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Sample records for glaciales tierra del

  1. Do crustal deformations observed by GPS in Tierra del Fuego (Argentina) reflect glacial-isostatic adjustment?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendoza, L.; Richter, A.; Hormaechea, J. L.; Perdomo, R.; Del Cogliano, D.; Dietrich, R.; Fritsche, M.

    2010-09-01

    Vertical site velocities determined by geodetic GPS observations in the Lago Fagnano area, Tierra del Fuego main island, are interpreted with respect to their potential relation with the glacial-isostatic crustal response to ice mass changes. The spatial pattern of the uplift rates, in combination with the horizontal crustal deformation pattern, point towards a fault-tectonic rather than glacial-isostatic origin of the determined vertical crustal deformations. This implies rather small GIA effects pointing towards relatively small Holocene ice-mass changes in Tierra del Fuego. However, these findings are considered to be preliminary. They should be confirmed by additional observations covering an extended area with GPS sites.

  2. Erratic boulder trains and cosmogenic exposure dating of former glacial limits: A case-study from Tierra del Fuego, southernmost South America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darvill, Christopher; Stokes, Chris; Bentley, Mike

    2014-05-01

    Erratic Boulder Trains (EBTs) are a spectacular yet poorly-understood glacial geomorphological feature. These linear clusters of glacial erratic boulders help to illustrate the flow-lines of former glaciers by pin-pointing the parent rock from which they have originated and are often used as targets for cosmogenic nuclide exposure dating. Consequently, there is a need to understand their geomorphological significance to improve ice-sheet reconstructions and provide important contextual information for dating studies. The EBTs in Tierra del Fuego are some of the finest examples of this feature in the world, and this paper presents the first comprehensive mapping and physical assessment of four boulder trains. Unlike most other examples, they were deposited laterally rather than medially and are tightly clustered, presenting linear features only a few kilometres long that contain hundreds to thousands of huge boulders (often >8 m in diameter). The size and angularity of the boulders strongly supports the hypothesis that they were deposited as a supraglacial rock avalanche. The boulders have been the subject of previous cosmogenic dating, which have yielded anomalously young ages from deposits thought to be hundreds of thousands of years old. Analysis of weathering proxies shows little difference between boulder trains thought to be of radically different ages, with important implications for the timing of glaciations and potentially contradicting previous age constraints on glacial limits in the region.

  3. Geomorphology and weathering characteristics of erratic boulder trains on Tierra del Fuego, southernmost South America: Implications for dating of glacial deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darvill, Christopher M.; Bentley, Michael J.; Stokes, Chris R.

    2015-01-01

    Erratic boulder trains (EBTs) are a useful glacial geomorphological feature because they reveal former ice flow trajectories and can be targeted for cosmogenic nuclide exposure dating. However, understanding how they are transported and deposited is important because this has implications for palaeoglaciological reconstructions and the pre-exposure and/or erosion of the boulders. In this study, we review previous work on EBTs, which indicates that they may form subglacially or supraglacially but that large angular boulders transported long distances generally reflect supraglacial transport. We then report detailed observations of EBTs from Tierra del Fuego, southernmost South America, where their characteristics provide a useful framework for the interpretation of previously published cosmogenic nuclide exposure dates. We present the first comprehensive map of the EBTs and analyse their spatial distribution, size, and physical appearance. Results suggest that they were produced by one or more supraglacial rock avalanches in the Cordillera Darwin and were then transported supraglacially for 100 s of kilometres before being deposited. Rock surface weathering analysis shows no significant difference in the weathering characteristics of a sequence of EBTs, previously hypothesized to be of significantly different age (i.e., different glacial cycles). We interpret this to indicate that the EBTs are much closer in age than previous work has implied. This emphasises the importance of understanding EBT formation when using them for cosmogenic nuclide exposure dating.

  4. Tierra del Fuego, Argentina, South America

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The Mitre Peninsula is the easternmost tip of Tierra del Fuego, Argentina, (54.5S, 65.5W). Early winter snow can be seen on this south tip of the Andes Mountains. These same mountains continue underwater to Antarctica. The Strait of Magellan, separating the South American mainland from Tierra del Fuego is off the scene to the north and west, but the Strait of LeMaire, separating Tierra del Fuego from the Isla de los Estados can be seen.

  5. Late Quaternary vegetation and climate of southern Tierra del Fuego

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heusser, Calvin J.

    1989-05-01

    Vegetation and climate over approximately the past 13,000 yr are reconstructed from fossil pollen in a 9.4-m mire section at Caleta Róbalo on Beagle Channel, Isla Navarino (54°56'S, 67°38'W), southern Tierra del Fuego. Fifty surface samples reflecting modern pollen dispersal serve to interpret the record. Chronologically controlled by nine radiocarbon dates, fossil pollen assemblages are: Empetrum-Gramineae- Gunnera-Tubuliflorae (zone 3b, 13,000-11,850 yr B.P.), Gramineae- Empetrum-assorted minor taxa (zone 3a, 11,850-10,000 yr B.P.), Nothofagus-Gramineae-Tubuliflorae-Polypodiaceae (zone 2, 10,000-5000 yr B.P.), Nothofagus-Empetrum (zone 1b, 5000-3000 yr B.P.), and Empetrum-Nothofagus (zone 1a, 3000-0 yr B.P.). Assemblages show tundra under a cold, dry climate (zone 3), followed by open woodland (zone 2), as conditions became warmer and less dry, and later, with greater humidity and lower temperatures, by closed forest and the spread of mires (zone 1). Comparisons drawn with records from Antarctica, New Zealand, Tasmania, and the subantarctic islands demonstrate broadly uniform conditions in the circumpolar Southern Hemisphere. The influences of continental and maritime antarctic air masses were apparently considerable in Tierra del Fuego during cold late-glacial time, whereas Holocene climate was largely regulated by interplay between maritime polar and maritime tropical air.

  6. Extreme Environments in Tierra del Fuego, Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, C.; D'Antoni, H.; Burgess, S.; Zamora, J.; Skiles, J.

    2007-12-01

    The upper timberline of the Andes Cordillera on the island of Tierra del Fuego at the tip of South America is an environment subject to extreme conditions. In order to further understand this environment, ecosystem parameters were measured within two transects of the Andes at Glaciar Martial and Cerro Guanaco. The measurements included pH, soil temperature, soil moisture, nitrogen, sodium and potassium concentration, chlorophyll absorbance, and irradiance in the ultraviolet range (200-400 nm). These data comprise a survey that serves as a baseline for an intensive research program. Chlorophyll concentration and soil data were within the range of our observations at several other sites, from Lapataia Bay on the southwestern boundary with Chile, through the eastern end of Lake Fagnano. However, unusual levels of solar irradiance were found in the open sites of both transects while those in the forest exhibited lower UV values, suggesting strong absorption and/or reflection by the forest canopy. High levels of UV radiation damage important biomolecules and may be partially responsible for the presence of life forms such as the krummholz belt in the upper timberline. These UV values may be due to the effects of global ozone depletion and the ozone hole. The low temperatures, strong winds, snow and ice-covered soil and especially the exposure to UV radiation make this area an extreme environment for life.

  7. Bryophyte-cyanobacteria associations during primary succession in recently Deglaciated areas of Tierra del Fuego (Chile).

    PubMed

    Arróniz-Crespo, María; Pérez-Ortega, Sergio; De Los Ríos, Asunción; Green, T G Allan; Ochoa-Hueso, Raúl; Casermeiro, Miguel Ángel; de la Cruz, María Teresa; Pintado, Ana; Palacios, David; Rozzi, Ricardo; Tysklind, Niklas; Sancho, Leopoldo G

    2014-01-01

    Bryophyte establishment represents a positive feedback process that enhances soil development in newly exposed terrain. Further, biological nitrogen (N) fixation by cyanobacteria in association with mosses can be an important supply of N to terrestrial ecosystems, however the role of these associations during post-glacial primary succession is not yet fully understood. Here, we analyzed chronosequences in front of two receding glaciers with contrasting climatic conditions (wetter vs drier) at Cordillera Darwin (Tierra del Fuego) and found that most mosses had the capacity to support an epiphytic flora of cyanobacteria and exhibited high rates of N2 fixation. Pioneer moss-cyanobacteria associations showed the highest N2 fixation rates (4.60 and 4.96 µg N g-1 bryo. d-1) very early after glacier retreat (4 and 7 years) which may help accelerate soil development under wetter conditions. In drier climate, N2 fixation on bryophyte-cyanobacteria associations was also high (0.94 and 1.42 µg N g-1 bryo. d-1) but peaked at intermediate-aged sites (26 and 66 years). N2 fixation capacity on bryophytes was primarily driven by epiphytic cyanobacteria abundance rather than community composition. Most liverworts showed low colonization and N2 fixation rates, and mosses did not exhibit consistent differences across life forms and habitat (saxicolous vs terricolous). We also found a clear relationship between cyanobacteria genera and the stages of ecological succession, but no relationship was found with host species identity. Glacier forelands in Tierra del Fuego show fast rates of soil transformation which imply large quantities of N inputs. Our results highlight the potential contribution of bryophyte-cyanobacteria associations to N accumulation during post-glacial primary succession and further describe the factors that drive N2-fixation rates in post-glacial areas with very low N deposition. PMID:24819926

  8. Bryophyte-Cyanobacteria Associations during Primary Succession in Recently Deglaciated Areas of Tierra del Fuego (Chile)

    PubMed Central

    Arróniz-Crespo, María; Pérez-Ortega, Sergio; De los Ríos, Asunción; Green, T. G. Allan; Ochoa-Hueso, Raúl; Casermeiro, Miguel Ángel; de la Cruz, María Teresa; Pintado, Ana; Palacios, David; Rozzi, Ricardo; Tysklind, Niklas; Sancho, Leopoldo G.

    2014-01-01

    Bryophyte establishment represents a positive feedback process that enhances soil development in newly exposed terrain. Further, biological nitrogen (N) fixation by cyanobacteria in association with mosses can be an important supply of N to terrestrial ecosystems, however the role of these associations during post-glacial primary succession is not yet fully understood. Here, we analyzed chronosequences in front of two receding glaciers with contrasting climatic conditions (wetter vs drier) at Cordillera Darwin (Tierra del Fuego) and found that most mosses had the capacity to support an epiphytic flora of cyanobacteria and exhibited high rates of N2 fixation. Pioneer moss-cyanobacteria associations showed the highest N2 fixation rates (4.60 and 4.96 µg N g−1 bryo. d−1) very early after glacier retreat (4 and 7 years) which may help accelerate soil development under wetter conditions. In drier climate, N2 fixation on bryophyte-cyanobacteria associations was also high (0.94 and 1.42 µg N g−1 bryo. d−1) but peaked at intermediate-aged sites (26 and 66 years). N2 fixation capacity on bryophytes was primarily driven by epiphytic cyanobacteria abundance rather than community composition. Most liverworts showed low colonization and N2 fixation rates, and mosses did not exhibit consistent differences across life forms and habitat (saxicolous vs terricolous). We also found a clear relationship between cyanobacteria genera and the stages of ecological succession, but no relationship was found with host species identity. Glacier forelands in Tierra del Fuego show fast rates of soil transformation which imply large quantities of N inputs. Our results highlight the potential contribution of bryophyte-cyanobacteria associations to N accumulation during post-glacial primary succession and further describe the factors that drive N2-fixation rates in post-glacial areas with very low N deposition. PMID:24819926

  9. Phytoseiid mites (Acari: Phytoseiidae) from Patagonia and Tierra del Fuego.

    PubMed

    Ferragut, Francisco; Navia, Denise

    2015-01-01

    Predatory phytoseiid mites have been intensively studied and surveyed in the last decades because of their economic importance as biocontrol agents of agricultural pests. However, many regions of the world remain unexplored and the diversity of the family worldwide is still fragmentary. Up to date no phytoseiid species have been collected in the southernmost part of the Earth down to latitude 45º S. In this study Phytoseiidae were sampled from native vegetation in southern Argentina and Chile in the regions of Patagonia and Tierra del Fuego Island. Thirteen species were collected, five of which were previously described and eight, Chileseius australis n. sp., Neoseiulus mapuche n. sp., Typhlodromips valdivianus n. sp., T. fissuratus n. sp., Amblyseius grandiporus n. sp., A. caliginosus n. sp., Typhlodromus (Anthoseius) anomalos n. sp. and Metaseiulus parabrevicollis n. sp. are proposed as new to science and are described and diagnosed. PMID:26250248

  10. [Epidemiology of dog bite lesions in Tierra del Fuego, Argentina].

    PubMed

    Zanini, Fabián; Padinger, Patricia; Elissondo, María C; Pérez, Héctor

    2008-01-01

    The coexistence between man and dog has resulted in mutual benefits during thousands of years, nevertheless some problems have recently arisen where bite injuries have an important role. The aim of this work was to describe the epidemiological characteristics of dog bite lesions which occurred during a year in Tierra del Fuego. A descriptive observational, transversal study of patients who were admitted with dog bite injuries to clinic and pediatric emergency services of hospitals and health centers was carried out between 3/1/05 and 3/1/06. A total of 382 records were made. The children group represents 49.5%. The group between 5 and 9 year-old was the most affected (44.4%; IC95% 37.2-51.8). In the adult group, that between 15 and 24 year-old was the most affected (29.5%; IC95% 23.2-36.5). More lesions were registered in men (57.6%) than in women (42.4%) (chi2 = 8.6, p = 0.003). During spring and summer months, 56.5% of the lesions were registered. A 72.8% of the incidents occurred on the public highway. Dogs of big size were responsible of 49.7% (IC95% 44.6-54.9) of the injuries. The 89.8% of the incidents were caused by another person's dog. Of the lesions, 55.8% (IC95% 50.6-60.8) were registered in lower extremities and 11% (IC95% 8.1-14.7) in head and neck. These data show that dog bite lesions affect the health and impact in the quality of life of the population of Tierra del Fuego, Argentina. PMID:18416313

  11. The Geologic and Geochemical Setting of Lago Fagnano, Tierra del Fuego, Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tingle, D.; Odle, K.; Knettel, P.; Redding, S.; Perry, E.; Ellins, K.; Ormiston, C.; Dovzak, N.; Anderson, S.

    2005-12-01

    Lago Fagnano, Tierra del Fuego, Argentina is the largest and southernmost ice-free lake on Earth. The isolated lake is unique because the geographic and geologic context provides information relating to the westerly wind patterns, interaction of multiple water sources (hot springs, glacial meltwater, precipitation, groundwater), and tectonic dynamics along a major transform fault. In March, 2005, four students and three teachers from Boerne High School, south-central Texas joined scientists from the United States, Argentina and Switzerland engaged in a geophysical survey of this lake. Lago Fagnano potentially contains within its sediments an undisturbed record of the geotectonic and global climate variability of past 20,000 years. The science team imaged the lake floor with a boat specially equipped to collect both high resolution data (high frequency), imaging the upper 10-15 meters of the sediment, and long range data (low frequency), penetrating 100 or more meters into the sediment. The group conducted field research of existing tectonic features at the eastern end of Tierra del Fuego, an activity directly tied to the research objectives of the science team. They also collected water and soil samples to assess chemical and isotopic trends in the Lago Fagnano region. The research performed can help to characterize the modern geochemical setting of the lake. Analyses of dissolved oxygen, NH4+, PO42-, pH (water) and N, P, and pH (soils) demonstrate a link between low nutrient levels and low biodiversity (which was confirmed by observation) in Tierra del Fuego. Water and soil data are incorporated into a database to facilitate comparisons to North American samples collected and analyzed during the Boerne High School summer field courses. Twenty-three ^18O and ^D analyses yielded a south-north isotopic trend across the Lago Fagnano region. ^18O and ^D transition from -11.92 to -3.53% and -87.81 to -40.26%, respectively, moving south to the Beagle Channel. These

  12. Epidemiological surveillance of ovine hydatidosis in Tierra del Fuego, Patagonia Argentina, 1997-1999.

    PubMed

    Zanini, Fabián; Gonzalo, Roberto; Pérez, Héctor; Aparici, Inés; Soto, Ximena; Guerrero, Juvenal; Cerrone, Gloria; Elissondo, Celina

    2006-06-15

    Cystic echinococcosis is the most prevalent zoonosis in Tierra del Fuego province, Argentina, with important economic, productive and public health consequences. The present work was performed to determine the ovine prevalence in Tierra del Fuego, Argentina, as well as to evaluate the quality of diagnostic systems in slaughterhouses. Moreover, genetic analyses to characterize the strain of Echinococcus granulosus involved in the region were done. The first actions to perform a diagnosis of the epidemiological situation of hydatidosis in Tierra del Fuego were done between 1976 and 1977. A canine prevalence of 80% and an ovine prevalence of 55% results were obtained. Since 1979 the control program of Hydatidosis of Tierra del Fuego was implemented. It was based on semiannual canine anthelmintic treatment with praziquantel at dose of 5mg/kg, and complemented with sanitary education and canine and ovine epidemiological surveillance. During May 1997-January 1999: 5,916 sheep coming from 20 farms of the programmatic area were evaluated. In the lamb category, hydatid cysts were not found. In the adults category, 62 infected animals were found (3.2%). The ovine prevalence was 1.1% and there was 100% of coincidence between diagnosis in the slaughterhouse, re-inspection in the laboratory and histopathological study. The marked decrease in the prevalence observed for sheep infection evidenced a destabilization of the biological cycle of the parasite. This could be explained by the application of a control program with uninterrupted systematic actions. Polymerase chain reaction-ribosomal ITS-1 DNA (rDNA) restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) analysis and partial sequencing of the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (CO1) gene were used to characterize E. granulosus isolates collected from different regions of Tierra del Fuego to determine which genotypes occurred in this region. The results revealed the presence of the G1 genotype (sheep-dog strain

  13. Mitochondrial DNA diversity of feral pigs from Karukinka Natural Park, Tierra del Fuego Island, Chile.

    PubMed

    Aravena, P; Skewes, O; Gouin, N

    2015-01-01

    Control or eradication of exotic species is one of the greatest challenges facing biodiversity and ecosystem conservation. Domestic pigs (Sus scrofa domestica) were released and became feral in the southern region of Chilean Tierra del Fuego Island in the 1900s. Currently, they inhabit part of Karukinka Natural Park, an area of global conservation concern. To gain insight into the control of this invasive species, we analyzed genetic variation in the mitochondrial DNA control region to determine the origin and population subdivision of feral pigs in Tierra del Fuego. Sequences from a sample of 42 feral pigs, 10 domestic pigs from local farms, and references from other countries and commercial breeds revealed 2 highly differentiated populations, 1 in the western and the other in the eastern area of the park, each harboring a different haplotype, suggesting no connectivity between populations. Comparison of these haplotypes with reference sequences from other countries and commercial breeds indicated that feral pigs from Chilean Tierra del Fuego are of European origin, very likely from 2 separate introduction events. The haplotype found in the western feral population was also identified in domestic pigs from a farm. This raises concerns regarding the possible connectivity between stocks from local farms and the wild population. Based on these results, we recommend the development of strategies for controlling the population of this invasive species in Karukinka Natural Park. PMID:25966196

  14. Loss of helminth species diversity in the large hairy armadillo Chaetophractus villosus on the Tierra del Fuego Island, Argentina.

    PubMed

    Ezquiaga, M C; Abba, A M; Navone, G T

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this work is to compare the taxonomic diversity of parasite species of the large hairy armadillo Chaetophractus villosus in its native range and in another recently introduced population (Tierra del Fuego island), and to evaluate whether the isolation of the latter determines a decrease in its parasitic diversity. Forty specimens from Buenos Aires and Tierra del Fuego Provinces were collected and examined for helminths. Eleven parasite species were found in the native population, and only one species was present in Tierra del Fuego (Trichohelix tuberculata). This may be explained because isolation and climatic conditions prevent encounters between potential host species and infective forms of parasites. Further sampling will be needed throughout the entire Patagonia steppe to confirm how the characteristic parasitic fauna of C. villosus behaves across the armadillo's southern distribution. PMID:25673233

  15. [Tierra del Fuego: the scientific-political construction of exclusion and counter-image of the ideal city dweller].

    PubMed

    Nacach, Gabriela

    2012-01-01

    Due to its late incorporation into the national State, the social, economic and political setting of the Argentine province Tierra del Fuego differed from that of the rest of the national territory. In the construction of dependent otherness, objectifications and representations were imposed by state-related and non-state-related institutions, among other agencies. In this context, the Salesian mission of La Candelaria and Ushuaia's Jail for recidivists stand out as spaces in which biopolitics was concretised. The native population and criminals in Tierra del Fuego were those to be subjugated. The thesis of the extinction of the Indian and the simultaneous exaltation of the criminal as the subject of progress identified the scientific and political mechanisms by which the exclusion of certain social groups (Tierra del Fuego's indigenous population) and the inclusion of others (criminals) were regulated. PMID:22849216

  16. Holocene paleoclimate characterization in Lago Fagnano (Tierra del Fuego) using sedimentary, physical and geochemical proxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vizcaino Marti, A.; Dunbar, R. B.; Wahl, D.; Moy, C. M.; Mucciarone, D. A.; Anderson, L.; Guilderson, T. P.

    2010-12-01

    Tierra del Fuego is the world's southernmost landmass outside of Antarctica. Two features of ocean circulation control the climate of Tierra del Fuego: the Southern Ocean circumpolar flow and the South Pacific Gyre. Together with Patagonia, Tierra del Fuego is the only terrestrial region directly influenced by the southern hemisphere westerly winds. This region is also a tectonically active area affected by volcanic and seismic activity related to South American and Scotia-Antarctic plate boundaries. Accommodated along the Magallanes-Fagnano fault system, as part of the plate boundary, the Lago Fagnano is the largest lake in Tierra del Fuego. This E-W trending lake is 100 km long and 5-15 km wide. Our investigations were carried out on the upper 4 meters of an 8.4 m long piston core obtained at 69 m water depth in Bahía Grande (LF06-PC8); a southwestern lake sub-basin separated from the main lake by a shallow sill. Our studies are based on the integration of sediment description, physical properties, pollen, and geochemical analyses including C and N isotopes (1cm interval) and XRF scan (1mm interval). The age model for the core is based on radiocarbon ages and tephrochronology. Additionally, a 800 km long grid of high resolution seismic profiles support the sedimentary analyses and allow the correlation with other cores from within the lake basin. LF06-PC8 yields continuous and high accumulation-rate sedimentary sections for Lago Fagnano. The presented sediment record corresponds to a laminated hemipelagite with presence of a single but complex mass transport deposit interval. An accurate sedimentological interpretation of the core together with the radiocarbon ages and tephra dates allow to identify and characterize the main sedimentary processes occurring in the lake over the last 8 kyr. In addition, proxy data (C and N isotopes and XRF scan data) from the laminated hemipelagic interval provide a reliable record of past variability in the westerly wind field as

  17. Epidemiological surveillance of cystic echinococcosis in rural population of Tierra del Fuego, Argentina, 1997-2006.

    PubMed

    Zanini, Fabián; Suárez, Carlos; Pérez, Héctor; Elissondo, María C

    2009-03-01

    Cystic echinococcosis (CE) is the most prevalent zoonosis in Tierra del Fuego. In 1997, ulrasonography (US) was selected as the method of choice for the development of population surveys for epidemiological surveillance and early diagnosis in rural population. The aim of this work was to present the results of the epidemiological surveillance of CE by means of US in rural population of Tierra del Fuego, Argentina between 1997 and 2006. The ultrasonographic diagnostic was realized once a year. The population was stratified in children (4 to 17 years) and adults. From each individual, name, age, sex, actual residence and origin were registered. The images compatible with cysts were graded according to location, number and characteristics. A total of 1400 rural inhabitants were examined for CE. From the total of studied individuals, 27 (1.9%) exhibited images compatible with cysts on the abdominal ultrasound scan. Thirteen of these persons were finally diagnosed as having CE. The overall prevalence of CE was 0.9%. This value is in accordance with the decrease in the prevalence observed in the definitive host and the intermediate hosts (sheep and cattle). The absence of cases in children during the studied period, evidence no transmission of the disease to humans in the recent past. PMID:18996221

  18. Isolation of Sphaerotilus-Leptothrix strains from iron bacteria communities in Tierra del Fuego wetlands.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Bertram; Sánchez, Leandro A; Fretschner, Till; Kreps, Gastón; Ferrero, Marcela A; Siñeriz, Faustino; Szewzyk, Ulrich

    2014-11-01

    Sheath-forming iron- and manganese-depositing bacteria belonging to the Sphaerotilus-Leptothrix group (SLG) are widespread in natural and artificial water systems. Known requirements for their growth include the presence of organic substrates and molecular oxygen. High concentrations of reduced iron or manganese, although not necessary for most species, make their growth a noticeable phenomenon. Such microbial communities have been studied mostly in the Northern Hemisphere. Here, we present descriptions of diverse ochre-depositing microbial communities in Tierra del Fuego, Argentina, using a combined approach of microscopical examination, clone library construction and cultivation focused on SLG bacteria. To date, only few SLG type strains are available. The present work increases the number and diversity of cultivated SLG bacteria by obtaining isolates from biofilms and sediment samples of wetlands in Tierra del Fuego. Thirty isolates were selected based on morphological features such as sheath formation and iron/manganese deposition. Five operational taxonomic units (OTUs) were deduced. Sequencing of 16S rRNA genes showed that one OTU is identical to the Leptothrix mobilis Feox-1(T) -sequence while the four remaining OTUs show similarity values related to previously described type strains. Similarity values ranged from 96.5% to 98.8%, indicating possible new species and subspecies. PMID:25098830

  19. Atmospheric background trace elements deposition in Tierra del Fuego region (Patagonia, Argentina), using transplanted Usnea barbata lichens.

    PubMed

    Conti, Marcelo Enrique; Finoia, Maria Grazia; Bocca, Beatrice; Mele, Giustino; Alimonti, Alessandro; Pino, Anna

    2012-01-01

    Lichen, Usnea barbata, transplants taken from Tierra del Fuego (south Patagonia, Argentina) were tested as potential biomonitors of atmospheric airborne deposition in an apparently pristine environment. In 2005, lichens were sampled in a reference site (n = 31) and transplanted in the northern Region of Tierra del Fuego. After, respectively, 1 month and 1 year of exposure, we collected them. The aim of the study was to determine the bioaccumulation of 26 elements in order to evaluate the background levels in the selected area. Samples were analyzed by the sector field inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Discriminant analysis on principal component analysis factors was applied in order to explore the relationship among the different elements as far as time and spatial variation in transplants regards. The analysis was tested by Monte Carlo test based on 999 replicates. The most important contamination source resulted to be the atmospheric soil particle deposition. Furthermore, the results were compared with those obtained from the lichens collected in central and southern Tierra del Fuego. This study confirms the ability of U. barbata to reflect the background levels of the 26 elements in that environment. Compared with other background sites in the world, we did confirm that Tierra del Fuego lichens have a low content of the studied elements. Tierra del Fuego turned out not to be a pristine environment as supposed, but it can be considered as a reference basal ecosystem for useful comparisons among different geographical areas. These findings can be very relevant and useful for environmental conservation programs. PMID:21409357

  20. Saprolegnia oliviae sp. nov. isolated from an Argentine river (Tierra del Fuego Province, Argentina).

    PubMed

    Steciow, Mónica Mirta

    2003-02-28

    Saprolegnia oliviae sp. nov. is described from litter (floating dead twigs, leaves and roots) in the Olivia River, Ushuaia Department, Tierra del Fuego Province (Argentina). The new species is illustrated and compared with other species of the genus. Distinguishing characteristics of S. oliviae are the production of smooth oogonia (with some lateral or terminal projections) and the absence of antheridial branches on the majority of the oogonia, but when present, they are mostly diclinous, at times oogonia are supplied with androgynous and monoclinous antheridial branches. The oogonial stalks are predominantly short and straight or long and bent, curved or many times coiled; oospores are distinctive subcentric, (1-) 15-50 (-70) per oogonium. Morphological details of the new species and its comparison with other described species are discussed here. PMID:12620629

  1. Heavy metal concentrations in litteral sediments from the Beagle Channel, Tierra del Fuego, Argentina.

    PubMed

    Amin, O; Ferrer, L; Marcovecchio, J

    1996-07-01

    For the first time the concentration of trace metals (Fe, Pb, Cu, Zn, Cd and total Hg) of sediments from the coastal zone of the Beagle Channel (Tierra del Fuego, in Southern Argentina) were measured. Atomic absorption spectrophotometry was utilized in order to determine the metal contents. The level of metals as observed in the sediments was recognized as the natural background, even though the use of normalization of lead, copper, and zinc to iron allowed the identification of the main sources of metal pollution for this environment. In order to develop future environmental monitoring programmes for the area of Ushuaia city and the Beagle Channel, the present results need to be considered. PMID:24193396

  2. Three new species and one new record of Tullbergiidae (Collembola: Onychiuroidea) from Tierra del Fuego.

    PubMed

    Arbea, Javier I

    2016-01-01

    Three new species, Tullbergia rapoporti sp. nov., Dinaphorura nerudai sp. nov. and Dinaphorura najtae sp. nov., and one new record, Tullbergia meridionalis Cassagnau & Rapoport, 1962 are described based on specimens from Tierra del Fuego. Tullbergia rapoporti sp. nov. is similar to T. crozetensis, but can be distinguished from it by the presence of an empodial appendage and the chaetotaxy of Abd VI. Dinaphorura nerudai sp. nov. is diagnosed by the dorsal pso formula, the seven spiniform processes on Abd VI, an elongate PAO, the absence of vesicle on Ant IV and the dorsal chaetotaxy. Dinaphorura najtae sp. nov. is characterised by the dorsal pso formula, the seven spiniform processes on Abd VI, a triangular PAO, the absence of vesicle on Ant IV and the dorsal chaetotaxy. PMID:27394481

  3. Iridium, platinum and rhodium baseline concentration in lichens from Tierra del Fuego (South Patagonia, Argentina).

    PubMed

    Pino, Anna; Alimonti, Alessandro; Conti, Marcelo Enrique; Bocca, Beatrice

    2010-10-01

    Lichen samples of Usnea barbata were used as possible biomonitors of the atmospheric background level of iridium (Ir), platinum (Pt) and rhodium (Rh) in the remote region of Tierra del Fuego (South Patagonia, Argentina). Lichens were collected in 2006 at 53 sites covering 7 different areas of the region (24 transplanted lichens of the northern region and 29 native lichen samples of the central-southern region). A microwave acidic digestion procedure was used to mineralize the samples and a sector field inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry method was developed to quantify the elements. The study of the influence of interferences on analyte signals and a quality control procedure were carried out. The analytical protocol was further applied to evaluate Ir, Pt and Rh bioaccumulation in lichens. The detection limits obtained were 0.010 ng g⁻¹, 0.013 ng g⁻¹ and 0.030 ng g⁻¹ for Ir, Pt and Rh, respectively. Recoveries at different fortification levels were between 96.3% and 106% and precision was 3.3% on average. The metals concentration (as dry weight) spanned the following ranges: Ir, <0.010-1.011 ng g⁻¹; Pt, 0.016-2.734 ng g⁻¹; and Rh, 0.063-1.298 ng g⁻¹. Data on 7 areas were similar suggesting that no specific source, for example traffic or anthropogenic activity, influenced directly the metal concentrations in Tierra del Fuego. Values detected are more likely influenced by the long-range atmospheric transport of these pollutants and, in comparison with densely populated areas in the world, they can represent the baseline for low impacted areas. PMID:20830409

  4. Epidemiological studies on intestinal helminth parasites of the patagonian grey fox (Pseudalopex griseus) in Tierra del Fuego, Patagonia Argentina.

    PubMed

    Zanini, Fabián; Laferrara, Miguel; Bitsch, Matías; Pérez, Héctor; Elissondo, Maria Celina

    2006-03-31

    The present work was performed to study the intestinal helminths of the patagonian grey fox (Pseudalopex griseus) and to obtain information about its possible role in the sylvatic life cycle of Echinococcu granulosus in Tierra del Fuego, Patagonia Argentina. Eighty-one foxes were captured and subject to post-mortem analysis. Thirty-one foxes (38.3%) harboured helminths. A total of six helminth species were recovered. Only one adult of E. granulosus was found in the studied samples. The current study is the first report of the intestinal helminths of the patagonian grey fox in Tierra del Fuego, Argentina and showed that this specie is probably not an important reservoir host for E. granulosus. PMID:16414190

  5. Large residuals on geoidal heights determined on the Fagnano Lake, Tierra del Fuego-Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez, M. E.; Del Cogliano, D.; Perdomo, R.

    2013-05-01

    A new geoid model was developed in Tierra del Fuego and it was evaluated in the area of Fagnano Lake. The model was developed by means of the Equivalent Source Technique combining gravity data, levelling information measured on the province and observations of a GPS buoy on the Fagnano Lake. Those GPS buoy measurements provide information of the mean lake level surface (Del Cogliano et al., 2007). A cross validation process was realized in order to evaluate the model on the lake. What allowed determining a 6 cm geoid in the area of Fagnano Lake. Also, an evaluation of the EGM2008 (Pavlis et al., 2008) was made on the lake. Its behaviour was compared to that observed on the levelling lines. Differences of several decimetres were found when EGM2008 undulations were compared to observed geoid undulations in the lake area. In the regions where EGM2008 has included real gravimetric observations, differences between model and observations were only of a few centimetres. Such model has the particularity that includes fill-in gravity in that region. The above mentioned evaluation derived in an analysis of the effect that not representative gravity information could have on the estimation of geoid undulations in high mountainous regions. We found that this effect could be significant if there is no real information in the computing area (Gomez et al, 2012).

  6. Lichen Usnea barbata as biomonitor of airborne elements deposition in the Province of Tierra del Fuego (southern Patagonia, Argentina).

    PubMed

    Conti, Marcelo Enrique; Pino, Anna; Botrè, Francesco; Bocca, Beatrice; Alimonti, Alessandro

    2009-05-01

    Lichen Usnea barbata was tested as a possible biomonitor of atmospheric deposition in a supposedly pristine environment Tierra del Fuego (Argentina). Lichen samples were collected in 2005 and again in 2006 in 71 sites covering almost the entire region. The aim of the study was to evaluate the bioaccumulation of 26 elements in order to define the background levels in the region. The quantification was carried out by the sector field inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. No relevant temporal accumulation patterns between 2005 and 2006 sampling campaigns were observed. Then, the results were submitted to multivariate statistical analysis (cluster and principal component analyses). Cluster analysis produced a dendrogram where the 71 sites were divided into four clusters at (Dlink/Dmax)100<30. The areas and the elements were correlated according to the element concentrations by principal component analysis. Four significant components that accounted for 67% were obtained. Cluster 1 was mainly composed of sites of Ushuaia-Road 3 (E area) and it was characterized by high levels of Cd, Co, Ni, Pb, Sb, and W in lichens. The present study has revealed the good capacity of U. barbata to reflect the baseline levels of elements in the environment at a regional scale level. The presence of certain level of elements in lichens agrees with the hypothesis that Tierra del Fuego is not a relatively pristine environment as occasionally supposed. However, when comparing our results with other countries, Tierra del Fuego lichens have a very low content of the measured elements. PMID:19232724

  7. Rock Magnetic Properties of Laguna Carmen (Tierra del Fuego, Argentina): Implications for Paleomagnetic Reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gogorza, C. G.; Orgeira, M. J.; Ponce, F.; Fernández, M.; Laprida, C.; Coronato, A.

    2013-05-01

    We report preliminary results obtained from a multi-proxy analysis including paleomagnetic and rock-magnetic studies of two sediment cores of Laguna Carmen (53°40'60" S 68°19'0" W, ~83m asl) in the semiarid steppe in northern Tierra del Fuego island, Southernmost Patagonia, Argentina. Two short cores (115 cm) were sampled using a Livingstone piston corer during the 2011 southern fall. Sediments are massive green clays (115 to 70 cm depth) with irregularly spaced thin sandy strata and lens. Massive yellow clay with thin sandy strata continues up to 30 cm depth; from here up to 10 cm yellow massive clays domain. The topmost 10 cm are mixed yellow and green clays with fine sand. Measurements of intensity and directions of Natural Remanent Magnetization (NRM), magnetic susceptibility, isothermal remanent magnetization, saturation isothermal remanent magnetization (SIRM), back field and anhysteretic remanent magnetization at 100 mT (ARM100mT) were performed and several associated parameters calculated (ARM100mT/k and SIRM/ ARM100mT). Also, as a first estimate of relative magnetic grain-size variations, the median destructive field of the NRM (MDFNRM), was determined. Additionally, we present results of magnetic parameters measured with vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). The stability of the NRM was analyzed by alternating field demagnetization. The magnetic properties have shown variable values, showing changes in both grain size and concentration of magnetic minerals. It was found that the main carrier of remanence is magnetite with the presence of hematite in very low percentages. This is the first paleomagnetic study performed in lakes located in the northern, semiarid fuegian steppe, where humid-dry cycles have been interpreted all along the Holocene from an aeolian paleosoil sequence (Orgeira et el, 2012). Comparison between paleomagnetic records of Laguna Carmen and results obtained in earlier studies carried out at Laguna Potrok Aike (Gogorza et al., 2012

  8. Paleoseismic observations of an onshore transform boundary: The Magallanes-Fagnano fault, Tierra del Fuego, Argentina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Costa, C.H.; Smalley, R., Jr.; Schwartz, D.P.; Stenner, H.D.; Ellis, M.; Ahumada, E.A.; Velasco, M.S.

    2006-01-01

    We present preliminary information on the geomorphologic features and paleoseismic record associated with the ruptures of two Ms 7.8 earthquakes that struck Tierra del Fuego and the southernmost continental margin of South America on December 17, 1949. The fault scarp was surveyed in several places cast of Lago Fagnano and a trench across a secondary fault trace of the Magallanes-Fagnano fault was excavated at the Ri??o San Pablo. The observed deformation in a 9 kyr-old peat bog sequence suggests evidence for two, and possibly three pre-1949 paleoearthquakes is preserved in the stratigraphy. The scarp reaches heights up to 11 m in late Pleistocene-Holocence(?) deposits, but the vertical component of the 1949 events was always less than ???1 m. This observation also argues for the occurrence of previous events during the Quaternary. Along die part of the fault we investigated east of Lago Fagnano, the horizontal component of the 1949 rupture does not exceed 4 m and is likely lower than 0.4 m, which is consistent with the kinematics of a local releasing bend, or at the end of a strike-slip rupture zone. ?? 2006 Revista de la Asociacio??n Geolo??gica Argentina.

  9. Block modeling of crustal deformation in Tierra del Fuego from GNSS velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendoza, L.; Richter, A.; Fritsche, M.; Hormaechea, J. L.; Perdomo, R.; Dietrich, R.

    2015-05-01

    The Tierra del Fuego (TDF) main island is divided by a major transform boundary between the South America and Scotia tectonic plates. Using a block model, we infer slip rates, locking depths and inclinations of active faults in TDF from inversion of site velocities derived from Global Navigation Satellite System observations. We use interseismic velocities from 48 sites, obtained from field measurements spanning 20 years. Euler vectors consistent with a simple seismic cycle are estimated for each block. In addition, we introduce far-field information into the modeling by applying constraints on Euler vectors of major tectonic plates. The difference between model and observed surface deformation near the Magallanes Fagnano Fault System (MFS) is reduced by considering finite dip in the forward model. For this tectonic boundary global plate circuits models predict relative movements between 7 and 9 mm yr- 1, while our regional model indicates that a strike-slip rate of 5.9 ± 0.2 mm yr- 1 is accommodated across the MFS. Our results indicate faults dipping 66- 4+ 6° southward, locked to a depth of 11- 5+ 5 km, which are consistent with geological models for the MFS. However, normal slip also dominates the fault perpendicular motion throughout the eastern MFS, with a maximum rate along the Fagnano Lake.

  10. Pressure tide gauge records from the Atlantic shelf off Tierra del Fuego, southernmost South America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richter, Andreas; Mendoza, Luciano; Perdomo, Raúl; Hormaechea, José Luis; Savcenko, Roman; Bosch, Wolfgang; Dietrich, Reinhard

    2012-07-01

    Based on pressure tide gauge observations at three sites off the Atlantic coast of Tierra del Fuego main island, time series spanning one to seven months of bottom pressure and sea-level variations are derived and analysed to reveal the major driving mechanisms. Ocean tides account for 99.5% of the total energy of the sea-level variations. The amplitudes and phases of a comprehensive set of tidal constituents resulting from a harmonic tidal analysis are presented. Exceptionally large shallow-water tides are identified. The second largest contribution is due to the local inverse barometer model accounting for up to 65% of the variance of the tide residual sea-level variations. Close to the shore a significant topographic modulation of the sea-level variations is revealed. The in situ observations are compared with six recent global ocean tide models, official tide tables, and sea-surface heights derived from satellite altimetry data. The amplitudes and phases predicted by the ocean tide models for the semidiurnal and diurnal constituents agree with those derived from our tide gauge records on average within 2 cm and 5°, respectively. In the time domain the tidal signal represented by the models deviates typically by a few decimetres from that extracted from our records. Absolute altimeter biases were determined for the Jason-2, Jason-1 extended mission, and Envisat satellite altimeters. Relative sea-level variations are represented by the altimetry data with an accuracy of the order of 5 cm.

