These are representative sample records from Science.gov related to your search topic.
For comprehensive and current results, perform a real-time search at Science.gov.
1

Spatial and temporal variability of annual glacier equilibrium line altitudes in the Southern Alps, New Zealand  

Microsoft Academic Search

Assessments of the contribution of meltwater to sea-level rise from mountain glaciers cannot presently account for the considerable spatial inter-catchment and temporal inter-annual variations in annual net glacier mass balance. We therefore analyse annual equilibrium line altitudes (ELAs) to infer the controls on annual net glacier mass-balance variability for 34 glaciers in the central Southern Alps, New Zealand. Elevation, curvature

JL Carrivick; SE Chase

2011-01-01

2

Distributed modelling of the regional climatic equilibrium line altitude of glaciers in the European Alps  

Microsoft Academic Search

Glaciers are among the key indicators of ongoing climate change. The equilibrium line altitude is a theoretical line which defines the altitude at which annual accumulation equals the ablation. It represents the lowest boundary of the climatic glacierisation and, therefore, is an excellent proxy for climate variability. In this study we introduce a simple approach for modelling the glacier distribution

Michael Zemp; Martin Hoelzle; Wilfried Haeberli

2007-01-01

3

Mass balance and equilibrium-line altitudes of glaciers in high-mountain environments  

Microsoft Academic Search

The mass-balance characteristics of glaciers in high-mountain environments complicate the relationship between glacier equilibrium-line altitudes (ELAs) and climatic variables such as precipitation and air temperature. Therefore, methods of ELA reconstruction employed in low-relief environments are commonly not applicable in high mountains, or require some modification. We review the concept of the ELA, with reference to the mass balance of a

Douglas I Benn; Frank Lehmkuhl

2000-01-01

4

Reconstructing glacier retreat since the Little Ice Age in SE Tibet by glacier mapping and equilibrium line altitude calculation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Temperate glaciers in the eastern Nyainqêntanglha Range, southeastern Tibet, are highly sensitive to climate change and therefore of particular high interest for research on late Holocene changes of the monsoonal climate in High Asia. However, because of the remoteness of the area, the scarcity of empirical data, and the challenges to remote sensing work posed by cloud and snow cover, knowledge about the glacier dynamics and changes in this region is still very limited. In this study, we applied a remote sensing approach in which 1964 glaciers were mapped from a Landsat ETM+ scene and subsequently parameterized by DEM-supported measurements. Geomorphological evidence, i.e., trimlines and latero-frontal moraines, were used to obtain quantitative data on the glaciers' morphological characteristics and the changes since the Little Ice Age (LIA) maximum glacier advance. Statistical analysis of glacier length change revealed an average retreat of ~ 27% and a trend toward stronger retreat for smaller glaciers. An evaluation of different methods to calculate equilibrium line altitudes (ELAs) indicates that an optimized toe-to-ridge altitude method (TRAM) is more suitable than other methods in settings with complex topography and a lack of mass balance measurements. A large number of glacier measurements are crucial for high quality of TRAM results, and special attention has to be paid to different glacier characteristics. In order to determine the best-fitting TRAM ratio value and to test the quality of the calculated ELAs, a remote sensing approach was applied: for each investigated glacier, the altitudes of transient snowlines visible in the late summer Landsat scene were measured from the DEM and compared to TRAM results. The interpolated ELA results show a SE-NW gradient ranging from 4400 to 5600 m asl and an average ELA rise of ~ 136 m since the LIA. Because of the high spatial resolution of measurements, the ELA distribution reveals topographic effects down to the catchment scale, specifically orographic rainfall and leeward shielding. The interpretation of these patterns reveals that the eastern Nyainqêntanglha Range is influenced by both, the Indian (ISM) and East Asian summer monsoon (EASM). However, the EASM does not reach the western part of the study area. The results indicate that the monsoonal temperate glaciers' high sensitivity to climate change is driven by two double forcings owing to the coincidence of accumulation and ablation phases.

Loibl, David; Lehmkuhl, Frank; Grießinger, Jussi

2014-06-01

5

Modelled glacier equilibrium line altitudes during the mid-Holocene in the southern mid-latitudes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Glacier behaviour during the mid-Holocene (MH, 6000 year BP) in the Southern Hemisphere provides observational data to constrain our understanding of the origin and propagation of palaeo-climatic signals. We examine the climatic forcing of glacier expansion in the MH by evaluating modelled glacier equilibrium line altitude (ELA) and climate conditions during the MH compared with pre-industrial time (PI, year 1750) in the mid latitudes of the Southern Hemisphere, specifically in Patagonia and the South Island of New Zealand. Climate conditions for the MH are obtained from PMIP2 models simulations, which in turn force a simple glacier mass balance model to simulate changes in equilibrium-line altitude during this period. Climate conditions during the MH show significantly (p ? 0.05) colder temperatures in summer, autumn and winter, and significantly (p ? 0.05) warmer temperatures in spring. These changes are a consequence of insolation differences between the two periods. Precipitation does not show significant changes, but exhibits a temporal pattern with less precipitation from August to September and more precipitation from October to April during the MH. In response to these climatic changes, glaciers in both analysed regions have an ELA that is 15-33 m lower than PI during the MH. The main causes of this difference are the colder temperature during the MH, reinforcing previous results that mid-latitude glaciers are more sensitive to temperature change compared to precipitation changes. Differences in temperature have a dual effect on mass balance. First, during summer and early autumn less energy is available for melting. Second in late autumn and winter, lower temperatures cause more precipitation to fall as snow rather than rain, resulting in more accumulation and higher surface albedo. For these reasons, we postulate that the modelled ELA changes, although small, may help to explain larger glacier extents observed in the mid Holocene in both South America and New Zealand.

Bravo, C.; Rojas, M.; Anderson, B. M.; Mackintosh, A. N.; Sagredo, E.; Moreno, P. I.

2015-03-01

6

Reconstruction of late Holocene glacier retreat and relevant climatic and topographic patterns in southeastern Tibet by glacier mapping and equilibrium line altitude calculation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Temperate glaciers in the eastern Nyainqêntanglha range, southeastern Tibet, are highly sensitive to climate change and are therefore of particular high interest for research on late Holocene changes of the monsoonal climate in High Asia. However, due to the remoteness of the area, the scarcity of empirical data, and the challenges to remote sensing work posed by cloud and snow cover, knowledge about the glacier dynamics and changes is still very limited. We applied a remote sensing approach that allowed a comprehensive regional glacier survey despite the few available data. Geomorphologic characteristics, distribution and late Holocene changes of 1964 glaciers were mapped from one of the few appropriate late summer satellite images: a Landsat ETM+ scene from September 23, 1999. The glacier dataset was subsequently parameterized by DEM supported measurements. Complex climate-relief-glacier interactions were studied in detail for three large glaciers in neighboring valleys. Despite their spatial proximity, these display strong heterogeneity in terms of catchment morphology, debris cover, and glacier characteristics. The results of this case study then provided the conceptual basis to use geomorphological evidence, i.e. trimlines and latero-frontal moraines, to obtain quantitative data on the changes since the Little Ice Age (LIA) maximum glacier advance. Statistical analysis of glacier length change revealed an average retreat of ~ 40 % and a trend towards stronger retreat for smaller glaciers. An evaluation of different methods to calculate equilibrium line altitudes (ELAs) indicates that an optimized toe-to-ridge altitude method (TRAM) outperforms other methods in settings with complex topography and a lack of mass-balance measurements. However, a large number of glacier measurements is crucial for high quality TRAM results and special attention has to be paid to different morphological glacier characteristics: debris-cover, reconstitution, valley floor limitation, and detachment of glacier tributaries, are criteria that prevent reliable ELA calculations. In order to determine the best-fitting TRAM ratio value and to test the quality of the calculated ELAs, a remote sensing approach was applied: the altitudes of transient snowlines visible in the late summer Landsat scene were measured from the DEM and compared to TRAM results for each glacier. The interpolated ELA results show a southeast-northwest gradient ranging from 4,400 to 5,600 m a.s.l. and an average ELA rise of ~ 98 m since the LIA. Due to the large amount of measurements, the ELA distribution reveals topographic effects down to the catchment scale, i.e. orographic rainfalls and leeward shielding. Contrasting to the expectations for subtropical settings, glaciers on south facing slopes have not retreated strongest and ELAs on south facing slopes did not rise furthest. Instead, highly heterogeneous spatial patterns emerge that show a strong imprint of both, topography and monsoonal dynamics. The interpretation of these patterns provides insights into the monsoonal system and the characteristics of late Holocene glacier change in southeastern Tibet. For example, the ELA distribution reveals that the study area is influenced by both, Indian summer monsoon and East Asian summer monsoon, but that the latter does not reach the Tibetan Plateau.

Loibl, David; Lehmkuhl, Frank

2014-05-01

7

Topographic control of equilibrium-line altitude depression on reconstructed 'Little Ice Age' glaciers, Grovabreen, western Norway  

Microsoft Academic Search

'Little Ice Age' marginal moraines in the Grovabreen area, inner Sunnfjord, are mapped and described. The modem and 'Little Ice Age' (mid-eighteenth century) equilibrium-line altitude (ELA) of the plateau glacier Grovabreen is calculated by the use of an accumulation-area ratio (AAR) of 0.6, giving a 'Little Ice Age' ELA depression of 125 m. AAR-ELA depression of the 'Little Ice Age'

Asbjørn Rune Aa

1996-01-01

8

Younger Dryas and Holocene glacier fluctuations and equilibrium-line altitude variations in the Jostedalsbre region, western Norway  

SciTech Connect

Reconstructed Younger Dryas (11000-10000 y BP) valley- and cirque glaciers west of the Jostedalsbre ice cap suggest an equilibrium-line altitude (ELA) depression of (450{+-}200 y BP) deglaciation was characterized by vertical wastage, indicating that the LA was above the summit plateaus. During the Erdalen event (9100{+-}200 y BP) marginal moraines were formed up to 1 km beyond the Little Ice Age (LIA) moraines which lie in front of the present valley outlet glaciers of the Jostedalsbre ice cap. The average ELA lowering during this event is calculated to 325 m below the modern level. Lithostratigraphic and paleobotanical studies show that the Hypsithermal (ca. 8000-6000 y BP) ELA was about 450 m higher than at present. As a result, Jostedalsbreen probably disappeared entirely during that period. The glacier reformed about 5300 y BP. The ELA intersected the modern mean equilibrium line altitude five times from ca. 2600 y BP to the present. The outlet valley glaciers reached their maximum Neoglacial extent during the LIA in the mid-18th century, when the ELA was depressed 100-150 m below the present level. 25 refs., 9 figs.

Nesje, A. [Univ. of Bergen (Norway)

1992-01-01

9

Detecting the equilibrium?line altitudes of New Zealand glaciers using ASTER satellite images  

Microsoft Academic Search

The glaciers of the Southern Alps of New Zealand play an important role in understanding regional and global patterns of climate change. They constitute the third largest ice mass in the Southern Hemisphere after Antarctica and South America, and present unique glaciological features in the region: high sensitivity, high input?output systems that represent the temperate, maritime end of glacier process?behaviour

Renaud Mathieu; Trevor Chinn; Blair Fitzharris

2009-01-01

10

Using remote-sensing data to determine equilibrium-line altitude and mass-balance time series: validation on three French glaciers,  

E-print Network

Using remote-sensing data to determine equilibrium-line altitude and mass-balance time series to calculate glacier mass balance using remote-sensing data. Snowline measurements from remotely sensed images by ground measurements and remote sensing are compared and show excellent correlation (r2 > 0.89), both

Rabatel, Antoine

11

Modern and Little Ice Age equilibrium-line altitudes on Outlet Valley glaciers from Jostedalsbreen, western Norway: An evaluation of different approaches to their calculation  

SciTech Connect

The modern and Little Ice Age (LIA) equilibrium-line altitude (ELA) of 20 outlet valley glacier from Jostedalsbreen, western Norway, has been calculated using different approaches. Using an accumulation area ratio (AAR) of 0.6 [+-] 0.05 gave a mean little Ice Age ELA depression of 70 m. A method developed by M. Kuhle, taking the influence by topography into account gave a mean ELA depression of 35-255 m, the median elevation of glaciers 115 m, and the toe-to-headwall altitude ration 140 m. Differences in the ELA estimates can be attributed to the differences in topography and morphology of the glaciers. The AAR method appears to provide the most reliable results. This will aid in determining mean global temperatures during the LIA. 34 refs., 9 figs., 5 tabs.

Torsnes, I.; Rye, N. (Univ. of Bergen (Norway)); Nesje, A. (Univ. of Bergen, Bergen-Sandviken (Norway))

1993-05-01

12

Reconstruction of glacier equilibrium-line altitudes for the Last Glacial Maximum on the High Plain of Bogotá, Eastern Cordillera, Colombia: climatic and topographic implications  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The High Plain of Bogotá in the Andes of Colombia provides an exceptionally detailed record of glaciation. A two-stage Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) is noted in Bogotá; the older stage (max) presents an opportunity to reconstruct individual valley glaciers and explore spatial patterns. Well-mapped geomorphic features on topographic base maps permit the reconstruction of 23 palaeoglacier surfaces. Glacier extent varies across the region, with lower altitudes reached farther to the east. Equilibrium line altitudes (ELAs) are reconstructed using the area-altitude balance ratio (AABR) method, with BRs in three groups reflecting the W-E gradient in glacier extent and selected by minimising variation from group means. Average LGM ELA for all palaeoglaciers is 3488 m with a standard deviation of 182 m. The average lowering in ELA from LGM to modern of ca. 1300 m is best explained by a considerable drop in temperature. Significant intra-regional variance in LGM ELA can be ascribed to topography and its influence on precipitation and/or glacier form, with lower headwall elevations being correlated to larger accumulation areas.

Mark, Bryan G.; Helmens, Karin F.

2005-10-01

13

Temperature and precipitation climate at the equilibrium-line altitude of glaciers expressed by the degree-day factor for melting snow  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Several authors relate accumulation (or precipitation) at the glacier equilibrium-line altitude (ELA) to summer mean temperature using exponential or power-law functions. I analyze the accumulation-temperature relation at the ELA with a degree-day model using data from the 1992 paper by A. Ohmura and others. The dataset includes estimates at the ELA of winter balance and of `winter balance plus summer precipitation' which represent respectively low and high estimates of annual accumulation, which is seldom measured. The Ohmura dataset only lists summer mean temperature, but I recover monthly temperatures for the whole year for 66 of the glaciers by assuming sinusoidal temperature variation through the year and using annual temperature range from a gridded climatology. Monthly degree-day sums are then estimated from monthly mean temperature and summed to give annual totals so degree-day factors for melting snow at the ELA are obtained. The degree-day factors fall close to those reported in the literature for glacier snowmelt, with averages of 3.5±1.4 and 4.6±1.4 mmd-1 K-1 for low- and high-accumulation estimates on the 66 glaciers. The degree-day model gives a family of accumulation-temperature curves that depend upon the annual temperature range, representing the contrast between maritime and continental climates.

Braithwaite, Roger J.

14

Present and late Pleistocene equilibrium line altitudes in the Mt Everest region — an application of the glacier inventory  

Microsoft Academic Search

UNESCO's pilot glacier inventory of the Mt Everest area was extended to include some 450 glaciers. After evaluation of various methods to establish the ELA, the pattern of the ELA isolines was analysed in relation to the orography, precipitation and temperature. The dominant role played by precipitation is recognized, and the unusually low mean AAR value of 0.41 is explained.

F. Mùller

15

Reconstruction of Equilibrium Line Altitudes of Nevado Coropuna Glaciers (Southern Peru) from the Late Pleistocene to the present  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Nevado Coropuna (15°31'S-72°39'W) is a volcanic complex located 200 km NE of the city of Arequipa, in the Southern Peruvian Andes. The summit area in the complex is covered with a glacier system formed by dozens of branches descending in all directions totaling many km2 in surface area. The study of the volcanic complex and its glaciers is of

J. Úbeda; D. Palacios; L. Vázquez

2009-01-01

16

BIODIVERSITY Accounting for tree line shift, glacier  

E-print Network

BIODIVERSITY RESEARCH Accounting for tree line shift, glacier retreat and primary succession land cover (tree line shift, glacier retreat and primary succession) into species distribution model. Methods We fit linear mixed effects (LME) models to historical changes in forest and glacier cover

Zimmermann, Niklaus E.

17

Automating the implementation of an equilibrium profile model for glacier reconstruction in a GIS environment  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Reconstruction of glacier equilibrium line altitudes (ELAs) associated with advance stages of former ice masses is widely used as a tool for palaeoclimatic reconstruction. This requires an accurate reconstruction of palaeo-glacier surface hypsometry, based on mapping of available ice-marginal landform evidence. Classically, the approach used to define ice-surface elevations, using such evidence, follows the 'cartographic method', whereby contours are estimated based on an 'understanding' of the typical surface form of contemporary ice masses. This method introduces inherent uncertainties in the palaeoclimatic interpretation of reconstructed ELAs, especially where the upper limits of glaciation are less well constrained and/or the age of such features in relation to terminal moraine sequences is unknown. An alternative approach is to use equilibrium profile models to define ice surface elevations. Such models are tuned, generally using basal shear stress, in order to generate an ice surface that reaches 'target elevations' defined by geomorphology. In areas where there are no geomorphological constraints for the former ice surface, the reconstruction is undertaken using glaciologiaclly representative values for basal shear stress. Numerical reconstructions have been shown to produce glaciologically "realistic" ice surface geometries, allowing for more objective and robust comparative studies at local to regional scales. User-friendly tools for the calculation of equilibrium profiles are presently available in the literature. Despite this, their use is not yet widespread, perhaps owing to the difficult and time consuming nature of acquiring the necessary inputs from contour maps or digital elevation models. Here we describe a tool for automatically reconstructing palaeo-glacier surface geometry using an equilibrium profile equation implemented in ArcGIS. The only necessary inputs for this tool are 1) a suitable digital elevation model and 2) mapped outlines of the former glacier terminus position (usually a frontal moraine system) and any relevant geomorphological constraints on ice surface elevation (e.g. lateral moraines, trimlines etc.). This provides a standardised method for glacier reconstruction that can be applied rapidly and systematically to large geomorphological datasets.

Frew, Craig R.; Pellitero, Ramón; Rea, Brice R.; Spagnolo, Matteo; Bakke, Jostein; Hughes, Philip D.; Ivy-Ochs, Susan; Lukas, Sven; Renssen, Hans; Ribolini, Adriano

2014-05-01

18

Equilibrium-Line Altitudes In Cold Hyperarid Settings  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Equilibrium-line altitude (ELA) is a climatically sensitive elevation on the glacier surface where annual accumulation equals annual ablation. Although local effects including debris cover, slope and aspect can influence the mass balance, ELA responds most strongly to snowfall and summer temperature (positive degree days). ELA can be estimated from the distribution and elevations of glacial deposits and is thus a useful parameter in the study of paleoclimate, although it is highly sensitive to extraneous factors, especially for small glaciers confined to cirques. This problem can be overcome by examining numerous nearby glaciated drainages, instead of point studies, for example with remote sensing using images and DEMs provided there is chronologic control from field work. However, the concept of ELA was developed and most studies of ELA have been undertaken in temperate regions with relatively high mean annual snowfall where ablation increases at lower elevations and there actually is a well-defined altitude of equilibrium. In cold arid regions such as Central Asia or parts of the Andes, snowfall can be so low (<150 mm/yr) that solar irradiation alone is sufficient to evaporate the accumulation directly (sublimation), in contrast to regions in which high amounts of snowfall require warm temperatures for melting. In these hyperarid regions, the ELA may be a poorly defined concept since the entire glacier experiences ablation, not just the lower elevations. However, because glaciers in these settings can only exist where there is no melting, the precipitation-limited arid paleoglaciers are easy to distinguish and map from the temperature-controlled glaciers, which occur hundreds of meters lower. Remote mapping can therefore be used to map the ~150 mm/yr isohyet in continental settings.

Jigjidsuren, B.; Gillespie, A. R.

2012-12-01

19

An approach to derive regional snow lines and glacier mass change from MODIS imagery, western North America  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We describe a method to calculate regional snow line elevations and annual equilibrium line altitudes (ELAs) from daily MODIS imagery (MOD02QKM) on large glaciers and icefields in western North America. An automated cluster analysis of the cloud-masked visible and near-infrared bands at 250 m resolution is used to delineate glacier facies (snow and ice) for ten glacierized regions between 2000-2011. For each region and season, the maximum observed value of the 20th percentile of snow-covered pixels (ZS(20)) is used to define a regional ELA proxy (ELAest). Our results indicate significant increases in the regional ELA proxy at two continental sites (Peyto Glacier and Gulkana Glacier) over the period of observation, though no statistically significant trends are identified at other sites. To evaluate the utility of regional ELA proxies derived from MOD02QKM imagery, we compare standard geodetic estimates of glacier mass change with estimates derived from historical mass balance gradients and observations of ZS(20) at three large icefields. Our approach yields estimates of mass change that more negative than traditional geodetic approaches, though MODIS-derived estimates are within the margins of error at all three sites. Both estimates of glacier mass change corroborate the continued mass loss of glaciers in western North America. Between 2000 and 2009, the geodetic change approach yields mean annual rates of surface elevation change for the Columbia, Lillooet, and Sittakanay icefields of -0.29 ± 0.05, -0.26 ± 0.05, and -0.63 ± 0.17 m a-1, respectively. This study provides a new technique for glacier facies detection at daily timescales, and contributes to the development of regional estimates of glacier mass change, both of which are critical for studies of glacier contributions to streamflow and global sea level rise.

Shea, J. M.; Menounos, B.; Moore, R. D.; Tennant, C.

2013-04-01

20

Estimates of Regional Equilibrium Line Altitudes and Net Mass Balance from MODIS Imagery  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Glacier mass balance is a key variable used to assess the health of glaciers and ice sheets. Estimates of glacier mass balance are required to model the dynamic response of glaciers and ice sheets to climate change, estimate sea-level contribution from surface melt, and document the response of glaciers to climate forcing. Annually resolved estimates of regional mass balance for mountain ranges is often inferred from a sparse network of ground-based measurements of mass balance for individual glaciers. Given that net mass balance is highly correlated with the annual equilibrium line altitude (ELA), we develop an automated approach to estimate the ELA, and by inference net mass balance, on large glaciers and icefields using MODIS 250 m imagery (MOD02QKM). We discriminate areas of bare ice and snow/firn using the product of MODIS' red (0.620 - 0.670 ? m) and near infrared (0.841 - 0.876 ? m) bands. To assess the skill in estimating glacier ELAs, we compare ELAs derived from (1) manual delineation and (2) unsupervised classification of the band product to ground-based observations of ELA and net mass balance at seven long term mass-balance monitoring sites in western North America (Gulkana, Wolverine, Lemon Creek, Taku, Place, Peyto, and South Cascade). Spatial and temporal variations in MODIS-derived ELAs provide an opportunity to validate regional mass-balance models, estimate surface melt contributions to sea-level rise, and examine the cryospheric response to climate change.

Shea, J. M.; Menounos, B.; Moore, R. D.

2011-12-01

21

Glaciers  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This interactive Flash exercise and animation explores glaciers, including their formation, growth, and retreat. This resource provides animations, diagrams, models in which students can see the influence of temperature and precipitation on glacier growth, and supplementary information that may serve as an overview or review of glaciers for introductory level physical geology or Earth science students at the high school or undergraduate level.

Smoothstone

22

Glaciers  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This is a great site to help you learn about glaciers! On this webpage, you will learn what glaciers are, how they are formed, the different types of glaciers, their anatomy, how they move, and about glacial erosion. This site also has a model that helps you to understand glacial growth and retreat.

2010-01-01

23

Glaciers  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Glaciers are found on every continent except Australia. This interactive feature provides an introduction to these moving streams of ice, which cover about 10 percent of Earth's land surface and hold between two and three percent of its water. Topics include what glaciers are, where and why they form, what influences their growth and decline, and how an apparently solid mass appears to flow like a river. There is also a brief description of some types of glaciers. A background essay and discussion questions are included.

24

'Little Ice Age' glaciation of Tröllaskagi peninsula, northern Iceland: climatic implications for reconstructed equilibrium line altitudes (ELAS)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Comparison of the equilibrium line altitudes (ELAS) for the present (1980s) and the maximum 'Little Ice Age' depression determined for glaciers in the Skíõadalur\\/Svarfaõardalur area of the Tröllaskagi peninsula, northern Iceland, shows a rise of c. 50 m over the last 100-150 years. Meteoro logical data suggest that over the same period the mean summer temperature at the equilibrium line

Chris Caseldine; Johann Stötter

1993-01-01

25

Glaciers  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this online activity, learners adjust mountain snowfall and temperature to see how glaciers grow and shrink. They will use scientific tools to measure thickness, velocity and glacial budget. This activity includes an online simulation, sample learning goals, teaching ideas, and translations in over 20 languages.

Wendy Adams

2011-01-01

26

Climate regime of Asian glaciers revealed by GAMDAM Glacier Inventory  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Among meteorological elements, precipitation has a large spatial variability and less observation, particularly in High Mountain Asia, although precipitation in mountains is an important parameter for hydrological circulation. We estimated precipitation contributing to glacier mass at median elevation of glaciers, which is presumed to be at equilibrium-line altitude (ELA) so that mass balance is zero at that elevation, by tuning adjustment parameters of precipitation. We also made comparisons between median elevation of glaciers, including the effect of drifting snow and avalanche, and eliminated those local effects. Then, we could obtain median elevation of glaciers depending only on climate to estimate glacier surface precipitation. The calculated precipitation contributing to glacier mass can elucidate that glaciers in the arid High Mountain Asia have very less precipitation, while much precipitation contribute to glacier mass in the Hindu Kush, the Himalayas, and the Hengduan Shan due to not only direct precipitation amount but also avalanche nourishment. We classified glaciers in High Mountain Asia into summer-accumulation type and winter-accumulation type using the summer accumulation ratio, and confirmed that summer-accumulation type glaciers have a higher sensitivity than winter-accumulation type glaciers.

Sakai, A.; Nuimura, T.; Fujita, K.; Takenaka, S.; Nagai, H.; Lamsal, D.

2014-07-01

27

The length of the glaciers in the world - a straightforward method for the automated calculation of glacier center lines  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Glacier length is an important measure of glacier geometry but global glacier inventories are mostly lacking length data. Only recently semi-automated approaches to measure glacier length have been developed and applied regionally. Here we present a first global assessment of glacier length using a fully automated method based on glacier surface slope, distance to the glacier margins and a set of trade-off functions. The method is developed for East Greenland, evaluated for the same area as well as for Alaska, and eventually applied to all ∼200 000 glaciers around the globe. The evaluation highlights accurately calculated glacier length where DEM quality is good (East Greenland) and limited precision on low quality DEMs (parts of Alaska). Measured length of very small glaciers is subject to a certain level of ambiguity. The global calculation shows that only about 1.5% of all glaciers are longer than 10 km with Bering Glacier (Alaska/Canada) being the longest glacier in the world at a length of 196 km. Based on model output we derive global and regional area-length scaling laws. Differences among regional scaling parameters appear to be related to characteristics of topography and glacier mass balance. The present study adds glacier length as a central parameter to global glacier inventories. Global and regional scaling laws might proof beneficial in conceptual glacier models.

Machguth, H.; Huss, M.

2014-05-01

28

Simulation of runoff processes of a continental mountain glacier in the Tian Shan, China  

Microsoft Academic Search

Based on calculations of energy, water and mass balance and on measurements of water routine, a model is developed to simulate glacial runoff processes for Glacier No. 1, a continental mountain glacier at the source of the Urumqi River in the Chinese Tian Shan. The melt at the equilibrium line is related to the mean melt of the glacier. The

KANG ERSI; ATSUMU OHMURA; HERBERT LANG

29

Surface energy balance of Keqicar Glacier, Tianshan Mountains, China, during ablation period  

Microsoft Academic Search

The meteorological data of ablation season in 2005 were recorded by two automatic weather stations on Keqicar Glacier in southwestern Tianshan Mountains in China. One is operated on the glacier near the equilibrium line with the altitude of 4265 m (site A) and another is operated on the glacier ablation area with the altitude of 3700 m (site B). These

Jing Li; Shiyin Liu; Yong Zhang; Haidong Han

2010-01-01

30

Polar versus temperate grounding-line sedimentary systems and marine glacier stability during sea level rise by global warming  

SciTech Connect

Marine-ending glaciers may retreat with global warming as sea level rises by ocean thermal expansion. If the sea floor rises by sediment accumulation, then glaciers may not feel the effect of sea level rise. A submersible ROV and other techniques have been used to collect data from temperate and polar glaciers to compare sediment production and mass balance of their grounding-line systems. Temperature Alaskan valley glaciers flow at about 0.2--2 km/a and have high volumes of supraglacial, englacial and subglacial debris. However, most sediment contributed to the base of their tidewater cliffs comes from subglacial streams or squeezing out subglacial sediment and pushing it with other marine sediment into a morainal bank. Blue Glacier, a thin, locally fed polar glacier in Antarctica, flows slowly and has minimal glacial debris. The grounding-line system at the tidewater cliff is a morainal bank that forms solely by pushing of marine sediment. An Antarctic polar outlet glacier, Mackay Glacier, terminating as a floating glacier-tongue, has similar volumes of basal debris to Alaskan temperature glaciers and flows at 250 m/a. However, no subglacial streams issued from Mackay's grounding line and all sedimentation was by rockfall and grainfall rainout from seawater undermelt of the tongue. A grounding-line wedge of glacimarine diamicton is deposited over subglacial (lodgement ) till. Although Antarctic grounding-line accumulation rates are three orders of magnitude smaller than Alaskan rates, both are capable of compensating for predicted rises in sea level by thermal heating from global warming.

Powell, R.D. (Illinois Univ., DeKalb, IL (United States). Geology Dept.); Pyne, A.R. (Victoria Univ., Wellington (New Zealand). Antarctic Research Center); Hunter, L.E.; Rynes, N.R.

1992-01-01

31

The Little Ice Age climate of New Zealand reconstructed from Southern Alps cirque glaciers: a synoptic type approach  

E-print Network

The Little Ice Age climate of New Zealand reconstructed from Southern Alps cirque glaciers at 22 cirque glacier sites across the Southern Alps of New Zealand. Modern analog seasons:3039­3060 DOI 10.1007/s00382-013-1876-8 #12;Keywords Little Ice Age Á New Zealand Á Glaciers Á Equilibrium line

Phipps, Steven J.

32

Glacier sensitivity and regional climate: Past and present  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study develops a surface energy- and mass-balance model with which to understand the interactions between glaciers and climate on regional-scales. This model is applied to Central Asia because of the diverse climate regimes and glacier history. The model is used to understand the sensitivity of equilibrium line altitudes (ELAs) to modern interannual climate variability, and to reconcile patterns of

Summer Burton Rupper

2007-01-01

33

Central Asian Glacier Sensitivity and Regional Climate: Past and Present  

Microsoft Academic Search

A surface energy- and mass-balance model that captures the interactions between glaciers and climate on regional-scales is presented. The model is applied to Central Asia because of the diverse climate regimes and unusual glacier history. It is used to understand the sensitivity of equilibrium line altitudes (ELAs) to modern interannual climate variability, and to reconcile patterns of ELA changes with

S. Rupper; G. Roe; A. Gillespie

2007-01-01

34

Sensitivities of the equilibrium line altitude to temperature and precipitation changes along the Andes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Equilibrium line altitudes (ELAs) of alpine glaciers are sensitive indicators of climate change and have been commonly used to reconstruct paleoclimates at different temporal and spatial scales. However, accurate interpretations of ELA fluctuations rely on a quantitative understanding of the sensitivity of ELAs to changes in climate. We applied a full surface energy- and mass-balance model to quantify ELA sensitivity to temperature and precipitation changes across the range of climate conditions found in the Andes. Model results show that ELA response has a strong spatial variability across the glaciated regions of South America. This spatial variability correlates with the distribution of the present-day mean climate conditions observed along the Andes. We find that ELAs respond linearly to changes in temperature, with the magnitude of the response being prescribed by the local lapse rates. ELA sensitivities to precipitation changes are nearly linear and are inversely correlated with the emissivity of the atmosphere. Temperature sensitivities are greatest in the inner tropics; precipitation becomes more important in the subtropics and northernmost mid-latitudes. These results can be considered an important step towards developing a framework for understanding past episodes of glacial fluctuations and ultimately for predicting glacier response to future climate changes.

Sagredo, Esteban A.; Rupper, Summer; Lowell, Thomas V.

2014-03-01

35

The current disequilibrium of North Cascade glaciers  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Three lines of evidence indicate that North Cascade (Washington, USA) glaciers are currently in a state of disequilibrium. First, annual balance measured on nine glaciers yields a mean cumulative balance for the 1984-2004 period of -8.58 m water equivalent (w.e.), a net loss of ice thickness exceeding 9.5 m. This is a significant loss for glaciers that average 30-50 m in thickness, representing 18-32% of their entire volume.Second, longitudinal profiles completed in 1984 and 2002 on 12 North Cascade glaciers confirm this volume change indicating a loss of -5.7 to -6.3 m in thickness (5.0-5.6 m w.e.) between 1984 and 2002, agreeing well with the measured cumulative balance of -5.52 m w.e. for the same period. The change in thickness on several glaciers has been equally substantial in the accumulation zone and the ablation zone, indicating that there is no point to which the glacier can retreat to achieve equilibrium. Substantial thinning along the entire length of a glacier is the key indicator that a glacier is in disequilibrium.Third, North Cascade glacier retreat is rapid and ubiquitous. All 47 glaciers monitored are currently undergoing significant retreat or, in the case of four, have disappeared. Two of the glaciers where mass balance observations were begun, Spider Glacier and Lewis Glacier, have disappeared. The retreat since 1984 of eight Mount Baker glaciers that were all advancing in 1975 has averaged 297 m. These observations indicate broad regional continuity in glacial response to climate.

Pelto, Mauri S.

2006-03-01

36

Attribution of glacier fluctuations to climate change  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Glacier retreat is a worlwide phenomenon, which started around the middle of the 19th century. During the period 1800-1850 the number of retreating and advancing glaciers was roughly equal (based on 42 records from different continents). During the period 1850-1900 about 92% of all mountain glaciers became shorter (based on 65 records). After this, the percentage of shrinking glaciers has been around 90% until the present time. The glacier signal is rather coherent over the globe, especially when surging and calving glaciers are not considered (for such glaciers the response to climate change is often masked by length changes related to internal dynamics). From theoretical studies as well as extensive meteorological work on glaciers, the processes that control the response of glaciers to climate change are now basically understood. It is useful to make a difference between geometric factors (e.g. slope, altitudinal range, hypsometry) and climatic setting (e.g. seasonal cycle, precipitation). The most sensitive glaciers appear to be flat glaciers in a maritime climate. Characterizing the dynamic properties of a glacier requires at least two quantities: the climate sensitivity, expressing how the equilibrium glacier state depends on the climatic conditions, and the response time, indicating how fast a glacier approaches a new equilibrium state after a stepwise change in the climatic forcing. These quantities can be estimated from relatively simple theory, showing that differences among glaciers are substantial. For larger glaciers, climate sensitivities (in terms of glacier length) vary from 1 to 8 km per 100 m change in the equilibrium-line altitude. Response times are mainly in the range of 20 to 200 years, with most values between 30 and 80 years. Changes in the equilibrium-line altitude or net mass balance of a glacier are mainly driven by fluctuations in air temperature, precipitation, and global radiation. Energy-balance modelling for many glaciers shows that, globally speaking, a 1 K temperature increase has the same effect as a ~25% decrease in precipitation, or a ~15% increase in global radiation. However, the relative importance of these drivers depends significantly on the climatic setting (notably continentality). In this contribution I will give a brief survey of glacier fluctuations over the past few centuries, and provide arguments that on the worldwide scale air temperature must have been the main driver of these fluctuations. A history of global mean temperature that explains the observed glacier fluctuations best will be discussed. On smaller spatial (regional) and temporal (decades) scales, changes in precipitation become important. Both with respect to the attribution problem (what caused the glacier fluctuations in the past?) and the projection issue (what will happen in the next 100 years?), it is important that many more glaciers are explicitly studied with numerical models. I will argue that for non-calving glaciers these models can be relatively simple.

Oerlemans, J.

2012-04-01

37

Simple chaotic flows with a line equilibrium Sajad Jafari a,  

E-print Network

Simple chaotic flows with a line equilibrium Sajad Jafari a, , J.C. Sprott b a Biomedical://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.chaos.2013.08.018 Corresponding author. E-mail address: sajadjafari@aut.ac.ir (S. Jafari

Sprott, Julien Clinton

38

Climate Change in the Russian Altai Mountains and its Influence on Tree Line and Glacier Dynamics  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The mountain ecosystems are highly sensitive to climate changes. The Russian Altai Mountains are located in the Inner Asia on the border of Russia, Mongolia, China and Kazakhstan. The Department of Geography and Geoecology of SPbSU has been organizing annual field expeditions to this region during the last 20 yrs. The uniqueness of the Altai landscapes lies in its great variety as these mountains are higher than 4 km and located on the zonal border between steppes and semi-deserts and between continental and sharply continental climates. This research deals with space-time features of regional climate changes and the dynamics of high-altitude landscapes. The 1940-2004 time series of seasonal air temperature and precipitation from 14 weather stations from 300 to 2600 m a.s.l. were statistically analyzed applying regression, correlation, spectral and cluster analyses. To extend time series over the past 350-400 yrs, mean summer temperature and precipitation were reconstructed applying dendroclimatological methods and using the WSL Dendro data base. Comparing to the Northern Hemisphere tendency of temperature increase in the second half of the 20th century over the Altai has been observed generally earlier, since 1950s. Maximum warming rate in the last quarter of the 20th century is typical to winter in the Altai (0,85°/10 yrs) as well as the entire Northern Hemisphere. Synchronous changes in the Altai and the Northern Hemisphere are observed in all seasons only in 1975-2004. At the turn of the XX-XXI centuries warming rates slow down in the region while temperature level is still high. These changes are partly associated with circulation epochs. Spectral analysis revealed important role of natural cyclical recurrence in climate changes, for example quasi-biennial, solar and Brückner cycles. According to dendrochronological reconstruction mean summer temperature increased from the end of the Little Ice Age (LIA) to its maximum in the 1990s by approximately 2°C, to the average for the period 1986-2004 - about 1,3°C. As tree line against the other belt borders strongly limited by summer temperature its eventual dynamics since the end of the LIA over the Altai were estimated and tree line position at different stages of modern regional warming was reconstructed. Theoretical evaluation shows that mean summer temperature increase of 1.3°C from the end of the LIA causes tree line to rise maximum by 180-280 m in different localities of the Altai. Glacial complexes of mountain massifs Mongun-Taiga, Tavan-Boghd-Ola, Turgeni-Nuru and Harhira-Nuru located in the South-Eastern Altai are represented by small glaciers mostly on northern and eastern leeward slopes. Being situated in region with dry climatic conditions (250-400 mm/year) glaciers survive only in negative forms of relief with high concentration of snow. Accumulation coefficient is mainly from 2 to 3, and on cirque glaciers is from 6 to 8. Now glaciers retreat rapidly (17% of area loss for the period of 1995-2010 for Mongun-Taiga, 12% in 2002-2009 for Tavan-Boghd-Ola), especially valley glaciers (2-10 m/yr), the number of glaciers increase due to disintegration of larger glaciers. Small forms of glaciation disappear or transform into snow patches and rock glaciers.

Syromyatina, M.; Moskalenko, I.; Ganushkin, D.; Chistyakov, K.

2011-12-01

39

The length of the world's glaciers - a new approach for the global calculation of center lines  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Glacier length is an important measure of glacier geometry. Nevertheless, global glacier inventories are mostly lacking length data. Only recently semi-automated approaches to measure glacier length have been developed and applied regionally. Here we present a first global assessment of glacier length using an automated method that relies on glacier surface slope, distance to the glacier margins and a set of trade-off functions. The method is developed for East Greenland, evaluated for East Greenland as well as for Alaska and eventually applied to all ~ 200 000 glaciers around the globe. The evaluation highlights accurately calculated glacier length where digital elevation model (DEM) quality is high (East Greenland) and limited accuracy on low-quality DEMs (parts of Alaska). Measured length of very small glaciers is subject to a certain level of ambiguity. The global calculation shows that only about 1.5% of all glaciers are longer than 10 km, with Bering Glacier (Alaska/Canada) being the longest glacier in the world at a length of 196 km. Based on the output of our algorithm we derive global and regional area-length scaling laws. Differences among regional scaling parameters appear to be related to characteristics of topography and glacier mass balance. The present study adds glacier length as a key parameter to global glacier inventories. Global and regional scaling laws might prove beneficial in conceptual glacier models.

Machguth, H.; Huss, M.

2014-09-01

40

Quasi-equilibrium electron density along a magnetic field line  

SciTech Connect

A methodology is developed to determine the density of high-energy electrons along a magnetic field line for a low-{beta} plasma. This method avoids the expense and statistical noise of traditional particle tracking techniques commonly used for high-energy electrons in bombardment plasma generators. By preserving the magnetic mirror and assuming a mixing timescale, typically the elastic collision frequency with neutrals, a quasi-equilibrium electron distribution can be calculated. Following the transient decay, the analysis shows that both the normalized density and the reduction fraction due to collision converge to a single quasi-equilibrium solution.

Mao, Hann-Shin; Wirz, Richard [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States)

2012-11-26

41

Glacier fluctuations in the Kenai Fjords, Alaska, U.S.A.: An evaluation of controls on Iceberg-calving glaciers  

SciTech Connect

The histories of four iceberg-calving outlet-glacier systems in the Kenai Fjords National Park underscore the importance of fiord depth, sediment supply, and fiord geometry on glacier stability. These parameters, in turn, limit the reliability of calving glacier chronologies as records of climatic change. Tree-ring analysis together with radiocarbon dating show that the Northwestern and McCarty glaciers, with large drainage basins, were advancing in concert with nearby land-terminating glaciers about A.D. 600. After an interval of retreat and possible nonclimatically induced extension during the Medieval Warm Period, these ice margins advanced again through the Little Ice Age and then retreated synchronously with the surrounding land-terminating glaciers about A.D. 1900. In contrast, Holgate and Aialik glaciers, with deeper fiords and smaller basins, retreated about 300 yr earlier. Reconstructions of Little Ice Age glaciers suggest that equilibrium-line altitudes of Northwestern and McCarty glaciers were, respectively, 270 and 500 m lower than now. Furthermore, the reconstructions show that these two glaciers were climatically sensitive when at their terminal moranies. However, with ice margins at their present recessional positions and accumulation area ratios between 0.8 and 0.9, only McCarty Glacier shows evidence of advance. Aialik and Holgate glaciers were climatically insensitive during the Little Ice Age maxima and remain insensitive to climate. 40 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

Wiles, G.C. [Columbia Univ., Palisades, NY (United States); Calkin, P.E. [Univ. of New York, Buffalo, NY (United States); Post, A. [Geological Survey, Vashon, WA (United States)

1995-08-01

42

Combined Ice and Water Balances of Maclure Glacier, California, South Cascade Glacier, Washington, and Wolverine and Gulkana Glaciers, Alaska, 1967 Hydrologic Year  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Combined ice and water balances were measured in the 1967 hydrologic year (October 1-September 30) on four glaciers in western North America ranging in latitude from 37 deg to 63 deg N. This hydrologic year was characterized by heavier than normal winter precipitation in California and Washington and abnormally dry winter conditions in coastal Alaska. In summer the western conterminous states were abnormally dry and central and southern Alaska experienced very wet conditions. Maclure Glacier (lat 37 deg 45' N., 3,650-m (metres) mean equilibrium line altitude) had an above normal winter balance of 3.46 m and a positive annual balance of 1.05 m (metres of water equivalent). South Cascade Glacier (lat 48 deg 22' N., 1900-m mean equilibrium line altitude) had a winter balance of 3.28 m, slightly above average. Above normal summer ablation resulted in a final annual balance of -0.58 m, slightly more negative than has been the case for the past decade. Wolverine Glacier's (lat 60 deg 24' N., 1,200-m mean equilibrium line altitude) winter balance was 1.17 m, considerably below normal; the annual balance was -2.04 m. Gulkana Glacier (lat 63 deg 15' N., 1,700-m mean equilibrium line altitude) had a winter balance of 1.05 m, approximately normal for this glacier; the final annual balance was -0.30 m.

Tangborn, Wendell V.; Mayo, Lawrence R.; Scully, David R.; Krimmel, Robert M.

1977-01-01

43

On estimating length fluctuations of glaciers caused by changes in climatic forcing  

Microsoft Academic Search

The reaction of alpine glaciers to shifts in the equilibrium line altitude (ELA) is calculated by using a two-dimensional numerical model to solve the full equations for the velocity and stress fields (full-system model) in the absence of basal motion. Rates of advance and retreat of the snout of typically sized alpine glaciers are found to be insensitive to the

G. J.-M. C. Leysinger Vieli; G. H. Gudmundsson

2004-01-01

44

Variations in Melt-Flow Acceleration Above and Below the Greenland Equilibrium Line  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Initial observations of accelerated ice flow at the equilibrium line in West-central Greenland during summer melt periods (1996 to 1999) indicated that surface melt-water rapidly propagated to the base and enhanced the basal sliding. Since then numerous observational and theoretical results have provided additional information on the melt-acceleration effect, while leading to some differing conclusions about the climatological and hydrological processes involved. Additional velocity measurements since 1999 show further characteristics of the melt-acceleration in the ice flowline though Swiss Camp, which terminates on land, and in a nearby flowline, which terminates in an outlet glacier. Accelerations as large as three times the average winter velocity are observed during stronger melt events. At downstream locations, accelerations begin earlier in the melt season, but accelerations at multiple sites along a flow line occur simultaneously later in the season. At the equilibrium line, a short period of surface uplift of about 50 cm occurs when the flow abruptly changes from acceleration to deceleration, apparently caused by ice compression during the transition. At downstream locations, the surface rises at the beginning of the melt season and drops at the end of melting suggesting an uplift forced by sub-ice water and sediment. Equivalence of the net additional displacement at upstream and downstream sites indicates no net longitudinal ice strain after the acceleration-deceleration periods. Approximate equivalence of the ratio of peak summer velocities to average winter velocities along the flowline indicate that local melt-acceleration is occurring at and above the equilibrium as well as from longitudinal coupling of downstream effects. High-frequency velocity observations show that the ice flow continues to accelerate with increasing water production during melt events, follow by an abrupt deceleration after the event, indicating that saturation of the acceleration effect from production of efficient sub-glacial channelization is not generally occurring. As the EL migrates inland with climatic warming, the melt-acceleration effect has also been migrating. The net additional displacement of several meters during the summer is about 3 to 5% of the total annual displacement, and is increasing as summer temperatures and surface melting increases.

Zwally, H.; Saba, J. L.; Steffen, K.

2013-12-01

45

Complex Behaviour of Glaciers in Ladakh Mountains (J & K State, India) : Case Study  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Ladakh Mountains house approximately 4500 glaciers in its two major basins, namely Indus (1800 glaciers) and Shyok (2700 glaciers).Glaciers in Indian Himalaya have been under monitor for past about five decades. Monitoring of scores of glaciers have been both in terms of documentary record and field studies of the glaciers in northwest Himalaya. The studies suggest that glaciers of Ladakh mountains show an extremely different behavior as compared to the glaciers of rest of northwest Himalaya. Four glaciers, namely Durung Drung, Kangriz, Machoi and Siachen, representing the Indus and Shyok basin are dealt herein. Sufficient documentary and field evidences of these four glaciers support the view that glaciers housed in Ladakh mountains contradict the commonly accepted concept of fast melting glaciers in Himalaya (Ganjoo and Koul 2009; Ganjoo et al. 2010). The studies further suggest that the secular movement of glaciers in Ladakh mountains is a complex phenomena of several micro and macro-climatic factors, terrain morphology, and tectonics (Ganjoo 2009, Koul and Ganjoo 2010). The change in the morphology of glaciers is not necessarily related with the change in climate as commonly believed and hyped. Ganjoo, R.K. (2009) Holocene Tectonics and Climate of Durung Drung Glacier Basin, Zanskar Himalaya, India (Abstract). The 5th International Symposium on Tibetan Plateau and 24th Himalaya- Karakorum-Tibet Workshop, Aug. 11-14, Beijing, China. Ganjoo, R.K. and Koul, M.N. (2009) Is the Siachen glacier melting? Current Science, 97(3), 309-310. Ganjoo, RK; Koul, MN; Ajai; Bahuguna, IM (2010) Glaciers of Nubra valley, Karakorum mountains, Ladakh (India) vis-à-vis climate change (abstract). 7th Annual Meeting of Asia Oceania Geosciences Society, Hyderabad. Koul, M.N. and Ganjoo, R.K. (2010) Impact of inter- and intra-annual variation in weather parameters on mass balance and equilibrium line altitude of Naradu glacier (Himachal Pradesh), NW Himalaya, India. Climatic Change, 99, 119-139.

Ganjoo, R. K.

2011-12-01

46

Franz Josef and Fox Glaciers, New Zealand: Historic length records  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Compilation of modern and historical length change records for Franz Josef and Fox Glaciers demonstrates that these glaciers have lost ~ 3 km in length and at least 3-4 km2 in area since the 1800s, with the greatest overall loss occurring between 1934 and 1983. Within this dramatic and ongoing retreat, both glaciers have experienced periods of re-advance. The record from Franz Josef Glacier is the most detailed, and shows major advances from 1946 to 1951 (340 m), 1965-1967 (400 m), 1983-1999 (1420 m) and 2004-2008 (280 m). At Fox Glacier the record is similar, with advances recorded during 1964-1968 (60 m), 1985-1999 (710 m) and 2004-2008 (290 m). Apart from the latest advance event, the magnitude of advance has been greater at Franz Josef Glacier, suggesting a higher length sensitivity. Analysis of the relationship between glacier length and a reconstructed annual equilibrium line altitude (ELA) record shows that the glaciers react very quickly to ELA variations - with the greatest correlation at 3-4 years' lag. The present (2014) retreat is the fastest retreat in the records of both glaciers. While decadal length fluctuations have been linked to hemispheric ocean-atmosphere variability, the overall reduction in length is a clear sign of twentieth century warming. However, documenting glacier length changes can be challenging; especially when increased surface debris-cover makes identification of the ‘true’ terminus a convoluted process.

Purdie, Heather; Anderson, Brian; Chinn, Trevor; Owens, Ian; Mackintosh, Andrew; Lawson, Wendy

2014-10-01

47

Linking glacier annual mass balance and glacier albedo retrieved from MODIS data  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Albedo is one of the variables controlling the mass balance of temperate glaciers. Multispectral imagers, such as MODerate Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on board the TERRA and AQUA satellites, provide a means to monitor glacier surface albedo. In this study, different methods to retrieve broadband glacier surface albedo from MODIS data are compared. The effect of multiple reflections due to the rugged topography and of the anisotropic reflection of snow and ice are particularly investigated. The methods are tested on the Saint Sorlin Glacier (Grandes Rousses area, French Alps). The accuracy of the retrieved albedo is estimated using both field measurements, at two automatic weather stations located on the glacier, and albedo values derived from terrestrial photographs. For summers 2008 and 2009, the root mean square deviation (RMSD) between field measurements and the broadband albedo retrieved from MODIS data at 250 m spatial resolution was found to be 0.052 or about 10% relative error. The RMSD estimated for the MOD10 daily albedo product is about three times higher. One decade (2000-2009) of MODIS data were then processed to create a time series of albedo maps of Saint Sorlin Glacier during the ablation season. The annual mass balance of Saint Sorlin Glacier was compared with the minimum albedo value (average over the whole glacier surface) observed with MODIS during the ablation season. A strong linear correlation exists between the two variables. Furthermore, the date when the average albedo of the whole glacier reaches a minimum closely corresponds to the period when the snow line is located at its highest elevation, thus when the snow line is a good indicator of the glacier equilibrium line. This indicates that this strong correlation results from the fact that the minimal average albedo values of the glacier contains considerable information regarding the relative share of areal surfaces between the ablation zone (i.e. ice with generally low albedo values) and the accumulation zone (i.e. snow with a relatively high albedo). As a consequence, the monitoring of the glacier surface albedo using MODIS data can provide a useful means to evaluate the interannual variability of the glacier mass balance. Finally, the albedo in the ablation area of Saint Sorlin Glacier does not exhibit any decreasing trend over the study period, contrasting with the results obtained on Morteratsch Glacier in the Swiss Alps.

Dumont, M.; Gardelle, J.; Sirguey, P.; Guillot, A.; Six, D.; Rabatel, A.; Arnaud, Y.

2012-12-01

48

Glacier Hazards From Space  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This interactive slide show presents aerial photographs of seven glaciers worldwide. All of the glaciers present some form of hazard due to the rapid melting of mountain glaciers and a detailed explanation is given for each. Two of the photos contain superimposed before and after photographs and a sliding line which allows the viewer to alternate the two views. Locations of the glaciers include Bhutan and Nepal, Russia and Italy, as well as Alaska in the United States.

49

Modelling glacier change in the Everest region, Nepal Himalaya  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this study, we apply a glacier mass balance and ice redistribution model to simulate historical and future glacier change in the Everest region of Nepal. High-resolution temperature and precipitation fields derived from gridded APHRODITE data, and validated against independent station observations from the EVK2CNR network, are used to drive the historical model from 1961 to 2007. The model is calibrated against geodetically derived estimates of net glacier mass change from 1992 to 2008, termini position of four large glaciers at the end of the calibration period, average velocities observed on selected debris-covered glaciers, and total glacierized area. We integrate field-based observations of glacier mass balance and ice thickness with remotely-sensed observations of decadal glacier change to validate the model. Between 1961 and 2007, the mean modelled volume change over the Dudh Kosi basin is -6.4 ± 1.5 km3, a decrease of 15.6% from the original estimated ice volume in 1961. Modelled glacier area change between 1961 and 2007 is -101.0 ± 11.4 km2, a decrease of approximately 20% from the initial extent. Scenarios of future climate change, based on CMIP5 RCP4.5 and RCP8.5 end members, suggest that glaciers in the Everest region will continue to lose mass through the 21st century. Glaciers in the basin are concentrated between 5000 and 6000 m of elevation, and are thus expected to be sensitive to changes in temperature and equilibrium line altitude (ELA). Glacier volume reductions between -35 to -62% are possible by 2050, and sustained temperature increases to 2100 may result in total glacier volume losses of between -73 and -96%.

