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Sample records for giulio bevilacqua stefano

  1. Alternative interpretations, history, and experiment: Reply to Cushing, Crease, Bevilacqua, and Giannetto

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eger, Martin

    1995-04-01

    Cushing's contribution on Bohm's deterministic interpretation of quantum mechanics raises the question of whether self-understanding is at issue in physical science as it is in social science. This question is pursued further in the present paper. Bevilacqua's and Giannetto's belief in the importance of history and the lifeworld of the researcher is one I share; but their prescription of the historical context as the only context of interest leads to an extended discussion of the several types of philosophical hermeneutics now practiced, and of other existing links between science and the lifeworld. Historical studies, I argue, should be used to interpret current texts, current concerns, even current textbooks, not to replace any of these. While I do not share Robert Crease's belief in the primacy of experiment, I agree that it is fundamental in natural science, and must not be neglected in favor of theory. However, the pervasive nature of theoretical languages, their role in understanding experiment and in communicating results, still justify a special hermeneutical concern for this aspect of science, particularly in education.

  2. The Work by Giulio Ceradini in Explaining the Mechanism of Semilunar Cardiac Valve Function

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Troiani, Diana; Manni, Ermanno

    2011-01-01

    Using an excised pig heart preparation with tubes, a manometer, and a visualizing apparatus, Giulio Ceradini, an Italian physiologist working in the years of 1871-1872 in Carl Ludwig's famous laboratory in Leipzig, Germany, illustrated the mechanism of closure of the semilunar valves. He was the first to conceive that the closure of the heart…

  3. The Law of Unintended Consequences Revisited: The Case of Ricci v. DeStefano

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vedder, Richard; Denhart, Matthew; Malesick, Michael; Templeton, Jordan

    2009-01-01

    Deciding it necessary to review the earlier ruling of the Second Circuit court, on January 9, 2009 the U.S. Supreme Court granted certiorari in the case "Ricci v. DeStefano." The case originates from New Haven, Connecticut where a group of firefighters argue that city officials violated their Title VII rights by dismissing the results of tests…

  4. Giulio Cesare Aranzio (Arantius) (1530-89) in the pageant of anatomy and surgery.

    PubMed

    Gurunluoglu, Raffi; Shafighi, Maziar; Gurunluoglu, Aslin; Cavdar, Safiye

    2011-05-01

    Giulio Cesare Aranzio in Italian (Julius Caesar Arantius in Latin) has not received full acclaim for his achievements in the field of anatomy and surgery that remain unknown to most physicians. His anatomical books Observationes Anatomicas, and De Humano Foetu Opusculum and surgical books De Tumoribus Secundum Locos Affectos and Hippocratis librum de vulneribus capitis commentarius brevis printed in Latin and additional existing literature on Aranzio from medical history books and journals were analysed extensively. Aranzio became Professor of Anatomy and Surgery at the University of Bologna in 1556. He established anatomy as a distinguished branch of medicine for the first time in medical history. Aranzio combined anatomy with a description of pathological processes. He discovered the 'Nodules of Aranzio' in the semilunar valves of the heart. He gave the first description of the superior levator palpebral and the coracobrachialis muscles. Aranzio wrote on surgical techniques for a wide spectrum of conditions that range from hydrocephalus, nasal polyp, goitre and tumours to phimosis, ascites, haemorrhoids, anal abscess and fistulae, and much more. Aranzio had an extensive knowledge in surgery and anatomy based in part on the ancient Greek and his contemporaries in the 16th century but essentially on his personal experience and practice. PMID:21558532

  5. The ring-shaped thermal field of Stefanos crater, Nisyros Island: a conceptual model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pantaleo, M.; Walter, T. R.

    2013-11-01

    Fumarole fields related to hydrothermal processes release the heat of the underground through permeable pathways. Thermal changes, therefore, are likely to depend also on the variation of these pathways. As these paths may affect or even control the temperature field at the surface, their understanding is relevant to applied and basic science alike. A common difficulty, however, in surface temperature field studies at active volcanoes is that the parameters controlling the ascending routes of fluids are poorly constrained in general. Here we analyze the crater of Stefanos, Nisyros (Greece), and highlight complexities in the spatial pattern of the fumarole field related to permeability conditions. There may be different explanations for the observed permeability changes, such as structural control, lithology, weathering, and heterogeneous sediment accumulation and erosion. We combine high resolution infrared mosaics and grain-size analysis of soils, aiming to elaborate parameters controlling the appearance of the fumarole field. We find a ring-shaped thermal field located within the explosion crater, which is dependent on contrasts of the soil granulometry and volcanotectonic history. We develop a conceptual model of how the ring-shaped thermal field has formed at the Stefanos crater and similarly at other volcanic edifices, highlighting the importance of local permeability contrast that may increase or decrease the thermal fluid flux.

  6. 77 FR 60044 - Safety Zone; DeStefano Wedding Fireworks Display, Patchogue Bay, Patchogue, NY

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-02

    ... this regulated area is prohibited unless authorized by the Captain of the Port (COTP) Sector Long... ``SEARCH'' box and click ``SEARCH.'' Click on Open Docket Folder on the line associated with this... Guard Sector Long Island Sound, (203) 468-4544, Joseph.L.Graun@uscg.mil . If you have questions...

  7. 77 FR 46349 - Safety Zone; DeStefano Wedding Fireworks Display, Patchogue Bay, Patchogue, NY

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-03

    ... Port (COTP) Sector Long Island Sound. ] DATES: Comments and related material must be received by the... this rule, call or email Petty Officer Joseph Graun, Prevention Department, Coast Guard Sector Long.... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Table of Acronyms COTP Captain of the Port DHS Department of Homeland Security...

  8. Julius Caesar Arantius (Giulio Cesare Aranzi, 1530-1589) and the hippocampus of the human brain: history behind the discovery.

    PubMed

    Bir, Shyamal C; Ambekar, Sudheer; Kukreja, Sunil; Nanda, Anil

    2015-04-01

    Julius Caesar Arantius is one of the pioneer anatomists and surgeons of the 16th century who discovered the different anatomical structures of the human body. One of his prominent discoveries is the hippocampus. At that time, Arantius originated the term hippocampus, from the Greek word for seahorse (hippos ["horse"] and kampos ["sea monster"]). Arantius published his description of the hippocampus in 1587, in the first chapter of his work titled De Humano Foetu Liber. Numerous nomenclatures of this structure, including "white silkworm," "Ammon's horn," and "ram's horn" were proposed by different scholars at that time. However, the term hippocampus has become the most widely used in the literature. PMID:25574573

  9. Exercises for mind and body: Giulio Mancini, collecting, and the beholding of landscape painting in the seventeenth century.

    PubMed

    Gage, Frances

    2008-01-01

    This article explores the intellectual foundations for the development of princely art collections, and of Italian picture galleries in particular, as spaces for combined physical and mental exercise and recreation. This study then establishes the relationship between the therapeutic function of picture galleries and the manner in which landscape paintings produced for princely collectors at this moment in Italy embodied ideals of both exercise and repose. PMID:19235286

  10. Discussion of "Soil Moisture Measurements: Comparison of Instrumentation Performances" by Ventura Francesca, Facini Osvaldo, Piana Stefano, and Rossi Pisa Paola

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Despite the peer review process, it sometimes happens that scientific papers are published that give misleading or incorrect conclusions. Scientists with the USDA-ARS Soil and Water Management Research Unit, Bushland, Texas, found that a paper on soil water sensors published in an engineering journa...

  11. Theoretical Modeling for the X-ray Spectroscopy of Iron-bearing MgSiO3 under High Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X.; Tsuchiya, T.

    2012-12-01

    The behaviors of iron (Fe) in MgSiO3 perovskite, including valence state, spin state, and chemical environments, at high pressures are of fundamental importance for more detailed understanding the properties of the Earth's lower mantle. The pressure induced spin transition of Fe-bearing MgO and MgSiO3 are detected often by using high-resolution K-edge X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) [1,2,3] and confirmed by theoretical simulations. [4,5] Since the Fe K-edge XES is associated to the 3p orbital, which is far from the valence orbitals (3d and 4s), it provides no information about its coordination environments. However, the Fe L-edge XES and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) can directly present the distribution and intensity of Fe-3d character. To identify both the spin states and the coordination environments of iron-bearing MgSiO3, we systematically investigate the L-edge XAS, XES and X-ray photoelectron (XPS) spectroscopy of Fe2+- and Fe3+-bearing MgSiO3 under high pressure by using the first-principles density functional method combined with the slater-transition method. Our results show that Fe2+ and Fe3+ can be distinguished easily by taking the XPS spectra. The spin transition of Fe2+ and Fe3+ can also be clearly certified by XAS and XES. Interestingly, the broadness of L-edge XES of Fe changes depending on the iron position, meaning that its coordination environment might also be distinguishable by using high-resolution XES measurements. Research supported by the Ehime University G-COE program and KAKENHI. [1] James Badro, Guillaume Fiquet, FranÇois Guyot, Jean-Pascal Rueff, Viktor V. Struzhkin, György VankÓ, and Giulio Monaco. Science 300, 789 (2003), [2] James Badro, Jean-Pascal Rueff, György VankÓ, Giulio Monaco, Guillaume Fiquet, and FranÇois Guyot, Science 305, 383 (2004), [3] Jung-Fu Lin, Viktor V. Struzhkin, Steven D. Jacobsen, Michael Y. Hu, Paul Chow, Jennifer Kung, Haozhe Liu, Ho-kwang Mao, and Gussell J. Hemley, Nature 436, 377 (2005). [4

  12. Three-dimensional modeling in the study of subsidence in mining Acquaresi (Sardinia South - West) - Francesco Muntoni (1) Teresa Balvis (2) Paolo Bevilacqua (3) (1) Geological, Mining Park of Sardinia - Via Monteverdi, 16 09016 - Iglesias (2) freelance (3) Department of Engineering and Architecture - University of Trieste, Via Valerio 10 - Trieste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muntoni, F.

    2013-12-01

    The effects of subsidence and subsequent landslides in mining areas are very frequent, the study examines the proposed mining area of Acquaresi (Sardinia South - West), interested in the years between 1991 and 2003 by major subsidence phenomena and consequent events landslides. The valley of Acquaresi is particularly important, not only for its mines, but also for the aspect related to the geomorphological evolution morphotectonic in the context of Paleozoic lithologies, which have a rectangular structure parallel to the coastline. To make measurements and analysis of the evolution of human morphostructural and throughout the industry, it was considered appropriate to create a three-dimensional model that would allow a synoptic view with the different information available to the industry. E 'was created a model using the points listed extrapolated from the Regional Technical Map scale 1:10,000, the map at scale 1:2000 dell'IGEA and the values of a detailed survey of the study area, measured at a scale 1: 500. How MicroStation CAD software was used, with whom it is made of a TIN high detail taking into account then is, if possible, of quoted points, roads, major infrastructure, contour lines (lines-intermediate-auxiliary), buildings and lines coast. The model was supported and shaped (draping) image obtained by integrating the color orthophotos of the area in 1:10,000 scale of the Autonomous Region of Sardinia and photos to scale 1:2,000 made to run dall'IGEA spa at the last event of the landslide. The use of aerial photographs, a scale similar to that of cartography, has allowed us to achieve excellent results by superimposing the frames of the areas of interest on models made, with views that appear to be consistent with the technical papers, with a maximum error of less than that of the reference mapping. Moreover, to emphasize the tectonic lineations, morphological aspects and changes in landscape and environment, it was considered appropriate to use a three-dimensional model, thanks to software used in this trial, with a high detail 3D visualization. Starting from the Regional Technical Map has been possible to realize the DEM file, then perform an interpolation with a point layer containing elevation values recorded separately and then superimpose the orthophoto to 3D surface. It was also decided to use a terrain model DTM knitted irregular TIN compared to a regular grid pattern GRID, because the first best response to the need to have a shirt that exploited all possible points present and identifiable in the territory. With the use of a TIN was thus possible to insert also the points detected by the GPS in the country to verify the area of detachment of the landslide, thus being able to increase the detail in the area of observation. Getting a noticeable "jump" quality: moving from a two-dimensional to a three-dimensional display. The model thus obtained has allowed a very good point of the area: they are easy to locate the outcrops of the different lithological structures, facilitating the study and evaluation for interventions of recovery.

  13. Macintoshed Libraries 2.0.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vaccaro, Bill, Ed.; Valauskas, Edward J., Ed.

    This annual collection contains 18 papers about the use of Macintosh computers in libraries. Papers include: "The Macintosh as a Wayfinding Tool for Professional Conferences: The LITA '88 HyperCard Stack" (Ann F. Bevilacqua); "Enhancing Library Services with the Macintosh" (Naomi C. Broering); "Scanning Technologies in Libraries" (Steve Cisler);…

  14. Comment on «Tidal notches in the Mediterranean Sea: A comprehensive analysis» by Fabrizio Antonioli, Valeria Lo Presti, Alessio Rovere, Luigi Ferranti, Marco Anzidei, Stefano Furlani, Giuseppe Mastronuzzi, Paolo E. Orru, Giovanni Scicchitano, Gianmaria Sannino, Cecilia R. Spampinato, Rossella Pagliarulo, Giacomo Deiana, Eleonora de Sabata, Paolo Sansò, Matteo Vacchi and Antonio Vecchio. Quaternary Science Reviews 119 (2015) 66-84

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evelpidou, Niki; Pirazzoli, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    The paper of Antonioli et al. (2015) presents observations of 73 sites with erosion notches, which are called tidal notches, which in fact appear to be of various genetic origins, because a combination of several physical chemical and biological processes of formation is considered including, in addition to intertidal bioerosion, also carbonate rock solution, wetting and drying and wave abrasion that would produce different types of notches. Among the erosion notches, some «roof notches», in which the notch lacks a floor, are distinguished. For these isolated roofs, we would tend to ascribe erosion to dissolution by a freshwater spring undercutting a limestone cliff at sea level. Accompanying a rise in sea level, dissolution by freshwater will tend to continuously displace the roof of the notch upwards, while the base of the notch, dissolved, will tend to be missing. For such isolated roof of a solution notch, protruding above the waterline, the term «visor» has been proposed by Evelpidou et al. (2011).

  15. Something from Nothing: Exploring Dimensions of Children's Knowing through the Repeated Reading of Favourite Books

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Witte-Townsend, Darlene L.; DiGiulio, Emily

    2004-01-01

    Witte-Townsend and DiGiulio explore some of the dimensions of knowing that children, teachers and parents may engage together during story-time. They reflect on some of their own long-term relationships with children and children's books, especially Phoebe Gilman's "Something from nothing" (published in 1992) and Simms Taback's "Joseph had a…

  16. Weighing the Evidence for Psychotherapy Equivalence: Implications for Research and Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westmacott, Robin; Hunsley, John

    2007-01-01

    In the past two decades, numerous meta-analyses have been published that examine the question of psychotherapy equivalence. Hunsley and Di Giulio (2002) critically reviewed this literature and concluded that there was abundant evidence that the Dodo bird verdict of equivalence across psychotherapies is false. In this article, we summarize and…

  17. EMERGING MOLECULAR AND COMPUTATIONAL APPROACHES FOR CROSS-SPECIES EXTRAPLATIONS: A WORKSHOP SUMMARY REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Benson, W.H., R.T. Di Giulio, J.C. Cook, J. Freedman, R.L. Malek, C. Thompson and D. Versteeg. In press. Emerging Molecular and Computational Approaches for Cross-Species Extrapolations: A Workshop Summary Report (Abstract). To be presented at the SETAC Fourth World Congress, 14-...

  18. Ranibizumab or bevacizumab in AMD?

    PubMed

    2016-05-01

    The Italian independent drug bulletin Informazioni sui Farmaci, a member of the International Society of Drug Bulletins (ISDB), published a review comparing ranibizumab versus bevacizumab for age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Its conclusion differs from that of Prescrire's review, published in issue 163. Giulio Formoso and Maria Font have offered on behalf of Informazioni sui Farmacito present their evaluations. The position of Informazioni sui Farmaci is recapped below, and an English translation of the full article published in the Italian bulletin is available at english.prescrire.org. Giulio Formoso and Maria Font's letter is followed by a few points outlining Prescrire's position, already set out in detail in issue 163. PMID:27280201

  19. Grammar Instruction and Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lacina, Jan

    2005-01-01

    Much of the research literature from the past 25 years has supported the importance of teaching grammar in the context of writing instruction (Calkins, 1980; DiStefano & Killion, 1984; Weaver, 1996,1998). Unlike other content areas, practice does not make perfect when learning grammar. While isolated drill and practice of grammatical concepts may…

  20. Investigating the Nature of Method Factors through Multiple Informants: Evidence for a Specific Factor?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alessandri, Guido; Vecchione, Michele; Tisak, John; Barbaranelli, Claudio

    2011-01-01

    When a self-report instrument includes a balanced number of positively and negatively worded items, factor analysts often use method factors to aid model fitting. The nature of these factors, often referred to as acquiescence, is still debated. Relying upon previous results (Alessandri et al., 2010; DiStefano & Motl, 2006, 2008; Rauch, Schweizer,…

  1. Walsh, Da Silva, and Wei Reply

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, A.; Da Silva, J. L. F.; Wei, S. H.

    2009-04-17

    This is a reply to Stefano Sanvito and Chaitanya Das Pemmaraju's, Comment on Theoretical Description of Carrier Mediated Magnetism in Cobalt Doped ZnO, Phys. Rev. Lett. 102, 159701 (2009); and the original article is Theoretical Description of Carrier Mediated Magnetism in Cobalt Doped ZnO, Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 256401 (2008).

  2. Orthogonal Higher Order Factor Structure of the Stanford-Binet Intelligence Scales--Fifth Edition for Children and Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canivez, Gary L.

    2008-01-01

    Orthogonal higher-order factor structure of the Stanford-Binet Intelligence Scales-Fifth Edition (SB-5; Roid, 2003a) for child and adolescent samples is reported. Multiple criteria for factor extraction unanimously supported extraction of only one dimension and a unidimensional model. However, following results from DiStefano and Dombrowski (2006)…

  3. Improving Measurement of Workplace Sexual Identity Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lance, Teresa S.; Anderson, Mary Z.; Croteau, James M.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to advance measurement of sexual identity management for lesbian, gay, and bisexual workers. Psychometric properties of a revised version of the Workplace Sexual Identity Management Measure (WSIMM; Anderson, Croteau, Chung, & DiStefano, 2001) were examined on a sample of 64 predominantly White K-12 teachers.…

  4. Investigating Transactions among Motives, Emotional Regulation Related to Testing, and Test Emotions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeCuir-Gunby, Jessica T.; Aultman, Lori Price; Schutz, Paul A.

    2009-01-01

    The authors examined the relationships among achievement motives, emotional regulation, and emotions. They collected data from 425 college undergraduates (110 men, 315 women) and used several scales, including the Achievement Motives Scales (K. Hagtvet & L. Zou, 2000), the Emotional Regulation During Testing Scale (P. A. Schutz, C. DiStefano, J.…

  5. Soil moisture and potential measurements in NW Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferraris, Stefano; Canone, Davide; Previati, Maurizio

    2015-04-01

    The vertical variability of soil moisture in the rootzone is a key factor and it is not taken into account in many hydrological models. Therefore it is here proposed a novel approach that is based on the inversion of a semianalytical solution of the equation governing the infiltration and the exfiltration processes. The inversion allows keeping the information contained in the vertical spatial variability. It has been monitored with TDR measurements down to 2 meters depth. Also, the hysteresis and dynamical effects are then taken into account, with water potential measurements, in order to correctly predict the water retention both in infiltration and in drainage/exfiltration transients. References M. Baudena, I. Bevilacqua, D. Canone, S. Ferraris, M. Previati, A. Provenzale (2012). Soil water dynamics at a midlatitude test site: Field measurements and box modeling approaches. JOURNAL OF HYDROLOGY, vol. 414-415, p. 329-340, ISSN: 0022-1694, doi: 10.1016/j.jhydrol.2011.11.009

  6. Consciousness as a state of matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tegmark, Max

    2015-07-01

    I examine the hypothesis that consciousness can be understood as a state of matter, "perceptronium", with distinctive information processing abilities. I explore five basic principles that may distinguish conscious matter from other physical systems such as solids, liquids and gases: the information, integration, independence, dynamics and utility principles. This approach generalizes Giulio Tononi's integrated information framework for neural-network-based consciousness to arbitrary quantum systems, and provides interesting links to error-correcting codes and condensed matter criticality, as well as an interesting connections between the emergence of consciousness and the emergence of time. (For more technical details, see arXiv:1401.1219).

  7. The size and shape of Dante's Purgatorio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magnaghi-Delfino, Paola; Norando, Tullia

    2015-07-01

    Where is Mount Purgatory? How high is it? How large is the island upon which it was situated? In the previous century Rodolfo Benini and Ideale Capasso developed a series of hypothesis and calculations to find answers to these questions. Each used data derived from mathematics, astronomy, history of science and cartography, but they completely disagreed on the location and on the overall size and shape of the island. In this paper we review the main points of these two scholars, then we rework the calculations and estimates, according with a new astronomical hypothesis presented by Giulio Magli and Claudio Facciolo.

  8. CONSTRAINING THE SPIN-DOWN TIMESCALE OF THE WHITE DWARF PROGENITORS OF TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect

    Meng, Xiangcun; Podsiadlowski, Philipp

    2013-12-01

    Justham and Di Stefano et al. proposed that the white dwarf progenitor of a Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) may have to spin down before it can explode. As the white dwarf spin-down timescale is not well known theoretically, here we try to constrain it empirically (within the framework of this spin-down model) for progenitor systems that contain a giant donor and for which circumbinary material has been detected after the explosion: we obtain an upper limit of a few 10{sup 7}yr. Based on the study of Di Stefano and Kilic, this means that it is too early to rule out the existence of a surviving companion in SNR 0509–67.5.

  9. Constraining the Spin-down Timescale of the White Dwarf Progenitors of Type Ia Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Xiangcun; Podsiadlowski, Philipp

    2013-12-01

    Justham and Di Stefano et al. proposed that the white dwarf progenitor of a Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) may have to spin down before it can explode. As the white dwarf spin-down timescale is not well known theoretically, here we try to constrain it empirically (within the framework of this spin-down model) for progenitor systems that contain a giant donor and for which circumbinary material has been detected after the explosion: we obtain an upper limit of a few 107yr. Based on the study of Di Stefano & Kilic, this means that it is too early to rule out the existence of a surviving companion in SNR 0509-67.5.

  10. A negative cis-acting G-fer element participates in the regulation of expression of the human H-ferritin-encoding gene (FERH).

    PubMed

    Barresi, R; Sirito, M; Karsenty, G; Ravazzolo, R

    1994-03-25

    Ferritin (Fer) is the major iron storage protein in man. Its synthesis is regulated both at the translational and transcriptional levels. In previous studies on transcriptional regulation of the human H-ferritin-encoding gene (FERH), a 160-bp promoter segment was analyzed [Bevilacqua et al., Gene 111 (1992) 255-260]. In order to obtain a more complete view of the elements involved in the transcriptional regulation of FERH, we have studied, in a further upstream region of the human FERH promoter (pFERH), a sequence between -272 and -291, named G-fer, because it contains a stretch of ten G, which binds a nuclear factor present in different cell types. DNA-binding assays and competition experiments suggest that the factor binding to G-fer has binding properties very similar to inhibitory factor-1 (IF-1), an ubiquitous factor that interacts with G-rich elements in the promoters of the mouse type-I collagen genes. DNA transfection experiments in HeLa cells, using either a wild-type or mutated pFERH fused to a reporter gene, showed that a 3-bp substitution mutation, that abolished the binding of the specific factor to G-fer, increased the promoter activity, thus suggesting an inhibitory role for the G-fer element and its cognate trans-acting factor. PMID:8144027

  11. Pauli equation for a charged spin particle on a curved surface in an electric and magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yong-Long; Du, Long; Xu, Chang-Tan; Liu, Xiao-Jun; Zong, Hong-Shi

    2014-10-01

    We derive the Pauli equation for a charged spin particle confined to move on a spatially curved surface S in an electromagnetic field. Using the thin-layer quantization scheme to constrain the particle on S , and in the transformed spinor representations, we obtain the well-known geometric potential Vg and the presence of e-i φ, which can generate additive spin connection geometric potentials by the curvilinear coordinates derivatives, and we find that the two fundamental evidences in the literature [Giulio Ferrari and Giampaolo Cuoghi, Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 230403 (2008), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.100.230403] are still valid in the present system without source current perpendicular to S . Finally, we apply the surface Pauli equation to spherical, cylindrical, and toroidal surfaces, in which we obtain expectantly the geometric potentials and new spin connection geometric potentials, and find that only the normal Pauli matrix appears in these equations.

  12. Clues to prolific productivity among prominent scientists.

    PubMed

    Kantha, S S

    1992-10-01

    In a survey based on the biographical sketches, obituary notes and eulogies of notable scientists, eight were identified as belonging to an elite group, having authored more than 1000 research publications, which include books, monographs and patents. They were, in chronological order, Thomas Alva Edison, Paul Karrer, Margaret Mead, Giulio Natta, Hans Selye, Herbert C Brown, Tetsuji Kametani and Carl Djerassi. Among these, Karrer, Natta and Brown were Nobelists in chemistry. Four criteria which can be identified as clues to their prolific productivity are, 1) enthusiasm for compulsive work and eccentric life style, 2) physical and/or environmental handicap, 3) pioneering efforts in a new research field, and 4) selection of research area, predominantly organic chemistry. PMID:1461180

  13. A Career in Manuscripts: Genres and Purposes of a Physician’s Writing in Rome, 1600–1630*

    PubMed Central

    De Renzi, Silvia

    2011-01-01

    Following the stellar career of papal physician Giulio Mancini, the article brings into focus learned doctors’ uses of, and relationships with, manu- scripts. Manuscripts were the main outcome of their practice — as letters of consultation to patients and colleagues, as consilia of various kinds, including for use in courts of law, and also in the form of key professional tools such as casebooks. Clues found in Mancini’s rich paper-trail shed light on material aspects of his professional writing and on the role that circulating knowledge in manuscript had in creating and sustaining medical networks. The article also argues that even in a domain as shaped by print as early modern medicine, physicians’ use of this medium should not be taken for granted; especially in courtly settings, scribal, as opposed to print, publishing provided them with an effective means of building the social relationships on which their careers depended. PMID:22298938

  14. Analytical methods for the characterization of surface finishing in bricks.

    PubMed

    Nardini, I; Zendri, E; Biscontin, G; Brunetin, A

    2006-09-01

    The recent restoration works of Santo Stefano Church Façade (XV century) in Venice have shown traces variously saved of different kind of surface finishes. These finishes were found on the brick's surface both in the masonry and in the decorative elements. Different brick's surface and decorative tile samples were investigated using several techniques: optical microscopy, scanning electron-microscopy, thermal analysis, infrared spectroscopy and reflectance Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy. The evaluation of the reached results was used to understand the decorative techniques and to recognize the material employed. PMID:17723684

  15. A report from the EMBO conference on autophagy.

    PubMed

    Klionsky, Daniel J

    2009-11-01

    The first EMBO conference on "Autophagy, Cell Biology, Physiology and Pathology" was held October 17-21, 2009 at the Centro Stefano Franscini of the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology. The meeting organizers, Drs. Matthias Peter, Claudine Kraft and Fulvio Reggiori, invited a range of interesting speakers and the poster sessions also proved valuable. I will not attempt to summarize the entire meeting; however, one of my goals with Autophagy is to build and strengthen the community of researchers in this field. Accordingly, I am highlighting a small subset of the presented talks, focusing on researchers either new to the field, or those we do not hear from routinely. PMID:19901526

  16. International Conference on Contaminated Sediments - ContaSed 2015 8-13 March 2015, Monte Verità, Ascona, Switzerland.

    PubMed

    Chiaia-Hernandez, Aurea C; Giger, Walter

    2015-01-01

    About 80 participants from 22 countries from industry and academia gathered at the International Conference on Contaminated Sediments (ContaSed 2015) held at the Congressi Stefano Franscini (CSF), the conference center of ETH Zurich, located at Monte Verità, Ascona, Switzerland. ContaSed 2015 provided a platform for top experts as well as for junior researchers from different scientific disciplines to present recent results and novel approaches on the analysis, assessment and remediation of contaminated sediments. ContaSed 2015 served as a unique communication and discussion opportunity for environmental scientists with an emphasis on chemistry, sedimentology, ecotoxicology or remediation engineering. PMID:26507601

  17. Geochemistry of natural gas manifestions from the Upper Tiber Valley (central Italy)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vaselli, O.; Tassi, F.; Minissale, A.; Capaccioni, B.; Macro, G.; Evans, William C.

    1997-01-01

    Six natural gas manifestions from the upper Tiber Valley at Caprese Michelangela and Pieve S. Stefano (Arezzo) and at Umbertide (Pertugia) localities have been analysed for major, minor, trace gas compositions, as well as for ??13C in CO2 and CH4, ??15N in N2 and 3He/4He isotopic ratios. All gas emissions are CO2-rich (???94%), with N2 contents of 4-5%. Those from Caprese and Pieve S. Stefano have very peculiar compsitions when compared to other gases from northern-central Apennines. Apart from CO2, these gases show relatively high contents of He (with crustal isotopic ratios) and medium to high temperature-related gases such as CO, H2 and C6H6. Although located quite far from the geothermal areas in Tuscany, the application of several gas geothermetric techniques suggest for these gases deep equilibrium tempratures of about 300??C. Moreover, the ??13C in CO2 and CH4 (~.4.0% and -38.0%, respectively) and the ??13N values in N2 (+0.064 to +0.84%) would seem to imply a multiple deep source for these gases.

  18. Magnetic modeling of the Phlegraean Volcanic District with extension to the Ponza archipelago, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orsi, G.; Patella, D.; Piochi, M.; Tramacere, A.

    1999-08-01

    A 3D modeling of the residual aeromagnetic anomalies of the area including the Phlegraean Volcanic District (PVD; Campi Flegrei caldera (CFc), and Ischia and Procida-Vivara islands) and two volcanic islands of the Ponza archipelago (Ventotene and S. Stefano) has been carried out. The observed residual anomalies have been reproduced with several large magnetized bodies located at 2-10 km depth in the crust. A volcanological interpretation has been made possible only for those bodies that have been constrained by geological, geothermal and other geophysical data. The magnetized structures associated with CFc and Ischia, Procida-Vivara, Ventotene and Santo Stefano islands, have been interpreted as igneous bodies that may be solidified intrusions or magma reservoirs. On the basis of magnetic data, volcanological and magmatological history and geothermal heat flux distribution, the existence of a partially solidified magma chamber is suggested at Ischia. A speculation shows that the magnetization intensity assumed for the magnetic bodies located at Procida and south-west of Ventotene matches quite well with the calculated composition of a cooled residual magma resulting from crystallization processes within a chamber.

