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Sample records for glacial maximum climate

  1. High-resolution climate simulation of the last glacial maximum

    SciTech Connect

    Erickson III, David J

    2008-01-01

    The climate of the last glacial maximum (LGM) is simulated with a high-resolution atmospheric general circulation model, the NCAR CCM3 at spectral truncation of T170, corresponding to a grid cell size of roughly 75 km. The purpose of the study is to assess whether there are significant benefits from the higher resolution simulation compared to the lower resolution simulation associated with the role of topography. The LGM simulations were forced with modified CLIMAP sea ice distribution and sea surface temperatures (SST) reduced by 1 C, ice sheet topography, reduced CO{sub 2}, and 21,000 BP orbital parameters. The high-resolution model captures modern climate reasonably well, in particular the distribution of heavy precipitation in the tropical Pacific. For the ice age case, surface temperature simulated by the high-resolution model agrees better with those of proxy estimates than does the low-resolution model. Despite the fact that tropical SSTs were only 2.1 C less than the control run, there are many lowland tropical land areas 4-6 C colder than present. Comparison of T170 model results with the best constrained proxy temperature estimates (noble gas concentrations in groundwater) now yield no significant differences between model and observations. There are also significant upland temperature changes in the best resolved tropical mountain belt (the Andes). We provisionally attribute this result in part as resulting from decreased lateral mixing between ocean and land in a model with more model grid cells. A longstanding model-data discrepancy therefore appears to be resolved without invoking any unusual model physics. The response of the Asian summer monsoon can also be more clearly linked to local geography in the high-resolution model than in the low-resolution model; this distinction should enable more confident validation of climate proxy data with the high-resolution model. Elsewhere, an inferred salinity increase in the subtropical North Atlantic may have

  2. Dust fluxes and iron fertilization in Holocene and Last Glacial Maximum climates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambert, Fabrice; Tagliabue, Alessandro; Shaffer, Gary; Lamy, Frank; Winckler, Gisela; Farias, Laura; Gallardo, Laura; De Pol-Holz, Ricardo

    2015-07-01

    Mineral dust aerosols play a major role in present and past climates. To date, we rely on climate models for estimates of dust fluxes to calculate the impact of airborne micronutrients on biogeochemical cycles. Here we provide a new global dust flux data set for Holocene and Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) conditions based on observational data. A comparison with dust flux simulations highlights regional differences between observations and models. By forcing a biogeochemical model with our new data set and using this model's results to guide a millennial-scale Earth System Model simulation, we calculate the impact of enhanced glacial oceanic iron deposition on the LGM-Holocene carbon cycle. On centennial timescales, the higher LGM dust deposition results in a weak reduction of <10 ppm in atmospheric CO2 due to enhanced efficiency of the biological pump. This is followed by a further ~10 ppm reduction over millennial timescales due to greater carbon burial and carbonate compensation.

  3. The influence of climate on peatland extent in Western Siberia since the Last Glacial Maximum.

    PubMed

    Alexandrov, G A; Brovkin, V A; Kleinen, T

    2016-01-01

    Boreal and subarctic peatlands are an important dynamical component of the earth system. They are sensitive to climate change, and could either continue to serve as a carbon sink or become a carbon source. Climatic thresholds for switching peatlands from sink to source are not well defined, and therefore, incorporating peatlands into Earth system models is a challenging task. Here we introduce a climatic index, warm precipitation excess, to delineate the potential geographic distribution of boreal peatlands for a given climate and landscape morphology. This allows us to explain the present-day distribution of peatlands in Western Siberia, their absence during the Last Glacial Maximum, their expansion during the mid-Holocene, and to form a working hypothesis about the trend to peatland degradation in the southern taiga belt of Western Siberia under an RCP 8.5 scenario for the projected climate in year 2100. PMID:27095029

  4. The influence of climate on peatland extent in Western Siberia since the Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandrov, G. A.; Brovkin, V. A.; Kleinen, T.

    2016-04-01

    Boreal and subarctic peatlands are an important dynamical component of the earth system. They are sensitive to climate change, and could either continue to serve as a carbon sink or become a carbon source. Climatic thresholds for switching peatlands from sink to source are not well defined, and therefore, incorporating peatlands into Earth system models is a challenging task. Here we introduce a climatic index, warm precipitation excess, to delineate the potential geographic distribution of boreal peatlands for a given climate and landscape morphology. This allows us to explain the present-day distribution of peatlands in Western Siberia, their absence during the Last Glacial Maximum, their expansion during the mid-Holocene, and to form a working hypothesis about the trend to peatland degradation in the southern taiga belt of Western Siberia under an RCP 8.5 scenario for the projected climate in year 2100.

  5. The influence of climate on peatland extent in Western Siberia since the Last Glacial Maximum

    PubMed Central

    Alexandrov, G. A.; Brovkin, V. A.; Kleinen, T.

    2016-01-01

    Boreal and subarctic peatlands are an important dynamical component of the earth system. They are sensitive to climate change, and could either continue to serve as a carbon sink or become a carbon source. Climatic thresholds for switching peatlands from sink to source are not well defined, and therefore, incorporating peatlands into Earth system models is a challenging task. Here we introduce a climatic index, warm precipitation excess, to delineate the potential geographic distribution of boreal peatlands for a given climate and landscape morphology. This allows us to explain the present-day distribution of peatlands in Western Siberia, their absence during the Last Glacial Maximum, their expansion during the mid-Holocene, and to form a working hypothesis about the trend to peatland degradation in the southern taiga belt of Western Siberia under an RCP 8.5 scenario for the projected climate in year 2100. PMID:27095029

  6. A brief history of climate - the northern seas from the Last Glacial Maximum to global warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eldevik, Tor; Risebrobakken, Bjørg; Bjune, Anne E.; Andersson, Carin; Birks, H. John B.; Dokken, Trond M.; Drange, Helge; Glessmer, Mirjam S.; Li, Camille; Nilsen, Jan Even Ø.; Otterå, Odd Helge; Richter, Kristin; Skagseth, Øystein

    2014-12-01

    The understanding of climate and climate change is fundamentally concerned with two things: a well-defined and sufficiently complete climate record to be explained, for example of observed temperature, and a relevant mechanistic framework for making closed and consistent inferences concerning cause-and-effect. This is the case for understanding observed climate, as it is the case for historical climate as reconstructed from proxy data and future climate as projected by models. The present study offers a holistic description of northern maritime climate - from the Last Glacial Maximum through to the projected global warming of the 21st century - in this context. It includes the compilation of the most complete temperature record for Norway and the Norwegian Sea to date based on the synthesis of available terrestrial and marine paleoclimate reconstructions into continuous times series, and their continuation into modern and future climate with the instrumental record and a model projection. The scientific literature on a variable northern climate is reviewed against this background, and with a particular emphasis on the role of the Norwegian Atlantic Current - the Gulf Stream's extension towards the Arctic. This includes the introduction of an explicit and relatively simple diagnostic relation to quantify the change in ocean circulation consistent with reconstructed ocean temperatures. It is found that maritime climate and the strength of the Norwegian Atlantic Current are closely related throughout the record. The nature of the relation is however qualitatively different as one progresses from the past, through the present, and into the future.

  7. Climate, CO2, and the history of North American grasses since the Last Glacial Maximum

    PubMed Central

    Cotton, Jennifer M.; Cerling, Thure E.; Hoppe, Kathryn A.; Mosier, Thomas M.; Still, Christopher J.

    2016-01-01

    The spread of C4 grasses in the late Neogene is one of the most important ecological transitions of the Cenozoic, but the primary driver of this global expansion is widely debated. We use the stable carbon isotopic composition (δ13C) of bison and mammoth tissues as a proxy for the relative abundance of C3 and C4 vegetation in their grazing habitat to determine climatic and atmospheric CO2 controls on C4 grass distributions from the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) to the present. We predict the spatial variability of grass δ13C in North America using a mean of three different methods of classification and regression tree (CART) machine learning techniques and nine climatic variables. We show that growing season precipitation and temperature are the strongest predictors of all single climate variables. We apply this CART analysis to high-resolution gridded climate data and Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5) mean paleoclimate model outputs to produce predictive isotope landscape models (“isoscapes”) for the current, mid-Holocene, and LGM average δ13C of grass-dominated areas across North America. From the LGM to the present, C4 grass abundances substantially increased in the Great Plains despite concurrent increases in atmospheric CO2. These results suggest that changes in growing season precipitation rather than atmospheric CO2 were critically important in the Neogene expansion of C4 grasses. PMID:27051865

  8. Climate, CO2, and the history of North American grasses since the Last Glacial Maximum.

    PubMed

    Cotton, Jennifer M; Cerling, Thure E; Hoppe, Kathryn A; Mosier, Thomas M; Still, Christopher J

    2016-03-01

    The spread of C4 grasses in the late Neogene is one of the most important ecological transitions of the Cenozoic, but the primary driver of this global expansion is widely debated. We use the stable carbon isotopic composition (δ(13)C) of bison and mammoth tissues as a proxy for the relative abundance of C3 and C4 vegetation in their grazing habitat to determine climatic and atmospheric CO2 controls on C4 grass distributions from the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) to the present. We predict the spatial variability of grass δ(13)C in North America using a mean of three different methods of classification and regression tree (CART) machine learning techniques and nine climatic variables. We show that growing season precipitation and temperature are the strongest predictors of all single climate variables. We apply this CART analysis to high-resolution gridded climate data and Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5) mean paleoclimate model outputs to produce predictive isotope landscape models ("isoscapes") for the current, mid-Holocene, and LGM average δ(13)C of grass-dominated areas across North America. From the LGM to the present, C4 grass abundances substantially increased in the Great Plains despite concurrent increases in atmospheric CO2. These results suggest that changes in growing season precipitation rather than atmospheric CO2 were critically important in the Neogene expansion of C4 grasses. PMID:27051865

  9. Sensitivity of Last Glacial Maximum climate to uncertainties in tropical and subtropical ocean temperatures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hostetler, S.; Pisias, N.; Mix, A.

    2006-01-01

    The faunal and floral gradients that underlie the CLIMAP (1981) sea-surface temperature (SST) reconstructions for the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) reflect ocean temperature gradients and frontal positions. The transfer functions used to reconstruct SSTs from biologic gradients are biased, however, because at the warmest sites they display inherently low sensitivity in translating fauna to SST and they underestimate SST within the euphotic zones where the pycnocline is strong. Here we assemble available data and apply a statistical approach to adjust for hypothetical biases in the faunal-based SST estimates of LGM temperature. The largest bias adjustments are distributed in the tropics (to address low sensitivity) and subtropics (to address underestimation in the euphotic zones). The resulting SSTs are generally in better agreement than CLIMAP with recent geochemical estimates of glacial-interglacial temperature changes. We conducted a series of model experiments using the GENESIS general atmospheric circulation model to assess the sensitivity of the climate system to our bias-adjusted SSTs. Globally, the new SST field results in a modeled LGM surface-air cooling relative to present of 6.4 ??C (1.9 ??C cooler than that of CLIMAP). Relative to the simulation with CLIMAP SSTs, modeled precipitation over the oceans is reduced by 0.4 mm d-1 (an anomaly -0.4 versus 0.0 mm d-1 for CLIMAP) and increased over land (an anomaly -0.2 versus -0.5 mm d-1 for CLIMAP). Regionally strong responses are induced by changes in SST gradients. Data-model comparisons indicate improvement in agreement relative to CLIMAP, but differences among terrestrial data inferences and simulated moisture and temperature remain. Our SSTs result in positive mass balance over the northern hemisphere ice sheets (primarily through reduced summer ablation), supporting the hypothesis that tropical and subtropical ocean temperatures may have played a role in triggering glacial changes at higher latitudes.

  10. Climatic controls of western U.S. glaciers at the last glacial maximum

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hostetler, S.W.; Clark, P.U.

    1997-01-01

    We use a nested atmospheric modeling strategy to simulate precipitation and temperature of the western United States 18,000 years ago (18 ka). The high resolution of the nested model allows us to isolate the regional structure of summer temperature and winter precipitation that is crucial to determination of the net mass balance of late-Pleistocene mountain glaciers in this region of diverse topography and climate. Modeling results suggest that climatic controls of these glaciers varied significantly over the western U.S. Glaciers in the northern Rocky Mountains existed under relatively cold July temperatures and low winter accumulation, reflecting anticyclonic, easterly wind flow off the Laurentide Ice Sheet. In contrast, glaciers that existed under relatively warmer and wetter conditions are located along the Pacific coast south of Oregon, where enhanced westerlies delivered higher precipitation than at present. Between these two groupings lie glaciers that were controlled by a mix of cold and wet conditions attributed to the convergence of cold air from the ice sheet and moisture derived from the westerlies. Sensitivity tests suggest that, for our simulated 18 ka climate, many of the glaciers exhibit a variable response to climate but were generally more sensitive to changes in temperature than to changes in precipitation, particularly those glaciers in central Idaho and the Yellowstone Plateau. Our results support arguments that temperature depression generally played a larger role in lowering equilibrium line altitudes in the western U.S. during the last glacial maximum than did increased precipitation, although the magnitude of temperature depression required for steady-state mass balance varied from 8-18??C. Only the Sierra Nevada glaciers required a substantial increase in precipitation to achieve steady-state mass balance, while glaciers in the Cascade Range existed with decreased precipitation.

  11. Assessing the reliability of climate model ensembles using the Last Glacial Maximum and Mid Holocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hargreaves, J. C.; Annan, J. D.; Paul, A.; Ohgaito, R.; Abe-Ouchi, A.

    2011-12-01

    The principal obstacle to assessing the reliability of projections from the multi-model ensembles is the long term nature of the forecast, which means that it is not possible to regularly confront the forecast system with new observational data. Thus, while encouraging results have been obtained assessing the CMIP3 ensemble on the global scale with respect to modern climate, this does not necessarily imply that the ensembles will remain reliable when run for future scenarios. We should, therefore, further assess and update our confidence in the ensemble by quantitative assessment of model performance for other climate states, that were not used during the model development process. For CMIP3 (and also CMIP5) the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) and Mid Holocene qualify as a suitable climates from this point of view. Furthermore, the quality and quantity of available data at these periods is superior to other more distant periods with several gridded datasets having become available in recent years. We have analysed two LGM multi-model ensembles (the PMIP1 slab-ocean and PMIP2 coupled-ocean ensembles) with respect to the MARGO sea surface temperature dataset through the rank histogram method. Encouraging results, which add support to the hypothesis that the ensembles may reliably represent climate change, were obtained for both ensembles. The analysis also highlighted systematic differences between the two ensembles, consistent with the different model complexities. On the other hand, a single-model ensemble based on MIROC3.2 was found to be much less reliable. New results from continuing analyses incorporating terrestrial pollen datasets for the LGM and mid Holocene, alternative statistical assessments, and model runs from CMIP5 (as available) will also be presented.

  12. The simulated climate of the Last Glacial Maximum and the insights into the global carbon cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matear, R. J.; Lenton, A.; Etheridge, D.; Phipps, S. J.

    2015-03-01

    Global climate models (GCMs) provide an important tool for simulating the earth's climate. Here we present a GCM simulation of the climate of the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM), which was obtained by setting atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations and the earth's orbital parameters to the values which prevailed at 21 000 years before present (BP). During the LGM, we simulate a significant cooling of the ocean and a dramatic expansion of the sea-ice extent. This behaviour agrees with reconstructions from paleoclimate archives. In the ocean, the LGM simulation produces a significant redistribution of dissolved oxygen and carbon. The oxygen levels rise and the volume of anoxic water declines by more than 50%, which is consistent with paleoclimate reconstructions of denitrification. The simulated LGM climate also stores more carbon in the deep ocean (below 2000 m), but with a reduced atmospheric CO2 level the total carbon stored in the ocean declines by 600 Pg C. The LGM ocean circulation preconditions the ocean to store carbon in the deep; however, the ocean circulation and sea-ice changes are insufficient alone to increase the total carbon stored in the ocean and modifications to the ocean biogeochemical cycles are required. With modifications to organic and inorganic carbon export and organic carbon remineralization one can increase ocean carbon storage (240 Pg C) to a level that is sufficient to explain the reduction in atmospheric and land carbon during the LGM (520 ± 400 Pg C). With the modified biogeochemical cycling in the ocean, the simulated aragonite lysocline depth and dissolved oxygen become more consistent with paleo-reconstructions.

  13. Responses of Amazonian ecosystems to climatic and atmospheric carbon dioxide changes since the last glacial maximum.

    PubMed Central

    Mayle, Francis E; Beerling, David J; Gosling, William D; Bush, Mark B

    2004-01-01

    The aims of this paper are to review previously published palaeovegetation and independent palaeoclimatic datasets together with new results we present from dynamic vegetation model simulations and modern pollen rain studies to: (i) determine the responses of Amazonian ecosystems to changes in temperature, precipitation and atmospheric CO2 concentrations that occurred since the last glacial maximum (LGM), ca. 21 000 years ago; and (ii) use this long-term perspective to predict the likely vegetation responses to future climate change. Amazonia remained predominantly forested at the LGM, although the combination of reduced temperatures, precipitation and atmospheric CO2 concentrations resulted in forests structurally and floristically quite different from those of today. Cold-adapted Andean taxa mixed with rainforest taxa in central areas, while dry forest species and lianas probably became important in the more seasonal southern Amazon forests and savannahs expanded at forest-savannah ecotones. Net primary productivity (NPP) and canopy density were significantly lower than today. Evergreen rainforest distribution and NPP increased during the glacial-Holocene transition owing to ameliorating climatic and CO2 conditions. However, reduced precipitation in the Early-Mid-Holocene (ca. 8000-3600 years ago) caused widespread, frequent fires in seasonal southern Amazonia, causing increased abundance of drought-tolerant dry forest taxa and savannahs in ecotonal areas. Rainforests expanded once more in the Late Holocene owing to increased precipitation caused by greater austral summer insolation, although some of this forest expansion (e.g. in parts of the Bolivian Beni) is clearly caused by palaeo Indian landscape modification. The plant communities that existed during the Early-Mid-Holocene may provide insights into the kinds of vegetation response expected from similar increases in temperature and aridity predicted for the twenty-first century. We infer that ecotonal areas

  14. A Short Guide to the Climatic Variables of the Last Glacial Maximum for Biogeographers

    PubMed Central

    Varela, Sara; Lima-Ribeiro, Matheus S.; Terribile, Levi Carina

    2015-01-01

    Ecological niche models are widely used for mapping the distribution of species during the last glacial maximum (LGM). Although the selection of the variables and General Circulation Models (GCMs) used for constructing those maps determine the model predictions, we still lack a discussion about which variables and which GCM should be included in the analysis and why. Here, we analyzed the climatic predictions for the LGM of 9 different GCMs in order to help biogeographers to select their GCMs and climatic layers for mapping the species ranges in the LGM. We 1) map the discrepancies between the climatic predictions of the nine GCMs available for the LGM, 2) analyze the similarities and differences between the GCMs and group them to help researchers choose the appropriate GCMs for calibrating and projecting their ecological niche models (ENM) during the LGM, and 3) quantify the agreement of the predictions for each bioclimatic variable to help researchers avoid the environmental variables with a poor consensus between models. Our results indicate that, in absolute values, GCMs have a strong disagreement in their temperature predictions for temperate areas, while the uncertainties for the precipitation variables are in the tropics. In spite of the discrepancies between model predictions, temperature variables (BIO1-BIO11) are highly correlated between models. Precipitation variables (BIO12- BIO19) show no correlation between models, and specifically, BIO14 (precipitation of the driest month) and BIO15 (Precipitation Seasonality (Coefficient of Variation)) show the highest level of discrepancy between GCMs. Following our results, we strongly recommend the use of different GCMs for constructing or projecting ENMs, particularly when predicting the distribution of species that inhabit the tropics and the temperate areas of the Northern and Southern Hemispheres, because climatic predictions for those areas vary greatly among GCMs. We also recommend the exclusion of BIO14

  15. A Short Guide to the Climatic Variables of the Last Glacial Maximum for Biogeographers.

    PubMed

    Varela, Sara; Lima-Ribeiro, Matheus S; Terribile, Levi Carina

    2015-01-01

    Ecological niche models are widely used for mapping the distribution of species during the last glacial maximum (LGM). Although the selection of the variables and General Circulation Models (GCMs) used for constructing those maps determine the model predictions, we still lack a discussion about which variables and which GCM should be included in the analysis and why. Here, we analyzed the climatic predictions for the LGM of 9 different GCMs in order to help biogeographers to select their GCMs and climatic layers for mapping the species ranges in the LGM. We 1) map the discrepancies between the climatic predictions of the nine GCMs available for the LGM, 2) analyze the similarities and differences between the GCMs and group them to help researchers choose the appropriate GCMs for calibrating and projecting their ecological niche models (ENM) during the LGM, and 3) quantify the agreement of the predictions for each bioclimatic variable to help researchers avoid the environmental variables with a poor consensus between models. Our results indicate that, in absolute values, GCMs have a strong disagreement in their temperature predictions for temperate areas, while the uncertainties for the precipitation variables are in the tropics. In spite of the discrepancies between model predictions, temperature variables (BIO1-BIO11) are highly correlated between models. Precipitation variables (BIO12-BIO19) show no correlation between models, and specifically, BIO14 (precipitation of the driest month) and BIO15 (Precipitation Seasonality (Coefficient of Variation)) show the highest level of discrepancy between GCMs. Following our results, we strongly recommend the use of different GCMs for constructing or projecting ENMs, particularly when predicting the distribution of species that inhabit the tropics and the temperate areas of the Northern and Southern Hemispheres, because climatic predictions for those areas vary greatly among GCMs. We also recommend the exclusion of BIO14

  16. Synchronicity of Kuroshio Current and climate system variability since the Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Xufeng; Li, Anchun; Kao, ShuhJi; Gong, Xun; Frank, Martin; Kuhn, Gerhard; Cai, Wenju; Yan, Hong; Wan, Shiming; Zhang, Honghai; Jiang, Fuqing; Hathorne, Edmund; Chen, Zhong; Hu, Bangqi

    2016-10-01

    The Kuroshio Current (KC) is the northward branch of the North Pacific subtropical gyre (NPG) and exerts influence on the exchange of physical, chemical, and biological properties of downstream regions in the Pacific Ocean. Resolving long-term changes in the flow of the KC water masses is, therefore, crucial for advancing our understanding of the Pacific's role in global ocean and climate variability. Here, we reconstruct changes in KC dynamics over the past 20 ka based on grain-size spectra, clay mineral, and Sr-Nd isotope constraints of sediments from the northern Okinawa Trough. Combined with published sediment records surrounding the NPG, we suggest that the KC remained in the Okinawa Trough throughout the Last Glacial Maximum. Together with Earth-System-Model simulations, our results additionally indicate that KC intensified considerably during the early Holocene (EH). The synchronous establishment of the KC "water barrier" and the modern circulation pattern during the EH highstand shaped the sediment transport patterns. This is ascribed to the precession-induced increase in the occurrence of La Niña-like state and the strength of the East Asian summer monsoon. The synchronicity of the shifts in the intensity of the KC, Kuroshio extension, and El Niño/La Niña-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) variability may further indicate that the western branch of the NPG has been subject to basin-scale changes in wind stress curl over the North Pacific in response to low-latitude insolation. Superimposed on this long-term trend are high-amplitude, large century, and millennial-scale variations during last 5 ka, which are ascribed to the advent of modern ENSO when the equatorial oceans experienced stronger insolation during the boreal winter.

  17. Exploring the impact of climate variability during the Last Glacial Maximum on the pattern of human occupation of Iberia.

    PubMed

    Burke, Ariane; Levavasseur, Guillaume; James, Patrick M A; Guiducci, Dario; Izquierdo, Manuel Arturo; Bourgeon, Lauriane; Kageyama, Masa; Ramstein, Gilles; Vrac, Mathieu

    2014-08-01

    The Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) was a global climate event, which had significant repercussions for the spatial distribution and demographic history of prehistoric populations. In Eurasia, the LGM coincides with a potential bottleneck for modern humans and may mark the divergence date for Asian and European populations (Keinan et al., 2007). In this research, the impact of climate variability on human populations in the Iberian Peninsula during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) is examined with the aid of downscaled high-resolution (16 × 16 km) numerical climate experiments. Human sensitivity to short time-scale (inter-annual) climate variability during this key time period, which follows the initial modern human colonisation of Eurasia and the extinction of the Neanderthals, is tested using the spatial distribution of archaeological sites. Results indicate that anatomically modern human populations responded to small-scale spatial patterning in climate variability, specifically inter-annual variability in precipitation levels as measured by the standard precipitation index. Climate variability at less than millennial scale, therefore, is shown to be an important component of ecological risk, one that played a role in regulating the spatial behaviour of prehistoric human populations and consequently affected their social networks. PMID:25034085

  18. The effect of a dynamic soil scheme on the climate of the mid-Holocene and the Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stärz, M.; Lohmann, G.; Knorr, G.

    2016-01-01

    In order to account for coupled climate-soil processes, we have developed a soil scheme which is asynchronously coupled to a comprehensive climate model with dynamic vegetation. This scheme considers vegetation as the primary control of changes in physical soil characteristics. We test the scheme for a warmer (mid-Holocene) and colder (Last Glacial Maximum) climate relative to the preindustrial climate. We find that the computed changes in physical soil characteristics lead to significant amplification of global climate anomalies, representing a positive feedback. The inclusion of the soil feedback yields an extra surface warming of 0.24 °C for the mid-Holocene and an additional global cooling of 1.07 °C for the Last Glacial Maximum. Transition zones such as desert-savannah and taiga-tundra exhibit a pronounced response in the model version with dynamic soil properties. Energy balance model analyses reveal that our soil scheme amplifies the temperature anomalies in the mid-to-high northern latitudes via changes in the planetary albedo and the effective longwave emissivity. As a result of the modified soil treatment and the positive feedback to climate, part of the underestimated mid-Holocene temperature response to orbital forcing can be reconciled in the model.

  19. The effect of a dynamic soil scheme on the climate of the mid-Holocene and the Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stärz, Michael; Lohmann, Gerrit; Knorr, Gregor

    2016-04-01

    In order to account for coupled climate-soil processes, we have developed a soil scheme, which is asynchronously coupled to a comprehensive climate model with dynamic vegetation. This scheme considers vegetation as the primary control of changes in physical soil characteristics. We test the scheme for a warmer (mid-Holocene) and colder (Last Glacial Maximum) climate relative to the preindustrial climate. We find that the computed changes of physical soil characteristics lead to significant amplification of global climate anomalies, representing a positive feedback. The inclusion of the soil feedback yields an extra surface warming of 0.24°C for the mid-Holocene and an additional global cooling of 1.07°C for the Last Glacial Maximum. Transition zones such as desert/savannah and taiga/tundra exhibit a pronounced response in the model version with dynamic soil properties. Energy balance model analyses reveal that our soil scheme amplifies the temperature anomalies in the mid-to-high northern latitudes via changes in the planetary albedo and the effective longwave emissivity. As a result of the modified soil treatment and the positive feedback on climate, part of the underestimated mid-Holocene temperature response to orbital forcing can be reconciled in the model.

  20. Lake-levels, vegetation and climate in Central Asia during the Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amosov, Mikhail

    2014-05-01

    Central Asian region is bounded in the east corner of the Greater Khingan Range and the Loess Plateau, and to the west - the Caspian Sea. This representation of region boundaries is based on classical works of A.Humboldt and V.Obruchev. Three typical features of Central Asia nature are: climate aridity, extensive inland drainage basins with numerous lakes and mountain systems with developed glaciation. Nowadays the extensive data is accumulated about lake-levels during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) in Central Asia. Data compilation on 20 depressions, where lakes exist now or where they existed during LGM, shows that most of them had usually higher lake-level than at present time. This regularity could be mentioned for the biggest lakes (the Aral Sea, the Balkhash, the Ysyk-Kol etc.) and for small ones that located in the mountains (Tien Shan, Pamir and Tibet). All of these lake basins get the precipitation due to westerlies. On the other hand lakes, which are located in region's east rimland (Lake Qinghai and lakes in Inner Mongolia) and get the precipitation due to summer East Asian monsoons, do not comply with the proposed regularity. During LGM these lake-levels were lower than nowadays. Another exception is Lake Manas, its lake-level was also lowered. Lake Manas is situated at the bottom of Junggar Basin. There are many small rivers, which come from the ranges and suffer the violent fluctuation in the position of its lower channel. It is possible to assume that some of its runoff did not get to Lake Manas during LGM. Mentioned facts suggest that levels of the most Central Asian lakes were higher during LGM comparing to their current situation. However, at that period vegetation was more xerophytic than now. Pollen data confirm this information for Tibet, Pamir and Tien Shan. Climate aridization of Central Asia can be proved by data about the intensity of loess accumulation during LGM. This evidence received for the east part of region (the Loess Plateau) and

  1. Global connections between aeolian dust, climate and ocean biogeochemistry at the present day and at the last glacial maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maher, B. A.; Prospero, J. M.; Mackie, D.; Gaiero, D.; Hesse, P. P.; Balkanski, Y.

    2010-04-01

    Palaeo-dust records in sediments and ice cores show that wind-borne mineral aerosol ('dust') is strongly linked with climate state. During glacial climate stages, for example, the world was much dustier, with dust fluxes two to five times greater than in interglacial stages. However, the influence of dust on climate remains a poorly quantified and actively changing element of the Earth's climate system. Dust can influence climate directly, by the scattering and absorption of solar and terrestrial radiation, and indirectly, by modifying cloud properties. Dust transported to the oceans can also affect climate via ocean fertilization in those regions of the world's oceans where macronutrients like nitrate are abundant but primary production and nitrogen fixation are limited by iron scarcity. Dust containing iron, as fine-grained iron oxides/oxyhydroxides and/or within clay minerals, and other essential micronutrients (e.g. silica) may modulate the uptake of carbon in marine ecosystems and, in turn, the atmospheric concentration of CO 2. Here, in order to critically examine past fluxes and possible climate impacts of dust in general and iron-bearing dust in particular, we consider present-day sources and properties of dust, synthesise available records of dust deposition at the last glacial maximum (LGM); evaluate the evidence for changes in ocean palaeo-productivity associated with, and possibly caused by, changes in aeolian flux to the oceans at the LGM; and consider the radiative forcing effects of increased LGM dust loadings.

  2. Tropical climate at the last glacial maximum inferred from glacier mass-balance modeling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hostetler, S.W.; Clark, P.U.

    2000-01-01

    Model-derived equilibrium line altitudes (ELAs) of former tropical glaciers support arguments, based on other paleoclimate data, for both the magnitude and spatial pattern of terrestrial cooling in the tropics at the last glacial maximum (LGM). Relative to the present, LGM ELAs were maintained by air temperatures that were 3.5??to 6.6 ??C lower and precipitation that ranged from 63% wetter in Hawaii to 25% drier on Mt. Kenya, Africa. Our results imply the need for a ~3 ??C cooling of LGM sea surface temperatures in the western Pacific warm pool. Sensitivity tests suggest that LGM ELAs could have persisted until 16,000 years before the present in the Peruvian Andes and on Papua, New Guinea.

  3. Statistical Downscaling of Last Glacial Maximum and mid-Holocene climate simululations over the Continental United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondal, Y.; Chiang, J. C. H.; Koo, M.

    2014-12-01

    We document the creation of new high-resolution temperature and precipitation fields over the continental United States during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) and mid-Holocene intended for hind-casting species distributions and other biotic scenarios. Global climate simulations do not have the resolution to capture local climate variability that is needed to model ecological and biological variability. To this end, we use a recently developed statistical downscaling method, Equidistant CDF Matching (EDCDFm), developed by Li et al. (2010) [1] to create synthetic high-resolution estimates of the LGM and mid-Holocene climate over the continental United States. We find that this method works well for temperature but performs poorly for precipitation. This required processing over 1.5 billion time series. To do this, we wrote cluster-computing routines in MATLAB and implemented them on Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud.

  4. Gridded climate data from 5 GCMs of the Last Glacial Maximum downscaled to 30 arc s for Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmatz, D. R.; Luterbacher, J.; Zimmermann, N. E.; Pearman, P. B.

    2015-06-01

    Studies of the impacts of historical, current and future global change require very high-resolution climate data (≤ 1 km) as a basis for modelled responses, meaning that data from digital climate models generally require substantial rescaling. Another shortcoming of available datasets on past climate is that the effects of sea level rise and fall are not considered. Without such information, the study of glacial refugia or early Holocene plant and animal migration are incomplete if not impossible. Sea level at the last glacial maximum (LGM) was approximately 125 m lower, creating substantial additional terrestrial area for which no current baseline data exist. Here, we introduce the development of a novel, gridded climate dataset for LGM that is both very high resolution (1 km) and extends to the LGM sea and land mask. We developed two methods to extend current terrestrial precipitation and temperature data to areas between the current and LGM coastlines. The absolute interpolation error is less than 1 and 0.5 °C for 98.9 and 87.8 %, respectively, of all pixels within two arc degrees of the current coastline. We use the change factor method with these newly assembled baseline data to downscale five global circulation models of LGM climate to a resolution of 1 km for Europe. As additional variables we calculate 19 "bioclimatic" variables, which are often used in climate change impact studies on biological diversity. The new LGM climate maps are well suited for analysing refugia and migration during Holocene warming following the LGM.

  5. The climate of the Last Glacial Maximum in south-eastern Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shulmeister, J.; Cohen, T.; Kiernan, K.; Woodward, C.; Barrows, T.; Fitzsimmons, K.; Kemp, J.; Haworth, R.; Clark, D. H.; Gontz, A. M.; Chang, J.; Mueller, D.; Slee, A.; Ellerton, D.

    2015-12-01

    The Last Glaciation Maximum (c. 25-18 kyr) in south-eastern Australia has traditionally been regarded as both significantly colder than the present and much more arid. This was based on a variety of evidence including the dramatic reduction in tree pollen and dune activity in currently humid areas such as the Blue Mountains of NSW. Maintaining arid conditions under significantly lower temperatures is quite challenging and not all lines of evidence supported strong aridity. Over the last four years an ARC project has worked to develop new lines of evidence to test these inferences. Outcomes from the project indicate that winter temperatures were significantly colder than at present (an 8-11 C decrease) while summer temperatures were cooler but not as extreme (4-6.5 C). Moisture balances appear to have been more positive than present along the eastern highlands, while areas to the west were comparatively drier. The humid zone along the divide maintained at least seasonally stronger flows in the major rivers, meaning that water was more available in western districts than under modern climates. I will summarise the evidence for this new pattern and highlight the climatological patterns that would be consistent with the reconstruction. I will conclude by speculating on the implications for both human landscape use and what happened to the vegetation.

  6. Constraining the Last Glacial Maximum climate by data-model (iLOVECLIM) comparison using oxygen stable isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caley, T.; Roche, D. M.; Waelbroeck, C.; Michel, E.

    2014-01-01

    We use the fully coupled atmosphere-ocean three-dimensional model of intermediate complexity iLOVECLIM to simulate the climate and oxygen stable isotopic signal during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM, 21 000 yr). By using a model that is able to explicitly simulate the sensor (δ18O), results can be directly compared with data from climatic archives in the different realms. Our results indicate that iLOVECLIM reproduces well the main feature of the LGM climate in the atmospheric and oceanic components. The annual mean δ18O in precipitation shows more depleted values in the northern and southern high latitudes during the LGM. The model reproduces very well the spatial gradient observed in ice core records over the Greenland ice-sheet. We observe a general pattern toward more enriched values for continental calcite δ18O in the model at the LGM, in agreement with speleothem data. This can be explained by both a general atmospheric cooling in the tropical and subtropical regions and a reduction in precipitation as confirmed by reconstruction derived from pollens and plant macrofossils. Data-model comparison for sea surface temperature indicates that iLOVECLIM is capable to satisfyingly simulate the change in oceanic surface conditions between the LGM and present. Our data-model comparison for calcite δ18O allows investigating the large discrepancies with respect to glacial temperatures recorded by different microfossil proxies in the North Atlantic region. The results argue for a trong mean annual cooling between the LGM and present (> 6°C), supporting the foraminifera transfer function reconstruction but in disagreement with alkenones and dinocyst reconstructions. The data-model comparison also reveals that large positive calcite δ18O anomaly in the Southern Ocean may be explained by an important cooling, although the driver of this pattern is unclear. We deduce a large positive δ18Osw anomaly for the north Indian Ocean that contrasts with a large negative δ18Osw

  7. Oxygen stable isotopes during the Last Glacial Maximum climate: perspectives from data-model (iLOVECLIM) comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caley, T.; Roche, D. M.; Waelbroeck, C.; Michel, E.

    2014-11-01

    We use the fully coupled atmosphere-ocean three-dimensional model of intermediate complexity iLOVECLIM to simulate the climate and oxygen stable isotopic signal during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM, 21 000 years). By using a model that is able to explicitly simulate the sensor (δ18O), results can be directly compared with data from climatic archives in the different realms. Our results indicate that iLOVECLIM reproduces well the main feature of the LGM climate in the atmospheric and oceanic components. The annual mean δ18O in precipitation shows more depleted values in the northern and southern high latitudes during the LGM. The model reproduces very well the spatial gradient observed in ice core records over the Greenland ice sheet. We observe a general pattern toward more enriched values for continental calcite δ18O in the model at the LGM, in agreement with speleothem data. This can be explained by both a general atmospheric cooling in the tropical and subtropical regions and a reduction in precipitation as confirmed by reconstruction derived from pollens and plant macrofossils. Data-model comparison for sea surface temperature indicates that iLOVECLIM is capable to satisfyingly simulate the change in oceanic surface conditions between the LGM and present. Our data-model comparison for calcite δ18O allows investigating the large discrepancies with respect to glacial temperatures recorded by different microfossil proxies in the North Atlantic region. The results argue for a strong mean annual cooling in the area south of Iceland and Greenland between the LGM and present (> 6 °C), supporting the foraminifera transfer function reconstruction but in disagreement with alkenones and dinocyst reconstructions. The data-model comparison also reveals that large positive calcite δ18O anomaly in the Southern Ocean may be explained by an important cooling, although the driver of this pattern is unclear. We deduce a large positive δ18Osw anomaly for the north Indian

  8. Climate sensitivity estimated from temperature reconstructions of the Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmittner, A.; Urban, N.; Shakun, J. D.; Mahowald, N. M.; Clark, P. U.; Bartlein, P. J.; Mix, A. C.; Rosell-Melé, A.

    2011-12-01

    In 1959 IJ Good published the discussion "Kinds of Probability" in Science. Good identified (at least) five kinds. The need for (at least) a sixth kind of probability when quantifying uncertainty in the context of climate science is discussed. This discussion brings out the differences in weather-like forecasting tasks and climate-links tasks, with a focus on the effective use both of science and of modelling in support of decision making. Good also introduced the idea of a "Dynamic probability" a probability one expects to change without any additional empirical evidence; the probabilities assigned by a chess playing program when it is only half thorough its analysis being an example. This case is contrasted with the case of "Mature probabilities" where a forecast algorithm (or model) has converged on its asymptotic probabilities and the question hinges in whether or not those probabilities are expected to change significantly before the event in question occurs, even in the absence of new empirical evidence. If so, then how might one report and deploy such immature probabilities in scientific-support of decision-making rationally? Mature Probability is suggested as a useful sixth kind, although Good would doubtlessly argue that we can get by with just one, effective communication with decision makers may be enhanced by speaking as if the others existed. This again highlights the distinction between weather-like contexts and climate-like contexts. In the former context one has access to a relevant climatology (a relevant, arguably informative distribution prior to any model simulations), in the latter context that information is not available although one can fall back on the scientific basis upon which the model itself rests, and estimate the probability that the model output is in fact misinformative. This subjective "probability of a big surprise" is one way to communicate the probability of model-based information holding in practice, the probability that the

  9. The influence of continental ice, atmospheric CO2, and land albedo on the climate of the last glacial maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broccoli, A. J.; Manabe, S.

    1987-02-01

    The contributions of expanded continental ice, reduced atmospheric CO2, and changes in land albedo to the maintenance of the climate of the last glacial maximum (LGM) are examined. A series of experiments is performed using an atmosphere-mixed layer ocean model in which these changes in boundary conditions are incorporated either singly or in combination. The model used has been shown to produce a reasonably realistic simulation of the reduced temperature of the LGM (Manabe and Broccoli 1985b). By comparing the results from pairs of experiments, the effects of each of these environmental changes can be determined. Expanded continental ice and reduced atmospheric CO2 are found to have a substantial impact on global mean temperature. The ice sheet effect is confined almost exclusively to the Northern Hemisphere, while lowered CO2 cools both hemispheres. Changes in land albedo over ice-free areas have only a minor thermal effect on a global basis. The reduction of CO2 content in the atmosphere is the primary contributor to the cooling of the Southern Hemisphere. The model sensitivity to both the ice sheet and CO2 effects is characterized by a high latitude amplification and a late autumn and early winter maximum. Substantial changes in Northern Hemisphere tropospheric circulation are found in response to LGM boundary conditions during winter. An amplified flow pattern and enhanced westerlies occur in the vicinity of the North American and Eurasian ice sheets. These alterations of the tropospheric circulation are primarily the result of the ice sheet effect, with reduced CO2 contributing only a slight amplification of the ice sheet-induced pattern.

  10. Marine palynological record for tropical climate variations since the late last glacial maximum in the northern South China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Lu; Weng, Chengyu

    2015-12-01

    The upper part (191-1439 cm) of the marine sediment core MD05-2906 from the northern South China Sea (SCS) was palynologically investigated. The chronology suggested that it covered the record since ~19 calendar kiloyears before present (cal ka BP) and revealed a detailed environmental change history since the late last glacial maximum (LGM). During the late LGM, due to the lowered sea level (~100 m lower) and the shortened distance from the shore to the study site, the pollen concentration was very high. The pollen assemblages were dominated by non-arboreal taxa, especially Artemisia pollen, before ~15 cal ka BP. Abundant subtropical and tropical pollen taxa were still important components and a south subtropical climate prevailed during the late LGM. The coexistent rich Artemisia pollen possibly was not derived from near shores, but was derived mainly from the northern exposed continental shelf in the East China Sea (ECS). After ~15 cal ka BP, with the rise in the sea level and enhanced distance from the pollen source areas to the core site, pollen concentrations started to decline gradually. However, during the late deglaciation and early Holocene, the higher concentrations of many pollen taxa reoccurred, which cannot be attributed to the sea level changes. Pinus pollen deposited in the core, which is considered to be mostly water-carried based on many modern pollen surveys, also started to dramatically increase at the same time. Therefore, the higher pollen concentration, with more Pinus and Typha (an aquatic plant) pollen indicated a notably enhanced terrestrial runoff and precipitation during the last deglaciation/Holocene transition (~11.3-9.4 cal ka BP). We inferred that a strong summer monsoon occurred at this time. During the late LGM/deglaciation transition period, the pollen assemblage reflected a gradually warming climate, and the climate fluctuations derived from the high-latitudes were not well-identified. This study suggests that solar insolation

  11. Climate Controls on Last Glacial Maximum to Early Holocene Glacier Extents in the Rwenzori Mountains, Uganda-Democratic Republic of Congo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, M. S.; Kelly, M. A.; Russell, J. M.; Baber, M.; Loomis, S. E.

    2014-12-01

    The climate controls on past and present tropical glacier fluctuations are unclear. Here we present a chronology of past glacial extents in the Rwenzori Mountains (~1ºN, 30ºE), on the border of Uganda and the Democratic Republic of Congo, and compare this with local and regional paleoclimate records to infer the climate controls on glaciation. The Rwenzori Mountains host the most extensive glacial system in Africa and are composed of quartz-rich bedrock lithologies, enabling 10Be dating. Our dataset includes thirty 10Be ages of boulders on moraines estimated to have been deposited between the end of the last glacial period and early Holocene time. In the Mubuku Valley, eight 10Be ages of large (~50-150 m relief) lateral moraines that extend down to ~2000 m asl indicate that deposition occurred at ~23.4 ka (n=4) and ~20.1 ka (n=4), contemporaneously with the global Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). Local and regional paleoclimate records document dry, cool conditions in East Africa during this time. Therefore, we suggest that cooler temperatures were a primary influence on the LGM glacial extents. Upvalley from these samples, six 10Be ages of boulders on moraines (between 3450 and 3720 m asl) document stillstands or readvances of glacier ice at ~14.3 ka (n=2), ~13.2 ka (n=2), and ~11.1 ka (n=2). In the nearby Nyagumasani Valley sixteen 10Be ages of boulders on moraines at similar elevations (3870-4020 m asl) indicate stillstands or readvances at ~11.5 ka (n=4), ~10.6 ka (n=4), and ~10.5 ka (n=4). Local and regional paleoclimate records indicate dry conditions during Younger Dryas time, wet conditions during early Holocene time, and no significant late-glacial temperature reversal. Thus, the relationship between glacier advance and climate conditions during late-glacial time remains enigmatic. We continue to develop the moraine chronology in order to improve our interpretations of climate controls on glacier fluctuations during late-glacial to early Holocene time.

  12. Comparing modeled and observed changes in mineral dust transport and deposition to Antarctica between the Last Glacial Maximum and current climates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albani, Samuel; Mahowald, Natalie M.; Delmonte, Barbara; Maggi, Valter; Winckler, Gisela

    2012-05-01

    Mineral dust aerosols represent an active component of the Earth's climate system, by interacting with radiation directly, and by modifying clouds and biogeochemistry. Mineral dust from polar ice cores over the last million years can be used as paleoclimate proxy, and provide unique information about climate variability, as changes in dust deposition at the core sites can be due to changes in sources, transport and/or deposition locally. Here we present results from a study based on climate model simulations using the Community Climate System Model. The focus of this work is to analyze simulated differences in the dust concentration, size distribution and sources in current climate conditions and during the Last Glacial Maximum at specific ice core locations in Antarctica, and compare with available paleodata. Model results suggest that South America is the most important source for dust deposited in Antarctica in current climate, but Australia is also a major contributor and there is spatial variability in the relative importance of the major dust sources. During the Last Glacial Maximum the dominant source in the model was South America, because of the increased activity of glaciogenic dust sources in Southern Patagonia-Tierra del Fuego and the Southernmost Pampas regions, as well as an increase in transport efficiency southward. Dust emitted from the Southern Hemisphere dust source areas usually follow zonal patterns, but southward flow towards Antarctica is located in specific areas characterized by southward displacement of air masses. Observations and model results consistently suggest a spatially variable shift in dust particle sizes. This is due to a combination of relatively reduced en route wet removal favouring a generalized shift towards smaller particles, and on the other hand to an enhanced relative contribution of dry coarse particle deposition in the Last Glacial Maximum.

  13. A new coupled ice sheet-climate model: description and sensitivity to model physics under Eemian, Last Glacial Maximum, late Holocene and modern climate conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fyke, J. G.; Weaver, A. J.; Pollard, D.; Eby, M.; Carter, L.; Mackintosh, A.

    2010-08-01

    The need to better understand long-term climate/ice sheet feedback loops is motivating efforts to couple ice sheet models into Earth System models which are capable of long-timescale simulations. In this paper we describe a coupled model, that consists of the University of Victoria Earth System Climate Model (UVic ESCM) and the Pennsylvania State University Ice model (PSUI). The climate model generates a surface mass balance (SMB) field via a sub-gridded surface energy/moisture balance model that resolves narrow ice sheet ablation zones. The ice model returns revised elevation, surface albedo and ice area fields, plus coastal fluxes of heat and moisture. An arbitrary number of ice sheets can be simulated, each on their own high-resolution grid and each capable of synchronous or asynchronous coupling with the overlying climate model. The model is designed to conserve global heat and moisture. In the process of improving model performance we developed a procedure to account for modelled surface air temperature (SAT) biases within the energy/moisture balance surface model and improved the UVic ESCM snow surface scheme through addition of variable albedos and refreezing over the ice sheet. A number of simulations for late Holocene, Last Glacial Maximum (LGM), and Eemian climate boundary conditions were carried out to explore the sensitivity of the coupled model and identify model configurations that best represented these climate states. The modelled SAT bias was found to play a significant role in long-term ice sheet evolution, as was the effect of refreezing meltwater and surface albedo. The bias-corrected model was able to reasonably capture important aspects of the Antarctic and Greenland ice sheets, including modern SMB and ice distribution. The simulated northern Greenland ice sheet was found to be prone to ice margin retreat at radiative forcings corresponding closely to those of the Eemian or the present-day.

  14. A new coupled ice sheet/climate model: description and sensitivity to model physics under Eemian, Last Glacial Maximum, late Holocene and modern climate conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fyke, J. G.; Weaver, A. J.; Pollard, D.; Eby, M.; Carter, L.; Mackintosh, A.

    2011-03-01

    The need to better understand long-term climate/ice sheet feedback loops is motivating efforts to couple ice sheet models into Earth System models which are capable of long-timescale simulations. In this paper we describe a coupled model that consists of the University of Victoria Earth System Climate Model (UVic ESCM) and the Pennsylvania State University Ice model (PSUI). The climate model generates a surface mass balance (SMB) field via a sub-gridded surface energy/moisture balance model that resolves narrow ice sheet ablation zones. The ice model returns revised elevation, surface albedo and ice area fields, plus coastal fluxes of heat and moisture. An arbitrary number of ice sheets can be simulated, each on their own high-resolution grid and each capable of synchronous or asynchronous coupling with the overlying climate model. The model is designed to conserve global heat and moisture. In the process of improving model performance we developed a procedure to account for modelled surface air temperature (SAT) biases within the energy/moisture balance surface model and improved the UVic ESCM snow surface scheme through addition of variable albedos and refreezing over the ice sheet. A number of simulations for late Holocene, Last Glacial Maximum (LGM), and Eemian climate boundary conditions were carried out to explore the sensitivity of the coupled model and identify model configurations that best represented these climate states. The modelled SAT bias was found to play a significant role in long-term ice sheet evolution, as was the effect of refreezing meltwater and surface albedo. The bias-corrected model was able to reasonably capture important aspects of the Antarctic and Greenland ice sheets, including modern SMB and ice distribution. The simulated northern Greenland ice sheet was found to be prone to ice margin retreat at radiative forcings corresponding closely to those of the Eemian or the present-day.

  15. Climate during the last glacial maximum in the Wasatch and southern Uinta Mountains inferred from glacier modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laabs, Benjamin J. C.; Plummer, Mitchell A.; Mickelson, David M.

    2006-05-01

    Recent improvements in understanding glacial extents and chronologies in the Wasatch and Uinta Mountains and other mountain ranges in the western U.S. call for a more detailed approach to using glacier reconstructions to infer paleoclimates than commonly applied AAR-ELA-ÄT methods. A coupled 2-D mass balance and ice-flow numerical modeling approach developed by [Plummer, M.A., Phillips, F.M., 2003. A 2-D numerical model of snow/ice energy balance and ice flow for paleoclimatic interpretation of glacial geomorphic features. Quaternary Science Reviews 22, 1389-1406] allows exploration of the combined effects of temperature, precipitation, shortwave radiation and many secondary parameters on past ice extents in alpine settings. We apply this approach to the Little Cottonwood Canyon in the Wasatch Mountains and the Lake Fork and Yellowstone Canyons in the south-central Uinta Mountains. Results of modeling experiments indicate that the Little Cottonwood glacier required more precipitation during the local Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) than glaciers in the Uinta Mountains, assuming lapse rates were similar to modern. Model results suggest that if temperatures in the Wasatch Mountains and Uinta Mountains were ˜ 6 °C to 7 °C colder than modern, corresponding precipitation changes were ˜ 3 to 2× modern in Little Cottonwood Canyon and ˜ 2 to 1× modern in Lake Fork and Yellowstone Canyons. Greater amounts of precipitation in the Little Cottonwood Canyon likely reflect moisture derived from the surface of Lake Bonneville, and the lake may have also affected the mass balance of glaciers in the Uinta Mountains.

  16. The role of an Arctic ice shelf in the climate of the MIS 6 glacial maximum (140 ka)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colleoni, F.; Krinner, G.; Jakobsson, M.

    2010-12-01

    During the last decade, Arctic icebreaker and nuclear submarine expeditions have revealed large-scale Pleistocene glacial erosion on the Lomonosov Ridge, Chukchi Borderland and along the Northern Alaskan margin indicating that the glacial Arctic Ocean hosted large Antarctic-style ice shelves. Dating of sediment cores indicates that the most extensive and deepest ice grounding occurred during Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 6. The precise extents of Pleistocene ice shelves in the Arctic Ocean are unknown but seem comparable to present existing Antarctic ice shelves. How would an Antarctic-style ice shelf in the MIS 6 Arctic Ocean influence the Northern Hemisphere climate? Could it have impacted on the surface mass balance (SMB) of the MIS 6 Eurasian ice sheet and contributed to its large southward extent? We use an Atmospheric General Circulation Model (AGCM) to investigate the climatic impacts of both a limited MIS 6 ice shelf covering portions of the Canada Basin and a fully ice shelf covered Arctic Ocean. The AGCM results show that both ice shelves cause a temperature cooling of about 3 °C over the Arctic Ocean mainly due to the combined effect of ice elevation and isolation from the underlying ocean heat fluxes stopping the snow cover from melting during summer. The calculated SMB of the ice shelves are positive. The ice front horizontal velocity of the Canada Basin ice shelf is estimated to ≈ 1 km yr -1 which is comparable to the recent measurements of the Ross ice shelf, Antarctica. The existence of a large continuous ice shelf covering the entire Arctic Ocean would imply a mean annual velocity of icebergs of ≈12 km yr -1 through the Fram Strait. Our modeling results show that both ice shelf configurations could be viable under the MIS 6 climatic conditions. However, the cooling caused by these ice shelves only affects the Arctic margins of the continental ice sheets and is not strong enough to significantly influence the surface mass balance of the entire MIS

  17. Modeled Northern Hemisphere ice-sheet-climate interactions and contributions to sea-level change since the Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinemann, M.; Timmermann, A.; Elison Timm, O.; Saito, F.; Abe-Ouchi, A.

    2013-12-01

    One of the most recent massive climate change events in earth's history was the last glacial termination 19-9 thousand years before present (ka BP). Northern Hemisphere ice-sheets receded quickly, causing global sea level to rise by more than 100 m, meltwater was injected into the North Atlantic halting its deepwater formation, atmospheric CO2 concentrations rose by almost 100 ppmv, and the global surface warmed by about 4°C. It is still unresolved what exactly caused this deglacial climate change and ice sheet melting. To address this question, we set out to conduct a series of transient modeling experiments with a coupled 3-dimensional ice-sheet-climate model (iLove). The model includes atmosphere-ocean-sea ice-vegetation components of the intermediate complexity model LOVECLIM and uses bi-directional coupling to the ice-sheet model IcIES. Supporting Milankovitch theory, our results indicate that the deglaciation was initiated by orbital parameter changes. However, according to our model, rising CO2 concentrations after 17 ka BP accelerated the deglaciation. Without this deglacial CO2 increase, large parts of North America and Scandinavia would be covered by ice sheets today. Present sea level would be as much as 100 m lower, and still dropping by about 2.5 m per thousand years due to growing ice sheets. Despite the deglacial CO2-rise and global warming of 4°C, the simulated Greenland ice-sheet only looses about 25% of its volume during the deglaciation, and grows again in the Holocene after 8 ka BP at a rate of about 0.1 m sea level equivalent per thousand years. Our results indicate that the stability of the Greenland ice sheet during the deglaciation and Holocene is supported by changes of the atmospheric stationary wave pattern, and by the deglacial sea ice retreat.

  18. Decadal to millennial-scale solar forcing of Last Glacial Maximum climate in the Estancia Basin of central New Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menking, Kirsten M.

    2015-05-01

    Lacustrine sediments from the Estancia Basin of central New Mexico reveal decadal to millennial oscillations in the volume of Lake Estancia during Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) time. LGM sediments consist of authigenic carbonates, detrital clastics delivered to the lake in stream flow pulses, and evaporites that precipitated in mudflats exposed during lake lowstands and were subsequently blown into the lake. Variations in sediment mineralogy thus reflect changes in hydrologic balance and were quantified using Rietveld analysis of X-ray diffraction traces. Radiocarbon dates on ostracode valve calcite allowed the construction of mineralogical time series for the interval ~ 23,600 to ~ 18,300 ka, which were subjected to spectral analysis using REDFIT (Schulz and Mudelsee, 2002). Dominant periods of ~ 900, ~ 375, and ~ 265 yr are similar to cycles in Holocene 14C production reported for a variety of tree ring records, suggesting that the Lake Estancia sediments record variations in solar activity during LGM time. A prominent spectral peak with a period of ~ 88 yr appears to reflect the solar Gleissberg cycle and may help, along with the ~ 265 yr cycle, to explain an ongoing mystery about how Lake Estancia was able to undergo abrupt expansions without overflowing its drainage basin.

  19. Vegetation, fire and climate change in central-east Isla Grande de Chiloé (43°S) since the Last Glacial Maximum, northwestern Patagonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pesce, O. H.; Moreno, P. I.

    2014-04-01

    We present a detailed record from Lago Lepué to examine vegetation, climate and fire-regime changes since the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) in central-east Isla Grande de Chiloé (43°S), northwestern Patagonia. Precipitation in this region correlates with the intensity of the southern westerly winds (SWW), allowing reconstruction of past SWW behavior through precipitation-sensitive sensors. Recession from the LGM glacier margins exposed the central-east sector of Isla Grande de Chiloé by 17,800 cal yr BP, followed by the immediate colonization of pioneer cold-resistant herbs/shrubs and rapid establishment of closed-canopy Nothofagus forests by 17,000 cal yr BP. Broad-leaved temperate rainforests have persisted since then with compositional changes driven by changes in temperature, hydrologic balance and disturbance regimes. We detect low lake levels and enhanced fire activity between 800-2000, 4000-4300, ˜8000-11,000 and 16,100-17,800 cal yr BP, implying southward shifts and/or weaker SWW flow that alternated with cold, humid phases with muted fire activity. Covariation in paleoclimate trends revealed by the Lago Lepué record with tropical and Antarctic records since the LGM, suggests that the SWW have been a highly dynamic component of the climate system capable of linking climate changes from low- and high-southern latitudes during the Last Glacial termination and the current interglacial.

  20. Vegetation and environmental responses to climate forcing during the Last Glacial Maximum and deglaciation in the East Carpathians: attenuated response to maximum cooling and increased biomass burning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magyari, E. K.; Veres, D.; Wennrich, V.; Wagner, B.; Braun, M.; Jakab, G.; Karátson, D.; Pál, Z.; Ferenczy, Gy; St-Onge, G.; Rethemeyer, J.; Francois, J.-P.; von Reumont, F.; Schäbitz, F.

    2014-12-01

    The Carpathian Mountains were one of the main mountain reserves of the boreal and cool temperate flora during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) in East-Central Europe. Previous studies demonstrated Lateglacial vegetation dynamics in this area; however, our knowledge on the LGM vegetation composition is very limited due to the scarcity of suitable sedimentary archives. Here we present a new record of vegetation, fire and lacustrine sedimentation from the youngest volcanic crater of the Carpathians (Lake St Anne, Lacul Sfânta Ana, Szent-Anna-tó) to examine environmental change in this region during the LGM and the subsequent deglaciation. Our record indicates the persistence of boreal forest steppe vegetation (with Pinus, Betula, Salix, Populus and Picea) in the foreland and low mountain zone of the East Carpathians and Juniperus shrubland at higher elevation. We demonstrate attenuated response of the regional vegetation to maximum global cooling. Between ˜22,870 and 19,150 cal yr BP we find increased regional biomass burning that is antagonistic with the global trend. Increased regional fire activity suggests extreme continentality likely with relatively warm and dry summers. We also demonstrate xerophytic steppe expansion directly after the LGM, from ˜19,150 cal yr BP, and regional increase in boreal woodland cover with Pinus and Betula from 16,300 cal yr BP. Plant macrofossils indicate local (950 m a.s.l.) establishment of Betula nana and Betula pubescens at 15,150 cal yr BP, Pinus sylvestris at 14,700 cal yr BP and Larix decidua at 12,870 cal yr BP. Pollen data furthermore support population genetic inferences regarding the regional presence of some temperate deciduous trees during the LGM (Fagus sylvatica, Corylus avellana, Fraxinus excelsior). Our sedimentological data also demonstrate intensified aeolian dust accumulation between 26,000 and 20,000 cal yr BP.

  1. The response of the Okhotsk Sea environment to the orbital-millennium global climate changes during the Last Glacial Maximum, deglaciation and Holocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorbarenko, Sergey A.; Artemova, Antonina V.; Goldberg, Evgeniy L.; Vasilenko, Yuriy P.

    2014-05-01

    Reconstruction of regional climate and the Okhotsk Sea (OS) environment for the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM), deglaciation and Holocene was performed on the basis of high-resolution records of ice rafted debris (IRD), СаСО3, opal, total organic carbon (TOС), biogenic Ba (Ba_bio) and redox sensitive element (Mn, Mo) content, and diatom and pollen results of four cores that form a north-southern transect. Age models of the studied cores were earlier established by AMS 14C data, oxygen-isotope chronostratigraphy and tephrochronology. According to received results, since 25 ka the regional climate and OS environmental conditions have changed synchronously with LGM condition, cold Heinrich event 1, Bølling-Allerød (BA) warming, Younger Dryas (YD) cooling and Pre-Boreal (PB) warming recorded in the Greenland ice core, North Atlantic sediment, and China cave stalagmites. Calculation of IRD MAR in sediment of north-south transect cores indicates an increase of sea ice formation several times in the glacial OS as compared to the Late Holocene. Accompanying ice formation, increased brine rejection and the larger potential density of surface water at the north shelf due to a drop of glacial East Asia summer monsoon precipitation and Amur River run off, led to strong enhancement of the role of the OS in glacial North Pacific Intermediate Water (NPIW) formation. The remarkable increase in OS productivity during BA and PB warming was probably related with significant reorganisation of the North Pacific deep water ventilation and nutrient input into the NPIW and OS Intermediate Water (OSIW). Seven Holocene OS millennial cold events based on the elevated values of the detrended IRD stack record over the IRD broad trend in the sediments of the studied cores have occurred synchronously with cold events recorded in the North Atlantic, Greenland ice cores and China cave stalagmites after 9 ka. Diatom production in the OS was mostly controlled by sea ice cover changes and surface

  2. Pre-industrial-potential and Last Glacial Maximum global vegetation simulated with a coupled climate-biosphere model: diagnosis of bioclimatic relationships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crucifix, Michel; Betts, Richard A.; Hewitt, Christopher D.

    2005-03-01

    The global climate-vegetation model HadSM3_TRIFFID has been used to estimate the equilibrium states of climate and vegetation with pre-industrial and last glacial boundary conditions. The present study focuses on the evaluation of the terrestrial biosphere component (TRIFFID) and its response to changes in climate and CO 2 concentration. We also show how, by means of a diagnosis of the distribution of plant functional types according to climate parameters (soil temperature, winter temperature, growing-degree days, precipitation), it is possible to get better insights into the strengths and weaknesses of the biosphere model by reference to field knowledge of ecosystems. The model exhibits profound changes between the vegetation distribution at the Last Glacial Maximum and today that are generally consistent with palaeoclimate data, such as the disappearance of the Siberian boreal forest (taiga), an increase in shrub cover in Europe and an increase of the subtropical desert area. The effective equatorial and sub-tropical tree area is reduced by 18%. There is also an increase in cover of wooded species in North-Western Africa and in Mexico. The analysis of bioclimatic relationships turns out to be an efficient method to infer the contributions of different climatic factors to vegetation changes, both at high latitudes, where the position of the boreal treeline appears in this model to be more directly constrained by the water stress than by summer temperature, and in semi-humid areas where the contributions of temperature and precipitation changes may partly compensate each other. Our study also confirms the major contribution of the decrease in CO 2 to environmental changes and carbon storage through its selective impact on gross primary productivity of C3 and C4 plants and a reduction by 25% of water-use efficiency. Specifically, the reduction in CO 2 concentration increases the amount of precipitation necessary to sustain at least 20% of grass fraction by 50 mm

  3. Genetic and palaeo-climatic evidence for widespread persistence of the coastal tree species Eucalyptus gomphocephala (Myrtaceae) during the Last Glacial Maximum

    PubMed Central

    Nevill, Paul G.; Bradbury, Donna; Williams, Anna; Tomlinson, Sean; Krauss, Siegfried L.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims Few phylogeographic studies have been undertaken of species confined to narrow, linear coastal systems where past sea level and geomorphological changes may have had a profound effect on species population sizes and distributions. In this study, a phylogeographic analysis was conducted of Eucalyptus gomphocephala (tuart), a tree species restricted to a 400 × 10 km band of coastal sand-plain in south west Australia. Here, there is little known about the response of coastal vegetation to glacial/interglacial climate change, and a test was made as to whether this species was likely to have persisted widely through the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM), or conforms to a post-LGM dispersal model of recovery from few refugia. Methods The genetic structure over the entire range of tuart was assessed using seven nuclear (21 populations; n = 595) and four chloroplast (24 populations; n = 238) microsatellite markers designed for eucalypt species. Correlative palaeodistribution modelling was also conducted based on five climatic variables, within two LGM models. Key Results The chloroplast markers generated six haplotypes, which were strongly geographically structured (GST = 0·86 and RST = 0·75). Nuclear microsatellite diversity was high (overall mean HE 0·75) and uniformly distributed (FST = 0·05), with a strong pattern of isolation by distance (r2 = 0·362, P = 0·001). Distribution models of E. gomphocephala during the LGM showed a wide distribution that extended at least 30 km westward from the current distribution to the palaeo-coastline. Conclusions The chloroplast and nuclear data suggest wide persistence of E. gomphocephala during the LGM. Palaeodistribution modelling supports the conclusions drawn from genetic data and indicates a widespread westward shift of E. gomphocephala onto the exposed continental shelf during the LGM. This study highlights the importance of the inclusion of complementary, non-genetic data (information on geomorphology and

  4. A cosmogenic 10Be chronology for the local last glacial maximum and termination in the Cordillera Oriental, southern Peruvian Andes: Implications for the tropical role in global climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bromley, Gordon R. M.; Schaefer, Joerg M.; Hall, Brenda L.; Rademaker, Kurt M.; Putnam, Aaron E.; Todd, Claire E.; Hegland, Matthew; Winckler, Gisela; Jackson, Margaret S.; Strand, Peter D.

    2016-09-01

    Resolving patterns of tropical climate variability during and since the last glacial maximum (LGM) is fundamental to assessing the role of the tropics in global change, both on ice-age and sub-millennial timescales. Here, we present a10Be moraine chronology from the Cordillera Carabaya (14.3°S), a sub-range of the Cordillera Oriental in southern Peru, covering the LGM and the first half of the last glacial termination. Additionally, we recalculate existing 10Be ages using a new tropical high-altitude production rate in order to put our record into broader spatial context. Our results indicate that glaciers deposited a series of moraines during marine isotope stage 2, broadly synchronous with global glacier maxima, but that maximum glacier extent may have occurred prior to stage 2. Thereafter, atmospheric warming drove widespread deglaciation of the Cordillera Carabaya. A subsequent glacier resurgence culminated at ∼16,100 yrs, followed by a second period of glacier recession. Together, the observed deglaciation corresponds to Heinrich Stadial 1 (HS1: ∼18,000-14,600 yrs), during which pluvial lakes on the adjacent Peruvian-Bolivian altiplano rose to their highest levels of the late Pleistocene as a consequence of southward displacement of the inter-tropical convergence zone and intensification of the South American summer monsoon. Deglaciation in the Cordillera Carabaya also coincided with the retreat of higher-latitude mountain glaciers in the Southern Hemisphere. Our findings suggest that HS1 was characterised by atmospheric warming and indicate that deglaciation of the southern Peruvian Andes was driven by rising temperatures, despite increased precipitation. Recalculated 10Be data from other tropical Andean sites support this model. Finally, we suggest that the broadly uniform response during the LGM and termination of the glaciers examined here involved equatorial Pacific sea-surface temperature anomalies and propose a framework for testing the viability

  5. A model study of the effect of climate and sea-level change on the evolution of the Antarctic Ice Sheet from the Last Glacial Maximum to 2100

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maris, M. N. A.; van Wessem, J. M.; van de Berg, W. J.; de Boer, B.; Oerlemans, J.

    2015-08-01

    Due to a scarcity of observations and its long memory of uncertain past climate, the Antarctic Ice Sheet remains a largely unknown factor in the prediction of global sea level change. As the history of the ice sheet plays a key role in its future evolution, in this study we model the Antarctic Ice Sheet from the Last Glacial Maximum (21 kyr ago) until the year 2100 with the ice-dynamical model ANICE. We force the model with different temperature, surface mass balance and sea-level records to investigate the importance of these different aspects for the evolution of the ice sheet. Additionally, we compare the model output from 21 kyr ago until the present with observations to assess model performance in simulating the total grounded ice volume and the evolution of different regions of the Antarctic Ice Sheet. Although there are some clear limitations of the model, we conclude that sea-level change has driven the deglaciation of the ice sheet, whereas future temperature change and the history of the ice sheet are the primary cause of changes in ice volume in the future. We estimate the change in grounded ice volume between its maximum (around 15 kyr ago) and the present-day to be between 8.4 and 12.5 m sea-level equivalent and the contribution of the Antarctic Ice Sheet to the global mean sea level in 2100, with respect to 2000, to be -22 to 63 mm.

  6. Millenial-scale climatic and vegetation changes in a northern Cerrado (Northeast, Brazil) since the Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ledru, Marie-Pierre; Ceccantini, Gregorio; Gouveia, Susy E. M.; López-Sáez, José Antonio; Pessenda, Luiz C. R.; Ribeiro, Adauto S.

    2006-05-01

    In the Southern Hemisphere, lacustrine sediments started to be deposited with the beginning of the deglaciation at ca 19,000 cal yr BP. At this time the region of Lake Caço was dominated by sparse and shrubby vegetation with dominance of steppic grasses in a poor sandy soil. The landscape did not present any ecological characteristics of a modern Cerrado. However single pollen grains of two Cerrado indicators, Byrsonima and Mimosa, suggest that some Cerrado species were able to survive under the prevailing arid climate, probably as small shrubs. After 15,500 cal yr BP, a sudden increase in the moisture rates is evidenced with the progressive expansion of rainforest showing successive dominance of various associations of taxa. The development of the forest stopped abruptly at the end of the Pleistocene between 12,800 and 11,000 cal yr BP, as attested by strong fires and the expansion of Poaceae. In the early Holocene an open landscape with a relatively high level of water in the lake preceded the progressive expansion of Cerrado species towards a denser forested landscape; fires are recorded from then on, resulting in the physiognomy of the Cerrado we know today. Late Pleistocene paleoenvironmental records from northern Brazil reflect the interplay between insolation forcing of two hemispheres with the local components represented by the interannual shift of the Inter Tropical Convergence Zone and the influence of seasonal equatorwards polar air incursions.

  7. Climate-driven changes to dune activity during the Last Glacial Maximum and deglaciation in the Mu Us dune field, north-central China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zhiwei; Lu, Huayu; Yi, Shuangwen; Vandenberghe, Jef; Mason, Joseph A.; Zhou, Yali; Wang, Xianyan

    2015-10-01

    One significant change of terrestrial landscapes in response to past climate change has been the transformation between activity and stability of extensively distributed wind-blown sand dunes. The relations between the dynamics of the aeolian landscape and its drivers are not yet completely understood, however. Evidence of aeolian sand deposition during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) is scarce in many mid-latitude dune fields, whereas abundant evidence exists for aeolian sand accumulation during the deglaciation, i.e. after about 15 ka. Whether this contrast actually reflects changes in dune activity is still unclear, making paleoclimatic interpretation uncertain. Comprehensive field investigation and luminescence dating in the Mu Us dune field, north-central China, demonstrates that aeolian sands deposited during the LGM are preserved as fills in periglacial sand wedges and beneath loess deposits near the downwind dune field margin. The scarcity of LGM dune sand elsewhere in the dune field is interpreted as the result of intensive aeolian activity without substantial net sand accumulation. Increasing sand accumulation after 15 ka, reflected by much more extensive preservation, signals a change in sand supply relative to sand transportation through the dune field. Reduced wind strength and other environmental changes including regional permafrost degradation after 15 ka transformed the dune field state from net erosion to net accumulation; the dunes, however, remained largely mobile as they were in the LGM. Similar diverging patterns of dune sand accumulation and preservation before and after 15 ka in many mid-latitude dune fields imply broad climatic controls linked to the changes in high-northern-latitude forcing.

  8. Human population dynamics in Europe over the Last Glacial Maximum

    PubMed Central

    Tallavaara, Miikka; Luoto, Miska; Korhonen, Natalia; Järvinen, Heikki; Seppä, Heikki

    2015-01-01

    The severe cooling and the expansion of the ice sheets during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM), 27,000–19,000 y ago (27–19 ky ago) had a major impact on plant and animal populations, including humans. Changes in human population size and range have affected our genetic evolution, and recent modeling efforts have reaffirmed the importance of population dynamics in cultural and linguistic evolution, as well. However, in the absence of historical records, estimating past population levels has remained difficult. Here we show that it is possible to model spatially explicit human population dynamics from the pre-LGM at 30 ky ago through the LGM to the Late Glacial in Europe by using climate envelope modeling tools and modern ethnographic datasets to construct a population calibration model. The simulated range and size of the human population correspond significantly with spatiotemporal patterns in the archaeological data, suggesting that climate was a major driver of population dynamics 30–13 ky ago. The simulated population size declined from about 330,000 people at 30 ky ago to a minimum of 130,000 people at 23 ky ago. The Late Glacial population growth was fastest during Greenland interstadial 1, and by 13 ky ago, there were almost 410,000 people in Europe. Even during the coldest part of the LGM, the climatically suitable area for human habitation remained unfragmented and covered 36% of Europe. PMID:26100880

  9. Human population dynamics in Europe over the Last Glacial Maximum.

    PubMed

    Tallavaara, Miikka; Luoto, Miska; Korhonen, Natalia; Järvinen, Heikki; Seppä, Heikki

    2015-07-01

    The severe cooling and the expansion of the ice sheets during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM), 27,000-19,000 y ago (27-19 ky ago) had a major impact on plant and animal populations, including humans. Changes in human population size and range have affected our genetic evolution, and recent modeling efforts have reaffirmed the importance of population dynamics in cultural and linguistic evolution, as well. However, in the absence of historical records, estimating past population levels has remained difficult. Here we show that it is possible to model spatially explicit human population dynamics from the pre-LGM at 30 ky ago through the LGM to the Late Glacial in Europe by using climate envelope modeling tools and modern ethnographic datasets to construct a population calibration model. The simulated range and size of the human population correspond significantly with spatiotemporal patterns in the archaeological data, suggesting that climate was a major driver of population dynamics 30-13 ky ago. The simulated population size declined from about 330,000 people at 30 ky ago to a minimum of 130,000 people at 23 ky ago. The Late Glacial population growth was fastest during Greenland interstadial 1, and by 13 ky ago, there were almost 410,000 people in Europe. Even during the coldest part of the LGM, the climatically suitable area for human habitation remained unfragmented and covered 36% of Europe. PMID:26100880

  10. Modeling glacial climates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    North, G. R.; Crowley, T. J.

    1984-01-01

    Mathematical climate modelling has matured as a discipline to the point that it is useful in paleoclimatology. As an example a new two dimensional energy balance model is described and applied to several problems of current interest. The model includes the seasonal cycle and the detailed land-sea geographical distribution. By examining the changes in the seasonal cycle when external perturbations are forced upon the climate system it is possible to construct hypotheses about the origin of midlatitude ice sheets and polar ice caps. In particular the model predicts a rather sudden potential for glaciation over large areas when the Earth's orbital elements are only slightly altered. Similarly, the drift of continents or the change of atmospheric carbon dioxide over geological time induces radical changes in continental ice cover. With the advance of computer technology and improved understanding of the individual components of the climate system, these ideas will be tested in far more realistic models in the near future.

  11. Climate change and Arctic ecosystems: 1. Vegetation changes north of 55°N between the last glacial maximum, mid-Holocene, and present

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bigelow, N.H.; Brubaker, L.B.; Edwards, M.E.; Harrison, S.P.; Prentice, I.C.; Anderson, P.M.; Andreev, A.A.; Bartlein, P.J.; Christensen, T.R.; Cramer, W.; Kaplan, J.O.; Lozhkin, A.V.; Matveyeva, N.V.; Murray, D.F.; McGuire, A.D.; Razzhivin, V.Y.; Ritchie, J.C.; Smith, B.; Walker, D. A.; Gajewski, K.; Wolf, V.; Holmqvist, B.H.; Igarashi, Y.; Kremenetskii, K.; Paus, A.; Pisaric, M.F.J.; Volkova, V.S.

    2003-01-01

    A unified scheme to assign pollen samples to vegetation types was used to reconstruct vegetation patterns north of 55??N at the last glacial maximum (LGM) and mid-Holocene (6000 years B.P.). The pollen data set assembled for this purpose represents a comprehensive compilation based on the work of many projects and research groups. Five tundra types (cushion forb tundra, graminoid and forb tundra, prostrate dwarf-shrub tundra, erect dwarf-shrub tundra, and low- and high-shrub tundra) were distinguished and mapped on the basis of modern pollen surface samples. The tundra-forest boundary and the distributions of boreal and temperate forest types today were realistically reconstructed. During the mid-Holocene the tundra-forest boundary was north of its present position in some regions, but the pattern of this shift was strongly asymmetrical around the pole, with the largest northward shift in central Siberia (???200 km), little change in Beringia, and a southward shift in Keewatin and Labrador (???200 km). Low- and high-shrub tundra extended farther north than today. At the LGM, forests were absent from high latitudes. Graminoid and forb tundra abutted on temperate steppe in northwestern Eurasia while prostrate dwarf-shrub, erect dwarf-shrub, and graminoid and forb tundra formed a mosaic in Beringia. Graminoid and forb tundra is restricted today and does not form a large continuous biome, but the pollen data show that it was far more extensive at the LGM, while low- and high-shrub tundra were greatly reduced, illustrating the potential for climate change to dramatically alter the relative areas occupied by different vegetation types.

  12. North Atlantic Deep Water Production during the Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howe, Jacob N. W.; Piotrowski, Alexander M.; Noble, Taryn L.; Mulitza, Stefan; Chiessi, Cristiano M.; Bayon, Germain

    2016-06-01

    Changes in deep ocean ventilation are commonly invoked as the primary cause of lower glacial atmospheric CO2. The water mass structure of the glacial deep Atlantic Ocean and the mechanism by which it may have sequestered carbon remain elusive. Here we present neodymium isotope measurements from cores throughout the Atlantic that reveal glacial-interglacial changes in water mass distributions. These results demonstrate the sustained production of North Atlantic Deep Water under glacial conditions, indicating that southern-sourced waters were not as spatially extensive during the Last Glacial Maximum as previously believed. We demonstrate that the depleted glacial δ13C values in the deep Atlantic Ocean cannot be explained solely by water mass source changes. A greater amount of respired carbon, therefore, must have been stored in the abyssal Atlantic during the Last Glacial Maximum. We infer that this was achieved by a sluggish deep overturning cell, comprised of well-mixed northern- and southern-sourced waters.