Shea, J. M.; Immerzeel, W. W.; Wagnon, P.; Vincent, C.; Bajracharya, S.

2014-10-01

50

The Little Ice Age climate of New Zealand reconstructed from Southern Alps cirque glaciers: a synoptic type approach  

E-print Network

The Little Ice Age climate of New Zealand reconstructed from Southern Alps cirque glaciers;Keywords Little Ice Age Á New Zealand Á Glaciers Á Equilibrium line altitude Á Synoptic types Á Southern the Southern Alps of New Zealand. Modern analog seasons with temperature anomalies akin to the LIA

Phipps, Steven J.

51

Mountain and subpolar glaciers show an increase in sensitivity to climate warming and intensification of the water cycle  

Microsoft Academic Search

The time-series of all available records of seasonal and annual glacier mass balances, equilibrium line altitude, accumulation area ratio and change in surface area of about 300 glaciers have been compiled, digitized, quality checked and analyzed over the period of almost four decades (1961–1998). These time-series show significant changes towards loss in glacier area and volume in global scale with

Mark Dyurgerov

2003-01-01

52

Glacier Recession Prepared by Joni L. Kincaid  

E-print Network

Glacier Recession Prepared by Joni L. Kincaid for the Advancing Geospatial Skills in Science funded by the National Science Foundation's GK-12 Program. Spring, 2007 #12;Glacier: a large mass of ice Line Glacier How do glaciers form? Glaciers form in locations where the snow does not melt over

53

Linking glacier annual mass balance and glacier albedo retrieved from MODIS data  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Albedo is one of the variables controlling the mass balance of temperate glaciers. Multispectral imagers, such as MODerate Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on board the TERRA and AQUA satellites, provide a means to monitor glacier surface albedo. In this study, different methods to retrieve broadband glacier surface albedo from MODIS data are compared. The effect of multiple reflections due to the rugged topography and of the anisotropic reflection of snow and ice are particularly investigated. The methods are tested on the Saint Sorlin Glacier (Grandes Rousses area, French Alps). The accuracy of the retrieved albedo is estimated using both field measurements, at two automatic weather stations located on the glacier, and albedo values derived from terrestrial photographs. For summers 2008 and 2009, the Root Mean Square Deviation (RMSD) between field measurements and the broadband albedo retrieved from MODIS data at 250 m spatial resolution was found to be 0.052 or about 10% relative error. The RMSD estimated for the MOD10 daily albedo product is about three times higher. One decade (2000-2009) of MODIS data were then processed to create a time series of albedo maps of Saint Sorlin Glacier during the ablation season. The annual mass balance of Saint Sorlin Glacier was compared with the minimum albedo value (average over the whole glacier surface) observed with MODIS during the ablation season. A strong linear correlation exists between the two variables. Furthermore, the date when the average albedo of the whole glacier reaches a minimum closely corresponds to the period when the snowline is located at its highest elevation, thus when the snowline is a good indicator of the glacier equilibrium line. This indicates that this strong correlation results from the fact that the minimal average albedo values of the glacier contains a considerable information regarding the relative share of areal surfaces between the ablation zone (i.e. ice with generally low albedo values) and the accumulation zone (i.e. snow with a relatively high albedo). As a consequence, the monitoring of the glacier surface albedo using MODIS data can provide a useful means to evaluate the inter-annual variability of the glacier mass balance. Finally, the albedo in the ablation area of Saint Sorlin Glacier does not exhibit any decreasing trend over the study period, contrasting with the results obtained on Morteratsch Glacier in the Swiss Alps.

Dumont, M.; Gardelle, J.; Sirguey, P.; Guillot, A.; Six, D.; Rabatel, A.; Arnaud, Y.

2012-07-01

54

Linking glacier annual mass balance and glacier albedo retrieved from MODIS data  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on board the TERRA and AQUA satellites, provide a means to monitor glacier surface albedo. In this study, different methods to retrieve broadband glacier surface albedo from MODIS data are compared. The effect of multiple reflections due to the rugged topography and of the anisotropic reflection of snow and ice are particularly investigated. The methods are tested on the Saint Sorlin Glacier (Grandes Rousses area, French Alps). The accuracy of the retrieved albedo is estimated using both field measurements, at two automatic weather stations located on the glacier, and albedo values derived from terrestrial photographs. For summers 2008 and 2009, the Root Mean Square Deviation (RMSD) between field measurements and the broadband albedo retrieved from MODIS data at 250m spatial resolution was found to be 0.052 or about 10% relative error. The RMSD estimated for the MOD10 daily albedo product is about three times higher. One decade (2000-2009) of MODIS data were then processed to create a time series of albedo maps of four glaciers in the French Alps including Saint Sorlin Glacier during the ablation season. The annual mass balance of each glacier was compared with the minimum albedo value (average over the whole glacier surface) observed with MODIS during the ablation season. A strong linear correlation exists between the two variables. Furthermore, the date when the average albedo of the whole glacier reaches a minimum closely corresponds to the period when the snowline is located at its highest elevation, thus when the snowline is a good indicator of the glacier equilibrium line. This indicates that this strong correlation results from the fact that the minimal average albedo values of the glacier contains a considerable information regarding the relative share of areal surfaces between the ablation zone (i.e. ice with generally low albedo values) and the accumulation zone (i.e. snow with a relatively high albedo). As a consequence, the monitoring of the glacier surface albedo using MODIS data can provide a useful means to evaluate the inter-annual variability of the glacier mass balance. Finally, the albedo in the ablation area of Saint Sorlin Glacier does not exhibit any decreasing trend over the study period, contrasting with the results obtained on Morteratsch Glacier in the Swiss Alps.

Dumont, M.; Gardelle, J.; Sirguey, P. J.; Guillot, A.; Décaux, L.; Rabatel, A.; Six, D.; Arnaud, Y.

2012-12-01

55

Equilibrium and kinetic analysis of Autographa californica nuclear polyhedrosis virus attachment to different insect cell lines  

Microsoft Academic Search

The kinetic and equilibrium attachment of Autographa californica nuclear polyhedrosis virus (AcMNPV) to seven insect cell lines was evaluated. Kinetic experi- ments revealed differences of up to 10-fold in the infection rates among cell lines. Equilibrium binding also varied between cell lines and was saturable. The Tn 5B1-4 and Tn F cell lines had the highest virus binding affinities and

T. J. Wickham; M. L. Shuler; D. A. Hammer; R. R. Granados; H. A. Wood

1992-01-01

56

Rapid Thinning of a Lake Calving Glacier: Yakutat Glacier, Southeast Alaska  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Calving glaciers around the world have recently undergone a rapid retreat and are important contributors to global sea level rise. Due to their greatly increased mass loss, tidewater glaciers in particular have long received much attention, whereas lake calving glaciers have just been identified as significant contributors. In southeast Alaska, numerous glaciers have experienced rapid retreat and significant thinning during the last several decades. To better understand the causes for these rapid changes we have focused on Yakutat Glacier, a lake calving glacier in southeast Alaska. Yakutat Glacier is part of the Yakutat Ice field and drains into Harlequin Lake, which has depths of over 300 m at the calving face. The ice field covers an area of 668 sq km and lies in a maritime area off the coast of the Gulf of Alaska. The average precipitation in the nearby town of Yakutat is over 3800 mm per year. However, the ice field divide is essentially at or below the current equilibrium line altitude (ELA) of 800 - 900 m for this region, thereby ensuring the glacier will continue to thin, provided the current trend of regional warming does not reverse. The ongoing thinning continues to lower the glaciers average elevation, increasing its average ablation, even under constant climate. This forms a positive feedback loop that is known as the Bovardsson effect. In addition, radio echo sounding shows much of the glacier base near or below sea level, indicating that lake calving will remain playing a role in the retreat. We obtained a 40 m-grid digital elevation model (DEM) derived from September 3, 2007 SPOT imagery and obtained under the IPY SPIRIT program. We used August 26, 2007 laser altimetry profiles to check the accuracy of the DEM and found a mean difference of 2 m (DEM greater) with a standard deviation of 2.3 m. We differenced this DEM from a DEM from the February 2000 Shuttle Radar Topography Mission to determine the extent of the volume change and thinning. During this period, the Yakutat Ice field lost about 22.4 ± 7.5 cubic km of ice, with thinning rates increasing down glacier, especially towards the glacier's grounding line. Just up glacier from this grounding line, we found elevation changes of over 10 m per year. The same trend is visible in a comparison between the 2007 Spot DEM and a July 2009 DEM generated from photogrammetry imagery. Little change in surface elevation occurred over the 2-km-long floating tongue during this time period, but recently the entire floating tongue has started to disintegrate.

Truessel, B.; Motyka, R. J.; Larsen, C. F.; Truffer, M.

2010-12-01

57

Climatic and topographic influences on glacier distribution in the Bhutan Himalaya  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The locations and extent of mountain glaciers are affected by climatic constraints such as air temperature, precipitation, and solar radiation, as well as by local topography, which influences avalanche accumulation and debris supply. To evaluate these influences on the elevational distribution of glaciers in the Bhutan Himalaya, we created a glacier inventory together with debris-covered area and potential material-supply (PMS) slopes using satellite images with high spatial resolution. The median elevation of a glacier, which is used as a proxy of the equilibrium line altitude (ELA), decreases with increasing annual precipitation, suggesting the influence of climatic factors, according to which the ELA is lowered in relatively warm and humid environments, and raised when the opposite conditions prevail. We found a weak but significant influence of topography on the elevational distribution of glaciers, indicated by the relationship between the deviation of the median elevation of an individual glacier from the regional average and the PMS slope ratio (defined as the ratio of the PMS slope area to glacier area). We further analysed the dependency of the median glacier elevation on the gradient and aspect of PMS slopes. We found that the median elevation is affected by the avalanche-driven redistribution of snow accumulation on debris-free glaciers, and that in debris-covered glaciers the debris supply affects glacier extent through the insulation effect of the debris layer.

Nagai, H.; Fujita, K.; Sakai, A.; Nuimura, T.; Tadono, T.

2014-02-01

58

Response of Karakoram-Himalayan glaciers to climate variability and climatic change: A regional climate model assessment  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Karakoram and the Himalayan mountain range accommodate a large number of glaciers and are the major source of several perennial rivers downstream. To interactively describe to response of glaciers to climate change, a glacier parameterization scheme has been developed and implemented into the regional climate model REMO. The scheme simulates the mass balance as well as changes of the areal extent of glaciers on a subgrid scale. The parameterization scheme is for the first time applied to the region. A regional glacier inventory is compiled and is used to initialize glacier area and volume. Over the highly complex and data sparse region, the simulated mass balance largely agrees with observations including the positive Karakoram anomaly. The simulated equilibrium line altitude is well captured although a systematic underestimation is apparent. REMO simulates the glacier-climate interaction reasonably well; it has clear potential to be used for future climate assessments.

Kumar, Pankaj; Kotlarski, Sven; Moseley, Christopher; Sieck, Kevin; Frey, Holger; Stoffel, Markus; Jacob, Daniela

2015-03-01

59

Benchmark Glaciers  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The United States Geological Survey (USGS) operates a long-term "benchmark" glacier program to intensively monitor climate, glacier motion, glacier mass balance, glacier geometry, and stream runoff at a few select sites. The data collected are used to understand glacier-related hydrologic processes and improve the quantitative prediction of water resources, glacier-related hazards, and the consequences of climate change. This page presents some of the balance, runoff, and temperature data for three glaciers: Gulkana, South Cascade and Wolverine. Reports for each of these glaciers uses the collected data to draw many conclusions. There is also a section with common questions and myths about glaciers.

60

Gulkana Glacier, Alaska-Mass balance, meteorology, and water measurements, 1997-2001  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The measured winter snow, maximum winter snow, net, and annual balances for 1997-2001 in the Gulkana Glacier basin are determined at specific points and over the entire glacier area using the meteorological, hydrological, and glaciological data. We provide descriptions of glacier geometry to aid in estimation of conventional and reference surface mass balances and descriptions of ice motion to aid in the understanding of the glacier's response to its changing geometry. These data provide annual estimates for area altitude distribution, equilibrium line altitude, and accumulation area ratio during the study interval. New determinations of historical area altitude distributions are given for 1900 and annually from 1966 to 2001. As original weather instrumentation is nearing the end of its deployment lifespan, we provide new estimates of overlap comparisons and precipitation catch efficiency. During 1997-2001, Gulkana Glacier showed a continued and accelerated negative mass balance trend, especially below the equilibrium line altitude where thinning was pronounced. Ice motion also slowed, which combined with the negative mass balance, resulted in glacier retreat under a warming climate. Average annual runoff augmentation by glacier shrinkage for 1997-2001 was 25 percent compared to the previous average of 13 percent, in accordance with the measured glacier volume reductions.

March, Rod S.; O'Neel, Shad

2011-01-01

61

Equilibrium  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Using a visual approach, this applet is designed to help students learn to solve equilibrium calculations and also to help them gain a deeper understanding of the topic. It can be used by the instructor in the classroom as equilibrium topics are introduced. Sample exercises for students are included. The text is available in both English and Spanish.

62

What do We Know the Snow Darkening Effect Over Himalayan Glaciers?  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The atmospheric absorbing aerosols such as dust, black carbon (BC), organic carbon (OC) are now well known warming factors in the atmosphere. However, when these aerosols deposit onto the snow surface, it causes darkening of snow and thereby absorbing more energy at the snow surface leading to the accelerated melting of snow. If this happens over Himalayan glacier surface, the glacier meltings are expected and may contribute the mass balance changes though the mass balance itself is more complicated issue. Glacier has mainly two parts: ablation and accumulation zones. Those are separated by the Equilibrium Line Altitude (ELA). Above and below ELA, snow accumulation and melting are dominant, respectively. The change of ELA will influence the glacier disappearance in future. In the Himalayan region, many glacier are debris covered glacier at the terminus (i.e., in the ablation zone). Debris is pieces of rock from local land and the debris covered parts are probably not affected by any deposition of the absorbing aerosols because the snow surface is already covered by debris (the debris covered parts have different mechanism of melting). Hence, the contribution of the snow darkening effect is considered to be most important "over non debris covered part" of the Himalayan glacier (i.e., over the snow or ice surface area). To discuss the whole glacier retreat, mass balance of each glacier is most important including the discussion on glacier flow, vertical compaction of glacier, melting amount, etc. The contribution of the snow darkening is mostly associated with "the snow/ice surface melting". Note that the surface melting itself is not always directly related to glacier retreats because sometimes melt water refreezes inside of the glacier. We should discuss glacier retreats in terms of not only the snow darkening but also other contributions to the mass balance.

Yasunari, T. J.; Lau, K.-U.; Koster, R. D.; Suarez, M.; Mahanama, S. P.; Gautam, R.; Kim, K. M.; Dasilva, A. M.; Colarco, P. R.

2011-01-01

63

Bivachnyy Glacier  

USGS Multimedia Gallery

Photograph of Bivachnyy Glacier, a surging valley glacier in the central Pamir Mountains. The glacier has a thick debris cover derived from adjacent mountains. Photograph courtesy of V.M. Kotlyakov, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow....

64

Glacier Melt  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This short video shows an example of melting alpine glaciers in the Austrian Alps (Goldberg Glacier). Disappearing alpine glaciers have social and environmental impacts, including the decline of fresh water supplies and contributing to sea level rise.

National Geographic

65

The climatic conditions of polar-type glaciers development in china  

Microsoft Academic Search

Around the Kunlun Peak there are many huge and broad mountains lifting above the Equilibrium Line altitade (ELA). forming\\u000a the largest glacier distribution centre in China. Here the ELA is very high and the glacier existence is attributed to the\\u000a unfavorableness of ablation, not the favorablenesses of accumulation. In the ablation period strong evaporation-sublimation\\u000a and conduction expend a large amount

Maohuan Huang

1995-01-01

66

Draft paper, June 2011 Traffic equilibrium between transit lines serviced by  

E-print Network

of passenger waiting and route choice at a transit station where a set of lines serviced by vehicles of limitedDraft paper, June 2011 1/33 Traffic equilibrium between transit lines serviced by capacitated vehicles: a route choice model with passenger waiting on platform Fabien Leurent (1 ) Université Paris Est

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

67

Equilibrium Line Altitudes and paleotemperature reconstructions from Nevado Hualcán (9°S) and Nevado Coropuna (15°S), Tropical Andes (Peru).  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We have reconstructed the Equilibrium Line Altitude (ELA) in seven valleys on the SW slope of Nevado Hualcán (9°S, 77°W; 6122 m asl) and on the SE slope of Nevado Coropuna (15°S, 72°W; 6377masl) using the Area x Altitude Balance Ratio method (Osmaston 2005). We have also deduced the paleotemperatures using the following equation: ?T=ATLR•?ELA; being ?T (°C) the paleotemperature depression; ATLR (°C/m) the Atmospheric Temperature Lapse Rate; and ?ELA (m) the ELA depression. The ATLR for Coropuna was deduced through the use of data loggers. For Hualcán we used the value ATLR =0.0065°C/m, valid for the tropics (Kaser and Osmaston, 2002). We obtained the following results: 1) Hualcán: a) ELAs: 5124m (2003); 5018m (1962); 4994m during the Little Ice Age (LIA); and 4652m during the last studied maximum advance considered to be the Younger Dryas (YD, ~13-11ka) by correlation with nearby mountains (Glasser et al., 2009). b) ?ELAs: 106m (1962); 130m (LIA); and 199m (YD). c) ?T: -0.69°C (1962); -0.85°C (LIA); -3.07°C (YD). 2) Coropuna: a) ELAs: 5862m (2007); 5853m (1986); 5787m (1955); 5776 (LIA); and 4951m in the 13-1136Cl ka phase (Ubeda, 2011). b) ?ELA: 9m (1986); 66m (1955); 86m (LIA); and 911m in 13-1136Cl ka. C) ?T: -0.20°C (1986); -0.71°C (1955); and -7.65°C (13-1136Cl ka). The values ?T during LIA in Hualcán and Coropuna (0.85 and 0.72°C) are consistent with the global warming considered to be 0,74°C between 1906 and 2005 (IPCC, 2007). During the mid XXth century and the LIA, ?T is higher in Hualcán (0.69°C and 0.85°C) than in Coropuna (0.55°C and 0.72°C), with a regional gradient of -0.02°C per degree of latitude (°C/°). However, during the YD (13-1136Cl ka), ?T was higher in Coropuna (7.65°C) than in Hualcán (3.07°C), with a gradient of 0.76°C/°. Although other evidences exist of a pantropical cooling of >5°C during the last glaciation, in Coropuna this cooling was strengthened by the retro-alimentation of its glacial system which in 13-1136Cl ka had a surface of >400 km2 (Ubeda, 2011). Glasser, N.F., Clemmens, S., Schnabel, C., Fenton, C.R. and McHargue, L., 2009. Tropical glacier fluctuations in the Cordillera Blanca, Peru between 12.5 and 7.6 ka from cosmogenic 10Be dating. Quaternary Science Reviews, 28: 3448-3458. IPCC, 2007: Climate Change 2007: Synthesis Report. Contribution of Working Groups I, II and III to the Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change [Core Writing Team, Pachauri, R.K and Reisinger, A. (eds.)]. IPCC, Geneva, Switzerland, 104 pp. Kaser, G. and Osmaston, H., 2002. Tropical Glaciers. International Hydrology Series. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge (U.K.), 207 pp. Osmaston, H., 2005. Estimates of glacier equilibrium line altitudes by the Area x Altitude, the Area x Altitude Balance Ratio and the Area x Altitude Balance Index methods and their validation. Quaternary International, 22-31: 138-139. Úbeda, J., 2011. El impacto del cambio climático en los glaciares del complejo volcánico Nevado Coropuna (cordillera occidental de los Andes, Sur del Perú). PhD Thesis. Universidad Complutense de Madrid, (Spain), 558 pp. Available online: http://eprints.ucm.es/12076/ Research funded by CGL2009-7343 project, Government of Spain.

Úbeda, J.; Giráldez, C.; Palacios, D.

2012-04-01

68

Glacier Maker  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This site contains hands-on activities that explore the structure of glaciers. Students identify the contents of a glacier like those found in Patagonia; construct a mini glacier model in class; and compare and contrast the classroom model with Patagonian glaciers. Topics included in this page are: Instructional objectives, background materials, activity, procedure, evaluation and web resources.

69

Debris-Covered Glaciers in the Sierra Nevada, California, and Their Implications for Snowline Reconstructions  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Ice-walled melt ponds on the surfaces of active valley-floor rock glaciers and Matthes (Little Ice Age) moraines in the southern Sierra Nevada indicate that most of these landforms consist of glacier ice under thin (ca. 1 - 10 m) but continuous covers of rock-fall-generated debris. These debris blankets effectively insulate the underlying ice and greatly reduce rates of ablation relative to that of uncovered ice. Such insulation explains the observations that ice-cored rock glaciers in the Sierra, actually debris-covered glaciers, are apparently less sensitive to climatic warming and commonly advance to lower altitudes than do adjacent bare-ice glaciers. Accumulation-area ratios and toe-to-headwall-altitude ratios used to estimate equilibrium-line altitudes (ELAs) of former glaciers may therefore yield incorrect results for cirque glaciers subject to abundant rockfall. Inadvertent lumping of deposits from former debris-covered and bare-ice glaciers partially explains an apparently anomalous regional ELA gradient reported for the pre-Matthes Recess Peak Neoglacial advance. Distinguishing such deposits may be important to studies that rely on paleo-ELA estimates. Moreover, Matthes and Recess Peak ELA gradients along the crest evidently depend strongly on local orographic effects rather than latitudinal climatic trends, indicating that simple linear projections and regional climatic interpretations of ELA gradients of small glaciers may be unreliable.

Clark, D.H.; Clark, M.M.; Gillespie, A.R.

1994-01-01

70

Holocene optimum events inferred from subglacial sediments at Tschierva Glacier, Eastern Swiss Alps  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This study investigates the subglacial sedimentary archive at Tschierva Glacier, Eastern Swiss Alps. Subfossil wood remains found at the retreating glacier tongue indicate that their emergence results from recent transport from an upvalley basin. A confluence-basin-like structure was found to exist by georadar measurements underneath the present glacier. In combination with high resolution age determinations based on dendrochronology and radiocarbon dating it is implied that a retreated Tschierva Glacier allowed vegetation growth and sediment accumulation in that basin. Three periods of glacier recession were detected, which occurred around 9200 cal yr BP, from 7450 to 6650 cal yr BP and from 6200 to 5650 cal yr BP. These periods are called Holocene optimum events (HOE). Accordingly, an equilibrium line rise >220 m compared to the reference period from 1960 to 1985 was inferred from digital elevation models of former glacier extents. Since glacier mass balance depends on summer (June-July-August) temperature and precipitation, an equilibrium line altitude (ELA) rise of 220 m implies a summer temperature increase of about 1.8 °C assuming unchanged precipitation during the dated HOE. Alternative calculations point to probable temperature increase in a broad interval between +1.0 °C taking into account a precipitation change of -250 mm/a to +2.5 °C with +250 mm/a precipitation change, supporting earlier paleotemperature estimates. It is proposed that higher mean summer insolation caused a stronger seasonality during the mid-Holocene as compared to late Holocene conditions.

Joerin, U. E.; Nicolussi, K.; Fischer, A.; Stocker, T. F.; Schlüchter, C.

2008-02-01

71

Secular trend of the equilibrium-line altitude on the western side of the southern Andes, derived from radiosonde and surface observations  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The altitude of the 0°C isotherm obtained from radiosonde data of the aerological Chilean stations Antofagasta, Quintero/Santo Domingo, Puerto Montt and Punta Arenas are analyzed, along with surface temperature and precipitation records from nearby stations. The strong effect of the 1976/77 climate shift due to a change in the Pacific Decadal Oscillation is evident in the temperature and precipitation data. The data are used as input for an empirical model which reconstructs annually the equilibrium-line altitude (ELA) for the last 49 years on the western side of the southern Andes. The model takes air temperature, precipitation and altitude as the main parameters, and was first developed by Fox (1993) and applied by Condom and others (2007). From the radiosonde data, a significant positive trend of the 0°C isotherm has occurred in the northern, central and southern regions, indicating an ELA rise due to regional warming. General glacier retreat, ice thinning and negative mass balance observed during the past few decades in virtually all the Chilean Andes concur with the observed ELA reconstruction. In the Punta Arenas radiosonde record there is slight evidence for precipitation increase but no evidence for significant warming in the past few decades. This results in a slight lowering of the ELA according to the model reconstruction, which does not agree with the strong and increased glacier retreat observed in recent decades in Patagonia.

Carrasco, Jorge F.; Osorio, Roberto; Casassa, Gino

72

Seasonal changes in surface albedo of Himalayan glaciers from MODIS data and links with the annual mass balance  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Few glaciological field data are available on glaciers in the Hindu Kush-Karakoram-Himalayan (HKH) region, and remote sensing data are thus critical for glacier studies in this region. The main objectives of this study are to document, using satellite images, the seasonal changes of surface albedo for two Himalayan glaciers, Chhota Shigri Glacier (Himachal Pradesh, India) and Mera Glacier (Everest region, Nepal), and to reconstruct the annual mass balance of these glaciers based on the albedo data. Albedo is retrieved from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) images, and evaluated using ground based measurements. At both sites, we find high coefficients of determination between annual minimum albedo averaged over the glacier (AMAAG) and glacier-wide annual mass balance (Ba) measured with the glaciological method (R2 = 0.75). At Chhota Shigri Glacier, the relation between AMAAG found at the end of the ablation season and Ba suggests that AMAAG can be used as a proxy for the maximum snow line altitude or equilibrium line altitude (ELA) on winter-accumulation-type glaciers in the Himalayas. However, for the summer-accumulation-type Mera Glacier, our approach relied on the hypothesis that ELA information is preserved during the monsoon. At Mera Glacier, cloud obscuration and snow accumulation limits the detection of albedo during the monsoon, but snow redistribution and sublimation in the post-monsoon period allows for the calculation of AMAAG. Reconstructed Ba at Chhota Shigri Glacier agrees with mass balances previously reconstructed using a positive degree-day method. Reconstructed Ba at Mera Glacier is affected by heavy cloud cover during the monsoon, which systematically limited our ability to observe AMAAG at the end of the melting period. In addition, the relation between AMAAG and Ba is constrained over a shorter time period for Mera Glacier (6 years) than for Chhota Shigri Glacier (11 years). Thus the mass balance reconstruction is less robust for Mera Glacier than for Chhota Shigri Glacier. However our method shows promising results and may be used to reconstruct the annual mass balance of glaciers with contrasted seasonal cycles in the western part of the HKH mountain range since the early 2000s when MODIS images became available.

Brun, F.; Dumont, M.; Wagnon, P.; Berthier, E.; Azam, M. F.; Shea, J. M.; Sirguey, P.; Rabatel, A.; Ramanathan, Al.

2015-02-01

73

Engineering geomorphology of rock glaciers  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A partnership between geomorphology and engineering is facilitating human development in this harsh environment. Rock glaciers provide locations for urban water sources, construction borrow sources, drill sites, shaft and tunnel portals, ski tower supports, and dam abutments. Rock glaciers, as dynamic landforms, necessitate proper identification in the field. Placing structures on, in, or adjacent to rock glaciers requires an appreciation and understanding of their temporal stability. Internal and surface characteristics provide important clues to the development and deformation of rock glaciers. Rock glaciers play a significant role in the alpine debris transport system. Active movement and mass wasting are perhaps the most obvious geologic hazards affecting engineered works. The structure of the rock glacier is conducive to the production of a steady, continuous supply of meltwater during summer months. Thus, rock glaciers serve as alpine aquifers. Consideration of rock glaciers as potential aquifer sources requires caution because of the long-term impact of climate change on the temporal nature of the landform. From the rock glaciers that we have monitored for water quality characteristics, it appears that they provide quality potable water. This paper provides a foundation for appreciation and understanding of rock glaciers from an engineering geomorphologic point of view. The approach taken in this paper provides practical, important information to aid the engineer and engineering geologist in prudent evaluations of rock glaciers as potential sites for human development and uses. The bottom line of our paper is: rock glaciers must be avoided for essentially all structures.

Burger, K. C.; Degenhardt, J. J.; Giardino, J. R.

1999-12-01

74

Modeled and measured glacier change and related glaciological, hydrological, and meteorological conditions at South Cascade Glacier, Washington, balance and water years 2006 and 2007  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Winter snow accumulation and summer snow and ice ablation were measured at South Cascade Glacier, Washington, to estimate glacier mass balance quantities for balance years 2006 and 2007. Mass balances were computed with assistance from a new model that was based on the works of other glacier researchers. The model, which was developed for mass balance practitioners, coupled selected meteorological and glaciological data to systematically estimate daily mass balance at selected glacier sites. The North Cascade Range in the vicinity of South Cascade Glacier accumulated approximately average to above average winter snow packs during 2006 and 2007. Correspondingly, the balance years 2006 and 2007 maximum winter snow mass balances of South Cascade Glacier, 2.61 and 3.41 meters water equivalent, respectively, were approximately equal to or more positive (larger) than the average of such balances since 1959. The 2006 glacier summer balance, -4.20 meters water equivalent, was among the four most negative since 1959. The 2007 glacier summer balance, -3.63 meters water equivalent, was among the 14 most negative since 1959. The glacier continued to lose mass during 2006 and 2007, as it commonly has since 1953, but the loss was much smaller during 2007 than during 2006. The 2006 glacier net balance, -1.59 meters water equivalent, was 1.02 meters water equivalent more negative (smaller) than the average during 1953-2005. The 2007 glacier net balance, -0.22 meters water equivalent, was 0.37 meters water equivalent less negative (larger) than the average during 1953-2006. The 2006 accumulation area ratio was less than 0.10, owing to isolated patches of accumulated snow that endured the 2006 summer season. The 2006 equilibrium line altitude was higher than the glacier. The 2007 accumulation area ratio and equilibrium line altitude were 0.60 and 1,880 meters, respectively. Accompanying the glacier mass losses were retreat of the terminus and reduction of total glacier area. The terminus retreated at a rate of about 13 meters per year during balance year 2006 and at a rate of about 8 meters per year during balance year 2007. Glacier area near the end of balance years 2006 and 2007 was 1.74 and 1.73 square kilometers, respectively. Runoff from the basin containing the glacier and from an adjacent nonglacierized basin was gaged during all or parts of water years 2006 and 2007. Air temperature, wind speed, precipitation, and incoming solar radiation were measured at selected locations on and near the glacier. Air-temperature over the glacier at a height of 2 meters generally was less than at the same altitude in the air mass away from the glacier. Cooling of the air by the glacier increased systematically with increasing ambient air temperature. Empirically based equations were developed to estimate 2-meter-height air temperature over the glacier at five sites from site altitude and temperature at a non-glacier reference site.

Bidlake, William R.; Josberger, Edward G.; Savoca, Mark E.

2010-01-01

75

Velocity change and ice discharge from Antarctic Peninsula Glaciers  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Satellite radar interferometry data from ERS-1/2 acquired in 1996 were employed to map the ice velocity of the outlet glaciers discharging ice along the eastern flank of the Peninsula from 64 south to 71 south, and along the former Wordie Ice Shelf in the west. Differential radar interferometry was employed to map the position of the glacier grounding lines. Estimates of ice thickness at the grounding line were obtained from hydrostatic equilibrium using existing topographic maps, or from direct measurement from radio echo sounding by BAS in 1994-2000 and CECS/NASA in 2002. The resulting glacier fluxes were compared to snow accumulation compiled by Turner et al. (2002) to deduce first-order estimates of the glacier mass balance. In places where ice shelves are known to have been retreating, we compared the 1996 velocities with older measurements as well as more recent estimates from ERS-1/2 (2000), Radarsat (2000-2003) and Aster (2002). On Fleming Glacier, we find a large increase in flow speed from 1972 to 1996, with no further increase after 1996, which suggests that the glacier did respond to the collapse of Wordie Ice Shelf several decades ago. On Drygakski glacier in the east, we confirm a large acceleration of the glacier following the collapse of Larsen B, as revealed by Rott et al. (2002), which is continuing to this date. We conclude on the effect of retreating ice shelves on the evolution of inland ice in this sector of Antarctica and on its impact on sea level rise.

Rignot, E.; Pritchard, H.; Vaughan, D.; Rivera, A.; Kanagaratnam, P.; Casassa, G.; Thomas, R.

2003-12-01

76

Balance Mass Flux and Velocity Across the Equilibrium Line in Ice Drainage Systems of Greenland  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Estimates of balance mass flux and the depth-averaged ice velocity through the cross-section aligned with the equilibrium line are produced for each of six drainage systems in Greenland. (The equilibrium line, which lies at approximately 1200 m elevation on the ice sheet, is the boundary between the area of net snow accumulation at higher elevations and the areas of net melting at lower elevations around the ice sheet.) Ice drainage divides and six major drainage systems are delineated using surface topography from ERS (European Remote Sensing) radar altimeter data. The net accumulation rate in the accumulation zone bounded by the equilibrium line is 399 Gt/yr and net ablation rate in the remaining area is 231 Gt/yr. (1 GigaTon of ice is 1090 kM(exp 3). The mean balance mass flux and depth-averaged ice velocity at the cross-section aligned with the modeled equilibrium line are 0.1011 Gt kM(exp -2)/yr and 0.111 km/yr, respectively, with little variation in these values from system to system. The ratio of the ice mass above the equilibrium line to the rate of mass output implies an effective exchange time of approximately 6000 years for total mass exchange. The range of exchange times, from a low of 3 ka in the SE drainage system to 14 ka in the NE, suggests a rank as to which regions of the ice sheet may respond more rapidly to climate fluctuations.

Zwally, H. Jay; Giovinetto, Mario B.; Koblinsky, Chester J. (Technical Monitor)

2001-01-01

77

Glacier Physics  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This site features a collection of visual resources about glaciers. Diagrams, images and animations reveal how a glacier forms, advances and retreats. These resources can be integrated into lectures, labs or other activities.

Francek, Mark

78

Out-of-equilibrium relaxation of the Edwards Wilkinson elastic line  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We study the non-equilibrium relaxation of an elastic line described by the Edwards Wilkinson equation. Although this model is the simplest representation of interface dynamics, we highlight that many (though not all) important aspects of the non-equilibrium relaxation of elastic manifolds are already present in such quadratic and clean systems. We analyze in detail the ageing behavior of several two-times averaged and fluctuating observables taking into account finite size effects and the crossover to the stationary and equilibrium regimes. We start by investigating the structure factor and extracting from its decay a growing correlation length. We present the full two-times and size dependence of the interface roughness and we generalize the Family Vicsek scaling form to non-equilibrium situations. We compute the incoherent scattering function and we compare it to the one measured for other glassy systems. We analyze the response functions, the violation of the fluctuation-dissipation theorem in the ageing regime, and its crossover to the equilibrium relation in the stationary regime. Finally, we study the out-of-equilibrium fluctuations of the previously studied two-times functions and we characterize the scaling properties of their probability distribution functions. Our results allow us to obtain new insights into other glassy problems such as the ageing behavior in colloidal glasses and vortex glasses.

Bustingorry, Sebastian; Cugliandolo, Leticia F.; Iguain, José Luis

2007-09-01

79

Latest Pleistocene and Holocene glacier variations in the European Alps  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In the Alps, climatic conditions reflected in glacier and rock glacier activity in the earliest Holocene show a strong affinity to conditions in the latest Pleistocene (Younger Dryas). Glacier advances in the Alps related to Younger Dryas cooling led to the deposition of Egesen stadial moraines. Egesen stadial moraines can be divided into three or in some cases even more phases (sub-stadials). Moraines of the earliest and most extended advance, the Egesen maximum, stabilized at 12.2 ± 1.0 ka based on 10Be exposure dating at the Schönferwall (Tyrol, Austria) and the Julier Pass-outer moraine (Switzerland). Final stabilization of moraines at the end of the Egesen stadial was at 11.3 ± 0.9 ka as shown by 10Be data from four sites across the Alps. From west to east the sites are Piano del Praiet (northwestern Italy), Grosser Aletschgletscher (central Switzerland), Julier Pass-inner moraine (eastern Switzerland), and Val Viola (northeastern Italy). There is excellent agreement of the 10Be ages from the four sites. In the earliest Holocene, glaciers in the northernmost mountain ranges advanced at around 10.8 ± 1.1 ka as shown by 10Be data from the Kartell site (northern Tyrol, Austria). In more sheltered, drier regions rock glacier activity dominated as shown, for example, at Julier Pass and Larstig valley (Tyrol, Austria). New 10Be dates presented here for two rock glaciers in Larstig valley indicate final stabilization no later than 10.5 ± 0.8 ka. Based on this data, we conclude the earliest Holocene (between 11.6 and about 10.5 ka) was still strongly affected by the cold climatic conditions of the Younger Dryas and the Preboreal oscillation, with the intervening warming phase having had the effect of rapid downwasting of Egesen glaciers. At or slightly before 10.5 ka rapid shrinkage of glaciers to a size smaller than their late 20th century size reflects markedly warmer and possibly also drier climate. Between about 10.5 ka and 3.3 ka conditions in the Alps were not conducive to significant glacier expansion except possibly during rare brief intervals. Past tree-line data from Kaunertal (Tyrol, Austria) in concert with radiocarbon and dendrochronologically dated wood fragments found recently in the glacier forefields in both the Swiss and Austrian Alps points to long periods during the Holocene when glaciers were smaller than they were during the late 20th century. Equilibrium line altitudes (ELA) were about 200 m higher than they are today and about 300 m higher in comparison to Little Ice Age (LIA) ELAs. The Larstig rock glacier site we dated with 10Be is the type area for a postulated mid-Holocene cold period called the Larstig oscillation (presumed age about 7.0 ka). Our data point to final stabilization of those rock glaciers in the earliest Holocene and not in the middle Holocene. The combined data indicate there was no time window in the middle Holocene long enough for rock glaciers of the size and at the elevation of the Larstig site to have formed. During the short infrequent cold oscillations between 10.5 and 3.3 ka small glaciers (less than several km 2) may have advanced to close to their LIA dimensions. Overall, the cold periods were just too short for large glaciers to advance. After 3.3 ka, climate conditions became generally colder and warm periods were brief and less frequent. Large glaciers (for example Grosser Aletschgletscher) advanced markedly at 3.0-2.6 ka, around 600 AD and during the LIA. Glaciers in the Alps attained their LIA maximum extents in the 14th, 17th, and 19th centuries, with most reaching their greatest LIA extent in the final 1850/1860 AD advance.

Ivy-Ochs, Susan; Kerschner, Hanns; Maisch, Max; Christl, Marcus; Kubik, Peter W.; Schlüchter, Christian

2009-10-01

80

Effect of precipitation seasonality on climatic sensitivity of glacier mass balance  

Microsoft Academic Search

Numerical calculations are described, aimed at evaluating the influence of precipitation seasonality and seasonality concentration on climatic sensitivity of glacier mass balance. Equilibrium line altitudes (ELAs) are modeled using idealized meteorological variables, and then a warming test (+1 °C) is performed, which revealed that the effects of latitude and the annual precipitation amount are less than those of precipitation seasonality and

Koji Fujita

2008-01-01

81

Glacier Webquest  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

A project to learn about ice cores and Antarctica. Use handout lab (Webquest: Glaciers) and follow instructions given for each procedure. Go to Ice Core Changes Go to Glacial Loss Go to Glacial Cover Animation Go to Snow Cover Go to Gulkana Glacier Home Page Go to Glacial Topography Go to Glacial Picture Archive Go to Additional Glacier Pictures ...

Mr. Kio

2008-11-06

82

Age and significance of former low-altitude corrie glaciers on Hoy, Orkney Islands  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Geomorphological mapping provides evidence for two former low-level corrie glaciers on Hoy, both defined by end moraines. Five 10Be exposure ages obtained from sandstone boulders on moraine crests fall within the range 12.4??1.5 ka to 10.4??1.7 ka (weighted mean 11.7??0.6 ka), confirming that these glaciers developed during the Loch Lomond (Younger Dryas) Stade (LLS) of 12.9-11.5 cal. ka BP, and demonstrate the feasibility of using this approach to establish the age of LLS glacier limits. The equilibrium line altitude (ELA) of one of the glaciers (99 m) is the lowest recorded for any LLS glacier, and the area-weighted mean ELA for both (141 m) is consistent with a general northward ELA decrease along the west coast of Britain. The size of moraines fronting these small (???0.75 km2) glaciers implies that glacier termini remained at or close to their limits for a prolonged period. The apparent restriction of LLS glaciers to only two sites on Hoy probably reflects topographic favourability, and particularly the extent of snow-contributing areas.

Ballantyne, C.K.; Hall, A.M.; Phillips, W.; Binnie, S.; Kubik, P.W.

2007-01-01

83

Hydrodynamic Models of Line-Driven Accretion Disk Winds III: Local Ionization Equilibrium  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

We present time-dependent numerical hydrodynamic models of line-driven accretion disk winds in cataclysmic variable systems and calculate wind mass-loss rates and terminal velocities. The models are 2.5-dimensional, include an energy balance condition with radiative heating and cooling processes, and includes local ionization equilibrium introducing time dependence and spatial dependence on the line radiation force parameters. The radiation field is assumed to originate in an optically thick accretion disk. Wind ion populations are calculated under the assumption that local ionization equilibrium is determined by photoionization and radiative recombination, similar to a photoionized nebula. We find a steady wind flowing from the accretion disk. Radiative heating tends to maintain the temperature in the higher density wind regions near the disk surface, rather than cooling adiabatically. For a disk luminosity L (sub disk) = solar luminosity, white dwarf mass M(sub wd) = 0.6 solar mass, and white dwarf radii R(sub wd) = 0.01 solar radius, we obtain a wind mass-loss rate of M(sub wind) = 4 x 10(exp -12) solar mass yr(exp -1) and a terminal velocity of approximately 3000 km per second. These results confirm the general velocity and density structures found in our earlier constant ionization equilibrium adiabatic CV wind models. Further we establish here 2.5D numerical models that can be extended to QSO/AGN winds where the local ionization equilibrium will play a crucial role in the overall dynamics.

Pereyra, Nicolas Antonio; Kallman, Timothy R.; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

2002-01-01

84

Seasonal changes in surface albedo of Himalayan glaciers from MODIS data and links with the annual mass balance  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Few glaciological field data are available on glaciers in the Hindu Kush - Karakoram - Himalaya (HKH) region, and remote sensing data are thus critical for glacier studies in this region. The main objectives of this study are to document, using satellite images, the seasonal changes of surface albedo for two Himalayan glaciers, Chhota Shigri Glacier (Himachal Pradesh, India) and Mera Glacier (Everest region, Nepal), and to reconstruct the annual mass balance of these glaciers based on the albedo data. Albedo is retrieved from MODerate Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) images, and evaluated using ground based measurements. At both sites, we find high coefficients of determination between annual minimum albedo averaged over the glacier (AMAAG) and glacier-wide annual mass balance (Ba) measured with the glaciological method (R2 = 0.75). At Chhota Shigri Glacier, the relation between AMAAG found at the end of the ablation season and Ba suggests that AMAAG can be used as a proxy for the maximum snowline altitude or equilibrium line altitude (ELA) on winter accumulation-type glaciers in the Himalayas. However, for the summer-accumulation type Mera Glacier our approach relied on the hypothesis that ELA information, mostly not accessible from space during the monsoon, was still preserved later thanks to strong winter winds blowing away snow and in turn exposing again the late monsoon surface. AMAAG was subsequently revealed in the post-monsoon period. Reconstructed Ba at Chhota Shigri Glacier agrees with mass balances previously reconstructed using a positive degree-day method. Reconstructed Ba at Mera Glacier is affected by heavy cloud cover during the monsoon, which systematically limited our ability to observe AMAAG at the end of the melting period. In addition, the relation between AMAAG and Ba is constrained over a shorter time period for Mera Glacier (6 years) than for Chhota Shigri Glacier (11 years). Thus the mass balance reconstruction is less robust for Mera Glacier than for Chhota Shigri Glacier. However our method shows promising results and may be used to reconstruct the annual mass balance of glaciers with contrasted seasonal cycles in the western part of the HKH mountain range since the early 2000s when MODIS images became available.

Brun, F.; Dumont, M.; Wagnon, P.; Berthier, E.; Azam, M. F.; Shea, J. M.; Sirguey, P.; Rabatel, A.; Ramanathan, Al.

2014-06-01

85

Glacier fluctuations in the Southern Alps of New Zealand determined from snowline elevations  

SciTech Connect

Preliminary analysis of 452 determinations of end-of-summer glacier snowline altitudes (ELAs) made over 17 yr on up to 47 glaciers show good correlation with major climatic events, and conform well with fluctuations of glacier termini when reaction times are taken into consideration. With snowline altitudes used as surrogates for annual mass balance values, there is a recent trend to increased mass balances, i.e. a climate {open_quotes}cooling,{close_quotes} which follows a long period of predominantly glacial recession. Snowline trend surfaces plotted for the Southern Alps of New Zealand show considerable warping with variable departures from the steady-state equilibrium-line altitude each year. The current resurgence of the more active glaciers should continue in the near future. 39 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

Chinn, T.J.H. [Institute of Geological & Nuclear Sciences Ltds., P.B. Dunedin (New Zealand)

1995-05-01

86

Agassiz Glacier Glacier National Park, MT  

E-print Network

Agassiz Glacier Glacier National Park, MT Greg Pederson photo USGS USGS Repeat Photography Project Glacier Glacier National Park, MT Greg Pederson photo USGS USGS Repeat Photography Project http://nrmsc.usgs.gov/repeatphoto/ 2005 M. V. Walker photo courtesy of GNP archives1943 #12;Blackfoot ­ Jackson Glacier Glacier National

87

Combined Ice and Water Balances of Gulkana and Wolverine Glaciers, Alaska, and South Cascade Glacier, Washington, 1965 and 1966 Hydrologic Years  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Glaciers occur in northwestern North America between lat 37 deg and 69 deg N. in two major mountain systems. The Pacific Mountain System, near the west coast, receives large amounts of precipitation, has very mild temperatures, and contains perhaps 90 percent of the glacier ice. The Rocky Mountain or Eastern System, on the other hand, receives nearly an order of magnitude less precipitation, has temperatures that range from subpolar to subtropic, and contains glaciers that are much smaller in both size and total area. As a contribution to the International Hydrological Decade program on combined balances at selected glaciers, the U.S. Geological Survey is conducting studies of ice and water balance on four glaciers in the Pacific Mountain System: Wolverine and Gulkana Glaciers in Alaska, South Cascade Glacier in Washington, and Maclure Glacier in California. Similar data are being collected by other organizations at five glaciers in western Canada, including two in the Rocky Mountain System, and at one glacier in the Rocky Mountain System in northern Alaska. Gulkana, Wolverine, South Cascade, and Maclure Glaciers have dissimilar mass balances, and each is fairly representative of the glaciers for its particular region. Gulkana Glacier (lat 63 deg 15' N., Alaska Range, Alaska) normally has an equilibrium line at an altitude of 1,800 m (meters), an activity index of about 6 mm/m (millimeters per meter), a winter balance of about 1.0 m, and an annual exchange of about 2.2 m. (Balance values are given in terms of water-equivalent measure; the winter balance of 1 m, for example, indicates a volume of ice equal in mass to a volume of water 1 m in depth covering the area of the glacier.) The normal approximate parameters for the other glaciers studied are as follows: Wolverine Glacier (lat 60 deg 24' N., Kenai Mountains, Alaska) - equilibrium-line altitude 1,200 m, activity index 9 mm/m, winter balance 2.5 m, and annual exchange 5.5 m; South Cascade Glacier (lat 48 deg 22' N., North Cascades, Wash.) - equilibrium-line altitude 1,900 m, activity index 17 mm/m, winter balance 3.1 m, and annual exchange 6.6 m; and Maclure Glacier (lat 37 deg 45' N., Sierra Nevada, Calif.) - equilibrium-line altitude 3,600 m, activity index 23 mm/m, winter balance 2.3 m, and annual exchange 4.6 m. Mass balances of these four glaciers and their drainage basins are measured annually by standard glaciological techniques. In addition, the hydrologic balance is calculated using streamflow and precipitation measurements. Combining these independent measurements results in fairly well defined values of water and ice balance for the glaciers and drainage basins. A revision of the standard International Hydrological Decade mass-balance system permits combination of annual and stratigraphic terms. The annual balance of South Cascade Glacier at the end of the 1965 hydrologic year was slightly positive (+0.07 m averaged over the glacier), but continued ablation and deficient accumulation in October 1965 resulted in slightly negative net balances for both the glacier and the drainage basin. Factors tending to produce this near-zero balance were the above-average late-winter balance (3.48 m) and the numerous summer snowfalls. Ice ablation averaged about 39 mm of water per day during the main melt season. Runoff during the summer ablation season was lower than the 1958-64 average. The South Cascade Glacier annual balance in 1966 (-0.94 m) was considerably more negative mainly owing to the deficient winter snowpack (the late-winter balance was only 2.52 m) and the warm dry summer. Ice ablation averaged about 44 mm of water per day during the melt season. The loss in storage of this and other glaciers in the North Cascades increased the runoff of many valley streams by approximately 50 percent during August and September. The 1966 Gulkana Glacier annual balance was slightly positive (+0.06 m); on the basis of past observations and the rapid terminus ret

Meier, Mark Frederick; Tangborn, Wendell V.; Mayo, Lawrence R.; Post, Austin

1971-01-01

88

Modelling the impact of submarine frontal melting and ice mélange on glacier dynamics  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Two mechanisms are generally proposed to explain seasonal variations in the calving front of tidewater glaciers: submarine melting of the calving face and the mechanical back-force applied by the ice mélange. However, the way these processes affect the calving rate and the glacier dynamics remains uncertain. In this study, we used the finite element model Elmer/Ice to simulate the impact of these forcings on more than 200 two dimensional theoretical flowline glacier configurations. The model, which includes calving processes, suggests that frontal melting affects the position of the terminus only slightly (< a few hundred meters) and does not affect the pluriannual glacier mass balance at all. However, the ice mélange has a greater impact on the advance and retreat cycles of the glacier front (more than several 1000 m) and its consequences for the mass balance are not completely negligible, stressing the need for better characterization of forcing properties. We also show that ice mélange forcing against the calving face can mechanically prevent crevasse propagation at sea level and hence prevent calving. Results also revealed different behaviors in grounded and floating glaciers: in the case of a floating extension, the heaviest forcings can disrupt the glacier equilibrium by modifying its buttressing and ice flux at the grounding line.

Krug, J.; Durand, G.; Gagliardini, O.; Weiss, J.

2015-01-01

89

Fastest Glacier  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This video from a 2005 NOVA program features scientists who study how the Jakobshavn Isbrae glacier in western Greenland is shrinking and moving faster due to increased melting over the past ten years. The video includes footage of scientists in the field explaining methods and animation of ice sheet dynamics leading to faster glacier movement.

NOVA scienceNOW

90

World Glacier Monitoring Service  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The World Glacier Monitoring Service site contains online issues of Fluctuations of Glaciers and the Glacier Mass Balance Bulletin; glacier inventory data describing the spatial variability and glacier fluctuation data documenting changes in time; explanations of glacier monitoring strategy using glacier mass balance, length change, inventories, and data analysis; and a bibliography of related work.

91

Sedimentology and architecture of De Geer moraines in the western Scottish Highlands, and implications for grounding-line glacier dynamics  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Sedimentary exposures in moraines in a Scottish Highland valley (Glen Chaorach), reveal stacked sequences of bedded and laminated silt, sand and gravel, interspersed or capped with diamicton units. In four examples, faults and folds indicate deformation by glaciotectonism and syndepositional loading. We propose that these sediments were laid down in an ice-dammed lake, close to the last ice margin to occupy this glen. Individual units within cross-valley De Geer moraine ridges are interpreted by comparison with examples from similar environments elsewhere: stratified diamictons containing laminated or bedded lenses are interpreted as subaqueous ice-marginal debris-flow deposits; massive fine-grained deposits as hyperconcentrated flow deposits, and massive gravel units as high-density debris-flow deposits. Using an allostratigraphic approach we argue that glaciotectonically deformed coarsening-upward sand and gravel sequences that culminate in deposition of subglacial diamicton represent glacier advances into the ice-marginal lake, whereas undisturbed cross-bedded sand and gravel reflects channel or fan deposits laid down during glacier retreat. A flat terrace of bedded sand and gravel at the northern end of Glen Chaorach is interpreted as subaerial glaciofluvial outwash. On the basis of these inferences we propose the following three stage deglacial event chronology for Glen Chaorach. During glacier recession, ice separation and intra-lobe ponding first led to subaquaeous deposition of sorted and unsorted facies. Subsequent glacier stabilisation and ice-marginal oscillation produced glaciotectonic structures in the ice-marginal sediment pile and formed De Geer moraines. Finally, drainage of the ice-dammed lake allowed a subaerial ice-marginal drainage system to become established. Throughout deglaciation, deposition within the lake was characterized by abrupt changes in grain size and in the architecture of individual sediment bodies, reflecting changing delivery paths and sediment supply, and by dynamic margin oscillations typical of water-terminating glaciers.

Golledge, Nicholas R.; Phillips, Emrys

2008-07-01

92

Jakobshavn Glacier Retreat (WMS)  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Since measurements of Jakobshavn Isbrae were first taken in 1850, the glacier has gradually receded, finally coming to rest at a certain point for the past 5 decades. However, from 1997 to 2003, the glacier has begun to recede again, this time almost doubling in speed. The finding is important for many reasons. For starters, as more ice moves from glaciers on land into the ocean, it raises sea levels. Jakobshavn Isbrae is Greenlands largest outlet glacier, draining 6.5 percent of Greenlands ice sheet area. The ice streams speed-up and near-doubling of ice flow from land into the ocean has increased the rate of sea level rise by about .06 millimeters (about .002 inches) per year, or roughly 4 percent of the 20th century rate of sea level increase. This animation shows the recession for three years, from 2001 through 2003. The line of recession shows the place where the glacier meets the ocean and where pieces calve off and flow away from land toward open water.

