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Sample records for give ambiguous results

  1. Perceived ambiguity as a barrier to intentions to learn genome sequencing results

    PubMed Central

    Taber, Jennifer M.; Klein, William M.P.; Ferrer, Rebecca A.; Han, Paul K. J.; Lewis, Katie L.; Biesecker, Leslie G.; Biesecker, Barbara B.

    2015-01-01

    Many variants that could be returned from genome sequencing may be perceived as ambiguous—lacking reliability, credibility, or adequacy. Little is known about how perceived ambiguity influences thoughts about sequencing results. Participants (n=494) in an NIH genome sequencing study completed a baseline survey before sequencing results were available. We examined how perceived ambiguity regarding sequencing results and individual differences in medical ambiguity aversion and tolerance for uncertainty were associated with cognitions and intentions concerning sequencing results. Perceiving sequencing results as more ambiguous was associated with less favorable cognitions about results and lower intentions to learn and share results. Among participants low in tolerance for uncertainty or optimism, greater perceived ambiguity was associated with lower intentions to learn results for non-medically actionable diseases; medical ambiguity aversion did not moderate any associations. Results are consistent with the phenomenon of “ambiguity aversion” and may influence whether people learn and communicate genomic information. PMID:26003053

  2. Restricting SBH Ambiguity via Restriction Enzymes

    E-print Network

    Snir, Sagi

    Restricting SBH Ambiguity via Restriction Enzymes Steven Skiena1 and Sagi Snir2 1 Department, we build on [20] to enhance the resolving power of restriction enzymes. We give a hardness result­417, 2002. c Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2002 #12;Restricting SBH Ambiguity via Restriction Enzymes

  3. Study Finds Charter Networks Give No Clear Edge on Results

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shah, Nirvi

    2011-01-01

    The author reports on a national study of middle school students in 40 charter networks which finds that, when it comes to having an impact on student achievement, results vary and, overall, charter students do not learn dramatically more than their counterparts in regular public schools. The findings from the research group Mathematica and the…

  4. Lost in Translation: Ambiguity in Nerve Sheath Tumor Nomenclature and Its Resultant Treatment Effect

    PubMed Central

    Bernthal, Nicholas M.; Jones, Kevin B.; Monument, Michael J.; Liu, Ting; Viskochil, David; Randall, R. Lor

    2013-01-01

    There is much ambiguity surrounding the diagnosis of nerve sheath tumors, including atypical neurofibroma and low-grade MPNST, and yet, the distinction between these entities designates either benign or malignant behavior and thus carries presumed profound prognostic importance that often guides treatment. This study reviews the diagnostic criteria used to designate atypical neurofibroma from low-grade MPNSTs and reviews existing literature the natural history of each of these tumors to see if the distinction is, in fact, of importance. PMID:24216989

  5. Are ambiguity aversion and ambiguity intolerance identical? A neuroeconomics investigation

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Yusuke; Fujino, Junya; Ideno, Takashi; Okubo, Shigetaka; Takemura, Kazuhisa; Miyata, Jun; Kawada, Ryosaku; Fujimoto, Shinsuke; Kubota, Manabu; Sasamoto, Akihiko; Hirose, Kimito; Takeuchi, Hideaki; Fukuyama, Hidenao; Murai, Toshiya; Takahashi, Hidehiko

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, there has been growing interest in understanding a person's reaction to ambiguous situations, and two similar constructs related to ambiguity, “ambiguity aversion” and “ambiguity intolerance,” are defined in different disciplines. In the field of economic decision-making research, “ambiguity aversion” represents a preference for known risks relative to unknown risks. On the other hand, in clinical psychology, “ambiguity intolerance” describes the tendency to perceive ambiguous situations as undesirable. However, it remains unclear whether these two notions derived from different disciplines are identical or not. To clarify this issue, we combined an economic task, psychological questionnaires, and voxel-based morphometry (VBM) of structural brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in a sample of healthy volunteers. The individual ambiguity aversion tendency parameter, as measured by our economic task, was negatively correlated with agreeableness scores on the self-reported version of the Revised NEO Personality Inventory. However, it was not correlated with scores of discomfort with ambiguity, one of the subscales of the Need for Closure Scale. Furthermore, the ambiguity aversion tendency parameter was negatively correlated with gray matter (GM) volume of areas in the lateral prefrontal cortex and parietal cortex, whereas ambiguity intolerance was not correlated with GM volume in any region. Our results suggest that ambiguity aversion, described in decision theory, may not necessarily be identical to ambiguity intolerance, referred to in clinical psychology. Cautious applications of decision theory to clinical neuropsychiatry are recommended. PMID:25698984

  6. Are ambiguity aversion and ambiguity intolerance identical? A neuroeconomics investigation.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Yusuke; Fujino, Junya; Ideno, Takashi; Okubo, Shigetaka; Takemura, Kazuhisa; Miyata, Jun; Kawada, Ryosaku; Fujimoto, Shinsuke; Kubota, Manabu; Sasamoto, Akihiko; Hirose, Kimito; Takeuchi, Hideaki; Fukuyama, Hidenao; Murai, Toshiya; Takahashi, Hidehiko

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, there has been growing interest in understanding a person's reaction to ambiguous situations, and two similar constructs related to ambiguity, "ambiguity aversion" and "ambiguity intolerance," are defined in different disciplines. In the field of economic decision-making research, "ambiguity aversion" represents a preference for known risks relative to unknown risks. On the other hand, in clinical psychology, "ambiguity intolerance" describes the tendency to perceive ambiguous situations as undesirable. However, it remains unclear whether these two notions derived from different disciplines are identical or not. To clarify this issue, we combined an economic task, psychological questionnaires, and voxel-based morphometry (VBM) of structural brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in a sample of healthy volunteers. The individual ambiguity aversion tendency parameter, as measured by our economic task, was negatively correlated with agreeableness scores on the self-reported version of the Revised NEO Personality Inventory. However, it was not correlated with scores of discomfort with ambiguity, one of the subscales of the Need for Closure Scale. Furthermore, the ambiguity aversion tendency parameter was negatively correlated with gray matter (GM) volume of areas in the lateral prefrontal cortex and parietal cortex, whereas ambiguity intolerance was not correlated with GM volume in any region. Our results suggest that ambiguity aversion, described in decision theory, may not necessarily be identical to ambiguity intolerance, referred to in clinical psychology. Cautious applications of decision theory to clinical neuropsychiatry are recommended. PMID:25698984

  7. Charitable Giving for HIV and AIDS: Results from a Canadian National Survey

    PubMed Central

    Allman, Dan; Calzavara, Liviana; Worthington, Catherine; Tyndall, Mark; Adrien, Alix; Walters, Melissa; White, Samantha; Jones, Marcella K.

    2014-01-01

    Background For the first time, a national survey of adults in Canada posed questions on charitable giving for HIV and AIDS. The objective of this analysis was to explore the behaviour and attitudes of this population in terms of charitable giving. Methods In 2011, individuals in Canada 16 years of age or older were recruited for a survey from an online panel supplemented by random digit dial telephone interviewing. The margin of error was +/?2.1 percentage points (95%). Chi-square tests were used to detect bivariate associations. A multivariate logistic regression model was fit to compare those who had donated to HIV and AIDS in the past 12 months with those who had donated to other disease or illness charities. Results 2,139 participated. 82.5% had donated to a charitable cause in the past 12 months. 22.2% had ever donated to HIV and AIDS, with 7.8% doing so in the past 12 months. Individuals who had donated to HIV and AIDS versus other disease or illness charities tended to be younger (p<0.05), single (p<0.005), more highly educated (p<0.001) and to self-identify as a member of a sexual minority group (p<0.001). Multivariate analysis revealed individuals who self-identified as a member of a sexual minority group were significantly much more likely to have donated to HIV and AIDS than to other disease or illness charities in the past 12 months (OR, 7.73; p<0.001; CI 4.32–13.88). Discussion Despite a generally philanthropic orientation, relatively few respondents had ever been involved in charitable giving for HIV and AIDS. Those who had could be understood relationally as individuals at closer social proximity to HIV and AIDS such as members of sexual minority groups. PMID:25153827

  8. Fermionic entanglement ambiguity in noninertial frames

    SciTech Connect

    Montero, Miguel; Martin-Martinez, Eduardo

    2011-06-15

    We analyze an ambiguity in previous works on entanglement of fermionic fields in noninertial frames. This ambiguity, related to the anticommutation properties of field operators, leads to nonunique results when computing entanglement measures for the same state. We show that the ambiguity disappears when we introduce detectors, which are in any case necessary as a means to probe the field entanglement.

  9. Learning from Ambiguity

    E-print Network

    Maron, Oded

    1998-12-01

    There are many learning problems for which the examples given by the teacher are ambiguously labeled. In this thesis, we will examine one framework of learning from ambiguous examples known as Multiple-Instance learning. ...

  10. SAR ambiguous range suppression.

    SciTech Connect

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2006-09-01

    Pulsed Radar systems suffer range ambiguities, that is, echoes from pulses transmitted at different times arrive at the receiver simultaneously. Conventional mitigation techniques are not always adequate. However, pulse modulation schemes exist that allow separation of ambiguous ranges in Doppler space, allowing easy filtering of problematic ambiguous ranges.

  11. Neural Correlates of Decision-Making Under Ambiguity and Conflict

    PubMed Central

    Pushkarskaya, Helen; Smithson, Michael; Joseph, Jane E.; Corbly, Christine; Levy, Ifat

    2015-01-01

    HIGHLIGHTS We use a simple gambles design in an fMRI study to compare two conditions: ambiguity and conflict.Participants were more conflict averse than ambiguity averse.Ambiguity aversion did not correlate with conflict aversion.Activation in the medial prefrontal cortex correlated with ambiguity level and ambiguity aversion.Activation in the ventral striatum correlated with conflict level and conflict aversion. Studies of decision making under uncertainty generally focus on imprecise information about outcome probabilities (“ambiguity”). It is not clear, however, whether conflicting information about outcome probabilities affects decision making in the same manner as ambiguity does. Here we combine functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and a simple gamble design to study this question. In this design the levels of ambiguity and conflict are parametrically varied, and ambiguity and conflict gambles are matched on expected value. Behaviorally, participants avoided conflict more than ambiguity, and attitudes toward ambiguity and conflict did not correlate across participants. Neurally, regional brain activation was differentially modulated by ambiguity level and aversion to ambiguity and by conflict level and aversion to conflict. Activation in the medial prefrontal cortex was correlated with the level of ambiguity and with ambiguity aversion, whereas activation in the ventral striatum was correlated with the level of conflict and with conflict aversion. These novel results indicate that decision makers process imprecise and conflicting information differently, a finding that has important implications for basic and clinical research. PMID:26640434

  12. Effective ambiguity checking in biosequence analysis

    PubMed Central

    Reeder, Janina; Steffen, Peter; Giegerich, Robert

    2005-01-01

    Background Ambiguity is a problem in biosequence analysis that arises in various analysis tasks solved via dynamic programming, and in particular, in the modeling of families of RNA secondary structures with stochastic context free grammars. Several types of analysis are invalidated by the presence of ambiguity. As this problem inherits undecidability (as we show here) from the namely problem for context free languages, there is no complete algorithmic solution to the problem of ambiguity checking. Results We explain frequently observed sources of ambiguity, and show how to avoid them. We suggest four testing procedures that may help to detect ambiguity when present, including a just-in-time test that permits to work safely with a potentially ambiguous grammar. We introduce, for the special case of stochastic context free grammars and RNA structure modeling, an automated partial procedure for proving non-ambiguity. It is used to demonstrate non-ambiguity for several relevant grammars. Conclusion Our mechanical proof procedure and our testing methods provide a powerful arsenal of methods to ensure non-ambiguity. PMID:15967024

  13. Effects of ambiguous and unambiguous stimulus word differences on popular responses of schizophrenics.

    PubMed

    Penk, W E

    1978-10-01

    Tested that aspect of response interference theory that predicts that schizophrenics give fewer dominant and more competing responses for ambiguous, but not unambiguous, conditions. It was hypothesized that schizophrenics would evidence in a word association task greater gains, after treatment, in response popularity for ambiguous, but not for unambiguous, stimulus words. The prediction was assessed by administering a specially-constructed wordlist balanced for idiodynamic semantic sets (Moran, 1966). Results, from a pre- and posttest control group design, met predictions for 24 matched pairs of schizophrenics and neurotics: after 5 weeks of treatment, schizophrenics gained significantly in popular responses for ambiguous but not for unambiguous stimulus words, whereas neurotics did not gain significantly for either condition. Positive correlation for schizophrenics between ambiguous word response popularity gains in home and community adjustment as rated by a significant other coincided with expectations from response interference theory (Broen, 1968). PMID:711871

  14. Vignettes of Ambiguity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gotz, Ignacio L.

    2010-01-01

    This article is an exploration of ambiguity as it appears in various guises in philosophical, social, political, and educational situations. Among these situations is the experience of exile. The exploration is conducted by means of literary anecdotes and real-life instances, hence the use of vignettes. The suggestion is made that ambiguity can be…

  15. Processing Coordination Ambiguity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engelhardt, Paul E.; Ferreira, Fernanda

    2010-01-01

    We examined temporarily ambiguous coordination structures such as "put the butter in the bowl and the pan on the towel." Minimal Attachment predicts that the ambiguous noun phrase "the pan" will be interpreted as a noun-phrase coordination structure because it is syntactically simpler than clausal coordination. Constraint-based theories assume…

  16. Integer aperture ambiguity resolution based on difference test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jingyu; Wu, Meiping; Li, Tao; Zhang, Kaidong

    2015-07-01

    Carrier-phase integer ambiguity resolution (IAR) is the key to highly precise, fast positioning and attitude determination with Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS). It can be seen as the process of estimating the unknown cycle ambiguities of the carrier-phase observations as integers. Once the ambiguities are fixed, carrier phase data will act as the very precise range data. Integer aperture (IA) ambiguity resolution is the combination of acceptance testing and integer ambiguity resolution, which can realize better quality control of IAR. Difference test (DT) is one of the most popular acceptance tests. This contribution will give a detailed analysis about the following properties of IA ambiguity resolution based on DT: 1. The sharpest and loose upper bounds of DT are derived from the perspective of geometry. These bounds are very simple and easy to be computed, which give the range for the critical values of DT.

  17. Conspicuous Giving 

    E-print Network

    Anderson, Lindsay Alexandria

    2012-07-16

    When discussing charity, it is important to recognize that charity and other forms of giving are not solely done out of altruism, but can also be done out of greed and self promotion. It is especially important to recognize ...

  18. Lexical ambiguity resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Small, S.; Cottrell, G.; Tanenhaus, M.

    1987-01-01

    This book collects much of the best research currently available on the problem of lexical ambiguity resolution in the processing of human language. When taken out of context, sentences are usually ambiguous. When actually uttered in a dialogue or written in text, these same sentences often have unique interpretations. The inherent ambiguity of isolated sentences, becomes obvious in the attempt to write a computer program to understand them. Different views have emerged on the nature of context and the mechanisms by which it directs unambiguous understanding of words and sentences. These perspectives are represented and discussed. Eighteen original papers from a valuable source book for cognitive scientists in AI, psycholinguistics, neuropsychology, or theoretical linguistics.

  19. REDUCING AMBIGUITY IN THE FUNCTIONAL ASSESSMENT OF PROBLEM BEHAVIOR

    PubMed Central

    Rooker, Griffin W.; DeLeon, Iser G.; Borrero, Carrie S. W.; Frank-Crawford, Michelle A.; Roscoe, Eileen M.

    2015-01-01

    Severe problem behavior (e.g., self-injury and aggression) remains among the most serious challenges for the habilitation of persons with intellectual disabilities and is a significant obstacle to community integration. The current standard of behavior analytic treatment for problem behavior in this population consists of a functional assessment and treatment model. Within that model, the first step is to assess the behavior–environment relations that give rise to and maintain problem behavior, a functional behavioral assessment. Conventional methods of assessing behavioral function include indirect, descriptive, and experimental assessments of problem behavior. Clinical investigators have produced a rich literature demonstrating the relative effectiveness for each method, but in clinical practice, each can produce ambiguous or difficult-to-interpret outcomes that may impede treatment development. This paper outlines potential sources of variability in assessment outcomes and then reviews the evidence on strategies for avoiding ambiguous outcomes and/or clarifying initially ambiguous results. The end result for each assessment method is a set of best practice guidelines, given the available evidence, for conducting the initial assessment. PMID:26236145

  20. Children do not exhibit ambiguity aversion despite intact familiarity bias

    PubMed Central

    Li, Rosa; Brannon, Elizabeth M.; Huettel, Scott A.

    2015-01-01

    The phenomenon of ambiguity aversion, in which risky gambles with known probabilities are preferred over ambiguous gambles with unknown probabilities, has been thoroughly documented in adults but never measured in children. Here, we use two distinct tasks to investigate ambiguity preferences of children (8- to 9-year-olds) and a comparison group of adults (19- to 27-year-olds). Across three separate measures, we found evidence for significant ambiguity aversion in adults but not in children and for greater ambiguity aversion in adults compared to children. As ambiguity aversion in adults has been theorized to result from a preference to bet on the known and avoid the unfamiliar, we separately measured familiarity bias and found that children, like adults, are biased towards the familiar. Our findings indicate that ambiguity aversion emerges across the course of development between childhood and adolescence, while a familiarity bias is already present in childhood. PMID:25601848

  1. Precise Point Positioning with Partial Ambiguity Fixing

    PubMed Central

    Li, Pan; Zhang, Xiaohong

    2015-01-01

    Reliable and rapid ambiguity resolution (AR) is the key to fast precise point positioning (PPP). We propose a modified partial ambiguity resolution (PAR) method, in which an elevation and standard deviation criterion are first used to remove the low-precision ambiguity estimates for AR. Subsequently the success rate and ratio-test are simultaneously used in an iterative process to increase the possibility of finding a subset of decorrelated ambiguities which can be fixed with high confidence. One can apply the proposed PAR method to try to achieve an ambiguity-fixed solution when full ambiguity resolution (FAR) fails. We validate this method using data from 450 stations during DOY 021 to 027, 2012. Results demonstrate the proposed PAR method can significantly shorten the time to first fix (TTFF) and increase the fixing rate. Compared with FAR, the average TTFF for PAR is reduced by 14.9% for static PPP and 15.1% for kinematic PPP. Besides, using the PAR method, the average fixing rate can be increased from 83.5% to 98.2% for static PPP, from 80.1% to 95.2% for kinematic PPP respectively. Kinematic PPP accuracy with PAR can also be significantly improved, compared to that with FAR, due to a higher fixing rate. PMID:26067196

  2. Precise Point Positioning with Partial Ambiguity Fixing.

    PubMed

    Li, Pan; Zhang, Xiaohong

    2015-01-01

    Reliable and rapid ambiguity resolution (AR) is the key to fast precise point positioning (PPP). We propose a modified partial ambiguity resolution (PAR) method, in which an elevation and standard deviation criterion are first used to remove the low-precision ambiguity estimates for AR. Subsequently the success rate and ratio-test are simultaneously used in an iterative process to increase the possibility of finding a subset of decorrelated ambiguities which can be fixed with high confidence. One can apply the proposed PAR method to try to achieve an ambiguity-fixed solution when full ambiguity resolution (FAR) fails. We validate this method using data from 450 stations during DOY 021 to 027, 2012. Results demonstrate the proposed PAR method can significantly shorten the time to first fix (TTFF) and increase the fixing rate. Compared with FAR, the average TTFF for PAR is reduced by 14.9% for static PPP and 15.1% for kinematic PPP. Besides, using the PAR method, the average fixing rate can be increased from 83.5% to 98.2% for static PPP, from 80.1% to 95.2% for kinematic PPP respectively. Kinematic PPP accuracy with PAR can also be significantly improved, compared to that with FAR, due to a higher fixing rate. PMID:26067196

  3. Ambiguous Red Shifts

    E-print Network

    Carl E. Wulfman

    2010-10-11

    A one-parameter conformal invariance of Maxwell's equations allows the wavelengths of electromagnetic waves to change as they propagate, and do so even in otherwise field-free space. This produces an ambiguity in interpretations of stellar red shifts. Experiments that will determine the value of the group parameter, and thereby remove the ambiguity, are proposed. They are based on an analysis of the anomalous frequency shifts uncovered in the Pioneer 10 and 11 spacecraft studies, and physical interpretation of an isomorphism discovered by E. L. Hill. If the group parameter is found to be non-zero, Hubble's relations will have to be reinterpreted and space-time metrics will have to be altered. The cosmological consequences of the transformations are even more extensive because, though they change frequencies, they do not alter the energy and momentum conservations laws of classical and quantum-electrodynamical fields established by Cunningham and by Bialynicki-Birula.

  4. The Ambiguous Dying Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bern-Klug, Mercedes

    2004-01-01

    More than one-half of the 2.4 million deaths that will occur in the United States in 2004 will be immediately preceded by a time in which the likelihood of dying can best be described as "ambiguous." Many people die without ever being considered "dying" or "at the end of life." These people may miss out on the opportunity to close important…

  5. Facing ambiguous threats.

    PubMed

    Roberto, Michael A; Bohmer, Richard M J; Edmondson, Amy C

    2006-11-01

    On February 1, 2003, the world watched in horror as the Columbia space shuttle broke apart while reentering the earth's atmosphere, killing all seven astronauts. Some have argued that NASA's failure to respond with appropriate intensity to the so-called foam strike that led to the accident was evidence of irresponsible or incompetent management. The authors' research, however, suggests that NASA was exhibiting a natural, albeit unfortunate, pattern of behavior common in many organizations. The foam strike is a prime example of what the authors call an ambiguous threat-a signal that may or may not portend future harm. Ambiguous threats differ from threats with obvious causes-say, a fire in the building-for which the response is clear. They also differ from unmistakable threats that may lack straightforward response paths (such as the frightening oxygen-tank explosion aboard Apollo 13). However, when the warning sign is ambiguous and the threat's potential effect is unclear, managers may choose to ignore or discount the risk. Such an approach can be catastrophic. Firms that do a good job of dealing with ambiguous threats do not improvise during a crisis; rather, they apply a rigorous set of detection and response capabilities that they have developed and practiced beforehand. In this article, the authors outline how to put such capabilities in place long before a crisis strikes. First, companies need to hone their teamwork and rapid problem-solving skills through practice. Second, they must learn to recognize weak signals, amplify the threat, and encourage employees to ask disconcerting "what if" questions in a safe environment. Finally, they should explore possible responses to threats through quick, low-cost experimentation. PMID:17131567

  6. AB093. A case of exogenous C5-acylcarnitine giving rise to a false positive result in newborn screening (NBS)

    PubMed Central

    Yeo, Shu Jun; Tan, Ee Shien; Saumya, Jamuar; Poh, Sherry; Lim, James

    2015-01-01

    Background and objective NBS Screening by MS/MS is considered an effective screening test. However, the technique cannot distinguish between isobaric compounds, thus contributing to some false positive results. One such compound is C5-acylcarnitine in the in the identification of isovaleric acidemia (IVA) in the MS/MS profile. To report and contrast the findings of two newborns with C5-acylcarnitine elevations in newborn screening (NBS). Methods Blood collected on Guthrie card from newborns between 24-72 hours of life is analyzed by MS/MS. C5-acylcarnitine and its related ratios are measured in DBS sample to identify at risk newborn. Results Newborn A: DBS sample C5: 7.96 µmol/L (normal <0.50), C5/C0: 0.99 (normal <0.025), C5/C3: 16.1 (normal <0.40); Plasma acylcarnitines profile: C5: 9.42 µmol/L (normal 0.06-0.29). Urine organic acid profiles showed marked elevations of isovalerylglycine (IVG), ketone bodies and lactate. This profile is consistent with a patient presenting with a diagnosis of IVA. Newborn B: DBS sample C5: 0.84 µmol/L (normal <0.50), C5/C0: 0.041 (normal <0.025), C5/C3: 0.46 (normal <0.40); Despite the abnormal plasma acylcarnitines profile (C5: 4.38 µmol/L, normal 0.06-0.29), the urine acylglycine profile was normal [IVG: 1.02 mg/g Cr (normal 0.3-14.3 mg/g); 2-MBG: 0.16 mg/g Cr (normal: 0.3-7.5 mg/g)]. A 2nd plasma acylcarnitine showed a lower C5 level (1.49 µmol/L) and a repeat urine organic acid profile was normal; no IVG and 2-MBG detected. Mother’s (Newborn B) plasma acylcarnitines and urine organic acid profiles were normal, ruling out a possible maternal condition. Moreover, it was confirmed that mother and newborn were not on any antibiotics or steroids, which have been previously reported as the causal agents of falsely elevated C5-acylcarnitine. Further investigation revealed mom was using Mustela Nursing Comfort Balm which contained neopentanoate, a compound demonstrated by Boemer et al. [2014] as the causal agent for the false elevation of C5-acylcarnitine in NBS. The elevated C5 levels in the newborn’s plasma samples appear to correspond to the timing of the feed with the blood draw (i.e., the high C5 plasma acylcarnitine result (4.38 µmol/L) corresponds to a blood sample taken within minutes of a feed and the second sample was collected several hours (>2 hours) after the feed (C5: 1.49 µmol/L). Withdrawal of Comfort Balm use eliminated the biochemical derangements in Newborn B and he is clinically well at 10 months. Conclusions Neopentanoate in the form of an emollient can cause a C5 false positive result in NBS.

  7. Sexual function after surgical treatment for penile cancer: Which organ-sparing approach gives the best results?

    PubMed Central

    Sedigh, Omid; Falcone, Marco; Ceruti, Carlo; Timpano, Massimiliano; Preto, Mirko; Oderda, Marco; Kuehhas, Franklin; Sibona, Mattia; Gillo, Arianna; Gontero, Paolo; Rolle, Luigi; Frea, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: We compared the postoperative sexual function of patients who underwent wide local excision (WLE) and glansectomy with urethral glanduloplasty for penile cancer. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed clinical data of 41 patients affected by superficial, localized penile cancer (?cT2a) between 2006 and 2013. Patients with severe erectile dysfunction and not interested in resuming an active sexual life were selected for penile partial amputation. Patients with preoperative satisfying erectile function and concerned about the preservation of their sexual potency were scheduled for WLE (Group A) or glansectomy with urethral glanduloplasty (Group B). Sexual function was assessed with the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF) questionnaire and the Sex Encounter Profile (SEP). At 1 year, patients were asked to complete the questionnaires again and were questioned about their genital sensibility and ejaculatory reflex persistence. Postoperative complications were reported according to the Clavien-Dindo classification. Statistical analysis was performed by two-tailed test: Student t-test and chi-square. Results: Among the 41 patients enrolled, 12 underwent WLE (29.2%), 23 glansectomy with urethral glanduloplasty (56%) and 6 with penile partial amputation (14.6%). A decrease in postoperative IIEF was recorded in both groups, but was statistically significant only in Group B (p = 0.003). As for the SEP, while no significant changes were recorded postoperatively in Group A, a marked reduction was reported for Group B, with a statistically significant decrease in the possibility of achieving penetrative intercourse (p = 0.006) and in the perceived satisfaction during sexual activity (p = 0.004). Conclusions: WLE lead to better sexual outcomes and less postoperative complications as compared to glansectomy with urethral glanduloplasty. PMID:26279710

  8. The Ambiguity of the English Present Perfect.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michaelis, Laura A.

    1994-01-01

    Examines grammatical and discourse-pragmatic reflexes of the existential and resultative readings of the English present perfect and presents negative and positive arguments regarding its ambiguity. It is suggested that the resultative verb represents a formal idiom and that mastery of aspectual grammar entails knowledge of form-meaning pairings.…

  9. P300 and Decision Making under Risk and Ambiguity

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lei; Zheng, Jiehui; Huang, Shenwei; Sun, Haoye

    2015-01-01

    Our study aims to contrast the neural temporal features of early stage of decision making in the context of risk and ambiguity. In monetary gambles under ambiguous or risky conditions, 12 participants were asked to make a decision to bet or not, with the event-related potentials (ERPs) recorded meantime. The proportion of choosing to bet in ambiguous condition was significantly lower than that in risky condition. An ERP component identified as P300 was found. The P300 amplitude elicited in risky condition was significantly larger than that in ambiguous condition. The lower bet rate in ambiguous condition and the smaller P300 amplitude elicited by ambiguous stimuli revealed that people showed much more aversion in the ambiguous condition than in the risky condition. The ERP results may suggest that decision making under ambiguity occupies higher working memory and recalls more past experience while decision making under risk mainly mobilizes attentional resources to calculate current information. These findings extended the current understanding of underlying mechanism for early assessment stage of decision making and explored the difference between the decision making under risk and ambiguity. PMID:26539213

  10. Situs ambiguous in a schoolchild

    PubMed Central

    Tortajada, Miguel; Moreno, Miriam; Gracia, Miguel; Sanchis, Amparo

    2010-01-01

    We report the case of a 9-year-old child with asthma, atopic dermatitis and allergic rhinoconjunctivitis due to house dust mites, in whom a routine chest x-ray identified by chance abnormal organ position, such as the stomach located on the right side. Abdominal ultrasonography indicated a centralised liver, with polysplenia on the right side and an inferior cava vein located to the left of the aorta with no interruption. Ultrasonography did not show heart defects. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the abdomen was performed that showed a short pancreas, with no neck, body and tail in it, and a left inferior vena cava with normal outlet of the renal veins, and absence of the intrahepatic part of the inferior vena cava, that was replaced by the left hemiazygos vein. Spinal cord MRI revealed dorsal syringomelia. In view of the results obtained, the diagnosis of situs ambiguous was established. PMID:22121394

  11. Israel's nuclear ambiguity

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, A.; Frankel, B.

    1987-03-01

    On October 5, 1986, the London Sunday Times published details of secret Israeli nuclear weapons manufacturing, indicating that over the past 20 years Israel may have accumulated a nuclear arsenal of 100 to 200 weapons. While not entirely new, these recent revelations, in contrast to past information, are attributed to an identifiable source: Mordechai Vanunu, a former technician in Israel's Dimona nuclear facility. The prompt Israeli action that brought Vanunu to Israel to stand trial indicates how seriously the Israeli government has treated his story. The revelations bring into sharp focus the peculiar features of Israel's nuclear posture and the difficulty inherent in any serious discussion of the subject - notably the secrecy that has surrounded the program since its inception. To Israelis, no defense-related topic more sensitive. Although there is some evidence of internal debate at key junctures in the history of the Israeli nuclear project, there has never been any serious public questioning of the program, or its direction, from its inception three decades ago to the present, a period spanning the tenures of seven prime ministers. In view of the above revelations, the authors review Israel's nuclear weapons policy, deliberately ambiguous, and discuss possible alternatives in the context of possible nonproliferation efforts by the superpowers. 14 references, 2 figures.

  12. AmbiguityVis: Visualization of Ambiguity in Graph Layouts.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong; Shen, Qiaomu; Archambault, Daniel; Zhou, Zhiguang; Zhu, Min; Yang, Sixiao; Qu, Huamin

    2016-01-01

    Node-link diagrams provide an intuitive way to explore networks and have inspired a large number of automated graph layout strategies that optimize aesthetic criteria. However, any particular drawing approach cannot fully satisfy all these criteria simultaneously, producing drawings with visual ambiguities that can impede the understanding of network structure. To bring attention to these potentially problematic areas present in the drawing, this paper presents a technique that highlights common types of visual ambiguities: ambiguous spatial relationships between nodes and edges, visual overlap between community structures, and ambiguity in edge bundling and metanodes. Metrics, including newly proposed metrics for abnormal edge lengths, visual overlap in community structures and node/edge aggregation, are proposed to quantify areas of ambiguity in the drawing. These metrics and others are then displayed using a heatmap-based visualization that provides visual feedback to developers of graph drawing and visualization approaches, allowing them to quickly identify misleading areas. The novel metrics and the heatmap-based visualization allow a user to explore ambiguities in graph layouts from multiple perspectives in order to make reasonable graph layout choices. The effectiveness of the technique is demonstrated through case studies and expert reviews. PMID:26390486

  13. The Ellipticity Distribution of Ambiguously Blended Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawson, William A.; Schneider, Michael D.; Tyson, J. Anthony; Jee, M. James

    2016-01-01

    Using overlapping fields with space-based Hubble Space Telescope and ground-based Subaru Telescope imaging we identify a population of blended galaxies that are blended to such a large degree that they are detected as single objects in the ground-based monochromatic imaging, which we label "ambiguous blends." For deep imaging data, such as the depth targeted with the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST), the ambiguous blend population is both large (˜14%) and has a distribution of ellipticities that is different from that of unblended objects in a way that will likely be important for weak lensing measurements. Most notably, for a limiting magnitude of i ˜ 27 we find that ambiguous blending results in a ˜14% increase in shear noise (or an ˜12% decrease in the effective projected number density of lensed galaxies; neff) due to (1) larger intrinsic ellipticity dispersion, and (2) a scaling with the galaxy number density Ngal that is shallower than 1/&sqrt;{{N}{gal}}. For the LSST Gold Sample (i < 25.3) there is a ˜7% increase in shear noise (or ˜7% decrease in neff). More importantly than these increases in the shear noise, we find that the ellipticity distribution of ambiguous blends has an rms that is 13% larger than that of non-blended galaxies. Given the need of future weak lensing surveys to constrain the ellipticity distribution of galaxies to better than a percent in order to mitigate cosmic shear multiplicative biases, if it is unaccounted for, the different ellipticity distribution of ambiguous blends could be a dominant systematic.

  14. To mind the mind: an event-related potential study of word class and semantic ambiguity.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chia-Lin; Federmeier, Kara D

    2006-04-01

    The goal of this study was to jointly examine the effects of word class, word class ambiguity, and semantic ambiguity on the brain response to words in syntactically specified contexts. Four types of words were used: (1) word class ambiguous words with a high degree of semantic ambiguity (e.g., 'duck'); (2) word class ambiguous words with little or no semantic ambiguity (e.g., 'vote'); (3) word class unambiguous nouns (e.g., 'sofa'); and (4) word class unambiguous verbs (e.g., 'eat'). These words were embedded in minimal phrases that explicitly specified their word class: "the" for nouns (and ambiguous words used as nouns) and "to" for verbs (and ambiguous words used as verbs). Our results replicate the basic word class effects found in prior work (Federmeier, K.D., Segal, J.B., Lombrozo, T., Kutas, M., 2000. Brain responses to nouns, verbs and class ambiguous words in context. Brain, 123 (12), 2552-2566), including an enhanced N400 (250-450 ms) to nouns compared with verbs and an enhanced frontal positivity (300-700 ms) to unambiguous verbs in relation to unambiguous nouns. A sustained frontal negativity (250-900 ms) that was previously linked to word class ambiguity also appeared in this study but was specific to word class ambiguous items that also had a high level of semantic ambiguity; word class ambiguous items without semantic ambiguity, in contrast, were more positive than class unambiguous words in the early part of this time window (250-500 ms). Thus, this frontal negative effect seems to be driven by the need to resolve the semantic ambiguity that is sometimes associated with different grammatical uses of a word class ambiguous homograph rather than by the class ambiguity per se. PMID:16516169

  15. Structural Ambiguity in Montague Grammar and Categorial Grammar

    E-print Network

    Morrill, Glyn

    Structural Ambiguity in Montague Grammar and Categorial Grammar Glyn Morrill Departament de://www.lsi.upc.edu/~morrill/ Abstract We give a type logical categorial grammar for the syntax and semantics of Montague's seminal). Keywords: categorial grammar, displacement calculus, intensionality, modal categorial logic, Montague

  16. Giving behavior of millionaires.

    PubMed

    Smeets, Paul; Bauer, Rob; Gneezy, Uri

    2015-08-25

    This paper studies conditions influencing the generosity of wealthy people. We conduct incentivized experiments with individuals who have at least €1 million in their bank account. The results show that millionaires are more generous toward low-income individuals in a giving situation when the other participant has no power, than in a strategic setting, where the other participant can punish unfair behavior. Moreover, the level of giving by millionaires is higher than in any other previous study. Our findings have important implications for charities and financial institutions that deal with wealthy individuals. PMID:26261327

  17. Text Association Analysis and Ambiguity in Text Mining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhonde, S. B.; Paikrao, R. L.; Rahane, K. U.

    2010-11-01

    Text Mining is the process of analyzing a semantically rich document or set of documents to understand the content and meaning of the information they contain. The research in Text Mining will enhance human's ability to process massive quantities of information, and it has high commercial values. Firstly, the paper discusses the introduction of TM its definition and then gives an overview of the process of text mining and the applications. Up to now, not much research in text mining especially in concept/entity extraction has focused on the ambiguity problem. This paper addresses ambiguity issues in natural language texts, and presents a new technique for resolving ambiguity problem in extracting concept/entity from texts. In the end, it shows the importance of TM in knowledge discovery and highlights the up-coming challenges of document mining and the opportunities it offers.

  18. Resolving Tag Ambiguity Kilian Weinberger

    E-print Network

    Weinberger, Kilian

    ­31, 2008, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. Copyright 2008 ACM 978-1-60558-303-7/08/10 ...$5.00. jaguar specification Figure 1: An example of how different expansion of one tag ("jaguar") can lead to very different (e.g. "jaguar" can be a car or an animal), geographic ambiguity (e.g. "Cambridge" as in MA or UK

  19. Ambiguity Resolution in Lateralized Arabic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayadre, Manar; Kurzon, Dennis; Peleg, Orna; Zohar, Eviatar

    2015-01-01

    We examined ambiguity resolution in reading in Arabic. Arabic is an abjad orthography and is morphologically similar to Hebrew. However, Arabic literacy occurs in a diglossic context, and its orthography is more visually complex than Hebrew. We therefore tested to see whether hemispheric differences will be similar or different from previous…

  20. Legislation & Embedded Fundamental Ambiguities in

    E-print Network

    bundled with the computer #12;Why Does This Matter? The two laws are ¡ Article 2 (Law of Sales Law Institute (aka ALI). ¡ Adopted (most of it) as law in all 50 states ¡ Separate Articles, includingLegislation & Embedded Software Fundamental Ambiguities in Law and Computer Science Cem Kaner, J

  1. Lexical Access for Phonetic Ambiguities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spencer, N. J.; Wollman, Neil

    1980-01-01

    Reports on research that (1) suggests that phonetically ambiguous pairs (ice cream/I scream) have been used inaccurately to illustrate contextual effects in word segmentation, (2) supports unitary rather than exhaustive processing, and (3) supports the use of the concepts of word frequency and listener expectations instead of top-down, multiple…

  2. Reliability of partial ambiguity fixing with multiple GNSS constellations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jun; Feng, Yanming

    2013-01-01

    Reliable ambiguity resolution (AR) is essential to real-time kinematic (RTK) positioning and its applications, since incorrect ambiguity fixing can lead to largely biased positioning solutions. A partial ambiguity fixing technique is developed to improve the reliability of AR, involving partial ambiguity decorrelation (PAD) and partial ambiguity resolution (PAR). Decorrelation transformation could substantially amplify the biases in the phase measurements. The purpose of PAD is to find the optimum trade-off between decorrelation and worst-case bias amplification. The concept of PAR refers to the case where only a subset of the ambiguities can be fixed correctly to their integers in the integer least squares (ILS) estimation system at high success rates. As a result, RTK solutions can be derived from these integer-fixed phase measurements. This is meaningful provided that the number of reliably resolved phase measurements is sufficiently large for least-square estimation of RTK solutions as well. Considering the GPS constellation alone, partially fixed measurements are often insufficient for positioning. The AR reliability is usually characterised by the AR success rate. In this contribution, an AR validation decision matrix is firstly introduced to understand the impact of success rate. Moreover the AR risk probability is included into a more complete evaluation of the AR reliability. We use 16 ambiguity variance-covariance matrices with different levels of success rate to analyse the relation between success rate and AR risk probability. Next, the paper examines during the PAD process, how a bias in one measurement is propagated and amplified onto many others, leading to more than one wrong integer and to affect the success probability. Furthermore, the paper proposes a partial ambiguity fixing procedure with a predefined success rate criterion and ratio test in the ambiguity validation process. In this paper, the Galileo constellation data is tested with simulated observations. Numerical results from our experiment clearly demonstrate that only when the computed success rate is very high, the AR validation can provide decisions about the correctness of AR which are close to real world, with both low AR risk and false alarm probabilities. The results also indicate that the PAR procedure can automatically chose adequate number of ambiguities to fix at given high-success rate from the multiple constellations instead of fixing all the ambiguities. This is a benefit that multiple GNSS constellations can offer.

  3. Avoiding Lexical Ambiguities: Does Prior Experience Help? 

    E-print Network

    Nierop, Katharine

    2008-06-27

    The present study examined whether speakers avoided the production of lexically ambiguous target labels in a referential communication task (e.g., avoiding the ambiguous bare homophone mouse when pictures of both a computer ...

  4. Long-Duration Spaceflight Increases Depth Ambiguity of Reversible Perspective Figures.

    PubMed

    Clément, Gilles; Allaway, Heather C M; Demel, Michael; Golemis, Adrianos; Kindrat, Alexandra N; Melinyshyn, Alexander N; Merali, Tahir; Thirsk, Robert

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate depth perception in astronauts during and after spaceflight by studying their sensitivity to reversible perspective figures in which two-dimensional images could elicit two possible depth representations. Other ambiguous figures that did not give rise to a perception of illusory depth were used as controls. Six astronauts and 14 subjects were tested in the laboratory during three sessions for evaluating the variability of their responses in normal gravity. The six astronauts were then tested during four sessions while on board the International Space Station for 5-6 months. They were finally tested immediately after return to Earth and up to one week later. The reaction time decreased throughout the sessions, thus indicating a learning effect. However, the time to first percept reversal and the number of reversals were not different in orbit and after the flight compared to before the flight. On Earth, when watching depth-ambiguous perspective figures, all subjects reported seeing one three-dimensional interpretation more often than the other, i.e. a ratio of about 70-30%. In weightlessness this asymmetry gradually disappeared and after 3 months in orbit both interpretations were seen for the same duration. These results indicate that the perception of "illusory" depth is altered in astronauts during spaceflight. This increased depth ambiguity is attributed to the lack of the gravitational reference and the eye-ground elevation for interpreting perspective depth cues. PMID:26146839

  5. Long-Duration Spaceflight Increases Depth Ambiguity of Reversible Perspective Figures

    PubMed Central

    Clément, Gilles; Allaway, Heather C. M.; Demel, Michael; Golemis, Adrianos; Kindrat, Alexandra N.; Melinyshyn, Alexander N.; Merali, Tahir; Thirsk, Robert

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate depth perception in astronauts during and after spaceflight by studying their sensitivity to reversible perspective figures in which two-dimensional images could elicit two possible depth representations. Other ambiguous figures that did not give rise to a perception of illusory depth were used as controls. Six astronauts and 14 subjects were tested in the laboratory during three sessions for evaluating the variability of their responses in normal gravity. The six astronauts were then tested during four sessions while on board the International Space Station for 5–6 months. They were finally tested immediately after return to Earth and up to one week later. The reaction time decreased throughout the sessions, thus indicating a learning effect. However, the time to first percept reversal and the number of reversals were not different in orbit and after the flight compared to before the flight. On Earth, when watching depth-ambiguous perspective figures, all subjects reported seeing one three-dimensional interpretation more often than the other, i.e. a ratio of about 70–30%. In weightlessness this asymmetry gradually disappeared and after 3 months in orbit both interpretations were seen for the same duration. These results indicate that the perception of “illusory” depth is altered in astronauts during spaceflight. This increased depth ambiguity is attributed to the lack of the gravitational reference and the eye-ground elevation for interpreting perspective depth cues. PMID:26146839

  6. How Do Speakers Avoid Ambiguous Linguistic Expressions?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferreira, V.S.; Slevc, L.R.; Rogers, E.S.

    2005-01-01

    Three experiments assessed how speakers avoid linguistically and nonlinguistically ambiguous expressions. Speakers described target objects (a flying mammal, bat) in contexts including foil objects that caused linguistic (a baseball bat) and nonlinguistic (a larger flying mammal) ambiguity. Speakers sometimes avoided linguistic-ambiguity, and they…

  7. Generative Learning: Adults Learning within Ambiguity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nicolaides, Aliki

    2015-01-01

    This study explored the extent to which ambiguity can serve as a catalyst for adult learning. The purpose of this study is to understand learning that is generated when encountering ambiguity agitated by the complexity of liquid modernity. "Ambiguity," in this study, describes an encounter with an appearance of reality that is at first…

  8. Combined GPS/GLONASS Precise Point Positioning with Fixed GPS Ambiguities

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Lin; Cai, Changsheng; Santerre, Rock; Zhu, Jianjun

    2014-01-01

    Precise point positioning (PPP) technology is mostly implemented with an ambiguity-float solution. Its performance may be further improved by performing ambiguity-fixed resolution. Currently, the PPP integer ambiguity resolutions (IARs) are mainly based on GPS-only measurements. The integration of GPS and GLONASS can speed up the convergence and increase the accuracy of float ambiguity estimates, which contributes to enhancing the success rate and reliability of fixing ambiguities. This paper presents an approach of combined GPS/GLONASS PPP with fixed GPS ambiguities (GGPPP-FGA) in which GPS ambiguities are fixed into integers, while all GLONASS ambiguities are kept as float values. An improved minimum constellation method (MCM) is proposed to enhance the efficiency of GPS ambiguity fixing. Datasets from 20 globally distributed stations on two consecutive days are employed to investigate the performance of the GGPPP-FGA, including the positioning accuracy, convergence time and the time to first fix (TTFF). All datasets are processed for a time span of three hours in three scenarios, i.e., the GPS ambiguity-float solution, the GPS ambiguity-fixed resolution and the GGPPP-FGA resolution. The results indicate that the performance of the GPS ambiguity-fixed resolutions is significantly better than that of the GPS ambiguity-float solutions. In addition, the GGPPP-FGA improves the positioning accuracy by 38%, 25% and 44% and reduces the convergence time by 36%, 36% and 29% in the east, north and up coordinate components over the GPS-only ambiguity-fixed resolutions, respectively. Moreover, the TTFF is reduced by 27% after adding GLONASS observations. Wilcoxon rank sum tests and chi-square two-sample tests are made to examine the significance of the improvement on the positioning accuracy, convergence time and TTFF. PMID:25237901

  9. Discovering geospatial networks from ambiguous track data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bevington, James E.; Evans, Michael R.; Shekhar, Shashi

    2011-06-01

    Wide area motion imagery (WAMI) sensors increasingly are being used for persistent surveillance of large urban areas. One of the potential uses for such surveillance is the discovery of geo-spatial networks, which are sets of locations linked by repeated traffic flow over an extended period of time. In this work we present a simple method of deriving geo-spatial network links automatically from ambiguous track segments or tracklets. The method avoids making explicit tracklet linking decisions and relies on temporal aggregation to identify the persistent origin-destination location pairs. We present experimental network discovery results using simulated high density track data for a downtown urban setting.

  10. Adapting to an Uncertain World: Cognitive Capacity and Causal Reasoning with Ambiguous Observations

    PubMed Central

    Shou, Yiyun; Smithson, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Ambiguous causal evidence in which the covariance of the cause and effect is partially known is pervasive in real life situations. Little is known about how people reason about causal associations with ambiguous information and the underlying cognitive mechanisms. This paper presents three experiments exploring the cognitive mechanisms of causal reasoning with ambiguous observations. Results revealed that the influence of ambiguous observations manifested by missing information on causal reasoning depended on the availability of cognitive resources, suggesting that processing ambiguous information may involve deliberative cognitive processes. Experiment 1 demonstrated that subjects did not ignore the ambiguous observations in causal reasoning. They also had a general tendency to treat the ambiguous observations as negative evidence against the causal association. Experiment 2 and Experiment 3 included a causal learning task requiring a high cognitive demand in which paired stimuli were presented to subjects sequentially. Both experiments revealed that processing ambiguous or missing observations can depend on the availability of cognitive resources. Experiment 2 suggested that the contribution of working memory capacity to the comprehensiveness of evidence retention was reduced when there were ambiguous or missing observations. Experiment 3 demonstrated that an increase in cognitive demand due to a change in the task format reduced subjects’ tendency to treat ambiguous-missing observations as negative cues. PMID:26468653

  11. [Grandchildren in family care giving for people with dementia: experiences and evaluations--results from a life-world-oriented study].

    PubMed

    Philipp-Metzen, H E

    2011-12-01

    Dementia often has a serious impact on family life in household care giving situations. The qualitative study in applied gerontology presented here focuses on the subjective experiences of grandchildren and the intergenerational relationships of the family members. It includes 15 in-depth retrospective interviews with young adults (11 female, 4 male). The theoretical background is a sociological life-world-oriented approach by Alfred Schütz. The grandchildren reported a wide range of experiences with positive and enriching incidents prevailing, e.g., individual and familial competence in care giving, increased contact between family members, i.e., so-called"family cohesion", improvements in the grandchildren's social responsibility, and their acquired knowledge of the needs of older people and of persons with dementia. Individual stress was experienced because of so-called "challenging behavior" by the grandparents (e.g., aggressive behavior) or family circumstances when the demands were too great.A third category includes those experiences which seem to be "taken for granted" and are regarded as insignificant by the grandchildren. Because this category encompasses many of the grandchildren's own care giving activities, the widespread assumption that dementia must always cause younger carers stress is not true in general. The data suggest that living in a family that has difficulties in coping with the situation might be more demanding than dealing with the behavior and psychological symptoms of dementia. The grandchildren should be given access to age-appropriate information about the disease and the ways to communicate effectively with their grandparent needing care. PMID:21909775

  12. Social anxiety and interpretation of ambiguous smiles.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-García, Aida; Calvo, Manuel G

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated whether social anxiety facilitates the discrimination between genuine and ambiguous smiles. Socially anxious (N=20) and nonanxious (N=20) participants categorized as "happy" or "not happy" faces with either (1) a truly happy expression (i.e., happy eyes and a smile), (2) truly nonhappy expressions (e.g., angry eyes and an angry mouth), or (3) blended expressions with a smiling mouth and nonhappy (e.g., angry, sad, etc.) eyes. Results indicated that, relative to nonanxious participants, those high in social anxiety were more likely to judge as "not happy" any blended expression with nonhappy eyes, and they were faster in judging as "not happy" the blended expressions with angry, fearful, or disgusted eyes (but not those with sad, surprised, or neutral eyes). These results suggest, respectively, that social anxiety inhibits a benign interpretation of all the ambiguous expressions with a smile, and speeds up the detection of threatening eyes in such expressions. Importantly, no differences appeared as a function of social anxiety for truly happy or nonhappy faces. This rules out a response-bias explanation, and also reveals that social anxiety does not affect sensitivity in the recognition of prototypical expressions. PMID:23662633

  13. Ambiguous carcinogens and their regulation

    SciTech Connect

    Weinberg, A.M.; Storer, J.B.

    1985-06-01

    Examination of five animal and one human studies suggest that certain agents increase the incidence of some cancers but simultaneously reduce the incidence of other cancers. Yellow die number3, for example, sharply increases the incidence of liver tumors but practically eliminates naturally occurring leukemia/lymphoma in F-344 male rats. Such ambiguity in the action of presumed carcinogens suggests that caution must be used by regulatory bodies in proscribing suspected carcinogens, or even in recommending changes in lifestyle or dietary habits as a means of reducing incidence of cancer.

  14. At the crossroads of race: racial ambiguity and biracial identification influence psychological essentialist thinking.

    PubMed

    Young, Danielle M; Sanchez, Diana T; Wilton, Leigh S

    2013-10-01

    Racial essentialism refers to the widely held belief that race is a biological, stable, and natural category. Although research finds very little evidence that race has biological underpinnings, racial essentialist beliefs persist and are linked to negative outgroup consequences. This study initially demonstrates that label and visual ambiguity concurrently inform racial categorization. It then tests whether exposure to racially ambiguous targets (a) challenges essentialism when ambiguous targets are labeled with biracial categories and (b) reinforces essentialism when ambiguous targets identify with monoracial categories. The results showed that White perceivers (N = 84) who were exposed to racially ambiguous, biracially labeled targets showed reductions in their essentialist thinking about race, whereas perceivers who were exposed to racially ambiguous, monoracially labeled targets showed increases in their essentialist beliefs. PMID:23914743

  15. Selection of optimum median-filter-based ambiguity removal algorithm parameters for NSCAT. [NASA scatterometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaffer, Scott; Dunbar, R. Scott; Hsiao, S. Vincent; Long, David G.

    1989-01-01

    The NASA Scatterometer, NSCAT, is an active spaceborne radar designed to measure the normalized radar backscatter coefficient (sigma0) of the ocean surface. These measurements can, in turn, be used to infer the surface vector wind over the ocean using a geophysical model function. Several ambiguous wind vectors result because of the nature of the model function. A median-filter-based ambiguity removal algorithm will be used by the NSCAT ground data processor to select the best wind vector from the set of ambiguous wind vectors. This process is commonly known as dealiasing or ambiguity removal. The baseline NSCAT ambiguity removal algorithm and the method used to select the set of optimum parameter values are described. An extensive simulation of the NSCAT instrument and ground data processor provides a means of testing the resulting tuned algorithm. This simulation generates the ambiguous wind-field vectors expected from the instrument as it orbits over a set of realistic meoscale wind fields. The ambiguous wind field is then dealiased using the median-based ambiguity removal algorithm. Performance is measured by comparison of the unambiguous wind fields with the true wind fields. Results have shown that the median-filter-based ambiguity removal algorithm satisfies NSCAT mission requirements.

