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  1. Gingival Enlargement

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2017 Annual Meeting Orlando, FL Our Partners Gingival Enlargement Gingival (Gum) enlargement, also known as gingival hyperplasia or hypertrophy, is an abnormal overgrowth of gingival tissues. There ...

  2. Severe gingival enlargement associated with aggressive periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Padmanabhan, Shyam; Dwarakanath, C. D.

    2013-01-01

    Enlargement of the gingiva can be due to various causes. Most prevalent are the inflammatory type and drug-induced type of gingival hyperplasia. However, sever enlargement associated with an aggressive type of periodontitis is an infrequent finding. Reported here is a case of a female patient aged 18 years who presented with severe enlargement of the maxillary and mandibular gingiva. Examination revealed enlargement extending up to the incisal edge of all the teeth and also an associated generalized loss of attachment with radiographic evidence of reduced bone height resembling an aggressive type of periodontitis. There were no associated systemic signs and symptoms or any family history except that there was generalized vitiligo of the skin and oral mucous membrane. The case was treated by gross electrosection of the gingiva. PMID:23633785

  3. Gingival enlargements: Differential diagnosis and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Amit Arvind

    2015-01-01

    Gingival enlargement is one of the frequent features of gingival diseases. However due to their varied presentations, the diagnosis of these entities becomes challenging for the clinician. They can be categorized based on their etiopathogenesis, location, size, extent, etc. Based on the existing knowledge and clinical experience, a differential diagnosis can be formulated. Subsequently, after detailed investigation, clinician makes a final diagnosis or diagnosis of exclusion. A perfect diagnosis is critically important, since the management of these lesions and prevention of their recurrence is completely dependent on it. Furthermore, in some cases where gingival enlargement could be the primary sign of potentially lethal systemic diseases, a correct diagnosis of these enlargements could prove life saving for the patient or at least initiate early treatment and improve the quality of life. The purpose of this review article is to highlight significant findings of different types of gingival enlargement which would help clinician to differentiate between them. A detailed decision tree is also designed for the practitioners, which will help them arrive at a diagnosis in a systematic manner. There still could be some lesions which may present in an unusual manner and make the diagnosis challenging. By knowing the existence of common and rare presentations of gingival enlargement, one can keep a broad view when formulating a differential diagnosis of localized (isolated, discrete, regional) or generalized gingival enlargement. PMID:26380825

  4. A rare case of unusual gingival enlargement post radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Vishal; Bhat, G. Subraya; Bhat, K. Mahalinga

    2011-01-01

    Oral changes following radiotherapy are not uncommon. Oral mucositis, alteration in salivary gland function, radiation caries, and gingival changes have all been reported following radiotherapy and chemotherapy. The gingival changes seen after radiotherapy may be unusual and often cause diagnostic dilemma. Metastasis to the gingiva has also to be ruled out in these cases. A 30-year-old female patient presented with enlargement of the gingiva of 6 months’ duration and lower lip swelling of 7 months’ duration. She was a known case of carcinoma of nasopharynx and had received radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Based on the history, the clinical appearance of the gingiva, and the other oral changes we considered both post-radiotherapy gingival enlargement and secondary metastasis to gingiva as possibilities. An incisional biopsy was performed (internal bevel gingivectomy). The histopathological report did not reveal any metastatic changes. Thus, we diagnosed post-radiotherapy gingival enlargement. For the multiple carious teeth, extraction and root canal treatment was carried out as necessary. The patient was referred to the department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery for management of swelling of the lips, which was diagnosed as lymphedema of the lip. Gingival enlargement is rare post radiotherapy. Such nonplaque-associated gingival enlargement in a patient who has undergone radiotherapy should be subjected to biopsy and histopathological examination to distinguish between secondary metastasis and post-radiation changes. PMID:22028519

  5. Association between gingivitis and anterior gingival enlargement in subjects undergoing fixed orthodontic treatment

    PubMed Central

    Zanatta, Fabricio Batistin; Ardenghi, Thiago Machado; Antoniazzi, Raquel Pippi; Pinto, Tatiana Militz Perrone; Rösing, Cassiano Kuchenbecker

    2014-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to investigate the association among gingival enlargement (GE), periodontal conditions and socio-demographic characteristics in subjects undergoing fixed orthodontic treatment. Methods A sample of 330 patients undergoing fixed orthodontic treatment for at least 6 months were examined by a single calibrated examiner for plaque and gingival indexes, probing pocket depth, clinical attachment loss and gingival enlargement. Socio-economic background, orthodontic treatment duration and use of dental floss were assessed by oral interviews. Associations were assessed by means of unadjusted and adjusted Poisson's regression models. Results The presence of gingival bleeding (RR 1.01; 95% CI 1.00-1.01) and excess resin around brackets (RR 1.02; 95% CI 1.02-1.03) were associated with an increase in GE. No associations were found between socio-demographic characteristics and GE. Conclusion Proximal anterior gingival bleeding and excess resin around brackets are associated with higher levels of anterior gingival enlargement in subjects under orthodontic treatment. PMID:25162567

  6. Phenytoin, folic acid and gingival enlargement: Breaking myths

    PubMed Central

    Nayyar, Abhishek Singh; Khan, Mubeen; Vijayalakshmi, K. R.; Suman, B.; Subhas, G. T.; Nataraju, B.; Anitha, M.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Epilepsy is described as a chronic neurological disorder characterized by recurrent seizures of cerebral origin, presenting with episodes of sensory, motor or autonomic phenomenon with or, without loss of consciousness. A recent meta-analysis of published and unpublished studies puts an overall prevalence rate of epilepsy in India at 5.59 per 1,000 populations. There have been studies that report clinical benefits of the use of folic acid as an adjuvant to the anti-epileptic therapy in the prevention of anti-epileptic drug induced gingival enlargement. However, studies conducted in the past have also reported precipitation of epileptic attacks in patients on folic acid adjuvant therapy due to fall in sera levels of phenytoin due to drug interactions. The study was planned to investigate the association of phenytoin induced gingival enlargement and sera levels of folic acid in epileptic patients on phenytoin therapy so as to justify the use of folic acid as a routine adjuvant to the usual anti-epileptic therapy to prevent this inevitable adverse effect without destabilizing the ongoing regimen leading to the precipitation of seizures in an otherwise stable patient (breakthrough seizures). Materials and Methods: A total of 100 patients between the ages 18 and 50 years were clinically diagnosed with epilepsy prior to the start of phenytoin therapy were included based on selection criteria and written informed consents were obtained. Assessment of serum folic acid levels and gingival enlargement was performed prior to the start of and after 1 year of phenytoin therapy. Statistical Analysis Used: The statistical analysis was carried out using t-test and the baseline serum folate levels and the serum folate levels obtained after 1 year of phenytoin therapy were correlated with the respective grades of gingival enlargement using Pearson's coefficient formula. Results: The results of the study confirmed a significant association between low serum folate levels

  7. Gingival Enlargement in a Case of Variant Jones Syndrome: a Case Report

    PubMed Central

    DA, Roopa; Singh, Shinkhala; Gupta, Ira; Gopal, Saumiya

    2016-01-01

    Gingival enlargement can be caused by a variety of etiological factors like inflammation, drugs, and systemic diseases or can be presented as a part of a syndrome. One such syndrome is Jones Syndrome, which is associated with gingival enlargement and progressive hearing loss. We present here a case of fifteen-year-old boy with gingival enlargement, hearing loss, and generalized alveolar bone loss and diagnosed as Jones syndrome. The diagnosis was made based on history, clinical, radiographic, and histopathological findings. Gingival enlargement was surgically managed using gingivectomy and no recurrence was observed. The patient showed remarkable esthetical and functional improvement. PMID:26966711

  8. Gingival Enlargement in a Case of Variant Jones Syndrome: a Case Report.

    PubMed

    DA, Roopa; Singh, Shinkhala; Gupta, Ira; Gopal, Saumiya

    2016-03-01

    Gingival enlargement can be caused by a variety of etiological factors like inflammation, drugs, and systemic diseases or can be presented as a part of a syndrome. One such syndrome is Jones Syndrome, which is associated with gingival enlargement and progressive hearing loss. We present here a case of fifteen-year-old boy with gingival enlargement, hearing loss, and generalized alveolar bone loss and diagnosed as Jones syndrome. The diagnosis was made based on history, clinical, radiographic, and histopathological findings. Gingival enlargement was surgically managed using gingivectomy and no recurrence was observed. The patient showed remarkable esthetical and functional improvement. PMID:26966711

  9. Phenytoin-induced gingival enlargement: a dental awakening for patients with epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Mohan, Ravi Prakah Sasankoti; Rastogi, Khushboo; Bhushan, Rajarshi; Verma, Sankalp

    2013-01-01

    Drug-induced gingival enlargement is the term now used to describe medication-related gingival hypertrophy or hyperplasia, a condition commonly induced by three main classes of drugs: anticonvulsants, antihypertensive calcium channel blockers and the immunosuppressant cyclosporine. The pathogenesis of drug-induced gingival enlargement is uncertain and there appears to be no unifying hypothesis that links together the three commonly implicated drugs. Phenytoin-induced gingival overgrowth is a well known and frequently reported gingival lesion, which was first detected in 1939. This case report consists of phenytoin usage, duration and poor oral hygiene. PMID:23616318

  10. Successful management of phenytoin and phenobarbitone induced gingival enlargement: A multimodal approach

    PubMed Central

    Priyadharshini, V.; Belure, Vinita V.; Triveni, M. G.; Tarun Kumar, A. B.; Mehta, D. S.

    2014-01-01

    Medication-related gingival enlargement is a common reactionary phenomenon that occurs with the use of several types of therapeutic agents, including antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). This disorder has been documented since 1939, shortly after the introduction of phenytoin. In the present case, a concise review of literature concerning the etiopathogenesis and management of AEDs (phenobarbitone and phenytoin) induced gingival enlargement has been described. It is vital that not only the periodontist, but also dental surgeons and medical practitioners should become aware of the potential etiologic agents, characteristic features, and the differential diagnosis of drug induced gingival enlargement in order to be able to prevent, diagnose and successfully manage the condition. PMID:24963262

  11. Severe gingival enlargement with coexisting erosive lichen planus in severe chronic periodontitis patient.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Ambika; Aggarwal, Chakshu; Mathur, Vijay P; Sardana, Divesh

    2015-01-01

    Plaque induced gingival enlargement is most commonly seen and when encountered simultaneously with erosive lichen planus poses a challenge to the treating dentist. Prognosis of one condition may influence the prognosis of another condition. The presented case highlights the significance of proper diagnosis and the management of simultaneously occurring gingival lesions. A 49-year-old hypertensive female presented with painful enlarged bleeding and suppurating gums with burning sensation on eating food along with long-term usage of antihypertensive drug amlodipine known for its gingival enlargement effect. All these multiple factors led to diagnostic dilemma. Effective management of the gingival enlargement was done by using electrocautery to rehabilitate the functions and esthetics of the patient. Gingival condition was also complicated by the presence of coexisting lichen planus which was predominantly erosive for which topical corticosteroid, antifungal, and antimicrobial agents were prescribed. Eight-month follow-up did not show recurrence of gingival enlargement. Electrocautery is an effective tool for the gingivectomy in severe inflammatory type of gingival enlargement because of rapid postoperative hemostasis. For the management of erosive lichen planus, long-term use of topical corticosteroids is an effective approach. Maintenance of oral hygiene and regular follow-ups are essential for these conditions. PMID:25838949

  12. Severe Gingival Enlargement with Coexisting Erosive Lichen Planus in Severe Chronic Periodontitis Patient

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Ambika; Aggarwal, Chakshu; Mathur, Vijay P.; Sardana, Divesh

    2015-01-01

    Plaque induced gingival enlargement is most commonly seen and when encountered simultaneously with erosive lichen planus poses a challenge to the treating dentist. Prognosis of one condition may influence the prognosis of another condition. The presented case highlights the significance of proper diagnosis and the management of simultaneously occurring gingival lesions. A 49-year-old hypertensive female presented with painful enlarged bleeding and suppurating gums with burning sensation on eating food along with long-term usage of antihypertensive drug amlodipine known for its gingival enlargement effect. All these multiple factors led to diagnostic dilemma. Effective management of the gingival enlargement was done by using electrocautery to rehabilitate the functions and esthetics of the patient. Gingival condition was also complicated by the presence of coexisting lichen planus which was predominantly erosive for which topical corticosteroid, antifungal, and antimicrobial agents were prescribed. Eight-month follow-up did not show recurrence of gingival enlargement. Electrocautery is an effective tool for the gingivectomy in severe inflammatory type of gingival enlargement because of rapid postoperative hemostasis. For the management of erosive lichen planus, long-term use of topical corticosteroids is an effective approach. Maintenance of oral hygiene and regular follow-ups are essential for these conditions. PMID:25838949

  13. Unusual presentation of localized gingival enlargement associated with a slow-growing odontogenic myxoma

    PubMed Central

    Miranda Rius, Jaume; Nadal, Alfons; Lahor, Eduard; Mtui, Beatus; Brunet, Lluís

    2013-01-01

    Unusual presentation of localized gingival enlargement associated with a subjacent tumoural pathology is reported. The patient was a 55-year-old black male, whose chief complaint was a progressive gingival overgrowth for more than ten years, in the buccal area of the anterior left mandible. According to the clinical features and the radiological diagnosis of odontogenic keratocyst, a conservative surgery with enucleation and curettage was performed. Tissue submitted for histopathological analysis rendered the diagnosis of odontogenic myxoma. After 12-month of follow-up, no evidence of recurrence was found. Clinicians should be cautious when facing any gingival enlargement to avoid diagnostic pitfalls and to indicate the appropriate treatment. PMID:23722914

  14. Sarcoidosis Presenting as Isolated Gingival Enlargement: A Rare Case Entity

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Jaihans; Chopra, Deepak; Bagga, Sukhchain; Sethi, Kanika

    2014-01-01

    Sarcoidosis is a non-caseating granulomatous disease . It is a multiorgan inflammatory disorder of unknown etiology. Conditions affecting skin or other organs frequently involve oral cavity and rarely manifest as gingival disease. Here we are reporting a rare case in which gingival hyperplasia was the initial symptom which finally led to the diagnosis of sarcoidosis. Oral mucous membrane needs to be examined carefully as it may constitute in presenting first sign of systemic sarcoidosis. PMID:25584337

  15. Multidrug resistance 1 gene polymorphism in amlodipine-induced gingival enlargement.

    PubMed

    Naik, Kumaraswamy Naik Lambani Rama; Jhajharia, Kapil; Chaudhary, Roopam; Tatikonda, Aravind; Dhaliwal, Aprinderpal Singh; Kaur, Rose Kanwaljeet

    2015-01-01

    Gingival enlargement comprises any clinical condition in which an increase in the size of the gingiva is observed. It is a side effect associated with some distinct classes of drugs, such as anticonvulsants, immunosuppressant, and calcium channel blockers. Among calcium channel blockers, nifedipine causes gingival enlargement in about 10% of patients, whereas the incidence of amlodipine, a third-generation calcium channel blocker, induced gingival enlargement is very limited. Because the calcium antagonists, albeit to a variable degree, act as inhibitors of P-glycoprotein (P-gp), the gene product of multidrug resistance 1 (MDR1), and inflammation may modify P-gp expression. We hereby, report a case of amlodipine-induced gingival enlargement with MDR1 3435C/T polymorphism, associated with inflammatory changes due to plaque accumulation, in a 50-year-old hypertensive male patient. The genotype obtained for the polymorphism was a heteromutant genotype, thus supporting the contention that the MDR1 polymorphism may alter the inflammatory response to the drug. PMID:26015682

  16. Primary tuberculous gingival enlargement - A rare clinical entity: Case report and brief review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Jan, Suhail Majid; Khan, Fayiza Youqoob; Bhat, Muzafar Ahmad; Behal, Roobal

    2014-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a chronic specific granulomatous disease and a major cause of death in developing countries. The clinical presentation of TB lesions of the oral cavity varies widely and can manifest as ulcerations, diffuse inflammatory lesions, granulomas and fissures. Oral lesions generally appear secondary to primary TB infection elsewhere, although primary infection of the oral mucosa by Mycobacterium tuberculosis has also been described. We hereby report a case of primary TB of the gingiva manifesting as gingival enlargement. Diagnosis was based on histopathological examination, complete blood count, X-ray chest and immunological investigations with detection of antibodies against M. tuberculosis. Anti-tuberculous therapy was carried out for over 6 months and was followed by surgical excision of the residual enlargement under local anesthesia. After 1-year follow-up, there was no recurrence of the disease. This case report emphasizes the need for dentists to include TB in the differential diagnosis of various types of gingival enlargements. PMID:25425826

  17. Dual lifestyle of Porphyromonas gingivalis in biofilm and gingival cells.

    PubMed

    Sakanaka, Akito; Takeuchi, Hiroki; Kuboniwa, Masae; Amano, Atsuo

    2016-05-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis is deeply involved in the pathogenesis of marginal periodontitis, and recent findings have consolidated its role as an important and unique pathogen. This bacterium has a unique dual lifestyle in periodontal sites including subgingival dental plaque (biofilm) and gingival cells, as it has been clearly shown that P. gingivalis is able to exert virulence using completely different tactics in each environment. Inter-bacterial cross-feeding enhances the virulence of periodontal microflora, and such metabolic and adhesive interplay creates a supportive environment for P. gingivalis and other species. Human oral epithelial cells harbor a large intracellular bacterial load, resembling the polymicrobial nature of periodontal biofilm. P. gingivalis can enter gingival epithelial cells and pass through the epithelial barrier into deeper tissues. Subsequently, from its intracellular position, the pathogen exploits cellular recycling pathways to exit invaded cells, by which it is able to control its population in infected tissues, allowing for persistent infection in gingival tissues. Here, we outline the dual lifestyle of P. gingivalis in subgingival areas and its effects on the pathogenesis of periodontitis. PMID:26456558

  18. Successful nonsurgical management of post-orthodontic gingival enlargement with intensive cause-related periodontal therapy.

    PubMed

    Kwon, TaeHyun; Kim, David M; Levin, Liran

    2015-03-01

    Successful nonsurgical management of severe postorthodontic gingival enlargement and erythema in a 24-year-old male is presented. The patient received an intensive cause-related periodontal therapy, consisting of oral hygiene instruction, scaling and root planing, and weekly recall visits. At week five, complete resolution of the lesions was achieved. By targeting the primary etiologic factor, i.e., plaque, periodontal health was restored without needing surgical intervention. Reducing the bacterial load will give the biologic natural healing capacity of the body the opportunity to stabilize the periodontal condition and, thus, should be considered as the first line of intervention before a surgical approach is taken. PMID:25928969

  19. Bacterial Lysine Decarboxylase Influences Human Dental Biofilm Lysine Content, Biofilm Accumulation and Sub-Clinical Gingival Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Lohinai, Z.; Keremi, B.; Szoko, E.; Tabi, T.; Szabo, C.; Tulassay, Z.; Levine, M.

    2012-01-01

    Background Dental biofilms contain a protein that inhibits mammalian cell growth, possibly lysine decarboxylase from Eikenella corrodens. This enzyme decarboxylates lysine, an essential amino acid for dentally attached cell turnover in gingival sulci. Lysine depletion may stop this turnover, impairing the barrier to bacterial compounds. The aims of this study were to determine biofilm lysine and cadaverine contents before oral hygiene restriction (OHR), and their association with plaque index (PI) and gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) after OHR for a week. Methods Laser-induced fluorescence after capillary electrophoresis was used to determine lysine and cadaverine contents in dental biofilm, tongue biofilm and saliva before OHR and in dental biofilm after OHR. Results Before OHR, lysine and cadaverine contents of dental biofilm were similar and 10-fold greater than in saliva or tongue biofilm. After a week of OHR, the biofilm content of cadaverine increased and that of lysine decreased, consistent with greater biofilm lysine decarboxylase activity. Regression indicated that PI and GCF exudation were positively related to biofilm lysine post-OHR, unless biofilm lysine exceeded the minimal blood plasma content in which case PI was further increased but GCF exudation was reduced. Conclusions After OHR, lysine decarboxylase activity seems to determine biofilm lysine content and biofilm accumulation. When biofilm lysine exceeds minimal blood plasma content after OHR, less GCF appeared despite more biofilm. Lysine appears important for biofilm accumulation and the epithelial barrier to bacterial proinflammatory agents. Clinical Relevance Inhibiting lysine decarboxylase may retard the increased GCF exudation required for microbial development and gingivitis. PMID:22141361

  20. The expression of gingival epithelial junctions in response to subgingival biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Belibasakis, Georgios N; Kast, Jeannette I; Thurnheer, Thomas; Akdis, Cezmi A; Bostanci, Nagihan

    2015-01-01

    Periodontitis is an infectious inflammatory disease that destroys the tooth-supporting tissues. It is caused by the formation of subgingival biofilms on the surface of the tooth. Characteristic bacteria associated with subgingival biofilms are the Gram-negative anaerobes Porphyromonas gingivalis, Tannerella forsythia and Treponema denticola, collectively known as the “red complex” species. Inter-epithelial junctions ensure the barrier integrity of the gingival epithelium. This may however be disrupted by the biofilm challenge. The aim of this in vitro study was to investigate the effect of subgingival biofilms on the expression of inter-epithelial junctions by gingival epithelia, and evaluate the relative role of the red complex. Multi-layered human gingival epithelial cultures were challenged with a 10-species in vitro subgingival biofilm model, or its variant without the red complex, for 3 h and 24 h. A low-density array microfluidic card platform was then used for analyzing the expression of 62 genes encoding for tight junctions, gap junctions, adherens junctions, and desmosomes. Although there was a limited effect of the biofilms on the expression of tight, adherens and gap junctions, the expression of a number of desmosomal components was affected. In particular, Desmoglein-1 displayed a limited and transient up-regulation in response to the biofilm. In contrast, Desmocollin-2, Desmoplakin and Plakoglobin were down-regulated equally by both biofilm variants, after 24 h. In conclusion, this subgingival biofilm model may down-regulate selected desmosomal junctions in the gingival epithelium, irrespective of the presence of the “red complex.” In turn, this could compromise the structural integrity of the gingival tissue, favoring bacterial invasion and chronic infection. PMID:26305580

  1. [Cyclosporine-induced gingival hyperplasia: report of one case].

    PubMed

    Bahamondes, Carlos; Godoy, Jorge

    2007-03-01

    Gingival enlargement can be an adverse effect of cyclosporine A and nifedipine use. It has a high relapse rate if the drugs are not discontinued. There is a genetic predisposition to the development of this condition and dental biofilm can also play a role. We report a 64 years old male who received a renal allograft and was treated with cyclosporine and nifedipine. He required six surgical interventions for generalized gingival enlargement. After the sixth relapse, the patient was subjected to a periodontal treatment to eliminate the dental biofilm, which decreased the rate of recurrence of gingival enlargement. PMID:17505584

  2. A Randomized Clinical Trial of Schinus terebinthifolius Mouthwash to Treat Biofilm-Induced Gingivitis

    PubMed Central

    Freires, Irlan de Almeida; Alves, Livia Araújo; Ferreira, Gabriela Lacet Silva; Jovito, Vanessa de Carvalho; de Castro, Ricardo Dias; Cavalcanti, Alessandro Leite

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. This study aimed to investigate the efficacy of a Schinus terebinthifolius (ST) mouthwash in reducing gingival inflammation levels (GI) and biofilm accumulation (BA) in children with gingivitis. Methods. This was a randomized, controlled, triple blind, and phase II clinical trial, with children aged 9–13 years (n = 27) presenting with biofilm-induced gingivitis. The sample was randomized into experimental (0.3125% ST, n = 14) and control (0.12% chlorhexidine/CHX, n = 13) groups. Products were masked as regards color, flavor and aroma. Intervention protocol consisted in supervised rinsing of 10 mL/day for 01 minute for 10 days. Gingival bleeding and simplified oral hygiene indexes were used to assess the efficacy variables, measured at baseline and after intervention by calibrated examiners. Data were statistically treated with paired t-test, unpaired t-test, and Wilcoxon and Mann-Whitney tests (α = .05). Results. It was found that both ST and CHX were able to significantly reduce GI levels after 10 days (P < 0.001) and there was no significant difference between them (P > 0.05). CHX was the only product able to significantly reduce BA after 10 days when compared to baseline (P < 0.05). Conclusion. ST mouthwash showed significant anti-inflammatory activity (equivalent to CHX), but it was not able to reduce biofilm accumulation. PMID:23843886

  3. A Papilloma-like Atypical Gingival Enlargement Treated Using Nd:YAG Laser Surgery: Report of a Case

    PubMed Central

    Develioglu, H; Bakar, O; Goze, F

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Gingival overgrowths can occur due to various factors, such as inflammation, or rarely without a reason and are significant in periodontology. Here, we describe the diagnosis and treatment of a 33-year old female with a papilloma-like atypical enlargement of the gingiva attached to the molar vestibular region of her lower jaw. After the patient’s medical history was taken and the clinical examination done, the enlargement was surgically removed with a Nd:YAG laser and evaluated histopathologically. There was an inflamed, oedematous and vascularized stroma with a thick spongy squamous epithelium layer. After six months, there were no problems at the surgical area and recurrence was not observed. PMID:25803386

  4. Gingivitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... loosen and remove deposits from the teeth. Careful oral hygiene is necessary after professional tooth cleaning. The dentist ... Good oral hygiene is the best way to prevent gingivitis. You should brush your teeth at least twice a day. ...

  5. Phenytoin sensitivity of fibroblasts as the basis for susceptibility to gingival enlargement.

    PubMed Central

    Hassell, T. M.; Gilbert, G. H.

    1983-01-01

    A side effect of long-term administration of the anti-epileptic drug phenytoin is overgrowth of the connective tissues surrounding the teeth. In this in vitro study of protein and collagen synthesis by diploid fibroblasts from 17 nonepileptic young persons with healthy gingivae, only seven strains of cells responded to phenytoin in culture medium. Because not all phenytoin-treated individuals develop gingival overgrowth, we suggest that susceptibility is predicated upon the presence of a (genetically determined) phenytoin-sensitive subpopulation of gingival fibroblasts. The concept of the participation of sensitive cell subpopulations in other connective tissue disorders is supported by these findings. Images Figure 1 PMID:6881288

  6. Bifunctional bioceramics stimulating osteogenic differentiation of a gingival fibroblast and inhibiting plaque biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Shen, Ya; Wang, Zhejun; Wang, Jiao; Zhou, Yinghong; Chen, Hui; Wu, Chengtie; Haapasalo, Markus

    2016-04-22

    Gingival recession is a common clinical problem that results in esthetic deficiencies and poor plaque control and predominantly occurs in aged patients. In order to restore the cervical region, ideal biomaterials should possess the ability to stimulate proliferation and osteogenesis/cementogenesis of human gingival fibroblasts (HGF) and have a strong antibiofilm effect. The aim of the present study was to investigate the interactions of HGF and oral multispecies biofilms with Ca, Mg and Si-containing bredigite (BRT, Ca7MgSi4O16) bioceramics. BRT extract induced osteogenic/cementogenic differentiation of HGF and its inhibition of plaque biofilm formation were systematically studied. BRT extract in concentrations lower than <200 mg mL(-1) presented high biocompatibility to HGF cells in 3 days. Ion extracts from BRT also stimulated a series of bone-related gene and protein expressions in HGF cells. Furthermore, BRT extract significantly inhibited oral multispecies plaque biofilm growth on its surface and contributed to over 30% bacterial cell death without additional antibacterial agents in two weeks. A planktonic killing test showed that BRT suppressed 98% plaque bacterial growth compared to blank control in 3 days. The results also revealed that BRT extract has an osteostimulation effect on HGF. The suppression effect on plaque biofilms suggested that BRT might be used as a bioactive material for cervical restoration and that the synergistic effect of bioactive ions, such as Ca, Mg and Si ions, played an important role in the design and construction of bifunctional biomaterials in combination with tissue regeneration and antibiofilm activity. PMID:26806408

  7. Idiopathic gingival fibromatosis

    PubMed Central

    Dani, Nitin Hemchandra; Khanna, Dinkar Parveen; Bhatt, Vaibhavi Hitesh; Joshi, Chaitanya Pradeep

    2015-01-01

    Idiopathic gingival fibromatosis (IGF) is a rare hereditary condition characterized by slowly progressive, nonhemorrhagic, fibrous enlargement of maxillary and mandibular keratinized gingiva caused by increase in submucosal connective tissue elements, mostly associated with some syndrome. This case report describes a case of nonsyndromic generalized IGF in an 18-year-old male patient who presented with generalized gingival enlargement. The enlarged tissue was surgically removed by internal bevel gingivectomy and ledge and wedge procedure. The patient was regularly monitored clinically for improvement in his periodontal condition as well as for any recurrence of gingival overgrowth. PMID:26941525

  8. [THE CHARACTERISTICS OF MORPHOLOGY OF BIOFILM OF PERIODONTIUM UNDER INFLAMMATORY DISEASES OF GUMS (CHRONIC CATARRHAL GINGIVITIS, CHRONIC PERIODONTITIS, CANDIDA-ASSOCIATED PERIODONTITIS) ACCORDING RESULTS OF ELECTRONIC MICROSCOPY].

    PubMed

    Ippolitov, E V; Didenko, L V; Tzarev, V N

    2015-12-01

    The study was carried out to analyze morphology of biofilm of periodontium and to develop electronic microscopic criteria of differentiated diagnostic of inflammatory diseases of gums. The scanning electronic microscopy was applied to analyze samples of bioflm of periodont from 70 patients. Including ten patients with every nosologic form of groups with chronic catarrhal periodontitis. of light, mean and severe degree, chronic catarrhal gingivitis, Candida-associated paroperiodontitis and 20 healthy persons with intact periodontium. The analysis was implemented using dual-beam scanning electronic microscope Quanta 200 3D (FEI company, USA) and walk-through electronic micJEM 100B (JEOL, Japan). To detect marker DNA of periodont pathogenic bacteria in analyzed samples the kit of reagentsfor polymerase chain reaction "MultiDent-5" ("GenLab", Russia). The scanning electronic microscopy in combination with transmission electronic microscopy and polymerase chain reaction permits analyzing structure, composition and degree of development of biofilm of periodontium and to apply differentiated diagnostic of different nosologic forms of inflammatory diseases of periodontium, including light form of chronic periodontitis and gingivitis. The electronic microscopical indications of diseases ofperiodontium of inflammatory character are established: catarrhal gingivitis, (coccal morphological alternate), chronic periodontitis (bacillary morphological alternate), Candida-associated periodontitis (Candida morphological alternate of biofilm ofperiodontium). PMID:27032256

  9. Hereditary Gingival Fibromatosis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nevin, N. C.

    1971-01-01

    Case studies of two siblings suffering from a gum disorder in which enlargement of the gingival mucosa is caused by a fibrosis. The disorder in the two children was felt to be an hereditary recessive trait. (CD)

  10. Disruption of the ECM33 gene in Candida albicans prevents biofilm formation, engineered human oral mucosa tissue damage and gingival cell necrosis/apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Rouabhia, Mahmoud; Semlali, Abdelhabib; Chandra, Jyotsna; Mukherjee, Pranab; Chmielewski, Witold; Ghannoum, Mahmoud A

    2012-01-01

    In this study we demonstrated that ΔCaecm33 double mutant showed reduced biofilm formation and causes less damage to gingival mucosa tissues. This was confirmed by the reduced level of necrotic cells and Bax/Bcl2 gene expression as apoptotic markers. In contrast, parental and Caecm33 mutant strains decreased basement membrane protein production (laminin 5 and type IV collagen). We thus propose that ECM33 gene/protein represents a novel target for the prevention and treatment of infections caused by Candida. PMID:22665950

  11. Hereditary gingival fibromatosis

    PubMed Central

    Chaurasia, Akhilanand

    2014-01-01

    Hereditary gingival fibromatosis (HGF) is a rare condition that can occur as an isolated disease, chromosomal abnormality, or as part of a number of syndromes. The gingival enlargement in HGF can be so severe that it can cover the crowns of teeth completely, causing severe functional derangement and facial disfigurement. Through review of literature revealed that HGF is usually an autosomal dominant condition, however the recessive forms are also reported. The hyperplastic gingiva is firm on palpation and has normal color with abundant stippling on the adjacent gingiva. The buccal and lingual gingiva may be involved in both the mandible and maxilla. The degrees of gingival enlargement show both intra- and interindividual variations. Here, an interesting case report of massive HGF has been presented. PMID:25298717

  12. Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    van Hoek, Monique L

    2013-01-01

    Our understanding of the virulence and pathogenesis of Francisella spp. has significantly advanced in recent years, including a new understanding that this organism can form biofilms. What is known so far about Francisella spp. biofilms is summarized here and future research questions are suggested. The molecular basis of biofilm production has begun to be studied, especially the role of extracellular carbohydrates and capsule, quorum sensing and two-component signaling systems. Further work has explored the contribution of amoebae, pili, outer-membrane vesicles, chitinases, and small molecules such as c-di-GMP to Francisella spp. biofilm formation. A role for Francisella spp. biofilm in feeding mosquito larvae has been suggested. As no strong role in virulence has been found yet, Francisella spp. biofilm formation is most likely a key mechanism for environmental survival and persistence. The significance and importance of Francisella spp.’s biofilm phenotype as a critical aspect of its microbial physiology is being developed. Areas for further studies include the potential role of Francisella spp. biofilms in the infection of mammalian hosts and virulence regulation. PMID:24225421

  13. Wound biofilms: lessons learned from oral biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Mancl, Kimberly A.; Kirsner, Robert S.; Ajdic, Dragana

    2013-01-01

    Biofilms play an important role in the development and pathogenesis of many chronic infections. Oral biofilms, more commonly known as dental plaque,are a primary cause of oral diseases including caries, gingivitis and periodontitis. Oral biofilms are commonly studied as model biofilm systems as they are easily accessible, thus biofilm research in oral diseases is advanced with details of biofilm formation and bacterial interactions being well-elucidated. In contrast, wound research has relatively recently directed attentionto the role biofilms have in chronic wounds. This review discusses the biofilms in periodontal disease and chronic wounds with comparisons focusing on biofilm detection, biofilm formation, the immune response to biofilms, bacterial interaction and quorum sensing. Current treatment modalities used by both fields as well as future therapies are also discussed. PMID:23551419

  14. Enlarged prostate

    MedlinePlus

    BPH; Benign prostatic hyperplasia (hypertrophy); Prostate - enlarged ... The actual cause of prostate enlargement is unknown. Factors linked to aging and changes in the cells of the testicles may have a role in the growth ...