Eric Sokolowsky

2005-03-30

93

Climatic controls of western U.S. glaciers at the last glacial maximum  

USGS Publications Warehouse

We use a nested atmospheric modeling strategy to simulate precipitation and temperature of the western United States 18,000 years ago (18 ka). The high resolution of the nested model allows us to isolate the regional structure of summer temperature and winter precipitation that is crucial to determination of the net mass balance of late-Pleistocene mountain glaciers in this region of diverse topography and climate. Modeling results suggest that climatic controls of these glaciers varied significantly over the western U.S. Glaciers in the northern Rocky Mountains existed under relatively cold July temperatures and low winter accumulation, reflecting anticyclonic, easterly wind flow off the Laurentide Ice Sheet. In contrast, glaciers that existed under relatively warmer and wetter conditions are located along the Pacific coast south of Oregon, where enhanced westerlies delivered higher precipitation than at present. Between these two groupings lie glaciers that were controlled by a mix of cold and wet conditions attributed to the convergence of cold air from the ice sheet and moisture derived from the westerlies. Sensitivity tests suggest that, for our simulated 18 ka climate, many of the glaciers exhibit a variable response to climate but were generally more sensitive to changes in temperature than to changes in precipitation, particularly those glaciers in central Idaho and the Yellowstone Plateau. Our results support arguments that temperature depression generally played a larger role in lowering equilibrium line altitudes in the western U.S. during the last glacial maximum than did increased precipitation, although the magnitude of temperature depression required for steady-state mass balance varied from 8-18??C. Only the Sierra Nevada glaciers required a substantial increase in precipitation to achieve steady-state mass balance, while glaciers in the Cascade Range existed with decreased precipitation.

Hostetler, S.W.; Clark, P.U.

1997-01-01

94

A model study of Abrahamsenbreen, a surging glacier in northern Spitsbergen  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The climate sensitivity of Abrahamsenbreen, a 20 km long surge-type glacier in northern Spitsbergen, is studied with a simple glacier model. A scheme to describe the surges is included, which makes it possible to account for the effect of surges on the total mass budget of the glacier. A climate reconstruction back to AD 1300, based on ice-core data from Lomonosovfonna and climate records from Longyearbyen, is used to drive the model. The model is calibrated by requesting that it produces the correct Little Ice Age maximum glacier length and simulates the observed magnitude of the 1978-surge. Abrahamsenbreen is strongly out of balance with the current climate. If climatic conditions will remain as they were for the period 1989-2010, the glacier will ultimately shrink to a length of about 4 km (but this will take hundreds of years). For a climate change scenario involving a 2 m yr-1 rise of the equilibrium line from now onwards, we predict that in the year 2100 Abrahamsenbreen will be about 12 km long. The main effect of a surge is to lower the mean surface elevation and to increase the ablation area, thereby causing a negative perturbation of the mass budget. We found that the occurrence of surges leads to a somewhat stronger retreat of the glacier in a warming climate. Because of the very small bed slope, Abrahamsenbreen is sensitive to small perturbations in the equilibrium-line altitude E. For a decrease of E of only 160 m, the glacier would steadily grow into the Woodfjorddalen until after 2000 years it would reach the Woodfjord and calving could slow down the advance.

Oerlemans, J.; van Pelt, W. J. J.

2014-11-01

95

Western Glacier Stonefly  

USGS Multimedia Gallery

The rare western glacier stonefly (Zapada glacier) is native to Glacier National Park and is seeking habitat at higher elevations due to warming stream temperature and glacier loss due to climate warming. ...

96

Western Glacier Stonefly  

USGS Multimedia Gallery

 The rare western glacier stonefly (Zapada glacier) is native to Glacier National Park and is seeking habitat at higher elevations due to warming stream temperature and glacier loss due to climate warming. ...

97

Glacier Caves  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Created by Charlie Anderson Jr. of the International Glaciospeleological Survey, Glacier Caves provides numerous fantastic photographs of glaciers, caves, and volcanoes located mainly in Northwestern United States. Visitors can sort through the images by topic or by location. Users can find various materials on eruptions, special features, and explorations of many famous Northwestern mountains including Mount St. Helens, Mount Hood, and Mount Rainer. The site features links to volcano web cameras.

98

Past and future evolution of Himalayan glaciers: a regional climate model study  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Over 800 million people depend on glacier melt water runoff throughout the Hindu-Kush and Himalaya (HKH) region. The region, also called as "Water tower of Asia", is the location of several major rivers basins, like Ganges, Brahmaputra, and Indus etc. Glaciers in the HKH region are the primary source of water for the perennial rivers. Previous studies have assessed glacier areas and volumes in the HKH region by remote sensing techniques and slope-dependent thickness estimations. We here present a study in which, for the first time a glacier parameterization scheme is dynamically coupled to a regional climate model and applied over the South Asian Himalayan mountain range. The glacier scheme interactively simulates the mass balance as well as changes of the areal extent of glaciers on a sub-grid scale. Various observational data sets, in particular a regional glacier inventory, have been compiled and were used to initialize glacier area and volume in the year 1989. A simulation for the period 1989-2008 using the ECMWF ERA-Interim reanalysis as atmospheric boundary forcing was carried out. Preliminary results show a simulated decrease of glacier area of about 20% between 1989 and 2008. The spatial patterns of glacier area change show a remarkable decrease, but do show some regions of increase especially over the Karakoram (western Himalaya), a region for which available observations-based estimates also indicate a positive mass balance anomaly. The positive relation between altitude and mass balance is qualitatively reproduced by the model. The model is able to approximately represent the equilibrium line altitude (ELA) for selected sub-region when compared to observed values but simulated ELA's seem to have a systematic negative bias which, in turn, suggests an overestimation of the mean regional mass balance. Our results indicate that observed glacier changes can be approximately reproduced within a regional climate model based on simplified concepts of glacier-climate interaction. This, in turn, underlines the general applicability of the model system for scenarios of 21st century climate and glacier change. Presently, two climate change simulations forced with two GCMs are under preparation and the results will be presented.

Kumar, Pankaj; Kotlarski, Sven; Moseley, Christopher; Sieck, Kevin; Frey, Holger; Stoffel, Markus; Jacob, Daniela

2013-04-01

99

Seasonal and annual mass balances of Mera and Pokalde glaciers (Nepal Himalaya) since 2007  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In the Everest region, Nepal, ground-based monitoring programmes were started on the debris-free Mera Glacier (27.7° N, 86.9° E; 5.1 km2, 6420 to 4940 m a.s.l.) in 2007 and on the small Pokalde Glacier (27.9° N, 86.8° E; 0.1 km2, 5690 to 5430 m a.s.l., ~ 25 km north of Mera Glacier) in 2009. These glaciers lie on the southern flank of the central Himalaya under the direct influence of the Indian monsoon and receive more than 80% of their annual precipitation in summer (June to September). Despite a large inter-annual variability with glacier-wide mass balances ranging from -0.67 ± 0.28 m w.e. in 2011-2012 (Equilibrium-line altitude (ELA) at ~ 5800 m a.s.l.) to +0.46 ± 0.28 m w.e. in 2010-2011 (ELA at ~ 5340 m a.s.l.), Mera Glacier has been shrinking at a moderate mass balance rate of -0.08 ± 0.28 m w.e. yr-1 since 2007. Ice fluxes measured at two distinct transverse cross sections at ~ 5350 m a.s.l. and ~ 5520 m a.s.l. confirm that the mean state of this glacier over the last one or two decades corresponds to a limited mass loss, in agreement with remotely-sensed region-wide mass balances of the Everest area. Seasonal mass balance measurements show that ablation and accumulation are concomitant in summer which in turn is the key season controlling the annual glacier-wide mass balance. Unexpectedly, ablation occurs at all elevations in winter due to wind erosion and sublimation, with remobilised snow potentially being sublimated in the atmosphere. Between 2009 and 2012, the small Pokalde Glacier lost mass more rapidly than Mera Glacier with respective mean glacier-wide mass balances of -0.72 and -0.23 ± 0.28 m w.e. yr-1. Low-elevation glaciers, such as Pokalde Glacier, have been usually preferred for in-situ observations in Nepal and more generally in the Himalayas, which may explain why compilations of ground-based mass balances are biased toward negative values compared with the regional mean under the present-day climate.

Wagnon, P.; Vincent, C.; Arnaud, Y.; Berthier, E.; Vuillermoz, E.; Gruber, S.; Ménégoz, M.; Gilbert, A.; Dumont, M.; Shea, J. M.; Stumm, D.; Pokhrel, B. K.

2013-11-01

100

Seasonal and annual mass balances of Mera and Pokalde glaciers (Nepal Himalaya) since 2007  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In the Everest region, Nepal, ground-based monitoring programs were started on the debris-free Mera Glacier (27.7° N, 86.9° E; 5.1 km2, 6420 to 4940 m a.s.l.) in 2007 and on the small Pokalde Glacier (27.9° N, 86.8° E; 0.1 km2, 5690 to 5430 m a.s.l., ˜ 25 km North of Mera Glacier) in 2009. These glaciers lie on the southern flank of the central Himalaya under the direct influence of the Indian monsoon and receive more than 80% of their annual precipitation in summer (June to September). Despite a large inter-annual variability with glacier-wide mass balances ranging from -0.77± 0.40 m w.e. in 2011-2012 (Equilibrium-line altitude (ELA) at ˜ 6055 m a.s.l.) to + 0.46 ± 0.40 m w.e. in 2010-2011 (ELA at ˜ 5340 m a.s.l.), Mera Glacier has been shrinking at a moderate mass balance rate of -0.10± 0.40 m w.e. yr-1 since 2007. Ice fluxes measured at two distinct transverse cross sections at ˜ 5350 m a.s.l. and ˜ 5520 m a.s.l. confirm that the mean state of this glacier over the last one or two decades corresponds to a limited mass loss, in agreement with remotely-sensed region-wide mass balances of the Everest area. Seasonal mass balance measurements show that ablation and accumulation are concomitant in summer which in turn is the key season controlling the annual glacier-wide mass balance. Unexpectedly, ablation occurs at all elevations in winter due to wind erosion and sublimation, with remobilized snow likely being sublimated in the atmosphere. Between 2009 and 2012, the small Pokalde Glacier lost mass more rapidly than Mera Glacier with respective mean glacier-wide mass balances of -0.72 and -0.26 ± 0.40 m w.e. yr-1. Low-elevation glaciers, such as Pokalde Glacier, have been usually preferred for in-situ observations in Nepal and more generally in the Himalayas, which may explain why compilations of ground-based mass balances are biased toward negative values compared with the regional mean under the present-day climate.

Wagnon, P.; Vincent, C.; Arnaud, Y.; Berthier, E.; Vuillermoz, E.; Gruber, S.; Ménégoz, M.; Gilbert, A.; Dumont, M.; Shea, J. M.; Stumm, D.; Pokhrel, B. K.

2013-07-01

101

Low beta equilibrium and stability for anisotropic pressure closed field line plasma confinement systems  

SciTech Connect

General formalism is developed to analyze the equilibrium and stability of low beta anisotropic pressure plasmas confined in closed field line magnetic systems. The formalism allows one to consider rather general magnetic systems with nonuniform axis curvature and longitudinal profiles of toroidal and multipole poloidal field. It also allows having a strong pressure anisotropy corresponding to enhanced plasma pressure in mirror cells of the system. As an example of such a system the authors consider the recently proposed linked mirror neutron source (LMNS). Application of the above formalism to the LMNS analysis confirms most of the preliminary results, however, they obtain a considerable reduction of mirror cell axis curvature and an appreciable ellipticity of plasma cross-section in the mirror cell midplane. They have also optimized the longitudinal pressure and magnetic field distribution.

Pastukhov, V.P. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States). Inst. for Fusion Studies; Ilgisonis, V.I.; Subbotin, A.A. [Kurchatov Inst., Moscow (Russian Federation). Russian Research Center

1994-05-01

102

Melting Glaciers  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Due to the potential disastrous consequences to the environment and to numerous societies, scientists, governments, and civilians are concerned with the growing trend of glacial melt. This topic-in-depth explores various geographic regions where this phenomenon has recently been observed. Providing background into the study of glaciology, this report begins with a Web site (1) discussing the unique features of glaciers. The US Army Corps of Engineers offers visitors an insight to glacial properties including their locations, movements, and influences; along with a series educational images. The second site (2) explains the exceptionality of the two hundred sixty six glaciers at Glacier National Park. Through a collection of images, animations, and pictures provided by the National Park Service, users can learn about ice dams, climatic impacts, and the erosive powers of ice and water. The rest of the topic-in-depth discusses findings of glacial melting from around the world. NASA (3) addresses the Artic warming's affects on glacier formations. This Web site provides a few animations displaying ice sheet extent and the cracking of icebergs. On a positive note, visitors can learn how the decrease in glaciers has opened up new habitat for some Artic species. The next Web site (4), also by NASA, discusses the findings of a twenty-five year study of Patagonia's glaciers. Educators and students can discover how NASA utilized the Space Shuttle Endeavor to study the entire 17,200 square kilometer region. The site also discusses potential causes of the melting in this region, which has contributed to almost ten percent of the global sea-level change from mountain glaciers. As reported by the BBC (5), Dr. Harrison at the University of Oxford has determined that the glaciers in parts of Kazakhstan have been decreasing annually by almost two cubic kilometers between 1955 and 2000. Visitors can learn how the melting of these four hundred sixteen glaciers will adversely affect the region's rivers and its water supply. The Taipei Times (6) reports that the Swiss Alpine glacial melting has probably intensified due to this summer's record-breaking heat wave. This Web site provides short, intriguing descriptions of consequences of the "rush of melt water streaming from the ice wall." Users can learn about predictions in the 1990s that the glaciers would shrink to ten percent of their 1850 size by the end of the twenty first century. In the next Web site (7), the BBC provides a captivating illustration of the effects the Peruvian glacial melts may have on tourism, the country's water supply, and more. Students and educators can learn about NASA studies showing cracks in the ice, which could lead to the flooding of large cities. Visitors can also find out how the recent glacier recessions have affected some ancient spiritual traditions. The last site, by the USGS, (8) features excerpts from Myrna Hall and Daniel Fagre's 2003 research paper in BioScience. Visitors can discover the melt rate and spatial distributions of glaciers for two possible future climate situations. Providing an amazing animation, users will be amazed by the changes predicted by the model.

Enright, Rachel

103

Glaciers and Global Climate  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Glaciers are important indicators of global climate. Glacier recession, as observed from space and in the field, has been occurring for about 100 years. The present extent of glaciers and glaciers in the last Ice Age will be discussed. I will show slides of field work on glaciers and show instruments used to measure ice and snow. I will discuss reasons for studying glaciers and why remote sensing is important for glacier studies.

Hall, Dorothy K.

1999-01-01

104

Reconstruction of mass balance variations for Franz Josef Glacier, New Zealand, 1913 to 1989  

SciTech Connect

A model of mass balance is constructed for the Franz Josef Glacier on the west coast of New Zealand. It uses daily data from a nearby, but short-record climate station. The model is extended back to 1913 by creating hybrid climate data from a long-record, but more distant, climate station. Its monthly data provide long-term temperature and precipitation trends, and daily fluctuations are simulated using a stochastic approach that is tuned to the characteristics of the short-record station. The glacier model provides estimates of equilibrium-line altitudes which are in reasonable agreement with those observed, and variations of cumulative mass balance that correspond with patterns of advance and retreat of the glacier terminus.

Woo, Mingko Woo (McMaster Univ., Hamilton, Ontario (Canada)); Fitzharris, B.B. (Univ. of Otago, Dunedin (New Zealand))

1992-11-01

105

Recent ice dynamic and surface mass balance of Union Glacier in the West Antarctic Ice Sheet  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Here we present the results of a comprehensive glaciological investigation of Union Glacier (79°46' S/83°24' W) in the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS), a major outlet glacier within the Ellsworth Mountains. Union Glacier flows into the Ronne Ice Shelf, where recent models have indicated the potential for significant grounding line zone (GLZ) migrations in response to changing climate and ocean conditions. To elaborate a glaciological base line that can help to evaluate the potential impact of this GLZ change scenario, we installed an array of stakes on Union Glacier in 2007. The stake network has been surveyed repeatedly for elevation, velocity, and net surface mass balance. The region of the stake measurements is in near-equilibrium, and ice speeds are 10 to 33 m a-1. Ground-penetrating radars (GPR) have been used to map the subglacial topography, internal structure, and crevasse frequency and depth along surveyed tracks in the stake site area. The bedrock in this area has a minimum elevation of -858 m a.s.l., significantly deeper than shown by BEDMAP2 data. However, between this deeper area and the local GLZ, there is a threshold where the subglacial topography shows a maximum altitude of 190 m. This subglacial condition implies that an upstream migration of the GLZ will not have strong effects on Union Glacier until it passes beyond this shallow ice pinning point.

Rivera, A.; Zamora, R.; Uribe, J. A.; Jaña, R.; Oberreuter, J.

2014-08-01

106

Fast tidewater glaciers  

Microsoft Academic Search

Some iceburg-calving outlet glaciers flow continuously at speeds normally associated with surging glaciers and exhibit dramatic instability scenarios related to those suggested for marine ice sheets. No temperature tidewater glaciers are known to have floating termini, but many polar and subpolar tidewater glaciers do. The fast flow of temperature calving glaciers is almost entirely due to basal sliding and appears

M. F. Meier; Austin Post

1987-01-01

107

Fast recession of a west antarctic glacier  

PubMed

Satellite radar interferometry observations of Pine Island Glacier, West Antarctica, reveal that the glacier hinge-line position retreated 1.2 +/- 0.3 kilometers per year between 1992 and 1996, which in turn implies that the ice thinned by 3.5 +/- 0.9 meters per year. The fast recession of Pine Island Glacier, predicted to be a possible trigger for the disintegration of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet, is attributed to enhanced basal melting of the glacier floating tongue by warm ocean waters. PMID:9677195

Rignot

1998-07-24

108

Glacier Photograph Collection  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

These repeat photographs (also known as glacier pairs) are of special interest to scientists studying glaciers and climate. Glacier photographs taken from the same vantage point, but years apart in time, can reveal dramatic changes in the glacier terminus position, as a glacier either advances or retreats. Most glaciers around the world have retreated at unprecedented rates over the last century. These pairs of photographs can provide striking visual evidence of climate change.

National Snow and Ice Data Center

109

Methods of Measuring Glacier Change  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In the 19th century measuring glacier change was limited to measuring the position of the glacier front, or terminus. By the mid 20th century, change measurements expanded to include aerial photogrammetry and field-based mass balance methods. The latter were typically based on stakes drilled into a glacier, against which snow accumulation and ice loss were measured. Knowing the density of the surface material and area of the glacier, the mass change can be calculated. This approach still provides the most detailed information on glacier mass change. At the turn of the new millennium, the increased sophistication of aerial and satellite remote sensing technology and computer software have provided numerous new approaches to assessing glacier change. In particular, airborne laser altimetry can be used to define the altitude of a glacier surface and over time provides changes in glacier volume. Traditional aerial photogrammetry has been revitalized by tracking feature displacement to provide a displacement field over the glacier surface and inferring point estimates of mass change based on a numerical model of continuity. The same technique can be used with a scanning laser altimeter. Satellite images can be used to track glacier change both in the form of aerial changes and by feature tracking. However due to current image resolutions the satellite imagery has been restricted to large ice fields on ice sheets. This may change in the near future. Synthetic aperture radar (SAR) satellites provide an enormous potential for tracking glaciers because interferometric techniques can also be used to infer a displacement field, and surface features can be investigated such as the snow line, and the transition between wet and dry snow. The all weather capabilities of SAR including day/night imaging, make it a particularly attractive sensor. One has to be clear, however, that these various techniques provide somewhat different information about glacier change and some caution must be taken when comparing the results of these methods. Databases of glacier change has largely been the responsibility of the World Glacier Monitoring Service (WGMS). That database is based on scalar quantities of glacier geometries and change, such as, mass change, length change, mean elevation, and so on. When first established it was the only practical type of database. With the rapid development of increasing computer memory and speed, and analytic software, particularly geographic information systems (GIS), we are no longer restricted to scalar databases. Within a GIS we can store, in digital form, historic maps of glacier surfaces, aerial photography including digital orthophotoquadrangles, satellite imagery and products derived from laser altimetry. In addition, we can store interpretative products and metadata including references to relevant scientific reports. Thus an investigator will have the original data and derived products at their disposal. The availability of original data is particularly important in view of expected future advances in computational methods. A GIS database will contribute to the WGMS efforts and accelerate our ability to exchange data internationally and increase our understanding of the spatial and temporal components of glacier change. Current efforts in this direction need to be encouraged and expanded.

Fountain, A. G.

2001-12-01

110

Northeast Glaciers  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This reference guide provides a brief review of glaciers in the Northeastern U.S. It then focuses on the glacial affects in four areas, an inland basin near the Finger Lakes area of New York, the Appalachian/Piedmont through New York and Pennsylvania, the coastal plain and the exotic terrane of New England. Topics covered include glacial scouring, glacial deposits and periglacial features.

2003-01-01

111

Gas temperature determination from rotational lines in non-equilibrium plasmas: a review  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The gas temperature in non-equilibrium plasmas is often obtained from the plasma-induced emission by measuring the rotational temperature of a diatomic molecule in its excited state. This is motivated by both tradition and the availability of low budget spectrometers. However, non-thermal plasmas do not automatically guarantee that the rotational distribution in the monitored vibrational level of the diatomic molecule is in equilibrium with the translational (gas) temperature. Often non-Boltzmann rotational molecular spectra are found in non-equilibrium plasmas. The deduction of a gas temperature from these non-thermal distributions must be done with care as clearly the equilibrium between translational and rotational degrees of freedom cannot be achieved. In this contribution different methods and approaches to determine the gas temperature are evaluated and discussed. A detailed analysis of the gas temperature determination from rotational spectra is performed. The physical and chemical background of non-equilibrium rotational population distributions in molecular spectra is discussed and a large range of conditions for which non-equilibrium occurs are identified. Fitting procedures which are used to fit (non-equilibrium) rotational distributions are analyzed in detail. Lastly, recommendations concerning the conditions for which the gas temperatures can be obtained from diatomic spectra are formulated.

Bruggeman, P. J.; Sadeghi, N.; Schram, D. C.; Linss, V.

2014-04-01

112

Union Glacier: a new exploration gateway for the West Antarctic Ice Sheet  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Union Glacier (79°46' S/83°24' W) in the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS), has been used by the private company Antarctic Logistic and Expeditions (ALE) since 2007 for their landing and commercial operations, providing a unique logistic opportunity to perform glaciological research in a vast region, including the Ice divide between Institute and Pine Island glaciers and the Subglacial Lake Ellsworth. Union glacier is flowing into the Ronne Ice Shelf, where future migrations of the grounding line zone (GLZ) in response to continuing climate and oceanographic changes have been modelled. In order to analyse the potential impacts on Union glacier of this scenario, we installed an array of stakes, where ice elevation, mass balance and ice velocities have been measured since 2007, resulting in near equilibrium conditions with horizontal displacements between 10 and 33 m yr-1. GPS receivers and three radar systems have been also used to map the subglacial topography, the internal structure of the ice and the presence of crevasses along surveyed tracks. The resulting radar data showed a subglacial topography with a minimum of 858 m below sea level, much deeper than estimated before. The below sea level subglacial topography confirms the potential instability of the glacier in foreseen scenarios of GLZ upstream migration during the second half of the XXI century.

Rivera, A.; Zamora, R.; Uribe, J. A.; Jaña, R.; Oberreuter, J.

2014-02-01

113

Shepard Glacier, Glacier National Park, Montana - 2005  

USGS Multimedia Gallery

The thick, crevassed, ice flows of historic Shepard Glacier have been diminished to less than 0.1 square kilometer in area by 2005. According to the criteria set by the USGS Repeat Photography Project, Shepard Glacier is now considered to be too small to be defined as a glacier. (Blase Reardon)...

114

Glacier-and permafrost-related hazards increasingly threaten human lives,settlements,  

E-print Network

Glacier- and permafrost-related hazards increasingly threaten human lives where surface and sub-surface ice are involved.Changes in glacier and permafrost equilibrium in the cryospheric system.A number of recent glacier hazards and disasters underscore these trends.Difficult site

Kääb, Andreas

115

Mendenhall Glacier Juneau, Alaska  

E-print Network

· · · · · · #12;V1 Mendenhall Glacier Juneau, Alaska 404 Alaskan Frontiers & Glaciers V1 PRSRTSTD U blend of nature and modern culture. Marvel at the spectacular Hubbard Glacier, the longest tidewater glacier in Alaska and visit Icy Strait Point, a seaport nestled in the lush, seemingly endless northern

Raina, Ramesh

116

Muir Glacier Retreats  

USGS Multimedia Gallery

Muir Glacier has retreated out of the field of view and is now nearly 5 miles to the northwest. Riggs Glacier has retreated as much as 2000 ft and thinned by more than 800 feet. Note the dense vegetation that has developed. Also note the correlation between Muir Glacier’s 1941 thickness and th...

117

Glacier recession on Cerro Charquini (16° S), Bolivia, since the maximum of the Little Ice Age (17th century)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Cerro Charquini, Bolivia (Cordillera Real, 5392 ma.s.l.) was selected as a site to reconstruct glacier recession since the maximum of the Little Ice Age (LIA) in the central Andes. Five glaciers, located on differently exposed slopes, present comprehensive and well-preserved morainic systems attributed to former centuries. The moraines were dated by lichenometry and show a consistent organization on the different slopes. The past geometry of the glaciers was reconstructed using ground topography and aerophotogrammetry. Lichenometric dating shows that the LIA maximum occurred in the second half of the 17th century, after which the glaciers have receded nearly continuously. Over the last decades of the 20th century (1983 97), recession rates increased by a factor of four. On the northern and western slopes, glaciers receded more than on the southern and eastern slopes (by 78% and 65% of their LIA maximum area, respectively). The mean equilibrium-line altitude (ELA) rose by about 160 m between the LIA maximum and 1997. Recession rates were analysed in terms of climatic signal, suggesting that glacier recession since the LIA maximum was mainly due to a change in precipitation and that the 19th century may have been drier. For the 20th century, a temperature rise of about 0.6°C appears to be the main cause of glacier recession. Recent climatic conditions from 1983 to 1997 correspond to a mass deficit of about 1.36 mw.e.a-1. If such conditions persist, the small glaciers below 5300 ma.s.l. in the Cordillera Real should disappear completely in the near future.

Rabatel, Antoine; Machaca, Abraham; Francou, Bernard; Jomelli, Vincent

118

SAR investigations of glaciers in northwestern North America  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The objective of this project was to investigate the utility of satellite synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imagery for measurement of geophysical parameters on Alaskan glaciers relevant to their mass balance and dynamics, including: (1) the positions of firn lines (late-summer snow lines); (2) surface velocities on fast-flowing (surging) glaciers, and also on slower steady-flow glaciers; and (3) the positions and changes in the positions of glacier termini. Preliminary studies of topography and glacier surface velocity with SAR interferometry have also been carried out. This project was motivated by the relationships of multi-year to decadal changes in glacier geometry to changing climate, and the probable significant contribution of Alaskan glaciers to rising sea level.

Lingle, Craig S.; Harrison, William D.

1995-01-01

119

Muir Glacier in Glacier Bay National Monument 1941  

USGS Multimedia Gallery

This August 1941 photograph is of Muir Glacier in Glacier Bay National Monument, Alaska. It shows the lower reaches of Muir Glacier, then a large, tidewater calving valley glacier and its tributary, Riggs Glacier. For nearly two centuries before 1941, Muir Glacier had been retreating. In places, a t...

120

Glacier inventory of the upper Huasco valley, Norte Chico, Chile: glacier characteristics, glacier change and comparison with  

E-print Network

Glacier inventory of the upper Huasco valley, Norte Chico, Chile: glacier characteristics, glacier Chile, Portugal 84, Casilla 3387, Santiago, Chile ABSTRACT. Results of a new glacier inventory identified, and glaciers with surface areas glacierized area and 3% of the water

Rabatel, Antoine

121

Detailed Reconstructions of Fluctuations of Seven Glaciers during the "little Ice Age" in the Northern Caucasus, Russian Federation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The main task of this work is the development of detailed reconstructions of mountain glaciers' fluctuations with precise spatial references in the Northern Caucasus, their analyses in terms of glacier length, area and volume changes and identification of climate role in these fluctuations. The studied glaciers (Alibek, Ullukam, Terskol, Kashkatash, Bezingi, Mijirgi, Tsey) are situated along the Bolshoy Caucasus Range from the very west (Teberda river basin) to the east (Tseydon river basin). These valley glaciers have different size, aspect and percent of debris-cover. Basing on instrumental data (since the middle of 20th century), remote sensing images (CORONA, Geoeye, Cartosat, IRS, ASTER, etc.), aerial photos of 1950s-1980s, maps (since 1887), old photographs, as well as proxy data (historical descriptions, lichenometry, dendrochronology, 14C, 10Be), we reconstructed 15-20 positions of the glaciers tongues for each glacier and produced maps showing variations of the glaciers with precise spatial reference since their maximum in the mid 17th or first half of 19th century. For example, for Alibek glacier seven former front positions and eleven moraines were photo-identified and dated. We obtained the carbon dating of intermorainal peat-bog (103%), moraine dating based on isotopes of 10Be (1900±12) and determined minimum age of most distant moraine according to dendrochronological analysis of trees (Abies nordmanniana), growing on its surface (more than 200 years). At that time (1895) the glacier was 290 m longer than today, its surface was 0.31 km2 larger (5.94 km2 in 1895, 5.63 km2 in 2008). We calculated glaciers' length and area changes, using different methods (GLIMS; Bhambri et al., 2012) and analyzed advantages and disadvantages of each method in case of their application for Caucasian glaciers. Based on our measurements we evaluated changes of equilibrium line altitude and volume. Volume changes have been reconstructed using the model offered by Lüthi et al. (2010). The obtained data can be used as the base for reconstructions of different climatic parameters, it is important contribution to the global paleoclimatic reconstructions (e.g. Leclercq and Oerlemans, 2011), where Caucasus is strongly underrepresented. The results of this study are also important for verification of other reconstructions with the lower spatial and temporal resolutions (Shahgedanova, 2009).

Bushueva, I.

2012-12-01

122

The complex behavior of the Cordilleran Ice Sheet and mountain glaciers to abrupt climate change during the latest Pleistocene  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Surficial mapping and more than 70 radiometric ages 10Be, 14C] constrain the evolution of the Cordilleran Ice Sheet (CIS) and associated mountain glaciers in western Canada during the latest Pleistocene. Our data suggest that: i) there is widespread evidence for the Younger Dryas (YD) throughout the mountains of western Canada; ii) late Pleistocene climate reconstructions based solely on alpine moraines may be misleading in regions with decaying ice sheets; iii) extensive interfluves in some mountain regions were ice-free between 16 ka and 13 ka (kilo calibrated yrs BP). Initial decay of the CIS from its maximum extent around 16 ka was likely due to a combination of climatic (surface melting) and dynamical factors. Climate amelioration during the Bølling-Allerød Warm Period [14.7-12.9 ka], likely the cause for the major phase of CIS decay, resulted in ice sheet equilibrium line altitudes (ELAs) ranging from 2500 m asl in southern BC to around 2000 m asl along the BC-Yukon border. Hence, before the onset of the Younger Dryas (YD) Cold Period [12.9-11.7 ka], the ice sheet shrank and became a labyrinth of individual and coalescing valley glaciers fed by major accumulation zones centered on the Coast Mountains and other high ranges of NW Canada. The response of remnant ice and cirque glaciers to the YD climate deterioration was highly variable. In some cases, small glaciers (0.5-2 km2) built YD moraines that were only hundreds of meters beyond those constructed during the Little Ice Age (LIA) [0.30-0.15 ka]. Our dating also reveals that much larger glaciers persisted in nearby valleys that lie hundreds of meters below the cirques. Hence, we infer that many cirques were completely deglaciated prior the YD, in contrast to low-lying valleys where ice sheet remnants persisted. Glaciers also advanced in north-central British Columbia during the YD, but here glaciers constructed large terminal and lateral moraines. In the Cassiar and northern Coast mountains, for example, 25 10Be [13.10-12.00 ka] and four minimum-limiting 14C ages from lakes impounded by moraines show that glaciers existed up to 10 km beyond LIA glacier limits during the YD. These glaciers thus had ELAs that were 300-500 m lower than contemporary glaciers. We are currently performing high-resolution (

Menounos, Brian; Goehring, Brent; Osborn, Gerald; Clarke, Garry K. C.; Ward, Brent; Margold, Martin; Bond, Jeff; Clague, John J.; Lakeman, Tom; Schaefer, Joerg; Koch, Joe; Gosse, John; Stroeven, Arjen P.; Seguinot, Julien; Heyman, Jakob; Fulton, Robert

2014-05-01

123

Online Glacier Photograph Database  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This image collection from the National Snow and Ice Data Center features 14 pairs of Alaskan glacier photographs. Each photographic pair consists of a late-19th or early-20th century photograph and a 21st century photograph taken from the same location. The comparative photographs clearly show substantial changes in glacier position and size and document significant landscape evolution and vegetative succession. The site also provides links to pairs of photographs of glaciers in Switzerland, a repeat photography project at Glacier National Park by the USGS, a glacier database which features satellite images and maps, and further information on glaciers.

The National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC)

124

A non-local thermodynamic equilibrium, line-blanketed synthetic spectrum of Iota Herculis - C, Al, and Si lines  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A non-LTE line-blanketed model stellar atmosphere is used to compute a model of I Herculis (B3 IV) with a Teff of 17,500 K and a log g of 3.75, following the conclusions of Peters and Polidan (1985). Detailed profiles of a number of lines of C, Al, and Si in the 1200-2000-A region are computed, including the resonance lines of C II, Al II, and Al III. These profiles are compared to observations obtained from the coaddition of eight IUE SWP images, using a technique developed by Leckrone and Adelman (1989). Comparison of carbon lines with a model that is underabundant in carbon by a factor of 2 relative to the sun indicates that the C abundance of Iota Her is at most one-half solar. Non-LTE effects are examined by comparing an LTE model possessing identical atmospheric parameters with the non-LTE model. Substantial differences in the populations of the model atomic states are found, but differences in the temperature structure of the two models often mask the non-LTE effects in the synthetic spectra.

Grigsby, James A.

1991-01-01

125

Estimation the Dongkemadi Glacier Thickness Change by ALOS/PALSAR  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper presents a novel method to monitor the thickness changes of mountain glacier based on the deformation extracted by differential interferometric synthetic aperture radar (DInSAR) interferograms measurements of the glacier's surface. To estimate changes in surface elevation through time, we make use of differential phase and get the deformation of the glacier surface in the line of sight (LOS). The method exploits the one component of displacement along the LOS of radar beam for deriving the glacier thickness changes and uses these components to calculate thickness changes within glacier polygons. Using this method, we can monitor the thickness changes in cm-level accuracy. In order to demonstrate this method a practical example, the monitoring thickness changes of the Dongkemadi Glacier in Tibet Plateau of China, is given. The performance of this method is validated by GPS survey data. The result obtained with one DInSAR pair covering the Dongkemadi Glacier in the cold season.

Zhou, Jianmin; Li, Zhen; Tang, Zhihua; Tian, Bangsen; Chen, Quan; Huang, Lei; Liu, Jiuli

2014-03-01

126

Biogeochemistry of glacier and rock glacier outflow in the western United States  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Glaciers are melting at unprecedented rates worldwide, releasing bioavailable minerals and nutrients and altering downstream biogeochemistry. Though much research has focused on the recession of ice-glaciers in alpine environments, far less is known about the melt dynamics and biogeochemistry of rock glaciers. Rock glaciers, which are mixtures of ice and rocks that flow like a glacier, are far more abundant in mountainous regions of the western United States than ice glaciers. Little is known about their influence on downstream hydrology and water quality. We report here preliminary results of a west-wide survey of the influence of glaciers and rock glaciers on headwater properties. Measurements of specific conductance, nitrate (NO3-), ammonium (NH4+), dissolved silica, and dissolved organic matter were compared between glaciers, rock glaciers, and snow-fed reference streams from three basins in the Colorado Front Range. Samples were collected from ice, where possible, and downstream at 500m intervals from the first flowing water to tree line. UV and fluorescence data were analyzed using excitation emission matrices (EEMs) and PARAFAC modeling. High concentrations of NH4+ were only found in ice and the most upstream locations; NH4+ was below detection at all lower elevation sites, whereas NO3- concentrations were low in the headwaters and higher downstream. The fluorescence spectrum of DOC from both ice and the highest elevations had a strong autochthonous (microbial or algal) signal that was replaced by a more allochtonous, terrestrially-derived DOC as it approached tree line. Rock glacier stream chemistry was intermediate between glacier-fed streams and strictly snow fed drainages. DOC levels for ice glaciers ranged 2-3mg/L with increasing values downstream, while rock glaciers ranged from 1-2.5 mg/L with attenuation downstream. Snowfed only streams had DOC values at detection <0.5mg/L, with the exception at Lake Husted outflow, with an upland wetland, unlike the other snow-fed streams sampled. SUVA 254, an index of aromaticity of the dissolved organic matter, was lower in streams fed by rock glaciers than ice glaciers and snow fed streams. This is potentially indicative of microbial processing in streams fed by rock glaciers. Fluorescence index was highest for ice glaciers (1.44), lowest for snow-fed streams (1.33), and a medial value for rock glaciers (1.42). Freshness index, which indicates the proportion of recently produced dissolved organic matter, was highest for ice glacier streams, and lowest for rock glacier streams, and showed the most variability between sites with snow-fed streams. More research is planned, but rock glaciers appear more similar to ice glaciers than snow-fed streams in their influence on alpine stream chemistry on biology, suggesting a trajectory of change of the mountains as ice features waste away.

Fegel, T. S.; Baron, J.; Hall, E.; Boot, C. M.

2013-12-01

127

Glacier dynamics after the disintegration of Wordie Ice Shelf, Antarctic Peninsula  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The retreat of Wordie Ice Shelf in the 1980s was the first recent episode in a series of ice-shelf collapse events which culminated in a substantial break-up of Wilkins Ice Shelf in April 2009. This widespread behaviour of ice shelves in the Antarctic Peninsula has been attributed to atmospheric and oceanic warming. While atmospheric warming leads to a prolonged melt season and increased melt ponding, oceanic warming increases bottom melting eroding ice shelves from below. Glaciers feeding into these ice shelves are known to accelerate because of the loss of the buttressing force the ice shelf exerted. Although the loss of the ice shelf itself does not contribute to sea level rise, the increased glacier outflow results in a surface lowering of the grounded glaciers associated with a mass loss and a positive contribution to sea level. Based on remote sensing, airborne and in-situ data collected during 3 recent field campaigns, we study the behaviour of glaciers flowing into Wordie Bay and its relationship to ice-shelf history and local meteorological conditions. Satellite images from different optical and radar sensors (ASTER, Landsat, ERS, and Envisat) were used to map the ice-shelf extent throughout recent years and show an almost complete disappearance of Wordie Ice Shelf. The comparison of surface elevations acquired by airborne laser scanning on Fleming Glacier in 2004 and 2008 reveals a surface elevation decrease of up to 4 m/yr at the grounding line. GPS measurements at sites first surveyed in the 1970s show that the glacier maintains higher ice flow velocities than before the retreat of Wordie Ice Shelf. A continuous GPS station deployed at the upper reaches of Fleming Glacier for one year allows studying changes in ice flow velocity throughout the year. In summary, high ice flow velocities together with the marked surface elevation at the grounding line indicate that the glaciers in Wordie Bay are still losing mass and have not attained a new equilibrium stage after ice shelf removal.

Wendt, Anja; Bown, Francisca; Rivera, Andrés.; Wendt, Jens; Zamora, Rodrigo; Bravo, Claudio; Zenteno, Pablo; Casassa, Gino; Carrasco, Jorge; Quintana, Juan

2010-05-01

128

Holocene dynamics of the Rhone Glacier, Switzerland, deduced from ice flow models and cosmogenic nuclides  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We describe efforts to model the Holocene extent of the Rhone Glacier, Switzerland, using four paleoclimate records as templates for paleo-equilibrium line altitude to identify candidate driving mechanisms of glaciers in the Alps. We evaluate the success of each paleoclimate template by comparing cosmogenic 10Be and 14C concentrations in pro-glacial bedrock derived from modeled glacier configurations to measured values. An adequate fit can be obtained using mean summer insolation for 46.5°N. However, use of the Dongee Cave, China, speleothem record yields the best fit by accounting for both sub-millennial (e.g. Little Ice Age and Medieval Warm Period) and multi-millennial climate variations (summer insolation). Our result indicates that glaciers in the Alps primarily responded to changes in insolation during the Holocene were smaller than today during the early Holocene when insolation was relatively high, and became larger during the mid to late Holocene. Superimposed on the first-order insolation response were shorter, sometimes large amplitude, length changes in response to short-lived climate events such as the Medieval Warm Period and the LIA.

Goehring, Brent M.; Vacco, David A.; Alley, Richard B.; Schaefer, Joerg M.

2012-10-01

129

Afghanistan Glacier Diminution  

Microsoft Academic Search

Glaciers in Afghanistan represent a late summer - early fall source of melt water for late season crop irrigation in a chronically drought-torn region. Precise river discharge figures associated with glacierized drainage basins are generally unavailable because of the destruction of hydrological gauging stations built in pre-war times although historic discharge data and prior (1960s) mapped glacier regions offer some

J. F. Shroder; M. Bishop; U. Haritashya; J. Olsenholler

2008-01-01

130

Glaciers Then and Now  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this activity, students compare 2 photographs (with time span of 30-100 years between photos) of specific Alaskan glaciers to observe how glaciers have changed over the time interval. Activity is a good kickoff for learning about glaciology - how and why glaciers form, grow and shrink, and their relation to climate change.

2007-01-01

131

World Glacier Inventory  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC) provides the World Glacier Inventory data, which was collected by the World Glacier Monitoring Service. This inventory contains geographic location, area, length, orientation, elevation, and classification of morphological type and moraines of more than 67,000 glaciers throughout the world. The data may be downloaded via FTP or through form-based queries.

132

Glacier (?) National Park  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Spreadsheets Across the Curriculum/Geology of National Parks module. Students examine data about the disappearing glaciers in the park; after calculating percentage change in the number of glaciers from 1850 to 2000, they interpolate to estimate when Grinnell glacier will be gone.

Module by: Judy McIlrath, University of South Florida Cover Page by: Len Vacher and Denise Davis, University of South Florida

133

Glaciers in 21st Century Himalayan Geopolitics  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Glaciers are ablating rapidly the world over. Nowhere are the rates of retreat and downwasting greater than in the Hindu Kush-Himalaya (HKH) region. It is estimated that over the next century, 40,000 square kilometers of present glacier area in the HKH region will become ice free. Most of this area is in major valleys and the lowest glaciated mountain passes. The existence and characteristics of glaciers have security impacts, and rapidly changing HKH glaciers have broad strategic implications: (1) Glaciers supply much of the fresh water and hydroelectric power in South and Central Asia, and so glaciers are valuable resources. (2) Shared economic interests in water, hydroelectricity, flood hazards, and habitat preservation are a force for common cause and reasoned international relations. (3) Glaciers and their high mountains generally pose a natural barrier tending to isolate people. Historically, they have hindered trade and intercultural exchanges and have protected against aggression. This has further promoted an independent spirit of the region's many ethnic groups. (4) Although glaciers are generally incompatible with human development and habitation, many of the HKH region's glaciers and their mountains have become sanctuaries and transit routes for militants. Siachen Glacier in Kashmir has for 17 years been "the world's highest battlefield," with tens of thousands of troops deployed on both sides of the India/Pakistan line of control. In 1999, that conflict threatened to trigger all-out warfare, and perhaps nuclear warfare. Other recent terrorist and military action has taken place on glaciers in Kyrgyzstan and Tajikistan. As terrorists are forced from easily controlled territories, many may tend to migrate toward the highest ground, where definitive encounters may take place in severe alpine glacial environments. This should be a major concern in Nepali security planning, where an Army offensive is attempting to reign in an increasingly robust and brutal Maoist insurgency. (5) Glacier lakes are in many cases very fragile and their natural dams routinely rupture, causing devastating floods. A rising regional terrorist threat in several countries could target these dams and precipitate calamitous and terrifying results. (6) Over the next century, retreating glaciers may open new corridors for trade and human migration across the Himalaya and pave the way for possible new economic, military and political alliances in the region. (7) Glacier retreat might open new sanctuaries for terrorists and open new corridors for possible ground-based military offensive action across the HKH ranges. The documentation of glacier characteristics that may influence their trafficability, and projections of future glacier extent and behavior are relevant to wide ranging concerns of the region's inhabitants. Satellite remote sensing and mapping of glaciers is one approach to defining and monitoring the problems and opportunities presented by HKH glaciers. Global Land Ice Measurements from Space (GLIMS) is a joint USGS/NASA Pathfinder project that has formed a global consortium of glaciologists in several regional centers that are mapping and monitoring the HKH glaciers using repeat-pass ASTER and Landsat ETM+ data. We are currently building a comprehensive satellite multispectral image and GIS database that is providing detailed information on the state and rates of change of each glacier in the HKH region and other areas of the world. Merging these results with DEMs allows a predictive capability that could be useful in policy development and security planning.

Kargel, J. S.; Wessels, R.; Kieffer, H. H.

2002-05-01

134

Stark broadening for diagnostics of the electron density in non-equilibrium plasma utilizing isotope hydrogen alpha lines  

SciTech Connect

Two Stark broadening parameters including FWHM (full width at half maximum) and FWHA (full width at half area) of isotope hydrogen alpha lines are simultaneously introduced to determine the electron density of a pulsed vacuum arc jet. To estimate the gas temperature, the rotational temperature of the C{sub 2} Swan system is fit to 2500?±?100?K. A modified Boltzmann-plot method with b{sub i}-factor is introduced to determine the modified electron temperature. The comparison between results of atomic and ionic lines indicates the jet is in partial local thermodynamic equilibrium and the electron temperature is close to 13?000?±?400?K. Based on the computational results of Gig-Card calculation, a simple and precise interpolation algorithm for the discrete-points tables can be constructed to obtain the traditional n{sub e}-T{sub e} diagnostic maps of two Stark broadening parameters. The results from FWHA formula by the direct use of FWHM?=?FWHA and these from the diagnostic map are different. It can be attributed to the imprecise FWHA formula form and the deviation between FWHM and FWHA. The variation of the reduced mass pair due to the non-equilibrium effect contributes to the difference of the results derived from two hydrogen isotope alpha lines. Based on the Stark broadening analysis in this work, a corrected method is set up to determine n{sub e} of (1.10?±?0.08)?×?10{sup 21}?m{sup ?3}, the reference reduced mass ?{sub 0} pair of (3.30?±?0.82 and 1.65?±?0.41), and the ion kinetic temperature of 7900?±?1800?K.

Yang, Lin [Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Institute of Electronic Engineering, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Tan, Xiaohua; Wan, Xiang; Chen, Lei; Jin, Dazhi; Qian, Muyang [Institute of Electronic Engineering, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Li, Gongping, E-mail: ligp@lzu.edu.cn [Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

2014-04-28

135

Non-Equilibrium and Current Sheet Formation in Line-Tied  

E-print Network

mapping #12;More general topology Parker's optical analogy (1990) #12;Possible topology B1(l)dl 1 B1(l) ^B. Bhattacharjee Center for Magnetic Reconnection Studies The University of Iowa 2002 APS Division of Plasma. Field-lines are tied at z = 0 and z = L. Footpoint Mapping: x (z) = X[x (0),z], x (L) = X[x (0), L

Ng, Chung-Sang

136

Glacier Ecosystems of Himalaya  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Biological activity on glaciers has been believed to be extremely limited. However, we found various biotic communities specialized to the glacier environment in various part of the world, such as Himalaya, Patagonia and Alaska. Some of these glacier hosted biotic communities including various cold-tolerant insects, annelids and copepods that were living in the glacier by feeding on algae and bacteria growing in the snow and ice. Thus, the glaciers are simple and relatively closed ecosystems sustained by the primary production in the snow and ice. In this presentation, we will briefly introduce glacier ecosystems in Himalaya; ecology and behavior of glacier animals, altitudinal zonation of snow algal communities, and the structure of their habitats in the glacier. Since the microorganisms growing on the glacier surface are stored in the glacial strata every year, ice-core samples contain many layers with these microorganisms. We showed that the snow algae in the ice-core are useful for ice core dating and could be new environmental signals for the studies on past environment using ice cores. These microorganisms in the ice core will be important especially in the studies of ice core from the glaciers of warmer regions, in which chemical and isotopic contents are often heavily disturbed by melt water percolation. Blooms of algae and bacteria on the glacier can reduce the surface albedo and significantly affect the glacier melting. For example, the surface albedo of some Himalayan glaciers was significantly reduced by a large amount of dark-colored biogenic material (cryoconite) derived from snow algae and bacteria. It increased the melting rates of the surfaces by as much as three-fold. Thus, it was suggested that the microbial activity on the glacier could affect the mass balance and fluctuation of the glaciers.

Kohshima, S.; Yoshimura, Y.; Takeuchi, N.; Segawa, T.; Uetake, J.

2012-12-01

137

Energy balance-based distributed modeling of snow and glacier melt runoff for the Hunza river basin in the Pakistan Karakoram Himalayan region  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A spatially distributed biosphere hydrological model with energy balance-based multilayer snow physics and multilayer glacier model, including debris free and debris covered surface (enhanced WEB-DHM-S) has been developed and applied to the Hunza river basin in the Pakistan Karakoram Himalayan region, where about 34% of the basin area is covered by glaciers. The spatial distribution of seasonal snow and glacier cover, snow and glacier melt runoff along with rainfall-contributed runoff, and glacier mass balances are simulated. The simulations are carried out at hourly time steps and at 1-km spatial resolution for the two hydrological years (2002-2003) with the use of APHRODITE precipitation dataset, observed temperature, and other atmospheric forcing variables from the Global Land Data Assimilation System (GLDAS). The pixel-to-pixel comparisons for the snow-free and snow-covered grids over the region reveal that the simulation agrees well with the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) eight-day maximum snow-cover extent data (MOD10A2) with an accuracy of 83% and a positive bias of 2.8 %. The quantitative evaluation also shows that the model is able to reproduce the river discharge satisfactorily with Nash efficiency of 0.92. It is found that the contribution of rainfall to total streamflow is small (about 10-12%) while the contribution of snow and glacier is considerably large (35-40% for snowmelt and 50-53% for glaciermelt, respectively). The model simulates the state of snow and glaciers at each model grid prognostically and thus can estimate the net annual mass balance. The net mass balance varies from -2 m to +2 m water equivalent. Additionally, the hypsography analysis for the equilibrium line altitude (ELA) suggests that the average ELA in this region is about 5700 m with substantial variation from glacier to glacier and region to region. This study is the first to adopt a distributed biosphere hydrological model with the energy balance- based multilayer snow and glacier module to estimate the spatial distribution of snow/glacier cover and snow and glacier melt runoff for a river basin in the Karakoram Himalayan region.

Shrestha, M.; Wang, L.; Koike, T.; Xue, Y.; Hirabayashi, Y.; Ahmad, S.

2012-12-01

138

Bathymetric control of tidewater glacier mass loss in northwest Greenland  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

It has been suggested that fjord geometry could be an important contributor to the observed mass loss variability in Greenland by modulating the flow of warm water to marine-terminating glaciers. New gravity-derived bathymetry of Greenlandic fjords confirms the link between the grounding line depth and rates of glacier mass loss, a relationship previously predicted only in ice models. We focus on two neighboring glaciers to minimize differences in external forcing and therefore isolate the role of the fjord bathymetry. Tracy Glacier has a deeper grounding line and has been retreating since 1892 with a contemporary mass budget of -1.63 Gt a-1. Heilprin Glacier has a shallower grounding line depth, a stable ice terminus, and a mass budget of only -0.53 Gt a-1. Because of its deeper grounding line, Tracy has more ice in contact with warm subsurface water, leaving it more vulnerable to changes in ocean forcing and therefore mass loss.

Porter, David F.; Tinto, Kirsty J.; Boghosian, Alexandra; Cochran, James R.; Bell, Robin E.; Manizade, Serdar S.; Sonntag, John G.

2014-09-01

139

The World Glacier Inventory  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This web site is part of the National Snow and Ice Data Center's World Glacier Monitoring Service. The World Glacier Inventory contains information for over 67,000 glaciers throughout the world. Parameters within the inventory include: geographic location, area, length, orientation, elevation, and classification of morphological type and moraines. The inventory entries are based upon a single observation in time and can be viewed as a "snapshot" of the glacier at this time. These data are collected and digitized by the World Glacier Monitoring Service, Zurich. A point and click map of the world will also take users to the region of interest with a list of glaciated areas.

C. Haggerty

140

Worthington Glacier Project  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF), the Worthington Glacier Project is a collaboration between researchers at the University of Wyoming and the University of Colorado. The objective of this project is to understand glacier flow dynamics "by comparing detailed measurements of glacier motion with numerical models for glacier flow." Summaries and diagrams are provided of the discussed topics: Borehole Video Observations, Radio-Echo Sounding, Crevassing, Surface Flow Field, Englacial Flow Field, 3-D Flow Field, and In-Situ Stress. Images of the Worthington Glacier fieldwork, future research, and publications are also available at the site.

141

Fast tidewater glaciers  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Some iceberg-calving outlet glaciers flow continuously at speeds normally associated with surging glaciers arid exhibit dramatic instability scenarios related to those suggested for marine ice sheets. No temperate tidewater glaciers are known to have floating termini, but many polar and subpolar tidewater glaciers do. The fast flow of temperate calving glaciers is almost entirely due to basal sliding and appears to be a function of the effective pressure on the bed, which may approach zero, and the longitudinal back stress on the terminus. The terminus boundary condition (the calving relation) is imperfectly known yet is vital to the dynamics of these glaciers. Calving relations for grounded tidewater glaciers have been suggested on empirical grounds but have not been rigorously tested; the calving relations for floating termini are virtually unknown. This, together with the imperfect understanding of basal sliding, inhibits confidence in our understanding of the stability of these glaciers. Columbia Glacier (Alaska) is an instructive example because observations have been made on the major changes in its geometry, calving rate, and dynamics that have occurred in less than 10 years. The calving flux has increased more rapidly than the glacier flux, causing thinning and retreat; as a result, the ice velocity has increased markedly. The short-term velocity changes relate to changes in back pressure (ice recession, tidal changes) and the flux of water injected to the bed. These results have relevance to the mechanisms of basal sliding, glacier surges, and the stability of marine ice streams.