  11. Baseline trace metals in gastropod mollusks from the Beagle Channel, Tierra del Fuego (Patagonia, Argentina).

    PubMed

    Conti, Marcelo Enrique; Stripeikis, Jorge; Finoia, Maria Grazia; Tudino, Mabel Beatriz

    2012-05-01

    With the aim to evaluate the mollusk Nacella (P)magellanica as biomonitor of elemental pollution in seawater of the Beagle Channel, more than one hundred individuals of the gastropod were sampled, separated in viscera and muscle, and then examined with respect to the accumulation of Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn. Collection was performed in seven strategic locations along 170 km of the coastal area of the Beagle Channel (Tierra del Fuego, Argentina) in two campaigns during 2005 and 2007. Samples of surrounding seawater in the different sites were obtained and tested for the same metals as well. The accumulation capacity of Nacella (P)magellanica and thus its aptitude as biomonitor, was evaluated through the calculus of the preconcentration factors of the metals assayed. A discussion involving the comparison with other mollusks previously tested will be given. Several statistical approaches able to analyze data with environmental purposes were applied. Non parametric univariate tests such as Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney were carried out to assess the changes of the metal concentrations with time (2005 and 2007) in each location. Multivariate methods (linear discriminant analysis on PCA factors) were also applied to obtain a more reliable site classification. Johnson's probabilistic method was carried out for comparison between different geographical areas. The possibility of employing these results as heavy metals' background levels of seawater from the Beagle Channel will be debated. PMID:22350107

  12. New species of dictyostelids from Patagonia and Tierra del Fuego, Argentina.

    PubMed

    Vadell, Eduardo M; Cavender, James C; Romeralo, Maria; Edwards, Sally M; Stephenson, Steven L; Baldauf, Sandra L

    2011-01-01

    In late Jan and early Feb 2005 samples for isolation of dictyostelid cellular slime molds (dictyostelids) were collected in five different provinces and from six national parks (all located 39-55°S) in Patagonia and Tierra del Fuego, Argentina. Southern beech (Nothofagus) forests represented the primary vegetation type investigated, but some samples were obtained from Patagonian steppe, alpine meadows, Valdivian temperate rainforests and coniferous forests dominated by Araucaria, Austrocedrus and Fitzroya. Among the dictyostelids isolated from the samples we collected were seven species new to science. These species (Dictyostelium austroandinum, D. chordatum, D. fasciculoideum, D. gargantuum, D. leptosomopsis, D. valdivianum and Polysphondylium patagonicum) are described herein on the basis of both morphology and molecular (SSU rDNA) data. One of the new species, D. gargantuum, is one of the largest representatives of the group reported to date. Another unusual species, D. chordatum, produces long interwoven sorocarps that do not appear to respond to a spacing gas similar to the condition first noted in D. implicatum. PMID:20943559

  13. The Patagonian Orocline: New paleomagnetic data from the Andean magmatic arc in Tierra del Fuego, Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunningham, W. Dickson; Klepeis, Keith A.; Gose, Wulf A.; Dalziel, Ian W. D.

    1991-09-01

    The Hardy Formation is a 1300-m-thick succession of Upper Jurassic-Lower Cretaceous volcaniclastic sedimentary rocks interbedded with lava flows on Hoste Island at the southernmost tip of South America (55.5°S, 291.8°E). The strata are gently folded and metamorphosed to the prehnite-pumpellyite grade. A well-defined characteristic direction of magnetization, carried by magnetite, was readily identified in 95 samples from seven sites. At a given site, the directions group slightly better without structural correction. However, the means of the seven sites cluster better without tilt correction at the 99% significance level, implying that the magnetization postdates the folding event. It is most likely that the magnetization was acquired during the mid- to Late Cretaceous Andean orogeny that involved the folding and emplacement of the Patagonian Batholith. The fact that all samples are normally magnetized supports this age assignment. The pole position of 42.9°N, 156.6°E, α95=3.3° implies that the sampling area has rotated counterclockwise relative to cratonic South America by 90.1±11.9° with no significant flattening of inclination (F=1.9 ± 3.7°). Geologic considerations indicate that the rotation involved the entire Andean magmatic arc in Tierra Del Fuego. The results support interpretation of the Hardy Formation as part of the Andean magmatic arc deposited on the Pacific side of the Late Jurassic-Early Cretaceous Rocas Verdes marginal basin. Oroclinal bending of the arc in southernmost South America accompanied inversion of the marginal basin and the development of a Late Cretaceous-Cenozoic left-lateral transform system (South America-Antarctica) that later developed into the North Scotia Ridge.

  14. Alkali basalts and enclosed ultramafic xenoliths near Ushuaia, Tierra Del Fuego, Argentina.

    PubMed

    Acevedo, Rogelio Daniel

    2016-01-01

    At the southernmost part of Tierra del Fuego a few outcrops and erratic boulders of alkali basaltic rocks with ultramafic enclaves have been studied. Alkali basalt plugs or pipes hitherto identified are scarce, and host rocks are constituted by slates that belong to Mesozoic deposition. The petrography, texture and composition of the basalt and xenoliths were investigated by petrographic microscope and electron microprobe analysis. Xenocrysts of amphibole and alkali feldspar, phenocrysts of nepheline, olivine, spinel, phlogopite and Fe-Ti minerals (10 %) and a diversity of xenoliths, mainly lherzolitic, pyroxenite and wehrlitic nodules (15 %), but also from metamorphic rocks provenance, are contained in the basalt groundmass (75 %). This finer-grained material is made up of laths or needles of plagioclase, pyroxene, opaque minerals, apatite and glass, with intersertal, hyalopilitic and pilotaxitic. Locally, rock has an even granoblastic texture. Former amygdules are filled by analcite, zeolites, sodalite and calcite. The normative classification, based on nepheline content, conclude that this rock is an alkali basalt. The chemical classification, considering immobile elements as Zr/TiO2 versus Nb/Y indicate an alkali basalt too and plots over the TAS diagram fall in the foidite (Na-rich or nephelinite) and basanite fields. The REE patterns are fractionated (La/Yb primitive mantle normalized is approximately 30). The K-Ar isotopic technique on individual macrocrysts gave ages of 146 ± 5 Ma (amphibole) and 127 ± 4 Ma (alkali feldspar); and K-Ar whole rock datum reported 8.3 ± 0.3 Ma. Nevertheless, fertile samples show geochemical features typical of deep derived material thus, based on the position in the actual tectonic setting, indicate that the basalt is older than its isotopic age. PMID:27610313

  15. Depth Seismic-Migration Modeling Offshore `Tierra Del Fuego', Argentina (54° 25' S)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comínguez, A. H.; Flores, J.; Tassone, A.

    2007-05-01

    Within the framework of the TESAC Project (Tectonic Evolution of the South America-Scotia plate boundary during the Cenozoic), about 900 km of multichannel seismic reflection profiles were acquired off the Atlantic coast of the Tierra del Fuego Island. The profiles cut across the South America-Scotia plate boundary, a transform margin which traverses in an E-W direction the Island. Data processing and interpretation of a seismic reflection profile is presented in this contribution. A robust post-stack technique involved depth-migration of the seismic section, using an interval-velocity model of the upper Crust adjusted by iterative processing. An interpreted seismic- velocity section (which trends roughly NW-SE), shows a complex superposition of different tectonic structures, with presence of extensional, compressional and transtensional features in the area located to the north of Isla de los Estados. The profile, which crosses the offshore part of the Magallanes fold-and-thrust belt, images the deep structural framework of part of this tectonic province. The identification of acoustic fabrics and seismic discontinuities allowed us to recognize four main units. Overlaying the acoustic basement (Seismic unit 1), there is another unit (Seismic unit 2) which exhibits some reflector packages of high amplitude; this unit must be related to the volcanic and volcaniclastic sequences of Tobífera/Lemaire Fms. The Seismic Unit 3 displays internal reflector configurations of moderate amplitude and continuity and low-to-moderate frequency; the Yaghán/Beauvoir Fms must be the onshore equivalent of this unit. An uppermost seismic layer (Unit 4) may be correlated with the Tertiary sediments of the Magallanes foreland basin which were involved in the fold and thrust belt. A major structure identified in the studied seismic profile is a SE structural high (which involves the units 1, 2 and 3) and a NW down-faulted area. The latter display folds of kilometric size (3-4 km

  16. Diversity of endosymbiotic Nostoc in Gunnera magellanica from Tierra del Fuego, Chile [corrected].

    PubMed

    Fernández-Martínez, M A; de Los Ríos, A; Sancho, L G; Pérez-Ortega, S

    2013-08-01

    Global warming is causing ice retreat in glaciers worldwide, most visibly over the last few decades in some areas of the planet. One of the most affected areas is the region of Tierra del Fuego (southern South America). Vascular plant recolonisation of recently deglaciated areas in this region is initiated by Gunnera magellanica, which forms symbiotic associations with the cyanobacterial genus Nostoc, a trait that likely confers advantages in this colonisation process. This symbiotic association in the genus Gunnera is notable as it represents the only known symbiotic relationship between angiosperms and cyanobacteria. The aim of this work was to study the genetic diversity of the Nostoc symbionts in Gunnera at three different, nested scale levels: specimen, population and region. Three different genomic regions were examined in the study: a fragment of the small subunit ribosomal RNA gene (16S), the RuBisCO large subunit gene coupled with its promoter sequence and a chaperon-like protein (rbcLX) and the ribosomal internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region. The identity of Nostoc as the symbiont was confirmed in all the infected rhizome tissue analysed. Strains isolated in the present study were closely related to strains known to form symbioses with other organisms, such as lichen-forming fungi or bryophytes. We found 12 unique haplotypes in the 16S rRNA (small subunit) region analysis, 19 unique haplotypes in the ITS region analysis and 57 in the RuBisCO proteins region (rbcLX). No genetic variability was found among Nostoc symbionts within a single host plant while Nostoc populations among different host plants within a given sampling site revealed major differences. Noteworthy, interpopulation variation was also shown between recently deglaciated soils and more ancient ones, between eastern and western sites and between northern and southern slopes of Cordillera Darwin. The cell structure of the symbiotic relationship was observed with low-temperature scanning

  17. Effect of resource spatial correlation and hunter-fisher-gatherer mobility on social cooperation in Tierra del Fuego.

    PubMed

    Santos, José Ignacio; Pereda, María; Zurro, Débora; Álvarez, Myrian; Caro, Jorge; Galán, José Manuel; Briz i Godino, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    This article presents an agent-based model designed to explore the development of cooperation in hunter-fisher-gatherer societies that face a dilemma of sharing an unpredictable resource that is randomly distributed in space. The model is a stylised abstraction of the Yamana society, which inhabited the channels and islands of the southernmost part of Tierra del Fuego (Argentina-Chile). According to ethnographic sources, the Yamana developed cooperative behaviour supported by an indirect reciprocity mechanism: whenever someone found an extraordinary confluence of resources, such as a beached whale, they would use smoke signals to announce their find, bringing people together to share food and exchange different types of social capital. The model provides insight on how the spatial concentration of beachings and agents' movements in the space can influence cooperation. We conclude that the emergence of informal and dynamic communities that operate as a vigilance network preserves cooperation and makes defection very costly. PMID:25853728

  18. Solar ultraviolet irradiance at Tierra Del Fuego: Comparison of measurements and calculations over a full annual cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz, Susana B.; Frederick, John E.; Lucas, Timothy; Booth, C. Rocky; Smolskaia, Irina

    A spectroradiometer located at Ushuaia, Tierra del Fuego, Argentina obtained a high quality data set on the solar ultraviolet (UV) spectral irradiance for a full annual cycle during 1992. The unique aspect of the ground-based irradiances is their ability to characterize the effects of cloudiness. Measured irradiances at 340 nm can be used to characterize the attenuation provided by cloudy skies. When irradiances at shorter wavelengths, 302.5-320.0 nm, are adjusted for this attenuation, they show good agreement with radiative transfer calculations which assume clear skies and utilize data from the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) as inputs. The differences which exist are qualitatively consistent with the neglect of spherical geometry in the calculated irradiances.

  19. Effect of Resource Spatial Correlation and Hunter-Fisher-Gatherer Mobility on Social Cooperation in Tierra del Fuego

    PubMed Central

    Santos, José Ignacio; Pereda, María; Zurro, Débora; Álvarez, Myrian; Caro, Jorge; Galán, José Manuel; Briz i Godino, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    This article presents an agent-based model designed to explore the development of cooperation in hunter-fisher-gatherer societies that face a dilemma of sharing an unpredictable resource that is randomly distributed in space. The model is a stylised abstraction of the Yamana society, which inhabited the channels and islands of the southernmost part of Tierra del Fuego (Argentina-Chile). According to ethnographic sources, the Yamana developed cooperative behaviour supported by an indirect reciprocity mechanism: whenever someone found an extraordinary confluence of resources, such as a beached whale, they would use smoke signals to announce their find, bringing people together to share food and exchange different types of social capital. The model provides insight on how the spatial concentration of beachings and agents’ movements in the space can influence cooperation. We conclude that the emergence of informal and dynamic communities that operate as a vigilance network preserves cooperation and makes defection very costly. PMID:25853728

  20. Long-range Receiver Function Profile of Crustal and Mantle Discontinuities From the Aleutian Arc to Tierra del Fuego

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spieker, Kathrin; Rondenay, Stéphane; Sawade, Lucas

    2016-04-01

    The Circum-Pacific belt, also called the Pacific Ring of Fire, is the most seismically active region on Earth. Multiple plate boundaries form a zone characterized by frequent volcanic eruptions and seismicity. While convergent plate boundaries such as the Peru-Chile trench dominate the Circum-Pacific belt, divergent and transform boundaries are present as well. The eastern section of the Circum-Pacific belt extends from the Aleutian arc, through the Cascadia subduction zone, San Andreas Fault, middle America trench and the Andean margin down to Tierra del Fuego. Due to the significant hazards posed by this tectonic activity, the region has been densely instrumented by thousands of seismic stations deployed across fifteen countries, over a distance of more than 15000 km. Various seismological studies, including receiver function analyses, have been carried out to investigate the crustal and mantle structure beneath local segments of the eastern Circum-Pacific belt (i.e., at ~100-500 km scale). However, to the best of our knowledge, no study to date has ever attempted to combine all available seismic data from the eastern Circum-Pacific belt to generate a continuous profile of seismic discontinuities extending from the Aleutians to Tierra del Fuego. Here, we use results from the "Global Imaging using Earthquake Records" (GLImER) P-wave receiver function database to create a long-range profile of crustal and upper mantle discontinuities across the entire eastern portion of the Circum-Pacific belt. We image intermittent crustal and mantle discontinuities along the profile, and examine them with regard to their behaviour and properties across transitions between different tectonic regimes.

  1. Rare earth element and Nd isotope geochemistry of an ombrotrophic peat bog at Karukinka (Chile, 53.9° S): a palaeo-record of Holocene dust deposition in Tierra del Fuego.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanneste, Heleen; De Vleeschouwer, François; Vanderstraeten, Aubry; Mattielli, Nadine; Triquet, Delphine; Piotrowska, Natalia; Le Roux, Gael

    2013-04-01

    The value of ombrotrophic peat bogs as past atmospheric dust records, has been increasingly recognized over the past 10 years. Their high accumulation rates provide high resolution archives of natural atmospheric dust deposition since the Late Glacial, often missing in marine, lake and ice core records. Consequently, peat deposits can be used as a proxy for atmospheric circulation patterns and thus palaeoclimate. In the Southern Hemisphere, the climate is considered to be driven by the Southern Westerly Wind belt (SSW), as it significantly affects the Antarctic Circumpolar Current and hence atmospheric CO2 levels. Palaeo SSW belt migrations have been observed in palaeoclimate records but, reconstructions of SSW shifts and associated climatic changes are incoherent, in particular for the Holocene. As peatlands thrive in southwest Tierra del Fuego due to its high annual precipitation, a remote ombrotrophic peat bog at Karukinka (southwest on the Isla Grande de Tierra del Fuego) was sampled, to investigate the Holocene palaeoclimate in southern South America based on dust deposition records. A 4,5 m long Russian D-core was recovered and subsequently subsampled for elemental and isotope geochemistry in addition to density and radiocarbon dating measurements. Initial results show a number of layers enriched in scandium, indicating the presence of lithogenic material, i.e. dust. Rare earth element patterns indicate at least 2 different sources. The most significant dust peak occurs at the base of the core at ~7300 Cal years B.P and has a neodymium isotopic composition of 2.2, suggesting a volcanic origin.

  2. A Geochemical and Sedimentary Record of High Southern Latitude Holocene Climate Evolution from Lago Fagnano, Tierra del Fuego

    SciTech Connect

    Moy, C M; Dunbar, R B; Guilderson, T P; Waldmann, N; Mucciarone, D A; Recasens, C; Austin, J A; Anselmetti, F S

    2010-11-19

    Situated at the southern margin of the hemispheric westerly wind belt and immediately north of the Antarctic Polar Frontal zone, Tierra del Fuego is well-positioned to monitor coupled changes in the ocean-atmosphere system of the high southern latitudes. Here we describe a Holocene paleoclimate record from sediment cores obtained from Lago Fagnano, a large lake in southern Tierra del Fuego at 55{sup o}S, to investigate past changes in climate related to these two important features of the global climate system. We use an AMS radiocarbon chronology for the last 8,000 years based on pollen concentrates, thereby avoiding contamination from bedrock-derived lignite. Our chronology is consistent with a tephrochronologic age date for deposits from the middle Holocene Volcan Hudson eruption. Combining bulk organic isotopic ({delta}{sup 13}C and {delta}{sup 15}N) and elemental (C and N) parameters with physical sediment properties allow us to better understand sediment provenance and transport mechanisms and to interpret Holocene climate and tectonic change during the last 8,000 years. Co-variability and long-term trends in C/N ratio, carbon accumulation rate, and magnetic susceptibility reflect an overall Holocene increase in the delivery of terrestrial organic and lithogenic material to the deep eastern basin. We attribute this variability to westerly wind-derived precipitation. Increased wind strength and precipitation in the late Holocene drives the Nothofagus forest eastward and enhances run-off and terrigenous inputs to the lake. Superimposed on the long-term trend are a series of abrupt 9 negative departures in C/N ratio, which constrain the presence of seismically-driven mass flow events in the record. We identify an increase in bulk {delta}{sup 13}C between 7,000 and 5,000 cal yr BP that we attribute to enhanced aquatic productivity driven by warmer summer temperatures. The Lago Fagnano {delta}{sup 13}C record shows similarities with Holocene records of sea surface

  3. A geochemical and sedimentary record of high southern latitude Holocene climate evolution from Lago Fagnano, Tierra del Fuego

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moy, Christopher M.; Dunbar, Robert B.; Guilderson, Thomas P.; Waldmann, Nicolas; Mucciarone, David A.; Recasens, Cristina; Ariztegui, Daniel; Austin, James A.; Anselmetti, Flavio S.

    2011-02-01

    Situated at the southern margin of the hemispheric westerly wind belt and immediately north of the Antarctic Polar Frontal zone, Tierra del Fuego is well-positioned to monitor coupled changes in the ocean-atmosphere system of the high southern latitudes. Here we describe a Holocene paleoclimate record from sediment cores obtained from Lago Fagnano, a large lake in southern Tierra del Fuego at 55°S, to investigate past changes in climate related to these two important features of the global climate system. We use an AMS radiocarbon chronology for the last 8000 yr based on pollen concentrates, thereby avoiding contamination from bedrock-derived lignite. Our chronology is consistent with a tephrochronologic age date for deposits from the middle Holocene Volcán Hudson eruption. Combining bulk organic isotopic (δ13C and δ15N) and elemental (C and N) parameters with physical sediment properties allows us to better understand sediment provenance and transport mechanisms and to interpret Holocene climate and tectonic change during the last 8000 yr. Co-variability and long-term trends in C/N ratio, carbon accumulation rate, and magnetic susceptibility reflect an overall Holocene increase in the delivery of terrestrial organic and lithogenic material to the deep eastern basin. We attribute this variability to westerly wind-derived precipitation. Increased wind strength and precipitation in the late Holocene drives the Nothofagus forest eastward and enhances run-off and terrigenous inputs to the lake. Superimposed on the long-term trend are a series of abrupt 9 negative departures in C/N ratio, which constrain the presence of seismically-driven mass flow events in the record. We identify an increase in bulk δ13C between 7000 and 5000 cal yr BP that we attribute to enhanced aquatic productivity driven by warmer summer temperatures. The Lago Fagnano δ13C record shows similarities with Holocene records of sea surface temperature from the mid-latitude Chilean continental

  4. CO2 and CH4 fluxes of contrasting pristine bogs in southern Patagonia (Tierra del Fuego, Argentina)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Münchberger, Wiebke; Blodau, Christian; Kleinebecker, Till; Pancotto, Veronica

    2015-04-01

    South Patagonian peatlands cover a wide range of the southern terrestrial area and thus are an important component of the terrestrial global carbon cycle. These extremely southern ecosystems have been accumulating organic material since the last glaciation up to now and are - in contrast to northern hemisphere bogs - virtually unaffected by human activities. So far, little attention has been given to these pristine ecosystems and great carbon reservoirs which will potentially be affected by climate change. We aim to fill the knowledge gap in the quantity of carbon released from these bogs and in what controls their fluxes. We study the temporal and spatial variability of carbon fluxes in two contrasting bog ecosystems in southern Patagonia, Tierra del Fuego. Sphagnum-dominated bog ecosystems in Tierra del Fuego are similar to the ones on the northern hemisphere, while cushion plant-dominated bogs can almost exclusively be found in southern Patagonia. These unique cushion plant-dominated bogs are found close to the coast and their occurrence changes gradually to Sphagnum-dominated bogs with increasing distance from the coast. We conduct closed chamber measurements and record relevant environmental variables for CO2 and CH4 fluxes during two austral vegetation periods from December to April. Chamber measurements are performed on microforms representing the main vegetation units of the studied bogs. Gas concentrations are measured with a fast analyzer (Los Gatos Ultraportable Greenhouse Gas Analyzer) allowing to accurately record CH4 fluxes in the ppm range. We present preliminary results of the carbon flux variability from south Patagonian peat bogs and give insights into their environmental controls. Carbon fluxes of these two bog types appear to be highly different. In contrast to Sphagnum-dominated bogs, cushion plant-dominated bogs release almost no CH4 while their CO2 flux in both, photosynthesis and respiration, can be twice as high as for Sphagnum

  5. Assessment of land influence on a high-latitude marine coastal system: Tierra del Fuego, southernmost Argentina.

    PubMed

    Amin, Oscar; Comoglio, Laura; Spetter, Carla; Duarte, Claudia; Asteasuain, Raúl; Freije, Rubén Hugo; Marcovecchio, Jorge

    2011-04-01

    The study deals with the determination of physico-chemical parameters, inorganic nutrients, particulate organic matter, and photosynthetic pigments on a monthly basis during an annual cycle from nine sampling sites of the coastal zone of a high-latitude ecosystem (Tierra del Fuego, Argentina). Nitrites and phosphates concentrations were similar to other systems of the south Atlantic coast (median, 0.30 and 1.02 μM, respectively), while nitrates were higher in all sampling periods (median, 45.37 μM), and silicates were significantly smaller (median, 7.76 μM). Chlorophyll a and phaeopigments have shown median values of 0.38 and 0.85 mg m(-3), respectively, while saturated values of dissolved oxygen were recorded throughout the study. The analysis reflected that nutrient enrichment seems to be linked to an anthropogenic source, the presence of peatlands areas, and a sink of Nothofagus pumilio woods. The area could be characterized in three zones related to (1) high urban influence, (2) natural inputs of freshwater, and (3) mixed inputs coming from moderate urban impacts. PMID:20473562

  6. [Impact of school closings on the influenza A (H1N1) outbreak in Tierra del Fuego, Argentina].

    PubMed

    Orellano, Pablo Wenceslao; Grassi, Aurora; Reynoso, Julieta Itatí; Palmieri, Abel; Uez, Osvaldo; Carlino, Orestes

    2010-03-01

    The impact of school closings on reducing the number of cases of influenza-like illness during an outbreak of influenza A (H1N1), which reached pandemic proportions, was assessed, along with other control measures, in the two main cities of Tierra del Fuego Province in southern Argentina. The incidence before and after the school closings in 2009 was compared by means of the t-test for related samples. By week 40, 6 901 cases of influenza-like illness had been detected, 281 of which were confirmed as influenza A (H1N1) through laboratory tests; 38 patients were hospitalized. After the intervention, there were nearly 10 times fewer cases than the average recorded in the health centers. The results indicate that closing schools during the influenza A (H1N1) outbreak resulted in a significantly lower incidence of influenza-like illness. However, the impact of other measures, such as case management and protection against exposure, should not be ignored. Timely implementation of this intervention, together with other measures, can help minimize the spread of influenza outbreaks. PMID:20414512

  7. Hepatic and renal metallothionein concentrations in Commerson's dolphins (Cephalorhynchus commersonii) from Tierra del Fuego, South Atlantic Ocean.

    PubMed

    Cáceres-Saez, Iris; Polizzi, Paula; Romero, Belén; Dellabianca, Natalia A; Ribeiro Guevara, Sergio; Goodall, R Natalie P; Cappozzo, H Luis; Gerpe, Marcela

    2016-07-15

    The Commerson's dolphin is the most common endemic odontocete of subantarctic waters of Tierra del Fuego, Argentina incidentally caught in fishing nets. The species is classified as "Data Deficient" by the IUCN. Metallothioneins (MTs) are considered as suitable biomarkers for health and environmental monitoring. The aims of the study were to assess MT concentrations in the liver and kidney of bycaught specimens. Moreover, correlations with Zn, Se, Cd, Ag and Hg, and the molar ratios of MT:metals were estimated to evaluate if there is an indication of their respective protective role against metal toxicity in tissues. Hepatic and renal MT concentrations were similar, ranging from 11.6 to 29.1nmol·g(-1) WW, and Kidney/Liver ratios ranging from 0.73 to 1.93 corresponded to normal ranges. Results suggest that MTs are related to physiological ranges for the species. This information constitutes the first MT report on Commerson's dolphins and possibly considered as baseline for species' conservation. PMID:27072824

  8. U-Pb zircon constraints on the age and provenance of the Rocas Verdes basin fill, Tierra del Fuego, Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbeau, David L.; Gombosi, David J.; Zahid, Khandaker M.; Bizimis, Michael; Swanson-Hysell, Nicholas; Valencia, Victor; Gehrels, George E.

    2009-12-01

    The Late Jurassic to Early Cretaceous Rocas Verdes basin constitutes one of the most poorly understood components of the southernmost Andes. As a result, accurate reconstructions and interpretations of deformation associated with the Andean orogeny and the kinematics of Scotia arc development also remain poorly constrained. In this data brief, we report U-Pb zircon ages from sandstones of the Rocas Verdes basin fill and from a crosscutting pluton in the southernmost Andes of Argentine Tierra del Fuego. Detrital samples contain predominant Early to early Middle Cretaceous (circa 130-105 Ma) U-Pb zircon age populations, with very small or single-grain middle Mesozoic and Proterozoic subpopulations. A very small subpopulation of Late Cretaceous ages in one sample raises the unlikely possibility that parts of the Rocas Verdes basin are younger than perceived. A sample from a crosscutting syenitic pegmatite yields a crystallization age of 74.7 +2.2/-2.0 Ma. The data presented herein encourage further geochronologic evaluation of the Rocas Verdes basin in order to better constrain the depositional ages and provenance of its contents.

  9. Environmental context shapes the bacterial community structure associated to Peltigera cyanolichens growing in Tierra del Fuego, Chile.

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Fernández, Lía; Zúñiga, Catalina; Carú, Margarita; Orlando, Julieta

    2014-03-01

    The structure of the associated bacterial community of bipartite cyanolichens of the genus Peltigera from three different environmental contexts in the Karukinka Natural Park, Tierra del Fuego, Chile, was assessed. The sampling sites represent different habitat contexts: mature native forest, young native forest and grassland. Recently it has been determined that the bacterial community associated to lichens could be highly structured according to the mycobiont or photobiont identities, to the environmental context and/or to the geographic scale. However, there are some inconsistencies in defining which of these factors would be the most significant on determining the structure of the microbial communities associated with lichens, mainly because most studies compare the bacterial communities between different lichen species and/or with different photobiont types (algae vs. cyanobacteria). In this work bipartite lichens belonging to the same genus (Peltigera) symbiotically associated with cyanobacteria (Nostoc) were analyzed by TRFLP to determine the structure of the bacterial community intimately associated with the lichen thalli and the one present in the substrate where they grow. The results indicate that the bacterial community intimately associated differs from the one of the substrate, being the former more influenced by the environmental context where the lichen grows. PMID:24165746

  10. First evidence of testate amoebae in Lago Fagnano (54° S), Tierra del Fuego (Argentina): Proxies to reconstruct environmental changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caffau, Mauro; Lenaz, Davide; Lodolo, Emanuele; Zecchin, Massimo; Comici, Cinzia; Tassone, Alejandro

    2015-12-01

    We report here the first findings of testate amoebae at high southern latitudes (54° S) from four gravity cores recovered in the Lago Fagnano (Tierra del Fuego, Argentina), where twelve taxa have been recognized. Among them, Centropyxis constricta "constricta", Centropyxis elongata, Difflugia globulus, Difflugia oblonga "oblonga", and Difflugia protaeiformis "amphoralis" are always present, while other taxa are randomly distributed. According to the sand/silt ratio in the different cores, the Total Organic Carbon content and the Carbon/Nitrogen ratio, as well as the presence/disappearance and abundance of testate amoebae from cluster analysis, we infer a correlation between major textural/granulometrical changes found in the cores and environmental changes. A seismic event occurred on 1949, which substantially modified the morphology of the eastern Lago Fagnano shoreline and the supply pattern from two main eastern tributaries of the lake, is recorded in the studied cores. This event has in part modified the distribution of testate amoebae taxa within the studied cores. Present results show that testate amoebae represent important indicators to detect changes occurring in the environment in which they live.

  11. Hydro-Geomorphologic Effects Of Large Wood Jams On A Third-Order Stream (Tierra Del Fuego, Argentina)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, L.; Andreoli, A.; Comiti, F.; Lenzi, M. A.; Iturraspe, R.; Burns, S.; Novillo, M. G.

    2007-05-01

    Dead wood pieces, especially when organized in jams, play an important geomorphic role in streams because of the effects on flow hydraulics, pool formation and sediments storage. The increase of stream morphological diversity and complexity also exerts also an important ecological role. This work reports on geomorphic role of large wood pieces and jams in a third order mountain stream located in the Southern Tierra del Fuego (Argentina), and draining an old-growth nothofagus forested basin not influenced by the beavers damming activity. Even if the in-stream number of wood pieces (length > 1m; diameter > 0.1 m) is comparable to what observed in other climatic areas, the slow growth of the nothofagus forest causes a lower wood abundance in terms of volumetric load. Since the relatively small dimensions of the surveyed large wood pieces, almost the 70% of them demonstrated to have been fluvial transported and the also wood jams reflect the apparent dynamic of wood in the channel. Wood jams exert a significant influence on the channel morphology, representing almost the half of the drop caused by steps and being responsible for the creation of 30% of the pools. The LW-forced pool volume is strongly and positively correlated to the height of the LW jam, and a significant inverse relationship between pool spacing and wood density within is evident if only the LW-forced pools are considered. The geomorphic influence of LW jams is also exerted by a considerable sediment storing capacity.

  12. Holocene Paleoglacier History of Glaciar Dalla Vedova, Cordillera DARWIN, Tierra del Fuego, Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynhout, S.

    2015-12-01

    Southernmost South America is unique in its position immediately north of the present-day Antarctic Convergence, making it ideally suited for the evaluation of Antarctic influences on terrestrial paleoclimate. Here we present a glacial geomorphic interpretation of the paleoglacial history of Glaciar Dalla Vedova in Bahía Blanca, Cordillera Darwin, Chile (53°S). This interpretation is further constrained by radiocarbon dating, cosmogenic dating, dendrochronology, and historical photogrammetry. Preliminary field work suggests that Holocene glacier fluctuations have been constrained to within 3 km of the present glacier boundary, punctuated by rapid recent glacier retreat over the past century. By comparing the observed chronology with the record contained further north in Patagonia, we will evaluate possible mechanisms of regional climate variability over the Holocene across southernmost South America.

  13. Linking invasive exotic vertebrates and their ecosystem impacts in Tierra del Fuego to test theory and determine action

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valenzuela, Alejandro E. J.; Anderson, Christopher B.; Fasola, Laura; Cabello, José L.

    2014-01-01

    Understanding processes and impacts of biological invasions is fundamental for ecology and management. Recent reviews summarized the mechanisms by which invasive species alter entire ecosystems, but quantitative assessments of these mechanisms are lacking for actual assemblages to determine their relative importance, frequency and patterns. We updated information on introduced vertebrates in the Tierra del Fuego Archipelago (TDF) via an exhaustive literature review and new data to evaluate ecosystem impact mechanisms and provide management recommendations. To date, 24 exotic vertebrates have naturalized in TDF, outnumbering natives nearly 2:1, with the North American beaver (Castor canadensis) and muskrat (Ondatra zibethica) being the most widely distributed species and also impacting the ecosystem through the greatest number of mechanisms. Introduced vertebrates occupied most parts of the archipelago with human-inhabited islands having greater taxa richness. All exotics potentially altered ecosystems by one or more mechanisms: 100% food webs, 92% invasional meltdown, 42% habitat modification, 38% disease or parasite transmission, 21% soil property and disturbance regime changes. Impact to habitat structure was the main clustering criterion for this assemblage. Within the species that physically alter habitats, we found two sub-groups: 1) large herbivores and 2) "others" including beavers and muskrats. Species that did not alter habitat were divided further into those with predatory trophic effects (carnivorous mammals and trout, sub-group 4) and the rest with assorted impacts (sub-group 3). By establishing high quality information on archipelago-wide assemblage, distribution, impacts and mechanisms for exotic vertebrates, we recommend, based on ecological criteria, prioritizing the management of sub-group 2. A secondary priority might be given to the carnivores in sub-group 4, while species in sub-groups 1 and 3 are less urgent. As the first systematic survey of

  14. Sand dispersal in the southeastern Austral Basin, Tierra del Fuego, Argentina: Outcrop insights from Eocene channeled turbidite systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres Carbonell, Pablo J.; Olivero, Eduardo B.

    2012-02-01

    We made a detailed facies analysis of well exposed Eocene foredeep and wedge-top successions in the SE Austral Basin of eastern Tierra del Fuego, Argentina, contributing to a better understanding of its patterns of sand dispersal. The analysis reveals that these successions constitute portions of turbidite systems with recurrent facies associations, interpreted as channel, channel-margin and levée depositional elements. The channel facies, paleocurrents and interpreted paleogeography suggest that the studied successions form the transfer zone of the turbidite systems that fed the foreland basin. We hypothesize that the SE Austral Basin, which forms the transition between the Austral and Malvinas Basins, acted as an east-west conduit for sediments sourced at the Fuegian Andes and transported to a deeper depositional zone in the SW Malvinas Basin. The fill of the channels in the transfer zone involved a large amount of turbidity flows, which in addition to the evidence of levée confinement in the studied deposits suggests that the sandier portion of the flows was able to reach the depositional zone, were mostly unconfined (sheeted) sand bodies may have formed. In addition, overbank sand bodies were deposited within the transfer zone, associated to processes of flow overspill. Both types of sand bodies constitute potential reservoirs in this hydrocarbon producing basin, implying that the Eocene SE Austral Basin, and the ultimate zone of deposition in the SW Malvinas Basin may constitute major prospects for hydrocarbon exploration. The proposed model define a new perspective for future research on the sedimentologic and stratigraphic evolution of the SE portion of the Austral Basin.

  15. Present-day crustal deformation along the Magallanes-Fagnano Fault System in Tierra del Fuego from repeated GPS observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendoza, L.; Perdomo, R.; Hormaechea, J. L.; Del Cogliano, D.; Fritsche, M.; Richter, A.; Dietrich, R.

    2011-03-01

    The present-day deformation of the earth crust in the Argentine part of Tierra del Fuego main island (southernmost South America) is here investigated based on repeated geodetic GPS observations. The island is traversed by the active transform boundary between the South American and Scotia tectonic plates, represented by the Magallanes-Fagnano fault system. Since 1993 a regional network comprising to date 29 GPS sites has been observed almost every year. The complete set of accumulated observations was processed using the Bernese GPS software and state-of-the-art processing strategies and models. The utilization of homogeneous GPS products resulting from a reprocessing of the global IGS network warrants a stable realization of a global reference frame. For each GPS site 3-D positions and linear velocities with error estimates were obtained. A strain analysis of the horizontal velocity components revealed the zones of major deformation activity. A 30-km-wide deformation belt centred on the main trace of the fault system was identified. This belt is bordered to the north (South America) and south (Scotia) by geodynamically stable zones, which move horizontally with a relative average velocity of 4.4 ± 0.6 (east) and -0.3 ± 0.4 (north) mm a-1. Within the deformation belt a maximum strain rate in the order of 0.25 μstrain per year has been detected. A pronounced change in the deformation style from transtension (east) to transpression (west) is observed. The area of predominating shortening of the crust coincides with a local rotation minimum and relative uplift. Throughout the period covered by the GPS observations the displacements and deformations occurred to be linear with time.

  16. The Last Glacial Maximum and Termination in the Torres del Paine Region, Southern South America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, J.; Hall, B. L.; Kaplan, M. R.; Vega, R. M.; Binnie, S.; Gómez, G.; Santana, F.

    2012-12-01

    Deciphering the timing, structure and termination of the local last glacial maximum (LGM) throughout Patagonia (42-55 S) remains one of the key unsolved paleoclimate questions in Quaternary sciences. During the last glaciation, the Patagonian ice sheet formed one ice body along the Patagonian Andes (42-55 S) in southern South America, but previous work has revealed different spatiotemporal ice dynamics along the eastern and western ice margins. The Patagonian Andes is the only landmass that exists at this latitude confronting the southern westerly wind belt, which seems to have played a key role in past glacial and climate changes. Therefore, reconstructing southern Andes glacier history constitutes a key element for understanding the causes of glaciations in the Southern Hemisphere. Major progress has been made to document the local Late-Pleistocene glacier history, particularly in response to recent application of exposure-cosmogenic dating technique in the region, although only sparse well-dated paleoclimate records exist in this vast area. LGM moraine-based records in south Patagonia (~48-55 S) have been developed for the Strait of Magellan area, where full glacial conditions seems to have occurred between ~28.0 - 17.5 ka. Despite that these data seem to confirm previous glacial chronologies developed in north Patagonia and the Chilean Lake District (40-42 S), recent works in Torres del Paine and Última Esperanza basins (50-51 S), suggest that glacial maximum conditions may have occurred earlier (i.e., during Marine Isotope Stage 3) and that ice extent could have been twice the size of previously thought. Here, we discuss paleoclimatological implications from our 10Be and 26Al-dating program of moraines in the Torres del Paine region in southern Patagonia. We focused our efforts in the previously undated Río de las Viscachas (RV) I and II moraines, which occur distal to the late-glacial TDP II, III and IV moraines that enclose present lake bodies at the

  17. A second, cryptic species of the soft coral genus Incrustatus (Anthozoa: Octocorallia: Clavulariidae) from Tierra del Fuego, Argentina, revealed by DNA barcoding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McFadden, Catherine S.; van Ofwegen, Leen P.

    2013-03-01

    The encrusting soft coral Incrustatus comauensis is a common denizen of hard substrates in the shallow sub-tidal zone from the central Chilean fjords to the Cape Horn region of southern South America. DNA barcoding of specimens collected from the Beagle Channel, Tierra del Fuego, Argentina, revealed the presence of a second, cryptic species of Incrustatus that is syntopic with I. comauensis. We describe Incrustatus niarchosi, a new species that can be distinguished morphologically from I. comauensis by differences in the microscopic ornamentation of the coenenchymal sclerites. To date, I. niarchosi n. sp. is known only from the Beagle Channel. A population of I. comauensis discovered in the intertidal zone in eastern Tierra del Fuego represents a new record of the species for that habitat and geographic region. Although the intertidal population is also distinct genetically, it is morphologically indistinguishable from sub-tidal Chilean populations of I. comauensis, and at present, there is insufficient evidence to support its status as a separate species.

  18. Pathogenic and enzyme activities of the entomopathogenic fungus Tolypocladium cylindrosporum (Ascomycota: Hypocreales) from Tierra del Fuego, Argentina.

    PubMed

    Scorsetti, Ana C; Elíades, Lorena A; Stenglein, Sebastián A; Cabello, Marta N; Pelizza, Sebastián A; Saparrat, Mario C N

    2012-06-01

    Tolypocladium cylindrosporum is an entomopathogenic fungi that has been studied as a biological control agent against insects of several orders. The fungus has been isolated from the soil as well as from insects of the orders Coleoptera, Lepidoptera, Diptera and Hymenoptera. In this study, we analyzed the ability of a strain of T cylindrosporum, isolated from soil samples taken in Tierra del Fuego, Argentina, to produce hydrolytic enzymes, and to study the relationship of those activities to the fungus pathogenicity against pest aphids. We have made the traditional and molecular characterization of this strain of T cylindrosporum. The expression of hydrolase activity in the fungal strain was estimated at three incubation temperatures (4 degreeC, 12 degreeC and 24 degreeC), on different agar media supplemented with the following specific substrates: chitin azure, Tween 20, casein, and urea for chitinase, lipase, protease, and urease activity, respectively. The hydrolytic-enzyme activity was estimated qualitatively according to the presence of a halo of clarification through hydrolase action, besides was expressed semi-quantitatively as the ratio between the hydrolytic-halo and colony diameters. The pathogenicity of the fungus was tested on adults of the aphid Rhopalosiphum padi at three temperatures of incubation (4 degree C, 12 degree C and 24 degree C). The suspension was adjusted to a concentration of 1x10(7) conidia/ml. In pathogenicity assays at seven days post-inoculation, the fungus caused the mortality of adults of Ropalosiphum padi at different temperatures also showed a broad ability to grow on several agar-culture media, supplemented with different carbon sources at the three incubation temperatures tested. Although, the growth was greater with higher incubation temperatures (with maximum levels at 24 degreeC), the fungus reached similar colony diameters after 15 days of incubation on the medium supplemented with Tween 20 at the lower two incubation

  19. Glacial geomorphology of the Torres del Paine region (southern Patagonia): Implications for glaciation, deglaciation and paleolake history

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García, Juan-Luis; Hall, Brenda L.; Kaplan, Michael R.; Vega, Rodrigo M.; Strelin, Jorge A.