  19. Upscaling of soil moisture measurements in NW Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferraris, Stefano; Canone, Davide; Previati, Maurizio; Brunod, Christian; Ratto, Sara; Cauduro, Marco

    2015-04-01

    There is large mismatch in spatial scale between the climate and meteorological model grid, and the scale of soil and vegetation measurements. Remote sensing data can help to fit the model scale, but they cannot provide rootzone data. In this work some soil moisture datasets are analysed for the sake of providing larger scale estimation of soil moisture and water and energy fluxes. The first dataset refers to a plain site near Torino, where measurements are taken since 1997 (Baudena et al., 2012), and a mountain site close to the town. The second one is a dataset in the mountains of Valle d'Aosta (Brocca et al., 2013), where 4 years of data are available. The use of digital elevation models and vegetation maps is shown in this work. Some soil processes (e.g. Whalley et al., 2012) are usually disregarded, but in this work their possible impact is considered. References L. Brocca, A. Tarpanelli, T. Moramarco, F. Melone, S.M. Ratto, M. Cauduro, S. Ferraris, N. Berni, F. Ponziani, W. Wagner, T. Melzer (2013). Soil Moisture Estimation in Alpine Catchments through Modeling and Satellite Observations VADOSE ZONE JOURNAL, vol. 8-2, p. 1-10, doi:10.2136/vzj2012.0102 M. Baudena, I. Bevilacqua, D. Canone, S. Ferraris, M. Previati, A. Provenzale (2012). Soil water dynamics at a midlatitude test site: Field measurements and box modeling approaches. JOURNAL OF HYDROLOGY, vol. 414-415, p. 329-340, ISSN: 0022-1694, doi: 10.1016/j.jhydrol.2011.11.009 W.R. Whalley, G.P. Matthews, S. Ferraris (2012). The effect of compaction and shear deformation of saturated soil on hydraulic conductivity. SOIL & TILLAGE RESEARCH, vol. 125, p. 23-29, ISSN: 0167-1987

  20. Zebrafish Cardiotoxicity: The Effects of CYP1A Inhibition and AHR2 Knockdown Following Exposure to Weak Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Agonists

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Bryan William; Van Tiem Garner, Lindsey; Di Giulio, Richard Thomas

    2014-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) is a ligand-activated transcription factor that mediates many of the toxic effects of dioxin-like compounds (DLCs) and some polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Strong AHR agonists, such as certain polychlorinated biphenyls and 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), cause severe cardiac teratogenesis in fish embryos. Moderately strong AHR agonists, such as benzo[a]pyrene and β-naphthoflavone, have been shown to cause similar cardiotoxic effects when coupled with a cytochrome P450 1A (CYP1A) inhibitor, such as fluoranthene (FL). We sought to determine if weak AHR agonists, when combined with a CYP1A inhibitor (FL) or CYP1A morpholino gene knockdown, are capable of causing cardiac deformities similar to moderately strong AHR agonists (Wassenberg and Di Giulio 2004; Wassenberg and Di Giulio 2004; Billiard, Timme-Laragy et al. 2006; Van Tiem and Di Giulio 2011). The weak AHR agonists included the following: carbaryl, phenanthrene, 2-methylindole, 3-methylindole, indigo, and indirubin. The results showed a complex pattern of cardiotoxic response to weak agonist inhibitor exposure and morpholino-knockdown. Danio rerio (zebrafish) embryos were first exposed to weak AHR agonists at equimolar concentrations. The agonists were assessed for their relative potency as inducers of CYP1 enzyme activity, measured by the ethoxyresorufin-o-deethylase (EROD) assay, and cardiac deformities. Carbaryl, 2-methylindole, and 3-methylindole induced the highest CYP1A activity in zebrafish. Experiments were then conducted to determine the individual cardiotoxicity of each compound. Next, zebrafish were co-exposed to each agonist (at concentrations below those determined to be cardiotoxic) and FL in combination to assess if CYP1A inhibition could induce cardiac deformities. Carbaryl, 2-methylindole, 3-methylindole, and phenanthrene significantly increased pericardial edema relative to controls when combined with FL. To further evaluate the

  1. VizieR Online Data Catalog: PACS Evolutionary Probe (PEP-DR1) catalogs (Lutz+, 2011)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lutz, D.; Poglitsch, A.; Altieri, B.; Andreani, P.; Aussel, H.; Berta, S.; Bongiovanni, A.; Brisbin, D.; Cava, A.; Cepa, J.; Cimatti, A.; Daddi, E.; Dominguez-Sanchez, H.; Elbaz, D.; Foerster Schreiber, N. M.; Genzel, R.; Grazian, A.; Gruppioni, C.; Harwit, M.; Le Floc'h, E.; Magdis, G.; Magnelli, B.; Maiolino, R.; Nordon, R.; Perez Garcia, A. M.; Popesso, P.; Pozzi, F.; Riguccini, L.; Rodighiero, G.; Saintonge, A.; Sanchez Portal, M.; Santini, P.; Shao, L.; Sturm, E.; Tacconi, L. J.; Valtchanov, I.; Wetzstein, M.; Wieprecht, E.

    2013-11-01

    PACS catalogs built by the PEP team, with key contributions by Stefano Berta, Benjamin Magnelli, Paola Popesso, Dieter Lutz, Francesca Pozzi, Bruno Altieri, Herve Aussel, Hoseong Hwang, Emeric Le Floc'h, Georgios Magdis, Raanan Nordon, Albrecht Poglitsch, Laurie Riguccini, Amelie Saintonge, Li Shao. For more details, please refer to Lutz et al. (2011A&A...532A..90L) and to the PDF documentation associated to the release. Data and catalogs can be retrieved from the web page http://www.mpe.mpg.de/ir/Research/PEP/publicdatareleases.php See the PDF documentation associated to the PEP DR1 release, http://www.mpe.mpg.de/resources/PEP/DR1tarballs/readmePEP_global.pdf and http://www.mpe.mpg.de/resources/PEP/DR1tarballs/readmePEP_SPIRE.pdf for more details. (69 data files).

  2. International symposium on peripheral nerve repair and regeneration and 2nd club Brunelli meeting

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The International Symposium "Peripheral Nerve Repair and Regeneration and 2nd Club Brunelli Meeting" was held on December 4-5, 2009 in Turin, Italy (Organizers: Bruno Battiston, Stefano Geuna, Isabelle Perroteau, Pierluigi Tos). Interest in the study of peripheral nerve regeneration is very much alive because complete recovery of nerve function almost never occurs after nerve reconstruction and, often, the clinical outcome is rather poor. Therefore, there is a need for defining innovative strategies for improving the success of recovery after nerve lesion and repair and this meeting was intended to discuss, from a multidisciplinary point of view, some of today's most important issues in this scientific field, arising from both basic and clinical neurosciences. PMID:20214775

  3. International symposium on peripheral nerve repair and regeneration and 2nd club Brunelli meeting.

    PubMed

    Turgut, Mehmet; Geuna, Stefano

    2010-01-01

    The International Symposium "Peripheral Nerve Repair and Regeneration and 2nd Club Brunelli Meeting" was held on December 4-5, 2009 in Turin, Italy (Organizers: Bruno Battiston, Stefano Geuna, Isabelle Perroteau, Pierluigi Tos). Interest in the study of peripheral nerve regeneration is very much alive because complete recovery of nerve function almost never occurs after nerve reconstruction and, often, the clinical outcome is rather poor. Therefore, there is a need for defining innovative strategies for improving the success of recovery after nerve lesion and repair and this meeting was intended to discuss, from a multidisciplinary point of view, some of today's most important issues in this scientific field, arising from both basic and clinical neurosciences. PMID:20214775

  4. Bayesian Methods in Cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobson, Michael P.; Jaffe, Andrew H.; Liddle, Andrew R.; Mukherjee, Pia; Parkinson, David

    2014-02-01

    Preface; Part I. Methods: 1. Foundations and algorithms John Skilling; 2. Simple applications of Bayesian methods D. S. Sivia and Steve Rawlings; 3. Parameter estimation using Monte Carlo sampling Antony Lewis and Sarah Bridle; 4. Model selection and multi-model interference Andrew R. Liddle, Pia Mukherjee and David Parkinson; 5. Bayesian experimental design and model selection forecasting Roberto Trotta, Martin Kunz, Pia Mukherjee and David Parkinson; 6. Signal separation in cosmology M. P. Hobson, M. A. J. Ashdown and V. Stolyarov; Part II. Applications: 7. Bayesian source extraction M. P. Hobson, Graça Rocha and R. Savage; 8. Flux measurement Daniel Mortlock; 9. Gravitational wave astronomy Neil Cornish; 10. Bayesian analysis of cosmic microwave background data Andrew H. Jaffe; 11. Bayesian multilevel modelling of cosmological populations Thomas J. Loredo and Martin A. Hendry; 12. A Bayesian approach to galaxy evolution studies Stefano Andreon; 13. Photometric redshift estimation: methods and applications Ofer Lahav, Filipe B. Abdalla and Manda Banerji; Index.

  5. Bayesian Methods in Cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobson, Michael P.; Jaffe, Andrew H.; Liddle, Andrew R.; Mukherjee, Pia; Parkinson, David

    2009-12-01

    Preface; Part I. Methods: 1. Foundations and algorithms John Skilling; 2. Simple applications of Bayesian methods D. S. Sivia and Steve Rawlings; 3. Parameter estimation using Monte Carlo sampling Antony Lewis and Sarah Bridle; 4. Model selection and multi-model interference Andrew R. Liddle, Pia Mukherjee and David Parkinson; 5. Bayesian experimental design and model selection forecasting Roberto Trotta, Martin Kunz, Pia Mukherjee and David Parkinson; 6. Signal separation in cosmology M. P. Hobson, M. A. J. Ashdown and V. Stolyarov; Part II. Applications: 7. Bayesian source extraction M. P. Hobson, Graça Rocha and R. Savage; 8. Flux measurement Daniel Mortlock; 9. Gravitational wave astronomy Neil Cornish; 10. Bayesian analysis of cosmic microwave background data Andrew H. Jaffe; 11. Bayesian multilevel modelling of cosmological populations Thomas J. Loredo and Martin A. Hendry; 12. A Bayesian approach to galaxy evolution studies Stefano Andreon; 13. Photometric redshift estimation: methods and applications Ofer Lahav, Filipe B. Abdalla and Manda Banerji; Index.

  6. Medical competence, anatomy and the polity in seventeenth-century Rome

    PubMed Central

    De Renzi, Silvia

    2007-01-01

    At the centre of this article are two physicians active in Rome between 1600 and 1630 who combined medical practice with broader involvement in the dynamic cultural, economic and political scene of the centre of the Catholic world. The city's distinctive and very influential social landscape magnified issues of career-building and allows us to recapture physicians’ different strategies of self-fashioning at a time of major social and religious reorganization. At one level, reconstructing Johannes Faber and Giulio Mancini's medical education, arrival in Rome and overlapping but different career trajectories contributes to research on physicians’ identity in early modern Italian states. Most remarkable are their access to different segments of Roman society, including a dynamic art market, and their diplomatic and political role, claimed as well as real. But following these physicians from hospitals to courts, including that of the Pope, and from tribunals to the university and analysing the wide range of their writing – from medico-legal consilia to political essays and reports of anatomical investigations – also enriches our view of medical practice, which included, but went beyond, the bedside. Furthermore, their activities demand that we reassess the complex place of anatomical investigations in a courtly society, and start recovering the fundamental role played by hospitals – those quintessential Catholic institutions – as sites of routine dissections for both medical teaching and research. (pp. 551–567) PMID:21949463

  7. PREFACE: Physics and Mathematics of Nonlinear Phenomena 2013 (PMNP2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konopelchenko, B. G.; Landolfi, G.; Martina, L.; Vitolo, R.

    2014-03-01

    Modern theory of nonlinear integrable equations is nowdays an important and effective tool of study for numerous nonlinear phenomena in various branches of physics from hydrodynamics and optics to quantum filed theory and gravity. It includes the study of nonlinear partial differential and discrete equations, regular and singular behaviour of their solutions, Hamitonian and bi- Hamitonian structures, their symmetries, associated deformations of algebraic and geometrical structures with applications to various models in physics and mathematics. The PMNP 2013 conference focused on recent advances and developments in Continuous and discrete, classical and quantum integrable systems Hamiltonian, critical and geometric structures of nonlinear integrable equations Integrable systems in quantum field theory and matrix models Models of nonlinear phenomena in physics Applications of nonlinear integrable systems in physics The Scientific Committee of the conference was formed by Francesco Calogero (University of Rome `La Sapienza', Italy) Boris A Dubrovin (SISSA, Italy) Yuji Kodama (Ohio State University, USA) Franco Magri (University of Milan `Bicocca', Italy) Vladimir E Zakharov (University of Arizona, USA, and Landau Institute for Theoretical Physics, Russia) The Organizing Committee: Boris G Konopelchenko, Giulio Landolfi, Luigi Martina, Department of Mathematics and Physics `E De Giorgi' and the Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, and Raffaele Vitolo, Department of Mathematics and Physics `E De Giorgi'. A list of sponsors, speakers, talks, participants and the conference photograph are given in the PDF. Conference photograph

  8. Anatomical models and wax Venuses: art masterpieces or scientific craft works?

    PubMed Central

    Ballestriero, R

    2010-01-01

    The art of wax modelling has an ancient origin but rose to prominence in 14th century Italy with the cult of votive artefacts. With the advent of Neoclassicism this art, now deemed repulsive, continued to survive in a scientific environment, where it flourished in the study of normal and pathological anatomy, obstetrics, zoology and botany. The achievement of having originated the creation of anatomical models in coloured wax must be ascribed to a joint effort undertaken by the Sicilian wax modeller Gaetano Giulio Zumbo and the French surgeon Guillaume Desnoues in the late 17th century. Interest in anatomical wax models spread throughout Europe during the 18th century, first in Bologna with Ercole Lelli, Giovanni Manzolini and Anna Morandi, and then in Florence with Felice Fontana and Clemente Susini. In England, the art of anatomical ceroplastics was brought to London from Florence by the sculptor Joseph Towne. Throughout the centuries many anatomical artists preferred this material due to the remarkable mimetic likeness obtained, far surpassing any other material. Independent of the material used, whether wood, wax or clay, anatomical models were always considered merely craft works confined to hospitals or faculties of medicine and have survived to this day only because of their scientific interest. Italian and English waxes are stylistically different but the remarkable results obtained by Susini and Towne, and the fact that some contemporary artists are again representing anatomical wax bodies in their works, makes the border that formerly separated art and craft indistinguishable. PMID:20002228

  9. Anatomical models and wax Venuses: art masterpieces or scientific craft works?

    PubMed

    Ballestriero, R

    2010-02-01

    The art of wax modelling has an ancient origin but rose to prominence in 14th century Italy with the cult of votive artefacts. With the advent of Neoclassicism this art, now deemed repulsive, continued to survive in a scientific environment, where it flourished in the study of normal and pathological anatomy, obstetrics, zoology and botany. The achievement of having originated the creation of anatomical models in coloured wax must be ascribed to a joint effort undertaken by the Sicilian wax modeller Gaetano Giulio Zumbo and the French surgeon Guillaume Desnoues in the late 17th century. Interest in anatomical wax models spread throughout Europe during the 18th century, first in Bologna with Ercole Lelli, Giovanni Manzolini and Anna Morandi, and then in Florence with Felice Fontana and Clemente Susini. In England, the art of anatomical ceroplastics was brought to London from Florence by the sculptor Joseph Towne. Throughout the centuries many anatomical artists preferred this material due to the remarkable mimetic likeness obtained, far surpassing any other material. Independent of the material used, whether wood, wax or clay, anatomical models were always considered merely craft works confined to hospitals or faculties of medicine and have survived to this day only because of their scientific interest. Italian and English waxes are stylistically different but the remarkable results obtained by Susini and Towne, and the fact that some contemporary artists are again representing anatomical wax bodies in their works, makes the border that formerly separated art and craft indistinguishable. PMID:20002228

  10. Treatment of kidney diseases in the thermal springs of Pithecusa during the XVIII Century.

    PubMed

    Ricciardi, Elisabetta; Ricciardi, Carlo Alberto; Ricciardi, Biagio

    2016-02-01

    The island of Pithecusa (Ischia) is a volcanic island in the Tyrrhenian Sea in the north end of the Gulf of Naples at about 30 kilometers from the same city. Pithecusa is very popular for its hot springs which even the ancients used. This report aims to analyze the renal therapeutic benefits of the Pithacusa thermal mineral spring through a review of two different manuscripts: i) "Di Napoli il seno cratero"(The gulf of Naples) of Domenico Antonio Parrino (1642-1708) and ii) "De' rimedi naturali che sono nell'isola di Pithecusa oggi detta Ischia"(On the natural cures of the island of Pithecusa known today as Ischia)of Giulio Iasolino (1583-1622). These two manuscripts published during the 18th century and both manuscripts highlight the thermal virtues of the thermal springs of Pithecusa. In the past natural remedies were important in the treatment of different diseases including that of thermal springs dating back to ancient Rome. Thermal springs were used to treat spasms, skin diseases, hair loss and various renal ailments. Both manuscripts describe the thermal springs in Ischia and their therapeutic benefits in medical diseases. PMID:26913894

  11. Magnetic resonance for fluids in porous media at the University of Bologna.

    PubMed

    Fantazzini, Paola

    2005-02-01

    The magnetic resonance in porous media (MRPM) community is now a vast community of scientists from all over the world who recognize magnetic resonance as an instrument of choice for the characterization of pore space and of the distribution, diffusion and flow of fluids inside a vast range of different materials. The MRPM conferences are the occasions in which this community gets together, compares notes and grows. The scene was different in 1990, when this series of conferences was promoted at Bologna. I will go briefly over the history of these events, showing the role played by the University of Bologna and in particular by the intuition, ingenuity and passion of Giulio Cesare Borgia. The MRPM work at Bologna began in the mid-1980s. New correlations were found among parameters from NMR relaxation measurements and oil field parameters such as porosity, permeability to fluid flow, irreducible water saturation, residual oil saturation and pore-system surface-to-volume ratio, and fast algorithms were developed to give the different NMR parameters. Interest in valid interpretation of data led to extensive work also on the inversion of multiexponential relaxation data and the effects of inhomogeneous fields from susceptibility differences on distributions of relaxation times. In the last few years, extensive developments were made of combined magnetic resonance imaging and relaxation measurements in different fields. PMID:15833602

  12. Free-electron lasers for strategic defense: the benefits of scientific open scientific exchange

    SciTech Connect

    Barletta, W.A.

    1986-02-24

    A dominant theme of the Fifth International Seminar on Nuclear War, held at Erice, Sicily, (August 19-24, 1985), was the appeal for openness in science and in technological research. In his address to the seminar, Italian Foreign Minister Giulio Andreotti cited the remarkable achievements at the European Center for Nuclear Research (CERN), as an inspiring example of the benefits of scientific collaboration across national borders - science without frontiers. Dr. Edward Teller eloquently argued that, ''thanks to a nearly complete lack of official secrecy, computer technology has fluorished in the free societies of the United States, Japan, and Western Europe.'' The superiority of this technology, vis-a-vis its status in the Soviet bloc, has enhanced both the national security and the economic vitality of the United States and its allies. A further example of the success of science without secrecy can be found in another technology of major importance to the goals of America's Strategic Defense Initiative (SDI). The technology of note is the free electron-l'Ser (FEL).

  13. Free-electron lasers for strategic defense: The benefits of scientific open scientific exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barletta, W. A.

    1986-02-01

    A dominant theme of the Fifth International Seminar on Nuclear War, held at Erice, Sicily, (August 19-24, 1985), was the appeal for openness in science and in technological research. In his address to the seminar, Italian Foreign Minister Giulio Andreotti cited the remarkable achievements at the European Center for Nuclear Research (CERN), as an inspiring example of the benefits of scientific collaboration across national borders - science without frontiers. Dr. Edward Teller eloquently argued that, thanks to a nearly complete lack of official secrecy, computer technology has flourished in the free societies of the United States, Japan, and Western Europe. The superiority of this technology, vis-a-vis its status in the Soviet bloc, has enhanced both the national security and the economic vitality of the United States and its allies. A further example of the success of science without secrecy can be found in another technology of major importance to the goals of America's Strategic Defense Initiative (SDI). The technology of note is the free electron laser (FEL).

  14. The origins of psychology in Italy: Themes and authors that emerge through a content analysis of the Rivista di Filosofia Scientifica [Journal of Scientific Philosophy].

    PubMed

    Bartolucci, Chiara; Lombardo, Giovanni Pietro

    2012-08-01

    This article examines the scientific-cultural context of the second half of the 1800s, during which psychological science emerged in Italy. The article explores the contribution made by the emergence of the primary research traditions of that period, namely, physiological anthropology and phreniatry, by means of a methodology that combines content analysis with a classical historiographical study of the period. Themes and authors deriving from the various disciplines in the human and natural sciences were identified through a content analysis of the Rivista di Filosofia Scientifica [Journal of Scientific Philosophy], a periodical that is representative of Italian positivism. The analysis highlights the epistemological perspective held by scholars who, distancing themselves from the mechanistic reductionism of the proponents of positivism, integrated a naturalistic and evolutionary conceptualization with the neo-Kantian critique. A clearly delineated naturalistic and differential perspective of scientific research that brought about the birth of psychology as an experimental discipline in Italy in the 1900s emerges from the analysis, including psychology and psychopathology as studied by the phreniatrists Gabriele Buccola, Enrico Morselli, and Eugenio Tanzi; Tito Vignoli and Giuseppe Sergi's work in comparative anthropology; Giulio Fano's approach and contribution to physiology; and Enrico Ferri's contribution to criminology. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved). PMID:23397915

  15. Theodor Billroth's vision and Karl Ziegler's action: commemoration of the 40th day of death and the 50th anniversary of conferment of Nobel Prize for Chemistry of Karl Ziegler.

    PubMed

    Kapischke, Matthias; Pries, Alexandra

    2014-02-01

    Alloplastic materials are broadly used in modern surgery. Until the middle of the 20th century, metal materials and especially silver were used because of their antimicrobial properties. With the development of a new catalytic process for the production of high-density polyethylene and polypropylene materials, a new era of prosthesis was introduced. These polymers are integral part of our everyday operations surgery, especially in hernia repair. The famous surgeon Billroth mentioned to his pupil Czerny in 1878: "If we could artificially produce tissues of the density and toughness of fascia and tendon, the secret of the radical cure of hernia would be discovered". The polypropylene developed by Karl Ziegler gave the surgeon a material for daily practice, which in its properties (nearly) achieved Billroth's initial vision. In 1963 the Nobel Prize for Chemistry was awarded to Karl Ziegler and Giulio Natta in Stockholm. Furthermore, August 11, 2013 will be the 40th anniversary of Karl Ziegler's death. This manuscript honors both days. PMID:24387785

  16. The italian communist party and the "lysenko affair" (1948-1955).

    PubMed

    Cassata, Francesco

    2012-01-01

    This article explores the impact of the VASKhNIL conference upon the cultural policy of the Italian Communist Party (PCI) and Italian communist biology, with particular attention to the period between 1948 and 1951. News of the Moscow session did not appear in the Italian news media until October, 1948, and for the next three years party biologists struggled over whether to translate the official transcript of the proceedings, The Situation in Biological Science, into Italian. This struggle reveals the complex efforts of the PCI to confirm the ideological and political connection with the Soviet Union, without completely alienating significant milieus of the democratic and antifascist culture in Italy. The apparent impossibility of doing both is indicated by the fact that the project was finally abandoned in March-April, 1951. The article is divided into three sections, each focused on different actors and their response to Lysenkoism. The first section outlines the features of the PCI's pro-Lysenko campaign, with particular regard to the intellectual militancy and organizational commitment of Emilio Sereni, head of PCI's Cultural Commission between 1948 and 1951. The second section analyzes the reaction of the three most important figures in Italian communist biology during this period, Massimiliano Aloisi, Franco Graziosi and Emanuele Padoa. The third section interprets the decision not to publish a translation of The Situation in Biological Science as a consequence of the conflicts between PCI cultural program and the editorial policy of the left-wing publishing house Giulio Einaudi Editore. PMID:21701868

  17. Energy-efficiency labels and standards: A guidebook for appliances, equipment and lighting

    SciTech Connect

    McMahon, James E.; Wiel, Stephen

    2001-02-16

    Energy-performance improvements in consumer products are an essential element in any government's portfolio of energy-efficiency and climate change mitigation programs. Governments need to develop balanced programs, both voluntary and regulatory, that remove cost-ineffective, energy-wasting products from the marketplace and stimulate the development of cost-effective, energy-efficient technology. Energy-efficiency labels and standards for appliances, equipment, and lighting products deserve to be among the first policy tools considered by a country's energy policy makers. The U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) and the United Nations Foundation (UNF) recognize the need to support policy makers in their efforts to implement energy-efficiency standards and labeling programs and have developed this guidebook, together with the Collaborative Labeling and Appliance Standards Program (CLASP), as a primary reference. This guidebook was prepared over the course of the past year with significant contribution from the authors and reviewers mentioned previously. Their diligent participation has made this the international guidance tool it was intended to be. The lead authors would also like to thank the following individuals for their support in the development, production, and distribution of the guidebook: Marcy Beck, Elisa Derby, Diana Dhunke, Ted Gartner, and Julie Osborn of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory as well as Anthony Ma of Bevilacqua-Knight, Inc. This guidebook is designed as a manual for government officials and others around the world responsible for developing, implementing, enforcing, monitoring, and maintaining labeling and standards-setting programs. It discusses the pros and cons of adopting energy-efficiency labels and standards and describes the data, facilities, and institutional and human resources needed for these programs. It provides guidance on the design, development, implementation, maintenance, and evaluation of the programs

  18. Seismic Symphonies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strinna, Elisa; Ferrari, Graziano

    2015-04-01

    symbolize cosmic harmony. But here it is the earth, "nature", the ground beneath our feet that is moving. It speaks to us not of harmony, but of our fragility. For the oldest earthquakes considered, Seismic Symphonies drew on SISMOS archives, the INGV project for recovery, high resolution digital reproduction and distribution of the seismograms of earthquakes of the Euro-Mediterranean area from 1895 to 1984. After the first exposure to the Fondazione Bevilacqua La Masa in Venice, the organ was later exhibited in Taiwan, the Taipei Biennial, with seismograms provided from the Taiwanese Central Weather Bureau, and at the EACC Castello in Spain, with seismograms of Spanish earthquakes provided by the Instituto Geográfico Nacional.

  19. Modelling wet and dry spells for daily rainfall data series: an application to irrigation management in North-West Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferraris, Stefano; Agnese, Carmelo; Baiamonte, Giorgio; Cat Berro, Daniele; Mercalli, Luca

    2016-04-01

    rainfall events for Italian Sub-Alpine and Mediterranean areas". Adv. Sci. Res., 1, 1-7, 2012, doi:10.5194/asr-1-1-2012 Agnese C., Baiamonte G., Cammalleri C. (2014)."Modelling the occurrence of rainy days under a typical Mediterranean climate". Adv. Water Res., 64, 62-76 Canone D., Previati M., Bevilacqua I., Salvai L., Ferraris S. (2015) "Field measurements based model for surface irrigation efficiency assessment". Agric. Water Manag., vol. 156(1) pp. 30-42, doi:10.1016/j.agwat.2015.03.01 Chatfield C., Wet and dry spells. Weather 1966; 21:308-10.

  20. PREFACE: Preface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angelova, Maia; Zakrzewski, Wojciech

    2011-03-01

    the meeting was that all plenary talks presented the state-of-the-art and were at the same time educational and exciting, promoting the multidisciplinary aspects of the research, and thus were inspirational for young scientists considering work in these fields. The plenary talks, each lasting 1 hour, were given by distinguished world experts and some young 'rising stars': Richard Ward, Ulf Leonhardt, Jens Eisert, Michael Berry, Shahn Majid, Arndt von Haeseler, Michio Jimbo, Katrin Wendland, Raymond Goldstein, Mark Trodden, Maria Vozmediano and Giulio Chiribella. The public lecture was given by Francesco Iachello and was open to participants and other people from the Newcastle-Durham region. In addition, talks of 30 minutes duration each and including more technical content, were given in four parallel sessions. Each parallel session had a designated time for informal interaction with the speakers, discussions of new directions of research and for forming new collaborations. The poster session, in a room where posters were exhibited for the duration of the conference, was easily accessible, and had a friendly and relaxed atmosphere, encouraging discussions of work and exchanges of new ideas. To secure a high quality scientific programme, all contributions were reviewed. Another interesting feature of the conference was the Open Forum on the Friday afternoon, which was lively and well attended. It took the form of a question and answer session with a panel chaired by Allan Solomon, with the following members: Gerald Goldin, Jean-Pierre Gazeau, Mark Trodden and Giulio Chiribella. The focus was on new directions of research, novel applications and the further development of group theory, education, training and career opportunities for young researchers. The participants were asked to submit questions in advance; examples are: "What is the role of symmetries and conservation principles in deducing underlying physics from experimental data?" and "What are the most

  1. Neurosurgery at the Catholic University in Rome.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Gian Franco; Colicchio, Gabriella; Di Rocco, Concezio; Maira, Giulio; Meglio, Mario; Scerrati, Massimo

    2002-06-01

    Neurosurgery at the Catholic University in Rome was initiated by Gian Franco Rossi in 1969 and has gradually expanded since then. From the beginning, research has been regarded as an essential part of training and daily activities in the university's neurosurgery programs. The professional and research education of all faculty members includes at least 1 year abroad in a reputable neurosurgical center. Subspecialization is encouraged. Today, the faculty is composed of 3 full professors, 4 associate professors, and 16 assistant professors. The university's neurosurgery programs include the Institute of Neurosurgery, the residency program, and the following clinical units: a Division of General Neurosurgery; three subspecialty sections comprising Neurotraumatology, Pediatric Neurosurgery, and Functional and Spine Surgery; a day hospital; and dedicated laboratories. More than 1700 surgical patients are treated annually. Epilepsy, pain management, parkinsonism, spinal cord and vertebral pathologies, clinical and basic neuro-oncology, cerebrospinal fluid and intracranial pressure dynamics, cerebrovascular disease, neurotrauma, developmental malformations, and peripheral and central nervous system neuroregeneration are the main fields of clinical and research activities. The results of the research performed thus far at the Catholic University in Rome have been reported in more than 900 publications, most of which have appeared in prominent journals and books. Members of the faculty are involved in relevant editorial activities and serve as officers of national and international scientific and professional societies. In 1999, Giulio Maira succeeded Dr. Rossi in directing the Institute of Neurosurgery and the Division of General Neurosurgery. In addition to the history of neurosurgery at the Catholic University in Rome, this article describes present challenges and plans for the future in neurosurgery at the university. PMID:12015854

  2. Galileo's Medicean Moons (IAU S269)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbieri, Cesare; Chakrabarti, Supriya; Coradini, Marcello; Lazzarin, Monica

    2010-11-01

    Preface; 1. Galileo's telescopic observations: the marvel and meaning of discovery George V. Coyne, S. J.; 2. Popular perceptions of Galileo Dava Sobel; 3. The slow growth of humility Tobias Owen and Scott Bolton; 4. A new physics to support the Copernican system. Gleanings from Galileo's works Giulio Peruzzi; 5. The telescope in the making, the Galileo first telescopic observations Alberto Righini; 6. The appearance of the Medicean Moons in 17th century charts and books. How long did it take? Michael Mendillo; 7. Navigation, world mapping and astrometry with Galileo's moons Kaare Aksnes; 8. Modern exploration of Galileo's new worlds Torrence V. Johnson; 9. Medicean Moons sailing through plasma seas: challenges in establishing magnetic properties Margaret G. Kivelson, Xianzhe Jia and Krishan K. Khurana; 10. Aurora on Jupiter: a magnetic connection with the Sun and the Medicean Moons Supriya Chakrabarti and Marina Galand; 11. Io's escaping atmosphere: continuing the legacy of surprise Nicholas M. Schneider; 12. The Jovian Rings Wing-Huen Ip; 13. The Juno mission Scott J. Bolton and the Juno Science Team; 14. Seeking Europa's ocean Robert T. Pappalardo; 15. Europa lander mission: a challenge to find traces of alien life Lev Zelenyi, Oleg Korablev, Elena Vorobyova, Maxim Martynov, Efraim L. Akim and Alexander Zakahrov; 16. Atmospheric moons Galileo would have loved Sushil K. Atreya; 17. The study of Mercury Louise M. Prockter and Peter D. Bedini; 18. Jupiter and the other giants: a comparative study Thérèse Encrenaz; 19. Spectroscopic and spectrometric differentiation between abiotic and biogenic material on icy worlds Kevin P. Hand, Chris McKay and Carl Pilcher; 20. Other worlds, other civilizations? Guy Consolmagno, S. J.; 21. Concluding remarks Roger M. Bonnet; Posters; Author index; Object index.

