Science.gov

Sample records for glial-neuronal interactions contribute

  1. Alteration of glial-neuronal metabolic interactions in a mouse model of Alexander disease

    PubMed Central

    Meisingset, Tore Wergeland; Risa, Øystein; Brenner, Michael; Messing, Albee; Sonnewald, Ursula

    2010-01-01

    Alexander disease is a rare and usually fatal neurological disorder characterized by the abundant presence of protein aggregates in astrocytes. Most cases result from dominant missense de novo mutations in the gene encoding glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), but how these mutations lead to aggregate formation and compromise function is not known. A transgenic mouse line (Tg73.7) over-expressing human GFAP produces astrocytic aggregates indistinguishable from those seen in the human disease, making them a model of this disorder. To investigate possible metabolic changes associated with Alexander disease Tg73.7 mice and controls were injected simultaneously with [1-13C]glucose to analyze neuronal metabolism and [1,2-13C]acetate to monitor astrocytic metabolism. Brain extracts were analyzed by 1H magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) to quantify amounts of several key metabolites, and by 13C MRS to analyze amino acid neurotransmitter metabolism. In the cerebral cortex, reduced utilization of [1,2-13C]acetate was observed for synthesis of glutamine, glutamate, and GABA, and the concentration of the marker for neuronal mitochondrial metabolism, N-acetylaspartate (NAA), was decreased. This indicates impaired astrocytic and neuronal metabolism and decreased transfer of glutamine from astrocytes to neurons compared to control mice. In the cerebellum, glutamine and GABA content and labeling from [1-13C]glucose were increased. Evidence for brain edema was found in the increased amount of water and of the osmoregulators myo-inositol and taurine. It can be concluded that astrocyte – neuronal interactions were altered differently in distinct regions. PMID:20544858

  2. Contribution of hydrophobic interactions to protein stability.

    PubMed

    Pace, C Nick; Fu, Hailong; Fryar, Katrina Lee; Landua, John; Trevino, Saul R; Shirley, Bret A; Hendricks, Marsha McNutt; Iimura, Satoshi; Gajiwala, Ketan; Scholtz, J Martin; Grimsley, Gerald R

    2011-05-01

    Our goal was to gain a better understanding of the contribution of hydrophobic interactions to protein stability. We measured the change in conformational stability, Δ(ΔG), for hydrophobic mutants of four proteins: villin headpiece subdomain (VHP) with 36 residues, a surface protein from Borrelia burgdorferi (VlsE) with 341 residues, and two proteins previously studied in our laboratory, ribonucleases Sa and T1. We compared our results with those of previous studies and reached the following conclusions: (1) Hydrophobic interactions contribute less to the stability of a small protein, VHP (0.6±0.3 kcal/mol per -CH(2)- group), than to the stability of a large protein, VlsE (1.6±0.3 kcal/mol per -CH(2)- group). (2) Hydrophobic interactions make the major contribution to the stability of VHP (40 kcal/mol) and the major contributors are (in kilocalories per mole) Phe18 (3.9), Met13 (3.1), Phe7 (2.9), Phe11 (2.7), and Leu21 (2.7). (3) Based on the Δ(ΔG) values for 148 hydrophobic mutants in 13 proteins, burying a -CH(2)- group on folding contributes, on average, 1.1±0.5 kcal/mol to protein stability. (4) The experimental Δ(ΔG) values for aliphatic side chains (Ala, Val, Ile, and Leu) are in good agreement with their ΔG(tr) values from water to cyclohexane. (5) For 22 proteins with 36 to 534 residues, hydrophobic interactions contribute 60±4% and hydrogen bonds contribute 40±4% to protein stability. (6) Conformational entropy contributes about 2.4 kcal/mol per residue to protein instability. The globular conformation of proteins is stabilized predominantly by hydrophobic interactions. PMID:21377472

  3. Contribution of Hydrophobic Interactions to Protein Stability

    PubMed Central

    Pace, C. Nick; Fu, Hailong; Fryar, Katrina Lee; Landua, John; Trevino, Saul R.; Shirley, Bret A.; Hendricks, Marsha McNutt; Iimura, Satoshi; Gajiwala, Ketan; Scholtz, J. Martin; Grimsley, Gerald R.

    2011-01-01

    Our goal was to gain a better understanding of the contribution of hydrophobic interactions to protein stability. We measured the change in conformational stability, Δ(ΔG), for hydrophobic mutants of four proteins: villin head piece subdomain (VHP) with 36 residues, a surface protein from Borrelia burgdorferi (VlsE) with 341 residues, and two proteins previously studied in our laboratory, ribonucleases Sa and T1. We compare our results with previous studies and reach the following conclusions. 1. Hydrophobic interactions contribute less to the stability of a small protein, VHP (0.6 ± 0.3 kcal/mole per –CH2– group), than to the stability of a large protein, VlsE (1.6 ± 0.3 kcal/mol per –CH2– group). 2. Hydrophobic interactions make the major contribution to the stability of VHP (40 kcal/mol) and the major contributors are (in kcal/mol): Phe 18 (3.9), Met 13 (3.1), Phe 7 (2.9), Phe 11 (2.7), and Leu 21 (2.7). 3. Based on Δ(ΔG) values for 148 hydrophobic mutants in 13 proteins, burying a –CH2– group on folding contributes, on average, 1.1 ± 0.5 kcal/mol to protein stability. 4. The experimental Δ(ΔG) values for aliphatic side chains (Ala, Val, Ile, and Leu) are in good agreement with their ΔGtr values from water to cyclohexane. 5. For 22 proteins with 36 to 534 residues, hydrophobic interactions contribute 60 ± 4% and hydrogen bonds 40 ± 4% to protein stability. 6. Conformational entropy contributes about 2.4 kcal/mol per residue to protein instability. The globular conformation of proteins is stabilized predominately by hydrophobic interactions. PMID:21377472

  4. Transient receptor potential channels and their role in modulating radial glial-neuronal interaction: a signaling pathway involving mGluR5.

    PubMed

    Louhivuori, Lauri M; Jansson, Linda; Turunen, Pauli M; Jäntti, Maria H; Nordström, Tommy; Louhivuori, Verna; Åkerman, Karl E

    2015-03-15

    The guidance of developing neurons to the right position in the central nervous system is of central importance in brain development. Canonical transient receptor potential (TRPC) channels are thought to mediate turning responses of growth cones to guidance cues through fine control of calcium transients. Proliferating and 1- to 5-day-differentiated neural progenitor cells (NPCs) showed expression of Trpc1 and Trpc3 mRNA, while Trpc4-7 was not clearly detected. Time-lapse imaging showed that the motility pattern of neuronal cells was phasic with bursts of rapid movement (>60 μm/h), changes in direction, and intermittent slow phases or stallings (<40 μm/h), which frequently occurred in close contact with radial glial processes. Genetic interference with the TRPC3 and TRPC1 channel enhanced the motility of NPCs (burst frequency/stalling frequency). TRPC3-deficient cells or cells treated with the TRPC3 blocker pyr3 infrequently changed direction and seldom contacted radial glial processes. TRPC channels are also activated by group I metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluR1 and mGluR5). As shown here, pyr3 blocked the calcium response mediated through mGluR5 in radial glial processes. Furthermore, 2-methyl-6-(phenylethynyl)pyridine, a blocker of mGluR5, affected the motility pattern in a similar way as TRPC3/6 double knockout or pyr3. The results suggest that radial glial cells exert attractant signals to migrating neuronal cells, which alter their motility pattern. Our results suggest that mGluR5 acting through TRPC3 is of central importance in radial glial-mediated neuronal guidance. PMID:25347706

  5. Vibrational solvatochromism. III. Rigorous treatment of the dispersion interaction contribution.

    PubMed

    Błasiak, Bartosz; Cho, Minhaeng

    2015-10-28

    A rigorous first principles theory of vibrational solvatochromism including the intermolecular dispersion interaction, which is based on the effective fragment potential method, is developed. The present theory is an extended version of our previous vibrational solvatochromism model that took into account the Coulomb, exchange-repulsion, and induction interactions. We show that the frequency shifts of the amide I mode of N-methylacetamide in H2O and CDCl3, when combined with molecular dynamics simulations, can be quantitatively reproduced by the theory, which indicates that the dispersion interaction contribution to the vibrational frequency shift is not always negligibly small. Nonetheless, the reason that the purely Coulombic interaction model for vibrational solvatochromism works well for describing amide I mode frequency shifts in polar solvents is because the electrostatic contribution is strong and highly sensitive to the relative orientation of surrounding solvent molecules, which is in stark contrast with polarization, dispersion, and exchange-repulsion contributions. It is believed that the theory presented and discussed here will be of great use in quantitatively describing vibrational solvatochromism and electrochromism of infrared probes in not just polar solvent environments but also in biopolymers such as proteins. PMID:26520502

  6. Vibrational solvatochromism. III. Rigorous treatment of the dispersion interaction contribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Błasiak, Bartosz; Cho, Minhaeng

    2015-10-01

    A rigorous first principles theory of vibrational solvatochromism including the intermolecular dispersion interaction, which is based on the effective fragment potential method, is developed. The present theory is an extended version of our previous vibrational solvatochromism model that took into account the Coulomb, exchange-repulsion, and induction interactions. We show that the frequency shifts of the amide I mode of N-methylacetamide in H2O and CDCl3, when combined with molecular dynamics simulations, can be quantitatively reproduced by the theory, which indicates that the dispersion interaction contribution to the vibrational frequency shift is not always negligibly small. Nonetheless, the reason that the purely Coulombic interaction model for vibrational solvatochromism works well for describing amide I mode frequency shifts in polar solvents is because the electrostatic contribution is strong and highly sensitive to the relative orientation of surrounding solvent molecules, which is in stark contrast with polarization, dispersion, and exchange-repulsion contributions. It is believed that the theory presented and discussed here will be of great use in quantitatively describing vibrational solvatochromism and electrochromism of infrared probes in not just polar solvent environments but also in biopolymers such as proteins.

  7. Magnetic interactions in strongly correlated systems: Spin and orbital contributions

    SciTech Connect

    Secchi, A.; Lichtenstein, A.I.; Katsnelson, M.I.

    2015-09-15

    We present a technique to map an electronic model with local interactions (a generalized multi-orbital Hubbard model) onto an effective model of interacting classical spins, by requiring that the thermodynamic potentials associated to spin rotations in the two systems are equivalent up to second order in the rotation angles, when the electronic system is in a symmetry-broken phase. This allows to determine the parameters of relativistic and non-relativistic magnetic interactions in the effective spin model in terms of equilibrium Green’s functions of the electronic model. The Hamiltonian of the electronic system includes, in addition to the non-relativistic part, relativistic single-particle terms such as the Zeeman coupling to an external magnetic field, spin–orbit coupling, and arbitrary magnetic anisotropies; the orbital degrees of freedom of the electrons are explicitly taken into account. We determine the complete relativistic exchange tensors, accounting for anisotropic exchange, Dzyaloshinskii–Moriya interactions, as well as additional non-diagonal symmetric terms (which may include dipole–dipole interaction). The expressions of all these magnetic interactions are determined in a unified framework, including previously disregarded features such as the vertices of two-particle Green’s functions and non-local self-energies. We do not assume any smallness in spin–orbit coupling, so our treatment is in this sense exact. Finally, we show how to distinguish and address separately the spin, orbital and spin–orbital contributions to magnetism, providing expressions that can be computed within a tight-binding Dynamical Mean Field Theory.

  8. Person-Environment Interactions Contributing to Nursing Home Resident Falls

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Elizabeth E.; Nguyen, Tam H.; Shaha, Maya; Wenzel, Jennifer A.; DeForge, Bruce R.; Spellbring, Ann Marie

    2011-01-01

    Although approximately 50% of nursing home residents fall annually, the surrounding circumstances remain inadequately understood. This study explored nursing staff perspectives of person, environment, and interactive circumstances surrounding nursing home falls. Focus groups were conducted at two nursing homes in the mid-Atlantic region with the highest and lowest fall rates among corporate facilities. Two focus groups were conducted per facility: one with licensed nurses and one with geriatric nursing assistants. Thematic and content analysis revealed three themes and 11 categories. Three categories under the Person theme were Change in Residents’ Health Status, Decline in Residents’ Abilities, and Residents’ Behaviors and Personality Characteristics. There were five Nursing Home Environment categories: Design Safety, Limited Space, Obstacles, Equipment Misuse and Malfunction, and Staff and Organization of Care. Three Interactions Leading to Falls categories were identified: Reasons for Falls, Time of Falls, and High-Risk Activities. Findings highlight interactions between person and environment factors as significant contributors to resident falls. PMID:20077985

  9. The Interactive Account of ventral occipitotemporal contributions to reading

    PubMed Central

    Price, Cathy J.; Devlin, Joseph T.

    2011-01-01

    The ventral occipitotemporal cortex (vOT) is involved in the perception of visually presented objects and written words. The Interactive Account of vOT function is based on the premise that perception involves the synthesis of bottom-up sensory input with top-down predictions that are generated automatically from prior experience. We propose that vOT integrates visuospatial features abstracted from sensory inputs with higher level associations such as speech sounds, actions and meanings. In this context, specialization for orthography emerges from regional interactions without assuming that vOT is selectively tuned to orthographic features. We discuss how the Interactive Account explains left vOT responses during normal reading and developmental dyslexia; and how it accounts for the behavioural consequences of left vOT damage. PMID:21549634

  10. Gene-Environment Interactions in Stress Response Contribute Additively to a Genotype-Environment Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Matsui, Takeshi; Ehrenreich, Ian M.

    2016-01-01

    How combinations of gene-environment interactions collectively give rise to genotype-environment interactions is not fully understood. To shed light on this problem, we genetically dissected an environment-specific poor growth phenotype in a cross of two budding yeast strains. This phenotype is detectable when certain segregants are grown on ethanol at 37°C (‘E37’), a condition that differs from the standard culturing environment in both its carbon source (ethanol as opposed to glucose) and temperature (37°C as opposed to 30°C). Using recurrent backcrossing with phenotypic selection, we identified 16 contributing loci. To examine how these loci interact with each other and the environment, we focused on a subset of four loci that together can lead to poor growth in E37. We measured the growth of all 16 haploid combinations of alleles at these loci in all four possible combinations of carbon source (ethanol or glucose) and temperature (30 or 37°C) in a nearly isogenic population. This revealed that the four loci act in an almost entirely additive manner in E37. However, we also found that these loci have weaker effects when only carbon source or temperature is altered, suggesting that their effect magnitudes depend on the severity of environmental perturbation. Consistent with such a possibility, cloning of three causal genes identified factors that have unrelated functions in stress response. Thus, our results indicate that polymorphisms in stress response can show effects that are intensified by environmental stress, thereby resulting in major genotype-environment interactions when multiple of these variants co-occur. PMID:27437938

  11. Electrostatic forces contribute to interactions between trp repressor dimers.

    PubMed Central

    Martin, K S; Royer, C A; Howard, K P; Carey, J; Liu, Y C; Matthews, K; Heyduk, E; Lee, J C

    1994-01-01

    The trp repressor of Escherichia coli (TR), although generally considered to be dimeric, has been shown by fluorescence anisotropy of extrinsically labeled protein to undergo oligomerization in solution at protein concentrations in the micromolar range (Fernando, T., and C. A. Royer 1992. Biochemistry. 31:3429-3441). Providing evidence that oligomerization is an intrinsic property of TR, the present studies using chemical cross-linking, analytical ultracentrifugation, and molecular sieve chromatography demonstrate that unmodified TR dimers form higher order aggregates. Tetramers and higher order species were observed in chemical cross-linking experiments at concentrations between 1 and 40 microM. Results from analytical ultracentrifugation and gel filtration chromatography were consistent with average molecular weight values between tetramer and dimer, although no plateaus in the association were evident over the concentration ranges studied, indicating that higher order species are populated. Analytical ultracentrifugation data in presence of corepressor imply that corepressor binding destabilizes the higher order aggregates, an observation that is consistent with the earlier fluorescence work. Through the investigation of the salt and pH dependence of oligomerization, the present studies have revealed an electrostatic component to the interactions between TR dimers. Images FIGURE 1 PMID:8038388

  12. Genetic interactions contribute less than additive effects to quantitative trait variation in yeast

    PubMed Central

    Bloom, Joshua S.; Kotenko, Iulia; Sadhu, Meru J.; Treusch, Sebastian; Albert, Frank W.; Kruglyak, Leonid

    2015-01-01

    Genetic mapping studies of quantitative traits typically focus on detecting loci that contribute additively to trait variation. Genetic interactions are often proposed as a contributing factor to trait variation, but the relative contribution of interactions to trait variation is a subject of debate. Here we use a very large cross between two yeast strains to accurately estimate the fraction of phenotypic variance due to pairwise QTL–QTL interactions for 20 quantitative traits. We find that this fraction is 9% on average, substantially less than the contribution of additive QTL (43%). Statistically significant QTL–QTL pairs typically have small individual effect sizes, but collectively explain 40% of the pairwise interaction variance. We show that pairwise interaction variance is largely explained by pairs of loci at least one of which has a significant additive effect. These results refine our understanding of the genetic architecture of quantitative traits and help guide future mapping studies. PMID:26537231

  13. Shaping Learner Contributions in an EFL Classroom: Implications for L2 Classroom Interactional Competence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Can Daskin, Nilüfer

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the interactional patterns for shaping learner contributions in an EFL classroom with reference to Walsh's classroom interactional competence (CIC). In doing so, an EFL class at an English preparatory school in a Turkish state university was both videotaped and audiotaped in the course of six classroom hours. Conversation…

  14. Professional Interaction, Relevant Practical Experience, and Intellectual Contributions at Nondoctoral AACSB-Accredited Accounting Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arlinghaus, Barry P.

    2008-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses a survey of faculty members at nondoctoral AACSB-accredited accounting programs in the United States. The purpose of the survey was to determine the environment for professional interaction and relevant experience in light of institutional demands for intellectual contributions. The findings show that the…

  15. Early Markers of Language and Attention: Mutual Contributions and the Impact of Parent-Infant Interactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gartstein, Maria A.; Crawford, Jennifer; Robertson, Christopher D.

    2008-01-01

    This study was conducted to explore the contribution of attentional skills to early language, and the influence of early language markers on the development of attention, simultaneously examining the impact of parent-child interaction factors (reciprocity/synchrony and sensitivity/responsivity), including their potential moderator effects. All…

  16. Assessing Energetic Contributions to Binding from a Disordered Region in a Protein-Protein Interaction

    SciTech Connect

    S Cho; C Swaminathan; D Bonsor; M Kerzic; R Guan; J Yang; C Kieke; P Anderson; D Kranz; et al.

    2011-12-31

    Many functional proteins are at least partially disordered prior to binding. Although the structural transitions upon binding of disordered protein regions can influence the affinity and specificity of protein complexes, their precise energetic contributions to binding are unknown. Here, we use a model protein-protein interaction system in which a locally disordered region has been modified by directed evolution to quantitatively assess the thermodynamic and structural contributions to binding of disorder-to-order transitions. Through X-ray structure determination of the protein binding partners before and after complex formation and isothermal titration calorimetry of the interactions, we observe a correlation between protein ordering and binding affinity for complexes along this affinity maturation pathway. Additionally, we show that discrepancies between observed and calculated heat capacities based on buried surface area changes in the protein complexes can be explained largely by heat capacity changes that would result solely from folding the locally disordered region. Previously developed algorithms for predicting binding energies of protein-protein interactions, however, are unable to correctly model the energetic contributions of the structural transitions in our model system. While this highlights the shortcomings of current computational methods in modeling conformational flexibility, it suggests that the experimental methods used here could provide training sets of molecular interactions for improving these algorithms and further rationalizing molecular recognition in protein-protein interactions.

  17. A bivariate mann-whitney approach for unraveling genetic variants and interactions contributing to comorbidity.

    PubMed

    Wen, Yalu; Schaid, Daniel J; Lu, Qing

    2013-04-01

    Although comorbidity among complex diseases (e.g., drug dependence syndromes) is well documented, genetic variants contributing to the comorbidity are still largely unknown. The discovery of genetic variants and their interactions contributing to comorbidity will likely shed light on underlying pathophysiological and etiological processes, and promote effective treatments for comorbid conditions. For this reason, studies to discover genetic variants that foster the development of comorbidity represent high-priority research projects, as manifested in the behavioral genetics studies now underway. The yield from these studies can be enhanced by adopting novel statistical approaches, with the capacity of considering multiple genetic variants and possible interactions. For this purpose, we propose a bivariate Mann-Whitney (BMW) approach to unravel genetic variants and interactions contributing to comorbidity, as well as those unique to each comorbid condition. Through simulations, we found BMW outperformed two commonly adopted approaches in a variety of underlying disease and comorbidity models. We further applied BMW to datasets from the Study of Addiction: Genetics and Environment, investigating the contribution of 184 known nicotine dependence (ND) and alcohol dependence (AD) single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) to the comorbidity of ND and AD. The analysis revealed a candidate SNP from CHRNA5, rs16969968, associated with both ND and AD, and replicated the findings in an independent dataset with a P-value of 1.06 × 10(-03) . PMID:23334941

  18. Seeds of strategic and interactional psychotherapies: seminal contributions of Milton H. Erickson.

    PubMed

    Zeig, J K; Geary, B B

    1990-10-01

    The life and work of Milton H. Erickson exerts a considerable influence upon the development of strategic and interactional psychotherapies. In this paper we trace the historical course of Erickson's impact in these areas from his early associations with Gregory Bateson and Margaret Mead through his contributions to the ideologies of Jay Haley and practitioners at the Mental Research Institute. We have identified seven philosophical and methodological realms which represent the incorporation of Ericksonian principles into strategic and interactional family therapy models. PMID:2270835

  19. Genetic Interactions Involving Five or More Genes Contribute to a Complex Trait in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Matthew B.; Ehrenreich, Ian M.

    2014-01-01

    Recent research suggests that genetic interactions involving more than two loci may influence a number of complex traits. How these ‘higher-order’ interactions arise at the genetic and molecular levels remains an open question. To provide insights into this problem, we dissected a colony morphology phenotype that segregates in a yeast cross and results from synthetic higher-order interactions. Using backcrossing and selective sequencing of progeny, we found five loci that collectively produce the trait. We fine-mapped these loci to 22 genes in total and identified a single gene at each locus that caused loss of the phenotype when deleted. Complementation tests or allele replacements provided support for functional variation in these genes, and revealed that pre-existing genetic variants and a spontaneous mutation interact to cause the trait. The causal genes have diverse functions in endocytosis (END3), oxidative stress response (TRR1), RAS-cAMP signalling (IRA2), and transcriptional regulation of multicellular growth (FLO8 and MSS11), and for the most part have not previously been shown to exhibit functional relationships. Further efforts uncovered two additional loci that together can complement the non-causal allele of END3, suggesting that multiple genotypes in the cross can specify the same phenotype. Our work sheds light on the complex genetic and molecular architecture of higher-order interactions, and raises questions about the broader contribution of such interactions to heritable trait variation. PMID:24784154

  20. β-arrestin-1 contributes to brown fat function and directly interacts with PPARα and PPARγ

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Congcong; Zeng, Xianglu; Zhou, Zhaocai; Zhao, Jian; Pei, Gang

    2016-01-01

    The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) family plays central roles in brown adipose tissue (BAT) adipogenesis and contributes to body temperature maintenance. The transcriptional activity of PPAR family has been shown to be tightly controlled by cellular signal networks. β-arrestins function as major secondary messengers of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCR) signaling by functional interactions with diverse proteins. Here, we report that β-arrestin-1 knock-out mice show enhanced cold tolerance. We found that β-arrestin-1 directly interacts with PPARα and PPARγ through a LXXXLXXXL motif, while D371 in PPARα and L311/N312/D380 in PPARγ are required for their interactions with β-arrestin-1. Further mechanistic studies showed that β-arrestin-1 promotes PPARα- but represses PPARγ-mediated transcriptional activities, providing potential regulatory pathway for BAT function. PMID:27301785

  1. β-arrestin-1 contributes to brown fat function and directly interacts with PPARα and PPARγ.

    PubMed

    Wang, Congcong; Zeng, Xianglu; Zhou, Zhaocai; Zhao, Jian; Pei, Gang

    2016-01-01

    The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) family plays central roles in brown adipose tissue (BAT) adipogenesis and contributes to body temperature maintenance. The transcriptional activity of PPAR family has been shown to be tightly controlled by cellular signal networks. β-arrestins function as major secondary messengers of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCR) signaling by functional interactions with diverse proteins. Here, we report that β-arrestin-1 knock-out mice show enhanced cold tolerance. We found that β-arrestin-1 directly interacts with PPARα and PPARγ through a LXXXLXXXL motif, while D371 in PPARα and L311/N312/D380 in PPARγ are required for their interactions with β-arrestin-1. Further mechanistic studies showed that β-arrestin-1 promotes PPARα- but represses PPARγ-mediated transcriptional activities, providing potential regulatory pathway for BAT function. PMID:27301785

  2. CFL3D Contribution to the AIAA Supersonic Shock Boundary Layer Interaction Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rumsey, Christopher L.

    2010-01-01

    This paper documents the CFL3D contribution to the AIAA Supersonic Shock Boundary Layer Interaction Workshop, held in Orlando, Florida in January 2010. CFL3D is a Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes code. Four shock boundary layer interaction cases are computed using a one-equation turbulence model widely used for other aerodynamic problems of interest. Two of the cases have experimental data available at the workshop, and two of the cases do not. The effect of grid, flux scheme, and thin-layer approximation are investigated. Comparisons are made to the available experimental data. All four cases exhibit strong three-dimensional behavior in and near the interaction regions, resulting from influences of the tunnel side-walls.

  3. Conformational Contribution to the Heat Capacity of Interacting System of Carbohydrate Polymer - Water.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pyda, Marek; Wunderlich, Bernhard

    2001-03-01

    Based on the measured heat capacities of amorphous, dry starch and starch with low concentration of water above the partial glass transition of starch, the calculated Cp has been estimated from its vibrational, external, and conformational contributions. The conformational part is evaluated from a fit of the experimental Cp of starch and starch-water, decreased by the vibrational and the external Cp to a one-dimensional Ising-type model for two discrete states, and stiffness, cooperativity, and degeneracy parameters. These differences above the glass transition are interpreted as contributions of different conformational heat capacities from interacting chains of carbohydrate with water. The vibrational contribution was calculated as the heat capacity contributions from group and skeletal vibrations. The external contribution was computed based on thermal expansivity and compressibility as a function of temperature from experimental data of the partial liquid state of both dry starch and starch-water. The calculated and experimental heat capacities of starch-water and dry starch are compared over the whole range of temperatures measurements from 8 to 490 K. NSF, Polymers Program, DMR-9703692, and the Div. of Mat. Sci., BES, DOE at ORNL, managed UT-Batelle, LLC, for the U.S. Department of Energy, under contract number DOE- AC05-00OR22725.

  4. Conditioned place preference for social interaction in rats: contribution of sensory components

    PubMed Central

    Kummer, Kai; Klement, Sabine; Eggart, Vincent; Mayr, Michael J.; Saria, Alois; Zernig, Gerald

    2011-01-01

    A main challenge in the therapy of drug dependent individuals is to help them reactivate interest in non-drug-associated activities. We previously developed a rat experimental model based on the conditioned place preference (CPP) paradigm in which only four 15-min episodes of social interaction with a gender- and weight-matched male Sprague Dawley rat (1) reversed CPP from cocaine to social interaction despite continuing cocaine training and (2) prevented the reinstatement of cocaine CPP. In the present study, we investigated which of the sensory modalities of the composite stimulus “social interaction” contributes most to the rats' preference for it. If touch was limited by steel bars spaced at a distance of 2 cm and running across the whole length of a partitioning, CPP was still acquired, albeit to a lesser degree. If both rats were placed on the same side of a partitioning, rats did not develop CPP for social interaction. Thus, decreasing the available area for social interaction from 750 to 375 cm2 prevented the acquisition of CPP to social interaction despite the fact that animals could touch each other more intensely than through the bars of the partitioning. When touch was fully restricted by a glass screen dividing the conditioning chambers, and the only sensory modalities left were visual and olfactory cues, place preference shifted to place aversion. Overall, our findings indicate that the major rewarding sensory component of the composite stimulus “social interaction” is touch (taction). PMID:22232578

  5. Social inequalities in health: measuring the contribution of housing deprivation and social interactions for Spain

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Social factors have been proved to be main determinants of individuals’ health. Recent studies have also analyzed the contribution of some of those factors, such as education and job status, to socioeconomic inequalities in health. The aim of this paper is to provide new evidence about the factors driving socioeconomic inequalities in health for the Spanish population by including housing deprivation and social interactions as health determinants. Methods Cross-sectional study based on the Spanish sample of European Statistics on Income and Living Conditions (EU-SILC) for 2006. The concentration index measuring income-related inequality in health is decomposed into the contribution of each determinant. Several models are estimated to test the influence of different regressors for three proxies of ill-health. Results Health inequality favouring the better-off is observed in the distribution of self-assessed health, presence of chronic diseases and presence of limiting conditions. Inequality is mainly explained, besides age, by social factors such as labour status and financial deprivation. Housing deprivation contributes to pro-rich inequality in a percentage ranging from 7.17% to 13.85%, and social interactions from 6.16% to 10.19%. The contribution of some groups of determinants significantly differs depending on the ill-health variable used. Conclusions Health inequalities can be mostly reduced or shaped by policy, as they are mainly explained by social determinants such as labour status, education and other socioeconomic conditions. The major role played on health inequality by variables taking part in social exclusion points to the need to focus on the most vulnerable groups. JEL Codes H51, I14, I18 PMID:23241384

  6. Bacteria–bacteria interactions within the microbiota of the ancestral metazoan Hydra contribute to fungal resistance

    PubMed Central

    Fraune, Sebastian; Anton-Erxleben, Friederike; Augustin, René; Franzenburg, Sören; Knop, Mirjam; Schröder, Katja; Willoweit-Ohl, Doris; Bosch, Thomas CG

    2015-01-01

    Epithelial surfaces of most animals are colonized by diverse microbial communities. Although it is generally agreed that commensal bacteria can serve beneficial functions, the processes involved are poorly understood. Here we report that in the basal metazoan Hydra, ectodermal epithelial cells are covered with a multilayered glycocalyx that provides a habitat for a distinctive microbial community. Removing this epithelial microbiota results in lethal infection by the filamentous fungus Fusarium sp. Restoring the complex microbiota in gnotobiotic polyps prevents pathogen infection. Although mono-associations with distinct members of the microbiota fail to provide full protection, additive and synergistic interactions of commensal bacteria are contributing to full fungal resistance. Our results highlight the importance of resident microbiota diversity as a protective factor against pathogen infections. Besides revealing insights into the in vivo function of commensal microbes in Hydra, our findings indicate that interactions among commensal bacteria are essential to inhibit pathogen infection. PMID:25514534

  7. Contribution of excited states to stellar weak-interaction rates in odd-A nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarriguren, P.

    2016-05-01

    Weak-interaction rates, including β decay and electron capture, are studied in several odd-A nuclei in the p f -shell region at various densities and temperatures of astrophysical interest. Special attention is paid to the relative contribution to these rates of thermally populated excited states in the decaying nucleus. The nuclear structure involved in the weak processes is studied within a quasiparticle random-phase approximation with residual interactions in both particle-hole and particle-particle channels on top of a deformed Skyrme Hartree-Fock mean field with pairing correlations. In the range of densities and temperatures considered, it is found that the total rates do not differ much from the rates of the ground state fully populated. In any case, the changes are not larger than the uncertainties due to the nuclear-model dependence of the rates.

  8. Bacteria-bacteria interactions within the microbiota of the ancestral metazoan Hydra contribute to fungal resistance.

    PubMed

    Fraune, Sebastian; Anton-Erxleben, Friederike; Augustin, René; Franzenburg, Sören; Knop, Mirjam; Schröder, Katja; Willoweit-Ohl, Doris; Bosch, Thomas C G

    2015-07-01

    Epithelial surfaces of most animals are colonized by diverse microbial communities. Although it is generally agreed that commensal bacteria can serve beneficial functions, the processes involved are poorly understood. Here we report that in the basal metazoan Hydra, ectodermal epithelial cells are covered with a multilayered glycocalyx that provides a habitat for a distinctive microbial community. Removing this epithelial microbiota results in lethal infection by the filamentous fungus Fusarium sp. Restoring the complex microbiota in gnotobiotic polyps prevents pathogen infection. Although mono-associations with distinct members of the microbiota fail to provide full protection, additive and synergistic interactions of commensal bacteria are contributing to full fungal resistance. Our results highlight the importance of resident microbiota diversity as a protective factor against pathogen infections. Besides revealing insights into the in vivo function of commensal microbes in Hydra, our findings indicate that interactions among commensal bacteria are essential to inhibit pathogen infection. PMID:25514534

  9. Analysis of the Contribution of Individual Substituents in 4,6-Aminoglycoside-Ribosome Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Hobbie, Sven N.; Pfister, Peter; Brüll, Christian; Westhof, Eric; Böttger, Erik C.

    2005-01-01

    The 4,6-disubstituted 2-deoxystreptamines interfere with protein biosynthesis by specifically targeting the ribosomal A site. These drugs show subtle variations in the chemical groups of rings I, II, and III. In the present study we used site-directed mutagenesis to generate mutant strains of Mycobacterium smegmatis mc2155 SMR5 ΔrrnB with mutations in its single rRNA allele, rrnA. This genetic procedure gives rise to strains carrying homogeneous populations of mutant ribosomes and was used to study the contribution of individual chemical substituents to the binding of 4,6-disubstituted aminoglycosides. X-ray crystal structures of geneticin and tobramycin complexed to oligonucleotides containing the minimal bacterial ribosomal A site were used for interpretation of MICs determined for a panel of 4,6-aminoglycosides, including tobramycin, kanamycin A, kanamycin B, amikacin, gentamicin, and geneticin. Surprisingly, the considerable differences present within ring III did not seem to alter the interaction of the drug with the ribosome, as determined by site-directed mutagenesis of the A site. In contrast, subtle variations in ring I significantly influenced binding: (i) a 4′-hydroxyl moiety participates in the proper drug target interaction; and (ii) a 2′-amino group contributes an additional positive charge to ring I, making the drug less susceptible to any kind of sequence alteration within the decoding site, most notably, to conformational changes induced by transversion of U1495 to 1495A. The 4-amino-2-hydroxyl-1-oxobutyl extension at position 1 of ring II of amikacin provides an additional anchor and renders amikacin less dependent on the structural conformation of nucleotide U1406 compared to the dependencies of other kanamycins. Overall, the set of interactions forming the complex between drug substituents and nucleotides of the A site constitutes a network in which the interactions can partly compensate for each other when they are disrupted. PMID:16304180

  10. Isolating the non-polar contributions to the intermolecular potential for water-alkane interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballal, Deepti; Venkataraman, Pradeep; Fouad, Wael A.; Cox, Kenneth R.; Chapman, Walter G.

    2014-08-01

    Intermolecular potential models for water and alkanes describe pure component properties fairly well, but fail to reproduce properties of water-alkane mixtures. Understanding interactions between water and non-polar molecules like alkanes is important not only for the hydrocarbon industry but has implications to biological processes as well. Although non-polar solutes in water have been widely studied, much less work has focused on water in non-polar solvents. In this study we calculate the solubility of water in different alkanes (methane to dodecane) at ambient conditions where the water content in alkanes is very low so that the non-polar water-alkane interactions determine solubility. Only the alkane-rich phase is simulated since the fugacity of water in the water rich phase is calculated from an accurate equation of state. Using the SPC/E model for water and TraPPE model for alkanes along with Lorentz-Berthelot mixing rules for the cross parameters produces a water solubility that is an order of magnitude lower than the experimental value. It is found that an effective water Lennard-Jones energy ɛW/k = 220 K is required to match the experimental water solubility in TraPPE alkanes. This number is much higher than used in most simulation water models (SPC/E—ɛW/k = 78.2 K). It is surprising that the interaction energy obtained here is also higher than the water-alkane interaction energy predicted by studies on solubility of alkanes in water. The reason for this high water-alkane interaction energy is not completely understood. Some factors that might contribute to the large interaction energy, such as polarizability of alkanes, octupole moment of methane, and clustering of water at low concentrations in alkanes, are examined. It is found that, though important, these factors do not completely explain the anomalously strong attraction between alkanes and water observed experimentally.