  15. Idiopathic gingival fibromatosis with asymmetrical presentation and electrosurgical management

    PubMed Central

    Pol, Dilip Ganpat; Lobo, Tanya Marguerite; Pol, Samruddhi Dilip

    2016-01-01

    Idiopathic gingival fibromatosis is a rare genetically heterogeneous condition characterized by recurrent gingival enlargement without any identifiable cause. We report a case of 14-year-old female patient affected with sporadic, nonsyndromic, progressive gingival enlargement. It manifested more severely on the right side of the mouth with history of recurrence after prior conventional surgical excision. Electrosurgical resection of the enlargement was done, and overall patient management had a successful outcome along with achieving preservation of teeth with poor prognosis in the 2 years follow-up. PMID:27041849

  16. A review of factors influencing the incidence and severity of plaque-induced gingivitis.

    PubMed

    Trombelli, L; Farina, R

    2013-06-01

    An individual variation in the gingival inflammatory response to the dental biofilm has been demonstrated. This variability can be observed between individuals with neither quantitative nor qualitative differences in plaque accumulation. The reported significant differences in gingival inflammatory response under quantitatively and/or qualitatively almost identical bacterial challenge suggest that the gingival response to plaque accumulation may be an individual trait, possibly genetic in origin. The most recent classification of periodontal diseases acknowledges that the clinical expression of plaque-induced gingival inflammation can be substantially modified by systemic factors, either inherent to the host or related to environmental influences. The aim of the present literature review is to describe (i) the factors influencing the development of plaque-induced gingivitis as well as (ii) those metabolic, environmental and systemic factors which have a direct impact on the etiopathogenetic pathway of plaque-induced gingivitis, thus altering the nature or course of the gingival inflammatory response to dental biofilm. PMID:23828258

  17. [Pregnancy gingivitis and tumor gravidarum].

    PubMed

    Bilińska, Maria; Sokalski, Jerzy

    2016-01-01

    During pregnancy periodontal tissues may become more susceptible to internal and external factors promoting inflammation. Changes in hormone levels, alterations in the periodontal tissue structure and a predisposition to dilating blood vessels during pregnancy may lead to a painful inflammation as a response to a slightest amount of biofilm. Tumor gravidarum emerges in 5% of pregnant women during the first or second trimester - it may recede and fade completely right after the labour when hormone levels normalize. This paper explains the aetiology and potential risk factors of pregnancy gingivitis. PMID:27321105

  18. Gingival fibromatosis: clinical, molecular and therapeutic issues.

    PubMed

    Gawron, Katarzyna; Łazarz-Bartyzel, Katarzyna; Potempa, Jan; Chomyszyn-Gajewska, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Gingival fibromatosis is a rare and heterogeneous group of disorders that develop as slowly progressive, local or diffuse enlargements within marginal and attached gingiva or interdental papilla. In severe cases, the excess tissue may cover the crowns of the teeth, thus causing functional, esthetic, and periodontal problems, such as bone loss and bleeding, due to the presence of pseudopockets and plaque accumulation. It affects both genders equally. Hereditary, drug-induced, and idiopathic gingival overgrowth have been reported. Hereditary gingival fibromatosis can occur as an isolated condition or as part of a genetic syndrome. The pathologic manifestation of gingival fibromatosis comprises excessive accumulation of extracellular matrix proteins, of which collagen type I is the most prominent example. Mutation in the Son-of-Sevenless-1 gene has been suggested as one possible etiological cause of isolated (non-syndromic) hereditary gingival fibromatosis, but mutations in other genes are also likely to be involved, given the heterogeneity of this condition. The most attractive concept of mechanism for drug-induced gingival overgrowth is epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, a process in which interactions between gingival cells and the extracellular matrix are weakened as epithelial cells transdifferentiate into fibrogenic fibroblast-like cells. The diagnosis is mainly made on the basis of the patient's history and clinical features, and on histopathological evaluation of affected gingiva. Early diagnosis is important, mostly to exclude oral malignancy. Differential diagnosis comprises all pathologies in the mouth with excessive gingival overgrowth. Hereditary gingival fibromatosis may present as an autosomal-dominant or less commonly autosomal-recessive mode of inheritance. If a systemic disease or syndrome is suspected, the patient is directed to a geneticist for additional clinical examination and specialized diagnostic tests. Treatments vary according to the

  19. Recurrent idiopathic gingival fibromatosis with generalized aggressive periodontitis: A rare case report

    PubMed Central

    Jadhav, Ashwini Sudhakar; Marathe, Swati Pramodan

    2015-01-01

    Gingival fibromatosis is an enlargement of the gingival tissue, which may be localized or generalized, characterized by hypertrophy and proliferation of the connective tissue, predominantly Type I collagen, with occasional presence of an increased number of cells, supposedly fibroblasts. Gingival fibromatosis occurs more commonly as a side- effect of systemic drugs, such as phenytoin, cyclosporine, nifedipine, or due to hereditary factors. However, in some cases, it is idiopathic. We report one such case in 30 -year- old - female who presented with a complaint of swelling of gums since 2 months. This case appears to be of special interest because of the recurrent nature of gingival enlargement along with excessive osseous destruction. PMID:25810601

  20. Hereditary Nonsyndromic Gingival Fibromatosis: Report of Family Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Peeran, Syed Wali; Ramalingam, Karthikeyan; Peeran, Syed Ali; Mugrabi, Marei Hamed; Abdulla, Khaled Awidat

    2013-01-01

    Hereditary gingival fibromatosis (HGF) is a rare, benign disorder with slowly progressive enlargement of maxillary and mandibular gingiva. Herewith, we report the first case series of HGF presenting among mother and all of her 3 children. Their complaints included unaesthetic appearance due to gingival growth, malocclusion, and difficulty in mastication. Conventional gingivectomy with oral hygiene measures and regular followup is the treatment of choice for such presentation. PMID:24191204

  1. Hereditary nonsyndromic gingival fibromatosis: report of family case series.

    PubMed

    Peeran, Syed Wali; Ramalingam, Karthikeyan; Peeran, Syed Ali; Mugrabi, Marei Hamed; Abdulla, Khaled Awidat

    2013-01-01

    Hereditary gingival fibromatosis (HGF) is a rare, benign disorder with slowly progressive enlargement of maxillary and mandibular gingiva. Herewith, we report the first case series of HGF presenting among mother and all of her 3 children. Their complaints included unaesthetic appearance due to gingival growth, malocclusion, and difficulty in mastication. Conventional gingivectomy with oral hygiene measures and regular followup is the treatment of choice for such presentation. PMID:24191204

  2. RARE CASE OF IDIOPATHIC GINGIVAL FIBROMATOSIS AFFECTING PRIMARY DENTITION.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Sanaa; Ali, Zahid

    2015-01-01

    Gingival fibromatosis (GF) is a rare condition with an estimated incidence of 1750,000 in autosomal dominant cases and is supposedly genetic in origin. Gingival fibromatosis (GF) may occur as an isolated finding (Idiopathic gingival fibromatosis or IGF) or in combination with additional clinical problems that is, giving rise to syndromic forms of the disease. It usually is triggered when permanent dentition starts to erupt and can cover crowns of the teeth. Gingival fibromatosis occasionally manifests at birth or affect primary dentition. This enlargement may cause mal-position and diastema. Surgical excision of excessive fibrous tissue is the only treatment but it recurs. We are presenting here a case of 5 year old patient presenting with severe idiopathic gingival fibromatosis covering crowns of primary teeth and causing functional impairment. PMID:27004356

  3. [Gingival recessions and orthodontics].

    PubMed

    Renkema, A M; Padmos, J A D; de Quincey, G de

    2015-11-01

    Gingival recessions represent the most visible periodontal disease. The prevalence of gingival recessions is high. The root surface is literally exposed to negative influences such as erosion, abrasion, discoloration and decay. Moreover, gingival recessions can affect the quality of life by increased thermal sensitivity and reduced dento-gingival aesthetics. The aetiology of gingival recessions is complex and considered to be multifactorial. In order to prevent the development of gingival recessions during and after orthodontic treatment, several factors should be taken into account, among which maintenance of optimal oral hygiene and respect for the 'biological envelope' are decisive. Once gingival recessions have developed, orthodontic therapy can play a positive role in their treatment. PMID:26569002

  4. Idiopathic Gingival Fibromatosis: Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Ko, Yen Chen K; Farr, Jeffrey B; Yoon, Angela; Philipone, Elizabeth

    2016-06-01

    Gingival fibromatosis (GF) is a condition characterized by a progressive, normal colored enlargement of the gingiva caused by an increase in the size of submucosal connective tissue. Both familial and idiopathic variants of the condition exist. The authors present a case report of a 38-year-old African American man who presented with an impressive overgrowth of the maxillary and mandibular gingivae, subsequently diagnosed as idiopathic GF. In this report, the authors will review the etiologies, treatment, and clinical and histological findings of GF, review similar cases found in the literature, and discuss the differential diagnosis for diffuse gingival enlargements. PMID:27043333

  5. Ultrastructure of gingival epithelium in chronic gingivitis.

    PubMed

    Lushnikova, E L; Nepomnyashchikh, L M; Oskolsky, G I; Jurkevich, N V

    2012-03-01

    We studied ultrastructural reorganization of the gingival mucosa in chronic gingivitis. It was found that chronic inflammation leads to significant intracellular reorganization of epitheliocytes in the basal and prickle cell layers of gingival epithelium and their pronounced structural and functional heterogeneity. The main ultrastructural alterations of epitheliocytes in the basal and prickle cell layers include pronounced vacuolization of the perinuclear zone (partial necrosis), formation of thick tonofilament bundles, focal lysis and sequestration of glycogen, and destruction and reduction of intracellular junctions in some cases accompanied by acantholytic alterations. Chronic inflammation in the gingival mucosa induced extensive remodeling of the lamina propria manifested in multiplication of the basement membrane and obturation of blood vessels with collagen fibrils. PMID:22803154

  6. Breast enlargement in males

    MedlinePlus

    Gynecomastia; Breast enlargement in a male ... The condition may occur in one or both breasts. It begins as a small lump beneath the nipple, which may be tender. One breast may be larger than the other. Enlarged breasts ...

  7. [The causes of gingival overgrowth].

    PubMed

    Costuleanu, M; Plămădeală, P; Costuleanu, N; Foia, L; Indrei, A

    1999-01-01

    Gingival overgrowth includes a series of diseases with many clinical appearances. The pathological mechanisms being obscure there were used many terms for defining it. Thus, "gingival hyperplasia" and "gingival hypertrophy" were the definitions used to define this pathology. Therefore, the term of "gingival overgrowth" replaced in last decades the above two terms. This article have the goal of trying a classification of the entities forming the large family of gingival overgrowth. PMID:10756887

  8. Biofilm in endodontics: A review.

    PubMed

    Jhajharia, Kapil; Parolia, Abhishek; Shetty, K Vikram; Mehta, Lata Kiran

    2015-01-01

    Endodontic disease is a biofilm-mediated infection, and primary aim in the management of endodontic disease is the elimination of bacterial biofilm from the root canal system. The most common endodontic infection is caused by the surface-associated growth of microorganisms. It is important to apply the biofilm concept to endodontic microbiology to understand the pathogenic potential of the root canal microbiota as well as to form the basis for new approaches for disinfection. It is foremost to understand how the biofilm formed by root canal bacteria resists endodontic treatment measures. Bacterial etiology has been confirmed for common oral diseases such as caries and periodontal and endodontic infections. Bacteria causing these diseases are organized in biofilm structures, which are complex microbial communities composed of a great variety of bacteria with different ecological requirements and pathogenic potential. The biofilm community not only gives bacteria effective protection against the host's defense system but also makes them more resistant to a variety of disinfecting agents used as oral hygiene products or in the treatment of infections. Successful treatment of these diseases depends on biofilm removal as well as effective killing of biofilm bacteria. So, the fundamental to maintain oral health and prevent dental caries, gingivitis, and periodontitis is to control the oral biofilms. From these aspects, the formation of biofilms carries particular clinical significance because not only host defense mechanisms but also therapeutic efforts including chemical and mechanical antimicrobial treatment measures have the most difficult task of dealing with organisms that are gathered in a biofilm. The aim of this article was to review the mechanisms of biofilms' formation, their roles in pulpal and periapical pathosis, the different types of biofilms, the factors influencing biofilm formation, the mechanisms of their antimicrobial resistance, techniques to

  9. Management of Cyclosporine and Nifedipine-Induced Gingival Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Dilber, Erhan; Aral, Kübra; Sarica, Yagmur; Sivrikoz, Oya Nermin

    2015-01-01

    Gingival enlargements modified by medications are becoming more common because of the increased use of inducing drugs, and may create speech, mastication, tooth eruption, periodontal, and aesthetic problems. We hereby present a case of a 54-year-old man with 12-month history of generalized gingival enlargement in the keratinized gingiva was referred to our clinic. The patient had a history of kidney transplant and was under medication of cyclosporine and nifedipine. After medical consultation, cyclosporine was changed to tacrolimus and nifedipine was changed to captopril. Gingivectomy was performed using a diode laser, and scaling and root planning were performed. At five months postoperative, the gingival enlargements relapsed and diode laser-assisted surgery was repeated. The patient was followed-up on second postoperatively at 18 months and no relapse was seen. Diode laser-assisted gingivectomy was found to be useful for coagulation during surgery and decreased postoperative bleeding. Recurrence risk of cyclosporine and nifedipine-induced gingival overgrowth is high, thus, there is a great need for prolonged care of patients following treatment and prosthetic restoration. PMID:26812935

  10. Plasma cell gingivitis

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Chandershekhar; Shukla, Pradeep

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the article is to present a report on the clinical presentation of plasma cell gingivitis with the use of herbal toothpowder. Plasma cell gingivitis [PCG] is a rare benign condition of the gingiva characterized by sharply demarcated erythematous and edematous gingivitis often extending to the mucogingival junction. As the name suggests it is diffuse and massive infiltration of plasma cells into the sub-epithelial gingival tissue. It is a hypersensitivity reaction to some antigen, often flavouring agents or spices found in chewing gums, toothpastes and lorenzes. A 27-yr old male with a chief complaint of painful, bleeding swollen mass in his lower front teeth region with prolong use of herbal toothpowder. The gingiva bled readily on probing. Patient was advised to refrain from the use of herbal toothpowder and along with periodontal treatment, no further reoccurrence was found. as more and more herbal products are gaining popularity, clinicians should be aware of effects of these products. Early diagnosis is essential as plasma cell gingivitis has similar pathologic changes seen clinically as in leukemia, HIV infection, discoid lupus erythematosis, atrophic lichen planus, desquamative gingivitis, or cicatrical pemphigoid which must be differentiated through hematologic and serologic testing. PMID:26015677

  11. Changes in Gingival Crevicular Fluid Inflammatory Mediator Levels during the Induction and Resolution of Experimental Gingivitis in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Offenbacher, Steven; Barros, Silvana; Mendoza, L; Mauriello, S; Preisser, J; Moss, K; de Jager, Marko; Aspiras, Marcelo

    2010-01-01

    Aim The goal of this study is to characterize the changes in 33 biomarkers within the gingival crevicular fluid during the 3-week induction and 4-week resolution of stent-induced, biofilm overgrowth mediated, experimental gingivitis in humans. Methods Experimental gingivitis was induced in 25 subjects for 21 days followed by treatment with a sonic powered toothbrush for 28 days. Clinical indices and gingival crevicular fluids were collected weekly during induction and biweekly during resolution. Samples were analyzed using a bead-based multiplexing analysis for the simultaneous measurements of 33 biomarkers within each sample including cytokines, matrix-metalloproteinases and adipokines. Prostaglandin-E2 was measured by enzyme-linked immunoadsorbant assay. Statistical testing using general linear models with structured covariance matrices were performed to compare stent to contralateral (non-stent) changes in clinical signs and in biomarker levels over time. Results Gingivitis induction was associated with a significant 2.6-fold increase in interleukin 1-beta, a 3.1 fold increase in interleukin 1-alpha, and a significant decrease in multiple chemokines as well as matrixmetalloproteinases −1, −3 and 13. All changes in clinical signs and mediators rebounded to baseline in response to treatmentin the resolution phase. Conclusions Stent-induced gingivitis is associated with marked, but reversible increases in interleukins 1-alpha and 1-beta with suppression of multiple chemokines as well as selected matrixmetalloproteinases. PMID:20447255

  12. Gingival abscess removal using a soft-tissue laser.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Soni; Monaco, Edward A; Andreana, Sebastiano

    2011-02-01

    A case of acute inflammatory enlargement of gingival tissue in the form of a gingival abscess is presented in this paper. Its clinical features and histopathologic presentation are described. The etiology of this condition could be a variety of sources such as microbial plaque infection, trauma, and foreign body impaction. In this case, treatment included complete excision by the means of a 810-nm soft-tissue diode laser, which resulted in resolution of the abscess and clinical wound healing within approximately 2 to 3 weeks. Prognosis was excellent due to early diagnosis and immediate treatment. PMID:21400991

  13. Biofilm in endodontics: A review

    PubMed Central

    Jhajharia, Kapil; Parolia, Abhishek; Shetty, K Vikram; Mehta, Lata Kiran

    2015-01-01

    Endodontic disease is a biofilm-mediated infection, and primary aim in the management of endodontic disease is the elimination of bacterial biofilm from the root canal system. The most common endodontic infection is caused by the surface-associated growth of microorganisms. It is important to apply the biofilm concept to endodontic microbiology to understand the pathogenic potential of the root canal microbiota as well as to form the basis for new approaches for disinfection. It is foremost to understand how the biofilm formed by root canal bacteria resists endodontic treatment measures. Bacterial etiology has been confirmed for common oral diseases such as caries and periodontal and endodontic infections. Bacteria causing these diseases are organized in biofilm structures, which are complex microbial communities composed of a great variety of bacteria with different ecological requirements and pathogenic potential. The biofilm community not only gives bacteria effective protection against the host's defense system but also makes them more resistant to a variety of disinfecting agents used as oral hygiene products or in the treatment of infections. Successful treatment of these diseases depends on biofilm removal as well as effective killing of biofilm bacteria. So, the fundamental to maintain oral health and prevent dental caries, gingivitis, and periodontitis is to control the oral biofilms. From these aspects, the formation of biofilms carries particular clinical significance because not only host defense mechanisms but also therapeutic efforts including chemical and mechanical antimicrobial treatment measures have the most difficult task of dealing with organisms that are gathered in a biofilm. The aim of this article was to review the mechanisms of biofilms’ formation, their roles in pulpal and periapical pathosis, the different types of biofilms, the factors influencing biofilm formation, the mechanisms of their antimicrobial resistance, techniques to

  14. Phenytoin-induced severe gingival overgrowth in a child

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Rakesh; Singh, Rajeev Kumar; Verma, Nidhi; Verma, Umesh Pratap

    2014-01-01

    Gingival enlargement or overgrowth (GO) is a common complication of the anticonvulsant drug phenytoin (PHT). GO is evident in almost half of the patients receiving PHT therapy. PHT-induced gingival overgrowth (PGO) is more common in children than in adults and affects both males and females equally. PGO may vary from mild to severe and does not seem to be dose dependant. It is supposed that PHT and its metabolites cause a direct effect on the periodontal tissues; however, poor oral hygiene may contribute to the severity of gingival inflammation in patients with PGO. Management of PGO includes meticulous oral hygiene practice to reduce inflammation and surgical excision of the overgrown tissue, known as gingivectomy. We present a case of PHT-induced severe GO in a 10-year-old boy and discuss the clinical features, aetiology, pathogenesis and management of PGO. PMID:25053668

  15. An unusual clinical presentation of plasma cell gingivitis related to "Acacia" containing herbal toothpaste.

    PubMed

    Makkar, Anjali; Tewari, Shikha; Kishor, Kamal; Kataria, Santprakash

    2013-07-01

    A 17-year-old female patient presented with unusual enlargement of the gingiva with generalized alveolar bone loss. In spite of periodontal therapy, including plaque control, scaling, root planning and surgical treatment, recurrence with the same degree of the gingival enlargement and further loss of attachment level occurred. Biopsy revealed dense infiltration of normal plasma cells separated by collagenous stroma. Discontinuation of herbal toothpaste resulted in remarkable remission of the gingival enlargement within 2 weeks. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay of toothpaste components disclosed "Acacia" as an etiologic antigenic agent and confirmed the diagnosis of plasma cell gingivitis (PCG). Usually, PCG is not associated with the loss of attachment. This case report appears to be the first publication to document an atypical presentation of PCG with generalized aggressive periodontitis related to the use of herbal toothpaste containing "Acacia" extract from the tree "Acacia Arabica." PMID:24174738

  16. Enlarged Adenoids (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Are Reading Upsetting News Reports? What to Say Vaccines: Which Ones & When? Smart School Lunches Emmy-Nominated Video "Cerebral Palsy: Shannon's Story" 5 Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Enlarged Adenoids KidsHealth > ...

  17. Breast enlargement in males

    MedlinePlus

    ... substances can cause breast enlargement: Alcohol Amphetamines Heroin Marijuana Methadone Breast cancer in men is rare. Signs ... include: Stop taking all recreational drugs, such as marijuana Stop taking all nutritional supplements or any drugs ...

  18. Enlarged prostate gland

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... is encased within the prostate gland. As a man ages, the prostate typically enlarges in size in ... urinate, and incontinence. Less than half of all men with BPH have symptoms of the disease, or ...

  19. Enlarged prostate gland

    MedlinePlus

    ... enlarges in size in a process called benign hypertrophy, which means that the gland got larger without ... in several of the symptoms of benign prostatic hypertrophy, or BPH. Symptoms may include a slowed or ...

  20. Immunoexpression of interleukin-6 in drug-induced gingival overgrowth patients

    PubMed Central

    Ganesh, P. R.

    2016-01-01

    Background: To analyze the role of proinflammatory cytokines in drug-induced gingival enlargement in Indian population. Aim: To evaluate for the presence of interleukin-6 (IL-6) in drug-induced gingival enlargement and to compare it with healthy control in the absence of enlargement. Materials and Methods: Thirty-five patients selected for the study and divided into control group (10) and study group (25) consisting of phenytoin (10); cyclosporin (10) and nifedipine (5) induced gingival enlargement. Gingival overgrowth index of Seymour was used to assess overgrowth and allot groups. Under LA, incisional biopsy done, tissue sample fixed in 10% formalin and immunohistochemically evaluated for the presence of IL-6 using LAB-SA method, Labeled- Streptavidin-Biotin Method (LAB-SA kit from Zymed- 2nd generation LAB-SA detection system, Zymed Laboratories, CA). The results of immunohistochemistry were statistically analyzed using Kruskaal–Wallis and Mann–Whitney test. Results: The data obtained from immunohistochemistry assessment shows that drug-induced gingival overgrowth (DIGO) samples express more IL-6 than control group and cyclosporin expresses more IL-6 followed by phenytoin and nifedipine. Conclusion: Increased IL-6 expression was noticed in all three DIGO groups in comparison with control group. Among the study group, cyclosporin expressed maximum IL-6 expression followed by phenytoin and nifedipine. PMID:27307657

  1. [Amalgam gingival tatoo].

    PubMed

    Iacobelli, L; Ferraro, M; Vairo, F; Ianniciello, L; Venneri, A

    1988-01-01

    The Authors present (5) cases of gingival tattooing resulted by rapport between argentum amalgam and prosthetic reconstruction with aurum or combination. Theu concluded is opportune to substitute the stumps reconstructions in amalgam with other materials not cause of electrogalvanism. So we avaid principally the antiaesthetic aspect of pigmentation. PMID:3274159

  2. Effects of a Novel Dental Gel on Plaque and Gingivitis: A Comparative Study

    PubMed Central

    Dadkhah, M; Chung, NE; Ajdaharian, J; Wink, C; Klokkevold, P; Wilder-Smith, P

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The goal of this prospective, randomized, controlled, double-blinded study was to evaluate the effects of a novel dental gel on plaque and gingival health. The dental gel was designed to (1) break up and prevent re-accumulation of microbial biofilm, and (2) inhibit metal mediated inflammation. Materials and Methods Twenty-five subjects with moderate gingival inflammation (Löe and Silness Gingival Index ≥2) and pocket depths <4 were randomly assigned to brush twice daily for 21 days with the test or the control dental gel. On Days 0, 7, 14 and 21, plaque levels (Quigley-Hein, Turesky Modification Plaque Index), gingival inflammation (Löe and Silness Gingival Index) and gingival bleeding (modified Sulcus Bleeding Index) were determined by one blinded, investigator using a pressure sensitive probe. Results After 3 weeks, all 3 clinical indices were significantly improved in both groups (P<0.05) and significantly lower in the test group (P<0.05). Conclusion The novel dental gel formulation was provided effective plaque control and reduced gingival inflammation. Clinical Relevance A novel dentifrice formulation may be an effective tool for plaque removal and maintaining gingival health. PMID:26052472

  3. Significance of biofilms in dentistry.

    PubMed

    Wróblewska, Marta; Strużycka, Izabela; Mierzwińska-Nastalska, Elżbieta

    2015-01-01

    In the past decades significant scientific progress has taken place in the knowledge about biofilms. They constitute multilayer conglomerates of bacteria and fungi, surrounded by carbohydrates which they produce, as well as substances derived from saliva and gingival fluid. Modern techniques showed significant diversity of the biofilm environment and a system of microbial communication (quorum sensing), enhancing their survival. At present it is believed that the majority of infections, particularly chronic with exacerbations, are a result of biofilm formation, particularly in the presence of biomaterials. It should be emphasised that penetration of antibiotics and other antimicrobial agents into deeper layers of a biofilm is poor, causing therapeutic problems and necessitating sometimes removal of the implant or prosthesis. Biofilms play an increasing role in dentistry as a result of more and more broad use in dental practice of plastic and implantable materials. Biofilms are produced on the surfaces of teeth as dental plaque, in the para-nasal sinuses, on prostheses, dental implants, as well as in waterlines of a dental unit, constituting a particular risk for severely immunocompromised patients. New methods of therapy and prevention of infections linked to biofilms are under development. PMID:27139354

  4. Free gingival grafting procedure after excisional biopsy, 12-year follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Keskiner, Ilker; Alkan, B. Arzu; Tasdemir, Zekeriya

    2016-01-01

    The total removal of a lesion via excisional biopsy causes gingival recession, resulting in dentin hypersensitivity and esthetical problems. In this case report, a gingival recession defect resulting from an excisional biopsy was treated with a free gingival grafting procedure performed during the same appointment, and its 12-year follow-up was presented. A 44-year-old female patient was presented to our clinic with a firm, pedunculated, red gingival enlargement located on the labial surface of lower incisors. The exposed root surface, after the excisional biopsy, was covered with a free gingival graft. The lesion was pathologically diagnosed as pyogenic granuloma, and in the early postoperative phase, no recurrence was observed, but partial root coverage was determined. At 6-month follow-up, root coverage resulting from “creeping attachment” was observed, and this situation was maintained throughout the 12-year follow-up period. Repetitious postoperative discomfort and emotional stress for the patient may be avoided with a timesaving single appointment performing excisional biopsy and free gingival graft. Free gingival grafting procedure was used for this purpose not only to cover exposed root surfaces but also to eliminate dentin hypersensitivity and make oral hygiene procedures more effective. PMID:27403067

  5. Management of Gingival Overgrowth in a Cardiac Transplant Patient Using Laser-Assisted Gingivectomy/Gingivoplasty.

    PubMed

    Maddi, Abhiram; Alluri, Leela Subhashini; Ciancio, Sebastian G

    2015-07-01

    Drug-induced gingival overgrowth (DIGO) is an oral clinical manifestation associated with certain medications such as immunosuppressants that are administered to organ transplant patients to prevent graft rejection. In patients with cardiac transplants, management of DIGO is critical. In such patients, plaque biofilm accumulation at the gingival interface might be detrimental as it may lead to transient bacteremia as well as systemic inflammation resulting in thromboembolic events. This case report describes the management of DIGO in a cardiac transplant recipient by change of immunosuppressant medication, non-surgical periodontal therapy and laser-assisted gingivectomy. PMID:26373224

  6. Permeabilizing biofilms

    DOEpatents

    Soukos, Nikolaos S.; Lee, Shun; Doukas, Apostolos G.

    2008-02-19

    Methods for permeabilizing biofilms using stress waves are described. The methods involve applying one or more stress waves to a biofilm, e.g., on a surface of a device or food item, or on a tissue surface in a patient, and then inducing stress waves to create transient increases in the permeability of the biofilm. The increased permeability facilitates delivery of compounds, such as antimicrobial or therapeutic agents into and through the biofilm.

  7. [Etiology of gingival recessions].

    PubMed

    Kleber, B M; Schenk, H J

    1989-11-01

    About every third patient of our department suffers from gingival recessions (g. r.): 1980, 1985, 1986, 1987 altogether 1039 patients from 4022. People at the age of 20-25 years are mainly affected: 44.4% of these patients in the age-group of 20-25 years suffer from g. r., 28.3% of patients suffering from l.P.a. are 20-25 years old. Patients diseased with g. r. (N = 60) show functional disturbances (79% at the 1st bicuspid, 72% at the 2nd bicuspid) during their occlusion movements to a great extent. Patients afflected by g.r. (N = 20) show in comparison to healthy people a smaller diameter of the canin's apical basis both in upper and lower jaw, a smaller circumference of the alveolar crest as well as an upper canin-crown which is turned out from the teeth arcus in a more labial direction. Prevention of g. r. involves individual oral health education to protect the vestibular gingiva from chronic brushing-trauma, an early follow-up, and a functional adjustment. PMID:2638999

  8. Role of Biofilm Roughness and Hydrodynamic Conditions in Legionella pneumophila Adhesion to and Detachment from Simulated Drinking Water Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Yun; Monroy, Guillermo L.; Derlon, Nicolas; Janjaroen, Dao; Huang, Conghui; Morgenroth, Eberhard; Boppart, Stephen A.; Ashbolt, Nicholas J.; Liu, Wen-Tso; Nguyen, Thanh H.

