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Sample records for gillian ragsdell daune

  1. TRMM Flyby of Gillian on Mar. 23, 2014

    NASA Video Gallery

    On March 23 when the TRMM satellite passed over Gillian, it was at hurricane-force. TRMM revealed intense storms in a well-defined eye wall producing rain at a rate of over 100mm/3.9 inches per hou...

  2. "Your Part in This Adventure Is Over. You Have Lost": Gillian Rubinstein's Novels for Older Readers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foster, John

    1991-01-01

    Examines the works of Gillian Rubinstein, a popular author of children's literature who is now writing for older readers. Explores what she says and how she says it in her three novels for older readers. (PRA)

  3. Daun02 Inactivation of Behaviorally Activated Fos-Expressing Neuronal Ensembles.

    PubMed

    Koya, Eisuke; Margetts-Smith, Gabriella; Hope, Bruce T

    2016-01-01

    Learned associations about salient experiences (e.g., drug exposure, stress) and their associated environmental stimuli are mediated by a minority of sparsely distributed, behaviorally activated neurons coined 'neuronal ensembles.' For many years, it was not known whether these neuronal ensembles played causal roles in mediating learned behaviors. However, in the last several years the 'Daun02 inactivation technique' in Fos-lacZ transgenic rats has proved very useful in establishing causal links between neuronal ensembles that express the activity-regulated protein Fos and learned behaviors. Fos-expressing neurons in these rats also express the bacterial protein β-galactosidase (β-gal) in strongly activated neurons. When the prodrug Daun02 is injected into the brains of these rats 90 min after a behavior (e.g., drug-seeking) or cue exposure, then Daun02 is converted into daunorubicin by β-gal, which selectively inactivates Fos- and β-gal-expressing neurons that were activated 90 min before the Daun02 injection. This unit presents protocols for breeding the Fos-lacZ rats and conducting appropriate Daun02 inactivation experiments. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:27367964

  4. TRMM Flyby of Gillian Mar. 14 - Duration: 13 seconds.

    NASA Video Gallery

    On March 14, 2014 at 1 a.m. EDT this simulated 3-D flyby of the TRMM satellite showed rain falling at the rate of over 116 mm/4.5 inches per hour (red), and some storms were higher than 16.75 km/10...

  5. Histological Changes in the Fracture Callus Following the Administration of Water Extract of Piper Sarmentosum (Daun Kadok) in Estrogen-Deficient Rats

    PubMed Central

    Estai, Mohamed Abdalla; Soelaiman, Ima Nirwana; Shuid, Ahmad Nazrun; Das, Srijit; Ali, Aishah Mohd; Suhaimi, Farihah Hj

    2011-01-01

    Background: The fracture healing is impaired in osteoporosis. Piper sarmentosum is a plant, which contains potent antioxidant, naringenin that may enhance fracture healing. The present histological study aimed to determine the effects of water extract of Piper sarmentosum on the late phase of fracture healing in estrogen-deficient rats. Methods: Twenty four female Sprague-Dawley rats (200-250 gm) were obtained. Six rats underwent sham operation and the rest were ovariectomized. Six weeks post-ovariectomy all the rats were fractured at the mid-diaphysis of the right femur and a K-wire was inserted for internal fixation. The sham group was given vehicle (normal saline) and the ovariectomized group was randomly subdivided into three groups: (i) ovariectomized-control group supplemented with vehicle; (ii) ovariectomized+estrogen replacement therapy group treated with estrogen (100 µg/kg/day) and (iii) ovariectomized+Piper sarmentosum group treated with Piper sarmentosum water extract (125 mg/kg). Following six weeks of treatment, the rats were sacrificed and the right femora were harvested for histological assessment of fracture callus. Results: The ovariectomized-control group showed a significant delay in fracture healing compared to the sham, ovariectomized-estrogen replacement therapy and ovariectomized-Piper sarmentosum groups. The median callus score for the ovariectomized-Piper sarmentosum group was 4.50 (range, 4-5), which was significantly higher than the median callus score 3.50 (range, 3-4) for the ovariectomized-control group (P=0.019). However, there was no significant (P>0.05) difference in the callus score among the sham, ovariectomized-estrogen replacement therapy and ovariectomized-Piper sarmentosum groups groups. Conclusion: Treatment with water extract of Piper sarmentosum proved beneficial in the fracture healing in estrogen-deficient rats. PMID:23115413

  6. Focus on the Teacher. Communicative Approaches to Teacher Training. ELT Documents 110.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    British Council, London (England). English Language and Literature Div.

    A collection of papers on the training of English teachers includes: an introduction (Gillian Marsh); "The Use of Video in EFL Teacher Training" (Michael J. Wallace); "Designing a Micro-Teaching Programme in the Third World" (Donard Britten, Falla Sow); "Teacher Training at the Colchester English Study Centre" (Jonathan Seath); "The Training of…

  7. Bibliographic Instruction in Indiana.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, H. Scott, Ed.

    1988-01-01

    This issue contains nine articles written by Indiana librarians involved in bibliographic instruction: (1) "Information Management Education--Beyond BI (Bibliographic Instruction)" (Gillian S. Gremmels); (2) "Dealing with the New Technology: An Instructional Primer" (Patrick Max); (3) "Librarian/Teacher Partnerships for Better Library Instruction:…

  8. Technology for Transition and Postsecondary Success: Supporting Executive Function

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayes, Gillian; Hosaflook, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    This six-page (tri-fold) laminated reference guide by Gillian Hayes and Stephen Hosaflook focuses on readily available tools for augmenting and supporting the development of executive function skills, such as time and task management, organization, and self-regulation. These skills are crucial for accomplishing a variety of transition-related…

  9. Change and Continuity in Applied Linguistics. Selected Papers from the Annual Meeting of the British Association for Applied Linguistics (Edinburgh, Scotland, September 1999). British Studies in Applied Linguistics 15.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trappes-Lomax, Hugh, Ed.

    The following articles appear in this issue: "Changing Views of Language in Applied Linguistics" (Gillian Brown); "Society, Education, and Language: The Last 2000 (and the next 20?) Years of Language Teaching" (Michael Stubbs); "The Secret Life of Grammar Translation" (Malcolm J. Bensen); "Changing Views of Language Learning" (Susan Gass); "Change…

  10. Oxbridge Redivivus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ainley, Patrick

    2011-01-01

    How the dominance of the two medieval universities, namely, (1) The University of Oxford; and (2) The University of Cambridge, was gained and maintained is the subject of the institutional histories by Gillian Evans. She has long been a thorn in the side of successive Cambridge Vice-Chancellors' aspirations to turn that institution--at which she…

  11. Research About Nineteenth-Century Children and Books. Portrait Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richardson, Selma K., Ed.