Meier, M. F.; Post, Austin

1987-08-01

142

Pine Island Glacier, Antarctica  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This ASTER image was acquired on December 12, 2000, and covers an area of 38 x 48 km. Pine Island Glacier has undergone a steady loss of elevation with retreat of the grounding line in recent decades. Now, space imagery has revealed a wide new crack that some scientists think will soon result in a calving event. Glaciologist Robert Bindschadler of NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center predicts this crack will result in the calving of a major iceberg, probably in less than 18 months. Discovery of the crack was possible due to multi-year image archives and high resolution imagery. This image is located at 74.1 degrees south latitude and 105.1 degrees west longitude.

The U.S. science team is located at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Science Mission Directorate.

2001-01-01

143

Equilibrium of the human body and the gravity line: the basics  

Microsoft Academic Search

Introduction  Bipedalism is a distinguishing feature of the human race and is characterised by a narrow base of support and an ergonomically\\u000a optimal position thanks to the appearance of lumbar and cervical curves.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Materials  The pelvis, adapted to bipedalism, may be considered as the pelvic vertebra connecting the spine to the lower limbs. Laterally,\\u000a the body’s line of gravity is situated very

J. C. Le Huec; R. Saddiki; J. Franke; J. Rigal; S. Aunoble

144

Modelling Greenland Outlet Glaciers  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The objective of this project was to develop simple yet realistic models of Greenland outlet glaciers to better understand ongoing changes and to identify possible causes for these changes. Several approaches can be taken to evaluate the interaction between climate forcing and ice dynamics, and the consequent ice-sheet response, which may involve changes in flow style. To evaluate the icesheet response to mass-balance forcing, Van der Veen (Journal of Geophysical Research, in press) makes the assumption that this response can be considered a perturbation on the reference state and may be evaluated separately from how this reference state evolves over time. Mass-balance forcing has an immediate effect on the ice sheet. Initially, the rate of thickness change as compared to the reference state equals the perturbation in snowfall or ablation. If the forcing persists, the ice sheet responds dynamically, adjusting the rate at which ice is evacuated from the interior to the margins, to achieve a new equilibrium. For large ice sheets, this dynamic adjustment may last for thousands of years, with the magnitude of change decreasing steadily over time as a new equilibrium is approached. This response can be described using kinematic wave theory. This theory, modified to pertain to Greenland drainage basins, was used to evaluate possible ice-sheet responses to perturbations in surface mass balance. The reference state is defined based on measurements along the central flowline of Petermann Glacier in north-west Greenland, and perturbations on this state considered. The advantage of this approach is that the particulars of the dynamical flow regime need not be explicitly known but are incorporated through the parameterization of the reference ice flux or longitudinal velocity profile. The results of the kinematic wave model indicate that significant rates of thickness change can occur immediately after the prescribed change in surface mass balance but adjustments in flow rapidly diminish these rates to a few cm/yr at most. The time scale for adjustment is of the order of a thousand years or so.

vanderVeen, Cornelis; Abdalati, Waleed (Technical Monitor)

2001-01-01

145

Glacier activity at the Lateglacial / Holocene transition inferred from the Swiss Alps  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

High-alpine environments react sensitively to changes in climate. Depending on size, catchment area and valley topography, mountain glaciers response relatively fast with advances and recessions to shifts in temperature and precipitation (e.g. Oerlemans, 2005). About half of the present glaciers in the Swiss Alps are located in the highest mean altitudes areas. Past glacier activity beyond actual glacier extent is sometimes easily identified, such as the moraines related to the Little Ice Age. Records of older glacier activity, however, are usually less abundant. Lateglacial glacier advances are often documented by moraine complexes. By comparing geomorphological characteristics within and between several investigated sites across the Swiss Alps, a relative chronology of glacier oscillations and re-advances was established. A cross-correlation of moraines in the same high-alpine climatic region allows to conclude that moraine ridges in comparable relative positions with similar morphologies and characterized by similar equilibrium line altitude depressions (Gross et al. 1977; Maisch, 1987), may be allocated to the same supra-regional trends in climate change. Surface exposure dating on well defined moraines gives the absolute chronology for the relative framework. More than 50 samples from erratic boulders on the crestline of moraines and glacially abraded bedrock were dated using the radionuclide 10Be. According to the results on boulders of the outer moraines, the oldest ridge coincides in time with the initial phase of the Younger Dryas (e.g. Gerzensee Oscillation). In addition, a number of Lateglacial and early Holocene advances have been identified (Preboreal Oscillation, Younger Dryas and Gerzensee Oscillation). 10Be exposure ages on moraines of the innermost Lateglacial complexes, but distinctly downvalley from Little Ice Age moraines point to cold conditions in the Alps during the early Holocene. REFERENCES Gross, G., Kerschner, H. & Patzelt, G. (1977): Methodische Untersuchungen über die Schneegrenze in alpinen Gletschergebieten. Zeitschrift für Gletscherkunde und Glazialgeologie, 12, 223-251. Maisch, M. (1987): Zur Gletschergeschichte des alpinen Spätglazials: Analyse und Interpretation von Schneegrenzdaten. Geographica Helvetica, 42, 63-71. Oerlemans, J. (2005): Extracting a Climate Signal from 169 Glacier Records. Science, 308, 675-677.

Schindelwig, Inga; Akçar, Naki; Lukas, Sven; Kubik, Peter W.; Schlüchter, Christian

2010-05-01

146

Glaciers of Asia  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This chapter is the ninth to be released in U.S. Geological Survey Professional Paper 1386, Satellite Image Atlas of Glaciers of the World, a series of 11 chapters. In each of the geographic area chapters, remotely sensed images, primarily from the Landsat 1, 2, and 3 series of spacecraft, are used to analyze the specific glacierized region of our planet under consideration and to monitor glacier changes. Landsat images, acquired primarily during the middle to late 1970s and early 1980s, were used by an international team of glaciologists and other scientists to study various geographic regions and (or) to discuss related glaciological topics. In each glacierized geographic region, the present areal distribution of glaciers is compared, wherever possible, with historical information about their past extent. The atlas provides an accurate regional inventory of the areal extent of glacier ice on our planet during the 1970s as part of a growing international scientific effort to measure global environmental change on the Earth?s surface. The chapter is divided into seven geographic parts and one topical part: Glaciers of the Former Soviet Union (F-1), Glaciers of China (F-2), Glaciers of Afghanistan (F?3), Glaciers of Pakistan (F-4), Glaciers of India (F-5), Glaciers of Nepal (F?6), Glaciers of Bhutan (F-7), and the Paleoenvironmental Record Preserved in Middle-Latitude, High-Mountain Glaciers (F-8). Each geographic section describes the glacier extent during the 1970s and 1980s, the benchmark time period (1972-1981) of this volume, but has been updated to include more recent information. Glaciers of the Former Soviet Union are located in the Russian Arctic and various mountain ranges of Russia and the Republics of Georgia, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, and Kazakstun. The Glacier Inventory of the USSR and the World Atlas of Ice and Snow Resources recorded a total of 28,881 glaciers covering an area of 78,938 square kilometers (km2). China includes many of the mountain-glacier systems of the world including the Himalaya, Karakorum, Tien Shan and Altay mountain ranges. The glaciers are widely scattered and cover an area of about 59,425 km2. The mountain glaciers may be classified as maritime, subcontinental or extreme continental. In Afghanistan, more than 3,000 small glaciers occur in the Hindu Kush and Pamir mountains. Most glaciers occur on north-facing slopes shaded by mountain peaks and on east and southeast slopes that are shaded by monsoon clouds. The glaciers provide vital water resources to the region and cover an area of about 2,700 km2. Glaciers of northern Pakistan are some of the largest and longest mid-latitude glaciers on Earth. They are located in the Hindu Kush, Himalaya, and Karakoram mountains and cover an area of about 15,000 km2. Glaciers here are important for their role in providing water resources and their hazard potential. The glaciers in India are located in the Himalaya and cover about 8,500 km2. The Himalaya contains one of the largest reservoirs of snow and ice outside the polar regions. The glaciers are a major source of fresh water and supply meltwater to all the rivers in northern India, thereby affecting the quality of life of millions of people. In Nepal, the glaciers are located in the Himalaya as individual glaciers; the glacierized area covers about 5,324 km2. The region is the highest mountainous region on Earth and includes the Mt. Everest region. Glaciers in the Bhutan Himalaya have a total area of about 1,317 km2. Many recent glacier studies are focused on glacier lakes that have the potential of generating dangerous glacier lake outburst floods. Research on the glaciers of the middle-latitude, high-mountain glaciers of Asia has also focused on the information contained in the ice cores from the glaciers. This information helps in the reconstruction of paleoclimatic records, and the computer modeling of global climate change.

Williams, Richard S., Jr.; Ferrigno, Jane G.

2010-01-01

147

Alaskan Glaciers and Glacier-Outburst Floods (Jökulhlaups)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Alaska has more than 50,000 glaciers, including about 2,000 valley glaciers. Nearly all Alaskan glaciers are temperate. Many Alaskan valley glaciers end in ice-marginal lakes formed by terminal or recessional moraines. Some Alaskan valley glaciers act as ice dams, forming lakes by blocking side valleys or by extending into adjacent valleys. Many Alaskan glaciers store large quantities of water in

B. F. Molnia

2009-01-01

148

Afghanistan Glacier Diminution  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Glaciers in Afghanistan represent a late summer - early fall source of melt water for late season crop irrigation in a chronically drought-torn region. Precise river discharge figures associated with glacierized drainage basins are generally unavailable because of the destruction of hydrological gauging stations built in pre-war times although historic discharge data and prior (1960s) mapped glacier regions offer some analytical possibilities. The best satellite data sets for glacier-change detection are declassified Cornona and Keyhole satellite data sets, standard Landsat sources, and new ASTER images assessed in our GLIMS (Global Land Ice Measurements from Space) Regional Center for Southwest Asia (Afghanistan and Pakistan). The new hyperspectral remote sensing survey of Afghanistan completed by the US Geological Survey and the Afghanistan Ministry of Mines offers potential for future detailed assessments. Long-term climate change in southwest Asia has decreased precipitation for millennia so that glaciers, rivers and lakes have all declined from prehistoric and historic highs. As many glaciers declined in ice volume, they increased in debris cover until they were entirely debris-covered or became rock glaciers, and the ice was protected thereby from direct solar radiation, to presumably reduce ablation rates. We have made a preliminary assessment of glacier location and extent for the country, with selected, more-detailed, higher-resolution studies underway. In the Great Pamir of the Wakhan Corridor where the largest glaciers occur, we assessed fluctuations of a randomly selected 30 glaciers from 1976 to 2003. Results indicate that 28 glacier-terminus positions have retreated, and the largest average retreat rate was 36 m/yr. High albedo, non-vegetated glacier forefields formed prior to 1976, and geomorphological evidence shows apparent glacier-surface downwasting after 1976. Climatic conditions and glacier retreat have resulted in disconnection of tributary glaciers to their main trunk, the formation of high-altitude lakes, and an increased frequency and size of proglacial lakes that are, however, genrally unavailable for irrigation sources. Similar conditions of glacier diminution have occurred in almost all other high altitude parts of the country. Generally decreased precipitation in all seasons, coupled with decreased glacier storage of potential melt-water, augers continued severe problems for beleaguered Afghanistan agriculture, along with concomitant social problems as a result.

Shroder, J. F.; Bishop, M.; Haritashya, U.; Olsenholler, J.

2008-12-01

149

THE DIAGNOSTIC O VI ABSORPTION LINE IN DIFFUSE PLASMAS: COMPARISON OF NON-EQUILIBRIUM IONIZATION STRUCTURE SIMULATIONS TO FUSE DATA  

SciTech Connect

The nature of the interstellar O VI in the Galactic disk is studied by means of a multi-fluid hydrodynamical approximation, tracing the detailed time-dependent evolution of the ionization structure of the plasma. Our focus is to explore the signature of any non-equilibrium ionization condition present in the interstellar medium using the diagnostic O VI ion. A detailed comparison between the simulations and FUSE data is carried out by taking lines of sight (LOS) measurements through the simulated Galactic disk, covering an extent of 4 kpc from different vantage points. The simulation results bear a striking resemblance with the observations: (1) the N(O VI) distribution with distance and angle fall within the minimum and maximum values of the FUSE data; (2) the column density dispersion with distance is constant for all the LOS, showing a mild decrease at large distances; (3) O VI has a clumpy distribution along the LOS; and (4) the time-averaged midplane density for distances >400 pc has a value of (1.3-1.4) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -8} cm{sup -3}. The highest concentration of O VI by mass occurs in the thermally stable (10{sup 3.9} K < T {<=} 10{sup 4.2} K; 20%) and unstable (10{sup 4.2} K < T < 10{sup 5} K; 50%) regimes, both well below its peak temperature in collisional ionization equilibrium, with the corresponding volume filling factors oscillating with time between 8%-20% and 4%-5%, respectively. These results may also be relevant for intergalactic metal absorption systems at high redshifts.

De Avillez, Miguel A. [Department of Mathematics, University of Evora, R. Romao Ramalho 59, 7000 Evora (Portugal); Breitschwerdt, Dieter [Zentrum fuer Astronomie und Astrophysik, Technische Universitaet Berlin, Hardenbergstrasse 36, D-10623 Berlin (Germany)

2012-12-20

150

Topography, relief, climate and glaciers: a global prespective  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The examination of the relationship between Earth's topography and present and past climate (i.e. long-term elevation of glaciers Equilibrium Line Altitude) reveals that the elevation of mountain ranges may be limited or controlled by glaciations. This is of prime importance, because glacial condition would lead to a limit the mountain development, hence the accumulation of gravitational energy and prevent the development of further glacial conditions as well as setting the erosion in (peri)glacial environments. This study examines the relationships between topography and the global Equilibrium Line Altitude of alpine glaciers around the world (long term snowline, i.e. the altitude where the ice mass balance is null). Two main observations can be drawn: 1) The distance between the (averaged and maximum) topography, and the ELA decreases pole ward the poles, and even become reversed (mean elevation above to ELA) at high latitude. Correlatively, the elevation of very large portion of land at mid-latitude cannot be related to glaciations, simply because it was never glaciated (large distance between topography and long-term mean ELA). The maximum distance between the ELA and the topography is greater close to the equator and decreases poleward. In absence of glacial and periglacial erosion, this trend cannot have its origin in glacial and periglacial processes. Moreover, the ELA elevation shows a significant (1000 - 1500m) depression in the intertropical zone. This depression of the ELA is not reflected at all in the topography. 2) The distribution of relief on Earth, if normalized by the mean elevation of mountain ranges (as a proxy for available space to create relief) shows a latitudinal band of greater relief between 40° and 60° (or between ELA of 500m to 2500m a.s.l.). This mid-latitude relatively greater relief challenges the straightforward relationship between glaciations, erosion and topography. Oppositely, it suggests that glacier may be more efficient agent in temperate area, with important amplitude between glacial and interglacial climate. This is consistent with the view of a very variable glacier erodibility that can erode and protect the landscape, as well as with studies documenting a bimodal location of the preferred glacial erosion, at relatively high elevation (around the long-term ELA), and at much lower elevation (close to the glacial maximum lower reaches), thanks to efficient water lubrication of the glacier bases that greatly enhance the sliding velocity. These findings show that the relation between the mountain topography and the long term snowline is not as straightforward as previously proposed. Beside the role of tectonic forcing highlighted by several authors, the importance of the glacial erosion appears to be crucial at mid latitude, but more complex at both high and low latitude. Moreover, the relief at mid latitude appears to be higher, hence suggesting a positive correlation between relief and topographic control of glacier on the landscape.

Champagnac, Jean-Daniel; Valla, Pierre; Herman, fred

2014-05-01

151

Evolution of Glacier Snowline Since the End of the Last Ice Age in New Zealand  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

An important problem in paleoclimatology is how Southern Hemisphere climate changed since the end of the last ice age. The terrestrial glacier record reflects past snowline (=equilibrium line altitude) variability and is one of the few direct proxies available, in the middle latitudes, of former atmospheric properties. We reconstruct changes in snowline since ~15 ka on the South Island of New Zealand using geomorphologic mapping, 10Be surface-exposure dating, accumulation-area ratio (AAR) methods and numerical modeling. The snowline data are a proxy for the 0°C atmospheric isotherm, which occurs above 1500 m asl in the central Southern Alps, and trends in temperature since ~15 ka. Our findings show that snowline was depressed during the Antarctic Cold Reversal. Subsequently, snowline rose ~100 m during the Younger Dryas stadial in Europe. These late glacial changes appear coherent across the southern middle latitudes. In the early Holocene, snowline was depressed >200 m relative to modern in the Southern Alps. Between 11 ka and 600 years ago, short-term oscillations punctuated a multi-millennia trend of decreasing glacier extent as snowline rose ~100 m. Since ~600 yrs ago, net snowline has continued progressively to rise. The record implies long-term warming in New Zealand since the Late Glacial period. During the Holocene, the lowest snowlines and most extensive glaciers occurred in the early part of the epoch. Snowline reconstruction and numerical modeling allow us to estimate that temperature depression during the Late Glacial was ~2.1±0.4°C (relative to modern) and increased about 0.6 to 1°C between the early and late Holocene. Our terrestrial glacier and snowline records show coherence and also they are consistent with marine records in the Australian sector, documenting a regional climate pattern. However, the climate of the southwest Pacific region was fundamentally different from that observed in the Northern Hemisphere, where the most extensive Holocene glaciers occurred during the European Little Ice Age period.

Kaplan, M. R.; Putnam, A. E.; Schaefer, J. M.; Denton, G. H.; Chinn, T. J.; Barrell, D.; Doughty, A. M.; Mackintosh, A. N.; Andersen, B. G.

2012-12-01

152

Surface energy balance of Keqicar Glacier, Tianshan Mountains, China, during ablation period  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The meteorological data of ablation season in 2005 were recorded by two automatic weather stations on Keqicar Glacier in southwestern Tianshan Mountains in China. One is operated on the glacier near the equilibrium line with the altitude of 4265 m (site A) and another is operated on the glacier ablation area with the altitude of 3700 m (site B). These data were used to analyze the meteorological conditions and the surface energy balance (SEB) of Keqicar Glacier. The net radiation was directly measured, and the turbulent fluxes were calculated using the bulk aerodynamic approach, including stability correction. The ablation value of 0.68 m w.e derived from four ablation stakes is in close correspondence to the modeled ablation value of 0.71 m w.e calculated from the surface energy balance. During the observation period, the net radiation accounts for 81.4% of the total energy with its value of 63.3 W m-2. The rest energy source is provided by the sensible turbulent heat flux with its value of 14.4 W m-2. Energy is consumed mainly by melting and the evaporation, accounting for 69.5% and 29.7% of the total energy with their values of 54.0 W m-2 and 23.0 W m-2 respectively. The radiative energy dominates energy exchanges at the glacier-atmosphere interface, governed by the variation in net shortwave radiation. Net short-wave radiation varies significantly due to the effects of cloudiness and the high albedo caused by fallen snow. Wind speed influences the turbulent fluxes distinctively and sensible and latent flux is much bigger on July with high wind speed

Li, Jing; Liu, Shiyin; Zhang, Yong; Han, Haidong

2010-05-01

153

Temperature index modeling of the Kahiltna Glacier: Comparison to multiple field and geodetic mass balance datasets  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Glaciers of Alaska, USA, and Northwestern Canada are shedding mass at one of the highest rates of any mountain glacier system, with significant impact at the global and local scales. Despite advances in satellite and airborne technologies, fully characterizing the temporal evolution of glacier mass change in individual watersheds remains a challenge. Temperature index modeling is an approach that can be used to expand on sparse ground observations, and that can help bridge the gap between regional and individual watershed estimates of the time series of glacier mass change. Here we present a study on temperature index modeling of glacier-wide mass balance for the large Kahiltna Glacier (502 km2, 270 to 6100 m in elevation) in the Central Alaska Range, using a combination of ground observations and past climate data products. We reproduce mass changes from 1991 to 2011, and assess model performance by comparing our results to several field and remote sensing datasets. First, we compare our results to a 20-year record of mass balance measurements at a National Park Service index site at the glacier's equilibrium line altitude. We find low correlation between index site measurements and modeled glacier-wide balances (R2 = 0.24), indicating that the index site may not be representative of the glacier-wide mass balance regime. We compare next to glacier-wide mass balances derived from airborne laser altimetry, to assess the model's long-term mass change estimates. We find disagreement between the mean annual balances for 1995 to 2010 (-0.95 +/-0.49 m w.e. yr --1 from the model versus -0.69 +0.07/-0.08 m w.e. yr --1 from laser altimetry). To validate the laser altimetry methods, we then compare estimates from 1951 to 2011 from laser altimetry and digital elevation model differencing, finding close agreement (-0.48 +0.08/-0.09 m w.e. yr--1 and -0.41 +/-0.26 m w.e. yr--1 , respectively), and lending strength to the laser altimetry centerline extrapolation techniques. We also examine estimates derived from regionally-downscaled satellite gravimetry. While gravimetry likely underestimates long-term mass loss for this glacier (-0.36 +/-0.13 m w.e. yr--1 for 2003 to 2010), it correlates well to individual modeled annual balances (R2 = 0.72) and to the time series of mass balance at an ablation stake location (R2 = 0.81). Given ongoing refinements to gravimetry downscaling and geodetic techniques, our results point to the potential for integrating multiple methods to obtain the most information on subannual and long-term mass changes at the basin scale for remote sites such as the Kahiltna Glacier.

Young, Joanna C.

154

Analysis of meteorological data and the surface energy balance of Keqicar Glacier, Tien Shan, China  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Northwestern China currently experiences a climate change with fundamental consequences for the hydrological cycle. In the strongly arid region where water resources are essential for agriculture and food production, glaciers represent important water resources, contributing significantly to streamflow. The debris is an important glaciological feature of the region and has major impact on melt rates. It is essential to understand and quantify the interaction of climate and sub-debris melt in order to assess the current situation and to predict future water yield. Note that the surface energy balance determines glacier melt. However, little is known about the variability characteristics of the surface energy fluxes in this region. For this reason, we set up two automatic weather stuation (AWSs) in the ablation area of Keqicar Glacier. Keqicar Glacier is located in the Tarim River basin (largest inland river basin in China), southwestern Tien Shan, China. It is a representative debris-covered glacier with a length of 26.0 km and a total surface area of 83.6 km2. The thickness of the debris layer varies from 0.0 to 2.50 m in general. In some places large rocks are piled up to several meters. In this study, we report on analysis of meteorological data for the period 1 July-13 September 2003, from two automatic weather stations, aimed at studying the relationship between climate and ablation. One station is located on the lower part of the ablation area where the glacier is covered by debris layer, and the other near the equilibrium line altitude (ELA). All sensors were sampled every 10 seconds, and data were stored as hourly averages. The stations were visited regularly for maintenance at two weeks intervals depending on the weather conditions and location of the AWS. A total of 17 ablation stakes were drilled into the glacier at different elevations to monitor glacier melt during the study period. Readings were taken regularly in connection with AWS maintenance. The weather station on the glacier measured an average temperature of 2.6 °C (at 2m height above surface). The lapse rate of air temperature is close to the standard free atmospheric lapse rate (0.6 °C per 100m), which shows the cold effect of glacier is not significant. The local mountain-valley winds is significant, the speed of which is 2.3 m s-1 (at 2m height). Glacier is dominated by the convectional precipitation, 75% of which occurs in day time. The ablation stakes indicate a specific mass balance of -2.5 m w.e. between 1 July and 13 September. The specific mass balance calculated from the surface energy balance, -2.6 m w.e., is in close correspondence to this. The thermal processes on the debris layer are quite different from those on bare ice or snow. The main physical characteristics of the debris layer are the thermal conductivity and albedo that control heat conduction to the ice-debris interface. Net radiation is the main melt energy whether the debris layer is taken into consideration or not, which is lager between July and the middle of August, and then decreases. This is coincides with the glacier ablation. On the debris-covered area, the sensible- and latent-heat fluxes contribute 19.6% of the melt energy, higher than that on the debris-free ice (4.1%). Hence, due to the existing debris layer, the ablation shows a significant spatial distribution.

Zhang, Y.; Liu, S.; Fujita, K.; Han, H.; Li, J.

2009-04-01

155

All about glaciers  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The National Snow and Ice Data Center created this website to educate everyone, from grade school students to glaciologists, about glaciers. At the Data and Science link, researchers can learn about glaciological organizations, publications, and research projects as well as how to obtain glacial data. Students and educators can find a glaciology glossary, answers to many of their questions, and amazing images of glaciers at the General Information link. The website also provides a detailed portrayal of the life of glaciers.

156

Glaciers and Climate Change  

Microsoft Academic Search

Although my book focuses on valley glaciers, it is not intended\\u000ato provide a basic course in glaciology, nor does it claim to\\u000agive a state-of-the-art picture of glacier research. It consists\\u000amainly of the personal reflections of a meteorologist who\\u000agradually became interested in glaciers and is written primarily\\u000afor persons with a general interest in the physics of

J. Oerlemans

2001-01-01

157

Glacier Hazards from Space  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This "Science Now" feature from the Public Broadcasting Service (PBS) television program "Nova" shows students how remote sensing by satellites can be used to monitor and evaluate hazards presented by glaciers as the climate becomes warmer, causing the glaciers to melt. The feature, which can be presented as a slide show, consists of 11 satellite images with brief written descriptions that explain such hazards as ice collapses and avalanches, flooding by meltwater, and bursting glacier lakes.

158

Moving Model Glacier  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this goopy activity, learners will model glacial movement with “gak,” a white glue and liquid starch mixture. Each fist-sized gob of gak represents a year’s worth of snow, accumulating to form a “glacier” on a model landscape. Learners will record the gak’s rate of travel as well as make observations of other glacier behaviors. Relates to the linked video, DragonflyTV GPS: Glaciers.

Twin Cities Public Television, Inc.

2007-01-01

159

Temporal and spatial changes in Western Himalayan firn line altitudes from 1998 to 2009  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Understanding changes in glacier mass balance is important because it is indicative of changes in climate and the hydrologic cycle. The latter also has particular influence on people living near glaciers and/or glacier-fed rivers. The Western Himalayas remain one of the regions where recent changes in glacier mass balance are not well-known. The temporal and spatial changes in firn line altitudes are an indicator of equilibrium line altitudes and thus reflect changes in glacier mass balance. Here, we use Himalayan Landsat TM/ETM + data in July and August (the late summer melt season) to quantify changes in firn line altitudes from 1998 to 2009. We produced reflectance maps through radiometric calibration and atmospheric correction and use topographic correction to remove or reduce terrain or shadow effects. The real ‘surface albedo’ is obtained by narrowband-to-broadband (NTB) albedo conversion from the combined solar radiation. The firn line altitude was then extracted by combining the ‘surface albedo’ with pre-registered digital elevation model. The individual firn line altitude varies by region. The Western Himalayas display the largest range of firn line variability, where the firn line altitudes vary from 4840 m a.s.l. to 5770 m a.s.l. The individual glacier mean firn line altitude from 1998 to 2009 rose from 5072 ± 77 m a.s.l. to 5640 ± 74 m a.s.l. in the Western Himalayas. The mean firn line altitude increased from 1998 to 2009. The lowest mean recorded firn line altitude recorded was 5237 ± 166 m a.s.l. in 1998, whereas the highest was 5397 ± 135 m a.s.l. in 2000. We also observed a difference between the changes in fine line altitudes of northern and southern slopes of the western Himalayans, as the northern slope glaciers display a greater increase in firn line altitudes than the southern slope glaciers. In the southern slope, changes in firn line altitudes correlate with NCDC-NOAA temperature and precipitation data. This sustained increase of firn line altitudes and associated loss of glacier mass imply a persistent loss of stored freshwater in the Western Himalaya.

Guo, Zhongming; Wang, Ninglian; Kehrwald, Natalie M.; Mao, Ruijuan; Wu, Hongbo; Wu, Yuwei; Jiang, Xi

2014-07-01

160

Glaciers: Teacher's Guide  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Glaciers Teacher's Guide Web site was created by Arizona educator Patti Greenleaf. The site provides everything needed to complete the online activity, which is geared to students in grades 4 to 5. Objectives of the lesson include having students define what a glacier is, correctly use some terminology related to glaciers, describe how they form and move, and finally be able to tell where glaciers are located today. These objectives are accomplished by having the students read the provided text as well as looking at various photographs and movies. The structure and material of the site are its highlight, both of which are simple but effective.

Nichols, Marilyn.

1969-12-31

161

The thermophysics of glaciers  

SciTech Connect

This volume presents the results of experimental and theoretical work on the thermodynamics of ice sheets and glaciers. The author has carried out extensive field work in both the Soviet Union and Antarctica over the last 25 years and has contributed to the understanding of the thermophysics of glaciers. The topics covered in this volume embrace heat flow measurement and temperature distributions in glaciers, the thermal drilling of glaciers, the melting and freezing of ice sheets, and other thermophysical problems. Also included are topics of relevance to glacial engineering.

Zotikov, I.A.

1986-01-01

162

Glaciers and Icebergs  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This lesson plan provides instruction to teachers for creating a glacier in the classroom to demonstrate how glaciation affects landforms. Learning objectives include student understanding that as glaciers move, they create a variety of patterns on landforms by a process called glacial scraping, that the scraping patterns left by a glacier depend on how the glacier moved over the landform, and that the evidence of glaciation left by glacial scraping provides clues to the climate in a particular place over a long period of time. The site also includes relevant vocabulary words with sound recordings for pronunciation. There are ideas presented for more advanced activities, discussion questions, and additional sources to consult.

Frank Weisel

163

Holocene glacier history from alpine speleothems, Milchbach cave, Switzerland  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Mountain glaciers and their sediments are prominent witnesses of climate change, responding sensitively to even small modifications in meteorological parameters. Even in such a classical and thoroughly studied area as the European Alps the record of Holocene glacier mass-balance is only incompletely known. Here we explore a novel and continuous archive of glacier fluctuations in a cave system adjacent to the Upper Grindelwald Glacier in the Swiss Alps. Milchbach cave became partly ice-free only recently and hosts Holocene speleothems. Four coeval stalagmites show consistent petrographic and stable isotopic changes between 9.2 and 2.0 ka which can be tied to abrupt modifications in the cave environment as a result of the closing and opening of multiple cave entrances by the waxing and waning of the nearby glacier. During periods of Holocene glacier advances, columnar calcite fabric is characterized by ?18O values of about -8.0‰ indicative of speleothem growth under quasi-equilibrium conditions, i.e. little affected by kinetic effect related to forced degassing or biological processes. In contrast, fabrics formed during periods of glacier minima are typical of bacterially mediated calcite precipitation within caves overlain by an alpine soil cover. Moreover, ?18O values of the bacterially mediated calcite fabrics are consistent with a ventilated cave system fostering kinetic fractionation. These data suggest that glacier retreats occurred repeatedly before 5.8 ka, and that the amplitudes of glacier retreats became substantially smaller afterwards. Our reconstruction of the Upper Grindelwald Glacier fluctuations agrees well with paleoglaciological studies from other sites in the Alps and provides a higher temporal resolution compared to traditional analyses of peat and wood remains found in glacier forefields.

Luetscher, M.; Hoffmann, D. L.; Frisia, S.; Spötl, C.

2011-02-01

164

Area and volume changes from Greenland's longest-observed local glacier, Mittivakkat Gletscher, and surrounding glaciers  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Glaciers and ice caps are indicators of ongoing climate changes. Warming in the Arctic during the past several decades has caused local glaciers and ice caps to thin and retreat. Few mass-balance observations are available in Greenland to quantify area and volume losses and determine the extent to which these glaciers and ice caps are out of equilibrium with present-day climate. Here, we present mass balance records since 1995 and volume observations for the Mittivakkat Gletscher (17.6 km2; 65°41 N, 37°48 W), Southeast Greenland: the only local glacier in Greenland for which there exists long-term observations of both surface mass balance and glacier front fluctuations. Front observations were first made in 1931, taken by the British Arctic Air Route Expedition, 1930-1931, indicating continuous glacier recession since 1931 of about 1300 meters. Since 1995, mean values of observed net balance was -0.97 m w.e. The measurements show that 14 out of 16 balance years have a negative balance, and two balance years have a slightly positive balance. The cumulative mass balance since 1995 is -15.0 m w.e., corresponding to a volume loss of about 13% of the total glacier ice volume determined in 1994. Also, the Mittivakkat Gletscher (26.3 km2 in 2011) area extent has diminished about 22% since 1986 - close to the mean area exposure of 27±24% for glaciers and ice caps in Southeast Greenland. Since 1986, five GIC melted away in the Ammassalik area, and one would therefore expect that GIC might melt substantially within the 21st century under ongoing climate warming.

Mernild, S. H.; Knudsen, N. T.; Yde, J. C.

2012-04-01

165

Climates during Late Quaternary glacier advances: glacier-climate modeling in the Yingpu Valley, eastern Tibetan Plateau  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) featured a major cooling of Earth's climate, after which the climate evolved in the largest reconfiguration of the past 100 ka. Despite its significance, full understanding of the climate history during and since the LGM is still lacking on the eastern Tibetan Plateau. Recent improvements in understanding glacial extents and chronologies in the Yingpu Valley, eastern Tibetan Plateau present an opportunity to estimate the glacial climatic conditions during and since the LGM. Using a relatively new glacier-climate model, this study reconstructs glacier advances in the Yingpu Valley and quantifies the related climate conditions during the LGM, Lateglacial, and Late Holocene glacial stages. The model results show that the Yingpu Valley contained ice volumes of ˜1.65 km3, 1.03 km3, and 0.29 km3 with equilibrium line altitude (ELA) lowering values of ˜500 m, ˜410 m, and ˜150 m in the three successive glacial stages, respectively. By examining other independent paleoclimatic reconstructions, it is concluded that the temperature decreased by 4.0-5.9 °C, 3.4-3.7 °C, 0.3-0.6 °C with the precipitation amounts being 40-80%, 80-100%, and 100-110% of modern values during the LGM, Lateglacial, and Late Holocene glacial stages, respectively. The climate estimates for the three glacial stages are generally in agreement with other climatic proxy records on the Tibetan Plateau and atmospheric circulation modeling results.

Xu, Xiangke

2014-10-01

166

Retreat of Glaciers in Glacier National Park In Glacier National Park (GNP), MT some effects of global  

E-print Network

Retreat of Glaciers in Glacier National Park In Glacier National Park (GNP), MT some effects of global climate change are strikingly clear. Glacier recession is underway, and many glaciers have already disappeared. The retreat of these small alpine glaciers reflects changes in recent climate as glaciers respond

167

2. HORSESHOE CURVE IN GLACIER POINT ROAD NEAR GLACIER POINT. ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

2. HORSESHOE CURVE IN GLACIER POINT ROAD NEAR GLACIER POINT. HALF DOME AT CENTER REAR. LOOKING NNE. GIS N-37 43 44.3 / W-119 34 14.1 - Glacier Point Road, Between Chinquapin Flat & Glacier Point, Yosemite Village, Mariposa County, CA

168

HORSESHOE CURVE IN GLACIER POINT ROAD NEAR GLACIER POINT. HALF ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

HORSESHOE CURVE IN GLACIER POINT ROAD NEAR GLACIER POINT. HALF DOME AT CENTER REAR. SAME VIEW AT CA-157-2. LOOKING NNE. GIS: N-37' 43 44.3 / W-119 34 14.1 - Glacier Point Road, Between Chinquapin Flat & Glacier Point, Yosemite Village, Mariposa County, CA

169

Glaciers and Rocks  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This formative assessment item uncovers students' ideas about glacial erosion and how glaciers transport rocks and other sediment. The assessment is aligned with the National Science Education Standards. It contains instructional suggestions as well as links to other helpful resources dealing with glaciers and glacial movement.

Jessica Fries-Gaither

170

Mini Glacier Meltdown  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This activity (located on page 3 of the PDF) is a full inquiry investigation about the different causes of glacial melt. Groups of learners will design their own experiment using frozen "glaciers", bricks and different energy sources (fans, and lights) to test how different conditions affect the rate of melting. The results might be surprising. Relates to linked video, DragonflyTV GPS: Glaciers.

Twin Cities Public Television, Inc.

2007-01-01

171

Denali Fault: Susitna Glacier  

USGS Multimedia Gallery

Helicopters and satellite phones were integral to the geologic field response. Here, Peter Haeussler is calling a seismologist to pass along the discovery of the Susitna Glacier thrust fault. View is to the north up the Susitna Glacier. The Denali fault trace lies in the background where the two lan...

172

Melting Mountain Glaciers  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The world's glaciers are shrinking at alarming rates, and many scientists believe it is due to changes in climate. Dr. Lonnie Thompson of Ohio State University and Dr. Douglas Hardy of UMass-Amherst discuss glaciers and how they melt, and pay special attention to Africa's tallest mountain, Mt. Kilimanjaro. "Changing Planet" is produced in partnership with the National Science Foundation.

NBC Learn

2010-10-07

173

Glacier Peak, Washington  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This site features links to all aspects of Glacier Peak, a volcano in the Cascade Range, including its geographic setting, and geologic and eruptive history. Glacier Peak is not prominently visible from any major metropolitan centers, and thus its attractions, as well as its hazards, tend to be overlooked. Yet, Glacier Peak has produced larger and more explosive eruptions than any other Washington volcano except Mount St. Helens. Glacier Peak was not known by settlers to be a volcano until the 1850s, when Native Americans mentioned it to naturalist George Gibbs. Not until 1898 did Glacier Peak appear on a published map under its current name. Links labeled 'Special Items of Interest' include information about volcanic highlights and features, and points of interest. Other links lead to maps, graphics, images, publications, reports, and other items of interest involving this volcano and others.

174

National Park Glaciers Knowledge Center  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This interactive resource explains what glaciers are, where they are found, how they form, and how they move. The types and parts of glaciers are discussed, as well as ice ages, the different types of landforms that may result from glaciation, and how scientists monitor glaciers. Examples from our national parks are also highlighted as case studies to illustrate how glaciers have created landscapes.

2005-08-01

175

Modeling Glacier Erosion Through Time  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Prior to this lab, students will have read and learned about valley glacier processes, glacier mass balance, warm-based and cold-based glaciers, and can identify various glacier landforms formed by erosion. They will also have had an introductory lecture on ice physics, but that is not necessary to complete this activity.

Cathy L Connor

176

Fast Recession of a West Antarctic Glacier  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Satellite radar interferometry observations of Pine Island Glacier, in West Antarctica, reveal that the hinge-line position of this major ice stream retreated 1.2+/-0.2 km per year between 1992 and 1996, which in turn implies ice thinning at 3.5+/-0.6m ice per year.

Rignot, E. J.

1998-01-01

177

Bathymetric Controls On Observed Tidewater Glacier Retreat In Northwest Greenland  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Although many of the largest glaciers in Greenland are losing mass, the large variability in observed mass wastage of the remaining glaciers clouds interpretation of the proposed external forcings, such as warming of the ocean or atmosphere. Some glaciers are accelerating and thinning while other nearby glaciers advance and gain mass. Recent efforts suggest that increased ocean temperatures may be responsible for the observed glacial retreat in Greenland and Antarctica through increased basal melting beneath floating ice tongues and vertical ice faces of tidewater glaciers. Basal melting may contribute significantly to calving and thinning, and to an eventual speeding up of the glacier, resulting in thinning further inland. Knowledge of fjord geometry is crucial for ice-ocean interaction because the availability of ocean heat to the ice will be restricted by narrow sills and shallow grounding lines. We investigate whether the variability in observed changes among Greenland glaciers can be partially explained by variation in fjord geometry. Some features of a fjord that could influence the ice-ocean system include the depth of the grounding line, the presence of sills, sloping bed, and the water cavity shape beneath floating ice. New estimates of fjord bathymetries in northwest Greenland, using airborne gravimetry measurements from NASA Operation IceBridge flights, are compared to estimates of ice acceleration and mass wastage of neighboring glaciers. We investigate the correlation between fjord geometry features and several glacier parameters, such as surface velocity and elevation changes. We determine that the geometry of glacial fjords play a large role in determining the stability of outlet glaciers. Deep sills and deep terminus grounding lines will allow greater interaction with the deep and warm Atlantic water off the shelf break. For two neighboring glaciers in northwest Greenland, we find that the glacier with a deeper grounding line, and presumably in contact with more warm water, is flowing faster and experiencing larger mass loss over the past decade. Such broad correlations between grounding line depths and mass wastage are a starting point in an effort to understand the variability of observed retreat of outlet glaciers in northern Greenland.

Porter, D. F.; Tinto, K. J.; Boghosian, A.; Cochran, J. R.; Bell, R. E.

2013-12-01

178

Mount Cheops Cirque Glacier: Response of a Small Debris Covered Glacier to Climate Change  

E-print Network

Mount Cheops Cirque Glacier: Response of a Small Debris Covered Glacier of a microclimate cirque glacier on Mount Cheops in Glacier National Park of Canada. Rapidly receding glaciers are becoming an important water resource concern

Smith, Dan

179

A new glacier inventory for 2009 reveals spatial and temporal variability in glacier response to atmospheric warming in the Northern Antarctic Peninsula, 1988-2009  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Northern Antarctic Peninsula has recently exhibited ice-shelf disintegration, glacier recession and acceleration. However, the dynamic response of land-terminating, ice-shelf tributary and tidewater glaciers has not yet been quantified or assessed for variability, and there are sparse published data for glacier classification, morphology, area, length or altitude. This paper firstly uses ASTER images from 2009 and a SPIRIT DEM from 2006 to classify the area, length, altitude, slope, aspect, geomorphology, type and hypsometry of 194 glaciers on Trinity Peninsula, Vega Island and James Ross Island. Secondly, this paper uses LANDSAT-4 and ASTER images from 1988 and 2001 and data from the Antarctic Digital Database (ADD) from 1997 to document glacier change 1988-2009. From 1988-2001, 90 % of glaciers receded, and from 2001-2009, 79 % receded. Glaciers on the western side of Trinity Peninsula retreated relatively little. On the eastern side of Trinity Peninsula, the rate of recession of ice-shelf tributary glaciers has slowed from 12.9 km2 a-1 (1988-2001) to 2.4 km2 a-1 (2001-2009). Tidewater glaciers on the drier, cooler Eastern Trinity Peninsula experienced fastest recession from 1988-2001, with limited frontal retreat after 2001. Land-terminating glaciers on James Ross Island also retreated fastest in the period 1988-2001. Large tidewater glaciers on James Ross Island are now declining in areal extent at rates of up to 0.04 km2 a-1. This east-west difference is largely a result of orographic temperature and precipitation gradients across the Antarctic Peninsula. Strong variability in tidewater glacier recession rates may result from the influence of glacier length, altitude, slope and hypsometry on glacier mass balance. High snowfall means that the glaciers on the Western Peninsula are not currently rapidly receding. Recession rates on the eastern side of Trinity Peninsula are slowing as the floating ice tongues retreat into the fjords and the glaciers reach a new dynamic equilibrium. The rapid glacier recession of tidewater glaciers on James Ross Island is likely to continue because of their low elevations and flat profiles. In contrast, the higher and steeper tidewater glaciers on the Eastern Antarctic Peninsula will attain more stable frontal positions after low-lying ablation areas are removed.

Davies, B. J.; Carrivick, J. L.; Glasser, N. F.; Hambrey, M. J.; Smellie, J. L.

2011-12-01

180

Defining modern day Area-Altitude Balance Ratios (AABRs) and their use in glacier-climate reconstructions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

With the increasing use of digital elevation models in palaeo-glacier reconstructions and the availability of freeware spreadsheets the Area-Altitude Balance Ratio (AABR) and Balance Ratio (BR) methods are becoming increasingly used in palaeo-glacier reconstruction for estimating Equilibrium Line Altitudes (ELA) and subsequently deriving quantitative estimates of palaeo-climate. While there are many data detailing contemporary Accumulation Area Ratios, there are still only a few studies that have established, from contemporary environments, AABR/BR ratios. Publicly available glacier mass balance (World Glacier Monitoring Service, US Geological Survey, and Norwegian Water Directorate) and spatial extent datasets provided the basis for this research. From a time series of mass balance, regressing specific net balance against ELA allows the zero net balance ELA to be identified. Once the zero balance ELA is established, the glacier hypsometry above and below the ELA is defined. The AABR/BR is calculated by using (the right hand side) the following: AABR=b/b=(zA)/(zA), where, b nab and b nac are the net mass balance gradients in the ablation and accumulation zones respectively, z and z are the area-weighted mean altitudes of the accumulation and ablation areas respectively and A ac and A ab are the areas of the accumulation and ablation areas respectively. AABRs are calculated for a suite of glaciers located across a range of climatic zones and glacier types, with Antarctica being excluded. The following "representative" AABRs are found: a global AABR = 1.75 ± 0.71; Mid-latitude maritime = 1.9 ± 0.81; High-latitude = 2.24 ± 0.85; North America - West Coast = 2.09 ± 0.93; North America - Eastern Rockies = 1.11 ± 0.1; Canadian Arctic = 2.91 ± 0.35; Svalbard = 2.13 ± 0.52; Western Norway = 1.5 ± 0.4; European Alps = 1.59 ± 0.6; Central Asia = 1.75 ± 0.56; Kamchatka = 3.18 ± 0.16. This study provides an empirically derived dataset characterising AABR ratios which may be used for ELA estimation in palaeo-glacier reconstructions and for palaeo-climate quantification.

Rea, Brice R.

2009-02-01

181

Botanical Evidence of the Modern History of Nisqually Glacier, Washington  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A knowledge of the areas once occupied by mountain glaciers reveals at least part of the past behavior of these glaciers. From this behavior, inferences of past climate can be drawn. The maximum advance of Nisqually Glacier in the last thousand years was located, and retreat from this point is believed to have started about 1840. The maximum downvalley position of the glacier is marked by either a prominent moraine or by a line of difference between stands of trees of strikingly different size and significantly different age. The thousand-year age of the forest beyond the moraine or line between abutting stands represents the minimum time since the surface was glaciated. This age is based on the age of the oldest trees, plus an estimated interval required for the formation of humus, plus evidence of an ancient fire, plus an interval of deposition of pyroclastics. The estimate of the date when Nisqually Glacier began to retreat from its maximum advance is based upon the ages of the oldest trees plus an interval of 5 years estimated as the time required for the establishment of trees on stable moraines. This interval was derived from a study of the ages of trees growing at locations of known past positions of the glacier. Reconnaissance studies were made on moraines formed by Emmons and Tahoma Glaciers. Preliminary analyses of these data suggest that Emmons Glacier started to recede from its maximum advance in about 1745. Two other upvalley moraines mark positions from which recession started about 1849 and 1896. Ages of trees near Tahoma Glacier indicate that it started to recede from its position of maximum advance in about 1635. About 1835 Tahoma Glacier started to recede again from another moraine formed by a readvance that ter minated near the 1635 position.

Sigafoos, Robert S.; Hendricks, E.L.

1961-01-01

182

Mapping the Glaciers  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This earth systems field lab begins with an in-class guided inquiry experience which uses Minnesota Geological Survey 3-D maps of the upper Midwest to determine where they believe glaciers may have had an influence. They will determine this by looking at landscapes and compiling their own evidence from the maps. They will also offer evidence for a hypothesis they generate which involves the direction that the glacier was traveling. The two-day lesson ends (after student presentations on their findings about glaciers) with a field investigation of one of our parking lot snow banks. Students will compare and contrast what they know about glaciers, with one of our parking lot snow banks, determining any similarities with how the landscape may have appeared during the Pleistocene.

183

Glossary of Glacier Terminology  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This glossary provides definitions of terms necessary to understand the modern glacier environment. Terms are listed in alphabetical order and are accompanied by photographs. A separate section provides definitions of each type, accompanied by a photograph of an example.

184

Ablation of Martian glaciers  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Glacier like landforms are observed in the fretted terrain of Mars in the latitude belts near + or - 42 deg. It was suggested that sublimation or accumulation-ablation rates could be estimated for these glaciers if their shapes were known. To this end, photoclinometric profiles were obtained of a number of these landforms. On the basis of analyses of these profiles, it was concluded that ice is chiefly ablating from these landforms that either are inactive rock-glaciers or have materials within them that are moving exceedingly slowly at this time. These conclusions are consistent with other geologic information. The analyses were performed using a two-dimensional model of an isothermal glacier.

Moore, Henry J.; Davis, Philip A.

1987-01-01

185

A strategy for monitoring glaciers  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Glaciers are important features in the hydrologic cycle and affect the volume, variability, and water quality of runoff. Assessing and predicting the effect of glaciers on water resources require a monitoring program to provide basic data for this understanding. The monitoring program of the U.S. Geological Survey employs a nested approach whereby an intensively studied glacier is surrounded by less intensively studied glaciers and those monitored solely by remote sensing. Ideally, each glacierized region of the United States would have such a network of glaciers. The intensively studied glacier provides a detailed understanding of the physical processes and their temporal changes that control the mass exchange of the glaciers in that region. The less intensively studied glaciers are used to assess the variability of such processes within the region.

Fountain, Andrew G.; Krimmel, Robert M.; Trabant, Dennis C.

1997-01-01

186

Geological Field Trips: Glaciers  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Students will utilize the Internet to take a virtual field trip to visit a glacier and discover what physical effects glaciers have on the land. They will also have the opportunity to virtually visit Vermont and trace the pictorial history of how a whale's fossils were found there. The site also contains a student worksheet for their visual field trip. The site also provides an explanation of the formation of fossils.

Patti Zvanut

2000-03-23

187

Getting the Shot, Grinnell Glacier, Glacier National Park.  

USGS Multimedia Gallery

USGS scientist shoots a repeat photograph of Grinnell Glacier in Glacier National Park to illustrate glacial recession due to impacts of climate change. *note ? logo on scientists hat is logo from USGS Northern Rocky Mountain Science Center, not private. ...

188

Getting the Shot, Grinnell Glacier, Glacier National Park.  

USGS Multimedia Gallery

USGS scientist shoots a repeat photograph of Grinnell Glacier in Glacier National Park to illustrate glacial recession due to impacts of climate change.  *note – logo on scientists hat is logo from USGS Northern Rocky Mountain Science Center, not private....

189

Debris-Free Plateau Glacier  

USGS Multimedia Gallery

Small debris-free plateau glacier with glacier lakes at Gangrinchemzoe Pass at 5,200 m, south of the main Himalayan divide, Bhutan. Image courtesy of Shuji Iwata, Tokyo Metropolitan University, Japan....

190

The GLIMS Glacier Database  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Global Land Ice Measurements from Space (GLIMS) project has built a geospatial and temporal database of glacier data, composed of glacier outlines and various scalar attributes. These data are being derived primarily from satellite imagery, such as from ASTER and Landsat. Each "snapshot" of a glacier is from a specific time, and the database is designed to store multiple snapshots representative of different times. We have implemented two web-based interfaces to the database; one enables exploration of the data via interactive maps (web map server), while the other allows searches based on text-field constraints. The web map server is an Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) compliant Web Map Server (WMS) and Web Feature Server (WFS). This means that other web sites can display glacier layers from our site over the Internet, or retrieve glacier features in vector format. All components of the system are implemented using Open Source software: Linux, PostgreSQL, PostGIS (geospatial extensions to the database), MapServer (WMS and WFS), and several supporting components such as Proj.4 (a geographic projection library) and PHP. These tools are robust and provide a flexible and powerful framework for web mapping applications. As a service to the GLIMS community, the database contains metadata on all ASTER imagery acquired over glacierized terrain. Reduced-resolution of the images (browse imagery) can be viewed either as a layer in the MapServer application, or overlaid on the virtual globe within Google Earth. The interactive map application allows the user to constrain by time what data appear on the map. For example, ASTER or glacier outlines from 2002 only, or from Autumn in any year, can be displayed. The system allows users to download their selected glacier data in a choice of formats. The results of a query based on spatial selection (using a mouse) or text-field constraints can be downloaded in any of these formats: ESRI shapefiles, KML (Google Earth), MapInfo, GML (Geography Markup Language) and GMT (Generic Mapping Tools). This "clip-and-ship" function allows users to download only the data they are interested in. Our flexible web interfaces to the database, which includes various support layers (e.g. a layer to help collaborators identify satellite imagery over their region of expertise) will facilitate enhanced analysis to be undertaken on glacier systems, their distribution, and their impacts on other Earth systems.

Raup, B. H.; Khalsa, S. S.; Armstrong, R.

2007-12-01

191

Investigation of the physical characteristics of the photosphere from multiplet line profiles. I - Local thermodynamic equilibrium /LTE/ conditions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Oscillator strength ratios for 48 pairs of 20 multiplets of Fe I, Fe II, Ti I, Ni I, V I, Ca I, and Na I were determined assuming local thermodynamic equilibrium. It is shown that a deviation from LTE may occur at optical depths of tau5 less than 0.20.

Troian, V. I.

192

1, 1739, 2007 Glacier balance  

E-print Network

TCD 1, 17­39, 2007 Glacier balance measurement, forecasting M. S. Pelto Title Page Abstract The Cryosphere Discussions is the access reviewed discussion forum of The Cryosphere Glacier annual balance: 18 June 2007 Correspondence to: M. S. Pelto (mspelto@nichols.edu) 17 #12;TCD 1, 17­39, 2007 Glacier

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

193

Denali Fault: Black Rapids Glacier  

USGS Multimedia Gallery

View eastward along Black Rapids Glacier. The Denali fault follows the trace of the glacier. These very large rockslides went a mile across the glacier on the right side. Investigations of the headwall of the middle landslide indicate a volume at least as large as that which fell, has dropped a mete...

194

Iceland Glacier Recession 1973 to 2000, Glacier Terminus contrast emphasized  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This animation shows glacier recesion at the Breidamerkurjokull glacier in Iceland. The data from 1973 is taken from Landsat 1 and the 2000 data is from Landsat 7. The Breidamerkurjokull glacier in Iceland has been measured by Landsat to be receding since 1973. The glacierologists in Iceland and here at Nasas Goddard Space Flight Center have measured the recession throughout the entire glacier and found different rates of recession in different areas. In genral, the glacier seems to be receding at about 2% annually. It is extremely controversial whether this recession is caused by global warming.