  13. North Atlantic Deep Water Production during the Last Glacial Maximum.

    PubMed

    Howe, Jacob N W; Piotrowski, Alexander M; Noble, Taryn L; Mulitza, Stefan; Chiessi, Cristiano M; Bayon, Germain

    2016-01-01

    Changes in deep ocean ventilation are commonly invoked as the primary cause of lower glacial atmospheric CO2. The water mass structure of the glacial deep Atlantic Ocean and the mechanism by which it may have sequestered carbon remain elusive. Here we present neodymium isotope measurements from cores throughout the Atlantic that reveal glacial-interglacial changes in water mass distributions. These results demonstrate the sustained production of North Atlantic Deep Water under glacial conditions, indicating that southern-sourced waters were not as spatially extensive during the Last Glacial Maximum as previously believed. We demonstrate that the depleted glacial δ(13)C values in the deep Atlantic Ocean cannot be explained solely by water mass source changes. A greater amount of respired carbon, therefore, must have been stored in the abyssal Atlantic during the Last Glacial Maximum. We infer that this was achieved by a sluggish deep overturning cell, comprised of well-mixed northern- and southern-sourced waters. PMID:27256826

  14. The Last Glacial Maximum experiment in PMIP4-CMIP6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kageyama, Masa; Braconnot, Pascale; Abe-Ouchi, Ayako; Harrison, Sandy; Lambert, Fabrice; Peltier, W. Richard; Tarasov, Lev

    2016-04-01

    The Last Glacial Maximum (LGM), around 21,000 years ago, is a cold climate extreme. As such, it has been the focus of many studies on modelling and climate reconstruction, which have brought knowledge on the mechanisms explaining this climate, in terms of climate on the continents and of the ocean state, and in terms relationships between climate changes over land, ice sheets and oceans. It is still a challenge for climate or Earth System models to represent the amplitude of climate changes for this period, under the following forcings: - Ice sheets, which represent perturbations in land surface type, altitude and land/ocean distribution - Atmospheric composition - Astronomical parameters Feedbacks from the vegetation and dust are also known to have played a role in setting up the LGM climate but have not been accounted for in previous PMIP experiments. In this poster, we will present the experimental set-up of the PMIP4 LGM experiment, which is presently being discussed and will be finalized for March 2016. For more information and discussion of the PMIP4-CMIP6 experimental design, please visit: https://wiki.lsce.ipsl.fr/pmip3/doku.php/pmip3:cmip6:design:index

  15. Climate during the Last Glacial Maximum in the Wasatch Mountains Inferred from Glacier Mass-Balance and Ice-Flow Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bash, E. A.; Laabs, B. J.

    2006-12-01

    The Wasatch Mountains of northern Utah contained numerous valley glaciers east and immediately downwind of Lake Bonneville during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). While the extent and chronology of glaciation in the Wasatch Mountains and the rise and fall of Lake Bonneville are becoming increasingly well understood, inferences of climatic conditions during the LGM for this area and elsewhere in the Rocky Mountains and northern Great Basin have yielded a wide range of temperature depression estimates. For example, previous estimates of temperature depression based on glacier and lake reconstructions in this region generally range from 7° to 9° C colder than modern. Glacier modeling studies for Little Cottonwood Canyon (northern Wasatch Mountains) suggest that such temperature depressions would have been accompanied by precipitation increases of about 3 to 1x modern, respectively (McCoy and Williams, 1985; Laabs et al., 2006). However, interpretations of other proxies suggest that temperature depression in this area may have been significantly greater, up to 13° C (e.g., Kaufman 2003), which would likely have been accompanied by less precipitation than modern. To address this issue, we reconstructed ice extent in the American Fork Canyon of the Wasatch Mountains and applied glacier modeling methods of Plummer and Phillips (2003) to infer climatic conditions during the LGM. Field mapping indicates that glaciers occupied an area of more than 20 km2 in the canyon and reached maximum lengths of about 9 km. To link ice extent to climatic changes, a physically based, two- dimensional numerical model of glacier mass balance and ice flow was applied to these valleys. The modeling approach allows the combined effects of temperature, precipitation and solar radiation on net mass balance of a drainage basin to be explored. Results of model experiments indicate that a temperature depression of less than 9° C in the American Fork Canyon would have been accompanied by greater

  16. Contrasting scaling properties of interglacial and glacial climates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Zhi-Gang; Ditlevsen, Peter D.

    2016-03-01

    Understanding natural climate variability is essential for assessments of climate change. This is reflected in the scaling properties of climate records. The scaling exponents of the interglacial and the glacial climates are fundamentally different. The Holocene record is monofractal, with a scaling exponent H~0.7. On the contrary, the glacial record is multifractal, with a significantly higher scaling exponent H~1.2, indicating a longer persistence time and stronger nonlinearities in the glacial climate. The glacial climate is dominated by the strong multi-millennial Dansgaard-Oeschger (DO) events influencing the long-time correlation. However, by separately analysing the last glacial maximum lacking DO events, here we find the same scaling for that period as for the full glacial period. The unbroken scaling thus indicates that the DO events are part of the natural variability and not externally triggered. At glacial time scales, there is a scale break to a trivial scaling, contrasting the DO events from the similarly saw-tooth-shaped glacial cycles.

  17. Contrasting scaling properties of interglacial and glacial climates

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Zhi-Gang; Ditlevsen, Peter D.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding natural climate variability is essential for assessments of climate change. This is reflected in the scaling properties of climate records. The scaling exponents of the interglacial and the glacial climates are fundamentally different. The Holocene record is monofractal, with a scaling exponent H∼0.7. On the contrary, the glacial record is multifractal, with a significantly higher scaling exponent H∼1.2, indicating a longer persistence time and stronger nonlinearities in the glacial climate. The glacial climate is dominated by the strong multi-millennial Dansgaard–Oeschger (DO) events influencing the long-time correlation. However, by separately analysing the last glacial maximum lacking DO events, here we find the same scaling for that period as for the full glacial period. The unbroken scaling thus indicates that the DO events are part of the natural variability and not externally triggered. At glacial time scales, there is a scale break to a trivial scaling, contrasting the DO events from the similarly saw-tooth-shaped glacial cycles. PMID:26980084

  18. Contrasting scaling properties of interglacial and glacial climates.

    PubMed

    Shao, Zhi-Gang; Ditlevsen, Peter D

    2016-01-01

    Understanding natural climate variability is essential for assessments of climate change. This is reflected in the scaling properties of climate records. The scaling exponents of the interglacial and the glacial climates are fundamentally different. The Holocene record is monofractal, with a scaling exponent H∼0.7. On the contrary, the glacial record is multifractal, with a significantly higher scaling exponent H∼1.2, indicating a longer persistence time and stronger nonlinearities in the glacial climate. The glacial climate is dominated by the strong multi-millennial Dansgaard-Oeschger (DO) events influencing the long-time correlation. However, by separately analysing the last glacial maximum lacking DO events, here we find the same scaling for that period as for the full glacial period. The unbroken scaling thus indicates that the DO events are part of the natural variability and not externally triggered. At glacial time scales, there is a scale break to a trivial scaling, contrasting the DO events from the similarly saw-tooth-shaped glacial cycles. PMID:26980084

  19. The Southern Glacial Maximum 65,000 years ago and its Unfinished Termination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaefer, Joerg M.; Putnam, Aaron E.; Denton, George H.; Kaplan, Michael R.; Birkel, Sean; Doughty, Alice M.; Kelley, Sam; Barrell, David J. A.; Finkel, Robert C.; Winckler, Gisela; Anderson, Robert F.; Ninneman, Ulysses S.; Barker, Stephen; Schwartz, Roseanne; Andersen, Bjorn G.; Schluechter, Christian

    2015-04-01

    Glacial maxima and their terminations provide key insights into inter-hemispheric climate dynamics and the coupling of atmosphere, surface and deep ocean, hydrology, and cryosphere, which is fundamental for evaluating the robustness of earth's climate in view of ongoing climate change. The Last Glacial Maximum (LGM, ∼26-19 ka ago) is widely seen as the global cold peak during the last glacial cycle, and its transition to the Holocene interglacial, dubbed 'Termination 1 (T1)', as the most dramatic climate reorganization during this interval. Climate records show that over the last 800 ka, ice ages peaked and terminated on average every 100 ka ('100 ka world'). However, the mechanisms pacing glacial-interglacial transitions remain controversial and in particular the hemispheric manifestations and underlying orbital to regional driving forces of glacial maxima and subsequent terminations remain poorly understood. Here we show evidence for a full glacial maximum in the Southern Hemisphere 65.1 ± 2.7 ka ago and its 'Unfinished Termination'. Our 10Be chronology combined with a model simulation demonstrates that New Zealand's glaciers reached their maximum position of the last glacial cycle during Marine Isotope Stage-4 (MIS-4). Southern ocean and greenhouse gas records indicate coeval peak glacial conditions, making the case for the Southern Glacial Maximum about halfway through the last glacial cycle and only 15 ka after the last warm period (MIS-5a). We present the hypothesis that subsequently, driven by boreal summer insolation forcing, a termination began but remained unfinished, possibly because the northern ice sheets were only moderately large and could not supply enough meltwater to the North Atlantic through Heinrich Stadial 6 to drive a full termination. Yet the Unfinished Termination left behind substantial ice on the northern continents (about 50% of the full LGM ice volume) and after another 45 ka of cooling and ice sheet growth the earth was at inter

  20. Last Glacial Maximum in South America: Proxies and Model Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wainer, I.; Ledru, M. P.; Clauzet, G.; Otto-Bliesner, B.; Brady, E.

    2003-04-01

    The lack of paleo proxies to define Full Glacial conditions in South America (see COHMAP 1988) prevented accurate climatic reconstitution until recently. It is believed that full glacial climates throughout South America were cooler than today by about 5°C with moisture patterns showing distinct regional differences.Results show that from Equator to pole, four areas can be characterized from lacustrine records, travertine and speleothems analysis: the first region, between 0 and 25°S latitude, recorded a hiatus in sedimentation with an absence of organic matter deposition in all lowland records, while the Andes Amazonian-moisture-dependant-forests were drastically reduced and showed the set up of an open vegetation. Climates were defined as drier than today with less precipitation and reduction in soil moisture supply. On the other hand, observations on travertines on the northeastern coastal area of the state of Bahia (also at low latitudes) certify a climate more humid than today. South of 25°S, in the temperate regions of northern Patagonia, lake levels were higher than today, snow precipitation in the Southern Bolivia increased with an accompanying increase in speleothems formations in southern Brazil. This was interpreted as being associated with moister and cooler climates than today in this area. At higher latitudes the low lake-levels recorded, indicate an arid climate. These observations based on paleodata are compared to the analysis from simulation results of the Paleoclimate version of the National Center for Atmospheric Research coupled climate system model (PALEO CCSM) for the Last Glacial Maximum and present day. Analysis of the LGM wind simulation for the tropical Atlantic show that the convergence zone does not extend all the way into the continent. This prevents moisture inflow into the adjacent continental area (equatorial NE Brazil). Paleo proxies results, as explained above, are consistent with this scenario. At higher latitudes (south of 50

  1. Modeling East African tropical glaciers during the Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doughty, Alice; Kelly, Meredith; Russell, James; Jackson, Margaret; Anderson, Brian; Nakileza, Robert

    2016-04-01

    The timing and magnitude of tropical glacier fluctuations since the last glacial maximum could elucidate how climatic signals transfer between hemispheres. We focus on ancient glaciers of the East African Rwenzori Mountains, Uganda/D.R. Congo, where efforts to map and date the moraines are on-going. We use a coupled mass balance - ice flow model to infer past climate by simulating glacier extents that match the mapped and dated LGM moraines. A range of possible temperature/precipitation change combinations (e.g. -15% precipitation and -7C temperature change) allow simulated glaciers to fit the LGM moraines dated to 20,140±610 and 23,370±470 years old.

  2. A Global Ocean State Estimate at the Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amrhein, D. E.; Wunsch, C. I.

    2015-12-01

    Many features of Earth's climate at the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM, ca. 20,000 years ago) remain a mystery, including the role of the ocean circulation in transporting thermal energy, salinity, and other tracers. Most efforts at reconstructing the ocean state during the LGM have relied either upon integrations of general circulation models under prescribed LGM boundary conditions or the interpretation of climate proxy records without explicit physical constraints. Here we describe a global, primitive equation simulation of the LGM ocean with boundary conditions (wind, surface air temperature, and other atmospheric variables) and mixing parameters derived by a least-squares fit of an ocean general circulation model to observations of deep ocean stable isotopes and sea surface temperatures at the LGM.

  3. North Atlantic Deep Water Production during the Last Glacial Maximum

    PubMed Central

    Howe, Jacob N. W.; Piotrowski, Alexander M.; Noble, Taryn L.; Mulitza, Stefan; Chiessi, Cristiano M.; Bayon, Germain

    2016-01-01

    Changes in deep ocean ventilation are commonly invoked as the primary cause of lower glacial atmospheric CO2. The water mass structure of the glacial deep Atlantic Ocean and the mechanism by which it may have sequestered carbon remain elusive. Here we present neodymium isotope measurements from cores throughout the Atlantic that reveal glacial–interglacial changes in water mass distributions. These results demonstrate the sustained production of North Atlantic Deep Water under glacial conditions, indicating that southern-sourced waters were not as spatially extensive during the Last Glacial Maximum as previously believed. We demonstrate that the depleted glacial δ13C values in the deep Atlantic Ocean cannot be explained solely by water mass source changes. A greater amount of respired carbon, therefore, must have been stored in the abyssal Atlantic during the Last Glacial Maximum. We infer that this was achieved by a sluggish deep overturning cell, comprised of well-mixed northern- and southern-sourced waters. PMID:27256826

  4. Early Circum-Arctic Glacial Decay Following the Last Glacial Maximum?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snow, T.; Alonso-Garcia, M.; Flower, B. P.; Shevenell, A.; Roehl, U.; Goddard, E.

    2012-12-01

    Recent rapid warming, glacial retreat, and sea ice reduction observed in the Arctic suggest extreme regional environmental sensitivity to ongoing anthropogenic climate change. To place these recent environmental changes in context and better understand the forcings and feedbacks involved in Arctic climate change, regional studies of past intervals of rapid warming are required. Paleoceanographic studies from the high-latitude North Atlantic indicate close relationships between meltwater discharges from circum-Arctic ice sheets, perturbations of Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC), and global climate variations on sub-orbital timescales during the Late Quaternary. During the last glacial-interglacial transition (25-10 ka), when atmospheric temperatures over Greenland warmed 10-15°C and the AMOC experienced millennial-scale variability, low-resolution stable isotope studies from Fram Strait sediment cores indicate that the circum-Arctic ice sheets began to melt earlier than lower latitude Northern Hemisphere ice sheets, discharging their meltwater into the high latitude North Atlantic. Fram Strait, located at the gateway between the Atlantic and Arctic Oceans, is the only region where Arctic meltwater can exchange with the world oceans on both glacial and interglacial timescales. Thus, high-resolution paleoceanographic studies of Fram Strait sediments are critically required for understanding changes in Arctic meltwater flux to the North Atlantic on sub-orbital timescales. Here we present the first high-resolution (<100 yr) multi-proxy dataset from Fram Strait (ODP Site 986; 77°20.43'N, 9°04.66'E; water depth: 2063 m) to assess the timing of circum-Arctic ice sheet decay since the Last Glacial Maximum. Foraminiferal isotopic and elemental, scanning X-Ray Fluorescence, and ice-rafted debris records are used to isolate Arctic meltwater and iceberg discharge signals. Sharp increases in productivity and changes in water mass ventilation are inferred

  5. Interhemispheric ice-sheet synchronicity during the Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, M. E.; Clark, P. U.; Ricken, W.; Mitrovica, J. X.; Hostetler, S. W.; Kuhn, G.

    2012-04-01

    The timing of the last maximum extent of the Antarctic ice sheets relative to those in the Northern Hemisphere remains poorly understood because only a few findings with robust chronologies exist for Antarctic ice sheets. We developed a chronology for the Weddell Sea sector of the East Antarctic ice sheet that, combined with ages from other Antarctic ice-sheet sectors, indicates the advance to their maximum extent at 29 -28 ka, and retreat from their maximum extent at 19 ka was nearly synchronous with Northern Hemisphere ice sheets (Weber, M.E., Clark, P. U., Ricken, W., Mitrovica, J. X., Hostetler, S. W., and Kuhn, G. (2011): Interhemispheric ice-sheet synchronicity during the Last Glacial Maximum. - Science, 334, 1265-1269, doi: 10.1126:science.1209299). As for the deglaciation, modeling studies suggest a late ice-sheet retreat starting around 14 ka BP and ending around 7 ka BP with a large impact of an unstable West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS) and a small impact of a stable East Antarctic Ice Sheet (EAIS). However, the Weddell Sea sites studied here, as well as sites from the Scotia Sea, provide evidence that specifically the EAIS responded much earlier, possibly provided a significant contribution to the last sea-level rise, and was much more dynamic than previously thought. Using the results of an atmospheric general circulation we conclude that surface climate forcing of Antarctic ice mass balance would likely cause an opposite response, whereby a warming climate would increase accumulation but not surface melting. Furthermore, our new data support teleconnections involving a sea-level fingerprint forced from Northern Hemisphere ice sheets as indicated by gravitational modeling. Also, changes in North Atlantic Deepwater formation and attendant heat flux to Antarctic grounding lines may have contributed to synchronizing the hemispheric ice sheets.

  6. Glacial history of Tranquilo glacier (Central Patagonia) since the Last Glacial Maximum through to the present.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagredo, E. A.; Araya, P. S.; Schaefer, J. M.; Kaplan, M. R.; Kelly, M. A.; Lowell, T. V.; Aravena, J. C.

    2014-12-01

    Deciphering the timing and the inter-hemispheric phasing of former glacial fluctuations is critical for understanding the mechanisms and climate signals underlying these glacial events. Here, we present a detailed chronology of glacial fluctuations for Río Tranquilo glacier (47°S), since the LGM, including up to the present. Río Tranquilo is a small glacial valley located on the northern flank of Monte San Lorenzo, an isolated granitic massif, ~70 km to the east of the southern limit of the Northern Patagonian Icefield. Although Mt. San Lorenzo is located on the leeward side of the Andes, it is one of the most glacierized mountains in the region, with an ice surface area of ~140 km2. Geomorphic evidence suggests that during past episodes of climate change several small glaciers that today occupy the headwalls of Río Tranquilo valley expanded and coalesced, depositing a series of moraines complexes along the flanks and bottom of the valley. We used two independent dating techniques to constrain the age of the glacial history of the area. 10Be surface exposure ages from boulders located atop moraine ridges reveal that Río Tranquilo valley underwent glacial expansion/stabilization during at least the LGM (late LGM?), Late glacial (ACR and Younger Dryas) and Mid-Holocene. Within the Mid-Holocene limits, tree-ring based chronology indicates that Río Tranquilo glacier expanded during the Late Holocene as well. Our results are the first detailed chronology of glacial fluctuations from a single valley glacier, spanning the entire period from the (end of the) LGM up to the present, in southern South America. By identifying different glacial episodes within a single alpine valley, this study provides baseline data for studying the relative magnitude of the climate events responsible for these glacial events.

  7. Extensive glaciation in Transbaikalia, Siberia, at the Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margold, Martin; Jansen, John D.; Gurinov, Artem L.; Codilean, Alexandru T.; Fink, David; Preusser, Frank; Reznichenko, Natalya V.; Mifsud, Charles

    2016-01-01

    Successively smaller glacial extents have been proposed for continental Eurasia during the stadials of the last glacial period leading up to the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). At the same time the large mountainous region east of Lake Baikal, Transbaikalia, has remained unexplored in terms of glacial chronology despite clear geomorphological evidence of substantial past glaciations. We have applied cosmogenic 10Be exposure dating and optically stimulated luminescence to establish the first quantitative glacial chronology for this region. Based on eighteen exposure ages from five moraine complexes, we propose that large mountain ice fields existed in the Kodar and Udokan mountains during Oxygen Isotope Stage 2, commensurate with the global LGM. These ice fields fed valley glaciers (>100 km in length) reaching down to the Chara Depression between the Kodar and Udokan mountains and to the valley of the Vitim River northwest of the Kodar Mountains. Two of the investigated moraines date to the Late Glacial, but indications of incomplete exposure among some of the sampled boulders obscure the specific details of the post-LGM glacial history. In addition to the LGM ice fields in the highest mountains of Transbaikalia, we report geomorphological evidence of a much more extensive, ice-cap type glaciation at a time that is yet to be firmly resolved.

  8. Tropical Cyclones in Simulations of the Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamora, R. A.; Korty, R. L.; Camargo, S. J.

    2015-12-01

    How tropical cyclones respond to large-scale changes in climate is an important and complex question. Here we study the question using the response to the climate forcing of the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). Utilizing two detecting and tracking algorithms of tropical cyclones (TC), we assess the sensitivity of the genesis and frequency of TCs in a 1° x 1° simulation of a global climate model (CCSM), a limited-area simulation (western north Pacific; WNP) of the higher resolution WRF model (36 km horizontal resolution), and the statistical downscaling approach developed by Emanuel. We assess how changes between the LGM and 20th century climatology of TCs are related to changes in the large-scale environmental variables known to be important to TCs (e.g. vorticity, wind shear, and available moisture). Several facets of the TC climatology at the LGM are similar across all three modeling techniques: regions that spawn TCs and their seasonal cycle at the LGM is similar to the present-day distribution, while the total counts are slightly reduced at the LGM. The average intensity in the WRF model (which features resolution high enough to resolve strong storms) is similar between the two climates, though the distribution of intensity is more concentrated at the LGM (there are fewer weak events and fewer of the strongest events at the LGM). Conditions are similarly favorable in much of the deep tropics at the LGM compared to the 20th century, particularly in the central and western Pacific, but conditions become more hostile at the subtropical margins. We compare the resulting climatology with the underlying changes in environmental factors, and empirically derive a genesis index to identify the best fit between changes in the factors and climatology of events.

  9. The early rise and late demise of New Zealand’s last glacial maximum

    PubMed Central

    Rother, Henrik; Fink, David; Shulmeister, James; Mifsud, Charles; Evans, Michael; Pugh, Jeremy

    2014-01-01

    Recent debate on records of southern midlatitude glaciation has focused on reconstructing glacier dynamics during the last glacial termination, with different results supporting both in-phase and out-of-phase correlations with Northern Hemisphere glacial signals. A continuing major weakness in this debate is the lack of robust data, particularly from the early and maximum phase of southern midlatitude glaciation (∼30–20 ka), to verify the competing models. Here we present a suite of 58 cosmogenic exposure ages from 17 last-glacial ice limits in the Rangitata Valley of New Zealand, capturing an extensive record of glacial oscillations between 28–16 ka. The sequence shows that the local last glacial maximum in this region occurred shortly before 28 ka, followed by several successively less extensive ice readvances between 26–19 ka. The onset of Termination 1 and the ensuing glacial retreat is preserved in exceptional detail through numerous recessional moraines, indicating that ice retreat between 19–16 ka was very gradual. Extensive valley glaciers survived in the Rangitata catchment until at least 15.8 ka. These findings preclude the previously inferred rapid climate-driven ice retreat in the Southern Alps after the onset of Termination 1. Our record documents an early last glacial maximum, an overall trend of diminishing ice volume in New Zealand between 28–20 ka, and gradual deglaciation until at least 15 ka. PMID:25071171

  10. The early rise and late demise of New Zealand's last glacial maximum.

    PubMed

    Rother, Henrik; Fink, David; Shulmeister, James; Mifsud, Charles; Evans, Michael; Pugh, Jeremy

    2014-08-12

    Recent debate on records of southern midlatitude glaciation has focused on reconstructing glacier dynamics during the last glacial termination, with different results supporting both in-phase and out-of-phase correlations with Northern Hemisphere glacial signals. A continuing major weakness in this debate is the lack of robust data, particularly from the early and maximum phase of southern midlatitude glaciation (∼30-20 ka), to verify the competing models. Here we present a suite of 58 cosmogenic exposure ages from 17 last-glacial ice limits in the Rangitata Valley of New Zealand, capturing an extensive record of glacial oscillations between 28-16 ka. The sequence shows that the local last glacial maximum in this region occurred shortly before 28 ka, followed by several successively less extensive ice readvances between 26-19 ka. The onset of Termination 1 and the ensuing glacial retreat is preserved in exceptional detail through numerous recessional moraines, indicating that ice retreat between 19-16 ka was very gradual. Extensive valley glaciers survived in the Rangitata catchment until at least 15.8 ka. These findings preclude the previously inferred rapid climate-driven ice retreat in the Southern Alps after the onset of Termination 1. Our record documents an early last glacial maximum, an overall trend of diminishing ice volume in New Zealand between 28-20 ka, and gradual deglaciation until at least 15 ka. PMID:25071171

  11. Glacial onset predated Late Ordovician climate cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pohl, Alexandre; Donnadieu, Yannick; Le Hir, Guillaume; Ladant, Jean-Baptiste; Dumas, Christophe; Alvarez-Solas, Jorge; Vandenbroucke, Thijs R. A.

    2016-06-01

    The Ordovician glaciation represents the acme of one of only three major icehouse periods in Earth's Phanerozoic history and is notorious for setting the scene for one of the "big five" mass extinction events. Nevertheless, the mechanisms that drove ice sheet growth remain poorly understood and the final extent of the ice sheet crudely constrained. Here using an Earth system model with an innovative coupling method between ocean, atmosphere, and land ice accounting for climate and ice sheet feedback processes, we report simulations portraying for the first time the detailed evolution of the Ordovician ice sheet. We show that the emergence of the ice sheet happened in two discrete phases. In a counterintuitive sequence of events, the continental ice sheet appeared suddenly in a warm climate. Only during the second act, and set against a background of decreasing atmospheric CO2, followed steeply dropping temperatures and extending sea ice. The comparison with abundant sedimentological, geochemical, and micropaleontological data suggests that glacial onset may have occurred as early as the Middle Ordovician Darriwilian, in agreement with recent studies reporting third-order glacioeustatic cycles during the same period. The second step in ice sheet growth, typified by a sudden drop in tropical sea surface temperatures by ˜8°C and the further extension of a single, continental-scale ice sheet over Gondwana, marked the onset of the Hirnantian glacial maximum. By suggesting the presence of an ice sheet over Gondwana throughout most of the Middle and Late Ordovician, our models embrace the emerging paradigm of an "early Paleozoic Ice Age."

  12. Early local last glacial maximum in the tropical Andes.

    PubMed

    Smith, Jacqueline A; Seltzer, Geoffrey O; Farber, Daniel L; Rodbell, Donald T; Finkel, Robert C

    2005-04-29

    The local last glacial maximum in the tropical Andes was earlier and less extensive than previously thought, based on 106 cosmogenic ages (from beryllium-10 dating) from moraines in Peru and Bolivia. Glaciers reached their greatest extent in the last glacial cycle approximately 34,000 years before the present and were retreating by approximately 21,000 years before the present, implying that tropical controls on ice volumes were asynchronous with those in the Northern Hemisphere. Our estimates of snowline depression reflect about half the temperature change indicated by previous widely cited figures, which helps resolve the discrepancy between estimates of terrestrial and marine temperature depression during the last glacial cycle. PMID:15860623

  13. Paleodust variability since the Last Glacial Maximum and implications for iron inputs to the ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albani, S.; Mahowald, N. M.; Murphy, L. N.; Raiswell, R.; Moore, J. K.; Anderson, R. F.; McGee, D.; Bradtmiller, L. I.; Delmonte, B.; Hesse, P. P.; Mayewski, P. A.

    2016-04-01

    Changing climate conditions affect dust emissions and the global dust cycle, which in turn affects climate and biogeochemistry. In this study we use observationally constrained model reconstructions of the global dust cycle since the Last Glacial Maximum, combined with different simplified assumptions of atmospheric and sea ice processing of dust-borne iron, to provide estimates of soluble iron deposition to the oceans. For different climate conditions, we discuss uncertainties in model-based estimates of atmospheric processing and dust deposition to key oceanic regions, highlighting the large degree of uncertainty of this important variable for ocean biogeochemistry and the global carbon cycle. We also show the role of sea ice acting as a time buffer and processing agent, which results in a delayed and pulse-like soluble iron release into the ocean during the melting season, with monthly peaks up to ~17 Gg/month released into the Southern Oceans during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM).

  14. Ocean Cooling Pattern at the Last Glacial Maximum

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zhuang, Kelin; Giardino, John R.

    2012-01-01

    Ocean temperature and ocean heat content change are analyzed based on four PMIP3 model results at the Last Glacial Maximum relative to the prehistorical run. Ocean cooling mostly occurs in the upper 1000 m depth and varies spatially in the tropical and temperate zones. The Atlantic Ocean experiences greater cooling than the rest of the ocean basins. Ocean cooling is closely related to the weakening of meridional overturning circulation and enhanced intrusion of Antarctic Bottom Water into the North Atlantic.

  15. Meltwater input to the southern ocean during the last glacial maximum

    SciTech Connect

    Shemesh, A.; Burckle, L.H.; Hays, J.D.

    1994-12-02

    Three records of oxygen isotopes in biogenic silica from deep-sea sediment cores from the Atlantic and Indian sectors of the Southern Ocean reveal the presence of isotopically depleted diatomaceous opal in sediment from the last glacial maximum. This depletion is attributed to the presence of lids of meltwater that mixed with surface water along certain trajectories in the Southern Ocean. An increase in the drainage from Antarctica or extensive northward transport of icebergs are among the main mechanisms that could have produced the increase in meltwater input to the glacial Southern Ocean. Similar isotopic trends were observed in older climatic cycles at the same cores.

  16. Obliquity Control On Southern Hemisphere Climate During The Last Glacial

    PubMed Central

    Fogwill, C.J.; Turney, C.S.M.; Hutchinson, D.K.; Taschetto, A.S.; England, M.H.

    2015-01-01

    Recent paleoclimate reconstructions have challenged the traditional view that Northern Hemisphere insolation and associated feedbacks drove synchronous global climate and ice-sheet volume during the last glacial cycle. Here we focus on the response of the Patagonian Ice Sheet, and demonstrate that its maximum expansion culminated at 28,400 ± 500 years before present (28.4 ± 0.5 ka), more than 5,000 years before the minima in 65°N summer insolation and the formally-defined Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) at 21,000 ± 2,000 years before present. To investigate the potential drivers of this early LGM (eLGM), we simulate the effects of orbital changes using a suite of climate models incorporating prescribed and evolving sea-ice anomalies. Our analyses suggest that Antarctic sea-ice expansion at 28.5 ka altered the location and intensity of the Southern Hemisphere storm track, triggering regional cooling over Patagonia of 5°C that extends across the wider mid-southern latitudes. In contrast, at the LGM, continued sea-ice expansion reduced regional temperature and precipitation further, effectively starving the ice sheet and resulting in reduced glacial expansion. Our findings highlight the dominant role that orbital changes can play in driving Southern Hemisphere glacial climate via the sensitivity of mid-latitude regions to changes in Antarctic sea-ice extent. PMID:26115344

  17. Obliquity Control on Southern Hemisphere Climate during the Last Glacial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fogwill, C. J.; Hutchinson, D. K.; Turney, C. S.; Taschetto, A.; England, M. H.

    2015-12-01

    Recent paleoclimate reconstructions have challenged the traditional view that Northern Hemisphere insolation and associated feedbacks drove synchronous global climate and ice-sheet volume during the last glacial cycle. Here we focus on the response of the Patagonian Ice Sheet, and demonstrate that its maximum expansion culminated at 28,400 ± 500 years before present (28.4 ± 0.5 ka), more than 5,000 years before the minima in 65°N summer insolation and the formally-defined Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) at 21,000 ± 2,000 years before present. To investigate the potential drivers of this early LGM (eLGM), we simulate the effects of orbital changes using a suite of climate models incorporating prescribed and evolving sea-ice anomalies. Our analyses suggest that Antarctic sea-ice expansion at 28.5 ka altered the location and intensity of the Southern Hemisphere storm track, triggering regional cooling over Patagonia of 5°C that extends across the wider mid-southern latitudes. In contrast, at the LGM, continued sea-ice expansion reduced regional temperature and precipitation further, effectively starving the ice sheet and resulting in reduced glacial expansion. Our findings highlight the dominant role that orbital changes can play in driving Southern Hemisphere glacial climate via the sensitivity of mid-latitude regions to changes in Antarctic sea-ice extent.

  18. Paleoclimate at the last glacial maximum revealed by a global database of fossil groundwaters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jasechko, S.; Fawcett, P. J.; Gleeson, T. P.; Sharp, Z. D.; Lechler, A.; Galewsky, J.

    2013-12-01

    Natural climate warming since the last ice age provides an analogue to current warming likely due to human greenhouse gas and black carbon releases. Assessing the impacts of warming since the last glacial period has been aided by site-specific studies of the chemistry of groundwaters that recharged aquifers >20ka. Here we present the first comprehensive and global compilation of δ18O and δ2H values, corrected radiocarbon ages and noble gas concentrations for more than 100 major aquifers that contain water that recharged during the last glacial period. We estimate the global δ18O value of groundwater recharge during the last glacial maximum to be ~1 ‰ lower than modern. Recharge at individual aquifers during the last glacial period have δ18O values ranging from -6 to +2 relative to modern, with positive excursions limited to coastal aquifers influenced by proximity to the ~1 ‰ higher oceanic δ18O value that were present during Quaternary glaciations. Spatial patterns of δ18O values for last glacial period waters show similar patterns to modern recharge δ18O values over the continental USA, suggesting that the major continental-scale moisture sources of today were also important sources during the last glacial period. This dataset can be used in conjunction with other isotopic archives (e.g., lake sediments, speleothems) to help decouple confounding effects of shifting temperatures and isotope compositions. Further, this dataset provides a valuable constraint for isotope-enabled global climate model reconstructions of the last glacial maximum and can be used to delimit the global extent of fossil groundwater resources which are unsustainably extracted in a number of regions.

  19. Testing the Mass Balance of the Laurentide Ice Sheet During the Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullman, D. J.; Carlson, A. E.; Legrande, A. N.; Anslow, F. S.; Licciardi, J. M.; Caffee, M. W.

    2010-12-01

    Recent findings have suggested that the global Last Glacial Maximum occurred 26.5-20 ka. During this time, ice sheets were at their maximum extent and eustatic sea level was nearly 130 m lower than present. Such stability of Northern Hemisphere ice sheets suggests a nearly neutral net mass balance. Here we test the mass balance of the Laurentide Ice Sheet at the Last Glacial Maximum using an energy-mass balance model and two different ice sheet configurations. The energy-mass balance model is forced by simulated climate from the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies Model E-R, consistent with Last Glacial Maximum conditions. This coupled atmosphere-ocean global climate model contains water isotope tracers throughout the hydrologic cycle, which are used to constrain model skill against water isotopic records. Two model experiments are performed with different Laurentide Ice Sheet configurations: one using the ICE-5G geophysical reconstruction and the other using an alternative reconstruction based on a flow-line model that simulates glacier dynamics over deformable and rigid beds. These two reconstructions have widely contrasting ice sheet geometries at the Last Glacial Maximum, with the ICE-5G reconstruction having a much larger Keewatin Dome over west-central Canada, while the largest mass center according to the flow-line model is in the Labrador Dome over eastern Canada. This disparity in ice sheet geometry may result in large differences in simulated climate and net ice sheet mass balance. Initial results suggest that 1) the ICE-5G ice sheet forces a Last Glacial Maximum climate in conflict with paleoceanographic reconstructions of ocean circulation, whereas the flow-line ice sheet is in better agreement with circulation reconstructions; and 2) the initial increase in boreal summer insolation could trigger a negative mass balance for the Laurentide Ice Sheet by 21 ka, driving ice retreat. We will also compare our mass balance results with existing

  20. Glacial climate in the tropics

    SciTech Connect

    Broecker, W.

    1996-06-28

    New findings have caused ideas about the Earth`s climate during the Pleistocene glaciation to change. A consensus seems to be forming that during times of glaciation, climatic conditions in the tropics were quite different from those today. However still to be explained is why strontium-calcium measurements on corals and moble gas measurements of ground water suggest a tropical cooling of 4-6 C while foraminiferal speciation, oxygen isotope, and alkenone results suggest a cooling of no more than 3 C. This article discusses different aspects of the debate. 9 refs., 1 fig.

  1. Direct Determination of Deep Ocean Nitrate During the Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spivack, A. J.; Røy, H.; Brunner, B.; Graham, D.; Gribsholt, B.; Murray, R. W.; Schrum, H. N.; D'Hondt, S. L.

    2009-12-01

    Atmospheric carbon dioxide has systematically varied with the waxing and waning of Earth’s climate for at least the last 800,000 years, with peak glacial and interglacial values of approximately 180 ppm and 280 ppm, respectively. A variety of hypotheses have been presented to explain these CO2 variations. One important class of hypotheses asserts that changes in the deep ocean nitrate content or high latitude nitrate utilization are the proximal cause of the variations. These hypotheses can be tested by determination of last glacial maximum Pacific deep water total and pre-formed nitrate concentrations. . There have previously been no direct measurements, of paleo-nitrate concentrations as there have been for atmospheric CO2 (via ice core records). Various types of sedimentary evidence and proxies exist but have not produced an unequivocal test of these hypotheses. Here we present pore fluid nitrate data that are a direct measure of both pre-formed and total nitrate concentrations in the Pacific bottom water during the last glacial maximum. The data are from two 28 meter long piston cores collected in the North Pacific gyre. The approach used is similar to that used to reconstruct paleo-salinities based on pore fluid chloride concentrations. Pore fluid chloride at these sites in the North Pacific increases with depth in the sediment, as expected for fluids derived from bottom waters during the last glacial maximum. Oxygen is present in the pore fluids throughout the sediment column, from which we infer that there is no denitrification. In the absence of denitrification, pore fluids appear to reflect concentrations during the last glacial maximum and nitrate produced during oxic respiration. Using measured oxygen concentrations; calculated pre-formed nitrate is indistinguishable from present day values of Pacific bottom waters throughout both cores implying that preformed nitrate was the same during the last glacial maximum as it is today. Additionally, if

  2. Changing amounts and sources of moisture in the U.S. southwest since the Last Glacial Maximum in response to global climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Weimin; Hardt, Benjamin F.; Banner, Jay L.; Meyer, Kevin J.; James, Eric W.; Musgrove, MaryLynn; Edwards, R. Lawrence; Cheng, Hai; Min, Angela

    2014-09-01

    The U.S. southwest has a limited water supply and is predicted to become drier in the 21st century. An improved understanding of factors controlling moisture sources and availability is aided by reconstruction of past responses to global climate change. New stable isotope and growth-rate records for a central Texas speleothem indicate a strong influence of Gulf of Mexico (GoM) moisture and increased precipitation from 15.5 to 13.5 ka, which includes the majority of the Bølling-Allerød warming (BA: 14.7-12.9 ka). Coeval speleothem records from 900 and 1200 km to the west allow reconstruction of regional moisture sources and atmospheric circulation. The combined isotope and growth-rate time series indicates 1) increased GoM moisture input during the majority of the BA, producing greater precipitation in Texas and New Mexico; and 2) a retreat of GoM moisture during Younger Dryas cooling (12.9-11.5 ka), reducing precipitation. These results portray how late-Pleistocene atmospheric circulation and moisture distribution in this region responded to global changes, providing information to improve models of future climate.

  3. Changing amounts and sources of moisture in the U.S. southwest since the Last Glacial Maximum in response to global climate change

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Feng, Weimin; Hardt, Benjamin F.; Banner, Jay L.; Meyer, Kevin J.; James, Eric W.; Musgrove, MaryLynn; Edwards, R. Lawrence; Cheng, Hai; Min, Angela

    2014-01-01

    The U.S. southwest has a limited water supply and is predicted to become drier in the 21st century. An improved understanding of factors controlling moisture sources and availability is aided by reconstruction of past responses to global climate change. New stable isotope and growth-rate records for a central Texas speleothem indicate a strong influence of Gulf of Mexico (GoM) moisture and increased precipitation from 15.5 to 13.5 ka, which includes the majority of the Bølling–Allerød warming (BA: 14.7–12.9 ka). Coeval speleothem records from 900 and 1200 km to the west allow reconstruction of regional moisture sources and atmospheric circulation. The combined isotope and growth-rate time series indicates 1) increased GoM moisture input during the majority of the BA, producing greater precipitation in Texas and New Mexico; and 2) a retreat of GoM moisture during Younger Dryas cooling (12.9–11.5 ka), reducing precipitation. These results portray how late-Pleistocene atmospheric circulation and moisture distribution in this region responded to global changes, providing information to improve models of future climate.

  4. Atlantic meridional overturning circulation during the Last Glacial Maximum.

    PubMed

    Lynch-Stieglitz, Jean; Adkins, Jess F; Curry, William B; Dokken, Trond; Hall, Ian R; Herguera, Juan Carlos; Hirschi, Joël J-M; Ivanova, Elena V; Kissel, Catherine; Marchal, Olivier; Marchitto, Thomas M; McCave, I Nicholas; McManus, Jerry F; Mulitza, Stefan; Ninnemann, Ulysses; Peeters, Frank; Yu, Ein-Fen; Zahn, Rainer

    2007-04-01

    The circulation of the deep Atlantic Ocean during the height of the last ice age appears to have been quite different from today. We review observations implying that Atlantic meridional overturning circulation during the Last Glacial Maximum was neither extremely sluggish nor an enhanced version of present-day circulation. The distribution of the decay products of uranium in sediments is consistent with a residence time for deep waters in the Atlantic only slightly greater than today. However, evidence from multiple water-mass tracers supports a different distribution of deep-water properties, including density, which is dynamically linked to circulation. PMID:17412948

  5. Coupled Climate Model Simulations of Large-scale Eastern Boundary Current Forcing During the Mid-Holocene and Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diffenbaugh, N. S.

    2005-12-01

    We analyze coupled atmosphere-ocean general circulation model (GCM) output from the IPCC Fourth Assessment and the Paleoclimate Modelling Intercomparison Project. We focus on three time periods: the 20th century, 6 ka and 21 ka. The coupled GCMs capture the basic late-20th century seasonal structure of large-scale sea level pressure and wind forcing in the four major eastern boundary current regions (California, Canary, Humbolt and Benguela). There are moderate biases in the simulation of late-20th century inter-annual variability of large-scale sea level pressure and wind forcing, and substantial biases in the simulation of late-20th century mean monthly coastal winds. The coupled models show large changes in the magnitude of mean sea level pressure forcing in the 21 ka simulations and smaller changes in the 6 ka simulations. However, the magnitude of changes in inter-annual variability of sea level pressure forcing is similar in the 21 ka and 6 ka simulations. These and related analyses will aid in the evaluation of existing hypotheses of the response of eastern boundary currents to changes in external climate forcing. They will also help to create new testable hypotheses of eastern boundary current response and, in conjunction with proxy records, allow for a more sophisticated understanding of the mechanisms that shaped the late-Quaternary evolution of these important upwelling systems.

  6. The glaciers of Sierra Segundera (Zamora, NW Spain) during their Maximum Ice Extent: area, volume, Glacial Equilibrium Line Altitude and paleo-climatic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    María Fernández, Jose; Ubeda, Jose; Palacios, David

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this paper is to reconstruct the Quaternary glaciers which formed the eastern sector of the Sierra Segundera ice-cap (NW Iberian Peninsula) during its Maximum Ice Extent (MIE) local phase (33 ka) in a surface area of 165 km2, to estimate the ice volumes and Equilibrium Line Altitudes (ELAs). The study area presents a wide altimetric range of approx. 1200 m, from the Tera glacier front to the Peña Trevinca (42°14'33'' N, 6°47'46'' W; 2127 m) and Peña Negra (42°14'58'' N, 6°47'39'' W; 2121 m) horns, covering a wide plateau at an altitude of over 1700 m. The reconstruction of the MIE paleoglaciers used a combination of various tools: a rheological numerical model which describes the ice flow, GIS and geomorphological field work to validate the results. The model used here allowed the reconstruction of the surface topography of the paleoglacial ice, even though there is no existing geomorphologic evidence to reveal the thickness of the ice at that time. The GIS enabled the creation of Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) and the estimation of thicknesses and volumes. The reconstructed topography and the delimitation of the geomorphologic features were used to estimate the ELA using the following methods: Area x Altitude Balance Ratio (AABR), Accumulation Area Ratio (AAR), Terminus Headwall Altitude Ratio (THAR) and Maximum Elevation of Lateral Moraines (MELM). The DEM reconstructed for the surface of the paleoglaciers obtained an estimated maximum ice thickness of over 450 m during the MIE, and a total ice volume of 2.63 x 10(10)m3 for the eastern half of the ice-cap. When estimating the paleo-ELAs, the AABR and AAR methods obtain more logical values. The AABR method obtains BR=1, which questions the BR=2 assumed as representative for medium latitude glaciers with oceanic influence; the paleo-ELA AABR was 1739 m. Applying the AAR method with the ratio 0.65 gives the result 1735 m. The THAR and MELM methods give values of 1637 m and 1651 m respectively for

  7. Understanding Antarctic Climate and Glacial History

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeConto, Rob; Escutia, Carlota

    2010-01-01

    First Antarctic Climate Evolution Symposium; Granada, Spain, 7-11 September 2009; Antarctic Climate Evolution (ACE; http://www.ace.scar.org), a scientific research project of the Scientific Committee on Antarctic Research and a core International Polar Year project, held its first international symposium in Spain in September 2009. ACE's mission is to facilitate the study of Antarctic climate and glacial history through integration of numerical modeling with geophysical and geological data. Nearly 200 international scientists from the fields of climate, ocean, and ice modeling joined geologists, geophysicists, and geochemists for 5 days of intense interaction. Oral sessions were plenary and were limited to allow time for poster viewing, discussion, and workshops (http://www.acegranada2009.com/).

  8. The Last Glacial Maximum in the central North Island, New Zealand: palaeoclimate inferences from glacier modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eaves, Shaun R.; Mackintosh, Andrew N.; Anderson, Brian M.; Doughty, Alice M.; Townsend, Dougal B.; Conway, Chris E.; Winckler, Gisela; Schaefer, Joerg M.; Leonard, Graham S.; Calvert, Andrew T.

    2016-04-01

    Quantitative palaeoclimate reconstructions provide data for evaluating the mechanisms of past, natural climate variability. Geometries of former mountain glaciers, constrained by moraine mapping, afford the opportunity to reconstruct palaeoclimate, due to the close relationship between ice extent and local climate. In this study, we present results from a series of experiments using a 2-D coupled energy balance-ice flow model that investigate the palaeoclimate significance of Last Glacial Maximum moraines within nine catchments in the central North Island, New Zealand. We find that the former ice limits can be simulated when present-day temperatures are reduced by between 4 and 7 °C, if precipitation remains unchanged from present. The spread in the results between the nine catchments is likely to represent the combination of chronological and model uncertainties. The majority of catchments targeted require temperature decreases of 5.1 to 6.3 °C to simulate the former glaciers, which represents our best estimate of the temperature anomaly in the central North Island, New Zealand, during the Last Glacial Maximum. A decrease in precipitation of up to 25 % from present, as suggested by proxy evidence and climate models, increases the magnitude of the required temperature changes by up to 0.8 °C. Glacier model experiments using reconstructed topographies that exclude the volume of post-glacial ( < 15 ka) volcanism generally increased the magnitude of cooling required to simulate the former ice limits by up to 0.5 °C. Our palaeotemperature estimates expand the spatial coverage of proxy-based quantitative palaeoclimate reconstructions in New Zealand. Our results are also consistent with independent, proximal temperature reconstructions from fossil groundwater and pollen assemblages, as well as similar glacier modelling reconstructions from the central Southern Alps, which suggest air temperatures were ca. 6 °C lower than present across New Zealand during the Last

  9. Last Glacial Maximum and deglaciation of the Iberian Central System.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palacios, D.; Andrés, N.; Vieira, G.; Marcos, J.; Vázquez-Selem, L.

    2012-04-01

    The Central System runs E-W across the centre of the Iberian Peninsula and is composed mainly of crystalline rocks. A glacial morphology is well preserved on many of its most important summit areas especially towards the Atlantic. Research has recently been carried out in three of the sierras of this mountain system, with the aim of establishing the absolute chronology of the maximum glacial advance and of the deglaciation in the whole system. The method used is cosmogenic 36Cl surface exposure dating of moraine boulders and glacially polished outcrops. The selected areas are the Sierra de Guadarrama (Palacios et al. 2012) close to Peñalara Peak (40°51'N, 3°57'W; 2428 m), the Sierra de Gredos (Palacios et al. 2011) close to Almanzor Peak (40°14'N, 5°17'W; 2592 m), and the Sierra de la Estrela (Vieira and Palacios, 2010) close to Alto de la Torre summit (40°20'N, 7°34'W; 1993 m). These areas are representative of the whole Central System from west to east. The results are highly homogeneous. Moraines dating from earlier than the last glaciation were not found in any of the sierras. On the contrary, in all cases the oldest moraines from the last glaciation rest on intensely weathered crystalline surfaces. The oldest moraines date from between 31 and 26 ka. In most cases, the deposition of these moraine ridges was followed by minor advances and retreats which left a sequence of ridges very close together, lasting until 18-16 ka. A fast retreat occurred after 16-15 ka, when glaciers completely abandoned the valleys, disappearing in most cases by 13-14 ka. The ice lasted until 11-10 ka, but only in small cirques found on sheltered rock-walls below the highest peaks.

  10. Paleoecology of central Kentucky since the last glacial maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkins, Gary R.; Delcourt, Paul A.; Delcourt, Hazel R.; Harrison, Frederick W.; Turner, Manson R.

    1991-09-01

    Pollen grains and spores, plant macrofossils, and sponge spicules from a 7.2-m sediment core from Jackson Pond dating back to 20,000 yr B.P. are the basis for new interpretations of vegetational, limnological, and climatic changes in central Kentucky. During the full-glacial interval (20,400 to 16,800 yr B.P.) upland vegetation was closed spruce forest with jack pine as a subdominant. Aquatic macrophyte and sponge assemblages indicate that the site was a relatively deep, open pond with low organic productivity. During late-glacial time (16,800 to 11,300 yr B.P.) spruce populations continued to dominate while jack pine declined and sedge increased as the vegetation became a more open, taiga-like boreal woodland. Between 11,300 and 10,000 yr B.P., abundances of spruce and oak pollen oscillated reciprocally, possibly reflecting the Younger Dryas oscillation as boreal taxa underwent a series of declines and increases at the southern limit of their ranges before becoming extirpated and replaced by deciduous forest. In the early Holocene (10,000 to 7300 yr B.P.) a mesic deciduous woodland developed; it was replaced by xeric oak-hickory forest during the middle Holocene between 7300 and 3900 yr B.P. Grass increased after 3900 yr B.P., indicating that the presettlement vegetation mosaic of mixed deciduous forest and prairie (the "Kentucky Barrens") became established in central Kentucky after the Hypsithermal interval. Sponge spicules increased in number during the Holocene, reflecting reduced water depths in the pond. Sediment infilling, as well as climatic warming and the expansion of fringing shrub thickets, increased nutrient and habitat availability for freshwater sponges.

  11. Interannual physiological responses of glacial trees to changes in atmospheric [CO2] since the Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerhart, L. M.; Harris, J. M.; Ward, J. K.

    2009-12-01

    During the Last Glacial Maximum, atmospheric [CO2] were as low as 180 ppm and have currently risen to a modern value of 385 ppm as a result of fossil fuel combustion and deforestation. In order to understand how changing [CO2] influenced the physiology of trees over the last 50,000 years, we analyzed carbon isotope ratios of individual tree rings from juniper wood specimens from the Rancho La Brea tar pits in southern California and kauri wood specimens from peat bogs in New Zealand (North Island). Modern trees from different altitudes were compared to account for changes in precipitation and temperature through time in order to isolate the effects of changing [CO2]. We hypothesized that over the last 50,000 years, the ratio of ci (intracellular [CO2]) to ca (atmospheric [CO2]) would be maintained within each species. Consequently, ci values would be significantly lower in glacial trees due to lower ca levels during the LGM. In addition, we hypothesized that low [CO2] (which does not vary between years during the LGM) dominated tree physiology during the LGM as evidenced by low levels of inter-annual variation in ci/ca ratios relative to modern trees (which are known to respond to high frequency variation in water and temperature between years). In both kauri and juniper trees, mean ci/ca values remained constant throughout 50,000 years despite major climatic and [CO2] changes, indicating that there is a long-term physiological set point in these species. Limitations on the ci values of glacial junipers suggest that 90 ppm CO2 represents a survival compensation point for this species. In addition, glacial trees showed very low inter-annual variation in ci/ca values compared to modern trees. This suggests that glacial tree physiology may have been dominated by low CO2 that was constant between years, whereas modern trees may be dominated by climatic factors that vary substantially between years. Consequently, while each species maintained mean ci/ca values over time

  12. The Post-Glacial Species Velocity of Picea glauca following the Last Glacial Maximum in Alaska.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrison, B. D.; Napier, J.; Kelly, R.; Li, B.; Heath, K.; Hug, B.; Hu, F.; Greenberg, J. A.

    2015-12-01

    Anthropogenic climate change is leading to dramatic fluctuations to Earth's biodiversity that has not been observed since past interglacial periods. There is rising concern that Earth's warming climate will have significant impacts to current species ranges and the ability of a species to persist in a rapidly changing environment. The paleorecord provides information on past species distributions in relation to climate change, which can illuminate the patterns of potential future distributions of species. Particularly in areas where there are multiple potential limiting factors on a species' range, e.g. temperature, radiation, and evaporative demand, the spatial patterns of species migrations may be particularly complex. In this study, we assessed the change in the distributions of white spruce (Picea glauca) from the Last Glacial Maxima (LGM) to present-day for the entire state of Alaska. To accomplish this, we created species distribution models (SDMs) calibrated from modern vegetation data and high-resolution, downscaled climate surfaces at 60m. These SDMs were applied to downscaled modern and paleoclimate surfaces to produce estimated ranges of white spruce during the LGM and today. From this, we assessed the "species velocity", the rate at which white spruce would need to migrate to keep pace with climate change, with the goal of determining whether the expansion from the LGM to today originated from microclimate refugia. Higher species velocities indicate locations where climate changed drastically and white spruce would have needed to migrate rapidly to persist and avoid local extinction. Conversely, lower species velocities indicated locations where the local climate was changing less rapidly or was within the center of the range of white spruce, and indicated locations where white spruce distributions were unlikely to have changed significantly. Our results indicate the importance of topographic complexity in buffering the effects of climate change

  13. Modelling the trajectory of erratic boulders in the western Alps during the last glacial maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jouvet, Guillaume; Becker, Patrick; Funk, Martin; Seguinot, Julien

    2015-04-01

    Erratic boulders of the western Alps provide valuable information about the flow field prevailing during the last glacial maximum. In particular, the origin, the exposure time and the location of several boulders identified along the Jura are well documented. The goal of this study is to corroborate these information with ice flow simulations performed with the Parallel Ice Sheet Model (PISM). PISM is capable to simulate the time evolution of a large scale ice sheet by accounting for the dynamics of ice, englacial temperature, surface mass balance and variations of the lithosphere. The main difficulty of this exercise resides in large uncertainties concerning the climate forcing required as input in the surface mass balance model. To mimic with climate conditions prevailing during the last glacial maximum, a common approach consists of applying different temperature offsets and corrections in the precipitation patterns to present-day climate data, and to select the parametrizations which yield the best match between modelled ice sheet extents and geomorphologically-based margin reconstructions. To better constrain our modelling results we take advantage of some erratic boulders from which we know their origin. More precisely, we are looking for the climatic conditions which reproduce at best the trajectories of the boulders from their origins to their final location.

  14. Reconstruction of the glacial maximum recorded in the central Cantabrian Mountains (N Iberia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Laura; Jiménez-Sánchez, Montserrat; José Domínguez-Cuesta, María

    2014-05-01

    The Cantabrian Mountains is a coastal range up to 2648 m altitude trending parallel to northern Iberian Peninsula edge at a maximum distance of 100 km inland (~43oN 5oW). Glacial sediments and landforms are generally well-preserved at altitudes higher than 1600 m, evidencing the occurrence of former glaciations. Previous research supports a regional glacial maximum prior to ca 38 cal ka BP and an advanced state of deglaciation by the time of the global Last Glacial Maximum (Jiménez-Sánchez et al., 2013). A geomorphological database has been produced in ArcGIS (1:25,000 scale) for an area about 800 km2 that partially covers the Redes Natural Reservation and Picos de Europa Regional Park. A reconstruction of the ice extent and flow pattern of the former glaciers is presented for this area, showing that an ice field was developed on the study area during the local glacial maximum. The maximum length of the ice tongues that drained this icefield was remarkably asymmetric between both slopes, recording 1 to 6 km-long in the northern slope and up to 19 km-long in southern one. The altitude difference between the glacier fronts of both mountain slopes was ca 100 m. This asymmetric character of the ice tongues is related to geologic and topo-climatic factors. Jiménez-Sánchez, M., Rodríguez-Rodríguez, L., García-Ruiz, J.M., Domínguez-Cuesta, M.J., Farias, P., Valero-Garcés, B., Moreno, A., Rico, M., Valcárcel, M., 2013. A review of glacial geomorphology and chronology in northern Spain: timing and regional variability during the last glacial cycle. Geomorphology 196, 50-64. Research funded by the CANDELA project (MINECO-CGL2012-31938). L. Rodríguez-Rodríguez is a PhD student with a grant from the Spanish national FPU Program (MECD).

  15. Refugia of Marine Fish in the Northeast Atlantic During the Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kettle, Anthony; Morales, Arturo; Rosello, Eufrasia; Heinrich, Dirk; Vollestad, Asbjorn

    2010-05-01

    Archaeozoological finds of the remains of marine and amphihaline fish from the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) ca. 21 ka ago show evidence of very different species ranges compared to the present. Recent genetic results of some marine species also indicate the presence of a local population structure that further suggests a dramatic southward displacement of species ranges during the LGM. There are very few studies that have attempted to delimit the glacial refugia of marine fish from our present understanding of LGM climate conditions. The few studies that exist make predictions that may not agree with the data from archaeozoology and genetics. In this contribution, we show how an ecological niche model based on sea surface temperature and bathymetry can be used to effectively predict the spatial range of marine fish during the LGM. The results are startling especially for the northern species because the glacial refugia are almost completely displaced from the modern distribution. The results are important for understanding the present spatial genetic structure of marine populations that arose during the Pleistocene glaciations, and they present a challenge for future archaeozoological work to test the model predictions and delimit the glacial refugia.

  16. Craniometric analysis of European Upper Palaeolithic and Mesolithic samples supports discontinuity at the Late Glacial Maximum

    PubMed Central

    Brewster, Ciarán; Meiklejohn, Christopher; von Cramon-Taubadel, Noreen; Pinhasi, Ron

    2014-01-01

    The Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) represents the most significant climatic event since the emergence of anatomically modern humans (AMH). In Europe, the LGM may have played a role in changing morphological features as a result of adaptive and stochastic processes. We use craniometric data to examine morphological diversity in pre- and post-LGM specimens. Craniometric variation is assessed across four periods—pre-LGM, late glacial, Early Holocene and Middle Holocene—using a large, well-dated, dataset. Our results show significant differences across the four periods, using a MANOVA on size-adjusted cranial measurements. A discriminant function analysis shows separation between pre-LGM and later groups. Analyses repeated on a subsample, controlled for time and location, yield similar results. The results are largely influenced by facial measurements and are most consistent with neutral demographic processes. These findings suggest that the LGM had a major impact on AMH populations in Europe prior to the Neolithic. PMID:24912847

  17. Constraint on the penultimate glacial maximum Northern Hemisphere ice topography (≈140 kyrs BP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colleoni, Florence; Wekerle, Claudia; Näslund, Jens-Ove; Brandefelt, Jenny; Masina, Simona

    2016-04-01

    The penultimate glacial maximum (PGM, ≈140 kyrs BP), is known to be the most extensive glaciation on record that occurred during the last 400 kyrs over Eurasia. We used a coupled Atmosphere-Ocean-Sea-Ice-Land model to simulate the climate of the PGM accounting for a reconstruction of the large PGM Eurasian ice sheet. Due to uncertainties in the PGM Laurentide ice-sheet topography, two simulations with different ice-sheet topographies over North America (large as for the Last Glacial Maximum, LGM and small as for 13 kyrs BP) are performed. Results show that the simulated PGM glacial maximum climates are of comparable magnitude with previous simulations of the LGM in both cases. Assuming a small Laurentide ice-sheet instead of the LGM one in our PGM simulations results in a shift in the planetary waves. This causes an increase in storm track activity over the North Atlantic as well as higher temperatures and precipitation rates over North America, North Atlantic and over the Eurasian ice sheet. In addition, it induces a negative temperature anomaly over East Siberia yielding a thick snow cover, which seems to be in agreement with data from recent Arctic campaigns suggesting that an ice cap developed over Beringia during the PGM. All together, the changes in large-scale circulation and regional climate simulated using a small Laurentide ice sheet match the proxies well. Based on our findings, we suggest that the Laurentide ice sheet might have been smaller during the PGM than during the LGM, in turn also implying a larger Eurasian ice sheet than during the LGM, which is supported by various geological evidence of the PGM.

  18. Interhemispheric ice-sheet synchronicity during the last glacial maximum

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Weber, M.E.; Clark, P.U.; Ricken, W.; Mitrovica, J.X.; Hostetler, S.W.; Kuhn, G.

    2011-01-01

    The timing of the last maximum extent of the Antarctic ice sheets relative to those in the Northern Hemisphere remains poorly understood. We develop a chronology for the Weddell Sea sector of the East Antarctic Ice Sheet that, combined with ages from other Antarctic ice-sheet sectors, indicates that the advance to and retreat from their maximum extent was within dating uncertainties synchronous with most sectors of Northern Hemisphere ice sheets. Surface climate forcing of Antarctic mass balance would probably cause an opposite response, whereby a warming climate would increase accumulation but not surface melting. Our new data support teleconnections involving sea-level forcing from Northern Hemisphere ice sheets and changes in North Atlantic deep-water formation and attendant heat flux to Antarctic grounding lines to synchronize the hemispheric ice sheets.

  19. Tropical Pacific sea surface temperatures and upper water column thermal structure during the Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patrick, Andrew; Thunell, Robert C.

    1997-10-01

    Using two cores from the eastern and western Pacific, we have attempted to better quantify tropical ocean temperatures during the last glacial in order to determine how this climatically-important region responds to large scale changes in climate forcing. By analyzing the oxygen isotopes of surface dwelling (G. sacculifer, G. ruber), thermocline dwelling (N. dutertrei, G. menardii, P. obliquiloculata) and sub-thermocline dwelling (G. inflata) planktonic foraminifera, both relative and absolute estimates of the changes in the temperature gradient over this depth interval have been made. Owing to poor carbonate preservation in the Holocene section of both cores, relative temperature estimates suggest only a slight glacial cooling (˜2°C) at these locations, similar to that reported by CLIMAP [1976, 1981]. However, absolute temperature estimates determined from calcite-seawater paleothermometry indicate the eastern equatorial Pacific (EEP) was ˜3°C cooler during the last glacial maximum (LGM), while the western equatorial Pacific (WEP) was ˜4°C cooler. The upper water column appears to have been less stratified in the EEP, with a steeper thermocline, interpreted as indicating an increase in upwelling during the LGM. The WEP maintained a well developed mixed layer and deep thermocline, similar to today. These results are consistent with a variety of recent tropical temperature estimates for the LGM.

  20. Patterns and mechanisms of warm pool hydroclimate change at the Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DiNezio, Pedro; Tierney, Jessica; Otto-Bliesner, Bette; Timmermann, Axel

    2016-04-01

    A definitive answer on the mechanisms driving glacial-interglacial changes in tropical hydroclimate is lacking, particularly regarding the importance of greenhouse gases. We address this issue by evaluating mechanisms and patterns of rainfall change over the Indo-Pacific warm pool (IPWP) in climate model simulations and proxy data of the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). Our simulations show two mechanisms explaining the proxy data. Exposure of the Sunda and Sahul shelves due to lowered sea level drives a weakening of the Walker circulation explaining the dipole of drier IPWP center and wetter eastern Indian Ocean. Ice sheet albedo alters the inter-hemispheric temperature gradient driving changes in the Asian monsoon that explain the dry condition over India and the northern IPWP. Proxy and model data show consistent patterns of cooling over the Indian Ocean and Arabian Sea, providing independent evidence for the proposed mechanisms. Together these results demonstrate that ice sheets are a first order driver of tropical climate on glacial-interglacial timescales. Greenhouse gases drive a response that is relatively negligible and therefore cannot be detected using the available proxy data.

  1. Shortwave forcing and feedbacks in Last Glacial Maximum and Mid-Holocene PMIP3 simulations.

    PubMed

    Braconnot, Pascale; Kageyama, Masa

    2015-11-13

    Simulations of the climates of the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM), 21 000 years ago, and of the Mid-Holocene (MH), 6000 years ago, allow an analysis of climate feedbacks in climate states that are radically different from today. The analyses of cloud and surface albedo feedbacks show that the shortwave cloud feedback is a major driver of differences between model results. Similar behaviours appear when comparing the LGM and MH simulated changes, highlighting the fingerprint of model physics. Even though the different feedbacks show similarities between the different climate periods, the fact that their relative strength differs from one climate to the other prevents a direct comparison of past and future climate sensitivity. The land-surface feedback also shows large disparities among models even though they all produce positive sea-ice and snow feedbacks. Models have very different sensitivities when considering the vegetation feedback. This feedback has a regional pattern that differs significantly between models and depends on their level of complexity and model biases. Analyses of the MH climate in two versions of the IPSL model provide further indication on the possibilities to assess the role of model biases and model physics on simulated climate changes using past climates for which observations can be used to assess the model results. PMID:26438281

  2. Ground movement at Somma-Vesuvius from Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marturano, Aldo; Aiello, Giuseppe; Barra, Diana; Fedele, Lorenzo; Morra, Vincenzo

    2012-01-01

    Detailed micropalaeontological and petrochemical analyses of rock samples from two boreholes drilled at the archaeological excavations of Herculaneum, ~ 7 km west of the Somma -Vesuvius crater, allowed reconstruction of the Late Quaternary palaeoenvironmental evolution of the site. The data provide clear evidence for ground uplift movements involving the studied area. The Holocenic sedimentary sequence on which the archaeological remains of Herculaneum rest has risen several meters at an average rate of ~ 4 mm/yr. The uplift has involved the western apron of the volcano and the Sebeto-Volla Plain, a populous area including the eastern suburbs of Naples. This is consistent with earlier evidence for similar uplift for the areas of Pompeii and Sarno valley (SE of the volcano) and the Somma -Vesuvius eastern apron. An axisimmetric deep source of strain is considered responsible for the long-term uplift affecting the whole Somma -Vesuvius edifice. The deformation pattern can be modeled as a single pressure source, sited in the lower crust and surrounded by a shell of Maxwell viscoelastic medium, which experienced a pressure pulse that began at the Last Glacial Maximum.

  3. Simulated Last Glacial Maximum Δ14CATM and the Deep Glacial Ocean Reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mariotti, V.; Paillard, D.; Roche, D. M.; Bouttes, N.; Bopp, L.

    2012-12-01

    Δ14Catm has been estimated at 420 ± 80‰ (INTCAL09) during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) compared to preindustrial times (0‰), but mechanisms explaining this difference are not yet resolved. Δ14Catm is a function of cosmogenic production in high atmosphere and of carbon cycling in the Earth system (through carbon exchange with the superficial reservoirs, ocean and continental biosphere). 10Be-based reconstructions show a contribution of the cosmogenic production term of only 200 ± 200‰ at the LGM. The remaining 220‰ of Δ14Catm variation between the LGM and preindustrial times have thus to be explained by changes in the carbon cycle. Recently, Bouttes et al. (2010) proposed to explain most of the difference in atmospheric pCO2 between glacial and interglacial times by brine-induced ocean stratification in the Southern Ocean. This mechanism involves the formation of very saline water masses that can store Dissolved Inorganic Carbon (DIC) in the deep ocean. During glacial times, the sinking of brines is enhanced and more DIC is stored in the deep ocean, lowering atmospheric pCO2. Such an isolated ocean reservoir would be characterized by a low Δ14C signature. Evidence of such 14C-depleted deep waters during the LGM has recently been found in the Southern Ocean (Skinner et al., 2010). The degassing of this carbon with low Δ14C would then reduce Δ14Catm throughout the deglaciation. We have further developed the CLIMBER-2 model to include a cosmogenic production of 14C as well as an interactive atmospheric 14C reservoir. We investigate the role of both sinking of brines and cosmogenic production, alongside iron and vertical diffusion mechanisms to explain changes in Δ14Catm during the last deglaciation. In our simulations, not only the sinking of brine mechanism is consistent with past Δ14C data but also it explains most of the differences in atmospheric pCO2 and Δ14C between LGM and preindustrial times.

  4. Dust in High Latitudes in the Community Earth System Model since the Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albani, S.; Mahowald, N. M.

    2015-12-01

    Earth System Models are one of the main tools in modern climate research, and they provide the means to produce future climate projections. Modeling experiments of past climates is one of the pillars of the Coupled Modelling Inter-comparison Project (CMIP) / Paleoclimate Modelling Inter-comparison Project (PMIP) general strategy, aimed at understanding the climate sensitivity to varying forcings. Physical models are useful tools for studying dust transport patterns, as they allow representing the full dust cycle from sources to sinks with an internally consistent approach. Combining information from paleodust records and climate models in coherent studies can be a fruitful approach from different points of view. Based on a new quality-controlled, size- and temporally-resolved data compilation, we used the Community Earth System Model to estimate the mass balance of and variability in the global dust cycle since the Last Glacial Maximum and throughout the Holocene. We analyze the variability of the reconstructed global dust cycle at different climate equilibrium conditions since the LGM until the pre-industrial climate, and compare with palodust records, focusing on the high latitudes, and discuss the uncertainties and the implications for dust and iron deposition to the oceans.

  5. Large temperature variability in the southern African tropics since the Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powers, Lindsay A.; Johnson, Thomas C.; Werne, Josef P.; Castañeda, Isla S.; Hopmans, Ellen C.; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S.; Schouten, Stefan

    2005-04-01

    The role of the tropics in global climate change is actively debated, particularly in regard to the timing and magnitude of thermal and hydrological response. Continuous, high-resolution temperature records through the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) from tropical oceans have provided much insight but surface temperature reconstructions do not exist from tropical continental environments. Here we used the TEX86 paleotemperature proxy to reconstruct mean annual lake surface temperatures through the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) in Lake Malawi, East Africa (9°-14°S). We find a ~3.5°C overall warming since the LGM, with temperature reversals of ~2°C during the Younger Dryas (12.5 ka BP) and at 8.2 ka BP. Maximum Holocene temperatures of ~29°C were found at 5 ka BP, a period preceding severe drought in Africa. These results suggest a substantial thermal response of southeastern tropical Africa to deglaciation and to varying conditions during the Holocene.

  6. Reduced El Niño-Southern Oscillation during the Last Glacial Maximum.

    PubMed

    Ford, Heather L; Ravelo, A Christina; Polissar, Pratigya J

    2015-01-16

    El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) is a major source of global interannual variability, but its response to climate change is uncertain. Paleoclimate records from the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) provide insight into ENSO behavior when global boundary conditions (ice sheet extent, atmospheric partial pressure of CO2) were different from those today. In this work, we reconstruct LGM temperature variability at equatorial Pacific sites using measurements of individual planktonic foraminifera shells. A deep equatorial thermocline altered the dynamics in the eastern equatorial cold tongue, resulting in reduced ENSO variability during the LGM compared to the Late Holocene. These results suggest that ENSO was not tied directly to the east-west temperature gradient, as previously suggested. Rather, the thermocline of the eastern equatorial Pacific played a decisive role in the ENSO response to LGM climate. PMID:25593181

  7. Reversed flow of Atlantic deep water during the Last Glacial Maximum.

    PubMed

    Negre, César; Zahn, Rainer; Thomas, Alexander L; Masqué, Pere; Henderson, Gideon M; Martínez-Méndez, Gema; Hall, Ian R; Mas, José L

    2010-11-01

    The meridional overturning circulation (MOC) of the Atlantic Ocean is considered to be one of the most important components of the climate system. This is because its warm surface currents, such as the Gulf Stream, redistribute huge amounts of energy from tropical to high latitudes and influence regional weather and climate patterns, whereas its lower limb ventilates the deep ocean and affects the storage of carbon in the abyss, away from the atmosphere. Despite its significance for future climate, the operation of the MOC under contrasting climates of the past remains controversial. Nutrient-based proxies and recent model simulations indicate that during the Last Glacial Maximum the convective activity in the North Atlantic Ocean was much weaker than at present. In contrast, rate-sensitive radiogenic (231)Pa/(230)Th isotope ratios from the North Atlantic have been interpreted to indicate only minor changes in MOC strength. Here we show that the basin-scale abyssal circulation of the Atlantic Ocean was probably reversed during the Last Glacial Maximum and was dominated by northward water flow from the Southern Ocean. These conclusions are based on new high-resolution data from the South Atlantic Ocean that establish the basin-scale north to south gradient in (231)Pa/(230)Th, and thus the direction of the deep ocean circulation. Our findings are consistent with nutrient-based proxies and argue that further analysis of (231)Pa/(230)Th outside the North Atlantic basin will enhance our understanding of past ocean circulation, provided that spatial gradients are carefully considered. This broader perspective suggests that the modern pattern of the Atlantic MOC-with a prominent southerly flow of deep waters originating in the North Atlantic-arose only during the Holocene epoch. PMID:21048764

  8. Interhemispheric Ice-Sheet Synchronicity During the Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, M. E.; Clark, P. U.; Kuhn, G.; Ricken, W.; Sprenk, D.

    2011-12-01

    The timing of the last maximum extent of the Antarctic ice sheets relative to those in the Northern Hemisphere remains poorly understood because only a few findings with robust chronologies exist for Antarctic ice sheets. We developed a chronology for the Weddell Sea sector of the East Antarctic ice sheet that, combined with ages from other Antarctic ice-sheet sectors, indicates the advance to and retreat from their maximum extent was nearly synchronous with Northern Hemisphere ice sheets. As for the deglaciation, modeling studies suggest a late ice-sheet retreat starting around 14 ka BP and ending around 7 ka BP with a large impact of an unstable West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS) and a small impact of a stable East Antarctic Ice Sheet (EAIS). However, the Weddell Sea sites studied here, as well as sites from the Scotia Sea, provide evidence that specifically the EAIS responded much earlier, possibly provided a significant contribution to the last sea-level rise, and was much more dynamic than previously thought. Deep-sea sediment sites from the central Scotia Sea "iceberg alley" show four phases of enhanced deposition of ice-rated detritus (IRD) occurred at 19.5, 16.5,14.5, and 12 ka. The first two relate to the two ice-sheet retreat signals documented for the Weddell Sea; the third phase indicates an Antarctic component to meltwater pulse 1a; the fourth phase falls roughly into period of the Younger Dryas. Our modeling studies show that surface climate forcing of Antarctic ice sheets would have likely increased ice mass balance during deglaciation, whereby a warming climate would increase accumulation but not surface melting. We propose that sea-level forcing from Northern Hemisphere ice sheets and changes in North Atlantic deepwater formation and attendant heat flux to Antarctic grounding lines provided the teleconnections to synchronize the hemispheric ice sheets.

  9. Antarctic density stratification and the strength of the circumpolar current during the Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynch-Stieglitz, Jean; Ito, Takamitsu; Michel, Elisabeth

    2016-05-01

    The interaction between ocean circulation and biological processes in the Southern Ocean is thought to be a major control on atmospheric carbon dioxide content over glacial cycles. A better understanding of stratification and circulation in the Southern Ocean during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) provides information that will help us to assess these scenarios. First, we evaluate the link between Southern Ocean stratification and circulation states in a suite of climate model simulations. While simulated Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC) transport varies widely (80-350 Sverdrup (Sv)), it co-varies with horizontal and vertical stratification and the formation of the southern deep water. We then test the LGM simulations against available data from paleoceanographic proxies, which can be used to assess the density stratification and ACC transport south of Australia. The paleoceanographic data suggest a moderate increase in the Southern Ocean stratification and the ACC strength during the LGM. Even with the relatively large uncertainty in the proxy-based estimates, extreme scenarios exhibited by some climate models with ACC transports of greater than 250 Sv and highly saline Antarctic Bottom Water are highly unlikely.

  10. Numerical Modeling of the Last Glacial Maximum Yellowstone Ice Cap Captures Asymmetry in Moraine Ages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, L. S.; Wickert, A. D.; Colgan, W. T.; Anderson, R. S.

    2014-12-01

    The Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) Yellowstone Ice Cap was the largest continuous ice body in the US Rocky Mountains. Terminal moraine ages derived from cosmogenic radionuclide dating (e.g., Licciardi and Pierce, 2008) constrain the timing of maximum Ice Cap extent. Importantly, the moraine ages vary by several thousand years around the Ice Cap; ages on the eastern outlet glaciers are significantly younger than their western counterparts. In order to interpret these observations within the context of LGM climate in North America, we perform two numerical glacier modeling experiments: 1) We model the initiation and growth of the Ice Cap to steady state; and 2) We estimate the range of LGM climate states which led to the formation of the Ice Cap. We use an efficient semi-implicit 2-D glacier model coupled to a fully implicit solution for flexural isostasy, allowing for transient links between climatic forcing, ice thickness, and earth surface deflection. Independent of parameter selection, the Ice Cap initiates in the Absaroka and Beartooth mountains and then advances across the Yellowstone plateau to the west. The Ice Cap advances to its maximum extent first to the older eastern moraines and last to the younger western and northwestern moraines. This suggests that the moraine ages may reflect the timescale required for the Ice Cap to advance across the high elevation Yellowstone plateau rather than the timing of local LGM climate. With no change in annual precipitation from the present, a mean summer temperature drop of 8-9° C is required to form the Ice Cap. Further parameter searches provide the full range of LGM paleoclimate states that led to the Yellowstone Ice Cap. Using our preferred parameter set, we find that the timescale for the growth of the complete Ice Cap is roughly 10,000 years. Isostatic subsidence helps explain the long timescale of Ice Cap growth. The Yellowstone Ice Cap caused a maximum surface deflection of 300 m (using a constant effective elastic

  11. The role of ocean-atmosphere interactions in tropical cooling during the last glacial maximum

    PubMed

    Bush; Philander

    1998-02-27

    A simulation with a coupled atmosphere-ocean general circulation model configured for the Last Glacial Maximum delivered a tropical climate that is much cooler than that produced by atmosphere-only models. The main reason is a decrease in tropical sea surface temperatures, up to 6 degrees C in the western tropical Pacific, which occurs because of two processes. The trade winds induce equatorial upwelling and zonal advection of cold water that further intensify the trade winds, and an exchange of water occurs between the tropical and extratropical Pacific in which the poleward surface flow is balanced by equatorward flow of cold water in the thermocline. Simulated tropical temperature depressions are of the same magnitude as those that have been proposed from recent proxy data. PMID:9478892

  12. Large inert carbon pool in the terrestrial biosphere during the Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciais, P.; Tagliabue, A.; Cuntz, M.; Bopp, L.; Scholze, M.; Hoffmann, G.; Lourantou, A.; Harrison, S. P.; Prentice, I. C.; Kelley, D. I.; Koven, C.; Piao, S. L.