  3. The Hermann Weyl Prize - Laudatio for Guilio Chiribella

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    del Olmo, M. A.

    2011-03-01

    The Hermann Weyl Prize was created in 2000 by the Standing Committee of the International Group Theory Colloquium. The purpose of the Weyl Prize is to provide recognition for young scientists (younger than 35) who have performed original work of significant scientific quality in the area of understanding physics through symmetries. The Hermann Weyl Prize consists of a certificate citing the accomplishments of the recipient, prize money of $500 and an allowance towards the attendance of the bi-annual International Group Theory Colloquium at which the award is presented. The previous winners of the award were: Edward Frenkel (2002), Nikita A Nekrasov (2004), Boyko Bakalov (2006) and Mohammad M Sheikh-Jabbari (2008). The Selection Committee of the Weyl Prize 2010 consisted of S T Ali (Concordia University), E Corrigan (Durham Univeristy), P Kulish (St Petersburg Mathematical Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences), R Mosseri (CNRS Paris) and M A del Olmo (University of Valladolid, chairman). This committee has made the following announcement: The Weyl Prize for the year 2010 was awarded to Dr Giulio Chiribella, in recognition of his pioneering work on the application of group theoretical methods in Quantum Information Theory. In particular, for providing a general solution to the problem of optimal estimation of symmertry transformations based on the notion of quantum entanglement between representation and multiplicity spaces, for the derivation of optimal protocols for the alignment of quantum reference frames, for the characterization of extreme quantum measurements in finite dimensions, for the proof of equivalence between asymptotic cloning and state estimation and for the proof of the optimality of measure-and-reprepare for quantum learning of unitary transformations. The Laudatio of Guilio Chiribella, delivered by M A del Olmo, is included in the PDF.

  4. [Polycyclic aromatic hidrocarbons deposition in the Milazzo-Valle del Mela (Sicily Region, Southern Italy) high-risk area following an oil refinery fire].

    PubMed

    Grechi, Daniele; Biggeri, Annibale

    2016-01-01

    On September 2014, a fire began within an oil refinery involving a storage tank containing several hundreds of thousands cubic meters of virgin naphtha. Mayors of neighbouring municipalities asked the Epidemiology and Prevention Society "Giulio A. Maccacaro" to carry out an environmental survey in order to evaluate what was the nature and how dangerous was suspended dust deposited by the fumes. In the following days, after fire had been extinguished we conducted a sample survey on the presence of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and metals in particulate deposited on the soil on a radius of five kilometres from the refinery and we engaged the exposed population. The Milazzo-Valle del Mela (Sicily Region, Southern Italy) high-risk area includes several industrial plants; among them, an oil refinery and a fuel powered energy plant. As reference area we selected the Sarroch municipality (Sardinia Region, Southern Italy), in the coast of the Tyrrhenian Sea, which is geographically comparable, where a large oil refinery is located and where an environmental campaign with measurement of PAH and metals in particulate matter was ongoing. Qualitatively, metal composition of particulate matter resulted similar in the Sarroch and Milazzo samples. Instead, a large excess of PAH was documented in the Milazzo samples as compared to the Sarroch ones. In conclusion, the results of the analysis of the samples of particulate matter deposited in the Milazzo area in the days immediately following the oil refinery fire showed a high quantity of PAH, carcinogenic substances which pose major hazard to population health. The greater fall-out was registered in the proximity of the burnt storage tank and the West neighbourhood, and at lesser extent in the Southern neighbourhood. As a consequence, there was a population exposure to carcinogenic substances which could have reached the food chain. PMID:26951697

  5. Clues to tRNA Evolution from the Distribution of Class II tRNAs and Serine Codons in the Genetic Code.

    PubMed

    Bernhardt, Harold S

    2016-01-01

    We have previously proposed that tRNA(Gly) was the first tRNA and glycine was the first amino acid incorporated into the genetic code. The next two amino acids incorporated would have been the other two small hydrophilic amino acids serine and aspartic acid, which occurred through the duplication of the tRNA(Gly) sequence, followed by mutation of its anticodon by single C to U transition mutations, possibly through spontaneous deamination. Interestingly, however, tRNA(Ser) has a different structure than most other tRNAs, possessing a long variable arm; because of this tRNA(Ser) is classified as a class II tRNA. Also, serine codons are found not only in the bottom right-hand corner of the genetic code table next to those for glycine and aspartic acid, but also in the top row of the table, next to those for two of the most hydrophobic amino acids, leucine and phenylalanine. In the following, I propose that the class II tRNA structure of tRNA(Ser) and the arrangement of serine codons in the genetic code provide clues to the early evolution of tRNA and the genetic code. In addition, I address Di Giulio's recent criticism of our proposal that tRNA(Gly) was the first tRNA, and discuss how early peptides produced from a restricted amino acid alphabet of glycine, serine and aspartic acid might have possessed proteolytic activity, which is possibly important for the early recycling of amino acid monomers. PMID:26927183

  6. Safeguard of Cultural Heritage: Evaluation of Ground Motion at Palazzo Te (Mantova, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daminelli, R.; Tento, A.; Benetti, S.; Pisani, C.; Mastromarino, C.; Riva, P.; Marcellini, A.

    2011-12-01

    Built on the first half of the XVI century, under Federico II Gonzaga, Duke of Mantova, Palazzo Te is one of the most relevant Italian monuments and it belongs to the UNESCO World Heritage List; the Camera dei Giganti (Chamber of the Giants) hosts a famous XVI century Giulio Romano fresco. Palazzo Te raises concerns in particular for the statics of the Fruttiere external wall and for some fissures that cross the above mentioned fresco. Therefore a monitoring survey has been undertaken to detect and qualify the vibrations caused by earthquakes and anthropic activity. Palazzo Te is situated in a low seismicity area, nevertheless even weak earthquakes could result in significant damage due to the poor soil conditions. A seismic station deployed inside the Palazzo Te recorded, on July 17, 2011, 2 cm/sec2 PGA for the ML 4.7 earthquake located at approx 51 km distance: some light damage has been observed. As far as vibrations due to anthropic origin, the station has evidenced that the major threat is due to the trains at the nearby railway: inside the Palazzo Te PGA reached 5 cm/sec2. The seismic survey led to the following considerations: 1. even low magnitude earthquakes can be a threat, given the intrinsic vulnerability of some parts of the Palazzo Te; 2. the main and possibly unique significant dangerous vibrations of anthropic origin come from the trains running nearby; 3. the response spectra evidenced that the earthquake had a consistent energy content till T0=2 seconds, while the spectrum of the trains decay abruptly at around 10 Hz. In contrast the train response spectrum is significantly higher in the high frequency range. In conclusion, despite the relatively low hazard, seismic risk is still relevant, because of the poor soil conditions coupled with the high vulnerability. The train vibrations are not a threat for the Palazzo Te structure but can cause some concerns to the frescoes.

  7. Elastic, not plastic species: Frozen plasticity theory and the origin of adaptive evolution in sexually reproducing organisms

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Darwin's evolutionary theory could easily explain the evolution of adaptive traits (organs and behavioral patterns) in asexual but not in sexual organisms. Two models, the selfish gene theory and frozen plasticity theory were suggested to explain evolution of adaptive traits in sexual organisms in past 30 years. Results The frozen plasticity theory suggests that sexual species can evolve new adaptations only when their members are genetically uniform, i.e. only after a portion of the population of the original species had split off, balanced on the edge of extinction for several generations, and then undergone rapid expansion. After a short period of time, estimated on the basis of paleontological data to correspond to 1-2% of the duration of the species, polymorphism accumulates in the gene pool due to frequency-dependent selection; and thus, in each generation, new mutations occur in the presence of different alleles and therefore change their selection coefficients from generation to generation. The species ceases to behave in an evolutionarily plastic manner and becomes evolutionarily elastic on a microevolutionary time-scale and evolutionarily frozen on a macroevolutionary time-scale. It then exists in this state until such changes accumulate in the environment that the species becomes extinct. Conclusion Frozen plasticity theory, which includes the Darwinian model of evolution as a special case - the evolution of species in a plastic state, not only offers plenty of new predictions to be tested, but also provides explanations for a much broader spectrum of known biological phenomena than classic evolutionary theories. Reviewers This article was reviewed by Rob Knight, Fyodor Kondrashov and Massimo Di Giulio (nominated by David H. Ardell). PMID:20067646

  8. Transuranium radionuclide pollution in the waters of the La Maddalena National Marine Park.

    PubMed

    Aumento, F; Le Donne, K; Eroe, K

    2005-01-01

    Following the grounding and subsequent explosion, in October 2003, of a nuclear submarine in the waters of the La Maddalena National Marine Park, fears arose of possible radioactive leakages. However, isotopic analyses on algae showed that the gamma-ray emitting artificial radionuclides that one might expect to leak from a damaged nuclear reactor (such as U-235, I-131, Cs-137) were absent, and that U-238/U-234 activities were in equilibrium with values typical of sea water; this excluded any direct anthropogenic contamination as a result of the accident. We used alpha autoradiographic techniques to detect possible traces of transuranium radionuclides; 160 samples of algae, granites, sea urchins, gastropods, limpets, cuttlefish and jellyfish were collected from the area, as well as from other Mediterranean coastlines and the Baltic Sea. All samples were autoradiographed, and selected samples further analysed by alpha spectrometry. There were no alpha track concentrations above background levels in our control Mediterranean specimens. In the samples from the La Maddalena and Baltic areas two different track distributions were observed: --those homogeneously distributed over the surfaces examined; --groups (10 to over 500) of radially distributed alpha tracks (forming "star" bursts, or "hot spots") emanating from point sources. By comparing radionuclide activities measured by alpha spectroscopy with alpha track densities, we extrapolated Pu activities for all samples. About 74% of algae had Pu activities of less than 1 Bq/kg and 0.25 Bq/kg, 16% had accumulated Pu to levels between 1 and 2 Bq/kg, and a very few specimens had concentrations between 2 and 6 Bq/kg. Plots showed that alpha tracks and stars concentrate around the northern and eastern margins of the Rada (Basin) di Santo Stefano, sites facing the nuclear submarine base on the eastern shore of the island of Santo Stefano. What is the source of these nuclides: last century's atmospheric nuclear testing

  9. Preliminary results of trace elements mobility in soils and plants from the active hydrothermal area of Nisyros island (Greece)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daskalopoulou, Kyriaki; Calabrese, Sergio; Milazzo, Silvia; Brusca, Lorenzo; D'Alessandro, Walter; Kyriakopoulos, Konstantinos; Tassi, Franco; Parello, Francesco

    2014-05-01

    Trace elements, i.e. chemical constituents of rocks with concentration <1000 ppm, play a structural role in the organisms and use proteins as a carrier to their target site. Their toxicity depends on their concentration, speciation and reactions with other elements. In volcanic environments, significant amounts of trace elements discharged from gas emissions, contribute to produce air particulate. Nisyros Island is a stratovolcano located at the South Aegean active Volcanic Arc. Intense hydrothermal activity characterise the Lakki caldera. In particular, the fumaroles located in the craters of Stefanos, Kaminakia, Lofos Dome and the area comprising Phlegeton, Polyvotes Micros and Polyvotes Megalos discharge hydrothermal fluids rich in H2O (91- 99%), SO2 and H2S. Their temperatures are almost 100o C and H2S is highly abundant accounting for 8-26 % of the released dry gas phase. On June 2013, during a multidisciplinary field trip on Nisyros island, 39 samples of top soils and 31 of endemic plants (Cistus Creticus and Salvifolius and Erica Arborea and Manipuliflora) were collected in the caldera area, with the aim to investigate the distribution of concentrations of trace elements related to the contribution of deep originated fluids. Moreover, one sample of plant and soil was collected outside the caldera as local background, for comparison. All the soil samples were powdered avoiding metal contamination and they were extracted twice, using HNO3 + HCl for one extraction (closed microwave digestion) and ultrapure de- ionized water for the other one (leaching extraction). The leaves of plants were gently isolated, dried and powdered for acid microwave extraction (HNO3 + H2O2). All the solutions were analysed for major and trace elements contents by using ionic chromatography (IC) and inductively plasma spectrometry (ICP-MS and ICP-OES). The preliminary results showed high enrichment of many trace elements both in plant and soils respect to the local background, in

  10. Workshop session on pros and cons for different target materials/corrosion and corrosion control

    SciTech Connect

    Takeda, Y.; Mansur, L.K.; Dai, Y.; DiStefano, J.R.

    1996-06-01

    Two of the originally planned workshop sessions, indicated by the titles on each side of the {open_quotes}/{close_quotes} in the above title were combined. The session was structured into four areas in which target material attributes were considered: nuclear properties; physical properties; compatibility; and liquid metal engineering/safety. Short presentations were either volunteered by participants or requested by the session organizers to help establish a background and stimulate discussion. G. Bauer, J. Takeda, T. Gabriel and S. Wender covered the first two areas; J. DiStefano, Y. Dai and Y. Orlov made presentations in the third area. O. Lielausis and R. Dressler spoke on the fourth area. L.K. Mansur served as moderator for the combined session. Although there was much discussion and some differences of opinion, the overall recommendations, considering all available factors, as distilled by this session`s organizers, are as follows. Choose Hg as the prime candidate target material to which most resources should be devoted. A strong alternate candidate is considered to exist in Pb-Bi eutectic. Other candidate materials such as Pb, Pb-Mg eutectic and Bi are weaker choices for various reasons, with Bi being the weakest.

  11. Collective synchronization of divisions in Drosophila development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vergassola, Massimo

    Mitoses in the early development of most metazoans are rapid and synchronized across the entire embryo. While diffusion is too slow, in vitro experiments have shown that waves of the cell-cycle regulator Cdk1 can transfer information rapidly across hundreds of microns. However, the signaling dynamics and the physical properties of chemical waves during embryonic development remain unclear. We develop FRET biosensors for the activity of Cdk1 and the checkpoint kinase Chk1 in Drosophila embryos and exploit them to measure waves in vivo. We demonstrate that Cdk1 chemical waves control mitotic waves and that their speed is regulated by the activity of Cdk1 during the S-phase (and not mitosis). We quantify the progressive slowdown of the waves with developmental cycles and identify its underlying control mechanism by the DNA replication checkpoint through the Chk1/Wee1 pathway. The global dynamics of the mitotic signaling network illustrates a novel control principle: the S-phase activity of Cdk1 regulates the speed of the mitotic wave, while the Cdk1 positive feedback ensures an invariantly rapid onset of mitosis. Mathematical modeling captures the speed of the waves and predicts a fundamental distinction between the S-phase Cdk1 trigger waves and the mitotic phase waves, which is illustrated by embryonic ablation experiments. In collaboration with Victoria Deneke1, Anna Melbinger2, and Stefano Di Talia1 1 Department of Cell Biology, Duke University Medical Center 2 Department of Physics, University of California San Diego.

  12. Current research in nuclear medicine and molecular imaging in Italy: highlights of the 10th National Congress of the Italian Association of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging.

    PubMed

    Cuocolo, A

    2011-06-01

    The 10th National Congress of the Italian Association of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging (AIMN) took place in Rimini on March 18-21, 2011 under the chairmanship of Professor Stefano Fanti. The program was of excellent quality and put a further step for the settlement of the standardized AIMN congress structure. A large industrial exhibition demonstrated the latest technological innovations and developments within the field. The congress was a great success with more than 1100 total participants and more than 360 abstracts received. Of these, 40 abstracts were accepted for oral and 285 for poster presentations. The original investigations presented were related to different areas of nuclear medicine and molecular imaging, with particular focus on advances in instrumentation and data processing, progress in radiochemistry and pharmacy, novel diagnostics and therapeutics, and new insights in well established areas of clinical application, such as oncology, cardiology, neurology, psychiatry, endocrinology, paediatrics, and infection and inflammation. Noteworthy, several presentations at this congress, focusing on quantitative interpretation of the imaging data and on pragmatic endpoints, such as adverse outcomes, identified when nuclear medicine procedures achieved clinical effectiveness for patient care and patient management and further demonstrated that nuclear medicine plays a crucial role in the contemporary medical scenario. This highlights lecture is only a brief summary of the large amount of data presented and discussed, which can be found in much greater detail in the congress abstract book, published as volume 55, supplement 1 of the Q J Nucl Med Mol Imaging in April 2011. PMID:21532541

  13. Proton conductivity in ampullae of Lorenzini jelly

    PubMed Central

    Josberger, Erik E.; Hassanzadeh, Pegah; Deng, Yingxin; Sohn, Joel; Rego, Michael J.; Amemiya, Chris T.; Rolandi, Marco

    2016-01-01

    In 1678, Stefano Lorenzini first described a network of organs of unknown function in the torpedo ray—the ampullae of Lorenzini (AoL). An individual ampulla consists of a pore on the skin that is open to the environment, a canal containing a jelly and leading to an alveolus with a series of electrosensing cells. The role of the AoL remained a mystery for almost 300 years until research demonstrated that skates, sharks, and rays detect very weak electric fields produced by a potential prey. The AoL jelly likely contributes to this electrosensing function, yet the exact details of this contribution remain unclear. We measure the proton conductivity of the AoL jelly extracted from skates and sharks. The room-temperature proton conductivity of the AoL jelly is very high at 2 ± 1 mS/cm. This conductivity is only 40-fold lower than the current state-of-the-art proton-conducting polymer Nafion, and it is the highest reported for a biological material so far. We suggest that keratan sulfate, identified previously in the AoL jelly and confirmed here, may contribute to the high proton conductivity of the AoL jelly with its sulfate groups—acid groups and proton donors. We hope that the observed high proton conductivity of the AoL jelly may contribute to future studies of the AoL function. PMID:27386543

  14. KSC-03PD-3180

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. In the Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF), Richard Kuhns, NASA Node 2/10A Mission Integration Engineer, International Space Station and Payload Processing, discusses the Node 2 with members of the media. From left are Stefano Masiello, Alenia Spazio; Steve Shannon, Node 2 Mission Manager, The Boeing Co.; and Kuhns. The installation of NASA's Node 2 denotes the U.S. Core Complete stage of International Space Station assembly and, among other functions, will provide a passageway between four Station science experiment facilities: the U.S. Destiny Laboratory, the Kibo Japanese Experiment Module, the European Columbus Laboratory and the Centrifuge Accommodation Module. Reporters were invited to commemorate the fifth anniversary of the launch of the first element of the Station with a tour of the SSPF and had the opportunity to see Space Station hardware that is being processed for deployment once the Space Shuttles return to flight. NASA and Boeing mission managers were on hand to talk about the various hardware elements currently being processed for flight.

  15. Light Microsopy Module, International Space Station Premier Automated Microscope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, William V.; Sicker, Ronald J.; Chiaramonte, Francis P.; Brown, Daniel F.; O'Toole, Martin A.; Foster, William M.; Motil, Brian J.; Abbot-Hearn, Amber Ashley; Atherton, Arthur Johnson; Beltram, Alexander; Bozioney, Christopher M.; Brinkman, John Michael; Chestney, Louis S.; Czernec, Richard P.; Dial, William B.; Dombrosky, Deena M.; Eustace, John G.; Reid, Ryan James; Reinke, Sharon A.; Rogers, Christopher R.; Samrani, Joseph T.; Shumway, Steven Scott; Smith, Teresa Ann; Stroh, James R.; Storck, Jennifer L.; Werner, Christopher Raymond; Wilkinson, Myron A.; Zoldak, John T.; Grant, Nechelle M.; Loucks, Brian C.; Plastow, Richard A.; Pestak, Mark W.; Fletcher, William A.

    2015-01-01

    The Light Microscopy Module (LMM) was launched to the International Space Station (ISS) in 2009 and began science operations in 2010. It continues to support Physical and Biological scientific research on ISS. During 2015, if all goes as planned, five experiments will be completed: [1] Advanced Colloids Experiments with a manual sample base -3 (ACE-M-3), [2] the Advanced Colloids Experiment with a Heated Base -1 (ACE-H-1), [3] (ACE-H-2), [4] the Advanced Plant Experiment -03 (APEX-03), and [5] the Microchannel Diffusion Experiment (MDE). Preliminary results, along with an overview of present and future LMM capabilities will be presented; this includes details on the planned data imaging processing and storage system, along with the confocal upgrade to the core microscope. [1] New York University: Paul Chaikin, Andrew Hollingsworth, and Stefano Sacanna, [2] University of Pennsylvania: Arjun Yodh and Matthew Gratale, [3] a consortium of universities from the State of Kentucky working through the Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research (EPSCoR): Stuart Williams, Gerold Willing, Hemali Rathnayake, et al., [4] from the University of Florida and CASIS: Anna-Lisa Paul and Rob Ferl, and [5] from the Methodist Hospital Research Institute from CASIS: Alessandro Grattoni and Giancarlo Canavese.

  16. Pen Branch fault program: Consolidated report on the seismic reflection surveys and the shallow drilling

    SciTech Connect

    Stieve, A.L.; Stephenson, D.E.; Aadland, R.K.

    1991-03-23

    The Pen Branch fault was identified in the subsurface at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in 1989 based upon interpretation of earlier seismic reflection surveys and other geologic investigations (Seismorgraph Services Incorp., 1973; Chapman and DiStefano, 1989; Snipes, Fallaw and Price, 1989). A program was initiated at that time to determine the capability of the fault to release seismic energy (Price and others, 1989) as defined in the Nuclear Regulatory Commission regulatory guidelines, 10 CFR 100 Appendix A. This report presents the results of the Pen Branch fault investigation based on data acquired from seismic reflection surveys and shallow drilling across the fault completed at this time. The Earth Science Advisory Committee (ESAC) has reviewed the results of these investigations and unanimously agrees with the conclusion of Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) that the Pen Branch fault is a non-capable fault. ESAC is a committee of 12 earth science professionals from academia and industry with the charter of providing outside peer review of SRS geotechnical, seismic, and ground water modeling programs.

  17. Global Magnetospheric Simulations: coupling with ionospheric and solar wind models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapenta, Giovanni; Olshevskyi, Vyacheslav; Amaya, Jorge; Deca, Jan; Markidis, Stefano; Vapirev, Alexander

    2013-04-01

    We present results on the global fully kinetic model of the magnetosphere of the Earth. The simulations are based on the iPic3D code [1] that treats kinetically all plasma species solving implicitly the equations of motion for electrons and ions, coupled with the Maxwell equations. We present results of our simulations and discuss the coupling at the inner boundary near the Earth with models of the ionosphere and at the outer boundary with models of the arriving solar wind. The results are part of the activities of the Swiff FP7 project: www.swiff.eu [1] Stefano Markidis, Giovanni Lapenta, Rizwan-uddin, Multi-scale simulations of plasma with iPIC3D, Mathematics and Computers in Simulation, Volume 80, Issue 7, March 2010, Pages 1509-1519, ISSN 0378-4754, 10.1016/j.matcom.2009.08.038 [2] Giovanni Lapenta, Particle simulations of space weather, Journal of Computational Physics, Volume 231, Issue 3, 1 February 2012, Pages 795-821, ISSN 0021-9991, 10.1016/j.jcp.2011.03.035.

  18. Proton conductivity in ampullae of Lorenzini jelly.

    PubMed

    Josberger, Erik E; Hassanzadeh, Pegah; Deng, Yingxin; Sohn, Joel; Rego, Michael J; Amemiya, Chris T; Rolandi, Marco

    2016-05-01

    In 1678, Stefano Lorenzini first described a network of organs of unknown function in the torpedo ray-the ampullae of Lorenzini (AoL). An individual ampulla consists of a pore on the skin that is open to the environment, a canal containing a jelly and leading to an alveolus with a series of electrosensing cells. The role of the AoL remained a mystery for almost 300 years until research demonstrated that skates, sharks, and rays detect very weak electric fields produced by a potential prey. The AoL jelly likely contributes to this electrosensing function, yet the exact details of this contribution remain unclear. We measure the proton conductivity of the AoL jelly extracted from skates and sharks. The room-temperature proton conductivity of the AoL jelly is very high at 2 ± 1 mS/cm. This conductivity is only 40-fold lower than the current state-of-the-art proton-conducting polymer Nafion, and it is the highest reported for a biological material so far. We suggest that keratan sulfate, identified previously in the AoL jelly and confirmed here, may contribute to the high proton conductivity of the AoL jelly with its sulfate groups-acid groups and proton donors. We hope that the observed high proton conductivity of the AoL jelly may contribute to future studies of the AoL function. PMID:27386543

  19. General Relativity and Gravitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashtekar, Abhay; Berger, Beverly; Isenberg, James; MacCallum, Malcolm

    2015-07-01

    Part I. Einstein's Triumph: 1. 100 years of general relativity George F. R. Ellis; 2. Was Einstein right? Clifford M. Will; 3. Cosmology David Wands, Misao Sasaki, Eiichiro Komatsu, Roy Maartens and Malcolm A. H. MacCallum; 4. Relativistic astrophysics Peter Schneider, Ramesh Narayan, Jeffrey E. McClintock, Peter Mészáros and Martin J. Rees; Part II. New Window on the Universe: 5. Receiving gravitational waves Beverly K. Berger, Karsten Danzmann, Gabriela Gonzalez, Andrea Lommen, Guido Mueller, Albrecht Rüdiger and William Joseph Weber; 6. Sources of gravitational waves. Theory and observations Alessandra Buonanno and B. S. Sathyaprakash; Part III. Gravity is Geometry, After All: 7. Probing strong field gravity through numerical simulations Frans Pretorius, Matthew W. Choptuik and Luis Lehner; 8. The initial value problem of general relativity and its implications Gregory J. Galloway, Pengzi Miao and Richard Schoen; 9. Global behavior of solutions to Einstein's equations Stefanos Aretakis, James Isenberg, Vincent Moncrief and Igor Rodnianski; Part IV. Beyond Einstein: 10. Quantum fields in curved space-times Stefan Hollands and Robert M. Wald; 11. From general relativity to quantum gravity Abhay Ashtekar, Martin Reuter and Carlo Rovelli; 12. Quantum gravity via unification Henriette Elvang and Gary T. Horowitz.

  20. Coherent perfect absorption in nonlinear optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Yuanlin; Wan, Wenjie; Chen, Xianfeng

    2013-02-01

    Recently, a concept of time reversed lasing or coherent perfect absorber (CPA) has been proposed by A. D. Stone and co-workers, and was shortly experimentally demonstrated by them. The CPA system is illuminated coherently and monochromatically by the time reverse of the output of a lasing mode and the incident radiation is perfectly absorbed. Shortly afterwards, Stefano Longhi extended the idea to realize a CPA for colored incident light, and have theoretically shown that the time reversal of optical parametric oscillation (OPO) in a nonlinear medium could also realize a colored CPA for incident signal and idler fields which can be seemed as a kind of nonlinear CPA. Here we present the realization of such time-reversed processes in nonlinear optics regime, including time-reversed second harmonic generation (SHG) for coherent absorption at harmonic frequency of the pump and time-reversed optical parametric amplification (OPA) for coherent attenuation of colored travelling optical fields. Time reversed SHG is carried out at both phase matching and mismatching conditions, which shows parametric near perfect absorption at the harmonic frequency of the pump. The time reversal of OPA is demonstrated experimentally in a nonlinear medium to form a coherent absorber for perpendicularly polarized signal and idler travelling waves, realizing in the condition of OPA by a type II phase matching scheme. The absorption of signal/idler pair occurs at some specific phase difference. This is the first experimental demonstration of coherent absorption processes in nonlinear optics regime.

  1. Archaeometry of sicilian glazed pottery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alaimo, R.; Bultrini, G.; Fragalà, I.; Giarrusso, R.; Iliopoulos, I.; Montana, G.

    Petrographic and chemical analyses of the ``ceramic body'' of 114 majolica artefacts manufactured in Sicily over a wide time range (16th--19th century) are presented. All the analysed samples, which belong to museums and private collections, were previously attributed to Sicilian workshops based on stylistic features evaluated by expert historians of art. Unambiguous identification of the production sites of majolica handicrafts in Sicily remains, however, open to question when this relies only on purely stylistic considerations. To this end compositional and/or textural markers have been searched for in the ``ceramic body'' of the majolica artefacts in order to differentiate between the centres of manufacture which were active in Sicily in previous centuries. The study of thin sections has allowed the characterization of the raw materials as well as the microscopic ``fabric'' of manufacture from four of the more relevant Sicilian production sites, namely: Caltagirone, Sciacca, Palermo and Santo Stefano di Camastra. Chemical data, including minor and trace elements, have been submitted to computer assisted multivariate statistical techniques. Principal component analysis (PCA) and linear discriminant analysis (LDA) have defined compositional ``ceramic reference groups'' and, consequently, have enabled a more realistic discrimination of provenance. These data have documented several imports of majolica from Naples, while the same artefacts were previously attributed to Sicilian workshops, based on stylistic considerations .

