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Sample records for glancing angle deposited

  1. Argon-Assisted Glancing Angle Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorge, Jason Brian

    Glancing angle deposition (GLAD) is a physical vapour deposition (PVD) technique capable of fabricating highly porous thin films with controllable film morphology on the 10 nm length scale. The GLAD process is flexible and may be used on virtually any PVD-compatible material. This makes GLAD a useful technique in many applications including photovoltaics, humidity sensing, and photonic devices. Conventional, dense films grown at normal incidence concurrent with ion or energetic neutral bombardment have been reported to have higher film density than unbombarded films. In a similar sense, highly porous GLAD films grown with concurrent bombardment should generate films with new interesting properties and extend the versatility of the GLAD process. The research presented in this thesis investigates the use of energetic neutral bombardment during GLAD film growth to produce new film morphologies. Here, with increasing bombardment, the column tilt increases, film density increases, and specific surface area decreases. A film simultaneously exhibiting high column tilt angle and film density is enabled by incorporating bombardment concurrent with GLAD film growth. This in turn results in films with larger principal refractive indices, but a smaller normalized in plane birefringence. Bombarded films were also found to be compatible with the phisweep process which helps decouple the column tilt angle from film density. Characterization of the bombardment-assisted growth process indicates that both sputtering and bombardment-induced diffusion play a role in the modification of film morphology. The film property modifications which arise as a result of bombardment-assisted growth lead to device improvements in a number of applications. Bombardment was used to fabricate square spiral photonic crystal structures with increased column tilt which bear a closer resemblance to optimized simulated structures than conventionally-grown GLAD films. The increase in column tilt angle and

  2. Helical structured thin films deposited at a glancing angle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jen, Yi-Jun; Jheng, Ci-Yao; Chan, San; Tseng, Chien-Hoa

    2015-08-01

    Gold nanohelical structured thin films (NHFs) were tried to be deposited on a glass substrate using glancing angle deposition technique. At a deposition angle of 89°, gold NHFs were fabricated by introducing liquid nitrogen to flow under the backside of BK7 glass substrate holder. The temperature of substrate was reduced to be less than -140°C before deposition. The spin rate was controlled with respect to the deposition rate to grow three different sized nanohelices. The morphology and optical properties of Au NHFs were measured and compared between the three samples. The strong g-factor implies high sensitivity of deposited helixes in biosensing in the future.

  3. Growth of Nanowires by High-Temperature Glancing Angle Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Motofumi; Minamitake, Haruhiko; Kita, Ryo; Hamachi, Kenji; Hara, Hideki; Nakajima, Kaoru; Kimura, Kenji; Hsu, Chia-Wei; Chou, Li-Jen

    2013-11-01

    We have demonstrated that nanowires of various metals, Ge, and Ga2O3 can be grown by high-temperature glancing angle deposition (HT-GLAD). The nanowires of metals including Al, Cu, Ag, Au, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, and Zn are self-catalyzed, while the nanowires of other materials such as Ge and Ga2O3 are catalyzed by Au nanoparticles. However, once the nanowires start to grow, the growth modes of the HT-GLAD nanowires are fundamentally the same, i.e., nanowires with uniform diameter grow only when the vapor is incident at a very high glancing angle and reach a length larger than 1-8 µm even though the number of deposited atoms corresponds to the average thickness of 20-30 nm. This suggests that there is a universal growth mechanism for the nanowires grown by HT-GLAD.

  4. Large-scale Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Glancing Angle Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubartt, Bradley; Liu, Xuejing; Amar, Jacques

    2013-03-01

    While a variety of methods have been developed to carry out atomistic simulations of thin-film growth at small deposition angles with respect to the substrate normal, due to the complex morphology as well as the existence of multiple scattering of depositing atoms by the growing thin-film, realistically modeling the deposition process for large deposition angles can be quite challenging. Accordingly, we have developed a computationally efficient method based on the use of a single graphical processing unit (GPU) to carry out molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of the deposition and growth of thin-films via glancing angle deposition. Using this method we have carried out large-scale MD simulations, based on an embedded-atom-method potential, of Cu/Cu(100) growth up to 20 monolayers for deposition angles ranging from 50° to 85° and for both random and fixed azimuthal angles. Our results for the thin-film porosity, roughness, lateral correlation length, and density vs height will be presented and compared with experiments. Results for the dependence of the microstructure, grain-size distribution, surface texture, and defect concentration on deposition angle will also be presented. Supported by NSF DMR-0907399

  5. Nanostructured magnetic recording media by patterning and glancing angle deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Hao

    In order to solve the trilemma problems that perpendicular magnetic recording is facing, advanced approaches such as heat assisted magnetic recording and bit patterned media are being intensively researched. In this work, high coercivity magnetic materials have been studied in the form of nanostructured Co/Pd and FeB/Pt multilayers. Arrays of uniformly spaced nanopillars over large areas were formed by utilizing block copolymer patterning. Uniform nanorods were formed by glancing angle deposition, a unique single-step approach to bit-patterned media. First, a detailed study on Co/Pd multilayered thin films was carried out to optimize the magnetic properties with respect to the thickness ratio, number of bilayers and seed layers. Then a statistical optimization of the patterning of Co/Pd multilayers by nanosphere lithography and block copolymer templating was carried out. The highest measured perpendicular anisotropy for Co/Pd films was 2.8 x 106 ergs/cm3. However, many of the M-H loops for Co/Pd were not saturated at the maximum field of 18 kOe, so the perpendicular anisotropy approaches 107 ergs/cm3. A unique single-step approach to nanostructuring these Co/Pd multilayers was developed: glancing angle deposition (GLAD), which produced Co/Pd nanorods with a coercivity as high as 2.9 kOe, a 123% increase over the flat multilayers. For deposition of FeBPt based granular media, two different techniques were used to sputter FeB/Pt multilayers. A finely alternated layered structure was proven to be more effective in forming L10 structured B-doped FePt. The FeBPt films thus formed were also patterned by block copolymer templating, and their magnetic properties were studied as a function of ion milling and annealing conditions. The highest coercivity achieved for patterned and annealed B-doped FePt films was 14 kOe.

  6. Branched Ta nanocolumns grown by glancing angle deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, C.M.; Gall, D.

    2006-05-15

    Periodic arrays of Ta nanocolumns, 200 nm wide and 600 nm tall, were grown by glancing angle sputter deposition onto self-assembled close-packed arrays of 260-nm-diameter silica spheres. Each sphere leads to the development of a single Ta column. As growth progresses, roughening of the column top surfaces causes branching of some columns into subcolumns. The measured fraction of branched columns f{sub b} decreases with increasing growth temperature, from 30% at 200 deg. C to 4% at 700 deg. C. This is attributed to the increased adatom mobility at elevated temperatures, leading to a larger average separation of growth mounds and, in turn, lower nucleation probabilities for subcolumns. Branching into 3 and 4 subcolumns exhibits probabilities proportional to f{sub b}{sup 2} and f{sub b}{sup 3}, respectively. A fit of the data with a simple nucleation model provides an effective activation energy for Ta surface diffusion of 2.0 eV.

  7. Roughness of glancing angle deposited titanium thin films: an experimental and computational study.

    PubMed

    Backholm, Matilda; Foss, Morten; Nordlund, Kai

    2012-09-28

    The characterization of roughness at the nanoscale by the means of atomic force microscopy (AFM) was performed on high aspect ratio glancing angle deposited titanium thin films. With the use of scanning electron microscopy as well as x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, it was shown that the AFM measurements gave rise to incorrect roughness values for the films consisting of the highest aspect ratio structures. By correcting for this experimental artefact, the difference between the saturated roughness value of a film grown with conventional physical vapour deposition and films grown with a glancing angle of deposition was shown to behave as a power law function of the deposition angle, with a saturated roughness exponent of κ = 7.1 ± 0.2. This power law scaling was confirmed by three-dimensional molecular dynamics simulations of glancing angle deposition, where the saturated roughness exponent was calculated to κ = 6.7 ± 0.4. PMID:22948111

  8. Glancing angle sputter deposited nanostructures on rotating substrates: Experiments and simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Patzig, C.; Karabacak, T.; Fuhrmann, B.; Rauschenbach, B.

    2008-11-01

    Ordered arrays of Si nanorods and nanospirals have been produced by ion beam sputter glancing angle deposition of Si on rotating substrates. The substrates were prepatterned with honeycomb and hexagonal-closed-packed arranged Au dots obtained by nanosphere lithography. The effects of template type, substrate rotational speed, height of the artificial Au seeds, and deposition angle {theta} of the incident flux on the growth of the Si nanostructures is examined. Especially for the deposition of Si on honeycomb templates at different deposition angles, it is shown that the structure of the growing film changes drastically. A continuous film with honeycomblike arranged hillocks on top is deposited at normal incidence. With increased {theta}, the structure shifts to almost dense films with a mesh of hexagonally arranged pores ({theta}=70 deg.). Finally, separated rodlike structures with triangular cross section are obtained under glancing angle conditions ({theta}=85 deg.). In addition, the structural evolution of the glancing angle deposited Si films is compared with oblique angle deposition three-dimensional Monte Carlo simulations. Furthermore, the effects of surface diffusion on the growth of spiral Si nanostructures on nontemplated substrates in experiment and simulation are compared and discussed.

  9. Growth of Si nanorods in honeycomb and hexagonal-closed-packed arrays using glancing angle deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Patzig, Christian; Rauschenbach, Bernd; Fuhrmann, Bodo; Leipner, Hartmut S.

    2008-01-15

    Regular arrays of Si nanorods with a circular cross section in hexagonal-closed-packed and triangular cross section in honeycomblike arrangements were grown using glancing angle deposition on Si(100) and fused silica substrates that were patterned with Au dots using self-assembled mono- and double layers of polystyrene nanospheres as an evaporation mask. The Au dots were used as an etching mask for the underlying silica substrates in a reactive ion beam etching process, which greatly enhanced the height of the seeding spaces for the subsequent glancing angle deposition. An elongated shadowing length l of the prepatterned nucleation sites and less growth of Si structures between the surface mounds could be achieved this way. Differences in form, height, and diameter of the Si nanorods grown on either hcp or honeycomb arrays are explained by purely geometrical arguments. Different seed heights and interseed distances are found to be the main reasons for the strong distinctions between the grown nanorod arrays.

  10. Nanorods of Co/Pd multilayers fabricated by glancing angle deposition for advanced media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Hao; Natarajarathinam, Anusha; Gupta, Subhadra

    2013-05-01

    Perpendicular anisotropy magnetic nanorods composed of Co/Pd multilayers have been successfully fabricated by glancing angle deposition (GLAD) in a planetary sputtering system. Co and Pd layer thickness, ratio, and bilayer number were optimized for both normal and GLAD depositions. Scanning electron micrographs estimated the nanorods to be about 12 nm in diameter. M-H loops showed that the coercivity for the GLAD nanorods increased from 1.3 kOe for the normally deposited continuous films to 2.9 kOe for the GLAD nanorod array, a 123% increase.

  11. Nanorods of Co/Pd multilayers fabricated by glancing angle deposition for advanced media

    SciTech Connect

    Su, Hao; Gupta, Subhadra; Natarajarathinam, Anusha

    2013-05-28

    Perpendicular anisotropy magnetic nanorods composed of Co/Pd multilayers have been successfully fabricated by glancing angle deposition (GLAD) in a planetary sputtering system. Co and Pd layer thickness, ratio, and bilayer number were optimized for both normal and GLAD depositions. Scanning electron micrographs estimated the nanorods to be about 12 nm in diameter. M-H loops showed that the coercivity for the GLAD nanorods increased from 1.3 kOe for the normally deposited continuous films to 2.9 kOe for the GLAD nanorod array, a 123% increase.

  12. Fabrication of nanostructure by physical vapor deposition with glancing angle deposition technique and its applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horprathum, M.; Eiamchai, P.; Kaewkhao, J.; Chananonnawathorn, C.; Patthanasettakul, V.; Limwichean, S.; Nuntawong, N.; Chindaudom, P.

    2014-09-01

    A nanostructural thin film is one of the highly exploiting research areas particularly in applications in sensor, photocatalytic, and solar-cell technologies. In the past two decades, the integration of glancing-angle deposition (GLAD) technique to physical vapor deposition (PVD) process has gained significant attention for well-controlled multidimensional nanomorphologies because of fast, simple, cost-effective, and mass-production capability. The performance and functional properties of the coated thin films generally depend upon their nanostructural compositions, i.e., large aspect ratio, controllable porosity, and shape. Such structural platforms make the fabricated thin films very practical for several realistic applications. We therefore present morphological and nanostructural properties of various deposited materials, which included metals, i.e., silver (Ag), and oxide compounds, i.e., tungsten oxide (WO3), titanium dioxide (TiO2), and indium tin oxide (ITO). Different PVD techniques based on DC magnetron sputtering and electron-beam evaporation, both with the integrated GLAD component, were discussed. We further explore engineered nanostructures which enable controls of optical, electrical, and mechanical properties. These improvements led to several practical applications in surface-enhanced Raman, smart windows, gas sensors, self-cleaning materials and transparent conductive oxides (TCO).

  13. Fabrication of nanostructure by physical vapor deposition with glancing angle deposition technique and its applications

    SciTech Connect

    Horprathum, M. Eiamchai, P. Patthanasettakul, V.; Limwichean, S.; Nuntawong, N.; Chindaudom, P.; Kaewkhao, J.; Chananonnawathorn, C.

    2014-09-25

    A nanostructural thin film is one of the highly exploiting research areas particularly in applications in sensor, photocatalytic, and solar-cell technologies. In the past two decades, the integration of glancing-angle deposition (GLAD) technique to physical vapor deposition (PVD) process has gained significant attention for well-controlled multidimensional nanomorphologies because of fast, simple, cost-effective, and mass-production capability. The performance and functional properties of the coated thin films generally depend upon their nanostructural compositions, i.e., large aspect ratio, controllable porosity, and shape. Such structural platforms make the fabricated thin films very practical for several realistic applications. We therefore present morphological and nanostructural properties of various deposited materials, which included metals, i.e., silver (Ag), and oxide compounds, i.e., tungsten oxide (WO{sub 3}), titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}), and indium tin oxide (ITO). Different PVD techniques based on DC magnetron sputtering and electron-beam evaporation, both with the integrated GLAD component, were discussed. We further explore engineered nanostructures which enable controls of optical, electrical, and mechanical properties. These improvements led to several practical applications in surface-enhanced Raman, smart windows, gas sensors, self-cleaning materials and transparent conductive oxides (TCO)

  14. Structural properties of indium tin oxide thin films by glancing angle deposition method.

    PubMed

    Oh, Gyujin; Kim, Seon Pil; Lee, Kyoung Su; Kim, Eun Kyu

    2013-10-01

    We have studied the structural and optical properties of indium tin oxide (ITO) films deposited on sapphire substrates by electron beam evaporator with glancing angle deposition method. The ITO films were grown with different deposition angles of 0 degrees, 30 degrees, 45 degrees, 60 degrees at fixed deposition rate of 3 angstroms/s and with deposition rates of 2 angstroms/s, 3 angstroms/s, and 4angstroms/s at deposition angle of 45 degrees, respectively. From analysis of ellipsometry measurements, it appears that the void fraction of the films increased and their refractive indices decreased from 2.18 to 1.38 at the wavelength of 500 as increasing the deposition angle. The refractive index in the wavelength ranges of 550 nm-800 nm also depends on the deposition rates. Transmittance of ITO film with 235-nm-thickness grown at 60 degrees was covered about 20-80%, and then it was increased in visible wavelength range with increase of deposition angle. PMID:24245214

  15. Growth Assisted by Glancing Angle Deposition: A New Technique to Fabricate Highly Porous Anisotropic Thin Films.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Valencia, Juan Ramon; Longtin, Remi; Rossell, Marta D; Gröning, Pierangelo

    2016-04-01

    We report a new methodology based on glancing angle deposition (GLAD) of an organic molecule in combination with perpendicular growth of a second inorganic material. The resulting thin films retain a very well-defined tilted columnar microstructure characteristic of GLAD with the inorganic material embedded inside the columns. We refer to this new methodology as growth assisted by glancing angle deposition or GAGLAD, since the material of interest (here, the inorganic) grows in the form of tilted columns, though it is deposited under a nonglancing configuration. As a "proof of concept", we have used silver and zinc oxide as the perpendicularly deposited material since they usually form ill-defined columnar microstructures at room temperature by GLAD. By means of our GAGLAD methodology, the typical tilted columnar microstructure can be developed for materials that otherwise do not form ordered structures under conventional GLAD. This simple methodology broadens significantly the range of materials where control of the microstructure can be achieved by tuning the geometrical deposition parameters. The two examples presented here, Ag/Alq3 and ZnO/Alq3, have been deposited by physical vapor deposition (PVD) and plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD), respectively: two different vacuum techniques that illustrate the generality of the proposed technique. The two type of hybrid samples present very interesting properties that demonstrate the potentiality of GAGLAD. On one hand, the Ag/Alq3 samples present highly optical anisotropic properties when they are analyzed with linearly polarized light. To our knowledge, these Ag/Alq3 samples present the highest angular selectivity reported in the visible range. On the other hand, ZnO/Alq3 samples are used to develop highly porous ZnO thin films by using Alq3 as sacrificial material. In this way, antireflective ZnO samples with very low refractive index and extinction coefficient have been obtained. PMID:26954074

  16. Glancing angle deposited villi-like nanostructures for enhanced chemo-resistive performances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, Hi Gyu; Jung, Youngmo; Lee, Taikjin; Lee, Seok; Park, Hyung-Ho; Kim, Chulki; Kang, Chong-Yun

    Metal oxide nanostructures have attracted enormous attention for diverse applications such as solar cells, nanogenerators, nanolasers, optoelectronic devices and chemoresistive sensor. To achieve the enhanced electrical properties for these applications, one-dimensional (1D) metal oxide materials including nanowires, nanorods, nanotubes and nanobelts have been widely studied. However, the use of 1D nanomaterials as chemoresistive sensors is still in the beginning stage in how to integrate them. As an alternative, porous thin films based on 1D metal oxide nanostructures are considered as more desirable configuration due to their simplicity in synthesis, high reproducibility. In this study, we propose facile synthesis and self-assembled villi-like nanofingers (VLNF) WO3 thin films with large specific surface area on the SiO2/Si substrate. Room-temperature glancing angle deposition of WO3 by a simple controlling in both polar and azimuthal directions resulted in anisotropic nanostructures with large aspect ratio and porous structures with a relative surface area of 350 m2/g. Glancing angle deposited villi-like nanostructures for enhanced chemo-resistive performances.

  17. Wafer-scale, three-dimensional helical porous thin films deposited at a glancing angle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Zhifeng; Bai, Fan

    2014-07-01

    Minimization of helices opens a door to impose novel functions derived from the dimensional shrinkage of optical, mechanical and electronic devices. Glancing angle deposition (GLAD) enables one to deposit three-dimensional helical porous thin films (HPTFs) composed of separated spiral micro/nano-columns. GLAD integrates a series of advantageous features, including one-step deposition, wafer-scale production with mono-handedness of spirals, flexible engineering of spiral materials and dimensions, and the adaption to various kinds of substrates. Herein, we briefly review the fabrication of HPTFs by GLAD, specific growth mechanisms, physical properties in structures, mechanics and chiral optics, and the emerging applications in green energy. A prospective outlook is presented to illuminate some promising developments in enantioselection, bio-dynamic analyses, wirelessly-controlled drug delivery and mass production.

  18. Optical and infrared properties of glancing angle-deposited nanostructured tungsten films.

    PubMed

    Ungaro, Craig; Shah, Ankit; Kravchenko, Ivan; Hensley, Dale K; Gray, Stephen K; Gupta, Mool C

    2015-02-15

    Nanotextured tungsten thin films were obtained on a stainless steel (SS) substrate using the glancing-angle-deposition (GLAD) method. It was found that the optical absorption and thermal emittance of the SS substrate can be controlled by varying the parameters used during deposition. Finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) simulations were used to predict the optical absorption and infrared (IR) reflectance spectra of the fabricated samples, and good agreement was found between simulated and measured data. FDTD simulations were also used to predict the effect of changes in the height and periodicity of the nanotextures. These simulations show that good control over the absorption can be achieved by altering the height and periodicity of the nanostructure. These nanostructures were shown to be temperature stable up to 500°C with the addition of a protective HfO2 layer. Applications for this structure are explored, including a promising application for solar thermal energy systems. PMID:25680136

  19. In vivo optical resolution photoacoustic microscopy using glancing angle-deposited nanostructured Fabry-Perot etalons.

    PubMed

    Hajireza, Parsin; Sorge, Jason; Brett, Michael; Zemp, Roger

    2015-04-01

    In this Letter, reflection-mode optical resolution photoacoustic microscopy (OR-PAM) using glancing angle-deposited (GLAD) nanostructured Fabry-Perot interferometers (FPI) for in vivo applications is reported. GLAD is a single-step physical vapor deposition (PVD) technique used to fabricate porous nanostructured thin films. Using titanium dioxide, a transparent semiconductor with a high refractive index (n=2.4), the GLAD technique can be employed to fabricate samples with tailored nano-porosity, refractive index periodicities, and high Q-factor reflectance spectra. The OR-PAM in vivo images of chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) of 5-day chicken embryo model are demonstrated. The phantom study shows lateral resolution and signal-to-noise ratio better than 7 μm and 35 dB, respectively. The sensitive GLAD FPI allows photoacoustic imaging down to a few-nJ pulse energy. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that a FPI-based reflection mode optical resolution photoacoustic imaging technique is demonstrated for in vivo applications. PMID:25831330

  20. Optical and infrared properties of glancing angle-deposited nanostructured tungsten films

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ungaro, Craig; Shah, Ankit; Kravchenko, Ivan; Hensley, Dale K.; Gray, Stephen K.; Gupta, Mool C.

    2015-02-06

    For this study, nanotextured tungsten thin films were obtained on a stainless steel (SS) substrate using the glancing-angle-deposition (GLAD) method. It was found that the optical absorption and thermal emittance of the SS substrate can be controlled by varying the parameters used during deposition. Finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) simulations were used to predict the optical absorption and infrared (IR) reflectance spectra of the fabricated samples, and good agreement was found between simulated and measured data. FDTD simulations were also used to predict the effect of changes in the height and periodicity of the nanotextures. These simulations show that good control overmore » the absorption can be achieved by altering the height and periodicity of the nanostructure. These nanostructures were shown to be temperature stable up to 500°C with the addition of a protective HfO2 layer. Finally, applications for this structure are explored, including a promising application for solar thermal energy systems.« less

  1. Optical and infrared properties of glancing angle-deposited nanostructured tungsten films

    SciTech Connect

    Ungaro, Craig; Shah, Ankit; Kravchenko, Ivan; Hensley, Dale K.; Gray, Stephen K.; Gupta, Mool C.

    2015-02-06

    For this study, nanotextured tungsten thin films were obtained on a stainless steel (SS) substrate using the glancing-angle-deposition (GLAD) method. It was found that the optical absorption and thermal emittance of the SS substrate can be controlled by varying the parameters used during deposition. Finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) simulations were used to predict the optical absorption and infrared (IR) reflectance spectra of the fabricated samples, and good agreement was found between simulated and measured data. FDTD simulations were also used to predict the effect of changes in the height and periodicity of the nanotextures. These simulations show that good control over the absorption can be achieved by altering the height and periodicity of the nanostructure. These nanostructures were shown to be temperature stable up to 500°C with the addition of a protective HfO2 layer. Finally, applications for this structure are explored, including a promising application for solar thermal energy systems.

  2. Glancing angle deposition of SiO{sub 2} thin film microstructures: Investigations of optical and morphological properties

    SciTech Connect

    Tokas, R. B. E-mail: tokasstar@gmail.com; Jena, S. E-mail: tokasstar@gmail.com; Sarkar, P. E-mail: tokasstar@gmail.com; Thakur, S. E-mail: tokasstar@gmail.com; Sahoo, N. K. E-mail: tokasstar@gmail.com

    2014-04-24

    In present work, the optical and the morphological properties of micro-structured SiO{sub 2} thin films fabricated by using glancing angle deposition (GLAD) technique has been carried out. The results are compared with the normally deposited SiO{sub 2} films for the gained advantages. The influence of the glancing angle on the refractive index of porous SiO{sub 2} film was investigated by the spectral transmission measurement in 400–950 nm wavelength regimes. The refractive index has been found to be 1.14@532 nm for the porous SiO{sub 2} film deposited at a glancing angle of 85°. The density and surface qualities of these samples were primarily investigated by using grazing angle X-ray reflectivity (GIXR) and atomic force microscope (AFM) measurements. Results indicate a substantial decrease in film density and refractive index and increase in surface roughness and grain size for GLAD SiO{sub 2} compared to normally deposited SiO{sub 2} films.

  3. Oxygen partial pressure dependent optical properties of glancing angle deposited (GLAD) Ta2O5 films deposited by magnetron sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathi, S.; Haque, S. Maidul; Rao, K. Divakar; Misal, J. S.; Pratap, C.; Sahoo, N. K.

    2016-05-01

    Experiments were carried out on Ta2O5 oxide thin films by asymmetric bipolar pulsed DC magnetron sputtering using a new hybrid combination of conventional (normal incidence) deposition and glancing angle deposition (GLAD) geometries. The films were prepared with varying O2 partial pressure. The ellipsometry characterization reveals a systematic variation in refractive index, which decreased from 2.2 in the normal films to an average 1.78 in the GLAD films. The bandgap of these GLAD films is slightly higher as compared to normal films. Overall transmission of the GLAD films is increased is by ~ 15 % implying a reduction in the refractive index for potential optical filtering device applications. The results were further supported by X-ray reflectivity measurements which show an effective double layer structure in GLAD consisting of layers with different densities of the same Ta2O5 material.

  4. Structure-related antibacterial activity of a titanium nanostructured surface fabricated by glancing angle sputter deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sengstock, Christina; Lopian, Michael; Motemani, Yahya; Borgmann, Anna; Khare, Chinmay; Buenconsejo, Pio John S.; Schildhauer, Thomas A.; Ludwig, Alfred; Köller, Manfred

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study was to reproduce the physico-mechanical antibacterial effect of the nanocolumnar cicada wing surface for metallic biomaterials by fabrication of titanium (Ti) nanocolumnar surfaces using glancing angle sputter deposition (GLAD). Nanocolumnar Ti thin films were fabricated by GLAD on silicon substrates. S. aureus as well as E. coli were incubated with nanostructured or reference dense Ti thin film test samples for one or three hours at 37 °C. Bacterial adherence, morphology, and viability were analyzed by fluorescence staining and scanning electron microscopy and compared to human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). Bacterial adherence was not significantly different after short (1 h) incubation on the dense or the nanostructured Ti surface. In contrast to S. aureus the viability of E. coli was significantly decreased after 3 h on the nanostructured film compared to the dense film and was accompanied by an irregular morphology and a cell wall deformation. Cell adherence, spreading and viability of hMSCs were not altered on the nanostructured surface. The results show that the selective antibacterial effect of the cicada wing could be transferred to a nanostructured metallic biomaterial by mimicking the natural nanocolumnar topography.

  5. Temperature threshold for nanorod structuring of metal and oxide films grown by glancing angle deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Deniz, Derya; Lad, Robert J.

    2011-01-15

    Thin films of tin (Sn), aluminum (Al), gold (Au), ruthenium (Ru), tungsten (W), ruthenium dioxide (RuO{sub 2}), tin dioxide (SnO{sub 2}), and tungsten trioxide (WO{sub 3}) were grown by glancing angle deposition (GLAD) to determine the nanostructuring temperature threshold, {Theta}{sub T}, above which adatom surface diffusion becomes large enough such that nanorod morphology is no longer formed during growth. The threshold was found to be lower in metals compared to oxides. Films were grown using both dc and pulsed dc magnetron sputtering with continuous substrate rotation over the temperature range from 291 to 866 K. Film morphologies, structures, and compositions were characterized by high resolution scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Films were also grown in a conventional configuration for comparison. For elemental metals, nanorod structuring occurs for films with melting points higher than that of Al (933 K) when grown at room temperature with a rotation rate of {approx}5 rpm, corresponding to a value of {Theta}{sub T}{approx_equal}0.33{+-}0.01. For the oxide films, a value of {Theta}{sub T}{approx_equal}0.5 was found, above which GLAD nanorod structuring does not occur. The existence of a nanostructuring temperature threshold in both metal and oxide GLAD films can be attributed to greater adatom mobilities as temperature is increased resulting in nonkinetically limited film nucleation and growth processes.

  6. Band gap enhancement of glancing angle deposited TiO2 nanowire array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chinnamuthu, P.; Mondal, A.; Singh, N. K.; Dhar, J. C.; Chattopadhyay, K. K.; Bhattacharya, Sekhar

    2012-09-01

    Vertically oriented TiO2 nanowire (NW) arrays were fabricated by glancing angle deposition technique. Field emission-scanning electron microscopy shows the formation of two different diameters ˜80 nm and ˜40 nm TiO2 NW for 120 and 460 rpm azimuthal rotation of the substrate. The x-ray diffraction and Raman scattering depicted the presence of rutile and anatase phase TiO2. The overall Raman scattering intensity decreased with nanowire diameter. The role of phonon confinement in anatase and rutile peaks has been discussed. The red (7.9 cm-1 of anatase Eg) and blue (7.4 cm-1 of rutile Eg, 7.8 cm-1 of rutile A1g) shifts of Raman frequencies were observed. UV-vis absorption measurements show the main band absorption at 3.42 eV, 3.48 eV, and ˜3.51 eV for thin film and NW prepared at 120 and 460 rpm, respectively. Three fold enhance photon absorption and intense light emission were observed for NW assembly. The photoluminescence emission from the NW assembly revealed blue shift in main band transition due to quantum confinement in NW structures.

  7. Substrate temperature control for the formation of metal nanohelices by glancing angle deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Sumigawa, Takashi Sakurai, Atsushi; Iwata, Kazuya; Chen, Shaoguang; Kitamura, Takayuki; Tanie, Hisashi

    2015-11-15

    The targets of this study are to develop a device to precisely control the temperature during glancing angle deposition, to make films consisting of low melting temperature metal nanoelements with a controlled shape (helix), and to explore the substrate temperature for controlling the nanoshapes. A vacuum evaporation system capable of both cooling a substrate and measurement of its temperature was used to form thin films consisting of arrays of Cu and Al nanohelices on silicon substrates by maintaining the substrate temperature at T{sub s}/T{sub m} < 0.22 (T{sub s} is the substrate temperature and T{sub m} is the melting temperature of target material). The critical T{sub s}/T{sub m} to produce Cu and Al nanohelices corresponds to the transitional homologous temperature between zones I and II in the structure zone model for the solid film, where surface diffusion becomes dominant. X-ray diffraction analysis indicated that the Cu and Al nanohelix thin films were composed of coarse oriented grains with diameters of several tens of nanometers.