    2014-01-01

    The processes affecting paleoclimate variability and Pleistocene glacial landscape development in the southern mid-latitudes remain poorly understood, in part because of the scarcity of comprehensive, well-studied records. Glacial landforms are invaluable for reconstructing past ice-sheet, climate, and associated environmental changes along the southern Andes, but there are significant spatial and temporal gaps in existing data. In this paper, we present new geomorphic and sedimentologic analyses, including surficial maps, for the Torres del Paine region (51°S, 73°W), southern South America. Our findings provide a new framework for understanding changes in the regional glacier history and Pleistocene landscape development. Glacial extent during the local last glacial maximum (LGM) remains unknown but new chronological data supported by geomorphic evidence afford evidence for a larger ice sheet at Torres del Paine than previously assumed. Deglaciation from the local LGM was underway by 17,400 ± 200 (1σ) cal. yr. BP. As opposed to previous suggestions, we have found that most of the moraines fringing the lakes in the Torres del Paine national park were deposited during a late-glacial expansion that occurred between 14,100 and 12,500 cal. yr. BP. Late-glacial advances also have been documented recently for the Última Esperanza and Lago Argentino basins to the south and north of Torres del Paine, respectively, suggesting an overall regional ice response to a climate signal. The Tehuelche paleolake accompanied each of the ice-sheet fluctuations in Torres del Paine. New data document at least three main phases of this paleolake, which drained eastward to the Atlantic Ocean, while the Andes gaps were blocked with ice. During the late phase of glacial lake formation, when water levels reached 125-155 m a.s.l., the lake likely merged with paleolake Consuelo in the Última Esperanza area at the end of the last glaciation. Lake Tehuelche in Torres del Paine had drained

  20. Teleseismic receiver function analysis in Tierra del Fuego Island: an estimation of crustal thickness and Vp/Vs velocity ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buffoni, C.; Sabbione, N. C.; Schimmel, M.; Rosa, M. L.

    2012-04-01

    Tierra del Fuego Island (TdF) is situated in the southern part of South America, where the transform tectonic boundary between the Scotia and South America plates divides the island into two continental blocks. This boundary is represented by a mainly strike-slip lineament known as Magallanes-Fagnano fault system that runs from the western part of the north Scotia ridge to the Chile trench south of 50° S. This fault system is composed of many splays and diverse subparallel faults that overprint the fold-and-thrust belt and are the responsible for the complex tectonic setting that has TdF. Only a few studies have been carried out to constrain the crustal structure and Moho depth in TdF. We present the preliminary estimations on Moho depth and Vp/Vs velocity ratio in TdF Argentinian Island, from teleseismic receiver function analysis with data recorded at five permanent seismic stations. We analyzed data and selected among 40 and 120 events for each seismic station, according to data availability and quality. Earthquakes with magnitudes greater than 5.5 mb and epicentral distances between 30° and 90° were selected. We used Seismic Analysis Code software to pre-process the seismograms. After removing the mean and trend, the data were band-pass filtered using different ranges of frequencies: 0.5-2Hz, 0.08-2Hz and 0.02-1Hz. We applied an iterative deconvolution technique in order to isolate the P-to-S converted waves and obtain the Receiver Functions (RFs). A Gaussian factor of a= 2.5 ( ~1Hz) was selected to reduce the noise and improve the signal coherence in the RFs. Crustal thickness and Vp/Vs ratio were estimated using the H-K stacking method. Since our RFs were not as clear as those typically obtained for simple tectonic settings, we performed different resample techniques to asses the robustness of our results. RFs from clustered events were stacked to increase the signal-to-noise ratio. For this purpose we divided the events into three clusters according event

  1. Fate of a broad spectrum of perfluorinated compounds in soils and biota from Tierra del Fuego and Antarctica.

    PubMed

    Llorca, Marta; Farré, Marinella; Tavano, Máximo Sebastián; Alonso, Bruno; Koremblit, Gabriel; Barceló, Damià

    2012-04-01

    In this study, the presence of 18 perfluorinated compounds was investigated in biota and environmental samples from the Antarctica and Tierra de Fuego, which were collected during a sampling campaign carried out along February and March 2010. 61 samples were analysed including fish, superficial soils, guano, algae, dung and tissues of Papua penguin by liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry. The concentrations of PFCs were ranging from 0.10 to 240 ng/g for most of the samples except for penguin dung, which presented levels between 95 and 603 ng/g for perfluorooctane sulfonate, and guano samples from Ushuaia, with concentration levels of 1190-2480 ng/g of perfluorohexanoic acid. PFCs acids presented, in general, the highest levels of concentration and perfluorooctanesulfonate was the most frequently found compound. The present study provides a significant amount of results, which globally supports the previous studies, related to the transport, deposition, biodegradation and bioaccumulation patterns of PFCs. PMID:22325444

  2. [Obesity and sedentary lifestyles in four-years old children attending two pre-schools in the city of Río Grande, Tierra del Fuego, Argentina].

    PubMed

    Berghtein, Ileana Ruth

    2014-12-01

    The precocious start of the adipocyte rebound, such as sedentarism, increases the risk of developing obesity and its comorbidities at later ages. The city of Río Grande is located in the Northwestern part of Tierra del Fuego and its monthly average temperature is the lowest in all of Argentina. It also possesses the largest juvenile population (in proportion to the total) as well as a very low mortality rate. According to the 2006 National Health and Nutrition Survey, the prevalence of obesity among its children was also one of the highest in the country. The objective of this investigation was to determine the prevalence of obesity and sedentarism in 4-year-old children; the sample was taken from two local kindergartens. In order to achieve this, the children were weighed and measured, their body mass index and waist perimeter, as well as their percentiles, were calculated. A structured questionnaire was applied to characterize the average weekly time allotted to sedentary activities. In this study, 27.3% of children were deemed to be overweight, while 18.2% were classified as obese. Furthermore, 23.6% presented a waist circumference in the > 90 percentile or higher and 70.1% fell in the sedentary classification. Both the predominance of sedentarism and the pattern of fat distribution are a clear alert towards the need to deepen the search for metabolic-risk syndrome factors in vulnerable groups. PMID:25362907

  3. Transferring Knowledge Gained From a Field Experience in Tierra del Fuego, the Uttermost Part of the Earth, to Central Texas Science Classrooms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ormiston, C.; Dovzak, N.; Anderson, S.; Perry, E.; Ellins, K.; Tingle, D.; Knettel, P.; Redding, S.; Odle, K.

    2005-12-01

    As part of the UTIG's Teachers in the Field program, we, three teachers from Boerne High School in south-central Texas, and four of our students, collaborated with an international team of geoscientists studying the tectonic and climatic evolution of the Lago Fagnano region in Tierra del Fuego, Argentina, in March 2005. This unique field experience allowed us to participate in all aspects of the scientific process: the consideration of research questions, development of a research plan, collection of field data and observations, and synthesis and presentation of results. In addition to field work and reconnaissance tied directly to the project objectives, we characterized the modern chemical/physical soil and water parameters (temperature, pH, dissolved oxygen, NH4 content, etc.) and isotopic (18O and D) composition of the Lago Fagnano watershed. These data are now integrated into an existing database of comparable chemical/physical information gathered for North American sites through our summer field courses. We will utilize this rich data set to make Texas-Tierra del Fuego ecosystem comparisons with our classes. The level of mentoring, preparation and follow-up provided by an NSF GK-12 Fellow was a key factor contributing to the success of our experience and an important element in helping us transfer components of this challenging experience to our students. Before, during, and following a two-week field season at Lago Fagnano, we and our students were actively engaged as learners and as scientists. We acquired concepts and skills that are readily applicable in a classroom setting: geologic mapping, GIS applications, isotopic data collection and analysis, tectonics concepts, and a general understanding of how science is truly conducted. Other factors that contributed to a positive experience included the team of dynamic scientists, who encouraged, helped and inspired us, the strong support that we received from our high school campus and district level

  4. Geometry and evolution of the frontal part of the Magallanes foreland thrust and fold belt (Vicuna Area), Tierra del Fuego, southern Chile

    SciTech Connect

    Alvarez-Marron, J.; McClay, K.R. ); Harambour, S.; Rojas, L.; Skarmeta, J. )

    1993-11-01

    The Magallanes foreland thrust and fold belt is a thin-skinned foreland thrust and fold belt of Paleocene to Oligocene age that deforms Upper Jurassic through Tertiary volcanic, volcaniclastic, and siliciclastic strata of the Magallanes basin, southern Andean Cordillera, Chile. This paper is a detailed description and analysis of the geology and structural evolution of the thrust front (Vicuna area of southern Tierra del Fuego). Reflection seismic and well data, together with 1:50,000 scale geological mapping, have been used in the analysis. In the southern part of the Vicuna area, two different thrust systems have been found: an upper imbricate fan that deforms Upper Jurassic and Cretaceous strata, and a younger, lower duplex composed of Cretaceous and probably Upper Jurassic rocks. The imbricate fan is characterized by fault-propagation folding in which listric thrust faults merge downward into a sole thrust that probably is located within the Upper Jurassic stratigraphy. The sole thrust of the upper imbricates forms the roof thrust of the underlying duplex. In the northern part of the Vicuna area, the syntectonic sedimentary wedge of the foredeep consists of Late Cretaceous through Tertiary siliciclastics that have been deformed and uplifted by passive back thrusting at the triangle zone. The structural style in the foreland region shows three main subhorizontal detachment levels located within the sedimentary wedge as a result of the progressive transfer of slip from the thrust belt to the foreland. Minor blind thrusts produce stacked [open quotes]pop up[close quotes] and triangle structures that result in complex geometries in the cores of anticlines. A forward-breaking sequence of thrusting is interpreted. During deformation, the active foredeep wedge migrated at least 10 km northward. Balanced geological cross sections indicate approximately 60% (-30 km) shortening for this part of the Magallanes thrust belt.

  5. Multi-proxy analyses of a peat bog on Isla de los Estados, easternmost Tierra del Fuego: a unique record of the variable Southern Hemisphere Westerlies since the last deglaciation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Björck, Svante; Rundgren, Mats; Ljung, Karl; Unkel, Ingmar; Wallin, Åsa

    2012-05-01

    We have analyzed an almost 14,000 year old peat sequence on the island of Isla de los Estados (55° S, 64° W), east of Tierra del Fuego, in the core of the Southern Hemisphere Westerlies. A multitude of methods have been used: high resolution 14C dating; detailed lithologic descriptions including humification degree; loss on ignition; magnetic susceptibility; bulk density; pollen and spore analysis and determination of Aeolian sand influx. By combining proxies for wind and precipitation we have been able to reconstruct how the westerlies have varied over time in the Atlantic sector of the Southern Ocean. It shows that this westerly wind belt was most intense at the onset of the record, 13,600-13,200 cal BP, coinciding with the mid to late part of the Antarctic Cold Reversal, followed by a gradual decline. At 12,200 cal BP the westerlies seem to have shifted to a position south of Tierra del Fuego and this phase, the calmest and driest period on the island throughout the sequence, ended at 10,000 cal BP when the westerlies moved equatorward again. Since then the westerlies have been present but with a variable impact on the 55° S latitude of the Atlantic. Mostly conditions have been fairly similar to today, but occasionally with a wider or narrower and/or weaker or stronger wind belt. At 7200 cal BP wind intensity began to increase and between 4500 and 3500 cal BP these southern latitudes experienced a distinct wind and precipitation maximum, both in terms of perseverance and intensity. Our results show a both wide and strong wind belt, with possible niveo-aeolian activity in Tierra del Fuego in winter, and possibly creating milder summers around the Antarctic Peninsula. In the later part of the Holocene, expansion-contraction phases of the wind belt, especially in winter, seem to have been a common phenomenon.

  6. Records of environmental changes during the Holocene from Isla de los Estados (54.4°S), southeastern Tierra del Fuego

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unkel, Ingmar; Fernandez, Marilen; Björck, Svante; Ljung, Karl; Wohlfarth, Barbara

    2010-12-01

    Southernmost Patagonia, located at the relatively narrow passage between Antarctica and South America, is a highly sensitive region for recording meridional and zonal changes in the pattern of oceanic and atmospheric circulation. The island of Isla de los Estados, situated at 54.5°S, 64°W, east of Argentinean Tierra del Fuego, provides an exceptional possibility, to investigate terrestrial records of atmospheric conditions in an oceanic setting during the last deglaciation and the Holocene. Here we present geochemical and diatom analyses from 10 600 to c. 1500 cal BP of one sequence (LGB) with peat, lake sediments and lagoon deposits at the northern coast of the island, and a lake sediment sequence (CAS) 3 km further inland. The data comprise TC, TN, loss on ignition analyses and continuous XRF scanning as well as age-depth modeling based on AMS- 14C dating on both cores. Diatom analysis of the CAS record complements the geochemical proxies. During the Holocene, our two sites have been impacted by two different forcings: changes in the regional climate regime largely influenced by the varying strength and position of the Southern Hemisphere Westerlies (SHW), while relative sea-level changes affected the deposits of the coastal site. In concert with the onset of the Antarctic thermal optimum, our data suggest fairly warm conditions and the establishment of denser peat and forest vegetation on the island c. 10 600 cal BP. Between 8500 and 4500 cal BP geochemistry and diatoms from the CAS record indicate stronger Westerlies at this latitude, which means higher wind speed or higher storm frequency and more precipitation, resulting in more pronounced surface run-off. After 4500 cal BP, the geochemical proxies and large changes in diatom assemblages indicate a decrease in precipitation, weaker winds and possibly cooler conditions, probably as an effect of weaker SHW and/or a latitudinal shift. The depositional environment of CAS changed from gyttja to peat around 1000

  7. Los ojos de la NASA sobre la Tierra

    NASA Video Gallery

    La NASA cuenta con más de una decena de satélites que estudian la Tierra. Conoce la información que recaban los satélites, junto con Gilberto Colón, asistente especial del subdirector del Centro de...

  8. Current treatment and future prospects for the management of acute coronary syndromes: consensus recommendations of the 1997 ushuaia conference, tierra del fuego, Argentina.

    PubMed

    Gurfinkel, E

    1998-01-01

    Management of acute coronary syndromes, particularly unstable angina, acute myocardial infarction and non-Q-wave myocardial infarction, is one of the most common and costly problems facing modern medicine. Furthermore, the increasing availability of new research and clinical information relevant to the treatment of these conditions means that continuing reappraisal of management strategies is necessary. Accordingly, the Ushuaia conference, Tierra Del Fuego, Argentina, was convened to discuss current approaches and future treatment prospects for patients with these conditions. The conference was comprised of leading Argentinian cardiologists whose primary aim was to formulate consensus recommendations regarding the management of patients with acute coronary syndromes. The first of the major recommendations for the pharmacological management of acute coronary syndromes arising from the Ushuaia Consensus Conference was that aspirin (200 to 500mg initially, then 100 to 325 mg/day) should be administered to all patients except those for whom aspirin is absolutely (or relatively, depending on the clinician's discretion) contraindicated. In such cases, ticlopidine is a suitable alternative. Intravenous nitrates are indicated for patients with angina pain (24 to 48 hours' duration), ECG changes, recurrence of angina, or signs of heart failure; in other cases, oral, transdermal or sublingual nitrates may be administered. Use of beta-blockers is recommended except when absolutely contraindicated or when there is a strong suspicion of vasospasm as a dominant mechanism in angina. Intravenous administration of these agents is preferred in patients with tachycardia, arterial hypertension or angina. Calcium antagonists are generally not recommended as first choice therapy, but can be indicated (preferably using agents that decrease heart rate) when beta-blockers are contraindicated or when there is a strong suspicion of vasospasm as a dominant mechanism in angina. Calcium

  9. The effect of natural UV-B radiation on a perennial Salicornia salt-marsh in Bahía San Sebastián, Tierra del Fuego, Argentina: a 3-year field study.

    PubMed

    Bianciotto, O A; Pinedo, L B; San Roman, N A; Blessio, A Y; Collantes, M B

    2003-07-01

    The Antarctic ozone hole and a general depletion of the stratospheric ozone layer cause increased levels of ultraviolet-B solar radiation (UV-B) over Tierra del Fuego, the southernmost tip of South America. For three consecutive growing seasons (1997-2000), we studied the biological impacts (morphology, physiology, demography and phenology) of natural UV-B radiation on a perennial Salicornia ambigua Michx. community in San Sebastian Bay (53 degrees S and 68 degrees W), Tierra del Fuego, Argentina. This is the first UV-B screening experiment on a subantarctic halophytic community. The shortwave UV-B spectrum (280 to 320 nm) was excluded by covering plots with UV-B blocking film (Mylar). These plots were compared to controls covered with UV-B transparent (Aclar) plastic screens, and unscreened plots. Shoot length in Salicornia was not affected by UV-B. Exposure to natural UV-B reduced biomass and density (by 17% and 38%, respectively). Concentration of UV-shielding pigments and cuticle thickness were both significantly higher (25-48% and 21-40%, respectively) in plants receiving ambient UV-B. The increase in cuticle thickness persisted throughout the growing season, whereas pigment concentration was higher at the beginning of the growing season. Also, the number of dead shoots was higher in plants exposed to UV-B. At the end of the growing season (March) shoot mortality was higher in plants exposed to ambient UV-B, and post-flowering senescence was 30 days earlier. Slight changes in the relative composition of Salicornia to Puccinellia were seen. The reduction observed in Salicornia shoot density under ambient UV-B was cumulative over time; 23% in the first growing-season, rising to 38% by the third growing-season. A similar incremental increase in pigment absorption at 305 nm was seen; 25% in the first and 48% in the third growing season. PMID:12962642

  10. La Enseñanza/Aprendizaje del Modelo Sol-Tierra Análisis de la Situación Actual y Propuesta de Mejora Para la Formación de los Futuros Profesores de Primaria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez Sebastià, Bernat

    2004-12-01

    This work is an extened summary of the autor's PhD thesis. It deals with the teaching of astronomy (day/night, seasons) in primary school. At first, students teachers' undestanding of astronomical concepts related to Sun-Earth system have been analysed. Taking into account the results of the previous analysis and using a socio-constructivist approach a teaching sequence has been designed. This sequence has been tested with different groups of students teachers showing an improvement in their undestanding of elementary astronomical concepts. El trabajo que presentamos es un resumen extenso de la tesis doctoral del autor. El enfoque utilizado ha sido tratar de ligar la investigación sobre las ideas, razonamientos y obstáculos de los profesores de primaria con la planificación de la enseñanza del modelo Sol-Tierra que permite explicar el ciclo día/noche y las estaciones. En primer lugar, se ha procedido a realizar un análisis crítico de los resultados que se obtienen en el aprendizaje de los contenidos astronómicos en la enseñanza habitual. En segundo lugar se ha diseñado un curriculum potencialmente superador de esta situación desde una orientación que concibe la enseñanza y el aprendizaje como un proceso de construcción de conocimientos en una estructura problematizada. Finalmente, esta secuencia didáctica ha sido experimentada con diferentes grupos de estudiantes de magisterio, mostrando una mejora relevante en la comprensión de los conceptos astronómicos fundamentales.

  11. Modern rates of glacial sediment accumulation along a 15° S-N transect in fjords from the Antarctic Peninsula to southern Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boldt, Katherine V.; Nittrouer, Charles A.; Hallet, Bernard; Koppes, Michele N.; Forrest, Brittany K.; Wellner, Julia S.; Anderson, John B.

    2013-12-01

    of glacial erosion in temperate climates rank among the highest worldwide, and the sedimentary products of such erosion record climatic and tectonic signals in many glaciated settings, as well as temporal changes in glacier behavior. Glacial sediment yields are expected to decrease with increasing latitude because decreased temperature and meltwater production reduce glacial sliding, erosion, and sediment transfer; however, this expectation lacks a solid supportive database. Herein we present modern 210Pb-derived sediment accumulation rates on decadal to century time scales for 12 fjords spanning 15° of latitude from the Antarctic Peninsula to southern Chile and interpret the results in light of glacimarine sediment accumulation worldwide. 210Pb records from the Antarctic Peninsula show surprisingly steady sediment accumulation throughout the past century at rates of 1-7 mm yr-1, despite rapid warming and glacial retreat. Cores from the South Shetland Islands reveal accelerated sediment accumulation over the past few decades, likely due to changes in the thermal state of the glaciers in this region, which straddles the boundary between subpolar and temperate conditions. In Patagonia and Tierra del Fuego, sediment accumulates faster (11-24 mm yr-1), and previously collected seismic profiles show that rates reach meters per year close to the glacier termini. This increase in sediment accumulation rates with decreasing latitude reflects the gradient from subpolar to temperate climates and is consistent with glacial erosion being much faster in the temperate climate of southern Chile than in the polar climate of the Antarctic Peninsula.

  12. Trace elements deposition in the Tierra del Fuego region (south Patagonia) by using lichen transplants after the Puyehue-Cordón Caulle (north Patagonia) volcanic eruption in 2011.

    PubMed

    Conti, Marcelo Enrique; Jasan, Raquel; Finoia, Maria Grazia; Iavicoli, Ivo; Plá, Rita

    2016-04-01

    Lichen Usnea barbata transplants were tested as a biomonitor of atmospheric deposition in an apparently pristine environment that is Tierra del Fuego region (Patagonia, Argentina). The present survey is connected with the volcanic eruption that started in north Patagonia on June 4, 2011 from the Puyehue-Cordón Caulle volcano, Chile (north Patagonia, at 1700 km of distance of our sampling sites). Lichens were collected in September 2011 (one month of exposure) and September 2012 (1 year of exposure) in 27 sites covering the northern region of the province where trees are not present. The atmospheric deposition of 27 elements by using Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA) was determined in the collected samples. The first aim of the study was to evaluate the influence of the volcanic eruption on the regional atmospheric deposition comparing our results with baseline data we determined in U. barbata in 2006 in the same sites. The second aim was to test possible patterns of bioaccumulation between the two sampling campaigns after the volcanic eruption. With respect to 2006 baseline levels, we found significant higher levels for As, Ba, Co, Cr, Cs, Na, Sb and U in lichens collected after 1 month of exposure (first sampling campaign--2011). Between the two sampling campaigns (2011-2012) after the eruption, lichens reflected the natural contamination by volcanic ashes with significantly higher median levels of Br, Cr, Fe, K, Na, Sc, and Se. Results confirmed the very good aptitude of U. barbata to reflect the levels of elements in the environment at global scale and to reflect the volcanic emissions at distant places. Volcanic eruptions cause the emission in the atmosphere of elevated levels of particulate matter. In this regard, our findings demonstrate the importance to evaluate the metal composition of the particles to avoid possible health effects. PMID:26637301

  13. Recent Deglaciation of Darwin Mountains (Tierra de Fuego) after Little Ice Age: monitoring by photogrammetry, lichenometry, dendrochronology and field studies.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Sancho, L.; Palacios, D.; Zamorano, J. J.; Green, A.; Vivas, M.; Pintado, A.

    2012-04-01

    behaviour detected at the Pia glacial terminus results from a combination of climatic factors and elements derived from the dynamics of the glacial flow. García-Sancho, L. Palacios, D., Green, T.G.A., Vivas, M., Pintado, A. (2011): Extreme lichen growth rates detected in recent deglaciated areas in Tierra del Fuego. Polar Biology, 34 (6): 813-822. DOI: 10.1007/s00300-010-0935-4. Research funded by POL20060840 & CGL2009-7343 projects, Government of Spain.

  14. Mineralogical, IR-spectral and geochemical monitoring of hydrothermal alteration in a deformed and metamorphosed Jurassic VMS deposit at Arroyo Rojo, Tierra del Fuego, Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biel, C.; Subías, I.; Acevedo, R. D.; Yusta, I.; Velasco, F.

    2012-04-01

    The Arroyo Rojo Zn-Pb-Cu volcanogenic massive sulfide deposit is the main deposit of the Fin del Mundo District in the Fuegian Andes, Argentina. This deposit is hosted by a Middle Jurassic volcanic and volcanoclastic sequence forming the Lemaire Formation. The latter consists, from the base up, of the following: rhyolitic and dacitic porphyritic rocks, ignimbrite, tuff, and flow. It is underlain by a pre-Jurassic basement and overlain by the hyaloclastic andesites of the Yahgán Formation. The Arroyo Rojo consists of stacked lenticular lenses that are associated with disseminated mineralization in both the footwall and the hanging wall. The internal structure of the ore lenses is marked by the occurrence of massive, semi-massive and banded facies, along with stringer and brecciated zones and minor ore disseminations. The mineral assemblage comprises mainly pyrite and sphalerite, with minor amounts of galena and chalcopyrite and rare pyrrhotite, arsenopyrite, tetrahedrite and bournonite. The ores and the volcanic host rocks have metamorphosed to greenschist facies and were overprinted by a penetrative tectonic foliation, which led to the development of mylonitic, and cataclastic textures, recrystallization and remobilization. Primary depositional characteristics and regional and hydrothermal alteration patterns were preserved despite deformation and metamorphism. Therefore, primary banding was preserved between facies boundaries. In addition, some remnants of magmatic origin are recognizable in preserved phenocrysts and volcaniclastic phenoclasts. Most of the volcanic and volcaniclastic rocks of the host sequence show a rhyolitic to rhyo-dacitic composition. Regional seafloor alteration, characterized by the presence of clinozoisite, Fe-chlorite and titanite, along with quartz and albite, is partially obliterated by hydrothermal alteration. The hydrothermal alteration is stratabound with the following assemblages, which developed from the base to top: (1) Quartz

  15. Late-glacial elevated dust deposition linked to westerly wind shifts in southern South America.

    PubMed

    Vanneste, Heleen; De Vleeschouwer, François; Martínez-Cortizas, Antonio; von Scheffer, Clemens; Piotrowska, Natalia; Coronato, Andrea; Le Roux, Gaël

    2015-01-01

    Atmospheric dust loadings play a crucial role in the global climate system. Southern South America is a key dust source, however, dust deposition rates remain poorly quantified since the last glacial termination (~17 kyr ago), an important timeframe to anticipate future climate changes. Here we use isotope and element geochemistry in a peat archive from Tierra del Fuego, to reconstruct atmospheric dust fluxes and associated environmental and westerly wind changes for the past 16.2 kyr. Dust depositions were elevated during the Antarctic Cold Reversal (ACR) and second half of the Younger Dryas (YD) stadial, originating from the glacial Beagle Channel valley. This increase was most probably associated with a strengthening of the westerlies during both periods as dust source areas were already available before the onset of the dust peaks and remained present throughout. Congruent with glacier advances across Patagonia, this dust record indicates an overall strengthening of the wind belt during the ACR. On the other hand, we argue that the YD dust peak is linked to strong and poleward shifted westerlies. The close interplay between dust fluxes and climatic changes demonstrates that atmospheric circulation was essential in generating and sustaining present-day interglacial conditions. PMID:26126739

  16. Late-glacial elevated dust deposition linked to westerly wind shifts in southern South America

    PubMed Central

    Vanneste, Heleen; De Vleeschouwer, François; Martínez-Cortizas, Antonio; von Scheffer, Clemens; Piotrowska, Natalia; Coronato, Andrea; Le Roux, Gaël

    2015-01-01

    Atmospheric dust loadings play a crucial role in the global climate system. Southern South America is a key dust source, however, dust deposition rates remain poorly quantified since the last glacial termination (~17 kyr ago), an important timeframe to anticipate future climate changes. Here we use isotope and element geochemistry in a peat archive from Tierra del Fuego, to reconstruct atmospheric dust fluxes and associated environmental and westerly wind changes for the past 16.2 kyr. Dust depositions were elevated during the Antarctic Cold Reversal (ACR) and second half of the Younger Dryas (YD) stadial, originating from the glacial Beagle Channel valley. This increase was most probably associated with a strengthening of the westerlies during both periods as dust source areas were already available before the onset of the dust peaks and remained present throughout. Congruent with glacier advances across Patagonia, this dust record indicates an overall strengthening of the wind belt during the ACR. On the other hand, we argue that the YD dust peak is linked to strong and poleward shifted westerlies. The close interplay between dust fluxes and climatic changes demonstrates that atmospheric circulation was essential in generating and sustaining present-day interglacial conditions. PMID:26126739

  17. Late-glacial elevated dust deposition linked to westerly wind shifts in southern South America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanneste, Heleen; de Vleeschouwer, François; Martínez-Cortizas, Antonio; von Scheffer, Clemens; Piotrowska, Natalia; Coronato, Andrea; Le Roux, Gaël

    2015-07-01

    Atmospheric dust loadings play a crucial role in the global climate system. Southern South America is a key dust source, however, dust deposition rates remain poorly quantified since the last glacial termination (~17 kyr ago), an important timeframe to anticipate future climate changes. Here we use isotope and element geochemistry in a peat archive from Tierra del Fuego, to reconstruct atmospheric dust fluxes and associated environmental and westerly wind changes for the past 16.2 kyr. Dust depositions were elevated during the Antarctic Cold Reversal (ACR) and second half of the Younger Dryas (YD) stadial, originating from the glacial Beagle Channel valley. This increase was most probably associated with a strengthening of the westerlies during both periods as dust source areas were already available before the onset of the dust peaks and remained present throughout. Congruent with glacier advances across Patagonia, this dust record indicates an overall strengthening of the wind belt during the ACR. On the other hand, we argue that the YD dust peak is linked to strong and poleward shifted westerlies. The close interplay between dust fluxes and climatic changes demonstrates that atmospheric circulation was essential in generating and sustaining present-day interglacial conditions.

  18. La Memoria De Nuestra Tierra: Colorado

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baca, Judy

    2005-01-01

    La Memoria de Nuestra Tierra combines a meticulously hand-painted landscape with historic photographs in a seamless blend imprinted on the holographic-like surface of a metallic coated substrate. The mural for the Denver International Airport, entitled La Memoria de Nuestra Tierra is a breakthrough in digital murals, printed digitally on a…

  19. Deforestation in Tierras Bajas, Bolivia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This false-color image shows the gradual conversion of forest lands for agricultural use in the Tierras Bajas region of Santa Cruz, Bolivia, as observed by the Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+) flying aboard Landsat 5. Forest and woodland are represented as grey tones from Channel 5 in this ETM+ scene, collected in 1998. Other colors indicate the first year in which a site was developed for agriculture (see color scale in the image, which corresponds to years of development). In this scene, land use types are delineated with lines. Solid white lines show the locations of planned colonies, dashed white lines show spontaneous colonies, and dotted white lines show Mennonite colonies. All other regions of development are non-Mennonite industrial soybean farms. Natural vegetation formations in this image are delineated with black lines. Solid black lines show the locations of Northern Chaco Woodlands and dashed black lines show Cerrado regions. For more information, see this previous Image of the Day regarding Bolivian deforestation. Image courtesy Marc Steininger, NASA GSFC

  20. Tierra Nueva -- A passive solar cohousing project

    SciTech Connect

    Haggard, K.; Cooper, P.

    1999-10-01

    California architects take on the formidable challenges of designing a cohousing project, and discover that the end result is well worth the effort. The Tierra Nueva Cohousing Project consists of living units, a common house, community orchard, community gardens, community play space, space for a future shop and at the periphery of the site, parking, carports and garages. The units use thermal mass, solar heating, passive solar cooling, perimeter insulation on slabs. Design was agreed to by the community as a whole.

  1. Comparing modeled and observed changes in mineral dust transport and deposition to Antarctica between the Last Glacial Maximum and current climates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albani, Samuel; Mahowald, Natalie M.; Delmonte, Barbara; Maggi, Valter; Winckler, Gisela

    2012-05-01

    Mineral dust aerosols represent an active component of the Earth's climate system, by interacting with radiation directly, and by modifying clouds and biogeochemistry. Mineral dust from polar ice cores over the last million years can be used as paleoclimate proxy, and provide unique information about climate variability, as changes in dust deposition at the core sites can be due to changes in sources, transport and/or deposition locally. Here we present results from a study based on climate model simulations using the Community Climate System Model. The focus of this work is to analyze simulated differences in the dust concentration, size distribution and sources in current climate conditions and during the Last Glacial Maximum at specific ice core locations in Antarctica, and compare with available paleodata. Model results suggest that South America is the most important source for dust deposited in Antarctica in current climate, but Australia is also a major contributor and there is spatial variability in the relative importance of the major dust sources. During the Last Glacial Maximum the dominant source in the model was South America, because of the increased activity of glaciogenic dust sources in Southern Patagonia-Tierra del Fuego and the Southernmost Pampas regions, as well as an increase in transport efficiency southward. Dust emitted from the Southern Hemisphere dust source areas usually follow zonal patterns, but southward flow towards Antarctica is located in specific areas characterized by southward displacement of air masses. Observations and model results consistently suggest a spatially variable shift in dust particle sizes. This is due to a combination of relatively reduced en route wet removal favouring a generalized shift towards smaller particles, and on the other hand to an enhanced relative contribution of dry coarse particle deposition in the Last Glacial Maximum.

  2. Phylogeography of the Patagonian otter Lontra provocax: adaptive divergence to marine habitat or signature of southern glacial refugia?

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background A number of studies have described the extension of ice cover in western Patagonia during the Last Glacial Maximum, providing evidence of a complete cover of terrestrial habitat from 41°S to 56°S and two main refugia, one in south-eastern Tierra del Fuego and the other north of the Chiloé Island. However, recent evidence of high genetic diversity in Patagonian river species suggests the existence of aquatic refugia in this region. Here, we further test this hypothesis based on phylogeographic inferences from a semi-aquatic species that is a top predator of river and marine fauna, the huillín or Southern river otter (Lontra provocax). Results We examined mtDNA sequences of the control region, ND5 and Cytochrome-b (2151 bp in total) in 75 samples of L. provocax from 21 locations in river and marine habitats. Phylogenetic analysis illustrates two main divergent clades for L. provocax in continental freshwater habitat. A highly diverse clade was represented by haplotypes from the marine habitat of the Southern Fjords and Channels (SFC) region (43°38' to 53°08'S), whereas only one of these haplotypes was paraphyletic and associated with northern river haplotypes. Conclusions Our data support the hypothesis of the persistence of L. provocax in western Patagonia, south of the ice sheet limit, during last glacial maximum (41°S latitude). This limit also corresponds to a strong environmental change, which might have spurred L. provocax differentiation between the two environments. PMID:21356052

  3. Timescale dependence of glacial erosion rates: A case study of Marinelli Glacier, Cordillera Darwin, southern Patagonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez, Rodrigo A.; Anderson, John B.; Wellner, Julia S.; Hallet, Bernard

    2011-03-01

    Erosion rates have been estimated for a number of glaciated basins around the world, mostly based on modern observations (last few decades) of sediment fluxes to fjords. We use time-constrained sediment volumes delivered by Marinelli Glacier (55°S), an outlet glacier of the Cordillera Darwin ice cap, southern Patagonian Andes, Tierra del Fuego, to determine erosion rates across different timescales. Sediment volumes are derived using a dense grid of high- and low-frequency single channel seismic data and swath bathymetry data along with piston and Kasten cores. Our results show dramatic differences in erosion rates over different timescales. Erosion rates at Marinelli Glacier diminish about 80% (or by factor of ˜5) with each ten-fold increase in the time span over which erosion rates are averaged: 29.3 mm/yr for the last 45 years, 5.3 mm/yr for the last 364 years, and 0.5 mm/yr for the last 12,500 years. These results indicate that modern sediment yields and erosion rates from temperate tidewater glaciers can exceed long-term values over the time of deglaciation after the Last Glacial Maximum (centennial and millennial timescales) by up to 2 orders of magnitude. In view of the low exhumation rates of Cordillera Darwin (˜0.07 mm/yr average for the last 30 Myr), modern erosion rates could be up to 3 orders of magnitude higher than rates over geological time. We conclude that the pattern of erosion rate variation with time reflects the sensitivity of glaciers to climate variability.

  4. Glacial integrative modelling.

    PubMed

    Ganopolski, Andrey

    2003-09-15

    Understanding the mechanisms of past climate changes requires modelling of the complex interaction between all major components of the Earth system: atmosphere, ocean, cryosphere, lithosphere and biosphere. This paper reviews attempts at such an integrative approach to modelling climate changes during the glacial age. In particular, the roles of different factors in shaping glacial climate are compared based on the results of simulations with an Earth-system model of intermediate complexity, CLIMBER-2. It is shown that ice sheets, changes in atmospheric compositions, vegetation cover, and reorganization of the ocean thermohaline circulation play important roles in glacial climate changes. Another example of this approach is the modelling of two major types of abrupt glacial climate changes: Dansgaard-Oeschger and Heinrich events. Our results corroborate some of the early proposed mechanisms, which relate abrupt climate changes to the internal instability of the ocean thermohaline circulation and ice sheets. At the same time, it is shown that realistic representation of the temporal evolution of the palaeoclimatic background is crucial to simulate observed features of the glacial abrupt climate changes. PMID:14558899

  5. Glacial Geology of Wisconsin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Madison Public Schools, WI.

    This publication is a teacher's resource and guidebook for the presentation of the three filmstrips in the "Glacial Geology of Wisconsin" series. The first filmstrip is subtitled, "Evidence of the Glaciers," the second "How the Glaciers Reshaped the Landscape," and the third "Fossils of the Ice Age." Included are a list of objectives, an outline…

  6. Revealing the eruptive dynamics of post-glacial effusive volcanism in the western part of Laguna del Maule Volcanic Field: Insights into a complex magmatic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cáceres, F.; Castruccio, A.; Parada, M. Á.

    2015-12-01

    In this study we analyzed six Quaternary lava flows and one lava dome from Laguna del Maule Volcanic Field, in the Chilean Andes, in order to create a volcano-petrological eruptive model to get ideas about pre- and syn-eruptive stages, the main factors that control the broad distribution of vents and the architecture of magma reservoir. We estimated eruptive parameters such as effusion rates and erupted volumes, extrinsic and intrinsic lava flows emplacement controlling factors, magma ascent rates and pre-eruptive thermodynamics conditions to determine different stages in magma evolution from magma reservoir to emplacement of lava at surface. The analyzed lavas have andesitic-to-rhyolitic compositions, blocky morphology with volumes about a few cubic kilometers, thicknesses up to 140 m, maximum widths of 5 km and maximum lengths of 10 km. Modeling of the advance of these flows gives effusion rates of 10-1-102 m3s-1 and eruptions of a few months to years. Petrologic studies which include quantitative textural analyses and mineral and glass compositions, reveal similar provenance and crystalizing temperatures of similar minerals, coupled with similar pressures, H2O content and oxygen fugacity by similar lava composition, meanwhile individual chamber size estimations show an overlap sharing volume in near chambers indicating the equivalent provenance. Our main results about dynamics of lava flows suggest a crustal yield strength control in the emplacement over the internal viscosity of the flow for each lava. On the other hand, non-rhyolitic units appear to come from chambers located in similar depths and with coinciding volumes which indicate that the eruptions were triggered by the injection of different magma batches into a crystal-rich magma reservoir that could be divided into many sub-compartments which could explain the broad distribution of the vents. In addition, rhyolitic units also show similar thermodynamics conditions and coming from equivalent chambers.

  7. Glacial atmospheric phosphorus deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kjær, Helle Astrid; Dallmayr, Remi; Gabrieli, Jacopo; Goto-Azuma, Kumiko; Hirabayashi, Motohiro; Svensson, Anders; Vallelonga, Paul

    2016-04-01

    Phosphorus in the atmosphere is poorly studied and thus not much is known about atmospheric phosphorus and phosphate transport and deposition changes over time, though it is well known that phosphorus can be a source of long-range nutrient transport, e.g. Saharan dust transported to the tropical forests of Brazil. In glacial times it has been speculated that transport of phosphorus from exposed shelves would increase the ocean productivity by wash out. However whether the exposed shelf would also increase the atmospheric load to more remote places has not been investigated. Polar ice cores offer a unique opportunity to study the atmospheric transport of aerosols on various timescales, from glacial-interglacial periods to recent anthropogenic influences. We have for the first time determined the atmospheric transport of phosphorus to the Arctic by means of ice core analysis. Both total and dissolved reactive phosphorus were measured to investigate current and past atmospheric transport of phosphorus to the Arctic. Results show that glacial cold stadials had increased atmospheric total phosphorus mass loads of 70 times higher than in the past century, while DRP was only increased by a factor of 14. In the recent period we find evidence of a phosphorus increase over the past 50 yrs in ice cores close to human occupation likely correlated to forest fires. References: Kjær, Helle Astrid, et al. "Continuous flow analysis method for determination of dissolved reactive phosphorus in ice cores." Environmental science & technology 47.21 (2013): 12325-12332. Kjær, Helle Astrid, et al. "Greenland ice cores constrain glacial atmospheric fluxes of phosphorus." Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres120.20 (2015).

  8. Kennebunk glacial advance: A reappraisal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Geoffrey W.

    1981-06-01

    Evidence for the Kennebunk glacial advance (readvance) in southwestern Maine is discussed in light of recent geologic mapping. Orientations of glacially produced lineations record the response of ice to major topographic controls and do not indicate glacial readvance. Minor end moraines and large stratified end moraines associated with deformed marine sediments of the Presumpscot Formation occur throughout the southwestern coastal zone. These features outline the general pattern of ice retreat from this part of the coastal zone and suggest that withdrawal of the last ice from southwestern Maine occurred with minor stillstands and local frontal fluctuations but without significant readvance. The Kennebunk glacial advance (readvance) appears to have been one of many local fluctuations of the ice front during general recession, occurring at about 13,200 yr B.P.

  9. Sub-glacial volcanic eruptions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    White, Donald Edward

    1956-01-01

    The literature on sub-glacial volcanic eruptions and the related flood phenomena has been reviewed as a minor part of the larger problem of convective and conductive heat transfer from intrusive magma. (See Lovering, 1955, for a review of the extensive literature on this subject.) This summary of data on sub-glacial eruptions is part of a program that the U.S. Geological Survey is conducting in connection with its Investigations of Geologic Processes project on behalf of the Division of Research, U.S. Atomic Energy Commission.

  10. Applications of TIERRAS for underground particle cascade simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Tueros, M. J.

    2010-11-24

    In this communication we present some example applications of TIERRAS, a software package for the simulation of High Energy particle cascades underground and underwater. The examples illustrate how this package can be used to study the phenomenology of particle cascades from Extended Air Showers propagated several meters underground, including the effect of the surface ''albedo'' particles that are generated when a cascade reaches ground level. These up-going particles can have a measurable effect on surface or shallow underground detectors. Finally, to show the package ability ro perform simulations of particle cascades in ice, an application for neutrino radio detection is briefly introduced.

  11. Extraterrestrial accretion and glacial cycles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muller, R. A.

    1994-01-01

    We propose that the approx. 100-k.y. cycle seen in terrestrial glaciation is due to changes in meteor flux that come from changes in the Earth's orbit. This model can explain a 70-k.y. 'anomalous' period in climate data and the apparent discrepancy between present extraterrestrial fluxes and those in oceanic sediments. It can be tested by measuring Ir densities in sediments and ice during glacials and interglacials.