  11. Genetic variations and miRNA-target interactions contribute to natural phenotypic variations in Populus.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jinhui; Xie, Jianbo; Chen, Beibei; Quan, Mingyang; Li, Ying; Li, Bailian; Zhang, Deqiang

    2016-10-01

    Variation in regulatory factors, including microRNAs (miRNAs), contributes to variation in quantitative and complex traits. However, in plants, variants in miRNAs and their target genes that contribute to natural phenotypic variation, and the underlying regulatory networks, remain poorly characterized. We investigated the associations and interactions of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in miRNAs and their target genes with phenotypes in 435 individuals from a natural population of Populus. We used RNA-seq to identify 217 miRNAs differentially expressed in a tension wood system, and identified 1196 candidate target genes; degradome sequencing confirmed 60 of the target sites. In addition, 72 miRNA-target pairs showed significant co-expression. Gene ontology (GO) term analysis showed that most of the genes in the co-regulated pairs participate in biological regulation. Genome resequencing found 5383 common SNPs (frequency ≥ 0.05) in 139 miRNAs and 31 037 SNPs in 819 target genes. Single-SNP association analyses identified 232 significant associations between wood traits (P ≤ 0.05) and SNPs in 102 miRNAs and 1387 associations with 478 target genes. Among these, 102 miRNA-target pairs associated with the same traits. Multi-SNP associations found 102 epistatic pairs associated with traits. Furthermore, a reconstructed regulatory network contained 12 significantly co-expressed pairs, including eight miRNAs and nine targets associated with traits. Lastly, both expression and genetic association showed that miR156i, miR156j, miR396a and miR6445b were involved in the formation of tension wood. This study shows that variants in miRNAs and target genes contribute to natural phenotypic variation and annotated roles and interactions of miRNAs and their target genes by genetic association analysis. PMID:27265357

  12. Interaction with PI3-kinase contributes to the cytotoxic activity of Apoptin

    PubMed Central

    Maddika, S; Wiechec, E; Ande, SR; Poon, IK; Fischer, U; Wesselborg, S; Jans, DA; Schulze-Osthoff, K; Los, M

    2010-01-01

    Apoptin, a small protein from the chicken anemia virus, has attracted attention because of its specificity in killing tumor cells. Localization of apoptin in the nucleus of tumor cells has been shown to be vital for proapoptotic activity, however, targeted expression of apoptin in the nucleus of normal cells does not harm the cells, indicating that nuclear localization of apoptin is insufficient for its cytotoxicity. Here, we demonstrate for the first time that apoptin interacts with the SH3 domain of p85, the regulatory subunit of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3-K), through its proline-rich region. Apoptin derivatives devoid of this proline-rich region do not interact with p85, are unable to activate PI3-K, and show impaired apoptosis induction. Moreover, apoptin mutants containing the proline-rich domain are sufficient to elevate PI3-K activity and to induce apoptosis in cancer cells. Downregulation of p85 leads to nuclear exclusion of apoptin and impairs cell death induction, indicating that interaction with the p85 PI3-K subunit essentially contributes to the cytotoxic activity of apoptin. PMID:18059340

  13. Contribution of temperament to eating disorder symptoms in emerging adulthood: Additive and interactive effects.

    PubMed

    Burt, Nicole M; Boddy, Lauren E; Bridgett, David J

    2015-08-01

    Temperament characteristics, such as higher negative emotionality (NE) and lower effortful control (EC), are individual difference risk factors for developmental psychopathology. Research has also noted relations between temperament and more specific manifestations of psychopathology, such as eating disorders (EDs). Although work is emerging that indicates that NE and EC may additively contribute to risk for ED symptoms, no studies have considered the interactive effects of NE and EC in relation to ED symptoms. In the current investigation, we hypothesized that (1) low EC would be associated with increased ED symptoms, (2) high NE would be associated with increased ED symptoms, and (3) these temperament traits would interact, such that the relationship between NE and ED symptoms would be strongest in the presence of low EC. After controlling for gender and child trauma history, emerging adults' (N=160) lower EC (i.e., more difficulties with self-regulation) was associated with more ED symptoms. NE did not emerge as a direct predictor of ED symptoms. However, the anticipated interaction of these temperament characteristics on ED symptoms was found. The association between NE and ED symptoms was only significant in the context of low EC. These findings provide evidence that elevated NE may only be a risk factor for the development of eating disorders when individuals also have self-regulation difficulties. The implications of these findings for research and interventions are discussed. PMID:25875113

  14. Interaction between sphingomyelin and oxysterols contributes to atherosclerosis and sudden death

    PubMed Central

    Kummerow, Fred A

    2013-01-01

    Despite major public health efforts, coronary heart disease continues to be the leading cause of death in the United States. Oxidized lipids contribute to heart disease both by increasing deposition of calcium on the arterial wall, a major hallmark of atherosclerosis, and by interrupting blood flow, a major contributor to heart attack and sudden death. Oxidized cholesterol (oxysterols) enhances the production of sphingomyelin, a phospholipid found in the cellular membranes of the coronary artery. This increases the sphingomyelin content in the cell membrane, which in turn enhances the interaction between the membrane and ionic calcium (Ca2+), thereby increasing the risk of arterial calcification. Patients undergoing bypass surgery had greater concentrations of oxysterols in their plasma than cardiac catheterized controls with no stenosis, and had five times more sphingomyelin in their arteries than in the artery of the placenta of a newborn. The oxysterols found in the plasma of these patients were also found in the plasma of rabbits that had been fed oxidized cholesterol and in frying fats and powdered egg yolk intended for human consumption. Together these findings suggest that oxysterols found in the diet are absorbed and contribute to arterial calcification. Oxidized low-density lipoprotein (OxLDL) further contributes to heart disease by increasing the synthesis of thromboxane in platelets, which increases blood clotting. Cigarette smoke and trans fatty acids, found in partially hydrogenated soybean oil, both inhibit the synthesis of prostacyclin, which inhibits blood clotting. By increasing the ratio of thromboxane to prostacyclin, these factors interact to interrupt blood flow, thereby contributing to heart attack and sudden death. Levels of oxysterols and OxLDL increase primarily as a result of three diet or lifestyle factors: the consumption of oxysterols from commercially fried foods such as fried chicken, fish, and french fries; oxidation of cholesterol

  15. A direct interaction between fascin and microtubules contributes to adhesion dynamics and cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Villari, Giulia; Jayo, Asier; Zanet, Jennifer; Fitch, Briana; Serrels, Bryan; Frame, Margaret; Stramer, Brian M.; Goult, Benjamin T.; Parsons, Maddy

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Fascin is an actin-binding and bundling protein that is highly upregulated in most epithelial cancers. Fascin promotes cell migration and adhesion dynamics in vitro and tumour cell metastasis in vivo. However, potential non-actin bundling roles for fascin remain unknown. Here, we show for the first time that fascin can directly interact with the microtubule cytoskeleton and that this does not depend upon fascin-actin bundling. Microtubule binding contributes to fascin-dependent control of focal adhesion dynamics and cell migration speed. We also show that fascin forms a complex with focal adhesion kinase (FAK, also known as PTK2) and Src, and that this signalling pathway lies downstream of fascin–microtubule association in the control of adhesion stability. These findings shed light on new non actin-dependent roles for fascin and might have implications for the design of therapies to target fascin in metastatic disease. PMID:26542021

  16. Cell interactions and genetic regulation that contribute to testicular Leydig cell development and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Martin, Luc J

    2016-06-01

    Leydig cells, located within the interstitial compartment of the testis, are major contributors of androgen synthesis and secretion, which play an important role in testis development, normal masculinization, maintenance of spermatogenesis, and general male fertility. Accordingly, dysfunction of Leydig cells may lead to various male reproductive maladies, including primary hypogonadism, cryptorchidism, and hypospadias. A better understanding of how cell interactions and gene regulation contribute to testicular Leydig cell development and differentiation may therefore help limit the incidence of such male reproductive pathologies. Several hormones and signaling molecules have been identified as important regulators of Leydig cell differentiation and function. Recent work on the regulation of testis development, especially of Leydig cells, has focused on the Desert hedgehog and platelet-derived growth factor signaling pathways. This review outlines recent findings regarding cell interactions and gene regulation involved in the development and regulation of fetal and adult Leydig cell populations. Mol. Reprod. Dev. 83: 470-487, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27079813

  17. Maternal Dispositional Empathy and Electrodermal Reactivity: Interactive Contributions to Maternal Sensitivity with Toddler-Aged Children

    PubMed Central

    Emery, Helen T.; McElwain, Nancy L.; Groh, Ashley M.; Haydon, Katherine C.; Roisman, Glenn I.

    2015-01-01

    The present study investigated maternal dispositional empathy and skin conductance level (SCL) reactivity to infant emotional cues as joint predictors of maternal sensitivity. Sixty-four mother-toddler dyads (31 boys) were observed across a series of interaction tasks during a laboratory visit, and maternal sensitivity was coded from approximately 55 minutes of observation per family. In a second, mother-only laboratory visit, maternal SCL reactivity to infant cues was assessed using a cry-laugh audio paradigm. Mothers reported on their dispositional empathy via a questionnaire. As hypothesized, mothers with greater dispositional empathy exhibited more sensitive behavior at low, but not high, levels of SCL reactivity to infant cues. Analyses examining self-reported emotional reactivity to the cry-laugh audio paradigm yielded a similar finding: dispositional empathy was related to greater sensitivity when mothers reported low, but not high, negative emotional reactivity. Results provide support for Dix’s (1991) affective model of parenting that underscores the combined contribution of the parent’s empathic tendencies and his/her own emotional experience in response to child emotions. Specificity of the Empathy × Reactivity interaction is discussed with respect to the context in which reactivity was assessed (infant cry versus laugh) and the type of sensitivity examined (sensitivity to the child’s distress versus non-distress). PMID:24955589

  18. Biochemical and Genetic Evidence for a SAP-PKC-θ Interaction Contributing to IL-4 Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Cannons, Jennifer L.; Wu, Julie Z.; Gomez-Rodriguez, Julio; Zhang, Jinyi; Dong, Baoxia; Liu, Yin; Shaw, Stephen; Siminovitch, Katherine A.; Schwartzberg, Pamela L.

    2012-01-01

    SAP, an adaptor molecule that recruits Fyn to the SLAM-family of immunomodulatory receptors, is mutated in X-linked lymphoproliferative disease. CD4+ T cells from SAP-deficient mice have defective TCR-induced IL-4 production and impaired T cell-mediated help for germinal center formation; however, the downstream intermediates contributing to these defects remain unclear. We previously found that SAP-deficient CD4+ T cells exhibit decreased PKC-θ recruitment upon TCR stimulation. We demonstrate here using GST-pulldowns and co-immunoprecipitation studies that SAP constitutively associates with PKC-θ in T cells. SAP-PKC-θ interactions required R78 of SAP, a residue previously implicated in Fyn recruitment, yet SAP’s interactions with PKC-θ occurred independent of phosphotyrosine binding and Fyn. Overexpression of SAP in T cells increased and sustained PKC-θ recruitment to the immune synapse and elevated IL-4 production in response to TCR plus SLAM-mediated stimulation. Moreover, PKC-θ, like SAP, was required for SLAM-mediated increases in IL-4 production and conversely, membrane-targeted PKC-θ mutants rescued IL-4 expression in SAP−/− CD4+ T cells, providing genetic evidence that PKC-θ is a critical component of SLAM/SAP-mediated pathways that influence TCR-driven IL-4 production. PMID:20668219

  19. Contributions of host cellular trafficking and organization to the outcomes of plant-pathogen interactions.

    PubMed

    Underwood, William

    2016-08-01

    In recent years it has become increasingly apparent that dynamic changes in protein localization, membrane trafficking pathways, and cellular organization play a major role in determining the outcome of interactions between plants and pathogenic microorganisms. Plants have evolved sophisticated perception systems to recognize the presence of potentially pathogenic microorganisms via the detection of non-self or modified-self elicitor molecules, pathogen virulence factors, or the activities of such virulence factors. Dynamic changes to host cellular organization and membrane trafficking pathways play pivotal roles in detection and signaling by plant immune receptors and are vital for the execution of spatially targeted defense responses to thwart invasion by potential pathogens. Conversely, from the perspective of the pathogen, the ability to manipulate plant cellular organization and trafficking processes to establish infection structures and deliver virulence factors is a major determinant of pathogen success. This review summarizes selected topics that illustrate how dynamic changes in host cellular trafficking and organization shape the outcomes of diverse plant-pathogen interactions and addresses ways in which our rapidly expanding knowledge of the cell biological processes that contribute to immunity or infection may influence efforts to improve plant disease resistance. PMID:27216829

  20. Tumor loci and their interactions on mouse chromosome 19 that contribute to testicular germ cell tumors

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Complex genetic factors underlie testicular germ cell tumor (TGCT) development. One experimental approach to dissect the genetics of TGCT predisposition is to use chromosome substitution strains, such as the 129.MOLF-Chr 19 (M19). M19 carries chromosome (Chr) 19 from the MOLF whereas all other chromosomes are from the 129 strain. 71% of M19 males develop TGCTs in contrast to 5% in 129 strain. To identify and map tumor loci from M19 we generated congenic strains harboring MOLF chromosome 19 segments on 129 strain background and monitored their TGCT incidence. Results We found 3 congenic strains that each harbored tumor promoting loci that had high (14%-32%) whereas 2 other congenics had low (4%) TGCT incidences. To determine how multiple loci influence TGCT development, we created double and triple congenic strains. We found additive interactions were predominant when 2 loci were combined in double congenic strains. Surprisingly, we found an example where 2 loci, both which do not contribute significantly to TGCT, when combined in a double congenic strain resulted in greater than expected TGCT incidence (positive interaction). In an opposite example, when 2 loci with high TGCT incidences were combined, males of the double congenic showed lower than expected TGCT incidence (negative interaction). For the triple congenic strain, depending on the analysis, the overall TGCT incidence could be additive or could also be due to a positive interaction of one region with others. Additionally, we identified loci that promote bilateral tumors or testicular abnormalities. Conclusions The congenic strains each with their characteristic TGCT incidences, laterality of tumors and incidence of testicular abnormalities, are useful for identification of TGCT susceptibility modifier genes that map to Chr 19 and also for studies on the genetic and environmental causes of TGCT development. TGCTs are a consequence of aberrant germ cell and testis development. By defining

  1. Interactions of the Gasotransmitters Contribute to Microvascular Tone (Dys)regulation in the Preterm Neonate

    PubMed Central

    Dyson, Rebecca M.; Palliser, Hannah K.; Latter, Joanna L.; Kelly, Megan A.; Chwatko, Grazyna; Glowacki, Rafal; Wright, Ian M. R.

    2015-01-01

    Background & Aims Hydrogen sulphide (H2S), nitric oxide (NO), and carbon monoxide (CO) are involved in transitional microvascular tone dysregulation in the preterm infant; however there is conflicting evidence on the interaction of these gasotransmitters, and their overall contribution to the microcirculation in newborns is not known. The aim of this study was to measure the levels of all 3 gasotransmitters, characterise their interrelationships and elucidate their combined effects on microvascular blood flow. Methods 90 preterm neonates were studied at 24h postnatal age. Microvascular studies were performed by laser Doppler. Arterial COHb levels (a measure of CO) were determined through co-oximetry. NO was measured as nitrate and nitrite in urine. H2S was measured as thiosulphate by liquid chromatography. Relationships between levels of the gasotransmitters and microvascular blood flow were assessed through partial correlation controlling for the influence of gestational age. Structural equation modelling was used to examine the combination of these effects on microvascular blood flow and derive a theoretical model of their interactions. Results No relationship was observed between NO and CO (p = 0.18, r = 0.18). A positive relationship between NO and H2S (p = 0.008, r = 0.28) and an inverse relationship between CO and H2S (p = 0.01, r = -0.33) exists. Structural equation modelling was used to examine the combination of these effects on microvascular blood flow. The model with the best fit is presented. Conclusions The relationships between NO and H2S, and CO and H2S may be of importance in the preterm newborn, particularly as NO levels in males are associated with higher H2S levels and higher microvascular blood flow and CO in females appears to convey protection against vascular dysregulation. Here we present a theoretical model of these interactions and their overall effects on microvascular flow in the preterm newborn, upon which future mechanistic studies may

  2. Interaction of Mycoplasma gallisepticum with Chicken Tracheal Epithelial Cells Contributes to Macrophage Chemotaxis and Activation

    PubMed Central

    Majumder, Sanjukta

    2015-01-01

    Mycoplasma gallisepticum colonizes the chicken respiratory mucosa and mediates a severe inflammatory response hallmarked by subepithelial leukocyte infiltration. We recently reported that the interaction of M. gallisepticum with chicken tracheal epithelial cells (TECs) mediated the upregulation of chemokine and inflammatory cytokine genes in these cells (S. Majumder, F. Zappulla, and L. K. Silbart, PLoS One 9:e112796, http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0112796). The current study extends these observations and sheds light on how this initial interaction may give rise to subsequent inflammatory events. Conditioned medium from TECs exposed to the virulent Rlow strain induced macrophage chemotaxis to a much higher degree than the nonvirulent Rhigh strain. Coculture of chicken macrophages (HD-11) with TECs exposed to live mycoplasma revealed the upregulation of several proinflammatory genes associated with macrophage activation, including interleukin-1β (IL-1β), IL-6, IL-8, CCL20, macrophage inflammatory protein 1β (MIP-1β), CXCL-13, and RANTES. The upregulation of these genes was similar to that observed upon direct contact of HD-11 cells with live M. gallisepticum. Coculture of macrophages with Rlow-exposed TECs also resulted in prolonged expression of chemokine genes, such as those encoding CXCL-13, MIP-1β, RANTES, and IL-8. Taken together, these studies support the notion that the initial interaction of M. gallisepticum with host respiratory epithelial cells contributes to macrophage chemotaxis and activation by virtue of robust upregulation of inflammatory cytokine and chemokine genes, thereby setting the stage for chronic tissue inflammation. PMID:26527215

  3. Interaction of Mycoplasma gallisepticum with Chicken Tracheal Epithelial Cells Contributes to Macrophage Chemotaxis and Activation.

    PubMed

    Majumder, Sanjukta; Silbart, Lawrence K

    2016-01-01

    Mycoplasma gallisepticum colonizes the chicken respiratory mucosa and mediates a severe inflammatory response hallmarked by subepithelial leukocyte infiltration. We recently reported that the interaction of M. gallisepticum with chicken tracheal epithelial cells (TECs) mediated the upregulation of chemokine and inflammatory cytokine genes in these cells (S. Majumder, F. Zappulla, and L. K. Silbart, PLoS One 9:e112796, http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0112796). The current study extends these observations and sheds light on how this initial interaction may give rise to subsequent inflammatory events. Conditioned medium from TECs exposed to the virulent Rlow strain induced macrophage chemotaxis to a much higher degree than the nonvirulent Rhigh strain. Coculture of chicken macrophages (HD-11) with TECs exposed to live mycoplasma revealed the upregulation of several proinflammatory genes associated with macrophage activation, including interleukin-1β (IL-1β), IL-6, IL-8, CCL20, macrophage inflammatory protein 1β (MIP-1β), CXCL-13, and RANTES. The upregulation of these genes was similar to that observed upon direct contact of HD-11 cells with live M. gallisepticum. Coculture of macrophages with Rlow-exposed TECs also resulted in prolonged expression of chemokine genes, such as those encoding CXCL-13, MIP-1β, RANTES, and IL-8. Taken together, these studies support the notion that the initial interaction of M. gallisepticum with host respiratory epithelial cells contributes to macrophage chemotaxis and activation by virtue of robust upregulation of inflammatory cytokine and chemokine genes, thereby setting the stage for chronic tissue inflammation. PMID:26527215

  4. Complex T cell interactions contribute to Helicobacter pylori gastritis in mice.

    PubMed

    Gray, Brian M; Fontaine, Clinton A; Poe, Sara A; Eaton, Kathryn A

    2013-03-01

    Disease due to the gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori varies in severity from asymptomatic to peptic ulcer disease and cancer. Accumulating evidence suggests that one source of this variation is an abnormal host response. The goal of this study was to use a mouse model of H. pylori gastritis to investigate the roles of regulatory T cells (Treg) as well as proinflammatory T cells (Th1 and Th17) in gastritis, gastric T cell engraftment, and gastric cytokine production. Our results support published data indicating that severe gastritis in T cell recipient mice is due to failure of Treg engraftment, that Treg ameliorate gastritis, and that the proinflammatory response is attributable to interactions between several cell subsets and cytokines. We confirmed that gamma interferon (IFN-γ) is essential for induction of gastritis but showed that IFN-γ-producing CD4 T cells are not necessary. Interleukin 17A (IL-17A) also contributed to gastritis, but to a lesser extent than IFN-γ. Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and IL-17F were also elevated in association with disease. These results indicate that while H. pylori-specific CD4(+) T cells and IFN-γ are both essential for induction of gastritis due to H. pylori, IFN-γ production by T cells is not essential. It is likely that other proinflammatory cytokines, such as IL-17F and TNF-α, shown to be elevated in this model, also contribute to the induction of disease. We suggest that gastritis due to H. pylori is associated with loss of immunoregulation and alteration of several cytokines and cell subsets and cannot be attributed to a single immune pathway. PMID:23264048

  5. Parent-Child Interaction and Children's Peer Relationships: The Differential Contributions of Mothers and Fathers to Children's Dyadic Peer Interactions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kahen, Vanessa J.

    This study examined how parents' engagement and affect during parent-child interaction related to children's ability to successfully interact with peers. Subjects were 56 families, each with a child between the ages of 4 and 6. Ten-minute interactions were videotaped as parents obtained information about a story previously heard by the child, and…

  6. Assessment of odor activity value coefficient and odor contribution based on binary interaction effects in waste disposal plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chuandong; Liu, Jiemin; Yan, Luchun; Chen, Haiying; Shao, Huiqi; Meng, Tian

    2015-02-01

    Odor activity value (OAV) has been widely used for the assessment of odor pollution from various sources. However, little attention has been paid to the extreme OAV variation and potential inaccuracies of odor contribution assessment caused by odor interaction effects. The objective of this study is to assess the odor interaction effect for precise assessment of odor contribution. In this paper, samples were collected from a food waste disposal plant, and analyzed by instrumental and olfactory method to conclude odorants' occurrence and OAV. Then odor activity value coefficient (γ) was first proposed to evaluate the type and the level of binary interaction effects based on determination of OAV variation. By multiplying OAV and γ, odor activity factor (OAF) was used to reflect the real OAV. Correlation between the sum of OAF and odor concentration reached 80.0 ± 5.7%, which was 10 times higher than the sum of OAV used before. Results showed that hydrogen sulfide contributed most (annual average 66.4 ± 15.8%) to odor pollution in the waste disposal plant. However, as odor intensity of samples in summer rising, odor contribution of trimethylamine increased to 48.3 ± 3.7% by the strong synergistic interaction effect, while odor contribution of phenol decreased to 0.1 ± 0.02% for the increasing antagonistic interaction effect.

  7. Interacting vegetative and thermal contributions to water movement in desert soil

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Garcia, C.A.; Andraski, B.J.; Stonestrom, D.A.; Cooper, C.A.; Simunek, J.; Wheatcraft, S.W.

    2011-01-01

    Thermally driven water-vapor flow can be an important component of total water movement in bare soil and in deep unsaturated zones, but this process is often neglected when considering the effects of soil-plant-atmosphere interactions on shallow water movement. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the coupled and separate effects of vegetative and thermal-gradient contributions to soil water movement in desert environments. The evaluation was done by comparing a series of simulations with and without vegetation and thermal forcing during a 4.7-yr period (May 2001-December 2005). For vegetated soil, evapotranspiration alone reduced root-zone (upper 1 m) moisture to a minimum value (25 mm) each year under both isothermal and nonisothermal conditions. Variations in the leaf area index altered the minimum storage values by up to 10 mm. For unvegetated isothermal and nonisothermal simulations, root-zone water storage nearly doubled during the simulation period and created a persistent driving force for downward liquid fluxes below the root zone (total net flux ~1 mm). Total soil water movement during the study period was dominated by thermally driven vapor fluxes. Thermally driven vapor flow and condensation supplemented moisture supplies to plant roots during the driest times of each year. The results show how nonisothermal flow is coupled with plant water uptake, potentially influencing ecohydrologic relations in desert environments. ?? Soil Science Society of America 5585 Guilford Rd., Madison, WI 53711 USA. All rights reserved.

  8. Interacting vegetative and thermal contributions to water movement in desert soil

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Garcia, C.A.; Andraski, B.J.; Stonestrom, D.A.; Cooper, C.A.; Šimůnek, J.; Wheatcraft, S.W.

    2011-01-01

    Thermally driven water-vapor flow can be an important component of total water movement in bare soil and in deep unsaturated zones, but this process is often neglected when considering the effects of soil–plant–atmosphere interactions on shallow water movement. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the coupled and separate effects of vegetative and thermal-gradient contributions to soil water movement in desert environments. The evaluation was done by comparing a series of simulations with and without vegetation and thermal forcing during a 4.7-yr period (May 2001–December 2005). For vegetated soil, evapotranspiration alone reduced root-zone (upper 1 m) moisture to a minimum value (25 mm) each year under both isothermal and nonisothermal conditions. Variations in the leaf area index altered the minimum storage values by up to 10 mm. For unvegetated isothermal and nonisothermal simulations, root-zone water storage nearly doubled during the simulation period and created a persistent driving force for downward liquid fluxes below the root zone (total net flux ~1 mm). Total soil water movement during the study period was dominated by thermally driven vapor fluxes. Thermally driven vapor flow and condensation supplemented moisture supplies to plant roots during the driest times of each year. The results show how nonisothermal flow is coupled with plant water uptake, potentially influencing ecohydrologic relations in desert environments.

  9. Interaction contributions in thermal conductivity of three-dimensional complex liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahzad, Aamir; He, Mao-Gang

    2013-07-01

    This work generalizes Evans' homogenous nonequilibrium molecular dynamics (HNEMD) algorithm for computing the thermal conductivity of strongly-coupled complex (dusty) plasma liquids (SCCDPLs) described by the Yukawa potential. The effects of external field strength along with different screening strengths on the conductivity of Yukawa liquids have investigated using HNEMD simulations. We have carried out some more linear and nonlinear molecular dynamics calculations of the thermal conductivity, and the obtained simulation results of SCCDPLs are presented for various plasma coupling and screening parameters. Our calculations show that Yukawa liquid exhibits a non-Newtonian behavior that the thermal conductivity increases with increasing field strength which explains interaction contributions in Yukawa conductivity, for the first time. The simulation results obtained with different external filed strengths are in reasonable agreement with earlier simulation results and with reference set of data showed deviations within less than ±10% for most of the present data point. It is shown that new simulations extended the range of field strength (0.001≤F*≤0.1) used in the earlier studies in order to find out the size of the linear regimes and to explain the nature of nonlinearity of SCCDPLs.

  10. Evaluating contributions of natural language parsers to protein–protein interaction extraction

    PubMed Central

    Miyao, Yusuke; Sagae, Kenji; Sætre, Rune; Matsuzaki, Takuya; Tsujii, Jun'ichi

    2009-01-01

    Motivation: While text mining technologies for biomedical research have gained popularity as a way to take advantage of the explosive growth of information in text form in biomedical papers, selecting appropriate natural language processing (NLP) tools is still difficult for researchers who are not familiar with recent advances in NLP. This article provides a comparative evaluation of several state-of-the-art natural language parsers, focusing on the task of extracting protein–protein interaction (PPI) from biomedical papers. We measure how each parser, and its output representation, contributes to accuracy improvement when the parser is used as a component in a PPI system. Results: All the parsers attained improvements in accuracy of PPI extraction. The levels of accuracy obtained with these different parsers vary slightly, while differences in parsing speed are larger. The best accuracy in this work was obtained when we combined Miyao and Tsujii's Enju parser and Charniak and Johnson's reranking parser, and the accuracy is better than the state-of-the-art results on the same data. Availability: The PPI extraction system used in this work (AkanePPI) is available online at http://www-tsujii.is.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp/-100downloads/downloads.cgi. The evaluated parsers are also available online from each developer's site. Contact: yusuke@is.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp PMID:19073593

  11. Predicting Children's Interactions with Unfamiliar Peers: Contributions of Parent-Child Interaction Style and Child Individual Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carrillo, Sonia; And Others

    This study examined children's play interaction styles with unfamiliar peers; used mother-child and father-child dyadic qualities independently to predict children's social behavior; determined the relationship between children's individual behaviors and peer dyadic characteristics; and compared mother-child and father-child interactions on both…

  12. Mortality from desiccation contributes to a genotype–temperature interaction for cold survival in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Kobey, Robert L.; Montooth, Kristi L.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Survival at cold temperatures is a complex trait, primarily because of the fact that the physiological cause of injury may differ across degrees of cold exposure experienced within the lifetime of an ectothermic individual. In order to better understand how chill-sensitive insects experience and adapt to low temperatures, we investigated the physiological basis for cold survival across a range of temperature exposures from −4 to 6°C in five genetic lines of the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. Genetic effects on cold survival were temperature dependent and resulted in a significant genotype–temperature interaction for survival across cold temperature exposures that differ by as little as 2°C. We investigated desiccation as a potential mechanism of injury across these temperature exposures. Flies were dehydrated following exposures near 6°C, whereas flies were not dehydrated following exposures near −4°C. Furthermore, decreasing humidity during cold exposure decreased survival, and increasing humidity during cold exposure increased survival at 6°C, but not at −4°C. These results support the conclusion that in D. melanogaster there are multiple physiological mechanisms of cold-induced mortality across relatively small differences in temperature, and that desiccation contributes to mortality for exposures near 6°C but not for subzero temperatures. Because D. melanogaster has recently expanded its range from tropical to temperate latitudes, the complex physiologies underlying cold tolerance are likely to be important traits in the recent evolutionary history of this fruit fly. PMID:23197100

  13. Separation of the attractive and repulsive contributions to the adsorbate-adsorbate interactions of polar adsorbates on Si(100)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Ying-Hsiu; Jeng, Horng-Tay; Lin, Deng-Sung

    2015-11-01

    Dissociative adsorption of H2O, NH3, CH3OH and CH3NH2 polar molecules on the Si(100) surface results in a 1:1 mixture of two adsorbates (H and multi-atomic fragment A = OH, NH2, CH3O, CH3NH, respectively) on the surface. By using density functional theory (DFT) calculations, the adsorption geometry, the total energies and the charge densities for various possible ordered structures of the mixed adsorbate layer have been found. Analyzing the systematic trends in the total energies unveils concurrently the nearest-neighbor interactions ENN and the next nearest-neighbor interactions ENNN between two polar adsorbates A. In going from small to large polar adsorbates, ENN's exhibit an attractive-to-repulsive crossover behavior, indicating that they include competing attractive and repulsive contributions. Exploration of the charge density distributions allows the estimation of the degree of charge overlapping between immediately neighboring A's, the resulting contribution of the steric repulsions, and that of the attractive interactions to the corresponding ENN's. The attractive contributions to nearest neighboring adsorbate-adsorbate interactions between the polar adsorbates under study are shown to result from hydrogen bonds or dipole-dipole interactions.

  14. Paramagnetic Effects on Nuclear Relaxation in Enzyme-Bound Co(II)-Adenine Nucleotide Complexes: Relative Contributions of Dipolar and Scalar Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, Bruce D.; Jarori, Gotam K.; Nageswara Rao, B. D.

    1999-01-01

    31P NMR measurements on CoADP bound to creatine kinase designed to estimate the relative contribution of scalar and dipolar interactions to31P spin relaxation rates show that these rates are primarily due to distance-dependent dipolar interactions and that the contribution of the scalar interaction is negligible.

  15. Automated calculation of anharmonic vibrational contributions to first hyperpolarizabilities: Quadratic response functions from vibrational configuration interaction wave functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Mikkel Bo; Christiansen, Ove; Hättig, Christof

    2009-10-01

    Quadratic response functions are derived and implemented for a vibrational configuration interaction state. Combined electronic and vibrational quadratic response functions are derived using Born-Oppenheimer vibronic product wave functions. Computational tractable expressions are derived for determining the total quadratic response contribution as a sum of contributions involving both electronic and vibrational linear and quadratic response functions. In the general frequency-dependent case this includes a new and more troublesome type of electronic linear response function. Pilot calculations for the FH, H2O, CH2O, and pyrrole molecules demonstrate the importance of vibrational contributions for accurate comparison to experiment and that the vibrational contributions in some cases can be very large. The calculation of transition properties between vibrational states is combined with sum-over-states expressions for analysis purposes. On the basis of this some simple analysis methods are suggested. Also, a preliminary study of the effect of finite lifetimes on quadratic response functions is presented.

  16. Sense of Community in Graduate Online Education: Contribution of Learner to Learner Interaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shackelford, Jo L.; Maxwell, Marge

    2012-01-01

    Distance learning technologies offer a multitude of ways to build interaction into online courses to support learning. Based on social constructivism theory, this study explored which types of interaction are most predictive of students' sense of community in online graduate courses at a regional comprehensive university. Surveys were used to…

  17. Bem1p contributes to secretory pathway polarization through a direct interaction with Exo70p

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Dongmei

    2014-01-01

    The exocyst serves to tether secretory vesicles to cortical sites specified by polarity determinants, in preparation for fusion with the plasma membrane. Although most exocyst components are brought to these sites by riding on secretory vesicles as they are actively transported along actin cables, Exo70p displays actin-independent localization to these sites, implying an interaction with a polarity determinant. Here we show that Exo70p directly and specifically binds to the polarity determinant scaffold protein Bem1p. The interaction involves multiple domains of both Exo70p and Bem1p. Mutations in Exo70p that disrupt its interaction with Bem1, without impairing its interactions with other known binding partners, lead to the loss of actin-independent localization. Synthetic genetic interactions confirm the importance of the Exo70p–Bem1p interaction, although there is some possible redundancy with Sec3p and Sec15p, other exocyst components that also interact with polarity determinants. Similar to Sec3p, the actin-independent localization of Exo70p requires a synergistic interaction with the phosphoinositide PI(4,5)P2. PMID:25313406

  18. Derivative interactions and perturbative UV contributions in N Higgs doublet models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikuta, Yohei; Yamamoto, Yasuhiro

    2016-05-01

    We study the Higgs derivative interactions on models including arbitrary number of the Higgs doublets. These interactions are generated by two ways. One is higher order corrections of composite Higgs models, and the other is integration of heavy scalars and vectors. In the latter case, three point couplings between the Higgs doublets and these heavy states are the sources of the derivative interactions. Their representations are constrained to couple with the doublets. We explicitly calculate all derivative interactions generated by integrating out. Their degrees of freedom and conditions to impose the custodial symmetry are discussed. We also study the vector boson scattering processes with a couple of two Higgs doublet models to see experimental signals of the derivative interactions. They are differently affected by each heavy field.

  19. Species distribution models contribute to determine the effect of climate and interspecific interactions in moving hybrid zones.

    PubMed

    Engler, J O; Rödder, D; Elle, O; Hochkirch, A; Secondi, J

    2013-11-01

    Climate is a major factor delimiting species' distributions. However, biotic interactions may also be prominent in shaping geographical ranges, especially for parapatric species forming hybrid zones. Determining the relative effect of each factor and their interaction of the contact zone location has been difficult due to the lack of broad scale environmental data. Recent developments in species distribution modelling (SDM) now allow disentangling the relative contributions of climate and species' interactions in hybrid zones and their responses to future climate change. We investigated the moving hybrid zone between the breeding ranges of two parapatric passerines in Europe. We conducted SDMs representing the climatic conditions during the breeding season. Our results show a large mismatch between the realized and potential distributions of the two species, suggesting that interspecific interactions, not climate, account for the present location of the contact zone. The SDM scenarios show that the southerly distributed species, Hippolais polyglotta, might lose large parts of its southern distribution under climate change, but a similar gain of novel habitat along the hybrid zone seems unlikely, because interactions with the other species (H. icterina) constrain its range expansion. Thus, whenever biotic interactions limit range expansion, species may become 'trapped' if range loss due to climate change is faster than the movement of the contact zone. An increasing number of moving hybrid zones are being reported, but the proximate causes of movement often remain unclear. In a global context of climate change, we call for more interest in their interactions with climate change. PMID:24016292

  20. Causal functional contributions and interactions in the attention network of the brain: an objective multi-perturbation analysis.