  8. Study of hafnium oxide thin films deposited by RF magnetron sputtering under glancing angle deposition at varying target to substrate distance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haque, S. Maidul; Rao, K. Divakar; Misal, J. S.; Tokas, R. B.; Shinde, D. D.; Ramana, J. V.; Rai, Sanjay; Sahoo, N. K.

    2015-10-01

    Glancing angle deposition of HfO2 thin films by RF magnetron sputtering technique has been explored with respect to two vital deposition parameters visualizing angle of deposition (at 82° and 86° glancing angles) and target to substrate distance, DTS in the range 70-125 mm. AFM and spectroscopic ellipsometry measurements show that at optimum DTS of 110 mm and glancing angle 82°, the films exhibit nanostructures with an estimated lowest refractive index ∼1.63 at 550 nm. For both the deposition angles, with decrease in DTS the round shaped grains of the film surface as obtained from AFM images are found to coalesce and produce films with elliptical shaped grains at shorter target to substrate distance. With increase in DTS the deposition rate first decreases up to DTS = 110 mm and subsequently increases. The phenomenon has been ascribed to the competition between reduced deposition flux density and increased sticking coefficient due to decrease in adatom kinetic energy with the increase in DTS. GIXRD measurement reveals that all the films exhibit monoclinic crystal structure. At lower DTS, the crystallinity has improved with increase in deposition angle whereas at higher DTS (>90 mm) the crystallinity becomes poorer with increase in deposition angle. The fact has been explained in light of variation of shadowing effect and deposition rate.

  9. Control of Nano-Structure of Photocatalytic TiO2 Films by Oxygen Ion Assisted Glancing Angle Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoshi, Yoichi; Yasuda, Yoji; Kitahara, Naoto

    2013-11-01

    Control of the nano-structure of TiO2 photocatalytic films by a glancing angle deposition was investigated using an oxygen ion assisted reactive evaporation (OARE) system. The porosity of the film was increased as the incidence angle of Ti vapor increased, and films with clearly separated columnar grains were obtained at an incident angle above 60°. The increase in the porosity led to a significant decrease in UV reflectance and the film deposited at 60° had a large UV absorptance above 80% at 300 nm. The photocatalytic performance of the film, however, did not improve remarkably, since the crystallinity of the film was degraded by the deposition at a high incidence angle above 60°. To improve the crystallinity of the film, control of energy of the incident oxygen ions was attempted. However, only a slight improvement of photocatalytic properties was observed.

  10. Studies on temperature dependence of current-voltage characteristics of glancing angle deposited indium oxide nanowire on silicon substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondal, Aniruddha; Dey, Anubhab; Das, Amit Kumar; Choudhuri, Bijit

    2016-05-01

    The 1D perpendicular In2-xO3-y nanostructure arrays have been synthesized by using glancing angle deposition (GLAD) technique. A low deposition rate of 0.5 A°/S produced highly porous structure. The current - voltage characteristics for the In2-xO3-ynanocolumnar array based were measured through a gold Schottky contact at different temperatures. The temperature dependent ideality factor was calculated from the observed current - voltage characteristics. The ideality factor was found to vary from 4.19 to 2.75 with a variation in temperature from 313 K to 473 K.

  11. Molecular separations using nanostructured porous thin films fabricated by glancing angle deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezuidenhout, Louis Wentzel

    Biomolecular separation techniques are an enabling technology that indirectly in.uence many aspects of our lives. Advances have led to faster analyses, reduced costs, higher specificity, and new analytical techniques, impacting areas such as health care, environmental monitoring, polymer sciences, agriculture, and nutrition. Further development of separations technology is anticipated to follow the path of computing technology such that miniaturization through the development of microfluidics technology, lab-on-a-chip systems, and other integrative, multi-component systems will further extend our analysis capabilities. Creation of new and improvement of existing separation technologies is an integral part of the pathway to miniaturized systems. the work of this thesis investigates molecular separations using porous nanostructured films fabricated by the thin film process glancing angle deposition (GLAD). Structural architecture, pore size and shape, and film density can be finely controlled to produce high-surface area thin films with engineered morphology. The characteristic size scales and structural control of GLAD films are well-suited to biomolecules and separation techniques, motivating investigation into the utility and performance of GLAD films for biomolecular separations. This project consisted of three phases. First, chromatographic separation of dye molecules on silica GLAD films was demonstrated by thin layer chromatography Direct control of film nanostructure altered the separation characteristics; most strikingly, anisotropic structures provided two-dimensional analyte migration. Second, nanostructures made with GLAD were integrated in PDMS microfluidic channels using a sacrificial etching process; DNA molecules (10/48 kbp and 6/10/20 kbp mixtures) were electrophoretically separated on a microfluidic chip using a porous bed of SiO2 vertical posts. Third, mass spectrometry of proteins and drugs in the mass range of 100-1300 m/z was performed using

  12. Fabrication of Ni-silicide/Si heterostructured nanowire arrays by glancing angle deposition and solid state reaction

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    This work develops a method for growing Ni-silicide/Si heterostructured nanowire arrays by glancing angle Ni deposition and solid state reaction on ordered Si nanowire arrays. Samples of ordered Si nanowire arrays were fabricated by nanosphere lithography and metal-induced catalytic etching. Glancing angle Ni deposition deposited Ni only on the top of Si nanowires. When the annealing temperature was 500°C, a Ni3Si2 phase was formed at the apex of the nanowires. The phase of silicide at the Ni-silicide/Si interface depended on the diameter of the Si nanowires, such that epitaxial NiSi2 with a {111} facet was formed at the Ni-silicide/Si interface in Si nanowires with large diameter, and NiSi was formed in Si nanowires with small diameter. A mechanism that is based on flux divergence and a nucleation-limited reaction is proposed to explain this phenomenon of size-dependent phase formation. PMID:23663726

  13. Glancing Angle Deposition of Ag on Si(111)7x7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cobblah, A. N.; Hayden, S. T.; Chen, Yiyao; Kremenak, J.; Gramlich, M. W.; Miceli, P. F.

    2012-02-01

    Ag(111) films were vapor-deposited in ultra-high vacuum on Si(111)7x7 substrates. The angle of deposition was varied from normal incidence to 80 degrees and the films were studied by x-ray reflectivity. It is found that, even for very thin films, the film roughness increased dramatically with the angle of deposition. This poster will highlight experimental results as well as the development of a UHV chamber that enables a laboratory x-ray source to monitor low angle reflectivity during film growth. Funding is acknowledged from the Ronald E. McNair Post-baccalaureate Achievement Program and NSF DMR-0706278. Some measurements were performed on the 6IDC beam line, supported by the US-DOE (through Ames Lab, W-7405-Eng-82), at the Advanced Photon Source (US-DOE, W-31-109-Eng-38) located at Argonne National Laboratory.

  14. Plasmonic gratings with nano-protrusions made by glancing angle deposition for single-molecule super-resolution imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, B.; Wood, A.; Pathak, A.; Mathai, J.; Bok, S.; Zheng, H.; Hamm, S.; Basuray, S.; Grant, S.; Gangopadhyay, K.; Cornish, P. V.; Gangopadhyay, S.

    2016-06-01

    Super-resolution imaging has been advantageous in studying biological and chemical systems, but the required equipment and platforms are expensive and unable to observe single-molecules at the high (μM) fluorophore concentrations required to study protein interaction and enzymatic activity. Here, a plasmonic platform was designed that utilized an inexpensively fabricated plasmonic grating in combination with a scalable glancing angle deposition (GLAD) technique using physical vapor deposition. The GLAD creates an abundance of plasmonic nano-protrusion probes that combine the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) from the periodic gratings with the localized SPR of these nano-protrusions. The resulting platform enables simultaneous imaging of a large area without point-by-point scanning or bulk averaging for the detection of single Cyanine-5 molecules in dye concentrations ranging from 50 pM to 10 μM using epifluorescence microscopy. Combining the near-field plasmonic nano-protrusion probes and super-resolution technique using localization microscopy, we demonstrate the ability to resolve grain sizes down to 65 nm. This plasmonic GLAD grating is a cost-effective super-resolution imaging substrate with potential applications in high-speed biomedical imaging over a wide range of fluorescent concentrations.Super-resolution imaging has been advantageous in studying biological and chemical systems, but the required equipment and platforms are expensive and unable to observe single-molecules at the high (μM) fluorophore concentrations required to study protein interaction and enzymatic activity. Here, a plasmonic platform was designed that utilized an inexpensively fabricated plasmonic grating in combination with a scalable glancing angle deposition (GLAD) technique using physical vapor deposition. The GLAD creates an abundance of plasmonic nano-protrusion probes that combine the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) from the periodic gratings with the localized SPR of these nano

  15. Plasmonic gratings with nano-protrusions made by glancing angle deposition for single-molecule super-resolution imaging.

    PubMed

    Chen, B; Wood, A; Pathak, A; Mathai, J; Bok, S; Zheng, H; Hamm, S; Basuray, S; Grant, S; Gangopadhyay, K; Cornish, P V; Gangopadhyay, S

    2016-06-16

    Super-resolution imaging has been advantageous in studying biological and chemical systems, but the required equipment and platforms are expensive and unable to observe single-molecules at the high (μM) fluorophore concentrations required to study protein interaction and enzymatic activity. Here, a plasmonic platform was designed that utilized an inexpensively fabricated plasmonic grating in combination with a scalable glancing angle deposition (GLAD) technique using physical vapor deposition. The GLAD creates an abundance of plasmonic nano-protrusion probes that combine the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) from the periodic gratings with the localized SPR of these nano-protrusions. The resulting platform enables simultaneous imaging of a large area without point-by-point scanning or bulk averaging for the detection of single Cyanine-5 molecules in dye concentrations ranging from 50 pM to 10 μM using epifluorescence microscopy. Combining the near-field plasmonic nano-protrusion probes and super-resolution technique using localization microscopy, we demonstrate the ability to resolve grain sizes down to 65 nm. This plasmonic GLAD grating is a cost-effective super-resolution imaging substrate with potential applications in high-speed biomedical imaging over a wide range of fluorescent concentrations. PMID:27250765

  16. Towards engineered branch placement: Unreal™ match between vapour-liquid-solid glancing angle deposition nanowire growth and simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Taschuk, M. T.; Tucker, R. T.; LaForge, J. M.; Beaudry, A. L.; Kupsta, M. R.; Brett, M. J.

    2013-12-28

    The vapour-liquid-solid glancing angle deposition (VLS-GLAD) process is capable of producing complex nanotree structures with control over azimuthal branch orientation and height. We have developed a thin film growth simulation including ballistic deposition, simplified surface diffusion, and droplet-mediated cubic crystal growth for the VLS-GLAD process using the Unreal{sup TM} Development Kit. The use of a commercial game engine has provided an interactive environment while allowing a custom physics implementation. Our simulation's output is verified against experimental data, including a volumetric film reconstruction produced using focused ion beam and scanning-electron microscopy (SEM), crystallographic texture, and morphological characteristics such as branch orientation. We achieve excellent morphological and texture agreement with experimental data, as well as qualitative agreement with SEM imagery. The simplified physics in our model reproduces the experimental films, indicating that the dominant role flux geometry plays in the VLS-GLAD competitive growth process responsible for azimuthally oriented branches and biaxial crystal texture evolution. The simulation's successful reproduction of experimental data indicates that it should have predictive power in designing novel VLS-GLAD structures.

  17. 3-D matrix template-assisted growth of oriented oxide nanowire arrays using glancing angle pulsed laser deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, N.; Mateo-Feliciano, D.; Ostoski, A.; Mukherjee, P.; Witanachchi, S.

    Nanosphere lithography is a combination of different methods to nanofabrication. In this work nanosphere lithography is used to study the growth of Zinc Oxide Nano-columns (ZnO NCs) on different diameter Silica Nanosphere (SNS) self-assembled templates. ZnO NCs are promising building blocks for many existing and emerging optical, electrical, and piezoelectric devices, specifically, the seeded growth of other oxide materials. Recently, reports have shown a ferroelectric phase of zinc stannate (ZnSnO3) and while lead zirconium titanate oxide (PZT) has been the main material of interest in ferroelectric and piezoelectric applications, the toxicity of lead has been of great concern. The possibility of developing lead free piezoelectric materials is of great interest in the ferroelectric community. Langmuir-Blodgett method was used to construct a self-assembled monolayer of SNSs on silicon substrates. Oriented ZnO NCs were grown on top of the spheres using the glancing angle pulsed laser deposition technique. Columns were formed in a spatially ordered closed-packed hexagonal configuration. Growth of ZnO NCs was studied as function of ambient Oxygen pressure with SNS size ranging from 250-1000 nm. Cross-sectional Scanning Electron Microscopy and X-ray diffraction (XRD) were used to study the template structure. Relative aspect ratios were studied and showed tunability of column dimensions with sphere size. XRD revealed ZnO NC arrays were c-axis oriented with hexagonal wurtzite structure.

  18. Highly Sensitive H2S Sensor Based on the Metal-Catalyzed SnO2 Nanocolumns Fabricated by Glancing Angle Deposition

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Kwang Soo; Han, Soo Deok; Moon, Hi Gyu; Yoon, Seok-Jin; Kang, Chong-Yun

    2015-01-01

    As highly sensitive H2S gas sensors, Au- and Ag-catalyzed SnO2 thin films with morphology-controlled nanostructures were fabricated by using e-beam evaporation in combination with the glancing angle deposition (GAD) technique. After annealing at 500 °C for 40 h, the sensors showed a polycrystalline phase with a porous, tilted columnar nanostructure. The gas sensitivities (S = Rgas/Rair) of Au and Ag-catalyzed SnO2 sensors fabricated by the GAD process were 0.009 and 0.015, respectively, under 5 ppm H2S at 300 °C, and the 90% response time was approximately 5 s. These sensors showed excellent sensitivities compared with the SnO2 thin film sensors that were deposited normally (glancing angle = 0°, S = 0.48). PMID:26134105

  19. Modulation of human mesenchymal stem cell behavior on ordered tantalum nanotopographies fabricated using colloidal lithography and glancing angle deposition.

    PubMed

    Wang, Peng-Yuan; Bennetsen, Dines T; Foss, Morten; Ameringer, Thomas; Thissen, Helmut; Kingshott, Peter

    2015-03-01

    Ordered surface nanostructures have attracted much attention in biotechnology and biomedical engineering because of their potential to modulate cell-surface interactions in a controllable manner. However, the ability to fabricate large area ordered nanostructures is limited because of high costs and low speed of fabrication. Here, we have fabricated ordered nanostructures with large surface areas (1.5 × 1.5 cm(2)) using a combination of facile techniques including colloidal self-assembly, colloidal lithography and glancing angle deposition (GLAD). Polystyrene (722 nm) colloids were self-assembled into a hexagonally close-packed (hcp) crystal array at the water-air interface, transferred on a biocompatible tantalum (Ta) surface and used as a mask to generate an ordered Ta pattern. The Ta was deposited by sputter coating through the crystal mask creating approximately 60-nm-high feature sizes. The feature size was further increased by approximately 200-nm-height respectively using GLAD, resulting in the fabrication of four different surfaces (FLAT, Ta60, GLAD100, and GLAD200). Cell adhesion, proliferation, and osteogenic differentiation of primary human adipose-derived stem cells (hADSCs) were studied on these ordered nanostructures for up to 2 weeks. Our results suggested that cell spreading, focal adhesion formation, and filopodia extension of hADSCs were inhibited on the GLAD surfaces, while the growth rate was similar between each surface. Immunostaining for type I collagen (COL1) and osteocalcin (OC) showed that there was higher osteogenic components deposited on the GLAD surfaces compared to the Ta60 and FLAT surfaces after 1 week of osteogenic culture. After 2 weeks of osteogenic culture, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and the amount of calcium was higher on the GLAD surfaces. In addition, osteoblast-like cells were confluent on Ta60 and FLAT surfaces, whereas the GLAD surfaces were not fully covered suggesting that the cell-cell interactions are

  20. Enhanced photoresponse of conformal TiO{sub 2}/Ag nanorod array-based Schottky photodiodes fabricated via successive glancing angle and atomic layer deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Haider, Ali; Biyikli, Necmi; Cansizoglu, Hilal; Cansizoglu, Mehmet Fatih; Karabacak, Tansel; Okyay, Ali Kemal

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the authors demonstrate a proof of concept nanostructured photodiode fabrication method via successive glancing angle deposition (GLAD) and atomic layer deposition (ALD). The fabricated metal-semiconductor nanorod (NR) arrays offer enhanced photoresponse compared to conventional planar thin-film counterparts. Silver (Ag) metallic NR arrays were deposited on Ag-film/Si templates by utilizing GLAD. Subsequently, titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) was deposited conformally on Ag NRs via ALD. Scanning electron microscopy studies confirmed the successful formation of vertically aligned Ag NRs deposited via GLAD and conformal deposition of TiO{sub 2} on Ag NRs via ALD. Following the growth of TiO{sub 2} on Ag NRs, aluminum metallic top contacts were formed to complete the fabrication of NR-based Schottky photodiodes. Nanostructured devices exhibited a photo response enhancement factor of 1.49 × 10{sup 2} under a reverse bias of 3 V.

  1. Optical properties of WO3 thin films modeled by finite-difference time-domain and fabricated by glancing angle deposition.

    PubMed

    Charles, Cédric; Martin, Nicolas; Devel, Michel

    2012-12-01

    Optical transmittance spectra between 1.55 eV (800 nm) and 3.10 eV (400 nm) of tungsten oxide (WO3) thin films nanostructured thanks to the Glancing Angle Deposition technique are investigated both experimentally and theoretically, as a function of geometrical parameters. A Finite-Difference Time-Domain code was used to numerically model the films structure and to calculate their optical properties. The corresponding optical index and porosity are considered. It is found that the optical index of columnar structures always follows Cauchy's law as a function of energy and is reduced as the incident angle increases (alpha = 0 to 80 degrees) from n633 = 2.2 to 1.98 for experimental data against 2.1 to 1.75 for those computed with the Finite-Difference Time-Domain code. For zigzag architectures, an increase of the zigzag number from 0.5 to 8, amplifies interference fringes and improves the measured refractive indices. It agrees with modeled optical characteristics since n633 increases from 2.18 to 2.30. PMID:23447966

  2. Selective transmittance of linearly polarized light in thin films rationally designed by FDTD and FDFD theories and fabricated by glancing angle deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leontyev, Viktor; Wakefield, Nicholas G.; Tabunshchyk, Kyrylo; Sit, Jeremy C.; Brett, Michael J.; Kovalenko, Andriy

    2008-11-01

    Columnar thin films exhibiting linear polarization selectivity have been theoretically investigated and fabricated using the glancing angle deposition (GLAD) technique. The film structure employed an s-shaped columnar morphology that may be either smoothly bent or composed of discrete segments. Finite-difference time-domain and frequency-domain methods have been used to model these thin film structures numerically. Simulation results have yielded optimal geometries in which the films exhibit either a single frequency band with polarization-selective transmittance or two separated frequency bands each transmitting one of two orthogonal linearly polarized modes. Based on these designs, a series of TiO2 films were grown by GLAD with continuous and discrete s-shaped columnar morphology. Experimental measurements by spectrophotometry verified the presence of selectivity for the orthogonal linearly polarized modes. Films with more then 24 periods were found to have polarization selectivity approaching unity. The agreement between the simulation and experimental results demonstrates the potential for future theoretical development of highly selective polarization filters based on GLAD thin films.

  3. Adherence of human mesenchymal stem cells on Ti and TiO2 nano-columnar surfaces fabricated by glancing angle sputter deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motemani, Yahya; Greulich, Christina; Khare, Chinmay; Lopian, Michael; Buenconsejo, Pio John S.; Schildhauer, Thomas A.; Ludwig, Alfred; Köller, Manfred

    2014-02-01

    The interaction of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) with Ti and TiO2 nano-columnar surfaces fabricated using glancing angle sputter deposition was investigated. The adherence and proliferation of hMSCs on different nano-columnar surfaces, including vertical columns, slanted columns and chevrons, were examined with calcein-acetoxymethyl ester fluorescence staining and scanning electron microscopy. For comparison, adherence of hMSCs on compact, dense films was also studied. After 24 h and 7 days, adherent and viable cells were observed on both, Ti nano-columns as well as dense Ti films, which confirms the biocompatibility of these nanostructures. Very small pseudopodia with width of approximately 20-35 nm and length varying from 20 to 200 nm were observed between the nano-columns, independent of the type of the nano-columnar morphology. Large inter-column spacing and effectively increased surface area make these nanostructures promising candidates for bio-functionalization or drug loading on the surface of Ti-based implants.

  4. Response of MG63 osteoblast-like cells to ordered nanotopographies fabricated using colloidal self-assembly and glancing angle deposition.

    PubMed

    Wang, Peng-Yuan; Bennetsen, Dines T; Foss, Morten; Thissen, Helmut; Kingshott, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Ordered surface nanostructures have attracted much attention in different fields including biomedical engineering because of their potential to study the size effect on cellular response and modulation of cell fate. However, the ability to fabricate large-area ordered nanostructures is typically limited due to high costs and low speed of fabrication. Herein, highly ordered nanostructures with large surface areas (>1.5 × 1.5 cm(2)) were fabricated using a combination of facile techniques including colloidal self-assembly, colloidal lithography, and glancing angle deposition (GLAD). An ordered tantalum (Ta) pattern with 60-nm-height was generated using colloidal lithography. A monolayer of colloidal crystal, i.e., hexagonal close packed 720 nm polystyrene particles, was self-assembled and used as a mask. Ta patterns were subsequently generated by evaporation of Ta through the mask. The feature size was further increased by 100 or 200 nm using GLAD, resulting in the fabrication of four different surfaces (FLAT, Ta60, GLAD100, and GLAD200). Cell adhesion, proliferation, and mineralization of MG63 osteoblast-like cells were investigated on these ordered nanostructures over a 1 week period. Our results showed that cell adhesion, spreading, focal adhesion formation, and filopodia formation of the MG63 osteoblast-like cells were inhibited on the GLAD surfaces, especially the initial (24 h) attachment, resulting in a lower cell density on the GLAD surfaces. After 1 week culture, alkaline phosphatase activity and the amount of Ca was higher on the GLAD surfaces compared with Ta60 and FLAT controls, suggesting that the GLAD surfaces facilitate differentiation of osteoblasts. This study demonstrates that ordered Ta nanotopographies synthesized by combining colloidal lithography with GLAD can improve the mineralization of osteoblast-like cells providing a new platform for biomaterials and bone tissue engineering. PMID:26459103

  5. Tilt angle control of nanocolumns grown by glancing angle sputtering at variable argon pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia-Martin, J. M.; Cebollada, A.; Alvarez, R.; Romero-Gomez, P.; Palmero, A.

    2010-10-25

    We show that the tilt angle of nanostructures obtained by glancing angle sputtering is finely tuned by selecting the adequate argon pressure. At low pressures, a ballistic deposition regime dominates, yielding high directional atoms that form tilted nanocolumns. High pressures lead to a diffusive regime which gives rise to vertical columnar growth. Monte Carlo simulations reproduce the experimental results indicating that the loss of directionality of the sputtered particles in the gas phase, together with the self-shadowing mechanism at the surface, are the main processes responsible for the development of the columns.

  6. GLANCE

    PubMed Central

    Goodman, A D.; Rossman, H; Bar-Or, A; Miller, A; Miller, D H.; Schmierer, K; Lublin, F; Khan, O; Bormann, N M.; Yang, M; Panzara, M A.; Sandrock, A W.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the safety and tolerability of natalizumab when added to glatiramer acetate (GA) in patients with relapsing multiple sclerosis. The primary outcome assessed whether this combination would increase the rate of development of new active lesions on cranial MRI scans vs GA alone. Methods: This phase 2, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study included patients aged 19 to 55 years who were treated with GA for at least 1 year before randomization and experienced at least one relapse during the previous year. Patients received IV natalizumab 300 mg (n = 55) or placebo (n = 55) once every 4 weeks plus GA 20 mg subcutaneously once daily for ≤20 weeks. Results: The mean rate of development of new active lesions was 0.03 with combination therapy vs 0.11 with GA alone (p = 0.031). Combination therapy resulted in lower mean numbers of new gadolinium-enhancing lesions (0.6 vs 2.3 for GA alone, p = 0.020) and new/newly enlarging T2-hyperintense lesions (0.5 vs 1.3, p = 0.029). The incidence of infection and infusion reactions was similar in both groups; no hypersensitivity reactions were observed. One serious adverse event occurred with combination therapy (elective hip surgery). With the exception of an increase in anti-natalizumab antibodies with combination therapy, laboratory data were consistent with previous clinical studies of natalizumab alone. Conclusion: The combination of natalizumab and glatiramer acetate seemed safe and well tolerated during 6 months of therapy. GLOSSARY AE = adverse event; CONSORT = Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials; EDSS = Expanded Disability Status Scale; GA = glatiramer acetate; Gd+ = gadolinium-enhancing; GLANCE = Glatiramer Acetate and Natalizumab Combination Evaluation; IFNβ = interferon β; MS = multiple sclerosis; PML = progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy. PMID:19255407

  7. Strong light coupling effect for a glancing-deposited silver nanorod array in the Kretschmann configuration

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    In this work, three slanted silver nanorod arrays (NRAs) with different thicknesses are fabricated using the glancing angle deposition method. Each silver NRA in the Kretschmann configuration is arranged to form a prism/NRA/air system. Attenuated total reflection occurs over the visible wavelengths and wide incident angles of both s- and p-polarization states. The extinctance is inversely proportional to the thickness of the Ag NRA. The thinnest NRA, with a thickness of 169 nm, exhibits strong extinctance of more than 80% over the visible wavelengths. The associated forward scatterings from the three NRAs are measured and compared under illumination with a laser beam with a wavelength of 632.8 nm. PMID:25352769

  8. Glancing angle Talbot-Lau grating interferometers for phase contrast imaging at high x-ray energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stutman, D.; Finkenthal, M.

    2012-08-01

    A Talbot-Lau interferometer is demonstrated using micro-periodic gratings inclined at a glancing angle along the light propagation direction. Due to the increase in the effective thickness of the absorption gratings, the device enables differential phase contrast imaging at high x-ray energy, with improved fringe visibility (contrast). For instance, at 28° glancing angle, we obtain up to ˜35% overall interferometer contrast with a spectrum having ˜43 keV mean energy, suitable for medical applications. In addition, glancing angle interferometers could provide high contrast at energies above 100 keV, enabling industrial and security applications of phase contrast imaging.

  9. Glancing angle metal evaporation synthesis of catalytic swimming Janus colloids with well defined angular velocity.

    PubMed

    Archer, R J; Campbell, A I; Ebbens, S J

    2015-09-14

    The ability to control the degree of spin, or rotational velocity, for catalytic swimming devices opens up the potential to access well defined spiralling trajectories, enhance cargo binding rate, and realise theoretically proposed behaviour such as chiral diffusion. Here we assess the potential to impart a well-defined spin to individual catalytic Janus swimmers by using glancing angle metal evaporation onto a colloidal crystal to break the symmetry of the catalytic patch due to shadowing by neighbouring colloids. Using this approach we demonstrate a well-defined relationship between the glancing angle and the ratio of rotational to translational velocity. This allows batches of colloids with well-defined spin rates in the range 0.25 to 2.5 Hz to be produced. With reference to the shape and thickness variations across the catalytically active shapes, and their propulsion mechanism we discuss the factors that can lead to the observed variations in rotational propulsion. PMID:26234424

  10. Physical Ion Sputtering At Glancing Angles As A Novel IC De-processing Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Vyatkin, A. F.; Zinenko, V. I.

    2011-01-07

    Failure analysis (de-processing) techniques are becoming more and more important in tackling integrated circuits (IC) process-related problems. Particularly, failure analysis of ICs requires opening and de-layering a chip in a layer by layer mode in order to find hidden defects. Selective chemical etching, reactive ion etching, plasma etching and chemical mechanical polishing or a combination of these techniques are traditionally used for de-processing of IC. In this work a novel technique which is physical ion sputtering at glancing incidence angles allowing precise information about possible reasons of IC failures occurring at different steps of IC processing is proposed.

  11. High energy x-ray phase contrast CT using glancing-angle grating interferometers

    SciTech Connect

    Sarapata, A.; Stayman, J. W.; Siewerdsen, J. H.; Finkenthal, M.; Stutman, D.; Pfeiffer, F.

