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Sample records for glast lat tracker

  1. Environmental Tests of the Flight GLAST LAT Tracker Towers

    SciTech Connect

    Bagagli, R.; Baldini, L.; Bellazzini, R.; Barbiellini, G.; Belli, F.; Borden, T.; Brez, A.; Brigida, M.; Caliandro, G.A.; Cecchi, C.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Angelis, A.De; Drell, P.; Favuzzi, C.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Germani, S.; Giglietto, N.; Giordano, F.; Goodman, J.; Himel, T.

    2008-03-12

    The Gamma-ray Large Area Space telescope (GLAST) is a gamma-ray satellite scheduled for launch in 2008. Before the assembly of the Tracker subsystem of the Large Area Telescope (LAT) science instrument of GLAST, every component (tray) and module (tower) has been subjected to extensive ground testing required to ensure successful launch and on-orbit operation. This paper describes the sequence and results of the environmental tests performed on an engineering model and all the flight hardware of the GLAST LAT Tracker. Environmental tests include vibration testing, thermal cycles and thermal-vacuum cycles of every tray and tower as well as the verification of their electrical performance.

  2. Environmental Test Activity on the Flight Modules of the GLAST LAT Tracker

    SciTech Connect

    Brigida, M.; Caliandro, A.; Favuzzi, C.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Giglietto, N.; Giordano, F.; Loparco, F.; Marangelli, B.; Mazziotta, M.N.; Mirizzi, N.; Raino, S.; Spinelli, P.; /Bari U. /INFN, Bari

    2007-02-15

    The GLAST Large Area Telescope (LAT) is a gamma-ray telescope consisting of a silicon micro-strip detector tracker followed by a segmented CsI calorimeter and covered by a segmented scintillator anticoincidence system that will search for {gamma}-rays in the 20 MeV-300 GeV energy range. The results of the environmental tests performed on the flight modules (towers) of the Tracker are presented. The aim of the environmental tests is to verify the performance of the silicon detectors in the expected mission environment. The tower modules are subjected to dynamic tests that simulate the launch environment and thermal vacuum test that reproduce the thermal gradients expected on orbit. The tower performance is continuously monitored during the whole test sequence. The environmental test activity, the results of the tests and the silicon tracker performance are presented.

  3. The GLAST LAT Instrument Science Operations Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cameron, Robert A.; LAT ISOC, GLAST

    2006-12-01

    The Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) is scheduled for launch in late 2007. The major science instrument on GLAST is the Large Area Telescope (LAT). Operations support and science data processing for the LAT instrument on GLAST will be performed by the LAT Instrument Science Operations Center (ISOC) at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). The ISOC supports GLAST mission operations in cooperation with other GLAST mission ground system elements and supports the science research activities of the LAT collaboration. The ISOC will be responsible for monitoring the health and safety of the LAT, preparing command loads for the LAT, maintaining and updating embedded flight software which controls the LAT detector and data acquisition flight hardware, maintaining the operating configration of the LAT and its calibration, and applying event reconstruction processing to downlinked LAT data to recover information about detected gamma-ray photons. The SLAC computer farm will be used to process the large volume of LAT event data and generate science products to be made available to the LAT collaboration through the ISOC and to the broader scientific community through the GLAST Science Support Center at GSFC. Science operations in the ISOC will optimize the performance of the LAT and oversee automated science processing of LAT data to detect and monitor transient gamma-ray sources. We describe the use of collaboration-wide data challenges and service challenges to test and exercise LAT data processing and science operations before launch. This work is supported by Stanford University and the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) under DoE contract number DE-AC03-76SFO0515. Non-US sources of funding also support the efforts of GLAST LAT collaborators in France, Italy, Japan, and Sweden.

  4. The GLAST LAT Instrument Science Operations Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cameron, Robert A.

    2007-07-01

    The Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) is scheduled for launch in late 2007. Operations support and science data processing for the Large Area Telescope (LAT) instrument on GLAST will be provided by the LAT Instrument Science Operations Center (ISOC) at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). The ISOC supports GLAST mission operations in conjunction with other GLAST mission ground system elements and supports the research activities of the LAT scientific collaboration. The ISOC will be responsible for monitoring the health and safety of the LAT, preparing command loads for the LAT, maintaining embedded flight software which controls the LAT detector and data acquisition flight hardware, maintaining the operating configuration of the LAT and its calibration, and applying event reconstruction processing to down-linked LAT data to recover information about detected gamma-ray photons. The SLAC computer farm will be used to process LAT event data and generate science products, to be made available to the LAT collaboration through the ISOC and to the broader scientific community through the GLAST Science Support Center at NASA/GSFC. ISOC science operations will optimize the performance of the LAT and oversee automated science processing of LAT data to detect and monitor transient gamma-ray sources.

  5. The GLAST LAT Instrument Science Operations Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cameron, Robert A.; Silva, E. do Couto e.; Dubois, R.; LAT ISOC, GLAST

    2006-09-01

    Operations support and science data processing for the Large Area Telescope (LAT) instrument on the Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) will be provided by the LAT Instrument Science Operations Center (ISOC) at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). The ISOC supports GLAST mission operations in cooperation with other GLAST mission ground system elements and supports the science activities of the LAT collaboration. The ISOC will be responsible for monitoring the health and safety of the LAT, preparing command sequences for the LAT, maintaining and updating embedded flight software which controls the LAT detector and data acquisition flight hardware, maintaining the LAT configuration and calibration, and applying event reconstruction processing to downlinked LAT data to recover information about detected gamma-ray photons. The SLAC computer farm will be used to process the large volume of LAT event data and generate science products to be made available to the LAT collaboration through the ISOC and to the broader scientific community through the GLAST Science Support Center at GSFC. Science operations in the ISOC will optimize the performance of the LAT and oversee automated science processing of LAT data to detect and monitor transient gamma-ray sources. We describe the use of collaboration-wide data challenges to test and exercise LAT data processing before launch.

  6. The GLAST Mission, LAT and GRBs

    SciTech Connect

    Omodei, Nicola; /INFN, Pisa

    2006-04-05

    The GLAST Large Area Telescope (LAT) is the next generation satellite experiment for high-energy gamma-ray astronomy. It is a pair conversion telescope built with a plastic anticoincidence shield, a segmented CsI electromagnetic calorimeter, and the largest silicon strip tracker ever built. It will cover the energy range from 30 MeV to 300 GeV, shedding light on many issues left open by its predecessor EGRET. One of the most exciting science topics is the detection and observation of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). In this paper we present the work done so far by the GRB LAT science group in studying the performance of the LAT detector to observe GRBs.We report on the simulation framework developed by the group as well as on the science tools dedicated to GRBs data analysis. We present the LAT sensitivity to GRBs obtained with such simulations, and, finally, the general scheme of GRBs detection that will be adopted on orbit.

  7. Automated Science Processing for GLAST LAT Data

    SciTech Connect

    Chiang, James

    2007-07-12

    Automated Science Processing (ASP) will be performed by the GLAST Large Area Telescope (LAT) Instrument Science Operations Center (ISOC) on data from the satellite as soon as the Level 1 data are available in the ground processing pipeline. ASP will consist of time-critical science analyses that will facilitate follow-up and multi-wavelength observations of transient sources. These analyses include refinement of gamma-ray burst (GRB) positions, timing, flux and spectral properties, off-line searches for untriggered GRBs and gamma-ray afterglows, longer time scale monitoring of a standard set of sources (AGNs, X-ray binaries), and searches for previously unknown flaring sources in the LAT band. We describe the design of ASP and its scientific products; and we show results of a prototype implementation, driven by the standard LAT data processing pipeline, as applied to simulated LAT and GBM data.

  8. Automated Science Processing for GLAST LAT Data

    SciTech Connect

    Chiang, James; Carson, Jennifer; Focke, Warren; /SLAC

    2007-10-15

    Automated Science Processing (ASP) will be performed by the GLAST Large Area Telescope (LAT) Instrument Science Operations Center (ISOC) on data from the satellite as soon as the Level 1 data are available in the ground processing pipeline. ASP will consist of time-critical science analyses that will facilitate follow-up and multi-wavelength observations of transient sources. These analyses include refinement of gamma-ray burst (GRB) positions, timing, flux and spectral properties, off-line searches for untriggered GRBs and gamma-ray afterglows, longer time scale monitoring of a standard set of sources (AGNs, X-ray binaries), and searches for previously unknown flaring sources in the LAT band. We describe the design of ASP and its scientific products; and we show results of a prototype implementation, driven by the standard LAT data processing pipeline, as applied to simulated LAT and GBM data.

  9. Analysis of Burst Observations by GLAST'S LAT

    SciTech Connect

    Band, D

    2003-12-17

    Analyzing data from GLAST's Large Area Telescope (LAT) will require sophisticated techniques. The PSF and effective area are functions of both photon energy and the position in the field-of-view. During most of the mission the observatory will survey the sky continuously and thus the LAT will detect each count from a source at a different detector orientation; each count requires its own response function. The likelihood as a function of celestial position and photon energy will be the foundation of the standard analysis techniques. However the 20 MeV-300 GeV emission at the time of the {approx}100 keV burst emission (timescale of {approx}10 s) can be isolated and analyzed because essentially no non-burst counts are expected within a PSF radius of the burst location during the burst. Both binned and unbinned (in energy) spectral fitting will be possible. Longer timescale afterglow emission will require the likelihood analysis that will be used for persistent sources.

  10. GLAST LAT And Pulsars: What Do We Learn from Simulations?

    SciTech Connect

    Razzano, Massimiliano; Harding, Alice K.; /NASA, Goddard

    2007-10-24

    Gamma-ray pulsars are among the best targets for the Large Area Telescope (LAT) aboard the GLAST mission. The higher sensitivity, time and energy resolution of the LAT will provide data of fundamental importance to understand the physics of these fascinating objects. Powerful tools for studying the LAT capabilities for pulsar science are the simulation programs developed within the GLAST Collaboration. Thanks to these simulations it is possible to produce a detailed distribution of gamma-ray photons in energy and phase that can be folded through the LAT Instrument Response Functions (IRFs). Here we present some of the main interesting results from the simulations developed to study the discovery potential of the LAT. In particular we will focus on the capability of the LAT to discover new radio-loud gamma-ray pulsars, on the discrimination between Polar Cap and Outer Gap models, and on the LAT pulsar sensitivity.

  11. GeV flares observations with GLAST LAT

    SciTech Connect

    Galli, A.; Omodei, N.; Piro, L.

    2007-07-12

    Early X-ray afterglow observations show that X-ray flares are very common features in GRB light curves. X-ray flares may reflect long duration central engine activity. The delayed flare photons are expected to interact with relativistic electrons by Inverse Compton giving delayed high energy counterparts that potentially will be detected by GLAST LAT, which could observe GRB from 20 MeV to more than 300 GeV. The nature oh high energy spectral components from GRB detected by EGRET is still debated. Observations with GLAST LAT will give useful information to constrain the origin of X-ray flares. In this work we simulate a set of possible GeV emitting flares in the context of External Shock model to study the capability of GLAST LAT to detect GeV flares at different intensities and durations.

  12. Lessons Learned During Construction and Test of the GLAST Large Area Telescope Tracker

    SciTech Connect

    Latronico, L.; /INFN, Pisa

    2005-08-09

    The GLAST Large Area Telescope (LAT) is a satellite gamma-ray observatory designed to explore the sky in the energy range 20MeV {approx_equal} 300GeV, a region populated by emissions from the most energetic and mysterious objects in the cosmos, like black holes, AGNs, supernovae, gamma-ray bursters. The silicon-strip tracker is the heart of the photon detection system, and with its 80 m{sup 2} of surface and almost 1M channels is one of the largest silicon tracker ever built. Its construction, to be completed by 2006, and the stringent requirements from operation in space, represent a major technological challenge. Critical design, technology and system engineering issues are addressed in this paper, as well as the approach being followed during construction, test and qualification of the LAT silicon tracker.

  13. Performance of the Integrated Tracker Towers of the GLAST Large Area Telescope

    SciTech Connect

    Brigida, M.; Caliandro, A.; Favuzzi, C.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Giglietto, N.; Giordano, F.; Loparco, F.; Marangelli, B.; Mazziotta, M.N.; Mirizzi, N.; Raino, S.; Spinelli, P.; /Bari U. /INFN, Bari

    2007-02-15

    The GLAST Large Area Telescope (LAT) is a high energy gamma ray observatory, mounted on a satellite that will be own in 2007. The LAT tracker consists of an array of tower modules, equipped with planes of silicon strip detectors (SSDs) interleaved with tungsten converter layers. Photon detection is based on the pair conversion process; silicon strip detectors will reconstruct tracks of electrons and positrons. The instrument is actually being assembled. The first towers have been already tested and integrated at Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). An overview of the integration stages of the main components of the tracker and a description of the pre-launch tests will be given. Experimental results on the performance of the tracker towers will be also discussed.

  14. The Search for Milky Way Halo Substructure WIMP Annihilations Using the GLAST LAT

    SciTech Connect

    Wai, Larry; /SLAC

    2007-02-05

    The GLAST LAT Collaboration is one among several experimental groups, covering a wide range of approaches, pursuing the search for the nature of dark matter. The GLAST LAT has the unique ability to find new sources of high energy gamma radiation emanating directly from WIMP annihilations in situ in the universe. Using it's wide band spectral and full sky spatial capabilities, the GLAST LAT can form ''images'' in high energy gamma-rays of dark matter substructures in the gamma-ray sky. We describe a preliminary feasibility study for indirect detection of milky way dark matter satellites using the GLAST LAT.

  15. Studying Gamma-Ray Blazars With the GLAST-LAT

    SciTech Connect

    Lott, B.; Carson, J.; Madejski, G.; Ciprini, S.; Dermer, C.D.; Giommi, P.; Lonjou, V.; Reimer, A.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2007-11-13

    Thanks to its sensitivity (4 10{sup -9} ph (E> 100 MeV) cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} for one year of observation), the GLAST LAT should detect many more (over a thousand) gamma-ray blazars than currently known. This large blazar sample will enable detailed population studies to be carried out. Moreover, the LAT large field-of-view combined with the scanning mode will provide a very uniform exposure over the sky, allowing a constant monitoring of several tens of blazars and flare alerts to be issued. This poster presents the LAT performance relevant to blazar studies, more particularly related to timing and spectral properties. Major specific issues regarding the blazar phenomenon that the LAT data should shed light on thanks to these capabilities will be discussed, as well as the different approaches foreseen to address them. The associated data required in other bands, to be collected in contemporaneous/simultaneous multiwavelength campaigns are mentioned as well.

  16. Analysis of Burst Observations by GLAST's LAT Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Band, David L.; Digel, Seth W.

    2003-01-01

    Analyzing data from GLAST's Large Area Telescope (LAT) will require sophisticated techniques. The PSF and effective area are functions of both photon energy and the position in the field-of-view. During most of the mission the observatory will survey the sky continuously and thus the LAT will detect each count from a source at a different detector orientation; each count requires its own response function! The likelihood as a function of celestial position and photon energy will be the foundation of the standard analysis techniques. However the 20 MeV-300 GeV emission at the time of the approx.100 keV burst emission (timescale of approx.10 s) can be isolated and analyzed because essentially no non-burst counts are expected within a PSF radius of the burst location during the burst. Both binned and unbinned (in energy) spectral fitting will be possible. Longer timescale afterglow emission will require the likelihood analysis that will be used for persistent sources.

  17. Performance of the GLAST/LAT for the Observation of GRB Spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Komin, Nukri; Piron, Frederic

    2007-07-12

    GLAST is a gamma-ray mission which will be launched in autumn 2007. It is equipped with the GLAST Burst Monitor (GBM) which detects GRBs with high reliability and provides a position and energy spectrum in the range between 10 keV and 25 MeV. The Large Area Telescope (LAT) will observe photons with energies from 20 MeV up to more than 300 GeV.Here we present a systematic study of the performance of the LAT for the reconstruction of the energy spectrum of Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs), based on the simulation of 1 year of data taking. We focus on deviations from a pure power-law photon spectrum (exponential cut-offs). This feature can provide insight in the particle acceleration mechanisms at work in GRBs; and it can be used to probe the Extra-Galactic Background Light.

  18. The Synergy between the LAT and GBM in GLAST's Study of Gamma-Ray Bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Band, David L.

    2007-01-01

    Using semi-analytic calculations I characterize the gamma-ray bursts to which GLAST's LAT and GBM detectors will be sensitive. The thresholds of both instruments are at approximately the same vfv proportional to E(sup 2)N(E) values, i.e., the thresholds can be connected by an E(sup -2) spectrum. Therefore simultaneous detections by both instruments will be biased towards spectral components flatter than E(sup -2).

  19. The Synergy between the LAT and GBM in GLAST's Study of Gamma-Ray Bursts

    SciTech Connect

    Band, David L.

    2007-07-12

    Using semi-analytic calculations I characterize the gamma-ray bursts to which GLAST's LAT and GBM detectors will be sensitive. The thresholds of both instruments are at approximately the same {nu}f{nu} {proportional_to} E2N(E) values, i.e., the thresholds can be connected by an E-2 spectrum. Therefore simultaneous detections by both instruments will be biased towards spectral components flatter than E-2.

  20. First Results From GLAST-LAT Integrated Towers Cosmic Ray Data Taking And Monte Carlo Comparison

    SciTech Connect

    Brigida, M.; Caliandro, A.; Favuzzi, C.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Giordano, F.; Giglietto, N.; Loparco, F.; Marangelli, B.; Mazziotta, M.N.; Mirizzi, N.; Raino, S.; Spinelli, P.; /Bari U. /INFN, Bari

    2007-02-15

    GLAST Large Area Telescope (LAT) is a gamma ray telescope instrumented with silicon-strip detector planes and sheets of converter, followed by a calorimeter (CAL) and surrounded by an anticoincidence system (ACD). This instrument is sensitive to gamma rays in the energy range between 20 MeV and 300 GeV. At present, the first towers have been integrated and pre-launch data taking with cosmic ray muons is being performed. The results from the data analysis carried out during LAT integration will be discussed and a comparison with the predictions from the Monte Carlo simulation will be shown.

  1. The GLAST Mission: Using Scintillating Fibers as Both the Tracker and the Calorimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisman, Gerald J.

    1997-01-01

    The Gamma-Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) has been identified as the next major NASA mission in gamma-ray astronomy. It will operate at energies above 20 MeV to study some of the most energetic objects in the Universe. While the baseline tracker detector for GLAST during the study phase is based on silicon strips, we believe that scintillating fibers have considerable advantages for this purpose. Among the performance advantages are: larger effective area, better angular resolution at low energies and larger field of view. Practical advantages include: lower cost, the use of a common technology for both the tracker and the calorimeter, lower power consumption, and a simplified thermal design. Several alternative readout schemes for the fibers are under study.

  2. Gamma Ray Bursts And Data Challenge One: Searching GRB in One Week of Simulated GLAST LAT Data

    SciTech Connect

    Longo, F.; Omodei, N.; Band, D.; Bonnell, J.T.; Brigida, M.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Giannitrapani, R.; Kamae, T.; Norris, J.P.; Winai, M.; /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Siena U. /INFN, Pisa /NASA, Goddard /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /SLAC /Udine U.

    2006-02-22

    GLAST (Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope) is a gamma-ray astronomy mission that will be launched in mid 2007. The main instrument is the LAT (Large Area Telescope), a pair conversion telescope with sensitivity in the range 20 MeV-300 GeV. Data Challenge One (DC1) was the simulation of one week of observation of the entire gamma-ray sky by the LAT detector. the simulated data was similar to the real data, which allowed for the development of scientific software. In this paper they present the GRB simulations and the detection algorithms developed by the GLAST GRB and Solar Flare Science Team.

  3. Glast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloom, E. D.

    Recent results from the Energetic Gamma-Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET) aboard the Compton Observatory have generated strong interest in space based high-energy (Egamma greater than 10 MeV) gamma ray astronomy. This science has wetted the authors' curiosity of what might be observed with an instrument having considerably more capability than EGRET, if such a device were practical in these fiscally difficult times. Advances in silicon technology over the past decade, and the resulting rapid drop in costs, encourage the development of a dramatically new type of high-energy gamma ray space telescope based on silicon strip technology. The GLAST team (GLAST stands for Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope) has been working for the past two years on the design of such an instrument, and the development of the silicon strip hardware and readout electronics needed to realize this design. As in previous high-energy instruments, GLAST is a pair spectrometer backed by a total absorption electro-magnetic shower counter. Measurement of the energy and direction of the induced electro-magnetic shower provides information about the energy and direction of the incident gamma-ray. However, due to the flexibility and relatively low cost of the silicon strip technology, the telescope has about a factor of 10 increase in effective area over EGRET, and about a factor of 5 increase in field of view. At the same time, the GLAST design is calculated to have much better point source sensitivity, and to have an energy range of 10 MeV less than Egamma less than 300 GeV. Due to the economics of silicon technology, along with weight, and size savings compared to gas based detector technology, the authors estimate that this instrument can be built and flown as a Delta II mission. Thus, GLAST would easily fit into the NASA intermediate category with an estimated total cost of about $200 million.

  4. GRB Simulations in GLAST

    SciTech Connect

    Omodei, Nicola; Battelino, Milan; Komin, Nukri; Longo, Francesco; McEnery, Julie; Norris, Jay; Ryde, Felix

    2007-05-01

    The Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST), scheduled to be launched in fall of 2007, is the next generation satellite for high-energy gamma-ray astronomy. The Large Area Telescope (LAT) is a pair conversion telescope built with a high precision silicon tracker, a segmented CsI electromagnetic calorimeter and a plastic anticoincidence shield. The LAT will survey the sky in the energy range between 20 MeV to more than 300 GeV, shedding light on many issues left open by its highly successful predecessor EGRET. LAT will observe Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRB) in an energy range never explored before; to tie these frontier observations to the better-known properties at lower energies, a second instrument, the GLAST Burst Monitor (GBM) will provide important spectra and timing in the 10 keV to 30 MeV range. We briefly present the instruments onboard the GLAST satellite, their synergy in the GRB observations and the work done so far by the collaboration in simulation, analysis, and GRB sensitivity estimation.

  5. GRB Simulations in GLAST

    SciTech Connect

    Omodei, Nicola; Battelino, Milan; Komin, Nukri; Longo, Francesco; McEnery, Julie; Ryde, Felix; /Denver U.

    2007-10-22

    The Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST), scheduled to be launched in fall of 2007, is the next generation satellite for high-energy gamma-ray astronomy. The Large Area Telescope (LAT) is a pair conversion telescope built with a high precision silicon tracker, a segmented CsI electromagnetic calorimeter and a plastic anticoincidence shield. The LAT will survey the sky in the energy range between 20 MeV to more than 300 GeV, shedding light on many issues left open by its highly successful predecessor EGRET. LAT will observe Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRB) in an energy range never explored before; to tie these frontier observations to the better-known properties at lower energies, a second instrument, the GLAST Burst Monitor (GBM) will provide important spectra and timing in the 10 keV to 30 MeV range. We briefly present the instruments onboard the GLAST satellite, their synergy in the GRB observations and the work done so far by the collaboration in simulation, analysis, and GRB sensitivity estimation.

  6. The Use of Weighting in Periodicity Searches in All-Sky Monitor Data: Applications to the GLAST LAT

    SciTech Connect

    Corbet, Robin; Dubois, Richard; /SLAC

    2009-06-25

    The light curves produced by all-sky monitors, such as the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer All-Sky Monitor and the Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT), generally have non-uniform error bars. In searching for periodic modulation in this type of data using power spectra it can be important to use appropriate weighting of data points to achieve the best sensitivity. It was recently demonstrated that for Swift BAT data a simple weighting scheme can actually sometimes reduce the sensitivity of the power spectrum depending on source brightness. Instead, a modified weighting scheme, based on the Cochran semi-weighted mean, gives improved results independent of source brightness. We investigate the benefits of weighting power spectra in period searches using simulated GLAST LAT observations of {gamma}-ray binaries.

  7. Searching for Dark Matter Signatures in the GLAST LAT Electron Flux

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moiseev, Alexander; Profumo, Stefano

    2008-01-01

    We explored several viable scenarios of how LAT might observe DM, when the spectral feature is predicted to be observed in the HE electron flux It has been demonstrated elsewhere that LAT will be capable to detect HE electrons flux in energy range from 20 GeV to - 1 TeV with 520% energy resolution and good statistics If there is a DM-caused feature in the HE electron flux (in the range 20 GeV - 1 TeV), LAT will be the best current instrument to observe it!

  8. The Diffuse Galactic Gamma-Ray Emission Model for GLAST LAT

    SciTech Connect

    Porter, T.A.; Digel, S.W.; Grenier, I.A.; Moskalenko, I.V.; Strong, A.W.; /Garching, Max Planck Inst., MPE

    2007-06-13

    Diffuse emission from the Milky Way dominates the gamma-ray sky. About 80% of the high-energy luminosity of the Milky Way comes from processes in the interstellar medium. The Galactic diffuse emission traces interactions of energetic particles, primarily protons and electrons, with the interstellar gas and radiation field, thus delivering information about cosmic-ray spectra and interstellar mass in distant locations. Additionally, the Galactic diffuse emission is the celestial foreground for the study of gamma-ray point sources and the extragalactic diffuse gamma-ray emission. We will report on the latest developments in the modeling of the Galactic diffuse emission, which will be used for the Gamma Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) investigations.

  9. Gamma-Ray Large Area Space Telescope- GLAST Mission Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moiseev, Alexander A.

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST), and the instrumentation that will be on the spacecraft: Large Area Telescope (LAT) and GLAST Burst Monitor (GBM). The presentation revierws in detail the LAT instrument.

  10. A Comprehensive Approach to Gamma-Ray Source Identification in the GLAST-LAT Era

    SciTech Connect

    Caraveo, Patrizia A.; Reimer, Olaf; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2007-11-13

    Unveiling the nature of a vast number of unidentified sources is the most compelling problem facing today's high-energy (MeV-to-GeV) gamma-ray astronomy. However, unidentified sources are not peculiar to high-energy gamma-ray astronomy, they have been an ever-present phenomenon in astronomy. Indeed, every time a new astronomical window was opened, astronomers found sources they were not able to identify, i.e. to associate with previously known objects. This can happen either because such sources belong to a genuinely new (thus unknown) class or because their positions are not known accurately enough to allow for an unambiguous association between the newly found emitter and a known object. Thus, the lack of identification is frequently ascribed to poor angular resolution. Being unidentified, however, is a 'temporary' status: sooner or later better tools will allow the source identification, i.e. either its classification within a given class of astronomical objects or its recognition as belonging to a new class. Owing to the intrinsic limitations of gamma-ray detection technique, however, the instruments' angular resolution has not yet reached the minimum level required to permit the transition from the unidentified limbo to the paradise of known objects, thus creating a continuing unidentified high-energy gamma-ray source problem. Different approaches towards source identification have been pursued in the past. Here we will review the state of the art as well as the strategies devised for the GLAST era.

  11. The GLAST Burst Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meegan, Charles; Bhat, Narayana; Connaughton, Valerie; Briggs, Michael; Diehl, Roland; Fishman, Gerald; Greiner, Jochen; Kippen, R. Marc; vonKienlin, Andreas; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Lichti, Giselher; Paciesas, William; Preece, Robert; Steinle, Helmut; Wilson-Hodge, Colleen

    2007-01-01

    The GLAST Burst Monitor (GBM) comprises an array of NaI and BGO scintillation detectors designed to enhance the scientific return from GLAST in the study of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). By observing in the 10 keV to 30 MeV energy range, GBM extends the spectral coverage of GRBs more than 3 decades below the LAT energy threshold. GBM computes burst locations on-board, allowing repointing of the GLAST Observatory to place strong bursts within the LAT field-of-view to observe delayed high-energy emission.

  12. The GLAST Burst Monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Meegan, Charles; Fishman, Gerald; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Wilson-Hodge, Colleen; Bhat, Narayana; Connaughton, Valerie; Briggs, Michael; Paciesas, William; Preece, Robert; Diehl, Roland; Greiner, Jochen; Kienlin, Andreas von; Lichti, Giselher; Steinle, Helmut; Kippen, R. Marc

    2007-07-12

    The GLAST Burst Monitor (GBM) comprises an array of NaI and BGO scintillation detectors designed to enhance the scientific return from GLAST in the study of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). By observing in the 10 keV to 30 MeV energy range, GBM extends the spectral coverage of GRBs more than 3 decades below the LAT energy threshold. GBM computes burst locations on-board, allowing repointing of the GLAST Observatory to place strong bursts within the LAT field-of-view to observe delayed high-energy emission.

  13. GLAST's GBM Burst Trigger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Band, D.; Briggs, M.; Connaughton, V.; Kippen, M.; Preece, R.

    2003-01-01

    The GLAST Burst Monitor (GBM) will detect and localize bursts for the GLAST mission, and provide the spectral and temporal context in the traditional 10 keV to 25 MeV band for the high energy observations by the Large Area Telescope (LAT). The GBM will use traditional rate triggers in up to three energy bands, and on a variety of timescales between 16 ms and 16 s.