  12. Obsidian hydration dates glacial loading?

    PubMed

    Friedman, I; Pierce, K L; Obradovich, J D; Long, W D

    1973-05-18

    Three different groups of hydration rinds have been measured on thin sections of obsidian from Obsidian Cliff, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming. The average thickness of the thickest (oldest) group of hydration rinds is 16.3 micrometers and can be related to the original emplacement of the flow 176,000 years ago (potassium-argon age). In addition to these original surfaces, most thin sections show cracks and surfaces which have average hydration rind thicknesses of 14.5 and 7.9 micrometers. These later two hydration rinds compare closely in thickness with those on obsidian pebbles in the Bull Lake and Pinedale terminal moraines in the West Yellowstone Basin, which are 14 to 15 and 7 to 8 micrometers thick, respectively. The later cracks are thought to have been formed by glacial loading during the Bull Lake and Pinedale glaciations, when an estimated 800 meters of ice covered the Obsidian Cliff flow. PMID:17806883

  13. Obsidian hydration dates glacial loading?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Friedman, I.; Pierce, K.L.; Obradovich, J.D.; Long, W.D.

    1973-01-01

    Three different groups of hydration rinds have been measured on thin sections of obsidian from Obsidian Cliff, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming . The average thickness of the thickest (oldest) group of hydration rinds is 16.3 micrometers and can be related to the original emplacement of the flow 176,000 years ago (potassium-argon age). In addition to these original surfaces, most thin sections show cracks and surfaces which have average hydration rind thicknesses of 14.5 and 7.9 micrometers. These later two hydration rinds compare closely in thickness with those on obsidian pebbles in the Bull Lake and Pinedale terminal moraines in the West Yellowstone Basin, which are 14 to 15 and 7 to 8 micrometers thick, respectively. The later cracks are thought to have been formed by glacial loading during the Bull Lake and Pinedale glaciations, when an estimated 800 meters of ice covered the Obsidian Cliff flow.

  14. Espectroscopia del Cometa Halley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naranjo, O.; Fuenmayor, F.; Ferrin, L.; Bulka, P.; Mendoza, C.

    1987-05-01

    Se reportan observaciones espectroscópicas del cometa Halley. Los espectros fueron tomados usando el espectrógrafo del telescopio reflector de 1 metro del Observatorio Nacional de Venezuela. Se utilizó óptica azul, con una red de difracción de 600 lineas/min, obteniéndose una dispersión de 74.2 A/mm y una resolución de 2.5 A, en el rango espectral de 3500 a 6500 A. Seis placas fueron tomadas con emulsión IIa-O y dos con IIa-D. Los tiempos de exposición fueron entre 10 y 150 minutos. El cometa se encontraba entre 0.70 y 1.04 UA del Sol, y entre 1.28 y 0.73 UA de la Tierra. Las emisiones más prominentes en el espectro, son las del CN, C2, y C3. Otras emisiones detectadas corresponden a CH, NH2 y Na. Los espectros muestran un fuerte continuo, indicando un contenido significativo de polvo. Se detectó mayor intensidad del contínuo, en la dirección anti solar, lo cual es evidencia de la cola de polvo.

  15. Record of glacial Lake Missoula floods in glacial Lake Columbia, Washington

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanson, Michelle A.; Clague, John J.

    2016-02-01

    During the last glaciation (marine oxygen isotope stage 2), outburst floods from glacial Lake Missoula deposited diagnostic sediments within glacial Lake Columbia. Two dominant outburst flood lithofacies are present within glacial Lake Columbia deposits: a flood expansion bar facies and a finer-grained hyperpycnite facies. We conclude that the flood sediments have a glacial Lake Missoula source because: (1) current indicators indicate westward flow through the lake, and upvalley flow followed by downvalley flow in tributary valleys; (2) no flood sediments are found north of a certain point; (3) there is a dominance of Belt-Purcell Supergroup clasts in a flood expansion bar; and (4) some of the finer-grained beds have a pink colour, reflective of glacial Lake Missoula lake-bottom sediments. A new radiocarbon age of 13,400 ± 100 14C BP on plant detritus found below 37 flood beds helps constrain the timing of outburst flooding from glacial Lake Missoula.

  16. Observational and Model Constraints on Glacial Erosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehlers, T. A.; Enkelmann, E.; Yanites, B. J.

    2012-12-01

    Quantifying the controls on glacial erosion over geologic timescales is necessary to understand the role of Cenozoic climate change on the development of modern mountain belts. Unfortunately, understanding the spatial distribution of glacial erosion during repeated glaciations has proven difficult. We present results that integrate bedrock and detrital thermochronometer cooling ages with a glacial landscape evolution model. We use this to quantify the spatial distribution and temporal variability of glacial erosion in the Coast Mountains, British Columbia, Canada. A total of 100 apatite (U-Th)/He and 106 fission track single grain ages are presented from modern outwash of the Tiedemann Glacier whose catchment elevations range from 530-3960 m a.s.l.. Detrital thermochronometer ages utilize the tendency of thermochronometer cooling ages to increase with elevation and provide a sediment tracer for the elevation that eroded sediment is derived from. Bedrock ages used include 79 apatite (U-Th)/He ages collected in multiple catchments. Erosion rates derived from bedrock ages are compared to predicted erosion rates from a shallow-ice approximation glacial landscape evolution model of the region. Results from the observed distribution of detrital ages indicate that maximum glacial erosion occurs between elevations of 1200-1800m. Furthermore, near-uniform erosion is documented beneath the glacier with nearly all sediment derived from between elevations of 650- 3000 m a.s.l. Second, comparison of erosion rates derived from bedrock thermochronometer ages with the landscape evolution model suggest that a linear glacial sliding velocity is the primary control on erosion (r2=0.6). This result is important as it provides observational validation of the linear slide velocity erosion rule for million-year timescales. Finally, comparison of model and thermochronometer derived erosion rates reveals that active subglacial erosion occurs for only ~10-20% of a glacial-interglacial cycle

  17. A fresh look at glacial foods

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Colman, Steven M.

    2002-01-01

    Over the last 20 years, it has become clear that ice ages are characterized by glacial as well as climatic instability on millennial time scales. In his Perspective, Colman highlights two recent papers investigating the role of glacial meltwater and continental drainage in this instability. The results suggest a fundamental instability feedback between ocean circulation and ice sheet dynamics and provides an explanation for why instability was greatest at times of intermediate ice volume.

  18. Glacial migrations of plants: island biogeographical evidence.

    PubMed

    Simpson, B B

    1974-08-23

    Analyses of the floras of the high north Andean habitat islands (paramos) and the Galápagos Islands show that plant species diversity conforms to the MacArthur and Wilson model of island biogeography but that immigration occurred primarily during glacial periods. Modern plant species diversity is more significantly correlated with area and distance measures of the glacial forms of the islands than with similar measures of the present-day islands. PMID:17736375

  19. Analysis of recent glacial earthquakes in Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsen, K.; Nettles, M.

    2015-12-01

    Large calving events at Greenland's outlet glaciers produce teleseismically detectable glacial earthquakes. These events are observed in the seismic record for the past 22 years, but the complete catalog of glacial earthquakes still numbers only ~300. The annual occurrence of these long-period events has increased over time, which makes recent years especially valuable in expanding the global dataset. Glacial earthquakes from 1993- 2010 have been analyzed systematically (Tsai and Ekström, 2007; Veitch and Nettles, 2012). Here, we analyze more recent events using the same centroid—single-force (CSF) approach as previous authors, focusing initially on data from 2013. In addition, we perform a focused study of selected events from 2009-2010 to assess the reliability of the force azimuths obtained from such inversions. Recent spatial and temporal patterns of glacial earthquakes in Greenland differ from those in previous years. In 2013, three times as many events occurred on the west coast as on the east, and these events originated predominantly from two glaciers: Jakobshavn Glacier on the west coast and Helheim Glacier on the east. Kangerdlugssuaq Glacier, on the east coast, produced no glacial earthquakes in 2013, though it produced many events in earlier years. Previous CSF results for glacial earthquakes show force azimuths perpendicular to the glacier front during a calving event, with force plunges near horizontal. However, some azimuths indicate forces initially oriented upglacier, while others are oriented downglacier (seaward). We perform a set of experiments on events from 2009 and 2010 and find two acceptable solutions for each glacial earthquake, oriented 180° apart with plunges of opposite sign and centroid times differing by approximately one half of the assumed duration of the earthquake time function. These results suggest the need for a more complex time function to model glacial earthquakes more accurately.

  20. Periodic floods from glacial Lake Missoula into the Sanpoil arm of glacial Lake Columbia, northeastern Washington.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Atwater, B.F.

    1984-01-01

    At least 15 floods ascended the Sanpoil arm of glacial Lake Columbia during a single glaciation. Varves between 14 of the flood beds indicate one backflooding every 35 to 55 yr. This regularity suggests that the floods came from an ice-dammed lake that was self-dumping, probably glacial Lake Missoula, Montana. -from Author

  1. Tierra de Oportunidad Implementation Handbook. LAES: Latino Adult Education Services Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kissam, Ed; Dorsey, Holda

    This handbook is intended to help administrators and instructors of adult basic education and English-as-a-Second-Language programs use the 30 Tierra de Oportunidad (Land of Opportunity) instructional modules, which address four strands or clusters relating to the different major domains in which adults function: work life, family life, community,…

  2. Glacial history of Tranquilo glacier (Central Patagonia) since the Last Glacial Maximum through to the present.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagredo, E. A.; Araya, P. S.; Schaefer, J. M.; Kaplan, M. R.; Kelly, M. A.; Lowell, T. V.; Aravena, J. C.

    2014-12-01

    Deciphering the timing and the inter-hemispheric phasing of former glacial fluctuations is critical for understanding the mechanisms and climate signals underlying these glacial events. Here, we present a detailed chronology of glacial fluctuations for Río Tranquilo glacier (47°S), since the LGM, including up to the present. Río Tranquilo is a small glacial valley located on the northern flank of Monte San Lorenzo, an isolated granitic massif, ~70 km to the east of the southern limit of the Northern Patagonian Icefield. Although Mt. San Lorenzo is located on the leeward side of the Andes, it is one of the most glacierized mountains in the region, with an ice surface area of ~140 km2. Geomorphic evidence suggests that during past episodes of climate change several small glaciers that today occupy the headwalls of Río Tranquilo valley expanded and coalesced, depositing a series of moraines complexes along the flanks and bottom of the valley. We used two independent dating techniques to constrain the age of the glacial history of the area. 10Be surface exposure ages from boulders located atop moraine ridges reveal that Río Tranquilo valley underwent glacial expansion/stabilization during at least the LGM (late LGM?), Late glacial (ACR and Younger Dryas) and Mid-Holocene. Within the Mid-Holocene limits, tree-ring based chronology indicates that Río Tranquilo glacier expanded during the Late Holocene as well. Our results are the first detailed chronology of glacial fluctuations from a single valley glacier, spanning the entire period from the (end of the) LGM up to the present, in southern South America. By identifying different glacial episodes within a single alpine valley, this study provides baseline data for studying the relative magnitude of the climate events responsible for these glacial events.

  3. Geomorphical and Geochronological Constrains of the Last Glacial Period in Southern Patagonia, Southern South America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García, J.; Hall, B. L.; Kaplan, M. R.; Vega, R. M.; Binnie, S. A.; Hein, A.; Gómez, G. N.; Ferrada, J. J.

    2013-12-01

    Despite the outer limits of the former Patagonian ice sheet (PIS, ~38-55S) having been extensively mapped, it remains unknown if the Patagonian glaciers fluctuated synchronously or asynchronously during the last glacial period. Previous work has revealed asynchronous spatiotemporal ice dynamics along the eastern and western ice-margins at the end of the last glaciation but it is not well understood if the northern and southern parts of the PIS reached concurrent maximum glaciation during the last glacial cycle. The Patagonian Andes is the only landmass involving the southern westerly wind belt latitudinal range, which is thought to have played a key role in past glacial and climate changes. Therefore, reconstructing southern Andes glacier history constitutes a key element for understanding the cause of glaciations in Patagonia and the role of the westerlies in climate change. Here, we discuss paleoglaciological and paleoclimatological implications of new 10Be and 14C data obtained from moraines and strategically selected mires in two contiguous glacially molded basins of south Patagonia (48-55S): Torres del Paine (51S) and Última Esperanza (52S). In this region, we focused our 10Be cosmogenic-dating efforts in the previously undated outer moraines deposited (supposedly) during the last glacial cycle. In order to crosscheck cosmogenic data we collected boulders embedded in moraines and cobbles from the main glaciofluvial plains grading from the outermost moraines. Geomorphic and cosmogenic dating affords evidence for glacial maximum conditions occurring between 40-50 ka (ka = thousand of years before present) in southern Patagonia, which is different from other chronologies within southern South America. We obtained 14C basal ages from sites located within moraine depressions and on former paleolake shorelines and thus these may provide key data on deglaciation and debated regional paleolake history.

  4. Last Glacial loess in the conterminous USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bettis, E. Arthur, III; Muhs, Daniel R.; Roberts, Helen M.; Wintle, Ann G.

    2003-01-01

    The conterminous United States contains an extensive and generally well-studied record of Last Glacial loess. The loess occurs in diverse physiographic provinces, and under a wide range of climatic and ecological conditions. Both glacial and non-glacia lloess sources are present, and many properties of the loess vary systematically with distance from loess sources. United States' mid-continent Last Glacial loess is probably the thickest in the world, and our calculated mass accumulation rates (MARs) are as high as 17,500 g/m2/yr at the Bignell Hill locality in Nebraska, and many near-source localities have MARs greater than 1500 g/m2/yr. These MARs are high relative to rates calculated in other loess provinces around the world. Recent models of LastGlacial dust sources fail to predict the extent and magnitude of dust flux from the mid-continent of the United States. A better understanding of linkages between climate, ice sheet behaviour, routing of glacial meltwater, land surface processes beyond the ice margin, and vegetation is needed to improve the predictive capabilities of models simulating dust flux from this region.

  5. Millennial-scale sea ice variability in the southern Indian Ocean during the last glacial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikehara, M.; Katsuki, K.; Yamane, M.; Yokoyama, Y.

    2014-12-01

    The Southern Ocean has played an important role in the evolution of the global climate system. Sea ice coverage on sea surface strongly affects the climate of the Southern Hemisphere through its impacts on the energy and gas budget, on the atmospheric circulation, on the hydrological cycle, and on the biological productivity. In this study, we have conducted fundamental analyses of ice-rafted debris (IRD) and diatom assemblage to reveal a rapid change of sea ice distribution in the glacial southern Indian Ocean. Piston cores COR-1bPC and DCR-1PC were collected from the Conrad Rise and Del Caño Rise, Indian sector of the Southern Ocean. Age models of the cores were established by radiocarbon dating and oxygen isotope stratigraphy of planktic and benthic foraminifers. Records of IRD concentration suggest millennial-scale pulses of IRD delivery during the last glacial period. The depositions of rock-fragment IRD excluding volcanic glass and pumice were associated with increasing of sea-ice diatoms, suggesting that the millennial-scale events of cooling and sea-ice expansion were occurred in the southern Indian Ocean during the last glacial period. Provenance study of IRD grains suggest that the source of IRD in the southern Indian Ocean was mainly volcanic arc in the South Atlantic, based on chemical compositions of rock-fragment IRD grains. Thus prominent IRD layers in the glacial Southern Ocean suggest episodes of sea ice expansion and cooling in the Indian sectors of the Southern Ocean.

  6. Quaternary evolution of glaciated gneiss terrains: pre-glacial weathering vs. glacial erosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krabbendam, Maarten; Bradwell, Tom

    2014-07-01

    Vast areas previously covered by Pleistocene ice sheets consist of rugged bedrock-dominated terrain of innumerable knolls and lake-filled rock basins - the ‘cnoc-and-lochan' landscape or ‘landscape of areal scour'. These landscapes typically form on gneissose or granitic lithologies and are interpreted (1) either to be the result of strong and widespread glacial erosion over numerous glacial cycles; or (2) formed by stripping of a saprolitic weathering mantle from an older, deeply weathered landscape. We analyse bedrock structure, erosional landforms and weathering remnants and within the ‘cnoc-and-lochan' gneiss terrain of a rough peneplain in NW Scotland and compare this with a geomorphologically similar gneiss terrain in a non-glacial, arid setting (Namaqualand, South Africa). We find that the topography of the gneiss landscapes in NW Scotland and Namaqualand closely follows the old bedrock-saprolite contact (weathering front). The roughness of the weathering front is caused by deep fracture zones providing a highly irregular surface area for weathering to proceed. The weathering front represents a significant change in bedrock physical properties. Glacial erosion (and aeolian erosion in Namaqualand) is an efficient way of stripping saprolite, but is far less effective in eroding hard, unweathered bedrock. Significant glacial erosion of hard gneiss probably only occurs beneath palaeo-ice streams. We conclude that the rough topography of glaciated ‘cnoc-and-lochan' gneiss terrains is formed by a multistage process: 1) Long-term, pre-glacial chemical weathering, forming deep saprolite with an irregular weathering front; 2) Stripping of weak saprolite by glacial erosion during the first glaciation(s), resulting in a rough land surface, broadly conforming to the pre-existing weathering front (‘etch surface'); 3) Further modification of exposed hard bedrock by glacial erosion. In most areas, glacial erosion is limited, but can be significant beneath palaeo

  7. Geochronology, structural evolution of the Tierra Colorada area, and tectonic implications for southern Mexico and Chortís block connections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solari, L. A.; Torres de Leon, R.; Hernandez Pineda, G.; Sole', J.; Solis Pichardo, G.; Hernandez Treviño, T.

    2006-05-01

    The Tierra Colorada area is considered the best exposure of the northern limit between the Xolapa Complex and the Paleozoic-Precambrian Mixteca and Zapotecan terranes of southern Mexico. Geochemistry (major, trace, and REE) and geochronology on deformed granitoids in Tierra Colorada area show evidence of subduction-related magmatism during Mesozoic and Cenozoic. El Pozuelo granite, dated at 129 Ma (concordant U-Pb single-zircon age) is a foliated body, with local porphyric facies. Foliation is penetrative and characterized by oriented micas and stretched quartz. Geochemically it shows a metaluminous character, with arc-related trace and REE patterns. Because it cuts across high-grade gneisses of the Xolapa Complex, its intrusion postdates the second phase of metamorphism in the Xolapa Complex (> 130 Ma), which generated the orthogneisses-migmatites sequence. El Salitre granite (55 Ma, Rb-Sr 4 point isochron) is a foliated peraluminous body with a pronounced negative Zr anomaly. The protomylonitic Las PiÑas granite (54 +/- 6 Ma, U-Pb lower intercept) is characterized by ductile fabric, recognized by cinematic indicators such as mica fish, and indicates a top-to-the NNW sense of shear, dated at 50 +/- 1 Ma and 45.3 +/- 2 Ma (K-Ar on Bt, and Rb-Sr Bt-WR isochron, respectively), ages that indicate the time of ductile deformation along La Venta shear zone, as N-dipping detachment under low greenschist facies conditions. El Salitre and Las PiÑas granites are linked because of their similar HREE patterns. The Tierra Colorada, Xaltianguis and San Juan del Reparo granites, with calcalkaline subduction-related geochemistry, lack of penetrative deformation, and their ages of 30-34 Ma (U-Pb on zircons) constitute the last recognized granitic pulse in this area, post-dating the S-verging thrust of the Morelos limestones on top of sheared granites and volcanics. Together with previously published ages of magmatism in the studied area, we demonstrate here that calcalkaline

  8. Growth and production of the venerid bivalve Eurhomalea exalbida in the Beagle Channel, Tierra del Fuego

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lomovasky, Betina J.; Brey, Thomas; Morriconi, Elba; Calvo, Jorge

    2002-11-01

    Growth, mortality and productivity of the hard clam Eurhomalea exalbida from Ushuaia Bay, Beagle Channel, were investigated. The parameters of the von Bertalanffy growth function were estimated to be H ∞ = 74 mm, K = 0.18 y -1, t 0 = 0.15 y. Maximum individual production amounted to 2.74 g shell-free wet mass (SFWM) at 49.5 mm shell height. Animals between 40 mm and 70 mm shell height contributed most to overall population somatic production P of 134 g SFWM m -2 y -1. Mean annual biomass B amounted to 1123 g SFWM m -2 y -1. Annual P/B ratio and mortality rate Z were estimated to be 0.12 y -1 and 0.14 y -1, respectively. Slow growth and low turnover make this population less suitable for sustainable commercial exploitation.

  9. QBO modulation of the mesopause gravity wave momentum flux over Tierra del Fuego

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wit, R. J.; Janches, D.; Fritts, D. C.; Hibbins, R. E.

    2016-04-01

    The interannual variability of the mesosphere and lower thermosphere (MLT) gravity wave momentum flux over southern midlatitudes (53.7°S) has been studied using more than 7 years of meteor radar observations at Río Grande, Argentina. A modulation, with periods similar to that of the equatorial stratospheric quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO), is observed in the vertical flux of zonal as well as meridional momentum. The QBO signal is largest in the zonal component during summer and is in phase with the stratospheric QBO at 50 hPa (˜21 km). The relation between the stratospheric QBO and the QBO modulation in the MLT gravity wave forcing (derived from the divergence of the momentum flux) was found to be consistent with that expected from the Holton-Tan effect coupled to the interhemispheric coupling mechanism. These results provide the first observational support for the existence of the midlatitude gravity wave forcing anomalies as hypothesized in the interhemispheric coupling mechanism.

  10. Latest Pleistocene and Holocene glacier fluctuations in southernmost Tierra del Fuego, Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menounos, Brian; Clague, John J.; Osborn, Gerald; Davis, P. Thompson; Ponce, Federico; Goehring, Brent; Maurer, Malyssa; Rabassa, Jorge; Coronato, Andrea; Marr, Rob

    2013-10-01

    Some researchers propose that summer insolation controls long-term changes in glacier extent during the Holocene. If this hypothesis is correct, the record of glacier fluctuations at high latitudes in the Southern Hemisphere should differ from that in the Northern Hemisphere. Although the chronology of Holocene glacier fluctuations in the Northern Hemisphere is well established, much uncertainty remains in the ages of Holocene glacier fluctuations in the Southern Hemisphere, especially South America. Here we report on latest Pleistocene and Holocene glacier fluctuations at the southern end of the Andes north and west of Ushuaia, Argentina. Surface exposure ages (10Be) from glaciated bedrock beyond cirque moraines indicate that alpine areas were free of ice by ca 16.9 ka. One, and in some cases two, closely spaced moraines extend up to 2 km beyond Little Ice Age moraines within many of the cirques in the region. The mean age of five 10Be ages from two pre-Little Ice Age moraines is 14.27-12.67 ka, whereas a minimum limiting radiocarbon age for a smaller, recessional moraine in one cirque is 12.38-12.01 ka. Our ages imply that, following glacier retreat beginning about 18.52-17.17 ka, cirque glaciers first advanced during the Antarctic Cold Reversal (14.5-12.9 ka) and may have later advanced or stabilized in the Younger Dryas Chronozone (12.9-11.7 ka). Based on the distribution of thick, geochemically distinct, and well-dated Hudson tephra, no Holocene moraines appear to be older than 7.96-7.34 ka. At some sites, there is evidence for one or more advances of glaciers sometime between 7.96-7.34 ka and 5.29-5.05 ka to limits only tens of meters beyond Little Ice Age maximum positions. Taken together, the data: 1) do not support the summer insolation hypothesis to explain Holocene glacier fluctuations in southernmost Patagonia; 2) confirm paleobotanical evidence for a warm, dry early Holocene; and 3) suggest that some glaciers in the region reached extents comparable to those of the Little Ice Age shortly before 5.29-5.05 ka.

  11. Central Michigan University's Glacial Park: Instruction through Landscaping.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pape, Bruce; Francek, Mark A.

    1992-01-01

    Describes the creation of a glacial park on a university campus. Suggests that the park is a useful instructional resource that helps students relate classroom material to outdoor phenomena by visualizing and identifying glacial landforms, recognizing their spatial relationships, and understanding how glacial features originated. Offers advice for…

  12. Potential flood volume of Himalayan glacial lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujita, K.; Sakai, A.; Takenaka, S.; Nuimura, T.; Surazakov, A. B.; Sawagaki, T.; Yamanokuchi, T.

    2013-01-01

    Glacial lakes are potentially dangerous sources of glacial lake outburst floods (GLOFs), and represent a serious natural hazard in Himalayan countries. Despite the development of various indices aimed at determining the risk of such flooding, an objective evaluation of the thousands of Himalayan glacial lakes has yet to be completed. In this study we propose a single index, based on the depression angle from the lakeshore, which allows the lakes to be assessed using remotely sensed digital elevation models (DEMs). We test our approach on five lakes in Nepal, Bhutan, and Tibet using images taken by the declassified Hexagon KH-9 satellite before these lakes flooded. All five lakes had a steep lakefront area (SLA), on which a depression angle was steeper than our proposed threshold of 10° before the GLOF event, but the SLA was no longer evident after the events. We further calculated the potential flood volume (PFV); i.e. the maximum volume of floodwater that could be released if the lake surface was lowered sufficiently to eradicate the SLA. This approach guarantees repeatability because it requires no particular expertise to carry out. We calculated PFVs for more than 2000 Himalayan glacial lakes using the ASTER data. The distribution follows a power-law function, and we identified 49 lakes with PFVs of over 10 million m3 that require further detailed field investigations.

  13. Late glacial aridity in southern Rocky Mountains

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, O.K.; Pitblado, B.L.

    1995-09-01

    While the slopes of the present-day Colorado Rocky Mountains are characterized by large stands of subalpine and montane conifers, the Rockies of the late glacial looked dramatically different. Specifically, pollen records suggest that during the late glacial, Artemisia and Gramineae predominated throughout the mountains of Colorado. At some point between 11,000 and 10,000 B.P., however, both Artemisia and grasses underwent a dramatic decline, which can be identified in virtually every pollen diagram produced for Colorado mountain sites, including Como Lake (Sangre de Cristo Mountains), Copley Lake and Splains; Gulch (near Crested Butte), Molas Lake (San Juan Mountains), and Redrock Lake (Boulder County). Moreover, the same pattern seems to hold for pollen spectra derived for areas adjacent to Colorado, including at sites in the Chuska Mountains of New Mexico and in eastern Wyoming. The implications of this consistent finding are compelling. The closest modem analogues to the Artemisia- and Gramineae-dominated late-glacial Colorado Rockies are found in the relatively arid northern Great Basin, which suggests that annual precipitation was much lower in the late-glacial southern Rocky Mountains than it was throughout the Holocene.

  14. Earth's glacial record and its tectonic setting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eyles, N.

    1993-09-01

    Glaciations have occurred episodically at different time intervals and for different durations in Earth's history. Ice covers have formed in a wide range of plate tectonic and structural settings but the bulk of Earth's glacial record can be shown to have been deposited and preserved in basins within extensional settings. In such basins, source area uplift and basin subsidence fulfill the tectonic preconditions for the initiation of glaciation and the accomodation and preservation of glaciclastic sediments. Tectonic setting, in particular subsidence rates, also dictates the type of glaciclastic facies and facies successions that are deposited. Many pre-Pleistocene glaciated basins commonly contain well-defined tectonostratigraphic successions recording the interplay of tectonics and sedimentation; traditional climatostratigraphic approaches involving interpretation in terms of either ice advance/retreat cycles or glacio-eustatic sea-level change require revision. The direct record of continental glaciation in Earth history, in the form of classically-recognised continental glacial landforms and "tillites", is meagre; it is probable that more than 95% of the volume of preserved "glacial" strata are glacially-influenced marine deposits that record delivery of large amounts of glaciclastic sediment to offshore basins. This flux has been partially or completely reworked by "normal" sedimentary processes such that the record of glaciation and climate change is recorded in marine successions and is difficult to decipher. The dominant "glacial" facies in the rock record are subaqueous debris flow diamictites and turbidites recording the selective preservation of poorly-sorted glaciclastic sediment deposited in deep water basins by sediment gravity flows. However, these facies are also typical of many non-glacial settings, especially volcanically-influenced environments; numerous Archean and Proterozoic diamictites, described in the older literature as tillites, have no

  15. In-Stream Metabolism Differences Between Glacial and Non-Glacial Streams in Southeast Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nassry, M. Q.; Scott, D.; Vermilyea, A.; Hood, E. W.

    2011-12-01

    As glacier ice gives way to successional vegetation, streams located in glacier-containing watersheds receive decreased contributions from glacial meltwater and increased contributions from terrestrial landscapes. These changes result in increased water temperature, increased shading from vegetation, and changes in the composition and concentration of organic matter delivered to the stream from the landscape. Organic matter and source water contributions from the surrounding landscape can influence in-stream metabolism through both biotic and abiotic factors. The impact of these landscape controls on the in-stream cycling of carbon and nutrients is not well understood in glacial systems. Here, we are focusing on understanding the differences in processing of organic carbon by heterotrophic microbial communities between glacial and non-glacial streams. In this study, the metabolism in streams receiving glacial meltwater was compared to the metabolism of streams located in nearby non-glaciated watersheds to determine the effect of changing inputs of glacial meltwater on stream metabolism. In particular, we tested the hypothesis that decreased inputs of glacier meltwater will result in increased net ecosystem metabolism (NEM) in coastal streams in southeast Alaska. Dissolved oxygen and carbon dioxide measurements as well as temperature and PAR values were collected at 10-minute increments at each study site for 4 days. This data was used to generate diel curves to establish community respiration (CR24) and gross primary production (GPP) estimates. Lab-scale mesocosms containing sediment and stream water from each end-member stream were used to quantify the relative importance of glacial contributions to respiration rates in the surface sediments. Ultimately, this will provide a better understanding of the changing in-stream processing capabilities in watersheds affected by land cover changes resulting from glacial recession.

  16. Glacial-marine and glacial-lacustrine sedimentation in Sebago Lake, Maine: Locating the marine limit

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, R.A.; Kelley, J.T. ); Belknap, D. . Dept. of Geological Sciences)

    1993-03-01

    The marine limit in Maine marks a sea-level highstand at approximately 13 ka. It was inferred to cross Sebago Lake near Frye Island by Thompson and Borns (1985) on the Surficial Geological Map of Maine, dividing the lake into a northern glacial-lacustrine basin and a southern glacial-marine basin. This study examined the accuracy of the mapped marine limit in the lake and the nature of glacial-lacustrine and glacial-marine facies in Maine. Recognition of the marine limit is usually based on mapped shorelines, glacial-marine deltas, and contacts with glacial-marine sediments. This study, in Maine's second largest lake, collected 100 kilometers of side-scan sonar images, 100 kilometers of seismic reflection profiles, and one core. Side-scan sonar records show coarse sand and gravel and extensive boulder fields at an inferred grounding-line position near Frye Island, where the marine limit was drawn. ORE Geopulse seismic reflection profiles reveal a basal draping unit similar to glacial-marine units identified offshore. Later channels cut more than 30 m into the basal stratified unit. In addition, till and a possible glacial-tectonic grounding-line feature were identified. Slumps and possible spring disruptions are found in several locations. The top unit is an onlapping ponded Holocene lacustrine unit. Total sediment is much thicker in the southern basin; the northern basin, >97 m deep, north of the marine limit appears to have been occupied by an ice block. Retrieved sediments include 12 meters of rhythmites. Microfossil identifications and dating will resolve the environments and time of deposition in this core.

  17. Potential flood volume of Himalayan glacial lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujita, K.; Sakai, A.; Takenaka, S.; Nuimura, T.; Surazakov, A. B.; Sawagaki, T.; Yamanokuchi, T.

    2013-07-01

    Glacial lakes are potentially dangerous sources of glacial lake outburst floods (GLOFs), and represent a serious natural hazard in Himalayan countries. Despite the development of various indices aimed at determining the outburst probability, an objective evaluation of the thousands of Himalayan glacial lakes has yet to be completed. In this study we propose a single index, based on the depression angle from the lakeshore, which allows the lakes to be assessed using remotely sensed digital elevation models (DEMs). We test our approach on five lakes in Nepal, Bhutan, and Tibet using images taken by the declassified Hexagon KH-9 satellite before these lakes experienced an outburst flood. All five lakes had a steep lakefront area (SLA), on which a depression angle was steeper than our proposed threshold of 10° before the GLOF event, but the SLA was no longer evident after the events. We further calculated the potential flood volume (PFV); i.e., the maximum volume of floodwater that could be released if the lake surface was lowered sufficiently to eradicate the SLA. This approach guarantees repeatability to assess the possibility of GLOF hazards because it requires no particular expertise to carry out, though the PFV does not quantify the GLOF risk. We calculated PFVs for more than 2000 Himalayan glacial lakes using visible band images and DEMs of ASTER data. The PFV distribution follows a power-law function. We found that 794 lakes did not have an SLA, and consequently had a PFV of zero, while we also identified 49 lakes with PFVs of over 10 million m3, which is a comparable volume to that of recorded major GLOFs. This PFV approach allows us to preliminarily identify and prioritize those Himalayan glacial lakes that require further detailed investigation on GLOF hazards and risk.

  18. North Atlantic Deep Water Production during the Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howe, Jacob N. W.; Piotrowski, Alexander M.; Noble, Taryn L.; Mulitza, Stefan; Chiessi, Cristiano M.; Bayon, Germain

    2016-06-01

    Changes in deep ocean ventilation are commonly invoked as the primary cause of lower glacial atmospheric CO2. The water mass structure of the glacial deep Atlantic Ocean and the mechanism by which it may have sequestered carbon remain elusive. Here we present neodymium isotope measurements from cores throughout the Atlantic that reveal glacial-interglacial changes in water mass distributions. These results demonstrate the sustained production of North Atlantic Deep Water under glacial conditions, indicating that southern-sourced waters were not as spatially extensive during the Last Glacial Maximum as previously believed. We demonstrate that the depleted glacial δ13C values in the deep Atlantic Ocean cannot be explained solely by water mass source changes. A greater amount of respired carbon, therefore, must have been stored in the abyssal Atlantic during the Last Glacial Maximum. We infer that this was achieved by a sluggish deep overturning cell, comprised of well-mixed northern- and southern-sourced waters.

  19. North Atlantic Deep Water Production during the Last Glacial Maximum.

    PubMed

    Howe, Jacob N W; Piotrowski, Alexander M; Noble, Taryn L; Mulitza, Stefan; Chiessi, Cristiano M; Bayon, Germain

    2016-01-01

    Changes in deep ocean ventilation are commonly invoked as the primary cause of lower glacial atmospheric CO2. The water mass structure of the glacial deep Atlantic Ocean and the mechanism by which it may have sequestered carbon remain elusive. Here we present neodymium isotope measurements from cores throughout the Atlantic that reveal glacial-interglacial changes in water mass distributions. These results demonstrate the sustained production of North Atlantic Deep Water under glacial conditions, indicating that southern-sourced waters were not as spatially extensive during the Last Glacial Maximum as previously believed. We demonstrate that the depleted glacial δ(13)C values in the deep Atlantic Ocean cannot be explained solely by water mass source changes. A greater amount of respired carbon, therefore, must have been stored in the abyssal Atlantic during the Last Glacial Maximum. We infer that this was achieved by a sluggish deep overturning cell, comprised of well-mixed northern- and southern-sourced waters. PMID:27256826

  20. Glacial bed forms at Findelengletscher, Zermatt, Switzerland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madella, Andrea; Nyffenegger, Franziska; Schlüchter, Christian

    2013-04-01

    The current glacier meltdown is increasingly unveiling the glacial bed forms produced by the most recent glacial advance of the 1980ies, such as flutes, mega-flutes and drumlins. This is a challenging opportunity to study these morphologies and the processes involved in their formation; in addition, our observation suggests a new question to be answered: why can't any of these features in units belonging to previous glacial advances be recognised? Similar forms could either have been washed away already, or never been built during LGM and since. The most beautiful and evident of the forms under investigation are the flutes and mega-flutes: elongated streamlined ridges of sediments either starting from an obstacle or just sticking out of the basal lodgement till. The way flutes have been initiated and then evolve is still partially unknown, due to their variety in shape, size and material. The glacial forefield at Findelengletscher under investigation deglaciated over the past two years, offers a well-preserved variety of such forms at all scales. Their material (basal lodgement till) is homogeneous and consistent all over the site, as well as their fabric. In addition, this silty sand shows a low plasticity index. These preliminary results support the idea that flutes build up very quickly during repeated seasonal advances in thin ice conditions with retreating trend (Coray, 2007), and that they could be equally easily and rapidly washed away. References: Coray Sandro (2007): Genesis and significance of flutes at Findelengletscher, Valais, Switzerland, Institute of Geological Sciences, University of Bern.

  1. Glacial curvilineations: gradual or catastrophic origin?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Chris; Livingstone, Stephen

    2016-04-01

    Glacial curvilineations (GCLs) are enigmatic landforms that have recently been discovered in Poland (Lesemann et al., 2010, 2014). They comprise parallel sets of sinuous ridges separated by troughs that are found in tunnel valleys and replicate the morphology and pattern of the valley sides. The sedimentology for some has been reported to indicate that the sediment composition relates to a pre-GCL phase. So far just one theory for their formation exists - erosion by longitudinal-vortices within high-energy subglacial meltwater flows (Lesemann et al., 2010). Here, we provide an alternative hypothesis for their formation developed from observations of GCLs found along the southern sector of the Laurentide Ice Sheet. In all cases GCLs were found associated with tunnel valley widenings or hollows and occur as distinct parallel sets that mimic each other in terms of nicks and cusps. Using analogies from tree-rings and coral growth we take such mimicry as indicating either incremental growth or development from a template over time. Although without a strong physical explanation we find it much less likely that a series of parallel water channels would maintain such strong mimicry. We instead suggest that subglacial thawing of frozen ground in association with discrete water bodies (tunnel valleys or subglacial lakes) resulted in retrogressive bank failure, possibly along a glide plane provided by a frozen surface. References: Lesemann, J.-E., Piotrowski, J. a, Wysota, W., 2010. "Glacial curvilineations": New glacial landforms produced by longitudinal vortices in subglacial meltwater flows. Geomorphology 120, 153-161. Lesemann, J.-E., Piotrowski, J. a, Wysota, W., 2014. Genesis of the "glacial curvilineation" landscape by meltwater processes under the former Scandinavian Ice Sheet, Poland. Sediment. Geol. 312, 1-18.

  2. Regional Analysis of the Hazard Level of Glacial Lakes in the Cordillera Blanca, Peru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chisolm, Rachel E.; Jhon Sanchez Leon, Walter; McKinney, Daene C.; Cochachin Rapre, Alejo

    2016-04-01

    of glacial lakes and their hazard potential. This phase of glacial lake hazard assessment aims to be geographically comprehensive in order to identify potentially dangerous lakes that may have previously been ignored. A second phase of analysis that includes site visits will be necessary for a thorough analysis at each lake to determine the potential hazard for downstream communities. The objective of the work presented here is to identify potentially dangerous lakes that warrant further study rather than provide a final hazard assessment for each lake of the glacial lake inventory in the Cordillera Blanca. References: Emmer, A. and Vilímek, V.: New method for assessing the potential hazardousness of glacial lakes in the Cordillera Blanca, Peru, Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci. Discuss., 11, 2391-2439, 2014. UGRH - Unidad de Glaciologia y Recursos Hidricos. Inventario de Lagunas Glaciares del Peru. Ministerio de Agricultura y Riego, Autoridad Nacional del Agua, Direcccion de Conservacion y Planeamiento de Recursos Hidricos, Huaraz, Peru, 2014. Wang, W., Yao, T., Gao, Y., Yang, X., and Kattel, D. B.: A first-order method to identify potentially dangerous glacial lakes in a region of the southeastern Tibetan Plateau, Mountain Res. Develop., 31, 122-130, 2011.

  3. Glacial hydrology and erosion patterns: A mechanism for carving glacial valleys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herman, Frédéric; Beaud, Flavien; Champagnac, Jean-Daniel; Lemieux, Jean-Michel; Sternai, Pietro

    2011-10-01

    Most glacial erosion models assume that erosion rates are proportional to ice-sliding velocity. While recent studies have shown that water plays a major role in modulating sliding velocities, the impact it might have on erosion rates is still unclear. Here we incorporate subglacial hydrology into a glacial erosion model that is based on a sliding rule. Our results explicitly highlight that adding subglacial hydrology has profound impacts on the temporal and spatial patterns of glacial erosion. First, it suggests that erosion might mainly occur during melting seasons, when subglacial water pressure is large and effective pressure is low (i.e., before the channels fully develop and reduce the water pressure at the ice bedrock interface), which promotes sliding and erosion. Second, the distribution of erosion is bimodal with a peak at the equilibrium line altitude and, as we demonstrate, enhanced erosion at much lower altitudes within the ablation area where water due to melting abounds. This has important implications because it explains why glacial erosion can simultaneously set a limit on the mean elevation of mountain ranges and carve large fjords or glacial lakes.

  4. Late Glacial ice advances in southeast Tibet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strasky, Stefan; Graf, Angela A.; Zhao, Zhizhong; Kubik, Peter W.; Baur, Heinrich; Schlüchter, Christian; Wieler, Rainer

    2009-03-01

    The sensitivity of Tibetan glacial systems to North Atlantic climate forcing is a major issue in palaeoclimatology. In this study, we present surface exposure ages of erratic boulders from a valley system in the Hengduan Mountains, southeastern Tibet, showing evidence of an ice advance during Heinrich event 1. Cosmogenic nuclide analyses ( 10Be and 21Ne) revealed consistent exposure ages, indicating no major periods of burial or pre-exposure. Erosion-corrected (3 mm/ka) 10Be exposure ages range from 13.4 to 16.3 ka. This is in agreement with recalculated exposure ages from the same valley system by [Tschudi, S., Schäfer, J.M., Zhao, Z., Wu, X., Ivy-Ochs, S., Kubik, P.W., Schlüchter, C., 2003. Glacial advances in Tibet during the Younger Dryas? Evidence from cosmogenic 10Be, 26Al, and 21Ne. Journal of Asian Earth Sciences 22, 301-306.]. Thus this indicates that local glaciers advanced in the investigated area as a response to Heinrich event 1 cooling and that periglacial surface adjustments during the Younger Dryas overprinted the glacial morphology, leading to deceptively young exposure ages of certain erratic boulders.