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: The authors present initial progress toward a clinically compatible x-ray phase contrast CT system, using glancing-angle x-ray grating interferometry to provide high contrast soft tissue images at estimated by computer simulation dose levels comparable to conventional absorption based CT. Methods: DPC-CT scans of a joint phantom and of soft tissues were performed in order to answer several important questions from a clinical setup point of view. A comparison between high and low fringe visibility systems is presented. The standard phase stepping method was compared with sliding window interlaced scanning. Using estimated dose values obtained with a Monte-Carlo code the authors studied the dependence of the phase image contrast on exposure time and dose. Results: Using a glancing angle interferometer at high x-ray energy (∼45 keV mean value) in combination with a conventional x-ray tube the authors achieved fringe visibility values of nearly 50%, never reported before. High fringe visibility is shown to be an indispensable parameter for a potential clinical scanner. Sliding window interlaced scanning proved to have higher SNRs and CNRs in a region of interest and to also be a crucial part of a low dose CT system. DPC-CT images of a soft tissue phantom at exposures in the range typical for absorption based CT of musculoskeletal extremities were obtained. Assuming a human knee as the CT target, good soft tissue phase contrast could be obtained at an estimated absorbed dose level around 8 mGy, similar to conventional CT. Conclusions: DPC-CT with glancing-angle interferometers provides improved soft tissue contrast over absorption CT even at clinically compatible dose levels (estimated by a Monte-Carlo computer simulation). Further steps in image processing, data reconstruction, and spectral matching could make the technique fully clinically compatible. Nevertheless, due to its increased scan time and complexity the technique should be thought of not as

  12. High energy x-ray phase contrast CT using glancing-angle grating interferometers

    PubMed Central

    Sarapata, A.; Stayman, J. W.; Finkenthal, M.; Siewerdsen, J. H.; Pfeiffer, F.; Stutman, D.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The authors present initial progress toward a clinically compatible x-ray phase contrast CT system, using glancing-angle x-ray grating interferometry to provide high contrast soft tissue images at estimated by computer simulation dose levels comparable to conventional absorption based CT. Methods: DPC-CT scans of a joint phantom and of soft tissues were performed in order to answer several important questions from a clinical setup point of view. A comparison between high and low fringe visibility systems is presented. The standard phase stepping method was compared with sliding window interlaced scanning. Using estimated dose values obtained with a Monte-Carlo code the authors studied the dependence of the phase image contrast on exposure time and dose. Results: Using a glancing angle interferometer at high x-ray energy (∼45 keV mean value) in combination with a conventional x-ray tube the authors achieved fringe visibility values of nearly 50%, never reported before. High fringe visibility is shown to be an indispensable parameter for a potential clinical scanner. Sliding window interlaced scanning proved to have higher SNRs and CNRs in a region of interest and to also be a crucial part of a low dose CT system. DPC-CT images of a soft tissue phantom at exposures in the range typical for absorption based CT of musculoskeletal extremities were obtained. Assuming a human knee as the CT target, good soft tissue phase contrast could be obtained at an estimated absorbed dose level around 8 mGy, similar to conventional CT. Conclusions: DPC-CT with glancing-angle interferometers provides improved soft tissue contrast over absorption CT even at clinically compatible dose levels (estimated by a Monte-Carlo computer simulation). Further steps in image processing, data reconstruction, and spectral matching could make the technique fully clinically compatible. Nevertheless, due to its increased scan time and complexity the technique should be thought of not as

  13. Ultrasensitive hydrogen sensor based on Pt-decorated WO₃ nanorods prepared by glancing-angle dc magnetron sputtering.

    PubMed

    Horprathum, M; Srichaiyaperk, T; Samransuksamer, B; Wisitsoraat, A; Eiamchai, P; Limwichean, S; Chananonnawathorn, C; Aiempanakit, K; Nuntawong, N; Patthanasettakul, V; Oros, C; Porntheeraphat, S; Songsiriritthigul, P; Nakajima, H; Tuantranont, A; Chindaudom, P

    2014-12-24

    In this work, we report an ultrasensitive hydrogen (H2) sensor based on tungsten trioxide (WO3) nanorods decorated with platinum (Pt) nanoparticles. WO3 nanorods were fabricated by dc magnetron sputtering with a glancing angle deposition (GLAD) technique, and decorations of Pt nanoparticles were performed by normal dc sputtering on WO3 nanorods with varying deposition time from 2.5 to 15 s. Crystal structures, morphologies, and chemical information on Pt-decorated WO3 nanorods were characterized by grazing-incident X-ray diffraction, field-emission scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and photoelectron spectroscopy, respectively. The effect of the Pt nanoparticles on the H2-sensing performance of WO3 nanorods was investigated over a low concentration range of 150-3000 ppm of H2 at 150-350 °C working temperatures. The results showed that the H2 response greatly increased with increasing Pt-deposition time up to 10 s but then substantially deteriorated as the deposition time increased further. The optimally decorated Pt-WO3 nanorod sensor exhibited an ultrahigh H2 response from 1530 and 214,000 to 150 and 3000 ppm of H2, respectively, at 200 °C. The outstanding gas-sensing properties may be attributed to the excellent dispersion of fine Pt nanoparticles on WO3 nanorods having a very large effective surface area, leading to highly effective spillover of molecular hydrogen through Pt nanoparticles onto the WO3 nanorod surface. PMID:25422873

  14. Photocatalytic properties of porous titania grown by oblique angle deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riley, M. J.; Williams, B.; Condon, G. Y.; Borja, J.; Lu, T. M.; Gill, W. N.; Plawsky, J. L.

    2012-04-01

    High surface area nanorods of titanium dioxide were grown by oblique angle deposition on a transparent substrate to investigate their effectiveness as photocatalytic agents for the destruction of organic contaminants in air and water. Optical transmission measurements were made that allowed for an estimation of the porosity of the film (75%-78%). Comparing transmission measurements with those from a dense anatase film showed that the penetration depth for the light into the nanorod film was 2.5 times that in a dense, anatase film. The photocatalytic degradation of indigo carmine dye on the porous films was shown to depend on film thickness and annealing conditions. The effectiveness of the film was assessed by observing the change in absorbance of the dye at 610 nm over time and quantifying the film performance using a pseudo-first-order reaction rate model. Reaction rates increased as the film thickness increased from 600 nm to 1000 nm, but leveled out or decreased at thicknesses beyond 1500 nm. A transport/reaction model was used to show that there exists an optimal geometry that maximizes the overall reaction rate and that such a geometry can be simply produced using glancing angle deposition. The nanorod films were benchmarked against nanoparticle films and were shown to perform as well as 0.73 g/L of 25-nm-diameter anatase nanoparticles with surface area of 50 m2/g.

  15. Glancing-angle ion enhanced surface diffusion on gaAs(001) during molecular beam epitaxy.

    PubMed

    DeLuca, P M; Ruthe, K C; Barnett, S A

    2001-01-01

    We describe the effects of glancing incidence 3-4 keV Ar ion bombardment on homoepitaxial growth on vicinal GaAs(001). The average adatom lifetime on surface terraces, measured during growth using specular ion scattering, decreased monotonically with increasing ion current density. The results indicated that surface diffusivity was increased by the ions. The ion beam also suppressed growth oscillations and decreased the film surface roughness. This indicates a change from two-dimensional island nucleation to step-flow growth due to increased adatom surface diffusivity. A simple model, involving direct momentum transfer from ions to adatoms, is shown to be consistent with the measured enhanced diffusion. PMID:11177806

  16. Electrochromic behavior of W(x)Si(y)O(z) thin films prepared by reactive magnetron sputtering at normal and glancing angles.

    PubMed

    Gil-Rostra, Jorge; Cano, Manuel; Pedrosa, José M; Ferrer, Francisco Javier; García-García, Francisco; Yubero, Francisco; González-Elipe, Agustín R

    2012-02-01

    This work reports the synthesis at room temperature of transparent and colored W(x)Si(y)O(z) thin films by magnetron sputtering (MS) from a single cathode. The films were characterized by a large set of techniques including X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR), and Raman spectroscopies. Their optical properties were determined by the analysis of the transmission and reflection spectra. It was found that both the relative amount of tungsten in the W-Si MS target and the ratio O(2)/Ar in the plasma gas were critical parameters to control the blue coloration of the films. The long-term stability of the color, attributed to the formation of a high concentration of W(5+) and W(4+) species, has been related with the formation of W-O-Si bond linkages in an amorphous network. At normal geometry (i.e., substrate surface parallel to the target) the films were rather compact, whereas they were very porous and had less tungsten content when deposited in a glancing angle configuration. In this case, they presented outstanding electrochromic properties characterized by a fast response, a high coloration, a complete reversibility after more than one thousand cycles and a relatively very low refractive index in the bleached state. PMID:22208156

  17. Enhancement of the photocatalytic property of TiO{sub 2} columnar nanostructured films by changing deposition angle

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Zhengcao Teng, Yi; Xing, Liping; Zhang, Na; Zhang, Zhengjun

    2014-02-01

    Highlights: • Isolated and inclined columnar TiO{sub 2} nanostructures were obtained by sputtering Ti, and subsequently annealing. • The film performed photocatalytic decolorization effectively under UV irradiation. • The photocatalytic efficiency increased with deposition angle, which results in a more porous micro structure of the films. - Abstract: Isolated and inclined columnar nanostructured TiO{sub 2} films were obtained by sputtering titanium with glancing angle deposition method and subsequently annealing in air. Compared with flat film, TiO{sub 2} film fabricated with this method has higher porosity; compared with TiO{sub 2} powder, it overcomes the obstacles of immobilization and recycling. The TiO{sub 2} photocatalysis was evaluated by the degradation of methyl orange under UV light. It was indicated that the photocatalytic performance increased with deposition angle, which changed the porosity of the films. The relationship between deposition angle (the angle between the target and substrate surface) and the TiO{sub 2} columnar inclination angle (the angle between TiO{sub 2} columnar and substrate normal) was discussed.

  18. Self-organized ultrathin FePt nanowires produced by glancing-angle ion-beam codeposition on rippled alumina surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garel, Mathieu; Babonneau, David; Boulle, Alexandre; Pailloux, Frédéric; Coati, Alessandro; Garreau, Yves; Ramos, Aline Y.; Tolentino, Hélio C. N.

    2015-01-01

    Ultradense macroscopic arrays of ferromagnetic alloy nanowires exhibit unique properties that make them attractive both for basic physics studies and for prospective nanodevice applications in various areas. We report here on the production of self-organized equiatomic FePt nanowires produced by glancing-angle ion-beam codeposition on alumina nanoripple patterns at room temperature and subsequent annealing at 600 °C. This study demonstrates that periodically aligned FePt nanowires with tunable size (~10-20 nm width and ~0.5-10 nm height) can be successfully grown as a consequence of shadowing effects and low mobility of Fe and Pt on the rippled alumina surface. Moreover, the structure and magnetic properties of the FePt nanowires, which undergo a phase transition from a disordered A1 (soft) structure to a partially ordered L10 (hard) structure, can be modified upon annealing. We show that this behavior can be further exploited to change the effective uniaxial anisotropy of the system, which is determined by a strong interplay between the shape and magnetocrystalline anisotropies of the nanowires.

  19. X-ray absorption, glancing-angle reflectivity, and theoretical study of the N K- and Ga M{sub 2,3}-edge spectra in GaN

    SciTech Connect

    Lambrecht, W.R.; Rashkeev, S.N.; Segall, B.; Lawniczak-Jablonska, K.; Suski, T.; Gullikson, E.M.; Underwood, J.H.; Perera, R.C.; Rife, J.C.; Grzegory, I.; Porowski, S.; Wickenden, D.K.

    1997-01-01

    A comprehensive study of the nitrogen K edge and gallium M{sub 2,3} edge in gallium nitride is presented. Results of two different experimental techniques, x-ray absorption by total photocurrent measurements and glancing-angle x-ray reflectivity, are compared with each other. First-principles calculations of the (polarization averaged) dielectric response {epsilon}{sub 2}({omega}) contributions from the relevant core-level to conduction-band transitions and derived spectral functions are used to interpret the data. These calculations are based on the local density approximation (LDA) and use a muffin-tin orbital basis for the band structure and matrix elements. The angular dependence of the x-ray reflectivity is studied and shown to be in good agreement with the theoretical predictions based on Fresnel theory and the magnitude of the calculated x-ray optical response functions. The main peaks in the calculated and measured spectra are compared with those in the relevant partial density of conduction-band states. Assignments are made to particular band transitions and corrections to the LDA are discussed. From the analysis of the N K and Ga M{sub 2,3} edges the latter are found to be essentially constant up to {approximately}10 eV above the conduction-band minimum. The differences in spectral shape found between the various measurements were shown to be a result of polarization dependence. Since the c axis in all the measurements was normal to the sample surface, p-polarized radiation at glancing angles corresponds to {bold E}{parallel}{bold c} while s polarization corresponds to {bold E}{perpendicular}{bold c} at all incident angles. Thus, this polarization dependence is a result of the intrinsic anisotropy of the wurtzite structure. Spectra on powders which provide an average of both polarizations as well as separate measurements of reflectivity with s polarization and p polarization were used. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  20. Shape-controllable, bottom-up fabrication of microlens using oblique angle deposition.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hee Ju; Kang, Eun Kyu; Ju, Gun Wu; Song, Young Min; Lee, Yong Tak

    2016-07-15

    This Letter reports a novel method for the simple fabrication of microlens arrays with a controlled shape and diameter on glass substrates. Multilayer stacks of silicon dioxide deposited by oblique angle deposition with hole mask patterns enable microlens formation. Precise control of mask height and distance, as well as oblique angle steps between deposited layers, supports the controllability of microlens geometry. The fabricated microlens arrays with designed geometry exhibit uniform optical properties. PMID:27420527

  1. The influence of incident angle on physical properties of a novel back contact prepared by oblique angle deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yang; Zhao, Yue; Feng, Yue; Shen, Jiesheng; Liang, Xiaoyan; Huang, Jian; Min, Jiahua; Wang, Linjun; Shi, Weimin

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, oblique vacuum thermal evaporation and direct current (DC) magnetron sputtering technique are used to produce a novel back contact electrode (BCE) of CuInS2 solar cell. These novel back contact electrodes (BCEs) are based on a layered structure of Mo/Ag/Mo (MAM). The influence of vapor source incidence angle θ on optical-electrical properties of novel BCE is investigated by X-ray Diffraction (XRD), Surface Profiler, Atomic Force Microscope (AFM), UV-vis-IR Spectrometer, and Four-point Probe Method. According to the analysis of AFM images of BCEs, the variation tendencies of surface roughness and uniformity are closely related to the incidence angle θ. The surface roughness increases with the increase of incidence angle θ, but the uniformity becomes poor at same time. This phenomenon can be attributed to the variation of interlayer Ag films (the density and inclined angle of Ag nanorods). The results of four-point probe test show that the novel BCE deposited by vapor source incidence angle θ equal to 45° owns the lowest resistance value of 3.71 × 10-8 Ω m, which is probably due to a loose and multi-point contact interface between Ag layer and top layer (Mo2). The reflectance of novel BCEs deposited by incident angle less than 45° is higher than that of normal bi-layer Mo (Mo12) BCE. As a result, the efficiency of corresponding solar cell may be upgraded.

  2. Microstructure-related properties of magnesium fluoride films at 193nm by oblique-angle deposition.

    PubMed

    Guo, Chun; Kong, Mingdong; Lin, Dawei; Liu, Cunding; Li, Bincheng

    2013-01-14

    Magnesium fluoride (MgF2) films deposited by resistive heating evaporation with oblique-angle deposition have been investigated in details. The optical and micro-structural properties of single-layer MgF2 films were characterized by UV-VIS and FTIR spectrophotometers, scanning electron microscope (SEM), atomic force microscope (AFM), and x-ray diffraction (XRD), respectively. The dependences of the optical and micro-structural parameters of the thin films on the deposition angle were analyzed. It was found that the MgF2 film in a columnar microstructure was negatively inhomogeneous of refractive index and polycrystalline. As the deposition angle increased, the optical loss, extinction coefficient, root-mean-square (rms) roughness, dislocation density and columnar angle of the MgF2 films increased, while the refractive index, packing density and grain size decreased. Furthermore, IR absorption of the MgF2 films depended on the columnar structured growth. PMID:23388989

  3. Uniform Plasmonic Response of Colloidal Ag Patchy Particles Prepared by Swinging Oblique Angle Deposition.

    PubMed

    Bradley, Layne; Zhao, Yiping

    2016-05-17

    The plasmonic property of Ag patchy particles fabricated using a colloid monolayer and oblique angle deposition shows significant variations due to the multidomain nature of the monolayer. A swinging oblique angle deposition method is proposed to create uniform patchy particles. Both numerical calculations and experiment show that when the swinging angle is larger than 90°, the resulting plasmonic patchy particles have similar morphology and demonstrate uniform optical response that does not depend on the monolayer domain orientation. These uniform patchy plasmonic particles have great potential for plasmonic-based applications. PMID:27128221

  4. Fabrication of TiN nanostructure as a hydrogen peroxide sensor by oblique angle deposition

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Nanostructured titanium nitride (TiN) films with varying porosity were prepared by the oblique angle deposition technique (OAD). The porosity of films increases as the deposition angle becomes larger. The film obtained at an incident angle of 85° exhibits the best catalytic activity and sensitivity to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). This could be attributed to its largest contact area with the electrolyte. An effective approach is thus proposed to fabricate TiN nanostructure as H2O2 sensor by OAD. PMID:24589278

  5. Superhydrophobic hierarchical surfaces fabricated by anodizing of oblique angle deposited Al-Nb alloy columnar films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Takashi; Aoki, Yoshitaka; Habazaki, Hiroki

    2011-07-01

    A combined process of oblique angle magnetron sputtering and anodizing has been developed to tailor superhydrophobic surfaces with hierarchical morphology. Isolated submicron columns of single-phase Al-Nb alloys are deposited by magnetron sputtering at several oblique deposition angles on a scalloped substrate surface, with the gaps between columns increasing with an increase in the deposition angle from 70° to 110°. Then, the columnar films have been anodized in hot phosphate-glycerol electrolyte to form a nanoporous anodic oxide layer on each column. Such surfaces with submicron-/nano-porous structure have been coated with a fluoroalkyl phosphate layer to reduce the surface energy. The porous surface before coating is superhydrophilic with a contact angle for water is less than 10°, while after coating the contact angles are larger than 150°, being superhydrophobic. The beneficial effect of dual-scale porosity to enhance the water repellency is found from the comparison of the contact angles of the submicron columnar films with and without nanoporous oxide layers. The larger submicron gaps between columns are also preferable to increase the water repellency.

  6. Sputter deposition of Al-doped ZnO films with various incident angles

    SciTech Connect

    Sato, Yasushi; Yanagisawa, Kei; Oka, Nobuto; Nakamura, Shin-ichi; Shigesato, Yuzo

    2009-09-15

    Al-doped ZnO (AZO) films were sputter deposited on glass substrates heated at 200 degree sign C under incident angles of sputtered particles at 0 degree sign (incidence normal to substrate), 20 deg., 40 deg., 60 deg., and 80 deg. In the case of normal incidence, x-ray diffraction pole figures show a strong [001] preferred orientation normal to the film surface. In contrast, in the case wherein the incident angles were higher than 60 degree sign , the [001] orientation inclined by 25 deg. - 35 deg. toward the direction of sputtered particles. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that the tilt angle of the [001] orientation increased with increasing angle of the incident sputtered particles, whereas the columnar structure did not show any sign of inclination with respect to the substrate plane.

  7. Combinatorial fabrication of composite nanorods using oblique angle co-deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larson, Steven; Huang, Weijie; Zhao, Yiping

    2016-09-01

    We demonstrate that oblique angle co-deposition can be used as a versatile combinatory nanofabrication technique to generate a library of nanomaterials. Using the Cu-Fe2O3 system as an example, by carefully characterizing the vapor plumes of the source materials, a composition map can be generated, which is used to design the locations of all the substrate holders. The resulting nanostructures at different locations show different thickness, morphology, crystallinity, composition, as well as inhomogeneity in microstructures, and material maps of all these structural parameters are established. By further oxidizing or reducing the composite nanostructures, their properties—such as band gap, photocatalytic performance, and magnetic properties—can be easily linked to their composition and other structural parameters. Optimal materials for photocatalytic and magnetic applications are efficiently identified. It is expected that oblique angle co-deposition and its variations could become the most powerful combinatory nanofabrication technique for nanomaterial survey.

  8. Tunable optoelectronic properties of pulsed dc sputter-deposited ZnO:Al thin films: Role of growth angle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Mohit; Singh, Ranveer; Nandy, Suman; Ghosh, Arnab; Rath, Satchidananda; Som, Tapobrata

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we investigate the role of deposition angle on the physical properties and work function of pulsed dc sputter-deposited Al-doped zinc oxide (AZO) thin films. It is observed that average grain size and crystal quality increase with higher angle of deposition, yielding improved optical properties. A systematic blue shift as well as a decrease in the resistivity takes place with the increasing growth angle up to 70°, while an opposite trend is observed beyond that. In addition, the work function of AZO films is also measured using Kelvin probe force microscopy, which corroborates well with the optical and structural properties. The observed results are explained in the framework of growth angle induced diffusion and shadowing effects. The films deposited at higher angles will be important for rapid incorporation into new technological applications that require a transparent conductive oxide.

  9. High-angle reverse faults, fluid-pressure cycling, and mesothermal gold-quartz deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sibson, Richard H.; Robert, Francois; Poulsen, K. Howard

    1988-06-01

    Many mesothermal gold-quartz deposits are localized along high-angle reverse or reverse-oblique shear zones within greenstone belt terrains. Characteristically, these fault-hosted vein deposits exhibit a mixed "brittle-ductile" style of deformation (discrete shears and vein fractures as well as a schistose shear-zone fabric) developed under greenschist facies metamorphic conditions. Many of the vein systems are of considerable vertical extent (>2 km); they include steeply dipping fault veins (lenticular veins subparallel to the shear-zone schistosity) and, in some cases, associated flats (subhorizontal extensional veins). Textures of both vein sets record histories of incremental deposition. We infer that the vein sets developed near the roofs of active metamorphic/magmatic systems and represent the roots of brittle, high-angle reverse fault systems extending upward through the seismogenic regime. Friction theory and field relations suggest that the high-angle reverse faults acted as valves, promoting cyclic fluctuations in fluid pressure from supralithostatic to hydrostatic values. Because of their unfavorable orientation in the prevailing stress field, reactivation of the faults could only occur when fluid pressure exceeded the lithostatic load. Seismogenic fault failure then created fracture permeability within the rupture zone, allowing sudden draining of the geopressured reservoir at depth. Incremental opening of flats is attributed to the prefailure stage of supralithostatic fluid pressures; deposition within fault veins is attributed to the immediate postfailure discharge phase. Hydrothermal self-sealing leads to reaccumulation of fluid pressure and a repetition of the cycle. Mutual crosscutting relations between the two vein sets are a natural consequence of the cyclicity of the process. Abrupt fluid-pressure fluctuations from this fault-valve behavior of reverse faults seem likely to be integral to the mineralizing process at this

  10. Chromium Carbide Thin Films Synthesized by Pulsed Nd:YAG Laser Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suda, Yoshiaki; Kawasaki, Hiroharu; Terajima, Ryou; Emura, Masanari

    1999-06-01

    Chromium carbide thin films are synthesized on Si(100)substrates by a pulsed Nd:YAG laser deposition method at differentsubstrate temperatures. Glancing-angle X-ray diffraction shows that acrystalline chromium carbide film can be prepared at the substratetemperature of 700°C. Grain size of the films, examined witha field-emission secondary electron microscope, increases withincreasing substrate temperature.

  11. Estimation of glance from EEG for cursor control.

    PubMed

    Tan, Tele; Hakenberg, Jan Philipp; Guan, Cuntai

    2013-01-01

    The variations in the electrooculogram (EOG) caused by eye motion are roughly proportional to the instantaneous horizontal and vertical glance angle. This linear correlation is exploited in systems using EOG to control software, and hardware such as artificial limbs, or wheelchairs. In these approaches, the drift in the electronics is commonly compensated by applying a high-pass filter. Consequently, the remaining EOG signal contains only blinks and rapid eye movement. However, repeating these eye gestures voluntarily is exhausting. This paper presents an algorithm that estimates the instantaneous glance of a subject from EEG signals. The subject is seated in front of a computer screen to control an application by glance. Because the visual field of interest, in this setting, is the limited area of the monitor, we can compensate the error in the glance estimate by detecting outliers. Because no high-pass filter is applied to the data, the user controls the applications by eye glance, which is comfortable and can be performed over extended periods of time. The numerical evaluation of the experiments with 12 volunteers, and video recordings of EOG controlled applications demonstrate the accuracy of our algorithm. PMID:24110338

  12. Facile Route to NiO Nanostructured Electrode Grown by Oblique Angle Deposition Technique for Supercapacitors.

    PubMed

    Kannan, Vasudevan; Inamdar, Akbar I; Pawar, Sambaji M; Kim, Hyun-Seok; Park, Hyun-Chang; Kim, Hyungsang; Im, Hyunsik; Chae, Yeon Sik

    2016-07-13

    We report an efficient method for growing NiO nanostructures by oblique angle deposition (OAD) technique in an e-beam evaporator for supercapacitor applications. This facile physical vapor deposition technique combined with OAD presents a unique, direct, and economical route for obtaining high width-to-height ratio nanorods for supercapacitor electrodes. The NiO nanostructure essentially consists of nanorods with varying dimensions. The sample deposited at OAD 75° showed highest supercapacitance value of 344 F/g. NiO nanorod electrodes exhibits excellent electrochemical stability with no degradation in capacitance after 5000 charge-discharge cycles. The nanostructured film adhered well to the substrate and had 131% capacity retention. Peak energy density and power density of the NiO nanorods were 8.78 Wh/kg and 2.5 kW/kg, respectively. This technique has potential to be expanded for growing nanostructured films of other interesting metal/metal oxide candidates for supercapacitor applications. PMID:27322601

  13. Tilted bulk heterojunction organic photovoltaic cells grown by oblique angle deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ning; Forrest, Stephen R.

    2009-09-01

    We demonstrate small molecule bulk heterojunction organic photovoltaic cells using oblique angle vacuum deposition. Obliquely deposited donor chloroaluminum phthalocyanine (ClAlPc) films on indium tin oxide have surface feature sizes of ˜30 nm, resulting in ClAlPc/C60 donor-acceptor heterojunctions (HJs) with approximately twice the interface area of HJs grown at normal incidence. This results in nearly twice the external quantum efficiency in the ClAlPc absorption band compared with analogous, planar HJs. The efficiency increase is attributed to the increased surface area presented by the donor-acceptor junction to the incident illumination by ClAlPc protrusions lying obliquely to the substrate plane formed during deposition. The power conversion efficiency improves from (2.0±0.1)% to (2.8±0.1)% under 1 sun, AM 1.5G simulated solar illumination. Similarly, the power efficiency of copper phthalocyanine/C60 organic photovoltaic cells is increased from (1.3±0.1)% to (1.7±0.1)%.

  14. Use of nanostructures based on silver nanospike prepared by oblique angle deposition as broadband optical polarizer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamidi, Seyedeh Mehri; Zamani, Mojtaba

    2015-10-01

    Plasmonics have enabled the realization of new optical components in nanostructures such as polarizers. We construct nanostructures by polycarbonate grating comprising silver nanospikes prepared by an oblique angle deposition technique. Surface, wavelength, and polarization properties of these devices have been investigated by atomic force microscopy, fiber-coupled spectrometer, and rotating analyzer, respectively. Our results show that we can reach 31% polarization ratio with the aid of two pieces of metalized gratings placed back to back by index-matching gel. Also, we can reach the broadband optical polarizer in the visible region according to the concentration and direction of nanospike in each of metalized nanogratings, which can open up directions toward cheap and one-dimensional optical polarizers.

  15. Single-electron devices fabricated using double-angle deposition and plasma oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Y.; Barcikowski, Z. S.; Ramanayaka, A. N.; Stewart, M. D., Jr.; Zimmerman, N. M.; Pomeroy, J. M.; Quantum Processes; Metrology Group Team

    We report on development of plasma oxidized, single-electron transistors (SETs) where we seek low-capacitance and small-area Al/AlOx/Al tunnel junctions with small charge offset drift. Performance of metal-based SET quantum devices and superconducting devices has suffered from long-term charge offset drift, high defect densities and charge noise. We use plasma oxidation to lower defect densities of the oxide layer, and adjustable deposition angles to control the overlapping areas for Al/AlOx/Al tunnel junctions. Current-voltage and charge offset drift measurements are planned for cryogenic temperatures. Other electrical properties will be measured at room temperature. We hope to see Coulomb blockade oscillations on these devices and better charge offset stability than typical Al/AlOx/Al SETs.

  16. Dynamics of Molecular Orientation Observed Using Angle Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy during Deposition of Pentacene on Graphite.

    PubMed

    Park, Sang Han; Kwon, Soonnam

    2016-04-19

    A real-time method to observe both the structural and the electronic configuration of an organic molecule during deposition is reported for the model system of pentacene on graphite. Structural phase transition of the thin films as a function of coverage is monitored by using in situ angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) results to observe the change of the electronic configuration at the same time. A photoemission theory that uses independent atomic center approximations is introduced to identify the molecular orientation from the ARPES technique. This study provides a practical insight into interpreting ARPES data regarding dynamic changes of molecular orientation during initial growth of molecules on a well-defined surface. PMID:26999332

  17. Spectroscopic ellipsometry investigations of optical anisotropy in obliquely deposited hafnia thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokas, R. B.; Jena, Shuvendu; Haque, S. Maidul; Rao, K. Divakar; Thakur, S.; Sahoo, N. K.

    2016-05-01

    In present work, HfO2 thin films have been deposited at various oblique incidences on Si substrates by electron beam evaporation. These refractory oxide films exhibited anisotropy in refractive index predictably due to special columnar microstructure. Spectroscopic ellipsometry being a powerful tool for optical characterization has been employed to investigate optical anisotropy. It was observed that the film deposited at glancing angle (80°) exhibits the highest optical anisotropy. Further, anisotropy was noticed to decrease with lower values of deposition angles while effective refractive index depicts opposite trend. Variation in refractive index and anisotropy has been explained in light of atomic shadowing during growth of thin films at oblique angles.

  18. TFEB at a glance.

    PubMed

    Napolitano, Gennaro; Ballabio, Andrea

    2016-07-01

    The transcription factor EB (TFEB) plays a pivotal role in the regulation of basic cellular processes, such as lysosomal biogenesis and autophagy. The subcellular localization and activity of TFEB are regulated by mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR)-mediated phosphorylation, which occurs at the lysosomal surface. Phosphorylated TFEB is retained in the cytoplasm, whereas dephosphorylated TFEB translocates to the nucleus to induce the transcription of target genes. Thus, a lysosome-to-nucleus signaling pathway regulates cellular energy metabolism through TFEB. Recently, in vivo studies have revealed that TFEB is also involved in physiological processes, such as lipid catabolism. TFEB has attracted a lot of attention owing to its ability to induce the intracellular clearance of pathogenic factors in a variety of murine models of disease, such as Parkinson's and Alzheimer's, suggesting that novel therapeutic strategies could be based on the modulation of TFEB activity. In this Cell Science at a Glance article and accompanying poster, we present an overview of the latest research on TFEB function and its implication in human diseases. PMID:27252382

  19. Structural, Morphological and Optical Properties of Sn3Sb2S6 Thin Films Synthesized by Oblique Angle Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larbi, A.; Chaffar Akkari, F.; Dahman, H.; Demaille, D.; Gallas, B.; Kanzari, M.