    This collection of papers delivered at a symposium held in April 1979 explores the relationship between children and literature in the nineteenth century. The following titles are included: "The Researcher's Craft: Designs and Implements," and "Children's Books and Social History," by Gillian Avery; "Reflections on Histories of Childhood," by…

  12. Adult Learning: A Reader.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutherland, Peter, Ed.

    This book on adult learning is divided into six sections. Section 1, Cognitive Processes, includes the following chapters: "Cognitive Processes: Contemporary Paradigms of Learning" (Jack Mezirow); "Information Processing, Memory, Age and Adult Learning" (Gillian Boulton-Lewis); "Adult Learners' Metacognitive Behaviour in Higher Education" (Barry…

  13. Spoken Language. Papers from the Annual Meeting of the British Association for Applied Linguistics (Edinburgh, Scotland, September 1985). British Studies in Applied Linguistics 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meara, Paul, Ed.

    Selected papers from the annual meeting of the British Association for Applied Linguistics include the following: "The Scope of Applied Linguistics" (a brief introduction by Paul Meara); "Grading and Professionalism in ELT (English Language Teaching)" (Gillian Brown); "'The Arm of the Chair Is Where You Use For To Write': Developing Strategic…

  14. Toka Boot/The Big Jam: Making Music in Rural East Timor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howell, Gillian; Dunphy, Kim

    2012-01-01

    This article discusses a community music project in rural East Timor. Australian musician Gillian Howell lived for three months in the isolated town of Lospalos as an Asialink artist-in-residence, where she worked with local community members and visiting Australian musicians to share music and ideas, and to communicate across cultures. Three…

  15. Selective Listening in L2 Learners of French

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graham, Suzanne; Santos, Denise

    2013-01-01

    This paper considers the issue raised in 2008 by Gillian Brown in her article "Selective listening" regarding whether nouns are "privileged" in memory over verbs during listening tasks, and whether attention to nouns, at least in the early stages of L2 learning, is a desirable strategy to be taught to learners, as Brown suggests it might be. The…

  16. BIOMARKERS OF ENDOCRINE DISRUPTION AT THE MRNA LEVEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Denslow, Nancy D., Christopher J. Bowman, Gillian Robinson, H. Stephen Lee, Ronald J. Ferguson, Michael J. Hemmer and Leroy C. Folmar. 1999. Biomarkers of Endocrine Disruption at the mRNA Level. In: Environmental Toxicology and Risk Assessment: Standardization of Biomarkers for ...

  17. Book Reviews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forbes-Adam, Isobel; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Reviews three books: (1) "Contemporary Issues in the Early Years: Working Collaboratively for Children" (Gillian Pugh, editor); (2) "Social Interaction and the Development of Language and Cognition," (Alison F. Garton); and (3) "Child and Nature," (World Organization for Early Childhood Education). (AC)

  18. Recommendations for dextranase application in the 2006 Louisiana grinding season

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In the last few years (2003-2005), Dr. Gillian Eggleston, a Lead Scientist at the Southern Regional Research Center of USDA-ARS in New Orleans, and factory co-researchers have worked on optimizing the application of dextranases in the Louisiana sugarcane factories. The recommendations gained from t...

  19. Making the Difference. Proceedings of the Annual Conference of the Mathematics Education Research Group of Australasia Incorporated (22nd, Adelaide, South Australia, July 4-7, 1999).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Truran, John M., Ed.; Truran, Kathleen M., Ed.

    Papers from the 22nd Annual Conference of the Mathematics Education Research Group of Australasia Incorporated include the following: (1) "Making Sense of Primary Mathematics" (Gillian M. Boulton-Lewis); (2) "Seeking a Rationale for Particular Classroom Tasks and Activity" (Peter Sullivan); (3) "Research in Mathematics Education in Australia: What…

  20. Hybridized doxorubicin-Au nanospheres exhibit enhanced near-infrared surface plasmon absorption for photothermal therapy applications.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jialin; Wang, Zuhua; Li, Qingpo; Liu, Fei; Du, Yongzhong; Yuan, Hong; Hu, Fuqiang; Wei, Yinghui; You, Jian

    2015-03-19

    Photothermal therapy (PTT) employs photosensitizing agents, which are taken up by cells and generate heat when irradiated with near-infrared (NIR) light, to enable the photoablation of cancer cells. High absorption in the NIR region is crucial for a photosensitizing agent to achieve efficient PTT. Different combinations between gold nanoparticles and fluorescent agents always influence their spectrum properties. Herein, we fabricated a novel combination of a fluorescent agent (doxorubicin, DOX, also a popular chemotherapeutic agent) with gold nanospheres by synthesizing hybridized DOX-Au nanospheres (DAuNS), where a part of the DOX molecules and Au co-formed a hybridized matrix as the shell and the remaining DOX molecules precipitated as the core. The unique structure of DAuNS induced interesting changes in the characteristics including spectrum properties, morphology, drug loading and antitumor activity. We observed that DAuNS exhibited a significantly enhanced surface plasmon absorption in the NIR region, inducing a more efficient photothermal conversion and stronger tumor-cell killing ability under NIR laser irradiation. In addition, our study presents a new and simple platform to load a drug into nanoparticles. DAuNS could be a promising nanoparticle with the "two punch" efficacy of PTT and chemotherapy and could be used in clinical applications due to its controllable synthesis, small size, and narrow size distribution. PMID:25757809

  1. Role of nucleus accumbens shell neuronal ensembles in context-induced reinstatement of cocaine-seeking.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Fabio C; Babin, Klil R; Leao, Rodrigo M; Goldart, Evan M; Bossert, Jennifer M; Shaham, Yavin; Hope, Bruce T

    2014-05-28

    Environmental contexts previously associated with drug use provoke relapse to drug use in humans and reinstatement of drug seeking in animal models of drug relapse. We examined whether context-induced reinstatement of cocaine seeking is mediated by activation of context-selected nucleus accumbens neurons. We trained rats to self-administer cocaine in Context A and extinguished their lever-pressing in a distinct Context B. On test day, reexposure to the cocaine-associated Context A reinstated cocaine seeking and increased expression of the neural activity marker Fos in 3.3% of accumbens shell and 1.6% of accumbens core neurons. To assess a causal role for these activated neurons, we used the Daun02 inactivation procedure to selectively inactivate these neurons. We trained c-fos-lacZ transgenic rats to self-administer cocaine in Context A and extinguished their lever-pressing in Context B. On induction day, we exposed rats to either Context A or a novel Context C for 30 min and injected Daun02 or vehicle into accumbens shell or core 60 min later. On test day, 3 d after induction day, the ability of Context A to reinstate cocaine seeking and increase neuronal activity in accumbens shell was attenuated when Daun02 was previously injected after exposure to Context A. Daun02 injections after exposure to the novel Context C had no effect on context-induced reinstatement of cocaine seeking despite much greater numbers of Fos-expressing neurons induced by Context C. Daun02 injections in accumbens core had no effect. Our data suggest that context-induced reinstatement of cocaine seeking is mediated by activation of context-selected accumbens shell but not core neuronal ensembles. PMID:24872549

