Science.gov

Sample records for gli3 repressor controls

  1. GLI3 repressor controls functional development of the mouse ureter.

    PubMed

    Cain, Jason E; Islam, Epshita; Haxho, Fiona; Blake, Joshua; Rosenblum, Norman D

    2011-03-01

    Obstructive and nonobstructive forms of hydronephrosis (increased diameter of the renal pelvis and calyces) and hydroureter (dilatation of the ureter) are the most frequently detected antenatal abnormalities, yet the underlying molecular mechanisms are largely undefined. Hedgehog (Hh) proteins control tissue patterning and cell differentiation by promoting GLI-dependent transcriptional activation and by inhibiting the processing of GLI3 to a transcriptional repressor. Genetic mutations that generate a truncated GLI3 protein similar in size to the repressor in humans with Pallister-Hall syndrome (PHS; a disorder whose characteristics include renal abnormalities) and hydroureter implicate Hh-dependent signaling in ureter morphogenesis and function. Here, we determined that Hh signaling controls 2 cell populations required for the initiation and transmission of coordinated ureter contractions. Tissue-specific inactivation of the Hh cell surface effector Smoothened (Smo) in the renal pelvic and upper ureteric mesenchyme resulted in nonobstructive hydronephrosis and hydroureter characterized by ureter dyskinesia. Mutant mice had reduced expression of markers of cell populations implicated in the coordination of unidirectional ureter peristalsis (specifically, Kit and hyperpolarization-activation cation-3 channel [Hcn3]), but exhibited normal epithelial and smooth muscle cell differentiation. Kit deficiency in a mouse model of PHS suggested a pathogenic role for GLI3 repressor in Smo-deficient embryos; indeed, genetic inactivation of Gli3 in Smo-deficient mice rescued their hydronephrosis, hydroureter, Kit and Hcn3 expression, and ureter peristalsis. Together, these data demonstrate that Hh signaling controls Kit and Hcn3 expression and ureter peristalsis. PMID:21339645

  2. GLI3 repressor controls functional development of the mouse ureter

    PubMed Central

    Cain, Jason E.; Islam, Epshita; Haxho, Fiona; Blake, Joshua; Rosenblum, Norman D.

    2011-01-01

    Obstructive and nonobstructive forms of hydronephrosis (increased diameter of the renal pelvis and calyces) and hydroureter (dilatation of the ureter) are the most frequently detected antenatal abnormalities, yet the underlying molecular mechanisms are largely undefined. Hedgehog (Hh) proteins control tissue patterning and cell differentiation by promoting GLI-dependent transcriptional activation and by inhibiting the processing of GLI3 to a transcriptional repressor. Genetic mutations that generate a truncated GLI3 protein similar in size to the repressor in humans with Pallister-Hall syndrome (PHS; a disorder whose characteristics include renal abnormalities) and hydroureter implicate Hh-dependent signaling in ureter morphogenesis and function. Here, we determined that Hh signaling controls 2 cell populations required for the initiation and transmission of coordinated ureter contractions. Tissue-specific inactivation of the Hh cell surface effector Smoothened (Smo) in the renal pelvic and upper ureteric mesenchyme resulted in nonobstructive hydronephrosis and hydroureter characterized by ureter dyskinesia. Mutant mice had reduced expression of markers of cell populations implicated in the coordination of unidirectional ureter peristalsis (specifically, Kit and hyperpolarization-activation cation–3 channel [Hcn3]), but exhibited normal epithelial and smooth muscle cell differentiation. Kit deficiency in a mouse model of PHS suggested a pathogenic role for GLI3 repressor in Smo-deficient embryos; indeed, genetic inactivation of Gli3 in Smo-deficient mice rescued their hydronephrosis, hydroureter, Kit and Hcn3 expression, and ureter peristalsis. Together, these data demonstrate that Hh signaling controls Kit and Hcn3 expression and ureter peristalsis. PMID:21339645

  3. T396I Mutation of Mouse Sufu Reduces the Stability and Activity of Gli3 Repressor

    PubMed Central

    Makino, Shigeru; Zhulyn, Olena; Mo, Rong; Puviindran, Vijitha; Zhang, Xiaoyun; Murata, Takuya; Fukumura, Ryutaro; Ishitsuka, Yuichi; Kotaki, Hayato; Matsumaru, Daisuke; Ishii, Shunsuke; Hui, Chi-Chung; Gondo, Yoichi

    2015-01-01

    Hedgehog signaling is primarily transduced by two transcription factors: Gli2, which mainly acts as a full-length activator, and Gli3, which tends to be proteolytically processed from a full-length form (Gli3FL) to an N-terminal repressor (Gli3REP). Recent studies using a Sufu knockout mouse have indicated that Sufu is involved in regulating Gli2 and Gli3 activator and repressor activity at multiple steps of the signaling cascade; however, the mechanism of specific Gli2 and Gli3 regulation remains to be elucidated. In this study, we established an allelic series of ENU-induced mouse strains. Analysis of one of the missense alleles, SufuT396I, showed that Thr396 residue of Sufu played a key role in regulation of Gli3 activity. SufuT396I/T396I embryos exhibited severe polydactyly, which is indicative of compromised Gli3 activity. Concomitantly, significant quantitative reductions of unprocessed Gli3 (Gli3FL) and processed Gli3 (Gli3REP) were observed in vivo as well as in vitro. Genetic experiments showed that patterning defects in the limb buds of SufuT396I/T396I were rescued by a constitutive Gli3REP allele (Gli3∆699), strongly suggesting that SufuT396I reduced the truncated Gli3 repressor. In contrast, SufuT396I qualitatively exhibited no mutational effects on Gli2 regulation. Taken together, the results of this study show that the Thr396 residue of Sufu is specifically required for regulation of Gli3 but not Gli2. This implies a novel Sufu-mediated mechanism in which Gli2 activator and Gli3 repressor are differentially regulated. PMID:25760946

  4. Gata6-Dependent GLI3 Repressor Function is Essential in Anterior Limb Progenitor Cells for Proper Limb Development

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Shinichi; Akiyama, Ryutaro; Wong, Julia; Tahara, Naoyuki; Kawakami, Hiroko; Kawakami, Yasuhiko

    2016-01-01

    Gli3 is a major regulator of Hedgehog signaling during limb development. In the anterior mesenchyme, GLI3 is proteolytically processed into GLI3R, a truncated repressor form that inhibits Hedgehog signaling. Although numerous studies have identified mechanisms that regulate Gli3 function in vitro, it is not completely understood how Gli3 function is regulated in vivo. In this study, we show a novel mechanism of regulation of GLI3R activities in limb buds by Gata6, a member of the GATA transcription factor family. We show that conditional inactivation of Gata6 prior to limb outgrowth by the Tcre deleter causes preaxial polydactyly, the formation of an anterior extra digit, in hindlimbs. A recent study suggested that Gata6 represses Shh transcription in hindlimb buds. However, we found that ectopic Hedgehog signaling precedes ectopic Shh expression. In conjunction, we observed Gata6 and Gli3 genetically interact, and compound heterozygous mutants develop preaxial polydactyly without ectopic Shh expression, indicating an additional prior mechanism to prevent polydactyly. These results support the idea that Gata6 possesses dual roles during limb development: enhancement of Gli3 repressor function to repress Hedgehog signaling in the anterior limb bud, and negative regulation of Shh expression. Our in vitro and in vivo studies identified that GATA6 physically interacts with GLI3R to facilitate nuclear localization of GLI3R and repressor activities of GLI3R. Both the genetic and biochemical data elucidates a novel mechanism by Gata6 to regulate GLI3R activities in the anterior limb progenitor cells to prevent polydactyly and attain proper development of the mammalian autopod. PMID:27352137

  5. A Novel Gli3 Enhancer Controls the Gli3 Spatiotemporal Expression Pattern through a TALE Homeodomain Protein Binding Site ▿‡

    PubMed Central

    Coy, Sarah; Caamaño, Jorge H.; Carvajal, Jaime; Cleary, Michael L.; Borycki, Anne-Gaëlle

    2011-01-01

    The zinc finger transcription factor Gli3 is an essential mediator of hedgehog signaling. Gli3 has a dynamic expression pattern during embryonic development. In the neural tube, Gli3 transcripts are patterned along the anteroposterior and dorsoventral axes such that the initial broad expression in the posterior neural tube becomes dorsally restricted as neurogenesis takes place. Little is known about the molecular mechanisms that regulate this dynamic expression. Here, we report on a phylogenetic analysis of the Gli3 locus that uncovered a novel regulatory element, HCNE1. HCNE1 contains a compound Pbx/Meis binding site that binds Pbx and Meis/Prep proteins in vitro and in vivo. We show that HCNE1 recapitulates Gli3 expression in the developing neural tube and that mutations in the Pbx/Meis binding site affect the spatiotemporal control of HCNE1 transcriptional activity. Ectopic expression or loss of function of Pbx and Meis/Prep proteins in the chick and mouse embryo results in aberrant expression of endogenous Gli3 transcripts. We propose a novel role for TALE proteins in establishing the correct spatiotemporal expression pattern of Gli3 in the vertebrate spinal cord, thus implicating TALE transcription factors in early embryonic patterning events controlled by Sonic hedgehog signaling. PMID:21262763

  6. T-box3 is a ciliary protein and regulates stability of the Gli3 transcription factor to control digit number

    PubMed Central

    Emechebe, Uchenna; Kumar P, Pavan; Rozenberg, Julian M; Moore, Bryn; Firment, Ashley; Mirshahi, Tooraj; Moon, Anne M

    2016-01-01

    Crucial roles for T-box3 in development are evident by severe limb malformations and other birth defects caused by T-box3 mutations in humans. Mechanisms whereby T-box3 regulates limb development are poorly understood. We discovered requirements for T-box at multiple stages of mouse limb development and distinct molecular functions in different tissue compartments. Early loss of T-box3 disrupts limb initiation, causing limb defects that phenocopy Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) mutants. Later ablation of T-box3 in posterior limb mesenchyme causes digit loss. In contrast, loss of anterior T-box3 results in preaxial polydactyly, as seen with dysfunction of primary cilia or Gli3-repressor. Remarkably, T-box3 is present in primary cilia where it colocalizes with Gli3. T-box3 interacts with Kif7 and is required for normal stoichiometry and function of a Kif7/Sufu complex that regulates Gli3 stability and processing. Thus, T-box3 controls digit number upstream of Shh-dependent (posterior mesenchyme) and Shh-independent, cilium-based (anterior mesenchyme) Hedgehog pathway function. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.07897.001 PMID:27046536

  7. T-box3 is a ciliary protein and regulates stability of the Gli3 transcription factor to control digit number.

    PubMed

    Emechebe, Uchenna; Kumar P, Pavan; Rozenberg, Julian M; Moore, Bryn; Firment, Ashley; Mirshahi, Tooraj; Moon, Anne M

    2016-01-01

    Crucial roles for T-box3 in development are evident by severe limb malformations and other birth defects caused by T-box3 mutations in humans. Mechanisms whereby T-box3 regulates limb development are poorly understood. We discovered requirements for T-box at multiple stages of mouse limb development and distinct molecular functions in different tissue compartments. Early loss of T-box3 disrupts limb initiation, causing limb defects that phenocopy Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) mutants. Later ablation of T-box3 in posterior limb mesenchyme causes digit loss. In contrast, loss of anterior T-box3 results in preaxial polydactyly, as seen with dysfunction of primary cilia or Gli3-repressor. Remarkably, T-box3 is present in primary cilia where it colocalizes with Gli3. T-box3 interacts with Kif7 and is required for normal stoichiometry and function of a Kif7/Sufu complex that regulates Gli3 stability and processing. Thus, T-box3 controls digit number upstream of Shh-dependent (posterior mesenchyme) and Shh-independent, cilium-based (anterior mesenchyme) Hedgehog pathway function. PMID:27046536

  8. Primary cilia and Gli3 activity regulate cerebral cortical size

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Sandra L.; Wilson, John P.; Wang, Chengbing; Wang, Baolin; McConnell, Susan K.

    2012-01-01

    During neural development, patterning, neurogenesis and overall growth are highly regulated and coordinated between different brain regions. Here, we show that primary cilia and the regulation of Gli activity, are necessary for the normal expansion of the cerebral cortex. We show that loss of Kif3a, an important functional component of primary cilia, leads to the degeneration of primary cilia, marked overgrowth of the cortex, and altered cell cycle kinetics within cortical progenitors. The G1 phase of the cell cycle is shortened through a mechanism likely involving reduced Gli3 activity and a resulting increase in expression of cyclin D1 and Fgf15. The defects in Gli3 activity alone are sufficient to accelerate cell cycle kinetics and cause the molecular changes seen in brains that lack cilia. Finally, we show that levels of full-length and repressor Gli3 proteins are tightly regulated during normal development and correlate with changes in expression of two known Shh-target genes, CyclinD1 and Fgf15, and with the normal lengthening of the cell cycle during corticogenesis. These data suggest that Gli3 activity is regulated through the primary cilium to control cell cycle length in the cortex and thus determine cortical size. PMID:21976438

  9. GLI3 Constrains Digit Number by Controlling Both Progenitor Proliferation and BMP-Dependent Exit to Chondrogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Lopez-Rios, Javier; Speziale, Dario; Robay, Dimitri; Scotti, Martina; Osterwalder, Marco; Nusspaumer, Gretel; Galli, Antonella; Holländer, Georg A.; Kmita, Marie; Zeller, Rolf

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Inactivation of Gli3, a key component of Hedgehog signaling in vertebrates, results in formation of additional digits (polydactyly) during limb bud development. The analysis of mouse embryos constitutively lacking Gli3 has revealed the essential GLI3 functions in specifying the anteroposterior (AP) limb axis and digit identities. We conditionally inactivated Gli3 during mouse hand plate development, which uncoupled the resulting preaxial polydactyly from known GLI3 functions in establishing AP and digit identities. Our analysis revealed that GLI3 directly restricts the expression of regulators of the G1–S cell-cycle transition such as Cdk6 and constrains S phase entry of digit progenitors in the anterior hand plate. Furthermore, GLI3 promotes the exit of proliferating progenitors toward BMP-dependent chondrogenic differentiation by spatiotemporally restricting and terminating the expression of the BMP antagonist Gremlin1. Thus, Gli3 is a negative regulator of the proliferative expansion of digit progenitors and acts as a gatekeeper for the exit to chondrogenic differentiation. PMID:22465667

  10. Tibial hemimelia associated with GLI3 truncation.

    PubMed

    Deimling, Steven; Sotiropoulos, Chris; Lau, Kimberly; Chaudhry, Sonia; Sturgeon, Kendra; Kelley, Simon; Narayanan, Unni; Howard, Andrew; Hui, Chi-Chung; Hopyan, Sevan

    2016-05-01

    Tibial hemimelia is a rare, debilitating and often sporadic congenital deficiency. In syndromic cases, mutations of a Sonic hedgehog (SHH) enhancer have been identified. Here we describe an ~5 kb deletion within the SHH repressor GLI3 in two patients with bilateral tibial hemimelia. This deletion results in a truncated GLI3 protein that lacks a DNA-binding domain and cannot repress hedgehog signaling. These findings strengthen the concept that tibial hemimelia arises because of failure to restrict SHH activity to the posterior aspect of the limb bud. PMID:26791356

  11. Preaxial polydactyly caused by Gli3 haploinsufficiency is rescued by Zic3 loss of function in mice

    PubMed Central

    Quinn, Malgorzata E.; Haaning, Allison; Ware, Stephanie M.

    2012-01-01

    Limb anomalies are important birth defects that are incompletely understood genetically and mechanistically. GLI3, a mediator of hedgehog signaling, is a genetic cause of limb malformations including pre- and postaxial polydactyly, Pallister–Hall syndrome and Greig cephalopolysyndactyly. A closely related Gli (glioma-associated oncogene homolog)-superfamily member, ZIC3, causes X-linked heterotaxy syndrome in humans but has not been investigated in limb development. During limb development, post-translational processing of Gli3 from activator to repressor antagonizes and posteriorly restricts Sonic hedgehog (Shh). We demonstrate that Zic3 and Gli3 expression overlap in developing limbs and that Zic3 converts Gli3 from repressor to activator in vitro. In Gli3 mutant mice, Zic3 loss of function abrogates ectopic Shh expression in anterior limb buds, limits overexpression in the zone of polarizing activity and normalizes aberrant Gli3 repressor/Gli3 activator ratios observed in Gli3+/− embryos. Zic3 null;Gli3+/− neonates show rescue of the polydactylous phenotype seen in Gli3+/− animals. These studies identify a previously unrecognized role for Zic3 in regulating limb digit number via its modifying effect on Gli3 and Shh expression levels. Together, these results indicate that two Gli superfamily members that cause disparate human congenital malformation syndromes interact genetically and demonstrate the importance of Zic3 in regulating Shh pathway in developing limbs. PMID:22234993

  12. GLI3 Links Environmental Arsenic Exposure and Human Fetal Growth.

    PubMed

    Winterbottom, Emily F; Fei, Dennis L; Koestler, Devin C; Giambelli, Camilla; Wika, Eric; Capobianco, Anthony J; Lee, Ethan; Marsit, Carmen J; Karagas, Margaret R; Robbins, David J

    2015-06-01

    Although considerable evidence suggests that in utero arsenic exposure affects children's health, these data are mainly from areas of the world where groundwater arsenic levels far exceed the World Health Organization limit of 10 μg/L. We, and others, have found that more common levels of in utero arsenic exposure may also impact children's health. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms are poorly understood. To address this issue, we analyzed the expression of key developmental genes in fetal placenta in a birth cohort of women using unregulated water supplies in a US region with elevated groundwater arsenic. We identified several genes whose expression associated with maternal arsenic exposure in a fetal sex-specific manner. In particular, expression of the HEDGEHOG pathway component, GLI3, in female placentae was both negatively associated with arsenic exposure and positively associated with infant birth weight. This suggests that modulation of GLI3 in the fetal placenta, and perhaps in other fetal tissues, contributes to arsenic's detrimental effects on fetal growth. We showed previously that arsenic-exposed NIH3T3 cells have reduced GLI3 repressor protein. Together, these studies identify GLI3 as a key signaling node that is affected by arsenic, mediating a subset of its effects on developmental signaling and fetal health. PMID:26288817

  13. Prevention of Premature Fusion of Calvarial Suture in GLI-Kruppel Family Member 3 (Gli3)-deficient Mice by Removing One Allele of Runt-related Transcription Factor 2 (Runx2)*

    PubMed Central

    Tanimoto, Yukiho; Veistinen, Lotta; Alakurtti, Kirsi; Takatalo, Maarit; Rice, David P. C.

    2012-01-01

    Mutations in the gene encoding the zinc finger transcription factor GLI3 (GLI-Kruppel family member 3) have been identified in patients with Grieg cephalopolysyndactyly syndrome in which premature fusion of calvarial suture (craniosynostosis) is an infrequent but important feature. Here, we show that Gli3 acts as a repressor in the developing murine calvaria and that Dlx5, Runx2 type II isoform (Runx2-II), and Bmp2 are expressed ectopically in the calvarial mesenchyme, which results in aberrant osteoblastic differentiation in Gli3-deficient mouse (Gli3Xt-J/Xt-J) and resulted in craniosynostosis. At the same time, enhanced activation of phospho-Smad1/5/8 (pSmad1/5/8), which is a downstream mediator of canonical Bmp signaling, was observed in Gli3Xt-J/Xt-J embryonic calvaria. Therefore, we generated Gli3;Runx2 compound mutant mice to study the effects of decreasing Runx2 dosage in a Gli3Xt-J/Xt-J background. Gli3Xt-J/Xt-J Runx2+/− mice have neither craniosynostosis nor additional ossification centers in interfrontal suture and displayed a normalization of Dlx5, Runx2-II, and pSmad1/5/8 expression as well as sutural mesenchymal cell proliferation. These findings suggest a novel role for Gli3 in regulating calvarial suture development by controlling canonical Bmp-Smad signaling, which integrates a Dlx5/Runx2-II cascade. We propose that targeting Runx2 might provide an attractive way of preventing craniosynostosis in patients. PMID:22547067

  14. Kinetics of Hedgehog-Dependent Full-Length Gli3 Accumulation in Primary Cilia and Subsequent Degradation ▿ † ‡

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Xiaohui; Lai, Cary K.; Evangelista, Marie; Hongo, Jo-Anne; de Sauvage, Frederic J.; Scales, Suzie J.

    2010-01-01

    Hedgehog (Hh) signaling in vertebrates depends on intraflagellar transport (IFT) within primary cilia. The Hh receptor Patched is found in cilia in the absence of Hh and is replaced by the signal transducer Smoothened within an hour of Hh stimulation. By generating antibodies capable of detecting endogenous pathway transcription factors Gli2 and Gli3, we monitored their kinetics of accumulation in cilia upon Hh stimulation. Localization occurs within minutes of Hh addition, making it the fastest reported readout of pathway activity, which permits more precise temporal and spatial localization of Hh signaling events. We show that the species of Gli3 that accumulates at cilium tips is full-length and likely not protein kinase A phosphorylated. We also confirmed that phosphorylation and βTrCP/Cul1 are required for endogenous Gli3 processing and that this is inhibited by Hh. Surprisingly, however, Hh-dependent inhibition of processing does not lead to accumulation of full-length Gli3, but instead renders it labile, leading to its proteasomal degradation via the SPOP/Cul3 complex. In fact, full-length Gli3 disappears with faster kinetics than the Gli3 repressor, the latter not requiring SPOP/Cul3 or βTrCP/Cul1. This may contribute to the increased Gli3 activator/repressor ratios found in IFT mutants. PMID:20154143

  15. Cerebral Cortex Expression of Gli3 Is Required for Normal Development of the Lateral Olfactory Tract

    PubMed Central

    Amaniti, Eleni-Maria; Kelman, Alexandra; Mason, John O.; Theil, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Formation of the lateral olfactory tract (LOT) and innervation of the piriform cortex represent fundamental steps to allow the transmission of olfactory information to the cerebral cortex. Several transcription factors, including the zinc finger transcription factor Gli3, influence LOT formation by controlling the development of mitral cells from which LOT axons emanate and/or by specifying the environment through which these axons navigate. Gli3 null and hypomorphic mutants display severe defects throughout the territory covered by the developing lateral olfactory tract, making it difficult to identify specific roles for Gli3 in its development. Here, we used Emx1Cre;Gli3fl/fl conditional mutants to investigate LOT formation and colonization of the olfactory cortex in embryos in which loss of Gli3 function is restricted to the dorsal telencephalon. These mutants form an olfactory bulb like structure which does not protrude from the telencephalic surface. Nevertheless, mitral cells are formed and their axons enter the piriform cortex though the LOT is shifted medially. Mitral axons also innervate a larger target area consistent with an enlargement of the piriform cortex and form aberrant projections into the deeper layers of the piriform cortex. No obvious differences were found in the expression patterns of key guidance cues. However, we found that an expansion of the piriform cortex temporally coincides with the arrival of LOT axons, suggesting that Gli3 affects LOT positioning and target area innervation through controlling the development of the piriform cortex. PMID:26509897

  16. Abrogation of Gli3 expression suppresses the growth of colon cancer cells via activation of p53

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Han Na; Oh, Sang Cheul; Kim, Jun Suk

    2012-03-10

    p53, the major human tumor suppressor, appears to be related to sonic hedgehog (Shh)-Gli-mediated tumorigenesis. However, the role of p53 in tumor progression by the Shh-Gli signaling pathway is poorly understood. Herein we investigated the critical regulation of Gli3-p53 in tumorigenesis of colon cancer cells and the molecular mechanisms underlying these effects. RT-PCR analysis indicated that the mRNA level of Shh and Gli3 in colon tumor tissues was significantly higher than corresponding normal tissues (P < 0.001). The inhibition of Gli3 by treatment with Gli3 siRNA resulted in a clear decrease in cell proliferation and enhanced the level of expression of p53 proteins compared to treatment with control siRNA. The half-life of p53 was dramatically increased by treatment with Gli3 siRNA. In addition, treatment with MG132 blocked MDM2-mediated p53 ubiquitination and degradation, and led to accumulation of p53 in Gli3 siRNA-overexpressing cells. Importantly, ectopic expression of p53 siRNA reduced the ability of Gli3 siRNA to suppress proliferation of those cells compared with the cells treated with Gli3 siRNA alone. Moreover, Gli3 siRNA sensitized colon cancer cells to treatment with anti-cancer agents (5-FU and bevacizumab). Taken together, our studies demonstrate that loss of Gli3 signaling leads to disruption of the MDM2-p53 interaction and strongly potentiate p53-dependent cell growth inhibition in colon cancer cells, indicating a basis for the rational use of Gli3 antagonists as a novel treatment option for colon cancer.

  17. lac repressor blocks in vivo transcription of lac control region DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Sellitti, M A; Pavco, P A; Steege, D A

    1987-01-01

    Transcription of the Escherichia coli lac repressor gene (lacI) in vivo produces monocistronic mRNAs with discrete 3' ends in the lac control region, although the DNA sequence of this region does not specify a strong termination signal of the traditional form. Direct analysis of lac transcripts was used to show that the DNA sequence alone does not provide the signal to end the repressor mRNA and to establish that of the proteins with specific binding sites on control region DNA only the lac repressor has a striking effect on the continuity of lacI gene transcription. RNAs with 3' ends in the control region sequence are major mRNA species produced from a repressor-bound template, reflecting as much as a 50-fold increase over their levels in the repressor's absence. Repressor binding to the operator thus has a dual function. In addition to blocking initiation of transcription from the lacZ promoter, repressor serves as a termination factor by setting the length of its own transcript and separating lacI and lacZYA into two distinct transcription units. Images PMID:3554233

  18. Identification and functional characterization of novel transcriptional enhancers involved in regulating human GLI3 expression during early development.

    PubMed

    Anwar, Saneela; Minhas, Rashid; Ali, Shahid; Lambert, Nicholas; Kawakami, Yasuhiko; Elgar, Greg; Azam, Syed Sikandar; Abbasi, Amir Ali

    2015-10-01

    The zinc-finger transcription factor GLI3 acts as a primary transducer of Sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling in a context-dependent combinatorial fashion. GLI3 participates in the patterning and growth of many organs, including the central nervous system (CNS) and limbs. Previously, we reported a subset of human intronic cis-regulators controlling many known aspects of endogenous Gli3 expression in mouse and zebrafish. Here we demonstrate in a transgenic zebrafish assay the potential of two novel tetrapod-teleost conserved non-coding elements (CNEs) docking within GLI3 intronic intervals (intron 3 and 4) to induce reporter gene expression at known sites of endogenous Gli3 transcription in embryonic domains such as the central nervous system (CNS) and limbs. Interestingly, the cell culture based assays reveal harmony with the context dependent dual nature of intra-GLI3 conserved elements. Furthermore, a transgenic zebrafish assay of previously reported limb-specific GLI3 transcriptional enhancers (previously tested in mice and chicken limb buds) induced reporter gene expression in zebrafish blood precursor cells and notochord instead of fin. These results demonstrate that the appendage-specific activity of a subset of GLI3-associated enhancers might be a tetrapod innovation. Taken together with our recent data, these results suggest that during the course of vertebrate evolution Gli3 expression control acquired a complex cis-regulatory landscape for spatiotemporal patterning of CNS and limbs. Comparative data from fish and mice suggest that the functional aspects of a subset of these cis-regulators have diverged significantly between these two lineages. PMID:26464005

  19. Suppressor of Fused Is Required for Determining Digit Number and Identity via Gli3/Fgfs/Gremlin

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Ying; Yang, Xueqin; Li, Yan; Zhang, Xiaoyun; Qiu, Mengsheng; Zhang, Ze; Zhang, Zunyi

    2015-01-01

    The anterior-posterior patterning of the vertebrate limb bud requires closely coordinated signaling interactions, including Sonic Hedgehog (Shh)-mediated counteraction of the Gli3 transcription factor in the distal and posterior mesenchyme of the limb bud. Suppressor of Fused (Sufu), an intracellular negative regulator of Shh signaling via Gli2 and Gli3, is implicated in early development of the mouse limb bud. However, how Sufu is involved in the genetic regulation of limb bud patterning still remains elusive. In this study, we show that the conditional deletion of Sufu in the mesenchyme of the early limb bud results in polydactyly with loss of digit identity and supernumerary bones in the wrist and the ankle. These pattern alterations are associated with anterior expansion of HoxD genes located at the 5’ end of the cluster. By focusing on gene expression analysis of Shh/Gremlin1/Fgf signaling critical for the establishment and maintenance of anterior-posterior patterning, we show that early response to loss of Sufu involves anterior prolongation of Fgf4 and Fgf8 expression in the apical ectodermal ridge at E10.5. We also reveal the anterior activation of Shh-dependent posterior markers Ptc1, Gli1 and Gremlin in limb buds lacking Sufu. Furthermore, we find that loss of Sufu leads to attenuated levels of repressor Gli2 and repressor Gli3 in the early limb bud. Moreover, expression of Hand2 is activated in the entire limb bud at the early outgrowth stage in the mutant lacking Sufu. Thus, we provide evidence that Sufu is involved in the genetic network that restricts the posterior expression of Gli2/3/Hand2 and Gremlin/Fgf in limb bud patterning. PMID:26001200

  20. Suppressor of Fused Is Required for Determining Digit Number and Identity via Gli3/Fgfs/Gremlin.

    PubMed

    Li, Jianying; Wang, Qihui; Cui, Ying; Yang, Xueqin; Li, Yan; Zhang, Xiaoyun; Qiu, Mengsheng; Zhang, Ze; Zhang, Zunyi

    2015-01-01

    The anterior-posterior patterning of the vertebrate limb bud requires closely coordinated signaling interactions, including Sonic Hedgehog (Shh)-mediated counteraction of the Gli3 transcription factor in the distal and posterior mesenchyme of the limb bud. Suppressor of Fused (Sufu), an intracellular negative regulator of Shh signaling via Gli2 and Gli3, is implicated in early development of the mouse limb bud. However, how Sufu is involved in the genetic regulation of limb bud patterning still remains elusive. In this study, we show that the conditional deletion of Sufu in the mesenchyme of the early limb bud results in polydactyly with loss of digit identity and supernumerary bones in the wrist and the ankle. These pattern alterations are associated with anterior expansion of HoxD genes located at the 5' end of the cluster. By focusing on gene expression analysis of Shh/Gremlin1/Fgf signaling critical for the establishment and maintenance of anterior-posterior patterning, we show that early response to loss of Sufu involves anterior prolongation of Fgf4 and Fgf8 expression in the apical ectodermal ridge at E10.5. We also reveal the anterior activation of Shh-dependent posterior markers Ptc1, Gli1 and Gremlin in limb buds lacking Sufu. Furthermore, we find that loss of Sufu leads to attenuated levels of repressor Gli2 and repressor Gli3 in the early limb bud. Moreover, expression of Hand2 is activated in the entire limb bud at the early outgrowth stage in the mutant lacking Sufu. Thus, we provide evidence that Sufu is involved in the genetic network that restricts the posterior expression of Gli2/3/Hand2 and Gremlin/Fgf in limb bud patterning. PMID:26001200

  1. Control of transcription of gal repressor and isorepressor genes in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Weickert, M J; Adhya, S

    1993-01-01

    Two regulatory proteins, Gal repressor and isorepressor, control the expression of the gal and mgl operons in Escherichia coli. The transcription start sites for galR and galS, the genes for the repressor and isorepressor, were determined by primer extension of in vivo transcripts. Study of the promoter-lacZ gene fusions introduced into the chromosome indicated that galS expression was elevated in cells in which the normal galS gene was interrupted, but not in cells in which the galR gene was deleted. When both genes were disrupted, galS expression was further elevated. Expression from the galS promoter was stimulated by the addition of D-fucose, repressed by glucose, and dependent on cyclic AMP receptor protein (CRP). Expression of a similar gene fusion of the galR promoter to lacZ was unregulated. Both galR and galS genes contain two potential operator sites (OE and OI) and a CRP-binding site. The arrangement of OE, OI, and the CRP-binding site in the galS gene is analogous to the arrangement in the gal and mgl promoters, but the arrangement in galR is atypical. The increased concentration of the isorepressor when inducer is present may facilitate early shutoff of the isorepressor-regulated genes of the gal regulon when inducer (substrate) concentration falls. PMID:8416900

  2. Translation Repressors, an RNA Helicase, and Developmental Cues Control RNP Phase Transitions during Early Development

    PubMed Central

    Hubstenberger, Arnaud; Noble, Scott L.; Cameron, Cristiana; Evans, Thomas C.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Like membranous organelles, large-scale coassembly of macromolecules can organize functions in cells. Ribonucleoproteins (RNPs) can form liquid or solid aggregates, but control and consequences of these RNP states in living, developing tissue are poorly understood. Here, we show that regulated RNP factor interactions drive transitions among diffuse, semiliquid, or solid states to modulate RNP sorting and exchange in the Caenorhabditis elegans oocyte cytoplasm. Translation repressors induce an intrinsic capacity of RNP components to coassemble into either large semiliquids or solid lattices, whereas a conserved RNA helicase prevents polymerization into nondynamic solids. Developmental cues dramatically alter both fluidity and sorting within large RNP assemblies, inducing a transition from RNP segregation in quiescent oocytes to dynamic exchange in the early embryo. Therefore, large-scale organization of gene expression extends to the cytoplasm, where regulation of supramolecular states imparts specific patterns of RNP dynamics. PMID:24176641

  3. Snail1 transcriptional repressor binds to its own promoter and controls its expression

    PubMed Central

    Peiró, Sandra; Escrivà, Maria; Puig, Isabel; Barberà, Maria José; Dave, Natàlia; Herranz, Nicolás; Larriba, Maria Jesús; Takkunen, Minna; Francí, Clara; Muñoz, Alberto; Virtanen, Ismo; Baulida, Josep; de Herreros, Antonio García

    2006-01-01

    The product of Snail1 gene is a transcriptional repressor of E-cadherin expression and an inductor of the epithelial–mesenchymal transition in several epithelial tumour cell lines. Transcription of Snail1 is induced when epithelial cells are forced to acquire a mesenchymal phenotype. In this work we demonstrate that Snail1 protein limits its own expression: Snail1 binds to an E-box present in its promoter (at −146 with respect to the transcription start) and represses its activity. Therefore, mutation of the E-box increases Snail1 transcription in epithelial and mesenchymal cells. Evidence of binding of ectopic or endogenous Snail1 to its own promoter was obtained by chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) experiments. Studies performed expressing different forms of Snail1 under the control of its own promoter demonstrate that disruption of the regulatory loop increases the cellular levels of Snail protein. These results indicate that expression of Snail1 gene can be regulated by its product and evidence the existence of a fine-tuning feed-back mechanism of regulation of Snail1 transcription. PMID:16617148

  4. Molecular analysis expands the spectrum of phenotypes associated with GLI3 mutations

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, Jennifer J.; Sapp, Julie C.; Turner, Joyce T.; Amor, David; Aftimos, Salim; Aleck, Kyrieckos A.; Bocian, Maureen; Bodurtha, Joann N.; Cox, Gerald F.; Curry, Cynthia J.; Day, Ruth; Donnai, Dian; Field, Michael; Fujiwara, Ikuma; Gabbett, Michael; Gal, Moran; Graham, John M.; Hedera, Peter; Hennekam, Raoul C.M.; Hersh, Joseph H.; Hopkin, Robert J.; Kayserili, Hülya; Kidd, Alexa M.J.; Kimonis, Virginia; Lin, Angela E.; Lynch, Sally Ann; Maisenbacher, Melissa; Mansour, Sahar; McGaughran, Julie; Mehta, Lakshmi; Murphy, Helen; Raygada, Margarita; Robin, Nathaniel H.; Rope, Alan F.; Rosenbaum, Kenneth N.; Schaefer, G. Bradley; Shealy, Amy; Smith, Wendy; Soller, Maria; Sommer, Annmarie; Stalker, Heather J.; Steiner, Bernhard; Stephan, Mark J.; Tilstra, David; Tomkins, Susan; Trapane, Pamela; Tsai, Anne Chun-Hui; Van Allen, Margot I.; Vasudevan, Pradeep C.; Zabel, Bernhard; Zunich, Janice; Black, Graeme C.M.; Biesecker, Leslie G.

    2010-01-01

    A range of phenotypes including Greig cephalopolysyndactyly and Pallister-Hall syndromes (GCPS, PHS) are caused by pathogenic mutation of the GLI3 gene. To characterize the clinical variability of GLI3 mutations, we present a subset of a cohort of 174 probands referred for GLI3 analysis. Eighty-one probands with typical GCPS or PHS were previously reported, and we report the remaining ninety-three probands here. This includes nineteen probands (twelve mutations) who fulfilled clinical criteria for GCPS or PHS, forty-eight probands (sixteen mutations) with features of GCPS or PHS but who did not meet the clinical criteria (sub-GCPS and sub-PHS), twenty-one probands (six mutations) with features of PHS or GCPS and oral-facial-digital syndrome and five probands (one mutation) with non-syndromic polydactyly. These data support previously identified genotype-phenotype correlations and demonstrate a more variable degree of severity than previously recognized. The finding of GLI3 mutations in patients with features of oral-facial-digital syndrome supports the observation that GLI3 interacts with cilia. We conclude that the phenotypic spectrum of GLI3 mutations is broader than that encompassed by the clinical diagnostic criteria, but the phenotype-genotype correlation persists. Individuals with features of either GCPS or PHS should be screened for mutations in GLI3 even if they do not fulfill clinical criteria. PMID:20672375

  5. p21 as a Transcriptional Co-Repressor of S-Phase and Mitotic Control Genes

    PubMed Central

    Ferrándiz, Nuria; Caraballo, Juan M.; García-Gutierrez, Lucía; Devgan, Vikram; Rodriguez-Paredes, Manuel; Lafita, M. Carmen; Bretones, Gabriel; Quintanilla, Andrea; Muñoz-Alonso, M. Jose; Blanco, Rosa; Reyes, Jose C.; Agell, Neus; Delgado, M. Dolores; Dotto, G. Paolo; León, Javier

    2012-01-01

    It has been previously described that p21 functions not only as a CDK inhibitor but also as a transcriptional co-repressor in some systems. To investigate the roles of p21 in transcriptional control, we studied the gene expression changes in two human cell systems. Using a human leukemia cell line (K562) with inducible p21 expression and human primary keratinocytes with adenoviral-mediated p21 expression, we carried out microarray-based gene expression profiling. We found that p21 rapidly and strongly repressed the mRNA levels of a number of genes involved in cell cycle and mitosis. One of the most strongly down-regulated genes was CCNE2 (cyclin E2 gene). Mutational analysis in K562 cells showed that the N-terminal region of p21 is required for repression of gene expression of CCNE2 and other genes. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays indicated that p21 was bound to human CCNE2 and other p21-repressed genes gene in the vicinity of the transcription start site. Moreover, p21 repressed human CCNE2 promoter-luciferase constructs in K562 cells. Bioinformatic analysis revealed that the CDE motif is present in most of the promoters of the p21-regulated genes. Altogether, the results suggest that p21 exerts a repressive effect on a relevant number of genes controlling S phase and mitosis. Thus, p21 activity as inhibitor of cell cycle progression would be mediated not only by the inhibition of CDKs but also by the transcriptional down-regulation of key genes. PMID:22662213

  6. p21 as a transcriptional co-repressor of S-phase and mitotic control genes.

    PubMed

    Ferrándiz, Nuria; Caraballo, Juan M; García-Gutierrez, Lucía; Devgan, Vikram; Rodriguez-Paredes, Manuel; Lafita, M Carmen; Bretones, Gabriel; Quintanilla, Andrea; Muñoz-Alonso, M Jose; Blanco, Rosa; Reyes, Jose C; Agell, Neus; Delgado, M Dolores; Dotto, G Paolo; León, Javier

    2012-01-01

    It has been previously described that p21 functions not only as a CDK inhibitor but also as a transcriptional co-repressor in some systems. To investigate the roles of p21 in transcriptional control, we studied the gene expression changes in two human cell systems. Using a human leukemia cell line (K562) with inducible p21 expression and human primary keratinocytes with adenoviral-mediated p21 expression, we carried out microarray-based gene expression profiling. We found that p21 rapidly and strongly repressed the mRNA levels of a number of genes involved in cell cycle and mitosis. One of the most strongly down-regulated genes was CCNE2 (cyclin E2 gene). Mutational analysis in K562 cells showed that the N-terminal region of p21 is required for repression of gene expression of CCNE2 and other genes. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays indicated that p21 was bound to human CCNE2 and other p21-repressed genes gene in the vicinity of the transcription start site. Moreover, p21 repressed human CCNE2 promoter-luciferase constructs in K562 cells. Bioinformatic analysis revealed that the CDE motif is present in most of the promoters of the p21-regulated genes. Altogether, the results suggest that p21 exerts a repressive effect on a relevant number of genes controlling S phase and mitosis. Thus, p21 activity as inhibitor of cell cycle progression would be mediated not only by the inhibition of CDKs but also by the transcriptional down-regulation of key genes. PMID:22662213

  7. Control of the Escherichia coli Sialoregulon by Transcriptional Repressor NanR

    PubMed Central

    Kalivoda, Kathryn A.; Steenbergen, Susan M.

    2013-01-01

    NanR, one of >8,500 GntR superfamily helix-turn-helix transcriptional regulators, controls expression of the genes required for catabolism of sialic acids in Escherichia coli. It is predicted to do the same in related bacteria harboring orthologs of nanR. The sialic acids are a family of over 40 naturally occurring nine-carbon keto-sugar acids found mainly in the animal lineage, which includes starfish to humans in the deuterostome lineage. Sialic acids function in development, immunity, protein localization and stability, and homeostasis. They also serve as microbial carbon and nitrogen sources and ligands for cell recognition during host colonization. The importance of microbial sialic acid metabolism for host-microbe interactions has made it a target for therapeutic development. Exploiting this target depends on understanding sialometabolic pathways in a wide range of evolutionarily distinct bacteria. Here, we show by transcriptome, genetic, and biochemical analyses that the most common sialic acid, N-acetylneuraminate, induces the nanATEK-yhcH, yjhATS (nanCMS), and yjhBC operons by directly inactivating NanR, converting the predominantly dimeric form of the repressor to an inactive monomer of approximately 30-kDa. Additionally, other results identify critical amino acid residues and nucleotides in the regulator and operator, respectively. The combined results better define how sialic acids, acting through NanR, affect the metabolic flux of an important group of host-derived metabolites. Thus, E. coli serves as a valuable model for understanding sialocatabolic pathways in bacteria. PMID:23935044

  8. Novel GLI3 mutation in a Greek-Cypriot patient with Greig cephalopolysyndactyly syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tanteles, George A; Michaelidou, Sofia; Loukianou, Eleni; Christophidou-Anastasiadou, Violetta; Kleopa, Kleopas A

    2015-07-01

    Greig cephalopolysyndactyly syndrome (GCPS) is typically characterized by preaxial or mixed preaxial and postaxial polydactyly with or without syndactyly and craniofacial features including hypertelorism and macrocephaly. Although GLI3 shows considerable pleiotropy, it is the only gene known to cause this particular phenotype. We report on a patient with GCPS caused by a novel GLI3 mutation. In addition, the patient had asymmetry of the calf muscles, most likely secondary to chronic hypertrophic radiculopathy. The GLI3 mutation identified by targeted Sanger sequencing analysis in our patient is predicted to lead to premature termination of translation. This is the first report of a Cypriot patient with a GCPS because of a novel GLI3 mutation. The report provides additional evidence in support of the rich variability in phenotypic expression, the mutational heterogeneity and ethnic diversity associated with this rare condition. PMID:25714367

  9. Drosophila transcriptional repressor protein that binds specifically to negative control elements in fat body enhancers.