    2016-06-01

    The oblique angle deposition technique has attracted a lot attention in many different applications due to its unique advantage of programmable nanocolumns. In this work we use this technique to investigate the physical properties of obliquely thermal evaporated Sn3Sb2S6 thin films deposited onto unheated glass and silicon substrates, inclined from the flux vapor source at the deposition angles 0°, 40°, 60°, 75° and 85°. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and UV-Visible and near infrared (UV-Vis-IFR) analysis were used respectively to characterize the structural and optical properties of the layers. The influence of flux angle on the surface morphology and the microstructure was investigated by using scanning electron microscopy. The optical constants were obtained from analysis of the experimental recorded transmission and reflectance spectral data over the wavelength range 300 nm to 1800 nm. The band gaps of the synthesized thin films were found to be direct allowed transitions and increased from 1.44 eV to 1.66 eV with increasing γ from 0° to 85°, respectively. The absorption coefficients of the films are in the range of 105 cm-1 to 106 cm-1. The refractive indexes were evaluated in the transparent region in terms of the envelope method suggested by the Swanepoel model. It has been found that the refractive index decreases from 2.66 to 2.06 with increasing deposition angle from 0° to 85°, respectively. The relationship between the flux incident angles γ and the column angle β was also explored. The oblique angle deposition films showed an inclined columnar structure, with columns tilting in the direction of the incident flux. The effective packing densities of the synthesized Sn3Sb2S6 thin films were calculated using Bruggeman effective medium approximation.

  20. Reflectance and surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) of sculptured silver films deposited at various vapor incident angles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Shigeng; Keating, Martin; Chen, Yu; Placido, Frank

    2012-08-01

    By using e-beam evaporation at various oblique angles, silver nanorod arrays were produced on silicon and fused silica substrates. Reflectance of P and S polarizations was measured at an incident angle of 30°, with the data analyzed by using the appropriate optical dispersive model. The surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) was investigated using trans-1,2-bis(4-pyridyl)ethene (BPE) as a probe molecule at an excitation wavelength of 633 nm. The Ag-coated surface become rougher as the vapor incident angle is increased. Only the sample deposited at 85° shows clear oblique column structure. Reflectance fitting confirmed the positive rexlation between roughness and deposition angle and showed an increase of porosity in the film with increasing deposition angle. The reflectance measurements also indicate that the sample deposited at 85° has a very high anisotropic effect due to the inclined column structure. In the RS scans, only the 85° samples on Si and silica substrates gave strong SERS with a similar enhancement factor, with a higher background level and noise signal from the silica substrate.

  1. Growth direction of oblique angle electron beam deposited silicon monoxide thin films identified by optical second-harmonic generation

    SciTech Connect

    Vejling Andersen, Søren; Lund Trolle, Mads; Pedersen, Kjeld

    2013-12-02

    Oblique angle deposited (OAD) silicon monoxide (SiO) thin films forming tilted columnar structures have been characterized by second-harmonic generation. It was found that OAD SiO leads to a rotationally anisotropic second-harmonic response, depending on the optical angle of incidence. A model for the observed dependence of the second-harmonic signal on optical angle of incidence allows extraction of the growth direction of OAD films. The optically determined growth directions show convincing agreement with cross-sectional scanning electron microscopy images. In addition to a powerful characterization tool, these results demonstrate the possibilities for designing nonlinear optical devices through SiO OAD.

  2. Fabrication of an extreme ultraviolet glancing incidence telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleetwood, C. M.; Mangus, J. D.

    1974-01-01

    A technique is described for use in the fabrication of glancing incidence telescopes which operate at large grazing angles (i.e., 8 to 15 degrees). Precision conic section plunge laps are used in a controlled grinding procedure to initially generate imaging surfaces which have a minimum of subsurface damage. A numerically controlled Moore Number 3 Measuring Machine is used throughout the fabrication procedure. Surface geometry accuracies on the order of one-tenth micron have been achieved.

  3. Glancing incidence telescopes for space astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mangus, J. D.

    1972-01-01

    Design optimization is reported for glancing telescopes of increased collecting areas. Considered are nested geometries for X-ray and extreme ultraviolet telescopes, each of which generates only one singular principal surface. In the case of the X-ray telescope, the field curvature of the outer telescope serves as a standard and the focus of each of the inner telescopes is made coplanar by a slight descrease in the collecting area of each of the inner telescopes. In the case of the EUV telescope, a slight change in the maximum slope angle of the inner telescope makes the field curvatures coincide. Five concentric X-ray telescopes form a collecting area of approximately 900 sq cm, and a nested EUV telescope consisting of two concentric telescopes produces a collecting area of about 45 sq cm.

  4. Education at a Glance: Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development, Paris (France). Centre for Educational Research and Innovation.

    This new annual publication, a companion volume to the fourth edition of "Education at a Glance: OECD Indicators," presents a series of concise analyses on themes relevant to educational policy, based upon selected international education indicators. The analyses are presented in the following four chapters: (1) "An Overview of Enrolment (sic) and…

  5. Informal Learning. At a Glance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halliday-Wynes, Sian; Beddie, Francesca

    2009-01-01

    This "at a glance" publication investigates the idea of "informal learning", which has been described as an iceberg: "mostly invisible at the surface and immense in its mostly submerged informal aspects" (Livingstone 2000). It does so in order to offer some definitional clarity for those needing to uncover that learning. The publication also…

  6. PISA 2009 at a Glance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    OECD Publishing (NJ3), 2011

    2011-01-01

    "PISA 2009 at a Glance" is a companion publication to "PISA 2009 Results", the six-volume report on the 2009 survey conducted by the OECD's Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA). PISA assesses the extent to which students near the end of compulsory education have acquired some of the knowledge and skills that are essential for full…

  7. Orientating layers with adjustable pretilt angles for liquid crystals deposited by a linear atmospheric pressure plasma source

    SciTech Connect

    Jian, Shih-Jie; Kou, Chwung-Shan; Hwang, Jennchang; Lee, Chein-Dhau; Lin, Wei-Cheng

    2013-06-15

    A method for controlling the pretilt angles of liquid crystals (LC) was developed. Hexamethyldisiloxane polymer films were first deposited on indium tin oxide coated glass plates using a linear atmospheric pressure plasma source. The films were subsequently treated with the rubbing method for LC alignment. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements were used to characterize the film composition, which could be varied to control the surface energy by adjusting the monomer feed rate and input power. The results of LC alignment experiments showed that the pretilt angle continuously increased from 0 Degree-Sign to 90 Degree-Sign with decreasing film surface energy.

  8. Surface evolution of amorphous nanocolumns of Fe-Ni grown by oblique angle deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, Senoy; Anantharaman, M. R.; Al-Harthi, S. H.; Ramanujan, R. V.; Liu Yan; Zhao Bangchuan; Wang Lan

    2009-02-09

    The growth of Fe-Ni based amorphous nanocolumns has been studied using atomic force microscopy. The root mean square roughness of the film surface increased with the deposition time but showed a little change at higher deposition time. It was found that the separation between the nanostructures increased sharply during the initial stages of growth and the change was less pronounced at higher deposition time. During the initial stages of the column growth, a roughening process due to self shadowing is dominant and, as the deposition time increases, a smoothening mechanism takes place due to the surface diffusion of adatoms.

  9. Education at a Glance 2012: Highlights

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    OECD Publishing (NJ3), 2012

    2012-01-01

    "Education at a Glance 2012: Highlights" offers a reader-friendly introduction to the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development's (OECD's) collection of internationally comparable data on education. As the name suggests, it is derived from "Education at a Glance 2012", the OECD's flagship compendium of education statistics. However, it…

  10. Highlights from Education at a Glance 2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    OECD Publishing (NJ3), 2010

    2010-01-01

    "Highlights from Education at a Glance 2010" is a companion publication to the OECD's flagship compendium of education statistics, Education at a Glance. It provides easily accessible data on key topics in education today, including: education levels and student numbers, economic and social benefits of education, education spending, the school…

  11. Education at a Glance 2011: Highlights

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    OECD Publishing (NJ1), 2011

    2011-01-01

    "Education at a Glance 2011: Highlights" offers a reader-friendly introduction to the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development's (OECD's) collection of internationally comparable data on education. As the name suggests, it is derived from "Education at a Glance 2011", the OECD's flagship compendium of education statistics. However, it…

  12. A model for pattern deposition from an evaporating solution subject to contact angle hysteresis and finite solubility.

    PubMed

    Zigelman, Anna; Manor, Ofer

    2016-06-29

    We propose a model for the pattern deposition of the solute from an evaporating drop of a dilute solution on a horizontal substrate. In the model we take into account the three-phase contact angle hysteresis and the deposition of the solute whenever its concentration exceeds the solubility limit. The evaporating drop is governed by a film equation. We show that unless for a very small three-phase contact angle or a very rapid evaporation rate the film adopts a quasi-steady geometry, satisfying the Young-Laplace equation to leading order. The concentration profile is assumed to satisfy an advection diffusion equation subject to the standard Fick's law for the diffusive flux. We further use an integral boundary condition to describe the dynamics of the concentration in the vicinity of the three-phase contact line; we replace an exact geometric description of the vicinity of the contact line, which is usually assumed such that mathematical singularities are avoided, with general insights about the concentration and its flux. We use our model to explore the relationships between a variety of deposition patterns and the governing parameters, show that the model repeats previous findings, and suggest further insights. PMID:27279348

  13. Energetic deposition of metal ions: Observation of self-sputtering and limited sticking for off-normal angles of incidence

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Hongchen; Anders, Andre

    2009-09-15

    The deposition of films under normal and off-normal angle of incidence has been investigated to show the relevance of non-sticking of and self-sputtering by energetic ions, leading to the formation of neutral atoms. The flow of energetic ions was obtained using a filtered cathodic arc system in high vacuum and therefore the ion flux had a broad energy distribution of typically 50-100 eV per ion. The range of materials included Cu, Ag, Au, Ti, and Ni. Consistent with molecular dynamics simulations published in the literature, the experiments show, for all materials, that the combined effects of non-sticking and self-sputtering are very significant, especially for large off-normal angles. Modest heating and intentional introduction of oxygen background affect the results.

  14. Effects of Substrate Hardness and Spray Angle on the Deposition Behavior of Cold-Sprayed Ti Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Shuo; Suo, Xinkun; Su, Jiaqing; Guo, Zhiwei; Liao, Hanlin; Wang, Xiaofang

    2014-01-01

    In this study, finite element analysis combined with experimental observation was conducted to clarify the effects of substrate hardness and spray angle on the deposition behavior of cold-sprayed Ti particles. It is found that metallurgical bonding is highly possible to occur between the Ti particle and Cu substrate due to the intensive metal jet at the rim of the interface which helps to remove the cracked oxides. Because metallurgical bonding and large interfacial contact area can guarantee high adhesion strength, the thick Ti coating is achieved after deposition on the Cu substrate. As for the soft Al substrate, the first layer Ti particles are embedded in and then trapped by the soft substrate material, which results in the occurrence of mechanical interlock at the interface. As a consequence, the final coating thickness is also relatively large. When using hard stainless steel as the substrate, the essential conditions for forming the mechanical interlock are lacked due to the high hardness of the substrate material. In addition, the metal jet at rim of the interface is less prominent and also the interfacial contact area is smaller in comparison with the Ti-Cu case. Therefore, the particle-substrate bonding strength and the consequent coating thickness are relatively low. Besides, it is also found that the particle deformation and coating quality are significantly affected by the spray angle. The deformation of the particle localizes at only one side due to the additional tangential momentum. Also, such localized deformation becomes increasingly intensive with decreasing the spray angle. Moreover, the coating thickness is found to reduce with the decrease in spay angle, but the coating porosity shows a reverse trend.

  15. Anomalous grazing incidence small-angle x-ray scattering studies of platinum nanoparticles formed by cluster deposition.

    PubMed

    Lee, Byeongdu; Seifert, Sönke; Riley, Stephen J; Tikhonov, George; Tomczyk, Nancy A; Vajda, Stefan; Winans, Randall E

    2005-08-15

    The size evolution of platinum nanoparticles formed on a SiO2/Si(111) substrate as a function of the level of surface coverage with deposited clusters has been investigated. The anisotropic shapes of sub-nanometer-size nanoparticles are changed to isotropic on the amorphous substrate as their sizes increased. Using anomalous grazing incidence small-angle x-ray scattering (AGISAXS), the scattering from nanoparticles on the surface of a substrate is well separated from that of surface roughness and fluorescence. We show that AGISAXS is a very effective method to subtract the background and can provide unbiased information about particle sizes of less than 1 nm. PMID:16229604

  16. Study of the effect of ultrasonic agitation on the defects size in electro-deposited chromium layer by small-angle neutron scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Y.; Hahn, Y. S.; Seong, B. S.; Kim, M.

    2006-11-01

    Ultrasonic agitation during electro-plating results in increasing deposition rate and neutral salt fog spray test (NSFST) life. Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) showed that improvement of NSFST life is related to homogeneous size distribution of the defects.

  17. Effect of a declination angle of substrate position on magnetron sputter deposition from a YBa sub 2 Cu sub 3 O sub 7 minus x target

    SciTech Connect

    Kageyama, Y.; Taga, Y. )

    1989-09-04

    Thin-film deposition by magnetron sputtering of a multielement target was carried out with respect to the geometrical factors between a target and the substrates. The thin films were deposited on substrates which were located semicircularly over a YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7{minus}{ital x}} target in several declination angles measured from the normal to the target surface. The deposition rate decreased to about one-third with the change in the angle from 0{degree} to 90{degree}. In the angles of 45{degree}, 60{degree}, and 75{degree}, films showed significant instability in the atmosphere, which appeared to be caused by an excessive concentration of Ba atoms in the films. Target composition was almost reproduced in the films deposited in the angle of 90{degree}.

  18. Experimental and theoretical study of the optical and electrical properties of nanostructured indium tin oxide fabricated by oblique-angle deposition.

    PubMed

    Sood, Adam W; Poxson, David J; Mont, Frank W; Chhajed, Sameer; Cho, Jaehee; Schubert, E Fred; Welser, Roger E; Dhar, Nibir K; Sood, Ashok K

    2012-05-01

    Oblique-angle deposition of indium tin oxide (ITO) is used to fabricate optical thin-film coatings with a porous, columnar nanostructure. Indium tin oxide is a material that is widely used in industrial applications because it is both optically transparent and electrically conductive. The ITO coatings are fabricated, using electron-beam evaporation, with a range of deposition angles between 0 degrees (normal incidence) and 80 degrees. As the deposition angle increases, we find that the porosity of the ITO film increases and the refractive index decreases. We measure the resistivity of the ITO film at each deposition angle, and find that as the porosity increases, the resistivity increases superlinearly. A new theoretical model is presented to describe the relationship between the ITO film's resistivity and its porosity. The model takes into account the columnar structure of the film, and agrees very well with the experimental data. PMID:22852330

  19. Simulation of glancing shock wave and boundary layer interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, Ching-Mao

    1989-01-01

    Shock waves generated by sharp fins, glancing across a laminar boundary layer growing over a flat plate, are simulated numerically. Several basic issues concerning the resultant three-dimensional flow separation are studied. Using the same number of grid points, different grid spacings are employed to investigate the effects of grid resolution on the origin of the line of separation. Various shock strengths (generated by different fin angles) are used to study the so-called separated and unseparated boundary layer and to establish the existence or absence of the secondary separation. The usual interpretations of the flow field from previous studies and new interpretations arising from the present simulation are discussed.

  20. Variable magnification glancing incidence x ray telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoover, Richard (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A multispectral glancing incidence x ray telescope is disclosed, which capable of broadband, high resolution imaging of solar and stellar x ray and extreme ultraviolet radiation sources includes a primary optical system which focuses the incoming radiation to a primary focus. Two or more ellipsoidal mirrors are positioned behind the primary focus at an inclination to the optical axis, each mirror having a concave surface coated with a multilayer synthetic microstructure coating to reflect a desired wavelength. The ellipsoidal mirrors are segments of respective ellipsoids having a common first focus coincident with the primary focus. A detector such as an x ray sensitive photographic film is positioned at the second focus of each of the ellipsoids so that each of the ellipsoidal mirrors may reflect the image at the first focus to the detector. In one embodiment the mirrors are inclined at different angles and has its respective second focus at a different location, separate detectors being located at the respective second focus. The mirrors are arranged so that the magnification and field of view differ, and a solenoid activated arm may withdraw at least one mirror from the beam to select the mirror upon which the beam is to impinge so that selected magnifications and fields of view may be detected.

  1. Detecting anharmonicity at a glance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giliberti, M.; Stellato, M.; Barbieri, S.; Cavinato, M.; Rigon, E.; Tamborini, M.

    2014-11-01

    Harmonic motion is generally presented in such a way that most of the students believe that the small oscillations of a body are all harmonic. Since the situation is not actually so simple, and since the comprehension of harmonic motion is essential in many physical contexts, we present here some suggestions, addressed to undergraduate students and pre-service teachers, that allow one to find out at a glance the anharmonicity of a motion. Starting from a didactically motivated definition of harmonic motion, and stressing the importance of the interplay between mathematics and experiments, we give a four-point criterion for anharmonicity together with some emblematic examples. The role of linear damping is also analysed in relation to the gradual changing of harmonicity into anharmonicity when the ratio between the damping coefficient and the zero-friction angular frequency increases.

  2. Low-damage high-throughput grazing-angle sputter deposition on graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, C.-T.; Gajek, M.; Raoux, S.; Casu, E. A.

    2013-07-15

    Despite the prevalence of sputter deposition in the microelectronics industry, it has seen very limited applications for graphene electronics. In this letter, we report systematic investigation of the sputtering induced damages in graphene and identify the energetic sputtering gas neutrals as the primary cause of graphene disorder. We further demonstrate a grazing-incidence sputtering configuration that strongly suppresses fast neutral bombardment and retains graphene structure integrity, creating considerably lower damage than electron-beam evaporation. Such sputtering technique yields fully covered, smooth thin dielectric films, highlighting its potential for contact metals, gate oxides, and tunnel barriers fabrication in graphene device applications.

  3. Deposition temperature mediated tunable tilt angle magnetization in Co-Pt/Ni81Fe19 exchange springs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saravanan, P.; Hsu, Jen-Hwa; Tsai, C. L.; Lee, C.-M.

    2015-05-01

    In this study, we investigate the effect of deposition temperature of Co-Pt fixed layer, Td,CoPt (150, 250 and 350 °C) on the tilt angle magnetization (θM) of Ni81Fe19-layer grown at room temperature (RT) and at different thicknesses (tNiFe=0, 1.0, 2.5 and 4.0 nm) in Co-Pt(Td,CoPt)/NiFe(tNiFe) exchange springs. The magnetic studies demonstrated a strong perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA) for the equi-compositional ordered Co-Pt layer grown on glass substrate using the film sequence: Ta(20 nm)/Pt(20 nm)/CoPt(5 nm), regardless of Td,CoPt. The PMA can be retained with the addition of a 4-nm NiFe layer on the top when Td,CoPt≥250 °C. In contrast, relatively a thin layer of Ni-Fe (2.5 nm) can destroy the perpendicular exchange-spring behavior if the Co-Pt layer is deposited at RT. Using 3-D micromagnetic simulation, the interfacial exchange coupling strength (Aij) between the Co-Pt and NiFe-layers was estimated and the Aij value is found to increase rapidly when Td,CoPt is increased from RT to 300 °C. Besides, the magnetization tilted angle (θM) of NiFe can be easily tuned from completely out-of-plane to almost 60° when tNiFe=4.0 nm. Through this study, it is demonstrated that the θM of NiFe-layer can be tuned by not only altering the tNiFe; but also by varying the Td,CoPt.

  4. ERM proteins at a glance

    PubMed Central

    McClatchey, Andrea I.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The cell cortex is a dynamic and heterogeneous structure that governs cell identity and behavior. The ERM proteins (ezrin, radixin and moesin) are major architects of the cell cortex, and they link plasma membrane phospholipids and proteins to the underlying cortical actin cytoskeleton. Recent studies in several model systems have uncovered surprisingly dynamic and complex molecular activities of the ERM proteins and have provided new mechanistic insight into how they build and maintain cortical domains. Among many well-established and essential functions of ERM proteins, this Cell Science at a Glance article and accompanying poster will focus on the role of ERMs in organizing the cell cortex during cell division and apical morphogenesis. These examples highlight an emerging appreciation that the ERM proteins both locally alter the mechanical properties of the cell cortex, and control the spatial distribution and activity of key membrane complexes, establishing the ERM proteins as a nexus for the physical and functional organization of the cell cortex and making it clear that they are much more than scaffolds. This article is part of a Minifocus on Establishing polarity. For further reading, please see related articles: ‘Establishment of epithelial polarity – GEF who's minding the GAP?’ by Siu Ngok et al. (J. Cell Sci. 127, 3205–3215). ‘Integrins and epithelial cell polarity’ by Jessica Lee and Charles Streuli (J. Cell Sci. 127, 3217–3225). PMID:24951115

  5. Membrane curvature at a glance.

    PubMed

    McMahon, Harvey T; Boucrot, Emmanuel

    2015-03-15

    Membrane curvature is an important parameter in defining the morphology of cells, organelles and local membrane subdomains. Transport intermediates have simpler shapes, being either spheres or tubules. The generation and maintenance of curvature is of central importance for maintaining trafficking and cellular functions. It is possible that local shapes in complex membranes could help to define local subregions. In this Cell Science at a Glance article and accompanying poster, we summarize how generating, sensing and maintaining high local membrane curvature is an active process that is mediated and controlled by specialized proteins using general mechanisms: (i) changes in lipid composition and asymmetry, (ii) partitioning of shaped transmembrane domains of integral membrane proteins or protein or domain crowding, (iii) reversible insertion of hydrophobic protein motifs, (iv) nanoscopic scaffolding by oligomerized hydrophilic protein domains and, finally, (v) macroscopic scaffolding by the cytoskeleton with forces generated by polymerization and by molecular motors. We also summarize some of the discoveries about the functions of membrane curvature, where in addition to providing cell or organelle shape, local curvature can affect processes like membrane scission and fusion as well as protein concentration and enzyme activation on membranes. PMID:25774051

  6. ERM proteins at a glance.

    PubMed

    McClatchey, Andrea I

    2014-08-01

    The cell cortex is a dynamic and heterogeneous structure that governs cell identity and behavior. The ERM proteins (ezrin, radixin and moesin) are major architects of the cell cortex, and they link plasma membrane phospholipids and proteins to the underlying cortical actin cytoskeleton. Recent studies in several model systems have uncovered surprisingly dynamic and complex molecular activities of the ERM proteins and have provided new mechanistic insight into how they build and maintain cortical domains. Among many well-established and essential functions of ERM proteins, this Cell Science at a Glance article and accompanying poster will focus on the role of ERMs in organizing the cell cortex during cell division and apical morphogenesis. These examples highlight an emerging appreciation that the ERM proteins both locally alter the mechanical properties of the cell cortex, and control the spatial distribution and activity of key membrane complexes, establishing the ERM proteins as a nexus for the physical and functional organization of the cell cortex and making it clear that they are much more than scaffolds. This article is part of a Minifocus on Establishing polarity. PMID:24951115

  7. DNA Sequences at a Glance

    PubMed Central

    Pinho, Armando J.; Garcia, Sara P.; Pratas, Diogo; Ferreira, Paulo J. S. G.

    2013-01-01

    Data summarization and triage is one of the current top challenges in visual analytics. The goal is to let users visually inspect large data sets and examine or request data with particular characteristics. The need for summarization and visual analytics is also felt when dealing with digital representations of DNA sequences. Genomic data sets are growing rapidly, making their analysis increasingly more difficult, and raising the need for new, scalable tools. For example, being able to look at very large DNA sequences while immediately identifying potentially interesting regions would provide the biologist with a flexible exploratory and analytical tool. In this paper we present a new concept, the “information profile”, which provides a quantitative measure of the local complexity of a DNA sequence, independently of the direction of processing. The computation of the information profiles is computationally tractable: we show that it can be done in time proportional to the length of the sequence. We also describe a tool to compute the information profiles of a given DNA sequence, and use the genome of the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe strain 972 h− and five human chromosomes 22 for illustration. We show that information profiles are useful for detecting large-scale genomic regularities by visual inspection. Several discovery strategies are possible, including the standalone analysis of single sequences, the comparative analysis of sequences from individuals from the same species, and the comparative analysis of sequences from different organisms. The comparison scale can be varied, allowing the users to zoom-in on specific details, or obtain a broad overview of a long segment. Software applications have been made available for non-commercial use at http://bioinformatics.ua.pt/software/dna-at-glance. PMID:24278218

  8. DNA sequences at a glance.

    PubMed

    Pinho, Armando J; Garcia, Sara P; Pratas, Diogo; Ferreira, Paulo J S G

    2013-01-01

    Data summarization and triage is one of the current top challenges in visual analytics. The goal is to let users visually inspect large data sets and examine or request data with particular characteristics. The need for summarization and visual analytics is also felt when dealing with digital representations of DNA sequences. Genomic data sets are growing rapidly, making their analysis increasingly more difficult, and raising the need for new, scalable tools. For example, being able to look at very large DNA sequences while immediately identifying potentially interesting regions would provide the biologist with a flexible exploratory and analytical tool. In this paper we present a new concept, the "information profile", which provides a quantitative measure of the local complexity of a DNA sequence, independently of the direction of processing. The computation of the information profiles is computationally tractable: we show that it can be done in time proportional to the length of the sequence. We also describe a tool to compute the information profiles of a given DNA sequence, and use the genome of the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe strain 972 h(-) and five human chromosomes 22 for illustration. We show that information profiles are useful for detecting large-scale genomic regularities by visual inspection. Several discovery strategies are possible, including the standalone analysis of single sequences, the comparative analysis of sequences from individuals from the same species, and the comparative analysis of sequences from different organisms. The comparison scale can be varied, allowing the users to zoom-in on specific details, or obtain a broad overview of a long segment. Software applications have been made available for non-commercial use at http://bioinformatics.ua.pt/software/dna-at-glance. PMID:24278218

  9. Single-step process for the deposition of high water contact angle and high water sliding angle surfaces by atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharge.

    PubMed

    Boscher, Nicolas D; Duday, David; Verdier, Stéphane; Choquet, Patrick

    2013-02-01

    Fluorine-free surfaces with high water contact angle (WCA) and high adhesion force to water are prepared by the atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharge (AP-DBD) of hexamethyldisiloxane on cold rolled aluminum foil. Water droplets, which remained on the plasma-polymerized hexamethyldisiloxane (ppHMDSO) surface with contact angle of 155°, do not slide even when the surface is tilted vertically or turned upside down. Scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy and confocal microscopy highlight the importance of the dual-scale roughness of the ppHMDSO surface. The "sticky" high WCA property is achieved only when the nanometer scale particles generated during the AP-DBD process are present at the surface of the film and combine to the micrometer scale rolling lines of the aluminum substrate. PMID:23339545

  10. Education at a Glance 2009: OECD Indicators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    OECD Publishing (NJ1), 2009

    2009-01-01

    Across OECD countries, governments are seeking policies to make education more effective while searching for additional resources to meet the increasing demand for education. The 2009 edition of "Education at a Glance: OECD Indicators" enables countries to see themselves in the light of other countries' performance. It provides a rich, comparable…

  11. Education at a Glance 2012: OECD Indicators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    OECD Publishing (NJ3), 2012

    2012-01-01

    "Education at a Glance: OECD Indicators" is the authoritative source for accurate and relevant information on the state of education around the world. It provides data on the structure, finances, and performance of education systems in the OECD's 34 member countries, as well as a number of non-member G20 nations. Featuring more than 140…

  12. Establishing fiducials on glancing incidence mirrors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleetwood, C. M.; Thomas, R. J.; Wright, G. A.

    1985-01-01

    A method is described for aligning cylindrical glancing incidence mirrors and establishing fiducials prior to axial profile measurements. The residual uncertainty in the absolute axial position is 2.54 microns, and the uncertainty in the absolute radius is 0.812 micron.

  13. Education at a Glance 2008: OECD Indicators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    OECD Publishing (NJ1), 2008

    2008-01-01

    Across OECD countries, governments are seeking policies to make education more effective while searching for additional resources to meet the increasing demand for education. The 2008 edition of "Education at a Glance: OECD Indicators" enables countries to see themselves in the light of other countries' performance. It provides a rich, comparable…

  14. Education at a Glance 2011: OECD Indicators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    OECD Publishing (NJ1), 2011

    2011-01-01

    Across OECD (Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development) countries, governments are having to work with shrinking public budgets while designing policies to make education more effective and responsive to growing demand. The 2011 edition of "Education at a Glance: OECD Indicators" enables countries to see themselves in the light of…

  15. Education at a Glance 2015: OECD Indicators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    OECD Publishing, 2015

    2015-01-01

    "Education at a Glance: OECD Indicators" is the authoritative source for accurate information on the state of education around the world. It provides data on the output of educational institutions; the impact of learning across countries; the financial and human resources invested in education; access, participation and progression in…

  16. Education at a Glance 2013: OECD Indicators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    OECD Publishing, 2013

    2013-01-01

    "Education at a Glance: OECD Indicators" is the authoritative source for accurate and relevant information on the state of education around the world. It provides data on the structure, finances, and performance of education systems in more than 40 countries, including OECD members and G20 partners. Featuring more than 100 charts, 200…

  17. Wisconsin Public Schools at a Glance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction, 2014

    2014-01-01

    "Wisconsin Public Schools at a Glance" provides in a single page document statistical information on the following topics: (1) Total number of public schools (2014-15); (2) Staff (2013-14); (3) Students (2013-14);(4) Report Cards (2013-14); (5) Attendance and Graduation (2012-13); (6) Student Performance (2013-14); and (7) School Funding.

  18. Producing Calculable Worlds: Education at a Glance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gorur, Radhika

    2015-01-01

    The OECD's international education indicators have become very influential in contemporary education policies. Although these indicators are now routinely, annually published in the form of "Education at a Glance," the calculability upon which the indicators depend was an achievement that involved the mobilisation of a huge machinery of…

  19. Education at a Glance 2012: OECD Indicators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    OECD Publishing (NJ3), 2012

    2012-01-01

    "Education at a Glance: OECD Indicators" is the authoritative source for accurate and relevant information on the state of education around the world. It provides data on the structure, finances, and performance of education systems in the OECD's 34 member countries, as well as a number of non-member G20 nations. Featuring more than 140 charts,…

  20. Influence of Oblique Angle Deposition on the Nano-structure and Characteristics of ZnO Thin Films Produced by Annealing of Zn Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savaloni, Hadi; Abbaszadeh, Neda

    2016-07-01

    Zinc oxide films were prepared using oblique angle deposition of Zn at four deposition angles of 0°, 30°, 45°, and 60° and subsequent annealing with the flow of oxygen. Structural characteristics of the films were obtained using atomic force microscopy and field emission scanning electron microscopy while their crystallography was investigated by x-ray diffraction analysis. The largest value of void fraction and the highest preferred orientation were obtained for the ZnO(101) diffraction line for the Zn film deposited at 45°. The former is explained in the published literature on the basis of rearrangement of atoms resulting from the diffusion or thermal vibration and the available crystallographic sites and surface energy on the substrate/growing film surface for relaxation of an adatom. Zn film anisotropy due to the bundling effect resulting from oblique angle deposition was examined by sheet resistivity measurements along x and y directions of the samples. Optical spectra of the samples were measured using both polarized light and unpolarized light from which optical constants were deduced. Both direct and indirect band gap energies were obtained and compared with the reported theoretical calculations. Our results are consistent with the experimental data in the literature; while they are larger than the theoretical reported values.