  2. Hybridized doxorubicin-Au nanospheres exhibit enhanced near-infrared surface plasmon absorption for photothermal therapy applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jialin; Wang, Zuhua; Li, Qingpo; Liu, Fei; Du, Yongzhong; Yuan, Hong; Hu, Fuqiang; Wei, Yinghui; You, Jian

    2015-03-01

    Photothermal therapy (PTT) employs photosensitizing agents, which are taken up by cells and generate heat when irradiated with near-infrared (NIR) light, to enable the photoablation of cancer cells. High absorption in the NIR region is crucial for a photosensitizing agent to achieve efficient PTT. Different combinations between gold nanoparticles and fluorescent agents always influence their spectrum properties. Herein, we fabricated a novel combination of a fluorescent agent (doxorubicin, DOX, also a popular chemotherapeutic agent) with gold nanospheres by synthesizing hybridized DOX-Au nanospheres (DAuNS), where a part of the DOX molecules and Au co-formed a hybridized matrix as the shell and the remaining DOX molecules precipitated as the core. The unique structure of DAuNS induced interesting changes in the characteristics including spectrum properties, morphology, drug loading and antitumor activity. We observed that DAuNS exhibited a significantly enhanced surface plasmon absorption in the NIR region, inducing a more efficient photothermal conversion and stronger tumor-cell killing ability under NIR laser irradiation. In addition, our study presents a new and simple platform to load a drug into nanoparticles. DAuNS could be a promising nanoparticle with the ``two punch'' efficacy of PTT and chemotherapy and could be used in clinical applications due to its controllable synthesis, small size, and narrow size distribution.Photothermal therapy (PTT) employs photosensitizing agents, which are taken up by cells and generate heat when irradiated with near-infrared (NIR) light, to enable the photoablation of cancer cells. High absorption in the NIR region is crucial for a photosensitizing agent to achieve efficient PTT. Different combinations between gold nanoparticles and fluorescent agents always influence their spectrum properties. Herein, we fabricated a novel combination of a fluorescent agent (doxorubicin, DOX, also a popular chemotherapeutic agent) with gold

  3. Development of a CART Model to Predict the Synthesis of Cardiotoxic Daunorubicinol in Heart Tissue Samples From Donors With and Without Down Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hoefer, Carrie C; Blair, Rachael Hageman; Blanco, Javier G

    2016-06-01

    Daunorubicin (DAUN) and doxorubicin (DOX) are used to treat a variety of cancers. The use of DAUN and DOX is hampered by the development of cardiotoxicity. Clinical evidence suggests that patients with leukemia and Down syndrome are at increased risk for anthracycline-related cardiotoxicity. Carbonyl reductases and aldo-keto reductases (AKRs) catalyze the reduction of DAUN and DOX into cardiotoxic C-13 alcohol metabolites. Anthracyclines also exert cardiotoxicity by triggering mitochondrial dysfunction. In recent studies, a collection of heart samples from donors with and without Down syndrome was used to investigate determinants for anthracycline-related cardiotoxicity including cardiac daunorubicin reductase activity (DA), carbonyl reductase/AKRs protein expression, mitochondrial DNA content (mtDNA), and AKR7A2 DNA methylation status. In this study, the available demographic, biochemical, genetic, and epigenetic data were integrated through classification and regression trees analysis with the aim of pinpointing the most relevant variables for the synthesis of cardiotoxic daunorubicinol (i.e., DA). Seventeen variables were considered as potential predictors. Leave-one-out-cross-validation was performed for model selection and to estimate the generalization error. The classification and regression trees analysis model and variable importance measures suggest that cardiac mtDNA content, mtDNA(4977) deletion frequency, and AKR7A2 protein content are the most important variables in determining DA. PMID:27112290

  4. International Program and Local Organizing Committees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2012-12-01

    International Program Committee Dionisio Bermejo (Spain) Roman Ciurylo (Poland) Elisabeth Dalimier (France) Alexander Devdariani (Russia) Milan S Dimitrijevic (Serbia) Robert Gamache (USA) Marco A Gigosos (Spain) Motoshi Goto (Japan) Magnus Gustafsson (Sweden) Jean-Michel Hartmann (France) Carlos Iglesias (USA) John Kielkopf (USA) John C Lewis (Canada) Valery Lisitsa (Russia) Eugene Oks (USA) Christian G Parigger (USA) Gillian Peach (UK) Adriana Predoi-Cross (Canada) Roland Stamm (Germany) Local Organizing Committee Nikolay G Skvortsov (Chair, St Petersburg State University) Evgenii B Aleksandrov (Ioffe Physico-Technical Institute, St Petersburg) Vadim A Alekseev (Scientific Secretary, St Petersburg State University) Sergey F Boureiko (St.Petersburg State University) Yury N Gnedin (Pulkovo Observatory, St Petersburg) Alexander Z Devdariani (Deputy Chair, St Petersburg State University) Alexander P Kouzov (Deputy Chair, St Petersburg State University) Nikolay A Timofeev (St Petersburg State University)

  5. Targeted disruption of cocaine-activated accumbens neurons prevents context-specific sensitization

    PubMed Central

    Koya, Eisuke; Golden, Sam A.; Harvey, Brandon K.; Guez, Danielle H.; Berkow, Alexander; Simmons, Danielle E.; Bossert, Jennifer M.; Nair, Sunila G.; Uejima, Jamie L.; Marin, Marcelo T.; Mitchell, Timothy; Farquhar, David; Ghosh, Sukhen; Mattson, Brandi J.; Hope, Bruce T.

    2009-01-01

    Learned associations between effects of abused drugs and the drug administration environment play important roles in drug addiction. Histochemical and electrophysiological studies suggest that these associations are encoded in sparsely distributed nucleus accumbens neurons that are selectively activated by drugs and drug-associated cues. Although correlations between accumbens neuronal activity and responsivity to drugs and drug cues have been observed, no technique exists for selectively manipulating these activated neurons and establishing their causal role in behavioral effects of drugs and drug cues. Here we describe a novel method, termed ‘Daun02-inactivation method’, that selectively inactivates a minority of neurons activated by cocaine in an environment repeatedly paired with cocaine to demonstrate a causal role for these activated neurons in context-specific cocaine-induced psychomotor sensitization in rats. This method provides a new tool to study causal roles of selectively activated neurons in behavioral effects of drugs and drug cues and in other learned behaviors. PMID:19620976

  6. New technologies for examining neuronal ensembles in drug addiction and fear

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, Fabio C.; Koya, Eisuke; Guez-Barber, Danielle H.; Bossert, Jennifer M.; Lupica, Carl R.; Shaham, Yavin; Hope, Bruce T.