    2015-01-01

    Biofilms in drinking water distribution systems (DWDS) could exacerbate the persistence and associated risks of pathogenic Legionella pneumophila (L. pneumophila), thus raising human health concerns. However, mechanisms controlling adhesion and subsequent detachment of L. pneumophila associated with biofilms remain unclear. We determined the connection between L. pneumophila adhesion and subsequent detachment with biofilm physical structure characterization using optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging technique. Analysis of the OCT images of multispecies biofilms grown under low nutrient condition up to 34 weeks revealed the lack of biofilm deformation even when these biofilms were exposed to flow velocity of 0.7 m/s, typical flow for DWDS. L. pneumophila adhesion on these biofilm under low flow velocity (0.007 m/s) positively correlated with biofilm roughness due to enlarged biofilm surface area and local flow conditions created by roughness asperities. The preadhered L. pneumophila on selected rough and smooth biofilms were found to detach when these biofilms were subjected to higher flow velocity. At the flow velocity of 0.1 and 0.3 m/s, the ratio of detached cell from the smooth biofilm surface was from 1.3 to 1.4 times higher than that from the rough biofilm surface, presumably because of the low shear stress zones near roughness asperities. This study determined that physical structure and local hydrodynamics control adhesion and detachment from simulated drinking water biofilm, thus it is the first step toward reducing the risk of L. pneumophila exposure and subsequent infections. PMID:25699403

  9. Job Enlargement: A Multidimensional Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donaldson, Lex

    1975-01-01

    An evaluation study into the effects of a job enlargement exercise indicates that the expected increases in satisfaction associated with greater work variety, novelty, and felt use of abilities were achieved. (Author/MLF)

  10. Detection of fusobacterium nucleatum and fadA adhesin gene in patients with orthodontic gingivitis and non-orthodontic periodontal inflammation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ping; Liu, Yi; Wang, Jianning; Guo, Yang; Zhang, Yujie; Xiao, Shuiqing

    2014-01-01

    Fusobacterium nucleatum is one of the most abundant gram-negative bacilli colonizing the subgingival plaque and closely associated with periodontal disease. However it is unclear whether F. nucleatum is involved in gingival inflammation under orthodontic appliance. A novel adhesin, FadA, which is unique to oral Fusobacteria, is required for F. nucleatum binding and invasion to epithelial cells and thus may play an important role in colonization of Fusobacterium in the host. In this study, we evaluated the prevalence of F. nucleatum and its virulence factor FadA adhesion gene (fadA) in 169 subgingival biofilm samples from 55 cases of gingivitis patients with orthodontic appliances, 49 cases of gingivitis patients without orthodontic treatment, 35 cases of periodontitis patients and 30 cases of periodontally healthy people via PCR. The correlations between the F. nucleatum/fadA and gingivitis index(GI)was also analyzed. The detection rate of F. nucleatum/fadA in periodontitis group and non-orthodontic gingivitis group was higher than the other two groups (p<0.01) while it was higher in orthodontic gingivitis group than in health people (p<0.05). An obviously positive correlation was observed between the prevalence of F. nucleatum/fadA and GI. F. nucleatum carrying fadA may be more closely related to the development of gingivitis and periodontal disease compared with orthodontic gingivitis. PMID:24416378

  11. Multimodality Imaging of the Effects of a Novel Dentifrice on Oral Biofilm

    PubMed Central

    Ajdaharian, Janet; Dadkhah, Mohammad; Sabokpey, Sara; Biren-Fetz, John; Chung, Na Eun; Wink, Cherie; Wilder-Smith, Petra

    2014-01-01

    Objective Oral biofilm formation and progression on the surface of the tooth can lead to advanced oral disease such as gingivitis. The purpose of this randomized, controlled, double-blinded study was to evaluate the effects of a novel dental gel on oral plaque biofilm using multimodal imaging techniques. Materials and Methods Twenty-five subjects with moderate gingival inflammation (Löe and Silness Gingival Index ≥ 2) and pocket depths <4 were randomly assigned to brush twice daily for 21 days with the test or the control dental gel. In vivo multimodality in situ imaging was performed over a 3-week period using in vivo Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) and Non-Linear Optical microscopy (NLOM). Plaque levels, gingival inflammation and gingival bleeding were also charted on days 0, 7, 14, and 21 using standard clinical indices. Results After 3 weeks, OCT and NLOM images showed a macroscopic break-up of the plaque layer and smaller, fragmented residual deposits in the test group with no apparent changes in the pellicle. Biofilm was also reduced in the control group, but to a lesser degree with regard to thickness, continuity and surface area. Paralleling these imaging results, clinical indices were significantly improved in both groups (P <0.05) and significantly lower in the test group (P <0.05). Conclusion Both dental gels reduced oral biofilm with the test gel showing greater efficacy (P <0.05) as determined by clinical and imaging parameters. PMID:24916419

  12. [Gingival bleaching: teaching and ethnocentrism].

    PubMed

    Bolla, Edson Daruich; Goldenberg, Paulete

    2010-06-01

    The aim of this study was to identify buccal/gingival cosmetic dentistry patterns subjacent to formation and professional practice of the dental surgeon from the ethnocentrism point of view. This is an exploratory study with a qualitative approach based on the thematic analysis. Initially a documental analysis was carried out. Thereafter, dental surgeons were interviewed and semi-structured questions were applied. In the Periodontal teaching field, this study showed that the presence of racial melanosis is omitted or treated as an alteration in the normality patterns and it is considered anti-aesthetic. All the interviewers learnt how to practice gingival bleaching in the post-graduation courses, they were all encouraged to offer this cosmetic dentistry procedure with the opportunity of obtaining a beautiful and healthy smile, thus assuring the belief of the Caucasian racial aesthetic superiority. This study make us think that the offer of gingival bleaching is oriented by the Caucasian pattern of beauty evidencing the ethnocentric character of this procedure. PMID:20640340

  13. Does Gingival Recession Require Surgical Treatment?

    PubMed

    Chan, Hsun-Liang; Chun, Yong-Hee Patricia; MacEachern, Mark; Oates, Thomas W

    2015-10-01

    Gingival recession represents a clinical condition in adults frequently encountered in the general dental practice. Clinicians often face dilemmas of whether or not to treat such a condition surgically. An initial condensed literature search was performed using a combination of gingival recession and surgery controlled terms and keywords. An analysis of the search results highlights the limited understanding of the factors that guide the treatment of gingival recession. Understanding the cause, prognosis, and treatment of gingival recession continues to offer many unanswered questions and challenges in periodontics as we strive to provide the best care possible for our patients. PMID:26427577

  14. [CHRONIC PERIODONTITIS WITH SYMPTOMATIC HYPERTROPHIC GINGIVITIS: CASE REPORT AND REVIEW OF THE LITERATURE].

    PubMed

    Shinkevich, V; Udaltsova, K; Pisarenko, E; Kolomiets, S; Khmil, T

    2015-12-01

    Gingivitis in traditional national dentistry referred to independent diseases or symptomatic condition in periodontitis and classified morphologically. The diagnostic features of the diseases are characteristic, but the clinical presentation of symptomatic gingivitis and patterns of bone destructions may vary between patients. Successful treatment of the disease depends from proper diagnosis and advanced disease stages, but for symptomatic gingivitis that accompanying chronic periodontitis, protocols include surgical excision. Despite of the high prevalence of chronic generalized periodontitis, its active treatment often start in severe destruction and bone loss (2-3 stage severity). Today etiotropic antimicrobial therapy is real way to control microbial biofilm and has solid evidence base. Applying of etiotropic antimicrobial therapy as systemic azithromycin with timely treatment of mild to moderate periodontal and bone destruction may reduce severe periodontitis incidence of and treatment-related complications in the future. This paper attempts to describe the clinical diagnostic features and the current treatment options along with a suggested protocol for comprehensive management of chronic generalized periodontitis and hypertrophic gingivitis patient with case reports and a brief review. PMID:26719550

  15. [Gingival retraction methods. A literature review].

    PubMed

    Tosches, Nino A; Salvi, Giovanni E

    2009-01-01

    The exposure of the preparation margin and the control of the hemorrhage in the gingival sulcus are prerequisites for precise impressions and thereby improving the quality of indirectly fabricated restorations. The purpose of this review article is to summarize available evidence with respect to current methods of gingival retraction and to provide the clinician with practical tips. PMID:19306598

  16. Unusual gingival presentation of post-transplantation lymphoproliferative disorder: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Raut, A; Huryn, J; Pollack, A; Zlotolow, I

    2000-10-01

    Post-transplantation lymphoproliferative disorder is a well-documented complication of solid organ or bone marrow transplantation. Histologically, it is characterized by an abnormal proliferation of lymphocytes, which can range from benign B-cell hyperplasia to malignant lymphoma. Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) is associated with several risk factors, such as congenital or acquired immunodeficiency states, autoimmune disorders, and infectious agents (eg, Epstein-Barr virus). Primary sites of presentation in the head and neck are Waldeyer's ring, paranasal sinuses, salivary glands, the oral cavity, and the larynx. Clinical appearance of gingival NHL varies but is usually found to be an asymptomatic gingival enlargement or mass resembling a pyogenic granuloma. We present a patient with a gingival ulceration that was subsequently diagnosed as Epstein-Barr virus malignant lymphoma resulting from the immunosuppression needed to prevent graft-versus-host disease after bone marrow transplantation. PMID:11027379

  17. [Vectorcardiographic manifestations of atrial enlargements].

    PubMed

    de Micheli, A; Medrano, G A

    1990-01-01

    Rational interpretation of changes of the P loop due to atrial enlargements must to rely on the magnitude and spatial orientation of main resultant vectors of the activation sequence of the atria. Under normal conditions, these vectors give rise to a mean vector oriented to the left downward and discretely forward with respect to their point of origin. In the presence of right atrial enlargement, the manifestation of the first vector of atrial depolarization, oriented downward and forward, is increased. This one moves in the same direction as the mean vector of atrial depolarization, originating an elongated P loop of more than 100 mcv in the three planes. Nevertheless, in the horizontal plane, increase of the P loop voltage predominates when hypertrophy exists, while augmentation of its area predominates when dilatation exists. In left atrial enlargement, the manifestation of the second vector of atrial depolarization, oriented to the left and backward, is augmented, and it moves in the same direction as the mean vector of atrial depolarization. For this, the PF loop acquires a characteristic aspect of a boxing glove, an the PH loop becomes diphasic, with its posterior area more or less prominent, or with a typical figure-eight conformation. If a biatrial enlargement is present, the manifestation of both the main resultant vectors of atrial depolarization is accentuated. Therefore the voltage of the diphasic P loop increases. Moreover the Ps loop has a triangular configuration, with its base of 30 msc or more, located below its point of origin. Generally disturbances of interatrial and intraatrial conduction coexist owing to myocardial damage. PMID:2146934

  18. Ameloblastic Fibrodentinoma Presenting as a False Gingival Enlargement in the Maxillary Anterior Region

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, Shiny; Priya, Lakshmi; Gopal, Dinesh; Devachen, Mary; Narayan, Ajay; Afnan, Muhammed

    2015-01-01

    Ameloblastic fibrodentinoma is a rare benign mixed odontogenic neoplasm usually occurring in the first two decades of life. It is more common in males and the most common site of occurrence is in the mandibular premolar molar area. This report presents a case of ameloblastic fibrodentinoma in a 12-year-old boy in the maxillary anterior region, a less common site for the occurrence of ameloblastic fibrodentinoma. A 12-year-old boy presented with a midline diastema in 11 and 21 region and a swelling in the palatal aspect of 11 and 12. Intraoral periapical radiograph showed the presence of rarefaction of bone on the mesial aspect of the cervical and middle third of the root of 11. Excision biopsy was done. The specimen was processed and stained with hematoxylin and eosin. Microscopic examination showed islands, chords and strands of odontogenic epithelium in a primitive ectomesenchyme resembling dental papilla. The odontogenic epithelium exhibited peripheral ameloblast-like and central stellate reticulum-like cells. The presence of dentinoid material was seen adjacent to the odontogenic epithelium in some foci. The lesion was diagnosed as ameloblastic fibrodentinoma. PMID:25709845

  19. Ameloblastic fibrodentinoma presenting as a false gingival enlargement in the maxillary anterior region.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Shiny; Priya, Lakshmi; Gopal, Dinesh; Devachen, Mary; Narayan, Ajay; Afnan, Muhammed

    2015-01-01

    Ameloblastic fibrodentinoma is a rare benign mixed odontogenic neoplasm usually occurring in the first two decades of life. It is more common in males and the most common site of occurrence is in the mandibular premolar molar area. This report presents a case of ameloblastic fibrodentinoma in a 12-year-old boy in the maxillary anterior region, a less common site for the occurrence of ameloblastic fibrodentinoma. A 12-year-old boy presented with a midline diastema in 11 and 21 region and a swelling in the palatal aspect of 11 and 12. Intraoral periapical radiograph showed the presence of rarefaction of bone on the mesial aspect of the cervical and middle third of the root of 11. Excision biopsy was done. The specimen was processed and stained with hematoxylin and eosin. Microscopic examination showed islands, chords and strands of odontogenic epithelium in a primitive ectomesenchyme resembling dental papilla. The odontogenic epithelium exhibited peripheral ameloblast-like and central stellate reticulum-like cells. The presence of dentinoid material was seen adjacent to the odontogenic epithelium in some foci. The lesion was diagnosed as ameloblastic fibrodentinoma. PMID:25709845

  20. Gingival Enlargement Induced by Felodipine Resolves with a Conventional Periodontal Treatment and Drug Modification

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, David; Yie, Helen S.

    2016-01-01

    We present a case of a 47-year-old male who suffered from GE around his lower anterior teeth as soon as he started treatment with Felodipine 400 mg. We show that oral hygiene measures, antibiotics, and conventional periodontal treatment (scaling and root planing SRP) were all not sufficient to resolve the drug induced GE, which will persist and/or recur provided that systemic effect of the offending medication is still present. The condition immediately resolved after switching to a different medication. The mechanism of GE is complex and not fully understood yet. It is mainly due to overexpression of a number of growth factors due to high concentrations of calcium ions (Ca2+). This affects fibroblasts proliferation and DNA synthesis and leads to a heavy chronic inflammatory cell infiltrate. Our case was managed according to the suggested protocols in previous case studies. The unique features in our case were the immediate onset of the adverse effect after starting the medication and the absence of any underlying medical condition apart from high blood pressure. Improving the oral hygiene together with SRP and cessation of the medication resolves drug induced GE. PMID:27034854

  1. Gingival Enlargement Induced by Felodipine Resolves with a Conventional Periodontal Treatment and Drug Modification.

    PubMed

    Khzam, Nabil; Bailey, David; Yie, Helen S; Bakr, Mahmoud M

    2016-01-01

    We present a case of a 47-year-old male who suffered from GE around his lower anterior teeth as soon as he started treatment with Felodipine 400 mg. We show that oral hygiene measures, antibiotics, and conventional periodontal treatment (scaling and root planing SRP) were all not sufficient to resolve the drug induced GE, which will persist and/or recur provided that systemic effect of the offending medication is still present. The condition immediately resolved after switching to a different medication. The mechanism of GE is complex and not fully understood yet. It is mainly due to overexpression of a number of growth factors due to high concentrations of calcium ions (Ca(2+)). This affects fibroblasts proliferation and DNA synthesis and leads to a heavy chronic inflammatory cell infiltrate. Our case was managed according to the suggested protocols in previous case studies. The unique features in our case were the immediate onset of the adverse effect after starting the medication and the absence of any underlying medical condition apart from high blood pressure. Improving the oral hygiene together with SRP and cessation of the medication resolves drug induced GE. PMID:27034854

  2. Osteoblast integration of dental implant materials after challenge by sub-gingival pathogens: a co-culture study in vitro.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Bingran; van der Mei, Henny C; Rustema-Abbing, Minie; Busscher, Henk J; Ren, Yijin

    2015-12-01

    Sub-gingival anaerobic pathogens can colonize an implant surface to compromise osseointegration of dental implants once the soft tissue seal around the neck of an implant is broken. In vitro evaluations of implant materials are usually done in monoculture studies involving either tissue integration or bacterial colonization. Co-culture models, in which tissue cells and bacteria battle simultaneously for estate on an implant surface, have been demonstrated to provide a better in vitro mimic of the clinical situation. Here we aim to compare the surface coverage by U2OS osteoblasts cells prior to and after challenge by two anaerobic sub-gingival pathogens in a co-culture model on differently modified titanium (Ti), titanium-zirconium (TiZr) alloys and zirconia surfaces. Monoculture studies with either U2OS osteoblasts or bacteria were also carried out and indicated significant differences in biofilm formation between the implant materials, but interactions with U2OS osteoblasts were favourable on all materials. Adhering U2OS osteoblasts cells, however, were significantly more displaced from differently modified Ti surfaces by challenging sub-gingival pathogens than from TiZr alloys and zirconia variants. Combined with previous work employing a co-culture model consisting of human gingival fibroblasts and supra-gingival oral bacteria, results point to a different material selection to stimulate the formation of a soft tissue seal as compared to preservation of osseointegration under the unsterile conditions of the oral cavity. PMID:26674427

  3. Removal of Dental Biofilms with an Ultrasonically Activated Water Stream.

    PubMed

    Howlin, R P; Fabbri, S; Offin, D G; Symonds, N; Kiang, K S; Knee, R J; Yoganantham, D C; Webb, J S; Birkin, P R; Leighton, T G; Stoodley, P

    2015-09-01

    Acidogenic bacteria within dental plaque biofilms are the causative agents of caries. Consequently, maintenance of a healthy oral environment with efficient biofilm removal strategies is important to limit caries, as well as halt progression to gingivitis and periodontitis. Recently, a novel cleaning device has been described using an ultrasonically activated stream (UAS) to generate a cavitation cloud of bubbles in a freely flowing water stream that has demonstrated the capacity to be effective at biofilm removal. In this study, UAS was evaluated for its ability to remove biofilms of the cariogenic pathogen Streptococcus mutans UA159, as well as Actinomyces naeslundii ATCC 12104 and Streptococcus oralis ATCC 9811, grown on machine-etched glass slides to generate a reproducible complex surface and artificial teeth from a typodont training model. Biofilm removal was assessed both visually and microscopically using high-speed videography, confocal scanning laser microscopy (CSLM), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Analysis by CSLM demonstrated a statistically significant 99.9% removal of S. mutans biofilms exposed to the UAS for 10 s, relative to both untreated control biofilms and biofilms exposed to the water stream alone without ultrasonic activation (P < 0.05). The water stream alone showed no statistically significant difference in removal compared with the untreated control (P = 0.24). High-speed videography demonstrated a rapid rate (151 mm(2) in 1 s) of biofilm removal. The UAS was also highly effective at S. mutans, A. naeslundii, and S. oralis biofilm removal from machine-etched glass and S. mutans from typodont surfaces with complex topography. Consequently, UAS technology represents a potentially effective method for biofilm removal and improved oral hygiene. PMID:26056055

  4. Enlarged Vestibular Aqueducts and Childhood Hearing Loss

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Info » Hearing, Ear Infections, and Deafness Enlarged Vestibular Aqueducts and Childhood Hearing Loss On this page: ... more information about enlarged vestibular aqueducts? What are vestibular aqueducts? The inner ear Credit: NIH Medical Arts ...

  5. Salivary and crevicular fluid interleukins in gingivitis

    PubMed Central

    Boronat-Catalá, Montserrat; Bagán Sebastián, José V.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Gingivitis is a frequent inflammatory process of the gum tissue that is mainly caused by the accumulation of plaque. The immune response against inflammatory processes is regulated in part by cytokines. Aims: Given that a continuous inflammation exists in gingivitis, it would be logical to assume that the interleukins will be altered locally in those patients. Therefore, the aim of this review was to check whether there is evidence that the interleukins can be used as diagnostic markers of inflammation levels in patients with gingivitis. Materials and Methods: A bibliographical search was undertaken using the key words interleukin and gingivitis in Pubmed, Cochrane, Scopus and Embase. Only those articles published over the last 10 years that were systematic reviews, case-controls or cohort studies in which interleukins in saliva and/or crevicular fluid was investigated in patients with gingivitis were selected. Results: Finally 15 articles were selected, all of them being case-control studies. The interleukins analyzed in the reviewed articles were: IL-1β, IL-8, IL-18, IL-11, IL-12, TNFα, IL-4, IL-17, IL-1α and IL-6. The most commonly studied interleukin is IL-1β and most authors agree that it is higher in the saliva and/or crevicular fluid of patients with gingivitis. Therefore, it could be used as a diagnostic marker of the degree of inflammation in gingivitis. Moreover, as far as the other interleukins studied are concerned, there is no clear consensus among the authors. Conclusion: There is sufficient evidence to suggest that IL-1β in saliva and/or crevicular fluid can be used as a marker of the degree of inflammation in gingivitis. Key words:Interleukins, gingivitis, saliva, crevicular fluid. PMID:24790719

  6. Bacterial community development in experimental gingivitis.

    PubMed

    Kistler, James O; Booth, Veronica; Bradshaw, David J; Wade, William G

    2013-01-01

    Current knowledge of the microbial composition of dental plaque in early gingivitis is based largely on microscopy and cultural methods, which do not provide a comprehensive description of oral microbial communities. This study used 454-pyrosequencing of the V1-V3 region of 16S rRNA genes (approximately 500 bp), and bacterial culture, to characterize the composition of plaque during the transition from periodontal health to gingivitis. A total of 20 healthy volunteers abstained from oral hygiene for two weeks, allowing plaque to accumulate and gingivitis to develop. Plaque samples were analyzed at baseline, and after one and two weeks. In addition, plaque samples from 20 chronic periodontitis patients were analyzed for cross-sectional comparison to the experimental gingivitis cohort. All of the healthy volunteers developed gingivitis after two weeks. Pyrosequencing yielded a final total of 344,267 sequences after filtering, with a mean length of 354 bases, that were clustered into an average of 299 species-level Operational Taxonomic Units (OTUs) per sample. Principal coordinates analysis (PCoA) plots revealed significant shifts in the bacterial community structure of plaque as gingivitis was induced, and community diversity increased significantly after two weeks. Changes in the relative abundance of OTUs during the transition from health to gingivitis were correlated to bleeding on probing (BoP) scores and resulted in the identification of new health- and gingivitis-associated taxa. Comparison of the healthy volunteers to the periodontitis patients also confirmed the association of a number of putative periodontal pathogens with chronic periodontitis. Taxa associated with gingivitis included Fusobacterium nucleatum subsp. polymorphum, Lachnospiraceae [G-2] sp. HOT100, Lautropia sp. HOTA94, and Prevotella oulorum, whilst Rothia dentocariosa was associated with periodontal health. Further study of these taxa is warranted and may lead to new therapeutic approaches

  7. Gingivitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... long-term effects of plaque deposits on your teeth. Plaque is a sticky material made of bacteria, mucus, ... you how to properly brush and floss your teeth. Your dentist may suggest devices to help remove plaque deposits. These include special toothpicks, toothbrushes, water irrigation, ...

  8. Role of biofilm roughness and hydrodynamic conditions in Legionella pneumophila adhesion to and detachment from simulated drinking water biofilms.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yun; Monroy, Guillermo L; Derlon, Nicolas; Janjaroen, Dao; Huang, Conghui; Morgenroth, Eberhard; Boppart, Stephen A; Ashbolt, Nicholas J; Liu, Wen-Tso; Nguyen, Thanh H

    2015-04-01

    Biofilms in drinking water distribution systems (DWDS) could exacerbate the persistence and associated risks of pathogenic Legionella pneumophila (L. pneumophila), thus raising human health concerns. However, mechanisms controlling adhesion and subsequent detachment of L. pneumophila associated with biofilms remain unclear. We determined the connection between L. pneumophila adhesion and subsequent detachment with biofilm physical structure characterization using optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging technique. Analysis of the OCT images of multispecies biofilms grown under low nutrient condition up to 34 weeks revealed the lack of biofilm deformation even when these biofilms were exposed to flow velocity of 0.7 m/s, typical flow for DWDS. L. pneumophila adhesion on these biofilm under low flow velocity (0.007 m/s) positively correlated with biofilm roughness due to enlarged biofilm surface area and local flow conditions created by roughness asperities. The preadhered L. pneumophila on selected rough and smooth biofilms were found to detach when these biofilms were subjected to higher flow velocity. At the flow velocity of 0.1 and 0.3 m/s, the ratio of detached cell from the smooth biofilm surface was from 1.3 to 1.4 times higher than that from the rough biofilm surface, presumably because of the low shear stress zones near roughness asperities. This study determined that physical structure and local hydrodynamics control L. pneumophila adhesion to and detachment from simulated drinking water biofilm, thus it is the first step toward reducing the risk of L. pneumophila exposure and subsequent infections. PMID:25699403

  9. Is periodontal health a predictor of drug-induced gingival overgrowth? A cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Banthia, Ruchi; Gupta, Santosh; Banthia, Priyank; Singh, Pallavi; Raje, Sapna; Kaur, Navkiran

    2014-01-01

    Background: Gingival overgrowth is a common side-effect of amlodipine regimen on the oral cavity. There is controversy regarding the cause and effect relationship of periodontal health and drug induced gingival overgrowth. Therefore, this study was conducted to investigate and to assess the relationship between the periodontal health and the onset and severity of gingival overgrowth in hypertensive patients receiving amlodipine. Materials and Methods: A total of 99 known hypertensive patients on amlodipine regimen were included in this study. Probing pocket depth (PPD) and clinical attachment loss (CAL) were noted on four sites of maxillary and mandibular anterior teeth. Gingival enlargement scores were assessed for each patient by employing the hyperplastic index. Oral hygiene status was evaluated using the calculus index (CI). Patients were divided into H, E and L groups based on their periodontal status and responders and non-responders based on their hyperplastic index scores. Differences in means of different periodontal variables in different groups were tested for significance by using ANOVA and unpaired Student t-test. Pearson's correlation coefficient was calculated to assess the correlation between different variables. For all analyses, P < 0.05 was considered to be significant. Results: All the periodontal parameters were statistically highly significant (P = 0.00) amongst H, E and L groups and between responders and non-responders. Statistically highly significant Pearson correlation coefficients were found between mean PPD and mean hyperplastic score, mean CAL and mean hyperplastic score and mean calculus and mean hyperplastic score. Conclusion: The results of this study indicated a definite association between periodontal health and development and severity of amlodipine-induced gingival overgrowth PMID:25426150

  10. Gingival fibromatosis with significant de novo formation of fibrotic tissue and a high rate of recurrence.

    PubMed

    Gawron, Katarzyna; Łazarz-Bartyzel, Katarzyna; Fertala, Andrzej; Plakwicz, Paweł; Potempa, Jan; Chomyszyn-Gajewska, Maria

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Hereditary gingival fibromatosis is characterized by slowly progressive enlargement of the gingiva that can present as an isolated condition or present as part of various syndromes. CASE REPORT An 11-year-old female reported with a gingival lesion that caused masticatory problems and poor oral hygiene. Periodontal examination revealed a dense tissue covering 30% of her teeth crowns within both jaws. Panoramic x-ray showed a normal bone height and teeth positioning. The patient did not use any medications, but a similar condition was also present in other family members. The patient was diagnosed with hereditary gingival fibromatosis. Surgery was carried out to remove excess of gingival tissue. Post-surgical healing was uneventful, but four weeks after the first surgery, the condition recurred amounting to 45% of the initial tissue volume presenting in the mandible, and 25% in the maxilla. Two months later, no significant growth was noted in the mandible, while in the maxilla, growth increased to 40% of the preoperative state. Analysis by polarized microscope showed a significant increase of thin fibrotic fibrils that contributed 80% of the total pool of collagen fibrils in the patient's gingiva, but only 25% in healthy gingiva. The patient was receiving outpatient care for follow-up every three months and surgical intervention had not been planned as long as her periodontal health was not be compromised.  CONCLUSIONS It is currently not clear whether the extent of the fibrosis had a mechanistic association with the ratio of gingival tissue re-growth in our case study. Further studies are needed to explain this association and improve the management of this condition. PMID:27609299

  11. The vaginal microflora in relation to gingivitis

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Gingivitis has been linked to adverse pregnancy outcome (APO). Bacterial vaginosis (BV) has been associated with APO. We assessed if bacterial counts in BV is associated with gingivitis suggesting a systemic infectious susceptibilty. Methods Vaginal samples were collected from 180 women (mean age 29.4 years, SD ± 6.8, range: 18 to 46), and at least six months after delivery, and assessed by semi-quantitative DNA-DNA checkerboard hybridization assay (74 bacterial species). BV was defined by Gram stain (Nugent criteria). Gingivitis was defined as bleeding on probing at ≥ 20% of tooth sites. Results A Nugent score of 0–3 (normal vaginal microflora) was found in 83 women (46.1%), and a score of > 7 (BV) in 49 women (27.2%). Gingivitis was diagnosed in 114 women (63.3%). Women with a diagnosis of BV were more likely to have gingivitis (p = 0.01). Independent of gingival conditions, vaginal bacterial counts were higher (p < 0.001) for 38/74 species in BV+ in comparison to BV- women. Counts of four lactobacilli species were higher in BV- women (p < 0.001). Independent of BV diagnosis, women with gingivitis had higher counts of Prevotella bivia (p < 0.001), and Prevotella disiens (p < 0.001). P. bivia, P. disiens, M. curtisii and M. mulieris (all at the p < 0.01 level) were found at higher levels in the BV+/G+ group than in the BV+/G- group. The sum of bacterial load (74 species) was higher in the BV+/G+ group than in the BV+/G- group (p < 0.05). The highest odds ratio for the presence of bacteria in vaginal samples (> 1.0 × 104 cells) and a diagnosis of gingivitis was 3.9 for P. bivia (95% CI 1.5–5.7, p < 0.001) and 3.6 for P. disiens (95%CI: 1.8–7.5, p < 0.001), and a diagnosis of BV for P. bivia (odds ratio: 5.3, 95%CI: 2.6 to 10.4, p < 0.001) and P. disiens (odds ratio: 4.4, 95% CI: 2.2 to 8.8, p < 0.001). Conclusion Higher vaginal bacterial counts can be found in women with BV and gingivitis in comparison to women with BV but not gingivitis. P

  12. Apparatus for drilling enlarged boreholes

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, G.R.

    1982-10-19

    A rotary bore hole enlarging bit is connected to a rotary pipe string having a drilling fluid flow path and an actuator flow path. The bit comprises a body structure including inner and outer telescopic body sections, expansible and retractible arms carrying cutters on the outer body section and an expander on the inner body section engageable with the arms to expand the arms and cutters upon telescopic movement of body sections in one relative direction. A piston and cylinder is provided between the inner and outer body sections to secure relative telescopic movement between the body sections. A first passage is disposed in the body structure and expansible arms and cutters for conducting drilling fluid to the cutters from the drilling fluid flow path, there being a second passage in the body structure for conducting actuator fluid to the piston and cylinder from the actuator fluid flow path.

  13. 3-D Cavern Enlargement Analyses

    SciTech Connect

    EHGARTNER, BRIAN L.; SOBOLIK, STEVEN R.

    2002-03-01

    Three-dimensional finite element analyses simulate the mechanical response of enlarging existing caverns at the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR). The caverns are located in Gulf Coast salt domes and are enlarged by leaching during oil drawdowns as fresh water is injected to displace the crude oil from the caverns. The current criteria adopted by the SPR limits cavern usage to 5 drawdowns (leaches). As a base case, 5 leaches were modeled over a 25 year period to roughly double the volume of a 19 cavern field. Thirteen additional leaches where then simulated until caverns approached coalescence. The cavern field approximated the geometries and geologic properties found at the West Hackberry site. This enabled comparisons are data collected over nearly 20 years to analysis predictions. The analyses closely predicted the measured surface subsidence and cavern closure rates as inferred from historic well head pressures. This provided the necessary assurance that the model displacements, strains, and stresses are accurate. However, the cavern field has not yet experienced the large scale drawdowns being simulated. Should they occur in the future, code predictions should be validated with actual field behavior at that time. The simulations were performed using JAS3D, a three dimensional finite element analysis code for nonlinear quasi-static solids. The results examine the impacts of leaching and cavern workovers, where internal cavern pressures are reduced, on surface subsidence, well integrity, and cavern stability. The results suggest that the current limit of 5 oil drawdowns may be extended with some mitigative action required on the wells and later on to surface structure due to subsidence strains. The predicted stress state in the salt shows damage to start occurring after 15 drawdowns with significant failure occurring at the 16th drawdown, well beyond the current limit of 5 drawdowns.

  14. Nifedipine and phenytoin induce matrix synthesis, but not proliferation, in intact human gingival connective tissue ex vivo.