    2012-01-01

    During each of the late Pleistocene glacial-interglacial transitions, atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations rose by almost 100ppm. The sources of this carbon are unclear, and efforts to identify them are hampered by uncertainties in the magnitude of carbon reservoirs and fluxes under glacial conditions. Here we use oxygen isotope measurements from air trapped in ice cores and ocean carbon-cycle modelling to estimate terrestrial and oceanic gross primary productivity during the Last Glacial Maximum. We find that the rate of gross terrestrial primary production during the Last Glacial Maximum was about 40+/-10 Pg C yr-1, half that of the pre-industrial Holocene. Despite the low levels of photosynthesis, we estimate that the late glacial terrestrial biosphere contained only 330 Pg less carbon than pre-industrial levels. We infer that the area covered by carbon-rich but unproductive biomes such as tundra and cold steppes was significantly larger during the Last Glacial Maximum, consistent with palaeoecological data. Our data also indicate the presence of an inert carbon pool of 2,300 Pg C, about 700 Pg larger than the inert carbon locked in permafrost today. We suggest that the disappearance of this carbon pool at the end of the Last Glacial Maximum may have contributed to the deglacial rise in atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations.

  13. The Last Glacial Maximum and Termination in the Torres del Paine Region, Southern South America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, J.; Hall, B. L.; Kaplan, M. R.; Vega, R. M.; Binnie, S.; Gómez, G.; Santana, F.

    2012-12-01

    Deciphering the timing, structure and termination of the local last glacial maximum (LGM) throughout Patagonia (42-55 S) remains one of the key unsolved paleoclimate questions in Quaternary sciences. During the last glaciation, the Patagonian ice sheet formed one ice body along the Patagonian Andes (42-55 S) in southern South America, but previous work has revealed different spatiotemporal ice dynamics along the eastern and western ice margins. The Patagonian Andes is the only landmass that exists at this latitude confronting the southern westerly wind belt, which seems to have played a key role in past glacial and climate changes. Therefore, reconstructing southern Andes glacier history constitutes a key element for understanding the causes of glaciations in the Southern Hemisphere. Major progress has been made to document the local Late-Pleistocene glacier history, particularly in response to recent application of exposure-cosmogenic dating technique in the region, although only sparse well-dated paleoclimate records exist in this vast area. LGM moraine-based records in south Patagonia (~48-55 S) have been developed for the Strait of Magellan area, where full glacial conditions seems to have occurred between ~28.0 - 17.5 ka. Despite that these data seem to confirm previous glacial chronologies developed in north Patagonia and the Chilean Lake District (40-42 S), recent works in Torres del Paine and Última Esperanza basins (50-51 S), suggest that glacial maximum conditions may have occurred earlier (i.e., during Marine Isotope Stage 3) and that ice extent could have been twice the size of previously thought. Here, we discuss paleoclimatological implications from our 10Be and 26Al-dating program of moraines in the Torres del Paine region in southern Patagonia. We focused our efforts in the previously undated Río de las Viscachas (RV) I and II moraines, which occur distal to the late-glacial TDP II, III and IV moraines that enclose present lake bodies at the

  14. The vegetation cover of New Zealand at the Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newnham, Rewi; McGlone, Matt; Moar, Neville; Wilmshurst, Janet; Vandergoes, Marcus

    2013-08-01

    A new reconstruction of the vegetation cover for New Zealand at the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) is presented, based primarily on a database of 66 pollen site records and a more limited range of plant macrofossil and coleopteran records. Extensive forest is evident only from Auckland northwards. Conifer-broadleaf forest similar to that in the region today, but with Agathis australis scarce, persisted in the far north, whilst Nothofagus trees and a range of shrub taxa characterised the more open forests elsewhere in Northland. Survival of Nothofagus-dominated forest in coastal and exposed continental shelf locations to the southwest of Auckland and northwestern South Island is also indicated. Beyond these regions, vegetation cover comprised shrubland- and grassland-dominant communities, with the latter more prominent in eastern areas, to the south and presumably at higher altitudes. Nevertheless the survival of forest trees is indicated unambiguously in most regions apart from the eastern South Island. Thus the concept of 'micro glacial forest refugia' in New Zealand remains supported by this latest glacial vegetation reconstruction and we draw possible parallels with the developing but contentious concept of 'northern cryptic refugia' in Europe. Recent assertions that pollen and beetle reconstructions of the New Zealand LGM vegetation patterns diverge significantly are not supported by this analysis. Rather, the two proxies are readily reconciled if the term 'woody' as indicated by coleoptera is not restricted to tall forest trees but extended to the widespread woody shrub and small tree elements of the New Zealand flora. Regional distinctions in the LGM vegetation reconstruction concur broadly with the contemporary vegetation pattern, suggesting that, along with temperature depression and likely drier growing conditions, a zonal circulation regime with prominent southern westerly winds was important at 21 ka, as it is today. Pollen-climate modelling of the extent of

  15. Impact of vegetation changes on the dynamics of the atmosphere at the Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crucifix, Michel; Hewitt, Christopher D.

    2005-10-01

    Much work is under way to identify and quantify the feedbacks between vegetation and climate. Palaeoclimate modelling may provide a mean to address this problem by comparing simulations with proxy data. We have performed a series of four simulations of the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM, 21,000 years ago) using the climate model HadSM3, to test the sensitivity of climate to various changes in vegetation: a global change (according to a previously discussed simulation of the LGM with HadSM3 coupled to the dynamical vegetation model TRIFFID); a change only north of 35°N; a change only south of 35°N; and a variation in stomatal opening induced by the reduction in atmospheric CO2 concentration. We focus mainly on the response of temperature, precipitation, and atmosphere dynamics. The response of continental temperature and precipitation mainly results from regional interactions with vegetation. In Eurasia, particularly Siberia and Tibet, the response of the biosphere substantially enhances the glacial cooling through a positive feedback loop between vegetation, temperature, and snow-cover. In central Africa, the decrease in tree fraction reduces the amount of precipitation. Stomatal opening is not seen to play a quantifiable role. The atmosphere dynamics, and more specifically the Asian summer monsoon system, are significantly altered by remote changes in vegetation: the cooling in Siberia and Tibet act in concert to shift the summer subtropical front southwards, weaken the easterly tropical jet and the momentum transport associated with it. By virtue of momentum conservation, these changes in the mid-troposphere circulation are associated with a slowing of the Asian summer monsoon surface flow. The pattern of moisture convergence is slightly altered, with moist convection weakening in the western tropical Pacific and strengthening north of Australia.

  16. Change in atmospheric mineral aerosols in response to climate: Last glacial period, preindustrial, modern, and doubled carbon dioxide climates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mahowald, N.M.; Muhs, D.R.; Levis, S.; Rasch, P.J.; Yoshioka, M.; Zender, C.S.; Luo, C.

    2006-01-01

    Desert dust simulations generated by the National Center for Atmospheric Research's Community Climate System Model for the current climate are shown to be consistent with present day satellite and deposition data. The response of the dust cycle to last glacial maximum, preindustrial, modern, and doubled-carbon dioxide climates is analyzed. Only natural (non-land use related) dust sources are included in this simulation. Similar to some previous studies, dust production mainly responds to changes in the source areas from vegetation changes, not from winds or soil moisture changes alone. This model simulates a +92%, +33%, and -60% change in dust loading for the last glacial maximum, preindustrial, and doubled-carbon dioxide climate, respectively, when impacts of carbon dioxide fertilization on vegetation are included in the model. Terrestrial sediment records from the last glacial maximum compiled here indicate a large underestimate of deposition in continental regions, probably due to the lack of simulation of glaciogenic dust sources. In order to include the glaciogenic dust sources as a first approximation, we designate the location of these sources, and infer the size of the sources using an inversion method that best matches the available data. The inclusion of these inferred glaciogenic dust sources increases our dust flux in the last glacial maximum from 2.1 to 3.3 times current deposition. Copyright 2006 by the American Geophysical Union.

  17. Arctic Dinoflagellate Migration Marks the Oligocene Glacial Maximum: Implications for the Rupelian-Chattian Boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Simaeys, S.; Brinkhuis, H.; Pross, J.; Williams, G. L.; Zachos, J. C.

    2004-12-01

    Various geochemical and biotic climate proxies, and notably deep-sea benthic foraminiferal δ 18O records indicate that the Eocene 'greenhouse' state of the Earth gradually evolved towards an earliest Oligocene 'icehouse' state, eventually triggering the abrupt appearance of large continental ice-sheets on Antarctic at ˜33.3 Ma (Oi-1 event). This, however, was only the first of two major glacial events in the Oligocene. Benthic foraminiferal δ 18O records show a second positive excursion in the mid Oligocene, consistent with a significant ice-sheet expansion and/or cooling at 27.1 Ma (Oi-2b) coincident with magnetosubchron C9n. Here, we report on a mid Oligocene, globally synchronous, Arctic dinoflagellate migration event, calibrated against the upper half of C9n. A sudden appearance, and abundance increases of the Arctic taxon Svalbardella at lower-middle latitudes coincides with the so-called Oi-2b benthic δ 18O event, dated at ˜27.1 Ma. This phenomenon is taken to indicate significant high-latitude surface water cooling, concomitant Antarctic ice-sheet growth, and sea level lowering. The duration of the Svalbardella migrations, and the episode of profound cooling is estimated as ˜500 ka, and is here termed the Oligocene Glacial Maximum (OGM). Our records suggest a close link between the OGM, sea-level fall, and the classic Rupelian-Chattian boundary, magnetostratigraphically dating this boundary as ˜27.1 Ma.

  18. Reduced Surface Ocean Temperature Variability in the Eastern Equatorial Pacific During the Late Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, H. L.; Ravelo, A. C.; Polissar, P. J.

    2012-12-01

    El Niño-Southern Oscillation is the largest source of global interannual variability with far-reaching climatic effects. Climate model simulations of future warming exhibit widely divergent behavior indicating an incomplete understanding of the factors that dictate tropical climate variability. Generating records of past tropical Pacific variability during times with different climate states is one approach to deepening our understanding of tropical climate change processes and improving predictions of future change. Here we reconstruct tropical Pacific ocean variability from the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) and from the Holocene at ODP Sites 806 and 849, located in the western equatorial Pacific (WEP) warm pool and eastern equatorial Pacific (EEP) cold tongue, respectively. We reconstruct ocean temperature variability using the intra-sample distribution of Mg/Ca values from individual foraminifera. Sea surface temperature variability is reconstructed from individual specimens of G. sacculifer analyzed for Mg/Ca values with laser ablation ICP-MS (Photon Machines Analyte.193 with HelEx sample cell coupled with a Thermo ElementXS ICP-MS, LA-ICP-MS). Subsurface temperature variability is reconstructed from individual specimens of G. tumida analyzed for Mg/Ca values by ICP-OES. Our results indicate that the cooling of last glacial maximum SSTs was greater in the WEP compared to the EEP. Furthermore, we show this cooling is not an artifact of changes in seasonal or interannual foraminiferal fluxes, but rather, reflects overall cooler temperatures and thus changes in seasonal/interannual heat fluxes. At Site 806 in the WEP, variability during the Holocene and LGM was similar, suggesting the cooling was a direct response to pCO2-radiative forcing. In contrast, at Site 849, sea surface temperature variability during the LGM was greatly diminished in comparison to the Holocene suggesting reduced ENSO and seasonal variability. Therefore conditions in the EEP responded to both

  19. Refugia of marine fish in the northeast Atlantic during the last glacial maximum: concordant assessment from archaeozoology and palaeotemperature reconstructions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kettle, A. J.; Morales-Muñiz, A.; Roselló-Izquierdo, E.; Heinrich, D.; Vøllestad, L. A.

    2011-03-01

    Archaeozoological finds of the remains of marine and amphihaline fish from the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) ca. 21 ka ago show evidence of very different species ranges compared to the present. We have shown how an ecological niche model (ENM) based on palaeoclimatic reconstructions of sea surface temperature and bathymetry can be used to effectively predict the spatial range of marine fish during the LGM. The results indicate that the ranges of marine fish species now in northwestern Europe were displaced significantly southwards from the modern distribution, challenging an existing paradigm of marine glacial refugia. The model presents strong evidence that there was an invasion of important fish through the Straits of Gibraltar in glacial times, where they were exploited by Palaeolithic human populations around the western Mediterranean Sea. The ENM results are important for ongoing studies of molecular ecology that aim to assess marine glacial refugia from the genetic structure of living populations, and they pose questions about the genetic identity of vanished marine populations during the LGM. Economically, the approach may be used to understand how the ranges of exploited fish species may be displaced with the future climate warming. The research presents a challenge for future archaeozoological work to delimit the glacial refugia and to verify palaeoclimatic reconstructions based on deep-sea core records.

  20. Regional atmospheric circulation over Europe during the Last Glacial Maximum and its links to precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludwig, Patrick; Schaffernicht, Erik; Shao, Yaping; Pinto, Joaquim

    2016-04-01

    The Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) exhibits different large-scale atmospheric patterns compared to present-day climate due to altered boundary conditions. The impacts on the regional atmospheric circulation and associated precipitation patterns over Europe for the LGM are characterized for the first time with a weather typing approach (circulation weather types, CWT) from (paleo-) climate simulations. While the CWTs over Western Europe are prevailing westerly for both present-day and LGM conditions, considerable differences are identified elsewhere: Southern Europe experienced more frequent westerly and cyclonic CWTs under LGM conditions, while Central and Eastern Europe was predominantly affected by southerly and easterly flow patterns. Precipitation patterns under LGM conditions show increased rainfall in Western Europe but are reduced over most of Central and Eastern Europe. These differences are explained by changing CWT frequencies and evaporation patterns over the North Atlantic Ocean. The regional differences of the CWTs and precipitation patterns are linked to the North Atlantic storm track, which was stronger over Europe in all considered models during LGM, explaining the overall increase of the cyclonic CWT. Enhanced evaporation over the North Atlantic lead to an increased amount of available moisture over the ocean. Despite the overall cooling during the LGM, this explains the enhanced precipitation amounts over southwestern parts of Europe, particularly Iberia. This study links large scale atmospheric dynamics to the regional circulation and associated precipitation patterns and provides an improved regional assessment for climate conditions in Europe under LGM conditions.

  1. Variations in tree cover in North America since the last glacial maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, John W.

    2003-01-01

    Accurate reconstructions of late-Quaternary land-cover change are needed to better understand past interactions of the terrestrial biosphere with other components of the earth system. This paper presents a sequence of reconstructed needleleaved and broadleaved tree-cover densities for North America since the last glacial maximum, generated from fossil-pollen data and present-day tree-cover estimates derived from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR). For this study, a refined form of the modern analog technique was developed, called the hierarchical analog technique, which can constrain paleoenvironmental properties even for fossil-pollen assemblages without close analogs in the modern-pollen record. Pollen taxa from samples that are compositionally unlike any modern-pollen samples are regrouped into plant functional categories based upon phenology, life form, leaf shape, and climatic tolerances, and the analog analysis rerun. Reclassifying individual pollen taxa into broader functional categories enables analogs to be found when no compositional analogs exist, but at a cost of increased uncertainties in the analog estimates. Tests of the hierarchical analog technique shows that it accurately reconstructs present-day tree-cover densities. The median standard deviation for each individual estimate is <10%. Tree-cover densities during the last glacial maximum were low relative to present, and have increased since. Lower-than-present tree-cover densities at the last glacial maximum were likely due to a combination of low temperatures, low precipitation, and low atmospheric CO 2 concentrations. By 14 ka, broadleaved tree-cover densities had begun to rise in the southeastern US and needleleaved forests grew in the western US, southeastern US, and as a belt along the southern margin of the Laurentide Ice Sheet. By the mid-Holocene, the northern and western needleleaved forests had joined. Needleleaved and broadleaved tree densities continued to increase

  2. Drivers of Asian winter monsoon evolution since the Last Glacial Maximum (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrill, C.; Li, Y.

    2013-12-01

    The Asian winter monsoon is a major center of activity for global winter climate. Its extensive latitudinal reach, in particular, allows it to act as a bridge between extratropical and tropical climate. New loess and ocean sediment records describe how the winter monsoon has evolved over the last 21 ka, with strong phases during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) and Early Holocene, and weakening though the Middle and Late Holocene. Abrupt cold events, such as Heinrich event 1 or the 8.2 ka event, were periods of even more intense winter monsoon circulation. Reasons for this evolution have been proposed, but not yet tested using physically-consistent models of the coupled climate system. The causes are likely multiple, since the winter monsoon was strong during both the Early Holocene and the LGM, though the possible drivers (i.e., orbital forcing, greenhouse gas concentration, and ice sheet extent) were quite different between those two time periods. We test these ideas with a series of equilibrium, sensitivity, and transient simulations using the Community Climate System, version 3, coupled climate model. At LGM, the presence of the Laurentide Ice Sheet was primarily responsible for the stronger winter monsoon circulation. Reduced greenhouse gas concentrations at LGM made only a minor contribution. During the Early Holocene, on the other hand, lower winter insolation than today enhanced the land-ocean temperature contrast and strengthened the monsoon circulation. The remnant Laurentide ice sheet of the Early Holocene did not contribute to the stronger winter monsoon. Expansion of Northern Hemisphere sea ice during abrupt cold events increased the latitudinal temperature gradient and intensified winter winds throughout much of the mid-latitudes. Changes in the mechanisms driving winter monsoon behavior through time can also explain the observed covariance with the tropical summer monsoon.

  3. Hydrological and Vegetation Dynamics in Central Indonesia since the Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wicaksono, S. A.; Russell, J. M.; Bijaksana, S.; Holbourn, A. E.; Kuhnt, W.

    2014-12-01

    The Indonesian archipelago sits within the Indo-Pacific Warm Pool and plays a crucial role in today's global water vapor and heat transport. Despite the region's importance in the global climate system, we understand relatively little of long-term patterns of convection and precipitation across Indonesia. To better characterize the regional precipitation response in Indonesia since the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM), we developed continuous high-resolution records of the carbon and hydrogen isotopic composition of terrestrial leaf waxes (long-chain n-alkanoic acids; δ13Cwax and δDwax respectively) from marine and lacustrine cores retrieved offshore and in central Sulawesi, in the heart of Indonesia. Present-day rainfall variability in central Sulawesi is strongly influenced by variations in topography and wind pattern, including land-sea breezes, orographically-forced winds, and monsoonal winds related to the seasonal migration of the Intertropical Convergence Zone. Our terrestrial and marine records show excellent agreement. Together, our δ13Cwax records suggest that rainforests contracted and grasslands became more abundant during the LGM, indicating that the aridification and the likely increase of water stress during the dry season in central Indonesia are linked to high-latitude climate forcings (i.e. global cooling and Northern Hemisphere ice sheet expansion). However, our data also indicate that the highlands of Sulawesi remained relatively wet and might have become a refuge for rainforests during the LGM, suggesting that altitudinal gradients within the archipelago strongly influence local manifestations of hydrological changes at glacial-interglacial timescales. Despite evidence for regional drying, we observe depleted δDwax values during the LGM, demonstrating that the amount effect may not always be the most important factor controlling the δD of precipitation (δDprecip) in this region at orbital timescales. Instead, the presence of strong glacial

  4. Regional atmospheric circulation over Europe during the Last Glacial Maximum and its links to precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludwig, Patrick; Schaffernicht, Erik J.; Shao, Yaping; Pinto, Joaquim G.

    2016-03-01

    The Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) exhibits different large-scale atmospheric conditions compared to present-day climate due to altered boundary conditions. The regional atmospheric circulation and associated precipitation patterns over Europe are characterized for the first time with a weather typing approach (circulation weather types, CWT) for LGM paleoclimate simulations. The CWT approach is applied to four representative regions across Europe. While the CWTs over Western Europe are prevailing westerly for both present-day and LGM conditions, considerable differences are identified elsewhere: Southern Europe experienced more frequent westerly and cyclonic CWTs under LGM conditions, while Central and Eastern Europe was predominantly affected by southerly and easterly flow patterns. Under LGM conditions, rainfall is enhanced over Western Europe but is reduced over most of Central and Eastern Europe. These differences are explained by changing CWT frequencies and evaporation patterns over the North Atlantic Ocean. The regional differences of the CWTs and precipitation patterns are linked to the North Atlantic storm track, which was stronger over Europe in all considered models during the LGM, explaining the overall increase of the cyclonic CWT. Enhanced evaporation over the North Atlantic leads to higher moisture availability over the ocean. Despite the overall cooling during the LGM, this explains the enhanced precipitation over southwestern Europe, particularly Iberia. This study links large-scale atmospheric dynamics to the regional circulation and associated precipitation patterns and provides an improved regional assessment of the European climate under LGM conditions.

  5. Carbon storage in Amazonia during the last glacial maximum: secondary data and uncertainties.

    PubMed

    Turcq, Bruno; Cordeiro, Renato C; Sifeddine, Abdefettah; Simões Filho, Francisco F L; Albuquerque, Ana Luisa S; Abrão, Jorge J

    2002-12-01

    The Amazonian forest is, due to its great size, carbon storage capacity and present-day variability in carbon uptake and release, an important component of the global carbon cycle. Paleo-environmental reconstruction is difficult for Amazonia due to the scarcity of primary palynological data and the mis-interpretation of some secondary data. Studies of lacustrine sediment records have shown that Amazonia has known periods in which the climate was drier than it is today. However, not all geomorphological features such as dunes, and slope erosion, which are thought to indicate rainforest regression, date from the time of the Late Glacial Maximum (LGM) and these features do not necessarily correspond to episodes of forest regression. There is also uncertainty concerning LGM carbon storage due to rainforest soils and biomass estimates. Soil carbon content may decrease moderately during the LGM, whereas rainforest biomass may change considerably in response to changes in the global environment. Biomass per unit area in Amazonia has probably been reduced by the cumulative effects of low CO2 concentration, a drier climate and lower temperatures. As few paleo-vegetation data are available, there is considerable uncertainty concerning the amount of carbon stored in Amazonia during the LGM, which may have corresponded to 44-94% of the carbon currently stored in biomass and soils. PMID:12430660

  6. Glacial and climatic evolution from the Little Ice Age last Maximum to the present in Tröllaskagi Peninsula (North Iceland): the case of Gljúlfurárjökull

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    María Fernández, Jose; Andres, Nuria; Tanarro, Luis Miguel; Palacios, David

    2015-04-01

    This paper presents the evolution of the Gljúlfurárjökull glacier (65°42'48'' N, 18°39'13'' W; 980 m), located at the headwall of the Skiðadalur valley, on the Tröllaskagi peninsula (N. Iceland). This is one of many small glaciers situated on the bottom of the Tröllaskagi valleys. This glacier is one of the few "clean" glaciers, i.e. not covered with boulders, as is the case with most of the glaciers on this peninsula. This makes the glacier especially sensitive to climate change, and it has retreated and advanced many times since its last maximum during the Little Ice Age (LIA) maximum in the mid- 19th century (Caseldine and Stötter, 1993), leaving a large number of moraine ridges. This paper analyses the change in this glacier from the LIA up to the present day, with reference to the variations in the surface, ELA and volume. Lichenometry and geomorphological field analysis were used to establish the exact limits of the glacier during the LIA last maximum. An aerial photo from 1946 and two orthophotos from 2000 and 2013 were also used. Using photointerpretation and Geographical Information Systems (GIS), the aerial photos were georeferenced to delimit the glacier in different years, analyse the surface and volume variations, and calculate the ELA for each date. The ELA analysis was carried out using the method: Accumulation Area Ratio (AAR 0.67). The results obtained with this method are: Little Ice Age Maximum: 945 m a.s.l. (almost the same ELA proposed by Caseldine and Stötter, 1993) 1946: 970 m a.s.l. 2000: 980 m a.s.l. 2013: 990 m a.s.l. The ice volume lost from LIA to 2000 was: 111.68 hm3 Reference Caseldine, C., Stötter, J., 1993. "Little Ice Age" glaciation of Tröllaskagi Peninsula, northern Iceland: Climatic implications for reconstructed equilibrium line altitudes (ELAs). Holocene 3: 357-366. Research funded by Cryocrisis project (CGL2012-35858), Government of Spain, and Nils Mobility projects (EEA GRANTS)

  7. Decadal-scale climate drivers for glacial dynamics in Glacier National Park, Montana, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pederson, G.T.; Fagre, D.B.; Gray, S.T.; Graumlich, L.J.

    2004-01-01

    Little Ice Age (14th-19th centuries A.D.) glacial maxima and 20th century retreat have been well documented in Glacier National Park, Montana, USA. However, the influence of regional and Pacific Basin driven climate variability on these events is poorly understood. We use tree-ring reconstructions of North Pacific surface temperature anomalies and summer drought as proxies for winter glacial accumulation and summer ablation, respectively, over the past three centuries. These records show that the 1850's glacial maximum was likely produced by ???70 yrs of cool/wet summers coupled with high snowpack. Post 1850, glacial retreat coincides with an extended period (>50 yr) of summer drought and low snowpack culminating in the exceptional events of 1917 to 1941 when retreat rates for some glaciers exceeded 100 m/yr. This research highlights potential local and ocean-based drivers of glacial dynamics, and difficulties in separating the effects of global climate change from regional expressions of decadal-scale climate variability. Copyright 2004 by the American Geophysical Union.

  8. Radiocarbon chronology of the last glacial maximum and its termination in northwestern Patagonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno, Patricio I.; Denton, George H.; Moreno, Hugo; Lowell, Thomas V.; Putnam, Aaron E.; Kaplan, Michael R.

    2015-08-01

    We examine the timing and magnitude of the last glacial maximum (LGM) and the last glacial termination (LGT) in northwestern Patagonia, situated in the middle latitudes of South America. Our data indicate that the main phase of the LGT began with abrupt warm pulses at 17,800 and 17,100 cal yrs BP, accompanied by rapid establishment of evergreen temperate rainforests and extensive deglaciation of the Andes within 1000 years. This response shows that South American middle-latitude temperatures had approached average interglacial values by 16,800 cal yrs BP. The temperature rise in northwestern Patagonia coincides with the beginning of major warming and glacier recession in the Southern Alps of New Zealand at southern mid-latitudes on the opposite side of the Pacific Ocean. From this correspondence, the warming that began at 17,800 cal yrs BP appears to have been widespread in middle latitudes of the Southern Hemisphere, accounting for at least 75% of the total temperature recovery from the LGM to the Holocene. Moreover, this warming pulse is coeval with the first half of the Heinrich Stadial 1 (HS1) in the North Atlantic region. HS1 featured a decline of North Atlantic meridional overturning circulation, a southward shift of the westerly wind belt in both hemispheres and of the Intertropical Convergence Zone, as well as a weakening of the Asian monsoon. Along with the initiating trigger, identifying the mechanisms whereby these opposing climate signals in the two polar hemispheres interacted -whether through an oceanic or an atmospheric bipolar seesaw, or both- lies at the heart of understanding the LGT.

  9. Reconstructing Oceanographic Conditions From the Holocene to the Last Glacial Maximum in the Bay of Bengal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, J.; Dekens, P. S.; Weber, M. E.; Spiess, V.; France-Lanord, C.

    2015-12-01

    The International Ocean Discovery Program (IODP) Expedition 354 drilled 7 sites in the Bay of Bengal, providing a unique opportunity to improve our understanding of the link between glacial cycles, tropical oceanographic changes, and monsoon strength. Deep-sea sediment cores of the Bengal Fan fluctuate between sand, hemipelagic and terrestrial sediment layers. All but one of the sites (U1454) contain a layer of calcareous clay in the uppermost part of the core that is late Pleistocene in age. During Expedition 354 site U1452C was sampled at high resolution (every 2cm) by a broad group of collaborators with the goal of reconstructing monsoon strength and oceanographic conditions using a variety of proxies. The top 480 cm of site U1452C (8ºN, 87ºE, 3671m water depth) contains primarily nannofossil rich calcareous clay. The relatively high abundance of foraminifera will allow us to generate a high resolution record of sea surface temperature (SST) and sea surface salinity (SSS) using standard foraminifera proxies. We will present oxygen isotopes (δ18O) and Mg/Ca data of mixed layer planktonic foraminifera from the top 70cm of the core, representing the Holocene to the last glacial maximum. δ18O of planktonic foraminifera records global ice volume and local SST and SSS, while Mg/Ca of foraminifera is a proxy for SST. The paired Mg/Ca and δ18O measurements on the same samples of foraminifera, together with published estimates with global ocean δ18O, can be used to reconstruct both SST and local δ18O of seawater, which is a function of the evaporation/precipitation balance. In future work, the local SSS and SST during the LGM will be paired with terrestrial and other oceanic proxies to increase our understanding of how global climate is connected to monsoon strength.

  10. Refugia of marine fish in the Northeast Atlantic during the Last Glacial Maximum: concordant assessment from archaeozoology and palaeotemperature reconstructions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kettle, A. J.; Morales-Muñiz, A.; Roselló-Izquierdo, E.; Heinrich, D.; Vøllestad, L. A.

    2010-07-01

    Archaeozoological finds of the remains of marine and amphihaline fish from the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) ca. 21 ka ago show evidence of very different species ranges compared to the present. We show how an ecological niche model (ENM) based on palaeoclimatic reconstructions of sea surface temperature and bathymetry can be used to effectively predict the spatial range of marine fish during the LGM. The results indicate that the ranges of marine fish species that are now in Northwestern Europe were almost completely displaced southward from the modern distribution. Significantly, there is strong evidence that there was an invasion of fish of current economic importance into the Western Mediterranean through the Straits of Gibraltar, where they were exploited by Palaeolithic human populations. There has been much recent interest in the marine glacial refugia to understand how the ranges of the economically important fish species will be displaced with the future climate warming. Recent ENM studies have suggested that species ranges may not have been displaced far southward during the coldest conditions of the LGM. However, archaeozoological evidence and LGM ocean temperature reconstructions indicate that there were large range changes, and certain marine species were able invade the Western Mediterranean. These findings are important for ongoing studies of molecular ecology that aim to assess marine glacial refugia from the genetic structure of living populations, and they pose questions about the genetic identity of vanished marine populations during the LGM. The research presents a challenge for future archaeozoological work to verify palaeoclimatic reconstructions and delimit the glacial refugia.

  11. Timing of maximum glacial extent and deglaciation from HualcaHualca volcano (southern Peru), obtained with cosmogenic 36Cl.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alcalá, Jesus; Palacios, David; Vazquez, Lorenzo; Juan Zamorano, Jose

    2015-04-01

    Andean glacial deposits are key records of climate fluctuations in the southern hemisphere. During the last decades, in situ cosmogenic nuclides have provided fresh and significant dates to determine past glacier behavior in this region. But still there are many important discrepancies such as the impact of Last Glacial Maximum or the influence of Late Glacial climatic events on glacial mass balances. Furthermore, glacial chronologies from many sites are still missing, such as HualcaHualca (15° 43' S; 71° 52' W; 6,025 masl), a high volcano of the Peruvian Andes located 70 km northwest of Arequipa. The goal of this study is to establish the age of the Maximum Glacier Extent (MGE) and deglaciation at HualcaHualca volcano. To achieve this objetive, we focused in four valleys (Huayuray, Pujro Huayjo, Mollebaya and Mucurca) characterized by a well-preserved sequence of moraines and roches moutonnées. The method is based on geomorphological analysis supported by cosmogenic 36Cl surface exposure dating. 36Cl ages have been estimated with the CHLOE calculator and were compared with other central Andean glacial chronologies as well as paleoclimatological proxies. In Huayuray valley, exposure ages indicates that MGE occurred ~ 18 - 16 ka. Later, the ice mass gradually retreated but this process was interrupted by at least two readvances; the last one has been dated at ~ 12 ka. In the other hand, 36Cl result reflects a MGE age of ~ 13 ka in Mollebaya valley. Also, two samples obtained in Pujro-Huayjo and Mucurca valleys associated with MGE have an exposure age of 10-9 ka, but likely are moraine boulders affected by exhumation or erosion processes. Deglaciation in HualcaHualca volcano began abruptly ~ 11.5 ka ago according to a 36Cl age from a polished and striated bedrock in Pujro Huayjo valley, presumably as a result of reduced precipitation as well as a global increase of temperatures. The glacier evolution at HualcaHualca volcano presents a high correlation with

  12. High resolution record of the Last Glacial Maximum in eastern Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petherick, Lynda; Moss, Patrick; McGowan, Hamish

    2010-05-01

    time than traditionally accepted, and was not uniformly cool and dry. Alloway, B. V., D. J. Lowe, D. J. A. Barrell, R. M. Newnham, P. C. Almond, P. C. Augustinus, N. A. N. Bertler, L. Carter, N. J. Litchfield, M. S. McGlone, J. Shulmeister, M. J. Vandergoes, P. W. Williams and N.-I. members (2007). Towards a climate event stratigraphy for New Zealand over the past 30 000 years (NZ-INTIMATE project). Journal of Quaternary Science 22(1): 9-35. Denton, G. H., T. V. Lowell, C. J. Heusser, C. Schluchter, B. G. Andersen, L. E. Heusser, P. I. Moreno and D. R. Marchant (1999). Geomorrphology, stratigraphy, and radiocarbon chronology of Llanquihe Drift in the area of the Southern Lake District, Seno Reloncavi, and Isal Grande de Chiloe, Chile. Geografiska Annaler 81A: 167-229. EPICA (2006). One-to-one coupling of glacial climate variability in Greenland and Antarctica. Nature 444: 195-198. Kershaw, A. P., G. M. McKenzie, N. Porch, R. G. Roberts, J. Brown, H. Heijnis, M. L. Orr, G. Jacobsen and P. R. Newall (2007). A high-resolution record of vegetation and climate through the last glacial cycles from Caledonia Fen, southeastern highlands of Australia. Journal of Quaternary Science 22(5): 481-500. Newnham, R. M., D. J. Lowe, T. Giles and B. V. Alloway (2007). Vegetation and climate of Auckland, New Zealand, since ca. 32 000 cal. yr ago: support for an extended LGM Journal of Quaternary Science 22(5): 517-534. Petherick, L. M., H. A. McGowan and P. T. Moss (2008). Climate variability during the Last Glacial Maximum in eastern Australia: Evidence of two stadials? Journal of Quaternary Science 23(8): 787-802. Röthlisberger, R., R. Mulvaney, E. W. Wolff, M. A. Hutterli, M. Bigler, S. Sommer and J. Jouzel (2002). Dust and sea salt variability in central East Antarctica (Dome C) over the last 45 kyr and its implications for southern high latitude climate. Geophysical Research Letters 29(20): Art # 1963. Smith, M. A. (2009). Late Quaternary landscapes in Central Australia: sedimentary

  13. The concept of global monsoon applied to the last glacial maximum: A multi-model analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Dabang; Tian, Zhiping; Lang, Xianmei; Kageyama, Masa; Ramstein, Gilles

    2015-10-01

    The last glacial maximum (LGM, ca. 21,000 years ago) has been extensively investigated for better understanding of past glacial climates. Global-scale monsoon changes, however, have not yet been determined. In this study, we examine global monsoon area (GMA) and precipitation (GMP) as well as GMP intensity (GMPI) at the LGM using the experiments of 17 climate models chosen from the Paleoclimate Modelling Intercomparison Project (PMIP) according to their ability to reproduce the present global monsoon climate. Compared to the reference period (referring to the present day, ca. 1985, for three atmospheric plus two atm-slab ocean models and the pre-industrial period, ca. 1750, for 12 fully coupled atmosphere-ocean or atmosphere-ocean-vegetation models), the LGM monsoon area increased over land and decreased over the oceans. The boreal land monsoon areas generally shifted southward, while the northern boundary of land monsoon areas retreated southward over southern Africa and South America. Both the LGM GMP and GMPI decreased in most of the models. The GMP decrease mainly resulted from the reduced monsoon precipitation over the oceans, while the GMPI decrease was derived from the weakened intensity of monsoon precipitation over land and the boreal ocean. Quantitatively, the LGM GMP deficit was due to, first, the GMA reduction and, second, the GMPI weakening. In response to the LGM large ice sheets and lower greenhouse gas concentrations in the atmosphere, the global surface and tropospheric temperatures cooled, the boreal summer meridional temperature gradient increased, and the summer land-sea thermal contrast at 40°S - 70°N decreased. These are the underlying dynamic mechanisms for the LGM monsoon changes. Qualitatively, simulations agree with reconstructions in all land monsoon areas except in the western part of northern Australia where disagreements occur and in South America and the southern part of southern Africa where there is uncertainty in reconstructions

  14. Simulation of the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation at the Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oka, A.; Hasumi, H.; Abe-Ouchi, A.

    2008-12-01

    The ocean circulation in the Atlantic deep ocean is characterized by thermohaline circulation driven by deep convection in northern high latitudes. The heat transport associated with this circulation is comparable to that by atmosphere and has a great role in the present climate. The Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC) is believed to change in past and future climate changes. Coupled model simulations suggest that the AMOC becomes weak in the future global warming climate. Geological evidence such as carbon isotope ratio indicates that the AMOC was weaker and shallower than the present at the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). As for global warming climate, almost all model results reach consensus that the Atlantic deep circulation weakens in global warming climate. On the other hand, there is wide discrepancy in simulation of the Atlantic deep circulation at the LGM. Weber et al. (2007) report results of Paleoclimate Modeling Intercomparison Project where half of models reproduce the weakening of the Atlantic deep circulation but the other half simulates the strengthening. The reason for this disagreement between models has not been clarified yet, and investigation on the mechanism of weakening of the Atlantic deep circulation at the LGM is one of the most important topics in the paleoclimate studies. In this study, by using results of a coupled climate model (MIROC), we focus on role of changes in the sea surface heat and freshwater fluxes and investigate their role in controlling the AMOC at the LGM. In order to individually evaluate role of heat and freshwater fluxes, we conduct additional ocean general circulation model simulations under the sea surface heat/freshwater flux conditions obtained from the present and LGM simulations by MIROC. The results suggest that the freshwater flux changes contribute to weakening of the AMOC at the LGM, whereas the heat flux changes make the AMOC at the LGM stronger than the present. In the presentation, we are

  15. Last Glacial Maximum Dated by Means of 10Be in the Maritime Alps (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granger, D. E.; Spagnolo, M.; Federici, P.; Pappalardo, M.; Ribolini, A.; Cyr, A. J.

    2006-12-01

    Relatively few exposure dates of LGM moraines boulders are available for the European Alps, and none on the southern flank. Ponte Murato (PM) is a frontal moraine at 860 m asl in the Gesso Basin (Maritime Alps, SW European Alps). The PM moraine dams the 157 km2 Gesso della Barra Valley and it represents the lowermost frontal moraine of the entire Gesso Valley, near the outlet of the valley in the Po Plain. Its ELA, determined from the paleo- shape of the supposed Gesso della Barra glacier, is 1746 m asl. Tetti Bandito (TB) is a small and badly preserved glacial deposit, tentatively attributed to a lateral-frontal moraine, that is positioned 5 km downvalley from the PM deposit at 800 m asl. There are no other glacial deposits downvalley from the TB moraine in the Gesso Basin or farther NE in the piedmont region of the upper Po Plain. Boulders sampled on the PM and on the TB moraine crests gave a 10Be cosmogenic age of respectively 16300 ± 880 ka (average value) and 18798 ± 973 ka. This result constrains the PM frontal moraine within the LGM interval but also suggests that the maximum expansion of the Gesso Basin glacier was more downvalley at some point during the last glaciation. If the TB is a lateral-frontal moraine as supposed, the two TB and PM moraines would represent the outer and inner moraine crests of the same LGM stadial, with the outer moraine much less pronounced than the inner moraine, similarly to the maximalstand and the hochstand described in the Eastern Alps (Van Husen, 1997). Within this perspective, the PM and TB dates are consistent with a European Alps LGM corresponding to MIS 2 (Ivy-Ochs et al., 2004). This study of the Maritime Alps moraines is also in agreement with the Upper Würm climatic theory (Florineth and Schlüchter, 2000) of a stronger influence of the W and SW incoming humid airflows in the European Alps, differently from the nearby Vosges and Pyrenees mountain chains where more dry conditions were probably responsible for a very

  16. Abrupt glacial climate shifts controlled by ice sheet changes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xu; Lohmann, Gerrit; Knorr, Gregor; Purcell, Conor

    2014-08-21

    During glacial periods of the Late Pleistocene, an abundance of proxy data demonstrates the existence of large and repeated millennial-scale warming episodes, known as Dansgaard-Oeschger (DO) events. This ubiquitous feature of rapid glacial climate change can be extended back as far as 800,000 years before present (BP) in the ice core record, and has drawn broad attention within the science and policy-making communities alike. Many studies have been dedicated to investigating the underlying causes of these changes, but no coherent mechanism has yet been identified. Here we show, by using a comprehensive fully coupled model, that gradual changes in the height of the Northern Hemisphere ice sheets (NHISs) can alter the coupled atmosphere-ocean system and cause rapid glacial climate shifts closely resembling DO events. The simulated global climate responses--including abrupt warming in the North Atlantic, a northward shift of the tropical rainbelts, and Southern Hemisphere cooling related to the bipolar seesaw--are generally consistent with empirical evidence. As a result of the coexistence of two glacial ocean circulation states at intermediate heights of the ice sheets, minor changes in the height of the NHISs and the amount of atmospheric CO2 can trigger the rapid climate transitions via a local positive atmosphere-ocean-sea-ice feedback in the North Atlantic. Our results, although based on a single model, thus provide a coherent concept for understanding the recorded millennial-scale variability and abrupt climate changes in the coupled atmosphere-ocean system, as well as their linkages to the volume of the intermediate ice sheets during glacials. PMID:25119027

  17. Abrupt glacial climate shifts controlled by ice sheet changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xu; Lohmann, Gerrit; Knorr, Gregor; Purcell, Conor

    2014-08-01

    During glacial periods of the Late Pleistocene, an abundance of proxy data demonstrates the existence of large and repeated millennial-scale warming episodes, known as Dansgaard-Oeschger (DO) events. This ubiquitous feature of rapid glacial climate change can be extended back as far as 800,000 years before present (BP) in the ice core record, and has drawn broad attention within the science and policy-making communities alike. Many studies have been dedicated to investigating the underlying causes of these changes, but no coherent mechanism has yet been identified. Here we show, by using a comprehensive fully coupled model, that gradual changes in the height of the Northern Hemisphere ice sheets (NHISs) can alter the coupled atmosphere-ocean system and cause rapid glacial climate shifts closely resembling DO events. The simulated global climate responses--including abrupt warming in the North Atlantic, a northward shift of the tropical rainbelts, and Southern Hemisphere cooling related to the bipolar seesaw--are generally consistent with empirical evidence. As a result of the coexistence of two glacial ocean circulation states at intermediate heights of the ice sheets, minor changes in the height of the NHISs and the amount of atmospheric CO2 can trigger the rapid climate transitions via a local positive atmosphere-ocean-sea-ice feedback in the North Atlantic. Our results, although based on a single model, thus provide a coherent concept for understanding the recorded millennial-scale variability and abrupt climate changes in the coupled atmosphere-ocean system, as well as their linkages to the volume of the intermediate ice sheets during glacials.

  18. Radiocarbon evidence for enhanced respired carbon storage in the Atlantic at the Last Glacial Maximum.

    PubMed

    Freeman, E; Skinner, L C; Waelbroeck, C; Hodell, D

    2016-01-01

    The influence of ocean circulation changes on atmospheric CO2 hinges primarily on the ability to alter the ocean interior's respired nutrient inventory. Here we investigate the Atlantic overturning circulation at the Last Glacial Maximum and its impact on respired carbon storage using radiocarbon and stable carbon isotope data from the Brazil and Iberian Margins. The data demonstrate the existence of a shallow well-ventilated northern-sourced cell overlying a poorly ventilated, predominantly southern-sourced cell at the Last Glacial Maximum. We also find that organic carbon remineralization rates in the deep Atlantic remained broadly similar to modern, but that ventilation ages in the southern-sourced overturning cell were significantly increased. Respired carbon storage in the deep Atlantic was therefore enhanced during the last glacial period, primarily due to an increase in the residence time of carbon in the deep ocean, rather than an increase in biological carbon export. PMID:27346723

  19. Radiocarbon evidence for enhanced respired carbon storage in the Atlantic at the Last Glacial Maximum

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, E.; Skinner, L. C.; Waelbroeck, C.; Hodell, D.

    2016-01-01

    The influence of ocean circulation changes on atmospheric CO2 hinges primarily on the ability to alter the ocean interior's respired nutrient inventory. Here we investigate the Atlantic overturning circulation at the Last Glacial Maximum and its impact on respired carbon storage using radiocarbon and stable carbon isotope data from the Brazil and Iberian Margins. The data demonstrate the existence of a shallow well-ventilated northern-sourced cell overlying a poorly ventilated, predominantly southern-sourced cell at the Last Glacial Maximum. We also find that organic carbon remineralization rates in the deep Atlantic remained broadly similar to modern, but that ventilation ages in the southern-sourced overturning cell were significantly increased. Respired carbon storage in the deep Atlantic was therefore enhanced during the last glacial period, primarily due to an increase in the residence time of carbon in the deep ocean, rather than an increase in biological carbon export. PMID:27346723

  20. Radiocarbon evidence for enhanced respired carbon storage in the Atlantic at the Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freeman, E.; Skinner, L. C.; Waelbroeck, C.; Hodell, D.

    2016-06-01

    The influence of ocean circulation changes on atmospheric CO2 hinges primarily on the ability to alter the ocean interior's respired nutrient inventory. Here we investigate the Atlantic overturning circulation at the Last Glacial Maximum and its impact on respired carbon storage using radiocarbon and stable carbon isotope data from the Brazil and Iberian Margins. The data demonstrate the existence of a shallow well-ventilated northern-sourced cell overlying a poorly ventilated, predominantly southern-sourced cell at the Last Glacial Maximum. We also find that organic carbon remineralization rates in the deep Atlantic remained broadly similar to modern, but that ventilation ages in the southern-sourced overturning cell were significantly increased. Respired carbon storage in the deep Atlantic was therefore enhanced during the last glacial period, primarily due to an increase in the residence time of carbon in the deep ocean, rather than an increase in biological carbon export.

  1. Windiness spells in SW Europe since the last glacial maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costas, Susana; Naughton, Filipa; Goble, Ronald; Renssen, Hans

    2016-02-01

    Dunefields have a great potential to unravel past regimes of atmospheric circulation as they record direct traces of this component of the climate system. Along the Portuguese coast, transgressive dunefields represent relict features originated by intense and frequent westerly winds that largely contrast with present conditions, clearly dominated by weaker northwesterly winds. Optical dating and subsurface stratigraphy document three age clusters indicating main episodes of dune mobilization during: the last termination (20-11.6 ka), Middle Holocene (5.6 ka), and Late Holocene (1.2-0.98 and 0.4-0.15 ka). We find reconstructed windfields to be analogous during all episodes and dominated by strong westerlies. Yet, larger grain size diameters and dune volumes documented for the last termination support amplified patterns compatible with a southward shift and intensification of the North Atlantic westerlies during winters. Conversely, dunes deposited after the Middle Holocene are compatible with more variable windfields and weakened patterns controlled by interannual shifts towards low values of the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO). This work demonstrates that present windfield regimes in southern Europe are not compatible with past aeolian activity. Indeed, present day analogs indicate that wind intensities compatible with past aeolian activity are rare at present (sediment transport potentials below estimates in the aeolian record), but can occur if the jet stream is diverted to the south (i.e. 30°N with negative NAO index) or if very deep cyclones anchor around 50°N, extending their influence to the western Portuguese coast (relatively low NAO index). However, these conditions represent temporary patterns lasting around one day, while we suggest that the identified episodes of aeolian activity may represent semi-permanent conditions.

  2. European emissions of isoprene and monoterpenes from the Last Glacial Maximum to present

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schurgers, G.; Hickler, T.; Miller, P. A.; Arneth, A.

    2009-09-01

    Biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOC), such as isoprene and monoterpenes, play an important role in atmospheric processes. BVOC species are oxidized in the atmosphere and influence levels of ozone. The less volatile amongst the BVOC and their oxidation products are important for the formation and growth of secondary biogenic aerosol. In this way, the earth's radiation balance is affected. Geographic distribution and temporal changes in BVOC emissions are highly uncertain. Here we assessed changes in emission patterns across Europe since the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) with a dynamic vegetation model that reproduces European tree species distribution and in which a process-based algorithm for terpenoid production was incorporated. In a set of simulations the model was driven with paleoclimate anomalies and reconstructed CO2 concentrations. We quantified three main driving factors for the changes in emissions of isoprene and monoterpenes since the LGM: (1) the changes in climate, with temperature changes as the most important factor affecting plant physiology and terpenoid production in all plant species, (2) a change in species distribution related to the changes in climate, causing local shifts in emission characteristics of the vegetation, and (3) a change in CO2 concentration, causing opposing effects on the availability of different substrates for terpenoid production. The effect of atmospheric CO2 concentration is particularly uncertain, but sensitivity simulations showed an increase in European BVOC emissions in all sensitivity experiments irrespective of the use of a direct inhibition of terpenoid production by CO2. The effects of climate change on physiology and terpenoid production resulted in an overall relatively uniform increase of emissions in Europe over the simulation period, but regionally the effect of changes in species distribution and the related changes in emission capacities resulted in changes of emissions that can dominate over the

  3. European emissions of isoprene and monoterpenes from the Last Glacial Maximum to present

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schurgers, G.; Hickler, T.; Miller, P. A.; Arneth, A.

    2009-12-01

    Biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOC), such as isoprene and monoterpenes, play an important role in atmospheric processes. BVOC species are oxidized in the atmosphere and influence levels of ozone. The less volatile amongst the BVOC and their oxidation products are important for the formation and growth of secondary biogenic aerosol. In this way, the Earth's radiation balance is affected. Geographic distribution and temporal changes in BVOC emissions are highly uncertain. Here we assessed changes in emission patterns across Europe since the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) with a dynamic vegetation model. This model reproduces European tree species distribution and includes a process-based algorithm for terpenoid production. In a set of simulations the model was driven with paleoclimate anomalies and reconstructed CO2 concentrations. We quantified three main driving factors for the changes in emissions of isoprene and monoterpenes since the LGM: (1) the changes in climate, with temperature changes as the most important factor affecting plant physiology and terpenoid production in all plant species, (2) a change in species distribution related to the changes in climate, causing local shifts in emission characteristics of the vegetation, and (3) a change in CO2 concentration, causing opposing effects on the availability of different substrates for terpenoid production. The effect of atmospheric CO2 concentration is particularly uncertain, but sensitivity simulations showed an increase in European BVOC emissions in all sensitivity experiments irrespective of the use of a direct inhibition of terpenoid production by CO2. The effects of climate change on physiology and terpenoid production resulted in an overall relatively uniform increase of emissions in Europe over the simulation period, but regionally the effect of changes in species distribution and the related changes in emission capacities resulted in changes of emissions that can dominate over the physiology

  4. Upward Altitudinal Shifts in Habitat Suitability of Mountain Vipers since the Last Glacial Maximum

    PubMed Central

    Yousefi, Masoud; Ahmadi, Mohsen; Nourani, Elham; Behrooz, Roozbeh; Rajabizadeh, Mehdi; Geniez, Philippe; Kaboli, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    We determined the effects of past and future climate changes on the distribution of the Montivipera raddei species complex (MRC) that contains rare and endangered viper species limited to Iran, Turkey and Armenia. We also investigated the current distribution of MRC to locate unidentified isolated populations as well as to evaluate the effectiveness of the current network of protected areas for their conservation. Present distribution of MRC was modeled based on ecological variables and model performance was evaluated by field visits. Some individuals at the newly identified populations showed uncommon morphological characteristics. The distribution map of MRC derived through modeling was then compared with the distribution of protected areas in the region. We estimated the effectiveness of the current protected area network to be 10%, which would be sufficient for conserving this group of species, provided adequate management policies and practices are employed. We further modeled the distribution of MRC in the past (21,000 years ago) and under two scenarios in the future (to 2070). These models indicated that climatic changes probably have been responsible for an upward shift in suitable habitats of MRC since the Last Glacial Maximum, leading to isolation of allopatric populations. Distribution will probably become much more restricted in the future as a result of the current rate of global warming. We conclude that climate change most likely played a major role in determining the distribution pattern of MRC, restricting allopatric populations to mountaintops due to habitat alterations. This long-term isolation has facilitated unique local adaptations among MRC populations, which requires further investigation. The suitable habitat patches identified through modeling constitute optimized solutions for inclusion in the network of protected areas in the region. PMID:26367126

  5. Evaluation of a wetland methane emission parameterization for present-day and Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, A.; Schultz, M. G.; Francois, L.

    2012-04-01

    Wetlands are the largest natural source of atmospheric methane and presumably contribute ~25-40% to its annual budget (~500 Tg). However, there remain considerable uncertainties in estimation of global wetlands and their methane emissivity, given the large domain of their vegetation and hydrological characteristics. In this study, we describe the development of a wetland methane emission model in conjunction with global wetland parameterization at seasonal resolution. Contrary to most of the other modeling studies, our model is based on a simple parameterization and also readily adaptable to different paleo climatic scenarios, in which the role of methane is still largely unexplored. Wetlands with a strong climatic sensitivity are perceived to be a key factor in past changes of atmospheric methane concentration, e.g. the double fold increase since the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). The present parameterization is primarily based on CARAIB, a large scale dynamic vegetation model designed to study the role of vegetation in the global carbon cycle. Its hydrological module is adept at simulating soil water and several associated hydrological fluxes over various biome types. Our model parameterization uses three basic drivers from CARAIB: soil water, soil temperature and soil carbon content along with high resolution terrain slope data. The emission model is included in the chemistry climate model ECHAM5-MOZ for present day and also used in LGM methane simulations. The model results are evaluated in comparison with atmospheric methane observations from the NOAA-CMDL flask network and ice core records for LGM. We obtained the present day wetland methane source to be 153 Tg/year, which lies near the lower edge of model assumptions. We also discuss the uncertainties of the present day simulation and the impact of emission scaling on atmospheric concentration. The latitudinal distribution of other major methane sources, uncertainties in their budget and their potential role in

  6. Upward Altitudinal Shifts in Habitat Suitability of Mountain Vipers since the Last Glacial Maximum.

    PubMed

    Yousefi, Masoud; Ahmadi, Mohsen; Nourani, Elham; Behrooz, Roozbeh; Rajabizadeh, Mehdi; Geniez, Philippe; Kaboli, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    We determined the effects of past and future climate changes on the distribution of the Montivipera raddei species complex (MRC) that contains rare and endangered viper species limited to Iran, Turkey and Armenia. We also investigated the current distribution of MRC to locate unidentified isolated populations as well as to evaluate the effectiveness of the current network of protected areas for their conservation. Present distribution of MRC was modeled based on ecological variables and model performance was evaluated by field visits. Some individuals at the newly identified populations showed uncommon morphological characteristics. The distribution map of MRC derived through modeling was then compared with the distribution of protected areas in the region. We estimated the effectiveness of the current protected area network to be 10%, which would be sufficient for conserving this group of species, provided adequate management policies and practices are employed. We further modeled the distribution of MRC in the past (21,000 years ago) and under two scenarios in the future (to 2070). These models indicated that climatic changes probably have been responsible for an upward shift in suitable habitats of MRC since the Last Glacial Maximum, leading to isolation of allopatric populations. Distribution will probably become much more restricted in the future as a result of the current rate of global warming. We conclude that climate change most likely played a major role in determining the distribution pattern of MRC, restricting allopatric populations to mountaintops due to habitat alterations. This long-term isolation has facilitated unique local adaptations among MRC populations, which requires further investigation. The suitable habitat patches identified through modeling constitute optimized solutions for inclusion in the network of protected areas in the region. PMID:26367126

  7. Thermocline Structure and ENSO Variability in the eastern equatorial Pacific during the Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, S.; Koutavas, A.; Lynch-Stieglitz, J.; Rustic, G.

    2015-12-01

    The mean state and variability of the eastern equatorial Pacific (EEP) during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) are of great interest because of the region's role in the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and global climate. We investigated changes in thermocline structure between the Late Holocene (LH) and LGM with stable isotopes of planktonic foraminifera in sediment cores from the Galápagos. We measured δ18O in two species—Globigerinoides ruber, inhabiting the surface mixed layer, and Neogloboquadrina dutertrei, inhabiting the deep thermocline—in order to evaluate the vertical temperature contrast between the two species. We also measured δ18O of individual N. dutertrei from modern (late 20th century) and LGM sediments in order to assess thermocline temperature variability related to ENSO activity. Our data indicate a reduced vertical contrast in the upper ocean during the LGM, which is most consistent with a deeper thermocline and thicker mixed layer. Additionally, δ18O of individual N. dutertrei shells shows 2.5 times greater population variance in the LGM than in the modern sample. This large variance indicates that thermocline temperatures were more variable during the LGM than today, consistent with more active ENSO. Together, these results imply that the mean state of the EEP was characterized by a deeper thermocline and greater ENSO variability. The results further show the potential for reconstructing ENSO variability from deep-sea sediments of the EEP, where other geological archives of ENSO are currently extremely limited.

  8. Single Foraminifera Reconstructions of Equatorial Pacific Variability from the Late Glacial Maximum to the Holocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, H. L.; Ravelo, A. C.; Polissar, P. J.

    2011-12-01

    The tropical Pacific ocean is the largest source of global climate interannual variability today. Climate model simulations of future warming exhibit widely divergent behavior indicating an incomplete understanding of the factors that dictate tropical climate variability. Past records of tropical Pacific variability are one approach to deepening our understanding of tropical climate change processes and improving predictions of future change. Here we reconstruct tropical Pacific variability from the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) and from the Holocene at ODP Sites 806 and 849, located in the western equatorial Pacific warm pool (WEP) and eastern equatorial Pacific cold tongue (EEP), respectively. In order to reconstruct sea surface temperature (SST) variability, individual specimens of G. sacculifer were analyzed for Mg/Ca values via laser ablation (Photon Machines Analyte.193 with HelEx sample cell) coupled with a Thermo ElementXS ICP-MS (LA-ICP-MS). At WEP Site 806, average SST of the single shell analyses was cooler, by about 3°C, in the LGM compared to the Holocene, but the standard deviation of analyses was similar in the two time periods. Thus, it may be that average, minimum, and maximum SSTs in the WEP are controlled by radiative processes throughout the year, perhaps related to lower greenhouse gas forcing in the LGM. For EEP Site 849, the average SST of the single shell analyses was also cooler, by about 2°C, but, unlike WEP Site 806, the standard deviation of the analyses was less in the LGM compared to the Holocene. Most notably, at EEP Site 849, the coldest of single shell SST analyses were similar in the LGM and Holocene samples. In contrast, the warmest single shell SSTs were cooler in the LGM sample compared to the Holocene. In the modern ocean, about 80% of the SST variance at EEP Site 849 is related to the seasonal cycle, thus our data may indicate that the primary difference between conditions in the Holocene and LGM was that the warm season was

  9. High resolution paleoenvironment reconstruction for Lake Khanka since the last glacial maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yanguang; Chen, Jiaojie; Ge, Shulan; Li, Chaoxin

    2014-05-01

    A novel sedimentary sequence is presented based on sediment core in the Khanka Lake (XKH1, collected form the small Khanka Lake) by using of paleomagnetic stratigraphy, grain size and organic geochemical data. The sedimentary history of XKH1 is distinctly retrieved to 24 ka BP by comparing with the geomagnetic inclination lows recorded in XKH1 and Lake Biwa. Multi-proxies paleoenvironmental reconstruction for Lake Khanka since the last glacial maximum (LGM) by grain size, total organic carbon (TOC), magnetic susceptibility (MS), and color reflectance. During 24 and 19.5 ka BP, Lake Khanka experienced low lake level and cooling-wet climate approved by the decreasing mean grain size, high sediment brightness and MS values, and low TOC value. The relatively high sand fraction and slightly variation also indicate a low lake condition between 19.5 and 15 ka BP. High TOC content and marked variation in others proxies represent a peat swamp deposition environment during 19 and 16 ka BP, which may associated with lower precipitation and probably modulated by the restrained Asian summer monsoon. From 16 to 15 ka BP, the lake condition change to cold-dry and the sediment has lower content of TOC and coarser grain size. During the deglaciation, together with global temperature rising, the effective precipitation increase around Lake Khanka, result in rising of lake level. The fluctuating characteristics of the environment sensitive grain content are corresponding well to the Oldest Dryas/Bolling-Allerod/Younger Dryas periods. Since 10.6 ka BP, the lake level slightly declining under warm climate because a successive sand bar developed between the small Khanka Lake and the main water area.

  10. Ice-sheet configuration in the CMIP5/PMIP3 Last Glacial Maximum experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe-Ouchi, A.; Saito, F.; Kageyama, M.; Braconnot, P.; Harrison, S. P.; Lambeck, K.; Otto-Bliesner, B. L.; Peltier, W. R.; Tarasov, L.; Peterschmitt, J.-Y.; Takahashi, K.

    2015-11-01

    We describe the creation of a data set describing changes related to the presence of ice sheets, including ice-sheet extent and height, ice-shelf extent, and the distribution and elevation of ice-free land at the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM), which were used in LGM experiments conducted as part of the fifth phase of the Coupled Modelling Intercomparison Project (CMIP5) and the third phase of the Palaeoclimate Modelling Intercomparison Project (PMIP3). The CMIP5/PMIP3 data sets were created from reconstructions made by three different groups, which were all obtained using a model-inversion approach but differ in the assumptions used in the modelling and in the type of data used as constraints. The ice-sheet extent in the Northern Hemisphere (NH) does not vary substantially between the three individual data sources. The difference in the topography of the NH ice sheets is also moderate, and smaller than the differences between these reconstructions (and the resultant composite reconstruction) and ice-sheet reconstructions used in previous generations of PMIP. Only two of the individual reconstructions provide information for Antarctica. The discrepancy between these two reconstructions is larger than the difference for the NH ice sheets, although still less than the difference between the composite reconstruction and previous PMIP ice-sheet reconstructions. Although largely confined to the ice-covered regions, differences between the climate response to the individual LGM reconstructions extend over the North Atlantic Ocean and Northern Hemisphere continents, partly through atmospheric stationary waves. Differences between the climate response to the CMIP5/PMIP3 composite and any individual ice-sheet reconstruction are smaller than those between the CMIP5/PMIP3 composite and the ice sheet used in the last phase of PMIP (PMIP2).

  11. Pollen record from Ka'au Crater, Oahu, Hawaii: Evidence for a dry glacial maximum

    SciTech Connect

    Hotchkiss, S.C.; Juvik, J.O. Univ. of Hawaii, Hilo )

    1993-06-01

    Fossil pollen from a 3.5 m-long core from Ka'au Crater, Hawaii (elev. 460 m), yields a ca. 23,000-year record of regional vegetation history. Results indicate a full-glacial period drier and possibly cooler than present, a warmer and wetter early Holocene, and a somewhat drier late Holocene; this sequence agrees with earlier work by Selling (1948) on other islands. The oldest zone is donated by pollen of Chenopodium oahuense, Acacia koa, and Dodonaea viscosa; post-glacial pollen assemblages feature high percentages of Myrsine and Coprosma, followed by increases in Lycopodium cernuum Ilex anomala. Freycinetia arborea and Pritchardia. After about 8000 years ago, Chenopodium, Acacia, and Dodonaea increase, suggesting a return to drier conditions. Abundant pollen of Chenopodium oahuense, a plant of dry regions, during the last glacial maximum implies that neither the trade winds nor cyclonic storms were delivering as much moisture to the regional vegetation as they presently do. This suggests that the ocean surface temperature during the last glacial maximum may have been cooler than present, a finding contradictory to the reconstructions of the CLIMAP (1981) group, which show temperatures near Hawaii equal to or even warmer than present.

  12. The role of glacial cycles in promoting genetic diversity in the Neotropics: the case of cloud forests during the Last Glacial Maximum

    PubMed Central

    Ramírez-Barahona, Santiago; Eguiarte, Luis E

    2013-01-01

    The increasing aridity during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) has been proposed as a major factor affecting Neotropical species. The character and intensity of this change, however, remains the subject of ongoing debate. This review proposes an approach to test contrasting paleoecological hypotheses by way of their expected demographic and genetic effects on Neotropical cloud forest species. We reviewed 48 paleoecological records encompassing the LGM in the Neotropics. The records show contrasting evidence regarding the changes in precipitation during this period. Some regions remained fairly moist and others had a significantly reduced precipitation. Many paleoecological records within the same region show apparently conflicting evidence on precipitation and forest stability. From these data, we propose and outline two demographic/genetic scenarios for cloud forests species based on opposite precipitation regimes: the dry refugia and the moist forests hypotheses. We searched for studies dealing with the population genetic structure of cloud forest and other montane taxa and compared their results with the proposed models. To date, the few available molecular studies show insufficient genetic evidence on the predominance of glacial aridity in the Neotropics. In order to disentangle the climatic history of the Neotropics, the present study calls for a general multi-disciplinary approach to conduct future phylogeographic studies. Given the contradictory paleoecological information, population genetic data on Neotropical cloud forest species should be used to explicitly test the genetic consequences of competing paleoecological models. PMID:23531632

  13. The role of glacial cycles in promoting genetic diversity in the Neotropics: the case of cloud forests during the Last Glacial Maximum.

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Barahona, Santiago; Eguiarte, Luis E

    2013-03-01

    The increasing aridity during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) has been proposed as a major factor affecting Neotropical species. The character and intensity of this change, however, remains the subject of ongoing debate. This review proposes an approach to test contrasting paleoecological hypotheses by way of their expected demographic and genetic effects on Neotropical cloud forest species. We reviewed 48 paleoecological records encompassing the LGM in the Neotropics. The records show contrasting evidence regarding the changes in precipitation during this period. Some regions remained fairly moist and others had a significantly reduced precipitation. Many paleoecological records within the same region show apparently conflicting evidence on precipitation and forest stability. From these data, we propose and outline two demographic/genetic scenarios for cloud forests species based on opposite precipitation regimes: the dry refugia and the moist forests hypotheses. We searched for studies dealing with the population genetic structure of cloud forest and other montane taxa and compared their results with the proposed models. To date, the few available molecular studies show insufficient genetic evidence on the predominance of glacial aridity in the Neotropics. In order to disentangle the climatic history of the Neotropics, the present study calls for a general multi-disciplinary approach to conduct future phylogeographic studies. Given the contradictory paleoecological information, population genetic data on Neotropical cloud forest species should be used to explicitly test the genetic consequences of competing paleoecological models. PMID:23531632

  14. The Northern Extent of the Southern Hemisphere Westerly Wind Belt since the Last Glacial Maximum Tracked via Sediment Provenance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franzese, A. M.; Goldstein, S. L.; Hemming, S. R.

    2015-12-01

    The Southern Hemisphere Westerlies are known to be important for climate due to their effects on the global carbon cycle and on the global thermohaline circulation. Many proxy records suggest that the strength and position of the Southern Hemisphere westerly winds have changed significantly since the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) at ~21,000 years BP. However, a recent compilation of all available evidence for Southern Hemisphere westerly wind changes during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) led to the conclusion that "their strength and position in colder and warmer climates relative to today remain a wide open question" (Kohfeld et al. (2013) Quaternary Science Reviews, 68). This paper finds that an equatorward displacement of the glacial winds is consistent with observations, but cannot rule out other, competing hypotheses. Using the geochemical characteristics of deep-sea sediments deposited along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, I test the hypothesis that the LGM Southern Hemisphere Westerlies were displaced northward. In the central South Atlantic, dust can be delivered from South America via the Westerlies, or from Africa via the Trade Winds. The continental sources of South America and Africa have very different geochemical signatures, making it possible to distinguish between eolian transport via the Westerlies vs. the Trade Winds. Any northward shift in the Southern Hemisphere Westerlies would increase the northward extent of a South American provenance in sediments dominated by eolian sources. I will present geochemical provenance data (radiogenic isotope ratios; major and trace element concentrations) in a latitudinal transect of cores along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge that document whether, in fact, such a shift occurred, and put an important constraint on how far north the wind belts shifted during the LGM.

  15. Investigating the Indirect Effects of Dust via Ice-Containing Clouds in the Last Glacial Maximum and Pliocene Paleoclimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagoo, N.; Storelvmo, T.

    2015-12-01

    A longstanding issue in paleoclimate research is that proxy data indicates greater polar amplification than that simulated by climate models. This is true for periods both colder and warmer than today, such as the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) and the Pliocene. Resolving this disparity requires a better understanding of climate processes, particularly in the sensitive polar regions. Climate records indicate that atmospheric dust load has varied greatly in the past with greater fluxes during the recent glacials compared to the interglacials. Dust fluxes in the Pliocene were reduced compared to the modern, partly due to the northward expansion of vegetation in Africa, which limited the extent of this major dust source. Mineral dust is an important ice nuclei (IN) in clouds. The presence of dust allows ice-crystals in clouds to form over a wider range of environmental conditions than in its absence. Termed the indirect effect of dust, this process has a considerable impact on the physical and radiative properties of clouds and therefore climate. We investigate the indirect effects of dust on the LGM and Pliocene climates as they represent end member cold / warm climates with a high & low-dust load respectively. We use CAM5 & CESM, state of the art climate models, and a new empirical parameterization for mixed-phase clouds (DeMott et al., 2015) in which dust is able to act as a cloud IN. Cloud ice-formation in our climate model is based on temperature and IN availability as opposed to the overly simple temperature-only parameterization often used. We modify global dustiness and CO2concentrations to create idealized LGM and Pliocene simulations. Our results show that the indirect effects of dust have a strong impact on the climate, particularly in the northern hemisphere. Modifying global dustiness impacts cloud physical and radiative properties, which translate into a large influence on global climate & polar amplification over the Arctic. Global temperatures and polar

  16. Global monsoon change during the Last Glacial Maximum: a multi-model study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Mi; Wang, Bin; Liu, Jian

    2016-07-01

    Change of global monsoon (GM) during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) is investigated using results from the multi-model ensemble of seven coupled climate models participated in the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5. The GM changes during LGM are identified by comparison of the results from the pre-industrial control run and the LGM run. The results show (1) the annual mean GM precipitation and GM domain are reduced by about 10 and 5 %, respectively; (2) the monsoon intensity (demonstrated by the local summer-minus-winter precipitation) is also weakened over most monsoon regions except Australian monsoon; (3) the monsoon precipitation is reduced more during the local summer than winter; (4) distinct from all other regional monsoons, the Australian monsoon is strengthened and the monsoon area is enlarged. Four major factors contribute to these changes. The lower greenhouse gas concentration and the presence of the ice sheets decrease air temperature and water vapor content, resulting in a general weakening of the GM precipitation and reduction of GM domain. The reduced hemispheric difference in seasonal variation of insolation may contribute to the weakened GM intensity. The changed land-ocean configuration in the vicinity of the Maritime Continent, along with the presence of the ice sheets and lower greenhouse gas concentration, result in strengthened land-ocean and North-South hemispheric thermal contrasts, leading to the unique strengthened Australian monsoon. Although some of the results are consistent with the proxy data, uncertainties remain in different models. More comparison is needed between proxy data and model experiments to better understand the changes of the GM during the LGM.

  17. Last glacial maximum constraints on the Earth System model HadGEM2-ES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopcroft, Peter O.; Valdes, Paul J.

    2015-09-01

    We investigate the response of the atmospheric and land surface components of the CMIP5/AR5 Earth System model HadGEM2-ES to pre-industrial (PI: AD 1860) and last glacial maximum (LGM: 21 kyr) boundary conditions. HadGEM2-ES comprises atmosphere, ocean and sea-ice components which are interactively coupled to representations of the carbon cycle, aerosols including mineral dust and tropospheric chemistry. In this study, we focus on the atmosphere-only model HadGEM2-A coupled to terrestrial carbon cycle and aerosol models. This configuration is forced with monthly sea surface temperature and sea-ice fields from equivalent coupled simulations with an older version of the Hadley Centre model, HadCM3. HadGEM2-A simulates extreme cooling over northern continents and nearly complete die back of vegetation in Asia, giving a poor representation of the LGM environment compared with reconstructions of surface temperatures and biome distributions. The model also performs significantly worse for the LGM in comparison with its precursor AR4 model HadCM3M2. Detailed analysis shows that the major factor behind the vegetation die off in HadGEM2-A is a subtle change to the temperature dependence of leaf mortality within the phenology model of HadGEM2. This impacts on both snow-vegetation albedo and vegetation dynamics. A new set of parameters is tested for both the pre-industrial and LGM, showing much improved coverage of vegetation in both time periods, including an improved representation of the needle-leaf forest coverage in Siberia for the pre-industrial. The new parameters and the resulting changes in global vegetation distribution strongly impact the simulated loading of mineral dust, an important aerosol for the LGM. The climate response in an abrupt 4× pre-industrial CO2 simulation is also analysed and shows modest regional impacts on surface temperatures across the Boreal zone.

  18. Global monsoon change during the Last Glacial Maximum: a multi-model study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Mi; Wang, Bin; Liu, Jian

    2015-10-01

    Change of global monsoon (GM) during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) is investigated using results from the multi-model ensemble of seven coupled climate models participated in the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5. The GM changes during LGM are identified by comparison of the results from the pre-industrial control run and the LGM run. The results show (1) the annual mean GM precipitation and GM domain are reduced by about 10 and 5 %, respectively; (2) the monsoon intensity (demonstrated by the local summer-minus-winter precipitation) is also weakened over most monsoon regions except Australian monsoon; (3) the monsoon precipitation is reduced more during the local summer than winter; (4) distinct from all other regional monsoons, the Australian monsoon is strengthened and the monsoon area is enlarged. Four major factors contribute to these changes. The lower greenhouse gas concentration and the presence of the ice sheets decrease air temperature and water vapor content, resulting in a general weakening of the GM precipitation and reduction of GM domain. The reduced hemispheric difference in seasonal variation of insolation may contribute to the weakened GM intensity. The changed land-ocean configuration in the vicinity of the Maritime Continent, along with the presence of the ice sheets and lower greenhouse gas concentration, result in strengthened land-ocean and North-South hemispheric thermal contrasts, leading to the unique strengthened Australian monsoon. Although some of the results are consistent with the proxy data, uncertainties remain in different models. More comparison is needed between proxy data and model experiments to better understand the changes of the GM during the LGM.

  19. Fast Vegetational Responses to Late-Glacial Climate Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, J. W.; Post, D. M.; Cwynar, L. C.; Lotter, A. F.; Levesque, A. J.

    2001-12-01

    How rapidly can natural ecosystems respond to rapid climate change? This question can be addressed by studying paired paleoecological and paleoclimatological records spanning the last deglaciation. Between 16 and 10 ka, abrupt climatic oscillations (e.g. Younger Dryas, Gerzensee/Killarney Oscillations) interrupted the general warming trend. Rates of climate change during these events were as fast or faster than projected rates of change for this century. We compiled a dozen high-resolution lacustrine records in North America and Europe with a pollen record and independent climatic proxy, a clear Younger Dryas signal, and good age control. Cross-correlation analysis suggests that vegetation responded rapidly to late-glacial climate change, with significant changes in vegetation composition occurring within the lifespan of individual trees. At all sites, vegetation lagged climate by less than 200 years, and at two-thirds of the sites, the initial vegetational response occurred within 100 years. The finding of rapid vegetational responses is consistent across sites and continents, and is similar to the 100-200 year response times predicted by gap-scale forest models. Likely mechanisms include 1) increased susceptibility of mature trees to disturbances such as fire, wind, and disease, thereby opening up gaps for colonization, 2) the proximity of these sites to late-glacial treeline, where climate may directly control plant population densities and range limits, 3) the presence of herbaceous taxa with short generation times in these plant communities, and 4) rapid migration due to rare long-distance seed dispersals. Our results are consistent with reports that plant ranges are already shifting in response to recent climate change, and suggest that these shifts will persist for the next several centuries. Widespread changes in plant distributions may affect surface-atmosphere interactions and will challenge attempts to manage ecosystems and conserve biodiversity.

  20. Chronology of the last glacial maximum in the upper Bear River Basin, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Laabs, B.J.C.; Munroe, J.S.; Rosenbaum, J.G.; Refsnider, K.A.; Mickelson, D.M.; Singer, B.S.; Caffee, M.W.

    2007-01-01

    The headwaters of the Bear River drainage were occupied during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) by outlet glaciers of the Western Uinta Ice Field, an extensive ice mass (???685 km2) that covered the western slope of the Uinta Mountains. A well-preserved sequence of latero-frontal moraines in the drainage indicates that outlet glaciers advanced beyond the mountain front and coalesced on the piedmont. Glacial deposits in the Bear River drainage provide a unique setting where both 10Be cosmogenic surface-exposure dating of moraine boulders and 14C dating of sediment in Bear Lake downstream of the glaciated area set age limits on the timing of glaciation. Limiting 14C ages of glacial flour in Bear Lake (corrected to calendar years using CALIB 5.0) indicate that ice advance began at 32 ka and culminated at about 24 ka. Based on a Bayesian statistical analysis of cosmogenic surface-exposure ages from two areas on the terminal moraine complex, the Bear River glacier began its final retreat at about 18.7 to 18.1 ka, approximately coincident with the start of deglaciation elsewhere in the central Rocky Mountains and many other alpine glacial localities worldwide. Unlike valleys of the southwestern Uinta Mountains, deglaciation of the Bear River drainage began prior to the hydrologie fall of Lake Bonneville from the Provo shoreline at about 16 ka. ?? 2007 Regents of the University of Colorado.

  1. Constraints on soluble aerosol iron flux to the Southern Ocean at the Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conway, T. M.; Wolff, E. W.; Röthlisberger, R.; Mulvaney, R.; Elderfield, H. E.

    2015-07-01

    Relief of iron (Fe) limitation in the Southern Ocean during ice ages, with potentially increased carbon storage in the ocean, has been invoked as one driver of glacial-interglacial atmospheric CO2 cycles. Ice and marine sediment records demonstrate that atmospheric dust supply to the oceans increased by up to an order of magnitude during glacial intervals. However, poor constraints on soluble atmospheric Fe fluxes to the oceans limit assessment of the role of Fe in glacial-interglacial change. Here, using novel techniques, we present estimates of water- and seawater-soluble Fe solubility in Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) atmospheric dust from the European Project for Ice Coring in Antarctica (EPICA) Dome C and Berkner Island ice cores. Fe solubility was very variable (1-42%) during the interval, and frequently higher than typically assumed by models. Soluble aerosol Fe fluxes to Dome C at the LGM (0.01-0.84 mg m-2 per year) suggest that soluble Fe deposition to the Southern Ocean would have been >=10 × modern deposition, rivalling upwelling supply.

  2. Glacial geomorphic evidence for a late climatic change on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kargel, J. S.; Strom, R. G.