    2015-01-01

    Correlational data suggest that learned associations are encoded within neuronal ensembles. However, it has been difficult to prove that neuronal ensembles mediate learned behaviours because traditional pharmacological and lesion methods, and even newer cell type-specific methods, affect both activated and non-activated neurons. Additionally, previous studies on synaptic and molecular alterations induced by learning did not distinguish between behaviourally activated and non-activated neurons. Here, we describe three new approaches—Daun02 inactivation, FACS sorting of activated neurons and c-fos-GFP transgenic rats — that have been used to selectively target and study activated neuronal ensembles in models of conditioned drug effects and relapse. We also describe two new tools — c-fos-tTA mice and inactivation of CREB-overexpressing neurons — that have been used to study the role of neuronal ensembles in conditioned fear. PMID:24088811

  7. New technologies for examining the role of neuronal ensembles in drug addiction and fear.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Fabio C; Koya, Eisuke; Guez-Barber, Danielle H; Bossert, Jennifer M; Lupica, Carl R; Shaham, Yavin; Hope, Bruce T

    2013-11-01

    Correlational data suggest that learned associations are encoded within neuronal ensembles. However, it has been difficult to prove that neuronal ensembles mediate learned behaviours because traditional pharmacological and lesion methods, and even newer cell type-specific methods, affect both activated and non-activated neurons. In addition, previous studies on synaptic and molecular alterations induced by learning did not distinguish between behaviourally activated and non-activated neurons. Here, we describe three new approaches--Daun02 inactivation, FACS sorting of activated neurons and Fos-GFP transgenic rats--that have been used to selectively target and study activated neuronal ensembles in models of conditioned drug effects and relapse. We also describe two new tools--Fos-tTA transgenic mice and inactivation of CREB-overexpressing neurons--that have been used to study the role of neuronal ensembles in conditioned fear. PMID:24088811

  8. Chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes) relational matching: playing by their own (analogical) rules.

    PubMed

    Flemming, Timothy M; Kennedy, Erica Hoy

    2011-05-01

    Chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) have been known to exhibit rudimentary abilities in analogical reasoning (Flemming, Beran, Thompson, Kleider, & Washburn, 2008; Gillian, Premack, & Woodruff, 1981; Haun & Call, 2009; Thompson & Oden, 2000; Thompson, Oden, & Boysen, 1997). With a wide array of individual differences, little can be concluded about the species' capacity for analogies, much less their strategies employed for solving such problems. In this study, we examined analogical strategies in 3 chimpanzees using a 3-dimensional search task (e.g., Kennedy & Fragaszy, 2008). Food items were hidden under 1 of 2 or 3 plastic cups of varying sizes. Subsequently, chimpanzees searched for food under the cup of the same relative size in their own set of cups--reasoning by analogy. Two chimpanzees initially appeared to fail the first relational phase of the task. Meta-analyses revealed, however, that they were instead using a secondary strategy not rewarded by the contingencies of the task--choosing on the basis of the same relative position in the sample. Although this was not the intended strategy of the task, it was nonetheless analogical. In subsequent phases of the task, chimpanzees eventually learned to shift their analogical reasoning strategy to match the reward contingencies of the task and successfully choose on the basis of relative size. This evidence not only provides support for the analogical ape hypothesis (Thompson & Oden, 2000), but also exemplifies how foundational conceptually mediated analogical behavior may be for the chimpanzee. PMID:21604854

  9. Park Break: collaborative opportunity established for graduate students

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    White, Robin P.; Donahue, John; O'Leary, Debbie

    2014-01-01

    Among the many topics discussed during the 2007-2008 George Wright Society (GWS) board meetings was the subject of how to inspire students seeking careers in science and natural resource management to consider the Department of Interior (DOI) in general, and the National Park Service (NPS) and the US Geological Survey (USGS) in particular, as good options for future employment. Board members participating in these discussions included Suzette Kimball, now acting director of USGS, and Gillian Browser, now a research scientists with Colorado State University, who envisioned a program that would offer an alternative to the break from classes that universities typically offer students in early spring. Since those initial discussions among the GWS board members, Park Break sessions have been held in eleven different NPS sites across the country. Each session has sponsored six to eight graduate students in various stages off their university programs for a week-long seminar focused on a specific theme relevant to the host park, such as conversation policy and climate change. Sessions have varied in format but all generally have been composed of a week of field and classroom activity with participation from local, state, and national experts.

  10. Electromagnet Design for an Experimental Search for CP Violation in Positronium Decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petersburg, Ryan; Henning, Reyco; Bartram, Chelsea

    2015-04-01

    The 3-photon decay of spin-aligned triplet positronium could be used to search for a charge conjugation and parity (CP) symmetry violation. This CP violation would manifest as a nonzero angular correlation (S-> .k1 -->) (S-> .k1 --> ×k2 -->) between the three decay photons' momentum vectors (|k1 --> | > |k2 --> | > |k3 --> |) and the triplet positronium spin (S->). Current limits on this correlation are at the ~10-3 level; therefore, we propose an experiment to improve this limit. In our experiment, the positronium is spin-polarized by a uniform magnetic field from a conventional electromagnet, and the photons are detected by a segmented NaI gamma detector array with large angular acceptance. This talk discusses the design of this unique electromagnet, which requires good field uniformity for the positronium source and a novel yoke design to minimize fringe field effects for the NaI array's PMTs. This project was supported by the Gillian T. Cell Senior Thesis Research Award in the College of Arts & Sciences, administered by Honors Carolina.