    PubMed

    Kim, Shawna S; Michelsons, Sarah; Creber, Kendal; Rieder, Michael J; Hamilton, Douglas W

    2015-12-01

    Drug-induced gingival enlargement (DIGE) is a fibrotic condition that can be caused by the antihypertensive drug nifedipine and the anti-seizure drug phenytoin, but the molecular etiology of this type of fibrosis is not well understood and the role of confounding factors such as inflammation remains to be fully investigated. The aim of this study was to develop an ex vivo gingival explant system to allow investigation of the effects of nifedipine and phenytoin alone on human gingival tissue. Comparisons were made to the histology of human DIGE tissue retrieved from individuals with DIGE. Increased collagen, fibronectin, and proliferating fibroblasts were evident, but myofibroblasts were not detected in DIGE samples caused by nifedipine and phenytoin. In healthy gingiva cultured in nifedipine or phenytoin-containing media, the number of cells positive for p-SMAD2/3 increased, concomitant with increased CCN2 and periostin immunoreactivity compared to untreated explants. Collagen content assessed through hydroxyproline assays was significantly higher in tissues cultured with either drug compared to control tissues, which was confirmed histologically. Matrix fibronectin levels were also qualitatively greater in tissues treated with either drug. No significant differences in proliferating cells were observed between any of the conditions. Our study demonstrates that nifedipine and phenytoin activate canonical transforming growth factor-beta signaling, CCN2 and periostin expression, as well as increase collagen density, but do not influence cell proliferation or induce myofibroblast differentiation. We conclude that in the absence of confounding variables, nifedipine and phenytoin alter matrix homeostasis in gingival tissue explants ex vivo, and drug administration is a significant factor influencing ECM accumulation in gingival enlargement. PMID:26296421

  15. Secreted gingipains from Porphyromonas gingivalis colonies exert potent immunomodulatory effects on human gingival fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Bengtsson, Torbjörn; Khalaf, Atika; Khalaf, Hazem

    2015-09-01

    Periodontal pathogens, including Porphyromonas gingivalis, can form biofilms in dental pockets and cause inflammation, which is one of the underlying mechanisms involved in the development of periodontal disease, ultimately leading to tooth loss. Although P. gingivalis is protected in the biofilm, it can still cause damage and modulate inflammatory responses from the host, through secretion of microvesicles containing proteinases. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of cysteine proteinases in P. gingivalis colony growth and development, and subsequent immunomodulatory effects on human gingival fibroblast. By comparing the wild type W50 with its gingipain deficient strains we show that cysteine proteinases are required by P. gingivalis to form morphologically normal colonies. The lysine-specific proteinase (Kgp), but not arginine-specific proteinases (Rgps), was associated with immunomodulation. P. gingivalis with Kgp affected the viability of gingival fibroblasts and modulated host inflammatory responses, including induction of TGF-β1 and suppression of CXCL8 and IL-6 accumulation. These results suggest that secreted products from P. gingivalis, including proteinases, are able to cause damage and significantly modulate the levels of inflammatory mediators, independent of a physical host-bacterial interaction. This study provides new insight of the pathogenesis of P. gingivalis and suggests gingipains as targets for diagnosis and treatment of periodontitis. PMID:26302843

  16. Resection of Gingival Fibromatosis with High-power Laser.

    PubMed

    Camilotti, Renata Stifelman; Jasper, Juliana; Ferreira, Thaiana Barreto; Antonini, Fernando; Poli, Vladimir Dourado; Pagnoncelli, Rogério Miranda

    2015-01-01

    Hereditary gingival fibromatosis (HGF), also known as hereditary gingival hyperplasia, idiopathic gingival fibromatosis, and hereditary gingival overgrowth, is a rare condition but the most common form of gingival hyperplasia. Overgrowth of gingival tissue is usually slow and progressive and may delay or prevent tooth eruption, resulting in cosmetic and functional impairments. Hypertrichosis, epilepsy, and intellectual disability may be associated with HGF, which can occur in isolation or as part of a syndrome. The purpose of this case report is to describe a diode laser resection of gingival hyperplasia in a seven-year-old patient with nonsyndromic HGF and hypertrichosis. The diode laser enabled efficient removal of hypertrophic gingival tissue with good healing and minimal postoperative discomfort. PMID:25909843

  17. Management and prevention of gingival recession.

    PubMed

    Merijohn, George K

    2016-06-01

    Gingival recession is highly prevalent worldwide. It increases the risk for root caries and can interfere with patient comfort, function and esthetics. Progressive gingival recession also increases the risk of tooth loss secondary to clinical attachment loss. Although mitigating the causes of gingival recession decreases its incidence and severity, implementing practical management and prevention strategies in the clinical setting can be challenging. Identification of susceptible patients and evaluating them for the presence of modifiable risk exposures are essential first steps in developing action plans for appropriate interventions. This article reviews these steps and introduces chairside tools that can help in the selection of interventions designed to reduce the risk of future gingival recession and may also facilitate patient communication. Practical decision-making criteria are proposed for when and how to monitor gingival recession, for deciding when a patient is a candidate for surgical evaluation or referral to a periodontist, and, if surgery is the treatment of choice, what should be considered as key surgical outcome objectives. PMID:27045439

  18. Isolated gingival overgrowths: A review of case series

    PubMed Central

    Raizada, Shruti; Varghese, Jothi M.; Bhat, K. M.; Gupta, Kanishk

    2016-01-01

    Clinicians are often intrigued by the varied manifestations of the gingival tissue. Gingival overgrowth is a common clinical finding and most of them represent a reactive hyperplasia as a direct result of plaque-related inflammatory gingival disease. These types of growth generally respond to good plaque control, removal of the causative irritants, and conservative tissue management. This case series highlights three different cases of localized gingival overgrowth and its management with emphasis on the importance of patient awareness and motivation. PMID:27307683

  19. Isolated gingival overgrowths: A review of case series.

    PubMed

    Raizada, Shruti; Varghese, Jothi M; Bhat, K M; Gupta, Kanishk

    2016-01-01

    Clinicians are often intrigued by the varied manifestations of the gingival tissue. Gingival overgrowth is a common clinical finding and most of them represent a reactive hyperplasia as a direct result of plaque-related inflammatory gingival disease. These types of growth generally respond to good plaque control, removal of the causative irritants, and conservative tissue management. This case series highlights three different cases of localized gingival overgrowth and its management with emphasis on the importance of patient awareness and motivation. PMID:27307683

  20. Etiology and occurrence of gingival recession - An epidemiological study

    PubMed Central

    Mythri, Sarpangala; Arunkumar, Suryanarayan Maiya; Hegde, Shashikanth; Rajesh, Shanker Kashyap; Munaz, Mohamed; Ashwin, Devasya

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Gingival recession is the term used to characterize the apical shift of the marginal gingiva from its normal position on the crown of the tooth. It is frequently observed in adult subjects. The occurrence and severity of the gingival recession present considerable differences between populations. To prevent gingival recession from occurring, it is essential to detect the underlying etiology. The aim of the present study was to determine the occurrence of gingival recession and to identify the most common factor associated with the cause of gingival recession. Methods: A total of 710 subjects aged between 15 years to 60 years were selected. Data were collected by an interview with the help of a proforma and then the dental examination was carried out. The presence of gingival recession was recorded using Miller's classification of gingival recession. The Silness and Loe Plaque Index, Loe and Silness gingival index, community periodontal index were recorded. The data thus obtained were subjected to statistical analysis using Chi-square test and Student's unpaired t-test. Results: Of 710 subjects examined, 291 (40.98%) subjects exhibited gingival recession. The frequency of gingival recession was found to increase with age. High frequency of gingival recession was seen in males (60.5%) compared to females (39.5%). Gingival recession was commonly seen in mandibular incisors (43.0%). Miller's class I gingival recession was more commonly seen. The most common cause for gingival recession was dental plaque accumulation (44.1%) followed by faulty toothbrushing (42.7%). Conclusion: Approximately half of the subjects examined exhibited gingival recession. The etiology of gingival recession is multifactorial, and its appearance is always the result of more than one factor acting together. PMID:26941519

  1. Comparative Evaluation of Gingival Depigmentation using Tetrafluoroethane Cryosurgery and Gingival Abrasion Technique: Two Years Follow Up

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Santhosh; Bhat, G. Subraya; Bhat, K. Mahalinga

    2013-01-01

    Objective: A comparative evaluation of the gingival depigmentation by using Tetrafluoroethane cryosurgery and the gingival abrasion technique – 2 years of follow up. Material and Methods: Ten systemically healthy patients who were aged 18 to 36 years were selected for the study. Tetrafluoroethane was used for the cryosurgical depigmentation and the gingival abrasion technique used a coarse flame shaped bur. The presence or absence of pigmentation was tabulated, based on the GPI (Gingival Pigmentation Index). For the statistical analysis, Freidman’s test was used. Results: The keratinization was completed within a week after the application of the cryogen and about 10 days after the gingival abrasion technique was done. The statistical analysis which was done after 90th, 180th days and 2 years. The p-value which was obtained (p<.001) showed the superiority of cryosurgery over the gingival abrasion. During the follow up period, no side effects were seen for both the techniques and the improved aesthetics was maintained upto 2 years. Conclusion: The use of cryogen Tetrafluoroethane is easy, practical and inexpensive as compared to gingival abrasion, due to its high rate of recurrence. Hence, it is more acceptable to the patients and the operator. Further studies are needed to assess the long term effectiveness of the cryosurgical method of depigmentation. PMID:23543863

  2. Estimation of Levels of Salivary Mucin, Amylase and Total Protein in Gingivitis and Chronic Periodontitis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Bhandary, Rahul; Thomas, Biju; Kumari, Suchetha

    2014-01-01

    Background: Periodontal diseases are a group of inflammatory conditions resulting from interaction between a pathogenic bacterial biofilm and susceptible host’s inflammatory response eventually leading to the destruction of periodontal structures and subsequent tooth loss. Hence, investigation of salivary proteins in individuals with periodontal diseases may be useful to enhance the knowledge of their roles in these diseases. Materials and Methods: This case-control study was conducted at A.B. Shetty Memorial Institute of Dental Sciences, Mangalore. The study comprised of 90 patients of age between 25-60 years who were clinically examined and divided into three groups of 30 each: namely clinically healthy, gingivitis and chronic periodontitis. These were classified according to the values of gingival index score, clinical attachment loss and probing pocket depth. Unstimulated saliva was collected and salivary mucin, amylase and total protein levels were determined. Statistical analysis: Results obtained were tabulated and statistically analyzed using ANOVA test and Karl pearson’s correlation test. Results: The results of the study showed an increased concentration of salivary mucin, amylase and total protein in gingivitis patients and increased levels of amylase and total protein in saliva of chronic periodontitis patients compared to healthy individuals which were statistically significant. A decrease in mucin concentration was observed in the periodontitis group compared to gingivitis group. A positive correlation was present between salivary mucin, amylase and total protein levels in the three groups. Conclusion: Salivary mucin, amylase and total protein may serve as an important biochemical parameter of inflammation of the periodontium. Also, it can be hypothesized that various enzyme inhibitors might be useful as a part of host modulation therapy in the treatment of periodontal diseases. PMID:25478449

  3. Angiotensin II Levels in Gingival Tissues from Healthy Individuals, Patients with Nifedipine Induced Gingival Overgrowth and Non Responders on Nifedipine

    PubMed Central

    Balaji, Anitha; Balaji, Thodur Madapusi

    2015-01-01

    Context The Renin Angiotensin system has been implicated in the pathogenesis of Drug Induced Gingival Overgrowth (DIGO), a fibrotic condition, caused by Phenytoin, Nifedipine and Cyclosporine. Aim This study quantified Angiotensin II levels in gingival tissue samples obtained from healthy individuals, patients on Nifedipine manifesting/not manifesting drug induced gingival overgrowth. Materials and Methods Gingival tissue samples were obtained from healthy individuals (n=24), patients on nifidipine manifesting gingival overgrowth (n= 18) and patients on nifidipine not manifesting gingival overgrowth (n=8). Angiotensin II levels were estimated in the samples using a commercially available ELISA kit. Results Angiotensin II levels were significantly elevated in patients on Nifedipine manifesting gingival overgrowth compared to the other 2 groups (p<0.01). Conclusion The results of the study give an insight into the role played by Angiotensin II in the pathogenesis of drug induced gingival overgrowth. PMID:26436057

  4. 21 CFR 872.1500 - Gingival fluid measurer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Gingival fluid measurer. 872.1500 Section 872.1500...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 872.1500 Gingival fluid measurer. (a) Identification. A gingival fluid measurer is a gauge device intended to measure the amount of fluid in the...

  5. 21 CFR 872.1500 - Gingival fluid measurer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Gingival fluid measurer. 872.1500 Section 872.1500...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 872.1500 Gingival fluid measurer. (a) Identification. A gingival fluid measurer is a gauge device intended to measure the amount of fluid in the...

  6. 21 CFR 872.1500 - Gingival fluid measurer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Gingival fluid measurer. 872.1500 Section 872.1500...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 872.1500 Gingival fluid measurer. (a) Identification. A gingival fluid measurer is a gauge device intended to measure the amount of fluid in the...

  7. 21 CFR 872.1500 - Gingival fluid measurer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Gingival fluid measurer. 872.1500 Section 872.1500...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 872.1500 Gingival fluid measurer. (a) Identification. A gingival fluid measurer is a gauge device intended to measure the amount of fluid in the...

  8. Pseudoangiomatous stromal hyperplasia causing massive breast enlargement.

    PubMed

    Bourke, Anita Geraldine; Tiang, Stephen; Harvey, Nathan; McClure, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Pseudoangiomatous stromal hyperplasia (PASH) of the breast is a benign mesenchymal proliferative process, initially described by Vuitch et al. We report an unusual case of a 46-year-old woman who presented with a 6-week history of bilateral massive, asymmetrical, painful enlargement of her breasts, without a history of trauma. On clinical examination, both breasts were markedly enlarged and oedematous, but there were no discrete palpable masses. Preoperative image-guided core biopsies and surgery showed PASH. PASH is increasingly recognised as an incidental finding on image-guided core biopsy performed for screen detected lesions. There are a few reported cases of PASH presenting as rapid breast enlargement. In our case, the patient presented with painful, asymmetrical, massive breast enlargement. Awareness needs to be raised of this entity as a differential diagnosis in massive, painful breast enlargement. PMID:26475873

  9. Biophysics of Biofilm Infection

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Philip S.

    2014-01-01

    This article examines a likely basis of the tenacity of biofilm infections that has received relatively little attention: the resistance of biofilms to mechanical clearance. One way that a biofilm infection persists is by withstanding the flow of fluid or other mechanical forces that work to wash or sweep microorganisms out of the body. The fundamental criterion for mechanical persistence is that the biofilm failure strength exceeds the external applied stress. Mechanical failure of the biofilm and release of planktonic microbial cells is also important in vivo because it can result in dissemination of infection. The fundamental criterion for detachment and dissemination is that the applied stress exceeds the biofilm failure strength. The apparent contradiction for a biofilm to both persist and disseminate is resolved by recognizing that biofilm material properties are inherently heterogeneous. There are also mechanical aspects to the ways that infectious biofilms evade leukocyte phagocytosis. The possibility of alternative therapies for treating biofilm infections that work by reducing biofilm cohesion could: 1) allow prevailing hydrodynamic shear to remove biofilm, 2) increase the efficacy of designed interventions for removing biofilms, 3) enable phagocytic engulfment of softened biofilm aggregates, and 4) improve phagocyte mobility and access to biofilm. PMID:24376149

  10. Biophysics of biofilm infection.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Philip S

    2014-04-01

    This article examines a likely basis of the tenacity of biofilm infections that has received relatively little attention: the resistance of biofilms to mechanical clearance. One way that a biofilm infection persists is by withstanding the flow of fluid or other mechanical forces that work to wash or sweep microorganisms out of the body. The fundamental criterion for mechanical persistence is that the biofilm failure strength exceeds the external applied stress. Mechanical failure of the biofilm and release of planktonic microbial cells is also important in vivo because it can result in dissemination of infection. The fundamental criterion for detachment and dissemination is that the applied stress exceeds the biofilm failure strength. The apparent contradiction for a biofilm to both persist and disseminate is resolved by recognizing that biofilm material properties are inherently heterogeneous. There are also mechanical aspects to the ways that infectious biofilms evade leukocyte phagocytosis. The possibility of alternative therapies for treating biofilm infections that work by reducing biofilm cohesion could (1) allow prevailing hydrodynamic shear to remove biofilm, (2) increase the efficacy of designed interventions for removing biofilms, (3) enable phagocytic engulfment of softened biofilm aggregates, and (4) improve phagocyte mobility and access to biofilm. PMID:24376149

  11. Spontaneous improvement of gingival recession after correction of tooth positioning.

    PubMed

    Machado, Andre Wilson; MacGinnis, Matthew; Damis, Lucio; Moon, Won

    2014-06-01

    A 30-year-old woman sought treatment for malpositioned mandibular incisors; the roots were positioned outside the alveolar bone, related to severe localized gingival recession. She had been previously treated orthodontically and subsequently underwent 2 gingival grafts. The new treatment included torquing the roots back within the alveolar bone and referral to a periodontist for a gingival graft. In this clinical report, the possible spontaneous improvement of gingival recession is discussed. A hypothesis described in the literature is called the "creeping attachment" phenomenon. The literature includes conflicting reports about the cause-and-effect relationship between orthodontics and gingival recession. This clinical example reports spontaneous improvement of gingival recession after correction of tooth positioning in the alveolar bone. A gingival graft can be performed after adequate root positioning in the alveolar bone housing, thus increasing the chance of achieving more favorable results. PMID:24880854

  12. Susceptibility to gingivitis: a way to predict periodontal disease?

    PubMed

    Trombelli, Leonardo

    2004-01-01

    Clinical studies suggest that gingival inflammatory response to plaque accumulation may vary between individuals. Evidence seems to indicate that there is an association between susceptibility to gingivitis and susceptibility to periodontitis. Recently, among participants in a large scale experimental gingivitis trial, we were able to identify and characterize subjects that differ significantly in their gingival inflammatory response to plaque accumulation. Research efforts are being focused on the effect of genetic, anatomic and environmental host-related factors which may be implicated in the pathogenesis of the gingival inflammatory process, and whether susceptibility to periodontitis and susceptibility to gingivitis may partly share common risk factors. In this respect, it is possible that identification of factors related to increased susceptibility to gingivitis may help identify, at an early age, subjects at risk of periodontitis. PMID:15646584

  13. The relation of gingival thickness to dynamics of gingival margin position pre- and post-surgically

    PubMed Central

    Vandana, Kharidhi Laxman; Gupta, Ira

    2016-01-01

    Background: To evaluate the gingival margin position (GMP) before and after open flap debridement in different gingival thickness (GT). Materials and Methods: Twenty-seven healthy patients with moderate to advanced adult periodontitis were included in a randomized control clinical trial. A calibrated UNC-15 periodontal probe, an occlusal onlay stent was used for clinical measurements recorded at baseline, 3 month, 6 month, and 16 month. The changes in the GMP were studied at midbuccal (Mi-B), mesiobuccal (MB), and distobuccal sites. GT was measured presurgically, transgingivally at Mi-B and interdental sites, divided into 2 groups: Group 1 (thin) and Group 2 (thick). Results: In GT of ≤1 mm group, the statistically significant apical shift of GMP led to gingival recession at all study sites in the early postsurgical period of 1 and 3 months. During 6 and 16 months, the apical shift of GMP coincided with the Chernihiv Airport at Mi-B site (6 months), MB site (16 months). The gingival recession was obvious at Mi-B sites (16 months). In the GT of >1 mm, the statistically significant apical shift of GMP did not cause gingival recession at any sites throughout postsurgical (1, 3, 6, and 16 months) period. Conclusion: Thin gingiva showed apical shift of GMP leading to gingival recession as compared to thick gingiva postsurgically. PMID:27143829

  14. Enlarged facial pores: an update on treatments.

    PubMed

    Dong, Joanna; Lanoue, Julien; Goldenberg, Gary

    2016-07-01

    Enlarged facial pores remain a common dermatologic and cosmetic concern from acne and rosacea, among other conditions, that is difficult to treat due to the multifactorial nature of their pathogenesis and negative impact on patients' quality of life. Enlarged facial pores are primarily treated through addressing associative factors, such as increased sebum production and cutaneous aging. We review the current treatment modalities for enlarged or dense facial pores, including topical retinoids, chemical peels, oral antiandrogens, and lasers and devices, with a focus on newer therapies. PMID:27529707

  15. Aloe vera: It's effect on gingivitis

    PubMed Central

    Ajmera, Neha; Chatterjee, Anirban; Goyal, Vikas

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Aloe vera is the oldest medicinal plant that has maintained its popularity over the course of time. It is widely known for its medicinal uses in wound healing, as an analgesic, and for its anti-inflammatory properties. Aim: The aim of this study is to evaluate the anti-inflammatory property of aloe vera mouthwash on plaque-induced gingivitis. Materials and Methods: Forty-five patients who were diagnosed with plaque-induced gingivitis were included in the study. They were divided into three groups with fifteen patients in each group. Group 1 was asked to rinse with 10 ml of aloe vera mouthwash twice daily for three months. Group 2 were treated with scaling only. Group 3 patients were asked to rinse with aloe vera mouthwash and scaling was done. The clinical changes were evaluated with Loe and Silness gingival index (1963) and Muhlemann and Son's Sulcus bleeding index (1971) at baseline, after one month and three months, respectively. Results: The data obtained was compared statistically. The paired ‘t’ test was done for intragroup comparison and one-way analysis of variance with a post hoc Tukey test was used for intergroup comparison. The data was obtained at the baseline, end of first month, and end of the third month. The result suggested reduction in gingival inflammation in all the three groups, but it was more in the aloe vera mouthwash and scaling group. Hence, it was concluded that aloe vera had a significant anti-inflammatory property. Thus, it can be used as an adjunct to mechanical therapy for treating plaque-induced gingivitis. PMID:24174720

  16. Effects of a triclosan dentifrice on plaque formation, gingivitis and gingival bleeding in pregnant women: five-month clinical results.

    PubMed

    Kraivaphan, P; Amornchat, C; Triratana, T

    2007-05-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effects of a triclosan/copolymer dentifrice on plaque formation, gingivitis and gingival bleeding in pregnant subjects. This double-blind clinical study was carried out in 180 women at 3 months of pregnancy. The subjects were stratified into two balanced groups according to their baseline plaque, gingivitis and bleeding scores. Subjects received a thorough dental prophylaxis and were assigned to brush with either a placebo or triclosan dentifrice for five months. They were instructed to brush their teeth as they normally would, twice a day for one minute per brushing. Follow-up examinations after five months of dentifrice use evaluated supragingival plaque, gingivitis and gingival bleeding. After five months, the triclosan dentifrice significantly reduced plaque formation, gingivitis and gingival bleeding by 40.5%, 22.5% and 35.3%, respectively, compared to the placebo group (p<0.05). PMID:17877239

  17. Genetics Home Reference: enlarged parietal foramina

    MedlinePlus

    ... parietal foramina is an inherited condition of impaired skull development. It is characterized by enlarged openings (foramina) ... that form the top and sides of the skull. This condition is due to incomplete bone formation ( ...

  18. Effect of estradiol on planktonic growth, coaggregation, and biofilm formation of the Prevotella intermedia group bacteria.

    PubMed

    Fteita, Dareen; Könönen, Eija; Söderling, Eva; Gürsoy, Ulvi Kahraman

    2014-06-01

    Alterations in the quantity and quality of biofilms at gingival margin are considered to play a role in the initiation and development of pregnancy-related gingivitis. Prevotella intermedia sensu lato is able to consume estradiol, the major sex hormone secreted during pregnancy, in the absence of vitamin K. The aim of the study was to examine the effect of estradiol on the planktonic growth, coaggregation, polysaccharide production, and biofilm formation of the P. intermedia group bacteria, namely P. intermedia, Prevotella nigrescens, and Prevotella pallens. In all experiments, the type strain (ATCC) and a clinical strain (AHN) of P. intermedia, P. nigrescens, and P. pallens were incubated with the concentrations of 0, 30, 90, and 120 nmol/L of estradiol. Planktonic growth was assessed by means of the colony forming unit method, while coaggregation and biofilm formation were assessed by spectrophotometric methods. In the determination of protein and polysaccharide levels, the Bradford and phenol-sulfuric acid methods were used, respectively. P. pallens AHN 9283 and P. nigrescens ATCC 33563 increased their numbers at planktonic stage with increasing estradiol concentrations. In 48-h biofilm tests, elevated protein levels were found for both strains of P. intermedia, and the strains P. nigrescens ATCC 33563 and P. pallens AHN 9283 in the presence of estradiol. The P. intermedia strains also increased the levels of polysaccharide formation in the biofilm. Coaggregation of the P. intermedia group organisms with Fusobacterium nucleatum was enhanced only in P. intermedia AHN 8290. In conclusion, our in vitro experiments indicate that estradiol regulates planktonic growth, coaggregation, polysaccharide production, and biofilm formation characteristics of P. intermedia, P. nigrescens, and P. pallens differently. These results may, at least partly, explain the differences seen in their contribution to the pathogenesis of pregnancy-related gingivitis. PMID

  19. Non-focal enlargement in pancreatic carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Wittenberg, J.; Simeone, J.F.; Ferrucci, J.T. Jr.; Mueller, P.R.; van Sonnenberg, E.; Neff, C.C.

    1982-07-01

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma can appear radiographically as enlargement of the major part of the pancreas. In this series, part or all of three or more pancreatic segments (head, neck, body, and tail) were involved in 27% of patients with adenocarcinoma who had computed tomography. Differentiation from pure pancreatitis may require additional radiographic studies. The varied tissue composition of a pancreas enlarged by adenocarcinoma will often require biopsy of multiple sites for confirmation.

  20. Lactoferrin in Gingival Crevicular Fluid and Peripheral Blood during Experimental Gingivitis

    PubMed Central

    Ozdemir, Burcu; Ozcan, Gonen; Karaduman, Burcu; Teoman, Asli Idil; Ayhan, Eylem; Ozer, Nazmi; Us, Durdal

    2009-01-01

    Objectives Lactoferrin (LF) is an iron binding protein and stored in the specific granules of granulocytes. It is released by degranulation following granulocyte activation. A positive correlation was previously reported between periodontitis and LF titers of gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) and blood. The purpose of this study was to examine alterations of GCF and blood levels of LF (LF-GCF and LF-BL, respectively), employing the experimental gingivitis model. Methods Twelve systemically healthy volunteers, aged 19–21, were selected. Pre-experimental phase of hygiene was followed by a 14-day experimental gingivitis phase in which subjects refrained from all oral hygiene procedures. After that subjects resumed optimal plaque control for 21 days of recovery period. At days 0 (baseline), 14 and 35 gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) and blood samples were collected and plaque index (PI), gingival index (GI), bleeding on probing (BOP) and probing pocket depth scores were recorded. LF levels were measured with commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kit. Results PI, GI, BOP and LF-GCF increased significantly after 14 days of experimental gingivitis period and decreased significantly after reinstitution of oral hygiene measures (P<.05). LF-BL appeared to follow the same pattern. Significant negative correlation was detected between the level of LF-BL and BOP at day 14 (P<.05), whereas significant positive correlation was noticed between LF-BL and clinical scores PI, GI and BOP at day 35 (P<.05). Conclusions LF-BL followed the same pattern with LF-GCF and clinical scores during the experimental gingivitis and recovery periods, although alterations of the LF-BL appeared statistically insignificant. PMID:19262727

  1. Biofilms: A microbial home

    PubMed Central

    Chandki, Rita; Banthia, Priyank; Banthia, Ruchi

    2011-01-01

    Microbial biofilms are mainly implicated in etiopathogenesis of caries and periodontal disease. Owing to its properties, these pose great challenges. Continuous and regular disruption of these biofilms is imperative for prevention and management of oral diseases. This essay provides a detailed insight into properties, mechanisms of etiopathogenesis, detection and removal of these microbial biofilms. PMID:21976832

  2. Distribution of smile line, gingival angle and tooth shape among the Saudi Arabian subpopulation and their association with gingival biotype

    PubMed Central

    AlQahtani, Nabeeh A.; Haralur, Satheesh B.; AlMaqbol, Mohammad; AlMufarrij, Ali Jubran; Al Dera, Ahmed Ali; Al-Qarni, Mohammed

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the occurrence of smile line and maxillary tooth shape in the Saudi Arabian subpopulation, and to estimate the association between these parameters with gingival biotype. Materials and Methods: On the fulfillment of selection criteria, total 315 patients belong to Saudi Arabian ethnic group were randomly selected. Two frontal photographs of the patients were acquired. The tooth morphology, gingival angle, and smile line classification were determined with ImageJ image analyzing software. The gingival biotype was assessed by probe transparency method. The obtained data were analyzed with SPSS 19 (IBM Corporation, New York, USA) software to determine the frequency and association between other parameters and gingival biotype. Results: Among the clinical parameters evaluated, the tapering tooth morphology (56.8%), thick gingival biotype (53%), and average smile line (57.5%) was more prevalent. The statistically significant association was found between thick gingival biotype and the square tooth, high smile line. The high gingival angle was associated with thin gingival biotype. Conclusions: The study results indicate the existence of an association between tooth shape, smile line, and gingival angle with gingival biotype. PMID:27195228

  3. Treatment of gingival recession using free gingival graft with fibrin fibronectin sealing system: A novel approach.

    PubMed

    Srinivas, B V V; Rupa, N; Halini Kumari, K V; Rajender, A; Reddy, M Narendra

    2015-08-01

    Periodontal plastic surgery is the branch of periodontology that is focused mainly on the correction or elimination of mucogingival problems associated with lack of attached gingiva, a shallow vestibule and aberrant frenum. Various mucogingival surgical procedures are used to halt the progression of the gingival recession and to correct poor esthetic appearance. Free gingival autograft is one of the most common techniques used for a gingival recession in areas of inadequate attached gingiva in the mandibular anterior region. Fibrin sealants are human plasma derivatives that mimic the final stages of blood coagulation, forming a fibrin clot. Fibrin Sealants enhances the overall outcome of surgical intervention because of their hemostatic, adhesive, and healing properties. These properties of fibrin sealants may reduce operating time, prevent complications, and enhance the overall outcome of many surgical interventions. Hence, this case report aims to investigate the clinical effectiveness of free gingival graft along with the commercially available fibrin-fibronectin sealing system (Tissucol(®)) in the treatment of Miller's class II gingival recession. PMID:26538956

  4. Primary Gingival Melanoma: An Important Entity.

    PubMed

    Ben Kridis, Wala; Feki, Jihène; Ayedi, Lobna; Khanfir, Afef; Toumi, Nabil; Abdelmoula, Mohamed; Boudawra, Tahia; Daoud, Jamel; Frikha, Mounir

    2016-07-01

    Primary melanoma of the mandibular gingiva is extremely rare. It is often misinterpreted as a benign pigmented process. The prognosis of this entity is very poor. We report here the first case of primary gingival melanoma described in the Tunisian literature about a 55-year-old smoker having cerebral and pulmonary metastases from gingival melanoma at diagnosis. Our patient underwent brain radiotherapy at a dose of 18 Gy in three sessions but he died with a decline of 3 months before starting systemic therapy. Therefore, each new case should be illustrated to make clinicians aware about the importance of the early diagnosis to improve the poor diagnosis of this entity. PMID:27408455

  5. Chronic Inflammatory Gingival Overgrowths: Laser Gingivectomy & Gingivoplasty

    PubMed Central

    Shankar, B Shiva; T, Ramadevi; S, Neetha M; Reddy, P Sunil Kumar; Saritha, G; Reddy, J Muralinath

    2013-01-01

    It is quite common to note chronic inflammatory Gingival overgrowths during and/or post orthodontic treatment. Sometimes the overgrowths may even potentially complicate and/or interrupt orthodontic treatment. With the introduction of soft tissue lasers these problems can now be addressed more easily. Amongst many LASERS now available in Dentistry DIODE LASERS seem to be most ideal for orthodontic soft tissue applications. As newer treatments herald into minimally invasive techniques, DIODE LASERS are becoming more promising both in patient satisfaction and dentist satisfaction. How to cite this article: Shankar BS, Ramadevi T, Neetha M S, Reddy P S K, Saritha G, Reddy J M. Chronic Inflammatory Gingival Overgrowths: Laser Gingivectomy & Gingivoplasty. J Int Oral Health 2013; 5(1):83-87. PMID:24155582

  6. Gingival salivary gland choristoma. Report of a case.

    PubMed

    Moskow, B S; Baden, E

    1986-08-01

    A unique example of a gingival salivary gland choristoma together with a gingival cyst is described in a human autopsy specimen of periodontal tissues. A choristoma is a tumor-like growth which is derived from primordial cells which have been displaced from their original tissue or organ. Only 6 other examples of the gingival salivary gland choristoma have been described in the world literature. PMID:3463576

  7. My secret life (in the gingival crevice).

    PubMed

    Rossomando, E F

    1996-09-01

    This paper describes my attempt to develop a new technology for sampling the contents of the gingival crevice. Following a brief introduction on the potential of the gingival crevice as a prognosticator of periodontal health, the problems associated with attempting to fulfill this potential are discussed. These problems include difficulties in identifying a crevice component or property that was correlated with disease, the shortcomings of the paper strip method used for sampling from the crevice, and finally difficulties in defining periodontal disease and finding clinical parameters useful for correlation with biochemical studies. A new technology for sampling the contents of the gingival crevice is described. This technology is based on immunomagnetic capture in which antibody coated magnetic microspheres are introduced into the sulcus. Following the capture of antigens, the microspheres are removed and the amount of antigen quantified by immunochemical assays. This paper describes attempts to develop this technology into a commercial product and includes experiences with raising capital and marketing the discovery. A brief discussion of the role of the scientific community, the practicing dentist and insurance coverage to the technology transfer process is included. Finally, some suggestions for improving the technology transfer process are included. PMID:8931248

  8. Gingival Tissue Transcriptomes Identify Distinct Periodontitis Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Kebschull, M.; Demmer, R.T.; Grün, B.; Guarnieri, P.; Pavlidis, P.; Papapanou, P.N.

    2014-01-01

    The currently recognized principal forms of periodontitis—chronic and aggressive—lack an unequivocal, pathobiology-based foundation. We explored whether gingival tissue transcriptomes can serve as the basis for an alternative classification of periodontitis. We used cross-sectional whole-genome gene expression data from 241 gingival tissue biopsies obtained from sites with periodontal pathology in 120 systemically healthy nonsmokers with periodontitis, with available data on clinical periodontal status, subgingival microbial profiles, and serum IgG antibodies to periodontal microbiota. Adjusted model-based clustering of transcriptomic data using finite mixtures generated two distinct clusters of patients that did not align with the current classification of chronic and aggressive periodontitis. Differential expression profiles primarily related to cell proliferation in cluster 1 and to lymphocyte activation and unfolded protein responses in cluster 2. Patients in the two clusters did not differ with respect to age but presented with distinct phenotypes (statistically significantly different whole-mouth clinical measures of extent/severity, subgingival microbial burden by several species, and selected serum antibody responses). Patients in cluster 2 showed more extensive/severe disease and were more often male. The findings suggest that distinct gene expression signatures in pathologic gingival tissues translate into phenotypic differences and can provide a basis for a novel classification. PMID:24646639

  9. Biofilm Matrix Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Fong, Jiunn N. C.; Yildiz, Fitnat H.

    2015-01-01

    Proteinaceous components of the biofilm matrix include secreted extracellular proteins, cell surface adhesins and protein subunits of cell appendages such as flagella and pili. Biofilm matrix proteins play diverse roles in biofilm formation and dissolution. They are involved in attaching cells to surfaces, stabilizing the biofilm matrix via interactions with exopolysaccharide and nucleic acid components, developing three-dimensional biofilm architectures, and dissolving biofilm matrix via enzymatic degradation of polysaccharides, proteins, and nucleic acids. In this chapter, we will review functions of matrix proteins in a selected set of microorganisms, studies of the matrix proteomes of Vibrio cholerae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and roles of outer membrane vesicles and of nucleoid-binding proteins in biofilm formation. PMID:26104709

  10. Bifidobacteria inhibit the growth of Porphyromonas gingivalis but not of Streptococcus mutans in an in vitro biofilm model.