  14. GLAST's GBM Burst Trigger

    SciTech Connect

    Band, D.; Kippen, M.

    2004-09-28

    The GLAST Burst Monitor (GBM) will detect and localize bursts for the GLAST mission, and provide the spectral and temporal context in the traditional 10 keV to 25 MeV band for the high energy observations by the Large Area Telescope (LAT). The GBM will use traditional rate triggers in up to three energy bands, and on a variety of timescales between 16 ms and 16 s.

  15. GLAST GRB Observations and Capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meegan, Charles

    2008-01-01

    Gamma Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) is schedule to launch on May 16, 2008. GLAST consists of the Large Area Telescope (LAT), which will detect gamma rays above 20 MeV with unprecedented sensitivity, and the GLAST Burst Monitor (GBM), which will provide all-sky monitoring of GRBS in the 10 kev to 30 MeV range. Predicted GRB capabilities of GLAST will be described. The on-orbit performance of the instruments and preliminary GRB observations will be presented.

  16. The GLAST Background Model

    SciTech Connect

    Ormes, J.F.; Atwood, W.; Burnett, T.; Grove, E.; Longo, F.; McEnery, J.; Mizuno, T.; Ritz, S.; /NASA, Goddard

    2007-10-17

    In order to estimate the ability of the GLAST/LAT to reject unwanted background of charged particles, optimize the on-board processing, size the required telemetry and optimize the GLAST orbit, we developed a detailed model of the background particles that would affect the LAT. In addition to the well-known components of the cosmic radiation, we included splash and reentrant components of protons, electrons (e+ and e-) from 10 MeV and beyond as well as the albedo gamma rays produced by cosmic ray interactions with the atmosphere. We made estimates of the irreducible background components produced by positrons and hadrons interacting in the multilayered micrometeorite shield and spacecraft surrounding the LAT and note that because the orbital debris has increased, the shielding required and hence the background are larger than were present in EGRET. Improvements to the model are currently being made to include the east-west effect.

  17. The GLAST Background Model

    SciTech Connect

    Ormes, J. F.; Atwood, W.; Burnett, T.; Grove, E.; Longo, F.; McEnery, J.; Ritz, S.; Mizuno, T.

    2007-07-12

    In order to estimate the ability of the GLAST/LAT to reject unwanted background of charged particles, optimize the on-board processing, size the required telemetry and optimize the GLAST orbit, we developed a detailed model of the background particles that would affect the LAT. In addition to the well-known components of the cosmic radiation, we included splash and reentrant components of protons, electrons (e+ and e-) from 10 MeV and beyond as well as the albedo gamma rays produced by cosmic ray interactions with the atmosphere. We made estimates of the irreducible background components produced by positrons and hadrons interacting in the multilayered micrometeorite shield and spacecraft surrounding the LAT and note that because the orbital debris has increased, the shielding required and hence the background are larger than were present in EGRET. Improvements to the model are currently being made to include the east-west effect.

  18. Design and Characteristics of the Anticoincidence Detector for the GLAST Large Area Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moiseev, A. A.; Hartman, R. C.; Johnson, T. E.; Ormes, J. F.; Thompson, D. J.

    2005-01-01

    The Anti-Coincidence Detector (ACD) is the outermost detector layer in the GLAST Large Area Telescope (LAT), surrounding the top and sides of the tracker. The purpose of the ACD is to detect and veto incident cosmic ray charged particles, which outnumber cosmic gamma rays by 3-4 orders of magnitude. The challenge in ACD design is that it must have high (0.9997) detection efficiency for singly charged relativistic particles, but must also have low sensitivity to backsplash particles. These are products of high- energy interactions in the LAT calorimeter. They can cause a veto signal in the ACD, resulting in loss of good gamma-ray events.

  19. The GLAST Burst Monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Bhat, P.N.; Briggs, M.S.; Connaughton, V.; Paciesas, W.S.; Preece, R.D.; Meegan, C.A.; Fishman, G.J.; Wilson, R.B.; Lichti, G.G.; Diehl, R.; Greiner, J.; Schoenfelder, V.; Kienlin, A. von; Kippen, R.M.; Kouveliotou, C.

    2004-09-28

    The Gamma Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) mission is a followup to the successful EGRET experiment onboard the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO). It will provide a high-sensitivity survey of the sky in high-energy {gamma}-rays, and will perform detailed observations of persistent and transient sources. There are two experiments onboard the GLAST - the Large Area Telescope (LAT) and the GLAST Burst Monitor (GBM).The primary mission of the GBM instrument is to support the LAT in observing {gamma}-ray bursts (GRBs) by providing low-energy measurements with high time resolution and rapid burst locations over a large field-of-view ({>=} 8 sr). The GBM will complement the LAT measurements by observing GRBs in the energy range 10 keV to 30 MeV, the region of the spectral turnover in most GRBs. An important objective of the GBM is to compute the locations of GRB sources on-board the spacecraft and quickly communicate them to the LAT and to the ground to allow rapid followup observations. This information may be used to re-point the LAT towards particularly interesting burst sources that occurred outside its field-of-view. The GBM consists of 14 uncollimated scintillation detectors coupled to phototubes to measure {gamma}-ray energies and time profiles. Two types of detectors are used to obtain spectral information over a wide energy range: 12 NaI(Tl) detectors (10 keV to 1 MeV), and 2 BGO detectors (150 keV to 30 MeV). The detectors are distributed around the GLAST spacecraft to provide a large, unobstructed field of view. The 12 NaI(Tl) detectors are mounted with different orientations for use in locating GRB sources.

  20. Gamma-Ray Pulsar Studies with GLAST

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, David J.

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the prospects of extending the understanding of gamma ray pulsars, and answering the open questions left from the limited observations that are available from current observatories. There are 2 new gamma ray observatories that are either on orbit or will be shortly launched: (1) Astro-rivelatore Gamma a Immagini LEggero (AGILE), and Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST). On board GLAST there will be two instruments Large Area Telescope (LAT), and GLAST Burst Monitor (GBM).

  1. GLAST: Physics Goals And Instrument Status

    SciTech Connect

    Carson, Jennifer E.; /SLAC

    2006-11-07

    The Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) is a space-based observatory scheduled to launch in October 2007 with two instruments: (1) the GLAST Burst Monitor (GBM), sensitive to photon energies between 8 keV and 25 MeV and optimized to detect gamma-ray bursts, and (2) the Large Area Telescope (LAT), sensitive to gamma rays between 20 MeV and 300 GeV and designed to survey the gamma-ray sky with unprecedented sensitivity. We describe the LAT and the GBM. We then focus on the LAT's capabilities for studying active galactic nuclei.

  2. The GLAST Burst Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meegan, Charles A.

    2004-01-01

    The Gamma Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) observatory, scheduled for launch in 2007, comprises the Large Area Telescope (LAT) and the GLAST Burst Monitor (GBM). spectral changes that are known to occur within GRBs. between the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, the University of Alabama in Huntsville, and the Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics. It consists of an array of NaI and BGO scintillation detectors operating in the 10 kev to 25 MeV range. The field of view includes the entire unocculted sky when the observatory is pointing close to the zenith. The GBM will enhance LAT observations of GRBs by extending the spectral coverage into the range of current GRB databases, and will provide a trigger for reorienting the spacecraft to observe delayed emission from bursts outside the LAT field of view. GBM is expected to trigger on about 200 bursts per year, and will provide on-board locations of strong bursts accurate to better than 10 degrees.

  3. The GLAST Large Area Telescope Detector Performance Monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Borgland, A.W.; Charles, E.; /SLAC

    2007-10-16

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT) is one of two instruments on board the Gamma-ray Large Area Telescope (GLAST), the next generation high energy gamma-ray space telescope. The LAT contains sixteen identical towers in a four-by-four grid. Each tower contains a silicon-strip tracker and a CsI calorimeter that together will give the incident direction and energy of the pair-converting photon in the energy range 20 MeV - 300 GeV. In addition, the instrument is covered by a finely segmented Anti-Coincidence Detector (ACD) to reject charged particle background. Altogether, the LAT contains more than 864k channels in the trackers, 1536 CsI crystals and 97 ACD plastic scintillator tiles and ribbons. Here we detail some of the strategies and methods for how we are planning to monitor the instrument performance on orbit. It builds on the extensive experience gained from Integration & Test and Commissioning of the instrument on ground.

  4. GLAST large area telescope - daily survey of high energy sky

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamae, Tuneyoshi

    2003-07-01

    GLAST Large Area Telescope was proposed to NASA in 1999 as a follow-up of EGRET on-board Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory by an international collaboration. The proposal has been approved as a part of the GLAST observatory mission in its capability to explore a wide range of astrophysics with 5-40 times higher sensitivity and extended energy coverage (20MeV to 300GeV) than EGRET. The instrument consists of 16 towers of e+e- pair tracker, 16 blocks of segmented electro-magnetic calorimeter, and a set of anti-coicidence plastic scintillator tiles covering the tracker towers. It will have 5-10 times larger on-axis effective area, 6 times wider field-of-view (FOV), and up to 5 times better angular resolution when compared with EGRET. The Large Area Telescope will cover about 40% of the sky above the Earth's horizon in its FOV at any given time and will scan nearly the entire Universe every orbit (~ 90min): about 20% of Gamma-Ray Bursts will be observed from the onset of the bursts to the initial after-glow phase; all longer-lasting transients and variabilities will be detected daily at the improved sensitivity. The instrument has been prototyped twice between 1995 and 2001, designed almost to the Flight Model by the international collaboration of the US (NASA and DoE), France, Italy, Japan, and Sweden. The first prototype consisted of one tower of e+e- pair trackers, one block of segmented calorimeters and a smaller set of anti-coicidence plastic scintillator tiles (Beam Test Engineering Model, BTEM), which was put into e+, p, and γ beams at SLAC in the winter of 1999-2000. It was subsequently modified for a balloon experiment (Balloon Flight Engineering Model, BFEM) and flown at Palestine, Texas in August 2001. Data collected in the test experiments have been analyzed and compared with predictions of computer simulation codes such as Geant4. These studies have confirmed validity of the basic design, brought up a few issues for further improvement, and gathered data on

  5. Dark Matter Searches With GLAST

    SciTech Connect

    Wai, Lawrence; Nuss, E.

    2007-02-05

    Indirect detection of particle dark matter relies upon pair annihilation of Weakly Interaction Massive Particles (WIMPs), which is complementary to the well known techniques of direct detection (WIMP-nucleus scattering) and collider production (WIMP pair production). Pair annihilation of WIMPs results in the production of gamma-rays, neutrinos, and anti-matter. Of the various experiments sensitive to indirect detection of dark matter, the Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) may play the most crucial role in the next few years. After launch in late 2007, The GLAST Large Area Telescope (LAT) will survey the gamma-ray sky in the energy range of 20MeV-300GeV. By eliminating charged particle background above 100 MeV, GLAST may be sensitive to as yet to be observed Milky Way dark matter subhalos, as well as WIMP pair annihilation spectral lines from the Milky Way halo. Discovery of gamma-ray signals from dark matter in the Milky Way would not only demonstrate the particle nature of dark matter; it would also open a new observational window on galactic dark matter substructure. Location of new dark matter sources by GLAST would dramatically alter the experimental landscape; ground based gamma ray telescopes could follow up on the new GLAST sources with precision measurements of the WIMP pair annihilation spectrum.

  6. Gamma-Ray Burst Physics with GLAST

    SciTech Connect

    Omodei, N.; /INFN, Pisa

    2006-10-06

    The Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) is an international space mission that will study the cosmos in the energy range 10 keV-300 GeV, the upper end of which is one of the last poorly observed region of the celestial electromagnetic spectrum. The ancestor of the GLAST/LAT was the Energetic Gamma Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET) detector, which flew onboard the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO). The amount of information and the step forward that the high energy astrophysics made thanks to its 9 years of observations are impressive. Nevertheless, EGRET uncovered the tip of the iceberg, raising many questions, and it is in the light of EGRET's results that the great potential of the next generation gamma-ray telescope can be appreciated. GLAST will have an imaging gamma-ray telescope, the Large Area Telescope (LAT) vastly more capable than instruments own previously, as well as a secondary instrument, the GLAST Bursts Monitor, or GBM, to augment the study of gamma-ray bursts. Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) science is one of the most exciting challenges for the GLAST mission, exploring the high energy emission of one of the most intense phenomena in the sky, shading light on various problems: from the acceleration of particles to the emission processes, to more exotic physics like Quantum Gravity effect. In this paper we report the work done so far in the simulation development as well as the study of the LAT sensitivity to GRB.

  7. GLAST Burst Monitor Trigger Classification Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perrin, D. J.; Sidman, E. D.; Meegan, C. A.; Briggs, M. S.; Connaughton, V.

    2004-01-01

    The Gamma Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST), currently set for launch in the first quarter of 2007, will consist of two instruments, the GLAST Burst Monitor (GBM) and the Large Area Telescope (LAT). One of the goals of the GBM is to identify and locate gamma-ray bursts using on-board software. The GLAST observatory can then be re-oriented to allow observations by the LAT. A Bayesian analysis will be used to distinguish gamma-ray bursts from other triggering events, such as solar flares, magnetospheric particle precipitation, soft gamma repeaters (SGRs), and Cygnus X-1 flaring. The trigger parameters used in the analysis are the burst celestial coordinates, angle from the Earth's horizon, spectral hardness, and the spacecraft geomagnetic latitude. The algorithm will be described and the results of testing will be presented.

  8. Galactic Variable Sky with EGRET and GLAST

    SciTech Connect

    Digel, S.W.; /SLAC

    2006-11-28

    The characteristics of the largely-unidentified Galactic sources of gamma rays that were detected by EGRET are reviewed. Proposed source populations that may have the correct spatial, spectral, luminosity, and variability properties to be the origins of the EGRET sources are also presented. Finally, the prospects for studying Galactic gamma-ray sources with the GLAST LAT are reviewed.

  9. GLAST Large Area Telescope Multiwavelength Opportunities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, David

    2008-01-01

    The Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) is scheduled for launch this year. Because the GLAST Large Area Telescope (LAT) has a huge field of view and the GLAST Observatory will be operated in scanning mode, it will survey the entire sky daily. The GLAST Mission and the LAT Collaboration invite cooperative efforts from theorists and observers at all wavelengths to help optimize the science. Possible topics include: (1) Blazars: These Active Galactic Nuclei are expected to be a major source class for LAT. Identifying new blazars, monitoring their variability, and joining programs to carry out planned or Target of Opportunity multiwavelength campaigns will all be important activities. The study of AGN gamma-ray jets can help link the accretion processes close to the black hole with the large-scale interaction of the AGN with its environment. (2) Unidentified Gamma-ray Sources: Modeling of possible gamma-ray sources is important to establish testable hypotheses. New gamma-ray sources need first to be identified with known objects by position, spectrum, or time variability, and then multiwavelength studies can be used to explore the astrophysical implications of high-energy radiation from these sources. The LAT team is committed to releasing a preliminary source list about six months after the start of science operations.

  10. Gamma-Ray Pulsar Studies with GLAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, D. J.

    2008-02-01

    Some pulsars have their maximum observable energy output in the gamma-ray band, offering the possibility of using these high-energy photons as probes of the particle acceleration and interaction processes in pulsar magnetospheres. After an extended hiatus between satellite missions, the recently-launched AGILE mission and the upcoming Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) Large Area Telescope (LAT) will allow gamma-ray tests of the theoretical models developed based on past discoveries. With its greatly improved sensitivity, better angular resolution, and larger energy reach than older instruments, GLAST LAT should detect dozens to hundreds of new gamma-ray pulsars and measure luminosities, light curves, and phase-resolved spectra with unprecedented resolution. It will also have the potential to find radio-quiet pulsars like Geminga, using blind search techniques. Cooperation with radio and X-ray pulsar astronomers is an important aspect of the LAT team's planning for pulsar studies.

  11. Gamma-Ray Pulsar Studies With GLAST

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, D.J.; /NASA, Goddard

    2011-11-23

    Some pulsars have their maximum observable energy output in the gamma-ray band, offering the possibility of using these high-energy photons as probes of the particle acceleration and interaction processes in pulsar magnetospheres. After an extended hiatus between satellite missions, the recently-launched AGILE mission and the upcoming Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) Large Area Telescope (LAT) will allow gamma-ray tests of the theoretical models developed based on past discoveries. With its greatly improved sensitivity, better angular resolution, and larger energy reach than older instruments, GLAST LAT should detect dozens to hundreds of new gamma-ray pulsars and measure luminosities, light curves, and phase-resolved spectra with unprecedented resolution. It will also have the potential to find radio-quiet pulsars like Geminga, using blind search techniques. Cooperation with radio and X-ray pulsar astronomers is an important aspect of the LAT team's planning for pulsar studies.

  12. Gamma-Ray Pulsar Studies with GLAST

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, D. J.

    2008-02-27

    Some pulsars have their maximum observable energy output in the gamma-ray band, offering the possibility of using these high-energy photons as probes of the particle acceleration and interaction processes in pulsar magnetospheres. After an extended hiatus between satellite missions, the recently-launched AGILE mission and the upcoming Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) Large Area Telescope (LAT) will allow gamma-ray tests of the theoretical models developed based on past discoveries. With its greatly improved sensitivity, better angular resolution, and larger energy reach than older instruments, GLAST LAT should detect dozens to hundreds of new gamma-ray pulsars and measure luminosities, light curves, and phase-resolved spectra with unprecedented resolution. It will also have the potential to find radio-quiet pulsars like Geminga, using blind search techniques. Cooperation with radio and X-ray pulsar astronomers is an important aspect of the LAT team's planning for pulsar studies.

  13. Serving Data to the GLAST Users Community

    SciTech Connect

    Stephens, Thomas E.

    2007-07-12

    The scientific community will access the public GLAST data through the website of the GLAST Science Support Center (GSSC). For most data products the GSSC website will link to the NASA High Energy Astrophysics Science Archive Research Center's (HEASARC) Browse interface, which will actually serve the data. For example, data from the GLAST Burst Monitor (GBM) from a given burst will be packaged together and accessible through Browse. However, the photon and event data produced by the Large Area Telescope (LAT), GLAST's primary instrument, will be distributed through a custom GSSC interface. These data will be collected over the LAT's large field-of-view, usually while the LAT is scanning the sky, and thus photons from a particular direction cannot be attributed to a single 'observation' in the traditional sense. Users will request all photons detected from a region on the sky over a specified time and energy range. Through its website the GSSC will also provide long and short term science timelines, spacecraft position and attitude histories, exposure maps and other scientific data products. The different data products provided by the GSSC will be described.

  14. Gamma Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) Balloon Flight Engineering Model: Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, D. J.; Godfrey, G.; Williams, S. M.; Grove, J. E.; Mizuno, T.; Sadrozinski, H. F.-W.; Kamae, T.; Ampe, J.; Briber, Stuart; Dann, James; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The Gamma Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) Large Area Telescope (LAT) is a pair-production high-energy (greater than 20 MeV) gamma-ray telescope being built by an international partnership of astrophysicists and particle physicists for a satellite launch in 2006, designed to study a wide variety of high-energy astrophysical phenomena. As part of the development effort, the collaboration has built a Balloon Flight Engineering Model (BFEM) for flight on a high-altitude scientific balloon. The BFEM is approximately the size of one of the 16 GLAST-LAT towers and contains all the components of the full instrument: plastic scintillator anticoincidence system (ACD), high-Z foil/Si strip pair-conversion tracker (TKR), CsI hodoscopic calorimeter (CAL), triggering and data acquisition electronics (DAQ), commanding system, power distribution, telemetry, real-time data display, and ground data processing system. The principal goal of the balloon flight was to demonstrate the performance of this instrument configuration under conditions similar to those expected in orbit. Results from a balloon flight from Palestine, Texas, on August 4, 2001, show that the BFEM successfully obtained gamma-ray data in this high-background environment.

  15. GLAST Status and Application to Microquasars

    SciTech Connect

    Dubois, Richard; /SLAC

    2006-11-15

    The Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) is a next generation high energy gamma-ray observatory due for launch in Fall 2007. The primary instrument is the Large Area Telescope (LAT), which will measure gamma-ray flux and spectra from 20 MeV to > 300 GeV and is a successor to the highly successful EGRET experiment on CGRO. The LAT will have better angular resolution, greater effective area, wider field of view and broader energy coverage than any previous experiment in this energy range. An overview of the LAT instrument design and construction is presented which includes performance estimates with particular emphasis on how these apply to studies of microquasars. The nature and quality of the data that will be provided by the LAT is described with results from recent detailed simulations that illustrate the potential of the LAT to observe gamma ray variability and spectra.

  16. Observing Gamma-ray Bursts with GLAST

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McEnery, Julie

    2008-01-01

    The Gamma-ray Large Area Telescope (GLAST) is a satellite-based observatory to study the high-energy gamma-ray sky. The Large Area Telescope, the main instrument, is a pair-conversion telescope which will survey the sky in the energy range 20 MeV to greater than 300 GeV. The LAT's wide field of view (greater than 2 sr), large effective area and low deadtime combine to provide excellent high-energy gamma-ray observations of GRB. To tie these frontier high-energy observations to the better-known properties at lower energies, a second instrument, the GLAST Burst Monitor (GBM) will provide important spectra and timing in the 8 keV to 30 MeV range. Upon detection of a GRB by the LAT or the GBM, the spacecraft can autonomously repoint to keep the GRB location within the LAT field of view, allowing high-energy afterglow observations. We describe how the instruments, spacecraft, and ground system work together to provide observations of gamma-ray bursts from 8 keV to over 300 GeV and provide rapid notification of these observations to the wider gamma-ray burst community. Analysis and simulation tools dedicated to the GRB science have been developed. In this contribution we show the expected LAT sensitivity obtained with such simulations, and illustrate the results we expect from GLAST observations with spectral and temporal analysis of simulated GRB.

  17. The GLAST Guest Investigator Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Band, David L.

    2007-01-01

    We provide an overview of the GLAST Guest Investigator (GI) program, which will support basic research relevant to the GLAST mission in yearly cycles beginning approximately two months after launch. Current details about the GLAST GI program will always be posted on the GLAST Science Support Center (GSSC) website: http://glast.gsfc.nasa.gov/ssc/.

  18. GLAST: GeV astronomy in a multiwavelength context

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, David J.

    2004-04-01

    The GLAST Large Area Telescope (LAT), successor to Energetic Gamma-ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET) on the Compton Observatory, will play an important role in multiwavelength studies during the second half of this decade. Operating at energies between 20 MeV and greater than 300 GeV with sensitivity 30 or more times greater than that of EGRET, the LAT will offer good spatial and time resolution over a large (>2 sr) field of view. The LAT will bring insight to the whole range of high-energy γ-ray phenomena, including bursts, active galactic nuclei, pulsars, supernova remnants, diffuse emission and unidentified sources. In essentially all cases, the maximum scientific return will come from coordinated (although not necessarily simultaneous) multiwavelength observations. Particularly with its planned scanning mode of operation, GLAST will have full sky coverage on relatively short time scales. The LAT team looks forward to cooperating with observers at other wavelengths.

  19. LAT and Solar Neutrons: Preliminary estimates

    SciTech Connect

    Longo, Francesco |

    2007-07-12

    GLAST LAT will detect several solar flares in gamma rays. Motivated by the CGRO results on neutrons emitted during a solar flare, we try to estimate the possibility of the LAT to detect solar neutrons. Besides gamma rays, neutrons could indeed interact in the LAT instrument and mimic a gamma-ray signal. An estimate of the contamination of gamma-ray detection in solar flares by the neutron component is given.

  20. Gamma Ray Burst Observations with Swift and GLAST

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gehrels, Neil

    2007-01-01

    The Swift and GLAST missions promise a great increase in our understanding of the gamma-ray universe. Swift was launched in November 2004 with a primary objective to study gamma-ray bursts. All instruments are performing well and more than 200 GRBs have been studied in detail. Major advances have already been made in the areas of short bursts, high redshift events and afterglow physics. The GLAST mission is scheduled for launch in fall 2007. It features a large newtechnology instrument for high energy gamma-ray observations. Hundreds of gamma-ray bursts will be detected by the LAT and GBM instruments. The talk will discuss the GRB science available with GLAST and the opportunities for joint Swift and GLAST observations of bursts.

  1. Expected Performance of the GLAST Burst Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meegan, Charles; Fishman, Gerald; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Wilson-Hodge, Colleen; Paciesas, William; Preece, Robert; Briggs, Michael; Bhat, Narayana; Connaughton, Valerie; Greiner, Jochen; vonKienlin, Andreas; Diehl, Roland; Steinle, Helmut; Bissaldi, Elisabetta; Kippen, R. Marc

    2007-01-01

    The GLAST Burst Monitor (GBM) will enhance LAT observations of GRBs by extending the spectral coverage from the LAT threshold down to approx. 8 kev, and will provide a trigger for re-orienting the spacecraft to observe delayed emission from selected bursts outside the LAT field of view. GBM consists of twelve NaI scintillation detectors operating in the 8 kev to 1 MeV energy range and two BGO scintillation detectors operating in the 150 keV to 30 MeV energy range. Detector resolution, effective area, and angular response have been determined by calibrations. Analyses indicate that the on-board burst threshold will be approx. 0.7 photon/cm2/s and the on-board burst localization accuracy will typically be better than 8 degrees.

  2. Expected Performance of the GLAST Burst Monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Meegan, Charles; Fishman, Gerald; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Wilson-Hodge, Colleen; Bissaldi, Elisabetta; Diehl, Roland; Greiner, Jochen; Kienlin, Andreas von; Lichti, Giselher; Steinle, Helmut; Kippen, R. Marc

    2008-05-22

    The GLAST Burst Monitor (GBM) will enhance LAT observations of GRBs by extending the spectral coverage from the LAT threshold down to {approx}8 keV, and will provide a trigger for re-orienting the spacecraft to observe delayed emission from selected bursts outside the LAT field of view. GBM consists of twelve NaI scintillation detectors operating in the 8 keV to 1 MeV energy range and two BGO scintillation detectors operating in the 150 keV to 30 MeV energy range. Detector resolution, effective area, and angular response have been determined by calibrations. Analyses indicate that the on-board burst threshold will be {approx}0.7 photons cm{sup -2}s{sup -1} and the on-board burst localization accuracy will typically be better than 8 deg.

  3. GLAST Large Area Telescope Multiwavelength Planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, D. J.; Cameron, R. A.; Digel, S. W.; Wood, K. S.

    2006-01-01

    Because gamma-ray astrophysics depends in many ways on multiwavelength studies, the GLAST Large Area Telescope (LAT) Collaboration has started multiwavelength planning well before the scheduled 2007 launch of the observatory. Some of the high-priority needs include: (1) radio and X-ray timing of pulsars; (2) expansion of blazar catalogs, including redshift measurements (3) improved observations of molecular clouds, especially at high galactic latitudes; (4) simultaneous broad-spectrum blazar flare measurements; (5) characterization of gamma-ray transients, including gamma ray bursts; (6) radio, optical, X-ray and TeV counterpart searches for unidentified gamma-ray sources. Work on the first three of these activities is needed before launch. The GLAST Large Area Telescope is an international effort, with U.S. funding provided by the Department of Energy and NASA.

  4. Gev Gamma-ray Astronomy in the Era of GLAST

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gehrels, Neil; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Gamma Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) is a high energy astronomy mission planned for launch in 2005. GLAST features two instruments; the Large Area Telescope (LAT) operating from 20 MeV - 300 GeV and the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) operating from 10 keV - 25 MeV. GLAST observations will contribute to our understanding of active galactic nuclei and their jets, gamma-ray bursts, extragalactic and galactic diffuse emissions, dark matter, supernova remnants, pulsars, and the unidentified high energy gamma-ray sources. The LAT sensitivity is 4 x 10(exp -9) photons per square centimeter per second (greater than 100 MeV) for a one year all-sky survey, which is a factor of greater than 20 better than CGRO/EGRET. GLAST spectral observations of gamma-ray bursts cover over 6 orders of magnitude in energy thanks to the context observations of the GBM. The upper end of the LAT energy range merges with the low energy end of ground-based observatories to provide a remarkable new perspective on particle acceleration in the Universe.

  5. Gamma-Ray Pulsar Candidates for GLAST

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, D. J.

    2008-01-01

    The Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) will be launched this year, and its Large Area Telescope (LAT) is expected to discover scores to hundreds of gamma-ray pulsars. This poster discusses which of the over 1700 known pulsars, mostly visible only at radio frequencies, are likely to emit greater than 100 MeV gamma rays with intensities detectable by the LAT. The main figure of merit used to select gamma-ray pulsar candidates is sqrt(E-dot)/d2, where E-dot is the energy loss due to rotational spin-down, and d is the distance to the pulsar. The figure of merit incorporates spin-down flux at earth (proportional to E-dot/d2) times efficiency, assumed proportional to l/sqrt(E-dot). A few individual objects are cited to illustrate the issues. Since large E-dot pulsars also tend to have large timing noise and occasional glitches, their ephemerides can become inaccurate in weeks to months. To detect and study the gamma-ray emission the photons must be accurately tagged with the pulse phase. With hours to days between gamma-ray photon arrival times from a pulsar and months to years of LAT exposure needed for good detections, GLAST will rely on radio and X-ray timing measurements throughout the continuous gamma-ray observations. The poster will describe efforts to coordinate pulsar timing of the candidate gamma-ray pulsars.