  11. Sampling and analysis of quaternary ammonium compounds (QACs) traces in indoor atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Vincent, Guillaume; Kopferschmitt-Kubler, Marie Christine; Mirabel, Philippe; Pauli, Gabrielle; Millet, Maurice

    2007-10-01

    Quaternary Ammonium Compounds (QACs) are widely found in disinfectants used in hospitals. Benzalkonium chloride (BAC) and didecyldimethylammonium chloride (DDAC) predominate in the disinfecting formulations. These compounds are strong irritants and can play a role in the induction of Occupational Asthma among the professionals of health and cleaning. In order to evaluate the potential health effect of these quaternary ammonium compounds to hospital employers, the development of an analytical method for their quantification in indoor air was developed. DDAC aerosols are trapped by adsorption on XAD-2 resin SKC tube. The air in hospital buildings was sampled using a constant debit Gillian pump at a flow of 1.0 l/min (+/-5%). Ion Chromatography (IC) was chosen for the analysis of DDAC especially for its high sensitivity and specificity. The Limit of Detection (LOD) by IC for DDAC is 0.56 mug/ml. Therefore the LOD of atmospheric DDAC is 28 microg/m(3) with an air volume of 100 l and a desorption volume of 5 ml. All DDAC air samples were lower than the LOD of the analytical method by IC. Under the standard conditions of use of the disinfecting solutions (Surfanios, Ampholysine Plus and Amphospray 41), the insignificant volatility of DDAC would not seem to be able to contaminate the indoor hospital atmosphere during the disinfection process. However, the DDAC can contaminate working atmospheres if it is put in suspension by aerosolisation. PMID:17180409

  12. ZIKA VIRUS INFECTION; VERTICAL TRANSMISSION AND FOETAL CONGENITAL ANOMALIES.

    PubMed

    Abbasi, Aziz-un-Nisa

    2016-01-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV) is an arbovirus belonging to flaviviridae family that includes Dengue, West Nile, and Yellow Fever among others. Zika virus was first discovered in 1947 in Zika forest of Uganda. It is a vector borne disease, which has been sporadically reported mostly from Africa, Pacific islands and Southeast Asia since its discovery. ZIKV infection presents as a mild illness with symptoms lasting for several days to a week after the bite of an infected mosquito. Majority of the patients have low grade fever, rash, headaches, joints pain, myalgia, and flu like symptoms. Pregnant women are more vulnerable to ZIKV infection and serious congenital anomalies can occur in foetus through trans-placental transmission. The gestation at which infection is acquired is important. Zika virus infection acquired in early pregnancy poses greater risk. There is no evidence so far about transmission through breast milk. Foetal microcephaly, Gillian Barre syndrome and other neurological and autoimmune syndromes have been reported in areas where Zika outbreaks have occurred. As infection is usually very mild no specific treatment is required. Pregnant women may be advised to take rest, get plenty of fluids. For fever and pain they can take antipyretics like paracetamol. So far no specific drugs or vaccines are available against Zika Virus Infection so prevention is the mainstay against this diseases. As ZIKV infection is a vector borne disease, prevention can be a multi-pronged strategy. These entail vector control interventions, personal protection, environmental sanitation and health education among others. PMID:27323550

  13. Determination of Vitamin C, b-carotene and Riboflavin Contents in Five Green Vegetables Organically and Conventionally Grown.

    PubMed

    Ismail, Amin; Cheah, Sook Fun

    2003-03-01

    As consumer interest in organically grown vegetables is increasing in Malaysia, there is a need to answer whether the vegetables are more nutritious than those conventionally grown. This study investigates commercially available vegetables grown organically and conventionally, purchased from retailers to analyse β-carotene, vitamin C and riboflavin contents. Five types of green vegetables were selected, namely Chinese mustard (sawi) (Brassica juncea), Chinese kale (kai-lan) (Brassica alboglabra), lettuce (daun salad) (Lactuca sativa), spinach (bayam putih) (Amaranthus viridis) and swamp cabbage (kangkung) (Ipomoea aquatica). For vitamin analysis, a reverse-phase high performance liquid chromatography was used to identify and quantify β -carotene, vitamin C and riboflavin. The findings showed that not all of the organically grown vegetables were higher in vitamins than that conventionally grown. This study found that only swamp cabbage grown organically was highest in β -carotene, vitamin C and riboflavin contents among the entire samples studied. The various nutrients in organically grown vegetables need to be analysed for the generation of a database on nutritional value which is important for future research. PMID:22692530

  14. Authenticity: is it real or is it marketing?

    PubMed

    Weinberger, David

    2008-03-01

    Marty Echt, the new head of marketing at Hunsk Engines, is determined to bring the motorcycle maker back to its roots. He says it's not enough to project authenticity to customers--employees must personally subscribe to the brand's values. Should the company's CEO support Marty's "real deal" vision? Five experts comment on this fictional case study. Bruce Weindruch, the founder and CEO of the History Factory, says that an authenticity-based campaign can be effective--but only if it's truly drawn from history. Marketers like Marty often remember their organization's past in a golden haze. Weindruch recommends exploring old engineering drawings, ads, and product photos in order to understand what customers and employees really valued back in the day. Gillian Arnold, a consultant to luxury fashion and fine jewelry brands, thinks Marty's approach is right: People in key marketing posts must be passionate about their products and know them inside and out. She argues that the CEO needs to commit more fully to the new campaign and address the significant gap between the staff and the brand. James H. Gilmore and B. Joseph Pine II, the cofounders of Strategic Horizons, point out that Hunsk needs to manage customers' perceptions rather than trying to be a "real company" or forming a management team whose personal interests match the brand. People purchase a product if it conforms to their self-image; that alone determines the brand's authenticity. Glenn Brackett of Sweetgrass Rods, a maker of bamboo fly-fishing rods, says Marty seems to be one of the few people who understand Hunsk motorcycles. If employees bring blood, sweat, heart, and soul to a product, it will manifest that spirit, and customers will line up for it. PMID:18411964

  15. Factors affecting commencement and cessation of smoking behaviour in Malaysian adults

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Tobacco consumption peak in developed countries has passed, however, it is on the increase in many developing countries. Apart from cigarettes, consumption of local hand-rolled cigarettes such as bidi and rokok daun are prevalent in specific communities. Although factors associated with smoking initiation and cessation has been investigated elsewhere, the only available data for Malaysia is on prevalence. This study aims to investigate factors associated with smoking initiation and cessation which is imperative in designing intervention programs. Methods Data were collected from 11,697 adults by trained recording clerks on sociodemographic characteristics, practice of other risk habit and details of smoking such as type, duration and frequency. Smoking commencement and cessation were analyzed using the Kaplan-Meier estimates and log-rank tests. Univariate and multivariate Cox proportional hazard regression models were used to calculate the hazard rate ratios. Results Males had a much higher prevalence of the habit (61.7%) as compared to females (5.8%). Cessation was found to be most common among the Chinese and those regularly consuming alcoholic beverages. Kaplan-Meier plot shows that although males are more likely to start smoking, females are found to be less likely to stop. History of betel quid chewing and alcohol consumption significantly increase the likelihood of commencement (p < 0.0001), while cessation was least likely among Indians, current quid chewers and kretek users (p < 0.01). Conclusions Gender, ethnicity, history of quid chewing and alcohol consumption have been found to be important factors in smoking commencement; while ethnicity, betel quid chewing and type of tobacco smoked influences cessation. PMID:22429627

  16. A network model comprising 4 segmental, interconnected ganglia, and its application to simulate multi-legged locomotion in crustaceans.