  2. Fluorescence responses and photosynthetic rates of sunlit and shaded leaves of Italian alpine forest species: Summer 1997 ATOM-LIFT campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Moon S.; Cecchi, Giovanna; Chappelle, Emmett W.; Bazzani, Marco; McMurtrey, James E., III; Corp, Lawrence A.; Sandu, R.; Tirelli, Daniele

    1998-07-01

    Terrestrial vegetation studies were carried out in the Italian Northeastern Alps in Val Visdende. The measurement site was 15 Kilometers Northeast of the town of St. Stefano di Calore (Belluno), Italy. Measurements were acquired on a wooded site at the Italian Department of Forestry Station on species native to the Italian Alps. The species included spruce (Picea abies) and alder (Alnus incana) trees. Characterization was also made of the fluorescence responses of several under-story species such as Dactylorhiza fuchsii of the Orchidaceae family, Caltha palustris and Ranunculus ficaria of the Ranuncolcee family, and Trifolium pratense and Trifolium repens of the Leguminosae family. Terrestrial vegetation monitoring was conducted with the Italian FLIDAR remote sensing instrument mounted in a mobile van, the NASA/USDA Fluorescence Imaging System (FIS), and the Spectron SE-590 for optical properties. Photosynthetic CO2 gas exchange rates we made with LI-COR 6400 infrared gas analyzer. Pigments from the samples were extracted and analyzed with a Perkin Elmer Lamda 7 Spectrometer to determine pigment concentrations. Fluorescence responses were collected from vegetation samples grown under different ambient light regimes of sun-lit versus shaded. The vegetation showed different fluorescence characteristics. A fluorescence algorithm, (F740/F680)/F550, and rate of photosynthesis showed a strong linear relationship.

  3. Primer Extension Reactions for the PCR- based α- complementation Assay

    PubMed Central

    Achuthan, Vasudevan; DeStefano, Jeffrey J.

    2016-01-01

    The PCR- based- α- complementation assay is an effective technique to measure the fidelity of polymerases, especially RNA-dependent RNA polymerases (RDRP) and Reverse Transcriptases (RT). It has been successfully employed to determine the fidelity of the poliovirus polymerase 3D-pol (DeStefano, 2010) as well as the human immunodeficiency virus Reverse Transcriptase (HIV RT) (Achuthan et al., 2014). A major advantage of the assay is that since the PCR step is involved, even the low yield of products obtained after two rounds of low yield of RNA synthesis (for RDRP) or reverse transcription (for RT) can be measured using the assay. The assay also mimics the reverse transcription process, since both RNA- and DNA- directed RT synthesis steps are performed. We recently used this assay to show that the HIV RT, at physiologically relevant magnesium concentration, has accuracy in the same range as other reverse transcriptases (Achuthan et al., 2014). Here, we describe in detail how to prepare the inserts using the primer extension reactions. The prepared inserts are then processed further in the PCR- based- α- complementation assay.

  4. Kombucha might be promising probiotics for consumption on the Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozyrovska, Natalia; Foing, Bernard H.

    The sanitization at permanently manned lunar bases and consuming germ-free food in a concert with effect of lunar stressors may result in crews disorders, including inflammatory and atopic states and decrease of resistance to indigenous pathogens which present in human organism in suppressed state. The administration of live microbial supplements with presumptive health benefits on human physiology might be reasonable solution to prevent disbacteriosis. Many of microbial species are associated with the fermentation of dairy products, however, they have a short self-life and so far unpractical to be used at lunar habitation. The popular "Tea mushroom" or "Kombucha Tea" is a probiotics proven by FDA that many people are now taking in health promoting diets to detoxify and revitalize the organism (Danielian, 1993; Sreeramulu et al., 2001). Kombucha is composed by symbiotic bacteria and yeasts, surrounded by a permeable membrane. The Kombucha culture is a tiny biochemical factory, producing organic acids, amino acids, enzymes, polyphenols, antibiotic substances, vitamins, enzymes as well as some other products beneficial for human health. Within the ages the Kombucha Tea has been consumed by practically all nations in Far East and now in Eastern Europe and America due to probiotic properties, and within this period the Kombucha microbial ecosystem has been selected to be remarkably adaptive to culturing conditions and resistant to adverse factors. Metagenomic approaches in a study of microbial ecosystems will allow to reconstruct the Kombucha microbiome and to elucidate unknown species and genes on the base of bioinformatics programs. Compared with Kombucha wild type, metabolically engineered strains, expected to exhibit broader substrate specificity, utilizing sugars from waste material which will be used for Kombucha fermentation. References 1. Danielian L.T. (1993) Tea fungus. Publ. House "Armenia", 112 pp. 2. Palmer C., Bik E.M., DiGiulio D.B., Relman D.A., Brown P

  5. PREFACE: 6th Workshop on Infrared Spectroscopy and Microscopy with Accelerator-Based Sources (WIRMS11)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lupi, Stefano; Perucchi, Andrea

    2012-05-01

    This volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series is dedicated to a subset of papers related to the work presented at the 6th edition of the international Workshop on Infrared Spectroscopy and Microscopy with Accelerator-Based Sources (WIRMS), held in Trieste, Italy, September 4-8 2011. Previous editions of the conference were held in Porquerolles (France), Lake Tahoe (USA), Rathen (Germany), Awaji (Japan), and Banff (Canada). This edition was organized and chaired by Stefano Lupi (Roma La Sapienza) and co-chaired by Andrea Perucchi (Elettra), with the support of the Italian Synchrotron Light Laboratory ELETTRA, which was honored to host the WIRMS workshop in its tenth anniversary. The 6th WIRMS edition addressed several different topics, ranging from biochemistry to strongly correlated materials, from geology to conservation science, and from forensics to the study of cometary dusts. Representatives from the infrared scientific programs at synchrotron light sources and free-electron-laser facilities. This edition was attended by 88 participants, including representatives from the infrared scientific programs at synchrotron light sources and free-electron-laser facilities, who enjoyed the stimulating scientific presentations, several detailed discussions, and the beautiful weather and scenery of the Trieste gulf. Participants came from 16 different nations and four continents, including many young scientists, six of which were supported by the organizers. There were 45 scientific talks divided in 11 sessions: Facilities, Microspectroscopy (I, II, III), Time-Resolved Spectroscopies, Extreme Conditions, Condensed Matter, Near-Field, Imaging, THz Techniques and High-Resolution Spectroscopy. 37 posters were also presented at two very lively evening poster sessions. We would like to use the opportunity of writing this preface to thank all the participants of the workshop for the very high level of their scientific contribution and for the very friendly atmosphere

  6. PREFACE: International Conference "Trends in Spintronics and Nanomagnetism" (TSN-2010)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maruccio, Giuseppe; Sanvito, Stefano; Hoffmann, Germar; Wiesendanger, Roland; Rowan, Alan

    2011-03-01

    Conference banner The International Conference "Trends in Spintronics and Nanomagnetism" (TSN-2010), was organized by partners of the EU-project SpiDME and held in the historical city of Lecce, Italy from 23-27 May 2010, at the Ecotekne Campus, University of Salento. The conference provided an international forum to discuss recent progress and future trends in the field. In particular, the aim was to bring together the community of more conventional spin-transport, with that of molecular and nano-magnetism. The main topics of TSN-2010 were: MATERIALSSPIN-PHYSICS AND THEORY - Molecular Magnets- Spin injection - Magnetic nanoparticles and nanowires- Domain walls, spin torque and vortex dynamics - Magnetic semiconductors- Numerical modeling of organic nanomagnetism - Multiferroics and transition metal oxides APPLICATIONSADVANCES IN CHARACTERIZATION - Magnetic Multilayers- Magneto-optical characterization and spin manipulation - Spin-photonics- Intrinsic spin transport mechanism in organics - Molecular and nano-spintronics- Organometallic molecules on surfaces - Spin-based quantum computation- Single molecular magnets on surfaces - Magnetism for sensing and nanomedicine- Nanoscale characterization and spin-sensitive SPM The scientific programme started on Monday 24 May and ended on Thursday 27 May. The Nobel Laureate A Fert attended the conference giving a plenary talk and the programme also featured invited presentations by (in alphabetical order): M Aeschlimann, M Affronte, N Atodiresei, P A Bobbert, A Dediu, N Kioussis, L W Molenkamp, J Moodera, V Prigodin, M Ruben, R Sessoli, R Tan, and H Wende. TSN2010 had 150 attendees who came from around the globe to present their latest research in 100 oral presentations. Contributed talks were selected by the program committee, composed of Giuseppe Maruccio, Ross Rinaldi, Valentina Arima, Fabio Della Sala, Maurizio Martino (Universitá del Salento, NNL Institute Nanoscience-CNR, Lecce, Italy), Stefano Sanvito (Trinity College

  7. Attitudes towards exercise and physical activity behaviours in Greek schoolchildren after a year long health education intervention

    PubMed Central

    Christodoulos, A D; Douda, H T; Polykratis, M; Tokmakidis, S P

    2006-01-01

    Objective To examine the short term effects of a health education programme on Greek primary schoolchildren Methods The school based intervention programme was applied to 29 children in the 6th grade of the 2nd Primary School of Agios Stefanos (∼12 000 inhabitants); 49 pupils from the 1st Primary School constituted the control group. To assess the effectiveness of the intervention, attitude and behavioural variables were measured before and after the intervention. Results After adjustment for initial differences in the assessed variables, pupils who took part in the intervention had more positive attitudes towards physical activity than the control group and scored significantly more highly on their intention to participate in physical activity. Moreover, pupils in the intervention group reported more hours/week spent in organised physical activities than pupils in the control group (mean (SD) 3.54 (0.32) v 2.54 (0.26), p<0.020). Finally, a higher proportion of pupils in the intervention classes matched the recommendations of 60 minutes of moderate to vigorous physical activity daily (77.4% v 55.1%, p<0.043). Conclusions Within the limitations of the study, the data show that school health education programmes have the potential to slow the age related decline in physical activity and help pupils establish lifelong, healthy physical activity patterns. Promoting healthy habits and physical activity behaviours during childhood may prevent some of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in the Greek population, and also decrease direct healthcare costs and improve quality of life. PMID:16556796

  8. COMMITTEES: LISA 7 Science Organizing Committee and Local Organizing Committee LISA 7 Science Organizing Committee and Local Organizing Committee

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2009-05-01

    Science Organising Committee (SOC) Pierre Binetruy, APC - College de France Massimo Cerdonio, University of Padova Karsten Danzmann, AEI/University of Hannover Mike Cruise, University of Birmingham Jim Hough, University of Glasgow Oliver Jennrich, ESTEC Philippe Jetzer, University Zurich Alberto Lobo (Chair), ICE-CSIC and IEEC Yannick Mellier, IAP, Paris Bernard Schutz, AEI Potsdam Tim Sumner, Imperial College, London Jean-Yves Vinet, OCA, Nice Stefano Vitale, University of Trento Peter Bender, University of Colorado Sasha Buchman, Stanford University Joan Centrella, NASA/Goddard Neil Cornish, Montana State University Curt Cutler, NASA/JPL Sam Finn, Penn State University Jens Gundlach, NPL Craig Hogan, University of Washington Scott Hughes, MIT Piero Madau, Lick Observatory Tom Prince, NASA/JPL Sterl Phinney, Caltech Doug Richstone, University of Michigan Tuck Stebbins, NASA/Goddard Kip Thorne, Caltech Roger Blandford, Stanford University Eugenio Coccia, University of Roma-2 Carlos F Sopuerta,ICE-CSIC and IEEC Enrique Garcia-Berro, Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, Barcelona Seiji Kawamura, National Observatory, Japan Jay Marx, LIGO Laboratory Stephen Merkowitz, NASA/Goddard Benoit Mours, Laboratoire d'Annec Gijs Nelemans, IMAPP, Nijmegen Enric Verdaguer, University of Barcelona Clifford M Will, Washington University, St Louis Local Organising Committee (LOC) Anna Bertolín (IEEC) Priscilla Cañizares (ICE-CSIC and IEEC) Carlos F Sopuerta (ICE-CSIC and IEEC) Ivan Lloro (ICE-CSIC and IEEC),Chair Alberto Lobo (ICE-CSIC and IEEC) Nacho Mateos (ICE-CSIC and IEEC) Pilar Montes (IEEC) Miquel Nofrarias (IEEC) Juan Ramos-Castro (Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya) Josep Sanjuán (IEEC)

  9. "Treatises on Earthquakes" in late Renaissance (16th-17th cent), at the roots of historical seismology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albini, P.

    2009-04-01

    It was soon after the damaging November 1570 earthquake at Ferrara, Northern Italy, that the academic Stefano Breventano from Pavia, a small town in Northern Italy as well, started to compose his "Treatise on the earthquake". Completed by September 1576, this 250-page manuscript was to remain unpublished for centuries. The critical edition recently appeared (Albini, 2007) was a due tribute to the remarkable amount of information put together by Breventano, an otherwise "obscure" literate who, before getting involved with earthquakes, had published a history of the antiquities and remarkable events at his hometown Pavia (1570). Indeed, he was not the first Renaissance author to pursue the goal of checking into the historical sources of the previous centuries in search of earthquakes and other natural phenomena. What is outstanding in his "Treatise" is that he suceeded in retrieving information on more than two hundred earthquakes, along two thousand years, between 504 B.C. and 1575 A.D., covering the whole Euro-Mediterranean region, and the West Indies in early 16th century. Breventano's essay is here presented, together with a comparison between his style and amount of information with those included in the work by the contemporary British author Stephen Batman, "The Doome warning all men to the Judgement" (1581). A later treatise is presented also, the work by Marcello Bonito (1690) "Terra Tremante [Trembling Earth]", which could easily be defined as a worldwide list of earthquakes. In structure and content, Bonito's work goes along the same lines of Breventano, and could be considered a precursor of today descriptive catalogues, because of his outstandingly modern approach that paved the way to modern historical seismology.

  10. Costs and deaths of landslides in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haque, Ubydul; Blum, Philipp

    2016-04-01

    Landslides cause human and large economic losses worldwide and also in Europe. However, the quantification of associated costs and deaths is highly underestimated and still incomplete, thus the estimation of landslide costs and risk is still rather ambitious. Hence, in this study a spatio-temporal analysis of fatal landslides is presented for 27 European countries from 1995-2014. These landslides are mainly concentrated in mountainous areas. A total of 1370 fatalities are reported resulting from 476 landslides. The highest fatalities with 335 are observed in Turkey. In general, an increasing trend of fatal landslides is recognized starting in 2008. The latter is almost certainly triggered by an increase in natural extreme events such as storms (i.e. heavy rainfall) and floods. The highest annual economic loss is observed in Italy with 3.9 billion Euro per year. In contrast, in Germany the annual total loss is only about 0.3 billion Euro. The results of this study serves as an initial baseline information for further risk studies integrating landslide locations, local land use data, cost data, and will therefore certainly support the studied countries to better protect their citizens and assets. Acknowledgements We would like to acknowledge the valuable contributions by Paula F. da Silva, Peter Andersen, Jürgen Pilz, Ali Ardalan, Sergey R. Chalov, Jean-Philippe Malet, Mateja Jemec Auflič, Norina Andres, Eleftheria Poyiadji, Pedro C. Lamas, Wenyi Zhang, Igor Pesevski, Halldór G. Pétursson, Tayfun Kurt, Nikolai Dobrev, Juan Carlos García Davalillo, Matina Halkia, Stefano Ferri, George Gaprindashvili, Johanna Engström and David Keellings.

  11. Rapid generation of value added products for seismic crisis management, using ground and satellite data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvi, Stefano; Atzori, Simone; Pezzo, Giuseppe; Merryman Boncori, John Peter; Tolomei, Cristiano; Antonioli, Andrea; Trasatti, Elisa; Zoffoli, Simona; Coletta, Alessandro

    2013-04-01

    Rapid generation of value added products for seismic crisis management, using ground and satellite data Stefano Salvi (1), Simone Atzori (1), Giuseppe Pezzo (1), John Peter Merryman Boncori (1), Cristiano Tolomei (1), Andrea Antonioli (1), Elisa Trasatti (1), Simona Zoffoli (2), Alessandro Coletta (2) (1): Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Centro Nazionale Terremoti, via di Vigna Murata 605, 00143 Roma, Italy (2): Agenzia Spaziale Italiana, Unità Osservazione della Terra, Viale Liegi 26, 00198, Roma, Italy The increased availability of Earth Observation optical and SAR data occurred in the last few years, has stimulated new applications in many different fields. The foreseen launch of new space platforms as the Sentinel satellites, providing good monitoring frequencies and free worldwide access to data is expected to increase the number of scientific and commercial activities exploiting EO data. In the sector of natural hazards the EO data have already demonstrated to be indispensable for the generation of information products for the prevention, and emergency management phases. In particular, the Italian Space Agency has promoted and funded, together with INGV, the development of dedicated infrastructures for the generation of advanced information products supporting different phases of the seismic and volcanic risk management cycles. These products were based mainly on SAR data from the COSMO-SkyMed 4-satellite constellation, and on optical data from commercial and scientific platforms, integrated with data from ground monitoring networks. During the last few years, such infrastructures have been tested under operational conditions and the products distributed to the Italian Civil Protection authority for validation and assessment. Here, with reference to the earthquake emergency management, we will present the infrastructure, the rapid mapping information products and some examples of activities during the latest seismic crises.

  12. Density Predictions of Mercury's Exosphere Utilizing HEMO, the Hermean Exosphere Model of Oxygen, Including the Effects of Photodissociation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grotheer, E.; Mangano, V.; Livi, S. A.

    2014-12-01

    The work presented here builds on the results of Grotheer & Livi [2014], which found that the majority of the vapor produced due to meteoroid impacts on Mercury is caused by meteoroids with masses 4.2 x 10-7 g ≤ m ≤ 8.3 x 10-2 g. Meteoroids with a mass of 2.1 x 10-4 g are the largest contributors to the vapor released by meteoroid impacts, thus here we focus on meteoroids with such masses as an input to a particle tracing simulation called the Hermean Exosphere Model of Oxygen (HEMO). The HEMO simulations include 36 different particle species which can be released via meteoritic impact vaporization, based on the abundances determined by Berezhnoy & Klumov [2008]. After the initial simulation of the meteoroid impact, the released particles are affected by the gravitational pull of the planet Mercury, as well as the Sun's radiation. Particles may be photoionized or in the case of molecules also photodissociated. Due to the effects of photodissociation, a total of 38 species are actually present in the simulation, since 2 species are not directly released by impact vaporization but may be created due to photodissociation. These simulations record various pieces of information about each simulated particle, including position and velocity, for each time-step of the model. This information is then utilized to construct density profiles for each simulation run, as well as for aggregates of simulation runs with similar input parameters. The results are intended to aid the interpretation of results from the MESSENGER and BepiColombo missions to Mercury, with a particular focus on atomic and molecular oxygen. ReferencesAlexey A. Berezhnoy and Boris A. Klumov. Impacts as sources of the exosphere on Mercury. Icarus, 195(2): 511-522, 2008. Emmanuel B. Grotheer and Stefano A. Livi. Small meteoroids' major contribution to Mercury's exosphere. Icarus, 227(1): 1-7, 2014.

  13. ESA on RAINEWS24: A Case Study of Television Communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandrelli, S.

    2005-12-01

    In May 2000, ESRIN, the Italian establishment of the European Space Agency (ESA), started a collaboration with the television channel Rainews24. Rainews24 is the "allnews" channel of Italian public television (RAI) and is now about 10 years old. It transmits 24 hours a day and is the most watched all-news satellite channel in Italy. Each Thursday an ESA representative (Stefano Sandrelli) is interviewed by a professional RAI journalist in a 5-6 minute long slot that follows the 5 pm news bulletin. The broadcast is repeated late at night or in the early hours of Thursday and Friday. Interviews are strictly linked to the weekly news and are prepared on the morning of the same day by the ESA representative in collaboration with a RAI journalist. The subject is chosen from the most topical news items of the week: video, images and animations are provided by the ESA television service and by press agencies (Reuters etc.). The interviews are largely informal and resemble a dialogue rather than an academic discussion "from space". Even though they focus on ESA activities, they are not advertisements: space science and research is dealt with as a human activity, so both the positive and negative aspects of space exploration and exploitation may emerge. Although this outreach activity began as an experiment, the ESA interviews have become a fixed feature. As a result of five years of uninterrupted collaboration, over 200 interviews have been recorded, with about 30% of the interviews dedicated to pure astronomy. A welcome positive feature is that the interviews are seen by Rainews24 as an open source of daily news.

  14. PREFACE: International Symposium on Geohazards and Geomechanics (ISGG2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utili, S.

    2015-09-01

    further enquiries or information on the conference proceedings please contact the organizer, Dr Stefano Utili, University of Warwick, s.utili@warwick.ac.uk.

  15. LISA 8 Science Organizing Committee and Local Organizing Committee LISA 8 Science Organizing Committee and Local Organizing Committee

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2011-05-01

    Science Organising Committee (SOC) Tom Abel, Stanford University Odylio Aguiar, Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais Tal Alexander, Wizemann Institute Peter Bender, University of Colorado Pierre Binetruy, APC - College de France Sasha Buchman, Stanford University Robert Byer, Stanford University Manuela Campanelli, University of Texas Joan Centrella, NASA/Goddard Massimo Cerdonio, University of Padova Eugenio Coccia, University of Roma-2 Neil Cornish, Montana State University Michael Cruise, University of Birmingham Curt Cutler, NASA/JPL Karsten Danzmann, University of Hannover Sam Finn, Penn State University Jens Gundlach, NPL Gerhard Heinzel, Max-Planck-Institut fuer Gravitationsphysik Craig Hogan, University of Washington Jim Hough, University of Glasgow Scott Hughes, MIT Oliver Jennrich, ESTEC Philippe Jetzer, University Zurich Seiji Kawamura, National Observatory, Japan Alberto Lobo, ICE-CSIC and IEEC Avi Loeb, Harvard University Piero Madau, Lick Observatory Yannick Mellier, IAP, Paris Peter Michelson, Stanford University Guido Mueller, University of Florida Sterl Phinney, Caltech Tom Prince, NASA/JPL Doug Richstone, University of Michigan Bernard Schutz, AEI Potsdam Tuck Stebbins, NASA/Goddard Tim Sumner, Imperial College, London Ke-Xun Sun, Stanford University Kip Thorne, Caltech Michele Vallisneri, NASA/JPL Alberto Vecchio, University of Birmingham Jean-Yves Vinet, OCA, Nice Stefano Vitale, University of Trento Rai Weiss, MIT Nick White, NASA/Goddard Local Organising Committee (LOC) Sasha Buchman (Stanford University) Robert Byer (Stanford University) Sara Charbonneau-Lefort (Stanford University) Nancy Christianson (Stanford University) John Conklin (Stanford University) Dan DeBra (Stanford University) Jan Goebel (Stanford University) Vivian Drew (Stanford University) Ke-Xun Sun (Stanford University) Lucy Zhou (Stanford University) Andrea Zoellner (Stanford University)

  16. Multinuclear group 4 catalysis: olefin polymerization pathways modified by strong metal-metal cooperative effects.

    PubMed

    McInnis, Jennifer P; Delferro, Massimiliano; Marks, Tobin J

    2014-08-19

    Polyolefins are produced today catalytically on a vast scale, and the manufactured polymers find use in everything from artificial limbs and food/medical packaging to automotive and electrical components and lubricants. Although polyolefin monomers are typically cheap (e.g., ethylene, propylene, α-olefins), the resulting polymer properties can be dramatically tuned by the particular polymerization catalyst employed, and reflect a rich interplay of macromolecular chemistry, materials science, and physics. For example, linear low-density polyethylene (LLDPE), produced by copolymerization of ethylene with linear α-olefin comonomers such as 1-butene, 1-hexene, or 1-octene, has small but significant levels of short alkyl branches (C2, C4, C6) along the polyethylene backbone, and is an important technology material due to outstanding rheological and mechanical properties. In 2013, the total world polyolefin production was approximately 211 million metric tons, of which about 11% was LLDPE. Historically, polyolefins were produced using ill-defined but highly active heterogeneous catalysts composed of supported groups 4 or 6 species (usually halides) activated by aluminum alkyls. In 1963, Karl Ziegler and Giulio Natta received the Nobel Prize for these discoveries. Beginning in the late 1980s, a new generation of group 4 molecule-based homogeneous olefin polymerization catalysts emerged from discoveries by Walter Kaminsky, a team led by James Stevens at The Dow Chemical Company, this Laboratory at Northwestern University, and a host of talented groups in Germany, Italy, Japan, the United Kingdom, and the United States. These new "single-site" catalysts and their activating cocatalysts were far better defined and more rationally tunable in terms of structure, mechanism, thermodynamics, and catalyst activity and selectivity than ever before possible. An explosion of research advances led to new catalysts, cocatalysts, deeper mechanistic understanding of both the

  17. SEAC 2011 Stars and Stones: Voyages in Archaeoastronomy and Cultural Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pimenta, F.; Ribeiro, N.; Silva, F.; Campion, N.; Joaquinito, A.; Tirapicos, L.

    2015-05-01

    Culture was held in Évora, Portugal, from September 19th to 23th, 2011, and was attended by 85 participants from 29 countries. A total number of 71 talks and 4 posters were presented. Among them 20 invited lectures given by Michael Rappenglüück, José Manuel Malhão Pereira, Jarita Holbrook, Giulio Magli, Nicholas Campion, J. Kim Malville, David Pankenier, Alejandro Martín López, Ivan Sprajc, Mariusz Ziólkowski, Marciano da Silva, Lionel Sims, Emilia Pasztor, Frank Prendergast, Fernando Pimenta, A. César González-Garcia, Henrique Leitão, Shi Yunli and Stanislaw Iwaniszewski and 3 public lectures given by Luísa Pereira, Juan Belmonte Avilés and Clive Ruggles. Most of the contributions were submitted for publication and went through a peer-review process. The present volume is the result of this process, arranged in the same thematic sections as the Conference was organised.

  18. PREFACE: First Mediterranean Conference on Classical and Quantum Gravity (MCCQG 2009)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basilakos, Spyros; Cadoni, Mariano; Cavaglia, Marco; Christodoulakis, Theodosios; Vagenas, Elias C.

    2010-04-01

    quite fruitful, enjoyable 'Mediterranean' atmosphere for the exchange of ideas and discussion. It is a pleasure to thank our administrative and technical staff Georgia Angelopoulou, Athina Pouri, Mando Zambeli and Manolis Zoulias for their untiring assistance. We also thank the staff of the OAC for the enthusiastic support and their hospitality. We are grateful to the Academy of Athens and the Tomalla Foundation for their generous financial support which made MCCQG possible. Finally, our gratitude goes to all the participants and especially the many experienced scientists. Their contributions highlighted the meeting. The success of the MCCQG is due to them and to the enthusiasm of the younger participants. The Editors March 2010 COMMITTEES Organising Committee Spyros Basilakos (RCAAM, Academy of Athens, Greece) Mariano Cadoni (University and INFN Cagliari, Italy) Marco Cavaglià (University of Mississippi, USA) Theodosios Christodoulakis (University of Athens, Greece) Elias Vagenas (RCAAM, Academy of Athens, Greece) Advisory Committee Ignatios Antoniadis (CERN, Switzerland) Orfeu Bertolami (IST, Lisbon, Portugal) Loriano Bonora (SISSA, Trieste, Italy) George Contopoulos (Academy of Athens, Greece) Ruth Durrer (Geneva University, Switzerland) Enrique Gaztanaga (IEEC, Barcelona, Spain) Gabriela Gonzalez (Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, USA) Marc Henneaux (Brussels University, Belgium) Roman Jackiw (MIT, USA) Claus Kiefer (Cologne University, Germany) Stefano Liberati (SISSA, Trieste, Italy) Ofer Lahav (University College London, UK) Roy Maartens (University of Portsmouth, UK) Don Marolf (UC Santa Barbara, USA) Hermann Nicolai (AEI, Potsdam, Germany) Augusto Sagnotti (Scuola Normale Superiore, Pisa, Italy) Mairi Sakellariadou (King's College London, UK) Jorge Zanelli (CECS, Valdivia, Chile) SPONSORS Academy of Athens The Tomalla Foundation Università di Cagliari University of Mississippi University of Athens LIST OF PARTICIPANTS Abdalla, Elcio (Instituto de

  19. Fractal Fragmentation triggered by meteor impact: The Ries Crater (Germany)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paredes Marino, Joali; Perugini, Diego; Rossi, Stefano; Kueppers, Ulrich

    2015-04-01

    FRACTAL FRAGMENTATION TRIGGERED BY METEOR IMPACT: THE RIES CRATER (GERMANY) Joali Paredes (1), Stefano Rossi (1), Diego Perugini (1), Ulrich Kueppers (2) 1. Department of Physics and Geology, University of Perugia, Italy 2. Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Munich, Germany The Nördlinger Ries is a large circular depression in western Bavaria, Germany. The depression was caused by a meteor impact, which occurred about 14.3 million-14.5 million years ago. The original crater rim had an estimated diameter of 24 kilometers. Computer modeling of the impact event indicates that the impact or probably had diameters of about 1.5 kilometers and impacted the target area at an angle around 30 to 50 degrees from the surface in a west- southwest to east-northeast direction. The impact velocity is thought to have been about 20 km/s. The meteor impact generated extensive fragmentation of preexisting rocks. In addition, melting of these rocks also occurred. The impact melt was ejected at high speed provoking its extensive fragmentation. Quenched melt fragments are ubiquitous in the outcrops. Here we study melt fragment size distributions with the aim of understanding the style of melt fragmentation during ejection and to constrain the rheological properties of such melts. Digital images of suevite (i.e. the rock generated after deposition and diagenesis of ash and fragments produced by the meteor impact) were obtained using a high-resolution optical scanner. Successively, melt fragments were traced by image analysis and the images segmented in order to obtain binary images on which impact melt fragments are in black color, embedded on a white background. Hence, the size of fragments was determined by image analysis. Fractal fragmentation theory has been applied to fragment size distributions of melt fragments in the Ries crater. Results indicate that melt fragments follow fractal distributions indicating that fragmentation of melt generated by the

  20. The abundance pattern of heavy elements in Sirius: Impact of modern observations (STIS) and improved Atomic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramsay Cowley, Charles; Ayres, Thomas; Wahlgren, Glenn; Carpenter, Kenneth

    2015-08-01

    The abundance pattern of heavy elements in Sirius: Impact of modern observations (STIS) and improved atomic data. We determine abundances or upper limits for the 55 stable elements from copper to uranium for the A1 Vm star Sirius. The primary observational material consists of Hubble Space Telescope (HST) spectra taken with the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) from the ASTRAL project (Ayres 2010, ApJS, 187, 149). We have also used archival material from COPERNICUS (retrieved from the MAST) and from HST/GHRS, as well as the ground-based Furenlid, Westin, and Kurucz Sirius Atlas (FWK). The GHRS observations were described by Wahlgren, et al. (1993, Bull. AAS, 25, 1321). We also used the monumental study of Sirius by Klaus Kohl (1964, Zs. f. Ap. 60, 115, 1964, see also 1964, Das Spektrum des Sirius, 3100 - 8863A, Kiel thesis). Abundance determinations are based on the photospheric model of Landstreet (2011, A&A, 528, 132). The atomic data base is significantly improved since the pioneering work by Sadakane (1988, PASP, 100, 811; 1991, 103, 355). The basic source was VALD3 (http://vald.inasan.ru/~vald3/php/vald.php), supplemented for all species by the essential NIST bibliographic data base (http://physics.nist.gov/cgi-bin/ASBib1/TransProbBib.cgi). We determine abundances and upper limits by synthesizing short wavelength regions around strong lines. Virtually all of the abundance/upper limit results show excesses over the solar composition of between 1 and 2 dex. This result is in general agreement with overall results for metallic line stars, though we have no information on possible severe depletions for most elements. We conclude that the mechanisms causing abundance anomalies in Sirius have not acted to produce the extreme excesses of 4 or more dex (Pt, Hg), or deficiencies (Zn) seen in many HgMn stars.CRC thanks Stefano Bagnulo for the UVESPOP Sirius spectrum. Robert Kurucz was most helpful with older Sirius UV and visual spectra.