  6. Gamma-Ray Pulsar Candidates for GLAST

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, David J.; Smith, D. A.; Dumora, D.; Guillemot, L.; Parent, D.; Reposeur, T.; Grove, E.; Romani, R. W.; Thorsett, S. E.

    2007-01-01

    The Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) will be launched less than a year from now, and its Large Area Telescope (LAT) is expected to discover scores to hundreds of gamma-ray pulsars. This poster discusses which of the over 1700 known pulsars, mostly visible only at radio Erequencies, are likely to emit greater than l00 MeV gamma rays with intensities detectable by the LAT. The main figure of merit used to select gamma-ray pulsar candidates is sqrt(E-dot)/d^2, where E-dot is the energy loss due to rotational spindown, and d is the distance to the pulsar. The figure of merit incorporates spin-down flux at earth (proportional to E-dot/d^2) times efficiency, assumed proportional to 1/sqrt(E-dot). A few individual objects are cited to illustrate the issues. Since large E-dot pulsars also tend to have large timing noise and occasional glitches, their ephemerides can become inaccurate in weeks to months. To detect and study the gamma-ray emission the photons must be accurately tagged with the pulse phase. With hours to days between gamma-ray photon arrival times from a pulsar and months to years of LAT exposure needed for good detections, GLAST will need timing measurements throughout the continuous gamma-ray observations. The poster will describe efforts to coordinate pulsar timing of the candidate gamma-ray pulsars.

  7. Pulsar Astronomy with GLAST

    SciTech Connect

    Thorsett, Stephen

    2005-09-12

    Despite their name, the rotation powered neutron stars called "radio pulsars" are actually most luminous in the hard x-ray and gamma-ray bands. GLAST will be the first high-energy satellite with sufficient sensitivity to detect and study large numbers of these pulsars. I will review GLAST's key science goals in pulsar astrophysics and summarize the extraordinary advances in low-energy pulsar surveys since the days of CGRO.

  8. Simultaneous Radio to (Sub-) Mm-Monitoring of Variability and Spectral Shape Evolution of Potential GLAST Blazars

    SciTech Connect

    Fuhrmann, L.; Zensus, J.A.; Krichbaum, T.P.; Angelakis, E.; Readhead, A.C.S.; /Caltech

    2011-11-29

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT) instrument onboard GLAST offers a tremendous opportunity for future blazar studies. In order to fully benefit from its capabilities and to maximize the scientific return from the LAT, it is of great importance to conduct dedicated multi-frequency monitoring campaigns that will result comprehensive observations. Consequently, we initiated an effort to conduct a GLAST-dedicated, quasi-simultaneous, broad-band flux-density (and polarization) monitoring of potential GLAST blazars with the Effelsberg and OVRO radio telescopes (11 cm to 7mm wavelength). Here, we present a short overview of these activities which will complement the multi-wavelengths activities of the GLAST/LAT collaboration towards the 'low-energy' radio bands. Further we will give a brief outlook including the extension of this coordinated campaign towards higher frequencies and future scientific aims.

  9. Design and Initial Tests of the Tracker-Converter ofthe Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope

    SciTech Connect

    Atwood, W.B.; Bagagli, R.; Baldini, L.; Bellazzini, R.; Barbiellini, G.; Belli, F.; Borden, T.; Brez, A.; Brigida, M.; Caliandro, G.A.; Cecchi, C.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; De Angelis, A.; Drell, P.; Favuzzi, C.; Fukazawa, Y.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Germani, S.; Giannitrapani, R.; Giglietto, N.; /UC, Santa Cruz /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Trieste /INFN, Rome /Rome U.,Tor Vergata /SLAC /INFN, Bari /Bari U. /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /Udine U. /Hiroshima U. /NASA, Goddard /Maryland U. /Tokyo Inst. Tech. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore

    2007-04-16

    The Tracker subsystem of the Large Area Telescope (LAT) science instrument of the Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) mission has been completed and tested. It is the central detector subsystem of the LAT and serves both to convert an incident gamma-ray into an electron-positron pair and to track the pair in order to measure the gamma-ray direction. It also provides the principal trigger for the LAT. The Tracker uses silicon strip detectors, read out by custom electronics, to detect charged particles. The detectors and electronics are packaged, along with tungsten converter foils, in 16 modular, high-precision carbon-composite structures. It is the largest silicon-strip detector system ever built for launch into space, and its aggressive design emphasizes very low power consumption, passive cooling, low noise, high efficiency, minimal dead area, and a structure that is highly transparent to charged particles. The test program has demonstrated that the system meets or surpasses all of its performance specifications as well as environmental requirements. It is now installed in the completed LAT, which is being prepared for launch in early 2008.

  10. Building ISOC Status Displays for the Large AreaTelescope aboard the Gamma Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) Observatory

    SciTech Connect

    Ketchum, Christina; /SLAC

    2006-09-01

    In September 2007 the Gamma Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) is scheduled to launch aboard a Delta II rocket in order to put two high-energy gamma-ray detectors, the Large Area Telescope (LAT) and the GLAST Burst Monitor (GBM) into low earth orbit. The Instrument Science Operations Center (ISOC) at SLAC is responsible for the LAT operations for the duration of the mission, and will therefore build an operations center including a monitoring station at SLAC to inform operations staff and visitors of the status of the LAT instrument and GLAST. This monitoring station is to include sky maps showing the location of GLAST in its orbit as well as the LAT's projected field of view on the sky containing known gamma-ray sources. The display also requires a world map showing the locations of GLAST and three Tracking and Data Relay Satellites (TDRS) relative to the ground, their trail lines, and ''footprint'' circles indicating the range of communications for each satellite. The final display will also include a space view showing the orbiting and pointing information of GLAST and the TDRS satellites. In order to build the displays the astronomy programs Xephem, DS9, SatTrack, and STK were employed to model the position of GLAST and pointing information of the LAT instrument, and the programming utilities Python and Cron were used in Unix to obtain updated information from database and load them into the programs at regular intervals. Through these methods the indicated displays were created and combined to produce a monitoring display for the LAT and GLAST.

  11. Prospects for Pulsar Studies with the GLAST Large Area Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harding, Alice K.

    2007-01-01

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT) on the Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST), due to launch in November 2007, will have unprecedented sensitivity and energy resolution for gamma-rays in the range of 30 MeV to 200 GeV. GLAST is therefore expected to provide major advances in the understanding of high-energy emission from rotation-powered pulsars. As the only presently known galactic GeV source class; pulsars will be one of the most important sources for study with GLAST. The main science goals of the LAT for pulsar studies include an increase in the number of detected radio-loud and radio-quiet gamma-ray pulsars, including millisecond pulsars, giving much better statistics for elucidating population characteristics, measurement of the high-energy spectrum and the shape of spectral cutoffs and determining pulse profiles for a variety of pulsars of different age. Further, measurement of phase-resolved spectra and energy dependent pulse profiles of the brighter pulsars should allow detailed tests of magnetospheric particle acceleration and radiation mechanisms, by comparing data with theoretical models that have been developed. Additionally, the LAT will have the sensitivity to allow blind pulsation searches of nearly all unidentified EGRET sources, to possibly uncover more radio-quiet Geminga-like pulsars.

  12. Prospects for Pulsar Studies with the GLAST Large Area Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harding, Alice K.

    2007-01-01

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT) on the Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST), due to launch in November 2007, will have unprecedented sensitivity and energy resolution for gamma-rays in the range of 30 MeV to 200 GeV. GLAST is therefore expected to provide major advances in the understanding of high-energy emission from rotation-powered p ulsars. As the only presently known galactic GeV source class, pulsar s will be one of the most important sources for study with GLAST. The main science goals of the LAT for pulsar studies include an increase in the number of detected radio-loud and radio-quiet gamma-ray pulsar s, including millisecond pulsars, giving much better statistics for e lucidating population characteristics, measurement of the high-energy spectrum and the shape of spectral cutoffs and determining pulse profiles for a variety of pulsars of different age. Further, measurement of phase-resolved spectra and energy dependent pulse profiles of the brighter pulsars should allow detailed tests of magnetospheric partic le acceleration and radiation mechanisms, by comparing data with theo retical models that have been developed. Additionally, the LAT will have the sensitivity to allow blind pulsation searches of nearly all un identified EGRET sources, to possibly uncover more radio-quiet Geming a-like pulsars.

  13. Prospects for Pulsar Studies with the GLAST Large Area Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harding, Alice K.

    2006-01-01

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT) on the Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) will have unprecedented sensitivity and energy resolution for gamma-rays in the range of 30 MeV to 200 GeV. GLAST is therefore expected to provide major advances in the understanding of high-energy emission from rotation-powered pulsars. As the only presently known galactic GeV source class, pulsars will be one of the most important sources for study with GLAST. The main science goals of the LAT for pulsar studies include an increase in the number of detected radio-loud and radio-quiet gamma ray pulsars, including millisecond pulsars, giving much better statistics for elucidating population characteristics, measurement of the high-energy spectrum and the shape of spectral cutoffs and determining pulse profiles for a variety of pulsars of different age. Further, measurement of phase-resolved spectra and energy dependent pulse profiles of the brighter pulsars should allow detailed tests of magnetospheric particle acceleration and radiation mechanisms, by comparing data with theoretical models that have been developed. Additionally, the LAT will have the sensitivity to allow blind pulsation searches of nearly all unidentified EGRET sources, to possibly uncover more radio-quiet Geminga-like pulsars.

  14. Performance of the Anti-Coincidence Detector on the GLAST Large Area Telescope

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, D.J.; Charles, E.; Hartman, R.C.; Moiseev, A.A.; Ormes, J.F.; /NASA, Goddard /Denver U.

    2007-10-22

    The Anti-Coincidence Detector (ACD), the outermost detector layer in the Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) Large Area Telescope (LAT), is designed to detect and veto incident cosmic ray charged particles, which outnumber cosmic gamma rays by 3-4 orders of magnitude. The challenge in ACD design is that it must have high (0.9997) detection efficiency for singly-charged relativistic particles, but must also have a low probability for self-veto of high-energy gammas by backsplash radiation from interactions in the LAT calorimeter. Simulations and tests demonstrate that the ACD meets its design requirements. The performance of the ACD has remained stable through stand-alone environmental testing, shipment across the U.S., installation onto the LAT, shipment back across the U.S., LAT environmental testing, and shipment to Arizona. As part of the fully-assembled GLAST observatory, the ACD is being readied for final testing before launch.

  15. New Results on High Energy Cosmic Ray Electrons Observed with Fermi LAT and Their Implications on the Models of Pulsars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moiseev, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation describes, in detail, the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) and GLAST Burst Monitor (GBM). Observations made from the June 11, 2008 launch and a discussion of observations made of high energy cosmic ray electrons is also presented.

  16. Gamma-ray Large-Area Space Telescope (GLAST) balloon flight data handling overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burnett, T. H.; Chekhtman, A.; Do Couto E Silva, E.; Dubois, R.; Flath, D.; Gable, I.; Grove, J. E.; Hartman, R. C.; Kamae, T.; Kavelaars, A.; Kelly, H.; Kotani, T.; Kuss, M.; Lauben, D.; Lindner, T.; Lumb, N.; Mizuno, T.; Moiseev, A.; Ozaki, M.; Rochester, L. S.; Schaefer, R.; Spandre, G.; Thompson, D. J.; Usher, T.; Young, K.

    2002-08-01

    The GLAST Balloon Flight Engineering Model (BFEM) represents one of 16 towers that constitute the Large Area Telescope (LAT), a high-energy (>20 MeV) gamma-ray pair-production telescope being built by an international partnership of astrophysicists and particle physicists for a satellite launch in 2006. The prototype tower consists of a Pb/Si pair-conversion tracker (TKR), a CsI hodoscopic calorimeter (CAL), an anti-coincidence detector (ACD) and an autonomous data acquisition system (DAQ). The self-triggering capabilities and performance of the detector elements have been previously characterized using positron, photon and hadron beams. External target scintillators were placed above the instrument to act as sources of hadronic showers. This paper provides a comprehensive description of the BFEM data-reduction process, from receipt of the flight data from telemetry through event reconstruction and background rejection cuts. The goals of the ground analysis presented here are to verify the functioning of the instrument and to validate the reconstruction software and the background-rejection scheme.

  17. GLAST Solar System Science

    SciTech Connect

    Share, Gerald H.; Murphy, Ronald J.

    2007-07-12

    We briefly discuss GLAST's capabilities for observing high-energy radiation from various energetic phenomena in our solar system. These emissions include: bremsstrahlung, nuclear-line and pion-decay gamma-radiation, and neutrons from solar flares; bremsstrahlung and pion-decay gamma radiation from cosmic-ray interactions with the Sun, the Moon, and the Earth's atmosphere; and inverse Compton radiation from cosmic-ray electron interactions with sunlight.

  18. GLAST and Suzaku

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sambruna, Rita

    2007-01-01

    The upcoming years will see a formidable synergy of high-energy observatories for the study of extragalactic objects, especially AGN. In particular, the launch of GLAST will allow us coordinated monitoring of sources with Suzaku over a very large energy band, from medium X-rays to GeV energies. In this talk I will review the science issues that such a remarkable coverage will enable us to address.

  19. Calibration of the GLAST Burst Monitor detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Kienlin, Andreas von; Bissaldi, Elisabetta; Lichti, Giselher G.; Steinle, Helmut; Diehl, Roland; Greiner, Jochen; Krumrey, Michael; Gerlach, Martin; Fishman, Gerald J.; Meegan, Charles; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Wilson-Hodge, Colleen; Bhat, Narayana; Briggs, Michael S.; Connaughton, Valerie; Paciesas, William; Preece, Robert; Kippen, R. Marc

    2007-07-12

    The GLAST Burst Monitor (GBM) will augment the capabilities of GLAST for the detection of cosmic gamma-ray bursts by extending the energy range (20 MeV to > 300 GeV) of the Large Area Telescope (LAT) towards lower energies by 2 BGO-detectors (150 keV to 30 MeV) and 12 NaI(Tl) detectors (10 keV to 1 MeV). The physical detector response of the GBM instrument for GRBs is determined with the help of Monte Carlo simulations, which are supported and verified by on-ground calibration measurements, performed extensively with the individual detectors at the MPE in 2005. All flight and spare detectors were irradiated with calibrated radioactive sources in the laboratory (from 14 keV to 4.43 MeV). The energy/channel-relations, the dependences of energy resolution and effective areas on the energy and the angular responses were measured. Due to the low number of emission lines of radioactive sources below 100 keV, calibration measurements in the energy range from 10 keV to 60 keV were performed with the X-ray radiometry working group of the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) at the BESSY synchrotron radiation facility, Berlin.

  20. Calibration of the GLAST Burst Monitor Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    von Kienlin, Andreas; Bissaldi, Elisabetta; Lichti, Giselher G.; Steinle, Helmut; Krumrey, Michael; Gerlach, Martin; Fishman, Gerald J.; Meegan, Charles; Bhat, Narayana; Briggs, Michael S.; Diehl, Roland; Connaughton, Valerie; Greiner, Jochen; Kippen, R.Marc; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Paciesas, William; Preece, Robert; Wilson-Hodge, Colleen

    2011-11-29

    The GLAST Burst Monitor (GBM) will augment the capabilities of GLAST for the detection of cosmic gamma-ray bursts by extending the energy range (20 MeV to > 300 GeV) of the Large Area Telescope (LAT) towards lower energies by 2 BGO-detectors (150 keV to 30 MeV) and 12 NaI(Tl) detectors (10 keV to 1 MeV). The physical detector response of the GBM instrument for GRBs is determined with the help of Monte Carlo simulations, which are supported and verified by on-ground calibration measurements, performed extensively with the individual detectors at the MPE in 2005. All flight and spare detectors were irradiated with calibrated radioactive sources in the laboratory (from 14 keV to 4.43 MeV). The energy/channel-relations, the dependences of energy resolution and effective areas on the energy and the angular responses were measured. Due to the low number of emission lines of radioactive sources below 100 keV, calibration measurements in the energy range from 10 keV to 60 keV were performed with the X-ray radiometry working group of the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) at the BESSY synchrotron radiation facility, Berlin.

  1. GLAST Science Across Wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blandford, R. D.

    2006-12-01

    The GLAST satellites is almost guaranteed to revolutionize GeV gamma ray astronomy because of the great discoveries that are being made at hard X-ray energy by the Suzaku and Swift satellites and in the TeV range using the H.E.S.S. and Magic telescopes. Unidentified EGRET sources are likely to be identified and new and fainter sources will be found. Known classes of sources blazars, pulsars, gamma ray bursts, supernova remnants, binary X-ray sources and so on will be monitored in much greater detail. Finally, there is the need to limit or even detect dark matter through its annihilation signature. The science that will emerge from GLAST will be determined in large measure by the effort that is put into multiwavelength observing. This will require significant commitments of observing time for monitoring pulsar arrival times, measuring faint galaxy spectra, detecting GeV gamma rays gamma ray bursts and so on. In this talk I will attempt to summarize current thinking on the GLAST multi-wavelength observing program and propose some new approaches.

  2. GLAST Large Area Telescope Multiwavelength Planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reimer, O.; Michelson, P. F.; Cameron, R. A.; Digel, S. W.; Thompson, D. J.; Wood, K. S.

    2007-01-01

    Gamma-ray astrophysics depends in many ways on multiwavelength studies. The Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) Large Area Telescope (LAT) Collaboration has started multiwavelength planning well before the scheduled 2007 launch of the observatory. Some of the high-priority multiwavelength needs include: (1) availability of contemporaneous radio and X-ray timing of pulsars; (2) expansion of blazar catalogs, including redshift measurements; (3) improved observations of molecular clouds, especially at high galactic latitudes; (4) simultaneous broad-spectrum blazar monitoring; (5) characterization of gamma-ray transients, including gamma ray bursts; (6) radio, optical, X-ray and TeV counterpart searches for reliable and effective sources identification and characterization. Several of these activities are needed to be in place before launch.

  3. GLAST Large Area Telescope Multiwavelength Planning

    SciTech Connect

    Reimer, O.; Michelson, P.F.; Cameron, R.A.; Digel, S.W.; Thompson, D.J.; Wood, K.S.

    2007-01-03

    Gamma-ray astrophysics depends in many ways on multiwavelength studies. The Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) Large Area Telescope (LAT) Collaboration has started multiwavelength planning well before the scheduled 2007 launch of the observatory. Some of the high-priority multiwavelength needs include: (1) availability of contemporaneous radio and X-ray timing of pulsars; (2) expansion of blazar catalogs, including redshift measurements; (3) improved observations of molecular clouds, especially at high galactic latitudes; (4) simultaneous broad-band blazar monitoring; (5) characterization of gamma-ray transients, including gamma ray bursts; (6) radio, optical, X-ray and TeV counterpart searches for reliable and effective sources identification and characterization. Several of these activities are needed to be in place before launch.

  4. The GLAST Silicon-Strip Tracking System

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, R

    2004-09-30

    The GLAST instrument concept is a gamma-ray pair conversion telescope that uses silicon microstrip detector technology to track the electron-positron pairs resulting from gamma ray conversions in thin lead foils. A cesium iodide calorimeter following the tracker is used to measure the gamma-ray energy. Silicon strip technology is mature and robust, with an excellent heritage in space science and particle physics. It has many characteristics important for optimal performance of a pair conversion telescope, including high efficiency in thin detector planes, low noise, and excellent resolution and two-track separation. The large size of GLAST and high channel count in the tracker puts demands on the readout technology to operate at very low power, yet with sufficiently low noise occupancy to allow self triggering. A prototype system employing custom-designed ASIC's has been built and tested that meets the design goal of approximately 200 {micro}W per channel power consumption with a noise occupancy of less than one hit per trigger per 10,000 channels. Detailed design of the full-scale tracker is well advanced, with non-flight prototypes built for all components, and a complete 50,000 channel engineering demonstration tower module is currently under construction and will be tested in particle beams in late 1999. The flight-instrument conceptual design is for a 4 x 4 array of tower modules with an aperture of 2.9 m{sup 2} and an effective area of greater than 8000 cm{sup 2}.

  5. GLAST: Launched And Being Commissioned - Status And Prospects for Microquasars

    SciTech Connect

    Dubois, Richard; /SLAC

    2011-12-01

    GLAST: Launched And Being Commissioned - Status And Prospects for Microquasars The Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (Fermi) is a next generation high energy gamma-ray observatory launched in June 2008. The primary instrument is the Large Area Telescope (LAT), which will measure gamma-ray flux and spectra from 20 MeV to > 300 GeV and is a successor to the highly successful EGRET experiment on CGRO. The LAT has better angular resolution, greater effective area, wider field of view and broader energy coverage than any previous experiment in this energy range. An overview of the LAT instrument design and construction is presented which includes performance estimates with particular emphasis on how these apply to studies of microquasars. Early results on LS I +61 303 detection are presented.

  6. Supporting the GLAST User Community

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Band, David L.

    2004-01-01

    The Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) Science Support Center (GSSC) is the scientific community's interface with GLAST. The GSSC will provide data, analysis software and documentation. In addition, the GSSC will administer the guest investigator program for NASA HQ. Consequently, the GSSC will provide proposal preparation tools to assist proposers in assessing the feasibility of observing sources of interest.

  7. Source identification with GLAST

    SciTech Connect

    Lonjou, Vincent; Knoedlseder, Juergen

    2007-07-12

    With more than 50% of unidentified sources, the third EGRET catalogue reflects the complexity of source identification in the GeV domain. In that context, we developed a dedicated GLAST ScienceTool dubbed gtsrcid for the general purpose of source identification. gtsrcid has been designed in a very flexible way and allows cross correlation with any counterpart catalogue using user-definable figures-of-merit. Our source identification strategy, the results for DC2 as well as possible improvements of our identification procedures are presented.

  8. GLAST and Suzaku: Study on Cosmic-Ray Acceleration And Interaction in the Cosmos

    SciTech Connect

    Kamae, T.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC

    2008-05-23

    The Gamma-Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) is an international and multiagency mission scheduled for launch in the fall 2007. The Large Area Telescope (LAT), the primary instrument of the mission, will survey the high energy sky found to be very dynamic and surprisingly diverse by its predecessor the Energetic Gamma Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET). GLAST-LAT will have a much improved sensitivity when compared with EGRET and extend the higher energy coverage to {approx} 300 GeV. The instrument is now mounted on the spacecraft and undergoing a suite of pre-flight tests. Data analysis software has been tried out by collaborators in two rounds of 'Data Challenges' using simulated observations including backgrounds. The instrument performance and observational data on selected sources presented here have been obtained through the Data Challenges in the collaborative efforts. There are features in the GLAST-LAT observation possibly unfamiliar to X-ray astronomers: (1) GLAST will operate mostly in the survey mode; (2) the foreground objects (gas, dust, and star-light) become gamma-ray sources; (3) multiple sources will be 'confused' because of the wide point-spread-function. The last two features will pose a challenge for analysis on extended Galactic sources such as supernova remnants and pulsar wind nebulae: multi-wavelength study with X-ray instruments like Suzaku and atmospheric Chrenkov telescopes will become essential to dig out the underlying physics.

  9. Status of GLAST, the Gamma-ray Large-area Space Telescope

    SciTech Connect

    Rochester, L.; /SLAC

    2005-12-14

    GLAST is a satellite-based observatory consisting of the Large-Area Telescope (LAT), a modular 4 x 4-tower pair-conversion telescope with a field-of-view greater than 2 steradians, capable of measuring gamma-ray energies in the range 20 MeV to 300 GeV, and the GLAST Burst Monitor (GBM), a set of NaI and BGO detectors covering 8 steradians and sensitive to photons with energies between 10 keV and 25 MeV, allowing for correlative observations of transient events. The observatory is currently being constructed and is scheduled to be launched in August 2007.

  10. GLAST: Exploring Nature's Highest Energy Processes with the Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Digel, Seth; Myers, J. D.; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) is an international and multi-agency space mission that will study the cosmos in the energy range 10 keV-300 GeV. Several successful exploratory missions in gamma-ray astronomy led to the Energetic Gamma Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET) instrument on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO). Launched in 1991, EGRET made the first complete survey of the sky in the 30 MeV-10 GeV range. EGRET showed the high-energy gamma-ray sky to be surprisingly dynamic and diverse, with sources ranging from the sun and moon to massive black holes at large redshifts. Most of the gamma-ray sources detected by EGRET remain unidentified. In light of the discoveries with EGRET, the great potential of the next generation gamma-ray telescope can be appreciated. GLAST will have an imaging gamma-ray telescope vastly more capable than instruments flown previously, as well as a secondary instrument to augment the study of gamma-ray bursts. The main instrument, the Large Area Telescope (LAT), will have superior area, angular resolution, field of view, and deadtime that together will provide a factor of 30 or more advance in sensitivity, as well as provide capability for study of transient phenomena. The GLAST Burst Monitor (GBM) will have a field of view several times larger than the LAT and will provide spectral coverage of gamma-ray bursts that extends from the lower limit of the LAT down to 10 keV. The basic parameters of the GBM are compared to those of the Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) instrument on CGRO in Table 1-2. With the LAT and GBM, GLAST will be a flexible observatory for investigating the great range of astrophysical phenomena best studied in high-energy gamma rays. NASA plans to launch GLAST in late 2005.

  11. Supernova Remnants And GLAST

    SciTech Connect

    Slane, Patrick; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.

    2011-11-29

    It has long been speculated that supernova remnants represent a major source of cosmic rays in the Galaxy. Observations over the past decade have ceremoniously unveiled direct evidence of particle acceleration in SNRs to energies approaching the knee of the cosmic ray spectrum. Nonthermal X-ray emission from shell-type SNRs reveals multi-TeV electrons, and the dynamical properties of several SNRs point to efficient acceleration of ions. Observations of TeV gamma-ray emission have confirmed the presence of energetic particles in several remnants as well, but there remains considerable debate as to whether this emission originates with high energy electrons or ions. Equally uncertain are the exact conditions that lead to efficient particle acceleration. Based on the catalog of EGRET sources, we know that there is a large population of Galactic gamma-ray sources whose distribution is similar to that of SNRs.With the increased resolution and sensitivity of GLAST, the gamma-ray SNRs from this population will be identified. Their detailed emission structure, along with their spectra, will provide the link between their environments and their spectra in other wavebands to constrain emission models and to potentially identify direct evidence of ion acceleration in SNRs. Here I summarize recent observational and theoretical work in the area of cosmic ray acceleration by SNRs, and discuss the contributions GLAST will bring to our understanding of this problem.

  12. The Capabilities of the GLAST Large Area Telescope for Blazar Variability Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McEnery, Julie

    2006-01-01

    One of the more notable features of the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on GLAST is its extremely large field of view, which covers more than 20% of the sky at any instant. In survey mode the LAT will be rocked about the orbital plane to provide coverage of the entire gamma-ray sky above 20 MeV every three hours. This will be the default observing mode for the first year of operations and is likely to be the dominant observing mode throughout the rest of the mission. Thus the LAT will provide long, evenly sampled, gamma-ray lightcurves for a large number of sources. In this talk we describe the nature and quality of the data that will be provided by the LAT and use simulated lightcurves to illustrate some of the scientific questions that can be addressed with LAT observations.

  13. GlastCam: A Telemetry-Driven Spacecraft Visualization Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoneking, Eric T.; Tsai, Dean

    2009-01-01

    Developed for the GLAST project, which is now the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, GlastCam software ingests telemetry from the Integrated Test and Operations System (ITOS) and generates four graphical displays of geometric properties in real time, allowing visual assessment of the attitude, configuration, position, and various cross-checks. Four windows are displayed: a "cam" window shows a 3D view of the satellite; a second window shows the standard position plot of the satellite on a Mercator map of the Earth; a third window displays star tracker fields of view, showing which stars are visible from the spacecraft in order to verify star tracking; and the fourth window depicts

  14. GLAST beam test at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Engovatov, D.; Anthony, P.; Atwood, W.

    1996-10-01

    In May and June, a beam test for GLAST calorimeter technologies was conducted. A parasitic low intensity electron/tagged photon beam line into the End Station A at SLAC was commissioned and used. The preliminary stage of the test was devoted to measuring the performance of the parasitic beam. In the main test we studied the response of GLAST prototype CsI and scintillating fiber calorimeters to the electrons and photons. Results of this work are discussed.