    1992-01-01

    In a series of preliminary reports, we documented evidence of former glacial epochs on Mars. Apparent glacial landforms seemed to be concentrated primarily at middle to high southern latitudes. We now have additional evidence supporting the view that Martian glaciation appears to have been more extensive than previously recognized. The growth and collapse of ice sheets on Mars seems closely analogous to the growth and decline of Earth's great Pleistocene ice sheets. This implies that climate change was probably somewhat comparable on the two planets, although in the case of Mars the entire planet seems to have changed rapidly to a cold, dry present-day environment after the collapse of the ice sheets.

  3. Glacial geomorphic evidence for a late climatic change on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kargel, J. S.; Strom, R. G.

    1992-12-01

    In a series of preliminary reports, we documented evidence of former glacial epochs on Mars. Apparent glacial landforms seemed to be concentrated primarily at middle to high southern latitudes. We now have additional evidence supporting the view that Martian glaciation appears to have been more extensive than previously recognized. The growth and collapse of ice sheets on Mars seems closely analogous to the growth and decline of Earth's great Pleistocene ice sheets. This implies that climate change was probably somewhat comparable on the two planets, although in the case of Mars the entire planet seems to have changed rapidly to a cold, dry present-day environment after the collapse of the ice sheets.

  4. Multiple evolutionary units and demographic stability during the last glacial maximum in the Scytalopus speluncae complex (Aves: Rhinocryptidae).

    PubMed

    Pulido-Santacruz, Paola; Bornschein, Marcos Ricardo; Belmonte-Lopes, Ricardo; Bonatto, Sandro L

    2016-09-01

    The Atlantic Forest (AF) of South America harbors one of the world's highest bird species richness, but to date there is a deficient understanding of the spatial patterns of genetic diversity and the evolutionary history of this biome. Here we estimated the phylogenetic and populational history of the widespread Mouse-colored Tapaculo (Scytalopus speluncae) complex across the Brazilian AF, using data from two mitochondrial genes and 12 microsatellite loci. Both markers uncovered several cryptic, mostly allopatric and well-supported lineages that may represent distinct species-level taxa. We investigated whether diversification in S. speluncae is compatible with the Carnaval-Moritz model of Pleistocene refugia. We found that northern lineages have high levels of genetic diversity, agreeing with predictions of more stable forest refugia in these areas. In contrast, southern lineages have lower levels of mtDNA diversity with a signature of population expansion that occurred earlier (∼0.2Mya) than the last glacial maximum. This result suggests that the AF may be stable enough to maintain endemic taxa through glacial cycles. Moreover, we propose that the "mid-Pleistocene climate transition" between 1.2 and 0.7million years ago, from a warmer to a colder climate, may have played an important but mostly overlooked role in the evolution of AF montane taxa. PMID:27233438

  5. High regional climate sensitivity over continental China constrained by glacial-recent changes in temperature and the hydrological cycle

    PubMed Central

    Eagle, Robert A.; Risi, Camille; Mitchell, Jonathan L.; Eiler, John M.; Seibt, Ulrike; Neelin, J. David; Li, Gaojun; Tripati, Aradhna K.

    2013-01-01

    The East Asian monsoon is one of Earth’s most significant climatic phenomena, and numerous paleoclimate archives have revealed that it exhibits variations on orbital and suborbital time scales. Quantitative constraints on the climate changes associated with these past variations are limited, yet are needed to constrain sensitivity of the region to changes in greenhouse gas levels. Here, we show central China is a region that experienced a much larger temperature change since the Last Glacial Maximum than typically simulated by climate models. We applied clumped isotope thermometry to carbonates from the central Chinese Loess Plateau to reconstruct temperature and water isotope shifts from the Last Glacial Maximum to present. We find a summertime temperature change of 6–7 °C that is reproduced by climate model simulations presented here. Proxy data reveal evidence for a shift to lighter isotopic composition of meteoric waters in glacial times, which is also captured by our model. Analysis of model outputs suggests that glacial cooling over continental China is significantly amplified by the influence of stationary waves, which, in turn, are enhanced by continental ice sheets. These results not only support high regional climate sensitivity in Central China but highlight the fundamental role of planetary-scale atmospheric dynamics in the sensitivity of regional climates to continental glaciation, changing greenhouse gas levels, and insolation. PMID:23671087

  6. Glacial landscape evolution on Hall Peninsula, Baffin Island, since the Last Glacial Maximum: insights into switching glacial dynamics and thermo-mechanical conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, C. L.; Ross, M.

    2012-12-01

    Ice cover in north central Hall Peninsula, Baffin Island has evolved from full Laurentide Ice Sheet (LIS) cover during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) to a thin ice cap that now covers about 800 km2 in the northeast sector. The exposed subglacial landscape consists of contrasting geomorphological zones which allude to complex spatial and temporal changes in basal ice dynamics and thermal regime since LGM. We used satellite imagery, field observations, a large till geochemical database, and terrestrial cosmogenic isotopes to get new insights into subglacial erosion intensity, ice flow dynamics, and glacial history. Fields of streamlined bedrock-cored ridges (e.g. drumlins) have been mapped and their elongation ratios calculated. The density of bedrock-controlled lakes, which has traditionally been used as a proxy for subglacial erosion intensity on Baffin Island, has been re-examined using modern GIS techniques. This work has revealed a mosaic of glacial terrain zones each consisting of characteristics that are distinct from the other zones. Five glacial terrain zones (GTZ) have been recognized. One zone (GTZ 1) is characterized by a broad flowset of northeast trending streamlined hills and parallel paleo-flow indicators. It also has the highest streamlined hill density, longest elongation ratios, and the highest lake density of the study area. This northeast flowset is crosscut locally by ice flow indicators that converge into troughs that now form a series of fjords. Landforms and ice flow indicators of this younger system (GTZ 2) are traced inland showing propagation of the channelized system into this portion of the LIS. The central area of the peninsula contains a zone of thicker till and rolling topography (GTZ 3) as well as a zone consisting of southeast trending features and associated perpendicular moraines (GTZ 4). The modern ice cap and its past extension form the last zone (GTZ 5). The preservation of the northeast system (GTZ 1) outside of the

  7. A community-based geological reconstruction of Antarctic Ice Sheet deglaciation since the Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bentley, Michael J.; Ó Cofaigh, Colm; Anderson, John B.; Conway, Howard; Davies, Bethan; Graham, Alastair G. C.; Hillenbrand, Claus-Dieter; Hodgson, Dominic A.; Jamieson, Stewart S. R.; Larter, Robert D.; Mackintosh, Andrew; Smith, James A.; Verleyen, Elie; Ackert, Robert P.; Bart, Philip J.; Berg, Sonja; Brunstein, Daniel; Canals, Miquel; Colhoun, Eric A.; Crosta, Xavier; Dickens, William A.; Domack, Eugene; Dowdeswell, Julian A.; Dunbar, Robert; Ehrmann, Werner; Evans, Jeffrey; Favier, Vincent; Fink, David; Fogwill, Christopher J.; Glasser, Neil F.; Gohl, Karsten; Golledge, Nicholas R.; Goodwin, Ian; Gore, Damian B.; Greenwood, Sarah L.; Hall, Brenda L.; Hall, Kevin; Hedding, David W.; Hein, Andrew S.; Hocking, Emma P.; Jakobsson, Martin; Johnson, Joanne S.; Jomelli, Vincent; Jones, R. Selwyn; Klages, Johann P.; Kristoffersen, Yngve; Kuhn, Gerhard; Leventer, Amy; Licht, Kathy; Lilly, Katherine; Lindow, Julia; Livingstone, Stephen J.; Massé, Guillaume; McGlone, Matt S.; McKay, Robert M.; Melles, Martin; Miura, Hideki; Mulvaney, Robert; Nel, Werner; Nitsche, Frank O.; O'Brien, Philip E.; Post, Alexandra L.; Roberts, Stephen J.; Saunders, Krystyna M.; Selkirk, Patricia M.; Simms, Alexander R.; Spiegel, Cornelia; Stolldorf, Travis D.; Sugden, David E.; van der Putten, Nathalie; van Ommen, Tas; Verfaillie, Deborah; Vyverman, Wim; Wagner, Bernd; White, Duanne A.; Witus, Alexandra E.; Zwartz, Dan

    2014-09-01

    A robust understanding of Antarctic Ice Sheet deglacial history since the Last Glacial Maximum is important in order to constrain ice sheet and glacial-isostatic adjustment models, and to explore the forcing mechanisms responsible for ice sheet retreat. Such understanding can be derived from a broad range of geological and glaciological datasets and recent decades have seen an upsurge in such data gathering around the continent and Sub-Antarctic islands. Here, we report a new synthesis of those datasets, based on an accompanying series of reviews of the geological data, organised by sector. We present a series of timeslice maps for 20 ka, 15 ka, 10 ka and 5 ka, including grounding line position and ice sheet thickness changes, along with a clear assessment of levels of confidence. The reconstruction shows that the Antarctic Ice sheet did not everywhere reach the continental shelf edge at its maximum, that initial retreat was asynchronous, and that the spatial pattern of deglaciation was highly variable, particularly on the inner shelf. The deglacial reconstruction is consistent with a moderate overall excess ice volume and with a relatively small Antarctic contribution to meltwater pulse 1a. We discuss key areas of uncertainty both around the continent and by time interval, and we highlight potential priorities for future work. The synthesis is intended to be a resource for the modelling and glacial geological community.

  8. Pollen- and diatom based environmental history since the Last Glacial Maximum from the Andean core Fúquene-7, Colombia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vélez, Maria Isabel; Hooghiemstra, Henry; Metcalfe, Sarah; Martínez, Ignacio; Mommersteeg, Herman

    2003-01-01

    The late Pleistocene-Holocene ecological and limnological history of Lake Fúquene (2580 m a.s.l.), in the Colombian Andes, is reconstructed on the basis of diatom, pollen and sediment analyses of the upper 7 m of the core Fúquene-7. Time control is provided by 11 accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) 14C dates ranging from 19 670 +/- 240 to 6040 +/- 60 yr BP. In this paper we present the evolution of the lake and its surroundings. Glacial times were cold and dry, lake-levels were low and the area was surrounded by paramo and subparamo vegetation. Late-glacial conditions were warm and humid. The El Abra Stadial, a Younger Dryas equivalent, is reflected by a gap in the sedimentary record, a consequence of the cessation of deposition owing to a drop in lake-level. The early Holocene was warm and humid; at this time the lake reached its maximum extension and was surrounded by Andean forest. The onset of the drier climate prevailing today took place in the middle Holocene, a process that is reflected earlier in the diatom and sediment records than in the pollen records. In the late Holocene human activity reduced the forest and transformed the landscape.Climate patterns from the Late-glacial and throughout the Holocene, as represented in our record, are similar to other records from Colombia and northern South America (the Caribbean, Venezuela and Panama) and suggest that the changes in lake-level were the result of precipitation variations driven by latitudinal shifts of the Intertropical Convergence Zone.

  9. Basal conditions and flow dynamics of the Rhine glacier, Alps, at the Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Denis; Gillet-Chaulet, Fabien; Zwinger, Thomas; Machguth, Horst; Haeberli, Wilfried; Fischer, Urs H.

    2016-04-01

    The safe disposal of radioactive wastes in deep geological repositories requires their containment and isolation for up to one million years. In Switzerland, repositories are planned in the northern Swiss lowlands near the marginal zone of the former Rhine glacier that repeatedly formed two extensive piedmont lobes (the Rhine and Linth lobes) over the Swiss Plateau. Future ice-age conditions may thus impact the repositories due to erosion by glaciers, permafrost conditions, and changes in groundwater fluxes. We use the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) as a representative future ice-age scenario over northern Switzerland and model the Rhine glacier at the LGM using a full three-dimensional, thermo-mechanical model that solves Stokes flow in ice and the heat equation in both ice and rock. Permafrost in rocks and sediments is implemented using an effective heat capacity formulation. The Rhine glacier at the LGM is one of the best studied paleo-glacier with geomorphic reconstructions of terminal moraines, equilibrium lines, provenance of erratics, till extent and provenance, and evidences of cold vs warm subglacial environments. These data are compared with modeled ice ice thickness, cold vs warm basal condition, and flow paths. Numerical results indicate that LGM modeled ice extent and ice thickness are not fully consistent with geomorphic reconstructions and known climate proxies: ice is either too thick in the accumulation zone or summer temperatures are too cold at the terminus. Simulations with different climate parameters all indicate, however, that the beds of the Rhine and Linth lobes were at the melting temperature except above local topographic highs and along a thin marginal zone. Sliding speed was highest along topographic lows with ice moving at 20 to 80 m a‑1 depending on mass balance gradients. Basal shear stress was low (< 30 kPa). Melt water was probably abundant due to above-freezing temperatures in summer. Thus, melt water was likely routed over large

  10. Geoarchaeological response to landscape changes of the Greek continental shelf since the Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapsimalis, Vasilios; Pavlopoulos, Kosmas; Panagiotopoulos, Ioannis

    2010-05-01

    An overview of geological, sedimentological, palaeoclimatic, archaeological and mythological data is presented in order to detect the geomorphological changes of the Aegean and Ionian shelves during the last sea-level transgression, and comprehend the consequent prehistoric human adaptations. The irregular rise of sea level since the Last Glacial Maximum forced the Palaeolithic human to abandon its settlements located near the old (lower) coastlines and to move landward in new positions. Commonly, the coastline movement was very slow causing no significant impact on human activities; however in some cases, the transgression was very prompt causing human migration towards highlands. In some very gentle-dipped and wide regions, e.g. the North Aegean plateau, the sea-level rise caused a rapid coastline retreat (in some extreme case as fast as 10 m/yr) and inundation of an extended surface area. However, at the same time, in the steep parts of the Greek shelf, e.g. the Kyparissiakos Gulf and Crete, the coastline advanced landwards with a slow motion (commonly, a few cm/yr) covering small areas. In addition, coastal regions with particular geomorphologic characteristics, e.g. coastal paleo-lakes protected by a sill (gulfs of Corinth, Amvrakikos, Pagasitikos Evvoikos, Saronikos), were deluged by the sea during different periods and under different intensity, depending on the elevation of the sill and the manner of its overflow. Although the presence of Palaeolithic human in the Greek mainland has been confirmed by several archaeological excavations, there is no certain evidence for human settlement in the deep parts of Greek shelf. However, many archaeologists have suggested that some of Palaeolithic people lived on the shelf, when the sea level was lower than its present position. Nevertheless, some potential Palaeolithic migration routes can be indicated taking into account (a) the palaeogeographic reconstruction of Greek shelf over the Last Quaternary; (b

  11. Climatic implications of correlated upper Pleistocene glacial and fluvial deposits on the Cinca and Gallego rivers, NE Spain

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, Claudia J; Mcdonald, Eric; Sancho, Carlos; Pena, Jose- Luis

    2008-01-01

    We correlate Upper Pleistocene glacial and fluvial deposits of the Cinca and Gallego River valleys (south central Pyrenees and Ebro basin, Spain) using geomorphic position, luminescence dates, and time-related trends in soil development. The ages obtained from glacial deposits indicate glacial periods at 85 {+-} 5 ka, 64 {+-} 11 ka, and 36 {+-} 3 ka (from glacial till) and 20 {+-} 3 ka (from loess). The fluvial drainage system, fed by glaciers in the headwaters, developed extensive terrace systems in the Cinca River valley at 178 {+-} 21 ka, 97 {+-} 16 ka, 61 {+-} 4 ka, 47 {+-} 4 ka, and 11 {+-} 1 ka, and in the Gallego River valley at 151 {+-} 11 ka, 68 {+-} 7 ka, and 45 {+-} 3 ka. The times of maximum geomorphic activity related to cold phases coincide with Late Pleistocene marine isotope stages and heinrich events. The maximum extent of glaciers during the last glacial occurred at 64 {+-} 11 ka, and the terraces correlated with this glacial phase are the most extensive in both the Cinca (61 {+-} 4 ka) and Gallego (68 {+-} 7 ka) valleys, indicating a strong increase in fluvial discharge and availability of sediments related to the transition to deglaciation. The global Last Glacial Maximum is scarcely represented in the south central Pyrenees owing to dominantly dry conditions at that time. Precipitation must be controlled by the position of the Iberian Peninsula with respect to the North Atlantic atmospheric circulation system. The glacial systems and the associated fluvial dynamic seem sensitive to (1) global climate changes controlled by insolation, (2) North Atlantic thermohaline circulation influenced by freshwater pulses into the North Atlantic, and (3) anomalies in atmospheric circulation in the North Atlantic controlling precipitation on the Iberian peninsula. The model of glacial and fluvial evolution during the Late Pleistocene in northern Spain could be extrapolated to other glaciated mountainous areas in southern Europe.

  12. Reversed North Atlantic gyre dynamics in present and glacial climates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montoya, Marisa; Born, Andreas; Levermann, Anders

    2011-03-01

    The dynamics of the North Atlantic subpolar gyre (SPG) are assessed under present and glacial boundary conditions by investigating the SPG sensitivity to surface wind-stress changes in a coupled climate model. To this end, the gyre transport is decomposed in Ekman, thermohaline, and bottom transports. Surface wind-stress variations are found to play an important indirect role in SPG dynamics through their effect on water-mass densities. Our results suggest the existence of two dynamically distinct regimes of the SPG, depending on the absence or presence of deep water formation (DWF) in the Nordic Seas and a vigorous Greenland-Scotland ridge (GSR) overflow. In the first regime, the GSR overflow is weak and the SPG strength increases with wind-stress as a result of enhanced outcropping of isopycnals in the centre of the SPG. As soon as a vigorous GSR overflow is established, its associated positive density anomalies on the southern GSR slope reduce the SPG strength. This has implications for past glacial abrupt climate changes, insofar as these can be explained through latitudinal shifts in North Atlantic DWF sites and strengthening of the North Atlantic current. Regardless of the ultimate trigger, an abrupt shift of DWF into the Nordic Seas could result both in a drastic reduction of the SPG strength and a sudden reversal in its sensitivity to wind-stress variations. Our results could provide insight into changes in the horizontal ocean circulation during abrupt glacial climate changes, which have been largely neglected up to now in model studies.

  13. Dust deposition in Antarctica in glacial and interglacial climate conditions: a modelling study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudarchikova, N.; Mikolajewicz, U.; Timmreck, C.; O'Donnell, D.; Schurgers, G.; Sein, D.; Zhang, K.

    2014-09-01

    The mineral dust cycle responds to climate variations and plays an important role in the climate system by affecting the radiative balance of the atmosphere and modifying biogeochemistry. Polar ice cores provide a unique information about deposition of aeolian dust particles transported over long distance. These cores are a paleoclimate proxy archive of climate variability thousands of years ago. The current study is a first attempt to simulate past interglacial dust cycles with a global aerosol-climate model ECHAM5-HAM. The results are used to explain the dust deposition changes in Antarctica in terms of quantitative contribution of different processes, such as emission, atmospheric transport and precipitation, which will help to interpret paleodata from Antarctic ice cores. The investigated periods include four interglacial time-slices such as the pre-industrial control (CTRL), mid-Holocene (6000 yr BP), last glacial inception (115 000 yr BP) and Eemian (126 000 yr BP). One glacial time interval, which is Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) (21 000 yr BP) was simulated as well as to be a reference test for the model. Results suggest an increase of mineral dust deposition globally, and in Antarctica, in the past interglacial periods relative to the pre-industrial CTRL simulation. Approximately two thirds of the increase in the mid-Holocene and Eemian is attributed to enhanced Southern Hemisphere dust emissions. Slightly strengthened transport efficiency causes the remaining one third of the increase in dust deposition. The moderate change of dust deposition in Antarctica in the last glacial inception period is caused by the slightly stronger poleward atmospheric transport efficiency compared to the pre-industrial. Maximum dust deposition in Antarctica was simulated for the glacial period. LGM dust deposition in Antarctica is substantially increased due to 2.6 times higher Southern Hemisphere dust emissions, two times stronger atmospheric transport towards Antarctica, and

  14. Modelling of mineral dust for interglacial and glacial climate conditions with a focus on Antarctica

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Sudarchikova, Natalia; Mikolajewicz, Uwe; Timmreck, C.; O'Donnell, D.; Schurgers, G.; Sein, Dmitry; Zhang, Kai

    2015-05-19

    The mineral dust cycle responds to climate variations and plays an important role in the climate system by affecting the radiative balance of the atmosphere and modifying biogeochemistry. Polar ice cores provide unique information about deposition of aeolian dust particles transported over long distances. These cores are a palaeoclimate proxy archive of climate variability thousands of years ago. The current study is a first attempt to simulate past interglacial dust cycles with a global aerosol–climate model ECHAM5-HAM. The results are used to explain the dust deposition changes in Antarctica in terms of quantitative contribution of different processes, such as emission,more » atmospheric transport and precipitation, which will help to interpret palaeodata from Antarctic ice cores. The investigated periods include four interglacial time slices: the pre-industrial control (CTRL), mid-Holocene (6000 yr BP; hereafter referred to as \\"6 kyr\\"), last glacial inception (115 000 yr BP; hereafter \\"115 kyr\\") and Eemian (126 000 yr BP; hereafter \\"126 kyr\\"). One glacial time interval, the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) (21 000 yr BP; hereafter \\"21 kyr\\"), was simulated as well to be a reference test for the model. Results suggest an increase in mineral dust deposition globally, and in Antarctica, in the past interglacial periods relative to the pre-industrial CTRL simulation. Approximately two-thirds of the increase in the mid-Holocene and Eemian is attributed to enhanced Southern Hemisphere dust emissions. Slightly strengthened transport efficiency causes the remaining one-third of the increase in dust deposition. The moderate change in dust deposition in Antarctica in the last glacial inception period is caused by the slightly stronger poleward atmospheric transport efficiency compared to the pre-industrial. Maximum dust deposition in Antarctica was simulated for the glacial period. LGM dust deposition in Antarctica is substantially increased due to 2.6 times

  15. Modelling of mineral dust for interglacial and glacial climate conditions with a focus on Antarctica

    SciTech Connect

    Sudarchikova, Natalia; Mikolajewicz, Uwe; Timmreck, C.; O'Donnell, D.; Schurgers, G.; Sein, Dmitry; Zhang, Kai

    2015-05-19

    The mineral dust cycle responds to climate variations and plays an important role in the climate system by affecting the radiative balance of the atmosphere and modifying biogeochemistry. Polar ice cores provide unique information about deposition of aeolian dust particles transported over long distances. These cores are a palaeoclimate proxy archive of climate variability thousands of years ago. The current study is a first attempt to simulate past interglacial dust cycles with a global aerosol–climate model ECHAM5-HAM. The results are used to explain the dust deposition changes in Antarctica in terms of quantitative contribution of different processes, such as emission, atmospheric transport and precipitation, which will help to interpret palaeodata from Antarctic ice cores. The investigated periods include four interglacial time slices: the pre-industrial control (CTRL), mid-Holocene (6000 yr BP; hereafter referred to as \\"6 kyr\\"), last glacial inception (115 000 yr BP; hereafter \\"115 kyr\\") and Eemian (126 000 yr BP; hereafter \\"126 kyr\\"). One glacial time interval, the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) (21 000 yr BP; hereafter \\"21 kyr\\"), was simulated as well to be a reference test for the model. Results suggest an increase in mineral dust deposition globally, and in Antarctica, in the past interglacial periods relative to the pre-industrial CTRL simulation. Approximately two-thirds of the increase in the mid-Holocene and Eemian is attributed to enhanced Southern Hemisphere dust emissions. Slightly strengthened transport efficiency causes the remaining one-third of the increase in dust deposition. The moderate change in dust deposition in Antarctica in the last glacial inception period is caused by the slightly stronger poleward atmospheric transport efficiency compared to the pre-industrial. Maximum dust deposition in Antarctica was simulated for the glacial period. LGM dust deposition in Antarctica is substantially increased due to 2.6 times higher

  16. Last Glacial vegetation and climate change in the southern Levant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miebach, Andrea; Chen, Chunzhu; Litt, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    Reconstructing past climatic and environmental conditions is a key task for understanding the history of modern mankind. The interaction between environmental change and migration processes of the modern Homo sapiens from its source area in Africa into Europe is still poorly understood. The principal corridor of the first human dispersal into Europe and also later migration dynamics crossed the Middle East. Therefore, the southern Levant is a key area to investigate the paleoenvironment during times of human migration. In this sense, the Last Glacial (MIS 4-2) is particularly interesting to investigate for two reasons. Firstly, secondary expansions of the modern Homo sapiens are expected to occur during this period. Secondly, there are ongoing discussions on the environmental conditions causing the prominent lake level high stand of Lake Lisan, the precursor of the Dead Sea. This high stand even culminated in the merging of Lake Lisan and Lake Kinneret (Sea of Galilee). To provide an independent proxy for paleoenvironmental reconstructions in the southern Levant during the Last Glacial, we investigated pollen assemblages of the Dead Sea/Lake Lisan and Lake Kinneret. Located at the Dead Sea Transform, the freshwater Lake Kinneret is nowadays connected via the Jordan with the hypersaline Dead Sea, which occupies Earth's lowest elevation on land. The southern Levant is a transition area of three different vegetation types. Therefore, also small changes in the climate conditions effect the vegetation and can be registered in the pollen assemblage. In contrast to the Holocene, our preliminary results suggest another vegetation pattern during the Last Glacial. The vegetation belt of the fragile Mediterranean biome did no longer exist in the vicinity of Lake Kinneret. Moreover, the vegetation was rather similar in the whole study area. A steppe vegetation with dwarf shrubs, herbs, and grasses predominated. Thermophilous elements like oaks occurred in limited amounts. The

  17. Magnetic and mineralogical properties of central Baffin Bay sediments since the Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Q.; St-Onge, G.; Hillaire-Marcel, C.

    2011-12-01

    Magnetic and mineralogical properties of terrigenous sediments from the deep central Baffin Bay (HU2008-029-016PC - 70°46,14N/-64°65,77W - 2063 m) were analyzed as a means of linking sedimentological changes to ice-margin dynamics along the surrounding coastlines of W. Greenland, E. Baffin Island and N.E. Ellesmere Island since the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). A chronology based on relative paleointensity (RPI) and secular variation (PSV) in sections where magnetism properties were suitable has been set. The age-model yields a low mean sedimentation rate varying between 4 - 8 cm/kyr along the core and illustrates a significant increase during Termination 1. Carbonate content increases drastically from 16 ka due to increasing supplies of dolomitic material from dolostone rocks outcropping in the Canadian Arctic Archipelago and associated with inputs from the Innuitian Ice Sheet margin. The magnetic properties demonstrate major changes during the deglaciation and especially during Heinrich event 1 (H1), the Younger Dryas (YD) and throughout the Holocene. Very low median destructive field (MDF) of the natural remanent magnetization (NRM) values are observed during the 11.5 - 12.6 ka (YD) and 14.8 - 16 (H1) ka intervals, and are reflecting coarser magnetic grains. Similarly, the kARM/kLF grain-size ratio shows coarser magnetic grain size during the H1 and YD intervals, and finer magnetic grains during the LGM (19 - 22 ka). During the LGM, "glacial flour" formed by mechanical grinding of rocks by ice sheets released finer magnetic grains from lateral source (e.g., Greenland continental shelf). On the contrary, during the YD and H1 periods, icebergs released coarser magnetic grains from a northern source (axial source). The Holocene is marked by the highest median destructive field (MDF) and ARM20mT/ARM0mT values of the core, indicating an increased proportion of finer magnetic grains during this interval. Together with the large increase in the silt fraction, these

  18. Climatic Instability and Regional Glacial Advances in the Late Ediacaran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hannah, J. L.; Stein, H. J.; Marolf, N.; Bingen, B.

    2014-12-01

    The Ediacaran Period closed out the environmentally raucous Neoproterozoic Era with the last of multiple glacial events and the first ephemeral glimmer of multicellular life. As such, evolution of Earth's biosphere and the marine environments that nurtured this nascent biota are of particular interest. Because the Ediacaran biota appear in the stratigraphic record just above tillites in many localities, inferences are naturally drawn to link glaciation to bioevolution. Here we review known controls on the timing and extent of the late Ediacaran Gaskier and Varanger glacial events, bolstered by new constraints on the Moelv tillite of South Norway. The elusive mid-Ediacaran glacial strata are poorly dated, patchy in distribution, and relatively limited in thickness. The type Gaskier glaciogenic units in Newfoundland are 582 to 584 Ma, based on U-Pb zircon ages from intercalated ash beds [1]. The Varanger glaciogenic deposits in northern Norway, in contrast, remain only roughly constrained to ca. 630 to 560 Ma. Post-Gaskier negative carbon isotope excursions (CIEs) have been reported from multiple localities in both China and SW United States, suggesting climatic instability in the late Ediacaran. Although most localities lack solid geochronology, paleontologic constraints place the Hongtiegou glacial diamictite and accompanying CIE in the Chaidam Basin, NW China, in the latest Ediacaran, ca. 555 Ma [2]. We previously suggested that the Moelv tillite in south Norway was roughly equivalent to the Gaskier, based on an imprecise Re-Os age of ~560 Ma [3] for the underlying Biri shale. Reanalysis of these data shows that the upper part of the shale section was disturbed by a redox front during the Caledonian orogeny. The undisturbed lower part of the section yields a more precise Model 1 isochron age of 559.5 ± 6.2 Ma, clearly post-dating the Gaskier event well outside analytical uncertainty. These new results bolster arguments that the Gaskier glaciation was not a global

  19. Intensification of the meridional temperature gradient in the Great Barrier Reef following the Last Glacial Maximum.

    PubMed

    Felis, Thomas; McGregor, Helen V; Linsley, Braddock K; Tudhope, Alexander W; Gagan, Michael K; Suzuki, Atsushi; Inoue, Mayuri; Thomas, Alexander L; Esat, Tezer M; Thompson, William G; Tiwari, Manish; Potts, Donald C; Mudelsee, Manfred; Yokoyama, Yusuke; Webster, Jody M

    2014-01-01

    Tropical south-western Pacific temperatures are of vital importance to the Great Barrier Reef (GBR), but the role of sea surface temperatures (SSTs) in the growth of the GBR since the Last Glacial Maximum remains largely unknown. Here we present records of Sr/Ca and δ(18)O for Last Glacial Maximum and deglacial corals that show a considerably steeper meridional SST gradient than the present day in the central GBR. We find a 1-2 °C larger temperature decrease between 17° and 20°S about 20,000 to 13,000 years ago. The result is best explained by the northward expansion of cooler subtropical waters due to a weakening of the South Pacific gyre and East Australian Current. Our findings indicate that the GBR experienced substantial meridional temperature change during the last deglaciation, and serve to explain anomalous deglacial drying of northeastern Australia. Overall, the GBR developed through significant SST change and may be more resilient than previously thought. PMID:24937320

  20. The narrow endemic Norwegian peat moss Sphagnum troendelagicum originated before the last glacial maximum

    PubMed Central

    Stenøien, H K; Shaw, A J; Stengrundet, K; Flatberg, K I

    2011-01-01

    It is commonly found that individual hybrid, polyploid species originate recurrently and that many polyploid species originated relatively recently. It has been previously hypothesized that the extremely rare allopolyploid peat moss Sphagnum troendelagicum has originated multiple times, possibly after the last glacial maximum in Scandinavia. This conclusion was based on low linkage disequilibrium in anonymous genetic markers within natural populations, in which sexual reproduction has never been observed. Here we employ microsatellite markers and chloroplast DNA (cpDNA)-encoded trnG sequence data to test hypotheses concerning the origin and evolution of this species. We find that S. tenellum is the maternal progenitor and S. balticum is the paternal progenitor of S. troendelagicum. Using various Bayesian approaches, we estimate that S. troendelagicum originated before the Holocene but not before c. 80 000 years ago (median expected time since speciation 40 000 years before present). The observed lack of complete linkage disequilibrium in the genome of this species suggests cryptic sexual reproduction and recombination. Several lines of evidence suggest multiple origins for S. troendelagicum, but a single origin is supported by approximate Bayesian computation analyses. We hypothesize that S. troendelagicum originated in a peat-dominated refugium before last glacial maximum, and subsequently immigrated to central Norway by means of spore flow during the last thousands of years. PMID:20717162

  1. Intensification of the meridional temperature gradient in the Great Barrier Reef following the Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felis, Thomas; McGregor, Helen V.; Linsley, Braddock K.; Tudhope, Alexander W.; Gagan, Michael K.; Suzuki, Atsushi; Inoue, Mayuri; Thomas, Alexander L.; Esat, Tezer M.; Thompson, William G.; Tiwari, Manish; Potts, Donald C.; Mudelsee, Manfred; Yokoyama, Yusuke; Webster, Jody M.

    2014-06-01

    Tropical south-western Pacific temperatures are of vital importance to the Great Barrier Reef (GBR), but the role of sea surface temperatures (SSTs) in the growth of the GBR since the Last Glacial Maximum remains largely unknown. Here we present records of Sr/Ca and δ18O for Last Glacial Maximum and deglacial corals that show a considerably steeper meridional SST gradient than the present day in the central GBR. We find a 1-2 °C larger temperature decrease between 17° and 20°S about 20,000 to 13,000 years ago. The result is best explained by the northward expansion of cooler subtropical waters due to a weakening of the South Pacific gyre and East Australian Current. Our findings indicate that the GBR experienced substantial meridional temperature change during the last deglaciation, and serve to explain anomalous deglacial drying of northeastern Australia. Overall, the GBR developed through significant SST change and may be more resilient than previously thought.

  2. Intensification of the meridional temperature gradient in the Great Barrier Reef following the Last Glacial Maximum

    PubMed Central

    Felis, Thomas; McGregor, Helen V.; Linsley, Braddock K.; Tudhope, Alexander W.; Gagan, Michael K.; Suzuki, Atsushi; Inoue, Mayuri; Thomas, Alexander L.; Esat, Tezer M.; Thompson, William G.; Tiwari, Manish; Potts, Donald C.; Mudelsee, Manfred; Yokoyama, Yusuke; Webster, Jody M.

    2014-01-01

    Tropical south-western Pacific temperatures are of vital importance to the Great Barrier Reef (GBR), but the role of sea surface temperatures (SSTs) in the growth of the GBR since the Last Glacial Maximum remains largely unknown. Here we present records of Sr/Ca and δ18O for Last Glacial Maximum and deglacial corals that show a considerably steeper meridional SST gradient than the present day in the central GBR. We find a 1–2 °C larger temperature decrease between 17° and 20°S about 20,000 to 13,000 years ago. The result is best explained by the northward expansion of cooler subtropical waters due to a weakening of the South Pacific gyre and East Australian Current. Our findings indicate that the GBR experienced substantial meridional temperature change during the last deglaciation, and serve to explain anomalous deglacial drying of northeastern Australia. Overall, the GBR developed through significant SST change and may be more resilient than previously thought. PMID:24937320

  3. Comparison of glacial periods reveals systematic cold climate variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauch, Henning

    2013-04-01

    On a global scale, major variations in Pleistocene temperatures correlate well with glacial-interglacial changes of northern hemisphere ice sheet sizes. While a discharge of icebergs from the ice sheets surrounding the polar North Atlantic region directly reflects the rates of growth and decay of the ice sheet margins at sea level, it is also the result of a rapidly changing climate which affected both the meridional overturning in the ocean and the pattern in ocean-atmosphere circulation. Ice cores and many deep-sea sediment records from this region have demonstrated such complex interrelations between these main environmental processes for the last glaciation (Weichselian). In ice cores, the millennial-scale climate variabilities of the Weichselian are recognized in both hemispheres, albeit with apparently a significant time lag between the southern and northern pole regions. Comparing records of iceberg discharge from the polar and subpolar North Atlantic now reveals a very similar millennial-scale variability between the Weichselian and the penultimate glaciation (Saalian) during which warmer, interstadial times alternated with rather cold polar conditions. Because cold conditions in the polar North were also time-coeval with enhanced aridity and atmospheric dust content (e.g. at least over northern Africa due to changes in the monsoon system), the glacial dust records of Antarctica, which extend back in time much farther than Greenland ice records, could be used to also make an interhemispheric climate comparison. For the last two glaciations such a comparison would indeed indicate a strong linkage between iceberg discharge events in the polar North and increased dust content in the atmosphere.

  4. The Growth Response of Two Diatom Species to Atmospheric Dust from the Last Glacial Maximum

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Linn J.; Breitbarth, Eike; Strzepek, Robert F.; Wolff, Eric W.

    2016-01-01

    Relief of iron (Fe) limitation in the surface Southern Ocean has been suggested as one driver of the regular glacial-interglacial cycles in atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2). The proposed cause is enhanced deposition of Fe-bearing atmospheric dust to the oceans during glacial intervals, with consequent effects on export production and the carbon cycle. However, understanding the role of enhanced atmospheric Fe supply in biogeochemical cycles is limited by knowledge of the fluxes and ‘bioavailability’ of atmospheric Fe during glacial intervals. Here, we assess the effect of Fe fertilization by dust, dry-extracted from the Last Glacial Maximum portion of the EPICA Dome C Antarctic ice core, on the Antarctic diatom species Eucampia antarctica and Proboscia inermis. Both species showed strong but differing reactions to dust addition. E. antarctica increased cell number (3880 vs. 786 cells mL-1), chlorophyll a (51 vs. 3.9 μg mL-1) and particulate organic carbon (POC; 1.68 vs. 0.28 μg mL-1) production in response to dust compared to controls. P. inermis did not increase cell number in response to dust, but chlorophyll a and POC per cell both strongly increased compared to controls (39 vs. 15 and 2.13 vs. 0.95 ng cell-1 respectively). The net result of both responses was a greater production of POC and chlorophyll a, as well as decreased Si:C and Si:N incorporation ratios within cells. However, E, antarctica decreased silicate uptake for the same nitrate and carbon uptake, while P. inermis increased carbon and nitrate uptake for the same silicate uptake. This suggests that nutrient utilization changes in response to Fe addition could be driven by different underlying mechanisms between different diatom species. Enhanced supply of atmospheric dust to the surface ocean during glacial intervals could therefore have driven nutrient-utilization changes which could permit greater carbon fixation for lower silica utilization. Additionally, both species responded more

  5. The Growth Response of Two Diatom Species to Atmospheric Dust from the Last Glacial Maximum.

    PubMed

    Conway, Tim M; Hoffmann, Linn J; Breitbarth, Eike; Strzepek, Robert F; Wolff, Eric W

    2016-01-01

    Relief of iron (Fe) limitation in the surface Southern Ocean has been suggested as one driver of the regular glacial-interglacial cycles in atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2). The proposed cause is enhanced deposition of Fe-bearing atmospheric dust to the oceans during glacial intervals, with consequent effects on export production and the carbon cycle. However, understanding the role of enhanced atmospheric Fe supply in biogeochemical cycles is limited by knowledge of the fluxes and 'bioavailability' of atmospheric Fe during glacial intervals. Here, we assess the effect of Fe fertilization by dust, dry-extracted from the Last Glacial Maximum portion of the EPICA Dome C Antarctic ice core, on the Antarctic diatom species Eucampia antarctica and Proboscia inermis. Both species showed strong but differing reactions to dust addition. E. antarctica increased cell number (3880 vs. 786 cells mL-1), chlorophyll a (51 vs. 3.9 μg mL-1) and particulate organic carbon (POC; 1.68 vs. 0.28 μg mL-1) production in response to dust compared to controls. P. inermis did not increase cell number in response to dust, but chlorophyll a and POC per cell both strongly increased compared to controls (39 vs. 15 and 2.13 vs. 0.95 ng cell-1 respectively). The net result of both responses was a greater production of POC and chlorophyll a, as well as decreased Si:C and Si:N incorporation ratios within cells. However, E, antarctica decreased silicate uptake for the same nitrate and carbon uptake, while P. inermis increased carbon and nitrate uptake for the same silicate uptake. This suggests that nutrient utilization changes in response to Fe addition could be driven by different underlying mechanisms between different diatom species. Enhanced supply of atmospheric dust to the surface ocean during glacial intervals could therefore have driven nutrient-utilization changes which could permit greater carbon fixation for lower silica utilization. Additionally, both species responded more strongly

  6. Antarctic ice dynamics and southern ocean surface hydrology during the last glacial maximum

    SciTech Connect

    Labeyrie, L.D.; Burckle, L.; Labracherie, M.; Pichon, J.J.; Ippolito, P.; Grojean, M.C.; Duplessy, J.C.

    1985-01-01

    Eight high sedimentation rate cores located between 61/sup 0/S and 43/sup 0/S in the Atlantic and Indian sectors of the Southern Ocean have been studied in detail for foraminifera and diatom /sup 18/O//sup 16/O ratios, and changes in radiolarian and diatom specific abundance. Comparison of these different parameters permits a detailed description of the surface water hydrology during the last glacial maximum. The authors demonstrate that from 25 kyr BP to 15 kyr BP a large number of icebergs formed around the Antarctic continent. Melting along the Polar Front decreased surface salinity by approximately 1.5 per thousand between 43/sup 0/S and 50/sup 0/S. They propose that an increase of snow accumulation at the Antarctic periphery and downdraw during maximum ice extension are primary causes for this major discharge of icebergs.

  7. Inconsistent Last Glacial Maximum ice thickness of the Rhine glacier between geomorphological reconstructions and two numerical models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jouvet, Guillaume; Cohen, Denis; Seguinot, Julien; Gillet-Chaulet, Fabien

    2016-04-01

    Using two different state-of-the-art ice flow models (PISM and ELMER/ICE), we simulate the extent of the Rhine glacier (Switzerland, Germany) at the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). On the one hand, PISM is a computationally efficient and mechanically simplified model, which is used to perform many simulation runs to assess the influence of each model parameters. On the other hand, ELMER is a computationally expensive and mechanically exhaustive model, which is used to assess and refine PISM results. Regardless of the model used, the most uncertain input remains the LGM climate forcing required to compute the surface mass balance. To mimic climate conditions prevailing during the LGM, we apply different temperature and precipitation corrections to present-day climate data, and select the parametrizations which yield the best match between the modelled glacier extent and the mapped end moraines. Using the end moraines to constrain the extent of ice at the LGM, neither PISM nor ELMER could reproduce geomorphological reconstructions of the Rhine Glacier ice thickness accurately in the accumulation area despite a wide range of parameterizations tested. Instead, our model results indicate that the Rhine glacier was substantially thicker in the accumulation area than what has been reconstructed from its landscape imprint.

  8. The impacts of Meltwater Pulse-1A in the South Atlantic Ocean deep circulation since the Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marson, J. M.; Wainer, I.; Liu, Z.; Mata, M. M.

    2013-11-01

    Since 21 000 yr ago, the oceans have received large amounts of freshwater in pulses coming from the melting ice sheets. A specific event, known as meltwater pulse 1A (MWP-1A), has been identified in sea-level and temperature proxy records as responsible for the increase of ~20 m in sea level in less than 500 yr. Although its origin and timing are still under discussion, MWP-1A seems to have had a significant impact on several components of the climatic system. The present work aims to elucidate these impacts on the water mass distribution of the South Atlantic Ocean through the analysis of a transient simulation of the climate evolution from the Last Glacial Maximum to Present Day using a state-of-art CGCM, the National Center for Atmospheric Research Community Climate System Model version 3 (NCAR CCSM3). Results show that the freshwater discharge associated with the timing of MWP-1A was crucial to establish the present thermohaline structure associated with the North Atlantic Deep Water, marking the transition between a shallower and a deeper Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation.

  9. Testing a dynamic global vegetation model for pre-industrial and Last Glacial Maximum boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Handiani, Dian N.; Rachmayani, Rima; Paul, André; Dupont, Lydie M.

    2010-05-01

    Achieving better comparison between dynamic global vegetation models (DGVM) with pollen or plant data is important for the climate-vegetation modeling community. Our study tried to find a scheme that can be applied consistently to compare DGVMs with pollen data sets. We tested two models, the Top-down Representation of Interactive Foliage and Flora Including Dynamics (TRIFFID) and the Community Land Model's Dynamic Global Vegetation Model (CLM-DGVM), which we both ran for pre-industrial boundary conditions. In addition, we ran the TRIFFID model using boundary conditions for the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM, ~19,000- 23,000 years before present). For comparisons, we used the modern vegetation of the BIOME4 model and the reconstruction for the year 18000 after pollen data from the BIOME6000 (Version 4.2) project. Differences in the number of PFTs in each DGVMs lead to different results of the biome distribution even if models and data qualitatively agree. In the CLM-DGVM pre-industrial run, northern South America is covered by savanna or desert biome, which is associated with more growing degree days and lower rates of precipitation. Meanwhile, the TRIFFID model simulated a tropical forest in northern South America and a desert biome in Australia, probably because of higher values of growing degree days and different precipitation rates, which is lower in South America and higher in Australia. The climate parameters from both models show a similar pattern as in the BIOME4 model, but the values are higher in the DGVMs. Biome distributions of the pre-industrial simulation show similarities and differences between dynamic vegetation modeling and data reconstructions. Both models reveal a fair agreement simulating savanna and desert biomes around the Sahel, tropical forest in western Africa, boreal forest in eastern North America and in Siberia, and tundra in northern Canada. Some discrepancies appear in South America and Africa, where pollen data indicate a combination of

  10. Ploidy race distributions since the Last Glacial Maximum in the North American desert shrub, Larea tridentata

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hunter, Kimberly L.; Betancourt, Julio L.; Riddle, Brett R.; Van Devender, Thomas R.; Cole, K.L.; Spaulding, W.G.

    2001-01-01

    1. A classic biogeographic pattern is the alignment of diploid, tetraploid and hexaploid races of creosote bush (Larrea tridentata) across the Chihuahuan, Sonoran and Mohave Deserts of western North America. We used statistically robust differences in guard cell size of modern plants and fossil leaves from packrat middens to map current and past distributions of these ploidy races since the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). 2 Glacial/early Holocene (26a??10 14C kyr bp or thousands of radiocarbon years before present) populations included diploids along the lower Rio Grande of west Texas, 650 km removed from sympatric diploids and tetraploids in the lower Colorado River Basin of south-eastern California/south-western Arizona. Diploids migrated slowly from lower Rio Grande refugia with expansion into the northern Chihuahuan Desert sites forestalled until after ~4.0 14C kyr bp. Tetraploids expanded from the lower Colorado River Basin into the northern limits of the Sonoran Desert in central Arizona by 6.4 14C kyr bp. Hexaploids appeared by 8.5 14C kyr bp in the lower Colorado River Basin, reaching their northernmost limits (~37A?N) in the Mohave Desert between 5.6 and 3.9 14C kyr bp. 3 Modern diploid isolates may have resulted from both vicariant and dispersal events. In central Baja California and the lower Colorado River Basin, modern diploids probably originated from relict populations near glacial refugia. Founder events in the middle and late Holocene established diploid outposts on isolated limestone outcrops in areas of central and southern Arizona dominated by tetraploid populations. 4 Geographic alignment of the three ploidy races along the modern gradient of increasingly drier and hotter summers is clearly a postglacial phenomenon, but evolution of both higher ploidy races must have happened before the Holocene. The exact timing and mechanism of polyploidy evolution in creosote bush remains a matter of conjecture.

  11. Ploidy race distributions since the Last Glacial Maximum in the North American desert shrub, Larrea tridentata

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hunter, K.L.; Betancourt, J.L.; Riddle, B.R.; Van Devender, T. R.; Cole, K.L.; Geoffrey, Spaulding W.

    2000-01-01

    1 A classic biogeographic pattern is the alignment of diploid, tetraploid and hexaploid races of creosote bush (Larrea tridentata) across the Chihuahuan, Sonoran and Mohave Deserts of western North America. We used statistically robust differences in guard cell size of modern plants and fossil leaves from packrat middens to map current and past distributions of these ploidy races since the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). 2 Glacial/early Holocene (26-10 14C kyr BP or thousands of radiocarbon years before present) populations included diploids along the lower Rio Grande of west Texas, 650 km removed from sympatric diploids and tetraploids in the lower Colorado River Basin of south-eastern California/south-western Arizona. Diploids migrated slowly from lower Rio Grande refugia with expansion into the northern Chihuahuan Desert sites forestalled until after ???4.0 14C kyr BP. Tetraploids expanded from the lower Colorado River Basin into the northern limits of the Sonoran Desert in central Arizona by 6.4 14C kyr BP. Hexaploids appeared by 8.5 14C kyr BP in the lower Colorado River Basin, reaching their northernmost limits (???37??N) in the Mohave Desert between 5.6 and 3.9 14C kyr BP. 3 Modern diploid isolates may have resulted from both vicariant and dispersal events. In central Baja California and the lower Colorado River Basin, modern diploids probably originated from relict populations near glacial refugia. Founder events in the middle and late Holocene established diploid outposts on isolated limestone outcrops in areas of central and southern Arizona dominated by tetraploid populations. 4 Geographic alignment of the three ploidy races along the modern gradient of increasingly drier and hotter summers is clearly a postglacial phenomenon, but evolution of both higher ploidy races must have happened before the Holocene. The exact timing and mechanism of polyploidy evolution in creosote bush remains a matter of conjecture. ?? 2001 Blackwell Science Ltd.

  12. Assessing the Impact of Laurentide Ice-sheet Topography on Glacial Climate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ullman, D. J.; LeGrande, A. N.; Carlson, A. E.; Anslow, F. S.; Licciardi, J. M.

    2014-01-01

    Simulations of past climates require altered boundary conditions to account for known shifts in the Earth system. For the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) and subsequent deglaciation, the existence of large Northern Hemisphere ice sheets caused profound changes in surface topography and albedo. While ice-sheet extent is fairly well known, numerous conflicting reconstructions of ice-sheet topography suggest that precision in this boundary condition is lacking. Here we use a high-resolution and oxygen-isotopeenabled fully coupled global circulation model (GCM) (GISS ModelE2-R), along with two different reconstructions of the Laurentide Ice Sheet (LIS) that provide maximum and minimum estimates of LIS elevation, to assess the range of climate variability in response to uncertainty in this boundary condition.We present this comparison at two equilibrium time slices: the LGM, when differences in ice-sheet topography are maximized, and 14 ka, when differences in maximum ice-sheet height are smaller but still exist. Overall, we find significant differences in the climate response to LIS topography, with the larger LIS resulting in enhanced Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation and warmer surface air temperatures, particularly over northeastern Asia and the North Pacific. These up- and downstream effects are associated with differences in the development of planetary waves in the upper atmosphere, with the larger LIS resulting in a weaker trough over northeastern Asia that leads to the warmer temperatures and decreased albedo from snow and sea-ice cover. Differences between the 14 ka simulations are similar in spatial extent but smaller in magnitude, suggesting that climate is responding primarily to the larger difference in maximum LIS elevation in the LGM simulations. These results suggest that such uncertainty in ice-sheet boundary conditions alone may significantly impact the results of paleoclimate simulations and their ability to successfully simulate past climates

  13. Phylogenetic assemblage structure of North American trees is more strongly shaped by glacial-interglacial climate variability in gymnosperms than in angiosperms.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ziyu; Sandel, Brody; Svenning, Jens-Christian

    2016-05-01

    How fast does biodiversity respond to climate change? The relationship of past and current climate with phylogenetic assemblage structure helps us to understand this question. Studies of angiosperm tree diversity in North America have already suggested effects of current water-energy balance and tropical niche conservatism. However, the role of glacial-interglacial climate variability remains to be determined, and little is known about any of these relationships for gymnosperms. Moreover, phylogenetic endemism, the concentration of unique lineages in restricted ranges, may also be related to glacial-interglacial climate variability and needs more attention. We used a refined phylogeny of both angiosperms and gymnosperms to map phylogenetic diversity, clustering and endemism of North American trees in 100-km grid cells, and climate change velocity since Last Glacial Maximum together with postglacial accessibility to recolonization to quantify glacial-interglacial climate variability. We found: (1) Current climate is the dominant factor explaining the overall patterns, with more clustered angiosperm assemblages toward lower temperature, consistent with tropical niche conservatism. (2) Long-term climate stability is associated with higher angiosperm endemism, while higher postglacial accessibility is linked to to more phylogenetic clustering and endemism in gymnosperms. (3) Factors linked to glacial-interglacial climate change have stronger effects on gymnosperms than on angiosperms. These results suggest that paleoclimate legacies supplement current climate in shaping phylogenetic patterns in North American trees, and especially so for gymnosperms. PMID:27252830

  14. Ancient DNA supports southern survival of Richardson's collared lemming (Dicrostonyx richardsoni) during the last glacial maximum.

    PubMed

    Fulton, Tara L; Norris, Ryan W; Graham, Russell W; Semken, Holmes A; Shapiro, Beth

    2013-05-01

    Collared lemmings (genus Dicrostonyx) are circumpolar Arctic arvicoline rodents associated with tundra. However, during the last glacial maximum (LGM), Dicrostonyx lived along the southern ice margin of the Laurentide ice sheet in communities comprising both temperate and boreal species. To better understand these communities and the fate of these southern individuals, we compare mitochondrial cytochrome b sequence data from three LGM-age Dicrostonyx fossils from south of the Laurentide ice sheet to sequences from modern Dicrostonyx sampled from across their present-day range. We test whether the Dicrostonyx populations from LGM-age continental USA became extinct at the Pleistocene-Holocene transition ~11000 years ago or, alternatively, if they belong to an extant species whose habitat preferences can be used to infer the palaeoclimate along the glacial margin. Our results indicate that LGM-age Dicrostonyx from Iowa and South Dakota belong to Dicrostonyx richardsoni, which currently lives in a temperate tundra environment west of Hudson Bay, Canada. This suggests a palaeoclimate south of the Laurentide ice sheet that contains elements similar to the more temperate shrub tundra characteristic of extant D. richardsoni habitat, rather than the very cold, dry tundra of the Northern Arctic. While more data are required to determine whether or not the LGM southern population is ancestral to extant D. richardsoni, it seems most probable that the species survived the LGM in a southern refugium. PMID:23495672

  15. Mite dispersal among the Southern Ocean Islands and Antarctica before the last glacial maximum

    PubMed Central

    Mortimer, E.; Jansen van Vuuren, B.; Lee, J. E.; Marshall, D. J.; Convey, P.; Chown, S. L.

    2011-01-01

    It has long been maintained that the majority of terrestrial Antarctic species are relatively recent, post last glacial maximum, arrivals with perhaps a few microbial or protozoan taxa being substantially older. Recent studies have questioned this ‘recolonization hypothesis’, though the range of taxa examined has been limited. Here, we present the first large-scale study for mites, one of two dominant terrestrial arthropod groups in the region. Specifically, we provide a broad-scale molecular phylogeny of a biologically significant group of ameronothroid mites from across the maritime and sub-Antarctic regions. Applying different dating approaches, we show that divergences among the ameronothroid mite genera Podacarus, Alaskozetes and Halozetes significantly predate the Pleistocene and provide evidence of independent dispersals across the Antarctic Polar Front. Our data add to a growing body of evidence demonstrating that many taxa have survived glaciation of the Antarctic continent and the sub-Antarctic islands. Moreover, they also provide evidence of a relatively uncommon trend of dispersals from islands to continental mainlands. Within the ameronothroid mites, two distinct clades with specific habitat preferences (marine intertidal versus terrestrial/supralittoral) exist, supporting a model of within-habitat speciation rather than colonization from marine refugia to terrestrial habitats. The present results provide additional impetus for a search for terrestrial refugia in an area previously thought to have lacked ice-free ground during glacial maxima. PMID:20943685

  16. Could brown bears (Ursus arctos) have survived in Ireland during the Last Glacial Maximum?

    PubMed

    Leonard, Saoirse A; Risley, Claire L; Turvey, Samuel T

    2013-08-23

    Brown bears are recorded from Ireland during both the Late Pleistocene and early-mid Holocene. Although most of the Irish landmass was covered by an ice sheet during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM), Irish brown bears are known to have hybridized with polar bears during the Late Pleistocene, and it is suggested that the Irish brown bear population did not become extinct but instead persisted in situ through the LGM in a southwestern ice-free refugium. We use historical population modelling to demonstrate that brown bears are highly unlikely to have survived through the LGM in Ireland under any combination of life-history parameters shown by living bear populations, but instead would have rapidly become extinct following advance of the British-Irish ice sheet, and probably recolonized Ireland during the end-Pleistocene Woodgrange Interstadial from a closely related nearby source population. The time available for brown bear-polar bear hybridization was therefore restricted to narrow periods at the beginning or end of the LGM. Brown bears would have been extremely vulnerable to extinction in Quaternary habitat refugia and required areas substantially larger than southwestern Ireland to survive adverse glacial conditions. PMID:23676655

  17. Subglacial Sediment Transport of a Marine Ice Stream During the Late Glacial Maximum, Northern North Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nygard, A.; Sejrup, H. P.; Haflidason, H.; Lekens, W.; Clark, C.; Bigg, G.

    2006-12-01

    By means of high-resolution seismic and core data we have quantified the flux of sediment transported subglacially by the Norwegian Channel Ice Stream (NCIS) at the end of the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). This was achieved by mapping the volume of sediment deposited during the last NCIS phase on the North Sea Fan, a glacial fan located on the continental slope at the outlet of the Norwegian Channel, northern North Sea. The North Sea Fan is dominated by glacigenic debris flows sourced from subglacial till brought to the shelf break by the NCIS, which drained a major part of the southwestern Fennoscandian Ice Sheet. 800 km3 of sediment was brought to the shelf edge by the NCIS between 20.0 and 19.0 cal. ka BP, which gives an annual flux of 8000 m3 pr. metre width of the ice stream front. This equates to a total of 1.1 Gt of sediment per year and is comparable to the present sediment flux from the worlds largest rivers. To explain the extreme sediment flux the NCIS must have flowed with high velocity (several kilometres/year) and/or the subglacial sediment transport must have occurred in a thick layer (several metres).

  18. Constraints on soluble aerosol iron flux to the Southern Ocean at the Last Glacial Maximum

    PubMed Central

    Conway, T.M.; Wolff, E.W.; Röthlisberger, R.; Mulvaney, R.; Elderfield, H.E.

    2015-01-01

    Relief of iron (Fe) limitation in the Southern Ocean during ice ages, with potentially increased carbon storage in the ocean, has been invoked as one driver of glacial–interglacial atmospheric CO2 cycles. Ice and marine sediment records demonstrate that atmospheric dust supply to the oceans increased by up to an order of magnitude during glacial intervals. However, poor constraints on soluble atmospheric Fe fluxes to the oceans limit assessment of the role of Fe in glacial–interglacial change. Here, using novel techniques, we present estimates of water- and seawater-soluble Fe solubility in Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) atmospheric dust from the European Project for Ice Coring in Antarctica (EPICA) Dome C and Berkner Island ice cores. Fe solubility was very variable (1–42%) during the interval, and frequently higher than typically assumed by models. Soluble aerosol Fe fluxes to Dome C at the LGM (0.01–0.84 mg m−2 per year) suggest that soluble Fe deposition to the Southern Ocean would have been ≥10 × modern deposition, rivalling upwelling supply. PMID:26204562

  19. Atmospheric Rivers Enhanced Water Delivery to Southwestern North America at the Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lora, J. M.; Mitchell, J.; Risi, C. M.; Tripati, A. K.

    2015-12-01

    Proxy reconstructions of the late Pleistocene paleoclimate indicate that southwestern North America was significantly more wet at the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM; ~21 ka) than in the present. Pluvial paleolakes were abundant throughout the Great Basin and as far south as the modern Mojave Desert. The source of precipitation that fed these lakes and the role of evaporation in the hydrologic balance are debated. A leading hypothesis is increased Pacific winter storm frequency as a result of the jet stream being split or shifted south by the North American ice sheets. Alternative hypotheses include enhanced monsoonal precipitation, a re-routing of the storm track across the continent, and/or reduced evaporation. Using LGM simulations from the PMIP3 ensemble and the LMDZ general circulation model, and comparing to proxy records of LGM precipitation in the region, we find that atmospheric rivers, narrow filaments of humid tropical air, were strengthened over the eastern Pacific during glacial intervals and directed into southern California. A strengthened Aleutian Low and a weakened North Pacific High produced a mean state conducive to this strong, south-shifted atmospheric river system, which enhanced moisture delivery into the southwestern part of the Great Basin.

  20. Polar front shift and atmospheric CO2 during the glacial maximum of the Early Paleozoic Icehouse

    PubMed Central

    Vandenbroucke, Thijs R. A.; Armstrong, Howard A.; Williams, Mark; Paris, Florentin; Zalasiewicz, Jan A.; Sabbe, Koen; Nõlvak, Jaak; Challands, Thomas J.; Verniers, Jacques; Servais, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Our new data address the paradox of Late Ordovician glaciation under supposedly high pCO2 (8 to 22× PAL: preindustrial atmospheric level). The paleobiogeographical distribution of chitinozoan (“mixed layer”) marine zooplankton biotopes for the Hirnantian glacial maximum (440 Ma) are reconstructed and compared to those from the Sandbian (460 Ma): They demonstrate a steeper latitudinal temperature gradient and an equatorwards shift of the Polar Front through time from 55°–70° S to ∼40° S. These changes are comparable to those during Pleistocene interglacial-glacial cycles. In comparison with the Pleistocene, we hypothesize a significant decline in mean global temperature from the Sandbian to Hirnantian, proportional with a fall in pCO2 from a modeled Sandbian level of ∼8× PAL to ∼5× PAL during the Hirnantian. Our data suggest that a compression of midlatitudinal biotopes and ecospace in response to the developing glaciation was a likely cause of the end-Ordovician mass extinction. PMID:20696937

  1. Erosion and transport by Byrd Glacier, Antarctica during the Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Licht, K. J.; Palmer, E. F.

    2013-02-01

    Glacial till samples from seven, modern-Holocene Byrd Glacier moraines were characterized using particle size analysis, sand petrography and detrital zircon geochronology and compared to Ross Sea tills deposited during the Last Glacial Maximum. The goal was to identify the paleoflow path for Byrd Glacier and assess the use of multiple provenance techniques. The coarse sand fraction of Byrd Glacier tills is dominated by lithic fragments of adjacent bedrock outcrops, except samples from the Lonewolf Nunataks, which have a higher proportion of mineral to lithic fragments, as well as a recognizable exotic component. Cluster analysis shows that Byrd Glacier tills, with the exception of the two Lonewolf Nunataks sites, do not cluster strongly with Ross Sea samples because they have a higher proportion of lithic fragments. This indicates that comminution must be an active subglacial process beneath East Antarctic outlet glaciers. Byrd Glacier tills are also typically coarser grained that Ross Sea tills and their maturity is a reflection of both glacial processes and rock type. Measured U/Pb ages of detrital zircons from Byrd Glacier tills range from Triassic to Archean (240-3540 Ma) with a dominance of grains 530-600 Ma. Ross Sea till samples show spatial variability in U/Pb age distributions, with the core sites west of the 180° longitude line showing similarity to most Byrd Glacier tills, whereas core NBP9407-39, east of 180° long., is dominated by ˜100 Ma grains. Ross Sea tills also contain a recognizable detrital zircon fraction eroded inland of the Transantarctic Mountains. Both provenance methods indicate that the ice flow line for Byrd Glacier during the LGM was to the east of Ross Island and extended on either side of Ross Bank, with the majority of ice flowing to the Ross Sea's Central Basin. Our analysis shows that sand petrography and detrital zircon U/Pb age spectra provide complementary datasets that produce similar ice flow reconstructions and reveal

  2. Effects of fire and CO2 on biogeography and primary production in glacial and modern climates.

    PubMed

    Martin Calvo, Maria; Prentice, Iain Colin

    2015-11-01

    Dynamic global vegetation models (DGVMs) can disentangle causes and effects in the control of vegetation and fire. We used a DGVM to analyse climate, CO2 and fire influences on biome distribution and net primary production (NPP) in last glacial maximum (LGM) and pre-industrial (PI) times. The Land surface Processes and eXchanges (LPX) DGVM was run in a factorial design with fire 'off' or 'on', CO2 at LGM (185 ppm) or PI (280 ppm) concentrations, and LGM (modelled) or recent climates. Results were analysed by Stein-Alpert decomposition to separate primary effects from synergies. Fire removal causes forests to expand and global NPP to increase slightly. Low CO2 greatly reduces forest area (dramatically in a PI climate; realistically under an LGM climate) and global NPP. NPP under an LGM climate was reduced by a quarter as a result of low CO2 . The reduction in global NPP was smaller at low temperatures, but greater in the presence of fire. Global NPP is controlled by climate and CO2 directly through photosynthesis, but also through biome distribution, which is strongly influenced by fire. Future vegetation simulations will need to consider the coupled responses of vegetation and fire to CO2 and climate. PMID:26033154

  3. Retreat history of the East Antarctic Ice Sheet since the Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackintosh, Andrew N.; Verleyen, Elie; O'Brien, Philip E.; White, Duanne A.; Jones, R. Selwyn; McKay, Robert; Dunbar, Robert; Gore, Damian B.; Fink, David; Post, Alexandra L.; Miura, Hideki; Leventer, Amy; Goodwin, Ian; Hodgson, Dominic A.; Lilly, Katherine; Crosta, Xavier; Golledge, Nicholas R.; Wagner, Bernd; Berg, Sonja; van Ommen, Tas; Zwartz, Dan; Roberts, Stephen J.; Vyverman, Wim; Masse, Guillaume

    2014-09-01

    The East Antarctic Ice Sheet (EAIS) is the largest continental ice mass on Earth, and documenting its evolution since the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) is important for understanding its present-day and future behaviour. As part of a community effort, we review geological evidence from East Antarctica that constrains the ice sheet history throughout this period (˜30,000 years ago to present). This includes terrestrial cosmogenic nuclide dates from previously glaciated regions, 14C chronologies from glacial and post-glacial deposits onshore and on the continental shelf, and ice sheet thickness changes inferred from ice cores and continental-scale ice sheet models. We also include new 14C dates from the George V Land - Terre Adélie Coast shelf. We show that the EAIS advanced to the continental shelf margin in some parts of East Antarctica, and that the ice sheet characteristically thickened by 300-400 m near the present-day coastline at these sites. This advance was associated with the formation of low-gradient ice streams that grounded at depths of >1 km below sea level on the inner continental shelf. The Lambert/Amery system thickened by a greater amount (800 m) near its present-day grounding zone, but did not advance beyond the inner continental shelf. At other sites in coastal East Antarctica (e.g. Bunger Hills, Larsemann Hills), very little change in the ice sheet margin occurred at the LGM, perhaps because ice streams accommodated any excess ice build up, leaving adjacent, ice-free areas relatively unaffected. Evidence from nunataks indicates that the amount of ice sheet thickening diminished inland at the LGM, an observation supported by ice cores, which suggest that interior ice sheet domes were ˜100 m lower than present at this time. Ice sheet recession may have started ˜18,000 years ago in the Lambert/Amery glacial system, and by ˜14,000 years ago in Mac.Robertson Land. These early pulses of deglaciation may have been responses to abrupt sea-level rise

  4. Linking microbial assemblages to paleoenvironmental conditions from the Holocene and Last Glacial Maximum times in Laguna Potrok Aike sediments, Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vuillemin, Aurele; Ariztegui, Daniel; Leavitt, Peter R.; Bunting, Lynda

    2014-05-01

    Laguna Potrok Aike is a closed basin located in the southern hemisphere's mid-latitudes (52°S) where paleoenvironmental conditions were recorded as temporal sedimentary sequences resulting from variations in the regional hydrological regime and geology of the catchment. The interpretation of the limnogeological multiproxy record developed during the ICDP-PASADO project allowed the identification of contrasting time windows associated with the fluctuations of Southern Westerly Winds. In the framework of this project, a 100-m-long core was also dedicated to a detailed geomicrobiological study which aimed at a thorough investigation of the lacustrine subsurface biosphere. Indeed, aquatic sediments do not only record past climatic conditions, but also provide a wide range of ecological niches for microbes. In this context, the influence of environmental features upon microbial development and survival remained still unexplored for the deep lacustrine realm. Therefore, we investigated living microbes throughout the sedimentary sequence using in situ ATP assays and DAPI cell count. These results, compiled with pore water analysis, SEM microscopy of authigenic concretions and methane and fatty acid biogeochemistry, provided evidence for a sustained microbial activity in deep sediments and pinpointed the substantial role of microbial processes in modifying initial organic and mineral fractions. Finally, because the genetic material associated with microorganisms can be preserved in sediments over millennia, we extracted environmental DNA from Laguna Potrok Aike sediments and established 16S rRNA bacterial and archaeal clone libraries to better define the use of DNA-based techniques in reconstructing past environments. We focused on two sedimentary horizons both displaying in situ microbial activity, respectively corresponding to the Holocene and Last Glacial Maximum periods. Sequences recovered from the productive Holocene record revealed a microbial community adapted to

  5. Meta-analysis of tropical surface temperatures during the Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballantyne, A. P.; Lavine, M.; Crowley, T. J.; Liu, J.; Baker, P. B.

    2005-03-01

    The magnitude of tropical cooling during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) has been the subject of uncertainty for over 25 years. We use principles of meta-analysis as an objective approach to reconcile estimates from different proxies. This approach treats each observation as a random estimate of the true mean and weights estimates by their reported precision. We assigned global uncertainties to proxies and derived a new regional standard deviation for temperatures calculated from the Sr/Ca ratio in tropical corals (σ = 1.4°C). Using a Bayesian spatial interpolation scheme, we estimate a mean cooling of LGM tropical sea surface temperatures of -2.7 +/- 0.5°C (+/-σ) and surface air temperatures of -5.4 +/- 0.3°C (+/-σ).

  6. Mediterranean vegetation, lake levels and palaeoclimate at the Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prentice, I. Colin; Guiot, Joël; Harrison, Sandy P.

    1992-12-01

    THE apparent conflict between pollen evidence for widespread Artemisia steppe1-6 (implying semi-arid conditions) and geomorphological evidence for high lake levels4,7-11 has produced controversy about the ice-age palaeoclimate of the Mediterranean region. Here we use a water-balance model12 (to predict catchment runoff) and a biome model13 (to predict vegetation type) to reconstruct the palaeoenvironment around Lake loannina-a type locality for the northern Mediterranean region. We show that both sets of evidence are compatible with a summer-dry, winter-wet regime with seasonal temperature anomalies similar to those predicted by atmospheric model simulations of the Last Glacial Maximum14-18. The drying effect of the cold North Atlantic Ocean may have been counteracted in winter by increased storm frequency under a southward-shifted jet stream, as shown by several atmospheric models16-18.

  7. Reaching and abandoning the furthest ice extent during the Last Glacial Maximum in the Alps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivy-Ochs, Susan; Wirsig, Christian; Zasadni, Jerzy; Hippe, Kristina; Christl, Marcus; Akçar, Naki; Schluechter, Christian

    2016-04-01

    During the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) in the European Alps (late Würm) local ice caps and extensive ice fields in the high Alps fed huge outlet glaciers that occupied the main valleys and extended onto the forelands as piedmont lobes. Records from numerous sites suggest advance of glaciers beyond the mountain front by around 30 ka (Ivy-Ochs 2015 and references therein). Reaching of the maximum extent occurred by about 27-26 ka, as exemplified by dates from the Rhein glacier area (Keller and Krayss, 2005). Abandonment of the outermost moraines at sites north and south of the Alps was underway by about 24 ka. In the high Alps, systems of transection glaciers with transfluences over many of the Alpine passes dominated, for example, at Grimsel Pass in the Central Alps (Switzerland). 10Be exposure ages of 23 ± 1 ka for glacially sculpted bedrock located just a few meters below the LGM trimline in the Haslital near Grimsel Pass suggest a pulse of ice surface lowering at about the same time that the foreland moraines were being abandoned (Wirsig et al., 2016). Widespread ice surface lowering in the high Alps was underway by no later than 18 ka. Thereafter, glaciers oscillated at stillstand and minor re-advance positions on the northern forelands for several thousand years forming the LGM stadial moraines. Final recession back within the mountain front took place by 19-18 ka. Recalculation to a common basis of all published 10Be exposure dates for boulders situated on LGM moraines suggests a strong degree of synchrony for the timing of onset of ice decay both north and south of the Alps. Ivy-Ochs, S., 2015, Cuadernos de investigación geográfica 41: 295-315. Keller, O., Krayss, E., 2005, Vierteljahrschr. Naturforsch. Gesell. Zürich 150: 69-85. Wirsig, C. et al., 2016, J. Quat. Sci. 31: 46-59.

  8. Deepwater redox changes in the southern Okinawa Trough since the last glacial maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dou, Yanguang; Yang, Shouye; Li, Chao; Shi, Xuefa; Liu, Jihua; Bi, Lei

    2015-06-01

    In this study, rare earth element (REE) was treated as a paleo-redox proxy to investigate the changes of depositional environment in the southern Okinawa Trough since the last glacial maximum. The acid-leachable fraction (leachate) of the sediments recovered from the ODP Site 1202B is dominated by biogenic and authigenic components while detrital contamination is minor. The significant enrichment of middle REE suggests a large contribution from authigenic Mn oxyhydroxides and cerium (Ce) anomaly can indicate deepwater redox change. The REE parameters including Ce anomaly in the leachate exhibit remarkable and abrupt changes in the early Holocene (∼9.5 ka) and during LGM (∼20 ka). An increase of Ce anomaly at 28-22 ka implies the suboxic deepwater condition probably caused by increased primary productivity. Weak positive Ce anomalies during the last glacial maximum and deglaciation suggest an oxic depositional environment responding to the enhanced deepwater ventilation with the advection of the North Pacific Intermediate Water and/or South China Sea Intermediate Water into the trough. A decrease of Ce anomaly in the early Holocene might be caused by the intrusion and strengthening of the Kuroshio Current in the trough that enhanced the water stratification and induced a gradual development of suboxic depositional condition. Furthermore, an abrupt change of chemical composition at ca. 4 ka probably indicates a decrease of dissolved oxygen in deepwater and a weakening of ventilation in the Okinawa Trough. This study suggests that REE proxy can provide new insights into the linkage among surface current, deepwater circulation and sediment record in the continental margin where terrigenous input dominates.

  9. The Influence of Glacial Ice Sheets on Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation Through Atmospheric Circulation Change under Glacial Climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherriff-Tadano, S.; Abe-Ouchi, A.; Yoshimori, M.; Oka, A.; Chan, W. L.

    2014-12-01

    It is well known that glacial ice sheets (Laurentide, Fennoscandian and Antarctic ice sheets) exert a large influence on the climate including the atmospheric circulation. Moreover, recent climate modeling studies suggest that glacial ice sheets have a large impact on the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC). However, the process by which the ice sheets impact on the AMOC is not yet fully understood. On the other hand, recent studies showed that surface wind changes play a crucial role on changes to the AMOC under glacial climate. Therefore, in this study, we investigate in detail, the process by which the ice sheet modifies the AMOC through surface wind change. Here we conduct numerical experiments using an atmospheric general circulation model (AGCM) and an ocean general circulation model (OGCM) separately. Our method consists of 2 steps. First, from AGCM experiments, we evaluate the effect of glacial ice sheets on the surface wind. Second, from OGCM experiments, we evaluate the influence of the wind stress change on the AMOC by applying the surface wind change as a boundary condition, while leaving other boundary conditions (surface heat and water fluxes) unchanged. In addition, we conduct several sensitivity experiments. Using the AGCM, we explore individual ice sheet effect, ice sheet topography effect and albedo effect on surface wind change. Moreover, using the OGCM, we change the surface wind gradually or apply the surface wind change only at a specific region in order to explore the wind change effect in detail. We find that glacial ice sheets largely intensify the AMOC by surface wind change under glacial climate. Compare to other regions, it reveals that the wind change at the North Atlantic (NA) is a key region. There, the northern glacial ice sheet topography intensifies the Icelandic Low and anti-cyclonic circulation over the Laurentide ice sheet. However, this wind effect is effective only when the NA is not widely covered by sea ice

  10. Colombian vegetation at the Last Glacial Maximum: a comparison of model- and pollen-based biome reconstructions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchant, Robert; Boom, Arnoud; Behling, Hermann; Hooghiemstra, Henry; Melief, Bert; van Geel, Bas; van der Hammen, Thomas; Wille, Michael

    2004-10-01

    Colombian vegetation, at the ecological level of the biome, is reconstructed at the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) using two methods. A reconstruction of modern biomes shows that, for the majority of the sites, the pollen data accurately reflect the potential vegetation, even though much of the original vegetation has been transformed by agricultural practices. At 18 000 14C yr BP a generally cool and dry environment is reflected in biome assignments of cold mixed forests, cool evergreen forests and cool grassland/shrub, the latter extending to lower altitudes than presently recorded. Differential responses of the vegetation to climatic shifts are related to changes in moisture sources and the importance of edaphic control on the vegetation. Secondly, biomes at the LGM are also investigated by applying a vegetation model (BIOME-3) set to operate at CO2 levels of 200 ppmV and with climatic data from 12 meteorological stations that encompass a range of environments within Colombia. At lower altitudes it is apparent that moisture is the dominant control on driving vegetation change whereas temperature becomes more important at higher altitudes. The combined reconstruction of biome-scale vegetation dynamics in Colombia allows an understanding of the environmental controls on these to be developed that demonstrates the need to invoke different factors to explain the vegetation change rather than a uniform reduction in temperature or moisture. Copyright

  11. Quantifying the change in equilibrium-line altitude during the Last Glacial Maximum in the Subtropical Andes using a mass-balance model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vargo, L.; Galewsky, J.

    2014-12-01

    Quantifying changes in equilibrium-line altitude (ELA) can be used to better understand past regional climates. We use a glacial mass-balance model in conjunction with global climate model (GCM) output data to calculate the change in ELA between modern and Last Glacial Maximum (LGM; 21 ka) climates in the presently hyper-arid subtropical Andes. The region is currently unglaciated, despite cold enough temperatures, as there is too little moisture to sustain glaciers. Previous studies suggest this area was glaciated during the LGM, however, little is known about the extent of the glaciation or the climate required to sustain it. The mass-balance model used in this study calculates the change in ELA using the positive degree-day (PDD) sum, the sum of daily mean air temperatures that are above zero. The PDD sum is used to calculate ablation, which is then assumed to be proportional to temperature, in order to calculate the change in ELA. Using output from several GCM simulations, we compare the change in ELA between LGM and modern climates across the different models for the subtropical Andes. These simulations suggest that the changes in climate resulted in a lowering of ELAs to the extent that parts of the subtropical Andes were glaciated during the LGM.

  12. Instability of glacial climate in a model of the ocean- atmosphere-cryosphere system.

    PubMed

    Schmittner, Andreas; Yoshimori, Masakazu; Weaver, Andrew J

    2002-02-22

    In contrast to the relatively stable climate of the past 10,000 years, during glacial times the North Atlantic region experienced large-amplitude transitions between cold (stadial) and warm (interstadial) states. In this modeling study, we demonstrate that hydrological interactions between the Atlantic thermohaline circulation (THC) and adjacent continental ice sheets can trigger abrupt warming events and also limit the lifetime of the interstadial circulation mode. These interactions have the potential to destabilize the THC, which is already more sensitive for glacial conditions than for the present-day climate, thus providing an explanation for the increased variability of glacial climate. PMID:11823604

  13. First Global Climate Model Simulations of the M2 Pliocene Glacial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolan, A.; Haywood, A.; Hunter, S. J.; Tindall, J.; Valdes, P. J.