  1. HUBBLE UNCOVERS MYSTERY OBJECTS IN THE DENSE CORE OF A NEARBY STAR CLUSTER

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    light-years wide. The image was taken in June 1995 by the Burrell Schmidt telescope at the Case Western Reserve University's Warner and Swasey Observatory on Kitt Peak in Arizona. This release is issued jointly by NASA and ESA. Credits for Hubble image: NASA, Kailash Sahu, Stefano Casertano, Mario Livio, Ron Gilliland (Space Telescope Science Institute), Nino Panagia (European Space Agency/Space Telescope Science Institute), Michael Albrow and Mike Potter (Space Telescope Science Institute) Credits for ground-based image: Nigel A.Sharp, REU program/AURA/NOAO/NSF

  2. [Evaluating the implementation of involuntary hospitalization procedures: a profile of people, audits and recommendations].

    PubMed

    LeBlanc, Line

    2014-01-01

    Since the 1990s, legislative reforms have been undertaken in many Western countries to reduce involuntary hospitalization. Studies examining fluctuation rates before and after the legislative reform show a general trend toward an increase rather than a decrease in involuntary hospitalization rates (de Stefano & Ducci, 2008). In Quebec, many reports have shown that consent for psychiatric evaluation and hospitalisation for people who present an imminent danger to themselves or to others is difficult to obtain due to clinical, legal, and ethical considerations. To facilitate this process, a new protocol was developed and implemented following the training of 335 health workers and 85 medical doctors in 6 hospitals. Our study evaluated this protocol and established a profile of people who had been hospitalized against their will. Using a retrospective analysis, we examined the files of 179 patients who underwent a psychiatric evaluation process during an involuntary hospitalization. This file analysis allowed us to develop a better profile of these people and determine whether the required forms were present and how adequately they were filled out by the professionals. We also conducted a study with the professionals responsible for applying the new protocol to get a better idea of its characteristics (relative advantage, compatibility, simplicity, reversibility and observability) as well as the principles of consent and the obstacles to its implementation.Our study showed that that half of the patients were diagnosed with schizophrenia or another psychosis. Fifty-four point two percent (54.2%) of the patients were males, 79% were single or separated and only 18,4% were working. At the time of their crisis situation, 30,7% were brought to the hospital by police officers and 19% were already hospitalized. The remaining patients were brought in by ambulance, family members or they came in by themselves. Professional opinion of the new protocol was positive however they

  3. List of Participants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bombaci, I.; Covello, A.; Marcucci, L. E.; Rosati, S.

    2009-07-01

    Armani Paolo (Università di Trento) Benhar Omar (INFN Roma) Bombaci Ignazio (Università di Pisa) Bonanno Luca (Università di Ferrara) Catara Francesco (Università di Catania) Cò Giampaolo (Università di Lecce) Colonna Maria (Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, INFN Catania) Colonna Nicola (INFN Bari) Conti Francesco (Università di Pavia) Coraggio Luigi (INFN Napoli) Covello Aldo (Università di Napoli) Cristoforetti Marco (Technische Universität München, Germania) Cuofano Carmine (Università di Ferrara) Di Toro Massimo (Università di Catania) Drago Alessandro (Università di Ferrara) Faccioli Pietro (Università di Trento) Farina Nicola (INFN Roma) Finelli Paolo (Università di Bologna) Fiorentini Giovanni (Università di Ferrara) Fortunato Lorenzo (Università di Padova) Gambacurta Danilo (Università di Catania) Gandolfi Stefano (Università di Trento) Gargano Angela (INFN Napoli) Giannini Mauro (Università di Genova) Girlanda Luca (INFN Pisa) Giusti Carlotta (INFN Pavia) Illarionov Alexei (SISSA Trieste) Itaco Nunzio (Università di Napoli) Kievsky Alejandro (INFN Pisa) Lanza Edoardo (INFN Catania) Leidemann Winfried (Università di Trento) Lenzi Silvia (Università di Padova) Lipparini Enrico (Università di Trento) Lissia Marcello (Università di Cagliari) Lo Iudice Nicola (Università di Napoli) Maieron Chiara (Università di Lecce) Marcucci Laura Elisa (Università di Pisa) Matera Francesco (Università di Firenze) Millo Raffaele (Università di Trento) Orlandini Giuseppina (Università di Trento) Pacati Franco (Università di Pavia) Pastore Alessandro (Univeristy of Jyväskylä, Finlandia) Pederiva Francesco (Università di Trento) Pisent Gualtiero (Università di Padova) Prete Gianfranco (INFN Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro) Quarati Piero (Politecnico di Torino) Rosati Sergio (Università di Pisa) Salmè Giovanni (INFN Roma) Santopinto Elena (INFN Genova) Traini Marco (Università di Trento) Vigezzi Enrico (INFN Milano) Vitturi Andrea (Universit

  4. Extreme QCD 2012 (xQCD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2013-04-01

    Acknowledgements This conference would not have been possible without the generous support from Brookhaven National Laboratory and the George Washington University INS and IMPACT institutes, Columbian College of Arts and Sciences, the Office of Vice-President for Research, and the Department of Physics. We thank them wholeheartedly. We are also very grateful for the support of our colleagues on the local organizing committee, Walter Freeman and Frank Lee, and on the International Advisory Committee: Simon Hands, Tetsuo Hatsuda, Frithjof Karsch, Maria Paola Lombardo, Tereza Mendes, Atsushi Nakamura, Owe Philipsen, Claudia Ratti, Paul Romatschke, Misha Stephanov, and Nu Xu. List of participants Alexandru, Andrei George Washington University Bazavov, Alexei Brookhaven National Laboratory Bloch, Jacques University of Regensburg Braun-Munzinger, Peter EMMI, GSI Breto Rangel, Guillermo CMS/UC Davis D'Elia, Massimo University of Pisa, INFN Dexheimer, Veronica UFSC - Federal University of Santa Catarina Ding, Heng-Tong Brookhaven National Laboratory Dion, Alan Stony Brook University Dumitru, Adrian RBRC and Baruch College, CUNY Freeman, Walter George Washington University Gavai, Rajiv Tata Institute (TIFR), Mumbai Hanada, Masanori KEK Theory Center Hands, Simon Swansea University Hegde, Prasad Brookhaven National Laboratory Heinke, Craig University of Alberta Horvath, Ivan University of Kentucky Karsch, Frithjof Brookhaven National Laboratory Krieg, Stefan Wuppertal University Lattimer, James Stony Brook University Lee, Frank George Washington University Li, Anyi Institute for Nuclear Theory Liu, Keh-Fei University of Kentucky Lombardo, Maria Paola INFN - LNF Lottini, Stefano Goethe University, Frankfurt am Main Maezawa, Yu Brookhaven National Laboratory Miura, Kohtaroh Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati - INFN Monnai, Akihiko The University of Tokyo Mukherjee, Swagato Brookhaven National Laboratory Myers, Joyce University of Groningen Nakamura, Atsushi RIISE, Hiroshima

  5. Coseismic ground deformations related to the 2009 L’Aquila seismic sequence (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montone, P.; Working Group, E.

    2009-12-01

    and to many individual throws observed along the long-term Paganica fault, raise questions on the maximum expected Magnitude and the seismic hazard estimate of this area. Thus, although the 2009 L’Aquila earthquake and associated faulting caused major damage and loss of life, it does not fully characterize the seismic hazard associated to this area. Emergeo working group: Giuliana Alessio, Laura Alfonsi, Carlo Alberto Brunori, Francesca R. Cinti, Riccardo Civico, Luigi Cucci, Paolo Marco De Martini, Sofia Mariano, Maria Teresa Mariucci, Paola Montone, Rosa Nappi, Daniela Pantosti, Antonio Patera, Simona Pierdominici and Stefano Pucci.

  6. Landscapes of Central Italy through Science, Poetry and Music. A perspective for educating to the planet sustainability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nesci, Olivia; Valentini, Laura

    2016-04-01

    aptly suited to represent natural forms whose history began millions of years ago. Lorenzo Carnevali, artist from Urbino, is the poet that has expressly dedicated verses to these places, in an effort to grab that balance which summarizes the History and Nature. The poems are performed by Maxx Brizigotti, eclectic actor and director, deeply linked to his territory. Music and verses are the soundtrack of videos made by Stefano Baiocchi that, by using beautiful images of these places, creatively interprets the science, art and history. Our purpose is to educate to a new perception of the place, starting from its beauty and arriving to a knowledge of its problems and weakness.

  7. PREFACE: Fourth Meeting on Constrained Dynamics and Quantum Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cadoni, Mariano; Cavaglia, Marco; Nelson, Jeanette E.

    2006-04-01

    groups. In particular, help was provided to students and scientists from non-EU countries. It is our great pleasure to thank those people and institutions whose help and support was crucial to the success of the meeting. We appreciate the enthusiastic support of our colleagues of the academic community, especially those from the Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare and the Universities of Cagliari, Pisa, Torino and Mississippi. Financial support was provided by the Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, the Universities of Cagliari, Torino, Pisa and Mississippi. This was used largely to support participants, especially younger people. Special thanks go to Pietro Menotti (University of Pisa) and Stefano Sciuto (University of Torino) for their friendship and their universities' financial contributions. It is also a pleasure to acknowledge financial support from the Regione Autonoma della Sardegna and from Tiscali, the communications and Internet company, for providing free telephone cards. Technical support and local organisation was provided by the Sezione di Cagliari of the Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare. Warmest thanks go to our administrative and technical staff - Maria Assunta Lecca and Simona Renieri, for their untiring assistance, and to Palmasera Village and Hotel Smeraldo for their splendid hospitality. And finally, our gratitude goes to all the participants and especially the many experienced scientists. Their contributions highlighted the meeting and were largely without support. The success of the meeting is due to them and to the enthusiasm of the younger participants. The Editors January 2006 COMMITTEES Organising Committee Mariano Cadoni (Università and INFN Cagliari) Marco Cavaglià (University of Mississippi) Jeanette E. Nelson (Università and INFN Torino) Advisory Committee Orfeu Bertolami (IST Lisboa, Portugal) Luca Bombelli (Univ. Mississippi) Steve Carlip (UC Davis, USA) Alessandro D'Adda (INFN Torino, Italy) Stanley Deser (Brandeis, USA

  8. The ICTP Regional System Model (RESM) to simulate the monsoon in the South Asia CORDEX domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Sante, Fabio; Coppola, Erika; Farneti, Riccardo; Giorgi, Filippo

    2016-04-01

    . The impact of a simplified low-resolution hydrological model (HD model) and the physical based high-resolution hydrological model (CHyM model) is also assessed in the fully coupled RESM simulations. References: 1) Fu, X., Wang, B. and Li, T., 2002: Impacts of air-sea coupling on the simulation of mean Asian summer monsoon in the ECHAM4 model, Mon. Wea. Rev., 130, 2889-2904. 2) Fu, X., Wang, B., Waliser, D. E. and Tao, L., 2007: Impact of atmosphere-ocean coupling on the predictability of monsoon interseasonal oscillations, J. Atmos. Sci., 64,157-174. 3) Ratnam J. Venkata, Filippo Giorgi, Akshara Kaginalkar, Stefano Cozzini, 2008b: Simulation of Indian Monsoon using RegCM3 - ROMS regional coupled model, Climate Dynamics, 1432-0894. 4) Seo, H, Xie SP, Murtgudde R, Jochum M, Miller AJ. 2009. Seasonal effects of Indian Ocean freshwater forcing in a regional coupled model. Journal of Climate. 22:6577-6596. 5) Giorgi, F., et al. 2012: RegCM4: Model description and preliminary tests over multiple CORDEX domains, Clim. Res., 53(1), 7-29. 6) Marshall, J., C. Hill, L. Perelman, and A. Adcroft, 1997: Hydrostatic, quasi-hydrostatic, and nonhydrostatic ocean modeling. J. Geophysical Res., 102(C3), 5733-5752. 7) Hagemann, S., Dumenil, L., 1998: Application of a grid-scale lateral discharge model in the BALTEX region. MPI-Report No. 278 8) Coppola, E., Tomasetti, B., Mariotti, L., Verdecchia, M., Visconti, G., 2007: Cellular automata algorithms for drainage network extraction and rainfall data assimilation. Hydrol Sci J 2007;52(3). 9) Giorgi F., Jones C. Asrar G., 2009: Addressing climate information needs at the regional level: the CORDEX framework. WMO Bull 58:175-183

  9. The Lord of Rings - the mysterious case of the stolen rings: a critical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandrelli, S.

    The Lord of Rings - the mysterious case of the stolen rings: a critical analysis S. Sandrelli INAF - Osservatorio Astronomico di Brera, Milano, Italy (stefano.sandrelli@brera.inaf.it / Fax: 02 72001600 / Phone: +39 02 72320337) "The Lord of Rings - the mysterious case of the stolen rings" is a live astronomical role-playing game for kids aged 10 -13. Its goal is to introduce them to some of the main topics of the Solar System: a) the role of gravity; b) the distribution of mass & light; c) the effects of rotation; d) the distribution of water. The game was held both at the Perugia (2004) and the Genova Science Festival (2005), obtaining great success. Teams of about 6-8 members are introduced to Mr Schioppanelli, the astro-detective of the town (the name is a pun: it reminds Schiaparelli, the famous italian astronomer, and it is a slang expression meaning "ring-breaker"). Mr Schioppanelli has his office in an "gastronomical astronomical observatory", known as The Red Giant Pizzeria. Schioppanelli informs the kids that a mysterious Centaur succeded in stealing the rings of Saturn. The partecipants are appointed astro-detectives in-charge and asked to find the rings by browsing around the Solar System, which is scaled so as to fit the town historical centre or a pedestrian area, going from the Sun to Saturn or beyond, depending on the actual area at disposal. Great care must be taken allowing children playing only in a car-free area of the town. At the right scaled distances, the partecipants meet characters playing as the various planets. The kids can talk to them after solving a riddle, obtaining useful informations. A special characters play as a comet, timely going in and out of the inner solar system. The teams can also talk to some shepherd-moons of the rings. They easily discover that the rings were totally destroyed by the Centaur: a real disaster! They are also suggested to gather the necessary ingredients (gravity, light, rotation, inclination, dust and

  10. Reduced gamma-aminobutyric acid concentration is associated with physical disability in progressive multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Solanky, Bhavana S.; Muhlert, Nils; Tur, Carmen; Edden, Richard A. E.; Wheeler-Kingshott, Claudia A. M.; Miller, David H.; Thompson, Alan J.; Ciccarelli, Olga

    2015-01-01

    concentration in the sensorimotor cortex. Specifically for each unit decrease in gamma-aminobutyric acid levels (in mM), there was a predicted −10.86 (95% confidence intervals −16.786 to −4.482) decrease in grip strength (kg force) (P < 0.001) and −8.74 (95% confidence intervals −13.943 to −3.015) decrease in muscle strength (P < 0.006). This study suggests that reduced gamma-aminobutyric acid levels reflect pathological abnormalities that may play a role in determining physical disability. These abnormalities may include decreases in the pre- and postsynaptic components of gamma-aminobutyric acid neurotransmission and in the density of inhibitory neurons. Additionally, the reduced gamma-aminobutyric acid concentration may contribute to the neurodegenerative process, resulting in increased firing of axons, with consequent increased energy demands, which may lead to neuroaxonal degeneration and loss of the compensatory mechanisms that maintain motor function. This study supports the idea that modulation of gamma-aminobutyric acid neurotransmission may be an important target for neuroprotection in multiple sclerosis. See De Stefano and Giorgio (doi:10.1093/brain/awv213) for a scientific commentary on this article. PMID:26304151

  11. Macromolecular crowding: chemistry and physics meet biology (Ascona, Switzerland, 10-14 June 2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foffi, G.; Pastore, A.; Piazza, F.; Temussi, P. A.

    2013-08-01

    held in Ascona from 10 to 14 June 2012. In the unique scenario of the Maggiore lake and absorbed in the magic atmosphere of the Centro Stefano Franscini (CSF) at Monte Verità, we enjoyed three-and-a-half days of intense and inspiring activity, where not only many of the most prominent scientists working on macromolecular crowding, but also experts in closely related fields such as colloids and soft matter presented their work. The meeting was intended and has been organized to bring theoreticians and experimentalists together in the attempt to promote an active dialogue. Moreover, we wanted different disciplines to be represented, notably physics and chemistry, besides biology, as cross-fertilization is proving an increasingly fundamental source of inspiration and advancement. This issue of Physical Biology (PB) features a selection of the oral contributions presented at the conference, expanded in the form of research or review articles. PB, one of the scientific journals of the Institute of Physics (IOP), is one of the most dynamic and lively forums active at the interface between biology on one side, and physics and mathematics on the other. As its mission is stated by IOP, PB 'focuses on research in which physics-based approaches lead to new insights into biological systems at all scales of space and time, and all levels of complexity'. For these reasons, and also in view of its high reputation and broad readership, PB appears to be the ideal place for disseminating the thriving pieces of research presented at the conference. We are extremely grateful to PB and its kind and efficient editorial staff who helped make this issue a great scientific follow-up to the conference. The opening lecture of the conference, the first of four day-opening keynote lectures, was given by Allen P Minton from NIH (USA), possibly the most influential among the pioneers in the field. He provided a lucid and well-thought-out overview of the concept of macromolecular crowding through an

  12. Committees and organizers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2011-07-01

    (Orsay) S Hamann (Bochum)R Varga (Košice) U Hannemann (Dresden)P Vavassori (San Sebastian) L Havela (Prague)W Wulfhekel (Karlsruhe) O Heczko (Prague)M Yamashita (Sendai) B Hernando (Oviedo)R Zdyb (Lublin) O Isnard (Grenoble)A Zhukov (San Sebastián) Z Kąkol (Kraków)A K Zvezdin (Moscow) N-T H Kim-Ngan (Kraków) International Advisory Committee (2011): Dominique Givord, President (Grenoble)Ludwig Schultz, Former President (Dresden) Manfred Albrecht (Chemnitz)Burkard Hillebrands (Kaiserslautern) Agnés Barthélémy (Paris)Andrei Kirilyuk (Nijmegen) Roy Chantrell (York)Ron Jansen (Tsukuba) Russell Cowburn (London)Nicoleta Lupu (Iasi) Tomasz Dietl (Warszawa)Caroline A Ross (Cambridge, MA) Claudia Felser (Mainz)Stefano Sanvito (Dublin) Josef Fidler (Wien)Vladimir Sechovsky (Praha) Dino Fiorani (Roma)Roberta Sessoli (Firenze) Pietro Gambardella (Bellaterra)Jozef Spałek (Kraków) Alberto Guimarães (Rio de Janeiro)

  13. Study of Electron Acceleration and Multiple Dipolarization Fronts in 3D kinetic models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapenta, Giovanni; Ashour-Abdalla, Maha; Walker, Raymond; El-Alaoui, Mostafa

    2014-05-01

    . [1] Ashour-Abdalla, Maha, et al. "Observations and simulations of non-local acceleration of electrons in magnetotail magnetic reconnection events." Nature Physics 7.4 (2011): 360-365. [2] Markidis, Stefano, and Giovanni Lapenta. "Multi-scale simulations of plasma with iPIC3D." Mathematics and Computers in Simulation 80.7 (2010): 1509-1519. [3] Baumann, G., Troels Haugbølle, and Å. Nordlund. "Kinetic Modeling of Particle Acceleration in a Solar Null-point Reconnection Region." The Astrophysical Journal 771.2 (2013): 93. [4] Daldorff, L. K. S., et al. "Coupling the BATS-R-US global MHD code with the implicit particle-in-cell code iPIC3D." Bulletin of the American Physical Society 58 (2013).

  14. Integrating ArcGIS Online with GEOSS Data Access Broker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucchi, Roberto; Hogeweg, Marten

    2014-05-01

    The Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS) seeks to address 9 societal benefit areas for Earth observations to address: disasters, health, energy, climate, agriculture, ecosystems, biodiversity, water, and weather. As governments and their partners continue to monitor the face of the Earth, the collection, storage, analysis, and sharing of these observations remain fragmented, incomplete, or redundant. Major observational gaps also remain (particularly as we seek to look beneath the surface of the land and the water). As such, GEO's credo is that "decision makers need a global, coordinated, comprehensive, and sustained system of observing systems." Not surprisingly, one of the largest block of issues facing GEOSS is in the area of data: the access to data (including the building services to make the data more accessible), inadequate data integration and interoperability, error and uncertainty of observations, spatial and temporal gaps in observations, and the related issues of user involvement and capacity building. This is especially for people who stand to gain the most benefit from the datasets, but don't have the resources or knowledge to use them. Esri has millions of GIS and imagery users in hundreds of thousands of organizations around the world that work in the aforementioned 9 GEO societal benefit areas. Esri is therefore proud to have entered into a partnership with GEOSS, more specifically by way of a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) between Esri and the Earth and Space Science Informatics (ESSI) Laboratory of Prof. Stefano Nativi at the CNR (National Research Council of Italy) Institute of Atmospheric Pollution Research. Esri is working with the ESSI Lab to integrate ArcGIS Online by way of the ArcGIS Online API into the GEOSS Data Access Broker (DAB), resulting in the discoverability of all public content from ArcGIS Online through many of the search portals that participate in this network (e.g., DataOne, CEOS, CUAHSI, OneGeology, IOOS

  15. PREFACE: First Mediterranean Conference on Classical and Quantum Gravity (MCCQG 2009)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basilakos, Spyros; Cadoni, Mariano; Cavaglia, Marco; Christodoulakis, Theodosios; Vagenas, Elias C.

    2010-04-01

    quite fruitful, enjoyable 'Mediterranean' atmosphere for the exchange of ideas and discussion. It is a pleasure to thank our administrative and technical staff Georgia Angelopoulou, Athina Pouri, Mando Zambeli and Manolis Zoulias for their untiring assistance. We also thank the staff of the OAC for the enthusiastic support and their hospitality. We are grateful to the Academy of Athens and the Tomalla Foundation for their generous financial support which made MCCQG possible. Finally, our gratitude goes to all the participants and especially the many experienced scientists. Their contributions highlighted the meeting. The success of the MCCQG is due to them and to the enthusiasm of the younger participants. The Editors March 2010 COMMITTEES Organising Committee Spyros Basilakos (RCAAM, Academy of Athens, Greece) Mariano Cadoni (University and INFN Cagliari, Italy) Marco Cavaglià (University of Mississippi, USA) Theodosios Christodoulakis (University of Athens, Greece) Elias Vagenas (RCAAM, Academy of Athens, Greece) Advisory Committee Ignatios Antoniadis (CERN, Switzerland) Orfeu Bertolami (IST, Lisbon, Portugal) Loriano Bonora (SISSA, Trieste, Italy) George Contopoulos (Academy of Athens, Greece) Ruth Durrer (Geneva University, Switzerland) Enrique Gaztanaga (IEEC, Barcelona, Spain) Gabriela Gonzalez (Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, USA) Marc Henneaux (Brussels University, Belgium) Roman Jackiw (MIT, USA) Claus Kiefer (Cologne University, Germany) Stefano Liberati (SISSA, Trieste, Italy) Ofer Lahav (University College London, UK) Roy Maartens (University of Portsmouth, UK) Don Marolf (UC Santa Barbara, USA) Hermann Nicolai (AEI, Potsdam, Germany) Augusto Sagnotti (Scuola Normale Superiore, Pisa, Italy) Mairi Sakellariadou (King's College London, UK) Jorge Zanelli (CECS, Valdivia, Chile) SPONSORS Academy of Athens The Tomalla Foundation Università di Cagliari University of Mississippi University of Athens LIST OF PARTICIPANTS Abdalla, Elcio (Instituto de

  16. Thermoelectrically cooled semiconductor detectors for non-destructive analysis of works of art by means of energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cesareo, Roberto; Ettore Gigante, Giovanni; Castellano, Alfredo

    1999-06-01

    ) in an old roman fresco in the church of S. Stefano Rotondo (Rome).

  17. Macromolecular crowding: chemistry and physics meet biology (Ascona, Switzerland, 10-14 June 2012).

    PubMed

    Foffi, G; Pastore, A; Piazza, F; Temussi, P A

    2013-08-01

    conference held in Ascona from 10 to 14 June 2012. In the unique scenario of the Maggiore lake and absorbed in the magic atmosphere of the Centro Stefano Franscini (CSF) at Monte Verità, we enjoyed three-and-a-half days of intense and inspiring activity, where not only many of the most prominent scientists working on macromolecular crowding, but also experts in closely related fields such as colloids and soft matter presented their work. The meeting was intended and has been organized to bring theoreticians and experimentalists together in the attempt to promote an active dialogue. Moreover, we wanted different disciplines to be represented, notably physics and chemistry, besides biology, as cross-fertilization is proving an increasingly fundamental source of inspiration and advancement. This issue of Physical Biology (PB) features a selection of the oral contributions presented at the conference, expanded in the form of research or review articles. PB, one of the scientific journals of the Institute of Physics (IOP), is one of the most dynamic and lively forums active at the interface between biology on one side, and physics and mathematics on the other. As its mission is stated by IOP, PB 'focuses on research in which physics-based approaches lead to new insights into biological systems at all scales of space and time, and all levels of complexity'. For these reasons, and also in view of its high reputation and broad readership, PB appears to be the ideal place for disseminating the thriving pieces of research presented at the conference. We are extremely grateful to PB and its kind and efficient editorial staff who helped make this issue a great scientific follow-up to the conference. The opening lecture of the conference, the first of four day-opening keynote lectures, was given by Allen P Minton from NIH (USA), possibly the most influential among the pioneers in the field. He provided a lucid and well-thought-out overview of the concept of macromolecular crowding

  18. PREFACE: Young Researcher Meeting, Trieste 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agostini, F.; Antolini, C.; Aversa, R.; Cattani, G.; Di Stefano, M.; Longobardi, M.; Martinelli, M.; Miceli, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Paci, F.; Pietrobon, D.; Pusceddu, E.; Stellato, F.