    PubMed

    Grabowska, M; Toth, T I; Smarandache-Wellmann, C; Daun-Gruhn, S

    2015-06-01

    Inter-segmental coordination is crucial for the locomotion of animals. Arthropods show high variability of leg numbers, from 6 in insects up to 750 legs in millipedes. Despite this fact, the anatomical and functional organization of their nervous systems show basic similarities. The main similarities are the segmental organization, and the way the function of the segmental units is coordinated. We set out to construct a model that could describe locomotion (walking) in animals with more than 6 legs, as well as in 6-legged animals (insects). To this end, we extended a network model by Daun-Gruhn and Tóth (Journal of Computational Neuroscience, doi: 10.1007/s10827-010-0300-1 , 2011). This model describes inter-segmental coordination of the ipsilateral legs in the stick insect during walking. Including an additional segment (local network) into the original model, we could simulate coordination patterns that occur in animals walking on eight legs (e.g., crayfish). We could improve the model by modifying its original cyclic connection topology. In all model variants, the phase relations between the afferent segmental excitatory sensory signals and the oscillatory activity of the segmental networks played a crucial role. Our results stress the importance of this sensory input on the generation of different stable coordination patterns. The simulations confirmed that using the modified connection topology, the flexibility of the model behaviour increased, meaning that changing a single phase parameter, i.e., gating properties of just one afferent sensory signal was sufficient to reproduce all coordination patterns seen in the experiments. PMID:25904469

  17. Flavonoid (myricetin, quercetin, kaempferol, luteolin, and apigenin) content of edible tropical plants.

    PubMed

    Miean, K H; Mohamed, S

    2001-06-01

    Studies were conducted on the flavonoids (myricetin, quercetin, kaempferol, luteolin, and apigenin) contents of 62 edible tropical plants. The highest total flavonoids content was in onion leaves (1497.5 mg/kg quercetin, 391.0 mg/kg luteolin, and 832.0 mg/kg kaempferol), followed by Semambu leaves (2041.0 mg/kg), bird chili (1663.0 mg/kg), black tea (1491.0 mg/kg), papaya shoots (1264.0 mg/kg), and guava (1128.5 mg/kg). The major flavonoid in these plant extracts is quercetin, followed by myricetin and kaempferol. Luteolin could be detected only in broccoli (74.5 mg/kg dry weight), green chili (33.0 mg/kg), bird chili (1035.0 mg/kg), onion leaves (391.0 mg/kg), belimbi fruit (202.0 mg/kg), belimbi leaves (464.5 mg/kg), French bean (11.0 mg/kg), carrot (37.5 mg/kg), white radish (9.0 mg/kg), local celery (80.5 mg/kg), limau purut leaves (30.5 mg/kg), and dried asam gelugur (107.5 mg/kg). Apigenin was found only in Chinese cabbage (187.0 mg/kg), bell pepper (272.0 mg/kg), garlic (217.0 mg/kg), belimbi fruit (458.0 mg/kg), French peas (176.0 mg/kg), snake gourd (42.4 mg/kg), guava (579.0 mg/kg), wolfberry leaves (547.0 mg/kg), local celery (338.5 mg/kg), daun turi (39.5 mg/kg), and kadok (34.5 mg/kg). In vegetables, quercetin glycosides predominate, but glycosides of kaempferol, luteolin, and apigenin are also present. Fruits contain almost exclusively quercetin glycosides, whereas kaempferol and myricetin glycosides are found only in trace quantities. PMID:11410016

  18. PREFACE 12th International Workshop on Slow Positron Beam Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckman, Stephen; Sullivan, James; White, Ronald

    2011-01-01

    SLOPOS-12 included: Positron Interactions with Surfaces Positron Beam and Detector Technology Positron Interactions with Atoms and Molecules Positronium Science Defects and Vacancies in Materials Porosity and Open Volume in Materials Antimatter in Biomedical Science Anti-hydrogen Studies Positron Transport Annihilation On a sad note, delegates paid tribute to the contributions of one of our colleagues, Chris Beling, who tragically passed away shortly before the meeting. Chris' contributions to positron science and to the education of young scientists were noted in a number of the invited presentations. It is an honour for our community to begin these proceedings with a short tribute to Chris' life by Professor Paul Coleman. The Workshop could not have occurred without the generous support of our sponsors: The ARC Centre for Antimatter-Matter Studies, The Australian National University, Flinders University, James Cook University, The Institute of Physics (UK) and the Australian Government's Department of Innovation, Industry, Science and Research. It would also not have been possible without the hard work of the Local and International Organising Committees and the friendly and efficient staff at the All Seasons Resort, Magnetic Island. We are most grateful for the on-site assistance of Gillian Drew, the CAMS student and postdoc team, the financial wizardry of Chris Kalos, and the post-Workshop editorial assistance of Julia Wee and Adam Edwards. Finally we would like to thank all of the attendees at SLOPOS12 for their scientific contributions to the Workshop, and for the warm spirit of engagement which characterised the scientific discussions and social occasions. SLOPOS13 will be held in Germany in 2013 and we all look forward to the occasion. Stephen Buckman, James Sullivan and Ronald White(Guest Editors) Local Organising CommitteeInternational Committee Stephen Buckman (Chair, ANU, Canberra)G Amarendra (India) James Sullivan (Secretary, ANU, Canberra)M-F Barthe (France

  19. Piloted Well Clear Performance Evaluation of Detect and Avoid Systems with Suggestive Guidance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, Eric; Santiago, Confesor; Watza, Spencer

    2016-01-01

    Regulations to establish operational and performance requirements for unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) are being developed by a consortium of government, industry and academic institutions (RTCA, 2013). Those requirements will apply to the new detect-and-avoid (DAA) systems and other equipment necessary to integrate UAS with the United States (U.S) National Airspace System (NAS) and will be determined according to their contribution to the overall safety case. That safety case requires demonstration that DAA-equipped UAS collectively operating in the NAS meet an airspace safety threshold (AST). Several key gaps must be closed in order to link equipment requirements to an airspace safety case. Foremost among these is calculation of the systems risk ratio, the degree to which a particular system mitigates violation of an aircraft separation standard (FAA, 2013). The risk ratio of a DAA system, in combination with risk ratios of other collision mitigation mechanisms, will determine the overall safety of the airspace measured in terms of the number of collisions per flight hour. It is not known what the effectiveness is of a pilot-in-the-loop DAA system or even what parameters of the DAA system most improve the pilots ability to maintain separation. The relationship between the DAA system design and the overall effectiveness of the DAA system that includes the pilot, expressed as a risk ratio, must be determined before DAA operational and performance requirements can be finalized. Much research has been devoted to integrating UAS into non-segregated airspace (Dalamagkidis, 2009, Ostwald, 2007, Gillian, 2012, Hesselink, 2011, Santiago, 2015, Rorie 2015 and 2016). Several traffic displays intended for use as part of a DAA system have gone through human-in-the-loop simulation and flight-testing. Most of these evaluations were part of development programs to produce a deployable system, so it is unclear how to generalize particular aspects of those designs to general