    2013-12-01

    The Pliocene Epoch (5.2 to 2.6 Ma) and specifically the PRISM interval (3.0 to 3.3 Ma) have frequently been targeted to investigate warm intervals in Earth history (e.g. Haywood et al., 2013). However, climate variability within the Pliocene is often overlooked. Although not as dramatic as the glacial and interglacial cycles that typified the Pleistocene, the Pliocene also exhibited climate variability and periods which were apparently cooler than modern (Lisiecki and Raymo, 2005). Of particular interest is the major cooling event that occurred around 3.3 Ma during Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) M2. This 'Pliocene glacial' punctuates an otherwise relatively warm background climate and has been referred to as a failed attempt of the climate to reach a full glacial state (De Schepper et al., 2009; Haug and Tiedemann, 1998). The onset of full Northern Hemisphere (NH) glaciation finally occurred at the end of the Pliocene (~ 2.75 Ma). Although numerous temperature reconstructions from around the world's oceans tend to capture the MIS M2 cooling event, the exact nature of M2 remains enigmatic. Sea level records vary but suggest a maximum sea level drop of ~65 m compared to modern, which in itself is significant enough to necessitate the growth of a NH ice sheet (Dwyer and Chandler, 2009). Previous ice sheet modelling suggests that ~8 m sea level equivalent (SLE) ice could be stored on Antarctica (Pollard and DeConto, 2009) and this larger ice sheet (compared to modern) is potentially supported by the increase in ice-rafted debris (IRD) found offshore of East Antarctica during this time (Passchier, 2011). IRD in the North Atlantic would suggest the presence of an ice sheet on Greenland (e.g. Kleiven et al., 2002), but the locations of other ice caps in the NH are not determined due to the destructive nature of subsequent Pleistocene ice sheet advances. Moreover, recent evidence questions whether the climate in the NH was favourable at all for the initiation of ice sheets

  14. The climate response of the Indo-Pacific warm pool to glacial sea level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Nezio, Pedro N.; Timmermann, Axel; Tierney, Jessica E.; Jin, Fei-Fei; Otto-Bliesner, Bette; Rosenbloom, Nan; Mapes, Brian; Neale, Rich; Ivanovic, Ruza F.; Montenegro, Alvaro

    2016-06-01

    Growing climate proxy evidence suggests that changes in sea level are important drivers of tropical climate change on glacial-interglacial timescales. These paleodata suggest that rainfall patterns over the Indo-Pacific warm pool (IPWP) are highly sensitive to the landmass configuration of the Maritime Continent and that lowered sea level contributed to large-scale drying during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM, approximately 21,000 years B.P.). Using the Community Earth System Model Version 1.2 (CESM1), we investigate the mechanisms by which lowered sea level influenced the climate of the IPWP during the LGM. The CESM1 simulations show that, in agreement with previous hypotheses, changes in atmospheric circulation are initiated by the exposure of the Sunda and Sahul shelves. Ocean dynamical processes amplify the changes in atmospheric circulation by increasing the east-west sea surface temperature (SST) gradient along the equatorial Indian Ocean. The coupled mechanism driving this response is akin to the Bjerknes feedback and results in a large-scale climatic reorganization over the Indian Ocean with impacts extending from east Africa to the western tropical Pacific. Unlike exposure of the Sunda shelf, exposure of Sahul shelf and the associated changes in surface albedo play a key role because of the positive feedback. This mechanism could explain the pattern of dry (wet) eastern (western) Indian Ocean identified in climate proxies and LGM simulations. However, this response also requires a strengthened SST gradient along the equatorial Indian Ocean, a pattern that is not evident in marine paleoreconstructions. Strategies to resolve this issue are discussed.

  15. Migration Patterns of Subgenus Alnus in Europe since the Last Glacial Maximum: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Douda, Jan; Doudová, Jana; Drašnarová, Alena; Kuneš, Petr; Hadincová, Věroslava; Krak, Karol; Zákravský, Petr; Mandák, Bohumil

    2014-01-01

    Background/Aims Recently, new palaeoecological records supported by molecular analyses and palaeodistributional modelling have provided more comprehensive insights into plant behaviour during the last Quaternary cycle. We reviewed the migration history of species of subgenus Alnus during the last 50,000 years in Europe with a focus on (1) a general revision of Alnus history since the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM), (2) evidence of northern refugia of Alnus populations during the LGM and (3) the specific history of Alnus in particular European regions. Methodology We determined changes in Alnus distribution on the basis of 811 and 68 radiocarbon-dated pollen and macrofossil sites, respectively. We compiled data from the European Pollen Database, the Czech Quaternary Palynological Database, the Eurasian Macrofossil Database and additional literature. Pollen percentage thresholds indicating expansions or retreats were used to describe patterns of past Alnus occurrence. Principal Findings An expansion of Alnus during the Late Glacial and early Holocene periods supports the presence of alders during the LGM in southern peninsulas and northerly areas in western Europe, the foothills of the Alps, the Carpathians and northeastern Europe. After glaciers withdrew, the ice-free area of Europe was likely colonized from several regional refugia; the deglaciated area of Scandinavia was likely colonized from a single refugium in northeastern Europe. In the more northerly parts of Europe, we found a scale-dependent pattern of Alnus expansion characterised by a synchronous increase of Alnus within individual regions, though with regional differences in the times of the expansion. In southern peninsulas, the Alps and the Carpathians, by contrast, it seems that Alnus expanded differently at individual sites rather than synchronously in whole regions. Conclusions Our synthesis supports the idea that northern LGM populations were important sources of postglacial Alnus expansion. The

  16. The Last Glacial Maximum around Lago d'Orta, Northern Italy; a multi method reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braakhekke, Jochem; Ivy-Ochs, Susan; Hajdas, Irka; Monegato, Giovanni; Gianotti, Franco; Christl, Marcus

    2016-04-01

    During the Quaternary multiple ice-ages saw the ice reaching the low Alpine forelands. Glacial erosion helped creating overdeepenings and during stable glacier positions moraines could be built up. Today we can recognize these landforms in the research area as a lake basin which accomodates Lago d'Orta and sets of moraines surrounding the southern lake tip, referred to as the amphitheatre. The glacier that used to fill the overdeepening during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) was a small branch of the Toce Glacier, which originated from the Simplon and Monte Rosa areas and which saw a bigger branch flowing down the Lago Maggiore area. However, which moraines can be attributed to the LGM is variously discussed in the literature. To determine which ice-ages have formed the different moraines in the amphitheatre, we used cosmogenic nuclide exposure dating on the erratic boulders found on the frontal and lateral moraines. On a nearby outcropping section of a Ticino River terrace in Castelnovate we applied radiocarbon dating over a profile depth of 5 meters to find ages of deposition. Whilst using multiple preparation methods on the radiocarbon samples we found large variations in the resulting ages. Possible reasons for these variations will be discussed. Combining results of both these dating methods, conventional geomorphological mapping and ArcGIS landscape analysis, we have constructed a spatial and temporal reconstruction of the LGM around Lago d'Orta. This research adds to our understanding of the termination of the LGM on the Southern side of the Alps.

  17. Carbonate chemistry of intermediate waters in the Southwest Pacific Ocean since the Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, K. A.; Sikes, E. L.; Elmore, A.; Hoenisch, B.; deMenocal, P. B.; Rosenthal, Y.

    2013-12-01

    Shifts in ocean circulation and marine carbon storage likely played an important role in the termination of the last ice age, but the mechanisms driving these changes have not yet been fully explained. It has been suggested that a greater amount of CO2 was stored in the deep sea during glacial periods via the biologic pump and/or increased uptake by a more alkaline ocean. To quantify the relative roles of such processes, more constraints on past deep ocean alkalinity are needed. Here, we present a new record of deep water carbonate chemistry for the last 30,000 years derived from a sediment core located at 1,627 meters depth in New Zealand's Bay of Plenty. Today, this core site lies at the boundary between relatively fresh Antarctic/Tasman Intermediate Water (above), and Circumpolar Deep Water (below) with more corrosive Pacific Deep Water also intruding from the north. Trace element and stable isotopic composition of foraminiferal calcite (the epibenthic species Cibicidoides wuellerstorfi) reveal changes in bottom water carbonate chemistry during periods of atmospheric CO2 change. The boron to calcium ratio (B/Ca) in these shells indicates that deep water saturation (ΔCO32-) during the last glacial maximum (LGM) was only 5 μmol kg-1 less than the modern value of ~ 20 μmol/kg, consistent with previous work identifying the Pacific as a 'well-buffered' ocean basin on long timescales. However, reconstructed ΔCO32- values fluctuated by as much as 30 μmol/kg across the deglaciation, exhibiting the most pronounced changes between 17 and 13 ka. Together with shifts in carbon isotopes, these results imply changes in circulation and/or respired CO2 storage, and support a series of events in which major oceanographic changes are intimately linked with shifts in atmospheric circulation.

  18. Anatomy of Some Non-Heinrich Events During The Last Glacial Maximum on Laurentian Fan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gil, I. M.; Keigwin, L. D.

    2013-12-01

    High-resolution diatom assemblage analyses coupled with oxygen and carbon isotopic records from a new 28 m piston core on Laurentian Fan reveal significant sedimentological and marine productivity changes related to variability of the nearby Laurentide Ice Sheet during the Last Glacial Maximum. Between 21.0 and 19.7 ka and between 18.8 and 18.6 ka, olive-grey clays intervals interrupt the usual glacial red-clays sedimentation. The timing of these two intervals corresponds to reported occurrence of layers low in detrital carbonate (LDC, considered as non-Heinrich events) that occurred between Heinrich Event 1 and 2. Diatoms are only abundant during those LDC - olive-grey clay intervals and suggest ice retreat (allowing light penetration necessary to diatoms). The species succession reveals also different environmental conditions. The 21.0 to 19.7 ka interval is divisible to two main periods: the first was characterized by environmental conditions dominated by ice, while the second period (starting at 20.2 ka) was warmer than the first. During the shorter 18.8 to 18.6 ka interval, conditions were even warmer than during the 20.2 to 19.7 ka sub-interval. Finally, the comparison of the interpreted oceanographic conditions with changes in Ice Rafted Debris and other records from the North Atlantic will bring a new insight into those episodes that precede the transition to deglaciation beginning ~18.2 ka on Laurentian Fan (based on δ18-O in N. pachyderma (s.)).

  19. Decoding the dipstick: Thickness of Siple Dome, West Antarctica, at the Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waddington, E. D.; Conway, H.; Steig, E. J.; Alley, R. B.; Brook, E. J.; Taylor, K. C.; White, J. W. C.

    2005-04-01

    Ice thickness in West Antarctica at the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) is poorly known, yet is key information for understanding ice streams and interpreting ice cores. Although trim lines, moraine limits, and exposure-age dating provide geologic constraints on ice thickness near the Transantarctic Mountains and in Marie Byrd Land, lack of exposed bedrock hampers traditional geologic methods in a central, ˜2 × 106 km2 region. Here we infer ice-sheet thickness changes in the central Ross Sea Embayment by using a transient ice-flow model to find combinations of accumulation-rate and ice-sheet thickness histories that match the depth-age relationship and the measured layer-thickness pattern in the Siple Dome ice core. After we reject unreasonable accumulation-rate histories, the remaining history pairs indicate thinning of 200 400 m since the LGM. Our estimate is lower than previous reconstructions that were constrained by geologic evidence from the Transantarctic Mountains and by marine data from the Ross Sea floor, which indicate that a grounded ice sheet extended to the continental shelf margin during the last glacial period. Low surface elevations in the central Ross Sea Embayment during the LGM do not preclude thicker ice along its boundaries. However, if this grounded ice sheet came over 1000 km from interior West Antarctica, as is usually assumed, then it had very low surface slope, requiring a very slippery bed. Alternatively, the grounded Ross Sea ice might have flowed from the Transantarctic Mountains and western Marie Byrd Land.

  20. The Environment Changes in the Southwestern Taiwan Since the Last Glacial Maximum Epoch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yung-Jan; Chen, Wen-Shan

    2015-04-01

    We use 31 boreholes to reconstruct the depositional environments in the southwestern Taiwan. Based on the sedimentary structures, it is divided into eight facies associations that is important to reconstruct depositional environment. Based on the depositional environment, sequence stratigraphy and radiocarbon dating data, it can be implied significant environment and shoreline changes. (1) The southwestern Taiwan is characterized by a subaerial environment and formed two incised valleys during the sea-level fall in the last glacial maximum epoch. (2) The shoreline was migrated to the landward and close to the frontal foothills, and the environment changed deepen into tidal flat and lagoon during 18,000-10,000 years ago. (3) The area occurred the deepest environment from shoreface to offshore transition during 8,000-7,000 years ago. (4) The shoreline was retreated to the seaward. The environment changed shallowen into barrier island, lagoon, and coastal plain since 7,000 years ago. This study confirm the decreasing accommodation space in this area result from huge sediment inputs and decreased eustatic sea-level rise, which cause the maximum flooding epoch appear earlier.

  1. North Atlantic storm track changes during the Last Glacial Maximum recorded by Alpine speleothems

    PubMed Central

    Luetscher, Marc; Boch, R.; Sodemann, H.; Spötl, C.; Cheng, H.; Edwards, R. L.; Frisia, S.; Hof, F.; Müller, W.

    2015-01-01

    The European Alps are an effective barrier for meridional moisture transport and are thus uniquely placed to record shifts in the North Atlantic storm track pattern associated with the waxing and waning of Late-Pleistocene Northern Hemisphere ice sheets. The lack of well-dated terrestrial proxy records spanning this time period, however, renders the reconstruction of past atmospheric patterns difficult. Here we present a precisely dated, continuous terrestrial record of meteoric precipitation in Europe between 30 and 14.7 ka. In contrast to present-day conditions, our speleothem data provide strong evidence for preferential advection of moisture from the South across the Alps supporting a southward shift of the storm track during the local Last Glacial Maximum (that is, 26.5–23.5 ka). Moreover, our age control indicates that this circulation pattern preceded the Northern Hemisphere precession maximum by ~3 ka, suggesting that obliquity may have played a considerable role in the Alpine ice aggradation. PMID:25724008

  2. North Atlantic storm track changes during the Last Glacial Maximum recorded by Alpine speleothems.

    PubMed

    Luetscher, Marc; Boch, R; Sodemann, H; Spötl, C; Cheng, H; Edwards, R L; Frisia, S; Hof, F; Müller, W

    2015-01-01

    The European Alps are an effective barrier for meridional moisture transport and are thus uniquely placed to record shifts in the North Atlantic storm track pattern associated with the waxing and waning of Late-Pleistocene Northern Hemisphere ice sheets. The lack of well-dated terrestrial proxy records spanning this time period, however, renders the reconstruction of past atmospheric patterns difficult. Here we present a precisely dated, continuous terrestrial record of meteoric precipitation in Europe between 30 and 14.7 ka. In contrast to present-day conditions, our speleothem data provide strong evidence for preferential advection of moisture from the South across the Alps supporting a southward shift of the storm track during the local Last Glacial Maximum (that is, 26.5-23.5 ka). Moreover, our age control indicates that this circulation pattern preceded the Northern Hemisphere precession maximum by ~3 ka, suggesting that obliquity may have played a considerable role in the Alpine ice aggradation. PMID:25724008

  3. Reconstruction of glacial changes on HualcaHualca volcano (southern Peru) from the Maximum Glacier Extent to present.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alcalá, Jesus; Palacios, David; Juan Zamorano, Jose

    2015-04-01

    Little is known about glacial area changes in the Peruvian glaciers and how responds to climate fluctuations especially in the arid region where ice masses represent the major water supply. In this research, we present the results related to glacier area, volume and minimum glacier altitude evolution from the Maximum Glacier Extent (MGE) to 2000 on HualcaHualca volcano (15° 43' S; 71° 52' W; 6,025 masl), a large andesitic stratovolcano located in the south-western Peruvian Andes approximately 70 km north-west of Arequipa. We focused the study in four valleys (Huayuray, Pujro Huayjo, Mollebaya and Mucurca) because preserved a complete and well-defined sequence of glacial deposits. Moreover, these valleys, with the exception of Mucurca, still retain ice masses relegated to active cirques on summits areas so has been possible to reconstruct glacier recent dynamics. To reconstruct former glaciers, we used frontal and lateral moraines while delimitation of recent ice masses was based on the analysis of aerial photographs (1955) as well as Landsat satellite scene (2000). Geographical Information System (GIS) allowed map and quantify with high accuracy glacier spatial parameters. The magnitude of glacial expansion was highest during MEG in Huayuray, where the glacier reached 22.7 km2 of extension and the front ice was situated at 3,650 masl, than in Pujro Huayjo (23.8 km2; 4,300 masl), Mollebaya (17.8 km2; 4,315 masl) and Mucurca (8.0 km2; 4,350 masl). The cause of this difference has been associated to the control exercised by topography. Glacier of Huayuray flowed by a steep slope while mass ices of Pujro Huayjo, Mollebaya and Mucurca slipped to the Altiplano. In the other hand, the data from 2000 show that the intensity of deglaciation was more drastic in Mucurca, where glacier has already disappeared, than in Huayuray (1.2 km2; 5,800 masl), Pujro Huayjo (1.8 km2; 5,430 masl) or Mollebaya (0.95 km2; 5,430 masl) as a consequence of it's lesser glacier entity. Research

  4. Evidence for Highstand of Lake Tahoe During the Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delusina, I.; Verosub, K. L.; Acton, G.; Osleger, D.; Starratt, S. W.

    2006-12-01

    We have been studying a core of opportunity obtained as a result of geotechnical drilling in the Upper Truckee Marsh on South Lake Tahoe, California. The core is 51.8 meters long and provides new information about conditions in the Lake Tahoe basin toward the end of the last glacial. We have conducted sedimentological, environmental magnetic, palynological and paleontological studies of the core. Detailed particle size analysis shows that the upper 9 meters of the core consists primarily of coarse sand, which is underlain by 8 meters of silty sand. A silty clay layer spans the interval from 17 to 21 meters, and that is underlain by another 29 meters of silty sand. At the base of the core is a second silty clay interval. The magnetic intensity is generally higher in the fine-grained units than in the coarser-grained units although other magnetic properties do not vary significantly. The trends in magnetic grain-size mirror those in overall sediment particle size. The pollen spectrum is dominated by two types of pine and by fir, but there is little variation in either the concentration or relative abundances. Diatoms have not been found in the fine-grained portions of the core. Radiocarbon dating of the upper fine-grained interval gives an age of 14,000 BP for the top and 25, 000 BP for the bottom. The concentration of radiocarbon in the basal fine-grained interval is too low to provide an age. As indicated by the radiocarbon dates, this core provides information about conditions in the Lake Tahoe basin before, during and after the Last Glacial Maximum. Previous workers have suggested that the lower part of the Upper Truckee River, which drains into Lake Tahoe, was never glaciated. Our results support the idea that the valley was occupied by a glacial outwash plain that provided the coarse sediment that predominates in the core. We hypothesize that the fine-grained layer in the upper part of the core reflects a time when the canyon of the Lower Truckee River, into

  5. Millenial-scale lag times in vegetation response to glacial climate in Siberia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herzschuh, Ulrike; Birks, John H.; Andreev, Andrei; Melles, Martin; Brigham-Grette, Julie

    2016-04-01

    Vegetation change on all relevant temporal scales is assumed to be primarily driven by contemporary climate change, which would imply that vegetation-climate feedbacks become effective without long-term delay. However, our results from multivariate analyses of pollen assemblages from Lake Eĺgygytgyn (NE Siberia) and other data covering the Mid-Pliocene-Warm-Period and the Plio-Pleistocene-Transition challenge this concept of broad-scale vegetation-climate equilibrium. Our results indicate that interglacial vegetation during the Plio-Pleistocene transition mainly reflects the condition of the preceding glacial instead of contemporary interglacial climate. We assume that the observed vegetation-climate disequilibrium, in particular the absence of pine and spruce in interglacials following strong glacial stages, originates from the combined effects of permafrost persistence, distant glacial refugia, and fire plus possible interactions. Our results imply that today's widespread larch ecosystem on permafrost is not in climate-equilibrium but rather represents a transient vegetation type which is still responding to the extreme glacial condition of the last glacial. This also implies that feedback between vegetation and climate and between permafrost and climate in northern mid- and high latitudes becomes active with long-term delay, which is of relevance for global climate change.

  6. Glacial Atlantic overturning increased by wind stress in climate models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muglia, Juan; Schmittner, Andreas

    2015-11-01

    Previous Paleoclimate Model Intercomparison Project (PMIP) simulations of the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) showed dissimilar results on transports and structure. Here we analyze the most recent PMIP3 models, which show a consistent increase (on average by 41 ± 26%) and deepening (663 ± 550 m) of the AMOC with respect to preindustrial simulations, in contrast to some reconstructions from proxy data. Simulations run with the University of Victoria (UVic) ocean circulation model suggest that this is caused by changes in the Northern Hemisphere wind stress, brought about by the presence of ice sheets over North America in the LGM. When forced with LGM wind stress anomalies from PMIP3 models, the UVic model responds with an increase of the northward salt transport in the North Atlantic, which strengthens North Atlantic Deep Water formation and the AMOC. These results improve our understanding of the LGM AMOC's driving forces and suggest that some ocean mechanisms may not be correctly represented in PMIP3 models or some proxy data may need reinterpretation.

  7. Ice-age Ice-sheet Rheology: Constraints from the Last Glacial Maximum Form of the Laurentide Ice Sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peltier, W. Richard; Goldsby, David L.; Kohlstedt, David L.; Tarasov, Lev

    2000-01-01

    State-ot-the-art thermomechanical models of the modern Greenland ice and the ancient Laurenticle ice sheet that covered Canada at the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) are not able to explain simultaneously the observed forms of these cryospheric structures when the same, anisotropy-enhanced, version of the conventional Glen flow law is employed to describe their rheology. The LGM Laurenticle ice sheet. predicted to develop in response to orbital climate forcing, is such that the ratio of its thickness to its horizontal extent is extremely large compared to the aspect ratio inferred on the basis of surface-geomorphological and solid-earth-geophysical constraints. We show that if the Glen flow law representation of the rheology is replaced with a new rheology based upon very high quality laboratory measurements of the stress-strain-rate relation, then the aspect ratios of both the modern Greenland ice sheet and the Laurenticle ice sheet, that existed at the LGM, are simultaneously explained with little or no retuning of the flow law.

  8. Last Glacial Maximum cirque glaciation in Ireland and implications for reconstructions of the Irish Ice Sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barth, Aaron M.; Clark, Peter U.; Clark, Jorie; McCabe, A. Marshall; Caffee, Marc

    2016-06-01

    Reconstructions of the extent and height of the Irish Ice Sheet (IIS) during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM, ∼19-26 ka) are widely debated, in large part due to limited age constraints on former ice margins and due to uncertainties in the origin of the trimlines. A key area is southwestern Ireland, where various LGM reconstructions range from complete coverage by a contiguous IIS that extends to the continental shelf edge to a separate, more restricted southern-sourced Kerry-Cork Ice Cap (KCIC). We present new 10Be surface exposure ages from two moraines in a cirque basin in the Macgillycuddy's Reeks that provide a unique and unequivocal constraint on ice thickness for this region. Nine 10Be ages from an outer moraine yield a mean age of 24.5 ± 1.4 ka while six ages from an inner moraine yield a mean age of 20.4 ± 1.2 ka. These ages show that the northern flanks of the Macgillycuddy's Reeks were not covered by the IIS or a KCIC since at least 24.5 ± 1.4 ka. If there was more extensive ice coverage over the Macgillycuddy's Reeks during the LGM, it occurred prior to our oldest ages.

  9. Last Glacial Maximum cirque glaciation in Ireland and implications for reconstructions of the Irish Ice Sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barth, Aaron M.; Clark, Peter U.; Clark, Jorie; McCabe, A. Marshall; Caffee, Marc

    2016-06-01

    Reconstructions of the extent and height of the Irish Ice Sheet (IIS) during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM, ∼19-26 ka) are widely debated, in large part due to limited age constraints on former ice margins and due to uncertainties in the origin of the trimlines. A key area is southwestern Ireland, where various LGM reconstructions range from complete coverage by a contiguous IIS that extends to the continental shelf edge to a separate, more restricted southern-sourced Kerry-Cork Ice Cap (KCIC). We present new 10Be surface exposure ages from two moraines in a cirque basin in the Macgillycuddy's Reeks that provide a unique and unequivocal constraint on ice thickness for this region. Nine 10Be ages from an outer moraine yield a mean age of 24.5 ± 1.4 ka while six ages from an inner moraine yield a mean age of 20.4 ± 1.2 ka. These ages show that the northern flanks of the Macgillycuddy's Reeks were not covered by the IIS or a KCIC since at least 24.5 ± 1.4 ka. If there was more extensive ice coverage over the Macgillycuddy's Reeks during the LGM, it occurred prior to our oldest ages.

  10. Paleolithic human exploitation of plant foods during the last glacial maximum in North China.

    PubMed

    Liu, Li; Bestel, Sheahan; Shi, Jinming; Song, Yanhua; Chen, Xingcan

    2013-04-01

    Three grinding stones from Shizitan Locality 14 (ca. 23,000-19,500 calendar years before present) in the middle Yellow River region were subjected to usewear and residue analyses to investigate human adaptation during the last glacial maximum (LGM) period, when resources were generally scarce and plant foods may have become increasingly important in the human diet. The results show that these tools were used to process various plants, including Triticeae and Paniceae grasses, Vigna beans, Dioscorea opposita yam, and Trichosanthes kirilowii snakegourd roots. Tubers were important food resources for Paleolithic hunter-gatherers, and Paniceae grasses were exploited about 12,000 y before their domestication. The long tradition of intensive exploitation of certain types of flora helped Paleolithic people understand the properties of these plants, including their medicinal uses, and eventually led to the plants' domestication. This study sheds light on the deep history of the broad spectrum subsistence strategy characteristic of late Pleistocene north China before the origins of agriculture in this region. PMID:23509257

  11. Across-shelf sediment transport since the Last Glacial Maximum, southern California margin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sommerfield, C.K.; Lee, H.J.

    2004-01-01

    Correlation of continental shelf-slope stratigraphy in Santa Monica Bay (southern California) with Ocean Drilling Program records for nearby slope-basin sites has illuminated the timing and scale of terrigenous sediment dispersal on margin since the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). Marine flooding surfaces preserved in a transgressive sequence on the Santa Monica Shelf provide a key link between base-level elevation and sediment transport across shelf. Sediment-accumulation rates at slope-basin sites were maximal ca. 15-10 ka, well after the LGM, decreased during the 12-9 ka transition from fluvial-estuarine to fully marine conditions on the shelf, and decelerated throughout the Holocene to 30%-75% of their values at the LGM. The deceleration is interpreted to manifest a landward shift in the margin depocenter with the onset of transgressive sedimentation beginning when sea level surmounted the shelf edge ca. 13 ka, as predicted by sequence-stratigraphic models. However, the records make clear that factors other than base level modulated slope-basin accumulation rates during the deglaciation. ?? 2004 Geological Society of America.

  12. A matrilineal genetic legacy from the last glacial maximum confers susceptibility to schizophrenia in Han Chinese.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wen; Tang, Jinsong; Zhang, A-Mei; Peng, Min-Sheng; Xie, Hai-Bing; Tan, Liwen; Xu, Lin; Zhang, Ya-Ping; Chen, Xiaogang; Yao, Yong-Gang

    2014-07-20

    Mitochondrial dysfunction has been widely reported in schizophrenia patients. To dissect the matrilineal structure of Han Chinese with or without schizophrenia and to decipher the maternal influence and evolutionary history of schizophrenia, a total of 1212 schizophrenia patients and 1005 matched healthy controls, all of Han Chinese origin, were recruited in Hunan Province, China. We classified haplogroup for each individual based on mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequence variations and compared the haplogroup distribution pattern between cases and controls. Haplogroup B5a presented a higher frequency in cases than in controls (P = 0.02, OR = 1.67, 95% CI = [1.09, 2.56]), and this result could be confirmed by permutation analysis. Age estimation of haplogroup B5a in cases revealed a much younger age than that of controls, which was coincident with the Northern Hemisphere deglaciation at the end of the Last Glacial Maximum. Analysis of complete mtDNA in five patients belonging to haplogroup B5a showed that this background effect might be caused by haplogroup-defining variants m.8584G>A and m.10398A>G. Our results showed that matrilineal risk factor for schizophrenia had an ancient origin and might acquire a predisposing effect on schizophrenia due to the environment change and/or orchestration with other nuclear genetic factors appeared recently in human evolutionary history. PMID:25064678

  13. Last glacial maximum environments in northwestern Patagonia revealed by fossil small mammals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tammone, Mauro N.; Hajduk, Adan; Arias, Pablo; Teta, Pablo; Lacey, Eileen A.; Pardiñas, Ulyses F. J.

    2014-07-01

    Comparisons of historical and modern assemblages of mammals can yield important insights into patterns and processes of environmental change. Here, we present the first analyses of small mammal assemblages present in northern Patagonia during the last glacial maximum (LGM). Using remains obtained from owl pellets excavated from an archeological cave site (Arroyo Corral I, levels VII-V, carbon dates of 22,400-21,530 cal yr BP), we generate estimates of the minimum number of individuals for all species detected; these estimates, in turn are used to determine relative species abundances. Comparisons of these data with similar analyses of small mammal remains obtained from a second archeological site (ACoII, levels IV-V, carbon dates of 10,010-9220 cal yr BP) as well as from modern owl pellets reveal pronounced changes in relative species abundance since the LGM. In particular, Euneomys chinchilloides and Ctenomys sociabilis - the predominant species during the LGM - declined markedly, suggesting a change from open, bare habitat punctuated by patches of wet meadows and shrubs to the more densely vegetated mosaic of ecotone habitats found in this region today. These data provide important new insights into the environmental changes that have occurred in northern Patagonia over the last 20,000 years.

  14. Remote forcing at the Last Glacial Maximum in the Tropical Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreasen, Dyke H.; Ravelo, A. Christina; Broccoli, Anthony J.

    2001-01-01

    We present results of a Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) wind stress sensitivity experiment using a high-resolution ocean general circulation model of the tropical Pacific Ocean. LGM wind stress, used to drive the ocean model, was generated using an atmospheric general circulation model simulation forced by LGM boundary conditions as part of the Paleoclimate Modeling Intercomparison Project (PMIP) [Broccoli, 2000]. LGM wind stress anomalies were large in the western half of the basin, yet there was a significant hydrographic response in the eastern half. This ocean model experiment hind casts changes that are in close agreement with paleoceanographic data from the entire region, even without the explicit modeling of the air-sea interactions. Data and model both predict that the annual average thermocline tilt across the basin was enhanced. Data and model are consistent with a stronger equatorial undercurrent which shoaled to the west of where it does today, and stronger advection of water from the Peru Current into the east equatorial Pacific and across the equator. Paleoproductivity and sea surface temperature (SST) data are interpreted in light of the modeling results, indicating that paleoproductivity changes were related to wind-forced dynamical changes resulting from LGM boundary conditions, while SST changes were related to independent, possibly radiative, forcing. Overall, our results imply that much of the dynamic response of the tropical Pacific during the LGM can be explained by wind field changes resulting from global LGM boundary conditions.

  15. Range-wide genetic structure of maritime pine predates the last glacial maximum: evidence from nuclear DNA.

    PubMed

    Naydenov, Krassimir D; Alexandrov, Alexander; Matevski, Vlado; Vasilevski, Kole; Naydenov, Michel K; Gyuleva, Veselka; Carcaillet, Christopher; Wahid, Nadya; Kamary, Salim

    2014-02-01

    Using nuclear simple sequence repeats (nuSSRs), we determined the genetic variability in the natural distribution range of maritime pine (Pinus pinaster) in the western Mediterranean region. We analysed the role of global and significant climatic fluctuations in driving the evolutionary diversification of this species. We attempted to determine the impact of the last glacial maximum (LGM) and human activity on genetic variation and to identify the effect of bottlenecks, admixing, migration, time to the most recent common ancestor (TMRCA), and recent splits. A total of 972 individuals were analysed. The sample represented 27 natural populations from the western Mediterranean region, which encompasses most of the natural range of P. pinaster. Using eight nuSSRs, we analysed genetic diversity indices for each population and group of populations. We also examined the interpopulation structure by the frequency and distance method and investigated genetic barriers, signals of historical demographic fluctuations, phylogeographic structure, admixing, rate of mutation, migration, as well as testing the hypothesis of isolation by distance (IBD). Both cluster analyses showed similar population genetic structure with three genetic barriers that divided the samples into four large groups. Intensive migration was only detected during the period of the last glacial maximum (LGM), which permitted the mutation rate of the markers used to be calculated. The majority of the population was found to exhibit signs of a recent bottleneck and its timing showed a clear northeast-southwest geographic distribution. A clearly defined phylogeographic structure (Nst > Gst and Rst > Gst ) under IBD was established, and showed the highest divergence between groups of populations separated by physical barriers, such as the Strait of Gibraltar, the Mediterranean Sea and the Pyrenees. The high level of intergroup genetic differentiation (ΦIS = 20.26) was attributed to a long historical isolation

  16. Sensitivity of Photosynthetic Gas Exchange and Growth of Lodgepole Pine to Climate Variability Depends on the Age of Pleistocene Glacial Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osborn, B.; Chapple, W.; Ewers, B. E.; Williams, D. G.

    2014-12-01

    The interaction between soil conditions and climate variability plays a central role in the ecohydrological functions of montane conifer forests. Although soil moisture availability to trees is largely dependent on climate, the depth and texture of soil exerts a key secondary influence. Multiple Pleistocene glacial events have shaped the landscape of the central Rocky Mountains creating a patchwork of soils differing in age and textural classification. This mosaic of soil conditions impacts hydrological properties, and montane conifer forests potentially respond to climate variability quite differently depending on the age of glacial till and soil development. We hypothesized that the age of glacial till and associated soil textural changes exert strong control on growth and photosynthetic gas exchange of lodgepole pine. We examined physiological and growth responses of lodgepole pine to interannual variation in maximum annual snow water equivalence (SWEmax) of montane snowpack and growing season air temperature (Tair) and vapor pressure deficit (VPD) across a chronosequence of Pleistocene glacial tills ranging in age from 700k to 12k years. Soil textural differences across the glacial tills illustrate the varying degrees of weathering with the most well developed soils with highest clay content on the oldest till surfaces. We show that sensitivity of growth and carbon isotope discrimination, an integrated measure of canopy gas exchange properties, to interannual variation SWEmax , Tair and VPD is greatest on young till surfaces, whereas trees on old glacial tills with well-developed soils are mostly insensitive to these interannual climate fluctuations. Tree-ring widths were most sensitive to changes in SWEmax on young glacial tills (p < 0.01), and less sensitive on the oldest till (p < 0.05). Tair correlates strongly with δ13C values on the oldest and youngest tills sites, but shows no significant relationship on the middle aged glacial till. It is clear that

  17. Sea level and global ice volumes from the Last Glacial Maximum to the Holocene.

    PubMed

    Lambeck, Kurt; Rouby, Hélène; Purcell, Anthony; Sun, Yiying; Sambridge, Malcolm

    2014-10-28

    The major cause of sea-level change during ice ages is the exchange of water between ice and ocean and the planet's dynamic response to the changing surface load. Inversion of ∼1,000 observations for the past 35,000 y from localities far from former ice margins has provided new constraints on the fluctuation of ice volume in this interval. Key results are: (i) a rapid final fall in global sea level of ∼40 m in <2,000 y at the onset of the glacial maximum ∼30,000 y before present (30 ka BP); (ii) a slow fall to -134 m from 29 to 21 ka BP with a maximum grounded ice volume of ∼52 × 10(6) km(3) greater than today; (iii) after an initial short duration rapid rise and a short interval of near-constant sea level, the main phase of deglaciation occurred from ∼16.5 ka BP to ∼8.2 ka BP at an average rate of rise of 12 m⋅ka(-1) punctuated by periods of greater, particularly at 14.5-14.0 ka BP at ≥40 mm⋅y(-1) (MWP-1A), and lesser, from 12.5 to 11.5 ka BP (Younger Dryas), rates; (iv) no evidence for a global MWP-1B event at ∼11.3 ka BP; and (v) a progressive decrease in the rate of rise from 8.2 ka to ∼2.5 ka BP, after which ocean volumes remained nearly constant until the renewed sea-level rise at 100-150 y ago, with no evidence of oscillations exceeding ∼15-20 cm in time intervals ≥200 y from 6 to 0.15 ka BP. PMID:25313072

  18. Sea level and global ice volumes from the Last Glacial Maximum to the Holocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambeck, Kurt; Rouby, Hélène; Purcell, Anthony; Sun, Yiying; Sambridge, Malcolm

    2014-10-01

    The major cause of sea-level change during ice ages is the exchange of water between ice and ocean and the planet's dynamic response to the changing surface load. Inversion of ∼1,000 observations for the past 35,000 y from localities far from former ice margins has provided new constraints on the fluctuation of ice volume in this interval. Key results are: (i) a rapid final fall in global sea level of ∼40 m in <2,000 y at the onset of the glacial maximum ∼30,000 y before present (30 ka BP); (ii) a slow fall to -134 m from 29 to 21 ka BP with a maximum grounded ice volume of ∼52 × 106 km3 greater than today; (iii) after an initial short duration rapid rise and a short interval of near-constant sea level, the main phase of deglaciation occurred from ∼16.5 ka BP to ∼8.2 ka BP at an average rate of rise of 12 mṡka-1 punctuated by periods of greater, particularly at 14.5-14.0 ka BP at ≥40 mmṡy-1 (MWP-1A), and lesser, from 12.5 to 11.5 ka BP (Younger Dryas), rates; (iv) no evidence for a global MWP-1B event at ∼11.3 ka BP; and (v) a progressive decrease in the rate of rise from 8.2 ka to ∼2.5 ka BP, after which ocean volumes remained nearly constant until the renewed sea-level rise at 100-150 y ago, with no evidence of oscillations exceeding ∼15-20 cm in time intervals ≥200 y from 6 to 0.15 ka BP.

  19. Sea level and global ice volumes from the Last Glacial Maximum to the Holocene

    PubMed Central

    Lambeck, Kurt; Rouby, Hélène; Purcell, Anthony; Sun, Yiying; Sambridge, Malcolm

    2014-01-01

    The major cause of sea-level change during ice ages is the exchange of water between ice and ocean and the planet’s dynamic response to the changing surface load. Inversion of ∼1,000 observations for the past 35,000 y from localities far from former ice margins has provided new constraints on the fluctuation of ice volume in this interval. Key results are: (i) a rapid final fall in global sea level of ∼40 m in <2,000 y at the onset of the glacial maximum ∼30,000 y before present (30 ka BP); (ii) a slow fall to −134 m from 29 to 21 ka BP with a maximum grounded ice volume of ∼52 × 106 km3 greater than today; (iii) after an initial short duration rapid rise and a short interval of near-constant sea level, the main phase of deglaciation occurred from ∼16.5 ka BP to ∼8.2 ka BP at an average rate of rise of 12 m⋅ka−1 punctuated by periods of greater, particularly at 14.5–14.0 ka BP at ≥40 mm⋅y−1 (MWP-1A), and lesser, from 12.5 to 11.5 ka BP (Younger Dryas), rates; (iv) no evidence for a global MWP-1B event at ∼11.3 ka BP; and (v) a progressive decrease in the rate of rise from 8.2 ka to ∼2.5 ka BP, after which ocean volumes remained nearly constant until the renewed sea-level rise at 100–150 y ago, with no evidence of oscillations exceeding ∼15–20 cm in time intervals ≥200 y from 6 to 0.15 ka BP. PMID:25313072

  20. Early break-up of the Norwegian Channel Ice Stream during the Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svendsen, John Inge; Briner, Jason P.; Mangerud, Jan; Young, Nicolás E.

    2015-01-01

    We present 18 new cosmogenic 10Be exposure ages that constrain the breakup time of the Norwegian Channel Ice Stream (NCIS) and the initial retreat of the Scandinavian Ice Sheet from the Southwest coast of Norway following the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). Seven samples from glacially transported erratics on the island Utsira, located in the path of the NCIS about 400 km up-flow from the LGM ice front position, yielded an average 10Be age of 22.0 ± 2.0 ka. The distribution of the ages is skewed with the 4 youngest all within the range 20.2-20.8 ka. We place most confidence on this cluster of ages to constrain the timing of ice sheet retreat as we suspect the 3 oldest ages have some inheritance from a previous ice free period. Three additional ages from the adjacent island Karmøy provided an average age of 20.9 ± 0.7 ka, further supporting the new timing of retreat for the NCIS. The 10Be ages from Utsira and Karmøy suggest that the ice stream broke up about 2000 years earlier than the age assignment based on 14C ages on foraminifera and molluscs from marine sediment cores. We postulate that the Scandinavian Ice Sheet flowed across the Norwegian Channel to Denmark and onto the North Sea plateau during early phases of the LGM. When the NCIS started to operate this ice supply to the North Sea was cut off and the fast flow of the NCIS also led to a lowering of the ice surface along the Norwegian Channel and thereby drawdown of the entire ice sheet. This facilitated rapid calving of the ice front in the North Sea and we reconstruct a large open bay across the entire northern North Sea by ˜20 ka based on our 10Be ages in the east and radiocarbon ages from marine cores in the west. Additional 10Be ages show that the mainland slightly east of the islands Utsira and Karmøy remained ice covered until about 16 ka, indicating almost no net ice-margin retreat for the 4000 years between 20 and 16 ka. After 16 ka the ice margin retreated quickly up-fjord.

  1. Models and the paleo record of biome responses to glacial climate and CO2

    SciTech Connect

    Prentice; Colin, I.; Haxeltine

    1995-06-01

    Continental-scale reconstructions of the distribution of biomes at the last glacial maximum (LGM) indicate big changes, which can primarily be explained by climate. The climate was different from today mainly because of a combination of low concentrations of CO{sub 2} and other greenhouse gases and the presence of large continental ice sheets. Atmospheric general circulation model (AGCM) simulations, driven by these factors and linked to simple biome models in {open_quotes}diagnostic{close_quotes} mode, account for the broad outlines of the changes in vegetation patterns, including encroachment of C4 grasslands and savannas on what are now tropical forests. Physiological effects of low CO{sub 2} might also have played a role by altering the partitioning of precipitation to evapotranspiration and runoff, and altering the competitive balance of C3 and C4 plants. Such effects have not been quantified until recently, with the development of integrated biome/biochemistry models like those used in the VEMAP project. In these models, vegetation composition affects the coupled C and H{sub 2}O fluxes, which in turn influence the competitive balance of the constituent plant types. The relative importance of climatic and physiological effects of CO{sub 2} on biome distributions is a key issue for the future. This is gives added impetus to research that aims to exploit the potential of palaeo, data, through global data synthesis projects like BIOME 6000, to provide objective benchmarks against which to test models of the biosphere and climate.

  2. Satsurblia: New Insights of Human Response and Survival across the Last Glacial Maximum in the Southern Caucasus

    PubMed Central

    Pinhasi, Ron; Meshveliani, Tengiz; Matskevich, Zinovi; Bar-Oz, Guy; Weissbrod, Lior; Miller, Christopher E.; Wilkinson, Keith; Lordkipanidze, David; Jakeli, Nino; Kvavadze, Eliso; Higham, Thomas F. G.; Belfer-Cohen, Anna

    2014-01-01

    The region of western Georgia (Imereti) has been a major geographic corridor for human migrations during the Middle and Upper Palaeolithic (MP/UP). Knowledge of the MP and UP in this region, however, stems mostly from a small number of recent excavations at the sites of Ortvale Klde, Dzudzuana, Bondi, and Kotias Klde. These provide an absolute chronology for the Late MP and MP–UP transition, but only a partial perspective on the nature and timing of UP occupations, and limited data on how human groups in this region responded to the harsh climatic oscillations between 37,000–11,500 years before present. Here we report new UP archaeological sequences from fieldwork in Satsurblia cavein the same region. A series of living surfaces with combustion features, faunal remains, stone and bone tools, and ornaments provide new information about human occupations in this region (a) prior to the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) at 25.5–24.4 ka cal. BP and (b) after the LGM at 17.9–16.2 ka cal. BP. The latter provides new evidence in the southern Caucasus for human occupation immediately after the LGM. The results of the campaigns in Satsurblia and Dzudzuana suggest that at present the most plausible scenario is one of a hiatus in the occupation of this region during the LGM (between 24.4–17.9 ka cal. BP). Analysis of the living surfaces at Satsurblia offers information about human activities such as the production and utilisation of lithics and bone tools, butchering, cooking and consumption of meat and wild cereals, the utilisation of fibers, and the use of certain woods. Microfaunal and palynological analyses point to fluctuations in the climate with consequent shifts in vegetation and the faunal spectrum not only before and after the LGM, but also during the two millennia following the end of the LGM. PMID:25354048

  3. Satsurblia: new insights of human response and survival across the Last Glacial Maximum in the southern Caucasus.

    PubMed

    Pinhasi, Ron; Meshveliani, Tengiz; Matskevich, Zinovi; Bar-Oz, Guy; Weissbrod, Lior; Miller, Christopher E; Wilkinson, Keith; Lordkipanidze, David; Jakeli, Nino; Kvavadze, Eliso; Higham, Thomas F G; Belfer-Cohen, Anna

    2014-01-01

    The region of western Georgia (Imereti) has been a major geographic corridor for human migrations during the Middle and Upper Palaeolithic (MP/UP). Knowledge of the MP and UP in this region, however, stems mostly from a small number of recent excavations at the sites of Ortvale Klde, Dzudzuana, Bondi, and Kotias Klde. These provide an absolute chronology for the Late MP and MP-UP transition, but only a partial perspective on the nature and timing of UP occupations, and limited data on how human groups in this region responded to the harsh climatic oscillations between 37,000-11,500 years before present. Here we report new UP archaeological sequences from fieldwork in Satsurblia cavein the same region. A series of living surfaces with combustion features, faunal remains, stone and bone tools, and ornaments provide new information about human occupations in this region (a) prior to the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) at 25.5-24.4 ka cal. BP and (b) after the LGM at 17.9-16.2 ka cal. BP. The latter provides new evidence in the southern Caucasus for human occupation immediately after the LGM. The results of the campaigns in Satsurblia and Dzudzuana suggest that at present the most plausible scenario is one of a hiatus in the occupation of this region during the LGM (between 24.4-17.9 ka cal. BP). Analysis of the living surfaces at Satsurblia offers information about human activities such as the production and utilisation of lithics and bone tools, butchering, cooking and consumption of meat and wild cereals, the utilisation of fibers, and the use of certain woods. Microfaunal and palynological analyses point to fluctuations in the climate with consequent shifts in vegetation and the faunal spectrum not only before and after the LGM, but also during the two millennia following the end of the LGM. PMID:25354048

  4. The vegetation and climate during the Last Glacial Cold Period, northern South Island, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callard, S. Louise; Newnham, Rewi M.; Vandergoes, Marcus J.; Alloway, Brent V.; Smith, Carol

    2013-08-01

    Pollen assemblages from Howard Valley, South Island, New Zealand, were used to reconstruct the palaeovegetation and infer past climate during the period ca 38-21 cal. ka, which encompasses the Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 3/2 transition and Last Glacial Cold Period (LGCP). A glacier occupied the upper Howard Valley during the Last Glacial, whilst extensive glaciofluvial outwash surfaces were constructed in the lower valley. Episodic periods of fluvial aggradation and incision have produced a complex sequence of terraces flanking the main Howard River and its tributaries. Sedimentary sequences from three exposed valley fills, sampled for palynological analysis and radiocarbon dating, consist of a complex vertical and lateral arrangement of coarse textured cobbly sandy gravels interbedded with organic-rich silt deposits. Palynology of these organic-rich horizons was directly compared to an existing beetle record from these same horizons. During late MIS 3 the site was dominated by marshy shrubland vegetation interspersed with mixed beech forest, indicating temperatures ˜2-3 °C cooler than present. Climate cooling began as early as 35.7 cal. ka and coincides with evidence of cooling from other sites in New Zealand, South America and with an Antarctic cooling signature. A three phase vegetation and inferred climate pattern occurs at the site during the LGCP beginning with a transition to an alpine/sub-alpine grassland comparable to communities growing near treeline today marking the change to glacial conditions before 31 cal. ka. A small increase in tree abundance between ca 25.8 and 22.7 cal. ka suggests minor climate amelioration during the mid-LGCP. During this phase, a possible volcanically induced vegetation disruption caused by the deposition of the Kawakawa Tephra at 25 cal. ka is evident in the pollen record. This is followed by a further decline in tree pollen and increase in alpine grassland and herb pollen indicating further deterioration of conditions and a

  5. The last glacial-interglacial cycle in Lake Ohrid (Macedonia/Albania): testing diatom response to climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, J. M.; Cvetkoska, A.; Levkov, Z.; Vogel, H.; Wagner, B.

    2010-06-01

    Lake Ohrid is a site of global importance for palaeoclimate research. This study presents results of diatom analysis of a ca. 136 ka sequence, Co1202, from the northeast of the lake basin. It offers the opportunity to test diatom response across two glacial-interglacial transitions and within the Last Glacial, while setting up taxonomic protocols for future research. The results are outstanding in demonstrating the sensitivity of diatoms to climate change, providing proxy evidence for temperature change marked by glacial-interglacial shifts between the dominant planktonic taxa, Cyclotella fottii and C. ocellata, and exact correlation with geochemical proxies to mark the start of the Last Interglacial at ca. 130 ka. Importantly, diatoms show much stronger evidence in this site for warming during MIS3 than recorded in other productivity-related proxies, peaking at ca. 39 ka, prior to the extreme conditions of the Last Glacial maximum. In the light of the observed patterns, and from the results of analysis of early Holocene sediments from a second core, Lz1120, the lack of a response to Late Glacial and early Holocene warming from ca. 15-7.4 ka suggests the Co1202 sequence may be compromised during this phase. After ca. 7.4 ka, there is evidence for enhanced nutrient enrichment compared to the Last Interglacial, following by a post-Medieval cooling trend. Taxonomically, morphological variability in C. fottii shows no clear trends linked to climate, but an intriguing change in central area morphology occurs after ca. 48.7 ka, coincident with a tephra layer. In contrast, C. ocellata shows morphological variation in the number of ocelli between interglacials, suggesting climatically-forced variation or evolutionary selection pressure. The application of a simple dissolution index does not track preservation quality very effectively, underlining the importance of diatom concentration data in future studies.

  6. The last glacial-interglacial cycle in Lake Ohrid (Macedonia/Albania): testing diatom response to climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, J. M.; Cvetkoska, A.; Levkov, Z.; Vogel, H.; Wagner, B.

    2010-10-01

    Lake Ohrid is a site of global importance for palaeoclimate research. This study presents results of diatom analysis of a ca. 136 ka sequence, Co1202, from the northeast of the lake basin. It offers the opportunity to test diatom response across two glacial-interglacial transitions and within the Last Glacial, while setting up taxonomic protocols for future research. The results are outstanding in demonstrating the sensitivity of diatoms to climate change, providing proxy evidence for temperature change marked by glacial-interglacial shifts between the dominant planktonic taxa, Cyclotella fottii and C. ocellata, and exact correlation with geochemical proxies to mark the start of the Last Interglacial at ca. 130 ka. Importantly, diatoms show much stronger evidence in this site for warming during MIS3 than recorded in other productivity-related proxies, peaking at ca. 39 ka, prior to the extreme conditions of the Last Glacial maximum. In the light of the observed patterns, and from the results of analysis of early Holocene sediments from a second core, Lz1120, the lack of a response to Late Glacial and early Holocene warming from ca. 14.7-6.9 ka suggests the Co1202 sequence may be compromised during this phase. After ca. 7.4 ka, there is evidence for enhanced nutrient enrichment compared to the Last Interglacial, followed by a post-Medieval loss of diversity which is consistent with cooling, but not definitive. Taxonomically, morphological variability in C. fottii shows no clear trends linked to climate, but an intriguing change in central area morphology occurs after ca. 48.7 ka, coincident with a tephra layer. In contrast, C. ocellata shows morphological variation in the number of ocelli between interglacials, suggesting climatically-forced variation or evolutionary selection pressure. The application of a simple dissolution index does not track preservation quality very effectively, underlining the importance of diatom accumulation data in future studies.

  7. Antarctic sea ice control on ocean circulation in present and glacial climates.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, Raffaele; Jansen, Malte F; Adkins, Jess F; Burke, Andrea; Stewart, Andrew L; Thompson, Andrew F

    2014-06-17

    In the modern climate, the ocean below 2 km is mainly filled by waters sinking into the abyss around Antarctica and in the North Atlantic. Paleoproxies indicate that waters of North Atlantic origin were instead absent below 2 km at the Last Glacial Maximum, resulting in an expansion of the volume occupied by Antarctic origin waters. In this study we show that this rearrangement of deep water masses is dynamically linked to the expansion of summer sea ice around Antarctica. A simple theory further suggests that these deep waters only came to the surface under sea ice, which insulated them from atmospheric forcing, and were weakly mixed with overlying waters, thus being able to store carbon for long times. This unappreciated link between the expansion of sea ice and the appearance of a voluminous and insulated water mass may help quantify the ocean's role in regulating atmospheric carbon dioxide on glacial-interglacial timescales. Previous studies pointed to many independent changes in ocean physics to account for the observed swings in atmospheric carbon dioxide. Here it is shown that many of these changes are dynamically linked and therefore must co-occur. PMID:24889624

  8. Mean annual temperature in New Zealand during the last glacial maximum derived from dissolved noble gases in groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seltzer, A. M.; Stute, M.; Morgenstern, U.; Stewart, M. K.; Schaefer, J. M.

    2015-12-01

    This study presents a reconstruction of mean annual surface temperature in New Zealand over the last glacial period using groundwater noble gas paleothermometry. Low resolution 14C-derived mean recharge ages of groundwater from the Deep Moutere, Deep Wairau, and Taranaki aquifers range from roughly 41,500 yr to present, including the last glacial maximum (LGM). Modeled noble gas temperatures of probable glacial-age samples range from roughly 3.7-6.2 °C cooler than present. We present an error-weighted mean cooling of 4.6 ± 0.5°C relative to present during last glacial period. The screened depth intervals of some wells sampled in this study allow for a degree of mixing during extraction between groundwater layers of different recharge age. Mixing with modern groundwater may slightly elevate the noble gas temperatures (NGTs) of glacial-age samples while making them appear substantially younger. Given the uncertainty in dating, we cannot rule out a larger LGM temperature depression of up to ∼6 °C. The ∼4.6 °C cooling estimate agrees with a number of terrestrial paleoclimate reconstructions near the study area as well as the majority of nearby paleoceanographic temperature studies.

  9. Dynamics of the last glacial maximum Antarctic ice-sheet and its response to ocean forcing.

    PubMed

    Golledge, Nicholas R; Fogwill, Christopher J; Mackintosh, Andrew N; Buckley, Kevin M

    2012-10-01

    Retreat of the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) Antarctic ice sheet is thought to have been initiated by changes in ocean heat and eustatic sea level propagated from the Northern Hemisphere (NH) as northern ice sheets melted under rising atmospheric temperatures. The extent to which spatial variability in ice dynamics may have modulated the resultant pattern and timing of decay of the Antarctic ice sheet has so far received little attention, however, despite the growing recognition that dynamic effects account for a sizeable proportion of mass-balance changes observed in modern ice sheets. Here we use a 5-km resolution whole-continent numerical ice-sheet model to assess whether differences in the mechanisms governing ice sheet flow could account for discrepancies between geochronological studies in different parts of the continent. We first simulate the geometry and flow characteristics of an equilibrium LGM ice sheet, using pan-Antarctic terrestrial and marine geological data for constraint, then perturb the system with sea level and ocean heat flux increases to investigate ice-sheet vulnerability. Our results identify that fast-flowing glaciers in the eastern Weddell Sea, the Amundsen Sea, central Ross Sea, and in the Amery Trough respond most rapidly to ocean forcings, in agreement with empirical data. Most significantly, we find that although ocean warming and sea-level rise bring about mainly localized glacier acceleration, concomitant drawdown of ice from neighboring areas leads to widespread thinning of entire glacier catchments-a discovery that has important ramifications for the dynamic changes presently being observed in modern ice sheets. PMID:22988078

  10. Modeling the contribution of dissolved organic carbon to carbon sequestration during the last glacial maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Wentao; Tian, Jun

    2014-10-01

    Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) is a carbon reservoir that is as large as the atmospheric CO2 pool, and its contribution to the global carbon cycle is gaining attention. As DOC is a dissolved tracer, its distribution can serve to trace the mixing of water masses and the pathways of ocean circulation. Published proxy and model reconstructions have revealed that, during the last glacial maximum (LGM), the pattern of deep ocean circulation differed from that of the modern ocean, whereby additional carbon is assumed to have been sequestered in stratified LGM deep water. The aim of this study is to explore the distribution of DOC and its production/removal rate during the LGM using the Grid ENabled Integrated Earth system model (GENIE). Modeled results reveal that increased salinity of bottom waters in the Southern Ocean is associated with stronger stratification and oxygen depletion. The stratified LGM deep ocean traps more nutrients, resulting in a decrease in the DOC reservoir size that, in turn, causes a negative feedback for carbon sequestration. This finding requires an increase in DOC lifetime to compensate for the negative feedback. The upper limit of DOC lifetime is assumed to be 20,000 years. Modeled results derive an increase (decrease) in DOC reservoir by 100 Pg C leading to an atmospheric CO2 decrease (increase) of 9.1 ppm and a dissolved inorganic carbon δ13C increase (decrease) of 0.06‰. The DOC removal rate is estimated to be 39.5 Tg C year-1 in the deep sea during the LGM. The contribution of DOC to the LGM carbon cycle elucidates potential carbon sink-increasing strategies.

  11. Millennial climatic fluctuations are key to the structure of last glacial ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Huntley, Brian; Allen, Judy R M; Collingham, Yvonne C; Hickler, Thomas; Lister, Adrian M; Singarayer, Joy; Stuart, Anthony J; Sykes, Martin T; Valdes, Paul J

    2013-01-01

    Whereas fossil evidence indicates extensive treeless vegetation and diverse grazing megafauna in Europe and northern Asia during the last glacial, experiments combining vegetation models and climate models have to-date simulated widespread persistence of trees. Resolving this conflict is key to understanding both last glacial ecosystems and extinction of most of the mega-herbivores. Using a dynamic vegetation model (DVM) we explored the implications of the differing climatic conditions generated by a general circulation model (GCM) in "normal" and "hosing" experiments. Whilst the former approximate interstadial conditions, the latter, designed to mimic Heinrich Events, approximate stadial conditions. The "hosing" experiments gave simulated European vegetation much closer in composition to that inferred from fossil evidence than did the "normal" experiments. Given the short duration of interstadials, and the rate at which forest cover expanded during the late-glacial and early Holocene, our results demonstrate the importance of millennial variability in determining the character of last glacial ecosystems. PMID:23613985

  12. Rapid climate and environmental changes in the western Iberian Peninsula since the last glacial period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Etourneau, Johan; Kim, Jung-Hyun; Kang, Sujin; Oliveira, Dulce; Gal, Jong-Ku; Choi, Bohyung; Shin, Kyung-Hoon; Penaud, Aurélie; Fernanda Sanchez Goni, Maria

    2016-04-01

    The warm and saline Mediterranean Outflow Waters (MOW) affect density structure of the North Atlantic current, thereby altering the Atlantic Meridional Overturning circulation and thus global climate. Previous studies on southwestern European margin sequences have demonstrated their capability to reconstruct past changes in atmospheric and oceanic conditions at orbital and millennial time scales. However, the detailed evolution of the climate and environmental variability during the last climatic transition, especially during the last major abrupt climate events (e.g. the Dansgaard-Oeschger, Heinrich and 8.2 kyr events), is not well documented. Furthermore, the potential impact of changes in the Mediterranean Outflow Waters (MOW) on the North Atlantic and climate are far from being understood. Here we scrutinize changes in MOW over the last 25 kyrs by investigating sediment core MD99-2339 (35.89°N, 7.53°W, 1170 m water depth) collected in the Gulf of Cadiz. We analyzed alkenones (UK'37) to gain information on the sea surface temperatures. We also analyzed n-alkanes and their associated carbon (d13C) isotopes that we combined to pollen assemblages to reconstruct vegetation and humidity changes. We find that the cold alkenone-derived SST periods (Last Glacial Maximum (LGM), Younger Dryas (YD) and Heinrich Stadial 1 (HS1)) might be associated to a regional increase in the upwelling activity driven by stronger coastal off-shore winds that supply this area by cold deep waters. Stronger upwelling intensity may be linked to a greater export of MOW. In comparison, the d13C n-alkanes indicate drier conditions during HS1 and YD, and wetter conditions during the LGM and Holocene, which is opposite to the recorded precipitation signal by pollen assemblages. This inverse relationship suggest an opposite trend in seasonal precipitation (summer vs winter) which might imply a distinct forcing since the last glacial period. Alternatively, the signals of d13C n-alkanes might

  13. Last Glacial - Holocene climate variability in the Atlantic sector of the Southern Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Wenshen; Esper, Oliver; Gersonde, Rainer

    2016-03-01

    The Southern Ocean plays a major role in the glacial/interglacial global carbon cycle. However, there is a substantial lack of information from its Antarctic Zone south of the Polar Front (PF) to understand key climate processes (e.g., sea ice variability, productivity changes, CO2 source region, shifts of the Southern Westerly Wind) active in this region during the glacial/interglacial transition, due to the limited high-resolution sediment records from this area. To close this gap, we investigated high resolution diatom records from a series of sediment cores from the Atlantic and Western Indian sectors of the Southern Ocean between the modern PF and the Winter Sea Ice (WSI) edge. Summer Sea Surface Temperature (SSST) and sea ice information spanning the past 30 thousand years were derived from diatom transfer functions and indicators, which augment comprehensive information on past surface ocean conditions and related ocean and atmospheric circulation, as well as opal deposition. These complementary lines of evidences also provide important environmental boundary conditions for climate simulations understanding the past climate development in the high latitudes Southern Ocean. Our reconstructions show that the Last Glacial (LG) SSSTs south of the modern PF are 1-3 °C colder than modern conditions, WSI expanded to the modern PF. Our data suggests effective carbon export in the Antarctic Zone during the LG. Deglacial two steps of warming support the bipolar seesaw mechanism. Antarctic Zone is an important source region for the CO2 deglacial increase. The warming was more suppressed towards south, due to continuous ice discharge from Antarctica. The SSSTs exceeded modern values during the early Holocene optimum, when WSI extent probably retreated south of its modern position. The southern boundary of maximum opal deposition zone may have shifted to south of 55°S in the Bouvet Island area at this time. The mid-late Holocene cooling with WSI re-expanding to the

  14. Re-visiting Bonaparte Gulf: Assessment of Sea-Level Lowstand in the Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishiwa, T.; Yokoyama, Y.; Miyairi, Y.; Obrochta, S.; Sasaki, T.; Suzuki, A.; Ikehara, M.; Ikehara, K.; Kimoto, K.; Bourget, J.; Matsuzaki, H.

    2014-12-01

    The Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) is known as the period when ice volume reached its maximum and global temperature was lower than that of today. Accurate record of ice volume change requires relative sea-level reconstruction. Yokoyama et al. (2000) reported that the LGM terminated abruptly at 19 ka with a rapid rise (19 ka Event) using marine sediment cores from Bonaparte Gulf, Northwestern Australia. Although their reconstruction of the duration and magnitude of sea-level minima was confirmed to be reliable (cf. De Deckker and Yokoyama, 2009), relatively weaker evidence was presented for sea level during the time into the LGM. Partly because the number of their radiocarbon dates is insufficient to constrain the duration of LGM, thus further dating on sediment cores obtained from the key water depth (ca. 120m) is desired. Here we present the relative sea level record from Bonaparte Gulf using high-resolution radiocarbon dating. The result indicates that the duration of LGM is shorter than that from previous studies (cf, Yokoyama et al., 2000, Mix et al., 2001, Clark et al., 2009). Bonaparte Gulf is a far-field site located in a tectonically stable region. Consequently, this area is considered to be suitable for reconstructing accurate records of ice volume change. Using a marine sediment core (water depth: 120 m, length: 583 cm) taken from this region, we found the timing of LGM by reconstructing relative sea-level records. High-resolution radiocarbon dating of 23 shell samples and 26 bulk sediments is conducted to determine the precise relative sea-level records. Total organic carbon and total nitrogen as well as stable carbon isotope from bulk sediments are also employed for the paleo-environmental reconstruction caused by sea level change. Our result shows that the contributions from terrestrial organic matters were higher during the LGM than that for a sea-level highstand. This indicates that a sea-level lowstand occurred at ca. 21 ka and that ice volume in the

  15. Reconstructing paleosalinity from δ18O: Coupled model simulations of the Last Glacial Maximum, Last Interglacial and Late Holocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holloway, Max D.; Sime, Louise C.; Singarayer, Joy S.; Tindall, Julia C.; Valdes, Paul J.

    2016-01-01

    Reconstructions of salinity are used to diagnose changes in the hydrological cycle and ocean circulation. A widely used method of determining past salinity uses oxygen isotope (δOw) residuals after the extraction of the global ice volume and temperature components. This method relies on a constant relationship between δOw and salinity throughout time. Here we use the isotope-enabled fully coupled General Circulation Model (GCM) HadCM3 to test the application of spatially and time-independent relationships in the reconstruction of past ocean salinity. Simulations of the Late Holocene (LH), Last Glacial Maximum (LGM), and Last Interglacial (LIG) climates are performed and benchmarked against existing compilations of stable oxygen isotopes in carbonates (δOc), which primarily reflect δOw and temperature. We find that HadCM3 produces an accurate representation of the surface ocean δOc distribution for the LH and LGM. Our simulations show considerable variability in spatial and temporal δOw-salinity relationships. Spatial gradients are generally shallower but within ∼50% of the actual simulated LH to LGM and LH to LIG temporal gradients and temporal gradients calculated from multi-decadal variability are generally shallower than both spatial and actual simulated gradients. The largest sources of uncertainty in salinity reconstructions are found to be caused by changes in regional freshwater budgets, ocean circulation, and sea ice regimes. These can cause errors in salinity estimates exceeding 4 psu. Our results suggest that paleosalinity reconstructions in the South Atlantic, Indian and Tropical Pacific Oceans should be most robust, since these regions exhibit relatively constant δOw-salinity relationships across spatial and temporal scales. Largest uncertainties will affect North Atlantic and high latitude paleosalinity reconstructions. Finally, the results show that it is difficult to generate reliable salinity estimates for regions of dynamic oceanography

  16. Late glacial climate estimates for southern Nevada: The ostracode fossil record

    SciTech Connect

    Forester, R.M.; Smith, A.J.

    1995-10-01

    Climate change plays an important role in determining as possible long term hydrological performance of the potential high level nuclear waste repository within Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Present-day global circulation results in this region having an arid to semi-arid climate characterized by hot and relatively dry summers. Global circulation during the late glacial (about 14 to 20 ka) was very different from the present-day. Preliminary study of late-glacial fossil ostracodes from {open_quotes}marsh deposits{close_quotes} in the upper Las Vegas Valley suggests mean annual precipitation may have been four times higher, while mean annual temperature may have been about 10{degrees}C cooler than today. A major difference between present-day and late-glacial climate was likely the existence of cooler, cloudier, and wetter summers in the past.

  17. Abrupt Climate Change During the Last Glacial Cycle Based on Gulf of Mexico Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flower, B. P.; Hastings, D. W.; Hill, H.; Quinn, T. M.

    2003-12-01

    Evidence is emerging that the tropical climate system played a major role in past global climate change during the last glacial cycle. However, existing studies indicate asynchronous temperature variability in the western equatorial Atlantic, complicating the identification of causal mechanisms. Because the Gulf of Mexico (GOM) is linked to the equatorial Atlantic, sea-surface temperature (SST) records from the GOM help assess the phasing between low- and high-latitude Atlantic climate. High sedimentation rates of >40 cm/k.y. and laminated sediments in Orca Basin allow sub-centennial-scale resolution. Paired δ 18O and Mg/Ca data on the planktic foraminifer Globigerinoides ruber from core EN32-PC6 are used to separate deglacial changes in SST and δ 18Oseawater due to low-salinity meltwater from the Laurentide Ice Sheet (LIS). Mg-SST increases by >3.0° C between 17.2 and 15.2 ka (calendar years) encompassing Heinrich Event 1 in the North Atlantic. Comparison to polar ice core records indicates GOM SST was not in phase with Greenland air temperature, consistent with thermohaline circulation modulation of Atlantic climate. This warming represents the bulk of the 4.2+/-0.9° C increase from the last glacial maximum (24.0+/-0.8° C) to early Holocene (29.0+/-0.4° C). Subtracting temperature and ice-volume effects from Gs. ruber δ 18O reveals two episodes of LIS meltwater input, one of >1.5% from ca. 16.2-15.7 ka and a second major spike of >2% from ca. 15.2-13.0 ka that encompassed meltwater pulse 1A (mwp-1A) and peaked at ca. 13.4 ka. These results suggest that (1) subtropical Atlantic SST warming preceded peak LIS decay and mwp-1A by >2 k.y., (2) thermohaline circulation may have modulated Atlantic climate on the millennial scale during the last deglaciation, and (3) major LIS meltwater input to the GOM ended before North Atlantic Deep Water suppression during the Younger Dryas. A new 31.79 m Calypso piston core collected in July 2002 on the R/V Marion Dufresne

  18. Heinrich-type glacial surges in a low-order dynamical climate model

    SciTech Connect

    Verbitsky, M.; Saltzman, B.

    1994-07-01

    Recent studies suggest the occurrence of sporadic episodes during which the ice streams that discharge ice sheets become enormously active, producing large numbers of icebergs (reflected in North Atlantic sea cores as {open_quotes}Heinrich events{close_quotes}) and possibly causing the partial collapse of the ice sheets. To simulate the mechanism of implied internal thermo-hydrodynamical instability in the context of a more general paleoclimate dynamics model (PDM), a new sliding-catastrophe function that can account for ice-sheet surges in terms of the thickness, density, viscosity, heat-capacity. and heat-conductivity of ice is introduced. Analysis suggests these events might be of three possible kinds: the first occurs in periods of glacial maximum when temperature conditions on the ice surface are extremely cold, but internal friction within bottom boundary layer is also at its maximum and is strong enough to melt ice and cause its surge. The second may happen during an interglacial, when the ice thickness is small but relatively warm climate conditions on the upper surface of ice can be easily advected with the flow of ice to the bottom where even a small additional heating due to friction may cause melting. The third and, perhaps, most interesting type is one that may occur during ice sheet growth: in this period particles of ice reaching the bottom {open_quotes}remember{close_quotes} the warm temperature conditions of the previous interglacial and additional heating due to increasing friction associated with the growing ice sheet may again cause melting. This third introduces the interesting possibility that earlier CO{sub 2} concentrations may be as important for the present-day climate as its current value. According to our model the climate system seems more vulnerable to surges during the penultimate interglacial period than in present one contributing to an explanation of the recent results of the Greenland Ice Core Project. 18 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Rapid climate change and conditional instability of the glacial deep ocean from the thermobaric effect and geothermal heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adkins, Jess F.; Ingersoll, Andrew P.; Pasquero, Claudia

    2005-03-01

    Previous results from deep-sea pore fluid data demonstrate that the glacial deep ocean was filled with salty, cold water from the South. This salinity stratification of the ocean allows for the possible accumulation of geothermal heat in the deep-sea and could result in a water column with cold fresh water on top of warm salty water and with a corresponding increase in potential energy. For an idealized 4000 dbar two-layer water column, we calculate that there are ˜10 6 J/m 2 (˜0.2 J/kg) of potential energy available when a 0.4 psu salinity contrast is balanced by a ˜2 °C temperature difference. This salt-based storage of heat at depth is analogous to Convectively Available Potential Energy (CAPE) in the atmosphere. The "thermobaric effect" in the seawater equation of state can cause this potential energy to be released catastrophically. Because deep ocean stratification was dominated by salinity at the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM), the glacial climate is more sensitive to charging this "thermobaric capacitor" and can plausibly explain many aspects of the record of rapid climate change. Our mechanism could account for the grouping of Dansgaard/Oeschger events into Bond Cycles and for the different patterns of warming observed in ice cores from separate hemispheres.

  20. The hierarchical structure of glacial climatic oscillations: Interactions between ice-sheet dynamics and climate

    SciTech Connect

    Paillard, D.

    1995-04-01

    Abrupt climatic oscillations around the North Atlantic have been identified recently in Greenland ice cores as well as in North Atlantic marine sediment cores. The good correlation between the {open_quote}Dansgaard Oeschger events{close_quote} in the ice and the {open_quote}Heinrich events{close_quote} in the ocean suggests climate, in the North Atlantic region, underwent several massive reorganizations in the last glacial period. A characteristic feature seems to be their hierarchical structure. Every 7 to 10-thousand years, when the temperature is close to its minimum, the ice-sheet undergoes a massive iceberg discharge. This Heinrich event is followed by an abrupt warming. then by other oscillations, each lasting between one and two thousand years. These secondary oscillations do not have a clear signature in marine sediments but constitute most of the{open_quote} Dansgaard-Oeschger events{close_quote} found in the ice. A simplified model coupling an ice-sheet and an ocean basin, to illustrate how the interactions between these two components can lead to such a hierarchical structure. The ice-sheet model exhibits internal oscillations composed of growing phases and basal ice melting phases that induce massive iceberg discharges. These fresh water inputs in the ocean stop for a moment the thermohaline circulation, enhancing the temperature contrast between low- and high-latitudes. Just after this event, the thermohaline circulation restarts and an abrupt warming of high-latitude regions is observed. For some parameter values, these warmer temperatures have some influence on the ice-sheet, inducing secondary oscillations similar to those found in paleoclimatic records. Although the mechanism presented here may be too grossly simplified. it nevertheless underlines the potential importance of the coupling between ice-sheet dynamics and oceanic thermohaline circulation on the structure of the climatic records during the last glacial period. 33 refs., 14 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Younger Dryas glacial stillstands on the Bolivian Altiplano: pattern and climatic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Léo; Blard, Pierre-Henri; Lave, Jérôme; Premaillon, Melody; Charreau, Julien; Jomelli, Vincent; Brunstein, Daniel

    2014-05-01

    Modifications of the global climate during the last deglaciation have been characterized by regional reorganization that may have in turn amplified or attenuated the global changes. Notably, the respective influences of the Southern and Northern Hemispheres are poorly understood in the Tropics. This underlines the importance of studying past climate variations in the Tropics, particularly in the poorly documented tropical moutain areas. Cosmogenic exposure dating applied to the glacial landscapes provides temporal constraints on glacier fluctuations in response of climate variations. This permits high-resolution reconstructions of regional climates. In this work we present new cosmogenic ages from two different locations of the Bolivian Altiplano, the Nevado Sajama volcano (S18.11° - W66.88°) and the Zongo Valley (S16.25°- W68.11°). On the Sajama, new cosmogenic 3He dates support a late local glacial maximum, synchronous with the plaeolake Tauca highstand (ca. 16 ka) and contemporary to the north Atlantic Heinrich 1 (H1) event, with an equilibrium line altitude (ELA) at ca. 5200 m. Our data document also several recession episodes with the youngest one, characterized by an ELA of 5350 m, that seems to correspond to the Younger Dryas (YD) stadial (ca. 12 ka). In the Zongo valley, two recessional moraines have indistinguishable cosmogenic 10Be ages of ca. 17 ka, synchronous with the transgression of the Lake Tauca, with respective ELA of 4760 and 4640 m. Upstream, we identified an intermediate recessional moraine that could either be synchronous with Heinrich 1 or with the Antarctic Cold Reversal episode. Upward along the valley, a Younger Dryas stadial is clearly established by well-clustered cosmogenic 10Be ages, yielding a moraine age of ca. 12 ka, contemporary with the paleolake Coipasa highstand, with an ELA of 5000 m. These results confirm the sensitivity of South Hemisphere tropical glaciers to North Atlantic climate events, such as H1 or the YD. These

  2. Reconstructing ecological niches and geographic distributions of caribou ( Rangifer tarandus) and red deer ( Cervus elaphus) during the Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banks, William E.; d'Errico, Francesco; Peterson, A. Townsend; Kageyama, Masa; Colombeau, Guillaume

    2008-12-01

    A variety of approaches have been used to reconstruct glacial distributions of species, identify their environmental characteristics, and understand their influence on subsequent population expansions. Traditional methods, however, provide only rough estimates of past distributions, and are often unable to identify the ecological and geographic processes that shaped them. Recently, ecological niche modeling (ENM) methodologies have been applied to these questions in an effort to overcome such limitations. We apply ENM to the European faunal record of the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) to reconstruct ecological niches and potential ranges for caribou ( Rangifer tarandus) and red deer ( Cervus elaphus), and evaluate whether their LGM distributions resulted from tracking the geographic footprint of their ecological niches (niche conservatism) or if ecological niche shifts between the LGM and present might be implicated. Results indicate that the LGM geographic ranges of both species represent distributions characterized by niche conservatism, expressed through geographic contraction of the geographic footprints of their respective ecological niches.

  3. Similar millennial climate variability on the Iberian margin during two early Pleistocene glacials and MIS 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birner, B.; Hodell, D. A.; Tzedakis, P. C.; Skinner, L. C.

    2016-01-01

    Although millennial-scale climate variability (<10 ka) has been well studied during the last glacial cycles, little is known about this important aspect of climate in the early Pleistocene, prior to the Middle Pleistocene Transition. Here we present an early Pleistocene climate record at centennial resolution for two representative glacials (marine isotope stages (MIS) 37-41 from approximately 1235 to 1320 ka) during the "41 ka world" at Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Site U1385 (the "Shackleton Site") on the southwest Iberian margin. Millennial-scale climate variability was suppressed during interglacial periods (MIS 37, MIS 39, and MIS 41) and activated during glacial inceptions when benthic δ18O exceeded 3.2‰. Millennial variability during glacials MIS 38 and MIS 40 closely resembled Dansgaard-Oeschger events from the last glacial (MIS 3) in amplitude, shape, and pacing. The phasing of oxygen and carbon isotope variability is consistent with an active oceanic thermal bipolar see-saw between the Northern and Southern Hemispheres during most of the prominent stadials. Surface cooling was associated with systematic decreases in benthic carbon isotopes, indicating concomitant changes in the meridional overturning circulation. A comparison to other North Atlantic records of ice rafting during the early Pleistocene suggests that freshwater forcing, as proposed for the late Pleistocene, was involved in triggering or amplifying perturbations of the North Atlantic circulation that elicited a bipolar see-saw response. Our findings support similarities in the operation of the climate system occurring on millennial time scales before and after the Middle Pleistocene Transition despite the increases in global ice volume and duration of the glacial cycles.

  4. Changing climatic response: a conceptual model for glacial cycles and the Mid-Pleistocene Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daruka, I.; Ditlevsen, P. D.