  16. Possible ambiguities in the equation of state for neutron stars

    SciTech Connect

    Cheoun, Myung-Ki; Miyatsu, Tsuyoshi; Ryu, C. Y.; Deliduman, Cemsinan; Güngör, Can; Kele?, Vildan; Kajino, Toshitaka; Mathews, Grant J.

    2014-05-02

    We addressed possible ambiguities on the properties of neutron stars (NSs) estimated in theoretical sides. First, roles of hyperons inside the NS are discussed through various relativistic mean field (RMF) theories. In particular, the extension of SU(6) spin-flavor symmetry to SU(3) flavor symmetry is shown to give rise to the increase of hyperon threshold density, similarly to the Fock term effects in RMF theories. As a result, about 2.0 solar mass is obtained with the hyperons. Second, the effect by the modified f(R) gravity, which leaves a room for the dark energy in the Einstein equation to be taken into account, is discussed for the NS in a strong magnetic field (MF). Our results show that the modified gravity with the Kaluza-Klein electro-magnetism theory expanded in terms of a length scale parameter may reasonably describe the NS in strong MF, so called magnetar. Even the super-soft equation of state is shown to be revived by the modified f(R) gravity.

  17. On Ambiguities in SAR Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freeman, Anthony

    2006-01-01

    Ambiguities are an aliasing effect caused by the periodic sampling of the scene backscatter inherent to pulsed radar systems such as Synthetic Aperture radar (SAR). In this paper we take a fresh look at the relationship between SAR range and azimuth ambiguity constraints on the allowable pulse repetition frequency (PRF) and the antenna length. We show that for high squint angles smaller antennas may be feasible in some cases. For some applications, the ability to form a synthetic aperture at high squint angles is desirable, but the size of the antenna causes problems in the design of systems capable of such operation. This is because the SAR system design is optimized for a side-looking geometry. In two examples design examples we take a suboptimum antenna size and examine the performance in terms of azimuth resolution and swath width as a function of squint angle. We show that for stripmap SARs, the swath width is usually worse for off-boresight squint angles, because it is severely limited by range walk, except in cases where we relax the spatial resolution. We consider the implications for the design of modest-resolution, narrow swath, scanning SAR scatterometers .

  18. Authoritarianism, cognitive rigidity, and the processing of ambiguous visual information.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Lauren E; Peterson, Bill E

    2014-01-01

    Intolerance of ambiguity and cognitive rigidity are unifying aspects of authoritarianism as defined by Adorno, Frenkel-Brunswik, Levinson, and Sanford (1982/1950), who hypothesized that authoritarians view the world in absolute terms (e.g., good or evil). Past studies have documented the relationship between authoritarianism and intolerance of ambiguity and rigidity. Frenkel-Brunswik (1949) hypothesized that this desire for absolutism was rooted in perceptual processes. We present a study with three samples that directly tests the relationship between right wing authoritarianism (RWA) and the processing of ideologically neutral but ambiguous visual stimuli. As hypothesized, in all three samples we found that RWA was related to the slower processing of visual information that required participants to recategorize objects. In a fourth sample, RWA was unrelated to speed of processing visual information that did not require recategorization. Overall, results suggest a relationship between RWA and rigidity in categorization. PMID:25280165

  19. Sequence data - Magnitude and implications of some ambiguities.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmquist, R.; Jukes, T. H.

    1972-01-01

    A stochastic model is applied to the divergence of the horse-pig lineage from a common ansestor in terms of the alpha and beta chains of hemoglobin and fibrinopeptides. The results are compared with those based on the minimum mutation distance model of Fitch (1972). Buckwheat and cauliflower cytochrome c sequences are analyzed to demonstrate their ambiguities. A comparative analysis of evolutionary rates for various proteins of horses and pigs shows that errors of considerable magnitude are introduced by Glx and Asx ambiguities into evolutionary conclusions drawn from sequences of incompletely analyzed proteins.

  20. A Two-Dimensional Variational Analysis Method for NSCAT Ambiguity Removal: Methodology, Sensitivity, and Tuning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, R. N.; Leidner, S. M.; Henderson, J. M.; Atlas, R.; Ardizzone, J. V.; Bloom, S. C.; Atlas, Robert (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    In this study, we apply a two-dimensional variational analysis method (2d-VAR) to select a wind solution from NASA Scatterometer (NSCAT) ambiguous winds. 2d-VAR determines a "best" gridded surface wind analysis by minimizing a cost function. The cost function measures the misfit to the observations, the background, and the filtering and dynamical constraints. The ambiguity closest in direction to the minimizing analysis is selected. 2d-VAR method, sensitivity and numerical behavior are described. 2d-VAR is compared to statistical interpolation (OI) by examining the response of both systems to a single ship observation and to a swath of unique scatterometer winds. 2d-VAR is used with both NSCAT ambiguities and NSCAT backscatter values. Results are roughly comparable. When the background field is poor, 2d-VAR ambiguity removal often selects low probability ambiguities. To avoid this behavior, an initial 2d-VAR analysis, using only the two most likely ambiguities, provides the first guess for an analysis using all the ambiguities or the backscatter data. 2d-VAR and median filter selected ambiguities usually agree. Both methods require horizontal consistency, so disagreements occur in clumps, or as linear features. In these cases, 2d-VAR ambiguities are often more meteorologically reasonable and more consistent with satellite imagery.

  1. AMBIGUITY IN OMEGA CONTEXT FREE LANGUAGES

    E-print Network

    Finkel, Olivier - �quipe de Logique Mathématique, Université Paris 7

    free languages to the case of omega context free languages (!-* *CFL) accepted by B"uchi or Muller free languages. A context free grammar G is said to be non ambiguous if every word x generated by G if it is the language L = L(G) generated by a non ambiguous context free grammar G; otherwise the CFL L is said

  2. AMBIGUITY IN OMEGA CONTEXT FREE LANGUAGES

    E-print Network

    Finkel, Olivier - �quipe de Logique Mathématique, Université Paris 7

    context free languages to the case of omega context free languages (!-CFL) accepted by Buchi or Muller. A context free grammar G is said to be non ambiguous if every word x generated by G is generated via if it is the language L = L(G) generated by a non ambiguous context free grammar G; otherwise the CFL L is said

  3. Ambiguous Words Are Harder to Learn

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Degani, Tamar; Tokowicz, Natasha

    2010-01-01

    Relatively little is known about the role of ambiguity in adult second-language learning. In this study, native English speakers learned Dutch-English translation pairs that either mapped in a one-to-one fashion (unambiguous items) in that a Dutch word uniquely corresponded to one English word, or mapped in a one-to-many fashion (ambiguous items),…

  4. The Communicative Function of Ambiguity in Language

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piantadosi, Steven T.; Tily, Harry; Gibson, Edward

    2012-01-01

    We present a general information-theoretic argument that all efficient communication systems will be ambiguous, assuming that context is informative about meaning. We also argue that ambiguity allows for greater ease of processing by permitting efficient linguistic units to be re-used. We test predictions of this theory in English, German, and…

  5. Effects of Bias on Processing and Reprocessing of Lexically Ambiguous Sentences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cairns, Helen S.

    1973-01-01

    Biased and unbiased ambiguous sentences, paired with either an expected'' or unexpected'' second sentence, were presented to 80 Ss for judgments of compatibility. The results supported the conclusion that only one meaning was derived for both types of ambiguities during initial comprehension processing. (Author)

  6. Do Children Exploit the Maxim of Antecedent in Order to Interpret Ambiguous Descriptions?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Surian, Luca

    1991-01-01

    Reports the results of a study to determine children's use of the Antecedent Maxim strategy in which 20 Italian 6-year olds and 20 8-year olds were asked to interpret 8 ambiguous and 8 clear definite descriptions. Findings show children use pragmatic comprehension strategies in solving referential ambiguities. (11 references) (GLR)

  7. Giving Psychological Science Away

    E-print Network

    Klatzky, Roberta

    Giving Psychological Science Away The Role of Applications Courses Roberta L. Klatzky Carnegie reasons for that gap, including confusion between the relevance of psychological science and its actual students constitute a relatively underutilized audience for demonstrating that psychological science has

  8. Stimulation of Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL) Cells with CpG Oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN) Gives Consistent Karyotypic Results among Laboratories: a CLL Research Consortium (CRC)h Study

    PubMed Central

    Heerema, Nyla A.; Byrd, John C.; Cin, Paola Dal; Dell’ Aquila, Marie L.; Koduru, Prasad; Aviram, Ayala; Smoley, Stephanie; Rassenti, Laura Z.; Greaves, Andrew W.; Brown, Jennifer R.; Rai, Kanti R.; Kipps, Thomas J.; Kay, Neil E.; van Dyke, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    Cytogenetic abnormalities in CLL are important prognostic indicators. Historically, only interphase cytogenetics was clinically useful in CLL because traditional mitogens are not effective mitotic stimulants. Recently, CpG-oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN) stimulation has shown effectiveness in CLL. The CLL Research Consortium (CRC) tested the effectiveness and reproducibility of CpG-ODN stimulation to detect chromosomally abnormal clones by five laboratories. More clonal abnormalities were observed after culture of CLL cells with CpG-ODN than with pokeweed mitogen (PWM)+12-O-tetradecanoyl-phorobol-13-acetate (TPA). All clonal abnormalities in PWM+TPA cultures were observed in CpG-ODN cultures, whereas CpG-ODN identified some clones not found by PWM+TPA. CpG-ODN stimulation of one normal control and 12 CLL samples showed that excepting clones of del(13q) in low frequencies and one translocation, results in all five laboratories were consistent, and all abnormalities were concordant with FISH. Thus, abnormal clones in CLL are more readily detected with CpG-ODN stimulation than with traditional B-cell mitogens. After CpG-ODN stimulation, abnormalities were reproducible among cytogenetic laboratories. CpG-ODN did not appear to induce aberrations in cell culture and enhanced detection of abnormalities and complexity in CLL. Since karyotypic complexity is prognostic and is not detectable by standard FISH analyses, stimulation with CpG-ODN is useful to identify this additional prognostic factor in CLL. PMID:21156225

  9. Clock ambiguity and the emergence of physical laws

    SciTech Connect

    Albrecht, Andreas; Iglesias, Alberto

    2008-03-15

    The process of identifying a time variable in time-reparameterization invariant theories results in great ambiguities about the actual laws of physics described by a given theory. A theory set up to describe one set of physical laws can equally well be interpreted as describing any other laws of physics by making a different choice of time variable or clock. In this article we demonstrate how this 'clock ambiguity' arises and then discuss how one might still hope to extract specific predictions about the laws of physics even when the clock ambiguity is present. We argue that a requirement of quasiseparability should play a critical role in such an analysis. As a step in this direction, we compare the Hamiltonian of a local quantum field theory with a completely random Hamiltonian. We find that any random Hamiltonian (constructed in a sufficiently large space) can yield a 'good enough' approximation to a local field theory. Based on this result we argue that theories that suffer from the clock ambiguity may in the end provide a viable fundamental framework for physics in which locality can be seen as a strongly favored (or predicted) emergent behavior. We also speculate on how other key aspects of known physics such as gauge symmetries and Poincare invariance might be predicted to emerge in this framework.

  10. GNSS integer ambiguity validation based on posterior probability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Zemin; Bian, Shaofeng

    2015-10-01

    GNSS integer ambiguity validation is considered to be a challenge task for decades. Several kinds of validation tests are developed and widely used in these years, but theoretical basis is their weakness. Ambiguity validation theoretically is an issue of hypothesis test. In the frame of Bayesian hypothesis testing, posterior probability is the canonical standard that statistical decision should be based on. In this contribution, (i) we derive the posterior probability of the fixed ambiguity based on the Bayesian principle and modify it for practice ambiguity validation. (ii) The optimal property of the posterior probability test is proved based on an extended Neyman-Pearson lemma. Since validation failure rate is the issue users most concerned about, (iii) we derive the failure rate upper bound of the posterior probability test, so the user can use the posterior probability test either in the fixed posterior probability or in the fixed failure rate way. Simulated as well as real observed data are used for experimental validations. The results show that (i) the posterior probability test is the most effective within the R-ratio test, difference test, ellipsoidal integer aperture test and posterior probability test, (ii) the posterior probability test is computational efficient and (iii) the failure rate estimation for posterior probability test is useful.

  11. Learning the Language of Evolution: Lexical Ambiguity and Word Meaning in Student Explanations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rector, Meghan A.; Nehm, Ross H.; Pearl, Dennis

    2013-06-01

    Our study investigates the challenges introduced by students' use of lexically ambiguous language in evolutionary explanations. Specifically, we examined students' meaning of five key terms incorporated into their written evolutionary explanations: pressure, select, adapt, need, and must. We utilized a new technological tool known as the Assessment Cascade System (ACS) to investigate the frequency with which biology majors spontaneously used lexically ambiguous language in evolutionary explanations, as well as their definitions and explanations of what they meant when they used such terms. Three categories of language were identified and examined in this study: terms with Dual Ambiguity, Incompatible Ambiguity, and Unintended Ambiguity. In the sample of 1282 initial evolutionary explanations, 81 % of students spontaneously incorporated lexically ambiguous language at least once. Furthermore, the majority of these initial responses were judged to be inaccurate from a scientific point of view. While not significantly related to gender, age, or reading/writing ability, students' use of contextually appropriate evolutionary language ( pressure and adapt) was significantly associated with academic performance in biology. Comparisons of initial responses to follow-up responses demonstrated that the majority of student explanations were not reinterpreted after consideration of the follow-up response; nevertheless, a sizeable minority was interpreted differently. Most cases of interpretation change were a consequence of resolving initially ambiguous responses, rather than a change of accuracy, resulting in an increased understanding of students' evolutionary explanations. We discuss a series of implications of lexical ambiguity for evolution education.

  12. Event ambiguity fuels the effective spread of rumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jiuping; Zhang, Yi

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, a new rumor spreading model which quantifies a specific rumor spreading feature is proposed. The specific feature focused on is the important role the event ambiguity plays in the rumor spreading process. To study the impact of this event ambiguity on the spread of rumors, the probability p(t) that an individual becomes a rumor spreader from an initially unaware person at time t is built. p(t) reflects the extent of event ambiguity, and a parameter c of p(t) is used to measure the speed at which the event moves from ambiguity to confirmation. At the same time, a principle is given to decide on the correct value for parameter c A rumor spreading model is then developed with this function added as a parameter to the traditional model. Then, several rumor spreading model simulations are conducted with different values for c on both regular networks and ER random networks. The simulation results indicate that a rumor spreads faster and more broadly when c is smaller. This shows that if events are ambiguous over a longer time, rumor spreading appears to be more effective, and is influenced more significantly by parameter c in a random network than in a regular network. We then determine parameters of this model through data fitting of the missing Malaysian plane, and apply this model to an analysis of the missing Malaysian plane. The simulation results demonstrate that the most critical time for authorities to control rumor spreading is in the early stages of a critical event.

  13. Ambiguities in spaceborne synthetic aperture radar systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, F. K.; Johnson, W. T. K.

    1983-01-01

    An examination of aspects of spaceborne SAR time delay and Doppler ambiguities has led to the formulation of an accurate method for the evaluation of the ratio of ambiguity intensities to that of the signal, which has been applied to the nominal SAR system on Seasat. After discussing the variation of this ratio as a function of orbital latitude and attitude control error, it is shown that the detailed range migration-azimuth phase history of an ambiguity is different from that of a signal, so that the images of ambiguities are dispersed. Seasat SAR dispersed images are presented, and their dispersions are eliminated through an adjustment of the processing parameters. A method is also presented which uses a set of multiple pulse repetition sequences to determine the Doppler centroid frequency absolute values for SARs with high carrier frequencies and poor attitude measurements.

  14. Ambiguous Rights: Gender Politics and Theory

    E-print Network

    Beck, Jillian

    2011-01-01

    Gender, Politics, and Theory Critical and Supportive of Marriage?of marriage. he panel, “Ambiguous Rights: Gender, panelgender difference. contents According to Popa, while Mill openly criticized how marriage

  15. Role ambiguity, employee gender, and workplace friendship.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chien-Yu; Mao, Hsiao-Yen; Hsieh, An-Tien

    2012-06-01

    The importance of workplace friendship is recognized by researchers and practitioners, but its antecedents with respect to work roles are not well understood. Employees' gender might moderate a relationship between work roles and friendships. Data from a survey of 221 international tourist hotel employees showed that a key aspect of job support, role ambiguity, was negatively related to having workplace friendships. However, employees' gender did not moderate this relationship. Role clarity (the opposite of role ambiguity) may facilitate workplace friendships. PMID:22897079

  16. European starlings unriddle the ambiguous-cue problem

    PubMed Central

    Vasconcelos, Marco; Monteiro, Tiago

    2014-01-01

    The ambiguous-cue problem is deceptively simple. It involves two concurrently trained simultaneous discriminations (known as PA and NA trials), but only three stimuli. Stimulus A is common to both discriminations, but serves as non-reinforced stimulus (S-) on PA trials and as reinforced stimulus (S+) on NA trials. Typically, animals’ accuracy is lower on PA trials—the ambiguous-cue effect. We conducted two experiments with European starlings (Sturnus vulgaris) using Urcuioli and Michalek’s (2007, Psychon B Rev 14, 658–662) experimental manipulations as a springboard to test the predictions of two of the most important theoretical accounts of the effect: the interfering cue hypothesis and value transfer theory. Both experiments included two groups of birds, one trained with a regular ambiguous-cue problem (Group Continuous) and another trained with partial reinforcement on PA trials (Group PA-Partial). The experiments differed only in the number of sessions (18 vs. 36) and daily trials (360 vs. 60). As previously observed, we found faster acquisition on NA trials than on PA trials in both experiments, but by the end of training PA performance was surprisingly high, such that no ambiguous-cue effect was present in Group Continuous of either experiment. The effect was still present in both PA-Partial groups, but to a smaller degree than expected. These findings are inconsistent with the literature, in particular with the results of Urcuioli and Michalek (2007) with pigeons, and question the aforementioned theoretical accounts as complete explanations of the ambiguous-cue effect. In our view, to achieve such high levels of accuracy on PA trials, starlings must have attended to configural (i.e., contextual) cues, thus differentiating stimulus A when presented on PA trials from stimulus A when presented on NA trials. A post hoc simulation of a reinforcement-based configural model supported our assertion. PMID:25206346

  17. Recommendations for reducing ambiguity in written procedures.

    SciTech Connect

    Matzen, Laura E.

    2009-11-01

    Previous studies in the nuclear weapons complex have shown that ambiguous work instructions (WIs) and operating procedures (OPs) can lead to human error, which is a major cause for concern. This report outlines some of the sources of ambiguity in written English and describes three recommendations for reducing ambiguity in WIs and OPs. The recommendations are based on commonly used research techniques in the fields of linguistics and cognitive psychology. The first recommendation is to gather empirical data that can be used to improve the recommended word lists that are provided to technical writers. The second recommendation is to have a review in which new WIs and OPs and checked for ambiguities and clarity. The third recommendation is to use self-paced reading time studies to identify any remaining ambiguities before the new WIs and OPs are put into use. If these three steps are followed for new WIs and OPs, the likelihood of human errors related to ambiguity could be greatly reduced.

  18. Probability judgments under ambiguity and conflict

    PubMed Central

    Smithson, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Whether conflict and ambiguity are distinct kinds of uncertainty remains an open question, as does their joint impact on judgments of overall uncertainty. This paper reviews recent advances in our understanding of human judgment and decision making when both ambiguity and conflict are present, and presents two types of testable models of judgments under conflict and ambiguity. The first type concerns estimate-pooling to arrive at “best” probability estimates. The second type is models of subjective assessments of conflict and ambiguity. These models are developed for dealing with both described and experienced information. A framework for testing these models in the described-information setting is presented, including a reanalysis of a multi-nation data-set to test best-estimate models, and a study of participants' assessments of conflict, ambiguity, and overall uncertainty reported by Smithson (2013). A framework for research in the experienced-information setting is then developed, that differs substantially from extant paradigms in the literature. This framework yields new models of “best” estimates and perceived conflict. The paper concludes with specific suggestions for future research on judgment and decision making under conflict and ambiguity. PMID:26042081

  19. Ambiguity Can Be Pragmatic, and a Good Thing, Too.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Rong

    Both the speaker and hearer of a conversation can make use of ambiguity to achieve their special purpose in a given situation. The strategies stemming from pragmatic ambiguity offer distinct advantages to speakers and hearers. When dealing with ambiguity, linguists have concentrated on the source of ambiguity and how to analyze it. References to…

  20. Give/Take

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2007-09-12

    Give and Take are set of companion utilities that allow a secure transfer of files from one user to another without exposing the files to third parties. The named files are copied to a spool area. The reciever can retrieve the files by running the "take" program. Ownership of the files remains with the giver until they are taken. Certain users may be limited to take files only from specific givers. For these users, filesmore »may only be taken from givers who are members of the gt-uid-group where uid is the UNIX id of the limited user.« less

  1. Ambiguity as a signature of the (in)adequation between a model, an available data set and the problem to be solved

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zin, I.; Saulnier, G. M.; Obled, Ch.

    2003-04-01

    Three levels of complexity are inherent to a simulation. The first one is fixed by the question the modeller has to answer: the more complex it is, the more it may require a complex model and/or a lot of information. The second one is fixed by the information contained in the available data set : the more lacking and/or uncertain data there are, the more uncertain the simulation results can be. Finally, the third level of complexity is linked to the choice of the structure of the model, which may be too complex for the actually available data and existing theories and/or too simple versus the problem to be solved. Generally, a compromise has to be done between these three levels of complexity, in order to constrain the model parameter values and to reduce uncertainty. However, a problem of non-uniqueness in parameter estimation and model identification is frequently observed. A methodology based on a Monte Carlo sampling of different parameter values is here proposed for assessing the model ambiguity. By a Chi-square test, this approach allows to identify all the model parameter values giving simulations that (i) are not significantly different, notably due to the uncertainties on the forcing data series (internal ambiguity) and/or (ii) are different, but globally as close as the others to the validation data series (external ambiguity). An application of the methodology to the river discharge modelling at the outlet of the Vogue catchment (640 km2, in the Cevennes region, France) by TOPSIMPL is presented. It is shown that throughout a rainfall-runoff event, the model is mostly ambiguous during the rising phase of the discharge while lowly ambiguous at the peak and during the recession phase. This allows to determine which are the more constrainable parameter values.

  2. An Ambiguity Aversion Framework of Security Games under Ambiguities , Xudong Luo2

    E-print Network

    Liu, Weiru

    An Ambiguity Aversion Framework of Security Games under Ambiguities Wenjun Ma1 , Xudong Luo2 , and Weiru Liu1 1 School of Electronics, Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Queen's University-sen University, Guangzhou, China, 510275 luoxd3@mail.sysu.edu.cn Abstract Security is a critical concern around

  3. Query Ambiguity Revisited: Clickthrough Measures for Distinguishing Informational and Ambiguous Queries

    E-print Network

    Agichtein, Eugene

    the ex- ample queries of each type below: Ambiguous Unambiguous Informational "al pacino" "lyrics informational intents. In contrast, the query "lyrics" has an unambiguous informational in- tent, which is to explore websites with song lyrics. For the ambiguous navigational query "people", popular destinations

  4. Clarity and ambiguity in psychoanalytic practice.

    PubMed

    Szajnberg, Nathan

    2011-03-01

    The author explores the presence and the essential tension between clarity and ambiguity as processes within our minds that become prominent in psychoanalysis. We learn from aesthetics and literary criticism that ambiguity can shade from taut disorganization to tolerating life's richness; clarity can range from a concrete fixity to a lucid grasp of one's state of mind. This article responds to Wallerstein's (1991) challenge to find common ground in psychoanalytic practice: We attempt this by avoiding metapsychological jargon and relying on more experience-near terms, such as clarity and ambiguity. The article also refers to Sandler's (1983) concept of implicit theory-that psychoanalysts use "preconscious, overlapping but not fully integrated models" (Sandler, 1988, p. 388)-in this case explicating how clarity and ambiguity are frequent but implicit phenomena in clinical work. Identifying these and the essential tension between them permits us to both improve training and identify our clinical efforts. The analyst's and analysand's tolerance of the tension between clarity and ambiguity facilitates increased structuralization and emotional robustness. PMID:21500957

  5. Phalloplasty in Complete Aphallia and Ambiguous Genitalia

    PubMed Central

    Bluebond-Langner, Rachel; Redett, Richard J.

    2011-01-01

    The most common indications for phalloplasty in children include aphallia, micropenis/severe penile inadequacy, ambiguous genitalia, phallic inadequacy associated with epispadias/bladder exstrophy and female to male gender reassignment in adolescents. There are many surgical options for phalloplasty; both local pedicled tissue as well as free tissue transfer. The advantages of local tissue include a more concealed donor site, less complex operation and potentially faster recovery. However, pedicled options are generally less sensate, making placement of a penile prosthesis more risky and many children with bladder exstrophy have been previously operated upon making the blood supply for local pedicled flaps less reliable. This Here the authors discuss free tissue transfer, including the radial forearm, the anterolateral thigh, the scapula and latissimus, and the fibula free flaps, as well as local rotational flaps from the abdomen, groin, and thigh. The goal of reconstruction should be an aesthetic and functional (ability to penetrate) phallus, which provides tactile and erogenous sensation, and the ability to urinate standing. Ideally, the operation should be completed in one to two operations with minimal donor site morbidity. There are advantages and disadvantages of each of flap and thus the choice of donor site should be a combination of the patient's preference and surgeon's ability to produce a consistent result. PMID:22851911

  6. Doppler shift and ambiguity velocity caused by relative motion in quantum-enhanced measurement.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yanghe; Xu, Luping; Zhang, Hua; Yang, Peng

    2015-07-13

    We study the effect of relative motion on a frequency-entangled-based ranging scheme. Two major puzzles arise, i.e., Doppler shift and ambiguity velocity. During condition of rapid relative motion, Doppler shift invalidates the measurement result of this scheme; while during condition of slow relative motion, the ambiguity velocity turns into a major limitation. If relative speed between targets and measurement platform exceeds the ambiguity velocity, an accumulated profile obtained by the coincidence measurement will be distorted, which causes a lower ranging accuracy. Theoretical analysis shows a time-varying delay can be introduced to solve the two major puzzles. PMID:26191903

  7. Death: 'nothing' gives insight.

    PubMed

    Ettema, Eric J

    2013-08-01

    According to a widely accepted belief, we cannot know our own death--death means 'nothing' to us. At first sight, the meaning of 'nothing' just implies the negation or absence of 'something'. Death then simply refers to the negation or absence of life. As a consequence, however, death has no meaning of itself. This leads to an ontological paradox in which death is both acknowledged and denied: death is … nothing. In this article, I investigate whether insight into the ontological paradox of the nothingness of death can contribute to a good end-of-life. By analysing Aquinas', Heidegger's and Derrida's understanding of death as nothingness, I explore how giving meaning to death on different ontological levels connects to, and at the same time provides resistance against, the harsh reality of death. By doing so, I intend to demonstrate that insight into the nothingness of death can count as a framework for a meaningful dealing with death. PMID:23054426

  8. Sensitivity to Referential Ambiguity in Discourse: The Role of Attention, Working Memory, and Verbal Ability.

    PubMed

    Boudewyn, Megan A; Long, Debra L; Traxler, Matthew J; Lesh, Tyler A; Dave, Shruti; Mangun, George R; Carter, Cameron S; Swaab, Tamara Y

    2015-12-01

    The establishment of reference is essential to language comprehension. The goal of this study was to examine listeners' sensitivity to referential ambiguity as a function of individual variation in attention, working memory capacity, and verbal ability. Participants listened to stories in which two entities were introduced that were either very similar (e.g., two oaks) or less similar (e.g., one oak and one elm). The manipulation rendered an anaphor in a subsequent sentence (e.g., oak) ambiguous or unambiguous. EEG was recorded as listeners comprehended the story, after which participants completed tasks to assess working memory, verbal ability, and the ability to use context in task performance. Power in the alpha and theta frequency bands when listeners received critical information about the discourse entities (e.g., oaks) was used to index attention and the involvement of the working memory system in processing the entities. These measures were then used to predict an ERP component that is sensitive to referential ambiguity, the Nref, which was recorded when listeners received the anaphor. Nref amplitude at the anaphor was predicted by alpha power during the earlier critical sentence: Individuals with increased alpha power in ambiguous compared with unambiguous stories were less sensitive to the anaphor's ambiguity. Verbal ability was also predictive of greater sensitivity to referential ambiguity. Finally, increased theta power in the ambiguous compared with unambiguous condition was associated with higher working-memory span. These results highlight the role of attention and working memory in referential processing during listening comprehension. PMID:26401815

  9. A new approach to modernized GPS phase-only ambiguity resolution over long baselines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Feng-Yu; Yang, Ming; Wu, Joz

    2015-10-01

    With the advent of modernized GPS, triple-frequency phase measurements (L1, L2, and L5) are available for civil use. The successful ambiguity resolution of the integer ambiguities of the phase measurements will be the key to centimeter-level positioning. In order to achieve ambiguity resolution over long baselines, code measurements (pseudorange) are regularly incorporated with the phase measurements in the observation model. However, code multipath affects ambiguity resolution and thus completely eliminating the influence is an important issue. Therefore, the present study proposes an approach that uses only the phase measurements in the observation model. The proposed approach has three steps and focuses on resolving the integer ambiguities of the triple-frequency phase measurements. Simulation baseline data were processed by the proposed approach and the results show that the integer ambiguities of the phase measurements can be successfully resolved and that satellite geometry is an important factor for the phase-only ambiguity resolution performance. Real triple-frequency GPS data from currently available Block IIF satellites were also processed to demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed approach.

  10. The impact of fluctuations on the recognition of ambiguous patterns.

    PubMed

    Ditzinger, T; Haken, H

    1990-01-01

    The recognition of ambiguous patterns by humans is modelled by coupled differential equations which describe the formation of percepts by means of order parameters which in turn are determined by the saturation of attention parameters. We study the impact of fluctuations on the attention parameters and thus indirectly on the recognition of ambiguous patterns. Excellent agreement with psychophysical experimental results by Price on the transient behaviour of switching times and by Borsellino et al. on the distribution function of switching times as function of the size of the visual field is obtained. Our model allows us to deal also with the shift of width and position of the distribution function with respect to slow and fast observers in the sense of Borsellino. PMID:2257283

  11. Roles of frontal and temporal regions in reinterpreting semantically ambiguous sentences

    PubMed Central

    Vitello, Sylvia; Warren, Jane E.; Devlin, Joseph T.; Rodd, Jennifer M.

    2014-01-01

    Semantic ambiguity resolution is an essential and frequent part of speech comprehension because many words map onto multiple meanings (e.g., “bark,” “bank”). Neuroimaging research highlights the importance of the left inferior frontal gyrus (LIFG) and the left posterior temporal cortex in this process but the roles they serve in ambiguity resolution are uncertain. One possibility is that both regions are engaged in the processes of semantic reinterpretation that follows incorrect interpretation of an ambiguous word. Here we used fMRI to investigate this hypothesis. 20 native British English monolinguals were scanned whilst listening to sentences that contained an ambiguous word. To induce semantic reinterpretation, the disambiguating information was presented after the ambiguous word and delayed until the end of the sentence (e.g., “the teacher explained that the BARK was going to be very damp”). These sentences were compared to well-matched unambiguous sentences. Supporting the reinterpretation hypothesis, these ambiguous sentences produced more activation in both the LIFG and the left posterior inferior temporal cortex. Importantly, all but one subject showed ambiguity-related peaks within both regions, demonstrating that the group-level results were driven by high inter-subject consistency. Further support came from the finding that activation in both regions was modulated by meaning dominance. Specifically, sentences containing biased ambiguous words, which have one more dominant meaning, produced greater activation than those with balanced ambiguous words, which have two equally frequent meanings. Because the context always supported the less frequent meaning, the biased words require reinterpretation more often than balanced words. This is the first evidence of dominance effects in the spoken modality and provides strong support that frontal and temporal regions support the updating of semantic representations during speech comprehension. PMID:25120445

  12. Another model for giving.

    PubMed

    Bergman, Stanley M

    2008-12-01

    Most of the global healthcare issues facing us--from expanding access to care, to providing medical and dental care in the aftermath of disasters--are far too complex for any single sector to successfully solve. Industry, the healthcare profession, government, academia and non-governmental organizations (NGOs) are all limited in their scope and their ability to effectively address the necessary challenges of these multifaceted issues. It is only though public-private partnerships, in which the participants contribute resources and skills for which they individually are best suited, that true progress can be made in affecting change. In addition, every effort should be made to expand the pool of participants for these partnerships, including small and mid-sized organizations that may be inclined to help, but lack the experience or the infrastructure to initiate programs on their own. As the largest distributor of healthcare products and services to office-based practitioners in the combined North American and European markets, Henry Schein, Inc., is uniquely positioned to use its association with thousands of healthcare product manufacturers and its day-to-day relationships with more than 550,000 healthcare practices around the world to catalyze awareness of and support for important healthcare issues. Through Henry Schein's model for giving, the Company has been successful in forging new partnerships among industry, the healthcare profession, government, academia and NGOs, and in expanding existing ones to help meet the healthcare challenges facing us all. PMID:18781610

  13. A table of geometrical ambiguities in powder indexing obtained by exhaustive search.

    PubMed

    Oishi-Tomiyasu, R

    2016-01-01

    Geometrical ambiguity means the cases in which more than one powder indexing solution exists. Using a new function implemented in the powder indexing software CONOGRAPH, unit cells that involve geometrical ambiguity are exhaustively searched. As a result, many unknown cases are obtained, although the number of such unit cells is still rather limited. It is also proven that the number of solutions in powder auto-indexing is not always unique, but generally finite. PMID:26697869

  14. Textbook presentations of weight: Conceptual difficulties and language ambiguities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taibu, Rex; Rudge, David; Schuster, David

    2015-06-01

    The term "weight" has multiple related meanings in both scientific and everyday usage. Even among experts and in textbooks, weight is ambiguously defined as either the gravitational force on an object or operationally as the magnitude of the force an object exerts on a measuring scale. This poses both conceptual and language difficulties for learners, especially for accelerating objects where the scale reading is different from the gravitational force. But while the underlying physical constructs behind the two referents for the term weight (and their relation to each other) are well understood scientifically, it is unclear how the concept of weight should be introduced to students and how the language ambiguities should be dealt with. We investigated treatments of weight in a sample of twenty introductory college physics textbooks, analyzing and coding their content based on the definition adopted, how the distinct constructs were dealt with in various situations, terminologies used, and whether and how language issues were handled. Results indicate that language-related issues, such as different, inconsistent, or ambiguous uses of the terms weight, "apparent weight," and "weightlessness," were prevalent both across and within textbooks. The physics of the related constructs was not always clearly presented, particularly for accelerating bodies such as astronauts in spaceships, and the language issue was rarely addressed. Our analysis of both literature and textbooks leads us to an instructional position which focuses on the physics constructs before introducing the term weight, and which explicitly discusses the associated language issues.

  15. Ionosphere Weighted GPS Cycle Ambiguity Resolution1

    E-print Network

    Calgary, University of

    1 Ionosphere Weighted GPS Cycle Ambiguity Resolution1 George Chia Liu, Gérard Lachapelle Department approach to mitigate the high ionospheric effect has been either to reduce the inter-station separation or to form ionosphere-free observables. Neither is satisfactory: the first restricts the operating range

  16. Teachers' Burnout, Depression, Role Ambiguity and Conflict

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Papastylianou, Antonia; Kaila, Maria; Polychronopoulos, Michael

    2009-01-01

    The present study investigates issues associated with teachers' burnout in primary education as related to depression and role conflict-ambiguity. At the time of the study the participants (562 teachers) were working in seventy nine (79) Primary Education State Schools in Greece (Athens and two prefectures in the southern part of the country). The…

  17. Actions and Affordances in Syntactic Ambiguity Resolution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chambers, Craig G.; Tanenhaus, Michael K.; Magnuson, James S.

    2004-01-01

    In 2 experiments, eye movements were monitored as participants followed instructions containing temporary syntactic ambiguities (e.g., "Pour the egg in the bowl over the flour"). The authors varied the affordances of task-relevant objects with respect to the action required by the instruction (e.g., whether 1 or both eggs in the visual workspace…

  18. The Development of Ambiguous Figure Perception

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wimmer, Marina C.; Doherty, Martin J.

    2011-01-01

    Ambiguous figures have fascinated researchers for almost 200 years. The physical properties of these figures remain constant, yet two distinct interpretations are possible; these reverse (switch) from one percept to the other. The consensus is that reversal requires complex interaction of perceptual bottom-up and cognitive top-down elements. The…

  19. A Framework for Space Systems Architecting under Stakeholder Objectives Ambiguity

    E-print Network

    de Weck, Olivier L.

    1 A Framework for Space Systems Architecting under Stakeholder Objectives Ambiguity by Ing;2 A Framework for Space Systems Architecting under Stakeholder Objectives Ambiguity by Alessandro Aliakbargolkar. This thesis develops a structured approach to develop recommendations to system architects concerned

  20. Ionosphere influence on success rate of GPS ambiguity resolution in a satellite formation flying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baroni, Leandro

    2015-10-01

    Satellite formation flying is one of the most promising technologies for future space missions. The distribution of sensors and payloads among different satellites provides more redundancy, flexibility, improved communication coverage, among other advantages. One of the fundamental issues in spacecraft formation flying is precise position and velocity determination between satellites. For missions in low Earth orbits, GPS system can meet the precision requirement in relative positioning, since the satellite dynamics is modeled properly. The key for high accuracy GPS relative positioning is to resolve the ambiguities to their integer values. Ambiguities resolved successfully can improve the positioning accuracy to decimetre or even millimetre-level. So, integer carrier phase ambiguity resolution is often a prerequisite for high precision GPS positioning. The determination of relative position was made using an extended Kalman filter. The filter must take into account imperfections in dynamic modeling of perturbations affecting the orbital flight, and changes in solar activity that affects the GPS signal propagation, for mitigating these effects on relative positioning accuracy. Thus, this work aims to evaluate the impact of ionosphere variation, caused by changes in solar activity, in success rate of ambiguity resolution. Using the Ambiguity Dilution of Precision (ADOP) concept, the ambiguity success rate is analyzed and the expected precision of the ambiguity-fixed solution is calculated. Evaluations were performed using actual data from GRACE mission and analyzed for their performance in real scenarios. Analyses were conducted in different configurations of relative position and during different levels of solar activity. Results bring the impact of various disturbances and modeling of solar activity level on the success rate of ambiguity resolution.

  1. A study of potential sources of linguistic ambiguity in written work instructions.

    SciTech Connect

    Matzen, Laura E.

    2009-11-01

    This report describes the results of a small experimental study that investigated potential sources of ambiguity in written work instructions (WIs). The English language can be highly ambiguous because words with different meanings can share the same spelling. Previous studies in the nuclear weapons complex have shown that ambiguous WIs can lead to human error, which is a major cause for concern. To study possible sources of ambiguity in WIs, we determined which of the recommended action verbs in the DOE and BWXT writer's manuals have numerous meanings to their intended audience, making them potentially ambiguous. We used cognitive psychology techniques to conduct a survey in which technicians who use WIs in their jobs indicated the first meaning that came to mind for each of the words. Although the findings of this study are limited by the small number of respondents, we identified words that had many different meanings even within this limited sample. WI writers should pay particular attention to these words and to their most frequent meanings so that they can avoid ambiguity in their writing.

  2. The Inertial Attitude Augmentation for Ambiguity Resolution in SF/SE-GNSS Attitude Determination

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jiancheng; Hu, Xiaoping; Zhang, Jingyu; Li, Tao; Wang, Jinling; Wu, Meiping

    2014-01-01

    The Unaided Single Frequency/Single Epoch Global Navigation Satellite System (SF/SE GNSS) model is the most challenging scenario for ambiguity resolution in the GNSS attitude determination application. To improve the performance of SF/SE-GNSS ambiguity resolution without excessive cost, the Micro-Electro-Mechanical System Inertial Measurement Unit (MEMS-IMU) is a proper choice for the auxiliary sensor that carries out the inertial attitude augmentation. Firstly, based on the SF/SE-GNSS compass model, the Inertial Derived Baseline Vector (IDBV) is defined to connect the MEMS-IMU attitude measurement with the SF/SE-GNSS ambiguity search space, and the mechanism of inertial attitude augmentation is revealed from the perspective of geometry. Then, through the quantitative description of model strength by Ambiguity Dilution of Precision (ADOP), two ADOPs are specified for the unaided SF/SE-GNSS compass model and its inertial attitude augmentation counterparts, respectively, and a sufficient condition is proposed for augmenting the SF/SE-GNSS model strength with inertial attitude measurement. Finally, in the framework of an integer aperture estimator with fixed failure rate, the performance of SF/SE-GNSS ambiguity resolution with inertial attitude augmentation is analyzed when the model strength is varying from strong to weak. The simulation results show that, in the SF/SE-GNSS attitude determination application, MEMS-IMU can satisfy the requirements of ambiguity resolution with inertial attitude augmentation. PMID:24971472

  3. The Effect of Role Ambiguity on Competitive State Anxiety.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beauchamp, Mark R.; Bray, Steven R.; Eys, Mark A.; Carron, Albert V.

    2003-01-01

    Investigated the relationship between role ambiguity and precompetition state anxiety among high school athletes playing field hockey. Surveys of male and female field hockey players in the United Kingdom indicated that ambiguity concerning the scope of one's offensive responsibilities was predictive cognitive state anxiety, while ambiguity

  4. LEXICAL SEGMENTATION AND AMBIGUITY: INVESTIGATING THE RECOGNITION OF ONSETEMBEDDED WORDS

    E-print Network

    Davis, Matt

    LEXICAL SEGMENTATION AND AMBIGUITY: INVESTIGATING THE RECOGNITION OF ONSET­EMBEDDED WORDS Matt. H of acoustic markers of word boundaries in connected speech may create temporary ambiguities between words like cap and the start of longer words like captain. These ambiguities have motivated models of spoken word

  5. LEXICAL SEGMENTATION AND AMBIGUITY: INVESTIGATING THE RECOGNITION OF EMBEDDED WORDS

    E-print Network

    Davis, Matt

    LEXICAL SEGMENTATION AND AMBIGUITY: INVESTIGATING THE RECOGNITION OF EMBEDDED WORDS Matt Davis of word boundaries may create ambiguity between words like cap and the start of longer words like captain. This potential ambiguity has motivated models of spoken word recognition in which lexical competition allows

  6. Evaluation of Compass Ambiguity Resolution Performance Using Geometric-Based

    E-print Network

    Calgary, University of

    performance in terms of ambiguity resolution compared to GPS and Galileo due to the fact that Compass signals of the performance of ambiguity resolution using Compass carrier phase measurements based on covariance simulationEvaluation of Compass Ambiguity Resolution Performance Using Geometric-Based Techniques

  7. Auditory motion capturing ambiguous visual motion.

    PubMed

    Alink, Arjen; Euler, Felix; Galeano, Elena; Krugliak, Alexandra; Singer, Wolf; Kohler, Axel

    2012-01-01

    In this study, it is demonstrated that moving sounds have an effect on the direction in which one sees visual stimuli move. During the main experiment sounds were presented consecutively at four speaker locations inducing left or rightward auditory apparent motion. On the path of auditory apparent motion, visual apparent motion stimuli were presented with a high degree of directional ambiguity. The main outcome of this experiment is that our participants perceived visual apparent motion stimuli that were ambiguous (equally likely to be perceived as moving left or rightward) more often as moving in the same direction than in the opposite direction of auditory apparent motion. During the control experiment we replicated this finding and found no effect of sound motion direction on eye movements. This indicates that auditory motion can capture our visual motion percept when visual motion direction is insufficiently determinate without affecting eye movements. PMID:22232613

  8. Disambiguation of ambiguous figures in the brain

    PubMed Central

    Ishizu, Tomohiro

    2013-01-01

    Disambiguation refers to the ability to interpret ambiguous information in a sensible way, which is important in an ever-changing external environment. Disambiguation occurs when prior knowledge is given before an ambiguous stimulus is presented. For example, labeling a series of meaningless blobs as a “human body” can change the observer's perception. The aim of this experiment was to study the neural circuitry underlying disambiguation caused by prior knowledge. We presented to participants a series of meaningless blobs with different contextual information. As participants performed this task, we used magnetoencephalography to map the brain areas that were activated when participants perceived blobs as a human body. The participants were presented identical sets of blob stimuli, and were instructed that a human body would appear more frequently in the “high body” condition than in the “low body” condition. We found the blob stimuli were more frequently perceived as the human body when they were presented in the “high body” condition. Such contextual modulation correlated with activity in the extrastriate body area (EBA) and the inferior frontal gyrus (IFG). Furthermore, we observed that IFG activation preceded EBA activation. These findings suggest that top-down processing in the IFG plays a role in disambiguating ambiguous information and modifying an individual's perceptions. PMID:24009570

  9. Decoding covert shifts of attention induced by ambiguous visuospatial cues

    PubMed Central

    Trachel, Romain E.; Clerc, Maureen; Brochier, Thomas G.

    2015-01-01

    Simple and unambiguous visual cues (e.g., an arrow) can be used to trigger covert shifts of visual attention away from the center of gaze. The processing of visual stimuli is enhanced at the attended location. Covert shifts of attention modulate the power of cerebral oscillations in the alpha band over parietal and occipital regions. These modulations are sufficiently robust to be decoded on a single trial basis from electroencephalography (EEG) signals. It is often assumed that covert attention shifts are under voluntary control, and that they also occur in more natural and complex environments, but there is no direct evidence to support this assumption. We address this important issue by using random-dot stimuli to cue one of two opposite locations, where a visual target is presented. We contrast two conditions, one in which the random-dot motion is predictive of the target location, and the other, in which it provides ambiguous information. Behavioral results show attention shifts in anticipation of the visual target, in both conditions. In addition, using the common spatial patterns (CSPs) algorithm, we extract EEG power features in the alpha-band (around 10 Hz) that best discriminate the attended location in single trials. We obtain a significant decoding accuracy in 7/10 subjects using a cross-validation procedure applied in the predictive condition. Interestingly, similar accuracy (significant in 5/10 subjects) is obtained when the CSPs trained in the predictive condition are tested in the ambiguous condition. In agreement with this result, we find that the CSPs show very similar topographies in both conditions. These results shed a new light on the behavioral and EEG correlates of visuospatial attention in complex visual environments. This study demonstrates that alpha-power features could be used in brain–computer interfaces to decode covert attention shifts in an environment containing ambiguous spatial information. PMID:26150780

  10. Risk and Ambiguity-on-Nature in Normal-form Games Modeling Risk and Ambiguity-on-Nature in

    E-print Network

    Yang, Jian

    Risk and Ambiguity-on-Nature in Normal-form Games Modeling Risk and Ambiguity-on-Nature in Normal University Newark, NJ 07102 Email: jyang@business.rutgers.edu November 2015 1 / 22 #12;Risk and Ambiguity-on-Nature and nature, acting as exogenous source of randomness and treated as player n + 1 Under any nature action an+1

  11. Giving and Getting Career Advice

    E-print Network

    Tilbury, Dawn

    that all women and men of color are particularly likely to suffer career setbacks from lack of career; supporters, people who give emotional and moral encouragement; tutors, people who give specific feedback

  12. GNSS triple-frequency geometry-free and ionosphere-free track-to-track ambiguities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kan; Rothacher, Markus

    2015-06-01

    During the last few years, more and more GNSS satellites have become available sending signals on three or even more frequencies. Examples are the GPS Block IIF and the Galileo In-Orbit-Validation (IOV) satellites. Various investigations have been performed to make use of the increasing number of frequencies to find a compromise between eliminating different error sources and minimizing the noise level, including the investigations in the triple-frequency geometry-free (GF) and ionosphere-free (IF) linear combinations, which eliminate all the geometry-related errors and the first-order term of the ionospheric delays. In contrast to the double-difference GF and IF ambiguity resolution, the resolution of the so-called track-to-track GF and IF ambiguities between two tracks of a satellite observed by the same station only requires one receiver and one satellite. Most of the remaining errors like receiver and satellite delays (electronics, cables, etc.) are eliminated, if they are not changing rapidly in time, and the noise level is reduced theoretically by a factor of square root of two compared to double-differences. This paper presents first results concerning track-to-track ambiguity resolution using triple-frequency GF and IF linear combinations based on data from the Multi-GNSS Experiment (MGEX) from April 29 to May 9, 2012 and from December 23 to December 29, 2012. This includes triple-frequency phase and code observations with different combinations of receiver tracking modes. The results show that it is possible to resolve the combined track-to-track ambiguities of the best two triple-frequency GF and IF linear combinations for the Galileo frequency triplet E1, E5b and E5a with more than 99.6% of the fractional ambiguities for the best linear combination being located within ± 0.03 cycles and more than 98.8% of the fractional ambiguities for the second best linear combination within ± 0.2 cycles, while the fractional parts of the ambiguities for the GPS frequency triplet L1, L2 and L5 are more disturbed by errors as e.g. the uncalibrated Phase Center Offsets (PCOs) and Phase Center Variations (PCVs), that have not been considered. The best two GF and IF linear combinations between tracks are helpful to detect problems in data and receivers. Furthermore, resolving the track-to-track ambiguities is helpful to connect the single-receiver ambiguities on the normal equation level and to improve ambiguity resolution.

  13. Human Perception of Ambiguous Inertial Motion Cues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Guan-Lu

    2010-01-01

    Human daily activities on Earth involve motions that elicit both tilt and translation components of the head (i.e. gazing and locomotion). With otolith cues alone, tilt and translation can be ambiguous since both motions can potentially displace the otolithic membrane by the same magnitude and direction. Transitions between gravity environments (i.e. Earth, microgravity and lunar) have demonstrated to alter the functions of the vestibular system and exacerbate the ambiguity between tilt and translational motion cues. Symptoms of motion sickness and spatial disorientation can impair human performances during critical mission phases. Specifically, Space Shuttle landing records show that particular cases of tilt-translation illusions have impaired the performance of seasoned commanders. This sensorimotor condition is one of many operational risks that may have dire implications on future human space exploration missions. The neural strategy with which the human central nervous system distinguishes ambiguous inertial motion cues remains the subject of intense research. A prevailing theory in the neuroscience field proposes that the human brain is able to formulate a neural internal model of ambiguous motion cues such that tilt and translation components can be perceptually decomposed in order to elicit the appropriate bodily response. The present work uses this theory, known as the GIF resolution hypothesis, as the framework for experimental hypothesis. Specifically, two novel motion paradigms are employed to validate the neural capacity of ambiguous inertial motion decomposition in ground-based human subjects. The experimental setup involves the Tilt-Translation Sled at Neuroscience Laboratory of NASA JSC. This two degree-of-freedom motion system is able to tilt subjects in the pitch plane and translate the subject along the fore-aft axis. Perception data will be gathered through subject verbal reports. Preliminary analysis of perceptual data does not indicate that the GIF resolution hypothesis is completely valid for non-rotational periodic motions. Additionally, human perception of translation is impaired without visual or spatial reference. The performance of ground-base subjects in estimating tilt after brief training is comparable with that of crewmembers without training.

  14. Hemispheric asymmetries in semantic processing: evidence from false memories for ambiguous words.

    PubMed

    Faust, Miriam; Ben-Artzi, Elisheva; Harel, Itay

    2008-06-01

    Previous research suggests that the left hemisphere (LH) focuses on strongly related word meanings; the right hemisphere (RH) may contribute uniquely to the processing of lexical ambiguity by activating and maintaining a wide range of meanings, including subordinate meanings. The present study used the word-lists false memory paradigm [Roediger, H. L. III., & McDermott, K. B. (1995). Creating false memories: Remembering words not presented in lists. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition, 21, 803-814.] to examine whether these differences between the two cerebral hemispheres in semantic processing also affect memory representations for different meanings of ambiguous words. Specifically, we tested the differences between the LH and RH in recollecting unpresented, semantically related, ambiguous words following the presentation of lists of words all related to either the dominant or the subordinate meanings of these ambiguous words. Findings showed that for the unpresented ambiguous words, the LH made more false alarms than the RH for the dominant lists, whereas the opposite pattern emerged for subordinate lists. Moreover, d' analyses showed that, whereas the LH was more sensitive to subordinate than dominant meanings, the RH showed no differences in sensitivity for the two types of word-lists. Taken as a whole, these results support the RH coarse semantic coding theory [Beeman, M. (1998). Coarse semantic coding and discourse comprehension. In Beeman & M., Chiarello, C. (Eds.), Right hemisphere language comprehension: Perspectives from cognitive neuroscience (pp. 255-284). Mahwah, NJ: Erlbaum; Jung-Beeman, M. (2005). Bilateral brain processes for comprehending natural language. Trends in Cognitive Sciences, 9, 512-518.] indicating that during word recognition, the RH activates and maintains a broader and less differentiated range of related meanings than the LH, including both dominant and subordinate meanings of ambiguous words. Furthermore, the findings suggest that hemispheric differences in ambiguity resolution during language processing extend also to verbal memory. PMID:18178246

  15. Ambiguity between self and other: Individual differences in action attribution.

    PubMed

    de Bézenac, Christophe E; Sluming, Vanessa; O'Sullivan, Noreen; Corcoran, Rhiannon

    2015-09-01

    Individuals differ in their ability to attribute actions to self or other. This variance is thought to explain, in part, the experience of voice-hearing. Misattribution can also be context-driven. For example, causal ambiguity can arise when the actions of two or more individuals are coordinated and produce similar effects (e.g., music-making). Experience in such challenging contexts may refine skills of action attribution. Forty participants completed a novel finger-tapping task which parametrically manipulated the proportion of control that 'self' versus 'other' possessed over resulting auditory tones. Results showed that action misattribution peaked in the middle of the self-to-other continuum and was biased towards other. This pattern was related to both high hallucination-proneness and to low musical-experience. Findings suggest not only that causal ambiguity plays a key role in agency but also that action attribution abilities may improve with practice, potentially providing an avenue for remediation of the positive symptoms of schizophrenia. PMID:25956971

  16. Effects of pitch accents in attachment ambiguity resolution

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eun-Kyung; Watson, Duane G.