  15. The Synergy of Gamma-Ray Burst Detectors in the GLAST Era

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Band, David

    2008-01-01

    Simultaneous observations by the large number of gamma-ray burst detectors that will operate in the GLAST era will provide the spectra, lightcurves and locations necessary for studying burst physics and testing the putative relations between intrinsic burst properties. I review the burst detection sensitivities, spectral bands, and localization capabilities of the GLAST (GBM and LAT), Swift (BAT), INTEGRAL (ISGRI), Suzaku (wAM), AGILE (Super-AGILE) and wind (Konus) detectors; the detectors' energy band and the accumulation timescale of their trigger system affect their sensitivity to hard vs. soft and long vs. short bursts. In addition, I estimate the rate of simultaneous burst observations. In particular, coordination of the Swift observing plan consistent with Swift's other science objectives could increase the rate of GLAST bursts with redshifts

  16. Orbital Observatory GLAST - New Step in the Study of Cosmic Gamma-Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moiseev, A. A.

    2008-01-01

    The new Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) is scheduled for launch in the middle of 2008. It contains the high energy gamma-ray telescope LAT (Large Area Telescope) which covers the energy range from 20 MeV to >300 GeV and the GMB (GLAST Burst Monitor), covering 8 keV - 30 MeV energy range. The GLAST science objectives include understanding the mechanism of charged particle acceleration in active galactic nuclei, pulsars and supernova remnants, determining the nature of the still-unidentified EGRET sources, detailed study of gamma-ray diffuse emission, high-energy emission from gamma-ray bursts and transient sources, and probing dark matter. A brief overview of the mission is given.

  17. Orbital Observatory GLAST - New Step in the Study of Cosmic Gamma Radiation: Mission Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moiseev, Alexander

    2008-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation is a overview of the Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST), now named Fermi Space Telescope. The new telescope is scheduled for launch in the middle of 2008. It contains the high energy gamma-ray telescope LAT (Large Area Telescope) and the GMB (GLAST Burst Monitor). The science objectives of GLAST cover almost every area of high energy astrophysics, including Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN), including Extragalactic background light (EBL), Gamma-ray bursts (GRB), Pulsars, Diffuse gamma-radiation, EGRET unidentified sources, Solar physics, Origin of Cosmic Rays and, Dark Matter and New Physics. Also included in this overview is a discussion of the preparation to the analysis of the science data.

  18. Massive Stars in Colliding Wind Systems: the GLAST Perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Reimer, Anita; Reimer, Olaf; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2011-11-29

    Colliding winds of massive stars in binary systems are considered as candidate sites of high-energy non-thermal photon emission. They are already among the suggested counterparts for a few individual unidentified EGRET sources, but may constitute a detectable source population for the GLAST observatory. The present work investigates such population study of massive colliding wind systems at high-energy gamma-rays. Based on the recent detailed model (Reimer et al. 2006) for non-thermal photon production in prime candidate systems, we unveil the expected characteristics of this source class in the observables accessible at LAT energies. Combining the broadband emission model with the presently cataloged distribution of such systems and their individual parameters allows us to conclude on the expected maximum number of LAT-detections among massive stars in colliding wind binary systems.

  19. GLAST and Ground-Based Gamma-Ray Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McEnery, Julie

    2008-01-01

    The launch of the Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope together with the advent of a new generation of ground-based gamma-ray detectors such as VERITAS, HESS, MAGIC and CANGAROO, will usher in a new era of high-energy gamma-ray astrophysics. GLAST and the ground based gamma-ray observatories will provide highly complementary capabilities for spectral, temporal and spatial studies of high energy gamma-ray sources. Joint observations will cover a huge energy range, from 20 MeV to over 20 TeV. The LAT will survey the entire sky every three hours, allowing it both to perform uniform, long-term monitoring of variable sources and to detect flaring sources promptly. Both functions complement the high-sensitivity pointed observations provided by ground-based detectors. Finally, the large field of view of GLAST will allow a study of gamma-ray emission on large angular scales and identify interesting regions of the sky for deeper studies at higher energies. In this poster, we will discuss the science returns that might result from joint GLAST/ground-based gamma-ray observations and illustrate them with detailed source simulations.

  20. Developing gamma-ray pulsar simulation tools for GLAST

    SciTech Connect

    Razzano, Massimiliano

    2007-07-12

    Pulsars are among the most intriguing sources in the gamma-ray Universe and their high-energy emission remains today quite mysterious. The Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) will study the pulsar gamma-ray emission in great detail and will discover a great number of new gamma-ray pulsars. Here are presented the latest developments of the tools that have been created for producing accurate simulations of gamma-ray pulsars emission. The main simulator is called PulsarSpectrum and can reproduce gamma-ray emission with great detail, taking also into account advanced timing effects, e.g. period increase with time, barycentric corrections and higher-order timing noise currently under development. Detailed spectral features can also be simulated with PulsarSpectrum, such as phase-dependent spectra. A suite of ancillary tools have also been built to provide a realistic pulsar population with related timing solutions. Anyway PulsarSpectrum can also simulate pulsar populations coming from external synthesis codes. All these tools are presently used within the GLAST collaboration for testing the LAT Science Analysis Environment tools and for better study of LAT capabilities for pulsar science.

  1. The Anti-Coincidence Detector for the GLAST Large Area Telescope

    SciTech Connect

    Moiseev, A.A.; Hartman, R.C.; Ormes, J.F.; Thompson, D.J.; Amato, M.J.; Johnson, T.E.; Segal, K.N.; Sheppard, D.A.

    2007-03-23

    This paper describes the design, fabrication and testing of the Anti-Coincidence Detector (ACD) for the Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) Large Area Telescope (LAT). The ACD is LAT's first-level defense against the charged cosmic ray background that outnumbers the gamma rays by 3-5 orders of magnitude. The ACD covers the top and 4 sides of the LAT tracking detector, requiring a total active area of {approx}8.3 square meters. The ACD detector utilizes plastic scintillator tiles with wave-length shifting fiber readout. In order to suppress self-veto by shower particles at high gamma-ray energies, the ACD is segmented into 89 tiles of different sizes. The overall ACD efficiency for detection of singly charged relativistic particles entering the tracking detector from the top or sides of the LAT exceeds the required 0.9997.

  2. GLAST and Suzaku: Study on Cosmic-Ray Acceleration and Interaction in the Cosmos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamae, T.

    The Gamma-Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) is an international and multi-agency mission scheduled for launch in the fall of 2007. The Large Area Telescope (LAT), the primary instrument of the mission, will survey the high energy sky found to be very dynamic and surprisingly diverse by its predecessor the Energetic Gamma Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET). GLAST-LAT will have a much improved sensitivity when compared with EGRET and extend the higher energy coverage to ˜ 300 GeV. The insrument is now mounted on the spacecraft and undergoing a suite of pre-flight tests. Data analysis software has been tried out by collaborators in two rounds of ``Data Challenges'' using simulated observations including backgrounds. The instrument performance and observational data on selected sources presented here have been obtained through the Data Challenges in the collaborative efforts. There are features in the GLAST-LAT observation possibly unfamiliar to X-ray astronomers: 1) G LAST will operate mostly in the survey mode; 2) the foreground objects (gas, dust, and star-light) become gamma-ray sources; 3) multiple sources will be ``confused'' because of the wide point-spread-function. The last two features will pose a challenge for analysis on extended Galactic sources such as supernova remnants and pulsar wind nebulae: multi-wavelength study with X-ray instruments like Suzaku and atmospheric Chrenkov telescopes will become essential to dig out the underlying physics.

  3. Real-Time Visualization of Spacecraft Telemetry for the GLAST and LRO Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoneking, Eric T.; Shah, Neerav; Chai, Dean J.

    2010-01-01

    GlastCam and LROCam are closely-related tools developed at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center for real-time visualization of spacecraft telemetry, developed for the Gamma-Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) and Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) missions, respectively. Derived from a common simulation tool, they use related but different architectures to ingest real-time spacecraft telemetry and ground predicted ephemerides, and to compute and display features of special interest to each mission in its operational environment. We describe the architectures of GlastCam and LROCam, the customizations required to fit into the mission operations environment, and the features that were found to be especially useful in early operations for their respective missions. Both tools have a primary window depicting a three-dimensional Cam view of the spacecraft that may be freely manipulated by the user. The scene is augmented with fields of view, pointing constraints, and other features which enhance situational awareness. Each tool also has another "Map" window showing the spacecraft's groundtrack projected onto a map of the Earth or Moon, along with useful features such as the Sun, eclipse regions, and TDRS satellite locations. Additional windows support specialized checkout tasks. One such window shows the star tracker fields of view, with tracking window locations and the mission star catalog. This view was instrumental for GLAST in quickly resolving a star tracker mounting polarity issue; visualization made the 180-deg mismatch immediately obvious. Full access to GlastCam's source code also made possible a rapid coarse star tracker mounting calibration with some on the fly code adjustments; adding a fine grid to measure alignment offsets, and introducing a calibration quaternion which could be adjusted within GlastCam without perturbing the flight parameters. This calibration, from concept to completion, took less than half an hour. Both GlastCam and LROCam were

  4. Definition of a Twelve-Point Polygonal SAA Boundaryfor the GLAST Mission

    SciTech Connect

    Djomehri, Sabra I.; /UC, Santa Cruz /SLAC

    2007-08-29

    The Gamma-Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST), set to launch in early 2008, detects gamma rays within a huge energy range of 100 MeV - 300 GeV. Background cosmic radiation interferes with such detection resulting in confusion over distinguishing cosmic from gamma rays encountered. This quandary is resolved by encasing GLAST's Large Area Telescope (LAT) with an Anti-Coincidence Detector (ACD), a device which identifies and vetoes charged particles. The ACD accomplishes this through plastic scintillator tiles; when cosmic rays strike, photons produced induce currents in Photomultiplier Tubes (PMTs) attached to these tiles. However, as GLAST orbits Earth at altitudes {approx}550km and latitudes between -26 degree and 26 degree, it will confront the South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA), a region of high particle flux caused by trapped radiation in the geomagnetic field. Since the SAA flux would degrade the sensitivity of the ACD's PMTs over time, a determined boundary enclosing this region need be attained, signaling when to lower the voltage on the PMTs as a protective measure. The operational constraints on such a boundary require a convex SAA polygon with twelve edges, whose area is minimal ensuring GLAST has maximum observation time. The AP8 and PSB97 models describing the behavior of trapped radiation were used in analyzing the SAA and defining a convex SAA boundary of twelve sides. The smallest possible boundary was found to cover 14.58% of GLAST's observation time. Further analysis of defining a boundary safety margin to account for inaccuracies in the models reveals if the total SAA hull area is increased by {approx}20%, the loss of total observational area is < 5%. These twelve coordinates defining the SAA flux region are ready for implementation by the GLAST satellite.

  5. Pre-launch Estimates for GLAST Sensitivity to Dark Matter Annihilation Signals

    SciTech Connect

    Baltz, E.A.; Berenji, B.; Bertone, G.; Bergstrom, L.; Bloom, E.; Bringmann, T.; Chiang, J.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Conrad, J.; Edmonds, Y.; Edsjo, J.; Godfrey, G.; Hughes, R.E.; Johnson, R.P.; Lionetto, A.; Moiseev, A.A.; Morselli, A.; Moskalenko, I.V.; Nuss, E.; Ormes, J.F.; Rando, R.; /INFN, Padua /Ohio State U. /Stockholm U. /Ohio State U. /Garching, Max Planck Inst., MPE /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Ohio State U.

    2009-05-15

    We investigate the sensitivity of the Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) to indirectly detect weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) through the {gamma}-ray signal that their pair annihilation produces. WIMPs are among the favorite candidates to explain the compelling evidence that about 80% of the mass in the Universe is non-baryonic dark matter (DM). They are serendipitously motivated by various extensions of the standard model of particle physics such as Supersymmetry and Universal Extra Dimensions (UED). With its unprecedented sensitivity and its very large energy range (20 MeV to more than 300 GeV) the main instrument on board the GLAST satellite, the Large Area Telescope (LAT), will open a new window of discovery. As our estimates show, the LAT will be able to detect an indirect DM signature for a large class of WIMP models given a cuspy profile for the DM distribution. Using the current state of the art Monte Carlo and event reconstruction software developed within the LAT collaboration, we present preliminary sensitivity studies for several possible sources inside and outside the Galaxy. We also discuss the potential of the LAT to detect UED via the electron/positron channel. Diffuse background modeling and other background issues that will be important in setting limits or seeing a signal are presented.

  6. Simulation and Analysis of SNRs in LAT Data Challenge 2

    SciTech Connect

    Tibolla, O.; Busetto, G.; Digel, S.; Longo, F.

    2007-07-12

    In 2006 the GLAST LAT collaboration organized a detailed simulation of 55 days of the gamma-ray sky and particle background in orbit to test the simulation and analysis tools of the collaboration. For this simulation, designated Data Challenge 2 (DC2), empirical models for SNRs as gamma-ray sources in the energy range of the LAT were developed, in most cases informed by X-ray or gamma-ray observations. The development of these models and an example of analysis of one of the simulated SNRs are described here.

  7. Simulation And Analysis of SNRs in LAT Data Challenge 2

    SciTech Connect

    Tibolla, O.; Busetto, G.; Digel, S.; Longo, F.; /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste

    2007-11-13

    In 2006 the GLAST LAT collaboration organized a detailed simulation of 55 days of the gamma-ray sky and particle background in orbit to test the simulation and analysis tools of the collaboration. For this simulation, designated Data Challenge 2 (DC2), empirical models for SNRs as gamma-ray sources in the energy range of the LAT were developed, in most cases informed by X-ray or gamma-ray observations. The development of these models and an example of analysis of one of the simulated SNRs are described here.

  8. Study of the LAT PSF of the Gamma Ray Large Area Telescope

    SciTech Connect

    Cecchi, C.; Germani, S.; Pepe, M.; Bonamente, E.; Ciprini, S.; Lubrano, P.; Tosti, G.

    2007-07-12

    GLAST is the next generation telescope for the study of the Gamma Ray Universe. The GLAST mission is composed of two instruments: the LAT (Large Area Telescope) exploring the energy range between 20 MeV and 300 GeV and the GBM (Gamma ray Burst Monitor) studying the region from 10 KeV up to 30 MeV.GLAST represents an important step beyond EGRET providing a large improvement in instrument performance: large Field of View (FOV), large energy range extending to unexplored region of energies larger than 10 GeV, large effective area, a factor of 30 improvement in sensitivity, a much smaller dead time and a very good Point Spread Function (PSF).Since GLAST will operate in a continuous scanning mode, for most of the time during the mission, photons from a source will be detected at different angles in the LAT field of view requiring a good PSF in order to disentangle between sources.We will present results on PSF studies performed with various sets of data. The selection criteria and algorithm have been initially developed on DC1 and DC2 data (simulation of one and 55 days respectively of data collected by the LAT), applied to the data collected with the 16 LAT towers during the I and T integration phase with cosmic ray muons and finally applied to the testbeam data collected in August 2006 at the CERN beam line.

  9. Future GLAST Observations of Supernova Remnants And Pulsar Wind Nebulae

    SciTech Connect

    Funk, S.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2007-09-26

    Shell-type Supernova remnants (SNRs) have long been known to harbour a population of ultra-relativistic particles, accelerated in the Supernova shock wave by the mechanism of diffusive shock acceleration. Experimental evidence for the existence of electrons up to energies of 100 TeV was first provided by the detection of hard X-ray synchrotron emission as e.g. in the shell of the young SNR SN1006. Furthermore using theoretical arguments shell-type Supernova remnants have long been considered as the main accelerator of protons - Cosmic rays - in the Galaxy; definite proof of this process is however still missing. Pulsar Wind Nebulae (PWN) - diffuse structures surrounding young pulsars - are another class of objects known to be a site of particle acceleration in the Galaxy, again through the detection of hard synchrotron X-rays such as in the Crab Nebula. Gamma-rays above 100 MeV provide a direct access to acceleration processes. The GLAST Large Area telescope (LAT) will be operating in the energy range between 30 MeV and 300 GeV and will provide excellent sensitivity, angular and energy resolution in a previously rather poorly explored energy band. We will describe prospects for the investigation of these Galactic particle accelerators with GLAST.

  10. GLAST and Ground-based {gamma}-ray astronomy

    SciTech Connect

    Funk, S.; Carson, J. E.; Giebels, B.; Longo, F.; McEnery, J. E.; Paneque, D.; Reimer, O.; Reyes, L. C

    2007-07-12

    The launch of the Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) in 2007 will open the possibility of combined studies of astrophysical sources with existing ground-based VHE {gamma}-ray experiments such as H.E.S.S., VERITAS and MAGIC. Ground-based {gamma}-ray observatories provide complementary capabilities for spectral, temporal, spatial and population studies of high-energy {gamma}-ray sources. Joint observations cover a huge energy range, from 20 MeV to over 50 TeV. The LAT will survey the entire sky every three hours, allowing us to perform long-term monitoring of variable sources under uniform observation conditions and to detect flaring sources promptly. Imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes (IACTs) will complement these observations with high-sensitivity pointed observations on regions of interest.

  11. GLAST and Ground-Based Gamma-Ray Astronomy

    SciTech Connect

    Funk, S.; Carson, J.E.; Giebels, B.; Longo, F.; McEnery, J.E.; Paneque, D.; Reimer, O.; Reyes, L.C.

    2007-10-10

    The launch of the Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) in 2007 will open the possibility of combined studies of astrophysical sources with existing ground-based VHE {gamma}-ray experiments such as H.E.S.S., VERITAS and MAGIC. Ground-based {gamma}-ray observatories provide complementary capabilities for spectral, temporal, spatial and population studies of high-energy {gamma}-ray sources. Joint observations cover a huge energy range, from 20 MeV to over 50 TeV. The LAT will survey the entire sky every three hours, allowing us to perform long-term monitoring of variable sources under uniform observation conditions and to detect flaring sources promptly. Imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes (IACTs) will complement these observations with high-sensitivity pointed observations on regions of interest.

  12. Fabrication of the GLAST Silicon Tracker Readout Electronics

    SciTech Connect

    Baldini, Luca; Brez, Alessandro; Himel, Thomas; Johnson, R.P.; Latronico, Luca; Minuti, Massimo; Nelson, David; Sadrozinski, H.F.-W.; Sgro, Carmelo; Spandre, Gloria; Sugizaki, Mutsumi; Tajima, Hiro; Cohen Tanugi, Johann; Young, Charles; Ziegler, Marcus; /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /SLAC /UC, Santa Cruz

    2006-03-03

    A unique electronics system has been built and tested for reading signals from the silicon-strip detectors of the Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope mission. The system amplifies and processes signals from 884,736 36-cm long silicon strips in a 4 x 4 array of tower modules. An aggressive mechanical design fits the readout electronics in narrow spaces between the tower modules, to minimize dead area. This design and the resulting departures from conventional electronics packaging led to several fabrication challenges and lessons learned. This paper describes the fabrication processes and how the problems peculiar to this design were overcome.

  13. The silicon-strip tracker of the Gamma ray Large Area Space Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellazzini, R.; Angelini, F.; Bagagli, R.; Baldini, L.; Brez, A.; Ceccanti, M.; Cohen Tanugi, J.; Kuss, M.; Latronico, L.; Massai, M. M.; Minuti, M.; Omodei, N.; Spandre, G.; Vigiani, L.; Zetti, F.

    2003-10-01

    The Gamma ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) is an astro-particle mission that will study the mostly unexplored, high energy (20MeV-1TeV) spectrum of photons coming from active sources in the universe. Construction of the GLAST silicon tracker, by far the largest ever built for a space mission, is now well on the way, as it is scheduled for launch by NASA in autumn 2006. We report on the basic technology adopted for the silicon detectors, particularly in connection to their use in space, on the first results of sensors testing and on the status of tracker assembly.

  14. LAT Perspectives in Detection of High Energy Cosmic Ray Electrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moiseev, Alexander; Ormes, J. F.; Funk, Stefan

    2007-01-01

    The GLAST Large Area Telescope (LAT) science objectives and capabilities in the detection of high energy electrons in the energy range from 20 GeV to approx. 1 TeV are presented. LAT simulations are used to establish the event selections. It is found that maintaining the efficiency of electron detection at the level of 30% the residual hadron contamination does not exceed 2-3% of the electron flux. LAT should collect approx. ten million of electrons with the energy above 20 GeV for each year of observation. Precise spectral reconstruction with high statistics presents us with a unique opportunity to investigate several important problems such as studying galactic models of IC radiation, revealing the signatures of nearby sources such as high energy cutoff in the electron spectrum, testing the propagation model, and searching for KKDM particles decay through their contribution to the electron spectrum.

  15. The Trigger and Onboard Filter of the GLAST Large Area Telescope

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, R.; Grove, J. E.; Kocian, M.; Ritz, S.; Russell, J. J.; Siskind, E.; Smith, P.; Usher, T.; Winer, B.

    2007-07-12

    The GLAST Large Area Telescope (LAT) will measure the cosmic gamma-ray flux in the energy range 20 MeV to >300 GeV. The LAT will open a new and important window on a wide variety of high-energy phenomena. Achieving the capability requires a hardware trigger and onboard software event filters that are robust and highly efficient for gamma rays while remaining powerful rejecters of the much larger fluxes of charged-particle backgrounds. Because of the important discovery windows for science and the uncertainties in the background fluxes, configuration flexibility is a particularly important system feature. This paper describes the purposes and architecture of the system, the components and capabilities of the hardware trigger and onboard software filters, and the on-orbit operations plan and expected performance.

  16. The Trigger And Onboard Filter of the GLAST Large Area Telescope

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, R.; Grove, J.E.; Kocian, M.; Ritz, S.; Russell, J.J.; Siskind, E.; Smith, P.; Winer, B.; Usher, T.; /SLAC

    2007-11-13

    The GLAST Large Area Telescope (LAT) will measure the cosmic gamma-ray flux in the energy range 20 MeV to >300 GeV. The LAT will open a new and important window on a wide variety of high-energy phenomena. Achieving this capability requires a hardware trigger and onboard software event filters that are robust and highly efficient for gamma rays while keeping the event rates due to the much larger fluxes of charged particle backgrounds at an acceptable level. Because of the important discovery windows for science and the uncertainties in the background fluxes, configuration flexibility is a particularly important system feature. This poster describes the purposes and architecture of the system, the components and capabilities of the hardware trigger and onboard software filters, testing and operation experience on the ground, and the on-orbit operations plan and expected performance.

  17. Fermi LAT Observations of Cosmic-Ray Electrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moiseev, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    Designed as a gamma-ray instrument, the LAT is a capable detector of high energy cosmic ray electrons. The LAT is composed of a 4x4 array of identical towers. Each tower has a Tracker and a Calorimeter module. Entire LAT is covered by segmented Anti-Coincidence Detector (ACD). The electron data analysis is based on that developed for photons. The main challenge is to identify and separate electrons from all other charged species, mainly CR protons (for gamma-ray analysis this is provided by the Anti-Coincidence Detector)

  18. GLAST (FERMI) Data-Processing Pipeline

    SciTech Connect

    Flath, Daniel L.; Johnson, Tony S.; Turri, Massimiliano; Heidenreich, Karen A.; /SLAC

    2011-08-12

    The Data Processing Pipeline ('Pipeline') has been developed for the Gamma-Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) which launched June 11, 2008. It generically processes graphs of dependent tasks, maintaining a full record of its state, history and data products. The Pipeline is used to automatically process the data down-linked from the satellite and to deliver science products to the GLAST collaboration and the Science Support Center and has been in continuous use since launch with great success. The pipeline handles up to 2000 concurrent jobs and in reconstructing science data produces approximately 750GB of data products using 1/2 CPU-year of processing time per day.

  19. High-redshift Gamma-Ray Burst Studies with GLAST

    SciTech Connect

    Bissaldi, Elisabetta; Longo, Francesco; Barbiellini, Guido; Calura, Francesco; Matteucci, Francesca

    2007-05-01

    We compare predicted Type Ib/c supernova (SN) rates with the observed long-duration gamma-ray burst (GRB) rates both locally and as a function of redshift. To do that, we assume different star formation histories in galaxies of different morphological type: ellipticals, spirals and irregulars. In particular, the predicted Type Ib/c SN rate (SNRIb/c) is always higher than the GRB rate, as expected, suggesting that only a small fraction (0.1-1%) of them become GRBs. We predict a ratio between the cosmic GRB rate and the cosmic SNRIb/c in the range 10-2 - 10-3, in agreement with previous estimates. Finally, due to the high star formation in spheroids at high redshift, we predict more GRBs at high redshift than previous estimates, a prediction which awaits to be proven by future observations by GLAST. Based on our studies and on the current LAT performance, an estimate of the detection possibility of this high-redshift burst population is finally presented.

  20. LAT Onboard Science: Gamma-Ray Burst Identification

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhn, Frederick; Bonnell, Jerry; Hughes, Richard; Norris, Jay; Ritz, Steven; Russell, James; Smith, Patrick; Winer, Brian; /Ohio State U.

    2007-10-15

    The main goal of the Large Area Telescope (LAT) onboard science program is to provide quick identification and localization of Gamma Ray Bursts (GRB) onboard the LAT for follow-up observations by other observatories. The GRB identification and localization algorithm will provide celestial coordinates with an error region that will be distributed via the Gamma ray burst Coordinate Network (GCN). We present results that show our sensitivity to bursts as characterized using Monte Carlo simulations of the GLAST observatory. We describe and characterize the method of onboard track determination and the GRB identification and localization algorithm. Onboard track determination is considerably different than in the onground case, resulting in a substantially altered point spread function. The algorithm contains tunable parameters which may be adjusted after launch when real bursts characteristics at very high energies have been identified.

  1. LAT Onboard Science: Gamma-Ray Burst Identification

    SciTech Connect

    Kuehn, Frederick; Hughes, Richard; Smith, Patrick; Winer, Brian; Bonnell, Jerry; Norris, Jay; Ritz, Steven; Russell, James

    2007-07-12

    The main goal of the Large Area Telescope (LAT) onboard science program is to provide quick identification and localization of Gamma Ray Bursts (GRB) onboard the LAT for follow-up observations by other observatories. The GRB identification and localization algorithm will provide celestial coordinates with an error region that will be distributed via the Gamma ray burst Coordinate Network (GCN). We present results that show our sensitivity to bursts as characterized using Monte Carlo simulations of the GLAST observatory. We describe and characterize the method of onboard track determination and the GRB identification and localization algorithm. Onboard track determination is considerably different than in the on-ground case, resulting in a substantially altered point spread function. The algorithm contains tunable parameters which may be adjusted after launch when real bursts characteristics at very high energies have been identified.

  2. Enhancing GLAST Science Through Complementary Radio Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulvestad, James S.

    2006-12-01

    Radio astronomical observations with state-of-the-art instrumentation will be critical for achieving the maximum science return from the GLAST mission. Radio nterferometers with baselines of thousands of kilometers, such as the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA), will provide sub-milliarcsecond imaging of GLAST blazars. High-frequency VLBA imaging, repeatable at intervals of days to weeks, will image the region where gamma-ray flares occur in blazars and help determine the location of the gamma-ray emission. Multi-frequency arcsecond-scale imaging with interferometers having baselines of one to tens of kilometers, particularly the Very Large Array, will provide efficient discrimination among the candidates for unidentified gamma-ray sources. Pulsar timing with single-dish radio telescopes such as the Green Bank Telescope will enable accurate registration of gamma-ray photons with pulsar ephemerides for studies of the pulsar emission mechanisms. Along with these contemporaneous radio/GLAST observing programs, we will discuss briefly some of the recent radio programs that have been conducted in preparation for GLAST launch. The National Radio Astronomy Observatory is a facility of the National Science Foundation operated under cooperative agreement by Associated Universities, Inc.

  3. Tracker Toolkit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, Steven J.; Palacios, David M.

    2013-01-01

    This software can track multiple moving objects within a video stream simultaneously, use visual features to aid in the tracking, and initiate tracks based on object detection in a subregion. A simple programmatic interface allows plugging into larger image chain modeling suites. It extracts unique visual features for aid in tracking and later analysis, and includes sub-functionality for extracting visual features about an object identified within an image frame. Tracker Toolkit utilizes a feature extraction algorithm to tag each object with metadata features about its size, shape, color, and movement. Its functionality is independent of the scale of objects within a scene. The only assumption made on the tracked objects is that they move. There are no constraints on size within the scene, shape, or type of movement. The Tracker Toolkit is also capable of following an arbitrary number of objects in the same scene, identifying and propagating the track of each object from frame to frame. Target objects may be specified for tracking beforehand, or may be dynamically discovered within a tripwire region. Initialization of the Tracker Toolkit algorithm includes two steps: Initializing the data structures for tracked target objects, including targets preselected for tracking; and initializing the tripwire region. If no tripwire region is desired, this step is skipped. The tripwire region is an area within the frames that is always checked for new objects, and all new objects discovered within the region will be tracked until lost (by leaving the frame, stopping, or blending in to the background).