    2014-03-01

    Milankovitch's astronomical theory of glacial cycles, attributing ice age climate oscillations to orbital changes in Northern Northern-Hemisphere insolation, is challenged by the paleoclimatic record. The climatic response to the variations in insolation is far from trivial. In general the glacial cycles are highly asymmetric in time, with slow cooling from the interglacials to the glacials (inceptions) and very rapid warming from the glacials to the interglacials (terminations). We shall refer to this fast-slow dynamics as the "saw-tooth" shape of the paleoclimatic record. This is non-linearly related to the time-symmetric variations in the orbital forcing. However, the most pronounced challenge to the Milankovitch theory is the Mid-Pleistocene Transition (MPT) occurring about one million years ago. During that event, the prevailing 41 kyr glacial cycles, corresponding to the almost harmonic obliquity cycle were replaced by longer saw-tooth shaped cycles with a time scale around 100 kyr. The MPT must have been driven by internal changes in climate response, since it does not correspond to any apparent changes in the orbital forcing. In order to identify possible mechanisms causing the observed changes in glacial dynamics, it is relevant to study simplified models with the capability of generating temporal behavior similar to the observed records. We present a simple oscillator type model approach, with two variables, a temperature anomaly and an ice volume analogous, climatic memory term. The generalization of the ice albedo feedback is included in terms of an effective multiplicative coupling between this latter climatic memory term (representing the internal degrees of freedom) and the external drive. The simple model reproduces the temporal asymmetry of the late Pleistocene glacial cycles and suggests that the MPT can be explained as a regime shift, aided by climatic noise, from a period 1 frequency locking to the obliquity cycle to a period 2-3 frequency

  5. Comparing Terrestrial Organic Carbon Cycle Dynamics in Interglacial and Glacial Climates in the South American Tropics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fornace, K. L.; Galy, V.; Hughen, K. A.

    2014-12-01

    The application of compound-specific radiocarbon dating to molecular biomarkers has allowed for tracking of specific organic carbon pools as they move through the environment, providing insight into complex processes within the global carbon cycle. Here we use this technique to investigate links between glacial-interglacial climate change and terrestrial organic carbon cycling in the catchments of Cariaco Basin and Lake Titicaca, two tropical South American sites with well-characterized climate histories since the last glacial period. By comparing radiocarbon ages of terrestrial biomarkers (leaf wax compounds) with deposition ages in late glacial and Holocene sediments, we are able to gauge the storage time of these compounds in the catchments in soils, floodplains, etc. before transport to marine or lacustrine sediments. We are also able to probe the effects of temperature and hydrologic change individually by taking advantage of opposite hydrologic trends at the two sites: while both were colder during the last glacial period, precipitation at Titicaca decreased from the last glacial period to the Holocene, but the late glacial was marked by drier conditions at Cariaco. Preliminary data from both sites show a wide range of apparent ages of long-chain n-fatty acids (within error of 0 to >10,000 years older than sediment), with the majority showing ages on the order of several millennia at time of deposition and age generally increasing with chain length. While late glacial leaf waxes appear to be older relative to sediment than those deposited in the Holocene at both sites, at Cariaco we find a ~2-3 times larger glacial-interglacial age difference than at Titicaca. We hypothesize that at Titicaca the competing influences of wetter and colder conditions during the last glacial period, which respectively tend to increase and decrease the rate of organic carbon turnover on land, served to minimize the contrast between glacial and interglacial leaf wax storage time

  6. Reversed North Atlantic subpolar gyre dynamics in present and glacial climates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montoya, M.; Born, A.; Levermann, A.

    2009-04-01

    The dynamics of the North Atlantic subpolar gyre (SPG) are assessed under present and glacial boundary conditions by investigating its sensitivity to surface wind-stress changes using an intermediate complexity coupled climate model. The SPG is found to be stronger in present than in glacial climates and shows an opposite sensitivity to wind-stress changes in both climates. While in the present it decreases with increasing surface wind-stress, in glacial times it rather increases. Both features result from density changes produced by wind-induced circulation changes. Our results suggest the existence of two dynamically distinct regimes of the SPG, depending on the absence or presence of deep water formation (DWF) in the Nordic Seas and a vigorous Greenland-Scotland ridge (GSR) overflow. In the first regime, the GSR overflow is weak and the SPG strength increases with the wind-stress as a result of a basin-scale reduction in stratification. As soon as a vigorous GSR overflow is established, its associated positive density anomalies in the southern GSR slope contribute to reduce the SPG strength. Our results have implications for past glacial abrupt climate changes, which are explained through latitudinal shifts in North Atlantic DWF sites and strengthening of the North Atlantic current. Regardless of the ultimate trigger, an abrupt shift of DWF into the Nordic Seas could result both in a drastic reduction of the SPG strength and a sudden change in its sensitivity to wind-stress variations.

  7. Variability of neodymium isotopes associated with planktonic foraminifera in the Pacific Ocean during the Holocene and Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Rong; Piotrowski, Alexander M.; Bostock, Helen C.; Crowhurst, Simon; Rennie, Victoria

    2016-08-01

    The deep Pacific Ocean holds the largest oceanic reservoir of carbon which may interchange with the atmosphere on climatologically important timescales. The circulation of the deep Pacific during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM), however, is not well understood. Neodymium (Nd) isotopes of ferromanganese oxide coatings precipitated on planktonic foraminifera are a valuable proxy for deep ocean water mass reconstruction in paleoceanography. In this study, we present Nd isotope compositions (εNd) of planktonic foraminifera for the Holocene and the LGM obtained from 55 new sites widely distributed in the Pacific Ocean. The Holocene planktonic foraminiferal εNd results agree with the proximal seawater data, indicating that they provide a reliable record of modern bottom water Nd isotopes in the deep Pacific. There is a good correlation between foraminiferal εNd and seawater phosphate concentrations (R2 = 0.80), but poorer correlation with silicate (R2 = 0.37). Our interpretation is that the radiogenic Nd isotope is added to the deep open Pacific through particle release from the upper ocean during deep water mass advection and aging. The data thus also imply the Nd isotopes in the Pacific are not likely to be controlled by silicate cycling. In the North Pacific, the glacial Nd isotopic compositions are similar to the Holocene values, indicating that the Nd isotope composition of North Pacific Deep Water (NPDW) remained constant (-3.5 to -4). During the LGM, the southwest Pacific cores throughout the water column show higher εNd corroborating previous studies which suggested a reduced inflow of North Atlantic Deep Water to the Pacific. However, the western equatorial Pacific deep water does not record a corresponding radiogenic excursion, implying reduced radiogenic boundary inputs during the LGM probably due to a shorter duration of seawater-particle interaction in a stronger glacial deep boundary current. A significant negative glacial εNd excursion is evident in

  8. Varied response of western Pacific hydrology to climate forcings over the last glacial period.

    PubMed

    Carolin, Stacy A; Cobb, Kim M; Adkins, Jess F; Clark, Brian; Conroy, Jessica L; Lejau, Syria; Malang, Jenny; Tuen, Andrew A

    2013-06-28

    Atmospheric deep convection in the west Pacific plays a key role in the global heat and moisture budgets, yet its response to orbital and abrupt climate change events is poorly resolved. Here, we present four absolutely dated, overlapping stalagmite oxygen isotopic records from northern Borneo that span most of the last glacial cycle. The records suggest that northern Borneo's hydroclimate shifted in phase with precessional forcing but was only weakly affected by glacial-interglacial changes in global climate boundary conditions. Regional convection likely decreased during Heinrich events, but other Northern Hemisphere abrupt climate change events are notably absent. The new records suggest that the deep tropical Pacific hydroclimate variability may have played an important role in shaping the global response to the largest abrupt climate change events. PMID:23744779

  9. Last Glacial Maximum sea surface temperature and sea-ice extent in the Pacific sector of the Southern Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benz, Verena; Esper, Oliver; Gersonde, Rainer; Lamy, Frank; Tiedemann, Ralf

    2016-08-01

    Sea surface temperatures and sea-ice extent are most critical variables to evaluate the Southern Ocean paleoceanographic evolution in relation to the development of the global carbon cycle, atmospheric CO2 and ocean-atmosphere circulation. Here we present diatom transfer function-based summer sea surface temperature (SSST) and winter sea-ice (WSI) estimates from the Pacific sector of the Southern Ocean to bridge a gap in information that has to date hampered a well-established reconstruction of the last glacial Southern Ocean at circum-Antarctic scale. We studied the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) at the EPILOG time slice (19,000-23,000 calendar years before present) in 17 cores and consolidated our LGM picture of the Pacific sector taking into account published data from its warmer regions. Our data display a distinct east-west differentiation with a rather stable WSI edge north of the Pacific-Antarctic Ridge in the Ross Sea sector and a more variable WSI extent over the Amundsen Abyssal Plain. The zone of maximum cooling (>4 K) during the LGM is in the present Subantarctic Zone and bounded to its south by the 4 °C isotherm. The isotherm is in the SSST range prevailing at the modern Antarctic Polar Front, representing a circum-Antarctic feature, and marks the northern edge of the glacial Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC). The northward deflection of colder than modern surface waters along the South American continent led to a significant cooling of the glacial Humboldt Current surface waters (4-8 K), which affected the temperature regimes as far north as tropical latitudes. The glacial reduction of ACC temperatures may also have resulted in significant cooling in the Atlantic and Indian Southern Ocean, thus enhancing thermal differentiation of the Southern Ocean and Antarctic continental cooling. The comparison with numerical temperature and sea-ice simulations yields discrepancies, especially concerning the estimates of the sea-ice fields, but some simulations

  10. Glacial Lake Agassiz: Its northwest maximum extent and outlet in Saskatchewan (Emerson Phase)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, Timothy G.; Smith, Derald G.

    Six different lines of evidence support the hypothesis that glacial Lake Agassiz expanded an additional 70,000 km2 over that previously mapped in northwestern Saskatchewan and that the lake discharged out the northwestern (Clearwater) outlet, then through glacial Lake McConnell and Mackenzie River to the Arctic Ocean. Elevations of formerly unmapped (1) strandlines and (2) glaciolacustrine sediments between the previously mapped northwest limit of Lake Agassiz and the Clearwater-lower Athabasca spillway indicate that water extended 170 km farther northwest. Recently, mapped strandlines at elevations up to 60 m above the previously mapped extent of Lake Agassiz can be traced along (3) isobases to the mouth of the spillway. Based upon (4) six radiocarbon dates recovered from spillway flood deposits in the Athabasca River valley and its late Pleistocene delta, the (5) Clearwater spillway was cut at 9.9 ka BP. This date is synchronous with the initiation of the Emerson Phase (9.9 ka BP) in the southern Lake Agassiz basin and (6) coincides with the position of the Laurentide Ice Sheet at the Cree Lake Moraine (10 ka BP) along the northern margin of the lake. Following closure of the eastern outlets at the onset of the Emerson Phase, Lake Agassiz transgressed toward the northwest into the deglaciated and isostatically depressed glacial foreland in the Churchill River valley to an elevation of 490 m, the pre-flood elevation of the Churchill-Mackenzie drainage divide at the head of the Clearwater-lower Athabasca spillway. The Beaver River Moraine (an earthen drainage divide) was breached, resulting in lowering Lake Agassiz 52 m to a stable elevation at 438 m. The lake discharged 21,000 km3 of water into the Arctic Ocean that raised global sea level by 6 cm.

  11. Evolution and modulation of tropical heating from the last glacial maximum through the twenty-first century

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoyos, Carlos D.; Webster, Peter J.

    2012-04-01

    Twentieth century observations show that during the last 50 years the sea-surface temperature (SST) of the tropical oceans has increased by ~0.5°C and the area of SST >26.5 and 28°C (arbitrarily referred to as the oceanic warm pool: OWP) by 15 and 50% respectively in association with an increase in green house gas concentrations, with non-understood natural variability or a combination of both. Based on CMIP3 projections the OWP is projected to double during twenty-first century in a moderate CO2 forcing scenario (IPCC A1B scenario). However, during the observational period the area of positive atmospheric heating (referred to as the dynamic warm pool, DWP), has remained constant. The threshold SST ( T H ), which demarks the region of net heating and cooling, has increased from 26.6°C in the 1950s to 27.1°C in the last decade and it is projected to increase to ~28.5°C by 2100. Based on climate model simulations, the area of the DWP is projected to remain constant during the twenty-first century. Analysis of the paleoclimate model intercomparison project (PMIP I and II) simulations for the Last Glacial maximum and the Mid-Holocene periods show a very similar behaviour, with a larger OWP in periods of elevated tropical SST, and an almost constant DWP associated with a varying T H . The constancy of the DWP area, despite shifts in the background SST, is shown to be the result of a near exact matching between increases in the integrated convective heating within the DWP and the integrated radiative cooling outside the DWP as SST changes. Although the area of the DWP remains constant, the total tropical atmospheric heating is a strong function of the SST. For example the net heating has increased by about 10% from 1950 to 2000 and it is projected to increase by a further 20% by 2100. Such changes must be compensated by a more vigorous atmospheric circulation, with growth in convective heating within the warm pool, and an increase of subsiding air and stability

  12. Late Glacial and Early Holocene Climatic Changes Based on a Multiproxy Lacustrine Sediment Record from Northeast Siberia

    SciTech Connect

    Kokorowski, H D; Anderson, P M; Sletten, R S; Lozhkin, A V; Brown, T A

    2008-05-20

    Palynological (species assemblage, pollen accumulation rate), geochemical (carbon to nitrogen ratios, organic carbon and biogenic silica content), and sedimentological (particle size, magnetic susceptibility) data combined with improved chronology and greater sampling resolution from a new core from Elikchan 4 Lake provide a stronger basis for defining paleoenvironmental changes than was previously possible. Persistence of herb-dominated tundra, slow expansion of Betula and Alnus shrubs, and low percentages of organic carbon and biogenic silica suggest that the Late-Glacial transition (ca. 16,000-11,000 cal. yr BP) was a period of gradual rather than abrupt vegetation and climatic change. Consistency of all Late-Glacial data indicates no Younger Dryas climatic oscillation. A dramatic peak in pollen accumulation rates (ca. 11,000-9800 cal. yr BP) suggests a possible summer temperature optimum, but finer grain-sizes, low magnetic susceptibility, and greater organic carbon and biogenic silica, while showing significant warming at ca. 11,000 cal. yr BP, offer no evidence of a Holocene thermal maximum. When compared to trends in other paleo-records, the new Elikchan data underscore the apparent spatial complexity of climatic responses in Northeast Siberia to global forcings between ca. 16,000-9000 cal. yr BP.

  13. High-resolution regional paleoclimate simulations of Lake Bonneville and its influence on geomorphic processes in the Uinta Mountains during the Last Glacial Maximum (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galewsky, J.

    2013-12-01

    Reconstructed equilibrium line altitudes (ELAs) for alpine glaciers in the Uinta Mountains at the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) increase with distance from the shoreline of pluvial Lake Bonneville, an effect that has been linked at least in part to enhanced precipitation derived from Lake Bonneville. While this result is broadly consistent with relatively large-scale climate modeling studies, the precise meteorological mechanisms by which Lake Bonneville may have influenced the glacial geomorphology of the Uinta Mountains remain poorly understood. New, high resolution (4km grid spacing) quasi-idealized regional paeoclimate simulations of the LGM computed with the Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) model provide new insights into these processes. Preliminary results indicate that moisture derived from Lake Bonneville likely would not have exerted a significant impact on regional precipitation unless the lake temperature exceeded about 4 degrees C. However, an ice-free Lake Bonneville would have likely exerted a modest (at least 1-2C) local warming, with associated impacts on precipitation and snowpack development. While the overall snowfall amounts do not appear to be greatly affected by the presence of a cold, ice-free lake, the presence of such a lake does appear to influence precipitation extremes throughout the region. These results suggest that the local temperature influence of pluvial lakes on regional glaciation may be of similar magnitude to the effects of enhanced evaporation from those lakes.

  14. The permafrost glacial hypothesis: Is permafrost carbon the black box between insolation forcing and global climate?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zech, R.

    2012-04-01

    Global climate is tightly correlated with and controlled by the amount of CO2 in the atmosphere, and both show frequencies of orbital insolation on glacial-interglacial timescales. However, the 'black box', i.e. the mechanisms that control atmospheric CO2 and climate, remain enigmatic. Soil organic carbon pools in northern permafrost regions have long been extremely underestimated and may exceed 1670 Pg - more than twice the atmospheric carbon pool. The reason for this large 'permafrost carbon' storage is that cold and waterlogging conditions are favorable for the preservation of soil organic matter, which more than compensates for low biomass productivity. Recent findings of increasing CO2 and methane emissions from warming and thawing permafrost ecosystems have fueled concerns about strong positive climate feedbacks, but the potential role of permafrost carbon dynamics for atmospheric CO2 levels and global climate on glacial-interglacial timescales has largely been ignored. I propose a conceptual model - the permafrost glacial hypothesis - to explain the rhythm of the Pleistocene ice ages based on the strong positive climate feedback related to insolation-driven permafrost carbon dynamics: 1. Obliquity is the dominant mean annual insolation signal at high latitudes, and obliquity forcing of permafrost carbon dynamics can thus readily help explaining the '40 ka world', i.e. the pronounced 40 ka cyclicity of the ice ages, during the early Pleistocene. 2. The long-term Pleistocene cooling trend led to an expansion of permafrost areas to lower (~45°N) latitudes at ~1 Ma. Here, integrated annual insolation is no longer controlled by obliquity, but by eccentricity. As a consequence, obliquity cycles (glacial terminations) were skipped, unless they coincided with increasing eccentricity, resulting in ~80 or 120 ka glacial cycles and marking the Mid-Pleistocene Transition. The characteristic saw-tooth pattern of the ~100 ka ice ages during the Late and Middle

  15. Offshore Extent of the Iceland Ice Cap During the Last Glacial Maximum Inferred from Multibeam Bathymetric Data and Sediment Cores.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helgadottir, G.; Brandsdottir, B.; Geirsdottir, A.; Björnsson, H.

    2005-12-01

    The insular margin of Iceland is incised by several major troughs, which mark the pathways of outlet glaciers during the last glaciations. Multibeam bathymetric data have revealed features of glacial erosion and sedimentation pertinent to the extent of the Iceland ice cap during the Last Glacial Maximum. Marginal moraines have been identified at the southern, western and northwestern edge of the insular margin. Furthermore, glacial erosion and sedimentation along the Kolbeinsey Ridge, North Iceland, indicates that the Iceland ice cap extended beyond 67°30'N. The ridge axis is made up of various types of seamounts, crater rows and hummocky ridges whereas older seamounts have been sculptured into roche moutonnées by glacial erosion. The far extent of the ice cap to the north is also supported by sediment studies on cores that have been retrieved from the troughs on the northern and northwestern part of the insular margin. Numerous smaller moraines exist closer to land marking stepwise retreat of the ice cap during deglacial times. Such moraines have been identified at 400-500 m depth within a 3-6 km wide, U-shaped valley along the western margin of the Kolbeinsey ridge (at 66°55'N) and within many of the costal fjords. Many of the offshore features resemble those known from land, such as streamlined bedrock features elongated in the regional direction of ice flow, eskers and subglacial meltwater channels together with erosional channels possibly formed by jökulhlaups. Extensive number of ice plough marks are revealed on bank areas and landslides on the marginal slope. Fluted surfaces and subglacially formed meltwater channels suggest formation underneath fast flowing, warm-based ice streams. These newly identified glacial features reveal new information on the spatial extent, dynamics and retreat of the Iceland ice cap during the last glaciation and deglaciation. Eustatic and isostatic contributions can be predicted from models of ice sheets and mantle rheology

  16. The role of Southern Ocean winds and CO2 in glacial abrupt climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banderas, R.; Alvarez-Solas, J.; Montoya, M.

    2011-12-01

    The last glacial period (ca. 110-10 kyr before present, hereafter kyr BP) is characterized by substantial climate instability, manifested as climatic variability on millennial timescales. Two types of events dominate this variability: Dansgaard-Oeschger (DO) events, which involve decadal-scale warming by more than 10K, and Heinrich events, massive iceberg discharges from the Laurentide Ice Sheet at intervals of ca. 10 kyr during peak glacial conditions. Both DO and Heinrich events are associated with widespread centennial to millennial scale climatic changes, including a synchronous temperature response over the North Atlantic and an anti-phase temperature relationship over Antarctica and most of the Southern Ocean, as revealed by a wealth of deep sea sediments and terrestrial record. Recent studies indicate CO2 changes during deglaciation and, possibly, during glacial abrupt climate changes were preceded by significant increases of Southern Ocean upwelling caused by an enhancement and/or a shift of surface winds over that region. The proposed hypothesis is that periods of halted or reduced North Atlantic deep water (NADW) formation resulted in warming of the Southern Ocean through the bipolar see-saw effect leading to a reorganization of Southern Hemisphere (SH) surface winds, and thereby enhanced upwelling and atmospheric CO2 concentrations. Here, the role of SH surface wind and CO2 changes in the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (MOC) is analyzed in a coupled climate model of intermediate complexity. We investigate whether changes in the former could eventually trigger an intensification of the Atlantic overturning circulation and a northward shift of NADW formation, which would allow to explain glacial abrupt climate changes as the result of an oscillation which involves the MOC, CO2 and the winds.

  17. Invertebrate Metacommunity Structure and Dynamics in an Andean Glacial Stream Network Facing Climate Change

    PubMed Central

    Cauvy-Fraunié, Sophie; Espinosa, Rodrigo; Andino, Patricio; Jacobsen, Dean; Dangles, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    Under the ongoing climate change, understanding the mechanisms structuring the spatial distribution of aquatic species in glacial stream networks is of critical importance to predict the response of aquatic biodiversity in the face of glacier melting. In this study, we propose to use metacommunity theory as a conceptual framework to better understand how river network structure influences the spatial organization of aquatic communities in glacierized catchments. At 51 stream sites in an Andean glacierized catchment (Ecuador), we sampled benthic macroinvertebrates, measured physico-chemical and food resource conditions, and calculated geographical, altitudinal and glaciality distances among all sites. Using partial redundancy analysis, we partitioned community variation to evaluate the relative strength of environmental conditions (e.g., glaciality, food resource) vs. spatial processes (e.g., overland, watercourse, and downstream directional dispersal) in organizing the aquatic metacommunity. Results revealed that both environmental and spatial variables significantly explained community variation among sites. Among all environmental variables, the glacial influence component best explained community variation. Overland spatial variables based on geographical and altitudinal distances significantly affected community variation. Watercourse spatial variables based on glaciality distances had a unique significant effect on community variation. Within alpine catchment, glacial meltwater affects macroinvertebrate metacommunity structure in many ways. Indeed, the harsh environmental conditions characterizing glacial influence not only constitute the primary environmental filter but also, limit water-borne macroinvertebrate dispersal. Therefore, glacier runoff acts as an aquatic dispersal barrier, isolating species in headwater streams, and preventing non-adapted species to colonize throughout the entire stream network. Under a scenario of glacier runoff decrease, we

  18. Invertebrate Metacommunity Structure and Dynamics in an Andean Glacial Stream Network Facing Climate Change.

    PubMed

    Cauvy-Fraunié, Sophie; Espinosa, Rodrigo; Andino, Patricio; Jacobsen, Dean; Dangles, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    Under the ongoing climate change, understanding the mechanisms structuring the spatial distribution of aquatic species in glacial stream networks is of critical importance to predict the response of aquatic biodiversity in the face of glacier melting. In this study, we propose to use metacommunity theory as a conceptual framework to better understand how river network structure influences the spatial organization of aquatic communities in glacierized catchments. At 51 stream sites in an Andean glacierized catchment (Ecuador), we sampled benthic macroinvertebrates, measured physico-chemical and food resource conditions, and calculated geographical, altitudinal and glaciality distances among all sites. Using partial redundancy analysis, we partitioned community variation to evaluate the relative strength of environmental conditions (e.g., glaciality, food resource) vs. spatial processes (e.g., overland, watercourse, and downstream directional dispersal) in organizing the aquatic metacommunity. Results revealed that both environmental and spatial variables significantly explained community variation among sites. Among all environmental variables, the glacial influence component best explained community variation. Overland spatial variables based on geographical and altitudinal distances significantly affected community variation. Watercourse spatial variables based on glaciality distances had a unique significant effect on community variation. Within alpine catchment, glacial meltwater affects macroinvertebrate metacommunity structure in many ways. Indeed, the harsh environmental conditions characterizing glacial influence not only constitute the primary environmental filter but also, limit water-borne macroinvertebrate dispersal. Therefore, glacier runoff acts as an aquatic dispersal barrier, isolating species in headwater streams, and preventing non-adapted species to colonize throughout the entire stream network. Under a scenario of glacier runoff decrease, we

  19. High-elevation amplification of warming since the Last Glacial Maximum in East Africa: New perspectives from biomarker paleotemperature reconstructions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loomis, S. E.; Russell, J. M.; Kelly, M. A.; Eggermont, H.; Verschuren, D.

    2013-12-01

    Tropical lapse rate variability on glacial/interglacial time scales has been hotly debated since the publication of CLIMAP in 1976. Low-elevation paleotemperature reconstructions from the tropics have repeatedly shown less warming from the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) to present than reconstructions from high elevations, leading to widespread difficulty in estimating the true LGM-present temperature change in the tropics. This debate is further complicated by the fact that most paleotemperature estimates from high elevations in the tropics are derived from pollen- and moraine-based reconstructions of altitudinal shifts in vegetation belts and glacial equilibrium line altitudes (ELAs). These traditional approaches rely on the assumption that lapse rates have remained constant through time. However, this assumption is problematic in the case of the LGM, when pervasive tropical aridity most likely led to substantial changes in lapse rates. Glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraethers (GDGTs) can be used to reconstruct paleotemperatures independent of hydrological changes, making them the ideal proxy to reconstruct high elevation temperature change and assess lapse rate variability through time. Here we present two new equatorial paleotemperature records from high elevations in East Africa (Lake Rutundu, Mt. Kenya and Lake Mahoma, Rwenzori Mountains, Uganda) based on branched GDGTs. Our record from Lake Rutundu shows deglacial warming starting near 17 ka and a mid-Holocene thermal maximum near 5 ka. The overall amplitude of warming in the Lake Rutundu record is 6.8×1.0°C from the LGM to the present, with mid-Holocene temperatures 1.6×0.9°C warmer than modern. Our record from Lake Mahoma extends back to 7 ka and shows similar temperature trends to our record from Lake Rutundu, indicating similar temporal resolution of high-elevation temperature change throughout the region. Combining these new records with three previously published GDGT temperature records from different

  20. Reconstructing paleo-ocean silicon chemistry and ecology during Last Glacial Maximum, a biogeochemical cycle modeling approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, D. D.; Lerman, A.; Mackenzie, F. T.

    2012-12-01

    It has been established by a number of investigators that opal content and Si-C isotope studies in the marine sediments reveal information about paleooceanography and the impact on silicic acid utilization by marine autotrophes (diatoms, silicoflagellates) and heterotrophes (radiolarians) during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). Opal, as an amorphous form of SiO2, formed by marine Si-secreting organisms, has been used as a proxy to indicate chemical ocean evolution, paleoproductivity and temperature variations in the paleoenvironment and regional ocean water biogeochemical studies, both on million- and thousand-year scales. Here, we are using a model of the global silicon biogeochemical cycle to understand and reconstruct evolutionary history of the paleobiogeochemical cycle and paleoenvironment since LGM. The model is process-driven, temperature-driven, and land-ocean-sediment coupled with specific marine Si-secreting organisms that represent different trophic levels and physiological mechanisms. Specifically, Si utilization by marine silicoflagellates and radiolarians are each about 5% of that of ubiquitous marine diatoms. Available marine reactive Si is controlled by variation of diatom bioproduction that represents 5% of the total marine primary productivity (Si/C Redfield ratio in the marine organic matter is ~0.13, which is an order of magnitude higher than ratio in land organic matter). River input of Si is controlled by chemical weathering of silicate rocks and biocyling of land plant phytoliths. Decreasing dissolved and particulate Si input from land and less favorable climatic condition into LGM diminished the primary production of marine diatoms. However, because radiolarians favor deep-water habitat, where a higher level of DSi is found and that is less affected by temperature changes, a peak of relative abundance is usually observed in sedimentary record during LGM. Given that opal formation fractionated seawater δ30Si (1‰) and enriched seawater with

  1. Millennial-scale trends in west Pacific warm pool hydrology since the Last Glacial Maximum.

    PubMed

    Partin, Judson W; Cobb, Kim M; Adkins, Jess F; Clark, Brian; Fernandez, Diego P

    2007-09-27

    Models and palaeoclimate data suggest that the tropical Pacific climate system plays a key part in the mechanisms underlying orbital-scale and abrupt climate change. Atmospheric convection over the western tropical Pacific is a major source of heat and moisture to extratropical regions, and may therefore influence the global climate response to a variety of forcing factors. The response of tropical Pacific convection to changes in global climate boundary conditions, abrupt climate changes and radiative forcing remains uncertain, however. Here we present three absolutely dated oxygen isotope records from stalagmites in northern Borneo that reflect changes in west Pacific warm pool hydrology over the past 27,000 years. Our results suggest that convection over the western tropical Pacific weakened 18,000-20,000 years ago, as tropical Pacific and Antarctic temperatures began to rise during the early stages of deglaciation. Convective activity, as inferred from oxygen isotopes, reached a minimum during Heinrich event 1 (ref. 10), when the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation was weak, pointing to feedbacks between the strength of the overturning circulation and tropical Pacific hydrology. There is no evidence of the Younger Dryas event in the stalagmite records, however, suggesting that different mechanisms operated during these two abrupt deglacial climate events. During the Holocene epoch, convective activity appears to track changes in spring and autumn insolation, highlighting the sensitivity of tropical Pacific convection to external radiative forcing. Together, these findings demonstrate that the tropical Pacific hydrological cycle is sensitive to high-latitude climate processes in both hemispheres, as well as to external radiative forcing, and that it may have a central role in abrupt climate change events. PMID:17898765

  2. Polar Climate Connections of the Last Glacial Period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, X.; Rial, J. A.

    2015-12-01

    Ever since the cross-core chronology became available, the connection between the Earth's polar regions - or the lack of such [Wunsch, 2003; 2006] - has been an on-going debate in the paleoclimate community. While the inverse relationship inferred from the bipolar seesaw model [Crowley, 1992] could not account for the difference in signal shape of the polar records, integration/differentiation (I/D) has been proposed as the linkage between them [Schmittner et al., 2003; Huybers, 2004; Roe and Steig, 2004; Schmittner et al., 2004]. Stoker and Johnsen [2003] have proposed a revised (thermal) bipolar seesaw model (TBS), demonstrating that the climate record from Antarctic is that of the Greenland convolved with an exponential decaying function, which represents the heat reservoir of the Southern Ocean. More recently, Rial [2012] has proposed phase synchronization (PS) as the polar climate connection from which polar climate records can be treated approximately as a Hilbert transform pair. All three models (I/D, TBS, and PS) have been used to reconstruct past climate of the north from the longer climate record of the south [Siddall et al., 2006; Barker et al., 2011; Oh et al., 2014]. However, no comparison has been made to test and analyze these models against one another for their performance and stabilities. Here we investigated the aforementioned models with polar climate data on the recent AICC2012 chronology to derive the similarities and differences among them in both time and frequency domains. Most importantly we discussed how such differences translate to the discrepancies in reconstructions of the northern climate and possible physical mechanism(s) of connection each model limits and allows. ReferencesBarker et al., 2011, Science, 334(6054), 347-351. Crowley, 1992, Paleoceanography, 7(4), 489-497. Huybers, 2004, QSR, 23(1-2), 207-210. Oh et al., 2014, QSR, 83, 129-142. Rial, 2012, Am J Sci, 312(4), 417-448. Roe & Steig, 2004, Journal of Climate, 17(10), 1929

  3. Was millennial scale climate change during the Last Glacial triggered by explosive volcanism?

    PubMed Central

    Baldini, James U.L.; Brown, Richard J.; McElwaine, Jim N.

    2015-01-01

    The mechanisms responsible for millennial scale climate change within glacial time intervals are equivocal. Here we show that all eight known radiometrically-dated Tambora-sized or larger NH eruptions over the interval 30 to 80 ka BP are associated with abrupt Greenland cooling (>95% confidence). Additionally, previous research reported a strong statistical correlation between the timing of Southern Hemisphere volcanism and Dansgaard-Oeschger (DO) events (>99% confidence), but did not identify a causative mechanism. Volcanic aerosol-induced asymmetrical hemispheric cooling over the last few hundred years restructured atmospheric circulation in a similar fashion as that associated with Last Glacial millennial-scale shifts (albeit on a smaller scale). We hypothesise that following both recent and Last Glacial NH eruptions, volcanogenic sulphate injections into the stratosphere cooled the NH preferentially, inducing a hemispheric temperature asymmetry that shifted atmospheric circulation cells southward. This resulted in Greenland cooling, Antarctic warming, and a southward shifted ITCZ. However, during the Last Glacial, the initial eruption-induced climate response was prolonged by NH glacier and sea ice expansion, increased NH albedo, AMOC weakening, more NH cooling, and a consequent positive feedback. Conversely, preferential SH cooling following large SH eruptions shifted atmospheric circulation to the north, resulting in the characteristic features of DO events. PMID:26616338

  4. Was millennial scale climate change during the Last Glacial triggered by explosive volcanism?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldini, James U. L.; Brown, Richard J.; McElwaine, Jim N.

    2015-11-01

    The mechanisms responsible for millennial scale climate change within glacial time intervals are equivocal. Here we show that all eight known radiometrically-dated Tambora-sized or larger NH eruptions over the interval 30 to 80 ka BP are associated with abrupt Greenland cooling (>95% confidence). Additionally, previous research reported a strong statistical correlation between the timing of Southern Hemisphere volcanism and Dansgaard-Oeschger (DO) events (>99% confidence), but did not identify a causative mechanism. Volcanic aerosol-induced asymmetrical hemispheric cooling over the last few hundred years restructured atmospheric circulation in a similar fashion as that associated with Last Glacial millennial-scale shifts (albeit on a smaller scale). We hypothesise that following both recent and Last Glacial NH eruptions, volcanogenic sulphate injections into the stratosphere cooled the NH preferentially, inducing a hemispheric temperature asymmetry that shifted atmospheric circulation cells southward. This resulted in Greenland cooling, Antarctic warming, and a southward shifted ITCZ. However, during the Last Glacial, the initial eruption-induced climate response was prolonged by NH glacier and sea ice expansion, increased NH albedo, AMOC weakening, more NH cooling, and a consequent positive feedback. Conversely, preferential SH cooling following large SH eruptions shifted atmospheric circulation to the north, resulting in the characteristic features of DO events.

  5. Millennial Climatic Fluctuations Are Key to the Structure of Last Glacial Ecosystems

    PubMed Central

    Huntley, Brian; Allen, Judy R. M.; Collingham, Yvonne C.; Hickler, Thomas; Lister, Adrian M.; Singarayer, Joy; Stuart, Anthony J.; Sykes, Martin T.; Valdes, Paul J.

    2013-01-01

    Whereas fossil evidence indicates extensive treeless vegetation and diverse grazing megafauna in Europe and northern Asia during the last glacial, experiments combining vegetation models and climate models have to-date simulated widespread persistence of trees. Resolving this conflict is key to understanding both last glacial ecosystems and extinction of most of the mega-herbivores. Using a dynamic vegetation model (DVM) we explored the implications of the differing climatic conditions generated by a general circulation model (GCM) in “normal” and “hosing” experiments. Whilst the former approximate interstadial conditions, the latter, designed to mimic Heinrich Events, approximate stadial conditions. The “hosing” experiments gave simulated European vegetation much closer in composition to that inferred from fossil evidence than did the “normal” experiments. Given the short duration of interstadials, and the rate at which forest cover expanded during the late-glacial and early Holocene, our results demonstrate the importance of millennial variability in determining the character of last glacial ecosystems. PMID:23613985

  6. Approach to estimating the maximum depth for glacially induced hydraulic jacking in fractured crystalline rock at Forsmark, Sweden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lönnqvist, M.; Hökmark, H.

    2013-09-01

    Hydraulic jacking is a significant dilation of a fracture that occurs when the pore pressure within it exceeds the sum of the fracture's normal stress and tensile strength. This phenomenon may occur during a glacial period because of changes in hydraulic and mechanical boundary conditions. Since hydraulic jacking may alter flow patterns and the transport capacity of the rock mass, its possible effects on the long-term performance of a nuclear waste repository should be considered. We develop an approach to assess glacially induced hydraulic jacking in fractured crystalline rock and establish bounding estimates of the maximum jacking depth for the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company's (SKB) repository site at Forsmark. The pore pressure is estimated using mechanically uncoupled two-dimensional poroelastic continuum models with hydraulic and mechanical conditions based on SKB's reconstruction of the Weichselian glaciation at this site (120-0 ka B.P.). For warm-based conditions, the water pressure at the ice/bed interface is set at 98% of the mechanical load, whereas for glacial conditions with extensive proglacial permafrost, the corresponding water pressure is set at a (lower) annual average value. We demonstrate that the pore pressure within the uppermost kilometer of rock is mainly governed by the water pressure at the ice/bed interface and that the mechanical impact of the ice load on the pore pressure is sufficiently small to be ignored. Given the current and estimated future stress conditions at Forsmark, hydraulic jacking is mainly of concern for subhorizontal fractures, i.e., it is sufficient to consider situations when the pore pressure exceeds the vertical stress. We conclude that hydraulic jacking at Forsmark will be confined to the uppermost 200 m of the rock mass.

  7. Analysis of the global atmospheric methane budget using ECHAM-MOZ simulations for present-day, pre-industrial time and the Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, A.; Schultz, M. G.; Schröder, S.; Francois, L.; Zhang, X.; Lohmann, G.; Laepple, T.

    2014-01-01

    Atmospheric methane concentrations increased considerably from pre-industrial (PI) to present times largely due to anthropogenic emissions. However, firn and ice core records also document a notable rise of methane levels between the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) and the pre-industrial era, the exact cause of which is not entirely clear. This study investigates these changes by analyzing the methane sources and sinks at each of these climatic periods. Wetlands are the largest natural source of methane and play a key role in determining methane budget changes in particular in the absence of anthropogenic sources. Here, a simple wetland parameterization suitable for coarse-scale climate simulations over long periods is introduced, which is derived from a high-resolution map of surface slopes together with various soil hydrology parameters from the CARAIB vegetation model. This parameterization was implemented in the chemistry general circulation model ECHAM5-MOZ and multi-year time slices were run for LGM, PI and present-day (PD) climate conditions. Global wetland emissions from our parameterization are 72 Tg yr-1 (LGM), 115 Tg yr-1 (PI), and 132 Tg yr-1 (PD). These estimates are lower than most previous studies, and we find a stronger increase of methane emissions between LGM and PI. Taking into account recent findings that suggest more stable OH concentrations than assumed in previous studies, the observed methane distributions are nevertheless well reproduced under the different climates. Hence, this is one of the first studies where a consistent model approach has been successfully applied for simulating methane concentrations over a wide range of climate conditions.

  8. Genetic Signals of Demographic Expansion in Downy Woodpecker (Picoides pubescens) after the Last North American Glacial Maximum

    PubMed Central

    Pulgarín-R, Paulo C.; Burg, Theresa M.

    2012-01-01

    The glacial cycles of the Pleistocene have been recognized as important, large-scale historical processes that strongly influenced the demographic patterns and genetic structure of many species. Here we present evidence of a postglacial expansion for the Downy Woodpecker (Picoides pubescens), a common member of the forest bird communities in North America with a continental distribution. DNA sequences from the mitochondrial tRNA-Lys, and ATPase 6 and 8 genes, and microsatellite data from seven variable loci were combined with a species distribution model (SDM) to infer possible historical scenarios for this species after the last glacial maximum. Analyses of Downy Woodpeckers from 23 geographic areas suggested little differentiation, shallow genealogical relationships, and limited population structure across the species’ range. Microsatellites, which have higher resolution and are able to detect recent differences, revealed two geographic groups where populations along the eastern edge of the Rocky Mountains (Montana, Utah, Colorado, and southern Alberta) were genetically isolated from the rest of the sampled populations. Mitochondrial DNA, an important marker to detect historical patterns, recovered only one group. However, populations in Idaho and southeast BC contained high haplotype diversity and, in general were characterized by the absence of the most common mtDNA haplotype. The SDM suggested several areas in the southern US as containing suitable Downy Woodpecker habitat during the LGM. The lack of considerable geographic structure and the starburst haplotype network, combined with several population genetic tests, suggest a scenario of demographic expansion during the last part of Pleistocene and early Holocene. PMID:22792306

  9. Simulating soil organic carbon in yedoma deposits during the Last Glacial Maximum in a land surface model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, D.; Peng, S.; Ciais, P.; Zech, R.; Krinner, G.; Zimov, S.; Grosse, G.

    2016-05-01

    Substantial quantities of organic carbon (OC) are stored in the thick, ice-rich, and organic-rich sediments called yedoma deposits, distributed in eastern Siberia and Alaska today. Quantifying yedoma carbon stocks during the glacial period is important for understanding how much carbon could have been decomposed during the last deglaciation. Yet processes that yield the formation of thick frozen OC in yedoma deposits are missing in global carbon cycle models. Here we incorporate sedimentation parameterizations into the Organizing Carbon and Hydrology In Dynamic Ecosystems (ORCHIDEE-MICT) land surface model, which leads to reasonable results in OC vertical distribution and regional budgets, compared with site-specific observations and inventories for today's nondegraded yedoma region. Simulated total soil OC stock for the northern permafrost region during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) is 1536-1592 Pg C, of which 390-446 Pg C is within today's yedoma region. This result is an underestimation since we did not account for the potentially much larger yedoma area during the LGM than the present day.

  10. Glacial morphology in the Chinese Pamir: Connections among climate, erosion, topography, lithology and exhumation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoenbohm, Lindsay M.; Chen, Jie; Stutz, Jamey; Sobel, Edward R.; Thiede, Rasmus C.; Kirby, Benjamin; Strecker, Manfred R.

    2014-09-01

    Modification of the landscape by glacial erosion reflects the dynamic interplay of climate through temperature, precipitation, and prevailing wind direction, and tectonics through rock uplift and exhumation rate, lithology, and range and fault geometry. We investigate these relationships in the northeast Pamir Mountains using mapping and dating of moraines and terraces to determine the glacial history. We analyze modern glacial morphology to determine glacier area, spacing, headwall relief, debris cover, and equilibrium line altitude (ELA) using the area x altitude balance ratio (AABR), toe-to-headwall altitude ratio (THAR) and toe-to-summit altitude method (TSAM) for 156 glaciers and compare this to lithologic, tectonic, and climatic data. We observe a pronounced asymmetry in glacial ELA, area, debris cover, and headwall relief that we interpret to reflect both structural and climatic control: glaciers on the downwind (eastern) side of the range are larger, more debris covered, have steeper headwalls, and tend to erode headward, truncating the smaller glaciers of the upwind, fault-controlled side of the range. We explain this by the transfer of moisture deep into the range as wind-blown or avalanched snow and by limitations imposed on glacial area on the upwind side of the range by the geometry of the Kongur extensional system (KES). The correspondence between rapid exhumation along the KES and maxima in glacier debris cover and headwall relief and minimums in all measures of ELA suggest that taller glacier headwalls develop in a response to more rapid exhumation rates. However, we find that glaciers in the Muji valley did not extend beyond the range front until at least 43 ka, in contrast to extensive glaciation since 300 ka in the south around the high peaks, a pattern which does not clearly reflect uplift rate. Instead, the difference in glacial history and the presence of large peaks (Muztagh Ata and Kongur Shan) with flanking glaciers likely reflects

  11. Simulation of glacial ocean biogeochemical tracer and isotope distributions based on the PMIP3 suite of climate models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khatiwala, Samar; Muglia, Juan; Kvale, Karin; Schmittner, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    In the present climate system, buoyancy forced convection at high-latitudes together with internal mixing results in a vigorous overturning circulation whose major component is North Atlantic Deep Water. One of the key questions of climate science is whether this "mode" of circulation persisted during glacial periods, and in particular at the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM; 21000 years before present). Resolving this question is both important for advancing our understanding of the climate system, as well as a critical test of numerical models' ability to reliably simulate different climates. The observational evidence, based on interpreting geochemical tracers archived in sediments, is conflicting, as are simulations carried out with state-of-the-art climate models (e.g., as part of the PMIP3 suite), which, due to the computational cost involved, do not by and large include biogeochemical and isotope tracers that can be directly compared with proxy data. Here, we apply geochemical observations to evaluate the ability of several realisations of an ocean model driven by atmospheric forcing from the PMIP3 suite of climate models to simulate global ocean circulation during the LGM. This results in a wide range of circulation states that are then used to simulate biogeochemical tracer and isotope (13C, 14C and Pa/Th) distributions using an efficient, "offline" computational scheme known as the transport matrix method (TMM). One of the key advantages of this approach is the use of a uniform set of biogeochemical and isotope parameterizations across all the different circulations based on the PMIP3 models. We compare these simulated distributions to both modern observations and data from LGM ocean sediments to identify similarities and discrepancies between model and data. We find, for example, that when the ocean model is forced with wind stress from the PMIP3 models the radiocarbon age of the deep ocean is systematically younger compared with reconstructions. Changes in

  12. Deep circulation changes in the South Atlantic since the Last Glacial Maximum from Nd isotope and multi-proxy records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, R.; Abouchami, W.; Zahn, R.; Masque, P.

    2016-01-01

    We report down-core sedimentary Nd isotope (εNd) records from two South Atlantic sediment cores, MD02-2594 and GeoB3603-2, located on the western South African continental margin. The core sites are positioned downstream of the present-day flow path of North Atlantic Deep Water (NADW) and close to the Southern Ocean, which makes them suitable for reconstructing past variability in NADW circulation over the last glacial cycle. The Fe-Mn leachates εNd records show a coherent decreasing trend from glacial radiogenic values towards less radiogenic values during the Holocene. This trend is confirmed by εNd in fish debris and mixed planktonic foraminifera, albeit with an offset during the Holocene to lower values relative to the leachates, matching the present-day composition of NADW in the Cape Basin. We interpret the εNd changes as reflecting the glacial shoaling of Southern Ocean waters to shallower depths combined with the admixing of southward flowing Northern Component Water (NCW). A compilation of Atlantic εNd records reveals increasing radiogenic isotope signatures towards the south and with increasing depth. This signal is most prominent during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) and of similar amplitude across the Atlantic basin, suggesting continuous deep water production in the North Atlantic and export to the South Atlantic and the Southern Ocean. The amplitude of the εNd change from the LGM to Holocene is largest in the southernmost cores, implying a greater sensitivity to the deglacial strengthening of NADW at these sites. This signal impacted most prominently the South Atlantic deep and bottom water layers that were particularly deprived of NCW during the LGM. The εNd variations correlate with changes in 231Pa/230Th ratios and benthic δ13C across the deglacial transition. Together with the contrasting 231Pa/230Th: εNd pattern of the North and South Atlantic, this indicates a progressive reorganization of the AMOC to full strength during the Holocene.

  13. Imaging Evidence for Hubbard Glacier Advances and Retreats since the Last Glacial Maximum in Disenchantment and Yakutat Bays, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zurbuchen, J.; Gulick, S. P.; Levoir, M. A.; Goff, J. A.; Haeussler, P. J.

    2013-12-01

    confirms at least two of these advances to be during the Holocene while the oldest may represent the Last Glacial Maximum. The most recent advance likely reached its terminal position at the mouth of Disenchantment Bay, never entering Yakutat Bay. Our interpretation suggests that the Hubbard Glacier has repeatedly advanced around the east side of Yakutat Bay in Knight Island Channel, possibly due to the presence of Malaspina Glacier cutting off access to the central Yakutat Bay during a time of mutual advance. Within the range of the seismic data available for the area, it seems unlikely that the Hubbard Glacier fills all of Yakutat Bay when it advances.

  14. Role of the Bering Strait on the hysteresis of the ocean conveyor belt circulation and glacial climate stability.

    PubMed

    Hu, Aixue; Meehl, Gerald A; Han, Weiqing; Timmermann, Axel; Otto-Bliesner, Bette; Liu, Zhengyu; Washington, Warren M; Large, William; Abe-Ouchi, Ayako; Kimoto, Masahide; Lambeck, Kurt; Wu, Bingyi

    2012-04-24

    Abrupt climate transitions, known as Dansgaard-Oeschger and Heinrich events, occurred frequently during the last glacial period, specifically from 80-11 thousand years before present, but were nearly absent during interglacial periods and the early stages of glacial periods, when major ice-sheets were still forming. Here we show, with a fully coupled state-of-the-art climate model, that closing the Bering Strait and preventing its throughflow between the Pacific and Arctic Oceans during the glacial period can lead to the emergence of stronger hysteresis behavior of the ocean conveyor belt circulation to create conditions that are conducive to triggering abrupt climate transitions. Hence, it is argued that even for greenhouse warming, abrupt climate transitions similar to those in the last glacial time are unlikely to occur as the Bering Strait remains open. PMID:22493225

  15. Climate change and evolving human diversity in Europe during the last glacial.

    PubMed Central

    Gamble, Clive; Davies, William; Pettitt, Paul; Richards, Martin

    2004-01-01

    A link between climate change and human evolution during the Pleistocene has often been assumed but rarely tested. At the macro-evolutionary level Foley showed for hominids that extinction, rather than speciation, correlates with environmental change as recorded in the deep sea record. Our aim is to examine this finding at a smaller scale and with high-resolution environmental and archaeological archives. Our interest is in changing patterns of human dispersal under shifting Pleistocene climates during the last glacial period in Europe. Selecting this time frame and region allows us to observe how two hominid taxa, Neanderthals and Crô-Magnons, adapted to climatic conditions during oxygen isotope stage 3. These taxa are representative of two hominid adaptive radiations, termed terrestrial and aquatic, which exhibited different habitat preferences but similar tolerances to climatic factors. Their response to changing ecological conditions was predicated upon their ability to extend their societies in space and time. We examine this difference further using a database of all available radiocarbon determinations from western Europe in the late glacial. These data act as proxies for population history, and in particular the expansion and contraction of regional populations as climate changed rapidly. Independent assessment of these processes is obtained from the genetic history of Europeans. The results indicate that climate affects population contraction rather than expansion. We discuss the consequences for genetic and cultural diversity which led to the legacy of the Ice Age: a single hominid species, globally distributed. PMID:15101580

  16. Migration of the subtropical front as a modulator of glacial climate.

    PubMed

    Bard, Edouard; Rickaby, Rosalind E M

    2009-07-16

    Ice cores extracted from the Antarctic ice sheet suggest that glacial conditions, and the relationship between isotopically derived temperatures and atmospheric PCO(2) have been constant over the last 800,000 years of the Late Pleistocene epoch. But independent lines of evidence, such as the extent of Northern Hemisphere ice sheets, sea level and other temperature records, point towards a fluctuating severity of glacial periods, particularly during the more extreme glacial stadials centred around 340,000 and 420,000 years ago (marine isotope stages 10 and 12). Previously unidentified mechanisms therefore appear to have mediated the relationship between insolation, CO(2) and climate. Here we test whether northward migration of the subtropical front (STF) off the southeastern coast of South Africa acts as a gatekeeper for the Agulhas current, which controls the transport of heat and salt from the Indo-Pacific Ocean to the Atlantic Ocean. Using a new 800,000-year record of sea surface temperature and ocean productivity from ocean sediment core MD962077, we demonstrate that during cold stadials (particularly marine isotope stages 10 and 12), productivity peaked and sea surface temperature was up to 6 degrees C cooler than modern temperatures. This suggests that during these cooler stadials, the STF moved northward by up to 7 degrees latitude, nearly shutting off the Agulhas current. Our results, combined with faunal assemblages from the south Atlantic show that variable northwards migration of the Southern Hemisphere STF can modulate the severity of each glacial period by altering the strength of the Agulhas current carrying heat and salt to the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation. We show hence that the degree of northwards migration of the STF can partially decouple global climate from atmospheric partial pressure of carbon dioxide, P CO(2), and help to resolve the long-standing puzzle of differing glacial amplitudes within a consistent range of atmospheric

  17. Abrupt climate and vegetation variability of eastern Anatolia during the last glacial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pickarski, N.; Kwiecien, O.; Langgut, D.; Litt, T.

    2015-11-01

    Detailed analyses of the Lake Van pollen, Ca / K ratio, and stable oxygen isotope record allow the identification of millennial-scale vegetation and environmental changes in eastern Anatolia throughout the last glacial (~ 111.5-11.7 ka BP). The climate of the last glacial was cold and dry, indicated by low arboreal pollen (AP) levels. The driest and coldest period corresponds to Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 2 (~ 28-14.5 ka BP), which was dominated by highest values of xerophytic steppe vegetation. Our high-resolution multi-proxy record shows rapid expansions and contractions of tree populations that reflect variability in temperature and moisture availability. These rapid vegetation and environmental changes can be related to the stadial-interstadial pattern of Dansgaard-Oeschger (DO) events as recorded in the Greenland ice cores. Periods of reduced moisture availability were characterized by enhanced occurrence of xerophytic species and high terrigenous input from the Lake Van catchment area. Furthermore, the comparison with the marine realm reveals that the complex atmosphere-ocean interaction can be explained by the strength and position of the westerlies, which are responsible for the supply of humidity in eastern Anatolia. Influenced by the diverse topography of the Lake Van catchment, more pronounced DO interstadials (e.g., DO 19, 17-16, 14, 12 and 8) show the strongest expansion of temperate species within the last glacial. However, Heinrich events (HE), characterized by highest concentrations of ice-rafted debris (IRD) in marine sediments, cannot be separated from other DO stadials based on the vegetation composition in eastern Anatolia. In addition, this work is a first attempt to establish a continuous microscopic charcoal record for the last glacial in the Near East. It documents an immediate response to millennial-scale climate and environmental variability and enables us to shed light on the history of fire activity during the last glacial.

  18. Stable isotopes of fossil teeth corroborate key general circulation model predictions for the Last Glacial Maximum in North America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohn, Matthew J.; McKay, Moriah

    2010-11-01

    Oxygen isotope data provide a key test of general circulation models (GCMs) for the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) in North America, which have otherwise proved difficult to validate. High δ18O pedogenic carbonates in central Wyoming have been interpreted to indicate increased summer precipitation sourced from the Gulf of Mexico. Here we show that tooth enamel δ18O of large mammals, which is strongly correlated with local water and precipitation δ18O, is lower during the LGM in Wyoming, not higher. Similar data from Texas, California, Florida and Arizona indicate higher δ18O values than in the Holocene, which is also predicted by GCMs. Tooth enamel data closely validate some recent models of atmospheric circulation and precipitation δ18O, including an increase in the proportion of winter precipitation for central North America, and summer precipitation in the southern US, but suggest aridity can bias pedogenic carbonate δ18O values significantly.

  19. Vegetation and climate changes in western Amazonia during a previous Interglacial- Glacial transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardenas, M. L.; Gosling, W. D.; Sherlock, S. C.; Poole, I.; Pennington, R. T.

    2009-12-01

    Amazonia is one of the most biodiverse areas of the world and its vegetation plays a crucial role in controlling the global climate through the regulation of the levels of atmospheric CO2. However, Amazonian ecosystems and their role in the climate system are threatened by ongoing the human impact (already estimated loss of 60% of the species in western Amazonia) and predicted climate change (+1.1-6.4oC by 2100). Unfortunately, there is absence of data relating to the ecological baseline function and response to global climate change of western Amazonian ecosystems in the absence of humans. To help anticipate the impact of future climate change predictions an improved understanding of the natural responses of tropical vegetation to known past climate change is required. Here we present the first study that shows the response of pristine tropical ecosystems in western Amazonia biodiversity hotspot to a major global climate change event (a Quaternary Interglacial-Glacial transition). Pleistocene lake/swamp sediments preserved at the Erazo study site (Lat. 00o 33’S, Long. 077o 52’W, 1927m alt.) today within tropical cloud forest vegetation provide a unique opportunity to examine the impact of past climate shifts. The sediment are >40,000 years old (radiocarbon infinite) and younger than 1 million years (presence of Alder biomarker) and consist of organic layers interbedded with volcanic ash (tephra). This study presents data from multiple proxies (fossil pollen, wood macrofossils and charcoal) to establish a comprehensive picture of regional and local vegetation change prior to human arrival. Our data show a change of vegetation from palm-dominated forest indicative of warm and wet conditions similar to the present at the base of this record, to a forest dominated by Podocarpus sp. suggesting cold and wet conditions at the top of the record. The transition between these two vegetation communities appears to be progressive with small sharp changes along the

  20. Orbital control of western North America atmospheric circulation and climate over two glacial cycles.

    PubMed

    Lachniet, Matthew S; Denniston, Rhawn F; Asmerom, Yemane; Polyak, Victor J

    2014-01-01

    The now arid Great Basin of western North America hosted expansive late Quaternary pluvial lakes, yet the climate forcings that sustained large ice age hydrologic variations remain controversial. Here we present a 175,000 year oxygen isotope record from precisely-dated speleothems that documents a previously unrecognized and highly sensitive link between Great Basin climate and orbital forcing. Our data match the phasing and amplitudes of 65°N summer insolation, including the classic saw-tooth pattern of global ice volume and on-time terminations. Together with the observation of cold conditions during the marine isotope substage 5d glacial inception, our data document a strong precessional-scale Milankovitch forcing of southwestern paleoclimate. Because the expansion of pluvial lakes was associated with cold glacial conditions, the reappearance of large lakes in the Great Basin is unlikely until ca. 55,000 years into the future as climate remains in a mild non-glacial state over the next half eccentricity cycle. PMID:24787456

  1. Orbital control of western North America atmospheric circulation and climate over two glacial cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lachniet, Matthew S.; Denniston, Rhawn F.; Asmerom, Yemane; Polyak, Victor J.

    2014-05-01

    The now arid Great Basin of western North America hosted expansive late Quaternary pluvial lakes, yet the climate forcings that sustained large ice age hydrologic variations remain controversial. Here we present a 175,000 year oxygen isotope record from precisely-dated speleothems that documents a previously unrecognized and highly sensitive link between Great Basin climate and orbital forcing. Our data match the phasing and amplitudes of 65°N summer insolation, including the classic saw-tooth pattern of global ice volume and on-time terminations. Together with the observation of cold conditions during the marine isotope substage 5d glacial inception, our data document a strong precessional-scale Milankovitch forcing of southwestern paleoclimate. Because the expansion of pluvial lakes was associated with cold glacial conditions, the reappearance of large lakes in the Great Basin is unlikely until ca. 55,000 years into the future as climate remains in a mild non-glacial state over the next half eccentricity cycle.

  2. Deep lakes in the Polar Urals - unique archives for reconstructing the Quaternary climate and glacial history in the Russian Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svendsen, J.; Gyllencreutz, R.; Henriksen, M.; Lohne, O. S.; Mangerud, J.; Nazarov, D.

    2009-12-01

    A lake coring campaign in the Polar Urals is carried out within the framework of the Norwegian-Russian IPY-project “The Ice Age Development and Human Settlement in Northern Eurasia” (ICEHUS). The overall aim of the project is to improve the description and understanding of the Late Quaternary environmental and climate changes in the Russian Arctic and how these changes may have affected the early human occupation. In order to obtain a continuous record of climate variability back in time seismic records and sediment cores have been collected from selected mountain lakes. The summer of 2009 we cored two lakes situated near the water shed in the interior northernmost Urals. Seismic profiles show that both these glacially eroded basins contain thick sequences of Quaternary sediments. The thickest strata were found in Bolshoye Shuchye, the largest and deepest lake in the Ural Mountains. This lake is 13 km long and 140 m deep and contains more than 130 m of acoustically laminated sediments. These strata probably accumulated over a rather long time span, possibly covering several interglacial-glacial cycles. Up to 24 m long cores were obtained from the lake floors. We anticipate that they will provide unique high resolution records of the climate and glacial history during the last Ice Age. The seismic records and the sediment cores will form a well-founded basis for assessing the potential and possibilities to core also the deeper strata that could not be reached with the applied coring equipment. In view of the obtained results from the investigated basins, as well as other geological and geochronological data from the surrounding areas, we find it highly unlikely that any glaciers extended into these lakes during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM), supporting our current hypothesis that the local glaciers in the Polar Urals remained small during the LGM. Our observations indicate that the mountain valleys have been essentially ice free since Marine Isotope Stage 4, at

  3. Southern Ocean influence on the eastern tropical North Pacific's intermediate-depth circulation during the Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carriquiry, José D.; Sanchez, Alberto; Leduc, Guillaume

    2015-08-01

    The oxygen and carbon isotopic compositions of benthic foraminiferal tests were measured on sedimentary sequences retrieved on the Magdalena Margin, off southern Baja California, Mexico. We reconstruct the hydrographic changes along the water column that occurred in the northeastern tropical Pacific since the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) and compare those changes to the ones that occurred in the northwest Pacific (NWP, i.e., off Japan and Russia), in the northeast Pacific along the Californian Margin, as well as in the southeast Pacific (off Chile). The foraminiferal δ18O depth profiles across the North and southeast Pacific show similar trends between the LGM and the Holocene, indicating that changes in the oceanographic conditions between ~400 and 2000 m depth were very similar. Changes in the isotopic composition of dissolved inorganic carbon (δ13CDIC) in the Baja California Margin since the Last Glacial Maximum were reconstructed using the δ13C of shallow endobenthic foraminifers U. peregrina and the epibenthic Cibicides mckannai. The most striking result is a marked shift toward more positive δ13C values below 1200 m depth in the northeast Pacific (NEP) during the Holocene (relative to the LGM). This observation suggests that a nutrient-rich water mass ventilated the NEP during the LGM. At a basin scale, the δ13C values of NEP waters at intermediate depths were more negative relative to the NWP and southeast Pacific during the LGM, suggesting that the nutrient-rich water column along the NEP (i.e., Baja California Margin) was confined in that area as observed today.

  4. Weak oceanic heat transport as a cause of the instability of glacial climates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colin de Verdière, Alain; Te Raa, L.

    2010-12-01

    The stability of the thermohaline circulation of modern and glacial climates is compared with the help of a two dimensional ocean—atmosphere—sea ice coupled model. It turns out to be more unstable as less freshwater forcing is required to induce a polar halocline catastrophy in glacial climates. The large insulation of the ocean by the extensive sea ice cover changes the temperature boundary condition and the deepwater formation regions moves much further South. The nature of the instability is of oceanic origin, identical to that found in ocean models under mixed boundary conditions. With similar strengths of the oceanic circulation and rates of deep water formation for warm and cold climates, the loss of stability of the cold climate is due to the weak thermal stratification caused by the cooling of surface waters, the deep water temperatures being regulated by the temperature of freezing. Weaker stratification with similar overturning leads to a weakening of the meridional oceanic heat transport which is the major negative feedback stabilizing the oceanic circulation. Within the unstable regime periodic millennial oscillations occur spontaneously. The climate oscillates between a strong convective thermally driven oceanic state and a weak one driven by large salinity gradients. Both states are unstable. The atmosphere of low thermal inertia is carried along by the oceanic overturning while the variation of sea ice is out of phase with the oceanic heat content. During the abrupt warming events that punctuate the course of a millennial oscillation, sea ice variations are shown respectively to damp (amplify) the amplitude of the oceanic (atmospheric) response. This sensitivity of the oceanic circulation to a reduced concentration of greenhouse gases and to freshwater forcing adds support to the hypothesis that the millennial oscillations of the last glacial period, the so called Dansgaard—Oeschger events, may be internal instabilities of the climate system.

  5. Modeling permafrost extension in a rock slope since the Last Glacial Maximum: Application to the large Séchilienne landslide (French Alps)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebrouc, V.; Schwartz, S.; Baillet, L.; Jongmans, D.; Gamond, J. F.

    2013-09-01

    Recent dating performed on large landslides in the Alps has revealed that the initiation of instability did not immediately follow deglaciation but occurred several thousand years after ice down-wastage in the valleys. This result indicates that debuttressing is not the immediate cause of landslide initiation. The period of slope destabilization appears to coincide with the wetter and warmer Holocene Climatic Optimum, indicating a climatic cause of landslide triggering, although the role of seismic activity cannot be ruled out. A phenomenon which may partly explain the delay between valley deglaciation and gravitational instability is the temporal persistence of thick permafrost layers developed in the Alps since the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). This hypothesis was tested through 2D thermal numerical modeling of the large Séchilienne landslide (Romanche valley, French Alps) using plausible input parameter values. Simulation results suggest that permafrost vanished in the Séchilienne slope at 10 to 11 ka, 3000 to 4000 years following the total ice down-wastage of the Romanche valley at 14.3 ka. Permafrost persistence could have contributed to the failure delay by temporally strengthening the slope. Numerical simulations also show that the permafrost depth expansion approximately fits the thickness of ground affected by gravitational destabilization, as deduced from geophysical investigations. These results further suggest that permafrost development, associated with an ice segregation mechanism, damaged the rock slope and influenced the resulting landslide geometry.

  6. A chironomid-inferred summer temperature reconstruction from subtropical Australia during the last glacial maximum (LGM) and the last deglaciation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Jie Christine; Shulmeister, James; Woodward, Craig; Steinberger, Lincoln; Tibby, John; Barr, Cameron

    2015-08-01

    A chironomid-based mean February temperature reconstruction from Welsby Lagoon, North Stradbroke Island, Australia covering the last glacial maximum (LGM) and deglaciation (between c. ∼23.2 and 15.5 cal ka BP) is presented. Mean February temperature reconstructions show a maximum inferred cooling of c. ∼6.5 °C at c. ∼18.5 cal ka BP followed by rapid warming to near Holocene values immediately after the LGM. The inferred timing, magnitude and trend of maximum cooling and warming display strong similarities to marine records from areas affected by the East Australian current (EAC). The warming trend started at c. ∼18.1 cal ka BP and is consistent with the start of deglaciation from Antarctic records. Near Holocene values are maintained through the deglaciation to 15.5 cal ka BP. These records suggest that changes in the Australian subtropics are linked to southern high latitudes.

  7. The influence of glacial ice sheets on Atlantic meridional overturning circulation through atmospheric circulation change under glacial climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherriff-Tadano, Sam; Abe-Ouchi, Ayako; Yoshimori, Masakazu; Oka, Akira; Chan, Wing-Le

    2016-04-01

    Recent coupled modeling studies have shown that the existence of the glacial ice sheets intensifies the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC). Since this may play an important role in maintaining a strong AMOC over the last glacial period, which is suggested by recent reconstruction study, it is very important to understand the process by which glacial ice sheets intensify the AMOC. Here, a decoupled simulation is conducted to investigate the effect of wind change due to glacial ice sheets on the AMOC, the crucial region where wind modifies the AMOC and the mechanism, which remained elusive in previous studies. First, from atmospheric general circulation model (AGCM) experiments, the effect of glacial ice sheets on the surface wind is evaluated. Second, from ocean general circulation model (OGCM) experiments, the influence of the wind stress change on the AMOC is evaluated by applying only the changes in the surface wind as a boundary condition, while leaving surface heat and freshwater fluxes unchanged. Moreover, several sensitivity experiments are conducted. Using the AGCM, glacial ice sheets are applied individually. Using the OGCM, changes in the wind are applied regionally or at different magnitudes, ranging from the full glacial to modern levels. These experiments demonstrate that glacial ice sheets intensify the AMOC through an increase in the wind stress curl mainly at the North Atlantic mid-latitudes. This intensification is caused by the increased Ekman upwelling and gyre transport of salt while the change in sea ice transport works as a negative, though minor, feedback.

  8. Glacial thermohaline circulation and climate: Forcing from the north or south?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Z. Y.

    2006-03-01

    Based on the evidence available from both observations and model simulations, the author proposes a view that may provide a unified interpretation of the North Atlantic thermohaline variability. Because of the slow response time of the Southern Ocean (millennia) and the relatively faster response time of the North Atlantic (centuries), the North Atlantic thermohaline circulation is controlled predominantly by the climate forcing over the Southern Ocean at the long glacial cycle timescales, but by the North Atlantic climate forcing at the short millennial timescales.

  9. Abrupt shifts in Horn of Africa hydroclimate since the Last Glacial Maximum.

    PubMed

    Tierney, Jessica E; deMenocal, Peter B

    2013-11-15

    The timing and abruptness of the initiation and termination of the Early Holocene African Humid Period are subjects of ongoing debate, with direct consequences for our understanding of abrupt climate change, paleoenvironments, and early human cultural development. Here, we provide proxy evidence from the Horn of Africa region that documents abrupt transitions into and out of the African Humid Period in northeast Africa. Similar and generally synchronous abrupt transitions at other East African sites suggest that rapid shifts in hydroclimate are a regionally coherent feature. Our analysis suggests that the termination of the African Humid Period in the Horn of Africa occurred within centuries, underscoring the nonlinearity of the region's hydroclimate. PMID:24114782

  10. Mediterranean Sea surface radiocarbon reservoir age changes since the last glacial maximum.

    PubMed

    Siani, G; Paterne, M; Michel, E; Sulpizio, R; Sbrana, A; Arnold, M; Haddad, G

    2001-11-30

    Sea surface reservoir ages must be known to establish a common chronological framework for marine, continental, and cryospheric paleoproxies, and are crucial for understanding ocean-continent climatic relationships and the paleoventilation of the ocean. Radiocarbon dates of planktonic foraminifera and tephra contemporaneously deposited over Mediterranean marine and terrestrial regions reveal that the reservoir ages were similar to the modern one (approximately 400 years) during most of the past 18,000 carbon-14 years. However, reservoir ages increased by a factor of 2 at the beginning of the last deglaciation. This is attributed to changes of the North Atlantic thermohaline circulation during the massive ice discharge event Heinrich 1. PMID:11729315

  11. Abrupt climate variability of eastern Anatolia vegetation during the last glacial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pickarski, N.; Kwiecien, O.; Langgut, D.; Litt, T.

    2015-07-01

    Detailed analyses of the Lake Van pollen and stable oxygen isotope record allow the identification of millennial-scale vegetation and environmental changes in eastern Anatolia throughout the last glacial. The climate within the last glacial period (∼75-15 ka BP) was cold and dry, with low arboreal pollen (AP) levels. The driest and coldest period corresponds to Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 2 (∼28-14.5 ka BP) dominated by the highest values of xerophytic steppe vegetation. Our high-resolution multi proxy record shows rapid expansions and contractions that mimic the stadial-interstadial pattern of the Dansgaard-Oeschger (DO) events as recorded in the Greenland ice cores, and thus, provide a linkage to North Atlantic climate oscillations. Periods of reduced moisture availability characterized at Lake Van by enhanced xerophytic species correlates well with increase in ice-rafted debris (IRD) and a decrease of sea surface temperature (SST) in the North Atlantic. Furthermore, comparison with the marine realm reveals that the complex atmosphere-ocean interaction can be recognized by the strength and position of the westerlies in eastern Anatolia. Influenced by rough topography at Lake Van, the expansion of temperate species (e.g. deciduous Quercus) was stronger during interstadials DO 19, 17-16, 14, 12 and 8. However, Heinrich events (HE), characterized by highest concentrations of ice-rafted debris in marine sediments, are identified in eastern Anatolia by AP values not lower and high steppe components not more abundant than during DO stadials. In addition, this work is a first attempt to establish a continuous microscopic charcoal record over the last glacial in the Near East, which documents an initial immediate response to millennial-scale climate and environmental variability and enables the shed light on the history of fire activity during the last glacial.

  12. The last glacial termination: targets for climate modelling and proxy-based reconstructions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renssen, Hans; Blockley, Simon P.; Rasmussen, Sune O.; Roche, Didier M.; Valdes, Paul J.; Nisancioglu, Kerim M.; Working Group 3 Members Of Intimate

    2013-04-01

    During the last glacial termination, the climate system experienced a major reorganisation, making this time interval a crucial period for our understanding of climate change. Despite a basic understanding of these changes and a reasonable level of agreement between data and model simulations, a deeper understanding of the last glacial termination remains a long standing goal: we are still faced with the dual challenge of reconstructing the climate history from incomplete and uncertain proxy data, and accurately simulating the climate history with physics-based climate models. There are, however, significant advantages in attempting to reliably integrate palaeoclimate data with model simulations, not least because it is necessary to examine the limitations of both current models and palaeoclimate records before testing possible forcing mechanisms. For the model studies, palaeodata play a crucial role, both as a source of (1) climate forcings for the modelling experiments and (2) palaeoclimate information that is required for model evaluation. Therefore, interaction between the modelling and data communities is essential. For this purpose, and with the last termination as a target, a working group has been set up within the INTIMATE (INTegration of Ice core, MArine and TErrestrial records of the last termination) COST Action (http://cost-es0907.geoenvi.org). We report on the outcome of a workshop of this working group, discussing the state of knowledge of the forcings and various aspects of climate variability during the last termination. We focus in particular on the main uncertainties in the climate signals and the forcings. We discuss the major problems that must be solved to make further progress in our understanding. This requires a joint effort of paleodata, chronology, and climate modelling communities. A number of specific targets for these communities are identified.

  13. Modeling of depth to base of Last Glacial Maximum and seafloor sediment thickness for the California State Waters Map Series, eastern Santa Barbara Channel, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wong, Florence L.; Phillips, Eleyne L.; Johnson, Samuel Y.; Sliter, Ray W.

    2012-01-01

    Models of the depth to the base of Last Glacial Maximum and sediment thickness over the base of Last Glacial Maximum for the eastern Santa Barbara Channel are a key part of the maps of shallow subsurface geology and structure for offshore Refugio to Hueneme Canyon, California, in the California State Waters Map Series. A satisfactory interpolation of the two datasets that accounted for regional geologic structure was developed using geographic information systems modeling and graphics software tools. Regional sediment volumes were determined from the model. Source data files suitable for geographic information systems mapping applications are provided.

  14. Sequence stratigraphy of the subaqueous Changjiang (Yangtze River) delta since the Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Taoyu; Wang, Guoqing; Shi, Xuefa; Wang, Xin; Yao, Zhengquan; Yang, Gang; Fang, Xisheng; Qiao, Shuqing; Liu, Shengfa; Wang, Xuchen; Zhao, Quanhong

    2016-01-01

    This study focuses on sedimentary research at the subaqueous Changjiang (Yangtze River) delta, based on five high-resolution seismic profiles and seven borehole cores with accurate AMS 14C datings. Three distinct seismic units were identified from the seismic profiles according to seismic reflection characteristics, and five sedimentary facies were recognized from borehole cores. These facies constituted a fining upward sedimentary sequence in relation to postglacial sea-level transgression. Three sequence surfaces (sequence boundary (SB), transgressive surface (TS), and maximum flooding surface (MFS)) demarcate the boundaries between early transgressive system tract (E-TST), late transgressive system tract (L-TST), early highstand system tract (E-HST) and late highstand system tract (L-HST), which constitute the sixth order sequence. These system tracts were developed coevally with postglacial sea-level rise. E-TST (~ 19-12 ka BP) corresponds to an incised-valley infilling in the early stages of postglacial transgression whereas L-TST (~ 12-7.5 ka BP) was formed during the last stage of postglacial transgression. The progradational structure of L-TST reflected in seismic profiles is possibly related to the intensification of the East Asian summer monsoon. E-HST (~ 7.5-2 ka BP) was deposited in response to the highstand after maximum postglacial transgression was reached, while L-HST (~ 2 ka BP-present) was initiated by accelerated progradation of the Changjiang delta.

  15. The nature of millennial-scale climate variability during the last two glacial cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skinner, Luke; Margari, Vasiliki; Tzedakis, Chronis; Ganopolski, Andrey; Vautravers, Maryline; Shackleton, Nicholas

    2010-05-01

    During the last glacial period, iceberg discharges into the North Atlantic led to a disruption of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC), a cooling of the Northern Hemisphere, and a warming of Antarctica. This asymmetric response has been explained in terms of a bipolar seesaw mechanism, whereby changes in the strength of the AMOC result in changes in interhemispheric heat transport. However, it remains unclear to what extent the response of the AMOC and the operation of the bipolar seesaw may depend on background climate conditions, or the magnitude/delivery of freshwater flux to the North Atlantic. Here we present foraminiferal isotope and pollen records from the Portuguese margin from the last and penultimate glacial periods. A comparison of our records with temperature reconstructions from Antarctica indicates that the bipolar seesaw was a characteristic feature of both glacial periods. However, our comparison also underlines the dependence of the bipolar seesaw on background climate as well as the magnitude of iceberg discharge. Our results suggest that an intensified hydrological cycle may lead to a weaker overturning circulation with a smaller disruption threshold and extended North Atlantic stadial durations.

  16. The nature of millennial-scale climate variability during the past two glacial periods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margari, V.; Skinner, L. C.; Tzedakis, P. C.; Ganopolski, A.; Vautravers, M.; Shackleton, N. J.

    2010-02-01

    During the last glacial period, iceberg discharges into the North Atlantic disrupted the meridional overturning circulation, leading to cooling in the Northern Hemisphere and warming in Antarctica. This asymmetric response can be explained by a bipolar see-saw mechanism, whereby changes in the strength of the meridional overturning circulation lead to changes in the interhemispheric heat transport. It is unclear, however, to what extent the response of the overturning circulation is a function of freshwater flux and boundary climate conditions. Here we use foraminiferal isotope and pollen records from the Portuguese margin to reconstruct surface- and deep-water hydrography and atmospheric changes during the last and penultimate glacial periods. When we compare our records with temperature reconstructions from Antarctica, we find that the bipolar see-saw was a characteristic feature of both glacial periods. However, the comparison also underlines the dependence of the bipolar see-saw on background climate and magnitude of iceberg discharge. It also suggests that an intensified hydrological cycle may lead to a weaker overturning circulation with a smaller disruption threshold and extended North Atlantic stadial durations.

  17. Insolation-driven 100 kyr glacial cycles and millennial climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe-Ouchi, A.; Saito, F.; Kawamura, K.; Raymo, M. E.; Okuno, J.; Takahashi, K.; Blatter, H.