    2011-01-01

    Previous work has found that listeners prefer to attach ambiguous syntactic constituents to nouns produced with a pitch accent (Schafer et al., 1996). This study examines what factors underlie previously established accent attachment effects by testing whether these effects are driven by a preference to attach syntactic constituents to new or important information (the Syntax Hypothesis) or whether there is a bias to respond to post-sentence probe questions with an accented word (the Salience Hypothesis). One of the predictions of the Salience Hypothesis is that selection of accented words should be greater when a sentence is complex and processing resources are limited. The results from the experiments presented here show that the probability of listeners’ selecting accented words when asked about the interpretation of a relative clause varies with sentence type: listeners selected accented words more frequently in long sentences than in short sentences, consistent with the predictions of the Salience Hypothesis. Furthermore, Experiment 4 demonstrates that listeners are more likely to respond to post-sentence questions with accented words than with non-accented words, even when no ambiguity is present, and even when the response results in an incorrect answer. These findings suggest that accent-driven attachment effects found in earlier studies reflect a post-sentence selection process rather than a syntactic processing mechanism. PMID:22287815

  17. Is ambiguity tolerance malleable? Experimental evidence with potential implications for future research

    PubMed Central

    Endres, Megan L.; Camp, Richaurd; Milner, Morgan

    2015-01-01

    We conducted two research studies to address the malleability of tolerance of ambiguity (TA) by manipulating situational ambiguity. Students participated in a semester-end assessment of their management skills (n = 306). In Study 1, students in low and moderate ambiguity conditions had significantly higher post-experiment TA, more positive change in self-efficacy, and marginally higher faculty ratings. In Study 2, a control group (n = 103) did not participate in the assessment and was established for comparison to the first study results. The Study 2 students reported TA significantly lower than Study 1 students in the low and moderate ambiguity conditions. The control group TA was not significantly different from that of the Study 1 high ambiguity condition. This further suggested TA’s situational malleability, as those who had controlled access to structured information appeared to have increased their TA over that observed in the other two groups. These results suggest that TA may be malleable. We review the relevant literature, offer hypotheses, report our analyses and findings, and then propose future research, and potential prescriptive applications in such areas as management development, assessment, and decision-making. PMID:26042059

  18. Sensorimotor Adaptation Following Exposure to Ambiguous Inertial Motion Cues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, S. J.; Clement, G. R.; Harm, D. L.; Rupert, A. H.; Guedry, F. E.; Reschke, M. F.

    2005-01-01

    The central nervous system must resolve the ambiguity of inertial motion sensory cues in order to derive accurate spatial orientation awareness. Our general hypothesis is that the central nervous system utilizes both multi-sensory integration and frequency segregation as neural strategies to resolve the ambiguity of tilt and translation stimuli. Movement in an altered gravity environment, such as weightlessness without a stable gravity reference, results in new patterns of sensory cues. For example, the semicircular canals, vision and neck proprioception provide information about head tilt on orbit without the normal otolith head-tilt position that is omnipresent on Earth. Adaptive changes in how inertial cues from the otolith system are integrated with other sensory information lead to perceptual and postural disturbances upon return to Earth's gravity. The primary goals of this ground-based research investigation are to explore physiological mechanisms and operational implications of disorientation and tilt-translation disturbances reported by crewmembers during and following re-entry, and to evaluate a tactile prosthesis as a countermeasure for improving control of whole-body orientation during tilt and translation motion.

  19. Sensorimotor Adaptation Following Exposure to Ambiguous Inertial Motion Cues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, S. J.; Clement, G. R.; Harm, D L.; Rupert, A. H.; Guedry, F. E.; Reschke, M. F.

    2005-01-01

    The central nervous system must resolve the ambiguity of inertial motion sensory cues in order to derive accurate spatial orientation awareness. Our general hypothesis is that the central nervous system utilizes both multi-sensory integration and frequency segregation as neural strategies to resolve the ambiguity of tilt and translation stimuli. Movement in an altered gravity environment, such as weightlessness without a stable gravity reference, results in new patterns of sensory cues. For example, the semicircular canals, vision and neck proprioception provide information about head tilt on orbit without the normal otolith head-tilt position that is omnipresent on Earth. Adaptive changes in how inertial cues from the otolith system are integrated with other sensory information lead to perceptual and postural disturbances upon return to Earth s gravity. The primary goals of this ground-based research investigation are to explore physiological mechanisms and operational implications of disorientation and tilt-translation disturbances reported by crewmembers during and following re-entry, and to evaluate a tactile prosthesis as a countermeasure for improving control of whole-body orientation during tilt and translation motion.

  20. Immirzi ambiguity in the kinematics of quantum general relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garay, Luis J.; Mena Marugán, Guillermo A.

    2002-07-01

    The Immirzi ambiguity arises in loop quantum gravity when geometric operators are represented in terms of different connections that are related by means of an extended Wick transform. We analyze the action of this transform in gravity coupled with matter fields and discuss its analogy with the Wick rotation on which the Thiemann transform between Euclidean and Lorentzian gravity is based. In addition, we prove that the effect of this extended Wick transform is equivalent to a constant scale transformation as far as the symplectic structure and kinematical constraints are concerned. This equivalence is broken in the dynamical evolution. Our results are applied to the discussion of the black hole entropy in the limit of large horizon areas. We first argue that, since the entropy calculation is performed for horizons of fixed constant area, one might in principle choose an Immirzi parameter that depends on this quantity. This would spoil the linearity with the area in the entropy formula. We then show that the Immirzi parameter appears as a constant scaling in all the steps where dynamical information plays a relevant role in the entropy calculation. This fact, together with the kinematical equivalence of the Immirzi ambiguity with a change of scale, is used to preclude the potential nonlinearity of the entropy on physical grounds.

  1. Lexical and Prosodic Effects on Syntactic Ambiguity Resolution in Aphasia

    PubMed Central

    DeDe, Gayle

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether and when individuals with aphasia and healthy controls use lexical and prosodic information during on-line sentence comprehension. Individuals with aphasia and controls (n = 12 per group) participated in a self-paced listening experiment. The stimuli were early closure sentences, such as “While the parents watched(,) the child sang a song.” Both lexical and prosodic cues were manipulated. The cues were biased toward the subject- or object- of the ambiguous noun phrase (the child). Thus, there were two congruous conditions (in which both lexical cues and prosodic cues were consistent) and two incongruous conditions (in which lexical and prosodic cues conflicted). The results showed that the people with aphasia had longer listening times for the ambiguous noun phrase (the child) when the cues were conflicting, rather than consistent. The controls showed effects earlier in the sentence, at the subordinate verb (watched or danced). Both groups showed evidence of reanalysis at the main verb (sang). These effects demonstrate that the aphasic group was sensitive to the lexical and prosodic cues, but used them on a delayed time course relative to the control group. PMID:22143353

  2. Who is respectful? Effects of social context and individual empathic ability on ambiguity resolution during utterance comprehension.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xiaoming; Zhou, Xiaolin

    2015-01-01

    Verbal communication is often ambiguous. By employing the event-related potential (ERP) technique, this study investigated how a comprehender resolves referential ambiguity by using information concerning the social status of communicators. Participants read a conversational scenario which included a minimal conversational context describing a speaker and two other persons of the same or different social status and a directly quoted utterance. A singular, second-person pronoun in the respectful form (nin/nin-de in Chinese) in the utterance could be ambiguous with respect to which of the two persons was the addressee (the "Ambiguous condition"). Alternatively, the pronoun was not ambiguous either because one of the two persons was of higher social status and hence should be the addressee according to social convention (the "Status condition") or because a word referring to the status of a person was additionally inserted before the pronoun to help indicate the referent of the pronoun (the "Referent condition"). Results showed that the perceived ambiguity decreased over the Ambiguous, Status, and Referent conditions. Electrophysiologically, the pronoun elicited an increased N400 in the Referent than in the Status and the Ambiguous conditions, reflecting an increased integration demand due to the necessity of linking the pronoun to both its antecedent and the status word. Relative to the Referent condition, a late, sustained positivity was elicited for the Status condition starting from 600 ms, while a more delayed, anterior negativity was elicited for the Ambiguous condition. Moreover, the N400 effect was modulated by individuals' sensitivity to the social status information, while the late positivity effect was modulated by individuals' empathic ability. These findings highlight the neurocognitive flexibility of contextual bias in referential processing during utterance comprehension. PMID:26557102

  3. Who is respectful? Effects of social context and individual empathic ability on ambiguity resolution during utterance comprehension

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Xiaoming; Zhou, Xiaolin

    2015-01-01

    Verbal communication is often ambiguous. By employing the event-related potential (ERP) technique, this study investigated how a comprehender resolves referential ambiguity by using information concerning the social status of communicators. Participants read a conversational scenario which included a minimal conversational context describing a speaker and two other persons of the same or different social status and a directly quoted utterance. A singular, second-person pronoun in the respectful form (nin/nin-de in Chinese) in the utterance could be ambiguous with respect to which of the two persons was the addressee (the “Ambiguous condition”). Alternatively, the pronoun was not ambiguous either because one of the two persons was of higher social status and hence should be the addressee according to social convention (the “Status condition”) or because a word referring to the status of a person was additionally inserted before the pronoun to help indicate the referent of the pronoun (the “Referent condition”). Results showed that the perceived ambiguity decreased over the Ambiguous, Status, and Referent conditions. Electrophysiologically, the pronoun elicited an increased N400 in the Referent than in the Status and the Ambiguous conditions, reflecting an increased integration demand due to the necessity of linking the pronoun to both its antecedent and the status word. Relative to the Referent condition, a late, sustained positivity was elicited for the Status condition starting from 600 ms, while a more delayed, anterior negativity was elicited for the Ambiguous condition. Moreover, the N400 effect was modulated by individuals' sensitivity to the social status information, while the late positivity effect was modulated by individuals' empathic ability. These findings highlight the neurocognitive flexibility of contextual bias in referential processing during utterance comprehension. PMID:26557102

  4. How Hispanic Patients Address Ambiguous versus Unambiguous Bias in the Doctor's Office

    PubMed Central

    Bean, Meghan G.; Covarrubias, Rebecca; Stone, Jeff

    2014-01-01

    Two studies examined Hispanic individuals’ preferences for using ten different bias reduction strategies when interacting with a doctor whose beliefs about their group were either ambiguous or clearly biased. Consistent with predictions, participants who imagined interacting with a doctor whose beliefs were ambiguous preferred strategies that facilitate positive doctor-patient interactions, whereas participants whose doctor explicitly endorsed negative stereotypes about their group preferred strategies that address stereotype content. The results also revealed that, regardless of whether the doctor's beliefs were ambiguous or clearly biased, stigma consciousness predicted participants’ preferences for using strategies that address stereotype content. These findings suggest that both doctors’ behavior and individual-level factors influence how minority individuals choose to behave in a healthcare setting. PMID:25395691

  5. Threat processing in generalized social phobia: an investigation of interpretation biases in ambiguous facial affect.

    PubMed

    Jusyte, Aiste; Schönenberg, Michael

    2014-06-30

    Facial affect is one of the most important information sources during the course of social interactions, but it is susceptible to distortion due to the complex and dynamic nature. Socially anxious individuals have been shown to exhibit alterations in the processing of social information, such as an attentional and interpretative bias toward threatening information. This may be one of the key factors contributing to the development and maintenance of anxious psychopathology. The aim of the current study was to investigate whether a threat-related interpretation bias is evident for ambiguous facial stimuli in a population of individuals with a generalized Social Anxiety Disorder (gSAD) as compared to healthy controls. Participants judged ambiguous happy/fearful, angry/fearful and angry/happy blends varying in intensity and rated the predominant affective expression. The results obtained in this study do not indicate that gSAD is associated with a biased interpretation of ambiguous facial affect. PMID:24656896

  6. Monolingual and bilingual preschoolers' use of gestures to interpret ambiguous pronouns.

    PubMed

    Yow, W Quin

    2015-11-01

    Young children typically do not use order-of-mention to resolve ambiguous pronouns, but may do so if given additional cues, such as gestures. Additionally, this ability to utilize gestures may be enhanced in bilingual children, who may be more sensitive to such cues due to their unique language experience. We asked monolingual and bilingual four-year-olds and adults to determine referents of ambiguous pronouns given order-of-mention and co-referential localizing gestures. Results showed that bilingual children, like adults, but not monolingual children, used order-of-mention with gestures to resolve ambiguous pronouns. This highlights a wider implication of bilingualism for socio-cognitive development in children. PMID:25403225

  7. Mental states follow quantum mechanics during perception and cognition of ambiguous figures

    E-print Network

    Elio Conte; Andrei Yuri Khrennikov; Orlando Todarello; Antonio Federici; Leonardo Mendolicchio; Joseph P. Zbilut

    2009-06-26

    Processes undergoing quantum mechanics, exhibit quantum interference effects. In this case quantum probabilities result to be different from classical probabilities because they contain an additional main point that in fact is called the quantum interference term. We use ambiguous figures to analyse if during perception cognition of human subjects we have violation of the classical probability field and quantum interference. The experiments, conducted on a group of 256 subjects, evidence that we have such quantum effect. Therefore, mental states, during perception cognition of ambiguous figures, follow quantum mechanics

  8. Ambiguous taxa: Effects on the characterization and interpretation of invertebrate assemblages

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cuffney, T.F.; Bilger, M.D.; Haigler, A.M.

    2007-01-01

    Damaged and immature specimens often result in macroinvertebrate data that contain ambiguous parent-child pairs (i.e., abundances associated with multiple related levels of the taxonomic hierarchy such as Baetis pluto and the associated ambiguous parent Baetis sp.). The choice of method used to resolve ambiguous parent-child pairs may have a very large effect on the characterization of invertebrate assemblages and the interpretation of responses to environmental change because very large proportions of taxa richness (73-78%) and abundance (79-91%) can be associated with ambiguous parents. To address this issue, we examined 16 variations of 4 basic methods for resolving ambiguous taxa: RPKC (remove parent, keep child), MCWP (merge child with parent), RPMC (remove parent or merge child with parent depending on their abundances), and DPAC (distribute parents among children). The choice of method strongly affected assemblage structure, assemblage characteristics (e.g., metrics), and the ability to detect responses along environmental (urbanization) gradients. All methods except MCWP produced acceptable results when used consistently within a study. However, the assemblage characteristics (e.g., values of assemblage metrics) differed widely depending on the method used, and data should not be combined unless the methods used to resolve ambiguous taxa are well documented and are known to be comparable. The suitability of the methods was evaluated and compared on the basis of 13 criteria that considered conservation of taxa richness and abundance, consistency among samples, methods, and studies, and effects on the interpretation of the data. Methods RPMC and DPAC had the highest suitability scores regardless of whether ambiguous taxa were resolved for each sample separately or for a group of samples. Method MCWP gave consistently poor results. Methods MCWP and DPAC approximate the use of family-level identifications and operational taxonomic units (OTU), respectively. Our results suggest that restricting identifications to the family level is not a good method of resolving ambiguous taxa, whereas generating OTUs works well provided that documentation issues are addressed. ?? 2007 by The North American Benthological Society.

  9. How to Safely Give Acetaminophen

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Pregnant? What to Expect How to Safely Give Acetaminophen KidsHealth > Parents > Doctors & Hospitals > Medicine > How to Safely ... without getting a doctor's OK first. What Is Acetaminophen Also Called? Acetaminophen is the generic name of ...

  10. Risk, ambiguity and quantum decision theory

    E-print Network

    Riccardo Franco

    2007-11-06

    In the present article we use the quantum formalism to describe the effects of risk and ambiguity in decision theory. The main idea is that the probabilities in the classic theory of expected utility are estimated probabilities, and thus do not follow the classic laws of probability theory. In particular, we show that it is possible to use consistently the classic expected utility formula, where the probability associated to the events are computed with the equation of quantum interference. Thus we show that the correct utility of a lottery can be simply computed by adding to the classic expected utility a new corrective term, the uncertainty utility, directly connected with the quantum interference term.

  11. Ambiguity resolution for satellite Doppler positioning systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Argentiero, P. D.; Marini, J. W.

    1977-01-01

    A test for ambiguity resolution was derived which was the most powerful in the sense that it maximized the probability of a correct decision. When systematic error sources were properly included in the least squares reduction process to yield an optimal solution, the test reduced to choosing the solution which provided the smaller valuation of the least squares loss function. When systematic error sources were ignored in the least squares reduction, the most powerful test was a quadratic form comparison with the weighting matrix of the quadratic form obtained by computing the pseudo-inverse of a reduced rank square matrix. A formula is presented for computing the power of the most powerful test. A numerical example is included in which the power of the test is computed for a situation which may occur during an actual satellite aided search and rescue mission.

  12. How ambiguous is the local kinetic energy?

    PubMed

    Anderson, James S M; Ayers, Paul W; Hernandez, Juan I Rodriguez

    2010-08-26

    The local kinetic energy and the closely related local electronic stress tensor are commonly used to elucidate chemical bonding patterns, especially for covalent bonds. We use three different approaches-transformation properties of the stress tensor, quasiprobability distributions, and the virial theorem from density-functional theory-to clarify the inherent ambiguity in these quantities, discussing the implications for analyses based on the local kinetic energy and stress tensor. An expansive-but not universal-family of local kinetic energy forms that includes the most common choices and is suitable for both chemical-bonding and atoms-in-molecule analysis is derived. A family of local electronic stress tensors is also derived. Several local kinetic energy functions that are mathematically justified, but unlikely to be conceptually useful, are derived. The implications of these forms for atoms-in-molecule analysis are discussed. PMID:20586467

  13. Examining English-German Translation Ambiguity Using Primed Translation Recognition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eddington, Chelsea M.; Tokowicz, Natasha

    2013-01-01

    Many words have more than one translation across languages. Such "translation-ambiguous" words are translated more slowly and less accurately than their unambiguous counterparts. We examine the extent to which word context and translation dominance influence the processing of translation-ambiguous words. We further examine how these factors…

  14. The Impact of Role Ambiguity and Conflict on Resident Assistants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deluga, Ronald J.; Winters, John J., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    Collected data from 42 Resident Assistants (RAs) to determine whether RA role ambiguity and conflict related to stress, job performance, job satisfaction, and satisfaction as a student. Found ambiguity and conflict to be positively associated with stress and negatively related to satisfaction and performance. Suggests these relationships are a…

  15. The Learning Teacher: Role of Ambiguity in Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suzawa, Gilbert S.

    2013-01-01

    Life is full of ambiguities, but as teachers we generally try to teach our students in a manner that sanitizes knowledge of all of its ambiguities. In doing so, we create an educational environment which forces students to learn in a rather meaningless fashion and this in turn leads to a lack of vitality and relevance within the academy. This need…

  16. Modelling the Effects of Semantic Ambiguity in Word Recognition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodd, Jennifer M.; Gaskell, M. Gareth; Marslen-Wilson, William D.

    2004-01-01

    Most words in English are ambiguous between different interpretations; words can mean different things in different contexts. We investigate the implications of different types of semantic ambiguity for connectionist models of word recognition. We present a model in which there is competition to activate distributed semantic representations. The…

  17. The Role of Verb Information in Syntactic Ambiguity Resolution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennison, Shelia M.

    This study, consisting of two experiments, investigated the role of verb information in resolving ambiguous noun phrases (NPs) in reading comprehension. Both experiments extended earlier studies. The first measured and compared reading time for sentences containing temporarily ambiguous subject complements and unambiguous complements, which were…

  18. Zones of ambiguity and identity politics in Samoa

    E-print Network

    Kemp, Brian M.

    Zones of ambiguity and identity politics in Samoa Jeannette Mageo Washington State University Here politics. By creating `zones of ambiguity' in the performing arts, indigenes think through colonial images of gender and race. Bhabha's `zones of ambivalence' characterize contradictions in colonists' approach

  19. Left-Right Ambiguity Resolution of a Towed Array Sonar

    E-print Network

    Breward, Chris J W

    Left-Right Ambiguity Resolution of a Towed Array Sonar Katerina Kaouri Somerville College-Right Ambiguity in Passive Sonar Systems with towed arrays. This problem arises in source localization when that the Sharpness Method does not seem appropriate in the sonar context. Therefore, we conclude that

  20. How Do Adults and Children Process Referentially Ambiguous Pronouns?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sekerina, Irina A.; Stromswold, Karin; Hestvik, Arild

    2004-01-01

    In two eye-tracking experiments, we investigate adults' and children's on-line processing of referentially ambiguous English pronouns. Sixteen adults and 16 four-to-seven-year-olds listened to sentences with either an unambiguous reflexive ("himself") or an ambiguous pronoun ("him") and chose a picture with two characters that corresponded to…

  1. Not So Black and White: Memory for Ambiguous Group Members

    PubMed Central

    Pauker, Kristin; Weisbuch, Max; Ambady, Nalini; Sommers, Samuel R; Ivcevic, Zorana; Adams, Reginald B

    2013-01-01

    Exponential increases in multi-racial identities expected over the next century, creates a conundrum for perceivers accustomed to classifying people as “own” or “other” race. The current research examines how perceivers resolve this dilemma with regard to the “own-race bias.” We hypothesized that perceivers would not be motivated to include ambiguous-race individuals in the in-group and would therefore have some difficulty remembering them. Both racially-ambiguous and other-race faces were misremembered more often than own-race faces (Study 1), though memory for ambiguous faces was improved among perceivers motivated to include biracial individuals in the in-group (Study 2). Racial labels assigned to racially ambiguous faces determined memory for these faces, suggesting that uncertainty provides the motivational context for discounting ambiguous faces in memory (Study 3). Finally, an inclusion motivation fostered cognitive associations between racially-ambiguous faces and the in-group. Moreover, the extent to which perceivers associated racially-ambiguous faces with the in-group predicted memory for ambiguous faces and accounted for the impact of motivation on memory (Study 4). Thus, memory for biracial individuals seems to involve a flexible person construal process shaped by motivational factors. PMID:19309203

  2. Inevitable ambiguity in perturbation around flat space-time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichinose, Shoichi; Kaminaga, Yasuhito

    1989-12-01

    Perturbation of general-relativistic predictions around flat geometry, in general, introduces inevitable ambiguity. The ambiguity reflects the geometrical nature of general relativity and is never a difficulty of it. We explain it by taking a concrete example of the radar-echo experiment.

  3. Top-Down Influence in Young Children's Linguistic Ambiguity Resolution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rabagliati, Hugh; Pylkkanen, Liina; Marcus, Gary F.

    2013-01-01

    Language is rife with ambiguity. Do children and adults meet this challenge in similar ways? Recent work suggests that while adults resolve syntactic ambiguities by integrating a variety of cues, children are less sensitive to top-down evidence. We test whether this top-down insensitivity is specific to syntax or a general feature of children's…

  4. U.S./Arab Reflections on Our Tolerance for Ambiguity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bright, Larry K.; Mahdi, Ghada S.

    2012-01-01

    As the authors, a Midwestern American educational administration professor and a Middle Eastern Iraqi doctoral candidate, have continued to interact over the past 3 years, both have come to appreciate the importance of increasing their tolerance for ambiguity--ambiguities in examining cultural, linguistic, and religious customs and complexities in…

  5. Ambiguous versus non ambiguous characterization of components from pictures of cataclasites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohlmayer, Norbert; Grasemann, Bernhard

    2013-12-01

    The quantitative analysis of shape parameters of components in cataclastic rocks is often complicated by the fact that the individual components are difficult to identify. Frequently, the components have the same mineralogical composition as the matrix and the size distribution of components and the resolution of the images make it difficult to discriminate between the individual fragments. This work investigates the differences of component shape analysis from processing pictures of cataclasites digitized by different persons. The approach undertaken herein assumes that the ambiguity of the forms is expressed in a diversity of component identification, respectively in different selection of the components. The extent of this diversity is quantified and analyzed as to how far statistical parameters reflect this ambiguity. Components in the samples may be more or less unambiguous with respect to the identification of particle shape parameters. The present study demonstrates that two parameters, the Aspect Ratio and the angularity (Elliptical Parisfactor) might be used in order to reflect this ambiguity in the component identification.

  6. Resolving the 180-degree ambiguity in vector magnetic field measurements: The 'minimum' energy solution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Metcalf, Thomas R.

    1994-01-01

    I present a robust algorithm that resolves the 180-deg ambiguity in measurements of the solar vector magnetic field. The technique simultaneously minimizes both the divergence of the magnetic field and the electric current density using a simulated annealing algorithm. This results in the field orientation with approximately minimum free energy. The technique is well-founded physically and is simple to implement.

  7. Effect of Prefrontal Cortex Damage on Resolving Lexical Ambiguity in Text

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frattali, Carol; Hanna, Rebecca; McGinty, Anita Shukla; Gerber, Lynn; Wesley, Robert; Grafman, Jordan; Coelho, Carl

    2007-01-01

    The function of suppression of context-inappropriate meanings during lexical ambiguity resolution was examined in 25 adults with prefrontal cortex damage (PFCD) localized to the left (N = 8), right (N = 6), or bilaterally (N = 11); and 21 matched Controls. Results revealed unexpected inverse patterns of suppression between PFCD and Control groups,…

  8. Ambiguous sound elements contribute differently to auditory object identity and object location

    E-print Network

    Lee, Adrian KC

    Ambiguous sound elements contribute differently to auditory object identity and object location. Results show that perceived object location can be 1) directly affected by sound elements not part of an object and 2) indirectly affected by other objects in the mixture. All experiments used a sound mixture

  9. Fixed point theorems of GPS carrier phase ambiguity resolution and their application to massive network processing: Ambizap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blewitt, Geoffrey

    2008-12-01

    Precise point positioning (PPP) has become popular for Global Positioning System (GPS) geodetic network analysis because for n stations, PPP has O(n) processing time, yet solutions closely approximate those of O(n3) full network analysis. Subsequent carrier phase ambiguity resolution (AR) further improves PPP precision and accuracy; however, full-network bootstrapping AR algorithms are O(n4), limiting single network solutions to n < 100. In this contribution, fixed point theorems of AR are derived and then used to develop "Ambizap," an O(n) algorithm designed to give results that closely approximate full network AR. Ambizap has been tested to n ? 2800 and proves to be O(n) in this range, adding only ˜50% to PPP processing time. Tests show that a 98-station network is resolved on a 3-GHz CPU in 7 min, versus 22 h using O(n4) AR methods. Ambizap features a novel network adjustment filter, producing solutions that precisely match O(n4) full network analysis. The resulting coordinates agree to ?1 mm with current AR methods, much smaller than the ˜3-mm RMS precision of PPP alone. A 2000-station global network can be ambiguity resolved in ˜2.5 h. Together with PPP, Ambizap enables rapid, multiple reanalysis of large networks (e.g., ˜1000-station EarthScope Plate Boundary Observatory) and facilitates the addition of extra stations to an existing network solution without need to reprocess all data. To meet future needs, PPP plus Ambizap is designed to handle ˜10,000 stations per day on a 3-GHz dual-CPU desktop PC.

  10. Corporate Change and Corporate Giving.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pollack, Rachel H.; Toward, Christopher

    1999-01-01

    With each merger or corporate restructuring comes the possibility that corporate giving to higher education will suffer. A combination of patience, understanding of the processes at work in corporate change, and regular contact with affected companies can help position the college or university to make the most of any outcome. (MSE)

  11. Building and Giving Away: Motivations

    E-print Network

    Newby, Gregory B.

    among communities of volunteers #12;In short ... There is a tremendous history of technology! Please give away copies! #12; Volunteer: Project Gutenberg (www.gutenberg.org) Day job: Director empowerment Expertise in information security Hobbies include: dog mushing, running Volunteered with HOPE

  12. Giving Psychology Away Is Expensive

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gorsuch, Richard L.; Wallace, William L.

    2005-01-01

    This article presents comments on "Does Psychology make a significant difference in our lives?" by P. Zimbardo. We deeply appreciate the documentation and inspiration provided by Zimbardo on how psychology is reaching out to the public by "giving psychology away" (p. 340). We totally agree that psychology has much, much more to offer that could be…

  13. Quadri-stability of a spatially ambiguous auditory illusion

    PubMed Central

    Bainbridge, Constance M.; Bainbridge, Wilma A.; Oliva, Aude

    2014-01-01

    In addition to vision, audition plays an important role in sound localization in our world. One way we estimate the motion of an auditory object moving towards or away from us is from changes in volume intensity. However, the human auditory system has unequally distributed spatial resolution, including difficulty distinguishing sounds in front vs. behind the listener. Here, we introduce a novel quadri-stable illusion, the Transverse-and-Bounce Auditory Illusion, which combines front-back confusion with changes in volume levels of a nonspatial sound to create ambiguous percepts of an object approaching and withdrawing from the listener. The sound can be perceived as traveling transversely from front to back or back to front, or “bouncing” to remain exclusively in front of or behind the observer. Here we demonstrate how human listeners experience this illusory phenomenon by comparing ambiguous and unambiguous stimuli for each of the four possible motion percepts. When asked to rate their confidence in perceiving each sound’s motion, participants reported equal confidence for the illusory and unambiguous stimuli. Participants perceived all four illusory motion percepts, and could not distinguish the illusion from the unambiguous stimuli. These results show that this illusion is effectively quadri-stable. In a second experiment, the illusory stimulus was looped continuously in headphones while participants identified its perceived path of motion to test properties of perceptual switching, locking, and biases. Participants were biased towards perceiving transverse compared to bouncing paths, and they became perceptually locked into alternating between front-to-back and back-to-front percepts, perhaps reflecting how auditory objects commonly move in the real world. This multi-stable auditory illusion opens opportunities for studying the perceptual, cognitive, and neural representation of objects in motion, as well as exploring multimodal perceptual awareness. PMID:25642180

  14. Ambiguity and regularization in parallel MRI.

    PubMed

    Gol, Derya; Potter, Lee C

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we formulate the parallel magnetic resonance imaging(pMRI) as a multichannel blind deconvolution problem with subsampling. First, the model allows formal characterization of image solutions consistent with data obtained by uniform subsampling of k-space. Second, the model allows analysis of the minimum set of required calibration data. Third, the filter bank formulation provides analysis of the sufficient sizes of interpolation kernels in widely used reconstruction techniques. Fourth, the model suggests principled development of regularization terms to fight ambiguity and ill-conditioning; specifically, subspace regularization is adapted from the blind image super-resolution work of Sroubek et al. [11]. Finally, characterization of the consistent set of image solutions leads to a cautionary comment on L1 regularization for the peculiar class of piece-wise constant images. Thus, it is proposed that the analysis of the subsampled blind deconvolution task provides insight into both the multiply determined nature of the pMRI task and possible design strategies for sampling and reconstruction. PMID:22254930

  15. Ambiguity resolution for satellite Doppler positioning systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Argentiero, P.; Marini, J.

    1979-01-01

    The implementation of satellite-based Doppler positioning systems frequently requires the recovery of transmitter position from a single pass of Doppler data. The least-squares approach to the problem yields conjugate solutions on either side of the satellite subtrack. It is important to develop a procedure for choosing the proper solution which is correct in a high percentage of cases. A test for ambiguity resolution which is the most powerful in the sense that it maximizes the probability of a correct decision is derived. When systematic error sources are properly included in the least-squares reduction process to yield an optimal solution the test reduces to choosing the solution which provides the smaller valuation of the least-squares loss function. When systematic error sources are ignored in the least-squares reduction, the most powerful test is a quadratic form comparison with the weighting matrix of the quadratic form obtained by computing the pseudoinverse of a reduced-rank square matrix. A formula for computing the power of the most powerful test is provided. Numerical examples are included in which the power of the test is computed for situations that are relevant to the design of a satellite-aided search and rescue system.

  16. Chimpanzees and bonobos distinguish between risk and ambiguity

    PubMed Central

    Rosati, Alexandra G.; Hare, Brian

    2011-01-01

    Although recent research has investigated animal decision-making under risk, little is known about how animals choose under conditions of ambiguity when they lack information about the available alternatives. Many models of choice behaviour assume that ambiguity does not impact decision-makers, but studies of humans suggest that people tend to be more averse to choosing ambiguous options than risky options with known probabilities. To illuminate the evolutionary roots of human economic behaviour, we examined whether our closest living relatives, chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) and bonobos (Pan paniscus), share this bias against ambiguity. Apes chose between a certain option that reliably provided an intermediately preferred food type, and a variable option that could vary in the probability that it provided a highly preferred food type. To examine the impact of ambiguity on ape decision-making, we interspersed trials in which chimpanzees and bonobos had no knowledge about the probabilities. Both species avoided the ambiguous option compared with their choices for a risky option, indicating that ambiguity aversion is shared by humans, bonobos and chimpanzees. PMID:21106573

  17. The (IR-)relevance of the Gribov ambiguity in SU(2)×U(1) gauge theories with fundamental Higgs matter

    SciTech Connect

    Capri, M.A.L.; Dudal, D.; Guimaraes, M.S.; Justo, I.F.; Sorella, S.P.; and others

    2014-04-15

    It is well accepted that dealing with the Gribov ambiguity has a major impact on correlation functions in gauge-fixed Yang–Mills theories, in particular in the low momentum regime where standard perturbation theory based on the Faddeev–Popov approach fails. Recent results, derived from functional tools (Dyson–Schwinger equations or exact RG) or the effective Gribov–Zwanziger action method, pointed towards e.g. gauge boson correlation functions that are not compatible with the properties of observable degrees of freedom. Although such an observation is a welcome feature for gauge theories exhibiting confinement, it would be a discomfort for gauge theories supplemented with Higgs fields, cf. the experimental success of the electroweak model based on a SU(2)×U(1) gauge group. The purpose of this short note is to assure that the effective action resolution to the Gribov ambiguity reduces to the standard Faddeev–Popov method in the perturbative regime of sufficiently small coupling/large Higgs condensate, thereby not compromising the physical particle spectrum of massive gauge bosons and a massless photon for the SU(2)×U(1) gauge–Higgs model. The closer the theory gets to the limit of vanishing Higgs condensate, the more the Gribov problem resurfaces with all its consequences. We give some speculations w.r.t. the Fradkin–Shenker insights about the phase diagram. -- Highlights: •Gribov horizon influences gauge propagators in a strong-coupling regime. •No influence of Gribov horizon in weak-coupling. •Inclusion of U(1) factor leads to very rich behavior of propagators.

  18. Decision under ambiguity: Effects of sign and magnitude

    E-print Network

    Inukai, Keigo

    2012-01-01

    Decision under ambiguity (uncertainty with unknown probabilities) has been attracting attention in behavioral and neuroeconomics. However, recent neuroimaging studies have mainly focused on gain domains while little attention has been paid to the magnitudes of outcomes. In this study, we examined the effects of the sign (i.e. gain and loss) and magnitude of outcomes on ambiguity aversion and the additivity of subjective probabilities in Ellsberg's urn problem. We observed that (i) ambiguity aversion was observed in both signs, and (ii) subadditivity of subjective probability was not observed in negative outcomes.

  19. Mentalizing under uncertainty: dissociated neural responses to ambiguous and unambiguous mental state inferences.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Adrianna C; Mitchell, Jason P

    2010-02-01

    The ability to read the minds of others (i.e., to mentalize) requires that perceivers understand a wide range of different kinds of mental states, including not only others' beliefs and knowledge but also their feelings, desires, and preferences. Moreover, although such inferences may occasionally rely on observable features of a situation, perceivers more typically mentalize under conditions of "uncertainty," in which they must generate plausible hypotheses about a target's mental state from ambiguous or otherwise underspecified information. Here, we use functional neuroimaging to dissociate the neural bases of these 2 distinct social-cognitive challenges: 1) mentalizing about different types of mental states (beliefs vs. preferences) and 2) mentalizing under conditions of varying ambiguity. Although these 2 aspects of mentalizing have typically been confounded in earlier research, we observed a double dissociation between the brain regions sensitive to type of mental state and ambiguity. Whereas ventral and dorsal aspects of medial prefrontal cortex responded more during ambiguous than unambiguous inferences regardless of the type of mental state, the right temporoparietal junction was sensitive to the distinction between beliefs and preferences irrespective of certainty. These results underscore the emerging consensus that, rather than comprising a single mental operation, social cognition makes flexible use of different processes as a function of the particular demands of the social context. PMID:19478034

  20. Biasing the perception of ambiguous vocal affect: a TMS study on frontal asymmetry.

    PubMed

    Donhauser, Peter W; Belin, Pascal; Grosbras, Marie-Hélène

    2014-07-01

    Several sources of evidence point toward a link between asymmetry of prefrontal brain activity and approach-withdrawal tendencies. Here, we tested the causal nature of this link and examined if the categorization of an ambiguous approach- or withdrawal-related vocal signal can be biased by manipulating left and right frontal neural activity. We used voice morphing of affective non-verbal vocalizations to create individually tailored affectively ambiguous stimuli on an Anger-Fear continuum-two emotions that represent extremes on the approach-withdrawal dimension. We tested perception of these stimuli after 10 min of low-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation over left or right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex or over the vertex (control), a technique that has transient inhibitory effects on the targeted brain region. As expected, ambiguous stimuli were more likely perceived as expressing Anger (approach) than Fear (withdrawal) after right prefrontal compared with left prefrontal or control stimulation. These results provide the first evidence that the manipulation of asymmetrical activity in prefrontal cortex can change the explicit categorization of ambiguous emotional signals. PMID:23784072

  1. Improving Ambiguity Resolution for Medium Baselines Using Combined GPS and BDS Dual/Triple-Frequency Observations.

    PubMed

    Gao, Wang; Gao, Chengfa; Pan, Shuguo; Wang, Denghui; Deng, Jiadong

    2015-01-01

    The regional constellation of the BeiDou navigation satellite system (BDS) has been providing continuous positioning, navigation and timing services since 27 December 2012, covering China and the surrounding area. Real-time kinematic (RTK) positioning with combined BDS and GPS observations is feasible. Besides, all satellites of BDS can transmit triple-frequency signals. Using the advantages of multi-pseudorange and carrier observations from multi-systems and multi-frequencies is expected to be of much benefit for ambiguity resolution (AR). We propose an integrated AR strategy for medium baselines by using the combined GPS and BDS dual/triple-frequency observations. In the method, firstly the extra-wide-lane (EWL) ambiguities of triple-frequency system, i.e., BDS, are determined first. Then the dual-frequency WL ambiguities of BDS and GPS were resolved with the geometry-based model by using the BDS ambiguity-fixed EWL observations. After that, basic (i.e., L1/L2 or B1/B2) ambiguities of BDS and GPS are estimated together with the so-called ionosphere-constrained model, where the ambiguity-fixed WL observations are added to enhance the model strength. During both of the WL and basic AR, a partial ambiguity fixing (PAF) strategy is adopted to weaken the negative influence of new-rising or low-elevation satellites. Experiments were conducted and presented, in which the GPS/BDS dual/triple-frequency data were collected in Nanjing and Zhengzhou of China, with the baseline distance varying from about 28.6 to 51.9 km. The results indicate that, compared to the single triple-frequency BDS system, the combined system can significantly enhance the AR model strength, and thus improve AR performance for medium baselines with a 75.7% reduction of initialization time on average. Besides, more accurate and stable positioning results can also be derived by using the combined GPS/BDS system. PMID:26528977

  2. Principles of good evidence giving.

    PubMed

    Griffith, Richard; Tengnah, Cassam

    2010-11-01

    With increased regulation and litigation in the health-care sector, appearing in court is becoming an almost routine part of a district nurse's role. A review of local newspapers shows that in the last 4weeks alone district nurses around the UK have given evidence in no fewer than ten different cases that have involved the coroners' court, county court and magistrates' court. The prospect of appearing in court or giving evidence at fitness to practice hearings remains a daunting one. The process is still largely adversarial and cross examination is a hostile experience. This article highlights the principles of good evidence. PMID:21079560

  3. Generalized rough sets, entropy, and image ambiguity measures.

    PubMed

    Sen, Debashis; Pal, Sankar K

    2009-02-01

    Quantifying ambiguities in images using fuzzy set theory has been of utmost interest to researchers in the field of image processing. In this paper, we present the use of rough set theory and its certain generalizations for quantifying ambiguities in images and compare it to the use of fuzzy set theory. We propose classes of entropy measures based on rough set theory and its certain generalizations, and perform rigorous theoretical analysis to provide some properties which they satisfy. Grayness and spatial ambiguities in images are then quantified using the proposed entropy measures. We demonstrate the utility and effectiveness of the proposed entropy measures by considering some elementary image processing applications. We also propose a new measure called average image ambiguity in this context. PMID:19150762

  4. Ambiguity Of Doppler Centroid In Synthetic-Aperture Radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Chi-Yung; Curlander, John C.

    1991-01-01

    Paper discusses performances of two algorithms for resolution of ambiguity in estimated Doppler centroid frequency of echoes in synthetic-aperture radar. One based on range-cross-correlation technique, other based on multiple-pulse-repetition-frequency technique.

  5. A modal ambiguity in for-infinitival relative clauses

    E-print Network

    Hackl, Martin

    This squib presents two puzzles related to an ambiguity found in for-infinitival relative clauses (FIRs). FIRs invariably receive a modal interpretation even in the absence of any overt modal verb. The modal interpretation ...

  6. Reaction Order Ambiguity in Integrated Rate Plots

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Joe

    2008-01-01

    Integrated rate plots are frequently used in reaction kinetics to determine orders of reactions. It is often emphasised, when using this methodology in practice, that it is necessary to monitor the reaction to a substantial fraction of completion for these plots to yield unambiguous orders. The present article gives a theoretical and statistical…

  7. Ambiguous Cylinders: A New Class of Solid That Evokes Anomalous Perception.

    PubMed

    Sugihara, Kokichi

    2015-09-01

    We have discovered a new type of optical illusion in which a single solid generates impressions of two quite different cylinders when it is seen from two special viewpoints. By positioning a solid and a mirror in such a way that the two special viewpoints can be experienced simultaneously, the viewer sees both the solid itself and its mirror image, but as apparently different objects. From this, the viewer understands logically that what he/she is perceiving is different from the real shape of the solid, but the visual system of the viewer does not correct the misperception of the solid's shape. In this sense, this anomalous perception belongs to the class of optical illusions, and we are naming it the ambiguous cylinder illusion. The ambiguous cylinder illusion can be explained as the result of an interaction between depth ambiguity in a single image and a human preference for a rectangular structure. From a mathematical point of view, a single image cannot uniquely specify the three-dimensional shape of an object appearing in the image, because the image does not convey depth information, and hence there is ambiguity in the object. From a psychological point of view, on the other hand, the human visual system prefers certain interpretations more strongly than other interpretations. In particular, if the solid is composed of planar faces, then the system seems to prefer the interpretation of a rectangular structure to other interpretations. In the case of an image of a cylindrical object, the human visual system seems to consider that the object is generated by cutting a cylinder with a plane perpendicular to the axis of the cylinder. We will show that ambiguous cylinders can be created successfully on the basis of this hypothesis. Meeting abstract presented at VSS 2015. PMID:26326418

  8. Automatic Resolution of Ambiguous Terms Based on Machine Learning and Conceptual Relations in the UMLS

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hongfang; Johnson, Stephen B.; Friedman, Carol

    2002-01-01

    Motivation. The UMLS has been used in natural language processing applications such as information retrieval and information extraction systems. The mapping of free-text to UMLS concepts is important for these applications. To improve the mapping, we need a method to disambiguate terms that possess multiple UMLS concepts. In the general English domain, machine-learning techniques have been applied to sense-tagged corpora, in which senses (or concepts) of ambiguous terms have been annotated (mostly manually). Sense disambiguation classifiers are then derived to determine senses (or concepts) of those ambiguous terms automatically. However, manual annotation of a corpus is an expensive task. We propose an automatic method that constructs sense-tagged corpora for ambiguous terms in the UMLS using MEDLINE abstracts. Methods. For a term W that represents multiple UMLS concepts, a collection of MEDLINE abstracts that contain W is extracted. For each abstract in the collection, occurrences of concepts that have relations with W as defined in the UMLS are automatically identified. A sense-tagged corpus, in which senses of W are annotated, is then derived based on those identified concepts. The method was evaluated on a set of 35 frequently occurring ambiguous biomedical abbreviations using a gold standard set that was automatically derived. The quality of the derived sense-tagged corpus was measured using precision and recall. Results. The derived sense-tagged corpus had an overall precision of 92.9% and an overall recall of 47.4%. After removing rare senses and ignoring abbreviations with closely related senses, the overall precision was 96.8% and the overall recall was 50.6%. Conclusions. UMLS conceptual relations and MEDLINE abstracts can be used to automatically acquire knowledge needed for resolving ambiguity when mapping free-text to UMLS concepts. PMID:12386113

  9. Housing conditions affect rat responses to two types of ambiguity in a reward–reward discrimination cognitive bias task

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Richard M.A.; Paul, Elizabeth S.; Burman, Oliver H.P.; Browne, William J.; Mendl, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Decision-making under ambiguity in cognitive bias tasks is a promising new indicator of affective valence in animals. Rat studies support the hypothesis that animals in a negative affective state evaluate ambiguous cues negatively. Prior automated operant go/go judgement bias tasks have involved training rats that an auditory cue of one frequency predicts a Reward and a cue of a different frequency predicts a Punisher (RP task), and then measuring whether ambiguous cues of intermediate frequency are judged as predicting reward (‘optimism’) or punishment (‘pessimism’). We investigated whether an automated Reward–Reward (RR) task yielded similar results to, and was faster to train than, RP tasks. We also introduced a new ambiguity test (simultaneous presentation of the two training cues) alongside the standard single ambiguous cue test. Half of the rats experienced an unpredictable housing treatment (UHT) designed to induce a negative state. Control rats were relatively ‘pessimistic’, whilst UHT rats were quicker, but no less accurate, in their responses in the RR test, and showed less anxiety-like behaviour in independent tests. A possible reason for these findings is that rats adapted to and were stimulated by UHT, whilst control rats in a predictable environment were more sensitive to novelty and change. Responses in the new ambiguity test correlated positively with those in single ambiguous cue tests, and may provide a measure of attention bias. The RR task was quicker to train than previous automated RP tasks. Together, they could be used to disentangle how reward and punishment processes underpin affect-induced cognitive biases. PMID:25106739

  10. Housing conditions affect rat responses to two types of ambiguity in a reward-reward discrimination cognitive bias task.

    PubMed

    Parker, Richard M A; Paul, Elizabeth S; Burman, Oliver H P; Browne, William J; Mendl, Michael

    2014-11-01

    Decision-making under ambiguity in cognitive bias tasks is a promising new indicator of affective valence in animals. Rat studies support the hypothesis that animals in a negative affective state evaluate ambiguous cues negatively. Prior automated operant go/go judgement bias tasks have involved training rats that an auditory cue of one frequency predicts a Reward and a cue of a different frequency predicts a Punisher (RP task), and then measuring whether ambiguous cues of intermediate frequency are judged as predicting reward ('optimism') or punishment ('pessimism'). We investigated whether an automated Reward-Reward (RR) task yielded similar results to, and was faster to train than, RP tasks. We also introduced a new ambiguity test (simultaneous presentation of the two training cues) alongside the standard single ambiguous cue test. Half of the rats experienced an unpredictable housing treatment (UHT) designed to induce a negative state. Control rats were relatively 'pessimistic', whilst UHT rats were quicker, but no less accurate, in their responses in the RR test, and showed less anxiety-like behaviour in independent tests. A possible reason for these findings is that rats adapted to and were stimulated by UHT, whilst control rats in a predictable environment were more sensitive to novelty and change. Responses in the new ambiguity test correlated positively with those in single ambiguous cue tests, and may provide a measure of attention bias. The RR task was quicker to train than previous automated RP tasks. Together, they could be used to disentangle how reward and punishment processes underpin affect-induced cognitive biases. PMID:25106739

  11. Children's Understanding of Ambiguous Figures: Which Cognitive Developments Are Necessary to Experience Reversal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doherty, M.J.; Wimmer, M.C.

    2005-01-01

    In two experiments involving one hundred and thirty-eight 3- to 5-year-olds we examined the claim that a complex understanding of ambiguity is required to experience reversal of ambiguous stimuli [Gopnik, A., & Rosati, A. (2001). Duck or rabbit? Reversing ambiguous figures and understanding ambiguous representations. Developmental Science, 4,…

  12. Auditory Scene Analysis: The Sweet Music of Ambiguity

    PubMed Central

    Pressnitzer, Daniel; Suied, Clara; Shamma, Shihab A.

    2011-01-01

    In this review paper aimed at the non-specialist, we explore the use that neuroscientists and musicians have made of perceptual illusions based on ambiguity. The pivotal issue is auditory scene analysis (ASA), or what enables us to make sense of complex acoustic mixtures in order to follow, for instance, a single melody in the midst of an orchestra. In general, ASA uncovers the most likely physical causes that account for the waveform collected at the ears. However, the acoustical problem is ill-posed and it must be solved from noisy sensory input. Recently, the neural mechanisms implicated in the transformation of ambiguous sensory information into coherent auditory scenes have been investigated using so-called bistability illusions (where an unchanging ambiguous stimulus evokes a succession of distinct percepts in the mind of the listener). After reviewing some of those studies, we turn to music, which arguably provides some of the most complex acoustic scenes that a human listener will ever encounter. Interestingly, musicians will not always aim at making each physical source intelligible, but rather express one or more melodic lines with a small or large number of instruments. By means of a few musical illustrations and by using a computational model inspired by neuro-physiological principles, we suggest that this relies on a detailed (if perhaps implicit) knowledge of the rules of ASA and of its inherent ambiguity. We then put forward the opinion that some degree perceptual ambiguity may participate in our appreciation of music. PMID:22174701

  13. Selective biasing of stereo correspondence in an ambiguous stereogram.

    PubMed

    Goutcher, Ross; Mamassian, Pascal

    2005-02-01

    In spite of numerous studies in stereoscopic perception, it is still not clear how the visual system matches features between the two eyes. One reason is that these previous studies used stimuli that presented little perceptual ambiguity, so the correspondence problem had only one solution. We present here a novel stimulus that presents a more complex correspondence problem. This stimulus is inspired by "wallpaper" stimuli and was specifically designed to put into conflict two possible constraints underlying stereo correspondence matching. These constraints are the nearest neighbour matching rule--that biases surfaces towards the horopter--and the nearest disparity rule--that biases surfaces to be smooth. By varying the contrast of adjacent image features in this stimulus, we were able to reveal and quantify a preference for nearest disparity matching. The magnitude of this preference is dependent upon the magnitude of possible disparities in the scene and is consistent with the idea that the visual system seeks to minimise local differences in disparity. We discuss these results with regard to the use of prior constraints in models of stereo matching. PMID:15610751

  14. A contrast function for independent component analysis without permutation ambiguity.

    PubMed

    Zarzoso, Vicente; Comon, Pierre; Phlypo, Ronald

    2010-05-01

    This brief deals with the problem of blind source separation (BSS) via independent component analysis (ICA). We prove that a linear combination of the separator output fourth-order marginal cumulants (kurtoses) is a valid contrast function for ICA under prewhitening if the weights have the same sign as the source kurtoses. If, in addition, the source kurtoses are different and so are the linear combination weights, the contrast eliminates the permutation ambiguity typical to ICA, as the estimated sources are sorted at the separator output according to their kurtosis values in the same order as the weights. If the weights equal the source kurtoses, the contrast is a cumulant matching criterion based on the maximum-likelihood principle. The contrast can be maximized by means of a cost-efficient Jacobi-type pairwise iteration. In the real-valued two-signal case, the asymptotic variance of the resulting Givens angle estimator is determined in closed form, leading to the contrast weights with optimal finite-sample performance. A fully blind solution can be implemented by computing the optimum weights from the initial source estimates obtained by a classical ICA stage. An experimental study validates the features of the proposed technique and shows its superior performance compared to related previous methods. PMID:20350848

  15. Instantaneous and controllable integer ambiguity resolution: review and an alternative approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jingyu; Wu, Meiping; Li, Tao; Zhang, Kaidong

    2015-11-01

    In the high-precision application of Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS), integer ambiguity resolution is the key step to realize precise positioning and attitude determination. As the necessary part of quality control, integer aperture (IA) ambiguity resolution provides the theoretical and practical foundation for ambiguity validation. It is mainly realized by acceptance testing. Due to the constraint of correlation between ambiguities, it is impossible to realize the controlling of failure rate according to analytical formula. Hence, the fixed failure rate approach is implemented by Monte Carlo sampling. However, due to the characteristics of Monte Carlo sampling and look-up table, we have to face the problem of a large amount of time consumption if sufficient GNSS scenarios are included in the creation of look-up table. This restricts the fixed failure rate approach to be a post process approach if a look-up table is not available. Furthermore, if not enough GNSS scenarios are considered, the table may only be valid for a specific scenario or application. Besides this, the method of creating look-up table or look-up function still needs to be designed for each specific acceptance test. To overcome these problems in determination of critical values, this contribution will propose an instantaneous and CONtrollable (iCON) IA ambiguity resolution approach for the first time. The iCON approach has the following advantages: (a) critical value of acceptance test is independently determined based on the required failure rate and GNSS model without resorting to external information such as look-up table; (b) it can be realized instantaneously for most of IA estimators which have analytical probability formulas. The stronger GNSS model, the less time consumption; (c) it provides a new viewpoint to improve the research about IA estimation. To verify these conclusions, multi-frequency and multi-GNSS simulation experiments are implemented. Those results show that IA estimators based on iCON approach can realize controllable ambiguity resolution. Besides this, compared with ratio test IA based on look-up table, difference test IA and IA least square based on the iCON approach most of times have higher success rates and better controllability to failure rates.