    PubMed

    Jäsberg, Heli; Söderling, Eva; Endo, Akihito; Beighton, David; Haukioja, Anna

    2016-06-01

    There is growing interest in the use of probiotic bifidobacteria for enhancement of the therapy, and in the prevention, of oral microbial diseases. However, the results of clinical studies assessing the effects of bifidobacteria on the oral microbiota are controversial, and the mechanisms of actions of probiotics in the oral cavity remain largely unknown. In addition, very little is known about the role of commensal bifidobacteria in oral health. Our aim was to study the integration of the probiotic Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis Bb12 and of oral Bifidobacterium dentium and Bifidobacterium longum isolates in supragingival and subgingival biofilm models and their effects on other bacteria in biofilms in vitro using two different in vitro biofilms and agar-overlay assays. All bifidobacteria integrated well into the subgingival biofilms composed of Porphyromonas gingivalis, Actinomyces naeslundii, and Fusobacterium nucleatum and decreased significantly only the number of P. gingivalis in the biofilms. The integration of bifidobacteria into the supragingival biofilms containing Streptococcus mutans and A. naeslundii was less efficient, and bifidobacteria did not affect the number of S. mutans in biofilms. Therefore, our results suggest that bifidobacteria may have a positive effect on subgingival biofilm and thereby potential in enhancing gingival health; however, their effect on supragingival biofilm may be limited. PMID:27061393

  11. Establishing gingival symmetry when placing anterior direct nanohybrid composite restorations.

    PubMed

    Hollar, Susan

    2013-01-01

    Restoring the beauty of patients' smiles requires clinicians to incorporate both tooth and gingival esthetics. When gingivectomies and crown-lengthening procedures are required, opting for direct nanohybrid composite restorations can help enable dentists to achieve harmonious blending of the gingival architecture and the anticipated restoration by allowing for tissue healing and subsequent modifications to the gingival portions of restorations. This article presents two cases in which anterior nanohybrid direct composite restorations provided a means to enhance tooth esthetics simultaneous to improving gingival harmony. PMID:24568218

  12. Gingival Recession: Review and Strategies in Treatment of Recession

    PubMed Central

    Pradeep, Koppolu; Rajababu, Palaparthy; Satyanarayana, Durvasula; Sagar, Vidya

    2012-01-01

    One of the most common esthetic concerns associated with the periodontal tissues is gingival recession. Gingival recession is the exposure of root surfaces due to apical migration of the gingival tissue margins; gingival margin migrates apical to the cementoenamel junction. Although it rarely results in tooth loss, marginal tissue recession is associated with thermal and tactile sensitivity, esthetic complaints, and a tendency toward root caries. This paper reviews etiology, consequences, and the available surgical procedures for the coverage of exposed root surfaces, including three case reports. PMID:23082256

  13. Characterization of the human immune cell network at the gingival barrier

    PubMed Central

    Greenwell-Wild, Teresa; Moutsopoulos, Niki M.

    2015-01-01

    The oral mucosa is a barrier site constantly exposed to rich and diverse commensal microbial communities, yet little is known of the immune cell network maintaining immune homeostasis at this interface. We have performed a detailed characterization of the immune cell subsets of the oral cavity in a large cohort of healthy subjects. We focused our characterization on the gingival interface, a particularly vulnerable mucosal site, with thin epithelial lining and constant exposure to the tooth adherent biofilm. In health, we find a predominance of T cells, minimal B cells, a large presence of granulocytes/neutrophils, a sophisticated network of professional antigen presenting cells (APC) and a small population of innate lymphoid cells (ILC) policing the gingival barrier. We further characterize cellular subtypes in health and interrogate shifts in immune cell populations in the common oral inflammatory disease periodontitis. In disease we document an increase in neutrophils and an up regulation of IL-17 responses. We identify the main source of IL-17 in health and periodontitis within the CD4+ T cell compartment. Collectively our studies provide a first view of the landscape of physiologic oral immunity and serve as a baseline for the characterization of local immunopathology. PMID:26732676

  14. Quercitrin-nanocoated titanium surfaces favour gingival cells against oral bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Gomez-Florit, Manuel; Pacha-Olivenza, Miguel A.; Fernández-Calderón, Maria C.; Córdoba, Alba; González-Martín, Maria L.; Monjo, Marta; Ramis, Joana M.

    2016-01-01

    Many dental implants fail due to the infection and inflammation that walk hand in hand with poor healing and soft tissue integration. Titanium surfaces were nanocoated with quercitrin, a natural flavonoid, with the aim to improve soft tissue integration and increase dental implants success. Streptococcus mutans attachment and biofilm formation was analysed. Then, the anti-inflammatory properties and the potential of quercitrin-nanocoated surfaces to boost soft tissue regeneration were tested using human gingival fibroblasts. An inflammatory situation was mimicked using interleulin-1-beta. We found that quercitrin-nanocoated surfaces decreased initial bacterial adhesion while increasing human gingival fibroblasts attachment. Furthermore, quercitrin-nanocoated Ti increased collagen mRNA levels and decreased matrix metalloproteinase-1/tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinanse-1 mRNA ratio, which is related to a reduced metalloproteinase-mediated collagen degradation, while also decreasing the pro-inflammatory prostaglandin E2 release under basal and inflammatory conditions. These results suggest that quercitrin-nanocoated surfaces could enhance the soft tissue integration and increase dental implants success. PMID:26925553

  15. Characterization of the human immune cell network at the gingival barrier.

    PubMed

    Dutzan, N; Konkel, J E; Greenwell-Wild, T; Moutsopoulos, N M

    2016-09-01

    The oral mucosa is a barrier site constantly exposed to rich and diverse commensal microbial communities, yet little is known of the immune cell network maintaining immune homeostasis at this interface. We have performed a detailed characterization of the immune cell subsets of the oral cavity in a large cohort of healthy subjects. We focused our characterization on the gingival interface, a particularly vulnerable mucosal site, with thin epithelial lining and constant exposure to the tooth adherent biofilm. In health, we find a predominance of T cells, minimal B cells, a large presence of granulocytes/neutrophils, a sophisticated network of professional antigen-presenting cells (APCs), and a small population of innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) policing the gingival barrier. We further characterize cellular subtypes in health and interrogate shifts in immune cell populations in the common oral inflammatory disease periodontitis. In disease, we document an increase in neutrophils and an upregulation of interleukin-17 (IL-17) responses. We identify the main source of IL-17 in health and Periodontitis within the CD4(+) T-cell compartment. Collectively, our studies provide a first view of the landscape of physiologic oral immunity and serve as a baseline for the characterization of local immunopathology. PMID:26732676

  16. Photodynamic inactivation of biofilm: taking a lightly colored approach to stubborn infection

    PubMed Central

    de Melo, Wanessa CMA; Avci, Pinar; de Oliveira, Milene Nóbrega; Gupta, Asheesh; Vecchio, Daniela; Sadasivam, Magesh; Chandran, Rakkiyappan; Huang, Ying-Ying; Yin, Rui; Perussi, Livia R; Tegos, George P; Perussi, Janice R; Dai, Tianhong; Hamblin, Michael R

    2015-01-01

    Microbial biofilms are responsible for a variety of microbial infections in different parts of the body, such as urinary tract infections, catheter infections, middle-ear infections, gingivitis, caries, periodontitis, orthopedic implants, and so on. The microbial biofilm cells have properties and gene expression patterns distinct from planktonic cells, including phenotypic variations in enzymic activity, cell wall composition and surface structure, which increase the resistance to antibiotics and other antimicrobial treatments. There is consequently an urgent need for new approaches to attack biofilm-associated microorganisms, and antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (aPDT) may be a promising candidate. aPDT involves the combination of a nontoxic dye and low-intensity visible light which, in the presence of oxygen, produces cytotoxic reactive oxygen species. It has been demonstrated that many biofilms are susceptible to aPDT, particularly in dental disease. This review will focus on aspects of aPDT that are designed to increase efficiency against biofilms modalities to enhance penetration of photosensitizer into biofilm, and a combination of aPDT with biofilm-disrupting agents. PMID:23879608

  17. Photodynamic inactivation of biofilm: taking a lightly colored approach to stubborn infection.

    PubMed

    de Melo, Wanessa C M A; Avci, Pinar; de Oliveira, Milene Nóbrega; Gupta, Asheesh; Vecchio, Daniela; Sadasivam, Magesh; Chandran, Rakkiyappan; Huang, Ying-Ying; Yin, Rui; Perussi, Livia R; Tegos, George P; Perussi, Janice R; Dai, Tianhong; Hamblin, Michael R

    2013-07-01

    Microbial biofilms are responsible for a variety of microbial infections in different parts of the body, such as urinary tract infections, catheter infections, middle-ear infections, gingivitis, caries, periodontitis, orthopedic implants, and so on. The microbial biofilm cells have properties and gene expression patterns distinct from planktonic cells, including phenotypic variations in enzymic activity, cell wall composition and surface structure, which increase the resistance to antibiotics and other antimicrobial treatments. There is consequently an urgent need for new approaches to attack biofilm-associated microorganisms, and antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (aPDT) may be a promising candidate. aPDT involves the combination of a nontoxic dye and low-intensity visible light which, in the presence of oxygen, produces cytotoxic reactive oxygen species. It has been demonstrated that many biofilms are susceptible to aPDT, particularly in dental disease. This review will focus on aspects of aPDT that are designed to increase efficiency against biofilms modalities to enhance penetration of photosensitizer into biofilm, and a combination of aPDT with biofilm-disrupting agents. PMID:23879608

  18. Antimicrobial Tolerance in Biofilms.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Philip S

    2015-06-01

    The tolerance of microorganisms in biofilms to antimicrobial agents is examined through a meta-analysis of literature data. A numerical tolerance factor comparing the rates of killing in the planktonic and biofilm states is defined to provide a quantitative basis for the analysis. Tolerance factors for biocides and antibiotics range over three orders of magnitude. This variation is not explained by taking into account the molecular weight of the agent, the chemistry of the agent, the substratum material, or the speciation of the microorganisms. Tolerance factors do depend on the areal cell density of the biofilm at the time of treatment and on the age of the biofilm as grown in a particular experimental system. This suggests that there is something that happens during biofilm maturation, either physical or physiological, that is essential for full biofilm tolerance. Experimental measurements of antimicrobial penetration times in biofilms range over orders of magnitude, with slower penetration (>12 min) observed for reactive oxidants and cationic molecules. These agents are retarded through the interaction of reaction, sorption, and diffusion. The specific physiological status of microbial cells in a biofilm contributes to antimicrobial tolerance. A conceptual framework for categorizing physiological cell states is discussed in the context of antimicrobial susceptibility. It is likely that biofilms harbor cells in multiple states simultaneously (e.g., growing, stress-adapted, dormant, inactive) and that this physiological heterogeneity is an important factor in the tolerance of the biofilm state. PMID:26185072

  19. Antimicrobial Tolerance in Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Philip S.

    2015-01-01

    The tolerance of microorganisms in biofilms to antimicrobial agents is examined through a meta-analysis of literature data. A numerical tolerance factor comparing the rates of killing in the planktonic and biofilm states is defined to provide a quantitative basis for the analysis. Tolerance factors for biocides and antibiotics range over three orders of magnitude. This variation is not explained by taking into account the molecular weight of the agent, the chemistry of the agent, the substratum material, or the speciation of the microorganisms. Tolerance factors do depend on the areal cell density of the biofilm at the time of treatment and on the age of the biofilm as grown in a particular experimental system. This suggests that there is something that happens during biofilm maturation, either physical or physiological, that is essential for full biofilm tolerance. Experimental measurements of antimicrobial penetration times in biofilms range over orders of magnitude, with slower penetration (>12 min) observed for reactive oxidants and cationic molecules. These agents are retarded through the interaction of reaction, sorption, and diffusion. The specific physiological status of microbial cells in a biofilm contributes to antimicrobial tolerance. A conceptual framework for categorizing physiological cell states is discussed in the context of antimicrobial susceptibility. It is likely that biofilms harbor cells in multiple states simultaneously (e.g., growing, stress-adapted, dormant, inactive) and that this physiological heterogeneity is an important factor in the tolerance of the biofilm state. PMID:26185072

  20. Hearts and Flowers: Learning To Enlarge Images.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalil, Judy

    2003-01-01

    Describes a lesson that teaches kindergarten students how to enlarge a smaller drawing onto a bigger piece of paper. Explains that the students create their heart-shape designs using tempera paint and pastels in the larger picture. Includes a list of materials. (CMK)

  1. The Biofilm Community-Rebels with a Cause

    PubMed Central

    Aruni, A. Wilson; Dou, Yuetan; Mishra, Arunima; Fletcher, Hansel M.

    2015-01-01

    Oral Biofilms are one of the most complex and diverse ecosystem developed by successive colonization of more than 600 bacterial taxa. Development starts with the attachment of early colonizers such as Actinomyces species and oral streptococci on the acquired pellicle and tooth enamel. These bacteria not only adhere to tooth surface but also interact with each other and lay foundation for attachment of bridging colonizer such as Fusobacterium nucleatum followed by late colonizers including the red complex species: Porphyromonas gingivalis, Tannerella forsythia and Treponema denticola-the founders of periodontal disease. As the biofilm progresses from supragingival sites to subgingival sites, the environment changes from aerobic to anaerobic thus favoring the growth of mainly Gram-negative obligate anaerobes while restricting the growth of the early Gram-positive facultative aerobes. Microbes present at supragingival level are mainly related to gingivitis and root-caries whereas subgingival species advance the destruction of teeth supporting tissues and thus causing periodontitis. This review summarizes our present understanding and recent developments on the characteristic features of supra- and subgingival biofilms, interaction between different genera and species of bacteria constituting these biofilms and draws our attention to the role of some of the recently discovered members of the oral community. PMID:26120510

  2. Effect of chlorhexidine varnish on gingival growth in orthodontic patients: a randomized prospective split-mouth study

    PubMed Central

    Pretti, Henrique; Barbosa, Gabriella Lopes de Rezende; Lages, Elizabeth Maria Bastos; Gala-García, Alfonso; de Magalhães, Claudia Silami; Moreira, Allyson Nogueira

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Fixed orthodontic appliances patients suffer limitations on the effective control of biofilm by mechanical methods, bringing the need of a coadjutant in the control of inflammation and oral health improvement. Objective: The aim of this prospective split-mouth blind study was to analyze the effect of a 40% chlorhexidine (CHX) varnish on gingival growth of patients with orthodontic fixed appliances. Methods: Healthy teenage patients with fixed orthodontic appliances and increased gingival volume were recruited (n = 30). Each individual was his own control, having in the maxilla one control side and one treatment side. An application of varnishes occurred on the vestibular area of the upper premolars and first molar crowns, on the control side (placebo varnish) and on the experimental side (EC40(r) Biodentic CHX varnish). The varnishes and sides were randomly chosen and its identification and group was kept by a third party observer and it was not revealed to the researchers and participants until the end of study. In order to establish a baseline registration, digital photographs were taken by a trained photographer before varnish application at baseline (T0), as well as 14 days (T14) and 56 days (T56) after the application. The gingival volume was calculated indirectly using the vestibular areas (mm2) of the upper second premolars' clinical crowns by RapidSketch(r) software, at all study times. The data were analyzed using ANOVA and the Turkey-Krammer test. Results: It was observed, in the final sample of 30 individuals, that at T0, the control and treatment groups were similar. At T14 and T56, a progressive reduction of the clinical crown area was seen in the control group, and an increase in the average area was detected in the experimental group (p < 0,05). Conclusions: The use of 40% CHX varnish decreases the gingival overgrowth in patients undergoing orthodontic treatment. Further studies are necessary to set the action time and frequency of

  3. Apoptotic Genes are Differentially Expressed in Aged Gingival Tissue

    PubMed Central

    González, O.A.; Stromberg, A.J.; Huggins, P.M.; Gonzalez-Martinez, J.; Novak, M.J.; Ebersole, J.L.

    2011-01-01

    Cellular and molecular changes of the periodontium associated with a higher prevalence of oral diseases (e.g., chronic periodontitis) in aged populations have received little attention. Since impaired apoptosis during aging appears to be related to chronic inflammatory disorders, we hypothesized that the expression of genes associated with apoptotic processes are altered in aged healthy and periodontitis-affected gingival tissue. Ontology analysis of 88 genes related to apoptotic pathways was performed in gingival biopsies of healthy and periodontitis sites from young, adult, and aged non-human primates (Macaca mulatta), using the GeneChip® Rhesus Macaque Genome Array. Lower expression of anti-apoptotic and higher expression of pro-apoptotic genes were associated with healthy gingival tissue from young compared with aged animals. Few differences in gene expression were observed in healthy gingival tissue between adult and aged animals. Comparison between healthy and periodontitis gingival tissues showed that the up- or down-regulated apoptotic genes in diseased gingival tissue are different in adults compared with aged animals. These results suggest that apoptotic events normally occurring in gingival tissues could be reduced in aging,and unique aspects of apoptotic pathways are potentially involved in the pathophysiology of perio-dontal disease in adult vs. aged gingival tissues. PMID:21471327

  4. Cytolethal Distending Toxin Damages the Oral Epithelium of Gingival Explants

    PubMed Central

    Damek-Poprawa, M.; Haris, M.; Volgina, A.; Korostoff, J.; DiRienzo, J.M.

    2011-01-01

    The cytolethal distending toxin (Cdt), expressed by the periodontal pathogen Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, inhibits the proliferation of cultured epithelial cells by arresting the cell cycle. The gingival epithelium is an early line of defense against microbial assault. When damaged, bacteria collectively gain entry into underlying connective tissue where microbial products can affect infiltrating inflammatory cells, leading to the destruction of the attachment apparatus. Histological evaluation of rat and healthy human gingival tissue exposed ex vivo to the Cdt for 36 and 18 hours, respectively, revealed extensive detachment of the keratinized outer layer and distention of spinous and basal cells in the oral epithelium. Treated human tissue also exhibited disruption of rete pegs and dissolution of cell junctions. Cells in the connective tissue appeared unaffected. Primary gingival epithelial cells, but not gingival fibroblasts, isolated from the same healthy human tissue were cell-cycle-arrested when treated with the toxin. These findings provide new evidence that the Cdt severely damages the oral epithelium, ex vivo, by specifically targeting epithelial cells, in situ. The Cdt shows preferential targeting of the epithelium as opposed to connective tissue in animal and human gingival explant models. Abbreviations: cytolethal distending toxin (Cdt), connective tissue (CT), 4′,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI), human gingival epithelial cells (HGEC), human gingival explants (HGX), human gingival fibroblasts (HGF), junctional epithelium (JE), oral epithelium (OE), rete pegs (RP), sulcular epithelium (SE) PMID:21471326

  5. Staphylococcus aureus biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Archer, Nathan K; Mazaitis, Mark J; Costerton, J William; Leid, Jeff G; Powers, Mary Elizabeth

    2011-01-01

    Increasing attention has been focused on understanding bacterial biofilms and this growth modality's relation to human disease. In this review we explore the genetic regulation and molecular components involved in biofilm formation and maturation in the context of the Gram-positive cocci, Staphylococcus aureus. In addition, we discuss diseases and host immune responses, along with current therapies associated with S. aureus biofilm infections and prevention strategies. PMID:21921685

  6. [Control of generalized chronic periodontitis combined with calcium-antagonist-related gingival overgrowth by a complex periodontal-endodontic-prosthodontic treatment. Case report].

    PubMed

    Szánto, Erika; Gera, István

    2011-12-01

    To day a relatively high percentage of elderly population of the industrialized world suffers with different cardiovascular diseases and are on permanent antihypertensive therapy. One of the most frequently used drugs is the calcium channel blockers prescribed against high blood pressure. The most common oral side effect of these drugs is the gingival enlargement that might develop even on otherwise healthy gingiva. The incidence of chronic periodontitis in this age group is also high and the Ca antagonist medication in those individuals might substantially modify the clinical course of periodontal inflammation leading to gingival enlargement and hypertrophic pocket wall. The case presented here is a 52 years old hypertonic woman with a long history of Ca-antagonist therapy and generalized chronic periodontitis combined with gingival hyperplasia. After the change of medication the 1,5 years comprehensive periodontal endodontic and prosthodontic therapy restored patient's periodontal health and provided complex dental rehabilitation. Nevertheless, only regular periodontal supportive therapy could ensure predictable outcome and guarantee long lasting periodontal health. PMID:22308953

  7. Host Responses to Biofilm.

    PubMed

    Watters, C; Fleming, D; Bishop, D; Rumbaugh, K P

    2016-01-01

    From birth to death the human host immune system interacts with bacterial cells. Biofilms are communities of microbes embedded in matrices composed of extracellular polymeric substance (EPS), and have been implicated in both the healthy microbiome and disease states. The immune system recognizes many different bacterial patterns, molecules, and antigens, but these components can be camouflaged in the biofilm mode of growth. Instead, immune cells come into contact with components of the EPS matrix, a diverse, hydrated mixture of extracellular DNA (bacterial and host), proteins, polysaccharides, and lipids. As bacterial cells transition from planktonic to biofilm-associated they produce small molecules, which can increase inflammation, induce cell death, and even cause necrosis. To survive, invading bacteria must overcome the epithelial barrier, host microbiome, complement, and a variety of leukocytes. If bacteria can evade these initial cell populations they have an increased chance at surviving and causing ongoing disease in the host. Planktonic cells are readily cleared, but biofilms reduce the effectiveness of both polymorphonuclear neutrophils and macrophages. In addition, in the presence of these cells, biofilm formation is actively enhanced, and components of host immune cells are assimilated into the EPS matrix. While pathogenic biofilms contribute to states of chronic inflammation, probiotic Lactobacillus biofilms cause a negligible immune response and, in states of inflammation, exhibit robust antiinflammatory properties. These probiotic biofilms colonize and protect the gut and vagina, and have been implicated in improved healing of damaged skin. Overall, biofilms stimulate a unique immune response that we are only beginning to understand. PMID:27571696

  8. [Biofilms and public health].

    PubMed

    Choisy, Claude

    2011-01-01

    Micro-organisms do not always exist in planctonic forms (single cells or small groups). To survive, especially in limiting media, they may adhere to inert or living surfaces. This enables them to multiply within a community protected by an extracellular matrix, thus forming a biofilm which protects them from antimicrobials. Biofilms have many potential consequences for public health. Some are positive, such as the commensal biofilms that protect against pathogenic bacteria, while environmental biofilms may be a source of outbreaks of respiratory or gastrointestinal diseases or infections associated with implanted medical devices. Respiratory tract infection can be caused by aerosols of fragmented biofilms growing in warm humid conditions (air cooling towers, hot springs, showers, etc.). Digestive tract infection can arise from biofilms formed during food manufacturing or packaging processes. Colonized implanted medical devices can lead to sepsis. This article examines the role of central venous catheters, taking into account the surgical site. In vivo studies show that the source of catheter infection may be exogenous or endogenous, while in vitro studies of biofilms show that ablation of the device is the best solution. Prevention is difficult, as biofilm formation is multifactorial. Physical and biological knowledge of biofilms may help to limit their formation and growth. PMID:22375373

  9. Gingival recession: prevalence and risk indicators among young greek adults

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of the current research was to assess the prevalence of gingival recession and to investigate possible associations among this condition, periodontal and epidemiological variables in a sample of young Greek adults in a general dental practice. Material and Methods: A total of 1,430 young adults was examined clinically and interviewed regarding several periodontal and epidemiological variables. Collected data included demographic variables, oral hygiene habits and smoking status. Clinical examination included the recording of dental plaque, supragingival calculus presence, gingival status and buccal gingival recession. Multivariate logistic regression analysis model was performed to access the possible association between gingival recession and several periodontal and epidemiological variables as potential risk factors. Results: The overall prevalence of gingival recession was 63.9%. The statistical analysis indicated that higher educational level [OR= 2.12, 95% CI= 0.53-8.51], cigarette smoking [OR= 1.97, 95% CI= 1.48-7.91], frequent tooth brushing [OR= 0.98, 95% CI= 0.56-1.96], presence of oral piercing [OR= 0.92, 95% CI= 0.38-1.58], presence of gingival inflammation [OR= 4.54, 95% CI= 1.68-7.16], presence of dental plaque [OR= 1.67, 95% CI= 0.68-2.83] and presence of supragingival calculus [OR=1.34, 95% CI= 0.59-1.88], were the most important associated factors of gingival recession. Conclusions: The observations of the current research supported the results from previous authors that several periodontal factors, educational level and smoking were significantly associated with the presence of gingival recession, while presence of oral piercing was a new factor that was found to be associated with gingival recession. Key words:Gingival recession, prevalence, risk factors, young adults. PMID:25136424

  10. Gingivitis from the Viewpoint of Traditional Persian Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Sedigh-Rahimabadi, Massih; Shams, Mesbah; Fani, Mohammadmehdi; Chijan, Mahsa Rostami

    2016-01-01

    Background: Gingivitis is among the top general health problems in the world, especially in developing countries. Meanwhile, it may be associated with pulmonary and cardiovascular diseases. In a qualitative study, we tried to identify the corresponding terminology to gingivitis in traditional Persian medicine (TPM) and to explain its potential mechanisms, treatments, and prevention characteristics. Methods: In a literature review, 4 modern textbooks and 18 related articles, 2 traditional medical dictionaries and 12 traditional medical and 4 traditional pharmaceutical texts were assessed by a specific method. Initially, traditional scripts were searched for signs and symptoms of gingivitis as well as related keywords such as bleeding, swollen and loosen gum, oral or gingival ulcers, teeth, or gingival pain. Then the disease/s or disorder/s, which matched gingivitis in TPM, was appraised in details. Finally, potential mechanisms, prevention and therapeutic protocols presented by TPM were collated and summarized. Results: “Lasse-e-Dâmiyeh” (bleeding gum) or “Khoon-Reezi az Goosht-e Bon-e Dandân” (bleeding from under teeth flesh) was the main disease comparable to gingivitis. Based on TPM, the leading etiologies are insufficient gum feeding mechanism, pouring and gathering of excessive fluid in the gum and accumulation of excessive blood in it or in the whole body. Although there were remarkable similarities in the subjects of different TPM texts over the centuries, particularly in oral and teeth hygiene and overall approach to gingivitis, we faced notable differences in recipes (herbal drugs) that each text proposed. Conclusion: While there are overlapping terminologies to gingivitis in TPM, “Lasse-e-Dâmiyeh” is the closest disease that relates to it. Meanwhile, adjusting diet and lifestyle, having appropriate oral hygiene, obtaining a vast variety of herbal medications, cupping, phlebotomy, leech therapy, etc. are the different TPM modalities for the

  11. Effect of Periodontal Surgery on Osteoprotegerin Levels in Gingival Crevicular Fluid, Saliva, and Gingival Tissues of Chronic Periodontitis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Sandy H. S.; El-Refai, Mahmoud I.; Ghallab, Noha A.; Kasem, Rehab Fawzy; Shaker, Olfat G.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. This study was undertaken to investigate the OPG profiles in gingival crevicular fluid (GCF), saliva, and gingival tissues of chronic periodontitis (CP) patients in response to open flap debridement (OFD). Subjects and Methods. The study included 30 subjects divided into 2 groups: 20 CP patients and 10 periodontally healthy subjects. Plaque index, gingival index, pocket depth, and clinical attachment level measurements were recorded for all subjects. GCF, salivary, and gingival samples were collected from all 30 subjects at baseline and 3 and 6 month after OFD from the 20 CP patients. GCF and salivary OPG levels were assessed by ELISA assay, while OPG expression in gingival tissues was examined by immunohistochemistry. Results. GCF, salivary and gingival OPG profiles were significantly higher in control subjects compared to CP patients at baseline (P < 0.001). Within CP group, OPG levels in GCF, saliva, and gingival samples showed a significant increase at 3 and 6 months after OFD (P < 0.001) compared to baseline. Although OPG values increased significantly in gingival samples and insignificantly in saliva after 3 months compared to 6 months, yet GCF levels were significantly decreased. Conclusions. OPG might be considered as a diagnostic and prognostic biomarker of periodontal bone destruction. This trial is registered with NCT02160613. PMID:25814780

  12. Evaluation of Toothpaste Containing Aqueous Saffron Stigma Extract on Gingival Indices in Patients with Marginal Generalized Plaque-Induced Gingivitis

    PubMed Central

    Forouzanfar, Ali; Mokhtari, Majid Reza; Kamalinezhad, Mohammad; Babayian, Mohammad; Tavakoli-Kakhki, Mandana; Lotfalizadeh, Mohammad Hasan

    2016-01-01

    Background: Gingivitis is an inflammatory disease involving the gums. Saffron contains various forms of flavonoids, glycosides, and anthocyanin compounds that are proven to have anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects. This study evaluates the anti-inflammatory effects of Saffron stigma on gingival indices in patients with marginal generalized plaque-induced gingivitis. Methods: For this study, we used toothpaste containing aqueous extract of Saffron stigma. Twenty-two patients with generalized marginal gingivitis were selected. Patients were randomly divided into two equal groups of test and placebo. In each group the pocket depth index (PD), gingival index (GI), plaque index (PI) and bleeding of probing index (BOP) were measured before and one month after use. Independent t-test, Mann–Whitney test and Wilcoxon test were used for statistical analysis (P<0.05). Results: The comparison between gingival indices before and one month after toothpaste usage showed a significant decrease in some measured indices at the end of the study. Saffron stigma treated group had a significant difference in reducing GI and BOP indices in comparison with the placebo group (P<0.05). However, the difference for PD and PI indices was not statistically significant (P>0.05). Conclusion: In this study, it was found that using aqueous extract of Saffron stigma flower containing toothpaste might have a positive effect on some gingival indices in patients with gingivitis. PMID:27516664

  13. Successfully use agglomeration for size enlargement

    SciTech Connect

    Pietsch, W.

    1996-04-01

    The processing of fine and ultrafine particles by size enlargement finds an ever increasing application. At the same time, undesirable agglomeration such as buildup, caking, bridging, and uncontrolled aggregation of fine particles can occur during processing and handling of these particulate solids. This article will provide a survey of the phenomena of agglomeration and discuss the unit operation of size enlargement by agglomeration. This article is also an invitation, particularly to young engineers, to become interested in agglomeration. Considering that mechanical process technologies are requiring more energy every year than any other group of consumers and efficiencies are typically in the single digits or teens at best, considerable rewards can be expected from the development of scientifically modified, more energy-efficient methods and equipment.

  14. Enlarging mediastinal/hilar lymphadenopathy with calcification.

    PubMed

    Adachi, Takashi; Nakahata, Masashi; Moritani, Suzuko; Iida, Hiroatsu; Ogawa, Kenji

    2016-02-01

    A 77-year-old man was referred to our hospital due to enlarging mediastinal/hilar lymphadenopathy with calcification. Endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) and bone marrow aspiration were performed. Subsequently, monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) associated with mediastinal amyloidosis was diagnosed. We hereby report a case in which EBUS-TBNA led to a successful diagnosis of amyloidosis. PMID:26862422

  15. Penile enlargement: from medication to surgery.

    PubMed

    Nugteren, Helena M; Balkema, G T; Pascal, A L; Schultz, W C M Weijmar; Nijman, J M; van Driel, M F

    2010-01-01

    Penis lengthening pills, stretch apparatus, vacuum pumps, silicone injections, and lengthening and thickening operations are available for men who worry about their penis size. Surgery is thus far the only proven scientific method for penile enlargement. In this article, we consider patient selection, outcome evaluation, and techniques applied. In our view, sexological counseling and detailed explanation of risks and complications are mandatory before any operative intervention. PMID:20169492

  16. [Characteristics of domestically produced siloxane elastomer for making elastic gingival prosthetic device].