  1. Influence of Oblique Angle Deposition on the Nano-structure and Characteristics of ZnO Thin Films Produced by Annealing of Zn Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savaloni, Hadi; Abbaszadeh, Neda

    2016-04-01

    Zinc oxide films were prepared using oblique angle deposition of Zn at four deposition angles of 0°, 30°, 45°, and 60° and subsequent annealing with the flow of oxygen. Structural characteristics of the films were obtained using atomic force microscopy and field emission scanning electron microscopy while their crystallography was investigated by x-ray diffraction analysis. The largest value of void fraction and the highest preferred orientation were obtained for the ZnO(101) diffraction line for the Zn film deposited at 45°. The former is explained in the published literature on the basis of rearrangement of atoms resulting from the diffusion or thermal vibration and the available crystallographic sites and surface energy on the substrate/growing film surface for relaxation of an adatom. Zn film anisotropy due to the bundling effect resulting from oblique angle deposition was examined by sheet resistivity measurements along x and y directions of the samples. Optical spectra of the samples were measured using both polarized light and unpolarized light from which optical constants were deduced. Both direct and indirect band gap energies were obtained and compared with the reported theoretical calculations. Our results are consistent with the experimental data in the literature; while they are larger than the theoretical reported values.

  2. Influence of subaqueous shelf angle on coastal plain-shelf-slope deposits resulting from a rise or fall in base-level

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, L.J.; Ethridge, F.G.; Schumm, S.A. )

    1991-03-01

    Extensive research in the past decade concerning the effects of base-level fluctuations on coastal plain-shelf-slope systems along passive margins has failed to properly assess the influence of the subaqueous shelf angle on the development, character, and preservation of the resulting deposits. A series of experiments were performed in a 4 m by 7 m flume to examine the effect that differing shelf angles have on a simulated coastal plain-shelf-slope system undergoing a cycle of base-level rise and fall. Results of the experiments indicate that the angle of the shelf affects (1) the amount of sediment available for deposition, (2) the timing of the influx of drainage basin sediment into the lower portions of the fluvial system, and (3) the width to depth ratio and sinuosity of fluvial systems that develop on the shelf. Base-level fall over a steep shelf results in deep, narrow, straight fluvial channels on the shelf and fine-grained, thick shelf-margin deltas. Depositional systems show high sedimentation rates, but a low ratio of coarse-grained to fine-grained sediment. Multiple fluvial incisions on the shelf are rapidly abandoned for a single incised valley. In contrast, gentle shelf angles result in shallow, wide, meandering fluvial channels on the shelf and coarser-grained, thinner shelf-margin deltas. Depositional systems have a lower sedimentation rate, but a high ratio of coarse-grained to fine-grained sediment. Multiple fluvial incisions on the shelf are active for a longer period of time. During subsequent base-level rise, deposits have a low potential for preservation owing to their thin nature and the slower rate at which transgression occurs over the shelf.

  3. Glance Information System for ATLAS Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grael, F. F.; Maidantchik, C.; Évora, L. H. R. A.; Karam, K.; Moraes, L. O. F.; Cirilli, M.; Nessi, M.; Pommès, K.; ATLAS Collaboration

    2011-12-01

    ATLAS Experiment is an international collaboration where more than 37 countries, 172 institutes and laboratories, 2900 physicists, engineers, and computer scientists plus 700 students participate. The management of this teamwork involves several aspects such as institute contribution, employment records, members' appointment, authors' list, preparation and publication of papers and speakers nomination. Previously, most of the information was accessible by a limited group and developers had to face problems such as different terminology, diverse data modeling, heterogeneous databases and unlike users needs. Moreover, the systems were not designed to handle new requirements. The maintenance has to be an easy task due to the long lifetime experiment and professionals turnover. The Glance system, a generic mechanism for accessing any database, acts as an intermediate layer isolating the user from the particularities of each database. It retrieves, inserts and updates the database independently of its technology and modeling. Relying on Glance, a group of systems were built to support the ATLAS management and operation aspects: ATLAS Membership, ATLAS Appointments, ATLAS Speakers, ATLAS Analysis Follow-Up, ATLAS Conference Notes, ATLAS Thesis, ATLAS Traceability and DSS Alarms Viewer. This paper presents the overview of the Glance information framework and describes the privilege mechanism developed to grant different level of access for each member and system.

  4. Influences of deposition strategies and oblique angle on properties of AISI316L stainless steel oblique thin-walled part by direct laser fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xinlin; Deng, Dewei; Qi, Meng; Zhang, Hongchao

    2016-06-01

    Direct laser fabrication (DLF) developed from laser cladding and rapid prototyping technique has been widely used to fabricate thin-walled parts exhibiting more functions without expending weight and size. Oblique thin-walled parts accompanied with inhomogeneous mechanical properties are common in application. In the present study, a series of AISI316L stainless steel oblique thin-walled parts are successfully produced by DLF, in addition, deposition strategies, microstructure, and mechanical property of the oblique thin-walled parts are investigated. The results show that parallel deposition way is more valuable to fabricate oblique thin-walled part than oblique deposition way, because of the more remarkable properties. The hardness of high side initially increases until the distance to the substrate reaches about 25 mm, and then decreases with the increase of the deposition height. Oblique angle has a positive effect on the tensile property but a negative effect on microstructure, hardness and elongation due to the more tempering time. The maximum average ultimate tensile strength (UTS) and elongation are presented 744.3 MPa and 13.5% when the angle between tensile loading direction and horizontal direction is 45° and 90°, respectively.

  5. Anisotropic TixSn1-xO2 nanostructures prepared by magnetron sputter deposition.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shutian; Li, Zhengcao; Zhang, Zhengjun

    2011-01-01

    Regular arrays of TixSn1-xO2 nanoflakes were fabricated through glancing angle sputter deposition onto self-assembled close-packed arrays of 200-nm-diameter polystyrene spheres. The morphology of nanostructures could be controlled by simply adjusting the sputtering power of the Ti target. The reflectance measurements showed that the melon seed-shaped nanoflakes exhibited optimal properties of antireflection in the entire visible and ultraviolet region. In addition, we determined their anisotropic reflectance in the direction parallel to the surface of nanoflakes and perpendicular to it, arising from the anisotropic morphology. PMID:21711849

  6. Effects of Target-to-Substrate Angle on Off-Axis Sputter Deposition and EPR Studies of Near-Surface Magnetic Properties of YBCO Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pugel, D. E.; Xia, Y.-M.; Salamon, M. B.; Greene, L. H.

    2000-11-01

    We have determined the dependence of target-to-substrate angle on the elemental concentration of c-axis YBCO thin films. Away from the standard off-axis position, energy distributions of sputtered elements vary spatially within the sputter plume due to the angular dependence of thermalization. Standard materials characterization techniques and angle-dependent Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS) demonstrate that films grown away from the standard off-axis geometry produce bulk Y(123) with modified surface morphology and deposition rate. Several thin film planar tunneling experiments are consistent with a broken-time-reversal symmetry (BTRS) state. To compliment tunneling measurements, we measure electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) of the near-surface region of YBCO thin films. Preliminary data are consistent with the spontaneous formation of magnetic moments at low temperature.

  7. General surface equations for glancing incidence telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saha, Timo T.

    1987-01-01

    A generalized set of equations are derived for two mirror glancing incidence telescopes using Fermat's principle, a differential form of the law of reflection, the generalized sine condition, and a ray propagation equation described in vector form as a theoretical basis. The resulting formulation groups the possible telescope configurations into three distinct classes which are the Wolter, Wolter-Schwarzschild, and higher-order telescopes in which the Hettrick-Bowyer types are a subset. Eight configurations are possible within each class depending on the sign and magnitude of the parameters.

  8. Pyruvate kinase M2 at a glance

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Weiwei; Lu, Zhimin

    2015-01-01

    Reprogrammed metabolism is a key feature of cancer cells. The pyruvate kinase M2 (PKM2) isoform, which is commonly upregulated in many human cancers, has been recently shown to play a crucial role in metabolism reprogramming, gene transcription and cell cycle progression. In this Cell Science at a glance article and accompanying poster, we provide a brief overview of recent advances in understanding the mechanisms underlying the regulation of PKM2 expression, enzymatic activity, metabolic functions and subcellular location. We highlight the instrumental role of the non-metabolic functions of PKM2 in tumorigenesis and evaluate the potential to target PKM2 for cancer treatment. PMID:25770102

  9. General surface equations for glancing incidence telescopes.

    PubMed

    Saha, T T

    1987-02-15

    A generalized set of equations are derived for two mirror glancing incidence telescopes using Fermat's principle, a differential form of the law of reflection, the generalized sine condition, and a ray propagation equation described in vector form as a theoretical basis. The resulting formulation groups the possible telescope configurations into three distinct classes which are the Wolter, Wolter-Schwarzschild, and higherorder telescopes in which the Hettrick-Bowyer types are a subset. Eight configurations are possible within each class depending on the sign and magnitude of the parameters. PMID:20454195

  10. Monte Carlo simulation of electron depth distribution and backscattering for carbon films deposited on aluminium as a function of incidence angle and primary energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dapor, Maurizio

    2005-01-01

    Carbon films are deposited on various substrates (polymers, polyester fabrics, polyester yarns, metal alloys) both for experimental and technological motivations (medical devices, biocompatible coatings, food package and so on). Computational studies of the penetration of electron beams in supported thin film of carbon are very useful in order to compare the simulated results with analytical techniques data (obtained by scanning electron microscopy and/or Auger electron spectroscopy) and investigate the film characteristics. In the present paper, the few keV electron depth distribution and backscattering coefficient for the special case of film of carbon deposited on aluminium are investigated, by a Monte Carlo simulation, as a function of the incidence angle and primary electron energy. The simulated results can be used as a way to evaluate the carbon film thickness by a set of measurements of the backscattering coefficient.

  11. Glancing incidence telescopes for space astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alonso, J., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    A technique for determining the state of polarization of a light source by evaluating its image at the focus of a glancing telescope is reported. An analysis of the central disc of the diffraction image reveals if the light source is polarized, the plane of polarization, and the degree of polarization. When polarized light is incident at the aperture of a diffraction limited glancing telescope, the central disc of the diffraction pattern takes on an elliptical configuration. This ellipticity is caused by the tendency of the electric vector component in the plane of incidence to be absorbed by the reflecting material. As the state of polarization goes from plane polarized to decreasing degrees of elliptically polarized light, the ellipticity of the central disc goes from a maximum at plane polarization to zero at circular polarization. These curves give a direct relationship between the degree of polarization of a light source and the ellipticity of the central disc for this particular telescope, independent of the light source wavelength.

  12. On the formation of the porous structure in nanostructured a-Si coatings deposited by dc magnetron sputtering at oblique angles.

    PubMed

    Godinho, V; Moskovkin, P; Álvarez, R; Caballero-Hernández, J; Schierholz, R; Bera, B; Demarche, J; Palmero, A; Fernández, A; Lucas, S

    2014-09-01

    The formation of the porous structure in dc magnetron sputtered amorphous silicon thin films at low temperatures is studied when using helium and/or argon as the processing gas. In each case, a-Si thin films were simultaneously grown at two different locations in the reactor which led to the assembly of different porous structures. The set of four fabricated samples has been analyzed at the microstructural level to elucidate the characteristics of the porous structure under the different deposition conditions. With the help of a growth model, we conclude that the chemical nature of the sputter gas not only affects the sputtering mechanism of Si atoms from the target and their subsequent transport in the gaseous/plasma phase towards the film, but also the pore formation mechanism and dynamics. When Ar is used, pores emerge as a direct result of the shadowing processes of Si atoms, in agreement with Thornton's structure zone model. The introduction of He produces, in addition to the shadowing effects, a new process where a degree of mobility results in the coarsening of small pores. Our results also highlight the influence of the composition of sputtering gas and tilt angles (for oblique angle deposition) on the formation of open and/or occluded porosity. PMID:25120129

  13. Quantitative analysis of nanoripple and nanoparticle patterns by grazing incidence small-angle x-ray scattering 3D mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babonneau, D.; Camelio, S.; Vandenhecke, E.; Rousselet, S.; Garel, M.; Pailloux, F.; Boesecke, P.

    2012-06-01

    3D reciprocal space mapping in the grazing incidence small-angle x-ray scattering geometry was used to obtain accurate morphological characteristics of nanoripple patterns prepared by broad beam-ion sputtering of Al2O3 and Si3N4 amorphous thin films as well as 2D arrays of Ag nanoparticles obtained by glancing angle deposition on Al2O3 nanorippled buffer layers. Experiments and theoretical simulations based on the distorted-wave Born approximation make it possible to determine the average 3D shape of the ripples and nanoparticles together with crucial information on their in-plane organization. In the case of nanoparticle arrays, the approach was also used to quantify the growth conformity of an additional capping layer, which proceeds by replication of the buried ripple pattern.

  14. Nanocolumnar interfaces and enhanced magnetic coercivity in preferentially oriented cobalt ferrite thin films grown using oblique-angle pulsed laser deposition.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Devajyoti; Hordagoda, Mahesh; Hyde, Robert; Bingham, Nicholas; Srikanth, Hariharan; Witanachchi, Sarath; Mukherjee, Pritish

    2013-08-14

    Highly textured cobalt ferrite (CFO) thin films were grown on Si (100) substrates using oblique-angle pulsed laser deposition (α-PLD). X-ray diffraction and in-depth strain analysis showed that the obliquely deposited CFO films had both enhanced orientation in the (111) crystal direction as well as tunable compressive strains as a function of the film thicknesses, in contrast to the almost strain-free polycrystalline CFO films grown using normal-incidence PLD under the same conditions. Using in situ optical plume diagnostics the growth parameters in the α-PLD process were optimized to achieve smoother film surfaces with roughness values as low as 1-2 nm as compared to the typical values of 10-12 nm in the normal-incidence PLD grown films. Cross-sectional high resolution transmission electron microscope images revealed nanocolumnar growth of single-crystals of CFO along the (111) crystallographic plane at the film-substrate interface. Magnetic measurements showed larger coercive fields (∼10 times) with similar saturation magnetization in the α-PLD-grown CFO thin films as compared to those deposited using normal-incidence PLD. Such significantly enhanced magnetic coercivity observed in CFO thin films make them ideally suited for magnetic data storage applications. A growth mechanism based on the atomic shadowing effect and strain compression-relaxation mechanism was proposed for the obliquely grown CFO thin films. PMID:23829642

  15. Ubiquitin chain diversity at a glance.

    PubMed

    Akutsu, Masato; Dikic, Ivan; Bremm, Anja

    2016-03-01

    Ubiquitin plays an essential role in modulating protein functions, and deregulation of the ubiquitin system leads to the development of multiple human diseases. Owing to its molecular features, ubiquitin can form various homo- and heterotypic polymers on substrate proteins, thereby provoking distinct cellular responses. The concept of multifaceted ubiquitin chains encoding different functions has been substantiated in recent years. It has been established that all possible ubiquitin linkage types are utilized for chain assembly and propagation of specific signals in vivo. In addition, branched ubiquitin chains and phosphorylated ubiquitin molecules have been put under the spotlight recently. The development of novel technologies has provided detailed insights into the structure and function of previously poorly understood ubiquitin signals. In this Cell Science at a Glance article and accompanying poster, we provide an update on the complexity of ubiquitin chains and their physiological relevance. PMID:26906419

  16. Cerebral cavernous malformation proteins at a glance.

    PubMed

    Draheim, Kyle M; Fisher, Oriana S; Boggon, Titus J; Calderwood, David A

    2014-02-15

    Loss-of-function mutations in genes encoding KRIT1 (also known as CCM1), CCM2 (also known as OSM and malcavernin) or PDCD10 (also known as CCM3) cause cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs). These abnormalities are characterized by dilated leaky blood vessels, especially in the neurovasculature, that result in increased risk of stroke, focal neurological defects and seizures. The three CCM proteins can exist in a trimeric complex, and each of these essential multi-domain adaptor proteins also interacts with a range of signaling, cytoskeletal and adaptor proteins, presumably accounting for their roles in a range of basic cellular processes including cell adhesion, migration, polarity and apoptosis. In this Cell Science at a Glance article and the accompanying poster, we provide an overview of current models of CCM protein function focusing on how known protein-protein interactions might contribute to cellular phenotypes and highlighting gaps in our current understanding. PMID:24481819

  17. Autophagosome dynamics in neurodegeneration at a glance.

    PubMed

    Wong, Yvette C; Holzbaur, Erika L F

    2015-04-01

    Autophagy is an essential homeostatic process for degrading cellular cargo. Aging organelles and protein aggregates are degraded by the autophagosome-lysosome pathway, which is particularly crucial in neurons. There is increasing evidence implicating defective autophagy in neurodegenerative diseases, including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and Huntington's disease. Recent work using live-cell imaging has identified autophagy as a predominantly polarized process in neuronal axons; autophagosomes preferentially form at the axon tip and undergo retrograde transport back towards the cell body. Autophagosomes engulf cargo including damaged mitochondria (mitophagy) and protein aggregates, and subsequently fuse with lysosomes during axonal transport to effectively degrade their internalized cargo. In this Cell Science at a Glance article and the accompanying poster, we review recent progress on the dynamics of the autophagy pathway in neurons and highlight the defects observed at each step of this pathway during neurodegeneration. PMID:25829512

  18. Muscle stem cells at a glance.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu Xin; Dumont, Nicolas A; Rudnicki, Michael A

    2014-11-01

    Muscle stem cells facilitate the long-term regenerative capacity of skeletal muscle. This self-renewing population of satellite cells has only recently been defined through genetic and transplantation experiments. Although muscle stem cells remain in a dormant quiescent state in uninjured muscle, they are poised to activate and produce committed progeny. Unlike committed myogenic progenitor cells, the self-renewal capacity gives muscle stem cells the ability to engraft as satellite cells and capitulate long-term regeneration. Similar to other adult stem cells, understanding the molecular regulation of muscle stem cells has significant implications towards the development of pharmacological or cell-based therapies for muscle disorders. This Cell Science at a Glance article and accompanying poster will review satellite cell characteristics and therapeutic potential, and provide an overview of the muscle stem cell hallmarks: quiescence, self-renewal and commitment. PMID:25300792

  19. Groundtruthing and potential for predicting acid deposition impacts in headwater streams using bedrock geology, GIS, angling, and stream chemistry.

    PubMed

    Kirby, C S; McInerney, B; Turner, M D

    2008-04-15

    Atmospheric acid deposition is of environmental concern worldwide, and the determination of impacts in remote areas can be problematic. Rainwater in central Pennsylvania, USA, has a mean pH of approximately 4.4. Bedrock varies dramatically in its ability to neutralize acidity. A GIS database simplified reconnaissance of non-carbonate bedrock streams in the Valley and Ridge Province and identified potentially chronically impacted headwater streams, which were sampled for chemistry and brook trout. Stream sites (n=26) that originate in and flow through the Tuscarora had a median pH of 5.0 that was significantly different from other formations. Shawangunk streams (n=6) and non-Tuscarora streams (n=20) had a median pH of 6.0 and 6.3, respectively. Mean alkalinity for non-Tuscarora streams (2.6 mg/L CaCO(3)) was higher than the mean for Tuscarora streams (0.5 mg/L). Lower pH and alkalinity suggest that the buffering capability of the Tuscarora is inferior to that of adjacent sandstones. Dissolved aluminum concentrations were much higher for Tuscarora streams (0.2 mg/L; approximately the lethal limit for brook trout) than for non-Tuscarora streams (0.03 mg/L) or Shawangunk streams (0.02 mg/L). Hook-and-line methods determined the presence/absence of brook trout in 47 stream reaches with suitable habitat. Brook trout were observed in 21 of 22 non-Tuscarora streams, all 6 Shawangunk streams, and only 9 of 28 Tuscarora stream sites. Carefully-designed hook-and-line sampling can determine the presence or absence of brook trout and help confirm biological impacts of acid deposition. 15% of 334 km of Tuscarora stream lengths are listed as "impaired" due to atmospheric deposition by the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection. 65% of the 101 km of Tuscarora stream lengths examined in this study were impaired. PMID:18258282

  20. Multispectral glancing incidence X-ray telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoover, Richard B. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A multispectral glancing incidence X-ray telescope is illustrated capable of broadband, high-resolution imaging of solar and stellar X-ray and extreme ultraviolet radiation sources which includes a primary optical system preferably of the Wolter I type having a primary mirror system (20, 22). The primary optical system further includes an optical axis (24) having a primary focus (F1) at which the incoming radiation is focused by the primary mirrors. A plurality of ellipsoidal mirrors (30a, 30b, 30cand 30d) are carried at an inclination to the optical axis behind the primary focus (F1). A rotating carrier (32) is provided on which the ellipsoidal mirrors are carried so that a desired one of the ellipsoidal mirrors may be selectively positioned in front of the incoming radiation beam (26). In the preferred embodiment, each of the ellipsoidal mirrors has an identical concave surface carrying a layered synthetic microstructure coating tailored to reflect a desired wavelength of 1.5 .ANG. or longer. Each of the identical ellipsoidal mirrors has a second focus (F2) at which a detector (16) is carried. Thus the different wavelength image is focused upon the detector irregardless of which mirror is positioned in front of the radiation beam. In this manner, a plurality of low wavelengths in a wavelength band generally less than 30 angstroms can be imaged with a high resolution.

  1. The LC3 interactome at a glance.

    PubMed

    Wild, Philipp; McEwan, David G; Dikic, Ivan

    2014-01-01

    Continuous synthesis of all cellular components requires their constant turnover in order for a cell to achieve homeostasis. To this end, eukaryotic cells are endowed with two degradation pathways - the ubiquitin-proteasome system and the lysosomal pathway. The latter pathway is partly fed by autophagy, which targets intracellular material in distinct vesicles, termed autophagosomes, to the lysosome. Central to this pathway is a set of key autophagy proteins, including the ubiquitin-like modifier Atg8, that orchestrate autophagosome initiation and biogenesis. In higher eukaryotes, the Atg8 family comprises six members known as the light chain 3 (LC3) or γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-receptor-associated protein (GABARAP) proteins. Considerable effort during the last 15 years to decipher the molecular mechanisms that govern autophagy has significantly advanced our understanding of the functioning of this protein family. In this Cell Science at a Glance article and the accompanying poster, we present the current LC3 protein interaction network, which has been and continues to be vital for gaining insight into the regulation of autophagy. PMID:24345374

  2. Syndecan-4 signaling at a glance

    PubMed Central

    Elfenbein, Arye; Simons, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Summary Syndecan-4, a ubiquitous cell surface proteoglycan, mediates numerous cellular processes through signaling pathways that affect cellular proliferation, migration, mechanotransduction and endocytosis. These effects are achieved through syndecan-4 functioning as both a co-receptor for the fibroblast growth factor receptors (FGFR1–FGFR4) and its ability to independently activate signaling pathways upon ligand binding. As an FGFR co-receptor, syndecan-4 strengthens the duration and intensity of downstream signaling upon ligand binding; this is particularly evident with regard to mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling. In contrast, syndecan-4 also functions as an independent receptor for heparin-binding growth factors, such as fibroblast growth factors (FGFs), vascular endothelial growth factors (VEGFs) and platelet-derived growth factors (PDGFs). These signaling cascades affect canonical signaling components, such as the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), AKT1 and the Rho family of GTPases. In combination with the integrin family of proteins, syndecan-4 is also able to form physical connections between the extracellular matrix (ECM) and cytoskeletal signaling proteins, and it has a key role in regulation of integrin turnover. This unique versatility of the interactions of syndecan-4 is characterized in this Cell Science at a Glance article and illustrated in the accompanying poster. PMID:23970415

  3. Inclined angle-controlled growth of GaN nanorods on m-sapphire by metal organic chemical vapor deposition without a catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kyuseung; Chae, Sooryong; Jang, Jongjin; Min, Daehong; Kim, Jaehwan; Eom, Daeyong; Yoo, Yang-Seok; Cho, Yong-Hoon; Nam, Okhyun

    2015-08-01

    In this study, we have intentionally grown novel types of (11-22)- and (1-10-3)-oriented3 and self-assembled inclined GaN nanorods (NRs) on (10-10) m-sapphire substrates using metal organic chemical vapor deposition without catalysts and ex situ patterning. Nitridation of the m-sapphire surface was observed to be crucial to the inclined angle as well as the growth direction of the GaN NRs. Polarity-selective KOH etching confirmed that both (11-22) and (1-10-3) GaN NRs are nitrogen-polar. Using pole figure measurements and selective area electron diffraction patterns, the epitaxial relationship between the inclined (11-22) and (1-10-3) GaN NRs and m-sapphire substrates was systematically demonstrated. Furthermore, it was verified that the GaN NRs were single-crystalline wurtzite structures. We observed that stacking fault-related defects were generated during the initial growth stage using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The blue-shift of the near band edge (NBE) peak in the inclined angle-controlled GaN NRs can be explained by a band filling effect through carrier saturation of the conduction band, resulting from a high Si-doping concentration; in addition, the decay time of NBE emission in (11-22)- and (1-10-3)-oriented NRs was much shorter than that of stacking fault-related emission. These results suggest that defect-free inclined GaN NRs can be grown on m-sapphire without ex situ treatment.

  4. Inclined angle-controlled growth of GaN nanorods on m-sapphire by metal organic chemical vapor deposition without a catalyst.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyuseung; Chae, Sooryong; Jang, Jongjin; Min, Daehong; Kim, Jaehwan; Eom, Daeyong; Yoo, Yang-Seok; Cho, Yong-Hoon; Nam, Okhyun

    2015-08-21

    In this study, we have intentionally grown novel types of (11-22)- and (1-10-3)-oriented(3) and self-assembled inclined GaN nanorods (NRs) on (10-10) m-sapphire substrates using metal organic chemical vapor deposition without catalysts and ex situ patterning. Nitridation of the m-sapphire surface was observed to be crucial to the inclined angle as well as the growth direction of the GaN NRs. Polarity-selective KOH etching confirmed that both (11-22) and (1-10-3) GaN NRs are nitrogen-polar. Using pole figure measurements and selective area electron diffraction patterns, the epitaxial relationship between the inclined (11-22) and (1-10-3) GaN NRs and m-sapphire substrates was systematically demonstrated. Furthermore, it was verified that the GaN NRs were single-crystalline wurtzite structures. We observed that stacking fault-related defects were generated during the initial growth stage using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The blue-shift of the near band edge (NBE) peak in the inclined angle-controlled GaN NRs can be explained by a band filling effect through carrier saturation of the conduction band, resulting from a high Si-doping concentration; in addition, the decay time of NBE emission in (11-22)- and (1-10-3)-oriented NRs was much shorter than that of stacking fault-related emission. These results suggest that defect-free inclined GaN NRs can be grown on m-sapphire without ex situ treatment. PMID:26222432

  5. Physical vapor deposition synthesis of two-dimensional orthorhombic SnS flakes with strong angle/temperature-dependent Raman responses.

    PubMed

    Xia, Jing; Li, Xuan-Ze; Huang, Xing; Mao, Nannan; Zhu, Dan-Dan; Wang, Lei; Xu, Hua; Meng, Xiang-Min

    2016-01-28

    Anisotropic layered semiconductors have attracted significant interest due to the huge possibility of bringing new functionalities to thermoelectric, electronic and optoelectronic devices. Currently, most reports on anisotropy have concentrated on black phosphorus and ReS2, less effort has been contributed to other layered materials. In this work, two-dimensional (2D) orthorhombic SnS flakes on a large scale have been successfully synthesized via a simple physical vapor deposition method. Angle-dependent Raman spectroscopy indicated that the orthorhombic SnS flakes possess a strong anisotropic Raman response. Under a parallel-polarization configuration, the peak intensity of Ag (190.7 cm(-1)) Raman mode reaches the maximum when incident light polarization is parallel to the armchair direction of the 2D SnS flakes, which strongly suggests that the Ag (190.7 cm(-1)) mode can be used to determine the crystallographic orientation of the 2D SnS. In addition, temperature-dependent Raman characterization confirmed that the 2D SnS flakes have a higher sensitivity to temperature than graphene, MoS2 and black phosphorus. These results are useful for the future studies of the optical and thermal properties of 2D orthorhombic SnS. PMID:26698370

  6. Array of Cu{sub 2}O nano-columns fabricated by oblique angle sputter deposition and their application in photo-assisted proton reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Swain, S.; Chatterjee, S.; Chaudhary, Y. S.; Thakur, I.; Kulkarni, N. A.; Ayyub, P.

    2015-01-14

    Nano-columnar arrays of Cu{sub 2}O were grown by the oblique angle sputter deposition technique based on the self-shadowing principle. The as-grown nano-columnar samples are oriented along (111) direction, and they are highly transmitting in the visible range with a low reflectance. In this work, we show the photo-electrochemical activity of nano-columnar array of Cu{sub 2}O, which shows a higher (∼25%) photocurrent density and a two-fold enhancement in the incident-to-photon conversion efficiency as compared to continuous thin film of Cu{sub 2}O in photo-assisted proton reduction type reaction. The improvement in electrochemical activity of nano-columnar Cu{sub 2}O photocathode can be attributed to the change in morphology, crystal structure, as well as electrical property, which shows a higher degree of band bending, increased donor carrier (e−) density and lower width of space charge region as revealed by capacitance measurements and Mott-Schottky analysis.