Lori Perkins

2001-04-09

195

Influences of Climate Warming and Facility Management on Continuous Permafrost at Matterhorn Glacier Paradise, Zermatt, Swiss Alps.  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In many parts of the Alps, hazardous bedrock instabilities occur more often during the past 30 years. In many cases, permafrost degradation played a central role for instability (e.g. in 1987 the Val Pola rockslide, Italy). At other events, the role of permafrost degradation is more complex or unpredictable (e.g. in 1991 the Randa rockfall, Wallis, Swiss Alps). However, instabilities in perennially frozen bedrock may also be provoked by human influence. This is exemplarily shown at touristic facilities in the Alps. Human impact on permafrost is often underestimated, or even carelessly taken into account. The tourist resort Zermatt with more than 1.8 million overnight stays per year is located at 1600 m a.s.l. and is surrounded by high mountain ranges that often reach above 4000 m. The dry and sunny climate results in a high glacier equilibrium line thus leaving space for vast non-glaciated permafrost terrain. Numerous tourist facilities provide excellent logistics and easy access to permafrost sites, and the region is thus especially suitable for permafrost research. The infrastructure erected on permafrost consists of hotels, restaurants and mountain huts, station buildings of railways, funiculars, ski lifts and installations for artificial snowing the ski-runs. Some problems at these constructions due to permafrost degradation are shown. At the Matterhorn Glacier Paradise station at an altitude of 3820 meters, todays MAAT ranges between -6 °C and -8°C. During the construction of a tunnel in 1981 bedrock temperatures were at -12°C. Over the past 30 years, these bedrock temperatures have risen to -3 to -2°C, due to the heat brought into the tunnel by facilities and more than 490,000 visitors per year. In an elevator shaft, the temperature temporarily even rose above freezing point. Several new construction sites in continuous permafrost are described and new research data is presented. Another interesting site for permafrost and ice studies at Matterhorn Glacier Paradise is the glacier palace. Since summer 2011 this tourist attraction can be accessed via two elevators leading to an ice tunnel about 12 meters below the glaciers surface. Interesting thermal interactions exist between the permafrost bedrock that is in direct contact to the glacier ice. Great care has to be taken that there is no heat transfer from buildings to the glacier ice. Degradation of permafrost due to climatic change and human interference may become a serious threat to many installations of high mountain tourist centers. These facilities need appropriate management. Permafrost scientists may provide the necessary expertise for a proper hazard management.

King, Lorenz; Duishonakunov, Murataly; Imbery, Stephan

2014-05-01

196

Karakoram glacier surge dynamics  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We examine the surges of five glaciers in the Pakistan Karakoram using satellite remote sensing to investigate the dynamic nature of surges in this region and how they may be affected by climate. Surface velocity maps derived by feature-tracking quantify the surge development spatially in relation to the terminus position, and temporally with reference to seasonal weather. We find that the season of surge initiation varies, that each surge develops gradually over several years, and that maximum velocities are recorded within the lowermost 10 km of the glacier. Measured peak surge velocities are between one and two orders of magnitude greater than during quiescence. We also note that two of the glaciers are of a type not previously reported to surge. The evidence points towards recent Karakoram surges being controlled by thermal rather than hydrological conditions, coinciding with high-altitude warming from long-term precipitation and accumulation patterns.

Quincey, D. J.; Braun, M.; Glasser, N. F.; Bishop, M. P.; Hewitt, K.; Luckman, A.

2011-09-01

197

Non-equilibrium Modeling of the Fe XVII 3C/3D Line Ratio in an Intense X-Ray Free-Electron Laser Excited Plasma  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Recent measurements using an X-ray Free Electron Laser (XFEL) and an Electron Beam Ion Trap at the Linac Coherent Light Source facility highlighted large discrepancies between the observed and theoretical values for the Fe xvii 3C/3D line intensity ratio. This result raised the question of whether the theoretical oscillator strengths may be significantly in error, due to insufficiencies in the atomic structure calculations. We present time-dependent spectral modeling of this experiment and show that non-equilibrium effects can dramatically reduce the predicted 3C/3D line intensity ratio, compared with that obtained by simply taking the ratio of oscillator strengths. Once these non-equilibrium effects are accounted for, the measured line intensity ratio can be used to determine a revised value for the 3C/3D oscillator strength ratio, giving a range from 3.0 to 3.5. We also provide a framework to narrow this range further, if more precise information about the pulse parameters can be determined. We discuss the implications of the new results for the use of Fe xvii spectral features as astrophysical diagnostics and investigate the importance of time-dependent effects in interpreting XFEL-excited plasmas.

Loch, S. D.; Ballance, C. P.; Li, Y.; Fogle, M.; Fontes, C. J.

2015-03-01

198

Greenland Glacier Albedo Variability  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The program for Arctic Regional Climate Assessment (PARCA) is a NASA-funded project with the prime goal of addressing the mass balance of the Greenland ice sheet. Since the formal initiation of the program in 1995, there has been a significant improvement in the estimates of the mass balance of the ice sheet. Results from this program reveal that the high-elevation regions of the ice sheet are approximately in balance, but the margins are thinning. Laser surveys reveal significant thinning along 70 percent of the ice sheet periphery below 2000 m elevations, and in at least one outlet glacier, Kangerdlugssuaq in southeast Greenland, thinning has been as much as 10 m/yr. This study examines the albedo variability in four outlet glaciers to help separate out the relative contributions of surface melting versus ice dynamics to the recent mass balance changes. Analysis of AVHRR Polar Pathfinder albedo shows that at the Petermann and Jakobshavn glaciers, there has been a negative trend in albedo at the glacier terminus from 1981 to 2000, whereas the Stor+strommen and Kangerdlugssuaq glaciers show slightly positive trends in albedo. These findings are consistent with recent observations of melt extent from passive microwave data which show more melt on the western side of Greenland and slightly less on the eastern side. Significance of albedo trends will depend on where and when the albedo changes occur. Since the majority of surface melt occurs in the shallow sloping western margin of the ice sheet where the shortwave radiation dominates the energy balance in summer (e.g. Jakobshavn region) this region will be more sensitive to changes in albedo than in regions where this is not the case. Near the Jakobshavn glacier, even larger changes in albedo have been observed, with decreases as much as 20 percent per decade.

2004-01-01

199

Northern Illinois University: Glaciers  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Northern Illinois University offers illustrative summary of glaciers and glacial processes. The website provides a timeline of the glacial advances into Illinois. Students and educators can learn a few of the landscape features that scientists use to interpret geologic history. Users can learn how glaciers affected Illinois's topography and waterbodies. The site furnishes educational maps of Illinois's bedrock geology and shaded relief. The text is linked to a glossary to assist users with glacial terminology. While this website does concentrate on the state of Illinois, everyone can learn basic characteristics of glacial movements.

200

Variable glacier response to atmospheric warming, northern Antarctic Peninsula, 1988-2009  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The northern Antarctic Peninsula has recently exhibited ice-shelf disintegration, glacier recession and acceleration. However, the dynamic response of land-terminating, ice-shelf tributary and tidewater glaciers has not yet been quantified or assessed for variability, and there are sparse data for glacier classification, morphology, area, length or altitude. This paper firstly classifies the area, length, altitude, slope, aspect, geomorphology, type and hypsometry of 194 glaciers on Trinity Peninsula, Vega Island and James Ross Island in 2009 AD. Secondly, this paper documents glacier change 1988-2009. In 2009, the glacierised area was 8140±262 km2. From 1988-2001, 90% of glaciers receded, and from 2001-2009, 79% receded. This equates to an area change of -4.4% for Trinity Peninsula eastern coast glaciers, -0.6% for western coast glaciers, and -35.0% for ice-shelf tributary glaciers from 1988-2001. Tidewater glaciers on the drier, cooler eastern Trinity Peninsula experienced fastest shrinkage from 1988-2001, with limited frontal change after 2001. Glaciers on the western Trinity Peninsula shrank less than those on the east. Land-terminating glaciers on James Ross Island shrank fastest in the period 1988-2001. This east-west difference is largely a result of orographic temperature and precipitation gradients across the Antarctic Peninsula, with warming temperatures affecting the precipitation-starved glaciers on the eastern coast more than on the western coast. Reduced shrinkage on the western Peninsula may be a result of higher snowfall, perhaps in conjunction with the fact that these glaciers are mostly grounded. Rates of area loss on the eastern side of Trinity Peninsula are slowing, which we attribute to the floating ice tongues receding into the fjords and reaching a new dynamic equilibrium. The rapid shrinkage of tidewater glaciers on James Ross Island is likely to continue because of their low elevations and flat profiles. In contrast, the higher and steeper tidewater glaciers on the eastern Antarctic Peninsula will attain more stable frontal positions after low-lying ablation areas are removed, reaching equilibrium more quickly.

Davies, B. J.; Carrivick, J. L.; Glasser, N. F.; Hambrey, M. J.; Smellie, J. L.

2012-09-01

201

Svalbard surging glacier landsystems  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The percentage of Svalbard glaciers thought to be of surge-type is somewhere between 13-90% according to different sources variously based on statistical analysis and observations of diagnostic glaciological and geomorphological features, e.g. looped moraines. Developing a better understanding of which of these figures, if either, is most realistic is important in the context of glacier dynamics and related contributions of small glaciers and ice caps to sea level change in the immediate future. We present detailed geomorphological assessments of the margins of several known surge-type glaciers in Svalbard in order to update and improve the existing framework by which they are identified, and to provide a foundation for future reassessments of the surge-type glacier population based on distinct landform-sediment assemblages. Three landsystems are proposed: (1) Surges of small valley glaciers produce a prominent ice-cored latero-frontal moraine at their surge maximum and are characterised by an inner zone of ice stagnation terrain (hummocky topography, kettle lakes, debris flows) with no or only very few poorly-defined bedforms (crevasse squeeze ridges, eskers and flutes) and no recessional moraines. Many of these glaciers may have surged in the past but show no signs that they have the capability to do so again in the future. (2) Larger land-terminating glaciers, often with several tributaries, typically produce a push moraine complex which contains evidence for multiple advances, as identified from ridge-meltwater channel relationships. The inner zone often contains a large lagoon, partly dammed by the push moraine complex, and widespread ice stagnation terrain. Crevasse squeeze ridges, eskers and flutes are well-defined but small and limited in number and distribution. (3) Surges of large tidewater glaciers produce distinctive, often multi-generational, landform assemblages both in submarine and lateral terrestrial positions. The well-preserved submarine record is characterised by large cross-fjord push moraines of fjord floor sediments with lobe-shaped debris flows on their distal slope, glacial lineations, dense rhombohedral networks of crevasse squeeze ridges, and eskers. Annual push moraines associated with the quiescent phase are also observed and are unique to the submarine record. The terrestrial record consists of large lateral moraine systems alongside the fjord which contain outer push ridges composed of shallow marine sediments and an inner zone of ice stagnation terrain. Eskers, flutes and large, sharp-crested crevasse fill ridges in dense networks are superimposed on this inner zone; the latter are similar in character to their submarine counterparts but typically higher. We suggest that these three landsystems broadly characterise the geomorphology of the vast majority of known Svalbard surge-type glaciers and may allow previously unknown surge-type glaciers to be identified, both in the field and from aerial photographs and sea floor imagery.

Lovell, Harold; Benn, Douglas; Lukas, Sven; Flink, Anne

2014-05-01

202

Timing of glacier advances and climate in the High Tatra Mountains (Western Carpathians) during the Last Glacial Maximum  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

During the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM), long valley glaciers developed on the northern and southern sides of the High Tatra Mountains, Poland and Slovakia. Chlorine-36 exposure dating of moraine boulders suggests two major phases of moraine stabilization, at 26-21 ka (LGM I - maximum) and at 18 ka (LGM II). The dates suggest a significantly earlier maximum advance on the southern side of the range. Reconstructing the geometry of four glaciers in the Sucha Woda, Pa?szczyca, Mlynicka and Velicka valleys allowed determining their equilibrium-line altitudes (ELAs) at 1460, 1460, 1650 and 1700 m asl, respectively. Based on a positive degree-day model, the mass balance and climatic parameter anomaly (temperature and precipitation) has been constrained for LGM I advance. Modeling results indicate slightly different conditions between northern and southern slopes. The N-S ELA gradient finds confirmation in slightly higher temperature (at least 1 °C) or lower precipitation (15%) on the south-facing glaciers during LGM I. The precipitation distribution over the High Tatra Mountains indicates potentially different LGM atmospheric circulation than at the present day, with reduced northwesterly inflow and increased southerly and westerly inflows of moist air masses.

Makos, Micha?; Dzier?ek, Jan; Nitychoruk, Jerzy; Zreda, Marek

2014-07-01

203

Alaska Glaciers and Rivers  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA's Terra satellite captured this image on October 7, 2007, showing the Alaska Mountains of south-central Alaska already coated with snow. Purple shadows hang in the lee of the peaks, giving the snow-clad land a crumpled appearance. White gives way to brown on the right side of the image where the mountains yield to the lower-elevation Susitna River Valley. The river itself cuts a silver, winding path through deep green forests and brown wetlands and tundra. Extending from the river valley, are smaller rivers that originated in the Alaska Mountains. The source of these rivers is evident in the image. Smooth white tongues of ice extend into the river valleys, the remnants of the glaciers that carved the valleys into the land. Most of the water flowing into the Gulf of Alaska from the Susitna River comes from these mountain glaciers. Glacier melt also feeds glacier lakes, only one of which is large enough to be visible in this image. Immediately left of the Kahiltna River, the aquamarine waters of Chelatna Lake stand out starkly against the brown and white landscape.

2007-01-01

204

Melting Glaciers Threaten Peru  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Thousands of people in the Andes mountains of Peru are having their lives affected in both a practical and cultural way by climate change, which is causing the region's glaciers to melt. This document explores the causes of the glacial melt and its impacts on the local cultures.

2003-10-09

205

Taking a Glacier's Pulse  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This article profiles Dr. Leigh Stearns, a research scientist with the National Science Foundation's Science and Technology Center for Remote Sensing of Ice Sheets (CReSIS) and Assistant Professor in Geology at the University of Kansas who studies glaciers in Greenland.

Carol Landis

206

Glaciers and Glaciation  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This web page contains 23 multiple-choice practice exam questions on the topic glaciers and glaciation. It is part of the Principles of Earth Science course at the University of South Dakota. Users select an answer, then click to see if it is correct.

Timothy Heaton

207

Gifts of the Glaciers  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This website highlights the glacial formation of the Great Lakes: - Lake Superior, Lake Huron, Lake Michigan, Lake Erie and Lake Ontario. This site provides photos and descriptions of the lakes and how they formed by the glaciers thousands of years ago.

Stephen Wittman

208

Changing Planet: Melting Glaciers  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This NBC Learn video features climate scientists doing their research on Mt. Kilimanjaro to study the climate of the past. The scientists put the recently observed changes on the glacier into perspective by comparing past climate fluctuations, stressing that the current observed rate of change is unprecedented.

NBC Learn video - Changing Planet

209

Glaciers and Glaciation  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This site contains lecture notes to accompany one chapter/lecture of a physical geology course using the text, The Dynamic Earth: An Introduction to Physical Geology, 4th Edition, by Brian J. Skinner and Stephen C. Porter. Subtopics include glaciers, glacial deposits, glacial features, glaciation, and glacial ages.

Stephen Nelson

210

Alaskan Glaciers and Glacier-Outburst Floods (Jökulhlaups)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Alaska has more than 50,000 glaciers, including about 2,000 valley glaciers. Nearly all Alaskan glaciers are temperate. Many Alaskan valley glaciers end in ice-marginal lakes formed by terminal or recessional moraines. Some Alaskan valley glaciers act as ice dams, forming lakes by blocking side valleys or by extending into adjacent valleys. Many Alaskan glaciers store large quantities of water in thermokarst lakes, crevasses, conduits, and cavities. Annually, all of these situations result in jökulhlaups. Draining of ice-dammed lakes or ice-marginal lakes causes most. Some jökulhlaups are produced by the release of water stored subglacially, englacially, or supraglacially, sometimes through surge-related processes. Less frequently, jökulhlaups result from the melting of glaciers located around the summit craters of many of Alaska's erupting volcanoes. Recently, all of these mechanisms have produced jökulhlaups that have effected resource development, fisheries, and infrastructure. In spite of Alaska's small population and large geographic area, annually Alaskan jökulhlaups cause millions of dollars of damage. In the last three decades, jökulhlaup events at Hubbard Glacier have produced two of the largest floods that have occurred anywhere on Earth in post-Pleistocene time. Two recent Bering Glacier jökulhlaups resulted in a flood lasting nearly a year and in the rapid lowering of an ice-dammed lake by more than 50 m. This presentation characterizes the scope of jökulhlaups that have recently occurred in Alaska, focusing on recent jökulhlaup events at Hubbard and Bering Glaciers and Mount Redoubt.

Molnia, B. F.

2009-04-01

211

The Lateglacial to Holocene transition as recorded by glacier fluctuations  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Examination of glacier associated records may contribute to a better understanding of the ice-continent-ocean-atmosphere interactions, since glacial deposits related to short-term temperature fluctuations, driven by climate change, might be preserved. Surface exposure dating (SED) of such glacial deposits can improve the chronology of climate records. The western Swiss Alps repeatedly hosted mountain glaciers during the Pleistocene, and even during the Last Glacial-Interglacial transition, with abundant stadial and interstadial transitions during the Lateglacial (e.g. Björck et al. 1998). In this study, the adjacent valleys of Belalp and Great Aletsch (catchment area is generally south facing) in the western Swiss Alps are investigated. The slow responding Great Aletsch valley glacier shows only one confirmed moraine ridge related to the Lateglacial (Egesen stadial) (Kelly et al. 2004). However, the rather fast responding Unnerbäch cirque (recent) glacier at the Belalp (a similarly exposed - and tributary - valley to the Great Aletsch valley), features 6 individual lateral-terminal moraine ridges related to Lateglacial and early Holocene times. In the Belalp valley, 22 erratic boulders from four out of six well-preserved moraines were sampled in order to establish a detailed chronological framework. From the Great Aletsch valley four samples (boulder and ice moulded bedrock) of the lateral moraine were collected for SED. Our 10Be exposure dates suggest a stabilization of the Great Aletsch moraine related to the Egesen advance in the beginning of the Younger Dryas, assuming that the ages of the oldest erratic boulders on a single moraine ridge are representative for the time of moraine stabilization (Putkonen & Swanson, 2003). According to our investigations on the right-lateral moraine and the dataset (recalculated from Kelly et al. 2004) for the left-lateral moraine, the Egesen stadial is the first preserved re-advance after the last deglaciation. In contrast, the glacier at the Belalp shows multiple advances during the Lateglacial to early Holocene. 10Be exposure age data suggest that the outer moraine ridge can be an advance older than the Egesen stadial and younger than the LGM. This is in concert with other Younger Dryas related glacial landsystems in Switzerland (reviewing the outer moraine ages e.g. Julier Pass, Ivy-Ochs et al. 1996, 2008). A large number of Lateglacial moraines have been identified and relative correlations on the basis of elevation, equilibrium line altitude (Gross et al. 1977; Maisch, 1987) and morphological characteristics have been established. Nevertheless, it remains important to refine the absolute chronology in order to put further temporal constraints on these relative frameworks. This allows the allocation of such absolutely dated deposits to distinguished cold phases (Preboreal oscillation, Younger Dryas, Aegelsee oscillation) thus underlining their potential significance in the context of regional, as well as global Lateglacial climate conditions. The 10Be exposure ages from an inner moraine ridge are in a good agreement with the recalculated previously published 10Be exposure ages from the Egesen moraines in the Alps. This suggests a synchronicity of the Egesen stadial in the European Alps at the end of the Younger Dryas cold phase. REFERENCES Björck, S., Walker, M. J.C., Cwynar, L.C., Johnson, S., Knudsen, K-L., Lowe, J. J. & Wohlfarth, B. (1998): An event stratigraphy for the Last Termination in the North Atlantic region based on the Greenland ice-core record: a proposal by the INTIMATE group. Journal of Quarternary Science, 13, 283-292. Gross, G., Kerschner, H. & Patzelt, G. (1977): Methodische Untersuchungen über die Schneegrenze in alpinen Gletschergebieten. Zeitschrift für Gletscherkunde und Glazialgeologie, 12, 223-251. Ivy-Ochs, S., Kerschner, H., Reuther, A., Preusser, F., Heine, K., Maisch, M., Kubik, P.W. & Schlüchter, C. (2008): Chronology of the last glacial cycle in the European Alps. Journal of Quaternary Science, 23, 559-573. Ivy-Ochs, S., Schlü

Schindelwig, I.; Akçar, N.; Kubik, P. W.; Schlüchter, C.

2009-04-01

212

Controlling mechanisms of Thwaites Glacier, West Antarctica  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Ice shelves play a major role in the stability of fast flowing ice streams in Antarctica, by exerting buttressing on inland ice and controlling the discharge of ice into the ocean. However, the mechanisms at work remain poorly understood and interactions between floating and grounded ice need to be better characterized in order to estimate the impact of climate change on the ice sheets. Thwaites glacier, in West Antarctica, features a small and heavily fractured ice shelf that provides limited back stress pressure on inland ice but is pinned on the eastern part on a prominent ridge. Thwaites glacier has maintained a consistently high velocity and negative mass balance for at least 20 years. Recent observations show a widening of its fast flowing area as well as a sustained acceleration since 2006 and a rapid retreat of its grounding line in the center of the glacier. The objective of this work is to characterize the dynamic response of Thwaites glacier to changes in its floating tongue on decadal to centennial time scales. To achieve this objective, we rely on high resolution ice flow modeling and grounding line dynamics using the Ice Sheet System Model (ISSM). We will focus on the complex interplay between the main floating tongue of Thwaites Glacier and its eastern, slow moving ice shelf, which is pinned down by an ice rumple. The speed of the eastern ice shelf is strongly affected by the coupling with the main floating ice tongue, which results in significant fluctuations in speed of the eastern ice shelf the formation of ice shelf cracks at the grounding line during acceleration phases. Our results show that ice rigidity at the junction between the eastern and western part of the shelf controls the dynamic regime of the ice shelf and suggest that Thwaites Glacier is likely to undergo substantial changes in the coming decades. This work was performed at the California Institute of Technology's Jet Propulsion Laboratory and the University of California Irvine under a contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Cryospheric Sciences and Modeling, Analysis and Prediction Programs

Seroussi, H. L.; Morlighem, M.; Rignot, E. J.; Larour, E. Y.; Mouginot, J.; Khazendar, A.

2013-12-01

213

Alpine Glacier Oscillations and Climate in the Early Holocene  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Well preserved glacial advances represent a valuable information source of climate history because glaciers react directly to changes in climate. In this context, several moraine systems located morphostratigraphically between Younger Dryas moraines ("Egesen Stadial") and the "Little Ice Age" moraines are investigated in the Eastern Alps of Austria. Hitherto few investigations of such sites have been undertaken in this region and those that have been, have often yielded a broad range of ages within the early Holocene. Based on stratigraphy and morphological characteristics of Alpine moraines as well as corresponding ELA (equilibrium line altitude) depressions, possible early Holocene moraine systems are identified. The field investigations encompass sites in the western Austrian Federal States of Vorarlberg and Tirol ranging from the central Alps to the northern Alpine fringe. The dating of these glacial advances takes place by means of exposure dating. Thereby, clast supported boulders associated to the respective moraines are sampled and the ages determined with 10Be and 36Cl. This study aims at shedding light on this particular time frame between 11.5 and 10 ka and to determine whether a correlation of glacial stadials to various known short termed (~100-200a) climatic oscillations can be achieved. The regional distribution of investigated field sites within western Austria helps to gain spatial climate knowledge. The interpretation of climate history is supported by the use of energy and mass balance calculations at the equilibrium line and on empirical precipitation-temperature models and positive degree-day models. Additional necessary climate information (especially summer temperature) is taken from the available proxy data sources of the respective time segment. Therewith changes in precipitation structures throughout the Alpine region and indications of atmospheric circulation conditions in times of rapid climate change can be derived.

Moran, Andrew; Ivy-Ochs, Susan; Kerschner, Hanns

2014-05-01

214

Gifts of the Glaciers Glacial Landforms  

E-print Network

Gifts of the Glaciers Glacial Landforms Gifts of the Glaciers Moving ice of glacier was responsible. Glaciers perform, in many ways, like an excavator. Although they can push weak material, like gravel, like it in place, like a ripper. And, like a bulldozer, glaciers are poor at eroding rock unless it is already

Cochran-Stafira, D. Liane

215

On the instability of avalanching glaciers  

Microsoft Academic Search

The instability of hanging glaciers and more generally of avalanching glaciers is discussed on the basis of observations performed on several glaciers located in the European Alps. A classification of avalanching glaciers is proposed, which allows a primary appreciation of the danger inherent in these glaciers. On the basis of field observations and results of numerical simulations of crevassing, the

Antoine Pralong; Martin Funk

2006-01-01

216

Annual satellite imaging of the world's glaciers Assessment of glacier extent and change  

E-print Network

GLIMS HIGH ICE Annual satellite imaging of the world's glaciers Assessment of glacier extent and change Development and population of a digital glacier data inventory #12;Glaciers of High Asia: Where was a debris-covered glacier near Mt. Everest J.S. Kargel, April 2001 #12;Gangotri Glacier, India #12;A. Kääb

217

Observed changes in glaciers in China  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Small glaciers are highly sensitive to changes in temperature and precipitation making them important indicators of regional climate change. At present, worldwide evaluation and prediction of glacier change are based on or aided by detailed observations from a small number of glaciers due to the inaccessibility of many glacier areas. Thus, the ground-based detailed glacier monitoring is of strong need and extremely important for glacier variability evaluation in both regional and global scale. China has 46,377 glaciers with a total area of 59,425 km2 and 5600 km3 in volume. Most of the glaciers have experienced rapid and accelerated shrinkage during last few decades. Although some of the glaciers have been investigated or observed through field expeditions and ground-based monitoring, the information of the glacier changes are poorly documented and relatively new to international community. This paper summarizes the observed changes of 9 reference glaciers in China: 1) Urumqi Glacier No. 1, located at the headwaters of Urumqi River in eastern Tianshan which is the best observed glacier in China; 2) Haxilegen Glacier No. 51, at Kuitun River in eastern Tianshan; 3) Qingbingtan Glacier No.72, located at the upper reach of Aksu River in the middle of Tianshan; 4) Miaoergou ice cap, located in the most east part of Tianshan; 5) Laohugou Glacier No. 12, located in Shule River in Qinlian Mountains; 6) Qi Yi glacier (also named as July First Glacier), located in Qinlian Mountains; 7) Dongkemadi Glacier located in Tianggula Mountains in Qinghai-Xizang (Tibetan) Plateau; 8) Rongbu Glacier at the north slop of Mt. Everest in Himalaya Mountains; and 9) Baishui Glacier No. 1, the only temperate glacier in this glacier group, located at Yulong Snow Mountain. Geographically those reference glaciers well represent the glaciers in the major high mountain system in western China. In addition, they have been monitored for 5-53 years and promise the best datasets for glacier changes in their regions.

Li, L.; Li, H.; Wang, F.

2012-04-01

218

Global Warming and its Effects on Glaciers  

E-print Network

The addition of more greenhouse gasses to earth’s atmosphere has been blocking an increased amount of the heat radiated out from the earth’s surface. This in turn has lead to higher average global temperatures, or global warming. One of the main problems posed by this development is the melting of the earth’s glaciers. This is problematic because more liquid water will cause the planet’s sea levels to rise, possibly by as much as 66m if they are completely melted. Other environmental concerns related to melting include changes to mountain habitats and an accelerated water cycle. Although some modeling has shown no serious deterioration of the earth’s glaciers it is becoming increasingly evident that continued global warming would have serious repercussions on the planet’s ice. With the increasing acceptance of global warming as an important phenomenon occurring in our environment today, its effects on the natural cycles of the planet are becoming the center of research. One of the most interesting of these topics is the effect of global warming on the earth’s glaciers. It has been observed that increasing temperatures have and will continue to lead to glacial melting, and that the additional water will lead to a rise in the earth’s sea levels. The other potential effects of glacial melting are still the subject of controversy but it is becoming clear that nature’s equilibriums are being altered. Factors such as global warming have been blamed for the melting of the Earth’s glaciers. The overall global temperature has been increasing due to the greenhouse effect; over the past century the average global temperature has risen by about 0.5-0.6 degrees C (Bernarde, 1992). Around the turn of the century, Swedish chemist and

Andrew Grosvenor; Will Roble; Marcus De Castro

219

100 Years of Glacier Retreat in Central Asia  

E-print Network

100 Years of Glacier Retreat in Central Asia 100 Years of Glacier Retreat in Central Asia · Jeffrey+GLIMS Glacier databaseMODIS+GLIMS Glacier database #12;Benchmark GlaciersBenchmark Glaciers #12;Everest ASTER Mosaic, 2001Everest ASTER Mosaic, 2001 #12;KhumbuKhumbu Glacier, Nepal, 1958Glacier, Nepal, 1958 #12

220

For more information, contact ap.ask@business.gatech.edu or (404) 894-5000 FORM NRA FELLOWSHIP 12/2012 Initiate Glacier Payee Record  

E-print Network

/2012 Initiate Glacier Payee Record Submit Payment Request and Required Documentation to Accounts Payable Visitor is required to claim the tax treaty. Glacier will analyze tax treaty eligibility and inform payee be processed through the Bursar's Office Glacier is the secure on-line tax compliance software system

Jacobs, Laurence J.

221

For more information, contact ap.ask@business.gatech.edu or (404) 894-5000 FORM NRA AWARD 12/2012 Initiate Glacier Payee Record  

E-print Network

/2012 Initiate Glacier Payee Record Submit Payment Request and Required Documentation to Accounts Payable Submit documents from Glacier. Code payment as 751120 (award, prize) or 751380 (participant), or 751510 (human/approval. Glacier is the secure on-line tax compliance software system that collects immigration and tax related

Jacobs, Laurence J.

222

Fracture and Back Stress Along the Byrd Glacier Flowband on the Ross Ice Shelf  

Microsoft Academic Search

East Antarctic ice discharged by Byrd Glacier continues as a flowband to the calving front of the Ross Ice Shelf. Flow across the grounding line changes from compressive to extensive as it leaves the fjord through the Transantarctic Mountains occupied by Byrd Glacier. Magnitudes of the longitudinal compressive stress that suppress opening of transverse tensile cracks are calculated for the

James P. Kenneally; Terence J. Hughes

2004-01-01

223

Remote sensing and GIS techniques for assessing decadal glacier changes in the Sikkim and Nepal Himalayas  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

There is urgency in developing and testing remote sensing tools for developing extensive glacier datasets in high altitude areas of the Himalayas. Detailed information about glacier parameters is missing in many areas of the Himalayas, limiting our understanding of glacier fluctuations in this area. One of the biggest challenges in glacier mapping from spaceborne imagery is the delineation of debris-covered glacial tongues. The high Himalayas provide interesting challenges and unique opportunities for testing glacier mapping algorithms including debris cover. This research exploits the potential of visible, infrared and thermal ASTER data combined with SRTM elevation datasets for mapping glacier parameters (glacier area, elevations and snow lines) in the Himalayas. Multi-spectral classification techniques (ASTER ¾ band ratios and normalized differences NDSI and NDVI), single band thresholds, topographic characteristics (elevation and slope) and thermal information were combined in a decision tree to map clean ice and debris-covered ice. Snow lines were mapped from ASTER imagery acquired at the end of the ablation season, with instrument gains suitable for snow and ice. Ground control points (GCPs) collected in the field were used to assess the accuracy of the remote sensing-derived elevations. Changes in glacier parameters were derived by comparison with glacier datasets from older topographic maps and were linked with changes in climate parameters (precipitation and temperature).

Racoviteanu, A.

2009-04-01

224

New climate change scenarios reveal uncertain future for Central Asian glaciers  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Central Asian water resources largely depend on (glacier) melt water generated in the Pamir and Tien Shan mountain ranges, located in the basins of the Amu and Syr Darya rivers, important life lines in Central Asia and the prominent water source of the Aral Sea. To estimate future water availability in the region, it is thus necessary to project the future glacier extent and volume in the Amu and Syr Darya river basins. The aim of this study is to quantify the impact of uncertainty in climate change projections on the future glacier extent in the Amu and Syr Darya river basins. The latest climate change projections provided by the fifth Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5) generated for the upcoming fifth assessment report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) are used to model future glacier extent in the Central Asian region for the two large river basins. The outcomes are compared to model results obtained with the climate change projections used for the fourth IPCC assessment (CMIP3). We use a regionalized glacier mass balance model to estimate changes in glacier extent as a function of glacier size and projections of temperature and precipitation. The model is developed for implementation in (large scale) hydrological models, when the spatial model resolution does not allow for modelling of individual glaciers and data scarcity is an issue. Both CMIP3 and CMIP5 model simulations point towards a strong decline in glacier extent in Central Asia. However, compared to the CMIP3 projections, the CMIP5 projections of future glacier extent in Central Asia provide a wider range of outcomes, mostly owing to greater variability in precipitation projections among the latest suite of climate models. These findings have great impact on projections of the timing and quantity of water availability in glacier melt dominated rivers in the region. Uncertainty about the size of the decline in glacier extent remains large, making estimates of future Central Asian glacier extent and downstream water availability uncertain.

Lutz, A. F.; Immerzeel, W. W.; Gobiet, A.; Pellicciotti, F.; Bierkens, M. F. P.

2012-11-01

225

Investigation of the physical characteristics of the photosphere from multiplet line profiles. II - Deviation from local thermodynamic equilibrium  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The source function in the line and the non-LTE factor are found to depend on the optical depth tau5 in the photosphere. Deviation from LTE must be taken into account for depths tau5 less than 0.20. Values of oscillator strength ratios obtained in a previous study are confirmed.

Troian, V. I.

226

Life Cycle of a Glacier  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This slide show follows a snowflake through its life in a glacier. The path of the ice crystal is traced from its incorporation in the zone of accumulation, through the zone of ablation to its final departure, whether being calved as an iceberg or melting or sublimated. There is also information on the speed of the glacier and the difference between a cold and a warm glacier.

227

Glacier National Park  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This is the homepage of Glacier National Park. Users can access materials on the park's ecology and environment (plants and animals, biodiversity and air quality, geology, and fires), the culture and history of the park, park activities, and publications on naturalist activities. There are also video clips of park wildlife and scenery, a photo gallery, and live webcams. Links are provided to additional information, such as research activities on bear DNA and global climate change.

228

Pine Island Glacier - basal properties and sliding laws  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The dynamics of the Antarctic Ice Sheet can be well seen and studied on the behavior of Pine Island Glacier. Despite the long time believe in a slow response of the ice sheet to changing atmospheric and oceanic forcing, Pine Island has shown acceleration, thinning and a significant grounding line retreat in the past decades. These ongoing processes are coinciding with a concentrated mass loss in the area around Pine Island Glacier, the Amundsen Sea Embayment. The area is of additional interest due to its retrograde bed slope below the glacier. The postulated instability of the setting turns the glacier into an even more suitable object for modeling studies. Plenty of working groups have conducted modeling studies of Pine Island Glacier with varying model complexity and diverse focuses. We want to add to this by conducting model experiments with a diagnostic 3D full-stokes model of Pine Island Glacier. The model is thermo-mechanically coupled and implemented with the commercial finite-element package COMSOL Multiphysics©. We use remotely sensed surface velocity data to validate our results. The focus of our work lies on the basal properties below the glacier and the connection to sliding behavior. We believe that this is a crucial part, as different basal conditions might cause different responses to ongoing changes in the area. Recent studies presented evidence for the existence of a water saturated sediment basin below the main trunk of the glacier. We conduct a variety a numerical experiments with which we test different approaches of combining information about the basal properties with sliding laws.

Wilkens, Nina; Humbert, Angelika

2013-04-01

229

Pine Island Glacier - local flow mechanisms and basal sliding  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Pine Island Glacier is a fast moving outlet glacier in the West Antarctic Ice Sheet. Several tributaries feeding the central ice stream characterise the flow field structure of this glacier. In the past decades the glacier has shown acceleration, thinning and a significant grounding line retreat. These ongoing processes are coinciding with a concentrated mass loss in the area around Pine Island Glacier, the Amundsen Sea Embayment. The area is of additional interest due to its retrograde bed slope. The postulated instability of the setting turns the glacier into an even more suitable object for modelling studies. One major challenge encountered when modelling the flow field of Pine Island Glacier is to reproduce the locally varying flow pattern, with its many tributaries. Commonly this difficulty is overcome by inversion for parameters controlling basal sliding. Our study is aimed at connecting basal sliding again to physical parameters. To achieve this we conduct experiments of Pine Island Glacier with the diagnostic 3D full-Stokes model COMice. The model is thermo-mechanically coupled and implemented with the commercial finite-element package COMSOL Multiphysics©. We use remotely sensed surface velocity data to validate our results. In a first step, the model is used to identify dominant local mechanisms that drive the flow of the different tributaries. We identify connections between the basal topography, the basal temperature, the driving stress and the basal roughness distribution. The thus gained information is used to confine basal sliding. Areas with similar qualitative characteristics are identified, and constant-sliding assumptions made for those. Additionally, the basal roughness distribution is matched onto a basal sliding parameter. This way the sliding law is again brought closer to its original meaning. Our results are important for prognostic model experiments, as we connect basal sliding to locally varying basal properties, which might lead to different responses of the tributaries to altered external forcing.

Wilkens, N. M.; Kleiner, T.; Humbert, A.

2013-12-01

230

Muir Glacier in Glacier Bay National Monument 2004  

USGS Multimedia Gallery

This August 2004 photo further documents the significant changes that have occurred during the 63 years between photographs A and C, and during the 54 years between photographs B and C. Muir Glacier has retreated out of the field of view and is now nearly 5 miles to the northwest. Riggs Glacier has ...

231

Seasonal and altitudinal variations in snow algal communities on an Alaskan glacier (Gulkana glacier in the Alaska range)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Snow and ice algae are cold tolerant algae growing on the surface of snow and ice, and they play an important role in the carbon cycles for glaciers and snowfields in the world. Seasonal and altitudinal variations in seven major taxa of algae (green algae and cyanobacteria) were investigated on the Gulkana glacier in Alaska at six different elevations from May to September in 2001. The snow algal communities and their biomasses changed over time and elevation. Snow algae were rarely observed on the glacier in May although air temperature had been above 0?° C since the middle of the month and surface snow had melted. In June, algae appeared in the lower areas of the glacier, where the ablation ice surface was exposed. In August, the distribution of algae was extended to the upper parts of the glacier as the snow line was elevated. In September, the glacier surface was finally covered with new winter snow, which terminated algal growth in the season. Mean algal biomass of the study sites continuously increased and reached 6.3 × 10 ?l m-2 in cell volume or 13 mg carbon m-2 in September. The algal community was dominated by Chlamydomonas nivalis on the snow surface, and by Ancylonema nordenskiöldii and Mesotaenium berggrenii on the ice surface throughout the melting season. Other algae were less abundant and appeared in only a limited area of the glacier. Results in this study suggest that algae on both snow and ice surfaces significantly contribute to the net production of organic carbon on the glacier and substantially affect surface albedo of the snow and ice during the melting season.

Takeuchi, Nozomu

2013-09-01

232

Listening to Glaciers: Passive hydroacoustics near marine-terminating glaciers  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The catastrophic breakup of the Larsen B Ice Shelf in the Weddell Sea in 2002 paints a vivid portrait of the effects of glacier-climate interactions. This event, along with other unexpected episodes of rapid mass loss from marine-terminating glaciers (i.e., tidewater glaciers, outlet glaciers, ice streams, ice shelves) sparked intensified study of the boundaries where marine-terminating glaciers interact with the ocean. These dynamic and dangerous boundaries require creative methods of observation and measurement. Toward this effort, we take advantage of the exceptional sound-propagating properties of seawater to record and interpret sounds generated at these glacial ice-ocean boundaries from distances safe for instrument deployment and operation.

Pettit, E.C.; Nystuen, J.A.; O'Neel, Shad

2012-01-01

233

Glacier and Ice Shelves Studies Using Satellite SAR Interferometry  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Satellite radar interferometry is a powerful technique to measure the surface velocity and topography of glacier ice. On ice shelves, a quadruple difference technique separates tidal motion from the steady creep flow deformation of ice. The results provide a wealth of information about glacier grounding lines , mass fluxes, stability, elastic properties of ice, and tidal regime. The grounding line, which is where the glacier detaches from its bed and becomes afloat, is detected with a precision of a few tens of meters. Combining this information with satellite radar altimetry makes it possible to measure glacier discharge into the ocean and state of mass balance with greater precision than ever before, and in turn provide a significant revision of past estimates of mass balance of the Greenland and Antarctic Ice Sheets. Analysis of creep rates on floating ice permits an estimation of basal melting at the ice shelf underside. The results reveal that the action of ocean water in sub-ice-shelf cavities has been largely underestimated by oceanographic models and is the dominant mode of mass release to the ocean from an ice shelf. Precise mapping of grounding line positions also permits the detection of grounding line migration, which is a fine indicator of glacier change, independent of our knowledge of snow accumulation and ice melting. This technique has been successfully used to detect the rapid retreat of Pine Island Glacier, the largest ice stream in West Antarctica. Finally, tidal motion of ice shelves measured interferometrically provides a modern, synoptic view of the physical processes which govern the formation of tabular icebergs in the Antarctic.

Rignot, Eric

1999-01-01

234

Glaciers and the Changing Earth  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this lesson, students will investigate how glaciers affect the landscape in the context of wondering how the rocks used in the stone walls first got into the ground. Following a directed reading and discussion, they will perform an activity in which they use ice cubes and a bucket of sand to simulate the effects of a glacier.

235

Chernobyl fallout on Alpine glaciers  

SciTech Connect

Measurements of the gross beta activity of snow samples from four Alpine glaciers contaminated by radioactive fallout from the Chernobyl nuclear accident and a gamma-spectrum analysis of selected samples are reported. The results are discussed with respect to possible risks to the population from using meltwater from these glaciers as drinking water.

Ambach, W.; Rehwald, W.; Blumthaler, M.; Eisner, H.; Brunner, P.

1989-01-01

236

Life Cycle of a Glacier  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

An interactive slide show explores the journey of a single snowflake onto and through a glacier. This journey, which can take as much as 30,000 years to complete, shows that the life cycle of a glacier can be more complex than originally perceived.

237

ASTER Image of Gangotri Glacier  

USGS Multimedia Gallery

Sept 9, 2001 ASTER image showing the position of the terminus of Gangotri Glacier, India, between 1780 and 2001. Image from Jesse Allen, NASA's Earth Observatory. Glacier retreat boundaries courtesy of the U.S. Land Processes Distributed Active Archive Center...

238

Malaspina Glacier, Alaska  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This image from the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) instrument on NASA's Terra satellite covers an area of 55 by 40 kilometers (34 by 25 miles) over the southwest part of the Malaspina Glacier and Icy Bay in Alaska. The composite of infrared and visible bands results in the snow and ice appearing light blue, dense vegetation is yellow-orange and green, and less vegetated, gravelly areas are in orange. According to Dr. Dennis Trabant (U.S. Geological Survey, Fairbanks, Alaska), the Malaspina Glacier is thinning. Its terminal moraine protects it from contact with the open ocean; without the moraine, or if sea level rises sufficiently to reconnect the glacier with the ocean, the glacier would start calving and retreat significantly. ASTER data are being used to help monitor the size and movement of some 15,000 tidal and piedmont glaciers in Alaska. Evidence derived from ASTER and many other satellite and ground-based measurements suggests that only a few dozen Alaskan glaciers are advancing. The overwhelming majority of them are retreating.

This ASTER image was acquired on June 8, 2001. With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER will image Earth for the next six years to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet.

ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18,1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products. Dr. Anne Kahle at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., is the U.S. science team leader; Bjorn Eng of JPL is the project manager. ASTER is the only high-resolution imaging sensor on Terra. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Earth Science Enterprise, along-term research and technology program designed to examine Earth's land, oceans, atmosphere, ice and life as a total integrated system.

The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER will provide scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping, and monitoring dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats; monitoring potentially active volcanoes; identifying crop stress; determining cloud morphology and physical properties; wetlands evaluation; thermal pollution monitoring; coral reef degradation; surface temperature mapping of soils and geology; and measuring surface heat balance.

Size: 55 by 40 kilometers (34 by 25 miles) Location: 60.0 degrees North latitude, 140.7 degrees West longitude Orientation: North at top Image Data: ASTER bands 2, 3 and 4 Original Data Resolution: 15 meters (49 feet) Date Acquired: June 8, 2001

2001-01-01

239

Physical and chemical properties of ice in a main valley glacier and a tributary glacier, Gornergletscher,  

E-print Network

Physical and chemical properties of ice in a main valley glacier and a tributary glacier properties of ice in a main valley glacier and a tributary glacier, Gornergletscher, Canton Valais, Switzerland Annika M. Quick Department of Geological Sciences Master of Science Glacier models often fail

Seamons, Kent E.

240

Patagonia Glacier, Chile  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This ASTER images was acquired on May 2, 2000 over the North Patagonia Ice Sheet, Chile near latitude 47 degrees south, longitude 73 degrees west. The image covers 36 x 30 km. The false color composite displays vegetation in red. The image dramatically shows a single large glacier, covered with crevasses. A semi-circular terminal moraine indicates that the glacier was once more extensive than at present. ASTER data are being acquired over hundreds of glaciers worldwide to measure their changes over time. Since glaciers are sensitive indicators of warming or cooling, this program can provide global data set critical to understand climate change.

This image is located at 46.5 degrees south latitude and 73.9 degrees west longitude.

Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of International Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products. Dr. Anne Kahle at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., is the U.S. Science team leader; Moshe Pniel of JPL is the project manager. ASTER is the only high resolution imaging sensor on Terra. The primary goal of the ASTER mission is to obtain high-resolution image data in 14 channels over the entire land surface, as well as black and white stereo images. With revisit time of between 4 and 16 days, ASTER will provide the capability for repeat coverage of changing areas on Earth's surface.

The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER will provide scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping, and monitoring dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats, monitoring potentially active volcanoes, identifying crop stress, determining cloud morphology and physical properties, wetlands Evaluation, thermal pollution monitoring, coral reef degradation, surface temperature mapping of soils and geology, and measuring surface heat balance.

2000-01-01

241

Primer on glacier flows Christian Heining  

E-print Network

Primer on glacier flows Christian Heining University of Bayreuth, Germany, Department of Applied Mechanics and Fluid Dynamics 1. Why is it important to understand the physics of glaciers? - Glaciers ocean sediments (ice shelfs in antarctica) o pollen - Glaciers contribute to the raise

Sainudiin, Raazesh

242

Glacier Shrinkage and Effects on Alpine Hydrology  

Microsoft Academic Search

Alpine glaciers cover an area of about 553 km2 in seven western states of the American West. With few exceptions, all glaciers have been shrinking over the past century and the rate of shrinkage has accelerated over the past few decades. Overall, smaller glaciers exhibit greatest shrinkage, relative to their size, compared to larger glaciers. Preliminary results from studies of

H. Basagic; A. G. Fountain; D. H. Clark

2004-01-01

243

Canadian Glacier Hydrology, 2003-2007  

Microsoft Academic Search

Glacier hydrological research in Canada from 2002-2007 continues to advance, driven by new observations of glacier retreat in all regions of the country. New observation networks have been formed to study various aspects of glacier change and linkages with the hydrological system. Small- scale studies of accumulation and melt processes on glacier surfaces continue, and are being used to parameterize

Sarah Boon; Gwenn E. Flowers; D. Scott Munro

2009-01-01

244

Ice-proximal sediment dynamics and their effect on the stability of Muir Glacier, Alaska: A case study of non-climatic glacier response  

SciTech Connect

Recent studies have shown that water depth at tidewater termini affect calving rates and, therefore, glacier mass balance and terminus stability. Grounding-line water depths are themselves governed by glacial and marine processes that interact during the formation of morainal bank depocenters. These morainal banks can fluctuate 10s of meters in height within an interval of a few weeks. Recent investigations in Glacier Bay have focused on quantitatively assessing sediment budgets in the ice-proximal environment. The monitoring of morainal banks in upper Muir Inlet has included repeated bathymetric mapping, sediment trap studies, bottom grab sampling, glacier and iceberg sampling, and submersible ROV investigations within 1 km of the terminus. Such relationships are important in interpreting recent changes in the dynamics of Muir Glacier where a century of retreat has been succeeded by quasi stability. The new glacier regime has accompanied basin infilling from approximately 100 m depth to a maximum of 52 m at the grounding line. Two large grounding-line fans have aggraded to deltas and reduced the length of the calving margin from 900 m to 290 m wide. These effects have reduced the ice flow velocities by 45%. Annual morainal bank growth ranged from 10[sup 6] to 10[sup 7] m[sup 3] and is the result of glacifluvial dumping, suspension settling from turbid overflow plumes, debris dumping from ice-cliff and iceberg melting, glacier squeezing and pushing of morainal bank sediment, and sediment gravity flow processes. Each of these processes are an integral facet of the morainal bank dynamics and glacier response. These studies of Muir Glacier indicate that glacier response to sediment dynamics need to be addresses before climatic implications are made.

Hunter, L.E.; Powell, R.D. (Northern Illinois Univ., Dekalb, IL (United States). Dept. of Geology)

1992-01-01

245

Application of Near-Surface Geophysics to Problems in Glacier Dynamics, Pitted Outwash Plain Formation, and Glaciotectonics, Matanuska Glacier, Alaska  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

From 2000 to 2004, near-surface geophysics data in various forms was collected near the active terminus of Matanuska Glacier, Alaska, to address several specific hypotheses and also provide general subsurface information in several relatively unsampled zones of the subsurface. (1) Seismic reflection data was collected on the glacier to test the predicted thickening of debris-rich basal ice in response to the motion of the glacier out of a localized overdeepening. The seismic data imaged the 5-to-10 meter thick basal ice at depths of 50-150 m, and clearly showed a 50 percent thicking--supporting the glaciohydraulic supercooling mechanism for basal ice formation. An interesting result of this basal-freeze-on mechanism of forced equilibrium is the concept of the "graded glacier" that has implications of sediment-pumping effects in response to changes in the surface slope of the glacier in response to climate change. (2) Seismic reflection, GPR, and electrical resistivity data were collected in a proximal pitted outwash plain abutting the active margin of Matanuska Glacier. These data indicate the presence of laterally continuous "slabs" of buried ice, in places possibly in duplex-like structures formed during readvances. The formation of thermokarst resulting in pits (sinkholes) in the surface of the outwash plain are therefore interpreted to result from preferential pathways of melting (relict moulins?) in the buried ice slabs, rather than from discreet blocks of ice. (3) 4-D GPR data (3-D through time) were collected at the terminus of Matanuska Glacier in an attempt to examine the formation of debris-flow-generated stratigraphy during the collapse of a portion of an ice-cored moraine complex. During a 30-m readvance of the glacier (2002-2003, between "snapshots" of data collection) glaciotectonic deformation of the moraine stratigraphy was observed. The GPR data indicate that the readvancing glacier impacted the rigid buried ice within the moraine, passively translating and deforming the overlying sediment in response to occasional brittle faulting and thrusting of the buried ice.

Baker, G. S.; Pyke, K.; Evenson, E.; Lawson, D.; Larson, G.; Alley, R. B.

2005-05-01

246

Recent behaviour of Slovenian glaciers  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Just two glaciers, below the peaks of Triglav (2864 m) and Skuta (2532 m), are persisting in Slovenian Alps, both on a relatively very low elevation. Their present surfaces do not exceed one hectare, thus we can speak only about two glacierets or very small glaciers. The Anton Melik Geographical Institute of the Scientific Research Centre at the Slovenian Academy of Sciences and Arts has regularly performed measurements since 1946. The size of the Triglav glacier, measured in 1946, was 14.4 hectares, and by the year 2012 the glacier had shrunk to a half of a hectare. The direct vicinity of the meteorological station on Mt. Kredarica makes possible an analysis of the dependency of the glacier's fluctuation on weather changes. Several methods of measuring have been applied. Since 1999 we have regularly performed photogrammetric measurements of the glacier, which render possible exact calculations of changes in the glacier's area and volume by individual years. In addition, we also performed georadar measurements in 2000 and 2013. Besides regular annual measurements performed at the end of melting seasons, the Triglav glacier has also been photographed monthly since 1976, from two fixed positions on Mt. Kredarica. In 2012, we performed aerial laser scanning (LIDAR) of the Triglav glacier. While for the last decade of the 20th century we reported that the Triglav glacier has not only retreated but literally disintegrated, in the first decade of the 21st century we can observe its stagnation. Due to the present concave form of the glacier's surface, snow remains on it late into summer, and since the year 2007, the ice of the lower part of the glacier has not been revealed even at the end of the melting season but has remained covered with the firn and snow of previous winters. Should such weather conditions continue and the amount of winter precipitation further increase, the remainder of the Triglav glacier will, though very small in size, continue to exist for next ten years or even more.

Gabrovec, Matej; Ferk, Mateja; Ortar, Jaka

2014-05-01

247

Mass balance model parameter transferability on a tropical glacier  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The mass balance and melt water production of glaciers is of particular interest in the Peruvian Andes where glacier melt water has markedly increased water supply during the pronounced dry seasons in recent decades. However, the melt water contribution from glaciers is projected to decrease with appreciable negative impacts on the local society within the coming decades. Understanding mass balance processes on tropical glaciers is a prerequisite for modeling present and future glacier runoff. As a first step towards this aim we applied a process-based surface mass balance model in order to calculate observed ablation at two stakes in the ablation zone of Shallap Glacier (4800 m a.s.l., 9°S) in the Cordillera Blanca, Peru. Under the tropical climate, the snow line migrates very frequently across most of the ablation zone all year round causing large temporal and spatial variations of glacier surface conditions and related ablation. Consequently, pronounced differences between the two chosen stakes and the two years were observed. Hourly records of temperature, humidity, wind speed, short wave incoming radiation, and precipitation are available from an automatic weather station (AWS) on the moraine near the glacier for the hydrological years 2006/07 and 2007/08 while stake readings are available at intervals of between 14 to 64 days. To optimize model parameters, we used 1000 model simulations in which the most sensitive model parameters were varied randomly within their physically meaningful ranges. The modeled surface height change was evaluated against the two stake locations in the lower ablation zone (SH11, 4760m) and in the upper ablation zone (SH22, 4816m), respectively. The optimal parameter set for each point achieved good model skill but if we transfer the best parameter combination from one stake site to the other stake site model errors increases significantly. The same happens if we optimize the model parameters for each year individually and transfer these combinations to the other year. We show that multi-site and multi-year analyses are crucial before extrapolating ablation modeling to larger glacier areas. So far tested surface albedo schemes and respective parameterizations can obviously not satisfyingly reproduce the dynamics of glacier surface conditions at our study site and new solutions to the problem have to be explored.