  5. Constraints on the glacial erosion rule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herman, Frédéric

    2016-04-01

    It is thought that glaciers erode their underlying bedrock mainly through abrasion and quarrying. Theories predict erosion to be proportional to ice-sliding velocity raised to some power: ˙e = Kguls (1) where ė is the erosion rate, and Kg a proportionality constant and l an exponent. By implementing such a rule in numerical models, it has been possible to reproduce typical glacial landscape features, such as U-shape valleys, hanging valleys, glacial cirques or fjords. Although there have been great advances in the level of sophistication of these models, for example through the inclusion of high-order ice dynamics and subglacial hydrology, the proportionality constant, and the exponent have remained poorly constrained parameters. Recently, two independent studies in the Antarctic Peninsula and Patagonian Andes (Koppes et al., 2015) and the Franz Josef Glacier, New Zealand (Herman et al., 2015) simultaneously collected erosion rate and ice velocity data to find that erosion depends non-linearly on sliding velocity, and that the exponent on velocity is about 2. Such a nonlinear rule is appealing because it may, in part, explain the observed variations in erosion rates globally. Furthermore, an exponent about 2 closely matches theoretical predictions for abrasion. Although it is tempting to argue that abrasion is the dominant process for fast flowing glaciers like the Franz Josef Glacier, there is a clear need for more data and better quantification for the role of quarrying. Both studies also led to very similar values for the proportionality constant Kg. These new results therefore imply that glacial erosion processes might be better constrained than previously thought. Given that glacial velocity can nowadays be measured and modeled at an unprecedented resolution, it may potentially become possible to use glacial erosion models in a predictive manner. Herman, F. et al. "Erosion by an Alpine glacier." Science 350.6257 (2015): 193-195. Koppes, M. et al. "Observed

  6. Glacial Retreat and Associated Glacial Lake Hazards in the High Tien Shan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, T. T.

    2013-12-01

    A number of studies have identified glacial retreat throughout the greater Himalayan region over the past few decades, but the Karakorum region remains an anomaly with large stagnating or advancing glaciers. The glacial behavior in the Tien Shan is still unclear, as few studies have investigated mass balances in the region. This study focuses on the highest peaks of the Tien Shan mountain range, in the region of Jengish Chokusu along the Kyrgyzstan-China-Kazakhstan border. In a first step, a 30-year time series of Landsat imagery (n=27) and ASTER imagery (n=10) was developed to track glacial growth and retreat in the region. Using a combination of spectral and topographic information, glacial outlines are automatically delineated. As several important glaciers in the study region contain medium to high levels of debris cover, our algorithm also improves upon current methods of detecting debris-covered glaciers by using topography, distance weighting methods, river networks, and additional spectral data. Linked to glacial retreat are glacial lake outburst floods (GLOFs) that have become increasingly common in High Mountain Asia over the last few decades. As glaciers retreat, their melt water is often trapped by weakly bonded moraines. These moraines have been known to fail due to overtopping caused by surge waves created by avalanches, rockslides, or glacial calving. A suite of studies throughout High Mountain Asia have used remotely-sensed data to monitor the formation and growth of glacial lakes. In a second step of the work, lake-area changes over the past 15 years were tracked monthly and seasonally using dense Landsat/ASTER coverage (n=30) with an automatic procedure based on spectral and topographic information. Previous work has identified GLOFs as a significant process for infrastructural damage in the southern Tien Shan/northern Pamir, as well as in the better studied Himalaya region. Lake identification and quantification of lake-growth rates is a valuable

  7. Periodic floods from glacial Lake Missoula into the Sanpoil arm of glacial Lake Columbia, northeastern Washington

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atwater, Brian F.

    1984-08-01

    At least 15 floods ascended the Sanpoil arm of glacial Lake Columbia during a single glaciation. Varves between 14 of the flood beds indicate one backflooding every 35 to 55 yr. This regularity suggests that the floods came from an ice-dammed lake that was self-dumping. Probably the self-dumping lake was glacial Lake Missoula, Montana, because the floods accord with inferred emptyings of that lake in frequency and number, apparently entered Lake Columbia from the east, and produced beds resembling backflood deposits of Lake Missoula floods in southern Washington.

  8. Glacial Events Spanning the Last Glacial Cycle in the Southern Alps, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thackray, G. D.; Rittenour, T. M.; Shulmeister, J.; Hyatt, O.

    2012-12-01

    The Rakaia, Rangitata, and Clutha River basins of the Southern Alps were major ice pathways for Southern Alps outlet glaciers during the last glaciation. While extensive CRN dating of moraine boulders has constrained the timing of a major ice advance to around the time of the Northern Hemisphere ice sheet maximum ("LGM"), extensive stratigraphic exposures permit extension of glacial records to important earlier phases of the last glaciation. Those exposures, present in most valleys, yield an extensive and detailed sedimentologic record and a closely linked luminescence chronology of glacial events spanning the entire last glacial cycle. Recently published work from the Rakaia drainage demonstrates multiple ice advances into the middle Rakaia Valley and uppermost Canterbury Plains during the last glacial cycle. Prominent ice advances there are documented largely in glacial-lacustrine and glacial-fluvial sediments, in a coarsening-upward, basin-filling sequence. Those ice advances occurred during MIS 5b (ca. 100-90 ka), MIS 5a/4 (ca. 80 ka), MIS 3 (ca. 48 ka and 40 ka), and MIS 2 (ca. 25-15 ka). In the central Rangitata valley, a spectacular kame terrace sequence superposes LGM and deglacial-phase sediments on extensive MIS 3 and possible MIS 4 sediments. At three distinct locations, provisional OSL ages indicate a prominent ice advance during MIS 3 (ca. 30-50 ka). Near surface sediments associated with kame terraces indicate enhanced fluvial activity around the LGM, and indicate that deglaciation was well under way by 13 ka. Further south in the Clutha valley, exposures at Lakes Wanaka and Hawea demonstrate ice advances during MIS 3 and MIS 2, largely associated with ice-proximal lacustrine deposition. Extensive outwash sequences 2-15 km downvalley reveal a detailed record of glacial-fluvial activity that appears to extend through the last glacial cycle. These valley records demonstrate that, in particular, MIS 3 featured extensive ice advances, with ice extent

  9. North Atlantic Deep Water Production during the Last Glacial Maximum

    PubMed Central

    Howe, Jacob N. W.; Piotrowski, Alexander M.; Noble, Taryn L.; Mulitza, Stefan; Chiessi, Cristiano M.; Bayon, Germain

    2016-01-01

    Changes in deep ocean ventilation are commonly invoked as the primary cause of lower glacial atmospheric CO2. The water mass structure of the glacial deep Atlantic Ocean and the mechanism by which it may have sequestered carbon remain elusive. Here we present neodymium isotope measurements from cores throughout the Atlantic that reveal glacial–interglacial changes in water mass distributions. These results demonstrate the sustained production of North Atlantic Deep Water under glacial conditions, indicating that southern-sourced waters were not as spatially extensive during the Last Glacial Maximum as previously believed. We demonstrate that the depleted glacial δ13C values in the deep Atlantic Ocean cannot be explained solely by water mass source changes. A greater amount of respired carbon, therefore, must have been stored in the abyssal Atlantic during the Last Glacial Maximum. We infer that this was achieved by a sluggish deep overturning cell, comprised of well-mixed northern- and southern-sourced waters. PMID:27256826

  10. Hypsometric analysis to identify spatially variable glacial erosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sternai, P.; Herman, F.; Fox, M. R.; Castelltort, S.

    2011-09-01

    Relatively little research has been undertaken on the use of digital elevation models to recognize the spatially variable glacial imprint of a landscape. Using theoretical topographies and a landscape evolution model, we investigate to what extent the hypsometric analysis of digital elevation models may be used to recognize the glacial signature of mountain ranges. A new morphometric parameter, which we term the hypsokyrtome (from the Greek: ipsos = elevation, kyrtoma = curvature), is derived from the gradient of the hypsometric curve. The efficacy of the hypsometric integral and hypsokyrtome is tested through the study of the Ben Ohau Range, New Zealand, whose glacial imprint has been described previously. With a numerical model we further test the geomorphic parameters in describing the morphologies of regions subject to diverse climatic and tectonic conditions. The hypsokyrtome is highly sensitive to glacial erosion, and the maps produced provide insights into the spatial distribution of glacial erosion. We use SRTM data and focus on two alternative geomorphic settings: the European Alps and the Apennines. The former has been affected by both fluvial and glacial erosion while the latter mainly exhibits a fluvially dominated morphology. The correlation between elevations with increased glacial erosion and Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) equilibrium line altitudes (ELAs) suggests the prevalence of a "glacial buzz saw" in the Alps, indicating that climate may put a limit on alpine topography.

  11. Glacial isostatic uplift of the European Alps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mey, Juergen; Scherler, Dirk; Wickert, Andrew D.; Egholm, David L.; Tesauro, Magdala; Schildgen, Taylor F.; Strecker, Manfred R.

    2016-04-01

    Present-day vertical movements of the Earth's surface are mostly due to tectonic deformation, volcanic processes, and crustal loading/unloading. In tectonically stable regions of North America and Scandinavia, vertical movements are almost entirely attributable to glacial isostatic rebound after the melting of the Laurentide and Fennoscandian ice sheets. In contrast, the Pleistocene Alpine icecap grew on a younger mountain belt that formed by collision of the European and African plates, still subject to shortening. Therefore, measured uplift is potentially a composite signal of tectonic shortening and unloading after deglaciation and concomitant erosion. Deciphering the contributions of tectonics and crustal unloading to present-day uplift rates in formerly-glaciated mountain belts is a prerequisite to using uplift data to estimate the viscosity structure of the Earth's mantle, a key variable in geodynamics. We evaluate the post-LGM glacial-isostatic rebound of the Alps following a 4-tiered procedure. First, we estimated the thickness distribution of sedimentary valley fills to create a bedrock map of the entire mountain belt. Second, this map was used as topographic basis for the reconstruction of the Alpine icecap using a numerical ice-flow model. Third, we estimated the equilibrium deflection of the Alpine lithosphere, using the combined loads of ice and sediments with a variable effective elastic thickness. Finally, we used an exponential decay function to infer the residual deflection and the present-day uplift rate for a range of upper mantle viscosities. Our analysis shows that virtually all of the geodetically measured surface uplift in the Swiss and the Austrian Alps can be attributed to glacial unloading and redistribution of sediments, assuming an upper-mantle viscosity lower than that inferred for an old craton (e.g., Fennoscandia), but higher than that for a region with recent crustal thinning (e.g., Basin and Range province).

  12. Outburst floods from glacial Lake Missoula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarke, G. K. C.; Mathews, W. H.; Pack, R. T.

    1984-11-01

    The Pleistocene outburst floods from glacial Lake Missoula, known as the "Spokane Floods", released as much as 2184 km 3 of water and produced the greatest known floods of the geologic past. A computer simulation model for these floods that is based on physical equations governing the enlargement by water flow of the tunnel penetrating the ice dam is described. The predicted maximum flood discharge lies in the range 2.74 × 10 6-13.7 × 10 6 m 3 sec -1, lending independent glaciological support to paleohydrologic estimates of maximum discharge.

  13. Resolving Large Pre-glacial Valleys Buried by Glacial Sediment Using Electric Resistivity Imaging (ERI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, D. R.; Welz, M.; Rokosh, C. D.; Pontbriand, M.-C.; Smith, D. G.

    2004-05-01

    Two-dimensional electric resistivity imaging (ERI) is the most exciting and promising geological tool in geomorphology and stratigraphy since development of ground-penetrating radar. Recent innovations in 2-D ERI provides a non-intrusive mean of efficiently resolving complex shallow subsurface structures under a number of different geological scenarios. In this paper, we test the capacity of ERI to image two large pre-late Wisconsinan-aged valley-fills in central Alberta and north-central Montana. Valley-fills record the history of pre-glacial and glacial sedimentary deposits. These fills are of considerable economical value as groundwater aquifers, aggregate resources (sand and gravel), placers (gold, diamond) and sometime gas reservoirs in Alberta. Although the approximate locations of pre-glacial valley-fills have been mapped, the scarcity of borehole (well log) information and sediment exposures make accurate reconstruction of their stratigraphy and cross-section profiles difficult. When coupled with borehole information, ERI successfully imaged three large pre-glacial valley-fills representing three contrasting geological settings. The Sand Coulee segment of the ancestral Missouri River, which has never been glaciated, is filled by electrically conductive pro-glacial lacustrine deposits over resistive sandstone bedrock. By comparison, the Big Sandy segment of the ancestral Missouri River valley has a complex valley-fill composed of till units interbedded with glaciofluvial gravel and varved clays over conductive shale. The fill is capped by floodplain, paludal and low alluvial fan deposits. The pre-glacial Onoway Valley (the ancestral North Saskatchewan River valley) is filled with thick, resistive fluvial gravel over conductive shale and capped with conductive till. The cross-sectional profile of each surveyed pre-glacial valley exhibits discrete benches (terraces) connected by steep drops, features that are hard to map using only boreholes. Best quality ERI

  14. Glacial lakes in the Indian Himalayas--from an area-wide glacial lake inventory to on-site and modeling based risk assessment of critical glacial lakes.

    PubMed

    Worni, Raphael; Huggel, Christian; Stoffel, Markus

    2013-12-01

    Glacial lake hazards and glacial lake distributions are investigated in many glaciated regions of the world, but comparably little attention has been given to these topics in the Indian Himalayas. In this study we present a first area-wide glacial lake inventory, including a qualitative classification at 251 glacial lakes >0.01 km(2). Lakes were detected in the five states spanning the Indian Himalayas, and lake distribution pattern and lake characteristics were found to differ significantly between regions. Three glacial lakes, from different geographic and climatic regions within the Indian Himalayas were then selected for a detailed risk assessment. Lake outburst probability, potential outburst magnitudes and associated damage were evaluated on the basis of high-resolution satellite imagery, field assessments and through the use of a dynamic model. The glacial lakes analyzed in the states of Jammu and Kashmir and Himachal Pradesh were found to present moderate risks to downstream villages, whereas the lake in Sikkim severely threatens downstream locations. At the study site in Sikkim, a dam breach could trigger drainage of ca. 16×10(6)m(3) water and generate maximum lake discharge of nearly 7000 m(3) s(-). The identification of critical glacial lakes in the Indian Himalayas and the detailed risk assessments at three specific sites allow prioritizing further investigations and help in the definition of risk reduction actions. PMID:23218457

  15. Interhemispheric correlation of late pleistocene glacial events

    SciTech Connect

    Lowell, T.V.; Heusser, C.J.; Andersen, B.G.

    1995-09-15

    A radiocarbon chronology shows that piedmont glacier lobes in the Chilean Andes achieved maxima during the last glaciation at 13,900 to 14,890, 21,000, 23,060, 26,940, 29,600, and {ge}33,500 carbon-14 years before present ({sup 14}C yr B.P.) in a cold and wet Subantarctic Parkland environment. The last glaciation ended with massive collapse of ice lobes close to 14,000 {sup 14}C yr B.P., accompanied by an influx of North Patagonian Rain Forest species. In the Southern Alps of New Zealand, additional glacial maxima are registered at 17,720 {sup 14}C yr B.P., and at the beginning of the Younger Dryas at 11,050 {sup 14}C yr B.P. These glacial maxima in mid-latitude mountains rimming the South Pacific were coeval with ice-rafting pulses in the North Atlantic Ocean. Furthermore, the last termination began suddenly and simultaneously in both polar hemispheres before the resumption of the modern mode of deep-water production in the Nordic Seas. Such interhemispheric coupling implies a global atmospheric signal rather than regional climatic changes caused by North Atlantic thermohaline switches or Laurentide ice surges. 51 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Geothermal activity helps life survive glacial cycles.

    PubMed

    Fraser, Ceridwen I; Terauds, Aleks; Smellie, John; Convey, Peter; Chown, Steven L

    2014-04-15

    Climate change has played a critical role in the evolution and structure of Earth's biodiversity. Geothermal activity, which can maintain ice-free terrain in glaciated regions, provides a tantalizing solution to the question of how diverse life can survive glaciations. No comprehensive assessment of this "geothermal glacial refugia" hypothesis has yet been undertaken, but Antarctica provides a unique setting for doing so. The continent has experienced repeated glaciations that most models indicate blanketed the continent in ice, yet many Antarctic species appear to have evolved in almost total isolation for millions of years, and hence must have persisted in situ throughout. How could terrestrial species have survived extreme glaciation events on the continent? Under a hypothesis of geothermal glacial refugia and subsequent recolonization of nongeothermal regions, we would expect to find greater contemporary diversity close to geothermal sites than in nongeothermal regions, and significant nestedness by distance of this diversity. We used spatial modeling approaches and the most comprehensive, validated terrestrial biodiversity dataset yet created for Antarctica to assess spatial patterns of diversity on the continent. Models clearly support our hypothesis, indicating that geothermally active regions have played a key role in structuring biodiversity patterns in Antarctica. These results provide critical insights into the evolutionary importance of geothermal refugia and the history of Antarctic species. PMID:24616489

  17. Glacial CO2 Cycles: A Composite Scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broecker, W. S.

    2015-12-01

    There are three main contributors to the glacial drawdown of atmospheric CO2 content: starvation of the supply of carbon to the ocean-atmosphere reservoir, excess CO2 storage in the deep sea, and surface-ocean cooling. In this talk, I explore a scenario in which all three play significant roles. Key to this scenario is the assumption that deep ocean storage is related to the extent of nutrient stratification of the deep Atlantic. The stronger this stratification, the larger the storage of respiration CO2. Further, it is my contention that the link between Milankovitch insolation cycles and climate is reorganizations of the ocean's thermohaline circulation leading to changes in the deep ocean's CO2 storage. If this is the case, the deep Atlantic d13C record kept in benthic foraminifera shells tells us that deep ocean CO2 storage follows Northern Hemisphere summer insolation cycles and thus lacks the downward ramp so prominent in the records of sea level, benthic 18O and CO2. Rather, the ramp is created by the damping of planetary CO2 emissions during glacial time intervals. As it is premature to present a specific scenario, I provide an example as to how these three contributors might be combined. As their magnitudes and shapes remain largely unconstrained, the intent of this exercise is to provoke creative thinking.

  18. Estimating the volume of Alpine glacial lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, S. J.; Quincey, D. J.

    2015-09-01

    Supraglacial, moraine-dammed and ice-dammed lakes represent a potential glacial lake outburst flood (GLOF) threat to downstream communities in many mountain regions. This has motivated the development of empirical relationships to predict lake volume given a measurement of lake surface area obtained from satellite imagery. Such relationships are based on the notion that lake depth, area and volume scale predictably. We critically evaluate the performance of these existing empirical relationships by examining a global database of measured glacial lake depths, areas and volumes. Results show that lake area and depth are not always well correlated (r2 = 0.38), and that although lake volume and area are well correlated (r2 = 0.91), there are distinct outliers in the dataset. These outliers represent situations where it may not be appropriate to apply existing empirical relationships to predict lake volume, and include growing supraglacial lakes, glaciers that recede into basins with complex overdeepened morphologies or that have been deepened by intense erosion, and lakes formed where glaciers advance across and block a main trunk valley. We use the compiled dataset to develop a conceptual model of how the volumes of supraglacial ponds and lakes, moraine-dammed lakes and ice-dammed lakes should be expected to evolve with increasing area. Although a large amount of bathymetric data exist for moraine-dammed and ice-dammed lakes, we suggest that further measurements of growing supraglacial ponds and lakes are needed to better understand their development.

  19. Fault activation due to glacially induced stresses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steffen, R.; Lund, B.; Wu, P. P.

    2013-12-01

    Melting glaciers worldwide have an effect on sea level, but also on the stability of pre-existing faults. The load due to continental ice sheets or glaciers depresses the surface below, leading to changes in the lithospheric stresses. The accumulation of ice mass increases the vertical stress, and the horizontal stresses increase due to the accompanying flexure of the lithosphere. During deglaciation, ice-mass loss causes a simultaneous decrease in vertical stress; however, horizontal stresses decrease only slowly due to the slow readjusting of the Earth. After the end of deglaciation, only the induced horizontal stresses remain as the process of glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA) proceeds visco-elastically. The modelling of this process and the estimation of fault slip is enabled by a new GIA-fault model. However, this finite-element model is only available in two dimensions, and the extension to three dimensions is a necessary step further to allow the comparison of obtained fault slips to observations of glacially induced faults in Europe and North America. The model has several input parameters, which affect the activation time of faults and their resulting slip (e.g. ice history, rheology of the Earth, frictional properties, pore-fluid pressure). We will present the results of the new 3D model and show the sensitivity of faults with respect to modelling parameters. Furthermore, a comparison to observations will be presented.

  20. Fault activation due to glacially induced stresses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steffen, Rebekka; Lund, Björn

    2014-05-01

    Melting glaciers worldwide have an effect on sea level, but also on the stability of pre-existing faults. The load due to continental ice sheets or glaciers depresses the surface below, leading to changes in the lithospheric stresses. The accumulation of ice mass increases the vertical stress, and the horizontal stresses increase due to the accompanying flexure of the lithosphere. During deglaciation, ice-mass loss causes a simultaneous decrease in vertical stress; however, horizontal stresses decrease only slowly due to the slow readjusting of the Earth. After the end of deglaciation, only the induced horizontal stresses remain as the process of glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA) proceeds visco-elastically. The modelling of this process and the estimation of fault slip is enabled by a new GIA-fault model. However, this finite-element model is only available in two dimensions, and the extension to three dimensions is a necessary step further to allow the comparison of obtained fault slips to observations of glacially induced faults in Europe and North America. The model has several input parameters, which affect the activation time of faults and their resulting slip (e.g. ice history, rheology of the Earth, frictional properties, pore-fluid pressure). We will present the results of the new 3D model and show the sensitivity of faults with respect to modelling parameters. Furthermore, a comparison to observations will be presented.

  1. Glacial isostasy - possible tilting of petroleum reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fjeldskaar, Willy; Amantov, Aleksey

    2015-04-01

    Scandinavia has experienced major uplift after the last ice age. The rate of uplift along the coasts is so high that its effects have been observed within one generation. Glaciers, sediments and erosion act as loads on the Earth's surface - positive or negative. When a load is applied to the lithosphere covering the asthenosphere, part of the applied load will be supported by the elastic stiffness of the lithosphere, and part by the buoyant forces of the asthenosphere. This process is called isostasy, and the rebound over the last thousands of years has revealed how the Earth reacts to loads. Prior to the last glaciation, northern Europe has experienced more than 30 glaciations. Glacial erosion and repeated ice loading over the last millions of years has significantly influenced the temperature history of sedimentary basins, and associated hydrocarbon maturation in potential source rocks. In addition, repeated loading of glaciers leads to an isostatic response of the lithosphere, which may cause tilting of potential reservoirs, and possible remigration of hydrocarbons. The effects of glaciations are assumed to have caused parts of the accumulation in the Johan Sverdrup field (Utsira High) due to changed migration pathways. Glacial isostasy will lead to tilting of potential reservoirs on the entire Norwegian Continental Shelf. In the western Barents Sea and offshore mid Norway the tilts could exceed 4 m/km, dipping towards east during the glaciations.

  2. Geothermal activity helps life survive glacial cycles

    PubMed Central

    Fraser, Ceridwen I.; Terauds, Aleks; Smellie, John; Convey, Peter; Chown, Steven L.

    2014-01-01

    Climate change has played a critical role in the evolution and structure of Earth’s biodiversity. Geothermal activity, which can maintain ice-free terrain in glaciated regions, provides a tantalizing solution to the question of how diverse life can survive glaciations. No comprehensive assessment of this “geothermal glacial refugia” hypothesis has yet been undertaken, but Antarctica provides a unique setting for doing so. The continent has experienced repeated glaciations that most models indicate blanketed the continent in ice, yet many Antarctic species appear to have evolved in almost total isolation for millions of years, and hence must have persisted in situ throughout. How could terrestrial species have survived extreme glaciation events on the continent? Under a hypothesis of geothermal glacial refugia and subsequent recolonization of nongeothermal regions, we would expect to find greater contemporary diversity close to geothermal sites than in nongeothermal regions, and significant nestedness by distance of this diversity. We used spatial modeling approaches and the most comprehensive, validated terrestrial biodiversity dataset yet created for Antarctica to assess spatial patterns of diversity on the continent. Models clearly support our hypothesis, indicating that geothermally active regions have played a key role in structuring biodiversity patterns in Antarctica. These results provide critical insights into the evolutionary importance of geothermal refugia and the history of Antarctic species. PMID:24616489

  3. Quaternary Glacial Mapping in Western Wisconsin Using Soil Survey Information

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oehlke, Betsy M.; Dolliver, Holly A. S.

    2011-01-01

    The majority of soils in the western Wisconsin have developed from glacial sediments deposited during the Quaternary Period (2.6 million years before present). In many regions, multiple advances and retreats have left a complex landscape of diverse glacial sediments and landforms. The soils that have developed on these deposits reflect the nature…

  4. Contrasting scaling properties of interglacial and glacial climates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Zhi-Gang; Ditlevsen, Peter D.

    2016-03-01

    Understanding natural climate variability is essential for assessments of climate change. This is reflected in the scaling properties of climate records. The scaling exponents of the interglacial and the glacial climates are fundamentally different. The Holocene record is monofractal, with a scaling exponent H~0.7. On the contrary, the glacial record is multifractal, with a significantly higher scaling exponent H~1.2, indicating a longer persistence time and stronger nonlinearities in the glacial climate. The glacial climate is dominated by the strong multi-millennial Dansgaard-Oeschger (DO) events influencing the long-time correlation. However, by separately analysing the last glacial maximum lacking DO events, here we find the same scaling for that period as for the full glacial period. The unbroken scaling thus indicates that the DO events are part of the natural variability and not externally triggered. At glacial time scales, there is a scale break to a trivial scaling, contrasting the DO events from the similarly saw-tooth-shaped glacial cycles.

  5. Contrasting scaling properties of interglacial and glacial climates

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Zhi-Gang; Ditlevsen, Peter D.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding natural climate variability is essential for assessments of climate change. This is reflected in the scaling properties of climate records. The scaling exponents of the interglacial and the glacial climates are fundamentally different. The Holocene record is monofractal, with a scaling exponent H∼0.7. On the contrary, the glacial record is multifractal, with a significantly higher scaling exponent H∼1.2, indicating a longer persistence time and stronger nonlinearities in the glacial climate. The glacial climate is dominated by the strong multi-millennial Dansgaard–Oeschger (DO) events influencing the long-time correlation. However, by separately analysing the last glacial maximum lacking DO events, here we find the same scaling for that period as for the full glacial period. The unbroken scaling thus indicates that the DO events are part of the natural variability and not externally triggered. At glacial time scales, there is a scale break to a trivial scaling, contrasting the DO events from the similarly saw-tooth-shaped glacial cycles. PMID:26980084

  6. Contrasting scaling properties of interglacial and glacial climates.

    PubMed

    Shao, Zhi-Gang; Ditlevsen, Peter D

    2016-01-01

    Understanding natural climate variability is essential for assessments of climate change. This is reflected in the scaling properties of climate records. The scaling exponents of the interglacial and the glacial climates are fundamentally different. The Holocene record is monofractal, with a scaling exponent H∼0.7. On the contrary, the glacial record is multifractal, with a significantly higher scaling exponent H∼1.2, indicating a longer persistence time and stronger nonlinearities in the glacial climate. The glacial climate is dominated by the strong multi-millennial Dansgaard-Oeschger (DO) events influencing the long-time correlation. However, by separately analysing the last glacial maximum lacking DO events, here we find the same scaling for that period as for the full glacial period. The unbroken scaling thus indicates that the DO events are part of the natural variability and not externally triggered. At glacial time scales, there is a scale break to a trivial scaling, contrasting the DO events from the similarly saw-tooth-shaped glacial cycles. PMID:26980084

  7. Quaternary glacial evolution in the Central Cantabrian Mountains (Northern Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serrano, E.; González-Trueba, J. J.; Pellitero, R.; González-García, M.; Gómez-Lende, M.

    2013-08-01

    The glacial evolution of the Cantabrian Mountains is not well known. Previous studies have focused on the extent of the glacial maximum and the presence of younger features in several massifs. Recently, efforts have been made to date glacial periods, particularly the glacial maximum. This work presents a reconstruction of the glacial evolution in the Cantabrian Mountains, providing data on the environmental characteristics and timing of the different stages from the Quaternary glacial maximum to the Little Ice Age. The study area covers 3000 km2 between the 4°58'W and 3°34'W and includes eleven massifs of the central area of the Cantabrian Mountains. The selected sectors have an Atlantic and Atlantic-Mediterranean transitional climate and include the highest massifs (above 2600 m) and low-altitude glacierised massifs (lower than 2000 m). Glacial extent and evolution have been reconstructed on the basis of detailed geomorphological and morphostratigraphic mapping. The equilibrium line altitude (palaeo-ELA) has been estimated for the different stages of each tongue. The ELA has been assessed by the AAR and modified Kurowski methods and altitude methods have been considered. A numerical chronological framework is proposed using 17 AMS radiocarbon and one OSL data obtained in lake and bog deposits from three massifs. Four main glacial stages have been differentiated, between 38,000 BP and the Little Ice Age. They correspond to different cold environments, and the number of glacial stages varies from one to four among the different massifs. Conclusions are analysed in the context of the Quaternary glacial evolution of other Iberian mountains.

  8. Global Inventory of Terrestrial Glacial Megafloods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, V. R.

    2010-12-01

    After centuries of geological controversy it is now well-established that the last major deglaciation of planet Earth involved huge fluxes of water from the wasting continental ice sheets, and that much of this water was delivered as floods of immense magnitude and relatively short duration. These late Quaternary megafloods had short-term peak flows comparable in discharge to the more prolonged fluxes of ocean currents. (The discharges for both ocean currents and megafloods generally exceed one million cubic meters per second, hence the prefix “mega.”) Some outburst floods likely induced very rapid, short-term effects on Quaternary climates. The late Quaternary megafloods also greatly altered drainage evolution and the planetary patterns of water and sediment movement to the oceans. The classic Channeled Scabland region is now seen a but a small component in a source-to-sink system extending from ice-marginal lacustrine (glacial lakes Columbia and Missoula) and possible subglacial sources beneath the Cordilleran Ice Sheet, through the scabland intermediate zone, and on to sink relationships on the abyssal plain of the Pacific Ocean. Other North American glacial megaflood landscapes are now recognized in the Columbia and Snake River drainages of the northwestern U.S.; in the spillway systems of the upper Mississippi Basin; near the Great Lakes and adjacent St. Lawrence Basin; the Hudson River Basin; the Mackenzie Basin; the Yukon Basin (Porcupine River); the Sustina and Copper River Basins (Alaska); and the Hudson Strait. South American megafloods in the Santa Cruz River system (Argentina) emanated from the Patagonian Ice Sheet, and other Patagonian megaflooding probably occurred on the Chilean side. In Eurasia, the megaflooding from the margins of the Fennoscandian Ice Sheet spilled through the English Channel. In the mountain areas of central northern Asia, there were megaflood outbursts from the Issyk-Kul area, the Altai Mountains (upper Ob drainage), and the

  9. The influence of glacial ice sheets on Atlantic meridional overturning circulation through atmospheric circulation change under glacial climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherriff-Tadano, Sam; Abe-Ouchi, Ayako; Yoshimori, Masakazu; Oka, Akira; Chan, Wing-Le

    2016-04-01

    Recent coupled modeling studies have shown that the existence of the glacial ice sheets intensifies the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC). Since this may play an important role in maintaining a strong AMOC over the last glacial period, which is suggested by recent reconstruction study, it is very important to understand the process by which glacial ice sheets intensify the AMOC. Here, a decoupled simulation is conducted to investigate the effect of wind change due to glacial ice sheets on the AMOC, the crucial region where wind modifies the AMOC and the mechanism, which remained elusive in previous studies. First, from atmospheric general circulation model (AGCM) experiments, the effect of glacial ice sheets on the surface wind is evaluated. Second, from ocean general circulation model (OGCM) experiments, the influence of the wind stress change on the AMOC is evaluated by applying only the changes in the surface wind as a boundary condition, while leaving surface heat and freshwater fluxes unchanged. Moreover, several sensitivity experiments are conducted. Using the AGCM, glacial ice sheets are applied individually. Using the OGCM, changes in the wind are applied regionally or at different magnitudes, ranging from the full glacial to modern levels. These experiments demonstrate that glacial ice sheets intensify the AMOC through an increase in the wind stress curl mainly at the North Atlantic mid-latitudes. This intensification is caused by the increased Ekman upwelling and gyre transport of salt while the change in sea ice transport works as a negative, though minor, feedback.

  10. Characterization methods for fractured glacial tills

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haefner, R.J.

    2000-01-01

    This paper provides a literature review of methods successfully employed to characterize finegrained and fractured or unfractured glacial deposits. Descriptions and examples are given for four major categories of characterization methods: physical, hydraulic, chemical, and indirect. Characterization methods have evolved significantly within the past ten years; however, there still exists uncertainty about the reliability of individual characterization methods applied to till deposits. Therefore, a combination of methods is best, the choice of which depends on the objectives of the work. Sampling methods, sampling scales, and reporting methods are extremely important and should be considered when interpreting and comparing results between sites. Recognition of these issues is necessary to ensure that decisions regarding the transport of fluids in fractured tills are not based on the assumption that poorly permeable tills are always an inhibitor of subsurface flow.

  11. Understanding Antarctic Climate and Glacial History

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeConto, Rob; Escutia, Carlota

    2010-01-01

    First Antarctic Climate Evolution Symposium; Granada, Spain, 7-11 September 2009; Antarctic Climate Evolution (ACE; http://www.ace.scar.org), a scientific research project of the Scientific Committee on Antarctic Research and a core International Polar Year project, held its first international symposium in Spain in September 2009. ACE's mission is to facilitate the study of Antarctic climate and glacial history through integration of numerical modeling with geophysical and geological data. Nearly 200 international scientists from the fields of climate, ocean, and ice modeling joined geologists, geophysicists, and geochemists for 5 days of intense interaction. Oral sessions were plenary and were limited to allow time for poster viewing, discussion, and workshops (http://www.acegranada2009.com/).

  12. Dissolved organic matter export in glacial and non-glacial streams along the Gulf of Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hood, E. W.; Scott, D.; Jeffery, A.; Schreiber, S.; Heavner, M.; Edwards, R.; D'Amore, D. V.; Fellman, J.

    2009-12-01

    The Gulf of Alaska drainage basin contains more than 75,000 km2 of glaciers, many of which are rapidly thinning and receding. We are using a paired watershed approach to evaluate how changes in glacier ecosystems will impact the export dissolved organic matter (DOM) into the Gulf of Alaska. Our primary study watersheds, Lemon Creek and Montana Creek, are similar in size, bedrock lithology and elevation range and extend from near sea level to the margin or interior of the Juneau Icefield. Lemon Creek has a glacial coverage of ~60%, while Montana Creek is free of glacier ice. Our goal is to evaluate seasonal differences in the quantity, chemical character and reactivity of DOM being exported from these watersheds to downstream near-shore marine ecosystems. In addition, we are monitoring a variety of physical parameters that influence instream DOM metabolism in both watersheds. Our initial results from the 2009 runoff season indicate that concentrations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) are substantially higher in the non-glacial watershed. However, fluorescence analyses indicate that DOM from the glacier watershed has a higher protein and lower humic material content compared to DOM from the non-glacial watershed. After the spring snowmelt season, physical parameters between the two watersheds diverged, with higher streamflow and turbidity as well as colder water temperatures in the glacial watershed. Although our previous yield calculations show significantly higher DOC fluxes from the forested watershed, our results here suggest that glacier watersheds may be an important source of labile carbon to the near shore marine ecosystem. The contrast in the physical habitat between the two rivers (e.g glacier stream = cold, low light penetration, unstable substrate) supports the hypothesis that that in-stream DOM processing is limited within glacier dominated rivers, therefore delivering a higher percentage of labile DOM downstream.

  13. Late Glacial lakes - uniform or contrasting ecosystems?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zawiska, Izabela; Rzodkiewicz, Monika; Noryśkiewicz, Agnieszka M.; Obremska, Milena; Ott, Florian; Kramkowski, Mateusz; Słowiński, Michał; Błaszkiewicz, Mirosław; Brauer, Achim

    2015-04-01

    Climate changes are one of the most investigated topic in paleolimnology. The Late Glacial and Early Holocene time are specially interesting as than most abrupt changes happened. Lake sediments are known to be great source of information of the past environments. They are functioning as natural archives because in them preserve animal and plants remains. In this study we investigated three cores of the biogenic sediments from the lakes located in close vicinity in Tuchola Forest (Northern Poland): paleolake Trzechowskie, Lake Czechowskie-deepest part and Lake Czechowskie-bay. We made Cladocera, diatom and pollen analysis, the chronology was determined by varve counting, Laacher See Tephra (12,880 yrs BP) and 14C dating. The aim of our research was to find out the response of zooplankton, phytoplankton, lake and catchment vegetation to abrupt climate changes. We were interested in similarities and differences between those three locations in response of entire communities but also species composition. The preliminary results revealed that the Cladocera, diatoms and plants communities were sensitive to climatic shifts and it is well shown in the results of ordination method (PCA). However in the Cladocera and diatoms assemblages, which reflect well lake environment conditions, the dominant species and total number of species present, were different in all three locations. Especially great difference was noted between paleolake Trzechowskie and Lake Czechowskie (core from the deepest part). The results of our research shows that in Late Glacial time landscape in Lake Czechowskie region (Tuchola Forest, Northern Poland) had mosaic character. Local factors such as relief, edaphic conditions strongly modified type of vegetation and in close vicinity existed lakes that had very diverse environments.

  14. Numerical simulation of Glacial Isostatic Adjustment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miglio, E.

    2015-12-01

    In the Earth's crust, stress can be subdivided into tectonic background stress, overburden pressure, and pore-fluid pressure. The superposition of the first two and the variation of the third part are key factors in controlling movement along faults. Furthermore, stresses due to sedimentation and erosion contribute to the total stress field. In deglaciated regions, an additional stress must be considered: the rebound stress, which is related to rebounding of the crust and mantle after deglaciation. During the growth of a continental ice sheet, the lithosphere under the iceload is deformed and the removal of the ice load during deglaciation initiates a rebound process. The uplift is well known in formerly glaciated areas, e.g.North America and Scandinavia, and in currently deglaciating areas, e.g.Alaska, Antarctica, and Greenland. The whole process of subsiding and uplifting during the growth and melting of an iceload and all related phenomena is known as glacial isostatic adjustment. During the process of glaciation, the surface of the lithosphere is depressed underneath the ice load and compressional flexural stresses are induced in the upper lithosphere, whereas the bottom of the lithosphere experiences extensional flexural stresses; an additional vertical stress due to the ice load is present and it decreases to zero during deglaciation. During rebound, flexural stresses relax slowly. These stresses are able to change the original stress directions and regime.In this work we aim to study the effect of the GIA process in the context of petroleum engineering. The main aspect we will focus on is the mathematical and numerical modeling of the GIA including thermal effects. We plan also to include a preliminary study of the effect of the glacial erosion. All these phenomena are of paramount importance in petroleum engineering: for example some reservoir have been depleted due to tilting caused by both GIA, erosion and thermal effects.

  15. Estimating the volume of Alpine glacial lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, S. J.; Quincey, D. J.

    2015-12-01

    Supraglacial, moraine-dammed and ice-dammed lakes represent a potential glacial lake outburst flood (GLOF) threat to downstream communities in many mountain regions. This has motivated the development of empirical relationships to predict lake volume given a measurement of lake surface area obtained from satellite imagery. Such relationships are based on the notion that lake depth, area and volume scale predictably. We critically evaluate the performance of these existing empirical relationships by examining a global database of glacial lake depths, areas and volumes. Results show that lake area and depth are not always well correlated (r2 = 0.38) and that although lake volume and area are well correlated (r2 = 0.91), and indeed are auto-correlated, there are distinct outliers in the data set. These outliers represent situations where it may not be appropriate to apply existing empirical relationships to predict lake volume and include growing supraglacial lakes, glaciers that recede into basins with complex overdeepened morphologies or that have been deepened by intense erosion and lakes formed where glaciers advance across and block a main trunk valley. We use the compiled data set to develop a conceptual model of how the volumes of supraglacial ponds and lakes, moraine-dammed lakes and ice-dammed lakes should be expected to evolve with increasing area. Although a large amount of bathymetric data exist for moraine-dammed and ice-dammed lakes, we suggest that further measurements of growing supraglacial ponds and lakes are needed to better understand their development.

  16. Glacial onset predated Late Ordovician climate cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pohl, Alexandre; Donnadieu, Yannick; Le Hir, Guillaume; Ladant, Jean-Baptiste; Dumas, Christophe; Alvarez-Solas, Jorge; Vandenbroucke, Thijs R. A.

    2016-06-01

    The Ordovician glaciation represents the acme of one of only three major icehouse periods in Earth's Phanerozoic history and is notorious for setting the scene for one of the "big five" mass extinction events. Nevertheless, the mechanisms that drove ice sheet growth remain poorly understood and the final extent of the ice sheet crudely constrained. Here using an Earth system model with an innovative coupling method between ocean, atmosphere, and land ice accounting for climate and ice sheet feedback processes, we report simulations portraying for the first time the detailed evolution of the Ordovician ice sheet. We show that the emergence of the ice sheet happened in two discrete phases. In a counterintuitive sequence of events, the continental ice sheet appeared suddenly in a warm climate. Only during the second act, and set against a background of decreasing atmospheric CO2, followed steeply dropping temperatures and extending sea ice. The comparison with abundant sedimentological, geochemical, and micropaleontological data suggests that glacial onset may have occurred as early as the Middle Ordovician Darriwilian, in agreement with recent studies reporting third-order glacioeustatic cycles during the same period. The second step in ice sheet growth, typified by a sudden drop in tropical sea surface temperatures by ˜8°C and the further extension of a single, continental-scale ice sheet over Gondwana, marked the onset of the Hirnantian glacial maximum. By suggesting the presence of an ice sheet over Gondwana throughout most of the Middle and Late Ordovician, our models embrace the emerging paradigm of an "early Paleozoic Ice Age."