  20. PREFACE: IUPAP C20 Conference on Computational Physics (CCP 2011)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troparevsky, Claudia; Stocks, George Malcolm

    2012-12-01

    . We are grateful to the committees that helped put the conference together, especially the local organizing committee. Particular thanks are also due to a number of ORNL staff who spent long hours with the administrative details. We are pleased to express our thanks to the conference administrator Ann Strange (ORNL/CDP) for her responsive and efficient day-to-day handling of this event, Sherry Samples, Assistant Conference Administrator (ORNL), Angie Beach and the ORNL Conference Office, and Shirley Shugart (ORNL) and Fern Stooksbury (ORNL) who created and maintained the conference website. Editors: G Malcolm Stocks (ORNL) and M Claudia Troparevsky (UT) http://ccp2011.ornl.gov Chair: Dr Malcolm Stocks (ORNL) Vice Chairs: Adriana Moreo (ORNL/UT) James Guberrnatis (LANL) Local Program Committee: Don Batchelor (ORNL) Jack Dongarra (UTK/ORNL) James Hack (ORNL) Robert Harrison (ORNL) Paul Kent (ORNL) Anthony Mezzacappa (ORNL) Adriana Moreo (ORNL) Witold Nazarewicz (UT) Loukas Petridis (ORNL) David Schultz (ORNL) Bill Shelton (ORNL) Claudia Troparevsky (ORNL) Mina Yoon (ORNL) International Advisory Board Members: Joan Adler (Israel Institute of Technology, Israel) Constantia Alexandrou (University of Cyprus, Cyprus) Claudia Ambrosch-Draxl (University of Leoben, Austria) Amanda Barnard (CSIRO, Australia) Peter Borcherds (University of Birmingham, UK) Klaus Cappelle (UFABC, Brazil) Giovanni Ciccotti (Università degli Studi di Roma 'La Sapienza', Italy) Nithaya Chetty (University of Pretoria, South Africa) Charlotte Froese-Fischer (NIST, US) Giulia A. Galli (University of California, Davis, US) Gillian Gehring (University of Sheffield, UK) Guang-Yu Guo (National Taiwan University, Taiwan) Sharon Hammes-Schiffer (Penn State, US) Alex Hansen (Norweigan UST) Duane D. Johnson (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, US) David Landau (University of Georgia, US) Joaquin Marro (University of Granada, Spain) Richard Martin (UIUC, US) Todd Martinez (Stanford University, US) Bill

  1. Holocene flood stack from three Eifel maar lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunck, Heiko; Sirocko, Frank

    2015-04-01

    Lacustrine sediments are very sensitive to natural and anthropogenically enviromental changes. Thus, lake sediments are excellent climate archives and can be used for reconstructions of past precipitation and flood events. However, we extend our flood record for MIS 2/3 to the entire Holocene up to recent years to get a complete flood stack for the last 60 000 years. The present study reconstructs paleo floods from event layers in the sediment, of Schalkenmehren Maar (SM3), Ulmen Maar (UM1) and Holzmaar (HM1) combined with recent gauge time-series. All three maar lakes has an inflow by a local stream. Accordingly the sedimentation rate is directly linked to runoff activity and the bioturbation was low so that event layers become visible, but varves are only preserved in lake Holzmaar. The maar sites are situated in the Eifel near to the town of Daun and were drilled in the ELSA (Eifel Laminated Sediment archive) project. The Eifel area is well suited to approximate Central European weather, because modern water level gauge data from Eifel rivers correlate with respective data from the Rhine (Wernli and Pfahl, 2009). Combined sedimentological, paleobotanical and geochemical data received from SM3, UM1 and HM1 builds the foundation of the 14C based chronology. The synchronisation of the record is controlled by tephra time markers and pollen. Both are used to align the main cores of the ELSA project and construct an integrated age model for the last 220 000 years [b2k] (Förster and Sirocko, 2014). For the extension of our MIS 2/3 flood stack we used the Laacher See Tephra (10 900 BC) as marker for the correlation with the Holocene cores. To study the flood events in detail, 10 cm long thin sections were used to distinguish flood layers from distal turbidites. Turbidites have a continuous grain size gradation; the grains size profile of flood events is in contrast characterized by several grain size maxima over the entire layer thickness. A flood event over several

  2. Engelhauptite, KCu3(V2O7)(OH)2Cl, a new mineral species from Eifel, Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pekov, Igor V.; Siidra, Oleg I.; Chukanov, Nikita V.; Yapaskurt, Vasiliy O.; Britvin, Sergey N.; Krivovichev, Sergey V.; Schüller, Willi; Ternes, Bernd

    2015-12-01

    A new mineral engelhauptite, KCu3(V2O7)(OH)2Cl, was found within cavities in nepheline basalts at the Auf'm Kopp quarry ("Schlackenkegel der Höhe 636 südöstlich Neroth" ), Daun, Eifel region, Rheinland-Pfalz, Germany. Associated minerals are volborthite, allophane, malachite, tangeite and chrysocolla; earlier minerals belonging to the primary, high-temperature parageneses are augite, mica of the phlogopite-oxyphlogopite series, sanidine, nepheline, leucite, fluorapatite and magnetite. Engelhauptite occurs as spherulites (up to 0.2 mm in diameter) and bunches consisting of rough spindle-shaped crystals elongated parallel to [0001]. The crystals are up to 0.12 mm long and up to 0.04 mm thick. Individual grains of engelhauptite are transparent, whereas their aggregates are translucent. The mineral is yellow-brown to brown, typically with an olive green hue. The luster is vitreous. Engelhauptite is brittle, cleavage is not observed, fracture is uneven. D calc = 3.86 g cm-3. Engelhauptite is optically uniaxial (+), ω = 1.978(4), ɛ = 2.021(4). Chemical data (wt.%, electron-microprobe, H2O by difference) are as following: K2O 9.63, FeO 0.05, NiO 0.29, CuO 46.11, Al2O3 0.24, V2O5 34.92, SO3 0.79, Cl 5.94, H2Ocalc 3.37, O = Cl2 -1.34, total 100.00. The empirical formula, based on 10 (O + OH + Cl) apfu, is K1.05(Cu2.97Al0.02Ni0.02)Σ3.01(V1.97S0.05)Σ2.02O7.23(OH)1.91Cl0.86. Engelhauptite is hexagonal, P63/ mmc, a = 5.922(2), c = 14.513(5) Å, V = 440.78(3) Å3 and Z = 2. The eight strongest reflections of the powder X-ray diffraction pattern [ d,Å( I) ( hkl)] are: 7.32(98) (002), 4.224(17) (102), 2.979(100) (104, 110), 2.759(19) (112), 2.565(18) (200), 2.424(18) (202), 1.765(16) (206) and 1.481(14) (208, 220). The crystal structure of engelhauptite has been solved from the single-crystal X-ray diffraction data and refined to R = 0.090 on the basis of 135 unique observed reflections. The structure is based upon the [Cu2+ 3(V2O7)(OH)2]0 framework formed by the linkage