    PubMed

    Zavaglia, Melissa; Hilgetag, Claus C

    2016-06-01

    Spatial attention is a prime example for the distributed network functions of the brain. Lesion studies in animal models have been used to investigate intact attentional mechanisms as well as perspectives for rehabilitation in the injured brain. Here, we systematically analyzed behavioral data from cooling deactivation and permanent lesion experiments in the cat, where unilateral deactivation of the posterior parietal cortex (in the vicinity of the posterior middle suprasylvian cortex, pMS) or the superior colliculus (SC) cause a severe neglect in the contralateral hemifield. Counterintuitively, additional deactivation of structures in the opposite hemisphere reverses the deficit. Using such lesion data, we employed a game-theoretical approach, multi-perturbation Shapley value analysis (MSA), for inferring functional contributions and network interactions of bilateral pMS and SC from behavioral performance in visual attention studies. The approach provides an objective theoretical strategy for lesion inferences and allows a unique quantitative characterization of regional functional contributions and interactions on the basis of multi-perturbations. The quantitative analysis demonstrated that right posterior parietal cortex and superior colliculus made the strongest positive contributions to left-field orienting, while left brain regions had negative contributions, implying that their perturbation may reverse the effects of contralateral lesions or improve normal function. An analysis of functional modulations and interactions among the regions revealed redundant interactions (implying functional overlap) between regions within each hemisphere, and synergistic interactions between bilateral regions. To assess the reliability of the MSA method in the face of variable and incomplete input data, we performed a sensitivity analysis, investigating how much the contribution values of the four regions depended on the performance of specific configurations and on the

  1. Contribution of Physical Interactions to Signaling Specificity between a Diguanylate Cyclase and Its Effector

    PubMed Central

    Dahlstrom, Kurt M.; Giglio, Krista M.; Collins, Alan J.; Sondermann, Holger

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cyclic diguanylate (c-di-GMP) is a bacterial second messenger that controls multiple cellular processes. c-di-GMP networks have up to dozens of diguanylate cyclases (DGCs) that synthesize c-di-GMP along with many c-di-GMP-responsive target proteins that can bind and respond to this signal. For such networks to have order, a mechanism(s) likely exists that allow DGCs to specifically signal their targets, and it has been suggested that physical interactions might provide such specificity. Our results show a DGC from Pseudomonas fluorescens physically interacting with its target protein at a conserved interface, and this interface can be predictive of DGC-target protein interactions. Furthermore, we demonstrate that physical interaction is necessary for the DGC to maximally signal its target. If such “local signaling” is a theme for even a fraction of the DGCs used by bacteria, it becomes possible to posit a model whereby physical interaction allows a DGC to directly signal its target protein, which in turn may help curtail undesired cross talk with other members of the network. PMID:26670387

  2. Gene-gene interactions contribute to eye colour variation in humans.

    PubMed

    Pośpiech, Ewelina; Draus-Barini, Jolanta; Kupiec, Tomasz; Wojas-Pelc, Anna; Branicki, Wojciech

    2011-06-01

    Prediction of phenotypes from genetic data is considered to be the first practical application of data gained from association studies, with potential importance for medicine and the forensic sciences. Multiple genes and polymorphisms have been found to be associated with variation in human pigmentation. Their analysis enables prediction of blue and brown eye colour with a reasonably high accuracy. More accurate prediction, especially in the case of intermediate eye colours, may require better understanding of gene-gene interactions affecting this polygenic trait. Using multifactor dimensionality reduction and logistic regression methods, a study of gene-gene interactions was conducted based on variation in 11 known pigmentation genes examined in a cohort of 718 individuals of European descent. The study revealed significant interactions of a redundant character between the HERC2 and OCA2 genes affecting determination of hazel eye colour and between HERC2 and SLC24A4 affecting determination of blue eye colour. Our research indicates interactive effects of a synergistic character between HERC2 and OCA2, and also provides evidence for a novel strong synergistic interaction between HERC2 and TYRP1, both affecting determination of green eye colour. PMID:21471978

  3. A Three-Way Interaction among Maternal and Fetal Variants Contributing to Congenital Heart Defects.

    PubMed

    Li, Ming; Li, Jingyun; Wei, Changshuai; Lu, Qing; Tang, Xinyu; Erickson, Stephen W; MacLeod, Stewart L; Hobbs, Charlotte A

    2016-01-01

    Congenital heart defects (CHDs) develop through a complex interplay between genetic variants, epigenetic modifications, and maternal environmental exposures. Genetic studies of CHDs have commonly tested single genetic variants for association with CHDs. Less attention has been given to complex gene-by-gene and gene-by-environment interactions. In this study, we applied a recently developed likelihood-ratio Mann-Whitney (LRMW) method to detect joint actions among maternal variants, fetal variants, and maternal environmental exposures, allowing for high-order statistical interactions. All subjects are participants from the National Birth Defect Prevention Study, including 623 mother-offspring pairs with CHD-affected pregnancies and 875 mother-offspring pairs with unaffected pregnancies. Each individual has 872 single nucleotide polymorphisms encoding for critical enzymes in the homocysteine, folate, and trans-sulfuration pathways. By using the LRMW method, three variants (fetal rs625879, maternal rs2169650, and maternal rs8177441) were identified with a joint association to CHD risk (nominal P-value = 1.13e-07). These three variants are located within genes BHMT2, GSTP1, and GPX3, respectively. Further examination indicated that maternal SNP rs2169650 may interact with both fetal SNP rs625879 and maternal SNP rs8177441. Our findings suggest that the risk of CHD may be influenced by both the intragenerational interaction within the maternal genome and the intergenerational interaction between maternal and fetal genomes. PMID:26612412

  4. Spin Relaxation in III-V Semiconductors in various systems: Contribution of Electron-Electron Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dogan, Fatih; Kesserwan, Hasan; Manchon, Aurelien

    2015-03-01

    In spintronics, most of the phenomena that we are interested happen at very fast time scales and are rich in structure in time domain. Our understanding, on the other hand, is mostly based on energy domain calculations. Many of the theoretical tools use approximations and simplifications that can be perceived as oversimplifications. We compare the structure, material, carrier density and temperature dependence of spin relaxation time in n-doped III-V semiconductors using Elliot-Yafet (EY) and D'yakanov-Perel'(DP) with real time analysis using kinetic spin Bloch equations (KSBE). The EY and DP theories fail to capture details as the system investigated is varied. KSBE, on the other hand, incorporates all relaxation sources as well as electron-electron interaction which modifies the spin relaxation time in a non-linear way. Since el-el interaction is very fast (~ fs) and spin-conserving, it is usually ignored in the analysis of spin relaxation. Our results indicate that electron-electron interaction cannot be neglected and its interplay with the other (spin and momentum) relaxation mechanisms (electron-impurity and electron-phonon scattering) dramatically alters the resulting spin dynamics. We use each interaction explicitly to investigate how, in the presence of others, each relaxation source behaves. We use GaAs and GaN for zinc-blend structure, and GaN and AlN for the wurtzite structure.

  5. Dispersion Interactions between Urea and Nucleobases Contribute to the Destabilization of RNA by Urea in Aqueous Solution

    PubMed Central

    Kasavajhala, Koushik; Bikkina, Swetha; Patil, Indrajit; MacKerell, Alexander D.; Priyakumar, U. Deva

    2015-01-01

    Urea has long been used to investigate protein folding and, more recently, RNA folding. Studies have proposed that urea denatures RNA by participating in stacking interactions and hydrogen bonds with nucleic acid bases. In this study, the ability of urea to form unconventional stacking interactions with RNA bases is investigated using ab initio calculations (RI-MP2 and CCSD(T) methods with the aug-cc-pVDZ basis set). A total of 29 stable nucleobase-urea stacked complexes are identified in which the intermolecular interaction energies (up to −14 kcal/mol) are dominated by dispersion effects. Natural bond orbital (NBO) and atoms in molecules (AIM) calculations further confirm strong interactions between urea and nucleobases. Calculations on model systems with multiple urea and water molecules interacting with a guanine base lead to a hypothesis that urea molecules along with water are able to form cage-like structures capable of trapping nucleic acid bases in extrahelical states by forming both hydrogen bonded and dispersion interactions, thereby contributing to the unfolding of RNA in the presence of urea in aqueous solution. PMID:25668757

  6. Plasmid replication initiator interactions with origin 13-mers and polymerase subunits contribute to strand-specific replisome assembly

    PubMed Central

    Wawrzycka, Aleksandra; Gross, Marta; Wasaznik, Anna; Konieczny, Igor

    2015-01-01

    Although the molecular basis for replisome activity has been extensively investigated, it is not clear what the exact mechanism for de novo assembly of the replication complex at the replication origin is, or how the directionality of replication is determined. Here, using the plasmid RK2 replicon, we analyze the protein interactions required for Escherichia coli polymerase III (Pol III) holoenzyme association at the replication origin. Our investigations revealed that in E. coli, replisome formation at the plasmid origin involves interactions of the RK2 plasmid replication initiation protein (TrfA) with both the polymerase β- and α-subunits. In the presence of other replication proteins, including DnaA, helicase, primase and the clamp loader, TrfA interaction with the β-clamp contributes to the formation of the β-clamp nucleoprotein complex on origin DNA. By reconstituting in vitro the replication reaction on ssDNA templates, we demonstrate that TrfA interaction with the β-clamp and sequence-specific TrfA interaction with one strand of the plasmid origin DNA unwinding element (DUE) contribute to strand-specific replisome assembly. Wild-type TrfA, but not the TrfA QLSLF mutant (which does not interact with the β-clamp), in the presence of primase, helicase, Pol III core, clamp loader, and β-clamp initiates DNA synthesis on ssDNA template containing 13-mers of the bottom strand, but not the top strand, of DUE. Results presented in this work uncovered requirements for anchoring polymerase at the plasmid replication origin and bring insights of how the directionality of DNA replication is determined. PMID:26195759

  7. Contributions of the RAD51 N-terminal domain to BRCA2-RAD51 interaction.

    PubMed

    Subramanyam, Shyamal; Jones, William T; Spies, Maria; Spies, M Ashley

    2013-10-01

    RAD51 DNA strand exchange protein catalyzes the central step in homologous recombination, a cellular process fundamentally important for accurate repair of damaged chromosomes, preservation of the genetic integrity, restart of collapsed replication forks and telomere maintenance. BRCA2 protein, a product of the breast cancer susceptibility gene, is a key recombination mediator that interacts with RAD51 and facilitates RAD51 nucleoprotein filament formation on single-stranded DNA generated at the sites of DNA damage. An accurate atomistic level description of this interaction, however, is limited to a partial crystal structure of the RAD51 core fused to BRC4 peptide. Here, by integrating homology modeling and molecular dynamics, we generated a structure of the full-length RAD51 in complex with BRC4 peptide. Our model predicted previously unknown hydrogen bonding patterns involving the N-terminal domain (NTD) of RAD51. These interactions guide positioning of the BRC4 peptide within a cavity between the core and the NTDs; the peptide binding separates the two domains and restricts internal dynamics of RAD51 protomers. The model's depiction of the RAD51-BRC4 complex was validated by free energy calculations and in vitro functional analysis of rationally designed mutants. All generated mutants, RAD51(E42A), RAD51(E59A), RAD51(E237A), RAD51(E59A/E237A) and RAD51(E42A/E59A/E237A) maintained basic biochemical activities of the wild-type RAD51, but displayed reduced affinities for the BRC4 peptide. Strong correlation between the calculated and experimental binding energies confirmed the predicted structure of the RAD51-BRC4 complex and highlighted the importance of RAD51 NTD in RAD51-BRCA2 interaction. PMID:23935068

  8. Kinetic contributions to gating by interactions unique to N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors.

    PubMed

    Borschel, William F; Cummings, Kirstie A; Tindell, LeeAnn K; Popescu, Gabriela K

    2015-10-30

    Among glutamate-gated channels, NMDA receptors produce currents that subside with unusually slow kinetics, and this feature is essential to the physiology of central excitatory synapses. Relative to the homologous AMPA and kainate receptors, NMDA receptors have additional intersubunit contacts in the ligand binding domain that occur at both conserved and non-conserved sites. We examined GluN1/GluN2A single-channel currents with kinetic analyses and modeling to probe these class-specific intersubunit interactions for their role in glutamate binding and receptor gating. We found that substitutions that eliminate such interactions at non-conserved sites reduced stationary gating, accelerated deactivation, and imparted sensitivity to aniracetam, an AMPA receptor-selective positive modulator. Abolishing unique contacts at conserved sites also reduced stationary gating and accelerated deactivation. These results show that contacts specific to NMDA receptors, which brace the heterodimer interface within the ligand binding domain, stabilize actively gating receptor conformations and result in longer bursts and slower deactivations. They support the view that the strength of the heterodimer interface modulates gating in both NMDA and non-NMDA receptors and that unique interactions at this interface are responsible in part for basic differences between the kinetics of NMDA and non-NMDA currents at glutamatergic synapses. PMID:26370091

  9. TatBC-Independent TatA/Tat Substrate Interactions Contribute to Transport Efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Taubert, Johannes; Hou, Bo; Risselada, H. Jelger; Mehner, Denise; Lünsdorf, Heinrich; Grubmüller, Helmut; Brüser, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The Tat system can transport folded, signal peptide-containing proteins (Tat substrates) across energized membranes of prokaryotes and plant plastids. A twin-arginine motif in the signal peptide of Tat substrates is recognized by TatC-containing complexes, and TatA permits the membrane passage. Often, as in the model Tat systems of Escherichia coli and plant plastids, a third component – TatB – is involved that resembles TatA but has a higher affinity to TatC. It is not known why most TatA dissociates from TatBC complexes in vivo and distributes more evenly in the membrane. Here we show a TatBC-independent substrate-binding to TatA from Escherichia coli, and we provide evidence that this binding enhances Tat transport. First hints came from in vivo cross-linking data, which could be confirmed by affinity co-purification of TatA with the natural Tat substrates HiPIP and NrfC. Two positions on the surface of HiPIP could be identified that are important for the TatA interaction and transport efficiency, indicating physiological relevance of the interaction. Distributed TatA thus may serve to accompany membrane-interacting Tat substrates to the few TatBC spots in the cells. PMID:25774531

  10. Contribution of SUMO-interacting motifs and SUMOylation to the antiretroviral properties of TRIM5α

    PubMed Central

    Brandariz-Nuñez, Alberto; Roa, Amanda; Valle-Casuso, Jose Carlos; Biris, Nikolaos; Ivanov, Dmitri; Diaz-Griffero, Felipe

    2012-01-01

    Recent findings suggested that the SUMO-interacting motifs (SIMs) present in the human TRIM5α (TRIM5αhu) protein play an important role in the ability of TRIM5αhu to restrict N-MLV. Here we explored the role of SIMs in the ability of rhesus TRIM5α (TRIM5αrh) to restrict HIV-1, and found that TRIM5αrh SIM mutants IL376KK (SIM1mut) and VI405KK (SIM2mut) completely lost their ability to block HIV-1 infection. Interestingly, these mutants also lost the recently described property of TRIM5αrh to shuttle into the nucleus. Analysis of these variants revealed that they are unable to interact with the HIV-1 core, which might explain the reason that these variants are not active against HIV-1. Furthermore, NMR titration experiments to assay the binding between the PRYSPRY domain of TRIM5αrh and the small ubiquitin-like modifier 1(SUMO-1) revealed no interaction. In addition, we examined the role of SUMOylation in restriction, and find out that inhibition of SUMOylation by the adenoviral protein Gam1 did not altered the retroviral restriction ability of TRIM5α. Overall, our results do not support a role for SIMs or SUMOylation in the antiviral properties of TRIM5α. PMID:23084420

  11. Dopamine and oxytocin interactions underlying behaviors: potential contributions to behavioral disorders.

    PubMed

    Baskerville, Tracey A; Douglas, Alison J

    2010-06-01

    Dopamine is an important neuromodulator that exerts widespread effects on the central nervous system (CNS) function. Disruption in dopaminergic neurotransmission can have profound effects on mood and behavior and as such is known to be implicated in various neuropsychiatric behavioral disorders including autism and depression. The subsequent effects on other neurocircuitries due to dysregulated dopamine function have yet to be fully explored. Due to the marked social deficits observed in psychiatric patients, the neuropeptide, oxytocin is emerging as one particular neural substrate that may be influenced by the altered dopamine levels subserving neuropathologic-related behavioral diseases. Oxytocin has a substantial role in social attachment, affiliation and sexual behavior. More recently, it has emerged that disturbances in peripheral and central oxytocin levels have been detected in some patients with dopamine-dependent disorders. Thus, oxytocin is proposed to be a key neural substrate that interacts with central dopamine systems. In addition to psychosocial improvement, oxytocin has recently been implicated in mediating mesolimbic dopamine pathways during drug addiction and withdrawal. This bi-directional role of dopamine has also been implicated during some components of sexual behavior. This review will discuss evidence for the existence dopamine/oxytocin positive interaction in social behavioral paradigms and associated disorders such as sexual dysfunction, autism, addiction, anorexia/bulimia, and depression. Preliminary findings suggest that whilst further rigorous testing has to be conducted to establish a dopamine/oxytocin link in human disorders, animal models seem to indicate the existence of broad and integrated brain circuits where dopamine and oxytocin interactions at least in part mediate socio-affiliative behaviors. A profound disruption to these pathways is likely to underpin associated behavioral disorders. Central oxytocin pathways may serve as a

  12. The AMPTE program's contribution to studies of the solar wind-magnetosphere-ionosphere interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Sibeck, D.G. )

    1990-12-01

    The Active Magnetospheric Particle Tracer Explorers (AMPTE) program provided important information on the behavior of clouds of plasma artificially injected into the solar wind and the earth's magnetosphere. Now that the releases are over, data from the satellites are being analyzed to investigate the processes by which the ambient solar wind mass, momentum, and energy are transferred to the magnetosphere. Work in progress at APL indicates that the solar wind is much more inhomogeneous than previously believed, that the solar wind constantly buffets the magnetosphere, and that ground observers may remotely sense these interactions as geomagnetic pulsations. 8 refs.

  13. Water absorption in PEEK and PEI matrices. Contribution to the understanding of water-polar group interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courvoisier, E.; Bicaba, Y.; Colin, X.

    2016-05-01

    The water absorption in two aromatic linear polymers (PEEK and PEI) was studied between 10% and 90% RH at 30, 50 and 70°C. It was found that these polymers display classical Henry and Fick's behaviors. Moreover, they have very close values of equilibrium water concentration C∞ and water diffusivity D presumably because their respective polar groups establish molecular interactions of the same nature with water. This assumption was checked from a literature compilation of values of C∞ and D for a large variety of linear and tridimensional polymers containing a single type of polar group. It was then evidenced that almost all types of carbonyl group (in particular, those belonging to imides, amides and ketones) have the same molar contribution to water absorption, except those belonging to esters which are much less hydrophilic. Furthermore, hydroxyl and sulfone groups are much more hydrophilic than carbonyl groups so that their molar contribution is located on another master curve. On this basis, semi-empirical structure/water transport property relationships were proposed. It was found that C∞ increases exponentially with the concentration of polar groups (presumably because water is doubly bonded), but also with the intensity of their molecular interactions with water. In contrast, D is inversely proportional to C∞, which means that polar group-water interactions slow down the rate of water diffusion.

  14. Observations of Ions in Comets: A Contribution Towards Understanding the Comet-Solar Wind Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jockers, K.; Bonev, T.; Credner, T.

    Since many years cometary ions have been observed by the authors and their coworkers in order to study the comet-solar wind interaction. Comets with water production rates ranging from 10^28 (46P/Wirtanen) to 6 10^30 molecules s^-1 (C/1995 O1 Hale-Bopp) have been observed. In this paper we briefly introduce the physics of the comet-solar wind interaction. New observations of comet C/1996 Q1 (Tabur) are presented, where for the first time H_2O^+ and CO^+ ions have been recorded exactly simultaneously with a two-channel system. They are compared with previous observations of comets C/1989 X1 (Austin), 46P (Wirtanen) and 109P (Swift-Tuttle). We use a new method of Wegmann et al. (1998), based on the MHD scaling law, to determine the water production of comet Tabur from its H_2O^+ column density map and obtain a value of 3.3 10^28 water molecules s^-1. Nonstationary phenomena like tail rays and so-called tail disconnections are very briefly reviewed. A movie of plasma envelopes observed in the light of OH^+ in comet 1995 O1 (Hale-Bopp) is presented on the attached CD-ROM.

  15. Wind-US Code Contributions to the First AIAA Shock Boundary Layer Interaction Prediction Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Georgiadis, Nicholas J.; Vyas, Manan A.; Yoder, Dennis A.

    2013-01-01

    This report discusses the computations of a set of shock wave/turbulent boundary layer interaction (SWTBLI) test cases using the Wind-US code, as part of the 2010 American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA) shock/boundary layer interaction workshop. The experiments involve supersonic flows in wind tunnels with a shock generator that directs an oblique shock wave toward the boundary layer along one of the walls of the wind tunnel. The Wind-US calculations utilized structured grid computations performed in Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes mode. Four turbulence models were investigated: the Spalart-Allmaras one-equation model, the Menter Baseline and Shear Stress Transport k-omega two-equation models, and an explicit algebraic stress k-omega formulation. Effects of grid resolution and upwinding scheme were also considered. The results from the CFD calculations are compared to particle image velocimetry (PIV) data from the experiments. As expected, turbulence model effects dominated the accuracy of the solutions with upwinding scheme selection indicating minimal effects.

  16. Intramolecular interactions contributing for the conformational preference of bioactive diphenhydramine: Manifestation of the gauche effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Rezende, Fátima M. P.; Andrade, Laize A. F.; Freitas, Matheus P.

    2015-08-01

    Diphenhydramine is an antihistamine used to treat some symptoms of allergies and the common cold. It is usually marketed as the hydrochloride salt, and both the neutral and cation forms have the O-C-C-N fragment. The gauche effect is well known in fluorine-containing chains, because its main origin is hyperconjugative and the σ∗C-F is a low-lying acceptor orbital, allowing electron delocalization in the conformation where F and an adjacent electronegative substituent in an ethane fragment are in the gauche orientation. Our experimental (NMR) and theoretical findings indicate that diphenhydramine exhibits the gauche effect, since the preferential conformations have the O-C-C-N moiety in this orientation due especially to antiperiplanar σC-H → σ∗C-O and σC-H → σ∗C-N interactions. This conformational preference is strengthened in the protonated form due to an incremental electrostatic gauche effect. Because the gauche conformation matches the bioactive structure of diphenhydramine complexed with histamine methyltransferase, it is suggested that intramolecular interactions, and not only induced fit, rule its bioactive form.

  17. The importance of interacting climate modes on Australia’s contribution to global carbon cycle extremes

    PubMed Central

    Cleverly, James; Eamus, Derek; Luo, Qunying; Restrepo Coupe, Natalia; Kljun, Natascha; Ma, Xuanlong; Ewenz, Cacilia; Li, Longhui; Yu, Qiang; Huete, Alfredo

    2016-01-01

    The global carbon cycle is highly sensitive to climate-driven fluctuations of precipitation, especially in the Southern Hemisphere. This was clearly manifested by a 20% increase of the global terrestrial C sink in 2011 during the strongest sustained La Niña since 1917. However, inconsistencies exist between El Niño/La Niña (ENSO) cycles and precipitation in the historical record; for example, significant ENSO–precipitation correlations were present in only 31% of the last 100 years, and often absent in wet years. To resolve these inconsistencies, we used an advanced temporal scaling method for identifying interactions amongst three key climate modes (El Niño, the Indian Ocean dipole, and the southern annular mode). When these climate modes synchronised (1999–2012), drought and extreme precipitation were observed across Australia. The interaction amongst these climate modes, more than the effect of any single mode, was associated with large fluctuations in precipitation and productivity. The long-term exposure of vegetation to this arid environment has favoured a resilient flora capable of large fluctuations in photosynthetic productivity and explains why Australia was a major contributor not only to the 2011 global C sink anomaly but also to global reductions in photosynthetic C uptake during the previous decade of drought. PMID:26976754

  18. The importance of interacting climate modes on Australia's contribution to global carbon cycle extremes.

    PubMed

    Cleverly, James; Eamus, Derek; Luo, Qunying; Restrepo Coupe, Natalia; Kljun, Natascha; Ma, Xuanlong; Ewenz, Cacilia; Li, Longhui; Yu, Qiang; Huete, Alfredo

    2016-01-01

    The global carbon cycle is highly sensitive to climate-driven fluctuations of precipitation, especially in the Southern Hemisphere. This was clearly manifested by a 20% increase of the global terrestrial C sink in 2011 during the strongest sustained La Niña since 1917. However, inconsistencies exist between El Niño/La Niña (ENSO) cycles and precipitation in the historical record; for example, significant ENSO-precipitation correlations were present in only 31% of the last 100 years, and often absent in wet years. To resolve these inconsistencies, we used an advanced temporal scaling method for identifying interactions amongst three key climate modes (El Niño, the Indian Ocean dipole, and the southern annular mode). When these climate modes synchronised (1999-2012), drought and extreme precipitation were observed across Australia. The interaction amongst these climate modes, more than the effect of any single mode, was associated with large fluctuations in precipitation and productivity. The long-term exposure of vegetation to this arid environment has favoured a resilient flora capable of large fluctuations in photosynthetic productivity and explains why Australia was a major contributor not only to the 2011 global C sink anomaly but also to global reductions in photosynthetic C uptake during the previous decade of drought. PMID:26976754

  19. The importance of interacting climate modes on Australia’s contribution to global carbon cycle extremes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cleverly, James; Eamus, Derek; Luo, Qunying; Restrepo Coupe, Natalia; Kljun, Natascha; Ma, Xuanlong; Ewenz, Cacilia; Li, Longhui; Yu, Qiang; Huete, Alfredo

    2016-03-01

    The global carbon cycle is highly sensitive to climate-driven fluctuations of precipitation, especially in the Southern Hemisphere. This was clearly manifested by a 20% increase of the global terrestrial C sink in 2011 during the strongest sustained La Niña since 1917. However, inconsistencies exist between El Niño/La Niña (ENSO) cycles and precipitation in the historical record; for example, significant ENSO–precipitation correlations were present in only 31% of the last 100 years, and often absent in wet years. To resolve these inconsistencies, we used an advanced temporal scaling method for identifying interactions amongst three key climate modes (El Niño, the Indian Ocean dipole, and the southern annular mode). When these climate modes synchronised (1999–2012), drought and extreme precipitation were observed across Australia. The interaction amongst these climate modes, more than the effect of any single mode, was associated with large fluctuations in precipitation and productivity. The long-term exposure of vegetation to this arid environment has favoured a resilient flora capable of large fluctuations in photosynthetic productivity and explains why Australia was a major contributor not only to the 2011 global C sink anomaly but also to global reductions in photosynthetic C uptake during the previous decade of drought.

  20. Anomalously interacting Z* bosons: an example of JINR's contribution to physics at LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bednyakov, V. A.; Yeletskikh, I. V.; Chizhov, M. V.; Boyko, I. R.

    2016-04-01

    Fundamental particle physics research at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR) has always included the use of highest-energy accelerator machines, and it is only natural that from its very beginning, the institute played an active role in work on developing, assembling, and upgrading both the Large Hadron Collider itself and its detectors. Along with providing hardware and software support to secure the failure-free operation of detectors and the gathering and processing of experimental data, JINR sets as its primary goal to effectively participate in the unprecedentedly comprehensive and important LHC research program. As part of this program, the experimental search for new heavy chiral Z* and W* bosons is carried out by the ATLAS collaboration, an effort whose necessity was fully justified and strategy exhaustively developed by JINR physicists. The search results from the first run of the LHC are briefly discussed, together with the decisive contribution from JINR and future prospects.

  1. Lactate involvement in neuron-glia metabolic interaction: (13)C-NMR spectroscopy contribution.

    PubMed

    Bouzier-Sore, A-K; Serres, S; Canioni, P; Merle, M

    2003-09-01

    Glucose is commonly admitted to be the main substrate for brain energy requirement. However, it has been recently proposed that lactate, generated from glucose via glycolysis, would be the oxidative substrate for neurons, particularly during neuronal activation, according to a mechanism called the astrocyte-neuron lactate shuttle hypothesis (ANLSH). In that mechanism, glutamate released in the synaptic cleft during brain activation is taken up by astrocytes. This uptake, via the glutamate/Na(+) transporter, induces the entry of sodium, which is then excluded from the astrocytes via the Na(+)/K(+) ATPase. This exclusion consumes ATP, which stimulates glycolysis and thus lactate formation in astrocytes. This lactate is then transferred to neurons where it is utilized as oxidative substrate. This review tries to gather the recent evidences that support this hypothesis and presents the contribution of NMR to this matter. PMID:14652173

  2. The CHUVA Project Contributions to the Understanding of Anthropogenic Interactions Affecting the Atmospheric Physics over Amazonas.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machado, L.; Cecchini, M. A.; Gonçalves, W.

    2014-12-01

    CHUVA, meaning "rain" in Portuguese, is the acronym for the Cloud processes of tHe main precipitation systems in Brazil: A contribUtion to cloud resolVing modeling and to the GPM (GlobAl Precipitation Measurement). The CHUVA project has conducted six field campaigns; the last campaign was held in Manaus in 2014 jointly with GoAmazon and ACRIDICON. CHUVA's main scientific motivation is to contribute to the understanding of cloud processes, which represent one of the least understood components of the weather and climate system. This study will briefly describe the CHUVA project and the main scientific results obtained in the Amazon region. Specifically, we will describe the results of one year radar observation of Manaus rainfall and the relationship with black carbon. The results indicate that the aerosol influence on precipitating systems is modulated by the atmospheric instability degree. For stable atmospheres, the higher the aerosol concentration, the lower the precipitation over the region. On the other hand, for unstable cases, higher concentrations of particulate material are associated with more precipitation, elevated presence of ice and larger rain cells, which suggests an association with long lived systems. Also we will describe some preliminary results obtained during GoAmazon describing the cloud and rainfall size distribution (DSD). The DSD was adjusted to the gamma function using the momentum method and disposed in the three-dimensional space of the gamma parameters: the intercept, the shape and the width. Each point in this three-dimensional space corresponds to a specific DSD and the ensemble of points describes all regimes of precipitation in Amazon. Based in this Gamma space we will discuss the characteristics of the rainfall regime and anthropogenic features.

  3. Under the radar: how unexamined biases in decision-making processes in clinical interactions can contribute to health care disparities.

    PubMed

    Dovidio, John F; Fiske, Susan T

    2012-05-01

    Several aspects of social psychological science shed light on how unexamined racial/ethnic biases contribute to health care disparities. Biases are complex but systematic, differing by racial/ethnic group and not limited to love-hate polarities. Group images on the universal social cognitive dimensions of competence and warmth determine the content of each group's overall stereotype, distinct emotional prejudices (pity, envy, disgust, pride), and discriminatory tendencies. These biases are often unconscious and occur despite the best intentions. Such ambivalent and automatic biases can influence medical decisions and interactions, systematically producing discrimination in health care and ultimately disparities in health. Understanding how these processes may contribute to bias in health care can help guide interventions to address racial and ethnic disparities in health. PMID:22420809

  4. Under the Radar: How Unexamined Biases in Decision-Making Processes in Clinical Interactions Can Contribute to Health Care Disparities

    PubMed Central

    Fiske, Susan T.

    2012-01-01

    Several aspects of social psychological science shed light on how unexamined racial/ethnic biases contribute to health care disparities. Biases are complex but systematic, differing by racial/ethnic group and not limited to love–hate polarities. Group images on the universal social cognitive dimensions of competence and warmth determine the content of each group's overall stereotype, distinct emotional prejudices (pity, envy, disgust, pride), and discriminatory tendencies. These biases are often unconscious and occur despite the best intentions. Such ambivalent and automatic biases can influence medical decisions and interactions, systematically producing discrimination in health care and ultimately disparities in health. Understanding how these processes may contribute to bias in health care can help guide interventions to address racial and ethnic disparities in health. PMID:22420809

  5. Defining the contributions of permanent electrostatics, Pauli repulsion, and dispersion in density functional theory calculations of intermolecular interaction energies.

    PubMed

    Horn, Paul R; Mao, Yuezhi; Head-Gordon, Martin

    2016-03-21

    In energy decomposition analysis of Kohn-Sham density functional theory calculations, the so-called frozen (or pre-polarization) interaction energy contains contributions from permanent electrostatics, dispersion, and Pauli repulsion. The standard classical approach to separate them suffers from several well-known limitations. We introduce an alternative scheme that employs valid antisymmetric electronic wavefunctions throughout and is based on the identification of individual fragment contributions to the initial supersystem wavefunction as determined by an energetic optimality criterion. The density deformations identified with individual fragments upon formation of the initial supersystem wavefunction are analyzed along with the distance dependence of the new and classical terms for test cases that include the neon dimer, ammonia borane, water-Na(+), water-Cl(-), and the naphthalene dimer. PMID:27004862

  6. Galaxies and Genes: Towards an Automatic Modeling of Interacting Galaxies (Oral Contribution)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theis, Christian; Gerds, Christoph; Spinneker, Christian

    The main problems in modeling interacting galaxies are the extended parameter space and the fairly high CPU costs of self-consistent N-body simulations. Therefore, traditional modeling techniques suffer from either extreme CPU demands or trapping in local optima (or both). A very promising alternative approach are evolutionary algorithms which mimic natural adaptation in order to optimize the numerical models. One main advantage is their very weak dependence on starting points which makes them much less prone to trapping in local optima. We present a Genetic Algorithm (GA) coupled with a fast (but not self-consistent) restricted N-body solver. This combination allows us to identify interesting regions of parameter space within only a few CPU hours on a standard PC or a few CPU minutes on a parallel computer. Especially, we demonstrate here the ability of GA-based fitting procedures to analyse observational data automatically, provided the data are sufficiently accurate.

  7. PRICKLE1 Contributes to Cancer Cell Dissemination through Its Interaction with mTORC2.

    PubMed

    Daulat, Avais M; Bertucci, François; Audebert, Stéphane; Sergé, Arnauld; Finetti, Pascal; Josselin, Emmanuelle; Castellano, Rémy; Birnbaum, Daniel; Angers, Stéphane; Borg, Jean-Paul

    2016-05-23

    Components of the evolutionarily conserved developmental planar cell polarity (PCP) pathway were recently described to play a prominent role in cancer cell dissemination. However, the molecular mechanisms by which PCP molecules drive the spread of cancer cells remain largely unknown. PRICKLE1 encodes a PCP protein bound to the promigratory serine/threonine kinase MINK1. We identify RICTOR, a member of the mTORC2 complex, as a PRICKLE1-binding partner and show that the integrity of the PRICKLE1-MINK1-RICTOR complex is required for activation of AKT, regulation of focal adhesions, and cancer cell migration. Disruption of the PRICKLE1-RICTOR interaction results in a strong impairment of breast cancer cell dissemination in xenograft assays. Finally, we show that upregulation of PRICKLE1 in basal breast cancers, a subtype characterized by high metastatic potential, is associated with poor metastasis-free survival. PMID:27184734

  8. Cation–π Interactions Contribute to Substrate Recognition in γ‐Butyrobetaine Hydroxylase Catalysis

    PubMed Central

    Kamps, Jos J. A. G.; Khan, Amjad; Choi, Hwanho; Lesniak, Robert K.; Brem, Jürgen; Rydzik, Anna M.; McDonough, Michael A.; Schofield, Christopher J.; Claridge, Timothy D. W.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract γ‐Butyrobetaine hydroxylase (BBOX) is a non‐heme FeII‐ and 2‐oxoglutarate‐dependent oxygenase that catalyzes the stereoselective hydroxylation of an unactivated C−H bond of γ‐butyrobetaine (γBB) in the final step of carnitine biosynthesis. BBOX contains an aromatic cage for the recognition of the positively charged trimethylammonium group of the γBB substrate. Enzyme binding and kinetic analyses on substrate analogues with P and As substituting for N in the trimethylammonium group show that the analogues are good BBOX substrates, which follow the efficiency trend N+>P+>As+. The results reveal that an uncharged carbon analogue of γBB is not a BBOX substrate, thus highlighting the importance of the energetically favorable cation–π interactions in productive substrate recognition. PMID:26660433

  9. Model for evaluating patterned charge regulation contribution to electrostatic interactions between proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hollenbeck, Dawn; Martini, K. Michael; Langner, Andreas; Ross, David; Harkin, Anthony; Nelson, Edward; Thurston, George

    2010-03-01

    We study the pattern-specific work of charging for two spherical model proteins in close proximity in ionic solution, using a grand-canonical partition function together with a coarse-grained, linear Debye-Huckel model to calculate the needed work of charging for each possible proton occupancy configuration. We seek to delineate a parameter-space phase diagram to characterize the circumstances under which patterned charge regulation, attractions due to heterogeneous protein charging patterns, and screened net protein charge could individually dominate the electrostatic portion of the interaction between model particles. Within the model, we place titratable residues in accordance with the tertiary protein structure, as is done in the case of a single protein within the Tanford-Kirkwood protein electrostatics model. We use Monte-Carlo simulation and analytical work to evaluate how the local statistics of the charging patterns on each protein respond to close proximity and relative orientation of neighboring proteins.