  7. Physical vapor deposition synthesis of two-dimensional orthorhombic SnS flakes with strong angle/temperature-dependent Raman responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Jing; Li, Xuan-Ze; Huang, Xing; Mao, Nannan; Zhu, Dan-Dan; Wang, Lei; Xu, Hua; Meng, Xiang-Min

    2016-01-01

    Anisotropic layered semiconductors have attracted significant interest due to the huge possibility of bringing new functionalities to thermoelectric, electronic and optoelectronic devices. Currently, most reports on anisotropy have concentrated on black phosphorus and ReS2, less effort has been contributed to other layered materials. In this work, two-dimensional (2D) orthorhombic SnS flakes on a large scale have been successfully synthesized via a simple physical vapor deposition method. Angle-dependent Raman spectroscopy indicated that the orthorhombic SnS flakes possess a strong anisotropic Raman response. Under a parallel-polarization configuration, the peak intensity of Ag (190.7 cm-1) Raman mode reaches the maximum when incident light polarization is parallel to the armchair direction of the 2D SnS flakes, which strongly suggests that the Ag (190.7 cm-1) mode can be used to determine the crystallographic orientation of the 2D SnS. In addition, temperature-dependent Raman characterization confirmed that the 2D SnS flakes have a higher sensitivity to temperature than graphene, MoS2 and black phosphorus. These results are useful for the future studies of the optical and thermal properties of 2D orthorhombic SnS.Anisotropic layered semiconductors have attracted significant interest due to the huge possibility of bringing new functionalities to thermoelectric, electronic and optoelectronic devices. Currently, most reports on anisotropy have concentrated on black phosphorus and ReS2, less effort has been contributed to other layered materials. In this work, two-dimensional (2D) orthorhombic SnS flakes on a large scale have been successfully synthesized via a simple physical vapor deposition method. Angle-dependent Raman spectroscopy indicated that the orthorhombic SnS flakes possess a strong anisotropic Raman response. Under a parallel-polarization configuration, the peak intensity of Ag (190.7 cm-1) Raman mode reaches the maximum when incident light polarization

  8. MCPS Schools at a Glance 2014-2015

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montgomery County Public Schools, 2015

    2015-01-01

    "MCPS Schools at a Glance" provides, in a single document, information about enrollment, staffing, facilities, programs, outcome measures, and personnel costs for each Montgomery County (Maryland) public school. Information on personnel costs for each school includes position salaries for professional and supporting services employees…

  9. MCPS Special Education at a Glance 2006-2007

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montgomery County Public Schools, 2007

    2007-01-01

    Montgomery County Public Schools (MCPS) "Special Education at a Glance," which includes a copy of the "Guide to Planning and Assessing School-Based Special Education Programs," provides in a single document, information about the special education population at each Montgomery County (Maryland) public school, including…

  10. MCPS Special Education at a Glance 2005-2006

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montgomery County Public Schools, 2006

    2006-01-01

    "MCPS Special Education at a Glance" is a direct result of the work of the Special Education Continuous Improvement Team (SECIT), an advisory group to the Montgomery County Public Schools Board of Education Special Education Ad Hoc Subcommittee. During the 2004-2005 school year, the SECIT developed, in collaboration with special…

  11. MCPS School Safety & Security at a Glance 2013-2014

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montgomery County Public Schools, 2014

    2014-01-01

    "MCPS School Safety and Security at a Glance" provides, in a single document, information about the reporting of incidents related to school safety and security, school climate, local school safety program descriptions, and serious incidents. Information is presented for each Montgomery County (Maryland) public school. While much of this…

  12. MCPS Special Education at a Glance 2011-2012

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montgomery County Public Schools, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Montgomery County Public Schools (MCPS) "Special Education at a Glance," which includes a copy of the "Guide to Planning and Assessing School-Based Special Education Programs," provides in a single document, information about the special education population at each Montgomery County (Maryland) public school, including…

  13. MCPS Special Education at a Glance 2010-2011

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montgomery County Public Schools, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Montgomery County Public Schools (MCPS) "Special Education at a Glance," which includes a copy of the "Guide to Planning and Assessing School-Based Special Education Programs," provides in a single document, information about the special education population at each Montgomery County (Maryland public school, including…

  14. MCPS Special Education at a Glance 2007-2008

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montgomery County Public Schools, 2008

    2008-01-01

    Montgomery County Public Schools (MCPS) "Special Education at a Glance," which includes a copy of the "Guide to Planning and Assessing School-Based Special Education Programs," provides in a single document, information about the special education population at each MCPS school, including enrollment, staffing, special education…

  15. MCPS Special Education at a Glance 2013-2014

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montgomery County Public Schools, 2014

    2014-01-01

    Montgomery County Public Schools (MCPS) "Special Education at a Glance," which includes a copy of the "Guide to Planning and Assessing School-Based Special Education Programs," provides in a single document, information about the special education population at each Montgomery County public school, including enrollment,…

  16. MCPS Special Education at a Glance 2009-2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montgomery County Public Schools, 2010

    2010-01-01

    Montgomery County Public Schools (MCPS) "Special Education at a Glance." which includes a copy of the "Guide to Planning and Assessing School-Based Special Education Programs." provides in a single document, information about the special education population at each Montgomery County (Maryland) public school, including…

  17. MCPS Special Education at a Glance 2008-2009

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montgomery County Public Schools, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Montgomery County Public Schools (MCPS) "Special Education at a Glance," which includes a copy of the "Guide to Planning and Assessing School-Based Special Education Programs," provides in a single document, information about the special education population at each Montgomery County (Maryland) public school, including…

  18. MCPS Special Education at a Glance 2012-2013

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montgomery County Public Schools, 2013

    2013-01-01

    Montgomery County Public Schools (MCPS) "Special Education at a Glance," which includes a copy of the "Guide to Planning and Assessing School-Based Special Education Programs," provides in a single document, information about the special education population at each Montgomery County (Maryland) public school, including…

  19. MCPS School Safety & Security at a Glance 2012-2013

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montgomery County Public Schools, 2013

    2013-01-01

    "MCPS School Safety and Security at a Glance" provides, in a single document, information about the reporting of incidents related to school safety and security, school climate, local school safety program descriptions, and serious incidents. Information is presented for each Montgomery County (Maryland) public school. While much of this…

  20. MCPS School Safety & Security at a Glance 2011-2012

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montgomery County Public Schools, 2012

    2012-01-01

    "MCPS School Safety and Security at a Glance" provides, in a single document, information about the reporting of incidents related to school safety and security, school climate, local school safety program descriptions, and serious incidents. Information is presented for each Montgomery County (Maryland) public school. While much of this…

  1. What's Your Angle on Angles?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Browning, Christine A.; Garza-Kling, Gina; Sundling, Elizabeth Hill

    2007-01-01

    Although the nature of the research varies, as do concepts of angle, research in general supports the supposition that angle is a complex idea, best understood from a variety of perspectives. In fact, the concept of angle tends to be threefold, consisting of: (1) the traditional, static notion of two rays meeting at a common vertex; (2) the idea…

  2. Late Miocene termination of tectonic activity on the detachment in the Alaşehir Rift, Western Anatolia: Depositional records of the Göbekli Formation and high-angle cross-cutting faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sen, Fatih

    2016-04-01

    Western Anatolia is a well-known province of continental extension in the world. Most distinctive structural elements of the region are E-W trending grabens. The Alaşehir Rift/Graben is an asymmetric rift/graben trending E-W between Ahmetli and Turgutlu in its western part and continues eastwardly in a NW-SE direction to Alaşehir (Philadelphia in ancient Greek). The stratigraphy of the region consists of metamorphic rocks of the Menderes Massif (Paleozoic-lower Cenozoic) and the syn-extensional Salihli granitoid (middle Miocene) forming the basement unit and overlying sedimentary cover rocks of Neogene-Quaternary. These rocks are cut and deformed by the Karadut detachment fault and various low-angle normal faults (antithetic and synthetic faults of the Karadut detachment fault), which are also cut by various younger high-angle normal faults. It is possible to observe two continuous sequences of different time intervals in that Miocene deposits of the first rifting phase are covered by Plio-Quaternary sediments of second rifting phase with a "break-up" unconformity. In lower levels of a measured stratigraphic section (583 m) of the Göbekli formation which has lower age of late Miocene and upper age of early Pliocene, the presence of angular to sub-angular clasts of the blocks and conglomerates suggests alluvial-fun origin during an initial stage of deposition. Existence of normal-reverse graded, cross-bedding, pebble imbrications in layers of the pebbly sandstone demonstrates fluvial environment in following levels of the sequence. Existence of lenses and normal graded conglomerates in pebbly sandstones and fine grained sandstones strata evidences a low energy environment. Observed siltstone-claystone intercalations on the middle levels of the sequence indicate an environment with low dipping morphology to be formed as flat plains during this period. In the uppermost levels of the sequence, existence of the pebble imbrications inside pebbly sandstones overlying

  3. Driver's adaptive glance behavior to in-vehicle information systems.

    PubMed

    Peng, Yiyun; Boyle, Linda Ng

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the adaptive behavior of drivers as they engage with in-vehicle devices over time and in varying driving situations. Behavioral adaptation has been shown to occur among drivers after prolonged use of in-vehicle devices, but few studies have examined drivers' risk levels across different driving demands. A multi-day simulator study was conducted with 28 young drivers (under 30 years old) as they engaged in different text entry and reading tasks while driving in two different traffic conditions. Cluster analysis was used to categorize drivers based on their risk levels and random coefficient models were used to assess changes in drivers' eye glance behavior. Glance duration significantly increased over time while drivers were performing text entry tasks but not for text reading tasks. High-risk drivers had longer maximum eyes-off-road when performing long text entry tasks compared to low-risk drivers, and this difference increased over time. The traffic condition also had a significant impact on drivers' glance behavior. This study suggests that drivers may exhibit negative behavioral adaptation as they become more comfortable with using in-vehicle technologies over time. Results of this paper may provide guidance for the design of in-vehicle devices that adapt based on the context of the situation. It also demonstrates that random coefficient models can be used to obtain better estimations of driver behavior when there are large individual differences. PMID:26406538

  4. Pulsed Laser Deposited Ferromagnetic Chromium Dioxide thin Films for Applications in Spintronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dwivedi, S.; Jadhav, J.; Sharma, H.; Biswas, S.

    Stable rutile type tetragonal chromium dioxide (CrO2) thin films have been deposited on lattice-matched layers of TiO2 by KrF excimer laser based pulsed laser deposition (PLD) technique using Cr2O3 target. The TiO2 seed layer was deposited on oxidized Si substrates by the same PLD process followed by annealing at 1100 °C for 4 h. The lattice-matched interfacial layer is required for the stabilization of Cr (IV) phase in CrO2, since CrO2 behaves as a metastable compound under ambient conditions and readily converts into its stable phase of Cr (III) oxide, Cr2O3. Analyses with X-ray diffraction (XRD), Glancing-angle XRD (GIXRD), Raman spectroscopy and grazing-angle Fourier transform infra-red (FTIR) spectroscopy confirm the presence of tetragonal CrO2 phase in the as-deposited films. Microstructure and surface morphology in the films were studied with field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM) and atomic force microscope (AFM). Electrical and magnetic characterizations of the films were performed at room temperature. Such type of stable half-metallic CrO2 thin films with low field magnetoresistive switching behaviour are in demand for applications as diverse as spin-FETs, magnetic sensors, and magneto-optical devices.

  5. Flume studies of mud deposition: Implications for shallow marine mud deposition and the stratigraphic record (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schieber, J.

    2010-12-01

    Racetrack flumes with paddle-belt drives, designed to avoid destruction of floccules, were used to examine mud deposition from swift moving suspensions. At flow velocities that transport and deposit sand (20-35 cm/s, 5 cm flow depth) muddy suspensions produce deposition-prone floccules that form migrating floccule ripples. Mud beds that form as a consequence of floccule ripple accretion appear parallel laminated at first glance, but reveal internal low angle cross-lamination on closer inspection. In plan view, the observed pattern of ripple foresets is identical to rib and furrow structure in sandstones. In experiments at marine salinity, where clays were mixed with quartz silt, uniform as well as gradually decelerating currents produce deposits that show low relief coarser silt ripples at the base, followed by low angle inclined silty laminae and an increasing clay component upwards. Once examined with proper care, the clay-rich upper portion of the deposits shows internal laminae and cross-laminae. We also observed comparable sedimentary features in various ancient shallow marine mudstone successions. When examined at the hand specimen or drill core scale, above experimental deposits show the same features that have been widely reported from fluid-mud event layers in modern shelf settings. The latter have been attributed to gravity flows that are triggered by wave re-suspension of surficial muds. Whereas that model is consistent with the features attributed to the purported process, our experiments point to a potential alternative scenario. In addition to fluid muds, meaning high concentration sediment suspensions with mass concentrations > 10 g/l, the low concentration sediment suspensions (<10 g/l) from our experiments appear to be able to create equivalent deposits when given sufficient time for advective sediment transport. Graded muddy deposits on modern shelves and in ancient shelf successions thus may be of multiple origins. In addition to being the result

  6. Theoretical study of swift molecular ions specularly reflected from solid surfaces under glancing angle of incidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Yuan-Hong; Wang, You-Nian; Mišković, Z. L.

    2005-04-01

    We develop a theoretical model to study grazing scattering of fast diatomic molecular ions from a solid surface, based on the dielectric response formalism within the specular reflection model, where the plasmon pole approximation for dielectric function is employed to describe the single-particle and the collective excitations of the electron gas at the surface. Evolution of the bound-electron densities at the constituent ions of a molecule in the course of scattering is described by an approach similar to recent implementation of the Brandt-Kitagawa model for single-ion surface grazing scattering. We solve numerically the equations of motion for the constituent ions and obtain the ion scattering trajectories in the presence of Coulomb explosion modified by the surface wake potential, for the initial molecular-axis orientations in either random directions or along the beam. Vicinage effect on the total energy loss is discussed on the basis of analyzing the position-dependent stopping powers of individual ions and the interferences in the electron excitations of the substrate.

  7. A new highly automated sputter equipment for in situ investigation of deposition processes with synchrotron radiation.

    PubMed

    Döhrmann, Ralph; Botta, Stephan; Buffet, Adeline; Santoro, Gonzalo; Schlage, Kai; Schwartzkopf, Matthias; Bommel, Sebastian; Risch, Johannes F H; Mannweiler, Roman; Brunner, Simon; Metwalli, Ezzeldin; Müller-Buschbaum, Peter; Roth, Stephan V

    2013-04-01

    HASE (Highly Automated Sputter Equipment) is a new mobile setup developed to investigate deposition processes with synchrotron radiation. HASE is based on an ultra-high vacuum sputter deposition chamber equipped with an in-vacuum sample pick-and-place robot. This enables a fast and reliable sample change without breaking the vacuum conditions and helps to save valuable measurement time, which is required for experiments at synchrotron sources like PETRA III at DESY. An advantageous arrangement of several sputter guns, mounted on a rotative flange, gives the possibility to sputter under different deposition angles or to sputter different materials on the same substrate. The chamber is also equipped with a modular sample stage, which allows for the integration of different sample environments, such as a sample heating and cooling device. The design of HASE is unique in the flexibility. The combination of several different sputtering methods like standard deposition, glancing angle deposition, and high pressure sputter deposition combined with heating and cooling possibilities of the sample, the large exit windows, and the degree of automation facilitate many different grazing incidence X-ray scattering experiments, such as grazing incidence small and wide angle X-ray scattering, in one setup. In this paper we describe in detail the design and the performance of the new equipment and present the installation of the HASE apparatus at the Micro and Nano focus X-ray Scattering beamline (MiNaXS) at PETRA III. Furthermore, we describe the measurement options and present some selected results. The HASE setup has been successfully commissioned and is now available for users. PMID:23635203

  8. A new highly automated sputter equipment for in situ investigation of deposition processes with synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Doehrmann, Ralph; Botta, Stephan; Buffet, Adeline; Santoro, Gonzalo; Schlage, Kai; Schwartzkopf, Matthias; Risch, Johannes F. H.; Mannweiler, Roman; Roth, Stephan V.; Bommel, Sebastian; Brunner, Simon; Metwalli, Ezzeldin; Mueller-Buschbaum, Peter

    2013-04-15

    HASE (Highly Automated Sputter Equipment) is a new mobile setup developed to investigate deposition processes with synchrotron radiation. HASE is based on an ultra-high vacuum sputter deposition chamber equipped with an in-vacuum sample pick-and-place robot. This enables a fast and reliable sample change without breaking the vacuum conditions and helps to save valuable measurement time, which is required for experiments at synchrotron sources like PETRA III at DESY. An advantageous arrangement of several sputter guns, mounted on a rotative flange, gives the possibility to sputter under different deposition angles or to sputter different materials on the same substrate. The chamber is also equipped with a modular sample stage, which allows for the integration of different sample environments, such as a sample heating and cooling device. The design of HASE is unique in the flexibility. The combination of several different sputtering methods like standard deposition, glancing angle deposition, and high pressure sputter deposition combined with heating and cooling possibil-ities of the sample, the large exit windows, and the degree of automation facilitate many different grazing incidence X-ray scattering experiments, such as grazing incidence small and wide angle X-ray scattering, in one setup. In this paper we describe in detail the design and the performance of the new equipment and present the installation of the HASE apparatus at the Micro and Nano focus X-ray Scattering beamline (MiNaXS) at PETRA III. Furthermore, we describe the measurement options and present some selected results. The HASE setup has been successfully commissioned and is now available for users.

  9. Studies on hard TaN thin film deposition by R C-Mag technique

    SciTech Connect

    Valleti, Krishna

    2009-07-15

    The physical and mechanical properties of pulsed rotating cylindrical magnetron sputter-grown tantalum nitride (TaN) thin films were studied. Initially, films were grown at ambient substrate temperature by varying the reactive (N{sub 2}) to sputter (Ar) gas ratio (R) at a constant pulsing frequency of the target power (100 kHz). The results were compared with planar magnetron-grown TaN samples. The R C-Mag. grown thin films have properties nearly similar to the high temperature (300 degree sign C) dc planar magnetron sputter deposited samples. In comparison to the planar magnetron deposition, the progression of the phase composition occurs over a wider range of R in the pulsed R C-Mag. deposition. These observed differences for R C-Mag. deposition are attributed to the increased glancing angle deposition of adatoms and pulsing of the target power. To study the effect of pulsing frequency of the target power in R C-Mag., the films were also grown at different frequencies at a fixed R (0.1). With the increase in frequency, the mechanical hardness increased up to 50 kHz and started decreasing beyond 50 kHz. The observed changes in the mechanical hardness are attributed to the increase in stress and to the formation of increased polycrystalline understoichiometric TaN phases.

  10. Clathrin-mediated endocytosis in budding yeast at a glance.

    PubMed

    Lu, Rebecca; Drubin, David G; Sun, Yidi

    2016-04-15

    Clathrin-mediated endocytosis is an essential cellular process that involves the concerted assembly and disassembly of many different proteins at the plasma membrane. In yeast, live-cell imaging has shown that the spatiotemporal dynamics of these proteins is highly stereotypical. Recent work has focused on determining how the timing and functions of endocytic proteins are regulated. In this Cell Science at a Glance article and accompanying poster, we review our current knowledge of the timeline of endocytic site maturation and discuss recent works focusing on how phosphorylation, ubiquitylation and lipids regulate various aspects of the process. PMID:27084361

  11. The cytotoxic T lymphocyte immune synapse at a glance.

    PubMed

    Dieckmann, Nele M G; Frazer, Gordon L; Asano, Yukako; Stinchcombe, Jane C; Griffiths, Gillian M

    2016-08-01

    The immune synapse provides an important structure for communication with immune cells. Studies on immune synapses formed by cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) highlight the dynamic changes and specialised mechanisms required to facilitate focal signalling and polarised secretion in immune cells. In this Cell Science at a Glance article and the accompanying poster, we illustrate the different steps that reveal the specialised mechanisms used to focus secretion at the CTL immune synapse and allow CTLs to be such efficient and precise serial killers. PMID:27505426

  12. Pulsed laser deposition of ferroelectric thin films in conjunction with superconducting oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sengupta, S.; Sengupta, L. C.; Demaree, J. D.; Kosik, W.

    1994-12-01

    The possibility of combining ferroelectrics and superconductors has been of interest for use in memory storage devices. Additionally, superconductors offer crystal structures compatible to the epitaxial growth of the ferroelectric, Ba(0.6)Sr(0.4)TiO3 (BSTO), which is cubic at this stoichiometry. BSTO has a lattice constant of 3.94 A as compared to the superconducting Pr(2 - x)Ce(x)CuO4 tetragonal single crystal which also has a lattice constant of a = 3.94 A. (minor variations with Cerium content). In this study, ferroelectric thin films of BSTO were deposited on single crystals of Pr2CuO4 and Pr(2 - x)Ce(x)CuO4. The optical constants of the substrates, single crystals of Pr2CuO4 and Pr(2 - x)Ce(x)CuO4, were determined using Variable Angle Spectroscopic Ellipsometry (VASE) and the composition and crystal structure were examined using Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS) with ion beam channeling. The substrate/film interfaces and the compositional variation in the films were also studied with RBS and with SEM/EDS. Glancing angle x-ray diffraction was used to verify the epitaxial nature of the films. The effect of the deposition parameters (laser repetition rate, oxygen backfill pressure, and deposition geometry) on the quality of the films was experimented with previously and only the optimized parameters were used.

  13. Angle detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parra, G. T. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    An angle detector for determining a transducer's angular disposition to a capacitive pickup element is described. The transducer comprises a pendulum mounted inductive element moving past the capacitive pickup element. The capacitive pickup element divides the inductive element into two parts L sub 1 and L sub 2 which form the arms of one side of an a-c bridge. Two networks R sub 1 and R sub 2 having a plurality of binary weighted resistors and an equal number of digitally controlled switches for removing resistors from the networks form the arms of the other side of the a-c bridge. A binary counter, controlled by a phase detector, balances the bridge by adjusting the resistance of R sub 1 and R sub 2. The binary output of the counter is representative of the angle.

  14. Glancing incidence optics for X-ray and ultraviolet astronomy.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Underwood, J. H.; Neupert, W. M.; Hoover, R. B.

    1971-01-01

    Glancing incidence telescopes of the kind first described by Wolter have now been physically realized, so that it is possible to obtain high-resolution images of celestial objects at all wavelengths greater than about 3 A. The GSFC-MSFC X-ray telescope for the Apollo telescope mount uses Wolter type 1 optics and is capable of forming images of the sun in the 8-70 A region with spatial resolution of the order of one arc second. The GSFC extreme ultraviolet spectroheliometer for OSO H uses type 2 optics and can obtain images of the sun in spectral lines in the 170-400 A region with a spatial resolution of about ten arc seconds. Theoretical (ray trace) and laboratory data on these systems are presented.

  15. Interaction of two glancing, crossing shock waves with a turbulent boundary-layer at various Mach numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hingst, Warren R.; Williams, Kevin E.

    1991-01-01

    A preliminary experimental investigation was conducted to study two crossing, glancing shock waves of equal strengths, interacting with the boundary-layer developed on a supersonic wind tunnel wall. This study was performed at several Mach numbers between 2.5 and 4.0. The shock waves were created by fins (shock generators), spanning the tunnel test section, that were set at angles varying from 4 to 12 degrees. The data acquired are wall static pressure measurements, and qualitative information in the form of oil flow and schlieren visualizations. The principle aim is two-fold. First, a fundamental understanding of the physics underlying this flow phenomena is desired. Also, a comprehensive data set is needed for computational fluid dynamic code validation. Results indicate that for small shock generator angles, the boundary-layer remains attached throughout the flow field. However, with increasing shock strengths (increasing generator angles), boundary layer separation does occur and becomes progressively more severe as the generator angles are increased further. The location of the separation, which starts well downstream of the shock crossing point, moves upstream as shock strengths are increased. At the highest generator angles, the separation appears to begin coincident with the generator leading edges and engulfs most of the area between the generators. This phenomena occurs very near the 'unstart' limit for the generators. The wall pressures at the lower generator angles are nominally consistent with the flow geometries (i.e. shock patterns) although significantly affected by the boundary-layer upstream influence. As separation occurs, the wall pressures exhibit a gradient that is mainly axial in direction in the vicinity of the separation. At the limiting conditions the wall pressure gradients are primarily in the axial direction throughout.

  16. Memory Conditions at a Glance | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Memory & Forgetfulness Memory Conditions at a Glance Past Issues / Summer 2013 ... called MCI. It causes people to have more memory problems than other people their age. The signs ...

  17. Hybrid Physical-Chemical Vapor Deposition of Bi2Se3 Thin films on Sapphire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brom, Joseph; Ke, Yue; Du, Renzhong; Gagnon, Jarod; Li, Qi; Redwing, Joan

    2012-02-01

    High quality thin films of topological insulators continue to garner much interest. We report on the growth of highly-oriented thin films of Bi2Se3 on c-plane sapphire using hybrid physical-chemical vapor deposition (HPCVD). The HPCVD process utilizes the thermal decomposition of trimethyl bismuth (TMBi) and evaporation of elemental selenium in a hydrogen ambient to deposit Bi2Se3. Growth parameters including TMBi flow rate and decomposition temperature and selenium evaporation temperature were optimized, effectively changing the Bi:Se ratio, to produce high quality films. Glancing angle x- ray diffraction measurements revealed that the films were c-axis oriented on sapphire. Trigonal crystal planes were observed in atomic force microscopy images with an RMS surface roughness of 1.24 nm over an area of 2μmx2μm. Variable temperature Hall effect measurements were also carried out on films that were nominally 50-70 nm thick. Over the temperature range from 300K down to 4.2K, the carrier concentration remained constant at approximately 6x10^18 cm-3 while the mobility increased from 480 cm^2/Vs to 900 cm^2/Vs. These results demonstrate that the HPCVD technique can be used to deposit Bi2Se3 films with structural and electrical properties comparable to films produced by molecular beam epitaxy.

  18. Three-Dimensional, Fibrous Lithium Iron Phosphate Structures Deposited by Magnetron Sputtering.

    PubMed

    Bünting, Aiko; Uhlenbruck, Sven; Sebold, Doris; Buchkremer, H P; Vaßen, R

    2015-10-14

    Crystalline, three-dimensional (3D) structured lithium iron phosphate (LiFePO4) thin films with additional carbon are fabricated by a radio frequency (RF) magnetron-sputtering process in a single step. The 3D structured thin films are obtained at deposition temperatures of 600 °C and deposition times longer than 60 min by using a conventional sputtering setup. In contrast to glancing angle deposition (GLAD) techniques, no tilting of the substrate is required. Thin films are characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectrospcopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), cyclic voltammetry (CV), and galvanostatic charging and discharging. The structured LiFePO4+C thin films consist of fibers that grow perpendicular to the substrate surface. The fibers have diameters up to 500 nm and crystallize in the desired olivine structure. The 3D structured thin films have superior electrochemical properties compared with dense two-dimensional (2D) LiFePO4 thin films and are, hence, very promising for application in 3D microbatteries. PMID:26381359

  19. Phase stabilities at a glance: Stability diagrams of nickel dipnictides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachhuber, F.; Rothballer, J.; Söhnel, T.; Weihrich, R.

    2013-12-01

    In the course of the recent advances in chemical structure prediction, a straightforward type of diagram to evaluate phase stabilities is presented based on an expedient example. Crystal structures and energetic stabilities of dipnictides NiPn2 (Pn = N, P, As, Sb, Bi) are systematically investigated by first principles calculations within the framework of density functional theory using the generalized gradient approximation to treat exchange and correlation. These dipnictides show remarkable polymorphism that is not yet understood systematically and offers room for the discovery of new phases. Relationships between the concerned structures including the marcasite, the pyrite, the arsenopyrite/CoSb2, and the NiAs2 types are highlighted by means of common structural fragments. Electronic stabilities of experimentally known and related AB2 structure types are presented graphically in so-called stability diagrams. Additionally, competing binary phases are taken into consideration in the diagrams to evaluate the stabilities of the title compounds with respect to decomposition. The main purpose of the stability diagrams is the introduction of an image that enables the estimation of phase stabilities at a single glance. Beyond that, some of the energetically favored structure types can be identified as potential new phases.

  20. Phase stabilities at a glance: stability diagrams of nickel dipnictides.

    PubMed

    Bachhuber, F; Rothballer, J; Söhnel, T; Weihrich, R

    2013-12-01

    In the course of the recent advances in chemical structure prediction, a straightforward type of diagram to evaluate phase stabilities is presented based on an expedient example. Crystal structures and energetic stabilities of dipnictides NiPn2 (Pn = N, P, As, Sb, Bi) are systematically investigated by first principles calculations within the framework of density functional theory using the generalized gradient approximation to treat exchange and correlation. These dipnictides show remarkable polymorphism that is not yet understood systematically and offers room for the discovery of new phases. Relationships between the concerned structures including the marcasite, the pyrite, the arsenopyrite/CoSb2, and the NiAs2 types are highlighted by means of common structural fragments. Electronic stabilities of experimentally known and related AB2 structure types are presented graphically in so-called stability diagrams. Additionally, competing binary phases are taken into consideration in the diagrams to evaluate the stabilities of the title compounds with respect to decomposition. The main purpose of the stability diagrams is the introduction of an image that enables the estimation of phase stabilities at a single glance. Beyond that, some of the energetically favored structure types can be identified as potential new phases. PMID:24320392

  1. Phase stabilities at a glance: Stability diagrams of nickel dipnictides

    SciTech Connect

    Bachhuber, F.; Rothballer, J.; Weihrich, R.; Söhnel, T.

    2013-12-07

    In the course of the recent advances in chemical structure prediction, a straightforward type of diagram to evaluate phase stabilities is presented based on an expedient example. Crystal structures and energetic stabilities of dipnictides NiPn{sub 2} (Pn = N, P, As, Sb, Bi) are systematically investigated by first principles calculations within the framework of density functional theory using the generalized gradient approximation to treat exchange and correlation. These dipnictides show remarkable polymorphism that is not yet understood systematically and offers room for the discovery of new phases. Relationships between the concerned structures including the marcasite, the pyrite, the arsenopyrite/CoSb{sub 2}, and the NiAs{sub 2} types are highlighted by means of common structural fragments. Electronic stabilities of experimentally known and related AB{sub 2} structure types are presented graphically in so-called stability diagrams. Additionally, competing binary phases are taken into consideration in the diagrams to evaluate the stabilities of the title compounds with respect to decomposition. The main purpose of the stability diagrams is the introduction of an image that enables the estimation of phase stabilities at a single glance. Beyond that, some of the energetically favored structure types can be identified as potential new phases.