    2013-12-01

    The waxing and waning of Northern Hemisphere ice sheets over the past one million years is dominated by an approximately 100-kyr periodicity and a sawtooth pattern (gradual growth and fast termination). Milankovitch theory proposes that summer insolation at high northern latitudes drives the glacial cycles, and statistical tests demonstrated that the glacial cycles are indeed linked to eccentricity, obliquity and precession cycles. However, insolation alone cannot explain the strong 100 kyr cycle which presumably arises through internal climatic feedbacks. Prior work with conceptual models, for example, showed that glacial terminations are associated with the build-up of Northern Hemisphere 'excess ice', but the physical mechanisms of 100-kyr cycle at work remain unclear. Here, using comprehensive climate and ice sheet models, we show that the ~100-kyr periodicity is explained by insolation and internal feedback amongst the climate, ice sheet and lithosphere/asthenosphere system (reference). We found that equilibrium states of ice sheets exhibit hysteresis responses to summer insolation, and that the shape and position of the hysteresis loop play a key role in determining the periodicities of glacial cycles. The hysteresis loop of the North American ice sheet is such that, after its inception, the ice sheet mass balance remains mostly positive or neutral through several precession cycles whose amplitude decreases towards an eccentricity minimum. The larger the ice sheet grows and extends towards lower latitudes, the smaller is the insolation required to turn the mass balance to negative. Therefore, once the large ice sheet is established, only a moderate increase in insolation can trigger a negative mass balance, leading to a complete retreat within several thousand years, due to the delayed isostatic rebound. The effect of ocean circulation and millennial scale climate change are not playing the dominant role for determing the 100kyr cycle, but are effective for

  18. Patterns of glacial-interglacial vegetation and climate variability in eastern South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupont, Lydie; Caley, Thibaut; Malaizé, Bruno; Giraudeau, Jacques

    2010-05-01

    Vegetation is an integrated part of the earth system and our understanding needs records of its glacial-interglacial variability. Although the data coverage for South Africa is slightly better than for some other parts of Africa, there are only very few records that allow us a glimpse of the vegetation history and development through one or more late Quaternary climate cycles. The existing evidence is fragmentary and in some cases contradictory. Marine sediments can offer here continuous sequences that cover large periods of time and provide a record of a signal that integrates rather large continental regions. Core MD96-2048 has been cored off the Limpopo River mouth at 26°10'S 34°01'E in 660 m water depth. This area is under the double influence of continental discharge and Agulhas current water advection. The sedimentation is slow and continuous. The upper 5 meter (down till 250 ka) have been analysed for pollen and spores at millennial resolution. The terrestrial pollen assemblages indicate that during interglacials the vegetation of eastern South Africa and southern Mozambique largely consisted of evergreen and deciduous forests with an increase of dry deciduous forest and open woodland during interglacial optima. During glacials open mountainous shrubland extended. The pattern strongly suggests a shifting of altitudinal vegetation belts in the mountains primarily depending on temperature, although the decline of forested areas during glacial times might also be the effect of low atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations. This pattern in eastern South Africa differs from that suggested for western South Africa, where extension of the winter rain climate seems likely, and corroborates findings of increased C4 vegetation during the Glacial of eastern South Africa. The spread of dry deciduous forest and open woodland suggests a hot and dry climate during interglacial optima. The vegetation and climate of eastern South Africa seems to follow a mid to high

  19. Nearly synchronous climate change in the Northern Hemisphere during the last glacial termination

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Benson, L.; Burdett, J.; Lund, S.; Kashgarian, Michaele; Mensing, S.

    1997-01-01

    The climate of the North Atlantic region underwent a series of abrupt cold/warm oscillations when the ice sheets of the Northern Hemisphere retreated during the last glacial termination (17.711.5 kyr ago). Evidence for these oscillations, which are recorded in European terrestrial sediments as the Oldest Dryas/Bolling/Older Dryas/Allerod/Younger Dryas vegetational sequence, has been found in Greenland ice cores. The geographical extent of many of these oscillations is not well known, but the last major cold event (the Younger Dryas) seems to have been global in extent. Here we present evidence of four major oscillations in the hydrological balance of the Owens basin, California, that occurred during the last glacial termination. Dry events in western North America occurred at approximately the same time as cold events recorded in Greenland ice, with transitions between climate regimes in the two regions taking place within a few hundred years of each other. Our observations thus support recent climate simulations which indicate that cooling of the North Atlantic Ocean results in cooling of the North Pacific Ocean which, in turn, leads to a drier climate in western North America.

  20. Atmospheric greenhouse gases and climate at onset of the last glacial termination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, J.; Brook, E.

    2011-12-01

    Deciphering exact phase relationship between greenhouse gases and climate is important for understanding how greenhouse effect and climate are linked. Especially, onset of the last glacial termination is of great interest because that time interval is important for cracking glacial-interglacial climate cycles. However, previous ice core studies were not able to well handle the issue due to lack of sufficient resolution, precision and/or chronology of greenhouse gas records. Here we present high resolution of CO2 and CH4 records from Siple Dome core, Antarctica. We take advantages from the high accumulation rate in the coring site and high-precision analytical techniques. We also take advantage from the high-resolution of the CH4 records that help better synchronize the CO2 ages with GICC05 Greenland ice core timescale, being consistent with absolute ages obtained from stalagmite records. Implications of our new data for carbon cycles and climate during onset of the last termination will be discussed in the presentation.

  1. One-to-one coupling of glacial climate variability in Greenland and Antarctica.

    PubMed

    2006-11-01

    Precise knowledge of the phase relationship between climate changes in the two hemispheres is a key for understanding the Earth's climate dynamics. For the last glacial period, ice core studies have revealed strong coupling of the largest millennial-scale warm events in Antarctica with the longest Dansgaard-Oeschger events in Greenland through the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation. It has been unclear, however, whether the shorter Dansgaard-Oeschger events have counterparts in the shorter and less prominent Antarctic temperature variations, and whether these events are linked by the same mechanism. Here we present a glacial climate record derived from an ice core from Dronning Maud Land, Antarctica, which represents South Atlantic climate at a resolution comparable with the Greenland ice core records. After methane synchronization with an ice core from North Greenland, the oxygen isotope record from the Dronning Maud Land ice core shows a one-to-one coupling between all Antarctic warm events and Greenland Dansgaard-Oeschger events by the bipolar seesaw6. The amplitude of the Antarctic warm events is found to be linearly dependent on the duration of the concurrent stadial in the North, suggesting that they all result from a similar reduction in the meridional overturning circulation. PMID:17099953

  2. Variations in Organic Matter Burial and Composition in Sediments from the Indian Ocean Continental Margin Off SW Indonesia (Sumatra - Java - Flores) Since the Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jennerjahn, T. C.; Gesierich, K.; Schefuß, E.; Mohtadi, M.

    2014-12-01

    Global climate change is a mosaic of regional changes to a large extent determined by region-specific feedbacks between climate and ecosystems. At present the ocean is forming a major sink in the global carbon cycle. Organic matter (OM) storage in sediments displays large regional variations and varied over time during the Quaternary. Upwelling regions are sites of high primary productivity and major depocenters of organic carbon (OC), the least understood of which is the Indian Ocean upwelling off Indonesia. In order to reconstruct the burial and composition of OM during the Late Quaternary, we analyzed five sediment cores from the Indian Ocean continental margin off the Indonesian islands Sumatra to Flores spanning the last 20,000 years (20 kyr). Sediments were analyzed for bulk composition, stable carbon and nitrogen isotopes of OM, amino acids and hexosamines and terrestrial plant wax n-alkanes and their stable carbon isotope composition. Sedimentation rates hardly varied over time in the western part of the transect. They were slightly lower in the East during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) and deglaciation, but increased strongly during the Holocene. The amount and composition of OM was similar along the transect with maximum values during the deglaciation and the late Holocene. High biogenic opal covarying with OM content indicates upwelling-induced primary productivity dominated by diatoms to be a major control of OM burial in sediments in the East during the past 20 kyr. The content of labile OM was low throughout the transect during the LGM and increased during the late Holocene. The increase was stronger and the OM less degraded in the East than in the West indicating that continental margin sediments off Java and Flores were the major depocenter of OC burial along the Indian Ocean margin off SW Indonesia. Temporal variations probably resulted from changes in upwelling intensity and terrestrial inputs driven by variations in monsoon strength.

  3. Last Glacial Maximum Development of Parna Dunes in Panhandle Oklahoma, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, W. C.; Halfen, A. F.; McGowen, S.; Carter, B.; Fine, S.; Bement, L. C.; Simms, A. R.

    2012-12-01

    Though dunefields are a ubiquitous feature of the North American Great Plains, those studied to date have consisted primarily of sand grains. In Beaver County of the Oklahoma panhandle, however, upland dune forms consist of sand-sized aggregates of silt and clay. These aptly named parna dunes occur in two swarms, range in height from 10-15 m, and have asymmetrical dome morphologies with approximate north-south dune orientations. Despite their morphological similarities to sand dunes of the region, their origin and evolution is unknown. Documenting parna dune formation in the Oklahoma panhandle will help improve our understanding of prehistoric landscape instability and climate change, particularly in the central Great Plains where such records are limited. Panhandle parna dunes are typified by Blue Mound, our best documented parna dune thus far. Coring has documented a basal paleosol buried at a depth equivalent to the surrounding landscape—14C ages from this soil indicate its formation about 25-21 ka. The paleosol is a hydric Mollisol with a pronounced C3 isotopic signature reflecting hydric plant communities, rather than the regionally dominated C4 prairie vegetation. Hydric soils are associated with many of the playas on the surrounding landscape today, which suggests that they may have been more prevalent during the LGM. The overlying 8-10 m of parna is low in organic C and high in calcite, with indications of up to ten major episodes of sediment flux, which are documented with magnetic, isotope, soil-stratigraphic, particle-size, and color data. Near-surface luminescence (OSL) ages from Blue Mound are similar to the 14C ages from the basal paleosol, indicating rapid dune construction, with little or no Holocene accumulation of sediment. Marine isotope stage (MIS) 3 loess records indicate that upland areas of the region were relatively stable with attendant widespread pedogenesis prior to development of the parna dunes. At the onset of the LGM, however, the

  4. Tropical Atlantic SSTS at the Last Glacial Maximum derived from Sr/Ca ratios of fossil coral

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, A. L.; Saenger, C. P.

    2006-12-01

    The sensitivity of the tropics to climate change is a particularly controversial issue in paleoclimatology. At the heart of this controversy are disagreements amongst different proxy datasets regarding the amplitude of glacial-interglacial changes in temperature, particularly at the sea surface. Data obtained from the aragonitic skeletons of massive reef corals have contributed in no small measure to the debate, yielding LGM and deglacial SSTs 5-6°C cooler than today (Guilderson et al., 1994; McCulloch et al., 1999; Correge et al., 2004), that imply a high sensitivity of Earth's climate to changes in boundary conditions (Crowley, 2000). We used SIMS ion microprobe to analyze Sr/Ca ratios of small pieces of Montastrea coral retrieved from a Barbados drillcore (Guilderson et al., 2001). U/Th dates place the samples between 22 and 24 kyr BP. Localized areas of dissolution and re-growth of secondary (diagenetic) aragonite crystals were identified at centers of septa. Sr/Ca ratios of these crystals were higher than Sr/Ca ratios of original coral crystals preserved in adjacent fasciculi and yielded relatively cooler derived SSTs. The original coral crystals, recognized by their size and orientation, were selectively targeted for analysis using a 20 micron-diameter sample spot. Our calibration study using modern corals from Bermuda, St Croix (USVI) and Barbados indicates that Montastrea Sr/Ca is strongly correlated with SST and with annual extension (growth) rate (Saenger et al., 2006). Growth rate of the fossil corals was determined from measurement of daily growth bands identified in petrographic thin-sections. Application of a growth-dependent Sr/Ca-T calibration yielded Barbados SSTs that were, on average, 2.5°C cooler than today during the LGM and ~1°C cooler than today during Heinrich Event 2. Our LGM SSTs are consistent with the original CLIMAP estimates (CLIMAP, 1976) and with more recent Mg/Ca-based SSTs derived from calcitic foraminifera in the Caribbean

  5. Black Sea temperature response to glacial millennial-scale climate variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wegwerth, Antje; Ganopolski, Andrey; Ménot, Guillemette; Kaiser, Jérôme; Dellwig, Olaf; Bard, Edouard; Lamy, Frank; Arz, Helge W.

    2015-10-01

    The Eurasian inland propagation of temperature anomalies during glacial millennial-scale climate variability is poorly understood, but this knowledge is crucial to understanding hemisphere-wide atmospheric teleconnection patterns and climate mechanisms. Based on biomarkers and geochemical paleothermometers, a pronounced continental temperature variability between 64,000 and 20,000 years ago, coinciding with the Greenland Dansgaard-Oeschger cycles, was determined in a well-dated sediment record from the formerly enclosed Black Sea. Cooling during Heinrich events was not stronger than during other stadials in the Black Sea. This is corroborated by modeling results showing that regular Dansgaard-Oeschger cycles penetrated deeper into the Eurasian continent than Heinrich events. The pattern of coastal ice-rafted detritus suggests a strong dependence on the climate background state, with significantly milder winters during periods of reduced Eurasian ice sheets and an intensified meridional atmospheric circulation.

  6. Validation of climate model-inferred regional temperature change for late-glacial Europe.

    PubMed

    Heiri, Oliver; Brooks, Stephen J; Renssen, Hans; Bedford, Alan; Hazekamp, Marjolein; Ilyashuk, Boris; Jeffers, Elizabeth S; Lang, Barbara; Kirilova, Emiliya; Kuiper, Saskia; Millet, Laurent; Samartin, Stéphanie; Toth, Monika; Verbruggen, Frederike; Watson, Jenny E; van Asch, Nelleke; Lammertsma, Emmy; Amon, Leeli; Birks, Hilary H; Birks, H John B; Mortensen, Morten F; Hoek, Wim Z; Magyari, Enikö; Muñoz Sobrino, Castor; Seppä, Heikki; Tinner, Willy; Tonkov, Spassimir; Veski, Siim; Lotter, André F

    2014-01-01

    Comparisons of climate model hindcasts with independent proxy data are essential for assessing model performance in non-analogue situations. However, standardized palaeoclimate data sets for assessing the spatial pattern of past climatic change across continents are lacking for some of the most dynamic episodes of Earth's recent past. Here we present a new chironomid-based palaeotemperature dataset designed to assess climate model hindcasts of regional summer temperature change in Europe during the late-glacial and early Holocene. Latitudinal and longitudinal patterns of inferred temperature change are in excellent agreement with simulations by the ECHAM-4 model, implying that atmospheric general circulation models like ECHAM-4 can successfully predict regionally diverging temperature trends in Europe, even when conditions differ significantly from present. However, ECHAM-4 infers larger amplitudes of change and higher temperatures during warm phases than our palaeotemperature estimates, suggesting that this and similar models may overestimate past and potentially also future summer temperature changes in Europe. PMID:25208610

  7. Validation of climate model-inferred regional temperature change for late-glacial Europe

    PubMed Central

    Heiri, Oliver; Brooks, Stephen J.; Renssen, Hans; Bedford, Alan; Hazekamp, Marjolein; Ilyashuk, Boris; Jeffers, Elizabeth S.; Lang, Barbara; Kirilova, Emiliya; Kuiper, Saskia; Millet, Laurent; Samartin, Stéphanie; Toth, Monika; Verbruggen, Frederike; Watson, Jenny E.; van Asch, Nelleke; Lammertsma, Emmy; Amon, Leeli; Birks, Hilary H.; Birks, H. John B.; Mortensen, Morten F.; Hoek, Wim Z.; Magyari, Enikö; Sobrino, Castor Muñoz; Seppä, Heikki; Tinner, Willy; Tonkov, Spassimir; Veski, Siim; Lotter, André F.

    2014-01-01

    Comparisons of climate model hindcasts with independent proxy data are essential for assessing model performance in non-analogue situations. However, standardized paleoclimate datasets for assessing the spatial pattern of past climatic change across continents are lacking for some of the most dynamic episodes of Earth's recent past. Here we present a new chironomid-based paleotemperature dataset designed to assess climate model hindcasts of regional summer temperature change in Europe during the late-glacial and early Holocene. Latitudinal and longitudinal patterns of inferred temperature change are in excellent agreement with simulations by the ECHAM-4 model, implying that atmospheric general circulation models like ECHAM-4 can successfully predict regionally diverging temperature trends in Europe, even when conditions differ significantly from present. However, ECHAM-4 infers larger amplitudes of change and higher temperatures during warm phases than our paleotemperature estimates, suggesting that this and similar models may overestimate past and potentially also future summer temperature changes in Europe. PMID:25208610

  8. Estimating maximum global wind power availability and associated climatic consequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Lee; Gans, Fabian; Kleidon, Axel

    2010-05-01

    Estimating maximum global wind power availability and associated climatic consequences Wind speed reflects the continuous generation of kinetic energy and its dissipation, primarily in the atmospheric boundary layer. When wind turbines extract kinetic wind energy, less kinetic energy remains in the atmosphere in the mean state. While this effect does not play a significant role for a single turbine, it becomes a critical factor for the estimation of large-scale wind power availability. This extraction of kinetic energy by turbines also competes with the natural processes of kinetic energy dissipation, thus setting fundamental limits on extractability that are not considered in previous large-scale studies [1,2,3]. Our simple momentum balance model using ECMWF climate data illustrates a fundamental limit to global wind power extractability and thereby electricity potential (93TW). This is independent of engineering advances in turbine design and wind farm layout. These results are supported by similar results using a global climate model of intermediate complexity. Varying the surface drag coefficient with different simulations allows us to directly relate changes in atmospheric and boundary layer dissipation with resulting climate indices and wind power potential. These new estimates of the maximum power generation by wind turbines are well above the currently installed capacity. Hence, present day installations are unlikely to have a global impact. However, when compared to the current human energy demand of 17TW combined with plans by the US and EU to drastically increase onshore and offshore wind turbine installations [4,5,6], understanding the climatic response and ultimate limitations of wind power as a large-scale renewable energy source is critical. [1] Archer, C., and M.Z. Jacobson, (2005) Evaluation of global wind power, J. Geophys. Res. 110:D12110. [2] Lu, X., M.B. McElroy, and J. Kiviluoma, (2009) Global potential for wind-generated electricity, Proc

  9. Evidence for Amazonian northern mid-latitude regional glacial landsystems on Mars: Glacial flow models using GCM-driven climate results and comparisons to geological observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fastook, James L.; Head, James W.; Forget, Francois; Madeleine, Jean-Baptiste; Marchant, David R.

    2011-11-01

    A fretted valley system on Mars located at the northern mid-latitude dichotomy boundary contains lineated valley fill (LVF) with extensive flow-like features interpreted to be glacial in origin. We have modeled this deposit using glacial flow models linked to atmospheric general circulation models (GCM) for conditions consistent with the deposition of snow and ice in amounts sufficient to explain the interpreted glaciation. In the first glacial flow model simulation, sources were modeled in the alcoves only and were found to be consistent with the alpine valley glaciation interpretation for various environments of flow in the system. These results supported the interpretation of the observed LVF deposits as resulting from initial ice accumulation in the alcoves, accompanied by debris cover that led to advancing alpine glacial landsystems to the extent observed today, with preservation of their flow texture and the underlying ice during downwasting in the waning stages of glaciation. In the second glacial flow model simulation, the regional accumulation patterns predicted by a GCM linked to simulation of a glacial period were used. This glacial flow model simulation produced a much wider region of thick ice accumulation, and significant glaciation on the plateaus and in the regional plains surrounding the dichotomy boundary. Deglaciation produced decreasing ice thicknesses, with flow centered on the fretted valleys. As plateaus lost ice, scarps and cliffs of the valley and dichotomy boundary walls were exposed, providing considerable potential for the production of a rock debris cover that could preserve the underlying ice and the surface flow patterns seen today. In this model, the lineated valley fill and lobate debris aprons were the product of final retreat and downwasting of a much larger, regional glacial landsystem, rather than representing the maximum extent of an alpine valley glacial landsystem. These results favor the interpretation that periods of mid

  10. Glacial to Holocene climate changes in the SE Pacific. The Raraku Lake sedimentary record (Easter Island, 27°S)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sáez, Alberto; Valero-Garcés, Blas L.; Giralt, Santiago; Moreno, Ana; Bao, Roberto; Pueyo, Juan J.; Hernández, Armand; Casas, David

    2009-12-01

    Easter Island (SE Pacific, 27°S) provides a unique opportunity to reconstruct past climate changes in the South Pacific region based on terrestrial archives. Although the general climate evolution of the south Pacific since the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) is coherent with terrestrial records in southern South America and Polynesia, the details of the dynamics of the shifting Westerlies, the South Pacific Convergence Zone and the South Pacific Anticyclone during the glacial-interglacial transition and the Holocene, and the large scale controls on precipitation in tropical and extratropical regions remain elusive. Here we present a high-resolution reconstruction of lake dynamics, watershed processes and paleohydrology for the last 34 000 cal yrs BP based on a sedimentological and geochemical multiproxy study of 8 cores from the Raraku Lake sediments constrained by 22 AMS radiocarbon dates. This multicore strategy has reconstructed the sedimentary architecture of the lake infilling and provided a stratigraphic framework to integrate and correlate previous core and vegetation studies conducted in the lake. High lake levels and clastic input dominated sedimentation in Raraku Lake between 34 and 28 cal kyr BP. Sedimentological and geochemical evidences support previously reported pollen data showing a relatively open forest and a cold and relatively humid climate during the Glacial period. Between 28 and 17.3 cal kyr BP, including the LGM period, colder conditions contributed to a reduction of the tree coverage in the island. The coherent climate patterns in subtropical and mid latitudes of Chile and Eastern Island for the LGM (more humid conditions) suggest stronger influence of the Antarctic circumpolar current and an enhancement of the Westerlies. The end of Glacial Period occurred at 17.3 cal kyr BP and was characterized by a sharp decrease in lake level conducive to the development of major flood events and erosion of littoral sediments. Deglaciation (Termination

  11. Not so deserted…paleoecology and human subsistence in Central Iberia (Guadalajara, Spain) around the Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yravedra, José; Julien, Marie-Anne; Alcaraz-Castaño, Manuel; Estaca-Gómez, Verónica; Alcolea-González, Javier; de Balbín-Behrmann, Rodrigo; Lécuyer, Christophe; Marcel, Claude Hillaire; Burke, Ariane

    2016-05-01

    In contrast to the coastal areas of the Iberian Peninsula, the Upper Palaeolithic settlement of central Iberia, dominated by the Spanish plateau, is poorly known. Traditional models assume a total or virtual depopulation of the interior of the Iberian Peninsula during the Last Glacial. In this paper we present a detailed investigation of human-environment interactions through the first zooarchaeological, taphonomic and isotopic study of the key site of Peña Capón, a rock shelter located in the south-eastern foothills of the Central System range that contains a multi-layered deposit dated to marine isotope stage 2 (MIS 2). Analyses of the faunal assemblages of the Proto-Solutrean (3) and Middle Solutrean (2) layers show that human preferentially hunted horse, deer and iberian ibex living in the vicinity of the rock shelter. Isotope geochemistry of the animal remains of Peña Capón provides us with the first detailed intra-tooth multi-proxy analysis for this time period in south-western Europe, providing estimates of climatic conditions, seasonal flucturation of diet, as well as patterns of seasonal mobility. Our results indicate that human presence at Peña Capón was apparently restricted to relatively warm intervals around the LGM or reflects the presence of an ecological refuge, and provide us with evidence of recurrent human presence in the Iberian interior during the Upper Paleolithic prior to the Magdalenian.

  12. Post-glacial landscape response to climate variability in the southeastern San Juan Mountains of Colorado, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Bradley G.; Eppes, Martha Cary; Diemer, John A.; Jiménez-Moreno, Gonzalo; Layzell, Anthony L.

    2011-11-01

    Geomorphic mapping in the upper Conejos River Valley of the San Juan Mountains has shown that three distinct periods of aggradation have occurred since the end of the last glacial maximum (LGM). The first occurred during the Pleistocene-Holocene transition (~ 12.5-9.5 ka) and is interpreted as paraglacial landscape response to deglaciation after the LGM. Evidence of the second period of aggradation is limited but indicates a small pulse of sedimentation at ~ 5.5 ka. A third, more broadly identifiable period of sedimentation occurred in the late Holocene (~ 2.2-1 ka). The latest two periods of aggradation are concurrent with increases in the frequency of climate change in the region suggesting that Holocene alpine and sub-alpine landscapes respond more to rapid changes in climate than to large singular climatic swings. Soil development and radiocarbon dating indicate that hillslopes were stable during the Holocene even while aggradation was occurring in valley bottoms. Thus, we can conclude that erosion does not occur equally throughout the landscape but is focused upslope of headwater streams, along tributary channels, or on ridge tops. This is in contrast to some models which assume equal erosion in headwater basins.

  13. Evidence of Dry and Cold Climatic Conditions at Glacial Times in Tropical Southeastern Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behling, Hermann; Lichte, Martin

    1997-11-01

    Last-glacial paleoenvironments have been reconstructed from a pollen and charcoal record analyzed in organic sediments and dated between ca. 18,000 and >48,000 14C yr B.P. The site is located near the village Catas Altas in the lower highland region of southeastern Brazil. The last-glacial landscape was covered by extensive areas of subtropical grasslands and small areas of gallery forests along the rivers, where tropical semideciduous forests and cerrado ecosystems exist today. The subtropical gallery forests were composed of Araucariaforest trees such as Araucaria angustifolia, Podocarpus, Drimys, Ilex,and Symplocos.Paleofires were frequent. The record indicates that subtropical grassland vegetation, which today is found in patches on the highlands in southern Brazil (especially in the state of Santa Catarina), expanded from southern Brazil to southeastern Brazil, over a distance of more than 750 km, from latitudes of about 28° S to at least 20° S. The completely different last-glacial environment, in comparison to the present-day environment, reflects a dry and cold climate with strong frosts during the winter months. Temperatures of 5°-7°C below those of the present are inferred for the last glaciation.

  14. Climate versus geological controls on glacial meltwater micronutrient production in southern Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aciego, S. M.; Stevenson, E. I.; Arendt, C. A.

    2015-08-01

    Low concentrations of micronutrients in subarctic North Atlantic surface waters limit phytoplankton growth. Iron, phosphorous, and silicon are all potentially bio-limiting nutrients; iron is the most well documented in the subarctic North Atlantic. Manganese, nickel, copper and zinc are also essential trace metals for phytoplankton cell function. However, the spatial and temporal variability in the flux of these elements to the subarctic North Atlantic is undercharacterized. Here we show new data from the meltseason peak in 2013 indicating that glacial meltwater from the southern tip of Greenland has elevated dissolved major and trace metal concentrations compared to glacial meltwater draining shorter melt season glacial catchments to the north. Fe concentrations range from 0.13 to 6.97 μM, Zn from 4 to 95 μM, and Si from 4 to 36 μM, all higher than the depleted surface waters of the subarctic North Atlantic. Measured hydrochemical data modeled by PHREEQC indicates meltwater is undersaturated in pyrite and silicate phases but supersaturated with respect to oxyhydroxides, hematite and goethite, all phases that precipitate Fe as colloids, of which the nanoparticle phases should remain biologically available. The variability in geologic units between the sites indicates that subglacial lithology is a minor but not the dominant control on meltwater chemistry. The disparity in concentrations is directly correlated with climate, and an extended melt season, suggesting that future warming in Greenland will lead to increased trace element, and potential micronutrient, flux to the subarctic North Atlantic surface waters.

  15. Response of Terrestrial Vegetation to Variations in Temperature and Aridity Since the Last Glacial Maximum in Lake Chalco, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werne, J. P.; Rubesch, M.; Brown, E. T.; Ortega, B.; Caballero, M.; Lozano-Garcia, S.

    2011-12-01

    The water balance of the Southwestern United States and most of Mexico is dependent on regional climate systems, including the Mexican (or North American) Monsoon. The Mexican Monsoon leads to significant summer rainfall across a broad swath of the continent, which constitutes the major source of annual precipitation over much of this region. The position of the ITCZ and the strength of the accompanying monsoon are affected by variability in insolation. Stronger northern hemisphere summer insolation shifts the ITCZ northward, bringing about a more intense monsoon. Here we discuss a new geochemical climate record from Lake Chalco, Mexico, which couples inorganic (X-ray fluorescence) and organic (biomarkers and stable isotopes) geochemical proxies to reconstruct temperature and aridity over the past 45,000 years, as well as the response of terrestrial vegetation to such climate changes. The Basin of Mexico is a high altitude closed lacustrine basin (20°N, 99°W; 2240 m.a.s.l.) in the Trans Mexican Volcanic Belt. The plain of Lake Chalco, located near Mexico City in the southern sub-basin, has an area of 120 km2 and a catchment of 1100 km2. Though the present-day lake has been reduced to a small marsh due to historic diversion of its waters, over longer timescales the lake has been a sensitive recorder of hydroclimatic variations. Low Ca concentrations indicate more arid periods during the late glacial (34 - 15 kybp) compared to the last interstadial or early Holocene. This observation is supported by the ratio of terrestrial to aquatic lipid biomarkers (long vs. short chain n-alkanes), which indicate greater relative inputs of aquatic biomarkers during wetter periods. The changes in aridity as shown in these geochemical proxies are compared with temperature as reflected in glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraether (GDGT) based paleotemperature proxies to assess the extent to which insolation may have driven aridity variations, and with terrestrial and aquatic biomarker

  16. Response of Terrestrial Vegetation to Variations in Temperature and Aridity Since the Last Glacial Maximum in Lake Chalco, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werne, J. P.; Halbur, J.; Rubesch, M.; Brown, E. T.; Ortega, B.; Caballero, M.; Correa-Metrio, A.; Lozano, S.

    2013-05-01

    The water balance of the Southwestern United States and most of Mexico is dependent on regional climate systems, including the Mexican (or North American) Monsoon. The Mexican Monsoon leads to significant summer rainfall across a broad swath of the continent, which constitutes the major source of annual precipitation over much of this region. The position of the ITCZ and the strength of the accompanying monsoon are affected by variability in insolation. Stronger northern hemisphere summer insolation shifts the ITCZ northward, bringing about a more intense monsoon. Here we discuss a new geochemical climate record from Lake Chalco, Mexico, which couples inorganic (X-ray fluorescence) and organic (biomarkers and stable isotopes) geochemical proxies to reconstruct temperature and aridity over the past 45,000 years, as well as the response of terrestrial vegetation to such climate changes. The Basin of Mexico is a high altitude closed lacustrine basin (20°N, 99°W; 2240 m.a.s.l.) in the Trans Mexican Volcanic Belt. The plain of Lake Chalco, located near Mexico City in the southern sub-basin, has an area of 120 km2 and a catchment of 1100 km2. Though the present-day lake has been reduced to a small marsh due to historic diversion of its waters, over longer timescales the lake has been a sensitive recorder of hydroclimatic variations. Low Ca concentrations indicate more arid periods during the late glacial (34 - 15 kybp) compared to the last interstadial or early Holocene. This observation is supported by the ratio of terrestrial to aquatic lipid biomarkers (long vs. short chain n-alkanes), which indicate greater relative inputs of aquatic biomarkers during wetter periods. The changes in aridity as shown in these geochemical proxies are compared with temperature as reflected in glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraether (GDGT) based paleotemperature proxies to assess the extent to which insolation may have driven aridity variations, and with terrestrial and aquatic biomarker

  17. Climate and vegetation since the Last Interglacial (MIS 5e) in a putative glacial refugium, northern Idaho, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herring, Erin M.; Gavin, Daniel G.

    2015-06-01

    There are very few terrestrial sediment records from North America that contain a nearly continuous sequence spanning from the Last Interglacial period to the present. We present stratigraphic records of pollen and several other proxies from a Carex-dominated wetland, Star Meadows, located 140 km south of the maximum extent of the Cordilleran Ice Sheet and near the current southern extent of interior mesic forests in northern Idaho. Many species in this region are disjunct by 160 km of arid steppe and dry forest from their more extensive distribution along the Pacific Northwest coast and may have survived in an interior refugium. The chronology for the upper 251 cm was determined by six radiocarbon dates and one tephra deposit, and the age of the remainder of the core (251-809 cm) was estimated by correlation with SPECMAP δ18O. Fluctuating water levels were inferred from alternating peat, biogenic silica, and aquatic pollen types. During MIS 5e the region was warmer and drier than today and was dominated by Pinus (likely Pinus contorta) mixed conifer forest surrounding a Carex meadow. A cool-moist climate (MIS 5b-5d) soon developed, and the site was inundated with deep water. Pollen indicated wetland vegetation (Betula glandulosa, Typhaceae, and Salix) developed around a lake with a Pseudotsuga/Larix and Picea forest on the surrounding slopes. During MIS 5a, a warmer climate supported a Pseudotsuga/Larix, Abies, and Picea forest on the surrounding hillsides and a Carex-dominated environment within a dry meadow. From MIS 4 to MIS 3, a cool and wet Pinus and Picea forest predominated. Water levels rose, enabling Nuphar to persist within a perennial lake while a sedge fen established along the lake margin. As climate transitioned into MIS 2, a cooler and drier climate supported a Pinus and Picea subalpine parkland, though water levels remained high enough to support Nuphar. During the Last Glacial Maximum the sediment was mainly silt and clay with high Artemisia and

  18. Atlantic Ocean modulated hydroclimate of the subtropical northeastern Mexico since the last glacial maximum and comparison with the southern US

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Priyadarsi D.; Rivero-Navarrete, Axel; Sánchez-Zavala, José L.; Beramendi-Orosco, Laura E.; Muthu-Sankar, Gowrappan; Lozano-Santacruz, Rufino

    2016-01-01

    Proxy records generated from chemical composition and radiocarbon dating of a sediment sequence collected from the El Potosi Basin provide information about variable hydroclimate of the subtropical northeastern Mexico since the last glacial maximum (LGM). Minimal amounts of runoff and more carbonate deposition during >19 ka represent the LGM. The deglaciation was wetter compared to the LGM and enhanced runoff during ˜ 19- 12 ka transported more Ti-bearing clastics from a relatively humid watershed. Over the deglaciation, the basin received more runoff during the Bølling-Allerød compared to the Heinrich Stadial 1 and Younger Dryas. Reduction in the amount of runoff during ˜ 10- 1 ka and deposition of unweathered Si-bearing clastics during ˜ 4- 1 ka suggest that the Holocene was drier compared to the deglaciation. Hydroclimates of the northeastern Mexico and southern US were synchronous during the LGM as well as deglaciation. Change from the drier LGM to wetter Bølling-Allerød occurred as the Gulf of Mexico became warmer and the region received more summer precipitation. However, the dissimilarities observed in regional hydroclimates of the Holocene need further evaluation.

  19. Carbon storage increases by major forest ecosystems in tropical South America since the Last Glacial Maximum and the early Holocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behling, Hermann

    2002-06-01

    To study the carbon storage increase of major forest ecosystems in tropical South America, such as Amazon rain forest, Atlantic rain forest, semideciduous forest, and Araucaria forest, the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) and the early Holocene vegetation cover were reconstructed by pollen records. Marked forest expansion points to a significant total carbon storage increase by tropical forests in South America since the LGM and the early Holocene. The Amazon rain forest expansion, about 39% in area, had 28.3×10 9 tC (+20%), the highest carbon storage increase since the LGM. The expansion of the other much smaller forest areas also had a significant carbon storage increase since the LGM, the Atlantic rain forest with 4.9×10 9 tC (+55%), the semideciduous forest of eastern Brazil with 6.3×10 9 tC (+46%), the Araucaria forest with 3.4×10 9 tC (+108%). The estimated carbon storage increase of the four forest biomes since the early Holocene is also remarkable. The extensive deforestation in the last century strongly affected the carbon storage by tropical forests.

  20. Glacial-Interglacial, Orbital and Millennial-Scale Climate Variability for the Last Glacial Cycle at Shackleton Site U1385 based on Dinoflagellate Cysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datema, M.

    2015-12-01

    The Shackleton Site (IODP Expedition 339 Site U1385), located off the West-Portuguese Margin, preserves a continuous high-fidelity record of millennial-scale climate variability for the last several glacial cycles (~1.4 Myr) that can be correlated precisely to patterns observed in polar ice cores. In addition, rapid delivery of terrestrial material to the deep-sea environment allows the correlation of these marine records to European terrestrial climate records. This unique marine-ice-terrestrial linkage makes the Shackleton Site the ideal reference section for studying Quaternary abrupt climate change. The main objective of studying Site U1385 is to establish a marine reference section of Pleistocene climate change. We generated (sub)millennial-scale (~600 year interval) dinoflagellate cyst (dinocyst) assemblage records from Shackleton Site U1385 (IODP Expedition 339) to reconstruct sea surface temperature (SST) and productivity/upwelling over the last 152 kyrs. In addition, our approach allows for detailed land-sea correlations, because we also counted assemblages of pollen and spores from higher plants. Dinocyst SST and upwelling proxies, as well as warm/cold pollen proxies from Site U1385 show glacial-interglacial, orbital and stadial-interstadial climate variability and correlate very well to Uk'37, planktic foraminifer δ18O and Ca/Ti proxies of previously drilled Shackleton Sites and Greenland Ice Core δ18O. The palynological proxies capture (almost) all Dansgaard-Oeschger events of the last glacial cycle, also before ~70 ka, where millennial-scale variability is overprinted by precession. We compare the performance and results of the palynology of Site U1385 to proxies of previously drilled Shackleton Sites and conclude that palynology strengthens the potential of this site to form a multi-proxy reference section for millennial scale climate variability across the Pleistocene-Holocene. Finally, we will present a long-term paleoceanographic perspective down

  1. Debris flow sensitivity to glacial-interglacial climate change - supply vs transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Arcy, Mitch; Roda Boluda, Duna C.; Whittaker, Alexander C.

    2016-04-01

    Numerical models suggest that small mountain catchment-alluvial fan systems might be sensitive to climate changes over glacial-interglacial cycles, and record these palaeoclimate signals in the sedimentology of their deposits. However, these models are still largely untested, and the propagation of climate signals through simple sediment routing systems remains contentious. Here, we present detailed sedimentological records from 8 debris flow fan systems in Owens Valley, California, that capture the past ~ 120 ka of deposition. We identify a strong and sustained relationship between deposit grain size and palaeoclimate records over a full glacial-interglacial cycle, with significantly coarser-grained deposits found in warm and dry periods. Our data show that these systems are highly sensitive to climate with a rapid response timescale of < 10ka, which we attribute to rapid transfer from source to sink. This sensitive record might be explained by changes in sediment supply and/or changes in sediment mobilisation, and we evaluate these mechanisms quantitatively. We find little evidence that changes in catchment hypsometry, weathering patterns, past glaciation or sediment production can explain the grain size changes we observe on the fans. However we do find that grain size has increased exponentially with rising temperatures, at a rate that matches the intensification of storms with warming. As these debris flows are triggered by surface runoff during intense storms, we interpret that enhanced runoff rates in warm and stormy conditions are responsible for entraining larger clasts during debris flow initiation. This implies that debris flow fans might record signals of past storm intensity. Our study utilises field sedimentology and focuses on short transport distances (~ 10 km) and climate changes over ~ 1-100 ka timespans, but could additionally have important implications for how eroding landscapes might respond to future warming scenarios. We address the

  2. Simulating the vegetation response in western Europe to abrupt climate changes under glacial background conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woillez, M.-N.; Kageyama, M.; Combourieu-Nebout, N.; Krinner, G.

    2013-03-01

    The last glacial period has been punctuated by two types of abrupt climatic events, the Dansgaard-Oeschger (DO) and Heinrich (HE) events. These events, recorded in Greenland ice and in marine sediments, involved changes in the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) and led to major changes in the terrestrial biosphere. Here we use the dynamical global vegetation model ORCHIDEE to simulate the response of vegetation to abrupt changes in the AMOC strength. We force ORCHIDEE offline with outputs from the IPSL_CM4 general circulation model, in which the AMOC is forced to change by adding freshwater fluxes in the North Atlantic. We investigate the impact of a collapse and recovery of the AMOC, at different rates, and focus on Western Europe, where many pollen records are available for comparison. The impact of an AMOC collapse on the European mean temperatures and precipitations simulated by the GCM is relatively small but sufficient to drive an important regression of forests and expansion of grasses in ORCHIDEE, in qualitative agreement with pollen data for an HE event. On the contrary, a run with a rapid shift of the AMOC to a hyperactive state of 30 Sv, mimicking the warming phase of a DO event, does not exhibit a strong impact on the European vegetation compared to the glacial control state. For our model, simulating the impact of an HE event thus appears easier than simulating the abrupt transition towards the interstadial phase of a DO. For both a collapse or a recovery of the AMOC, the vegetation starts to respond to climatic changes immediately but reaches equilibrium about 200 yr after the climate equilibrates, suggesting a possible bias in the climatic reconstructions based on pollen records, which assume equilibrium between climate and vegetation. However, our study does not take into account vegetation feedbacks on the atmosphere.

  3. Timing of advance and basal condition of the Laurentide Ice Sheet during the last glacial maximum in the Richardson Mountains, NWT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacelle, Denis; Lauriol, Bernard; Zazula, Grant; Ghaleb, Bassam; Utting, Nicholas; Clark, Ian D.

    2013-09-01

    This study presents new ages for the northwest section of the Laurentide Ice Sheet (LIS) glacial chronology from material recovered from two retrogressive thaw slumps exposed in the Richardson Mountains, Northwest Territories, Canada. One study site, located at the maximum glacial limit of the LIS in the Richardson Mountains, had calcite concretions recovered from aufeis buried by glacial till that were dated by U/Th disequilibrium to 18,500 cal yr BP. The second site, located on the Peel Plateau to the east yielded a fossil horse (Equus) mandible that was radiocarbon dated to ca. 19,700 cal yr BP. These ages indicate that the Peel Plateau on the eastern flanks of the Richardson Mountains was glaciated only after 18,500 cal yr BP, which is later than previous models for the global last glacial maximum (LGM). As the LIS retreated the Peel Plateau around 15,000 cal yr BP, following the age of the Tutsieta phase, we conclude that the presence of the northwestern margin of the LIS at its maximum limit was a very short event in the western Canadian Arctic.

  4. Responses of ocean circulation and carbon cycle to changes in the position of the Southern Hemisphere westerlies at Last Glacial Maximum

    PubMed Central

    Völker, Christoph; Köhler, Peter

    2013-01-01

    We explore the impact of a latitudinal shift in the westerly wind belt over the Southern Ocean on the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC) and on the carbon cycle for Last Glacial Maximum background conditions using a state-of-the-art ocean general circulation model. We find that a southward (northward) shift in the westerly winds leads to an intensification (weakening) of no more than 10% of the AMOC. This response of the ocean physics to shifting winds agrees with other studies starting from preindustrial background climate, but the responsible processes are different. In our setup changes in AMOC seemed to be more pulled by upwelling in the south than pushed by downwelling in the north, opposite to what previous studies with different background climate are suggesting. The net effects of the changes in ocean circulation lead to a rise in atmospheric pCO2 of less than 10 μatm for both northward and southward shift in the winds. For northward shifted winds the zone of upwelling of carbon- and nutrient-rich waters in the Southern Ocean is expanded, leading to more CO2outgassing to the atmosphere but also to an enhanced biological pump in the subpolar region. For southward shifted winds the upwelling region contracts around Antarctica, leading to less nutrient export northward and thus a weakening of the biological pump. These model results do not support the idea that shifts in the westerly wind belt play a dominant role in coupling atmospheric CO2 rise and Antarctic temperature during deglaciation suggested by the ice core data. PMID:26074663

  5. Reconstructed moisture evolution of the deserts in northern China since the Last Glacial Maximum and its implications for the East Asian Summer Monsoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qin; Wu, Haibin; Yu, Yanyan; Sun, Aizhi; Marković, Slobodan B.; Guo, Zhengtang

    2014-10-01

    The East Asian summer monsoon (EASM) affects rainfall variability and consequently terrestrial ecosystems in the densely populated Asian region. Understanding the nature of EASM evolution is vital for interpreting the paleoclimatic conditions of the region and for predicting future climate changes. However, the relative importance of factors such as high northern latitude ice volume, low northern latitude summer insolation and atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) levels in controlling the EASM on orbital timescales remains controversial. The aeolian deposits and vegetation in the dry lands of northern China are highly sensitive to climatic changes. Here, we present a reconstruction of effective moisture levels in the region since the Last Glacial Maximum based on an analysis of changes in the sedimentary facies of aeolian deposits and vegetation type combined with reliable age control. The results demonstrate that extremely arid conditions prevailed from approximately 21-16 ka BP; that conditions gradually became wetter from 16-8 ka BP, reaching a peak in effective moisture from 8-4 ka BP; and that relatively arid conditions prevailed thereafter. This pattern of moisture evolution probably reflects changes in summer monsoon precipitation. Although the strengthening of the EASM lagged variations in northern hemisphere insolation and atmospheric CO2 content, the strengthening was in phase with the rise in sea level from 21-6 ka BP which was controlled by changes in global ice volume. Therefore our results suggest that sea level rise may have been a major driver of EASM precipitation in the desert area of northern China during this period, as a result of shortening the transport distance of oceanic moisture sources to the continental interior and thus enabling the monsoon rainfall belt to reach the study region.

  6. Basal conditions of the Rhine Glacier at the Last Glacial Maximum: insights from high-resolution transient numerical models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Denis; Gillet-Chaulet, Fabien; Haeberli, Wilfried; Fischer, Urs H.

    2014-05-01

    Questions about the safety of nuclear waste repositories during future ice ages in previously glaciated landscapes have lent impetus to new numerical model simulations concerning past ice conditions. In Switzerland, all potential sites investigated for these repositories have been affected during LGM or earlier ice ages by large piedmont glaciers and/or peri-/subglacial permafrost under cold-dry conditions. First quantitative reconstructions and analysis using steady-state approaches were carried out in the 1980s. Recent advances in ice flow numerical models and code parallelization make it now possible to run transient thermo-mechanical full-Stokes models at high resolution. These models couple ice flow to temperature-dependent sliding at the bed and climate parameterization (temperature, mass balance gradients) at the surface. Starting from the reconstruction of the Alpine ice field in Switzerland, we model the transient flow of the Rhine Glacier from its source in the Alps to its terminus that formed a large polythermal piedmont lobe in the northern Swiss plateau and in southern Germany. Results indicate that basal conditions are strongly dependent on initial temperature parameterization and climate conditions that lead to the LGM. The models indicate that much of the substrate below the ice lobe was at the melting temperature, opening possibilities for fast erosion and overdeepening formation. Other areas in alpine valleys were also at the melting temperature when the basal ice originating from high up in the Alps had sufficient time to reach the melting temperature at the bed of thick valley glaciers. Cold climate conditions kept marginal ice and ice up valley cold. High sliding speed and basal shear stress, two other parameters that promote erosion, indicate that erosion was potentially high in some portions of the main trunks of the Rhine Glacier but less so in more marginal parts of the flat piedmont lobe. Results from these transient full thermo

  7. Links between tropical rainfall and North Atlantic climate during the last glacial period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deplazes, Gaudenz; Lückge, Andreas; Peterson, Larry C.; Timmermann, Axel; Hamann, Yvonne; Hughen, Konrad A.; Röhl, Ursula; Laj, Carlo; Cane, Mark A.; Sigman, Daniel M.; Haug, Gerald H.

    2013-03-01

    During the last glacial period, the North Atlantic regionexperienced pronounced, millennial-scale alternations between cold, stadial conditions and milder interstadial conditions--commonly referred to as Dansgaard-Oeschger oscillations--as well as periods of massive iceberg discharge known as Heinrich events. Changes in Northern Hemisphere temperature, as recorded in Greenland, are thought to have affected the location of the Atlantic intertropical convergence zone and the strength of the Indian summer monsoon. Here we use high-resolution records of sediment colour--a measure of terrigenous versus biogenic content--from the Cariaco Basin off the coast of Venezuela and the Arabian Sea to assess teleconnections with the North Atlantic climate system during the last glacial period. The Cariaco record indicates that the intertropical convergence zone migrated seasonally over the site during mild stadial conditions, but was permanently displaced south of the basin during peak stadials and Heinrich events. In the Arabian Sea, we find evidence of a weak Indian summer monsoon during the stadial events. The tropical records show a more variable response to North Atlantic cooling than the Greenland temperature records. We therefore suggest that Greenland climate is especially sensitive to variations in the North Atlantic system--in particular sea-ice extent--whereas the intertropical convergence zone and Indian monsoon system respond primarily to variations in mean Northern Hemisphere temperature.

  8. The Last Glacial Maximum at 44°S documented by a 10Be moraine chronology at Lake Ohau, Southern Alps of New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Putnam, Aaron E.; Schaefer, Joerg M.; Denton, George H.; Barrell, David J. A.; Birkel, Sean D.; Andersen, Bjørn G.; Kaplan, Michael R.; Finkel, Robert C.; Schwartz, Roseanne; Doughty, Alice M.

    2013-02-01

    Determining whether glaciers registered the classic Last Glacial Maximum (LGM; ˜26,500-˜19,000 yrs ago) coevally between the hemispheres can help to discriminate among hypothesized drivers of ice-age climate. Here, we present a record of glacier behavior from the Southern Alps of New Zealand during the 'local LGM' (LLGM). We used 10Be surface-exposure dating methods and detailed glacial geomorphologic mapping to produce a robust chronology of well-preserved terminal moraines deposited during the LLGM near Lake Ohau on central South Island. We then used a glaciological model to estimate a LLGM glacier snowline and atmospheric temperature from the Ohau glacier record. Seventy-three 10Be surface-exposure ages place culminations of terminal moraine construction, and hence completions of glacier advances to positions outboard of present-day Lake Ohau, at 138,600 ± 10,600 yrs, 32,520 ± 970 yrs ago, 27,400 ± 1300 yrs ago, 22,510 ± 660 yrs ago, and 18,220 ± 500 yrs ago. Recessional moraines document glacier recession into the Lake Ohau trough by 17,690 ± 350 yrs ago. Exposure of an ice-molded bedrock bench located inboard of the innermost LLGM moraines by 17,380 ± 510 yrs ago indicates that the ice tongue had receded about 40% of its overall length by that time. Comparing our chronology with distances of retreat suggests that the Ohau glacier terminus receded at a mean net rate of about 77 m yr-1 and its surface lowered by 200 m between 17,690 and 17,380 yrs ago. A long-term continuation of ice retreat in the Ohau glacier catchment is implied by moraine records at the head of Irishman Stream valley, a tributary of the Ohau glacier valley. The Irishman Stream cirque glacier advanced to produce a set of Lateglacial moraines at 13,000 ± 500 yrs ago, implying that the cirque glacier was less extensive prior to that advance. We employed a glaciological model, fit to these mapped and dated LLGM moraines, to derive snowline elevations and temperature parameters from the

  9. Hydrological and Vegetation Shifts in the Equatorial Sulawesi since the Last Glacial Maximum: Perspectives from Hydrogen and Carbon Isotopes of Terrestrial Leaf Wax Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wicaksono, Satrio; Russell, James; Holbourn, Ann; Kuhnt, Wolfgang

    2014-05-01

    The Indo-Pacific Warm Pool (IPWP) is a major epicenter of the tropical convective activity that drives both the Walker and Hadley circulations. The island of Sulawesi is situated at the heart of the Maritime Continent within the IPWP, and despite the region's importance, published proxy records and numerical simulations of convection and precipitation patterns from Sulawesi and across the Maritime Continent since the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) display some substantial disagreement. Today, precipitation over Sulawesi is strongly influenced by variations in topography and wind pattern, which include land-sea breezes, orographically-forced winds, and monsoonal winds related to the seasonal migration of the Intertropical Convergence Zone. To better understand the interplay between such variations and high latitude climate dynamics during the last deglaciation, we developed high resolution records of the deuterium isotopic composition of terrestrial leaf waxes (long-chain n-alkanoic acids; δDwax) from a marine core (3.63 ºS, 119.36 ºE, water depth: 688 m) retrieved 10 km west of Sulawesi in close proximity to a major river delta. At low latitudes, δDwax has been used to reconstruct the δD of catchment-integrated precipitation, often interpreted as an indicator of regional rainfall amounts and large-scale convective activity. Our record displays relatively depleted values during the height of LGM, followed by a gradual enrichment that reached its peak (up to 10o enrichment) during the Younger Dryas (YD). Following the YD, δDwax becomes more depleted into the Holocene, reaching values nearly identical to the LGM. The deglacial pattern observed in our δDwax, derived from a predominantly high-altitude catchment in the southwestern arm of Sulawesi, is similar to that of δDwax record from Lake Towuti (2.5 ºS, 121.5 ºE, surface elevation: 319 m) in the southeastern arm of Sulawesi. The synoptic deglacial shifts seen in both catchments demonstrate that the equatorial

  10. Groundwater flow modeling of periods with periglacial and glacial climate conditions for the safety assessment of the proposed high-level nuclear waste repository site at Forsmark, Sweden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidstrand, Patrik; Follin, Sven; Selroos, Jan-Olof; Näslund, Jens-Ove

    2014-09-01

    The impact of periglacial and glacial climate conditions on groundwater flow in fractured crystalline rock is studied by means of groundwater flow modeling of the Forsmark site, which was recently proposed as a repository site for the disposal of spent high-level nuclear fuel in Sweden. The employed model uses a thermal-hydraulically coupled approach for permafrost modeling and discusses changes in groundwater flow implied by the climate conditions found over northern Europe at different times during the last glacial cycle (Weichselian glaciation). It is concluded that discharge of particles released at repository depth occurs very close to the ice-sheet margin in the absence of permafrost. If permafrost is included, the greater part discharges into taliks in the periglacial area. During a glacial cycle, hydraulic gradients at repository depth reach their maximum values when the ice-sheet margin passes over the site; at this time, also, the interface between fresh and saline waters is distorted the most. The combined effect of advances and retreats during several glaciations has not been studied in the present work; however, the results indicate that hydrochemical conditions at depth in the groundwater flow model are almost restored after a single event of ice-sheet advance and retreat.

  11. Rapid response of climatic conditions during the last glacial: evidence from U-series dated Irish speleothems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fankhauser, A.; McDermott, F.; Fleitmann, D.; Hoffmann, D. L.

    2012-04-01

    Rapid climate change events (Dansgaard-Oeschger and Heinrich events) during the last glacial have been well documented in the Greenland ice cores (e.g. NGRIP), but their impact at lower latitudes is still not fully understood. In Ireland, few climate records older than the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) exist due to extensive glacial reworking. Exceptions are cave deposits in an environment protected from extensive glacial erosion. Speleothem deposition requires the presence of liquid water implying cave air temperatures above 0°C. As air temperature in shallow caves (<30m depth) is similar to the mean annual air temperature (MAAT) at the surface; speleothem deposition can only occur in the absence of permafrost or glaciation. In this study, intervals of speleothems deposition in Crag cave, South West Ireland have been determined by U-series-dating to constrain the timing of ice- and permafrost-free conditions prior to the LGM. Here we present evidence for episodic speleothem deposition between the Holocene and the last interglacial. Ninety eight U-Th dates indicate phases of speleothem deposition, interrupted by visible hiatuses e.g. at 131.5 ±0.6; 104.8 ±0.2; 83.9 ±0.3; 71.7 ±0.2; 65.2 ±0.2; 58.9 ±0.3; 47.1 ±0.1; 43.5 ±0.2; 40.0 ±0.1; 38.0 ±0.1; 32.1 ±0.1; 28.8 ±0.1; 27.8 ±0.1; 23.3 ±0.1; 12.5 ±0.2; 11.6 ±0.1; 8.5 ±0.4 ka. These depositional intervals in Crag cave speleothems show an overall synchronicity with Dansgaard-Oeschger (D-O) events recorded in NGRIP. Furthermore, Heinrich events 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6 are characterised by non-deposition. Measured δ18O values in Crag cave speleothems deposited during Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 5a are similar to the mean value for Holocene speleothems (δ18O = -3.26 ‰ VPDB). A trend to higher δ18O values during the glacial is interpreted to predominantly reflect changes in the ocean source region (ice volume effect). Observed δ13C values down to -10‰ (VPDB) indicate the presence of C3 vegetation above the

  12. From flakes to grooves: a technical shift in antlerworking during the last glacial maximum in southwest France.

    PubMed

    Pétillon, Jean-Marc; Ducasse, Sylvain

    2012-04-01

    The evolution of antlerworking technology in Paleolithic and Mesolithic Europe, especially the production of splinters, is usually described as a cumulative process. A progressive increase in blank standardization and productivity was prompted by the application of a key technical process, the groove and splinter technique (GST). The Badegoulian, however, appears as an interruption in this continuum. According to the original definition of this post-Solutrean, pre-Magdalenian archeological culture, one of its distinctive features is the absence of the GST and the manufacture of antler blanks by knapping only. However, this conception has been recently questioned, leading to an alternative hypothesis suggesting that both GST and knapping were used during the Badegoulian. In this article, we present new evidence from several sites in southwest France, which sheds new light on the issue of Badegoulian antlerworking and the transition with the subsequent Lower Magdalenian. Our study is based on two complementary methods: the technological analysis of antler assemblages well-dated to the Badegoulian (Le Cuzoul de Vers) or to the Lower Magdalenian (La Grotte des Scilles, Saint-Germain-la-Rivière), and the direct (14)C dating of specific antler artifacts from mixed or problematic contexts (Cap-Blanc, Reverdit and Lassac). The results firmly establish that, in southwest France, knapping is the only method used for the production of antler splinters during the Badegoulian, before ca. 20,500 cal BP (calibrated years before present), and that it is rapidly replaced by the GST at the beginning of the Lower Magdalenian, after ca. 20,500 cal BP. This technical shift is not linked to an influx of new human populations, environmental change or the supposed economic advantages of the GST. Instead, it must be understood as one of the expressions of a broader reconfiguration of the technical world that starts to take shape in the middle of the Last Glacial Maximum. PMID:22386151

  13. Millennial-scale tropical atmospheric and Atlantic Ocean circulation change from the Last Glacial Maximum and Marine Isotope Stage 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Them, T. R.; Schmidt, M. W.; Lynch-Stieglitz, J.

    2015-10-01

    Abrupt, millennial-scale climate oscillations, known as Dansgaard-Oeschger (D-O) cycles, characterized the climate system of the last glacial period. Although proxy evidence shows that D-O cycles resulted in large-scale changes in atmospheric circulation patterns around the planet, an understanding of how Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) varied across these events remains unclear. Here, we take advantage of the fact that both tropical atmospheric circulation changes corresponding to north-south shifts in the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) and large-scale changes in ocean circulation associated with AMOC variability can be reconstructed in the same sediment core from the Florida Straits to examine the relationship between atmospheric and ocean circulation changes across D-O events. To reconstruct surface water conditions, Mg/Ca-paleothermometry and stable isotope measurements were combined on the planktonic foraminifera Globigerinoides ruber (white variety) from sediment core KNR166-2 JPC26 (24°19.61‧N, 83°15.14‧W; 546 m depth) to reconstruct a high-resolution record of sea surface temperature and δO18seawater (a proxy for upper mixed layer salinity) during Marine Isotope Stages (MIS) 2 and 3 from 20-35 ka BP. As an additional proxy for upper water column salinity change, we also generate a faunal abundance record of the salinity-sensitive planktonic foraminifera Neogloboquadrina dutertrei. Our results suggest that rapid reductions in sea surface salinity occurred at the onset of D-O interstadials, while stadials are characterized by increased surface salinities. The most likely cause of these salinity changes was variation in the strength and position of the ITCZ across D-O events. Finally, we examine the relationship between millennial-scale atmospheric circulation changes recorded in the planktonic records and ocean circulation changes inferred from the benthic δ18O record from our core. Our results provide some of the first

  14. The Influence of True Polar Wander on Climate and Glacial Inception in North America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daradich, A.; Huybers, P. J.; Mitrovica, J. X.; Chan, N. H.

    2014-12-01

    While plate tectonic motions and dynamic topography of continents each reflect an active mantle convective regime, excursions of the Earth's rotation axis relative to a fixed hotspot reference frame are remarkably muted. Early studies of paleomagnetically inferred pole positions suggested excursions of less than a few degrees [Jurdy and Van Der Voo, 1975]. For this reason, long-term changes in Earth's rotation, or true polar wander (TPW), were thought to have a negligible role in the observed long-term secular cooling of Earth's climate through the Tertiary [Donn and Shaw, 1977]. This gradual cooling over the past 65 million years began at a time when much of Earth's climate was relatively warm and quiescent and culminated in dramatic glacial cycles of the Pleistocene. In contrast to earlier studies, recent reanalyses of paleomagnetic pole positions suggest a secular drift in Earth's rotation axis of greater than ten degrees in the last 40 million years [Torsvik et al., 2012; Doubrovine et al., 2012]. The direction of this drift brings North America, a site of advancing and retreating ice sheets throughout the Pleistocene, to increasingly higher latitudes. Using an orbital solution valid for the last 50 million years [Laskar et al., 2004], we compute the effect of TPW on insolation quantities for sites in Greenland and the Canadian Arctic Archipelago. Our results indicate that a three degree shift in latitude driven by TPW is comparable to a two degree change in obliquity in terms of its impact on summer energy (i.e. the total energy for the year on days surpassing a given insolation threshold; Huybers, 2006). In addition, we explore climatological gradients using modern climatological data and employ simple climate models to characterize reductions in positive degree days for the North American Arctic over the last 40 million years. We find that TPW and continental drift that moved arctic North America poleward could have driven cooling that contributed to glacial

  15. Glacial to Interglacial Climate and Sea Level Changes Recorded in Submerged Speleothems, Argentarola, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Folz-Donahue, K.; Dutton, A.; Antonioli, F.; Richards, D. A.; Nita, D. C.; Lambeck, K.

    2014-12-01

    Direct records of Quaternary sea level change can provide insight on the timing and nature of ice sheet retreat during glacial terminations. Such records are generally rare, particularly prior to the last deglaciation, due in part to the difficulty of recovering material from sites that have been submerged by subsequent sea-level rise. A suite of stalagmites recovered from a submerged cave on Argentarola Island in the Tyrrhenian Sea contains hiatuses that were formed when the cave became submerged by seawater. These hiatuses are remarkable due to the presence of calcite tubes secreted by serpulid worms, providing direct evidence of marine inundation. As sea level drops during the following glacial inception, the cave is drained and dense spelean calcite encases the serpulid worm tubes, forming alternating layers of spelean and serpulid calcite. U-Th dates of spelean calcite directly above and below these serpulid layers has previously been used to constrain timing and amplitude of sea level highstands in the Mediterranean. Stable isotope records from the same cave have also been used to indicate increased precipitation across the Mediterranean during Sapropel 6 (175 ka). Here we present U-Th dates and stable isotope records for three Argentarola stalagmites. These specimens were recovered from -22, -18, and -14 m relative to present sea level (rpsl), and complement previously published data for Argentarola stalagmites at -21, -18.5, and -18 m rpsl. The timing and elevation of spelean calcite directly above and below serpulid tube layers provide rare insight on rates of sea-level change between -14 and -22 m during glacial terminations and inceptions prior to the last termination. Stable isotope records from the same stalagmites are used to investigate changes in western Mediterranean climate and potential relationships to Mediterranean sapropel events.

  16. Late glacial and Early Holocene climatic conditions along the margin of the Greenland Ice Sheet, registered by glacial extents in Milne Land, east Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy, L.; Kelly, M. A.; Lowell, T. V.

    2010-12-01

    Determining the mechanisms that caused past abrupt climate changes is important for understanding today’s rapidly warming climate and, in particular, whether we may be faced with abrupt climate change in the future. Scientists, policy makers and the public are concerned about ongoing warming because it is sending our climate into unprecedented territory at a rapid pace. The Younger Dryas cold event (~12,850-11,650 cal yr B.P.) was an abrupt climate event that occurred during the last transition from glacial to interglacial conditions. Due to its abrupt nature and the magnitude of temperature change that occurred, the Younger Dryas has been the focus of extensive research, however, the mechanisms that caused this cold event are still not well understood. Wide belts (up to 5 km) of moraines, known as the Milne Land stade moraines, are present in the Scoresby Sund region of central east Greenland. Previous work in the region using a combination of equilibrium line altitudes, surface exposure dating of moraines, and relative sea level changes indicates that mountain glacier advances during Younger Dryas time represent only moderate summer temperature cooling (~3-4C colder than at present). In contrast, Greenland ice cores, which register mean annual temperatures, indicate that Younger Dryas temperatures over the ice sheet were ~15C colder than at present. This mismatch between the two nearby paleoclimate records is interpreted to result from strong seasonality (very cold winters and only moderately cold summers) during Younger Dryas time. We are examining seasonality during Younger Dryas time by developing records of summer temperatures from local glaciers in Milne Land (71.0°N, 25.6°W). These mountain glaciers are located adjacent to the Greenland Ice Sheet, less than 50 km from the location of Renland Ice core and only ~250 km from the locations of the GISP2 and GRIP cores. We present new 10Be ages of local glacial extents in Milne Land. Ages range from 11,880 yr

  17. Late quaternary distribution of the Cycladophora davisiana radiolarian species: Reflection of possible ventilation of the North Pacific intermediate water during the Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matul, A. G.; Abelmann, A.; Gersonde, R.; Nürnberg, D.; Tiedemann, R.; Kruglikova, S. B.

    2015-02-01

    A comparison of micropaleontological data on the distribution of the Cycladophora davisiana radiolarian species in the surface sediment layer and the Late Quaternary sediments from the Subarctic Pacific and Far East marginal seas allowed conclusions concerning the possible conditions and occurrence of intermediate waters during the last glacial maximum. We used the modern data on the C. davisiana species, which is a micro-paleontological indicator of the cold oxygen-rich upper intermediate water mass, which is now forming only in the Sea of Okhotsk. The high amount of C. davisiana in sediments of the last glacial maximum may point to the possible formation and expansion of the ventilated intermediate water in the most part of the Subarctic paleo-Pacific: the Bering Sea, the Sea of Okhotsk, within the NW Gyre, and in the Gulf of Alaska.

  18. Laurentide Ice Sheet meltwater and the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation since the last glacial maximum: A view from the Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flower, B. P.; Williams, C.; Brown, E. A.; Hastings, D. W.; Hendricks, J.; Goddard, E. A.

    2010-12-01

    The influence of ice sheet meltwater on the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC) since the last glacial maximum represents an important issue in abrupt climate change. Comparison of Greenland and Antarctic ice core records has revealed a complex interhemispheric linkage and led to different models of ocean circulation including the “bipolar seesaw.” Meltwater input from the Laurentide Ice Sheet has been invoked as a cause of proximal sea-surface temperature (SST) and salinity change in the North Atlantic, and of regional to global climate change via its influence on the AMOC. We present published and new Mg/Ca, Ba/Ca, and δ18O data on the planktic foraminifer Globigerinoides ruber from northern Gulf of Mexico sediment cores that provide detailed records of SST, δ18O of seawater (δ18Osw), and inferred salinity for the 20-8 ka interval. Age control for Orca Basin core MD02-2550 is based on >40 AMS 14C dates on Globigerinoides ruber and documents continuous sedimentation at rates >35 cm/kyr. Early meltwater input is inferred from δ18Osw and Ba/Ca data prior to and during the Mystery Interval, consistent with a high sensitivity to solar insolation and greenhouse forcing. New bulk sediment δ18O data show major spikes reaching -5.5‰ ca. 14.6 and 12.6 ka. We speculate that these excursions represent fine carbonate sediment from Canadian Paleozoic marine carbonates, analogous to detrital carbonate in the North Atlantic which has a δ18O value of -5‰. Partial support for our hypothesis comes from SEM photomicrographs of bulk sediment from this section, which show no coccoliths or foraminifera in contrast to other intervals. The biogenic carbonate flux seems to have been greatly reduced by fine sediment input. Inferred peak meltwater flow appears to have been associated with the Bolling warming and meltwater pulse 1a. Finally, meltwater reduction at the start of the Younger Dryas supports models for a diversion to North Atlantic outlets and AMOC

  19. The effect of abrupt climate changes and climate background conditions in Southern Europe during the last glacial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knorr, Gregor; Martin-Puertas, Celia; Brauer, Achim; Lohmann, Gerrit

    2015-04-01

    The last glacial period is characterized by abrupt and large temperature shifts in Greenland and the North Atlantic realm. Pollen and sediment data from Lago Grande di Monticchio (MON) have demonstrated a clear imprint of these fluctuations operating at millennial time-scales. Interestingly, basic mean environmental condition changes with respect to temperature and precipitation occurred during MIS4, separating warm and dry conditions during MIS5 from relatively cold and humid conditions within MIS3. This general climate background shift is superposed by distinct millennial-scale variability at MON. Using a fully coupled atmosphere-ocean general circulation model applying boundary conditions at 32 ka BP and pre-industrial conditions as a surrogate for MIS3 and MIS5, we have simulated and analysed characteristic changes in Southern Europe during the last glacial. We find that changes in the mean state at MON are mainly related to a partial shift of the North Atlantic deep water (NADW) convection sites from the Nordic Seas to South of Iceland, the presence of the Fennoscandian ice sheet and lower greenhouse gas concentrations. These background characteristics provide the basis for enhanced zonal moisture transport from the eastern North Atlantic to Middle and Southern Europe. Furthermore, simulations of abrupt climate change scenarios show that a deactivation of the convection sites South of Iceland during MIS3 leads to cooler and dryer conditions at MON. Such temperature and precipitation changes are thought to provide a counter-acting effect on woody vegetation and associated pollen signals at MON. This is in contrast to the impact of abrupt climate perturbation scenarios during MIS5, where no significant precipitation changes are detected. Hence, the simulated changes and underlying mechanisms are largely consistent with the recorded proxy evidence with respect to both, mean state and millennial-scale changes.

  20. Lizards on Ice: Evidence for Multiple Refugia in Liolaemus pictus (Liolaemidae) during the Last Glacial Maximum in the Southern Andean Beech Forests

    PubMed Central

    Vera-Escalona, Iván; D'Elía, Guillermo; Gouin, Nicolás; Fontanella, Frank M.; Muñoz-Mendoza, Carla; Sites, Jack W.; Victoriano, Pedro F.

    2012-01-01

    Historical climate changes and orogenesis are two important factors that have shaped intraspecific biodiversity patterns worldwide. Although southern South America has experienced such complex events, there is a paucity of studies examining the effects on intraspecific diversification in this part of the world. Liolaemus pictus is the southernmost distributed lizard in the Chilean temperate forest, whose genetic structure has likely been influenced by Pleistocene glaciations. We conducted a phylogeographic study of L. pictus in Chile and Argentina based on one mitochondrial and two nuclear genes recovering two strongly divergent groups, Northern and Southern clades. The first group is distributed from the northernmost limit of the species to the Araucanía region while the second group is distributed throughout the Andes and the Chiloé archipelago in Southern Chile. Our results suggest that L. pictus originated 751 Kya, with divergence between the two clades occurring in the late Pleistocene. Demographic reconstructions for the Northern and Southern clades indicate a decrease in effective population sizes likely associated with Pleistocene glaciations. Surprisingly, patterns of genetic variation, clades age and historical gene flow in populations distributed within the limits of the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) are not explained by recent colonization. We propose an “intra-Andean multiple refuge” hypothesis, along with the classical refuge hypothesis previously proposed for the biota of the Chilean Coastal range and Eastern Andean Cordillera. Our hypothesis is supported by niche modelling analysis suggesting the persistence of fragments of suitable habitat for the species within the limits of the LGM ice shield. This type of refuge hypothesis is proposed for the first time for an ectothermic species. PMID:23209552

  1. Uniform summer cooling drove glacier re-advance across New Zealand during the late-glacial climate reversal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eaves, S.; Mackintosh, A. N.; Winckler, G.; Schaefer, J. M.; Anderson, B.; Townsend, D.

    2014-12-01

    Rapid, millennial-scale climate events characterised the last global glacial-interglacial transition (18-11 ka). In New Zealand, the timing and magnitude of climatic events during this period are poorly understood. Improving our understanding of these events will help to identify the mechanisms via which rapid shifts in climate occur. In this study, we report results from geomorphological mapping, cosmogenic 3He exposure dating and numerical glacier modelling, which show evidence for re-advance of mountain glaciers on Mt Ruapehu in central North Island, New Zealand (39°S) during the late glacial chron (15-11 ka). Using a distributed energy balance model, coupled with a 2D ice flow model, we perform a range of experiments and sensitivity analyses to constrain estimates of past temperature associated with the mapped and dated former ice limits. We find that glaciers in North Island re-advanced early in the late glacial period in response to a likely temperature cooling of 2.5 - 3.4 °C relative to present day, assuming precipitation remained within ± 20% of present. This reconstructed cooling is greater than recorded in nearby pollen archives, which may reflect a seasonal bias between climate proxies. Using our glacier model, we quantify the length sensitivity of glaciers on Mt. Ruapehu to seasonal climate changes. We find that a 3 °C cooling relative to present causes a c. 80% increase in glacier length when applied to the austral summer months (Dec-Feb), compared to c. 20% in winter (June-August). Thus, glaciers in North Island, New Zealand are most sensitive to temperature changes during summer. Strong agreement between our late-glacial reconstructions and other summer temperature proxy records (e.g. mountain glaciers, chironomids) from the Southern Alps, suggest New Zealand experienced uniform summertime cooling during the late-glacial climate reversal.

  2. Multi-proxies study on the paleoceanography and terrigenous input in the polar Nodic Sea since the Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yanguang

    2016-04-01

    The polar Nodic Sea (NS) lies between the Arctic and Antlantic Oceans and the poleward-directed Atlantic heat and water transfer system plays a key role in affecting the ocean changes and sediments input. A suite of well-proven proxy methods for sediment core ARC5-BB03 (72°26.606'N, 7°35.890'E, water depth 2598 m) are used to address issues that are critical to the understanding of paleoceanographic conditions and sediments supplies over the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) in this region. The methods include grain size analysis, AMS14C dating, color reflectance, high-resolution XRF scanning, oxygen isotope of planktic foraminifera and organic geochemistry measuring. The principal component analysis of the XRF data is applied for identification of sedimentary sources. Variations of grain size and elements' content indicate that the sedimentary sources of the polar NS have undergone dramatic changes over the past 26 ka BP. Changes of terrigenous input in the polar NS show close relationship with the variations of the North Atlantic Current (NAC), the melting of sea ice and ice sheet, the establishment of the Thermohaline Circulation (TC) and the forming of the North Atlantic Deep Water. The coarse grain size sediments before 21.5 ka BP implies different source from those in the later period because the terrigenous input is dominant in this period and occupied by an orderly layer of expandable minerals (OLEM). Strengthened sea ice extension is deemed to the main reason for the high terrigenous input in the polar NS before 21.5 ka BP. Between 21.5~16.5 cal. ka BP, biogenic materials increase accompanied with the decrease of terrigenous contribution indicates the impact of northward intrusion of NAC and the strenghthen of water ventilaiton in polar NS. The decrease of biogenic substance and the increase of terrigenous input during 16.5~10 cal. ka BP is consistent with the fluctuation in the melting of ice sheet and intensity of NAC during the last deglaciation. Compare

  3. Post-Last Glacial Maximum (Latest Pleistocene to Holocene) geology of the Santa Barbara shelf, southern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, S. Y.; Ritchie, A. C.; Conrad, J. E.; Dartnell, P.; Phillips, E.; Sliter, R. W.

    2011-12-01

    High-resolution bathymetric and seismic-reflection data collected for the California Seafloor Mapping Program (http://walrus.wr.usgs.gov/mapping/csmp/) provide new insights for understanding the post-Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) evolution of the Santa Barbara shelf, highlighting relationships between tectonics, eustasy, and sediment supply. The west-trending shelf extends offshore for 5 to 7 km and is bounded on the south by the deep Santa Barbara basin and on the north by a narrow coastal zone and the steep, rapidly uplifting Santa Ynez Mountains. The active, west-trending, north-dipping Ventura-Pitas Point-North Channel and Red Mountain fault systems form the structural boundary between two distinct shelf domains. The smooth, gently sloping, southern shelf is flooded by thick (35 to 40 m), prograding Santa Clara and Ventura River deltaic deposits. These thick strata drape the shelfbreak and fill the accommodation space created by rising sea level, largely masking the influence of active tectonics. In contrast, the northern shelf has complex bathymetry and a well-defined, sharp shelfbreak at ~90 m water depth. The northern shelf is relatively sediment starved (mean sediment thickness is 3 to 4 m), with thickest accumulations (up to ~18 m) forming shallow (< 30 m), discontinuous to laterally coalescing, inner-shelf bars that are best developed at the mouths of steep coastal watersheds. These watersheds also feed several distinct, coarse-grained sediment lobes (as large as ~1.5 km2, extending to 3 km offshore and depths of 70 m) that probably formed during massive flood events. The relative lack of offshore deposits on the northern shelf suggests sediment transport is dominated by easterly nearshore drift. Faulting and folding on the northern shelf are significant controls on sediment distribution and thickness, the occurrence of bedrock uplifts, and common hydrocarbon-associated seeps, pockmarks, and mounds. Bedrock, typically "soft" Neogene strata, is especially

  4. Late-glacial and Holocene record of vegetation and climate from Cynthia Bay, Lake St Clair, Tasmania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopf, F. V. L.; Colhoun, E. A.; Barton, C. E.

    2000-10-01

    A Late-glacial-Holocene pollen record was obtained from a 3.96 m sediment core taken from Lake St Clair, central Tasmania. Modern vegetation and pollen analyses formed the basis for interpretation of the vegetation and climate history. Following deglaciation and before ca. 18450 yr BP Podocarpus lawrencei coniferous heath and Astelia-Plantago wet alpine herbfield became established at Lake St Clair. A distinct Poaceae-Plantago peak occurs between 18450 and 11210 yr BP and a mean annual temperature depression from ca. 6.2°C to 3°C below present is inferred for this period. The marked reduction in Podocarpus and strong increase of Poaceae suggests reduced precipitation levels during the period of widespread deglaciation (ca. 18.5-11 kyr BP). The local Late Pleistocene-Holocene non-forest to forest biostratigraphical boundary is dated at 11.2 kyr BP. It is characterised by expansion of the subalpine taxa Athrotaxis/Diselma with Nothofagus gunnii, and by the establishment of Nothofagus cunninghamii with Eucalyptus spp. A Phyllocladus bulge prior to the expansion of Nothofagus cunninghamii, reported at other Tasmanian sites, is not present at Lake St Clair. Nothofagus cunninghamii cool temperate rainforest peaked at 7800 yr BP, probably under wetter climatic conditions than present. The maximum development of rainforest in the early-middle Holocene may indicate that the temperature was slightly warmer than present, but the evidence is not definitive. The expansion of Eucalyptus spp. and Poaceae after 6000 yr BP may be partly a disclimax effect as a result of Aboriginal burning, but appears also to reflect reduced precipitation. The changes in vegetation and inferred climate can be explained by major changes in synoptic patterns of southern Australia and the adjacent southwest Pacific.

  5. Vegetation, climate and fire-dynamics in East Africa inferred from the Maundi crater pollen record from Mt Kilimanjaro during the last glacial-interglacial cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schüler, Lisa; Hemp, Andreas; Zech, Wolfgang; Behling, Hermann

    2012-04-01

    The pollen, charcoal and sedimentological record from the Maundi crater, located at 2780 m elevation on the south-eastern slope of Mt Kilimanjaro, is one of the longest terrestrial records in equatorial East Africa, giving an interesting insight into the vegetation and climate dynamics back to the early last Glacial period. Our sediment record has a reliable chronology until 42 ka BP. An extrapolation of the age-depth model, as well as matching with other palaeo-records from tropical East Africa, suggest a total age of about 90 ka BP at the bottom of the record. During the last Glacial the distribution as well as the composition of the vegetation belts classified as colline savanna, submontane woodland, montane forest, ericaceous belt, and alpine vegetation changed. The early last Glacial is characterized by high amounts of Poaceae and Asteraceae pollen suggesting a climatically dry but stable phase. Based on the absence of pollen grains in samples deposited around 70 ka BP, we assume the occurrence of distinct drought periods. During the pre-LGM (Last Glacial Maximum) a higher taxa diversity of the ericaceous and montane zone is recorded and suggests a spread of forest and shrub vegetation, thus indicating a more humid period. The taxa diversity increases steadily during the recorded time span. The decent of vegetation zones indicate dry and cold conditions during the LGM and seem to have been detrimental for many taxa, especially those of the forest vegetation; however, the early last Glacial seems to have been markedly drier than the LGM. The reappearance of most of the taxa (most importantly Alchemilla, Araliaceae, Dodonea, Hagenia, Ilex, Myrsine, Moraceae, Piperaceae) during the deglacial and Holocene period suggest a shift into humid conditions. An increase in ferns and the decrease in grasses during the Holocene also indicate increasing humidity. Fire played an important role in controlling the development and elevation of the ericaceous zone and the tree

  6. Antarctic climate cooling and response of diatoms in glacial meltwater streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Esposito, R.M.M.; Horn, S.L.; McKnight, Diane M.; Cox, M.J.; Grant, M.C.; Spaulding, S.A.; Doran, P.T.; Cozzetto, K.D.