  3. PREFACE: IUPAP C20 Conference on Computational Physics (CCP 2011)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troparevsky, Claudia; Stocks, George Malcolm

    2012-12-01

    . We are grateful to the committees that helped put the conference together, especially the local organizing committee. Particular thanks are also due to a number of ORNL staff who spent long hours with the administrative details. We are pleased to express our thanks to the conference administrator Ann Strange (ORNL/CDP) for her responsive and efficient day-to-day handling of this event, Sherry Samples, Assistant Conference Administrator (ORNL), Angie Beach and the ORNL Conference Office, and Shirley Shugart (ORNL) and Fern Stooksbury (ORNL) who created and maintained the conference website. Editors: G Malcolm Stocks (ORNL) and M Claudia Troparevsky (UT) http://ccp2011.ornl.gov Chair: Dr Malcolm Stocks (ORNL) Vice Chairs: Adriana Moreo (ORNL/UT) James Guberrnatis (LANL) Local Program Committee: Don Batchelor (ORNL) Jack Dongarra (UTK/ORNL) James Hack (ORNL) Robert Harrison (ORNL) Paul Kent (ORNL) Anthony Mezzacappa (ORNL) Adriana Moreo (ORNL) Witold Nazarewicz (UT) Loukas Petridis (ORNL) David Schultz (ORNL) Bill Shelton (ORNL) Claudia Troparevsky (ORNL) Mina Yoon (ORNL) International Advisory Board Members: Joan Adler (Israel Institute of Technology, Israel) Constantia Alexandrou (University of Cyprus, Cyprus) Claudia Ambrosch-Draxl (University of Leoben, Austria) Amanda Barnard (CSIRO, Australia) Peter Borcherds (University of Birmingham, UK) Klaus Cappelle (UFABC, Brazil) Giovanni Ciccotti (Università degli Studi di Roma 'La Sapienza', Italy) Nithaya Chetty (University of Pretoria, South Africa) Charlotte Froese-Fischer (NIST, US) Giulia A. Galli (University of California, Davis, US) Gillian Gehring (University of Sheffield, UK) Guang-Yu Guo (National Taiwan University, Taiwan) Sharon Hammes-Schiffer (Penn State, US) Alex Hansen (Norweigan UST) Duane D. Johnson (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, US) David Landau (University of Georgia, US) Joaquin Marro (University of Granada, Spain) Richard Martin (UIUC, US) Todd Martinez (Stanford University, US) Bill

  4. Quality in university physics teaching: is it being achieved?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1998-11-01

    This was the title of a Physics Discipline Workshop held at the University of Leeds on 10 and 11 September 1998. Organizer Ashley Clarke of the university's Physics and Astronomy Department collected together an interesting variety of speakers polygonically targeting the topic, although as workshops go the audience didn't have to do much work except listen. There were representatives from 27 university physics departments who must have gone away with a lot to think about and possibly some new academic year resolutions to keep. But as a non-university no-longer teacher of (school) physics I was impressed with the general commitment to the idea that if you get the right quality of learning the teaching must be OK. I also learned (but have since forgotten) a lot of new acronyms. The keynote talk was by Gillian Hayes, Associate Director of the Quality Assurance Agency for Higher Education (QAA). She explained the role and implementation of the Subject Reviews that QAA is making for all subjects in all institutions of higher education on a five- to seven-year cycle. Physics Education hopes to publish an article about all this from QAA shortly. In the meantime, suffice it to say that the review looks at six aspects of provision, essentially from the point of view of enhancing students' experiences and learning. No doubt all participants would agree with this (they'd better if they want to score well on the Review) but may have been more worried by the next QAA speaker, Norman Jackson, who drummed in the basic facts of life as HE moves from an elite provision system to a mass provision system. He had an interesting graph showing how in the last ten years or so more students were getting firsts and upper seconds and fewer getting thirds. It seems that all those A-level students getting better grades than they used to are carrying on their good luck to degree level. But they still can't do maths (allegedly) and I doubt whether Jon Ogborn (IoP Advancing Physics Project

  5. PREFACE 12th International Workshop on Slow Positron Beam Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckman, Stephen; Sullivan, James; White, Ronald

    2011-01-01

    SLOPOS-12 included: Positron Interactions with Surfaces Positron Beam and Detector Technology Positron Interactions with Atoms and Molecules Positronium Science Defects and Vacancies in Materials Porosity and Open Volume in Materials Antimatter in Biomedical Science Anti-hydrogen Studies Positron Transport Annihilation On a sad note, delegates paid tribute to the contributions of one of our colleagues, Chris Beling, who tragically passed away shortly before the meeting. Chris' contributions to positron science and to the education of young scientists were noted in a number of the invited presentations. It is an honour for our community to begin these proceedings with a short tribute to Chris' life by Professor Paul Coleman. The Workshop could not have occurred without the generous support of our sponsors: The ARC Centre for Antimatter-Matter Studies, The Australian National University, Flinders University, James Cook University, The Institute of Physics (UK) and the Australian Government's Department of Innovation, Industry, Science and Research. It would also not have been possible without the hard work of the Local and International Organising Committees and the friendly and efficient staff at the All Seasons Resort, Magnetic Island. We are most grateful for the on-site assistance of Gillian Drew, the CAMS student and postdoc team, the financial wizardry of Chris Kalos, and the post-Workshop editorial assistance of Julia Wee and Adam Edwards. Finally we would like to thank all of the attendees at SLOPOS12 for their scientific contributions to the Workshop, and for the warm spirit of engagement which characterised the scientific discussions and social occasions. SLOPOS13 will be held in Germany in 2013 and we all look forward to the occasion. Stephen Buckman, James Sullivan and Ronald White(Guest Editors) Local Organising CommitteeInternational Committee Stephen Buckman (Chair, ANU, Canberra)G Amarendra (India) James Sullivan (Secretary, ANU, Canberra)M-F Barthe (France