  10. Fundamentals of Nanoscale Polymer–Protein Interactions and Potential Contributions to Solid-State Nanobioarrays

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Protein adsorption onto polymer surfaces is a very complex, ubiquitous, and integrated process, impacting essential areas of food processing and packaging, health devices, diagnostic tools, and medical products. The nature of protein–surface interactions is becoming much more complicated with continuous efforts toward miniaturization, especially for the development of highly compact protein detection and diagnostic devices. A large body of literature reports on protein adsorption from the perspective of ensemble-averaged behavior on macroscopic, chemically homogeneous, polymeric surfaces. However, protein–surface interactions governing the nanoscale size regime may not be effectively inferred from their macroscopic and microscopic characteristics. Recently, research efforts have been made to produce periodically arranged, nanoscopic protein patterns on diblock copolymer surfaces solely through self-assembly. Intriguing protein adsorption phenomena are directly probed on the individual biomolecule level for a fundamental understanding of protein adsorption on nanoscale surfaces exhibiting varying degrees of chemical heterogeneity. Insight gained from protein assembly on diblock copolymers can be effectively used to control the surface density, conformation, orientation, and biofunctionality of prebound proteins in highly miniaturized applications, now approaching the nanoscale. This feature article will highlight recent experimental and theoretical advances made on these fronts while focusing on single-biomolecule-level investigations of protein adsorption behavior combined with surface chemical heterogeneity on the length scale commensurate with a single protein. This article will also address advantages and challenges of the self-assembly-driven patterning technology used to produce protein nanoarrays and its implications for ultrahigh density, functional, and quantifiable protein detection in a highly miniaturized format. PMID:24456577

  11. Fundamentals of nanoscale polymer-protein interactions and potential contributions to solid-state nanobioarrays.

    PubMed

    Hahm, Jong-in

    2014-08-26

    Protein adsorption onto polymer surfaces is a very complex, ubiquitous, and integrated process, impacting essential areas of food processing and packaging, health devices, diagnostic tools, and medical products. The nature of protein-surface interactions is becoming much more complicated with continuous efforts toward miniaturization, especially for the development of highly compact protein detection and diagnostic devices. A large body of literature reports on protein adsorption from the perspective of ensemble-averaged behavior on macroscopic, chemically homogeneous, polymeric surfaces. However, protein-surface interactions governing the nanoscale size regime may not be effectively inferred from their macroscopic and microscopic characteristics. Recently, research efforts have been made to produce periodically arranged, nanoscopic protein patterns on diblock copolymer surfaces solely through self-assembly. Intriguing protein adsorption phenomena are directly probed on the individual biomolecule level for a fundamental understanding of protein adsorption on nanoscale surfaces exhibiting varying degrees of chemical heterogeneity. Insight gained from protein assembly on diblock copolymers can be effectively used to control the surface density, conformation, orientation, and biofunctionality of prebound proteins in highly miniaturized applications, now approaching the nanoscale. This feature article will highlight recent experimental and theoretical advances made on these fronts while focusing on single-biomolecule-level investigations of protein adsorption behavior combined with surface chemical heterogeneity on the length scale commensurate with a single protein. This article will also address advantages and challenges of the self-assembly-driven patterning technology used to produce protein nanoarrays and its implications for ultrahigh density, functional, and quantifiable protein detection in a highly miniaturized format. PMID:24456577

  12. Contributions of conserved serine residues to the interactions of ligands with dopamine D2 receptors.

    PubMed

    Cox, B A; Henningsen, R A; Spanoyannis, A; Neve, R L; Neve, K A

    1992-08-01

    Four dopamine D2 receptor mutants were constructed, in each of which an alanine residue was substituted for one of four conserved serine residues, i.e., Ser-193, Ser-194, Ser-197, and Ser-391. Wild-type and mutant receptors were expressed transiently in COS-7 cells and stably in C6 glioma cells for analysis of ligand-receptor interactions. In radioligand binding assays, the affinity of D2 receptors for dopamine was decreased 50-fold by substitution of alanine for Ser-193, implicating this residue in the binding of dopamine. Each mutant had smaller decreases in affinity for one or more of the ligands tested, with no apparent relationship between the class of ligand and the pattern of mutation-induced changes in affinity, except that the potency of agonists was decreased by substitution for Ser-193. The potency of dopamine for inhibition of adenylyl cyclase was reduced substantially by substitution of alanine for Ser-193 or Ser-197. Mutation of Ser-194 led to a complete loss of efficacy for dopamine and p-tyramine, which would be consistent with an interaction between Ser-194 and the p-hydroxyl substituent of dopamine that is necessary for activation of the receptors to occur. Because mutation of the corresponding residues of beta 2-adrenergic receptors has very different consequences, we conclude that although the position of these serine residues is highly conserved among catecholamine receptors, and the residues as a group are important in ligand binding and activation of receptors by agonists, the function of each of the residues considered separately varies among catecholamine receptors. PMID:1321233

  13. Contribution to the beam plasma material interactions during material processing with TEA CO2 laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaschek, Rainer; Konrad, Peter E.; Mayerhofer, Roland; Bergmann, Hans W.; Bickel, Peter G.; Kowalewicz, Roland; Kuttenberger, Alfred; Christiansen, Jens

    1995-03-01

    The TEA-CO2-laser (transversely excited atmospheric pressure) is a tool for the pulsed processing of materials with peak power densities up to 1010 W/cm2 and a FWHM of 70 ns. The interaction between the laser beam, the surface of the work piece and the surrounding atmosphere as well as gas pressure and the formation of an induced plasma influences the response of the target. It was found that depending on the power density and the atmosphere the response can take two forms. (1) No target modification due to optical break through of the atmosphere and therefore shielding of the target (air pressure above 10 mbar, depending on the material). (2) Processing of materials (air pressure below 10 mbar, depending on the material) with melting of metallic surfaces (power density above 0.5 109 W/cm2), hole formation (power density of 5 109 W/cm2) and shock hardening (power density of 3.5 1010 W/cm2). All those phenomena are usually linked with the occurrence of laser supported combustion waves and laser supported detonation waves, respectively for which the mechanism is still not completely understood. The present paper shows how short time photography and spatial and temporal resolved spectroscopy can be used to better understand the various processes that occur during laser beam interaction. The spectra of titanium and aluminum are observed and correlated with the modification of the target. If the power density is high enough and the gas pressure above a material and gas composition specific threshold, the plasma radiation shows only spectral lines of the background atmosphere. If the gas pressure is below this threshold, a modification of the target surface (melting, evaporation and solid state transformation) with TEA-CO2- laser pulses is possible and the material specific spectra is observed. In some cases spatial and temporal resolved spectroscopy of a plasma allows the calculation of electron temperatures by comparison of two spectral lines.

  14. Nonenzymatic domains of Kalirin7 contribute to spine morphogenesis through interactions with phosphoinositides and Abl

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Xin-Ming; Miller, Megan B.; Vishwanatha, K. S.; Gross, Maegan J.; Wang, Yanping; Abbott, Thomas; Lam, TuKiet T.; Mains, Richard E.; Eipper, Betty A.

    2014-01-01

    Like several Rho GDP/GTP exchange factors (GEFs), Kalirin7 (Kal7) contains an N-terminal Sec14 domain and multiple spectrin repeats. A natural splice variant of Kalrn lacking the Sec14 domain and four spectrin repeats is unable to increase spine formation; our goal was to understand the function of the Sec14 and spectrin repeat domains. Kal7 lacking its Sec14 domain still increased spine formation, but the spines were short. Strikingly, Kal7 truncation mutants containing only the Sec14 domain and several spectrin repeats increased spine formation. The Sec14 domain bound phosphoinositides, a minor but crucial component of cellular membranes, and binding was increased by a phosphomimetic mutation. Expression of KalSec14-GFP in nonneuronal cells impaired receptor-mediated endocytosis, linking Kal7 to membrane trafficking. Consistent with genetic studies placing Abl, a non–receptor tyrosine kinase, and the Drosophila orthologue of Kalrn into the same signaling pathway, Abl1 phosphorylated two sites in the fourth spectrin repeat of Kalirin, increasing its sensitivity to calpain-mediated degradation. Treating cortical neurons of the wild-type mouse, but not the Kal7KO mouse, with an Abl inhibitor caused an increase in linear spine density. Phosphorylation of multiple sites in the N-terminal Sec14/spectrin region of Kal7 may allow coordination of the many signaling pathways contributing to spine morphogenesis. PMID:24600045

  15. Neuron-Glia Interactions in Neural Plasticity: Contributions of Neural Extracellular Matrix and Perineuronal Nets

    PubMed Central

    Dzyubenko, Egor; Gottschling, Christine

    2016-01-01

    Synapses are specialized structures that mediate rapid and efficient signal transmission between neurons and are surrounded by glial cells. Astrocytes develop an intimate association with synapses in the central nervous system (CNS) and contribute to the regulation of ion and neurotransmitter concentrations. Together with neurons, they shape intercellular space to provide a stable milieu for neuronal activity. Extracellular matrix (ECM) components are synthesized by both neurons and astrocytes and play an important role in the formation, maintenance, and function of synapses in the CNS. The components of the ECM have been detected near glial processes, which abut onto the CNS synaptic unit, where they are part of the specialized macromolecular assemblies, termed perineuronal nets (PNNs). PNNs have originally been discovered by Golgi and represent a molecular scaffold deposited in the interface between the astrocyte and subsets of neurons in the vicinity of the synapse. Recent reports strongly suggest that PNNs are tightly involved in the regulation of synaptic plasticity. Moreover, several studies have implicated PNNs and the neural ECM in neuropsychiatric diseases. Here, we highlight current concepts relating to neural ECM and PNNs and describe an in vitro approach that allows for the investigation of ECM functions for synaptogenesis. PMID:26881114

  16. Contribution of the C-Terminal Region of a Group II Chaperonin to its Interaction with Prefoldin and Substrate Transfer.

    PubMed

    Zako, Tamotsu; Sahlan, Muhamad; Fujii, Sayaka; Yamamoto, Yohei Y; Tai, Phan The; Sakai, Kotaro; Maeda, Mizuo; Yohda, Masafumi

    2016-06-01

    Prefoldin is a molecular chaperone that captures an unfolded protein substrate and transfers it to a group II chaperonin. Previous studies have shown that the interaction sites for prefoldin are located in the helical protrusions of group II chaperonins. However, it does not exclude the possibility of the existence of other interaction sites. In this study, we constructed C-terminal truncation mutants of a group II chaperonin and examined the effects of these mutations on the chaperone's function and interaction with prefoldin. Whereas the mutants with up to 6 aa truncation from the C-terminus retained more than 90% chaperone activities for protecting citrate synthase from thermal aggregation and refolding of green fluorescent protein and isopropylmalate dehydrogenase, the truncation mutants showed decreased affinities for prefoldin. Consequently, the truncation mutants showed reduced transfer efficiency of the denatured substrate protein from prefoldin and subsequent chaperonin-dependent refolding. The results clearly show that the C-terminal region of group II chaperonins contributes to their interactions with prefoldin, the transfer of the substrate protein from prefoldin and its refolding. PMID:27079363

  17. Affinity thermoprecipitatin: Contribution of the efficiency of ligand-protein interaction and access of the ligand.

    PubMed

    Galaev, I Y; Mattiasson, B

    1993-05-01

    Conjugates to two thermoprecipitating polymers, poly(N-vinyl caprolactam) and poly(N-isopropylacrylmide), with soybean trypsin inhibitor, Cibacron Blue 3GA, Cu-iminodiacetic acid, and p-aminobenzamidine were synthesized. The interaction of these conjugates with trypsin and lactate dehydrogenase was studied. Coupling of the ligand to a polymer resulted in a 100-1000-fold decrease in enzyme-affinity. Rough theoretical estimates revealed that a successful affinity precipitation required that the binding of a target protein and a ligand coupled to a polymer have binding constants on the order of 10(-7)-10(-8) M. Such strong affinity of low molecular weight ligands that can provide binding constants of 10(-9)-10(-11) M or alternatively multipoint attachment of the target protein molecule. The ligand in the ligand-polymer conjugate is still accessible to the protein after thermoprecipitation, and the latter can bind with the particle of the dispersion of thermoprecipitated ligand-polymer precipitate may result in stripping of enzyme molecules from the surface of the particles. PMID:18601296

  18. Testing the relative contribution of positive and negative interactions in rocky intertidal communities

    SciTech Connect

    Bertness, M.D.; Leonard, G.H.; Levine, J.M.; Schmidt, P.R.; Ingraham, A.O.

    1999-12-01

    In contrast to many other biotic forces, such as competition and predation, the role played by habitat modification by plants and sessile animals in natural communities has not been given the experimental attention it deserves. To test the hypothesis that habitat modification by seaweed canopies can have direct positive effects on rocky intertidal communities, the authors quantified habitat amelioration by Ascophyllum nodosum canopies and its consequences on understory organisms in the Gulf of Maine, USA. At the upper and lower elevational borders of the algal canopy, the authors examined the recruitment, growth, and survivorship of common benthic organisms in canopy removal, and shaded canopy removal plots intended to mimic canopy habitat modifications. The algal canopy greatly reduced potential physical stresses, particularly at high tidal heights. Maximum daily rock temperatures were 5--10 C lower and evaporative water loss was in order of magnitude less under the canopy than in canopy removal plots. The response of understory organisms to canopy removal, however, was species specific and somewhat idiosyncratic. Nonetheless, in general, at the high intertidal border of the canopy the recruitment, growth, and survival of understory organisms were enhanced by the canopy, whereas at the low intertidal border canopy effects were negative or neutral. nearly half of the interactions the authors studied were positive in the high zone.

  19. Sensorimotor Decoupling Contributes to Triadic Attention: A Longitudinal Investigation of Mother-Infant-Object Interactions.

    PubMed

    de Barbaro, Kaya; Johnson, Christine M; Forster, Deborah; Deák, Gedeon O

    2016-03-01

    Previous developmental accounts of joint object activity identify a qualitative "shift" around 9-12 months. In a longitudinal study of 26 dyads, videos of joint object interactions at 4, 6, 9, and 12 months were coded for all targets of gaze and manual activity (at 10 Hz). At 12 months, infants distribute their sensorimotor modalities between objects handled by the parent and others controlled by the infant. Analyses reveal novel trajectories in distributed joint object activity across the 1st year. At 4 months, infants predominantly look at and manipulate a single object, typically held by their mothers. Between 6 and 9 months, infants increasingly decouple their visual and haptic modalities and distribute their attention between objects held by their mothers and by themselves. These previously unreported developments in the distribution of multimodal object activity might "bridge the gap" to coordinated joint activity between 6 and 12 months. PMID:26613383

  20. A neuron-glia interaction involving GABA Transaminase contributes to sleep loss in sleepless mutants

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wen-Feng; Maguire, Sarah; Sowcik, Mallory; Luo, Wenyu; Koh, Kyunghee; Sehgal, Amita

    2014-01-01

    Sleep is an essential process and yet mechanisms underlying it are not well understood. Loss of the Drosophila quiver/sleepless (qvr/sss) gene increases neuronal excitability and diminishes daily sleep, providing an excellent model for exploring the underpinnings of sleep regulation. Here, we used a proteomic approach to identify proteins altered in sss brains. We report that loss of sleepless post-transcriptionally elevates the CG7433 protein, a mitochondrial γ-aminobutyric acid transaminase (GABAT), and reduces GABA in fly brains. Loss of GABAT increases daily sleep and improves sleep consolidation, indicating that GABAT promotes wakefulness. Importantly, disruption of the GABAT gene completely suppresses the sleep phenotype of sss mutants, demonstrating that GABAT is required for loss of sleep in sss mutants. While SSS acts in distinct populations of neurons, GABAT acts in glia to reduce sleep in sss flies. Our results identify a novel mechanism of interaction between neurons and glia that is important for the regulation of sleep. PMID:24637426

  1. PE_PGRS33 Contributes to Mycobacterium tuberculosis Entry in Macrophages through Interaction with TLR2

    PubMed Central

    Palucci, Ivana; Camassa, Serena; Cascioferro, Alessandro; Sali, Michela; Anoosheh, Saber; Zumbo, Antonella; Minerva, Mariachiara; Iantomasi, Raffaella; De Maio, Flavio; Di Sante, Gabriele; Ria, Francesco; Sanguinetti, Maurizio; Palù, Giorgio; Brennan, Michael J.; Manganelli, Riccardo; Delogu, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    PE_PGRS represent a large family of proteins typical of pathogenic mycobacteria whose members are characterized by an N-terminal PE domain followed by a large Gly-Ala repeat-rich C-terminal domain. Despite the abundance of PE_PGRS-coding genes in the Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) genome their role and function in the biology and pathogenesis still remains elusive. In this study, we generated and characterized an Mtb H37Rv mutant (MtbΔ33) in which the structural gene of PE_PGRS33, a prototypical member of the protein family, was inactivated. We showed that this mutant entered macrophages with an efficiency up to ten times lower than parental or complemented strains, while its efficiency in infecting pneumocytes remained unaffected. Interestingly, the lack of PE_PGRS33 did not affect the intracellular growth of this mutant in macrophages. Using a series of functional deletion mutants of the PE_PGRS33 gene to complement the MtbΔ33 strain, we demonstrated that the PGRS domain is required to mediate cell entry into macrophages, with the key domain encompassing position 140–260 amino acids of PE_PGRS33. PE_PGRS33-mediated entry into macrophages was abolished in TLR2-deficient mice, as well as following treatment with wortmannin or an antibody against the complement receptor 3 (CR3), indicating that PE_PGRS33-mediated entry of Mtb in macrophages occurs through interaction with TLR2. PMID:26978522

  2. Regulation of primary plant metabolism during plant-pathogen interactions and its contribution to plant defense

    PubMed Central

    Rojas, Clemencia M.; Senthil-Kumar, Muthappa; Tzin, Vered; Mysore, Kirankumar S.

    2014-01-01

    Plants are constantly exposed to microorganisms in the environment and, as a result, have evolved intricate mechanisms to recognize and defend themselves against potential pathogens. One of these responses is the downregulation of photosynthesis and other processes associated with primary metabolism that are essential for plant growth. It has been suggested that the energy saved by downregulation of primary metabolism is diverted and used for defense responses. However, several studies have shown that upregulation of primary metabolism also occurs during plant-pathogen interactions. We propose that upregulation of primary metabolism modulates signal transduction cascades that lead to plant defense responses. In support of this thought, we here compile evidence from the literature to show that upon exposure to pathogens or elicitors, plants induce several genes associated with primary metabolic pathways, such as those involved in the synthesis or degradation of carbohydrates, amino acids and lipids. In addition, genetic studies have confirmed the involvement of these metabolic pathways in plant defense responses. This review provides a new perspective highlighting the relevance of primary metabolism in regulating plant defense against pathogens with the hope to stimulate further research in this area. PMID:24575102

  3. Polarization contributions to intermolecular interactions revisited with fragment electric-field response functions

    SciTech Connect

    Horn, Paul R. E-mail: mhg@cchem.berkeley.edu; Head-Gordon, Martin E-mail: mhg@cchem.berkeley.edu

    2015-09-21

    The polarization energy in intermolecular interactions treated by self-consistent field electronic structure theory is often evaluated using a constraint that the atomic orbital (AO) to molecular orbital transformation is blocked by fragments. This approach is tied to AO basis sets, overestimates polarization energies in the overlapping regime, particularly in large AO basis sets, and lacks a useful complete basis set limit. These problems are addressed by the construction of polarization subspaces based on the responses of isolated fragments to weak electric fields. These subspaces are spanned by fragment electric-field response functions, which can capture effects up to the dipole (D), or quadrupole (DQ) level, or beyond. Schemes are presented for the creation of both non-orthogonal and orthogonal fragment subspaces, and the basis set convergence of the polarization energies computed using these spaces is assessed. Numerical calculations for the water dimer, water–Na{sup +}, water–Mg{sup 2+}, water–F{sup −}, and water–Cl{sup −} show that the non-orthogonal DQ model is very satisfactory, with small differences relative to the orthogonalized model. Additionally, we prove a fundamental difference between the polarization degrees of freedom in the fragment-blocked approaches and in constrained density schemes. Only the former are capable of properly prohibiting charge delocalization during polarization.

  4. Polarization contributions to intermolecular interactions revisited with fragment electric-field response functions.

    PubMed

    Horn, Paul R; Head-Gordon, Martin

    2015-09-21

    The polarization energy in intermolecular interactions treated by self-consistent field electronic structure theory is often evaluated using a constraint that the atomic orbital (AO) to molecular orbital transformation is blocked by fragments. This approach is tied to AO basis sets, overestimates polarization energies in the overlapping regime, particularly in large AO basis sets, and lacks a useful complete basis set limit. These problems are addressed by the construction of polarization subspaces based on the responses of isolated fragments to weak electric fields. These subspaces are spanned by fragment electric-field response functions, which can capture effects up to the dipole (D), or quadrupole (DQ) level, or beyond. Schemes are presented for the creation of both non-orthogonal and orthogonal fragment subspaces, and the basis set convergence of the polarization energies computed using these spaces is assessed. Numerical calculations for the water dimer, water-Na(+), water-Mg(2+), water-F(-), and water-Cl(-) show that the non-orthogonal DQ model is very satisfactory, with small differences relative to the orthogonalized model. Additionally, we prove a fundamental difference between the polarization degrees of freedom in the fragment-blocked approaches and in constrained density schemes. Only the former are capable of properly prohibiting charge delocalization during polarization. PMID:26395691

  5. Do Interactions Between Gut Ecology and Environmental Chemicals Contribute to Obesity and Diabetes?

    PubMed Central

    Snedeker, Suzanne M.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Gut microbiota are important factors in obesity and diabetes, yet little is known about their role in the toxicodynamics of environmental chemicals, including those recently found to be obesogenic and diabetogenic. Objectives: We integrated evidence that independently links gut ecology and environmental chemicals to obesity and diabetes, providing a framework for suggesting how these environmental factors may interact with these diseases, and identified future research needs. Methods: We examined studies with germ-free or antibiotic-treated laboratory animals, and human studies that evaluated how dietary influences and microbial changes affected obesity and diabetes. Strengths and weaknesses of studies evaluating how environmental chemical exposures may affect obesity and diabetes were summarized, and research gaps on how gut ecology may affect the disposition of environmental chemicals were identified. Results: Mounting evidence indicates that gut microbiota composition affects obesity and diabetes, as does exposure to environmental chemicals. The toxicology and pharmacology literature also suggests that interindividual variations in gut microbiota may affect chemical metabolism via direct activation of chemicals, depletion of metabolites needed for biotransformation, alteration of host biotransformation enzyme activities, changes in enterohepatic circulation, altered bioavailability of environmental chemicals and/or antioxidants from food, and alterations in gut motility and barrier function. Conclusions: Variations in gut microbiota are likely to affect human toxicodynamics and increase individual exposure to obesogenic and diabetogenic chemicals. Combating the global obesity and diabetes epidemics requires a multifaceted approach that should include greater emphasis on understanding and controlling the impact of interindividual gut microbe variability on the disposition of environmental chemicals in humans. PMID:22042266

  6. Mothers as a resource in times of stress: interactive contributions of socialization of coping and stress to youth psychopathology.

    PubMed

    Abaied, Jamie L; Rudolph, Karen D

    2010-02-01

    This study examined the hypothesis that maternal socialization of coping would make a differential contribution to youth depression and externalizing psychopathology depending on youths' level of exposure to life stress. A sample of 155 youth (M age = 12.41, SD = 1.21) and their maternal caregivers completed semi-structured interviews and questionnaires in a two-wave longitudinal study over a 1-year period. Results provided evidence for two types of socialization x stress interactions-an amplification-effects model and a differential-effects model. In the context of interpersonal stress, findings supported an amplification-effects model wherein the risk and protective effects of engagement and disengagement socialization of coping emerged in youth exposed to high but not mild levels of stress. In the context of noninterpersonal stress, findings supported a differential-effects model wherein disengagement socialization of coping contributed to heightened risk among youth exposed to high stress but dampened risk among youth exposed to mild stress. This research identifies maternal socialization of coping as a noteworthy contributor to risk for youth psychopathology, and highlights the need to consider parenting x environment interactions when investigating parenting processes related to youth psychopathology. PMID:19908139

  7. Interparticle interactions and surface contribution to the effective anisotropy in biocompatible iron oxide nanoparticles used for contrast agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arelaro, A. D.; Brandl, A. L.; Lima, E.; Gamarra, L. F.; Brito, G. E. S.; Pontuschka, W. M.; Goya, G. F.

    2005-05-01

    We have investigated the dynamic magnetic properties of dextran-coated magnetite (Fe3O4) nanoparticles in the form of (a) particles suspended in a carrier liquid and (b) concentrated powder obtained from lyophilization. The blocking temperature was found to increase from TB=42(2)to52(2)K (@μ0H=10mT) after lyophilization, showing the effects of dipolar interactions in samples with identical size distributions. The temperature dependence of the hyperfine field Bhyp(T) reveals the effects of collective magnetic excitations at low temperature, and allowed us to obtain the magnetic anisotropy energy Ea=3.6×10-21J for noninteracting particles. The obtained values can be understood assuming only magnetocrystalline anisotropy, without any additional contributions from surface, shape, or exchange origin. Moreover, a magnetocrystalline anisotropy constant value K1=10kJ/m3 was obtained by assuming the cubic phase with easy magnetic direction [111] of the bulk material above the Verwey transition, supporting the idea that the Verwey transition is absent in nanosized particles. Accordingly, no indication of magnetic transition at TV could be observed in our measurements. From the dynamical parameters of ac susceptibility χ(f ,T) curves, the contribution of the dipolar interactions to the total anisotropy energy barrier could be estimated to be Ω =4.5×10-21J, larger than the single-particle value.

  8. Microtubule-Associated Protein 1 Light Chain 3 Interacts with and Contributes to Growth Inhibiting Effect of PML

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Jia-Kai; Fan, Li; Xu, Yi-Wei; Liu, Man-Hua; Yan, Shu-Yang; Chen, Guo-Qiang; Huang, Ying

    2014-01-01

    Previously we reported that the expression of promyelocytic leukemia (PML)-retinoic acid receptor alpha (RARα) fusion gene, which is caused by specific translocation (15;17) in acute promyelocytic leukemia, can enhance constitutive autophagic activity in leukemic and nonleukemic cells, and PML overexpression can sequestrate part of microtubule-associated protein light chain 3 (LC3) protein in PML nuclear bodies, suggesting that LC3 protein also distributes into nuclei although it is currently thought to function primarily in the cytoplasm, the site of autophagosomal formation. However, its potential significance of nucleoplasmic localizations remains greatly elusive. Here we demonstrate that PML interacts with LC3 in a cell type-independent manner as assessed by Co-IP assay and co-localization observation. Overexpressed PML significantly coprecipitates with endogenous and nuclear LC3 protein. Furthermore, a fraction of endogenous PML protein is found to be co-localized with LC3 protein under steady state condition, which is further enhanced by IFNα induction, indicating that PML up-regulation potentiates this interaction. Additionally, DsRed-PML associates with EGFP-LC3 during telophase and G1 phase but not in metaphase and anaphase. Two potential LC3-interacting region (LIR) motifs in PML are required for interaction of PML with LC3 while this association is independent of autophagic activity. Finally, we show that interaction between PML and LC3 contributes to cell growth inhibition function of PML. Considering that PML is an important tumor suppressor, we propose that nuclear portion of LC3 protein may associate with PML to control cell growth for prevention and inhibition of cancer occurrence and development. PMID:25419843

  9. A Surface Enolase Participates in Borrelia burgdorferi-Plasminogen Interaction and Contributes to Pathogen Survival within Feeding Ticks

    PubMed Central

    Nogueira, Sarah Veloso; Smith, Alexis A.; Qin, Jin-Hong

    2012-01-01

    Borrelia burgdorferi, a tick-borne bacterial pathogen, causes a disseminated infection involving multiple organs known as Lyme disease. Surface proteins can directly participate in microbial virulence by facilitating pathogen dissemination via interaction with host factors. We show here that a fraction of the B. burgdorferi chromosomal gene product BB0337, annotated as enolase or phosphopyruvate dehydratase, is associated with spirochete outer membrane and is surface exposed. B. burgdorferi enolase, either in a recombinant form or as a membrane-bound native antigen, displays enzymatic activities intrinsic to the glycolytic pathway. However, the protein also interacts with host plasminogen, potentially leading to its activation and resulting in B. burgdorferi-induced fibrinolysis. As expected, enolase displayed consistent expression in vivo, however, with a variable temporal and spatial expression during spirochete infection in mice and ticks. Despite an extracellular exposure of the antigen and a potential role in host-pathogen interaction, active immunization of mice with recombinant enolase failed to evoke protective immunity against subsequent B. burgdorferi infection. In contrast, enolase immunization of murine hosts significantly reduced the acquisition of spirochetes by feeding ticks, suggesting that the protein could have a stage-specific role in B. burgdorferi survival in the feeding vector. Strategies to interfere with the function of surface enolase could contribute to the development of novel preventive measures to interrupt the spirochete infection cycle and reduce the incidences of Lyme disease. PMID:22025510

  10. Microtubule-associated protein 1B interaction with tubulin tyrosine ligase contributes to the control of microtubule tyrosination.

    PubMed

    Utreras, Elías; Jiménez-Mateos, Eva Maria; Contreras-Vallejos, Erick; Tortosa, Elena; Pérez, Mar; Rojas, Sebastián; Saragoni, Lorena; Maccioni, Ricardo B; Avila, Jesús; González-Billault, Christian

    2008-01-01

    Microtubule-associated protein 1B (MAP1B) is the first microtubule-associated protein to be expressed during nervous system development. MAP1B belongs to a large family of proteins that contribute to the stabilization and/or enhancement of microtubule polymerization. These functions are related to the control of the dynamic properties of microtubules. The C-terminal domain of the neuronal alpha-tubulin isotype is characterized by the presence of an acidic polypeptide, with the last amino acid being tyrosine. This tyrosine residue may be enzymatically removed from the protein by an unknown carboxypeptidase activity. Subsequently, the tyrosine residue is again incorporated into this tubulin by another enzyme, tubulin tyrosine ligase, to yield tyrosinated tubulin. Because neurons lacking MAP1B have a reduced proportion of tyrosinated microtubules, we analyzed the possible interaction between MAP1B and tubulin tyrosine ligase. Our results show that these proteins indeed interact and that the interaction is not affected by MAP1B phosphorylation. Additionally, neurons lacking MAP1B, when exposed to drugs that reversibly depolymerize microtubules, do not fully recover tyrosinated microtubules upon drug removal. These results suggest that MAP1B regulates tyrosination of alpha-tubulin in neuronal microtubules. This regulation may be important for general processes involved in nervous system development such as axonal guidance and neuronal migration. PMID:18075266

  11. Manufactured and Airborne Nanoparticle Cardiopulmonary Interactions: A Review of Mechanisms and the Possible Contribution of Mast Cells

    PubMed Central

    Shannahan, Jonathan H.; Kodavanti, Urmila P.; Brown, Jared M.

    2013-01-01

    Human inhalation exposures to manufactured nanoparticles (NP) and airborne ultrafine particles (UFP) continues to increase in both occupational and environmental settings. UFP exposures have been associated with increased cardiovascular mortality and morbidity, while ongoing research supports adverse systemic and cardiovascular health effects after NP exposures. Adverse cardiovascular health effects include alterations in heart rate variability, hypertension, thrombosis, arrhythmias, increased myocardial infarction, and atherosclerosis. Exactly how UFP and NP cause these negative cardiovascular effects is poorly understood, however a variety of mediators and mechanisms have been proposed. UFP and NP, as well as their soluble components, are known to systemically translocate from the lung. Translocated particles could mediate cardiovascular toxicity through direct interactions with the vasculature, blood, and heart. Recent study suggests that sensory nerve stimulation within the lung may also contribute to UFP- and NP-induced acute cardiovascular alterations. Activation of sensory nerves, such as C-fibers, within the lung may result in altered cardiac rhythm and function. Lastly, release of pulmonary-derived mediators into systemic circulation has been proposed to facilitate cardiovascular effects. In general, these proposed pulmonary-derived mediators include pro-inflammatory cytokines, oxidatively-modified macromolecules, vasoactive proteins, and prothrombotic factors. These pulmonary-derived mediators have been postulated to contribute to the subsequent prothrombotic, atherogenic, and inflammatory effects after exposure. This review will evaluate the potential contribution of individual mediators and mechanisms in facilitating cardiopulmonary toxicity following inhalation of UFP and NP. Lastly we will appraise the literature and propose a hypothesis regarding the possible role of mast cells in contributing to these systemic effects. PMID:22486349

  12. Direct Ca2+-dependent Heterophilic Interaction between Desmosomal Cadherins, Desmoglein and Desmocollin, Contributes to Cell–Cell Adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Chitaev, Nikolai A.; Troyanovsky, Sergey M.

    1997-01-01

    Human fibrosarcoma cells, HT-1080, feature extensive adherens junctions, lack mature desmosomes, and express a single known desmosomal protein, Desmoglein 2 (Dsg2). Transfection of these cells with bovine Desmocollin 1a (Dsc1a) caused dramatic changes in the subcellular distribution of endogenous Dsg2. Both cadherins clustered in the areas of the adherens junctions, whereas only a minor portion of Dsg2 was seen in these areas in the parental cells. Deletion mapping showed that intact extracellular cadherin-like repeats of Dsc1a (Arg1-Thr170) are required for the translocation of Dsg2. Deletion of the intracellular C-domain that mediates the interaction of Dsc1a with plakoglobin, or the CSI region that is involved in the binding to desmoplakin, had no effect. Coimmunoprecipitation experiments of cell lysates stably expressing Dsc1a with anti-Dsc or -Dsg antibodies demonstrate that the desmosomal cadherins, Dsg2 and Dsc1a, are involved in a direct Ca2+-dependent interaction. This conclusion was further supported by the results of solid phase binding experiments. These showed that the Dsc1a fragment containing cadherin-like repeats 1 and 2 binds directly to the extracellular portion of Dsg in a Ca2+-dependent manner. The contribution of the Dsg/ Dsc interaction to cell–cell adhesion was tested by coculturing HT-1080 cells expressing Dsc1a with HT-1080 cells lacking Dsc but expressing myc-tagged plakoglobin (MPg). In the latter cells, MPg and the endogenous Dsg form stable complexes. The observed specific coimmunoprecipitation of MPg by anti-Dsc antibodies in coculture indicates that an intercellular interaction between Dsc1 and Dsg is involved in cell–cell adhesion. PMID:9214392

  13. Activation of focal adhesion kinase through an interaction with β4 integrin contributes to tumorigenicity of colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Tai, Yu-Ling; Lai, I-Rue; Peng, Yu-Ju; Ding, Shih-Torng; Shen, Tang-Long

    2016-06-01

    High expression of either β4 integrin or focal adhesion kinase (FAK) has been reported in human colon cancer. However, it remains unclear how β4 integrin together with FAK contributes to the tumorigenicity of colon cancer. Here, we demonstrate that the co-overexpression of β4 integrin and FAK positively correlates with advanced stages of human colon cancer. Activated β4 integrin interacts with FAK and subsequently induces FAK phosphorylation at Tyr397. Furthermore, ablation of the β4 integrin/FAK complex and/or FAK activation impair colon cancer cell proliferation, anchorage-independent growth, and tumorigenicity. Our data indicate that the β4 integrin/FAK complex and subsequent FAK activation are essential regulators during the tumorigenicity of colon cancer, and we suggest an alternative strategy for colon cancer therapy. PMID:27178753

  14. Genomic distance entrained clustering and regression modelling highlights interacting genomic regions contributing to proliferation in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Genomic copy number changes and regional alterations in epigenetic states have been linked to grade in breast cancer. However, the relative contribution of specific alterations to the pathology of different breast cancer subtypes remains unclear. The heterogeneity and interplay of genomic and epigenetic variations means that large datasets and statistical data mining methods are required to uncover recurrent patterns that are likely to be important in cancer progression. Results We employed ridge regression to model the relationship between regional changes in gene expression and proliferation. Regional features were extracted from tumour gene expression data using a novel clustering method, called genomic distance entrained agglomerative (GDEC) clustering. Using gene expression data in this way provides a simple means of integrating the phenotypic effects of both copy number aberrations and alterations in chromatin state. We show that regional metagenes derived from GDEC clustering are representative of recurrent regions of epigenetic regulation or copy number aberrations in breast cancer. Furthermore, detected patterns of genomic alterations are conserved across independent oestrogen receptor positive breast cancer datasets. Sequential competitive metagene selection was used to reveal the relative importance of genomic regions in predicting proliferation rate. The predictive model suggested additive interactions between the most informative regions such as 8p22-12 and 8q13-22. Conclusions Data-mining of large-scale microarray gene expression datasets can reveal regional clusters of co-ordinate gene expression, independent of cause. By correlating these clusters with tumour proliferation we have identified a number of genomic regions that act together to promote proliferation in ER+ breast cancer. Identification of such regions should enable prioritisation of genomic regions for combinatorial functional studies to pinpoint the key genes and interactions

  15. RNA polymerase III drives alternative splicing of the potassium channel–interacting protein contributing to brain complexity and neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Massone, Sara; Vassallo, Irene; Castelnuovo, Manuele; Fiorino, Gloria; Gatta, Elena; Robello, Mauro; Borghi, Roberta; Tabaton, Massimo; Russo, Claudio; Dieci, Giorgio; Cancedda, Ranieri

    2011-01-01

    Alternative splicing generates protein isoforms that are conditionally or differentially expressed in specific tissues. The discovery of factors that control alternative splicing might clarify the molecular basis of biological and pathological processes. We found that IL1-α−dependent up-regulation of 38A, a small ribonucleic acid (RNA) polymerase III–transcribed RNA, drives the synthesis of an alternatively spliced form of the potassium channel–interacting protein (KCNIP4). The alternative KCNIP4 isoform cannot interact with the γ-secretase complex, resulting in modification of γ-secretase activity, amyloid precursor protein processing, and increased secretion of β-amyloid enriched in the more toxic Aβ x-42 species. Notably, synthesis of the variant KCNIP4 isoform is also detrimental to brain physiology, as it results in the concomitant blockade of the fast kinetics of potassium channels. This alternative splicing shift is observed at high frequency in tissue samples from Alzheimer’s disease patients, suggesting that RNA polymerase III cogenes may be upstream determinants of alternative splicing that significantly contribute to homeostasis and pathogenesis in the brain. PMID:21624954

  16. Partial Dominance, Overdominance, Epistasis and QTL by Environment Interactions Contribute to Heterosis in Two Upland Cotton Hybrids.