    PubMed Central

    Falb, D; Maniatis, T

    1992-01-01

    Expression of the Drosophila melanogaster Adh gene in adults requires a fat body-specific enhancer called the Adh adult enhancer (AAE). We have identified a protein in Drosophila nuclear extracts that binds specifically to a site within the AAE (adult enhancer factor 1 [AEF-1]). In addition, we have shown that AEF-1 binds specifically to two other Drosophila fat body enhancers. Base substitutions in the AEF-1 binding site that disrupt AEF-1 binding in vitro result in a significant increase in the level of Adh expression in vivo. Thus, the AEF-1 binding site is a negative regulatory element within the AAE. A cDNA encoding the AEF-1 protein was isolated and shown to act as a repressor of the AAE in cotransfection studies. The AEF-1 protein contains four zinc fingers and an alanine-rich sequence. The latter motif is found in other eukaryotic proteins known to be transcriptional repressors. Images PMID:1508206

  10. Control of developmentally primed erythroid genes by combinatorial co-repressor actions

    PubMed Central

    Stadhouders, Ralph; Cico, Alba; Stephen, Tharshana; Thongjuea, Supat; Kolovos, Petros; Baymaz, H. Irem; Yu, Xiao; Demmers, Jeroen; Bezstarosti, Karel; Maas, Alex; Barroca, Vilma; Kockx, Christel; Ozgur, Zeliha; van Ijcken, Wilfred; Arcangeli, Marie-Laure; Andrieu-Soler, Charlotte; Lenhard, Boris; Grosveld, Frank; Soler, Eric

    2015-01-01

    How transcription factors (TFs) cooperate within large protein complexes to allow rapid modulation of gene expression during development is still largely unknown. Here we show that the key haematopoietic LIM-domain-binding protein-1 (LDB1) TF complex contains several activator and repressor components that together maintain an erythroid-specific gene expression programme primed for rapid activation until differentiation is induced. A combination of proteomics, functional genomics and in vivo studies presented here identifies known and novel co-repressors, most notably the ETO2 and IRF2BP2 proteins, involved in maintaining this primed state. The ETO2–IRF2BP2 axis, interacting with the NCOR1/SMRT co-repressor complex, suppresses the expression of the vast majority of archetypical erythroid genes and pathways until its decommissioning at the onset of terminal erythroid differentiation. Our experiments demonstrate that multimeric regulatory complexes feature a dynamic interplay between activating and repressing components that determines lineage-specific gene expression and cellular differentiation. PMID:26593974

  11. Point mutations throughout the GLI3 gene cause Greig cephalopolysyndactyly syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kalff-Suske, M; Wild, A; Topp, J; Wessling, M; Jacobsen, E M; Bornholdt, D; Engel, H; Heuer, H; Aalfs, C M; Ausems, M G; Barone, R; Herzog, A; Heutink, P; Homfray, T; Gillessen-Kaesbach, G; König, R; Kunze, J; Meinecke, P; Müller, D; Rizzo, R; Strenge, S; Superti-Furga, A; Grzeschik, K H

    1999-09-01

    Greig cephalopolysyndactyly syndrome, characterized by craniofacial and limb anomalies (GCPS; MIM 175700), previously has been demonstrated to be associated with translocations as well as point mutations affecting one allele of the zinc finger gene GLI3. In addition to GCPS, Pallister-Hall syndrome (PHS; MIM 146510) and post-axial polydactyly type A (PAP-A; MIM 174200), two other disorders of human development, are caused by GLI3 mutations. In order to gain more insight into the mutational spectrum associated with a single phenotype, we report here the extension of the GLI3 mutation analysis to 24 new GCPS cases. We report the identification of 15 novel mutations present in one of the patient's GLI3 alleles. The mutations map throughout the coding gene regions. The majority are truncating mutations (nine of 15) that engender prematurely terminated protein products mostly but not exclusively N-terminally to or within the central region encoding the DNA-binding domain. Two missense and two splicing mutations mapping within the zinc finger motifs presumably also interfere with DNA binding. The five mutations identified within the protein regions C-terminal to the zinc fingers putatively affect additional functional properties of GLI3. In cell transfection experiments using fusions of the DNA-binding domain of yeast GAL4 to different segments of GLI3, transactivating capacity was assigned to two adjacent independent domains (TA(1)and TA(2)) in the C-terminal third of GLI3. Since these are the only functional domains affected by three C-terminally truncating mutations, we postulate that GCPS may be due either to haploinsufficiency resulting from the complete loss of one gene copy or to functional haploinsufficiency related to compromised properties of this transcription factor such as DNA binding and transactivation. PMID:10441342

  12. A Set of Activators and Repressors Control Peripheral Glucose Pathways in Pseudomonas putida To Yield a Common Central Intermediate▿

    PubMed Central

    del Castillo, Teresa; Duque, Estrella; Ramos, Juan L.

    2008-01-01

    Pseudomonas putida KT2440 channels glucose to the central Entner-Doudoroff intermediate 6-phosphogluconate through three convergent pathways. The genes for these convergent pathways are clustered in three independent regions on the host chromosome. A number of monocistronic units and operons coexist within each of these clusters, favoring coexpression of catabolic enzymes and transport systems. Expression of the three pathways is mediated by three transcriptional repressors, HexR, GnuR, and PtxS, and by a positive transcriptional regulator, GltR-2. In this study, we generated mutants in each of the regulators and carried out transcriptional assays using microarrays and transcriptional fusions. These studies revealed that HexR controls the genes that encode glucokinase/glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase that yield 6-phosphogluconate; the genes for the Entner-Doudoroff enzymes that yield glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate and pyruvate; and gap-1, which encodes glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase. GltR-2 is the transcriptional regulator that controls specific porins for the entry of glucose into the periplasmic space, as well as the gtsABCD operon for glucose transport through the inner membrane. GnuR is the repressor of gluconate transport and gluconokinase responsible for the conversion of gluconate into 6-phosphogluconate. PtxS, however, controls the enzymes for oxidation of gluconate to 2-ketogluconate, its transport and metabolism, and a set of genes unrelated to glucose metabolism. PMID:18245293

  13. Differential requirements for Gli2 and Gli3 in the regional specification of the mouse hypothalamus

    PubMed Central

    Haddad-Tóvolli, Roberta; Paul, Fabian A.; Zhang, Yuanfeng; Zhou, Xunlei; Theil, Thomas; Puelles, Luis; Blaess, Sandra; Alvarez-Bolado, Gonzalo

    2015-01-01

    Secreted protein Sonic hedgehog (Shh) ventralizes the neural tube by modulating the crucial balance between activating and repressing functions (GliA, GliR) of transcription factors Gli2 and Gli3. This balance—the Shh-Gli code—is species- and context-dependent and has been elucidated for the mouse spinal cord. The hypothalamus, a forebrain region regulating vital functions like homeostasis and hormone secretion, shows dynamic and intricate Shh expression as well as complex regional differentiation. Here we asked if particular combinations of Gli2 and Gli3 and of GliA and GliR functions contribute to the variety of hypothalamic regions, i.e., we wanted to approach the question of a possible hypothalamic version of the Shh-Gli code. Based on mouse mutant analysis, we show that: (1) hypothalamic regional heterogeneity is based in part on differentially stringent requirements for Gli2 or Gli3; (2) another source of diversity are differential requirements for Shh of neural vs. non-neural origin; (3) the medial progenitor domain known to depend on Gli2 for its development generates several essential hypothalamic nuclei plus the pituitary and median eminence; (4) the suppression of Gli3R by neural and non-neural Shh is essential for hypothalamic specification. Finally, we have mapped our results on a recent model which considers the hypothalamus as a transverse region with alar and basal portions. Our data confirm the model and are explained by it. PMID:25859185

  14. Fins into limbs: Autopod acquisition and anterior elements reduction by modifying gene networks involving 5'Hox, Gli3, and Shh.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Mikiko

    2016-05-01

    Two major morphological changes occurred during the fin-to-limb transition: the appearance of the autopod, and the reduction of anterior skeletal elements. In the past decades, numerous approaches to the study of genetic developmental systems involved in patterning of fins/limbs among different taxa have provided clues to better understand the mechanism of the fin-to-limb transition. In this article, I discuss recent progress toward elucidating the evolutionary origin of the autopod and the mechanism through which the multiple-basal bones of ancestral fins were reduced into a single bone (humerus/femur). A particular focus of this article is the patterning mechanism of the tetrapod limb and chondrichthyan fin controlled by gene networks involving the 5'Hox genes, Gli3 and Shh. These recent data provide possible scenarios that could have led to the transformation of fins into limbs. PMID:26992366

  15. GLI3-dependent repression of DR4 mediates hedgehog antagonism of TRAIL-induced apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Kurita, S; Mott, J L; Almada, L L; Bronk, S F; Werneburg, N W; Sun, S-Y; Roberts, L R; Fernandez-Zapico, M E; Gores, G J

    2010-08-26

    Tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) induces apoptosis through its cognate receptors death receptor 4 (DR4) and death receptor 5 (DR5), preferentially in malignant cells. However, many malignant cells remain resistant to TRAIL cytotoxicity by poorly characterized mechanisms. Here, using cholangiocarcinoma cells, as a model for TRAIL resistance, we identified a role for the oncogenic Hedgehog (Hh)-GLI pathway in the regulation of TRAIL cytotoxicity. Blockade of Hh using pharmacological and genetic tools sensitizes the cells to TRAIL cytotoxicity. Restoration of apoptosis sensitivity coincided with upregulation of DR4 expression, while expression of other death effector proteins remained unaltered. Knockdown of DR4 mimics Hh-mediated resistance to TRAIL cytotoxicity. Hh regulates the expression of DR4 by modulating the activity of its promoter. Luciferase, chromatin immunoprecipitation and expression assays show that the transcription factor GLI3 binds to the DR4 promoter and Hh requires an intact GLI3-repression activity to silence DR4 expression. Finally, small interfering RNA (siRNA)-targeted knockdown of GLI3, but not GLI1 or GLI2, restores DR4 expression and TRAIL sensitivity, indicating that the Hh effect is exclusively mediated by this transcription factor. In conclusion, these data provide evidence of a regulatory mechanism, which modulates TRAIL signaling in cancer cells and suggest new therapeutic approaches for TRAIL-resistant neoplasms. PMID:20562908

  16. GLI3-dependent repression of DR4 mediates hedgehog antagonism of TRAIL-induced apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Kurita, S; Mott, JL; Almada, LL; Bronk, SF; Werneburg, NW; Sun, S-Y; Roberts, LR; Fernandez-Zapico, ME; Gores, GJ

    2010-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) induces apoptosis through its cognate receptors death receptor 4 (DR4) and death receptor 5 (DR5), preferentially in malignant cells. However, many malignant cells remain resistant to TRAIL cytotoxicity by poorly characterized mechanisms. Here, using cholangiocarcinoma cells, as a model for TRAIL resistance, we identified a role for the oncogenic Hedgehog (Hh)-GLI pathway in the regulation of TRAIL cytotoxicity. Blockade of Hh using pharmacological and genetic tools sensitizes the cells to TRAIL cytotoxicity. Restoration of apoptosis sensitivity coincided with upregulation of DR4 expression, while expression of other death effector proteins remained unaltered. Knockdown of DR4 mimics Hh-mediated resistance to TRAIL cytotoxicity. Hh regulates the expression of DR4 by modulating the activity of its promoter. Luciferase, chromatin immunoprecipitation and expression assays show that the transcription factor GLI3 binds to the DR4 promoter and Hh requires an intact GLI3-repression activity to silence DR4 expression. Finally, small interfering RNA (siRNA)-targeted knockdown of GLI3, but not GLI1 or GLI2, restores DR4 expression and TRAIL sensitivity, indicating that the Hh effect is exclusively mediated by this transcription factor. In conclusion, these data provide evidence of a regulatory mechanism, which modulates TRAIL signaling in cancer cells and suggest new therapeutic approaches for TRAIL-resistant neoplasms. PMID:20562908

  17. Set7 mediated Gli3 methylation plays a positive role in the activation of Sonic Hedgehog pathway in mammals.

    PubMed

    Fu, Lin; Wu, Hailong; Cheng, Steven Y; Gao, Daming; Zhang, Lei; Zhao, Yun

    2016-01-01

    Hedgehog signaling plays very important roles in development and cancers. Vertebrates have three transcriptional factors, Gli1, Gli2 and Gli3. Among them, Gli3 is a very special transcriptional factor which closely resembles Cubitus interruptus (Ci, in Drosophila) structurally and functionally as a 'double agent' for Shh target gene expression. Here we show that Gli3 full-length, but not the truncated form, can be methylated at K436 and K595. This methylation is specifically catalyzed by Set7, a lysine methyltransferase (KMT). Methylation at K436 and K595 respectively increases the stability and DNA binding ability of Gli3, resulting in an enhancement of Shh signaling activation. Furthermore, functional experiments indicate that the Gli3 methylation contributes to the tumor growth and metastasis in non-small cell lung cancer in vitro and in vivo. Therefore, we propose that Set7 mediated methylation is a novel PTM of Gli3, which positively regulates the transactivity of Gli3 and the activation of Shh signaling. PMID:27146893

  18. Set7 mediated Gli3 methylation plays a positive role in the activation of Sonic Hedgehog pathway in mammals

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Lin; Wu, Hailong; Cheng, Steven Y; Gao, Daming; Zhang, Lei; Zhao, Yun

    2016-01-01

    Hedgehog signaling plays very important roles in development and cancers. Vertebrates have three transcriptional factors, Gli1, Gli2 and Gli3. Among them, Gli3 is a very special transcriptional factor which closely resembles Cubitus interruptus (Ci, in Drosophila) structurally and functionally as a ‘double agent’ for Shh target gene expression. Here we show that Gli3 full-length, but not the truncated form, can be methylated at K436 and K595. This methylation is specifically catalyzed by Set7, a lysine methyltransferase (KMT). Methylation at K436 and K595 respectively increases the stability and DNA binding ability of Gli3, resulting in an enhancement of Shh signaling activation. Furthermore, functional experiments indicate that the Gli3 methylation contributes to the tumor growth and metastasis in non-small cell lung cancer in vitro and in vivo. Therefore, we propose that Set7 mediated methylation is a novel PTM of Gli3, which positively regulates the transactivity of Gli3 and the activation of Shh signaling. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.15690.001 PMID:27146893

  19. MiRNA-133b promotes the proliferation of human Sertoli cells through targeting GLI3

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Chencheng; Sun, Min; Yuan, Qingqing; Niu, Minghui; Chen, Zheng; Hou, Jingmei; Wang, Hong; Wen, Liping; Liu, Yun; Li, Zheng; He, Zuping

    2016-01-01

    Sertoli cells play critical roles in regulating spermatogenesis and they can be reprogrammed to the cells of other lineages, highlighting that they have significant applications in reproductive and regenerative medicine. The fate determinations of Sertoli cells are regulated precisely by epigenetic factors. However, the expression, roles, and targets of microRNA (miRNA) in human Sertoli cells remain unknown. Here we have for the first time revealed that 174 miRNAs were distinctly expressed in human Sertoli cells between Sertoli-cell-only syndrome (SCOS) patients and obstructive azoospermia (OA) patients with normal spermatogenesis using miRNA microarrays and real time PCR, suggesting that these miRNAs may be associated with the pathogenesis of SCOS. MiR-133b is upregulated in Sertoli cells of SCOS patients compared to OA patients. Proliferation assays with miRNA mimics and inhibitors showed that miR-133b enhanced the proliferation of human Sertoli cells. Moreover, we demonstrated that GLI3 was a direct target of miR-133b and the expression of Cyclin B1 and Cyclin D1 was enhanced by miR-133b mimics but decreased by its inhibitors. Gene silencing of GLI3 using RNA inference stimulated the growth of human Sertoli cells. Collectively, miR-133b promoted the proliferation of human Sertoli cells by targeting GLI3. This study thus sheds novel insights into epigenetic regulation of human Sertoli cells and the etiology of azoospermia and offers new targets for treating male infertility PMID:26755652

  20. Radiation abolishes inducer binding to lactose repressor.

    PubMed

    Gillard, Nathalie; Spotheim-Maurizot, Mélanie; Charlier, Michel

    2005-04-01

    The lactose operon functions under the control of the repressor-operator system. Binding of the repressor to the operator prevents the expression of the structural genes. This interaction can be destroyed by the binding of an inducer to the repressor. If ionizing radiations damage the partners, a dramatic dysfunction of the regulation system may be expected. We showed previously that gamma irradiation hinders repressor-operator binding through protein damage. Here we show that irradiation of the repressor abolishes the binding of the gratuitous inducer isopropyl-1-beta-D-thiogalactoside (IPTG) to the repressor. The observed lack of release of the repressor from the complex results from the loss of the ability of the inducer to bind to the repressor due to the destruction of the IPTG binding site. Fluorescence measurements show that both tryptophan residues located in or near the IPTG binding site are damaged. Since tryptophan damage is strongly correlated with the loss of IPTG binding ability, we conclude that it plays a critical role in the effect. A model was built that takes into account the kinetic analysis of damage production and the observed protection of its binding site by IPTG. This model satisfactorily accounts for the experimental results and allows us to understand the radiation-induced effects. PMID:15799700

  1. The lac repressor.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Mitchell

    2005-06-01

    Few proteins have had such a strong impact on a field as the lac repressor has had in Molecular Biology. Over 40 years ago, Jacob and Monod [Genetic regulatory mechanisms in the synthesis of proteins, J. Mol. Biol. 3 (1961) 318] proposed a model for gene regulation, which survives essentially unchanged in contemporary textbooks. It is a cogent depiction of how a set of 'structural' genes may be coordinately transcribed in response to environmental conditions and regulates metabolic events in the cell. In bacteria, the genes required for lactose utilization are negatively regulated when a repressor molecule binds to an upstream cis activated operator. The repressor and its operator together form a genetic switch, the lac operon. The switch functions when inducer molecules alter the conformation of the repressor in a specific manner. In the presence of a particular metabolite, the repressor undergoes a conformational change that reduces its affinity for the operator. The structures of the lac repressor and its complexes with operator DNA and effector molecules have provided a physical platform for visualizing at the molecular level the different conformations the repressor and the molecular basis for the switch. The structures of lac repressor, bound to its operator and inducer, have also been invaluable for interpreting a plethora of biochemical and genetic data. PMID:15950160

  2. Expression of the vertebrate Gli proteins in Drosophila reveals a distribution of activator and repressor activities.

    PubMed

    Aza-Blanc, P; Lin, H Y; Ruiz i Altaba, A; Kornberg, T B

    2000-10-01

    The Cubitus interruptus (Ci) and Gli proteins are transcription factors that mediate responses to Hedgehog proteins (Hh) in flies and vertebrates, respectively. During development of the Drosophila wing, Ci transduces the Hh signal and regulates transcription of different target genes at different locations. In vertebrates, the three Gli proteins are expressed in overlapping domains and are partially redundant. To assess how the vertebrate Glis correlate with Drosophila Ci, we expressed each in Drosophila and monitored their behaviors and activities. We found that each Gli has distinct activities that are equivalent to portions of the regulatory arsenal of Ci. Gli2 and Gli1 have activator functions that depend on Hh. Gli2 and Gli3 are proteolyzed to produce a repressor form able to inhibit hh expression. However, while Gli3 repressor activity is regulated by Hh, Gli2 repressor activity is not. These observations suggest that the separate activator and repressor functions of Ci are unevenly partitioned among the three Glis, yielding proteins with related yet distinct properties. PMID:10976059

  3. Synthesis of Glycopolymer Containing Cell-Penetrating Peptides as Inducers of Recombinant Protein Expression under the Control of Lactose Operator/Repressor Systems.

    PubMed

    Katagiri, Kei; Takasu, Akinori; Higuchi, Masahiro

    2016-05-01

    We recently reported on newly synthesized S-galactosyl oligo(Arg) conjugates to overcome the serious problem of the passage through the E. coli cell membrane. Following in vivo expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP) induced by each of the S-galactosyl (Arg)n constructs (n = 5, 6, 8) at the T5 promoter in E. coli for 18 h, we visually observed that the cultures fluoresced green light when excited with UV light. The fluorescence intensities for these cultures were greater than that found for a control culture, indicating that the peptides had induced GFP expression. In order to accomplish higher expression efficiency, we investigated the cluster effect and structural fine-tuning of new poly(2-oxazoline) containing CysArgArg as the cell-penetrating peptide (CPP) and S-galactosides when acting as inducers of recombinant protein expression under the control of lac operator/repressor systems in this article. Quantitative fluorescence intensities (calculated per molecule) also supported the observations that the cell-penetrating glyco poly(2-oxazoline)s were better inducers of GFP expression than glyco poly(2-oxazoline) containing no CPP or isopropyl β-d-thiogalactoside. Because the level of GFP expression was directly related to the number of sugar residues in each glyco poly(2-oxazoline), we propose that a cluster effect of the S-galactosides attached to the cell-penetrating poly(2-oxazoline) is responsible for how well the galactosides inhibited the lac repressor to activate the protein expression under the control of the lac operator/repressor system. A similar tendency was observed when the T7 promoter was placed upstream of the gene for an artificial extracellular matrix protein and glyco poly(2-oxazoline)s-CPP conjugates were used as inducers. To assess how the glyco poly(2-oxazoline) penetrate the cell membrane, we labeled the glyco poly(2-oxazoline) using 1-amino pyrene and directly observed the penetration process. Furthermore, we could visualize protein

  4. The Phenylpropanoid Pathway Is Controlled at Different Branches by a Set of R2R3-MYB C2 Repressors in Grapevine1

    PubMed Central

    Cavallini, Erika; Matus, José Tomás; Finezzo, Laura; Zenoni, Sara; Loyola, Rodrigo; Guzzo, Flavia; Schlechter, Rudolf; Ageorges, Agnès; Arce-Johnson, Patricio

    2015-01-01

    Because of the vast range of functions that phenylpropanoids possess, their synthesis requires precise spatiotemporal coordination throughout plant development and in response to the environment. The accumulation of these secondary metabolites is transcriptionally controlled by positive and negative regulators from the MYB and basic helix-loop-helix protein families. We characterized four grapevine (Vitis vinifera) R2R3-MYB proteins from the C2 repressor motif clade, all of which harbor the ethylene response factor-associated amphiphilic repression domain but differ in the presence of an additional TLLLFR repression motif found in the strong flavonoid repressor Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) AtMYBL2. Constitutive expression of VvMYB4a and VvMYB4b in petunia (Petunia hybrida) repressed general phenylpropanoid biosynthetic genes and selectively reduced the amount of small-weight phenolic compounds. Conversely, transgenic petunia lines expressing VvMYBC2-L1 and VvMYBC2-L3 showed a severe reduction in petal anthocyanins and seed proanthocyanidins together with a higher pH of crude petal extracts. The distinct function of these regulators was further confirmed by transient expression in tobacco (Nicotiana benthamiana) leaves and grapevine plantlets. Finally, VvMYBC2-L3 was ectopically expressed in grapevine hairy roots, showing a reduction in proanthocyanidin content together with the down-regulation of structural and regulatory genes of the flavonoid pathway as revealed by a transcriptomic analysis. The physiological role of these repressors was inferred by combining the results of the functional analyses and their expression patterns in grapevine during development and in response to ultraviolet B radiation. Our results indicate that VvMYB4a and VvMYB4b may play a key role in negatively regulating the synthesis of small-weight phenolic compounds, whereas VvMYBC2-L1 and VvMYBC2-L3 may additionally fine tune flavonoid levels, balancing the inductive effects of

  5. Biofilm formation by Bacillus subtilis requires an endoribonuclease-containing multisubunit complex that controls mRNA levels for the matrix gene repressor SinR.

    PubMed

    DeLoughery, Aaron; Dengler, Vanina; Chai, Yunrong; Losick, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Biofilm formation by Bacillus subtilis is largely governed by a circuit in which the response regulator Spo0A turns on the gene for the anti-repressor SinI. SinI, in turn, binds to and inactivates SinR, a dedicated repressor of genes for matrix production. Mutants of the genes ylbF, ymcA and yaaT are blocked in biofilm formation, but the mechanism by which they act has been mysterious. A recent report attributed their role in biofilm formation to stimulating Spo0A activity. However, we detect no measurable effect on the transcription of sinI. Instead, we find that the block in biofilm formation is caused by an increase in the levels of SinR and of its mRNA. Evidence is presented that YlbF, YmcA and YaaT interact with, and control the activity of, RNase Y, which is known to destabilize sinR mRNA. We also show that the processing of another target of RNase Y, cggR-gapA mRNA, similarly depends on YlbF and YmcA. Our work suggests that sinR mRNA stability is an additional posttranscriptional control mechanism governing the switch to multicellularity and raises the possibility that YlbF, YmcA and YaaT broadly regulate mRNA stability as part of an RNase Y-containing, multi-subunit complex. PMID:26434553

  6. MicroRNA-378 limits activation of hepatic stellate cells and liver fibrosis by suppressing Gli3 expression

    PubMed Central

    Hyun, Jeongeun; Wang, Sihyung; Kim, Jieun; Rao, Kummara Madhusudana; Park, Soo Yong; Chung, Ildoo; Ha, Chang-Sik; Kim, Sang-Woo; Yun, Yang H.; Jung, Youngmi

    2016-01-01

    Hedgehog (Hh) signalling regulates hepatic fibrogenesis. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) mediate various cellular processes; however, their role in liver fibrosis is unclear. Here we investigate regulation of miRNAs in chronically damaged fibrotic liver. MiRNA profiling shows that expression of miR-378 family members (miR-378a-3p, miR-378b and miR-378d) declines in carbon tetrachloride (CCl4)-treated compared with corn-oil-treated mice. Overexpression of miR-378a-3p, directly targeting Gli3 in activated hepatic stellate cells (HSCs), reduces expression of Gli3 and profibrotic genes but induces gfap, the inactivation marker of HSCs, in CCl4-treated liver. Smo blocks transcriptional expression of miR-378a-3p by activating the p65 subunit of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB). The hepatic level of miR-378a-3p is inversely correlated with the expression of Gli3 in tumour and non-tumour tissues in human hepatocellular carcinoma. Our results demonstrate that miR-378a-3p suppresses activation of HSCs by targeting Gli3 and its expression is regulated by Smo-dependent NF-κB signalling, suggesting miR-378a-3p has therapeutic potential for liver fibrosis. PMID:27001906

  7. MicroRNA-378 limits activation of hepatic stellate cells and liver fibrosis by suppressing Gli3 expression.

    PubMed

    Hyun, Jeongeun; Wang, Sihyung; Kim, Jieun; Rao, Kummara Madhusudana; Park, Soo Yong; Chung, Ildoo; Ha, Chang-Sik; Kim, Sang-Woo; Yun, Yang H; Jung, Youngmi

    2016-01-01

    Hedgehog (Hh) signalling regulates hepatic fibrogenesis. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) mediate various cellular processes; however, their role in liver fibrosis is unclear. Here we investigate regulation of miRNAs in chronically damaged fibrotic liver. MiRNA profiling shows that expression of miR-378 family members (miR-378a-3p, miR-378b and miR-378d) declines in carbon tetrachloride (CCl4)-treated compared with corn-oil-treated mice. Overexpression of miR-378a-3p, directly targeting Gli3 in activated hepatic stellate cells (HSCs), reduces expression of Gli3 and profibrotic genes but induces gfap, the inactivation marker of HSCs, in CCl4-treated liver. Smo blocks transcriptional expression of miR-378a-3p by activating the p65 subunit of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB). The hepatic level of miR-378a-3p is inversely correlated with the expression of Gli3 in tumour and non-tumour tissues in human hepatocellular carcinoma. Our results demonstrate that miR-378a-3p suppresses activation of HSCs by targeting Gli3 and its expression is regulated by Smo-dependent NF-κB signalling, suggesting miR-378a-3p has therapeutic potential for liver fibrosis. PMID:27001906

  8. Gli2 and Gli3 Localize to Cilia and Require the Intraflagellar Transport Protein Polaris for Processing and Function

    SciTech Connect

    Michaud III, Edward J; Haycraft, Courtney J; Aydin Son, Yesim; Zhang, Qihong; Yoder, Bradley

    2005-01-01

    Intraflagellar transport (IFT) proteins are essential for cilia assembly and have recently been associated with a number of developmental processes, such as left-right axis specification and limb and neural tube patterning. Genetic studies indicate that IFT proteins are required for Sonic hedgehog (Shh)signaling downstream of the Smoothened and Patched membrane proteins but upstream of the Glioma (Gli) transcription factors. However, the role that IFT proteins play in transduction of Shh signaling and the importance of cilia in this process remain unknown. Here we provide insights into the mechanism by which defects in an IFT protein, Tg737/Polaris, affect Shh signaling in the murine limb bud. Our data show that loss of Tg737 results in altered Gli3 processing that abrogates Gli3-mediated repression of Gli1 transcriptional activity. In contrast to the conclusions drawn from genetic analysis, the activity of Gli1 and truncated forms of Gli3 (Gli3R) are unaffected in Tg737 mutants at the molecular level, indicating that Tg737/Polaris is differentially involved in specific activities of the Gli proteins. Most important, a negative regulator of Shh signaling, Suppressor of fused, and the three full-length Gli transcription factors localize to the distal tip of cilia in addition to the nucleus. Thus, our data support a model where cilia have a direct role in Gli processing and Shh signal transduction.

  9. Sost and its paralog Sostdc1 coordinate digit number in a Gli3-dependent manner☆

    PubMed Central

    Collette, Nicole M.; Yee, Cristal S.; Murugesh, Deepa; Sebastian, Aimy; Taher, Leila; Gale, Nicholas W.; Economides, Aris N.; Harland, Richard M.; Loots, Gabriela G.

    2013-01-01

    WNT signaling is critical in most aspects of skeletal development and homeostasis, and antagonists of WNT signaling are emerging as key regulatory proteins with great promise as therapeutic agents for bone disorders. Here we show that Sost and its paralog Sostdc1 emerged through ancestral genome duplication and their expression patterns have diverged to delineate non-overlapping domains in most organ systems including musculoskeletal, cardiovascular, nervous, digestive, reproductive and respiratory. In the developing limb, Sost and Sostdc1 display dynamic expression patterns with Sost being restricted to the distal ectoderm and Sostdc1 to the proximal ectoderm and the mesenchyme. While Sostdc1–/– mice lack any obvious limb or skeletal defects, Sost–/– mice recapitulate the hand defects described for Sclerosteosis patients. However, elevated WNT signaling in Sost–/–; Sostdc1–/– mice causes misregulation of SHH signaling, ectopic activation of Sox9 in the digit 1 field and preaxial polydactyly in a Gli1- and Gli3-dependent manner. In addition, we show that the syndactyly documented in Sclerosteosis is present in both Sost–/– and Sost–/–; Sostdc1–/– mice, and is driven by misregulation of Fgf8 in the AER, a region lacking Sost and Sostdc1 expression. This study highlights the complexity of WNT signaling in skeletal biology and disease and emphasizes how redundant mechanism and non-cell autonomous effects can synergize to unveil new intricate phenotypes caused by elevated WNT signaling. PMID:23994639

  10. Arabidopsis Ovate Family Proteins, a Novel Transcriptional Repressor Family, Control Multiple Aspects of Plant Growth and Development

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Shucai; Chang, Ying; Guo, Jianjun; Zeng, Qingning; Ellis, Brian; Chen, Jay

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The Arabidopsis genome contains 18 genes that are predicted to encode Ovate Family Proteins (AtOFPs), a protein family characterized by a conserved OVATE domain, an approximately 70-amino acid domain that was originally found in tomato OVATE protein. Among AtOFP family members, AtOFP1 has been shown to suppress cell elongation, in part, by suppressing the expression of AtGA20ox1, AtOFP4 has been shown to regulate secondary cell wall formation by interact with KNOTTED1-LIKE HOMEODOMAIN PROTEIN 7 (KNAT7), and AtOFP5 has been shown to regulate the activity of a BEL1-LIKEHOMEODOMAIN 1(BLH1)-KNAT3 complex during early embryo sac development, but little is known about the function of other AtOFPs. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We demonstrated here that AtOFP proteins could function as effective transcriptional repressors in the Arabidopsis protoplast transient expression system. The analysis of loss-of-function alleles of AtOFPs suggested AtOFP genes may have overlapping function in regulating plant growth and development, because none of the single mutants identified, including T-DNA insertion mutants in AtOFP1, AtOFP4, AtOFP8, AtOFP10, AtOFP15 and AtOFP16, displayed any apparent morphological defects. Further, Atofp1 Atofp4 and Atofp15 Atofp16 double mutants still did not differ significantly from wild-type. On the other hand, plants overexpressing AtOFP genes displayed a number of abnormal phenotypes, which could be categorized into three distinct classes, suggesting that AtOFP genes may also have diverse functions in regulating plant growth and development. Further analysis suggested that AtOFP1 regulates cotyledon development in a postembryonic manner, and global transcript profiling revealed that it suppress the expression of many other genes. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results showed that AtOFPs function as transcriptional repressors and they regulate multiple aspects of plant growth and development. These results provided the first overview of a

  11. The Conserved MAPK Site in E(spl)-M8, an Effector of Drosophila Notch Signaling, Controls Repressor Activity during Eye Development

    PubMed Central

    Bandyopadhyay, Mohna; Bishop, Clifton P.

    2016-01-01

    The specification of patterned R8 photoreceptors at the onset of eye development depends on timely inhibition of Atonal (Ato) by the Enhancer of split (E(spl) repressors. Repression of Ato by E(spl)-M8 requires the kinase CK2 and is inhibited by the phosphatase PP2A. The region targeted by CK2 harbors additional conserved Ser residues, raising the prospect of regulation via multi-site phosphorylation. Here we investigate one such motif that meets the consensus for modification by MAPK, a well-known effector of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) signaling. Our studies reveal an important role for the predicted MAPK site of M8 during R8 birth. Ala/Asp mutations reveal that the CK2 and MAPK sites ensure that M8 repression of Ato and the R8 fate occurs in a timely manner and at a specific stage (stage-2/3) of the morphogenetic furrow (MF). M8 repression of Ato is mitigated by halved EGFR dosage, and this effect requires an intact MAPK site. Accordingly, variants with a phosphomimetic Asp at the MAPK site exhibit earlier (inappropriate) activity against Ato even at stage-1 of the MF, where a positive feedback-loop is necessary to raise Ato levels to a threshold sufficient for the R8 fate. Analysis of deletion variants reveals that both kinase sites (CK2 and MAPK) contribute to ‘cis’-inhibition of M8. This key regulation by CK2 and MAPK is bypassed by the E(spl)D mutation encoding the truncated protein M8*, which potently inhibits Ato at stage-1 of R8 birth. We also provide evidence that PP2A likely targets the MAPK site. Thus multi-site phosphorylation controls timely onset of M8 repressor activity in the eye, a regulation that appears to be dispensable in the bristle. The high conservation of the CK2 and MAPK sites in the insect E(spl) proteins M7, M5 and Mγ, and their mammalian homologue HES6, suggest that this mode of regulation may enable E(spl)/HES proteins to orchestrate repression by distinct tissue-specific mechanisms, and is likely to have broader

  12. The transcriptional repressor Bcl6 controls the stability of regulatory T cells by intrinsic and extrinsic pathways.

    PubMed

    Sawant, Deepali V; Wu, Hao; Yao, Weiguo; Sehra, Sarita; Kaplan, Mark H; Dent, Alexander L

    2015-05-01

    Foxp3(+) regulatory T (Treg) cells are essential to maintain immune homeostasis, yet controversy exists about the stability of this cell population. Bcl6-deficient (Bcl6(-/-) ) mice develop severe and spontaneous T helper type 2 (Th2) inflammation and Bcl6-deficient Treg cells are ineffective at controlling Th2 responses. We used a lineage tracing approach to analyse the fate of Treg cells in these mice. In the periphery of Bcl6(-/-) mice, increased numbers of Foxp3-negative 'exTreg' cells were found, particularly in the CD25(+) population. ExTreg cells from Bcl6(-/-) mice expressed increased interleukin-17 (IL-17) and extremely elevated levels of Th2 cytokines compared with wild-type exTreg cells. Although Treg cells normally express only low levels of cytokines, Treg cells from Bcl6(-/-) mice secreted higher levels of IL-4, IL-5, IL-13 and IL-17 than wild-type conventional T cells. Next, Treg-specific conditional Bcl6-deficient (Bcl6(Foxp3-/-) ) mice were analysed. Bcl6(Foxp3-/-) mice do not develop inflammatory disease, indicating a requirement for non-Treg cells for inflammation in Bcl6(-/-) mice, and have normal numbers of exTreg cells. We induced Th2-type allergic airway inflammation in Bcl6(Foxp3-/-) mice, and found that while exTreg cytokine expression was normal, Bcl6-deficient Treg cells expressed higher levels of the Th2-specific regulator Gata3 than Bcl6(+) Treg cells. Bcl6(Foxp3-/-) mice had increased numbers of Th2 cells after induction of airway inflammation and increased T cells in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. These data show both Treg-intrinsic and Treg-extrinsic roles for Bcl6 in controlling Treg cell stability and Th2 inflammation, and support the idea that Bcl6 expression in Treg cells is critical for controlling Th2 responses. PMID:25262912

  13. The Soybean-Specific Maturity Gene E1 Family of Floral Repressors Controls Night-Break Responses through Down-Regulation of FLOWERING LOCUS T Orthologs.

    PubMed

    Xu, Meilan; Yamagishi, Noriko; Zhao, Chen; Takeshima, Ryoma; Kasai, Megumi; Watanabe, Satoshi; Kanazawa, Akira; Yoshikawa, Nobuyuki; Liu, Baohui; Yamada, Tetsuya; Abe, Jun

    2015-08-01

    Photoperiodism is a rhythmic change of sensitivity to light, which helps plants to adjust flowering time according to seasonal changes in daylength and to adapt to growing conditions at various latitudes. To reveal the molecular basis of photoperiodism in soybean (Glycine max), a facultative short-day plant, we analyzed the transcriptional profiles of the maturity gene E1 family and two FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT) orthologs (FT2a and FT5a). E1, a repressor for FT2a and FT5a, and its two homologs, E1-like-a (E1La) and E1Lb, exhibited two peaks of expression in long days. Using two different approaches (experiments with transition between light and dark phases and night-break experiments), we revealed that the E1 family genes were expressed only during light periods and that their induction after dawn in long days required a period of light before dusk the previous day. In the cultivar Toyomusume, which lacks the E1 gene, virus-induced silencing of E1La and E1Lb up-regulated the expression of FT2a and FT5a and led to early flowering. Therefore, E1, E1La, and E1Lb function similarly in flowering. Regulation of E1 and E1L expression by light was under the control of E3 and E4, which encode phytochrome A proteins. Our data suggest that phytochrome A-mediated transcriptional induction of E1 and its homologs by light plays a critical role in photoperiodic induction of flowering in soybean. PMID:26134161

  14. The Soybean-Specific Maturity Gene E1 Family of Floral Repressors Controls Night-Break Responses through Down-Regulation of FLOWERING LOCUS T Orthologs1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Meilan; Yamagishi, Noriko; Zhao, Chen; Takeshima, Ryoma; Kasai, Megumi; Watanabe, Satoshi; Kanazawa, Akira; Yoshikawa, Nobuyuki; Liu, Baohui; Yamada, Tetsuya; Abe, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Photoperiodism is a rhythmic change of sensitivity to light, which helps plants to adjust flowering time according to seasonal changes in daylength and to adapt to growing conditions at various latitudes. To reveal the molecular basis of photoperiodism in soybean (Glycine max), a facultative short-day plant, we analyzed the transcriptional profiles of the maturity gene E1 family and two FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT) orthologs (FT2a and FT5a). E1, a repressor for FT2a and FT5a, and its two homologs, E1-like-a (E1La) and E1Lb, exhibited two peaks of expression in long days. Using two different approaches (experiments with transition between light and dark phases and night-break experiments), we revealed that the E1 family genes were expressed only during light periods and that their induction after dawn in long days required a period of light before dusk the previous day. In the cultivar Toyomusume, which lacks the E1 gene, virus-induced silencing of E1La and E1Lb up-regulated the expression of FT2a and FT5a and led to early flowering. Therefore, E1, E1La, and E1Lb function similarly in flowering. Regulation of E1 and E1L expression by light was under the control of E3 and E4, which encode phytochrome A proteins. Our data suggest that phytochrome A-mediated transcriptional induction of E1 and its homologs by light plays a critical role in photoperiodic induction of flowering in soybean. PMID:26134161

  15. DNA sequence of the control region of phage D108: the N-terminal amino acid sequences of repressor and transposase are similar both in phage D108 and in its relative, phage Mu.

    PubMed Central

    Mizuuchi, M; Weisberg, R A; Mizuuchi, K

    1986-01-01

    We have determined the DNA sequence of the control region of phage D108 up to position 1419 at the left end of the phage genome. Open reading frames for the repressor gene, ner gene, and the 5' part of the A gene (which codes for transposase) are found in the sequence. The genetic organization of this region of phage D108 is quite similar to that of phage Mu in spite of considerable divergence, both in the nucleotide sequence and in the amino acid sequences of the regulatory proteins of the two phages. The N-terminal amino acid sequences of the transposases of the two phages also share only limited homology. On the other hand, a significant amino acid sequence homology was found within each phage between the N-terminal parts of the repressor and transposase. We propose that the N-terminal domains of the repressor and transposase of each phage interact functionally in the process of making the decision between the lytic and the lysogenic mode of growth. PMID:3012481

  16. An unusual repressor controls the expression of a crucial nicotine-degrading gene cluster in Pseudomonas putida S16.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lijuan; Tang, Hongzhi; Yu, Hao; Yao, Yuxiang; Xu, Ping

    2014-03-01

    Transcriptional factors that contain helix-turn-helix (HTH) DNA-binding domains are widespread in bacteria for regulating gene expression on demand, and function as homodimers that bind a palindromic DNA segment. Here, we show that an HTH-containing transcriptional regulator, NicR2, in Pseudomonas putida S16 plays a critical role in controlling the expression of a crucial gene cluster (nic2) in nicotine degradation, and NicR2 binds DNA in a manner different from most other DNA-binding proteins that use HTHs for recognition. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) and DNase I footprinting indicate that NicR2 directly interacts with a 28 bp inverted repeat (IR) in the nic2 promoter region. Using EMSA with synthetic DNA fragments, we found that both NicR2 dimer and tetramer can bind to the half-site of the IR. This is confirmed independently by biolayer interferometry and cross-linking experiments. Our results indicate that two NicR2 dimers bind to the IR cooperatively through protein-protein interactions, with each dimer binding the half-site of the IR. Thus, NicR2 appears to be an unusual regulator, which uses HTH for recognition and displays the binding characteristics of some regulators that use β-sheets. The transcriptional regulation of nicotine degradation in Pseudomonas highlights a new level of complexity in prokaryotic transcriptional regulation. PMID:24471758

  17. Mechanism of promoter repression by Lac repressor-DNA loops.

    PubMed

    Becker, Nicole A; Peters, Justin P; Maher, L James; Lionberger, Troy A

    2013-01-01

    The Escherichia coli lactose (lac) operon encodes the first genetic switch to be discovered, and lac remains a paradigm for studying negative and positive control of gene expression. Negative control is believed to involve competition of RNA polymerase and Lac repressor for overlapping binding sites. Contributions to the local Lac repressor concentration come from free repressor and repressor delivered to the operator from remote auxiliary operators by DNA looping. Long-standing questions persist concerning the actual role of DNA looping in the mechanism of promoter repression. Here, we use experiments in living bacteria to resolve four of these questions. We show that the distance dependence of repression enhancement is comparable for upstream and downstream auxiliary operators, confirming the hypothesis that repressor concentration increase is the principal mechanism of repression loops. We find that as few as four turns of DNA can be constrained in a stable loop by Lac repressor. We show that RNA polymerase is not trapped at repressed promoters. Finally, we show that constraining a promoter in a tight DNA loop is sufficient for repression even when promoter and operator do not overlap. PMID:23143103

  18. MicroRNA-31 controls phenotypic modulation of human vascular smooth muscle cells by regulating its target gene cellular repressor of E1A-stimulated genes

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jie; Yan, Cheng-Hui; Li, Yang; Xu, Kai; Tian, Xiao-Xiang; Peng, Cheng-Fei; Tao, Jie; Sun, Ming-Yu; Han, Ya-Ling

    2013-05-01

    Phenotypic modulation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of a variety of proliferative vascular diseases. The cellular repressor of E1A-stimulated genes (CREG) has been shown to play an important role in phenotypic modulation of VSMCs. However, the mechanism regulating CREG upstream signaling remains unclear. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have recently been found to play a critical role in cell differentiation via target-gene regulation. This study aimed to identify a miRNA that binds directly to CREG, and may thus be involved in CREG-mediated VSMC phenotypic modulation. Computational analysis indicated that miR-31 bound to the CREG mRNA 3′ untranslated region (3′-UTR). miR-31 was upregulated in quiescent differentiated VSMCs and downregulated in proliferative cells stimulated by platelet-derived growth factor and serum starvation, demonstrating a negative relationship with the VSMC differentiation marker genes, smooth muscle α-actin, calponin and CREG. Using gain-of-function and loss-of-function approaches, CREG and VSMC differentiation marker gene expression levels were shown to be suppressed by a miR-31 mimic, but increased by a miR-31 inhibitor at both protein and mRNA levels. Notably, miR-31 overexpression or inhibition affected luciferase expression driven by the CREG 3′-UTR containing the miR-31 binding site. Furthermore, miR-31-mediated VSMC phenotypic modulation was inhibited in CREG-knockdown human VSMCs. We also determined miR-31 levels in the serum of patients with coronary artery disease (CAD), with or without in stent restenosis and in healthy controls. miR-31 levels were higher in the serum of CAD patients with restenosis compared to CAD patients without restenosis and in healthy controls. In summary, these data demonstrate that miR-31 not only directly binds to its target gene CREG and modulates the VSMC phenotype through this interaction, but also can be an important biomarker in diseases involving VSMC

  19. Cell type-specific control of protein synthesis and proliferation by FGF-dependent signaling to the translation repressor 4E-BP.