  16. Phase ambiguity resolution for offset QPSK modulation systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Tien M. (inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A demodulator for Offset Quaternary Phase Shift Keyed (OQPSK) signals modulated with two words resolves eight possible combinations of phase ambiguity which may produce data error by first processing received I(sub R) and Q(sub R) data in an integrated carrier loop/symbol synchronizer using a digital Costas loop with matched filters for correcting four of eight possible phase lock errors, and then the remaining four using a phase ambiguity resolver which detects the words to not only reverse the received I(sub R) and Q(sub R) data channels, but to also invert (complement) the I(sub R) and/or Q(sub R) data, or to at least complement the I(sub R) and Q(sub R) data for systems using nontransparent codes that do not have rotation direction ambiguity.

  17. Ballpoint probe gives optimum results in ultrasonic testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melton, R. E.

    1967-01-01

    Ballpoint-type ultrasonic probe assembly focuses its beam precisely on the bond lines of a composite thin face sheet structure when testing for bond integrity. It can scan in any direction, and eliminate external couplant spray.

  18. The effects of cocaine and mazindol on the cognitive judgement bias of rats in the ambiguous-cue interpretation paradigm.

    PubMed

    Rygula, Rafal; Szczech, Ewa; Papciak, Justyna; Nikiforuk, Agnieszka; Popik, Piotr

    2014-08-15

    Recent research has shown that pharmacological enhancement of dopaminergic function increases an optimism bias in humans. The present study investigated whether acute dopaminergic system stimulation through the administration of two dopamine-mimetic drugs, cocaine and mazindol, have similar effects in rats. To accomplish this goal, after initial behavioural training, two groups of rats received single injections of either cocaine or mazindol and were subsequently tested with the ambiguous-cue interpretation (ACI) paradigm. Both drugs were administered in three doses using the fully randomised Latin square designs. Cocaine (1, 2 and 5mg/kg) had no significant effect on the interpretation of the ambiguous cue. Mazindol at all three doses (0.5, 1 and 2mg/kg) significantly biased animals towards negative interpretation of the ambiguous cue. The results are discussed in relation to pharmacological and behaviourally evoked actions of tested compounds. PMID:24859175

  19. Processing ambiguity in a linguistic context: decision-making difficulties in non-aphasic patients with behavioral variant frontotemporal degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Spotorno, Nicola; Healey, Meghan; McMillan, Corey T.; Rascovsky, Katya; Irwin, David J.; Clark, Robin; Grossman, Murray

    2015-01-01

    Some extent of ambiguity is ubiquitous in everyday conversations. For example, words have multiple meaning and very common pronouns, like “he” and “she” (anaphoric pronouns), have little meaning on their own and refer to a noun that has been previously introduced in the discourse. Ambiguity triggers a decision process that is not a subroutine of language processing but rather a more general domain resource. Therefore non-aphasic patients with limited decision-making capability can encounter severe limitation in language processing due to extra linguistic limitations. In the present study, we test patients with behavioral variant frontotemporal degeneration (bvFTD), focusing on anaphora as a paradigmatic example of ambiguity resolution in the linguistic domain. bvFTD is characterized by gray matter (GM) atrophy in prefrontal cortex, but relative sparing of peri-Sylvian cortex. A group of patients with parietal disease due to corticobasal syndrome (CBS) was also tested here in order to investigate the specific role of prefrontal cortex in the task employed in the current study. Participants were presented with a pair of sentences in which the first sentence contained two nouns while the second contained a pronoun. In the experimental (ambiguous) condition, both nouns are plausible referents of the pronoun, thus requiring decision-making resources. The results revealed that bvFTD patients are significantly less accurate than healthy seniors in identifying the correct referent of a pronoun in the ambiguous condition, although CBS patients were as accurate as healthy seniors. Imaging analyses related bvFTD patients’ performance to GM atrophy in ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC). These results suggest that bvFTD patients have difficulties in decision processes that involve the resolution of an ambiguity. PMID:26578928

  20. Results.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zemsky, Robert; Shaman, Susan; Shapiro, Daniel B.

    2001-01-01

    Describes the Collegiate Results Instrument (CRI), which measures a range of collegiate outcomes for alumni 6 years after graduation. The CRI was designed to target alumni from institutions across market segments and assess their values, abilities, work skills, occupations, and pursuit of lifelong learning. (EV)

  1. Ambiguous filling-in at the blind spot resolved through perceptual rivalry.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhimin; Denison, Rachel; Whitney, David; Maus, Gerrit

    2015-09-01

    Visual stimulation at adjacent borders of the retinal blind spot leads to perceptual filling in: a bar reaching through the blind spot, for example, is seen as complete. When multiple stimuli are presented reaching through the blind spot, which stimulus is to be filled in remains ambiguous. This can be demonstrated in a novel illusion, the "jumping pen illusion". Hold a strip of paper horizontally and view it monocularly so that part of it reaches through the blind spot. Then hold a pen (or another object) vertically behind the paper where it also spans the blind spot region. The pen appears to jump in front of the paper. The blind spot thus provides a unique opportunity to study the resolution of perceptual ambiguity in the absence of retinal input. Here we show that the visual system resolves ambiguity by alternating between unambiguous percepts in which one filled-in stimulus occludes the other. Using a haploscopic setup, we presented an orthogonal cross formed by two isoluminant bars of different colors only to one eye, with its intersection placed in the blind spot. Observers viewed this stimulus continuously for trials of 1 minute. They indicated with continuous key presses which of the two bars appeared in front of the other; no key press meant unsure. Observers readily perceived one bar in front of the other; only brief periods were associated with 'unsure' responses. Which bar was perceived to be in front was stochastically alternating, akin to other cases of perceptual rivalry. Distributions of perceptual dominance durations followed gamma distributions, as found for binocular and monocular rivalry (O'Shea et al., 2009). These results demonstrate a novel situation: perceptual competition between two illusory percepts. Further, they suggest that filling-in at the blind spot shares common features with other mechanisms that resolve perceptual ambiguity. Meeting abstract presented at VSS 2015. PMID:26325960

  2. Giving curriculum planners an edge

    PubMed Central

    Oandasan, Ivy F.; Archibald, Douglas; Authier, Louise; Lawrence, Kathrine; McEwen, Laura April; Palacios, Maria; Parkkari, Marie; Plant, Heidi; Slade, Steve; Ross, Shelley

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective To pilot a survey of family medicine residents entering residency, describing their exposure to family medicine and their perspectives related to their future intentions to practise family medicine, in order to inform curriculum planners; and to test the methodology, feasibility, and utility of delivering a longitudinal survey to multiple residency programs. Design Pilot study using surveys. Setting Five Canadian residency programs. Participants A total of 454 first-year family medicine residents were surveyed. Main outcome measures Residents’ previous exposure to family medicine, perspectives on family medicine, and future practice intentions. Results Overall, 70% of first-year residents surveyed responded (n = 317). Although only 5 residency programs participated, respondents included graduates from each of the medical schools in Canada, as well as international medical graduates. Among respondents, 92% felt positive or strongly positive about their choice to be family physicians. Most (73%) indicated they had strong or very strong exposure to family medicine in medical school, yet more than 40% had no or minimal exposure to key clinical domains of family medicine like palliative care, home care, and care of underserved groups. Similar responses were found about residents’ lack of intention to practise in these domains. Conclusion Exposure to clinical domains in family medicine could influence future practice intentions. Surveys at entrance to residency can help medical school and family medicine residency planners consider important learning experiences to include in training. PMID:26052601

  3. Top-down influences on ambiguous perception: the role of stable and transient states of the observer

    PubMed Central

    Scocchia, Lisa; Valsecchi, Matteo; Triesch, Jochen

    2014-01-01

    The world as it appears to the viewer is the result of a complex process of inference performed by the brain. The validity of this apparently counter-intuitive assertion becomes evident whenever we face noisy, feeble or ambiguous visual stimulation: in these conditions, the state of the observer may play a decisive role in determining what is currently perceived. On this background, ambiguous perception and its amenability to top-down influences can be employed as an empirical paradigm to explore the principles of perception. Here we offer an overview of both classical and recent contributions on how stable and transient states of the observer can impact ambiguous perception. As to the influence of the stable states of the observer, we show that what is currently perceived can be influenced (1) by cognitive and affective aspects, such as meaning, prior knowledge, motivation, and emotional content and (2) by individual differences, such as gender, handedness, genetic inheritance, clinical conditions, and personality traits and by (3) learning and conditioning. As to the impact of transient states of the observer, we outline the effects of (4) attention and (5) voluntary control, which have attracted much empirical work along the history of ambiguous perception. In the huge literature on the topic we trace a difference between the observer's ability to control dominance (i.e., the maintenance of a specific percept in visual awareness) and reversal rate (i.e., the switching between two alternative percepts). Other transient states of the observer that have more recently drawn researchers' attention regard (6) the effects of imagery and visual working memory. (7) Furthermore, we describe the transient effects of prior history of perceptual dominance. (8) Finally, we address the currently available computational models of ambiguous perception and how they can take into account the crucial share played by the state of the observer in perceiving ambiguous displays. PMID:25538601

  4. Difficulty Processing Temporary Syntactic Ambiguities in Lewy Body Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grossman, Murray; Gross, Rachel G.; Moore, Peachie; Dreyfuss, Michael; McMillan, Corey T.; Cook, Philip A.; Ash, Sherry; Siderowf, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    While grammatical aspects of language are preserved, executive deficits are prominent in Lewy body spectrum disorder (LBSD), including Parkinson's disease (PD), Parkinson's dementia (PDD) and dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB). We examined executive control during sentence processing in LBSD by assessing temporary structural ambiguities. Using an…

  5. Long-term priming of the meanings of ambiguous words

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodd, Jennifer M.; Lopez Cutrin, Belen; Kirsch, Hannah; Millar, Allesandra; Davis, Matthew H.

    2013-01-01

    Comprehension of semantically ambiguous words (e.g., "bark") is strongly influenced by the relative frequencies of their meanings, such that listeners are biased towards retrieving the most frequent meaning. These biases are often assumed to reflect a highly stable property of an individual's long-term lexical-semantic representations. We present…

  6. Psychometric Analysis of Role Conflict and Ambiguity Scales in Academia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khan, Anwar; Yusoff, Rosman Bin Md.; Khan, Muhammad Muddassar; Yasir, Muhammad; Khan, Faisal

    2014-01-01

    A comprehensive Psychometric Analysis of Rizzo et al.'s (1970) Role Conflict & Ambiguity (RCA) scales were performed after its distribution among 600 academic staff working in six universities of Pakistan. The reliability analysis includes calculation of Cronbach Alpha Coefficients and Inter-Items statistics, whereas validity was determined by…

  7. Semantic partition and the ambiguity of temporal adverbials 

    E-print Network

    Hitzeman, Janet

    1997-01-01

    It has often been observed that sentences such as (1) are ambiguous: (1) Mary has lived in Amsterdam for three years. Sentence (1) has a reading in which there is some three-year interval in the past during which Mary ...

  8. Children's Interpretation of Ambiguous Focus in Sentences with "Only"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paterson, Kevin B.; Liversedge, Simon P.; White, Diane; Filik, Ruth; Jaz, Kristina

    2006-01-01

    We report 3 studies investigating children's and adults' interpretation of ambiguous focus in sentences containing the focus-sensitive quantifier only. In each experiment, child and adult participants compared sentences with only in a preverbal position and counterpart sentences without only against a series of pictures depicting events that…

  9. What Is Reflection? Looking for Clarity in an Ambiguous Notion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarà, Marc

    2015-01-01

    The notion of reflection nowadays is considered crucial in the field of teaching and teacher education. However, although the great majority of approaches to reflection are grounded on the same main theoretical sources, the meaning of this notion is unanimously recognized in the field to be ambiguous. This article aims to look for clarity about…

  10. WORD SENSE AMBIGUATION: CLUSTERING RELATED SENSES William B. Dolan

    E-print Network

    WORD SENSE AMBIGUATION: CLUSTERING RELATED SENSES William B. Dolan Microsoft Research billdol that in many cases this kind of "forced-choice" approach to disambiguation leads to arbitrary decisions which an anima!; eSpl ad6g or cat)to lose or throw 0ff(hair or fur) The arbitrary nature of such divisions

  11. Social Anxiety and Performance in Ambiguous versus Structured Social Situations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Robert G.

    Previous research has suggested that behavioral differences between shy and not shy persons may be explained by differences in inhibition rather than differences in interpersonal skills. To investigate the behavior of high and low social anxiety subjects in both ambiguous social situations and in explicitly structured ones, three studies using…

  12. Ambiguity of Reflexives and Case Extension* Richard Zuber

    E-print Network

    Ambiguity of Reflexives and Case Extension* Richard Zuber CNRS, Paris, France Richard.Zuber@linguist.jussieu.fr Abstract. It is suggested that the difference between co-referential and bound reflexive pronouns found nominal case extension first. Bound reflexives are reflexivisers in the sense that they are not case

  13. Ambiguity, Accessibility, and a Division of Labor for Communicative Success

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Victor S.

    2009-01-01

    People talk to be understood, and so they should produce utterances that are easy for their listeners to understand. I begin this chapter by describing evidence showing that speakers rarely avoid sentences that are ambiguous, even though ambiguity is a factor that is well known to cause difficulty for listeners. Instead, speakers seem to choose utterances that are especially easy for them to say, specifically by producing more accessible, easy-to-think-of material sooner, and less accessible, harder-to-think-of material later. If speakers produce utterances that are easy to say but not utterances that are easy to understand, how is it that we understand each other? A third line of evidence shows that even when sentences are structurally ambiguous, they’re likely to include enough information for comprehenders to figure out what they mean. This suggests that speakers produce ambiguous utterances simply because they can -- because the grammar of their language will only let them produce utterances that are unambiguous enough to be understood most of the time anyway. And so, we understand each other because speakers produce utterances efficiently even if they’re not optimally understandable; addressees do what they need to to understand their speakers; and the grammar makes sure everything works out properly. PMID:19710948

  14. Investigation of Combined GPS/GALILEO Cascading Ambiguity Resolution Schemes

    E-print Network

    Calgary, University of

    Investigation of Combined GPS/GALILEO Cascading Ambiguity Resolution Schemes Wentao Zhang, M researches include GPS/GALILEO interoperability as well as GNSS receiver design. Paul Alves is a PhD student Engineering in May 2000. He has studied positioning and navigation with a focus on GPS and GALILEO integration

  15. Expecting and Accepting: The Temporal Ambiguity of Recovery Identities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howard, Jenna

    2006-01-01

    This paper has two complementary agendas. One is to develop a formal analysis of temporal ambiguity in self-identification. This refers specifically to having two conflicting orientations toward the future with regard to one's identity (e.g., a temporary expecting orientation and a permanent accepting orientation). I use the recovery identity…

  16. Is Multilingualism Linked to a Higher Tolerance of Ambiguity?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeWaele, Jean-Marc; Wei, Li

    2013-01-01

    The present study investigates the link between multilingualism and the personality trait Tolerance of Ambiguity (TA) among 2158 mono-, bi- and multilinguals. Monolinguals and bilinguals scored significantly lower on TA compared to multilinguals. A high level of global proficiency of various languages was linked to higher TA scores. A stay abroad…

  17. Resolving and Mediating Ambiguous Contexts for Pervasive Care Environments

    E-print Network

    Julien, Christine

    ), context state (Si) and situation space (Ri), and attempts to incorporate various intuitions that should, a significant challenge facing the development of realistic and deployable context-aware services for healthcare applications is the ability to deal with ambiguous contexts to prevent hazardous situations. In this work, we

  18. Translation Ambiguity but Not Word Class Predicts Translation Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prior, Anat; Kroll, Judith F.; Macwhinney, Brian

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the influence of word class and translation ambiguity on cross-linguistic representation and processing. Bilingual speakers of English and Spanish performed translation production and translation recognition tasks on nouns and verbs in both languages. Words either had a single translation or more than one translation. Translation…

  19. Bidirectional Transfer: Consequences of Translation Ambiguity for Bilingual Word Meaning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Degani, Tamar

    2011-01-01

    Could a second language (L2) influence how bilinguals process their native language (L1)? The work described in this dissertation examined this issue focusing on the way bilinguals interpret the meanings of words. Capitalizing on the prevalence of words that can be translated in more than one way across languages (i.e., "translation ambiguity,"…

  20. Textbook Presentations of Weight: Conceptual Difficulties and Language Ambiguities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taibu, Rex; Rudge, David; Schuster, David

    2015-01-01

    The term "weight" has multiple related meanings in both scientific and everyday usage. Even among experts and in textbooks, weight is ambiguously defined as either the gravitational force on an object or operationally as the magnitude of the force an object exerts on a measuring scale. This poses both conceptual and language difficulties…

  1. Ambiguous Argument as Advocacy in Organizational Crisis Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sellnow, Timothy L.; Ulmer, Robert R.

    1995-01-01

    Posits that organizations in crisis situations must address multiple audiences with distinct needs. Analyzes the public communication offered by Jack in the Box restaurants during a food poisoning outbreak. Finds that ambiguity may provide organizations with a means for satisfying the divergent needs of their audiences--even where these distinct…

  2. Radar Ambiguity and Finite Equiangular Gabor (Heisenberg-Weyl) Frames

    E-print Network

    Pfander, Götz

    Radar Ambiguity and Finite Equiangular Gabor (Heisenberg-Weyl) Frames Onur Oktay Jacobs University Bremen April 23, 2009 #12;logo A Radar Detection Problem Finite Equiangular Gabor (Heisenberg-Weyl) Frames Closing note: general maximally redunda Outline 1 A Radar Detection Problem 2 Finite Equiangular

  3. Children's Use of Gesture to Resolve Lexical Ambiguity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kidd, Evan; Holler, Judith

    2009-01-01

    We report on a study investigating 3-5-year-old children's use of gesture to resolve lexical ambiguity. Children were told three short stories that contained two homonym senses; for example, "bat" (flying mammal) and "bat" (sports equipment). They were then asked to re-tell these stories to a second experimenter. The data were coded for the means…

  4. MAXIMUM ENTROPY MODELS FOR NATURAL LANGUAGE AMBIGUITY RESOLUTION

    E-print Network

    Rodriguez, Carlos

    MAXIMUM ENTROPY MODELS FOR NATURAL LANGUAGE AMBIGUITY RESOLUTION Adwait Ratnaparkhi A DISSERTATION with whom you argue, discuss, and nurture your ideas. I thank all of the people at Penn and elsewhere who the intellectual freedom to pursue what I believed to be the best way to approach natural language processing

  5. Resolving Ambiguities of Chinese Conjunctive Structures by Divide-and-conquer Approaches

    E-print Network

    Resolving Ambiguities of Chinese Conjunctive Structures by Divide- and-conquer Approaches Duen in parsing conjunctive structures. Long conjunctive structures cause long-distance dependencies and tre- mendous syntactic ambiguities. Pure syn- tactic approaches hardly can determine boundaries of conjunctive

  6. TnToolkit: A Design and Analysis Tool for Ambiguous, QWERTY, and On-Screen Keypads

    E-print Network

    MacKenzie, Scott

    of an ambiguous keypad. Even the popular Nintendo Wii video game console provides an on-screen telephone keypad. The ambiguous keypad used in the Nintendo Wii's Message Board application. After reviewing text entry concepts

  7. Income Tax Policy and Charitable Giving

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooks, Arthur C.

    2007-01-01

    Many studies over the past 20 years have looked at the response of charitable donations to tax incentives--the tax price elasticity of giving. Generally, authors have assumed this elasticity is constant across all types of giving. Using the 2001 Panel Study of Income Dynamics data on charitable giving, this paper estimates the tax price elasticity…

  8. Anisotropy in an ambiguous kinetic depth effect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulligan, Jeffrey B.

    1992-01-01

    A set of animated stimuli (Lissajous figures), each element of which is physically consistent with two different 3D shapes undergoing rigid rotations about orthogonal axes is presented. Predictions of which shape will be seen are made by utilizing an adaptation of Hildreth's smoothest-velocity-field computation. Results indicate that the ambiquity in 2D visual motion, i.e., the aperture problem, is not resolved before the interpretation of the 3D structure.

  9. The classification of ambiguity in polarimetric reconstruction of coronal mass ejection

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, Xinghua; Wang, Huaning; Huang, Xin; Du, Zhanle; He, Han

    2014-01-10

    The Thomson scattering theory indicates that there exist explicit and implicit ambiguities in polarimetric analyses of coronal mass ejection (CME) observations. We suggest a classification for these ambiguities in CME reconstruction. Three samples, including double explicit, mixed, and double implicit ambiguity, are shown with the polarimetric analyses of STEREO CME observations. These samples demonstrate that this classification is helpful for improving polarimetric reconstruction.

  10. Ambiguous Loss after Lesbian Couples with Children Break up: A Case for Same-Gender Divorce

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Katherine R.

    2007-01-01

    The theory of ambiguous loss is applied to structural ambiguity and personal transcendence in the parent-child relationship following a same-gender relational ending. Working recursively through the six guidelines of ambiguous loss (finding meaning, tempering mastery, reconstructing identity, normalizing ambivalence, revising attachment, and…

  11. Thrombin–aptamer recognition: a revealed ambiguity

    PubMed Central

    Russo Krauss, Irene; Merlino, Antonello; Giancola, Concetta; Randazzo, Antonio; Mazzarella, Lelio; Sica, Filomena

    2011-01-01

    Aptamers are structured oligonucleotides that recognize molecular targets and can function as direct protein inhibitors. The best-known example is the thrombin-binding aptamer, TBA, a single-stranded 15-mer DNA that inhibits the activity of thrombin, the key enzyme of coagulation cascade. TBA folds as a G-quadruplex structure, as proved by its NMR structure. The X-ray structure of the complex between TBA and human ?-thrombin was solved at 2.9-Å resolution, but did not provide details of the aptamer conformation and the interactions with the protein molecule. TBA is rapidly processed by nucleases. To improve the properties of TBA, a number of modified analogs have been produced. In particular, a modified TBA containing a 5?-5? polarity inversion site, mTBA, has higher stability and higher affinity toward thrombin with respect to TBA, although it has a lower inhibitory activity. We present the crystal structure of the thrombin–mTBA complex at 2.15-Å resolution; the resulting model eventually provides a clear picture of thrombin–aptamers interaction, and also highlights the structural bases of the different properties of TBA and mTBA. Our findings open the way for a rational design of modified aptamers with improved potency as anticoagulant drugs. PMID:21715374

  12. Do Market Incentives Crowd Out Charitable Giving?

    PubMed

    Deck, Cary; Kimbrough, Erik O

    2013-12-01

    Donations and volunteerism can be conceived as market transactions with a zero explicit price. However, evidence suggests people may not view zero as just another price when it comes to pro-social behavior. Thus, while markets might be expected to increase the supply of assets available to those in need, some worry such financial incentives will crowd out altruistic giving. This paper reports laboratory experiments directly investigating the degree to which market incentives crowd out large, discrete charitable donations in a setting related to deceased organ donation. The results suggest markets increase the supply of assets available to those in need. However, as some critics fear, market incentives disproportionately influence the relatively poor. PMID:24348002

  13. Context sensitivity and ambiguity in component-based systems design

    SciTech Connect

    Bespalko, S.J.; Sindt, A.

    1997-10-01

    Designers of components-based, real-time systems need to guarantee to correctness of soft-ware and its output. Complexity of a system, and thus the propensity for error, is best characterized by the number of states a component can encounter. In many cases, large numbers of states arise where the processing is highly dependent on context. In these cases, states are often missed, leading to errors. The following are proposals for compactly specifying system states which allow the factoring of complex components into a control module and a semantic processing module. Further, the need for methods that allow for the explicit representation of ambiguity and uncertainty in the design of components is discussed. Presented herein are examples of real-world problems which are highly context-sensitive or are inherently ambiguous.

  14. Integer-ambiguity resolution in astronomy and geodesy

    E-print Network

    Lannes, André

    2013-01-01

    Recent theoretical developments in astronomical aperture synthesis have revealed the existence of integer-ambiguity problems. Those problems, which appear in the self-calibration procedures of radio imaging, have been shown to be similar to the nearest-lattice point (NLP) problems encountered in high-precision geodetic positioning, and in global navigation satellite systems. In this paper, we analyse the theoretical aspects of the matter and propose new methods for solving those NLP problems. The related optimization aspects concern both the preconditioning stage, and the discrete-search stage in which the integer ambiguities are finally fixed. Our algorithms, which are described in an explicit manner, can easily be implemented. They lead to substantial gains in the processing time of both stages. Their efficiency was shown via intensive numerical tests.

  15. Integer-ambiguity resolution in astronomy and geodesy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lannes, A.; Prieur, J.-L.

    2014-02-01

    Recent theoretical developments in astronomical aperture synthesis have revealed the existence of integer-ambiguity problems. Those problems, which appear in the self-calibration procedures of radio imaging, have been shown to be similar to the nearest-lattice point (NLP) problems encountered in high-precision geodetic positioning and in global navigation satellite systems. In this paper we analyse the theoretical aspects of the matter and propose new methods for solving those NLP~problems. The related optimization aspects concern both the preconditioning stage, and the discrete-search stage in which the integer ambiguities are finally fixed. Our algorithms, which are described in an explicit manner, can easily be implemented. They lead to substantial gains in the processing time of both stages. Their efficiency was shown via intensive numerical tests.

  16. Resolving the range ambiguity in OFDR using digital signal processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riesen, Nicolas; T-Y Lam, Timothy; Chow, Jong H.

    2014-12-01

    A digitally range-gated variant of optical frequency domain reflectometry is demonstrated which overcomes the beat note ambiguity when sensing beyond a single frequency sweep. The range-gating is achieved using a spread spectrum technique involving time-stamping of the optical signal using high-frequency pseudorandom phase modulation. The reflections from different sections of fiber can then be isolated in the time domain by digitally inverting the phase modulation using appropriately-delayed copies of the pseudorandom noise code. Since the technique overcomes the range ambiguity in OFDR, it permits high sweep repetition rates without sacrificing range, thus allowing for high-bandwidth sensing over long lengths of fiber. This is demonstrated for the case of quasi-distributed sensing.

  17. Decision making and ambiguity in auditory stream segregation

    PubMed Central

    Deike, Susann; Heil, Peter; Böckmann-Barthel, Martin; Brechmann, André

    2015-01-01

    Researchers of auditory stream segregation have largely taken a bottom-up view on the link between physical stimulus parameters and the perceptual organization of sequences of ABAB sounds. However, in the majority of studies, researchers have relied on the reported decisions of the subjects regarding which of the predefined percepts (e.g., one stream or two streams) predominated when subjects listened to more or less ambiguous streaming sequences. When searching for neural mechanisms of stream segregation, it should be kept in mind that such decision processes may contribute to brain activation, as also suggested by recent human imaging data. The present study proposes that the uncertainty of a subject in making a decision about the perceptual organization of ambiguous streaming sequences may be reflected in the time required to make an initial decision. To this end, subjects had to decide on their current percept while listening to ABAB auditory streaming sequences. Each sequence had a duration of 30 s and was composed of A and B harmonic tone complexes differing in fundamental frequency (?F). Sequences with seven different ?F were tested. We found that the initial decision time varied non-monotonically with ?F and that it was significantly correlated with the degree of perceptual ambiguity defined from the proportions of time the subjects reported a one-stream or a two-stream percept subsequent to the first decision. This strong relation of the proposed measures of decision uncertainty and perceptual ambiguity should be taken into account when searching for neural correlates of auditory stream segregation. PMID:26321899

  18. A new ionosphere-free ambiguity resolution method for long-range baseline with GNSS triple-frequency signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Ying; Ji, Shengyue; Chen, Wu; Weng, Duojie

    2015-10-01

    New GNSS systems (i.e. GPS modernization, BeiDou, and Galileo) will provide multiple navigation signals for reliable navigation services. The triple or even multiple frequency signals are expected to bring great benefits to the ambiguity resolution (AR) over long-range baselines, which is always regarded as a huge challenge. Another issue in the long baseline AR is the unmodeled ionospheric delay, which is one of the major errors in ranging signals. A new triple-frequency, ionosphere-free technique for ambiguity resolution of long-range baseline is developed in this study. In this technique, the optimal observation combinations are chosen considering the effect of ionospheric delay. At the same time, using this technique, the double difference (DD) ionospheric delay is nullified in the ambiguity search process. The performance of the new technique is examined using the simulated GPS triple frequency data as well as the real BDS observation. Results show that the ambiguity can be fixed within 10 min for GPS and BDS long-range baselines with this new technique.

  19. The Role of Informative and Ambiguous Feedback in Avoidance Behavior: Empirical and Computational Findings

    PubMed Central

    Moustafa, Ahmed A.; Sheynin, Jony; Myers, Catherine E.

    2015-01-01

    Avoidance behavior is a critical component of many psychiatric disorders, and as such, it is important to understand how avoidance behavior arises, and whether it can be modified. In this study, we used empirical and computational methods to assess the role of informational feedback and ambiguous outcome in avoidance behavior. We adapted a computer-based probabilistic classification learning task, which includes positive, negative and no-feedback outcomes; the latter outcome is ambiguous as it might signal either a successful outcome (missed punishment) or a failure (missed reward). Prior work with this task suggested that most healthy subjects viewed the no-feedback outcome as strongly positive. Interestingly, in a later version of the classification task, when healthy subjects were allowed to opt out of (i.e. avoid) responding, some subjects (“avoiders”) reliably avoided trials where there was a risk of punishment, but other subjects (“non-avoiders”) never made any avoidance responses at all. One possible interpretation is that the “non-avoiders” valued the no-feedback outcome so positively on punishment-based trials that they had little incentive to avoid. Another possible interpretation is that the outcome of an avoided trial is unspecified and that lack of information is aversive, decreasing subjects’ tendency to avoid. To examine these ideas, we here tested healthy young adults on versions of the task where avoidance responses either did or did not generate informational feedback about the optimal response. Results showed that provision of informational feedback decreased avoidance responses and also decreased categorization performance, without significantly affecting the percentage of subjects classified as “avoiders.” To better understand these results, we used a modified Q-learning model to fit individual subject data. Simulation results suggest that subjects in the feedback condition adjusted their behavior faster following better-than-expected outcomes, compared to subjects in the no-feedback condition. Additionally, in both task conditions, “avoiders” adjusted their behavior faster following worse-than-expected outcomes, and treated the ambiguous no-feedback outcome as less rewarding, compared to non-avoiders. Together, results shed light on the important role of ambiguous and informative feedback in avoidance behavior. PMID:26630279

  20. Ambiguity resolution in precise point positioning with hourly data for global single receiver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaohong; Li, Pan; Guo, Fei

    2013-01-01

    Integer ambiguity resolution (IAR) can improve precise point positioning (PPP) performance significantly. IAR for PPP became a highlight topic in global positioning system (GPS) community in recent years. More and more researchers focus on this issue. Progress has been made in the latest years. In this paper, we aim at investigating and demonstrating the performance of a global zero-differenced (ZD) PPP IAR service for GPS users by providing routine ZD uncalibrated fractional offsets (UFOs) for wide-lane and narrow-lane. Data sets from all IGS stations collected on DOY 1, 100, 200 and 300 of 2010 are used to validate and demonstrate this global service. Static experiment results show that an accuracy better than 1 cm in horizontal and 1-2 cm in vertical could be achieved in ambiguity-fixed PPP solution with only hourly data. Compared with PPP float solution, an average improvement reaches 58.2% in east, 28.3% in north and 23.8% in vertical for all tested stations. Results of kinematic experiments show that the RMS of kinematic PPP solutions can be improved from 21.6, 16.6 and 37.7 mm to 12.2, 13.3 and 34.3 mm for the fixed solutions in the east, north and vertical components, respectively. Both static and kinematic experiments show that wide-lane and narrow-lane UFO products of all satellites can be generated and provided in a routine way accompanying satellite orbit and clock products for the PPP user anywhere around the world, to obtain accurate and reliable ambiguity-fixed PPP solutions.

  1. Embedded promotions in online services: how goal-relevance ambiguity shapes response and affect.

    PubMed

    Brasel, S Adam

    2010-09-01

    Adding promotions to online services is increasingly commonplace, yet consumers may have difficulty determining whether service-embedded promotions are goal-relevant, due to the linear and transactional nature of online services. This contextual effect of goal-relevance ambiguity on promotions is explored across three studies. An exploratory study utilizing actual service websites and a broad range of consumers as participants showed promotional elements in online services generated considerable confusion, and instructions labeling promotions as optional did little to relieve goal-relevance ambiguity. A second study using student participants inserted promotions into an online airline ticket service, a shopping site, a local news blog, and a news headline aggregator, to explore how linear and transactional sites such as online services compared to more exploratory or informational online environments. Results showed that service-embedded promotions enjoyed initial compliance far beyond promotions in traditional websites but also generated increased confusion, frustration, and anger. A third study utilizing student participants explored how varying levels of online service experience created differing responses to promotions in services; novices were less able to judge promotional goal-relevance and experienced more confusion, whereas experienced searchers were more likely to respond with frustration and anger. Many participants complied with promotional offers at the time of the service transaction, but stated intentions to use the promotion postservice were very low. The overall results spotlight goal-relevance ambiguity as an important driver of consumer response to online promotions, and highlight the role website context can play in the processing of online promotional elements. PMID:20853986

  2. Partial Ambiguity Resolution for Ground and Space-Based Applications in a GPS+Galileo scenario: A simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nardo, A.; Li, B.; Teunissen, P. J. G.

    2016-01-01

    Integer Ambiguity Resolution (IAR) is the key to fast and precise GNSS positioning. The proper diagnostic metric for successful IAR is provided by the ambiguity success rate being the probability of correct integer estimation. In this contribution we analyse the performance of different GPS+Galileo models in terms of number of epochs needed to reach a pre-determined success rate, for various ground and space-based applications. The simulation-based controlled model environment enables us to gain insight into the factors contributing to the ambiguity resolution strength of the different GPS+Galileo models. Different scenarios of modernized GPS+Galileo are studied, encompassing the long baseline ground case as well as the medium dynamics case (airplane) and the space-based Low Earth Orbiter (LEO) case. In our analyses of these models the capabilities of partial ambiguity resolution (PAR) are demonstrated and compared to the limitations of full ambiguity resolution (FAR). The results show that PAR is generally a more efficient way than FAR to reduce the time needed to achieve centimetre-level positioning precision. For long single baselines, PAR can achieve time reductions of fifty percent to achieve such precision levels, while for multiple baselines it even becomes more effective, reaching reductions up to eighty percent for four station networks. For a LEO, the rapidly changing observation geometry does not even allow FAR, while PAR is then still possible for both dual- and triple-frequency scenarios. With the triple-frequency GPS+Galileo model the availability of precise positioning improves by fifteen percent with respect to the dual-frequency scenario.

  3. Particle filter-based estimation of inter-frequency phase bias for real-time GLONASS integer ambiguity resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Yumiao; Ge, Maorong; Neitzel, Frank

    2015-11-01

    GLONASS could hardly reach the positioning performance of GPS, especially for fast and real-time precise positioning. One of the reasons is the phase inter-frequency bias (IFB) at the receiver end prevents its integer ambiguity resolution. A number of studies were carried out to achieve the integer ambiguity resolution for GLONASS. Based on some of the revealed IFB characteristics, for instance IFB is a linear function of the received carrier frequency and L1 and L2 have the same IFB in unit of length, most of recent methods recommend estimating the IFB rate together with ambiguities. However, since the two sets of parameters are highly correlated, as demonstrated in previous studies, observations over several hours up to 1 day are needed even with simultaneous GPS observations to obtain a reasonable solution. Obviously, these approaches cannot be applied for real-time positioning. Actually, it can be demonstrated that GLONASS ambiguity resolution should also be available even for a single epoch if the IFB rate is precisely known. In addition, the closer the IFB rate value is to its true value, the larger the fixing RATIO will be. Based on this fact, in this paper, a new approach is developed to estimate the IFB rate by means of particle filtering with the likelihood function derived from RATIO. This approach is evaluated with several sets of experimental data. For both static and kinematic cases, the results show that IFB rates could be estimated precisely just with GLONASS data of a few epochs depending on the baseline length. The time cost with a normal PC can be controlled around 1 s and can be further reduced. With the estimated IFB rate, integer ambiguity resolution is available immediately and as a consequence, the positioning accuracy is improved significantly to the level of GPS fixed solution. Thus the new approach enables real-time precise applications of GLONASS.

  4. GNSS Carrier Phase Integer Ambiguity Resolution with Camera and Satellite images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henkel, Patrick

    2015-04-01

    Ambiguity Resolution is the key to high precision position and attitude determination with GNSS. However, ambiguity resolution of kinematic receivers becomes challenging in environments with substantial multipath, limited satellite availability and erroneous cycle slip corrections. There is a need for other sensors, e.g. inertial sensors that allow an independent prediction of the position. The change of the predicted position over time can then be used for cycle slip detection and correction. In this paper, we provide a method to improve the initial ambiguity resolution for RTK and PPP with vision-based position information. Camera images are correlated with geo-referenced aerial/ satellite images to obtain an independent absolute position information. This absolute position information is then coupled with the GNSS and INS measurements in an extended Kalman filter to estimate the position, velocity, acceleration, attitude, angular rates, code multipath and biases of the accelerometers and gyroscopes. The camera and satellite images are matched based on some characteristic image points (e.g. corners of street markers). We extract these characteristic image points from the camera images by performing the following steps: An inverse mapping (homogenous projection) is applied to transform the camera images from the driver's perspective to bird view. Subsequently, we detect the street markers by performing (a) a color transformation and reduction with adaptive brightness correction to focus on relevant features, (b) a subsequent morphological operation to enhance the structure recognition, (c) an edge and corner detection to extract feature points, and (d) a point matching of the corner points with a template to recognize the street markers. We verified the proposed method with two low-cost u-blox LEA 6T GPS receivers, the MPU9150 from Invensense, the ASCOS RTK corrections and a PointGrey camera. The results show very precise and seamless position and attitude estimates in an urban environment with substantial multipath.

  5. Satiation or availability? Effects of attention, memory, and imagery on the perception of ambiguous figures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horlitz, Krista L.; O'Leary, Ann

    1993-01-01

    The prolonged-inspection technique has been used to demonstrate effects of satiation on the perception of ambiguous figures. We propose that the inspection phase, in which subjects view an unambiguous version of the stimulus prior to observing the ambiguous figure, does not create neural fatigue but rather provides a context in which the alternative percept is apprehended and gains perceptual strength through processes such as imagination or memory. The consequent availability of the alternative organization drives the perceptual phenomena that have been thought to reflect satiation. In Experiment 1, we demonstrated that (1) preexperimental exposure to the target figures and (2) allocation of attention to the inspection figures were both necessary in order to obtain results similar to those predicted by the satiation model. In Experiment 2, we obtained similar results, finding that effects of prior inspection were greater the greater the amount and availability of information regarding the alternative percept during the inspection phase. Subjects who generated visual images of the noninspected alternative during inspection yielded results comparable to those from subjects to whom both versions were presented visually.

  6. Dressed skeleton expansion and the coupling scale ambiguity problem

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Hung Jung

    1992-09-01

    Perturbative expansions in quantum field theories are usually expressed in powers of a coupling constant. In principle, the infinite sum of the expansion series is independent of the renormalization scale of the coupling constant. In practice, there is a remnant dependence of the truncated series on the renormalization scale. This scale ambiguity can severely restrict the predictive power of theoretical calculations. The dressed skeleton expansion is developed as a calculational method which avoids the coupling scale ambiguity problem. In this method, physical quantities are expressed as functional expansions in terms of a coupling vertex function. The arguments of the vertex function are given by the physical momenta of each process. These physical momenta effectively replace the unspecified renormalization scale and eliminate the ambiguity problem. This method is applied to various field theoretical models and its main features and limitations are explored. For quantum chromodynamics, an expression for the running coupling constant of the three-gluon vertex is obtained. The effective coupling scale of this vertex is shown to be essentially given by {mu}{sup 2} {approximately} Q{sub min}{sup 2}Q{sub med}{sup 2}/Q{sub max}{sup 2} where Q{sub min}{sup 2}Q{sub med}{sup 2}/Q{sub max}{sup 2} are respectively the smallest, the next-to-smallest and the largest scale among the three gluon virtualities. This functional form suggests that the three-gluon vertex becomes non-perturbative at asymmetric momentum configurations. Implications for four-jet physics is discussed.

  7. Sensorimotor Adaptation Following Exposure to Ambiguous Inertial Motion Cues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, S. J.; Clement, G. R.; Rupert, A. H.; Reschke, M. F.; Harm, D. L.; Guedry, F. E.

    2007-01-01

    The central nervous system must resolve the ambiguity of inertial motion sensory cues in order to derive accurate spatial orientation awareness. Adaptive changes in how inertial cues from the otolith system are integrated with other sensory information lead to perceptual and postural disturbances upon return to Earth s gravity. The primary goals of this ground-based research investigation are to explore physiological mechanisms and operational implications of tilt-translation disturbances during and following re-entry, and to evaluate a tactile prosthesis as a countermeasure for improving control of whole-body orientation during tilt and translation motion.

  8. UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON OUR WORKPLACE GIVING CAMPAIGN

    E-print Network

    Borenstein, Elhanan

    .................................................................................................... December 31 Submit nominations for volunteer appreciation event awards ceremony King County CFD Volunteer Volunteer Event ......................................................................... October 28 UW ......................................................................................................November 25 Submit fundraiser forms and cash to campaign assistant Last Week to Give

  9. How to Give Your Child Medicine

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Ask your pharmacist for a spoon, cup, or syringe that lists both teaspoons (tsp) and milliliters (mL). ... right amount of medicine. If you use a syringe to give liquid medicine to your child, first ...

  10. Statistical analysis of the ambiguities in the asteroid period determinations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butkiewicz, M.; Kwiatkowski, T.; Bartczak, P.; Dudzi?ski, G.

    2014-07-01

    A synodic period of an asteroid can be derived from its lightcurve by standard methods like Fourier-series fitting. A problem appears when results of observations are based on less than a full coverage of a lightcurve and/or high level of noise. Also, long gaps between individual lightcurves create an ambiguity in the cycle count which leads to aliases. Excluding binary systems and objects with non-principal-axis rotation, the rotation period is usually identical to the period of the second Fourier harmonic of the lightcurve. There are cases, however, where it may be connected with the 1st, 3rd, or 4th harmonic and it is difficult to choose among them when searching for the period. To help remove such uncertainties we analysed asteroid lightcurves for a range of shapes and observing/illuminating geometries. We simulated them using a modified internal code from the ISAM service (Marciniak et al. 2012, A&A 545, A131). In our computations, shapes of asteroids were modeled as Gaussian random spheres (Muinonen 1998, A&A, 332, 1087). A combination of Lommel-Seeliger and Lambert scattering laws was assumed. For each of the 100 shapes, we randomly selected 1000 positions of the spin axis, systematically changing the solar phase angle with a step of 5°. For each lightcurve, we determined its peak-to-peak amplitude, fitted the 6th-order Fourier series and derived the amplitudes of its harmonics. Instead of the number of the lightcurve extrema, which in many cases is subjective, we characterized each lightcurve by the order of the highest-amplitude Fourier harmonic. The goal of our simulations was to derive statistically significant conclusions (based on the underlying assumptions) about the dominance of different harmonics in the lightcurves of the specified amplitude and phase angle. The results, presented in the Figure, can be used in individual cases to estimate the probability that the obtained lightcurve is dominated by a specified Fourier harmonic. Some of the conclusions are: (1) the 4th harmonic dominates about 1 percent of lightcurves only at low amplitudes (A<0.1 mag, ? < 40°). (2) The dominance of the 3rd harmonic can be observed more often only in the case of near-Earth asteroids, observed at ? > 30°; for the main-belt asteroids (MBAs), it can be present only in small amplitude lightcurves (A < 0.1 mag). (3) The 1st harmonic is present quite often in the low-amplitude (A < 0.2 mag) lightcurves of MBAs; for NEAs it can be seen even in high-amplitude lightcurves (A<0.7~mag for ?? 40°, A<0.9~mag for ? ? 50°). (4) In 100 percent of the cases, the 2nd harmonic dominates the lightcurves of MBAs whose amplitudes A > 0.2 mag.

  11. Semantic Similarity in a Taxonomy: An Information-Based Measure and its Application to Problems of Ambiguity in Natural Language

    E-print Network

    Resnik, P

    2011-01-01

    This article presents a measure of semantic similarity in an IS-A taxonomy based on the notion of shared information content. Experimental evaluation against a benchmark set of human similarity judgments demonstrates that the measure performs better than the traditional edge-counting approach. The article presents algorithms that take advantage of taxonomic similarity in resolving syntactic and semantic ambiguity, along with experimental results demonstrating their effectiveness.

  12. Psychoanalytic and musical ambiguity: the tritone in gee, officer krupke.

    PubMed

    Jaffee Nagel, Julie

    2010-02-01

    The poignant and timeless Broadway musical West Side Story is viewed from the standpoint of taking musical forms as psychoanalytic data. The musical configuration of notes called the tritone (or diabolus in musica) is taken as a sonic metaphor expressing ambiguity both in musical vocabulary and in mental life. The tritone, which historically and harmonically represents instability, is heard throughout the score and emphasizes the intrapsychic, interpersonal, and social dramas that unfold within and between the two gangs in West Side Story. Particular emphasis is given to the comic but exceedingly sober song Gee, Officer Krupke. Bernstein's sensitivity to the ambiguity and tension inherent in the tritone in West Side Story is conceptualized as an intersection of music theory and theories of mind; this perspective holds implications for clinical practice and transports psychoanalytic concepts from the couch to the Broadway stage and into the community to address the complexities of love, hate, aggression, prejudice, and violence. Ultimately, West Side Story cross-pollinates music and theater, as well as music and psychoanalytic concepts. PMID:20234007

  13. Non-Abelian gauge redundancy and entropic ambiguities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balachandran, A. P.; de Queiroz, A. R.; Vaidya, S.

    2015-04-01

    The von Neumann entropy of a generic quantum state is not unique unless the state can be uniquely decomposed as a sum of extremal or pure states. Therefore one reaches the remarkable possibility that there may be many entropies for a given state. We show that this happens if the GNS representation (of the algebra of observables in some quantum state) is reducible, and some representations in the decomposition occur with non-trivial degeneracy. This ambiguity in entropy, which can occur at zero temperature, can often be traced to a gauge symmetry emergent from the non-trivial topological character of the configuration space of the underlying system. We also establish the analogue of an H-theorem for this entropy by showing that its evolution is Markovian, determined by a stochastic matrix. After demonstrating this entropy ambiguity for the simple example of the algebra of 2 × 2 matrices, we argue that the degeneracies in the GNS representation can be interpreted as an emergent broken gauge symmetry, and play an important role in the analysis of emergent entropy due to non-Abelian anomalies. We work out the simplest situation with such non-Abelian symmetry, that of an ethylene molecule.

  14. Vaccine Hesitancy: Clarifying a Theoretical Framework for an Ambiguous Notion

    PubMed Central

    Peretti-Watel, Patrick; Larson, Heidi J; Ward, Jeremy K.; Schulz, William S; Verger, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Today, according to many public health experts, public confidence in vaccines is waning. The term “vaccine hesitancy” (VH) is increasingly used to describe the spread of such vaccine reluctance. But VH is an ambiguous notion and its theoretical background appears uncertain. To clarify this concept, we first review the current definitions of VH in the public health literature and examine its most prominent characteristics. VH has been defined as a set of beliefs, attitudes, or behaviours, or some combination of them, shared by a large and heterogeneous portion of the population and including people who exhibit reluctant conformism (they may either decline a vaccine, delay it or accept it despite their doubts) and vaccine-specific behaviours. Secondly, we underline some of the ambiguities of this notion and argue that it is more a catchall category than a real concept. We also call into question the usefulness of understanding VH as an intermediate position along a continuum ranging from anti-vaccine to pro-vaccine attitudes, and we discuss its qualification as a belief, attitude or behaviour. Thirdly, we propose a theoretical framework, based on previous literature and taking into account some major structural features of contemporary societies, that considers VH as a kind of decision-making process that depends on people’s level of commitment to healthism/risk culture and on their level of confidence in the health authorities and mainstream medicine. PMID:25789201

  15. Radiological Evaluation of Ambiguous Genitalia with Various Imaging Modalities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravi, N.; Bindushree, Kadakola

    2012-07-01

    Disorders of sex development (DSDs) are congenital conditions in which the development of chromosomal, gonadal, or anatomic sex is atypical. These can be classified broadly into four categories on the basis of gonadal histologic features: female pseudohermaphroditism (46,XX with two ovaries); male pseudohermaphroditism (46,XY with two testes); true hermaphroditism (ovotesticular DSD) (both ovarian and testicular tissues); and gonadal dysgenesis, either mixed (a testis and a streak gonad) or pure (bilateral streak gonads). Imaging plays an important role in demonstrating the anatomy and associated anomalies. Ultrasonography is the primary modality for demonstrating internal organs and magnetic resonance imaging is used as an adjunct modality to assess for internal gonads and genitalia. Early and appropriate gender assignment is necessary for healthy physical and psychologic development of children with ambiguous genitalia. Gender assignment can be facilitated with a team approach that involves a pediatric endocrinologist, geneticist, urologist, psychiatrist, social worker, neonatologist, nurse, and radiologist, allowing timely diagnosis and proper management. We describe case series on ambiguous genitalia presented to our department who were evaluated with multiple imaging modalities.

  16. Vaccine hesitancy: clarifying a theoretical framework for an ambiguous notion.

    PubMed

    Peretti-Watel, Patrick; Larson, Heidi J; Ward, Jeremy K; Schulz, William S; Verger, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Today, according to many public health experts, public confidence in vaccines is waning. The term "vaccine hesitancy" (VH) is increasingly used to describe the spread of such vaccine reluctance. But VH is an ambiguous notion and its theoretical background appears uncertain. To clarify this concept, we first review the current definitions of VH in the public health literature and examine its most prominent characteristics. VH has been defined as a set of beliefs, attitudes, or behaviours, or some combination of them, shared by a large and heterogeneous portion of the population and including people who exhibit reluctant conformism (they may either decline a vaccine, delay it or accept it despite their doubts) and vaccine-specific behaviours. Secondly, we underline some of the ambiguities of this notion and argue that it is more a catchall category than a real concept. We also call into question the usefulness of understanding VH as an intermediate position along a continuum ranging from anti-vaccine to pro-vaccine attitudes, and we discuss its qualification as a belief, attitude or behaviour. Thirdly, we propose a theoretical framework, based on previous literature and taking into account some major structural features of contemporary societies, that considers VH as a kind of decision-making process that depends on people's level of commitment to healthism/risk culture and on their level of confidence in the health authorities and mainstream medicine. PMID:25789201

  17. Speech Rhythm Facilitates Syntactic Ambiguity Resolution: ERP Evidence

    PubMed Central

    Roncaglia-Denissen, Maria Paula; Schmidt-Kassow, Maren; Kotz, Sonja A.