    PubMed

    Riakhovskiĭ, A N; Poiurovskaia, I Ia; Kirillova, E V

    2006-01-01

    Gingival prosthetics effectively eliminates esthetic and phonetic disturbances in cases of pronounced gingival recession. Technology for making elastic gingival prosthetic devices of domestically produced siloxane elastomer composition with microwave siloxane vulcanization is described as well as the technique for making combined gingival prosthetics of siloxane composition and colorless plastic. PMID:16482030

  17. Quantitative characterization of airspace enlargement in emphysema.

    PubMed

    Parameswaran, Harikrishnan; Majumdar, Arnab; Ito, Satoru; Alencar, Adriano M; Suki, Béla

    2006-01-01

    The mean linear intercept (L(m)) can be used to estimate the surface area for gas exchange in the lung. However, in recent years, it is most commonly used as an index for characterizing the enlargement of airspaces in emphysema and the associated severity of structural destruction in the lung. Specifically, an increase in L(m) is thought to result from an increase in airspace sizes. In this paper, we examined how accurately L(m) measures the linear dimensions of airspaces from histological sections and a variety of computer-generated test images. To this end, we developed an automated method for measuring linear intercepts from digitized images of tissue sections and calculate L(m) as their mean. We examined how the shape of airspaces and the variability of their sizes influence L(m) as well as the distribution of linear intercepts. We found that, for a relatively homogeneous enlargement of airspaces, L(m) was a reliable index for detecting emphysema. However, in the presence of spatial heterogeneities with a large variability of airspace sizes, L(m) did not significantly increase and sometimes even decreased compared with its value in normal tissue. We also developed an automated method for measuring the area and computed an equivalent diameter of each individual airspace that is independent of shape. Finally, we introduced new indexes based on the moments of diameter that we found to be more reliable than L(m) to characterize airspace enlargement in the presence of heterogeneities. PMID:16166240

  18. Foreign body gingivitis: An iatrogenic disease

    SciTech Connect

    Daley, T.D.; Wysocki, G.P. )

    1990-06-01

    Gingival biopsy specimens from eight patients exhibiting a localized, erythematous, or mixed erythematous/leukoplakic gingivitis that was refractory to conventional periodontal therapy were examined histologically and by energy-dispersive X-ray microanalysis. Histologic examination revealed variable numbers of small, usually subtle, sometimes equivocal, and occasionally obvious foci of granulomatous inflammation. Special stains for fungi and acid-fast bacilli were consistently negative. In all cases, the granulomatous foci contained particles of foreign material that were often inconspicuous and easily overlooked during routine histologic examination. Energy-dispersive X-ray microanalysis of these foreign particles disclosed Ca, Al, Si, Ti, and P in most lesions. However, other elements such as Zr, V, Ag, and Ni were found only in specific biopsy specimens. By comparing the elemental analyses, clinical features, and history of the lesions, strong evidence for an iatrogenic source of the foreign material was found in one case, and good evidence in five cases. In the remaining two patients, the source of the foreign particles remains unresolved.

  19. Gingival Diseases in Childhood – A Review

    PubMed Central

    Ilango, Paavai; Subbareddy, Venkat; Katamreddy, Vineela; Parthasarthy, Harinath

    2014-01-01

    Children and adolescents are subject to a wide variety of gingival infections. Epidemiological studies indicate that gingivitis of varying severity is nearly a universal finding in children and adolescents. The shorter life span of the primary dentition may be the reason why in general little attention is given to periodontitis in children. Since early diagnosis is important for successful treatment, it is imperative that children receive a periodontal examination as part of their routine dental visit. Furthermore destructive periodontal disease occurs in children with certain systemic diseases. Indeed the presence of severe periodontitis may be an early sign of systemic disease. A general medical evaluation to determine if systemic diseases are present should be considered in children who exhibit severe periodontitis, especially if the disease appears resistant to therapy. Though periodontal health awareness and therapy are increasing day by day in our country compared to earlier days, it is much restricted to adults rather than children. Oral cavity examination in children is much oriented in hard tissue evaluation than soft tissue health. Hence, this article enlightens about the prevalence of various soft tissue diseases and importance of long term overall oral health maintenance in childhood. PMID:25478471

  20. Gingival diseases in childhood - a review.

    PubMed

    Pari, Arul; Ilango, Paavai; Subbareddy, Venkat; Katamreddy, Vineela; Parthasarthy, Harinath

    2014-10-01

    Children and adolescents are subject to a wide variety of gingival infections. Epidemiological studies indicate that gingivitis of varying severity is nearly a universal finding in children and adolescents. The shorter life span of the primary dentition may be the reason why in general little attention is given to periodontitis in children. Since early diagnosis is important for successful treatment, it is imperative that children receive a periodontal examination as part of their routine dental visit. Furthermore destructive periodontal disease occurs in children with certain systemic diseases. Indeed the presence of severe periodontitis may be an early sign of systemic disease. A general medical evaluation to determine if systemic diseases are present should be considered in children who exhibit severe periodontitis, especially if the disease appears resistant to therapy. Though periodontal health awareness and therapy are increasing day by day in our country compared to earlier days, it is much restricted to adults rather than children. Oral cavity examination in children is much oriented in hard tissue evaluation than soft tissue health. Hence, this article enlightens about the prevalence of various soft tissue diseases and importance of long term overall oral health maintenance in childhood. PMID:25478471

  1. Periodontal regeneration in gingival recession defects.

    PubMed

    Trombelli, L

    1999-02-01

    Surgical treatment of gingival recession defects aims at obtaining soft tissue coverage of exposed root surfaces and/or augmentation of gingival tissue dimensions. A variety of protocols have been developed to manage these clinical problems. Since one goal of periodontal therapy is the regeneration of the lost attachment apparatus of the tooth, full restoration of defect should be accomplished following mucogingival procedures. This implies regeneration of all periodontal structures, including formation of new cementum with inserting connective tissue fibers, alveolar bone regeneration and recreation of a functional and aesthetic morphology of the mucogingival complex. Animal and human histological studies have shown that healing at gingiva-root interface following pedicle flaps or free soft tissue grafts generally includes a long junctional epithelium with varying amounts of a new connective tissue attachment in the most apical aspect of the covered root surface. Limited bone regeneration has been observed. Adjunctive use of root conditioning agents and cell excluding, wound-stabilizing devices may amplify regenerative outcomes. Changes in the amount of keratinized tissue, which can significantly affect the aesthetic outcome of treatment, have been shown to depend on the interactions among various tissues involved in the healing process and the selected surgical procedure. PMID:10321221

  2. Chronic Wound Biofilm Model

    PubMed Central

    Ganesh, Kasturi; Sinha, Mithun; Mathew-Steiner, Shomita S.; Das, Amitava; Roy, Sashwati; Sen, Chandan K.

    2015-01-01

    Significance: Multispecies microbial biofilms may contribute to wound chronicity by derailing the inherent reparative process of the host tissue. In the biofilm form, bacteria are encased within an extracellular polymeric substance and become recalcitrant to antimicrobials and host defenses. For biofilms of relevance to human health, there are two primary contributing factors: the microbial species involved and host response which, in turn, shapes microbial processes over time. This progressive interaction between microbial species and the host is an iterative process that helps evolve an acute-phase infection to a pathogenic chronic biofilm. Thus, long-term wound infection studies are needed to understand the longitudinal cascade of events that culminate into a pathogenic wound biofilm. Recent Advances: Our laboratory has recently published the first long-term (2 month) study of polymicrobial wound biofilm infection in a translationally valuable porcine wound model. Critical Issues: It is widely recognized that the porcine system represents the most translationally valuable approach to experimentally model human skin wounds. A meaningful experimental biofilm model must be in vivo, include mixed species of clinically relevant microbes, and be studied longitudinally long term. Cross-validation of such experimental findings with findings from biofilm-infected patient wounds is critically important. Future Directions: Additional value may be added to the experimental system described above by studying pigs with underlying health complications (e.g., metabolic syndrome), as is typically seen in patient populations. PMID:26155380

  3. Biofilm formation by haloarchaea.

    PubMed

    Fröls, Sabrina; Dyall-Smith, Mike; Pfeifer, Felicitas

    2012-12-01

    A fluorescence-based live-cell adhesion assay was used to examine biofilm formation by 20 different haloarchaea, including species of Halobacterium, Haloferax and Halorubrum, as well as novel natural isolates from an Antarctic salt lake. Thirteen of the 20 tested strains significantly adhered (P-value  < 0.05) to a plastic surface. Examination of adherent cell layers on glass surfaces by differential interference contrast, fluorescence and confocal microscopy showed two types of biofilm structures. Carpet-like, multi-layered biofilms containing micro- and macrocolonies (up to 50 μm in height) were formed by strains of Halobacterium salinarum and the Antarctic isolate t-ADL strain DL24. The second type of biofilm, characterized by large aggregates of cells adhering to surfaces, was formed by Haloferax volcanii DSM 3757T and Halorubrum lacusprofundi DL28. Staining of the biofilms formed by the strongly adhesive haloarchaeal strains revealed the presence of extracellular polymers, such as eDNA and glycoconjugates, substances previously shown to stabilize bacterial biofilms. For Hbt. salinarum DSM 3754T and Hfx. volcanii DSM 3757T , cells adhered within 1 day of culture and remained viable for at least 2 months in mature biofilms. Adherent cells of Hbt. salinarum DSM 3754T showed several types of cellular appendages that could be involved in the initial attachment. Our results show that biofilm formation occurs in a surprisingly wide variety of haloarchaeal species. PMID:23057712

  4. Gingival pigmentation index proposal of a new index with a brief review of current indices.

    PubMed

    Peeran, Syed Wali; Ramalingam, Karthikeyan; Peeran, Syed Ali; Altaher, Omar Basheer; Alsaid, Fatma Mojtaba; Mugrabi, Marei Hamed

    2014-04-01

    Cosmetic expectations have increased with time and current trends speak volumes about gingival esthetics and smile designing. Gingival pigmentation especially on the labial aspect of anterior teeth has become an important component of general esthetics. Various physiologic and pathologic factors cause gingival pigmentation. The existing indices do not deal with the etiology, extent and severity of gingival pigmentation. Hence, we propose a new classification and index for gingival pigmentation to assess the treatment needs for the patient. PMID:24966785

  5. Gingival fibromatosis with multiple unusual findings: report of a rare case

    PubMed Central

    He, Long; Ping, Fei-Yun

    2012-01-01

    Gingival fibromatosis is a rare disease, especially its syndromic form. Here, we review the literatures on gingival fibromatosis and briefly summarize some characters on clinical, etiological, genetic and histopathological aspects. We also present a rare case of gingival fibromatosis with multiple unusual findings in a 21-year-old man. And we differentiate it from some well-known syndromes including gingival fibromatosis. Maybe it implies a new syndrome within the spectrum of those including gingival fibromatosis. PMID:22955199

  6. Gingival pigmentation index proposal of a new index with a brief review of current indices

    PubMed Central

    Peeran, Syed Wali; Ramalingam, Karthikeyan; Peeran, Syed Ali; Altaher, Omar Basheer; Alsaid, Fatma Mojtaba; Mugrabi, Marei Hamed

    2014-01-01

    Cosmetic expectations have increased with time and current trends speak volumes about gingival esthetics and smile designing. Gingival pigmentation especially on the labial aspect of anterior teeth has become an important component of general esthetics. Various physiologic and pathologic factors cause gingival pigmentation. The existing indices do not deal with the etiology, extent and severity of gingival pigmentation. Hence, we propose a new classification and index for gingival pigmentation to assess the treatment needs for the patient. PMID:24966785

  7. Osteocompatibility of Biofilm Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Rawson, Monica; Haggard, Warren; Jennings, Jessica A

    2014-01-01

    The demand for infection prevention therapies has led to the discovery of several biofilm inhibitors. These inhibiting signals are released by bacteria, fungi, or marine organisms to signal biofilm dispersal or disruption in Gram-positive, Gram-negative, and fungal microorganisms. The purpose of this study was to test the biocompatibility of five different naturally-produced biofilm chemical dispersal and inhibition signals with osteoblast-like cells: D-amino acids (D-AA), lysostaphin (LS), farnesol, cis-2-decenoic acid (C2DA), and desformyl flustrabromine (dFBr). In this preliminary study, compatibility of these anti-biofilm agents with differentiating osteoblasts was examined over a 21 days period at levels above and below concentrations active against bacterial biofilm. Anti-biofilm compounds listed above were serially diluted in osteogenic media and added to cultures of MC3T3 cells. Cell viability and cytotoxicity, after exposure to each anti-biofilm agent, were measured using a DNA assay. Differentiation characteristics of osteoblasts were determined qualitatively by observing staining of mineral deposits and quantitatively with an alkaline phosphatase assay. D-AA, LS, and C2DA were all biocompatible within the reported biofilm inhibitory concentration ranges and supported osteoblast differentiation. Farnesol and dFBr induced cytotoxic responses within the reported biofilm inhibitory concentration range and low doses of dFBr were found to inhibit osteoblast differentiation. At high concentrations, such as those that may be present after local delivery, many of these biofilm inhibitors can have effects on cellular viability and osteoblast function. Concentrations at which negative effects on osteoblasts occur should serve as upper limits for delivery to orthopaedic trauma sites and guide development of these potential therapeutics for orthopaedics. PMID:25505496

  8. Electrical spiking in bacterial biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Masi, Elisa; Ciszak, Marzena; Santopolo, Luisa; Frascella, Arcangela; Giovannetti, Luciana; Marchi, Emmanuela; Viti, Carlo; Mancuso, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    In nature, biofilms are the most common form of bacterial growth. In biofilms, bacteria display coordinated behaviour to perform specific functions. Here, we investigated electrical signalling as a possible driver in biofilm sociobiology. Using a multi-electrode array system that enables high spatio-temporal resolution, we studied the electrical activity in two biofilm-forming strains and one non-biofilm-forming strain. The action potential rates monitored during biofilm-forming bacterial growth exhibited a one-peak maximum with a long tail, corresponding to the highest biofilm development. This peak was not observed for the non-biofilm-forming strain, demonstrating that the intensity of the electrical activity was not linearly related to the bacterial density, but was instead correlated with biofilm formation. Results obtained indicate that the analysis of the spatio-temporal electrical activity of bacteria during biofilm formation can open a new frontier in the study of the emergence of collective microbial behaviour. PMID:25392401

  9. Treating Enlarged Prostate (BPH): Which Drugs Work Best

    MedlinePlus

    ... the prostate gets larger. This is called prostate enlargement, or BPH (benign prostatic hyperplasia). Why should I ... alpha-blocker doxazosin for a first treatment. Prostate enlargement affects millions of men, including about half of ...

  10. Measurement of Reduced Gingival Melanosis after Smoking Cessation: A Novel Analysis of Gingival Pigmentation Using Clinical Oral Photographs

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Tomotaka; Takiuchi, Hiroya; Sugiyama, Seiichi; Makino, Michiko; Noguchi, Satoshi; Katayama-Ono, Tomoko; Hanioka, Takashi; Naito, Toru

    2016-01-01

    Background: Due to moisture and the anatomical complexity of the oral mucosa, it is difficult to measure the extent of gingival melanosis in an optical manner. Therefore, we developed a new quantitative method using clinical oral photographs and compared the extent of gingival melanosis before and after smoking cessation. Methods: A new analysis method, which we named the gingival melanosis record (GMR), is a quantitative analysis method using clinical oral photographs. We obtained 659 clinical photographs from 263 patients from 16 general dental offices in Japan. Standardized measuring sites were automatically spotted on the screen, and the presence of gingival melanosis was determined at the measuring sites. We assessed the validity of the GMR with the previously reported Hedin’s classification using Spearman’s rank correlation and intraclass correlation coefficients. Results: The GMR showed a significant association with Hedin’s classification (p < 0.01, correlation coefficient = 0.94). The GMR also showed excellent reproducibility of the substantial repeated agreement intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) (1,1) and ICC (2,1), p > 0.61). The longitudinal loss of gingival melanosis was confirmed by a change in the GMR among patients who successfully achieved smoking cessation for a mean of 4.5 years. Conclusion: The GMR is an effective method to assess gingival melanosis. The loss of gingival melanosis after smoking cessation can be objectively confirmed with the use of the GMR. PMID:27322294

  11. Expression of the Peptide Antibiotic Human β-Defensin 1 in Cultured Gingival Epithelial Cells and Gingival Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Krisanaprakornkit, Suttichai; Weinberg, Aaron; Perez, Christopher N.; Dale, Beverly A.

    1998-01-01

    Human β-defensin-1 (hBD-1) is a member of the family of small cationic antimicrobial peptides that have been identified in several mucosal epithelia. Because human gingival epithelium is a site that is constantly challenged by oral microorganisms, we examined the expression of hBD-1 in human gingival epithelial and fibroblast cell cultures and tissue samples. Cell cultures were challenged with cell wall extracts of Porphyromonas gingivalis or Fusobacterium nucleatum, Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide, tumor necrosis factor alpha, or phorbol myristate acetate. hBD-1 mRNA was detected in unstimulated and stimulated cultures by reverse transcription (RT)-PCR using several primer sets specific for hBD-1. Gingival epithelial cells, but not gingival fibroblasts, expressed a product of the predicted size for hBD-1 mRNA. The sequence of the PCR product was identical to that of hBD-1. hBD-1 mRNA expression was not significantly modulated by any of the stimulants tested. Human gingival tissues from noninflamed and inflamed sites were also analyzed by RT-PCR. hBD-1 mRNA was expressed in all tissue samples. The relative expression of hBD-1 mRNA was similar in noninflamed and inflamed tissues obtained from each of four patients undergoing treatment for periodontitis. However, the relative expression of hBD-1 mRNA varied in gingival biopsies obtained from 15 different normal individuals, and the relative hBD-1 expression was unrelated to interleukin-8 expression. Our findings show the constitutive expression of hBD-1 mRNA in cultured epithelial cells and gingival tissues but not gingival fibroblasts. These findings suggest that expression of hBD-1 may play a role as part of the innate host defenses in maintaining normal gingival health. PMID:9712771

  12. Enlarging perineal endometrioma developing after colpoperineorrhaphy.

    PubMed

    Strube, Felix Andreas; Niazi, Masooma; Lazarou, George

    2011-10-01

    Although endometriosis is not infrequent, the occurrence of perineal endometriomata is relatively rare and is generally attributed to seeding of endometrial cells to the perineal body during obstetrical trauma. A 45-year-old female with a history of a colpoperineorrhaphy during menses and a remote history of obstetric perineal trauma presented with an enlarging perineal mass. Excision of the mass led to a clinical and histopathologic diagnosis of perineal endometriosis. Elective surgery disrupting the vaginoperineal epithelium performed during menses may facilitate the seeding of endometrial cells to the perineal body and formation of perineal endometriomata. PMID:21431936

  13. Chronic desquamative gingivitis in siblings: A report of two cases

    PubMed Central

    Vijayakar, Harshad N.; Shah, Pratik P.; Desai, Ankit B.; Ghonasgi, Sugandha R.; Gawankar, Ravindra J.

    2014-01-01

    Desquamative gingivitis is a gingival response associated with a variety of clinical conditions and characterized by intense erythema, desquamation and ulceration of free and attached gingiva. A variety of diseases such as lichen planus, pemphigus, pemphigoid, dermatitis herpetiformis, linear IgA disease, lupus erythematosus, erythema multiformae manifest clinically as desquamative gingivitis. Of all the disease entities, Lichen Planus is a relatively common disorder affecting the skin and mucous membrane. Very often it has oral manifestations. These lesions of oral lichen planus (OLP) have myriad but distinct morphology. As they mimic other mucocutaneous disorders with regard to clinical appearance, many lesions of oral lichen planus go undiagnosed or are wrongly diagnosed. Reported here are two cases of desquamative gingivitis. One of these was diagnosed as erosive lichen planus based on the symptoms, clinical findings, histologic, and immunofluorescent examination. Further management was done in consultation with a dermatologist. PMID:25024556

  14. [Adjusting gingival tissues morphology after dental implantation with fibrin use].

    PubMed

    Maĭborodin, I V; Kolesnikov, I S; Sheplev, B V; Ragimova, T M; Kovyntsev, A N; Kovyntsev, D N; Shevela, A I

    2009-01-01

    In gingival tissues of 62 patients after dental implantation of traditional type and with the use of thrombocyte rich fibrin preparation (TRFP) microcirculation and leucocytal infiltration were studied. It was disclosed that in all terms after titanium screw dental implant setting lymphostasis and leucocytal infiltration were seen as signs of active inflammatory process in gingival tissues. 3 months later after implants setting with the use of TRFP the lymphatic vessels status was normalized, the degree of leucocytal infiltration was reduced; when implantation was made without use of fibrin technologies in gingival tissues more leucocytes were found and lymphatic bed components were remained dilated. Besides fibrin preparation use in the process of dental implantation promoted quicker and stronger implant fixation, but granulomatous inflammatory process could develop and amount of eosinophils in gingival tissues could also increased. PMID:19365340

  15. 21 CFR 872.1500 - Gingival fluid measurer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... sulcus (depression between the tooth and gums) to determine if there is a gingivitis condition. (b) Classification. Class I (general controls). The device is exempt from the premarket notification procedures...

  16. Midwifery and the enlarged European Union.

    PubMed

    Mead, Marianne

    2003-06-01

    The freedom of movement of midwives within the European Union has been guaranteed by the application of midwives' sectoral directives signed in 1980 and applied in 1983. Since then the size of the European Union has grown from 9 to 15 members and is due for a next wave of enlargement of another 10 member states in 2004. The rules and regulations that govern the European Union are being revisited to accommodate this change. Midwifery will be affected and some changes are potentially worrying, in particular the proposed loss of the Advisory Committee on the Training of Midwives. Six other professions regulated in a very similar way are also to lose their own advisory committees. The European Commission has proposed the adoption of a single directive for all professions, together with the setting up of an expert group whose function would be to deal principally with health professions. However, neither its remit nor its membership has been determined. Whereas previous movement of midwives within Europe has been minimal, it is anticipated that this may well be changed at the next enlargement stage. Without clear directives and some form of controlling power at European level, public health may be threatened. In this paper the developments to date and the concerns that have emerged from the recent proposals are outlined. PMID:12809627

  17. Periodontal plastic surgical technique for gingival fenestration closure.

    PubMed

    Peacock, M E; Mott, D A; Cuenin, M F; Hokett, S D; Fowler, E B

    2001-01-01

    Gingival fenestration is an opening through oral keratinized tissue, usually unattached, that is observed in thin gingiva with usually thick subgingival calculus deposits. This lesion is seen infrequently but may be more common than has been reported; lack of symptoms may inhibit patient awareness. Because surgical correction usually is not required, there are very few reports in the literature concerning this lesion. The following report describes a case of gingival fenestration and surgical treatment with a connective tissue/periosteal graft. PMID:12016683

  18. Molecular and Clinical Aspects of Drug-induced Gingival Overgrowth

    PubMed Central

    Kantarci, A.

    2015-01-01

    Drug-induced gingival overgrowth is a tissue-specific condition and is estimated to affect approximately one million North Americans. Lesions occur principally as side-effects from phenytoin, nifedipine, or ciclosporin therapy in approximately half of the people who take these agents. Due to new indications for these drugs, their use continues to grow. Here, we review the molecular and cellular characteristics of human gingival overgrowth lesions and highlight how they differ considerably as a function of the causative drug. Analyses of molecular signaling pathways in cultured human gingival fibroblasts have provided evidence for their unique aspects compared with fibroblasts from the lung and kidney. These findings provide insights into both the basis for tissue specificity and into possible therapeutic opportunities which are reviewed here. Although ciclosporin-induced gingival overgrowth lesions exhibit principally the presence of inflammation and little fibrosis, nifedipine- and especially phenytoin-induced lesions are highly fibrotic. The increased expression of markers of gingival fibrosis, particularly CCN2 [also known as connective tissue growth factor (CTGF)], markers of epithelial to mesenchymal transition, and more recently periostin and members of the lysyl oxidase family of enzymes have been documented in phenytoin or nifedipine lesions. Some oral fibrotic conditions such as leukoplakia and oral submucous fibrosis, after subsequent additional genetic damage, can develop into oral cancer. Since many pathways are shared, the study of gingival fibrosis and comparisons with characteristics and molecular drivers of oral cancer would likely enhance understandings and functional roles of molecular drivers of these oral pathologies. PMID:25680368

  19. Predictive modeling of gingivitis severity and susceptibility via oral microbiota.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shi; Li, Rui; Zeng, Xiaowei; He, Tao; Zhao, Helen; Chang, Alice; Bo, Cunpei; Chen, Jie; Yang, Fang; Knight, Rob; Liu, Jiquan; Davis, Catherine; Xu, Jian

    2014-09-01

    Predictive modeling of human disease based on the microbiota holds great potential yet remains challenging. Here, 50 adults underwent controlled transitions from naturally occurring gingivitis, to healthy gingivae (baseline), and to experimental gingivitis (EG). In diseased plaque microbiota, 27 bacterial genera changed in relative abundance and functional genes including 33 flagellar biosynthesis-related groups were enriched. Plaque microbiota structure exhibited a continuous gradient along the first principal component, reflecting transition from healthy to diseased states, which correlated with Mazza Gingival Index. We identified two host types with distinct gingivitis sensitivity. Our proposed microbial indices of gingivitis classified host types with 74% reliability, and, when tested on another 41-member cohort, distinguished healthy from diseased individuals with 95% accuracy. Furthermore, the state of the microbiota in naturally occurring gingivitis predicted the microbiota state and severity of subsequent EG (but not the state of the microbiota during the healthy baseline period). Because the effect of disease is greater than interpersonal variation in plaque, in contrast to the gut, plaque microbiota may provide advantages in predictive modeling of oral diseases. PMID:24646694

  20. Predictive modeling of gingivitis severity and susceptibility via oral microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Shi; Li, Rui; Zeng, Xiaowei; He, Tao; Zhao, Helen; Chang, Alice; Bo, Cunpei; Chen, Jie; Yang, Fang; Knight, Rob; Liu, Jiquan; Davis, Catherine; Xu, Jian

    2014-01-01

    Predictive modeling of human disease based on the microbiota holds great potential yet remains challenging. Here, 50 adults underwent controlled transitions from naturally occurring gingivitis, to healthy gingivae (baseline), and to experimental gingivitis (EG). In diseased plaque microbiota, 27 bacterial genera changed in relative abundance and functional genes including 33 flagellar biosynthesis-related groups were enriched. Plaque microbiota structure exhibited a continuous gradient along the first principal component, reflecting transition from healthy to diseased states, which correlated with Mazza Gingival Index. We identified two host types with distinct gingivitis sensitivity. Our proposed microbial indices of gingivitis classified host types with 74% reliability, and, when tested on another 41-member cohort, distinguished healthy from diseased individuals with 95% accuracy. Furthermore, the state of the microbiota in naturally occurring gingivitis predicted the microbiota state and severity of subsequent EG (but not the state of the microbiota during the healthy baseline period). Because the effect of disease is greater than interpersonal variation in plaque, in contrast to the gut, plaque microbiota may provide advantages in predictive modeling of oral diseases. PMID:24646694

  1. Microbiota-based Signature of Gingivitis Treatments: A Randomized Study

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Shi; Li, Zhen; He, Tao; Bo, Cunpei; Chang, Jinlan; Li, Lin; He, Yanyan; Liu, Jiquan; Charbonneau, Duane; Li, Rui; Xu, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Plaque-induced gingivitis can be alleviated by various treatment regimens. To probe the impacts of various anti-gingivitis treatments on plaque microflora, here a double blinded, randomized controlled trial of 91 adults with moderate gingivitis was designed with two anti-gingivitis regimens: the brush-alone treatment and the brush-plus-rinse treatment. In the later group, more reduction in both Plaque Index (TMQHI) and Gingival Index (mean MGI) at Day 3, Day 11 and Day 27 was evident, and more dramatic changes were found between baseline and other time points for both supragingival plaque microbiota structure and salivary metabonomic profiles. A comparison of plaque microbiota changes was also performed between these two treatments and a third dataset where 50 subjects received regimen of dental scaling. Only Actinobaculum, TM7 and Leptotrichia were consistently reduced by all the three treatments, whereas the different microbial signatures of the three treatments during gingivitis relieve indicate distinct mechanisms of action. Our study suggests that microbiota based signatures can serve as a valuable approach for understanding and potentially comparing the modes of action for clinical treatments and oral-care products in the future. PMID:27094556

  2. Microbiota-based Signature of Gingivitis Treatments: A Randomized Study.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shi; Li, Zhen; He, Tao; Bo, Cunpei; Chang, Jinlan; Li, Lin; He, Yanyan; Liu, Jiquan; Charbonneau, Duane; Li, Rui; Xu, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Plaque-induced gingivitis can be alleviated by various treatment regimens. To probe the impacts of various anti-gingivitis treatments on plaque microflora, here a double blinded, randomized controlled trial of 91 adults with moderate gingivitis was designed with two anti-gingivitis regimens: the brush-alone treatment and the brush-plus-rinse treatment. In the later group, more reduction in both Plaque Index (TMQHI) and Gingival Index (mean MGI) at Day 3, Day 11 and Day 27 was evident, and more dramatic changes were found between baseline and other time points for both supragingival plaque microbiota structure and salivary metabonomic profiles. A comparison of plaque microbiota changes was also performed between these two treatments and a third dataset where 50 subjects received regimen of dental scaling. Only Actinobaculum, TM7 and Leptotrichia were consistently reduced by all the three treatments, whereas the different microbial signatures of the three treatments during gingivitis relieve indicate distinct mechanisms of action. Our study suggests that microbiota based signatures can serve as a valuable approach for understanding and potentially comparing the modes of action for clinical treatments and oral-care products in the future. PMID:27094556

  3. [Unilateral idiopathic gingival fibromatosis--a case report].

    PubMed

    Łazarz-Bartyzel, Katarzyna; Gawron, Katarzyna; Darczuki, Dagmara; Chomyszyn-Gajewska, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Gingival fibromatosis is a painless gingival overgrowth. It may result in difficulties with proper dental hygiene keeping, mastication and occlusion. Herein, a case of a 10-year-old patient was described. The patient reported to the Department of Periodontology and Oral Medicine of the Jagiellonian University Medical College in Krakow due to the problems with permanent teeth eruption (23-26), chewing and dental hygiene maintaining. Based on medical history, clinical examination, diagnostic tests and histopathological study of gingival tissue biopsies the patient was diagnosed with unilateral idiopathic gingival fibromatosis. After oral cavity hygienization, patient un- derwent dental surgery procedures by gingivectomy and gingivoplasty. The follow-up examination 2 and 6 months post operation showed un- eventful healing, proper tooth eruption, improved oral hygiene and chewing function. Twelve months post surgery no recurrence was noted. Due to the etiological diversity of gingival lesions occurring as an overgrowth, accurate medical history, clinical examination, laboratory tests and histopathological study are needed. Accurate diagnos- tics is crucial mainly to exclude he- matological and oncological diseases. Gingivectomy being the "gold method" of gingival fibromatosis treatment was effective and sufficient to cure the case presented in this article. PMID:27526431

  4. Endotoxemia and the host systemic response during experimental gingivitis

    PubMed Central

    Wahaidi, Vivian Y.; Kowolik, Michael J.; Eckert, George J.; Galli, Dominique M.