    PubMed

    Ruoff, Rachel; Katsara, Olga; Kolupaeva, Victoria

    2016-07-01

    Regulation of protein synthesis plays a vital role in posttranscriptional modulation of gene expression. Translational control most commonly targets the initiation of protein synthesis: loading 40S ribosome complexes onto mRNA and AUG start codon recognition. This step is initiated by eukaryotic initiation factor 4E (eIF4E) (the m7GTP cap-binding protein), whose binding to eIF4G (a scaffolding subunit) and eIF4A (an ATP-dependent RNA helicase) leads to assembly of active eIF4F complex. The ability of eIF4E to recognize the cap is prevented by its binding to eIF4E binding protein (4E-BP), which thereby inhibits cap-dependent translation by sequestering eIF4E. The 4E-BP activity is, in turn, inhibited by mTORC1 [mTOR (the mechanistic target of rapamycin) complex 1] mediated phosphorylation. Here, we define a previously unidentified mechanism of mTOR-independent 4E-BP1 regulation that is used by chondrocytes upon FGF signaling. Chondrocytes are responsible for the formation of the skeleton long bones. Unlike the majority of cell types where FGF signaling triggers proliferation, chondrocytes respond to FGF with inhibition. We establish that FGF specifically suppresses protein synthesis in chondrocytes, but not in any other cells of mesenchymal origin. Furthermore, 4E-BP1 repressor activity is necessary not only for suppression of protein synthesis, but also for FGF-induced cell-cycle arrest. Importantly, FGF-induced changes in the 4E-BP1 activity observed in cell culture are likewise detected in vivo and reflect the action of FGF signaling on downstream targets during bone development. Thus, our findings demonstrate that FGF signaling differentially impacts protein synthesis through either stimulation or repression, in a cell-type-dependent manner, with 4E-BP1 being a key player. PMID:27313212

  20. A genetic biosensor for identification of transcriptional repressors of target promoters

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Weishan; Li, Xiao; Li, Yue; Li, Shanshan; Fan, Keqiang; Yang, Keqian

    2015-01-01

    Transcriptional repressors provide widespread biological significance in the regulation of gene expression. However, in prokaryotes, it is particularly difficult to find transcriptional repressors that recognize specific target promoters on genome-scale. To address this need, a genetic biosensor for identifying repressors of target promoters was developed in Escherichia coli from a de novo designed genetic circuit. This circuit can convert the negative input of repressors into positive output of reporters, thereby facilitating the selection and identification of repressors. After evaluating the sensitivity and bias, the biosensor was used to identify the repressors of scbA and aco promoters (PscbA and Paco), which control the transcription of signalling molecule synthase genes in Streptomyces coelicolor and Streptomyces avermitilis, respectively. Two previously unknown repressors of PscbA were identified from a library of TetR family regulators in S. coelicolor, and three novel repressors of Paco were identified from a genomic library of S. avermitilis. Further in vivo and in vitro experiments confirmed that these newly identified repressors attenuated the transcription of their target promoters by direct binding. Overall, the genetic biosensor developed here presents an innovative and powerful strategy that could be applied for identifying genome-wide unknown repressors of promoters in bacteria. PMID:26510468

  1. A tale of two repressors.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Mitchell

    2011-05-27

    Few proteins have had such a strong impact on a field, as the lac repressor and λ repressor have had in Molecular Biology in bacteria. The genes required for lactose utilization are negatively regulated; the lac repressor binds to an upstream operator blocking the transcription of the enzymes necessary for lactose utilization. A similar switch regulates the virus life cycle; λ repressor binds to an operator site and blocks transcription of the phage genes necessary for lytic development. It is now 50 years since Jacob and Monod first proposed a model for gene regulation, which survives essentially unchanged in contemporary textbooks. Jacob, F. & Monod, J. (1961). Genetic regulatory mechanisms in the synthesis of proteins. J. Mol. Biol. 3, 318-356. This model provides a cogent depiction of how a set of genes can be coordinately transcribed in response to environmental conditions and regulates metabolic events in the cell. A historical perspective that illustrates the role these two repressor molecules played and their contribution to our understanding of gene regulation is presented. PMID:21392509

  2. Retinoic Acid-Mediated Regulation of GLI3 Enables Efficient Motoneuron Derivation from Human ESCs in the Absence of Extrinsic SHH Activation

    PubMed Central

    Calder, Elizabeth L.; Steinbeck, Julius A.; Tu, Edmund; Keros, Sotirios; Ying, Shui-Wang; Jaiswal, Manoj K.; Cornacchia, Daniela; Goldstein, Peter A.; Tabar, Viviane

    2015-01-01

    The derivation of somatic motoneurons (MNs) from ES cells (ESCs) after exposure to sonic hedgehog (SHH) and retinoic acid (RA) is one of the best defined, directed differentiation strategies to specify fate in pluripotent lineages. In mouse ESCs, MN yield is particularly high after RA + SHH treatment, whereas human ESC (hESC) protocols have been generally less efficient. In an effort to optimize yield, we observe that functional MNs can be derived from hESCs at high efficiencies if treated with patterning molecules at very early differentiation steps before neural induction. Remarkably, under these conditions, equal numbers of human MNs were obtained in the presence or absence of SHH exposure. Using pharmacological and genetic strategies, we demonstrate that early RA treatment directs MN differentiation independently of extrinsic SHH activation by suppressing the induction of GLI3. We further demonstrate that neural induction triggers a switch from a poised to an active chromatin state at GLI3. Early RA treatment prevents this switch by direct binding of the RA receptor at the GLI3 promoter. Furthermore, GLI3 knock-out hESCs can bypass the requirement for early RA patterning to yield MNs efficiently. Our data demonstrate that RA-mediated suppression of GLI3 is sufficient to generate MNs in an SHH-independent manner and that temporal changes in exposure to patterning factors such as RA affect chromatin state and competency of hESC-derived lineages to adopt specific neuronal fates. Finally, our work presents a streamlined platform for the highly efficient derivation of human MNs from ESCs and induced pluripotent stem cells. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Our study presents a rapid and efficient protocol to generate human motoneurons from embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells. Surprisingly, and in contrast to previous work, motoneurons are generated in the presence of retinoic acid but in the absence of factors that activate sonic hedgehog signaling. We show that early

  3. Activated RecA protein may induce expression of a gene that is not controlled by the LexA repressor and whose function is required for mutagenesis and repair of UV-irradiated bacteriophage lambda

    SciTech Connect

    Calsou, P.; Villaverde, A.; Defais, M.

    1987-10-01

    The activated form of the RecA protein (RecA) is known to be involved in the reactivation and mutagenesis of UV-irradiated bacteriophage lambda and in the expression of the SOS response in Escherichia coli K-12. The expression of the SOS response requires cleavage of the LexA repressor by RecA and the subsequent expression of LexA-controlled genes. The evidence presented here suggests that RecA induces the expression of a gene(s) that is not under LexA control and that is also necessary for maximal repair and mutagenesis of damaged phage. This conclusion is based on the chloramphenicol sensitivity of RecA -dependent repair and mutagenesis of damaged bacteriophage lambda in lexA(Def) hosts.

  4. The Transcriptional Repressor TupA in Aspergillus niger Is Involved in Controlling Gene Expression Related to Cell Wall Biosynthesis, Development, and Nitrogen Source Availability

    PubMed Central

    Schachtschabel, Doreen; Arentshorst, Mark; Nitsche, Benjamin M.; Morris, Sam; Nielsen, Kristian F.; van den Hondel, Cees A. M. J. J.; Klis, Frans M.; Ram, Arthur F. J.

    2013-01-01

    The Tup1-Cyc8 (Ssn6) complex is a well characterized and conserved general transcriptional repressor complex in eukaryotic cells. Here, we report the identification of the Tup1 (TupA) homolog in the filamentous fungus Aspergillus niger in a genetic screen for mutants with a constitutive expression of the agsA gene. The agsA gene encodes a putative alpha-glucan synthase, which is induced in response to cell wall stress in A. niger. Apart from the constitutive expression of agsA, the selected mutant was also found to produce an unknown pigment at high temperatures. Complementation analysis with a genomic library showed that the tupA gene could complement the phenotypes of the mutant. Screening of a collection of 240 mutants with constitutive expression of agsA identified sixteen additional pigment-secreting mutants, which were all mutated in the tupA gene. The phenotypes of the tupA mutants were very similar to the phenotypes of a tupA deletion strain. Further analysis of the tupA-17 mutant and the ΔtupA mutant revealed that TupA is also required for normal growth and morphogenesis. The production of the pigment at 37°C is nitrogen source-dependent and repressed by ammonium. Genome-wide expression analysis of the tupA mutant during exponential growth revealed derepression of a large group of diverse genes, including genes related to development and cell wall biosynthesis, and also protease-encoding genes that are normally repressed by ammonium. Comparison of the transcriptome of up-regulated genes in the tupA mutant showed limited overlap with the transcriptome of caspofungin-induced cell wall stress-related genes, suggesting that TupA is not a general suppressor of cell wall stress-induced genes. We propose that TupA is an important repressor of genes related to development and nitrogen metabolism. PMID:24205111

  5. How Trp repressor binds to its operator.

    PubMed Central

    Staacke, D; Walter, B; Kisters-Woike, B; von Wilcken-Bergmann, B; Müller-Hill, B

    1990-01-01

    We propose that the generally accepted model of a single Trp repressor dimer binding to a center of symmetry in the natural trp operator (Otwinowski et al., 1988) is wrong. We show here that the Trp repressor binds to a sequence whose center is located four base pairs either to the right or to the left of the central axis of symmetry that was previously identified. We show that: (i) the oligonucleotide used by Otwinowski et al. is not retarded by the Trp repressor in a mobility shift assay under conditions wherein a shorter oligonucleotide carrying our consensus sequence is retarded, (ii) that methylation protection experiments on the full natural operator sequence and the short oligonucleotide protect similar patterns and (iii) that by varying every base in the shorter oligonucleotide, we can demonstrate an optimal sequence for Trp repressor binding. Images Fig. 3. Fig. 4. PMID:2189726

  6. Surface expression of GABAA receptors is transcriptionally controlled by the interplay of cAMP-response element-binding protein and its binding partner inducible cAMP early repressor.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yinghui; Lund, Ingrid V; Gravielle, Maria C; Farb, David H; Brooks-Kayal, Amy R; Russek, Shelley J

    2008-04-01

    The regulated expression of type A gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptor (GABA(A)R) subunit genes plays a critical role in neuronal maturation and synaptogenesis. It is also associated with a variety of neurological diseases. Changes in GABA(A) receptor alpha1 subunit gene (GABRA1) expression have been reported in animal models of epilepsy, alcohol abuse, withdrawal, and stress. Understanding the genetic mechanism behind such changes in alpha subunit expression will lead to a better understanding of the role that signal transduction plays in control over GABA(A)R function and brings with it the promise of providing new therapeutic tools for the prevention or cure of a variety of neurological disorders. Here we show that activation of protein kinase C increases alpha1 subunit levels via phosphorylation of CREB (pCREB) that is bound to the GABRA1 promoter (GABRA1p). In contrast, activation of protein kinase A decreases levels of alpha1 even in the presence of pCREB. Decrease of alpha1 is dependent upon the inducible cAMP early repressor (ICER) as directly demonstrated by ICER-induced down-regulation of endogenous alpha1-containing GABA(A)Rs at the cell surface of cortical neurons. Taken together with the fact that there are less alpha1gamma2-containing GABA(A)Rs in neurons after protein kinase A stimulation and that activation of endogenous dopamine receptors down-regulates alpha1 subunit mRNA levels subsequent to induction of ICER, our studies identify a transcriptional mechanism for regulating the cell surface expression of alpha1-containing GABA(A)Rs that is dependent upon the formation of CREB heterodimers. PMID:18180303

  7. A genome-wide association scan implicates DCHS2, RUNX2, GLI3, PAX1 and EDAR in human facial variation

    PubMed Central

    Adhikari, Kaustubh; Fuentes-Guajardo, Macarena; Quinto-Sánchez, Mirsha; Mendoza-Revilla, Javier; Camilo Chacón-Duque, Juan; Acuña-Alonzo, Victor; Jaramillo, Claudia; Arias, William; Lozano, Rodrigo Barquera; Pérez, Gastón Macín; Gómez-Valdés, Jorge; Villamil-Ramírez, Hugo; Hunemeier, Tábita; Ramallo, Virginia; Silva de Cerqueira, Caio C.; Hurtado, Malena; Villegas, Valeria; Granja, Vanessa; Gallo, Carla; Poletti, Giovanni; Schuler-Faccini, Lavinia; Salzano, Francisco M.; Bortolini, Maria- Cátira; Canizales-Quinteros, Samuel; Cheeseman, Michael; Rosique, Javier; Bedoya, Gabriel; Rothhammer, Francisco; Headon, Denis; González-José, Rolando; Balding, David; Ruiz-Linares, Andrés

    2016-01-01

    We report a genome-wide association scan for facial features in ∼6,000 Latin Americans. We evaluated 14 traits on an ordinal scale and found significant association (P values<5 × 10−8) at single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in four genomic regions for three nose-related traits: columella inclination (4q31), nose bridge breadth (6p21) and nose wing breadth (7p13 and 20p11). In a subsample of ∼3,000 individuals we obtained quantitative traits related to 9 of the ordinal phenotypes and, also, a measure of nasion position. Quantitative analyses confirmed the ordinal-based associations, identified SNPs in 2q12 associated to chin protrusion, and replicated the reported association of nasion position with SNPs in PAX3. Strongest association in 2q12, 4q31, 6p21 and 7p13 was observed for SNPs in the EDAR, DCHS2, RUNX2 and GLI3 genes, respectively. Associated SNPs in 20p11 extend to PAX1. Consistent with the effect of EDAR on chin protrusion, we documented alterations of mandible length in mice with modified Edar funtion. PMID:27193062

  8. Sox2, Tlx, Gli3, and Her9 converge on Rx2 to define retinal stem cells in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Reinhardt, Robert; Centanin, Lázaro; Tavhelidse, Tinatini; Inoue, Daigo; Wittbrodt, Beate; Concordet, Jean-Paul; Martinez-Morales, Juan Ramón; Wittbrodt, Joachim

    2015-01-01

    Transcriptional networks defining stemness in adult neural stem cells (NSCs) are largely unknown. We used the proximal cis-regulatory element (pCRE) of the retina-specific homeobox gene 2 (rx2) to address such a network. Lineage analysis in the fish retina identified rx2 as marker for multipotent NSCs. rx2-positive cells located in the peripheral ciliary marginal zone behave as stem cells for the neuroretina, or the retinal pigmented epithelium. We identified upstream regulators of rx2 interrogating the rx2 pCRE in a trans-regulation screen and focused on four TFs (Sox2, Tlx, Gli3, and Her9) activating or repressing rx2 expression. We demonstrated direct interaction of the rx2 pCRE with the four factors in vitro and in vivo. By conditional mosaic gain- and loss-of-function analyses, we validated the activity of those factors on regulating rx2 transcription and consequently modulating neuroretinal and RPE stem cell features. This becomes obvious by the rx2-mutant phenotypes that together with the data presented above identify rx2 as a transcriptional hub balancing stemness of neuroretinal and RPE stem cells in the adult fish retina. PMID:25908840

  9. A genome-wide association scan implicates DCHS2, RUNX2, GLI3, PAX1 and EDAR in human facial variation.

    PubMed

    Adhikari, Kaustubh; Fuentes-Guajardo, Macarena; Quinto-Sánchez, Mirsha; Mendoza-Revilla, Javier; Camilo Chacón-Duque, Juan; Acuña-Alonzo, Victor; Jaramillo, Claudia; Arias, William; Lozano, Rodrigo Barquera; Pérez, Gastón Macín; Gómez-Valdés, Jorge; Villamil-Ramírez, Hugo; Hunemeier, Tábita; Ramallo, Virginia; Silva de Cerqueira, Caio C; Hurtado, Malena; Villegas, Valeria; Granja, Vanessa; Gallo, Carla; Poletti, Giovanni; Schuler-Faccini, Lavinia; Salzano, Francisco M; Bortolini, Maria-Cátira; Canizales-Quinteros, Samuel; Cheeseman, Michael; Rosique, Javier; Bedoya, Gabriel; Rothhammer, Francisco; Headon, Denis; González-José, Rolando; Balding, David; Ruiz-Linares, Andrés

    2016-01-01

    We report a genome-wide association scan for facial features in ∼6,000 Latin Americans. We evaluated 14 traits on an ordinal scale and found significant association (P values<5 × 10(-8)) at single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in four genomic regions for three nose-related traits: columella inclination (4q31), nose bridge breadth (6p21) and nose wing breadth (7p13 and 20p11). In a subsample of ∼3,000 individuals we obtained quantitative traits related to 9 of the ordinal phenotypes and, also, a measure of nasion position. Quantitative analyses confirmed the ordinal-based associations, identified SNPs in 2q12 associated to chin protrusion, and replicated the reported association of nasion position with SNPs in PAX3. Strongest association in 2q12, 4q31, 6p21 and 7p13 was observed for SNPs in the EDAR, DCHS2, RUNX2 and GLI3 genes, respectively. Associated SNPs in 20p11 extend to PAX1. Consistent with the effect of EDAR on chin protrusion, we documented alterations of mandible length in mice with modified Edar funtion. PMID:27193062

  10. Repressors report fewer intrusions following a laboratory stressor: the role of reduced stressor-relevant concept activation and inhibitory functioning.

    PubMed

    Overwijk, Sippie; Wessel, Ineke; de Jong, Peter J

    2009-03-01

    This study investigated whether a repressive coping style is associated with fewer intrusions following an experimentally controlled stressor. Furthermore, we examined whether lower activation of stressor-relevant concepts in long-term memory and better inhibitory functioning may contribute to this association. Extreme-scoring participants on a trait anxiety and a social desirability scale were selected to form repressor (n=35), low anxious (n=15), high anxious (n=30), and defensive (n=21) groups. In line with predictions, repressors reported fewer intrusions following a failure manipulation compared to non-repressors. Furthermore, pre-stressor inhibitory functioning was negatively associated with color-naming interference of stressor-related words. This suggests that overall, higher inhibitory control is related to lower activation of failure-related concepts. However, there was no evidence that concept activation and inhibitory control were responsible for repressors' lower number of self-reported intrusions. PMID:18937086

  11. Nucleotide sequence of the gene encoding the repressor for the histidine utilization genes of Pseudomonas putida.

    PubMed Central

    Allison, S L; Phillips, A T

    1990-01-01

    The hutC gene of Pseudomonas putida encodes a repressor which, in combination with the inducer urocanate, regulates expression of the five structural genes necessary for conversion of histidine to glutamate, ammonia, and formate. The nucleotide sequence of the hutC region was determined and found to contain two open reading frames which overlapped by one nucleotide. The first open reading frame (ORF1) appeared to encode a 27,648-dalton protein of 248 amino acids whose sequence strongly resembled that of the hut repressor of Klebsiella aerogenes (A. Schwacha and R. A. Bender, J. Bacteriol. 172:5477-5481, 1990) and contained a helix-turn-helix motif that could be involved in operator binding. The gene was preceded by a sequence which was nearly identical to that of the operator site located upstream of hutU which controls transcription of the hutUHIG genes. The operator near hutC would presumably allow the hut repressor to regulate its own synthesis as well as the expression of the divergent hutF gene. A second open reading frame (ORF2) would encode a 21,155-dalton protein, but because this region could be deleted with only a slight effect on repressor activity, it is not likely to be involved in repressor function or structure. PMID:2203753

  12. Lac repressor: a genetic and nuclear magnetic resonance study of structure and function

    SciTech Connect

    Jarema, M.A.C.; Lu, P.; Miller, J.H.

    1980-10-01

    The prototype gene control system, the lac operon of E. coli, has recently also become the best chemically characterized system to date. The complete primary sequence of both the gene and the protein reponsible for the regulation of this operon, the repressor, is known, along with the DNA sequence of its site of action, the operator. The lac repressor is a tetrametic protein with four identical subunits of 360 amino acids each, giving a total molecular weight of 154,000. The lac operator sequence is about 25 to 30 base pairs long. With the wealth of information about the primary structure the next question is one of geometry. This leads to the application of either x-ray diffraction or nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) methods, since these are the only approaches that yield information about the geometry and environment of specific groups and atoms in these molecules. Since we are interested in the interaction of repressor with a variety of small molecular weight inducers and anti-inducers, as well as the operator sequence in aqueous solution, we chose the NMR approach. As of this writing, no useful crystals of the lac repressor or the repressor and any of its ligands have been reported. Because of our extensive genetic work with this system, we have a unique advantage in taking this approach as well.

  13. Solitons and collapse in the λ-repressor protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krokhotin, Andrey; Lundgren, Martin; Niemi, Antti J.

    2012-08-01

    The enterobacteria lambda phage is a paradigm temperate bacteriophage. Its lysogenic and lytic life cycles echo competition between the DNA binding λ-repressor (CI) and CRO proteins. Here we scrutinize the structure, stability, and folding pathways of the λ-repressor protein, which controls the transition from the lysogenic to the lytic state. We first investigate the supersecondary helix-loop helix composition of its backbone. We use a discrete Frenet framing to resolve the backbone spectrum in terms of bond and torsion angles. Instead of four, there appears to be seven individual loops. We model the putative loops using an explicit soliton Ansatz. It is based on the standard soliton profile of the continuum nonlinear Schrödinger equation. The accuracy of the Ansatz far exceeds the B-factor fluctuation distance accuracy of the experimentally determined protein configuration. We then investigate the folding pathways and dynamics of the λ-repressor protein. We introduce a coarse-grained energy function to model the backbone in terms of the Cα atoms and the side chains in terms of the relative orientation of the Cβ atoms. We describe the folding dynamics in terms of relaxation dynamics and find that the folded configuration can be reached from a very generic initial configuration. We conclude that folding is dominated by the temporal ordering of soliton formation. In particular, the third soliton should appear before the first and second. Otherwise, the DNA binding turn does not acquire its correct structure. We confirm the stability of the folded configuration by repeated heating and cooling simulations.

  14. Solitons and collapse in the λ-repressor protein.

    PubMed

    Krokhotin, Andrey; Lundgren, Martin; Niemi, Antti J

    2012-08-01

    The enterobacteria lambda phage is a paradigm temperate bacteriophage. Its lysogenic and lytic life cycles echo competition between the DNA binding λ-repressor (CI) and CRO proteins. Here we scrutinize the structure, stability, and folding pathways of the λ-repressor protein, which controls the transition from the lysogenic to the lytic state. We first investigate the supersecondary helix-loop helix composition of its backbone. We use a discrete Frenet framing to resolve the backbone spectrum in terms of bond and torsion angles. Instead of four, there appears to be seven individual loops. We model the putative loops using an explicit soliton Ansatz. It is based on the standard soliton profile of the continuum nonlinear Schrödinger equation. The accuracy of the Ansatz far exceeds the B-factor fluctuation distance accuracy of the experimentally determined protein configuration. We then investigate the folding pathways and dynamics of the λ-repressor protein. We introduce a coarse-grained energy function to model the backbone in terms of the C(α) atoms and the side chains in terms of the relative orientation of the C(β) atoms. We describe the folding dynamics in terms of relaxation dynamics and find that the folded configuration can be reached from a very generic initial configuration. We conclude that folding is dominated by the temporal ordering of soliton formation. In particular, the third soliton should appear before the first and second. Otherwise, the DNA binding turn does not acquire its correct structure. We confirm the stability of the folded configuration by repeated heating and cooling simulations. PMID:23005801

  15. Bacteriophage lambda repressor mediates the formation of a complex enhancer-like structure

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Lun; Murchland, Iain; Dodd, Ian B; Shearwin, Keith E

    2013-01-01

    For the past 40 years, bacteriophage lambda has been crucial in revealing fundamental principles underlying control of transcription by elements positioned close to promoters. With the discovery that lambda CI repressors bound to distant sites can interact efficiently, lambda also provides a model for long range gene regulation, including the action of enhancer elements. PMID:23989664

  16. Proteins of the ETS family with transcriptional repressor activity.

    PubMed

    Mavrothalassitis, G; Ghysdael, J

    2000-12-18

    ETS proteins form one of the largest families of signal-dependent transcriptional regulators, mediating cellular proliferation, differentiation and tumorigenesis. Most of the known ETS proteins have been shown to activate transcription. However, four ETS proteins (YAN, ERF, NET and TEL) can act as transcriptional repressors. In three cases (ERF, NET and TEL) distinct repression domains have been identified and there are indications that NET and TEL may mediate transcription via Histone Deacetylase recruitment. All four proteins appear to be regulated by MAPKs, though for YAN and ERF this regulation seems to be restricted to ERKs. YAN, ERF and TEL have been implicated in cellular proliferation although there are indications suggesting a possible involvement of YAN and TEL in differentiation as well. Other ETS-domain proteins have been shown to repress transcription in a context specific manner, and there are suggestions that the ETS DNA-binding domain may act as a transcriptional repressor. Transcriptional repression by ETS domain proteins adds an other level in the orchestrated regulation by this diverse family of transcription factors that often recognize similar if not identical binding sites on DNA and are believed to regulate critical genes in a variety of biological processes. Definitive assessment of the importance of this novel regulatory level will require the identification of ETS proteins target genes and the further analysis of transcriptional control and biological function of these proteins in defined pathways. PMID:11175368

  17. The role of repressor kinetics in relief of transcriptional interference between convergent promoters.

    PubMed

    Hao, Nan; Palmer, Adam C; Ahlgren-Berg, Alexandra; Shearwin, Keith E; Dodd, Ian B

    2016-08-19

    Transcriptional interference (TI), where transcription from a promoter is inhibited by the activity of other promoters in its vicinity on the same DNA, enables transcription factors to regulate a target promoter indirectly, inducing or relieving TI by controlling the interfering promoter. For convergent promoters, stochastic simulations indicate that relief of TI can be inhibited if the repressor at the interfering promoter has slow binding kinetics, making it either sensitive to frequent dislodgement by elongating RNA polymerases (RNAPs) from the target promoter, or able to be a strong roadblock to these RNAPs. In vivo measurements of relief of TI by CI or Cro repressors in the bacteriophage λ PR-PRE system show strong relief of TI and a lack of dislodgement and roadblocking effects, indicative of rapid CI and Cro binding kinetics. However, repression of the same λ promoter by a catalytically dead CRISPR Cas9 protein gave either compromised or no relief of TI depending on the orientation at which it binds DNA, consistent with dCas9 being a slow kinetics repressor. This analysis shows how the intrinsic properties of a repressor can be evolutionarily tuned to set the magnitude of relief of TI. PMID:27378773

  18. Weak operator binding enhances simulated Lac repressor-mediated DNA looping.

    PubMed

    Colasanti, Andrew V; Grosner, Michael A; Perez, Pamela J; Clauvelin, Nicolas; Lu, Xiang-Jun; Olson, Wilma K

    2013-12-01

    The 50th anniversary of Biopolymers coincides closely with the like celebration of the discovery of the Escherichia coli (lac) lactose operon, a classic genetic system long used to illustrate the influence of biomolecular structure on function. The looping of DNA induced by the binding of the Lac repressor protein to sequentially distant operator sites on DNA continues to serve as a paradigm for understanding long-range genomic communication. Advances in analyses of DNA structures and in incorporation of proteins in computer simulations of DNA looping allow us to address long-standing questions about the role of protein-mediated DNA loop formation in transcriptional control. Here we report insights gained from studies of the sequence-dependent contributions of the natural lac operators to Lac repressor-mediated DNA looping. Novel superposition of the ensembles of protein-bound operator structures derived from NMR measurements reveals variations in DNA folding missed in conventional structural alignments. The changes in folding affect the predicted ease with which the repressor induces loop formation and the ways that DNA closes between the protein headpieces. The peeling of the auxiliary operators away from the repressor enhances the formation of loops with the 92-bp wildtype spacing and hints of a structural reason behind their weak binding. PMID:23818216

  19. Loss of floral repressor function adapts rice to higher latitudes in Europe

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Ariza, Jorge; Galbiati, Francesca; Goretti, Daniela; Brambilla, Vittoria; Shrestha, Roshi; Pappolla, Andrea; Courtois, Brigitte; Fornara, Fabio

    2015-01-01

    The capacity to discriminate variations in day length allows plants to align flowering with the most favourable season of the year. This capacity has been altered by artificial selection when cultivated varieties became adapted to environments different from those of initial domestication. Rice flowering is promoted by short days when HEADING DATE 1 (Hd1) and EARLY HEADING DATE 1 (Ehd1) induce the expression of florigenic proteins encoded by HEADING DATE 3a (Hd3a) and RICE FLOWERING LOCUS T 1 (RFT1). Repressors of flowering antagonize such induction under long days, maintaining vegetative growth and delaying flowering. To what extent artificial selection of long day repressor loci has contributed to expand rice cultivation to Europe is currently unclear. This study demonstrates that European varieties activate both Hd3a and RFT1 expression regardless of day length and their induction is caused by loss-of-function mutations at major long day floral repressors. However, their contribution to flowering time control varies between locations. Pyramiding of mutations is frequently observed in European germplasm, but single mutations are sufficient to adapt rice to flower at higher latitudes. Expression of Ehd1 is increased in varieties showing reduced or null Hd1 expression under natural long days, as well as in single hd1 mutants in isogenic backgrounds. These data indicate that loss of repressor genes has been a key strategy to expand rice cultivation to Europe, and that Ehd1 is a central node integrating floral repressive signals. PMID:25732533

  20. A tale of two repressors – a historical perspective

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Mitchell

    2011-01-01

    Few proteins have had such a strong impact on a field as the lac repressor and λ repressor have had in Molecular Biology In bacteria, the genes required for lactose utilization are negatively regulated; the lac repressor binds to an upstream operator blocking transcription of the enzymes necessary for lactose utilization. A similar switch regulates the virus life cycle; λ repressor binds to an operator site and blocks transcription of the phage genes necessary for lytic development. It is now 50 years since Jacob and Monod first proposed a model for gene regulation, which survives essentially unchanged in contemporary textbooks1. This model provides a cogent depiction of how a set of genes can be coordinately transcribed in response to environmental conditions and regulates metabolic events in the cell. A historical perspective is presented that illustrates the role these two repressor molecules played and their contribution to our understanding of gene regulation. PMID:21392509

  1. CopY-like copper inducible repressors are putative 'winged helix' proteins.

    PubMed

    Portmann, Reto; Poulsen, Kristian R; Wimmer, Reinhard; Solioz, Marc

    2006-02-01

    CopY of Enterococcus hirae is a well characterized copper-responsive repressor involved in copper homeostasis. In the absence of copper, it binds to the promoter. In high copper, the CopZ copper chaperone donates copper to CopY, thereby releasing it from the promoter and allowing transcription of the downstream copper homeostatic genes of the cop operon. We here show that the CopY-like repressors from E. hirae, Lactococcus lactis, and Streptococcus mutans have similar affinities not only for their native promoters, but also for heterologous cop promoters. CopZ of L. lactis accelerated the release of CopY from the promoter, suggesting that CopZ of L. lactis acts as copper chaperone, similar to CopZ in E. hirae. The consensus binding motif of the CopY-like repressors was shown to be TACAxxTGTA. The same binding motif is present in promoters controlled by BlaI of Bacillus licheniformis, MecI of Staphylococcus aureus and related repressors. BlaI and MecI have known structures and belong to the family of 'winged helix' proteins. In the N- terminal domain, they share significant sequence similarity with CopY of E. hirae. Moreover, they bind to the same TACAxxTGTA motif. NMR analysis of the N-terminal DNA binding domain of CopY of L. lactis showed that it contained the same alpha-helical content like the same regions of BlaI and MecI. These findings suggest that the DNA binding domains of CopY-like repressors are also of the 'winged helix' type. PMID:16502332

  2. Structural Analysis of Iac Repressor Bound to Allosteric Effectors

    SciTech Connect

    Daber,R.; Stayrook, S.; Rosenberg, A.; Lewis, M.

    2007-01-01

    The lac operon is a model system for understanding how effector molecules regulate transcription and are necessary for allosteric transitions. The crystal structures of the lac repressor bound to inducer and anti-inducer molecules provide a model for how these small molecules can modulate repressor function. The structures of the apo repressor and the repressor bound to effector molecules are compared in atomic detail. All effectors examined here bind to the repressor in the same location and are anchored to the repressor through hydrogen bonds to several hydroxyl groups of the sugar ring. Inducer molecules form a more extensive hydrogen-bonding network compared to anti-inducers and neutral effector molecules. The structures of these effector molecules suggest that the O6 hydroxyl on the galactoside is essential for establishing a water-mediated hydrogen bonding network that bridges the N-terminal and C-terminal sub-domains. The altered hydrogen bonding can account in part for the different structural conformations of the repressor, and is vital for the allosteric transition.

  3. The lactose repressor system: paradigms for regulation, allosteric behavior and protein folding.

    PubMed

    Wilson, C J; Zhan, H; Swint-Kruse, L; Matthews, K S

    2007-01-01

    In 1961, Jacob and Monod proposed the operon model for gene regulation based on metabolism of lactose in Escherichia coli. This proposal was followed by an explication of allosteric behavior by Monod and colleagues. The operon model rationally depicted how genetic mechanisms can control metabolic events in response to environmental stimuli via coordinated transcription of a set of genes with related function (e.g. metabolism of lactose). The allosteric response found in the lactose repressor and many other proteins has been extended to a variety of cellular signaling pathways in all organisms. These two models have shaped our view of modern molecular biology and captivated the attention of a surprisingly broad range of scientists. More recently, the lactose repressor monomer was used as a model system for experimental and theoretical explorations of protein folding mechanisms. Thus, the lac system continues to advance our molecular understanding of genetic control and the relationship between sequence, structure and function. PMID:17103112

  4. Determinants of Bacteriophage 933W Repressor DNA Binding Specificity

    PubMed Central

    Bullwinkle, Tammy J.; Samorodnitsky, Daniel; Rosati, Rayna C.; Koudelka, Gerald B.

    2012-01-01

    We reported previously that 933W repressor apparently does not cooperatively bind to adjacent sites on DNA and that the relative affinities of 933W repressor for its operators differ significantly from that of any other lambdoid bacteriophage. These findings indicate that the operational details of the lysis-lysogeny switch of bacteriophage 933W are unique among lambdoid bacteriophages. Since the functioning of the lysis-lysogeny switch in 933W bacteriophage uniquely and solely depends on the order of preference of 933W repressor for its operators, we examined the details of how 933W repressor recognizes its DNA sites. To identify the specificity determinants, we first created a molecular model of the 933W repressor-DNA complex and tested the predicted protein-DNA interactions. These results of these studies provide a picture of how 933W repressor recognizes its DNA sites. We also show that, opposite of what is normally observed for lambdoid phages, 933W operator sequences have evolved in such a way that the presence of the most commonly found base sequences at particular operator positions serves to decrease, rather than increase, the affinity of the protein for the site. This finding cautions against assuming that a consensus sequence derived from sequence analysis defines the optimal, highest affinity DNA binding site for a protein. PMID:22509323

  5. Structural requirements of tetracycline-Tet repressor interaction: determination of equilibrium binding constants for tetracycline analogs with the Tet repressor.

    PubMed Central

    Degenkolb, J; Takahashi, M; Ellestad, G A; Hillen, W

    1991-01-01

    We used the Tn10-encoded Tet repressor, which has a highly specific binding capacity for tetracycline, to probe contacts between the drug and protein by chemical interference studies of the antibiotic. For that purpose, the equilibrium association constants of modified tetracyclines with the Tet repressor and Mg2+ cations were determined quantitatively. The results confirm the previous notion that Mg2+ probably binds with the oxygens at positions 11 and 12 and is absolutely required for protein-drug recognition. Modifications were introduced at positions seven, six, five, and four of the drug, and anhydrotetracycline was also studied. Substitutions or eliminations of functions at these positions influenced binding to the Tet repressor up to 35-fold. The introduction of an azido function at position seven in 7-azidotetracycline and epimerization of the substituents at position four in 4-epitetracycline lead to a 2- or 25-fold reduction, respectively, of Tet repressor affinity in those compounds. Anhydrotetracycline bound about 35-fold more strongly than tetracycline did, indicating that the oxygen at position 11 may be involved in Tet repressor recognition. This increased binding is in contrast to the lower antibiotic activity of anhydrotetracycline and indicates that the Tet repressor and ribosomes recognize the drug differently. PMID:1929330

  6. The qa repressor gene of Neurospora crassa: wild-type and mutant nucleotide sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Huiet, L; Giles, N H

    1986-01-01

    The qa-1S gene, one of two regulatory genes in the qa gene cluster of Neurospora crassa, encodes the qa repressor. The qa-1S gene together with the qa-1F gene, which encodes the qa activator protein, control the expression of all seven qa genes, including those encoding the inducible enzymes responsible for the utilization of quinic acid as a carbon source. The nucleotide sequence of the qa-1S gene and its flanking regions has been determined. The deduced coding sequence for the qa-1S protein encodes 918 amino acids with a calculated molecular weight of 100,650 and is interrupted by a single 66-base-pair intervening sequence. Both constitutive and noninducible mutants occur in the qa-1S gene and two different mutations of each type have been cloned and sequenced. All four mutations occur within the predicted coding region of the qa-1S gene. This result strongly supports the hypothesis that the qa-1S gene encodes a repressor. All four mutations are located within codons for the last 300 amino acids of the qa-1S protein. The mutations in three of the mutants involve amino acid substitutions, while the fourth mutant, which has a constitutive phenotype, contains a frameshift mutation. The two constitutive mutations occur in the most distal region of the gene, possibly implicating the COOH-terminal region of the qa repressor in binding to its target. The two noninducible mutations occur in a region proximal to the constitutive mutations, possibly implicating this region of the qa repressor in binding the inducer. Images PMID:3010294

  7. A cell cycle-dependent co-repressor mediates photoreceptor cell-specific nuclear receptor function

    PubMed Central

    Takezawa, Shinichiro; Yokoyama, Atsushi; Okada, Maiko; Fujiki, Ryoji; Iriyama, Aya; Yanagi, Yasuo; Ito, Hiroaki; Takada, Ichiro; Kishimoto, Masahiko; Miyajima, Atsushi; Takeyama, Ken-ichi; Umesono, Kazuhiko; Kitagawa, Hirochika; Kato, Shigeaki

    2007-01-01

    Photoreceptor cell-specific nuclear receptor (PNR) (NR2E3) acts as a sequence-specific repressor that controls neuronal differentiation in the developing retina. We identified a novel PNR co-repressor, Ret-CoR, that is expressed in the developing retina and brain. Biochemical purification of Ret-CoR identified a multiprotein complex that included E2F/Myb-associated proteins, histone deacetylases (HDACs) and NCoR/HDAC complex-related components. Ret-CoR appeared to function as a platform protein for the complex, and interacted with PNR via two CoRNR motifs. Purified Ret-CoR complex exhibited HDAC activity, co-repressed PNR transrepression function in vitro, and co-repressed PNR function in PNR target gene promoters, presumably in the retinal progenitor cells. Notably, the appearance of Ret-CoR protein was cell-cycle-stage-dependent (from G1 to S). Therefore, Ret-CoR appears to act as a component of an HDAC co-repressor complex that supports PNR repression function in the developing retina, and may represent a co-regulator class that supports transcriptional regulator function via cell-cycle-dependent expression. PMID:17255935

  8. Phosphorylation of Trihelix Transcriptional Repressor ASR3 by MAP KINASE4 Negatively Regulates Arabidopsis Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bo; Jiang, Shan; Yu, Xiao; Cheng, Cheng; Chen, Sixue; Cheng, Yanbing; Yuan, Joshua S.; Jiang, Daohong; He, Ping; Shan, Libo

    2015-01-01

    Proper control of immune-related gene expression is crucial for the host to launch an effective defense response. Perception of microbe-associated molecular patterns (MAMPs) induces rapid and profound transcriptional reprogramming via unclear mechanisms. Here, we show that ASR3 (ARABIDOPSIS SH4-RELATED3) functions as a transcriptional repressor and plays a negative role in regulating pattern-triggered immunity (PTI) in Arabidopsis thaliana. ASR3 belongs to a plant-specific trihelix transcription factor family for which functional studies are lacking. MAMP treatments induce rapid phosphorylation of ASR3 at threonine 189 via MPK4, a mitogen-activated protein kinase that negatively regulates PTI responses downstream of multiple MAMP receptors. ASR3 possesses transcriptional repressor activity via its ERF-associated amphiphilic repression motifs and negatively regulates a large subset of flg22-induced genes. Phosphorylation of ASR3 by MPK4 enhances its DNA binding activity to suppress gene expression. Importantly, the asr3 mutant shows enhanced disease resistance to virulent bacterial pathogen infection, whereas transgenic plants overexpressing the wild-type or phospho-mimetic form of ASR3 exhibit compromised PTI responses. Our studies reveal a function of the trihelix transcription factors in plant innate immunity and provide evidence that ASR3 functions as a transcriptional repressor regulated by MAMP-activated MPK4 to fine-tune plant immune gene expression. PMID:25770109

  9. DWARF 53 acts as a repressor of strigolactone signalling in rice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Liang; Liu, Xue; Xiong, Guosheng; Liu, Huihui; Chen, Fulu; Wang, Lei; Meng, Xiangbing; Liu, Guifu; Yu, Hong; Yuan, Yundong; Yi, Wei; Zhao, Lihua; Ma, Honglei; He, Yuanzheng; Wu, Zhongshan; Melcher, Karsten; Qian, Qian; Xu, H. Eric; Wang, Yonghong; Li, Jiayang

    2013-12-01

    Strigolactones (SLs) are a group of newly identified plant hormones that control plant shoot branching. SL signalling requires the hormone-dependent interaction of DWARF 14 (D14), a probable candidate SL receptor, with DWARF 3 (D3), an F-box component of the Skp-Cullin-F-box (SCF) E3 ubiquitin ligase complex. Here we report the characterization of a dominant SL-insensitive rice (Oryza sativa) mutant dwarf 53 (d53) and the cloning of D53, which encodes a substrate of the SCFD3 ubiquitination complex and functions as a repressor of SL signalling. Treatments with GR24, a synthetic SL analogue, cause D53 degradation via the proteasome in a manner that requires D14 and the SCFD3 ubiquitin ligase, whereas the dominant form of D53 is resistant to SL-mediated degradation. Moreover, D53 can interact with transcriptional co-repressors known as TOPLESS-RELATED PROTEINS. Our results suggest a model of SL signalling that involves SL-dependent degradation of the D53 repressor mediated by the D14-D3 complex.