Gurgiser, Wolfgang; Mölg, Thomas; Nicholson, Lindsey; Kaser, Georg

2013-04-01

248

Glaciers show direct linkage between erosion rate and chemical weathering fluxes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Field studies suggest a linkage between high physical erosion rates and rates of chemical denudation. Mechanical erosion by temperate glaciers is commonly an order of magnitude higher than in mountainous fluvial catchments, leading to an expectation that chemical weathering fluxes should also be high from glacierized basins. Yet solute fluxes from glaciers are not found to be higher than non-glacierized catchments. Application of a model of silicate weathering from glaciers based on mineral surface area production and mineralogy shows that solute fluxes are consistent with the low temperatures, dilute water chemistry, and high mineral surface area production in these environments. Low temperatures reduce silicate-weathering rates; this effect explains the difference between silica fluxes from glaciers and from non-glacierized basins. As in laboratory flow-through reactors, glacial solute flux should depend on surface area production and mineral weathering rate constants. The surface area production is significant: a typical glacial erosion rate and grain-size distribution produces on the order of 10 4 km 2 of mineral surface area per square kilometer per year. This new surface area is highly reactive because mineral weathering rates decline with surface age. Application of the "reactor" model yields results largely consistent with measured solute fluxes for the example of Bench Glacier, Alaska. The model underpredicts potassium fluxes, probably due to accelerated initial dissolution of biotite strained by abrasion. The success of the model in predicting other silicate weathering fluxes reflects the far-from-equilibrium conditions in glacial runoff, such that mineral weathering rate constants are not limited by saturation state. In a small data set from glacial catchments, both annual silica fluxes and mean concentrations increase with water discharge. This suggests that mineral surface area increases with water discharge from glaciers, an effect plausibly linked to erosion rates. Those glaciers for which both erosion rate and silica flux data are available support the idea that production of new reactive mineral surface area by glacial erosion drives silicate weathering fluxes.

Anderson, Suzanne Prestrud

2005-04-01

249

Dynamic behavior of the Bering Glacier-Bagley icefield system during a surge, and other measurements of Alaskan glaciers with ERS SAR imagery  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

ERS-1 synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imagery was employed for the measurement of the dynamics of the Bagley icefield during a major surge in 1993-1994, the measurement of ice velocities on the Malaspina piedmont glacier during a quiescent phase between surges, and for mapping the snow lines and the position of the terminus of Nabesna glacier on Mount Wrangell (a 4317 m andesitic shield volcano) in the heavily glacierized Saint Elias and Wrangell Mountains of Alaska. An overview and summary of results is given. The methods used include interferometry, cross-correlation of sequential images, and digitization of boundaries using terrain-corrected SAR imagery.

Lingle, Craig S.; Fatland, Dennis R.; Voronina, Vera A.; Ahlnaes, Kristina; Troshina, Elena N.

1997-01-01

250

Teleconnections between Andean and New Zealand glaciers  

Microsoft Academic Search

Retreat and advance of glaciers in the Southern Alps of New Zealand have occurred over two distinct 20-yr climate periods (1954–1974) and (1974–1994). Changes in tropical and southern Andean glaciers are compared over these same periods. Behaviour of glaciers in the tropical Andes are out of phase with the Southern Alps glaciers, but some glaciers in Patagonia appear to be

B. Blair Fitzharris; Gareth R. Clare; Jim Renwick

2007-01-01

251

Velocities of Pine Island and Thwaites Glaciers, West Antarctica, from ERS-1 SAR images  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Average velocities of Pine Island and Thwaites Glaciers were measured for the time periods between 1992 and 1994 by tracking ice-surface patterns. Velocities of the central flow of the Pine Island Glacier range from 1.5 km/yr above the grounding line (separating the grounded from the floating parts of a glacier) to 2.8 km/yr near the terminus; velocities of the central Thwaites Glacier range from 2.2 km/yr above the grounding line to 3.4 km/yr at the limit of measurements on the tongue. Both glaciers show an increase in velocity of about 1 km/yr where they cross their grounding lines. The velocities derived from ERS-1 images are higher than those previously derived from Landsat images, perhaps reflecting acceleration of the glaciers. Both glaciers are exceptionally fast. The high velocities may be due to high precipitation rates over West Antarctica and the lack of a major buttressing ice shelf.

Lucchitta, B.K.; Rosanova, C.E.

1997-01-01

252

Predicting glacier evolution: Why additional data is critical  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Both modeling and existing data indicate rapid and substantial dynamic changes can occur in the outlet glaciers and ice streams that drain large portions of the Antarctic and Greenland ice sheets. Understanding which physical processes and/or feedbacks could prolong, shorten, or reverse these trends is a fundamental step towards accurately simulating the future cryospheric contribution to eustatic sea level. We present results from a range of numerical experiments that highlight system sensitivity to poorly constrained boundary conditions and, in particular, illustrate why detailed knowledge of basal properties and processes are critical to improved projections of glacier evolution. Furthermore, we show how dynamic changes in glaciers and their floating extensions can, at least temporarily, reverse the prevailing direction of grounding-line motion and how accurate prediction of those changes is dependent on additional high-resolution data sets.

Parizek, B. R.; Alley, R. B.; Anandakrishnan, S.; Christianson, K.; Dupont, T. K.; Edwards, R. A.; Walker, R. T.; Wolfe, D. S.

2012-12-01

253

Gallery Walk Questions about Glaciers  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

created by Mark Francek, Central Michigan University The following are potential questions that could be used in a gallery walk activity about glaciers. The questions are organized according to the cognitive level ...

254

IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON GEOSCIENCE AND REMOTE SENSING, VOL. 46, NO. 10, OCTOBER 2008 2823 Glacier Volume Changes Using ASTER Satellite  

E-print Network

, and contour lines from a topographic map from the 1970s. For two ice caps in Eastern Svalbard, Kvalpyntfonna-term glacier volume changes can be observed from space over a large number of ice caps and glaciers. Index and illumination conditions in glacial and mountain environments such as snow accumulation, snow melt, topographic

Kääb, Andreas

255

Flow instabilities of Alaskan glaciers  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Over 300 of the largest glaciers in southern Alaska have been identified as either surge-type or pulse-type, making glaciers with flow instabilities the norm among large glaciers in that region. Consequently, the bulk of mass loss due to climate change will come from these unstable glaciers in the future, yet their response to future climate warming is unknown because their dynamics are still poorly understood. To help broaden our understanding of unstable glacier flow, the decadal-scale ice dynamics of 1 surging and 9 pulsing glaciers are investigated. Bering Glacier had a kinematic wave moving down its ablation zone at 4.4 +/- 2.0 km/yr from 2002 to 2009, which then accelerated to 13.9 +/- 2.0 km/yr as it traversed the piedmont lobe. The wave first appeared in 2001 near the confluence with Bagley Ice Valley and it took 10 years to travel ~64 km. A surge was triggered in 2008 after the wave activated an ice reservoir in the midablation zone, and it climaxed in 2011 while the terminus advanced several km into Vitus Lake. Ruth Glacier pulsed five times between 1973 and 2012, with peak velocities in 1981, 1989, 1997, 2003, and 2010; approximately every 7 years. A typical pulse increased ice velocity 300%, from roughly 40 m/yr to 160 m/yr in the midablation zone, and involved acceleration and deceleration of the ice en masse; no kinematic wave was evident. The pulses are theorized to be due to deformation of a subglacial till causing enhanced basal motion. Eight additional pulsing glaciers are identified based on the spatiotemporal pattern of their velocity fields. These glaciers pulsed where they were either constricted laterally or joined by a tributary, and their surface slopes are 1-2°. These traits are consistent with an overdeepening. This observation leads to a theory of ice motion in overdeepenings that explains the cyclical behavior of pulsing glaciers. It is based on the concept of glaciohydraulic supercooling, and includes sediment transport and erosion along an adverse slope, ice thickening, and ablation of the ice surface such that the ratio of the angle of the adverse slope to ice surface slope oscillates around the supercooling threshold.

Turrin, James Bradley

256

Instructions for Glacier Recession Lesson Objective: Students will learn  

E-print Network

Instructions for Glacier Recession Lesson Objective: Students will learn: - about the connection between glaciers and climate, - why glacial studies are important, - how glacier recession affects humanity, and - how humans are affecting glaciers. Materials: Movie ­ Inconvenient Truth For Exercise

257

Modeling glacier beds in the Austrian Alps: How many lakes will form in future?  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Glacial retreat exposes landscapes with relief characteristics greatly differing from the former ice covered surfaces. If glacial retreat exposes natural basins capable of forming proglacial lakes, then the downstream hydrologic and geomorphic systems in such catchments will be significantly altered due to discharge modifications, sediment trapping, decoupling effects and long term sediment storage (e.g. Geilhausen et al. 2013). Further implications are related to hydropower management, tourism and natural hazards. Consequently, sound knowledge of present day glacier beds ("proglacial zones of tomorrow") and in particular the total number, locations and characteristics of overdeepenings are of importance. For Austria, however, this important information about significant future changes of high alpine regions is yet missing. An interdisciplinary research project is currently in preparation to close this gap. This paper presents results of a pilot study. We used a novel GIS-based approach (GlabTop, cf. Linsbauer et al. 2012) to compute approximate glacier beds in the Austrian Alps. GlabTop ('Glacier bed Topography') is based on an empirical relation between average basal shear stress and elevation range of individual glaciers and makes use of digital elevation models (DEM), glacier outlines and branch lines (i.e. a set of lines covering all important glacier branches). DEMs and glacier outlines were derived from the Austrian glacier inventory (1998) and branch lines were manually digitized. The inventory includes 911 glaciers of which 876 (96%) were considered and 35 were excluded due to size restrictions (< 0.01 km²) or insufficient DEM coverage. We found 165 overdeepenings (> 0.01 km²) with the potential of forming proglacial lakes when glacier retreat reveals the bed. The total area and volume of all overdeepenings is approx. 10 km² and 236 Mio m³ respectively and 33 lakes will be larger than 1 km³. A total glacier volume of 16 ± 5 km³ with an average ice thickness of 36 ± 11 m was calculated for 1998. Comparisons with geophysical surveys (13 GPR profiles) revealed that ice thickness is mostly within the ± 30 % model uncertainty range and locations of potential future lakes are robust. Future work will focus on further model validation and optimization. References: Geilhausen, M., Morche, D., Otto, J.-C. & L. Schrott (2013): Sediment discharge from the proglacial zone of a retreating Alpine glacier (Obersulzbachkees, Hohe Tauern, Austria). Zeitschrift für Geomorphologie Vol. 57, Suppl. 2:29-53. Linsbauer, A., Paul, F. & Haeberli, W. (2012): Modeling glacier thickness distribution and bed topography over entire mountain ranges with GlabTop: Application of a fast and robust approach. J. Geophys. Res. 117. F03007, doi:10.1029/2011JF002313.

Koehler, Dominik; Geilhausen, Martin; Linsbauer, Andreas

2014-05-01

258

The Loch Lomond Readvance on the Isle of Mull, Scotland: glacier reconstruction and palaeoclimatic implications  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Geomorphological mapping of Mull provides evidence for an icefield 143 km2 in area flanked by six corrie glaciers with a total area of ca. 13 km2. The absence of Lateglacial periglacial features, shorelines and pollen sites from the area occupied by this readvance, together with radiocarbon dating of shell fragments, confirm that it occurred during the Loch Lomond (Younger Dryas) Stade. The thickness of glacigenic deposits within the area of the readvance is attributed to reworking of paraglacial sediments. Up-valley continuity of recessional moraines indicates that the ice remained active and near to equilibrium during retreat, consistent with slow warming following the coldest part of the stade. Reconstructed equilibrium line altitudes (ELAs) imply vigorous snow-blowing by westerly winds, and are consistent with a general southwestwards decline in ELAs across the Scottish Highlands. An ELA of 250 m was calculated for the Mull Icefield using an ablation:accumulation balance ratio (ABR) approach. Palaeotemperature and palaeoprecipitation estimates were derived by calculating a theoretical regional ELA from meteorological data and assuming that the combination of temperature and precipitation implied by the theoretical ELA approximates conditions at 250 m on Mull during the Loch Lomond Stade. The result indicates a mean July sea-level temperature of 5.7 +/- 0.5°C and a mean annual precipitation at 250 m of ca. 2700-3800 mm (best estimate 3200 mm), indicating higher precipitation totals than at present owing to more vigorous atmospheric circulation.

Ballantyne, Colin K.

2002-12-01

259

Analysis of glacier facies using satellite techniques  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Landsat-derived reflectance is lowest for exposed ice and increases markedly at the transient snow line. Above the slush zone is a gradual increase in near-infrared reflectance as a result of decreasing grain-size of the snow, which characterizes drier snow. Landsat data are useful in measuring the areal extent of the ice facies, the slush zone within the wet-snow facies, the snow facies (combined wet-snow, percolation and dry-snow facies), and the respective position of the transient snow line and the slush limit. In addition, fresh snowfall and/or airborne contaminants, such as soot and tephra, can limit the utility of Landsat data for delineation of the glacier facies in some cases. -from Authors

Williams, R.S., Jr.; Hall, D.K.; Benson, C.S.

1991-01-01

260

Chronology for Fluctuations in Late Pleistocene Sierra Nevada Glaciers and Lakes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Mountain glaciers, because of their small size, are usually close to equilibrium with the local climate and thus should provide a test of whether temperature oscillations in Greenland late in the last glacial period are part of global-scale climate variability or are restricted to the North Atlantic region. Correlation of cosmogenic chlorine-36 dates on Sierra Nevada moraines with a continuous

Fred M. Phillips; Marek G. Zreda; Larry V. Benson; Mitchell A. Plummer; David Elmore; Pankaj Sharma

1996-01-01

261

Aletsch Glacier, Switzerland  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Aletsch Glacier, the largest glacier of Europe, covers more than 120 square kilometers (more than 45 square miles)in southern Switzerland. At its eastern extremity lies a glacierlake, Mdrjelensee (2,350 meters/7,711 feet above sea level). To the west rises Aletschhorn (4,195 meters/13,763 feet), which was first climbed in 1859. The Rhone River flows along the southern flank of the mountains.

This image was acquired on July 23, 2001 by the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA's Terra satellite. With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER will image Earth for the next 6 years to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet. ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products.

The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER will provide scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping, and monitoring dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats; monitoring potentially active volcanoes; identifying crop stress; determining cloud morphology and physical properties; wetlands evaluation; thermal pollution monitoring; coral reef degradation; surface temperature mapping of soils and geology; and measuring surface heat balance.

Dr. Anne Kahle at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California, is the U.S. Science team leader; Bjorn Eng of JPL is the project manager. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Earth Science Enterprise, a long-term research and technology program designed to examine Earth's land, oceans, atmosphere, ice and life as a total integrated system.

Size: 60 x 56 km (37.2 x 34.7 miles) Location: 46.5 deg. North lat., 8.0 deg. East long. Orientation: North at top Image Data: ASTER bands 1,2, and 3. Original Data Resolution: 15 m Date Acquired: July 23, 2001

2002-01-01

262

Response of glaciers in northwestern North America to future climate change: an atmosphere/glacier  

E-print Network

Response of glaciers in northwestern North America to future climate change: an atmosphere/glacier@gi.alaska.edu 2 HyMet, Inc., 13629 Burma Road SW, Vashon Island, WA 98070, USA ABSTRACT. The response of glaciers to changing climate is explored with an atmosphere/glacier hierarchical modeling approach, in which global

Bhatt, Uma

263

Annual satellite imaging of the world's glaciers Assessment of glacier extent and change  

E-print Network

GLIMS HIGH ICE Annual satellite imaging of the world's glaciers Assessment of glacier extent and change Development and population of a digital glacier data inventory #12;Skeletal remains of what was a debris-covered glacier near Mt. Everest J.S. Kargel, April 2001 #12;#12;#12;Global Land Ice Measurements

264

The GLIMS geospatial glacier database: A new tool for studying glacier change  

E-print Network

The GLIMS geospatial glacier database: A new tool for studying glacier change Bruce Raup a,, Adina's estimated 160000 glaciers. Each institution (called a Regional Center, or RC) oversees the analysis of satellite imagery for a particular region containing glacier ice. Data received by the GLIMS team

265

Rapid Thinning of a Lake Calving Glacier: Yakutat Glacier, Southeast Alaska  

Microsoft Academic Search

Calving glaciers around the world have recently undergone a rapid retreat and are important contributors to global sea level rise. Due to their greatly increased mass loss, tidewater glaciers in particular have long received much attention, whereas lake calving glaciers have just been identified as significant contributors. In southeast Alaska, numerous glaciers have experienced rapid retreat and significant thinning during

B. Truessel; R. J. Motyka; C. F. Larsen; M. Truffer

2010-01-01

266

Dating of Little Ice Age glacier fluctuations in the tropical Andes: Charquini glaciers, Bolivia, 16°S  

Microsoft Academic Search

Fluctuations of the Charquini glaciers (Cordillera Real, Bolivia) have been reconstructed for the Little Ice Age (LIA) from a set of 10 moraines extending below the present glacier termini. A lichenometric method using the Rhizocarpon geographicum was used to date the moraines and reconstruct the main glacier fluctuations over the period. The maximum glacier extent occurred in the second half

Antoine Rabatel; Vincent Jomelli; Philippe Naveau; Bernard Francou; Delphine Grancher

2005-01-01

267

The triggering of subglacial lake drainage during rapid glacier drawdown: Crane Glacier, Antarctic Peninsula  

E-print Network

The triggering of subglacial lake drainage during rapid glacier drawdown: Crane Glacier, Antarctic Glacier, Antarctic Peninsula, shows an unusual temporal pattern of elevation loss: a period of very rapid is not seen. Bathymetry in Crane Glacier fjord reveals a series of flat-lying, formerly subglacial deeps

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

268

Assessment of multispectral glacier mapping methods and derivation of glacier area changes, 19782002, in the central  

E-print Network

Assessment of multispectral glacier mapping methods and derivation of glacier area changes, 1978 56, Dunedin 9054, New Zealand ABSTRACT. We have measured the glacier area changes in the central Southern Alps, New Zealand, between 1978 and 2002 and have compiled the 2002 glacier outlines using

Kääb, Andreas

269

Extreme Short-term Variability in Southeast Greenland Outlet Glacier Dynamics  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Widespread acceleration, retreat and dynamically-induced thinning of marine-terminating outlet glaciers along Greenland’s southeastern coast peaked earlier in the decade and then appeared to subside between 2005 and 2007, prompting speculation that these glaciers have stabilized. Rapid thinning, however, continued in 2008 and 2009, before again changing to thickening by 2010. Individual glaciers exhibit remarkable variability over this period; the largest glacier of Koge Bugt fjord thinned over 100m between 2003 and 2005, thickened by nearly 100m in a single year between 2006 and 2007, thinning again by over 60m the following year. We hypothesize that this extreme volatility in behavior is likely due to thinning of the glacier trunk to flotation, so that small variations in thickness and basal effective pressure lead to large variations in basal slip. Variability in motion and thickness is likely exacerbated by basal topography, glacier shape and changing oceanographic conditions within the fjord. We analyze a decade of ice thickness, speed and front position data for southeast Greenland outlet glaciers and concurrent climate ocean and climate data to assess the cause(s) of this extreme short-term variability and implications for future glacier stability and predictions of ice sheet mass balance. Boxplot of annual ice thinning rate (positive implies thickening) for the 31 largest glaciers along the southeast Greenland coast (not all glaciers have data for all years). Red lines denote the median, the edges of the boxes are the 75th percentiles, and the whiskers extend to the most extreme non-outlier data points. Outliers are plotted individually as red crosses.

Howat, I. M.; McFadden, E. M.; Ahn, Y.; Joughin, I. R.; Smith, B. E.

2010-12-01

270

High Altitude Glaciers in the Tropics  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

While it may seem like a contradiction, glaciers do exist in the tropical latitudes. In this video produced by ThinkTV, learn about tropical glaciers and why scientists are studying them to better understand global climate change.

ThinkTV

2010-11-30

271

Glacier Mass Balance measurements in Bhutan  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Long-term glacier measurements are scarce in the Himalayas, partly due to lack of resources as well as inaccessibility of most of the glaciers. There are over 600 glaciers in Bhutan in the Eastern Himalayas, but no long-term measurements. However, such studies are an important component of hydrological modelling, and especially relevant to the proposed expansion of hydropower resources in this area. Glaciological studies are also critical to understanding the risk of jøkulhlaups or GLOFS (glacier lake outburst floods) from glaciers in this region. Glacier mass balance measurements have been initiated on a glacier in the Chamkhar Chu region in central Bhutan by the Department of Hydro-Met Services in co-operation with the Norwegian Water Resources and Energy Directorate. Chamkhar Chu is the site of two proposed hydropower plants that will each generate over 700 MW, although the present and future hydrological regimes in this basin, and especially the contribution from glaciers, are not well-understood at present. There are about 94 glaciers in the Chamkhar Chhu basin and total glacier area is about 75 sq. km. The glaciers are relatively accessible for the Himalayas, most of them can be reached after only 4-5 days walk from the nearest road. One of the largest, Thana glacier, has been chosen as a mass balance glacier and measurements were initiated in 2013. The glacier area is almost 5 sq. km. and the elevation range is 500 m (5071 m a.s.l. to 5725 m a.s.l.) making it suitable as a benchmark glacier. Preliminary measurements on a smaller, nearby glacier that was visited in 2012 and 2013 showed 1 m of firn loss (about 0.6 m w.eq.) over 12 months.

Jackson, Miriam; Tenzin, Sangay; Tashi, Tshering

2014-05-01

272

Where Have All the Glaciers Gone?  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this activity, students examine images of alpine glaciers to develop an understanding of how glaciers respond to climate change. They record, discuss, and interpret their observations. They consider explanations for changes in the size and position of glaciers from around the world. They develop an understanding that the melting (retreat) of glaciers is occurring simultaneously on different continents around the world, and, thus, they represent evidence of global climate change.

National Center For Atmospheric Research

273

Stagnant air temperature and receding glaciers - a puzzling question in the Cordillera Blanca, Peru  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The tropical Andes have been recognized as one of the most vulnerable regions to climate change. Recent research shows that climatic changes in the region are not uniform. However, in many sites, critical information on observed trends are missing and unclear, representing barriers to design and implement appropriate climate change adaptation measures. Here, we analysed air temperature trends in the Cordillera Blanca, Peru. Long temperature data series between 1964 and 2011 are available for five meteorological stations at elevations of over 3000 m asl. in the area of the Cordillera Blanca, the Cordillera Huayash and the Cordillera Central and for three additional stations near the coast, at the foothills of the Cordillera Negra. We found that - after a strong positive trend between 1965 and 1980 of about 0.5°C per decade - mean annual air temperature in the area of the Cordillera Blanca did not show any significant increase during the last about 30 years, what could be confirmed by even more stations. Additionally, also four stations situated between approx. 4000 and 4800 m asl. do not show a trend in the last decade. These findings are consistent with the ERA-Interim reanalysis data for the 500 hPa pressure level, but are not confirmed by the NCEP/NCAR Reanalysis data. The stagnant temperature in the studied area stands in contrast to the temperature trends e.g. in the Peruvian Altiplano, where no break in the increasing trend of air temperature is observed. At some stations of the Cordillera Blanca, there was even a decreasing trend observed since 1980, at least for minimum air temperature. We argue here that this might be linked with a decadal mode of the ocean-atmosphere-land climate system counteracting to the anthropogenic warming of the atmosphere during the last about 30 years. These findings are in sharp contrast to the general pattern of the tropics characterized by an increasing freezing level height during the last few decades. Astonishingly enough, glaciers of the Cordillera Blanca were all the same receding heavily within the last 30 years. Considering that the response time of these quite small mountain glaciers are in the order of a few years, this glacier wastage seems to be contra-intuitive. One reason for this might be that equilibrium line altitudes (ELAs) are - already today - quite high in relation to a steady state ELA. If this decadal mode turns temperature forcing from negative to positive and comes in-line with anthropogenic warming in the Cordillera Blanca region, glacier wastage may accelerate dramatically, and peak water may be delayed for the next one or two decades. Diminishing of water resources coming from glaciers may be thereafter even more abrupt than solely estimated based on CMIP5 climate model scenarios, with important consequences on climate change adaptation.

Schauwecker, Simone; Rohrer, Mario; Huggel, Christian; Salzmann, Nadine; Acuña, Delia; Giráldez, Claudia; Jacques, Martín; Vuille, Mathias; Gómez, Jesús; Cochachin, Alejo

2013-04-01

274

Analysis of time series of glacier speed: Columbia Glacier, Alaska  

USGS Publications Warehouse

During the summer of 1984 and 1985, laser measurements were made of the distance from a reference location to markers on the surface of the lower reach of Columbia Glacier, Alaska. The speed varies from 7 to 15 m/d and has three noteworthy components: 1) a low-frequency perturbation in speed with a time scale of days related to increased precipitation, 2) semidiurnal and diurnal variations related to sea tides, and 3) diurnal variations related to glacier surface melt. -from Authors

Walters, R.A.; Dunlap, W.W.

1987-01-01

275

Longitudinal surface structures (flowstripes) on Antarctic glaciers  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Longitudinal surface structures ("flowstripes") are common on many glaciers but their origin and significance are poorly understood. In this paper we present observations of the development of these longitudinal structures from four different Antarctic glacier systems; the Lambert Glacier/Amery Ice Shelf area, the Taylor and Ferrar Glaciers in the Ross Sea sector, Crane and Jorum Glaciers (ice-shelf tributary glaciers) on the Antarctic Peninsula, and the onset zone of a tributary to the Recovery Glacier Ice Stream in the Filchner Ice Shelf area. Mapping from optical satellite images demonstrates that longitudinal surface structures develop in two main situations: (1) as relatively wide flow stripes within glacier flow units and (2) as relatively narrow flow stripes where there is convergent flow around nunataks or at glacier confluence zones. Our observations indicate that the confluence features are narrower, sharper, and more clearly defined features. They are characterised by linear troughs or depressions on the ice surface and are much more common than the former type. Longitudinal surface structures within glacier flow units have previously been explained as the surface expression of localised bed perturbations but a universal explanation for those forming at glacier confluences is lacking. Here we propose that these features are formed at zones of ice acceleration and extensional flow at glacier confluences. We provide a schematic model for the development of longitudinal surface structures based on extensional flow that can explain their ridge and trough morphology as well as their down-ice persistence.

Glasser, N. F.; Gudmundsson, G. H.

2012-03-01

276

Get Close to Glaciers with Satellite Imagery.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses the use of remote sensing from satellites to monitor glaciers. Discusses efforts to use remote sensing satellites of the Landsat series for examining the global distribution, mass, balance, movements, and dynamics of the world's glaciers. Includes several Landsat images of various glaciers. (TW)

Hall, Dorothy K.

1986-01-01

277

Fate of Mountain Glaciers in the Anthropocene  

E-print Network

Fate of Mountain Glaciers in the Anthropocene A Report by the Working Group Commissioned of Sciences at the Vatican, to contemplate the observed retreat of the mountain glaciers, its causes and consequences. This report resulted from a workshop in April 2011 at the Vatican. 2007 Courtesy of Glacier

Stocker, Thomas

278

Glaciers and icecaps: Storehouses of freshwater  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Glacier: Complete description of what glaciers and icecaps are and why they are important to us. Maps show the location of glaciers and icecaps. This resource is part of the "Water Science for Schools" collection at the United States Geological Survey.

279

4, 173211, 2008 Climate and glacier  

E-print Network

CPD 4, 173­211, 2008 Climate and glacier response to ENSO in subtropical Andes E. Dietze et al forum of Climate of the Past Response of regional climate and glacier ice proxies to El Ni of the European Geosciences Union. 173 #12;CPD 4, 173­211, 2008 Climate and glacier response to ENSO

Boyer, Edmond

280

2, 121, 2008 Mountain glaciers of  

E-print Network

TCD 2, 1­21, 2008 Mountain glaciers of NE Asia M. D. Ananicheva et al. Title Page Abstract The Cryosphere Discussions is the access reviewed discussion forum of The Cryosphere Mountain glaciers of NE Asia in the near future: a projection based on climate-glacier systems' interaction M. D. Ananicheva1 , A. N

Boyer, Edmond

281

Glacier variations in the Bernese Alps (Switzerland)  

E-print Network

Glacier variations in the Bernese Alps (Switzerland) ­ Reconstructions and simulations #12;#12;Glacier variations in the Bernese Alps (Switzerland) ­ Reconstructions and simulations Two Alpine glaciers over the last two centuries: a scientific view based on pictorial sources Starting

Steiner, Daniel

282

Muir Glacier and Muir Inlet 1980  

USGS Multimedia Gallery

This ship-deck-based August 1980 photograph of Muir Glacier and Muir Inlet, Glacier Bay National Park and Preserve, St. Elias Mountains, Alaska, shows the nearly 200-ft-high retreating tidewater end of Muir Glacier with part of its face capped by a few angular pinnacles of ice, called séracs....

283

Glacier sensitivity to climate change in the Nepalese Himalaya quantified using higher-order modelling  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Recent studies of glaciers in the eastern Himalaya have identified rapid changes in ice volume with small changes in climate indicating that these glaciers are highly sensitive to primary climate variables (e.g. daily variations in air temperature and monsoon precipitation). However, quantifying Himalayan glacier sensitivity to climate change is challenging due to: (1) a lack of information about how glaciological and geomorphological factors influence the balance of large debris-covered glaciers; (2) the local modification of meteorological variables by the interaction of high topography with regional atmospheric circulation systems; and (3) the simple representation of ice dynamics in many numerical glacier models which limits their usefulness in regions with steep terrain. To quantify the sensitivity of Himalayan glaciers to climate change we apply the integrated second-order shallow ice approximation (iSOSIA) [Egholm et al. 2011, Journal of Geophysical Research-Earth Surface] to large debris-covered glaciers on the southern slopes of Mt. Everest in the Khumbu Himal, Nepal. iSOSIA considers both the longitudinal and transverse stresses that drive mountain glacier flow in regions with steep terrain--a more suitable approach for Himalayan glaciers than those models based on approximations developed for shallow ice sheets. We apply iSOSIA at a 100-m resolution on a regular grid using a daily timestep to Nepalese glaciers including Khumbu, Ngozumpa and Lhotse. Our mass balance model development has focused on the dynamic representation of snow avalanching onto the glacier surfaces as this accounts for up to 75% of accumulation. We investigate Himalayan glacier sensitivities to primary climatological, glaciological and geological variables including air temperature, supraglacial debris cover, and catchment hypsometry. Furthermore, we aim to improve the representation of climate in glacier models for the Himalaya by testing a range of methods to describe these variables: (1) simple elevation-dependent rates for accumulation and ablation with empirical values for melt along a flow line beneath supraglacial debris; (2) climate-elevation relationships derived from local automatic weather stations in the Khumbu valley; and (3) 3-D surface energy balance calculations using regional meteorological data. Once we have described glacier-climate sensitivities in the Khumbu Himal, we will use these results to predict the likely magnitude and timescales of glacier mass loss under IPCC future climate change scenarios, and quantify the uncertainties associated with these predictions. Future work will consider: how glacier hydrology modifies variations in ice dynamics; how the spatial distribution of supraglacial debris modifies glacier balance sensitivity; how rock debris is transported within and on these glaciers; and how rates of rock debris delivery from hillslopes affects glacier balance and dynamics. Fieldwork in Nepal is planned for 2014 to collect data from debris-covered Khumbu Glacier with which to validate our numerical model.

Rowan, A. V.; Egholm, D. L.; Glasser, N. F.; Quincey, D. J.

2013-12-01

284

Flow velocities of Alaskan glaciers.  

PubMed

Our poor understanding of tidewater glacier dynamics remains the primary source of uncertainty in sea level rise projections. On the ice sheets, mass lost from tidewater calving exceeds the amount lost from surface melting. In Alaska, the magnitude of calving mass loss remains unconstrained, yet immense calving losses have been observed. With 20% of the global new-water sea level rise coming from Alaska, partitioning of mass loss sources in Alaska is needed to improve sea level rise projections. Here we present the first regionally comprehensive map of glacier flow velocities in Central Alaska. These data reveal that the majority of the regional downstream flux is constrained to only a few coastal glaciers. We find regional calving losses are 17.1?Gt?a(-1), which is equivalent to 36% of the total annual mass change throughout Central Alaska. PMID:23857302

Burgess, Evan W; Forster, Richard R; Larsen, Christopher F

2013-01-01

285

Modeling energy and mass balance of Shallap Glacier, Peru  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We calculated the distributed surface mass and energy balance of Shallap Glacier, Cordillera Blanca, Peru (9° S, 77° W, 4700-5700 m a.s.l., ∼ 7 km2) on hourly time steps for two years (September 2006-August 2008) using a process-based model and meteorological measurements as input. Model parameter combinations were optimized against 21 temporal readings of 20 stakes in the ablation zone of the glacier. Uncertainty caused by model input parameters and parameterization schemes was estimated using a leave-one-out cross-validation scheme and yields values of root mean square deviation (RMSD) of surface height change < 1m (< 10% of the measured amplitude) for all stakes. With the best parameter combination (smallest RMSD) applied, the modeled annual surface mass balance of the glacier was -0.32 ± 0.4 m w.e. for September 2006-August 2007 and 0.51 ± 0.56 m w.e. for September 2007-August 2008. While the mass balance above 5000 m was similar in both years (? 0.35 ± 0.68 m w.e.) due to similar annual sums of solid precipitation, a difference of ∼ 2 ± 0.68 m w.e. was calculated for the lower parts of the glacier. This difference is associated with more frequent occurrence of higher snow line altitudes during the first year, which was mainly caused by a higher fraction of liquid precipitation due to higher mean air temperatures. As the net shortwave budget was found to be the main source for ablation throughout the year at Shallap Glacier, lower surface albedo caused by higher snow line altitudes explains most of the difference in modeled ablation and mass balance between the two years.

Gurgiser, W.; Marzeion, B.; Nicholson, L.; Kaser, G.; Ortner, M.

2013-08-01

286

The role of snowmelt and glacier melt on runoff in a glacierized catchment: a multi-tracer experiment  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The release of water as snowmelt and ice melt in high elevation catchments has significant social and economic impacts for population living in mountain areas. This is even more critical under the current conditions of glacier retreat as a consequence of global warming. Therefore, it is important to understand the role of ice and snow meltwater on runoff dynamics and groundwater recharge in glacierized environments. This task can be effectively accomplished by integrating isotopic and other tracers that are widely recognized as useful tools for the identification of the main water sources contributing to streamflow. In this work, we collected water samples from different sources in the Saldur catchment (Eastern Italian Alps). The catchment (area: 62 km², elevation range: 1600-3700 m a.s.l.) hosts a small glacier (2.8 km²) in its upper portion. Samples of rainfall, snow, snowmelt, glacier melt, stream water (main stream and tributaries) and spring water have been manually collected between April-October 2011 and April-November 2012 approximately on a monthly basis. Furthermore, 24-hour samplings with hourly collection frequency were performed at two cross sections during five melt-runoff events. The composition in stable water isotopes was determined by laser spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. Electrical conductivity (EC) and water temperature were measured in the field. Additionally, deuterium excess (DE) was computed for all samples based on the relationship between deuterium and 18-oxygen. The isotopic composition of rainfall and snow shows marked altitudinal and seasonal variations. A strong positive correlation is also evident in the relationship between DE of spring waters and elevation. Rainfall and snow samples fall perfectly on the Global Meteoric Water Line, revealing a predominant Atlantic origin of air masses producing precipitation in the study area. EC and water temperature linearly increase with the distance from the glacier snout, suggesting a decreasing influence of snow and glacier melt water (cold and little conductive) and an increasing contribution of non-glacierized areas moving downstream. Stream water shows a strong daily variability in isotopic composition and EC correlated well with discharge and air temperature, suggesting the relevant contribution of meltwater on runoff. Moreover, a seasonal trend is also observable in stream water and groundwater, with the most isotopically enriched and highest EC values found at low flow conditions (no melting periods), in early spring and late autumn. In agreement with these observations, end-member mixing analysis shows that summer precipitation plays a minor role on runoff temporal variability compared to glacier melt and snowmelt. Two- and three-component hydrograph separation for the summer melt-runoff events confirms the significant contribution of melting-event water (up to 73% for the upper station) and the importance of snowmelt and glacier melt (up to 37% and 28%, respectively) as water sources for streamflow at the daily scale in the study catchment. These results underline the critical role played by meltwater stored in glaciers and snow on water availability in mountain regions. Moreover, this works reveals the usefulness of a multi-tracer approach for the analysis of the main contributors to streamflow in glacierized catchments. Keywords: water stable isotopes, deuterium excess, electrical conductivity, snowmelt, glacier melt.

Penna, Daniele; Engel, Michael; Mao, Luca; Dell'Agnese, Andrea; Bertoldi, Giacomo; Comiti, Francesco

2013-04-01

287

Accelerating Ice Loss from the Fastest Greenland and Antarctic Glaciers  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Ice discharge from the fastest glaciers draining the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets . Jakobshavn Isbrae (JI) and Pine Island Glacier (PIG). continues to increase, and is now more than double that needed to balance snowfall in their catchment basins. Velocity increase probably resulted from decreased buttressing from thinning (and, for JI, breakup) of their floating ice tongues, and from reduced basal drag as grounding lines on both glaciers retreat. JI flows directly into the ocean as it becomes afloat, and here creep rates are proportional to the cube of bed depth. Rapid thinning of the PIG ice shelf increases the likelihood of its breakup, and subsequent rapid increase in discharge velocity. Results from a simple model indicate that JI velocities should almost double to >20 km/a by 2015, with velocities on PIG increasing to >10 km/a after breakup of its ice shelf. These high velocities would probably be sustained over many decades as the glaciers retreat within their long, very deep troughs. Resulting sea ]level rise would average about 1.5 mm/a.

Thomas, R.; Frederick, E.; Li, J.; Krabill, W.; Manizade, S.; Paden, J.; Sonntag, J.; Swift, R.; Yungel, J.

2011-01-01

288

Glacier recession in Iceland and Austria  

SciTech Connect

It has been possible to measure glacier recession on the basis of Landsat data, in conjunction with comparisons of the magnitude of recession of a glacier margin with in situ measurements at fixed points along the same margin. Attention is presently given to the cases of Vatnajokull ice cap, in Iceland, and the Pasterze Glacier, in Austria, on the basis of satellite data from 1973-1987 and 1984-1990, respectively. Indications of a trend toward negative mass balance are noted. Nevertheless, while most of the world's small glaciers have been receding, some are advancing either due to local climate or the tidewater glacier cycle. 21 refs.

Hall, D.K.; Williams, R.S. Jr.; Bayr, K.J. (NASA, Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD (United States) USGS, Reston, VA (United States) Keene State College, NH (United States))

1992-03-01

289

Glacier recession in Iceland and Austria  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

It has been possible to measure glacier recession on the basis of Landsat data, in conjunction with comparisons of the magnitude of recession of a glacier margin with in situ measurements at fixed points along the same margin. Attention is presently given to the cases of Vatnajokull ice cap, in Iceland, and the Pasterze Glacier, in Austria, on the basis of satellite data from 1973-1987 and 1984-1990, respectively. Indications of a trend toward negative mass balance are noted. Nevertheless, while most of the world's small glaciers have been receding, some are advancing either due to local climate or the tidewater glacier cycle.

Hall, Dorothy K.; Williams, Richard S., Jr.; Bayr, Klaus J.

1992-01-01

290

Light Iceland Glacier Recession 1973 to 2000  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This animation shows glacier recesion at the Breidamerkurjokull glacier in Iceland. The data from 1973 is taken from Landsat 1 and the 2000 data is from Landsat 7. The Breidamerkurjokull glacier in Iceland has been measured by Landsat to be receding since 1973. The glacierologists in Iceland and here at NASAs Goddard Space Flight Center have measured the recession throughout the entire glacier and found different rates of recession in different areas. In genral, the glacier seems to be receding at about 2% annually. It is extremely controversial whether or not this recession is caused by global warming.

Lori Perkins

2001-04-09

291

Stars equilibrium  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

What causes the fusion reaction in a star's core? This activity page, part of an interactive laboratory series for grades 8-12, introduces students to processes inside a star. Students read about the equilibrium process in a star, in which outward gas pressure equals inward gravitational pressure. Then, an interactive lab activity offers students the opportunity to predict temperature, pressure, and gravity changes that occur during equilibrium. The chemical reactions of the fusion process are presented, and more specific detailed reactions are available in a pop-up box. Student practice quizzes about the equilibrium process and pressure and gravity interactions inside the star are included, as are answers. Copyright 2005 Eisenhower National Clearinghouse

University of Utah. Astrophysics Science Project Integrating Research and Education (ASPIRE)

2003-01-01

292

Longitudinal surface structures (flowstripes) on Antarctic glaciers  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Longitudinal surface structures (''flowstripes'') are common on many glaciers but their origin and significance are poorly understood. In this paper we present observations of the development of these longitudinal structures from four different Antarctic glacier systems (the Lambert Glacier/Amery Ice Shelf area, outlet glaciers in the Ross Sea sector, ice-shelf tributary glaciers on the Antarctic Peninsula, and the onset zone of a tributary to the Recovery Glacier Ice Stream in the Filchner Ice Shelf area). Mapping from optical satellite images demonstrates that longitudinal surface structures develop in two main situations: (1) as relatively wide flow stripes within glacier flow units and (2) as relatively narrow flow stripes where there is convergent flow around nunataks or at glacier confluence zones. Our observations indicate that the confluence features are narrower, sharper, and more clearly defined features. They are characterised by linear troughs or depressions on the ice surface and are much more common than the former type. Longitudinal surface structures within glacier flow units have previously been explained as the surface expression of localised bed perturbations but a universal explanation for those forming at glacier confluences is lacking. Here we propose that these features are formed at zones of ice acceleration and extensional flow at glacier confluences. We provide a schematic model for the development of longitudinal surface structures based on extensional flow that can explain their ridge and trough morphology as well as their down-ice persistence.

Glasser, N. F.; Gudmundsson, G. H.

2011-11-01

293

The contribution of glacier melt to streamflow  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Ongoing and projected future changes in glacier volume and extent globally have led to concerns about the implications for water supplies. Glacier contributions to river discharge are not well known on a regional or global basis, nor are the populations at risk to future glacier changes. We estimate upper bounds on the fraction of river discharge attributable to glacier discharge on a monthly basis using a global hydrology model and glacier energy balance computations, and track this fraction through the global stream network. In general, our estimates of the fraction of river discharge attributable to glacier sources are lower than previously published values. Nonetheless, we estimate that globally 370 (140) million people live in river basins where glacier sources contribute at least 10% (25%) of river discharge on a seasonal basis. Most of this population is in the High Asia region.

Schaner, Neil; Voisin, Nathalie; Nijssen, Bart; Lettenmaier, Dennis P.

2012-09-01

294

The contribution of glacier melt to streamflow  

SciTech Connect

Ongoing and projected future changes in glacier extent and water storage globally have lead to concerns about the implications for water supplies. However, the current magnitude of glacier contributions to river runoff is not well known, nor is the population at risk to future glacier changes. We estimate an upper bound on glacier melt contribution to seasonal streamflow by computing the energy balance of glaciers globally. Melt water quantities are computed as a fraction of total streamflow simulated using a hydrology model and the melt fraction is tracked down the stream network. In general, our estimates of the glacier melt contribution to streamflow are lower than previously published values. Nonetheless, we find that globally an estimated 225 (36) million people live in river basins where maximum seasonal glacier melt contributes at least 10% (25%) of streamflow, mostly in the High Asia region.

Schaner, Neil; Voisin, Nathalie; Nijssen, Bart; Lettenmaier, D. P.

2012-09-13

295

Quaternary Glaciers of New Zealand  

Microsoft Academic Search

Located in the southwestern Pacific Ocean, New Zealand's record of Quaternary glaciations, preserved in landforms and near-surface deposits, begins at the margins of modern glaciers and extends outwards geographically and backwards in time, to the last glaciation and beyond. The record becomes increasingly fragmentary into the Middle and Early Pleistocene.

D. J. A. Barrell

2011-01-01

296

Icebergs and Glaciers: Unit Outlines  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This article assembles free resources from the Icebergs and Glaciers issue of the Beyond Penguins and Polar Bears cyberzine into a unit outline based on the 5E learning cycle framework. Outlines are provided for Grades K-2 and 3-5.

Jessica Fries-Gaither

297

MOVEMENT OF WATER IN GLACIERS  

Microsoft Academic Search

A network of passages situated along three-grain intersections enables water to percolate through temperate glacier ice. The deformability of the ice allows the passages to expand and contract in response to changes in pressure, and melting of the passage walls by heat generated by viscous dissipation and carried by above-freezing water causes the larger passages gradually to increase in size

R. L. SHREVE

1972-01-01

298

Mountain Glaciers and Ice Caps  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Projections of future rates of mass loss from mountain glaciers and ice caps in the Arctic focus primarily on projections of changes in the surface mass balance. Current models are not yet capable of making realistic forecasts of changes in losses by calving. Surface mass balance models are forced with downscaled output from climate models driven by forcing scenarios that make assumptions about the future rate of growth of atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations. Thus, mass loss projections vary considerably, depending on the forcing scenario used and the climate model from which climate projections are derived. A new study in which a surface mass balance model is driven by output from ten general circulation models (GCMs) forced by the IPCC (Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change) A1B emissions scenario yields estimates of total mass loss of between 51 and 136 mm sea-level equivalent (SLE) (or 13% to 36% of current glacier volume) by 2100. This implies that there will still be substantial glacier mass in the Arctic in 2100 and that Arctic mountain glaciers and ice caps will continue to influence global sea-level change well into the 22nd century.

Ananichheva, Maria; Arendt, Anthony; Hagen, Jon-Ove; Hock, Regine; Josberger, Edward G.; Moore, R. Dan; Pfeffer, William Tad; Wolken, Gabriel J.

2011-01-01

299

UV - GLACIER NATIONAL PARK MT  

EPA Science Inventory

Brewer 134 is located in Glacier NP, measuring ultraviolet solar radiation. Irradiance and column ozone are derived from this data. Ultraviolet solar radiation is measured with a Brewer Mark IV, single-monochrometer, spectrophotometer manufactured by SCI-TEC Instruments, Inc. of ...

300

Jakobshavn Glacier Ice Flow (WMS)  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Since measurements of Jakobshavn Isbrae were first taken in 1850, the glacier has gradually receded, finally coming to rest at a certain point for the past 5 decades. However, from 1997 to 2003, the glacier has begun to recede again, this time almost doubling in speed. The finding is important for many reasons. For starters, as more ice moves from glaciers on land into the ocean, it raises sea levels. Jakobshavn Isbrae is Greenlands largest outlet glacier, draining 6.5 percent of Greenlands ice sheet area. The ice streams speed-up and near-doubling of ice flow from land into the ocean has increased the rate of sea level rise by about .06 millimeters (about .002 inches) per year, or roughly 4 percent of the 20th century rate of sea level increase. This animation shows a time-lapse sequence of the ice flowing toward the ocean. In recent years, even ice that has traditionally remained in place is now being pulled down to the edge of land.

Eric Sokolowsky

2005-03-30

301

Southern Alaska as an Example of the Long-Term Consequences of Mountain Building Under the Influence of Glaciers  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Southern Alaska is a continent-scale region of ongoing crustal deformation within the Pacific-North American plate boundary zone. Glaciers and glacial erosion have dictated patterns of denudation in the orogen over the last approx. 5 My. The orogen comprises three discrete topographic domains from south to north, respectively: (1) the Chugach/St. Elias Range; (2) the Wrangell Mountains; and (3) the eastern Alaska Range. Although present deformation is distributed across the orogen, much of the shortening and uplift are concentrated in the Chugach/St. Elias Range. A systematic increase in topographic wavelength of the range from east to west reflects east-to-west increases in the width of a shallowly-dipping segment of the plate interface, separation of major upper plate structures, and a decrease in the obliquity of plate motion relative to the plate boundary. Mean elevation decays exponentially from approx. 2500 m to approx. 1100 m from east to west, respectively. Topographic control on the present and past distribution of glaciers is indicated by close correspondence along the range between mean elevation and the modern equilibrium line altitude of glaciers (ELA) and differences in the modern ELA, mean annual precipitation and temperature across the range between the windward, southern and leeward, northern flanks. Net, range- scale erosion is the sum of: (1) primary bedrock erosion by glaciers and (2) erosion in areas of the landscape that are ice-marginal and are deglaciated at glacial minima. Oscillations between glacial and interglacial climates controls ice height and distribution, which, in turn, modulates the locus and mode of erosion in the landscape. Mean topography and the mean position of the ELA are coupled because of the competition between rock uplift, which tends to raise the ELA, and enhanced orographic precipitation accompanying mountain building, which tends to lower the ELA. Mean topography is controlled both by the 60 deg latitude and maritime setting of active deformation and by the feedback between shortening and uplift, glacial erosion, and orographic effects on climate accompanying mountain building.

Meigs, Andrew; Sauber, Jeanne

2000-01-01

302

Muir and Riggs Glaciers, Muir Inlet, Alaska - 1941  

USGS Multimedia Gallery

This northeast-looking photograph, on the southeastern side of White Thunder Ridge ,shows the lower reaches of Muir Glacier, then a large tidewater calving valley glacier, and its tributary Riggs Glacier. The séracs in the lower right-hand corner of the photograph mark Muir Glacier’s te...

303

Talus rock glaciers in Scotland: Characteristics and controls on formation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Talus rock glaciers produced by creep of internal ice are common in mountains underlain by permafrost. In Scotland, relict talus rock glaciers of inferred Loch Lomond Stadial age are rare, despite widespread former permafrost. In part this reflects occupation of favourable sites by glacier ice. Outside the glacierized area, rock glacier formation was constrained by debris thickness. The debris in

Alison F. Sandeman; Colin K. Ballantyne

1996-01-01

304

Modeling energy and mass balance of Shallap Glacier, Peru  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We calculated the distributed surface mass and energy balance of Shallap Glacier, Cordillera Blanca, Peru (9° S, 77° W, 4700-5700 m a.s.l., ~ 7 km2), on hourly time steps for two years (September 2006-August 2008) using a process-based model and meteorological measurements as input. Model parameter combinations were optimized against 21 temporal readings of 20 stakes in the ablation zone of the glacier. Uncertainty caused by model input parameters and parameterization schemes was estimated using a leave-one out cross-validation scheme, which yields values of root mean square deviation (RMSD) of surface height change < 1 m (< 10% of the measured amplitude) for all stakes. With the best parameter combination (smallest RMSD) applied, the modeled annual surface mass balance of the glacier was -0.32 ± 0.4 m w.e. (water equivalent) for September 2006-August 2007 and 0.51 ± 0.56 m w.e. for September 2007-August 2008. While the mass balance above 5000 m was similar in both years (? 0.33 ± 0.68 m w.e.) due to similar annual sums of solid precipitation, a difference of 1.97 ± 0.68 m w.e. was calculated for the lower parts of the glacier. This difference is associated with more frequent occurrence of higher snow line altitudes during the first year, which was mainly caused by a higher fraction of liquid precipitation due to higher mean air temperatures. As the net shortwave budget was found to be the main source for ablation throughout the year at Shallap Glacier, lower surface albedo especially caused by lower solid precipitation amounts explains most of the difference in modeled ablation and mass balance between the two years.

Gurgiser, W.; Marzeion, B.; Nicholson, L.; Ortner, M.; Kaser, G.

2013-11-01

305

Food Web Structure in a Harsh Glacier-Fed River  

PubMed Central

Glacier retreat is occurring across the world, and associated river ecosystems are expected to respond more rapidly than those in flowing waters in other regions. The river environment directly downstream of a glacier snout is characterised by extreme low water temperature and unstable channel sediments but these habitats may become rarer with widespread glacier retreat. In these extreme environments food web dynamics have been little studied, yet they could offer opportunities to test food web theories using highly resolved food webs owing to their low taxonomic richness. This study examined the interactions of macroinvertebrate and diatom taxa in the Ödenwinkelkees river, Austrian central Alps between 2006 and 2011. The webs were characterised by low taxon richness (13–22), highly connected individuals (directed connectance up to 0.19) and short mean food chain length (2.00–2.36). The dominant macroinvertebrates were members of the Chironomidae genus Diamesa and had an omnivorous diet rich in detritus and diatoms as well as other Chironomidae. Simuliidae (typically detritivorous filterers) had a diet rich in diatoms but also showed evidence of predation on Chironomidae larvae. Food webs showed strong species-averaged and individual size structuring but mass-abundance scaling coefficients were larger than those predicted by metabolic theory, perhaps due to a combination of spatial averaging effects of patchily distributed consumers and resources, and/or consumers deriving unquantified resources from microorganisms attached to the large amounts of ingested rock fragments. Comparison of food web structural metrics with those from 62 published river webs suggest these glacier-fed river food web properties were extreme but in line with general food web scaling predictions, a finding which could prove useful to forecast the effects of anticipated future glacier retreat on the structure of aquatic food webs. PMID:23613751

Clitherow, Leonie R.; Carrivick, Jonathan L.; Brown, Lee E.