    2011-01-01

    Aim To assess endotoxemia episodes and subsequent changes in serum inflammatory biomarkers using the experimental gingivitis model Materials and Methods Data from 50 healthy black and white adult males and females were compared for serum concentrations of endotoxin, and serum biomarkers [neutrophil oxidative activity, interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, IL-8, C-reactive protein, and fibrinogen] at baseline, at 3 weeks of experimental gingivitis, and after 2 weeks of recovery. Means were compared using repeated measures ANOVA. Results Endotoxemia was reported in 56% of the serum samples at three weeks of induced gingivitis. At two weeks of recovery, endotoxin levels decreased to levels similar to those reported at baseline. Neutrophil oxidative activity increased significantly following three weeks of gingivitis versus baseline (p<0.05). In the endotoxin-negative group this increase was associated with the black subjects whereas in the endotoxin-positive group change in neutrophil activity was driven by the female subpopulation. Serum cytokines, CRP, and fibrinogen levels did not change during the study. Conclusions Experimental gingivitis was associated with endotoxemia and hyperactivity of circulating neutrophils, but not with changes in systemic levels of cytokines and acute phase proteins. This may be attributed to the mild nature and the short duration of the induced gingivitis. PMID:21320151

  5. Unique database study linking gingival inflammation and smoking in carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Söder, Birgitta; Andersson, Leif C; Meurman, Jukka H; Söder, Per-Östen

    2015-02-01

    We investigated statistical association between gingival inflammation and cancer in a group of patients followed up for 26 years with the hypothesis that gingival inflammation affects carcinogenesis. Altogether, 1676 30- to 40-year-old subjects from Stockholm were clinically examined in 1985. In 2011, we compared the baseline oral examination and follow-up data with cancer diagnoses sourced from the Swedish national hospital register databases. Of 1676 individuals, 89 (55 women, 34 men) had got cancer by the year 2011. Women were found to be at higher risk for cancer than men. Smoking (expressed in pack-years) had been more prevalent in the cancer group than in those with no cancer diagnosis. Gingival index, marker of gingival inflammation, was higher in the cancer group than in subjects with no cancer. There were no significant differences between the groups regarding age, education, dental plaque and calculus index scores, or in the number of missing teeth. In multiple logistic regression analysis with cancer as the dependent variable and several independent variables, pack-years of smoking appeared to be a principal independent predictor with odds ratio (OR) 1.32 while gingival inflammation showed OR 1.29. Hence, our present findings showed that together with smoking, gingival inflammation indeed associated with the incidence of cancer in this cohort. PMID:25533098

  6. In vivo biofilm formation on stainless steel bonded retainers during different oral health-care regimens.

    PubMed

    Jongsma, Marije A; van der Mei, Henny C; Atema-Smit, Jelly; Busscher, Henk J; Ren, Yijin

    2015-03-01

    Retention wires permanently bonded to the anterior teeth are used after orthodontic treatment to prevent the teeth from relapsing to pre-treatment positions. A disadvantage of bonded retainers is biofilm accumulation on the wires, which produces a higher incidence of gingival recession, increased pocket depth and bleeding on probing. This study compares in vivo biofilm formation on single-strand and multi-strand retention wires with different oral health-care regimens. Two-centimetre wires were placed in brackets that were bonded to the buccal side of the first molars and second premolars in the upper arches of 22 volunteers. Volunteers used a selected toothpaste with or without the additional use of a mouthrinse containing essential oils. Brushing was performed manually. Regimens were maintained for 1 week, after which the wires were removed and the oral biofilm was collected to quantify the number of organisms and their viability, determine the microbial composition and visualize the bacteria by electron microscopy. A 6-week washout period was employed between regimens. Biofilm formation was reduced on single-strand wires compared with multi-strand wires; bacteria were observed to adhere between the strands. The use of antibacterial toothpastes marginally reduced the amount of biofilm on both wire types, but significantly reduced the viability of the biofilm organisms. Additional use of the mouthrinse did not result in significant changes in biofilm amount or viability. However, major shifts in biofilm composition were induced by combining a stannous fluoride- or triclosan-containing toothpaste with the mouthrinse. These shifts can be tentatively attributed to small changes in bacterial cell surface hydrophobicity after the adsorption of the toothpaste components, which stimulate bacterial adhesion to the hydrophobic oil, as illustrated for a Streptococcus mutans strain. PMID:25572920

  7. In vivo biofilm formation on stainless steel bonded retainers during different oral health-care regimens

    PubMed Central

    Jongsma, Marije A; van der Mei, Henny C; Atema-Smit, Jelly; Busscher, Henk J; Ren, Yijin

    2015-01-01

    Retention wires permanently bonded to the anterior teeth are used after orthodontic treatment to prevent the teeth from relapsing to pre-treatment positions. A disadvantage of bonded retainers is biofilm accumulation on the wires, which produces a higher incidence of gingival recession, increased pocket depth and bleeding on probing. This study compares in vivo biofilm formation on single-strand and multi-strand retention wires with different oral health-care regimens. Two-centimetre wires were placed in brackets that were bonded to the buccal side of the first molars and second premolars in the upper arches of 22 volunteers. Volunteers used a selected toothpaste with or without the additional use of a mouthrinse containing essential oils. Brushing was performed manually. Regimens were maintained for 1 week, after which the wires were removed and the oral biofilm was collected to quantify the number of organisms and their viability, determine the microbial composition and visualize the bacteria by electron microscopy. A 6-week washout period was employed between regimens. Biofilm formation was reduced on single-strand wires compared with multi-strand wires; bacteria were observed to adhere between the strands. The use of antibacterial toothpastes marginally reduced the amount of biofilm on both wire types, but significantly reduced the viability of the biofilm organisms. Additional use of the mouthrinse did not result in significant changes in biofilm amount or viability. However, major shifts in biofilm composition were induced by combining a stannous fluoride- or triclosan-containing toothpaste with the mouthrinse. These shifts can be tentatively attributed to small changes in bacterial cell surface hydrophobicity after the adsorption of the toothpaste components, which stimulate bacterial adhesion to the hydrophobic oil, as illustrated for a Streptococcus mutans strain. PMID:25572920

  8. Liquid Flow in Biofilm Systems

    PubMed Central

    Stoodley, Paul; deBeer, Dirk; Lewandowski, Zbigniew

    1994-01-01

    A model biofilm consisting of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Pseudomonas fluorescens, and Klebsiella pneumoniae was developed to study the relationships between structural heterogeneity and hydrodynamics. Local fluid velocity in the biofilm system was measured by a noninvasive method of particle image velocimetry, using confocal scanning laser microscopy. Velocity profiles were measured in conduit and porous medium reactors in the presence and absence of biofilm. Liquid flow was observed within biofilm channels; simultaneous imaging of the biofilm allowed the liquid velocity to be related to the physical structure of the biofilm. Images PMID:16349345

  9. Conductance enlargement in picoscale electroburnt graphene nanojunctions

    PubMed Central

    Sadeghi, Hatef; Mol, Jan A.; Lau, Chit Siong; Briggs, G. Andrew D.; Warner, Jamie; Lambert, Colin J.

    2015-01-01

    Provided the electrical properties of electroburnt graphene junctions can be understood and controlled, they have the potential to underpin the development of a wide range of future sub-10-nm electrical devices. We examine both theoretically and experimentally the electrical conductance of electroburnt graphene junctions at the last stages of nanogap formation. We account for the appearance of a counterintuitive increase in electrical conductance just before the gap forms. This is a manifestation of room-temperature quantum interference and arises from a combination of the semimetallic band structure of graphene and a cross-over from electrodes with multiple-path connectivity to single-path connectivity just before breaking. Therefore, our results suggest that conductance enlargement before junction rupture is a signal of the formation of electroburnt junctions, with a picoscale current path formed from a single sp2 bond. PMID:25730863

  10. Investigations into Monochloramine Biofilm Penetration

    EPA Science Inventory

    Biofilm in drinking water systems is undesirable. Free chlorine and monochloramine are commonly used as secondary drinking water disinfectants, but monochloramine is perceived to penetrate biofilm better than free chlorine. However, this hypothesis remains unconfirmed by direct b...

  11. Mucosal biofilms of Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Ganguly, Shantanu; Mitchell, Aaron P

    2011-08-01

    Biofilms are microbial communities that form on surfaces and are embedded in an extracellular matrix. C. albicans forms pathogenic mucosal biofilms that are evoked by changes in host immunity or mucosal ecology. Mucosal surfaces are inhabited by many microbial species; hence these biofilms are polymicrobial. Several recent studies have applied paradigms of biofilm analysis to study mucosal C. albicans infections. These studies reveal that the Bcr1 transcription factor is a master regulator of C. albicans biofilm formation under diverse conditions, though the most relevant Bcr1 target genes can vary with the biofilm niche. An important determinant of mucosal biofilm formation is the interaction with host defenses. Finally, studies of interactions between bacterial species and C. albicans provide insight into the communication mechanisms that endow polymicrobial biofilms with unique properties. PMID:21741878

  12. Inactivation of biofilm bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    LeChevallier, M W; Cawthon, C D; Lee, R G

    1988-01-01

    The current project was developed to examine inactivation of biofilm bacteria and to characterize the interaction of biocides with pipe surfaces. Unattached bacteria were quite susceptible to the variety of disinfectants tested. Viable bacterial counts were reduced 99% by exposure to 0.08 mg of hypochlorous acid (pH 7.0) per liter (1 to 2 degrees C) for 1 min. For monochloramine, 94 mg/liter was required to kill 99% of the bacteria within 1 min. These results were consistent with those found by other investigators. Biofilm bacteria grown on the surfaces of granular activated carbon particles, metal coupons, or glass microscope slides were 150 to more than 3,000 times more resistant to hypochlorous acid (free chlorine, pH 7.0) than were unattached cells. In contrast, resistance of biofilm bacteria to monochloramine disinfection ranged from 2- to 100-fold more than that of unattached cells. The results suggested that, relative to inactivation of unattached bacteria, monochloramine was better able to penetrate and kill biofilm bacteria than free chlorine. For free chlorine, the data indicated that transport of the disinfectant into the biofilm was a major rate-limiting factor. Because of this phenomenon, increasing the level of free chlorine did not increase disinfection efficiency. Experiments where equal weights of disinfectants were used suggested that the greater penetrating power of monochloramine compensated for its limited disinfection activity. These studies showed that monochloramine was as effective as free chlorine for inactivation of biofilm bacteria. The research provides important insights into strategies for control of biofilm bacteria. Images PMID:2849380

  13. [NUG--necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis: a review].

    PubMed

    Mizrahi, Y

    2014-07-01

    Necrotizing Ulcerative Gingivitis (NUG) is an acute and rare (0.5-11% of the population) infectious disease of the gum tissue, which is characterized by ulceration and inflammation of the inter-dental gum tissue. NUG was documented by historians since the fourth century BC, most of the reports from the ancient world were in the context of illness among fighting troops, present studies of NUG in the modern world are still common among soldiers. NUG is associated with poor oral hygiene and weakening of the host, especially in immunocompromised patients, malnutrition and poor living conditions, as well as in the context of mental stress. NUG is more common in young adults, but reports of morbidity in young children with malnutrition in the background are not uncommon. NUG diagnosis is based on three essential symptoms: sore gums, bleeding gums and the most diagnostic characteristic, ulceration and necrosis of the interdental papillae. The disease is considered to have a clear initial infectious etiology, when the main bacteria, associated with the disease, include: Bacteroides intermedius and Fusobacterium sp. The infection involves anaerobic \\ aerobic bacteria with a majority of Gram-negative bacteria. The treatment of NUG is based on combining mechanical removal of tartar with local and systemic delivery of antimicrobial agents. Adequate treatment usually prevent the progression of the disease and ulcer healing is expected in a few days. Nevertheless, lack of treatment can lead to deterioration in the form NUP to Noma. PMID:25219100

  14. Relationship of Gingival Pigmentation with Passive Smoking in Women

    PubMed Central

    Moravej-Salehi, Elahe; Moravej-Salehi, Elham

    2015-01-01

    Background: Oral mucosal pigmentation is among the most common findings in smokers, affecting smile esthetics. Passive smoking significantly compromises the health of non-smoker individuals particularly women. The purpose of this study was to assess the relationship of passive smoking with oral pigmentation in non-smoker women. Materials and Methods: This historical-cohort study was conducted on a case group of 50 married women who were unemployed, not pregnant, non-smoker, had no systemic condition causing cutaneous or mucosal pigmentation, were not taking any medication causing cutaneous or mucosal pigmentation and had a heavy smoker husband. The control group comprised of 50 matched females with no smoker member in the family. Both groups were clinically examined for presence of gingival pigmentation and the results were analyzed using chi-square and logistic regression tests. Results: Gingival pigmentation was found in 27 (54%) passive smokers and 14 (28%) controls (P=0.01). The odds ratio (OR) of gingival pigmentation in women exposed to secondhand smoke of their husbands (adjusted for education and having a smoker parent at childhood) was 3 (95% confidence interval; CI: 1.26 – 7.09). House floor area was correlated with gingival pigmentation in female passive smokers (P=0.025). Conclusion: This study was the first to describe the relationship between secondhand smoke and gingival pigmentation in women and this effect was magnified in smaller houses. PMID:26528364

  15. Comparative clinical efficacy evaluation of three gingival displacement systems

    PubMed Central

    Shrivastava, Kirti Jajoo; Bhoyar, Anjali; Agarwal, Surendra; Shrivastava, Saurabh; Parlani, Swapnil; Murthy, Varsha

    2015-01-01

    Aim: We compared the clinical efficacy of three gingival displacement systems to accurately record intra-crevicular margins of tooth preparation. Materials and Methods: One mechanical (magic foam cord) and two chemico-mechanical (expasyl paste and retraction cord impregnated with 15% aluminum chloride) gingival displacement systems were used. This study was conducted on the maxillary central incisors of 20 patients (20-60 years old) requiring full coverage restoration. All the three gingival displacement systems were tested in three sessions at an interval of 14 days in same order. The casts were sectioned and viewed under an optical microscope, followed by quantitative measurements of the width of the pre and postretracted sulci. Results: All the three displacement systems produced highly significant horizontal gingival displacement. Retraction cord soaked in 15% aluminum chloride produced maximum displacement (0.74 mm), followed by expasyl paste (0.48 mm) whereas magic foam cord produced the least displacement (0.41 mm). Conclusions: Gingival displacement shown by each displacement system was found to be more than the accepted value necessary for elastomeric impression accuracy (0.2 mm) to record intra-crevicular margins of tooth preparation. PMID:26604620

  16. The Effectiveness of Propolis on Gingivitis: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Paulino, Niraldo; Nör, Jacques E.; Moreira, Alexandre

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background: A randomized, double-blind, controlled clinical trial was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of a propolis rinse on induced gingivitis by using the co-twin study design. Methods: Twenty-one twin pairs (n=42) were enrolled in a gingivitis study with oral hygiene promotion (14 days) and gingivitis induction (21 days). During the gingivitis induction phase, one member of the twin pair was randomly assigned to a 2% typified propolis rinse, and the other was assigned a color-matched 0.05% sodium fluoride plus 0.05% cetylpyridinium chloride rinse (positive control). Patients rinsed twice daily with 20 mL for 30 seconds for 21 days. Gingivitis was measured on days −14 (baseline), 0 (after hygiene phase), and 21 (after no-hygiene phase) by using the Papillary Bleeding Score (PBS) and by standard digital imaging of the gum tissues (G-parameter). Results: The 38 persons who completed the study (age 13–22 years) were well balanced according to PBS at baseline and G-parameter after the initial hygiene phase. After 21 days without oral hygiene, the propolis rinse and positive control rinse groups did not differ significantly for average PBS measurements or G-parameter. Conclusions: Use of a 2% typified propolis rinse was equivalent to a positive control rinse during a 21-day no-hygiene period. PMID:25380344

  17. Enlarged cerebrospinal fluid spaces in infants with subdural hematomas

    SciTech Connect

    Kapila, A.; Trice, J.; Spies, W.G.; Siegel, B.A.; Gado, M.H.

    1982-03-01

    Computed tomography in 16 infants with subdural hematomas showed enlarged basal cisterns, a wide interhemispheric fissure, prominent cortical sulci, and varying degrees of ventricular enlargement. Radionuclide cisternography in eight of the 16 patients showed findings consistent with enlargement of the subarachnoid space rather than those of communicating hydrocephalus. Clinical findings and brief follow-up showed no convincing evidence for cerebral atrophy in 13 patients. These findings suggest that the enlarged subarachnoid space, which is encountered in some infants and may be a developmental variant, predisposes such infants to subdural hematomas.

  18. A Clinical Evaluation of Gingival Overgrowth in Children on Antiepileptic Drug Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Chopra, Saroj; Thomas, Abi M; Pandian, Jeyraj

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Gingival overgrowth, a well-known side effect of chronic phenytoin therapy has also been known to be caused by other anti epileptic drugs (AED’s). Various factors like plaque, gingival inflammation, and periodontal health have been postulated to effect gingival overgrowth. Aim To identify the AED having an effect on gingival overgrowth and to study the factors affecting it. Materials and Methods Three groups of 30 children each on monotherapy of phenytoin, sodium valproate, and carbamazepine were longitudinally followed for six months. Their oral and epileptic health status was assessed and were monitored for change in plaque levels, gingival inflammation, probing depth and the status of gingival overgrowth at baseline, at the end of 3 months and finally at the end of 6 months. The data was recorded and statistically analysed. Results Phenytoin caused gingival overgrowth in a significant number of children (53.6%) within 3 months. Sodium valproate also led to gingival overgrowth, but not upto statistically significant levels. Patients on carbamazepine did not show any signs of gingival overgrowth. Gingival overgrowth is seen more on buccal side, in the anterior segment and in the lower arch. No correlation could be found between, either plaque level, or gingival inflammation with gingival overgrowth. Probing depth could be positively correlated with gingival overgrowth. Conclusion Phenytoin is the drug, which can be chiefly implicated for causing gingival overgrowth. Sodium valproate carries the potential for gingival overgrowth, although only up to clinically insignificant levels in 6 months. Carbamazepine can be considered a safe drug in children in relation to gingival overgrowth. PMID:26894172

  19. A Five-Species Transcriptome Array for Oral Mixed-Biofilm Studies

    PubMed Central

    Podbielski, Andreas; Kreikemeyer, Bernd

    2011-01-01

    Background Oral polymicrobial interactions and biofilm formation are associated with initiation and progression of caries, gingivitis, and periodontitis. Transcriptome studies of such interactions, allowing a first mechanistic insight, are hampered by current single-species array designs. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study we used 385 K NimbleGene™ technology for design and evaluation of an array covering the full genomes of 5 important physiological-, cariogenic-, and periodontitis-associated microorganisms (Streptococcus sanguinis, Streptococcus mutans, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, and Porphyromonas gingivalis). Array hybridization was done with cDNA from cultures grown for 24 h anaerobically. Single species experiments identified cross-species hybridizing array probes. These probes could be neglected in a mixed-species experimental setting without the need to exclude the whole genes from the analysis. Between 69% and almost 99% of the genomes were actively transcribed under the mono-species planktonic, monolayer, and biofilm conditions. The influence of Streptococcus mitis (not represented on the array) on S. mutans gene transcription was determined as a test for a dual-species mixed biofilm setup. Phenotypically, under the influence of S. mitis an increase in S. mutans biofilm mass and a decrease in media pH-value were noticed, thereby confirming previously published data. Employing a stringent cut-off (2-fold, p<0.05), 19 S. mutans transcripts were identified with increased abundance, and 11 with decreased abundance compared to a S. mutans mono-species biofilm. Several of these genes have previously been found differentially regulated under general and acid stress, thereby confirming the value of this array. Conclusions/Significance This new array allows transcriptome studies on multi-species oral biofilm interactions. It may become an important asset in future oral biofilm and inhibitor/therapy studies. PMID

  20. Prevention of Phenytoin-Induced Gingival Overgrowth by Lovastatin in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Assaggaf, Mohammad A.; Kantarci, Alpdogan; Sume, Siddika S.; Trackman, Philip C.

    2016-01-01

    Drug-induced gingival overgrowth is caused by the antiseizure medication phenytoin, calcium channel blockers, and ciclosporin. Characteristics of these drug-induced gingival overgrowth lesions differ. We evaluate the ability of a mouse model to mimic human phenytoin-induced gingival overgrowth and assess the ability of a drug to prevent its development. Lovastatin was chosen based on previous analyses of tissue-specific regulation of CCN2 production in human gingival fibroblasts and the known roles of CCN2 in promoting fibrosis and epithelial to mesenchymal transition. Data indicate that anterior gingival tissue overgrowth occurred in phenytoin-treated mice based on gross tissue observations and histomorphometry of tissue sections. Molecular markers of epithelial plasticity and fibrosis were regulated by phenytoin in gingival epithelial tissues and in connective tissues similar to that seen in humans. Lovastatin attenuated epithelial gingival tissue growth in phenytoin-treated mice and altered the expressions of markers for epithelial to mesenchymal transition. Data indicate that phenytoin-induced gingival overgrowth in mice mimics molecular aspects of human gingival overgrowth and that lovastatin normalizes the tissue morphology and the expression of the molecular markers studied. Data are consistent with characterization of phenytoin-induced human gingival overgrowth in vivo and in vitro characteristics of cultured human gingival epithelial and connective tissue cells. Findings suggest that statins may serve to prevent or attenuate phenytoin-induced human gingival overgrowth, although specific human studies are required. PMID:25843680

  1. Prevention of phenytoin-induced gingival overgrowth by lovastatin in mice.

    PubMed

    Assaggaf, Mohammad A; Kantarci, Alpdogan; Sume, Siddika S; Trackman, Philip C

    2015-06-01

    Drug-induced gingival overgrowth is caused by the antiseizure medication phenytoin, calcium channel blockers, and ciclosporin. Characteristics of these drug-induced gingival overgrowth lesions differ. We evaluate the ability of a mouse model to mimic human phenytoin-induced gingival overgrowth and assess the ability of a drug to prevent its development. Lovastatin was chosen based on previous analyses of tissue-specific regulation of CCN2 production in human gingival fibroblasts and the known roles of CCN2 in promoting fibrosis and epithelial to mesenchymal transition. Data indicate that anterior gingival tissue overgrowth occurred in phenytoin-treated mice based on gross tissue observations and histomorphometry of tissue sections. Molecular markers of epithelial plasticity and fibrosis were regulated by phenytoin in gingival epithelial tissues and in connective tissues similar to that seen in humans. Lovastatin attenuated epithelial gingival tissue growth in phenytoin-treated mice and altered the expressions of markers for epithelial to mesenchymal transition. Data indicate that phenytoin-induced gingival overgrowth in mice mimics molecular aspects of human gingival overgrowth and that lovastatin normalizes the tissue morphology and the expression of the molecular markers studied. Data are consistent with characterization of phenytoin-induced human gingival overgrowth in vivo and in vitro characteristics of cultured human gingival epithelial and connective tissue cells. Findings suggest that statins may serve to prevent or attenuate phenytoin-induced human gingival overgrowth, although specific human studies are required. PMID:25843680

  2. Repair of a Gingival Fenestration Using an Acellular Dermal Matrix Allograft.

    PubMed

    Breault, Lawrence G; Brentson, Raquel C; Fowler, Edward B; Bisch, Frederick C

    2016-01-01

    A case report illustrating the successful treatment of a gingival fenestration with an acellular dermal matrix (ADM) allograft. After 2½ months of healing, the ADM was completely integrated into the soft tissues of the mandibular anterior gingiva with complete resolution of the gingival fenestration, resulting in excellent gingival esthetics. PMID:26874103

  3. Effects of titania nanotubes with or without bovine serum albumin loaded on human gingival fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiangning; Zhou, Xiaosong; Li, Shaobing; Lai, Renfa; Zhou, Zhiying; Zhang, Ye; Zhou, Lei

    2014-01-01

    Modifying the surface of the transmucosal area is a key research area because this process positively affects the three functions of implants: attachment to soft tissue, inhibiting bacterial biofilm adhesion, and the preservation of the crestal bone. To exploit the potential of titania nanotube arrays (TNTs) with or without using bovine serum albumin (BSA) to modify the surface of a dental implant in contact with the transmucosal area, BSA was loaded into TNTs that were fabricated by anodizing Ti sheets; the physical characteristics of these arrays, including their morphology, chemical composition, surface roughness, contact angle, and surface free energy (SFE), were assessed. The effect of Ti surfaces with TNTs or TNTs-BSA on human gingival fibroblasts (HGFs) was determined by analyzing cell morphology, early adhesion, proliferation, type I collagen (COL-1) gene expression, and the extracellular secretion of COL-1. The results indicate that early HGF adhesion and spreading behavior is positively correlated with surface characteristics, including hydrophilicity, SFE, and surface roughness. Additionally, TNT surfaces not only promoted early HGF adhesion, but also promoted COL-1 secretion. BSA-loaded TNT surfaces promoted early HGF adhesion, while suppressing late proliferation and COL-1 secretion. Therefore, TNT-modified smooth surfaces are expected to be applicable for uses involving the transmucosal area. Further study is required to determine whether BSA-loaded TNT surfaces actually affect closed loop formation of connective tissue because BSA coating actions in vivo are very rapid. PMID:24623977

  4. Prevalence of gingival biotype and its relationship to clinical parameters

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Rucha; Sowmya, N. K.; Mehta, D. S.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The dimensions of gingiva and different parts of the masticatory mucosa have a profound impact in periodontics as it governs the way; the gingival tissue reacts to various physical, chemical, or bacterial insults. The purpose of the following study was to assess the gingival thickness (GT) and correlate it to gender, presence of recession, and width of keratinized gingiva (WKG) in a subset of the Indian population. Methods: A total of 400 subjects in the age range of 20–35 years (200 males and 200 females) were included in the study. Clinical parameters such as probing depth, recession depth, WKG, and GT were recorded for all the patients. Results: The prevalence of thin biotype was 43.25%, and that of thick gingival biotype was 56.75%. The mean GT of central incisor, lateral incisor, and canine in Group I was 1.11 ± 0.17, 1.01 ± 0.16, and 0.82 ± 0.17 mm, respectively. No significant association was observed between the gender and the presence of gingival recession to GT. The mean WKG of central incisor, lateral incisor, and canine in Group I was 4.38 ± 1.18, 5.18 ± 1.25, 4.16 ± 1.16 mm, respectively. A positive correlation exists between WKG and the GT (P < 0.05). Conclusion: It was concluded that the prevalence of thick and thin gingival biotype is 56.75% versus 43.25%, respectively, and there is no significant relationship between age, gender, and the presence of recession to gingival biotype. A positive correlation exists between WKG and the GT. PMID:26604569

  5. The ability of an herbal mouthrinse to reduce gingival bleeding.

    PubMed

    Scherer, W; Gultz, J; Lee, S S; Kaim, J

    1998-01-01

    Forty healthy adult volunteers from the Junior Comprehensive Care Clinics at New York University College of Dentistry were accepted as subjects for this three-month, examiner-blinded, parallel-group clinical trial. To be eligible for a baseline clinical examination, subjects had to first indicate that during the previous six months they habitually brushed their teeth two or more times per day and had noticed "bleeding gums" or "blood in the toothpaste" after brushing or after flossing their teeth. At the baseline examination, subjects were enrolled in the study if they were found to have at least five Löe-Silness gingival bleeding sites and 20 natural teeth, including four molars. Subjects were assigned to one of the two following treatment groups: 1) Herbal Mouth and Gum Therapy; or 2) Control (distilled water and dye). Subjects were instructed to clean their teeth in their usual manner, not to use any other mouthrinses or oral irrigation products for the duration of the study. Subjects were to return for clinical examinations after three months of product use. At these examinations, gingivitis and gingival bleeding scores were recorded. An independent t-test before treatment indicated that there were no significant differences between the baseline evaluations of the two groups in the study. A one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), comparing gingivitis and bleeding scores from baseline and three months with the baseline scores as a covariate, indicated that Herbal Mouth and Gum Therapy produced a statistically significant effect (p < 0.01) on both parameters relative to the control mouthrinse. The results of this study support the clinical efficacy of Herbal Mouth and Gum Therapy in reducing gingivitis and gingival bleeding. PMID:10518858

  6. Binding, uptake, and release of nicotine by human gingival fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Hanes, P.J.; Schuster, G.S.; Lubas, S. )

    1991-02-01

    Previous studies of the effects of nicotine on fibroblasts have reported an altered morphology and attachment of fibroblasts to substrates and disturbances in protein synthesis and secretion. This altered functional and attachment response may be associated with changes in the cell membrane resulting from binding of the nicotine, or to disturbances in cell metabolism as a result of high intracellular levels of nicotine. The purpose of the present study, therefore, was to (1) determine whether gingival fibroblasts bound nicotine and if any binding observed was specific or non-specific in nature; (2) determine whether gingival fibroblasts internalized nicotine, and if so, at what rate; (3) determine whether gingival fibroblasts also released nicotine back into the extracellular environment; and (4) if gingival fibroblasts release nicotine intact or as a metabolite. Cultures of gingival fibroblasts were prepared from gingival connective tissue biopsies. Binding was evaluated at 4{degree}C using a mixture of {sup 3}H-nicotine and unlabeled nicotine. Specific binding was calculated as the difference between {sup 3}H-nicotine bound in the presence and absence of unlabeled nicotine. The cells bound 1.44 (+/- 0.42) pmols/10(6) cells in the presence of unlabeled nicotine and 1.66 (+/- 0.55) pmols/10(6) cells in the absence of unlabeled nicotine. The difference was not significant. Uptake of nicotine was measured at 37{degree}C after treating cells with {sup 3}H-nicotine for time periods up to 4 hours. Uptake in pmols/10(6) cells was 4.90 (+/- 0.34) at 15 minutes, 8.30 (+/- 0.75) at 30 minutes, 12.28 (+/- 2.62) at 1 hour and 26.31 (+/- 1.15) at 4 hours.

  7. Manipulation of Biofilm Microbial Ecology

    SciTech Connect

    White, D.C.; Palmer, R.J., Jr.; Zinn, M.; Smith, C.A.; Burkhalter, R.; Macnaughton, S.J.; Whitaker, K.W.; Kirkegaard, R.D.

    1998-08-15

    The biofilm mode of growth provides such significant advantages to the members of the consortium that most organisms in important habitats are found in biofilms. The study of factors that allow manipulation of biofilm microbes in the biofilm growth state requires that reproducible biofilms be generated. The most effective monitoring of biofilm formation, succession and desaturation is with on-line monitoring of microbial biofilms with flowcell for direct observation. The biofilm growth state incorporates a second important factor, the heterogeneity in distribution in time and space of the component members of the biofilm consortium. This heterogeneity is reflected not only in the cellular distribution but in the metabolic activity within a population of cells. Activity and cellular distribution can be mapped in four dimensions with confocal microscopy, and function can be ascertained by genetically manipulated reporter functions for specific genes or by vital stains. The methodology for understanding the microbial ecology of biofilms is now much more readily available and the capacity to manipulate biofilms is becoming an important feature of biotechnology.

  8. Manipulatiaon of Biofilm Microbial Ecology

    SciTech Connect

    Burkhalter, R.; Macnaughton, S.J.; Palmer, R.J.; Smith, C.A.; Whitaker, K.W.; White, D.C.; Zinn, M.; kirkegaard, R.

    1998-08-09

    The Biofilm mode of growth provides such significant advantages to the members of the consortium that most organisms in important habitats are found in biofilms. The study of factors that allow manipulation of biofilm microbes in the biofilm growth state requires that reproducible biofilms by generated. The most effective monitoring of biofilm formation, succession and desquamation is with on-line monitoring of microbial biofilms with flowcell for direct observation. The biofilm growth state incorporates a second important factor, the heterogeneity in the distribution in time and space of the component members of the biofilm consortium. This heterogeneity is reflected not only in the cellular distribution but in the metabolic activity within a population of cells. Activity and cellular distribution can be mapped in four dimensions with confocal microscopy, and function can be ascertained by genetically manipulated reporter functions for specific genes or by vital stains. The methodology for understanding the microbial ecology of biofilms is now much more readily available and the capacity to manipulate biofilms is becoming an important feature of biotechnology.

  9. Biofilm-specific antibiotic resistance.

    PubMed

    Mah, Thien-Fah

    2012-09-01

    Bacterial biofilms are the basis of many persistent diseases. The persistence of these infections is primarily attributed to the increased antibiotic resistance exhibited by the cells within the biofilms. This resistance is multifactorial; there are multiple mechanisms of resistance that act together in order to provide an increased overall level of resistance to the biofilm. These mechanisms are based on the function of wild-type genes and are not the result of mutations. This article reviews the known mechanisms of resistance, including the ability of the biofilm matrix to prevent antibiotics from reaching the cells and the function of individual genes that are preferentially expressed in biofilms. Evidence suggests that these mechanisms have been developed as a general stress response of biofilms that enables the cells in the biofilm to respond to all of the changes in the environment that they may encounter. PMID:22953707

  10. Biofilms: Microbial Life on Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    2002-01-01

    Microorganisms attach to surfaces and develop biofilms. Biofilm-associated cells can be differentiated from their suspended counterparts by generation of an extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) matrix, reduced growth rates, and the up- and down- regulation of specific genes. Attachment is a complex process regulated by diverse characteristics of the growth medium, substratum, and cell surface. An established biofilm structure comprises microbial cells and EPS, has a defined architecture, and provides an optimal environment for the exchange of genetic material between cells. Cells may also communicate via quorum sensing, which may in turn affect biofilm processes such as detachment. Biofilms have great importance for public health because of their role in certain infectious diseases and importance in a variety of device-related infections. A greater understanding of biofilm processes should lead to novel, effective control strategies for biofilm control and a resulting improvement in patient management. PMID:12194761

  11. [Biofilms, tolerance and antimicrobial resistance].

    PubMed

    Bahar, Gül

    2002-01-01

    Virtually every surface examined in natural, industrial and pathogenic ecosystems are colonized by biofilms consisting of adherent populations of microorganisms surrounded with a glycocalyx matrix. The development of biofilms has important economic and medical consequences. The development and use of a broad range of medical devices made us recognize a variety of infections caused by microorganisms that were regarded previously as harmless. Infections caused by biofilms are difficult to eradicate with antimicrobial treatment, and in-vitro susceptibility tests show significant resistance of biofilm cells to be killed. Advances in our understanding of biofilm formation can assist in the development of novel strategies for the prevention and treatment of infections caused by biofilms. In this review article, structures, general properties and antimicrobial resistance mechanisms of biofilms were discussed under the light of recent literature. PMID:12838670

  12. Can Chemical Mouthwash Agents Achieve Plaque/Gingivitis Control?

    PubMed

    Van der Weijden, Fridus A; Van der Sluijs, Eveline; Ciancio, Sebastian G; Slot, Dagmar E

    2015-10-01

    Also note that structured abstracts are not allowed per journal style: What is the effect of a mouthwash containing various active chemical ingredients on plaque control and managing gingivitis in adults based on evidence gathered from existing systematic reviews? The summarized evidence suggests that mouthwashes containing chlorhexidine(CHX) and essential oils (EO) had a large effect supported by a strong body of evidence. Also there was strong evidence for a moderate effect of cetylpyridinium chloride(CPC). Evidence suggests that a CHX mouthwash is the first choice, the most reliable alternative is EO. No difference between CHX and EO with respect to gingivitis was observed. PMID:26427569

  13. [Parodontocid efficiency in complex treatment and prevention of gingivitis].