    2013-01-01

    In the current event-related potential (ERP) study, we investigated how speech rhythm impacts speech segmentation and facilitates the resolution of syntactic ambiguities in auditory sentence processing. Participants listened to syntactically ambiguous German subject- and object-first sentences that were spoken with either regular or irregular speech rhythm. Rhythmicity was established by a constant metric pattern of three unstressed syllables between two stressed ones that created rhythmic groups of constant size. Accuracy rates in a comprehension task revealed that participants understood rhythmically regular sentences better than rhythmically irregular ones. Furthermore, the mean amplitude of the P600 component was reduced in response to object-first sentences only when embedded in rhythmically regular but not rhythmically irregular context. This P600 reduction indicates facilitated processing of sentence structure possibly due to a decrease in processing costs for the less-preferred structure (object-first). Our data suggest an early and continuous use of rhythm by the syntactic parser and support language processing models assuming an interactive and incremental use of linguistic information during language processing. PMID:23409109

  18. Interpretation of ambiguity: Differences between children and adolescents with and without an anxiety disorder

    PubMed Central

    Waite, Polly; Codd, Jon; Creswell, Cathy

    2015-01-01

    Background Theory and treatment of anxiety disorders in young people are commonly based on the premise that interpretation biases found in anxious adults are also found in children and adolescents. Although there is some evidence that this may be the case, studies have not typically taken age into account, which is surprising given the normative changes in cognition that occur throughout childhood. The aim of the current study was to identify whether associations between anxiety disorder status and interpretation biases differed in children and adolescents. Methods The responses of children (7–10 years) and adolescents (13–16 years) with and without anxiety disorders (n=120) were compared on an ambiguous scenarios task. Results Children and adolescents with an anxiety disorder showed significantly higher levels of threat interpretation and avoidant strategies than non-anxious children and adolescents. However, age significantly moderated the effect of anxiety disorder status on interpretation of ambiguity, in that adolescents with anxiety disorders showed significantly higher levels of threat interpretation and associated negative emotion than non-anxious adolescents, but a similar relationship was not observed among children. Conclusions The findings suggest that theoretical accounts of interpretation biases in anxiety disorders in children and adolescents should distinguish between different developmental periods. For both ages, treatment that targets behavioral avoidance appears warranted. However, while adolescents are likely to benefit from treatment that addresses interpretation biases, there may be limited benefit for children under the age of ten. PMID:26363617

  19. Living With Ambiguity: A Metasynthesis of Qualitative Research on Mild Cognitive Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Gomersall, Tim; Astell, Arlene; Nygård, Louise; Sixsmith, Andrew; Mihailidis, Alex; Hwang, Amy

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of the study: Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) is a diagnosis proposed to describe an intermediate state between normal cognitive aging and dementia. MCI has been criticised for its conceptual fuzziness, its ambiguous relationship to dementia, and the tension it creates between medical and sociological understandings of “normal aging”. Design and Methods: We examined the published qualitative literature on experiences of being diagnosed and living with MCI using metasynthesis as the methodological framework. Results: Two overarching conceptual themes were developed. The first, MCI and myself-in-time, showed that a diagnosis of MCI could profoundly affect a person’s understanding of their place in the world. This impact appears to be mediated by multiple factors including a person’s social support networks, which daily activities are affected, and subjective interpretations of the meaning of MCI. The second theme, Living with Ambiguity, describes the difficulties people experienced in making sense of their diagnosis. Uncertainty arose, in part, from lack of clarity and consistency in the information received by people with MCI, including whether they are even told MCI is the diagnosis. Implications: We conclude by suggesting an ethical tension is always at play when a MCI diagnosis is made. Specifically, earlier support and services afforded by a diagnosis may come at the expense of a person’s anxiety about the future, with continued uncertainty about how his or her concerns and needs can be addressed. PMID:26315317

  20. A new ambiguity acceptance test threshold determination method with controllable failure rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lei; Verhagen, Sandra

    2015-04-01

    The ambiguity acceptance test is an important quality control procedure in high precision GNSS data processing. Although the ambiguity acceptance test methods have been extensively investigated, its threshold determine method is still not well understood. Currently, the threshold is determined with the empirical approach or the fixed failure rate (FF-) approach. The empirical approach is simple but lacking in theoretical basis, while the FF-approach is theoretical rigorous but computationally demanding. Hence, the key of the threshold determination problem is how to efficiently determine the threshold in a reasonable way. In this study, a new threshold determination method named threshold function method is proposed to reduce the complexity of the FF-approach. The threshold function method simplifies the FF-approach by a modeling procedure and an approximation procedure. The modeling procedure uses a rational function model to describe the relationship between the FF-difference test threshold and the integer least-squares (ILS) success rate. The approximation procedure replaces the ILS success rate with the easy-to-calculate integer bootstrapping (IB) success rate. Corresponding modeling error and approximation error are analysed with simulation data to avoid nuisance biases and unrealistic stochastic model impact. The results indicate the proposed method can greatly simplify the FF-approach without introducing significant modeling error. The threshold function method makes the fixed failure rate threshold determination method feasible for real-time applications.

  1. Resolution of sensory ambiguities for gaze stabilization requires a second neural integrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Andrea M.; Angelaki, Dora E.

    2003-01-01

    The ability to simultaneously move in the world and maintain stable visual perception depends critically on the contribution of vestibulo-ocular reflexes (VORs) to gaze stabilization. It is traditionally believed that semicircular canal signals drive compensatory responses to rotational head disturbances (rotational VOR), whereas otolith signals compensate for translational movements [translational VOR (TVOR)]. However, a sensory ambiguity exists because otolith afferents are activated similarly during head translations and reorientations relative to gravity (i.e., tilts). Extra-otolith cues are, therefore, necessary to ensure that dynamic head tilts do not elicit a TVOR. To investigate how extra-otolith signals contribute, we characterized the temporal and viewing distance-dependent properties of a TVOR elicited in the absence of a lateral acceleration stimulus to the otoliths during combined translational/rotational motion. We show that, in addition to otolith signals, angular head position signals derived by integrating sensory canal information drive the TVOR. A physiological basis for these results is proposed in a model with two distinct integration steps. Upstream of the well known oculomotor velocity-to-position neural integrator, the model incorporates a separate integration element that could represent the "velocity storage integrator," whose functional role in the oculomotor system has so far remained controversial. We propose that a key functional purpose of the velocity storage network is to temporally integrate semicircular canal signals, so that they may be used to extract translation information from ambiguous otolith afferent signals in the natural and functionally relevant bandwidth of head movements.

  2. Polymorphisms and ambiguous sites present in DNA sequences of Leishmania clones: looking closer.

    PubMed

    Boité, Mariana Côrtes; de Oliveira, Taíse Salgado; Ferreira, Gabriel Eduardo Melim; Trannin, Marcos; dos Santos, Barbara Neves; Porrozzi, Renato; Cupolillo, Elisa

    2014-07-01

    In genetic studies of Leishmania parasites, co-dominant markers are chosen for their ability to detect heterozygous polymorphisms, to infer the occurrence of inbreeding and to resolve genetic variability. The majority of DNA sequence based reports perform conventional dye terminator cycle sequencing where perfectly ambiguous sites or double peaks in the chromatogram are interpreted as heterozygous strains. However, molecular peculiarities of the parasite such as aneuploidy, mixed populations and homologous recombination advise that data from regular DNA sequence analysis should be carefully evaluated. We report here a closer look at ambiguous sites observed in 6pgd DNA sequences obtained for a multilocus sequence analysis project on Leishmania (Viannia) strains. After comparing 286 DNA sequences from biological and molecular clones of six L. (Viannia) strains we could distinguish events that contribute to genetic variation in Leishmania (recombination, mutation, chromosomal mosaics). Also, the results suggest how diversity might not be completely revealed through regular DNA sequence analysis and demonstrate the importance for molecular epidemiology research to be aware of such possibilities while choosing samples for studies. PMID:24768683

  3. Trait Anxiety Has Effect on Decision Making under Ambiguity but Not Decision Making under Risk

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Long; Wang, Kai; Zhu, Chunyan; Yu, Fengqiong; Chen, Xingui

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have reported that trait anxiety (TA) affects decision making. However, results remain largely inconsistent across studies. The aim of the current study was to further address the interaction between TA and decision making. 304 subjects without depression from a sample consisting of 642 participants were grouped into high TA (HTA), medium TA (MTA) and low TA (LTA) groups based on their TA scores from State Trait Anxiety Inventory. All subjects were assessed with the Iowa Gambling Task (IGT) that measures decision making under ambiguity and the Game of Dice Task (GDT) that measures decision making under risk. While the HTA and LTA groups performed worse on the IGT compared to the MTA group, performances on the GDT between the three groups did not differ. Furthermore, the LTA and HTA groups showed different individual deck level preferences in the IGT: the former showed a preference for deck B indicating that these subjects focused more on the magnitude of rewards, and the latter showed a preference for deck A indicating significant decision making impairment. Our findings suggest that trait anxiety has effect on decision making under ambiguity but not decision making under risk and different levels of trait anxiety related differently to individual deck level preferences in the IGT. PMID:26000629

  4. Happy hamsters? Enrichment induces positive judgement bias for mildly (but not truly) ambiguous cues to reward and punishment in Mesocricetus auratus

    PubMed Central

    Bethell, Emily J.; Koyama, Nicola F.

    2015-01-01

    Recent developments in the study of animal cognition and emotion have resulted in the ‘judgement bias’ model of animal welfare. Judgement biases describe the way in which changes in affective state are characterized by changes in information processing. In humans, anxiety and depression are characterized by increased expectation of negative events and negative interpretation of ambiguous information. Positive wellbeing is associated with enhanced expectation of positive outcomes and more positive interpretation of ambiguous information. Mood-congruent judgement biases for ambiguous information have been demonstrated in a range of animal species, with large variation in the way tests are administered and in the robustness of analyses. We highlight and address some issues using a laboratory species not previously tested: the Syrian hamster (Mesocricetus auratus). Hamsters were tested using a spatial judgement go/no-go task in enriched and unenriched housing. We included a number of controls and additional behavioural tests and applied a robust analytical approach using linear mixed effects models. Hamsters approached the ambiguous cues significantly more often when enriched than unenriched. There was no effect of enrichment on responses to the middle cue. We discuss these findings in light of mechanisms underlying processing cues to reward, punishment and true ambiguity, and the implications for the welfare of laboratory hamsters. PMID:26587255

  5. The Effect of Media on Charitable Giving and Volunteering: Evidence from the "Give Five" Campaign

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yoruk, Baris K.

    2012-01-01

    Fundraising campaigns advertised via mass media are common. To what extent such campaigns affect charitable behavior is mostly unknown, however. Using giving and volunteering surveys conducted biennially from 1988 to 1996, I investigate the effect of a national fundraising campaign, "Give Five," on charitable giving and volunteering patterns. The…

  6. Ionospheric effects in uncalibrated phase delay estimation and ambiguity-fixed PPP based on raw observable model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Shengfeng; Shi, Chuang; Lou, Yidong; Liu, Jingnan

    2015-05-01

    Zero-difference (ZD) ambiguity resolution (AR) reveals the potential to further improve the performance of precise point positioning (PPP). Traditionally, PPP AR is achieved by Melbourne-Wübbena and ionosphere-free combinations in which the ionosphere effect are removed. To exploit the ionosphere characteristics, PPP AR with L1 and L2 raw observable has also been developed recently. In this study, we apply this new approach in uncalibrated phase delay (UPD) generation and ZD AR and compare it with the traditional model. The raw observable processing strategy treats each ionosphere delay as an unknown parameter. In this manner, both a priori ionosphere correction model and its spatio-temporal correlation can be employed as constraints to improve the ambiguity resolution. However, theoretical analysis indicates that for the wide-lane (WL) UPD retrieved from L1/L2 ambiguities to benefit from this raw observable approach, high precision ionosphere correction of better than 0.7 total electron content unit (TECU) is essential. This conclusion is then confirmed with over 1 year data collected at about 360 stations. Firstly, both global and regional ionosphere model were generated and evaluated, the results of which demonstrated that, for large-scale ionosphere modeling, only an accuracy of 3.9 TECU can be achieved on average for the vertical delays, and this accuracy can be improved to about 0.64 TECU when dense network is involved. Based on these ionosphere products, WL/narrow-lane (NL) UPDs are then extracted with the raw observable model. The NL ambiguity reveals a better stability and consistency compared to traditional approach. Nonetheless, the WL ambiguity can be hardly improved even constrained with the high spatio-temporal resolution ionospheric corrections. By applying both these approaches in PPP-RTK, it is interesting to find that the traditional model is more efficient in AR as evidenced by the shorter time to first fix, while the three-dimensional positioning accuracy of the RAW model outperforms the combination model by about . This reveals that, with the current ionosphere models, there is actually no optimal strategy for the dual-frequency ZD ambiguity resolution, and the combination approach and raw approach each has merits and demerits.

  7. Resolving ambiguities in nanowire field-effect transistor characterization.

    PubMed

    Heedt, Sebastian; Otto, Isabel; Sladek, Kamil; Hardtdegen, Hilde; Schubert, Jürgen; Demarina, Natalia; Lüth, Hans; Grützmacher, Detlev; Schäpers, Thomas

    2015-10-29

    We have modeled InAs nanowires using finite element methods considering the actual device geometry, the semiconducting nature of the channel and surface states, providing a comprehensive picture of charge distribution and gate action. The effective electrostatic gate width and screening effects are taken into account. A pivotal aspect is that the gate coupling to the nanowire is compromised by the concurrent coupling of the gate electrode to the surface/interface states, which provide the vast majority of carriers for undoped nanowires. In conjunction with field-effect transistor (FET) measurements using two gates with distinctly dissimilar couplings, the study reveals the density of surface states that gives rise to a shallow quantum well at the surface. Both gates yield identical results for the electron concentration and mobility only at the actual surface state density. Our method remedies the flaws of conventional FET analysis and provides a straightforward alternative to intricate Hall effect measurements on nanowires. PMID:26482127

  8. Resolving ambiguities in nanowire field-effect transistor characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heedt, Sebastian; Otto, Isabel; Sladek, Kamil; Hardtdegen, Hilde; Schubert, Jürgen; Demarina, Natalia; Lüth, Hans; Grützmacher, Detlev; Schäpers, Thomas

    2015-10-01

    We have modeled InAs nanowires using finite element methods considering the actual device geometry, the semiconducting nature of the channel and surface states, providing a comprehensive picture of charge distribution and gate action. The effective electrostatic gate width and screening effects are taken into account. A pivotal aspect is that the gate coupling to the nanowire is compromised by the concurrent coupling of the gate electrode to the surface/interface states, which provide the vast majority of carriers for undoped nanowires. In conjunction with field-effect transistor (FET) measurements using two gates with distinctly dissimilar couplings, the study reveals the density of surface states that gives rise to a shallow quantum well at the surface. Both gates yield identical results for the electron concentration and mobility only at the actual surface state density. Our method remedies the flaws of conventional FET analysis and provides a straightforward alternative to intricate Hall effect measurements on nanowires.

  9. A physical-model-based, field-wise and self-contained algorithm for removing directional ambiguities of ocean surface winds retrieved from scatterometer measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Young-Joon

    2000-09-01

    An algorithm is introduced to remove the directional ambiguities in ocean surface winds measured by scatterometers, which requires scatterometer data only. It is based on two versions of PBL (planetary boundary layer) models and a low-pass filter. A pressure field is first derived from the median-filtered scatterometer winds, is then noise-filtered, and is finally converted back to the winds, respectively, by an inverted PBL model, a smoothing algorithm, and a PBL model. The derived wind field is used to remove the directional ambiguities in the scatterometer data. This new algorithm is applied to Hurricane Eugene and produces results comparable to those from the current standard ambiguity removal algorithm for NASA/JPL SeaWinds project, which requires external numerical weather forecast/analyses data.

  10. Todd Baumann Gives a Thumbs Up

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    USGS hydrologist Todd Baumann gives a thumbs up after setting the Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) aboard the Butta Bean during the 2011 Flood. USGS uses the ADCP to make streamflow measurements. The ADCP emits soundwaves through the water column, which rebound off particles in the water ...

  11. Community College Alumni: Predicting Who Gives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skari, Lisa Ann

    2014-01-01

    Due to the decrease in public funding, community colleges are in a position where they need to generate private gifts. Alumni represent the largest untapped pool of prospective donors, and the success of alumni giving at 4-year institutions illustrates the potential that exists for community colleges. To develop effective fundraising strategies,…

  12. Our Tradition of Giving Western Bank

    E-print Network

    Greenlees, John

    Our Tradition of Giving Western Bank Library Exhibition Gallery The refurbishment of the Exhibition Bank Library 12 May 1959 The restoration and refurbishment of the Western Bank Library Exhibition and friends. This key public space in the Grade II* listed Western Bank Library enables items from

  13. Crossing the line: rites of passage, team aspects, and ambiguity of hazing.

    PubMed

    Waldron, Jennifer J; Kowalski, Christopher L

    2009-06-01

    Framed within the psychosocial context of the sport ethic and social-approval goal orientation, 10 female and 11 male current collegiate or former high school athletes participated in individual interviews about their hazing experiences. Data analysis resulted in seven lower order themes and two higher order themes. The higher order theme of the general aspects of hazing included types of factors influencing, reasons for and the effects of hazing. The higher order theme of hazing as deviant overconformity included rites of passage, hazing and the team, and the ambiguity of hazing. Results indicated that athletes reported engaging in risky, hazing behaviors and that both the values of sport as well as the desire to be accepted by teammates encouraged hazing. PMID:19650395

  14. Fast Integer Ambiguity Resolution for GPS Attitude Determination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lightsey, E. Glenn; Crassidis, John L.; Markley, F. Landis

    1999-01-01

    In this paper, a new algorithm for GPS (Global Positioning System) integer ambiguity resolution is shown. The algorithm first incorporates an instantaneous (static) integer search to significantly reduce the search space using a geometric inequality. Then a batch-type loss function is used to check the remaining integers in order to determine the optimal integer. This batch function represents the GPS sightline vectors in the body frame as the sum of two vectors, one depending on the phase measurements and the other on the unknown integers. The new algorithm has several advantages: it does not require an a-priori estimate of the vehicle's attitude; it provides an inherent integrity check using a covariance-type expression; and it can resolve the integers even when coplanar baselines exist. The performance of the new algorithm is tested on a dynamic hardware simulator.

  15. Differential age effects on lexical ambiguity resolution mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chia-lin; Federmeier, Kara D.

    2010-01-01

    Multiple neurocognitive subsystems are involved in resolving lexical ambiguity under different circumstances. We examined how processing in these subsystems changes with normal aging by comparing ERP responses to homographs and unambiguous words completing congruent sentences (with both semantic and syntactic contextual information) or syntactic prose (syntactic information only). Like young adults in prior work, older adults elicited more negative N400s to homographs in congruent sentences, suggesting mismatch between the context and residual activation of the contextually-irrelevant sense. However, the frontal negativity seen in young adults to homographs in syntactically well-defined but semantically neutral contexts was absent in older adults as a group, suggesting decline in recruiting additional neural resources to aid difficult semantic selection. A subset of older adults with high verbal fluency maintained a young-like effect pattern. PMID:21175671

  16. Differential age effects on lexical ambiguity resolution mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chia-Lin; Federmeier, Kara D

    2011-07-01

    Multiple neurocognitive subsystems are involved in resolving lexical ambiguity under different circumstances. We examined how processing in these subsystems changes with normal aging by comparing ERP responses to homographs and unambiguous words completing congruent sentences (with both semantic and syntactic contextual information) or syntactic prose (syntactic information only). Like young adults in prior work, older adults elicited more negative N400s to homographs in congruent sentences, suggesting mismatch between the context and residual activation of the contextually irrelevant sense. However, the frontal negativity seen in young adults to homographs in syntactically well-defined but semantically neutral contexts was absent in older adults as a group, suggesting a decline in recruiting additional neural resources to aid difficult semantic selection. A subset of older adults with high verbal fluency maintained a young-like effect pattern. PMID:21175671

  17. Sensorimotor Adaptations Following Exposure to Ambiguous Inertial Motion Cues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, S. J.; Harm, D. L.; Reschke, M. F.; Rupert, A. H.; Clement, G. R.

    2009-01-01

    The central nervous system must resolve the ambiguity of inertial motion sensory cues in order to derive accurate spatial orientation awareness. We hypothesize that multi-sensory integration will be adaptively optimized in altered gravity environments based on the dynamics of other sensory information available, with greater changes in otolith-mediated responses in the mid-frequency range where there is a crossover of tilt and translation responses. The primary goals of this ground-based research investigation are to explore physiological mechanisms and operational implications of tilt-translation disturbances during and following re-entry, and to evaluate a tactile prosthesis as a countermeasure for improving control of whole-body orientation.

  18. Space-time ambiguity functions for electronically scanned ISR applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swoboda, John; Semeter, Joshua; Erickson, Philip

    2015-05-01

    Electronically steerable array (ESA) technology has recently been applied to incoherent scatter radar (ISR) systems. These arrays allow for pulse-to-pulse steering of the antenna beam to collect data in a three-dimensional region. This is in direct contrast to dish-based antennas, where ISR acquisition is limited at any one time to observations in a two-dimensional slice. This new paradigm allows for more flexibility in the measurement of ionospheric plasma parameters. Multiple ESA-based ISR systems operate currently in the high-latitude region where the ionosphere is highly variable in both space and time. Because of the highly dynamic nature of the ionosphere in this region, it is important to differentiate between measurement-induced artifacts and the true behavior of the plasma. Often, three-dimensional ISR data produced by ESA systems are fitted in a spherical coordinate space and then the parameters are interpolated to a Cartesian grid, potentially introducing error and impacting the reconstructions of the plasma parameters. To take advantage of the new flexibility inherent in ESA systems, we present a new way of analyzing ISR observations through use of the space-time ambiguity function. The use of this new measurement ambiguity function allows us to pose the ISR observational problem in terms of a linear inverse problem whose goal is the estimate of the time domain lags of the intrinsic plasma autocorrelation function used for parameter fitting. The framework allows us to explore the impact of nonuniformity in plasma parameters in both time and space. We discuss examples of possible artifacts in high-latitude situations and discuss possible ways of reducing them and improving the quality of data products from electronically steerable ISRs.

  19. Remediation of context-processing deficits in schizophrenia: preliminary data with ambiguous sentences

    PubMed Central

    Besche-Richard, Chrystel; Terrien, Sarah; Lesgourgues, Marion; Béchiri-Payet, Célia; Gierski, Fabien; Limosin, Frédéric

    2014-01-01

    Background Processing of contextual information is essential for the establishment of good interpersonal relations and communicational interactions. Nevertheless, it is known that schizophrenic patients present impairments in the processing of contextual information. The aim of this study is to explore the influence of the remediation of context processing in schizophrenic patients. Methods Thirty-one schizophrenic patients and 28 matched healthy participants were included in this study. All participants were assessed on verbal knowledge (Mill-Hill test) and depression intensity (Beck Depression Scale 21 items). Schizophrenic patients were also assessed on thought, language, and communication disorders (Thought, Language and Communication scale). All participants completed a disambiguation task with two different levels of contextualization (high or low context) and a context-processing remediation task containing social scenarios that included ambiguous words and were presented with two different types of instruction: with or without context explanation. Results For the disambiguation task, results showed no effect of group, but a main effect of context, with better performances in the high-context than the low-context condition. For the context-processing remediation task, results showed a main effect of group: The performance of schizophrenic patients who had received explanations differed from that both of healthy participants and of schizophrenic patients who had not received explanations. Conclusion This study revealed that for all participants, the structuring of context had a positive effect on the contextual integration of ambiguous words. Concerning the remediation task, explanations about the strategies that could be used to take context into account improved the schizophrenic patients’ performances. This allows us to consider new methods of remediation that could improve social interaction in schizophrenia. PMID:25516712

  20. The Kindergarten Path Effect Revisited: Children's Use of Context in Processing Structural Ambiguities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weighall, Anna R.

    2008-01-01

    Research with adults has shown that ambiguous spoken sentences are resolved efficiently, exploiting multiple cues--including referential context--to select the intended meaning. Paradoxically, children appear to be insensitive to referential cues when resolving ambiguous sentences, relying instead on statistical properties intrinsic to the…

  1. Transfer in L3 Sentence Processing: Evidence from Relative Clause Attachment Ambiguities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rah, Anne

    2010-01-01

    The present study investigates transfer effects in two groups of German learners of French for ambiguous relative clause (RC) constructions. The first learner group had started to learn French before English, whereas the second group had started to learn English before French. The RC attachment ambiguity is interesting to study possible transfer…

  2. Efficient Pulse-Doppler Processing and Ambiguity Functions of Nonuniform Coherent Pulse Trains

    E-print Network

    Nehorai, Arye

    Efficient Pulse-Doppler Processing and Ambiguity Functions of Nonuniform Coherent Pulse Trains parameters of the pulse train can be varied to op- timize the ambiguity function and trade resolution processing receiver for staggered pulse trains. The proposed receiver is a simple extension of traditional

  3. In the Face of Uncertainty: A Twin Study of Ambiguous Information, Anxiety and Depression in Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eley, Thalia C.; Gregory, Alice M.; Lau, Jennifer Y. F.; McGuffin, Peter; Napolitano, Maria; Rijsdijk, Fruhling V.; Clark, David M.

    2008-01-01

    Anxiety and depression share genetic influences, and have been associated with similar cognitive biases. Psychological theories of anxiety and depression highlight threat interpretations of ambiguity. Little is known about whether genes influence cognitive style, or its links to symptoms. We assessed ambiguous word and scenario interpretations,…

  4. On the Impact of L2 Speech Rhythm on Syntactic Ambiguity Resolution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roncaglia-Denissen, M. Paula; Schmidt-Kassow, Maren; Heine, Angela; Kotz, Sonja A.

    2015-01-01

    In an event-related potential (ERP) study we investigated the role of age of acquisition (AoA) on the use of second language rhythmic properties during syntactic ambiguity resolution. Syntactically ambiguous sentences embedded in rhythmically regular and irregular contexts were presented to Turkish early and late second language (L2) learners of…

  5. Using Syntactic Dependency as Local Context to Resolve Word Sense Ambiguity

    E-print Network

    Using Syntactic Dependency as Local Context to Resolve Word Sense Ambiguity Dekang Lin Department Most previous corpus-based algorithms dis- ambiguate a word with a classifier trained from previous usages of the same word. Separate classifiers have to be trained for different words. We present

  6. Using Syntactic Dependency as Local Context to Resolve Word Sense Ambiguity

    E-print Network

    Lin, Dekang

    Using Syntactic Dependency as Local Context to Resolve Word Sense Ambiguity Dekang Lin Department Most previous corpus­based algorithms dis­ ambiguate a word with a classifier trained from previous usages of the same word. Separate classifiers have to be trained for different words. We present

  7. Ambiguous Belonging and the Challenge of Inclusion: Parent Perspectives on School Membership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scorgie, Kate

    2015-01-01

    Boundary ambiguity occurs when members of a family are confused or uncertain regarding roles, responsibilities and subsystem configurations within the family. Research suggests that perception of boundary ambiguity is associated with family stress despite internal and external resource availability. It has been suggested that research on family…

  8. Medical Student and Junior Doctors' Tolerance of Ambiguity: Development of a New Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hancock, Jason; Roberts, Martin; Monrouxe, Lynn; Mattick, Karen

    2015-01-01

    The practice of medicine involves inherent ambiguity, arising from limitations of knowledge, diagnostic problems, complexities of treatment and outcome and unpredictability of patient response. Research into doctors' tolerance of ambiguity is hampered by poor conceptual clarity and inadequate measurement scales. We aimed to create and pilot a…

  9. Top-Down Influence in Young Children's Linguistic Ambiguity Resolution Hugh Rabagliati

    E-print Network

    Pylkkänen, Liina

    with the feather. Here, the ambiguity arises over where to attach the prepositional phrase with the feather, as an instrument phrase attached to the verb (tickling using the feather) or as a modifier of the noun (the frog holding the feather). Five-year-olds can resolve these ambiguities using bottom-up cues such as lexical

  10. Ambiguity Tolerance: Adolescents' Responses to Uncertainty in Life. Research Report, September 1996-December 1997.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stoycheva, Katya

    Adolescents today have to live with incoherence for longer periods than before, and that makes ambiguity tolerance a socially significant personality dimension. Studies of the development of ambiguity tolerance in adolescents are reported. The pilot study, "Adaptation of MAT-50 for Use with Bulgarian Population," involves translation and…

  11. Implicit and Explicit Understanding of Ambiguous Figures by Adolescents with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Melissa L.; Chambers, Alison

    2011-01-01

    Children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) can process both interpretations of an ambiguous figure (e.g. rabbit/duck) when told about the ambiguity, however they tend not to do so spontaneously. Here we show that although adolescents with ASD can explicitly experience such "reversals", implicit measures suggest they are conceptually processing…

  12. Children's Gender Orientation and Perceptions of Female, Male, and Gender-Ambiguous Animal Characters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karniol, Rachel; Reichman, Shiri; Fund, Liat

    2000-01-01

    Examined the effects of preadolescents' gender orientation on social perception of animal characters whose gender was clearly female, male, or gender-ambiguous. Children's gender orientation did not influence perceptions of the gender of characters that were clearly female and male, but did influence perceptions of ambiguous characters. Children's…

  13. Exploiting Lexical Ambiguity to Help Students Understand the Meaning of "Random"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaplan, Jennifer J.; Rogness, Neal T.; Fisher, Diane G.

    2014-01-01

    Words that are part of colloquial English but used differently in a technical domain may possess lexical ambiguity. The use of such words by instructors may inhibit student learning if incorrect connections are made by students between the technical and colloquial meanings. One fundamental word in statistics that has lexical ambiguity for students…

  14. An ambiguity of information content and error in an ill-posed satellite inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koner, Prabhat

    According to Rodgers (2000, stochastic approach), the averaging kernel (AK) is the representational matrix to understand the information content in a scholastic inversion. On the other hand, in deterministic approach this is referred to as model resolution matrix (MRM, Menke 1989). The analysis of AK/MRM can only give some understanding of how much regularization is imposed on the inverse problem. The trace of the AK/MRM matrix, which is the so-called degree of freedom from signal (DFS; stochastic) or degree of freedom in retrieval (DFR; deterministic). There are no physical/mathematical explanations in the literature: why the trace of the matrix is a valid form to calculate this quantity? We will present an ambiguity between information and error using a real life problem of SST retrieval from GOES13. The stochastic information content calculation is based on the linear assumption. The validity of such mathematics in satellite inversion will be questioned because it is based on the nonlinear radiative transfer and ill-conditioned inverse problems. References: Menke, W., 1989: Geophysical data analysis: discrete inverse theory. San Diego academic press. Rodgers, C.D., 2000: Inverse methods for atmospheric soundings: theory and practice. Singapore :World Scientific.

  15. Ambiguity in running spectral index with an extra light field during inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Kohri, Kazunori; Matsuda, Tomohiro E-mail: matsuda@sit.ac.jp

    2015-02-01

    At the beginning of inflation there could be extra dynamical scalar fields that will soon disappear (become static) before the end of inflation. In the light of multi-field inflation, those extra degrees of freedom may alter the time-dependence of the original spectrum of the curvature perturbation. It is possible to remove such fields introducing extra number of e-foldings prior to 0N{sub e}? 6, however such extra e-foldings may make the trans-Planckian problem worse due to the Lyth bound. We show that such extra scalar fields can change the running of the spectral index to give correction of ± 0.01 without adding significant contribution to the spectral index. The corrections to the spectral index (and the amplitude) could be important in considering global behavior of the corrected spectrum, although they can be neglected in the estimation of the spectrum and its spectral index at the pivot scale. The ambiguity in the running of the spectral index, which could be due to such fields, can be used to nullify tension between BICEP2 and Planck experiments.

  16. Ambiguity tolerance in organizations: definitional clarification and perspectives on future research

    PubMed Central

    McLain, David L.; Kefallonitis, Efstathios; Armani, Kimberly

    2015-01-01

    Ambiguity tolerance is an increasingly popular subject for study in a wide variety of fields. The definition of ambiguity tolerance has changed since its inception, and accompanying that change are changes in measurement and the research questions that interest researchers. There is a wealth of opportunity for research related to ambiguity tolerance and recent advances in neuroscience, measurement, trait research, perception, problem solving, and other fields highlight areas of interest and point to issues that need further attention. The future of ambiguity tolerance research is promising and it is expected that future studies will yield new insights into individual differences in reactions to the complex, unfamiliar, confusing, indeterminate, and incomplete stimuli that fall within the conceptual domain of ambiguity. PMID:25972818

  17. Ambiguity tolerance in organizations: definitional clarification and perspectives on future research.

    PubMed

    McLain, David L; Kefallonitis, Efstathios; Armani, Kimberly

    2015-01-01

    Ambiguity tolerance is an increasingly popular subject for study in a wide variety of fields. The definition of ambiguity tolerance has changed since its inception, and accompanying that change are changes in measurement and the research questions that interest researchers. There is a wealth of opportunity for research related to ambiguity tolerance and recent advances in neuroscience, measurement, trait research, perception, problem solving, and other fields highlight areas of interest and point to issues that need further attention. The future of ambiguity tolerance research is promising and it is expected that future studies will yield new insights into individual differences in reactions to the complex, unfamiliar, confusing, indeterminate, and incomplete stimuli that fall within the conceptual domain of ambiguity. PMID:25972818

  18. Dissecting the Ambiguity of FMA Concept Names Using Taxonomy and Partonomy Structural Information.

    PubMed

    Luo, Lingyun; Xu, Rong; Zhang, Guo-Qiang

    2013-01-01

    The complex inner structures of concept names in the Foundational Model of Anatomy (FMA) remain an obstacle for further analyzing the ontology using lexical methods. A very common problem is the ambiguity lying in names with the sometimes multiple occurrences of the preposition "of." In this paper, we propose an automatic method to help disambiguating FMA terms by leveraging the taxonomy and partonomy information. If a sub-phrase of a concept name also appears in its parents, it is likely to occur as a sub-tree in its parse tree, hence should be parsed as such. We classified all the concept names with a single occurrence of the preposition "of" by the appearances of their sub-phrases in the parent names using three test suites. Results show that more than 90% of them can be provided with useful information to assist their correct parsing. PMID:24303256

  19. Rocking or rolling--perception of ambiguous motion after returning from space.

    PubMed

    Clément, Gilles; Wood, Scott J

    2014-01-01

    The central nervous system must resolve the ambiguity of inertial motion sensory cues in order to derive an accurate representation of spatial orientation. Adaptive changes during spaceflight in how the brain integrates vestibular cues with other sensory information can lead to impaired movement coordination, vertigo, spatial disorientation, and perceptual illusions after return to Earth. The purpose of this study was to compare tilt and translation motion perception in astronauts before and after returning from spaceflight. We hypothesized that these stimuli would be the most ambiguous in the low-frequency range (i.e., at about 0.3 Hz) where the linear acceleration can be interpreted either as a translation or as a tilt relative to gravity. Verbal reports were obtained in eleven astronauts tested using a motion-based tilt-translation device and a variable radius centrifuge before and after flying for two weeks on board the Space Shuttle. Consistent with previous studies, roll tilt perception was overestimated shortly after spaceflight and then recovered with 1-2 days. During dynamic linear acceleration (0.15-0.6 Hz, ±1.7 m/s2) perception of translation was also overestimated immediately after flight. Recovery to baseline was observed after 2 days for lateral translation and 8 days for fore-aft translation. These results suggest that there was a shift in the frequency dynamic of tilt-translation motion perception after adaptation to weightlessness. These results have implications for manual control during landing of a space vehicle after exposure to microgravity, as it will be the case for human asteroid and Mars missions. PMID:25354042

  20. Rocking or Rolling – Perception of Ambiguous Motion after Returning from Space

    PubMed Central

    Clément, Gilles; Wood, Scott J.

    2014-01-01

    The central nervous system must resolve the ambiguity of inertial motion sensory cues in order to derive an accurate representation of spatial orientation. Adaptive changes during spaceflight in how the brain integrates vestibular cues with other sensory information can lead to impaired movement coordination, vertigo, spatial disorientation, and perceptual illusions after return to Earth. The purpose of this study was to compare tilt and translation motion perception in astronauts before and after returning from spaceflight. We hypothesized that these stimuli would be the most ambiguous in the low-frequency range (i.e., at about 0.3 Hz) where the linear acceleration can be interpreted either as a translation or as a tilt relative to gravity. Verbal reports were obtained in eleven astronauts tested using a motion-based tilt-translation device and a variable radius centrifuge before and after flying for two weeks on board the Space Shuttle. Consistent with previous studies, roll tilt perception was overestimated shortly after spaceflight and then recovered with 1–2 days. During dynamic linear acceleration (0.15–0.6 Hz, ±1.7 m/s2) perception of translation was also overestimated immediately after flight. Recovery to baseline was observed after 2 days for lateral translation and 8 days for fore–aft translation. These results suggest that there was a shift in the frequency dynamic of tilt-translation motion perception after adaptation to weightlessness. These results have implications for manual control during landing of a space vehicle after exposure to microgravity, as it will be the case for human asteroid and Mars missions. PMID:25354042

  1. Which Compact Spaces Can Give Reliable Newton's Law Modifications

    E-print Network

    Oikonomou, V K

    2011-01-01

    We present a criterion for deciding which compact spaces give reliable Newton's law corrections. We study manifolds with and without boundary (Dirichlet or Neumann) and decide which manifolds can yield reliable results by applying a general criterion. We find that compact connected Riemannian manifolds with Dirichlet boundaries are completely excluded as extra dimensional spaces.

  2. A NEW COHERENT STATES APPROACH TO SEMICLASSICS WHICH GIVES SCOTT'S

    E-print Network

    A NEW COHERENT STATES APPROACH TO SEMICLASSICS WHICH GIVES SCOTT'S CORRECTION #3; Jan Philip-Fermi potential 22 6 Proof of the Scott correction for the molecular ground state energy 33 A Appendix: Results by Scott in [15] and was later generalized to molecules and formulated as a clear mathematical conjecture

  3. Advice on Giving a Scientific Talk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurtz, D. W.

    2006-04-01

    What makes one speaker exciting and another boring? You have been to good talks and you have sat through far too many poor ones, so what makes the difference? It doesn't really matter whether it is a scientific talk, a public talk or a classroom lecture: Your prime concern is to think about the audience. You are talking to them. You are performing. Look at them; talk to them; think about what they are hearing and seeing. They very much want you to give a good talk -- that is why they have chosen to be your audience. But at the start of your talk they are worried you might not, so they are nervous. Your first job is to relax them and get their trust that you are going to do a good job. Then you will relax and you will be off to a great start. Of course your content matters; if you have a great discovery, they will forgive you anything. But it is still better to make a good presentation. I give some advice here on what to do, and what not to do, when giving any kind of talk, but with emphasis on short scientific talks presented at conferences. You should be a little nervous at the start of a talk - that is caused by your concern to do a good job. With a good start your talk will flow, you will then present your discoveries, and with a good ending your audience will applaud appreciatively and want to ask you questions. You will have enjoyed performing and want to do it again. Speaking can be fun for you, and rewarding for your audiences.

  4. Disambiguating ambiguous motion perception: what are the cues?

    PubMed Central

    Piedimonte, Alessandro; Woods, Adam J.; Chatterjee, Anjan

    2015-01-01

    Motion perception is a fundamental feature of the human visual system. As part of our daily life we often have to determine the direction of motion, even in ambiguous (AMB) situations. These situations force us to rely on exogenous cues, such as other environmental motion, and endogenous cues, such as our own actions, or previously learned experiences. In three experiments, we asked participants to report the direction of an AMB motion display, while manipulating exogenous and endogenous sources of information. Specifically, in all three experiments the exogenous information was represented by another motion cue while the endogenous cue was represented, respectively, by movement execution, movement planning, or a learned association about the motion display. Participants were consistently biased by less AMB motion cues in the environment when reporting the AMB target direction. In the absence of less AMB exogenous motion information, participants were biased by their motor movements and even the planning of such movements. However, when participants learned a specific association about the target motion, this acquired endogenous knowledge countered exogenous motion cues in biasing participants’ perception. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that we disambiguate AMB motion using different sources of exogenous and endogenous cues, and that learned associations may be particularly salient in countering the effects of environmental cues. PMID:26217257

  5. Parents' experiences of having a baby with ambiguous genitalia.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Mailme de Souza; de Paiva-e-Silva, Roberto Benedito; Guerra-Junior, Gil; Maciel-Guerra, Andréa Trevas

    2015-07-01

    Health professionals must be aware of the impact on parents of the birth of children with ambiguous genitalia. This study aimed to analyze the experiences and perceptions of such parents. Parents of 30 children who were evaluated in a reference center for disorders of sex development (DSD) were interviewed. The questionnaire covered the prenatal period, the moment they were told about the disorder, initial management by health professionals, and problems they experienced. Only two cases were detected during pregnancy. The news was usually given to the mother alone by pediatricians. Most parents kept it secret and avoided exposing the baby to the prejudice of others. Parents of children who were referred without sex assignment usually held a personal belief of their child's sex. Previous assignment was based on clinical examination and/or karyotype. Spreading knowledge about DSD could increase awareness of this issue, thus reducing parents' shock and societal stigma. Training of neonatal care teams is required to avoid assignment before evaluation. PMID:26068900

  6. Giving life, giving death: ethical problems of high-technology medicine.

    PubMed

    Kjellstrand, C M

    1988-01-01

    High-technology medicine, such as dialysis and transplantation is limited and nowhere can all potential beneficiaries receive it. Although very successful, high-technology medicine sometimes makes dying to a cruel spectacle and patients whose lives depend on a machine want to stop. The resulting ethical questions revolve around just distribution of life support - giving life, and withdrawal of life support in giving death. We investigated distributive justice of life-support by setting the number of patients accepted for dialysis in relation to those who died of renal failure and by setting the transplanted patients in relation to those waiting on chronic dialysis. In both Sweden and in the USA, and in both dialysis and transplantation, older patients received less treatment than younger ones. Seventy-year old people had less than 1/10 the chance of 20-40 year old of receiving dialysis and less than 1/30 chance of receiving a transplant. Women had between 70%-90% the chance of men of receiving dialysis and transplantation in both countries. Black people were more often dialyzed, but less often transplanted in the USA. Neither in Sweden, nor in the USA has distributive justice been achieved in dialysis and transplantation. Similar problems have been reported in other areas of high-technology medicine. We studied withdrawal, i.e. passive euthanasia, in chronic dialysis patients and found that 10% of all patients who begun dialysis died because it was stopped, although there was no medical or technical reason. Stopping caused 22% of all dialysis deaths. Half of those who died because dialysis was stopped, made the decision to stop treatment themselves. The other half was incompetent and families and physicians decided to discontinue treatment and let the patient die. The competent and incompetent patients were similar and the decisions seem to have been made on the same ground in both groups suggesting that families and physicians are appropriate surrogate decision-makers for incompetent patients. Home dialysis patients withdrew from dialysis, three times more often than center dialysis patients. The decision did not seem to harm the surviving relatives, but the relatives complained of poor physician communication. Old patients had shorter survival on dialysis, were more often excluded from, and stopped dialyses ten times more often than young patients. However, the ratio of mortality on dialysis compared to the mortality in the population at large was higher in young than in old patients and the self-reported quality of life of the old patients was particularly high.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) PMID:11659082

  7. When in doubt, seize the day? Security values, prosocial values, and proactivity under ambiguity.

    PubMed

    Grant, Adam M; Rothbard, Nancy P

    2013-09-01

    Researchers have suggested that both ambiguity and values play important roles in shaping employees' proactive behaviors, but have not theoretically or empirically integrated these factors. Drawing on theories of situational strength and values, we propose that ambiguity constitutes a weak situation that strengthens the relationship between the content of employees' values and their proactivity. A field study of 204 employees and their direct supervisors in a water treatment plant provided support for this contingency perspective. Ambiguity moderated the relationship between employees' security and prosocial values and supervisor ratings of proactivity. Under high ambiguity, security values predicted lower proactivity, whereas prosocial values predicted higher proactivity. Under low ambiguity, values were not associated with proactivity. We replicated these findings in a laboratory experiment with 232 participants in which we measured proactivity objectively as initiative taken to correct errors: Participants with strong security values were less proactive, and participants with strong prosocial values were more proactive, but only when performance expectations were ambiguous. We discuss theoretical implications for research on proactivity, values, and ambiguity and uncertainty. PMID:23627604

  8. Probing ambiguous base-pairs by genetic transformation with XNA templates.

    PubMed

    Pezo, Valérie; Schepers, Guy; Lambertucci, Catia; Marlière, Philippe; Herdewijn, Piet

    2014-10-13

    The templating potential of anhydrohexitol oligonucleotides bearing ambiguous bases was studied in vivo, by using a selection screen for mosaic heteroduplex plasmids in Escherichia coli. 1,5-Anhydro-2,3-dideoxy-2-(5-nitroindazol-1-yl)-D-arabino-hexitol showed the greatest ambiguity among the three nucleosides tested. At most two successive ambiguous bases could be tolerated on hexitol templates read in bacterial cells. Hexitol nucleosides bearing simplified heterocycles thus stand as promising monomers for generating random DNA sequences in vivo from defined synthetic oligonucleotides. PMID:25158283

  9. The effects of acute pharmacological stimulation of the 5-HT, NA and DA systems on the cognitive judgement bias of rats in the ambiguous-cue interpretation paradigm.

    PubMed

    Rygula, Rafal; Papciak, Justyna; Popik, Piotr

    2014-07-01

    In the present study, we investigated the effects of acute pharmacological stimulation of the serotonergic (5-HT), noradrenergic (NA) and dopaminergic (DA) systems on the valence of cognitive judgement bias of rats in the ambiguous-cue interpretation (ACI) paradigm. To accomplish this goal, after initial behavioural training, different groups of rats received single injections of citalopram, desipramine or d-amphetamine and were subsequently tested with the ACI paradigm. Each drug was administered in 3 doses using a fully randomised Latin square design. Citalopram at the dose of 1mg/kg significantly biased animals towards positive interpretation of the ambiguous cue, while at higher doses (5 and 10mg/kg), the animals interpreted the ambiguous cue more negatively. Desipramine at all 3 tested doses (1, 2 and 5mg/kg) significantly biased animals towards negative interpretation of the ambiguous cue, while d-amphetamine at the dose of 1mg/kg induced positive bias, having no effects at lower doses (0.1 and 0.5mg/kg). Our results indicate that cognitive bias in rats can be influenced by acute pharmacological intervention. PMID:24503278

  10. VNTR fingerprinting of Kluyveromyces marxianus strains WT, 7-1, and 8-1 by using different primer types to give best results in PCR and on electrophorese gel in order to find differentiation of the DNA of the yeast strains.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Using mutagenized Kluyveromyces marxianus strains (WT, 7-1, 8-1) we wish to find out the variable numbered tandem repeats (VNTR) of each of the DNA strains from the different mutagenized K. marxianus strains. To do this we used Phusion HF Buffer Pack to try and give a clear picture of the VNTR by u...

  11. Don't give an inch!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geller, Robert J.

    The camera ready copy (CRC) procedures for Geophysical Research Letters are now being revised. As one of the new editors, I looked through preliminary versions of the new forms and instructions for authors. Remarkably, all of the units (for example, maximum length = 75 inches or 189.9 cm) are given in both British and metric units, despite the fact that AGU's style guide for authors (Eos, October 11, 1988) states that “all quantities must be in metric units.”When I contacted the AGU staff to ask them to eliminate the anachronistic British units they refused, claiming that “In the word-processing packages with which we are familiar all margins are given in inches. It is inconvenient for folks not to have both measurements if the software they are using for making CRC requires them to give commands in the British system.” They did not, however, cite any examples of a software package that will not also accept metric units, perhaps because none exists. All packages with which I am familiar accept both inches and metric units.

  12. Still Giving Thanks for Good Health

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on the image for Still Giving Thanks for Good Health (QTVR)

    NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit took this full-circle panorama of the region near 'Husband Hill' (the peak just to the left of center) over the Thanksgiving holiday, before ascending farther. Both the Spirit and Opportunity rovers are still going strong, more than a year after landing on Mars.

    This 360-degree view combines 243 images taken by Spirit's panoramic camera over several martian days, or sols, from sol 318 (Nov. 24, 2004) to sol 325 (Dec. 2, 2004). It is an approximately true-color rendering generated from images taken through the camera's 750-, 530-, and 480-nanometer filters. The view is presented here in a cylindrical projection with geometric seam correction.

    Spirit is now driving up the slope of Husband Hill along a path about one-quarter of the way from the left side of this mosaic.

  13. Doctoral Alumni Giving: Motivations for Donating to the University of Pennsylvania

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mastroieni, Anita

    2010-01-01

    This study sought to ascertain the specific motivations behind doctoral alumni giving. Most U.S. colleges and universities depend on alumni giving to supplement revenues from tuition and governmental support; however, relatively little alumni giving is generated from PhD graduates. The result is untapped revenue for doctoral-granting institutions.…

  14. The Influence of implicit causality verb bias on children's interpretation of ambiguous pronouns 

    E-print Network

    Kane, Joanna

    2006-01-01

    In this study a completion task and a comprehension task were carried out to investigate the influence of implicit causality on children’s resolution of ambiguous pronouns. The children in this study were aged 8 years ...

  15. Design criteria for purposefully ambiguous expression : proposal for a theater / performing arts school in Kenmore Square

    E-print Network

    Verhulst, Catharina A

    1986-01-01

    Inclusion of zones which possess sufficient ambiguity to provide multiple use, character and meaning, generating an environment supporting freedom of interpretation and expression, is explored in this thesis. Conceptually, ...

  16. Health messaging to individuals who perceive ambiguity in health communications: the promise of self-affirmation.

    PubMed

    Klein, William M P; Hamilton, Jada G; Harris, Peter R; Han, Paul K J

    2015-01-01

    The perception that extant health messages about risk factors for a disease are ambiguous can be associated with greater anxiety and reduced interest in taking precautionary action. In this experiment, 247 female alcohol consumers who perceived varying degrees of ambiguity in current cancer prevention messages read an unambiguous article about the documented link between alcohol consumption and breast cancer. Before reading the article, half were given the opportunity to self-affirm by reflecting on an important value-a technique previously shown to enhance receptivity to threatening messages. The authors found that self-affirmation increased message acceptance among those who perceived relatively higher levels of ambiguity in cancer communications. Also, the relation between perceived ambiguity and risk perception became positive among self-affirmed participants, suggesting they had become less defensive. Self-affirmation may be an effective technique to use when delivering health communications to audiences who perceive a lack of consistency in prevention messages. PMID:25806652

  17. Role conflict and ambiguity of CEOs in international joint ventures: a transaction cost perspective.

    PubMed

    Gong, Y; Shenkar, O; Luo, Y; Nyaw, M K

    2001-08-01

    Insights from transaction cost economics were used to study the boundary conditions underlying the role conflict and ambiguity of 265 CEOs in Chinese-based international joint ventures. Role conflict and ambiguity were lower when the contract between parents was more complete. Contract completeness fully mediated the effects of parent objective gap and parent formalization on role ambiguity but only partially so in the case of role conflict. Role conflict was lower when the foreign parent was dominant in the venture but higher when the local parent was dominant. Role conflict and ambiguity were inversely related to cultural distance. Neither construct had a detrimental effect on international joint venture performance. Implications for role theory are discussed. PMID:11519659

  18. Reference and the resolution of local syntactic ambiguity : the effect of context during human sentence processing 

    E-print Network

    Altmann, Gerald T.M.

    1986-01-01

    In this thesis we shall investigate the kinds of information which the Human Sentence Processing Mechanism employs during the resolution of local syntactic ambiguity in written texts. The thesis is in three parts. In ...

  19. From Ambiguity Aversion to a Generalized Expected Utility. Modeling Preferences in a Quantum Probabilistic Framework

    E-print Network

    Aerts, Diederik

    2015-01-01

    Ambiguity and ambiguity aversion have been widely studied in decision theory and economics both at a theoretical and an experimental level. After Ellsberg's seminal studies challenging subjective expected utility theory (SEUT), several (mainly normative) approaches have been put forward to reproduce ambiguity aversion and Ellsberg-type preferences. However, Machina and other authors have pointed out some fundamental difficulties of these generalizations of SEUT to cope with some variants of Ellsberg's thought experiments, which has recently been experimentally confirmed. Starting from our quantum modeling approach to human cognition, we develop here a general probabilistic framework to model human decisions under uncertainty. We show that our quantum theoretical model faithfully represents different sets of data collected on both the Ellsberg and the Machina paradox situations, and is flexible enough to describe different subjective attitudes with respect to ambiguity. Our approach opens the way toward a quan...

  20. Priming the interpretation of ambiguous noun-noun compounds in young children 

    E-print Network

    Fialka, Justine K B

    2010-06-30

    Abstract: Investigation into adult language users’ interpretation of ambiguous noun-noun compounds has been considerably explored and documented. However, investigation into the same phenomenon in a population such as young children has been...

  1. QWERTH: An Optimized Semi-ambiguous Keyboard Design

    E-print Network

    Dunlop, Mark D.

    and increase the overall dimensions of the device. Touch screen phones give text input designers more freedom ­ however the two classic input methods still dominate: touch-screen QWERTY or touch-screen 12- key. In the early days of mobile touch screen interaction Parhi et al. [15] recommended that touch screen buttons

  2. Semiconductor Bolometers Give Background-Limited Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goebel, John; McMurray, Robert

    2006-01-01

    Semiconductor bolometers that are capable of detecting electromagnetic radiation over most or all of the infrared spectrum and that give background-limited performance at operating temperatures from 20 to 300 K have been invented. The term background-limited performance as applied to a bolometer, thermopile, or other infrared detector signifies that the ability to detect infrared signals that originate outside the detector is limited primarily by thermal noise attributable to the background radiation generated external to the bolometer. The signal-to-noise ratios and detectivities of the bolometers and thermopiles available prior to this invention have been lower than those needed for background-limited performance by factors of about 100 and 10, respectively. Like other electrically resistive bolometers, a device according to the invention exhibits an increase in electrical resistance when heated by infrared radiation. Depending on whether the device is operated under the customary constant- current or constant-voltage bias, the increase in electrical resistance can be measured in terms of an increase in voltage across the device or a decrease in current through the device, respectively. In the case of a semiconductor bolometer, it is necessary to filter out visible and shorter-wavelength light that could induce photoconductivity and thereby counteract all or part of the desired infrared- induced increase in resistance. The basic semiconductor material of a bolometer according to the invention is preferably silicon doped with one or more of a number of elements, each of which confers a different variable temperature coefficient of resistance. Suitable dopants include In, Ga, S, Se, Te, B, Al, As, P, and Sb. The concentration of dopant preferably lies in the range between 0.1 and 1,000 parts per billion.

  3. Resummation ambiguities in the Higgs transverse-momentum spectrum in the Standard Model and beyond

    E-print Network

    Bagnaschi, Emanuele; Mantler, Hendrik; Vicini, Alessandro; Wiesemann, Marius

    2015-01-01

    We study the prediction for the Higgs transverse momentum distribution in gluon fusion and focus on the problem of matching fixed- and all-order perturbative results. The main sources of matching ambiguities on this distribution are investigated by means of a twofold comparison. On the one hand, we present a detailed qualitative and quantitative comparison of two recently introduced algorithms for determining the matching scale. On the other hand, we apply the results of both methods to three widely used approaches for the resummation of logarithmically enhanced contributions at small transverse momenta: the MC@NLO and POWHEG Monte Carlo approaches, and analytic resummation. While the three sets of results are largely compatible in the low-pT region, they exhibit sizable differences at large pT. We show that these differences can be significantly reduced by suitable modifications of formally subleading terms in the Monte Carlo implementations. We apply our study to the Standard Model Higgs boson and to the ne...