    2014-12-01

    skills. Engaging the public and finding unconventional ways to communicate results turn out to be real assets in improving the quality of presentation of current research to peers, as well as to the general public. In this volume, we collect part of the contributions that have been presented at the conference. They cover topics in astrophysics and cosmology, particle and theoretical physics, soft and condensed matter, medical physics and applied physics. Given the recent experimental achievements in particle physics and cosmology, several contributions were focused on the latest results obtained in these fields, presenting the impact of experiments such as LHC and Planck to the community of young researchers and forecasting the future goals in these areas of research. Particular interest was aroused by the session fully dedicated to applied Physics and conservation of cultural assets. Besides the intrinsic scientific value of the discussed topics, the increasing relative weight of the applied Physics session is a demonstration of the benefits that fundamental science brings to the community. YRM Organising and Editorial Committee Fabio Agostini (fabio.agostini31@gmail.com) Telespazio A Finmeccanica Thales Company Claudia Antolini (claudia.antolini@sissa.it) SISSA - Scuola Internazionale Superiore di Studi Avanzati and Fudan University Rossella Aversa (raversa@sissa.it) SISSA - Scuola Internazionale Superiore di Studi Avanzati Giordano Cattani (giordano.cattani@gmail.com) Marco Di Stefano (distefan@sissa.it) SISSA - Scuola Internazionale Superiore di Studi Avanzati Maria Longobardi (marialongobardi@gmail.com) Department of Condensed Matter Physics, University of Geneva Matteo Martinelli (martinelli@thphys.uni-heidelberg.de) SISSA - Scuola Internazionale Superiore di Studi Avanzati and Institut fur Theoretische Physik Alice Miceli (alice.miceli@uniroma2.it) Physics Department, University of Rome Tor Vergata Marina Migliaccio (mm858@ast.cam.ac.uk) Institute of Astronomy and

  19. Reduced gamma-aminobutyric acid concentration is associated with physical disability in progressive multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Cawley, Niamh; Solanky, Bhavana S; Muhlert, Nils; Tur, Carmen; Edden, Richard A E; Wheeler-Kingshott, Claudia A M; Miller, David H; Thompson, Alan J; Ciccarelli, Olga

    2015-09-01

    sensorimotor cortex. Specifically for each unit decrease in gamma-aminobutyric acid levels (in mM), there was a predicted -10.86 (95% confidence intervals -16.786 to -4.482) decrease in grip strength (kg force) (P < 0.001) and -8.74 (95% confidence intervals -13.943 to -3.015) decrease in muscle strength (P < 0.006). This study suggests that reduced gamma-aminobutyric acid levels reflect pathological abnormalities that may play a role in determining physical disability. These abnormalities may include decreases in the pre- and postsynaptic components of gamma-aminobutyric acid neurotransmission and in the density of inhibitory neurons. Additionally, the reduced gamma-aminobutyric acid concentration may contribute to the neurodegenerative process, resulting in increased firing of axons, with consequent increased energy demands, which may lead to neuroaxonal degeneration and loss of the compensatory mechanisms that maintain motor function. This study supports the idea that modulation of gamma-aminobutyric acid neurotransmission may be an important target for neuroprotection in multiple sclerosis.See De Stefano and Giorgio (doi:10.1093/brain/awv213) for a scientific commentary on this article. PMID:26304151

  20. Soil gas composition from the 2001-2002 fissure in the Lakki Plain (Nisyros Island, Greece): evidences for shallow hydrothermal fluid circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venturi, Stefania; Tassi, Franco; Kanellopoulos, Christos; Vaselli, Orlando; Caponi, Chiara; Ricci, Andrea; Raspanti, Alessio; Gallorini, Andrea; Cabassi, Jacopo; Vougioukalakis, Georges

    2016-04-01

    Nisyros volcano (Aegean Sea, Greece) is currently classified in the "Very High Threat" category (Kinvig et al., 2010). Although the last volcanic activity, consisting of phreatic eruptions, occurred in the 19th century, Nisyros experienced an intense seismic activity during 1996-1998 accompanied by ground deformation and changes in the chemistry of fumarolic gases (Chiodini et al., 2002), pointing to a renewed unrest. Between November 2001 and December 2002, a NNE-oriented 600 m long fissure opened in the vegetated central part of the Lakki Plain. The fissure, 1-5 m wide and up to 15-20 m deep, showed neither vertical displacements nor gas release. No changes in the seismic and volcanic activity were observed during or after this event, which was interpreted as related to collapse of the upper caldera floor fine sediment cover (<50 m thick) induced by hydrothermal fluid circulation (Vougioukalakis and Fytikas, 2005). In June 2015, diffuse CO2 flux measurements, in combination with sampling and chemical analysis of the interstitial soil gases, were performed in (i) the fissure bottom, (ii) the adjacent vegetated areas in the Lakki Plain, (iii) the near hydrothermal craters (Stefanos, Kaminakia, Lofos domes), and (iv) sites located outside the caldera (blank values). The fissure showed neither temperature (<30 °C) nor CO2 fluxes (<10 gm-2d-1) anomalies with respect to the blank sites and the Lakki Plain, with values strikingly lower than those measured in the hydrothermal craters (up to 98 °C and 208 gm-2d-1, respectively). Contrarily, the CO2 concentrations in the interstitial soil gases from the fissure (up to 513 mmol/mol) were markedly higher than the background values and comparable with those measured in the craters (up to 841 mmol/mol). Relatively high H2S, H2 and CH4 contents in soil gases from the fissure confirm the hydrothermal origin of these soil gases. However, their CH4/CO2 ratio were lower than those measured in the soil gases from the craters

  1. Geological and geophysical activities at Spallanzani Science Department (Liceo Scientifico Statale "Lazzaro Spallanzani" - Tivoli, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Favale, T.; De Angelis, F.; De Filippis, L.

    2012-04-01

    The high school Liceo Scientifico "Lazzaro Spallanzani" at Tivoli (Rome) has been fully involved in the study of geological and geophysical features of the town of Tivoli and the surrounding area in the last twelve years. Objective of this activity is to promote the knowledge of the local territory from the geological point of view. Main activities: • School year 2001-2002: Setting up inside the school building of a Geological Museum focusing on "Geological Evolution of Latium, Central Italy" (in collaboration with colleagues M. Mancini, and A. Pierangeli). • March, 15, 2001: Conference of Environmental Geology. Lecturer: Prof. Raniero Massoli Novelli, L'Aquila University and Società Italiana di Geologia Ambientale. • School years 2001-2002 and 2002-2003: Earth Sciences course for students "Brittle deformation and tectonic stress in Tivoli area". • November, 2003: Conference of Geology, GIS and Remote Sensing. Lecturers: Prof. Maurizio Parotto and Dr Alessandro Cecili (Roma Tre University, Rome), and Dr Stefano Pignotti (Istituto Nazionale per la Ricerca sulla Montagna, Rome). • November, 2003, 2004 and 2005: GIS DAY, organized in collaboration with ESRI Italia. • School year 2006-2007: Earth Sciences course for students "Acque Albule basin and the Travertine of Tivoli, Latium, Central Italy" (focus on travertine formation). • School year 2010-2011: Earth Sciences course for students "Acque Albule basin and the Travertine of Tivoli. Geology, Hydrogeology and Microbiology of the basin, Latium, Central Italy" (focus on thermal springs and spa). In the period 2009-2010 a seismic station with three channels, currently working, was designed and built in our school by the science teachers Felice De Angelis and Tomaso Favale. Our seismic station (code name LTTV) is part of Italian Experimental Seismic Network (IESN) with identification code IZ (international database IRIS-ISC). The three drums are online in real time on websites http

  2. Chandra Finds Most Distant X-ray Galaxy Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2001-02-01

    center of the cluster. Until Chandra, X-ray telescopes have not had the needed sensitivity to identify and measure hot gas clouds in distant clusters. Carolin Crawford, Stefano Ettori and Jeremy Sanders of the Institute of Astronomy were also members of the team that observed 3C294 for 5.4 hours on October 29, 2000 with the Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer (ACIS). The ACIS X-ray camera was developed for NASA by Pennsylvania State University and Massachusetts Institute of Technology. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, AL, manages the Chandra program for the Office of Space Science in Washington, DC. The Smithsonian's Chandra X-ray Center controls science and flight operations from Cambridge, MA. Images associated with this release are available on the World Wide Web at: http://chandra.harvard.edu AND http://chandra.nasa.gov

  3. Variability of DTM-derived, morphometric parameters versus cell size. An example of application in Calabria (Southern Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rago, Valeria; Caloiero, Paola; Pellegrino, Annamaria Daniela; Iovine, Giulio G. R.; Terranova, Oreste G.; Pascale, Stefania

    2016-04-01

    , G. Gullà, G. Iovine, O. Petrucci, P. Salvador Sanchis, M. Sorriso-Valvo, O. Terranova, D. Torri, V. Bagarello, C. Di Stefano, V. Ferro, G. Buttafuoco, G. Callegari, P. Porto, B. Betrò, A. Bodini, C. Brambilla (2010) - Relazione Finale Contratto Lotto 2 Pericolosità legata ai fenomeni di intensa erosione idrica areale e lineare- POR Calabria 2000-2006, Azione. 1.4c. Rapporto per Autorità di Bacino Regione Calabria. Iovine G., Greco R., Gariano S.L., Pellegrino A.D., Terranova O.G. (2014) - Shallow-landslide susceptibility in the Costa Viola mountain ridge (southern Calabria, Italy) with considerations on the role of causal factors. Natural Hazards, 73(1), pp.111-136. In: G. Iovine & D. Cohen (Eds.), Advanced methods in landslide modelling. Iovine G., Greco R., Gariano S.L., Iaquinta P., Pellegrino A.D., Terranova O.G. (2013) - Shallow-landslide susceptibility in the Costa Viola mountain ridge (Italia). In: Landslide Science and Practice, Claudio Margottini, Paolo Canuti, Kyoji Sassa (Editors), Volume 3: Spatial Analysis and Modelling, pp.81-87. Proc. Second World Landslide Forum, 3-7 October 2011, Rome.

  4. EDITORIAL: Focus on Quantum Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabitz, Herschel

    2009-10-01

    Control of quantum phenomena has grown from a dream to a burgeoning field encompassing wide-ranging experimental and theoretical activities. Theoretical research in this area primarily concerns identification of the principles for controlling quantum phenomena, the exploration of new experimental applications and the development of associated operational algorithms to guide such experiments. Recent experiments with adaptive feedback control span many applications including selective excitation, wave packet engineering and control in the presence of complex environments. Practical procedures are also being developed to execute real-time feedback control considering the resultant back action on the quantum system. This focus issue includes papers covering many of the latest advances in the field. Focus on Quantum Control Contents Control of quantum phenomena: past, present and future Constantin Brif, Raj Chakrabarti and Herschel Rabitz Biologically inspired molecular machines driven by light. Optimal control of a unidirectional rotor Guillermo Pérez-Hernández, Adam Pelzer, Leticia González and Tamar Seideman Simulating quantum search algorithm using vibronic states of I2 manipulated by optimally designed gate pulses Yukiyoshi Ohtsuki Efficient coherent control by sequences of pulses of finite duration Götz S Uhrig and Stefano Pasini Control by decoherence: weak field control of an excited state objective Gil Katz, Mark A Ratner and Ronnie Kosloff Multi-qubit compensation sequences Y Tomita, J T Merrill and K R Brown Environment-invariant measure of distance between evolutions of an open quantum system Matthew D Grace, Jason Dominy, Robert L Kosut, Constantin Brif and Herschel Rabitz Simplified quantum process tomography M P A Branderhorst, J Nunn, I A Walmsley and R L Kosut Achieving 'perfect' molecular discrimination via coherent control and stimulated emission Stephen D Clow, Uvo C Holscher and Thomas C Weinacht A convenient method to simulate and visually

  5. PREFACE: International Conference on the Use of X-ray (and related) Techniques in Arts and Cultural Heritage (XTACH 11)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamdan, Nasser; El-Khatib, Sami

    2012-07-01

    The International Conference on the Use of X-Ray (and related) Techniques in Arts and Cultural Heritage (XTACH11) was held on 7 and 8 December 2011 at the American University of Sharjah (AUS) in the United Arab Emirates. The conference was organized in collaboration with the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and the National X-ray Fluorescence Laboratory (NXFL). The conference was inaugurated by Dr Peter Heath, Chancellor of the American University of Shrjah and attended by Mr Kwaku Aning, deputy Director General of the International Atomic Energy and Ambassador Hamad Al-Kaabi, Ambassador of the UAE to the International Atomic Energy university officials, faculty and students. The conference covered a variety of topics including the use of x-ray and micro beam x-ray analysis, synchrotron based techniques, ion beam and neutron based techniques, optical imaging and mass spectroscopy and chromatography techniques as well as best conservation practices. XTACH11 provided an excellent forum for scientists in the region to interact, exchange ideas and to initiate collaborations with each other as well as with the international community. It showcased some of the latest technical developments in the field of non-destructive testing for the diagnosis and conservation of cultural heritage materials. In addition to the presentations by the invited speakers (Rene van Grieken and K Janssens, University of Antwerp, Belgium; Thomas Calligaro, Centre de Recherche et de Restauration des Musees de France; Stefano Ridolfi, Ars Mensurae, Rome, Italy, and Andrzej Markowicz, IAEA, Austria), a total of 25 other research papers were also presented and discussed. Scientists from many countries participated in the conference: Austria, Belgium, Egypt, Italy, India, Iran, Iraq, Jordan, Lebanon, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Spain, Sri Lanka, Syria, Thailand, the United Arab Emirates and Yemen. The conference concluded with a Discussion Panel. Thomas Calligaro (Centre de Recherché et de

  6. Chandra Catches Cannibal Galaxy in the Act

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-07-01

    NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory image of Perseus A provides new insight into how this supergiant galaxy has grown by cannibalizing other galaxies and gas in the vicinity. For the first time astronomers see an X-ray shadow cast by a smaller galaxy as its gas is being stripped away by the enormous galaxy. The research was reported by Professor Andrew Fabian of the Institute of Astronomy, Cambridge, England on June 7 at the 196th National Meeting of the American Astronomical Society, in Rochester, NY. Other members of the research team are Jeremy Sanders, Stefano Ettori, Steve Allen, Carolin Crawford, Kazushi Iwasawa, and Roderick Johnstone of the Institute of Astronomy, Gregory Taylor on the National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Socorro, NM, and Patrick Ogle of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA. Perseus A, or NGC 1275, is in the center of a large galaxy cluster 320 million light years from Earth. The cluster, which contains thousands of galaxies and enough gas to make thousands more, is one of the largest gravitationally bound objects in the universe. Over the eons, Perseus A has accumulated hundreds of billions of stars to become one of the most massive known galaxies as gas and galaxies have been pulled inward by gravity. The Chandra observation shows a region of hot gas that extends over several hundred thousand light years. The gas in the outer portion of the cluster has a temperature of 70 million degrees. The cluster gas cools gradually and settles toward the center of the cluster. A galaxy with "only" about 20 billion stars is falling into Perseus A (located at two o'clock from the center of the image) and appears as a small dark patch due to absorption of X rays by cool gas in the infalling galaxy. Another larger hole seen further out is thought to be due to a bubble of high-energy particles ejected in an explosion from Perseus A hundreds of millions of years ago. These outbursts are presumably fueled by matter releasing tremendous

  7. Carbon Dioxide Removal from Flue Gas Using Microporous Metal Organic Frameworks

    SciTech Connect

    Lesch, David A

    2010-06-30

    UOP LLC, a Honeywell Company, in collaboration with Professor Douglas LeVan at Vanderbilt University (VU), Professor Adam Matzger at the University of Michigan (UM), Professor Randall Snurr at Northwestern University (NU), and Professor Stefano Brandani at the University of Edinburgh (UE), supported by Honeywell's Specialty Materials business unit and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), have completed a three-year project to develop novel microporous metal organic frameworks (MOFs) and an associated vacuum-pressure swing adsorption (vPSA) process for the removal of CO{sub 2} from coal-fired power plant flue gas. The project leveraged the team's complementary capabilities: UOP's experience in materials development and manufacturing, adsorption process design and process commercialization; LeVan and Brandani's expertise in high-quality adsorption measurements; Matzger's experience in syntheis of MOFs and the organic components associated with MOFs; Snurr's expertise in molecular and other modeling; Honeywell's expertise in the manufacture of organic chemicals; and, EPRI's knowledge of power-generation technology and markets. The project was successful in that a selective CO{sub 2} adsorbent with good thermal stability and reasonable contaminant tolerance was discovered, and a low cost process for flue gas CO{sub 2} capture process ready to be evaluated further at the pilot scale was proposed. The team made significant progress toward the current DOE post-combustion research targets, as defined in a recent FOA issued by NETL: 90% CO{sub 2} removal with no more than a 35% increase in COE. The team discovered that favorable CO{sub 2} adsorption at more realistic flue gas conditions is dominated by one particular MOF structure type, M/DOBDC, where M designates Zn, Co, Ni, or Mg and DOBDC refers to the form of the organic linker in the resultant MOF structure, dioxybenzenedicarboxylate. The structure of the M/DOBDC MOFs consists of infinite-rod secondary

  8. PREFACE: 5th International Workshop on Top Quark Physics (TOP2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salamanna, G.; Boisvert, V.; Cerrito, L.; Khan, A.; Moretti, S.; Owen, M.; Schwanenberger, C.

    2013-07-01

    resonances in the boosted top regime were also provided. Finally, a set of dedicated talks on the interplay between the top sector and other hot subjects, like the Higgs and SUSY, were given both at the theory and experimental level. Furthermore, ad hoc student sessions were organized to allow younger colleagues to pose questions to the senior experts in the field and contribute with their more recent studies. The conference has been a definitive success, not just scientifically: about 130 participants from all over the world created a collegiate spirit which culminated in the social events at Winchester Hall below King Arthur's table; and in a cosy 16th century barn for the social dinner. The Local Organizing Committee would like to thank all participants, and in particular the speakers, for their high level contributions to TOP 2012 and for making this a very fruitful and pleasant time together. We conclude by wishing the Organizing Committee of TOP 2013 all the best for a successful conference. We look forward to seeing everyone in Germany in 2013. Giuseppe Salamanna Local Organizing Committee London, June 2013 Local Organising Committee Veronique Boisvert (Chair, Royal Holloway, University of London) Lucio Cerrito (Queen Mary, University of London) Akram Khan (Brunel University, London) Stefano Moretti (University of Southampton) Mark Owen (University of Manchester) Giuseppe Salamanna (Queen Mary, University of London) Christian Schwanenberger (University of Manchester) International Advisory Committee Roberto Tenchini (INFN, Pisa) Martine Bosman (IFAE, Barcelona) Michelangelo Mangano (CERN) Scott Willenbrock (University of Illinois, Urbana) Werner Bernreuther (RWTH, Aachen) Jorgen D'Hondt (VUB, Brussels) Antonio Onofre (LIP, University Minho) Fabio Maltoni (UCL, Louvain) Eric Laenen (NIKHEF) Fabrizio Margaroli (INFN, Roma 1) Juan Antonio Aguilar Saavedra (University of Granada) Yvonne Peters (University of Manchester) Roberto Chierici (CERN) Markus Cristinziani

  9. Self-organization in magnetic flux ropes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukin, Vyacheslav S.

    2014-06-01

    describes how canonical helicity can determine the result of reconnection and merging of multiple magnetic flux ropes, John Finn et al focus on diagnosing flux rope reconnection using quasi-separatrix layers, and Stefano Markidis et al investigate how a single flux rope can become unstable and begin to fall apart. With these many examples of different magnetized plasma structures, which can all be called magnetic flux ropes, the question still stands: just what is it that makes a volume of magnetized plasma a magnetic flux rope? There may not be a strict definition of a magnetic flux rope that everyone can agree on. Nonetheless, the ingredient common to all magnetic flux ropes is that the magnetic field lines that thread nearby plasma elements at one location along the flux rope must wind around and not diverge away from each other over a sufficiently long distance to look like a piece of an ordinary rope. In a way, it is similar to turbulence—you know it when you see it. The figures and illustrations included in this special issue provide plenty of examples of observed, measured, modeled and imagined magnetic flux ropes for you, the reader, to develop an appreciation of what different members of our research community mean by a magnetic flux rope. If you have never studied magnetic flux ropes, we hope that this special issue inspires you to look into their many mysteries. If magnetic flux ropes are already an integral part of your research, we hope the diversity of perspectives presented herein refresh your interest in the underlying plasma physics of whichever kind of magnetic flux rope you happen to be working with. References [1] Russell C T, Priest E R and Lee L-C 1990 Physics of Magnetic Flux Ropes AGU Geophysical Monograph Series vol 58 (Washington, DC: American Geophysical Union)

  10. Measuring a Black Hole's Mass with Robotic Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2015-11-01

    .A team of scientists led by Stefano Valenti (LCOGT, UC Santa Barbara) has published the first results from the AGN Key Project, a project which uses the LCOGT network to conduct several studies of AGN including reverberation mapping of both local and high-redshift objects. In these first results, the team reports the outcome of a 200-day observing campaign of the galaxy Arp 151, which has a highly variable active nucleus.The LCOGT observations successfully show a measurable lag between the continuum emission and the broad emission lines for Arp 151. They are also enough-resolved that a velocity can be measured from the broad emission lines, allowing the team to calculate the mass of the black hole enclosed. Valenti and collaborators announce a mass of 6.2 million solar masses consistent with previously measured masses for this system.The success of this test demonstrates the viability of this approach, as well as the powerful capabilities of robotic telescope networks for long-term AGN time domain campaigns.CitationS. Valenti et al 2015 ApJ 813 L36. doi:10.1088/2041-8205/813/2/L36

  11. PREFACE: Fourth Meeting on Constrained Dynamics and Quantum Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cadoni, Mariano; Cavaglia, Marco; Nelson, Jeanette E.

    2006-04-01

    groups. In particular, help was provided to students and scientists from non-EU countries. It is our great pleasure to thank those people and institutions whose help and support was crucial to the success of the meeting. We appreciate the enthusiastic support of our colleagues of the academic community, especially those from the Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare and the Universities of Cagliari, Pisa, Torino and Mississippi. Financial support was provided by the Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, the Universities of Cagliari, Torino, Pisa and Mississippi. This was used largely to support participants, especially younger people. Special thanks go to Pietro Menotti (University of Pisa) and Stefano Sciuto (University of Torino) for their friendship and their universities' financial contributions. It is also a pleasure to acknowledge financial support from the Regione Autonoma della Sardegna and from Tiscali, the communications and Internet company, for providing free telephone cards. Technical support and local organisation was provided by the Sezione di Cagliari of the Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare. Warmest thanks go to our administrative and technical staff - Maria Assunta Lecca and Simona Renieri, for their untiring assistance, and to Palmasera Village and Hotel Smeraldo for their splendid hospitality. And finally, our gratitude goes to all the participants and especially the many experienced scientists. Their contributions highlighted the meeting and were largely without support. The success of the meeting is due to them and to the enthusiasm of the younger participants. The Editors January 2006 COMMITTEES Organising Committee Mariano Cadoni (Università and INFN Cagliari) Marco Cavaglià (University of Mississippi) Jeanette E. Nelson (Università and INFN Torino) Advisory Committee Orfeu Bertolami (IST Lisboa, Portugal) Luca Bombelli (Univ. Mississippi) Steve Carlip (UC Davis, USA) Alessandro D'Adda (INFN Torino, Italy) Stanley Deser (Brandeis, USA

  12. Entropy of Egypt's virtual water trade gravity field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karakatsanis, Georgios; Bierbach, Sandra

    2016-04-01

    's 20 trading partner countries, for a time frame from 1995 to 2013. The calculations -implemented for each country and each crop- display a network that illustrates the gravity of virtual water trade. It is then possible for us to model the entropy of Egypt's virtual water trade gravity field, via the statistical examination of its spatial fragmentation or continuity for each traded crop and for each water footprint type. Hence, with the distribution's entropy we may conduct a targeted analysis on the comparative advantages of the Egyptian agriculture. Keywords: entropy, virtual water trade, gravity model, agricultural trade, water footprint, water subsidies, comparative advantage References 1. Antonelli, Marta and Martina Sartori (2014), Unfolding the potential of the Virtual Water concept. What is still under debate?, MPRA Paper No. 60501, http://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/60501/ 2. Fracasso, Andrea (2014), A gravity model of virtual water trade, Ecological Economics, Vol. 108, p. 215-228 3. Fracasso, Andrea; Martina Sartori and Stefano Schiavo (2014), Determinants of virtual water flows in the Mediterranean, MPRA Paper No. 60500, https://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/60500/ 4. Yang, H. et al. (2006), Virtual water trade: An assessment of water use efficiency in the international food trade, Hydrology and Earth System Sciences 10, p. 443-454

  13. EDITORIAL: Ice in the environment: connections to atmospheric chemistry Ice in the environment: connections to atmospheric chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNeill, V. Faye; Hastings, Meredith G.

    2008-12-01

    understanding of the atmospheric chemistry of ice: the role of a quasi-liquid layer (QLL) or quasi-brine layer (QBL) at the ice surface. The studies presented here advance our understanding of the complex interactions of snow and ice with important reactive components in our atmosphere. It has become clear in recent years that the polar regions do not act as an ultimate sink for many compounds—the release of halogens and reactive nitrogen oxides from ice and snow are examples of this. Two notable implications arise from these findings (i) the impact of anthropogenic pollutants in our environment may extend further than we fully appreciate with current global atmospheric chemistry models and (ii) our interpretation of chemical records in ice cores requires that we fundamentally understand and quantify air-snow and air-ice interactions. Additionally, laboratory studies are elucidating the details of heterogeneous reactions that are prevalent on ice and snow surfaces throughout the troposphere, and we are poised to make significant strides in the near future quantifying these effects on regional and global scales. We look forward to continued progress in this field in the coming years, and we will continue to work to connect those conducting modeling, field and laboratory studies. Focus on Connections between Atmospheric Chemistry and Snow and Ice Contents HONO emissions from snow surfaces Harry Beine, Agustín J Colussi, Antonio Amoroso, Giulio Esposito, Mauro Montagnoli and Michael R Hoffmann Heterogeneous ozonation kinetics of phenanthrene at the air-ice interface T F Kahan and D J Donaldson Release of gas-phase halogens from sodium halide substrates: heterogeneous oxidation of frozen solutions and desiccated salts by hydroxyl radicals S J Sjostedt and J P D Abbatt Uptake of acetone, ethanol and benzene to snow and ice: effects of surface area and temperature J P D Abbatt, T Bartels-Rausch, M Ullerstam and T J Ye Interaction of gaseous elemental mercury with snow surfaces

  14. EDITORIAL: Focus on Quantum Information and Many-Body Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eisert, Jens; Plenio, Martin B.

    2010-02-01

    in an optical lattice J Schachenmayer, G Pupillo and A J Daley Implementing quantum gates using the ferromagnetic spin-J XXZ chain with kink boundary conditions Tom Michoel, Jaideep Mulherkar and Bruno Nachtergaele Long-distance entanglement in many-body atomic and optical systems Salvatore M Giampaolo and Fabrizio Illuminati QUANTUM MEMORIES AND TOPOLOGICAL ORDER Thermodynamic stability criteria for a quantum memory based on stabilizer and subsystem codes Stefano Chesi, Daniel Loss, Sergey Bravyi and Barbara M Terhal Topological color codes and two-body quantum lattice Hamiltonians M Kargarian, H Bombin and M A Martin-Delgado RENORMALIZATION Local renormalization method for random systems O Gittsovich, R Hübener, E Rico and H J Briegel

  15. PREFACE: The Eighth Liquid Matter Conference The Eighth Liquid Matter Conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dellago, Christoph; Kahl, Gerhard; Likos, Christos N.

    2012-07-01

    interface tension of flat and curved interfaces from Monte Carlo simulationsA Tröster and K Binder Phase diagrams of particles with dissimilar patches: X-junctions and Y-junctionsJ M Tavares and P I C Teixeira The unbearable heaviness of colloids: facts, surprises, and puzzles in sedimentationRoberto Piazza, Stefano Buzzaccaro and Eleonora Secchi Exploring water and other liquids at negative pressureFrédéric Caupin, Arnaud Arvengas, Kristina Davitt, Mouna El Mekki Azouzi, Kirill I Shmulovich, Claire Ramboz, David A Sessoms and Abraham D Stroock The configurational space of colloidal patchy polymers with heterogeneous sequencesIvan Coluzza and Christoph Dellago Repeated sorption of water in SBA-15 investigated by means of in situ small-angle x-ray scatteringM Erko, D Wallacher, G H Findenegg and O Paris Transition of the hydration state of a surfactant accompanying structural transitions of self-assembled aggregatesM Hishida and K Tanaka The effects of topology on the structural, dynamic and mechanical properties of network-forming materialsMark Wilson Surface tension of an electrolyte-air interface: a Monte Carlo studyAlexandre Diehl, Alexandre P dos Santos and Yan Levin Water and other tetrahedral liquids: order, anomalies and solvationB Shadrack Jabes, Divya Nayar, Debdas Dhabal, Valeria Molinero and Charusita Chakravarty Diffusion coefficient and shear viscosity of rigid water modelsSami Tazi, Alexandru Boţan, Mathieu Salanne, Virginie Marry, Pierre Turq and Benjamin Rotenberg Phase behaviour of colloidal assemblies on 2D corrugated substratesSamir El Shawish, Emmanuel Trizac and Jure Dobnikar Structural properties of dendrimer-colloid mixturesDominic A Lenz, Ronald Blaak and Christos N Likos Fluid-fluid demixing of off-critical colloid-polymer systems confined between parallel platesE A G Jamie, R P A Dullens and D G A L Aarts Simulations of nematic homopolymer melts using particle-based models with interactions expressed through collective variablesKostas Ch

  16. Active faulting Vs other surface displacing complex geomorphic phenomena. Case studies from a tectonically active area, Abruzzi Region, central Apennines, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo Sardo, Lorenzo; Gori, Stefano; Falcucci, Emanuela; Saroli, Michele; Moro, Marco; Galadini, Fabrizio; Lancia, Michele; Fubelli, Giandomenico; Pezzo, Giuseppe

    2016-04-01

    How can be univocally inferred the genesis of a linear surface scarp as the result of an active and capable fault (FAC) in tectonically active regions? Or, conversely, how it is possible to exclude that a scarp is the result of a capable fault activation? Trying to unravel this open questions, we show two ambiguous case studies about the problem of the identification of active and capable faults in a tectonically active area just based on the presence of supposed fault scarps at surface. The selected cases are located in the area comprised between the Middle Aterno Valley Fault (MAVF) and the Campo Imperatore Plain (Abruzzi Region, central Apennines), nearby the epicentral area of the April 6th, 2009 L'Aquila earthquake. In particular, the two case studies analysed are located in a region characterized by a widespread Quaternary faults and by several linear scarps: the case studies of (i) Prata D'Ansidonia area and (ii) Santo Stefano di Sessanio area. To assess the origin and the state of activity of the investigated geomorphic features, we applied a classical geological and geomorphological approach, based on the analysis of the available literature, the interpretation of the aerial photographs, field surveying and classical paleoseismological approach, the latter consisting in digging excavations across the analysed scarps. These analysis were then integrated by morphometrical analyses. As for case (i), we focused on determining the geomorphic "meaning" of linear scarps carved onto fluvial-deltaic conglomerates (dated to the Early Pleistocene; Bertini and Bosi, 1993), up to 3 meters high and up to 1,5 km long, that border a narrow, elongated and flat-bottom depressions, filled by colluvial deposits. These features groove the paleo-landsurface of Valle Daria (Bosi and Bertini, 1970), wide landsurface located between Barisciano and Prata D'Ansidonia. Entwining paleoseismological trenching with geophysical analyses (GPR, ERT and microgravimetrical prospections), it

  17. 3D displacements maps of the L'Aquila earthquake by applying SISTEM method to GPS and ENVISAT and ALOS DInSAR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guglielmino, Francesco; Anzidei, Marco; Briole, Pierre; de Michele, Marcello; Elias, Panagiotis; Nunnari, Giuseppe; Puglisi, Giuseppe; Spata, Alessandro

    2010-05-01

    Italian earthquakes from 461 B.C. to 1997, Ann. Geofis., 43, 609- 868. Chiarabba, C., L. Jovane, and R. Di Stefano (2005), A new view of Italian seismicity using 20 years of instrumental recordings, Tectonophysics, 395, 251-268, doi:10.1016/j.tecto.2004.09.013. EMERGEO Working Group (2009), Field geological survey in the epicentral area of the Abruzzi (central Italy) seismic sequence of April 6th, 2009, in Quaderni di Geofisica, vol. 70, Ist. Naz. Di Geofis. e Vulcanol., Rome. Guglielmino F., Nunnari G., Puglisi G., Spata A. (2009), Simultaneous and Integrated Strain Tensor Estimation from geodetic and satellite deformation Measurements (SISTEM) to obtain threedimensional displacements maps. Submitted to IEEE Transactions on Geoscience and Remote Sensing. Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia (INGV) (2009), The L'Aquila seismic sequence— April 2009, Ist. Naz. di Geofis. e Vulcanol., Rome. (Available at http://portale.ingv.it/).