  4. Eye tracker.

    PubMed

    Pruehsner, W; Enderle, J D

    1999-01-01

    A device that records saccadic eye movements, the Eye Tracker, is presented in this paper. The Eye Tracker utilizes infra-red technology mounted on fully adjustable goggles to follow eye movements targeted by either a goggles mounted HUD type display or a wall mounted light bank. Output from the goggles is remotely sent to a PC type computer, which leads to device portability. The goggles can also maintain output data in an internal memory for latter download. The user interface is Windows based with the output from the goggles represented as a trace map or plotted points. This output can also be saved or printed for future reference. The user interface can be used on any PC type computer. The device is designed with reference to standard ISO design methodology. Safety in design and final product usage has also been addressed with reference to standard ISO type procedures. Device accuracy is maintained by precise construction of the IR units in the goggles and tight control of cross talk between each IR device plus filtering of ambient light signals. Also, a reset feature is included to maintain equal baseline control. An automatic switching device is included in the goggles to allow the Eye Tracker to "warm up," assuring that equal IR power is delivered for each subject tested. The IR units in the goggles are also modular in case replacement is required. PMID:11143354

  5. Functional analysis of glutamate transporters in excitatory synaptic transmission of GLAST1 and GLAST1/EAAC1 deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Stoffel, Wilhelm; Körner, Rafael; Wachtmann, Dagmar; Keller, Bernhard U

    2004-09-28

    The high affinity, Na(+)-dependent, electrogenic glial L-glutamate transporters GLAST1 and GLT1, and two neuronal EAAC1 and EAAT4, regulate the neurotransmitter concentration in excitatory synapses of the central nervous system. We dissected the function of the individual transporters in the monogenic null allelic mouse lines, glast1(-/-) and eaac1(-/-), and the derived double mutant glast(-/-)eaac1(-/-). Unexpectedly, the biochemical analysis and the behavioral phenotypes of these null allelic mouse lines were inconspicuous. Inhibition studies of the Na(+)-dependent glutamate transport by plasma membrane vesicles and by isolated astrocytes of wt and glast1(-/-) mouse brains indicated the pivotal compensatory role of GLT1 in the absence particularly of GLAST1 and GLAST1 and EAAC1 mutant mice. In electrophysiological studies, the decay rate of excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) of Purkinje cells (PC) after selective activation of parallel and climbing fibers proved to be similar in wt and eaac1(-/-), but was significantly prolonged in glast1(-/-) PCs. Bath application of the glutamate uptake blocker SYM2081 prolonged EPSC decay profiles in both wt and double mutant glast1(-/-)eaac1(-/-) PCs by 286% and 229%, respectively, indicating a prominent role of compensatory glutamate transport in shaping glast1(-/-)eaac1(-/-) EPSCs. PMID:15363892

  6. GLAST Burst Monitor Instrument Simulation and Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Hoover, A. S.; Kippen, R. M.; Wallace, M. S.; Pendleton, G. N.; Fishman, G. J.; Meegan, C. A.; Kouveliotou, C.; Wilson-Hodge, C. A.; Bhat, P. N.; Briggs, M. S.; Connaughton, V.; Paciesas, W. S.; Preece, R. D.

    2008-05-22

    The GLAST Burst Monitor (GBM) is designed to provide wide field of view observations of gamma-ray bursts and other fast transient sources in the energy range 10 keV to 30 MeV. The GBM is composed of several unshielded and uncollimated scintillation detectors (twelve NaI and two BGO) that are widely dispersed about the GLAST spacecraft. As a result, reconstructing source locations, energy spectra, and temporal properties from GBM data requires detailed knowledge of the detectors' response to both direct radiation as well as that scattered from the spacecraft and Earth's atmosphere. This full GBM instrument response will be captured in the form of a response function database that is derived from computer modeling and simulation. The simulation system is based on the GEANT4 Monte Carlo radiation transport simulation toolset.

  7. Gamma-ray Astronomy and GLAST

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McEnery, Julie

    2007-01-01

    The high energy gamma-ray (30 MeV to 100 GeV) sky has been relatively poorly studied. Most of our current knowledge comes from observations made by the Energetic Gamma Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET) detector on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO), which revealed that the GeV gamma-ray sky is rich and vibrant. Studies of astrophysical objects at GeV energies are interesting for several reasons: The high energy gamma-rays are often produced by a different physical process than the better studied X-ray and optical emission, thus providing a unique information for understanding these sources. Production of such high-energy photons requires that charged particles are accelerated to equally high energies, or much greater. Thus gamma-ray astronomy is the study of extreme environments, with natural and fundamental connections to cosmic-ray and neutrino astrophysics. The launch of GLAST in 2008 will herald a watershed in our understanding of the high energy gamma-ray sky, providing dramatic improvements in sensitivity, angular resolution and energy range. GLAST will open a new avenue to study our Universe as well as to answer scientific questions EGRET observations have raised. In this talk, I will describe the GLAST instruments and capabilities and highlight some of the science we expect to address.

  8. High-Energy Calibration of a BGO detector of the GLAST Burst Monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Kienlin, Andreas von; Steinle, Helmut; Fishman, Gerald J.; Briggs, Michael S.; Godfrey, Gary L.

    2007-07-12

    The understanding of the instrumental response of the GLAST Burst Monitor BGO detectors at energies above the energy range which is accessible by common laboratory radiation sources (< 4.43 MeV), is important, especially for the later cross-calibration with the LAT response in the overlap region between {approx} 20 MeV to 30 MeV. In November 2006 the high-energy calibration of the GBM-BGO spare detector was performed at the small Van-de-Graaff accelerator at SLAC. High-energy gamma-rays from excited 8Be* (14.6 MeV and 17.5 MeV) and 16O* (6.1 MeV) were generated through (p, {gamma})-reactions by irradiating a LiF-target. For the calibration at lower energies radioactive sources were used. The results, including spectra, the energy/channel-relation and the dependence of energy resolution are presented.

  9. High-Energy Calibration of a BGO Detector of the GLAST Burst Monitor

    SciTech Connect

    von Kienlin, Andreas; Fishman, Gerald J.; Briggs, Michael S.; Godfrey, Gary L.; Steinle, Helmut; /Garching, Max Planck Inst., MPE

    2011-11-30

    The understanding of the instrumental response of the GLAST Burst Monitor BGO detectors at energies above the energy range which is accessible by common laboratory radiation sources (< 4.43 MeV), is important, especially for the later cross-calibration with the LAT response in the overlap region between {approx}20 MeV to 30 MeV. In November 2006 the high-energy calibration of the GBM-BGO spare detector was performed at the small Van-de-Graaff accelerator at SLAC. High-energy gamma-rays from excited {sup 8}Be* (14.6 MeV and 17.5 MeV) and {sup 16}O* (6.1 MeV) were generated through (p, {gamma})-reactions by irradiating a LiF-target. For the calibration at lower energies radioactive sources were used. The results, including spectra, the energy/channel-relation and the dependence of energy resolution are presented.

  10. Force Measurement on the GLAST Delta II Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, Scott; Kaufman, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the interface force measurement at spacecraft separation of GLAST Delta II. The contents include: 1) Flight Force Measurement (FFM) Background; 2) Team Members; 3) GLAST Mission Overview; 4) Methodology Development; 5) Ground Test Validation; 6) Flight Data; 7) Coupled Loads Simulation (VCLA & Reconstruction); 8) Basedrive Simulation; 9) Findings; and 10) Summary and Conclusions.

  11. GLAST Prospects for Swift-Era Afterglows

    SciTech Connect

    Gou, L.J.; Meszaros, P.; /Penn State U.

    2011-11-23

    We calculate the GeV spectra of gamma-ray burst afterglows produced by inverse Compton scattering of these objects sub-MeV emission. We improve on earlier treatments by using refined afterglow parameters and new model developments motivated by recent Swift observations. We present time-dependent GeV spectra for standard, constant-parameter models, as well as for models with energy injection and with time-varying parameters, for a range of burst parameters. We evaluate the limiting redshift to which such afterglows can be detected by the GLAST Large Area Telescope, as well as by AGILE.

  12. Changing Horses in Midstream: Fermi LAT Computing and SCons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogart, J. R.; Golpayegani, N.

    2011-07-01

    (For the Fermi LAT Collaboration) Several years into GLAST (now Fermi) offline software development it became evident we would need a replacement for our original build system, the Configuration Management Tool (CMT) developed at CERN, in order to support Mac users and to keep pace with newer compilers and operating system versions on our traditional platforms, Linux and Windows. The open source product SCons emerged as the only viable alternative and development began in earnest several months before Fermi's successful launch in June of 2008. Over two years later the conversion is nearing completion. This paper describes the conversion to and our use of SCons, concentrating on the resulting environment for users and developers and how it was achieved. Topics discussed include SCons and its interaction with Fermi code, GoGui, a cross-platform gui for Fermi developers, and issues specific to Windows developer support.

  13. Explore Physics Beyond the Standard Model with GLAST

    SciTech Connect

    Lionetto, A. M.

    2007-07-12

    We give an overview of the possibility of GLAST to explore theories beyond the Standard Model of particle physics. Among the wide taxonomy we will focus in particular on low scale supersymmetry and theories with extra space-time dimensions. These theories give a suitable dark matter candidate whose interactions and composition can be studied using a gamma ray probe. We show the possibility of GLAST to disentangle such exotic signals from a standard production background.

  14. Swift Late GRB Emission and GLAST

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, Nathaniel

    2007-07-12

    Recent observations of early X-ray afterglows of GRBs by the Swift satellite - prior to t {approx} 103s but well after the end of the burst - show most GRBs to be followed by highly time and energy variable emission. This was unexpected prior to Swift and physical mechanisms remain largely mysterious. The spectra exhibit a strong hard-to-soft evolution which tracks the flux, consistent with a well-established hardness intensity correlation for the prompt Gamma-ray emission. The light curves show dramatic flares or rapid logarithmic time decays. In the simplest interpretation, this emission is GRB-like and indicates a long lived energy source with the possibility of interacting shells of widely varying bulk Lorentz factor. We review the phenomenology in order to ascertain how GLAST observations of this early emission, either detected directly or through the detection of inverse-Compton emission, can help to rule on possible models.

  15. Detection of Galactic Dark Matter by GLAST

    SciTech Connect

    Bloom, Elliott D

    1999-07-07

    The mysterious dark matter has been a subject of special interest to high energy physicists, astrophysicists and cosmologists for many years. According to theoretical models, it can make up a significant fraction of the mass of the Universe. One possible form of galactic dark matter, Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs), could be detected by their annihilation into monoenergetic gamma-ray line(s). This paper will demonstrate that the Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST), scheduled for launch in 2005 by NASA, will be capable of searching for these gamma-ray lines in the energy range from 20 GeV to {approx}500 GeV and will be sufficiently sensitive to test a number of models. The required instrument performance and its capability to reject backgrounds to the required levels are explicitly discussed.

  16. Interacting Multiview Tracker.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Ju Hong; Yang, Ming-Hsuan; Yoon, Kuk-Jin

    2016-05-01

    A robust algorithm is proposed for tracking a target object in dynamic conditions including motion blurs, illumination changes, pose variations, and occlusions. To cope with these challenging factors, multiple trackers based on different feature representations are integrated within a probabilistic framework. Each view of the proposed multiview (multi-channel) feature learning algorithm is concerned with one particular feature representation of a target object from which a tracker is developed with different levels of reliability. With the multiple trackers, the proposed algorithm exploits tracker interaction and selection for robust tracking performance. In the tracker interaction, a transition probability matrix is used to estimate dependencies between trackers. Multiple trackers communicate with each other by sharing information of sample distributions. The tracker selection process determines the most reliable tracker with the highest probability. To account for object appearance changes, the transition probability matrix and tracker probability are updated in a recursive Bayesian framework by reflecting the tracker reliability measured by a robust tracker likelihood function that learns to account for both transient and stable appearance changes. Experimental results on benchmark datasets demonstrate that the proposed interacting multiview algorithm performs robustly and favorably against state-of-the-art methods in terms of several quantitative metrics. PMID:26336117

  17. Fermi (nee GLAST) at Six Months

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ritz, Steve

    2009-01-01

    The Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, formerly called GLAST, is a mission to measure the cosmic gamma-ray flux in the energy range 20 MeV to >300 GeV, with supporting measurements for gamma-ray bursts from 8 keV to 30 MeV. In addition to breakthrough capabilities in energy coverage and localization, the very large field of view enables observations of 20% of the sky at any instant, and the entire sky on a timescale of a few hours. With its recent launch on 11 June 2008, Fermi now opens a new and important window on a wide variety of phenomena, including pulsars, black holes and active galactic nuclei, gamma-ray bursts, the origin of cosmic rays and supernova remnants, and searches for hypothetical new phenomena such as supersymmetric dark matter annihilations. In addition to early results and the science opportunities, this talk includes a description of the instruments and the mission status and plans.

  18. Fermi (Formerly GLAST) at Six Months

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ritz, Steven M.

    2009-01-01

    The Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, formerly called GLAST, is a mission to measure the cosmic gamma-ray flux in the energy range 20 MeV to more than 300 GeV, with supporting measurements for gamma-ray bursts from 8 keV to 30 MeV. In addition to breakthrough capabilities in energy coverage and localization, the very large field of view enables observations of 20% of the sky at any instant, and the entire sky on a timescale of a few hours. With its recent launch on 11 June 2008, Fermi now opens a new and important window on a wide variety of phenomena, including pulsars, black holes and active galactic nuclei, gamma-ray bursts, the origin of cosmic rays and supernova remnants, and searches for hypothetical new phenomena such as supersymmetric dark matter annihilations. In addition to early results and the science opportunities, this talk includes a description of the instruments and the mission status and plans.

  19. Finding (or not) New Gamma-ray Pulsars with GLAST

    SciTech Connect

    Ransom, Scott M.

    2007-07-12

    Young energetic pulsars will likely be the largest class of Galactic sources observed by GLAST, with many hundreds detected. Many will be unknown as radio pulsars, making pulsation detection dependent on radio and/or x-ray observations or on blind periodicity searches of the gamma-rays. Estimates for the number of pulsars GLAST will detect in blind searches have ranged from tens to many hundreds. I argue that the number will be near the low end of this range, partly due to observations being made in a scanning as opposed to a pointing mode. This paper briefly reviews how blind pulsar searches will be conducted using GLAST, what limits these searches, and how the computations and statistics scale with various parameters.

  20. Exploring the High Energy Universe: GLAST Mission and Science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McEnery, Julie

    2007-01-01

    GLAST, the Gamma-Ray Large Area Space Telescope, is NASA's next-generation high-energy gamma-ray satellite scheduled for launch in Autumn 2007. GLAST will allow measurements of cosmic gamma-ray sources in t he 10 MeV to 100 GeV energy band to be made with unprecedented sensi tivity. Amongst its key scientific objectives are to understand part icle acceleration in Active Galactic Nuclei, Pulsars and Supernovae Remnants, to provide high resolution measurements of unidentified ga mma-ray sources, to study transient high energy emission from objects such as gamma-ray bursts, and to probe Dark Matter and the early Uni verse. Dr. McEnery will present an overview of the GLAST mission and its scientific goals.

  1. Exploring the High Energy Universe: GLAST Mission and Science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McEnery, Julie

    2007-01-01

    GLAST, the Gamma-Ray Large Area Space Telescope, is NASA's next-generation high-energy gamma-ray satellite scheduled for launch in Autumn 2007. GLAST will allow measurements of cosmic gamma-ray sources in the 10 MeV to 100 GeV energy band to be made with unprecedented sensitivity. Amongst its key scientific objectives are to understand particle acceleration in Active Galactic Nuclei, Pulsars and Supernovae Remnants, to provide high resolution measurements of unidentified gamma-ray sources, to study transient high energy emission from objects such as gamma-ray bursts, and to probe Dark Matter and the early Universe. Dr. McEnery will present an overview of the GLAST mission and its scientific goals.

  2. Finding (Or Not) New Gamma-Ray Pulsars with GLAST

    SciTech Connect

    Ransom, Scott M.; /NRAO, Charlottesville

    2011-11-29

    Young energetic pulsars will likely be the largest class of Galactic sources observed by GLAST, with many hundreds detected. Many will be unknown as radio pulsars, making pulsation detection dependent on radio and/or x-ray observations or on blind periodicity searches of the gamma-rays. Estimates for the number of pulsars GLAST will detect in blind searches have ranged from tens to many hundreds. I argue that the number will be near the low end of this range, partly due to observations being made in a scanning as opposed to a pointing mode. This paper briefly reviews how blind pulsar searches will be conducted using GLAST, what limits these searches, and how the computations and statistics scale with various parameters.

  3. Validation of the GLAST Burst Monitor Instrument Response Simulation Software

    SciTech Connect

    Hoover, A. S.; Klimenko, A.; Kippen, R. M.; Wallace, M. S.; Pendleton, G. N.; Meegan, C. A.; Fishman, G. J.; Wilson-Hodge, C. A.; Kouveliotou, C.; Preece, R. D.; Connaughton, V.; Briggs, M. S.; Paciesas, W. S.; Bhat, P. N.

    2007-07-12

    The GLAST Burst Monitor (GBM) comprises 12 NaI and 2 BGO detectors dispersed about the GLAST spacecraft. The GBM instrument simulation software must generate an accurate response function database for all detectors in their flight configuration to optimize the mission science return. Before science analysis codes use the response database, we must confirm that our simulation codes and models can reproduce laboratory observations. To validate the simulation effort, Monte Carlo results are compared to calibrated laboratory measurements collected with a variety of radiation sources.

  4. GLAST and Dark Matter Substructure in the Milky Way

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhlen, Michael; Diemand, Juerg; Madau, Piero

    2007-07-12

    We discuss the possibility of GLAST detecting gamma-rays from the annihilation of neutralino dark matter in the Galactic halo. We have used ''Via Lactea'', currently the highest resolution simulation of cold dark matter substructure, to quantify the contribution of subhalos to the annihilation signal. We present a simulated allsky map of the expected gamma-ray counts from dark matter annihilation, assuming standard values of particle mass and cross section. In this case GLAST should be able to detect the Galactic center and several individual subhalos.

  5. GLAST observation of high-redshift GRBs

    SciTech Connect

    Bissaldi, Elisabetta; Longo, Francesco; Barbiellini, Guido; Calura, Francesco; Matteucci, Francesca; Omodei, Nicola

    2007-07-12

    We compare predicted Type Ib/c supernova (SNIb/c) rates with the observed long-duration Gamma-Ray-Burst (GRB) rates both locally and as a function of redshift, by assuming different star formation histories in galaxies of different morphological types. Due to the high star formation in spheroids at high redshift, we predict a large number of GRBs beyond z > 7. Moreover, based on our studies and on the current LAT performance, an estimate of the detection possibility of this burst population is presented.

  6. Supernova Remnants, Cosmic Rays, and GLAST

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, Steve

    2006-02-13

    The shock waves of supernova remnants (SNRs) are the traditional sources of Galactic cosmic rays, at least up to about 3000 TeV (the 'knee' energy in the cosmic-ray spectrum). In the last decade or so, X-ray observations have confirmed in a few SNRs the presence of synchrotron-X-ray-emitting electrons with energies of order 100 TeV. TeV photons from SNRs have been observed with ground-based air Cerenkov telescopes as well, but it is still unclear whether they are due to hadronic processes (inelastic p-p scattering of cosmic-ray protons from thermal gas, with secondary neutral pions decaying to gamma rays), or to leptonic processes (inverse-Compton upscattering of cosmic microwave background photons, or bremsstrahlung). The spatial structure of synchrotron X-rays as observed with the Chandra X-ray Observatory suggests the remarkable possibility that magnetic fields are amplified by orders of magnitude in strong shock waves. The electron spectra inferred from X-rays reach 100 TeV, but at that energy are cutting off steeply, well below the 'knee' energy. Are the cutoff processes due only to radiative losses so that ion spectra might continue unsteepened? Can we confirm the presence of energetic ions in SNRs at all? Are typical SNRs capable of supplying the pool of Galactic cosmic rays? Is strong magnetic-field amplification a property of strong astrophysical shocks in general? These major questions require the next generation of observational tools. I shall outline the theoretical and observational framework of particle acceleration to high energies in SNRs, and shall describe how GLAST will advance this field.

  7. Supernova Remnants, Cosmic Rays, and GLAST

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, Steve

    2006-02-13

    The shock waves of supernova remnants (SNRs) are the traditional sources of Galactic cosmic rays, at least up to about 3000 TeV (the "knee" energy in the cosmic-ray spectrum). In the last decade or so, X-ray observations have confirmed in a few SNRs the presence of synchrotron-X-ray-emitting electrons with energies of order 100 TeV. TeV photons from SNRs have been observed with ground-based air Cerenkov telescopes as well, but it is still unclear whether they are due to hadronic processes (inelastic p-p scattering of cosmic-ray protons from thermal gas, with secondary neutral pions decaying to gamma rays), or to leptonic processes (inverse-Compton upscattering of cosmic microwave background photons, or bremsstrahlung). The spatial structure of synchrotron X-rays as observed with the Chandra X-ray Observatory suggests the remarkable possibility that magnetic fields are amplified by orders of magnitude in strong shock waves. The electron spectra inferred from X-rays reach 100 TeV, but at that energy are cutting off steeply, well below the "knee" energy. Are the cutoff processes due only to radiative losses so that ion spectra might continue unsteepened? Can we confirm the presence of energetic ions in SNRs at all? Are typical SNRs capable of supplying the pool of Galactic cosmic rays? Is strong magnetic-field amplification a property of strong astrophysical shocks in general? These major questions require the next generation of observational tools. I shall outline the theoretical and observational framework of particle acceleration to high energies in SNRs, and shall describe how GLAST will advance this field.

  8. Fermi's Large Area Telescope (LAT)

    NASA Video Gallery

    Fermi’s Large Area Telescope (LAT) is the spacecraft’s main scientificinstrument. This animation shows a gamma ray (purple) entering the LAT,where it is converted into an electron (red) and a...

  9. A Catalog of Candidate High-redshift Blazars for GLAST

    SciTech Connect

    Arias, Tersi M.; /SLAC /San Francisco State U.

    2006-09-27

    High-redshift blazars are promising candidates for detection by the Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST). GLAST, expected to be launched in the Fall of 2007, is a high-energy gamma-ray observatory designed for making observations of celestial gamma-ray sources in the energy band extending from 10 MeV to more than 200 GeV. It is estimated that GLAST will find several thousand blazars. The motivations for measuring the gamma-ray emission from distant blazars include the study of the high-energy emission processes occurring in these sources and an indirect measurement of the extragalactic background light. In anticipation of the launch of GLAST we have compiled a catalog of candidate high-redshift blazars. The criteria for sources chosen for the catalog were: high radio emission, high redshift, and a flat radio spectrum. A preliminary list of 307 radio sources brighter than 70mJy with a redshift z {ge} 2.5 was acquired using data from the NASA Extragalactic Database. Flux measurements of each source were obtained at two or more radio frequencies from surveys and catalogs to calculate their radio spectral indices {alpha}. The sources with a flat-radio spectrum ({alpha} {le} 0.5) were selected for the catalog, and the final catalog includes about 200 sources.

  10. ORNL SunTracker

    SciTech Connect

    Wysor, Robert Wesley

    2005-09-14

    The ORNL Sun Tracker software is the user interface that operates on a Personal Computer and serially communicates with the controller board. This software allows the user to manually operate the Hybrid Solar Lighting (HSL) unit. It displays the current location of the HSL unit, its parameters and it provides real-time monitoring. The ORNL Sun Tracker software is also the main component used in setting up and calibrating the tracker. It contains a setup screen that requires latitude, longitude, and a few other key values to accurately locate the sun's position. The software also will provide the user access to calibrate the tracking location in relation to the sun's actual position.

  11. Observation of the Milky Way with the High Energy Gamma-Ray Satellite GLAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizushima, H.; Ohto, A.; Mizuno, T.; Yoshida, S.; Fukazawa, Y.; Ohsugi, T.; Ozaki, M.; Tajima, H.; Kamae, T.

    Gamma-ray observations of the universe have revealed that pulsars and Active Galactic Nuclei as well as the Milky Way are gamma-ray emitters, and thus gamma-ray observation is very important for the study of these objects. GLAST (Gamma Ray Large Area Space Telescope) is a gamma-ray satellite which will be launched in 2006. GLAST has a wide energy range, large field of view, and good angular resolution and energy resolution. In this paper, some of the scientific topics planned for GLAST are presented, in addition to the developments of the background simulator which will be necessary to analyze the GLAST data.

  12. Miniature Laser Tracker

    DOEpatents

    Vann, Charles S.

    2003-09-09

    This small, inexpensive, non-contact laser sensor can detect the location of a retroreflective target in a relatively large volume and up to six degrees of position. The tracker's laser beam is formed into a plane of light which is swept across the space of interest. When the beam illuminates the retroreflector, some of the light returns to the tracker. The intensity, angle, and time of the return beam is measured to calculate the three dimensional location of the target. With three retroreflectors on the target, the locations of three points on the target are measured, enabling the calculation of all six degrees of target position. Until now, devices for three-dimensional tracking of objects in a large volume have been heavy, large, and very expensive. Because of the simplicity and unique characteristics of this tracker, it is capable of three-dimensional tracking of one to several objects in a large volume, yet it is compact, light-weight, and relatively inexpensive. Alternatively, a tracker produces a diverging laser beam which is directed towards a fixed position, and senses when a retroreflective target enters the fixed field of view. An optically bar coded target can be read by the tracker to provide information about the target. The target can be formed of a ball lens with a bar code on one end. As the target moves through the field, the ball lens causes the laser beam to scan across the bar code.

  13. GLAST, the Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ritz, Steven

    2007-01-01

    The Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope, GLAST, is a mission to measure the cosmic gamma-ray flux in the energy range 20 MeV to greater than 300 GeV, with supporting measurements for gamma-ray bursts from 10 keV to 25 MeV. With its upcoming launch in 2008, GLAST will open a new and important window on a wide variety of phenomena, including black holes and active galactic nuclei; the optical-UV extragalactic background light, gamma-ray bursts; the origin of cosmic rays and supernova remnants; and searches for hypothetical new phenomena such as supersymmetric dark matter annihilations and Lorentz invariance violation. In addition to the science opportunities, this talk includes a description of the instruments, the collaboration between particle physicists and astrophysicists, the opportunities for guest observers, and the mission status.

  14. Estimation of Electron Temperature on Glass Spherical Tokamak (GLAST)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussain, S.; Sadiq, M.; Shah, S. I. W.; GLAST Team

    2015-03-01

    Glass Spherical Tokamak (GLAST) is a small spherical tokamak indigenously developed in Pakistan with an insulating vacuum vessel. A commercially available 2.45 GHz magnetron is used as pre-ionization source for plasma current startup. Different diagnostic systems like Rogowski coils, magnetic probes, flux loops, Langmuir probe, fast imaging and emission spectroscopy are installed on the device. The plasma temperature inside of GLAST, at the time of maxima of plasma current, is estimated by taking into account the Spitzer resistivity calculations with some experimentally determined plasma parameters. The plasma resistance is calculated by using Ohm's law with plasma current and loop voltage as experimentally determined inputs. The plasma resistivity is then determined by using length and area of the plasma column. Finally, the average plasma electron temperature is predicted to be 12.65eV for taking neon (Ne) as a working gas.

  15. Energy calibration of Cherenkov Telescopes using GLAST data

    SciTech Connect

    Bastieri, D.; Busetto, G.; Piano, G.; Rando, R.; Saggion, A.; De Angelis, A.; Longo, F.

    2007-07-12

    We discuss the possibility of using the observations by GLAST of steady gamma sources, as the Crab Nebula and some selected AGNs, to calibrate the Imaging Air Cherenkov Telescopes (IACT) and improve their energy resolution, in particular. We show that at around 100 GeV, exploiting the features in the spectrum of the Crab Nebula, the absolute energy calibration uncertainty of Cherenkov telescopes can be reduced to < 10%.

  16. GLAST And Dark Matter Substructure in the Milky Way

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhlen, Michael; Diemand, Jurg; Madau, Piero; /UC, Santa Cruz, Astron. Astrophys. /Garching, Max Planck Inst.

    2011-11-29

    We discuss the possibility of GLAST detecting gamma-rays from the annihilation of neutralino dark matter in the Galactic halo. We have used 'Via Lactea', currently the highest resolution simulation of cold dark matter substructure, to quantify the contribution of subhalos to the annihilation signal. We present a simulated allsky map of the expected gamma-ray counts from dark matter annihilation, assuming standard values of particle mass and cross section. In this case GLAST should be able to detect the Galactic center and several individual subhalos. One of the most exciting discoveries that the Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) could make, is the detection of gamma-rays from the annihilation of dark matter (DM). Such a measurement would directly address one of the major physics problems of our time: the nature of the DM particle. Whether or not GLAST will actually detect a DM annihilation signal depends on both unknown particle physics and unknown astrophysics theory. Particle physics uncertainties include the type of particle (axion, neutralino, Kaluza-Klein particle, etc.), its mass, and its interaction cross section. From the astrophysical side it appears that DM is not smoothly distributed throughout the Galaxy halo, but instead exhibits abundant clumpy substructure, in the form of thousands of so-called subhalos. The observability of DM annihilation radiation originating in Galactic DM subhalos depends on their abundance, distribution, and internal properties. Numerical simulations have been used in the past to estimate the annihilation flux from DM substructure, but since the subhalo properties, especially their central density profile, which determines their annihilation luminosity, are very sensitive to numerical resolution, it makes sense to re-examine their contribution with higher resolution simulations.