  4. Give Better Feedback on Engineering Drawings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cobb, Robert, Jr.; Graham, Tony; Kapur, Arjun; Rhodes, Craig; Blackwell, Ellinor

    2005-01-01

    Most, if not all, systems have a mechanism that collects information to facilitate monitoring performance. This information is primarily used to modify the system to make it more efficient in performing desired tasks and, thus, attaining desired results. Similar to electrical, mechanical, or hydraulic systems, the feedback mechanism in an…

  5. Ambiguity in measuring matrix diffusion with single-well injection/recovery tracer tests

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lessoff, S.C.; Konikow, L.F.

    1997-01-01

    Single-well injection/recovery tracer tests are considered for use in characterizing and quantifying matrix diffusion in dual-porosity aquifers. Numerical modeling indicates that neither regional drift in homogeneous aquifers, nor heterogeneity in aquifers having no regional drift, nor hydrodynamic dispersion significantly affects these tests. However, when drift is coupled simultaneously with heterogeneity, they can have significant confounding effects on tracer return. This synergistic effect of drift and heterogeneity may help explain irreversible flow and inconsistent results sometimes encountered in previous single-well injection/recovery tracer tests. Numerical results indicate that in a hypothetical single-well injection/recovery tracer test designed to demonstrate and measure dual-porosity characteristics in a fractured dolomite, the simultaneous effects of drift and heterogeneity sometimes yields responses similar to those anticipated in a homogeneous dual-porosity formation. In these cases, tracer recovery could provide a false indication of the occurrence of matrix diffusion. Shortening the shut-in period between injection and recovery periods may make the test less sensitive to drift. Using multiple tracers having different diffusion characteristics, multiple tests having different pumping schedules, and testing the formation at more than one location would decrease the ambiguity in the interpretation of test data.

  6. The role of strategies in deciding advantageously in ambiguous and risky situations.

    PubMed

    Brand, Matthias; Heinze, Katharina; Labudda, Kirsten; Markowitsch, Hans J

    2008-08-01

    In decision situations of everyday life, the potential positive or negative consequences of a decision are often specified and the associated probabilities are known or they are principally calculable ("decisions under risk"). On the basis of correlations reported in patient studies, it has been recently proposed that decisions under risk involve strategic components, i.e. calculation of the risk, as well as emotional processes, i.e. processing feedback from previous decisions. However, the potential impact of calculative strategies on decision-making under risk has not been investigated systematically, so far. In the current study, we examined 42 healthy subjects (21 females) with the Game of Dice Task measuring decisions under risk, and a questionnaire assessing strategy application in items comparable to the choices in the Game of Dice Task. In addition, the subjects performed the Iowa Gambling Task, examining decision-making under ambiguity, and a neuropsychological test battery focusing on executive functions. Results indicate that deciding advantageously in a decision-making task with explicit and stable rules is linked to applying calculative strategies. In contrast, individuals who decide intuitively prefer risky or disadvantageous choices in the Game of Dice Task. Applying calculative strategies was correlated with executive functions but not with performance on the Iowa Gambling Task. The results support the view that calculative processes and strategies may improve decision-making under explicit risk conditions. PMID:18231817

  7. Foul or dive? Motor contributions to judging ambiguous foul situations in football.

    PubMed

    Renden, Peter G; Kerstens, Sander; Oudejans, Raôul R D; Cañal-Bruland, Rouwen

    2014-01-01

    Football (soccer) referees frequently face situations in which they have to distinguish dives and fouls. Yet, little is known about the contributing factors that characterise the ability to judge these ambiguous situations correctly. To this end, in the current article we tested the hypothesis that motor experience of observers contributes to the visual identification of deceptive actions. Thereto, we asked skilled football referees, skilled football players, wheelchair bounded football fans (thus with limited motor experience) and novices to judge whether potential tackle situations in football were either fouls or dives. Results revealed that the referees (accuracy 72.2%, s=6.2) and players (accuracy 72.0%, s=6.4) were better at discriminating fouls and dives than the fans (accuracy 61.1%, s=7.2) and the novices (accuracy 57.4%, s=7.0) (P < 0.001). The results seem to point to an added value of motor experience in detecting deceptive movements. PMID:24444210

  8. Various Ambiguities in Re-constructing Laser Pulse Parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roychoudhuri, Chandrasekhar; Prasa, Narasimha

    2006-01-01

    We think that mode lock laser pulses are generated by the summation process that take place between the monochromatic EM filed frequencies as if they interact with each other as shown in equation 1. In reality, the pulse generation is a collaborative interaction process between EM fields and various material medium. When we carry out the actual mode lock analysis, we do take into account of interpaly between all the temporal dynamics of the cavity gain medium, cavity round trip time and the response time of the intra cavity element (saturable absorber, Kerr medium, etc.). that really enforces the locking of the phase of the cavity spontaneous emissions. On a conceptual level, this simplistic representation of the mode locking by Eq.1 ignores all these critical physical processes. When we try to analyze a pulsed field, again we start by representing it very much like this equation, even though we can only detect the square modulus of this complex field and loose a lot of phase related information to the detectors quantum whims and their time constants. The key parameters for a light pulse are as follows. Foremost is the (i) carrier frequency, which cannot be described or imagined without its state of undulation expressed as its (ii) phase. Next is our imagined time finite (iii) carrier envelope that provides the temporal boundary of the field amplitude strength of the undulating E-field. The final parameter is the (iv) state of polarization or the unique plane along which the strength of the E-field gradient undulates. None of these filed characteristics are made self-evident to us by the fields themselves. We do not see light. Light does not see light. Light beams pass through each other without altering each others energy distribution unless there are interacting material molecules (dipoles) within the physical volume of superposition of the beams. In contrast, we can sense the material particles. Material particles sense each other and they cannot pass through each other without interacting with (scattering from) each other. Thus the interpretation of the superposition phenomenon of multiple fields on detectors should not be lumped under the mysterious "wave-particle duality" philosophy. The phenomenon of superposition can be understood better when we focus on the actual process experienced by the detecting dipoles when allowed by QM rules, they respond to and sum all the induced stimulations due to all the superposed fields followed by the proportionate energy absorption giving rise to the fringes we observe. We will present various experimental results to illustrate our arguments. Our position is that such detector behavior driven interpretations rather than the generally implied field-field interaction driven explanations, will help us better understand the ultimate nature of light and hence invent better and newer devices and instruments.

  9. Giving students the run of sprinting models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heck, André; Ellermeijer, Ton

    2009-11-01

    A biomechanical study of sprinting is an interesting task for students who have a background in mechanics and calculus. These students can work with real data and do practical investigations similar to the way sports scientists do research. Student research activities are viable when the students are familiar with tools to collect and work with data from sensors and video recordings and with modeling tools for comparing simulation and experimental results. This article describes a multipurpose system, named COACH, that offers a versatile integrated set of tools for learning, doing, and teaching mathematics and science in a computer-based inquiry approach. Automated tracking of reference points and correction of perspective distortion in videos, state-of-the-art algorithms for data smoothing and numerical differentiation, and graphical system dynamics based modeling are some of the built-in techniques that are suitable for motion analysis. Their implementation and their application in student activities involving models of running are discussed.

  10. Giving preschoolers choice increases sharing behavior.

    PubMed

    Chernyak, Nadia; Kushnir, Tamar

    2013-10-01

    Young children are remarkably prosocial, but the mechanisms driving their prosociality are not well understood. Here, we propose that the experience of choice is critically tied to the expression of young children's altruistic behavior. Three- and 4-year-olds were asked to allocate resources to an individual in need by making a costly choice (allocating a resource they could have kept for themselves), a noncostly choice (allocating a resource that would otherwise be thrown away), or no choice (following instructions to allocate the resource). We measured subsequent prosociality by allowing children to then allocate new resources to a new individual. Although the majority of children shared with the first individual, children who were given costly alternatives shared more with the new individual. Results are discussed in terms of a prosocial-construal hypothesis, which suggests that children rationally infer their prosociality through the process of making difficult, autonomous choices. PMID:23955355

  11. Tolerance for ambiguity: an ethics-based criterion for medical student selection.

    PubMed

    Geller, Gail

    2013-05-01

    Planned changes to the MCAT exam and the premedical course requirements are intended to enable the assessment of humanistic characteristics and, thus, to select students who are more likely to become physicians who can communicate and relate with patients and engage in ethical decision making. Identifying students who possess humanistic and communication skills is an important goal, but the changes being implemented may not be sufficient to evaluate key personality traits that characterize well-rounded, thoughtful, empathic, and respectful physicians. The author argues that consideration should be given to assessing prospective students' tolerance for ambiguity as part of the admission process. Several strategies are proposed for implementing and evaluating such an assessment. Also included in this paper is an overview of the conceptual and empirical literature on tolerance for ambiguity among physicians and medical students, its impact on patient care, and the attention it is given in medical education. This evidence suggests that if medical schools admitted students who possess a high tolerance for ambiguity, quality of care in ambiguous conditions might improve, imbalances in physician supply and practice patterns might be reduced, the humility necessary for moral character formation might be enhanced, and the increasing ambiguity in medical practice might be better acknowledged and accepted. PMID:23524934

  12. Enhancement of Directional Ambiguity Removal Skill in Scatterometer Data Processing Using Planetary Boundary Layer Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Young-Joon; Pak, Kyung S.; Dunbar, R. Scott; Hsiao, S. Vincent; Callahan, Philip S.

    2000-01-01

    Planetary boundary layer (PBL) models are utilized to enhance directional ambiguity removal skill in scatterometer data processing. The ambiguity in wind direction retrieved from scatterometer measurements is removed with the aid of physical directional information obtained from PBL models. This technique is based on the observation that sea level pressure is scalar and its field is more coherent than the corresponding wind. An initial wind field obtained from the scatterometer measurements is used to derive a pressure field with a PBL model. After filtering small-scale noise in the derived pressure field, a wind field is generated with an inverted PBL model. This derived wind information is then used to remove wind vector ambiguities in the scatterometer data. It is found that the ambiguity removal skill can be improved when the new technique is used properly in conjunction with the median filter being used for scatterometer wind dealiasing at JPL. The new technique is applied to regions of cyclone systems which are important for accurate weather prediction but where the errors of ambiguity removal are often large.

  13. Improved PPP Ambiguity Resolution Considering the Stochastic Characteristics of Atmospheric Corrections from Regional Networks.

    PubMed

    Li, Yihe; Li, Bofeng; Gao, Yang

    2015-01-01

    With the increased availability of regional reference networks, Precise Point Positioning (PPP) can achieve fast ambiguity resolution (AR) and precise positioning by assimilating the satellite fractional cycle biases (FCBs) and atmospheric corrections derived from these networks. In such processing, the atmospheric corrections are usually treated as deterministic quantities. This is however unrealistic since the estimated atmospheric corrections obtained from the network data are random and furthermore the interpolated corrections diverge from the realistic corrections. This paper is dedicated to the stochastic modelling of atmospheric corrections and analyzing their effects on the PPP AR efficiency. The random errors of the interpolated corrections are processed as two components: one is from the random errors of estimated corrections at reference stations, while the other arises from the atmospheric delay discrepancies between reference stations and users. The interpolated atmospheric corrections are then applied by users as pseudo-observations with the estimated stochastic model. Two data sets are processed to assess the performance of interpolated corrections with the estimated stochastic models. The results show that when the stochastic characteristics of interpolated corrections are properly taken into account, the successful fix rate reaches 93.3% within 5 min for a medium inter-station distance network and 80.6% within 10 min for a long inter-station distance network. PMID:26633400

  14. Ambiguities in Determination Of Self-Affinity in the AE-index Time Series

    E-print Network

    Watkins, N W; Rhodes, C S; Rowlands, G

    2001-01-01

    The interaction between the Earth's magnetic field and the solar wind plasma results in a natural plasma confinement system which stores energy. Dissipation of this energy through Joule heating in the ionosphere can be studied via the Auroral Electrojet (AE) index. The apparent broken power law form of the frequency spectrum of this index has motivated investigation of whether it can be described as fractal coloured noise. One frequently-applied test for self-affinity is to demonstrate linear scaling of the logarithm of the structure function of a time series with the logarithm of the dilation factor $\\lambda$. We point out that, while this is conclusive when applied to signals that are self-affine over many decades in $\\lambda$, such as Brownian motion, the slope deviates from exact linearity and the conclusions become ambiguous when the test is used over shorter ranges of $\\lambda$. We demonstrate that non self-affine time series made up of random pulses can show near-linear scaling over a finite dynamic ra...

  15. Ambiguities in Determination Of Self-Affinity in the AE-index Time Series

    E-print Network

    N. W. Watkins; M. P. Freeman; C. S. Rhodes; G. Rowlands

    2001-11-22

    The interaction between the Earth's magnetic field and the solar wind plasma results in a natural plasma confinement system which stores energy. Dissipation of this energy through Joule heating in the ionosphere can be studied via the Auroral Electrojet (AE) index. The apparent broken power law form of the frequency spectrum of this index has motivated investigation of whether it can be described as fractal coloured noise. One frequently-applied test for self-affinity is to demonstrate linear scaling of the logarithm of the structure function of a time series with the logarithm of the dilation factor $\\lambda$. We point out that, while this is conclusive when applied to signals that are self-affine over many decades in $\\lambda$, such as Brownian motion, the slope deviates from exact linearity and the conclusions become ambiguous when the test is used over shorter ranges of $\\lambda$. We demonstrate that non self-affine time series made up of random pulses can show near-linear scaling over a finite dynamic range such that they could be misinterpreted as being self-affine. In particular we show that pulses with functional forms such as those identified by Weimer within the $AL$ index, from which $AE$ is partly derived, will exhibit nearly linear scaling over ranges similar to those previously shown for $AE$ and $AL$. The value of the slope, related to the Hurst exponent for a self-affine fractal, seems to be a more robust discriminator for fractality, if other information is available.

  16. Accessing characters in spoken Chinese disyllables: An ERP study on the resolution of auditory ambiguity.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xuqian; Huang, Guoliang; Huang, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Chinese differs from most Indo-European languages in its phonological, lexical, and syntactic structures. One of its unique properties is the abundance of homophones at the monosyllabic/morphemic level, with the consequence that monosyllabic homophones are all ambiguous in speech perception. Two-morpheme Chinese words can be composed of two high homophone-density morphemes (HH words), two low homophone-density morphemes (LL words), or one high and one low homophone-density morphemes (LH or HL words). The assumption of a simple inhibitory homophone effect is called into question in the case of disyllabic spoken word recognition, in which the recognition of one morpheme is affected by semantic information given by the other. Event-related brain potentials (ERPs) were used to trace on-line competitions among morphemic homophones in accessing Chinese disyllables. Results showing significant differences in ERP amplitude when comparing LL and LH words, but not when comparing LL and HL words, suggested that the first morpheme cannot be accessed without feedback from the second morpheme. Most importantly, analyses of N400 amplitude among different densities showed a converse homophone effect in which LL words, rather than LH or HL words, triggered larger N400. These findings provide strong evidence of a dynamic integration system at work during spoken Chinese disyllable recognition. PMID:26589544

  17. Influence of Gribov ambiguities in a class of nonlinear covariant gauges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serreau, J.; Tissier, M.; Tresmontant, A.

    2015-11-01

    We consider Yang-Mills theories in a recently proposed family of nonlinear covariant gauges that consistently deals with the issue of Gribov ambiguities. Such gauges provide a generalization of the Curci-Ferrari-Delbourgo-Jarvis gauges which can be formulated as an extremization procedure and might be implemented in numerical calculations. This would allow for nonperturbative studies of Yang-Mills correlators in a broad class of covariant gauges continuously connected to the well-studied Landau gauge. We compute the ghost and gluon propagators in the continuum formulation at one-loop order in perturbation theory and we study their momentum dependence down to the deep infrared regime, with and without renormalization-group improvement. In particular, we show that the theory admits infrared-safe renormalization-group trajectories with no Landau pole. Both the gluon and the ghost behave as massive fields at low energy, and the gluon propagator is transverse even away from the Landau gauge limit. We compare our results to those obtained in the usual Curci-Ferrari model, which allows us to pinpoint the specific effects arising from our treatment of Gribov copies.

  18. The effects of one night of sleep deprivation on known-risk and ambiguous-risk decisions.

    PubMed

    McKenna, Benjamin S; Dickinson, David L; Orff, Henry J; Drummond, Sean P A

    2007-09-01

    Sleep deprivation has been shown to alter decision-making abilities. The majority of research has utilized fairly complex tasks with the goal of emulating 'real-life' scenarios. Here, we use a Lottery Choice Task (LCT) which assesses risk and ambiguity preference for both decisions involving potential gains and those involving potential losses. We hypothesized that one night of sleep deprivation would make subjects more risk seeking in both gains and losses. Both a control group and an experimental group took the LCT on two consecutive days, with an intervening night of either sleep or sleep deprivation. The control group demonstrated that there was no effect of repeated administration of the LCT. For the experimental group, results showed significant interactions of night (normal sleep versus total sleep deprivation, TSD) by frame (gains versus losses), which demonstrate that following as little as 23 h of TSD, the prototypical response to decisions involving risk is altered. Following TSD, subjects were willing to take more risk than they ordinarily would when they were considering a gain, but less risk than they ordinarily would when they were considering a loss. For ambiguity preferences, there seems to be no direct effect of TSD. These findings suggest that, overall, risk preference is moderated by TSD, but whether an individual is willing to take more or less risk than when well-rested depends on whether the decision is framed in terms of gains or losses. PMID:17716272

  19. Impaired decision making under ambiguity but not under risk in individuals with pathological buying-behavioral and psychophysiological evidence.

    PubMed

    Trotzke, Patrick; Starcke, Katrin; Pedersen, Anya; Müller, Astrid; Brand, Matthias

    2015-09-30

    Pathological buying (PB) is described as dysfunctional buying behavior, associated with harmful consequences. It is discussed whether decision-making deficits are related to PB, because affected individuals often choose the short-term rewarding option of buying despite persistent negative long-term consequences. We investigated 30 patients suffering from PB and 30 matched control participants with two different decision-making tasks: the Iowa Gambling Task (IGT) measures decisions under ambiguity and involves emotional feedback processing, whereas the Game of Dice Task (GDT) measures decisions under risk and can be solved strategically. Potential emotional and cognitive correlates of decision making were investigated by assessing skin conductance response (SCR) and executive functioning. In comparison to the control participants, the patients showed more disadvantageous decisions under ambiguity in the IGT. These data were supported by the SCR results: patients failed to generate SCRs that usually occur before disadvantageous decisions. The physiological and behavioral performance on decisions under risk and executive functioning did not differ between groups. Thus, deficits in emotional feedback processing might be one potential factor in etiology and pathogenesis of PB and should be considered in theory and treatment. PMID:26165961

  20. Old Star's "Rebirth" Gives Astronomers Surprises

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2005-04-01

    Astronomers using the National Science Foundation's Very Large Array (VLA) radio telescope are taking advantage of a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to watch an old star suddenly stir back into new activity after coming to the end of its normal life. Their surprising results have forced them to change their ideas of how such an old, white dwarf star can re-ignite its nuclear furnace for one final blast of energy. Sakurai's Object Radio/Optical Images of Sakurai's Object: Color image shows nebula ejected thousands of years ago. Contours indicate radio emission. Inset is Hubble Space Telescope image, with contours indicating radio emission; this inset shows just the central part of the region. CREDIT: Hajduk et al., NRAO/AUI/NSF, ESO, StSci, NASA Computer simulations had predicted a series of events that would follow such a re-ignition of fusion reactions, but the star didn't follow the script -- events moved 100 times more quickly than the simulations predicted. "We've now produced a new theoretical model of how this process works, and the VLA observations have provided the first evidence supporting our new model," said Albert Zijlstra, of the University of Manchester in the United Kingdom. Zijlstra and his colleagues presented their findings in the April 8 issue of the journal Science. The astronomers studied a star known as V4334 Sgr, in the constellation Sagittarius. It is better known as "Sakurai's Object," after Japanese amateur astronomer Yukio Sakurai, who discovered it on February 20, 1996, when it suddenly burst into new brightness. At first, astronomers thought the outburst was a common nova explosion, but further study showed that Sakurai's Object was anything but common. The star is an old white dwarf that had run out of hydrogen fuel for nuclear fusion reactions in its core. Astronomers believe that some such stars can undergo a final burst of fusion in a shell of helium that surrounds a core of heavier nuclei such as carbon and oxygen. However, the outburst of Sakurai's Object is the first such blast seen in modern times. Stellar outbursts observed in 1670 and 1918 may have been caused by the same phenomenon. Astronomers expect the Sun to become a white dwarf in about five billion years. A white dwarf is a dense core left after a star's normal, fusion-powered life has ended. A teaspoon of white dwarf material would weigh about 10 tons. White dwarfs can have masses up to 1.4 times that of the Sun; larger stars collapse at the end of their lives into even-denser neutron stars or black holes. Computer simulations indicated that heat-spurred convection (or "boiling") would bring hydrogen from the star's outer envelope down into the helium shell, driving a brief flash of new nuclear fusion. This would cause a sudden increase in brightness. The original computer models suggested a sequence of observable events that would occur over a few hundred years. "Sakurai's object went through the first phases of this sequence in just a few years -- 100 times faster than we expected -- so we had to revise our models," Zijlstra said. The revised models predicted that the star should rapidly reheat and begin to ionize gases in its surrounding region. "This is what we now see in our latest VLA observations," Zijlstra said. "It's important to understand this process. Sakurai's Object has ejected a large amount of the carbon from its inner core into space, both in the form of gas and dust grains. These will find their way into regions of space where new stars form, and the dust grains may become incorporated in new planets. Some carbon grains found in a meteorite show isotope ratios identical to those found in Sakurai's Object, and we think they may have come from such an event. Our results suggest this source for cosmic carbon may be far more important than we suspected before," Zijlstra added. The scientists continue to observe Sakurai's Object to take advantage of the rare opportunity to learn about the process of re-ignition. They are making new VLA observations just

  1. Human otolith-ocular reflexes during off-vertical axis rotation: effect of frequency on tilt-translation ambiguity and motion sickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Scott J.; Paloski, W. H. (Principal Investigator)

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine how the modulation of tilt and translation otolith-ocular responses during constant velocity off-vertical axis rotation varies as a function of stimulus frequency. Eighteen human subjects were rotated in darkness about their longitudinal axis 30 degrees off-vertical at stimulus frequencies between 0.05 and 0.8 Hz. The modulation of torsion decreased while the modulation of horizontal slow phase velocity (SPV) increased with increasing frequency. It is inferred that the ambiguity of otolith afferent information is greatest in the frequency region where tilt (torsion) and translational (horizontal SPV) otolith-ocular responses crossover. It is postulated that the previously demonstrated peak in motion sickness susceptibility during linear accelerations around 0.3 Hz is the result of frequency segregation of ambiguous otolith information being inadequate to distinguish between tilt and translation.

  2. Automated detection of ambiguity in BI-RADS assessment categories in mammography reports.

    PubMed

    Bozkurt, Selen; Rubin, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    An unsolved challenge in biomedical natural language processing (NLP) is detecting ambiguities in the reports that can help physicians to improve report clarity. Our goal was to develop NLP methods to tackle the challenges of identifying ambiguous descriptions of the laterality of BI-RADS Final Assessment Categories in mammography radiology reports. We developed a text processing system that uses a BI-RADS ontology we built as a knowledge source for automatic annotation of the entities in mammography reports relevant to this problem. We used the GATE NLP toolkit and developed customized processing resources for report segmentation, named entity recognition, and detection of mismatches between BI-RADS Final Assessment Categories and mammogram laterality. Our system detected 55 mismatched cases in 190 reports and the accuracy rate was 81%. We conclude that such NLP techniques can detect ambiguities in mammography reports and may reduce discrepancy and variability in reporting. PMID:24743074

  3. Efficiency and sensitivity of methods for assessing ambiguity in data association decisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kragel, Bret D.; Herman, Shawn M.; Roseveare, Nick J.

    2008-04-01

    The central problem in multitarget, multisensor surveillance is that of determining which reports from separate sensors arise from common objects. Due to stochastic errors in the source reports, there may be multiple data association hypotheses with similar likelihoods. Moreover, established methods for performing data association make fundamental modeling assumptions that hold only approximately in practice. For these reasons, it is beneficial to include some measure of uncertainty, or ambiguity, when reporting association decisions. In this paper, we perform an analysis of the benefits versus runtime performance of three methods of producing ambiguity estimates for data association: enumeration of the k-best data association hypotheses, importance sampling, and Markov Chain Monte Carlo estimation. In addition, we briefly examine the sensitivity of ambiguity estimates to violations of the stochastic model used in the data association procedure.

  4. Efficient decomposition of cosmic microwave background polarization maps into pure E, pure B, and ambiguous components

    SciTech Connect

    Bunn, Emory F.

    2011-04-15

    Separation of the B component of a cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization map from the much larger E component is an essential step in CMB polarimetry. For a map with incomplete sky coverage, this separation is necessarily hampered by the presence of ambiguous modes which could be either E or B modes. I present an efficient pixel-space algorithm for removing the ambiguous modes and separating the map into pure E and B components. The method, which works for arbitrary geometries, does not involve generating a complete basis of such modes and scales the cube of the number of pixels on the boundary of the map.

  5. Fence - An Efficient Parser with Ambiguity Support for Model-Driven Language Specification

    E-print Network

    Quesada, Luis; Cortijo, Francisco J

    2011-01-01

    Model-based language specification has applications in the implementation of language processors, the design of domain-specific languages, model-driven software development, data integration, text mining, natural language processing, and corpus-based induction of models. Model-based language specification decouples language design from language processing and, unlike traditional grammar-driven approaches, which constrain language designers to specific kinds of grammars, it needs general parser generators able to deal with ambiguities. In this paper, we propose Fence, an efficient bottom-up parsing algorithm with lexical and syntactic ambiguity support that enables the use of model-based language specification in practice.

  6. IMPACT OF THE “GIVING CIGARETTES IS GIVING HARM” CAMPAIGN ON KNOWLEDGE AND ATTITUDES OF CHINESE SMOKERS

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Li-Ling; Thrasher, James F.; Jiang, Yuan; Li, Qiang; Fong, Geoffrey T.; Chang, Yvette; Walsemann, Katrina M.; Friedman, Daniela B.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To date there is limited published evidence on the efficacy of tobacco control mass media campaigns in China. This study aimed to evaluate the impact of a mass media campaign “Giving Cigarettes is Giving Harm” (GCGH) on Chinese smokers’ knowledge of smoking-related harms and attitudes toward cigarette gifts. Methods Population-based, representative data were analyzed from a longitudinal cohort of 3,709 adult smokers who participated in the International Tobacco Control China Survey conducted in six Chinese cities before and after the campaign. Logistic regression models were estimated to examine associations between campaign exposure and attitudes about cigarettes as gifts measured post-campaign. Poisson regression models were estimated to assess the effects of campaign exposure on post-campaign knowledge, adjusting for pre-campaign knowledge. Findings Fourteen percent (n=335) of participants recalled the campaign within the cities where the GCGH campaign was implemented. Participants in the intervention cities who recalled the campaign were more likely to disagree that cigarettes are good gifts (71% vs. 58%, p<0.01) and had greater levels of campaign-targeted knowledge than those who did not recall the campaign (Mean=1.97 vs. 1.62, p<0.01). Disagreeing that cigarettes are good gifts was higher in intervention cities than in control cities. Changes in campaign-targeted knowledge were similar in both cities, perhaps due to a secular trend, low campaign recall, or contamination issues. Conclusions These findings suggest that the GCGH campaign increased knowledge of smoking harms, which could promote downstream cessation. Findings provide evidence to support future campaign development to effectively fight the tobacco epidemic in China. PMID:24813427

  7. 20 CFR 404.704 - Your responsibility for giving evidence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...2010-04-01 false Your responsibility for giving evidence. 404...704 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION ...General § 404.704 Your responsibility for giving evidence...aware that Section 208 of the Social Security Act provides...

  8. Effective Presentations Pieces to Giving Good Oral Presentations

    E-print Network

    Kunkle, Tom

    Effective Presentations Pieces to Giving Good Oral Presentations The ability to give an effective presentation begins with designing one. These basic questions should be answered before you begin to put together your presentation. Situation What is the purpose of giving this presentation

  9. Understanding Alumni Giving: Theory and Predictors of Donor Status

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoyt, Jeff E.

    2004-01-01

    The current study tests a theoretical model of alumni giving developed inductively from prior research. Donor status is directly predicted by willingness to give, alumni involvement, perceptions of the economic environment, perceived need, charitable preferences, receipt of a scholarship and capacity to give along with several indirect predictors.…

  10. Direction-Giving Skills in the Classroom (A Teaching Tip).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, Charlynn

    1992-01-01

    Offers a unit on direction giving to help students identify effective and ineffective direction giving; become familiar with the preparation and presentation components of sound direction giving; and determine whether the message intended was the massage received. Discusses barriers to listening, misunderstandings, and provides exercises and steps…

  11. How Do Family Caregivers of Older People Give Up Caregiving?

    PubMed Central

    Mortazavi, Hamed; Peyrovi, Hamid; Joolaee, Soodabeh

    2015-01-01

    Background Population aging has social, economic and political consequences. Most family caregivers prefer to care for their family member older person with chronic disease at home. Despite traditional culture within Iranian families, in some cases, hospitalization of the elderly in nursing home is inevitable, and this affects the old person and his/her family. The aim of this study was to explain how Iranian family cargivers give up caring their older person with chronic condition at home. Methods A grounded theory approach was used to conduct the study. The study setting included four nursing homes under the auspices of Iran Welfare Organization. Fourteen participants were recruited through purposive sampling. Data were collected from December 2010 to March 2011 by Semi-structured interviews lasting about 17 to 95 minutes (average 52 minutes). Constant comparative analysis was used to analyze the data. Results Three main categories appeared at the end of the analysis: “going out of the road of usual life”, “challenge of meeting older person, family and caregivers care needs”, and “the appearance of inconstancy in the family”. They explained exclusively how family caregivers of old people give up caregiving. Conclusion Health care providers are recommended to become familiar with challenges of family caregivers in taking care of older person with chronic disease at home, and then organize their supportive and consulting actions according to family situations in order to improve the life quality of older person and family caregivers. PMID:26171407

  12. Learn from Web Search Logs to Organize Search Results Xuanhui Wang

    E-print Network

    Zhai, ChengXiang

    for the ambiguous query "jaguar" (as of Dec. 2nd, 2006) contain at least four different senses of "jaguar" (i.e., car, animal, software, and a sports team); even for a more refined query such as "jaguar team picture", the results are still quite ambiguous, includ- ing at least four different jaguar teams ­ a wrestling team

  13. Who gives? Multilevel effects of gender and ethnicity on workplace charitable giving.

    PubMed

    Leslie, Lisa M; Snyder, Mark; Glomb, Theresa M

    2013-01-01

    Research on diversity in organizations has largely focused on the implications of gender and ethnic differences for performance, to the exclusion of other outcomes. We propose that gender and ethnic differences also have implications for workplace charitable giving, an important aspect of corporate social responsibility. Drawing from social role theory, we hypothesize and find that gender has consistent effects across levels of analysis; women donate more money to workplace charity than do men, and the percentage of women in a work unit is positively related to workplace charity, at least among men. Alternatively and consistent with social exchange theory, we hypothesize and find that ethnicity has opposing effects across levels of analysis; ethnic minorities donate less money to workplace charity than do Whites, but the percentage of minorities in a work unit is positively related to workplace charity, particularly among minorities. The findings provide a novel perspective on the consequences of gender and ethnic diversity in organizations and highlight synergies between organizational efforts to increase diversity and to build a reputation for corporate social responsibility. PMID:22985116

  14. Giving and taking: Representational building blocks of active resource-transfer events in human infants

    PubMed Central

    Tatone, Denis; Geraci, Alessandra; Csibra, Gergely

    2015-01-01

    Active resource transfer is a pervasive and distinctive feature of human sociality. We hypothesized that humans possess an action schema of giving specific for representing social interactions based on material exchange, and specified the set of necessary assumptions about giving events that this action schema should be equipped with. We tested this proposal by investigating how 12-month-old infants interpret abstract resource-transfer events. Across eight looking-time studies using a violation-of-expectation paradigm we found that infants were able to distinguish between kinematically identical giving and taking actions. Despite the surface similarity between these two actions, only giving was represented as an object-mediated social interaction. While we found no evidence that infants expected the target of a giving or taking action to reciprocate, the present results suggest that infants interpret giving as an inherently social action, which they can possibly use to map social relations via observing resource-transfer episodes. PMID:25614012

  15. Children's Trait and Emotion Attributions in Socially Ambiguous and Unambiguous Situations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boseovski, Janet J.; Lapan, Candace; Bosacki, Sandra

    2013-01-01

    Children's attributions about story characters in ambiguous and unambiguous social situations were assessed. One hundred and forty-four 6-7-year-olds and 10-11-year-olds heard about actors who slighted a recipient intentionally or for an undetermined reason and then made causal attributions about the events, an emotion attribution about the…

  16. Parallel line raster eliminates ambiguities in reading timing of pulses less than 500 microseconds apart

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horne, A. P.

    1966-01-01

    Parallel horizontal line raster is used for precision timing of events occurring less than 500 microseconds apart for observation of hypervelocity phenomena. The raster uses a staircase vertical deflection and eliminates ambiguities in reading timing of pulses close to the end of each line.

  17. The Professional Negotiator: Role Conflict, Role Ambiguity and Motivation To Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Medford, Robert E.; Miskel, Cecil

    The investigation examined the relationship among role conflict, role ambiguity, and motivation to work of teacher-negotiators. The theoretical rationale for the study was formulated from the finding of Walton and McKersie, Deutsch, Vidmar and McGrath, and Blum concerning the negotiator's conflict with his adversary, his dependence on his…

  18. Engineering Objects for Collaboration: Strategies of Ambiguity and Clarity at Knowledge Boundaries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barley, William C.; Leonardi, Paul M.; Bailey, Diane E.

    2012-01-01

    Prior research suggests that boundary objects gain meaning through group interaction. Drawing from the literature on strategic ambiguity, we explore the possibility that individuals strategically create potential boundary objects in an attempt to shape the meanings that groups develop. From ethnographic observations of automotive engineers, we…

  19. How I handled ambiguity in a system to read music scores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruttenberg, Alan

    1992-11-01

    In a program for reading printed music, a variety of low level feature detectors were used to extract sufficient information to reconstruct the score. All feature detectors were unreliable to some extent, and were biased towards yielding false positives rather than missing features. In order to reconstruct the score, conflicting information from the feature detectors needed to be recognized and eliminated. All objects as well as their geometric and semantic relations were represented in an object oriented framework. Ambiguity (implemented as a generic predicate) was defined -- and explicitly represented -- in terms of these relationships. Examples of ambiguous relationships include: An accidental and a note head having an on-top-of geometric relationship, or the total duration of notes in a measure not being equal to the notated time signature. A method inspired by Waltz filtering was used to produce a consistent, unambiguous interpretation. Waltz filtering is a symbolic constraint propagation technique which has been applied to line drawings. During interpretation attention was focused on objects which had ambiguous relations. Ambiguity was iteratively reduced or removed by using a variety of methods employing information gathered from local unambiguous relations.

  20. Imaginary Companions and Young Children's Responses to Ambiguous Auditory Stimuli: Implications for Typical and Atypical Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fernyhough, Charles; Bland, Kirsten; Meins, Elizabeth; Coltheart, Max

    2007-01-01

    Background: Previous research has reported a link between imaginary companions (ICs) in middle childhood and the perception of verbal material in ambiguous auditory stimuli. These findings have been interpreted in terms of commonalities in the cognitive processes underlying children's engagement with ICs and adults' reporting of imaginary verbal…

  1. Ambiguities in the relationship between gonadal steroids and reproduction in axolotls (Ambystoma mexicanum)

    E-print Network

    Eisthen, Heather L.

    Ambiguities in the relationship between gonadal steroids and reproduction in axolotls (Ambystoma Testosterone a b s t r a c t Axolotls (Ambystoma mexicanum) are aquatic salamanders that are widely used in research. Axolotls have been bred in laboratories for nearly 150 years, yet little is known about the basic

  2. From Ambiguity Aversion to a Generalized Expected Utility. Modeling Preferences in a Quantum Probabilistic Framework

    E-print Network

    Diederik Aerts; Sandro Sozzo

    2015-10-30

    Ambiguity and ambiguity aversion have been widely studied in decision theory and economics both at a theoretical and an experimental level. After Ellsberg's seminal studies challenging subjective expected utility theory (SEUT), several (mainly normative) approaches have been put forward to reproduce ambiguity aversion and Ellsberg-type preferences. However, Machina and other authors have pointed out some fundamental difficulties of these generalizations of SEUT to cope with some variants of Ellsberg's thought experiments, which has recently been experimentally confirmed. Starting from our quantum modeling approach to human cognition, we develop here a general probabilistic framework to model human decisions under uncertainty. We show that our quantum theoretical model faithfully represents different sets of data collected on both the Ellsberg and the Machina paradox situations, and is flexible enough to describe different subjective attitudes with respect to ambiguity. Our approach opens the way toward a quantum-based generalization of expected utility theory (QEUT), where subjective probabilities depend on the state of the conceptual entity at play and its interaction with the decision-maker, while preferences between acts are determined by the maximization of this 'state-dependent expected utility'.

  3. Metaphor, Ambiguity, and Motive in Evolutionary Biology: W. D. Hamilton and the "Gene's Point of View"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journet, Debra

    2005-01-01

    This article analyzes the power of ambiguous metaphors to present scientific novelty. Its focus is a series of papers by the prominent population biologist W. D. Hamilton in which he redefined the meaning of biological altruism. In particular, the article draws on Kenneth Burke's dramatistic pentad to examine why suggestions of motive are so…

  4. Translational Ambiguity Rephrased Danit Ben-Ari*, Daniel M. Berry**, Mori Rimon*

    E-print Network

    Berry, Daniel M.

    to humans, due to their extensive world knowledge, may present ambiguities to automatic parsers may be handled syntactically e.g. by defining sub-categorization for verbs, assuming a heuristic not aim at full automation and people involved are pursuing ways of using human expertise

  5. Preferences for Travel Time under Risk and Ambiguity: Implications in Path Selection and Network Equilibrium

    E-print Network

    Sun, Defeng

    Preferences for Travel Time under Risk and Ambiguity: Implications in Path Selection and Network the preferences for uncertain travel time in which the probability distribu- tion may not be fully characterized. In evaluating an uncertain travel time, we explicitly distinguish between risk, where probability distribution

  6. Tinkering with Material Resources: Operating under Ambiguous Conditions in Rock Construction Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Styhre, Alexander

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Ethnographic studies of, for instance, laboratory work show that practices never reach a full closure but are always open to contingencies and ambiguities, making it possible to accommodate new empirical findings. The aim of the paper is to demonstrate that this is true also for less "high-brow" work in, for example, the construction…

  7. Digitally Signed Documents Ambiguities and Solutions Adil Alsaid and Chris J. Mitchell

    E-print Network

    Mitchell, Chris

    Digitally Signed Documents ­ Ambiguities and Solutions Adil Alsaid and Chris J. Mitchell.Alsaid@rhul.ac.uk Abstract Digitally signing a digital document is a straightforward procedure; however, when the digital document contains dynamic content, the digital signature may remain valid but the viewed document may

  8. The indexing ambiguity in serial femtosecond crystallography (SFX) resolved using an expectation maximization algorithm.

    PubMed

    Liu, Haiguang; Spence, John C H

    2014-11-01

    Crystallographic auto-indexing algorithms provide crystal orientations and unit-cell parameters and assign Miller indices based on the geometric relations between the Bragg peaks observed in diffraction patterns. However, if the Bravais symmetry is higher than the space-group symmetry, there will be multiple indexing options that are geometrically equivalent, and hence many ways to merge diffraction intensities from protein nanocrystals. Structure factor magnitudes from full reflections are required to resolve this ambiguity but only partial reflections are available from each XFEL shot, which must be merged to obtain full reflections from these 'stills'. To resolve this chicken-and-egg problem, an expectation maximization algorithm is described that iteratively constructs a model from the intensities recorded in the diffraction patterns as the indexing ambiguity is being resolved. The reconstructed model is then used to guide the resolution of the indexing ambiguity as feedback for the next iteration. Using both simulated and experimental data collected at an X-ray laser for photosystem I in the P63 space group (which supports a merohedral twinning indexing ambiguity), the method is validated. PMID:25485120

  9. Pokes, Prods, and Pushes: Information Availability and Decision Making in Ambiguous Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenwood, Brad N.

    2013-01-01

    In this dissertation I investigate how changes in the availability of information influences decision making in inherently ambiguous environments. As the Internet has not only fostered connectivity, but also catalyzed information generation on an unprecedented scale, my objective is to revisit the concept of information availability and salience…

  10. When Does the Brain Distinguish between Genuine and Ambiguous Smiles? An ERP Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calvo, Manuel G.; Marrero, Hipolito; Beltran, David

    2013-01-01

    Event-related brain potentials (ERPs) were recorded to assess the processing time course of ambiguous facial expressions with a smiling mouth but neutral, fearful, or angry eyes, in comparison with genuinely happy faces (a smile and happy eyes) and non-happy faces (neutral, fearful, or angry mouth and eyes). Participants judged whether the faces…

  11. How Often Is Often? Reference Ambiguities of the Likert-Scale in Language Learning Strategy Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gu, Yongqi; And Others

    Based on personal experience, this paper examines the ambiguities of the Likert-type 5-point scale in learning strategy elicitation. Four parallel questionnaires consisting of the same batch of 20 items taken from the Oxford scale (1990) were administered among a group of 120 tertiary level, non-English majors in China. Questionnaire 1 used the…

  12. University Administration and the Language of Management: Seven Types of Ambiguity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Papp, James

    2002-01-01

    Considers that the prevalence of excellence may reveal more about the spread of sloganeering in support of brands otherwise indistinguishable to consumers than it does any change in institutional philosophies or management techniques. Offers a sample of seven types of management ambiguity with brief exegeses; branding, market share, success, core…

  13. Newcomer Immigrant Adolescents and Ambiguous Discrimination: The Role of Cognitive Appraisal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patel, Sita G.; Tabb, Kevin M.; Strambler, Michael J.; Eltareb, Fazia

    2015-01-01

    Cognitive appraisal has been shown to mediate the relationship between stressors and internalizing symptoms, but not among newcomer immigrant youth facing ambiguous discrimination. Using a mixed-methods design with a sample of newcomer adolescents from African, Arab, Asian, Caribbean, European, and Latin American countries, this study measured the…

  14. Capstone and Building Block: Helping Students Manage Ambiguity about their Futures through Writing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Love, Brad; Mackert, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Encouraging students to engage with principles and ideas is one way to address ambiguity with consistent, effective approaches in situations made up of "gray area." This includes the looming post-college world where students may be unsure about choosing between job offers, geographic locations, or even communication fields. Such…

  15. Intact visual discrimination of complex and feature-ambiguous stimuli in the absence

    E-print Network

    Squire, Larry R.

    Research Intact visual discrimination of complex and feature-ambiguous stimuli in the absence Healthcare System, San Diego, California 92161, USA; Departments of 2 Psychiatry, 3 Neurosciences, and 4 also be involved in visual perceptual functions. In four experiments, we assessed visual discrimination

  16. On the ideology of hypodescent: Political conservatism predicts categorization of racially ambiguous faces as Black

    E-print Network

    of interracial relationships, the United States of America has become an increasingly multiracial society of racially ambiguous individuals in terms of their most subordinate racial group may exacerbate inequality) jokingly describes his mother as "White as milk," but the fact is that he is seen as the United States

  17. THE ROLE OF PROSODY IN DISAMBIGUATING POTENTIALLY AMBIGUOUS UTTERANCES IN ENGLISH AND ITALIAN

    E-print Network

    Hirschberg, Julia

    THE ROLE OF PROSODY IN DISAMBIGUATING POTENTIALLY AMBIGUOUS UTTERANCES IN ENGLISH AND ITALIAN Julia in English and Italian, to see a) whether speakers employ intona­ tional means to disambiguate to disambiguate syntactically and semantically am­ biguous utterances in English and Italian. We wanted

  18. Irish Math. Soc. Bulletin 67 (2011), 6773 67 The Two-Child Paradox: Dichotomy and Ambiguity

    E-print Network

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    2011-01-01

    , that the sex of each child is independent of that of the other, that each day of the week is equally probableIrish Math. Soc. Bulletin 67 (2011), 67­73 67 The Two-Child Paradox: Dichotomy and Ambiguity PETER LYNCH Abstract. Given that one of the children in a two-child fam- ily is a boy, what are the chances

  19. Young Children's Classification, Stereotyping and Play Behaviour for Gender Neutral and Ambiguous Toys

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cherney, Isabelle D.; Dempsey, Jessica

    2010-01-01

    Developmental intergroup theory would predict that children develop fewer or weaker stereotypes about toys that have less distinguishable gender attributes than those that are clearly associated with a gender. The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of neutral and ambiguous toys in 31 three- to five-year-old children's play behaviour…

  20. Ambiguity in Units and the Referents: Two Cases in Rational Number Operations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rathouz, Margaret

    2010-01-01

    I explore the impact of ambiguous referral to the unit on understanding of decimal and fraction operations during episodes in two different mathematics courses for pre-service teachers (PSTs). In one classroom, the instructor introduces a rectangular area diagram to help the PSTs visualize decimal multiplication. A transcript from this classroom…

  1. Improved Triple-Frequency GPS/GALILEO Carrier Phase Ambiguity Resolution Using a

    E-print Network

    Calgary, University of

    Improved Triple-Frequency GPS/GALILEO Carrier Phase Ambiguity Resolution Using a Stochastic researches include GPS/GALILEO interoperability as well as GNSS receiver design. Paul Alves is a Ph.Sc. in Geomatics Engineering in May 2000. He current research focuses on GPS and GALILEO integration and Network

  2. LIFG-Based Attentional Control and the Resolution of Lexical Ambiguities in Sentence Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vuong, Loan C.; Martin, Randi C.

    2011-01-01

    The role of attentional control in lexical ambiguity resolution was examined in two patients with damage to the left inferior frontal gyrus (LIFG) and one control patient with non-LIFG damage. Experiment 1 confirmed that the LIFG patients had attentional control deficits compared to normal controls while the non-LIFG patient was relatively…

  3. Family Boundary Ambiguity: A 30-Year Review of Theory, Research, and Measurement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carroll, Jason S.; Olson, Chad D.; Buckmiller, Nicolle

    2007-01-01

    Since its introduction 30 years ago, family boundary ambiguity (BA) has been a widely used construct in family stress research and clinical intervention. In this article, we present a comprehensive and interdisciplinary review of published research studies that have used BA as a primary variable. Our review identified 37 studies investigating BA…

  4. Battling Scylla and Charybdis: the Search for Redundancy and Ambiguity in the 2001 UMLS Metathesaurus

    E-print Network

    Cimino, James J.

    , it is possible for it to have multiple semantic types. Inter-term relationships (including parent-child concepts, 1817 ambiguous concepts, and 544 relationships between concepts that were inconsistent relationships) from the source vocabularies provide inter-concept relationships. Figure 1 (based on UMLS

  5. Comprehension of a Non-Text: The Effect of the Title and Ambiguity Tolerance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahmadi, Alireza

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of the title and ambiguity tolerance on the comprehensibility of a non-text. To this end, ten irrelevant sentences from different texts were put together to make two seemingly cohesive and coherent texts. The two texts were exactly the same except for the fact that one of them carried a title whereas the other…

  6. Embedded Promotions in Online Services: How Goal-Relevance Ambiguity Shapes Response and Affect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brasel, S. Adam

    2010-01-01

    Adding promotions to online services is increasingly commonplace, yet consumers may have difficulty determining whether service-embedded promotions are goal-relevant, due to the linear and transactional nature of online services. This contextual effect of goal-relevance ambiguity on promotions is explored across three studies. An exploratory study…

  7. Children's Use of Phonological Information in Ambiguity Resolution: A View from Mandarin Chinese

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhou, Peng; Su, Yi; Crain, Stephen; Gao, Liqun; Zhan, Likan

    2012-01-01

    How do children develop the mapping between prosody and other levels of linguistic knowledge? This question has received considerable attention in child language research. In the present study two experiments were conducted to investigate four- to five-year-old Mandarin-speaking children's sensitivity to prosody in ambiguity resolution. Experiment…

  8. Perfect Ambiguous Optimistic Fair Exchange Yang Wang, Man Ho Au, and Willy Susilo

    E-print Network

    International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR)

    of Intel's shares value. Therefore, it is necessary that the fair exchange protocol should not leak anyPerfect Ambiguous Optimistic Fair Exchange Yang Wang, Man Ho Au, and Willy Susilo Centre of Wollongong, Australia {yw990}@uowmail.edu.au {aau, wsusilo}@uow.edu.au Abstract. Protocol for fair exchange

  9. The Effect of Behavioral Objectives and Tolerance of Ambiguity on Achievement in English Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Martin

    Fifteen inner-city senior English classes in a New York City high school participated in this study of the effect of behavioral objectives on achievement in English sentence skills. Students were pretested with a measure of tolerance of ambiguity and a test consisting of correct sentences, sentence fragments, and run-on sentences. Teachers then…

  10. Interpretation of Ambiguous Situations: Evidence for a Dissociation between Social and Physical Threat in Williams Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dodd, Helen F.; Porter, Melanie A.

    2011-01-01

    Williams syndrome (WS) is associated with an unusual profile of anxiety, characterised by increased rates of non-social anxiety but not social anxiety (Dodd and Porter, J Ment Health Res Intellect Disabil 2(2):89-109, "2009"). The present research examines whether this profile of anxiety is associated with an interpretation bias for ambiguous

  11. Hemispheric Asymmetries in Semantic Processing: Evidence from False Memories for Ambiguous Words

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Faust, Miriam; Ben-Artzi, Elisheva; Harel, Itay

    2008-01-01

    Previous research suggests that the left hemisphere (LH) focuses on strongly related word meanings; the right hemisphere (RH) may contribute uniquely to the processing of lexical ambiguity by activating and maintaining a wide range of meanings, including subordinate meanings. The present study used the word-lists false memory paradigm [Roediger,…

  12. Method and apparatus for reducing range ambiguity in synthetic aperture radar

    DOEpatents

    Kare, Jordin T. (San Ramon, CA)

    1999-10-26

    A modified Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) system with reduced sensitivity to range ambiguities, and which uses secondary receiver channels to detect the range ambiguous signals and subtract them from the signal received by the main channel. Both desired and range ambiguous signals are detected by a main receiver and by one or more identical secondary receivers. All receivers are connected to a common antenna with two or more feed systems offset in elevation (e.g., a reflector antenna with multiple feed horns or a phased array with multiple phase shift networks. The secondary receiver output(s) is (are) then subtracted from the main receiver output in such a way as to cancel the ambiguous signals while only slightly attenuating the desired signal and slightly increasing the noise in the main channel, and thus does not significantly affect the desired signal. This subtraction may be done in real time, or the outputs of the receivers may be recorded separately and combined during signal processing.

  13. Concern-Focused Evaluation for Ambiguous and Conflicting Policies: An Approach from the Environmental Field

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mermet, Laurent; Bille, Raphael; Leroy, Maya

    2010-01-01

    Environment and sustainable development show how policies are becoming ever more complex and ambiguous. This trend calls for new evaluation approaches. They need to be more clearly focused on specific, explicit concerns. They must be driven by a strategic concept of use to overcome the vulnerability to manipulation of many integrative, essentially…

  14. A Fine Risk To Be Run? The Ambiguity of Eros and Teacher Responsibility.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Todd, Sharon

    2003-01-01

    Describes teachers as often being in a place of tension between responding to students as persons and responding to students in their institutional-defined roles. Studies the significance of communicative ambiguity for responsibility, and explores what is ethically at stake for teachers in erotic form of communication. Contains 14 references. (JS)

  15. What is organic agriculture? Although the term "organic" may sound ambiguous,

    E-print Network

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    What is organic agriculture? Although the term "organic" may sound ambiguous, the USDA National agriculture "is based on minimal use of off-farm inputs and on-farm management practices that restore, maintain, or enhance ecological harmony." In this context, "the primary goal of organic agriculture

  16. Learning the Language of Evolution: Lexical Ambiguity and Word Meaning in Student Explanations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rector, Meghan A.; Nehm, Ross H.; Pearl, Dennis

    2013-01-01

    Our study investigates the challenges introduced by students' use of lexically ambiguous language in evolutionary explanations. Specifically, we examined students' meaning of five key terms incorporated into their written evolutionary explanations: "pressure", "select", "adapt", "need", and "must". We utilized a new technological tool known as the…

  17. Preschoolers' Sensitivity to Referential Ambiguity: Evidence for a Dissociation between Implicit Understanding and Explicit Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nilsen, Elizabeth S.; Graham, Susan A.; Smith, Shannon; Chambers, Craig G.

    2008-01-01

    Four-year-olds were asked to assess an adult listener's knowledge of the location of a hidden sticker after the listener was provided an ambiguous or unambiguous description of the sticker location. When preschoolers possessed private knowledge about the sticker location, the location they chose indicated that they judged a description to be…

  18. Cognate and Word Class Ambiguity Effects in Noun and Verb Processing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bultena, Sybrine; Dijkstra, Ton; van Hell, Janet G.