    PubMed

    Shang, Lianguang; Wang, Yumei; Cai, Shihu; Wang, Xiaocui; Li, Yuhua; Abduweli, Abdugheni; Hua, Jinping

    2016-03-01

    Based on two recombinant inbred line (RIL) populations, two corresponding backcross (BC) populations were constructed to elucidate the genetic basis of heterosis in Upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.). The yield, and yield components, of these populations were evaluated in three environments. At the single-locus level, 78 and 66 quantitative trait loci (QTL) were detected using composite interval mapping in RIL and BC populations, respectively, and 29 QTL were identified based on mid-parental heterosis (MPH) data of two hybrids. Considering all traits together, a total of 50 (64.9%) QTL with partial dominance effect, and 27 (35.1%) QTL for overdominance effect were identified in two BC populations. At the two-locus level, 120 and 88 QTL with main effects (M-QTL), and 335 and 99 QTL involved in digenic interactions (E-QTL), were detected by inclusive composite interval mapping in RIL and BC populations, respectively. A large number of QTL by environment interactions (QEs) for M-QTL and E-QTL were detected in three environments. For most traits, average E-QTL explained a larger proportion of phenotypic variation than did M-QTL in two RIL populations and two BC populations. It was concluded that partial dominance, overdominance, epistasis, and QEs all contribute to heterosis in Upland cotton, and that partial dominance resulting from single loci and epistasis play a relatively more important role than other genetic effects in heterosis in Upland cotton. PMID:26715091

  17. Abnormal Interactions between Perifollicular Mast Cells and CD8+ T-Cells May Contribute to the Pathogenesis of Alopecia Areata

    PubMed Central

    Bertolini, Marta; Zilio, Federica; Rossi, Alfredo; Gilhar, Amos; Keren, Aviad; Meyer, Katja C.; Wang, Eddy; Funk, Wolfgang; McElwee, Kevin; Paus, Ralf

    2014-01-01

    Alopecia areata (AA) is a CD8+ T-cell dependent autoimmune disease of the hair follicle (HF) in which the collapse of HF immune privilege (IP) plays a key role. Mast cells (MCs) are crucial immunomodulatory cells implicated in the regulation of T cell-dependent immunity, IP, and hair growth. Therefore, we explored the role of MCs in AA pathogenesis, focusing on MC interactions with CD8+ T-cells in vivo, in both human and mouse skin with AA lesions. Quantitative (immuno-)histomorphometry revealed that the number, degranulation and proliferation of perifollicular MCs are significantly increased in human AA lesions compared to healthy or non-lesional control skin, most prominently in subacute AA. In AA patients, perifollicular MCs showed decreased TGFβ1 and IL-10 but increased tryptase immunoreactivity, suggesting that MCs switch from an immuno-inhibitory to a pro-inflammatory phenotype. This concept was supported by a decreased number of IL-10+ and PD-L1+ MCs, while OX40L+, CD30L+, 4–1BBL+ or ICAM-1+ MCs were increased in AA. Lesional AA-HFs also displayed significantly more peri- and intrafollicular- CD8+ T-cells as well as more physical MC/CD8+ T-cell contacts than healthy or non-lesional human control skin. During the interaction with CD8+ T-cells, AA MCs prominently expressed MHC class I and OX40L, and sometimes 4–1BBL or ICAM-1, suggesting that MC may present autoantigens to CD8+ T-cells and/or co-stimulatory signals. Abnormal MC numbers, activities, and interactions with CD8+ T-cells were also seen in the grafted C3H/HeJ mouse model of AA and in a new humanized mouse model for AA. These phenomenological in vivo data suggest the novel AA pathobiology concept that perifollicular MCs are skewed towards pro-inflammatory activities that facilitate cross-talk with CD8+ T-cells in this disease, thus contributing to triggering HF-IP collapse in AA. If confirmed, MCs and their CD8+ T-cell interactions could become a promising new therapeutic target in the future

  18. Contributions of soil moisture interactions to climate change in the tropics in the GLACE-CMIP5 experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    May, Wilhelm; Meier, Arndt; Rummukainen, Markku; Berg, Alexis; Chéruy, Frederique; Hagemann, Stefan

    2015-12-01

    Contributions of changes in soil moisture to the projected climate change in the tropics at the end of the twenty first century are quantified using the simulations from five different global climate models, which contributed to the GLACE-CMIP5 experiment. "GLACE" refers to the Global Land Atmosphere Coupling Experiment and "CMIP5" to the fifth phase of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project. This is done by relating the overall projected changes in climate to those changes in climate that are related to the projected changes in soil moisture. The study focusses on two particular aspects of the interactions of the soil moisture with climate, the soil moisture-temperature coupling and the soil moisture-precipitation coupling. The simulations show distinct future changes in soil moisture content in the tropics, with a general tendency of increases in the central parts of the tropics and decreases in the subtropics. These changes are associated with corresponding changes in precipitation, with an overall tendency of an approximate 5 % change in soil moisture in response to a precipitation change of 1 mm/day. All five individual models are characterized by the same qualitative behaviour, despite differences in the strength and in the robustness of the coupling between soil moisture and precipitation. The changes in soil moisture content are found to give important contributions to the overall climate change in the tropics. This is in particularly the case for latent and sensible heat flux, for which about 80 % of the overall changes are related to soil moisture changes. Similarly, about 80 % of the overall near-surface temperature changes (with the mean temperature changes in the tropics removed) are associated with soil moisture changes. For precipitation, on the other hand, about 30-40 % of the overall change can be attributed to soil moisture changes. The robustness of the contributions of the soil moisture changes to the overall climate change varies between the

  19. Lipid solvation effects contribute to the affinity of Gly-xxx-Gly motif-mediated helix-helix interactions.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Rachel M; Rath, Arianna; Melnyk, Roman A; Deber, Charles M

    2006-07-18

    Interactions between transmembrane helices are mediated by the concave Gly-xxx-Gly motif surface. Whether Gly residues per se are sufficient for selection of this motif has not been established. Here, we used the in vivo TOXCAT assay to measure the relative affinities of all 18 combinations of Gly, Ala, and Ser "small-xxx-small" mutations in glycophorin A (GpA) and bacteriophage M13 major coat protein (MCP) homodimers. Affinity values were compared with the accessibility to a methylene-sized probe of the total surface area of each helix monomer as a measure of solvation by membrane components. A strong inverse correlation was found between nonpolar-group lipid accessibility and dimer affinity (R = 0.75 for GpA, p = 0.013, and R = 0.81 for MCP, p = 0.004), suggesting that lipid as a poor membrane protein solvent, conceptually analogous to water in soluble protein folding, can contribute to dimer stability and help to define helix-helix interfaces. PMID:16834324

  20. Quercetin, an in vitro inhibitor of CYP3A, does not contribute to the interaction between nifedipine and grapefruit juice.

    PubMed Central

    Rashid, J; McKinstry, C; Renwick, A G; Dirnhuber, M; Waller, D G; George, C F

    1993-01-01

    Quercetin, a flavonoid present in various fruits, is a potent in vitro inhibitor of CYP3A. Its role in the reported interaction between grapefruit juice and nifedipine has been determined in vivo in humans. Eight healthy volunteers were given in random order 10 mg nifedipine orally, either alone or with 200 ml double strength grapefruit juice, or with 400 mg quercetin. The area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC) for nifedipine with grapefruit juice (mean 320 ng ml(-1) h) was increased significantly (P < 0.01) compared with the AUC when nifedipine was given alone (mean 218 ng ml(-1) h). The time to peak plasma concentration for nifedipine with grapefruit juice (1.5 h) was also increased (P < 0.05) compared with control (0.5 h) suggesting delayed absorption. Although quercetin delayed the time to peak nifedipine concentration (1.3 h) it did not alter the AUC of either the parent drug (mean 209 ng ml(-1) h) or its first-pass metabolite. The results suggest that quercetin does not contribute to the effects of grapefruit juice (which contains <10 mg of quercetin 200 ml(-1)) on the metabolism of nifedipine. Oral doses of quercetin, similar to those possible from the ingestion of other fruits such as strawberries, do not produce in vivo inhibition of CYP3A mediated metabolism of nifedipine. PMID:12959295

  1. Contributions of gas-phase plasma chemistry to surface modifications and gas-surface interactions: investigations of fluorocarbon rf plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuddy, Michael F., II

    The fundamental aspects of inductively coupled fluorocarbon (FC) plasma chemistry were examined, with special emphasis on the contributions of gas-phase species to surface modifications. Characterization of the gas-phase constituents of single-source CF4-, C2F6-, C3F 8-, and C3F6-based plasmas was performed using spectroscopic and mass spectrometric techniques. The effects of varying plasma parameters, including applied rf power (P) and system pressure (p) were examined. Optical emission spectroscopy (OES) and laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) spectroscopy were employed to monitor the behavior of excited and ground CFx (x = 1,2) radicals, respectively. Mass spectrometric techniques, including ion energy analyses, elucidated behaviors of nascent ions in the FC plasmas. These gas-phase data were correlated with the net effect of substrate processing for Si and ZrO2 surfaces. Surface-specific analyses were performed for post-processed substrates via x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and contact angle goniometry. Generally, precursors with lower F/C ratios tended to deposit robust FC films of high surface energy. Precursors of higher F/C ratio, such as CF4, were associated with etching or removal of material from surfaces. Nonetheless, a net balance between deposition of FC moieties and etching of material exists for each plasma system. The imaging of radicals interacting with surfaces (IRIS) technique provided insight into the phenomena occurring at the interface of the plasma gas-phase and substrate of interest. IRIS results demonstrate that CFx radicals scatter copiously, with surface scatter coefficients, S, generally greater than unity under most experimental conditions. Such considerable S values imply surface-mediated production of the CFx radicals at FC-passivated sites. It is inferred that the primary route to surface production of CFx arises from energetic ion bombardment and ablation of surface FC films. Other factors which may influence the observed CFx

  2. Progesterone receptor isoforms PRA and PRB differentially contribute to breast cancer cell migration through interaction with focal adhesion kinase complexes

    PubMed Central

    Bellance, Catherine; Khan, Junaid A.; Meduri, Geri; Guiochon-Mantel, Anne; Lombès, Marc; Loosfelt, Hugues

    2013-01-01

    Progesterone receptor (PR) and progestins affect mammary tumorigenesis; however, the relative contributions of PR isoforms A and B (PRA and PRB, respectively) in cancer cell migration remains elusive. By using a bi-inducible MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell line expressing PRA and/or PRB, we analyzed the effect of conditional PR isoform expression. Surprisingly, unliganded PRB but not PRA strongly enhanced cell migration as compared with PR(–) cells. 17,21-Dimethyl-19-norpregna-4,9-dien-3,20-dione (R5020) progestin limited this effect and was counteracted by the antagonist 11β-(4-dimethyl­amino)­phenyl-17β-hydroxy-17-(1-propynyl)­estra-4,9-dien-3-one (RU486). Of importance, PRA coexpression potentiated PRB-mediated migration, whereas PRA alone was ineffective. PR isoforms differentially regulated expressions of major players of cell migration, such as urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA), its inhibitor plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1, uPA receptor (uPAR), and β1-integrin, which affect focal adhesion kinase (FAK) signaling. Moreover, unliganded PRB but not PRA enhanced FAK Tyr397 phosphorylation and colocalized with activated FAK in cell protrusions. Because PRB, as well as PRA, coimmunoprecipitated with FAK, both isoforms can interact with FAK complexes, depending on their respective nucleocytoplasmic trafficking. In addition, FAK degradation was coupled to R5020-dependent turnovers of PRA and PRB. Such an effect of PRB/PRA expression on FAK signaling might thus affect adhesion/motility, underscoring the implication of PR isoforms in breast cancer invasiveness and metastatic evolution with underlying therapeutic outcomes. PMID:23485561

  3. Npn-1 Contributes to Axon-Axon Interactions That Differentially Control Sensory and Motor Innervation of the Limb

    PubMed Central

    Bianchi, Elisa; Novitch, Bennett G.; Huber, Andrea B.

    2011-01-01

    The initiation, execution, and completion of complex locomotor behaviors are depending on precisely integrated neural circuitries consisting of motor pathways that activate muscles in the extremities and sensory afferents that deliver feedback to motoneurons. These projections form in tight temporal and spatial vicinities during development, yet the molecular mechanisms and cues coordinating these processes are not well understood. Using cell-type specific ablation of the axon guidance receptor Neuropilin-1 (Npn-1) in spinal motoneurons or in sensory neurons in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG), we have explored the contribution of this signaling pathway to correct innervation of the limb. We show that Npn-1 controls the fasciculation of both projections and mediates inter-axonal communication. Removal of Npn-1 from sensory neurons results in defasciculation of sensory axons and, surprisingly, also of motor axons. In addition, the tight coupling between these two heterotypic axonal populations is lifted with sensory fibers now leading the spinal nerve projection. These findings are corroborated by partial genetic elimination of sensory neurons, which causes defasciculation of motor projections to the limb. Deletion of Npn-1 from motoneurons leads to severe defasciculation of motor axons in the distal limb and dorsal-ventral pathfinding errors, while outgrowth and fasciculation of sensory trajectories into the limb remain unaffected. Genetic elimination of motoneurons, however, revealed that sensory axons need only minimal scaffolding by motor axons to establish their projections in the distal limb. Thus, motor and sensory axons are mutually dependent on each other for the generation of their trajectories and interact in part through Npn-1-mediated fasciculation before and within the plexus region of the limbs. PMID:21364975

  4. Analysis of Van der Waals interactions between nanoparticles with different geometries, with accounting for three-particle contributions to the total energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emelyanenko, K. A.

    2016-05-01

    The Axilrod-Teller-Muto method with corrections for triple interactions is used to calculate the energies of Van der Waals interaction for nanosystems containing particles with different geometries. Results are presented for symmetric systems with identical cubic particles of different sizes, for film and cubic particle systems, and for the systems with differently oriented nanorods. Boundary and particle arrangement effects are studied. The fundamental importance of allowing for nonadditive contributions to obtain a reliable quantitative description of interaction processes inside nanosystems is demonstrated. The results are compared to ones obtained using analytical macroscopic methods and the limits of the applicability of macroscopic approximations are estimated.

  5. Inter-Subunit Interactions across the Upper Voltage Sensing-Pore Domain Interface Contribute to the Concerted Pore Opening Transition of Kv Channels

    PubMed Central

    Shem-Ad, Tzilhav; Irit, Orr; Yifrach, Ofer

    2013-01-01

    The tight electro-mechanical coupling between the voltage-sensing and pore domains of Kv channels lies at the heart of their fundamental roles in electrical signaling. Structural data have identified two voltage sensor pore inter-domain interaction surfaces, thus providing a framework to explain the molecular basis for the tight coupling of these domains. While the contribution of the intra-subunit lower domain interface to the electro-mechanical coupling that underlies channel opening is relatively well understood, the contribution of the inter-subunit upper interface to channel gating is not yet clear. Relying on energy perturbation and thermodynamic coupling analyses of tandem-dimeric Shaker Kv channels, we show that mutation of upper interface residues from both sides of the voltage sensor-pore domain interface stabilizes the closed channel state. These mutations, however, do not affect slow inactivation gating. We, moreover, find that upper interface residues form a network of state-dependent interactions that stabilize the open channel state. Finally, we note that the observed residue interaction network does not change during slow inactivation gating. The upper voltage sensing-pore interaction surface thus only undergoes conformational rearrangements during channel activation gating. We suggest that inter-subunit interactions across the upper domain interface mediate allosteric communication between channel subunits that contributes to the concerted nature of the late pore opening transition of Kv channels. PMID:24340010

  6. The Contribution of High-Order Metabolic Interactions to the Global Activity of a Four-Species Microbial Community.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xiaokan; Boedicker, James Q

    2016-09-01

    The activity of a biological community is the outcome of complex processes involving interactions between community members. It is often unclear how to accurately incorporate these interactions into predictive models. Previous work has shown a range of positive and negative metabolic pairwise interactions between species. Here we examine the ability of a modified general Lotka-Volterra model with cell-cell interaction coefficients to predict the overall metabolic rate of a well-mixed microbial community comprised of four heterotrophic natural isolates, experimentally quantifying the strengths of two, three, and four-species interactions. Within this community, interactions between any pair of microbial species were positive, while higher-order interactions, between 3 or more microbial species, slightly modulated community metabolism. For this simple community, the metabolic rate of can be well predicted only with taking into account pairwise interactions. Simulations using the experimentally determined interaction parameters revealed that spatial heterogeneity in the distribution of cells increased the importance of multispecies interactions in dictating function at both the local and global scales. PMID:27623159

  7. A simple retinal mechanism contributes to perceptual interactions between rod- and cone-mediated responses in primates.

    PubMed

    Grimes, William N; Graves, Logan R; Summers, Mathew T; Rieke, Fred

    2015-01-01

    Visual perception across a broad range of light levels is shaped by interactions between rod- and cone-mediated signals. Because responses of retinal ganglion cells, the output cells of the retina, depend on signals from both rod and cone photoreceptors, interactions occurring in retinal circuits provide an opportunity to link the mechanistic operation of parallel pathways and perception. Here we show that rod- and cone-mediated responses interact nonlinearly to control the responses of primate retinal ganglion cells; these nonlinear interactions, surprisingly, were asymmetric, with rod responses strongly suppressing subsequent cone responses but not vice-versa. Human psychophysical experiments revealed a similar perceptual asymmetry. Nonlinear interactions in the retinal output cells were well-predicted by linear summation of kinetically-distinct rod- and cone-mediated signals followed by a synaptic nonlinearity. These experiments thus reveal how a simple mechanism controlling interactions between parallel pathways shapes circuit output and perception. PMID:26098124

  8. The Contribution of the Dyadic Parent-Child Interaction Coding System (DPICS) Warm-Up Segments in Assessing Parent-Child Interactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shanley, Jenelle R.; Niec, Larissa N.

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluated the inclusion of uncoded segments in the Dyadic Parent-Child Interaction Coding System, an analogue observation of parent-child interactions. The relationships between warm-up and coded segments were assessed, as well as the segments' associations with parent ratings of parent and child behaviors. Sixty-nine non-referred…

  9. To What Extent Do Teacher-Student Interaction Quality and Student Gender Contribute to Fifth Graders' Engagement in Mathematics Learning?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rimm-Kaufman, Sara E.; Baroody, Alison E.; Larsen, Ross A. A.; Curby, Timothy W.; Abry, Tashia

    2015-01-01

    This study examines concurrent teacher-student interaction quality and 5th graders' (n = 387) engagement in mathematics classrooms (n = 63) and considers how teacher-student interaction quality relates to engagement differently for boys and girls. Three approaches were used to measure student engagement in mathematics: Research assistants observed…

  10. Constituent quark masses obtained from hadron masses with contributions of Fermi-Breit and Glozman-Riska hyperfine interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Borka Jovanovic, V.; Borka, D.; Ignjatovic, S. R.; Jovanovic, P.

    2010-12-01

    We use the color-spin and flavor-spin interaction Hamiltonians with SU(3) flavor symmetry breaking to obtain meson and baryon mass formulas. Adjusting these masses with experimental masses we determine the constituent quark masses. We discuss the constituent quark masses obtained from meson and baryon mass fits. The results for constituent quark masses are very similar in the case of two different phenomenological models: Fermi-Breit and Glozman-Riska hyperfine interactions.

  11. A simple retinal mechanism contributes to perceptual interactions between rod- and cone-mediated responses in primates

    PubMed Central

    Grimes, William N; Graves, Logan R; Summers, Mathew T; Rieke, Fred

    2015-01-01

    Visual perception across a broad range of light levels is shaped by interactions between rod- and cone-mediated signals. Because responses of retinal ganglion cells, the output cells of the retina, depend on signals from both rod and cone photoreceptors, interactions occurring in retinal circuits provide an opportunity to link the mechanistic operation of parallel pathways and perception. Here we show that rod- and cone-mediated responses interact nonlinearly to control the responses of primate retinal ganglion cells; these nonlinear interactions, surprisingly, were asymmetric, with rod responses strongly suppressing subsequent cone responses but not vice-versa. Human psychophysical experiments revealed a similar perceptual asymmetry. Nonlinear interactions in the retinal output cells were well-predicted by linear summation of kinetically-distinct rod- and cone-mediated signals followed by a synaptic nonlinearity. These experiments thus reveal how a simple mechanism controlling interactions between parallel pathways shapes circuit output and perception. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.08033.001 PMID:26098124

  12. Filamin A Protein Interacts with Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Gag Protein and Contributes to Productive Particle Assembly*

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, JoAnn; Liu, Ling; Woodruff, Elvin A.; Taylor, Harry E.; Goodwin, J. Shawn; D'Aquila, Richard T.; Spearman, Paul; Hildreth, James E. K.; Dong, Xinhong

    2011-01-01

    HIV-1 Gag precursor directs virus particle assembly and release. In a search for Gag-interacting proteins that are involved in late stages of the HIV-1 replication cycle, we performed yeast two-hybrid screening against a human cDNA library and identified the non-muscle actin filament cross-linking protein filamin A as a novel Gag binding partner. The 280-kDa filamin A regulates cortical actin network dynamics and participates in the anchoring of membrane proteins to the actin cytoskeleton. Recent studies have shown that filamin A facilitates HIV-1 cell-to-cell transmission by binding to HIV receptors and coreceptors and regulating their clustering on the target cell surface. Here we report a novel role for filamin A in HIV-1 Gag intracellular trafficking. We demonstrate that filamin A interacts with the capsid domain of HIV-1 Gag and that this interaction is involved in particle release in a productive manner. Disruption of this interaction eliminated Gag localization at the plasma membrane and induced Gag accumulation within internal compartments. Moreover, blocking clathrin-dependent endocytic pathways did not relieve the restriction to particle release induced by filamin A depletion. These results suggest that filamin A is involved in the distinct step of the Gag trafficking pathway. The discovery of the Gag-filamin A interaction may provide a new therapeutic target for the treatment of HIV infection. PMID:21705339

  13. What Are the Unique and Interacting Contributions of School and Family Factors to Early Adolescents' Empathic Concern and Perspective Taking?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Batanova, Milena D.; Loukas, Alexandra

    2012-01-01

    Empathy in children has received considerable attention in the literature, but limited research has investigated the contributions of various socializing factors on both affective (e.g., empathic concern) and cognitive (e.g., perspective taking) components of empathy in early adolescents. Guided by socialization theories, this study examined the…

  14. Functional Contribution of Chorismate Synthase, Anthranilate Synthase, and Chorismate Mutase to Penetration Resistance in Barley-Powdery Mildew Interactions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plant processes resulting from primary or secondary metabolism have been hypothesized to contribute to defense against microbial attack. Barley chorismate synthase (HvCS), anthranilate synthase alpha subunit 2 (HvASa2) and chorismate mutase 1 (HvCM1) occupy pivotal branch-points downstream of the s...

  15. Mothers as a Resource in Times of Stress: Interactive Contributions of Socialization of Coping and Stress to Youth Psychopathology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abaied, Jamie L.; Rudolph, Karen D.

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the hypothesis that maternal socialization of coping would make a differential contribution to youth depression and externalizing psychopathology depending on youths' level of exposure to life stress. A sample of 155 youth (M age = 12.41, SD = 1.21) and their maternal caregivers completed semi-structured interviews and…

  16. Experimental assessment of the contribution of electrodynamic interactions to long-distance recruitment of biomolecular partners: Theoretical basis.

    PubMed

    Preto, Jordane; Floriani, Elena; Nardecchia, Ilaria; Ferrier, Pierre; Pettini, Marco

    2012-04-01

    Highly specific spatiotemporal interactions between cognate molecular partners essentially sustain all biochemical transactions in living matter. That such an exquisite level of accuracy may result from encountering forces solely driven by thermal diffusive processes is unlikely. Here we propose a yet unexplored strategy to experimentally tackle the long-standing question of a possibly active recruitment at a distance of cognate partners of biomolecular reactions via the action of resonant electrodynamic interactions. We considered two simplified models for a preliminary feasibility investigation of the devised methodology. By taking advantage of advanced experimental techniques nowadays available, we propose to measure the characteristic encounter time scales of dually interacting biopartners and to compare them with theoretical predictions worked out in both the presence and absence of putative long-range electromagnetic forces. PMID:22680495

  17. The Contribution of Electrostatic and van der Waals Interactions to the Stereospecificity of the Reaction Catalyzed by Lactate Dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    van Beek, Jeroen; Callender, Robert; Gunner, M. R.

    1997-01-01

    Continuum electrostatic calculations in conjunction with molecular dynamics simulations have been used to investigate the source of the stereospecificity in the hydride transfer reaction catalyzed by lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). These studies show that favorable electrostatic interactions between the carboxamide group of the reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide coenzyme and protein residues of the active site of LDH can account for much if not all of the stereospecificity of the LDH-catalyzed reaction, with A-side hydride transfer more than 107 times greater than B-side transfer. Unfavorable steric interactions within the binding complex for B-side transfer are not found. ImagesFIGURE 2 PMID:9017191

  18. Deformation-corrosion interactions for Zr alloys during I-SCC crack initiation. Part I: Chemical contributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacques, Patrick; Lefebvre, Florence; Lemaignan, Clément

    1999-01-01

    For a better understanding of the initiation step of iodine-induced stress corrosion cracking in Zr alloys, responsible for pellet-cladding interaction (PCI) fuel rod failures, an analytical study has been undertaken, the aim of which being focused on the respective roles of local chemistry and stress/strain state on the crack nucleation. This first part is mostly related to the chemical environment. From the tensile tests performed under iodine rich and inert environments, it was concluded that no crack initiation could be detected following the tests in an inert atmosphere. The iodine induced stress corrosion initiation mechanism must therefore be analysed as a corrosion-strain interaction.

  19. What Motivates Students to Learn? Contribution of Student-to-Student Relations, Student-Faculty Interaction and Critical Thinking Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rugutt, John; Chemosit, Caroline C.

    2009-01-01

    This study used standard multiple linear regression to investigate relationships between student motivation, critical thinking skills, student-to-student relations, and student-faculty interaction with a sample of 2,190 undergraduate students. The study used measures first developed by Ellett, Culross, McMullen, and Rugutt, (1996), and later…

  20. Characteristics of current tasks that contribute to mentalizing judgments: does the engagement of the participants in the social interaction matter? Comment on Achim et al. (2013).

    PubMed

    Champagne-Lavau, Maud; Moreau, Noémie

    2013-12-01

    In a recent article, Achim et al. (2013) discussed the different sources of information that contribute to mentalizing judgments in current theory-of-mind (ToM) tasks. The authors rightly emphasized the dynamic aspect of real-life social interaction, suggesting that taking account of the ongoing changes occurring during social interaction would make ToM tasks more ecological. They proposed a framework (i.e., the Eight Sources of Information Framework) that specifies the 8 sources of information we get from the environment and/or from our memories to attribute mental states to others. Nevertheless, we believe that a central aspect of ToM is missing in this framework: the engagement (or not) of the participant in the social interaction during ToM assessment. Indeed, this framework fails to consider how the participant who takes part in the ToM task manages this information, depending on the fact that he or she is involved in the interaction or not and how the information concerning the agent may impact the participant attribution of mental states. We reviewed several arguments and results from the ToM literature suggesting that merely observing a social interaction is not equivalent to participating in an interaction in terms of cognitive processes involved in the attribution of mental states to others. PMID:24320766

  1. Interactions between N-Ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor and GluA2 contribute to effects of glucocorticoid hormones on AMPA receptor function in the rodent hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Hui; Cassé, Frédéric; Zhou, Ming; Xiong, Zhi-Qi; Joels, Marian; Martin, Stéphane; Krugers, Harm J

    2016-07-01

    Glucocorticoid hormones, via activation of their receptors, promote memory consolidation, but the exact underlying mechanisms remain elusive. We examined how corticosterone regulates AMPA receptor (AMPAR) availability in the synapse, which is important for synaptic plasticity and memory formation. Peptides which specifically block the interaction between N-Ethylmaleimide-Sensitive Factor (NSF) and the AMPAR-subunit GluA2 prevented the increase in synaptic transmission and surface expression of AMPARs known to occur after corticosterone application to hippocampal neurons. Combining a live imaging Fluorescence Recovery After Photobleaching (FRAP) approach with the use of the pH-sensitive GFP-AMPAR tagging revealed that this NSF/GluA2 interaction was also essential for the increase of the mobile fraction and reduction of the diffusion of AMPARs after treating hippocampal neurons with corticosterone. We conclude that the interaction between NSF and GluA2 contributes to the effects of corticosterone on AMPAR function. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26766634

  2. Genetic interactions with sex make a relatively small contribution to the heritability of complex traits in mice.

    PubMed

    Krohn, Jon; Speed, Doug; Palme, Rupert; Touma, Chadi; Mott, Richard; Flint, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    The extent to which sex-specific genetic effects contribute to phenotypic variation is largely unknown. We applied a novel Bayesian method, sparse partitioning, to detect gene by sex (GxS) and gene by gene (GxG) quantitative loci (QTLs) in 1,900 outbred heterogeneous stock mice. In an analysis of 55 phenotypes, we detected 16 GxS and 6 GxG QTLs. The increase in the amount of phenotypic variance explained by models including GxS was small, ranging from 0.14% to 4.30%. We conclude that GxS rarely make a large overall contribution to the heritability of phenotypes, however there are cases where these will be individually important. PMID:24811081

  3. Sliding Clamp–DNA Interactions Are Required for Viability and Contribute to DNA Polymerase Management in Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Heltzel, J.; Scouten Ponticelli, S; Sanders, L; Duzen, J; Cody, V; Pace, J; Snell, E; Sutton, M

    2009-01-01

    Sliding clamp proteins topologically encircle DNA and play vital roles in coordinating the actions of various DNA replication, repair, and damage tolerance proteins. At least three distinct surfaces of the Escherichia coli {beta} clamp interact physically with the DNA that it topologically encircles. We utilized mutant {beta} clamp proteins bearing G66E and G174A substitutions ({beta}159), affecting the single-stranded DNA-binding region, or poly-Ala substitutions in place of residues 148-HQDVR-152 ({beta}148-152), affecting the double-stranded DNA binding region, to determine the biological relevance of clamp-DNA interactions. As part of this work, we solved the X-ray crystal structure of {beta}148-152, which verified that the poly-Ala substitutions failed to significantly alter the tertiary structure of the clamp. Based on functional assays, both {beta}159 and {beta}148-152 were impaired for loading and retention on a linear primed DNA in vitro. In the case of {beta}148-152, this defect was not due to altered interactions with the DnaX clamp loader, but rather was the result of impaired {beta}148-152-DNA interactions. Once loaded, {beta}148-152 was proficient for DNA polymerase III (Pol III) replication in vitro. In contrast, {beta}148-152 was severely impaired for Pol II and Pol IV replication and was similarly impaired for direct physical interactions with these Pols. Despite its ability to support Pol III replication in vitro, {beta}148-152 was unable to support viability of E. coli. Nevertheless, physiological levels of {beta}148-152 expressed from a plasmid efficiently complemented the temperature-sensitive growth phenotype of a strain expressing {beta}159 (dnaN159), provided that Pol II and Pol IV were inactivated. Although this strain was impaired for Pol V-dependent mutagenesis, inactivation of Pol II and Pol IV restored the Pol V mutator phenotype. Taken together, these results support a model in which a sophisticated combination of competitive clamp

  4. Nucleolin interacts with influenza A nucleoprotein and contributes to viral ribonucleoprotein complexes nuclear trafficking and efficient influenza viral replication.

    PubMed

    Terrier, Olivier; Carron, Coralie; De Chassey, Benoît; Dubois, Julia; Traversier, Aurélien; Julien, Thomas; Cartet, Gaëlle; Proust, Anaïs; Hacot, Sabine; Ressnikoff, Denis; Lotteau, Vincent; Lina, Bruno; Diaz, Jean-Jacques; Moules, Vincent; Rosa-Calatrava, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Influenza viruses replicate their single-stranded RNA genomes in the nucleus of infected cells and these replicated genomes (vRNPs) are then exported from the nucleus to the cytoplasm and plasma membrane before budding. To achieve this export, influenza viruses hijack the host cell export machinery. However, the complete mechanisms underlying this hijacking remain not fully understood. We have previously shown that influenza viruses induce a marked alteration of the nucleus during the time-course of infection and notably in the nucleolar compartment. In this study, we discovered that a major nucleolar component, called nucleolin, is required for an efficient export of vRNPs and viral replication. We have notably shown that nucleolin interacts with the viral nucleoprotein (NP) that mainly constitutes vRNPs. Our results suggest that this interaction could allow vRNPs to "catch" the host cell export machinery, a necessary step for viral replication. PMID:27373907

  5. Nucleolin interacts with influenza A nucleoprotein and contributes to viral ribonucleoprotein complexes nuclear trafficking and efficient influenza viral replication

    PubMed Central

    Terrier, Olivier; Carron, Coralie; De Chassey, Benoît; Dubois, Julia; Traversier, Aurélien; Julien, Thomas; Cartet, Gaëlle; Proust, Anaïs; Hacot, Sabine; Ressnikoff, Denis; Lotteau, Vincent; Lina, Bruno; Diaz, Jean-Jacques; Moules, Vincent; Rosa-Calatrava, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Influenza viruses replicate their single-stranded RNA genomes in the nucleus of infected cells and these replicated genomes (vRNPs) are then exported from the nucleus to the cytoplasm and plasma membrane before budding. To achieve this export, influenza viruses hijack the host cell export machinery. However, the complete mechanisms underlying this hijacking remain not fully understood. We have previously shown that influenza viruses induce a marked alteration of the nucleus during the time-course of infection and notably in the nucleolar compartment. In this study, we discovered that a major nucleolar component, called nucleolin, is required for an efficient export of vRNPs and viral replication. We have notably shown that nucleolin interacts with the viral nucleoprotein (NP) that mainly constitutes vRNPs. Our results suggest that this interaction could allow vRNPs to “catch” the host cell export machinery, a necessary step for viral replication. PMID:27373907

  6. The self-interaction of native TDP-43 C terminus inhibits its degradation and contributes to early proteinopathies.

    PubMed

    Wang, I-Fan; Chang, Hsiang-Yu; Hou, Shin-Chen; Liou, Gunn-Guang; Way, Tzong-Der; James Shen, C-K

    2012-01-01

    The degraded, misfolded C terminus of TAR DNA-binding protein-43 is associated with a wide spectrum of neurodegenerative diseases, particularly frontotemporal lobar degeneration with ubiquitin-positive inclusions and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. However, the precise mechanism of pathological cleavage of the TAR DNA-binding protein-43 remains unknown. Here we show that the TAR DNA-binding protein-43 C-terminal protein physically interacts with itself or with the cellular-folded yeast prion domain of Sup35 forming dynamic aggregates. This prion-like nature governs known cellular functions of the TAR DNA-binding protein-43, including subcellular localisation and exon skipping of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator. Significantly, mutants with a failure to engage in prion-like interactions are processed into an ~24-kDa C-terminal fragment of the TAR DNA-binding protein-43. The estimated cleavage site of degraded TAR DNA-binding protein-43 fragments corresponds to the pathological cleavage site identified in patients with the TAR DNA-binding protein-43 proteinopathies. Consistently, epigallocatechin gallate constrains prion-like interactions, attenuating pathological-like degradation. Thus, the native folding of TAR DNA-binding protein-43 C terminus acts as a guardian of pathogenesis, which is directly associated with loss-of-function. PMID:22473010

  7. Electrostatic Contributions Drive the Interaction Between Staphylococcus aureus Protein Efb-C and its Complement Target C3d

    SciTech Connect

    Haspel, N.; Ricklin, D.; Geisbrecht, B.V.; Kavraki, L.E.; Lambris, J.D.

    2008-11-13

    The C3-inhibitory domain of Staphylococcus aureus extracellular fibrinogen-binding protein (Efb-C) defines a novel three-helix bundle motif that regulates complement activation. Previous crystallographic studies of Efb-C bound to its cognate subdomain of human C3 (C3d) identified Arg-131 and Asn-138 of Efb-C as key residues for its activity. In order to characterize more completely the physical and chemical driving forces behind this important interaction, we employed in this study a combination of structural, biophysical, and computational methods to analyze the interaction of C3d with Efb-C and the single-point mutants R131A and N138A. Our results show that while these mutations do not drastically affect the structure of the Efb-C/C3d recognition complex, they have significant adverse effects on both the thermodynamic and kinetic profiles of the resulting complexes. We also characterized other key interactions along the Efb-C/C3d binding interface and found an intricate network of salt bridges and hydrogen bonds that anchor Efb-C to C3d, resulting in its potent complement inhibitory properties.