2013-01-01

306

Glacier area changes in Northern Eurasia  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Glaciers are widely recognized as key indicators of climate change. Recent evidence suggests an acceleration of glacier mass loss in several key mountain regions. Glacier recession implies landscape changes in the glacial zone, the origin of new lakes and activation of natural disaster processes, catastrophic mudflows, ice avalanches, outburst floods, etc. The absence or inadequacy of such information results in financial and human losses. A more comprehensive evaluation of glacier changes is imperative to assess ice contributions to global sea level rise and the future of water resources from glacial basins. One of the urgent steps is a full inventory of all ice bodies and their changes. The first estimation of glacier state and glacier distribution on the territory of the former Soviet Union has been done in the USSR Glacier Inventory (UGI) published in 1965-1982. The UGI is based on topographic maps and air photos and reflects the status of the glaciers in the 1940s-1970s. There is information about 28?884 glaciers with an area of 7830.75 km2 in the inventory. It covers 25 glacier systems in Northern Eurasia. In the 1980s the UGI has been transformed into digital form as a part of the World Glacier Inventory (WGI). Recent satellite data provide a unique opportunity to look again at these glaciers and to evaluate changes in glacier extent for the second part of the 20th century. About 15?000 glacier outlines for the Caucasus, Polar Urals, Pamir Alay, Tien Shan, Altai, Kamchatka and Russian Arctic have been derived from ASTER and Landsat imagery and can be used for glacier change evaluation. Results of the analysis indicate the steady trend in glacier shrinkage in all mountain regions for the second part of the 20th century. Glacier area loss for the studied regions varies from 13% (Tien Shan) to 22.3% (Polar Urals). The common driver, most likely, is an increase in summer air temperature. There is also a very large variability in the degree of individual glacier degradation, very much depending on the morphology and local meteorological conditions.

Khromova, Tatiana; Nosenko, Gennady; Kutuzov, Stanislav; Muraviev, Anton; Chernova, Ludmila

2014-01-01

307

Hasty retreat of glaciers in northern Patagonia  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Mapping glacier extent from optical satellite data has become a most efficient tool to create or update glacier inventories and determine glacier changes over time. A most valuable archive in this regard is the nearly 30-year time series of Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) data that is freely available (already orthorectified) for most regions in the world from the USGS. One region with a most dramatic glacier shrinkage and a missing systematic assessment of changes, is the Palena province in Chile, located south of Puerto Montt in northern Patagonia. A major bottleneck for accurate determination of glacier changes in this region is related to the huge amounts of snow falling in this very maritime region, hiding the perimeter of glaciers throughout the year. Consequently, we found only three years with Landsat scenes that can be used to map glacier extent through time. We here present the results of a glacier change analysis from six Landsat scenes (path-rows 232-89/90) acquired in 1985, 2000 and 2011 covering the Palena district in Chile and neighbouring regions. Clean glacier ice was mapped automatically with a standard technique (TM3/TM band ratio) and manual editing was applied to remove wrongly classified lakes and to add debris-covered glacier parts. The digital elevation model (DEM) from ASTER (GDEM2) was used to derive drainage divides, determine glacier specific topographic parameters, and analyse the area changes in regard to topography. The scene from the year 2000 has the best snow conditions and was used to eliminate seasonal snow in the other two scenes by digital combination of the binary glacier masks and neighbourhood analysis. The derived mean relative area loss over the entire study area is 25%, showing a large spatial variability and a strong dependence on elevation. While small mountain glaciers at high elevations and steep slopes show only little change over the 26-year period, ice at low elevations from large valley glaciers shows a dramatic decline (area and thickness loss). Some glaciers retreated more than 3 km over this time period or even disappeared completely. Typically, these glaciers lost contact to the accumulation areas of tributaries and melted away as dead ice. Furthermore, numerous proglacial lakes formed or expanded rapidly, increasing the local hazard potential. On the other hand, some glaciers located on or near to (still active) volcanoes have also slightly advanced over the same time period. Observed trends in temperature (decreasing) are in contrast to the observed strong glacier shrinkage, indicating that also other factors must play a role.

Paul, Frank; Mölg, Nico

2014-05-01

308

Rapid thinning and collapse of lake calving Yakutat Glacier, Southeast Alaska  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Glaciers around the globe are experiencing a notable retreat and thinning, triggered by atmospheric warming. Tidewater glaciers in particular have received much attention, because they have been recognized to contribute substantially to global sea level rise. However, lake calving glaciers in Alaska show increasingly high thinning and retreat rates and are therefore contributors to sea level rise. The number of such lake calving systems is increasing worldwide as land-terminating glaciers retreat into overdeepened basins and form proglacial lakes. Yakutat Glacier in Southeast Alaska is a low elevation lake calving glacier with an accumulation to total area ratio of 0.03. It experienced rapid thinning of 4.43 +/- 0.06 m w.e. yr-1 between 2000-2010 and terminus retreat of over 15 km since the beginning of the 20th century. Simultaneously, adjacent Yakutat Icefield land-terminating glaciers thinned at lower but still substantial rates (3.54 +/- 0.06 m w.e. yr -1 for the same time period), indicating lake calving dynamics help drive increased mass loss. Yakutat Glacier sustained a ˜3 km long floating tongue for over a decade, which started to disintegrate into large tabular icebergs in 2010. Such floating tongues are rarely seen on temperate tidewater glaciers. The floating ice was weakened by surface ablation, which then allowed rifts to form and intersect. Ice velocity from GPS measurements showed that the ice on the floating tongue was moving substantially faster than grounded ice, which was attributed to rift opening between the floating and grounded ice. Temporal variations of rift opening were determined from time-lapse imagery, and correlated well with variations in ice speeds. Larger rift opening rates occurred during and after precipitation or increased melt episodes. Both of these events increased subglacial discharge and could potentially increase the subaqueous currents towards the open lake and thus increase drag on the ice underside. Simultaneously, increased water input may cause lake level in rifts to rise resulting in faster rift propagation and spreading. Similar formation and disintegration of floating tongues are expected to occur in the glacier's future, as the ice divide lies below the current lake level. In addition to calving retreat, Yakutat Glacier is rapidly thinning, which lowers its surface and therefore exposes the ice to warmer air temperatures causing increased thinning. Even under a constant climate, this positive feedback mechanism would force Yakutat Glacier to quickly retreat and mostly disappear. Simulations of future mass loss were run for two scenarios, keeping the current climate and forcing it with a projected warming climate. Results showed that over 95% of the glacier ice will have disappeared by 2120 or 2070 under a constant vs projected climate, respectively. For the first few decades, the glacier will be able to maintain its current thinning rate by retreating and thus losing areas of lowest elevation. However, once higher elevations have thinned substantially, the glacier cannot compensate any more to maintain a constant thinning rate and transfers into an unstable run-away situation. To stop this collapse and transform Yakutat Glacier into equilibrium in its current geometry, air temperatures would have to drop by 1.5 K or precipitation would have to increase by more than 50%. An increase in precipitation alone is unlikely to lead to a stable configuration, due to the very small current accumulation area.

Trussel, Barbara Lea

309

Evaluation of Lateglacial temperatures in the Southern Alps of New Zealand based on glacier modelling at Irishman Stream, Ben Ohau Range  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Climate proxy records from the middle to high latitude Southern Hemisphere indicate that a Lateglacial (15,000-11,500 years ago) climate reversal, approximately coeval with the Antarctic Cold Reversal (ACR), interrupted a warming trend during deglaciation. In New Zealand, some palaeoclimate proxy records indicate a cool episode during the ACR (ca 14,500-12,500 years ago), while others do not express a significant change in climate. Recently published moraine maps and ages present an opportunity to improve the palaeoclimate interpretation through numerical modelling of glaciers. We use a coupled energy-balance and ice-flow model to quantify palaeoclimate from past glacier extent constrained by mapped and dated moraines in the headwaters of Irishman Stream, a high-elevation catchment in the Southern Alps. First, a suite of steady-state model runs is used to identify the temperature and precipitation forcing required to fit the modelled glacier to well-dated Lateglacial moraine crests. Second, time-dependent glacier simulations forced by a nearby proxy temperature record derived from chironomids are used to assess the fit with the glacial geomorphic record. Steady-state experiments using an optimal parameter set demonstrate that the conditions under which the 13,000 year old moraine formed were 2.3-3.2 °C colder than present with the range in temperature corresponding to a ±20% variance in precipitation relative to the present-day. This reconstructed climate change relative to the present-day corresponds to an equilibrium-line altitude of ca 2000 ± 40 m above sea level (asl), which is ca 400 m lower than present. Time-dependent simulations of glacier length produce ice advance to within 100 m of the 13,000 year old terminal moraine, indicating that the chironomid-based temperature forcing and moraine record provide consistent information about past climate. Our results, together with other climate proxy reconstructions from pollen records and marine sediment cores, support the notion that temperatures during the ACR in New Zealand were ˜2-3 °C cooler than today.

Doughty, Alice M.; Anderson, Brian M.; Mackintosh, Andrew N.; Kaplan, Michael R.; Vandergoes, Marcus J.; Barrell, David J. A.; Denton, George H.; Schaefer, Joerg M.; Chinn, Trevor J. H.; Putnam, Aaron E.

2013-08-01

310

The effect of black carbon on reflectance of snow in the accumulation area of glaciers in the Baspa basin, Himachal Pradesh, India  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Himalayan glaciers are being extensively debated in scientific and public forums, as changes in their distribution can significantly affect the availability of water in many rivers originating in the region. The distribution of glaciers can be influenced by mass balance, and most of the glaciers located in the Pir Panjal and Greater Himalayan mountain ranges are losing mass at the rate of almost a meter per year. The Equilibrium Line Altitude (ELA) has also shifted upward by 400 m in the last two decades. This upward migration of ELA and the loss in mass could have been influenced by changes in temperature, precipitation and by the deposition of black carbon in the accumulation area of glaciers. The deposition of black carbon can reduce the albedo of snow in the accumulation area leading to faster melting of snow and causing more negative mass balance. In this investigation, a change in reflectance in the accumulation area of the Baspa basin is analysed for the year 2009, as the region has experienced extensive forest fires along with northern Indian biomass burning. The investigation has shown that: (1) The number of forest fires in the summer of 2009 was substantially higher than in any other year between 2001 and 2010; (2) the drop in reflectance in the visible region from April to May in the accumulation area was significantly higher in the year 2009 than in any other year from 2000 to 2012; (3) the temperature of the region was substantially lower than the freezing point during the active fire period of 2009, indicating the small influence of liquid water and grain size; (4) the drop in reflectance was observed only in the visible region, indicating role of contamination; (5) in the visible region, a mean drop in reflectance of 21± 5% was observed during the active fire period in the accumulation area. At some places, the drop was as high as 50 ± 5%. This can only be explained by the deposition of black carbon. The study suggests that a change in snow albedo in the accumulation area due to the deposition of black carbon from anthropogenic and natural causes can influence the mass balance of the glaciers in the Baspa basin, Himachal Pradesh, India.

Kulkarni, A. V.; Vinay Kumar, G.; Negi, H. S.; Srinivasan, J.; Satheesh, S. K.

2013-04-01

311

Rotational Equilibrium  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this activity, learners explore the concept of rotational equilibrium. Learners work in teams to estimate and determine the force within a mobile design. Learners solve algebraic equations, apply graphing techniques, compare results and discuss findings. Designing the mobile requires learners to solve a set of two linear algebraic equations. Learners solve the equations using three different methods: by substitution, by graphing the equations and finding the intersection, and by using determinants.

IEEE

2014-05-22

312

Integrated research on mountain glaciers: Current status, priorities and future prospects  

E-print Network

Integrated research on mountain glaciers: Current status, priorities and future prospects Lewis A: Glaciation Glaciers Mountains Glaciology Geochronology Modeling Mountain glaciers are sensitive probes and to predict future changes. Furthermore, glaciers can constitute hazards, including: glacier outburst floods

Roe, Gerard

313

5. GLACIER POINT ROAD VIEW AT SENTINEL DOME PARKING AREA. ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

5. GLACIER POINT ROAD VIEW AT SENTINEL DOME PARKING AREA. LOOKING E. GIS: N-37 42 43.8 / W-119 35 12.1 - Glacier Point Road, Between Chinquapin Flat & Glacier Point, Yosemite Village, Mariposa County, CA

314

1. PARKING LOT AT GLACIER POINT. HALF DOME AT CENTER ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

1. PARKING LOT AT GLACIER POINT. HALF DOME AT CENTER REAR. LOOKING NE. GIS: N-36 43 45.8 / W-119 34 14.1 - Glacier Point Road, Between Chinquapin Flat & Glacier Point, Yosemite Village, Mariposa County, CA

315

Calendar-dated, early 'Little Ice Age' glacier advance at Robson Glacier, British Columbia, Canada  

Microsoft Academic Search

Dendrochronological studies at Robson and Bennington Glaciers have provided the first calendar dating of an early 'Little Ice Age' glacier advance in North America. Dates derived from in-situ stumps indicate that Robson Glacier began over-riding forest between c. AD 1142 and 1150 and continued until at least AD 1350. The highest rates of glacier advance (c. 3.8 m yr-1 )

B. H. Luckman

1995-01-01

316

Brief Communication: Getting Greenland's glaciers right - a new dataset of all official Greenlandic glacier names  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

With this new dataset we wish to give the researcher working with Greenlandic glaciers the proper tool to finding the correct name for glaciers and ice caps in Greenland, as well as to locate glaciers described in the historic literature with the old Greenlandic orthography.

Bjørk, A. A.; Kruse, L. M.; Michaelsen, P. B.

2015-03-01

317

115GLACIERS AND ICE CAPSCHAPTER 6B Glaciers and Ice Caps  

E-print Network

. Chinn New Zealand (Alpine and Polar Processes, New Zealand); Andrew G. Fountain USA and Canada115GLACIERS AND ICE CAPSCHAPTER 6B 6B Glaciers and Ice Caps Michael Zemp (lead author, Department, University of Zurich, Switzerland) Contributing Authors for Regional Perspectives and Glacier Hazards

Fountain, Andrew G.

318

The GAMDAM Glacier Inventory: a quality controlled inventory of Asian glaciers  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present a new glacier inventory for the high mountain Asia named "Glacier Area Mapping for Discharge from the Asian Mountains" (GAMDAM). Glacier outlines were delineated manually using more than 226 Landsat ETM+ scenes from the period 1999-2003, in conjunction with a digital elevation model (DEM) and high-resolution Google Earth imagery. Geolocations are consistent between the Landsat imagery and DEM due to systematic radiometric and geometric corrections made by the United States Geological Survey. We performed repeated delineation tests and rigorous peer review of all scenes used in order to maintain the consistency and quality of the inventory. Our GAMDAM Glacier Inventory (GGI) includes 82776 glaciers covering a total area of 87507 ± 13126 km2 in the high mountain Asia. Thus, our inventory represents a greater number (+4%) of glaciers but significantly less surface area (-31%) than a recent global glacier inventory (Randolph Glacier Inventory, RGI). The employed definition of the upper boundaries of glaciers, glacier recession since the 1970s, and misinterpretation of seasonal snow cover are likely causes of discrepancies between the inventories, though it is difficult to evaluate these effects quantitatively. The GGI will help improve the temporal consistency of the RGI, which incorporated glacier outlines from the 1970s for the Tibetan Plateau, and will provide new opportunities to study Asian glaciers.

Nuimura, T.; Sakai, A.; Taniguchi, K.; Nagai, H.; Lamsal, D.; Tsutaki, S.; Kozawa, A.; Hoshina, Y.; Takenaka, S.; Omiya, S.; Tsunematsu, K.; Tshering, P.; Fujita, K.

2014-06-01

319

Drainage events from a glacier-dammed lake, Bear Glacier, Alaska: Remote sensing and field observations  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We investigated drainage events from a glacier-dammed lake on Bear Glacier, Alaska, and associated outburst floods and hazards. The glacier-dammed lake, which we call Ice Lake, is 17.5 km up-glacier from Bear Glacier's terminus at Bear Glacier Lake. We combine field observations and remote sensing to examine temporal changes in the size of Ice Lake, the frequency and timing of its drainage, and down-glacier propagation of its outburst floods. We found that in recent years, Ice Lake has likely drained every year or two, in late summer or fall (August-October), with outbursts generally following the damming of sufficient water to create a lake area of between 0.35 and 0.5 km2. Ice Lake has migrated downvalley to the south since the 1990s, likely as a result of thinning of the glacier that dams it. In situ measurements of a drainage event in October 2010 showed that Ice Lake drained over a period of days, which manifested at Bear Glacier Lake as a gradual, multiday increase and then decrease in water levels. Glacial lake outburst flooding at Bear Glacier creates risks for sea kayakers in Bear Glacier Lake and may be relevant to understanding the effects of climate warming on glacier-dammed and proglacial lakes.

Wilcox, A. C.; Wade, A. A.; Evans, E. G.

2014-09-01

320

Glacier Surge Mechanism: 1982-1983 Surge of Variegated Glacier, Alaska  

Microsoft Academic Search

The hundredfold speedup in glacier motion in a surge of the kind that took place in Variegated Glacier in 1982-1983 is caused by the buildup of high water pressure in the basal passageway system, which is made possible by a fundamental and pervasive change in the geometry and water-transport characteristics of this system. The behavior of the glacier in surge

Barclay Kamb; C. F. Raymond; W. D. Harrison; Hermann Engelhardt; K. A. Echelmeyer; N. Humphrey; M. M. Brugman; T. Pfeffer

1985-01-01

321

GLACIER HAZARDS AT BELVEDERE GLACIER AND THE MONTE ROSA EAST FACE, ITALIAN ALPS: PROCESSES AND MITIGATION  

E-print Network

, and confront the responsible authorities with complex problems without precedent in the European Alps­ I / 67 ­ GLACIER HAZARDS AT BELVEDERE GLACIER AND THE MONTE ROSA EAST FACE, ITALIAN ALPS and Giorgio Viazzo7 ABSTRACT In summer 2001, the Belvedere glacier, Macugnaga, Italian Alps, started a surge

Kääb, Andreas

322

Google Earth Tours of Glacier Change  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

To prepare for this assignment students have already used Google Earth to examine beach erosion, but they have not yet created any new content with Google Earth. Students are already competent navigators and are accustomed to the perspective views used in Google Earth. In this assignment students first go through a prepared Google Earth tour on Juneau Icefield glaciers, and answer questions about glacier features. Then students create their own Google Earth tour, using placemarks to identify key features of their glacier.

Mauri Pelto

323

Sensitivity analysis of glacier systems to climate warming in China  

Microsoft Academic Search

Data of 44 glacier systems in China used in this paper were obtained from Chinese Glacier Inventories and the meteorological\\u000a data were got from Meteorological Atlas of Plateau of west China. Based on the statistical analysis and functional model simulation\\u000a results of the 44 glacier systems in China, the glacier systems were divided into extremely-sensitive glacier system, semi-sensitive\\u000a glacier system,

Xin Wang; Zichu Xie; Qiaoyuan Li; Shuhong Wang; Lei Cheng

2008-01-01

324

Bering Glacier resumes its surge  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Bering Glacier has started to surge again following a 7-month period of minor retreat and near-stagnation. Part of the terminus advanced about 750 m between May 19 and June 1.Bering—the largest surging temperate glacier on Earth—recently experienced a major, 17-month-long surge that ended in September 1994. That surge displaced the terminus by a maximum of about 9 km and caused a substantial increase in iceberg production. It also covered the islands within Vitus Lake completely or partially with ice [Eos, 74, 321-322, 521; Eos, 75, 549] and caused significant changes in the lake's size, bathymetry, hydrology, and water chemistry. The latest surge is overriding two of these islands, which are home to many species of waterfowl, including the endangered dusky snow goose, at the peak of the nesting season.

Molnia, Bruce F.

325

Glac Modeled Glacier Change Animation  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Animation of Modeled Climate-Induced Glacier Change in Glacier National Park, 1850- 2100. The simulation reflects the predicted exponential rise in atmospheric CO2 concentrations, a 2xCO2 "global warming" scenario, with a concurrent warming of 2-3 degrees centigrade (4-5 degrees Fahrenheit) by the year 2050. In addition it assumes that precipitation, primarily in the form of rain, will increase over the same time period about 10 percent (based on the research of Dr. Steven Running, University of Montana). The animation view of the Blackfoot-Jackson basin along the Continental Divide, includes Gunsight Lake in the foreground and a portion of Lake Ellen Wilson visible over Gunsight Pass.

Myrna H. P. Hall

326

Global analysis of glacier mass balance - how important are firn pack changes? (Invited)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Modern satellite systems like ICESat and GRACE have made it possible to estimate glacier mass balance in remote regions where field measurements are sparse. In a recent global study we showed that all major glacier regions of the world have lost mass between 2003 and 2009, contributing significantly to sea level rise. This implies that the vast majority of glaciers are out of equilibrium with the present climate, putting into question the commonly used assumption that the firn pack remains unchanged between altimetric surveys that are used to determine glacier volume change. Comparisons with gravimetric estimates from GRACE could give insights to whether there are any biases from such volume-to-mass conversions, but GRACE has its own issues with contamination of other mass change signals. In this presentation, we discuss the suitability of different approaches to convert measured volume changes into mass balances. We provide practical examples of (1) applying a constant density conversion factor to the total volume change, (2) using zonal densities that account for variable elevation changes over areas of firn and glacier ice, and (3) applying models of surface mass balance and/or firn compaction to account for density-related changes. All techniques have severe limitations, so investigators should be encouraged to assess the suitability of their conversion in each individual case. Improved models and multi-sensor remote sensing techniques are likely the only ways to reduce current uncertainties.

Moholdt, G.; Gardner, A. S.; Cogley, J. G.; Wouters, B.; Ligtenberg, S.; van den Broeke, M. R.

2013-12-01

327

Step-wise changes in glacier flow speed coincide with calving and glacial earthquakes at Helheim Glacier, Greenland  

E-print Network

[1] Geodetic observations show several large, sudden increases in flow speed at Helheim Glacier, one of Greenland's largest outlet glaciers, during summer, 2007. These step-like accelerations, detected along the length of the glacier, coincide...

Nettles, M.; Larsen, T.B.; Elosegui, P.; Hamilton, Gordon S.; Stearns, Leigh; Ahlstrom, A.P.; Davis, J.L.; Anderson, M.L.; de Juan, J.; Khan, S.A.; Stenseng, L.; Ekstrom, G.; Forsberg, R.

2008-12-30

328

Fluffy Snow to Glacier Ice  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this activity, students build on their growing knowledge of ice and glacier growth. The students examine images of core samples and make observations about the decreasing size of gas bubbles with increasing depth in the core. The students model permeability. From this experiment, they will develop an understanding of the movement of air through snow and ice and why this information is critical to researchers studying the past climate of our Earth.

Sharon Shutey

329

Automated Glacier Surface Velocity using Multi-Image/Multi-Chip (MIMC) Feature Tracking  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Remote sensing from space has enabled effective monitoring of remote and inhospitable polar regions. Glacier velocity, and its variation in time, is one of the most important parameters needed to understand glacier dynamics, glacier mass balance and contribution to sea level rise. Regular measurements of ice velocity are possible from large and accessible satellite data set archives, such as ASTER and LANDSAT-7. Among satellite imagery, optical imagery (i.e. passive, visible to near-infrared band sensors) provides abundant data with optimal spatial resolution and repeat interval for tracking glacier motion at high temporal resolution. Due to massive amounts of data, computation of ice velocity from feature tracking requires 1) user-friendly interface, 2) minimum local/user parameter inputs and 3) results that need minimum editing. We focus on robust feature tracking, applicable to all currently available optical satellite imagery, that is ASTER, SPOT and LANDSAT etc. We introduce the MIMC (multiple images/multiple chip sizes) matching approach that does not involve any user defined local/empirical parameters except approximate average glacier speed. We also introduce a method for extracting velocity from LANDSAT-7 SLC-off data, which has 22 percent of scene data missing in slanted strips due to failure of the scan line corrector. We apply our approach to major outlet glaciers in west/east Greenland and assess our MIMC feature tracking technique by comparison with conventional correlation matching and other methods (e.g. InSAR).

Ahn, Y.; Howat, I. M.

2009-12-01

330

Antarctica: measuring glacier velocity from satellite images  

SciTech Connect

Many Landsat images of Antarctica show distinctive flow and crevasse features in the floating part of ice streams and outlet glaciers immediately below their grounding zones. Some of the features, which move with the glacier or ice stream, remain visible over many years and thus allow time-lapse measurements of ice velocities. Measurements taken from Landsat images of features on Byrd Glacier agree well with detailed ground and aerial observations. The satellite-image technique thus offers a rapid and cost-effective method of obtaining average velocities, to a first order of accuracy, of many ice streams and outlet glaciers near their termini.

Lucchitta, B.K.; Ferguson, H.M.

1986-11-28

331

Antarctica: Measuring glacier velocity from satellite images  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Many Landsat images of Antarctica show distinctive flow and crevasse features in the floating part of ice streams and outlet glaciers immediately below their grounding zones. Some of the features, which move with the glacier or ice stream, remain visible over many years and thus allow time-lapse measurements of ice velocities. Measurements taken from Landsat images of features on Byrd Glacier agree well with detailed ground and aerial observations. The satellite-image technique thus offers a rapid and cost-effective method of obtaining average velocities, to a first order of accuracy, of many ice streams and outlet glaciers near their termini.

Lucchitta, B.K.; Ferguson, H.M.

1986-01-01

332

Internationally coordinated glacier monitoring: strategy and datasets  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Internationally coordinated monitoring of long-term glacier changes provide key indicator data about global climate change and began in the year 1894 as an internationally coordinated effort to establish standardized observations. Today, world-wide monitoring of glaciers and ice caps is embedded within the Global Climate Observing System (GCOS) in support of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) as an important Essential Climate Variable (ECV). The Global Terrestrial Network for Glaciers (GTN-G) was established in 1999 with the task of coordinating measurements and to ensure the continuous development and adaptation of the international strategies to the long-term needs of users in science and policy. The basic monitoring principles must be relevant, feasible, comprehensive and understandable to a wider scientific community as well as to policy makers and the general public. Data access has to be free and unrestricted, the quality of the standardized and calibrated data must be high and a combination of detailed process studies at selected field sites with global coverage by satellite remote sensing is envisaged. Recently a GTN-G Steering Committee was established to guide and advise the operational bodies responsible for the international glacier monitoring, which are the World Glacier Monitoring Service (WGMS), the US National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC), and the Global Land Ice Measurements from Space (GLIMS) initiative. Several online databases containing a wealth of diverse data types having different levels of detail and global coverage provide fast access to continuously updated information on glacier fluctuation and inventory data. For world-wide inventories, data are now available through (a) the World Glacier Inventory containing tabular information of about 130,000 glaciers covering an area of around 240,000 km2, (b) the GLIMS-database containing digital outlines of around 118,000 glaciers with different time stamps and (c) the Randolph Glacier Inventory (RGI), a new and globally complete digital dataset of outlines from about 180,000 glaciers with some meta-information, which has been used for many applications relating to the IPCC AR5 report. Concerning glacier changes, a database (Fluctuations of Glaciers) exists containing information about mass balance, front variations including past reconstructed time series, geodetic changes and special events. Annual mass balance reporting contains information for about 125 glaciers with a subset of 37 glaciers with continuous observational series since 1980 or earlier. Front variation observations of around 1800 glaciers are available from most of the mountain ranges world-wide. This database was recently updated with 26 glaciers having an unprecedented dataset of length changes from from reconstructions of well-dated historical evidence going back as far as the 16th century. Geodetic observations of about 430 glaciers are available. The database is completed by a dataset containing information on special events including glacier surges, glacier lake outbursts, ice avalanches, eruptions of ice-clad volcanoes, etc. related to about 200 glaciers. A special database of glacier photographs contains 13,000 pictures from around 500 glaciers, some of them dating back to the 19th century. A key challenge is to combine and extend the traditional observations with fast evolving datasets from new technologies.

Hoelzle, Martin; Armstrong, Richard; Fetterer, Florence; Gärtner-Roer, Isabelle; Haeberli, Wilfried; Kääb, Andreas; Kargel, Jeff; Nussbaumer, Samuel; Paul, Frank; Raup, Bruce; Zemp, Michael

2014-05-01

333

Subglacial drainage processes at a High Arctic polythermal valley glacier  

E-print Network

Glacier, Ellesmere Island, Canada, were designed to investigate the character of the subglacial drainage, polythermal valley glacier situated in eastern Ellesmere Island, Nunavut, Canada (Fig. 1). The specific

334

Geomorphological and sedimentological record of accelerated deglaciation of small mountain glacier, Ragnarbreen, Svalbard  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Most of the Svalbrad glaciers have been in retreat since the end of the Little Ice Age (LIA). Hence, they give a good opportunity to study the geomorphological and sedimentological record of deglaciation. The aim of the study is to describe main landsystem elements of Ragnar glacier and relate them to different stages of the glacier recession. The Ragnar glacier is located in the Svalbard archipelago, in the central part of the West Spitsbergen Isle, in the north branch of Billefjorden. Ragnar is a small (~ 6 km2), outlet glacier, which current clean ice edge has retreated ca. 1500 m from the position related to the maximum LIA extent. Fieldworks of the study comprised detailed geomorphological mapping and sedimentary works. Four main elements of the landsystem of the Ragnar glacier can be distinguished: 1) Clean glacier surface. Currently, the ice surface of Ragnar glacier is almost completely debris-free and with only several supraglacial streams. 2) Ice-marginal lake. The lake started to form after 1980 year. Since that time, its length has reached 1000 m. Distant (from the ice-edge) part of the lake is shallow (< 2 m) with several small islands. Part proximal to the current ice edge is deeper (up to 16 m) and devoid of islands. At the bottom of the lake some ice (probable of glacier origin) was detected. 3) Lateral moraines - were developed along the both valley sides, from frontal moraine complex - to ca. 2 km upward the glacier valley. 4) Frontal moraine complex. This complex comprises of several chains of ridges and depressions and is relatively distinct - elevated about 35 m above the valley bottom. The elements of the landsystem of the Ragnar glacier have undergone several transformations since the LIA maximum: 1) Formation of the frontal moraine complex can be related to the state of dynamic equilibrium of the glacier during the LIA maximum. During formation of the complex and shortly after it the main depositional agents were intense debris flows, which are recorded by thick covers of the old debris flow deposits. Nowadays, despite of ice-cores, frontal moraine complex is much more stable than the lateral moraines or ice-marginal lake. 2) As a consequence of lowering of the clean glacier surface and formation of the distinct lateral moraines, the debris delivering from the valley sides is limited only to very narrow zone of the glacier (i.e. only to the lateral moraine). 3) Accelerated recession of the ice mouth and limitation in delivery of debris from sides of the valley caused that amount of deposits released in the ice front is small. 4) Increasing amount of water flowing from the glacier was blocked by frontal moraine complex and the ice marginal lake was created. 5) The debris cover on the lateral moraines is relatively thin. In addition, as a consequence of the clean ice surface lowering, slopes of the lateral moraines are very steep. It causes that mass movement processes (especially debris flows) are ubiquitous. Contemporary, lateral moraines are the elements undergoing the most intense transformations. Observations made in the Ragnar marginal zone revealed spatial-temporal changes in distribution of the sediments and landforms. They also add some premises that in the first stage of deglaciation debris flow and other mass wasting processes are most common. In the later phase glaciolacustrine and glaciofluvial deposition also plays important role in transformation of landforms and sediments.

Ewertowski, Marek

2010-05-01

335

Helical axis stellarator equilibrium model  

SciTech Connect

An asymptotic model is developed to study MHD equilibria in toroidal systems with a helical magnetic axis. Using a characteristic coordinate system based on the vacuum field lines, the equilibrium problem is reduced to a two-dimensional generalized partial differential equation of the Grad-Shafranov type. A stellarator-expansion free-boundary equilibrium code is modified to solve the helical-axis equations. The expansion model is used to predict the equilibrium properties of Asperators NP-3 and NP-4. Numerically determined flux surfaces, magnetic well, transform, and shear are presented. The equilibria show a toroidal Shafranov shift.

Koniges, A.E.; Johnson, J.L.

1985-02-01

336

Glaciers. Attribution of global glacier mass loss to anthropogenic and natural causes.  

PubMed

The ongoing global glacier retreat is affecting human societies by causing sea-level rise, changing seasonal water availability, and increasing geohazards. Melting glaciers are an icon of anthropogenic climate change. However, glacier response times are typically decades or longer, which implies that the present-day glacier retreat is a mixed response to past and current natural climate variability and current anthropogenic forcing. Here we show that only 25 ± 35% of the global glacier mass loss during the period from 1851 to 2010 is attributable to anthropogenic causes. Nevertheless, the anthropogenic signal is detectable with high confidence in glacier mass balance observations during 1991 to 2010, and the anthropogenic fraction of global glacier mass loss during that period has increased to 69 ± 24%. PMID:25123485

Marzeion, Ben; Cogley, J Graham; Richter, Kristin; Parkes, David

2014-08-22

337

Preliminary results of a radio echo sounding survey of the Recovery Glacier, Antarctica  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Recovery Glacier is draining about 8% of the East Antarctic ice sheet and feeds into the Filchner Ice Shelf. This ice shelf might be subjected in future to increasing basal melting (Hellmer et al., 2012) forcing potentially grounding line retreat. Compared to other areas in Antarctica this glacier is been surveyed very sparse and hence does not allow modeling studies yet. As many large and small subglacial lakes are present underneath this ice stream at different locations along the flow, the question of the influence of the lakes on ice stream genesis and ice stream dynamics arose. For investigating this influence by observation and subsequent modelling, an airborne campaign of the Alfred Wegener Institute was carried out in January 2014, covering the Recovery Ice Stream and two smaller glaciers merging with it, the Ramp Glacier and the Blackwall Glacier. The radar system uses a carrier frequency of 150MHz and a 600ns pulse. The survey includes several flights along flow lines in order to assess the basal roughness of the ice stream. Here we present the first preliminary data analysis.

Humbert, Angelika; Kleiner, Thomas; Steinhage, Daniel

2014-05-01

338

Himalayan glacier retreat delayed by debris cover  

Microsoft Academic Search

Variable retreat rates and paucity of mass-balance data complicate a coherent picture of the current state and future fate of Himalayan glaciers. We report frontal changes and remotely-sensed surface velocities from >250 glaciers in the greater Himalayan realm (Hindu Kush, Karakoram, Himalaya, West Kunlun Shan) between 2000 and 2008 that provide evidence for widespread meltdown, which is obscured by debris

D. Scherler; B. Bookhagen; M. R. Strecker

2010-01-01

339

Microbial biodiversity in glacier-fed streams  

PubMed Central

While glaciers become increasingly recognised as a habitat for diverse and active microbial communities, effects of their climate change-induced retreat on the microbial ecology of glacier-fed streams remain elusive. Understanding the effect of climate change on microorganisms in these ecosystems is crucial given that microbial biofilms control numerous stream ecosystem processes with potential implications for downstream biodiversity and biogeochemistry. Here, using a space-for-time substitution approach across 26 Alpine glaciers, we show how microbial community composition and diversity, based on 454-pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA gene, in biofilms of glacier-fed streams may change as glaciers recede. Variations in streamwater geochemistry correlated with biofilm community composition, even at the phylum level. The most dominant phyla detected in glacial habitats were Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Actinobacteria and Cyanobacteria/chloroplasts. Microorganisms from ice had the lowest ? diversity and contributed marginally to biofilm and streamwater community composition. Rather, streamwater apparently collected microorganisms from various glacial and non-glacial sources forming the upstream metacommunity, thereby achieving the highest ? diversity. Biofilms in the glacier-fed streams had intermediate ? diversity and species sorting by local environmental conditions likely shaped their community composition. ? diversity of streamwater and biofilm communities decreased with elevation, possibly reflecting less diverse sources of microorganisms upstream in the catchment. In contrast, ? diversity of biofilms decreased with increasing streamwater temperature, suggesting that glacier retreat may contribute to the homogenisation of microbial communities among glacier-fed streams. PMID:23486246

Wilhelm, Linda; Singer, Gabriel A; Fasching, Christina; Battin, Tom J; Besemer, Katharina

2013-01-01

340

Using Metaphorical Models for Describing Glaciers  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

To date, there has only been little conceptual change research regarding conceptions about glaciers. This study used the theoretical background of embodied cognition to reconstruct different metaphorical concepts with respect to the structure of a glacier. Applying the Model of Educational Reconstruction, the conceptions of students and scientists…

Felzmann, Dirk

2014-01-01

341

Muir Glacier and Muir Inlet 2003  

USGS Multimedia Gallery

This photo was taken in September 2003; in the 23 years between photographs, Muir Glacier has retreated more than a mile and ceased to have a tidewater terminus. Since 1980, Muir Glacier has thinned by more than 600 ft, permitting a view of a mountain with a summit elevation of greater than 4000 ft,...

342

Glaciers in 21st Century Himalayan Geopolitics  

Microsoft Academic Search

Glaciers are ablating rapidly the world over. Nowhere are the rates of retreat and downwasting greater than in the Hindu Kush-Himalaya (HKH) region. It is estimated that over the next century, 40,000 square kilometers of present glacier area in the HKH region will become ice free. Most of this area is in major valleys and the lowest glaciated mountain passes.

J. S. Kargel; R. Wessels; H. H. Kieffer

2002-01-01

343

Holocene glacier and climate variations in western Norway: Evidence for early Holocene glacier demise and multiple Neoglacial events  

Microsoft Academic Search

Lithostratigraphic and paleobotanical studies suggest that the Jostedalsbreen ice cap probably disappeared during the early Holocene Hypsithermal interval (ca. 8000-6000 B.P.) and re-formed about 5300 B.P. The equilibrium-line altitude was lower than the modern mean equilibrium-line altitude between 2595 ±85 and 2360 ±80 B.P., between 2250 ±65 and 2150 ±80 B.P., between 1740 ±75 and 1730 ±75 B.P., between 1430

Atle Nesje; Mons Kvamme

1991-01-01

344

Iceland Glacier Recession 1997 to 2000  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This animation is a close up zoom into largest area of glacier recesion at the Breidamerkurjokull glacier in Iceland. The data from 1997 is taken from Landsat 5 and the 2000 data is from Landsat 7. The Breidamerkurjokull glacier in Iceland has been measured by Landsat to be receding since 1973. In 1997, Landsat 5 took several other images of the glacier. It was thought by some glacierologists that this particular glacier was receding quicker in the late 1990s than it did in the late 1980s or 1970s. After careful analysis Goddards Glacierologist, Dorothy Hall, concluded that the recession from 1997 to 2000 occurs at a similar rate to the recession between 1973 and 2000. It is extremely controversial whether or not this recession is caused by global warming.

Lori Perkins

2001-04-09

345

Ice thickness measurements over Pine Island and Thwaites Glaciers  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Pine Island and Thwaites glaciers (PIG and TG) are the fastest measured glaciers in Antarctica and have been identified as the part of the West Antarctica ice sheet most prone to instability. However, the reasons for the rapid retreat of these glaciers have not been resolved due to insufficient data. In particular, the role of ice shelves in regulating the ice discharge of these glaciers has been a point of contention in the glaciology community. To help resolve this issue the Centro de Estudios Científicos (CECS) and NASA with the support of the Armada de Chile conducted four airborne remote sensing missions over the PIG/TG regions. In addition, two missions were conducted over the Antarctic Peninsula. The University of Kansas operated its Coherent Radar Depth Sounder (CORDS) to measure the thickness of the ice sheet in these regions. CORDS is a pulse-compression radar that has proven its utility in the glaciological surveys over Greenland. The combination of pulse compression and coherent processing has allowed us to obtain high-sensitivity and high-resolution in the along-track direction while keeping the transmitted power low. CORDS transmits a 140-160 MHz chirp signal with 200 Watts of peak power and has a vertical resolution of about 5 meters in ice. We used a four-element dipole array on either side of the wing to transmit and receive the radar signals. We successfully mapped the thickness of the ice sheet over 99% of the PIG/TG flight lines. In this paper we will provide a description of the radar, experiment and signal processing. We will also discuss samples results of the ice thickness, basal conditions and surface roughness.

Kanagaratnam, P.; Casassa, G.; Thomas, R.; Gogineni, S.

2003-04-01

346

Mapping Glacier Data and Photographs via GeoServer and Virtual Globes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Two extensively used glacier data sets include the World Glacier Inventory and the Glacier Photograph Collection. Both data sets are hosted at the National Snow and Ice Data Center in Boulder, Colorado. The World Glacier Inventory encompasses over 100,000 records of glacier data and the Glacier Photograph Collection houses approximately 9,000 digitized photographs. The online Glacier Photograph Collection has doubled

L. M. Ballagh; I. Wang; A. Wallace

2008-01-01

347

HIGH ICE, Continuation Some glacier image analysis capabilities  

E-print Network

.GLIMS.orgwww.GLIMS.org #12;Tasman glacier, New Zealand 25 km Mt. Cook Courtesy of Andreas Kaeaeb #12;Baltoro GlacierHIGH ICE, Continuation Some glacier image analysis capabilities #12;VNIR bands 321 RGB 2001, Sep. 6 RickRick WesselsWessels 12/0112/01 Glacier mapping using simple ratios of ASTER band 7 (2.25) / band 1

348

Black soot and the survival of Tibetan glaciers  

PubMed Central

We find evidence that black soot aerosols deposited on Tibetan glaciers have been a significant contributing factor to observed rapid glacier retreat. Reduced black soot emissions, in addition to reduced greenhouse gases, may be required to avoid demise of Himalayan glaciers and retain the benefits of glaciers for seasonal fresh water supplies. PMID:19996173

Xu, Baiqing; Cao, Junji; Hansen, James; Yao, Tandong; Joswia, Daniel R.; Wang, Ninglian; Wu, Guangjian; Wang, Mo; Zhao, Huabiao; Yang, Wei; Liu, Xianqin; He, Jianqiao

2009-01-01

349

Extracting a Climate Signal from 169 Glacier Records  

E-print Network

Extracting a Climate Signal from 169 Glacier Records J. Oerlemans I constructed a temperature history for different parts of the world from 169 glacier length records. Using a first-order theory of glacier dynamics, I related changes in glacier length to changes in temperature. The derived temperature

Wright, Dawn Jeannine

350

Seasonal variability of organic matter composition in an Alaskan glacier outflow: insights into glacier carbon sources  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Glacier ecosystems are a significant source of bioavailable, yet ancient dissolved organic carbon (DOC). Characterizing DOC in Mendenhall Glacier outflow (southeast Alaska) we document a seasonal persistence to the radiocarbon-depleted signature of DOC, highlighting ancient DOC as a ubiquitous feature of glacier outflow. We observed no systematic depletion in ? 14C-DOC with increasing discharge during the melt season that would suggest mobilization of an aged subglacial carbon store. However, DOC concentration, ? 13C-DOC, ? 14C-DOC and fluorescence signatures appear to have been influenced by runoff from vegetated hillslopes above the glacier during onset and senescence of melt. In the peak glacier melt period, the ? 14C-DOC of stream samples at the outflow (-181.7 to -355.3‰) was comparable to the ? 14C-DOC for snow samples from the accumulation zone (-207.2 to -390.9‰), suggesting that ancient DOC from the glacier surface is exported in glacier runoff. The pre-aged DOC in glacier snow and runoff is consistent with contributions from fossil fuel combustion sources similar to those documented previously in ice cores and thus provides evidence for anthropogenic perturbation of the carbon cycle. Overall, our results emphasize the need to further characterize DOC inputs to glacier ecosystems, particularly in light of predicted changes in glacier mass and runoff in the coming century.

Spencer, Robert G. M.; Vermilyea, Andrew; Fellman, Jason; Raymond, Peter; Stubbins, Aron; Scott, Durelle; Hood, Eran

2014-05-01

351

Title: Climate-glacier Relationship of Retreating Alaskan Glaciers Author: Elliott Mazur and Umesh K. Haritashya  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Portage, Whittier, Eklutna, as well as many other well-known "tourism glaciers" in the vicinity of Anchorage, Alaska are known to have retreated in the past 20 years. This begs the question, "what of the other lesser-known glaciers? Do they follow the same patterns and minimal glacier models?" Glaciers such as Byron, Leonard, Matanuska, Raven and Spencer may fit a minimal model. Information on Byron and Leonard is sparse, as both have become hanging glaciers. Other glaciers, such as Raven, are small enough to be deemed insignificant, yet may have information to give. Consequently our objective is to study five Alaskan glaciers and determine wide-ranging variability to changing regional climate. To do this we obtained field geo-location data and characterized glaciers based on the satellite imagery and climate reevaluation. Our result shows that glaciers are retreating and thinning irrespective of their aspects, location and altitudinal variability. Moreover, our presentation establishes the strong climate-glacier relationship and defines retreating snowline patterns over the last few decades.

Mazur, E. M.

2012-12-01

352

Radar Measurements of Ice Sheet Thickness of Outlet Glaciers in Greenland D. Braaten+  

E-print Network

echo sounder to obtain ice thickness measurements along the flight lines flown by the NASA P-3B since, and the typically narrow terrain which confines many outlet glaciers. The airborne radio echo sounder operated ice sheet from the NASA P-3B aircraft using a 150- MHz coherent radar depth sounder to obtain

Kansas, University of

353

Research Team Discovers First Evidence of Microbes Living in a Rock Glacier  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This NSF press release reports that scientists have discovered evidence of microbial activity in a rock glacier high above tree line in the Rocky Mountains, a barren environment previously thought to be devoid of life. Included in this NSF press release are links to all NSF affiliated pages.

The National Science Foundation (NSF)

354

36 CFR 13.1116 - Do I need a camping permit in Glacier Bay?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...30, camping within Glacier Bay as defined by this subpart up to 1/4 nautical mile (1519 feet) above the line of mean high tide without a camping permit is prohibited. The Superintendent may establish permit terms and conditions. Failure to comply with...

2012-07-01

355

36 CFR 13.1116 - Do I need a camping permit in Glacier Bay?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...30, camping within Glacier Bay as defined by this subpart up to 1/4 nautical mile (1519 feet) above the line of mean high tide without a camping permit is prohibited. The Superintendent may establish permit terms and conditions. Failure to comply with...

2011-07-01

356

Quantifying global warming from the retreat of glaciers  

SciTech Connect

Records of glacier fluctuations compiled by the World Glacier Monitoring Service can be used to derive an independent estimate of global warming during the last 100 years. Records of different glaciers are made comparable by a two-step scaling procedure; one allowing for differences in glacier geometry, the other for differences in climate sensitivity. The retreat of glaciers during the last 100 years appears to be coherent over the globe. On the basis of modeling of the climate sensitivity of glaciers, the observed glacier retreat can be explained by a linear warming trend of 0.66 kelvin per century.

Oerlemans, J. (Utrecht Univ. (Netherlands))

1994-04-08

357

Shuttle Topography Radar Mission DEM, ASTER Images and Aerial Photography in Evaluation of Mountain Glacier Area and Volume Changes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The glacier monitoring on a regional scale have been done traditionally by means of optical space images resulting mainly in observing of changes of area, length and other 2-D information. A lack of texture on the snow fields, steep walls with deep shadows and often cloudiness in high mountains significantly reduce quality and availability of photogrammetrically derived Digital Elevation Models (DEM). Laser altimetry and repeat-pass InSAR DEMs show large potential for glacier volume changes measurements but still have very limited spatial coverage. Recently released 3-arcsecond DEM by NASA-JPL resulted from STRM flown in February 2000 provide unique opportunity for regional-scale glacier change assessment. The method of glacial area and glacier volume changes has been developed over the Akshiirak ice-fields in the Tien Shan Mountains, Central Asia using aerial photography of 1977, topographic maps and RS data of 2000/2003. The datum transformation from WGS-84 used in STRM data to Pulkovo 1942 (Russian) coordinate system was accomplished by 7-parameter Helmert transformation with accuracy at least one order higher than STRM horizontal accuracy (20 m). For vertical validation we compared STRM DEM with DEM constructed from 10 and 5 m additional contour lines digitized from 1:25000 topographic maps on non-glacial relatively flat areas. Though well consistent with 16 m (90%) absolute vertical accuracy, relative accuracy requirement of 6 m (90%) can be easily met only after removing systematic wavy bias in along-track direction. The Akshiirak ice-fields have more than 83% area inclination below 30° . These factors reduce influence of slope-related STRM vertical error to final glacier volume change calculations. Glacier boundaries were manually digitized from an ASTER L1A image acquired on August 18, 2003 that was orthorectified in Orthobase digital photogrammetric package with 9.5 m RMSE of 28 GCPs. For delineating of glaciers in problem areas (debris-covered termini, shadows) we used thermal bands and true hardware-enabled stereo viewing with nadir 3N and backward-looking 3B bands. Accuracy of digitized 2003 glacier boundaries were checked against GPS measurements of 7 glacier termini made in 2002. For surface elevation comparison a second DEM was generated from 10 m contour lines for all glaciers (424 km2) using 16 topographic maps of 1:25000 scale created from 1977 aerial photography. The map vertical accuracy is 1/3 of contour interval. Glacier boundaries of 1977 were directly delineated from stereo models. It is revealed that from 1977 till 2003 Akshiirak glaciers have lost 10 km3 of ice volume and 35 km2 of area.

Surazakov, A. B.; Aizen, V. B.; Kuzmichenok, V. A.

2004-12-01

358

10Be surface exposure dating of rock glaciers in Larstigtal, Tyrol, Austria  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In the context of Lateglacial and Holocene climate change research, rock glaciers (creeping mountain permafrost) also play an important role. They are phenomena of discontinuous alpine permafrost and as such good indicators for the mean annual air temperature for the period they are active. We have 10Be surface exposure dated boulders from two relict rock glaciers in Larstigtal, Austria. This is the type area for a postulated mid-Holocene cold period called the Larstig oscillation. The period of activity was suggested to be of similar age as the mid-Holocene Frosnitz advance of glaciers in the Venediger Mountains farther to the east (Patzelt and Bortenschlager, 1973). For rock glaciers of this size to be active at 2200 m a.s.l. in Larstig valley would have required a significant drop in temperatures, thus a marked mid-Holocene cold pulse, for at least several centuries at around 7.0 ka. In contrast, our exposure dates show that the rock glaciers stabilized during the early Preboreal (Ivy-Ochs et al., submitted). We see no distinct pattern with respect to exposure age and boulder location on the rock glaciers. This implies that for our site the blocks did not acquire inherited 10Be during exposure in the free rock face, in the talus at the base of the slope, or during transport on the rock glaciers. Our data point to final stabilization of the Larstigtal rock glaciers in the earliest Holocene and not in the middle Holocene. Combined with data from other archives (Nicolussi et al., 2005), there appears to have been no time window in the middle Holocene long enough for rock glaciers of the size and at the elevation of the Larstig site to have formed. Ivy-Ochs, S., Kerschner, H., Maisch, M., Christl, M., Kubik, P.W., Schlüchter, C., Latest Pleistocene and Holocene glacier variations in the European Alps. Quaternary Science Reviews (submitted). Nicolussi, K., Kaufmann, M., Patzelt, G., van der Plicht, J., Thurner, A., 2005. Holocene tree-line variability in the Kauner Valley, Central Eastern Alps, indicated by dendrochronological analysis of living trees and subfossil logs. Vegetation History and Archaeobotany 14, 221-234. Patzelt, G., Bortenschlager, S., 1973. Die postglazialen Gletscher- und Klimaschwankungen in der Venedigergruppe (Hohe Tauern, Ostalpen). Zeitschrift für Geomorphologie N.F. Supplementband 16, 25-72.

Ivy-Ochs, S.; Kerschner, H.; Maisch, M.; Christl, M.; Kubik, P. W.; Schluchter, C.

2009-04-01

359

Glacier surge triggered by massive rock avalanche: Teleseismic and satellite image study of long-runout landslide onto RGO Glacier, Pamirs  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Glacier surges are thought to result from changes in resistance to sliding at the base of the ice mass. The reasons for such changes in basal conditions are not entirely understood, and this is in part because empirical constraints are severely limited. Recent work in the Karakoram and Pamir mountains, home to the majority of Earth's surging mountain glaciers, has boosted observational data, but has led to diametrically opposed interpretations of their glacier surging mechanics, ranging from thermal to hydrological switching. In this context we describe a surge of the RGO (Russian Geographical Society) Glacier in the Pamirs triggered by a massive rock avalanche off Mt Garmo in 2001. Initial reports pegged the RGO Glacier landslide as having been triggered in 2002 by strong ground motion originating from a nearby tectonic earthquake. We used multitemporal satellite imagery to establish failure must have struck in August-September 2001. This revised date was confirmed by reexamining teleseismic data recorded at stations in central Asia: it became clear that a landslide seismic source of magnitude Msw?5.4 on 2001/09/02 had been misinterpreted as two tectonic sources located within kilometers of Mt Garmo. Exploiting a new technique we have developed for inverting long-period seismic waveforms, we show that a mass of rock and ice around 2.8×{}1011 kg collapsed to the SSE from an elevation of around 5800m, accelerated to a peak speed of about 60m/s, collided with the valley wall ˜ 2 km to the south and turned east to run out a further 6km over significant fractions of the accumulation and ablation zones of the RGO Glacier. Based on this estimate of landslide mass, we deduce that the supraglacial debris blanket generated by this rock avalanches averaged about 20m in thickness. By this reckoning, the Mt Garmo landslide is one of the largest in the last 33 years. Next we mapped the velocity field of the RGO Glacier over time using multitemporal satellite imagery. We performed image correlation velocimetry (sometimes known as feature tracking or optical flow velocimetry) using around 120 Landsat 7 ETM+ scenes spanning 1999 through 2012. Reliable velocity fields were generated even after the loss of scan-line correction (SLC-off scenes) in 2003. Our preliminary results reveal two phases of glacier surge. The first began within a few months of the rock avalanche during the winter of 2001, with ice flow speeds rising by more than an order of magnitude to nearly 1000m/y mid-glacier at the landslide toe, and propagating as a wave down-glacier in less than a year. This phase ended in 2002-3. The second, milder surge phase began in 2005 and ended in 2007. Each phase led to an advance of the terminus over several 100m. We interpret surge initiation as being the direct consequence of rock avalanche deposition on the glacier. To explore the apparent link between rock avalanching and glacier surging, we have developed a 2D thermomechanical, higher-order, flowline model coupled to a basal hydrology scheme. We conclude with a discussion of the behavior of this model when heavily perturbed by abrupt debris deposition, and we explore whether the occurrence of landslide-triggered surging can in any way advance our understanding of glacier surge mechanics in general.

Stark, C. P.; Wolovick, M.; Ekstrom, G.

2012-12-01

360

Welcome to GLACIER Tax Prep We hope you find GLACIER Tax Prep simple to use and easy to understand!  