  18. Active faulting Vs other surface displacing complex geomorphic phenomena. Case studies from a tectonically active area, Abruzzi Region, central Apennines, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo Sardo, Lorenzo; Gori, Stefano; Falcucci, Emanuela; Saroli, Michele; Moro, Marco; Galadini, Fabrizio; Lancia, Michele; Fubelli, Giandomenico; Pezzo, Giuseppe

    2016-04-01

    How can be univocally inferred the genesis of a linear surface scarp as the result of an active and capable fault (FAC) in tectonically active regions? Or, conversely, how it is possible to exclude that a scarp is the result of a capable fault activation? Trying to unravel this open questions, we show two ambiguous case studies about the problem of the identification of active and capable faults in a tectonically active area just based on the presence of supposed fault scarps at surface. The selected cases are located in the area comprised between the Middle Aterno Valley Fault (MAVF) and the Campo Imperatore Plain (Abruzzi Region, central Apennines), nearby the epicentral area of the April 6th, 2009 L'Aquila earthquake. In particular, the two case studies analysed are located in a region characterized by a widespread Quaternary faults and by several linear scarps: the case studies of (i) Prata D'Ansidonia area and (ii) Santo Stefano di Sessanio area. To assess the origin and the state of activity of the investigated geomorphic features, we applied a classical geological and geomorphological approach, based on the analysis of the available literature, the interpretation of the aerial photographs, field surveying and classical paleoseismological approach, the latter consisting in digging excavations across the analysed scarps. These analysis were then integrated by morphometrical analyses. As for case (i), we focused on determining the geomorphic "meaning" of linear scarps carved onto fluvial-deltaic conglomerates (dated to the Early Pleistocene; Bertini and Bosi, 1993), up to 3 meters high and up to 1,5 km long, that border a narrow, elongated and flat-bottom depressions, filled by colluvial deposits. These features groove the paleo-landsurface of Valle Daria (Bosi and Bertini, 1970), wide landsurface located between Barisciano and Prata D'Ansidonia. Entwining paleoseismological trenching with geophysical analyses (GPR, ERT and microgravimetrical prospections), it

  19. Physics in one dimension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Houselt, A.; Schäfer, J.; Zandvliet, H. J. W.; Claessen, R.

    2013-01-01

    Pashkin, C A Kuntscher, S G Ebbinghaus, M Hanfland, F Lissner, Th Schleid and M Dressel Photoemission spectroscopy and the unusually robust one-dimensional physics of lithium purple bronzeL Dudy, J D Denlinger, J W Allen, F Wang, J He, D Hitchcock, A Sekiyama and S Suga Luttinger liquid behaviour of Li0.9Mo6O17 studied by scanning tunnelling microscopyT Podlich, M Klinke, B Nansseu, M Waelsch, R Bienert, J He, R Jin, D Mandrus and R Matzdorf Mn-silicide nanostructures aligned on massively parallel silicon nano-ribbonsPaola De Padova, Carlo Ottaviani, Fabio Ronci, Stefano Colonna, Bruno Olivieri, Claudio Quaresima, Antonio Cricenti, Maria E Dávila, Franz Hennies, Annette Pietzsch, Nina Shariati and Guy Le Lay Iridium silicide nanowires on Si(001) surfacesNuri Oncel and Dylan Nicholls Structure and growth of quasi-one-dimensional YSi2 nanophases on Si(100)V Iancu, P R C Kent, S Hus, H Hu, C G Zeng and H H Weitering Metallic rare-earth silicide nanowires on silicon surfacesMario Dähne and Martina Wanke One-dimensional collective excitations in Ag atomic wires grown on Si(557)U Krieg, C Brand, C Tegenkamp and H Pfnür Interfering Bloch waves in a 1D electron systemR Heimbuch, A van Houselt, M Farmanbar, G Brocks and H J W Zandvliet Au-induced quantum chains on Ge(001)—symmetries, long-range order and the conduction pathC Blumenstein, S Meyer, S Mietke, J Schäfer, A Bostwick, E Rotenberg, R Matzdorf and R Claessen

  20. List of Participants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2007-11-01

    Ceresole Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare and Università di Torino Kang Sin Choi University of Bonn Michele Cirafici University of Patras Andres Collinucci Katholieke Universiteit Leuven Aldo Cotrone Universitat de Barcelona Ben Craps Vrije Universiteit, Brussel Stefano Cremonesi SISSA, Trieste Gianguido Dall'Agata Padova University Sanjit Das Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur Forcella Davide SISSA, Trieste Jose A de Azcarraga Valencia University and Instituto de Fìsica Corpuscular (CSIC-UVEG), Valencia Sophie de BuylInstitut des Hautes Études Scientifiques, Bures-sur-Yvette Jean-Pierre Derendinger Université de Neuchâtel Stephane Detournay Università Degli Studi di Milano Paolo Di Vecchia NORDITA, København Oscar Dias Universitat de Barcelona Vladimir Dobrev Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Sofia Joel Ekstrand Department of Theoretical Physics, Uppsala University Federico Elmetti Università di Milano I Diaconu Eugen University of Craiova Oleg Evnin Vrije Universiteit, Brussel Bo Feng Imperial College, London Livia Ferro Università di Torino Pau Figueras Universitat de Barcelona Raphael Flauger University of Texas at Austin Valentina Forini Università di Perugia Angelos Fotopoulos Università di Torino Denis Frank Université de Neuchâtel Lisa Freyhult Albert-Einstein-Institut, Golm Carlos Fuertes Instituto de Física Teórica, Madrid Matthias Gaberdiel Eidgenössische Technische Hochschule, Zürich Maria Pilar Garcia del Moral Università di Torino Daniel Gerber Instituto de Física Teórica, Madrid Valentina Giangreco Marotta Puletti Uppsala University Joaquim Gomis Universitat de Barcelona Gianluca Grignani Università di Perugia Luca Griguolo Università di Parma Umut Gursoy École Polytechnique, Palaiseau and École Normale Supérieure, Paris Michael Haack Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität, München Troels Harmark Niels Bohr Institute, København Alexander Haupt Imperial College, London Michal

  1. List of Participants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-11-01

    Davide CassaniLaboratoire de Physique Théorique, École Normale Supérieure, Paris Alejandra CastroUniversity of Michigan Claudio Caviezel Max-Planck-Institut für Physik, München Alessio Celi Universitat de Barcelona Anna Ceresole Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Università di Torino Athanasios ChatzistavrakidisNational Technical University of Athens Wissam ChemissanyCentre for Theoretical Physics, University of Groningen Eugen-Mihaita CioroianuUniversity of Craiova Andres CollinucciTechnische Universität Wien Paul CookUniversità di Roma, Tor Vergata Lorenzo CornalbaUniversità di Milano-Bicocca Aldo CotroneKatholieke Universiteit Leuven Ben Craps Vrije Universiteit, Brussel Stefano Cremonesi SISSA, Trieste Riccardo D'AuriaPolitecnico di Torino Gianguido Dall'AgataUniversity of Padova Jose A de AzcarragaUniversidad de Valencia Jan de BoerInstituut voor Theoretische Fysica, Universiteit van Amsterdam Sophie de BuylInstitut des Hautes Études Scientifiques, Bures-sur-Yvette Marius de LeeuwUtrecht University Frederik De RooVrije Universiteit, Brussel Jan De Rydt Katholieke Universiteit Leuven and CERN, Geneva Bernard de WitInstitute for Theoretical Physics, Utrecht University Stephane DetournayIstituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Milano Paolo Di Vecchia Niels Bohr Institute, København Eugen DiaconuUniversity of Craiova Vladimir Dobrev Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Sofia Nick DoreyUniversity of Cambridge Hajar Ebrahim NajafabadiIPM, Tehran Federico Elmetti Università di Milano Oleg Evnin Vrije Universiteit, Brussel Francesco Fiamberti Università di Milano Davide Forcella SISSA, Trieste and CERN, Geneva Valentina Forini Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin Angelos Fotopoulos Università di Torino Denis Frank Université de Neuchâtel Marialuisa Frau Università di Torino Matthias Gaberdiel Eidgenössische Technische Hochschule (ETH), Zürich Diego Gallego SISSA/ISAS, Trieste Maria Pilar Garcia del

  2. The Secret Lives Of Galaxies Unveiled In Deep Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-06-01

    team's results. The Chandra results are found in papers led by Koekemoer and Stefano Cristiani of the Trieste Astronomical Observatory. Hubble's findings came from papers led by Giavalisco, Mark Dickinson, and Harry Ferguson of the STScI. The image and additional information are available at: http://chandra.harvard.edu and http://hubblesite.org/newscenter/archive/2003/18/

  3. The Project Serapis: High Resolution Seismic Imagingof The Campi Flegrei Caldera Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zollo, A.; Virieux, J.; Capuano, P.; Chiarabba, C.; de Franco, R.; Makris, J.; Michelini, A.; Musacchio, G.; Serapis Group

    , Iannaccone Giovanni, La Rocca Mario, Saccorotti Gilberto, Cattaneo Marco, De Mar- tin Martina , Colasanti Gianfranco, Moretti Milena, Marcello Silvestri, Edoardo Gian- domenico, Raffaele Stefano, Graziano Boniolo, Maria Rosaria Tondi, Maistrello Mar- iano, Gomez Antonio, Piccareda Carlo, Paolo Di Bartolomeo, Marco Romanelli, So- phie Peyrat, Christophe Larroque, Claude Pambrun, Tony Monfret, Stephane Gaffet, Mark Noble, Sylvain Nguyen 2

  4. Discovery of a Satellite around a Near-Earth Asteroid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1997-07-01

    In the course of the major observational programme of asteroids by the Institute of Planetary Exploration of the German Aerospace Research Establishment (DLR) [1] in Berlin, two of the staff astronomers, Stefano Mottola and Gerhard Hahn , have discovered a small satellite (moon) orbiting the asteroid (3671) Dionysus. The new measurements were obtained with the DLR CCD Camera attached at the 60-cm Bochum telescope at the ESO La Silla Observatory in Chile. This is only the second known case of an asteroid with a moon. Moons and planets Until recently, natural satellites were only known around the major planets . The Moon orbits the Earth, there are two tiny moons around Mars, each of the giant planets Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune has many more, and even the smallest and outermost, Pluto, is accompanied by one [2]. However, the new discovery now strengthens the belief of many astronomers that some, perhaps even a substantial number of the many thousands of minor planets (asteroids) in the solar system may also possess their own moons. The first discovery of a satellite orbiting an asteroid was made by the NASA Galileo spacecraft, whose imagery, obtained during a fly-by of asteroid (253) Ida in August 1993, unveiled a small moon that has since been given the name Dactyl. (3671) Dionysus: an Earth-crossing asteroid In the framework of the DLR asteroid monitoring programme, image sequences are acquired to measure an asteroid's brightness variations caused by the changing amount of sunlight reflected from the asteroid's illuminated surface as it spins, due to its irregular shape. The brightness variations may be used to derive the asteroid's rotational properties, such as speed of rotation and spin axis orientation. Asteroid Dionysus [3] was put on the observing list because it belongs to a special class of asteroids, the members of which occasionally come very close to the Earth and have a small, but non-negligible chance of colliding with our planet. Most of

  5. PREFACE: Young Researcher Meeting, Trieste 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agostini, F.; Antolini, C.; Aversa, R.; Cattani, G.; Di Stefano, M.; Longobardi, M.; Martinelli, M.; Miceli, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Paci, F.; Pietrobon, D.; Pusceddu, E.; Stellato, F.

    2014-12-01

    skills. Engaging the public and finding unconventional ways to communicate results turn out to be real assets in improving the quality of presentation of current research to peers, as well as to the general public. In this volume, we collect part of the contributions that have been presented at the conference. They cover topics in astrophysics and cosmology, particle and theoretical physics, soft and condensed matter, medical physics and applied physics. Given the recent experimental achievements in particle physics and cosmology, several contributions were focused on the latest results obtained in these fields, presenting the impact of experiments such as LHC and Planck to the community of young researchers and forecasting the future goals in these areas of research. Particular interest was aroused by the session fully dedicated to applied Physics and conservation of cultural assets. Besides the intrinsic scientific value of the discussed topics, the increasing relative weight of the applied Physics session is a demonstration of the benefits that fundamental science brings to the community. YRM Organising and Editorial Committee Fabio Agostini (fabio.agostini31@gmail.com) Telespazio A Finmeccanica Thales Company Claudia Antolini (claudia.antolini@sissa.it) SISSA - Scuola Internazionale Superiore di Studi Avanzati and Fudan University Rossella Aversa (raversa@sissa.it) SISSA - Scuola Internazionale Superiore di Studi Avanzati Giordano Cattani (giordano.cattani@gmail.com) Marco Di Stefano (distefan@sissa.it) SISSA - Scuola Internazionale Superiore di Studi Avanzati Maria Longobardi (marialongobardi@gmail.com) Department of Condensed Matter Physics, University of Geneva Matteo Martinelli (martinelli@thphys.uni-heidelberg.de) SISSA - Scuola Internazionale Superiore di Studi Avanzati and Institut fur Theoretische Physik Alice Miceli (alice.miceli@uniroma2.it) Physics Department, University of Rome Tor Vergata Marina Migliaccio (mm858@ast.cam.ac.uk) Institute of Astronomy and

  6. The Quiet Explosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-07-01

    . "Since the masses and energies involved are smaller than in every known gamma-ray burst related supernova, we think that the collapse of the star gave rise to a weak jet, and that the presence of the Helium layer made it even more difficult for the jet to remain collimated, so that when it emerged from the stellar surface the signal was weak," says Massimo Della Valle, co-author. "The scenario we propose implies that gamma-ray burst-like inner engine activity exists in all supernovae that form a black hole," adds co-author Stefano Valenti. "As our X-ray and gamma-ray instruments become more advanced, we are slowly uncovering the very diverse properties of stellar explosions," explains Guido Chincarini, co-author and the Principal Investigator of the Italian research on gamma-ray bursts. "The bright gamma-ray bursts were the easiest to discover, and now we are seeing variations on a theme that link these special events to more normal ones." These are however very important discoveries, as they continue to paint a picture of how massive star end their lives, producing dense objects, and injecting new chemical elements back into the gas from which new stars will be formed.

  7. PREFACE: International Conference on the Use of X-ray (and related) Techniques in Arts and Cultural Heritage (XTACH 11)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamdan, Nasser; El-Khatib, Sami

    2012-07-01

    The International Conference on the Use of X-Ray (and related) Techniques in Arts and Cultural Heritage (XTACH11) was held on 7 and 8 December 2011 at the American University of Sharjah (AUS) in the United Arab Emirates. The conference was organized in collaboration with the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and the National X-ray Fluorescence Laboratory (NXFL). The conference was inaugurated by Dr Peter Heath, Chancellor of the American University of Shrjah and attended by Mr Kwaku Aning, deputy Director General of the International Atomic Energy and Ambassador Hamad Al-Kaabi, Ambassador of the UAE to the International Atomic Energy university officials, faculty and students. The conference covered a variety of topics including the use of x-ray and micro beam x-ray analysis, synchrotron based techniques, ion beam and neutron based techniques, optical imaging and mass spectroscopy and chromatography techniques as well as best conservation practices. XTACH11 provided an excellent forum for scientists in the region to interact, exchange ideas and to initiate collaborations with each other as well as with the international community. It showcased some of the latest technical developments in the field of non-destructive testing for the diagnosis and conservation of cultural heritage materials. In addition to the presentations by the invited speakers (Rene van Grieken and K Janssens, University of Antwerp, Belgium; Thomas Calligaro, Centre de Recherche et de Restauration des Musees de France; Stefano Ridolfi, Ars Mensurae, Rome, Italy, and Andrzej Markowicz, IAEA, Austria), a total of 25 other research papers were also presented and discussed. Scientists from many countries participated in the conference: Austria, Belgium, Egypt, Italy, India, Iran, Iraq, Jordan, Lebanon, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Spain, Sri Lanka, Syria, Thailand, the United Arab Emirates and Yemen. The conference concluded with a Discussion Panel. Thomas Calligaro (Centre de Recherché et de

  8. Galaxy Cluster Smashes Distance Record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2009-10-01

    he most distant galaxy cluster yet has been discovered by combining data from NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory and optical and infrared telescopes. The cluster is located about 10.2 billion light years away, and is observed as it was when the Universe was only about a quarter of its present age. The galaxy cluster, known as JKCS041, beats the previous record holder by about a billion light years. Galaxy clusters are the largest gravitationally bound objects in the Universe. Finding such a large structure at this very early epoch can reveal important information about how the Universe evolved at this crucial stage. JKCS041 is found at the cusp of when scientists think galaxy clusters can exist in the early Universe based on how long it should take for them to assemble. Therefore, studying its characteristics - such as composition, mass, and temperature - will reveal more about how the Universe took shape. "This object is close to the distance limit expected for a galaxy cluster," said Stefano Andreon of the National Institute for Astrophysics (INAF) in Milan, Italy. "We don't think gravity can work fast enough to make galaxy clusters much earlier." Distant galaxy clusters are often detected first with optical and infrared observations that reveal their component galaxies dominated by old, red stars. JKCS041 was originally detected in 2006 in a survey from the United Kingdom Infrared Telescope (UKIRT). The distance to the cluster was then determined from optical and infrared observations from UKIRT, the Canada-France-Hawaii telescope in Hawaii and NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope. Infrared observations are important because the optical light from the galaxies at large distances is shifted into infrared wavelengths because of the expansion of the universe. The Chandra data were the final - but crucial - piece of evidence as they showed that JKCS041 was, indeed, a genuine galaxy cluster. The extended X-ray emission seen by Chandra shows that hot gas has been detected

  9. PREFACE: International Conference on Computing in High Energy and Nuclear Physics (CHEP 2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ernst, Michael; Düllmann, Dirk; Rind, Ofer; Wong, Tony

    2012-12-01

    Collaborative Tools. We would like to thank Brookhaven Science Associates, New York University, Blue Nest Events, the International Advisory Committee, the Program Committee and the Local Organizing Committee members for all their support and assistance. We also would like to acknowledge the support provided by the following sponsors: ACEOLE, Data Direct Networks, Dell, the European Middleware Initiative and Nexsan. Special thanks to the Program Committee members for their careful choice of conference contributions and enormous effort in reviewing and editing the conference proceedings. The next CHEP conference will be held in Amsterdam, the Netherlands on 14-18 October 2013. Conference Chair Michael Ernst (BNL) Program Committee Daniele Bonacorsi, University of Bologna, Italy Simone Campana, CERN, Switzerland Philippe Canal, Fermilab, United States Sylvain Chapeland, CERN, Switzerland Dirk Düllmann, CERN, Switzerland Johannes Elmsheuser, Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich, Germany Maria Girone, CERN, Switzerland Steven Goldfarb, University of Michigan, United States Oliver Gutsche, Fermilab, United States Benedikt Hegner, CERN, Switzerland Andreas Heiss, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Germany Peter Hristov, CERN, Switzerland Tony Johnson, SLAC, United States David Lange, LLNL, United States Adam Lyon, Fermilab, United States Remigius Mommsen, Fermilab, United States Axel Naumann, CERN, Switzerland Niko Neufeld, CERN, Switzerland Rolf Seuster, TRIUMF, Canada Local Organizing Committee Maureen Anderson, John De Stefano, Mariette Faulkner, Ognian Novakov, Ofer Rind, Tony Wong (BNL) Kyle Cranmer (NYU) International Advisory Committee Mohammad Al-Turany, GSI, Germany Lothar Bauerdick, Fermilab, United States Ian Bird, CERN, Switzerland Dominique Boutigny, IN2P3, France Federico Carminati, CERN, Switzerland Marco Cattaneo, CERN, Switzerland Gang Chen, Institute of High Energy Physics, China Peter Clarke, University of Edinburgh, United Kingdom Sridhara Dasu, University of

  10. List of Participants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-11-01

    Davide CassaniLaboratoire de Physique Théorique, École Normale Supérieure, Paris Alejandra CastroUniversity of Michigan Claudio Caviezel Max-Planck-Institut für Physik, München Alessio Celi Universitat de Barcelona Anna Ceresole Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Università di Torino Athanasios ChatzistavrakidisNational Technical University of Athens Wissam ChemissanyCentre for Theoretical Physics, University of Groningen Eugen-Mihaita CioroianuUniversity of Craiova Andres CollinucciTechnische Universität Wien Paul CookUniversità di Roma, Tor Vergata Lorenzo CornalbaUniversità di Milano-Bicocca Aldo CotroneKatholieke Universiteit Leuven Ben Craps Vrije Universiteit, Brussel Stefano Cremonesi SISSA, Trieste Riccardo D'AuriaPolitecnico di Torino Gianguido Dall'AgataUniversity of Padova Jose A de AzcarragaUniversidad de Valencia Jan de BoerInstituut voor Theoretische Fysica, Universiteit van Amsterdam Sophie de BuylInstitut des Hautes Études Scientifiques, Bures-sur-Yvette Marius de LeeuwUtrecht University Frederik De RooVrije Universiteit, Brussel Jan De Rydt Katholieke Universiteit Leuven and CERN, Geneva Bernard de WitInstitute for Theoretical Physics, Utrecht University Stephane DetournayIstituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Milano Paolo Di Vecchia Niels Bohr Institute, København Eugen DiaconuUniversity of Craiova Vladimir Dobrev Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Sofia Nick DoreyUniversity of Cambridge Hajar Ebrahim NajafabadiIPM, Tehran Federico Elmetti Università di Milano Oleg Evnin Vrije Universiteit, Brussel Francesco Fiamberti Università di Milano Davide Forcella SISSA, Trieste and CERN, Geneva Valentina Forini Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin Angelos Fotopoulos Università di Torino Denis Frank Université de Neuchâtel Marialuisa Frau Università di Torino Matthias Gaberdiel Eidgenössische Technische Hochschule (ETH), Zürich Diego Gallego SISSA/ISAS, Trieste Maria Pilar Garcia del

  11. List of Participants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2007-11-01

    Ceresole Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare and Università di Torino Kang Sin Choi University of Bonn Michele Cirafici University of Patras Andres Collinucci Katholieke Universiteit Leuven Aldo Cotrone Universitat de Barcelona Ben Craps Vrije Universiteit, Brussel Stefano Cremonesi SISSA, Trieste Gianguido Dall'Agata Padova University Sanjit Das Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur Forcella Davide SISSA, Trieste Jose A de Azcarraga Valencia University and Instituto de Fìsica Corpuscular (CSIC-UVEG), Valencia Sophie de BuylInstitut des Hautes Études Scientifiques, Bures-sur-Yvette Jean-Pierre Derendinger Université de Neuchâtel Stephane Detournay Università Degli Studi di Milano Paolo Di Vecchia NORDITA, København Oscar Dias Universitat de Barcelona Vladimir Dobrev Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Sofia Joel Ekstrand Department of Theoretical Physics, Uppsala University Federico Elmetti Università di Milano I Diaconu Eugen University of Craiova Oleg Evnin Vrije Universiteit, Brussel Bo Feng Imperial College, London Livia Ferro Università di Torino Pau Figueras Universitat de Barcelona Raphael Flauger University of Texas at Austin Valentina Forini Università di Perugia Angelos Fotopoulos Università di Torino Denis Frank Université de Neuchâtel Lisa Freyhult Albert-Einstein-Institut, Golm Carlos Fuertes Instituto de Física Teórica, Madrid Matthias Gaberdiel Eidgenössische Technische Hochschule, Zürich Maria Pilar Garcia del Moral Università di Torino Daniel Gerber Instituto de Física Teórica, Madrid Valentina Giangreco Marotta Puletti Uppsala University Joaquim Gomis Universitat de Barcelona Gianluca Grignani Università di Perugia Luca Griguolo Università di Parma Umut Gursoy École Polytechnique, Palaiseau and École Normale Supérieure, Paris Michael Haack Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität, München Troels Harmark Niels Bohr Institute, København Alexander Haupt Imperial College, London Michal

  12. Into the Epoch of Galaxy Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-02-01

    distant, evolved galaxies and also about the existence of associations of distant galaxies. A first clear example is the concentration of galaxies that appear uniformly yellow in PR Photo 06b/00 , apparently tracing a group of galaxies that was already assembled when the Universe was only 6 billion years old. A confirmation of the distance of a few of these galaxies has already been obtained by means of spectral observations in the framework of an ESO Large Programme , entitled "A Stringent Test on the Formation of Early Type and Massive Galaxies" and carried out by another group of astronomers [2]. A further clear example of a concentration of distant galaxies is seen in the upper right part of PR Photo 06b/00 . The very red colours of several galaxies in this sky area indicate that they are even more distant, "evolved" galaxies, already present when the Universe was only 1/3 of the current age. Notes [1] The European team consists of Emanuele Giallongo (Principal Investigator), Adriano Fontana , Nicola Menci and Francesco Poli (all at Rome Observatory), Stephane Arnouts and Sandro D'Odorico (European Southern Observatory, Garching), Stefano Cristiani (ST European Coordinating Facility, Garching) and Paolo Saracco (Milan Observatory). The data analysis was performed at the Milan ( P. Saracco ) and Rome ( A. Fontana , F. Poli ) Observatories. [2] This programme is conducted Andrea Cimatti (Principal Investigator) and Emanuele Daddi (both at Arcetri Observatory), Tom Broadhurst , Sandro D'Odorico , Roberto Gilmozzi and Alvio Renzini (European Southern Observatory), Stefano Cristiani (ST European Coordinating Facility, Garching), Adriano Fontana , Emanuele Giallongo , Nicola Menci and Francesco Poli (Rome Observatory), Marco Mignoli , Lucia Pozzetti and Giovanni Zamorani (Bologna Observatory) and Paolo Saracco (Milan Observatory). Technical note : The K-band image ( PR Photo 06a/00 ) is the result of 510 min of integration time with ISAAC at VLT ANTU. The 3-sigma magnitude

  13. Deep Sky Diving with the ESO New Technology Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1998-01-01

    Caption to ESO PR Photo 01/98 and access to two versions of the photo The frames were computer processed and combined to yield a colour view of the corresponding sky field ( ESO Press Photo 01/98 ). This is indeed a very deep look into the southern sky. The astronomers have found that the limiting magnitude (at a signal-to-noise ratio of 3) is beyond 27 in the blue and red frames and only slightly brighter in the two others. Magnitude 27 corresponds to a brightness that is 250 million times fainter than what can be perceived with the unaided eye. Although not as deep as the Hubble Deep Field due to the shorter exposure time and brighter sky background (caused by light emission in the upper layers of the terrestrial atmosphere), this new set of data is among the best ground-based observations of this type ever obtained. Galaxies down to a magnitude of roughly 25 will soon be targets of detailed spectroscopic observations with the VLT. They will provide a measure of their basic physical parameters like redshift, luminosity and mass. How to access the new data This scientific program aims at the study of the photometric redshift distribution of the faint galaxies [2] and of gravitational lensing effects (cosmic mirages). It has been decided to make the complete data set available to the wide scientific community and it is expected that many astronomers all over the world will want to perform their own investigations by means of this unique observational material. A full description of the project is available on the ESO Web at http://www.eso.org/ndf/. Here you will find a comprehensive explanation of the scientific background, details about the observations and the data reduction, as well as easy access to the corresponding data files. Notes: [1] The group consists of Sandro D'Odorico (Principal Investigator, ESO) and Jacqueline Bergeron (ESO), Hans-Martin Adorf (ESO), Stephane Charlot (IAP, Paris, France), David Clements (IAS, Orsay, France), Stefano Cristiani (Univ. of

  14. PREFACE: A tribute to Virginio Bortolani

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brivio, Gian Paolo

    2007-08-01

    , Fabrizio Nizzoli and Giorgio Santoro of the older generation, then Anna Franchini and Elisa Molinari, finally Carlo Cavazzoni, Stefano Martinelli, Andrea Vannossi and Roberto Zivieri who are still in their thirties. They were all attracted and benefited from Bortolani's stimulating, open and constructive personality. The same qualities and his expertise in surface physics and lattice dynamics motivated a number of outstanding scientists to collaborate with him and often write joint papers during his long career: G Boato, V Celli, G Chiarotti, T B Grimley, A A Maradudin, D L Mills, J P Toennies, E Tosatti, R F Wallis are a few examples. Finally I would like to recall two more distinctive features of Virginio Bortolani, which stem from his honest character and balanced personality. First, since quite a few years he showed no more interest in powerful positions, both at his University, where he was also Director of the Physics Department from 1993 to 1999, and in the Italian physics community. And he often left such positions to those colleagues he carefully looked after at the beginning of their career. Currently he is the only honorary director of PhD studies in physics at Modena University, and editor of Surface Science Reports. In this way he teaches us that there is a specific time for a specific role in life, and that the arrow of time cannot be reversed. Still he enjoys research and he is very active, regularly publishing papers on vibrational friction and gas-surface dynamics as a result of the supervision of a small group and of a bunch of selected international collaborations. Second, in any occasion, but especially when he was in charge of an institution, of a meeting, or works in an editorial board, he was and he is never in favour of rough competitive research, aggressive presentations and intensive paper production. Bortolani's interests are otherwise: inner satisfaction, after truly understanding a physical problem or presenting clearly a difficult subject to

  15. Controlled by Distant Explosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2007-03-01

    VLT Automatically Takes Detailed Spectra of Gamma-Ray Burst Afterglows Only Minutes After Discovery A time-series of high-resolution spectra in the optical and ultraviolet has twice been obtained just a few minutes after the detection of a gamma-ray bust explosion in a distant galaxy. The international team of astronomers responsible for these observations derived new conclusive evidence about the nature of the surroundings of these powerful explosions linked to the death of massive stars. At 11:08 pm on 17 April 2006, an alarm rang in the Control Room of ESO's Very Large Telescope on Paranal, Chile. Fortunately, it did not announce any catastrophe on the mountain, nor with one of the world's largest telescopes. Instead, it signalled the doom of a massive star, 9.3 billion light-years away, whose final scream of agony - a powerful burst of gamma rays - had been recorded by the Swift satellite only two minutes earlier. The alarm was triggered by the activation of the VLT Rapid Response Mode, a novel system that allows for robotic observations without any human intervention, except for the alignment of the spectrograph slit. ESO PR Photo 17a/07 ESO PR Photo 17a/07 Triggered by an Explosion Starting less than 10 minutes after the Swift detection, a series of spectra of increasing integration times (3, 5, 10, 20, 40 and 80 minutes) were taken with the Ultraviolet and Visual Echelle Spectrograph (UVES), mounted on Kueyen, the second Unit Telescope of the VLT. "With the Rapid Response Mode, the VLT is directly controlled by a distant explosion," said ESO astronomer Paul Vreeswijk, who requested the observations and is lead-author of the paper reporting the results. "All I really had to do, once I was informed of the gamma-ray burst detection, was to phone the staff astronomers at the Paranal Observatory, Stefano Bagnulo and Stan Stefl, to check that everything was fine." The first spectrum of this time series was the quickest ever taken of a gamma-ray burst afterglow