  8. ZNF70, a novel ILDR2-interacting protein, contributes to the regulation of HES1 gene expression.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Kazuhisa; Nakayama, Kazuhiro; Ohta, Satoshi; Tago, Kenji; Boonvisut, Supichaya; Millings, Elizabeth J; Fischer, Stuart G; LeDuc, Charles A; Leibel, Rudolph L; Iwamoto, Sadahiko

    2016-09-01

    A diabetes susceptibility gene, immunoglobulin-like domain containing receptor 2 (Ildr2), encodes a transmembrane protein localized to the endoplasmic reticulum membrane that is closely related to hepatic lipid metabolism. The livers of ob/ob mice in which Ildr2 is transiently overexpressed are relieved of hepatic steatosis. However, the molecular mechanisms through which ILDR2 affects these changes in hepatic lipid metabolism remain unknown. This study aimed to identify ILDR2-interacting proteins to further elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying the role of ILDR2 in lipid homeostasis. We purified ILDR2-containing protein complexes using tandem affinity purification tagging and identified ZNF70, a member of the Kruppel C2H2-type zinc finger protein family, as a novel ILDR2-interacting protein. We demonstrated that ZNF70 interacts with ZFP64 and activates HES1 transcription by binding to the HES1 promoter. In addition, HES1 gene expression is increased in ILDR2-knockdown HepG2 cells, in which ZNF70 is translocated from the cytoplasm to the nucleus, suggesting that ZNF70 migration to the nucleus after dissociating from the ILDR2-ZNF70 complex activates HES1 transcription. These results support a novel link between ILDR2 and HES1 gene expression and suggest that ILDR2 is involved in a novel pathway in hepatic steatosis. PMID:27353377

  9. HCI and mobile health interventions: How human-computer interaction can contribute to successful mobile health interventions.

    PubMed

    Poole, Erika S

    2013-12-01

    Advances in mobile computing offer the potential to change when, where, and how health interventions are delivered. Rather than relying on occasional in-clinic interactions, mobile health (mHealth) interventions may overcome constraints due to limited clinician time, poor patient adherence, and inability to provide meaningful interventions at the most appropriate time. Technological capability, however, does not equate with user acceptance and adoption. How then can we ensure that mobile technologies for behavior change meet the needs of their target audience? In this paper, we argue that overcoming acceptance and adoption barriers requires interdisciplinary collaborations, bringing together not only technologists and health researchers but also human-computer interaction (HCI) experts. We discuss the value of human-computer interaction research to the nascent field of mHealth and demonstrate how research from HCI can offer complementary insights on the creation of mobile health interventions. We conclude with a discussion of barriers to interdisciplinary collaborations in mobile health and suggest ways to overcome them. PMID:24294328

  10. Electrostatic contributions drive the interaction between Staphylococcus aureus protein Efb-C and its complement target C3d

    PubMed Central

    Haspel, Nurit; Ricklin, Daniel; Geisbrecht, Brian V.; Kavraki, Lydia E.; Lambris, John D.

    2008-01-01

    The C3–inhibitory domain of Staphylococcus aureus extracellular fibrinogen-binding protein (Efb-C) defines a novel three-helix bundle motif that regulates complement activation. Previous crystallographic studies of Efb-C bound to its cognate subdomain of human C3 (C3d) identified Arg-131 and Asn-138 of Efb-C as key residues for its activity. In order to characterize more completely the physical and chemical driving forces behind this important interaction, we employed in this study a combination of structural, biophysical, and computational methods to analyze the interaction of C3d with Efb-C and the single-point mutants R131A and N138A. Our results show that while these mutations do not drastically affect the structure of the Efb-C/C3d recognition complex, they have significant adverse effects on both the thermodynamic and kinetic profiles of the resulting complexes. We also characterized other key interactions along the Efb-C/C3d binding interface and found an intricate network of salt bridges and hydrogen bonds that anchor Efb-C to C3d, resulting in its potent complement inhibitory properties. PMID:18687868

  11. PARK2 and proinflammatory/anti-inflammatory cytokine gene interactions contribute to the susceptibility to leprosy: a case–control study of North Indian population

    PubMed Central

    Chopra, Rupali; Kalaiarasan, Ponnusamy; Ali, Shafat; Srivastava, Amit K; Aggarwal, Shweta; Garg, Vijay K; Bhattacharya, Sambit N; Bamezai, Rameshwar N K

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Cytokines and related molecules in immune-response pathways seem important in deciding the outcome of the host–pathogen interactions towards different polar forms in leprosy. We studied the role of significant and functionally important single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in these genes, published independently from our research group, through combined interaction with an additional analysis of the in silico network outcome, to understand how these impact the susceptibility towards the disease, leprosy. Design The study was designed to assess an overall combined contribution of significantly associated individual SNPs to reflect on epistatic interactions and their outcome in the form of the disease, leprosy. Furthermore, in silico approach was adopted to carry out protein–protein interaction study between PARK2 and proinflammatory/anti-inflammatory cytokines. Setting Population-based case–control study involved the data of North India. Protein–protein interaction networks were constructed using cytoscape. Participants Study included the data available from 2305 Northern Indians samples (829 patients with leprosy; 1476 healthy controls), generated by our research group. Primary and secondary outcome measures For genotype interaction analysis, all possible genotype combinations between selected SNPs were used as an independent variable, using binary logistic regression with the forward likelihood ratio method, keeping the gender as a covariate. Results Interaction analysis between PARK2 and significant SNPs of anti-inflammatory/proinflammatory cytokine genes, including BAT1 to BTNL2-DR spanning the HLA (6p21.3) region in a case–control comparison, showed that the combined analysis of: (1) PARK2, tumour necrosis factor (TNF), BTNL2-DR, interleukin (IL)-10, IL-6 and TGFBR2 increased the risk towards leprosy (OR=2.54); (2) PARK2, BAT1, NFKBIL1, LTA, TNF-LTB, IL12B and IL10RB provided increased protection (OR=0.26) in comparison with their

  12. Quantitative modeling assesses the contribution of bond strengthening, rebinding and force sharing to the avidity of biomolecule interactions.

    PubMed

    Lo Schiavo, Valentina; Robert, Philippe; Limozin, Laurent; Bongrand, Pierre

    2012-01-01

    Cell adhesion is mediated by numerous membrane receptors. It is desirable to derive the outcome of a cell-surface encounter from the molecular properties of interacting receptors and ligands. However, conventional parameters such as affinity or kinetic constants are often insufficient to account for receptor efficiency. Avidity is a qualitative concept frequently used to describe biomolecule interactions: this includes incompletely defined properties such as the capacity to form multivalent attachments. The aim of this study is to produce a working description of monovalent attachments formed by a model system, then to measure and interpret the behavior of divalent attachments under force. We investigated attachments between antibody-coated microspheres and surfaces coated with sparse monomeric or dimeric ligands. When bonds were subjected to a pulling force, they exhibited both a force-dependent dissociation consistent with Bell's empirical formula and a force- and time-dependent strengthening well described by a single parameter. Divalent attachments were stronger and less dependent on forces than monovalent ones. The proportion of divalent attachments resisting a force of 30 piconewtons for at least 5 s was 3.7 fold higher than that of monovalent attachments. Quantitative modeling showed that this required rebinding, i.e. additional bond formation between surfaces linked by divalent receptors forming only one bond. Further, experimental data were compatible with but did not require stress sharing between bonds within divalent attachments. Thus many ligand-receptor interactions do not behave as single-step reactions in the millisecond to second timescale. Rather, they exhibit progressive stabilization. This explains the high efficiency of multimerized or clustered receptors even when bonds are only subjected to moderate forces. Our approach provides a quantitative way of relating binding avidity to measurable parameters including bond maturation, rebinding and

  13. Higher-order electric multipole contributions to retarded non-additive three-body dispersion interaction energies between atoms: Equilateral triangle and collinear configurations

    SciTech Connect

    Salam, A.

    2013-12-28

    The theory of molecular quantum electrodynamics (QED) is used to calculate higher electric multipole contributions to the dispersion energy shift between three atoms or molecules arranged in a straight line or in an equilateral triangle configuration. As in two-body potentials, three-body dispersion interactions are viewed in the QED formalism to arise from exchange of virtual photons between coupled pairs of particles. By employing an interaction Hamiltonian that is quadratic in the electric displacement field means that third-order perturbation theory can be used to yield the energy shift for a particular combination of electric multipole polarizable species, with only six time-ordered diagrams needing to be summed over. Specific potentials evaluated include dipole-dipole-quadrupole (DDQ), dipole-quadrupole-quadrupole (DQQ), and dipole-dipole-octupole (DDO) terms. For the geometries of interest, near-zone limiting forms are found to exhibit an R{sup −11} dependence on separation distance for the DDQ interaction, and an R{sup −13} behaviour for DQQ and DDO shifts, agreeing with an earlier semi-classical computation. Retardation weakens the potential in each case by R{sup −1} in the far-zone. It is found that by decomposing the octupole moment into its irreducible components of weights-1 and -3 that the former contribution to the DDO potential may be taken to be a higher-order correction to the leading triple dipole energy shift.

  14. New insights into the interactions between cork chemical components and pesticides. The contribution of π-π interactions, hydrogen bonding and hydrophobic effect.

    PubMed

    Olivella, M À; Bazzicalupi, C; Bianchi, A; Fiol, N; Villaescusa, I

    2015-01-01

    The role of chemical components of cork in the sorption of several pesticides has been investigated. For this purpose raw cork and three cork extracted fractions (i.e. cork free of aliphatic extractives, cork free of all extractives and cork free of all extractives and suberin) were used as sorbent of three ionic pesticides (propazine, 2,4-dichlorophenoxy acetic acid (2,4-D) and alachlor) and five non-ionic pesticides (chlorpyrifos, isoproturon, metamitron, methomyl and oxamyl) with a logKow within the range -0.47 to 4.92. The effect of cations on the ionic pesticides, propazine and 2,4-D sorption was also analyzed. Results indicated that the highest yields were obtained for chlorpyrifos and alachlor sorption onto raw cork (>55%). After removal of aliphatic extractives sorption of all pesticides increased that ranged from 3% for propazine to 31% for alachlor. In contrast, removal of phenolic extractives caused a sorption decrease. Low sorption yields were obtained for hydrophobic pesticides such as metamitron, oxamyl and methomyl (<11%) by using all cork fractions and extremely low when using raw cork (<1%). FTIR analysis was useful to indicate that lignin moieties were the main components involved on the sorption process. Modelling calculations evidenced that π-stacking interactions with the aromatic groups of lignin play a major role in determining the adsorption properties of cork toward aromatic pesticides. Results presented in this paper gain insights into the cork affinities for pesticides and the interactions involved in the sorption process and also enables to envisage sorption affinity of cork for other organic pollutants. PMID:25240950

  15. Comparison of MCNPX and GEANT4 to Predict the Contribution of Non-elastic Nuclear Interactions to Absorbed Dose in Water, PMMA and A150

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shtejer, K.; Arruda-Neto, J. D. T.; Schulte, R.; Wroe, A.; Rodrigues, T. E.; de Menezes, M. O.; Moralles, M.; Guzmán, F.; Manso, M. V.

    2008-08-01

    Proton induced non-elastic nuclear reactions play an important role in the dose distribution of clinically used proton beams as they deposit dose of high biological effectiveness both within the primary beam path as well as outside the beam to untargeted tissues. Non-elastic nuclear reactions can be evaluated using transport codes based on the Monte Carlo method. In this work, we have utilized the Los Alamos code MCNPX and the CERN GEANT4 toolkit, which are currently the most widely used Monte Carlo programs for proton radiation transport simulations in medical physics, to study the contribution of non-elastic nuclear interactions to the absorbed dose of proton beams in the therapeutic energy range. The impact of different available theoretical models to address the nuclear reaction process was investigated. The contribution of secondary particles from non-elastic nuclear reactions was calculated in three materials relevant in radiotherapy applications: water, PMMA and A150. The results evidence that there are differences in the calculated contribution of the secondary particles heavier than protons to the absorbed dose, with different approaches to model the nuclear reactions. The MCNPX calculation give rise to a larger contribution of d, t, α3He to the total dose compared to the GEANT4 physical models chosen in this work.

  16. Comparison of MCNPX and GEANT4 to Predict the Contribution of Non-elastic Nuclear Interactions to Absorbed Dose in Water, PMMA and A150

    SciTech Connect

    Shtejer, K.; Arruda-Neto, J. D. T.; Rodrigues, T. E.; Schulte, R.; Wroe, A.; Menezes, M. O. de; Moralles, M.

    2008-08-11

    Proton induced non-elastic nuclear reactions play an important role in the dose distribution of clinically used proton beams as they deposit dose of high biological effectiveness both within the primary beam path as well as outside the beam to untargeted tissues. Non-elastic nuclear reactions can be evaluated using transport codes based on the Monte Carlo method. In this work, we have utilized the Los Alamos code MCNPX and the CERN GEANT4 toolkit, which are currently the most widely used Monte Carlo programs for proton radiation transport simulations in medical physics, to study the contribution of non-elastic nuclear interactions to the absorbed dose of proton beams in the therapeutic energy range. The impact of different available theoretical models to address the nuclear reaction process was investigated. The contribution of secondary particles from non-elastic nuclear reactions was calculated in three materials relevant in radiotherapy applications: water, PMMA and A150. The results evidence that there are differences in the calculated contribution of the secondary particles heavier than protons to the absorbed dose, with different approaches to model the nuclear reactions. The MCNPX calculation give rise to a larger contribution of d, t, {alpha}{sup 3}He to the total dose compared to the GEANT4 physical models chosen in this work.

  17. Cutting edge: Bcl6-interacting corepressor contributes to germinal center T follicular helper cell formation and B cell helper function.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jessica A; Tubo, Noah J; Gearhart, Micah D; Bardwell, Vivian J; Jenkins, Marc K

    2015-06-15

    CD4(+) germinal center (GC)-T follicular helper (Tfh) cells help B cells become long-lived plasma cells and memory cells. The transcriptional repressor Bcl6 plays a key role in GC-Tfh formation by inhibiting the expression of genes that promote differentiation into other lineages. We determined whether BCOR, a component of a Polycomb repressive complex that interacts with the Bcl6 BTB domain, influences GC-Tfh differentiation. T cell-targeted BCOR deficiency led to a substantial loss of peptide:MHC class II-specific GC-Tfh cells following Listeria monocytogenes infection and a 2-fold decrease following immunization with a peptide in CFA. The reduction in GC-Tfh cells was associated with diminished plasma cell and GC B cell formation. Thus, T cell-expressed BCOR is critical for optimal GC-Tfh cell differentiation and humoral immunity. PMID:25964495

  18. Deformation-corrosion interactions for Zr alloys during I-SCC crack initiation. Part II: Localised stress and strain contributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacques, Patrick; Lefebvre, Florence; Lemaignan, Clément

    1999-01-01

    For a better understanding of the initiation step of iodine induced stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in Zr alloys, responsible for pellet-cladding interaction (PCI) fuel rod failures, an analytical study has been undertaken, the aim of which being focused on the respective roles of local chemistry and stress/strain state on the crack nucleation. This second part is mostly related to the local stress induced by strain incompatibilities between grains. Using EBSP (electron back-scattering pattern) to analyze the crystallographic orientation of all the grains of the samples tested in SCC, it was possible to conclude that the major parameter controlling the nucleation of the intergranular cracks is not related to grain to grain strain incompatibilities, but to the orientation of the grain boundary planes with respect to the tensile stress.

  19. Interactions between SNP alleles at multiple loci contribute to skin color differences between caucasoid and mongoloid subjects.

    PubMed

    Anno, Sumiko; Abe, Takashi; Yamamoto, Takushi

    2008-01-01

    This study aimed to identify single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) alleles at multiple loci associated with racial differences in skin color using SNP genotyping. A total of 122 Caucasians in Toledo, Ohio and 100 Mongoloids in Japan were genotyped for 20 SNPs in 7 candidate genes, encoding the Agouti signaling protein (ASIP), tyrosinase-related protein 1 (TYRP1), tyrosinase (TYR), melanocortin 1 receptor (MC1R), oculocutaneous albinism II (OCA2), microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF), and myosin VA (MYO5A). Data were used to analyze associations between the 20 SNP alleles using linkage disequilibrium (LD). Combinations of SNP alleles were jointly tested under LD for associations with racial groups by performing a chi(2) test for independence. Results showed that SNP alleles at multiple loci can be considered the haplotype that contributes to significant differences between the two population groups and suggest a high probability of LD. Confirmation of these findings requires further study with other ethnic groups to analyze the associations between SNP alleles at multiple loci and skin color variation among races. PMID:18392143

  20. Chondroitin Sulfate N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferase-2 Contributes to the Replication of Infectious Bursal Disease Virus via Interaction with the Capsid Protein VP2

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lizhou; Ren, Xiangang; Chen, Yuming; Gao, Yulong; Wang, Nian; Lu, Zhen; Gao, Li; Qin, Liting; Wang, Yongqiang; Gao, Honglei; Li, Kai; Jiang, Lili; Cui, Hongyu; Liu, Changjun; Zhang, Yanping; Qi, Xiaole; Wang, Xiaomei

    2015-01-01

    Infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) is a birnavirus that causes a highly contagious immunosuppressive disease in young chickens. The capsid protein VP2 of IBDV plays multiple roles in its life cycle. To more comprehensively understand the functions of VP2 involved in the communication between virus and host, we used yeast two-hybrid screening to identify the cellular factors that interact with this protein. We found that chondroitin sulfate N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferase-2 (CSGalNAcT2), a typical type II transmembrane protein located in Golgi apparatus, could interact with VP2, and we confirmed this interaction by co-immunoprecipitation and confocal laser scanning microscopy assays. Additionally, up-regulation of CSGalNAcT2 during IBDV infection was observed. Overexpression and siRNA-mediated knockdown of CSGalNAcT2 assays suggested that CSGalNAcT2 promoted IBDV replication. Moreover, this enhancing effect of CSGalNAcT2 could be inhibited by Brefeldin A, which is a Golgi-disturbing agent. This indicated that the integrity of Golgi apparatus structure was involved in the function of CSGalNAcT2. Taken together, we concluded that CSGalNAcT2, located in the Golgi apparatus, contributed to the replication of IBDV via interaction with VP2. PMID:25807054

  1. An evolutionarily conserved interaction of tumor suppressor protein Pdcd4 with the poly(A)-binding protein contributes to translation suppression by Pdcd4

    PubMed Central

    Fehler, Olesja; Singh, Priyanka; Haas, Astrid; Ulrich, Diana; Müller, Jan P.; Ohnheiser, Johanna; Klempnauer, Karl-Heinz

    2014-01-01

    The tumor suppressor protein programmed cell death 4 (Pdcd4) has been implicated in the translational regulation of specific mRNAs, however, the identities of the natural Pdcd4 target mRNAs and the mechanisms by which Pdcd4 affects their translation are not well understood. Pdcd4 binds to the eukaryotic translation initiation factor eIF4A and inhibits its helicase activity, which has suggested that Pdcd4 suppresses translation initiation of mRNAs containing structured 5′-untranslated regions. Recent work has revealed a second inhibitory mechanism, which is eIF4A-independent and involves direct RNA-binding of Pdcd4 to the target mRNAs. We have now identified the poly(A)-binding protein (PABP) as a novel direct interaction partner of Pdcd4. The ability to interact with PABP is shared between human and Drosophila Pdcd4, indicating that it has been highly conserved during evolution. Mutants of Pdcd4 that have lost the ability to interact with PABP fail to stably associate with ribosomal complexes in sucrose density gradients and to suppress translation, as exemplified by c-myb mRNA. Overall, our work identifies PABP as a novel functionally relevant Pdcd4 interaction partner that contributes to the regulation of translation by Pdcd4. PMID:25190455

  2. Chondroitin sulfate N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferase-2 contributes to the replication of infectious bursal disease virus via interaction with the capsid protein VP2.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lizhou; Ren, Xiangang; Chen, Yuming; Gao, Yulong; Wang, Nian; Lu, Zhen; Gao, Li; Qin, Liting; Wang, Yongqiang; Gao, Honglei; Li, Kai; Jiang, Lili; Cui, Hongyu; Liu, Changjun; Zhang, Yanping; Qi, Xiaole; Wang, Xiaomei

    2015-03-01

    Infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) is a birnavirus that causes a highly contagious immunosuppressive disease in young chickens. The capsid protein VP2 of IBDV plays multiple roles in its life cycle. To more comprehensively understand the functions of VP2 involved in the communication between virus and host, we used yeast two-hybrid screening to identify the cellular factors that interact with this protein. We found that chondroitin sulfate N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferase-2 (CSGalNAcT2), a typical type II transmembrane protein located in Golgi apparatus, could interact with VP2, and we confirmed this interaction by co-immunoprecipitation and confocal laser scanning microscopy assays. Additionally, up-regulation of CSGalNAcT2 during IBDV infection was observed. Overexpression and siRNA-mediated knockdown of CSGalNAcT2 assays suggested that CSGalNAcT2 promoted IBDV replication. Moreover, this enhancing effect of CSGalNAcT2 could be inhibited by Brefeldin A, which is a Golgi-disturbing agent. This indicated that the integrity of Golgi apparatus structure was involved in the function of CSGalNAcT2. Taken together, we concluded that CSGalNAcT2, located in the Golgi apparatus, contributed to the replication of IBDV via interaction with VP2. PMID:25807054

  3. An evolutionarily conserved interaction of tumor suppressor protein Pdcd4 with the poly(A)-binding protein contributes to translation suppression by Pdcd4.

    PubMed

    Fehler, Olesja; Singh, Priyanka; Haas, Astrid; Ulrich, Diana; Müller, Jan P; Ohnheiser, Johanna; Klempnauer, Karl-Heinz

    2014-01-01

    The tumor suppressor protein programmed cell death 4 (Pdcd4) has been implicated in the translational regulation of specific mRNAs, however, the identities of the natural Pdcd4 target mRNAs and the mechanisms by which Pdcd4 affects their translation are not well understood. Pdcd4 binds to the eukaryotic translation initiation factor eIF4A and inhibits its helicase activity, which has suggested that Pdcd4 suppresses translation initiation of mRNAs containing structured 5'-untranslated regions. Recent work has revealed a second inhibitory mechanism, which is eIF4A-independent and involves direct RNA-binding of Pdcd4 to the target mRNAs. We have now identified the poly(A)-binding protein (PABP) as a novel direct interaction partner of Pdcd4. The ability to interact with PABP is shared between human and Drosophila Pdcd4, indicating that it has been highly conserved during evolution. Mutants of Pdcd4 that have lost the ability to interact with PABP fail to stably associate with ribosomal complexes in sucrose density gradients and to suppress translation, as exemplified by c-myb mRNA. Overall, our work identifies PABP as a novel functionally relevant Pdcd4 interaction partner that contributes to the regulation of translation by Pdcd4. PMID:25190455

  4. Centromere Protein (CENP)-W Interacts with Heterogeneous Nuclear Ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) U and May Contribute to Kinetochore-Microtubule Attachment in Mitotic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chun, Younghwa; Kim, Raehyung; Lee, Soojin

    2016-01-01

    Background Recent studies have shown that heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein U (hnRNP U), a component of the hnRNP complex, contributes to stabilize the kinetochore-microtubule interaction during mitosis. CENP-W was identified as an inner centromere component that plays crucial roles in the formation of a functional kinetochore complex. Results We report that hnRNP U interacts with CENP-W, and the interaction between hnRNP U and CENP-W mutually increased each other’s protein stability by inhibiting the proteasome-mediated degradation. Further, their co-localization was observed chiefly in the nuclear matrix region and at the microtubule-kinetochore interface during interphase and mitosis, respectively. Both microtubule-stabilizing and microtubule-destabilizing agents significantly decreased the protein stability of CENP-W. Furthermore, loss of microtubules and defects in microtubule organization were observed in CENP-W-depleted cells. Conclusion Our data imply that CENP-W plays an important role in the attachment and interaction between microtubules and kinetochore during mitosis. PMID:26881882

  5. BMSCs Interactions with Adventitial Fibroblasts Display Smooth Muscle Cell Lineage Potential in Differentiation and Migration That Contributes to Neointimal Formation.

    PubMed

    Wendan, Y; Changzhu, J; Xuhong, S; Hongjing, C; Hong, S; Dongxia, Y; Fang, X

    2016-01-01

    In this study a model of simulated vascular injury in vitro was used to study the characterization of bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) morphology and to investigate the differentiation and migration of BMSCs in the presence of adventitial fibroblasts. BMSCs from rats were indirectly cocultured with adventitial fibroblasts in a transwell chamber apparatus for 7 days, and clonogenic assays demonstrated that BMSCs could be differentiated into smooth muscle-like cells with this process, including smooth muscle α-actin (α-SMA) expression by immunofluorescence staining. Cell morphology of BMSCs was assessed by inverted microscope, while cell proliferation was assessed by MTT assay. The expressions of TGF-β1, MMP-1, and NF-κB were detected by immunofluorescence staining and Smad3 mRNA was measured by reverse transcription PCR. Migration ability of BMSCs with DAPI-labeled nuclei was measured by laser confocal microscopy. Our results demonstrate that indirect interactions with adventitial fibroblasts can induce proliferation, differentiation, and migration of BMSCs that can actively participate in neointimal formation. Our results indicate that the pathogenesis of vascular remodeling might perform via TGF-β1/Smad3 signal transduction pathways. PMID:26880952

  6. MRNIP/C5orf45 Interacts with the MRN Complex and Contributes to the DNA Damage Response.

    PubMed

    Staples, Christopher J; Barone, Giancarlo; Myers, Katie N; Ganesh, Anil; Gibbs-Seymour, Ian; Patil, Abhijit A; Beveridge, Ryan D; Daye, Caroline; Beniston, Richard; Maslen, Sarah; Ahel, Ivan; Skehel, J Mark; Collis, Spencer J

    2016-09-01

    Through an RNAi-based screen for previously uncharacterized regulators of genome stability, we have identified the human protein C5orf45 as an important factor in preventing the accumulation of DNA damage in human cells. Here, we functionally characterize C5orf45 as a binding partner of the MRE11-RAD50-NBS1 (MRN) damage-sensing complex. Hence, we rename C5orf45 as MRNIP for MRN-interacting protein (MRNIP). We find that MRNIP is rapidly recruited to sites of DNA damage. Cells depleted of MRNIP display impaired chromatin loading of the MRN complex, resulting in reduced DNA end resection and defective ATM-mediated DNA damage signaling, a reduced ability to repair DNA breaks, and radiation sensitivity. Finally, we show that MRNIP phosphorylation on serine 115 leads to its nuclear localization, and this modification is required for MRNIP's role in promoting genome stability. Collectively, these data reveal that MRNIP is an important component of the human DNA damage response. PMID:27568553

  7. Plasminogen Binding Proteins and Plasmin Generation on the Surface of Leptospira spp.: The Contribution to the Bacteria-Host Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Vieira, Monica L.; Atzingen, Marina V.; Oliveira, Rosane; Mendes, Renata S.; Domingos, Renan F.; Vasconcellos, Silvio A.; Nascimento, Ana L. T. O.

    2012-01-01

    Leptospirosis is considered a neglected infectious disease of human and veterinary concern. Although extensive investigations on host-pathogen interactions have been pursued by several research groups, mechanisms of infection, invasion and persistence of pathogenic Leptospira spp. remain to be elucidated. We have reported the ability of leptospires to bind human plasminogen (PLG) and to generate enzimatically active plasmin (PLA) on the bacteria surface. PLA-coated Leptospira can degrade immobilized ECM molecules, an activity with implications in host tissue penetration. Moreover, we have identified and characterized several proteins that may act as PLG-binding receptors, each of them competent to generate active plasmin. The PLA activity associated to the outer surface of Leptospira could hamper the host immune attack by conferring the bacteria some benefit during infection. The PLA-coated leptospires obstruct complement C3b and IgG depositions on the bacterial surface, most probably through degradation. The decrease of leptospiral opsonization might be an important aspect of the immune evasion strategy. We believe that the presence of PLA on the leptospiral surface may (i) facilitate host tissue penetration, (ii) help the bacteria to evade the immune system and, as a consequence, (iii) permit Leptospira to reach secondary sites of infection. PMID:23118516

  8. Methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 is phosphorylated by homeodomain-interacting protein kinase 2 and contributes to apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Bracaglia, Giorgia; Conca, Barbara; Bergo, Anna; Rusconi, Laura; Zhou, Zhaolan; Greenberg, Michael E; Landsberger, Nicoletta; Soddu, Silvia; Kilstrup-Nielsen, Charlotte

    2009-12-01

    Mutations in the methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MeCP2) are associated with Rett syndrome and other neurological disorders. MeCP2 represses transcription mainly by recruiting various co-repressor complexes. Recently, MeCP2 phosphorylation at Ser 80, Ser 229 and Ser 421 was shown to occur in the brain and modulate MeCP2 silencing activities. However, the kinases directly responsible for this are largely unknown. Here, we identify the homeodomain-interacting protein kinase 2 (HIPK2) as a kinase that binds MeCP2 and phosphorylates it at Ser 80 in vitro and in vivo. HIPK2 modulates cell proliferation and apoptosis, and the neurological defects of Hipk2-null mice indicate its role in proper brain functions. We show that MeCP2 cooperates with HIPK2 in induction of apoptosis and that Ser 80 phosphorylation is required together with the DNA binding of MeCP2. These data are, to our knowledge, the first that describe a kinase associating with MeCP2, causing its specific phosphorylation in vivo and, furthermore, they reinforce the role of MeCP2 in regulating cell growth. PMID:19820693

  9. Methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 is phosphorylated by homeodomain-interacting protein kinase 2 and contributes to apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Bracaglia, Giorgia; Conca, Barbara; Bergo, Anna; Rusconi, Laura; Zhou, Zhaolan; Greenberg, Michael E; Landsberger, Nicoletta; Soddu, Silvia; Kilstrup-Nielsen, Charlotte

    2009-01-01

    Mutations in the methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MeCP2) are associated with Rett syndrome and other neurological disorders. MeCP2 represses transcription mainly by recruiting various co-repressor complexes. Recently, MeCP2 phosphorylation at Ser 80, Ser 229 and Ser 421 was shown to occur in the brain and modulate MeCP2 silencing activities. However, the kinases directly responsible for this are largely unknown. Here, we identify the homeodomain-interacting protein kinase 2 (HIPK2) as a kinase that binds MeCP2 and phosphorylates it at Ser 80 in vitro and in vivo. HIPK2 modulates cell proliferation and apoptosis, and the neurological defects of Hipk2-null mice indicate its role in proper brain functions. We show that MeCP2 cooperates with HIPK2 in induction of apoptosis and that Ser 80 phosphorylation is required together with the DNA binding of MeCP2. These data are, to our knowledge, the first that describe a kinase associating with MeCP2, causing its specific phosphorylation in vivo and, furthermore, they reinforce the role of MeCP2 in regulating cell growth. PMID:19820693

  10. BMSCs Interactions with Adventitial Fibroblasts Display Smooth Muscle Cell Lineage Potential in Differentiation and Migration That Contributes to Neointimal Formation

    PubMed Central

    Wendan, Y.; Changzhu, J.; Xuhong, S.; Hongjing, C.; Hong, S.; Dongxia, Y.; Fang, X.

    2016-01-01

    In this study a model of simulated vascular injury in vitro was used to study the characterization of bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) morphology and to investigate the differentiation and migration of BMSCs in the presence of adventitial fibroblasts. BMSCs from rats were indirectly cocultured with adventitial fibroblasts in a transwell chamber apparatus for 7 days, and clonogenic assays demonstrated that BMSCs could be differentiated into smooth muscle-like cells with this process, including smooth muscle α-actin (α-SMA) expression by immunofluorescence staining. Cell morphology of BMSCs was assessed by inverted microscope, while cell proliferation was assessed by MTT assay. The expressions of TGF-β1, MMP-1, and NF-κB were detected by immunofluorescence staining and Smad3 mRNA was measured by reverse transcription PCR. Migration ability of BMSCs with DAPI-labeled nuclei was measured by laser confocal microscopy. Our results demonstrate that indirect interactions with adventitial fibroblasts can induce proliferation, differentiation, and migration of BMSCs that can actively participate in neointimal formation. Our results indicate that the pathogenesis of vascular remodeling might perform via TGF-β1/Smad3 signal transduction pathways. PMID:26880952

  11. Uracil DNA Glycosylase BKRF3 Contributes to Epstein-Barr Virus DNA Replication through Physical Interactions with Proteins in Viral DNA Replication Complex

    PubMed Central

    Su, Mei-Tzu; Liu, I-Hua; Wu, Chia-Wei; Chang, Shu-Ming; Tsai, Ching-Hwa; Yang, Pei-Wen; Chuang, Yu-Chia; Lee, Chung-Pei

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) BKRF3 shares sequence homology with members of the uracil-N-glycosylase (UNG) protein family and has DNA glycosylase activity. Here, we explored how BKRF3 participates in the DNA replication complex and contributes to viral DNA replication. Exogenously expressed Flag-BKRF3 was distributed mostly in the cytoplasm, whereas BKRF3 was translocated into the nucleus and colocalized with the EBV DNA polymerase BALF5 in the replication compartment during EBV lytic replication. The expression level of BKRF3 increased gradually during viral replication, coupled with a decrease of cellular UNG2, suggesting BKRF3 enzyme activity compensates for UNG2 and ensures the fidelity of viral DNA replication. In immunoprecipitation-Western blotting, BKRF3 was coimmunoprecipitated with BALF5, the polymerase processivity factor BMRF1, and the immediate-early transactivator Rta. Coexpression of BMRF1 appeared to facilitate the nuclear targeting of BKRF3 in immunofluorescence staining. Residues 164 to 255 of BKRF3 were required for interaction with Rta and BALF5, whereas residues 81 to 166 of BKRF3 were critical for BMRF1 interaction in glutathione S-transferase (GST) pulldown experiments. Viral DNA replication was defective in cells harboring BKRF3 knockout EBV bacmids. In complementation assays, the catalytic mutant BKRF3(Q90L,D91N) restored viral DNA replication, whereas the leucine loop mutant BKRF3(H213L) only partially rescued viral DNA replication, coupled with a reduced ability to interact with the viral DNA polymerase and Rta. Our data suggest that BKRF3 plays a critical role in viral DNA synthesis predominantly through its interactions with viral proteins in the DNA replication compartment, while its enzymatic activity may be supplementary for uracil DNA glycosylase (UDG) function during virus replication. IMPORTANCE Catalytic activities of both cellular UDG UNG2 and viral UDGs contribute to herpesviral DNA replication. To ensure that the enzyme

  12. Do student self-efficacy and teacher-student interaction quality contribute to emotional and social engagement in fifth grade math?

    PubMed

    Martin, Daniel P; Rimm-Kaufman, Sara E

    2015-10-01

    This study examined (a) the contribution of math self-efficacy to students' perception of their emotional and social engagement in fifth grade math classes, and (b) the extent to which high quality teacher-student interactions compensated for students' low math self-efficacy in contributing to engagement. Teachers (n = 73) were observed three times during the year during math to measure the quality of teacher-student interactions (emotional, organizational, and instructional support). Fifth graders (n = 387) reported on their math self-efficacy at the beginning of the school year and then were surveyed about their feelings of engagement in math class three times during the year immediately after the lessons during which teachers were observed. Results of multi-level models indicated that students initially lower in math self-efficacy reported lower emotional and social engagement during math class than students with higher self-efficacy. However, in classrooms with high levels of teacher emotional support, students reported similar levels of both emotional and social engagement, regardless of their self-efficacy. No comparable findings emerged for organizational and instructional support. The discussion considers the significance of students' own feelings about math in relation to their engagement, as well as the ways in which teacher and classroom supports can compensate for students lack of agency. The work has implications for school psychologists and teachers eager to boost students' engagement in math class. PMID:26407834

  13. Actions and Interactions of Alcohol and Transforming Growth Factor ß1 on Prepubertal Hypothalamic Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Vinod K.; Hiney, Jill K.; Dees, William L.