  10. Increased proteolytic processing of full-length Gli2 transcription factor reduces the Hedgehog pathway activity in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Li, Juan; Wang, Chengbing; Pan, Yong; Bai, Zengliang; Wang, Baolin

    2011-01-01

    The proteolytic processing of Gli2 and Gli3 full-length transcription factors into repressors is a key step of the regulation in Hedgehog (Hh) signaling. The differential Gli2 and Gli3 processing is controlled by the processing determinant domain or PDD, but its significance is not clear. We generated a Gli2 mutant allele, Gli23PDD, in which the Gli3PDD substitutes for the Gli2PDD. As expected, Gli23PDD is processed more efficiently and at the different position as compared to Gli2, indicating that PDD also determines the extent and site of Gli2 and Gli3 processing in vivo. The increase in levels of the Gli2 repressor in Gli23PDD mutant reduces the Hh pathway activity. Gli23PDD processing is still regulated by Hh signaling. These results indicate that the proper balance between the Gli2 full-length activator and repressor is essential for Hh signaling. PMID:21337666

  11. Binding Specificities of the Telomere Phage ϕKO2 Prophage Repressor CB and Lytic Repressor Cro.

    PubMed

    Hammerl, Jens Andre; Jäckel, Claudia; Lanka, Erich; Roschanski, Nicole; Hertwig, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Temperate bacteriophages possess a genetic switch which regulates the lytic and lysogenic cycle. The genomes of the temperate telomere phages N15, PY54, and ϕKO2 harbor a primary immunity region (immB) comprising genes for the prophage repressor (cI or cB), the lytic repressor (cro) and a putative antiterminator (q). The roles of these products are thought to be similar to those of the lambda proteins CI (CI prophage repressor), Cro (Cro repressor), and Q (antiterminator Q), respectively. Moreover, the gene order and the location of several operator sites in the prototype telomere phage N15 and in ϕKO2 are reminiscent of lambda-like phages. We determined binding sites of the ϕKO2 prophage repressor CB and lytic repressor Cro on the ϕKO2 genome in detail by electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) studies. Unexpectedly, ϕKO2 CB and Cro revealed different binding specificities. CB was bound to three OR operators in the intergenic region between cB and cro, two OL operators between cB and the replication gene repA and even to operators of N15. Cro bound exclusively to the 16 bp operator site OR3 upstream of the ϕKO2 prophage repressor gene. The ϕKO2 genes cB and cro are regulated by several strong promoters overlapping with the OR operators. The data suggest that Cro represses cB transcription but not its own synthesis, as already reported for PY54 Cro. Thus, not only PY54, but also phage ϕKO2 possesses a genetic switch that diverges significantly from the switch of lambda-like phages. PMID:27527206

  12. Binding Specificities of the Telomere Phage ϕKO2 Prophage Repressor CB and Lytic Repressor Cro

    PubMed Central

    Hammerl, Jens Andre; Jäckel, Claudia; Lanka, Erich; Roschanski, Nicole; Hertwig, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Temperate bacteriophages possess a genetic switch which regulates the lytic and lysogenic cycle. The genomes of the temperate telomere phages N15, PY54, and ϕKO2 harbor a primary immunity region (immB) comprising genes for the prophage repressor (cI or cB), the lytic repressor (cro) and a putative antiterminator (q). The roles of these products are thought to be similar to those of the lambda proteins CI (CI prophage repressor), Cro (Cro repressor), and Q (antiterminator Q), respectively. Moreover, the gene order and the location of several operator sites in the prototype telomere phage N15 and in ϕKO2 are reminiscent of lambda-like phages. We determined binding sites of the ϕKO2 prophage repressor CB and lytic repressor Cro on the ϕKO2 genome in detail by electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) studies. Unexpectedly, ϕKO2 CB and Cro revealed different binding specificities. CB was bound to three OR operators in the intergenic region between cB and cro, two OL operators between cB and the replication gene repA and even to operators of N15. Cro bound exclusively to the 16 bp operator site OR3 upstream of the ϕKO2 prophage repressor gene. The ϕKO2 genes cB and cro are regulated by several strong promoters overlapping with the OR operators. The data suggest that Cro represses cB transcription but not its own synthesis, as already reported for PY54 Cro. Thus, not only PY54, but also phage ϕKO2 possesses a genetic switch that diverges significantly from the switch of lambda-like phages. PMID:27527206

  13. Repressor-mediated tissue-specific gene expression in plants

    DOEpatents

    Meagher, Richard B.; Balish, Rebecca S.; Tehryung, Kim; McKinney, Elizabeth C.

    2009-02-17

    Plant tissue specific gene expression by way of repressor-operator complexes, has enabled outcomes including, without limitation, male sterility and engineered plants having root-specific gene expression of relevant proteins to clean environmental pollutants from soil and water. A mercury hyperaccumulation strategy requires that mercuric ion reductase coding sequence is strongly expressed. The actin promoter vector, A2pot, engineered to contain bacterial lac operator sequences, directed strong expression in all plant vegetative organs and tissues. In contrast, the expression from the A2pot construct was restricted primarily to root tissues when a modified bacterial repressor (LacIn) was coexpressed from the light-regulated rubisco small subunit promoter in above-ground tissues. Also provided are analogous repressor operator complexes for selective expression in other plant tissues, for example, to produce male sterile plants.

  14. An Unusual Phage Repressor Encoded by Mycobacteriophage BPs.

    PubMed

    Villanueva, Valerie M; Oldfield, Lauren M; Hatfull, Graham F

    2015-01-01

    Temperate bacteriophages express transcription repressors that maintain lysogeny by down-regulating lytic promoters and confer superinfection immunity. Repressor regulation is critical to the outcome of infection-lysogenic or lytic growth-as well as prophage induction into lytic replication. Mycobacteriophage BPs and its relatives use an unusual integration-dependent immunity system in which the phage attachment site (attP) is located within the repressor gene (33) such that site-specific integration leads to synthesis of a prophage-encoded product (gp33103) that is 33 residues shorter at its C-terminus than the virally-encoded protein (gp33136). However, the shorter form of the repressor (gp33103) is stable and active in repression of the early lytic promoter PR, whereas the longer virally-encoded form (gp33136) is inactive due to targeted degradation via a C-terminal ssrA-like tag. We show here that both forms of the repressor bind similarly to the 33-34 intergenic regulatory region, and that BPs gp33103 is a tetramer in solution. The BPs gp33103 repressor binds to five regulatory regions spanning the BPs genome, and regulates four promoters including the early lytic promoter, PR. BPs gp33103 has a complex pattern of DNA recognition in which a full operator binding site contains two half sites separated by a variable spacer, and BPs gp33103 induces a DNA bend at the full operator site but not a half site. The operator site structure is unusual in that one half site corresponds to a 12 bp palindrome identified previously, but the other half site is a highly variable variant of the palindrome. PMID:26332854

  15. An Unusual Phage Repressor Encoded by Mycobacteriophage BPs

    PubMed Central

    Villanueva, Valerie M.; Oldfield, Lauren M.; Hatfull, Graham F.

    2015-01-01

    Temperate bacteriophages express transcription repressors that maintain lysogeny by down-regulating lytic promoters and confer superinfection immunity. Repressor regulation is critical to the outcome of infection—lysogenic or lytic growth—as well as prophage induction into lytic replication. Mycobacteriophage BPs and its relatives use an unusual integration-dependent immunity system in which the phage attachment site (attP) is located within the repressor gene (33) such that site-specific integration leads to synthesis of a prophage-encoded product (gp33103) that is 33 residues shorter at its C-terminus than the virally-encoded protein (gp33136). However, the shorter form of the repressor (gp33103) is stable and active in repression of the early lytic promoter PR, whereas the longer virally-encoded form (gp33136) is inactive due to targeted degradation via a C-terminal ssrA-like tag. We show here that both forms of the repressor bind similarly to the 33–34 intergenic regulatory region, and that BPs gp33103 is a tetramer in solution. The BPs gp33103 repressor binds to five regulatory regions spanning the BPs genome, and regulates four promoters including the early lytic promoter, PR. BPs gp33103 has a complex pattern of DNA recognition in which a full operator binding site contains two half sites separated by a variable spacer, and BPs gp33103 induces a DNA bend at the full operator site but not a half site. The operator site structure is unusual in that one half site corresponds to a 12 bp palindrome identified previously, but the other half site is a highly variable variant of the palindrome. PMID:26332854

  16. A cyclic carbo-isosteric penta-depsipeptide: cyclo(Phe1–d-Ala2–Gly3–Phe4–APO5)

    PubMed Central

    Guéret, Stéphanie M.; Wagner, Trixie

    2015-01-01

    The title compound, cyclo(Phe1–d-Ala2–Gly3–Phe4–APO5), C26H32N4O5, is the minor diastereoisomer of a cyclic penta-peptidomimetic analogue containing a novel 2-amino­propyl lactone (APO) motif, which displays the same number of atoms as the native amino acid glycine and has a methyl group in place of the carbonyl O atom. The crystal structure presented here allows the analysis of the secondary structure of this unprecedented cyclic carbo-isosteric depsipeptide. The conformation of the central ring is stabilized by an intra­molecular N—H⋯O hydrogen bond between the carbonyl O atom of the first residue (Phe1) and the amide group H atom of the fourth residue (Phe4). Based on the previously reported hydrogen bond and on the values of the torsion angles ϕ and ψ, the loop formed by the first, second, third and fourth residues (Phe1, d-Ala2, Gly3 and Phe4) can be classified as a type II′ β-turn. The loop around the new peptidomimetic motif, on the other hand, resembles an open γ-turn containing a weak N—H⋯O hydrogen bond between the carbonyl group O atom of the fourth residue (Phe4) and the amide unit H atom of the first residue (Phe1). In the crystal, the peptidomimetic mol­ecules are arranged in chains along the b-axis direction. Within such a chain, the mol­ecules of the structure are linked via N—H⋯O hydrogen bonds between the amide group H atom of the secondary residue (d-Ala2) and the carb­oxy unit O atom of the fourth residue (Phe4) in a neighboring mol­ecule. The newly formed methyl stereocentre of the APO peptidomimetic motif (APO5) was obtained as the minor diastereoisomer in a ring-closing reductive amination reaction and adopts an R configuration. PMID:25705467

  17. Synthesis and biological evaluation of a novel (177)Lu-DOTA-[Gly(3)-cyclized(Dap(4), (d)-Phe(7), Asp(10))-Arg(11)]α-MSH(3-13) analogue for melanocortin-1 receptor-positive tumor targeting.

    PubMed

    Lim, Jae Cheong; Hong, Young Don; Kim, Jin Ju; Choi, Sang Mu; Baek, Hye Suk; Choi, Sun-Ju

    2012-10-01

    In this study, a novel α-melanocyte stimulating hormone (α-MSH) analogue 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA) coupled [Gly(3)-cyclized(Dap(4), (d)-Phe(7), Asp(10))-Arg(11)]α-MSH(3-13) (DOTA-GMSH) for melanocortin-1 receptor (MC-1R) targeting was newly synthesized, radiolabeled with (177)Lu, and in vitro and in vivo characterized. (177)Lu-labeled peptides were prepared with a high radiolabeling yield (>98%), and its Log p value was -2.89. No degradation was observed not only by serum incubation at 37°C for 7 days but also by an HPLC analysis of radioactive metabolites in urine. A cell binding assay revealed that an inhibitory concentration of 50% (IC(50)) of the peptide was 3.80 nM. The tumor-to-blood ratio, which was 14.27 at 2 hours p.i., was increased to 56.37 at 24 hours p.i., which means that the radiolabeled peptide was highly accumulated in a tumor and was rapidly cleared from the blood pool. We, therefore, conclude that (177)Lu-DOTA-GMSH has promising characteristics for application in nuclear medicine, namely for the diagnosis of MC-1R over-expressing tumors. PMID:22831553

  18. Does the repressor coping style predict lower posttraumatic stress symptoms?

    PubMed

    McNally, Richard J; Hatch, John P; Cedillos, Elizabeth M; Luethcke, Cynthia A; Baker, Monty T; Peterson, Alan L; Litz, Brett T

    2011-07-01

    We tested whether a continuous measure of repressor coping style predicted lower posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms in 122 health care professionals serving in Operation Iraqi Freedom. Zero-order correlational analyses indicated that predeployment repressor coping scores negatively predicted postdeployment PTSD symptoms, r(s) = -0.29, p = 0.001, whereas predeployment Connor-Davidson Resilience Scale (CD-RISC) scores did not predict postdeployment PTSD symptoms, r(s) = -0.13, p = 0.14. However, predeployment trait anxiety was chiefly responsible for the association between repressor coping and PTSD symptom severity, r(s) = 0.38, p = 0.001. Four percent of the subjects qualified for a probable PTSD diagnosis. Although service members with relatively higher PTSD scores had lower repressor coping scores than did the other subjects, their level of predeployment anxiety was chiefly responsible for this relationship. Knowing someone's predeployment level of trait anxiety permits better prediction of PTSD symptoms among trauma-exposed service members than does knowing his or her level of repressive coping. PMID:22128715

  19. Mapping DNA-Lac repressor interaction with ultra-fast optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monico, Carina; Tempestini, Alessia; Vanzi, Francesco; Pavone, Francesco S.; Capitanio, Marco

    2015-03-01

    The lac operon is a well-known example of gene expression regulation, based on the specific interaction of Lac repressor protein (LacI) with its target DNA sequence (operator). We recently developed an ultrafast force-clamp laser trap technique capable of probing molecular interactions with sub-ms temporal resolution, under controlled pN-range forces. With this technique, we tested the interaction of LacI with different DNA constructs. Based on position along the DNA sequence, the observed interactions can be interpreted as specific binding to operator sequences and transient interactions with nonspecific sequences.

  20. Optimized expression and purification of biophysical quantities of Lac repressor and Lac repressor regulatory domain.

    PubMed

    Stetz, Matthew A; Carter, Marie V; Wand, A Joshua

    2016-07-01

    The recombinant production of Lac repressor (LacI) in Escherichia coli is complicated by its ubiquitous use as a regulatory element in commercially-available expression vectors and host strains. While LacI-regulated expression systems are often used to produce recombinant LacI, the product can be heterogeneous and unsuitable for some studies. Alternative approaches include using unregulated vectors which typically suffer from low yield or vectors with promoters induced by metabolically active sugars which can dilute isotope labels necessary for certain biophysical studies. Here, an optimized expression system and isolation protocol for producing various constructs of LacI is introduced which eliminates these complications. The expression vector is an adaptation of the pASK backbone wherein expression of the lacI gene is regulated by an anhydrotetracyline inducible tetA promoter and the host strain lacks the lacI gene. Typical yields in highly deuterated minimal medium are nearly 2-fold greater than those previously reported. Notably, the new expression system is also able to produce the isolated regulatory domain of LacI without co-expression of the full-length protein and without any defects in cell viability, eliminating the inconvenient requirement for strict monitoring of cell densities during pre-culturing. Typical yields in highly deuterated minimal medium are significantly greater than those previously reported. Characterization by solution NMR shows that LacI constructs produced using this expression system are highly homogenous and functionally active. PMID:27064119

  1. A DNA mimic: the structure and mechanism of action for the anti-repressor protein AbbA.

    PubMed

    Tucker, Ashley T; Bobay, Benjamin G; Banse, Allison V; Olson, Andrew L; Soderblom, Erik J; Moseley, M Arthur; Thompson, Richele J; Varney, Kristen M; Losick, Richard; Cavanagh, John

    2014-05-01

    Bacteria respond to adverse environmental conditions by switching on the expression of large numbers of genes that enable them to adapt to unfavorable circumstances. In Bacillus subtilis, many adaptive genes are under the negative control of the global transition state regulator, the repressor protein AbrB. Stressful conditions lead to the de-repression of genes under AbrB control. Contributing to this de-repression is AbbA, an anti-repressor that binds to and blocks AbrB from binding to DNA. Here, we have determined the NMR structure of the functional AbbA dimer, confirmed that it binds to the N-terminal DNA-binding domain of AbrB, and have provided an initial description for the interaction using computational docking procedures. Interestingly, we show that AbbA has structural and surface characteristics that closely mimic the DNA phosphate backbone, enabling it to readily carry out its physiological function. PMID:24534728

  2. A DNA Mimic: The Structure and Mechanism of Action for the Anti-Repressor Protein AbbA

    PubMed Central

    Tucker, Ashley T.; Bobay, Benjamin G.; Banse, Allison V.; Olson, Andrew L.; Soderblom, Erik J.; Moseley, M. Arthur; Thompson, Richele J.; Varney, Kristen M.; Losick, Richard; Cavanagh, John

    2014-01-01

    Bacteria respond to adverse environmental conditions by switching on the expression of large numbers of genes that enable them to adapt to unfavorable circumstances. In Bacillus subtilis, many adaptive genes are under the negative control of the global transition state regulator, the repressor protein AbrB. Stressful conditions lead to the de-repression of genes under AbrB control. Contributing to this de-repression is AbbA, an anti-repressor that binds to and blocks AbrB from binding to DNA. Here, we have determined the NMR structure of the functional AbbA dimer, confirmed that it binds to the N-terminal DNA-binding domain of AbrB, and have provided an initial description for the interaction using computational docking procedures. Interestingly, we show that AbbA has structural and surface characteristics that closely mimic the DNA phosphate backbone, enabling it to readily carry out its physiological function. PMID:24534728

  3. Crystal Structure of the Lactose Operon Repressor and Its Complexes with DNA and Inducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Mitchell; Chang, Geoffrey; Horton, Nancy C.; Kercher, Michele A.; Pace, Helen C.; Schumacher, Maria A.; Brennan, Richard G.; Lu, Ponzy

    1996-03-01

    The lac operon of Escherichia coli is the paradigm for gene regulation. Its key component is the lac repressor, a product of the lacI gene. The three-dimensional structures of the intact lac repressor, the lac repressor bound to the gratuitous inducer isopropyl-β-D-1-thiogalactoside (IPTG) and the lac repressor complexed with a 21-base pair symmetric operator DNA have been determined. These three structures show the conformation of the molecule in both the induced and repressed states and provide a framework for understanding a wealth of biochemical and genetic information. The DNA sequence of the lac operon has three lac repressor recognition sites in a stretch of 500 base pairs. The crystallographic structure of the complex with DNA suggests that the tetrameric repressor functions synergistically with catabolite gene activator protein (CAP) and participates in the quaternary formation of repression loops in which one tetrameric repressor interacts simultaneously with two sites on the genomic DNA.

  4. Hexokinase 2 Is an Intracellular Glucose Sensor of Yeast Cells That Maintains the Structure and Activity of Mig1 Protein Repressor Complex.

    PubMed

    Vega, Montserrat; Riera, Alberto; Fernández-Cid, Alejandra; Herrero, Pilar; Moreno, Fernando

    2016-04-01

    Hexokinase 2 (Hxk2) fromSaccharomyces cerevisiaeis a bi-functional enzyme, being both a catalyst in the cytosol and an important regulator of the glucose repression signal in the nucleus. Despite considerable recent progress, little is known about the regulatory mechanism that controls nuclear Hxk2 association with theSUC2promoter chromatin and how this association is necessary forSUC2gene repression. Our data indicate that in theSUC2promoter context, Hxk2 functions through a variety of structurally unrelated factors, mainly the DNA-binding Mig1 and Mig2 repressors and the regulatory Snf1 and Reg1 factors. Hxk2 sustains the repressor complex architecture maintaining transcriptional repression at theSUC2gene. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation assays, we discovered that the Hxk2 in its open configuration, at low glucose conditions, leaves the repressor complex that induces its dissociation and promotesSUC2gene expression. In high glucose conditions, Hxk2 adopts a close conformation that promotes Hxk2 binding to the Mig1 protein and the reassembly of theSUC2repressor complex. Additional findings highlight the possibility that Hxk2 constitutes an intracellular glucose sensor that operates by changing its conformation in response to cytoplasmic glucose levels that regulate its interaction with Mig1 and thus its recruitment to the repressor complex of theSUC2promoter. Thus, our data indicate that Hxk2 is more intimately involved in gene regulation than previously thought. PMID:26865637

  5. Structural Basis for the Differential Regulation of DNA by the Methionine Repressor MetJ

    SciTech Connect

    Augustus, Anne; Reardon, Patrick; Heller, William T; Spicer, Leonard D.

    2006-01-01

    The Met regulon in Escherichia coli encodes several proteins responsible for the biosynthesis of methionine. Regulation of the expression of most of these proteins is governed by the methionine repressor protein MetJ and its co-repressor, the methionine derivative S-adenosylmethionine. Genes controlled by MetJ contain from two to five sequential copies of a homologous 8-bp sequence called the metbox. A crystal structure for one of the complexes, the repressor tetramer bound to two metboxes, has been reported (Somers, W. S., and S. E. Phillips (1992) Nature 359, 387-393), but little structural work on the larger assemblies has been done presumably because of the difficulties in crystallization and the variability in the number and sequences of metboxes for the various genes. Small angle neutron scattering was used to study complexes of MetJ and S-adenosylmethionine with double-stranded DNA containing two, three, and five metboxes. Our results demonstrate that the crystal structure of the two-metbox complex is not the native solution conformation of the complex. Instead, the system adopts a less compact conformation in which there is decreased interaction between the adjacent MetJ dimers. Models built of the higher order complexes from the scattering data show that the three-metbox complex is organized much like the two-metbox complex. However, the five-metbox complex differs significantly from the smaller complexes, providing much closer packing of the adjacent MetJ dimers and allowing additional contacts not available in the crystal structure. The results suggest that there is a structural basis for the differences observed in the regulatory effectiveness of MetJ for the various genes of the Met regulon.

  6. The DNA binding factor Hmg20b is a repressor of erythroid differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Esteghamat, Fatemehsadat; van Dijk, Thamar Bryn; Braun, Harald; Dekker, Sylvia; van der Linden, Reinier; Hou, Jun; Fanis, Pavlos; Demmers, Jeroen; van IJcken, Wilfred; Özgür, Zeliha; Horos, Rastislav; Pourfarzad, Farzin; von Lindern, Marieke; Philipsen, Sjaak

    2011-01-01

    Background In erythroblasts, the CoREST repressor complex is recruited to target promoters by the transcription factor Gfi1b, leading to repression of genes mainly involved in erythroid differentiation. Hmg20b is a subunit of CoREST, but its role in erythropoiesis has not yet been established. Design and Methods To study the role of Hmg20b in erythropoiesis, we performed knockdown experiments in a differentiation-competent mouse fetal liver cell line, and in primary mouse fetal liver cells. The effects on globin gene expression were determined. We used microarrays to investigate global gene expression changes induced by Hmg20b knockdown. Functional analysis was carried out on Hrasls3, an Hmg20b target gene. Results We show that Hmg20b depletion induces spontaneous differentiation. To identify the target genes of Hmg20b, microarray analysis was performed on Hmg20b knockdown cells and controls. In line with its association to the CoREST complex, we found that 85% (527 out of 620) of the deregulated genes are up-regulated when Hmg20b levels are reduced. Among the few down-regulated genes was Gfi1b, a known repressor of erythroid differentiation. Among the consistently up-regulated targets were embryonic β-like globins and the phospholipase HRAS-like suppressor 3 (Hrasls3). We show that Hrasls3 expression is induced during erythroid differentiation and that knockdown of Hrasls3 inhibits terminal differentiation of proerythroblasts. Conclusions We conclude that Hmg20b acts as an inhibitor of erythroid differentiation, through the down-regulation of genes involved in differentiation such as Hrasls3, and activation of repressors of differentiation such as Gfi1b. In addition, Hmg20b suppresses embryonic β-like globins. PMID:21606163

  7. The TetR Family of Transcriptional Repressors

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Juan L.; Martínez-Bueno, Manuel; Molina-Henares, Antonio J.; Terán, Wilson; Watanabe, Kazuya; Zhang, Xiaodong; Gallegos, María Trinidad; Brennan, Richard; Tobes, Raquel

    2005-01-01

    We have developed a general profile for the proteins of the TetR family of repressors. The stretch that best defines the profile of this family is made up of 47 amino acid residues that correspond to the helix-turn-helix DNA binding motif and adjacent regions in the three-dimensional structures of TetR, QacR, CprB, and EthR, four family members for which the function and three-dimensional structure are known. We have detected a set of 2,353 nonredundant proteins belonging to this family by screening genome and protein databases with the TetR profile. Proteins of the TetR family have been found in 115 genera of gram-positive, α-, β-, and γ-proteobacteria, cyanobacteria, and archaea. The set of genes they regulate is known for 85 out of the 2,353 members of the family. These proteins are involved in the transcriptional control of multidrug efflux pumps, pathways for the biosynthesis of antibiotics, response to osmotic stress and toxic chemicals, control of catabolic pathways, differentiation processes, and pathogenicity. The regulatory network in which the family member is involved can be simple, as in TetR (i.e., TetR bound to the target operator represses tetA transcription and is released in the presence of tetracycline), or more complex, involving a series of regulatory cascades in which either the expression of the TetR family member is modulated by another regulator or the TetR family member triggers a cell response to react to environmental insults. Based on what has been learned from the cocrystals of TetR and QacR with their target operators and from their three-dimensional structures in the absence and in the presence of ligands, and based on multialignment analyses of the conserved stretch of 47 amino acids in the 2,353 TetR family members, two groups of residues have been identified. One group includes highly conserved positions involved in the proper orientation of the helix-turn-helix motif and hence seems to play a structural role. The other set of

  8. Functional and Structural Analysis of HrcA Repressor Protein from Caulobacter crescentus

    PubMed Central

    Susin, Michelle F.; Perez, Humberto R.; Baldini, Regina L.; Gomes, Suely L.

    2004-01-01

    A large number of bacteria regulate chaperone gene expression during heat shock by the HrcA-CIRCE system, in which the DNA element called CIRCE serves as binding site for the repressor protein HrcA under nonstress conditions. In Caulobacter crescentus, the groESL operon presents a dual type of control. Heat shock induction is controlled by a σ32-dependent promoter and the HrcA-CIRCE system plays a role in regulation of groESL expression under physiological temperatures. To study the activity of HrcA in vitro, we purified a histidine-tagged version of the protein, and specific binding to the CIRCE element was obtained by gel shift assays. The amount of retarded DNA increased significantly in the presence of GroES/GroEL, suggesting that the GroE chaperonin machine modulates HrcA activity. Further evidence of this modulation was obtained using lacZ transcription fusions with the groESL regulatory region in C. crescentus cells, producing different amounts of GroES/GroEL. In addition, we identified the putative DNA-binding domain of HrcA through extensive protein sequence comparison and constructed various HrcA mutant proteins containing single amino acid substitutions in or near this region. In vitro and in vivo experiments with these mutated proteins indicated several amino acids important for repressor activity. PMID:15466027

  9. STENOFOLIA acts as a repressor in regulating leaf blade outgrowth

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Hao; Niu, Lifang; Tadege, Million

    2013-01-01

    We recently reported that the Medicago WOX gene, STENOFOLIA (STF), acts as a transcriptional repressor in regulating leaf blade outgrowth. By using the Nicotiana sylvestris bladeless lam1 mutant as a genetic tool, we showed that the WUS-box, which is conserved among WUS clade WOX genes, is partly responsible for the repressive activity of STF. All members of the modern/WUS clade genes (WUS, WOX1-WOX7) in Arabidopsis that contain intact WUS-box can substitute for STF/LAM1 function while the intermediate and ancient clade members including WOX9,WOX11 and WOX13 cannot, due to lack of the intact WUS-box. Taken together, our results reveal a conserved repression mechanism playing a central role in cell proliferation conferred to the evolutionarily dynamic WOX gene family with acquisition of a repressor domain. PMID:23603965

  10. The Krüppel-associated box repressor domain can induce reversible heterochromatization of a mouse locus in vivo.

    PubMed

    Groner, Anna C; Tschopp, Patrick; Challet, Ludivine; Dietrich, Jens-Erik; Verp, Sonia; Offner, Sandra; Barde, Isabelle; Rodriguez, Ivan; Hiiragi, Takashi; Trono, Didier

    2012-07-20

    The study of chromatin and its regulators is key to understanding and manipulating transcription. We previously exploited the Krüppel-associated box (KRAB) transcriptional repressor domain, present in hundreds of vertebrate-specific zinc finger proteins, to assess the effect of its binding to gene bodies. These experiments revealed that the ectopic and doxycycline (dox)-controlled tet repressor KRAB fusion protein (tTRKRAB) can induce reversible and long-range silencing of cellular promoters. Here, we extend this system to in vivo applications and use tTRKRAB to achieve externally controllable repression of an endogenous mouse locus. We employed lentiviral-mediated transgenesis with promoterless TetO-containing gene traps to engineer a mouse line where the endogenous kinesin family member 2A (Kif2A) promoter drives a YFP reporter gene. When these mice were crossed to animals expressing the TetO-binding tTRKRAB repressor, this regulator was recruited to the Kif2A locus, and YFP expression was reduced. This effect was reversed when dox was given to embryos or adult mice, demonstrating that the cellular Kif2A promoter was only silenced upon repressor binding. Molecular analyses confirmed that tTRKRAB induced transcriptional repression through the spread of H3K9me3-containing heterochromatin, without DNA methylation of the trapped Kif2A promoter. Therefore, we demonstrate that targeting of tTRKRAB to a gene body in vivo results in reversible transcriptional repression through the spreading of facultative heterochromatin. This finding not only sheds light on KRAB-mediated transcriptional processes, but also suggests approaches for the externally controllable and reversible modulation of chromatin and transcription in vivo. PMID:22605343

  11. Genomic Mining of Prokaryotic Repressors for Orthogonal Logic Gates

    PubMed Central

    Stanton, Brynne C.; Nielsen, Alec A.K.; Tamsir, Alvin; Clancy, Kevin; Peterson, Todd; Voigt, Christopher A.

    2014-01-01

    Genetic circuits perform computational operations based on interactions between freely diffusing molecules within a cell. When transcription factors are combined to build a circuit, unintended interactions can disrupt its function. Here, we apply “part mining” to build a library of 73 TetR-family repressors gleaned from prokaryotic genomes. The operators of a subset were determined using an in vitro method and this information was used to build synthetic promoters. The promoters and repressors were screened for cross-reactions. Of these, 16 were identified that both strongly repress their cognate promoter (5- to 207-fold) and do not interact with other promoters. Each repressor:promoter pair was converted to a NOT gate and characterized. Used as a set of 16 NOR gates, there are >1054 circuits that could be built by changing the pattern of input and output promoters. This represents a large set of compatible gates that can be used to construct user-defined circuits. PMID:24316737

  12. The repressor function of snail is required for Drosophila gastrulation and is not replaceable by Escargot or Worniu.

    PubMed

    Hemavathy, Kirugaval; Hu, Xiaodi; Ashraf, Shovon I; Small, Stephen J; Ip, Y Tony

    2004-05-15

    Mesoderm formation in the Drosophila embryo depends on the maternal Toll signaling pathway. The Toll pathway establishes the Dorsal nuclear gradient, which regulates many zygotic genes to establish the mesodermal fate and promote the invagination of ventral cells. An important target gene of Dorsal is snail, which is required for proper mesoderm invagination. The Snail protein contains five zinc fingers and is a transcriptional repressor. However, it is not clear whether repressing target genes is a requirement for Snail to control ventral invagination. To examine such requirement, we conducted a series of genetic rescue experiments in snail mutant embryos. Snail, Worniu, and Escargot are closely related zinc-finger proteins and have equal functions during neuroblast development. However, among these three proteins, only Snail can rescue the mesoderm invagination phenotype. Moreover, the ability of various Snail mutant constructs to repress gene expression correlates with their ability to control invagination. This unique property of Snail in mesoderm formation can be attributed mostly to the CtBP co-repressor interaction motifs in the N-terminus, not to the C-terminal DNA-binding zinc fingers. Ectopic expression of Snail outside the ventral domain is not sufficient to induce cell movement even though repression of target genes still occurs. Together, the results show that the repressor function of Snail is essential for gastrulation. The repression of target genes by Snail may permit other factors in the ventral cells to positively promote mesoderm invagination. PMID:15110709

  13. Subspecialization of R2R3-MYB Repressors for Anthocyanin and Proanthocyanidin Regulation in Forage Legumes

    PubMed Central

    Albert, Nick W.

    2015-01-01

    The synthesis of anthocyanin pigments and proanthocyanidins (condensed tannins) is regulated by MYB-bHLH-WDR (MBW) transcription factor complexes in all angiosperms studied to date. Tr-MYB133 and Tr-MYB134 were isolated from Trifolium repens and encode R2R3-MYBs that antagonize the activity of MBW activation complexes. These two genes are conserved in other legume species, and form two sub-clades within the larger anthocyanin/proanthocyanidin clade of MYB repressors. However, unlike petunia and Arabidopsis, these R2R3-MYB repressors do not prevent ectopic accumulation of anthocyanins or proanthocyanidins. Instead, they are expressed when anthocyanins or proanthocyanidins are being synthesized, and provide feedback regulation to MBW complexes. This feedback occurs because Tr-MYB133 and Tr-MYB134 are themselves regulated by MBW complexes. Tr-MYB133 is regulated by MBW complexes containing anthocyanin-related R2R3-MYB proteins (Tr-RED LEAF), while Tr-MYB134 is regulated by complexes containing the proanthocyanidin R2R3-MYBs (Tr-MYB14). Other features of the MBW gene regulation networks are also conserved within legumes, including the ability for the anthocyanin MBW complexes to activate the expression of the AN1/TT8 clade bHLH factor. The regulation of Tr-MYB133 and Tr-MYB134 by distinct, pathway-specific MBW complexes has resulted in subspecialization for controlling anthocyanin or proanthocyanidin synthesis. PMID:26779194

  14. Epigenetic repressor-like genes are differentially regulated during grapevine (Vitis vinifera L.) development.

    PubMed

    Almada, Rubén; Cabrera, Nuri; Casaretto, José A; Peña-Cortés, Hugo; Ruiz-Lara, Simón; González Villanueva, Enrique

    2011-10-01

    Grapevine sexual reproduction involves a seasonal separation between inflorescence primordia (flowering induction) and flower development. We hypothesized that a repression mechanism implicating epigenetic changes could play a role in the seasonal separation of these two developmental processes in grapevine. Therefore, the expression of five grapevine genes with homology to the Arabidopsis epigenetic repressor genes FERTILIZATION INDEPENDENT ENDOSPERM (FIE), EMBRYONIC FLOWER 2 (EMF2), CURLY LEAF (CLF), MULTICOPY SUPPRESSOR OF IRA 1 (MSI1) and SWINGER (SWN) was analyzed during the development of buds and vegetative and reproductive organs. During bud development, the putative grapevine epigenetic repressor genes VvCLF, VvEMF2, VvMSI1, VvSWN and VvFIE are mainly expressed in latent buds at the flowering induction period, but also detected during bud burst and inflorescence/flower development. The overlapping expression patterns of grapevine PcG-like genes in buds suggest that chromatin remodeling mechanisms could be operating during grapevine bud development for controlling processes such as seasonal flowering, dormancy and bud burst. Furthermore, the expression of grapevine PcG-like genes was also detected in fruits and vegetative organs, suggesting that epigenetic changes could be at the basis of the regulation of various proliferation-differentiation cell transitions that occur during grapevine development. PMID:21681473

  15. Multi-petal cyclamen flowers produced by AGAMOUS chimeric repressor expression

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Yuri; Oshima, Yoshimi; Yamamura, Tomomichi; Sugiyama, Masao; Mitsuda, Nobutaka; Ohtsubo, Norihiro; Ohme-Takagi, Masaru; Terakawa, Teruhiko

    2013-01-01

    Cyclamen persicum (cyclamen) is a commercially valuable, winter-blooming perennial plant. We cloned two cyclamen orthologues of AGAMOUS (AG), CpAG1 and CpAG2, which are mainly expressed in the stamen and carpel, respectively. Cyclamen flowers have 5 petals, but expression of a chimeric repressor of CpAG1 (CpAG1-SRDX) caused stamens to convert into petals, resulting in a flower with 10 petals. By contrast, CpAG2-SRDX only caused incomplete formation of stamens and carpels. Expression in Arabidopsis thaliana showed similar effects on flower organ specification. Simultaneous expression of CpAG1-SRDX and CpAG2-SRDX in cyclamen induced rose-like, multi-petal flowers, a potentially valuable trait in commercial ornamental varieties. Expression of CpAG2-SRDX in a cyclamen mutant lacking expression of CpAG1 more effectively produced multi-petal flowers. Here, we controlled the number of petals in cyclamen by simple genetic engineering with a chimeric repressor. This strategy may be applicable useful for other ornamental plants with two distinct AG orthologues. PMID:24026510

  16. The Escherichia coli LexA repressor-operator system works in mammalian cells.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, G M; Mileham, K A; Cooke, S E; Woolston, S J; George, H K; Charles, A D; Brammar, W J

    1988-01-01

    We have demonstrated the use of the Escherichia coli LexA repressor-operator system to down-regulate gene expression in mouse cells. The LexA gene was placed downstream of the RSVLTR promoter with polyadenylation and splice signals from SV40. This expression unit was introduced into mouse Ltk- cells by calcium phosphate transfection and stable transfectants selected which express LexA protein. We have used the bacterial chloramphenicol acetyltransferase gene (CAT) as our reporter gene. Transcription of this gene was driven by the HSV tk promoter, into which we have introduced one or two synthetic LexA operator sequences in various positions throughout the promoter. Necessary 3' signals were from the HSV tk gene. Repression by LexA was assessed by comparing the transient expression of tkCAT target constructs, containing LexA operator sequences in the promoter, in cells expressing LexA protein with that in control cells not expressing the repressor. We have observed up to 10-fold repression of CAT expression in LexA+ cells from promoters containing LexA operator sequences. Images PMID:3208758

  17. Enhanced Generation of Myeloid Lineages in Hematopoietic Differentiation from Embryonic Stem Cells by Silencing Transcriptional Repressor Twist-2

    PubMed Central

    Sharabi, Andrew B.; Lee, Sung-Hyung; Goodell, Margaret A.; Huang, Xue F.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract The self-renewal and multilineage differentiation of embryonic stem cells (ESC) is largely governed by transcription factors or repressors. Extensive efforts have focused on elucidating critical factors that control the differentiation of specific cell lineages, for instance, myeloid lineages in hematopoietic development. In this study, we found that Twist-2, a basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factor, plays a critical role in inhibiting the differentiation of ESC. Murine ES cells, in which Twist-2 expression is silenced by lentivirally delivered shRNA, exhibit an enhanced formation of primary embryoid bodies (EB) and enhanced differentiation into mesodermally derived hematopoietic colonies. Furthermore, Twist-2 silenced (LV-siTwist-2) ESC display significantly increased generation of myeloid lineages (Gr-1+ and F4/80+ cells) during in vitro hematopoietic differentiation. Treatment with the Toll-like receptor (TLR) 4 ligand synergistically stimulates the generation of primary EB formation as well as of hematopoietic progenitors differentiated from LV-siTwist-2 ES cells. Thus, this study reveals the critical role of the transcriptional repressor Twist-2 in regulating the development of myeloid lineage in hematopoietic differentiation from ESC. This study also suggests a potential strategy for directional differentiation of ESC by inhibiting a transcriptional repressor. PMID:20025523

  18. Transcriptional repressors, corepressors and chromatin modifying enzymes in T cell development

    PubMed Central

    Shapiro, Michael J.; Shapiro, Virginia Smith

    2010-01-01

    Gene expression is regulated by the combined action of transcriptional activators and transcriptional repressors. Transcriptional repressors function by recruiting corepressor complexes containing histone-modifying enzymes to specific sites within DNA. Chromatin modifying complexes are subsequently recruited, either directly by transcriptional repressors, or indirectly via corepressor complexes and/or histone modifications, to remodel chromatin into either a transcription-friendly ‘open’ form or an inhibitory ‘closed’ form. Transcriptional repressors, corepressors and chromatin modifying complexes play critical roles throughout T cell development. Here, we highlight those genes that function to repress transcription and that have been shown to be required for T cell development. PMID:21163671

  19. Transcriptional regulation of repressor synthesis in mycobacteriophage L5.

    PubMed

    Nesbit, C E; Levin, M E; Donnelly-Wu, M K; Hatfull, G F

    1995-09-01

    Mycobacteriophage L5 is a temperate phage of the mycobacteria that forms stable lysogens in Mycobacterium smegmatis. Lysogeny is maintained by the putative repressor, the gene 71 product, which also mediates immunity to superinfection. We show here that there are three promoters located upstream of gene 71 which are active in an L5 lysogen but which do not require any phage-encoded proteins. In early lytic growth, gene 71 is also transcribed from a promoter, Pleft, located at the right end of the genome and which appears to be a target of gp71 regulation. A model is given for the regulation of L5 life cycles. PMID:8594325

  20. SirR, a novel iron-dependent repressor in Staphylococcus epidermidis.

    PubMed

    Hill, P J; Cockayne, A; Landers, P; Morrissey, J A; Sims, C M; Williams, P

    1998-09-01

    In Staphylococcus epidermidis and Staphylococcus aureus, a number of cell wall- and cytoplasmic membrane-associated lipoproteins are induced in response to iron starvation. To gain insights into the molecular basis of iron-dependent gene regulation in the staphylococci, we sequenced the DNA upstream of the 3-kb S. epidermidis sitABC operon, which Northern blot analysis indicates is transcriptionally regulated by the growth medium iron content. We identified two DNA sequences which are homologous to elements of the Corynebacterium diphtheriae DtxR regulon, which controls, in response to iron stress, for example, production of diphtheria toxin, siderophore, and a heme oxygenase. Upstream of the sitABC operon and divergently transcribed lies a 645-bp open reading frame (ORF), which codes for a polypeptide of approximately 25 kDa with homology to the DtxR family of metal-dependent repressor proteins. This ORF has been designated SirR (staphylococcal iron regulator repressor). Within the sitABC promoter/operator region, we also located a region of dyad symmetry overlapping the transcriptional start of sitABC which shows high homology to the DtxR operator consensus sequence, suggesting that this region, termed the Sir box, is the SirR-binding site. The SirR protein was overexpressed, purified, and used in DNA mobility shift assays; SirR retarded the migration of a synthetic oligonucleotide based on the Sir box in a metal (Fe2+ or Mn2+)-dependent manner, providing confirmatory evidence that this motif is the SirR-binding site. Furthermore, Southern blot analysis of staphylococcal chromosomal DNA with the synthetic Sir box as a probe confirmed that there are at least five Sir boxes in the S. epidermidis genome and at least three in the genome of S. aureus, suggesting that SirR controls the expression of multiple target genes. Using a monospecific polyclonal antibody raised against SirR to probe Western blots of whole-cell lysates of S. aureus, S. carnosus, S. epidermidis

  1. Novel repressor regulates insulin sensitivity through interaction with Foxo1

    PubMed Central

    Nakae, Jun; Cao, Yongheng; Hakuno, Fumihiko; Takemori, Hiroshi; Kawano, Yoshinaga; Sekioka, Risa; Abe, Takaya; Kiyonari, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Toshiya; Sakai, Juro; Takahashi, Shin-Ichiro; Itoh, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    Forkhead box-containing protein o (Foxo) 1 is a key transcription factor in insulin and glucose metabolism. We identified a Foxo1-CoRepressor (FCoR) protein in mouse adipose tissue that inhibits Foxo1's activity by enhancing acetylation via impairment of the interaction between Foxo1 and the deacetylase Sirt1 and via direct acetylation. FCoR is phosphorylated at Threonine 93 by catalytic subunit of protein kinase A and is translocated into nucleus, making it possible to bind to Foxo1 in both cytosol and nucleus. Knockdown of FCoR in 3T3-F442A cells enhanced expression of Foxo target and inhibited adipocyte differentiation. Overexpression of FCoR in white adipose tissue decreased expression of Foxo-target genes and adipocyte size and increased insulin sensitivity in Leprdb/db mice and in mice fed a high-fat diet. In contrast, Fcor knockout mice were lean, glucose intolerant, and had decreased insulin sensitivity that was accompanied by increased expression levels of Foxo-target genes and enlarged adipocytes. Taken together, these data suggest that FCoR is a novel repressor that regulates insulin sensitivity and energy metabolism in adipose tissue by acting to fine-tune Foxo1 activity. PMID:22510882

  2. Modular construction of mammalian gene circuits using TALE transcriptional repressors.

    PubMed

    Li, Yinqing; Jiang, Yun; Chen, He; Liao, Weixi; Li, Zhihua; Weiss, Ron; Xie, Zhen

    2015-03-01

    An important goal of synthetic biology is the rational design and predictable implementation of synthetic gene circuits using standardized and interchangeable parts. However, engineering of complex circuits in mammalian cells is currently limited by the availability of well-characterized and orthogonal transcriptional repressors. Here, we introduce a library of 26 reversible transcription activator-like effector repressors (TALERs) that bind newly designed hybrid promoters and exert transcriptional repression through steric hindrance of key transcriptional initiation elements. We demonstrate that using the input-output transfer curves of our TALERs enables accurate prediction of the behavior of modularly assembled TALER cascade and switch circuits. We also show that TALER switches using feedback regulation exhibit improved accuracy for microRNA-based HeLa cancer cell classification versus HEK293 cells. Our TALER library is a valuable toolkit for modular engineering of synthetic circuits, enabling programmable manipulation of mammalian cells and helping elucidate design principles of coupled transcriptional and microRNA-mediated post-transcriptional regulation. PMID:25643171

  3. Plastic downregulation of the transcriptional repressor BCL6 during maturation of human dendritic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Pantano, Serafino . E-mail: serafino.pantano@unil.ch; Jarrossay, David; Saccani, Simona; Bosisio, Daniela; Natoli, Gioacchino

    2006-05-01

    Dendritic cell (DC) maturation links peripheral events initiated by the encounter with pathogens to the activation and expansion of antigen-specific T lymphocytes in secondary lymphoid organs. Here, we describe an as yet unrecognized modulator of human DC maturation, the transcriptional repressor BCL6. We found that both myeloid and plasmacytoid DCs constitutively express BCL6, which is rapidly downregulated following maturation triggered by selected stimuli. Both in unstimulated and maturing DCs, control of BCL6 protein levels reflects the convergence of several mechanisms regulating BCL6 stability, mRNA transcription and nuclear export. By regulating the induction of several genes implicated in the immune response, including inflammatory cytokines, chemokines and survival genes, BCL6 may represent a pivotal modulator of the afferent branch of the immune response.