  16. Matter Flashed at Ultra Speed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2007-06-01

    function of time (the light curve). The small size of the telescope is compensated by its rapidity of slewing, which allowed astronomers to begin observations very soon after each GRB's detection (39 and 41 seconds after the alert, respectively), and to monitor the very early stages of their light curve. The two gamma-ray bursts were located 9.3 and 11.5 billion light-years away, respectively. ESO PR Photo 26b/07 ESO PR Photo 26b/07 Light Curve of a Gamma-ray Burst For both events, the afterglow light curve initially rose, then reached a peak, and eventually started to decline, as is typical of GRB afterglows. The peak is, however, only rarely detected. Its determination is very important, since it allows a direct measurement of the expansion velocity of the explosion of the material. For both bursts, the velocity turns out to be very close to the speed of light, precisely 99.9997% of this value. Scientists use a special number, called the Lorentz factor, to express these high velocities. Objects moving much slower than light have a Lorentz factor of about 1, while for the two GRBs it is about 400. "Matter is thus moving with a speed that is only different from that of light by three parts in a million," says Stefano Covino, co-author of the study. "While single particles in the Universe can be accelerated to still larger velocities - i.e. much larger Lorentz factors - one has to realise that in the present cases, it is the equivalent of about 200 times the mass of the Earth that acquired this incredible speed." "You certainly wouldn't like to be in the way," adds team member Susanna Vergani. The measurement of the Lorentz factor is an important step in understanding gamma-ray burst explosions. This is in fact one of the fundamental parameters of the theory which tries to explain these gigantic explosions, and up to now it was only poorly determined. "The next question is which kind of 'engine' can accelerate matter to such enormous speeds," says Covino. More Information

  17. The Dark Side of Nature: the Crime was Almost Perfect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2006-12-01

    Astrofisico di Arcetri, Italy), Guido Chincarini (INAF, Osservatorio Astronomico di Brera & Università degli Studi di Milano-Bicocca, Italy), Nino Panagia (Space Telescope Science Institute, USA), Gianpiero Tagliaferri, Dino Fugazza, Sergio Campana, Stefano Covino, and Paolo D'Avanzo (INAF, Osservatorio Astronomico di Brera, Italy), Daniele Malesani (SISSA/ISAS, Italy and Dark Cosmology Centre, Copenhagen), Vincenzo Testa, L. Angelo Antonelli, Silvia Piranomonte, and Luigi Stella (INAF, Osservatorio Astronomico di Roma, Italy), Vanessa Mangano (INAF/IASF Palermo, Italy), Kevin Hurley (University of California, Berkeley, USA), I. Felix Mirabel (ESO), and Leonardo J. Pellizza (Instituto de Astronomia y Fisica del Espacio). The Danish-led team is composed of Johan P. U. Fynbo, Darach Watson, Christina C. Thöne, Tamara M. Davis, Jens Hjorth, José Mará Castro Cerón, Brian L. Jensen, Maximilian D. Stritzinger, and Dong Xu (Dark Cosmology Centre, University of Copenhagen, Denmark), Jesper Sollerman (Dark Cosmology Centre and Department of Astronomy, Stockholm University, Sweden), Uffe G. Jørgensen, Tobias C. Hinse, and Kristian G. Woller (Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen), Joshua S. Bloom, Daniel Kocevski, Daniel Perley (Department of Astronomy, University of California at Berkeley, USA), Páll Jakobsson (Centre for Astrophysics Research, University of Hertfordshire, UK), John F. Graham and Andrew S. Fruchter (Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, USA), David Bersier (Astrophysics Research Institute, Liverpool John Moores University, UK), Lisa Kewley (University of Hawaii, Institute of Astronomy, USA), Arnaud Cassan and Marta Zub (Astronomisches Rechen-Institut, Zentrum für Astronomie der Universität Heidelberg, Germany), Suzanne Foley (School of Physics, University College Dublin, Ireland), Javier Gorosabel (Instituto de Astrofisica de Andalucia, Granada, Spain), Keith D. Horne (SUPA Physics/Astronomy, University of St Andrews, Scotland, UK), Sylvio

  18. Discovery of a Satellite around a Near-Earth Asteroid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1997-07-01

    In the course of the major observational programme of asteroids by the Institute of Planetary Exploration of the German Aerospace Research Establishment (DLR) [1] in Berlin, two of the staff astronomers, Stefano Mottola and Gerhard Hahn , have discovered a small satellite (moon) orbiting the asteroid (3671) Dionysus. The new measurements were obtained with the DLR CCD Camera attached at the 60-cm Bochum telescope at the ESO La Silla Observatory in Chile. This is only the second known case of an asteroid with a moon. Moons and planets Until recently, natural satellites were only known around the major planets . The Moon orbits the Earth, there are two tiny moons around Mars, each of the giant planets Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune has many more, and even the smallest and outermost, Pluto, is accompanied by one [2]. However, the new discovery now strengthens the belief of many astronomers that some, perhaps even a substantial number of the many thousands of minor planets (asteroids) in the solar system may also possess their own moons. The first discovery of a satellite orbiting an asteroid was made by the NASA Galileo spacecraft, whose imagery, obtained during a fly-by of asteroid (253) Ida in August 1993, unveiled a small moon that has since been given the name Dactyl. (3671) Dionysus: an Earth-crossing asteroid In the framework of the DLR asteroid monitoring programme, image sequences are acquired to measure an asteroid's brightness variations caused by the changing amount of sunlight reflected from the asteroid's illuminated surface as it spins, due to its irregular shape. The brightness variations may be used to derive the asteroid's rotational properties, such as speed of rotation and spin axis orientation. Asteroid Dionysus [3] was put on the observing list because it belongs to a special class of asteroids, the members of which occasionally come very close to the Earth and have a small, but non-negligible chance of colliding with our planet. Most of

  19. ESO Astronomers Detect a Galaxy at the Edge of the Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1995-09-01

    between 4.0 and 4.7, whose spectrum is considerably depressed in the B and V bands by redshifted hydrogen absorption [4]. This is a strong indication that it is indeed this galaxy that causes the hydrogen absorption seen in the quasar spectrum. Definitive confirmation can only come from a spectrum of the galaxy, but this is not possible with existing telescopes due to its faintness, and the strong light from the nearby quasar would make such an observation even more difficult. The same galaxy has been independently detected [5] at the Keck 10-metre telescope (Mauna Kea, Hawaii) in the infrared K-band (wavelength 2.3 micron) by George Djorgovski (Palomar Observatory, USA). When compared with the accurate photometry by the ESO team, the fact that the galaxy is also visible at that wavelength indicates that it is intrinsically moderately luminous. From the evolutionary models for primeval galaxies, it appears that its age is about 100 million years. Future Observations This exciting result now opens a new window on the epoch of galaxy formation and paves the way for future investigations of primeval galaxies. The present team of astronomers is continuing this type of work towards fainter magnitudes and in other quasar fields. Some of the faintest images in the observed field (see the photo) probably belong to galaxies at the same or even higher redshifts. A detailed study of such objects will be one of the important tasks of the ESO Very Large Telescope. For this, the FORS instrument will be very well suited and it will become possible to measure the colours of galaxies down to magnitudes near R = 27. Spectra of the ``brighter'' ones, like the galaxy described here, can then also be obtained. Notes: [1] The team is headed by Sandro D'Odorico (ESO-Garching) and includes Stefano Cristiani (Department of Astronomy, University of Padova, Italy), as well as Adriano Fontana and Emanuele Giallongo (Astronomical Observatory, Rome, Italy). [2] In astronomy, the redshift denotes the

  20. EDITORIAL: Focus on Quantum Cryptography: Theory and Practice FOCUS ON QUANTUM CRYPTOGRAPHY: THEORY AND PRACTICE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lütkenhaus, N.; Shields, A. J.

    2009-04-01

    distribution network in Vienna M Peev, C Pacher, R Alléaume, C Barreiro, J Bouda, W Boxleitner, T Debuisschert, E Diamanti, M Dianati, J F Dynes, S Fasel, S Fossier, M Fürst, J-D Gautier, O Gay, N Gisin, P Grangier, A Happe, Y Hasani, M Hentschel, H Hübel, G Humer, T Länger, M Legré, R Lieger, J Lodewyck, T Lorünser, N Lütkenhaus, A Marhold, T Matyus, O Maurhart, L Monat, S Nauerth, J-B Page, A Poppe, E Querasser, G Ribordy, S Robyr, L Salvail, A W Sharpe, A J Shields, D Stucki, M Suda, C Tamas, T Themel, R T Thew, Y Thoma, A Treiber, P Trinkler, R Tualle-Brouri, F Vannel, N Walenta, H Weier, H Weinfurter, I Wimberger, Z L Yuan, H Zbinden and A Zeilinger Stable quantum key distribution with active polarization control based on time-division multiplexing J Chen, G Wu, L Xu, X Gu, E Wu and H Zeng Controlling passively quenched single photon detectors by bright light Vadim Makarov Information leakage via side channels in freespace BB84 quantum cryptography Sebastian Nauerth, Martin Fürst, Tobias Schmitt-Manderbach, Henning Weier and Harald Weinfurter Standardization of quantum key distribution and the ETSI standardization initiative ISG-QKD Thomas Länger and Gaby Lenhart Entangled quantum key distribution with a biased basis choice Chris Erven, Xiongfeng Ma, Raymond Laflamme and Gregor Weihs Finite-key analysis for practical implementations of quantum key distribution Raymond Y Q Cai and Valerio Scarani Field test of a continuous-variable quantum key distribution prototype S Fossier, E Diamanti, T Debuisschert, A Villing, R Tualle-Brouri and P Grangier Physics and application of photon number resolving detectors based on superconducting parallel nanowires F Marsili, D Bitauld, A Gaggero, S Jahanmirinejad, R Leoni, F Mattioli and A Fiore Device-independent quantum key distribution secure against collective attacks Stefano Pironio, Antonio Acín, Nicolas Brunner, Nicolas Gisin, Serge Massar and Valerio Scarani 1310 nm differential-phase-shift QKD system using

  1. Comet or Asteroid?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1997-11-01

    When is a minor object in the solar system a comet? And when is it an asteroid? Until recently, there was little doubt. Any object that was found to display a tail or appeared diffuse was a comet of ice and dust grains, and any that didn't, was an asteroid of solid rock. Moreover, comets normally move in rather elongated orbits, while most asteroids follow near-circular orbits close to the main plane of the solar system in which the major planets move. However, astronomers have recently discovered some `intermediate' objects which seem to possess properties that are typical for both categories. For instance, a strange object (P/1996 N2 - Elst-Pizarro) was found last year at ESO ( ESO Press Photo 36/96 ) which showed a cometary tail, while moving in a typical asteroidal orbit. At about the same time, American scientists found another (1996 PW) that moved in a very elongated comet-type orbit but was completely devoid of a tail. Now, a group of European scientists, by means of observations carried out at the ESO La Silla observatory, have found yet another object that at first appeared to be one more comet/asteroid example. However, continued and more detailed observations aimed at revealing its true nature have shown that it is most probably a comet . Consequently, it has received the provisional cometary designation P/1997 T3 . The Uppsala-DLR Trojan Survey Some time ago, Claes-Ingvar Lagerkvist (Astronomical Observatory, Uppsala, Sweden), in collaboration with Gerhard Hahn, Stefano Mottola, Magnus Lundström and Uri Carsenty (DLR, Institute of Planetary Exploration, Berlin, Germany), started to study the distribution of asteroids near Jupiter. They were particularly interested in those that move in orbits similar to that of Jupiter and which are located `ahead' of Jupiter in the so-called `Jovian L4 Lagrangian point'. Together with those `behind' Jupiter, these asteroids have been given the names of Greek and Trojan Heroes who participated in the famous Trojan war

  2. Adaptive Optics for Industry and Medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dainty, Christopher

    2008-01-01

    . Improved beam quality of a high power Yb: YAG laser (oral paper) / Dennis G. Harris ... [et al.]. Intracavity adaptive optics optimization of an end-pumped Nd:YVO4 laser (oral paper) / Petra Welp, Ulrich Wittrock. New results in high power lasers beam correction (oral paper) / Alexis Kudryashov ... [et al.]. Adaptive optical systems for the Shenguang-III prototype facility (oral paper) / Zeping Yang ... [et al.]. Adaptive optics control of solid-state lasers (poster paper) / Walter Lubeigt ... [et al.]. Gerchberg-Saxton algorithm for multimode beam reshaping (poster paper) / Inna V. Ilyina, Tatyana Yu. Cherezova. New algorithm of combining for spatial coherent beams (poster paper) / Ruofu Yang ... [et al.]. Intracavity mode control of a solid-state laser using a 19-element deformable mirror (poster paper) / Ping Yang ... [et al.] -- pt. 6. Adaptive optics in communication and atmospheric compensation. Fourier image sharpness sensor for laser communications (oral paper) / Kristin N. Walker and Robert K. Tyson. Fast closed-loop adaptive optics system for imaging through strong turbulence layers (oral paper) / Ivo Buske and Wolfgang Riede. Correction of wavefront aberrations and optical communication using aperture synthesis (oral paper) / R. J. Eastwood ... [et al.]. Adaptive optics system for a small telescope (oral paper) / G. Vdovin, M. Loktev and O. Soloviev. Fast correction of atmospheric turbulence using a membrane deformable mirror (poster paper) / Ivan Capraro, Stefano Bonora, Paolo Villoresi. Atmospheric turbulence measurements over a 3km horizontal path with a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor (poster paper) / Ruth Mackey, K. Murphy and Chris Dainty. Field-oriented wavefront sensor for laser guide stars (poster paper) / Lidija Bolbasova, Alexander Goncharov and Vladimir Lukin.

  3. First Results from the UT1 Science Verification Programme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1998-11-01

    the arrow) in the Hubble Deep Field South , discussed here. Photo 48e/98 (right) is the spectrum of a typical elliptical galaxy, redshifted to z = 1.8 and compared with the brightness of the galaxy in different wavebands (crosses), as measured during the VLT SV programme and the Hubble Deep Field South Test Program (the cross to the right). The arrow indicates the upper limit by the VLT SV in the ultraviolet band. It can be seen that these observations are fully consistent with the object being an old, elliptical galaxy at the high redshift of z=1.8 , i.e. at an epoch, when the Universe was much younger than now. The new ISAAC instrument at VLT UT1 will be able to obtain an infrared spectrum of this galaxy and thus to affirm or refute this provisional conclusion. The colours measured at the VLT and on the HST Test Image are very well matched by those of an old elliptical galaxy at redshift z ~ 1.8 ; see Photo 48e/98 . All the available evidence is thus consistent with this object being an elliptical galaxy with the highest-known redshift for this galaxy type. A preliminary analysis of Hubble Deep Field South data, just released, seems to support this hypothesis. If these conclusions are confirmed by direct measurement of its spectrum, this galaxy must already have been "old" (i.e. significantly evolved) when the Universe had an age of only about one fifth of its present value. A spectroscopic confirmation is still outstanding, but is now possible with the ISAAC instrument at VLT UT1. A positive result would demonstrate that elliptical galaxies can form very early in the history of the Universe. The scientists involved in this study are: Massimo Stiavelli, Tommaso Treu (also Scuola Normale Superiore, Italy), Stefano Casertano, Mark Dickinson, Henry Ferguson, Andrew Fruchter, Crystal Martin (STSci, Baltimore, USA), Piero Rosati and Rodolfo Viezzer (ESO), Marcella Carollo (Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, USA) and Henry Tieplitz (NASA, Goddard Space Flight Center

  4. Macromolecular crowding: chemistry and physics meet biology (Ascona, Switzerland, 10-14 June 2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foffi, G.; Pastore, A.; Piazza, F.; Temussi, P. A.

    2013-08-01

    held in Ascona from 10 to 14 June 2012. In the unique scenario of the Maggiore lake and absorbed in the magic atmosphere of the Centro Stefano Franscini (CSF) at Monte Verità, we enjoyed three-and-a-half days of intense and inspiring activity, where not only many of the most prominent scientists working on macromolecular crowding, but also experts in closely related fields such as colloids and soft matter presented their work. The meeting was intended and has been organized to bring theoreticians and experimentalists together in the attempt to promote an active dialogue. Moreover, we wanted different disciplines to be represented, notably physics and chemistry, besides biology, as cross-fertilization is proving an increasingly fundamental source of inspiration and advancement. This issue of Physical Biology (PB) features a selection of the oral contributions presented at the conference, expanded in the form of research or review articles. PB, one of the scientific journals of the Institute of Physics (IOP), is one of the most dynamic and lively forums active at the interface between biology on one side, and physics and mathematics on the other. As its mission is stated by IOP, PB 'focuses on research in which physics-based approaches lead to new insights into biological systems at all scales of space and time, and all levels of complexity'. For these reasons, and also in view of its high reputation and broad readership, PB appears to be the ideal place for disseminating the thriving pieces of research presented at the conference. We are extremely grateful to PB and its kind and efficient editorial staff who helped make this issue a great scientific follow-up to the conference. The opening lecture of the conference, the first of four day-opening keynote lectures, was given by Allen P Minton from NIH (USA), possibly the most influential among the pioneers in the field. He provided a lucid and well-thought-out overview of the concept of macromolecular crowding through an

  5. Sakurai's Object: a Once-In Experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1996-03-01

    and the following investigations at La Silla were undertaken by a small team of ESO astronomers, including Hilmar Duerbeck, Waltraut Seitter and Stefano Benetti. Which type of nova ? Before the first spectra from ESO became available, the object was suspected to be a very slow nova , that is a small and compact `white dwarf' star in a binary system which experiences a hydrogen nuclear explosion below its surface. During a nova outburst of this type, the spectrum of the exploding star contains bright emission lines of hydrogen and other chemical elements, superimposed on a rapidly weakening, almost featureless spectrum. But Sakurai's object showed nothing the like. Instead, the spectrum displayed a multitude of narrow absorption lines. The otherwise almost omnipresent lines of hydrogen, the most abundant chemical element in the Universe, were comparatively weak. Spectra of higher resolution, taken at the ESO 1.5-metre telescope the following night, revealed the characteristics of a fairly cool, chemically peculiar star with absorption lines of neutral helium, carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen and singly ionized lines of carbon and silicon. This spectrum is reproduced as ESO Press Photo 20/96 , accompanying this Press Release. Another immediate action relating to the new bright star was to search for its pre-outburst state. For this, the ESO/SERC Atlas of the Southern Sky was used; this is the most detailed photographic atlas in the south and was produced in the 1970's during a joint project with the ESO (La Silla) and UK (Siding Spring, Australia) Schmidt telescopes. At the location of Sakurai's object, three very faint stars were found as well as a minute trace of a possible nebulosity. The combination of the long phase of maximum light, the hydrogen-poor and carbon-rich outburst spectrum, and the hint of a nebulosity confirmed the suspicion of the ESO astronomers that this star had experienced its `Final Helium Flash' , the explosive, very last phase of nuclear burning in

  6. PREFACE: XVth International Conference on Calorimetry in High Energy Physics (CALOR2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akchurin, Nural

    2012-12-01

    /Saclay Irfu/SPP FRANCAVILLA, Paolo IFAE Barcelona GATAULLIN, Marat California Institute of Technology GATTO, Corrado INFN-Napoli GAUDIO, Gabriella INFN-Pavia GERMANI, Stefano INFN-Perugia Goldenzweig, Pablo University of Rochester GRAF, Norman SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory GROOM, Don Lawrence Berkeley Lab GUARDINCERRI, Elena Los Alamos National Laboratory HAUPTMAN, John Iowa State University HENRIQUES, Ana CERN HUANG, Jin Los Alamos National Laboratory HU, Tao IHEP-Beijing, CAS JIANG, Xiaodong Los Alamos National Laboratory JUI, Charles University of Utah KAPUSTINSKY, Jon Los Alamos National Laboratory KIBILKO, Mark SE Technical Sales, Inc. KIRSCHENMANN, Henning University of Hamburg KISTENEV, Edouard Brookhaven National Laboratory KLIMEK, Pawel Stockholm Universitet KROEGER, Robert University of Mississippi LECOQ, Paul CERN LEE, Sehwook Texas Tech University LEE, Sung-Won Texas Tech University LIVAN, Michele Pavia University LUTZ, Benjamin DESY MAGILL, Stephen Argonne National Laboratory MATHIS, Mark College of William and Mary MATTHEWS, John University of Utah MENKE, Sven Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik MOULSON, Matthew INFN-Frascati NAGEL, Martin Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik NAKAMURA, Isamu KEK NEMECEK, Stanislav FZU AVCR Praha NESSI-TEDALDI, Francesca ETH Zurich NOVOTNY, Rainer 2nd Physics Institute, University Giessen OREGLIA, Mark University of Chicago PERLOFF, Alexx Texas A&M University PETYT, David Rutherford Appleton Laboratory RAHMAT, Rahmat University of Mississippi RAMILLI, Marco Hamburg Universitaet ROSIER LEES, Sylvie LAPP- IN2P3-CNRS RUTHERFOORD, John University of Arizona SAKUMA, Tai Texas A&M University SANTIAGO CERQUEIRA, Augusto Federal University of Juiz de Fora SARRA, Ivano INFN-Frascati SEIDEL, Sally University of New Mexico SEIFERT, Frank TU Dresden, Germany SHAMIM, Mansoora University of Oregon SIMON, Frank Max-Planck-Institute for Physics STAFFAN, Paul Wiener Plein and Baus, Corp Dr. STAROVOITOV, Pavel DESY TABARELLI DE FATIS, Tommaso

  7. EDITORIAL: Colloidal suspensions Colloidal suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petukhov, Andrei; Kegel, Willem; van Duijneveldt, Jeroen

    2011-05-01

    Colloid-polymer mixtures and depletion interactions Phase stability of a reversible supramolecular polymer solution mixed with nanospheres Remco Tuinier When depletion goes critical Roberto Piazza, Stefano Buzzaccaro, Alberto Parola and Jader Colombo Tuning the demixing of colloid-polymer systems through the dispersing solvent E A G Jamie, R P A Dullens and D G A L Aarts Polydispersity effects in colloid-polymer mixtures S M Liddle, T Narayanan and W C K Poon Colloidal dynamics and crystallization Crystallization and aging in hard-sphere glasses C Valeriani, E Sanz, E Zaccarelli, W C K Poon, M E Cates and P N Pusey Real-time monitoring of complex moduli from micro-rheology Taiki Yanagishima, Daan Frenkel, Jurij Kotar and Erika Eiser Brownian motion of a self-propelled particle B ten Hagen, S van Teeffelen and H Löwen Crystallization in suspensions of hard spheres: a Monte Carlo and molecular dynamics simulation study T Schilling, S Dorosz, H J Schöpe and G Opletal Structural signature of slow dynamics and dynamic heterogeneity in two-dimensional colloidal liquids: glassy structural order Takeshi Kawasaki and Hajime Tanaka

  8. The VLT Unravels the Nature of the Fastest Binary Star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2002-03-01

    wave space experiment, the European Space Agency's Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) that will be launched in about 10 years' time, will be sufficiently sensitive to be able to reveal this radiation from RX J0806.3+1527 with a high degree of confidence. Such an observational feat would open an entirely new window on the universe. More information The results described in this Press Release were announced in IAU Circular 7835 and will shortly appear in print in the European research journal Astronomy & Astrophysics Letters ("RX J0806.3+1527: a double degenerate binary with the shortest known orbital period (321 s)" by G.L. Israel and co-authors), cf. astro-ph/0203043. The 5-min optical modulation was detected independently by another group led by G. Ramsay, cf. astro-ph/0203053. Note [1]: The team consists of GianLuca Israel and Luigi Stella at the Astronomical Observatory of Rome (Italy), Stefano Covino and Sergio Campana at the Astronomical Observatory of Brera (Milan, Italy), Wolfgang Hummel, Gianni Marconi and Gero Rupprecht at the European Southern Observatory, Immo Appenzeller and Otmar Stahl at the University of Heidelberg (Germany), Wolfgang Gassler and Karl-Heinz Mantel at the University of Munich (Germany), Christopher Mauche at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (USA), Ulisse Munari at the Astronomical Observatory of Padua (Italy), Ignacio Negueruela at the Astronomical Observatory of Strasbourg (France), Harald Nicklas at the University of Göttingen (Germany), and Richard Smart at the Astronomical Observatory of Turin (Italy). [2]: See the research article by Israel et al. (1999, Astronomy &A, Vol. 349, p. L1). Contact GianLuca Israel Osservatorio Astronomico di Roma Italy Tel.: +39 06 9428 6437 email: gianluca@ulysses.mporzio.astro.it Technical information about the photos PR Photo 10a/02 is reproduced from FORS1-exposures, obtained in November 1999 in the U- and R-bands, and both lasting 300 sec. The field measures 2.0 x 1.5 arcmin 2. PR

  9. EDITORIAL: Van der Waals interactions in advanced materials, in memory of David C Langreth Van der Waals interactions in advanced materials, in memory of David C Langreth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyldgaard, Per; Rahman, Talat S.

    2012-10-01

    Rahman Frictional temperature rise in a sliding physisorbed monolayer of Kr/grapheneM Walker, C Jaye, J Krim and Milton W Cole How to modify the van der Waals and Casimir forces without change of the dielectric permittivityG L Klimchitskaya, U Mohideen and V M Mostepanenko Spectroscopic characterization of van der Waals interactions in a metal organic framework with unsaturated metal centers: MOF-74-MgNour Nijem, Pieremanuele Canepa, Lingzhu Kong, Haohan Wu, Jing Li, Timo Thonhauser and Yves J Chabal A theoretical study of the hydrogen-storage potential of (H2)4CH4 in metal organic framework materials and carbon nanotubesQ Li and T Thonhauser The influence of dispersion interactions on the hydrogen adsorption properties of expanded graphiteYungok Ihm, Valentino R Cooper, Lujian Peng and James R Morris A DFT-D study of structural and energetic properties of TiO2 modificationsJonas Moellmann, Stephan Ehrlich, Ralf Tonner and Stefan Grimme Spherical-shell model for the van der Waals coefficients between fullerenes and/or nearly spherical nanoclustersJohn P Perdew, Jianmin Tao, Pan Hao, Adrienn Ruzsinszky, Gábor I Csonka and J M Pitarke Dynamical screening of the van der Waals interaction between graphene layersY J Dappe, P G Bolcatto, J Ortega and F Flores Structural evolution of amino acid crystals under stress from a non-empirical density functionalRiccardo Sabatini, Emine Küçükbenli, Brian Kolb, T Thonhauser and Stefano de Gironcoli Physisorption of nucleobases on graphene: a comparative van der Waals studyDuy Le, Abdelkader Kara, Elsebeth Schröder, Per Hyldgaard and Talat S Rahman The role of van der Waals interactions in the adsorption of noble gases on metal surfacesDe-Li Chen, W A Al-Saidi and J Karl Johnson Desorption of n-alkanes from graphene: a van der Waals density functional studyElisa Londero, Emma K Karlson, Marcus Landahl, Dimitri Ostrovskii, Jonatan D Rydberg and Elsebeth Schröder Benchmarking van der Waals density functionals with experimental data

  10. Southern Fireworks above ESO Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1999-05-01

    corresponding intensity. The sinusoidal curve shows the best fit to the data points (with error bars); the resulting degree of polarization is 1.7 ± 0.2 percent. A group of Italian astronomers led by Stefano Covino of the Observatory of Brera in Milan, have observed for the first time polarization (some degree of alignment of the electric fields of emitted photons) from the optical afterglow of a gamma-ray burst, see their dedicated webpage at http://www.merate.mi.astro.it/~lazzati/GRB990510/. This yielded a polarization at a level of 1.7 ± 0.2 percent for the optical afterglow of GRB 990510, some 18 hours after the gamma-ray burst event; the magnitude was R = 19.1 at the time of this VLT observation. Independently, the Dutch astronomers Vreeswijk, Galama and Rol measured polarization of the order of 2 percent with another data set from the VLT ANTU and FORS1 obtained during the same night. This important result was made possible by the very large light-gathering power of the 8.2-m VLT-ANTU mirror and the FORS1 imaging polarimeter. Albeit small, the detected degree of polarization is highly significant; it is also one of the most precise measurements of polarization ever made in an object as faint as this one. Most importantly, it provides the strongest evidence to date that the afterglow radiation of gamma-ray bursts is, at least in part, produced by the synchrotron process , i.e. by relativistic electrons spiralling in a magnetized region. This type of process is able to imprint some linear polarization on the produced radiation, if the magnetic field is not completely chaotic. The spectrum ESO PR Photo 22f/99 ESO PR Photo 22f/99 [Preview - JPEG: 400 x 485 pix - 112k] [Normal - JPEG: 800 x 969 pix - 288k] Caption to PR Photo 22f/99 : A spectrum of the afterglow of GRB 990510, obtained with VLT ANTU and the multi-mode FORS1 instrument during the night of May 10-11, 1999. Some of the redshifted absorption lines are identified and the stronger bands from the terrestrial

  11. UVES Analyses the Universe: A First Portfolio of Most Promising Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-04-01

    that the complex consists of two components (clouds), separated by ~ 83 km/sec, at z = 2.1795 and at z = 2.1804. The Voigt profile fitting gives a total column density of N(HI) = 1.3 x 10 16 cm -2 and accurate values for the column densities of SiIV, SiII, CIV, SiIII and CII. The SiIV/CIV ratio, an indicator of the temperature of the ionizing background for the z = 2.1795 component gives ~ 0.23 which is similar to what has been found in higher-z systems, suggesting little evolution in the shape of the spectrum of the ionizing background . But now, the high UV efficiency of UVES opens new research possibilities in this field. Already in the commissioning phase, several QSOs at redshifts around 2 were extensively observed. The analysis of these test data has been completed and the results about the forest and the metal absorption systems now provide the first detailed information about the Intergalactic Medium in this redshift range. Various examples of these results are shown in PR Photos 09f-h/00 . The specific implications are explained in the associated captions. The first analysis of the data shown here has been carried out by Taesun Kim and Sandro D'Odorico (ESO Garching) and Stefano Cristiani (ST/ECF, Garching). The corresponding research paper is in preparation. G. UVES Takes a Deep Look at the Intergalactic Gas in the Direction of the Hubble Space Telescope Deep Field South The Hubble Deep Field South (HDF-S) is a region of the sky in which the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) has provided the extremely deep images at wavelengths from the UV to the infrared. The photometric information on the galaxies in this field, complemented by low-resolution spectroscopy on the brightest ones, is being used to reconstruct the distribution of luminous matter with redshift. The HDF-South field is centered on the V = 17.5 quasar J2233-606 with emission redshift z = 2.238. The absorption spectrum of the quasar can be used to extract the properties of the intergalactic gas in the