    2006-01-01

    To understand biotic responses to an Antarctic cooling trend diatom samples from glacial meltwater streams in the McMurdo Dry Valleys, the largest ice-free area in Antarctica. Diatoms are abundant in these streams, and 24 of 40 species have only been found in the Antarctic. The percentage of these Antarctic diatom species increased with decreasing annual stream flow and increasing harshness of the stream habitat. The species diversity of assemblages reached a maximum when the Antarctic species accounted for 40-60% of relative diatom abundance. Decreased solar radiation and air-temperatures reduce annual stream flow, raising the dominance of these Antarctic species to levels above 60%. Thus, cooling favors the Antarctic species, and lowers diatom species diversity in this region. Copyright 2006 by the American Geophysical Union.

  7. Persistent millennial-scale climate variability in the eastern tropical North Pacific over the last two glacial cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arellano-Torres, Elsa; Ganeshram, Raja S.; Pichevin, Laetitia E.; Salas-de-Leon, David Alberto

    2015-06-01

    High-resolution sediment records from the eastern tropical North Pacific (ETNP) spanning the last ~240 ka B.P. were studied to document the nature of millennial-scale climatic events in the tropical Pacific and to investigate teleconnection mechanisms. We present organic carbon (%OC) and diffuse spectral reflectivity records as indicative of upwelling and productivity changes off NW Mexico over the middle to late Pleistocene. The new productivity records document the persistence of abrupt millennial-scale changes over the last two glacial cycles. Detailed spectral and wavelet time series analyses show the predominance of longer climatic cycles (2-6 ka) during the last and the penultimate glacial periods. The persistence of millennial variability during the penultimate glacial, in absence of large ice rafted debris events in the North Atlantic, suggests that freshwater input through ice sheet dynamics is not essential for millennial-scale climate variability. Given the worldwide emerging picture of remarkable similar millennial-scale records over long time periods, we suggest that the pacing of this climate variability may represent a natural resonance in the climate system, amplified by a tightly coupled oceanic and atmospheric teleconnection processes. We present a schematic scenario of millennial-scale climate change depicting the role of the tropical Pacific in this global teleconnection system by linking productivity and upwelling changes in the ETNP with shifts in the position of the Intertropical Convergence Zone and the strength of the subtropical North Pacific High.

  8. Possible solar origin of the 1,470-year glacial climate cycle demonstrated in a coupled model.

    PubMed

    Braun, Holger; Christl, Marcus; Rahmstorf, Stefan; Ganopolski, Andrey; Mangini, Augusto; Kubatzki, Claudia; Roth, Kurt; Kromer, Bernd

    2005-11-10

    Many palaeoclimate records from the North Atlantic region show a pattern of rapid climate oscillations, the so-called Dansgaard-Oeschger events, with a quasi-periodicity of approximately 1,470 years for the late glacial period. Various hypotheses have been suggested to explain these rapid temperature shifts, including internal oscillations in the climate system and external forcing, possibly from the Sun. But whereas pronounced solar cycles of approximately 87 and approximately 210 years are well known, a approximately 1,470-year solar cycle has not been detected. Here we show that an intermediate-complexity climate model with glacial climate conditions simulates rapid climate shifts similar to the Dansgaard-Oeschger events with a spacing of 1,470 years when forced by periodic freshwater input into the North Atlantic Ocean in cycles of approximately 87 and approximately 210 years. We attribute the robust 1,470-year response time to the superposition of the two shorter cycles, together with strongly nonlinear dynamics and the long characteristic timescale of the thermohaline circulation. For Holocene conditions, similar events do not occur. We conclude that the glacial 1,470-year climate cycles could have been triggered by solar forcing despite the absence of a 1,470-year solar cycle. PMID:16281042

  9. Leaf Dynamics of Panicum maximum under Future Climatic Changes.

    PubMed

    Britto de Assis Prado, Carlos Henrique; Haik Guedes de Camargo-Bortolin, Lívia; Castro, Érique; Martinez, Carlos Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Panicum maximum Jacq. 'Mombaça' (C4) was grown in field conditions with sufficient water and nutrients to examine the effects of warming and elevated CO2 concentrations during the winter. Plants were exposed to either the ambient temperature and regular atmospheric CO2 (Control); elevated CO2 (600 ppm, eC); canopy warming (+2°C above regular canopy temperature, eT); or elevated CO2 and canopy warming (eC+eT). The temperatures and CO2 in the field were controlled by temperature free-air controlled enhancement (T-FACE) and mini free-air CO2 enrichment (miniFACE) facilities. The most green, expanding, and expanded leaves and the highest leaf appearance rate (LAR, leaves day(-1)) and leaf elongation rate (LER, cm day(-1)) were observed under eT. Leaf area and leaf biomass were higher in the eT and eC+eT treatments. The higher LER and LAR without significant differences in the number of senescent leaves could explain why tillers had higher foliage area and leaf biomass in the eT treatment. The eC treatment had the lowest LER and the fewest expanded and green leaves, similar to Control. The inhibitory effect of eC on foliage development in winter was indicated by the fewer green, expanded, and expanding leaves under eC+eT than eT. The stimulatory and inhibitory effects of the eT and eC treatments, respectively, on foliage raised and lowered, respectively, the foliar nitrogen concentration. The inhibition of foliage by eC was confirmed by the eC treatment having the lowest leaf/stem biomass ratio and by the change in leaf biomass-area relationships from linear or exponential growth to rectangular hyperbolic growth under eC. Besides, eC+eT had a synergist effect, speeding up leaf maturation. Therefore, with sufficient water and nutrients in winter, the inhibitory effect of elevated CO2 on foliage could be partially offset by elevated temperatures and relatively high P. maximum foliage production could be achieved under future climatic change. PMID:26894932

  10. Leaf Dynamics of Panicum maximum under Future Climatic Changes

    PubMed Central

    Britto de Assis Prado, Carlos Henrique; Haik Guedes de Camargo-Bortolin, Lívia; Castro, Érique; Martinez, Carlos Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Panicum maximum Jacq. ‘Mombaça’ (C4) was grown in field conditions with sufficient water and nutrients to examine the effects of warming and elevated CO2 concentrations during the winter. Plants were exposed to either the ambient temperature and regular atmospheric CO2 (Control); elevated CO2 (600 ppm, eC); canopy warming (+2°C above regular canopy temperature, eT); or elevated CO2 and canopy warming (eC+eT). The temperatures and CO2 in the field were controlled by temperature free-air controlled enhancement (T-FACE) and mini free-air CO2 enrichment (miniFACE) facilities. The most green, expanding, and expanded leaves and the highest leaf appearance rate (LAR, leaves day-1) and leaf elongation rate (LER, cm day-1) were observed under eT. Leaf area and leaf biomass were higher in the eT and eC+eT treatments. The higher LER and LAR without significant differences in the number of senescent leaves could explain why tillers had higher foliage area and leaf biomass in the eT treatment. The eC treatment had the lowest LER and the fewest expanded and green leaves, similar to Control. The inhibitory effect of eC on foliage development in winter was indicated by the fewer green, expanded, and expanding leaves under eC+eT than eT. The stimulatory and inhibitory effects of the eT and eC treatments, respectively, on foliage raised and lowered, respectively, the foliar nitrogen concentration. The inhibition of foliage by eC was confirmed by the eC treatment having the lowest leaf/stem biomass ratio and by the change in leaf biomass-area relationships from linear or exponential growth to rectangular hyperbolic growth under eC. Besides, eC+eT had a synergist effect, speeding up leaf maturation. Therefore, with sufficient water and nutrients in winter, the inhibitory effect of elevated CO2 on foliage could be partially offset by elevated temperatures and relatively high P. maximum foliage production could be achieved under future climatic change. PMID:26894932

  11. Constraints on the Circulation of the Interior South Atlantic During the Last Glacial Maximum Inferred from a Highly-Resolved Sedimentary Depth Transect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foreman, A. D.; Charles, C.; Rae, J. W. B.; Slowey, N. C.; Adkins, J. F.

    2014-12-01

    Many models show that the relative intensity of stratification is a primary variable governing the sequestration and release of carbon from the ocean over ice ages. The wide-scale observations necessary to test these model-derived hypotheses are not yet sufficient, but sedimentary depth transects represent a promising approach for making progress. Here we present new glacial and late Holocene stable isotopic and trace metal data from benthic foraminifera collected from a detailed depth transect from the deep SE Atlantic. Following the approach developed in Lund et al. (2011) [1] for δ18O, we use conservative tracers (e.g. δ18O and Mg/Ca) to constrain the relative strength of meridional transport as compared to vertical diffusivity at the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) and during the late Holocene. We compare our new results from the SE Atlantic to a similar analysis of published depth profiles from other regions. These measurements, when combined with radiocarbon data for the same cores, provide insights into the relationship between alterations in deep/mid-depth stratification and changes in the ventilation of carbon in the deep ocean. [1] Lund, D. C., J. F. Adkins, and R. Ferrari (2011), Abyssal Atlantic circulation during the Last Glacial Maximum: Constraining the ratio between transport and vertical mixing, Paleoceanography, 26, PA1213, doi:10.1029/2010PA001938.

  12. A loess-paleosol record of climate and glacial history over the past two glacial-interglacial cycles (~140 ka), southern Jackson Hole, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pierce, Kenneth L.; Muhs, Daniel R.; Fosberg, Maynard A.; Mahan, Shannon; Rosenbaum, Joseph G.; Licciardi, Joseph M.; Pavich, Milan J.

    2011-01-01

    Loess accumulated on a Bull Lake outwash terrace of Marine Oxygen Isotope Stage 6 (MIS 6) age in southern Jackson Hole, Wyoming. The 9 m section displays eight intervals of loess deposition (Loess 1 to Loess 8, oldest), each followed by soil development. Our age-depth model is constrained by thermoluminescence, meteoric Be-10 accumulation in soils, and cosmogenic Be-10 surface exposure ages. We use particle size, geochemical, mineral-magnetic, and clay mineralogical data to interpret loess sources and pedogenesis. Deposition of MIS 6 loess was followed by a tripartite soil/thin loess complex (Soils 8,7, and 6) apparently reflecting the large climatic oscillations of MIS 5. Soil 8 (MIS 5e) shows the strongest development. Loess 5 accumulated during a glacial interval (similar to 76-69 ka; MIS 4) followed by soil development under conditions wetter and probably colder than present. Deposition of thick Loess 3 (similar to 43-51 ka, MIS 3) was followed by soil development comparable with that observed in Soil 1. Loess 1 (MIS 2) accumulated during the Pinedale glaciation and was followed by development of Soil 1 under a semiarid climate. This record of alternating loess deposition and soil development is compatible with the history of Yellowstone vegetation and the glacial flour record from the Sierra Nevada. Published by Elsevier Inc. on behalf of University of Washington.

  13. Differences in ice retreat across Pine Island Bay, West Antarctica, since the Last Glacial Maximum: Indications from multichannel seismic reflection data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Uenzelmann-Neben, G.; Gohl, K.; Larter, R.D.; Schlüter, P.

    2007-01-01

    An understanding of the glacial history of Pine Island Bay (PIB) is essential for refining models of the future stability of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS). New multichannel seismic reflection data from inner PIB are interpreted in context of previously published reconstructions for the retreat history in this area since the Last Glacial Maximum. Differences in the behavior of the ice sheet during deglaciation are shown to exist for the western and eastern parts of PIB. While we can identify only a thin veneer of sedimentary deposits in western PIB, eastern PIB shows sedimentary layers ≤ 400 msTWT. This is interpreted as a result of differences in ice retreat: a fast ice retreat in western PIB accompanied by rapid basal melting led to production of large meltwater streams, a slower ice retreat in eastern PIB is most probably the result of smaller drainage basins resulting in less meltwater production.

  14. Comparison of eastern tropical Pacific TEX86 and Globigerinoides ruber Mg/Ca derived sea surface temperatures: Insights from the Holocene and Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hertzberg, Jennifer E.; Schmidt, Matthew W.; Bianchi, Thomas S.; Smith, Richard W.; Shields, Michael R.; Marcantonio, Franco

    2016-01-01

    The use of the TEX86 temperature proxy has thus far come to differing results as to whether TEX86 temperatures are representative of surface or subsurface conditions. In addition, although TEX86 temperatures might reflect sea surface temperatures based on core-top (Holocene) values, this relationship might not hold further back in time. Here, we investigate the TEX86 temperature proxy by comparing TEX86 temperatures to Mg/Ca temperatures of multiple species of planktonic foraminifera for two sites in the eastern tropical Pacific (on the Cocos and Carnegie Ridges) across the Holocene and Last Glacial Maximum. Core-top and Holocene TEX86H temperatures at both study regions agree well, within error, with the Mg/Ca temperatures of Globigerinoides ruber, a surface dwelling planktonic foraminifera. However, during the Last Glacial Maximum, TEX86H temperatures are more representative of upper thermocline temperatures, and are offset from G. ruber Mg/Ca temperatures by 5.8 °C and 2.9 °C on the Cocos Ridge and Carnegie Ridge, respectively. This offset between proxies cannot be reconciled by using different TEX86 temperature calibrations, and instead, we suggest that the offset is due to a deeper export depth of GDGTs at the LGM. We also compare the degree of glacial cooling at both sites based on both temperature proxies, and find that TEX86H temperatures greatly overestimate glacial cooling, especially on the Cocos Ridge. This study has important implications for applying the TEX86 paleothermometer in the eastern tropical Pacific.

  15. Abrupt climate-triggered lake ecosystem changes recorded in late glacial lake sediments in northern Poland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slowinski, M. M.; Zawiska, I.; Ott, F.; Noryskiewicz, A. M.; Apolinarska, K.; Lutynska, M.; Michczynska, D. J.; Brauer, A.; Wulf, S.; Skubala, P.; Blaszkiewicz, M.

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this study was to better understand how local lake ecosystems responded to abrupt climate changes through applying multi-proxy sediment analyses. Therefore, we carried out a detailed and high-resolution case study on the late glacial sediment from the Trzechowskie palaeolake located in the eastern part of the Pomeranian Lakeland, northern Poland. We reconstructed climate induced environmental changes in the paleolake and its catchment using biotic proxies (macrofossils, pollen, cladocera, diatoms, oribatidae mite) and classical geochemical proxies (δ18O, δ13C, loss-on-ignition, CaCO3 content) in combination with high-resolution μ-XRF element core scanning. The core chronology has been established by means of biostratigraphy, AMS 14C-dating on plant macro remains, varve counting in laminated intervals and tephrochronology. The latter was possible by the discovery of the late Allerød Laacher See Tephra for the first time at such eastern location. Biogenic accumulation in the lake started rather late during the lateglacial interstadial at 13903×170 cal yrs BP. The rapid and pronounced cooling at the beginning of the Younger Dryas had a major impact on the lake and its catchment as clearly reflected by both, biotic and geochemical proxies. The depositional environment of the lake abruptly changed from a varved to massive gytjia. The pronounced warming at the demise of Younger Dryas cooling is well-reflected in all environmental indicators but with conspicuous leads and lags reflecting complex responses of lake ecosystems to climate warming. The research was supported by the National Science Centre Poland - NN306085037. This study is a contribution to the Virtual Institute ICLEA (Integrated Climate and Landscape Evolution Analysis) funded by the Helmholtz Association.

  16. Abrupt post-glacial climate events in West Asia and North Africa monsoon domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasse, Françoise; Van Campo, Elise

    1994-09-01

    Regions beyond the present or past penetration of the Indian and African monsoons have experienced several large and abrupt climatic fluctuations over the past 13 14C kyr. Pollen and lake records from West Asia (Western Tibet and Rajasthan), East Africa (Ethiopia) and West Africa (Western Sahara, Sahel and subequatorial Africa) were selected on the basis of chronological control, sensitivity of both site and environmental indicators to climate change, the continuity of the record, and interdisciplinary control of the palaeoclimatic interpretation. Conditions wetter than those of today prevailed during the early-mid-Holocene period, but major dry spells are recorded at all sites during the intervals ˜ 11.0-9.5 kyr BP, ˜ 8-7 kyr BP and 3-4 kyr BP. Several records also suggest dry events of minor amplitude around 6 kyr BP. Potential boundary forcings of insolation and sea surface and tropical land surface conditions are discussed. The solar radiation accounts for the general envelop of the post-glacial monsoon fluctuations, but explains neither the timing nor the amplitude of the short-term changes. In spite of apparent covariation between fluctuations in sea surface conditions in the North Atlantic and the monsoon record, no direct mechanism could be found relating the intensity of the oceanic thermohaline conveyor belt to the monsoon strength. Changes in tropical land surface conditions (soil moisture negative feedback, and changes in CH 4 production from wetlands) provide a more satisfactory hypothesis for explaining abrupt reversal events.

  17. Late-Glacial to Early Holocene Climate Changes from a Central Appalachians Pollen and Macrofossil Record

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kneller, Margaret; Peteet, Dorothy

    1997-01-01

    A Late-glacial to early Holocene record of pollen, plant macrofossils and charcoal, based on two cores, is presented for Browns Pond in the central Appalachians of Virginia. An AMS radiocarbon chronology defines the timing of moist and cold excursions, superimposed upon the overall warming trend from 14,200 to 7,500 C-14 yr B.P. This site shows cold, moist conditions from approximately 14,200 to 12,700 C-14 yr B.P., with warming at 12,730, 11,280 and 10,050 C-14 yr B.P. A decrease in deciduous broad-leaved tree taxa and Pinus strobus (haploxylon) pollen, simultaneous with a re-expansion of Abies denotes a brief, cold reversal from 12,260 to 12,200 C-14 yr B.P. A second cold reversal, inferred from increases in montane conifers, is centered at 7,500 C-14 yr B.P. The cold reversals at Browns Pond may be synchronous with climate change in Greenland, and northwestern Europe. Warming at 11,280 C-14 yr B.P. shows the complexity of regional climate responses during the Younger Dryas chronozone.

  18. The Dynamics of Greenland's Glacial Fjords and Their Role in Climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Straneo, Fiamma; Cenedese, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    Rapid mass loss from the Greenland Ice Sheet has sparked interest in its glacial fjords for two main reasons: Increased submarine melting of glaciers terminating in fjords is a plausible trigger for glacier retreat, and the anomalous freshwater discharged from Greenland is transformed by fjord processes before being released into the large-scale ocean. Knowledge of the fjords' dynamics is thus key to understanding ice sheet variability and its impact on climate. Although Greenland's fjords share some commonalities with other fjords, their deep sills and deeply grounded glaciers, the presence of Atlantic and Polar Waters on the continental shelves outside the fjords' mouths, and the seasonal discharge at depth of large amounts of surface melt make them unique systems that do not fit existing paradigms. Major gaps in understanding include the interaction of the buoyancy-driven circulation (forced by the glacier) and shelf-driven circulation, and the dynamics in the near-ice zone. These must be addressed before appropriate forcing conditions can be supplied to ice sheet and ocean/climate models.

  19. Strong hemispheric coupling of glacial climate through freshwater discharge and ocean circulation.

    PubMed

    Knutti, R; Flückiger, J; Stocker, T F; Timmermann, A

    2004-08-19

    The climate of the last glacial period was extremely variable, characterized by abrupt warming events in the Northern Hemisphere, accompanied by slower temperature changes in Antarctica and variations of global sea level. It is generally accepted that this millennial-scale climate variability was caused by abrupt changes in the ocean thermohaline circulation. Here we use a coupled ocean-atmosphere-sea ice model to show that freshwater discharge into the North Atlantic Ocean, in addition to a reduction of the thermohaline circulation, has a direct effect on Southern Ocean temperature. The related anomalous oceanic southward heat transport arises from a zonal density gradient in the subtropical North Atlantic caused by a fast wave-adjustment process. We present an extended and quantitative bipolar seesaw concept that explains the timing and amplitude of Greenland and Antarctic temperature changes, the slow changes in Antarctic temperature and its similarity to sea level, as well as a possible time lag of sea level with respect to Antarctic temperature during Marine Isotope Stage 3. PMID:15318212

  20. The Dynamics of Greenland's Glacial Fjords and Their Role in Climate.

    PubMed

    Straneo, Fiamma; Cenedese, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    Rapid mass loss from the Greenland Ice Sheet has sparked interest in its glacial fjords for two main reasons: Increased submarine melting of glaciers terminating in fjords is a plausible trigger for glacier retreat, and the anomalous freshwater discharged from Greenland is transformed by fjord processes before being released into the large-scale ocean. Knowledge of the fjords' dynamics is thus key to understanding ice sheet variability and its impact on climate. Although Greenland's fjords share some commonalities with other fjords, their deep sills and deeply grounded glaciers, the presence of Atlantic and Polar Waters on the continental shelves outside the fjords' mouths, and the seasonal discharge at depth of large amounts of surface melt make them unique systems that do not fit existing paradigms. Major gaps in understanding include the interaction of the buoyancy-driven circulation (forced by the glacier) and shelf-driven circulation, and the dynamics in the near-ice zone. These must be addressed before appropriate forcing conditions can be supplied to ice sheet and ocean/climate models. PMID:25149564

  1. Cryofacies evidences of a Yedoma (?) development during the last glacial maximum in Yukon (Canada) along the current Alaska border

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephani, E.; Fortier, D.; Shur, Y.

    2012-12-01

    silt (3 % organic matter). This was interpreted as ice-rich fine-grained soils that thawed, drained, and refroze afterward. This ice-poor layer with sediment deformations (e.g. fold, fault, diapir) is called 'taberal deposit' in the Russian literature. This layer can be observed in yedoma deposit in areas which were affected by permafrost degradation. Yedoma deposits are usually characterized by the presence of tall and wide ice wedges. These wedges form continuously as the permafrost table rises in response to surface sedimentation and their size is thus a function of sedimentation rate and time. In our study, we observed ice wedges at least 8 m tall (tip of the wedge > maximum coring depth). The bottom of the ice wedges was located in lodgement till (> 11 m below surface). This deposit was covered by woody peat deposit up to 4.9 m thick and was thus interpreted to be older than MIS 3. We propose that frost cracking first occurred in the peat and the underlying diamicton after the last interglacial and that upward syngenetic ice wedge growth followed silt accumulation over thousands of years sometimes during the last glacial period. The top of the ice wedges were located at about 2.5 m depth in Unit 2B. This indicates that ice wedge growth was interrupted by an episode of permafrost degradation and resumed afterward during accumulation of unit 2A.

  2. Evidence for post last-glacial-maximum punctuated sea level rise found on the eastern Mediterranean coast of Israel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katz, Oded; Goodman-Tchernov, Beverly

    2015-04-01

    The eustatic sea level curve for the eastern Mediterranean presents a general trend characterized by rapid post last-glacial-maximum rise (20,000 years ago), slowing approximately 6000 years ago and stabilizing at current sea-level 4000 years ago. Sea level evidence from portions of the Israeli coastline, suggest minimal to no hydro-glacio-isostatic influence on the local relative sea level curve, and no tectonic offsets for at least the past two thousand years. Recently, a submerged series of relict wave cut notches and erosional pits were identified along a sequence of coastal sites located approximately 20 km from one another (Michmoret, Olga, Caesarea, Dor) at 3 m and 6 m water depths. The features were carved into an upper-Pleistocene to Holocene eolianite sandstone, the age of which was previously constrained by OSL measurements to MIS 1-3. Elsewhere, similar features are widely used as sea-level markers. In this study, at some of the sites, we found a coinciding 3 m to 6 m submerged cliff with overhanging upper part, morphology that is comparable to the morphology of the modern coastal cliff. These submerged features should either suggest a tectonic offset, which is not favorable for the study area, or they might suggest that sea level rise has not been gradual, but rather punctuated, exhibiting pulses of sea level rise followed by periods of sea level stagnation. For the study site, the last stagnation took place at a few meters below current sea-level and enabled the development of the observed wave induced morphology within the eolianite. At present sea level, similar features exist and are being actively formed within the same host rock. At some of the sites, artificially-cut archaeological features from about the last 2000 years present with notches or erosional pits thereby providing insight into the period of time required for their creation due to their archaeological associations. Sea level rise might impacts the coastline significantly, with

  3. Climate Change Adaptation Decision Making for Glacial Lake Outburst Floods From Palcacocha Lake in Peru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuellar, A. D.; McKinney, D. C.

    2014-12-01

    Climate change has accelerated glacial retreat in high altitude glaciated regions of Peru leading to the growth and formation of glacier lakes. Glacial lake outburst floods (GLOF) are sudden events triggered by an earthquake, avalanche into the lake or other shock that causes a sudden outflow of water. These floods are catastrophic because of their sudden onset, the difficulty predicting them, and enormous quantity of water and debris rapidly flooding downstream areas. Palcacocha Lake in the Peruvian Andes has experienced accelerated growth since it burst in 1941 and threatens the major city of Huaraz and surrounding communities. Since the 1941 flood stakeholders have advocated for projects to adapt to the increasing threat posed by Palcacocha Lake. Nonetheless, discussions surrounding projects for Palcacocha have not included a rigorous analysis of the potential consequences of a flood, probability of an event, or costs of mitigation projects. This work presents the first step to rationally analyze the risks posed by Palcacocha Lake and the various adaptation projects proposed. In this work the authors use decision analysis to asses proposed adaptation measures that would mitigate damage in downstream communities from a GLOF. We use an existing hydrodynamic model of the at-risk area to determine how adaptation projects will affect downstream flooding. Flood characteristics are used in the HEC-FIA software to estimate fatalities and injuries from an outburst flood, which we convert to monetary units using the value of a statistical life. We combine the monetary consequences of a GLOF with the cost of the proposed projects and a diffuse probability distribution for the likelihood of an event to estimate the expected cost of the adaptation plans. From this analysis we found that lowering the lake level by 15 meters has the least expected cost of any proposal despite uncertainty in the effect of lake lowering on flooding downstream.

  4. Water versus ice: The competing roles of modern climate and Pleistocene glacial erosion in the Central Alps of Switzerland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlunegger, Fritz; Norton, Kevin P.

    2013-08-01

    Recent studies have identified relationships between landscape form, erosion and climate in regions of landscape rejuvenation, associated with increased denudation. Most of these landscapes are located in non-glaciated mountain ranges and are characterized by transient geomorphic features. The landscapes of the Swiss Alps are likewise in a transient geomorphic state as seen by multiple knickzones. In this mountain belt, the transient state has been related to erosional effects during the Late Glacial Maximum (LGM). Here, we focus on the catchment scale and categorize hillslopes based on erosional mechanisms, landscape form and landcover. We then explore relationships of these variables to precipitation and extent of LGM glaciers to disentangle modern versus palaeo controls on the modern shape of the Alpine landscape. We find that in grasslands, the downslope flux of material mainly involves unconsolidated material through hillslope creep, testifying a transport-limited erosional regime. Alternatively, strength-limited hillslopes, where erosion is driven by bedrock failure, are covered by forests and/or expose bedrock, and they display oversteepened hillslopes and channels. There, hillslope gradients and relief are more closely correlated with LGM ice occurrence than with precipitation or the erodibility of the underlying bedrock. We relate the spatial occurrence of the transport- and strength-limited process domains to the erosive effects of LGM glaciers. In particular, strength-limited, rock dominated basins are situated above the equilibrium line altitude (ELA) of the LGM, reflecting the ability of glaciers to scour the landscape beyond threshold slope conditions. In contrast, transport-limited, soil-mantled landscapes are common below the ELA. Hillslopes covered by forests occupy the elevations around the ELA and are constrained by the tree line. We conclude that the current erosional forces at work in the Central Alps are still responding to LGM glaciation, and

  5. Orbital- versus glacial-mode forcing of tropical African climate: Results of scientific drilling in Lake Malawi, East Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholz, C. A.; Cohen, A. S.; Johnson, T. C.; King, J. W.; Brown, E. T.; Lyons, R. P.; Stone, J. R.; Beuning, K. R.

    2007-12-01

    Lake Malawi extends from 9-14 degrees S within the East African Rift Valley, and at 700 m deep, contains more than 20 percent of the surface water on the African continent. In 2005 the Lake Malawi Scientific Drilling Project drilled 7 holes at two sites in the lake, recovering a continuous sediment record that samples much of the Quaternary. Detailed studies completed to date on sediments deposited during the past 145 ka indicate periods of severe aridity at precessional frequency between 135 and 75 ka, when the lake's water volume was periodically reduced by at least 95 percent. These dramatic drops in lake level (more than 550 m), signifying markedly arid conditions in the catchment, are documented in sediment lithology (decreased organic carbon content and increased authigenic carbonate content during severe lowstands), aquatic microfossils (appearance of a littoral ostracode fauna, and saline/alkaline lake diatom flora during extreme low lake stages), as well as in dramatic reductions in catchment pollen production. These intervals of pronounced tropical African aridity in the early late-Pleistocene were much more severe than the Last Glacial Maximum, and are consistent with sediment records from Lakes Tanganyika (East Africa) and Bosumtwi (West Africa). In all three lakes a major rise in water levels and a shift to more humid conditions is observed after ~70 ka. The transition to wetter, more stable conditions coincides with the relaxation of orbital eccentricity and a reduction in the amplitude of precession. The observed climate mode switch to decreased environmental variability is consistent with terrestrial and marine records from in and around tropical Africa, but these new drill cores provide evidence for dramatically drier conditions prior to 70 ka that have not as yet been detected in marine sediment records. Such climate change may have stimulated the expansion and migrations of early modern human populations.

  6. A large thermogenic-methane release event in the SW Barents Sea, during the Last Glacial Maximum. Indications from numerical modelling and seismic reflection data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anka, Z.; Rodrigues, E.; di Primio, R.; Ostanin, I.; Stoddart, D.; Horsfield, B.

    2011-12-01

    The Barents Sea, located in the Norwegian Artic area, has undergone a series of tectonic, paleoceanographic and paleo-climatic events during the Cenozoic, which most likely have caused the redistribution and leakage of hydrocarbons accumulations (Ohm et al., 2008). (Dimakis et al., 1998). Present-day under-filled accumulations are known to have leaked in the past providing a source of hydrocarbons, mostly thermogenic methane. However, the timing, extent and driving factors for this event are largely unconstrained. We built a 3D basin model of the Hammerfest Basin in the SW Barents Sea, in order to quantify the masses of liquid and gaseous hydrocarbons generated, accumulated and eventually leaked from the reservoirs during the evolution of the basin. Particular emphasis was placed on analysing the fate of leaked volumes within the dynamics of Plio-Quaternary glacial cycles and formation or destabilization of gas hydrate deposits. The model was calibrated with maturity and temperature well data and reconstructs, with large degree of accuracy, the composition and volume of the hydrocarbons, particularly the gaseous phase present in the main reservoirs. Our results predict the development of overpressures in the reservoirs due to the ice loading of the basin during the glacial periods. Pressure fluctuations derived from cyclic loading-unloading during the glacial-interglacial periods reached up to 5 MPa. The under-filled nature of the present-day accumulations would result from leakage events during the episodes of glacial retreat, in the transition from glacial to interglacial periods. Considerations of the gas hydrate stability conditions in the basin during the time span between 1.00Ma and ≈11,500 years indicate that the leaking thermogenic methane was probably trapped as gas hydrate deposits during the glacial events and then released at once upon hydrate destabilisation during the Last Glacial Maximun (LGM). These results are supported by the presence of km

  7. Aspects of the Glacial-deglacial Climate of Western North America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hostetler, S. W.; Alder, J. R.; Bartlein, P. J.; Cuzzone, J. K.; Wettstein, J. J.; Clark, P. U.

    2014-12-01

    We have completed a series of global climate simulations from the LGM (21 ka) to present at 3-ky increments with GENMOM, a coupled A/OGCM with a nominal horizontal resolution of 3.75°. Each time segment was forced by appropriate boundary conditions (insolation, GHGs, ice sheets, sea level,) and run out for 1100 years to ensure minimal drift in the temperature of the deep ocean. GENMOM produces LGM and mid-Holocene (6 ka) climates consistent with paleoenvironmental data and the PMIP2 and CMIP5/PMIP3 simulations. The climate sensitivity is attributed to the interplay of various boundary conditions changes throughout the deglaciation as the ice sheets melt, the seasonality of insolation increases and GHG concentrations rise. Given the dominance of the Laurentide Ice Sheet and insolation-driven continental heating during the deglaciation and MH, these controls are particularly evident in the hydroclimate of NA. We use our simulations alone and combined with the PMIP simulations to explore aspects of the evolution of the glacial-Holocene hydroclimate of Western North America related to changes in storm tracks and the strength of the monsoon circulation. We find variable agreement and disagreement among the models, particularly in the Southwest monsoon regions. We also find that, while the LGM moisture climatologies of the models may be locally consistent with paleoenvironmental data, the precipitation and temperature fields from the models produce substantial variability in simulations of the LIS as modeled by the CISM-GLIMMER ice sheet model, suggesting deficiencies in modeled regional and hemispheric circulation, moisture transport, or the surface energy balance over the ice.

  8. The impact of glacial/interglacial climate changes on fluvial and mass-wasting processes in the Taiwan's mountains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, W. L.; Hsieh, M. L.; Tsui, H. K.; Hsiao, Y. T.

    2014-12-01

    The Taiwan orogenic belt, located in Southeastern Asia, is under monsoon climate, frequently attacked by tropical typhoons, and characterized by rapid tectonic uplift with high seismicity. Researchers have been linking the Taiwan's landscapes to active tectonic uplift. In this study, we show the significance of glacial/interglacial climate changes in shaping the landscapes. We focus on the mountain areas that have never been glaciated. Based on >400 radiocarbon dates (70 of which >12 ka), we find that both the slope and fluvial activities were generally low during the glacial time. Still, extensive alluviation had occurred at certain time periods, forming large debris slopes or alluvial fans (typically along mountain fronts), and causing significant aggradation along some major rivers. In contrast, with numerous landslides and debris flows, river incision has dominated during the postglacial time. Episodic river aggradation with alluvial-terrace development (typically at tributary mouths) also occurred during this time period, but was less extensive than previously. Some huge postglacial alluvial terraces have been proved sourced from the colluviums deposited in the glacial time. We attribute the low landscape activities of the glacial period to the dryness during the period. However, even in this time rare but severe rainfall events must have occurred to trigger some extensive alluviation. In contrast, the increase in both rainfall and typhoon frequency during the postglacial time drastically increased the slope instability and sediment yield. The great stream power, along with the sufficient coarse debris acting as erosion tools, ensured the rapid river incision during this time.

  9. Sensitivity of Asian and African climate to variations in seasonal insolation, glacial ice cover, sea surface temperature, and Asian orography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demenocal, Peter B.; Rind, David

    1993-01-01

    A general circulation model was used to investigate the sensitivity of Asian and African climate to prescribed changes in boundary conditions with the objective of identifying the relative importance of individual high-latitude glacial boundary conditions on seasonal climate and providing a physical basis for interpreting the paleoclimate record. The circulation model is described and results are presented. Insolation forcing increased summer Asian monsoon winds, while increased high-latitude ice cover strengthened winter Asian trade winds causing decreased precipitation. These factors had little effect on African climate. Cooler North Atlantic sea surface temperatures enhanced winter trade winds over North Africa, southern Asian climate was relatively unaffected. Reducing Asian orography enhanced Asian winter circulation while decreasing the summer monsoon. These model results suggest that African and southern Asian climate respond differently to separate elements of high-latitude climate variability.

  10. Glacial climate driven sedimentation overwhelms tectonics in the battle for control of margin architecture: Southeast Alaska, St. Elias Orogeny

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulick, S. P.; Jaeger, J. M.; Willems, B.; Powell, R. D.; Lowe, L. A.

    2006-12-01

    The interplay of tectonic and climatic processes is fundamental to the development of mountain belts and the ensuing patterns of deformation and erosion. Of equal significance is the interaction of tectonic and climatic processes in the development of orogenic sedimentary basins, or in the case of a coastal mountain belt, in the growth of a continental margin. The Chugach-St. Elias Orogeny, which is driven by the collision of the Yakutat microplate with North America in southeast Alaska, has generated the highest coastal relief in the world. The combined forces of tectonic uplift and glacial erosion have resulted in the accumulation of over 5 km of sediment to form the continental shelf and the creation of the Surveyor Fan that is over 2 km thick proximally. High-resolution GI-gun seismic data allow for detailed examination of the margin architecture off the Bering Glacier within the leading edge of the Yakutat block. The deformation and growth of the margin appears to have first undergone a tectonically dominated phase followed more recently by a glacially dominated phase. During the tectonically dominated period a broad anticline-syncline system helped create accommodation space and the margin both shallowed and widened to its current 50 km width. Based on ties with industry well cuttings, the dominance switched sometime between 0.75 and 1.25 Ma to being completely controlled by glacial advance-retreat patterns. The mappable glacial sequences are undeformed by the underlying anticlines and display several notable features: 1) erosional bases that can often be mapped across the entire shelf, terminating at the shelf edge, 2) little evidence for terminal or retreat moraines on the shelf suggesting very rapid and single phase retreat of the glacier, 3) incomplete glacial sequences due to erosion by later advances, and 4) minimal creation of accommodation space. We investigate the cause of the switch to glacial dominance, the mechanisms and causes of the potentially

  11. Meltwater and Abrupt Climate Change in the Gulf of Mexico During the Last Glacial Termination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, C.; Flower, B.; Hastings, D.; Randle, N.

    2008-12-01

    During the Last Glacial Termination from 18,000-8,000 cal. yrs B.P., meltwater routing of the Laurentide Ice Sheet (LIS) may have been linked to abrupt climatic events, such as the Younger Dryas. Previous studies show episodic meltwater input from the LIS, via the Mississippi River to the Gulf of Mexico (GOM) several thousand years before the onset of the Younger Dryas until approximately 13,000 cal yrs B.P., when meltwater routing may have switched to a more northern spillway, causing an abrupt change in thermohaline circulation (THC). The exact timing and magnitude of this meltwater input to the GOM is poorly constrained due to the lack of high-resolution data. Also unknown are the detailed relationships between GOM sea surface temperature, sea surface salinity and ice volume, relative to Northern and Southern Hemisphere climate from Greenland and Antarctica ice core records. High sedimentation rates (~40 cm/kyr) from laminated, anoxic Orca Basin core MD02-2550 provide the necessary resolution to assess GOM paleoceanography. Paired Mg/Ca and δ18O values from planktonic Foraminifera species Globigerinoides ruber (pink and white varieties) provide the relative timing of meltwater input and temperature change in the GOM with nearly decadal resolution. δ18Ocalcite results show multiple cool and/or high salinity periods with isotopic excursions of at least 2‰ that coincide with abrupt climatic events in Greenland ice core records, including the Oldest Dryas from 16,200-15,000 cal. yrs B.P. and the Intra-Allerod Cold Period at 13,860-13,560 cal. yrs B.P. Meltwater input to the GOM is seen for several thousand years before the onset of the Younger Dryas with white G. ruber δ18Ocalcite values as low as -4‰. Thirty-three AMS radiocarbon dates and high-resolution δ18O results provide excellent temporal constraints on deglacial climate events, including an abrupt (<200 yrs) cessation of meltwater in the GOM centered at 10,970± 40 radiocarbon yrs B.P., with a δ18O

  12. Glacier changes since Local Last Glacial Maximum in the South-West slope of Nevado Hualcán, Cordillera Blanca, Peru, deduced from moraine mapping and GIS-based analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giráldez, Claudia; Palacios, David; Haeberli, Wilfried; Úbeda, Jose; Schauwecker, Simone; Torres, Judith

    2014-05-01

    Area x Altitude Balance Ratio (AABR). The results show a decrease in surface area with respect to Hualcán-III-LLGM of 16% for Hualcán-II-YD; 50% for Hualcán-I-LIA; and 74% for 2003. With respect to 2003, ELAs shifted ~520 m since the Local Last Glacial Maximum (LLGM), ~470 m since a marked late-glacial stage (YD?), ~130 m since the Little Ice Age (LIA) and about ~100 m since 1962. If the changes are exclusively attributed to temperature effects, warming since LLGM can be estimated at some 3°C and since the maximum glacier extent of LIA at about 0.8°C. Such values are rather close to mean global temperature change during the corresponding intervals. Most of the ELA shift since LIA appears to have taken place during recent decades characterized by very rapid glacier shrinkage, although air temperature does not seem to have risen considerably during the last 30 years. These results along with other environmental and social approaches will contribute to a better understanding of impacts from climate change and glacier shrinkage in order to develop adaptation, mitigation and disaster risk reduction strategies in the Peruvian Andes.

  13. Holocene and Last Glacial Maximum TEX86 and Globigerinoides ruber Mg/Ca Sea Surface Temperatures from the Eastern Equatorial Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, M. W.; Hertzberg, J. E.; Bianchi, T. S.; Smith, R. W.; Shields, M. R.

    2012-12-01

    Although the eastern equatorial Pacific (EEP) exerts a major influence on tropical climate dynamics, there is considerable disagreement among various proxy reconstructions on the evolution of sea surface temperatures (SST) in this region since the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). For example, foraminiferal Mg/Ca and alkenone UK'37 based SST reconstructions disagree on both the timing and magnitude of deglacial SST change in the EEP (Kienast et al., 2006; Lea et al., 2006), and it remains unclear how the SST gradient between the cold tongue and the warm pool to the north differed during the LGM (Koutavas and Lynch-Stieglitz, 2003). In order to better quantify regional SST change in the EEP, we will present companion reconstructions of Holocene SST change using both the molecular organic geochemical TEX86 index and Mg/Ca ratios in Globigerinoides ruber (white) from newly-acquired multicores on the Coco Ridge (MV1014-01-07MC; 6o14.0' N, 86o2.6' W; 1.2 - 3.5 kyr BP; 2.0 km depth) and Carnegie Ridge (MV1014-02-09MC; 0o41.6' S, 85o20.0' W; 2.3 - 6.9 kyr BP; 2.45 km depth). Reconstructed core-top values based on both proxies are in excellent agreement with modern average SSTs at each site. Furthermore, reconstructed Holocene TEX86 and Mg/Ca-SSTs are nearly identical within analytical error. To determine the relationship between TEX86 and Mg/Ca-SSTs in the past, we will also use both proxies to reconstruct LGM SSTs using radiocarbon-dated piston cores from the Cocos Ridge (MV1014-01-08JC; 6o14.0' N, 86o2.6' W; 2.0 km depth) and Carnegie Ridge (MV1014-02-17JC; 0o10.8' S, 85o52.0' W; 2.87 km depth). Kienast et al. (2006) Nature 443, 846-849. Koutavas and Lynch-Stieglitz (2003) Paleoceanography 18(4), 1089. Lea et al. (2006) Quat. Sci. Rev. 25, 1152-1167.

  14. A record of the variability of climate transitions between the last four glacial cycles from high-precision speleothem chronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polyak, V. J.; Asmerom, Y.; Lachniet, M. S.; Lapointe, Z. C.

    2011-12-01

    Speleothem growth in Fort Stanton Cave, central New Mexico in southwestern North America (SWNA), occurred predominantly during glacial periods for the last four glacial cycles, with some, but little growth spilling over into the glacial termination events. Given that lacustrine records show that glacial periods are pluvial periods in SWNA, Fort Stanton Cave speleothem growth seems to be a faithful indicator of periods of greater effective moisture for SWNA. Likewise, Asmerom et al. (2010) provided the first stable isotope record from a Fort Stanton stalagmite (FS-2) and reported an oxygen isotope record between 11.4 and 56 ka that closely mimicked the Greenland ice core oxygen records over much of the last glacial period. The δ18O variation in FS-2 reflected changes in the amount of winter precipitation, which in turn reflected the position of the Polar Jet Stream in response to changes in Northern Hemisphere temperature gradient. In contrast, variations in δ13C primarily reflect changes in the amount and type of vegetation which is linked to changes in local aridity. The stalagmites from this cave have high uranium, high δ234U and low detritus thorium and are thus ideally suited for dating using the uranium-series technique. Here we present a record of climate variability for the previous four ice ages. Based on growth of multiple stalagmites, we define the period from ~60 to 14.5 ka as speleothem-based pluvial 1 (SWNA-P1). Speleothems FS-5, FS-6, TR-2, TR-3 and HH-1 grew during glacial cycles 2-4, which we define as pluvials 2, 3, & 4 (SWNA-P2, P3, and P4) where preliminary results suggest that SWNA-P2 lasted from 170 to 130 ka, SWNA-P3 from 265 to 242 ka, and SWNA-P4 from 352 to 336 ka. Growth hiatuses and the carbon isotope records indicate the timing of pluvial terminations. Overall, SWNA-P3 is more similar to SWNA-P1, showing events that may have been more complex, with both exhibiting stadial- and interstadial-like climatic signals, while SWNA-P2 and P4

  15. Climatic Variation in the Western Part of Subtropical North America during Late Last Glacial and Deglaciation: Some New Records and a Synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, P. D.; Quiroz-Jiménez, J. D.; Chávez Lara, C. M.; Sánchez Zavala, J. L.; Lozano-Santacruz, R.; Lopez-Balbiaux, N.

    2014-12-01

    Late Quaternary climate of western subtropical North America is related to the dynamics of summer as well as winter precipitation. During the last glacial maximum, it was hypothesized that the frequent winter storms provided more precipitation (COHMAP members, 1988) as the southern branch of the jet streams carried more moisture into the region (Kutzbach and Wright, 1985). However, the new global climate simulations do not provide indication of the jet stream split and some even suggest that the southern branch of the jet was weaker (Kim et al., 2008; Toracinta et al., 2004). In the last few years, the proxy records from the region have provided new information and suggested new hypothesis (Barron et al., 2012; Lyle et al., 2012; Roy et al., 2013). We present some new records of paleohydrological changes occurred over the late last glacial and deglaciation from the northwestern México. A compilation of all the important records from the region provides information about the geographic coverage of summer and winter precipitation. Minimal influence of summer as well as winter precipitation caused drier conditions over a large part of northern and northwestern Mexico (i.e. 29°-31°N) during the late last glacial (27-18 cal ka BP). Summer precipitation was restricted to the southern part of subtropical North America during >18 cal ka BP and it expanded to higher latitudes and covered different regions over the deglaciation (18-10 cal ka BP). We relate the different geographical coverage of summer precipitation to moisture flow sourced from the tropical and subtropical Pacific and Gulf of California during different intervals.

  16. Killer whale nuclear genome and mtDNA reveal widespread population bottleneck during the last glacial maximum.

    PubMed

    Moura, Andre E; Janse van Rensburg, Charlene; Pilot, Malgorzata; Tehrani, Arman; Best, Peter B; Thornton, Meredith; Plön, Stephanie; de Bruyn, P J Nico; Worley, Kim C; Gibbs, Richard A; Dahlheim, Marilyn E; Hoelzel, Alan Rus

    2014-05-01

    Ecosystem function and resilience is determined by the interactions and independent contributions of individual species. Apex predators play a disproportionately determinant role through their influence and dependence on the dynamics of prey species. Their demographic fluctuations are thus likely to reflect changes in their respective ecological communities and habitat. Here, we investigate the historical population dynamics of the killer whale based on draft nuclear genome data for the Northern Hemisphere and mtDNA data worldwide. We infer a relatively stable population size throughout most of the Pleistocene, followed by an order of magnitude decline and bottleneck during the Weichselian glacial period. Global mtDNA data indicate that while most populations declined, at least one population retained diversity in a stable, productive ecosystem off southern Africa. We conclude that environmental changes during the last glacial period promoted the decline of a top ocean predator, that these events contributed to the pattern of diversity among extant populations, and that the relatively high diversity of a population currently in productive, stable habitat off South Africa suggests a role for ocean productivity in the widespread decline. PMID:24497033

  17. Imaging evidence for Hubbard Glacier advances and retreats since the last glacial maximum in Yakutat and Disenchantment Bays, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zurbuchen, Julie M.; Gulick, Sean P. S.; Walton, Maureen A. L.; Goff, John A.

    2015-06-01

    High-resolution 2-D multichannel seismic data, collected during the 2012 UTIG-USGS National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program survey of Disenchantment and Yakutat Bays in southeast Alaska, provide insight into their glacial history. These data show evidence of two unconformities, appearing in the form of channels, and are interpreted to be advance pathways for Hubbard Glacier. The youngest observable channel, thought to have culminated near the main phase of the Little Ice Age (LIA), is imaged in Disenchantment Bay and ends at a terminal moraine near Blizhni Point. An older channel, thought to be from an advance that culminated in the early phase of the LIA, extends from Disenchantment Bay into the northeastern edge of Yakutat Bay, turning southward at Knight Island and terminating on the southeastern edge of Yakutat Bay. Our interpretation is that Hubbard Glacier has repeatedly advanced around the east side of Yakutat Bay in Knight Island Channel, possibly due to the presence of Malaspina Glacier cutting off access to central Yakutat Bay during times of mutual advance. We observe two distinct erosional surfaces and retreat sequences of Hubbard Glacier in Yakutat Bay, supporting the hypothesis that minor glacial advances in fjords do not erode all prior sediment accumulations. Interpretation of chaotic seismic facies between these two unconformities suggests that Hubbard Glacier exhibits rapid retreats and that Disenchantment Bay is subject to numerous episodes of outburst flooding and morainal bank collapse. These findings also suggest that tidewater glaciers preferentially reoccupy the same channels in bay and marine settings during advances.

  18. Killer Whale Nuclear Genome and mtDNA Reveal Widespread Population Bottleneck during the Last Glacial Maximum

    PubMed Central

    Moura, Andre E.; Janse van Rensburg, Charlene; Pilot, Malgorzata; Tehrani, Arman; Best, Peter B.; Thornton, Meredith; Plön, Stephanie; de Bruyn, P.J. Nico; Worley, Kim C.; Gibbs, Richard A.; Dahlheim, Marilyn E.; Hoelzel, Alan Rus

    2014-01-01

    Ecosystem function and resilience is determined by the interactions and independent contributions of individual species. Apex predators play a disproportionately determinant role through their influence and dependence on the dynamics of prey species. Their demographic fluctuations are thus likely to reflect changes in their respective ecological communities and habitat. Here, we investigate the historical population dynamics of the killer whale based on draft nuclear genome data for the Northern Hemisphere and mtDNA data worldwide. We infer a relatively stable population size throughout most of the Pleistocene, followed by an order of magnitude decline and bottleneck during the Weichselian glacial period. Global mtDNA data indicate that while most populations declined, at least one population retained diversity in a stable, productive ecosystem off southern Africa. We conclude that environmental changes during the last glacial period promoted the decline of a top ocean predator, that these events contributed to the pattern of diversity among extant populations, and that the relatively high diversity of a population currently in productive, stable habitat off South Africa suggests a role for ocean productivity in the widespread decline. PMID:24497033

  19. The Latitudinal and Vertical Thermal Distribution Change from the Last Glacial Maximum in the Western North Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagawa, T.; Murayama, M.; Ikehara, M.; Okamura, K.; Oba, T.

    2008-12-01

    We conducted multi-species analysis of planktonic foraminiferal oxygen isotope and Mg/Ca in the tropical and subtropical western North Pacific sediment core in order to investigate latitudinal and vertical thermal structure change from the LGM. A box core 3cBX was collected from the west Caroline Basin (8 01 N, 139 38 E), and a piston core ASM5 was collected from the Amami Sea Mount (28 23 N, 132 45 E). Eight and seven species of planktonic foraminifera were picked from 3cBX and ASM5, respectively, in order to analyze oxygen isotope. In the tropics, the glacial-interglacial amplitude of G. ruber oxygen isotope was approximately 1.0 per mil between LGM and Holocene. On the other hand, the amplitude in the subtropics was approximately 1.5per mil. Because G. ruber prefers summer warmest temperature, the oxygen isotope difference suggested that the latitudinal summer surface temperature/salinity gradient in the last glacial period was steeper than that of modern. Multi-species approach reveals that the vertical thermal structure variations in the North Pacific. The vertical thermal gradient in the subtropic region was gentler in the LGM and steeper in the last deglaciation than modern condition. We will discuss about Mg/Ca temperature and salinity variation in the presentation.

  20. Modelling Glacial Lake Outburst Floods: Key Considerations and Challenges Posed By Climatic Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westoby, M.

    2014-12-01

    The number and size of moraine-dammed supraglacial and proglacial lakes is increasing as a result of contemporary climatic change. Moraine-dammed lakes are capable of impounding volumes of water in excess of 107 m3, and often represent a very real threat to downstream communities and infrastructure, should the bounding moraine fail and produce a catastrophic Glacial Lake Outburst Flood (GLOF). Modelling the individual components of a GLOF, including a triggering event, the complex dam-breaching process and downstream propagation of the flood is incredibly challenging, not least because direct observation and instrumentation of such high-magnitude flows is virtually impossible. We briefly review the current state-of-the-art in numerical GLOF modelling, with a focus on the theoretical and computational challenges associated with reconstructing or predicting GLOF dynamics in the face of rates of cryospheric change that have no historical precedent, as well as various implications for researchers and professionals tasked with the production of hazard maps and disaster mitigation strategies.

  1. Northern hemisphere climate control on the environmental dynamics in the glacial Black Sea "Lake"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wegwerth, Antje; Kaiser, Jérôme; Dellwig, Olaf; Shumilovskikh, Lyudmila S.; Nowaczyk, Norbert R.; Arz, Helge W.

    2016-03-01

    The Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 3 stands out due to its abrupt changes from cold and dry stadials to warm and humid interstadials, the so-called Dansgaard-Oeschger cycles that also affected temperature and rainfall in the Black Sea region. This study is based on a gravity core from the southeastern (SE) Black Sea that covers the last glacial lake stage from 64 to 20 ka BP. By using the composition of major and trace elements in the sediments, terrestrial plant-derived n-alkane flux, and Sr/Ca from benthic ostracods, we reconstruct the variability of riverine and aeolian input, salinity, and productivity in the SE Black Sea region in response to the Northern Hemisphere climate oscillations. During colder and drier stadials, the aeolian input increased relative to the riverine discharge, potentially due to southward shifted and/or stronger westerly winds and due to changes in the vegetation cover. An evaporation exceeding freshwater supply by rainfall and rivers possibly caused higher salinity and a lower lake level. The environmental status during MIS 4 and 2 is very much comparable with the stadial conditions during MIS 3. During warmer and more humid interstadials, lower salinity and presumably positive lake level changes most likely resulted from increased precipitation and river discharge. This likely increased primary productivity through an augmented nutrient supply. Lowest average salinities are suggested for the middle part of MIS 3 in response to enhanced meltwater from the disintegrating Fennoscandian Ice Sheet and/or by generally more humid conditions.

  2. Millennial-scale climate variability in response to changing glacial and orbital boundary conditions during the Mid-Pleistocene transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferretti, Patrizia; Crowhurst, Simon; Drysdale, Russell; Bajo, Petra; Barbante, Carlo

    2016-04-01

    The Mid-Pleistocene transition represents perhaps the most important climate transition in the Quaternary period, yet it is one of the most poorly understood. Although the exact timing and mechanism of the onset of the "100 kyr" regime remain a matter of debate, it is well established that the overall periodicity of the glacial-interglacial cycles changed from a dominant 41 kyr obliquity periodicity prior to ~0.9 Ma to a dominant late Pleistocene 100 kyr variance. This change in the frequency domain was associated with an increase in the amplitude of global ice volume variations that, superimposed on a long-term climatic trend towards more glacial conditions over millions of years, produced some of the most extreme glaciations recorded. This interval of time has often been considered to be important in relation to long-term Milankovitch-scale climate variability. In contrast, here, special emphasis will be placed on assessing the presence and the characteristics of the suborbital-scale variability, and reconstructing the evolution of millennial-scale climate variability as the average climate state evolve toward generally colder conditions with larger ice sheets, and the spectral character of climate variability shifted from dominantly 41 kyr to 100 kyr. Appealing evidence suggests that millennial-scale climate variability is amplified during times of intense forcing changes, but this rapid variability has not been thoroughly explored yet at the time when the major changes in climate periodicity occurred. To address these questions, we have examined the record of climatic conditions from Marine Isotope Stages 25 to 16 (~970-650 ka) using high-resolution stable isotope records from benthic and planktonic foraminifera from a sedimentary sequence in the North Atlantic (Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Expedition 306, Site U1313) in order to assess millennial-scale changes in sea-surface and deep-water conditions, the dynamics of thermohaline deep-water circulation

  3. High-amplitude, centennial-scale climate oscillations during the last glacial in the western Third Pole as recorded in the Guliya ice cap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, L. G.; Yao, T.; Mosley-Thompson, E.; Wu, G.; Davis, M. E.; Tian, L.; Lin, P. N.

    2015-12-01

    The Guliya ice cap, located in the Kunlun Mountains in the western Third Pole (TP) region near the northern limit of the southwest monsoon influence, may be the only non-polar ice field that provides detailed histories of climate and environment over the last glacial cycle. A continuous climate record from an ice core drilled in 1992 contains Eemian ice, and basal temperatures measured that year confirmed that the record was not being removed from the bottom. The δ18O record throughout Marine Isotope Stage 2 (MIS2) displays the occurrence of high-amplitude (~20‰) episodes of ~200-year periodicity, and the aerosol records suggest snow cover, regional vegetation and fire frequency that vary in synchrony. These oscillations might reflect the movement of the northernmost penetration of the monsoon precipitation through the Late Glacial Stage, which is restricted by the topographic barrier posed by the Kunlun range, and might also reflect solar-driven nonlinearities in the climate system such as sudden shifts in the jet stream. Recent model simulations suggest that glacial cooling over China was significantly amplified by stationary waves, and the Guliya MIS2 oscillations could reflect cyclical variability in these waves. These results are supported by clumped isotope thermometry of carbonates from the Chinese Loess Plateau, which indicate a 6 to 7oC decrease in Last Glacial Maximum summer temperatures. These studies will lead to a better understanding of the mechanisms driving such high-frequency, high-amplitude oscillations. A review of the 2015 Sino-American cooperative ice core drilling program on Guliya is presented. This program will serve as a flagship for the TP Environment Program, an international, multidisciplinary collaboration among professionals and students in 14 countries designed to investigate environmental changes across the TP. The rapidly warming TP contains ~46,000 glaciers that collectively hold one of Earth's largest stores of fresh water that

  4. Coeval fluctuations of the Greenland Ice Sheet and a local ice cap during the Younger Dryas: implications for late-glacial climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy, Laura; Kelly, Meredith; Lowell, Tom; Hall, Brenda; Howley, Jennifer; Smith, Colby

    2016-04-01

    Although the Younger Dryas (YD) has been recorded in ice cores atop the Greenland Ice Sheet, past glacier extents on Greenland dating to the YD are rare. In part, this is due to much of the Greenland Ice Sheet being located offshore until early Holocene time. The Scoresby Sund region (~71°N, 26°W) of central East Greenland, however, is one of only a few locations where the margins of the Greenland Ice Sheet and glaciers independent of the ice sheet were located at least partially on land by late-glacial time. In this region, two distinct sets of moraines, known as the inner and outer Milne Land Stade moraines, have been defined and mark a significant readvance or stillstand during deglaciation from the last glacial maximum. Previous work has dated these moraines to late-glacial and early Holocene time. We present a new 10Be chronology on fluctuations of both the Greenland Ice Sheet and the adjacent Milne Land ice cap from the type locality of the Milne Land Stade moraines in Milne Land. 10Be ages of boulders on bedrock distal to the inner Milne Land Stade moraines range from 12.3 to 11.5 ka and indicate that both ice masses retreated during the YD, likely in response to rising summer temperatures. Since Greenland ice-cores register cold mean annual temperatures throughout the YD, these ice-marginal data support climate conditions characterized by strong seasonality. The mean ages (± 1σ uncertainty) of the inner Milne Land Stade moraines date to 11.4 ± 0.8 ka (Greenland Ice Sheet) and 11.4 ± 0.6 ka (ice cap) indicating that they were formed during Preboreal time or at the end of the YD. Based on these coeval moraine ages, we suggest that both ice masses responded to climate conditions acting on the ice margins, specifically ablation. Moreover, our data show that the ice sheet responded sensitively (i.e., on the same time scale as a small ice cap) to late-glacial and early Holocene climate conditions.

  5. Evolution of the deep Atlantic water masses since the last glacial maximum based on a transient run of NCAR-CCSM3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mysak, Lawrence; Marson, Juliana; Mata, Mauricio; Wainer, Ilana

    2016-04-01

    During the last deglaciation, the high latitudes of the Atlantic Ocean underwent major changes. Besides the continuous warming, the polar and subpolar ocean surface received a large amount of meltwater from the retracting ice sheets. These changes in temperature and salinity affected the deep waters, such as the Antarctic Bottom Water (AABW) and the North Atlantic Deep Water (NADW). In this study, we present the evolution of the physical properties and the distribution of the AABW and NADW since the last glacial maximum (21 ka ago) using the results of a transient simulation with the NCAR-CCSM3. In this particular model scenario with a schematic freshwater forcing, we find that the modern NADW, with its characteristic salinity maximum at depth, was absent at the beginning of the deglaciation, while its intermediate version - Glacial North Atlantic Intermediate Water (GNAIW) - was being formed. GNAIW was a cold and relatively fresh water mass that dominated intermediate depths between 60 and 20 deg N. At this time, most of the deep and abyssal Atlantic basin was dominated by AABW. Within the onset of the Bolling-Allerod period, at nearly 15 ka ago, GNAIW expanded southwards when the simulated Meridional Overturning Circulation overshoots. The transition between GNAIW and NADW occurred after that, when AABW was fresh enough to allow NADW to sink deeper in the water column. When NADW appears (about 11 ka ago), AABW retracts and is constrained to lie near the bottom.

  6. The impact of precession changes on the Arctic climate during the last interglacial glacial transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khodri, Myriam; Cane, Mark A.; Kukla, George; Gavin, Joyce; Braconnot, Pascale

    2005-07-01

    Three sensitivity experiments using an Ocean Atmosphere General Circulation Model (OAGCM) are conducted to simulate the climate impact of precession. The relative contributions of components of the hydrological cycle including the albedo of Arctic sea ice, advection of atmospheric water vapor and sea surface temperature to the summer Arctic melt process are evaluated. Timing of the perihelion is varied in each experiment with meteorological spring (SP), winter (WP) and autumn (AP) perihelion corresponding to conditions at 110, 115 and 120 ky BP, respectively. Obliquity is unchanged at the 115 ky level which is lower than today. The experiments are assessed relative to the present day control, which has been shown to simulate current conditions based on observations. In the SP experiment, top of the atmosphere (TOA) insolation is weaker than today between the summer solstice and autumnal equinox. In the AP case representing the interglacial, it is less intense between vernal equinox and summer solstice but stronger during the remainder of the year. Although the incident solar radiation is reduced in summer in the SP experiment, increased melting of snow is found primarily as a result of feedbacks from the delayed seasonal cycle of hydrologic components. This is in contrast to both the WP and AP cases in which the perennial snow cover is simulated. At the time of the last glacial inception, 115 ky BP, the WP experiment shows lower insolation to the high northern latitudes in late spring and summer mainly as a result of lower obliquity than today. Dynamical ocean-atmosphere interactions in response to precession maintain the reduced sea ice melting in late spring, strengthen the annual equator-to-pole sea surface temperature (SST) gradient and increase atmospheric moisture convergence in glaciation-sensitive regions. In both the WP and AP experiments seasonal sea ice melting is weakened resulting in pronounced outgoing radiative flux at the locations of expanded sea

  7. Controlling factors on a paleo-lake oxygen isotope record (Yammoûneh, Lebanon) since the Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Develle, Anne-Lise; Herreros, Julien; Vidal, Laurence; Sursock, Alexandre; Gasse, Françoise

    2010-04-01

    Late Quaternary paleoclimatic changes in the Levant are difficult to extract from carbonate oxygen isotope records partly because the factors controlling the terrestrial δ 18O signals are not fully understood in this region characterized by sharp climatic gradients. Here, we address this purpose by presenting the first 14C-dated isotope record from the northern Levant. The record is based on oxygen isotopes from ostracod shells from lacustrine-palustrine deposits accumulated in a small karstic, hydrologically open basin (Yammoûneh), located on the eastern flank of Mount Lebanon. We have first constructed a composite isotopic record obtained from three different ostracod taxa. This yields an oxygen isotope record of ostracods (δ ost) related to the most widespread species ( Ilyocypris inermis), and converted to δ 18O values coeval with calcite precipitated in equilibrium (δ C) with the lake water (δ L). As with other records from the Mediterranean region, the Yammoûneh profile shows maximum and minimum δ C values during the LGM and the early Holocene, respectively, and a slight late Holocene increase. In order to discuss the potential causes of the observed δ 18O values fluctuations (e.g., changes in the isotopic composition of the moisture source, temperature, precipitation minus evaporation (P-E) balance, or atmospheric circulation), we tentatively reconstruct the lake water isotope composition by correcting the δ C values for lake water temperature using regional paleotemperature estimates. Inferred δ L values were then corrected for the isotopic composition of the Eastern Mediterranean sea surface water (the moisture source) derived from planktonic foraminifera δ 18O values corrected for alkenone-based sea surface temperature. Our study suggests that Holocene δ L fluctuations are primarily linked to changes in the sea surface water composition (source effect) amplified by enhanced inland rainfall during the early Holocene. During the LGM, low δ L

  8. Response of the Tropical Atmospheric Circulation to Glacial Boundary Conditions Simulated by an Ensemble of Coupled Climate Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Nezio, P. N.; Clement, A. C.; Vecchi, G. A.

    2009-12-01

    The response of the tropical atmospheric circulation to Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) boundary conditions is analyzed using an ensemble of coordinated climate model experiments performed for the Paleoclimate Modelling Intercomparison Project Phase II. The multi-model changes in the surface circulation of the Tropical Pacific are dominated by cross-equatorial winds flowing from the Northern hemisphere (NH) to the Southern hemisphere (SH) along with a strengthening of the easterlies over the equatorial Pacific. The anomalous cross-equatorial winds have been typically associated with an anomalous Hadley cell with the ascending branch in the SH and the descending branch in the NH compensating changes in atmospheric heat transport. However, in this ensemble of coupled General Circulation Models (GCMs) the changes in the tropical circulation result from different forcing in each hemisphere. In the NH hemisphere the changes are dominated by the topography of the ice sheets, while in the SH the changes result from cooling due to decreased CO2. The changes in circulation due to the topography of the icesheets are diagnosed using a steady s-coordinate primitive equation model linearized about a zonally symmetric basic state that solves for the eddy component of the circulation. The solutions from this model for each GCM indicate that differences in the simulation of the mean climate result in differences in the response to LGM topography. The multi-model atmospheric response in the NH is analogous to the expansion of the Aleutian low during boreal winter in the present climate, when the NH subtropical high is squeezed southeastward by an expanded Aleutian low. In the SH the models simulate an eastward expansion of the South Pacific Convergence Zone and contraction of the eastern Pacific dry zone consistent with reduced subsidence associated with a slowing down of the SH Hadley cell. This eastward shift in the mean climatology results in weakened trade winds. In addition to the

  9. Late glacial and Holocene sedimentation, vegetation, and climate history from easternmost Beringia (northern Yukon Territory, Canada)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritz, Michael; Herzschuh, Ulrike; Wetterich, Sebastian; Lantuit, Hugues; De Pascale, Gregory P.; Pollard, Wayne H.; Schirrmeister, Lutz

    2012-11-01

    Beringian climate and environmental history are poorly characterized at its easternmost edge. Lake sediments from the northern Yukon Territory have recorded sedimentation, vegetation, summer temperature and precipitation changes since ~ 16 cal ka BP. Herb-dominated tundra persisted until ~ 14.7 cal ka BP with mean July air temperatures ≤ 5°C colder and annual precipitation 50 to 120 mm lower than today. Temperatures rapidly increased during the Bølling/Allerød interstadial towards modern conditions, favoring establishment of Betula-Salix shrub tundra. Pollen-inferred temperature reconstructions recorded a pronounced Younger Dryas stadial in east Beringia with a temperature drop of ~ 1.5°C (~ 2.5 to 3.0°C below modern conditions) and low net precipitation (90 to 170 mm) but show little evidence of an early Holocene thermal maximum in the pollen record. Sustained low net precipitation and increased evaporation during early Holocene warming suggest a moisture-limited spread of vegetation and an obscured summer temperature maximum. Northern Yukon Holocene moisture availability increased in response to a retreating Laurentide Ice Sheet, postglacial sea level rise, and decreasing summer insolation that in turn led to establishment of Alnus-Betula shrub tundra from ~ 5 cal ka BP until present, and conversion of a continental climate into a coastal-maritime climate near the Beaufort Sea.

  10. Intensification of the meridional temperature gradient in the Great Barrier Reef following the Last Glacial Maximum - Results from IODP Expedition 325

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felis, Thomas; McGregor, Helen V.; Linsley, Braddock K.; Tudhope, Alexander W.; Gagan, Michael K.; Suzuki, Atsushi; Inoue, Mayuri; Thomas, Alexander L.; Esat, Tezer M.; Thompson, William G.; Tiwari, Manish; Potts, Donald C.; Mudelsee, Manfred; Yokoyama, Yusuke; Webster, Jody M.

    2015-04-01

    Tropical south-western Pacific temperatures are of vital importance to the Great Barrier Reef (GBR), but the role of sea surface temperatures (SSTs) in the growth of the GBR since the Last Glacial Maximum remains largely unknown. Here we present records of Sr/Ca and δ18O for Last Glacial Maximum and deglacial corals that were drilled by Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Expedition 325 along the shelf edge seaward of the modern GBR. The Sr/Ca and δ18O records of the precisely U-Th dated fossil shallow-water corals show a considerably steeper meridional SST gradient than the present day in the central GBR. We find a 1-2 ° C larger temperature decrease between 17° S and 20° S about 20,000 to 13,000 years ago. The result is best explained by the northward expansion of cooler subtropical waters due to a weakening of the South Pacific gyre and East Australian Current. Our findings indicate that the GBR experienced substantial and regionally differing temperature change during the last deglaciation, much larger temperature changes than previously recognized. Furthermore, our findings suggest a northward contraction of the Western Pacific Warm Pool during the LGM and last deglaciation, and serve to explain anomalous drying of northeastern Australia at that time. Overall, the GBR developed through significant SST change and, considering temperature alone, may be more resilient than previously thought. Webster, J. M., Yokoyama, Y. & Cotteril, C. & the Expedition 325 Scientists. Proceedings of the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Vol. 325 (Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Management International Inc., 2011). Felis, T., McGregor, H. V., Linsley, B. K., Tudhope, A. W., Gagan, M. K., Suzuki, A., Inoue, M., Thomas, A. L., Esat, T. M., Thompson, W. G., Tiwari, M., Potts, D. C., Mudelsee, M., Yokoyama, Y., Webster, J. M. Intensification of the meridional temperature gradient in the Great Barrier Reef following the Last Glacial Maximum. Nature Communications 5, 4102

  11. Changes in productivity and redox conditions during the Last Glacial Maximum as recorded in high-resolution geochemical records from Alfonso Basin, Gulf of California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choumiline, K.; Lyons, T. W.; Carriquiry, J. D.; Perez-Cruz, L. L.; Beaufort, L.

    2015-12-01

    The Last Glacial Maximum represents the most recent major sea level low stand in Earth history. Such changes in eustatic sea level impacted the oxygenation of marine basins, yet the characteristics and mechanisms of those impacts remain poorly known. Specific basin conditions are needed to develop, record, and preserve those paleoredox changes through time most effectively, including rapid sedimentation rates and silled basin morphologies. The anoxic Alfonso Basin, partially separated from the Gulf of California by a bathymetric sill, is such a place. The basin is located in a dry semiarid region dominated by dust inputs and only occasional tropical cyclone-induced fluvial contributions. We present the first multi-proxy reconstruction of southern Gulf of California paleoredox that covers an uninterrupted timespan from the Late Pleistocene to the present, with an emphasis on the Last Glacial Maximum. In this research we contrast geochemical data from a 47-meter-long sediment core (collected with the giant CALYPSO corer aboard the R/V Marion Dufresne) with the solid phase and pore water chemical data from a shorter but very detailed box core (collected on the R/V El Puma), both from Alfonso Basin. Our results show that during the Late Pleistocene and throughout the Holocene several paleoredox shifts occurred, often accompanied by differences in lamination (laminated/massive alternations) and trace element (Mo, V, U) compositions; detailed Fe chemistry (FeHR/FeTand Fe/Al ratios); as well as carbon and sulfur concentrations and isotope ratios. For example, FeHR/FeT ratios indicate values of roughly 0.15 during the Last Glacial Maximum (lower than theoretic threshold of 0.2 between oxic and anoxic), suggesting more oxic conditions, in comparison to 0.25 and higher in the Holocene. Most of the variability seen in these proxies is related to global sea level change, while some variability is instead related to local variations in paleoproductivity, often connected to

  12. Post-glacial landform evolution in the middle Satluj River valley, India: Implications towards understanding the climate tectonic interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Shubhra; Bartarya, S. K.; Marh, B. S.

    2016-04-01

    Late Quaternary landform evolution in monsoon-dominated middle Satluj valley is reconstructed using the fragmentary records of fluvial terraces, alluvial fans, debris flows, paleo-flood deposits, and epigenetic gorges. Based on detailed field mapping, alluvial stratigraphy, sedimentology and optical chronology, two phases of fluvial aggradations are identified. The older aggradation event dated between ˜13 and 11 ka (early-Holocene), occurred in the pre-existing topography carved by multiple events of erosion and incision. Climatically, the event corresponds to the post-glacial strengthened Indian summer monsoon (ISM). The younger aggradation event dated between ˜5 and 0.4 ka (mid- to late-Holocene), was during the declining phase of ISM. The terrain witnessed high magnitude floods during transitional climate (˜6.5-7 ka). The fluvial sedimentation was punctuated by short-lived debris flows and alluvial fans during the LGM (weak ISM), early to mid-Holocene transition climate and mid- to late-Holocene declining ISM. Based on the terrace morphology, an event of relatively enhanced surface uplift is inferred after late Holocene. The present study suggests that post-glacial landforms in the middle Satluj valley owe their genesis to the interplay between the climate variability and local/regional tectonic interactions.

  13. Running hotter, faster, shallower: acceleration of the marine nitrogen cycle from the Last Glacial Maximum to the pre-industrial, and implications for the future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galbraith, E. D.

    2015-12-01

    Biologically-available nitrogen is the primary limiting nutrient in the global ocean. The complex physical-biological interdependencies of nitrogen fixation and denitrification, the source and sink of bioavailable nitrogen, have led to uncertainty over their future trajectories under higher CO2. Sedimentary nitrogen isotope evidence suggests that the global rate of denitrification was on the order of 50% lower during the last glacial maximum, and reveals that significant changes in denitrification have occurred on a decadal-centennial timescale. Coupled atmosphere-ocean-biogeochemistry models simulate similar changes, through physically-driven changes in anoxia, which then feed back on nitrogen fixation through the availability of phosphorus to diazotrophs. In addition, diazotroph culture experiments suggest that nitrogen fixation was further limited during glacial maxima by low CO2, causing an additional slowdown of the nitrogen cycle. The emergent picture suggests that deglaciation accelerated both sides of the N cycle, with more rapid loss encouraged by expanded shallow anoxia, and more rapid gain encouraged by higher CO2. It will be argued that the net effect on the nitrogen inventory can be approximated by knowing the distribution of surface ocean PO4, given the observed correlation of surface PO4 concentrations on the P:C ratio of exported organic matter.

  14. Too much of a good thing: sea ice extent may have forced emperor penguins into refugia during the last glacial maximum.

    PubMed

    Younger, Jane L; Clucas, Gemma V; Kooyman, Gerald; Wienecke, Barbara; Rogers, Alex D; Trathan, Philip N; Hart, Tom; Miller, Karen J

    2015-06-01

    The relationship between population structure and demographic history is critical to understanding microevolution and for predicting the resilience of species to environmental change. Using mitochondrial DNA from extant colonies and radiocarbon-dated subfossils, we present the first microevolutionary analysis of emperor penguins (Aptenodytes forsteri) and show their population trends throughout the last glacial maximum (LGM, 19.5-16 kya) and during the subsequent period of warming and sea ice retreat. We found evidence for three mitochondrial clades within emperor penguins, suggesting that they were isolated within three glacial refugia during the LGM. One of these clades has remained largely isolated within the Ross Sea, while the two other clades have intermixed around the coast of Antarctica from Adélie Land to the Weddell Sea. The differentiation of the Ross Sea population has been preserved despite rapid population growth and opportunities for migration. Low effective population sizes during the LGM, followed by a rapid expansion around the beginning of the Holocene, suggest that an optimum set of sea ice conditions exist for emperor penguins, corresponding to available foraging area. PMID:25728986

  15. Climate Change, Glacier Retreat and Sediment Waves: Evidences from Fans in the Fox Glacial valley (New Zealand) and Analogical Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez, C. A.; Purdie, H.

    2015-12-01

    As global climate continues warm, mountain environments are changing, and rates of glacial retreat are unprecedented. The hydrologic implications of this rapid ice retreat and changing climate conditions have been the focus of numerous studies, but the consequent effects on the sediment cascade in valleys and tributaries has received considerably less attention. In the present study, we investigated the role of glacial recession on sediment mobilization and deposition in a mountain valley catchment at Fox Glacier, New Zealand. In particular, we analyze the role of glacier recession on the formation of sediment fans in the main valley. Emphasis was put on the role of sediment, impounded by the glacier in side tributaries, becoming rapidly available for remobilization as the glacier retreats. The method is based on field observations, and measurements using high resolution GNSS (Trimble R8 survey grade differential GNSS) and photogrammetric methods using Structure from Motion based on ground-, helicopter- and UAV- photographs. Field observations were conducted in the period 2014 - 2015, and have been complimented with analogic modeling in the laboratory, in order to comprehend the processes driving rapid fan formation. The analogic model reproduced the retreat of the glacier and the response of a tributary, with simulations for both glaciated and de-glaciated conditions. For similar hydrologic and slope parameters, the fans created after glacial retreat have shown an acceleration in their formation of up to 12 times compared to fanes created without glacial influence. Field observations within the period 2013 - 2015 of Straight Creek Fan (Fox Valley, New Zealand) have confirmed laboratory simulations, with the fan growing to a radius