  17. Blazar Continuum Variability II: Entering the GLAST Era

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, D. J.

    2005-01-01

    Intense, highly-variable gamma-ray emission from blazars was a principal discovery made with EGRET on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory. The EGRET data remain a valuable resource for modeling of blazar astrophysics and for planning of future gamma-ray missions such as AGILE and GLAST. This presentation will review a bit of history and summarize the EGRET blazar legacy, with emphasis on work done since the end of the Compton Observatory mission.

  18. Processing GPS Receiver Data for Improved Fermi GLAST Navigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodard, Mark A.

    2008-01-01

    Fermi GLAST s 5-year mission objectives: a) Explore the most extreme environments in the Universe. b) Search for signs of new laws of physics and what composes the mysterious Dark Matter. c) Explain how black holes accelerate immense jets of material to nearly light speed. d) Help crack the mysteries of gamma-ray bursts. e) Answer long-standing questions across a broad range of topics, including solar flares, pulsars and the origin of cosmic rays.

  19. ORNL SunTracker

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2005-09-14

    The ORNL Sun Tracker software is the user interface that operates on a Personal Computer and serially communicates with the controller board. This software allows the user to manually operate the Hybrid Solar Lighting (HSL) unit. It displays the current location of the HSL unit, its parameters and it provides real-time monitoring. The ORNL Sun Tracker software is also the main component used in setting up and calibrating the tracker. It contains a setup screenmore » that requires latitude, longitude, and a few other key values to accurately locate the sun's position. The software also will provide the user access to calibrate the tracking location in relation to the sun's actual position.« less

  20. Suzaku Observations of AGN and Synergy with GLAST

    SciTech Connect

    Kataoka, Jun; Takahashi, Tad; Madejski, Greg; /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2007-10-29

    In next five years, dramatic progress is anticipated for the AGN studies, as we have two important missions to observe celestial sources in the high energy regime: GLAST and Suzaku. Suzaku is the 5th Japanese X-ray astronomy satellite which was successfully launched in July 2005. It carries four X-ray sensitive imaging CCD cameras (0.2-12 keV) located in the focal planes of X-ray telescope, and a non-imaging, collimated hard X-ray detector, which extends the bandpass of the observatory to include the 10-600 keV range. Simultaneous monitoring observations by the two instruments (GLAST and Suzaku) will be particularly valuable for variable radio-loud AGN, allowing the cross-correlations of time series as well as detailed modeling of the spectral evolution between the X-ray and gamma-ray energy bands. In this paper, we show early highlights from Suzaku observations of radio-loud AGNs, and discuss what we can do with GLAST in forthcoming years.

  1. The Spectral Index Distribution of EGRET Blazars: Prospects for GLAST

    SciTech Connect

    Venters, Tonia M.; Pavlidou, Vasiliki; /SLAC

    2011-11-29

    The intrinsic distribution of spectral indices in GeV energies of gamma-ray-loud blazars is a critical input in determining the spectral shape of the unresolved blazar contribution to the diffuse extragalactic gamma-ray background, as well as an important test of blazar emission theories. We present a maximum-likelihood method of determining the intrinsic spectral index distribution (ISID) of a population of {gamma}-ray emitters which accounts for error in measurement of individual spectral indices, and we apply it to EGRET blazars. We find that the most likely Gaussian ISID for EGRET blazars has a mean of 2.27 and a standard deviation of 0.20. We additionally find some indication that FSRQs and BL Lacs may have different ISIDs (with BL Lacs being harder). We also test for spectral index hardening associated with blazar variability for which we find no evidence. Finally, we produce simulated GLAST spectral index datasets and perform the same analyses. With improved statistics due to the much larger number of resolvable blazars, GLAST data will help us determine the ISIDs with much improved accuracy. Should any difference exist between the ISIDs of BL Lacs and FSRQs or between the ISIDs of blazars in the quiescent and flaring states, GLAST data will be adequate to separate these ISIDs at a significance better than 3{sigma}.

  2. The Fermi LAT Pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romani, Roger W.

    2011-08-01

    The Large Area Telescope on the Fermi satellite is an impressive pulsar discovery machine, with over 75 pulse detections and counting. The populations of radio-selected, γ-selected and millisecond pulsars are now large enough to display observational patterns in the light curves and luminosities. These patterns are starting to teach us about the physics of the emission zone, which seems dominated by open field lines near the speed of light cylinder. The sample also provides initial inferences about the pulsar population. Apparently a large fraction of neutron stars have a young energetic γ-ray emitting phase, making these objects a good probe of massive star evolution. The long-lived millisecond γ-ray pulsars are even more ubiquitous and may produce a significant fraction of the γ-ray background. In any event, it is clear that the present LAT pulsar sample is dominated by nearby objects, and there is every expectation that the number, and quality, of pulsar detections will increase in years to come.

  3. Teaching Astronomy Using Tracker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belloni, Mario; Christian, Wolfgang; Brown, Douglas

    2013-03-01

    A recent paper in this journal1 presented a set of innovative uses of video analysis for introductory physics using Tracker. In addition, numerous other papers have described how video analysis can be a meaningful part of introductory courses.2-4 Yet despite this, there are few resources for using video analysis in introductory astronomy classes. In this paper we describe the use of Tracker in introductory astronomy to analyze a ``video'' consisting of a series of still images of star fields and sunspots. Because astronomy focuses on concepts unfamiliar to most students, the visualization that video analysis provides can be especially valuable.

  4. Vidicon star tracker.

    PubMed

    Schuck, W H

    1966-04-01

    In many applications of star trackers, extremely short acquisition times, as well as accuracy and sensitivity, are required. Tracking systems employing the vidicon as a radiation sensor have been shown to provide the necessary speed of acquisition for such applications. This paper discusses the various theoretical and practical considerations involved in using the vidicon as a sensor in a star tracking system. A typical system configuration including telescope, sensor, and processing electronics is presented. The various optical and sensor parametric relationships required in the design of a vidicon star tracker are fully discussed and analyzed. PMID:20048884

  5. Sharper Fermi LAT images: instrument response functions for an improved event selection

    SciTech Connect

    Portillo, Stephen K. N.; Finkbeiner, Douglas P.

    2014-11-20

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT) on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope has a point-spread function (PSF) with large tails, consisting of events affected by tracker inefficiencies, inactive volumes, and hard scattering; these tails can make source confusion a limiting factor. The parameter CTBCORE, available in the publicly available Extended Fermi LAT data (available at http://fermi.gsfc.nasa.gov/ssc/data/access/), estimates the quality of each event's direction reconstruction; by implementing a cut in this parameter, the tails of the PSF can be suppressed at the cost of losing effective area. We implement cuts on CTBCORE and present updated instrument response functions derived from the Fermi LAT data itself, along with all-sky maps generated with these cuts. Having shown the effectiveness of these cuts, especially at low energies, we encourage their use in analyses where angular resolution is more important than Poisson noise.

  6. Teaching Astronomy Using Tracker

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belloni, Mario; Christian, Wolfgang; Brown, Douglas

    2013-01-01

    A recent paper in this journal presented a set of innovative uses of video analysis for introductory physics using Tracker. In addition, numerous other papers have described how video analysis can be a meaningful part of introductory courses. Yet despite this, there are few resources for using video analysis in introductory astronomy classes. In…

  7. Rotational Dynamics with Tracker

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eadkhong, T.; Rajsadorn, R.; Jannual, P.; Danworaphong, S.

    2012-01-01

    We propose the use of Tracker, freeware for video analysis, to analyse the moment of inertia ("I") of a cylindrical plate. Three experiments are performed to validate the proposed method. The first experiment is dedicated to find the linear coefficient of rotational friction ("b") for our system. By omitting the effect of such friction, we derive…

  8. MediaTracker system

    SciTech Connect

    Sandoval, D. M.; Strittmatter, R. B.; Abeyta, J. D.; Brown, J.; Marks, T. , Jr.; Martinez, B. J.; Jones, D. B.; Hsue, W.

    2004-01-01

    The initial objectives of this effort were to provide a hardware and software platform that can address the requirements for the accountability of classified removable electronic media and vault access logging. The Media Tracker system software assists classified media custodian in managing vault access logging and Media Tracking to prevent the inadvertent violation of rules or policies for the access to a restricted area and the movement and use of tracked items. The MediaTracker system includes the software tools to track and account for high consequence security assets and high value items. The overall benefits include: (1) real-time access to the disposition of all Classified Removable Electronic Media (CREM), (2) streamlined security procedures and requirements, (3) removal of ambiguity and managerial inconsistencies, (4) prevention of incidents that can and should be prevented, (5) alignment with the DOE's initiative to achieve improvements in security and facility operations through technology deployment, and (6) enhanced individual responsibility by providing a consistent method of dealing with daily responsibilities. In response to initiatives to enhance the control of classified removable electronic media (CREM), the Media Tracker software suite was developed, piloted and implemented at the Los Alamos National Laboratory beginning in July 2000. The Media Tracker software suite assists in the accountability and tracking of CREM and other high-value assets. One component of the MediaTracker software suite provides a Laboratory-approved media tracking system. Using commercial touch screen and bar code technology, the MediaTracker (MT) component of the MediaTracker software suite provides an efficient and effective means to meet current Laboratory requirements and provides new-engineered controls to help assure compliance with those requirements. It also establishes a computer infrastructure at vault entrances for vault access logging, and can accommodate

  9. The LHCb silicon tracker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adeva, B.; Agari, M.; Bauer, C.; Baumeister, D.; Bay, A.; Bernhard, R. P.; Bernet, R.; Blouw, J.; Carron, B.; Ermoline, Y.; Esperante, D.; Frei, R.; Gassner, J.; Hofmann, W.; Jimenez-Otero, S.; Knöpfle, K. T.; Köstner, S.; Lehner, F.; Löchner, S.; Lois, C.; Needham, M.; Pugatch, V.; Schmelling, M.; Schwingenheuer, B.; Siegler, M.; Steinkamp, O.; Straumann, U.; Tran, M. T.; Vazquez, P.; Vollhardt, A.; Volyanskyy, D.; Voss, H.

    2005-07-01

    LHCb is a dedicated B-physics and CP-violation experiment for the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. Efficient track reconstruction and excellent trigger performances are essential in order to exploit fully its physics potential. Silicon strip detectors providing fast signal generation, high resolution and fine granularity are used for this purpose in the large area Trigger Tracker station in front of the spectrometer magnet and the LHCb Inner Tracker covering the area close to the beam pipe behind the magnet. Long read-out strips of up to 38 cm are used together with fast signal shaping adapted to the 25 ns LHC bunch crossing. The design of these tracking stations, the silicon sensor strip geometries and the latest test results are presented here.

  10. The Tevatron Chromaticity tracker

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Cheng-Yang; /Fermilab

    2008-12-01

    The Tevatron chromaticity tracker (CT) has been successfully commissioned and is now operational. The basic idea behind the CT is that when the phase of the Tevatron RF is slowly modulated, the beam momentum is also modulated. This momentum modulation is coupled transversely via chromaticity to manifest as a phase modulation on the betatron tune. Thus by phase demodulating the betatron tune, the chromaticity can be recovered. However, for the phase demodulation to be successful, it is critical that the betatron tune be a coherent signal that can be easily picked up by a phase detector. This is easily done because the Tevatron has a phase locked loop (PLL) based tune tracker which coherently excites the beam at the betatron tune.

  11. The Burst Monitor (GBM) on-board GLAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgii, R.

    The Gamma-ray Large-Area Space Telescope (GLAST) will be the next major NASA mission for high-energy γ-ray astronomy after EGRET. Presently the launch is foreseen for the end of 2005. Its scientific objective will be to observe AGNs, pulsars, SN remnants and interactions of cosmic rays with the interstellar medium from 10 MeV to 300 GeV. Another important objective will be the study of γ-ray burst spectra and time profiles at the high-energy end. A Burst Monitor ((GBM) will be on board of GLAST and will be built, by a collaboration of MSFC/UAH and the MPE, to enhance the γ-ray burst-detection capability of GLAST considerably. It will measure burst spectra between 5 keV and 30 MeV with an energy resolution between ≈3% (at 20 MeV) and ≈50% (at 5 keV). Thus an energy range of more than 6 decades will be accessible in burst spectra for the first time. Moreover it will measure the light curves with an absolute time accuracy of 10 μsec. Furthermore the GBM will provide an on-board position to the main instrument for repointing purposes, allowing for an observation of a burst with the main telescope within 10 minutes. Through an energy range similar to that of BASTE continuity with the large data base of γ-ray burst-spectra parameters can be achieved, putting the expected high-energy emission in a better context. In this talk the scientific goals of the GBM and its technical realisation will be presented.

  12. The LHCb Silicon Tracker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobin, Mark

    2013-12-01

    The LHCb experiment is designed to perform high-precision measurements of CP violation and search for new physics using the enormous flux of beauty and charm hadrons produced at the LHC. The LHCb detector is a single-arm spectrometer with excellent tracking and particle identification capabilities. The Silicon Tracker is part of the tracking system and measures very precisely the particle trajectories coming from the interaction point in the region of high occupancies around the beam axis. The LHCb Silicon Tracker covers a total sensitive area of about 12 m2 using silicon micro-strip detectors with long readout strips. It consists of one four-layer tracking station before the LHCb dipole magnet and three stations after. The detector has performed extremely well since the start of the LHC operation despite the fact that the experiment is collecting data at instantaneous luminosities well above the design value. This paper reports on the operation and performance of the Silicon Tracker during the Physics data taking at the LHC during the last two years.

  13. GLAST and GRBs: Probing Photon Propagation over cosmological distances

    SciTech Connect

    Longo, Francesco; Omodei, Nicola; Cohen-Tanugi, Johann; Scargle, Jeff D.; Piron, Frederic

    2006-05-19

    Especially in the framework of Quantum Gravity, it is theoretically possible that photons of different energy propagate at different velocity. Gamma-ray Bursts (GRBs), due to their large distances and rapid variability in a broad energy band, are perhaps the best astronomical sources in which to measure any such dispersion over cosmological distances. GLAST will detect several GRBs per year at GeV energies, where the effect may be detectable. We address problems of optimal sensitivity and discrimination against energy-dependent effects intrinsic to GRB emission, using simulated data and new unbinned lag-detection algorithms.

  14. The Origin of Cosmic Rays: What can GLAST Say?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ormes, Jonathan F.; Digel, Seith; Moskalenko, Igor V.; Moiseev, Alexander; Williamson, Roger

    2000-01-01

    Gamma rays in the band from 30 MeV to 300 GeV, used in combination with direct measurements and with data from radio and X-ray bands, provide a powerful tool for studying the origin of Galactic cosmic rays. Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) with its fine 10-20 arcmin angular resolution will be able to map the sites of acceleration of cosmic rays and their interactions with interstellar matter, It will provide information that is necessary to study the acceleration of energetic particles in supernova shocks, their transport in the interstellar medium and penetration into molecular clouds.

  15. Viewing the Violent Universe with SWIFT and GLAST

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, David J.

    2005-01-01

    As the most energetic form of light, gamma rays help reveal information about some of the most violent phenomena in the Universe. Previous space missions like the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory provided the observations that set the stage for two 21st century gamma-ray programs. Swift, launched in Fall, 2004, concentrates on gamma-ray bursts, the most powerful explosions in the Universe. GLAST, the Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope, will be launched in 2007 to study objects like blazars, pulsars, supernovae, and unidentified sources.

  16. The Synergy of Gamma-Ray Burst Detectors In The Glast Era

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Band, David L.

    2008-01-01

    Simultaneous observations by the large number of gamma-ray burst detectors operating in the GLAST era will provide the spectra, lightcurves and locations necessary for studying burst physics and testing the putative relations between intrinsic burst properties. The detectors' energy band and the accumulation timescale of their trigger system affect their sensitivity to hard vs. soft and long vs. short bursts. Coordination of the Swift and GLAST observing plans consistent with Swift's other science objectives could increase the rate of GLAST bursts with redshifts.

  17. Instrument Response Modeling and Simulation for the GLAST Burst Monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Kippen, R. M.; Hoover, A. S.; Wallace, M. S.; Pendleton, G. N.; Meegan, C. A.; Fishman, G. J.; Wilson-Hodge, C. A.; Kouveliotou, C.; Preece, R. D.; Connaughton, V.; Briggs, M. S.; Paciesas, W. S.; Bhat, P. N.

    2007-07-12

    The GLAST Burst Monitor (GBM) is designed to provide wide field of view observations of gamma-ray bursts and other fast transient sources in the energy range 10 keV to 30 MeV. The GBM is composed of several unshielded and uncollimated scintillation detectors (twelve NaI and two BGO) that are widely dispersed about the GLAST spacecraft. As a result, reconstructing source locations, energy spectra, and temporal properties from GBM data requires detailed knowledge of the detectors' response to both direct radiation as well as that scattered from the spacecraft and Earth's atmosphere. This full GBM instrument response will be captured in the form of a response function database that is derived from computer modeling and simulation. The simulation system is based on the GEANT4 Monte Carlo radiation transport simulation toolset, and is being extensively validated against calibrated experimental GBM data. We discuss the architecture of the GBM simulation and modeling system and describe how its products will be used for analysis of observed GBM data. Companion papers describe the status of validating the system.

  18. MAXI and GLAST Studies of Jets in Active Galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Madejski, Greg; Kataoka, Jun; Sikora, Marek

    2008-10-13

    The recent launch of GLAST--coinciding with the MAXI workshop--opens a new era for studies of jet-dominated active galaxies, known as blazars. While the emission processes operating in various spectral bands in blazars are reasonably well understood, the knowledge of the details of the structure of the jet, location of the dissipation region with respect to the accreting black hole, and coupling of the jet to the accretion process are known only at a rudimentary level. Blazars are variable, and this provides an opportunity to use the variability in various bands--and in particular, the relationship of respective time series to each other--to explore the relative location of regions responsible for emission in the respective bands. Observationally, this requires well-sampled time series in as many spectral bands as possible. To this end, with its all-sky, sensitive monitoring capability, the recently launched GLAST, and MAXI, to be deployed in 2009, are the most promising instruments bound to provide good sampling in respectively the energetic gamma-ray, and the soft X-ray band. This paper highlights the inferences regarding blazar jets that can be gleaned from such joint observations.

  19. Tracker 300 Software

    SciTech Connect

    Wysor, R. Wes

    2006-01-12

    The Tracker300 software is downloaded to an off-the-shelf product called RCM3400/RCM3410 made by Rabbit Semiconductor. The software is a closed loop control which computes the sun's position and provides stability compensation. Using the RCM3400/RCM3410 module, the software stores and retrieves parameters from the onboard flash. The software also allows for communication with a host. It will allow the parameters to be downloaded or uploaded, it will show the status of the controller, it will provide real-time feedback, and it will send command acknowledgements. The software will capture the GPS response and ensure the internal clock is set correctly.

  20. CMS tracker visualization tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mennea, M. S.; Osborne, I.; Regano, A.; Zito, G.

    2005-08-01

    This document will review the design considerations, implementations and performance of the CMS Tracker Visualization tools. In view of the great complexity of this sub-detector (more than 50 millions channels organized in 16540 modules each one of these being a complete detector), the standard CMS visualization tools (IGUANA and IGUANACMS) that provide basic 3D capabilities and integration within CMS framework, respectively, have been complemented with additional 2D graphics objects. Based on the experience acquired using this software to debug and understand both hardware and software during the construction phase, we propose possible future improvements to cope with online monitoring and event analysis during data taking.

  1. GLAST Burst Monitor On-Board Triggering, Locations and Event Classification

    SciTech Connect

    Briggs, M. S.; Connaughton, V.; Paciesas, W.; Preece, R.; Meegan, C. A.; Fishman, G.; Kouveliotou, C.; Wilson-Hodge, C.; Diehl, R.; Greiner, J.; Kienlin, A. von; Lichti, G.; Steinle, H.; Kippen, R. M.

    2007-07-12

    We report on how the the GLAST Burst Monitor (GBM) Flight Software will detect gamma-ray rate increases, a process known as 'triggering', and on how the Flight Software will locate and classify the causes of the triggers.

  2. Recent HiLat results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fremouw, E. J.

    1985-11-01

    The Defense Nuclear Agency (DNA) HiLat Satellite was launched on 27 June 1983 for the purpose of studying the development and dynamics of F-layer irregularities between the plasmapause and the pole. In a circular 800-km orbit at 82 inclination, it carries (1) a coherent radio beacon for measuring complex-signal scintillation and TEC, (2) a three-instrument thermal-plasma experiment consisting of a Langmuiare probe (debilitated on launch), a retarding-potential analyzer (RPA), and an ion drift meter; (3) an energetic-electron spectrometer operating between 20 ev and 20 kev, (4) a three-axis fluxgate magnetometer, and (5) an optical package consisting of a vacuum-ultraviolet (vuv) imaging spectrophometer (failed after collecting forty orbits of data) and two visible-wavelength telephotometers. All instruments other than the Langmuire probe and the vuv imager continue to operate reliably. To date, HiLat has returned the following three specific observations of note: first auroral image in full daylight, most intense field-aligned current flowing into the ionsophere, and energy-dispersed electron precipitation impulses with about a one-second periodicity. These observations and on-going analyses of HiLat's bulk data base are summarized.

  3. Search for GLAST gamma ray burst triggers due to particle precipitation in the South Atlantic Anomaly

    SciTech Connect

    Augusto, C. R. A.; Navia, C. E.; Tsui, K. H.

    2008-10-15

    When GLAST is in the South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA), the rate of charged particles is too high to be efficiently filtered out. Moreover the high rate can cause saturation effects in the readout electronics and the sensors must be turned off. The SAA area relative to the total area of GLAST's orbit is approximately 12.5% and GLAST spends 18% of the time in it. In spite of these cares, we show in this work that, due to drift processes, particle precipitation can still trigger GLAST when it is close to the SAA region. Here, we report two GLAST gamma ray burst monitor (GBM) triggers, trigger 239895229 and trigger 239913100, on August, 08, 2008 whose characteristics are similar to the ones observed in the Swift-BAT noise triggers (due to particle precipitation in the SAA region). Both GLAST triggers happened during a plentiful particle precipitation in the SAA region, observed by Tupi telescopes at the ground with their trigger coordinates close to the field of view of the telescopes. Details of these results are reported.

  4. BKGE: Fermi-LAT Background Estimator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasileiou, Vlasios

    2014-11-01

    The Fermi-LAT Background Estimator (BKGE) is a publicly available open-source tool that can estimate the expected background of the Fermi-LAT for any observational conguration and duration. It produces results in the form of text files, ROOT files, gtlike source-model files (for LAT maximum likelihood analyses), and PHA I/II FITS files (for RMFit/XSpec spectral fitting analyses). Its core is written in C++ and its user interface in Python.

  5. Fermi-LAT detection of increased gamma-ray activity from the blazar PKS 0727-115

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horan, D.; Hays, E. Gurwell, Mark A.

    2009-01-01

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT), one of the two instruments on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (formerly GLAST, launched June 11, 2008), has observed an increasing gamma-ray flux from a source positionally consistent with PKS 0727-115 (RA: 07h30m19.1s, Dec: -11d41m13s, J2000, z=1.59 ( Zensus et al. 2002)). Preliminary analysis indicates that over the past month the source has become, on average, brighter with a gamma-ray flux (E>100MeV) of approximately 5.0+/- 0.8 x 10^-7 photons cm^-2 s^-1 on weekly timescales and occasional day-scale detections at the level of approximately 4.0 +/- 1.0 x 10^-7 photons cm^-2 s^-1.

  6. Intelligent star tracker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Natalie

    2001-11-01

    Current state-of-the-art commercial star sensors typically weigh 15 pounds, attain 5 to 10 arc-second accuracy, and use roughly 10 watts of power. Unfortunately, the current state-of-the-art commercial star sensors do not meet many of NASA's next-generation spacecraft and instrument needs. Nor do they satisfy Air Force's needs for micro/nano-satellite systems. In an effort to satisfy micro/nano satellite mission needs the Air Force Research Laboratory is developing an intelligent star Tracker, called IntelliStar, which incorporates several novel technologies including Silicon carbide optical housing, MEMs based adaptive optic technologies, smart active pixels, and algebraic coding theory. The design considerations associated with the development of the IntelliStar system are presented along with experimental results which characterize each technologies contribution to overall system performance. In addition to being light weight, the IntelliStar System offers advantages in speed, size, power consumption, and radiation tolerance.

  7. Silicon tracker data acquisition

    SciTech Connect

    Haynes, W.J.

    1997-12-31

    Large particle physics experiments are making increasing technological demands on the design and implementation of real-time data acquisition systems. The LHC will have bunch crossing intervals of 25 nanoseconds and detectors, such as CMS, will contain over 10 million electronic channels. Readout systems will need to cope with 100 kHz rates of 1 MByte-sized events. Over 70% of this voluminous flow will stem from silicon tracker and MSGC devices. This paper describes the techniques currently being harnessed from ASIC devices through to modular microprocessor-based architectures around standards such as VMEbus and PCI. In particular, the experiences gained at the HERA H1 experiment are highlighted where many of the key technological concepts have already been im implemented.

  8. Tracker 300 Software

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2006-01-12

    The Tracker300 software is downloaded to an off-the-shelf product called RCM3400/RCM3410 made by Rabbit Semiconductor. The software is a closed loop control which computes the sun's position and provides stability compensation. Using the RCM3400/RCM3410 module, the software stores and retrieves parameters from the onboard flash. The software also allows for communication with a host. It will allow the parameters to be downloaded or uploaded, it will show the status of the controller, it will providemore » real-time feedback, and it will send command acknowledgements. The software will capture the GPS response and ensure the internal clock is set correctly.« less

  9. Optical Observations Of Fermi LAT Monitored Blazars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, Kyle; Carini, M. T.

    2009-01-01

    For the past 8 years the Bell Observatory at Western Kentucky University has been conducting R band monitoring of the variability of approximately 50 Blazars. A subset of these objects are being routinely observed with the LAT instrument on-board the Fermi Space Telescope. Adding the Robotically Controlled Telescope (RCT) at Kitt Peak National Observatory and observations with the AZT-11 telescope at the Crimean Astrophysical Observatory (CRAO), we are intensively monitoring the Blazars on the Lat monitoring list. We present the results of our long term monitoring of the LAT monitored Blazars, as well as the recent contemporaneous optical R band observations we have obtained of the LAT Blazars.

  10. Synergy Between Observations of AGN with GLAST and MAXI

    SciTech Connect

    Madejski, Grzegorz

    2002-03-25

    In five years' time we will witness the launch of two important missions developed to observe celestial sources in the high energy regime: GLAST, sensitive in the high energy {gamma}-ray band, and MAXI, the all-sky X-ray monitor. Simultaneous monitoring observations by the two instruments will be particularly valuable for variable sources, allowing cross-correlations of time series between the two bands. We present the anticipated results from such observations of active galaxies, and in particular, of the jet-dominated sub-class of AGN known as blazars. We discuss the constraints on the structure and emission processes--and in particular, on the internal shock models currently invoked to explain the particle acceleration processes in blazars--that can be derived with simultaneous {gamma}-ray and X-ray data.

  11. STAR heavy flavor tracker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Hao

    2014-11-01

    Hadrons containing heavy quarks are a clean probe of the early dynamic evolution of the dense and hot medium created in high-energy nuclear collisions. To explore heavy quark production at RHIC, the Heavy Flavor Tracker (HFT) for the STAR experiment was built and installed in time for RHIC Run 14. The HFT consists of four layers of silicon detectors. The two outermost layers are silicon strip detectors and the two innermost layers are made from state-of-the-art ultra-thin CMOS Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS). This is the first application of a CMOS MAPS detector in a collider experiment. The use of thin pixel sensors plus the use of carbon fiber supporting material limits the material budget to be only 0.4% radiation length per pixel detector layer, enabling the reconstruction of low pT heavy flavor hadrons. The status and performance of the HFT in the RHIC 200 GeV Au + Au run in 2014 are reported. Very good detector efficiency, hit residuals and track resolution (DCAs) were observed in the cosmic ray data and in the Au + Au data.

  12. WGM Temperature Tracker

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strekalov, Dmitry V.