  4. Ligand interactions with lactose repressor protein and the repressor-operator complex: the effects of ionization and oligomerization on binding.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Corey J; Zhan, Hongli; Swint-Kruse, Liskin; Matthews, Kathleen S

    2007-03-01

    Specific interactions between proteins and ligands that modify their functions are crucial in biology. Here, we examine sugars that bind the lactose repressor protein (LacI) and modify repressor affinity for operator DNA using isothermal titration calorimetry and equilibrium DNA binding experiments. High affinity binding of the commonly-used inducer isopropyl-beta,D-thiogalactoside is strongly driven by enthalpic forces, whereas inducer 2-phenylethyl-beta,D-galactoside has weaker affinity with low enthalpic contributions. Perturbing the dimer interface with either pH or oligomeric state shows that weak inducer binding is sensitive to changes in this distant region. Effects of the neutral compound o-nitrophenyl-beta,D-galactoside are sensitive to oligomerization, and at elevated pH this compound converts to an anti-inducer ligand with slightly enhanced enthalpic contributions to the binding energy. Anti-inducer o-nitrophenyl-beta,D-fucoside exhibits slightly enhanced affinity and increased enthalpic contributions at elevated pH. Collectively, these results both demonstrate the range of energetic consequences that occur with LacI binding to structurally-similar ligands and expand our insight into the link between effector binding and structural changes at the subunit interface. PMID:16860458

  5. Conservation of Histone Binding and Transcriptional Repressor Functions in a Schizosaccharomyces pombe Tup1p Homolog

    PubMed Central

    Mukai, Yukio; Matsuo, Eri; Roth, Sharon Y.; Harashima, Satoshi

    1999-01-01

    The Ssn6p-Tup1p corepressor complex is important to the regulation of several diverse genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and serves as a model for corepressor functions. To investigate the evolutionary conservation of these functions, sequences homologous to the S. cerevisiae TUP1 gene were cloned from Kluyveromyces lactis (TUP1) and Schizosaccharomyces pombe (tup11+). Interestingly, while the K. lactis TUP1 gene complemented an S. cerevisiae tup1 null mutation, the S. pombe tup11+ gene did not, even when expressed under the control of the S. cerevisiae TUP1 promoter. However, an S. pombe Tup11p-LexA fusion protein repressed transcription of a corresponding reporter gene, indicating that this Tup1p homolog has intrinsic repressor activity. Moreover, a chimeric protein containing the amino-terminal Ssn6p-binding domain of S. cerevisiae Tup1p and 544 amino acids from the C-terminal region of S. pombe Tup11p complemented the S. cerevisiae tup1 mutation. The failure of native S. pombe Tup11p to complement loss of Tup1p functions in S. cerevisiae corresponds to an inability to bind to S. cerevisiae Ssn6p in vitro. Disruption of tup11+ in combination with a disruption of tup12+, another TUP1 homolog gene in S. pombe, causes a defect in glucose repression of fbp1+, suggesting that S. pombe Tup1p homologs function as repressors in S. pombe. Furthermore, Tup11p binds specifically to histones H3 and H4 in vitro, indicating that both the repression and histone binding functions of Tup1p-related proteins are conserved across species. PMID:10567571

  6. Disruption of HDAC/CoREST/REST repressor by dnREST reduces genome silencing and increases virulence of herpes simplex virus

    PubMed Central

    Du, Te; Zhou, Guoying; Khan, Shaniya; Gu, Haidong; Roizman, Bernard

    2010-01-01

    In nonneuronal cells, herpes simplex virus 1 overcomes host defenses, replicates, and ultimately kills the infected cell. Among the host defenses suppressed by the virus is a repressor complex whose key components are histone deacetylase (HDAC) 1 or 2, RE-1 silencing transcription factor (REST), corepressor of REST (CoREST), and lysine-specific demethylase (LSD) 1. In neurons innervating cells at the portal of entry into the body, the virus establishes a “latent” infection in which viral DNA is silenced with the exception of a family of genes. The question posed here is whether the virus hijacks this repressor complex to silence itself in neurons during the latent state. To test this hypothesis, we inserted into the wild-type virus genome a wild-type REST [recombinant (R) 111], a dominant-negative REST (dnREST) lacking the N- and C-terminal repressor domains (R112), or an insertion control consisting of tandem repeats of stop codons (R113). The recombinant virus R112 carrying the dnREST replicated better and was more virulent than the wild-type parent or the other recombinant viruses when administered by the corneal or i.p. routes. Moreover, in contrast to other recombinants, corneal route inoculation by R112 recombinant virus resulted in higher DNA copy numbers, higher levels of infectious virus in eye, trigeminal ganglion, or brain, and virtually complete destruction of trigeminal ganglia in mice that may ultimately succumb to infection. These results support an earlier conclusion that the HDAC/CoREST/REST/LSD1 repressor complex is a significant component of the host innate immunity and are consistent with the hypothesis that HSV-1 hijacks the repressor to silence itself during latent infection. PMID:20798038

  7. Disruption of HDAC/CoREST/REST repressor by dnREST reduces genome silencing and increases virulence of herpes simplex virus.

    PubMed

    Du, Te; Zhou, Guoying; Khan, Shaniya; Gu, Haidong; Roizman, Bernard

    2010-09-01

    In nonneuronal cells, herpes simplex virus 1 overcomes host defenses, replicates, and ultimately kills the infected cell. Among the host defenses suppressed by the virus is a repressor complex whose key components are histone deacetylase (HDAC) 1 or 2, RE-1 silencing transcription factor (REST), corepressor of REST (CoREST), and lysine-specific demethylase (LSD) 1. In neurons innervating cells at the portal of entry into the body, the virus establishes a "latent" infection in which viral DNA is silenced with the exception of a family of genes. The question posed here is whether the virus hijacks this repressor complex to silence itself in neurons during the latent state. To test this hypothesis, we inserted into the wild-type virus genome a wild-type REST [recombinant (R) 111], a dominant-negative REST (dnREST) lacking the N- and C-terminal repressor domains (R112), or an insertion control consisting of tandem repeats of stop codons (R113). The recombinant virus R112 carrying the dnREST replicated better and was more virulent than the wild-type parent or the other recombinant viruses when administered by the corneal or i.p. routes. Moreover, in contrast to other recombinants, corneal route inoculation by R112 recombinant virus resulted in higher DNA copy numbers, higher levels of infectious virus in eye, trigeminal ganglion, or brain, and virtually complete destruction of trigeminal ganglia in mice that may ultimately succumb to infection. These results support an earlier conclusion that the HDAC/CoREST/REST/LSD1 repressor complex is a significant component of the host innate immunity and are consistent with the hypothesis that HSV-1 hijacks the repressor to silence itself during latent infection. PMID:20798038

  8. The Corynebacterium glutamicum aconitase repressor: scratching around for crystals

    PubMed Central

    García-Nafría, Javier; Baumgart, Meike; Bott, Michael; Wilkinson, Anthony J.; Wilson, Keith S.

    2010-01-01

    Imperfections on the surfaces of crystallization containers are known to influence crystal formation and are thought to do so by helping to overcome the nucleation barrier. The intentional creation of imperfections has been widely applied to induce crystallization of small molecules, but has not been reported for protein crystallization. Here, the crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of the TetR-type aconitase repressor are reported. This regulator was the first transcription factor to be identified in the regulation of the tricarboxylic acid cycle in Corynebacterium glutamicum, an organism that is of special industrial interest and is an emerging model organism for Corynebacterineae. Successful crystallization involved introducing manual scratches on the surface of standard commercial plates, which led to a substantial improvement in crystal nucleation and quality. PMID:20823530

  9. Binding of the N-terminal domain of the lactococcal bacteriophage TP901-1 CI repressor to its target DNA: a crystallography, small angle scattering, and nuclear magnetic resonance study.

    PubMed

    Frandsen, Kristian H; Rasmussen, Kim K; Jensen, Malene Ringkjøbing; Hammer, Karin; Pedersen, Margit; Poulsen, Jens-Christian N; Arleth, Lise; Lo Leggio, Leila

    2013-10-01

    In most temperate bacteriophages, regulation of the choice of lysogenic or lytic life cycle is controlled by a CI repressor protein. Inhibition of transcription is dependent on a helix-turn-helix motif, often located in the N-terminal domain (NTD), which binds to specific DNA sequences (operator sites). Here the crystal structure of the NTD of the CI repressor from phage TP901-1 has been determined at 1.6 Å resolution, and at 2.6 Å resolution in complex with a 9 bp double-stranded DNA fragment that constitutes a half-site of the OL operator. This N-terminal construct, comprising residues 2-74 of the CI repressor, is monomeric in solution as shown by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), small angle X-ray scattering, and gel filtration and is monomeric in the crystal structures. The binding interface between the NTD and the half-site in the crystal is very similar to the interface that can be mapped by NMR in solution with a full palindromic site. The interactions seen in the complexes (in the crystal and in solution) explain the observed affinity for the OR site that is lower than that for the OL site and the specificity for the recognized DNA sequence in comparison to that for other repressors. Compared with many well-studied phage repressor systems, the NTD from TP901-1 CI has a longer extended scaffolding helix that, interestingly, is strongly conserved in putative repressors of Gram-positive pathogens. On the basis of sequence comparisons, we suggest that these bacteria also possess repressor/antirepressor systems similar to that found in phage TP901-1. PMID:24047404

  10. The tryptophan repressor sequence is highly conserved among the Enterobacteriaceae.

    PubMed Central

    Arvidson, D N; Arvidson, C G; Lawson, C L; Miner, J; Adams, C; Youderian, P

    1994-01-01

    Tryptophan biosynthesis in Escherichia coli is regulated by the product of the trpR gene, the tryptophan (Trp) repressor. Trp aporepressor binds the corepressor, L-tryptophan, to form a holorepressor complex, which binds trp operator DNA tightly, and inhibits transcription of the tryptophan biosynthetic operon. The conservation of trp operator sequences among enteric Gram-negative bacteria suggests that trpR genes from other bacterial species can be cloned by complementation in E. coli. To clone trpR homologues, a deletion of the E. coli trpR gene, delta trpR504, was made on a plasmid by site-directed mutagenesis, then crossed onto the E. coli genome. Plasmid clones of the trpR genes of Enterobacter aerogenes and Enterobacter cloacae were isolated by complementation of the delta trpR504 allele, scored as the ability to repress beta-galactosidase synthesis from a prophage-borne trpE-lacZ gene fusion. The predicted amino acid sequences of four enteric TrpR proteins show differences, clustered on the backside of the folded repressor, opposite the DNA-binding helix-turn-helix substructures. These differences are predicted to have little effect on the interactions of the aporepressor with tryptophan, holorepressor with operator DNA, or tandemly bound holorepressor dimers with one another. Although there is some variation observed at the dimer interface, interactions predicted to stabilize the interface are conserved. The phylogenetic relationships revealed by the TrpR amino acid sequence alignment agree with the results of others. PMID:8208606

  11. Crystal structure of the lactose operon repressor and its complexes with DNA and inducer

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, M.; Chang, G.; Horton, N.C.

    1996-03-01

    The lac operon of Escherichia coli is the paradigm for gene regulation. Its key component is the lac repressor a product of the lacl gene. The three-dimensional structures of the intact lac repressor, the lac repressor bound to the gratuitous inducer isopropyl-B-D-1thiogalactoside (IPTG) and the lac repressor complexed with a 21 base pair symmetric operator DNA have been determined. These three structures show the conformation of the molecule in both the induced and the repressed states and provide a framework for understanding a wealth of biochemical and genetic information. The DNA sequence of the lac operon has three lac repressor recognition sites in stretch of 500 base pairs. The crystallographic structure of the complex with DNA suggests that the tetrameric repressor functions synergistically with catabolite gene activator protein (CAP) and participates in the quarternary formation of repression loops in which one tetrameric repressor interacts simultaneously with two sites in the genomic DNA. 76 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Mutually repressing repressor functions and multi-layered cellular heterogeneity regulate the bistable Salmonella fliC census

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Mary K.; Cookson, Brad T.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Bistable flagellar and virulence gene expression generates specialized Salmonella subpopulations with distinct functions. Repressing flagellar genes allows Salmonella to evade caspase-1 mediated host defenses and enhances systemic colonization. By definition, bistability arises when intermediate states of gene expression are rendered unstable by the underlying genetic circuitry. We demonstrate sustained bistable fliC expression in virulent Salmonella 14028 and document dynamic control of the distribution, or single-cell census, of flagellar gene expression by the mutually repressing repressors YdiV and FliZ. YdiV partitions cells into the fliC-OFF subpopulation, while FliZ partitions cells into the fliC-HIGH subpopulation at late timepoints during growth. Bistability of ΔfliZ populations and ydiV-independent FliZ control of flagellar gene expression provide evidence that the YdiV-FliZ mutually repressing repressor circuit is not required for bistability. Repression and activation by YdiV and FliZ (respectively) can shape the census of fliC expression independently, and bistability collapses into a predominantly intermediate population in the absence of both regulators. Metered expression of YdiV and FliZ reveals variable sensitivity to these regulators and defines conditions where expression of FliZ enhances fliC expression and where FliZ does not alter the fliC census. Thus, this evolved genetic circuitry coordinates multiple layers of regulatory heterogeneity into a binary response. PMID:25315056

  13. Radiation-induced tetramer-to-dimer transition of Escherichia coli lactose repressor.

    PubMed

    Goffinont, S; Davidkova, M; Spotheim-Maurizot, M

    2009-08-21

    The wild type lactose repressor of Escherichia coli is a tetrameric protein formed by two identical dimers. They are associated via a C-terminal 4-helix bundle (called tetramerization domain) whose stability is ensured by the interaction of leucine zipper motifs. Upon in vitro gamma-irradiation the repressor losses its ability to bind the operator DNA sequence due to damage of its DNA-binding domains. Using an engineered dimeric repressor for comparison, we show here that irradiation induces also the change of repressor oligomerisation state from tetramer to dimer. The splitting of the tetramer into dimers can result from the oxidation of the leucine residues of the tetramerization domain. PMID:19520056

  14. Ni2+-based immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography of lactose operon repressor protein from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Velkov, Tony; Jones, Alun; Lim, Maria L R

    2008-01-01

    A two-step chromatographic sequence is described for the purification of native lactose operon repressor protein from Escherichia coli cells. The first step involves Ni(2+)-based immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography of the soluble cytoplasmic extract. This method provides superior speed, resolution and yield than the established phosphocellulose cation-exchange chromatographic procedure. Anion-exchange chromatography is used for further purification to >95% purity. The identity and purity of the lactose repressor protein were demonstrated using sodium dodecylsulphate polyacrylamide electrophoresis, crystallization, tryptic finger-printing mass spectrometry, and inducer binding assays. The purified lac repressor exhibited inducer sensitivity for operator DNA binding and undergoes a conformational change upon inducer binding. By all these extensive biochemical criteria, the purified protein behaves exactly as that described for the Escherichia coli lactose operon repressor. PMID:18800304

  15. REST is a hypoxia-responsive transcriptional repressor

    PubMed Central

    Cavadas, Miguel A. S.; Mesnieres, Marion; Crifo, Bianca; Manresa, Mario C.; Selfridge, Andrew C.; Keogh, Ciara E.; Fabian, Zsolt; Scholz, Carsten C.; Nolan, Karen A.; Rocha, Liliane M. A.; Tambuwala, Murtaza M.; Brown, Stuart; Wdowicz, Anita; Corbett, Danielle; Murphy, Keith J.; Godson, Catherine; Cummins, Eoin P.; Taylor, Cormac T.; Cheong, Alex

    2016-01-01

    Cellular exposure to hypoxia results in altered gene expression in a range of physiologic and pathophysiologic states. Discrete cohorts of genes can be either up- or down-regulated in response to hypoxia. While the Hypoxia-Inducible Factor (HIF) is the primary driver of hypoxia-induced adaptive gene expression, less is known about the signalling mechanisms regulating hypoxia-dependent gene repression. Using RNA-seq, we demonstrate that equivalent numbers of genes are induced and repressed in human embryonic kidney (HEK293) cells. We demonstrate that nuclear localization of the Repressor Element 1-Silencing Transcription factor (REST) is induced in hypoxia and that REST is responsible for regulating approximately 20% of the hypoxia-repressed genes. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation assays we demonstrate that REST-dependent gene repression is at least in part mediated by direct binding to the promoters of target genes. Based on these data, we propose that REST is a key mediator of gene repression in hypoxia. PMID:27531581

  16. REST is a hypoxia-responsive transcriptional repressor.

    PubMed

    Cavadas, Miguel A S; Mesnieres, Marion; Crifo, Bianca; Manresa, Mario C; Selfridge, Andrew C; Keogh, Ciara E; Fabian, Zsolt; Scholz, Carsten C; Nolan, Karen A; Rocha, Liliane M A; Tambuwala, Murtaza M; Brown, Stuart; Wdowicz, Anita; Corbett, Danielle; Murphy, Keith J; Godson, Catherine; Cummins, Eoin P; Taylor, Cormac T; Cheong, Alex

    2016-01-01

    Cellular exposure to hypoxia results in altered gene expression in a range of physiologic and pathophysiologic states. Discrete cohorts of genes can be either up- or down-regulated in response to hypoxia. While the Hypoxia-Inducible Factor (HIF) is the primary driver of hypoxia-induced adaptive gene expression, less is known about the signalling mechanisms regulating hypoxia-dependent gene repression. Using RNA-seq, we demonstrate that equivalent numbers of genes are induced and repressed in human embryonic kidney (HEK293) cells. We demonstrate that nuclear localization of the Repressor Element 1-Silencing Transcription factor (REST) is induced in hypoxia and that REST is responsible for regulating approximately 20% of the hypoxia-repressed genes. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation assays we demonstrate that REST-dependent gene repression is at least in part mediated by direct binding to the promoters of target genes. Based on these data, we propose that REST is a key mediator of gene repression in hypoxia. PMID:27531581

  17. Predicting stability of Arc repressor mutants with protein stochastic moments.

    PubMed

    González-Díaz, Humberto; Uriarte, Eugenio; Ramos de Armas, Ronal

    2005-01-17

    As more and more protein structures are determined and applied to drug manufacture, there is increasing interest in studying their stability. In this study, the stochastic moments ((SR)pi(k)) of 53 Arc repressor mutants were introduced as molecular descriptors modeling protein stability. The Linear Discriminant Analysis model developed correctly classified 43 out of 53, 81.13% of proteins according to their thermal stability. More specifically, the model classified 20/28 (71.4%) proteins with near wild-type stability and 23/25 (92%) proteins with reduced stability. Moreover, validation of the model was carried out by re-substitution procedures (81.0%). In addition, the stochastic moments based model compared favorably with respect to others based on physicochemical and geometric parameters such as D-Fire potential, surface area, volume, partition coefficient, and molar refractivity, which presented less than 77% of accuracy. This result illustrates the possibilities of the stochastic moments' method for the study of bioorganic and medicinal chemistry relevant proteins. PMID:15598555

  18. Electrostatic forces contribute to interactions between trp repressor dimers.

    PubMed Central

    Martin, K S; Royer, C A; Howard, K P; Carey, J; Liu, Y C; Matthews, K; Heyduk, E; Lee, J C

    1994-01-01

    The trp repressor of Escherichia coli (TR), although generally considered to be dimeric, has been shown by fluorescence anisotropy of extrinsically labeled protein to undergo oligomerization in solution at protein concentrations in the micromolar range (Fernando, T., and C. A. Royer 1992. Biochemistry. 31:3429-3441). Providing evidence that oligomerization is an intrinsic property of TR, the present studies using chemical cross-linking, analytical ultracentrifugation, and molecular sieve chromatography demonstrate that unmodified TR dimers form higher order aggregates. Tetramers and higher order species were observed in chemical cross-linking experiments at concentrations between 1 and 40 microM. Results from analytical ultracentrifugation and gel filtration chromatography were consistent with average molecular weight values between tetramer and dimer, although no plateaus in the association were evident over the concentration ranges studied, indicating that higher order species are populated. Analytical ultracentrifugation data in presence of corepressor imply that corepressor binding destabilizes the higher order aggregates, an observation that is consistent with the earlier fluorescence work. Through the investigation of the salt and pH dependence of oligomerization, the present studies have revealed an electrostatic component to the interactions between TR dimers. Images FIGURE 1 PMID:8038388

  19. A direct fate exclusion mechanism by Sonic hedgehog-regulated transcriptional repressors.

    PubMed

    Nishi, Yuichi; Zhang, Xiaoxiao; Jeong, Jieun; Peterson, Kevin A; Vedenko, Anastasia; Bulyk, Martha L; Hide, Winston A; McMahon, Andrew P

    2015-10-01

    Sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling patterns the vertebrate spinal cord by activating a group of transcriptional repressors in distinct neural progenitors of somatic motor neuron and interneuron subtypes. To identify the action of this network, we performed a genome-wide analysis of the regulatory actions of three key ventral determinants in mammalian neural tube patterning: Nkx2.2, Nkx6.1 and Olig2. Previous studies have demonstrated that each factor acts predominantly as a transcriptional repressor, at least in part, to inhibit alternative progenitor fate choices. Here, we reveal broad and direct repression of multiple alternative fates as a general mechanism of repressor action. Additionally, the repressor network targets multiple Shh signaling components providing negative feedback to ongoing Shh signaling. Analysis of chromatin organization around Nkx2.2-, Nkx6.1- and Olig2-bound regions, together with co-analysis of engagement of the transcriptional activator Sox2, indicate that repressors bind to, and probably modulate the action of, neural enhancers. Together, the data suggest a model for neural progenitor specification downstream of Shh signaling, in which Nkx2.2 and Olig2 direct repression of alternative neural progenitor fate determinants, an action augmented by the overlapping activity of Nkx6.1 in each cell type. Integration of repressor and activator inputs, notably activator inputs mediated by Sox2, is probably a key mechanism in achieving cell type-specific transcriptional outcomes in mammalian neural progenitor fate specification. PMID:26293298

  20. Multirepressor Control Systems For Efficient Promoter Regulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, James E.; Chen, Wilfred

    1995-01-01

    Report presents numerical-simulation study, based on molecular-level mathematical models, to evaluate effectiveness of eight different configurations of repressor synthesis control of cloned-product-gene expression initiated from promoter/operator genetic sequence. In study, both single- and dual-repressor situations considered, using genetically structured molecules for lac and IPR promotor/operator in example calculations.

  1. Repressor activity of the RpoS/σS-dependent RNA polymerase requires DNA binding.

    PubMed

    Lévi-Meyrueis, Corinne; Monteil, Véronique; Sismeiro, Odile; Dillies, Marie-Agnès; Kolb, Annie; Monot, Marc; Dupuy, Bruno; Duarte, Sara Serradas; Jagla, Bernd; Coppée, Jean-Yves; Beraud, Mélanie; Norel, Françoise

    2015-02-18

    The RpoS/σ(S) sigma subunit of RNA polymerase (RNAP) activates transcription of stationary phase genes in many Gram-negative bacteria and controls adaptive functions, including stress resistance, biofilm formation and virulence. In this study, we address an important but poorly understood aspect of σ(S)-dependent control, that of a repressor. Negative regulation by σ(S) has been proposed to result largely from competition between σ(S) and other σ factors for binding to a limited amount of core RNAP (E). To assess whether σ(S) binding to E alone results in significant downregulation of gene expression by other σ factors, we characterized an rpoS mutant of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium producing a σ(S) protein proficient for Eσ(S) complex formation but deficient in promoter DNA binding. Genome expression profiling and physiological assays revealed that this mutant was defective for negative regulation, indicating that gene repression by σ(S) requires its binding to DNA. Although the mechanisms of repression by σ(S) are likely specific to individual genes and environmental conditions, the study of transcription downregulation of the succinate dehydrogenase operon suggests that σ competition at the promoter DNA level plays an important role in gene repression by Eσ(S). PMID:25578965

  2. Repressor activity of the RpoS/σS-dependent RNA polymerase requires DNA binding

    PubMed Central

    Lévi-Meyrueis, Corinne; Monteil, Véronique; Sismeiro, Odile; Dillies, Marie-Agnès; Kolb, Annie; Monot, Marc; Dupuy, Bruno; Duarte, Sara Serradas; Jagla, Bernd; Coppée, Jean-Yves; Beraud, Mélanie; Norel, Françoise

    2015-01-01

    The RpoS/σS sigma subunit of RNA polymerase (RNAP) activates transcription of stationary phase genes in many Gram-negative bacteria and controls adaptive functions, including stress resistance, biofilm formation and virulence. In this study, we address an important but poorly understood aspect of σS-dependent control, that of a repressor. Negative regulation by σS has been proposed to result largely from competition between σS and other σ factors for binding to a limited amount of core RNAP (E). To assess whether σS binding to E alone results in significant downregulation of gene expression by other σ factors, we characterized an rpoS mutant of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium producing a σS protein proficient for EσS complex formation but deficient in promoter DNA binding. Genome expression profiling and physiological assays revealed that this mutant was defective for negative regulation, indicating that gene repression by σS requires its binding to DNA. Although the mechanisms of repression by σS are likely specific to individual genes and environmental conditions, the study of transcription downregulation of the succinate dehydrogenase operon suggests that σ competition at the promoter DNA level plays an important role in gene repression by EσS. PMID:25578965

  3. A chimeric repressor of petunia PH4 R2R3-MYB family transcription factor generates margined flowers in torenia.

    PubMed

    Kasajima, Ichiro; Sasaki, Katsutomo

    2016-05-01

    The development of new phenotypes is key to the commercial development of the main floricultural species and cultivars. Important new phenotypes include features such as multiple-flowers, color variations, increased flower size, new petal shapes, variegation and distinctive petal margin colourations. Although their commercial use is not yet common, the transgenic technologies provide a potentially rapid means of generating interesting new phenotypes. In this report, we construct 5 vectors which we expected to change the color of the flower anthocyanins, from purple to blue, regulating vacuolar pH. When these constructs were transformed into purple torenia, we unexpectedly recovered some genotypes having slightly margined petals. These transgenic lines expressed a chimeric repressor of the petunia PhPH4 gene under the control of Cauliflower mosaic virus 35 S RNA promoter. PhPH4 is an R2R3-type MYB transcription factor. The transgenic lines lacked pigmentation in the petal margin cells both on the adaxial and abaxial surfaces. Expressions of Flavanone 3-hydroxylase (F3H), Flavonoid 3'-hydroxylase (F3'H) and Flavonoid 3'5'-hydroxylase (F3'5'H) genes were reduced in the margins of these transgenic lines, suggesting an inhibitory effect of PhPH4 repressor on anthocyanin synthesis. PMID:27089475

  4. Structure of the effector-binding domain of the arabinose repressor AraR from Bacillus subtilis

    SciTech Connect

    Procházková, Kateřina; Čermáková, Kateřina; Pachl, Petr; Sieglová, Irena; Fábry, Milan; Otwinowski, Zbyszek; Řezáčová, Pavlína

    2012-02-01

    The crystal structure of the effector-binding domain of the transcriptional repressor AraR from B. subtilis in complex with the effector molecule (l-arabinose) was determined at 2.2 Å resolution. A detailed analysis of the crystal identified a dimer organization that is distinctive from that of other members of the GalR/LacI family. In Bacillus subtilis, the arabinose repressor AraR negatively controls the expression of genes in the metabolic pathway of arabinose-containing polysaccharides. The protein is composed of two domains of different phylogenetic origin and function: an N-terminal DNA-binding domain belonging to the GntR family and a C-terminal effector-binding domain that shows similarity to members of the GalR/LacI family. The crystal structure of the C-terminal effector-binding domain of AraR in complex with the effector l-arabinose has been determined at 2.2 Å resolution. The l-arabinose binding affinity was characterized by isothermal titration calorimetry and differential scanning fluorimetry; the K{sub d} value was 8.4 ± 0.4 µM. The effect of l-arabinose on the protein oligomeric state was investigated in solution and detailed analysis of the crystal identified a dimer organization which is distinctive from that of other members of the GalR/LacI family.

  5. Alanine screening mutagenesis establishes the critical inactivating damage of irradiated E. coli lactose repressor.

    PubMed

    Goffinont, Stephane; Villette, Sandrine; Spotheim-Maurizot, Melanie

    2012-06-01

    The function of the E. coli lactose operon requires the binding of lactose repressor to operator DNA. We have previously shown that γ rradiation destabilizes the repressor-operator complex because the repressor loses its DNA-binding ability. It was suggested that the observed oxidation of the four tyrosines (Y7, Y12, Y17, Y47) and the concomitant structural changes of the irradiated DNA-binding domains (headpieces) could be responsible for the inactivation. To pinpoint the tyrosine whose oxidation has the strongest effect, four headpieces containing the product of tyrosine oxidation, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA), were simulated by molecular dynamics. We have observed that replacing Y47 by DOPA triggers the largest change of structure and stability of the headpiece and have concluded that Y47 oxidation is the greatest contributor to the decrease of repressor binding to DNA. To experimentally verify this conclusion, we applied the alanine screening mutagenesis approach. Tetrameric mutated repressors bearing an alanine instead of each one of the tyrosines were prepared and their binding to operator DNA was checked. Their binding ability is quite similar to that of the wild-type repressor, except for the Y47A mutant whose binding is strongly reduced. Circular dichroism determinations revealed small reductions of the proportion of α helices and of the melting temperature for Y7A, Y12A and Y17A headpieces, but much larger ones were revealed for Y47A headpiece. These results established the critical role of Y47 oxidation in modifying the structure and stability of the headpiece, and in reduction of the binding ability of the whole lactose repressor. PMID:22551504

  6. Loss of the co-repressor GPS2 sensitizes macrophage activation upon metabolic stress induced by obesity and type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Fan, Rongrong; Toubal, Amine; Goñi, Saioa; Drareni, Karima; Huang, Zhiqiang; Alzaid, Fawaz; Ballaire, Raphaelle; Ancel, Patricia; Liang, Ning; Damdimopoulos, Anastasios; Hainault, Isabelle; Soprani, Antoine; Aron-Wisnewsky, Judith; Foufelle, Fabienne; Lawrence, Toby; Gautier, Jean-Francois; Venteclef, Nicolas; Treuter, Eckardt

    2016-07-01

    Humans with obesity differ in their susceptibility to developing insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes (T2D). This variation may relate to the extent of adipose tissue (AT) inflammation that develops as their obesity progresses. The state of macrophage activation has a central role in determining the degree of AT inflammation and thus its dysfunction, and these states are driven by epigenomic alterations linked to gene expression. The underlying mechanisms that regulate these alterations, however, are poorly defined. Here we demonstrate that a co-repressor complex containing G protein pathway suppressor 2 (GPS2) crucially controls the macrophage epigenome during activation by metabolic stress. The study of AT from humans with and without obesity revealed correlations between reduced GPS2 expression in macrophages, elevated systemic and AT inflammation, and diabetic status. The causality of this relationship was confirmed by using macrophage-specific Gps2-knockout (KO) mice, in which inappropriate co-repressor complex function caused enhancer activation, pro-inflammatory gene expression and hypersensitivity toward metabolic-stress signals. By contrast, transplantation of GPS2-overexpressing bone marrow into two mouse models of obesity (ob/ob and diet-induced obesity) reduced inflammation and improved insulin sensitivity. Thus, our data reveal a potentially reversible disease mechanism that links co-repressor-dependent epigenomic alterations in macrophages to AT inflammation and the development of T2D. PMID:27270589

  7. Regulator of G-protein signaling - 5 (RGS5) is a novel repressor of hedgehog signaling.

    PubMed

    Mahoney, William M; Gunaje, Jagadambika; Daum, Guenter; Dong, Xiu Rong; Majesky, Mark W

    2013-01-01

    Hedgehog (Hh) signaling plays fundamental roles in morphogenesis, tissue repair, and human disease. Initiation of Hh signaling is controlled by the interaction of two multipass membrane proteins, patched (Ptc) and smoothened (Smo). Recent studies identify Smo as a G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR)-like protein that signals through large G-protein complexes which contain the Gαi subunit. We hypothesize Regulator of G-Protein Signaling (RGS) proteins, and specifically RGS5, are endogenous repressors of Hh signaling via their ability to act as GTPase activating proteins (GAPs) for GTP-bound Gαi, downstream of Smo. In support of this hypothesis, we demonstrate that RGS5 over-expression inhibits sonic hedgehog (Shh)-mediated signaling and osteogenesis in C3H10T1/2 cells. Conversely, signaling is potentiated by siRNA-mediated knock-down of RGS5 expression, but not RGS4 expression. Furthermore, using immuohistochemical analysis and co-immunoprecipitation (Co-IP), we demonstrate that RGS5 is present with Smo in primary cilia. This organelle is required for canonical Hh signaling in mammalian cells, and RGS5 is found in a physical complex with Smo in these cells. We therefore conclude that RGS5 is an endogenous regulator of Hh-mediated signaling and that RGS proteins are potential targets for novel therapeutics in Hh-mediated diseases. PMID:23637832

  8. Myeloid Deletion of Nemo Causes Osteopetrosis in Mice Owing to Upregulation of Transcriptional Repressors

    PubMed Central

    Swarnkar, Gaurav; Shim, Kyuhwan; Nasir, Amjad M.; Seehra, Kuljeet; Chen, Hung-Po (Tim); Mbalaviele, Gabriel; Abu-Amer, Yousef

    2016-01-01

    The transcription factor NF-κB is central to numerous physiologic processes including bone development, and its activation is controlled by IKKγ (also called NEMO), the regulatory subunit of IKK complex. NEMO is X-linked, and mutations in this gene result in Incontinentia Pigmenti in human hemizygous females. In mice, global deficiency causes embryonic lethality. In addition, certain point mutations in the NEMO (IKBKG) human gene manifest skeletal defects implicating NEMO in the regulation of bone homeostasis. To specifically investigate such role, we conditionally deleted Nemo from osteoclast and myeloid progenitors. Morphometric, histologic, and molecular analyses demonstrate that myeloid NEMO deletion causes osteopetrosis in mice. Mechanistically, NEMO deficiency hampered activation of IKK complex in osteoclast precursors, causing arrest of osteoclastogenesis and apoptosis. Interestingly, inhibiting apoptosis by genetic ablation of TNFr1 significantly increased cell survival, but failed to rescue osteoclastogenesis or reverse osteopetrosis. Based on this observation, we analyzed the expression of different regulators of osteoclastogenesis and discovered that NEMO deletion leads to increased RBPJ expression, resulting in a decrease of Blimp1 expression. Consequently, expression of IRF8 and Bcl6 which are targets of Blimp1 and potent osteoclastogenic transcriptional repressors, is increased. Thus, NEMO governs survival and osteoclast differentiation programs through serial regulation of multiple transcription factors. PMID:27435916

  9. Restrained expression, a method to overproduce toxic membrane proteins by exploiting operator-repressor interactions.

    PubMed

    Narayanan, Anoop; Ridilla, Marc; Yernool, Dinesh A

    2011-01-01

    A major rate-limiting step in determining structures of membrane proteins is heterologous protein production. Toxicity often associated with rapid overexpression results in reduced biomass along with low yields of target protein. Mitigation of toxic effects was achieved using a method we call "restrained expression," a controlled reduction in the frequency of transcription initiation by exploiting the infrequent transitions of Lac repressor to a free state from its complex with the lac-operator site within a T7lac promoter that occur in the absence of the inducer isopropyl β-D-1-thiogalactopyranoside. In addition, production of the T7 RNA polymerase that drives transcription of the target is limited using the tightly regulated arabinose promoter in Escherichia coli strain BL21-AI. Using this approach, we can achieve a 200-fold range of green fluorescent protein expression levels. Application to members of a family of ion pumps results in 5- to 25-fold increases in expression over the benchmark BL21(DE3) host strain. A viral ion channel highly toxic to E. coli can also be overexpressed. In comparative analyses, restrained expression outperforms commonly used E. coli expression strategies. The mechanism underlying improved target protein yield arises from minimization of protein aggregation and proteolysis that reduce membrane integrity and cell viability. This study establishes a method to overexpress toxic proteins. PMID:21031485

  10. Ultrafast force-clamp spectroscopy to probe lac repressor-DNA interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monico, Carina; Capitanio, Marco; Belcastro, Gionata; Vanzi, Francesco; Pavone, Francesco S.

    2013-06-01

    We recently developed an ultrafast force-clamp laser trap capable to probe, under controlled force, bimolecular interactions with unprecedented temporal resolution. Here we present the technique in the framework of protein-DNA interactions, specifically on Lactose repressor protein (LacI). The high temporal resolution of the method reveals the kinetics of both short- and long-lived interactions of LacI along the DNA template (from ˜100 μs to tens of seconds), as well the dependence on force of such interaction kinetics. The two kinetically well-distinct populations of interactions observed clearly represent specific interactions with the operator sequences and a fast scanning of LacI along non-cognate DNA. These results demonstrate the effectiveness of the method to study the sequence-dependent affinity of DNA-binding proteins along the DNA and the effects of force on a wide range of interaction durations, including μs time scales not accessible to other single-molecule methods. This improvement in time resolution provides also important means of investigation on the long-puzzled mechanism of target search on DNA and possible protein conformational changes occurring upon target recognition.

  11. Myeloid Deletion of Nemo Causes Osteopetrosis in Mice Owing to Upregulation of Transcriptional Repressors.

    PubMed

    Swarnkar, Gaurav; Shim, Kyuhwan; Nasir, Amjad M; Seehra, Kuljeet; Chen, Hung-Po Tim; Mbalaviele, Gabriel; Abu-Amer, Yousef

    2016-01-01

    The transcription factor NF-κB is central to numerous physiologic processes including bone development, and its activation is controlled by IKKγ (also called NEMO), the regulatory subunit of IKK complex. NEMO is X-linked, and mutations in this gene result in Incontinentia Pigmenti in human hemizygous females. In mice, global deficiency causes embryonic lethality. In addition, certain point mutations in the NEMO (IKBKG) human gene manifest skeletal defects implicating NEMO in the regulation of bone homeostasis. To specifically investigate such role, we conditionally deleted Nemo from osteoclast and myeloid progenitors. Morphometric, histologic, and molecular analyses demonstrate that myeloid NEMO deletion causes osteopetrosis in mice. Mechanistically, NEMO deficiency hampered activation of IKK complex in osteoclast precursors, causing arrest of osteoclastogenesis and apoptosis. Interestingly, inhibiting apoptosis by genetic ablation of TNFr1 significantly increased cell survival, but failed to rescue osteoclastogenesis or reverse osteopetrosis. Based on this observation, we analyzed the expression of different regulators of osteoclastogenesis and discovered that NEMO deletion leads to increased RBPJ expression, resulting in a decrease of Blimp1 expression. Consequently, expression of IRF8 and Bcl6 which are targets of Blimp1 and potent osteoclastogenic transcriptional repressors, is increased. Thus, NEMO governs survival and osteoclast differentiation programs through serial regulation of multiple transcription factors. PMID:27435916

  12. Functional analysis of NsrR, a nitric oxide sensing Rrf2 repressor in Neisseria gonorrhoeae

    PubMed Central

    Isabella, Vincent M.; Lapek, John D.; Kennedy, Edward M.; Clark, Virginia L.

    2008-01-01

    Nitric oxide has been shown to be an important component of the human immune response, and as such, it is important to understand how pathogenic organisms respond to its presence. In Neisseria gonorrhoeae, recent work has revealed that NsrR, an Rrf2-type transcriptional repressor, can sense NO and control the expression of genes responsible for NO metabolism. A highly pure extract of epitope tagged NsrR was isolated and mass spectroscopic analysis suggested that the protein contained a [2Fe-2S] cluster. NsrR/DNA interactions were thoroughly analyzed in vitro. Using EMSA analysis, NsrR::FLAG was shown to interact with predicted operators in the norB, aniA, and nsrR upstream regions with a Kd of 7 nM, 19 nM, and 35 nM respectively. DNase I footprint analysis was performed on the upstream regions of norB and nsrR, where NsrR was shown to protect the predicted 29 bp binding sites. The presence of exogenously added NO inhibited DNA binding by NsrR. Alanine substitution of C90, C97, or C103 in NsrR abrogated repression of norB::lacZ and inhibited DNA binding, consistent with their presumed role in coordination of a NO-sensitive Fe-S center required for DNA binding. PMID:19007408

  13. EGR1 Functions as a Potent Repressor of MEF2 Transcriptional Activity

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Olivia; Kontor, Akuah; Nocco, Sarah E.; Naya, Francisco J.

    2015-01-01

    The myocyte enhancer factor 2 (MEF2) transcription factor requires interactions with co-factors for precise regulation of its target genes. Our lab previously reported that the mammalian MEF2A isoform regulates the cardiomyocyte costamere, a critical muscle-specific focal adhesion complex involved in contractility, through its transcriptional control of genes encoding proteins localized to this cytoskeletal structure. To further dissect the transcriptional mechanisms of costamere gene regulation and identify potential co-regulators of MEF2A, a bioinformatics analysis of transcription factor binding sites was performed using the proximal promoter regions of selected costamere genes. One of these predicted sites belongs to the early growth response (EGR) transcription factor family. The EGR1 isoform has been shown to be involved in a number of pathways in cardiovascular homeostasis and disease, making it an intriguing candidate MEF2 coregulator to further characterize. Here, we demonstrate that EGR1 interacts with MEF2A and is a potent and specific repressor of MEF2 transcriptional activity. Furthermore, we show that costamere gene expression in cardiomyocytes is dependent on EGR1 transcriptional activity. This study identifies a mechanism by which MEF2 activity can be modulated to ensure that costamere gene expression is maintained at levels commensurate with cardiomyocyte contractile activity. PMID:26011708

  14. The Brm-HDAC3-Erm repressor complex suppresses dedifferentiation in Drosophila type II neuroblast lineages

    PubMed Central

    Koe, Chwee Tat; Li, Song; Rossi, Fabrizio; Wong, Jack Jing Lin; Wang, Yan; Zhang, Zhizhuo; Chen, Keng; Aw, Sherry Shiying; Richardson, Helena E; Robson, Paul; Sung, Wing-Kin; Yu, Fengwei; Gonzalez, Cayetano; Wang, Hongyan

    2014-01-01

    The control of self-renewal and differentiation of neural stem and progenitor cells is a crucial issue in stem cell and cancer biology. Drosophila type II neuroblast lineages are prone to developing impaired neuroblast homeostasis if the limited self-renewing potential of intermediate neural progenitors (INPs) is unrestrained. Here, we demonstrate that Drosophila SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling Brahma (Brm) complex functions cooperatively with another chromatin remodeling factor, Histone deacetylase 3 (HDAC3) to suppress the formation of ectopic type II neuroblasts. We show that multiple components of the Brm complex and HDAC3 physically associate with Earmuff (Erm), a type II-specific transcription factor that prevents dedifferentiation of INPs into neuroblasts. Consistently, the predicted Erm-binding motif is present in most of known binding loci of Brm. Furthermore, brm and hdac3 genetically interact with erm to prevent type II neuroblast overgrowth. Thus, the Brm-HDAC3-Erm repressor complex suppresses dedifferentiation of INPs back into type II neuroblasts. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01906.001 PMID:24618901

  15. Allosteric inhibition of a zinc-sensing transcriptional repressor: Insights into the arsenic repressor (ArsR) family

    PubMed Central

    Campanello, Gregory C.; Ma, Zhen; Grossoehme, Nicholas E.; Guerra, Alfredo J.; Ward, Brian P.; DiMarchi, Richard D.; Ye, Yuzhen; Dann, Charles E.; Giedroc, David P.

