Calcium ion is tightly regulated in body fluids and for euryhaline fish, which are exposed to rapid changes in environmental [Ca2+], homeostasis is especially challenging. The gill is the main organ of active calcium uptake and therefore plays a crucial role in the maintenance of calcium ion homeostasis. To study the molecular basis of the short-term responses to changing calcium availability, the whole gill transcriptome obtained by Super Serial Analysis of Gene Expression (SuperSAGE) of the euryhaline teleost green spotted puffer fish, Tetraodon nigroviridis, exposed to water with altered [Ca2+] was analysed. Results Transfer of T. nigroviridis from 10 ppt water salinity containing 2.9 mM Ca2+ to high (10 mM Ca2+ ) and low (0.01 mM Ca2+) calcium water of similar salinity for 2-12 h resulted in 1,339 differentially expressed SuperSAGE tags (26-bp transcript identifiers) in gills. Of these 869 tags (65%) were mapped to T. nigroviridis cDNAs or genomic DNA and 497 (57%) were assigned to known proteins. Thirteen percent of the genes matched multiple tags indicating alternative RNA transcripts. The main enriched gene ontology groups belong to Ca2+ signaling/homeostasis but also muscle contraction, cytoskeleton, energy production/homeostasis and tissue remodeling. K-means clustering identified co-expressed transcripts with distinct patterns in response to water [Ca2+] and exposure time. Conclusions The generated transcript expression patterns provide a framework of novel water calcium-responsive genes in the gill during the initial response after transfer to different [Ca2+]. This molecular response entails initial perception of alterations, activation of signaling networks and effectors and suggests active remodeling of cytoskeletal proteins during the initial acclimation process. Genes related to energy production and energy homeostasis are also up-regulated, probably reflecting the increased energetic needs of the acclimation response. This study is the

  9. Molecular characterization of woodchuck CD4 (wCD4) and production of a depletion monoclonal antibody against wCD4.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yinke; Zhang, Xiaoyong; Zhang, Chunyan; Tao, Yuanqing; Fan, Wei; Wang, Zhongdong; Wang, Hu; Lu, Mengji; Yang, Dongliang; Fiedler, Melanie; Wang, Baoju

    2013-11-01

    CD4 T cells play an important role in the immune response against hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. Woodchucks represent an excellent animal model to study HBV infection. In this study, we characterized the cDNA sequence of woodchuck CD4 (wCD4). The deduced wCD4 protein has four extracellular immunoglobulin-like domains comparable to the other mammalian CD4 molecules. The important extracellular cysteine residues and the intracellular tyrosine protein kinase-binding site of wCD4 are also conserved. The deduced wCD4 protein shows 53-63% identity with the counterparts of other mammalians. Phylogenetic analysis indicates that wCD4 is closely related with the counterparts of primates. Two polyclonal antibodies (pAbs) and four monoclonal Abs (mAbs) against wCD4 were produced. Two pAbs and one mAbs (G2) were found to effectively suppress ConA induced proliferation in vitro. Anti-wCD4 mAb G2 depleted 60% of CD4 cells from healthy woodchucks, while the remaining CD4 cells responded well to ConA stimulation. This work provides a basis for studying CD4 T cell mediated immune responses against HBV infection in the woodchuck model. PMID:23685260

  10. Lipopolysaccharide recognition, CD14, and lipopolysaccharide receptors.<