    2012-01-01

    This software implements digital control of a WGM (whispering-gallerymode) resonator temperature based on the dual-mode approach. It comprises one acquisition (dual-channel) and three control modules. The interaction of the proportional-integral loops is designed in the original way, preventing the loops from fighting. The data processing is organized in parallel with the acquisition, which allows the computational overhead time to be suppressed or often completely avoided. WGM resonators potentially provide excellent optical references for metrology, clocks, spectroscopy, and other applications. However, extremely accurate (below micro-Kelvin) temperature stabilization is required. This software allows one specifically advantageous method of such stabilization to be implemented, which is immune to a variety of effects that mask the temperature variation. WGM Temperature Tracker 2.3 (see figure) is a LabVIEW code developed for dual-mode temperature stabilization of WGM resonators. It has allowed for the temperature stabilization at the level of 200 nK with one-second integration time, and 6 nK with 10,000-second integration time, with the above room-temperature set point. This software, in conjunction with the appropriate hardware, can be used as a noncryogenic temperature sensor/ controller with sub-micro-Kelvin sensitivity, which at the time of this reporting considerably outperforms the state of the art.

  13. Controls Request Tracker

    SciTech Connect

    White, Karen S; Kasemir, Kay; Hartman, Steven M; Verstovsek, Igor

    2009-01-01

    Controls groups at large accelerators are routinely called upon to build and support controls for virtually all machine systems. While construction projects within the US DOE system are normally carefully planned and tracked by project management professionals, this support ends when construction milestones are met. However, once construction is complete, work continues as the group performs ongoing support and maintenance while also implementing requested system improvements and upgrades. With customers from virtually every accelerator and experiment group, the demands on the group often exceed the capacity of available resources. This type of diverse workload needs to be well organized and managed in order set proper priorities and ensure efficient use of resources. At SNS, we have collaborated with Cosylab to develop Controls Request Tracker (CRT), which is adapted from the Cosylab Project Manager (CPM) software. The resulting system not only provides standard request tracking features, but is interfaced to the SNS Logbook and work control system. This paper will discuss CRT and how we use it to manage the work of our controls group.

  14. Schedule-Tracker Computer Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collazo, Fernando F.

    1990-01-01

    Schedule Tracker provides effective method for tracking tasks "past due" and/or "near term". Generates reports for each responsible staff member having one or more assigned tasks falling within two listed categories. Schedule Organizer (SO) (COSMIC program MSC-21525), Schedule Tracker (ST), and Schedule Report Generator (SRG) (COSMIC program MSC-21527) computer programs manipulating data-base files in ways advantageous in scheduling. Written in PL/1 and DEC Command Language (DCL).

  15. P07.04PROMOTER METHYLATION OF THE LATS1 AND LATS2 GENES IN SCHWANNOMAS

    PubMed Central

    Ohta, T.; Oh, J.; Mittelbronn, M.; Paulus, W.; Ohgaki, H.

    2014-01-01

    Schwannoma is a benign nerve sheath tumor that is typically encapsulated and composed of well-differentiated Schwann cellswhich comprises 5-10% of all intracranial tumors in adults. Approximately 90% of schwannomas are solitary and sporadic, whereas ∼4% are considered to arise in the setting of neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2) syndrome by NF2 germline mutations. The molecular basis of sporadic schwannomas is not fully understood, other than frequent NF2 mutations (∼60%). LATS1 and the related LATS2 are downstream molecules of NF2 and negative regulators of the YAP oncogene in the Salvador/Warts/Hippo (SWH) signaling pathway. Expression of these genes is reduced due to promoter methylation in a variety of neoplasms including gliomas. In the present study, methylation-specific PCR revealed promoter methylation of the LATS1 and LATS2 in 15 of 91 (16%) and 32 of 91 (35%) schwannomas, respectively. These alterations were significantly more frequent in spinal than in peripheral schwannomas (23% vs 3% for LATS1, P = 0.0171; 42% vs 21% for LATS2, P = 0.0386). LATS1 methylation was also detected in 3 of 4 schwannomatosis cases. Furthermore, neurofibroma / schwannoma hybrid tumors showed promoter methylation in LATS1 (3/14; 21%) and LATS2 (8/14; 57%). LATS1 and LATS2 promoter methylation were largely mutually exclusive, and there was a significant negative correlation (P = 0.003); only 10 cases had methylation in both genes. These results suggest that LATS1 and LATS2 promoter methylation may be additional molecular mechanisms resulting in an abnormal SWH pathway in schwannomas and related tumors.

  16. Digging for the Truth: Photon Archeology with GLAST

    SciTech Connect

    Stecker, F. W.

    2007-07-12

    Stecker, Malkan and Scully, have shown how ongoing deep surveys of galaxy luminosity functions, spectral energy distributions and backwards evolution models of star formation rates can be used to calculate the past history of intergalactic photon densities for energies from 0.03 eV to the Lyman limit at 13.6 eV and for redshifts out to 6 (called here the intergalactic background light or IBL). From these calculations of the IBL at various redshifts, they predict the present and past optical depth of the universe to high energy {gamma}-rays owing to interactions with photons of the IBL and the 2.7 K CMB. We discuss here how this proceedure can be reversed by looking for sharp cutoffs in the spectra of extragalactic {gamma}-ray sources such as blazars at high redshifts in the multi-GeV energy range with GLAST (Gamma-Ray Large Are Space Telescope). By determining the cutoff energies of sources with known redshifts, we can refine our determination of the IBL photon densities in the past, i.e., the archeo-IBL, and therefore get a better measure of the past history of the total star formation rate. Conversely, observations of sharp high energy cutoffs in the {gamma}-ray spectra of sources at unknown redshifts can be used instead of spectral lines to give a measure of their redshifts.

  17. Hyperspectral Imager-Tracker

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agurok, Llya

    2013-01-01

    The Hyperspectral Imager-Tracker (HIT) is a technique for visualization and tracking of low-contrast, fast-moving objects. The HIT architecture is based on an innovative and only recently developed concept in imaging optics. This innovative architecture will give the Light Prescriptions Innovators (LPI) HIT the possibility of simultaneously collecting the spectral band images (hyperspectral cube), IR images, and to operate with high-light-gathering power and high magnification for multiple fast- moving objects. Adaptive Spectral Filtering algorithms will efficiently increase the contrast of low-contrast scenes. The most hazardous parts of a space mission are the first stage of a launch and the last 10 kilometers of the landing trajectory. In general, a close watch on spacecraft operation is required at distances up to 70 km. Tracking at such distances is usually associated with the use of radar, but its milliradian angular resolution translates to 100- m spatial resolution at 70-km distance. With sufficient power, radar can track a spacecraft as a whole object, but will not provide detail in the case of an accident, particularly for small debris in the onemeter range, which can only be achieved optically. It will be important to track the debris, which could disintegrate further into more debris, all the way to the ground. Such fragmentation could cause ballistic predictions, based on observations using high-resolution but narrow-field optics for only the first few seconds of the event, to be inaccurate. No optical imager architecture exists to satisfy NASA requirements. The HIT was developed for space vehicle tracking, in-flight inspection, and in the case of an accident, a detailed recording of the event. The system is a combination of five subsystems: (1) a roving fovea telescope with a wide 30 field of regard; (2) narrow, high-resolution fovea field optics; (3) a Coude optics system for telescope output beam stabilization; (4) a hyperspectral

  18. Gamma-Ray Burst observations with GLAST and TeV observatories

    SciTech Connect

    Longo, F. |; McEnery, J.; Omodei, N.; Bastieri, D.; Piron, F.

    2007-07-12

    The Gamma-Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST), scheduled to be launched in 2007, will provide the capability to observe Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRB) from 10 keV to more than 300 GeV. The spectral and temporal properties of GRBs above a few GeV are still almost unknown, extending these detections to higher energies with GLAST will have a large impact on our knowledge of the particle acceleration and emission processes occuring within these sources. In this work we review the requirements and the opportunities for good coordination of GLAST with ground-based telescopes operating above a few tens of GeV, and examine the potential of such simultaneous observations in terms of expected rates of alerts.

  19. Simulation of Prompt Emission from GRBs with a Photospheric Component and its Detectability by GLAST

    SciTech Connect

    Battelino, Milan; Ryde, Felix; Omodei, Nicola; Longo, Francesco

    2007-05-01

    The prompt emission from gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) still requires a physical explanation. Studies of time-resolved GRB spectra, observed in the keV-MeV range, show that a hybrid model consisting of two components, a photospheric and a non-thermal component, in many cases fits bright, single-pulsed bursts as well as, and in some instances even better than, the Band function. With an energy coverage from 8 keV up to 300 GeV, GLAST will give us an unprecedented opportunity to further investigate the nature of the prompt emission. In particular, it will give us the possibility to determine whether a photospheric component is the determining feature of the spectrum or not. Here we present a short study of the ability of GLAST to detect such a photospheric component in the sub-MeV range for typical bursts, using simulation tools developed within the GLAST science collaboration.

  20. Simulation of Prompt Emission from GRBs with a Photospheric Component and its Detectability By GLAST

    SciTech Connect

    Battelino, Milan; Ryde, Felix; Omodei, Nicola; Longo, Francesco; /U. Trieste /INFN, Trieste

    2011-11-29

    The prompt emission from gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) still requires a physical explanation. Studies of time-resolved GRB spectra, observed in the keV-MeV range, show that a hybrid model consisting of two components, a photospheric and a non-thermal component, in many cases fits bright, single-pulsed bursts as well as, and in some instances even better than, the Band function. With an energy coverage from 8 keV up to 300 GeV, GLAST will give us an unprecedented opportunity to further investigate the nature of the prompt emission. In particular, it will give us the possibility to determine whether a photospheric component is the determining feature of the spectrum or not. Here we present a short study of the ability of GLAST to detect such a photospheric component in the sub-MeV range for typical bursts, using simulation tools developed within the GLAST science collaboration.

  1. Conceptual Design Gamma-Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) Tower Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Jennings, Chad

    2002-07-18

    The main objective of this work was to develop a conceptual design and engineering prototype for the Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) tower structure. This thesis describes the conceptual design of a GLAST tower and the fabrication and testing of a prototype tower tray. The requirements were that the structure had to support GLAST's delicate silicon strip detector array through ground handling, launch and in orbit operations as well as provide for thermal and electrical pathways. From the desired function and the given launch vehicle for the spacecraft that carries the GLAST detector, an efficient structure was designed which met the requirements. This thesis developed in three stages: design, fabrication, and testing. During the first stage, a general set of specifications was used to develop the initial design, which was then analyzed and shown to meet or exceed the requirements. The second stage called for the fabrication of prototypes to prove manufacturability and gauge cost and time estimates for the total project. The last step called for testing the prototypes to show that they performed as the analysis had shown and prove that the design met the requirements. As a spacecraft engineering exercise, this project required formulating a solution based on engineering judgment, analyzing the solution using advanced engineering techniques, then proving the validity of the design and analysis by the manufacturing and testing of prototypes. The design described here met all the requirements set out by the needs of the experiment and operating concerns. This strawman design is not intended to be the complete or final design for the GLAST instrument structure, but instead examines some of the main challenges involved and demonstrates that there are solutions to them. The purpose of these tests was to prove that there are solutions to the basic mechanical, electrical and thermal problems presented with the GLAST project.

  2. Space Shuttle Star Tracker Challenges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herrera, Linda M.

    2010-01-01

    The space shuttle fleet of avionics was originally designed in the 1970's. Many of the subsystems have been upgraded and replaced, however some original hardware continues to fly. Not only fly, but has proven to be the best design available to perform its designated task. The shuttle star tracker system is currently flying as a mixture of old and new designs, each with a unique purpose to fill for the mission. Orbiter missions have tackled many varied missions in space over the years. As the orbiters began flying to the International Space Station (ISS), new challenges were discovered and overcome as new trusses and modules were added. For the star tracker subsystem, the growing ISS posed an unusual problem, bright light. With two star trackers on board, the 1970's vintage image dissector tube (IDT) star trackers track the ISS, while the new solid state design is used for dim star tracking. This presentation focuses on the challenges and solutions used to ensure star trackers can complete the shuttle missions successfully. Topics include KSC team and industry partner methods used to correct pressurized case failures and track system performance.

  3. Design and performance of the silicon strip tracker of the Fermi Large Area Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bregeon, J.

    2011-12-01

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT) is the primary instrument on-board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (Fermi), an observatory on a low Earth orbit that was launched on 11 June 2008 to monitor the high energy γ-ray sky. The LAT tracker is a solid-state instrument: tungsten foils convert the gamma rays into electron-positron pairs which are then tracked in silicon planes in order to reconstruct the incoming photon direction. The tracker comprises 36 planes of single-sided silicon strip detectors, for a total of 73 square meters of silicon, read out by nearly 900,000 amplifier-discriminator channels. The system operates on only 160 W of conditioned power while achieving > 99% single-plane efficiency within its active area and better than 1 channel per million noise occupancy. We describe the tracker design and performance, and discuss in particular the excellent stability of the hardware response during the first three years of operation on orbit.

  4. The Do/ scintillating fiber tracker

    SciTech Connect

    Bross, A.; Gutierrez, G.; Grunendahl, S.; Lincoln, D.; Ramberg, E.; Ray, R.; Ruchti, R.; Warchol, J.; Wayne, M.; Choic, S.

    1998-11-01

    The Do/ detector is being upgraded in preparation for the next collider run at Fermilab. The Central Fiber Tracker discussed in this report is a major component of the Do/ upgrade. The expected Tevatron luminosity of 2{times}10{sup 32} cm{sup {minus}2} sec{sup {minus}1}, the 132ns bunch crossing time, and the Do/ detector constraints of a 2 Tesla solenoid and a 52 cm lever arm, make a scintillating fiber based tracker an optimal choice for the upgrade of the Do/ detector. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  5. Fermi LAT detection of Increased Flux from new gamma-ray blazar PKS 0250-225

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corbel, Stephane; Reyes, Luis C.

    2009-02-01

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT), one of the two instruments on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (formerly GLAST, launched June 11, 2008), has observed an increasing gamma-ray flux from a source positionally consistent with PKS 0250-225 (RA: 02h52m47.9s, Dec:-22d19m25s, J2000). Preliminary analysis indicates that PKS 0250-225 (z=1.427 ; as CGRaBS J0252-2219 in Healey S. et al. 2007, ApJS, 175, 97) has been in a high state since Feb 17 with a gamma-ray flux (E>100MeV) of (0.5 +/- 0.1) x 10-6 ph cm-2 s-1, which represents a > 3-fold increase in flux with respect to the average preliminary flux observed during the first 6 months of data of the Fermi mission and about an 8-fold increase with respect to the first 3 months, suggesting thus a long-term trend of increasing flux.

  6. Correlative Spectral Analysis of Gamma-Ray Bursts using Swift-BAT and GLAST-GBM

    SciTech Connect

    Stamatikos, Michael; Sakamoto, Takanori; Band, David L.

    2008-05-22

    We discuss the preliminary results of spectral analysis simulations involving anticipated correlated multi-wavelength observations of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) using Swift's Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) and the Gamma-Ray Large Area Space Telescope's (GLAST) Burst Monitor (GLAST-GBM), resulting in joint spectral fits, including characteristic photon energy (E{sub peak}) values, for a conservative annual estimate of {approx}30 GRBs. The addition of BAT/s spectral response will (i) complement in-orbit calibration efforts of GBM's detector response matrices, (ii) augment GLAST's low energy sensitivity by increasing the {approx}20-100 keV effective area, (iii) facilitate ground-based follow-up efforts of GLAST GRBs by increasing GBM's source localization precision, and (iv) help identify a subset of non-triggered GRBs discovered via off-line GBM data analysis. Such multi-wavelength correlative analyses, which have been demonstrated by successful joint-spectral fits of Swift-BAT GRBs with other higher energy detectors such as Konus-WIND and Suzaku-WAM, would enable the study of broad-band spectral and temporal evolution of prompt GRB emission over three energy decades, thus potentially increasing science return without placing additional demands upon mission resources throughout their contemporaneous orbital tenure over the next decade.

  7. Adding the GLAST Burst Monitor to the 3rd Interplanetary Network

    SciTech Connect

    Hurley, Kevin

    2007-07-12

    The addition of the GLAST Burst Monitor to the interplanetary network is discussed. The IPN can detect about 32% of the GBM events, and reduce the sizes of their error boxes substantially. These error boxes have a wide variety of uses.

  8. Prospects for High Energy Detection of Microquasars with the AGILE and GLAST Gamma-Ray Telescopes

    SciTech Connect

    Santolamazza, Patrizia; Pittori, Carlotta; Verrecchia, Francesco

    2007-08-21

    We estimate the sensitivities of the AGILE and GLAST {gamma}-ray experiments taking into account two cases for the galactic {gamma}-ray diffuse background (at high galactic latitude and toward the galactic center). Then we use sensitivities to estimate microquasar observability with the two experiments, assuming the {gamma}-ray emission above 100 MeV of a recent microquasar model.

  9. TacNet Tracker Software

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2008-08-04

    The TacNet Tracker will be used for the monitoring and real-time tracking of personnel and assets in an unlimited number of specific applications. The TacNet Tracker software is a VxWorks Operating System based programming package that controls the functionality for the wearable Tracker. One main use of the TacNet Tracker is in Blue Force Tracking, the ability to track the good guys in an adversarial situation or in a force-on-force or real battle conditions. Themore » purpose of blue force tracking is to provide situational awareness to the battlefield commanders and personnel. There are practical military applications with the TacNet Tracker.The mesh network is a wireless IP communications network that moves data packets from source IP addresses to specific destination IP addresses. Addresses on the TacNet infrastructure utilize an 8-bit network mask (255.0.0.0). In other words, valid TacNet addresses range from 10.0.0.1 to 10.254.254.254. The TacNet software design uses uni-cast transmission techniques because earlier mesh network software releases did not provide for the ability to utilize multi-cast data movement. The TacNet design employs a list of addresses to move information within the TacNet infrastructure. For example, a convoy text file containing the IP addresses of all valid receivers of TacNet information could be used for transmitting the information and for limiting transmission to addresses on the list.« less

  10. TacNet Tracker Software

    SciTech Connect

    WISEMAN, JAMES; & STEVENS, JAMES

    2008-08-04

    The TacNet Tracker will be used for the monitoring and real-time tracking of personnel and assets in an unlimited number of specific applications. The TacNet Tracker software is a VxWorks Operating System based programming package that controls the functionality for the wearable Tracker. One main use of the TacNet Tracker is in Blue Force Tracking, the ability to track the good guys in an adversarial situation or in a force-on-force or real battle conditions. The purpose of blue force tracking is to provide situational awareness to the battlefield commanders and personnel. There are practical military applications with the TacNet Tracker.The mesh network is a wireless IP communications network that moves data packets from source IP addresses to specific destination IP addresses. Addresses on the TacNet infrastructure utilize an 8-bit network mask (255.0.0.0). In other words, valid TacNet addresses range from 10.0.0.1 to 10.254.254.254. The TacNet software design uses uni-cast transmission techniques because earlier mesh network software releases did not provide for the ability to utilize multi-cast data movement. The TacNet design employs a list of addresses to move information within the TacNet infrastructure. For example, a convoy text file containing the IP addresses of all valid receivers of TacNet information could be used for transmitting the information and for limiting transmission to addresses on the list.

  11. LHCb Upgrade: Scintillating Fibre Tracker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobin, Mark

    2016-07-01

    The LHCb detector will be upgraded during the Long Shutdown 2 (LS2) of the LHC in order to cope with higher instantaneous luminosities and to read out the data at 40 MHz using a trigger-less read-out system. All front-end electronics will be replaced and several sub-detectors must be redesigned to cope with higher occupancy. The current tracking detectors downstream of the LHCb dipole magnet will be replaced by the Scintillating Fibre (SciFi) Tracker. The SciFi Tracker will use scintillating fibres read out by Silicon Photomultipliers (SiPMs). State-of-the-art multi-channel SiPM arrays are being developed to read out the fibres and a custom ASIC will be used to digitise the signals from the SiPMs. The evolution of the design since the Technical Design Report in 2014 and the latest R & D results are presented.

  12. The LHCb Silicon Tracker Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agari, M.; Bauer, C.; Baumeister, D.; Blouw, J.; Hofmann, W.; Knöpfle, K. T.; Löchner, S.; Schmelling, M.; Pugatch, V.; Bay, A.; Carron, B.; Frei, R.; Jiminez-Otero, S.; Tran, M.-T.; Voss, H.; Adeva, B.; Esperante, D.; Lois, C.; Vasquez, P.; Bernhard, R. P.; Bernet, R.; Ermoline, Y.; Gassner, J.; Köstner, S.; Lehner, F.; Needham, M.; Siegler, M.; Steinkamp, O.; Straumann, U.; Vollhardt, A.; Volyanskyy, D.

    2006-01-01

    Two silicon strip detectors, the Trigger Tracker(TT) and the Inner Tracker(IT) will be constructed for the LHCb experiment. Transverse momentum information extracted from the TT will be used in the Level 1 trigger. The IT is part of the main tracking system behind the magnet. Both silicon detectors will be read out using a custom-developed chip by the ASIC lab in Heidelberg. The signal-over-noise behavior and performance of various geometrical designs of the silicon sensors, in conjunction with the Beetle read-out chip, have been extensively studied in test beam experiments. Results from those experiments are presented, and have been used in the final choice of sensor geometry.

  13. Introduction to Mini Muon Tracker

    SciTech Connect

    Borozdin, Konstantin N.

    2012-08-13

    Using a mini muon tracker developed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory we performed experiments of simple landscapes of various materials, including TNT, 9501, lead, tungsten, aluminium, and water. Most common scenes are four two inches thick step wedges of different dimensions: 12-inch x 12-inch, 12-inch x 9-inch, 12-inch x 6-inch, and 12-inch x 3-inch; and a one three inches thick hemisphere of lead with spherical hollow, and a similar full lead sphere.

  14. Star-Tracker Computer Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glavich, Thomas

    1987-01-01

    Image-analyzing pointing systems aimed to high precision. Star-tracker program, STRACKER, developed to solve algorithm-design problems for area-array tracking and pointing systems operating at accuracies of 0.001 to 0.01 picture element. Includes auxiliary programs for reformatting point-spread data from commercial ACCOSV lens-design program. Other optical-analysis program data reformatted by use of utility routines included in package. Written in FORTRAN 77.

  15. Upgrade of the CMS tracker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tricomi, A.

    2014-03-01

    The LHC machine is planning an upgrade program which will smoothly bring the luminosity up to or above 5 × 1034 cm-2s-1 sometimes after 2020, to possibly reach an integrated luminosity of 3000 fb-1 at the end of that decade. The foreseen increases of both the instantaneous and the integrated luminosity by the LHC during the next ten years will necessitate a stepwise upgrade of the CMS tracking detector. During the extended end-of-year shutdown 2016-2017 the pixel detector will be exchanged with a new one. The so-called Phase1 Pixel foresees one additional barrel layer and one additional end-cap disk, a new readout chip, reduction of material, and the installation of more efficient cooling and powering systems. In the so-called Phase2, when LHC will reach the High Luminosity (HL-LHC) phase, CMS will need a completely new Tracker detector, in order to fully exploit the high-demanding operating conditions and the delivered luminosity. The new Tracker should have also trigger capabilities. To achieve such goals, R&D activities are ongoing to explore options and develop solutions that would allow including tracking information at Level-1. The design choices for the CMS pixel and outer tracker upgrades are discussed along with some highlights of the R&D activities.

  16. The CMS tracker control system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dierlamm, A.; Dirkes, G. H.; Fahrer, M.; Frey, M.; Hartmann, F.; Masetti, L.; Militaru, O.; Shah, S. Y.; Stringer, R.; Tsirou, A.

    2008-07-01

    The Tracker Control System (TCS) is a distributed control software to operate about 2000 power supplies for the silicon modules of the CMS Tracker and monitor its environmental sensors. TCS must thus be able to handle about 104 power supply parameters, about 103 environmental probes from the Programmable Logic Controllers of the Tracker Safety System (TSS), about 105 parameters read via DAQ from the DCUs in all front end hybrids and from CCUs in all control groups. TCS is built on top of an industrial SCADA program (PVSS) extended with a framework developed at CERN (JCOP) and used by all LHC experiments. The logical partitioning of the detector is reflected in the hierarchical structure of the TCS, where commands move down to the individual hardware devices, while states are reported up to the root which is interfaced to the broader CMS control system. The system computes and continuously monitors the mean and maximum values of critical parameters and updates the percentage of currently operating hardware. Automatic procedures switch off selected parts of the detector using detailed granularity and avoiding widespread TSS intervention.

  17. Activity trackers: a critical review.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jeon; Finkelstein, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    The wearable consumer health devices can be mainly divided into activity trackers, sleep trackers, and stress management devices. These devices are widely advertised to provide positive effects on the user's daily behaviours and overall heath. However, objective evidence supporting these claims appears to be missing. The goal of this study was to review available evidence pertaining to performance of activity trackers. A comprehensive review of available information has been conducted for seven representative devices and the validity of marketing claims was assessed. The device assessment was based on availability of verified output metrics, theoretical frameworks, systematic evaluation, and FDA clearance. The review identified critical absence of supporting evidence of advertised functions and benefits for the majority of the devices. Six out of seven devices did not provide any information on sensor accuracy and output validity at all. Possible underestimation or overestimation of specific health indicators reported to consumers was not clearly disclosed to the public. Furthermore, significant limitations of these devices which can be categorized into user restrictions, user responsibilities and company disclaimers could not be easily found or comprehended by unsophisticated users and may represent a serious health hazard. PMID:25160247

  18. Fermi-LAT Observations of Galactic Transients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hays, Elizabeth

    2011-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the observations of Galactic transients by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on the Fermi Gamma Ray Space Telescope. The LAT is producing spectacular results for the GeV transient sky, some of which are shown and reviewed. Some of the results in the GeV range that are discussed in this presentation are: (1) New blazars and unidentified transients (2) the jet of the Cygnus X-3 microquasar (3) gamma rays from V407 Cygni nova (4) Fast high-energy gamma-ray flares from the Crab Nebula

  19. FGF2 alleviates PTSD symptoms in rats by restoring GLAST function in astrocytes via the JAK/STAT pathway.

    PubMed

    Feng, Dayun; Guo, Baolin; Liu, Gaohua; Wang, Bao; Wang, Wen; Gao, Guodong; Qin, Huaizhou; Wu, Shengxi

    2015-08-01

    In our previous study, we demonstrated that fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2) administration alleviated posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms via an "astrocyte-related" mechanism. We further investigated the changes in the astrocytic glutamate transporters GLAST and GLT-1 and in JAK/STAT3 signaling (which is involved in astrocyte activation and GLAST/GLT-1 function) in single prolonged stress (SPS) model rats. High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), Western blot and immunohistochemistry analyses revealed a significant SPS-induced increase in the concentration of glutamate in the cerebrospinal fluid and decrease in GLAST/GLT-1 expression and JAK/STAT3 signaling. Treatment with FGF2 significantly alleviated GLAST/GLT-1 dysfunction, JAK/STAT3 signaling inhibition, and the behavioral abnormalities. The administration of the JAK/STAT pathway inhibitor AG490 blocked the effects of FGF2 on PTSD symptoms, astrocyte activation, and GLAST, but not GLT-1, expression in vivo and in vitro. Our findings suggest that astrocytic JAK/STAT signaling is associated with SPS-induced GLAST dysfunction and that FGF2 protects against PTSD symptoms by restoring astrocytic glutamate uptake via the JAK/STAT signaling pathway. PMID:25979764

  20. Gamma-telescopes Fermi/LAT and GAMMA-400 Trigger Systems Event Recognizing Methods Comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arkhangelskaja, I. V.; Murchenko, A. E.; Chasovikov, E. N.; Arkhangelskiy, A. I.; Kheymits, M. D.