    2013-01-01

    The molecular basis of allosteric regulation remains a subject of intense interest. Staphylococcus aureus CzrA is a member of the ubiquitous arsenic repressor (ArsR) family of bacterial homodimeric metal sensing proteins, and has emerged as a model system for understanding allosteric regulation of operator DNA binding by transition metal ions. Using unnatural amino acid substitution and a standard linkage analysis, we show that a His97’ NHε2•••O=C-His67 quaternary structural hydrogen bond is an energetically significant contributor to the magnitude of the allosteric coupling free energy, ΔGc. A “cavity” introduced just beneath this hydrogen bond in V66A/L68V CzrA results in a dramatic loss of regulation by Zn(II) despite adopting a wild-type global structure and Zn(II) binding and DNA binding affinities only minimally affected from wild-type. The energetics of Zn(II) binding and heterotropic coupling free energies (ΔHc, −TΔSc) of the double mutant are also radically altered and suggest that increased internal dynamics leads to poorer allosteric negative regulation in V66A/L68V CzrA. A statistical coupling analysis of 3000 ArsR proteins reveals a sector that links the DNA-binding determinants and the α5 Zn(II) sensing sites through V66/L68 in CzrA. We propose that distinct regulatory sites uniquely characteristic of individual ArsR proteins results from evolution of distinct connectivities to this sector, each capable of driving the same biological outcome, transcriptional derepression. PMID:23353829

  16. A novel GDNF-inducible gene, BMZF3, encodes a transcriptional repressor associated with KAP-1

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Chikage; Murakumo, Yoshiki Kawase, Yukari; Sato, Tomoko; Morinaga, Takatoshi; Fukuda, Naoyuki; Enomoto, Atsushi; Ichihara, Masatoshi; Takahashi, Masahide

    2008-02-01

    The Krueppel-associated box (KRAB)-containing zinc finger proteins (ZFPs) comprise the largest family of zinc finger transcription factors that function as transcriptional repressors. In the study of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF)-RET signaling, we have identified bone marrow zinc finger 3 (BMZF3), encoding a KRAB-ZFP, as a GDNF-inducible gene by differential display analysis. The expression of BMZF3 transcripts in the human neuroblastoma cell line TGW increased 1 h after GDNF stimulation, as determined by Northern blotting and quantitative reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. The BMZF3 possesses transcriptional repressor activity in the KRAB domain. BMZF3 interacts with a co-repressor protein, KRAB-associated protein 1 (KAP-1), through the KRAB domain and siRNA-mediated knockdown of KAP-1 abolished the transcriptional repressor activity of BMZF3, indicating that KAP-1 is necessary for BMZF3 function. Furthermore, siRNA-mediated silencing of BMZF3 inhibited cell proliferation. These findings suggest that BMZF3 is a transcriptional repressor induced by GDNF that plays a role in cell proliferation.

  17. Comparing native and irradiated E. coli lactose repressor-operator complex by molecular dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Aci-Sèche, Samia; Garnier, Norbert; Goffinont, Stéphane; Genest, Daniel; Spotheim-Maurizot, Mélanie; Genest, Monique

    2010-09-01

    The function of the E. coli lactose operon requires the binding of the tetrameric repressor protein to the operator DNA. We have previously shown that gamma-irradiation destabilises the repressor-operator complex because the repressor gradually loses its DNA-binding ability (Radiat Res 170:604-612, 2008). It was suggested that the observed oxidation of tyrosine residues and the concomitant structural changes of irradiated headpieces (DNA-binding domains of repressor monomers) could be responsible for the inactivation. To unravel the mechanisms that lead to repressor-operator complex destabilisation when tyrosine oxidation occurs, we have compared by molecular dynamic simulations two complexes: (1) the native complex formed by two headpieces and the operator DNA, and (2) the damaged complex, in which all tyrosines are replaced by their oxidation product 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA). On a 20 ns time scale, MD results show effects consistent with complex destabilisation: increased flexibility, increased DNA bending, modification of the hydrogen bond network, and decrease of the positive electrostatic potential at the protein surface and of the global energy of DNA-protein interactions. PMID:20349312

  18. Crystal Structure of the lamda Repressor and a Model for Pairwise Cooperative Operator Binding

    SciTech Connect

    Stayrook,S.; Jaru-Ampornpan, P.; Ni, J.; Hochschild, A.; Lewis, M.

    2008-01-01

    Bacteriophage {lambda} has for many years been a model system for understanding mechanisms of gene regulation1. A 'genetic switch' enables the phage to transition from lysogenic growth to lytic development when triggered by specific environmental conditions. The key component of the switch is the cI repressor, which binds to two sets of three operator sites on the chromosome that are separated by about 2,400 base pairs (bp)2, 3. A hallmark of the system is the pairwise cooperativity of repressor binding4. In the absence of detailed structural information, it has been difficult to understand fully how repressor molecules establish the cooperativity complex. Here we present the X-ray crystal structure of the intact cI repressor dimer bound to a DNA operator site. The structure of the repressor, determined by multiple isomorphous replacement methods, reveals an unusual overall architecture that allows it to adopt a conformation that appears to facilitate pairwise cooperative binding to adjacent operator sites.

  19. Interconvertible lac repressor-DNA loops revealed by single-molecule experiments.

    PubMed

    Wong, Oi Kwan; Guthold, Martin; Erie, Dorothy A; Gelles, Jeff

    2008-09-30

    At many promoters, transcription is regulated by simultaneous binding of a protein to multiple sites on DNA, but the structures and dynamics of such transcription factor-mediated DNA loops are poorly understood. We directly examined in vitro loop formation mediated by Escherichia coli lactose repressor using single-molecule structural and kinetics methods. Small ( approximately 150 bp) loops form quickly and stably, even with out-of-phase operator spacings. Unexpectedly, repeated spontaneous transitions between two distinct loop structures were observed in individual protein-DNA complexes. The results imply a dynamic equilibrium between a novel loop structure with the repressor in its crystallographic "V" conformation and a second structure with a more extended linear repressor conformation that substantially lessens the DNA bending strain. The ability to switch between different loop structures may help to explain how robust transcription regulation is maintained even though the mechanical work required to form a loop may change substantially with metabolic conditions. PMID:18828671

  20. Interconvertible Lac Repressor--DNA Loops Revealed by Single-Molecule Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guthold, Martin

    2009-03-01

    At many promoters, transcription is regulated by simultaneous binding of a protein to multiple sites on DNA, but the structures and dynamics of such transcription factor-mediated DNA loops are poorly understood. We directly examined in vitro loop formation mediated by E. coli lactose repressor using single-molecule structural and kinetics methods. Small (150 bp) loops form quickly and stably, even with out-of-phase operator spacings. Unexpectedly, repeated spontaneous transitions between two distinct loop structures were observed in individual protein--DNA complexes. The results imply a dynamic equilibrium between a novel loop structure with the repressor in its crystallographic ``V'' conformation and a second structure with a more extended linear repressor conformation that substantially lessens the DNA bending strain. The ability to switch between different loop structures may help to explain how robust transcription regulation is maintained even though the mechanical work required to form a loop may change substantially with metabolic conditions.

  1. The trigger enzyme PepA (aminopeptidase A) of Escherichia coli, a transcriptional repressor that generates positive supercoiling.

    PubMed

    Nguyen Le Minh, Phu; Nadal, Marc; Charlier, Daniel

    2016-06-01

    Escherichia coli aminopeptidase A (PepA) is a trigger enzyme endowed with catalytic activity and DNA-binding properties prominent in transcriptional regulation and site-specific DNA recombination. The current work demonstrates that PepA is a repressor in its own right, capable of specifically inhibiting transcription initiation at promoter P1 of the carAB operon, encoding carbamoylphosphate synthase. Furthermore, in vitro topology studies performed with DNA minicircles demonstrate that PepA binding constrains a single positive supercoil in the carP1 control region. Such a topological event is understood to constitute an impediment to transcription initiation and may serve as a mechanism to regulate gene expression. PMID:27213286

  2. Neither Two-State nor Three-State: Dimerization of Lambda Cro Repressor.

    PubMed

    Yao, John; Wang, Jin

    2015-06-01

    Lambda Cro repressor is one of the best studied dimeric transcription factors. However, there has still been an unsettled debate for decades about whether it is a two-state dimer or three-state dimer. We provide a new mechanism model that can reconcile these seemingly conflicting (mutually exclusive) experimental results. From simulations with all-atom structure-based model, we observe that the dimerization process of Lambda Cro repressor starts from one folded monomer with one unfolded monomer. Intrasubunit folding and intersubunit binding are partially coupled, in a fly casting manner. PMID:26266496

  3. Superinduction of metallothionein I by inhibition of protein synthesis: role of a labile repressor in MTF-1 mediated gene transcription.

    PubMed

    Bi, Yongyi; Lin, Gary X; Millecchia, Lyndell; Ma, Qiang

    2006-01-01

    Induction of metallothioneins (MTs) through the metal-activated transcription factor-1 (MTF-1) provides a model response for analyzing transcriptional gene regulation by heavy metals. Here, we report inhibition of protein synthesis by cycloheximide (CHX) increases induction of Mt1 by approximately five-fold, a phenomenon designated as "superinduction." Characterization of superinduction revealed it is time- and concentration-dependent of CHX, requires the presence of an MTF-1 activator, and occurs at a transcriptional level, suggesting a labile repressor in the control of Mt1 induction. Genetic analyses using Mtf1 null cells and a metal response element (MRE)-driven reporter construct showed that superinduction of Mt1 is mediated through MTF-1 and MRE-dependent transcription. Analyses of intracellular zinc content by inductively coupled plasma emission spectroscopy and fluorescence imaging demonstrated that treatment with CHX alone or CHX plus an inducer does not increase the total zinc accumulation or the concentration of free zinc in cells under the conditions in which superinduction occurs. Moreover, superinduction was observed in cells cultured in a zinc-depleted medium, suggesting that superinduction does not involve elevation of intracellular zinc concentration. Northern blotting showed that Cd, CHX, or Cd + CHX does not affect the expression of the mRNA of MTF-1. Immunoblotting using antibodies specific for MTF-1 demonstrated that Cd induces a down-regulation of the MTF-1 protein, whereas cotreatment with Cd and CHX blocked the Cd-induced degradation of MTF-1. The findings reveal a new mechanistic aspect of the superinduction of Mt1, in which a labile repressor negatively controls agonist-induced turnover of the MTF-1 protein. PMID:16615093

  4. Role of the lytic repressor in prophage induction of phage lambda as analyzed by a module-replacement approach.

    PubMed

    Atsumi, Shota; Little, John W

    2006-03-21

    Using a module exchange approach, we have tested a long-standing model for the role of Cro repressor in lambda prophage induction. This epigenetic switch from lysogeny to the lytic state occurs on activation of the host SOS system, which leads to specific cleavage of CI repressor. It has been proposed that Cro repressor, which operates during lytic growth and which we shall term the lytic repressor, is crucial to prophage induction. In this view, Cro binds to the O(R)3 operator, thereby repressing the cI gene and making the switch irreversible. Here we tested this model by replacing lambda Cro with a dimeric form of Lac repressor and adding several lac operators. This approach allowed us to regulate the function of the lytic repressor at will and to prevent it from repressing cI, because lac repressor could not repress P(RM) in our constructs. Repression of cI by the lytic repressor was not required for prophage induction to occur. However, our evidence suggests that this binding can make induction more efficient, particularly at intermediate levels of DNA damage that otherwise cause induction of only a fraction of the population. These results indicate that this strategy of module exchange will have broad applications for analysis of gene regulatory circuits. PMID:16537413

  5. Role of the Cro repressor carboxy-terminal domain and flexible dimer linkage in operator and nonspecific DNA binding.

    PubMed

    Hubbard, A J; Bracco, L P; Eisenbeis, S J; Gayle, R B; Beaton, G; Caruthers, M H

    1990-10-01

    A series of mutations comprising single and multiple substitutions, deletions, and extensions within the carboxy-terminal domain of the bacteriophage lambda Cro repressor have been constructed. These mutations generally affect the affinity of repressor for specific and nonspecific DNA. Additionally, substitution of the carboxy-terminal alanine with several amino acids capable of hydrogen-bonding interactions leads to improved specific binding affinities. A mutation is also described whereby cysteine links the two Cro monomers by a disulfide bond. As a consequence, a significant improvement in nonspecific binding and a concomitant reduction in specific binding are observed with this mutant. These results provide evidence that the carboxy terminus of Cro repressor is an important DNA binding domain and that a flexible connection between the two repressor monomers is a critical factor in modulating the affinity of wild-type repressor for DNA. PMID:2271592

  6. Association between polymorphisms in the aryl hydrocarbon receptor repressor gene and disseminated testicular germ cell cancer

    PubMed Central

    Brokken, Leon J. S.; Lundberg-Giwercman, Yvonne; Meyts, Ewa Rajpert-De; Eberhard, Jakob; Ståhl, Olof; Cohn-Cedermark, Gabriella; Daugaard, Gedske; Arver, Stefan; Giwercman, Aleksander

    2013-01-01

    In the Western world, testicular germ cell cancer (TGCC) is the most common malignancy of young men. The malignant transformation of germ cells is thought to be caused by developmental and hormonal disturbances, probably related to environmental and lifestyle factors because of rapidly increasing incidence of TGCC in some countries. Additionally, there is a strong genetic component that affects susceptibility. However, genetic polymorphisms that have been identified so far only partially explain the risk of TGCC. Many of the persistent environmental pollutants act through the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR). AHR signaling pathway is known to interfere with reproductive hormone signaling, which is supposed to play a role in the pathogenesis and invasive progression of TGCC. The aim of the present study was to identify whether AHR-related polymorphisms were associated with risk as well as histological and clinical features of TGCC in 367 patients and 537 controls. Haplotype-tagging single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were genotyped in genes encoding AHR and AHR repressor (AHRR). Binary logistic regression was used to calculate the risk of TGCC, non-seminoma versus seminoma, and metastasis versus localized disease. Four SNPs in AHRR demonstrated a significant allele association with risk to develop metastases (rs2466287: OR = 0.43, 95% CI 0.21–0.90; rs2672725: OR = 0.49, 95% CI: 0.25–0.94; rs6879758: OR = 0.27, 95% CI: 0.08–0.92; rs6896163: OR = 0.34, 95% CI: 0.12–0.98). This finding supports the hypothesis that compounds acting through AHR may play a role in the invasive progression of TGCC, either directly or through modification of reproductive hormone action. PMID:23420531

  7. Molecular Binding Mechanism of TtgR Repressor to Antibiotics and Antimicrobials

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez-Escamilla, Ana Maria; Fernandez-Ballester, Gregorio; Morel, Bertrand; Casares-Atienza, Salvador; Ramos, Juan Luis

    2015-01-01

    A disturbing phenomenon in contemporary medicine is the prevalence of multidrug-resistant pathogenic bacteria. Efflux pumps contribute strongly to this antimicrobial drug resistance, which leads to the subsequent failure of clinical treatments. The TtgR protein of Pseudomonas putida is a HTH-type transcriptional repressor that controls expression of the TtgABC efflux pump, which is the main contributor to resistance against several antimicrobials and toxic compounds in this microbe. One of the main strategies to modulate the bacterial resistance is the rational modification of the ligand binding target site. We report the design and characterization of four mutants-TtgRS77A, TtgRE78A, TtgRN110A and TtgRH114A - at the active ligand binding site. The biophysical characterization of the mutants, in the presence and in the absence of different antimicrobials, revealed that TtgRN110A is the variant with highest thermal stability, under any of the experimental conditions tested. EMSA experiments also showed a different dissociation pattern from the operator for TtgRN110A, in the presence of several antimicrobials, making it a key residue in the TtgR protein repression mechanism of the TtgABC efflux pump. We found that TtgRE78A stability is the most affected upon effector binding. We also probe that one mutation at the C-terminal half of helix-α4, TtgRS77A, provokes a severe protein structure distortion, demonstrating the important role of this residue in the overall protein structure and on the ligand binding site. The data provide new information and deepen the understanding of the TtgR-effector binding mechanism and consequently the TtgABC efflux pump regulation mechanism in Pseudomonas putida. PMID:26422008

  8. Effects of Task Familiarity on Stress Responses of Repressors and Sensitizers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pagano, Don F.

    1973-01-01

    R.S. Lazarus's theory of coping was used to investigate appraisal and reappraisal of threat in repressors and sensitizers. Two indexes of stress, self-report ratings of affect and palmar skin conductance, were measured prior to performance on a reaction time task, after one-third of the task was completed and after two-thirds of the task was…

  9. Radiation-induced oxidative damage to the DNA-binding domain of the lactose repressor.

    PubMed

    Gillard, Nathalie; Goffinont, Stephane; Buré, Corinne; Davidkova, Marie; Maurizot, Jean-Claude; Cadene, Martine; Spotheim-Maurizot, Melanie

    2007-05-01

    Understanding the cellular effects of radiation-induced oxidation requires the unravelling of key molecular events, particularly damage to proteins with important cellular functions. The Escherichia coli lactose operon is a classical model of gene regulation systems. Its functional mechanism involves the specific binding of a protein, the repressor, to a specific DNA sequence, the operator. We have shown previously that upon irradiation with gamma-rays in solution, the repressor loses its ability to bind the operator. Water radiolysis generates hydroxyl radicals (OH* radicals) which attack the protein. Damage of the repressor DNA-binding domain, called the headpiece, is most likely to be responsible of this loss of function. Using CD, fluorescence spectroscopy and a combination of proteolytic cleavage with MS, we have examined the state of the irradiated headpiece. CD measurements revealed a dose-dependent conformational change involving metastable intermediate states. Fluorescence measurements showed a gradual degradation of tyrosine residues. MS was used to count the number of oxidations in different regions of the headpiece and to narrow down the parts of the sequence bearing oxidized residues. By calculating the relative probabilities of reaction of each amino acid with OH. radicals, we can predict the most probable oxidation targets. By comparing the experimental results with the predictions we conclude that Tyr7, Tyr12, Tyr17, Met42 and Tyr47 are the most likely hotspots of oxidation. The loss of repressor function is thus correlated with chemical modifications and conformational changes of the headpiece. PMID:17263689

  10. Mechanism of Metal Ion Activation of the Diphtheria Toxin Repressor DtxR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Aquino, J. Alejandro; Ringe, Dagmar

    2006-08-01

    The diphtheria toxin repressor, DtxR, is a metal ion-activated transcriptional regulator that has been linked to the virulence of Corynebacterium diphtheriae. Structure determination has shown that there are two metal ion binding sites per repressor monomer, and site-directed mutagenesis has demonstrated that binding site 2 (primary) is essential for recognition of the target DNA repressor, leaving the role of binding site 1 (ancillary) unclear (1 - 3). Calorimetric techniques have demonstrated that while binding site 1 (ancillary) has high affinity for metal ion with a binding constant of 2 × 10-7, binding site 2 (primary) is a low affinity binding site with a binding constant of 6.3 × 10-4. These two binding sites act independently and their contribution can be easily dissected by traditional mutational analysis. Our results clearly demonstrate that binding site 1 (ancillary) is the first one to be occupied during metal ion activation, playing a critical role in stabilization of the repressor. In addition, structural data obtained for the mutants Ni-DtxR(H79A,C102D), reported here and the previously reported DtxR(H79A) (4) has allowed us to propose a mechanism of metal ion activation for DtxR.

  11. Mechanism of Metal Ion Activation of the Diphtheria Toxin Repressor DtxR

    SciTech Connect

    D'Aquino,J.; Tetenbaum-Novatt, J.; White, A.; Berkovitch, F.; Ringe, D.

    2005-01-01

    The diphtheria toxin repressor (DtxR) is a metal ion-activated transcriptional regulator that has been linked to the virulence of Corynebacterium diphtheriae. Structure determination has shown that there are two metal ion binding sites per repressor monomer, and site-directed mutagenesis has demonstrated that binding site 2 (primary) is essential for recognition of the target DNA repressor, leaving the role of binding site 1 (ancillary) unclear. Calorimetric techniques have demonstrated that although binding site 1 (ancillary) has high affinity for metal ion with a binding constant of 2 x 10{sup -7}, binding site 2 (primary) is a low-affinity binding site with a binding constant of 6.3 x 10{sup -4}. These two binding sites act in an independent fashion, and their contribution can be easily dissected by traditional mutational analysis. Our results clearly demonstrate that binding site 1 (ancillary) is the first one to be occupied during metal ion activation, playing a critical role in stabilization of the repressor. In addition, structural data obtained for the mutants Ni-DtxR(H79A, C102D), reported here, and the previously reported DtxR(H79A) have allowed us to propose a mechanism of metal activation for DtxR.

  12. Dynamical analysis on gene activity in the presence of repressors and an interfering promoter.

    PubMed

    Nakanishi, Hiizu; Mitarai, Namiko; Sneppen, Kim

    2008-11-01

    Transcription is regulated through interplay among transcription factors, an RNA polymerase (RNAP), and a promoter. Even for a simple repressive transcription factor that disturbs promoter activity at initial binding of RNAP, its repression level is not determined solely by the dissociation constant of transcription factor but is sensitive to timescales of processes in RNAP. We first analyze the promoter activity under strong repression by a slow binding repressor, in which case transcription events occur in bursts, followed by long quiescent periods while a repressor binds to the operator; the number of transcription events, bursting, and quiescent times are estimated by reaction rates. We then examine interference effect from an opposing promoter, using the correlation function of initiation events for a single promoter. The interference is shown to de-repress the promoter because RNAPs from the opposing promoter most likely encounter the repressor and remove it in case of strong repression. This de-repression mechanism should be especially prominent for the promoters that facilitate fast formation of open complex with the repressor whose binding rate is slower than approximately 1/s. Finally, we discuss possibility of this mechanism for high activity of promoter PR in the hyp-mutant of lambda-phage. PMID:18658208

  13. Radiation-induced oxidative damage to the DNA-binding domain of the lactose repressor

    PubMed Central

    Gillard, Nathalie; Goffinont, Stephane; Buré, Corinne; Davidkova, Marie; Maurizot, Jean-Claude; Cadene, Martine; Spotheim-Maurizot, Melanie

    2007-01-01

    Understanding the cellular effects of radiation-induced oxidation requires the unravelling of key molecular events, particularly damage to proteins with important cellular functions. The Escherichia coli lactose operon is a classical model of gene regulation systems. Its functional mechanism involves the specific binding of a protein, the repressor, to a specific DNA sequence, the operator. We have shown previously that upon irradiation with γ-rays in solution, the repressor loses its ability to bind the operator. Water radiolysis generates hydroxyl radicals (OH· radicals) which attack the protein. Damage of the repressor DNA-binding domain, called the headpiece, is most likely to be responsible of this loss of function. Using CD, fluorescence spectroscopy and a combination of proteolytic cleavage with MS, we have examined the state of the irradiated headpiece. CD measurements revealed a dose-dependent conformational change involving metastable intermediate states. Fluorescence measurements showed a gradual degradation of tyrosine residues. MS was used to count the number of oxidations in different regions of the headpiece and to narrow down the parts of the sequence bearing oxidized residues. By calculating the relative probabilities of reaction of each amino acid with OH· radicals, we can predict the most probable oxidation targets. By comparing the experimental results with the predictions we conclude that Tyr7, Tyr12, Tyr17, Met42 and Tyr47 are the most likely hotspots of oxidation. The loss of repressor function is thus correlated with chemical modifications and conformational changes of the headpiece. PMID:17263689

  14. Evidence-Based Structural Model of the Staphylococcal Repressor Protein: Separation of Functions into Different Domains

    PubMed Central

    Nyíri, Kinga; Kőhegyi, Bianka; Micsonai, András; Kardos, József; Vertessy, Beata G.

    2015-01-01

    Horizontal transfer of mobile genetic elements within Staphylococci is of high biomedical significance as such elements are frequently responsible for virulence and toxic effects. Staphylococcus-encoded repressor proteins regulate the replication of these mobile genetic elements that are located within the so-called pathogenicity islands. Here, we report structural and functional characterization of one such repressor protein, namely the Stl protein encoded by the pathogenicity island SaPIbov1. We create a 3D structural model and based on this prediction, we investigate the different functionalities of truncated and point mutant constructs. Results suggest that a helix-turn-helix motif governs the interaction of the Stl protein with its cognate DNA site: point mutations within this motif drastically decrease DNA-binding ability, whereas the interaction with the Stl-binding partner protein dUTPase is unperturbed by these point mutations. The 3D model also suggested the potential independent folding of a carboxy-terminal domain. This suggestion was fully verified by independent experiments revealing that the carboxy-terminal domain does not bind to DNA but is still capable of binding to and inhibiting dUTPase. A general model is proposed, which suggests that among the several structurally different repressor superfamilies Stl-like Staphylococcal repressor proteins belong to the helix-turn-helix transcription factor group and the HTH motif is suggested to reside within N-terminal segment. PMID:26414067

  15. The Groucho Co-repressor Is Primarily Recruited to Local Target Sites in Active Chromatin to Attenuate Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Jennings, Barbara H.

    2014-01-01

    Gene expression is regulated by the complex interaction between transcriptional activators and repressors, which function in part by recruiting histone-modifying enzymes to control accessibility of DNA to RNA polymerase. The evolutionarily conserved family of Groucho/Transducin-Like Enhancer of split (Gro/TLE) proteins act as co-repressors for numerous transcription factors. Gro/TLE proteins act in several key pathways during development (including Notch and Wnt signaling), and are implicated in the pathogenesis of several human cancers. Gro/TLE proteins form oligomers and it has been proposed that their ability to exert long-range repression on target genes involves oligomerization over broad regions of chromatin. However, analysis of an endogenous gro mutation in Drosophila revealed that oligomerization of Gro is not always obligatory for repression in vivo. We have used chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by DNA sequencing (ChIP-seq) to profile Gro recruitment in two Drosophila cell lines. We find that Gro predominantly binds at discrete peaks (<1 kilobase). We also demonstrate that blocking Gro oligomerization does not reduce peak width as would be expected if Gro oligomerization induced spreading along the chromatin from the site of recruitment. Gro recruitment is enriched in “active” chromatin containing developmentally regulated genes. However, Gro binding is associated with local regions containing hypoacetylated histones H3 and H4, which is indicative of chromatin that is not fully open for efficient transcription. We also find that peaks of Gro binding frequently overlap the transcription start sites of expressed genes that exhibit strong RNA polymerase pausing and that depletion of Gro leads to release of polymerase pausing and increased transcription at a bona fide target gene. Our results demonstrate that Gro is recruited to local sites by transcription factors to attenuate rather than silence gene expression by promoting histone deacetylation

  16. Identification of NR0B1 as a novel androgen receptor co-repressor in mouse Sertoli cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Yu-Chi; Luo, Man-Ling; Guo, Huan; Wang, Tian-Tian; Lin, Shou-Ren; Chen, Jian-Bo; Ma, Qian; Gu, Yan-Li; Jiang, Zhi-Mao; Gui, Yao-Ting

    2016-09-01

    Nuclear receptor subfamily 0 group B member 1 (Nr0b1) is an atypical member of the nuclear receptor family that is predominantly expressed in mouse Sertoli cells (SCs). Mutations of NR0B1 in humans cause adrenal failure and hypogonadotropic hypogonadism. The targeted mutagenesis of Nr0b1 in mice has revealed a primary gonadal defect characterized by the overexpression of aromatase and cellular obstruction of the seminiferous tubules and efferent ductules, leading to germ cell death and infertility. The transgenic expression of Nr0b1 under the control of the Müllerian-inhibiting substance promoter (MIS-Nr0b1), which is selectively expressed in SCs, improves fertility. Testicular androgen receptor (AR) was also expressed in SCs. Many genes are directly regulated by androgen and its AR, which are involved in spermatogenesis and male infertility. As the association between NR0B1 and AR remains unclear in mouse SCs, we decided to further explore the relationship between them. In the present study, we have identified NR0B1 as a novel AR co-repressor in mouse SCs. Using RT‑qPCR and immunofluorescence, we determined that NR0B1 was mainly expressed in mouse SCs in an age-dependent manner from 2-8 weeks of age postnatally. The inhibition of the effects of AR on AR target genes by NR0B1, in an androgen‑dependent manner, was further demonstrated by western blot analysis and RT-qPCR in TM4 cells, a mouse Sertoli cell line. Finally, in vitro luciferase and co-immunoprecipitation assays validated that NR0B1, as an AR co-repressor, significantly inhibited the transcriptional activation of its target genes. These results suggest that novel inhibitory mechanisms underlie the effects of NR0B1 in modulating androgen-dependent gene transcription in mouse SCs. PMID:27431683

  17. Noncanonical DNA-binding mode of repressor and its disassembly by antirepressor

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Minsik; Kim, Hee Jung; Son, Sang Hyeon; Yoon, Hye Jin; Lim, Youngbin; Lee, Jong Woo; Seok, Yeong-Jae; Jin, Kyeong Sik; Yu, Yeon Gyu; Kim, Seong Keun; Ryu, Sangryeol; Lee, Hyung Ho

    2016-01-01

    DNA-binding repressors are involved in transcriptional repression in many organisms. Disabling a repressor is a crucial step in activating expression of desired genes. Thus, several mechanisms have been identified for the removal of a stably bound repressor (Rep) from the operator. Here, we describe an uncharacterized mechanism of noncanonical DNA binding and induction by a Rep from the temperate Salmonella phage SPC32H; this mechanism was revealed using the crystal structures of homotetrameric Rep (92–198) and a hetero-octameric complex between the Rep and its antirepressor (Ant). The canonical method of inactivating a repressor is through the competitive binding of the antirepressor to the operator-binding site of the repressor; however, these studies revealed several noncanonical features. First, Ant does not compete for the DNA-binding region of Rep. Instead, the tetrameric Ant binds to the C-terminal domains of two asymmetric Rep dimers. Simultaneously, Ant facilitates the binding of the Rep N-terminal domains to Ant, resulting in the release of two Rep dimers from the bound DNA. Second, the dimer pairs of the N-terminal DNA-binding domains originate from different dimers of a Rep tetramer (trans model). This situation is different from that of other canonical Reps, in which two N-terminal DNA-binding domains from the same dimeric unit form a dimer upon DNA binding (cis model). On the basis of these observations, we propose a noncanonical model for the reversible inactivation of a Rep by an Ant. PMID:27099293

  18. Noncanonical DNA-binding mode of repressor and its disassembly by antirepressor.

    PubMed

    Kim, Minsik; Kim, Hee Jung; Son, Sang Hyeon; Yoon, Hye Jin; Lim, Youngbin; Lee, Jong Woo; Seok, Yeong-Jae; Jin, Kyeong Sik; Yu, Yeon Gyu; Kim, Seong Keun; Ryu, Sangryeol; Lee, Hyung Ho

    2016-05-01

    DNA-binding repressors are involved in transcriptional repression in many organisms. Disabling a repressor is a crucial step in activating expression of desired genes. Thus, several mechanisms have been identified for the removal of a stably bound repressor (Rep) from the operator. Here, we describe an uncharacterized mechanism of noncanonical DNA binding and induction by a Rep from the temperate Salmonella phage SPC32H; this mechanism was revealed using the crystal structures of homotetrameric Rep (92-198) and a hetero-octameric complex between the Rep and its antirepressor (Ant). The canonical method of inactivating a repressor is through the competitive binding of the antirepressor to the operator-binding site of the repressor; however, these studies revealed several noncanonical features. First, Ant does not compete for the DNA-binding region of Rep. Instead, the tetrameric Ant binds to the C-terminal domains of two asymmetric Rep dimers. Simultaneously, Ant facilitates the binding of the Rep N-terminal domains to Ant, resulting in the release of two Rep dimers from the bound DNA. Second, the dimer pairs of the N-terminal DNA-binding domains originate from different dimers of a Rep tetramer (trans model). This situation is different from that of other canonical Reps, in which two N-terminal DNA-binding domains from the same dimeric unit form a dimer upon DNA binding (cis model). On the basis of these observations, we propose a noncanonical model for the reversible inactivation of a Rep by an Ant. PMID:27099293

  19. A novel phase variation mechanism in the meningococcus driven by a ligand-responsive repressor and differential spacing of distal promoter elements.

    PubMed

    Metruccio, Matteo M E; Pigozzi, Eva; Roncarati, Davide; Berlanda Scorza, Francesco; Norais, Nathalie; Hill, Stuart A; Scarlato, Vincenzo; Delany, Isabel

    2009-12-01

    Phase variable expression, mediated by high frequency reversible changes in the length of simple sequence repeats, facilitates adaptation of bacterial populations to changing environments and is frequently important in bacterial virulence. Here we elucidate a novel phase variable mechanism for NadA, an adhesin and invasin of Neisseria meningitidis. The NadR repressor protein binds to operators flanking the phase variable tract and contributes to the differential expression levels of phase variant promoters with different numbers of repeats likely due to different spacing between operators. We show that IHF binds between these operators, and may permit looping of the promoter, allowing interaction of NadR at operators located distally or overlapping the promoter. The 4-hydroxyphenylacetic acid, a metabolite of aromatic amino acid catabolism that is secreted in saliva, induces NadA expression by inhibiting the DNA binding activity of the repressor. When induced, only minor differences are evident between NadR-independent transcription levels of promoter phase variants and are likely due to differential RNA polymerase contacts leading to altered promoter activity. Our results suggest that NadA expression is under both stochastic and tight environmental-sensing regulatory control, both mediated by the NadR repressor, and may be induced during colonization of the oropharynx where it plays a major role in the successful adhesion and invasion of the mucosa. Hence, simple sequence repeats in promoter regions may be a strategy used by host-adapted bacterial pathogens to randomly switch between expression states that may nonetheless still be induced by appropriate niche-specific signals. PMID:20041170

  20. Situational Discrimination in Repressor-type and Sensitizer-type Approval Seekers and the Birth Order by Subject Sex Interaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Becker, Gilbert

    1970-01-01

    Five experiments are reported. One conclusion in that repressor-type high need-for-approval subjects made the discrimination and permitted less favorable self-description, but sensitizer-type high need-for-approval subjects did not. (DB)

  1. LSD1 co-repressor Rcor2 orchestrates neurogenesis in the developing mouse brain

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yixuan; Wu, Qian; Yang, Peng; Wang, Chenfei; Liu, Jing; Ding, Wenyu; Liu, Wensu; Bai, Ye; Yang, Yuanyuan; Wang, Hong; Gao, Shaorong; Wang, Xiaoqun

    2016-01-01

    Epigenetic regulatory complexes play key roles in the modulation of transcriptional regulation underlying neural stem cell (NSC) proliferation and progeny specification. How specific cofactors guide histone demethylase LSD1/KDM1A complex to regulate distinct NSC-related gene activation and repression in cortical neurogenesis remains unclear. Here we demonstrate that Rcor2, a co-repressor of LSD1, is mainly expressed in the central nervous system (CNS) and plays a key role in epigenetic regulation of cortical development. Depletion of Rcor2 results in reduced NPC proliferation, neuron population, neocortex thickness and brain size. We find that Rcor2 directly targets Dlx2 and Shh, and represses their expressions in developing neocortex. In addition, inhibition of Shh signals rescues the neurogenesis defects caused by Rcor2 depletion both in vivo and in vitro. Hence, our findings suggest that co-repressor Rcor2 is critical for cortical development by repressing Shh signalling pathway in dorsal telencephalon. PMID:26795843

  2. The Non-JAZ TIFY Protein TIFY8 from Arabidopsis thaliana Is a Transcriptional Repressor

    PubMed Central

    Cuéllar Pérez, Amparo; Nagels Durand, Astrid; Vanden Bossche, Robin; De Clercq, Rebecca; Persiau, Geert; Van Wees, Saskia C. M.; Pieterse, Corné M. J.; Gevaert, Kris; De Jaeger, Geert; Goossens, Alain; Pauwels, Laurens

    2014-01-01

    Jasmonate (JA) signalling is mediated by the JASMONATE-ZIM DOMAIN (JAZ) repressor proteins, which are degraded upon JA perception to release downstream responses. The ZIM protein domain is characteristic of the larger TIFY protein family. It is currently unknown if the atypical member TIFY8 is involved in JA signalling. Here we show that the TIFY8 ZIM domain is functional and mediated interaction with PEAPOD proteins and NINJA. TIFY8 interacted with TOPLESS through NINJA and accordingly acted as a transcriptional repressor. TIFY8 expression was inversely correlated with JAZ expression during development and after infection with Pseudomonas syringae. Nevertheless, transgenic lines with altered TIFY8 expression did not show changes in JA sensitivity. Despite the functional ZIM domain, no interaction with JAZ proteins could be found. In contrast, TIFY8 was found in protein complexes involved in regulation of dephosphorylation, deubiquitination and O-linked N-acetylglucosamine modification suggesting an important role in nuclear signal transduction. PMID:24416306

  3. Arabidopsis transcriptional repressor VAL1 triggers Polycomb silencing at FLC during vernalization.

    PubMed

    Qüesta, Julia I; Song, Jie; Geraldo, Nuno; An, Hailong; Dean, Caroline

    2016-07-29

    The determinants that specify the genomic targets of Polycomb silencing complexes are still unclear. Polycomb silencing of Arabidopsis FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC) accelerates flowering and involves a cold-dependent epigenetic switch. Here we identify a single point mutation at an intragenic nucleation site within FLC that prevents this epigenetic switch from taking place. The mutation blocks nucleation of plant homeodomain-Polycomb repressive complex 2 (PHD-PRC2) and indicates a role for the transcriptional repressor VAL1 in the silencing mechanism. VAL1 localizes to the nucleation region in vivo, promoting histone deacetylation and FLC transcriptional silencing, and interacts with components of the conserved apoptosis- and splicing-associated protein (ASAP) complex. Sequence-specific targeting of transcriptional repressors thus recruits the machinery for PHD-PRC2 nucleation and epigenetic silencing. PMID:27471304

  4. LSD1 co-repressor Rcor2 orchestrates neurogenesis in the developing mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yixuan; Wu, Qian; Yang, Peng; Wang, Chenfei; Liu, Jing; Ding, Wenyu; Liu, Wensu; Bai, Ye; Yang, Yuanyuan; Wang, Hong; Gao, Shaorong; Wang, Xiaoqun

    2016-01-01

    Epigenetic regulatory complexes play key roles in the modulation of transcriptional regulation underlying neural stem cell (NSC) proliferation and progeny specification. How specific cofactors guide histone demethylase LSD1/KDM1A complex to regulate distinct NSC-related gene activation and repression in cortical neurogenesis remains unclear. Here we demonstrate that Rcor2, a co-repressor of LSD1, is mainly expressed in the central nervous system (CNS) and plays a key role in epigenetic regulation of cortical development. Depletion of Rcor2 results in reduced NPC proliferation, neuron population, neocortex thickness and brain size. We find that Rcor2 directly targets Dlx2 and Shh, and represses their expressions in developing neocortex. In addition, inhibition of Shh signals rescues the neurogenesis defects caused by Rcor2 depletion both in vivo and in vitro. Hence, our findings suggest that co-repressor Rcor2 is critical for cortical development by repressing Shh signalling pathway in dorsal telencephalon. PMID:26795843

  5. Smoothened regulates activator and repressor functions of Hedgehog signaling via two distinct mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Ogden, Stacey K; Casso, David J; Ascano, Manuel; Yore, Mark M; Kornberg, Thomas B; Robbins, David J

    2006-03-17

    The secreted protein Hedgehog (Hh) plays an important role in metazoan development and as a survival factor for many human tumors. In both cases, Hh signaling proceeds through the activation of the seven-transmembrane protein Smoothened (Smo), which is thought to convert the Gli family of transcription factors from transcriptional repressors to transcriptional activators. Here, we provide evidence that Smo signals to the Hh signaling complex, which consists of the kinesin-related protein Costal2 (Cos2), the protein kinase Fused (Fu), and the Drosophila Gli homolog cubitus interruptus (Ci), in two distinct manners. We show that many of the commonly observed molecular events following Hh signaling are not transmitted in a linear fashion but instead are activated through two signals that bifurcate at Smo to independently affect activator and repressor pools of Ci. PMID:16423832

  6. Crystal Structures of the Tryptophan Repressor binding Protein WrbA and complexes with Flavin Mononucleotide

    SciTech Connect

    Gorman,J.; Shapiro, L.

    2005-01-01

    The tryptophan repressor binding protein WrbA binds to the tryptophan repressor protein TrpR. Although the biological role of WrbA remains unclear, it has been proposed to function in enhancing the stability of TrpR-DNA complexes. Sequence database analysis has identified WrbA as a founding member of a flavodoxin-like family of proteins. Here we present crystal structures of WrbA from Deinococcus radiodurans and Pseudomonas aeruginosa and their complexes with flavin mononucleotide. The protomer structure is similar to that of previously determined long-chain flavodoxins; however, each contains a conserved inserted region unique to the WrbA family. Interestingly, each WrbA protein forms a homotetramer with 222 symmetry, unique among flavodoxin-like proteins, in which each protomer binds one flavin mononucleotide cofactor molecule.

  7. A System of Repressor Gradients Spatially Organizes the Boundaries of “Morphogen-dependent” Target Genes

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hongtao; Xu, Zhe; Mei, Constance; Yu, Danyang; Small, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    Summary The homeodomain (HD) protein Bicoid (Bcd) is thought to function as a gradient morphogen that positions boundaries of target genes via threshold-dependent activation mechanisms. Here we analyze 66 Bcd-dependent regulatory elements, and show that their boundaries are positioned primarily by repressive gradients that antagonize Bcd-mediated activation. A major repressor is the pair-rule protein Runt, which is expressed in an opposing gradient, and is necessary and sufficient for limiting Bcd-dependent activation. Evidence is presented that Runt functions with the maternal repressor Capicua and the gap protein Kruppel as the principal components of a repression system that correctly orders boundaries throughout the anterior half of the embryo. These results put conceptual limits on the Bcd morphogen hypothesis, and demonstrate how the Bcd gradient functions within the gene network that patterns the embryo. PMID:22541432

  8. Lac repressor: Crystallization of intact tetramer and its complexes with inducer and operator DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Pace, H.C.; Lu, P. ); Lewis, M. Smith Kline and French Labs., King of Prussia, PA )

    1990-03-01

    The intact lac repressor tetramer, which regulates expression of the lac operon in Escherichia coli, has been crystallized in the native form, with an inducer, and in a ternary complex with operator DNA and an anti-inducer. The crystals without DNA diffract to better than 3.5 {angstrom}. They belong to the monoclinic space group C2 and have cell dimensions a = 164.7 {angstrom}, b = 75.6 {angstrom}, and c = 161.2 {angstrom}, with {alpha} = {gamma} = 90{degree} and {beta} = 125.5{degree}. Cocrystals have been obtained with a number of different lac operator-related DNA fragments. The complex with a blunt-ended 16-base-pair strand yielded tetragonal bipyramids that diffract to 6.5 {angstrom}. These protein-DNA cocrystals crack upon exposure to the gratuitous inducer isopropyl {beta}-D-thiogalactoside, suggesting a conformational change in the repressor-operator complex.