  2. RAS isoforms and mutations in cancer at a glance.

    PubMed

    Hobbs, G Aaron; Der, Channing J; Rossman, Kent L

    2016-04-01

    RAS proteins (KRAS4A, KRAS4B, NRAS and HRAS) function as GDP-GTP-regulated binary on-off switches, which regulate cytoplasmic signaling networks that control diverse normal cellular processes. Gain-of-function missense mutations in RAS genes are found in ∼25% of human cancers, prompting interest in identifying anti-RAS therapeutic strategies for cancer treatment. However, despite more than three decades of intense effort, no anti-RAS therapies have reached clinical application. Contributing to this failure has been an underestimation of the complexities of RAS. First, there is now appreciation that the four human RAS proteins are not functionally identical. Second, with >130 different missense mutations found in cancer, there is an emerging view that there are mutation-specific consequences on RAS structure, biochemistry and biology, and mutation-selective therapeutic strategies are needed. In this Cell Science at a Glance article and accompanying poster, we provide a snapshot of the differences between RAS isoforms and mutations, as well as the current status of anti-RAS drug-discovery efforts. PMID:26985062

  3. Regulators of actin filament barbed ends at a glance.

    PubMed

    Shekhar, Shashank; Pernier, Julien; Carlier, Marie-France

    2016-03-15

    Cells respond to external stimuli by rapidly remodeling their actin cytoskeleton. At the heart of this function lies the intricately controlled regulation of individual filaments. The barbed end of an actin filament is the hotspot for the majority of the biochemical reactions that control filament assembly. Assays performed in bulk solution and with single filaments have enabled characterization of a plethora of barbed-end-regulating proteins. Interestingly, many of these regulators work in tandem with other proteins, which increase or decrease their affinity for the barbed end in a spatially and temporally controlled manner, often through simultaneous binding of two regulators at the barbed ends, in addition to standard mutually exclusive binding schemes. In this Cell Science at a Glance and the accompanying poster, we discuss key barbed-end-interacting proteins and the kinetic mechanisms by which they regulate actin filament assembly. We take F-actin capping protein, gelsolin, profilin and barbed-end-tracking polymerases, including formins and WH2-domain-containing proteins, as examples, and illustrate how their activity and competition for the barbed end regulate filament dynamics. PMID:26940918

  4. Signatures of breast cancer metastasis at a glance.

    PubMed

    Karagiannis, George S; Goswami, Sumanta; Jones, Joan G; Oktay, Maja H; Condeelis, John S

    2016-05-01

    Gene expression profiling has yielded expression signatures from which prognostic tests can be derived to facilitate clinical decision making in breast cancer patients. Some of these signatures are based on profiling of whole tumor tissue (tissue signatures), which includes all tumor and stromal cells. Prognostic markers have also been derived from the profiling of metastasizing tumor cells, including circulating tumor cells (CTCs) and migratory-disseminating tumor cells within the primary tumor. The metastasis signatures based on CTCs and migratory-disseminating tumor cells have greater potential for unraveling cell biology insights and mechanistic underpinnings of tumor cell dissemination and metastasis. Of clinical interest is the promise that stratification of patients into high or low metastatic risk, as well as assessing the need for cytotoxic therapy, might be improved if prognostics derived from these two types of signatures are used in a combined way. The aim of this Cell Science at a Glance article and accompanying poster is to navigate through both types of signatures and their derived prognostics, as well as to highlight biological insights and clinical applications that could be derived from them, especially when they are used in combination. PMID:27084578

  5. Myosin-I molecular motors at a glance.

    PubMed

    McIntosh, Betsy B; Ostap, E Michael

    2016-07-15

    Myosin-I molecular motors are proposed to play various cellular roles related to membrane dynamics and trafficking. In this Cell Science at a Glance article and the accompanying poster, we review and illustrate the proposed cellular functions of metazoan myosin-I molecular motors by examining the structural, biochemical, mechanical and cell biological evidence for their proposed molecular roles. We highlight evidence for the roles of myosin-I isoforms in regulating membrane tension and actin architecture, powering plasma membrane and organelle deformation, participating in membrane trafficking, and functioning as a tension-sensitive dock or tether. Collectively, myosin-I motors have been implicated in increasingly complex cellular phenomena, yet how a single isoform accomplishes multiple types of molecular functions is still an active area of investigation. To fully understand the underlying physiology, it is now essential to piece together different approaches of biological investigation. This article will appeal to investigators who study immunology, metabolic diseases, endosomal trafficking, cell motility, cancer and kidney disease, and to those who are interested in how cellular membranes are coupled to the underlying actin cytoskeleton in a variety of different applications. PMID:27401928

  6. Transcriptional regulation of mammalian autophagy at a glance.

    PubMed

    Füllgrabe, Jens; Ghislat, Ghita; Cho, Dong-Hyung; Rubinsztein, David C

    2016-08-15

    Macroautophagy, hereafter referred to as autophagy, is a catabolic process that results in the lysosomal degradation of cytoplasmic contents ranging from abnormal proteins to damaged cell organelles. It is activated  under diverse conditions, including nutrient deprivation and hypoxia. During autophagy, members of the core autophagy-related (ATG) family of proteins mediate membrane rearrangements, which lead to the engulfment and degradation of cytoplasmic cargo. Recently, the nuclear regulation of autophagy, especially by transcription factors and histone modifiers, has gained increased attention. These factors are not only involved in rapid responses to autophagic stimuli, but also regulate the long-term outcome of autophagy. Now there are more than 20 transcription factors that have been shown to be linked to the autophagic process. However, their interplay and timing appear enigmatic as several have been individually shown to act as major regulators of autophagy. This Cell Science at a Glance article and the accompanying poster highlights the main cellular regulators of transcription involved in mammalian autophagy and their target genes. PMID:27528206

  7. Multispectral variable magnification glancing incidence x ray telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoover, Richard B. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A multispectral, variable magnification, glancing incidence, x-ray telescope capable of broadband, high resolution imaging of solar and stellar x-ray and extreme ultraviolet radiation sources is discussed. The telescope includes a primary optical system which focuses the incoming radiation to a primary focus. Two or more rotatable mirror carriers, each providing a different magnification, are positioned behind the primary focus at an inclination to the optical axis. Each carrier has a series of ellipsoidal mirrors, and each mirror has a concave surface covered with a multilayer (layered synthetic microstructure) coating to reflect a different desired wavelength. The mirrors of both carriers are segments of ellipsoids having a common first focus coincident with the primary focus. A detector such as an x-ray sensitive photographic film is positioned at the second respective focus of each mirror so that each mirror may reflect the image at the first focus to the detector at the second focus. The carriers are selectively rotated to position a selected mirror for receiving radiation from the primary optical system, and at least the first carrier may be withdrawn from the path of the radiation to permit a selected mirror on the second carrier to receive the radiation.

  8. Subcellular mRNA localisation at a glance.

    PubMed

    Parton, Richard M; Davidson, Alexander; Davis, Ilan; Weil, Timothy T

    2014-05-15

    mRNA localisation coupled to translational regulation provides an important means of dictating when and where proteins function in a variety of model systems. This mechanism is particularly relevant in polarised or migrating cells. Although many of the models for how this is achieved were first proposed over 20 years ago, some of the molecular details are still poorly understood. Nevertheless, advanced imaging, biochemical and computational approaches have started to shed light on the cis-acting localisation signals and trans-acting factors that dictate the final destination of localised transcripts. In this Cell Science at a Glance article and accompanying poster, we provide an overview of mRNA localisation, from transcription to degradation, focusing on the microtubule-dependent active transport and anchoring mechanism, which we will use to explain the general paradigm. However, it is clear that there are diverse ways in which mRNAs become localised and target protein expression, and we highlight some of the similarities and differences between these mechanisms. PMID:24833669

  9. Classes of phosphoinositide 3-kinases at a glance

    PubMed Central

    Jean, Steve; Kiger, Amy A.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) family is important to nearly all aspects of cell and tissue biology and central to human cancer, diabetes and aging. PI3Ks are spatially regulated and multifunctional, and together, act at nearly all membranes in the cell to regulate a wide range of signaling, membrane trafficking and metabolic processes. There is a broadening recognition of the importance of distinct roles for each of the three different PI3K classes (I, II and III), as well as for the different isoforms within each class. Ongoing issues include the need for a better understanding of the in vivo complexity of PI3K regulation and cellular functions. This Cell Science at a Glance article and the accompanying poster summarize the biochemical activities, cellular roles and functional requirements for the three classes of PI3Ks. In doing so, we aim to provide an overview of the parallels, the key differences and crucial interplays between the regulation and roles of the three PI3K classes. PMID:24587488

  10. The TLR and IL-1 signalling network at a glance.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Philip

    2014-06-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and the receptors for interleukin (IL)-1, IL-18 and IL-33 are required for defence against microbial pathogens but, if hyper-activated or not switched off efficiently, can cause tissue damage and inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. Understanding how the checks and balances in the system are integrated to fight infection without the network operating out of control will be crucial for the development of improved drugs to treat these diseases in the future. In this Cell Science at a Glance article and the accompanying poster, I provide a brief overview of how one of these intricate networks is controlled by the interplay of protein phosphorylation and protein ubiquitylation events, and the mechanisms in myeloid cells that restrict and terminate its activation to prevent inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. Finally, I suggest a few protein kinases that have been neglected as drug targets, but whose therapeutic potential should be explored in the light of recent advances in our understanding of their roles in the innate immune system. PMID:24829146

  11. A field study on the effects of digital billboards on glance behavior during highway driving.

    PubMed

    Belyusar, Daniel; Reimer, Bryan; Mehler, Bruce; Coughlin, Joseph F

    2016-03-01

    Developments in lighting technologies have allowed more dynamic digital billboards in locations visible from the roadway. Decades of laboratory research have shown that rapidly changing or moving stimuli presented in peripheral vision tends to 'capture' covert attention. We report naturalistic glance and driving behavior of a large sample of drivers who were exposed to two digital billboards on a segment of highway largely free from extraneous signage. Results show a significant shift in the number and length of glances toward the billboards and an increased percentage of time glancing off road in their presence. Findings were particularly evident at the time the billboards transitioned between advertisements. Since rapidly changing stimuli are difficult to ignore, the planned increase in episodically changing digital displays near the roadway may be argued to be a potential safety concern. The impact of digital billboards on driver safety and the need for continued research are discussed. PMID:26745271

  12. On the highway measures of driver glance behavior with an example automobile navigation system.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Dean P; Brooks, Aaron M; Weir, David H

    2004-05-01

    An over-the-road study of visual-manual destination entry using an example original equipment GPS-based navigation system was accomplished in traffic on urban streets and motorways. The evaluation used typical drivers, and a vehicle instrumented to record driver eye glances and fixations, driver control inputs, and lateral lane position. The primary task was to drive in a safe manner, in traffic, while maintaining speed and lateral lane position. As a secondary task, the drivers entered successive destinations while driving, using a touch screen, and at their own pace. They were told there was no need to enter the destination quickly. Results are shown for driver glance behavior, lane keeping performance, and subjective ratings. Overall, the drivers were able to accomplish the destination entry tasks with acceptably short glance durations, acceptable total task times, and with satisfactory subjective ratings for ease of entry. PMID:15145284

  13. The ALICE Glance Shift Accounting Management System (SAMS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins Silva, H.; Abreu Da Silva, I.; Ronchetti, F.; Telesca, A.; Maidantchik, C.

    2015-12-01

    ALICE (A Large Ion Collider Experiment) is an experiment at the CERN LHC (Large Hadron Collider) studying the physics of strongly interacting matter and the quark-gluon plasma. The experiment operation requires a 24 hours a day and 7 days a week shift crew at the experimental site, composed by the ALICE collaboration members. Shift duties are calculated for each institute according to their correlated members. In order to ensure the full coverage of the experiment operation as well as its good quality, the ALICE Shift Accounting Management System (SAMS) is used to manage the shift bookings as well as the needed training. ALICE SAMS is the result of a joint effort between the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ) and the ALICE Collaboration. The Glance technology, developed by the UFRJ and the ATLAS experiment, sits at the basis of the system as an intermediate layer isolating the particularities of the databases. In this paper, we describe the ALICE SAMS development process and functionalities. The database has been modelled according to the collaboration needs and is fully integrated with the ALICE Collaboration repository to access members information and respectively roles and activities. Run, period and training coordinators can manage their subsystem operation and ensure an efficient personnel management. Members of the ALICE collaboration can book shifts and on-call according to pre-defined rights. ALICE SAMS features a user profile containing all the statistics and user contact information as well as the Institutes profile. Both the user and institute profiles are public (within the scope of the collaboration) and show the credit balance in real time. A shift calendar allows the Run Coordinator to plan data taking periods in terms of which subsystems shifts are enabled or disabled and on-call responsible people and slots. An overview display presents the shift crew present in the control room and allows the Run Coordination team to confirm the presence

  14. Three mirror glancing incidence system for X-ray telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoover, R. B. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A telescope suitable for soft X-ray astronomical observations consists of a paraboloid section for receiving rays at a grazing angle and a hyperboloid section which receives reflections from the paraboloid at a grazing angle and directs them to a predetermined point of focus. A second hyperboloid section is centrally located from the other two surfaces and positioned to reflect from its outer surface radiation which was not first reflected by the paraboloid. A shutter is included to assist in calibration.

  15. A Glance at the Evolution of Native American Education: From Christianization to Self-Determination.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marshall, John D.

    This paper provides a broad, sweeping glance at the early policies, attitudes, and activities surrounding the education of Native Americans. The Indian education efforts of the colonists--involving civilization, Christianization, and literacy--did little to alter Indian culture and were in most cases abandoned by the mid-1700's. During the…

  16. MCPS School Safety and Security at a Glance 2007-2008

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montgomery County Public Schools, 2008

    2008-01-01

    "MCPS School Safety and Security at a Glance" provides, in a single document, information about the reporting of incidents related to school safety and security, including school climate, local school safety program descriptions, and serious incidents in all Montgomery County (Maryland) Public Schools. The information is presented for…

  17. MCPS School Safety and Security at a Glance 2010-2011

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montgomery County Public Schools, 2011

    2011-01-01

    "MCPS School Safety and Security at a Glance" provides, in a single document, information about the reporting of incidents related to school safety and security, school climate, local school safety program descriptions, and serious incidents in all Montgomery County (Maryland) Public Schools. The information is presented for each school.…

  18. MCPS School Safety and Security at a Glance 2008-2009

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montgomery County Public Schools, 2009

    2009-01-01

    "MCPS School Safety and Security at a Glance" provides, in a single document, information about the reporting of incidents related to school safety and security, school climate, local school safety program descriptions, and serious incidents in all Montgomery County (Maryland) Public Schools. The information is presented for each school.…

  19. MCPS School Safety and Security at a Glance 2009-2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montgomery County Public Schools, 2010

    2010-01-01

    "MCPS School Safety and Security at a Glance" provides, in a single document, information about the reporting of incidents related to school safety and security, school climate, local school safety program descriptions, and serious incidents in all Montgomery County (Maryland) public schools. The information is presented for each school.…

  20. Small Business and Vocational Education and Training. Research at a Glance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Centre for Vocational Education Research, Leabrook (Australia).

    This issue in the series, "Research at a Glance," explores Australian small business and its attitudes to training, needs, how small business becomes involved in training, and how training happens. It begins with an overview of findings, some policy options, and a list of 11 references used in preparation of this publication. Research findings are…

  1. Analyzing the Deposition of Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles at Model Rough Mineral Surfaces Using a Quartz Crystal Microbalance with Dissipation Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y.; Kananizadeh, N.; Rodenhausen, K. B.; Schubert, M.; Bartelt-Hunt, S.

    2015-12-01

    Titanium dioxide nanoparticles (nTiO2) is the most extensively manufactured engineered materials. nTiO2 from sunscreens was found to enter sediments after released into a lake. nTiO2 may also enter the subsurface via irrigation using effluents from wastewater treatment plants. Interaction of nTiO2 with soils and sediments will largely influence their fate, transport, and ecotoxicity. Measuring the interaction between nTiO2 and natural substrates (e.g. such as sands) is particularly challenging due to highly heterogeneous and rough natural sand surfaces. In this study, an engineered controllable rough surface known as three dimensional nanostructured sculptured columnar thin films (SCTFs) has been used to mimic surface roughness. SCTFs were fabricated by glancing angle deposition (GLAD), a physical vapor deposition technique facilitated by electron beam evaporation. Interaction between nTiO2 and SCTF coated surfaces was investigated using a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D). In parallel, a Generalized Ellipsometry (GE) was coupled with the QCM-D to measure the deposition of nTiO2. We found that the typical QCM-D modeling approach, e.g. viscoelastic model, would largely overestimate the mass of deposited nTiO2, because the frequency drops due to particle deposition or water entrapment in rough areas were not differentiated. Here, we demonstrate a new approach to model QCM-D data for nTiO2 deposition on rough surfaces, which couples the viscoelastic model with a model of flow on the non-uniform surface.

  2. Metal-boride phase formation on tungsten carbide (WC-Co) during microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, Jamin M.; Catledge, Shane A.

    2016-02-01

    Strengthening of cemented tungsten carbide by boriding is used to improve the wear resistance and lifetime of carbide tools; however, many conventional boriding techniques render the bulk carbide too brittle for extreme conditions, such as hard rock drilling. This research explored the variation in metal-boride phase formation during the microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition process at surface temperatures from 700 to 1100 °C. We showed several well-adhered metal-boride surface layers consisting of WCoB, CoB and/or W2CoB2 with average hardness from 23 to 27 GPa and average elastic modulus of 600-730 GPa. The metal-boride interlayer was shown to be an effective diffusion barrier against elemental cobalt; migration of elemental cobalt to the surface of the interlayer was significantly reduced. A combination of glancing angle X-ray diffraction, electron dispersive spectroscopy, nanoindentation and scratch testing was used to evaluate the surface composition and material properties. An evaluation of the material properties shows that plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposited borides formed at substrate temperatures of 800 °C, 850 °C, 900 °C and 1000 °C strengthen the material by increasing the hardness and elastic modulus of cemented tungsten carbide. Additionally, these boride surface layers may offer potential for adhesion of ultra-hard carbon coatings.

  3. Perception of Perspective Angles

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We perceive perspective angles, that is, angles that have an orientation in depth, differently from what they are in physical space. Extreme examples are angles between rails of a railway line or between lane dividers of a long and straight road. In this study, subjects judged perspective angles between bars lying on the floor of the laboratory. Perspective angles were also estimated from pictures taken from the same point of view. Converging and diverging angles were judged to test three models of visual space. Four subjects evaluated the perspective angles by matching them to nonperspective angles, that is, angles between the legs of a compass oriented in the frontal plane. All subjects judged both converging and diverging angles larger than the physical angle and smaller than the angles in the proximal stimuli. A model of shallow visual space describes the results. According to the model, lines parallel to visual lines, vanishing at infinity in physical space, converge to visual lines in visual space. The perceived shape of perspective angles is incompatible with the perceived length and width of the bars. The results have significance for models of visual perception and practical implications for driving and flying in poor visibility conditions. PMID:27433312

  4. Perception of Perspective Angles.

    PubMed

    Erkelens, Casper J

    2015-06-01

    We perceive perspective angles, that is, angles that have an orientation in depth, differently from what they are in physical space. Extreme examples are angles between rails of a railway line or between lane dividers of a long and straight road. In this study, subjects judged perspective angles between bars lying on the floor of the laboratory. Perspective angles were also estimated from pictures taken from the same point of view. Converging and diverging angles were judged to test three models of visual space. Four subjects evaluated the perspective angles by matching them to nonperspective angles, that is, angles between the legs of a compass oriented in the frontal plane. All subjects judged both converging and diverging angles larger than the physical angle and smaller than the angles in the proximal stimuli. A model of shallow visual space describes the results. According to the model, lines parallel to visual lines, vanishing at infinity in physical space, converge to visual lines in visual space. The perceived shape of perspective angles is incompatible with the perceived length and width of the bars. The results have significance for models of visual perception and practical implications for driving and flying in poor visibility conditions. PMID:27433312

  5. Glancing and Stopping Behavior of Motorcyclists and Car Drivers at Intersections

    PubMed Central

    Muttart, Jeffrey W.; Peck, Louis R.; Guderian, Steve; Bartlett, Wade; Ton, Lisa P.; Kauderer, Chris; Fisher, Donald L.; Manning, Joseph E.

    2012-01-01

    For the past decade, motorcycle fatalities have risen while other motor vehicle fatalities have declined. Many motorcycle fatalities occurred within intersections after a driver failed to see a motorcyclist. However, little is known about the behavior of motorcyclists when they negotiate an intersection. A study was undertaken to compare the behavior at intersections of an experienced group of motorcyclists when they were operating a motorcycle with their behavior when they were driving a car. Each participant navigated a course through low-volume, open roads. Participants wore eye-tracking equipment to record eye-glance information, and the motorcycle and car were instrumented with an onboard accelerometer and Global Positioning System apparatus. Results showed that participants were more likely to make last glances toward the direction of the most threatening traffic before they made a turn when they were driving a car than when they were riding a motorcycle. In addition, motorcyclists were less likely to come to a complete stop at a stop sign than car drivers. These results suggested that motorcyclists were exposing themselves to unnecessary risk. Specifically, motorcyclists frequently failed to make proper glances and practice optimal riding techniques. The behavior of the motorcyclists was compared with the current Motorcycle Safety Foundation curriculum. The results suggested that threat-response and delayed-apex techniques should be added to the training curriculum. PMID:23112436

  6. Glancing and Stopping Behavior of Motorcyclists and Car Drivers at Intersections.

    PubMed

    Muttart, Jeffrey W; Peck, Louis R; Guderian, Steve; Bartlett, Wade; Ton, Lisa P; Kauderer, Chris; Fisher, Donald L; Manning, Joseph E

    2011-01-01

    For the past decade, motorcycle fatalities have risen while other motor vehicle fatalities have declined. Many motorcycle fatalities occurred within intersections after a driver failed to see a motorcyclist. However, little is known about the behavior of motorcyclists when they negotiate an intersection. A study was undertaken to compare the behavior at intersections of an experienced group of motorcyclists when they were operating a motorcycle with their behavior when they were driving a car. Each participant navigated a course through low-volume, open roads. Participants wore eye-tracking equipment to record eye-glance information, and the motorcycle and car were instrumented with an onboard accelerometer and Global Positioning System apparatus. Results showed that participants were more likely to make last glances toward the direction of the most threatening traffic before they made a turn when they were driving a car than when they were riding a motorcycle. In addition, motorcyclists were less likely to come to a complete stop at a stop sign than car drivers. These results suggested that motorcyclists were exposing themselves to unnecessary risk. Specifically, motorcyclists frequently failed to make proper glances and practice optimal riding techniques. The behavior of the motorcyclists was compared with the current Motorcycle Safety Foundation curriculum. The results suggested that threat-response and delayed-apex techniques should be added to the training curriculum. PMID:23112436

  7. Changes over 12 months in eye glances during secondary task engagement among novice drivers.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Fearghal; Klauer, Sheila G; Ehsani, Johnathon; Simons-Morton, Bruce G

    2016-08-01

    During their first year of driving, crash rates among novice drivers are very high but decline rapidly. However, it is not clear what skills or knowledge they are acquiring in this period. Secondary task engagement while driving is a contributing factor to many traffic collisions and some of the elevated crash risk among novices could be explained by greater prevalence or longer periods of eyes off the road while engaging in these non-driving tasks. The current study looked at the eye glances of novice teen drivers engaging in secondary tasks on a test track at 0 and 12 months of licensure and compared their performance with their parents. Novices improved from 0 to 12 months on their longest single glance off the forward roadway and total percentage of time for eyes off the forward roadway, but parents remained stable. Compared with their parents, the longest single glance off the forward roadway was longer for novices at 0 months, but by 12 months there was no difference between the groups. However, for total percentage of time for eyes off the forward roadway, novices performed the same as their parents at 0 months and actually had shorter times at 12 months. These findings could reflect the combined development of driving skills over 12 months and the relative experience that modern teenagers have with portable electronic devices. The results suggest that novice drivers are particularly poor at engaging with secondary tasks while driving. PMID:27177392

  8. Circuitry for Angle Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Currie, J. R.; Kissel, R. R.

    1983-01-01

    Angle resolver pulsed and read under microprocessor control. Pulse generator excites resolver windings with dual slope pulse. System sequentially reads sine and cosine windings. Microprocessor determines angle through which resolver shaft turned from reference angle. Suitable applications include rate tables, antenna direction controllers, and machine tools.

  9. Cast Glance Near Infrared Imaging Observations of the Space Shuttle During Hypersonic Re-Entry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tack, Steve; Tomek, Deborah M.; Horvath, Thomas J.; Verstynen, Harry A.; Shea, Edward J.

    2010-01-01

    High resolution calibrated infrared imagery of the Space Shuttle was obtained during hypervelocity atmospheric entries of the STS-119, STS-125 and STS128 missions and has provided information on the distribution of surface temperature and the state of the airflow over the windward surface of the Orbiter during descent. This data collect was initiated by NASA s Hypersonic Thermodynamic Infrared Measurements (HYTHIRM) team and incorporated the use of air- and land-based optical assets to image the Shuttle during atmospheric re-entry. The HYTHIRM objective is to develop and implement a set of mission planning tools designed to establish confidence in the ability of an existing optical asset to reliably acquire, track and return global quantitative surface temperatures of the Shuttle during entry. On Space Shuttle Discovery s STS-119 mission, NASA flew a specially modified thermal protection system tile and instrumentation package to monitor heating effects from boundary layer transition during re-entry. On STS-119, the windward airflow on the port wing was deliberately disrupted by a four-inch wide and quarter-inch tall protuberance built into the modified tile. In coordination with this flight experiment, a US Navy NP-3D Orion aircraft was flown 28 nautical miles below Discovery and remotely monitored surface temperature of the Orbiter at Mach 8.4 using a long-range infrared optical package referred to as Cast Glance. Approximately two months later, the same Navy Cast Glance aircraft successfully monitored the surface temperatures of the Orbiter Atlantis traveling at approximately Mach 14.3 during its return from the successful Hubble repair mission. In contrast to Discovery, Atlantis was not part of the Boundary Layer Transition (BLT) flight experiment, thus the vehicle was not configured with a protuberance on the port wing. In September 2009, Cast Glance was again successful in capturing infrared imagery and monitoring the surface temperatures on Discovery s next

  10. Comprehensive study of the conditions for obtaining hydrogenated amorphous erbium- and oxygen-doped silicon suboxide films, a-SiO{sub x}:H Left-Pointing-Angle-Bracket Er,O Right-Pointing-Angle-Bracket , by dc-magnetron deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Undalov, Yu. K. Terukov, E. I.; Gusev, O. B.; Lebedev, V. M.; Trapeznikova, I. N.

    2011-12-15

    The results of a comprehensive study of the conditions for growing a-SiO{sub x}:H Left-Pointing-Angle-Bracket Er,O Right-Pointing-Angle-Bracket films are presented. The effect of the composition of various erbium-containing targets (a-SiO{sub x}:H , ErO{sub x}, Er{sub 2}SiO{sub 5}, Er{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and Er), substrate temperature, and annealing temperatures in argon, air, and under conditions of SiH{sub 4} + Ar + O{sub 2} plasma glow is studied. In order to obtain a-SiO{sub x}:H Left-Pointing-Angle-Bracket Er,O Right-Pointing-Angle-Bracket films with the highest photoluminescence intensity of erbium ions, it is recommended for the following technological conditions to be used: the substrate holder should be insulated from dc-magnetron electrodes and the working gas mixture should include silane, argon, and oxygen. Single-crystal silicon and metal erbium should be used as targets. The erbium target should be placed only in the Si-target erosion zone.

  11. Extended visual glances away from the roadway are associated with ADHD- and texting-related driving performance deficits in adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Kingery, Kathleen M.; Narad, Megan; Garner, Annie A.; Antonini, Tanya N.; Tamm, Leanne; Epstein, Jeffery N.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the research study was to determine whether ADHD- and texting-related driving impairments are mediated by extended visual glances away from the roadway. Sixty-one adolescents (ADHD = 28, non-ADHD = 33; 62% male; 11% minority) aged 16–17 with a valid driver’s license were videotaped while engaging in a driving simulation that included a No Distraction, Hands-Free Phone Conversation, and Texting condition. Two indicators of visual inattention were coded: 1) percentage of time with eyes diverted from the roadway; and 2) number of extended (greater than 2 seconds) visual glances away from the roadway. Adolescents with ADHD displayed significantly more visual inattention to the roadway on both visual inattention measures. Increased lane position variability among adolescents with ADHD compared to those without ADHD during the Hands-Free Phone Conversation and Texting conditions was mediated by an increased number of extended glances away from the roadway. Similarly, texting resulted in decreased visual attention to the roadway. Finally, increased lane position variability during texting was also mediated by the number of extended glances away from the roadway. Both ADHD and texting impair visual attention to the roadway and the consequence of this visual inattention is increased lane position variability. Visual inattention is implicated as a possible mechanism for ADHD- and texting-related deficits and suggests that driving interventions designed to address ADHD- or texting-related deficits in adolescents need to focus on decreasing extended glances away from the roadway. PMID:25416444

  12. Extended Visual Glances Away from the Roadway are Associated with ADHD- and Texting-Related Driving Performance Deficits in Adolescents.

    PubMed

    Kingery, Kathleen M; Narad, Megan; Garner, Annie A; Antonini, Tanya N; Tamm, Leanne; Epstein, Jeffery N

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of the research study was to determine whether ADHD- and texting-related driving impairments are mediated by extended visual glances away from the roadway. Sixty-one adolescents (ADHD =28, non-ADHD =33; 62% male; 11% minority) aged 16-17 with a valid driver's license were videotaped while engaging in a driving simulation that included a No Distraction, Hands-Free Phone Conversation, and Texting condition. Two indicators of visual inattention were coded: 1) percentage of time with eyes diverted from the roadway; and 2) number of extended (greater than 2 s) visual glances away from the roadway. Adolescents with ADHD displayed significantly more visual inattention to the roadway on both visual inattention measures. Increased lane position variability among adolescents with ADHD compared to those without ADHD during the Hands-Free Phone Conversation and Texting conditions was mediated by an increased number of extended glances away from the roadway. Similarly, texting resulted in decreased visual attention to the roadway. Finally, increased lane position variability during texting was also mediated by the number of extended glances away from the roadway. Both ADHD and texting impair visual attention to the roadway and the consequence of this visual inattention is increased lane position variability. Visual inattention is implicated as a possible mechanism for ADHD- and texting-related deficits and suggests that driving interventions designed to address ADHD- or texting-related deficits in adolescents need to focus on decreasing extended glances away from the roadway. PMID:25416444

  13. The effects of focused attention training (FOCAL) on the duration of novice drivers' glances inside the vehicle

    PubMed Central

    Pradhan, A.K.; Divekar, G.; Masserang, K.; Romoser, M.; Zafian, T.; Blomberg, R.D.; Thomas, F.D.; Reagan, I.; Knodler, M.; Pollatsek, A.; Fisher, D.L.