    PubMed

    Makeeva, I M; Turkina, A Iu; Poliakova, M A; Babina, K S

    2013-01-01

    Antiplaque/antigingivitis effect of an alcohol-free mouthrinse Parodontocid were evaluated by randomized parallel group clinical trial. Sixty patients with gingivitis were clinically examined to determine PHP, RMNPI and PMA indexes. After professional dental prophylaxis, subjects were randomly assigned in two groups to 10 days oral hygiene program. Group 1 patients used only toothbrush and prophylactic toothpaste while in group 2 persons used Parodontocid in conjunction with normal brushing and flossing.Parodontocid significantly reduced plaque and gingivitis compared to negative control. PMID:24429785

  14. Enlargement of the Baldone near-surface radioactive waste repository

    SciTech Connect

    Dreimanis, A.

    2007-07-01

    A unified analysis of the enlargement of the Baldone near-surface radioactive waste (RW) repository RADONS considers the interplay of the existing engineering, safety and infrastructure premises, with the foreseen newly socio-technical features. This enlargement consists in construction of two additional RW disposal vaults and in building a long-term storage facility for spent sealed sources at the RADONS territory. Our approach is based on consecutive analysis of following basic elements: - the origin of enlargement - the RADONS safety analysis and a set of optimal socio-technical solutions of Salaspils research reactor decommissioning waste management; - the enlargement - a keystone of the national RW management concept, including the long-term approach; - the enlargement concept - the result of international co-operation and obligations; - arrangement optimization of new disposal and storage space; - environmental impact assessment for the repository enlargement - the update of socio-technical studies. The study of the public opinion revealed: negative attitude to repository enlargement is caused mainly due to missing information on radiation level and on the RADONS previous operations. These results indicate: basic measures to improve the public attitude to repository enlargement: the safety upgrade, public education and compensation mechanisms. A detailed stakeholders engagement and public education plan is elaborated. (author)

  15. 48 CFR 6101.3 - Time: enlargement; computation [Rule 3].

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 7 2013-10-01 2012-10-01 true Time: enlargement; computation . 6101.3 Section 6101.3 Federal Acquisition Regulations System CIVILIAN BOARD OF CONTRACT APPEALS, GENERAL SERVICES ADMINISTRATION CONTRACT DISPUTE CASES 6101.3 Time: enlargement; computation . (a)...

  16. Biofilm Cohesive Strength as a Basis for Biofilm Recalcitrance: Are Bacterial Biofilms Overdesigned?

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Srijan; Stewart, Philip S.; Hozalski, Raymond M.

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial biofilms are highly resistant to common antibacterial treatments, and several physiological explanations have been offered to explain the recalcitrant nature of bacterial biofilms. Herein, a biophysical aspect of biofilm recalcitrance is being reported on. While engineering structures are often overdesigned with a factor of safety (FOS) usually under 10, experimental measurements of biofilm cohesive strength suggest that the FOS is on the order of thousands. In other words, bacterial biofilms appear to be designed to withstand extreme forces rather than typical or average loads. In scenarios requiring the removal or control of unwanted biofilms, this emphasizes the importance of considering strategies for structurally weakening the biofilms in conjunction with bacterial inactivation. PMID:26819559

  17. PATHOGENICITY OF BIOFILM BACTERIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    There is a paucity of information concerning any link between the microorganisms commonly found in biofilms of drinking water systems and their impacts on human health. For bacteria, culture-based techniques detect only a limited number of the total microorganisms associated wit...

  18. [Urinary catheter biofilm infections].

    PubMed

    Holá, V; Růzicka, F

    2008-04-01

    Urinary tract infections, most of which are biofilm infections in catheterized patients, account for more than 40% of hospital infections. Bacterial colonization of the urinary tract and catheters causes not only infection but also other complications such as catheter blockage by bacterial encrustation, urolithiasis and pyelonephritis. About 50% of long-term catheterized patients face urinary flow obstruction due to catheter encrustation, but no measure is currently available to prevent it. Encrustation has been known either to result from metabolic dysfunction or to be of microbial origin, with urease positive bacterial species implicated most often. Infectious calculi account for about 15-20% of all cases of urolithiasis and are often associated with biofilm colonization of a long-term indwelling urinary catheter or urethral stent. The use of closed catheter systems is helpful in reducing such problems; nevertheless, such a system only delays the inevitable, with infections emerging a little later. Various coatings intended to prevent the bacterial adhesion to the surface of catheters and implants and thus also the emergence of biofilm infections, unfortunately, do not inhibit the microbial adhesion completely and permanently and the only reliable method for biofilm eradication remains the removal of the foreign body from the patient. PMID:18578409

  19. Gingival health in relation to clinical crown length: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Gingival margin position in relation to synthetic crowns and crown length could be etiological factors in gingival health. Case presentation A 27-year-old male presented with necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis with short clinical crowns suggestive of altered passive eruption. Three years after the initial diagnosis, he presented with crowns on the maxillary incisors. There were short clinical crowns and marked gingival inflammation. Conclusion Placement of the crown margin could be an etiological factor in gingival inflammation. Therefore, should the margin be subgingival, equigingival or supragingival? PMID:20062553

  20. Gingival health in relation to clinical crown length: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Gingival margin position in relation to synthetic crowns and crown length could be etiological factors in gingival health. Case presentation A 27-year-old male presented with necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis with short clinical crowns suggestive of altered passive eruption. Three years after the initial diagnosis, he presented with crowns on the maxillary incisors. There were short clinical crowns and marked gingival inflammation. Conclusion Placement of the crown margin could be an etiological factor in gingival inflammation. Therefore, should the margin be subgingival, equigingival or supragingival? PMID:20184687

  1. Biofilm Formation by Neisseria gonorrhoeae

    PubMed Central

    Greiner, L. L.; Edwards, J. L.; Shao, J.; Rabinak, C.; Entz, D.; Apicella, M. A.

    2005-01-01

    Studies were performed in continuous-flow chambers to determine whether Neisseria gonorrhoeae could form a biofilm. Under these growth conditions, N. gonorrhoeae formed a biofilm with or without the addition of 10 μM sodium nitrite to the perfusion medium. Microscopic analysis of a 4-day growth of N. gonorrhoeae strain 1291 revealed evidence of a biofilm with organisms embedded in matrix, which was interlaced with water channels. N. gonorrhoeae strains MS11 and FA1090 were found to also form biofilms under the same growth conditions. Cryofield emission scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy confirmed that organisms were embedded in a continuous matrix with membranous structures spanning the biofilm. These studies also demonstrated that N. gonorrhoeae has the capability to form a matrix in the presence and absence of CMP-N-acetylneuraminic acid (CMP-Neu5Ac). Studies with monoclonal antibody 6B4 and the lectins soy bean agglutinin and Maackia amurensis indicated that the predominate terminal sugars in the biofilm matrix formed a lactosamine when the biofilm was grown in the absence of CMP-Neu5Ac and sialyllactosamine in the presence of CMP-Neu5Ac. N. gonorrhoeae strain 1291 formed a biofilm on primary urethral epithelial cells and cervical cells in culture without loss of viability of the epithelial cell layer. Our studies demonstrated that N. gonorrhoeae can form biofilms in continuous-flow chambers and on living cells. Studies of these biofilms may have implications for understanding asymptomatic gonococcal infection. PMID:15784536

  2. Lasers in esthetic treatment of gingival melanin hyperpigmentation: a review article.

    PubMed

    Bakhshi, Mahin; Rahmani, Somayeh; Rahmani, Ali

    2015-11-01

    The health and suitability of mouth components play an important role towards defining facial attractiveness. An important component of the oral cavity is the color of the gingival tissue. Gingival melanin hyperpigmentation is caused by several reasons and affects people across ethnicity, race, age, and both gender. Lasers are presently being used for gingival melanin depigmentation. In this article, we reviewed studies on laser parameters, duration of gingival healing, pain perception during and after the operation, scores used for the evaluation of gingival melanin hyperpigmentation, follow-up period, treatment results, and recurrence reports. We conclude that laser ablation for gingival depigmentation is one of the most pleasant, reliable, acceptable, and impressive techniques available for treating gingival melanin hyperpigmentation. PMID:26370204

  3. Surgical correction of gingival recessions associated with radicular carious lesions.

    PubMed

    Urbani, G; Lombardo, G; Castellarin, M; Santi, E; Abitbol, T

    1996-04-01

    In this clinical report, six cases are presented in which radicular carious lesions and gingival recessions were treated concurrently. The combined treatment included the removal of caries, radicular planing, and various surgical techniques for root coverage. Traditional procedures, as well as newer procedures, such as guided tissue regeneration, showed successful results. PMID:9051969

  4. Ambras Syndrome with Gingival Hyperplasia: A Rare Entity

    PubMed Central

    Reddy Kundoor, Vinay Kumar; Maloth, Kotya Naik; Kesidi, Sunitha; Moni, Thakur

    2016-01-01

    Ambras syndrome is a rare and special form of congenital hypertrichosis, characterized by dysmorphic facial features and familial pattern of inheritance. It is rarely associated with gingival hyperplasia. We report such a rare entity in a 38-year-old female patient with a history of consanguinity and positive family history. PMID:27601862

  5. Ambras Syndrome with Gingival Hyperplasia: A Rare Entity.

    PubMed

    Reddy Kundoor, Vinay Kumar; Maloth, Kotya Naik; Kesidi, Sunitha; Moni, Thakur

    2016-01-01

    Ambras syndrome is a rare and special form of congenital hypertrichosis, characterized by dysmorphic facial features and familial pattern of inheritance. It is rarely associated with gingival hyperplasia. We report such a rare entity in a 38-year-old female patient with a history of consanguinity and positive family history. PMID:27601862

  6. Evaluation of gingival vascularisation using laser Doppler flowmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitez, B.; Todea, C.; Velescu, A.; Şipoş, C.

    2016-03-01

    Aim: The present study aims to assess the level of vascularisation of the lower frontal gingiva of smoker patients, in comparison with non-smokers by using Laser Doppler Flowmetry (LDF), in order to determine the changes in gingival microcirculation. Material & methods: 16 volunteers were included in this study and separated into 2 equal groups: non-smoker subjects in Group I and smoker subjects in Group II. All patients were submitted to a visual examination and professional cleaning The gingival bloodflow of each patient was recorded in 5 zones using LDF, resulting in a total of 80 recordings. LDF was done with the Moor Instruments Ltd. "moorLAB" Laser Doppler. All data were collected as graphs, raw values and statistically analyzed. Results: After strict analysis results show that Group II presents a steady level of gingival microcirculation with even patterns in the graph, while Group I shows many signs of damage to it`s microvascular system through many irregularities in the microcirculation level and graph patterns. Conclusion: The results suggest that prolonged smoking has a definitive effect on the gingival vascularisation making it a key factor in periodontal pathology.

  7. Effect of Phenytoin and Age on Gingival Fibroblast Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Vahabi, Surena; Nazemisalman, Bahareh; Vahid Golpaigani, Mojtaba; Ahmadi, Anahid

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The alteration of cytokine balance is stated to exert greater influence on gingival overgrowth compared to the direct effect of the drug on the regulation of extracellular matrix metabolism. The current study evaluated the effect of phenytoin on the regulation of collagen, lysyl oxidase and elastin in gingival fibroblasts. Materials and Methods: Normal human gingival fibroblasts (HGFs) were obtained from 4 healthy children and 4 adults. Samples were cultured with phenytoin. MTT test was used to evaluate the proliferation and ELISA was performed to determine the level of IL1β and PGE2 production by HGFs. Total RNA of gingival fibroblasts was extracted and RT-PCR was performed on samples. Mann-Whitney U test was used to analyze the data with an alpha error level less than 0.05. Results: There was a significant difference in the expression of elastin between the controls and treated samples in both adult and pediatric groups and also in the lysyl oxidase expression of adult controls and treated adults. No significant difference was found between collagen expression in adults. Conclusion: The significant difference in elastin and lysyl oxidase expression between adult and pediatric samples indicates the significant effect of age on their production. PMID:25628662

  8. Electrodeposition of pronectin for titanium to augment gingival epithelium adhesion.

    PubMed

    Kawabata, Shingo; Asano, Kazunari; Miyazawa, Atsuko; Satoh, Tazuko; Tabata, Yasuhiko

    2013-05-01

    This paper is one trial of surface modification of titanium with pronectin F+ (PN) of an artificial protein to enhance gingival adhesion. Titanium plates were electrodeposited in the PN solution to prepare PN-electrodeposited titanium plates. When PN detachment from the PN-electrodeposited titanium plates was investigated, no detachment was observed, in contrast to the case of titanium plates simply coated with PN. A cell culture experiment demonstrated that electrodeposited PN had an inherent ability to enhance the initial attachment of gingival epithelial cells. The PN-electrodeposited titanium plates were implanted between the gingival epithelium and the underlying bone tissue of rabbits to evaluate epithelial growth on the plates and their gingival adhesion. Non-treated and PN-coated titanium plates were used as controls. PN electrodeposition enhanced epithelial growth and adhesion of titanium plates to a significantly great extent compared with PN-coated plates. These findings demonstrate that PN electrodeposition is a promising method to enhance epithelium adhesion onto a titanium surface. PMID:22294437

  9. [Gingival fibromatosis with oligophrenia and self-injurious behavior].

    PubMed

    Fehlow, P

    1990-01-01

    It is reported on a 14-year-old girl with a hirsutism gingival fibromatosis syndrome, which is combined with moderate generalised muscle hypotonia, inhibition of physical maturation, severe scoliosis, diastasis recti abdominis and aplasia of a rib. Psychically there are idioty, autism and severe selfinjurious behaviour. PMID:2377378

  10. Inhibition of biofilm formation and antibacterial properties of a silver nano-coating on human dentine.

    PubMed

    Besinis, Alexandros; De Peralta, Tracy; Handy, Richard D

    2014-11-01

    The survival of pathogenic bacteria in the oral cavity depends on their successful adhesion to dental surfaces and their ability to develop into biofilms, known as dental plaque. Bacteria from the dental plaque are responsible for the development of dental caries, gingivitis, periodontitis, stomatitis and peri-implantitis. Certain metal nanoparticles have been suggested for infection control and the management of the oral biofilm. Here, it is shown that application of a silver nano-coating directly on dentine can successfully prevent the biofilm formation on dentine surfaces as well as inhibit bacterial growth in the surrounding media. This silver nano-coating was found to be stable (>98.8%) and to maintain its integrity in biological fluids. Its antibacterial activity was compared to silver nitrate and the widely used clinical antiseptic, chlorhexidine. The bacterial growth and cell viability were quantitatively assessed by measuring the turbidity, proportion of live and dead cells and lactate production. All three bioassays showed that silver nanoparticles and silver nitrate dentine coatings were equally highly bactericidal (>99.5%), while inhibiting bacterial adhesion. However, the latter caused significant dentine discolouration (ΔE* = 50.3). The chlorhexidine coating showed no antibacterial effect. Thus, silver nanoparticles may be a viable alternative to both chlorhexidine and silver nitrate, protecting from dental plaque and secondary caries when applied as a dentine coating, while they may provide the platform for creating anti-biofilm surfaces in medical devices and other biomedical applications. PMID:23875717

  11. Prevalence of Gingival Biotypes among Young Dentate North Indian Population: A Biometric Approach

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Polsani L; Bhoria, Mohaneesh

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Aim: To evaluate the prevalence of various gingival biotypes and to corroborate gingival thickness and gingival biotypes across tooth type, site, and gender. Materials and methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted across systemically healthy subjects. A systematic clinical evaluation for gingival biotypes and gingival thicknesses was recorded by modified Iwanson’s gauge, to the nearest 0.1 mm, probing the gingival sulcus at the midfacial aspect of maxillary and mandibular central incisors and first molars. All measurements were made across a total of 920 sites in 115 subjects (69 female and 46 male) based on gingival transparency and were statistically analyzed. Results: A significant agreement on the reproducibility of the measurements was noted. The median overall gingival thickness was recorded at 0.75 mm with interquantile difference of 0.39 mm. The thin biotype variant showed across the ranges of 0.3 to 0.6 mm of gingival thicknesses and thick biotype variant across the ranges of 1.0 to 1.2 mm, with more prevalence in anterior and posterior site respectively. Moreover, for gingi-val thickness of 0.7 mm, the probe visibility showed tendency toward both thin/thick biotype variant in both anterior and posterior segments. The disposition of male participants toward thick biotype and female participants toward the thin biotype variant has been noted. Conclusion: Within the limitations of the current study, our data support the traditional hypothesis of two main gingival biotypes as distinguishable by gingival transparency. In addition, we provide evidence of existence of intermediate biotypes with respect to gingival thickness. These findings can be utilized as objective guidelines for determination of biotype and can be implicated in many dental operative procedures. How to cite this article: Rathee M, Rao PL, Bhoria M. Prevalence of Gingival Biotypes among Young Dentate North Indian Population: A Biometric Approach. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2016

  12. Tryptophan Inhibits Biofilm Formation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Brandenburg, Kenneth S.; Rodriguez, Karien J.; McAnulty, Jonathan F.; Murphy, Christopher J.; Abbott, Nicholas L.; Schurr, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Biofilm formation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa has been implicated in the pathology of chronic wounds. Both the d and l isoforms of tryptophan inhibited P. aeruginosa biofilm formation on tissue culture plates, with an equimolar ratio of d and l isoforms producing the greatest inhibitory effect. Addition of d-/l-tryptophan to existing biofilms inhibited further biofilm growth and caused partial biofilm disassembly. Tryptophan significantly increased swimming motility, which may be responsible in part for diminished biofilm formation by P. aeruginosa. PMID:23318791

  13. Human Memory B Cells in Healthy Gingiva, Gingivitis, and Periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Mahanonda, Rangsini; Champaiboon, Chantrakorn; Subbalekha, Keskanya; Sa-Ard-Iam, Noppadol; Rattanathammatada, Warattaya; Thawanaphong, Saranya; Rerkyen, Pimprapa; Yoshimura, Fuminobu; Nagano, Keiji; Lang, Niklaus P; Pichyangkul, Sathit

    2016-08-01

    The presence of inflammatory infiltrates with B cells, specifically plasma cells, is the hallmark of periodontitis lesions. The composition of these infiltrates in various stages of homeostasis and disease development is not well documented. Human tissue biopsies from sites with gingival health (n = 29), gingivitis (n = 8), and periodontitis (n = 21) as well as gingival tissue after treated periodontitis (n = 6) were obtained and analyzed for their composition of B cell subsets. Ag specificity, Ig secretion, and expression of receptor activator of NF-κB ligand and granzyme B were performed. Although most of the B cell subsets in healthy gingiva and gingivitis tissues were CD19(+)CD27(+)CD38(-) memory B cells, the major B cell component in periodontitis was CD19(+)CD27(+)CD38(+)CD138(+)HLA-DR(low) plasma cells, not plasmablasts. Plasma cell aggregates were observed at the base of the periodontal pocket and scattered throughout the gingiva, especially apically toward the advancing front of the lesion. High expression of CXCL12, a proliferation-inducing ligand, B cell-activating factor, IL-10, IL-6, and IL-21 molecules involved in local B cell responses was detected in both gingivitis and periodontitis tissues. Periodontitis tissue plasma cells mainly secreted IgG specific to periodontal pathogens and also expressed receptor activator of NF-κB ligand, a bone resorption cytokine. Memory B cells resided in the connective tissue subjacent to the junctional epithelium in healthy gingiva. This suggested a role of memory B cells in maintaining periodontal homeostasis. PMID:27335500

  14. New Technologies for Studying Biofilms.

    PubMed

    Franklin, Michael J; Chang, Connie; Akiyama, Tatsuya; Bothner, Brian

    2015-08-01

    Bacteria have traditionally been studied as single-cell organisms. In laboratory settings, aerobic bacteria are usually cultured in aerated flasks, where the cells are considered essentially homogenous. However, in many natural environments, bacteria and other microorganisms grow in mixed communities, often associated with surfaces. Biofilms are comprised of surface-associated microorganisms, their extracellular matrix material, and environmental chemicals that have adsorbed to the bacteria or their matrix material. While this definition of a biofilm is fairly simple, biofilms are complex and dynamic. Our understanding of the activities of individual biofilm cells and whole biofilm systems has developed rapidly, due in part to advances in molecular, analytical, and imaging tools and the miniaturization of tools designed to characterize biofilms at the enzyme level, cellular level, and systems level. PMID:26350329

  15. Biofilm Formation by Cryptococcus neoformans.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Luis R; Casadevall, Arturo

    2015-06-01

    The fungus Cryptococcus neoformans possesses a polysaccharide capsule and can form biofilms on medical devices. The increasing use of ventriculoperitoneal shunts to manage intracranial hypertension associated with cryptococcal meningoencephalitis highlights the importance of investigating the biofilm-forming properties of this organism. Like other microbe-forming biofilms, C. neoformans biofilms are resistant to antimicrobial agents and host defense mechanisms, causing significant morbidity and mortality. This chapter discusses the recent advances in the understanding of cryptococcal biofilms, including the role of its polysaccharide capsule in adherence, gene expression, and quorum sensing in biofilm formation. We describe novel strategies for the prevention or eradication of cryptococcal colonization of medical prosthetic devices. Finally, we provide fresh thoughts on the diverse but interesting directions of research in this field that may result in new insights into C. neoformans biology. PMID:26185073

  16. New Technologies for Studying Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    FRANKLIN, MICHAEL J.; CHANG, CONNIE; AKIYAMA, TATSUYA; BOTHNER, BRIAN

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria have traditionally been studied as single-cell organisms. In laboratory settings, aerobic bacteria are usually cultured in aerated flasks, where the cells are considered essentially homogenous. However, in many natural environments, bacteria and other microorganisms grow in mixed communities, often associated with surfaces. Biofilms are comprised of surface-associated microorganisms, their extracellular matrix material, and environmental chemicals that have adsorbed to the bacteria or their matrix material. While this definition of a biofilm is fairly simple, biofilms are complex and dynamic. Our understanding of the activities of individual biofilm cells and whole biofilm systems has developed rapidly, due in part to advances in molecular, analytical, and imaging tools and the miniaturization of tools designed to characterize biofilms at the enzyme level, cellular level, and systems level. PMID:26350329

  17. Electrochemical biofilm control: a review.

    PubMed

    Sultana, Sujala T; Babauta, Jerome T; Beyenal, Haluk

    2015-01-01

    One of the methods of controlling biofilms that has widely been discussed in the literature is to apply a potential or electrical current to a metal surface on which the biofilm is growing. Although electrochemical biofilm control has been studied for decades, the literature is often conflicting, as is detailed in this review. The goals of this review are: (1) to present the current status of knowledge regarding electrochemical biofilm control; (2) to establish a basis for a fundamental definition of electrochemical biofilm control and requirements for studying it; (3) to discuss current proposed mechanisms; and (4) to introduce future directions in the field. It is expected that the review will provide researchers with guidelines on comparing datasets across the literature and generating comparable datasets. The authors believe that, with the correct design, electrochemical biofilm control has great potential for industrial use. PMID:26592420

  18. Early canine plaque biofilms: characterization of key bacterial interactions involved in initial colonization of enamel.

    PubMed

    Holcombe, Lucy J; Patel, Niran; Colyer, Alison; Deusch, Oliver; O'Flynn, Ciaran; Harris, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    Periodontal disease (PD) is a significant problem in dogs affecting between 44% and 63.6% of the population. The main etiological agent for PD is plaque, a microbial biofilm that colonizes teeth and causes inflammation of the gingiva. Understanding how this biofilm initiates on the tooth surface is of central importance in developing interventions against PD. Although the stages of plaque development on human teeth have been well characterized little is known about how canine plaque develops. Recent studies of the canine oral microbiome have revealed distinct differences between the canine and human oral environments and the bacterial communities they support, particularly with respect to healthy plaque. These differences mean knowledge about the nature of plaque formation in humans may not be directly translatable to dogs. The aim of this study was to identify the bacterial species important in the early stages of canine plaque formation in vivo and then use isolates of these species in a laboratory biofilm model to develop an understanding of the sequential processes which take place during the initial colonization of enamel. Supra-gingival plaque samples were collected from 12 dogs at 24 and 48 hour time points following a full mouth descale and polish. Pyrosequencing of the 16S rDNA identified 134 operational taxonomic units after statistical analysis. The species with the highest relative abundance were Bergeyella zoohelcum, Neisseria shayeganii and a Moraxella species. Streptococcal species, which tend to dominate early human plaque biofilms, had very low relative abundance. In vitro testing of biofilm formation identified five primary colonizer species, three of which belonged to the genus Neisseria. Using these pioneer bacteria as a starting point, viable two and three species communities were developed. Combining in vivo and in vitro data has led us to construct novel models of how the early canine plaque biofilm develops. PMID:25463050

  19. Early Canine Plaque Biofilms: Characterization of Key Bacterial Interactions Involved in Initial Colonization of Enamel

    PubMed Central

    Holcombe, Lucy J.; Patel, Niran; Colyer, Alison; Deusch, Oliver; O’Flynn, Ciaran; Harris, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    Periodontal disease (PD) is a significant problem in dogs affecting between 44% and 63.6% of the population. The main etiological agent for PD is plaque, a microbial biofilm that colonizes teeth and causes inflammation of the gingiva. Understanding how this biofilm initiates on the tooth surface is of central importance in developing interventions against PD. Although the stages of plaque development on human teeth have been well characterized little is known about how canine plaque develops. Recent studies of the canine oral microbiome have revealed distinct differences between the canine and human oral environments and the bacterial communities they support, particularly with respect to healthy plaque. These differences mean knowledge about the nature of plaque formation in humans may not be directly translatable to dogs. The aim of this study was to identify the bacterial species important in the early stages of canine plaque formation in vivo and then use isolates of these species in a laboratory biofilm model to develop an understanding of the sequential processes which take place during the initial colonization of enamel. Supra-gingival plaque samples were collected from 12 dogs at 24 and 48 hour time points following a full mouth descale and polish. Pyrosequencing of the 16S rDNA identified 134 operational taxonomic units after statistical analysis. The species with the highest relative abundance were Bergeyella zoohelcum, Neisseria shayeganii and a Moraxella species. Streptococcal species, which tend to dominate early human plaque biofilms, had very low relative abundance. In vitro testing of biofilm formation identified five primary colonizer species, three of which belonged to the genus Neisseria. Using these pioneer bacteria as a starting point, viable two and three species communities were developed. Combining in vivo and in vitro data has led us to construct novel models of how the early canine plaque biofilm develops. PMID:25463050

  20. Organotypic co-cultures allow for immortalized human gingival keratinocytes to reconstitute a gingival epithelial phenotype in vitro.

    PubMed

    Roesch-Ely, Mariana; Steinberg, Thorsten; Bosch, F Xavier; Müssig, Eva; Whitaker, Noel; Wiest, Tina; Kohl, Annette; Komposch, Gerda; Tomakidi, Pascal

    2006-12-01

    We report here that the organotypic co-culture (OCC) system allows for significant preservation of the tissue-specific phenotype of human gingival keratinocytes (IHGK) immortalized with the E6/E7 gene of the human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16). The approach adopted is based on the OCC system facilitating spatially separated cell growth and cell-to-cell interactions via diffusible growth factors. Generally, IHGK reveal transcription of the HPV16 E6/E7 gene at rising passages. Fluorescence in situ hybridization performed for chromosomes 1, 8, 10, and 18 demonstrates that disomic fractions differ between the tested chromosomes but otherwise remain fairly constant. Monosomies of chromosome 18 are more prominent in late passages 81 and 83, while polysomies of chromosome 10 and 18 are detected in early passages 25 and 27. In comparison with corresponding monolayer cultures (MCs), IHGK in OCCs form stratified epithelia, proliferate, and express gingival-specific gene products in vitro. Moreover, mRNA gene transcription for growth factors interleukin 1beta, granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor, fibroblast growth factor 7, and EGF in OCCs is different from that in MCs. When grafted onto nude mice, IHGK develop hyperplastic, differentiated surface epithelia devoid of malignant growth. We are not aware of any other OCC system comprising of IHGK, which allows for site-specific expression of gingival epithelial markers. This substantiates reconstitution of a gingival epithelial phenotype in vitro. PMID:17177858

  1. Comparative evaluation of the amount of gingival displacement produced by three different gingival retraction systems: An in vivo study

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhari, Jignesh; Prajapati, Paranjay; Patel, Jayanti; Sethuraman, Rajesh; Naveen, Y.G

    2015-01-01

    Statement of Problem: Tetrahydrozoline has been introduced as new gingival retraction agent but its clinical efficacy with widely used conventional retraction agents has not been tested. Purpose: The study was designed to clinically evaluate efficacy of newer retraction agent tetrahydrozoline with two widely used retraction systems i.e., Expasyl retraction system and medicated retraction cords on basis of amount of gingival retraction. Materials and Methods: 30 subjects were selected according to inclusion and exclusion criteria. Maxillary Impressions were made with irreversible hydrocolloid for all subjects. Tray material was used for making the special tray. Latin Block Design was Used in the Study to avoid tissue fatigue. Retraction was done with aluminium chloride; Tetrahydrozoline and Expasyl according to Latin block design. Impressions were poured with die stone. Casts were retrieved and sections were made with die cutter. 3 mm thin slices were obtained. Each slice was used to measure the amount of retraction under stereomicroscope under 20x and images were transferred to image analyser. Results: The amount of gingival retraction obtained by using aluminium chloride as gingival retraction agent was maximum (148238.33 μm2) compared to tetrahydrozoline (140737.87 μm2) and Expasyl (67784.90 μm2). PMID:26097353

  2. Understanding Biofilms in Chronic Sinusitis.

    PubMed

    Tajudeen, Bobby A; Schwartz, Joseph S; Palmer, James N

    2016-02-01

    Chronic sinusitis is a burdensome disease that has substantial individual and societal impact. Although great advances in medical and surgical therapies have been made, some patients continue to have recalcitrant infections. Microbial biofilms have been implicated as a cause of recalcitrant chronic sinusitis, and recent studies have tried to better understand the pathogenesis of chronic sinusitis as it relates to microbial biofilms. Here, we provide an overview of biofilms in chronic sinusitis with emphasis on pathogenesis, treatment, and future directions. In addition, recent evidence is presented, elucidating the role of bitter taste receptors as a possible key factor leading to biofilm formation. PMID:26758863

  3. 1. Historic American Buildings Survey L. D. Andrew, Photographer Enlarged ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Historic American Buildings Survey L. D. Andrew, Photographer Enlarged Photographed by Harold Bush-Brown Nov. 14, 1936 GENERAL VIEW OF SLAVE CABINS - Bass Place (Slave Cabins), Columbus, Muscogee County, GA

  4. 2. Historic American Buildings Survey L. D. Andrew, Photographer, Enlarged ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Historic American Buildings Survey L. D. Andrew, Photographer, Enlarged Photographed by Harold Bush-Brown Nov. 14, 1936 VIEW OF EASTERN SLAVE CABIN - Bass Place (Slave Cabins), Columbus, Muscogee County, GA

  5. How do plants enlarge? A balancing act; Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Boyer, J.S.

    1996-12-31

    Cells of plants are surrounded by strong walls that prevent rupture from internal pressures that can be two or three times that of an automobile tire. In this way, the walls protect the cytoplasm. However, at the same time, the cells can enlarge as they grow. How this balancing act works and how it enlarges the plant were the subject of a recent conference at the University of Delaware in Lewes. The aim was to identify areas for future research that could explain the enlargement of whole plants. There is a large practical need to predict and modify plant enlargement but the additional processes that overlie the molecular ones need to be integrated with the molecular information before a picture will emerge. How best to accomplish this involved input from cross-disciplinary areas in biomechanics, physics and engineering as well as molecular biology, biochemistry and ultrastructure.

  6. 9. (5 X 7 enlargement from 4 X 5 negative) ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. (5 X 7 enlargement from 4 X 5 negative) FIRST FLOOR, WINDOW MOLDING ON SOUTH WALL LOOKING SOUTH - Sites Homestead, Monongahela National Forest (Tract 390) East of Route 28, Seneca Rocks, Pendleton County, WV

  7. The universe, life, and intelligence (Sixth enlarged edition)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shklovskii, Iosif Samuilovich

    This classic work examines the possibility of the existence of life (including intelligent life) on other planetary systems. This enlarged edition includes essays on the search for extraterrestrial civilizations and the possibility of communication with intelligent beings on other planets.

  8. 1. Historic American Buildings Survey L. D. Andrew, Photographer (Enlarged ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Historic American Buildings Survey L. D. Andrew, Photographer (Enlarged by) Aug. 6, 1936 Photographed by Harold Bush-Brown SIDE VIEW - Covered Bridge, Spanning Soap Creek, Atlanta, Fulton County, GA

  9. 1. Historic American Buildings Survey L. D. Andrew, Photographer Enlarged ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Historic American Buildings Survey L. D. Andrew, Photographer Enlarged from picture photographed by Harold Bush-Brown Aug. 1936 VIEW OF FRONT AND RIGHT SIDE - Old Methodist Church, Roswell, Fulton County, GA

  10. 2. Historic American Buildings Survey L. D. Andrew, Photographer Enlarged ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Historic American Buildings Survey L. D. Andrew, Photographer Enlarged Photo From photo of Miss Edith Johnston, Savannah, Ga. 1936 VIEW OF FRONT AND RIGHT SIDE (Restoration 1936) - Wild Heron Plantation, Little Ogeechee River Vicinity, Savannah, Chatham County, GA