    2013-01-01

    This study examined how noun and verb processing in bilingual visual word recognition are affected by within and between-language overlap. We investigated how word class ambiguous noun and verb cognates are processed by bilinguals, to see if co-activation of overlapping word forms between languages benefits from additional overlap within a…

  19. Context Effects on Frame Probability Independent of Verb Sense Ambiguity Frank Keller (keller@inf.ed.ac.uk)

    E-print Network

    Keller, Frank

    experiment and a reading experiment using sense ambiguous verbs. The verbs were not presented in isolation, but in has an influence on frame probability for the NP/VP ambiguity in German. This effect is observed incorporate a notion of frame probability (Garnsey et al., 1997; Jurafsky, 1996; MacDonald, 1994; Trueswell et

  20. The Effect of Role Ambiguity and Role Conflict on Performance of Vice Principals: The Mediating Role of Burnout

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Celik, Kazim

    2013-01-01

    Problem Statement: Role ambiguity and role conflict are considered issues that affect performance and lead to burnout. While numerous studies have analyzed role ambiguity or role conflict in relation to burnout or performance, few studies have studied all of these issues together. Since vice principals are expected to carry out a variety of…

  1. A Hierarchical Linear Modeling Analysis of Working Memory and Implicit Prosody in the Resolution of Adjunct Attachment Ambiguity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Traxler, Matthew J.

    2009-01-01

    An eye-movement monitoring experiment investigated readers' response to temporarily ambiguous sentences. The sentences were ambiguous because a relative clause could attach to one of two preceding nouns. Semantic information disambiguated the sentences. Working memory considerations predict an overall preference for the second of the two nouns, as…

  2. Docking of Protein-Protein Complexes on the Basis of Highly Ambiguous Intermolecular Distance Restraints Derived from

    E-print Network

    Clore, G. Marius

    Restraints Derived from 1HN/15N Chemical Shift Mapping and Backbone 15N-1H Residual Dipolar Couplings Using ambiguous, intermolecular distance restraints (comprising between 400 and 3000 individual distances-HPr and IIAGlc-HPr complexes, all structures satisfying the experimental restraints (i.e., both the ambiguous

  3. Boundary Ambiguity and Coparental Conflict after Divorce: An Empirical Test of a Family Systems Model of the Divorce Process.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Madden-Derdich, Debra A.; Leonard, Stacie A.; Christopher, F. Scott

    1999-01-01

    A family systems model of the divorce process was proposed and tested for divorced mothers and fathers using a series of multiple regression analysis. Findings support the hypothesized positive relationship between boundary ambiguity and coparental conflict. Reports factors that influence boundary ambiguity were found to be distinct for mothers…

  4. Photometric study to understand the ambiguity between accretion and chromospheric activity present in low-mass stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Restrepo, O. A.

    2014-06-01

    We conducted a photometric study of a sample of pre-main sequence and TTauri stars in a spectral range between G-K and some early M of masses from 0.5 to 3 M_?, in associations near the Sun (20-200 pc). We measured the excess of the UV band and found that for stars of spectral type early M and late K, the UV band increases considerably. There are two possible scenarios for such an increase: (1) Chromospheric activity, because the stars have radiative and convective cores, giving rise to magnetic activity which generates this excess present in the continuum and (2) the processes of accretion present in stars that have a disk of gas and dust, which they accrete to them by means of the magnetic lines field. Because of the ambiguity in the two effects (since they affect the same emission lines) it is difficult to distinguish which dominates. We propose that an excess of 0.2 magnitudes in the U band for our sample allows us to determine if both processes are at work, or if chromospheric activity dominates, since accretion stops at a very early age, 10 million years.

  5. The feeling of movement: EEG evidence for mirroring activity during the observations of static, ambiguous stimuli in the Rorschach cards.

    PubMed

    Giromini, Luciano; Porcelli, Piero; Viglione, Donald J; Parolin, Laura; Pineda, Jaime A

    2010-10-01

    The mirror neuron system (MNS) is considered the best explanation for the neural basis of embodied simulation. To date no study has investigated if it may be activated not only by actual but by the "feeling of movement". The Rorschach test cards were used to investigate evidence of EEG mu wave suppression at central areas, an index of MNS activity, since human movement responses (M) to the Rorschach elicit such feelings of movement. Nineteen healthy volunteers observed different sets of Rorschach stimuli during attribution, identification, and observation of human movements and different scenarios while their EEG were recorded. Significant mu suppression occurred when subjects perceived movement, regardless of the experimental condition. These results show that mirroring can be activated by static, ambiguous stimuli such as Rorschach cards, suggesting that internal representation of the "feeling of movement" may be sufficient to trigger MNS activity even when minimal external cues are present. PMID:20654683

  6. Interhemispheric communication via direct connections for alternative meanings of ambiguous words.

    PubMed

    Collins, Marjorie

    2002-01-01

    A priming experiment was used to investigate Burgess and Simpson's (1988) claim that interhemispheric cooperation plays an essential role in the interpretation of ambiguous text. In doing so, the merits of two models of interhemispheric cooperation, the homotopic inhibition theory (Cook, 1986) and the direct connections model (Collins & Coney, 1998), were examined. Priming of alternative meanings of ambiguous words was measured using homographs and their dominant (e.g., BARK-DOG) and subordinate meanings (e.g., BARK-TREE) as related pairs in a lexical decision task, with normal university students as subjects. Stimulus pairs were temporally separated by stimulus onset asynchronies (SOAs) of 180 and 350 ms and were independently projected to the left or right visual fields (LVF or RVF). At the shorter SOA, priming was restricted to LVF-RVF presentations, with homograph primes directed to the LVF equally facilitating responses to RVF targets which were associated with their dominant and subordinate meanings. This suggests that within 180 ms, a homograph projected to the right hemisphere activates a range of alternative meanings in the left hemisphere. At an SOA of 350 ms, LVF-RVF priming was obtained along with RVF-LVF and RVF-RVF priming. Evidently at this stage of processing, an ambiguous word directed to either hemisphere activates a range of alternative meanings in the contralateral hemisphere, while RVF primes also activate subordinate, but not dominant meanings in the left hemisphere. A homograph directed to the LVF did not activate dominant or subordinate meanings within the right hemisphere at either SOA. Generally, ambiguous words directed to either hemisphere activated a more extensive array of meanings in the contralateral hemisphere than in the hemisphere to which the prime was directed. This confirms the importance of interhemispheric cooperation in generating alternate meanings of ambiguous words. Strong support was found for the direct connections model (Collins & Coney, 1998), but no support for the homotopic inhibition theory (Cook, 1986). PMID:11817891

  7. Expanded, but not regulated: ambiguity in home-care policy in Ireland.

    PubMed

    Timonen, Virpi; Doyle, Martha; O'Dwyer, Ciara

    2012-05-01

    This article argues that home-care policy in Ireland was ambiguous throughout the first decade of the 21st century: policy-makers expanded home care, but failed to develop policies to govern this expanded provision. As a result, home care became more widely available in the absence of a framework to govern access to services and to regulate care providers. We analysed official policy documents, statistics and policy critiques published between 2000 and 2010 in order to understand this incongruity between the expansion of home-care services and the failure to develop policies to govern access to and quality of services. The key factors that motivated home-care expansion in the Irish case were: (1) problems in the acute hospital sector and the perception of home care as a partial solution to these (political blame avoidance) and (2) significant GDP growth (until 2007) that provided politicians with the means to fund expansion in home-care services (political credit claiming). The key factors that inhibited the development of a policy framework to govern home-care services were: (1) weak governance structures in health services and decision-making at national level based on short-term political gain; (2) Ireland's adherence to the liberal welfare state model and concern about uncontrollable care costs in the face of population ageing; (3) until 2010, paucity of attention to home-care issues in the Irish media and (4) weak provider interest representation. The recent budgetary cutbacks in Ireland bring into sharp relief the political expediency of an unregulated domiciliary care sector and absence of entitlements to home care. We conclude that the forces that drive expanded provision are different from drivers of policy to govern home care and that weakness of governance structures and political advantages of the absence of regulation are the main reasons for the lack of standards and entitlement rules. PMID:22168468

  8. Ambiguity in Social Network Data for Presence, Sensitive-Attribute, Degree and Relationship Privacy Protection

    PubMed Central

    Rajaei, Mehri; Haghjoo, Mostafa S.; Miyaneh, Eynollah Khanjari

    2015-01-01

    Maintaining privacy in network data publishing is a major challenge. This is because known characteristics of individuals can be used to extract new information about them. Recently, researchers have developed privacy methods based on k-anonymity and l-diversity to prevent re-identification or sensitive label disclosure through certain structural information. However, most of these studies have considered only structural information and have been developed for undirected networks. Furthermore, most existing approaches rely on generalization and node clustering so may entail significant information loss as all properties of all members of each group are generalized to the same value. In this paper, we introduce a framework for protecting sensitive attribute, degree (the number of connected entities), and relationships, as well as the presence of individuals in directed social network data whose nodes contain attributes. First, we define a privacy model that specifies privacy requirements for the above private information. Then, we introduce the technique of Ambiguity in Social Network data (ASN) based on anatomy, which specifies how to publish social network data. To employ ASN, individuals are partitioned into groups. Then, ASN publishes exact values of properties of individuals of each group with common group ID in several tables. The lossy join of those tables based on group ID injects uncertainty to reconstruct the original network. We also show how to measure different privacy requirements in ASN. Simulation results on real and synthetic datasets demonstrate that our framework, which protects from four types of private information disclosure, preserves data utility in tabular, topological and spectrum aspects of networks at a satisfactory level. PMID:26110762

  9. Unknown unknowns in biomedical research: does an inability to deal with ambiguity contribute to issues of irreproducibility?

    PubMed

    Mullane, Kevin; Williams, Michael

    2015-09-15

    The credibility and consequent sustainability of the biomedical research "ecosystem" is in jeopardy, in part due to an inability to reproduce data from the peer-reviewed literature. Despite obvious and relatively inexpensive solutions to improve reproducibility-ensuring that experimental reagents, specifically cancer cell lines and antibodies, are authenticated/validated before use and that best practices in statistical usage are incorporated into the design, analysis, and reporting of experiments-these are routinely ignored, a reflection of hubris and a comfort with the status quo on the part of many investigators. New guidelines for the peer review of publications and grant applications introduced in the past year, while well-intended, lack the necessary consequences, e.g., denial of funding, that would result in sustained improvements when scientific rigor is lacking and/or transparency is, at best, opaque. An additional factor contributing to irreproducibility is a reductionist mindset that prioritizes certainty in research outcomes over the ambiguity intrinsic to biological systems that is often reflected in "unknown unknowns". This has resulted in a tendency towards codifying "rules" that can provide "yes-no" outcomes that represent a poor substitute for the intellectual challenge and skepticism that leads to an awareness and consideration of "unknown unknowns". When acknowledged as potential causes of unexpected experimental outcomes, these can often transition into the "knowns" that facilitate positive, disruptive innovation in biomedical research like the human microbiome. Changes in investigator mindset, both in terms of validating reagents and embracing ambiguity, are necessary to aid in reducing issues with reproducibility. PMID:26239804

  10. Quantification and Negation Scope Ambiguity Resolution: An Interlanguage Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asadollahfam, Hassan; Lotfi, Ahmad Reza

    2010-01-01

    Two off-line and on-line reading tasks investigated the real-time comprehension of doubly quantified sentences with sentential negation interaction. The results showed that perceivers experienced processing difficulty in assigning inverse-scope interpretations to the sentences with double operators, not only when such sentences appeared in…

  11. THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN STUDENT ACADEMIC ENGAGEMENT AND ALUMNI GIVING AT A PUBLIC, STATE FLAGSHIP UNIVERSITY

    E-print Network

    Ropp, Christopher Tylerr

    2014-08-31

    academic engagement and alumni gift-giving behavior. The findings from this research identified a relationship to exist between student academic engagement and an alumna/us' decision to donate. Specifically, the results showed that undergraduates who were...

  12. The ambiguities in the asteroid spin determinations - statistical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butkiewicz, M.; Kwiatkowski, T.; Bartczak, P.

    2013-09-01

    Asteroid rotation periods are most often derived from their brightness variations. Excluding binary systems and objects with a non-principal axis rotation, the rotation period is usually identical to the period of the second Fourier harmonic of the lightcurve. There are cases, however, where it is connected with the 1st, 3rd or 4th harmonic. We simulated the light variation of asteroids with shapes modelled as Gaussian random spheres to check in which circumstances a simple "two maxima, two minima per period" assumption becomes invalid. Results can help in interpreting real data, which are often noisy and/or do not cover the whole rotation of the asteroid.

  13. Choosing a Thesis Advisor and a Postdoctoral Position Giving Talks

    E-print Network

    Miller, Peter D.

    athematics A Vignette Choosing a Thesis Advisor and a Postdoctoral Position Giving Talks Joining. is not enough! #12;athematics A Vignette Choosing a Thesis Advisor and a Postdoctoral Position Giving Talks Joining Professional Organizations Outline 1 A Vignette 2 Choosing a Thesis Advisor and a Postdoctoral

  14. CASE Planned Giving Ideas. The Best of CASE CURRENTS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Virginia L., Ed.; Garigan, Catherine S., Ed.

    Collected are articles by planned giving (deferred giving) experts on institutional commitment, policies, and programs to encourage various types of gifts to higher education institutions: bequests, unitrusts, annuity trusts, charitable income trusts (lead trusts), pooled income funds, gifts of land and so on. A major article covers how to hire…

  15. A Pilot Study of Nurses' Experience of Giving Spiritual Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deal, Belinda

    2010-01-01

    Using spiritual and religious resources gives patients and families strength to cope during a crisis, but nurses often do not offer spiritual care (Kloosterhouse & Ames, 2002). The purpose of this phenomenological study was to explore nurses" lived experience of giving spiritual care. A descriptive phenomenological approach was used to interview 4…

  16. Semiclassical scalar propagators in curved backgrounds: Formalism and ambiguities

    SciTech Connect

    Grain, J.; Barrau, A.

    2007-10-15

    The phenomenology of quantum systems in curved space-times is among the most fascinating fields of physics, allowing--often at the gedankenexperiment level--constraints on tentative theories of quantum gravity. Determining the dynamics of fields in curved backgrounds remains, however, a complicated task because of the highly intricate partial differential equations involved, especially when the space metric exhibits no symmetry. In this article, we provide--in a pedagogical way--a general formalism to determine this dynamics at the semiclassical order. To this purpose, a generic expression for the semiclassical propagator is computed and the equation of motion for the probability four-current is derived. Those results underline a direct analogy between the computation of the propagator in general relativistic quantum mechanics and the computation of the propagator for stationary systems in nonrelativistic quantum mechanics. A possible application of this formalism to curvature-induced quantum interferences is also discussed.

  17. Visuomotor neurons: ambiguity of the discharge or 'motor' perception?

    PubMed

    Fadiga, L; Fogassi, L; Gallese, V; Rizzolatti, G

    2000-03-01

    The cortical motor system has been classically considered as the unitary, output stage of the brain processing of sensory information. According to this idea, the motor cortex - the acting brain - receives the result of the perceptual processing (visual, acoustical, tactile, etc.) elaborated by the 'associative cortex'. During the last two decades this perspective has been challenged by a series of anatomical, hodological, and neurophysiological data. This converging evidence delineates a dramatically changed picture. Far from being unitary, the cortical motor system appears to be constituted by a constellation of distinct areas, each of those endowed with specific functional properties and linked by reciprocal connections with distinct sectors of the parietal cortex. Furthermore, several 'motor' neurons in addition to their motor discharge, are also activated by somatosensory and visual stimulation (somatomotor and visuomotor neurons). In the present paper we will discuss the functional properties of those sensorimotor neurons located in the ventral part of the monkey premotor cortex. On the basis of electrophysiological data, we will propose that the apparent parodox stemming from the coexistence within the same neuron of motor and sensory properties can be solved by postulating that the motor system not only executes actions but also internally represents them in terms of 'motor ideas'. These motor ideas may provide the neurobiological basis for space representation, understanding of actions made by others and, possibly, semantic categorization of objects. PMID:10677645

  18. Are You Insulting Me? Exposure to Alcohol Primes Increases Aggression Following Ambiguous Provocation

    PubMed Central

    Pedersen, William C.; Vasquez, Eduardo A.; Bartholow, Bruce D.; Grosvenor, Marianne; Truong, Ana

    2014-01-01

    Considerable research has shown that alcohol consumption can increase aggression and produce extremes in other social behaviors. Although most theories posit that such effects are caused by pharmacological impairment of cognitive processes, recent research indicates that exposure to alcohol-related constructs, in the absence of consumption, can produce similar effects. Here we tested the hypothesis that alcohol priming is most likely to affect aggression in the context of ambiguous provocation. Experiment 1 showed that exposure to alcohol primes increased aggressive retaliation but only when an initial provocation was ambiguous; unambiguous provocation elicited highly aggressive responses regardless of prime exposure. Experiment 2 showed that alcohol prime exposure effects are relatively short-lived and that perceptions of the provocateur's hostility mediated effects of prime exposure on aggression. These findings suggest modification and extension of existing models of alcohol-induced aggression. PMID:24854477

  19. Marine Creatures and the Sea in Bronze Age Greece: Ambiguities of Meaning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berg, Ina

    2013-06-01

    Like most cultures, prehistoric Greek communities had an ambiguous relationship with the sea and the creatures that inhabit it. Positive and negative associations always co-existed, though the particular manifestations changed over time. By drawing together evidence of consumption of marine animals, seafaring, fishing, and iconography, this article unites disparate strands of evidence in an attempt to illuminate the relationship prehistoric Greeks had with marine creatures and the sea. Based on the marked reduction in seafood consumption after the Mesolithic and the use of marine creatures in funerary iconography in the post-palatial period, it becomes apparent that the sea—then as now—is an inherently ambiguous medium that captures both positive and negative emotions. On the one hand, the sea and the animals residing in it are strongly associated with death. On the other hand, the sea's positive dimensions, such as fertility and rebirth, are expressed in conspicuous marine consumption events.

  20. Quantization ambiguities and bounds on geometric scalars in anisotropic loop quantum cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Parampreet; Wilson-Ewing, Edward

    2014-02-01

    We study quantization ambiguities in loop quantum cosmology that arise for space-times with non-zero spatial curvature and anisotropies. Motivated by lessons from different possible loop quantizations of the closed Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker cosmology, we find that using open holonomies of the extrinsic curvature, which due to gauge-fixing can be treated as a connection, leads to the same quantum geometry effects that are found in spatially flat cosmologies. More specifically, in contrast to the quantization based on open holonomies of the Ashtekar-Barbero connection, the expansion and shear scalars in the effective theories of the Bianchi type II and Bianchi type IX models have upper bounds, and these are in exact agreement with the bounds found in the effective theories of the Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker and Bianchi type I models in loop quantum cosmology. We also comment on some ambiguities present in the definition of inverse triad operators and their role.

  1. Biased Processing of Ambiguous Symptoms Favors the Initially Leading Hypothesis in Sequential Diagnostic Reasoning.

    PubMed

    Rebitschek, Felix G; Bocklisch, Franziska; Scholz, Agnes; Krems, Josef F; Jahn, Georg

    2015-11-01

    In sequential diagnostic reasoning, observed pieces of evidence activate hypotheses in memory and are integrated to reach a final diagnosis. The order of evidence can influence diagnostic reasoning. This article examines the processing of ambiguous evidence underlying order effects if multiple hypotheses are activated. In five experiments with a quasi-medical scenario, participants dealt with symptom sequences supporting multiple diagnoses. The symptom order, the response mode (end-of-sequence, step-by-step), and the consistency of evidence were manipulated. A primacy order effect occurred with both response modes suggesting that ambiguous pieces of evidence were distorted toward the hypothesis that strongly corresponded with the first piece. The primacy effect was partially counteracted by stepwise belief ratings, which strengthened the weight of recent evidence and promoted switching to an alternative diagnosis. We conclude that once hypotheses are generated, the interplay of coherence-oriented information distortion and memory-dependent analytic processes propagates into distinct order effects in diagnoses. PMID:26138302

  2. Individual differences in syntactic ambiguity resolution: Readers vary in their use of plausibility information

    PubMed Central

    Long, Debra L.; Prat, Chantel S.

    2009-01-01

    Two experiments investigated the relation between individual differences in working memory capacity and differences in the efficiency of syntactic processing. In one experiment, readers comprehended sentences containing main-verb/reduced-relative ambiguities that all resolved to the reduced-relative interpretation. High-span (but not low-span) readers processed sentences more slowly when the sentences were biased to the preferred, main-verb interpretation than when they were biased to the reduced-relative interpretation. Moreover, high-span (but not low-span) readers used information about the plausibility of the different interpretations even though low-span readers appeared to possess the requisite knowledge. In Experiment 2, readers received intensive exposure to sentences with main-verb/reduced-relative ambiguities. Exposure enhanced low-span readers’ use of plausibility information. Moreover, the effect of exposure generalized to sentences that were not included in the training materials. PMID:18426067

  3. Context sensitivity and invariance in perception of octave-ambiguous tones.

    PubMed

    Repp, Bruno H; Thompson, Jacqueline M

    2010-09-01

    Three experiments investigated the influence of unambiguous (UA) context tones on the perception of octave-ambiguous (OA) tones. In Experiment 1, pairs of OA tones spanning a tritone interval were preceded by pairs of UA tones instantiating a rising or falling interval between the same pitch classes. Despite the inherent ambiguity of OA tritone pairs, most participants showed little or no priming when judging the OA tritone as rising or falling. In Experiments 2 and 3, participants compared the pitch heights of single OA and UA tones representing either the same pitch class or being a tritone apart. These judgments were strongly influenced by the pitch range of the UA tones, but only slightly by the spectral center of the OA tones. Thus, the perceived pitch height of single OA tones is context sensitive, but the perceived relative pitch height of two OA tones, as described in previous research on the "tritone paradox," is largely invariant in UA tone contexts. PMID:19941003

  4. Creating Supportive Environments and Thriving in a Volatile, Uncertain, Complex, and Ambiguous World.

    PubMed

    Pabico, Christine

    2015-10-01

    Nurse executives (NEs) are operating in a volatile, uncertain, complex, and ambiguous world. NEs must create supportive environments that promote staff empowerment, resilience, and alignment, to ensure organizational success. In addition, NEs need to be transparent and create a culture of partnership with their staff. The ability of NEs to create and sustain this environment is vital in supporting teams to successfully navigate in today's healthcare environment. PMID:26425969

  5. Efficient High-Rate Satellite Clock Estimation for PPP Ambiguity Resolution Using Carrier-Ranges

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hua; Jiang, Weiping; Ge, Maorong; Wickert, Jens; Schuh, Harald

    2014-01-01

    In order to catch up the short-term clock variation of GNSS satellites, clock corrections must be estimated and updated at a high-rate for Precise Point Positioning (PPP). This estimation is already very time-consuming for the GPS constellation only as a great number of ambiguities need to be simultaneously estimated. However, on the one hand better estimates are expected by including more stations, and on the other hand satellites from different GNSS systems must be processed integratively for a reliable multi-GNSS positioning service. To alleviate the heavy computational burden, epoch-differenced observations are always employed where ambiguities are eliminated. As the epoch-differenced method can only derive temporal clock changes which have to be aligned to the absolute clocks but always in a rather complicated way, in this paper, an efficient method for high-rate clock estimation is proposed using the concept of “carrier-range” realized by means of PPP with integer ambiguity resolution. Processing procedures for both post- and real-time processing are developed, respectively. The experimental validation shows that the computation time could be reduced to about one sixth of that of the existing methods for post-processing and less than 1 s for processing a single epoch of a network with about 200 stations in real-time mode after all ambiguities are fixed. This confirms that the proposed processing strategy will enable the high-rate clock estimation for future multi-GNSS networks in post-processing and possibly also in real-time mode. PMID:25429413

  6. Resolving the ambiguities: An industrial hygiene Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) symposium

    SciTech Connect

    Gammage, R.B.

    1995-01-01

    Resolving the Ambiguities: An Industrial Hygiene (IAQ) Symposium was a one-day event designed to inform practicing industrial hygienists about highlight presentations made at Indoor Air `93. A broad range of topics was presented by invited speakers. Topics included were attempts to deal with guidelines and standards, questionnaires, odors and sensory irritation, respiratory allergies, neuroses, sick building syndrome (SBS), and multiple chemical sensitivity (MCS).

  7. Efficient high-rate satellite clock estimation for PPP ambiguity resolution using carrier-ranges.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hua; Jiang, Weiping; Ge, Maorong; Wickert, Jens; Schuh, Harald

    2014-01-01

    In order to catch up the short-term clock variation of GNSS satellites, clock corrections must be estimated and updated at a high-rate for Precise Point Positioning (PPP). This estimation is already very time-consuming for the GPS constellation only as a great number of ambiguities need to be simultaneously estimated. However, on the one hand better estimates are expected by including more stations, and on the other hand satellites from different GNSS systems must be processed integratively for a reliable multi-GNSS positioning service. To alleviate the heavy computational burden, epoch-differenced observations are always employed where ambiguities are eliminated. As the epoch-differenced method can only derive temporal clock changes which have to be aligned to the absolute clocks but always in a rather complicated way, in this paper, an efficient method for high-rate clock estimation is proposed using the concept of "carrier-range" realized by means of PPP with integer ambiguity resolution. Processing procedures for both post- and real-time processing are developed, respectively. The experimental validation shows that the computation time could be reduced to about one sixth of that of the existing methods for post-processing and less than 1 s for processing a single epoch of a network with about 200 stations in real-time mode after all ambiguities are fixed. This confirms that the proposed processing strategy will enable the high-rate clock estimation for future multi-GNSS networks in post-processing and possibly also in real-time mode. PMID:25429413

  8. Not all ambiguous words are created equal: An EEG investigation of homonymy and polysemy

    E-print Network

    Klepousniotou a,b,,1 , G. Bruce Pike a,b , Karsten Steinhauer b,c , Vincent Gracco b,c a McConnell Brain Imaging H3A 2B4 b Centre for Research on Language, Mind, and Brain, McGill University, 3640 de la Montagne Available online 21 July 2012 Keywords: ERP N400 Lexical ambiguity Lateralization Homonymy Polysemy Metaphor

  9. Subsequent to suppression: Downstream comprehension consequences of noun/verb ambiguity in natural reading.

    PubMed

    Stites, Mallory C; Federmeier, Kara D

    2015-09-01

    We used eye tracking to investigate the downstream processing consequences of encountering noun/verb (NV) homographs (i.e., park) in semantically neutral but syntactically constraining contexts. Target words were followed by a prepositional phrase containing a noun that was plausible for only 1 meaning of the homograph. Replicating previous work, we found increased first fixation durations on NV homographs compared with unambiguous words, which persisted into the next sentence region. At the downstream noun, we found plausibility effects following ambiguous words that were correlated with the size of a reader's first fixation effect, suggesting that this effect reflects the recruitment of processing resources necessary to suppress the homograph's context-inappropriate meaning. Using these same stimuli, Lee and Federmeier (2012) found a sustained frontal negativity to the NV homographs, and, on the downstream noun, found a plausibility effect that was also positively correlated with the size of a reader's ambiguity effect. Together, these findings suggest that when only syntactic constraints are available, meaning selection recruits inhibitory mechanisms that can be measured in both first fixation slowdown and event-related potential ambiguity effects. PMID:25961358

  10. Seven Types of Ambiguity in Evaluating the Impact of Humanities Provision in Undergraduate Medicine Curricula.

    PubMed

    Bleakley, Alan

    2015-12-01

    Inclusion of the humanities in undergraduate medicine curricula remains controversial. Skeptics have placed the burden of proof of effectiveness upon the shoulders of advocates, but this may lead to pursuing measurement of the immeasurable, deflecting attention away from the more pressing task of defining what we mean by the humanities in medicine. While humanities input can offer a fundamental critical counterweight to a potentially reductive biomedical science education, a new wave of thinking suggests that the kinds of arts and humanities currently used in medical education are neither radical nor critical enough to have a deep effect on students' learning and may need to be reformulated. The humanities can certainly educate for tolerance of ambiguity as a basis to learning democratic habits for contemporary team-based clinical work. William Empson's 'seven types of ambiguity' model for analyzing poetry is transposed to medical education to: (a) formulate seven values proffered by the humanities for improving medical education; (b) offer seven ways of measuring impact of medical humanities provision, thereby reducing ambiguity; and PMID:25843724

  11. Perirhinal cortex resolves feature ambiguity in configural object recognition and perceptual oddity tasks

    PubMed Central

    Bartko, Susan J.; Winters, Boyer D.; Cowell, Rosemary A.; Saksida, Lisa M.; Bussey, Timothy J.

    2007-01-01

    The perirhinal cortex (PRh) has a well-established role in object recognition memory. More recent studies suggest that PRh is also important for two-choice visual discrimination tasks. Specifically, it has been suggested that PRh contains conjunctive representations that help resolve feature ambiguity, which occurs when a task cannot easily be solved on the basis of features alone. However, no study has examined whether the ability of PRh to resolve configural feature ambiguity is related to its role in object recognition. Therefore, we examined whether bilateral excitotoxic lesions of PRh or PPRh (perirhinal plus post-rhinal cortices) in the rat would cause deficits in a configural spontaneous object recognition task, and a configural simultaneous oddity discrimination task, in which the task could not be solved on the basis of features, but could only be solved using conjunctive representations. As predicted by simulations using a computational model, rats with PPRh lesions were impaired during a minimal-delay configural object recognition task. These same rats were impaired during a zero-delay configural object recognition task. Furthermore, rats with localized PRh lesions were impaired in a configural simultaneous oddity discrimination task. These findings support the idea that PRh contains conjunctive representations for the resolution of feature ambiguity and that these representations underlie a dual role for PRh in memory and perception. PMID:18086825

  12. Giving back or giving up: Native American student experiences in science and engineering.

    PubMed

    Smith, Jessi L; Cech, Erin; Metz, Anneke; Huntoon, Meghan; Moyer, Christina

    2014-07-01

    Native Americans are underrepresented in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) careers. We examine communal goal incongruence-the mismatch between students' emphasis on communal work goals and the noncommunal culture of STEM-as a possible factor in this underrepresentation. First, we surveyed 80 Native American STEM freshmen and found they more highly endorsed communal goals than individualistic work goals. Next, we surveyed 96 Native American and White American students in STEM and non-STEM majors and confirmed that both Native American men and women in STEM highly endorsed communal goals. In a third study, we conducted a follow-up survey and in-depth interviews with a subset of Native American STEM students in their second semester to assess their experiences of belonging uncertainty, intrinsic motivation, persistence intentions, and perceived performance in STEM as a function of their initial communal work goals. Results demonstrate the prominence of communal goals among incoming Native American freshman (especially compared with White male STEM majors) and the connection between communal goals and feelings of belonging uncertainty, low motivation, and perceived poor performance 1 semester later. The interview data illustrate that these issues are particularly salient for students raised within tribal communities, and that a communal goal orientation is not just a vague desire to "help others," but a commitment to helping their tribal communities. The interviews also highlight the importance of student support programs for fostering feelings of belonging. We end by discussing implications for interventions and institutional changes that may promote Native American student retention in STEM. PMID:25045952

  13. EGFR-TKIs in adjuvant treatment of lung cancer: to give or not to give?

    PubMed Central

    Milovancev, Aleksandar; Stojsic, Vladimir; Zaric, Bojan; Kovacevic, Tomi; Sarcev, Tatjana; Perin, Branislav; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos; Tsirgogianni, Katerina; Freitag, Lutz; Darwiche, Kaid; Tsavlis, Drosos; Zissimopoulos, Athanasios; Stratakos, Grigoris; Zarogoulidis, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor-tyrosine-kinase inhibitors (EGFR-TKIs) brought a significant revolution in the treatment of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). In a short period of time, EGFR-TKIs became the standard of treatment for mutation-positive, advanced stage non-squamous NSCLC. In recent years, second- and third-generation EGFR-TKIs are emerging, further widening the clinical use. However, the question of EGFR-TKIs efficiency in the treatment of early stage NSCLC still remains open. Early clinical trials failed to approve the use of EGFR-TKIs in adjuvant setting. The majority of these early trials were performed in unselected NSCLC populations and without standardized biomarker identification. One should certainly not rely solely on these results and dismiss the use of EGFR-TKIs as adjuvant therapy. Many important questions are still unanswered. Most important issues such as stage heterogeneity (IA–IIIA), timing (after or concomitantly with chemotherapy), and type of administration (monotherapy or combination) need to be answered in near future. Adjuvant TKIs in the treatment of lung cancer might offer significant number of advancements. Having in mind the significant duration of response observed in advance disease setting, there could be place for prolongation of response in adjuvant setting potentially, leading to improvement in survival. TKIs could offer less-toxic adjuvant treatment with better efficiency than chemotherapy. However, there is a chronic lack of randomized controlled trials in this field, leading to inability to draw any scientifically sound conclusion with regard to the adjuvant treatment. For now, the use of EGFR-TKIs outside clinical trial setting is not recommended. The purpose of this review is to evaluate current and available data. PMID:26508876

  14. Who, Who, Who Gives a Hoot about Bones?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dolan, Arthur

    1988-01-01

    Describes a mouse skeleton reconstruction activity from owl pellets. Gives information about the materials, directions for students, and a five-day unit schedule. Provides some owl pellet sources. (YP)

  15. thrilled to hear from you. Enjoy and give us feedback.

    E-print Network

    Kritsuk, Alexei

    thrilled to hear from you. Enjoy and give us feedback. Thank you. Charles W. Tu Director, COSMOS experience ended. We would love to hear from you. The mission of COSMOS is to provide outstanding high school

  16. Give support staff band 5 roles, says skills for health.

    PubMed

    2015-10-28

    Healthcare providers underestimate the skill levels of support workers and do not give them adequate opportunities to develop their careers, the government-licensed body that advises the NHS on workforce issues said. PMID:26508214

  17. Exploring differences and similarities in tolerance for ambiguity and associative creativity among sceptics, moderate and strong paranormal believers 

    E-print Network

    Guesnet, Naya

    2011-06-29

    The relationship between paranormal beliefs and tolerance of ambiguity was explored in sceptics, moderate and strong paranormal believers. Those groups were de ned for New Age Philosophy (NAP) and Traditional Paranormal ...

  18. Ambiguous Genitalia

    MedlinePLUS

    ... to ask your doctor • What is my baby’s sex? • Does my child need treatment now or later? • Are there support ... for people dealing with this condition? • Should my child see a ... for Parents: http: / / dsdguidelines. org • dsd ...

  19. Ambiguous genitalia

    MedlinePLUS

    ... chromosome. These X and Y chromosomes determine the child's genetic sex. Normally, an infant inherits one pair of sex ... from the father. The father "determines" the genetic sex of the child. A baby who inherits the X chromosome from ...

  20. Infants’ online perception of give-and-take interactions

    PubMed Central

    Elsner, Claudia; Bakker, Marta; Rohlfing, Katharina; Gredebäck, Gustaf

    2014-01-01

    This research investigated infants’ online perception of give-me gestures during observation of a social interaction. In the first experiment, goal-directed eye movements of 12-month-olds were recorded as they observed a give-and-take interaction in which an object is passed from one individual to another. Infants’ gaze shifts from the passing hand to the receiving hand were significantly faster when the receiving hand formed a give-me gesture relative to when it was presented as an inverted hand shape. Experiment 2 revealed that infants’ goal-directed gaze shifts were not based on different affordances of the two receiving hands. Two additional control experiments further demonstrated that differences in infants’ online gaze behavior were not mediated by an attentional preference for the give-me gesture. Together, our findings provide evidence that properties of social action goals influence infants’ online gaze during action observation. The current studies demonstrate that infants have expectations about well-formed object transfer actions between social agents. We suggest that 12-month-olds are sensitive to social goals within the context of give-and-take interactions while observing from a third-party perspective. PMID:24973626

  1. Collective Philanthropy: Describing and Modeling the Ecology of Giving

    PubMed Central

    Gottesman, William L.; Reagan, Andrew James; Dodds, Peter Sheridan

    2014-01-01

    Reflective of income and wealth distributions, philanthropic gifting appears to follow an approximate power-law size distribution as measured by the size of gifts received by individual institutions. We explore the ecology of gifting by analysing data sets of individual gifts for a diverse group of institutions dedicated to education, medicine, art, public support, and religion. We find that the detailed forms of gift-size distributions differ across but are relatively constant within charity categories. We construct a model for how a donor's income affects their giving preferences in different charity categories, offering a mechanistic explanation for variations in institutional gift-size distributions. We discuss how knowledge of gift-sized distributions may be used to assess an institution's gift-giving profile, to help set fundraising goals, and to design an institution-specific giving pyramid. PMID:24983864

  2. Referential choice across the lifespan: why children and elderly adults produce ambiguous pronouns

    PubMed Central

    Hendriks, Petra; Koster, Charlotte; Hoeks, John C.J.

    2013-01-01

    In this study, children, young adults and elderly adults were tested in production and comprehension tasks assessing referential choice. Our aims were (1) to determine whether speakers egocentrically base their referential choice on the preceding linguistic discourse or also take into account the perspective of a hypothetical listener and (2) whether the possible impact of perspective taking on referential choice changes with increasing age, with its associated changes in cognitive capacity. In the production task, participants described picture-based stories featuring two characters of the same gender, making it necessary to use unambiguous forms; in the comprehension task, participants interpreted potentially ambiguous pronouns at the end of similar orally presented stories. Young adults (aged 18–35) were highly sensitive to the informational needs of hypothetical conversational partners in their production and comprehension of referring expressions. In contrast, children (aged 4–7) did not take into account possible conversational partners and tended to use pronouns for all given referents, leading to the production of ambiguous pronouns that are unrecoverable for a listener. This was mirrored in the outcome of the comprehension task, where children were insensitive to the shift of discourse topic marked by the speaker. The elderly adults (aged 69–87) behaved differently from both young adults and children. They showed a clear sensitivity to the other person's perspective in both production and comprehension, but appeared to lack the necessary cognitive capacities to keep track of the prominence of discourse referents, producing more potentially ambiguous pronouns than young adults, though fewer than children. In conclusion then, referential choice seems to depend on perspective taking in language, which develops with increasing linguistic experience and cognitive capacity, but also on the ability to keep track of the prominence of discourse referents, which is gradually lost with older age. PMID:24771955

  3. Embodied simulation and ambiguous stimuli: The role of the mirror neuron system.

    PubMed

    Ando, Agata; Salatino, Adriana; Giromini, Luciano; Ricci, Raffaella; Pignolo, Claudia; Cristofanelli, Stefania; Ferro, Laura; Viglione, Donald J; Zennaro, Alessandro

    2015-12-10

    According to the "embodied simulation theory," exposure to certain visual stimuli would automatically trigger action simulation in the mind of the observer, thereby originating a "feeling of movement" modulated by the mirror neuron system (MNS). Grounded on this conceptualization, some of us recently suggested that when exposed to the Rorschach inkblots, in order to see a human movement (e.g., "a person running") in those ambiguous stimuli, the observer would need to experience a "feeling of movement" via embodied simulation. The current study used repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) to further test this hypothesis. Specifically, we investigated whether temporarily interfering with the activity of the left inferior frontal gyrus (LIFG; a putative MNS area) using rTMS would decrease the propensity to see human movement (M) in the Rorschach inkblots. Thirty-six participants were exposed to the Rorschach stimuli twice, i.e., during a baseline (without rTMS) and soon after inhibitory rTMS. As for the rTMS condition, half of the sample was stimulated over the LIFG (experimental group) and the other half over the Vertex (control group). In line with our hypothesis, the application of rTMS over LIFG, but not over Vertex, yielded a statistically significant reduction in the attribution of M to the ambiguous stimuli, with large effect size. These findings may be interpreted as being consistent with the hypothesis that there is a link between the MNS and the "feeling of movement" people may experience, when observing ambiguous stimuli such as the Rorschach cards. PMID:26499259

  4. Ambiguities and subtleties in fermion mass terms in practical quantum field theory

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Yifan Kong, Otto C.W.

    2014-09-15

    This is a review on structure of the fermion mass terms in quantum field theory, under the perspective of its practical applications in the real physics of Nature—specifically, we discuss fermion mass structure in the Standard Model of high energy physics, which successfully describes fundamental physics up to the TeV scale. The review is meant to be pedagogical, with detailed mathematics presented beyond the level one can find any easily in the textbooks. The discussions, however, bring up important subtleties and ambiguities about the subject that may be less than well appreciated. In fact, the naive perspective of the nature and masses of fermions as one would easily drawn from the presentations of fermion fields and their equations of motion from a typical textbook on quantum field theory leads to some confusing or even wrong statements which we clarify here. In particular, we illustrate clearly that a Dirac fermion mass eigenstate is mathematically equivalent to two degenerated Majorana fermion mass eigenstates at least as long as the mass terms are concerned. There are further ambiguities and subtleties in the exact description of the eigenstate(s). Especially, for the case of neutrinos, the use of the Dirac or Majorana terminology may be mostly a matter of choice. The common usage of such terminology is rather based on the broken SU(2) charges of the related Weyl spinors hence conventional and may not be unambiguously extended to cover more complicate models. - Highlights: • Structure of fermion mass terms in practical quantum field theory is reviewed. • Important subtleties and ambiguities on the subject are clarified. • A mass eigenstate Dirac fermion and two degenerated Majorana ones are equivalent. • The conventional meaning of such terminology for neutrinos is critically discussed.

  5. List blocking and longer retention intervals reveal an influence of gist processing for lexically ambiguous critical lures.

    PubMed

    Huff, Mark J; McNabb, Jaimie; Hutchison, Keith A

    2015-11-01

    In two experiments, we examined veridical and false memory for lists of associates from two meanings (e.g., stumble, trip, harvest, pumpkin, etc.) that converged upon a single, lexically ambiguous critical lure (e.g., fall), in order to compare the activation-monitoring and fuzzy-trace false memory accounts. In Experiment 1, we presented study lists that were blocked or alternated by meaning (within subjects), followed by a free recall test completed immediately or after a 2.5-min delay. Correct recall was greater for blocked than for alternated lists. Critical-lure false recall was greater for blocked lists on an immediate test, whereas both list types produced equivalent false recall on a delayed test. In Experiment 2, lists blocked and alternated by meaning were presented via a between-subjects design, in order to eliminate possible list-type carryover effects. Correct recall replicated the result from Experiment 1; however, blocking lists increased false recall on delayed, but not on immediate, tests. Across the experiments, clustering correct recall by meaning increased across the delay selectively for the alternated lists. Our results suggest that thematic (i.e., gist) processes are influential for false recall, especially following a delay, a pattern consistent with fuzzy-trace theory. PMID:26105976

  6. This Place Looks Familiar—How Navigators Distinguish Places with Ambiguous Landmark Objects When Learning Novel Routes

    PubMed Central

    Strickrodt, Marianne; O'Malley, Mary; Wiener, Jan M.

    2015-01-01

    We present two experiments investigating how navigators deal with ambiguous landmark information when learning unfamiliar routes. In the experiments we presented landmark objects repeatedly along a route, which allowed us to manipulate how informative single landmarks were (1) about the navigators' location along the route and (2) about the action navigators had to take at that location. Experiment 1 demonstrated that reducing location informativeness alone did not affect route learning performance. While reducing both location and action informativeness led to decreased route learning performance, participants still performed well above chance level. This demonstrates that they used other information than just the identity of landmark objects at their current position to disambiguate their location along the route. To investigate how navigators distinguish between visually identical intersections, we systematically manipulated the identity of landmark objects and the actions required at preceding intersections in Experiment 2. Results suggest that the direction of turn at the preceding intersections was sufficient to tell two otherwise identical intersections apart. Together, results from Experiments 1 and 2 suggest that route knowledge is more complex than simple stimulus-response associations and that neighboring places are tightly linked. These links not only encompass sequence information but also directional information which is used to identify the correct direction of travel at subsequent locations, but can also be used for self-localization.

  7. Dopamine induces an optimism bias in rats-Pharmacological proof for the translational validity of the ambiguous-cue interpretation test.

    PubMed

    Kregiel, J; Golebiowska, J; Popik, P; Rygula, R

    2016-01-15

    Recent findings have revealed that pharmacological enhancement of dopaminergic (DA) function by the administration of a dopaminergic precursor (dihydroxy-l-phenylalanine; l-DOPA) increases an optimism bias in humans. This effect is due to l-DOPA's impairment of the ability to update beliefs in response to undesirable information about the future. To test whether an 'optimistic' bias is also mediated by dopamine in animals, first, two groups of rats received either a dopaminergic precursor, l-DOPA, or a D2 receptor antagonist, haloperidol, and were subsequently tested using the ambiguous-cue interpretation (ACI) paradigm. To test whether similar effects might be observed when manipulating another neurotransmitter implicated in learning about reward and punishment, we administered the serotonin (5-HT) reuptake inhibitor escitalopram to a third group of animals and the selective and irreversible tryptophan hydroxylase inhibitor para-chlorophenylalanine (PCPA) to a fourth group. The results of our study demonstrated that prolonged (2 weeks), but not acute, l-DOPA administration induced optimistic bias in rats. Neither acute nor chronic treatment with the other tested compounds had significant effects on the cognitive judgment bias of rats. The convergence of these results with human studies suggests the translational validity of the ambiguous-cue interpretation paradigm in testing the effects of pharmacological manipulations on cognitive judgment bias (optimism/pessimism) in rats. PMID:26462571

  8. Graph Structure-Based Simultaneous Localization and Mapping Using a Hybrid Method of 2D Laser Scan and Monocular Camera Image in Environments with Laser Scan Ambiguity

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Taekjun; Lee, Donghwa; Kim, Hyungjin; Myung, Hyun

    2015-01-01

    Localization is an essential issue for robot navigation, allowing the robot to perform tasks autonomously. However, in environments with laser scan ambiguity, such as long corridors, the conventional SLAM (simultaneous localization and mapping) algorithms exploiting a laser scanner may not estimate the robot pose robustly. To resolve this problem, we propose a novel localization approach based on a hybrid method incorporating a 2D laser scanner and a monocular camera in the framework of a graph structure-based SLAM. 3D coordinates of image feature points are acquired through the hybrid method, with the assumption that the wall is normal to the ground and vertically flat. However, this assumption can be relieved, because the subsequent feature matching process rejects the outliers on an inclined or non-flat wall. Through graph optimization with constraints generated by the hybrid method, the final robot pose is estimated. To verify the effectiveness of the proposed method, real experiments were conducted in an indoor environment with a long corridor. The experimental results were compared with those of the conventional GMappingapproach. The results demonstrate that it is possible to localize the robot in environments with laser scan ambiguity in real time, and the performance of the proposed method is superior to that of the conventional approach. PMID:26151203

  9. Graph Structure-Based Simultaneous Localization and Mapping Using a Hybrid Method of 2D Laser Scan and Monocular Camera Image in Environments with Laser Scan Ambiguity.

    PubMed

    Oh, Taekjun; Lee, Donghwa; Kim, Hyungjin; Myung, Hyun

    2015-01-01

    Localization is an essential issue for robot navigation, allowing the robot to perform tasks autonomously. However, in environments with laser scan ambiguity, such as long corridors, the conventional SLAM (simultaneous localization and mapping) algorithms exploiting a laser scanner may not estimate the robot pose robustly. To resolve this problem, we propose a novel localization approach based on a hybrid method incorporating a 2D laser scanner and a monocular camera in the framework of a graph structure-based SLAM. 3D coordinates of image feature points are acquired through the hybrid method, with the assumption that the wall is normal to the ground and vertically flat. However, this assumption can be relieved, because the subsequent feature matching process rejects the outliers on an inclined or non-flat wall. Through graph optimization with constraints generated by the hybrid method, the final robot pose is estimated. To verify the effectiveness of the proposed method, real experiments were conducted in an indoor environment with a long corridor. The experimental results were compared with those of the conventional GMappingapproach. The results demonstrate that it is possible to localize the robot in environments with laser scan ambiguity in real time, and the performance of the proposed method is superior to that of the conventional approach. PMID:26151203

  10. Ambiguities in the description of nucleon transfer in deep inelastic scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dworzecka, M.; Zielinska-Pfabé, M.; Griffin, J. J.

    1990-10-01

    In this paper we have discussed certain ambiguities which arise in the description of the mass and charge distributions in heavy ion collisions. We have concentrated on two additional mechanisms, beyond the simple nucleon transfer with average relative momentum, required in the random walk formalism to obtain an agreement with the experimental data. We have shown that these two mechansims, ?-process involving an additional "Fermi momentum" transfer and ?-process involving new non-transfer process for an energy dissipation, are formally interchangable as regards their effect on the total mass width. We have discussed the possible physical mechanisms responsible for these processes and their relationship to transport theories.

  11. Support Groups, Marriage, and the Management of Ambiguity among HIV-Positive Women in Northern Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Rhine, Kathryn A.

    2013-01-01

    In the context of the African HIV epidemic, support groups are not simply spaces for discussions of social and health well-being; neither are they institutions functioning solely to cultivate self-responsible and economically empowered patients. HIV-positive women in northern Nigeria have appropriated a support group to facilitate their marriage arrangements. In this group, women negotiate the threats of stigma and the promises of respectable marriage through what I call the management of ambiguity surrounding their HIV status. I further argue that the practice of support group matchmaking reveals the local political economic dynamics that shape social and illness trajectories in resource-poor settings. PMID:23946544

  12. Does Trapping Influence Decision-Making under Ambiguity in White-Lipped Peccary (Tayassu pecari)?

    PubMed

    Nogueira, Selene Siqueira da Cunha; Fernandes, Iurianny Karla; Costa, Thaise Silva Oliveira; Nogueira-Filho, Sérgio Luiz Gama; Mendl, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The white-lipped peccary (Tayassu pecari) is an endangered species whose bold anti-predator behaviour in comparison to related species may increase its vulnerability to hunting and predation. We used a judgement bias test to investigate whether captive peccaries that had recently experienced a trapping event made more 'pessimistic' decisions under ambiguity. If so, this would indicate (i) that the procedure may induce a negative affective state and hence have welfare implications, and (ii) that the species is able to adopt a cautious response style despite its bold phenotype. Eight individuals were trained to 'go' to a baited food bowl when a positive auditory cue (whistle; CS+) was given and to 'no-go' when a negative cue (horn A; CS-) was sounded to avoid a loud sound and empty food bowl. An 'ambiguous' auditory cue (bell; CSA) was presented to probe decision-making under ambiguity. Individuals were subjected to three tests in the order: T1 (control-no trap), T2 (24h after-trap procedure), and T3 (control-no trap). In each test, each animal was exposed to 10 judgement bias trials of each of the three cue types: CS+,CS-,CSA. We recorded whether animals reached the food bowl within 60s ('go' response) and their response speed (m/s). The animals varied in their responses to the CSA cue depending on test type. In all tests, animals made more 'go' responses to CS+ than CSA. During control tests (T1 and T3), the peccaries showed higher proportions of 'go' responses to CSA than to CS-. In T2, however, the animals showed similar proportions of 'go' responses to CSA and CS-, treating the ambiguous cue similarly to the negative cue. There were differences in their response speed according to cue type: peccaries were faster to respond to CS+ than to CS- and CSA. Trapping thus appeared to cause a 'pessimistic' judgement bias in peccaries, which may reflect a negative affective state with implications for the welfare and management of captive individuals, and also function to increase caution and survival chances following such an event in the wild environment. PMID:26061658

  13. Real-time Precise Point Positioning with Ambiguity Resolution for Geosciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, J.; Meng, X.; Teferle, F. N.; Dodson, A. H.; Ge, M.; Shi, C.; Liu, J.

    2009-04-01

    Real-time provision of information on large scale crustal deformation during an earthquake can be crucial in assessing property damage and managing relief operations. Moreover, such a real-time monitoring system may even lead to the accurate prediction of earthquakes in future and help the subsequent studies on the mechanism involved. During the past two decades, Global Positioning System (GPS) measurements have been extensively applied to investigate such processes in the geosciences. Precise point positioning (PPP) using GPS based on single stations can achieve comparable accuracies to conventional relative positioning, when precise satellite orbits and clocks, and Earth rotation products are used. Thus, PPP does not need any reference stations to achieve high positioning accuracy, e.g. at the millimetre level in static and centimetre level in kinematic applications. This has both technical and economic advantages and may be the only feasible option in some specific applications such as Tsunami early warning systems. However, unlike relative positioning, PPP suffers from unresolved integer ambiguities, which prevented further accuracy improvements within short observation periods or in real-time. On account of the great potential of PPP, we developed a prototype real-time PPP system which also employs ambiguity resolution at a single station. This development is based on the PANDA (Positioning And Navigation Data Analyst) software, which was originally developed at Wuhan University in China, and has been significantly refined by the authors. To assess this system, about 30 stations from the EUREF Permanent Network Internet Protocol (EUREF-IP) pilot project are used to produce the real-time satellite clocks, with satellite orbits and Earth rotation parameters (ERP) fixed to the predicted part of the IGS (International GNSS Service) ultra-rapid products. This is followed by the estimation of the uncalibrated hardware delays (UHD), which are crucial in resolving the ambiguities. Finally, all products (clocks, orbits, UHDs and ERPs) are provided in real-time to allow PPP with ambiguity resolution. Through the simulation of this prototype real-time PPP system, we show that significant accuracy improvements can be achieved, which are of significance to real-time applications in the geosciences.