    2014-01-01

    Background Alcohol (ALC) diminishes gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) secretion and delays puberty. Glial transforming growth factor ß1 (TGFß1) plays a role in glial-neuronal communications facilitating prepubertal GnRH secretion. We assessed the effects of acute ALC administration on TGFß1-induced GnRH gene expression in the brain preoptic area (POA), and release of the peptide from the medial basal hypothalamus (MBH). Furthermore, we assessed actions and interactions of TGFβ1 and ALC on an adhesion/signaling gene family involved in glial-neuronal communications. Methods Prepubertal female rats were administered ALC or water via gastric gavage at 0730 h. At 0900 h saline or TGFβ1 (100ng/3μl) was administered into the third ventricle. At 1500 h the POA was removed and frozen for gene expression analysis and repeated for protein assessments. In another experiment, the MBH was removed from ALC-free rats. After equilibration, tissues were incubated in Locke’s medium only or medium containing TGFß1 with or without 50 mM ALC for measurement of GnRH peptide released in vitro. Results TGFβ1 induced GnRH gene expression in the POA and this effect was blocked by ALC. We also described the presence and responsiveness of the TGFβ1 receptor in the POA and showed that acute ALC exposure not only altered the TGFß1 induced increase in TGFß-R1 protein expression but also the activation of receptor associated proteins, Smad2 and Smad3, key downstream components of the TGFß1 signaling pathway. Assessment of an adhesion/signaling family consisting of glial RPTPβ and neuronal Caspr1 and contactin showed that the neuronal components were induced by TGFβ1 and that ALC blocked these effects. Finally, TGFß1 was shown to induce release of the GnRH peptide in vitro, an action that was blocked by ALC. Conclusion We have demonstrated glial-derived TGFß1 induces GnRH gene expression in the POA, and stimulates release of the peptide from the MBH; actions necessary for

  14. Multiple metasomatic events recorded in Kilbourne Hole peridotite xenoliths: the relative contribution of host basalt interaction vs. silicate metasomatic glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammond, S. J.; Yoshikawa, M.; Harvey, J.; Burton, K. W.

    2010-12-01

    Stark differences between bulk-rock lithophile trace element budgets and the sum of the contributions from their constituent minerals are common, if not ubiquitous in peridotite xenoliths [1]. In the absence of modal metasomatism this discrepancy is often attributed to the “catch-all”, yet often vague process of cryptic metasomatism. This study presents comprehensive Sr-Nd isotope ratios for variably metasomatized bulk-rock peridotites, host basalts, constituent peridotite mineral phases and interstitial glass from 13 spinel lherzolite and harzburgite xenoliths from the Kilbourne Hole volcanic maar, New Mexico, USA. Similar measurements were also made on hand-picked interstitial glass from one of the most highly metasomatized samples (KH03-16) in an attempt to unravel the effects of multiple metasomatic events. In all Kilbourne Hole peridotites analysed, hand-picked, optically clean clinopyroxenes preserve a more primitive Sr isotope signature than the corresponding bulk-rock; a pattern preserved in all but one sample for Nd isotope measurements. Reaction textures, avoided during hand-picking, around clinopyroxene grains are evident in the most metasomatized samples and accompanied by films of high-SiO2 interstitial glass. The margins of primary minerals appear partially resorbed and trails of glassy melt inclusions similar in appearance to those previously reported from the same locality [2], terminate in these films. Hand-picked glass from KH03-16 reveals the most enriched 87Sr/86Sr of any component recovered from these xenoliths (87Sr/86Sr = 0.708043 ± 0.00009; [Sr] = 81 ppm). Similarly, the 143Nd/144Nd of the glass is amongst the most enriched of the peridotite components (143Nd/144Nd = 0.512893 ± 0.000012; [Nd] = 10 ppm). However, the host basalt (87Sr/86Sr = 0.703953 ± 0.00012; 143Nd/144Nd = 0.512873 ± 0.000013), similar in composition to nearby contemporaneous Potrillo Volcanic Field basalts [3], contains nearly an order of magnitude more Sr and more

  15. CK2-regulated schwannomin-interacting protein IQCJ-SCHIP-1 association with AnkG contributes to the maintenance of the axon initial segment.

    PubMed

    Papandréou, Marie-Jeanne; Vacher, Hélène; Fache, Marie-Pierre; Klingler, Esther; Rueda-Boroni, Fanny; Ferracci, Géraldine; Debarnot, Claire; Pipéroglou, Christelle; Garcia Del Caño, Gontzal; Goutebroze, Laurence; Dargent, Bénédicte

    2015-08-01

    The axon initial segment (AIS) plays a central role in electrogenesis and in the maintenance of neuronal polarity. Its molecular organization is dependent on the scaffolding protein ankyrin (Ank) G and is regulated by kinases. For example, the phosphorylation of voltage-gated sodium channels by the protein kinase CK2 regulates their interaction with AnkG and, consequently, their accumulation at the AIS. We previously showed that IQ motif containing J-Schwannomin-Interacting Protein 1 (IQCJ-SCHIP-1), an isoform of the SCHIP-1, accumulated at the AIS in vivo. Here, we analyzed the molecular mechanisms involved in IQCJ-SCHIP-1-specific axonal location. We showed that IQCJ-SCHIP-1 accumulation in the AIS of cultured hippocampal neurons depended on AnkG expression. Pull-down assays and surface plasmon resonance analysis demonstrated that AnkG binds to CK2-phosphorylated IQCJ-SCHIP-1 but not to the non-phosphorylated protein. Surface plasmon resonance approaches using IQCJ-SCHIP-1, SCHIP-1a, another SCHIP-1 isoform, and their C-terminus tail mutants revealed that a segment including multiple CK2-phosphorylatable sites was directly involved in the interaction with AnkG. Pharmacological inhibition of CK2 diminished both IQCJ-SCHIP-1 and AnkG accumulation in the AIS. Silencing SCHIP-1 expression reduced AnkG cluster at the AIS. Finally, over-expression of IQCJ-SCHIP-1 decreased AnkG concentration at the AIS, whereas a mutant deleted of the CK2-regulated AnkG interaction site did not. Our study reveals that CK2-regulated IQJC-SCHIP-1 association with AnkG contributes to AIS maintenance. The axon initial segment (AIS) organization depends on ankyrin (Ank) G and kinases. Here we showed that AnkG binds to CK2-phosphorylated IQCJ-SCHIP-1, in a segment including 12 CK2-phosphorylatable sites. In cultured neurons, either pharmacological inhibition of CK2 or IQCJ-SCHIP-1 silencing reduced AnkG clustering. Overexpressed IQCJ-SCHIP-1 decreased AnkG concentration at the AIS whereas a

  16. Contributions of primary and secondary biogenic VOC tototal OH reactivity during the CABINEX (Community Atmosphere-Biosphere INteractions Experiments)-09 field campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, S.; Guenther, A.; Karl, T.; Greenberg, J.

    2011-08-01

    We present OH reactivity measurements using the comparative reactivity method with a branch enclosure technique for four different tree species (red oak, white pine, beech and red maple) in the UMBS PROPHET tower footprint during the Community Atmosphere Biosphere INteraction EXperiment (CABINEX) field campaign in July of 2009. Proton Transfer Reaction-Mass Spectrometry (PTR-MS) was sequentially used as a detector for OH reactivity and BVOC concentrations including isoprene and monoterpenes (MT) for enclosure air. Therefore, the measurement dataset contains both measured and calculated OH reactivity from well-known BVOC. The results indicate that isoprene and MT, and in one case a sesquiterpene, can account for the measured OH reactivity. Significant discrepancy between measured OH reactivity and calculated OH reactivity from isoprene and MT is found for the red maple enclosure dataset but it can be reconciled by adding reactivity from emission of a sesquiterpene, α-farnesene, detected by GC-MS. This leads us to conclude that no significant unknown BVOC emission contributed to ambient OH reactivity from these trees at least during the study period. However, this conclusion should be followed up by more comprehensive side-by-side intercomparison between measured and calculated OH reactivity and laboratory experiments with controlled temperature and light environments to verify effects of those essential parameters towards unknown/unmeasured reactive BVOC emissions. This conclusion leads us to explore the contribution towards ambient OH reactivity (the dominant OH sink in this ecosystem) oxidation products such as hydroxyacetone, glyoxal, methylglyoxal and C4 and C5-hydroxycarbonyl using recently published isoprene oxidation mechanisms (Mainz Isoprene Mechanism II and Leuven Isoprene Mechanism). Evaluation of conventionally unmeasured first generation oxidation products of isoprene and their possible contribution to ambient missing OH reactivity indicates that the

  17. Investigation of the electronic structures of organolanthanide sandwich complex anions by photoelectron spectroscopy: 4f orbital contribution in the metal-ligand interaction.

    PubMed

    Hosoya, Natsuki; Yada, Keizo; Masuda, Tomohide; Nakajo, Erika; Yabushita, Satoshi; Nakajima, Atsushi

    2014-05-01

    The electronic structures of lanthanide (Ln) ions sandwiched between 1,3,5,7-cyclooctatetraene (COT), Ln(COT)2(-), have been investigated by anion photoelectron spectroscopy. Complexes of 12 Ln atoms were investigated (excluding promethium (Pm), europium (Eu), and ytterbium (Yb)). The 213 nm photoelectron (PE) spectra of Ln(COT)2(-) exhibit two peaks assignable to the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO; e2u) and the next HOMO (HOMO-1; e2g) approximately at 2.6 and 3.6 eV, respectively, and their energy gap increases as the central metal atom progresses from lanthanum (La) to lutetium (Lu). Since lanthanide contraction shortens the distance between the Ln atom and the COT ligands, the widening energy gap represents the destabilization of the e2u orbital as well as the stabilization of the e2g orbital. Evidence for 4f orbital contribution in the metal-ligand interaction has been revealed by the Ln atom dependence in which the same e2u orbital symmetry enables an interaction between the 4f orbital of Ln atoms and the π orbital of COT. PMID:24742246

  18. The contributions of soil-moisture interactions to climate change in the tropics in CMIP5 projections from the GLACE-CMIP5 experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    May, Wilhelm; Rummukainen, Markku; Meier, Arndt

    2015-04-01

    The contributions of the projected changes in soil moisture to the overall climate change in the tropics at the end of the 21st century are quantified using the simulations from the GLACE-CMIP5 experiment. This is done by directly comparing the overall projected future changes in climate, which are partly related to changes in soil moisture, to the changes in climate that are not affected by any changes in soil moisture. As the five different climate models contributing to the experiment, i.e., CESM, EC-EARTH, GDFL, IPSL and MPI-ESM show quite different geographical distributions of the future changes in soil moisture in the tropics as well as different magnitudes, we do not consider ensemble mean values based on the corresponding simulations with these models but rather analyse the simulations from the different models separately. This allows for quantifying the contributions of the projected changes in soil moisture to climate change in the tropics for each climate model despite the different characteristics of the soil moisture changes themselves. We focus on two aspects of the interactions of the soil moisture with climate, i.e., the soil moisture-temperature coupling and the soil moisture-precipitation coupling/feedback. The simulations show marked future changes in soil moisture content in the tropics, with a general tendency of increases in the central parts of the tropics and decreases in the subtropics. These changes are associated with corresponding changes in precipitation, with an overall tendency of a 5change in soil moisture in response to a precipitation change of 1 mm/d. The changes in soil moisture content are found to give major contributions to the overall climate change in the tropics. This is particularly the case for the latent and sensible heat fluxes as well as near-surface temperature, where more than 80moisture changes. For precipitation, on the other hand, 30-40overall future changes are induced by the changes in soil moisture. The

  19. Contribution of the interaction between the rabies virus P protein and I-kappa B kinase ϵ to the inhibition of type I IFN induction signalling.

    PubMed

    Masatani, Tatsunori; Ozawa, Makoto; Yamada, Kentaro; Ito, Naoto; Horie, Masayuki; Matsuu, Aya; Okuya, Kosuke; Tsukiyama-Kohara, Kyoko; Sugiyama, Makoto; Nishizono, Akira

    2016-02-01

    The P protein of rabies virus (RABV) is known to interfere with the phosphorylation of the host IFN regulatory factor 3 (IRF-3) and to consequently inhibit type I IFN induction. Previous studies, however, have only tested P proteins from laboratory-adapted fixed virus strains, and to the best of our knowledge there is no report about the effect of P proteins from street RABV strains or other lyssaviruses on the IRF-3-mediated type I IFN induction system. In this study, we evaluated the inhibitory effect of P proteins from several RABV strains, including fixed and street virus strains and other lyssaviruses (Lagos bat, Mokola and Duvenhage viruses), on IRF-3 signalling. All P proteins tested inhibited retinoic acid-inducible gene-1 (RIG-I)- and TANK binding kinase 1 (TBK1)-mediated IRF-3-dependent IFN-β promoter activities. On the other hand, the P proteins from the RABV street strains 1088 and HCM-9, but not from fixed strains Nishigahara (Ni) and CVS-11 and other lyssaviruses tested, significantly inhibited I-kappa B kinase ϵ (IKKϵ)-inducible IRF-3-dependent IFN-β promoter activity. Importantly, we revealed that the P proteins from the 1088 and HCM-9 strains, but not from the remaining viruses, interacted with IKKϵ. By using expression plasmids encoding chimeric P proteins from the 1088 strain and Ni strain, we found that the C-terminal region of the P protein is important for the interaction with IKKϵ. These findings suggest that the P protein of RABV street strains may contribute to efficient evasion of host innate immunity. PMID:26647356

  20. Relative contributions of sea surface salinity and temperature to density gradient and tropical instability waves: implications to eddy-mean flow interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasson, Audrey; Lee, Tong

    2015-04-01

    With their relatively uniform spatial and temporal sampling, satellite observations have revolutionized the estimates of the spatial derivative fields of various oceanic parameters that are not possible to derive from in-situ measurements on a global scale with sufficient spatial resolutions. For examples, the spatial gradients of sea surface height measurements from altimetry provide information about surface geostrophic currents; those of wind stress make possible the estimates of wind stress curl and divergence; those of sea surface temperature and salinity allow detections of thermal and haline fronts. These spatial derivatives fields are critical to the studies of ocean circulation and air-sea interaction. In particular, the spatial gradients of satellite-derived sea surface temperature and salinity (SST and SSS) have provided an unprecedented opportunity to study density gradient that is important to energy conversion between the background ocean state and the fluctuating flow field such as eddies and waves through baroclinic instability. In this study, we examine eddy-mean flow interaction in tropical oceans by studying the relations between background density gradient and tropical instability wave (TIW) variability using various satellite-derived SSS and SST products. In the equatorial Pacific and Atlantic Oceans, SSS is found to have equal or larger contribution to the background meridional density gradient. This has important consequence to the density variance associated with the TIWs (a proxy for the extraction of available potential energy from the background ocean state to the TIWs). Not accounting for salinity effect would under-estimate the TIW-related density variance by at least a factor of three.

  1. An Interaction between RRP6 and SU(VAR)3-9 Targets RRP6 to Heterochromatin and Contributes to Heterochromatin Maintenance in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Eberle, Andrea B; Jordán-Pla, Antonio; Gañez-Zapater, Antoni; Hessle, Viktoria; Silberberg, Gilad; von Euler, Anne; Silverstein, Rebecca A; Visa, Neus

    2015-09-01

    RNA surveillance factors are involved in heterochromatin regulation in yeast and plants, but less is known about the possible roles of ribonucleases in the heterochromatin of animal cells. Here we show that RRP6, one of the catalytic subunits of the exosome, is necessary for silencing heterochromatic repeats in the genome of Drosophila melanogaster. We show that a fraction of RRP6 is associated with heterochromatin, and the analysis of the RRP6 interaction network revealed physical links between RRP6 and the heterochromatin factors HP1a, SU(VAR)3-9 and RPD3. Moreover, genome-wide studies of RRP6 occupancy in cells depleted of SU(VAR)3-9 demonstrated that SU(VAR)3-9 contributes to the tethering of RRP6 to a subset of heterochromatic loci. Depletion of the exosome ribonucleases RRP6 and DIS3 stabilizes heterochromatic transcripts derived from transposons and repetitive sequences, and renders the heterochromatin less compact, as shown by micrococcal nuclease and proximity-ligation assays. Such depletion also increases the amount of HP1a bound to heterochromatic transcripts. Taken together, our results suggest that SU(VAR)3-9 targets RRP6 to a subset of heterochromatic loci where RRP6 degrades chromatin-associated non-coding RNAs in a process that is necessary to maintain the packaging of the heterochromatin. PMID:26389589

  2. An Interaction between RRP6 and SU(VAR)3-9 Targets RRP6 to Heterochromatin and Contributes to Heterochromatin Maintenance in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Eberle, Andrea B.; Jordán-Pla, Antonio; Gañez-Zapater, Antoni; Hessle, Viktoria; Silberberg, Gilad; von Euler, Anne; Silverstein, Rebecca A.; Visa, Neus

    2015-01-01

    RNA surveillance factors are involved in heterochromatin regulation in yeast and plants, but less is known about the possible roles of ribonucleases in the heterochromatin of animal cells. Here we show that RRP6, one of the catalytic subunits of the exosome, is necessary for silencing heterochromatic repeats in the genome of Drosophila melanogaster. We show that a fraction of RRP6 is associated with heterochromatin, and the analysis of the RRP6 interaction network revealed physical links between RRP6 and the heterochromatin factors HP1a, SU(VAR)3-9 and RPD3. Moreover, genome-wide studies of RRP6 occupancy in cells depleted of SU(VAR)3-9 demonstrated that SU(VAR)3-9 contributes to the tethering of RRP6 to a subset of heterochromatic loci. Depletion of the exosome ribonucleases RRP6 and DIS3 stabilizes heterochromatic transcripts derived from transposons and repetitive sequences, and renders the heterochromatin less compact, as shown by micrococcal nuclease and proximity-ligation assays. Such depletion also increases the amount of HP1a bound to heterochromatic transcripts. Taken together, our results suggest that SU(VAR)3-9 targets RRP6 to a subset of heterochromatic loci where RRP6 degrades chromatin-associated non-coding RNAs in a process that is necessary to maintain the packaging of the heterochromatin. PMID:26389589

  3. Age-changes in gene expression in primary mixed glia cultures from young vs old rat cerebral cortex are modified by interactions with neurons

    PubMed Central

    Kremsky, Isaac; Morgan, Todd E.; Hou, Xiaogang; Li, Lei; Finch, Caleb E.

    2013-01-01

    Astrocytic GFAP expression increases during normal aging in many brain regions and in primary astrocyte cultures derived from aging rodent brains. As shown below, we unexpectedly found that the age-related increase of GFAP expression was suppressed in mixed glia (astrocytes + microglia). However, the age-related increase of GFAP was observed when E18 neurons were co-cultured with mixed glia. Thus, the presence of microglia can suppress the age-related increase of GFAP, in primary cultures of astrocytes. To more broadly characterize how aging and co-culture with neurons alters glial gene expression, we profiled gene expression in mixed glia from young (3 mo) and old (24 mo) male rat cerebral cortex by Affymetrix microarray (Rat230 2.0). The majority of age changes were independent of the presence of neurons. Overall, the expression of 2-fold more genes increased with age than decreased with age. The minority of age changes that were either suppressed or revealed by the presence of neurons may be useful to analyze glial-neuron interaction during aging. Some in vitro changes are shared with those of aging rat hippocampus in studies from the Landfield group (Rowe et al., 2007; Kadish et al., 2009). PMID:22226781

  4. Promoted Interaction of Nuclear Factor-κB With Demethylated Purinergic P2X3 Receptor Gene Contributes to Neuropathic Pain in Rats With Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hong-Hong; Hu, Ji; Zhou, You-Lang; Qin, Xin; Song, Zhen-Yuan; Yang, Pan-Pan; Hu, Shufen; Jiang, Xinghong; Xu, Guang-Yin

    2015-12-01

    Painful diabetic neuropathy is a common complication of diabetes produced by mechanisms that as yet are incompletely defined. The aim of this study was to investigate the roles of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) in the regulation of purinergic receptor P2X ligand-gated ion channel 3 (P2X3R) plasticity in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons of rats with painful diabetes. Here, we showed that hindpaw pain hypersensitivity in streptozocin-induced diabetic rats was attenuated by treatment with purinergic receptor antagonist suramin or A-317491. The expression and function of P2X3Rs was markedly enhanced in hindpaw-innervated DRG neurons in diabetic rats. The CpG (cytosine guanine dinucleotide) island in the p2x3r gene promoter region was significantly demethylated, and the expression of DNA methyltransferase 3b was remarkably downregulated in DRGs in diabetic rats. The binding ability of p65 (an active form of NF-κB) with the p2x3r gene promoter region and p65 expression were enhanced significantly in diabetes. The inhibition of p65 signaling using the NF-κB inhibitor pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate or recombinant lentiviral vectors designated as lentiviral vector-p65 small interfering RNA remarkably suppressed P2X3R activities and attenuated diabetic pain hypersensitivity. Insulin treatment significantly attenuated pain hypersensitivity and suppressed the expression of p65 and P2X3Rs. Our findings suggest that the p2x3r gene promoter DNA demethylation and enhanced interaction with p65 contributes to P2X3R sensitization and diabetic pain hypersensitivity. PMID:26130762

  5. Increased hepatic receptor interacting protein kinase 3 expression due to impaired proteasomal functions contributes to alcohol-induced steatosis and liver injury

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shaogui; Ni, Hong-Min; Dorko, Kenneth; Kumer, Sean C.; Schmitt, Timothy M.; Nawabi, Atta; Komatsu, Masaaki; Huang, Heqing; Ding, Wen-Xing

    2016-01-01

    Chronic alcohol exposure increased hepatic receptor-interacting protein kinase (RIP) 3 expression and necroptosis in the liver but its mechanisms are unclear. In the present study, we demonstrated that chronic alcohol feeding plus binge (Gao-binge) increased RIP3 but not RIP1 protein levels in mouse livers. RIP3 knockout mice had decreased serum alanine amino transferase activity and hepatic steatosis but had no effect on hepatic neutrophil infiltration compared with wild type mice after Gao-binge alcohol treatment. The hepatic mRNA levels of RIP3 did not change between Gao-binge and control mice, suggesting that alcohol-induced hepatic RIP3 proteins are regulated at the posttranslational level. We found that Gao-binge treatment decreased the levels of proteasome subunit alpha type-2 (PSMA2) and proteasome 26S subunit, ATPase 1 (PSMC1) and impaired hepatic proteasome function. Pharmacological or genetic inhibition of proteasome resulted in the accumulation of RIP3 in mouse livers. More importantly, human alcoholics had decreased expression of PSMA2 and PSMC1 but increased protein levels of RIP3 compared with healthy human livers. Moreover, pharmacological inhibition of RIP1 decreased Gao-binge-induced hepatic inflammation, neutrophil infiltration and NF-κB subunit (p65) nuclear translocation but failed to protect against steatosis and liver injury induced by Gao-binge alcohol. In conclusion, results from this study suggest that impaired hepatic proteasome function by alcohol exposure may contribute to hepatic accumulation of RIP3 resulting in necroptosis and steatosis while RIP1 kinase activity is important for alcohol-induced inflammation. PMID:26769846

  6. Epstein-Barr virus latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1) C-terminal-activating region 3 contributes to LMP1-mediated cellular migration via its interaction with Ubc9.

    PubMed

    Bentz, Gretchen L; Whitehurst, Christopher B; Pagano, Joseph S

    2011-10-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1), the principal viral oncoprotein and a member of the tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily, is a constitutively active membrane signaling protein that regulates multiple signal transduction pathways via its C-terminal-activating region 1 (CTAR1) and CTAR2, and also the less-studied CTAR3. Because protein sumoylation among other posttranslational modifications may regulate many signaling pathways induced by LMP1, we investigated whether during EBV latency LMP1 regulates sumoylation processes that control cellular activation and cellular responses. By immunoprecipitation experiments, we show that LMP1 interacts with Ubc9, the single reported SUMO-conjugating enzyme. Requirements for LMP1-Ubc9 interactions include enzymatically active Ubc9: expression of inactive Ubc9 (Ubc9 C93S) inhibited the LMP1-Ubc9 interaction. LMP1 CTAR3, but not CTAR1 and CTAR2, participated in the LMP1-Ubc9 interaction, and amino acid sequences found in CTAR3, including the JAK-interacting motif, contributed to this interaction. Furthermore, LMP1 expression coincided with increased sumoylation of cellular proteins, and disruption of the Ubc9-LMP1 CTAR3 interaction almost completely abrogated LMP1-induced protein sumoylation, suggesting that this interaction promotes the sumoylation of downstream targets. Additional consequences of the disruption of the LMP1 CTAR3-Ubc9 interaction revealed effects on cellular migration, a hallmark of oncogenesis. Together, these data demonstrate that LMP1 CTAR3 does in fact function in intracellular signaling and leads to biological effects. We propose that LMP1, by interaction with Ubc9, modulates sumoylation processes, which regulate signal transduction pathways that affect phenotypic changes associated with oncogenesis. PMID:21795333

  7. Factoring the contribution of through-space and through-bond interactions to rates of photoinduced electron transfer in donor- spacer-acceptor molecules using ultrafast transient absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Gosztola, D.; Wang, Bing; Wasielewski, M.R. |

    1996-06-01

    Contributions from through-space and through-bond interactions to the electronic coupling matrix elements for photoinduced charge separation and recombination in linked donor-spacer-acceptor molecules were studied. The molecules consisted of a 4-piperidinyl-naphthalene-1,8-dicarboximide electron donor and a N-(n-octyl)pyromellitimide electron acceptor attached to the 1,5- and 1,8-positions of either anthracene or dibenzobicyclo(2.2.2)octatriene spacers.

  8. Solution NMR structures of Immunoglobulin-like domains 7 and 12 from Obscurin-like protein 1 contribute to the structural coverage of the human cancer protein interaction network

    PubMed Central

    Pulavarti, Surya VSRK; Huang, Yuanpeng J.; Pederson, Kari; Acton, Thomas B.; Xiao, Rong; Everett, John K.; Prestegard, James H.; Montelione, Gaetano T.

    2016-01-01

    High-quality solution NMR structures of immunoglobulin-like domains 7 and 12 from human Obscurin-like protein 1 were solved. The two domains share 30 % sequence identity and their structures are, as expected, rather similar. The new structures contribute to structural coverage of human cancer associated proteins. Mutations of Arg 812 in domain 7 cause the rare 3-M syndrome, and this site is located in a surface area predicted to be involved in protein-protein interactions. PMID:24989974

  9. Mitochondrial-Nuclear DNA Interactions Contribute to the Regulation of Nuclear Transcript Levels as Part of the Inter-Organelle Communication System

    PubMed Central

    Rodley, Chris D. M.; Grand, Ralph S.; Gehlen, Lutz R.; Greyling, Gary; Jones, M. Beatrix; O'Sullivan, Justin M.

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear and mitochondrial organelles must maintain a communication system. Loci on the mitochondrial genome were recently reported to interact with nuclear loci. To determine whether this is part of a DNA based communication system we used genome conformation capture to map the global network of DNA-DNA interactions between the mitochondrial and nuclear genomes (Mito-nDNA) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells grown under three different metabolic conditions. The interactions that form between mitochondrial and nuclear loci are dependent on the metabolic state of the yeast. Moreover, the frequency of specific mitochondrial - nuclear interactions (i.e. COX1-MSY1 and Q0182-RSM7) showed significant reductions in the absence of mitochondrial encoded reverse transcriptase machinery. Furthermore, these reductions correlated with increases in the transcript levels of the nuclear loci (MSY1 and RSM7). We propose that these interactions represent an inter-organelle DNA mediated communication system and that reverse transcription of mitochondrial RNA plays a role in this process. PMID:22292080

  10. The Protein Interaction of RNA Helicase B (RhlB) and Polynucleotide Phosphorylase (PNPase) Contributes to the Homeostatic Control of Cysteine in Escherichia coli*

    PubMed Central

    Tseng, Yi-Ting; Chiou, Ni-Ting; Gogiraju, Rajinikanth; Lin-Chao, Sue

    2015-01-01

    PNPase, one of the major enzymes with 3′ to 5′ single-stranded RNA degradation and processing activities, can interact with the RNA helicase RhlB independently of RNA degradosome formation in Escherichia coli. Here, we report that loss of interaction between RhlB and PNPase impacts cysteine homeostasis in E. coli. By random mutagenesis, we identified a mutant RhlBP238L that loses 75% of its ability to interact with PNPase but retains normal interaction with RNase E and RNA, in addition to exhibiting normal helicase activity. Applying microarray analyses to an E. coli strain with impaired RNA degradosome formation, we investigated the biological consequences of a weakened interaction between RhlB and PNPase. We found significant increases in 11 of 14 genes involved in cysteine biosynthesis. Subsequent Northern blot analyses showed that the up-regulated transcripts were the result of stabilization of the cysB transcript encoding a transcriptional activator for the cys operons. Furthermore, Northern blots of PNPase or RhlB mutants showed that RhlB-PNPase plays both a catalytic and structural role in regulating cysB degradation. Cells expressing the RhlBP238L mutant exhibited an increase in intracellular cysteine and an enhanced anti-oxidative response. Collectively, this study suggests a mechanism by which bacteria use the PNPase-RhlB exosome-like complex to combat oxidative stress by modulating cysB mRNA degradation. PMID:26494621

  11. Both STAT3 activation and cholesterol efflux contribute to the anti-inflammatory effect of apoA-I/ABCA1 interaction in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Tang, Chongren; Houston, Barbara A; Storey, Carl; LeBoeuf, Renee C

    2016-05-01

    ABCA1 exports excess cholesterol from cells to apoA-I and is essential for HDL synthesis. Genetic studies have shown that ABCA1 protects against cardiovascular disease. We have previously shown that the interaction of apoA-I with ABCA1 activates signaling molecule Janus kinase 2 (JAK2), which optimizes the cholesterol efflux activity of ABCA1. ABCA1-mediated activation of JAK2 also activates signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3), which significantly attenuates proinflammatory cytokine expression in macrophages. To determine the mechanisms of the anti-inflammatory effects of apoA-I/ABCA1 interaction, we identified two special ABCA1 mutants, one with normal STAT3-activating capacity but lacking cholesterol efflux ability and the other with normal cholesterol efflux ability but lacking STAT3-activating capacity. We showed that activation of STAT3 by the interaction of apoA-I/ABCA1 without cholesterol efflux could significantly decrease proinflammatory cytokine expression in macrophages. Mechanistic studies showed that the anti-inflammatory effect of the apoA-I/ABCA1/STAT3 pathway is suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 dependent. Moreover, we showed that apoA-I/ABCA1-mediated cholesterol efflux without STAT3 activation can also reduce proinflammatory cytokine expression in macrophages. These findings suggest that the interaction of apoA-I/ABCA1 activates cholesterol efflux and STAT3 branch pathways to synergistically suppress inflammation in macrophages. PMID:26989082

  12. Parental Depressive Symptoms and Marital Intimacy at 4.5 Years: Joint Contributions to Mother-Child and Father-Child Interaction at 6.5 Years

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engle, Jennifer M.; McElwain, Nancy L.

    2013-01-01

    Using data from a subset of 606 families who participated in the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Study of Early Child Care and Youth Development, we assessed emotional intimacy in the marriage as a buffer of the negative effects of parental depression on the quality of parent-child interaction. Maternal and paternal…

  13. Children's Attendance Rates and Quality of Teacher-Child Interactions in At-Risk Preschool Classrooms: Contribution to Children's Expressive Language Growth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Logan, Jessica A. R.; Piasta, Shayne B.; Justice, Laura M.; Schatschneider, Christopher; Petrill, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    The present research examines whether children's daily attendance rates would be predictive of gains in expressive language within the context of high-quality preschool classrooms. The quality of preschool classrooms was assessed by measuring the quality of the teacher's interactions with the children in his or her classroom. Hierarchical linear…

  14. From Action to Interaction: Exploring the Contribution of Body Motion Cues to Social Understanding in Typical Development and in Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Centelles, Laurie; Assaiante, Christine; Etchegoyhen, Katallin; Bouvard, Manuel; Schmitz, Christina

    2013-01-01

    Two studies investigated whether typically developing children (TD) and children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) were able to decide whether two characters were communicating or not on the basis of point-light displays. Point-lights portrayed actors engaged or not in a social interaction. In study 1, TD children (4-10 years old; n = 36)…

  15. Uncovering the function of Disrupted in Schizophrenia 1 through interactions with the cAMP phosphodiesterase PDE4: Contributions of the Houslay lab to molecular psychiatry.

    PubMed

    Brandon, Nicholas J

    2016-07-01

    Nearly 10years ago the laboratory of Miles Houslay was part of a collaboration which identified and characterized the interaction between Disrupted in Schizophrenia 1 and phosphodiesterase type 4. This work has had significant impact on our thinking of psychiatric illness causation and the potential for therapeutics. PMID:26432168

  16. THE CONTRIBUTIONS OF INTERACTIVE BINARY STARS TO DOUBLE MAIN-SEQUENCE TURNOFFS AND DUAL RED CLUMP OF INTERMEDIATE-AGE STAR CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Wuming; Bi Shaolan; Tian Zhijia; Li Tanda; Liu Kang; Meng Xiangcun E-mail: woomyang@gmail.com

    2011-04-20

    Double or extended main-sequence turnoffs (DMSTOs) and dual red clump (RC) were observed in intermediate-age clusters, such as in NGC 1846 and 419. The DMSTOs are interpreted as that the cluster has two distinct stellar populations with differences in age of about 200-300 Myr but with the same metallicity. The dual RC is interpreted as a result of a prolonged star formation. Using a stellar population-synthesis method, we calculated the evolution of a binary-star stellar population. We found that binary interactions and merging can reproduce the dual RC in the color-magnitude diagrams of an intermediate-age cluster, whereas in actuality only a single population exists. Moreover, the binary interactions can lead to an extended main-sequence turnoff (MSTO) rather than DMSTOs. However, the rest of the main sequence, subgiant branch, and first giant branch are hardly spread by the binary interactions. Part of the observed dual RC and extended MSTO may be the results of binary interactions and mergers.

  17. Fermi surface versus Fermi sea contributions to intrinsic anomalous and spin Hall effects of multiorbital metals in the presence of Coulomb interaction and spin-Coulomb drag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arakawa, Naoya

    2016-06-01

    Anomalous Hall effect (AHE) and spin Hall effect (SHE) are fundamental phenomena, and their potential for application is great. However, we understand the interaction effects unsatisfactorily, and should have clarified issues about the roles of the Fermi sea term and Fermi surface term of the conductivity of the intrinsic AHE or SHE of an interacting multiorbital metal and about the effects of spin-Coulomb drag on the intrinsic SHE. Here, we resolve the first issue and provide the first step about the second issue by developing a general formalism in the linear response theory with appropriate approximations and using analytic arguments. The most striking result is that even without impurities, the Fermi surface term, a non-Berry-curvature term, plays dominant roles at high or slightly low temperatures. In particular, this Fermi surface term causes the temperature dependence of the dc anomalous Hall or spin Hall conductivity due to the interaction-induced quasiparticle damping and the correction of the dc spin Hall conductivity due to the spin-Coulomb drag. Those results revise our understanding of the intrinsic AHE and SHE. We also find that the differences between the dc anomalous Hall and longitudinal conductivities arise from the difference in the dominant multiband excitations. This not only explains why the Fermi sea term such as the Berry-curvature term becomes important in clean and low-temperature case only for interband transports, but also provides the useful principles on treating the electron-electron interaction in an interacting multiorbital metal for general formalism of transport coefficients. Several correspondences between our results and experiments are finally discussed.

  18. Utilizing Resistivity Soundings and Forensic Geochemistry to Better Understand the Groundwater Contributions and the Interaction with Surface Water in a Streambed in the Texas Gulf Coast Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bighash, P.