  9. Probing the molecular mechanism of action of co-repressor in the E. coli methionine repressor-operator complex using surface plasmon resonance (SPR).

    PubMed Central

    Parsons, I D; Persson, B; Mekhalfia, A; Blackburn, G M; Stockley, P G

    1995-01-01

    We have studied quantitatively the effect of the corepressor, S-adenosylmethionine (SAM), on the interaction between the E. coli methionine repressor, MetJ, and an idealised operator fragment, by recording measurements of surface plasmon resonance using a BIAcore instrument. We have recorded kinetic binding data in the presence of SAM, which carries a net positive charge, and two corepressor analogues, adenosylornithine (AO) and aza-SAM, which differ in the location of the atom carrying the positive charge. Our data support the hypothesis that the effect of the corepressor is electrostatic in origin. The difference in electrostatic interaction energy between the SAM- and AO-repressor-operator complexes of approximately 3.5 kJ/mol calculated from the known three-dimensional structure is within the range of our experimentally determined values of 2.8-4.3 kJ/mol. These results illustrate the potential of SPR measurements for studying protein-nucleic acid interactions. Images PMID:7862523

  10. Identification of the Repressor-Encoding Gene of the Lactobacillus Bacteriophage A2

    PubMed Central

    Ladero, Victor; García, Pilar; Bascarán, Victoria; Herrero, Mónica; Alvarez, Miguel A.; Suárez, Juan E.

    1998-01-01

    The repressor gene of the Lactobacillus phage A2 has the following properties: it (i) encodes a 224-residue polypeptide with DNA binding and RecA cleavage motifs, (ii) is expressed in lysogenic cultures, and (iii) confers superinfection immunity on the host. Adjacent, but divergently transcribed, lies another open reading frame whose product resembles the λ Cro protein. In the 161-bp intergenic segment, putative promoters and operators have been detected. PMID:9642205

  11. Histone deacetylase inhibitor trichostatin A enhances myogenesis by coordinating muscle regulatory factors and myogenic repressors

    SciTech Connect

    Hagiwara, Hiroki; Saito, Fumiaki; Masaki, Toshihiro; Ikeda, Miki; Nakamura-Ohkuma, Ayami; Shimizu, Teruo; Matsumura, Kiichiro

    2011-11-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We investigated the effect of TSA, one of most potent HDACIs, on myogenesis using the C2C12 skeletal muscle cell line. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TSA enhances the expression of myosin heavy chain without affecting DAPC expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TSA enhances the expression of the early MRFs, Myf5 and MEF2, and suppresses the late MRF, myogenin, after 24 h treatment. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TSA enhances the expression of the myogenic repressors, Ids, which inhibit myogenic differentiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TSA promotes myogenesis by coordinating the expression of MRFs and myogenic repressors. -- Abstract: Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACIs) are known to promote skeletal muscle formation. However, their mechanisms that include effects on the expression of major muscle components such as the dystrophin-associated proteins complex (DAPC) or myogenic regulatory factors (MRFs) remain unknown. In this study, we investigated the effects of HDACIs on skeletal muscle formation using the C2C12 cell culture system. C2C12 myoblasts were exposed to trichostatin A (TSA), one of the most potent HDACIs, and differentiation was subsequently induced. We found that TSA enhances the expression of myosin heavy chain without affecting DAPC expression. In addition, TSA increases the expression of the early MRFs, Myf5 and MEF2, whereas it suppresses the expression of the late MRF, myogenin. Interestingly, TSA also enhances the expression of Id1, Id2, and Id3 (Ids). Ids are myogenic repressors that inhibit myogenic differentiation. These findings suggest that TSA promotes gene expression in proliferation and suppresses it in the differentiation stage of muscle formation. Taken together, our data demonstrate that TSA enhances myogenesis by coordinating the expression of MRFs and myogenic repressors.

  12. ERF and ETV3L are retinoic acid-inducible repressors required for primary neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Janesick, Amanda; Abbey, Rachelle; Chung, Connie; Liu, Sophia; Taketani, Mao; Blumberg, Bruce

    2013-08-01

    Cells in the developing neural tissue demonstrate an exquisite balance between proliferation and differentiation. Retinoic acid (RA) is required for neuronal differentiation by promoting expression of proneural and neurogenic genes. We show that RA acts early in the neurogenic pathway by inhibiting expression of neural progenitor markers Geminin and Foxd4l1, thereby promoting differentiation. Our screen for RA target genes in early Xenopus development identified Ets2 Repressor Factor (Erf) and the closely related ETS repressors Etv3 and Etv3-like (Etv3l). Erf and Etv3l are RA responsive and inhibit the action of ETS genes downstream of FGF signaling, placing them at the intersection of RA and growth factor signaling. We hypothesized that RA regulates primary neurogenesis by inducing Erf and Etv3l to antagonize proliferative signals. Loss-of-function analysis showed that Erf and Etv3l are required to inhibit proliferation of neural progenitors to allow differentiation, whereas overexpression of Erf led to an increase in the number of primary neurons. Therefore, these RA-induced ETS repressors are key components of the proliferation-differentiation switch during primary neurogenesis in vivo. PMID:23824578

  13. Co-repressor activity of scaffold attachment factor B1 requires sumoylation

    SciTech Connect

    Garee, Jason P.; Meyer, Rene; Systems Biology of Signal Transduction, German Cancer Research Center , INF 280, 69120 Heidelberg ; Oesterreich, Steffi

    2011-05-20

    Highlights: {yields} SAFB1 is sumoylated to two lysine residues K231 and K294. {yields} SAFB1 sumoylation is regulated by PIAS1 and SENP1. {yields} Sumoylation of SAFB1 regulates its transcriptional repressor activity. {yields} Mutation of sumoylation sites leads to decreased SAFB1 binding to HDAC3. -- Abstract: Sumoylation is an emerging modification associated with a variety of cellular processes including the regulation of transcriptional activities of nuclear receptors and their coregulators. As SUMO modifications are often associated with transcriptional repression, we examined if sumoylation was involved in modulation of the transcriptional repressive activity of scaffold attachment factor B1. Here we show that SAFB1 is modified by both the SUMO1 and SUMO2/3 family of proteins, on lysine's K231 and K294. Further, we demonstrate that SAFB1 can interact with PIAS1, a SUMO E3 ligase which mediates SAFB1 sumoylation. Additionally, SENP1 was identified as the enzyme desumoylating SAFB1. Mutation of the SAFB1 sumoylation sites lead to a loss of transcriptional repression, at least in part due to decreased interaction with HDAC3, a known transcriptional repressor and SAFB1 binding partner. In summary, the transcriptional repressor SAFB1 is modified by both SUMO1 and SUMO2/3, and this modification is necessary for its full repressive activity.

  14. Direct Fe2+ Sensing by Iron-responsive Messenger RNA·Repressor Complexes Weakens Binding*

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Mateen A.; Walden, William E.; Goss, Dixie J.; Theil, Elizabeth C.

    2009-01-01

    Fe2+ is now shown to weaken binding between ferritin and mitochondrial aconitase messenger RNA noncoding regulatory structures ((iron-responsive element) (IRE)-RNAs) and the regulatory proteins (IRPs), which adds a direct role of iron to regulation that can complement the well known regulatory protein modification and degradative pathways related to iron-induced mRNA translation. We observe that the Kd value increases 17-fold in 5′-untranslated region IRE-RNA·repressor complexes; Fe2+, is studied in the absence of O2. Other metal ions, Mn2+ and Mg2+ have similar effects to Fe2+ but the required Mg2+ concentration is 100 times greater than for Fe2+ or Mn2+. Metal ions also weaken ethidium bromide binding to IRE-RNA with no effect on IRP fluorescence, using Mn2+ as an O2-resistant surrogate for Fe2+, indicating that metal ions bound IRE-RNA but not IRP. Fe2+ decreases IRP repressor complex stability of ferritin IRE-RNA 5–10 times compared with 2–5 times for mitochondrial aconitase IRE-RNA, over the same concentration range, suggesting that differences among IRE-RNA structures contribute to the differences in the iron responses observed in vivo. The results show the IRE-RNA·repressor complex literally responds to Fe2+, selectively for each IRE-mRNA. PMID:19720833

  15. Lambda repressor recognizes the approximately 2-fold symmetric half-operator sequences asymmetrically.

    PubMed Central

    Sarai, A; Takeda, Y

    1989-01-01

    Results of systematic base-substitution experiments suggest that the lambda repressor dimer, made of identical subunits, recognizes the "pseudo(2-fold)symmetric" operator sequence asymmetrically. Base substitutions within the consensus half of the operator affect binding more than base substitutions within the nonconsensus half of the operator. Furthermore, changing the nonconsensus base pairs to the consensus base pairs does not increase, but decreases, binding. Evidently, the two subunits of the lambda repressor dimer bind to the two halves of the operator differently. This is consistent with the recently determined crystal structure of the complex, which shows that the relative positioning of the amino acids to the DNA bases are slightly different in the two halves of the operator. The sequence-specific interactions indicated by the systematic base-substitution experiments correlate well with the locations of the specific contacts found in the complex. Thus, the amino acids of lambda repressor, mainly of alpha 3-helix and the N-terminus arm, seem to directly read-out the DNA sequence by forming specific hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic contacts to the DNA bases. The observed asymmetric recognition suggests that no recognition code governs amino acids and DNA bases in protein-DNA interactions. PMID:2771938

  16. Accurate genetic switch in Escherichia coli: novel mechanism of regulation by co-repressor.

    PubMed

    Tabaka, Marcin; Cybulski, Olgierd; Hołyst, Robert

    2008-04-01

    Understanding a biological module involves recognition of its structure and the dynamics of its principal components. In this report we present an analysis of the dynamics of the repression module within the regulation of the trp operon in Escherichia coli. We combine biochemical data for reaction rate constants for the trp repressor binding to trp operator and in vivo data of a number of tryptophan repressors (TrpRs) that bind to the operator. The model of repression presented in this report greatly differs from previous mathematical models. One, two or three TrpRs can bind to the operator and repress the transcription. Moreover, reaction rates for detachment of TrpRs from the operator strongly depend on tryptophan (Trp) concentration, since Trp can also bind to the repressor-operator complex and stabilize it. From the mathematical modeling and analysis of reaction rates and equilibrium constants emerges a high-quality, accurate and effective module of trp repression. This genetic switch responds accurately to fast consumption of Trp from the interior of a cell. It switches with minimal dispersion when the concentration of Trp drops below a thousand molecules per cell. PMID:18313075

  17. Contextual interactions determine whether the Drosophila homeodomain protein, Vnd, acts as a repressor or activator

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Zhongxin; Syu, Li-Jyun; Mellerick, Dervla M.

    2005-01-01

    At the molecular level, members of the NKx2.2 family of transcription factors establish neural compartment boundaries by repressing the expression of homeobox genes specific for adjacent domains [Muhr et al. (2001) Cell, 104, 861–873; Weiss et al. (1998) Genes Dev., 12, 3591–3602]. The Drosophila homologue, vnd, interacts genetically with the high-mobility group protein, Dichaete, in a manner suggesting co-operative activation [Zhao and Skeath (2002) Development, 129, 1165–1174]. However, evidence for direct interactions and transcriptional activation is lacking. Here, we present molecular evidence for the interaction of Vnd and Dichaete that leads to the activation of target gene expression. Two-hybrid interaction assays indicate that Dichaete binds the Vnd homeodomain, and additional Vnd sequences stabilize this interaction. In addition, Vnd has two activation domains that are typically masked in the intact protein. Whether vnd can activate or repress transcription is context-dependent. Full-length Vnd, when expressed as a Gal4 fusion protein, acts as a repressor containing multiple repression domains. A divergent domain in the N-terminus, not found in vertebrate Vnd-like proteins, causes the strongest repression. The co-repressor, Groucho, enhances Vnd repression, and these two proteins physically interact. The data presented indicate that the activation and repression domains of Vnd are complex, and whether Vnd functions as a transcriptional repressor or activator depends on both intra- and inter-molecular interactions. PMID:15640442

  18. High-resolution specificity from DNA sequencing highlights alternative modes of Lac repressor binding.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Zheng; Stormo, Gary D

    2014-11-01

    Knowing the specificity of transcription factors is critical to understanding regulatory networks in cells. The lac repressor-operator system has been studied for many years, but not with high-throughput methods capable of determining specificity comprehensively. Details of its binding interaction and its selection of an asymmetric binding site have been controversial. We employed a new method to accurately determine relative binding affinities to thousands of sequences simultaneously, requiring only sequencing of bound and unbound fractions. An analysis of 2560 different DNA sequence variants, including both base changes and variations in operator length, provides a detailed view of lac repressor sequence specificity. We find that the protein can bind with nearly equal affinities to operators of three different lengths, but the sequence preference changes depending on the length, demonstrating alternative modes of interaction between the protein and DNA. The wild-type operator has an odd length, causing the two monomers to bind in alternative modes, making the asymmetric operator the preferred binding site. We tested two other members of the LacI/GalR protein family and find that neither can bind with high affinity to sites with alternative lengths or shows evidence of alternative binding modes. A further comparison with known and predicted motifs suggests that the lac repressor may be unique in this ability and that this may contribute to its selection. PMID:25209146

  19. Parallel SCF Adaptor Capture Proteomics Reveals a Role for SCFFBXL17 in NRF2 Activation via BACH1 Repressor Turnover

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Meng-Kwang Marcus; Lim, Hui-Jun; Bennett, Eric J.; Shi, Yang; Harper, J. Wade

    2014-01-01

    Modular Cullin-RING E3 ubiquitin ligases (CRLs) use substrate binding adaptor proteins to specify target ubiquitylation. Many of the ~200 human CRL adaptor proteins remain poorly studied due to a shortage of efficient methods to identify biologically relevant substrates. Here, we report the development of Parallel Adaptor Capture (PAC) proteomics, and its use to systematically identify candidate targets for the leucine-rich repeat family of F-box proteins (FBXLs) that function with SKP1-CUL1-F-box protein (SCF) E3s. In validation experiments, we identify the unstudied F-box protein FBXL17 as a regulator of the NFR2 oxidative stress pathway. We demonstrate that FBXL17 controls the transcription of the NRF2 target HMOX1 via turnover of the transcriptional repressor BACH1 in the absence or presence of extrinsic oxidative stress. This work identifies a role for SCFFBXL17 in controlling the threshold for NRF2-dependent gene activation and provides a framework for elucidating the functions of CRL adaptor proteins. PMID:24035498

  20. Specific interactions between lactose repressor protein and DNA affected by ligand binding: ab initio molecular orbital calculations.

    PubMed

    Ohyama, Tatsuya; Hayakawa, Masato; Nishikawa, Shin; Kurita, Noriyuki

    2011-06-01

    Transcription mechanisms of gene information from DNA to mRNA are essentially controlled by regulatory proteins such as a lactose repressor (LacR) protein and ligand molecules. Biochemical experiments elucidated that a ligand binding to LacR drastically changes the mechanism controlled by LacR, although the effect of ligand binding has not been clarified at atomic and electronic levels. We here investigated the effect of ligand binding on the specific interactions between LacR and operator DNA by the molecular simulations combined with classical molecular mechanics and ab initio fragment molecular orbital methods. The results indicate that the binding of anti-inducer ligand strengthens the interaction between LacR and DNA, which is consistent with the fact that the binding of anti-inducer enhances the repression of gene transcription by LacR. It was also elucidated that hydrating water molecules existing between LacR and DNA contribute to the specific interactions between LacR and DNA. PMID:21328406

  1. Parallel SCF adaptor capture proteomics reveals a role for SCFFBXL17 in NRF2 activation via BACH1 repressor turnover.

    PubMed

    Tan, Meng-Kwang Marcus; Lim, Hui-Jun; Bennett, Eric J; Shi, Yang; Harper, J Wade

    2013-10-10

    Modular cullin-RING E3 ubiquitin ligases (CRLs) use substrate binding adaptor proteins to specify target ubiquitylation. Many of the ~200 human CRL adaptor proteins remain poorly studied due to a shortage of efficient methods to identify biologically relevant substrates. Here, we report the development of parallel adaptor capture (PAC) proteomics and its use to systematically identify candidate targets for the leucine-rich repeat family of F-box proteins (FBXLs) that function with SKP1-CUL1-F-box protein (SCF) E3s. In validation experiments, we identify the unstudied F-box protein FBXL17 as a regulator of the NFR2 oxidative stress pathway. We demonstrate that FBXL17 controls the transcription of the NRF2 target HMOX1 via turnover of the transcriptional repressor BACH1 in the absence or presence of extrinsic oxidative stress. This work identifies a role for SCF(FBXL17) in controlling the threshold for NRF2-dependent gene activation and provides a framework for elucidating the functions of CRL adaptor proteins. PMID:24035498

  2. Multifunctional repressor KorB can block transcription by preventing isomerization of RNA polymerase-promoter complexes.

    PubMed Central

    Williams, D R; Motallebi-Veshareh, M; Thomas, C M

    1993-01-01

    The KorB protein of broad-host-range plasmid RK2 is a transcriptional repressor involved in the control of genes for plasmid replication, conjugative transfer and stable maintenance. We have purified this protein close to homogeneity from cells harbouring an overexpression vector with the korB gene under the control of the tac promoter. KorB binds to restriction fragments bearing its proposed operator sequence, OB. Its interaction with this palindromic site was confirmed by DNaseI or hydroxyl radical footprinting at two OB sequences from RK2. Comparisons showed that the OB context affects the nature of the footprint. Our evidence suggests that KorB is a tetramer. As such, it may be able to bind two sites simultaneously on the same or on different DNA molecules. Using the korABF promoter, which is subject to KorB repression, we demonstrate by footprinting and restriction protection that KorB and RNA polymerase can bind simultaneously. Permanganate footprinting showed that KorB represses this promoter by preventing isomerization of the RNA polymerase-promoter complex from the closed to open form. Images PMID:8464698

  3. Sumoylation of Forkhead L2 by Ubc9 is required for its activity as a transcriptional repressor of the Steroidogenic Acute Regulatory Gene

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Fang-Ting; Bentsi-Barnes, Ikuko K.; Barlow, Gillian M.; Bae, Jeehyeon; Pisarska, Margareta D.

    2010-01-01

    Forkhead L2 (FOXL2) is a member of the forkhead/hepatocyte nuclear factor 3 (FKH/HNF3) gene family of transcription factors and acts as a transcriptional repressor of the Steroidogenic Acute Regulatory (StAR) gene, a marker of granulosa cell differentiation. FOXL2 may play a role in ovarian follicle maturation and prevent premature follicle depletion leading to premature ovarian failure. In this study, we found that FOXL2 interacts with Ubc9, an E2-conjugating enzyme that mediates sumoylation, a key mechanism in transcriptional regulation. FOXL2 and Ubc9 are co-expressed in granulosa cells of small and medium ovarian follicles. FOXL2 is sumoylated by Ubc9, and this Ubc9-mediated sumoylation is essential to transcription activity of FOXL2 on the StAR promoter. As FOXL2 is endogenous to granulosa cells, we generated a stable cell line expressing FOXL2 and found that activity of the StAR promoter in this cell line is greatly decreased in the presence of Ubc9. The sumoylation site was identified at lysine 25 of FOXL2. Mutation of lysine 25 to arginine leads to loss of transcriptional repressor activity of FOXL2. Taken together, we propose that Ubc9-mediated sumoylation at lysine 25 of FOXL2 is required for transcriptional repression of the StAR gene and may be responsible for controlling the development of ovarian follicles. PMID:19744555

  4. bHLH003, bHLH013 and bHLH017 Are New Targets of JAZ Repressors Negatively Regulating JA Responses

    PubMed Central

    Fonseca, Sandra; Fernández-Calvo, Patricia; Fernández, Guillermo M.; Díez-Díaz, Monica; Gimenez-Ibanez, Selena; López-Vidriero, Irene; Godoy, Marta; Fernández-Barbero, Gemma; Van Leene, Jelle; De Jaeger, Geert; Franco-Zorrilla, José Manuel; Solano, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Cell reprogramming in response to jasmonates requires a tight control of transcription that is achieved by the activity of JA-related transcription factors (TFs). Among them, MYC2, MYC3 and MYC4 have been described as activators of JA responses. Here we characterized the function of bHLH003, bHLH013 and bHLH017 that conform a phylogenetic clade closely related to MYC2, MYC3 and MYC4. We found that these bHLHs form homo- and heterodimers and also interact with JAZ repressors in vitro and in vivo. Phenotypic analysis of JA-regulated processes, including root and rosette growth, anthocyanin accumulation, chlorophyll loss and resistance to Pseudomonas syringae, on mutants and overexpression lines, suggested that these bHLHs are repressors of JA responses. bHLH003, bHLH013 and bHLH017 are mainly nuclear proteins and bind DNA with similar specificity to that of MYC2, MYC3 and MYC4, but lack a conserved activation domain, suggesting that repression is achieved by competition for the same cis-regulatory elements. Moreover, expression of bHLH017 is induced by JA and depends on MYC2, suggesting a negative feed-back regulation of the activity of positive JA-related TFs. Our results suggest that the competition between positive and negative TFs determines the output of JA-dependent transcriptional activation. PMID:24465948

  5. A Repressor Protein Complex Regulates Leaf Growth in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Nathalie; Pauwels, Laurens; Baekelandt, Alexandra; De Milde, Liesbeth; Van Leene, Jelle; Besbrugge, Nienke; Heyndrickx, Ken S.; Pérez, Amparo Cuéllar; Durand, Astrid Nagels; De Clercq, Rebecca; Van De Slijke, Eveline; Vanden Bossche, Robin; Eeckhout, Dominique; Gevaert, Kris; Vandepoele, Klaas; De Jaeger, Geert; Goossens, Alain; Inzé, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Cell number is an important determinant of final organ size. In the leaf, a large proportion of cells are derived from the stomatal lineage. Meristemoids, which are stem cell-like precursor cells, undergo asymmetric divisions, generating several pavement cells adjacent to the two guard cells. However, the mechanism controlling the asymmetric divisions of these stem cells prior to differentiation is not well understood. Here, we characterized PEAPOD (PPD) proteins, the only transcriptional regulators known to negatively regulate meristemoid division. PPD proteins interact with KIX8 and KIX9, which act as adaptor proteins for the corepressor TOPLESS. D3-type cyclin encoding genes were identified among direct targets of PPD2, being negatively regulated by PPDs and KIX8/9. Accordingly, kix8 kix9 mutants phenocopied PPD loss-of-function producing larger leaves resulting from increased meristemoid amplifying divisions. The identified conserved complex might be specific for leaf growth in the second dimension, since it is not present in Poaceae (grasses), which also lack the developmental program it controls. PMID:26232487

  6. Mutations in the transcriptional repressor REST predispose to Wilms tumor.

    PubMed

    Mahamdallie, Shazia S; Hanks, Sandra; Karlin, Kristen L; Zachariou, Anna; Perdeaux, Elizabeth R; Ruark, Elise; Shaw, Chad A; Renwick, Alexander; Ramsay, Emma; Yost, Shawn; Elliott, Anna; Birch, Jillian; Capra, Michael; Gray, Juliet; Hale, Juliet; Kingston, Judith; Levitt, Gill; McLean, Thomas; Sheridan, Eamonn; Renwick, Anthony; Seal, Sheila; Stiller, Charles; Sebire, Neil; Westbrook, Thomas F; Rahman, Nazneen

    2015-12-01

    Wilms tumor is the most common childhood renal cancer. To identify mutations that predispose to Wilms tumor, we are conducting exome sequencing studies. Here we describe 11 different inactivating mutations in the REST gene (encoding RE1-silencing transcription factor) in four familial Wilms tumor pedigrees and nine non-familial cases. Notably, no similar mutations were identified in the ICR1000 control series (13/558 versus 0/993; P < 0.0001) or in the ExAC series (13/558 versus 0/61,312; P < 0.0001). We identified a second mutational event in two tumors, suggesting that REST may act as a tumor-suppressor gene in Wilms tumor pathogenesis. REST is a zinc-finger transcription factor that functions in cellular differentiation and embryonic development. Notably, ten of 11 mutations clustered within the portion of REST encoding the DNA-binding domain, and functional analyses showed that these mutations compromise REST transcriptional repression. These data establish REST as a Wilms tumor predisposition gene accounting for ∼2% of Wilms tumor. PMID:26551668

  7. Change of function of the wheat stress-responsive transcriptional repressor TaRAP2.1L by repressor motif modification.

    PubMed

    Amalraj, Amritha; Luang, Sukanya; Kumar, Manoj Yadav; Sornaraj, Pradeep; Eini, Omid; Kovalchuk, Nataliya; Bazanova, Natalia; Li, Yuan; Yang, Nannan; Eliby, Serik; Langridge, Peter; Hrmova, Maria; Lopato, Sergiy

    2016-02-01

    Plants respond to abiotic stresses by changes in gene regulation, including stress-inducible expression of transcriptional activators and repressors. One of the best characterized families of drought-related transcription factors are dehydration-responsive element binding (DREB) proteins, known as C-repeat binding factors (CBF). The wheat DREB/CBF gene TaRAP2.1L was isolated from drought-affected tissues using a dehydration-responsive element (DRE) as bait in a yeast one-hybrid screen. TaRAP2.1L is induced by elevated abscisic acid, drought and cold. A C-terminal ethylene responsive factor-associated amphiphilic repression (EAR) motif, known to be responsible for active repression of target genes, was identified in the TaRAP2.1L protein. It was found that TaRAP2.1L has a unique selectivity of DNA-binding, which differs from that of DREB activators. This binding selectivity remains unchanged in a TaRAP2.1L variant with an inactivated EAR motif (TaRAP2.1Lmut). To study the role of the TaRAP2.1L repressor activity associated with the EAR motif in planta, transgenic wheat overexpressing native or mutated TaRAP2.1L was generated. Overexpression of TaRAP2.1L under constitutive and stress-inducible promoters in transgenic wheat and barley led to dwarfism and decreased frost tolerance. By contrast, constitutive overexpression of the TaRAP2.1Lmut gene had little or no negative influence on wheat development or grain yield. Transgenic lines with the TaRAP2.1Lmut transgene had an enhanced ability to survive frost and drought. The improved stress tolerance is attributed to up-regulation of several stress-related genes known to be downstream genes of DREB/CBF activators. PMID:26150199

  8. Resolution of the fluorescence decay of the two tryptophan residues of lac repressor using single tryptophan mutants.

    PubMed Central

    Royer, C A; Gardner, J A; Beechem, J M; Brochon, J C; Matthews, K S

    1990-01-01

    We have studied the time-resolved intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence of the lac repressor (a symmetric tetramer containing two tryptophan residues per monomer) and two single-tryptophan mutant repressors obtained by site-directed mutagenesis, lac W201Y and lac W220Y. These mutant repressor proteins have tyrosine substituted for tryptophan at positions 201 and 220, respectively, leaving a single tryptophan residue per monomeric subunit at position 220 for the W201Y mutant and at position 201 in the W220Y mutant. It was found that the two decay rates recovered from the analysis of the wild type data do not correspond to the rates recovered from the analysis of the decays of the mutant proteins. Each of these residues in the mutant repressors displays at least two decay rates. Global analysis of the multiwavelength data from all three proteins, however, yielded results consistent with the fluorescence decay of the wild type lac repressor corresponding simply to the weighted linear combination of the decays from the mutant proteins. The effect of ligation by the antagonistic ligands, inducer and operator DNA, was similar for all three proteins. The binding of the inducer sugar resulted in a quenching of the long-lived species, while binding by the operator decreased the lifetime of the short components. Investigation of the time-resolved anisotropy of the intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence in these three proteins revealed that the depolarization of fluorescence resulted from a fast motion and the global tumbling of the macromolecule. Results from the simultaneous global analysis of the frequency domain data sets from the three proteins revealed anisotropic rotations for the macromolecule, consistent with the known elongated shape of the repressor tetramer. In addition, it appears that the excited-state dipole of tryptophan 220 is alighed with the long axis of the repressor. PMID:2207244

  9. The N-terminal domain of the repressor of Staphylococcus aureus phage Φ11 possesses an unusual dimerization ability and DNA binding affinity.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Anindya; Mandal, Sukhendu; Sau, Subrata

    2014-01-01

    Bacteriophage Φ11 uses Staphylococcus aureus as its host and, like lambdoid phages, harbors three homologous operators in between its two divergently oriented repressor genes. None of the repressors of Φ11, however, showed binding to all three operators, even at high concentrations. To understand why the DNA binding mechanism of Φ11 repressors does not match that of lambdoid phage repressors, we studied the N-terminal domain of the Φ11 lysogenic repressor, as it harbors a putative helix-turn-helix motif. Our data revealed that the secondary and tertiary structures of the N-terminal domain were different from those of the full-length repressor. Nonetheless, the N-terminal domain was able to dimerize and bind to the operators similar to the intact repressor. In addition, the operator base specificity, binding stoichiometry, and binding mechanism of this domain were nearly identical to those of the whole repressor. The binding affinities of the repressor and its N-terminal domain were reduced to a similar extent when the temperature was increased to 42°C. Both proteins also adequately dislodged a RNA polymerase from a Φ11 DNA fragment carrying two operators and a promoter. Unlike the intact repressor, the binding of the N-terminal domain to two adjacent operator sites was not cooperative in nature. Taken together, we suggest that the dimerization and DNA binding abilities of the N-terminal domain of the Φ11 repressor are distinct from those of the DNA binding domains of other phage repressors. PMID:24747758

  10. Regulatory T cells with reduced repressor capacities are extensively amplified in pulmonary sarcoid lesions and sustain granuloma formation.

    PubMed

    Rappl, Gunter; Pabst, Stefan; Riemann, Dagmar; Schmidt, Annette; Wickenhauser, Claudia; Schütte, Wolfgang; Hombach, Andreas A; Seliger, Barbara; Grohé, Christian; Abken, Hinrich

    2011-07-01

    Sarcoidosis can evolve into a chronic disease with persistent granulomas accompanied by progressive fibrosis. While an unlimited inflammatory response suggests an impaired immune control in sarcoid lesions, it stands in contrast to the massive infiltration with CD4(+)CD25(high)FoxP3(+) regulatory T cells. We here revealed that those Treg cells in affected lung lesions were mainly derived from activated natural Treg cells with GARP (LRRC32)-positive phenotype but exhibited reduced repressor capacities despite high IL-10 and TGF-beta 1 levels. The repressive capacity of blood Treg cells, in contrast, was not impaired compared to age-matched healthy donors. Treg derived cells in granuloma lesions have undergone extensive rounds of amplifications indicated by shortened telomeres compared to blood Treg cells of the same patient. Lesional Treg derived cells moreover secreted pro-inflammatory cytokines including IL-4 which sustains granuloma formation through fibroblast amplification and the activation of mast cells, the latter indicated by the expression of membrane-bound oncostatin M. PMID:21482483

  11. WRKY76 is a rice transcriptional repressor playing opposite roles in blast disease resistance and cold stress tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Nishizawa, Yoko

    2013-01-01

    OsWRKY76 encodes a group IIa WRKY transcription factor of rice. The expression of OsWRKY76 was induced within 48h after inoculation with rice blast fungus (Magnaporthe oryzae), and by wounding, low temperature, benzothiadiazole, and abscisic acid. Green fluorescent protein-fused OsWRKY76 localized to the nuclei in rice epidermal cells. OsWRKY76 showed sequence-specific DNA binding to the W-box element in vitro and exhibited W-box-mediated transcriptional repressor activity in cultured rice cells. Overexpression of OsWRKY76 in rice plants resulted in drastically increased susceptibility to M. oryzae, but improved tolerance to cold stress. Microarray analysis revealed that overexpression of OsWRKY76 suppresses the induction of a specific set of PR genes and of genes involved in phytoalexin synthesis after inoculation with blast fungus, consistent with the observation that the levels of phytoalexins in the transgenic rice plants remained significantly lower than those in non-transformed control plants. Furthermore, overexpression of OsWRKY76 led to the increased expression of abiotic stress-associated genes such as peroxidase and lipid metabolism genes. These results strongly suggest that OsWRKY76 plays dual and opposing roles in blast disease resistance and cold tolerance. PMID:24043853

  12. The Response Regulator YycF Inhibits Expression of the Fatty Acid Biosynthesis Repressor FabT in Streptococcus pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Mohedano, Maria L.; Amblar, Mónica; de la Fuente, Alicia; Wells, Jerry M.; López, Paloma

    2016-01-01

    The YycFG (also known as WalRK, VicRK, MicAB, or TCS02) two-component system (TCS) is highly conserved among Gram-positive bacteria with a low G+C content. In Streptococcus pneumoniae the YycF response regulator has been reported to be essential due to its control of pcsB gene expression. Previously we showed that overexpression of yycF in S. pneumoniae TIGR4 altered the transcription of genes involved in cell wall metabolism and fatty acid biosynthesis, giving rise to anomalous cell division and increased chain length of membrane fatty acids. Here, we have overexpressed the yycFG system in TIGR4 wild-type strain and yycF in a TIGR4 mutant depleted of YycG, and analyzed their effects on expression of proteins involved in fatty acid biosynthesis during activation of the TCS. We demonstrate that transcription of the fab genes and levels of their products were only altered in the YycF overexpressing strain, indicating that the unphosphorylated form of YycF is involved in the regulation of fatty acid biosynthesis. In addition, DNA-binding assays and in vitro transcription experiments with purified YycF and the promoter region of the FabTH-acp operon support a direct inhibition of transcription of the FabT repressor by YycF, thus confirming the role of the unphosphorylated form in transcriptional regulation. PMID:27610104

  13. Functional dissection of the global repressor Tup1 in yeast: dominant role of the C-terminal repression domain.

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhizhou; Varanasi, Ushasri; Trumbly, Robert J

    2002-01-01

    In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Tup1, in association with Cyc8 (Ssn6), functions as a general repressor of transcription. Tup1 and Cyc8 are required for repression of diverse families of genes coordinately controlled by glucose repression, mating type, and other mechanisms. This repression is mediated by recruitment of the Cyc8-Tup1 complex to target promoters by sequence-specific DNA-binding proteins. We created a library of XhoI linker insertions and internal in-frame deletion mutations within the TUP1 coding region. Insertion mutations outside of the WD domains were wild type, while insertions within the WD domains induced mutant phenotypes with differential effects on the target genes SUC2, MFA2, RNR2, and HEM13. Deletion mutations confirmed previous findings of two separate repression domains in the N and C termini. The cumulative data suggest that the C-terminal repression domain, located near the first WD repeat, plays the dominant role in repression. Although the N-terminal repression domain is sufficient for partial repression, deletion of this region does not compromise repression. Surprisingly, deletion of the majority of the histone-binding domain of Tup1 also does not significantly reduce repression. The N-terminal region containing potential alpha-helical coiled coils is required for Tup1 oligomerization and association with Cyc8. Association with Cyc8 is required for repression of SUC2, HEM13, and RNR2 but not MFA2 and STE2. PMID:12136003

  14. Regulation of gene expression through a transcriptional repressor that senses acyl-chain length in membrane phospholipids.

    PubMed

    Hofbauer, Harald F; Schopf, Florian H; Schleifer, Hannes; Knittelfelder, Oskar L; Pieber, Bartholomäus; Rechberger, Gerald N; Wolinski, Heimo; Gaspar, Maria L; Kappe, C Oliver; Stadlmann, Johannes; Mechtler, Karl; Zenz, Alexandra; Lohner, Karl; Tehlivets, Oksana; Henry, Susan A; Kohlwein, Sepp D

    2014-06-23

    Membrane phospholipids typically contain fatty acids (FAs) of 16 and 18 carbon atoms. This particular chain length is evolutionarily highly conserved and presumably provides maximum stability and dynamic properties to biological membranes in response to nutritional or environmental cues. Here, we show that the relative proportion of C16 versus C18 FAs is regulated by the activity of acetyl-CoA carboxylase (Acc1), the first and rate-limiting enzyme of FA de novo synthesis. Acc1 activity is attenuated by AMPK/Snf1-dependent phosphorylation, which is required to maintain an appropriate acyl-chain length distribution. Moreover, we find that the transcriptional repressor Opi1 preferentially binds to C16 over C18 phosphatidic acid (PA) species: thus, C16-chain containing PA sequesters Opi1 more effectively to the ER, enabling AMPK/Snf1 control of PA acyl-chain length to determine the degree of derepression of Opi1 target genes. These findings reveal an unexpected regulatory link between the major energy-sensing kinase, membrane lipid composition, and transcription. PMID:24960695

  15. Overexpression of the Transcriptional Repressor Complex BCL-6/BCoR Leads to Nuclear Aggregates Distinct from Classical Aggresomes

    PubMed Central

    Buchberger, Elisabeth; El Harchi, Miriam; Payrhuber, Dietmar; Zommer, Anna; Schauer, Dominic; Simonitsch-Klupp, Ingrid; Bilban, Martin; Brostjan, Christine

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear inclusions of aggregated proteins have primarily been characterized for molecules with aberrant poly-glutamine repeats and for mutated or structurally altered proteins. They were termed “nuclear aggresomes” and misfolding was shown to promote association with molecular chaperones and proteasomes. Here, we report that two components of a transcriptional repressor complex (BCL-6 and BCoR) of wildtype amino acid sequence can independently or jointly induce the formation of nuclear aggregates when overexpressed. The observation that the majority of cells rapidly downregulate BCL-6/BCoR levels, supports the notion that expression of these proteins is under tight control. The inclusions occur when BCL-6/BCoR expression exceeds 150-fold of endogenous levels. They preferentially develop in the nucleus by a gradual increase in aggregate size to form large, spheroid structures which are not associated with heat shock proteins or marked by ubiquitin. In contrast, we find the close association of BCL-6/BCoR inclusions with PML bodies and a reduction in aggregation upon the concomitant overexpression of histone deacetylases or heat shock protein 70. In summary, our data offer a perspective on nuclear aggregates distinct from classical “nuclear aggresomes”: Large complexes of spheroid structure can evolve in the nucleus without being marked by the cellular machinery for protein refolding and degradation. However, nuclear proteostasis can be restored by balancing the levels of chaperones. PMID:24146931

  16. Genetic Deletion of the Transcriptional Repressor NFIL3 Enhances Axon Growth In Vitro but Not Axonal Repair In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    van der Kallen, Loek R.; Eggers, Ruben; Ehlert, Erich M.; Verhaagen, Joost; Smit, August B.; van Kesteren, Ronald E.

    2015-01-01

    Axonal regeneration after injury requires the coordinated expression of genes in injured neurons. We previously showed that either reducing expression or blocking function of the transcriptional repressor NFIL3 activates transcription of regeneration-associated genes Arg1 and Gap43 and strongly promotes axon outgrowth in vitro. Here we tested whether genetic deletion or dominant-negative inhibition of NFIL3 could promote axon regeneration and functional recovery after peripheral nerve lesion in vivo. Contrary to our expectations, we observed no changes in the expression of regeneration-associated genes and a significant delay in functional recovery following genetic deletion of Nfil3. When NFIL3 function was inhibited specifically in dorsal root ganglia prior to sciatic nerve injury, we observed a decrease in regenerative axon growth into the distal nerve segment rather than an increase. Finally, we show that deletion of Nfil3 changes sciatic nerve lesion-induced expression in dorsal root ganglia of genes that are not typically involved in regeneration, including several olfactory receptors and developmental transcription factors. Together our findings show that removal of NFIL3 in vivo does not recapitulate the regeneration-promoting effects that were previously observed in vitro, indicating that in vivo transcriptional control of regeneration is probably more complex and more robust against perturbation than in vitro data may suggest. PMID:25993115

  17. Quaternary re-arrangement analysed by spectral enhancement: the interaction of a sporulation repressor with its antagonist.

    PubMed

    Scott, D J; Leejeerajumnean, S; Brannigan, J A; Lewis, R J; Wilkinson, A J; Hoggett, J G

    1999-11-12

    The protein/protein interaction between SinI and SinR has been studied by analytical ultracentrifugation and gel electrophoresis in an attempt to understand how these proteins contribute to developmental control of sporulation in Bacillus subtilis. SinR was found to be tetrameric, while SinI was found to exist as monomers and dimers in a rapidly reversible equilibrium. Labelling of SinR by incorporating the tryptophan analogue 7-azatryptophan (7AW) into the protein in place of tryptophan shifts the UV absorbance spectrum, thus allowing selective monitoring of 7AWSinR at 315 nm using the UV absorption optics of the analytical ultracentrifuge. Selective monitoring of SinR in mixtures of SinR and SinI enables the binding and stoichiometry of the interaction to be investigated quantitatively and unambiguously. We demonstrate that the oligomeric forms of SinR and SinI re-arrange to form a tight 1:1 SinR:SinI complex, with no stable intermediate species. A fragment of SinR, SinR(1-69), which contains only the DNA-binding domain, was found to be monomeric, showing that the protein appears not to oligomerise in a similar manner to the Cro repressor, a protein with which it shares a marked structural similarity. PMID:10547280

  18. WRKY76 is a rice transcriptional repressor playing opposite roles in blast disease resistance and cold stress tolerance.

    PubMed

    Yokotani, Naoki; Sato, Yuko; Tanabe, Shigeru; Chujo, Tetsuya; Shimizu, Takafumi; Okada, Kazunori; Yamane, Hisakazu; Shimono, Masaki; Sugano, Shoji; Takatsuji, Hiroshi; Kaku, Hisatoshi; Minami, Eiichi; Nishizawa, Yoko

    2013-11-01

    OsWRKY76 encodes a group IIa WRKY transcription factor of rice. The expression of OsWRKY76 was induced within 48h after inoculation with rice blast fungus (Magnaporthe oryzae), and by wounding, low temperature, benzothiadiazole, and abscisic acid. Green fluorescent protein-fused OsWRKY76 localized to the nuclei in rice epidermal cells. OsWRKY76 showed sequence-specific DNA binding to the W-box element in vitro and exhibited W-box-mediated transcriptional repressor activity in cultured rice cells. Overexpression of OsWRKY76 in rice plants resulted in drastically increased susceptibility to M. oryzae, but improved tolerance to cold stress. Microarray analysis revealed that overexpression of OsWRKY76 suppresses the induction of a specific set of PR genes and of genes involved in phytoalexin synthesis after inoculation with blast fungus, consistent with the observation that the levels of phytoalexins in the transgenic rice plants remained significantly lower than those in non-transformed control plants. Furthermore, overexpression of OsWRKY76 led to the increased expression of abiotic stress-associated genes such as peroxidase and lipid metabolism genes. These results strongly suggest that OsWRKY76 plays dual and opposing roles in blast disease resistance and cold tolerance. PMID:24043853

  19. Regulator of G-Protein Signaling – 5 (RGS5) Is a Novel Repressor of Hedgehog Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Mahoney, William M.; Gunaje, Jagadambika; Daum, Guenter; Dong, Xiu Rong; Majesky, Mark W.

    2013-01-01

    Hedgehog (Hh) signaling plays fundamental roles in morphogenesis, tissue repair, and human disease. Initiation of Hh signaling is controlled by the interaction of two multipass membrane proteins, patched (Ptc) and smoothened (Smo). Recent studies identify Smo as a G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR)-like protein that signals through large G-protein complexes which contain the Gαi subunit. We hypothesize Regulator of G-Protein Signaling (RGS) proteins, and specifically RGS5, are endogenous repressors of Hh signaling via their ability to act as GTPase activating proteins (GAPs) for GTP-bound Gαi, downstream of Smo. In support of this hypothesis, we demonstrate that RGS5 over-expression inhibits sonic hedgehog (Shh)-mediated signaling and osteogenesis in C3H10T1/2 cells. Conversely, signaling is potentiated by siRNA-mediated knock-down of RGS5 expression, but not RGS4 expression. Furthermore, using immuohistochemical analysis and co-immunoprecipitation (Co-IP), we demonstrate that RGS5 is present with Smo in primary cilia. This organelle is required for canonical Hh signaling in mammalian cells, and RGS5 is found in a physical complex with Smo in these cells. We therefore conclude that RGS5 is an endogenous regulator of Hh-mediated signaling and that RGS proteins are potential targets for novel therapeutics in Hh-mediated diseases. PMID:23637832

  20. Identification of a negative regulatory domain in the human papillomavirus type 18 promoter: interaction with the transcriptional repressor YY1.