E-print Network

Welcome to GLACIER Tax Prep We hope you find GLACIER Tax Prep simple to use and easy to understand institution has licensed GLACIER Tax Prep (which replaces CINTAX) to assist you in this process. Following available BEFORE I login to GLACIER Tax Prep? · Passport; · Visa/Immigration Status information, including

Mullins, Dyche

361

Climate Change and Glacier Retreat: Scientific Fact and Artistic Opportunity  

Microsoft Academic Search

Mountain glaciers continue to retreat rapidly over most of the globe. In North America, at Glacier National Park, Montana, recent research results from Sperry Glacier (2005-2007) indicate negative mass balances are now 3-4 times greater than in the 1950s. A geospatial model of glacier retreat in the Blackfoot-Jackson basin suggested all glaciers would be gone by 2030 but has proved

D. B. Fagre

2008-01-01

362

Glacier volume changes at Mt. Everest\\/Qomolangma 1962 - 2007  

Microsoft Academic Search

The larger glaciers at Mt. Everest are heavily covered with supra-glacial debris like many other glaciers in the Himalaya. Most glacier change studies concentrate on area change only. However, the melting of debris-covered glaciers is most recognisable through downwasting. Hence, multi-temporal DEM analysis is needed to study the reaction of these glaciers to climate change in detail. We generated a

Tobias Bolch; Tino Piezconka; Feng Chen; Shichang Kang; Manfred Buchroithner

2010-01-01

363

Sensitivity of glaciers and small ice caps to greenhouse warming  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recent field programs on glaciers have supplied information that makes simulation of glacier mass balance with meteorological models meaningful. An estimate of world-wide glacier sensitivity based on a modeling study of 12 selected glaciers situated in widely differing climatic regimes shows that for a uniform 1 K warming the area-weighted glacier mass balance will decrease by 0.40 meter per year.

J. Oerlemans; J. P. F. Fortuin

1992-01-01

364

Glaciers in Patagonia: Controversy and prospects  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Lately, glaciers have been subjects of unceasing controversy. Current debate about planned hydroelectric facilities—a US$7- to $10-billion megaproject—in a pristine glacierized area of Patagonia, Chile [Romero Toledo et al., 2009; Vince, 2010], has raised anew the matter of how glaciologists and global change experts can contribute their knowledge to civic debates on important issues. There has been greater respect for science in this controversy than in some previous debates over projects that pertain to glaciers, although valid economic motivations again could trump science and drive a solution to the energy supply problem before the associated safety and environmental problems are understood. The connection between glaciers and climate change—both anthropogenic and natural—is fundamental to glaciology and to glaciers' practical importance for water and hydropower resources, agriculture, tourism, mining, natural hazards, ecosystem conservation, and sea level [Buytaert et al., 2010; Glasser et al., 2011]. The conflict between conservation and development can be sharper in glacierized regions than almost anywhere else. Glaciers occur in spectacular natural landscapes, but they also supply prodigious exploitable meltwater.

Kargel, J. S.; Alho, P.; Buytaert, W.; Célleri, R.; Cogley, J. G.; Dussaillant, A.; Guido, Z.; Haeberli, W.; Harrison, S.; Leonard, G.; Maxwell, A.; Meier, C.; Poveda, G.; Reid, B.; Reynolds, J.; Rodríguez, C. A. Portocarrero; Romero, H.; Schneider, J.

2012-05-01

365

Erosion and transport by Byrd Glacier, Antarctica during the Last Glacial Maximum  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Glacial till samples from seven, modern-Holocene Byrd Glacier moraines were characterized using particle size analysis, sand petrography and detrital zircon geochronology and compared to Ross Sea tills deposited during the Last Glacial Maximum. The goal was to identify the paleoflow path for Byrd Glacier and assess the use of multiple provenance techniques. The coarse sand fraction of Byrd Glacier tills is dominated by lithic fragments of adjacent bedrock outcrops, except samples from the Lonewolf Nunataks, which have a higher proportion of mineral to lithic fragments, as well as a recognizable exotic component. Cluster analysis shows that Byrd Glacier tills, with the exception of the two Lonewolf Nunataks sites, do not cluster strongly with Ross Sea samples because they have a higher proportion of lithic fragments. This indicates that comminution must be an active subglacial process beneath East Antarctic outlet glaciers. Byrd Glacier tills are also typically coarser grained that Ross Sea tills and their maturity is a reflection of both glacial processes and rock type. Measured U/Pb ages of detrital zircons from Byrd Glacier tills range from Triassic to Archean (240-3540 Ma) with a dominance of grains 530-600 Ma. Ross Sea till samples show spatial variability in U/Pb age distributions, with the core sites west of the 180° longitude line showing similarity to most Byrd Glacier tills, whereas core NBP9407-39, east of 180° long., is dominated by ˜100 Ma grains. Ross Sea tills also contain a recognizable detrital zircon fraction eroded inland of the Transantarctic Mountains. Both provenance methods indicate that the ice flow line for Byrd Glacier during the LGM was to the east of Ross Island and extended on either side of Ross Bank, with the majority of ice flowing to the Ross Sea's Central Basin. Our analysis shows that sand petrography and detrital zircon U/Pb age spectra provide complementary datasets that produce similar ice flow reconstructions and reveal valuable information about glacial processes and ice covered bedrock.

Licht, K. J.; Palmer, E. F.

2013-02-01

366

Interaction between glacier and glacial lake in the Bhutan, Himalaya  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Recession of mountain glaciers in the Himalayas has been reported in the context of global warming. Associated with the glacier retreat, supraglacial lakes have been formed on the termini of debris-covered glaciers. Although it has been said that lake-terminating glaciers flow faster than land-terminating glaciers, observational evidence was scarce. We observationally investigated the influence of the presence/absence of glacial lakes on changes in surface elevation through glacier dynamics in two debris-covered glaciers, Thorthormi Glacier (land-terminating) and Lugge Glacier (lake-terminating), in the Lunana region, the Bhutan Himalaya. We surveyed the surface elevation of debris-covered areas of the two glaciers in 2004 and 2011 by a differential GPS. Change in surface elevation of the lake-terminating Lugge Glacier was much more negative than that of the land-terminating Thorthormi Glacier. Considering almost flat slope and location at lower elevation, however, larger ice thinning rate of the Thorthormi Glacier should have been expected than the Lugge Glacier. We measured surface flow speed of the two glaciers during 2009-2010 by multitemporal orthorectified The Panchromatic Remote-sensing Instrument for Stereo Mapping (PRISM) images of ALOS. Surface flow speed of the Thorthormi Glacier was faster in the upper reaches and reduced toward the downstream. In contrast, the flow speed at the Lugge Glacier measured in the same periods was greatest at the lower most part. Observed spatial distribution of surface flow speed at both glaciers are evaluated by a two-dimensional numerical flow model. The model shows that contribution of basal sliding to surface flow velocity is large in the lower part of both glaciers. Particularly in the Thorthormi Glacier, approximately 100% of surface flow velocity attribute to basal sliding. Calculated emergence velocity at the Thorthormi Glacier is larger than that at the Lugge Glacier. This result suggests that decreasing in flow velocity towards the terminus in the Thorthormi Glacier causes compressive flow and thus counterbalances surface melting, resulting in inhibition of the surface lowering. In contrast, the extensional flow of the Lugge Glacier accelerated the surface lowering. In this study we show the observational evidences, in which the glacier lake formation makes contrast the thinning rates of glaciers in the Bhutan Himalaya. If the supraglacial lake on Thorthormi Glacier expands, the surface lowering will be accelerated in the future.

Tsutaki, S.; Fujita, K.; Yamaguchi, S.; Sakai, A.; Nuimura, T.; Sugiyama, S.; Komori, J.; Takenaka, S.; Tshering, P.

2012-12-01

367

Glacier changes since Local Last Glacial Maximum in the South-West slope of Nevado Hualcán, Cordillera Blanca, Peru, deduced from moraine mapping and GIS-based analysis  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Anticipating and assessing hazards and risks associated with the shrinking of surface and subsurface ice in cold mountain chains is facilitated by empirical-quantitative data on present and past rates of change, as well as by a general understanding of related landforms and landscape evolution through time. Rock/ice avalanches and devastating outburst floods from glacial lakes indeed constitute a major cause of severe damage in populated mountain areas such as the Cordillera Blanca whose combination of tectonic, topographic and glaciological characteristics make it a threatened region. This study focuses on the Río Chucchún catchment above the city of Carhuaz, which was recently affected by a flood/debris flow from a rock/ice avalanche impacting a recently grown lake (Laguna 513). Traces left by past glaciations strongly affect the current geomorphodinamic behaviour of the catchment. For instance, a prominent sediment-filled glacial overdeepening behind Younger Dryas (YD) moraines (Pampa de Shonquil) with its retention function strongly influenced the chain of processes initiated by the outburst of Laguna 513. The aim of this study is to reconstruct earlier glacial phases in the SW slope of Nevado Hualcán (Río Chucchún catchment), in order to compile quantitative information on surface areas and Equilibrium Line Altitudes (ELAs). To do so, glacier stages were assigned to five different glacial phases, through photointerpretation and moraine cartography: 2003; 1962; Hualcán-I-LIA (15th to 18th centuries); Hualcán-II-YD (~12,5 ka BP); and Hualcán-III-LLGM (~34 to 21 ka BP). Glacial stages Hualcán-I-LIA, Hualcán-II-YD and Hualcán-III-LLGM present relative dating based on previous studies from different authors in the Peruvian Andes. Once glaciers were delimited, their surface areas and Equilibrium Line Altitudes (ELAs) were calculated. For ELA estimation three different methods were used: the mid-range elevation, the Accumulation Area Ratio (AAR), and the Area x Altitude Balance Ratio (AABR). The results show a decrease in surface area with respect to Hualcán-III-LLGM of 16% for Hualcán-II-YD; 50% for Hualcán-I-LIA; and 74% for 2003. With respect to 2003, ELAs shifted ~520 m since the Local Last Glacial Maximum (LLGM), ~470 m since a marked late-glacial stage (YD?), ~130 m since the Little Ice Age (LIA) and about ~100 m since 1962. If the changes are exclusively attributed to temperature effects, warming since LLGM can be estimated at some 3°C and since the maximum glacier extent of LIA at about 0.8°C. Such values are rather close to mean global temperature change during the corresponding intervals. Most of the ELA shift since LIA appears to have taken place during recent decades characterized by very rapid glacier shrinkage, although air temperature does not seem to have risen considerably during the last 30 years. These results along with other environmental and social approaches will contribute to a better understanding of impacts from climate change and glacier shrinkage in order to develop adaptation, mitigation and disaster risk reduction strategies in the Peruvian Andes.

Giráldez, Claudia; Palacios, David; Haeberli, Wilfried; Úbeda, Jose; Schauwecker, Simone; Torres, Judith

2014-05-01

368

Alaska PaleoGlacier Atlas: A Geospatial Compilation of Pleistocene Glacier Extents  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Alaska PaleoGlacier (APG) Atlas is a recently released, web-based summary of Pleistocene glaciation across Alaska. Students can access a gallery of maps depicting the extent of glaciers during the late Wisconsin glaciation in Alaska as well as the maximum extent reached during the last 3 million years by valley glaciers, ice caps, and the northwestern Cordilleran Ice Sheet. a set of links is also provided to sites on galcial geology and glacial geospatial data.

William Manley

369

GLACIER and related R&D  

E-print Network

Liquid argon detectors, with mass up to 100 kton, are being actively studied in the context of proton decay searches, neutrino astrophysics and for the next generation of long baseline neutrino oscillation experiments to study the neutrino mass hierarchy and CP violation in the leptonic sector. The proposed Giant Liquid Argon Charge Imaging ExpeRiment (GLACIER) offers a well defined conceptual design for such a detector. In this paper we present the GLACIER design and some of the R&D activities pursued within the GLACIER.

Curioni, Alessandro

2011-01-01

370

Acceleration of West Antarctic glacier discharge  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The glaciers that flow from the West Antarctic Ice Sheet into the Amundsen Sea are some of the fastest on the continent. Together they account for roughly a third of the flow from the west part of the ice sheet. Over the past few decades these glaciers have only gotten faster: From 1973 to 2013 their combined rate of discharge increased 77%, report Mouginot et al. As much as half of this increase took place in a burst from 2003 to 2009, and in recent years the combined discharge of these glaciers has accounted for nearly 10% of global sea level rise.

Schultz, Colin

2014-08-01

371

Insights into the Thwaites Glacier grounding zone from Operation IceBridge aerogravity  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Operation IceBridge acquired 1500 km of geophysical data, at 10 km spacing, in front of the Thwaites Glacier grounding line during the 2009 season. The gravity anomalies recorded by the survey have been used to model the bathymetry of the sea floor in front of the glacier, an area inaccessible to previous surveys. The resulting map reveals previously unseen detail of the Thwaites grounding zone, as well as the spatial extent of features that were formerly only known as points affecting the ice surface. The modeled bathymetry in front of Thwaites Glacier is marked by an undulating ridge running sub-parallel to the grounding line, 40 km seaward. The highest peak on the ridge is in contact with the overlying ice shelf, hindering its flow. Ridge elevation decreases to the west, with a maximum ridge depth of 850 m and an average relief of 350 m. This is comparable in scale to the recently identified ridge crossing the channel of nearby Pine Island Glacier (Jenkins et al., 2010). The present-day grounding line of Thwaites appears to be marked by a more subdued ridge, in which we have identified a 20 km wide hollow, to a water depth of 1200 m. Our model shows that this hollow corresponds to a landward bight in the grounding line, in the region through which the fast ice flow of Thwaites Glacier is focused. This correlation was not visible on previous, coarser scale maps of the grounding line, and shows a clear relationship between the bathymetry and ice flow. Gravity inversions have been constrained by nearby marine surveys, satellite images of the ice rise at the peak of the ridge and radar and laser data from the IceBridge survey to constrain ice thickness. The absolute values of predicted bathymetry are dependent on the density of the rocks in the subsurface, for example the presence or absence of volcanic material or loose sediments. Some models of the geology of the survey area are also proposed. Uncertainty of underlying geology may account for ~100 m errors in the modeled bathymetry. A good understanding of the bathymetry at and around the grounding line of the major outlet glaciers of West Antarctica is essential to the understanding of their grounding history, the access of sea water to the grounding zone and the distribution of the flow of the ice. These data also provide vital constraints for models of the future of the West Antarctic ice sheet. Jenkins, A, Dutrieux, P, Jacobs, SS, McPhail, SD, Perrett, JR, Webb, AT and White, D (2010). Observations beneath Pine Island Glacier in West Antarctica and implications for its retreat. Nature Geoscience, 3, 468-472.

Tinto, K. J.; Bell, R. E.; Cochran, J. R.; Elieff, S.; Frearson, N.

2010-12-01

372

Geostatistical evaluation of satellite radar altimetry for high-resolution mapping of Lambert Glacier, Antarctica  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The potential of satellite radar altimetry for high-resolution mapping of Antarctic ice streams is evaluated, using retracked and slope-corrected data from the Lambert Glacier and Amery Ice Shelf area, East Antarctica, acquired by Geosat during the Exact Repeat Mission (ERM), 1986-89. The map area includes lower Lambert Glacier north of 72.18 deg S, the southern Amery Ice Shelf, and the grounded inland ice sheet on both sides. The Geosat ERM altimetry is found to provide substantially more complete coverage than the 1978 Seasat altimetry, due to improved tracking. Variogram methods are used to estimate the noise levels in the data as a function of position throughout the map area. The spatial structure in the data is quantified by constructing experimental variograms using altimetry from the area of the grounding zone of Lambert Glacier, which is the area chiefly of interest in this topographically complex region. Kriging is employed to invert the along-track height measurements onto a fine-scale 3 km grid. The unsmoothed along-track Geosat ERM altimetry yields spatially continuous maps showing the main topographic features of lower Lambert Glacier, upper Amery Ice Shelf and the adjacent inland ice sheet. The probable position of the grounding line of Lambert Glacier is identified from a break in slope at the grounded ice/floating ice transition. The approximate standard error of the kriged map is inferred from the data noise levels.

Herzfeld, Ute C.; Lingle, Craig S.; Lee, Li-Her

1993-01-01

373

Late Quaternary Glaciers and paleoclimate on the southwest Mediterranean coast of Turkey  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We report an overview of Quaternary glaciers in Turkey, specifically on the southwest Mediterranean coast. Small-glaciated mountains exist on the western sector of the Taurus Mountain Range such as Akda? (36.54oN, 29.57oE, 3016 m). Forty-one moraine boulders from three glacial valleys on Akda? were dated with cosmogenic 36Cl. Valleys on the north side of the mountain were filled with few km long glaciers that terminated at elevations of about 2000 m above sea level (a.s.l). The oldest glaciers reached their maximum positions (2150 m a.s.l) by 35.1±2.5 ka ago (ka = 1000 calendar years). They readvanced during the global LGM and reached their farthest locations (2050 m a.s.l) by around 21.7±1.2 ka ago. Later, glaciers retreated and shortly stabilized during the Late Glacial at around 15.1±0.9 ka ago. Using the glacier modeling and paleoclimate proxies from the Eastern Mediterranean, we estimated that if temperatures during the LGM were 8-11 oC colder than modern, which is suggested by paleotemperature proxies from the region, precipitation on Akda? was up to two times more than that of today, in line with comparable estimation on southwest Turkey. Same model suggests that the central Turkey requires drier conditions, implying regional heterogeneity on LGM climates in Turkey.

Akif Sar?kaya, Mehmet; Ciner, Attila

2014-05-01

374

Modeled Climate-Induced Glacier Change in Glacier National Park, 1850--2100  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This peer-reviewed article from BioScience journal is about the glacier change in Glacier National park. The glaciers in the Blackfoot--Jackson Glacier Basin of Glacier National Park, Montana, decreased in area from 21.6 square kilometers (km2) in 1850 to 7.4 km2 in 1979. Over this same period global temperatures increased by 0.45 degrees C (+/- 0.15 degrees C). We analyzed the climatic causes and ecological consequences of glacier retreat by creating spatially explicit models of the creation and ablation of glaciers and of the response of vegetation to climate change. We determined the melt rate and spatial distribution of glaciers under two possible future climate scenarios, one based on carbon dioxide--induced global warming and the other on a linear temperature extrapolation. Under the former scenario, all glaciers in the basin will disappear by the year 2030, despite predicted increases in precipitation; under the latter, melting is slower. Using a second model, we analyzed vegetation responses to variations in soil moisture and increasing temperature in a complex alpine landscape and predicted where plant communities are likely to be located as conditions change.

MYRNA H. P. HALL and DANIEL B. FAGRE (; )

2002-02-01

375

A Revised Glacier Inventory of Bhaga Basin Himachal Pradesh, India : Current Status and Recent Glacier Variations  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Himalayan glaciers show large uncertainty regarding their present and future state due to their sensitive reaction towards change in climatic condition. Himalayan glaciers are unique as they are located in tropical, high altitude regions, predominantly valley type and many are covered with debris. The great northern plains of India sustain on the perennial melt of glaciers meeting the water requirements of agriculture, industries, domestic sector even in the months of summer when large tracts of the country go dry. Therefore, it is important to monitor and assess the state of snow and glaciers and to know the sustainability of glaciers in view of changing global scenarios of climate and water security of the nation. Any information pertaining to Himalayan glaciers is normally difficult to be obtained by conventional means due to its harsh weather and rugged terrains. Due to the ecological diversity and geographical vividness, major part of the Indian Himalaya is largely un-investigated. Considering the fact that Himalayan glaciers are situated in a harsh environment, conventional techniques of their study is challenging and difficult both in terms of logistics and finances whereas the satellite remote sensing offers a potential mode for monitoring glaciers in long term. In order to gain an updated overview of the present state of the glacier cover and its changes since the previous inventories, an attempt has been made to generate a new remotesensing- derived glacier inventory on 1:50,000 scale for Bhaga basin (N32°28'19.7'' - N33°0'9.9'' ; E76°56'16.3'' - E77°25'23.7'' ) Western Himalaya covering an area of 1695.63 km2. having 231 glaciers and occupying glacierized area of 385.17 ±3.71 km2. ranging from 0.03 km2. to 29.28 km2. Glacier inventory has been carried out using high resolution IRS P6 LISS III data of 2011, ASTER DEM and other ancillary data. Specific measurements of mapped glacier features are the inputs for generating the glacier inventory data sheet with 37 parameters as per the UNESCO/TTS format, 11 additional parameters associated with the de-glaciated valley as per the suggestions of Space Application Center Ahmadabad and 9 newly introduced parameters of present study. The data sheet provides glacier wise details for each glacier on the significant glacier parameters like morphology, dimensions, orientation, elevation, etc. for both the active glacier component as well as the associated de-glaciated valley features. Assessment of recent variation in the glacierized area between 2001 and 2011. Results indicate that 231 glaciers covering an area of 391.56 ±3.76 km2. in 2001 has been reduced to 385.17 ±3.71 km2. in 2011; a loss of 1.63 ±1.0% in glacierized area within a period of 10 years. The present paper brings out the methodology adopted and salient results of the glacier inventory carried out which will help to enrich the existing database required for water resources assessment of the country and also meet the requirements of various researches working on climate change related studies.

Birajdar, F.; Venkataraman, G.; Bahuguna, I.; Samant, H.

2014-11-01

376

Ocean properties, ice-ocean interactions, and calving front morphology at two major west Greenland glaciers  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Warm sub-polar mode water (SPMW) has been identified as a primary driver of mass loss of marine terminating glaciers draining the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS) yet, the specific mechanisms by which SPMW interacts with these tidewater termini remain uncertain. We present oceanographic data from Rink Glacier (RG) and Store Glacier (SG) fjords, two major marine outlets draining the western sector of the GrIS into Baffin Bay over the contrasting melt-seasons of 2009 and 2010. Submarine melting occurs wherever ice is in direct contact with warmer water and the consistent presence of 2.8 °C SPMW adjacent to both ice fronts below 400 m throughout all surveys indicates that melting is maintained by a combination of molecular diffusion and large scale, weak convection, diffusional (hereafter called ubiquitous) melting. At shallower depths (50-200 m), cold, brine-enriched water (BEW) formed over winter appears to persist into the summer thereby buffering this melt by thermal insulation. Our surveys reveal four main modes of glacier-ocean interaction, governed by water depth and the rate of glacier runoff water (GRW) injected into the fjord. Deeper than 200 m, submarine melt is the only process observed, regardless of the intensity of GRW or the depth of injection. However, between the surface and 200 m depth, three further distinct modes are observed governed by the GRW discharge. When GRW is weak (?1000 m3 s-1), upward motion of the water adjacent to the glacier front is subdued, weak forced or free convection plus diffusional submarine melting dominates at depth, and seaward outflow of melt water occurs from the glacier toe to the base of the insulating BEW. During medium intensity GRW (?1500 m3 s-1), mixing with SPMW yields deep mixed runoff water (DMRW), which rises as a buoyant plume and intensifies local submarine melting (enhanced buoyancy-driven melting). In this case, DMRW typically attains hydrostatic equilibrium and flows seaward at an intermediate depth of ?50-150 m, taking the BEW with it. Strong GRW (? 2000 m3 s-1) yields vigorous, buoyant DMRW, which has sufficient vertical momentum to break the sea surface before sinking and flowing seaward, thereby leaving much of the BEW largely intact. Whilst these modes of glacier-ocean interaction significantly affect the ice-ocean interaction in the upper water column (0-200 m), below 200 m both RG and SG are dominated by the weak forced convection/diffusional (herein termed ubiquitous) melting due to the presence of SPMW.

Chauché, N.; Hubbard, A.; Gascard, J.-C.; Box, J. E.; Bates, R.; Koppes, M.; Sole, A.; Patton, H.

2013-11-01

377

Distinct patterns of seasonal Greenland glacier velocity  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Predicting Greenland Ice Sheet mass loss due to ice dynamics requires a complete understanding of spatiotemporal velocity fluctuations and related control mechanisms. We present a 5 year record of seasonal velocity measurements for 55 marine-terminating glaciers distributed around the ice sheet margin, along with ice-front position and runoff data sets for each glacier. Among glaciers with substantial speed variations, we find three distinct seasonal velocity patterns. One pattern indicates relatively high glacier sensitivity to ice-front position. The other two patterns are more prevalent and appear to be meltwater controlled. These patterns reveal differences in which some subglacial systems likely transition seasonally from inefficient, distributed hydrologic networks to efficient, channelized drainage, while others do not. The difference may be determined by meltwater availability, which in some regions may be influenced by perennial firn aquifers. Our results highlight the need to understand subglacial meltwater availability on an ice sheet-wide scale to predict future dynamic changes.

Moon, Twila; Joughin, Ian; Smith, Ben; Broeke, Michiel R.; Berg, Willem Jan; Noël, Brice; Usher, Mika

2014-10-01

378

On the Formation of Cirques by Glaciers  

E-print Network

Range, New Zealand: Earth Surface Processes and Landforms,Range, New Zealand” Earth Surface Processes and LandformsNew Zealand Location Table 3.1. Cirque glacier erosion rates from the literature. landform

Sanders, John Webb

2011-01-01

379

Icebergs and Glaciers - Issue 15, August 2009  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This issue of the free online magazine, Beyond Penguins and Polar Bears, contains content knowledge and instructional resources about icebergs and glaciers and the scientific principles of density and buoyancy.

The Ohio State University

380

Common Misconceptions about Icebergs and Glaciers  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This article describes some common misconceptions that elementary students may have about icebergs and glaciers (including density and buoyancy). It also includes suggestions for formative assessment and teaching for conceptual change.

Jessica Fries-Gaither

381

Underwater acoustic signatures of glacier calving  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Climate-driven ice-water interactions in the contact zone between marine-terminating glaciers and the ocean surface show a dynamic and complex nature. Tidewater glaciers lose volume through the poorly understood process of calving. A detailed description of the mechanisms controlling the course of calving is essential for the reliable estimation and prediction of mass loss from glaciers. Here we present the potential of hydroacoustic methods to investigate different modes of ice detachments. High-frequency underwater ambient noise recordings are combined with synchronized, high-resolution, time-lapse photography of the Hans Glacier cliff in Hornsund Fjord, Spitsbergen, to identify three types of calving events: typical subaerial, sliding subaerial, and submarine. A quantitative analysis of the data reveals a robust correlation between ice impact energy and acoustic emission at frequencies below 200 Hz for subaerial calving. We suggest that relatively inexpensive acoustic methods can be successfully used to provide quantitative descriptions of the various calving types.

Glowacki, O.; Deane, G. B.; Moskalik, M.; Blondel, Ph.; Tegowski, J.; Blaszczyk, M.

2015-02-01

382

Malaspina Glacier, Alaska, Perspective with Landsat Overlay  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Malaspina Glacier in southeastern Alaska is considered the classic example of a piedmont glacier. Piedmont glaciers occur where valley glaciers exit a mountain range onto broad lowlands, are no longer laterally confined, and spread to become wide lobes. Malaspina Glacier is actually a compound glacier, formed by the merger of several valley glaciers, the most prominent of which seen here are Agassiz Glacier (left) and Seward Glacier (right). In total, Malaspina Glacier is up to 65 kilometers (40 miles) wide and extends up to 45 kilometers (28 miles) from the mountain front nearly to the sea.

This perspective view was created from a Landsat satellite image and an elevation model generated by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM). Landsat views both visible and infrared light, which have been combined here into a color composite that generally shows glacial ice in light blue, snow in white, vegetation in green, bare rock in grays and tans, and the ocean (foreground) in dark blue. The back (northern) edge of the data set forms a false horizon that meets a false sky.

Glaciers erode rocks, carry them down slope, and deposit them at the edge of the melting ice, typically in elongated piles called moraines. The moraine patterns at Malaspina Glacier are quite spectacular in that they have huge contortions that result from the glacier crinkling as it gets pushed from behind by the faster-moving valley glaciers.

Glaciers are sensitive indicators of climatic change. They can grow and thicken with increasing snowfall and/or decreased melting. Conversely, they can retreat and thin if snowfall decreases and/or atmospheric temperatures rise and cause increased melting. Landsat imaging has been an excellent tool for mapping the changing geographic extent of glaciers since 1972. The elevation measurements taken by SRTM in February 2000 now provide a near-global baseline against which future non-polar region glacial thinning or thickening can be assessed.

Elevation data used in this image were acquired by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour, launched on February 11, 2000. The mission used the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. The Shuttle Radar Topography Mission was designed to collect three-dimensional measurements of the Earth's surface. To collect the 3-D data, engineers added a 60-meter-long (200-foot) mast, installed additional C-band and X-band antennas, and improved tracking and navigation devices. The mission is a cooperative project between NASA, the National Imagery and Mapping Agency of the U.S. Department of Defense, and the German and Italian space agencies. It is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, for NASA's Earth Science Enterprise, Washington, DC. Size: 55 kilometers wide x 55 kilometers distance (34 x 34 miles) Location: 60 deg N latitude, 140 deg W longitude Orientation: View North, 2X vertical exaggeration Image Data: Landsat Thematic Mapper false-color image Original Data Resolution: SRTM 1 arcsecond (30 meters or 98 feet), Landsat 30 meters (98 feet) Date Acquired: February 2000 (SRTM), 31 August 2000 (Landsat)

2003-01-01

383

Hidden Lake in Glacier National Park, Montana  

USGS Multimedia Gallery

Hidden Lake in Glacier National Park, Montana, USA, a high mountain lake in an alpine setting. This lake is kept full of water mainly from precipitation runoff from the surrounding hills and, in the spring, from snowmelt....

384

Interferometric and polarimetric SAR for glacier investigation in west China  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The glacier is an important factor in climatologic and hydrological investigations, especially in western China. Remote sensing plays an important role for glacier inventorying and monitoring work. SAR systems have an ability to observe the earth's surface, independent of cloud conditions. Particularly, the interferometry and polarization SAR provide a useful tool for glacier investigation, such as extraction of glacial border, measurement of glacier movement and so on. In this paper, we demonstrate the methods and results for the glacier identification integrated intensity of backscattering from Envisat/ASAR images, coherence coefficients of repeat pass interferometry from ASAR and PALSAR, and full polarimetric SAR from PALSAR0 The movements of several types of glaciers were retrievaled using the SAR interferometry, such as continental glacier, sub-continental glacier and maritime glacier.

Li, Zhen; Zhou, Jianmin; Tian, Bangsen; Huang, Lei

2009-09-01

385

Interferometric and polarimetric SAR for glacier investigation in west China  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The glacier is an important factor in climatologic and hydrological investigations, especially in western China. Remote sensing plays an important role for glacier inventorying and monitoring work. SAR systems have an ability to observe the earth's surface, independent of cloud conditions. Particularly, the interferometry and polarization SAR provide a useful tool for glacier investigation, such as extraction of glacial border, measurement of glacier movement and so on. In this paper, we demonstrate the methods and results for the glacier identification integrated intensity of backscattering from Envisat/ASAR images, coherence coefficients of repeat pass interferometry from ASAR and PALSAR, and full polarimetric SAR from PALSAR0 The movements of several types of glaciers were retrievaled using the SAR interferometry, such as continental glacier, sub-continental glacier and maritime glacier.

Li, Zhen; Zhou, Jianmin; Tian, Bangsen; Huang, Lei

2010-11-01

386

Measurement of the Dissociation-Equilibrium Constants for Low Affinity Antibiotic Binding Interaction with Bacterial Ribosomes by the T2 (CPMG) and Line-Broadening Methods  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this study the dissociation constants of the low antibiotic-ribosomes interaction were determined by the T2 (CPMG), the Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill spin-echo decay rate and the line-broadening methods. Three MLSB antibiotics were studied, a macrolide roxithromycin, a ketolide HMR 3647 and a lincosamide clindamycin for their weak interaction with three bacterial ribosomes, E. coli, Staphylococcus aureus sensitive and resistant to erythromycin. Nous avons mesuré la constante de dissociation, Kd correspondant à l'interaction faible antibiotique-ribosome bactérien pour des antibiotiques de différentes classes, un macrolide (roxithromycine), un kétolide (HMR 3647) et une lincosamide (clindamycine) avec des ribosomes de différentes souches bactériennes (E. coli, Staphylococcus aureus sensible ou résistant à l'erythromycin) par deux méthodes : l'une basée sur la variation des largeurs de raies et l'autre sur les temps de relaxation transversaux T2 en utilisant une séquence CPMG.

Verdier, L.; Gharbi-Benarous, J.; Bertho, G.; Mauvais, P.; Girault, J.-P.

1999-10-01

387

Towards a complete World Glacier Inventory  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The need for an inventory of the world's glaciers evolved during the International Hydrological Decade (1965-74). As a result, guidelines were established in the mid 1970s to compile a worldwide detailed inventory of existing perennial snow and ice masses. Following these international guidelines, several countries started compiling national glacier inventories based primarily on aerial photographs and maps. In the 1980s, the World Glacier Inventory (WGI) database was launched together with a status report about global and regional glacierised surface areas for the second half of the 20th century. These estimates were based on the detailed inventory data together with preliminary estimates of the remaining glacierised regions derived from early satellite imagery. In the late 1990s, the Global Land Ice Measurements from Space (GLIMS) database was initiated to continue the inventory task with space-borne sensors. In the WGI, glaciers are represented by geographical point coordinates. The GLIMS database includes digital outlines. Both include exact time stamps and tabular information on glacier classifications, length, area, orientation, and altitude range. Both are regularly updated with newly available data: the WGI stores point information for the second half of the 20th century whereas the GLIMS includes digital outlines for the 21st century. Since these detailed glacier inventories are not (yet) globally complete, there have been several efforts towards preliminary estimates of the overall global glacier coverage. A first, well elaborated one was included in the original status report of the WGI, published in 1989, and was refined in 2005 with information from other sources by Dyurgerov and Meier. Other studies used the detailed WGI, or an extended format by Cogley, for regional or global up-scaling of glacier extents. In 2003, Cogley published a global map of percentage glacier coverage per 1°x1° grid box (GGHydro) that is widely used for modeling at global scale. A first globally and almost complete map with (generalized) digital outlines of all ice covered regions (incl. Greenland but excluding Antarctica) was derived from ESRI's Digital Chart of the World (DCW) and other sources by Raup and colleagues in 2000. Most recently, Arendt and colleagues produced the Randolph dataset which combines available outlines from the GLIMS, DCW, and WGI datasets as well as from many other (often unpublished) sources by using the highest quality version in each region. However, while having the advantage of being almost complete, these global estimates lack time stamps and attributes for individual glaciers. The present work provides a brief review of the various efforts, its methodological differences, and findings towards the completion of a World Glacier Inventory.

Zemp, Michael

2013-04-01

388

Glacier area and length changes in Norway from repeat inventories  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this study, we assess glacier area and length changes in mainland Norway from repeat Landsat TM/ETM+-derived inventories and digitized topographic maps. The multi-temporal glacier inventory consists of glacier outlines from three time ranges: 1947 to 1985 (GIn50), 1988 to 1997 (GI1990), and 1999 to 2006 (GI2000). For the northernmost regions, we include an additional inventory (GI1900) based on historic maps surveyed between 1895 and 1907. Area and length changes are assessed per glacier unit, 36 subregions, and for three main parts of Norway: southern, central, and northern. The results show a decrease in the glacierized area from 2994 km2 in GIn50 to 2668 km2 in GI2000 (total 2722 glacier units), corresponding to an area reduction of -326 km2, or -11% of the initial GIn50 area. The average length change for the full epoch (within GIn50 and GI2000) is -240 m. Overall, the comparison reveals both area and length reductions as general patterns, even though some glaciers have advanced. The three northernmost subregions show the highest retreat rates, whereas the central part of Norway shows the lowest change rates. Glacier area and length changes indicate that glaciers in maritime areas in southern Norway have retreated more than glaciers in the interior, and glaciers in the north have retreated more than southern glaciers. These observed spatial trends in glacier change are related to a combination of several factors such as glacier geometry, elevation, and continentality, especially in southern Norway.

Winsvold, S. H.; Andreassen, L. M.; Kienholz, C.

2014-10-01

389

International Symposium on Fast Glacier Flow  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Cryospheric Sciences Program "International Symposium on Fast Glacier Flow" (PI, C. Lingle) provided partial support for publication of Annals of Glaciology 36 by the International Glaciological Society. Annals of Glaciology is a peer-reviewed journal. Annals 36, which was published in 2003, contains 39 peer-reviewed and edited papers from the International Symposium on Fast Glacier Flow, which was held in Yakutat, Alaska, 10-14 June 2002.

Lingle, Craig S.

1990-01-01

390

Regional Observations of Alaska Glacier Dynamics  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Alaska glaciers contribute more to sea level rise than any other glacierized mountain region in the world. Alaska is loosing ~84 Gt of ice annually, which accounts for ~0.23 mm/yr of SLR (Luthcke et al., 2008). Complex glacier flow dynamics, frequently related to tidewater environments, is the primary cause of such rapid mass loss (Larsen et al., 2007). Indirect observations indicate these complex flow dynamics occur on many glaciers throughout Alaska, but no comprehensive velocity measurements exist. We are working to measure glacier surface velocities throughout Alaska using synthetic aperture radar (SAR) offset tracking. This work focuses on the Seward/Malaspina, Bering, Columbia, Kaskawulsh, and Hubbard Glaciers and uses a MODIS land surface temperature "melt-day" product (Hall et al., 2006, 2008) to identify potential links between velocity variability and summertime temperature fluctuations. Hall, D., R. Williams Jr., K. Casey, N. DiGirolamo, and Z. Wan (2006), Satellite-derived, melt-season surface temperature of the Greenland Ice Sheet (2000-2005) and its relationship to mass balance, Geophysical Research Letters, 33(11). Hall, D., J. Box, K. Casey, S. Hook, C. Shuman, and K. Steffen (2008), Comparison of satellite-derived and in-situ observations of ice and snow surface temperatures over Greenland, Remote Sensing of Environment, 112(10), 3739-3749. Larsen, C. F., R. J. Motyka, A. A. Arendt, K. A. Echelmeyer, and P. E. Geissler (2007), Glacier changes in southeast Alaska and northwest British Columbia and contribution to sea level rise, J. Geophys. Res. Luthcke, S., A. Arendt, D. Rowlands, J. McCarthy, and C. Larsen (2008), Recent glacier mass changes in the Gulf of Alaska region from GRACE mascon solutions, Journal of Glaciology, 54(188), 767-777.

Burgess, E. W.; Forster, R. R.; Hall, D. K.

2010-12-01

391

Impacts of Change in Glacier Ice  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This is a five-activity module that explores the evidence for and impacts of melting glacial ice, with resources from major institutions and scientists who study glaciers -- primarily in Arctic areas. The suite of activities includes both glaciers and melting ice, as well as the impact of melt water downstream. Each activity follows the 5E model of Engagement, Exploration, Explanation, Elaboration, and Evaluation.

Alaska Sea Grant

392

Fuzzy Cognitive Maps for Glacier Hazards Assessment: Application to Predicting the Potential for Glacier Lake Outbursts  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Glaciers and ice sheets are among the largest unstable parts of the solid Earth. Generally, glaciers are devoid of resources (other than water), are dangerous, are unstable and no infrastructure is normally built directly on their surfaces. Areas down valley from large alpine glaciers are also commonly unstable due to landslide potential of moraines, debris flows, snow avalanches, outburst floods from glacier lakes, and other dynamical alpine processes; yet there exists much development and human occupation of some disaster-prone areas. Satellite remote sensing can be extremely effective in providing cost-effective and time- critical information. Space-based imagery can be used to monitor glacier outlines and their lakes, including processes such as iceberg calving and debris accumulation, as well as changing thicknesses and flow speeds. Such images can also be used to make preliminary identifications of specific hazardous spots and allows preliminary assessment of possible modes of future disaster occurrence. Autonomous assessment of glacier conditions and their potential for hazards would present a major advance and permit systematized analysis of more data than humans can assess. This technical leap will require the design and implementation of Artificial Intelligence (AI) algorithms specifically designed to mimic glacier experts’ reasoning. Here, we introduce the theory of Fuzzy Cognitive Maps (FCM) as an AI tool for predicting and assessing natural hazards in alpine glacier environments. FCM techniques are employed to represent expert knowledge of glaciers physical processes. A cognitive model embedded in a fuzzy logic framework is constructed via the synergistic interaction between glaciologists and AI experts. To verify the effectiveness of the proposed AI methodology as applied to predicting hazards in glacier environments, we designed and implemented a FCM that addresses the challenging problem of autonomously assessing the Glacier Lake Outburst Flow Potential and Impound Water Upstream Flow Potential. The FCM is constructed using what is currently our understanding of how glacier lake outbursts occur, whereas the causal connection between concepts is defined to capture the expertise of glacier scientists. The proposed graph contains 27 nodes and a network of connections that represent the causal link between concepts. To test the developed FCM, we defined three scenarios representing glacier lake environmental conditions that either occurred or that are likely to occur in such highly dynamic environments. For each case, the FCM has been initialized using observables extracted from hypothesized remote sensing imagery. The map, which converges to a fixed point for all of the test scenarios within 15 iterations, shows reasoning consistent with that of glacier experts. The FCM-based cognitive approach has the potential to be the AI core of real-time operational hazards assessment and detection systems.

Furfaro, R.; Kargel, J. S.; Fink, W.; Bishop, M. P.

2010-12-01

393

Glacier, glacier lake and permafrost distribution in the Brahmaputra river basin  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Glacier distribution, glacier changes, glacier lakes and their changes, and mountain permafrost occurrence are investigated and compared to climate scenarios in order to assess the influence of melting glaciers and degrading permafrost on the long-term runoff of the Upper Brahmaputra River. In this contribution we derive glacier inventories for three test areas in the Upper Brahmaputra River Basin based on semi-automatic classification of Landsat data of 2000 and supplementary ASTER data. The resulting glacier outlines are intersected with the glacier outlines of the Chinese Glacier Inventory from about the 1970s-1980s and compared to selected Corona satellite data from the 1960s. In total, an area loss of about 18% was observed over the period investigated. We estimate the according ice volume loss to be on the order of 20%. Using the Chinese Glacier Inventory and our inventory results we upscale the above glacier change to the entire Upper Brahmaputra River Basin. Glacier lakes are mapped for the boundary region between Bhutan and Tibet using 1990 and 2000 Landsat imagery. Changes in lake area are compared to the observed glacier changes. The permafrost distribution in the study region is estimated using regionally adapted versions of two empirical models, both originally developed to estimate the permafrost distribution on a regional scale in the Swiss Alps. One model (PERMAKART) applies a topo-climatic key, based on the relation between altitude above sea level, aspect, and permafrost probability. The second model (PERMAMAP) is based on a linear spatial relation between the bottom temperature of the winter snow cover (BTS), the mean annual air temperature (MAAT) and the potential direct solar radiation. Adaptation of the models is done through the inclusion of ground based meteorological data and validated using distribution patterns of rock glaciers. The latter are mapped from high resolution satellite data such as CORONA and Quickbird imagery. Both, the observed glacier changes and the modelled permafrost distribution are compared to climate simulations in order to estimate the recent and near-future climate change impact on the glaciers and mountain permafrost in the Upper Brahmaputra River basin.

Kääb, A.; Frauenfelder, R.; Hoelzle, M.; Sossna, I.; Avian, M.

2009-04-01

394

Using airborne LiDAR and USGS DEM data for assessing rock glaciers and glaciers  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Varying topographic and geologic conditions affect the location of rock glaciers. Despite being found worldwide, rock glaciers are often confused with glacier counterparts or other periglacial landforms. Light detection and ranging (LiDAR) data, because of its accuracy and resolution, may help the assessment of topographic variables needed to form rock glaciers or help reveal unique characteristics to enhance regional, automatic mapping. The objectives of this paper are to compare the elevation, slope, aspect, hillshade, and curvature for 1 m LiDAR and 10 m US Geological Survey (USGS) Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) from the Andrews and Taylor Glaciers with the Taylor Rock Glacier in Colorado. The utility of these data sources will be assessed for landform discrimination and to evaluate the uncertainty between the DEMs. According to the LiDAR data, the Taylor Rock Glacier exists at a lower elevation and has a gentler slope compared to the glaciers. Each landform has steep areas from which snow and debris are delivered. The Andrews Glacier has the most northern aspect, which helps maintain it through snow accumulation and reduced insolation. Glaciers exhibit a concave mean curvature, whereas the Taylor Rock Glacier has a convex mean curvature. The fine resolution of the LiDAR data clearly identifies some distinct characteristics. On the Taylor Rock Glacier, ridges, furrows, and a pronounced front slope were easily identifiable on the LiDAR DEM, whereas crevasses, the boundary between snow and debris covered surfaces, and a lateral moraine were detectable near the Andrews Glacier. The accuracy assessment revealed that at a common 10 m resolution, the USGS DEM estimated a maximum elevation about 150 m greater compared to the LiDAR data in areas of rugged topography surrounding the landforms. A comparison of root mean squared errors (RMSE) between the LiDAR and USGS DEMs showed that the Taylor Rock Glacier has the lowest RMSE for the elevation and the curvature variables. As a result, readily available USGS DEMs may better for analysis to characterize the topographic setting of landforms at the regional scale. At the fine scale, however, the micro-topography of rock glaciers is illuminated much more clearly on the LiDAR data, making it an ideal, yet costly source, for feature extraction.

Janke, Jason R.

2013-08-01

395

The GLIMS geospatial glacier database: A new tool for studying glacier change  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Global Land Ice Measurement from Space (GLIMS) project is a cooperative effort of over sixty institutions world-wide with the goal of inventorying a majority of the world's estimated 160 000 glaciers. Each institution (called a Regional Center, or RC) oversees the analysis of satellite imagery for a particular region containing glacier ice. Data received by the GLIMS team at the National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC) in Boulder, Colorado are ingested into a spatially-enabled database (PostGIS) and made available via a website featuring an interactive map, and a Web-Mapping Service (WMS). The WMS, an Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC)-compliant web interface, makes GLIMS glacier data available to other data servers. The GLIMS Glacier Database is accessible on the World Wide Web at " http://nsidc.org/glims/". There, users can browse custom maps, display various data layers, query information within the GLIMS database, and download query results in different GIS-compatible formats. Map layers include glacier outlines, footprints of ASTER satellite optical images acquired over glaciers, and Regional Center information. The glacier and ASTER footprint layers may be queried for scalar attribute data, such as analyst name and date of contribution for glacier data, and acquisition time and browse imagery for the ASTER footprint layer. We present an example analysis of change in Cordillera Blanca glaciers, as determined by comparing data in the GLIMS Glacier Database to historical data. Results show marked changes in that system over the last 30 years, but also point out the need for establishing clear protocols for glacier monitoring from remote-sensing data.

Raup, Bruce; Racoviteanu, Adina; Khalsa, Siri Jodha Singh; Helm, Christopher; Armstrong, Richard; Arnaud, Yves

2007-03-01

396

The slow advance of a calving glacier: Hubbard Glacier, Alaska, U.S.A  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Hubbard Glacier is the largest tidewater glacier in North America. In contrast to most glaciers in Alaska and northwestern Canada, Hubbard Glacier thickened and advanced during the 20th century. This atypical behavior is an important example of how insensitive to climate a glacier can become during parts of the calving glacier cycle. As this glacier continues to advance, it will close the seaward entrance to 50 km long Russell Fjord and create a glacier-dammed, brackish-water lake. This paper describes measured changes in ice thickness, ice speed, terminus advance and fjord bathymetry of Hubbard Glacier, as determined from airborne laser altimetry, aerial photogrammetry, satellite imagery and bathymetric measurements. The data show that the lower regions of the glacier have thickened by as much as 83 m in the last 41 years, while the entire glacier increased in volume by 14.1 km3. Ice speeds are generally decreasing near the calving face from a high of 16.5 m d-1 in 1948 to 11.5 m d-1 in 2001. The calving terminus advanced at an average rate of about 16 m a-1 between 1895 and 1948 and accelerated to 32 m a-1 since 1948. However, since 1986, the advance of the part of the terminus in Disenchantment Bay has slowed to 28 m a-1. Bathymetric data from the lee slope of the submarine terminal moraine show that between 1978 and 1999 the moraine advanced at an average rate of 32 m a-1, which is the same as that of the calving face.

Trabant, D.C.; Krimmel, R.M.; Echelmeyer, K.A.; Zirnheld, S.L.; Elsberg, D.H.

2003-01-01

397

Accounting robustly for instantaneous chemical equilibriums in reactive transport: A numerical method  

E-print Network

Accounting robustly for instantaneous chemical equilibriums in reactive transport: A numerical, liquid-liquid extraction, mass transfer, instantaneous chemical equilibriums, method of lines, DAE, bound of interest here is the additional possibility of accounting for "instantaneous" chemical equilibriums. Here

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

398

Diverse calving patterns linked to glacier geometry  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Iceberg calving has been implicated in the retreat and acceleration of glaciers and ice shelves along the margins of the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets. Accurate projections of sea-level rise therefore require an understanding of how and why calving occurs. Unfortunately, calving is a complex process and previous models of the phenomenon have not reproduced the diverse patterns of iceberg calving observed in nature. Here we present a numerical model that simulates the disparate calving regimes observed, including the detachment of large tabular bergs from floating ice tongues, the disintegration of ice shelves and the capsizing of smaller bergs from grounded glaciers that terminate in deep water. Our model treats glacier ice as a granular material made of interacting boulders of ice that are bonded together. Simulations suggest that different calving regimes are controlled by glacier geometry, which controls the stress state within the glacier. We also find that calving is a two-stage process that requires both ice fracture and transport of detached icebergs away from the calving front. We suggest that, as a result, rapid iceberg discharge is possible in regions where highly crevassed glaciers are grounded deep beneath sea level, indicating portions of Greenland and Antarctica that may be vulnerable to rapid ice loss through catastrophic disintegration.

Bassis, J. N.; Jacobs, S.

2013-10-01

399

Rheology of rock glaciers: a preliminary assessment  

SciTech Connect

Movement of rock debris under the influence of gravity, i.e., mass movement, generates a range of phenomena from soil creep, through solifluction,debris flows and rock glaciers to rock falls. Whereas the resultant forms of these phenomena are different, common elements in the mechanics of movement are utilized in the basic interpretation of the processes of formation. Measurements of morphologic variables provide data for deductive analyses of processes that operate too slowly to observe or for processes that generated relict phenomena. External and internal characteristics or rock glacier morphometry and measured rates of motion serve as the basis for the development of a rheological model to explain phenomena classified as rock glaciers. A rock glacier in the Sangre de Cristo Mountains of Southern Colorado, which exhibits a large number of ridges and furrows and lichen bare fronts of lobes, suggests present day movement. A strain-net established on the surface provides evidence of movement characteristics. These data plus morphologic and fabric data suggest two rheological models to explain the flow of this rock glacier. Model one is based upon perfect plastic flow and model two is based upon stratified fluid movement with viscosity changing with depth. These models permit a better understanding of the movement mechanics and demonstrate that catastrophic events and slow creep contribute to the morphologic characteristics of this rock glacier.

Giardino, J.R.; Vitek, J.D.; Hoskins, E.R.

1985-01-01

400

What Influences Climate and Glacier Change in the Southwestern China?  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The subject of climate change in the areas of the Tibetan Plateau (TP) and the Himalayas has taken on increasing importance because of available water resources from their mountain glaciers. Many of these glaciers over the region have been retreating, while some are advancing and stable. Other studies report that some glaciers in the Himalayas show acceleration on their shrinkage. However, the causes of the glacier meltings are still difficult to grasp because of the complexity of climatic change and its influence on glacier issues. However, it is vital that we pursue further study to enable the future prediction on glacier changes.

Yasunari, Teppei J.

2012-01-01

401

Controls on advance of tidewater glaciers: Results from numerical modeling applied to Columbia Glacier  

Microsoft Academic Search

A one-dimensional numerical ice flow model is used to study the advance of a tidewater glacier into deep water. Starting with ice-free conditions, the model simulates glacier growth at higher elevations followed by advance on land to the head of the fjord. Once the terminus reaches a bed below sea level, calving is initiated. A series of simulations was carried

F. M. Nick; C. J. van der Veen; J. Oerlemans

2007-01-01

402

Modeled Climate-Induced Glacier Change in Glacier National Park, 1850–2100  

Microsoft Academic Search

mate change. We determined the melt rate and spatial distribution of glaciers under two possible future climate scenarios, one based on carbon dioxide-induced global warming and the other on a linear temperature extrapolation. Under the former scenario, all glaciers in the basin will dis-appear by the year 2030, despite predicted increases in precipitation; under the latter, melting is slower. Using

MYRNA H. P. HALL; DANIEL B. FAGRE

2003-01-01

403

Climate sensitivity of Tibetan Plateau glaciers - past and future implications  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Tibetan Plateau is one of the most extensively glaciated, non-Polar regions of the world, and its mountain glaciers are the primary source of melt water for several of the largest Asian rivers. During glacial cycles, Tibetan Plateau glaciers advanced and retreated multiple times, but remained restricted to the highest mountain areas as valley glaciers and ice caps. Because glacier extent is dominantly controlled by climate, the past extent of Tibetan glaciers provide information on regional climate. Here we present a study analyzing the past maximum extents of glaciers on the Tibetan Plateau with the output of a 3D glacier model, in an effort to quantify Tibetan Plateau climate. We have mapped present-day glaciers and glacial landforms deposited by formerly more extensive glaciers in eight mountain regions across the Tibetan Plateau, allowing us to define present-day and past maximum glacier outlines. Using a high-resolution (250 m) higher-order glacier model calibrated against present-day glacier extents, we have quantified the climate perturbations required to expand present-day glaciers to their past maximum extents. We find that a modest cooling of at most 6°C for a few thousand years is enough to attain past maximum extents, even with 25-75% precipitation reduction. This evidence for limited cooling indicates that the temperature of the Tibetan Plateau remained relatively stable over Quaternary glacial cycles. Given the significant sensitivity to temperature change, the expectation is perhaps that a future warmer climate might result in intense glacier reduction. We have tested this hypothesis and modeled the future glacier development for the three mountain regions with the largest present-day glacier cover using a projected warming of 2.8 to 6.2°C within 100 years (envelope limits from IPCC). These scenarios result in dramatic glacier reductions, including 24-100% ice volume loss after 100 years and 77-100% ice volume loss after 300 years.

Heyman, Jakob; Hubbard, Alun; Stroeven, Arjen P.; Harbor, Jonathan M.

2013-04-01