  17. Glacial-Interglacial period in Lago Sarmiento (Chilean Patagonia) using high resolution seismic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vizcaino Marti, A.; Dunbar, R. B.; Mucciarone, D. A.; LeRoy, S.; Stadnyk, A. D.

    2011-12-01

    geomorphological features indicate a displacement of the ice northward. Despite the fact that the exact timing of late glacial ice advance and extent is not known yet, this new study in Lago Sarmiento will accurately date the ice retreat evolution in the eastern part of Torres del Paine National Park (Chile).

  18. Conversation with Lara about the Earth and Land. (Spanish Title: Conversando con Lara sobre la Tierra y la Teirra.) Conversando com Lara sobre a Terra e a Terra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Conceição Barbosa-Lima, Maria

    2010-12-01

    The present article is the analysis of a conversation between the author and Lara, a four-yearold- girl, enrolled in nursery school, while she makes a drawing of the Earth. It took place outside school environment and without any other person around to avoid interference during the interview. According to Ferreira & Silva (2004), a researcher can only comprehend a child's drawing, or form, by listening to him/her while he/she is creating it. Lara presented the traditional flat drawing, picturing the sky parallel to the ground, as reported by Nardi & Carvalho (1996). However, when asked to draw the World - term used by Butterworth et al. (2002), in order to avoid unnecessary confusion - she represented it by a circle, with herself on the surface. Her drawings led to the conclusion that such girl does not know yet the World in which she lives is the Earth, and probably because of that, within her age and consequent maturity, she accurately differentiates the concepts of land and Earth. El presente artículo analiza una entrevista libre, mientras una niña de 4 años y 4 meses, matriculada en el pregrado, dibuja la Tierra. Esta entrevista se realizó fuera del ambiente escolar y sin otra persona alrededor que pudiera interferir. De acuerdo con Ferreira Silva (2004), para quien investiga es posible conocer realmente lo que un niño o una niña pone en el papel a través de grafismos y/o dibujos si se lo escucha durante el proceso de creación de la escritura con imágenes. La niña, en este caso, representa la Tierra con el tradicional dibujo plano y el "cielo" paralelo al suelo, conforme analizaron Nardi & Carvalho (1996). Pero, cuando se Le solicita dibujar el "Mundo" - palabra empleada en un trabajo de Butterworth et al. (2002), con intención de no provocar "confusiones" innecesarias a sus sujetos de investigación- lo representa de forma circular, poniéndose sobre su superficie. Sus dibujos llevan a concluir que esta niña aún no tiene conocimiento que el mundo

  19. High-resolution Geophysical Mapping of Submarine Glacial Landforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakobsson, M.; Dowdeswell, J. A.; Canals, M.; Todd, B. J.; Dowdeswell, E. K.; Hogan, K. A.; Mayer, L. A.

    2014-12-01

    Glacial landforms are generated from the activity of glaciers and display spatial dimensions ranging from below one meter up to tens of kilometers. Glacial landforms are used as diagnostic features of past activity of ice sheets and glaciers; they are specifically important in the field of palaeoglaciology. Mapping of submarine glacial landforms is largely dependent on geophysical survey methods capable of imaging the seafloor and sub-bottom through the water column. Full "global" seafloor mapping coverage, equivalent to what exists for land elevation, is to-date only achieved by the powerful method of deriving bathymetry from altimeters on satellites like GEOSAT and ERS-1. The lateral resolution of satellite derived bathymetry is, however, limited by the footprint of the satellite and the need to average out local wave and wind effects resulting in values of around 15 km. Consequently, mapping submarine glacial landforms requires for the most part higher resolution than is achievable by satellite derived bathymetry. The most widely-used methods for mapping submarine glacial landforms are based on echo-sounding principles. This presentation shows how the evolution of marine geophysical mapping techniques, in particular the advent of side-scan and multibeam bathymetric sonars, has made it possible to study submarine glacial landforms in unprecedented detail. Examples are shown from the Atlas of Submarine Glacial Landforms: Modern, Quaternary and Ancient, which will be published in late 2015 in the Memoir Series of the Geological Society of London.

  20. Extensive glaciation in Transbaikalia, Siberia, at the Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margold, Martin; Jansen, John D.; Gurinov, Artem L.; Codilean, Alexandru T.; Fink, David; Preusser, Frank; Reznichenko, Natalya V.; Mifsud, Charles

    2016-01-01

    Successively smaller glacial extents have been proposed for continental Eurasia during the stadials of the last glacial period leading up to the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). At the same time the large mountainous region east of Lake Baikal, Transbaikalia, has remained unexplored in terms of glacial chronology despite clear geomorphological evidence of substantial past glaciations. We have applied cosmogenic 10Be exposure dating and optically stimulated luminescence to establish the first quantitative glacial chronology for this region. Based on eighteen exposure ages from five moraine complexes, we propose that large mountain ice fields existed in the Kodar and Udokan mountains during Oxygen Isotope Stage 2, commensurate with the global LGM. These ice fields fed valley glaciers (>100 km in length) reaching down to the Chara Depression between the Kodar and Udokan mountains and to the valley of the Vitim River northwest of the Kodar Mountains. Two of the investigated moraines date to the Late Glacial, but indications of incomplete exposure among some of the sampled boulders obscure the specific details of the post-LGM glacial history. In addition to the LGM ice fields in the highest mountains of Transbaikalia, we report geomorphological evidence of a much more extensive, ice-cap type glaciation at a time that is yet to be firmly resolved.

  1. Glacial and periglacial buzzsaws: fitting mechanisms to metaphors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Adrian M.; Kleman, Johan

    2014-03-01

    The buzzsaw hypothesis refers to the potential for glacial and periglacial processes to rapidly denude mountains at and above glacier Equilibrium Line Altitudes (ELAs), irrespective of uplift rates, rock type or pre-existing topography. Here the appropriateness of the buzzsaw metaphor is examined alongside questions of the links between glacial erosion and ELAs, and whether the glacial system can produce low-relief surfaces or limit summit heights. Plateau fragments in mountains on both active orogens and passive margins that have been cited as products of glacial and periglacial buzzsaw erosion instead generally represent dissected remnants of largely inherited, pre-glacial relief. Summit heights may correlate with ELAs but no causal link need be implied as summit erosion rates are low, cirque headwalls may not directly abut summits and, on passive margins, cirques are cut into pre-existing mountain topography. Any simple links between ELAs and glacial erosion break down on passive margins due to topographic forcing of ice-sheet growth, and to the km-scale vertical swaths through which ELAs have shifted through the Quaternary. Glaciers destroy rather than create low-relief rock surfaces through the innate tendency for ice flow to be faster, thicker and warmer along valleys. The glacial buzzsaw cuts down.

  2. Late Ordovician (Ashgillian) glacial deposits in southern Jordan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, Brian R.; Makhlouf, Issa M.; Armstrong, Howard A.

    2005-11-01

    The Late Ordovician (Ashgillian) glacial deposits in southern Jordan, comprise a lower and upper glacially incised palaeovalley system, occupying reactivated basement and Pan-African fault-controlled depressions. The lower palaeovalley, incised into shoreface sandstones of the pre-glacial Tubeiliyat Formation, is filled with thin glaciofluvial sandstones at the base, overlain by up to 50 m of shoreface sandstone. A prominent glaciated surface near the top of this palaeovalley-fill contains intersecting glacial striations aligned E-W and NW-SE. The upper palaeovalley-fill comprises glaciofluvial and marine sandstones, incised into the lower palaeovalley or, where this is absent, into the Tubeiliyat Formation. Southern Jordan lay close to the margin of a Late Ordovician terrestrial ice sheet in Northwest Saudi Arabia, characterised by two major ice advances. These are correlated with the lower and upper palaeovalleys in southern Jordan, interrupted by two subsidiary glacial advances during late stage filling of the lower palaeovalley when ice advanced from the west and northwest. Thus, four ice advances are now recorded from the Late Ordovician glacial record of southern Jordan. Disturbed and deformed green sandstones beneath the upper palaeovalley-fill in the Jebel Ammar area, are confined to the margins of the Hutayya graben, and have been interpreted as structureless glacial loessite or glacial rock flour. Petrographic and textural analyses of the deformed sandstones, their mapped lateral transition into undeformed Tubeiliyat marine sandstones away from the fault zone, and the presence of similar sedimentary structures to those in the pre-glacial marine Tubeiliyat Formation suggest that they are a locally deformed facies equivalent of the Tubeiliyat, not part of the younger glacial deposits. Deformation is attributed to glacially induced crustal stresses and seismic reactivation of pre-existing faults, previously weakened by epeirogenesis, triggering sediment

  3. Isotopic evidence for reduced productivity in the glacial Southern Ocean

    SciTech Connect

    Shemesh, A. ); Macko, S.A. ); Charles, C.D. ); Rau, G.H. )

    1993-10-15

    Records of carbon and nitrogen isotopes in biogenic silica and carbon isotopes in planktonic foraminifera from deep-sea sediment cores from the Southern Ocean reveal that the primary production during the last glacial maximum was lower than Holocene productivity. These observations conflict with the hypothesis that the low atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations were introduced by an increase in the efficiency of the high-latitude biological pump. Instead, different oceanic sectors may have had high glacial productivity, or alternative mechanisms that do not involve the biological pump must be considered as the primary cause of the low glacial atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations.

  4. Probability of moraine survival in a succession of glacial advances.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gibbons, A.B.; Megeath, J.D.; Pierce, K.L.

    1984-01-01

    Emplacement of glacial moraines normally results in obliteration of older moraines deposited by less extensive glacial advances, a process we call 'obliterative overlap'. Assuming randomness and obliterative overlap, after 10 glacial episodes the most likely number of surviving moraines is only three. The record of the Pleistocene is in agreement with the probability analysis: the 10 glaciations during the past 0.9 Myr inferred from the deep-sea record resulted in moraine sequences in which only two or three different-aged moraine belts can generally be distinguished. -from Authors

  5. The taphonomy of human remains in a glacial environment.

    PubMed

    Pilloud, Marin A; Megyesi, Mary S; Truffer, Martin; Congram, Derek

    2016-04-01

    A glacial environment is a unique setting that can alter human remains in characteristic ways. This study describes glacial dynamics and how glaciers can be understood as taphonomic agents. Using a case study of human remains recovered from Colony Glacier, Alaska, a glacial taphonomic signature is outlined that includes: (1) movement of remains, (2) dispersal of remains, (3) altered bone margins, (4) splitting of skeletal elements, and (5) extensive soft tissue preservation and adipocere formation. As global glacier area is declining in the current climate, there is the potential for more materials of archaeological and medicolegal significance to be exposed. It is therefore important for the forensic anthropologist to have an idea of the taphonomy in this setting and to be able to differentiate glacial effects from other taphonomic agents. PMID:26917542

  6. What happened to the coal forests during Pennsylvanian glacial phases?

    SciTech Connect

    Falcon-Lang, H.J.; Dimichele, W.A.

    2010-09-15

    Sequence stratigraphic analysis of Pennsylvanian coal-bearing strata suggests that glacial-interglacial fluctuations at high latitudes drove cyclic changes in tropical biomes. A literature review of plant assemblages in this paleoclimatic context suggests that coal forests dominated during humid interglacial phases, but were replaced by seasonally dry vegetation during glacial phases. After each glacial event, coal forests reassembled with largely the same species composition. This remarkable stasis implies that coal-forest refugia existed across the equatorial landscape during glacial phases, expanding to repopulate lowlands during and following deglaciation. One possibility is that refugia comprised small pockets of wetland forest strung out along valleys at some sites, but data are currently insufficient to test this hypothesis. The model presented here, if accepted, dramatically alters our understanding of the coal forests and helps explain aspects of their dynamics.

  7. New exposure ages for the Last Glacial Cycle in the Sanabria Lake region (northwestern Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Laura; Jiménez-Sánchez, Montserrat; Domínguez-Cuesta, María Jose; Rinterknecht, Vincent; Pallàs, Raimon; Braucher, Régis; Bourlès, Didier; Valero-Garcés, Blas

    2013-04-01

    ., 2011. Last deglaciation in northwestern Spain: New chronological and geomorphologic evidence from the Sanabria region. Geomorphology 135, 48-65. Palacios, D., Andrés, N., Úbeda, J., Alcalá, J., Marcos, J., Vázquez-Selem, L., 2012. The importance of poligenic moraines in the paleoclimatic interpretation from cosmogenic dating. Geophysical Research Abstracts 14, EGU2012-3759-1. Pérez-Alberti, A., Valcárcel-Díaz, M., Martini, I.P., Pascucci, V., Andrucci, S., 2011. Upper Pleistocene glacial valley-junction sediments at Pias, Trevinca Mountains, NW Spain. In: Martini, I.P., French, H.M., Pérez-Alberti, A. (Eds.), Ice-Marginal and Periglacial Processes and Sediments. Geological Society (London) Special Publication 354, pp. 93-110. Research funded by the projects LIMNOCLIBER (REN2003-09130-C02-02), IBERLIMNO (CGL2005-20236-E/CLI), LIMNOCAL (CGL2006-13327-C04-01) and GRACCIE (CSD2007-00067) of the Spanish Inter-Ministry Commission of Science and Technology (CICYT). Additional funding was provided by the Fundación Patrimonio Natural de Castilla y León through the project "La investigacion en el Lago de Sanabria dentro del proyecto CALIBRE: perspectivas y posibilidades", and by the projects Consolider Ingenio 2006 (CSD2006-0041, Topo-Iberia), 2003 PIRA 00256, HF02.4, and RISKNAT (2009SGR520). L. Rodríguez-Rodríguez has developed her research under a Severo Ochoa Programme fellowship (FICYT- Asturias).

  8. Oceanographic gradients and seabird prey community dynamics in glacial fjords

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Arimitsu, Mayumi L.; Piatt, John F.; Madison, Erica N.; Conaway, Jeff; Hillgruber, N.

    2012-01-01

    Glacial fjord habitats are undergoing rapid change as a result of contemporary global warming, yet little is known about how glaciers influence marine ecosystems. These ecosystems provide important feeding, breeding and rearing grounds for a wide variety of marine organisms, including seabirds of management concern. To characterize ocean conditions and marine food webs near tidewater glaciers, we conducted monthly surveys of oceanographic variables, plankton, fish and seabirds in Kenai Fjords, Alaska, from June to August of 2007 and 2008. We also measured tidal current velocities near glacial features. We found high sediment load from glacial river runoff played a major role in structuring the fjord marine ecosystem. Submerged moraines (sills) isolated cool, fresh, stratified and silt-laden inner fjord habitats from oceanic influence. Near tidewater glaciers, surface layers of turbid glacial runoff limited availability of light to phytoplankton, but macrozooplankton were abundant in surface waters, perhaps due to the absence of a photic cue for diel migration. Fish and zooplankton community structure varied along an increasing temperature gradient throughout the summer. Acoustic measurements indicated that low density patches of fish and zooplankton were available in the surface waters near glacial river outflows. This is the foraging habitat occupied most by Kittlitz's murrelet (Brachyramphus brevirostris), a rare seabird that appears to be specialized for life in glacially influenced environments. Kittlitz's murrelets were associated with floating glacial ice, and they were more likely to occur near glaciers, in deeper water, and in areas with high acoustic backscatter. Kittlitz's murrelet at-sea distribution was limited to areas influenced by turbid glacial outflows, and where prey was concentrated near the surface in waters with low light penetration. Tidewater glaciers impart unique hydrographic characteristics that influence marine plankton and fish

  9. Glacial morphology and depositional sequences of the Antarctic Continental Shelf

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ten Brink, U.S.; Schneider, Christopher

    1995-01-01

    Proposes a simple model for the unusual depositional sequences and morphology of the Antarctic continental shelf. It considers the regional stratal geometry and the reversed morphology to be principally the results of time-integrated effects of glacial erosion and sedimentation related to the location of the ice grounding line. The model offers several guidelines for stratigraphic interpretation of the Antarctic shelf and a Northern Hemisphere shelf, both of which were subject to many glacial advances and retreats. -Authors

  10. Early Circum-Arctic Glacial Decay Following the Last Glacial Maximum?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snow, T.; Alonso-Garcia, M.; Flower, B. P.; Shevenell, A.; Roehl, U.; Goddard, E.

    2012-12-01

    Recent rapid warming, glacial retreat, and sea ice reduction observed in the Arctic suggest extreme regional environmental sensitivity to ongoing anthropogenic climate change. To place these recent environmental changes in context and better understand the forcings and feedbacks involved in Arctic climate change, regional studies of past intervals of rapid warming are required. Paleoceanographic studies from the high-latitude North Atlantic indicate close relationships between meltwater discharges from circum-Arctic ice sheets, perturbations of Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC), and global climate variations on sub-orbital timescales during the Late Quaternary. During the last glacial-interglacial transition (25-10 ka), when atmospheric temperatures over Greenland warmed 10-15°C and the AMOC experienced millennial-scale variability, low-resolution stable isotope studies from Fram Strait sediment cores indicate that the circum-Arctic ice sheets began to melt earlier than lower latitude Northern Hemisphere ice sheets, discharging their meltwater into the high latitude North Atlantic. Fram Strait, located at the gateway between the Atlantic and Arctic Oceans, is the only region where Arctic meltwater can exchange with the world oceans on both glacial and interglacial timescales. Thus, high-resolution paleoceanographic studies of Fram Strait sediments are critically required for understanding changes in Arctic meltwater flux to the North Atlantic on sub-orbital timescales. Here we present the first high-resolution (<100 yr) multi-proxy dataset from Fram Strait (ODP Site 986; 77°20.43'N, 9°04.66'E; water depth: 2063 m) to assess the timing of circum-Arctic ice sheet decay since the Last Glacial Maximum. Foraminiferal isotopic and elemental, scanning X-Ray Fluorescence, and ice-rafted debris records are used to isolate Arctic meltwater and iceberg discharge signals. Sharp increases in productivity and changes in water mass ventilation are inferred

  11. Rapid loss of glacial ice reveals stream community assembly processes

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Lee E; Milner, Alexander M

    2012-01-01

    Glacial retreat creates new habitat which is colonized and developed by plants and animals during the process of primary succession. While there has been much debate about the relative role of deterministic and stochastic processes during terrestrial succession, evidence from freshwater ecosystems remains minimal and a general consensus is lacking. Using a unique 27 years record of community assembly following glacial recession in southeast Alaska, we demonstrate significant change in the trait composition of stream invertebrate communities as catchment glacial cover decreased from ∼70% to zero. Functional diversity increased significantly as glacier cover decreased and taxonomic richness increased. Null modelling approaches led to a key finding that niche filtering processes were dominant when glacial cover was extensive, reflecting water temperature and dispersal constraints. Thereafter the community shifted towards co-occurrence of stochastic and deterministic assembly processes. A further novel discovery was that intrinsic functional redundancy developed throughout the study, particularly because new colonizers possessed similar traits to taxa already present. Rapid glacial retreat is occurring in Arctic and alpine environments worldwide and the assembly processes observed in this study provide new fundamental insights into how glacially influenced stream ecosystems will respond. The findings support tolerance as a key primary successional mechanism in this system, and have broader value for developing our understanding of how biological communities in river ecosystems assemble or restructure in response to environmental change.

  12. Glacial-Lake Outburst Erosion of the Grand Valley, Michigan, and Impacts on Glacial Lakes in the Lake Michigan Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kehew, Alan E.

    1993-01-01

    Geomorphic and sedimentologic evidence in the Grand Valley, which drained the retreating Saginaw Lobe of the Laurentide Ice Sheet and later acted as a spillway between lakes in the Huron and Erie basins and in the Michigan basin, suggests that at least one drainage event from glacial Lake Saginaw to glacial Lake Chicago was a catastrophic outburst that deeply incised the valley. Analysis of shoreline and outlet geomorphology at the Chicago outlet supports J H Bretz's hypothesis of episodic incision and lake-level change. Shoreline features of each lake level converge to separate outlet sills that decrease in elevation from the oldest to youngest lake phases. This evidence, coupled with the presence of boulder lags and other features consistent with outburst origin, suggests that the outlets were deepened by catastrophic outbursts at least twice. The first incision event is correlated with a linked series of floods that progressed from Huron and Erie basin lakes to glacial Lake Saginaw to glacial Lake Chicago and then to the Mississippi. The second downcutting event occurred after the Two Rivers Advance of the Lake Michigan Lobe. Outbursts from the eastern outlets of glacial Lake Agassiz to glacial Lake Algonquin are a possible cause for this period of downcutting at the Chicago outlets.

  13. Status of glacial Lake Columbia during the last floods from glacial Lake Missoula

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Atwater, B.F.

    1987-01-01

    The last floods from glacial Lake Missoula, Montana, probably ran into glacial Lake Columbia, in northeastern Washington. In or near Lake Columbia's Sanpoil arm, Lake Missoula floods dating from late in the Fraser glaciation produced normally graded silt beds that become thinner upsection and which alternate with intervals of progressively fewer varves. The highest three interflood intervals each contain only one or two varves, and about 200-400 successive varves conformably overlie the highest flood bed. This sequence suggests that jo??kulhlaup frequency progressively increased until Lake Missoula ended, and that Lake Columbia outlasted Lake Missoula. The upper Grand Coulee, Lake Columbia's late Fraser-age outlet, contains a section of 13 graded beds, most of them sandy and separated by varves, that may correlate with the highest Missoula-flood beds of the Sanpoil River valley. The upper Grand Coulee also contains probable correlatives of many of the approximately 200-400 succeeding varves, as do nearby parts of the Columbia River valley. This collective evidence casts doubt on a prevailing hypothesis according to which one or more late Fraser-age floods from Lake Missoula descended the Columbia River valley with little or no interference from Lake Columbia's Okanogan-lobe dam. ?? 1987.

  14. Status of glacial Lake Columbia during the last floods from glacial Lake Missoula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atwater, Brian F.

    1987-03-01

    The last floods from glacial Lake Missoula, Montana, probably ran into glacial Lake Columbia, in northeastern Washington. In or near Lake Columbia's Sanpoil arm, Lake Missoula floods dating from late in the Fraser glaciation produced normally graded silt beds that become thinner upsection and which alternate with intervals of progressively fewer varves. The highest three interflood intervals each contain only one or two varves, and about 200-400 successive varves conformably overlie the highest flood bed. This sequence suggests that jökulhlaup frequency progressively increased until Lake Missoula ended, and that Lake Columbia outlasted Lake Missoula. The upper Grand Coulee, Lake Columbia's late Fraser-age outlet, contains a section of 13 graded beds, most of them sandy and separated by varves, that may correlate with the highest Missoula-flood beds of the Sanpoil River valley. The upper Grand Coulee also contains probable correlatives of many of the approximately 200-400 succeeding varves, as do nearby parts of the Columbia River valley. This collective evidence casts doubt on a prevailing hypothesis according to which one or more late Fraser-age floods from Lake Missoula descended the Columbia River valley with little or no interference from Lake Columbia's Okanogan-lobe dam.

  15. Biogeochemistry of glacial runoff along the Gulf of Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hood, E.; Scott, D.; Vermilyea, A.; Stubbins, A.; Raymond, P.; Spencer, R.

    2012-04-01

    Glaciers and ice sheets represent the second largest reservoir of water in the global hydrologic system and glacier ecosystems cover 10% of the Earth, however the biogeochemistry of glacier discharge has not been well characterized. Preliminary investigations have shown that runoff from glaciers can be an important contributor of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and macro- and micro- nutrients such as P and Fe to downstream aquatic ecosystems. There is also mounting evidence that glacier ecosystems may be a source of anthropogenically derived constituents such as fossil fuel combustion by-products and persistent organic pollutants that are deposited in precipitation and released in melting glacier ice. As a result, it is critical to develop our understanding of glacial biogeochemistry, particularly in near-shore marine ecosystems along glacially-dominated coastal margins that receive large volumes of glacial runoff. To examine the spatial and temporal variability in the biogeochemical properties of glacial runoff, we sampled snow, ice melt, and glacial runoff at the Mendenhall Glacier near Juneau, Alaska during the summer of 2012. Mendenhall Glacier extends from near-sea level to >1700 m.a.s.l. and encompasses ~120 km2 of the 3900 km2 Juneau Icefield. The main sub-glacial drainage channel was sampled weekly throughout the glacier melt season (May-October) for a suite of physical (temperature, conductivity, suspended sediment) and biogeochemical (C, N, P, Fe and trace metals) parameters. In addition, we did opportunistic sampling of snow in the glacier accumulation zone and supra-glacial meltwater streams on the glacier surface. We also analyzed particulate and dissolved Hg in glacial runoff to quantify the export of Hg to downstream aquatic ecosystems. Preliminary results show that concentrations of dissolved organic carbon in snow, ice melt, and sub-glacial runoff were typically low (<0.5 mg C/L) and not well correlated with discharge. Recent research has shown that

  16. Should precise numerical dating overrule glacial geomorphology?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkler, Stefan

    2016-04-01

    Numerical age dating techniques, namely different types of terrestrial cosmogenic nuclide dating (TCND), have achieved an impressive progress in both laboratory precision and regional calibration models during the past few decades. It is now possible to apply precise TCND even to young landforms like Late Holocene moraines, a task seemed hardly achievable just about 15 years ago. An increasing number of studies provide very precise TCND ages for boulders from Late Holocene moraines enabling related reconstruction of glacier chronologies and the interpretation of these glacial landforms in a palaeoclimatological context. These studies may also solve previous controversies about different ages assigned to moraines obtained by different dating techniques, for example relative-age dating techniques or techniques combining relative-age dating with few fixed points derived from numerical age dating. There are a few cases, for example Mueller Glacier and nearby long debris-covered valley glacier in Aoraki/Mt.Cook National Park (Southern Alps, New Zealand), where the apparent "supremacy" of TCND-ages seem to overrule glacial geomorphological principles. Enabled by a comparatively high number of individual boulders precisely dated by TCND, moraine ridges on those glacier forelands have been primarily clustered on basis of these boulder ages rather than on their corresponding morphological position. To the extreme, segments of a particular moraine complex morphologically and sedimentologically proven to be formed during one event have become split and classified as two separate "moraines" on different parts of the glacier foreland. One ledge of another moraine complex contains 2 TCND-sampled boulders apparently representing two separate "moraines"-clusters of an age difference in the order of 1,500 years. Although recently criticism has been raised regarding the non-contested application of the arithmetic mean for calculation of TCND-ages for individual moraines, this

  17. Neoproterozoic Glacial Extremes: How Plausible is the

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peltier, W. R.

    2004-05-01

    The suggestion that the glaciation events of the Neoproterozoic could have been global in extent, so-called "snowball" glaciations, during which the oceans were entirely covered by sea ice and the continents by massive continental ice sheets, is an idea tha is recurrent in the geological and climate dynamics literature. It is an idea that haa both critics and defenders but concensus concerning it's plausiblity has yet to emerge. Previous work on this problem has led to the suggestion that a more likely scenario than the "hard snowball" is one in which open water continues to persist at the equator, thus enabling biological evolution into the Cambrian to proceed, perhaps stimulated by the transition from the cold conditions of the Neoproterozoic to the warm condition of the Cambrian, thus leading to the Cambrian "explosion of life". We will discuss recent extensions of our previous efforts to model the extreme climate of the Neoproterozoic, using both the University of Toronto Glacial Systems Model and the NCAR Community Climate System Model. With an appropriate choice for the albedo of sea ice, the former model conntinues to deliver hysteresis in the surface temperature vs. CO2 concentration space when solar luminosity is reduced by 6% below modern, and thus continues to suggest the existence of the previously hypothesized "CO2 attractor". We argue here that the system could be locked onto this attractor by the strong "out of equilibrium" effects of the carbon cycle recently discussed by Rothman et al. (PNAS, 2003). The open water solution is confirmed as the preferred mode of the system by the detailed CCSM integrations that we have performed.

  18. Preformed Nitrate in the Glacial North Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Homola, K.; Spivack, A. J.; D'Hondt, S.; Estes, E. R.; Insua, T. L.; McKinley, C. C.; Murray, R. W.; Pockalny, R. A.; Robinson, R. S.; Sauvage, J.

    2015-12-01

    Atmospheric CO2 abundances are highly correlated with global temperature variations over the past 800,000 years. Consequently, understanding the feedbacks between climate and CO2 is important for predictions of future climate. Leading hypotheses to explain this feedback invoke changes in ocean biology, circulation, chemistry, and/or gas exchange rates to trap CO2 in the deep ocean, thereby reducing the greenhouse effect of CO2 in the atmosphere. To test these hypotheses, we use sediment pore water profiles of dissolved nitrate and oxygen to reconstruct paleo-preformed nitrate concentrations at two deep-water sites in the western North Atlantic (23°N 57°W, 5557 m water depth; 30°N 58°W, 5367 m water depth). Preformed nitrate increases down-core to 22.7 μM (25.6 m core depth) at the northern site, and to 28.5 μM (27.8 m core depth) at the southern site. The large preformed nitrate gradient between these sites reveals a paleo-boundary between a southern water source high in preformed nitrate and a northern water source with lower concentrations, similar to today's ocean. However, the boundary between these water masses occurs north of where their modern counterparts meet, indicating that Antarctic Bottom Water (AABW) extended farther north during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). In addition, the southern source had a higher preformed nitrate concentration than today's AABW (25 μM), contradicting hypotheses that nutrient utilization was more efficient in the Southern Ocean deep-water formation regions during the LGM. Comparison to our previous Pacific data reveals that the average preformed nitrate concentration of the deep ocean was slightly higher during the LGM than today. This result implies that the CO2-climate feedback was not principally due to more efficient nitrate utilization.

  19. Geochemical Weathering in Glacial and Proglacial Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tranter, M.

    2003-12-01

    It seems counterintuitive that chemical erosion in glaciated regions proceeds at rates comparable to those of temperate catchments with comparable specific runoff (Anderson et al., 1997). All the usual factors that are associated with elevated rates of chemical weathering ( Drever, 1988, 1994), such as water, soil, and vegetation, are either entirely absent or absent for much of the year. For example, glaciated regions are largely frozen for significant periods each year, the residence time of liquid water in the catchment is low ( Knight, 1999), there are thin, skeletal soils at best, and vegetation is either absent or limited ( French, 1997). Other chapters in this volume have highlighted how these factors are important in other, more temperate and tropical environments. Even so, chemical erosion rates in glaciated terrain are usually near to or greater than the continental average ( Sharp et al., 1995; Wadham et al., 1997; Hodson et al., 2000). This is because glaciated catchments usually have high specific runoff, there are high concentrations of freshly comminuted rock flour, which is typically silt sized and coated with microparticles, and adsorbed organic matter or surface precipitates that may hinder water-rock interactions are largely absent ( Tranter, 1982). In short, the rapid flow of water over fine-grained, recently crushed, reactive mineral surfaces maximizes both the potential rates of chemical weathering and chemical erosion.A range of both lab- and field-based studies of glacial chemical weathering have been undertaken, mainly on the smaller glaciers of Continental Europe (e.g., Brown et al., 1993a, b), Svalbard (e.g., Hodson et al., 2002), and North America (e.g., Anderson et al., 2000). The field-based studies typically generate hydrographs of glacier runoff, which show a characteristic diurnal cycle during summer in low latitudes ( Figure 1), and more subdued diurnal cycles at high latitudes (Figure 2 and Figure 3). The concentration of ions in

  20. Aspects of conducting site investigations in glacial terrain

    SciTech Connect

    Schilling, K.E. )

    1993-03-01

    Much of northern US is mantled by Pleistocene glacial drift consisting of heterogeneous deposits of fine to coarse-textured sediments. Hazardous waste site investigations in glacial settings can often present unique design and implementation considerations. Complex glacial stratigraphy encountered during drilling activities demands flexibility built into work plans to allow for field decisions based on field conditions. Continuous cores should be collected from boreholes on a routine basis for stratigraphic purposes with particular importance assigned to field identification of relative permeabilities of stratigraphic units. Selection of appropriate field screening methodology should be based on site conditions. Utilization of open borehole groundwater sampling is recommended for fine-textured glacial settings where soil gas and well point sampling are ineffective. Installation of boreholes allows for collection of stratigraphic information and enables more surface area exposed beneath the water table for groundwater recharge and sampling. Water level determinations can be made on open boreholes for an initial assessment of the horizontal direction of groundwater flow. Placement of screens for monitoring wells should be based on field determination of likely groundwater flow paths. Nested wells are necessary to define the vertical groundwater flow system at most sites. Evaluation of the vertical flow system can often dominate site investigations in fine-textured glacial terrain. Two case studies from Iowa illustrate the usefulness of incorporating the above considerations in planning and implementing in fine-textured glacial sediments. Field investigations utilizing open borehole groundwater sampling successfully delineated site glacial geology and hydrogeology for determination of the nature and extent of groundwater contamination and better located the horizontal and vertical placement of monitoring wells.

  1. Simulated Last Glacial Maximum Δ14CATM and the Deep Glacial Ocean Reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mariotti, V.; Paillard, D.; Roche, D. M.; Bouttes, N.; Bopp, L.

    2012-12-01

    Δ14Catm has been estimated at 420 ± 80‰ (INTCAL09) during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) compared to preindustrial times (0‰), but mechanisms explaining this difference are not yet resolved. Δ14Catm is a function of cosmogenic production in high atmosphere and of carbon cycling in the Earth system (through carbon exchange with the superficial reservoirs, ocean and continental biosphere). 10Be-based reconstructions show a contribution of the cosmogenic production term of only 200 ± 200‰ at the LGM. The remaining 220‰ of Δ14Catm variation between the LGM and preindustrial times have thus to be explained by changes in the carbon cycle. Recently, Bouttes et al. (2010) proposed to explain most of the difference in atmospheric pCO2 between glacial and interglacial times by brine-induced ocean stratification in the Southern Ocean. This mechanism involves the formation of very saline water masses that can store Dissolved Inorganic Carbon (DIC) in the deep ocean. During glacial times, the sinking of brines is enhanced and more DIC is stored in the deep ocean, lowering atmospheric pCO2. Such an isolated ocean reservoir would be characterized by a low Δ14C signature. Evidence of such 14C-depleted deep waters during the LGM has recently been found in the Southern Ocean (Skinner et al., 2010). The degassing of this carbon with low Δ14C would then reduce Δ14Catm throughout the deglaciation. We have further developed the CLIMBER-2 model to include a cosmogenic production of 14C as well as an interactive atmospheric 14C reservoir. We investigate the role of both sinking of brines and cosmogenic production, alongside iron and vertical diffusion mechanisms to explain changes in Δ14Catm during the last deglaciation. In our simulations, not only the sinking of brine mechanism is consistent with past Δ14C data but also it explains most of the differences in atmospheric pCO2 and Δ14C between LGM and preindustrial times.

  2. Precise prediction of glacial cycle with its rhythm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, C.; Tseng, Y.; Yu, W.; Chueh, P.

    2010-12-01

    An ability to explain and predict the paleoclimatic cycles is one of necessary conditions for reliable predictions of future climate without and with anthropogenic forcing. Here, we solved a big puzzle. Quaternary glacial cycles, as represented by climate proxy data of benthic δ18O, can be divided into four typical periods (TP) with four characteristic points (CP). The cyclic sequence of them goes in the following order: (1) Onset point of glacial termination, (2) Glacial termination period, (3) Zip point of glacial termination, (4) Inter-glacial period, (5) Inception point of glaciations, (6) Period for glacial maturation, (7) Glacial maximum point, and (8) Period for glacial hibernation. The glacial termination (GT) is a swift transition period of about 6,500 years only. A precise prediction of its onset point is a great challenge to the theorem of orbital-forcing that is being developed since Milankovitch. We consider the climate system as a stack of heat capacitors that get warmed up by absorbing part of the insolation and cooled down via gray-body radiation. Part of the insolation is transformed into chemical energy through photosynthesis (CETP) and eventually gets accumulated in the clathrate hydrate (CH) in seawater. We found that, during the last 1.7 million years, every Onset point of GT falls in a very precise time-window defined with three conditions: (1) the eccentricity (E) of Earth’s orbit is increasing, (2) the obliquity (T) is also increasing, and (3) the phase angle of precession (P) falls between 7π/8 and 5π/4. The CETP is converted into sensible heat via oxidation of gases released from dissociated CH. The dissociation of CH depends on its floating level and dissociating level. Those levels are controlled by seawater temperature and the density of CH. The Zip point of GT comes when the average temperature of seawater at 150 m depth is about 18 C, which is mostly influenced by the H2S in the CH. We define the Inception point of glaciations as

  3. Evaluating Object-Based Image Analysis on Glacial Micromorphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chin, K. S.; Sjogren, D. B.

    2007-12-01

    Micromorphology has recently been applied more in analyzing glacial sediments at a microscopic level. It provides additional information and details that may help to explain glacial processes in areas where macro- scale observations cannot yield sufficient information. However, the process of interpreting thin sections has been very subjective, and reaching general consensus about glacial processes is difficult. Remote sensing technology is increasingly helpful in the development and advancement of many sciences; the concepts that lie behind the technology in object cognition used in other fields, such as landscape ecology, can be applied to micromorphology. Similar to what has been done to landscape ecology in the past, automating the process of interpreting objects in glacial sediments may potentially simplify and decrease the subjectivity of the process. Definiens Professional 5 is an object-based image analysis program that imitates human cognitive methods; it is used in this study to identify objects apart from background matrices in multiple thin section images of glacial sediments. The program's initial results proved that more work was needed to be done for better results, but overall the software produced promising results. The method is repeatable and continues to generate consistent results with no bias or ambiguity, so the application of this method to micromorphology and other areas alike will be valuable.

  4. Obliquity pacing of the late Pleistocene glacial terminations.

    PubMed

    Huybers, Peter; Wunsch, Carl

    2005-03-24

    The 100,000-year timescale in the glacial/interglacial cycles of the late Pleistocene epoch (the past approximately 700,000 years) is commonly attributed to control by variations in the Earth's orbit. This hypothesis has inspired models that depend on the Earth's obliquity (approximately 40,000 yr; approximately 40 kyr), orbital eccentricity (approximately 100 kyr) and precessional (approximately 20 kyr) fluctuations, with the emphasis usually on eccentricity and precessional forcing. According to a contrasting hypothesis, the glacial cycles arise primarily because of random internal climate variability. Taking these two perspectives together, there are currently more than thirty different models of the seven late-Pleistocene glacial cycles. Here we present a statistical test of the orbital forcing hypothesis, focusing on the rapid deglaciation events known as terminations. According to our analysis, the null hypothesis that glacial terminations are independent of obliquity can be rejected at the 5% significance level, whereas the corresponding null hypotheses for eccentricity and precession cannot be rejected. The simplest inference consistent with the test results is that the ice sheets terminated every second or third obliquity cycle at times of high obliquity, similar to the original proposal by Milankovitch. We also present simple stochastic and deterministic models that describe the timing of the late-Pleistocene glacial terminations purely in terms of obliquity forcing. PMID:15791252

  5. Deglaciation and post-glacial environmental evolution in the Western Massif of Picos de Europa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz-Fernández, Jesús; Oliva, Marc; García, Cristina; López-Sáez, José Antonio; Gallinar, David; Geraldes, Miguel

    2014-05-01

    This study examines the process of deglaciation of the Western Massif of Picos de Europa through field work, geomorphological mapping, sedimentary records and absolute datings of 14C. This massif has several peaks over 2,400 m a.s.l. (Peña Santa de Castilla, 2,596 m; Torre Santa María, 2,486 m; Torre del Mediu, 2,467 m). It is composed mainly by Carboniferous limestones. This area has been intensively affected by karstic dissolution, Quaternary glaciers and fluvio-torrential processes (Miotke, 1968; Moreno et al, 2010; Ruiz-Fernández et al, 2009; Ruiz-Fernández, 2013). At present day, periglacial processes are active at the highest elevations (Ruiz-Fernández, 2013). We have identified four main glacial stages regarding the deglaciation of the massif: (i) maximum advance corresponding to the Last Glaciation, (ii) retreat and stabilization after the maximum advance, (iii) Late Glacial, and (iv) Little Ice Age. Sedimentological studies also contribute data to the understanding of the chronological framework of these environmental changes. The datings of the bottom sediments in two long sequences (8 and 5.4 m) provided a minimum age of 18,075 ± 425 cal BP for the maximum advance stage and 11,150 ± 900 cal BP for retreat and stabilization in the phase following the maximum advance. The ongoing analyses of these sequences at very high resolution will provide new knowledge about the environmental conditions prevailing since the deglaciation of the massif. References Miotke, F.D. (1968). Karstmorphologische studien in der glazial-überformten Höhenstufe der Picos de Europa, Nordspanien. Hannover, Selbtverlag der Geografischen Gessellschaft, 161 pp. Moreno, A., Valero, B.L., Jiménez, M., Domínguez, M.J., Mata, M.P., Navas, A., González, P., Stoll, H., Farias, P., Morellón, M., Corella, J.P. & Rico, M. (2010). The last deglaciation in the Picos de Europa National Park (Cantabrian Mountains, Northern Spain). Journal of Quaternary Science, 25 (7), 1076-1091. Ruiz

  6. Crevassing and calving of glacial ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenneally, James Patrick

    Calving of ice is a relatively new area of research in the still young field of glaciology. In the short time that calving has been studied, it has been mainly treated as an afterthought, with the predominant mode of thinking being that it will happen so to concern oneself with why is not important. Many studies dealt with observations of calving front positions over time vs. ice velocity in an attempt to quantify the calving rate as the difference between the two, while others have attempted to deduce some empirical relationship between calving rate and variables such as water depth or temperature. This study instead addresses the question of why, where, and when ice will first become crevassed, which is an obviously necessary condition for a later calving event to occur. Previous work examining the causes of calving used ideas put forth from a variety of fields, including civil engineering, materials science, and results from basic physics and mechanics. These theories are re-examined here and presented as part of a larger whole. Important results from the field of fracture mechanics are utilized frequently, and these results can be used as a predictor of ice behavior and intrinsic properties of ice, as well as properties like back stresses induced by local pinning points and resistive shears along glacial ice boundaries. A theory of fracture for a material experiencing creep is also presented with applications to ice shelves and crevasse penetration. Finally, a speculative theory regarding large scale iceberg formation is presented. It is meant mainly as an impetus to further discussion on the topic, with the hope that a model relating crevasse geometries to flow parameters can result in crevasse spacings that could produce the tabular icebergs which are so newsworthy. The primary focus of this thesis is to move away from the "after the fact" studies that are so common in calving research, and instead devote energy to determining what creates the conditions that

  7. Tectonic control on the persistence of glacially sculpted topography.

    PubMed

    Prasicek, Günther; Larsen, Isaac J; Montgomery, David R

    2015-01-01

    One of the most fundamental insights for understanding how landscapes evolve is based on determining the extent to which topography was shaped by glaciers or by rivers. More than 10(4) years after the last major glaciation the topography of mountain ranges worldwide remains dominated by characteristic glacial landforms such as U-shaped valleys, but an understanding of the persistence of such landforms is lacking. Here we use digital topographic data to analyse valley shapes at sites worldwide to demonstrate that the persistence of U-shaped valleys is controlled by the erosional response to tectonic forcing. Our findings indicate that glacial topography in Earth's most rapidly uplifting mountain ranges is rapidly replaced by fluvial topography and hence valley forms do not reflect the cumulative action of multiple glacial periods, implying that the classic physiographic signature of glaciated landscapes is best expressed in, and indeed limited by, the extent of relatively low-uplift terrain. PMID:26271245

  8. Tectonic control on the persistence of glacially sculpted topography

    PubMed Central

    Prasicek, Günther; Larsen, Isaac J.; Montgomery, David R.