    PubMed Central

    Bauknecht, T; Angel, P; Royer, H D; zur Hausen, H

    1992-01-01

    The human papillomavirus type 18 (HPV-18) promoter contains a TPA responsive element (TRE) which confers TPA responsiveness on a heterologous promoter. In the context of the HPV-18 promoter, however, this AP-1 site is inactive. We have identified a negative regulatory domain in the HPV-18 promoter which represses the constitutive and TPA-induced AP-1 activity. This negative regulatory sequence has been mapped to 44 nucleotides (OL13). We identified this element as a transcriptional silencer based on its ability to interfere with transcriptional initiation. This HPV-18 silencer domain was narrowed down further to 23 nucleotides, the OL13B element, which bears similarity to three other silencer sequences, present in the mouse N-ras gene upstream regulatory region, the mouse albumin gene enhancer and the adeno-associated virus P5 promoter. The transcriptional repressor protein YY1, which negatively regulates the P5 promoter, binds to the HPV-18 silencer with high affinity. Mutation of the YY1 binding site leads to an enhanced activity of the HPV-18 promoter, strongly suggesting that YY1 plays an important role in controlling HPV-18 early gene expression. Images PMID:1330541

  1. The Response Regulator YycF Inhibits Expression of the Fatty Acid Biosynthesis Repressor FabT in Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Mohedano, Maria L; Amblar, Mónica; de la Fuente, Alicia; Wells, Jerry M; López, Paloma

    2016-01-01

    The YycFG (also known as WalRK, VicRK, MicAB, or TCS02) two-component system (TCS) is highly conserved among Gram-positive bacteria with a low G+C content. In Streptococcus pneumoniae the YycF response regulator has been reported to be essential due to its control of pcsB gene expression. Previously we showed that overexpression of yycF in S. pneumoniae TIGR4 altered the transcription of genes involved in cell wall metabolism and fatty acid biosynthesis, giving rise to anomalous cell division and increased chain length of membrane fatty acids. Here, we have overexpressed the yycFG system in TIGR4 wild-type strain and yycF in a TIGR4 mutant depleted of YycG, and analyzed their effects on expression of proteins involved in fatty acid biosynthesis during activation of the TCS. We demonstrate that transcription of the fab genes and levels of their products were only altered in the YycF overexpressing strain, indicating that the unphosphorylated form of YycF is involved in the regulation of fatty acid biosynthesis. In addition, DNA-binding assays and in vitro transcription experiments with purified YycF and the promoter region of the FabTH-acp operon support a direct inhibition of transcription of the FabT repressor by YycF, thus confirming the role of the unphosphorylated form in transcriptional regulation. PMID:27610104

  2. Structure of the C-terminal domain of the arginine repressor protein from Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    SciTech Connect

    Cherney, Leonid T.; Cherney, Maia M.; Garen, Craig R.; Lu, George J.; James, Michael N. G.

    2008-09-01

    The structure of the core domain of the arginine repressor protein from M. tuberculosis has been determined with (1.85 Å resolution) and without (2.15 Å resolution) the arginine corepressor bound. Three additional arginine molecules have been found to bind to the core domain hexamer at high (0.2 M) arginine concentration. The Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) gene product encoded by open reading frame Rv1657 is an arginine repressor (ArgR). All genes involved in the l-arginine (hereafter arginine) biosynthetic pathway are essential for optimal growth of the Mtb pathogen, thus making MtbArgR a potential target for drug design. The C-terminal domains of arginine repressors (CArgR) participate in oligomerization and arginine binding. Several crystal forms of CArgR from Mtb (MtbCArgR) have been obtained. The X-ray crystal structures of MtbCArgR were determined at 1.85 Å resolution with bound arginine and at 2.15 Å resolution in the unliganded form. These structures show that six molecules of MtbCArgR are arranged into a hexamer having approximate 32 point symmetry that is formed from two trimers. The trimers rotate relative to each other by about 11° upon binding arginine. All residues in MtbCArgR deemed to be important for hexamer formation and for arginine binding have been identified from the experimentally determined structures presented. The hexamer contains six regular sites in which the arginine molecules have one common binding mode and three sites in which the arginine molecules have two overlapping binding modes. The latter sites only bind the ligand at high (200 mM) arginine concentrations.

  3. Structural basis for recognition of diverse transcriptional repressors by the TOPLESS family of corepressors

    PubMed Central

    Ke, Jiyuan; Ma, Honglei; Gu, Xin; Thelen, Adam; Brunzelle, Joseph S.; Li, Jiayang; Xu, H. Eric; Melcher, Karsten

    2015-01-01

    TOPLESS (TPL) and TOPLESS-related (TPR) proteins comprise a conserved family of plant transcriptional corepressors that are related to Tup1, Groucho, and TLE (transducin-like enhancer of split) corepressors in yeast, insects, and mammals. In plants, TPL/TPR corepressors regulate development, stress responses, and hormone signaling through interaction with small ethylene response factor–associated amphiphilic repression (EAR) motifs found in diverse transcriptional repressors. How EAR motifs can interact with TPL/TPR proteins is unknown. We confirm the amino-terminal domain of the TPL family of corepressors, which we term TOPLESS domain (TPD), as the EAR motif–binding domain. To understand the structural basis of this interaction, we determined the crystal structures of the TPD of rice (Os) TPR2 in apo (apo protein) state and in complexes with the EAR motifs from Arabidopsis NINJA (novel interactor of JAZ), IAA1 (auxin-responsive protein 1), and IAA10, key transcriptional repressors involved in jasmonate and auxin signaling. The OsTPR2 TPD adopts a new fold of nine helices, followed by a zinc finger, which are arranged into a disc-like tetramer. The EAR motifs in the three different complexes adopt a similar extended conformation with the hydrophobic residues fitting into the same surface groove of each OsTPR2 monomer. Sequence alignments and structure-based mutagenesis indicate that this mode of corepressor binding is highly conserved in a large set of transcriptional repressors, thus providing a general mechanism for gene repression mediated by the TPL family of corepressors. PMID:26601214

  4. Restricted Heterochromatin Formation Links NFATc2 Repressor Activity With Growth Promotion in Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    BAUMGART, SANDRA; GLESEL, ELISABETH; SINGH, GARIMA; CHEN, NAI-MING; REUTLINGER, KRISTINA; ZHANG, JINSAN; BILLADEAU, DANIEL D.; FERNANDEZ-ZAPICO, MARTIN E.; GRESS, THOMAS M.; SINGH, SHIV K.; ELLENRIEDER, VOLKER

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS Transcriptional silencing of the p15INK4b tumor suppressor pathway overcomes cellular protection against unrestrained proliferation in cancer. Here we show a novel pathway involving the oncogenic transcription factor nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) c2 targeting a p15INK4b-mediated failsafe mechanism to promote pancreatic cancer tumor growth. METHODS Immunohistochemistry, real-time polymerase chain reaction, immunoblotting, and immunofluorescence microscopy were used for expression studies. Cancer growth was assessed in vitro by [3H]thymidine incorporation, colony formation assays, and in vivo using xenograft tumor models. Protein-protein interactions, promoter regulation, and local histone modifications were analyzed by immunoprecipitation, DNA pull-down, reporter, and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays. RESULTS Our study uncovered induction of NFATc2 in late-stage pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia lesions with increased expression in tumor cell nuclei of advanced cancers. In the nucleus, NFATc2 targets the p15INK4b promoter for inducible heterochromatin formation and silencing. NFATc2 binding to its cognate promoter site induces stepwise recruitment of the histone methyltransferase Suv39H1, causes local H3K9 trimethylation, and allows docking of heterochromatin protein HP1γ to the repressor complex. Conversely, inactivation of NFATc2 disrupts this repressor complex assembly and local heterochromatin formation, resulting in restoration of p15INK4b expression and inhibition of pancreatic cancer growth in vitro and in vivo. CONCLUSIONS Here we describe a novel mechanism for NFATc2-mediated gene regulation and identify a functional link among its repressor activity, the silencing of the suppressor pathway p15INK4b, and its pancreatic cancer growth regulatory functions. Thus, we provide evidence that inactivation of oncogenic NFATc2 might be an attractive strategy in treatment of pancreatic cancer. PMID:22079596

  5. Structure of the MecI repressor from Staphylococcus aureus in complex with the cognate DNA operator of mec

    SciTech Connect

    Safo, Martin K.; Ko, Tzu-Ping; Musayev, Faik N.; Zhao, Qixun; Archer, Gordon L.

    2006-04-01

    The up-and-down binding of dimeric MecI to mecA dyad DNA may account for the cooperative effect of the repressor. The dimeric repressor MecI regulates the mecA gene that encodes the penicillin-binding protein PBP-2a in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). MecI is similar to BlaI, the repressor for the blaZ gene of β-lactamase. MecI and BlaI can bind to both operator DNA sequences. The crystal structure of MecI in complex with the 32 base-pair cognate DNA of mec was determined to 3.8 Å resolution. MecI is a homodimer and each monomer consists of a compact N-terminal winged-helix domain, which binds to DNA, and a loosely packed C-terminal helical domain, which intertwines with its counter-monomer. The crystal contains horizontal layers of virtual DNA double helices extending in three directions, which are separated by perpendicular DNA segments. Each DNA segment is bound to two MecI dimers. Similar to the BlaI–mec complex, but unlike the MecI–bla complex, the MecI repressors bind to both sides of the mec DNA dyad that contains four conserved sequences of TACA/TGTA. The results confirm the up-and-down binding to the mec operator, which may account for cooperative effect of the repressor.

  6. Crystal structure of the lambda repressor C-terminal domain provides a model for cooperative operator binding.

    PubMed

    Bell, C E; Frescura, P; Hochschild, A; Lewis, M

    2000-06-23

    Interactions between transcription factors bound to separate operator sites commonly play an important role in gene regulation by mediating cooperative binding to the DNA. However, few detailed structural models for understanding the molecular basis of such cooperativity are available. The c1 repressor of bacteriophage lambda is a classic example of a protein that binds to its operator sites cooperatively. The C-terminal domain of the repressor mediates dimerization as well as a dimer-dimer interaction that results in the cooperative binding of two repressor dimers to adjacent operator sites. Here, we present the x-ray crystal structure of the lambda repressor C-terminal domain determined by multiwavelength anomalous diffraction. Remarkably, the interactions that mediate cooperativity are captured in the crystal, where two dimers associate about a 2-fold axis of symmetry. Based on the structure and previous genetic and biochemical data, we present a model for the cooperative binding of two lambda repressor dimers at adjacent operator sites. PMID:10892750

  7. The homeobox gene Mohawk represses transcription by recruiting the sin3A/HDAC co-repressor complex.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Douglas M; Beres, Brian J; Wilson-Rawls, Jeanne; Rawls, Alan

    2009-03-01

    Mohawk is an atypical homeobox gene expressed in embryonic progenitor cells of skeletal muscle, tendon, and cartilage. We demonstrate that Mohawk functions as a transcriptional repressor capable of blocking the myogenic conversion of 10T1/2 fibroblasts. The repressor activity is located in three small, evolutionarily conserved domains (MRD1-3) in the carboxy-terminal half of the protein. Point mutation analysis revealed six residues in MRD1 are sufficient for repressor function. The carboxy-terminal half of Mohawk is able to recruit components of the Sin3A/HDAC co-repressor complex (Sin3A, Hdac1, and Sap18) and a subset of Polymerase II general transcription factors (Tbp, TFIIA1 and TFIIB). Furthermore, Sap18, a protein that bridges the Sin3A/HDAC complex to DNA-bound transcription factors, is co-immunoprecipitated by MRD1. These data predict that Mohawk can repress transcription through recruitment of the Sin3A/HDAC co-repressor complex, and as a result, repress target genes required for the differentiation of cells to the myogenic lineage. PMID:19235719

  8. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the arginine repressor of the hyperthermophile Thermotoga neapolitana

    SciTech Connect

    Massant, Jan Peeters, Eveline; Charlier, Daniel; Maes, Dominique

    2006-01-01

    The arginine repressor of the hyperthermophile T. neapolitana was crystallized with and without its corepressor arginine. Both crystals diffracted to high resolution and belong to the orthorhombic space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with similar unit-cell parameters. The arginine repressor of Thermotoga neapolitana (ArgRTnp) is a member of the family of multifunctional bacterial arginine repressors involved in the regulation of arginine metabolism. This hyperthermophilic repressor shows unique DNA-binding features that distinguish it from its homologues. ArgRTnp exists as a homotrimeric protein that assembles into hexamers at higher protein concentrations and/or in the presence of arginine. ArgRTnp was crystallized with and without its corepressor arginine using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. Crystals of the aporepressor diffracted to a resolution of 2.1 Å and belong to the orthorhombic P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1} space group, with unit-cell parameters a = 117.73, b = 134.15, c = 139.31 Å. Crystals of the repressor in the presence of its corepressor arginine diffracted to a resolution of 2.4 Å and belong to the same space group, with similar unit-cell parameters.

  9. Individual differences in self-reported thought control: the role of the repressive coping sytle.

    PubMed

    Luciano, Juan Vicente; Algarabel, Salvador

    2006-05-01

    The purpose of the present research is to assess differences between repressors and non repressors in some aspects associated with conscious thought control. Thus, Sixty-three Spanish university students with different combinations of trait anxiety and defensiveness completed the Thought Control Ability Questionnaire (TCAQ) and the White Bear Suppression Inventory (WBSI). Data analysis showed that subjects with low anxiety (repressors and low anxious) reported higher perceived ability to control unpleasant thoughts and less tendency to suppress than did subjects with high anxiety (high anxious and defensive high anxious). Implications of these results are discussed in relation to recent researches that have explored the association between repression and thought suppression. PMID:17296036

  10. Decreased sucrase and lactase activity in iron deficiency is accompanied by reduced gene expression and upregulation of the transcriptional repressor PDX-1.

    PubMed

    West, Adrian R; Oates, Phillip S

    2005-12-01

    Disaccharidases are important digestive enzymes whose activities can be reduced by iron deficiency. We hypothesise that this is due to reduced gene expression, either by impairment to enterocyte differentiation or by iron-sensitive mechanisms that regulate mRNA levels in enterocytes. Iron-deficient Wistar rats were generated by dietary means. The enzyme activities and kinetics of sucrase and lactase were tested as well as the activity of intestinal alkaline phosphatase (IAP)-II because it is unrelated to carbohydrate digestion. mRNA levels of beta-actin, sucrase, lactase, and the associated transcription factors pancreatic duodenal homeobox (PDX)-1, caudal-related homeobox (CDX)-2, GATA-binding protein (GATA)-4, and hepatocyte nuclear factor (HNF)-1 were measured by real-time PCR. Spatial patterns of protein and gene expression were assessed by immunofluorescence and in situ hybridization, respectively. It was found that iron-deficient rats had significantly lower sucrase (19.5% lower) and lactase (56.8% lower) but not IAP-II activity than control rats. Kinetic properties of both enzymes remained unchanged from controls, suggesting a decrease in the quantity of enzyme present. Sucrase and lactase mRNA levels were reduced by 44.5% and 67.9%, respectively, by iron deficiency, suggesting that enzyme activity is controlled primarily by gene expression. Iron deficiency did not affect the pattern of protein and gene expression along the crypt to villus axis. Expression of PDX-1, a repressor of sucrase and lactase promoters, was 4.5-fold higher in iron deficiency, whereas CDX-2, GATA-4, and HNF-1 levels were not significantly different. These data suggest that decreases in sucrase and lactase activities result from a reduction in gene expression, following from increased levels of the transcriptional repressor PDX-1. PMID:16081762

  11. Identification of Chimeric Repressors that Confer Salt and Osmotic Stress Tolerance in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Kazama, Daisuke; Itakura, Masateru; Kurusu, Takamitsu; Mitsuda, Nobutaka; Ohme-Takagi, Masaru; Tada, Yuichi

    2013-01-01

    We produced transgenic Arabidopsis plants that express chimeric genes for transcription factors converted to dominant repressors, using Chimeric REpressor gene-Silencing Technology (CRES-T), and evaluated the salt tolerance of each line. The seeds of the CRES-T lines for ADA2b, Msantd, DDF1, DREB26, AtGeBP, and ATHB23 exhibited higher germination rates than Wild type (WT) and developed rosette plants under up to 200 mM NaCl or 400 mM mannitol. WT plants did not grow under these conditions. In these CRES-T lines, the expression patterns of stress-related genes such as RD29A, RD22, DREB1A, and P5CS differed from those in WT plants, suggesting the involvement of the six transcription factors identified here in the stress response pathways regulated by the products of these stress-related genes. Our results demonstrate additional proof that CRES-T is a superior tool for revealing the function of transcription factors. PMID:27137403

  12. ZIP: a novel transcription repressor, represses EGFR oncogene and suppresses breast carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ruifang; Zhang, Hua; Yu, Wenhua; Chen, Yupeng; Gui, Bin; Liang, Jing; Wang, Yan; Sun, Luyang; Yang, Xiaohan; Zhang, Yu; Shi, Lei; Li, Yanyan; Shang, Yongfeng

    2009-01-01

    Despite the importance of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) in animal development and malignant transformation, surprisingly little is known about the regulation of its expression. Here, we report a novel zinc finger and G-patch domain-containing protein, ZIP. We demonstrated that ZIP acts as a transcription repressor through the recruitment of the nucleosome remodelling and deacetylase complex. Transcriptional target analysis revealed that ZIP regulates several cellular signalling pathways including EGFR pathways that are critically involved in cell proliferation, survival, and migration. We showed that ZIP inhibits cell proliferation and suppresses breast carcinogenesis, and that ZIP depletion leads to a drastic tumour growth in vivo. We found that ZIP is downregulated in breast carcinomas and that its level of expression is negatively correlated with that of EGFR. Our data indicate that ZIP is a novel transcription repressor and a potential tumour suppressor. These findings may shed new light on the EGFR-related breast carcinogenesis and might offer a potential new target for breast cancer therapy. PMID:19644445

  13. The LAMMER Kinase Homolog, Lkh1, Regulates Tup Transcriptional Repressors through Phosphorylation in Schizosaccharomyces pombe*

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Won-Hwa; Park, Yun-Hee; Park, Hee-Moon

    2010-01-01

    Disruption of the fission yeast LAMMER kinase, Lkh1, gene resulted in diverse phenotypes, including adhesive filamentous growth and oxidative stress sensitivity, but an exact cellular function had not been assigned to Lkh1. Through an in vitro pull-down approach, a transcriptional repressor, Tup12, was identified as an Lkh1 binding partner. Interactions between Lkh1 and Tup11 or Tup12 were confirmed by in vitro and in vivo binding assays. Tup proteins were phosphorylated by Lkh1 in a LAMMER motif-dependent manner. The LAMMER motif was also necessary for substrate recognition in vitro and cellular function in vivo. Transcriptional activity assays using promoters negatively regulated by Tup11 and Tup12 showed 6 or 2 times higher activity in the Δlkh1 mutant than the wild type, respectively. Northern analysis revealed derepressed expression of the fbp1+ mRNA in Δlkh1 and in Δtup11Δtup12 mutant cells under repressed conditions. Δlkh1 and Δtup11Δtup12 mutant cells showed flocculation, which was reversed by co-expression of Tup11 and -12 with Ssn6. Here, we presented a new aspect of the LAMMER kinase by demonstrating that the activities of global transcriptional repressors, Tup11 and Tup12, were positively regulated by Lkh1-mediated phosphorylation. PMID:20200159

  14. DAX1 suppresses FXR transactivity as a novel co-repressor

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Jin; Lu, Yan; Liu, Ruya; Xiong, Xuelian; Zhang, Zhijian; Zhang, Xianfeng; Ning, Guang; Li, Xiaoying

    2011-09-09

    Highlights: {yields} DAX1 is co-localized with FXR and interacts with FXR. {yields} DAX1 acts as a negative regulator of FXR. {yields} Three LXXLL motifs in the N-terminus of DAX1 were required. {yields} DAX1 suppresses FXR transactivation by competing with co-activators. -- Abstract: Bile acid receptor FXR (farnesoid X receptor) is a key regulator of hepatic bile acid, glucose and lipid homeostasis through regulation of numerous genes involved in the process of bile acid, triglyceride and glucose metabolism. DAX1 (dosage-sensitive sex reversal adrenal hypoplasia congenital critical region on X chromosome, gene 1) is an atypical member of the nuclear receptor family due to lack of classical DNA-binding domains and acts primarily as a co-repressor of many nuclear receptors. Here, we demonstrated that DAX1 is co-localized with FXR in the nucleus and acted as a negative regulator of FXR through a physical interaction with FXR. Our study showed that over-expression of DAX1 down-regulated the expression of FXR target genes, whereas knockdown of DAX1 led to their up-regulation. Furthermore, three LXXLL motifs in the N-terminus of DAX1 were required for the full repression of FXR transactivation. In addition, our study characterized that DAX1 suppresses FXR transactivation via competing with co-activators such as SRC-1 and PGC-1{alpha}. In conclusion, DAX1 acts as a co-repressor to negatively modulate FXR transactivity.

  15. The Escherichia coli glucose transporter enzyme IICBGlc recruits the global repressor Mlc

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Tae-Wook; Cho, Seung-Hyon; Shin, Dongwoo; Kim, Ja-Hee; Jeong, Jin-Young; Lee, Joon-Hee; Roe, Jung-Hye; Peterkofsky, Alan; Kang, Sa-Ouk; Ryu, Sangryeol; Seok, Yeong-Jae

    2001-01-01

    In addition to effecting the catalysis of sugar uptake, the bacterial phosphoenolpyruvate:sugar phosphotransferase system regulates a variety of physiological processes. Exposure of cells to glucose can result in repression or induction of gene expression. While the mechanism for carbon catabolite repression by glucose was well documented, that for glucose induction was not clearly understood in Escherichia coli. Recently, glucose induction of several E.coli genes has been shown to be mediated by the global repressor Mlc. Here, we elucidate a general mechanism for glucose induction of gene expression in E.coli, revealing a novel type of regulatory circuit for gene expression mediated by the phosphorylation state-dependent interaction of a membrane-bound protein with a repressor. The dephospho-form of enzyme IICBGlc, but not its phospho-form, interacts directly with Mlc and induces transcription of Mlc-regulated genes by displacing Mlc from its target sequences. Therefore, the glucose induction of Mlc-regulated genes is caused by dephosphorylation of the membrane-bound transporter enzyme IICBGlc, which directly recruits Mlc to derepress its regulon. PMID:11157755

  16. The bovine papillomavirus type 1 E2 transactivator and repressor proteins use different nuclear localization signals.

    PubMed

    Skiadopoulos, M H; McBride, A A

    1996-02-01

    The E2 gene of bovine papillomavirus type 1 encodes at least three nuclear phosphoproteins that regulate viral transcription and DNA replication. All three proteins have a common C-terminal domain that has DNA-binding and dimerization activities. A basic region in this domain forms an alpha helix which makes direct contact with the DNA target. In this study, it is shown that in addition to its role in DNA binding, this basic region functions as a nuclear localization signal both in the E2 DNA-binding domain and in a heterologous protein. Deletion of this signal sequence resulted in increased accumulation of the E2 transactivator and repressor proteins in the cytoplasm, but nuclear localization was not eliminated. In the full-length transactivator protein, another signal, present in the N-terminal transactivation domain, is used for transport to the nucleus, and the C-terminal nuclear localization signal(s) are masked. The use of different nuclear localization signals could potentially allow differential regulation of the subcellular localization of the E2 transactivator and repressor proteins at some stage in the viral life cycle. PMID:8551571

  17. A Transcriptional Repressor ZBTB1 Promotes Chromatin Remodeling and Translesion DNA Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyungjin; Dejsuphong, Donniphat; Adelmant, Guillaume; Ceccaldi, Raphael; Yang, Kailin; Marto, Jarrod A.; D’Andrea, Alan D.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Timely DNA replication across damaged DNA is critical for maintaining genomic integrity. Translesion DNA synthesis (TLS) allows bypass of DNA lesions using error-prone TLS polymerases. The E3 ligase RAD18 is necessary for PCNA monoubiquitination and TLS polymerase recruitment; however, the regulatory steps upstream of RAD18 activation are less understood. Here, we show that the UBZ4 domain-containing transcriptional repressor ZBTB1 is a critical upstream regulator of TLS. The UBZ4 motif is required for PCNA monoubiquitination and survival after UV damage. ZBTB1 associates with KAP-1, a transcriptional repressor whose phosphorylation relaxes chromatin after DNA damage. ZBTB1 depletion impairs formation of phospho-KAP-1 at UV damage sites and reduces RAD18 recruitment. Furthermore, phosphorylation of KAP-1 is necessary for efficient PCNA modification. We propose that ZBTB1 is required for PCNA monoubiquitination, by localizing phospho-KAP-1 to chromatin and enhancing RAD18 accessibility. Collectively, our study implicates a new ubiquitin-binding protein in orchestrating chromatin remodeling during DNA repair. PMID:24657165

  18. Treponema denticola TroR is a manganese- and iron-dependent transcriptional repressor

    PubMed Central

    Brett, Paul J; Burtnick, Mary N; Fenno, J Christopher; Gherardini, Frank C

    2008-01-01

    Treponema denticola harbours a genetic locus with significant homology to most of the previously characterized Treponema pallidum tro operon. Within this locus are five genes (troABCDR) encoding for the components of an ATP-binding cassette cation-transport system (troABCD) and a DtxR-like transcriptional regulator (troR). In addition, a σ70-like promoter and an 18 bp region of dyad symmetry were identified upstream of the troA start codon. This putative operator sequence demonstrated similarity to the T. pallidum TroR (TroRTp) binding sequence; however, the position of this motif with respect to the predicted tro promoters differed. Interestingly, unlike the T. pallidum orthologue, T. denticola TroR (TroRTd) possesses a C-terminal Src homology 3-like domain commonly associated with DtxR family members. In the present study, we show that TroRTd is a manganese- and iron-dependent transcriptional repressor using Escherichia coli reporter constructs and in T. denticola. In addition, we demonstrate that although TroRTd possessing various C-terminal deletions maintain metal-sensing capacities, these truncated proteins exhibit reduced repressor activities in comparison with full-length TroRTd. Based upon these findings, we propose that TroRTd represents a novel member of the DtxR family of transcriptional regulators and is likely to play an important role in regulating both manganese and iron homeostases in this spirochaete. PMID:18761626

  19. Antiproliferation Activity of a Small Molecule Repressor of Liver Receptor Homolog 1

    PubMed Central

    Corzo, Cesar A.; Mari, Yelenis; Chang, Mi Ra; Khan, Tanya; Kuruvilla, Dana; Nuhant, Philippe; Kumar, Naresh; West, Graham M.; Duckett, Derek R.; Roush, William R.

    2015-01-01

    The orphan nuclear receptor liver receptor homolog 1 (LRH-1; NR5A2) is a potent regulator of cholesterol metabolism and bile acid homeostasis. Recently, LRH-1 has been shown to play an important role in intestinal inflammation and in the progression of estrogen receptor positive and negative breast cancers and pancreatic cancer. Structural studies have revealed that LRH-1 can bind phospholipids and the dietary phospholipid dilauroylphosphatidylcholine activates LRH-1 activity in rodents. Here we characterize the activity of a novel synthetic nonphospholipid small molecule repressor of LRH-1, SR1848 (6-[4-(3-chlorophenyl)piperazin-1-yl]-3-cyclohexyl-1H-pyrimidine-2,4-dione). In cotransfection studies, SR1848 reduced LRH-1-dependent expression of a reporter gene and in cells that endogenously express LRH-1 dose dependently reduced the expression of cyclin-D1 and -E1, resulting in inhibition of cell proliferation. The cellular effects of SR1848 treatment are recapitulated after transfection of cells with small-interfering RNA targeting LRH-1. Immunocytochemistry analysis shows that SR1848 induces rapid translocation of nuclear LRH-1 to the cytoplasm. Combined, these results suggest that SR1848 is a functional repressor of LRH-1 that impacts expression of genes involved in proliferation in LRH-1–expressing cancers. Thus, SR1848 represents a novel chemical scaffold for the development of therapies targeting malignancies driven by LRH-1. PMID:25473120

  20. Cell cycle-related transformation of the E2F4-p130 repressor complex

    SciTech Connect

    Popov, Boris . E-mail: popov_478@hotmail.com; Chang, L.-S.; Serikov, Vladimir

    2005-10-28

    During G0 phase the p130, member of the pRb tumor suppressor protein family, forms a repressor complex with E2F4 which is inactivated in G1/S by hyperphosphorylation of the p130. The role of p130 after G1/S remains poorly investigated. We found that in nuclear extracts of T98G cells, the p130-E2F4-DNA (pp-E2F4) complex does not dissociate at G1/S transition, but instead reverts to the p130-E2F4-cyclin E/A-cdk2 (cyc/cdk-pp-E2F4) complex, which is detected in S and G2/M phases of the cell cycle. Hyperphosphorylation of the p130 at G1/S transition is associated with a decrease of its total amount; however, this protein is still detected during the rest of the cell cycle, and it is increasingly hyperphosphorylated in the cytosol, but continuously dephosphorylated in the nucleus. Both nuclear and cytosol cell fractions in T98G cells contain a hyperphosphorylated form of p130 in complex with E2F4 at S and G2/M cell cycle phases. In contrast to T98G cells, transformation of the p130 containing cyc/cdk-pp-E2F4 complex into the p130-pp-E2F4 repressor does not occur in HeLa cells under growth restriction conditions.

  1. Crystal Structure of the Arginine Repressor Protein in Complex With the DNA Operator From Mycobacterium Tuberculosis

    SciTech Connect

    Cherney, L.T.; Cherney, M.M.; Garen, C.R.; Lu, G.J.; James, M.N.G.

    2009-05-12

    The Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) gene product encoded by open reading frame Rv1657 is an arginine repressor (ArgR). All genes involved in the L-arginine (hereafter arginine) biosynthetic pathway are essential for optimal growth of the Mtb pathogen, thus making MtbArgR a potential target for drug design. The C-terminal domains of arginine repressors (CArgR) participate in oligomerization and arginine binding. Several crystal forms of CArgR from Mtb (MtbCArgR) have been obtained. The X-ray crystal structures of MtbCArgR were determined at 1.85 {angstrom} resolution with bound arginine and at 2.15 {angstrom} resolution in the unliganded form. These structures show that six molecules of MtbCArgR are arranged into a hexamer having approximate 32 point symmetry that is formed from two trimers. The trimers rotate relative to each other by about 11{sup o} upon binding arginine. All residues in MtbCArgR deemed to be important for hexamer formation and for arginine binding have been identified from the experimentally determined structures presented. The hexamer contains six regular sites in which the arginine molecules have one common binding mode and three sites in which the arginine molecules have two overlapping binding modes. The latter sites only bind the ligand at high (200 mM) arginine concentrations.

  2. Transcriptional regulator Leu3 of Saccharomyces cerevisiae: separation of activator and repressor functions.

    PubMed Central

    Sze, J Y; Remboutsika, E; Kohlhaw, G B

    1993-01-01

    The Leu3 protein of Saccharomyces cerevisiae binds to specific DNA sequences present in the 5' noncoding region of at least five RNA polymerase II-transcribed genes. Leu3 functions as a transcriptional activator only when the metabolic intermediate alpha-isopropylmalate is also present. In the absence of alpha-isopropylmalate, Leu3 causes transcription to be repressed below basal levels. We show here that different portions of the Leu3 protein are responsible for activation and repression. Fusion of the 30 C-terminal residues of Leu3 to the DNA-binding domain of the Gal4 protein created a strong cross-species activator, demonstrating that the short C-terminal region is not only required but also sufficient for transcriptional activation. Using a recently developed Leu3-responsive in vitro transcription assay as a test system for repression (J. Sze, M. Woontner, J. Jaehning, and G. B. Kohlhaw, Science 258:1143-1145, 1992), we show that mutant forms of the Leu3 protein that lack the activation domain still function as repressors. The shortest repressor thus identified had only about 15% of the mass of the full-length Leu3 protein and was centered on the DNA-binding region of Leu3. Implications of this finding for the mechanism of repression are discussed. Images PMID:8355711

  3. Transcriptional regulator Leu3 of Saccharomyces cerevisiae: separation of activator and repressor functions.

    PubMed

    Sze, J Y; Remboutsika, E; Kohlhaw, G B

    1993-09-01

    The Leu3 protein of Saccharomyces cerevisiae binds to specific DNA sequences present in the 5' noncoding region of at least five RNA polymerase II-transcribed genes. Leu3 functions as a transcriptional activator only when the metabolic intermediate alpha-isopropylmalate is also present. In the absence of alpha-isopropylmalate, Leu3 causes transcription to be repressed below basal levels. We show here that different portions of the Leu3 protein are responsible for activation and repression. Fusion of the 30 C-terminal residues of Leu3 to the DNA-binding domain of the Gal4 protein created a strong cross-species activator, demonstrating that the short C-terminal region is not only required but also sufficient for transcriptional activation. Using a recently developed Leu3-responsive in vitro transcription assay as a test system for repression (J. Sze, M. Woontner, J. Jaehning, and G. B. Kohlhaw, Science 258:1143-1145, 1992), we show that mutant forms of the Leu3 protein that lack the activation domain still function as repressors. The shortest repressor thus identified had only about 15% of the mass of the full-length Leu3 protein and was centered on the DNA-binding region of Leu3. Implications of this finding for the mechanism of repression are discussed. PMID:8355711

  4. High-Resolution Specificity from DNA Sequencing Highlights Alternative Modes of Lac Repressor Binding

    PubMed Central

    Zuo, Zheng; Stormo, Gary D.

    2014-01-01

    Knowing the specificity of transcription factors is critical to understanding regulatory networks in cells. The lac repressor–operator system has been studied for many years, but not with high-throughput methods capable of determining specificity comprehensively. Details of its binding interaction and its selection of an asymmetric binding site have been controversial. We employed a new method to accurately determine relative binding affinities to thousands of sequences simultaneously, requiring only sequencing of bound and unbound fractions. An analysis of 2560 different DNA sequence variants, including both base changes and variations in operator length, provides a detailed view of lac repressor sequence specificity. We find that the protein can bind with nearly equal affinities to operators of three different lengths, but the sequence preference changes depending on the length, demonstrating alternative modes of interaction between the protein and DNA. The wild-type operator has an odd length, causing the two monomers to bind in alternative modes, making the asymmetric operator the preferred binding site. We tested two other members of the LacI/GalR protein family and find that neither can bind with high affinity to sites with alternative lengths or shows evidence of alternative binding modes. A further comparison with known and predicted motifs suggests that the lac repressor may be unique in this ability and that this may contribute to its selection. PMID:25209146

  5. Single-Molecule Spectroscopic Determination of Lac Repressor-DNA Loop Conformation

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Michael A.; Okamoto, Kenji; Kahn, Jason D.; English, Douglas S.

    2005-01-01

    The Escherichia coli lactose repressor protein (LacI) provides a classic model for understanding protein-induced DNA looping. LacI has a C-terminal four-helix bundle tetramerization domain that may act as a flexible hinge. In previous work, several DNA constructs, each containing two lac operators bracketing a sequence-induced bend, were designed to stabilize different possible looping geometries. The resulting hyperstable LacI-DNA loops exist as both a compact “closed” form with a V-shaped repressor and also a more “open” form with an extended hinge. The “9C14” construct was of particular interest because footprinting, electrophoretic mobility shift, and ring closure experiments suggested that it forms both geometries. Previous fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) measurements gave an efficiency of energy transfer (ET) of 70%, confirming the existence of a closed form. These measurements could not determine whether open form or intermediate geometries are populated or the timescale of interconversion. We have now applied single-molecule FRET to Cy3, Cy5 double-labeled LacI-DNA loops diffusing freely in solution. By using multiple excitation wavelengths and by carefully examining the behavior of the zero-ET peak during titration with LacI, we show that the LacI-9C14 loop exists exclusively in a single closed form exhibiting essentially 100% ET. PMID:16085773

  6. Co-repressor CBFA2T2 regulates pluripotency and germline development.

    PubMed

    Tu, Shengjiang; Narendra, Varun; Yamaji, Masashi; Vidal, Simon E; Rojas, Luis Alejandro; Wang, Xiaoshi; Kim, Sang Yong; Garcia, Benjamin A; Tuschl, Thomas; Stadtfeld, Matthias; Reinberg, Danny

    2016-06-16

    Developmental specification of germ cells lies at the heart of inheritance, as germ cells contain all of the genetic and epigenetic information transmitted between generations. The critical developmental event distinguishing germline from somatic lineages is the differentiation of primordial germ cells (PGCs), precursors of sex-specific gametes that produce an entire organism upon fertilization. Germ cells toggle between uni- and pluripotent states as they exhibit their own 'latent' form of pluripotency. For example, PGCs express a number of transcription factors in common with embryonic stem (ES) cells, including OCT4 (encoded by Pou5f1), SOX2, NANOG and PRDM14 (refs 2, 3, 4). A biochemical mechanism by which these transcription factors converge on chromatin to produce the dramatic rearrangements underlying ES-cell- and PGC-specific transcriptional programs remains poorly understood. Here we identify a novel co-repressor protein, CBFA2T2, that regulates pluripotency and germline specification in mice. Cbfa2t2(-/-) mice display severe defects in PGC maturation and epigenetic reprogramming. CBFA2T2 forms a biochemical complex with PRDM14, a germline-specific transcription factor. Mechanistically, CBFA2T2 oligomerizes to form a scaffold upon which PRDM14 and OCT4 are stabilized on chromatin. Thus, in contrast to the traditional 'passenger' role of a co-repressor, CBFA2T2 functions synergistically with transcription factors at the crossroads of the fundamental developmental plasticity between uni- and pluripotency. PMID:27281218

  7. Cif is negatively regulated by the TetR family repressor CifR.

    PubMed

    MacEachran, Daniel P; Stanton, Bruce A; O'Toole, George A

    2008-07-01

    We previously reported that the novel Pseudomonas aeruginosa toxin Cif is capable of decreasing apical membrane expression of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). We further demonstrated that Cif is capable of degrading the synthetic epoxide hydrolase (EH) substrate S-NEPC [(2S,3S)-trans-3-phenyl-2-oxiranylmethyl 4-nitrophenol carbonate], suggesting that Cif may be reducing apical membrane expression of CFTR via its EH activity. Here we report that Cif is capable of degrading the xenobiotic epoxide epibromohydrin (EBH) to its vicinal diol 3-bromo-1,2-propanediol. We also demonstrate that this epoxide is a potent inducer of cif gene expression. We show that the predicted TetR family transcriptional repressor encoded by the PA2931 gene, which is immediately adjacent to and divergently transcribed from the cif-containing, three-gene operon, negatively regulates cif gene expression by binding to the promoter region immediately upstream of the cif-containing operon. Furthermore, this protein-DNA interaction is disrupted by the epoxide EBH in vitro, suggesting that the binding of EBH by the PA2931 protein product drives the disassociation from its DNA-binding site. Given its role as a repressor of cif gene expression, we have renamed PA2931 as CifR. Finally, we demonstrate that P. aeruginosa strains isolated from cystic fibrosis patient sputum with increased cif gene expression are impaired for the expression of the cifR gene. PMID:18458065

  8. Structure-Based Functional Characterization of Repressor of Toxin (Rot), a Central Regulator of Staphylococcus aureus Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Killikelly, April; Benson, Meredith A.; Ohneck, Elizabeth A.; Sampson, Jared M.; Jakoncic, Jean; Spurrier, Brett

    2014-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is responsible for a large number of diverse infections worldwide. In order to support its pathogenic lifestyle, S. aureus has to regulate the expression of virulence factors in a coordinated fashion. One of the central regulators of the S. aureus virulence regulatory networks is the transcription factor repressor of toxin (Rot). Rot plays a key role in regulating S. aureus virulence through activation or repression of promoters that control expression of a large number of critical virulence factors. However, the mechanism by which Rot mediates gene regulation has remained elusive. Here, we have determined the crystal structure of Rot and used this information to probe the contribution made by specific residues to Rot function. Rot was found to form a dimer, with each monomer harboring a winged helix-turn-helix (WHTH) DNA-binding motif. Despite an overall acidic pI, the asymmetric electrostatic charge profile suggests that Rot can orient the WHTH domain to bind DNA. Structure-based site-directed mutagenesis studies demonstrated that R91, at the tip of the wing, plays an important role in DNA binding, likely through interaction with the minor groove. We also found that Y66, predicted to bind within the major groove, contributes to Rot interaction with target promoters. Evaluation of Rot binding to different activated and repressed promoters revealed that certain mutations on Rot exhibit promoter-specific effects, suggesting for the first time that Rot differentially interacts with target promoters. This work provides insight into a precise mechanism by which Rot controls virulence factor regulation in S. aureus. PMID:25331435

  9. Structure-based functional characterization of repressor of toxin (Rot), a central regulator of staphylococcus aureus virulence

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Killikelly, April; Jakoncic, Jean; Benson, Meredith A.; Ohneck, Elizabeth A.; Sampson, Jared M.; Spurrier, Brett; Torres, Victoer J.; Kong, Xian -Peng

    2014-10-20

    Staphylococcus aureus is responsible for a large number of diverse infections worldwide. In order to support its pathogenic lifestyle, S. aureus has to regulate the expression of virulence factors in a coordinated fashion. One of the central regulators of the S. aureus virulence regulatory networks is the transcription factor repressor of toxin (Rot). Rot plays a key role in regulating S. aureus virulence through activation or repression of promoters that control expression of a large number of critical virulence factors. However, the mechanism by which Rot mediates gene regulation has remained elusive. Here, we have determined the crystal structure ofmore » Rot and used this information to probe the contribution made by specific residues to Rot function. Rot was found to form a dimer, with each monomer harboring a winged helix-turn-helix (WHTH) DNA-binding motif. Despite an overall acidic pI, the asymmetric electrostatic charge profile suggests that Rot can orient the WHTH domain to bind DNA. Structure-based site-directed mutagenesis studies demonstrated that R91, at the tip of the wing, plays an important role in DNA binding, likely through interaction with the minor groove. We also found that Y66, predicted to bind within the major groove, contributes to Rot interaction with target promoters. Evaluation of Rot binding to different activated and repressed promoters revealed that certain mutations on Rot exhibit promoter-specific effects, suggesting for the first time that Rot differentially interacts with target promoters. As a result, this work provides insight into a precise mechanism by which Rot controls virulence factor regulation in S. aureus.« less

  10. Water-mediated contacts in the trp-repressor operator complex recognition process.

    PubMed

    Wibowo, Fajar R; Rauch, Christine; Trieb, Michael; Wellenzohn, Bernd; Liedl, Klaus R

    2004-04-15

    Water-mediated contacts are known as an important recognition tool in trp-repressor operator systems. One of these contacts involves two conserved base pairs (G(6).C(-6) and A(5). T(-5)) and three amino acids (Lys 72, Ile 79, and Ala 80). To investigate the nature of these contacts, we analyzed the X-ray structure (PDB code: 1TRO) of the trp-repressor operator complex by means of molecular dynamics simulations. This X-ray structure contains two dimers that exhibit structural differences. From these two different starting structures, two 10 ns molecular dynamics simulations have been performed. Both of our simulations show an increase of water molecules in the major groove at one side of the dimer, while the other side remains unchanged compared to the X-ray structure. Though the maximum residence time of the concerned water molecules decreases with an increase of solvent at the interface, these water molecules continue to play an important role in mediating DNA-protein contacts. This is shown by new stable amino acids-DNA distances and a long water residence time compared to free DNA simulation. To maintain stability of the new contacts, the preferential water binding site on O6(G6) is extended. This extension agrees with mutation experiment data on A5 and G6, which shows different relative affinity due to mutation on these bases [A. Joachimiak, T. E. Haran, P. B. Sigler, EMBO Journal 1994, Vol. 13, No. (2) pp. 367-372]. Due to the rearrangements in the system, the phosphate of the base G6 is able to interconvert to the B(II) substate, which is not observed on the other half side of the complex. The decrease of the number of hydrogen bonds between protein and DNA backbone could be the initial step of the dissociation process of the complex, or in other words an intermediate complex conformation of the association process. Thus, we surmise that these features show the importance of water-mediated contacts in the trp-repressor operator recognition process. PMID