    2011-01-01

    Several studies have documented that the failure of drivers to attend to the forward roadway for a period lasting longer than 2-3 seconds is a major cause of highway crashes. Moreover, several studies have demonstrated that novice drivers are more likely to glance away from the roadway than experienced drivers for extended periods when attempting to do a task inside the vehicle. The present study examines the efficacy of a PC-based training program (FOCAL) designed to teach novice drivers not to glance away for these extended periods of time. A FOCAL-trained group was compared to a placebo-trained group in an on-road test, and the FOCAL-trained group made significantly fewer glances away from the roadway that were more than 2 seconds than the placebo-trained group. Other measures indicated an advantage for the FOCAL-trained group as well. PMID:21973003

  14. Reading Angles in Maps

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Izard, Véronique; O'Donnell, Evan; Spelke, Elizabeth S.

    2014-01-01

    Preschool children can navigate by simple geometric maps of the environment, but the nature of the geometric relations they use in map reading remains unclear. Here, children were tested specifically on their sensitivity to angle. Forty-eight children (age 47:15-53:30 months) were presented with fragments of geometric maps, in which angle sections…

  15. Solar angle reference manual

    SciTech Connect

    Sibson, R.

    1983-01-01

    The introduction is the only text in the volume; the rest of the book contains easy-to-use graphical methods for building design and construction using solar energy. Isogonic charts and solar angle diagrams are included. Isogonic charts. Solar angle diagrams.

  16. Photoelectric angle converter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podzharenko, Volodymyr A.; Kulakov, Pavlo I.

    2001-06-01

    The photo-electric angle transmitter of rotation is offered, at which the output voltage is linear function of entering magnitude. In a transmitter the linear phototransducer is used on the basis of pair photo diode -- operating amplifier, which output voltage is linear function of the area of an illuminated photosensitive stratum, and modulator of a light stream of the special shape, which ensures a linear dependence of this area from an angle of rotation. The transmitter has good frequent properties and can be used for dynamic measurements of an angular velocity and angle of rotation, in systems of exact drives and systems of autocontrol.

  17. Reading Angles in Maps

    PubMed Central

    Izard, Véronique; O'Donnell, Evan; Spelke, Elizabeth S.

    2013-01-01

    Preschool children can navigate by simple geometric maps of the environment, but the nature of the geometric relations they use in map reading remains unclear. Here, children were tested specifically on their sensitivity to angle. Forty-eight children (age 47:15–53:30 months) were presented with fragments of geometric maps, in which angle sections appeared without any relevant length or distance information. Children were able to read these map fragments and compare 2D to 3D angles. However, this ability appeared both variable and fragile among the youngest children of the sample. These findings suggest that 4-year-old children begin to form an abstract concept of angle that applies both to 2D and 3D displays and that serves to interpret novel spatial symbols. PMID:23647223

  18. Angles, Time, and Proportion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pagni, David L.

    2005-01-01

    This article describes an investigation making connections between the time on an analog clock and the angle between the minute hand and the hour hand. It was posed by a middle school mathematics teacher. (Contains 8 tables and 6 figures.)

  19. Reading angles in maps.

    PubMed

    Izard, Véronique; O'Donnell, Evan; Spelke, Elizabeth S

    2014-01-01

    Preschool children can navigate by simple geometric maps of the environment, but the nature of the geometric relations they use in map reading remains unclear. Here, children were tested specifically on their sensitivity to angle. Forty-eight children (age 47:15-53:30 months) were presented with fragments of geometric maps, in which angle sections appeared without any relevant length or distance information. Children were able to read these map fragments and compare two-dimensional to three-dimensional angles. However, this ability appeared both variable and fragile among the youngest children of the sample. These findings suggest that 4-year-old children begin to form an abstract concept of angle that applies both to two-dimensional and three-dimensional displays and that serves to interpret novel spatial symbols. PMID:23647223

  20. Deposition and characterization of Cd{sub 1−x}Mg{sub x}Te thin films grown by a novel cosublimation method

    SciTech Connect

    Kobyakov, Pavel S. Swanson, Drew E.; Sampath, Walajabad S.; Moore, Andrew; Raguse, John M.

    2014-03-15

    Photovoltaic cells utilizing the CdS/CdTe structure have improved substantially in the past few years. Despite the recent advances, the efficiency of CdS/CdTe cells is still significantly below their Shockley–Queisser limit. CdTe based ternary alloy thin films, such as Cd{sub 1−x}Mg{sub x}Te (CMT), could be used to improve efficiency of CdS/CdTe photovoltaic cells. Higher band gap Cd{sub 1−x}Mg{sub x}Te films can be the absorber in top cells of a tandem structure or an electron reflector layer in CdS/CdTe cells. A novel cosublimation method to deposit CMT thin films has been developed. This method can deposit CMT films of band gaps ranging from 1.5 to 2.3 eV. The cosublimation method is fast, repeatable, and scalable for large areas, making it suitable for implementing into large-scale manufacturing. Characterization of as-deposited CMT films, with x varying from 0 to 0.35, reveals a linear relationship between Mg content measured by energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy and the optical band gap. Glancing angle x-ray diffraction (GAXRD) measurements of Cd{sub 1−x}Mg{sub x}Te films show a zinc-blende structure similar to CdTe. Furthermore, increasing Mg content decreases the lattice parameter and the grain size. GAXRD shows the films are under mild tension after deposition.

  1. The influence of spray properties on intranasal deposition.

    PubMed

    Foo, Mow Yee; Cheng, Yung-Sung; Su, Wei-Chung; Donovan, Maureen D

    2007-01-01

    While numerous devices, formulations, and spray characteristics have been shown to influence nasal deposition efficiency, few studies have attempted to identify which of these interacting factors plays the greatest role in nasal spray deposition. The deposition patterns of solutions with a wide range of surface tensions and viscosities were measured using an MRI-derived nasal cavity replica. The resulting spray plumes had angles between 29 degrees and 80 degrees and contained droplet sizes (D(v50)) from 37-157 microm. Each formulation contained rhodamine 590 as a fluorescent marker for detection. Administration angles of 30 degrees , 40 degrees , or 50 degrees above horizontal were tested to investigate the role of user technique on nasal deposition. The amount of spray deposited within specific regions of the nasal cavity was determined by disassembling the replica and measuring the amount of rhodamine retained in each section. Most of the spray droplets were deposited onto the anterior region of the model, but sprays with small plume angles were capable of reaching the turbinate region with deposition efficiencies approaching 90%. Minimal dependence on droplet size, viscosity, or device was observed. Changes in inspiratory flow rate (0-60 L/min) had no significant effect on turbinate deposition efficiency. Both plume angle and administration angle were found to be important factors in determining deposition efficiency. For administration angles of 40 degrees or 50 degrees , maximal turbinate deposition efficiency (30-50%) occurred with plume angles of 55-65 degrees , whereas a 30 degrees administration angle gave an approximately 75% deposition efficiency for similar plume angles. Deposition efficiencies of approximately 90% could be achieved with plume angles <30 degrees using 30 degrees administration angles. Both the plume angle and administration angle are critical factors in determining deposition efficiency, while many other spray parameters, including

  2. 'Magic Angle Precession'

    SciTech Connect

    Binder, Bernd

    2008-01-21

    An advanced and exact geometric description of nonlinear precession dynamics modeling very accurately natural and artificial couplings showing Lorentz symmetry is derived. In the linear description it is usually ignored that the geometric phase of relativistic motion couples back to the orbital motion providing for a non-linear recursive precession dynamics. The high coupling strength in the nonlinear case is found to be a gravitomagnetic charge proportional to the precession angle and angular velocity generated by geometric phases, which are induced by high-speed relativistic rotations and are relevant to propulsion technologies but also to basic interactions. In the quantum range some magic precession angles indicating strong coupling in a phase-locked chaotic system are identified, emerging from a discrete time dynamical system known as the cosine map showing bifurcations at special precession angles relevant to heavy nuclei stability. The 'Magic Angle Precession' (MAP) dynamics can be simulated and visualized by cones rolling in or on each other, where the apex and precession angles are indexed by spin, charge or precession quantum numbers, and corresponding magic angles. The most extreme relativistic warping and twisting effect is given by the Dirac spinor half spin constellation with 'Hyperdiamond' MAP, which resembles quark confinement.

  3. A simulator evaluation of the effects of attention maintenance training on glance distributions of younger novice drivers inside and outside the vehicle

    PubMed Central

    Divekar, Gautam; Pradhan, Anuj K.; Masserang, Kathleen M.; Reagan, Ian; Pollatsek, Alexander; Fisher, Donald L.

    2013-01-01

    Driver distraction inside and outside the vehicle is increasingly a problem, especially for younger drivers. In many cases the distraction is associated with long glances away from the forward roadway. Such glances have been shown to be highly predictive of crashes. Ideally, one would like to develop and evaluate a training program which reduced these long glances. Thus, an experiment was conducted in a driving simulator to test the efficacy of a training program, FOCAL, that was developed to teach novice drivers to limit the duration of glances that are inside the vehicle while performing an in-vehicle task, such as looking for a CD or finding the 4-way flashers. The test in the simulator showed that the FOCAL trained group performed significantly better than the placebo trained group on several measures, notably on the percentage of within-vehicle glances that were greater than 2, 2.5, and 3 s. However, the training did not generalize to glances away from the roadway (e.g., when drivers were asked to attend to a sign adjacent to the roadway, both trained and untrained novice drivers were equally likely to make especially long glances at the sign). PMID:24415905

  4. The nuclear pore complex--structure and function at a glance.

    PubMed

    Kabachinski, Greg; Schwartz, Thomas U

    2015-02-01

    Nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) are indispensable for cell function and are at the center of several human diseases. NPCs provide access to the nucleus and regulate the transport of proteins and RNA across the nuclear envelope. They are aqueous channels generated from a complex network of evolutionarily conserved proteins known as nucleporins. In this Cell Science at a Glance article and the accompanying poster, we discuss how transport between the nucleoplasm and the cytoplasm is regulated, what we currently know about the structure of individual nucleoporins and the assembled NPC, and how the cell regulates assembly and disassembly of such a massive structure. Our aim is to provide a general overview on what we currently know about the nuclear pore and point out directions of research this area is heading to. PMID:26046137

  5. The VCP/p97 system at a glance: connecting cellular function to disease pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Hemmo; Weihl, Conrad C.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The ATPase valosin-containing protein (VCP)/p97 has emerged as a central and important element of the ubiquitin system. Together with a network of cofactors, it regulates an ever-expanding range of processes that stretch into almost every aspect of cellular physiology. Its main role in proteostasis and key functions in signaling pathways are of relevance to degenerative diseases and genomic stability. In this Cell Science at a Glance and the accompanying poster, we give a brief overview of this complex system. In addition, we discuss the pathogenic basis for VCP/p97-associated diseases and then highlight in more detail new exciting links to the translational stress response and RNA biology that further underscore the significance of the VCP/p97 system. PMID:25146396

  6. An Iterative Angle Trisection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muench, Donald L.

    2007-01-01

    The problem of angle trisection continues to fascinate people even though it has long been known that it can't be done with straightedge and compass alone. However, for practical purposes, a good iterative procedure can get you as close as you want. In this note, we present such a procedure. Using only straightedge and compass, our procedure…

  7. Casting and Angling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Little, Mildred J.; Bunting, Camille

    The self-contained packet contains background information, lesson plans, 15 transparency and student handout masters, drills and games, 2 objective examinations, and references for teaching a 15-day unit on casting and angling to junior high and senior high school students, either as part of a regular physical education program or as a club…

  8. The Rainbow Angle.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sims, B.

    1978-01-01

    Two articles in the "Scientific American" form the background of this note. The rainbow angle for the primary bow of a monochromatic Cartesian rainbow is calculated. Special projects for senior high school students could be patterned after this quantitative study. (MP)

  9. Casting and Angling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Julian W.

    As part of a series of books and pamphlets on outdoor education, this manual consists of easy-to-follow instructions for fishing activities dealing with casting and angling. The manual may be used as a part of the regular physical education program in schools and colleges or as a club activity for the accomplished weekend fisherman or the…

  10. Yaw Angle Demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The Large Angle Magnetic Suspension Test Fixture (LAMSTF) is a 5 degree-of -freedom repulsive force magnetic suspension system designed to study the control of objects over large magnetic gaps. A digital control algorithm uses 6 sets of laser-sheet sensors and 5 control coils to position a cylinder 3' above the plane of electromagnetics

  11. How does the deposition of gas phase species affect surface pH at frozen salty interfaces?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donaldson, D. J.; Wren, S. N.

    2012-12-01

    Chemical processes occurring on snow and ice surfaces play an important role in controlling the oxidative capacity of the overlying atmosphere. However, efforts to gain a better, mechanistic understanding of such processes are impeded by a poor understanding of the chemical nature of the air-ice interface. In consequence, constraining the substrates that are most relevant to these processes (e.g., new sea ice, first-year ice, frost flowers, brine layers, saline snow) as well as understanding how chemistry will be affected as the areal extent of these substrates succumbs to polar environmental change, remains difficult. In this study, we used glancing-angle laser-induced fluorescence and a surface-active fluorescent pH indicator to investigate how the nature of the ice, whether frozen pure water, salt water or seawater, influences pH changes at the surface. We find that deposition of HCl(g) leads to a very different pH response at the frozen pure water surface than at the frozen salt water surface indicating that these two surfaces present different chemical environments. Results indicate that the frozen salt water surface is covered by a brine layer which behaves like a true liquid layer. On the other hand, the disordered interface at the pure ice surface presents a unique chemical environment. Our results also suggest that the sea ice surface is buffered against pH changes arising from the deposition of gas phase species. These results have important implications for understanding pH-sensitive processes occurring at the air-ice boundary, such as bromine activation.

  12. A Different Angle on Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frantz, Marc

    2012-01-01

    When a plane figure is photographed from different viewpoints, lengths and angles appear distorted. Hence it is often assumed that lengths, angles, protractors, and compasses have no place in projective geometry. Here we describe a sense in which certain angles are preserved by projective transformations. These angles can be constructed with…

  13. Acid Deposition

    EPA Science Inventory

    This indicator presents acid deposition trends in the contiguous U.S. from 1989 to 2007. Data are broken down by wet and dry deposition and deposition of nitrogen and sulfur compounds. Acid deposition is particularly damaging to lakes, streams, and forests and the plants and a...

  14. Angles in the Sky?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behr, Bradford

    2005-09-01

    Tycho Brahe lived and worked in the late 1500s before the telescope was invented. He made highly accurate observations of the positions of planets, stars, and comets using large angle-measuring devices of his own design. You can use his techniques to observe the sky as well. For example, the degree, a common unit of measurement in astronomy, can be measured by holding your fist at arm's length up to the sky. Open your fist and observe the distance across the sky covered by the width of your pinky fingernail. That is, roughly, a degree! After some practice, and knowing that one degree equals four minutes, you can measure elapsed time by measuring the angle of the distance that the Moon appears to have moved and multiplying that number by four. You can also figure distances and sizes of things. These are not precise measurements, but rough estimates that can give you a "close-enough" answer.

  15. The effect of vapor incidence angle upon thin film columnar growth

    SciTech Connect

    Mazor, A.; Bukiet, B.G.; Srolovitz, D.J.

    1988-01-01

    We present a generalized theory for the growth of columnar microstructure in vapor deposited thin films under the joint influence of a constant uniform deposition flux coming down with arbitrarily chosen incidence angle, and surface diffusion. The dependences of the Zone I to Zone II transition temperature, and the characteristic length scales associated with the unstable modes on the deposition angle are predicted. The surface morphology is obtained as a function of vapor incidence angle. For a specific deposition angle, there is a one-parameter family of steady-state surface profiles which corresponds to a range of possible columnar orientation angles, among which only one angle is associated with the tangent rule. These results agree with experimental observations. 10 refs., 6 figs.

  16. Laser angle sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pond, C. R.; Texeira, P. D.

    1985-01-01

    A laser angle measurement system was designed and fabricated for NASA Langley Research Center. The instrument is a fringe counting interferometer that monitors the pitch attitude of a model in a wind tunnel. A laser source and detector are mounted above the model. Interference fringes are generated by a small passive element on the model. The fringe count is accumulated and displayed by a processor in the wind tunnel control room. This report includes optical and electrical schematics, system maintenance and operation procedures.

  17. Angle states in quantum mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de la Torre, A. C.; Iguain, J. L.

    1998-12-01

    Angle states and angle operators are defined for a system with arbitrary angular momentum. They provide a reasonable formalization of the concept of angle provided that we accept that the angular orientation is quantized. The angle operator is the generator of boosts in angular momentum and is, almost everywhere, linearly related to the logarithm of the shift operator. Angle states for fermions and bosons behave differently under parity transformation.

  18. Small Angle Neutron Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Urban, Volker S

    2012-01-01

    Small Angle Neutron Scattering (SANS) probes structural details at the nanometer scale in a non-destructive way. This article gives an introduction to scientists who have no prior small-angle scattering knowledge, but who seek a technique that allows elucidating structural information in challenging situations that thwart approaches by other methods. SANS is applicable to a wide variety of materials including metals and alloys, ceramics, concrete, glasses, polymers, composites and biological materials. Isotope and magnetic interactions provide unique methods for labeling and contrast variation to highlight specific structural features of interest. In situ studies of a material s responses to temperature, pressure, shear, magnetic and electric fields, etc., are feasible as a result of the high penetrating power of neutrons. SANS provides statistical information on significant structural features averaged over the probed sample volume, and one can use SANS to quantify with high precision the structural details that are observed, for example, in electron microscopy. Neutron scattering is non-destructive; there is no need to cut specimens into thin sections, and neutrons penetrate deeply, providing information on the bulk material, free from surface effects. The basic principles of a SANS experiment are fairly simple, but the measurement, analysis and interpretation of small angle scattering data involves theoretical concepts that are unique to the technique and that are not widely known. This article includes a concise description of the basics, as well as practical know-how that is essential for a successful SANS experiment.

  19. Filling high aspect ratio trenches by superconformal chemical vapor deposition: Predictive modeling and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wenjiao B.; Abelson, John R.

    2014-11-01

    Complete filling of a deep recessed structure with a second material is a challenge in many areas of nanotechnology fabrication. A newly discovered superconformal coating method, applicable in chemical vapor deposition systems that utilize a precursor in combination with a co-reactant, can solve this problem. However, filling is a dynamic process in which the trench progressively narrows and the aspect ratio (AR) increases. This reduces species diffusion within the trench and may drive the component partial pressures out of the regime for superconformal coating. We therefore derive two theoretical models that can predict the possibility for filling. First, we recast the diffusion-reaction equation for the case of a sidewall with variable taper angle. This affords a definition of effective AR, which is larger than the nominal AR due to the reduced species transport. We then derive the coating profile, both for superconformal and for conformal coating. The critical (most difficult) step in the filling process occurs when the sidewalls merge at the bottom of the trench to form the V shape. Experimentally, for the Mg(DMADB)2/H2O system and a starting AR = 9, this model predicts that complete filling will not be possible, whereas experimentally we do obtain complete filling. We then hypothesize that glancing-angle, long-range transport of species may be responsible for the better than predicted filling. To account for the variable range of species transport, we construct a ballistic transport model. This incorporates the incident flux from outside the structure, cosine law re-emission from surfaces, and line-of-sight transport between internal surfaces. We cast the transport probability between all positions within the trench into a matrix that represents the redistribution of flux after one cycle of collisions. Matrix manipulation then affords a computationally efficient means to determine the steady-state flux distribution and growth rate for a given taper angle. The

  20. Wide Angle Movie

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This brief movie illustrates the passage of the Moon through the Saturn-bound Cassini spacecraft's wide-angle camera field of view as the spacecraft passed by the Moon on the way to its closest approach with Earth on August 17, 1999. From beginning to end of the sequence, 25 wide-angle images (with a spatial image scale of about 14 miles per pixel (about 23 kilometers)were taken over the course of 7 and 1/2 minutes through a series of narrow and broadband spectral filters and polarizers, ranging from the violet to the near-infrared regions of the spectrum, to calibrate the spectral response of the wide-angle camera. The exposure times range from 5 milliseconds to 1.5 seconds. Two of the exposures were smeared and have been discarded and replaced with nearby images to make a smooth movie sequence. All images were scaled so that the brightness of Crisium basin, the dark circular region in the upper right, is approximately the same in every image. The imaging data were processed and released by the Cassini Imaging Central Laboratory for Operations (CICLOPS)at the University of Arizona's Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, Tucson, AZ.

    Photo Credit: NASA/JPL/Cassini Imaging Team/University of Arizona

    Cassini, launched in 1997, is a joint mission of NASA, the European Space Agency and Italian Space Agency. The mission is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington DC. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA.

  1. Laser angle measurement system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pond, C. R.; Texeira, P. D.; Wilbert, R. E.

    1980-01-01

    The design and fabrication of a laser angle measurement system is described. The instrument is a fringe counting interferometer that monitors the pitch attitude of a model in a wind tunnel. A laser source and detector are mounted above the mode. Interference fringes are generated by a small passive element on the model. The fringe count is accumulated and displayed by a processor in the wind tunnel control room. Optical and electrical schematics, system maintenance and operation procedures are included, and the results of a demonstration test are given.

  2. Measurement of the angle of superficial tension by images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanez M., Javier; Alonso R., Sergio

    2006-02-01

    When a liquid is deposited on a surface, this one form a certain angle with respect to the surface, where depending on its value, it will conclude that so hard it is his adhesion with the surface. By means of the analysis of images we looked for to measure this angle of superficial tension. In order to make this measurement, we propose a technique by means of projective transformations and one method of regression to estimation parameters to conic fitting.

  3. Differences in glance behavior between drivers using a rearview camera, parking sensor system, both technologies, or no technology during low-speed parking maneuvers.

    PubMed

    Kidd, David G; McCartt, Anne T

    2016-02-01

    This study characterized the use of various fields of view during low-speed parking maneuvers by drivers with a rearview camera, a sensor system, a camera and sensor system combined, or neither technology. Participants performed four different low-speed parking maneuvers five times. Glances to different fields of view the second time through the four maneuvers were coded along with the glance locations at the onset of the audible warning from the sensor system and immediately after the warning for participants in the sensor and camera-plus-sensor conditions. Overall, the results suggest that information from cameras and/or sensor systems is used in place of mirrors and shoulder glances. Participants with a camera, sensor system, or both technologies looked over their shoulders significantly less than participants without technology. Participants with cameras (camera and camera-plus-sensor conditions) used their mirrors significantly less compared with participants without cameras (no-technology and sensor conditions). Participants in the camera-plus-sensor condition looked at the center console/camera display for a smaller percentage of the time during the low-speed maneuvers than participants in the camera condition and glanced more frequently to the center console/camera display immediately after the warning from the sensor system compared with the frequency of glances to this location at warning onset. Although this increase was not statistically significant, the pattern suggests that participants in the camera-plus-sensor condition may have used the warning as a cue to look at the camera display. The observed differences in glance behavior between study groups were illustrated by relating it to the visibility of a 12-15-month-old child-size object. These findings provide evidence that drivers adapt their glance behavior during low-speed parking maneuvers following extended use of rearview cameras and parking sensors, and suggest that other technologies which

  4. Measures on mixing angles

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbons, Gary W.; Gielen, Steffen; Pope, C. N.; Turok, Neil

    2009-01-01

    We address the problem of the apparently very small magnitude of CP violation in the standard model, measured by the Jarlskog invariant J. In order to make statements about probabilities for certain values of J, we seek to find a natural measure on the space of Kobayashi-Maskawa matrices, the double quotient U(1){sup 2}/SU(3)/U(1){sup 2}. We review several possible, geometrically motivated choices of the measure, and compute expectation values for powers of J for these measures. We find that different choices of the measure generically make the observed magnitude of CP violation appear finely tuned. Since the quark masses and the mixing angles are determined by the same set of Yukawa couplings, we then do a second calculation in which we take the known quark mass hierarchy into account. We construct the simplest measure on the space of 3x3 Hermitian matrices which reproduces this known hierarchy. Calculating expectation values for powers of J in this second approach, we find that values of J close to the observed value are now rather likely, and there does not seem to be any fine-tuning. Our results suggest that the choice of Kobayashi-Maskawa angles is closely linked to the observed mass hierarchy. We close by discussing the corresponding case of neutrinos.

  5. Variable angle correlation spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Y K

    1994-05-01

    In this dissertation, a novel nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) technique, variable angle correlation spectroscopy (VACSY) is described and demonstrated with {sup 13}C nuclei in rapidly rotating samples. These experiments focus on one of the basic problems in solid state NMR: how to extract the wealth of information contained in the anisotropic component of the NMR signal while still maintaining spectral resolution. Analysis of the anisotropic spectral patterns from poly-crystalline systems reveal information concerning molecular structure and dynamics, yet in all but the simplest of systems, the overlap of spectral patterns from chemically distinct sites renders the spectral analysis difficult if not impossible. One solution to this problem is to perform multi-dimensional experiments where the high-resolution, isotropic spectrum in one dimension is correlated with the anisotropic spectral patterns in the other dimensions. The VACSY technique incorporates the angle between the spinner axis and the static magnetic field as an experimental parameter that may be incremented during the course of the experiment to help correlate the isotropic and anisotropic components of the spectrum. The two-dimensional version of the VACSY experiments is used to extract the chemical shift anisotropy tensor values from multi-site organic molecules, study molecular dynamics in the intermediate time regime, and to examine the ordering properties of partially oriented samples. The VACSY technique is then extended to three-dimensional experiments to study slow molecular reorientations in a multi-site polymer system.

  6. A Note on Angle Construction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Francis, Richard L.

    1978-01-01

    The author investigates the construction of angles (using Euclidean tools) through a numerical approach. He calls attention to the surprising impossibility of constructing the conventional units of angle measure--the degree, minute, second, radian, and mil. (MN)

  7. Human mitochondrial COX1 assembly into cytochrome c oxidase at a glance.

    PubMed

    Dennerlein, Sven; Rehling, Peter

    2015-03-01

    Mitochondria provide the main portion of cellular energy in form of ATP produced by the F1Fo ATP synthase, which uses the electrochemical gradient, generated by the mitochondrial respiratory chain (MRC). In human mitochondria, the MRC is composed of four multisubunit enzyme complexes, with the cytochrome c oxidase (COX, also known as complex IV) as the terminal enzyme. COX comprises 14 structural subunits, of nuclear or mitochondrial origin. Hence, mitochondria are faced with the predicament of organizing and controlling COX assembly with subunits that are synthesized by different translation machineries and that reach the inner membrane by alternative transport routes. An increasing number of COX assembly factors have been identified in recent years. Interestingly, mutations in several of these factors have been associated with human disorders leading to COX deficiency. Recently, studies have provided mechanistic insights into crosstalk between assembly intermediates, import processes and the synthesis of COX subunits in mitochondria, thus linking conceptually separated functions. This Cell Science at a Glance article and the accompanying poster will focus on COX assembly and discuss recent discoveries in the field, the molecular functions of known factors, as well as new players and control mechanisms. Furthermore, these findings will be discussed in the context of human COX-related disorders. PMID:25663696

  8. Variable magnification variable dispersion glancing incidence imaging x ray spectroscopic telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoover, Richard (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A variable magnification variable dispersion glancing incidence x ray spectroscopic telescope capable of multiple high spatial revolution imaging at precise spectral lines of solar and stellar x ray and extreme ultraviolet radiation sources includes a primary optical system which focuses the incoming radiation to a primary focus. Two or more rotatable carriers each providing a different magnification are positioned behind the primary focus at an inclination to the optical axis, each carrier carrying a series of ellipsoidal diffraction grating mirrors each having a concave surface on which the gratings are ruled and coated with a multilayer coating to reflect by diffraction a different desired wavelength. The diffraction grating mirrors of both carriers are segments of ellipsoids having a common first focus coincident with the primary focus. A contoured detector such as an x ray sensitive photographic film is positioned at the second respective focus of each diffraction grating so that each grating may reflect the image at the first focus to the detector at the second focus. The carriers are selectively rotated to position a selected mirror for receiving radiation from the primary optical system, and at least the first carrier may be withdrawn from the path of the radiation to permit a selected grating on the second carrier to receive radiation.

  9. Nonsense-mediated mRNA decay in humans at a glance.

    PubMed

    Kurosaki, Tatsuaki; Maquat, Lynne E

    2016-02-01

    Nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) is an mRNA quality-control mechanism that typifies all eukaryotes examined to date. NMD surveys newly synthesized mRNAs and degrades those that harbor a premature termination codon (PTC), thereby preventing the production of truncated proteins that could result in disease in humans. This is evident from dominantly inherited diseases that are due to PTC-containing mRNAs that escape NMD. Although many cellular NMD targets derive from mistakes made during, for example, pre-mRNA splicing and, possibly, transcription initiation, NMD also targets ∼10% of normal physiological mRNAs so as to promote an appropriate cellular response to changing environmental milieus, including those that induce apoptosis, maturation or differentiation. Over the past ∼35 years, a central goal in the NMD field has been to understand how cells discriminate mRNAs that are targeted by NMD from those that are not. In this Cell Science at a Glance and the accompanying poster, we review progress made towards this goal, focusing on human studies and the role of the key NMD factor up-frameshift protein 1 (UPF1). PMID:26787741

  10. Variable magnification variable dispersion glancing incidence imaging x-ray spectroscopic telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoover, Richard B. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A variable magnification variable dispersion glancing incidence x-ray spectroscopic telescope capable of multiple high spatial revolution imaging at precise spectral lines of solar and stellar x-ray and extreme ultraviolet radiation sources includes a pirmary optical system which focuses the incoming radiation to a primary focus. Two or more rotatable carries each providing a different magnification are positioned behind the primary focus at an inclination to the optical axis, each carrier carrying a series of ellipsoidal diffraction grating mirrors each having a concave surface on which the gratings are ruled and coated with a mutlilayer coating to reflect by diffraction a different desired wavelength. The diffraction grating mirrors of both carriers are segments of ellipsoids having a common first focus coincident with the primary focus. A contoured detector such as an x-ray sensitive photogrpahic film is positioned at the second respective focus of each diffraction grating so that each grating may reflect the image at the first focus to the detector at the second focus. The carriers are selectively rotated to position a selected mirror for receiving radiation from the primary optical system, and at least the first carrier may be withdrawn from the path of the radiation to permit a selected grating on the second carrier to receive radiation.