    2015-01-01

    One of the most fundamental insights for understanding how landscapes evolve is based on determining the extent to which topography was shaped by glaciers or by rivers. More than 104 years after the last major glaciation the topography of mountain ranges worldwide remains dominated by characteristic glacial landforms such as U-shaped valleys, but an understanding of the persistence of such landforms is lacking. Here we use digital topographic data to analyse valley shapes at sites worldwide to demonstrate that the persistence of U-shaped valleys is controlled by the erosional response to tectonic forcing. Our findings indicate that glacial topography in Earth's most rapidly uplifting mountain ranges is rapidly replaced by fluvial topography and hence valley forms do not reflect the cumulative action of multiple glacial periods, implying that the classic physiographic signature of glaciated landscapes is best expressed in, and indeed limited by, the extent of relatively low-uplift terrain. PMID:26271245

  9. Early local last glacial maximum in the tropical Andes.

    PubMed

    Smith, Jacqueline A; Seltzer, Geoffrey O; Farber, Daniel L; Rodbell, Donald T; Finkel, Robert C

    2005-04-29

    The local last glacial maximum in the tropical Andes was earlier and less extensive than previously thought, based on 106 cosmogenic ages (from beryllium-10 dating) from moraines in Peru and Bolivia. Glaciers reached their greatest extent in the last glacial cycle approximately 34,000 years before the present and were retreating by approximately 21,000 years before the present, implying that tropical controls on ice volumes were asynchronous with those in the Northern Hemisphere. Our estimates of snowline depression reflect about half the temperature change indicated by previous widely cited figures, which helps resolve the discrepancy between estimates of terrestrial and marine temperature depression during the last glacial cycle. PMID:15860623

  10. Glacial geology of the Hellas region on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kargel, Jeffrey S.; Strom, Robert G.; Johnson, Natasha

    1991-01-01

    A glacial geologic interpretation was recently presented for Argyre, which is herein extended to Hellas. This glacial event is believed to constitute an important link in a global cryohydric epoch of Middle Amazonian age. At glacial maximum, ice apparently extended far beyond the regions of Argyre and Hellas, and formed what is termed as the Austral Ice Sheet, an agglomeration of several ice domes and lobes including the Hellas Lobe. It is concluded that Hellas was apparently heavily glaciated. Also glaciation was young by Martian standards (Middle Amazonian), and ancient by terrestrial standards. Glaciation appears to have occurred during the same period that other areas on Mars were experiencing glaciation and periglacial activity. Glaciation seems to have occurred as a geological brief epoch of intense geomorphic activity in an era characterized by long periods of relative inactivity.

  11. Giant glacial cirques of non-mountainous terrains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amantov, A.; Amantova, M.

    2012-04-01

    Cirques are usually considered as specific landforms of hill and mountain terrains produced by alpine glaciers, and/or slope failures (landslides). However, glacial cirques seem to be present also in non-mountainous terrains that underwent extensive Pleistocene ice-sheet glaciations and strong glacial and fluvio-glacial erosion. The largest form in the Baltic region is Severoladozhsky (North Lake Ladoga) cirque, probably the world's largest representative, with the length and width close to 100 km. Another example is the deepest Landsort basin of the Baltic Sea. In those cases Meso-Neoproterozoic sediments were subject to selected erosion, with evident overdeepening of the bedrock surface in comparison with surrounding crystalline frame. The bowl headwall shape of the cirque-like landforms was determined by the outline of the margin of exhumed basin. The origin of the major basins of margins of the Baltic and Canadian shields are similar. However, direct analogues of giant cirques are not well developed in this part of North America due to geological deviations and dominant directions of ice movement. Comparable landforms (like the South Chippewa basin of the Lake Michigan) are therefore less mature. We define glacial cirque as an amphitheatre-shape depression with comparable values of length and width, steep headwall with adjacent side slopes and gentle lip with commonly increased glacial accumulation. They are usually located within an ice stream that created typical relief profile with normal horseshoe overdeepening, and in areas predefined by geological and geomorphological peculiarities. This definition likely fits both classic mountain cirques, and giant ones created in favorable conditions in domains that underwent extensive glaciations and relevant selective glacial erosion. Length/width ratio typical for giant cirques group is close to 1:1, being comparable with classical alpine ones. Major differences (like length/height ratio of other order and possible

  12. Is rate of glacial retreat accelerated in Indian Himalaya? (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulkarni, A. V.

    2013-12-01

    The Himalaya has one of the largest concentration of glaciers and rivers like Indus, Ganga and Bramhputra originate from this region. The snow and glacier melt is an important source of water for these rivers. However, this source of water may get affected in the near future due to changes in the cryosphere. Therefore, retreat of Himalayan glaciers are discussed extensively in scientific and public forums in India. Conventionally health of glaciers is assessed using changes in glacial length, as it is widely measured. However changes in glacial length and loss in areal extent near terminus needs to be interpreted carefully, as these changes can be influenced by numerous terrain and climatically sensitive parameters. The terrain parameters which can influence glacial retreat are slope, area altitude distribution, debris cover and orientation. In addition, climatically sensitive parameters like mass balance, glacial lakes and black carbon can also influence glacier retreat. These multiple influences can produce a complex pattern of glacial retreat. In this paper long-term glacier retreat in three river basins in the Indian Himalaya as Tista, Baspa and Parbati will be discussed. These basins are located in different climatically sensitive regions and each basin has unique dominant process of mass wasting. In addition to terrain parameters, influence of process like formation and expansion of moraine dammed lakes in Tista basin, deposition of black carbon on accumulation area in Baspa basin and debris cover in Parbati basin will also be discussed. This will provide understanding on varying influence of different mass wasting processes on glacial retreat during last five decades in the Indian Himalaya.

  13. Sources and distribution of aliphatic and polyaromatic hydrocarbons in coastal sediments from the Ushuaia Bay (Tierra del Fuego, Patagonia, Argentina).

    PubMed

    Commendatore, Marta G; Nievas, Marina L; Amin, Oscar; Esteves, José L

    2012-03-01

    The environmental quality of Ushuaia Bay, located at the southernmost tip of South America, is affected by the anthropogenic pressure of Ushuaia city. In this study, levels and sources of hydrocarbons in coastal sediments were assessed. Aliphatic hydrocarbon fractions ranged between 5.5 and 1185.3 μg/g dry weight and PAHs from not detected to 360 ng/g. Aliphatic diagnostic indices, the nalkanes homologous series occurrence, Aliphatic Unresolved Complex Mixtures (AliUCMs), and pristane and phytane isoprenoids indicated a petrogenic input. Some sites showed biogenic features masked by the anthropogenic signature. Particularly in port areas biodegradation processes were evident. PAH ratios showed a mixture of petrogenic and pyrogenic sources. Aliphatic and aromatic UCMs were strongly correlated, reflecting chronic pollution. Three areas were distinguished inside the bay: (1) east, with low hydrocarbons impact; (2) central, where hydrocarbons accumulation was related to source proximity and sediment characteristics; (3) south-west, where sediment characteristics and current circulation favour hydrocarbons accumulation. PMID:22189069

  14. Early diagnosis of congenital Trypanosoma cruzi infection, using shed acute phase antigen, in Ushuaia, Tierra del Fuego, Argentina.

    PubMed

    Mallimaci, María Cristina; Sosa-Estani, Sergio; Russomando, Graciela; Sanchez, Zunilda; Sijvarger, Carina; Alvarez, Isabel Marcela; Barrionuevo, Lola; Lopez, Carlos; Segura, Elsa Leonor

    2010-01-01

    Chagas' disease, or American trypanosomiasis, is caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanasoma cruzi. It is estimated that 15,000 new cases of congenital T. cruzi transmission occur in the Americas each year. The aim of this study was to estimate the rate of congenital T. cruzi infection in infants born to infected women living in Ushuaia, Argentina, as well to assess a serologic test using Shed Acute Phase Antigen (SAPA) for a timely diagnosis of congenital infection. The rate of congenital infection among children in the study was 4.4% (3/68). Our results show that for infants younger than 30 days of age, matched blood samples from mother and infant were capable of identifying congenital transmission of infection using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay with SAPA. For infants older than 3 months, congenital infection could be ruled out using the same procedure. PMID:20064996

  15. Early Diagnosis of Congenital Trypanosoma cruzi Infection, Using Shed Acute Phase Antigen, in Ushuaia, Tierra del Fuego, Argentina

    PubMed Central

    Mallimaci, María Cristina; Sosa-Estani, Sergio; Russomando, Graciela; Sanchez, Zunilda; Sijvarger, Carina; Alvarez, Isabel Marcela; Barrionuevo, Lola; Lopez, Carlos; Segura, Elsa Leonor

    2010-01-01

    Chagas' disease, or American trypanosomiasis, is caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanasoma cruzi. It is estimated that 15,000 new cases of congenital T. cruzi transmission occur in the Americas each year. The aim of this study was to estimate the rate of congenital T. cruzi infection in infants born to infected women living in Ushuaia, Argentina, as well to assess a serologic test using Shed Acute Phase Antigen (SAPA) for a timely diagnosis of congenital infection. The rate of congenital infection among children in the study was 4.4% (3/68). Our results show that for infants younger than 30 days of age, matched blood samples from mother and infant were capable of identifying congenital transmission of infection using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay with SAPA. For infants older than 3 months, congenital infection could be ruled out using the same procedure. PMID:20064996

  16. Polynuclear aromatic and chlorinated hydrocarbons in mussels from the coastal zone of Ushuaia, Tierra del Fuego, Argentina.

    PubMed

    Amin, Oscar A; Comoglio, Laura I; Sericano, José L

    2011-03-01

    Mussels (Mytilus edulis chilensis) were collected from 12 coastal locations in Ushuaia Bay, Argentina, and the surrounding area in October 1999 and again in October 2003. Concentrations of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and selected chlorinated pesticides were determined to assess the impact of a fast-growing population in the area. Total PAH concentrations ranged from 2.24 to an extremely high concentration of 2,420 µg/g lipid measured in mussels collected near an oil jetty used to discharge to shore storage tanks. The composition of PAHs in these samples indicates that the source of these compounds inside Ushuaia Bay is predominantly petrogenic, with some pyrogenic background, whereas mostly pyrogenic-related PAHs were evident in areas outside the bay. Total concentrations of PCBs ranged between 12.8 and 8,210 ng/g lipid, with the highest concentration, detected inside Ushuaia harbor, representing a 10-fold increase when compared with historical data. Chlorinated pesticides were detected at comparatively lower concentrations, with 4-4'- 1,1-dichloro-2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl)ethylene being the most common. The aggressive increase in population and related activities observed in the city of Ushuaia over the last two decades might have affected the environmental quality of the local bay. Moreover, the oceanographic and atmospheric conditions existing in Ushuaia Bay and surrounding areas may favor the accumulation and long-term presence of these organic pollutants in all compartments of this fragile environment. PMID:21128271

  17. The southernmost Andean Mountain soils: a toposequence from Nothofagus Forest to Sub Antarctic Tundra at Ushuaia, Tierra del Fuego

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Firme Sá, Mariana M.; Schaefer, Carlos E.; Loureiro, Diego C.; Simas, Felipe N.; Francelino, Marcio R.; Senra, Eduardo O.

    2015-04-01

    Located at the southern tip of the Fuegian Andes Cordilhera, the Martial glacier witnessed a rapid process of retreat in the last century. Up to now little is known about the development and genesis of soils of this region. A toposequence of six soils, ranging from 430-925 m a.s.l, was investigated, with emphasis on genesis, chemical and mineralogical properties. The highest, youngest soil is located just below the Martial Glacier Martial Sur sector, and the lowest soils occur on sloping moraines under Nothofagus pumilio forests. Based on chemical, physical and mineralogical characteristics, the soils were classified according to the Soil taxonomy, being keyed out as Inceptisols and Entisols. Soil parent material of the soil is basically moraines, in which the predominant lithic components dominated by metamorphic rocks, with allochthonous contributions of wind-blown materials (very small fragments of volcanic glass) observed by hand lens in all horizons, except the highest profile under Tundra. In Nothofagus Deciduous Forests at the lowest part of the toposequence, poorly developed Inceptisols occur with Folistic horizons, with mixed "andic" and "spodic" characters, but with a predominance of andosolization (Andic Drystrocryepts). Under Tundra vegetation, Inceptisols are formed under hydromorphism and andosolization processes (Oxiaquic Dystrocrepts and Typic Dystrocrepts). On highland periglacial environments, soils without B horizon with strong evidence of cryoturbation and cryogenesis occur, without present-day permafrost down to 2 meters (Typic Cryorthents and Lithic Haploturbels). The mountain soils of Martial glacier generalize young, stony and rich in organic matter, with the exception of barely vegetated Tundra soils at higher altitudes. The forest soils are more acidic and have higher Al3+activity. All soils are dystrophic, except for the highest profile of the local periglacial environment. The organic carbon amounts are higher in forest soils and decrease with altitude. Clay content is low and varies little along the topossequence, indicating an overall low chemical weathering. The clay mineralogy indicates predominance of primary minerals and high proportion of low crystalline Fe and Al minerals, bound to organic matter.

  18. The glacial iron cycle from source to export

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawkings, J.; Wadham, J. L.; Tranter, M.; Raiswell, R.; Benning, L. G.; Statham, P. J.; Tedstone, A. J.; Nienow, P. W.; Telling, J.; Bagshaw, E.; Simmons, S. L.

    2014-12-01

    Nutrient availability limits primary production in large sectors of the world's oceans. Iron is the major limiting nutrient in around one third of the oceanic euphotic zone, most significantly in the Southern Ocean proximal to Antarctica. In these areas the availability of bioavailable iron can influence the amount of primary production, and thus the strength of the biological pump and associated carbon drawdown from the atmosphere. Despite experiencing widespread iron limitation, the Polar oceans are among the most productive on Earth. Due to the extreme cold, remoteness and their perceived "stasis", ice sheets have previously been though of as insignificant in global biogeochemical cycles. However, large marine algal blooms have been observed in iron-limited areas where glacial influence is large, and it is possible that these areas are stimulated by glacial bioavailable iron input. Here we discuss the importance of the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets in the global iron cycle. Using field collected trace element data, bulk meltwater chemistry and mineralogical analysis, including photomicrographs, EELS and XANES, we present, for the first time, a conceptual model of the glacial iron cycle from source to export. Using this data we discuss the sources of iron in glacial meltwater, transportation and alteration through the glacial system, and subsequent export to downstream environments. Data collected in 2012 and 2013 from two different Greenlandic glacial catchments are shown, with the most detailed breakdown of iron speciation and concentrations in glacial areas yet reported. Furthermore, the first data from Greenlandic icebergs is presented, allowing meltwater-derived and iceberg-derived iron export to be compared, and the influence of both in marine productivity to be estimated. Using our conceptual model and flux estimates from our dataset, glacial iron delivery in both the northern and southern hemisphere is discussed. Finally, we compare our flux

  19. Morphologic Map of Glacial and Periglacial Features in the Northwestern Argyre Basin, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raack, J.; Hiesinger, H.; Reiss, D.

    2010-03-01

    We produced a morphological map of the northwestern rim of the Argyre Basin with focus on glacial and periglacial features. We report on features such as gullies, pingo-like forms and glacial remnants which are observed.

  20. Last Glacial - Present Glacial Activity in East Greenland Fjords Inferred from Swath Bathymetry and High-Resolution Seismic Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forwick, M.; Laberg, J. S.; Husum, K.; Olsen, I. L.

    2014-12-01

    Swath bathymetry and high-resolution penetration echo sounder (chirp) data from fjords and sounds between Kong Oscars Fjord and Bredefjord, East Greenland, reveal glacial landforms and sedimentary processes that can be used to infer glacial activity from the last glacial to the present. Relatively straight, linear features oriented parallel to the fjord axes, as well as beyond the mouths of some fjords, are interpreted to be glacial lineations providing evidence of fast-flowing grounded ice draining the eastern parts of the Greenland Ice Sheet during the last glacial. In some areas, the glacial lineations are the only preserved glacigenic landfjorms (e.g. beyond the mouth of Bredefjord). However, in other areas, they are covered with multiple transverse ridges interpreted to be small terminal moraines (e.g. in Youngsund). Whereas the absence of such moraines is suggested to represent a rapid ice retreat due to lift-up and disintegration during parts of the deglaciation, their presence reflects that multiple halts and/or re-advances interrupted the retreat. Acoustically stratified sediment sequences dominate the fjord-fill stratigraphies (up to 180 ms two-way travel time). These deposits are suggested to reflect repeatedly changing lithological compositions in a glacimarine environment where deposition mainly occurred from suspension fall-out, in addition to ice rafting from icebergs calving off from tidewater glaciers, and sea ice. The stratified deposits form often relatively uniform drapes indicating that the tidewater glaciers were mainly located near the fjord heads since the last deglaciation. However, acoustically transparent bodies with irregular geometries, intercalated within the stratified deposits, occur in some of the inner fjords. These are suggested to be glacigenic sediment wedges (debris-flow lobes) that formed during relatively recent advances of tidewater glaciers (e.g. in Nordfjord and Moskusoksefjord).

  1. Glacial landforms of the southern Ungava Bay region (Canada): implications for the late-glacial dynamics and the damming of glacial Lake Naskaupi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dube-Loubert, Hugo; Roy, Martin

    2014-05-01

    The Laurentide ice sheet played an important role in the late Pleistocene climate, notably through discharges of icebergs and meltwater. In this context, the Ungava Bay region in northern Quebec-Labrador appears particularly important, especially during the last deglaciation when the retreating ice margin dammed major river valleys, creating large proglacial lakes (e.g., McLean, aux Feuilles). The history of these lakes is closely related to the temporal evolution of the Labrador-Quebec ice dome. There are, however, large uncertainties regarding the position of its ice divide system through time, thereby limiting our understanding of the history of these glacial lakes. Here we focus on glacial and deglacial landforms present in the George River valley, south of Ungava Bay, in order to bring additional constraints on the late-glacial ice dynamics of this region, which also comprised glacial Lake Naskaupi. This work is based on surficial mapping using aerial photos and satellite imagery, combined with extensive fieldwork and sediment sampling. Our investigation showed significant differences in the distribution of glacial landforms across the region. The area east of the George River is characterized by well-developed Naskaupi shorelines while the elevated terrains show a succession of geomorphological features indicative of cold-based ice or ice with low basal velocities. In the easternmost part of this sector, ice flow directional data indicate that the ice was flowing towards ENE, against the regional slope. Eskers show paleocurrent directions indicating a general ice retreat from east to west. In the western part of this sector, near the George River valley, eskers are absent and the region is covered by felsenmeer and ground moraine that likely reflect the presence of a residual ice mass that was no longer dynamic. The presence of a stagnant ice represents the best mechanism to explain the formation of glacial lakes in the George River valley and its main

  2. The Influence of Glacial Ice Sheets on Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation Through Atmospheric Circulation Change under Glacial Climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherriff-Tadano, S.; Abe-Ouchi, A.; Yoshimori, M.; Oka, A.; Chan, W. L.

    2014-12-01

    It is well known that glacial ice sheets (Laurentide, Fennoscandian and Antarctic ice sheets) exert a large influence on the climate including the atmospheric circulation. Moreover, recent climate modeling studies suggest that glacial ice sheets have a large impact on the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC). However, the process by which the ice sheets impact on the AMOC is not yet fully understood. On the other hand, recent studies showed that surface wind changes play a crucial role on changes to the AMOC under glacial climate. Therefore, in this study, we investigate in detail, the process by which the ice sheet modifies the AMOC through surface wind change. Here we conduct numerical experiments using an atmospheric general circulation model (AGCM) and an ocean general circulation model (OGCM) separately. Our method consists of 2 steps. First, from AGCM experiments, we evaluate the effect of glacial ice sheets on the surface wind. Second, from OGCM experiments, we evaluate the influence of the wind stress change on the AMOC by applying the surface wind change as a boundary condition, while leaving other boundary conditions (surface heat and water fluxes) unchanged. In addition, we conduct several sensitivity experiments. Using the AGCM, we explore individual ice sheet effect, ice sheet topography effect and albedo effect on surface wind change. Moreover, using the OGCM, we change the surface wind gradually or apply the surface wind change only at a specific region in order to explore the wind change effect in detail. We find that glacial ice sheets largely intensify the AMOC by surface wind change under glacial climate. Compare to other regions, it reveals that the wind change at the North Atlantic (NA) is a key region. There, the northern glacial ice sheet topography intensifies the Icelandic Low and anti-cyclonic circulation over the Laurentide ice sheet. However, this wind effect is effective only when the NA is not widely covered by sea ice

  3. A new benchmark study for post-glacial rebound codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spada, Giorgio

    2010-05-01

    Modern modelling approaches to post-glacial rebound (PGR) are based on several techniques ranging from purely analytical formulations to fully numerical methods. Various European teams nowadays are independently working on the post-glacial rebound process in order to constrain the rheological profile of the mantle and the extent and chronology of the late-Pleistocene ice sheets which are prerequisites for the determination of the PGR contribution to geodetic observables. With the aim of i) testing the codes currently in use by the various teams, ii) to establish a minimum set of agreed results, iii) correct possible systematic errors embedded in the various physical formulations and/or computer implementations, and iv) facilitate the dissemination of numerical tools for surface loading studies to the geodynamical community and to young scientists, we present a set of benchmark computations mainly based on models with spherical symmetry and viscoelastic rheology but also including inputs from finite elements modelers. This study is performed within the Working Group 4 of the ESF COST Action ES0701 "Improved constraints on models of Glacial Isostatic Adjustment" and focuses on i) load Love numbers and relaxation spectra, ii) the deformation and gravity variations driven by surface loads characterized by simple geometry and time-history, and iii) the rotational fluctuations in response to glacial unloading.

  4. Glacial isostatic stress shadowing by the Antarctic ice sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivins, E. R.; James, T. S.; Klemann, V.

    2005-01-01

    Numerous examples of fault slip that offset late Quaternary glacial deposits and bedrock polish support the idea that the glacial loading cycle causes earthquakes in the upper crust. A semianalytical scheme is presented for quantifying glacial and postglacial lithospheric fault reactivation using contemporary rock fracture prediction methods. It extends previous studies by considering differential Mogi-von Mises stresses, in addition to those resulting from a Coulomb analysis. The approach utilizes gravitational viscoelastodynamic theory and explores the relationships between ice mass history and regional seismicity and faulting in a segment of East Antarctica containing the great Antarctic Plate (Balleny Island) earthquake of 25 March 1998 (Mw 8.1). Predictions of the failure stress fields within the seismogenic crust are generated for differing assumptions about background stress orientation, mantle viscosity, lithospheric thickness, and possible late Holocene deglaciation for the D91 Antarctic ice sheet history. Similar stress fracture fields are predicted by Mogi-von Mises and Coulomb theory, thus validating previous rebound Coulomb analysis. A thick lithosphere, of the order of 150-240 km, augments stress shadowing by a late melting (middle-late Holocene) coastal East Antarctic ice complex and could cause present-day earthquakes many hundreds of kilometers seaward of the former Last Glacial Maximum grounding line.

  5. Glacial melting: an overlooked threat to Antarctic krill

    PubMed Central

    Fuentes, Verónica; Alurralde, Gastón; Meyer, Bettina; Aguirre, Gastón E.; Canepa, Antonio; Wölfl, Anne-Cathrin; Hass, H. Christian; Williams, Gabriela N.; Schloss, Irene R.

    2016-01-01

    Strandings of marine animals are relatively common in marine systems. However, the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. We observed mass strandings of krill in Antarctica that appeared to be linked to the presence of glacial meltwater. Climate-induced glacial meltwater leads to an increased occurrence of suspended particles in the sea, which is known to affect the physiology of aquatic organisms. Here, we study the effect of suspended inorganic particles on krill in relation to krill mortality events observed in Potter Cove, Antarctica, between 2003 and 2012. The experimental results showed that large quantities of lithogenic particles affected krill feeding, absorption capacity and performance after only 24 h of exposure. Negative effects were related to both the threshold concentrations and the size of the suspended particles. Analysis of the stomach contents of stranded krill showed large quantities of large particles ( > 106 μm3), which were most likely mobilized by glacial meltwater. Ongoing climate-induced glacial melting may impact the coastal ecosystems of Antarctica that rely on krill. PMID:27250339

  6. Glacial melting: an overlooked threat to Antarctic krill.

    PubMed

    Fuentes, Verónica; Alurralde, Gastón; Meyer, Bettina; Aguirre, Gastón E; Canepa, Antonio; Wölfl, Anne-Cathrin; Hass, H Christian; Williams, Gabriela N; Schloss, Irene R

    2016-01-01

    Strandings of marine animals are relatively common in marine systems. However, the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. We observed mass strandings of krill in Antarctica that appeared to be linked to the presence of glacial meltwater. Climate-induced glacial meltwater leads to an increased occurrence of suspended particles in the sea, which is known to affect the physiology of aquatic organisms. Here, we study the effect of suspended inorganic particles on krill in relation to krill mortality events observed in Potter Cove, Antarctica, between 2003 and 2012. The experimental results showed that large quantities of lithogenic particles affected krill feeding, absorption capacity and performance after only 24 h of exposure. Negative effects were related to both the threshold concentrations and the size of the suspended particles. Analysis of the stomach contents of stranded krill showed large quantities of large particles ( > 10(6 )μm(3)), which were most likely mobilized by glacial meltwater. Ongoing climate-induced glacial melting may impact the coastal ecosystems of Antarctica that rely on krill. PMID:27250339

  7. Obliquity Control On Southern Hemisphere Climate During The Last Glacial

    PubMed Central

    Fogwill, C.J.; Turney, C.S.M.; Hutchinson, D.K.; Taschetto, A.S.; England, M.H.

    2015-01-01

    Recent paleoclimate reconstructions have challenged the traditional view that Northern Hemisphere insolation and associated feedbacks drove synchronous global climate and ice-sheet volume during the last glacial cycle. Here we focus on the response of the Patagonian Ice Sheet, and demonstrate that its maximum expansion culminated at 28,400 ± 500 years before present (28.4 ± 0.5 ka), more than 5,000 years before the minima in 65°N summer insolation and the formally-defined Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) at 21,000 ± 2,000 years before present. To investigate the potential drivers of this early LGM (eLGM), we simulate the effects of orbital changes using a suite of climate models incorporating prescribed and evolving sea-ice anomalies. Our analyses suggest that Antarctic sea-ice expansion at 28.5 ka altered the location and intensity of the Southern Hemisphere storm track, triggering regional cooling over Patagonia of 5°C that extends across the wider mid-southern latitudes. In contrast, at the LGM, continued sea-ice expansion reduced regional temperature and precipitation further, effectively starving the ice sheet and resulting in reduced glacial expansion. Our findings highlight the dominant role that orbital changes can play in driving Southern Hemisphere glacial climate via the sensitivity of mid-latitude regions to changes in Antarctic sea-ice extent. PMID:26115344

  8. Ecology of invasive Melilotus alba on Alaskan glacial river floodplains

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    White sweetclover has recently invaded glacial river floodplains in Alaska. We sampled vegetation and measured environmental variables along transects located along the Nenana, Matanuska, and Stikine Rivers to describe plant communities and to determine the effects of white sweetclover on other plan...

  9. Alaskan mountain glacial melting observed by satellite gravimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, J. L.; Tapley, B. D.; Wilson, C. R.

    2006-08-01

    We use satellite gravity measurements from the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) as an indication of mass change to study potential long-term mountain glacial melting in southern Alaska and West Canada. The first 3.5 yr of GRACE monthly gravity data, spanning April 2002-November 2005, show a prominent glacial melting trend in the mountain regions around the Gulf of Alaska (GOA). GRACE-observed surface mass changes correlate remarkably well with available mass balance data at Gulkana and Wolverine, two benchmark glaciers of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), although the GRACE signals are smaller in magnitude. In addition, terrestrial water storage (TWS) changes estimated from an advanced land surface model show significant mass loss in this region during the same period. After correcting for the leakage errors and removing TWS contributions using model estimates, we conclude that GRACE-observed glacial melting in the GOA mountain region is equivalent to ˜ - 101 ± 22 km 3/yr, which agrees quite well with the assessment of ˜ - 96 ± 35 km 3/yr based on airborne laser altimetry data, and is consistent with an earlier estimate based on the first 2 yr of GRACE data. This study demonstrates the significant potentials of satellite gravity measurements for monitoring mountain glacial melting and regional climate change.

  10. Sulfur/Carbonate Springs and Life in Glacial Ice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, C. C.; Grasby, S.; Longazo, T.

    2001-01-01

    Glacial springs are useful analogs to channels and seeps issuing from frozen strata on Mars. Mineralized water can move through, and discharge from, solid ice. This water, even near freezing, can support microbial life and bring it to the surface. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  11. Remote Wetland Assessment for Missouri Coteau Prairie Glacial Basins

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Missouri Coteau prairie glacial wetlands are subject to numerous anthropogenic disturbances, such as cultivation, construction, and chemical inputs from upland land-use practices. High wetland density and temporal variability among these ecosystems necessitate synoptic tools for watershed-scale wetl...

  12. Glacial Influences on Solar Radiation in a Subarctic Sea.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Understanding macroscale processes controlling solar radia­tion in marine systems will be important in interpreting the potential effects of global change from increasing ultraviolet radiation (UV) and glacial retreat. This study provides the first quantitative assessment of UV i...

  13. Terrestrial glacial eskers: Analogs for Martian sinuous ridges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kargel, Jeffrey S.; Strom, Roger G.

    1991-01-01

    A glacial model was introduced last year for the Argyre region, a concept which is now extended, and which was recently integrated with a Global Hydrologic Model incorporating many other aspects of Martian geology. Despite wide agreement that the Martian ridges strongly resemble glacial eskers, this hypothesis has been presented with great equivocation due to a perceived lack of other glacial landforms. Quite to the contrary, it is shown that the Martian ridges actually do occur in logical ordered sequences with many other types of characteristically glacial appearing landforms. Herein, the esker hypothesis is further supported in isolation from considerations of regional landform assemblages. It is concluded that Martian sinuous ridges are similar in every respect to terrestrial eskers: scale, morphology, planimetric pattern, and associations with other probable glaciogenic landforms. It is found that the esker hypothesis is well supported. Eskers are glaciofluvial structures, and owe their existence to large scale melting of stagnant temporate glaciers. Thus, eskers are indicators of an ameliorating climatic regime after a protracted episode of cold, humid conditions.

  14. Obliquity Control on Southern Hemisphere Climate during the Last Glacial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fogwill, C. J.; Hutchinson, D. K.; Turney, C. S.; Taschetto, A.; England, M. H.

    2015-12-01

    Recent paleoclimate reconstructions have challenged the traditional view that Northern Hemisphere insolation and associated feedbacks drove synchronous global climate and ice-sheet volume during the last glacial cycle. Here we focus on the response of the Patagonian Ice Sheet, and demonstrate that its maximum expansion culminated at 28,400 ± 500 years before present (28.4 ± 0.5 ka), more than 5,000 years before the minima in 65°N summer insolation and the formally-defined Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) at 21,000 ± 2,000 years before present. To investigate the potential drivers of this early LGM (eLGM), we simulate the effects of orbital changes using a suite of climate models incorporating prescribed and evolving sea-ice anomalies. Our analyses suggest that Antarctic sea-ice expansion at 28.5 ka altered the location and intensity of the Southern Hemisphere storm track, triggering regional cooling over Patagonia of 5°C that extends across the wider mid-southern latitudes. In contrast, at the LGM, continued sea-ice expansion reduced regional temperature and precipitation further, effectively starving the ice sheet and resulting in reduced glacial expansion. Our findings highlight the dominant role that orbital changes can play in driving Southern Hemisphere glacial climate via the sensitivity of mid-latitude regions to changes in Antarctic sea-ice extent.

  15. Impacts of alpine glacial erosion on the shapes of glacial valleys, heights of mountains, and sediment delivery to the foreland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, R. S.; Dühnforth, M.; Anderson, L. S.; Colgan, W.

    2012-12-01

    Glacial erosion not only generates characteristic landforms at a variety of spatial scales, but also drastically influences the rate of sediment delivery to the foreland landscape. Prior glacial erosion models have explored the transition from V to U shaped valley cross sections, the flattening of along-valley profiles, and the steepening of headwalls. In tectonically inactive landscapes, repeated glacial erosion lowers the elevation of the valley, resulting in a long-term decline in glacier surface mass balance. As a consequence, earlier glacial periods often produce terminal moraines well beyond the moraines of more recent glaciations. In valleys with resistant rock, oversteepening of head and sidewalls leads to avalanching, which protects ridges from erosion. If rock uplift is significant, this feedback and the potential that higher elevations promote reduced erosion associated with cold basal glacial conditions, can promote the emergence of very tall mountains. While many first order features of glacial erosional landscapes have been replicated by coarse-resolution glacial erosion models, few models explicitly assess the role of rock type and fracture density in modulating local subglacial erosion. We explore the potential influence of rock properties on landscape evolution using a new finer-resolution numerical model of glacial erosion in which quarrying and abrasion are explicitly treated over a bed that is discretized into fracture-bounded blocks. Time varying subglacial cavity geometry at the ice-bed interface results from a prescribed sliding history. The quarrying of blocks from upvalley edges of subglacial cavities allows sharp edges to migrate upvalley, while abrasion operates on all portions of the bed that are in intimate contact with glacier. The model suggests that roche moutonées emerge as the characteristic landform, and migrate upvalley. As the discretization interval of the model approximates the length scale of fracture-bounded blocks, we can

  16. Oxygen-isotope variations in post-glacial Lake Ontario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hladyniuk, Ryan; Longstaffe, Fred J.

    2016-02-01

    The role of glacial meltwater input to the Atlantic Ocean in triggering the Younger Dryas (YD) cooling event has been the subject of controversy in recent literature. Lake Ontario is ideally situated to test for possible meltwater passage from upstream glacial lakes and the Laurentide Ice Sheet (LIS) to the Atlantic Ocean via the lower Great Lakes. Here, we use the oxygen-isotope compositions of ostracode valves and clam shells from three Lake Ontario sediment cores to identify glacial meltwater contributions to ancient Lake Ontario since the retreat of the LIS (∼16,500 cal [13,300 14C] BP). Differences in mineralogy and sediment grain size are also used to identify changes in the hydrologic regime. The average lakewater δ18O of -17.5‰ (determined from ostracode compositions) indicates a significant contribution from glacial meltwater. Upon LIS retreat from the St. Lawrence lowlands, ancient Lake Ontario (glacial Lake Iroquois) lakewater δ18O increased to -12‰ largely because of the loss of low-18O glacial meltwater input. A subsequent decrease in lakewater δ18O (from -12 to -14‰), accompanied by a median sediment grain size increase to 9 μm, indicates that post-glacial Lake Ontario received a final pulse of meltwater (∼13,000-12,500 cal [11,100-10,500 14C] BP) before the onset of hydrologic closure. This meltwater pulse, which is also recorded in a previously reported brief freshening of the neighbouring Champlain Valley (Cronin et al., 2012), may have contributed to a weakening of thermohaline circulation in the Atlantic Ocean. After 12,900 cal [11,020 14C] BP, the meltwater presence in the Ontario basin continued to inhibit entry of Champlain seawater into early Lake Ontario. Opening of the North Bay outlet diverted upper Great Lakes water from the lower Great Lakes causing a period (12,300-8300 cal [10,400-7500 14C] BP) of hydrologic closure in Lake Ontario (Anderson and Lewis, 2012). This change is demarcated by a shift to higher δ18Olakewater

  17. Glacial geology, glacial recession, proglacial lakes, and postglacial environments, Fishers Island, New York

    SciTech Connect

    Sirkin, L. ); Funk, R.E. . Anthropological Survey)

    1993-03-01

    The Fishers Island Moraine, a complex of three parallel ice margin depositional trends, forms the west-central segment of a major recessional moraine of the Connecticut-Rhode Island Lobe of the late Wisconsinan glacier. As such, the moraine links the Orient Point Moraine of eastern Long Island and the Charlestown Moraine of western Rhode Island and marks a prominent recessional ice margin. The moraine is correlative with the Roanoke Point Moraine of the Connecticut Lobe of northeastern Long Island. Pollen stratigraphy of >13,180 ka bog sediments begins early in the spruce (A) pollen zone with evidence of a cold, late-glacial climate. The pine (B) pollen zone, beginning prior to 11,145 ka, and the oak (C) pollen zone, dating from about 9,000 ka with hickory and hemlock subzones, are well represented. However, after about 2,000 ka, the stratigraphic record in the bog sections is missing in most cases due to peat harvesting. Pollen spectra from several archeological sites fall within the late oak pollen zone, well within the land clearing interval with evidence of hardwood forests and locally holly and cedar. Evidence of cultigens in the pollen record is sparse. Marine deposits over fresh water bog and proglacial lake sediments show that some coastal bogs were drowned by sea level rise.

  18. Abrupt glacial climate shifts controlled by ice sheet changes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xu; Lohmann, Gerrit; Knorr, Gregor; Purcell, Conor

    2014-08-21

    During glacial periods of the Late Pleistocene, an abundance of proxy data demonstrates the existence of large and repeated millennial-scale warming episodes, known as Dansgaard-Oeschger (DO) events. This ubiquitous feature of rapid glacial climate change can be extended back as far as 800,000 years before present (BP) in the ice core record, and has drawn broad attention within the science and policy-making communities alike. Many studies have been dedicated to investigating the underlying causes of these changes, but no coherent mechanism has yet been identified. Here we show, by using a comprehensive fully coupled model, that gradual changes in the height of the Northern Hemisphere ice sheets (NHISs) can alter the coupled atmosphere-ocean system and cause rapid glacial climate shifts closely resembling DO events. The simulated global climate responses--including abrupt warming in the North Atlantic, a northward shift of the tropical rainbelts, and Southern Hemisphere cooling related to the bipolar seesaw--are generally consistent with empirical evidence. As a result of the coexistence of two glacial ocean circulation states at intermediate heights of the ice sheets, minor changes in the height of the NHISs and the amount of atmospheric CO2 can trigger the rapid climate transitions via a local positive atmosphere-ocean-sea-ice feedback in the North Atlantic. Our results, although based on a single model, thus provide a coherent concept for understanding the recorded millennial-scale variability and abrupt climate changes in the coupled atmosphere-ocean system, as well as their linkages to the volume of the intermediate ice sheets during glacials. PMID:25119027

  19. Abrupt glacial climate shifts controlled by ice sheet changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xu; Lohmann, Gerrit; Knorr, Gregor; Purcell, Conor

    2014-08-01

    During glacial periods of the Late Pleistocene, an abundance of proxy data demonstrates the existence of large and repeated millennial-scale warming episodes, known as Dansgaard-Oeschger (DO) events. This ubiquitous feature of rapid glacial climate change can be extended back as far as 800,000 years before present (BP) in the ice core record, and has drawn broad attention within the science and policy-making communities alike. Many studies have been dedicated to investigating the underlying causes of these changes, but no coherent mechanism has yet been identified. Here we show, by using a comprehensive fully coupled model, that gradual changes in the height of the Northern Hemisphere ice sheets (NHISs) can alter the coupled atmosphere-ocean system and cause rapid glacial climate shifts closely resembling DO events. The simulated global climate responses--including abrupt warming in the North Atlantic, a northward shift of the tropical rainbelts, and Southern Hemisphere cooling related to the bipolar seesaw--are generally consistent with empirical evidence. As a result of the coexistence of two glacial ocean circulation states at intermediate heights of the ice sheets, minor changes in the height of the NHISs and the amount of atmospheric CO2 can trigger the rapid climate transitions via a local positive atmosphere-ocean-sea-ice feedback in the North Atlantic. Our results, although based on a single model, thus provide a coherent concept for understanding the recorded millennial-scale variability and abrupt climate changes in the coupled atmosphere-ocean system, as well as their linkages to the volume of the intermediate ice sheets during glacials.

  20. Thriving in the Cold: Glacial Expansion and Post-Glacial Contraction of a Temperate Terrestrial Salamander (Plethodon serratus)

    PubMed Central

    Newman, Catherine E.; Austin, Christopher C.

    2015-01-01

    The dynamic geologic history of the southeastern United States has played a major role in shaping the geographic distributions of amphibians in the region. In the phylogeographic literature, the predominant pattern of distribution shifts through time of temperate species is one of contraction during glacial maxima and persistence in refugia. However, the diverse biology and ecology of amphibian species suggest that a “one-size-fits-all” model may be inappropriate. Nearly 10% of amphibian species in the region have a current distribution comprised of multiple disjunct, restricted areas that resemble the shape of Pleistocene refugia identified for other temperate taxa in the literature. Here, we apply genetics and spatially explicit climate analyses to test the hypothesis that the disjunct regions of these species ranges are climatic refugia for species that were more broadly distributed during glacial maxima. We use the salamander Plethodon serratus as a model, as its range consists of four disjunct regions in the Southeast. Phylogenetic results show that P. serratus is comprised of multiple genetic lineages, and the four regions are not reciprocally monophyletic. The Appalachian salamanders form a clade sister to all other P. serratus. Niche and paleodistribution modeling results suggest that P. serratus expanded from the Appalachians during the cooler Last Glacial Maximum and has since been restricted to its current disjunct distribution by a warming climate. These data reject the universal applicability of the glacial contraction model to temperate taxa and reiterate the importance of considering the natural history of individual species. PMID:26132077

  1. Interglacial geomorphic dynamics during the Quaternary: Does glacial erosion dominates interglacial adjustment?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, T.; Johnson, E. A.