  14. Does Trapping Influence Decision-Making under Ambiguity in White-Lipped Peccary (Tayassu pecari)?

    PubMed Central

    Nogueira, Selene Siqueira da Cunha; Fernandes, Iurianny Karla; Costa, Thaise Silva Oliveira; Nogueira-Filho, Sérgio Luiz Gama; Mendl, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The white-lipped peccary (Tayassu pecari) is an endangered species whose bold anti-predator behaviour in comparison to related species may increase its vulnerability to hunting and predation. We used a judgement bias test to investigate whether captive peccaries that had recently experienced a trapping event made more ‘pessimistic’ decisions under ambiguity. If so, this would indicate (i) that the procedure may induce a negative affective state and hence have welfare implications, and (ii) that the species is able to adopt a cautious response style despite its bold phenotype. Eight individuals were trained to ‘go’ to a baited food bowl when a positive auditory cue (whistle; CS+) was given and to ‘no-go’ when a negative cue (horn A; CS-) was sounded to avoid a loud sound and empty food bowl. An ‘ambiguous’ auditory cue (bell; CSA) was presented to probe decision-making under ambiguity. Individuals were subjected to three tests in the order: T1 (control-no trap), T2 (24h after-trap procedure), and T3 (control-no trap). In each test, each animal was exposed to 10 judgement bias trials of each of the three cue types: CS+,CS-,CSA. We recorded whether animals reached the food bowl within 60s (‘go’ response) and their response speed (m/s). The animals varied in their responses to the CSA cue depending on test type. In all tests, animals made more ‘go’ responses to CS+ than CSA. During control tests (T1 and T3), the peccaries showed higher proportions of ‘go’ responses to CSA than to CS-. In T2, however, the animals showed similar proportions of ‘go’ responses to CSA and CS-, treating the ambiguous cue similarly to the negative cue. There were differences in their response speed according to cue type: peccaries were faster to respond to CS+ than to CS- and CSA. Trapping thus appeared to cause a ‘pessimistic’ judgement bias in peccaries, which may reflect a negative affective state with implications for the welfare and management of captive individuals, and also function to increase caution and survival chances following such an event in the wild environment. PMID:26061658

  15. TWISTED ALEXANDER NORMS GIVE LOWER BOUNDS ON THE THURSTON NORM

    E-print Network

    Friedl, Stefan

    TWISTED ALEXANDER NORMS GIVE LOWER BOUNDS ON THE THURSTON NORM STEFAN FRIEDL AND TAEHEE KIM Abstract. We introduce twisted Alexander norms of a compact connected ori- entable 3-manifold with first Betti number bigger than one, generalizing norms of McMullen and Turaev. We show that twisted Alexander

  16. Giving a good needle: resident guide to decreasing injection pain.

    PubMed

    Bronfenbrener, Roman

    2014-06-01

    Residency is a time when we set a foundation for how we will practice dermatology in the future. Perfecting good injection technique early in one's career can boost patient perception of the provider and help keep a schedule running smoothly. This resident guide focuses on ways we can give better injections by highlighting useful pearls to master this commonplace procedure. PMID:24999650

  17. Giving Students a Fighting Chance: Pragmatics in the Language Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLean, Terrence

    2004-01-01

    In order to give language learners a fighting chance outside the classroom, teachers must provide them with consciousness-raising opportunities for developing pragmatic awareness. By attending to pragmatic factors in second-language (L2) situations, student will be better able to make informed choices in negotiating effective communication. This…

  18. Giving Thanks: Observing Thanksgiving, Kwanzaa, and Day of the Dead.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dever, Martha T.; Barta, James J.

    1997-01-01

    Describes a primary-grade curriculum unit organized around the theme of "giving thanks" and encompassing the holidays of Thanksgiving, Kwanzaa, and Day of the Dead. Provides historical background and cultural context for each holiday, engagement activities, investigation activities, sharing activities, and a short list of related children's…

  19. Does Deficit Irrigation Give More Crop Per Drop?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    DOES DEFICIT IRRIGATION GIVE MORE CROP PER DROP? Deficit irrigation can be an effective way to maximize economic returns when water supply is the limiting resource. The ARS Water Management Research Unit is conducting field studies to determine the water production functions for 4 crops common in ...

  20. Education Philanthropy Catching a Chill as Economy Cools Charitable Giving

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robelen, Erik W.

    2009-01-01

    This article reports that the recession tearing into the U.S. economy is not only straining the public coffers that support K-12 schooling, it's also taking a toll on education philanthropy. From family foundations to corporate philanthropies, charitable giving to K-12 education appears to be facing a downturn. Although no national figures are…

  1. Primateinspired Autonomous Navigation Using Mental Rotation and AdviceGiving

    E-print Network

    Primate­inspired Autonomous Navigation Using Mental Rotation and Advice­Giving Lakshmi Velayudhan the years, autonomous navigation has undergone tremendous developments with increasingly advanced tech by designing a system that combines the two processes in order to achieve successful navigation to a goal

  2. 32. NORTHWEST PAST BENCH WITH TIRE BENDER (USED TO GIVE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    32. NORTHWEST PAST BENCH WITH TIRE BENDER (USED TO GIVE CURVATURE TO WHEEL RIMS ON ELI WINDMILLS) TO BINS ALONG NORTH INTERIOR WALL OF FACTORY WITH NEW OLD STOCK UNASSEMBLED PARTS FOR ELI WINDMILLS. - Kregel Windmill Company Factory, 1416 Central Avenue, Nebraska City, Otoe County, NE

  3. Does Generosity Beget Generosity? Alumni Giving and Undergraduate Financial Aid

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meer, Jonathan; Rosen, Harvey S.

    2012-01-01

    We investigate how undergraduates' financial aid packages affect their subsequent donative behavior as alumni. We analyze micro data on alumni giving at an anonymous research university, and focus on three types of financial aid, scholarships, loans, and campus jobs. Consistent with the view of some professional fundraisers, we allow the receipt…

  4. WORMS Panel: Leaders Give Professional Advice Women and Men

    E-print Network

    Nagurney, Anna

    WORMS Panel: Leaders Give Professional Advice to Women and Men Anna Nagurney Isenberg School November 13-16, 2011 Anna Nagurney WORMS Leaders Panel #12;Acknowledgments I would like to thank Women in Operations Research and the Management Sciences (WORMS) for sponsoring this panel and especially

  5. Planned Giving Administration: The Business Officer's Guide [with DVD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brostrom, Forrest C.

    2005-01-01

    Some people associate planned giving with fancy trusts and exotic tax plans. The truth is far simpler and more profound. This book provides a comprehensive review of the subject, from the relative simplicity of outright gifts and bequests to the more complex workings of pooled income funds and retained life estates. The author lends a common sense…

  6. Giving Voice to Reluctant Learners: An Exploratory Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pringle, Mark T.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this exploratory study is to hear from reluctant learners about their perceptions of their experiences in middle school and the meanings they make from these. This study will give voice to students, a stakeholder group that has been traditionally silent in the literature on K-12 learning and achievement. Capturing the perceptions…

  7. Gaze, during the giving of directions Lennart Boot

    E-print Network

    Theune, Mariët

    Gaze, during the giving of directions Lennart Boot University of Twente HMI departement l.boot@student.utwente.nl ABSTRACT Gaze is an effective function of a conversation. Different functions of gaze are described in literature over the world. During a route description the presence of gaze is also clearly visible

  8. ANNUAL GIVING GIFT FORM Gift/Pledge Options

    E-print Network

    Muzzio, Fernando J.

    ANNUAL GIVING GIFT FORM Gift/Pledge Options I would like to make a gift to Rutgers to the Rutgers University Foundation. I authorize the Rutgers University Foundation to collect my gift ______________________________________________________________ Matching Gift Reminder I am enclosing a matching gift form from

  9. I would like to give a gift in

    E-print Network

    Palmeri, Thomas

    I would like to give a gift in the amount of: I would like to support: $ The Founders Circle recognizes donors who make gifts of at least $2,500 annually to the Vanderbilt University Law School. Pledges(s), with the amount indicated for each: Note: For gifts of $25,000 and up, you will be contacted for additional

  10. GIVE THE PUBLIC SOMETHING, SOMETHING MORE INTERESTING THAN RADIOACTIVE WASTE

    SciTech Connect

    Codee, Hans D.K.

    2003-02-27

    In the Netherlands the policy to manage radioactive waste is somewhat different from that in other countries, although the practical outcome is not much different. Long-term, i.e. at least 100 years, storage in above ground engineered structures of all waste types is the first element in the Dutch policy. Second element, but equally important, is that deep geologic disposal is foreseen after the storage period. This policy was brought out in the early eighties and was communicated to the public as a practical, logical and feasible management system for the Dutch situation. Strong opposition existed at that time to deep disposal in salt domes in the Netherlands. Above ground storage at principle was not rejected because the need to do something was obvious. Volunteers for a long term storage site did not automatically emerge. A site selection procedure was followed and resulted in the present site at Vlissingen-Oost. The waste management organization, COVRA, was not really welcomed here , but was tolerated. In the nineties facilities for low and medium level waste were erected and commissioned. In the design of the facilities much attention was given to emotional factors. The first ten operational years were needed to gain trust from the local population. Impeccable conduct and behavior was necessary as well as honesty and full openness to the public Now, after some ten years, the COVRA facilities are accepted. And a new phase is entered with the commissioning of the storage facility for high level waste, the HABOG facility. A visit to that facility will not be very spectacular, activities take place only during loading and unloading. Furthermore it is a facility for waste, so unwanted material will be brought into the community. In order to give the public something more interesting the building itself is transformed into a piece of art and in the inside a special work of art will be displayed. Together with that the attitude of the company will change. We are proud on our work and we like to show that. Our work is necessary and useful for society. We will not hide our activities but show them and make it worth looking at them.

  11. A neural mechanism for time-window separation resolves ambiguity of adaptive coding.

    PubMed

    Hildebrandt, K Jannis; Ronacher, Bernhard; Hennig, R Matthias; Benda, Jan

    2015-03-01

    The senses of animals are confronted with changing environments and different contexts. Neural adaptation is one important tool to adjust sensitivity to varying intensity ranges. For instance, in a quiet night outdoors, our hearing is more sensitive than when we are confronted with the plurality of sounds in a large city during the day. However, adaptation also removes available information on absolute sound levels and may thus cause ambiguity. Experimental data on the trade-off between benefits and loss through adaptation is scarce and very few mechanisms have been proposed to resolve it. We present an example where adaptation is beneficial for one task--namely, the reliable encoding of the pattern of an acoustic signal-but detrimental for another--the localization of the same acoustic stimulus. With a combination of neurophysiological data, modeling, and behavioral tests, we show that adaptation in the periphery of the auditory pathway of grasshoppers enables intensity-invariant coding of amplitude modulations, but at the same time, degrades information available for sound localization. We demonstrate how focusing the response of localization neurons to the onset of relevant signals separates processing of localization and pattern information temporally. In this way, the ambiguity of adaptive coding can be circumvented and both absolute and relative levels can be processed using the same set of peripheral neurons. PMID:25761097

  12. Tipping points and ambiguity in the integrated assessment of climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemoine, D.; Traeger, C.

    2011-12-01

    The threat of crossing tipping points in the climate system often serves as an argument for more stringent greenhouse gas emission reductions. We introduce such regime shifts into a recursive relative of the DICE integrated assessment model for establishing optimal climate policies. A tipping point's effects on system dynamics are irreversible and are triggered by crossing an unknown temperature threshold. The tipping point's probability and timing are endogenously determined by the chosen emission policy. The policymaker can display ambiguity aversion in assessing tipping point uncertainty, which recognizes that the probability distribution for the temperature threshold is not known with confidence. Our simulations show that tipping points can increase the near-term social cost of carbon by up to 50% under reasonable assumptions. Regime shifts that directly increase temperature or damages for a given CO2 concentration have a stronger impact on optimal policy than do regime shifts that increase the atmospheric lifetime of CO2. The possibility of a tipping point is more important for the social cost of carbon than is ambiguity about the temperature threshold.

  13. Wideband Doppler frequency shift measurement and direction ambiguity resolution using optical frequency shift and optical heterodyning.

    PubMed

    Lu, Bing; Pan, Wei; Zou, Xihua; Yan, Xianglei; Yan, Lianshan; Luo, Bin

    2015-05-15

    A photonic approach for both wideband Doppler frequency shift (DFS) measurement and direction ambiguity resolution is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. In the proposed approach, a light wave from a laser diode is split into two paths. In one path, the DFS information is converted into an optical sideband close to the optical carrier by using two cascaded electro-optic modulators, while in the other path, the optical carrier is up-shifted by a specific value (e.g., from several MHz to hundreds of MHz) using an optical-frequency shift module. Then the optical signals from the two paths are combined and detected by a low-speed photodetector (PD), generating a low-frequency electronic signal. Through a subtraction between the specific optical frequency shift and the measured frequency of the low-frequency signal, the value of DFS is estimated from the derived absolute value, and the direction ambiguity is resolved from the derived sign (i.e., + or -). In the proof-of-concept experiments, DFSs from -90 to 90 kHz are successfully estimated for microwave signals at 10, 15, and 20 GHz, where the estimation errors are lower than ±60??Hz. The estimation errors can be further reduced via the use of a more stable optical frequency shift module. PMID:26393729

  14. A Neural Mechanism for Time-Window Separation Resolves Ambiguity of Adaptive Coding

    PubMed Central

    Hildebrandt, K. Jannis; Ronacher, Bernhard; Hennig, R. Matthias; Benda, Jan

    2015-01-01

    The senses of animals are confronted with changing environments and different contexts. Neural adaptation is one important tool to adjust sensitivity to varying intensity ranges. For instance, in a quiet night outdoors, our hearing is more sensitive than when we are confronted with the plurality of sounds in a large city during the day. However, adaptation also removes available information on absolute sound levels and may thus cause ambiguity. Experimental data on the trade-off between benefits and loss through adaptation is scarce and very few mechanisms have been proposed to resolve it. We present an example where adaptation is beneficial for one task—namely, the reliable encoding of the pattern of an acoustic signal—but detrimental for another—the localization of the same acoustic stimulus. With a combination of neurophysiological data, modeling, and behavioral tests, we show that adaptation in the periphery of the auditory pathway of grasshoppers enables intensity-invariant coding of amplitude modulations, but at the same time, degrades information available for sound localization. We demonstrate how focusing the response of localization neurons to the onset of relevant signals separates processing of localization and pattern information temporally. In this way, the ambiguity of adaptive coding can be circumvented and both absolute and relative levels can be processed using the same set of peripheral neurons. PMID:25761097

  15. The source ambiguity problem: Distinguishing the effects of grammar and processing on acceptability judgments

    PubMed Central

    Hofmeister, Philip; Jaeger, T. Florian; Arnon, Inbal; Sag, Ivan A.; Snider, Neal

    2012-01-01

    Judgments of linguistic unacceptability may theoretically arise from either grammatical deviance or significant processing difficulty. Acceptability data are thus naturally ambiguous in theories that explicitly distinguish formal and functional constraints. Here, we consider this source ambiguity problem in the context of Superiority effects: the dispreference for ordering a wh-phrase in front of a syntactically “superior” wh-phrase in multiple wh-questions, e.g. What did who buy? More specifically, we consider the acceptability contrast between such examples and so-called D-linked examples, e.g. Which toys did which parents buy? Evidence from acceptability and self-paced reading experiments demonstrates that (i) judgments and processing times for Superiority violations vary in parallel, as determined by the kind of wh-phrases they contain, (ii) judgments increase with exposure while processing times decrease, (iii) reading times are highly predictive of acceptability judgments for the same items, and (iv) the effects of the complexity of the wh-phrases combine in both acceptability judgments and reading times. This evidence supports the conclusion that D-linking effects are likely reducible to independently motivated cognitive mechanisms whose effects emerge in a wide range of sentence contexts. This in turn suggests that Superiority effects, in general, may owe their character to differential processing difficulty.* PMID:23539204

  16. On the ambiguities in the tri-bimaximal mixing matrix and corresponding charged lepton corrections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duarah, Chandan; Nimai Singh, N.

    2013-12-01

    Two negative signs naturally appear in the U?1 and U?2 elements of the tri-bimaximal (TBM) matrix for positive values of the mixing angles ?12 and ?23. Apart from this, in other TBM matrices negative signs are shifted to other elements in each case. They account for positive as well as negative values of ?12 and ?23. We discuss the sign ambiguity in the TBM matrix and find that the TBM matrices, in fact, can be divided into two groups under certain circumstances. Interestingly, this classification of the TBM matrices is accompanied by two different ? - ? symmetric mass matrices which can separately be related to the groups. To accommodate the non-zero value of ?13 and deviate ?23 toward the first octant, we then perturb the TBM mixing ansatz with the help of charged lepton correction. The diagonalizing matrices for the charged lepton mass matrices also possess sign ambiguity and respect the grouping of the TBM matrices. They are parameterized in terms of the Wolfenstein parameter ? and satisfy the unitarity condition up to the second order in ?.

  17. On the ambiguities in the tri-bimaximal mixing matrix and corresponding charged lepton corrections

    E-print Network

    Chandan Duarah; N. Nimai Singh

    2015-03-24

    Two negative signs naturally appear in the $U_{\\mu 1}$ and $U_{\\tau 2}$ elements of the Tri-bimaximal (TBM) matrix for positive values of the mixing angles $\\theta_{12}$ and $\\theta_{23}$. Apart from this, in other TBM matrices negative signs are shifted to other elements in each case. They account for positive as well as negative values of $\\theta_{12}$ and $\\theta_{23}$. We discuss the sign ambiguity in the TBM matrix and find that the TBM matrices, in fact, can be divided into two groups under certain circumstances. Interestingly, this classification of TBM matrices is accompanied by two different $\\mu-\\tau$ symmetric mass matrices which can separately be related to the groups. To accommodate non-zero value of $\\theta_{13}$ and deviate $\\theta_{23}$ towards first octant, we then perturb the TBM mixing ansatz with the help of charged lepton correction. The diagonalizing matrices for charged lepton mass matrices also possess sign ambiguity and respect the grouping of TBM matrices. They are parametrized in terms of the Wolfenstein parameter $\\lambda$ and satisfy unitarity condition up to second order in $\\lambda$.

  18. Ambiguity, logic, simplicity, and dynamics: Wittgensteinian evaluative criteria in peer review of quantitative research on categorization.

    PubMed

    Shimp, Charles P

    2004-06-30

    Research on categorization has changed over time, and some of these changes resemble how Wittgenstein's views changed from his Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus to his Philosophical Investigations. Wittgenstein initially focused on unambiguous, abstract, parsimonious, logical propositions and rules, and on independent, static, "atomic facts." This approach subsequently influenced the development of logical positivism and thereby may have indirectly influenced method and theory in research on categorization: much animal research on categorization has focused on learning simple, static, logical rules unambiguously interrelating small numbers of independent features. He later rejected logical simplicity and rigor and focused instead on Gestalt ideas about figure-ground reversals and context, the ambiguity of family resemblance, and the function of details of everyday language. Contemporary contextualism has been influenced by this latter position, some features of which appear in contemporary empirical research on categorization. These developmental changes are illustrated by research on avian local and global levels of visual perceptual analysis, categorization of rectangles and moving objects, and artificial grammar learning. Implications are described for peer review of quantitative theory in which ambiguity, logical rigor, simplicity, or dynamics are designed to play important roles. PMID:15157980

  19. Chronic psychosocial stress makes rats more 'pessimistic' in the ambiguous-cue interpretation paradigm.

    PubMed

    Papciak, Justyna; Popik, Piotr; Fuchs, Eberhard; Rygula, Rafal

    2013-11-01

    Human decisions are often biased by emotions. Stressed and depressed individuals tend to make negative, pessimistic judgements while those in positive affective states are often more optimistic. Chronic psychosocial stress has previously been shown to induce a spectrum of behavioural and physiological changes in rats that are considered the correlates of depressive symptoms in humans. In this study, we investigate whether chronic social defeat makes animals more 'pessimistic'. To measure the changes in cognitive judgement bias, we applied the ambiguous-cue interpretation paradigm. In the operant boxes, the rats were trained to press one lever in response to one tone to receive a reward and to press another lever in response to a different tone to avoid punishment. Cognitive bias was tested by measuring the pattern of animals' responses to a tone of intermediate frequency (ambiguous-cue). To induce chronic psychosocial stress, we subjected the animals to daily social defeat in the resident-intruder paradigm for 3 weeks. We report that chronic psychosocial stress makes rats more pessimistic. PMID:23993861

  20. Activation of shape and semantic information during ambiguous homophone processing: eye tracking evidence from Hindi.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Ramesh Kumar; Singh, Siddharth

    2014-11-01

    In two visual world eye tracking studies, we examined the activation of subordinate meanings of ambiguous homophones in Hindi and particularly when the sentence context is biased towards the dominant meaning. Participants listened to sentences that were either neutral or biased towards the dominant meaning of the homophone and saw a display containing four pictures. In experiment 1, the display had a shape competitor of the subordinate meaning of the homophone in both neutral and biased conditions along with three unrelated distractors. Experiment 2 had semantic competitors of the subordinate meaning of the homophones along with three distractors. Proportion of fixations to different objects overtime suggested that participants activated the subordinate meanings and oriented their attention to the shape and semantic competitors even when the prior context was biased towards the dominant meaning. Overall, these data from Hindi provide further support to those models of lexical access that assume exhaustive access of both the meanings of an ambiguous homophone. These data suggest even a dominant bias does not eliminate the activation of perceptual and conceptual features of the subordinate meaning. PMID:25015722

  1. Castillejo, Dalitz, and Dyson ambiguity in field theoretic models of scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLeod, R. J.

    2013-06-01

    We examine the numerical solutions of a field theoretic model to better understand the role played by the poles associated with the ambiguity identified by Castillejo, Dalitz, and Dyson (CDD). By analytically analyzing the numerical solutions to the crossing-symmetric Chew-Low model previously found, we show that the solutions are unique. This is done by requiring a second solution that would reproduce the original threshold and resonance. This uniqueness applies to the family of solutions, found by varying the parameters, that produces a resonance. The T matrix for this model is not a generalized R function. and no analogy can be made to the CDD analysis. Adding a CDD pole to the solution would constitute a new model, so there is no CDD ambiguity. None of the family of solutions from this new model will reproduce the original threshold and resonance. We also find that one cannot treat an individual channel as an R function, nor can one add a CDD pole to an individual channel alone. Both a pole and a crossed pole must be added to all channels to maintain crossing symmetry. Crossing symmetry analytically connects all of the channels. The Chew-Low model being phenomenological is more pertinent to modern field theoretic models.

  2. Ambiguities and subtleties in fermion mass terms in practical quantum field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Yifan; Kong, Otto C. W.

    2014-09-01

    This is a review on structure of the fermion mass terms in quantum field theory, under the perspective of its practical applications in the real physics of Nature-specifically, we discuss fermion mass structure in the Standard Model of high energy physics, which successfully describes fundamental physics up to the TeV scale. The review is meant to be pedagogical, with detailed mathematics presented beyond the level one can find any easily in the textbooks. The discussions, however, bring up important subtleties and ambiguities about the subject that may be less than well appreciated. In fact, the naive perspective of the nature and masses of fermions as one would easily drawn from the presentations of fermion fields and their equations of motion from a typical textbook on quantum field theory leads to some confusing or even wrong statements which we clarify here. In particular, we illustrate clearly that a Dirac fermion mass eigenstate is mathematically equivalent to two degenerated Majorana fermion mass eigenstates at least as long as the mass terms are concerned. There are further ambiguities and subtleties in the exact description of the eigenstate(s). Especially, for the case of neutrinos, the use of the Dirac or Majorana terminology may be mostly a matter of choice. The common usage of such terminology is rather based on the broken SU(2) charges of the related Weyl spinors hence conventional and may not be unambiguously extended to cover more complicate models.

  3. A Behavioral and Electrophysiological Investigation of the Effect of Bilingualism on Lexical Ambiguity Resolution in Young Adults

    PubMed Central

    Kousaie, Shanna; Laliberté, Christianne; López Zunini, Rocío; Taler, Vanessa

    2015-01-01

    Previous research suggests that bilinguals demonstrate superior cognitive control processes than monolinguals. The goal of the current investigation was to examine whether this “bilingual advantage” is observed in a language processing task that requires inhibition, i.e., lexical ambiguity processing. Monolingual and bilingual participants read sentences that biased the reading of a terminal homonym toward the subordinate or dominant reading (e.g., The doctor asked her to step onto the scale.). A relatedness judgment was made on target words that were related to the contextually appropriate (e.g., balance) or inappropriate meaning (e.g., skin), or unrelated to either meaning (e.g., shoe) while electrophysiological recording took place. The results revealed subtle processing differences between monolinguals and bilinguals that were evident in electrophysiological measures, but not in behavioral measures. These findings suggest that monolinguals rely on context to access the contextually appropriate meaning of a homonym to a greater extent than bilinguals, while bilinguals demonstrate simultaneous activation of both meanings.

  4. The Influence of Body Movements on Children’s Perception of Music with an Ambiguous Expressive Character

    PubMed Central

    Maes, Pieter-Jan; Leman, Marc

    2013-01-01

    The theory of embodied music cognition states that the perception and cognition of music is firmly, although not exclusively, linked to action patterns associated with that music. In this regard, the focus lies mostly on how music promotes certain action tendencies (i.e., dance, entrainment, etc.). Only recently, studies have started to devote attention to the reciprocal effects that people’s body movements may exert on how people perceive certain aspects of music and sound (e.g., pitch, meter, musical preference, etc.). The present study positions itself in this line of research. The central research question is whether expressive body movements, which are systematically paired with music, can modulate children’s perception of musical expressiveness. We present a behavioral experiment in which different groups of children (7–8 years, N?=?46) either repetitively performed a happy or a sad choreography in response to expressively ambiguous music or merely listened to that music. The results of our study show indeed that children’s perception of musical expressiveness is modulated in accordance with the expressive character of the dance choreography performed to the music. This finding supports theories that claim a strong connection between action and perception, although further research is needed to uncover the details of this connection. PMID:23358805

  5. Reducing Ambiguities in Spectroscopic Factors and the 86Kr(d,p) Reaction at 35 MeV/u

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walter, D.; Cizewski, J. A.; Baugher, T.; Ratkiewicz, A.; Manning, B.; Lonsdale, S. J.; Burcher, S.; Pain, S. D.; Chipps, K. A.; Nunes, F. M.; Ahn, S.; Thompson, P.; Cerizza, G.; Thornsberry, C.; Jones, K. L.; Bardayan, D. W.; O'Malley, P. D.; Kozub, R. L.; Ota, S.

    2014-09-01

    Spectroscopic information for neutron-rich nuclei near the N = 50 shell closure is important for understanding nuclear structure far from stability. The standard method of extracting spectroscopic factors suffers from serious ambiguities. Mukhamedzhanov and Nunes have proposed that measuring a transfer reaction at both low (peripheral reaction) and higher (less-peripheral) energies should enable spectroscopic factors to be more reliably deduced, with uncertainties dominated by the experimental cross-sections rather than uncertainties in the bound-state potential. We have measured 86Kr(d,p) at 35 MeV/u in inverse kinematics at the NSCL using the ORRUBA and SIDAR arrays of position-sensitive silicon strip detectors. The differential cross-section measurements will be combined with the published measurements at 5.5 MeV/u to extract spectroscopic factors for low-lying states in 87Kr, and to test the efficacy of this method. Preliminary results will be presented as well as plans to extend this approach to studies with radioactive ion beams. This work is supported in part by the NSF and the U.S. DOE.

  6. 19. PRIVATE SIDE ENTRANCE ADDED IN 1921 TO GIVE BARRIERFREE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. PRIVATE SIDE ENTRANCE ADDED IN 1921 TO GIVE BARRIER-FREE ACCESS FROM THE DRIVEWAY TO THE ELEVATOR. Wrought iron railings, extended upper step of stoop (indicated by the darker concrete between the two vertical posts), and wooden ramp added by the National Trust to meet modern barrier-free access codes, circa 1980. - Woodrow Wilson House, 2340 South S Street, Northwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  7. Giving a Newborn a Bath in her Parents' Presence.

    PubMed

    Didry, Pascale; Didry, Emmanuelle

    2015-11-01

    Today, Sophie is working on the maternity ward. She is going to give Manon, David and Laura's first born, a bath. Manon was born on the day before. She weighs 3.350kg and is 49cm long. She has already got a lot of fuzzy brown hair. Both parents are looking forward to watching and learning how to care for their new baby. PMID:26548395

  8. JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. 94, NO. B8, PAGES 10,187-10,203, AUGUST 10, 1989 Carrier Phase Ambiguity Resolution for the Global Positioning

    E-print Network

    Faulds, James E.

    . However, presently availablepseudorangedata are contaminated by multipath signatureswith amplitudestwo significantly to the error in baseline components. Resolving the integer ambiguity in carrier phase biases

  9. Some new results on an old controversy: Is perturbation theory the correct asymptotic expansion in non-Abelian models?

    SciTech Connect

    Aguado, Miguel; Seiler, Erhard

    2004-11-15

    Several years ago it was found that perturbation theory for two-dimensional O(N) models depends on boundary conditions even after the infinite volume limit has been taken termwise, provided N>2. There ensued a discussion whether the boundary conditions introduced to show this phenomenon were somehow anomalous and there was a class of 'reasonable' boundary conditions not suffering from this ambiguity. Here we present the results of some computations that may be interpreted as giving some support for the correctness of perturbation theory with conventional boundary conditions; however the fundamental underlying question of the correctness of perturbation theory in these models and, in particular, the perturbative {beta} function remain challenging problems of mathematical physics.

  10. Muon capture on the proton -- Final results from the MuCap experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winter, Peter

    2012-03-01

    The singlet rate ?S of ordinary muon capture (OMC) is the most direct probe for extracting the nucleon's pseudoscalar form factor, gP. The experimental determination of gP spans a long history including OMC efforts and one experiment using radiative muon capture. However, the situation prior to MuCap was inconclusive due to ambiguities in the interpretation as well as technical challenges. The MuCap experiment was designed to give an unambiguous measurement of gP. It uses a negative muon beam stopped in a time projection chamber as an active target filled with ultra-pure hydrogen gas which is surrounded by a decay electron detector. The capture rate is obtained from the difference of the negative muon's disappearance rate in hydrogen and the positive muon's decay rate recently measured to 1 ppm precision by the MuLan collaboration. A first-stage result, gP= 7.3 ±1.1, has been published in 2007. Since then, the MuCap system underwent some important upgrades before the full statistics were acquired. Two main data sets taken with different TPC gain were analyzed independently, and our final data selection cuts were established. The analysis is completed and all systematic errors have been evaluated. The final result presented in this talk will determine gP with four times improved precision compared to OMC results prior to MuCap. It is also immune to the above mentioned ambiguities in the interpretation of former OMC and RMC results. Therefore, it can be compared to the prediction from chiral perturbation theory and provides an important test of QCD symmetries at low energies.

  11. About the sign ambiguity in the evaluation of Grand Canonical traces for quasi-particle statistical density operators

    E-print Network

    G. Puddu

    2009-12-02

    A simple and general prescription for evaluating unambiguously the sign of the grand-canonical trace of quasi-particle statistical density operators (the so-called sign ambiguity in taking the square root of determinants) is given. Sign ambiguities of this kind appear in the evaluation of the grand-canonical partition function projected to good quantum numbers (angular momentum, parity and particle number) in the Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov approximation at finite temperature, since traces are usually expressed as the square root of determinants. A comparison is made with the numerical continuity method.

  12. Volunteering and Giving among American Teenagers 14 to 17 Years of Age. Findings from a National Survey. 1990 Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodgkinson, Virginia A.; Weitzman, Murray S.

    This survey was conducted by the Gallup organization on the volunteering and giving behavior of U.S. teenagers as a supplement to a national survey on giving and volunteering among U.S. adults. Information was obtained from in-home personal interviews with 301 teenagers from 14 to 17 years of age. Results indicated that 58 percent of teenagers…

  13. Governing stem cell therapy in India: regulatory vacuum or jurisdictional ambiguity?

    PubMed Central

    Tiwari, Shashank S.; Raman, Sujatha

    2014-01-01

    Stem cell treatments are being offered in Indian clinics although preclinical evidence of their efficacy and safety is lacking. This is attributed to a governance vacuum created by the lack of legally binding research guidelines. By contrast, this paper highlights jurisdictional ambiguities arising from trying to regulate stem cell therapy under the auspices of research guidelines when treatments are offered in a private market disconnected from clinical trials. While statutory laws have been strengthened in 2014, prospects for their implementation remain weak, given embedded challenges of putting healthcare laws and professional codes into practice. Finally, attending to the capacities of consumer law and civil society activism to remedy the problem of unregulated treatments, the paper finds that the very definition of a governance vacuum needs to be reframed to clarify whose rights to health care are threatened by the proliferation of commercial treatments and individualized negligence-based remedies for grievances. PMID:25431534

  14. Effective Schroedinger equation with general ordering ambiguity position-dependent mass Morse potential

    E-print Network

    Sameer M. Ikhdair

    2012-03-09

    We solve the parametric generalized effective Schr\\"odinger equation with a specific choice of posi-tion-dependent mass function and Morse oscillator potential by means of the Nikiforov-Uvarov (NU) method combined with the Pekeris approximation scheme. All bound-state energies are found explicitly and all corresponding radial wave functions are built analytically. We choose the Weyl or Li and Kuhn ordering for the ambiguity parameters in our numerical work to calculate the energy spectrum for a few and diatomic molecules with arbitrary vibration and rotation quantum numbers and different position-dependent mass functions. Two special cases including the constant mass and the vibration s-wave (l =0) are also investigated.

  15. Modeling Ambiguity Averse Behavior of Individual Decision Making: Prospect Theory under Uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamura, Hiroyuki

    Firstly, a behavioral model based on the "Prospect Theory" developed by Kahneman and Tversky is described. In this model weighting function of non-additive probabilities are introduced where probability of each event occurring is known. The effective application of this approach to the public sector is shown in modeling risks of extreme events with low probability and high outcome. Next, a behavioral model based on our "Prospect Theory under Uncertainty" is described where basic probability of a set of events is known but occurrence probability of each event is not known. It is shown that this model could properly explain the Ellsberg paradox of ambiguity aversion. Potential applicability of this approach to assessing global environmental-economic policies is described.

  16. On the transgressiveness of ambiguity: Richard Bruce Nugent and the flow of sexuality and race.

    PubMed

    Bauer, J Edgar

    2015-01-01

    The study focuses on the slender corpus of literary work by Harlem Renaissance poet, author and visual artist Richard Bruce Nugent (1906-1987), arguably America's foremost Black aesthete. As an individualist in the footsteps of post-Hegelian and pre-Nietzschean philosopher Max Stirner (1806-1856), Nugent sought to re-think sexuality and race beyond fixed schemes of categorial distribution. To this end, Nugent deployed a strategy of sexual and racial ambiguity that aimed at situating the uniquely sexed and raced individual within the continuities of ever-diversifying Nature. Nugent's deconstructive approach of sexuality and race proves to be convergent with (but not genealogically dependent on) the universalization of sexual intermediariness and racial miscegenation postulated by German-Jewish sexologist Magnus Hirschfeld during the first third of the twentieth century. Nugent's non-identitarian conception of sex acts anticipated by more than a decade comparable insights propounded by Alfred Kinsey. PMID:25710478

  17. The Relationship Between Subthreshold Autistic Traits, Ambiguous Figure Perception and Divergent Thinking.

    PubMed

    Best, Catherine; Arora, Shruti; Porter, Fiona; Doherty, Martin

    2015-12-01

    This research investigates the paradox of creativity in autism. That is, whether people with subclinical autistic traits have cognitive styles conducive to creativity or whether they are disadvantaged by the implied cognitive and behavioural rigidity of the autism phenotype. The relationship between divergent thinking (a cognitive component of creativity), perception of ambiguous figures, and self-reported autistic traits was evaluated in 312 individuals in a non-clinical sample. High levels of autistic traits were significantly associated with lower fluency scores on the divergent thinking tasks. However autistic traits were associated with high numbers of unusual responses on the divergent thinking tasks. Generation of novel ideas is a prerequisite for creative problem solving and may be an adaptive advantage associated with autistic traits. PMID:26272675

  18. Ernst Ferdinand Sauerbruch and His Ambiguous Role in the Period of National Socialism

    PubMed Central

    Dewey, Marc; Schagen, Udo; Eckart, Wolfgang U.; Schönenberger, Eva

    2006-01-01

    Abstract: The role of German physicians under National Socialism is highly controversial. We show that Ferdinand Sauerbruch, one of twentieth century's most outstanding surgeons and chair of surgery at Berlin's Charité from 1927 to 1949, openly supported National Socialism in his public statements and in his position as head of the medical section of the Reich Research Council. He was appointed state councilor and received the Knight's Cross of the War Merit Cross by the National Socialists. But Sauerbruch also supported victims of Nazi persecution, attempted to use his influence to put a stop to the “Euthanasia Program T4,” and in private expressed his criticism of National Socialists. The ambiguous stance of Ferdinand Sauerbruch is probably more typical of the role physicians played during National Socialism than the well-known black-and-white cases. PMID:16858197

  19. Do spinors give rise to a frame-dragging effect?

    SciTech Connect

    Randono, Andrew

    2010-01-15

    We investigate the effect of the intrinsic spin of a fundamental spinor field on the surrounding spacetime geometry. We show that despite the lack of a rotating stress-energy source (and despite claims to the contrary) the intrinsic spin of a spin-half fermion gives rise to a frame-dragging effect analogous to that of orbital angular momentum, even in Einstein-Hilbert gravity where torsion is constrained to be zero. This resolves a paradox regarding the counter-force needed to restore Newton's third law in the well-known spin-orbit interaction. In addition, the frame-dragging effect gives rise to a long-range gravitationally mediated spin-spin dipole interaction coupling the internal spins of two sources. We argue that despite the weakness of the interaction, the spin-spin interaction will dominate over the ordinary inverse square Newtonian interaction in any process of sufficiently high energy for quantum field theoretical effects to be non-negligible.

  20. Dictator Game Giving: The Importance of Descriptive versus Injunctive Norms

    PubMed Central

    Raihani, Nichola J.; McAuliffe, Katherine

    2014-01-01

    Human behaviour is influenced by social norms but norms can entail two types of information. Descriptive norms refer to what others do in this context, while injunctive norms refer to what ought to be done to ensure social approval. In many real-world situations these norms are often presented concurrently meaning that their independent effects on behaviour are difficult to establish. Here we used an online Dictator Game to test how descriptive and injunctive norms would influence dictator donations when presented independently of one another. In addition, we varied the cost of complying with the norm: By stating that $0.20 or $0.50 cent donations from a $1 stake were normal or suggested, respectively. Specifying a higher target amount was associated with increased mean donation size. In contrast to previous studies, descriptive norms did not seem to influence giving behaviour in this context, whereas injunctive norms were associated with increased likelihood to give at least the target amount to the partner. This raises the question of whether injunctive norms might be more effective than descriptive norms at promoting prosocial behaviour in other settings. PMID:25493945

  1. Ambiguities and Tensions in English Language Teaching: Portraits of EFL Teachers as Legitimate Speakers. ESL & Applied Linguistics Professional Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sayer, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The central theme of this book is the ambiguities and tensions teachers face as they attempt to position themselves in ways that legitimize them as language teachers, and as English speakers. Focusing on three EFL teachers and their schools in the southern Mexican state of Oaxaca, it documents how ordinary practices of language educators are…

  2. Ambiguity in the Manifestation of Adult Separation Anxiety Disorder Occurring in Complex Anxiety Presentations: Two Clinical Case Reports

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dudaee-Faass, Sigal; Marnane, Claire; Wagner, Renate

    2009-01-01

    Two case reports are described in which patients presented for the treatment of multiple comorbid anxiety disorders, all of which appeared to derive from prolonged separation anxiety disorder. In particular, these adults had effectively altered their lifestyles to avoid separation, thereby displaying only ambiguous separation anxiety symptoms that…

  3. The DescriptionExperience Gap in Risky and Ambiguous Gambles VARUN DUTT1,4*, HORACIO ARL-COSTA2

    E-print Network

    Spirtes, Peter

    The Description­Experience Gap in Risky and Ambiguous Gambles VARUN DUTT1,4*, HORACIO ARLÓ-COSTA2 choices when decisions are made from descriptions (gambles in which probability distributions and outcomes are explicitly stated) and when decisions are made from experience (the knowledge of the gambles is obtained

  4. Hemispheric Contributions to Lexical Ambiguity Resolution in a Discourse Context: Evidence from Individuals with Unilateral Left and Right Hemisphere Lesions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grindrod, C.M.; Baum, S.R.

    2005-01-01

    In the present study, a cross-modal semantic priming task was used to investigate the ability of left-hemisphere-damaged (LHD) nonfluent aphasic, right-hemisphere-damaged (RHD) and non-brain-damaged (NBD) control subjects to use a discourse context to resolve lexically ambiguous words. Subjects first heard four-sentence discourse passages ending…

  5. 294 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON SIGNAL PROCESSING, VOL. 46, NO. 2, FEBRUARY 1998 Ambiguity in Radar and Sonar

    E-print Network

    Moura, José

    and Sonar M. Jo~ao D. Rendas, Member, IEEE, and Jos´e M. F. Moura, Fellow, IEEE Abstract--We introduce a new the presentation on passive and active radar and sonar location mechanisms. The new definition is based ambiguity is much broader, handling radar/sonar problems when there are unknown parameters (e.g., unknown

  6. Ambiguity--A Tool or Obstacle for Joint Productive Dialogue Activity in Deaf and Hearing Students' Reasoning about Ecology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Molander, Bengt-Olov; Hallden, Ola; Lindahl, Camilla

    2010-01-01

    The ambiguity of words and signs as a resource or obstacle in group discussions is studied. How deaf and hearing students aged 13-15 years elaborate on ecological concepts through dialogue is described. Group interviews were conducted with 14 hearing and 18 deaf students. Probes were used to initiate discussion about the different meanings of…

  7. ABSORBANCE, ABSORPTION COEFFICIENT, AND APPARENT QUANTUM YIELD: A COMMENT ON AMBIGUITY IN THE USE OF THESE OPTICAL CONCEPTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Several important optical terms such as "absorbance" and "absorption coefficient" are frequently used ambiguously in the current peer-reviewed literature. Since they are important terms that are required to derive other quantities such as the "apparent quantum yield" of photoprod...

  8. A Director's Lot Is Not a Happy One--Using Peer Support To Deal with Role Ambiguity and Conflict.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgan, Henry M.

    2001-01-01

    Discusses using peer support to deal with role ambiguity and role conflict for early care and education directors. Examines causes of role conflict development. Suggests developing a support system with other incumbents of boundary jobs that provides for sharing, communicating, listening, letting off steam, and joining together to initiate…

  9. Syntactic Ambiguity Resolution in L2 Learners: Some Effects of Bilinguality on L1 and L2 Processing Strategies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dussias, Paola E.

    2003-01-01

    This study investigates whether proficient second language (L2) speakers of Spanish and English use the same parsing strategies as monolinguals when reading temporarily ambiguous sentences containing a complex noun phrase followed by a relative clause, such as "Peter fell in love with the daughter of the psychologist who studied in California."…

  10. When to Cry over Spilled Milk: Young Children's Use of Category Information to Guide Inferences about Ambiguous Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giles, Jessica W.; Heyman, Gail D.

    2004-01-01

    Three studies (N = 171) examined preschool children's tendency to use category information to make inferences about ambiguous behavior. Children heard stories in which category information about story characters was manipulated and behavioral information was held constant. Participants were asked to evaluate, explain, and determine the…

  11. Getting beyond "Good job": how to give effective feedback.

    PubMed

    Gigante, Joseph; Dell, Michael; Sharkey, Angela

    2011-02-01

    This article is the fourth in a series by the Council on Medical Student Education in Pediatrics (COMSEP) reviewing the critical attributes and skills of superb clinical teachers. The previous article in this series reviewed the vital importance of direct observation of students.(1) The purpose of this article is to describe how to use the information gained from the direct observation, namely the role of feedback. Although too often used interchangeably, encouragement, evaluation, and feedback are quite distinct. Encouragement (eg, "good job!") is supportive but does nothing to improve the learner's skills. Evaluation is summative and is the final judgment of the learner's performance. Feedback, however, is designed to improve future performance. This article focuses on feedback-what it is, why it is important, some of the barriers to effective feedback, and how to give helpful feedback. PMID:21242222

  12. Paedomorphic Facial Expressions Give Dogs a Selective Advantage

    PubMed Central

    Waller, Bridget M.; Peirce, Kate; Caeiro, Cátia C.; Scheider, Linda; Burrows, Anne M.; McCune, Sandra; Kaminski, Juliane

    2013-01-01

    How wolves were first domesticated is unknown. One hypothesis suggests that wolves underwent a process of self-domestication by tolerating human presence and taking advantage of scavenging possibilities. The puppy-like physical and behavioural traits seen in dogs are thought to have evolved later, as a byproduct of selection against aggression. Using speed of selection from rehoming shelters as a proxy for artificial selection, we tested whether paedomorphic features give dogs a selective advantage in their current environment. Dogs who exhibited facial expressions that enhance their neonatal appearance were preferentially selected by humans. Thus, early domestication of wolves may have occurred not only as wolf populations became tamer, but also as they exploited human preferences for paedomorphic characteristics. These findings, therefore, add to our understanding of early dog domestication as a complex co-evolutionary process. PMID:24386109

  13. Tips for success: giving an effective research talk.

    PubMed

    Kiefer, Julie C

    2010-12-01

    For many scientists, their working life can be charted as a series of talks: lab meetings, journal clubs, research seminars, and job talks. Based on the sheer volume of attended and given talks, one might think that nearly any scientist should be an expert speaker. As we are all painfully aware, that's not so. Giving an effective talk is a learned skill, built largely on preparation and practice. Presented here are tips from five panelists, each known for their informative, well-organized, and engaging style: Nicole King, PhD, Michael Levine, PhD, Susan McConnell, PhD, Denise Montell, PhD, and Sean Morrison, PhD. While their advice focuses on improving research seminars (departmental seminars, society meetings, and public lectures), they also offer many helpful tips for enhancing general public speaking skills. PMID:21046634

  14. The difference between “giving a rose” and “giving a kiss”: Sustained neural activity to the light verb construction

    PubMed Central

    Wittenberg, Eva; Paczynski, Martin; Wiese, Heike; Jackendoff, Ray; Kuperberg, Gina

    2014-01-01

    We used event-related potentials (ERPs) to investigate the neurocognitive mechanisms associated with processing light verb constructions such as “give a kiss”. These constructions consist of a semantically underspecified light verb (“give”) and an event nominal that contributes most of the meaning and also activates an argument structure of its own (“kiss”). This creates a mismatch between the syntactic constituents and the semantic roles of a sentence. Native speakers read German verb-final sentences that contained light verb constructions (e.g., “Julius gave Anne a kiss”), non-light constructions (e.g., “Julius gave Anne a rose”), and semantically anomalous constructions (e.g., *“Julius gave Anne a conversation”). ERPs were measured at the critical verb, which appeared after all its arguments. Compared to non-light constructions, the light verb constructions evoked a widely distributed, frontally focused, sustained negative-going effect between 500 and 900 ms after verb onset. We interpret this effect as reflecting working memory costs associated with complex semantic processes that establish a shared argument structure in the light verb constructions. PMID:24910498

  15. Natural gas leak location with K-L divergence-based adaptive selection of Ensemble Local Mean Decomposition components and high-order ambiguity function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jiedi; Xiao, Qiyang; Wen, Jiangtao; Zhang, Ying

    2015-07-01

    In this study, a time-delay estimation method based on Ensemble Local Mean Decomposition (ELMD) method and high-order ambiguity function (HAF) is proposed for locating natural gas pipeline leaks. The leakage signals were decomposed using ELMD, and numerous production functions (PFs) were obtained. An adaptive selection method based on Kullback-Leibler (K-L) divergence was proposed to process these PF components and choose the characteristic PFs that contain most of the leakage information. The HAF was employed to analyze the instantaneous parameters of the characteristic PFs and calculate the difference in arrival time of characteristic frequencies. From the time difference and the signal propagation speed, the natural gas pipeline leakage location can be determined. The experiment results show that the proposed method can locate leaks with higher accuracy than cross-correlation method.

  16. Source motion detection, estimation, and compensation for underwater acoustics inversion by wideband ambiguity lag-Doppler filtering.

    PubMed

    Josso, Nicolas F; Ioana, Cornel; Mars, Jérôme I; Gervaise, Cédric

    2010-12-01

    Acoustic channel properties in a shallow water environment with moving source and receiver are difficult to investigate. In fact, when the source-receiver relative position changes, the underwater environment causes multipath and Doppler scale changes on the transmitted signal over low-to-medium frequencies (300 Hz-20 kHz). This is the result of a combination of multiple paths propagation, source and receiver motions, as well as sea surface motion or water column fast changes. This paper investigates underwater acoustic channel properties in a shallow water (up to 150 m depth) and moving source-receiver conditions using extracted time-scale features of the propagation channel model for low-to-medium frequencies. An average impulse response of one transmission is estimated using the physical characteristics of propagation and the wideband ambiguity plane. Since a different Doppler scale should be considered for each propagating signal, a time-warping filtering method is proposed to estimate the channel time delay and Doppler scale attributes for each propagating path. The proposed method enables the estimation of motion-compensated impulse responses, where different Doppler scaling factors are considered for the different time delays. It was validated for channel profiles using real data from the BASE'07 experiment conducted by the North Atlantic Treaty Organization Undersea Research Center in the shallow water environment of the Malta Plateau, South Sicily. This paper provides a contribution to many field applications including passive ocean tomography with unknown natural sources position and movement. Another example is active ocean tomography where sources motion enables to rapidly cover one operational area for rapid environmental assessment and hydrophones may be drifting in order to avoid additional flow noise. PMID:21218875

  17. On Reminder Effects, Drop-Outs and Dominance: Evidence from an Online Experiment on Charitable Giving

    PubMed Central

    Sonntag, Axel; Zizzo, Daniel John

    2015-01-01

    We present the results of an experiment that (a) shows the usefulness of screening out drop-outs and (b) tests whether different methods of payment and reminder intervals affect charitable giving. Following a lab session, participants could make online donations to charity for a total duration of three months. Our procedure justifying the exclusion of drop-outs consists in requiring participants to collect payments in person flexibly and as known in advance and as highlighted to them later. Our interpretation is that participants who failed to collect their positive payments under these circumstances are likely not to satisfy dominance. If we restrict the sample to subjects who did not drop out, but not otherwise, reminders significantly increase the overall amount of charitable giving. We also find that weekly reminders are no more effective than monthly reminders in increasing charitable giving, and that, in our three months duration experiment, standing orders do not increase giving relative to one-off donations. PMID:26252524

  18. On Reminder Effects, Drop-Outs and Dominance: Evidence from an Online Experiment on Charitable Giving.

    PubMed

    Sonntag, Axel; Zizzo, Daniel John

    2015-01-01

    We present the results of an experiment that (a) shows the usefulness of screening out drop-outs and (b) tests whether different methods of payment and reminder intervals affect charitable giving. Following a lab session, participants could make online donations to charity for a total duration of three months. Our procedure justifying the exclusion of drop-outs consists in requiring participants to collect payments in person flexibly and as known in advance and as highlighted to them later. Our interpretation is that participants who failed to collect their positive payments under these circumstances are likely not to satisfy dominance. If we restrict the sample to subjects who did not drop out, but not otherwise, reminders significantly increase the overall amount of charitable giving. We also find that weekly reminders are no more effective than monthly reminders in increasing charitable giving, and that, in our three months duration experiment, standing orders do not increase giving relative to one-off donations. PMID:26252524

  19. Myeloid lineage progenitors give rise to vascular endothelium.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Alexis S; Willenbring, Holger; Jiang, Shuguang; Anderson, Daniel A; Schroeder, David A; Wong, Melissa H; Grompe, Markus; Fleming, William H

    2006-08-29

    Despite an important role in vascular development and repair, the origin of endothelial progenitors remains unknown. Accumulating evidence indicates that cells derived from the hematopoietic system participate in angiogenesis. However, the identity and functional role of these cells remain controversial. Here we show that vascular endothelial cells can differentiate from common myeloid progenitors and granulocyte/macrophage progenitors. Endothelial cells derived from transplanted bone marrow-derived myeloid lineage progenitors expressed CD31, von Willebrand factor, and Tie2 but did not express the hematopoietic markers CD45 and F4/80 or the pericyte markers desmin and smooth muscle actin. Lineage tracing analysis in combination with a Tie2-driven Cre/lox reporter system revealed that, in contrast to bone marrow-derived hepatocytes, bone marrow-derived endothelial cells are not the products of cell fusion. The establishment of both hematopoietic and endothelial cell chimerism after parabiosis demonstrates that circulating cells can give rise to vascular endothelium in the absence of acute radiation injury. Our findings indicate that endothelial cells are an intrinsic component of myeloid lineage differentiation and underscore the close functional relationship between the hematopoietic and vascular systems. PMID:16920790

  20. Myeloid lineage progenitors give rise to vascular endothelium

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Alexis S.; Willenbring, Holger; Jiang, Shuguang; Anderson, Daniel A.; Schroeder, David A.; Wong, Melissa H.; Grompe, Markus; Fleming, William H.

    2006-01-01

    Despite an important role in vascular development and repair, the origin of endothelial progenitors remains unknown. Accumulating evidence indicates that cells derived from the hematopoietic system participate in angiogenesis. However, the identity and functional role of these cells remain controversial. Here we show that vascular endothelial cells can differentiate from common myeloid progenitors and granulocyte/macrophage progenitors. Endothelial cells derived from transplanted bone marrow-derived myeloid lineage progenitors expressed CD31, von Willebrand factor, and Tie2 but did not express the hematopoietic markers CD45 and F4/80 or the pericyte markers desmin and smooth muscle actin. Lineage tracing analysis in combination with a Tie2-driven Cre/lox reporter system revealed that, in contrast to bone marrow-derived hepatocytes, bone marrow-derived endothelial cells are not the products of cell fusion. The establishment of both hematopoietic and endothelial cell chimerism after parabiosis demonstrates that circulating cells can give rise to vascular endothelium in the absence of acute radiation injury. Our findings indicate that endothelial cells are an intrinsic component of myeloid lineage differentiation and underscore the close functional relationship between the hematopoietic and vascular systems. PMID:16920790