    Usually instruments for high-energy γ-quanta registration consists of converter (where γ-quanta produced pairs) and calorimeter for particles energy measurements surrounded by anticoincidence shield used to events identification (whether incident particle was charged or neutral). The influence of pair formation by γ-quanta in shield and the backsplash (moved in the opposite direction particles created due high energy γ-rays interact with calorimeter) should be taken into account. It leads to decrease both effective area and registration efficiency at E>10 GeV. In the presented article the event recognizing methods used in Fermi/LAT trigger system is considered in comparison with the ones applied in counting and triggers signals formation system of gamma-telescope GAMMA-400. The GAMMA-400 (Gamma Astronomical Multifunctional Modular Apparatus) will be the new high-apogee space γ-observatory. The GAMMA-400 consist of converter-tracker based on silicon-strip coordinate detectors interleaved with tungsten foils, imaging calorimeter make of 2 layers of double (x, y) silicon strip coordinate detectors interleaved with planes of CsI(Tl) crystals and the electromagnetic calorimeter CC2 consists only of CsI(Tl) crystals. Several plastics detections systems used as anticoincidence shield, for particles energy and moving direction estimations. The main differences of GAMMA-400 constructions from Fermi/LAT one are using the time-of-flight system with base of 50 cm and double layer structure of plastic detectors provides more effective particles direction definition and backsplash rejection. Also two calorimeters in GAMMA-400 composed the total absorbtion spectrometer with total thickness ∼ 25 X0 or ∼1.2 λ0 for vertical incident particles registration and 54 X0 or 2.5 λ0 for laterally incident ones (where λ0 is nuclear interaction length). It provides energy resolution 1-2% for 10 GeV-3.0×103 GeV events while the Fermi/LAT energy resolution does not reach such a

  1. LATS2 Positively Regulates Polycomb Repressive Complex 2

    PubMed Central

    Torigata, Kosuke; Daisuke, Okuzaki; Mukai, Satomi; Hatanaka, Akira; Ohka, Fumiharu; Motooka, Daisuke; Nakamura, Shota; Ohkawa, Yasuyuki; Yabuta, Norikazu; Kondo, Yutaka; Nojima, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    LATS2, a pivotal Ser/Thr kinase of the Hippo pathway, plays important roles in many biological processes. LATS2 also function in Hippo-independent pathway, including mitosis, DNA damage response and epithelial to mesenchymal transition. However, the physiological relevance and molecular basis of these LATS2 functions remain obscure. To understand novel functions of LATS2, we constructed a LATS2 knockout HeLa-S3 cell line using TAL-effector nuclease (TALEN). Integrated omics profiling of this cell line revealed that LATS2 knockout caused genome-wide downregulation of Polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2) and H3K27me3. Cell-cycle analysis revealed that downregulation of PRC2 was not due to cell cycle aberrations caused by LATS2 knockout. Not LATS1, a homolog of LATS2, but LATS2 bound PRC2 on chromatin and phosphorylated it. LATS2 positively regulates histone methyltransferase activity of PRC2 and their expression at both the mRNA and protein levels. Our findings reveal a novel signal upstream of PRC2, and provide insight into the crucial role of LATS2 in coordinating the epigenome through regulation of PRC2. PMID:27434182

  2. LATS2 Positively Regulates Polycomb Repressive Complex 2.

    PubMed

    Torigata, Kosuke; Daisuke, Okuzaki; Mukai, Satomi; Hatanaka, Akira; Ohka, Fumiharu; Motooka, Daisuke; Nakamura, Shota; Ohkawa, Yasuyuki; Yabuta, Norikazu; Kondo, Yutaka; Nojima, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    LATS2, a pivotal Ser/Thr kinase of the Hippo pathway, plays important roles in many biological processes. LATS2 also function in Hippo-independent pathway, including mitosis, DNA damage response and epithelial to mesenchymal transition. However, the physiological relevance and molecular basis of these LATS2 functions remain obscure. To understand novel functions of LATS2, we constructed a LATS2 knockout HeLa-S3 cell line using TAL-effector nuclease (TALEN). Integrated omics profiling of this cell line revealed that LATS2 knockout caused genome-wide downregulation of Polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2) and H3K27me3. Cell-cycle analysis revealed that downregulation of PRC2 was not due to cell cycle aberrations caused by LATS2 knockout. Not LATS1, a homolog of LATS2, but LATS2 bound PRC2 on chromatin and phosphorylated it. LATS2 positively regulates histone methyltransferase activity of PRC2 and their expression at both the mRNA and protein levels. Our findings reveal a novel signal upstream of PRC2, and provide insight into the crucial role of LATS2 in coordinating the epigenome through regulation of PRC2. PMID:27434182

  3. LAT Automated Science Processing for Gamma-Ray Bursts

    SciTech Connect

    Chiang, James

    2007-05-01

    The LAT Instrument Science Operations Center (ISOC) will perform various tasks to support coordination of multiwavelength observations for transient sources. In this paper, we describe the prototype implementation of the Automated Science Processing (ASP) for the detection and analysis of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) in LAT and GBM data. The GRB-related tasks include: position refinement using LAT data given initial GBM or GCN locations, spectral analysis using LAT data alone, joint spectral fitting with GBM data, gamma-ray afterglow detection and characterization, and blind searches for prompt burst emission in LAT data.

  4. Studying the High Energy Gamma Ray Sky with Gamma Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamae, T.; Ohsugi, T.; Thompson, D. J.; Watanabe, K.

    1998-01-01

    Building on the success of the Energetic Gamma Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET) on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory, the Gamma Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) will make a major step in the study of such subjects as blazars, gamma Ray bursts, the search for dark matter, supernova remnants, pulsars, diffuse radiation, and unidentified high energy sources. The instrument will be built on new and mature detector technologies such as silicon strip detectors, low-power low-noise LSI, and a multilevel data acquisition system. GLAST is in the research and development phase, and one full tower (of 25 total) is now being built in collaborating institutes. The prototype tower will be tested thoroughly at Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) in the fall of 1999.

  5. The h1 Silicon Tracker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    List, Benno

    2004-07-01

    The silicon tracker of the H1 experiment at HERA consists of a barrel part and two endcaps with disks. The barrel part has 2 layers of double sided strip sensors with 81920 readout channels. The forward part uses 7 wheels of single sided strip detectors that measure three coordinates (r, u, and v) with 92160 channels. The backward part uses single sided strip detectors in 6 wheels, measuring the u and v coordinates with 84480 channels. These wheels are intersprsed with 4 wheels of pad detectors that provide fast triggering signals.

  6. The CDF silicon vertex tracker

    SciTech Connect

    A. Cerri et al.

    2000-10-10

    Real time pattern recognition is becoming a key issue in many position sensitive detector applications. The CDF collaboration is building SVT: a specialized electronic device designed to perform real time track reconstruction using the silicon vertex detector (SVX II). This will strongly improve the CDF capability of triggering on events containing b quarks, usually characterized by the presence of a secondary vertex. SVT is designed to reconstruct in real time charged particles trajectories using data coming from the Silicon Vertex detector and the Central Outer Tracker drift chamber. The SVT architecture and algorithm have been specially tuned to minimize processing time without degrading parameter resolution.

  7. Optical filtering for star trackers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, R. E.

    1973-01-01

    The optimization of optical filtering was investigated for tracking faint stars, down to the fifth magnitude. The effective wavelength and bandwidth for tracking pre-selected guide stars are discussed along with the results of an all-electronic tracker with a star tracking photomultiplier, which was tested with a simulated second magnitude star. Tables which give the sum of zodiacal light and galactic background light over the entire sky for intervals of five degrees in declination, and twenty minutes in right ascension are included.

  8. Understanding The GLAST Burst Monitor Detector Calibration: A Detailed Simulation Of The Calibration Including The Environment

    SciTech Connect

    Steinle, Helmut; Kienlin, Andreas von; Bissaldi, Elisabetta; Lichti, Giselher; Diehl, Roland; Greiner, Jochen; Meegan, Charles A.; Fishman, Gerald J.; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Wilson-Hodge, Colleen A.; Kippen, R. Marc; Hoover, Andrew S.

    2007-07-12

    The GLAST Burst Monitor (GBM) is the secondary instrument on NASA's next Gamma-ray mission GLAST. It will enhance the capabilities of GLAST by locating and detecting cosmic gamma-ray bursts at lower energies by the use of 12 NaI detectors (energy range 10 keV to 1 MeV) and 2 BGO-detectors (energy range 150 keV to 30 MeV). GBM was built in a close collaboration between the MPE and the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The angular and energy response of each GBM detector has been calibrated using various radioactive sources at different incidence angles relative to the detector in a laboratory environment at the MPE in 2005. To facilitate the understanding of the reconstruction of the detector response, a detailed simulation of the whole laboratory environment and the setup of the calibration source were performed. A modified version of the CERN GEANT 4 simulation software (provided by collaborators at the Los Alamos National Laboratory) was used.

  9. Downregulation of glutamine synthetase via GLAST suppression induces retinal axonal swelling in a rat ex vivo hydrostatic pressure model.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Makoto; Yoshitomi, Takeshi; Zorumski, Charles F; Izumi, Yukitoshi

    2011-08-01

    PURPOSE. High levels of glutamate can be toxic to retinal GCs. Thus, effective buffering of extracellular glutamate is important in preserving retinal structure and function. GLAST, a major glutamate transporter in the retina, and glutamine synthetase (GS) regulate extracellular glutamate accumulation and prevent excitotoxicity. This study was an examination of changes in function and expression of GLAST and GS in ex vivo rat retinas exposed to acute increases in ambient pressure. METHODS. Ex vivo rat retinas were exposed to elevated hydrostatic pressure for 24 hours. The expression of GLAST and GS were examined using immunochemistry and real-time PCR analysis. Also examined were the effects of (2S,3S)-3-[3-[4-(trifluoromethyl) benzoylamino] benzyloxy] aspartate (TFB-TBOA), an inhibitor of glutamate transporters, and l-methionine-S-sulfoximine (MSO), an inhibitor of GS. RESULTS. In this acute model, Western blot and real-time RT-PCR analyses revealed that substantially (75 mm Hg), but not moderately (35 mm Hg), elevated pressure depressed GLAST expression, diminished GS activity, and induced axonal swelling between the GC layer and the inner limiting membrane. However, at the moderately elevated pressure (35 mm Hg), administration of either TFB-TBOA or MSO also induced axonal swelling and excitotoxic neuronal damage. MSO did not depress GLAST expression but TFB-TBOA significantly suppressed GS, suggesting that downregulation of GS during pressure loading may result from impaired GLAST expression. CONCLUSIONS. The retina is at risk during acute intraocular pressure elevation due to downregulation of GS activity resulting from depressed GLAST expression. PMID:21775659

  10. Star tracker for the Apollo telescope mount

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, C. E.

    1971-01-01

    The star tracker for the Apollo Telescope Mount (ATM) has been designed specifically to meet the requirements of the Skylab vehicle and mission. The functions of the star tracker are presented, as well as descriptions of the optical-mechanical assembly (OMA) and the star tracker electronics (STE). Also included are the electronic and mechanical specifications, interface and operational requirements, support equipment and test requirements, and occultation information. Laboratory functional tests, environmental qualification tests, and life tests have provided a high confidence factor in the performance of the star tracker in the laboratory and on the Skylab mission.

  11. Teaching optical phenomena with Tracker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, M.; Simeão Carvalho, P.

    2014-11-01

    Since the invention and dissemination of domestic laser pointers, observing optical phenomena is a relatively easy task. Any student can buy a laser and experience at home, in a qualitative way, the reflection, refraction and even diffraction phenomena of light. However, quantitative experiments need instruments of high precision that have a relatively complex setup. Fortunately, nowadays it is possible to analyse optical phenomena in a simple and quantitative way using the freeware video analysis software ‘Tracker’. In this paper, we show the advantages of video-based experimental activities for teaching concepts in optics. We intend to show: (a) how easy the study of such phenomena can be, even at home, because only simple materials are needed, and Tracker provides the necessary measuring instruments; and (b) how we can use Tracker to improve students’ understanding of some optical concepts. We give examples using video modelling to study the laws of reflection, Snell’s laws, focal distances in lenses and mirrors, and diffraction phenomena, which we hope will motivate teachers to implement it in their own classes and schools.

  12. The STAR Heavy Flavor Tracker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Videbaek, Flemming; STAR Collaboration

    2013-10-01

    The Heavy Flavor Tracker (HFT) is an on-going upgrade for the STAR detector at RHIC that aim to study heavy quark production. In relativistic heavy-ion collisions at RHIC, heavy quarks are primarily created from initial hard scatterings. Since their large masses are not easily affected by the strong interaction with QCD medium they may carry information from the system at early stage. The interaction between heavy quarks and the medium is sensitive to the medium dynamics; therefore heavy quarks are suggested as an ideal probe to quantify the properties of the strongly interacting QCD matter. The HFT detectors will study this via the topological reconstruction of open charm hadrons. The HFT that consists of a thin two layer inner Pixel vertex detector, and two outer concentric layers of silicon, the Silicon Strip Detector, and the Intermediate Silicon Tracker. We will show how this detector system can assess heavy flavor physics with great precision. An overview of the HFT that will be completed for the upcoming RHIC run-14, its expected performance, and current status will be presented. Supported by the Division of Nuclear Physics of the Office of Science of the U.S. Department of Energy.

  13. GLAST Deficiency in Mice Exacerbates Gap Detection Deficits in a Model of Salicylate-Induced Tinnitus

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hong; Vikhe Patil, Kim; Han, Chul; Fabella, Brian; Canlon, Barbara; Someya, Shinichi; Cederroth, Christopher R.

    2016-01-01

    Gap detection or gap pre-pulse inhibition of the acoustic startle (GPIAS) has been successfully used in rat and guinea pig models of tinnitus, yet this system has been proven to have low efficacy in CBA mice, with low basal GPIAS and subtle tinnitus-like effects. Here, we tested five mouse strains (CBA, BalbC, CD-1, C57BL/6 and 129sv) for pre-pulse inhibition (PPI) and gap detection with varying interstimulus intervals (ISI) and found that mice from a CBA genetic background had the poorest capacities of suppressing the startle response in the presence of a pre-pulse or a gap. CD-1 mice displayed variable responses throughout all ISI. Interestingly, C57BL/6, 129sv and BalbC showed efficient suppression with either pre-pulses or gaps with shorter ISI. The glutamate aspartate transporter (GLAST) is expressed in support cells from the cochlea and buffers the excess of glutamate. We hypothesized that loss of GLAST function could sensitize the ear to tinnitus-inducing agents, such as salicylate. Using shorter ISI to obtain a greater dynamic range to assess tinnitus-like effects, we found that disruption of gap detection by salicylate was exacerbated across various intensities of a 32-kHz narrow band noise gap carrier in GLAST knockout (KO) mice when compared to their wild-type (WT) littermates. Auditory brainstem responses (ABR) and distortion-product otoacoustic emission (DPOAE) were performed to evaluate the effects on hearing functions. Salicylate caused greater auditory threshold shifts (near 15 dB) in GLAST KO mice than in WT mice across all tested frequencies, despite similarly reduced DPOAE. Despite these changes, inhibition using broad-band gap carriers and 32 kHz pre-pulses were not affected. Our study suggests that GLAST deficiency could become a useful experimental model to decipher the mechanisms underlying drug-induced tinnitus. Future studies addressing the neurological correlates of tinnitus in this model could provide additional insights into the

  14. GLAST Deficiency in Mice Exacerbates Gap Detection Deficits in a Model of Salicylate-Induced Tinnitus.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hong; Vikhe Patil, Kim; Han, Chul; Fabella, Brian; Canlon, Barbara; Someya, Shinichi; Cederroth, Christopher R

    2016-01-01

    Gap detection or gap pre-pulse inhibition of the acoustic startle (GPIAS) has been successfully used in rat and guinea pig models of tinnitus, yet this system has been proven to have low efficacy in CBA mice, with low basal GPIAS and subtle tinnitus-like effects. Here, we tested five mouse strains (CBA, BalbC, CD-1, C57BL/6 and 129sv) for pre-pulse inhibition (PPI) and gap detection with varying interstimulus intervals (ISI) and found that mice from a CBA genetic background had the poorest capacities of suppressing the startle response in the presence of a pre-pulse or a gap. CD-1 mice displayed variable responses throughout all ISI. Interestingly, C57BL/6, 129sv and BalbC showed efficient suppression with either pre-pulses or gaps with shorter ISI. The glutamate aspartate transporter (GLAST) is expressed in support cells from the cochlea and buffers the excess of glutamate. We hypothesized that loss of GLAST function could sensitize the ear to tinnitus-inducing agents, such as salicylate. Using shorter ISI to obtain a greater dynamic range to assess tinnitus-like effects, we found that disruption of gap detection by salicylate was exacerbated across various intensities of a 32-kHz narrow band noise gap carrier in GLAST knockout (KO) mice when compared to their wild-type (WT) littermates. Auditory brainstem responses (ABR) and distortion-product otoacoustic emission (DPOAE) were performed to evaluate the effects on hearing functions. Salicylate caused greater auditory threshold shifts (near 15 dB) in GLAST KO mice than in WT mice across all tested frequencies, despite similarly reduced DPOAE. Despite these changes, inhibition using broad-band gap carriers and 32 kHz pre-pulses were not affected. Our study suggests that GLAST deficiency could become a useful experimental model to decipher the mechanisms underlying drug-induced tinnitus. Future studies addressing the neurological correlates of tinnitus in this model could provide additional insights into the

  15. The Chesapeake Laser Tracker in Industrial Metrology

    SciTech Connect

    Ruland, Robert E.; /SLAC

    2005-08-16

    In the summer of 1992, the survey and alignment team at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center acquired a CMS3000 laser tracker manufactured by Chesapeake Laser Systems in Lanham, Maryland. This paper gives a description of the principles of operation and calibration of the tracker. Several applications are explained and the results shared.

  16. Flight experience of 329K star tracker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruzhilov, Ivan S.; Kuniaev, Vladimir V.; Fedoseev, Victor I.; Titov, Gennadiy P.; Shevlyakov, Oleg V.; Latyncev, Sergey V.

    2013-10-01

    The paper is devoted to the results of the star tracker 329K flight tests on board of the satellites Luch-5A and Luch-5B launched into geostationary orbit in December 2011 and November 2012 respectively. Emphasis is placed on accuracy and photometric characteristics of the star tracker 329K.

  17. A Rollercoaster Viewed through Motion Tracker Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pendrill, Ann-Marie; Rodjegard, Henrik

    2005-01-01

    A motion tracker measures acceleration and rotation in three dimensions, sufficient for a complete determination of the motion. In this article, a rollercoaster ride is analysed with reference to motion tracker data. The use of this type of data in education is discussed as a way to deepen students' understanding of concepts related to force and…

  18. Ruby on Rails Issue Tracker

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriguez, Juan Jared

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to detail the tasks accomplished as a NASA NIFS intern for the summer 2014 session. This internship opportunity is to develop an issue tracker Ruby on Rails web application to improve the communication of developmental anomalies between the Support Software Computer Software Configuration Item (CSCI) teams, System Build and Information Architecture. As many may know software development is an arduous, time consuming, collaborative effort. It involves nearly as much work designing, planning, collaborating, discussing, and resolving issues as effort expended in actual development. This internship opportunity was put in place to help alleviate the amount of time spent discussing issues such as bugs, missing tests, new requirements, and usability concerns that arise during development and throughout the life cycle of software applications once in production.

  19. Silicon photomultipliers for scintillating trackers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabaioli, S.; Berra, A.; Bolognini, D.; Bonvicini, V.; Bosisio, L.; Ciano, S.; Iugovaz, D.; Lietti, D.; Penzo, A.; Prest, M.; Rashevskaya, I.; Reia, S.; Stoppani, L.; Vallazza, E.

    2012-12-01

    In recent years, silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs) have been proposed as a new kind of readout device for scintillating detectors in many experiments. A SiPM consists of a matrix of parallel-connected pixels, which are independent photon counters working in Geiger mode with very high gain (∼106). This contribution presents the use of an array of eight SiPMs (manufactured by FBK-irst) for the readout of a scintillating bar tracker (a small size prototype of the Electron Muon Ranger detector for the MICE experiment). The performances of the SiPMs in terms of signal to noise ratio, efficiency and time resolution will be compared to the ones of a multi-anode photomultiplier tube (MAPMT) connected to the same bars. Both the SiPMs and the MAPMT are interfaced to a VME system through a 64 channel MAROC ASIC.

  20. ST - SCHEDULE TRACKER COMPUTER PROGRAM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collazo, F. F.

    1994-01-01

    The Schedule Organizer, SO (COSMIC Program MSC-21525), Schedule Tracker, ST, and Schedule Report Generator, SRG (COSMIC Program MSC-21527), are programs that manipulate data base files in ways that are advantageous to scheduling applications. Originally designed for the Space Shuttle flight schedule, the program can be easily modified for other scheduling situations. Schedule Organizer provides a simple method for generating distribution lists. These distribution lists contain readers' names for each task schedule defined by the input files. Schedule Tracker provides an effective method for tracking tasks that are 'past due' and/or 'near term'. ST generates reports for each responsible staff member with one or more assigned tasks that fall within the two listed categories. This enables an engineering manager to monitor tasks assigned to staff by running ST on a weekly basis. ST only lists tasks on reports that have become past due or are scheduled for recent completion (near term). Schedule Report Generator provides a simple method for generating periodic schedule reports. ST and SRG use the same data base file as input. The common data base file has a maximum number of 400 entries. The time span of all three programs is nineteen months. Both of these maximum numbers can be modified by the user. ST requires the VMS Operating System on DEC VAX and was written in PL/1 and DEC Command Language (DCL). The program requires a memory of 233KB. ST can be purchased separately or in a package (COSMIC Program COS-10021) containing SO, ST, and SRG. ST was developed in 1985.

  1. Overexpression of L-Type Amino Acid Transporter 1 (LAT1) and 2 (LAT2): Novel Markers of Neuroendocrine Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Barollo, Susi; Bertazza, Loris; Watutantrige-Fernando, Sara; Censi, Simona; Cavedon, Elisabetta; Galuppini, Francesca; Pennelli, Gianmaria; Fassina, Ambrogio; Citton, Marilisa; Rubin, Beatrice; Pezzani, Raffaele; Benna, Clara; Opocher, Giuseppe; Iacobone, Maurizio; Mian, Caterina

    2016-01-01

    Background 6-18F-fluoro-L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (18F-FDOPA) PET is a useful tool in the clinical management of pheochromocytoma (PHEO) and medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC). 18F-FDOPA is a large neutral amino acid biochemically resembling endogenous L-DOPA and taken up by the L-type amino acid transporters (LAT1 and LAT2). This study was conducted to examine the expression of the LAT system in PHEO and MTC. Methods Real-time PCR and Western blot analyses were used to assess LAT1 and LAT2 gene and protein expression in 32 PHEO, 38 MTC, 16 normal adrenal medulla and 15 normal thyroid tissue samples. Immunohistochemistry method was applied to identify the proteins’ subcellular localization. Results LAT1 and LAT2 were overexpressed in both PHEO and MTC by comparison with normal tissues. LAT1 presented a stronger induction than LAT2, and their greater expression was more evident in PHEO (15.1- and 4.1-fold increases, respectively) than in MTC (9.9- and 4.1-fold increases, respectively). Furthermore we found a good correlation between LAT1/2 and GLUT1 expression levels. A positive correlation was also found between urinary noradrenaline and adrenaline levels and LAT1 gene expression in PHEO. The increased expression of LAT1 is also confirmed at the protein level, in both PHEO and MTC, with a strong cytoplasmic localization. Conclusions The present study is the first to provide experimental evidence of the overexpression in some NET cancers (such as PHEO or MTC) of L-type amino acid transporters, and the LAT1 isoform in particular, giving the molecular basis to explain the increase of the DOPA uptake seen in such tumor cells. PMID:27224648

  2. Membrane topology of the high-affinity L-glutamate transporter (GLAST- 1) of the central nervous system

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    The membrane topology of the high affinity, Na(+)-coupled L-glutamate/L- aspartate transporter (GLAST-1) of the central nervous system has been determined. Truncated GLAST-1 cDNA constructs encoding protein fragments with an increasing number of hydrophobic regions were fused to a cDNA encoding a reporter peptide with two N-glycosylation sites. The respective cRNA chimeras were translated in vitro and in vivo in Xenopus oocytes. Posttranslational N-glycosylation of the two reporter consensus sites monitors the number, size, and orientation of membrane- spanning domains. The results of our experiments suggest a novel 10- transmembrane domain topology of GLAST-1, a representative of the L- glutamate neurotransmitter transporter family, with its NH2 and COOH termini on the cytoplasmic side, six NH2-terminal hydrophobic transmembrane alpha-helices, and four COOH-terminal short hydrophobic domains spanning the bilayer predicted as beta-sheets. PMID:8991097

  3. LAT1 regulates growth of uterine leiomyoma smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Xia Luo; Coon, John S; Su, Emily; Pearson, Elizabeth Kerry; Ping Yin; Ishikawa, Hiroshi; Bulun, Serdar E

    2010-09-01

    L-type amino acid transporter 1 (LAT1) and LAT2 were shown to encode system L, which mediates the Na(+)-independent transport of branched-chain and aromatic amino acids. We demonstrated previously that LAT2 is a progesterone receptor target gene involved in leiomyoma growth. The role of LAT1 in the regulation of human uterine leiomyoma growth, however, remains unelucidated. We herein investigated the function of LAT1 and its progesterone-mediated regulation within human uterine leiomyoma smooth muscle (LSM) cells (n = 8) and tissues (n = 29). In vivo, LAT1 expression was higher in leiomyoma than in myometrial tissue. LAT1 knockdown augmented cell proliferation and viability. Treatment of LSM cells with RU486 markedly increased LAT1 messenger RNA (mRNA) levels but decreased proliferation in a dose-dependent manner. L-type amino acid transporter 1 as a downstream target, however, did not entirely account for this antiproliferative effect of RU486 on LSM cells. Taken together, LAT1 may have a critical and complex role in regulating human leiomyoma cell growth. PMID:20601542

  4. The D0 silicon microstrip tracker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinn, Breese; D0 Collaboration

    2003-03-01

    The D0 collaboration has completed building a 793,000 channel silicon microstrip tracker for the D0 upgrade. The tracker consists of 768 ladder and wedge assemblies including both single- and double-sided detectors. Detector readout utilizes the SVX-IIE radiation hard chip with on-chip digitization and sparsification. A brief review of the detector design is presented along with results from the assembly and testing processes. The operation of the full readout chain and the performance of the silicon tracker are described. Finally, lessons for future production of large scale tracking systems are discussed.

  5. Personal Activity Trackers and the Quantified Self.

    PubMed

    Hoy, Matthew B

    2016-01-01

    Personal activity trackers are an inexpensive and easy way for people to record their physical activity and simple biometric data. As these devices have increased in availability and sophistication, their use in daily life and in medicine has grown. This column will briefly explore what these devices are, what types of data they can track, and how that data can be used. It will also discuss potential problems with trackers and how librarians can help patients and physicians manage and protect activity data. A brief list of currently available activity trackers is also included. PMID:26794199

  6. Pulsars at the Highest Energies: Questions for the GLAST and ACT's

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Dave

    2008-01-01

    The recent announcement by the MAGIC team of pulsed gamma rays from the Crab Pulsar above 25 GeV and the launch of AGILE and the Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) offer the promise of major progress in understanding the most extreme emission from pulsar magnetospheres. While waiting for detailed results, we can formulate questions to be addressed, based on past measurements and theoretical modeling. This brief review will highlight promising approaches for research into high-energy pulsed radiation.

  7. Science of Compact X- and Gamma-ray Sources: MAXI and GLAST

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Dave

    2008-01-01

    MAXI and GLAST will be surveying the sky simultaneously. Compact objects that may show variability will be excellent targets for coordinated multiwavelength studies. Gamma-ray bursts (and afterglows), pulsars, high-mass X-ray binaries, microquasars, and active galactic nuclei are all objects whose X- and gamma-ray relationship can be explored by such observations. Of particular interest will be variable unidentified gamma-ray sources, whose contemporaneous observations by MAXI may prove decisive in identifying the source of the high-energy emission.

  8. Simulating the High Energy Gamma-Ray Sky Seen by the GLAST Large Area Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longo, F.; Azzi, P.; Bastieri, D.; Busetto, P.; Lei, Y.; Rando, R.; Tibolla, O.; Baldini, L.; Kuss, M.; Latronico, L.; Omodei, N.; Razzano, M.; Spandre, G.; Boinee, P.; de Angelis, A.; Frailis, M.; Brigida, M.; Gargano, F.; Giglietto, N.; Loparco, F.; Mazziotta, M. N.; Cecchi, C.; Lubrano, P.; Marcucci, F.; Pepe, M.; Tosti, G.; Lionetto, A.; Morselli, A.; Pittori, C.

    This paper presents the simulation of the GLAST high energy gamma-ray telescope. The simulation package, written in C++, is based on the Geant4 toolkit, and it is integrated into a general framework used to process events. A detailed simulation of the electronic signals inside Silicon detectors has been provided and it is used for the particle tracking, which is handled by a dedicated software. A unique repository for the geometrical description of the detector has been realized using the XML language and a C++ library to access this information has been designed and implemented. A new event display based on the HepRep protocol was implemented.

  9. My Game Plan: Food and Activity Tracker

    MedlinePlus

    ... THIS WEEK… FOR CUTTING FAT GRAMS: FOR CUTTING CALORIES: FOR GETTING MORE PHYSICAL ACTIVITY: FROM — TO HHS' ... AND DRINK TRACKER AMOUNT /NAME /DESCRIPTION FAT GRAMS CALORIES 1/2 cup oatmeal 1 73 1 cup ...

  10. Commissioning of the Cms Tracker Outer Barrel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloch, Christoph

    2006-04-01

    Fully equipped final substructures of the CMS Tracker are installed in a dedicated mechanical support, the Cosmic Rack, providing a geometry suitable for tracking cosmic muons, and equipped with a dedicated trigger that allows the selection of tracks synchronous with the fast readout electronics. Data collected at room temperature and at the tracker operating temperature of -10°C can be used to test reconstruction and alignment algorithms for the tracker, as well as to perform a detailed qualification of the geometry and the functionality of the structures at different temperatures. The CMS Monte Carlo simulation has been adapted to the geometry of the cosmic rack, and the comparison with the data will provide a valuable test to improve the tracker simulation in CMS.