    2012-04-01

    High mountains are generally sculptured by glacial erosion, which resulted in the formation of glacial cirques and U-shaped valleys with strongly over-steepened hillslopes and widespread glacial deposits. The abundance of glacial (erosion and depositional) landforms in high mountains has been attributed to very effective glacial erosion and sediment transfer. Furthermore, it has been argued that geomorphic activity remains increased after the retreat of valley glaciers at the transition between glacial and interglacial periods. Thus, geologists and geomorphologist generally tend to look at glaciers as geomorphic agents that strongly enhance erosion and sediment fluxes. An important aspect of glacial erosion is the affect of glacial erosion on the decoupling of headwater basins from main river systems. Strong glacial erosion results in flat valley bottoms and glacial over-deepenings, with reduced transport capacities of the interglacial rivers draining formerly glaciated headwaters. While this effect has been described earlier, quantitative estimates of the degree of decoupling of glacial headwaters are missing. In this paper, we will present evidences of decreased sediment yields in glacial headwaters, which results from the transition of glacial to peri-/paraglacial process regimes. These evidences are derived from geomorphomteric analysis, numerical sediment flux models and sediment budget approaches, which were conducted in the Kananaskis Valley (Canadian Rocky Mountains). Furthermore, we will compare the duration of glacial and interglacial periods during the Quaternary and the calculated interglacial erosion rates with glacial rates. We discuss the wider implications of the results with respect to the landform evolution of glaciated mountains during the Quaternary.

  2. A first 10Be cosmogenic glacial chronology from the High Atlas, Morocco, during the last glacial cycle.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fink, David; Hughes, Philip; Fenton, Cassie

    2014-05-01

    Glacial geomorphological mapping, 10Be cosmogenic exposure ages of 21 erratics from cirque-valley systems and paleo-glacier climate modelling in the High Atlas Mountains, Morocco (31.1° N, 7.9° W), provides new and novel insights as to the history and evolution of the largest desert region on Earth. The Atlas Mountains display evidence of extensive and multiple Late Pleistocene glaciations whose extent is significantly larger than that recognised by previous workers. The largest glaciers formed in the Toubkal massif where we find 3 distinct phases of glacial advances within the last glacial cycle. The oldest moraines occurring at the lowest elevations have yielded eight 10Be ages ranging from 30 to 88 ka. Six of eight samples from moraines at intermediate elevations gave ages of 19 to 25 ka (2 outliers) which correlates well with the global Last Glacial Maximum (ca. 26-21 ka) and the last termination during marine isotope stage 2. Five erratics from the youngest and most elevated moraines yielded a suite of normally distributed exposure ages from 11 to 13 ka which supports a correlation with the northern hemisphere Younger Dryas (12.9-11.7 ka). The glacial record of the High Atlas effectively reflects moisture supply to the north-western Sahara Desert and can provide an indication of shifts between arid and pluvial conditions. The plaeo equilibrium line altitudes (ELA) of these three glacier phases was more than 1000 m lower than the predicted ELA based on today's temperatures. Glacier-climate modelling indicates that for each of these glacier phases climate was not only significantly cooler than today, but also much wetter. The new evidence on the extent, timing and palaeoclimatic significance of glaciations in this region has major implications for understanding moisture transfer between the North Atlantic Ocean and the Sahara Desert during Pleistocene cold stages.

  3. Quaternary glacial and post-glacial depositional history associated with the Green Bay lobe, east-central Wisconsin

    SciTech Connect

    Thieme, L.D.; Smith, G.L. . Dept. of Geology)

    1993-03-01

    Multiple layers of peat and wood fragments indicate that Quaternary glaciation of the east-central region of Wisconsin was punctuated by at least two interglacial periods. Till, outwash, and glaciolacustrine deposits suggest that deposition took place in alternating glacial and non-glacial environments due to oscillations in the position of the Green Bay Lobe terminus. The data for this study consists of 36 auger borings, 70 geologic logs and 100 well-construction reports from water wells. Nine vibracores were taken at the northern margin of Lake Winnebago in order to document in detail the post-glacial history of Glacial Lake Oshkosh/Lake Winnebago. Local bedrock consists of limestones and dolomites of the Middle Ordovician Sinnipee Group. Bedrock elevations range from 211--237 m; bedding dips regionally to the southeast at 1--2 degrees. Bedrock is overlain by a 3--13 m-thick layer of alternating red clay and gray silty-clay (basal Kewaunee Formation ) perhaps deposited in a proglacial lake. These sediments are overlain by apeat/wood layer indicating marsh deposition. This peat/wood layer is overlain by more proglacial lake sediment, 3--10 m of gray brown clay to silty-clay. A second peat/wood layer overlies the gray/brown sediment and may correlate with the Two Creeks buried forest bed. The uppermost unit consists of 2--3 m red silty-clay till (Middle Inlet Member of the Kewaunee Formation). Along the northern margin of present-day Lake Winnebago, red silty-clay is overlain by silty-sand deposited by Glacial Lake Oshkosh. Future work includes obtaining radiocarbon dates from buried peat/wood layers to verify these tentative correlations between east-central Wisconsin and the Lake Michigan Basin.

  4. Modeling the Glacial Buzzsaw in the Patagonian Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandon, M. T.; Tomkin, J. H.

    2006-12-01

    Modeling the Glacial Buzzsaw in the Patagonian Andes The concept of a "glacial buzzsaw" was spawned by Steve Porter's observation in 1977 and 1988 that the "equilibrium line altitude" (ELA) for alpine glaciation in the Andes parallels the summit elevations of the range. The modern ELA in the Patagonian Andes drops from about 4.5 km at 30 S to about 1 km at 50 S, due to colder temperatures at higher latitudes. The summit elevations decrease steadily by a similar amount over this 2200 km distance. The landscape of the western side of the Patagonian Andes clearly shows that it has long been dominated by glacial erosion. Locally preserved tills indicate that alpine glaciation was active at 7 to 4.6 Ma, if not earlier. The idea of a glacial buzzsaw is that erosion by alpine glaciers is aggressive enough to limit the height of a mountain range. Fission-track cooling ages indicate modest long-term erosion rates (~0.5 to 1 km/Ma) for the Patagonian Andes, which precludes the possibility that the range was trimmed down to size by Quaternary- age glaciations. Furthermore, the range shows clear evidence of growth by continental subduction and tectonic accretion along its eastern margin. Evidence for recent tectonic shortening is based on the observation that the range has an approximately constant taper, as expected for a critical wedge. The width of the range decreases southward in parallel with the decreasing summit elevations. We have developed a general analytical model for coupled wedge growth and glacial erosion that accounts for much of the tectonic evolution of the Patagonian Andes. The model is based on an actively accreting wedge that maintains a constant taper geometry. The size of the wedge is controlled by competition between accretion and glacial erosion. Recent work by one of us (JHT) and Gerard Roe shows that the erosional yield caused by alpine glaciation is approximately proportional to the local elevation difference between the summit of the range and the

  5. Glacial Features on the Northern Insular Margin of Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helgadóttir, G.; Brandsdóttir, B.; Detrick, R. S.; Driscoll, N.

    2003-12-01

    The iceberg scoured insular margin of Iceland is incised by several major fjords which mark the pathways of major outlet glaciers during recent glaciations. New Simrad EM300 multibeam bathymetric and Chirp sonar data from the northern insular margin have revealed glacial and glaciotectonic formations some of which, to our knowledge, have not been previously recognized. The iceberg scoured bank areas are mostly devoid of loose sediments which has accumulated within the fjords. Glacial erosion along the Kolbeinsey Ridge indicates that the Iceland ice cap extended beond 67° N during the last glacial maximum. Multiple marginal moraines exist at 400--500 m depth within a 3--6 km wide, U-shaped valley along the western margin of the ridge (at 66° 55'N). The region east of the ridge is dominated by large volcanic complexes which bear the marks of glacial erosion, however, volcanic deposits from postglacial eruptions have blanketed all glacial features in this region. Scoured bedrock surfaces and eskers reflect the direction of two major outlet glaciers, into Skagafjördur-Skagafjardardjúp and Eyjafjördur-Eyjafjardaráll. The region between 66° 20'N and 66° 35'N in Eyjafjardaráll is dominated by a system of a Λ -shaped highly reflective (till?) ridges, which are characteristically up to 1 km long and 300--500 m wide and open towards the presumed glacial flow. The northernmost ridges strike NNE-SSW, parallel to a 10 km long lateral moraine, which most likely separated the two main outlet glaciers in this region, i.e. from Skagafjördur and Eyjafjördur. Further south, they change direction gradually, along with the fjord curvature. The Λ -shaped ridges most likely represent glaciotectonic features formed during repeated glacier advances. They are not drumlins as drumlins generally increase in volume up-glacier but the ridges down-glacier. Instead they represent some sort of composite ridges intervening depressions conforming to the general shape of the glacier

  6. Glacially induced stresses in sedimentary rocks of northern Poland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trzeciak, Maciej; Dąbrowski, Marcin

    2016-04-01

    During the Pleistocene large continental ice sheets developed in Scandinavia and North America. Ice-loading caused bending of the lithosphere and outward flow in the mantle. Glacial loading is one of the most prominent tectono-mechanical event in the geological history of northern Poland. The Pomeranian region was subjected several times to a load equivalent of more than 1 km of rocks, which led to severe increase in both vertical and horizontal stresses in the upper crustal rocks. During deglaciation a rapid decrease in vertical stress is observed, which leads to destabilization of the crust - most recent postglacial faults scarps in northern Sweden indicate glacially induced earthquakes of magnitude ~Mw8. The presence of the ice-sheet altered as well the near-surface thermal structure - thermal gradient inversion is still observable in NW Poland. The glacially related processes might have left an important mark in the sedimentary cover of northern Poland, especially with regard to fracture reopening, changes in stress state, and damage development. In the present study, we model lithospheric bending caused by glacial load, but our point of interest lies in the overlying sediments. Typical glacial isostatic studies model the response of (visco-) elastic lithosphere over viscoelastic or viscous asthenosphere subjected to external loads. In our model, we introduce viscoelastic sedimentary layers at the top of this stack and examine the stress relaxation patterns therein. As a case study for our modelling, we used geological profiles from northern Poland, near locality of Wejherowo, which are considered to have unconventional gas potential. The Paleozoic profile of this area is dominated by almost 1 km thick Silurian-Ordovician shale deposits, which are interbedded with thin and strong limestone layers. This sequence is underlain by Cambrian shales and sandstones, and finally at ~3 km depth - Precambrian crystalline rocks. Above the Silurian there are approximately

  7. Pleistocene glacial evolution of Fuentes Carrionas (Cantabrian Range, NW Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pellitero, Ramon

    2014-05-01

    Fuentes Carrionas is a massif situated at the N of Spain, between Castilla y Leon and Cantabria regions. It is the second highest mountain massif of the Cantabrian Range after Picos de Europa, with peaks over 2500 m.a.s.l. and valleys well over 1000 m.a.s.l. Fuentes Carrionas was glaciated during Quaternary, and even during the Holocene and as far as Little Ice Age the presence of glaciers, or at least permafrost is controversial. Results from glacial geomorphology analysis of Fuentes Carrionas Massif are presented. Based on the interpretation of glacial landforms, glacial evolution since the Last Glacial Maximum until Pleistocene deglaciation is described. Four different glacial equilibrium phases are identified, the last one divided into two pulsations. Deglaciation process took place between 36 ka BP and 11 ka BP. Local Last Glacial Maximum is dated back to 36-38 ka. BP, therefore earlier than LGM. Glaciers reached 15 km. long and occupied valleys down to 1250 m.a.s.l. during this phase. By European LGM (20-18 ka.BP) glaciers had substantially retreated to fronts about 1700 m.a.s.l. A final stage with two marked pulsations shows only small glaciers located at cirques above 2000 m.a.s.l. and, finally, only small cirque glaciers at North and Northeast orientation above 2200 m.a.s.l. Both these phases have been correlated to Oldest and Younger Dryas, although no dates have been done yet. A palaeoenvironmental reconstruction is proposed, based on ELA (Equilibrium Line Altitude) rise. ELA has been calculated with the AAR method and 0.67 ratio. This reconstruction shows that temperatures ranged between 9°C and 10°C lower than present ones at the end of Pleistocene, depending on a precipitations variation between 30% higher and 20% lower than current ones. Further research will focus on these retreat phases, especially on Younger Dryas identification and reconstruction for this site and the rest of Cantabrian Range.

  8. Sediment core and glacial environment reconstruction - a method review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakke, Jostein; Paasche, Øyvind

    2010-05-01

    Alpine glaciers are often located in remote and high-altitude regions of the world, areas that only rarely are covered by instrumental records. Reconstructions of glaciers has therefore proven useful for understanding past climate dynamics on both shorter and longer time-scales. One major drawback with glacier reconstructions based solely on moraine chronologies - by far the most common -, is that due to selective preservation of moraine ridges such records do not exclude the possibility of multiple Holocene glacier advances. This problem is true regardless whether cosmogenic isotopes or lichenometry have been used to date the moraines, or also radiocarbon dating of mega-fossils buried in till or underneath the moraines themselves. To overcome this problem Karlén (1976) initially suggested that glacial erosion and the associated production of rock-flour deposited in downstream lakes could provide a continuous record of glacial fluctuations, hence overcoming the problem of incomplete reconstructions. We want to discuss the methods used to reconstruct past glacier activity based on sediments deposited in distal glacier-fed lakes. By quantifying physical properties of glacial and extra-glacial sediments deposited in catchments, and in downstream lakes and fjords, it is possible to isolate and identify past glacier activity - size and production rate - that subsequently can be used to reconstruct changing environmental shifts and trends. Changes in average sediment evacuation from alpine glaciers are mainly governed by glacier size and the mass turnover gradient, determining the deformation rate at any given time. The amount of solid precipitation (mainly winter accumulation) versus loss due to melting during the ablation-season (mainly summer temperature) determines the mass turnover gradient in either positive or negative direction. A prevailing positive net balance will lead to higher sedimentation rates and vice versa, which in turn can be recorded in downstream

  9. The Glacial BuzzSaw, Isostasy, and Global Crustal Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levander, A.; Oncken, O.; Niu, F.

    2015-12-01

    The glacial buzzsaw hypothesis predicts that maximum elevations in orogens at high latitudes are depressed relative to temperate latitudes, as maximum elevation and hypsography of glaciated orogens are functions of the glacial equilibrium line altitude (ELA) and the modern and last glacial maximum (LGM) snowlines. As a consequence crustal thickness, density, or both must change with increasing latitude to maintain isostatic balance. For Airy compensation crustal thickness should decrease toward polar latitudes, whereas for Pratt compensation crustal densities should increase. For similar convergence rates, higher latitude orogens should have higher grade, and presumably higher density rocks in the crustal column due to more efficient glacial erosion. We have examined a number of global and regional crustal models to see if these predictions appear in the models. Crustal thickness is straightforward to examine, crustal density less so. The different crustal models generally agree with one another, but do show some major differences. We used a standard tectonic classification scheme of the crust for data selection. The globally averaged orogens show crustal thicknesses that decrease toward high latitudes, almost reflecting topography, in both the individual crustal models and the models averaged together. The most convincing is the western hemisphere cordillera, where elevations and crustal thicknesses decrease toward the poles, and also toward lower latitudes (the equatorial minimum is at ~12oN). The elevation differences and Airy prediction of crustal thickness changes are in reasonable agreement in the North American Cordillera, but in South America the observed crustal thickness change is larger than the Airy prediction. The Alpine-Himalayan chain shows similar trends, however the strike of the chain makes interpretation ambiguous. We also examined cratons with ice sheets during the last glacial period to see if continental glaciation also thins the crust toward

  10. Simulation and understanding the nature of Quaternary glacial cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganopolski, A.; Calov, R.

    2012-04-01

    Although it is generally accepted that, as postulated by the Milankovitch theory, Earth's orbital variations play an important role in Quaternary climate dynamics, the mechanism of glacial cycles still remains poorly understood. Among remaining scientific challenges are an understanding of the nature of 100 kyr cycles that dominated global ice volume and climate variability over the late part of Quaternary and the causes of the transition from the "40 kyr world" to the "100 kyr world" around one million years ago. Using the Earth system model of intermediate complexity CLIMBER-2, we demonstrate that both strong 100 kyr periodicity in the ice volume variations and the timing of glacial terminations during past 800 kyr can be successfully simulated as direct, strong nonlinear responses of the climate-cryosphere system to orbital forcing alone. We show that the sharp 100 kyr peak in the power spectrum of ice volume results from the phase locking of the long glacial cycles to the corresponding eccentricity cycles. Variations in obliquity and CO2 concentration are not required to simulate strong 100 kyr cyclicity if the atmospheric CO2 concentration stays below its typical interglacial value. The existence of long glacial cycles is primarily attributed to the North American ice sheet and it requires the presence of a large continental area with exposed rocks. In case when the continents are completely covered by a thick sediment layer, for the realistic range of CO2 concentrations (180-300 ppm), the long glacial cycles can not be simulated. In the experiment with fixed CO2 concentration, ice volume variations contain both strong precessional and obliquity cycles, which apparently is in odd with empirical data that suggest complete dominance of the obliquity cycle. However, in the experiments with interactive carbon cycle, simulated obliquity component becomes much stronger, especially, in the deep ocean temperature. This is explained by the direct and indirect (via the

  11. Seasonality controls on glacial erosion in the Himalaya and Karakoram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scherler, D.; Bookhagen, B.; Strecker, M. R.

    2009-04-01

    The waxing and waning of mountain glaciers during the Quaternary left a clear imprint of glacial erosion in form of deeply incised, U-shaped valleys in many mountain ranges around the world. Temperature changes and the availability of moisture are generally thought of as the limiting factors for the geomorphic work that glaciers accomplish. Here, we present evidence that the seasonality of moisture supply strongly affects glacial flow velocities, and thus the erosional efficiency of glaciers. We used ASTER satellite imagery to measure flow velocities of glaciers in the Himalaya and Karakoram during the last decade. Being situated in the transition between moisture sources rooted in the Indian Summer Monsoon and the Northern Hemisphere Westerlies, this region provides a natural laboratory to study the influence of seasonally different moisture sources on glacier dynamics. We interpret the measured surface velocities to reflect ice flux, and use them as a proxy for glacial erosion. We tie our observations to east-west gradients in climate and how they affect the mass balance of glaciers. In the central Himalaya, glaciers characterized by summer accumulation, flow at generally lower velocities compared to glaciers in the Karakoram in a winter accumulation regime. The data also show that most ice flux occurs near the equilibrium line altitude (ELA), and thereby provide empirical support for focused glacial erosion at distinct, climate controlled altitudinal sectors. These zones are presently located at approx. 4.8-5 +/- 0.5 km in the Karakoram and western Himalaya, and at approx. 5.5 +/- 0.5 km in the central and eastern Himalaya. A mean position of the Quaternary ELA, depressed by approx. 500 m, delineates a zone of focused glacial erosion that corresponds well with areas of <0.5 m annual rainfall, but high local relief. These areas dominate the western end of the Asian highlands, including the western Himalaya, the Karakoram, eastern Hindukush, and the Pamir. Here

  12. Microbial Succession in Glacial Foreland Soils of the Canadian Subarctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazemi, S.; Lanoil, B. D.

    2014-12-01

    The Canadian arctic has experienced increasing temperatures over the past century leading to heightened rate of glacial retreat. Glacial retreat leads to subsequent exposure of foreland soils to atmospheric conditions, thus creating a sequence of change in these ecosystems. Microbes are critical for soil development and nutrient dynamics in glacial systems as they are the primary colonizers of these soils and have been demonstrated to play a role in geochemical weathering and nutrient cycling beneath the glacier. Although viable microbial communities exist beneath glaciers and are known to be important for the glacial ecosystem, the impact of glacial retreat on these communities and development of the resulting foreland ecosystem is not well understood. Here, we investigate how microbial communities respond to changing conditions brought on by glacial retreat and whether a pattern of succession, such as those found in well characterized plant systems, occurs along a soil foreland in these microbial communities. We hypothesis that time since deglaciation is the major determinant of structure and composition of microbial assemblages. To test this, soil samples were collected along two glacier forelands, Trapridge Glacier and Duke River Glacier, located in Kluane National Park, Yukon Territory. Chronosequence dating of satellite images using geographic information system software revealed sampling sites have been ice-free from ~30 years to over 60 years. Soil chemistry analysis of major nutrients revealed no change in chemical parameters along the chronosequence, suggesting that presence of microbes after exposure from subglacial environments does not significantly alter soil characteristics in the timeframe observed. Furthermore, next-generation IonTorrentTM sequencing performed on soil samples revealed over five million sequencing reads, suggesting prominent microbial presence within these soils. Further analysis on sequencing data is needed to establish the

  13. The Post-Glacial Species Velocity of Picea glauca following the Last Glacial Maximum in Alaska.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrison, B. D.; Napier, J.; Kelly, R.; Li, B.; Heath, K.; Hug, B.; Hu, F.; Greenberg, J. A.

    2015-12-01

    Anthropogenic climate change is leading to dramatic fluctuations to Earth's biodiversity that has not been observed since past interglacial periods. There is rising concern that Earth's warming climate will have significant impacts to current species ranges and the ability of a species to persist in a rapidly changing environment. The paleorecord provides information on past species distributions in relation to climate change, which can illuminate the patterns of potential future distributions of species. Particularly in areas where there are multiple potential limiting factors on a species' range, e.g. temperature, radiation, and evaporative demand, the spatial patterns of species migrations may be particularly complex. In this study, we assessed the change in the distributions of white spruce (Picea glauca) from the Last Glacial Maxima (LGM) to present-day for the entire state of Alaska. To accomplish this, we created species distribution models (SDMs) calibrated from modern vegetation data and high-resolution, downscaled climate surfaces at 60m. These SDMs were applied to downscaled modern and paleoclimate surfaces to produce estimated ranges of white spruce during the LGM and today. From this, we assessed the "species velocity", the rate at which white spruce would need to migrate to keep pace with climate change, with the goal of determining whether the expansion from the LGM to today originated from microclimate refugia. Higher species velocities indicate locations where climate changed drastically and white spruce would have needed to migrate rapidly to persist and avoid local extinction. Conversely, lower species velocities indicated locations where the local climate was changing less rapidly or was within the center of the range of white spruce, and indicated locations where white spruce distributions were unlikely to have changed significantly. Our results indicate the importance of topographic complexity in buffering the effects of climate change

  14. Glacial landscape evolution on Hall Peninsula, Baffin Island, since the Last Glacial Maximum: insights into switching glacial dynamics and thermo-mechanical conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, C. L.; Ross, M.

    2012-12-01

    Ice cover in north central Hall Peninsula, Baffin Island has evolved from full Laurentide Ice Sheet (LIS) cover during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) to a thin ice cap that now covers about 800 km2 in the northeast sector. The exposed subglacial landscape consists of contrasting geomorphological zones which allude to complex spatial and temporal changes in basal ice dynamics and thermal regime since LGM. We used satellite imagery, field observations, a large till geochemical database, and terrestrial cosmogenic isotopes to get new insights into subglacial erosion intensity, ice flow dynamics, and glacial history. Fields of streamlined bedrock-cored ridges (e.g. drumlins) have been mapped and their elongation ratios calculated. The density of bedrock-controlled lakes, which has traditionally been used as a proxy for subglacial erosion intensity on Baffin Island, has been re-examined using modern GIS techniques. This work has revealed a mosaic of glacial terrain zones each consisting of characteristics that are distinct from the other zones. Five glacial terrain zones (GTZ) have been recognized. One zone (GTZ 1) is characterized by a broad flowset of northeast trending streamlined hills and parallel paleo-flow indicators. It also has the highest streamlined hill density, longest elongation ratios, and the highest lake density of the study area. This northeast flowset is crosscut locally by ice flow indicators that converge into troughs that now form a series of fjords. Landforms and ice flow indicators of this younger system (GTZ 2) are traced inland showing propagation of the channelized system into this portion of the LIS. The central area of the peninsula contains a zone of thicker till and rolling topography (GTZ 3) as well as a zone consisting of southeast trending features and associated perpendicular moraines (GTZ 4). The modern ice cap and its past extension form the last zone (GTZ 5). The preservation of the northeast system (GTZ 1) outside of the

  15. Representations of Mexican American Migrant Childhood in Rivera's "...y no se lo trago la tierra" and Viramontes's "Under the Feet of Jesus"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beck, Scott A.; Rangel, Dolores E.

    2009-01-01

    This article gives an analysis of two books: Thomas Rivera's "...y no se lo trago la tierra" and Helena Maria Viramontes's "Under the Feet of Jesus". The two books are strong and important literary texts that stand in close relation to each other. Both texts treat the subject of migrant childhood by affirming central themes of Chicano literature.…

  16. Glacial geomorphic evidence for a late climatic change on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kargel, J. S.; Strom, R. G.

    1992-12-01

    In a series of preliminary reports, we documented evidence of former glacial epochs on Mars. Apparent glacial landforms seemed to be concentrated primarily at middle to high southern latitudes. We now have additional evidence supporting the view that Martian glaciation appears to have been more extensive than previously recognized. The growth and collapse of ice sheets on Mars seems closely analogous to the growth and decline of Earth's great Pleistocene ice sheets. This implies that climate change was probably somewhat comparable on the two planets, although in the case of Mars the entire planet seems to have changed rapidly to a cold, dry present-day environment after the collapse of the ice sheets.

  17. Evidence for Obliquity Forcing of Glacial Termination II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drysdale, R. N.; Hellstrom, J. C.; Zanchetta, G.; Fallick, A. E.; Sánchez Goñi, M. F.; Couchoud, I.; McDonald, J.; Maas, R.; Lohmann, G.; Isola, I.

    2009-09-01

    Variations in the intensity of high-latitude Northern Hemisphere summer insolation, driven largely by precession of the equinoxes, are widely thought to control the timing of Late Pleistocene glacial terminations. However, recently it has been suggested that changes in Earth’s obliquity may be a more important mechanism. We present a new speleothem-based North Atlantic marine chronology that shows that the penultimate glacial termination (Termination II) commenced 141,000 ± 2500 years before the present, too early to be explained by Northern Hemisphere summer insolation but consistent with changes in Earth’s obliquity. Our record reveals that Terminations I and II are separated by three obliquity cycles and that they started at near-identical obliquity phases.

  18. Glacial geomorphic evidence for a late climatic change on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kargel, J. S.; Strom, R. G.

    1992-01-01

    In a series of preliminary reports, we documented evidence of former glacial epochs on Mars. Apparent glacial landforms seemed to be concentrated primarily at middle to high southern latitudes. We now have additional evidence supporting the view that Martian glaciation appears to have been more extensive than previously recognized. The growth and collapse of ice sheets on Mars seems closely analogous to the growth and decline of Earth's great Pleistocene ice sheets. This implies that climate change was probably somewhat comparable on the two planets, although in the case of Mars the entire planet seems to have changed rapidly to a cold, dry present-day environment after the collapse of the ice sheets.

  19. Glacial cycles drive variations in the production of oceanic crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crowley, John W.; Katz, Richard F.; Huybers, Peter; Langmuir, Charles H.; Park, Sung-Hyun

    2015-03-01

    Glacial cycles redistribute water between oceans and continents, causing pressure changes in the upper mantle, with consequences for the melting of Earth’s interior. Using Plio-Pleistocene sea-level variations as a forcing function, theoretical models of mid-ocean ridge dynamics that include melt transport predict temporal variations in crustal thickness of hundreds of meters. New bathymetry from the Australian-Antarctic ridge shows statistically significant spectral energy near the Milankovitch periods of 23, 41, and 100 thousand years, which is consistent with model predictions. These results suggest that abyssal hills, one of the most common bathymetric features on Earth, record the magmatic response to changes in sea level. The models and data support a link between glacial cycles at the surface and mantle melting at depth, recorded in the bathymetric fabric of the sea floor.

  20. Glacial cycles drive variations in the production of oceanic crust.

    PubMed

    Crowley, John W; Katz, Richard F; Huybers, Peter; Langmuir, Charles H; Park, Sung-Hyun

    2015-03-13

    Glacial cycles redistribute water between oceans and continents, causing pressure changes in the upper mantle, with consequences for the melting of Earth's interior. Using Plio-Pleistocene sea-level variations as a forcing function, theoretical models of mid-ocean ridge dynamics that include melt transport predict temporal variations in crustal thickness of hundreds of meters. New bathymetry from the Australian-Antarctic ridge shows statistically significant spectral energy near the Milankovitch periods of 23, 41, and 100 thousand years, which is consistent with model predictions. These results suggest that abyssal hills, one of the most common bathymetric features on Earth, record the magmatic response to changes in sea level. The models and data support a link between glacial cycles at the surface and mantle melting at depth, recorded in the bathymetric fabric of the sea floor. PMID:25766231

  1. The Role of Glacial Erosion in Limiting Ice Sheet Extents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamieson, S.; Hulton, N.

    2007-12-01

    We aim to identify and quantify feedbacks between ice dynamics and glacial erosion. Whilst geological and geomorphological evidence indicates that ice sheets generally oscillate in time with orbital forcing, their extents are not necessarily a direct function of the amplitude of this forcing. Benthic δ18O records document glacial-interglacial fluctuations and indicate that maximum Pleistocene global ice volume occurs around 400 ka. However, geomorphological evidence in a number of regions is contradictory, with the most extensive ice masses often occurring 100's of kyrs prior to peaks in the δ18O record. For example, the glacial landforms of Patagonia preserve a record of just such behaviour with each successive glacial advance since 1.15 Ma covering an area less extensive than the previous expansion. This implies that other processes are modifying the linkages between ice sheets and climate. We ask: Could glacial erosion of bedrock have caused ice sheets to self-regulate their extents? Ground-breaking experiments by Oerlemans (1984) demonstrated that erosion induced margin retreat was indeed possible. He showed that retreat could be achieved but only where eroding ice streams were smaller in width than the wavelength of lithospheric response. In Patagonia however, the scales of retreat are much larger than this lithospheric wavelength - but could erosion still be an important factor? We use the GLIMMER 3-D thermomechanical ice sheet model (Payne, 1999) with an added erosion component to simulate long-term landscape evolution under theoretical ice sheets (Jamieson et al., 2007). We show that models of glacial erosion can generate feedbacks on a significant scale such that ice sheets can self-limit their extents over periods of 105 - 106 years regardless of the flexural response of the land surface. Erosion around the ELA enables increasingly efficient ice drainage, and the mass balance of the ice sheet thus shifts towards a more negative state. At the same time

  2. Mercury fluxes out of glacial and non-glacial streams, as determined by continuous measurements of turbidity and CDOM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vermilyea, A.; Nagorski, S. A.; Lamborg, C. H.; Scott, D.; Hood, E. W.

    2011-12-01

    Glaciers and icefields along the Alaskan coast contribute nearly half of the freshwater discharge to the Gulf of Alaska and can play an important role in near-shore marine ecosystems. In southeastern Alaska, glaciers are rapidly thinning and retreating and are being replaced by temperate forests and wetlands. This ongoing landscape evolution is altering the sensitivity of coastal watersheds to atmospheric Hg inputs. The influence of glacial runoff with high suspended sediment loads on in-stream mercury fluxes and dynamics is poorly understood. In contrast, numerous studies have shown that streams with large contributions from wetlands typically carry high dissolved organic matter (DOM) and filtered methylmercury (FMHg) loads. This study compares and contrasts the mercury concentrations, fluxes, partitioning, and speciation in two coastal watersheds in southeastern Alaska. The two watersheds are separated by only 23 km and are relatively similar in area, however one is heavily glaciated (Lemon Creek) and one is dominated by temperate forest and wetlands (Peterson Creek). Grab samples for unfiltered total mercury (UTHg), particulate total mercury (PTHg), filtered total mercury (FTHg), and FMHg were taken during three, 4-day sampling periods within the glacial melt season (May-Sept) while continuously monitoring in-situ chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) fluorescence and stream turbidity. While UTHg concentration-discharge relationships were poor (R2=0.38-0.55) in both streams, flux estimates for UTHg were greatly improved using CDOM fluorescence (R2=0.82) for Peterson Creek, and turbidity (R2=0.81) for Lemon Creek. UTHg concentrations were consistently greater in Peterson Creek (factor of 1.7-2.3); however, the watershed area normalized UTHg flux was 3-6 times greater in glacial Lemon Creek than Peterson Creek across all time periods. In Peterson Creek, the majority of the UTHg was in the filtered phase, whereas in Lemon Creek the majority of the mercury

  3. Sedimentary architecture of the Amundsen Sea Embayment shelf, West Antarctica, from pre-glacial to glacial processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gohl, Karsten; Uenzelmann-Neben, Gabriele; Hillenbrand, Claus-Dieter; Larter, Robert; Nitsche, Frank

    2013-04-01

    Studies of the sedimentary architecture and characteristics of Antarctic shelves provide clues of past ice sheet advance-retreat cycles and help improve constraints for paleo-ice dynamic models since early glacial periods. A first seismostratigraphic analysis of the Amundsen Sea Embayment shelf and slope of West Antarctica reveals insights into the structural architecture of the continental margin and shows stages of sediment deposition, erosion and transport history from pre-glacial times to early glaciation and to the most recent glacial periods. The shelf geometry consists of a large pre- and syn-rift basin in the middle shelf region between outcropping basement of the inner shelf and basement ridges and highs beneath the outer shelf. A middle shelf sub-basin exists which may have formed as a result of motion along an early West Antarctic Rift System branch. At least 4 km of pre-glacial strata has been eroded from the present inner shelf and coastal hinterland by ice sheet advances since the onset of glaciation. Some of the eroded sediments were deposited as a progradational wedge extending the outer shelf by 25 to 65 km oceanward of the pre-glacial shelf-break. Comparing the observed seismic characteristics with those of other Antarctic shelf sequences, we assign an Early Cretaceous age for bottom sedimentary unit ASS-1, a Late Cretaceous to Oligocene age for unit ASS-2, an Early to Mid-Miocene age for unit ASS-3, a Mid-Miocene age for unit ASS-4, a Late Miocene to Early Pliocene age for unit ASS-5, and a Pliocene to Pleistocene age for the top unit ASS-6. The survival of buried grounding zone wedges in the upper part of unit ASS-5 of the outer shelf is consistent with the onset of a long warming phase and a retreated ice sheet in the early Pliocene as observed for the Ross Sea shelf and reconstructed from paleo-ice sheet models. Our data also reveal that the paleo-ice flow paths of the central Pine Island Trough system have remained stationary across the

  4. Pre-glacial, Early Glacial, and Ice Sheet Stratigraphy Cored During NBP1402, Sabrina Coast, East Antarctic Margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domack, E. W.; Gulick, S. P. S.; Fernandez-Vasquez, R. A.; Frederick, B.; Lavoie, C.; Leventer, A.; Shevenell, A.; Saustrup, S., Sr.; Bohaty, S. M.; Sangiorgi, F.

    2014-12-01

    Western Wilkes Land provides an unusual setting with regard to passive margin subsidence and exposure of Cenozoic sedimentary units across the continental shelf, due to the unique rift to drift history off of the Australian-Antarctic Discordance and subsequent deep glacial erosion of the evolved continental shelf. The first factor has provided extensive accommodation space for the preservation of stratigraphic sequences that in turn represent critical periods in the climate evolution of Antarctica. Glacial erosion has then provided access to this stratigraphy that is usually inaccessible to all but deep drilling programs. Such stratigraphies are well exposed to within cm of the seafloor off the Sabrina Coast. Cruise NBP1402 investigated this region via a combination of multi-channel seismic imaging and innovative, strategic coring. The geophysical data imaged the geologic evolution of the margin, which exhibits a continuum from non-glacial, partly glaciated, to fully glaciated depo- and erosional systems. Based on the seismic stratigraphy, we collected dredges and one barrel Jumbo Piston Cores (JPCs) across areas of outcropping strata imaged seismically, a unique strategy that allowed us to identify and sample specific reflectors. The stratigraphically deepest coring targeted sections for which the seismic character suggested a pre-glacial context, with non-glaciated continental margin sequences including deltas. Coring recovered dark organic rich siltstones and sandy mudstones, and a large concretion whose center contained a cm-sized plant fossil. In addition, the sediments contain a fossil snail. These fossils provide a glimpse into the pre-glacial terrestrial environment in Antarctica. Overlying this section, coring recovered similar dark siltstones with a 20 cm thick horizon with abundant large angular clasts of variable lithology, interpreted to be ice-rafted debris and indicative of early glacial ice in Antarctica. Finally, JPCs targeting a younger part of

  5. Tectonic stress feedback loop explains U-shaped glacial valleys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, Colin

    2014-03-01

    In the shadow of the Matterhorn, the broad form of the Matter Valley—like so many throughout the Alps—is interrupted by a deep U-shaped glacial trough. Carved into a landscape reflecting millennia of tectonic uplift and river erosion, growing evidence suggests the 100-meter-deep U-shaped groove was produced shortly after a shift toward major cycles of Alpine glaciation almost a million years ago. Subsequent glaciations may have therefore had little effect on the landscape.

  6. Ocean Cooling Pattern at the Last Glacial Maximum

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zhuang, Kelin; Giardino, John R.

    2012-01-01

    Ocean temperature and ocean heat content change are analyzed based on four PMIP3 model results at the Last Glacial Maximum relative to the prehistorical run. Ocean cooling mostly occurs in the upper 1000 m depth and varies spatially in the tropical and temperate zones. The Atlantic Ocean experiences greater cooling than the rest of the ocean basins. Ocean cooling is closely related to the weakening of meridional overturning circulation and enhanced intrusion of Antarctic Bottom Water into the North Atlantic.

  7. Glacial Isostatic Adjustment Observed with VLBI and SLR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Argus, D.; Peltier, W.; Watkins, M.

    1999-01-01

    In global geodetic solutions vertical rates of site motion are usually estimated relative to the geocenter (center of figure) of the solid earth. The velocity of the geocenter is estimated assuming that the plates are rigid, that the velocities of the plates equal those in NUVEL-1A (DeMets et al. 1990, 1994) and that the uplift, subsidence, and intraplate deformation due to glacial isostatic adjustment is negligible.

  8. An Atlas of Submarine Glacial Landforms: Modern, Quaternary and Ancient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakobsson, M.; Dowdeswell, J. A.; Canals, M.; Todd, B. J.; Dowdeswell, E. K.; Hogan, K. A.

    2014-12-01

    In the past two decades there have been several advances that make the production of an atlas of submarine glacial landforms timely. First is the development of high-resolution imaging technologies; multi-beam echo-sounding or swath bathymetry that allows the detailed mapping of the sea floor at water depths of tens to thousands of metres across continental margins, and 3-D seismic methods that enable the visualisation of palaeo-continental shelves in Quaternary sediments and ancient palaeo-glacial rocks (e.g. Late Ordovician of Northern Africa). A second technological development is that of ice-breaking or ice-strengthened ships that can penetrate deep into the ice-infested waters of the Arctic and Antarctic, to deploy the multibeam systems. A third component is that of relevance - through both the recognition that the polar regions, and especially the Arctic, are particularly sensitive parts of the global environmental system and that these high-latitude margins (both modern and ancient) are likely to contain significant hydrocarbon resources. An enhanced understanding of the sediments and landforms of these fjord-shelf-slope systems is, therefore, of increasing importance to both academics and industry. We are editing an Atlas of Submarine Glacial Landforms that presents a series of individual contributions that describe, discuss and illustrate features on the high-latitude, glacier-influenced sea floor. Contributions are organised in two ways: first, by position on a continental margin - from fjords, through continental shelves to the continental slope and rise; secondly, by scale - as individual landforms and assemblages of landforms. A final section provides discussion of integrated fjord-shelf-slope systems. Over 100 contributions by scientists from many countries contain descriptions and interpretation of swath-bathymetric data from both Arctic and Antarctic margins and use 3D seismic data to investigate ancient glacial landforms. The Atlas will be

  9. Case for periodic, colossal jokulhlaups from Pleistocene glacial Lake Missoula.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waitt, R.B., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    Lake Missoula (2500 km3) remained sealed as long as any segment of the glacial dam remained grounded; when the lake rose to a critical level c.600 m in depth, the glacier bed at the seal became buoyant, initiating underflow from the lake. Subglacial tunnels then grew exponentially, leading to catastrophic discharge. Calculations of the water budget for the lake basin (including input from the Cordilleran ice sheet) suggest that the lake filled every three to seven decades. -from Author

  10. Uncovering the glacial history of the Irish continental shelf (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunlop, P.; Benetti, S.; OCofaigh, C.

    2013-12-01

    In 1999 the Irish Government initiated a €32 million survey of its territorial waters known as the Irish National Seabed Survey (INSS). The INSS is amongst the largest marine mapping programmes ever undertaken anywhere in the world and provides high-resolution multibeam, backscatter and seismic data of the seabed around Ireland. These data have been used to provide the first clear evidence for extensive glaciation of the continental shelf west and northwest of Ireland. Streamlined drumlins on the mid to outer shelf record former offshore-directed ice flow towards the shelf edge and show that the ice sheet was grounded in a zone of confluence where ice flowing onto the shelf from northwest Ireland merged with ice flowing across the Malin Shelf from southwest Scotland. The major glacial features on the shelf are well developed nested arcuate moraine systems that mark the position of the ice sheet margin and confirm that the former British Irish Ice Sheet was grounded as far as the shelf edge around 100 km offshore of west Donegal at the last glacial maximum. Distal to the moraines, on the outermost shelf, prominent zones of iceberg plough marks give way to the Barra/Donegal fan and a well developed system of gullies and canyons which incise the continental slope. Since 2008 several scientific cruises have retrieved cores from the shelf and slope to help build a more detailed understanding of glacial events in this region. This presentation will provide an overview of the glacial history of the Irish shelf and will discuss ongoing research programmes that are building on the initial research findings to produce a better understanding of the nature and timing of ice sheet events in this region.