    2012-12-01

    Water quality and quantity in a reservoir can be significantly affected by interactions between surface waters and adjacent aquifers. Environments that exhibit transient hydraulic conditions, such as changes in recharge and groundwater flow rates, are not well understood. The associated impacts to coastal water resources during elevated drought conditions can be better managed with a better understanding of the groundwater-surface water interaction and the transition zone. Proper characterization of the spatial and temporal extent of groundwater discharge is important for water resource management and contaminant migration pathways. The Texas coastal area has been experiencing exceptional drought conditions over the past few years which are expected to persist or intensify in the coming years. An investigation of how the hydrologic system is impacted by these conditions can be a valuable tool regarding water resource management, sustainability and conservation of the Gulf Coast region of South Texas. This study will be using resistivity soundings to vertically and laterally characterize groundwater-surface water interaction and provide a stratigraphic characterization of the transition zone in this area. Chemical and isotope tracers will be used to compliment the resistivity data in order to trace water sources in the surface water and transition zone. This information can aid in evaluating the extent of interaction and degree of mixing between the surface water and groundwater. The ultimate goal of this research is to provide new valuable information that could help professionals and researchers understand complex processes such as groundwater-surface water interaction using new methods that would improve the speed and accuracy of existing systems or techniques. This multidisciplinary approach can be useful in investigating land use impacts on groundwater inflow and in forecasting the availability of water resources in environmentally sensitive ecosystems such as

  19. Mitochondrial ATF2 translocation contributes to apoptosis induction and BRAF inhibitor resistance in melanoma through the interaction of Bim with VDAC1

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Chun; Guo, Chunbao

    2015-01-01

    Background The mitochondrial accumulation of ATF2 is involved in tumor suppressor activities via cytochrome c release in melanoma cells. However, the signaling pathways that connect mitochondrial ATF2 accumulation and cytochrome c release are not well documented. Methods Several melanoma cell lines, B16F10, K1735M2, A375 and A375-R1, were treated with paclitaxel and vemurafenib to test the function of mitochondrial ATF2 and its connection to Bim and voltage-dependent anion channel 1 (VDAC1). Immunoprecipitation analysis was performed to investigate the functional interaction between the involved proteins. VDAC1 oligomerization was evaluated using an EGS-based crosslinking assay. Results The expression and migration of ATF2 to the mitochondria accounted for paclitaxel stimuli and acquired resistance to BRAF inhibitors. Mitochondrial ATF2 facilitated Bim stabilization through the inhibition of its degradation by the proteasome, thereby promoting cytochrome c release and inducing apoptosis in B16F10 and A375 cells. Studies using B16F10 and A375 cells genetically modified for ATF2 indicated that mitochondrial ATF2 was able to dissociate Bim from the Mcl-1/Bim complex to trigger VDAC1 oligomerization. Immunoprecipitation analysis revealed that Bim interacts with VDAC1, and this interaction was remarkably enhanced during apoptosis. Conclusion These results reveal that mitochondrial ATF2 is associated with the induction of apoptosis and BRAF inhibitor resistance through Bim activation, which might suggest potential novel therapies for the targeted induction of apoptosis in melanoma therapy. PMID:26462148

  20. Cell-death-inducing DFFA-like Effector B Contributes to the Assembly of Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) Particles and Interacts with HCV NS5A

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Hua; Yao, Wenxia; Li, Leike; Li, Xinlei; Hu, Longbo; Mai, Runming; Peng, Tao

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) uses components of the very-low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) pathway for assembly/release. We previously reported that hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α (HNF4α) participates in HCV assembly/release through downstream factors those participate in VLDL assembly/secretion. Cell-death-inducing DFFA-like effector B (CIDEB) is an important regulator of the VLDL pathway. CIDEB is required for entry of HCV particles from cell culture (HCVcc), but the effects of CIDEB on the post-entry steps of the HCV lifecycle are unclear. In the present study, we determined that CIDEB is required for HCV assembly in addition to HCVcc entry. Furthermore, CIDEB interacts with the HCV NS5A protein, and the N terminus of CIDEB and the domain I of NS5A are involved in this interaction. Moreover, CIDEB silencing impairs the association of apolipoprotein E (ApoE) with HCV particles. Interestingly, CIDEB is also required for the post-entry stages of the dengue virus (DENV) life cycle. Collectively, these results indicate that CIDEB is a new host factor that is involved in HCV assembly, presumably by interacting with viral protein, providing new insight into the exploitation of the VLDL regulator CIDEB by HCV. PMID:27282740

  1. Large pre-equilibrium contribution in {alpha}+{sup nat}Ni interactions at {approx_equal}8-40 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Yadav, Abhishek; Singh, Pushpendra P.; Sharma, Manoj K.; Singh, Devendra P.; Unnati,; Singh, B. P.; Prasad, R.; Musthafa, M. M.

    2008-10-15

    To investigate pre-equilibrium emission of light nuclear particle(s), an experiment has been performed using {alpha} beams at the Variable Energy Cyclotron Center (VECC), Kolkata, India. In the present work, excitation functions for {sup 58}Ni({alpha},p){sup 61}Cu,{sup 58}Ni({alpha},pn){sup 60}Cu,{sup 60}Ni({alpha},p2n){sup 61}Cu,{sup 60}Ni({alpha},n){sup 63}Zn,{sup 60}Ni({alpha},2n) {sup 62}Zn,{sup 61}Ni({alpha},3n){sup 62}Zn, and {sup 61}Ni({alpha},2n){sup 63}Zn reactions have been measured by using the stacked foil activation technique followed by off-line {gamma}-ray spectroscopy. Experimentally measured excitation functions have been compared with the prediction of the theoretical model code ALICE-91 with and/or without the inclusion of pre-equilibrium emission. Analysis of the data suggests that an admixture of both equilibrium and pre-equilibrium emission is needed to reproduce experimental data at energies {approx_equal}8-40 MeV and reveals significant contribution from pre-equilibrium emission. An attempt has also been made to estimate the pre-equilibrium contribution, which has been found to depend on projectile energy and on number of emitted particle(s)

  2. Glycosylation contributes to variability in expression of MCMV m157 and enhances stability of interaction with the NK cell receptor, Ly49H

    PubMed Central

    Guseva, Natalya V.; Fullenkamp, Colleen A.; Naumann, Paul W.; Shey, Michael R.; Ballas, Zuhair K.; Houtman, Jon C.D.; Forbes, Catherine A.; Scalzo, Anthony A.; Heusel, Jonathan W.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Natural killer (NK) cell-mediated resistance to murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV) is controlled by allelic Ly49 receptors, including activating Ly49H (C57BL/6 strain) and inhibitory Ly49I (129 strain), which specifically recognize MCMV m157, a glycosylphosphatidylinositol-linked protein with homology to MHC class I. Although the Ly49 receptors retain significant homology to classic carbohydrate-binding lectins, the role of glycosylation in ligand binding is unclear. Herein we show that m157 is expressed in multiple, differentially N-glycosylated isoforms in m157-transduced or MCMV-infected cells. We used site-directed mutagenesis to express single and combinatorial asparagine (N)-to-glutamine (Q) mutations at N178, N187, N213, and N267 in myeloid and fibroblast cell lines. Progressive loss of N-linked glycans leads to a significant reduction of total cellular m157 abundance, although all variably glycosylated m157 isoforms are expressed at the cell surface and retain the capacity to activate Ly49HB6 and Ly49I129 reporter cells and Ly49H+ NK cells. However, the complete lack of N-linked glycans on m157 destabilized the m157-Ly49H interaction and prevented physical transfer of m157 to Ly49H-expressing cells. Thus, glycosylation on m157 enhances expression and binding to Ly49H, factors that may impact the interaction between NK cells and MCMV in vivo where receptor-ligand interactions are more limiting. PMID:20662096

  3. Analytic determination of the eight-and-a-half post-Newtonian self-force contributions to the two-body gravitational interaction potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bini, Donato; Damour, Thibault

    2014-05-01

    We analytically compute, to the eight-and-a-half post-Newtonian order, and to linear order in the mass ratio, the radial potential describing (within the effective one-body formalism) the gravitational interaction of two bodies, thereby extending previous analytic results. These results are obtained by applying analytical gravitational self-force theory (for a particle in circular orbit around a Schwarzschild black hole) to Detweiler's gauge-invariant redshift variable. We emphasize the increase in "transcendentality" of the numbers entering the post-Newtonian expansion coefficients as the order increases, in particular we note the appearance of ζ(3) (as well as the square of Euler's constant γ) starting at the seventh post-Newtonian order. We study the convergence of the post-Newtonian expansion as the expansion parameter u =GM/(c2r) leaves the weak-field domain u ≪1 to enter the strong field domain u=O(1).

  4. Contribution of the electron-phonon interaction to Lindhard energy partition at low energy in Ge and Si detectors for astroparticle physics applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazanu, Ionel; Lazanu, Sorina

    2016-02-01

    The influence of the transient thermal effects on the partition of the energy of selfrecoils in germanium and silicon into energy eventually given to electrons and to atomic recoils respectively is studied. The transient effects are treated in the frame of the thermal spike model, which considers the electronic and atomic subsystems coupled through the electron-phonon interaction. For low energies of selfrecoils, we show that the corrections to the energy partition curves due to the energy exchange during the transient processes modify the Lindhard predictions. These effects depend on the initial temperature of the target material, as the energies exchanged between electronic and lattice subsystems have different signs for temperatures lower and higher than about 15 K. Many of the experimental data reported in the literature support the model.

  5. RUNX1 Is a Key Target in t(4;11) Leukemias that Contributes to Gene Activation through an AF4-MLL Complex Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Wilkinson, Adam C.; Ballabio, Erica; Geng, Huimin; North, Phillip; Tapia, Marta; Kerry, Jon; Biswas, Debabrata; Roeder, Robert G.; Allis, C. David; Melnick, Ari; de Bruijn, Marella F.T.R.; Milne, Thomas A.

    2013-01-01

    Summary The Mixed Lineage Leukemia (MLL) protein is an important epigenetic regulator required for the maintenance of gene activation during development. MLL chromosomal translocations produce novel fusion proteins that cause aggressive leukemias in humans. Individual MLL fusion proteins have distinct leukemic phenotypes even when expressed in the same cell type, but how this distinction is delineated on a molecular level is poorly understood. Here, we highlight a unique molecular mechanism whereby the RUNX1 gene is directly activated by MLL-AF4 and the RUNX1 protein interacts with the product of the reciprocal AF4-MLL translocation. These results support a mechanism of transformation whereby two oncogenic fusion proteins cooperate by activating a target gene and then modulating the function of its downstream product. PMID:23352661

  6. Behavioral profiles of affected and unaffected siblings of children with autism: contribution of measures of mother-infant interaction and nonverbal communication.

    PubMed

    Rozga, Agata; Hutman, Ted; Young, Gregory S; Rogers, Sally J; Ozonoff, Sally; Dapretto, Mirella; Sigman, Marian

    2011-03-01

    We investigated whether deficits in social gaze and affect and in joint attention behaviors are evident within the first year of life among siblings of children with autism who go on to be diagnosed with autism or ASD (ASD) and siblings who are non-diagnosed (NoASD-sib) compared to low-risk controls. The ASD group did not differ from the other two groups at 6 months of age in the frequency of gaze, smiles, and vocalizations directed toward the caregiver, nor in their sensitivity to her withdrawal from interaction. However, by 12 months, infants in the ASD group exhibited lower rates of joint attention and requesting behaviors. In contrast, NoASD-sibs did not differ from comparison infants on any variables of interest at 6 and 12 months. PMID:20568002

  7. Testing a family intervention hypothesis: the contribution of mother-infant skin-to-skin contact (kangaroo care) to family interaction, proximity, and touch.

    PubMed

    Feldman, Ruth; Weller, Aron; Sirota, Lea; Eidelman, Arthur I

    2003-03-01

    The provision of maternal-infant body contact during a period of maternal separation was examined for its effects on parent-infant and triadic interactions. Participants were 146 three-month-old preterm infants and their parents, half of whom received skin-to-skin contact, or kangaroo care (KC), in the neonatal nursery. Global relational style and micro-patterns of proximity and touch were coded. Following KC, mothers and fathers were more sensitive and less intrusive, infants showed less negative affect, and family style was more cohesive. Among KC families, maternal and paternal affectionate touch of infant and spouse was more frequent, spouses remained in closer proximity, and infant proximity position was conducive to mutual gaze and touch during triadic play. The role of touch as a constituent of the co-regulatory parent-infant and triadic systems and the effects of maternal contact on mothering, co-parenting, and family processes are discussed. PMID:12666466

  8. Effect of different intestinal conditions on the intermolecular interaction between insulin and cell-penetrating peptide penetratin and on its contribution to stimulation of permeation through intestinal epithelium.

    PubMed

    Kamei, Noriyasu; Aoyama, Yukina; Khafagy, El-Sayed; Henmi, Mao; Takeda-Morishita, Mariko

    2015-08-01

    Our recent studies have shown that the coadministration of cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) is a potential strategy for oral delivery of peptide- and protein-based biopharmaceuticals. The intermolecular interaction between drug and CPP is an essential factor in the effective delivery of these drugs, but the characteristics of the interaction under the conditions of the intestinal lumen remain unknown. In this study, therefore, we examined the characteristics of binding of the amphipathic CPP penetratin to insulin and the efficiency of its enhancement of epithelial insulin transport at different pH and in simulated intestinal fluids (SIFs). The binding between insulin and penetratin was pH dependent and particularly decreased at pH 5.0. In addition, we clarified that the sodium taurocholate (NaTC) present in two types of SIF (fasted-state SIF [FaSSIF] and fed-state SIF [FeSSIF]) affected binding efficiency. However, the permeation of insulin through a Caco-2 cell monolayer was significantly facilitated by coincubation with l- or d-penetratin at various pH values. Moreover, the permeation-stimulating effect of l-penetratin was observed in FaSSIF containing NaTC and lecithin, but not in 3mM NaTC solution, suggesting that the presence of lecithin was the key factor in maintaining the ability of penetratin to enhance the intestinal absorption of biopharmaceuticals. This report describes the essential considerations for in vivo use and clinical application of a CPP-based oral delivery strategy. PMID:25960330

  9. Unraveling the contributions of hydrogen-bonding interactions to the activity of native and non-native ligands in the quorum-sensing receptor LasR

    PubMed Central

    Gerdt, Joseph P.; McInnis, Christine E.; Schell, Trevor L.; Blackwell, Helen E.

    2014-01-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) via the synthesis and detection of N-acyl L-homoserine lactone (AHL) signals regulates important pathogenic and mutualistic phenotypes in many bacteria. Over the past two decades, the development of non-native molecules that modulate this cell-cell signaling process has become an active area of research. The majority of these compounds were designed for block binding of the native AHL signal to its cognate LuxR-type receptor, and much effort has focused on LasR in the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Despite a small set of reported LasR structural data, it remains unclear which polar interactions are most important for either (i) activation of the LasR receptor by its native AHL signal, N-(3-oxo)-dodecanoyl L-homoserine lactone (OdDHL), or (ii) activation or inhibition of LasR by related AHL analogs. Herein, we report our investigations into the activity of OdDHL and five synthetic analogs in wild-type LasR and in nine LasR mutants with modifications to key polar residues in their ligand binding sites. Our results allowed us to rank, for the first time, the relative importance of each LasR:OdDHL hydrogen bond for LasR activation and provide strong evidence for the five synthetic ligands binding LasR in a very similar orientation as OdDHL. By delineating the specific molecular interactions that are important for LasR modulation by AHLs, these findings should aid in the design of new synthetic modulators of LasR (and homologous LuxR-type receptors) with improved potencies and selectivities. PMID:25474181

  10. Homeodomain-interacting protein kinase-2 stabilizes p27(kip1) by its phosphorylation at serine 10 and contributes to cell motility.

    PubMed

    Pierantoni, Giovanna Maria; Esposito, Francesco; Tornincasa, Mara; Rinaldo, Cinzia; Viglietto, Giuseppe; Soddu, Silvia; Fusco, Alfredo

    2011-08-19

    HIPK2 is a serine/threonine kinase that acts as a coregulator of an increasing number of factors involved in cell survival and proliferation during development and in response to different types of stress. Here we report on a novel target of HIPK2, the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p27(kip1). HIPK2 phosphorylates p27(kip1) in vitro and in vivo at serine 10, an event that accounts for 80% of the total p27(kip1) phosphorylation and plays a crucial role in the stability of the protein. Indeed, HIPK2 depletion by transient or stable RNA interference in tumor cells of different origin was consistently associated with strong reduction of p27(kip1) phosphorylation at serine 10 and of p27(kip1) stability. An initial evaluation of the functional relevance of this HIPK2-mediated regulation of p27(kip1) revealed a contribution to cell motility, rather than to cell proliferation, but only in cells that do not express wild-type p53. PMID:21715331

  11. Quantitative Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer Microscopy Analysis of the Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Gag-Gag Interaction: Relative Contributions of the CA and NC Domains and Membrane Binding▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Hogue, Ian B.; Hoppe, Adam; Ono, Akira

    2009-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 structural polyprotein Pr55Gag is necessary and sufficient for the assembly of virus-like particles on cellular membranes. Previous studies demonstrated the importance of the capsid C-terminal domain (CA-CTD), nucleocapsid (NC), and membrane association in Gag-Gag interactions, but the relationships between these factors remain unclear. In this study, we systematically altered the CA-CTD, NC, and the ability to bind membrane to determine the relative contributions of, and interplay between, these factors. To directly measure Gag-Gag interactions, we utilized chimeric Gag-fluorescent protein fusion constructs and a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) stoichiometry method. We found that the CA-CTD is essential for Gag-Gag interactions at the plasma membrane, as the disruption of the CA-CTD has severe impacts on FRET. Data from experiments in which wild-type (WT) and CA-CTD mutant Gag molecules are coexpressed support the idea that the CA-CTD dimerization interface consists of two reciprocal interactions. Mutations in NC have less-severe impacts on FRET between normally myristoylated Gag proteins than do CA-CTD mutations. Notably, when nonmyristoylated Gag interacts with WT Gag, NC is essential for FRET despite the presence of the CA-CTD. In contrast, constitutively enhanced membrane binding eliminates the need for NC to produce a WT level of FRET. These results from cell-based experiments suggest a model in which both membrane binding and NC-RNA interactions serve similar scaffolding functions so that one can functionally compensate for a defect in the other. PMID:19403686

  12. Structural elucidation, density functional calculations and contribution of intermolecular interactions in cholest-4-en-3-one crystals: Insights from X-ray and Hirshfeld surface analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khanam, Hena; Mashrai, Ashraf; Siddiqui, Nazish; Ahmad, Musheer; Alam, Mohammad Jane; Ahmad, Shabbir; Shamsuzzaman

    2015-03-01

    The foremost objective of the present work is systematic analysis of intermolecular interactions in crystal structure of cholest-4-en-3-one (2) molecule. It is accomplished by Hirshfeld surface analysis and fingerprint plot. Hirshfeld surface analysis has been used to visualize the fidelity of the crystal structure. This method permitted for the identification of individual types of intermolecular contacts and their impact on the complete packing. Molecules are linked by a combination of Cdbnd O---H, Csbnd H---H, and C---H contacts, which have clear signatures in the fingerprint plots. The theoretical study was attempted to predict the optimized geometry and computed spectra by the Density Functional Theory (DFT) using the B3LYP function with the 6-311++G(d,p) basis set. Atomic charges, MEP mapping, HOMO-LUMO, various thermodynamic and molecular properties have been reported. In addition thermal stability, optical, morphological, and microstructral properties of the title compound (2) have also been explored.

  13. Interaction of the neuropeptide S receptor gene Asn¹⁰⁷Ile variant and environment: contribution to affective and anxiety disorders, and suicidal behaviour.

    PubMed

    Laas, Kariina; Reif, Andreas; Akkermann, Kirsti; Kiive, Evelyn; Domschke, Katharina; Lesch, Klaus-Peter; Veidebaum, Toomas; Harro, Jaanus

    2014-04-01

    Neuropeptide S is involved in anxiety and arousal modulation, and the functional polymorphism Asn107Ile (rs324981, A > T) of the neuropeptide S receptor gene (NPSR1) is associated with panic disorder and anxiety/fear-related traits. NPSR1 also interacts with the environment in shaping personality and impulsivity. We therefore examined whether the NPSR1 A/T polymorphism is associated with affective and anxiety disorders in a population-representative sample. Lifetime psychiatric disorders were assessed by MINI interview (n = 501) in the older cohort of the longitudinal Estonian Children Personality, Behaviour and Health Study (ECPBHS). Anxiety (STAI), self-esteem (RSES), depression (MÅDRS), suicide attempts and environmental factors were self-reported in both the younger (original n = 583) and the older cohort (original n = 593). Most of the NPSR1 effects were sex-specific and depended on environmental factors. Females with the functionally least active NPSR1 AA genotype and exposed to environmental adversity had affective/anxiety disorders more frequently; they also exhibited higher anxiety and depressiveness, and lower self-esteem. Female AA homozygotes also reported suicidal behaviour more frequently, and this was further accentuated by adverse family environment. In the general population, the NPSR1 A/T polymorphism together with environmental factors is associated with anxious, depressive and activity-related traits, increased prevalence of affective/anxiety disorders and a higher likelihood of suicidal behaviour. PMID:24331455

  14. FasL Expression on Human Nucleus Pulposus Cells Contributes to the Immune Privilege of Intervertebral Disc by Interacting with Immunocytes

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhi-Heng; Sun, Zhen; Wang, Hai-Qiang; Ge, Jun; Jiang, Ting-Shuai; Chen, Yu-Fei; Ma, Ying; Wang, Chen; Hu, Sheng; Samartzis, Dino; Luo, Zhuo-Jing

    2013-01-01

    The mechanisms of immune privilege in human nucleus pulposus (NP) remain unclear. Accumulating evidence indicates that Fas ligand (FasL) might play an important role in the immune privilege of the disc. We aimed for addressing the role of FasL expression in human intervertebral disc degeneration (IDD) and immune privilege in terms of the interaction between NP cells and immunocytes via the FasL-Fas machinery. We collected NP specimens from 20 patients with IDD as degenerative group and 8 normal cadaveric donors as control. FasL expression was detected by qRT-PCR, western blotting and flow cytometry (FCM). We also collected macrophages and CD8+ T cells from the peripheral blood of patients with IDD for co-cultures with NP cells. And macrophages and CD8+ T cells were harvested for apoptosis analysis by FCM after 2 days of co-cultures. We found that FasL expression in mRNA, protein and cellular resolutions demonstrated a significant decrease in degenerative group compared with normal control (p<0.05). FCM analysis found that human NP cells with increased FasL expression resulted in significantly increased apoptosis ratio of macrophages and CD8+ T cells. Our study demonstrated that FasL expression tends to decrease in degenerated discs and FasL plays an important role in human disc immune privilege, which might provide a novel target for the treatment strategies for IDD. PMID:23801893

  15. Light scattering experiments on aqueous solutions of selected cellulose ethers: contribution to the study of polymer-mineral interactions in a new injectable biomaterial

    PubMed Central

    Bohic, Sylvain; Weiss, Pierre; Roger, Philippe; Daculsi, Guy

    2001-01-01

    Hydroxypropylmethylcellulose (HPMC) is used as a ligand for a bioactive calcium phosphate ceramic (the filler) in a ready-to-use injectable sterilized biomaterial for bone and dental surgery. Light scattering experiments were usually used to study high water-soluble polymers and to determine the basic macromolecular parameters. In order to gain a deeper understanding of polymer/mineral interactions in this type of material, we have investigated the effect of divalent and trivalent ions (Ca2+, PO43−) and steam sterilization on dilute solutions of HPMC and HEC. The sterilization process may cause some degradation of HEC taking into account its high molecular weight and some rigidity of the polymer chain. Moreover, in the case of HPMC, the changes in the conformations rather than degradation process are supposed. These effects of degradation and flocculation are strengthened in alkaline medium. Experimental data suggested the formation of chelate complexes between Ca2+ and HPMC which improve its affinity to the mineral blend and consolidate the injectable biomaterial even in the case of its hydration by biological fluid. PMID:15348303

  16. Contributions of Ionic Interactions and Protein Dynamics to Cytochrome P450 2D6 (CYP2D6) Substrate and Inhibitor Binding*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, An; Stout, C. David; Zhang, Qinghai; Johnson, Eric F.

    2015-01-01

    P450 2D6 contributes significantly to the metabolism of >15% of the 200 most marketed drugs. Open and closed crystal structures of P450 2D6 thioridazine complexes were obtained using different crystallization conditions. The protonated piperidine moiety of thioridazine forms a charge-stabilized hydrogen bond with Asp-301 in the active sites of both complexes. The more open conformation exhibits a second molecule of thioridazine bound in an expanded substrate access channel antechamber with its piperidine moiety forming a charge-stabilized hydrogen bond with Glu-222. Incubation of the crystalline open thioridazine complex with alternative ligands, prinomastat, quinidine, quinine, or ajmalicine, displaced both thioridazines. Quinine and ajmalicine formed charge-stabilized hydrogen bonds with Glu-216, whereas the protonated nitrogen of quinidine is equidistant from Asp-301 and Glu-216 with protonated nitrogen H-bonded to a water molecule in the access channel. Prinomastat is not ionized. Adaptations of active site side-chain rotamers and polypeptide conformations were evident between the complexes, with the binding of ajmalicine eliciting a closure of the open structure reflecting in part the inward movement of Glu-216 to form a hydrogen bond with ajmalicine as well as sparse lattice restraints that would hinder adaptations. These results indicate that P450 2D6 exhibits sufficient elasticity within the crystal lattice to allow the passage of compounds between the active site and bulk solvent and to adopt a more closed form that adapts for binding alternative ligands with different degrees of closure. These crystals provide a means to characterize substrate and inhibitor binding to the enzyme after replacement of thioridazine with alternative compounds. PMID:25555909

  17. Villin and actin in the mouse kidney brush-border membrane bind to and are degraded by meprins, an interaction that contributes to injury in ischemia-reperfusion

    PubMed Central

    Ongeri, Elimelda Moige; Anyanwu, Odinaka; Reeves, W. Brian

    2011-01-01

    Meprins, metalloproteinases abundantly expressed in the brush-border membranes (BBMs) of rodent proximal kidney tubules, have been implicated in the pathology of renal injury induced by ischemia-reperfusion (IR). Disruption of the meprin β gene and actinonin, a meprin inhibitor, both decrease kidney injury resulting from IR. To date, the in vivo kidney substrates for meprins are unknown. The studies herein implicate villin and actin as meprin substrates. Villin and actin bind to the cytoplasmic tail of meprin β, and both meprin A and B are capable of degrading villin and actin present in kidney proteins as well as purified recombinant forms of these proteins. The products resulting from degradation of villin and actin were unique to each meprin isoform. The meprin B cleavage site in villin was Glu744-Val745. Recombinant forms of rat meprin B and homomeric mouse meprin A had Km values for villin and actin of ∼1 μM (0.6–1.2 μM). The kcat values varied substantially (0.6–128 s−1), resulting in different efficiencies for cleavage, with meprin B having the highest kcat/Km values (128 M−1·s−1 × 106). Following IR, meprins and villin redistributed from the BBM to the cytosol. A 37-kDa actin fragment was detected in protein fractions from wild-type, but not in comparable preparations from meprin knockout mice. The levels of the 37-kDa actin fragment were significantly higher in kidneys subjected to IR. The data establish that meprins interact with and cleave villin and actin, and these cytoskeletal proteins are substrates for meprins. PMID:21795642

  18. Dynamic guide–target interactions contribute to sequential 2′-O-methylation by a unique archaeal dual guide box C/D sRNP

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Sanjay K.; Gurha, Priyatansh; Gupta, Ramesh

    2008-01-01

    Assembly and guide–target interaction of an archaeal box C/D-guide sRNP was investigated under various conditions by analyzing the lead (II)-induced cleavage of the guide RNA. Guide and target RNAs derived from Haloferax volcanii pre-tRNATrp were used with recombinant Methanocaldococcus jannaschii core proteins in the reactions. Core protein L7Ae binds differentially to C/D and C′/D′ motifs of the guide RNA, and interchanging the two motifs relative to the termini of the guide RNA did not affect L7Ae binding or sRNA function. L7Ae binding to the guide RNA exposes its D′-guide sequence first followed by the D guide. These exposures are reduced when aNop5p and aFib proteins are added. The exposed guide sequences did not pair with the target sequences in the presence of L7Ae alone. The D-guide sequence could pair with the target in the presence of L7Ae and aNop5p, suggesting a role of aNop5p in target recruitment and rearrangement of sRNA structure. aFib binding further stabilizes this pairing. After box C/D-guided modification, target–guide pairing at the D-guide sequence is disrupted, suggesting that each round of methylation may require some conformational change or reassembly of the RNP. Asymmetric RNPs containing only one L7Ae at either of the two box motifs can be assembled, but a functional RNP requires L7Ae at the box C/D motif. This arrangement resembles the asymmetric eukaryal snoRNP. Observations of initial D-guide–target pairing and the functional requirement for L7Ae at the box C/D motif are consistent with our previous report of the sequential 2′-O-methylations of the target RNA. PMID:18515549

  19. Modelling entomological-climatic interactions of Plasmodium falciparum malaria transmission in two Colombian endemic-regions: contributions to a National Malaria Early Warning System

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz, Daniel; Poveda, Germán; Vélez, Iván D; Quiñones, Martha L; Rúa, Guillermo L; Velásquez, Luz E; Zuluaga, Juan S

    2006-01-01

    Background Malaria has recently re-emerged as a public health burden in Colombia. Although the problem seems to be climate-driven, there remain significant gaps of knowledge in the understanding of the complexity of malaria transmission, which have motivated attempts to develop a comprehensive model. Methods The mathematical tool was applied to represent Plasmodium falciparum malaria transmission in two endemic-areas. Entomological exogenous variables were estimated through field campaigns and laboratory experiments. Availability of breeding places was included towards representing fluctuations in vector densities. Diverse scenarios, sensitivity analyses and instabilities cases were considered during experimentation-validation process. Results Correlation coefficients and mean square errors between observed and modelled incidences reached 0.897–0.668 (P > 0.95) and 0.0002–0.0005, respectively. Temperature became the most relevant climatic parameter driving the final incidence. Accordingly, malaria outbreaks are possible during the favourable epochs following the onset of El Niño warm events. Sporogonic and gonotrophic cycles showed to be the entomological key-variables controlling the transmission potential of mosquitoes' population. Simulation results also showed that seasonality of vector density becomes an important factor towards understanding disease transmission. Conclusion The model constitutes a promising tool to deepen the understanding of the multiple interactions related to malaria transmission conducive to outbreaks. In the foreseeable future it could be implemented as a tool to diagnose possible dynamical patterns of malaria incidence under several scenarios, as well as a decision-making tool for the early detection and control of outbreaks. The model will be also able to be merged with forecasts of El Niño events to provide a National Malaria Early Warning System. PMID:16882349

  20. The relative contribution of short-term versus long-term effects in shrub-understory species interactions under arid conditions.

    PubMed

    Noumi, Zouhaier; Chaieb, Mohamed; Le Bagousse-Pinguet, Yoann; Michalet, Richard

    2016-02-01

    Plant-plant interactions (competition and facilitation) in terrestrial ecosystems include: (1) short-term effects, primarily quantified with experimental removals; and (2) long-term effects, mostly due to soil weathering processes, primarily quantified with observational methods. It has been argued that these effects are likely to vary in contrasting directions with increasing drought stress in arid systems. However, few studies have used appropriate methodology to assess both types of effects and their variation across nurse species and environmental conditions, in particular in arid systems. This knowledge is crucial for predicting variation in the mediating role of facilitation with climate change and assessing the importance of nurse effects in ecological restoration. In the arid climate of central-south Tunisia, understory species' biomass, abundance and composition and soil parameters were compared in shrub-control, shrub-removed and open areas for three shrub species and in two habitats with contrasting soil moisture conditions. Long-term effects were dominant, positive for all three shrub species and associated with increasing nutrient content in shrub patches. Short-term effects, mainly related to water consumption, were weaker, mostly negative and dependent on shrub species. Additionally, long-term effects were less positive and short-term effects more negative in the dry habitat than in the wet habitat. Our study provides evidence of the primary influence of positive (facilitative) long-term effects in this arid system. However, the net effects of shrubs could be less beneficial for other species with increasing aridity under climate change, due to both a decrease in positive long-term effects and an increase in negative short-term effects. PMID:26527462

  1. Strategy of integrated evaluation on treatment of traditional Chinese medicine as 'interaction of system to system' and establishment of novel fuzzy target contribution recognition with herb-pairs, a case study on Astragali Radix-Fructus Corni.

    PubMed

    Duan, Yu; Pei, Ke; Cai, Hao; Tu, Sicong; Cheng, Xinwei; Zhang, Zhengwei; Fan, Kailei; Qiao, Fengxian; Qin, Kunming; Cai, Baochang

    2016-10-15

    To date, in the struggle against diseases and the development of TCM, what we lack is wisdom rather than knowledge. Studies on pharmacology of traditional Chinese medicine are facing critical challenges on how to select the proper parameters or targets to represent the pharmacological evaluation system. With seven steps of optimized modules established by ourselves, we can re-evaluate TCM in a panorama view with a proper pharmacological evaluation system. In this article, with the treatment of TCM as 'interaction of system to system', a novel and generally applicable approach called fuzzy target contribution recognition was established and agents from Astragali Radix-Fructus Corni in resisting diabetic nephropathy were successfully discovered for the first time. CG6, a promising agent from this herb-pair on the treatment of diabetic nephropathy, was finally acquired and its possible molecular mechanism was explored through a nuclear factor erythroid 2-Like 2 (NFE2L2) activation-dependent pathway. PMID:27392498

  2. Orientational mechanisms in liquid crystalline systems. 2. The contribution to solute ordering from the reaction field interaction between the solute electric quadrupole moment and the solvent electric field gradient.

    PubMed

    Celebre, Giorgio; Ionescu, Andreea

    2010-01-14

    In the previous paper of this issue, [Celebre, G.; Ionescu, A. J. Phys. Chem. B doi: 10.1021/jp907310g], following a generalized reaction field approach in the linear response approximation, we were successful in obtaining an analytical compact expression for the mean-field anisotropic orientational potential U(Q-EFG) theoretically experienced by a highly idealized nonionic and apolar solute, considered as a point quadrupole immersed in a uniaxial polarizable continuum medium (model of a nematic solvent comprised of dipolar mesogenic molecules). The term U(Q-EFG) describes the electrostatic interaction between the electric quadrupole of the solute and the electric field gradient induced at the solute by the surrounding medium polarized by the distribution of electric charges representing the quadrupolar solute itself. In the present paper, the obtained potential has been considered as an additional orientational interaction contributing to the solute ordering, besides the well-recognized and very effective "short-range" (size-and-shape-dictated) mechanisms. Since in our theory the solvent is characterized by its dielectric tensor, the model has been widely tested by taking as references the experimental order parameters of several uniaxial and biaxial different small rigid probe molecules (H(2), N(2), acetylene, allene, propyne, benzene, hexafluorobenzene, 1,4-difluorobenzene, and norbornadiene) dissolved in the nematic solvents ZLI1132 (Deltaepsilon > 0) and EBBA (Deltaepsilon < 0); moreover, the order parameters of the same solutes in the so-called nematic "magic mixture" (45 wt % EBBA + 55 wt % ZLI1132), where the short-range orientational effects are commonly believed to be very dominant, have been conventionally assumed as reference of the absence of electrostatic orientational effects. The experimental order parameters of the treated solutes, obtained in the past by liquid crystal NMR and available from literature, have been then compared with those

  3. Dynamic and Static Simulations of Fluvoxamine-Perpetrated Drug-Drug Interactions Using Multiple Cytochrome P450 Inhibition Modeling, and Determination of Perpetrator-Specific CYP Isoform Inhibition Constants and Fractional CYP Isoform Contributions to Victim Clearance.

    PubMed

    Iga, Katsumi

    2016-03-01

    Fluvoxamine-perpetrated drug-drug interactions (DDIs) of victims metabolized by multiple cytochrome P450 isoforms (CYP1A2, CYP2C19, and CYP3A4) were simulated using 2 compartment-based tube modeling, assuming a multiple inhibition-constant (Ki) model, as well as a previously reported single Ki model. Good fittings were obtained for all DDIs using consistent perpetrator-specific CYP isoform Kis and fractional CYP isoform contributions to victim clearance in concordance with literature information. Through these simulations, the following rules to predict DDI were derived. Overall enzymatic inhibitory activity calculated from static DDI data determines entirely dynamic DDIs. DDI-relevant time-dependent hepatic blood unbound perpetrator levels can be approximated to mean hepatic blood unbound perpetrator levels in any victim DDIs when a perpetrator is supplied consistently. Static and dynamic multiple CYP model-based simulations agree with one another. Fluvoxamine-perpetrated DDIs can be bridged to other perpetrator DDIs. The derived rules will allow simpler prediction of DDIs from in vivo DDI databases. Tens or hundreds of Ki gaps between in vitro and in vivo data could be reduced to within severalfold using the liver-microsome contamination model, thus suggesting that microsomes qualified with contamination would greatly improve prediction of DDIs from in vitro data. PMID:26886336

  4. Recent Langley helicopter acoustics contributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, Homer G.; Pao, S. P.; Powell, C. A.

    1988-01-01

    The helicopter acoustics program at NASA Langley has included technology for elements of noise control ranging from sources of noise to receivers of noise. The scope of Langley contributions for about the last decade is discussed. Specifically, the resolution of two certification noise quantification issues by subjective acoustics research, the development status of the helicopter system noise prediction program ROTONET are reviewed and the highlights from research on blade rotational, broadband, and blade vortex interaction noise sources are presented. Finally, research contributions on helicopter cabin (or interior) noise control are presented. A bibliography of publications from the Langley helicopter acoustics program for the past 10 years is included.

  5. p38α MAPK-mediated induction and interaction of FOXO3a and p53 contribute to the inhibited-growth and induced-apoptosis of human lung adenocarcinoma cells by berberine

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    proliferation and induces apoptosis of NSCLC cells through activation of p38α MAPK signaling pathway, followed by induction of the protein expression of p53 and FOXO3a. The latter contribute to the BBR-increased p21 (CIP1/WAF1) protein expression. The exogenous FOXO3a, interaction and mutually exclusive events of p53 and FOXO3a augment the overall response of BBR. PMID:24766860

  6. X-ray Spectroscopic Characterization of Co(IV) and Metal-Metal Interactions in Co4O4: Electronic Structure Contributions to the Formation of High-Valent States Relevant to the Oxygen Evolution Reaction.

    PubMed

    Hadt, Ryan G; Hayes, Dugan; Brodsky, Casey N; Ullman, Andrew M; Casa, Diego M; Upton, Mary H; Nocera, Daniel G; Chen, Lin X

    2016-08-31

    The formation of high-valent states is a key factor in making highly active transition-metal-based catalysts of the oxygen evolution reaction (OER). These high oxidation states will be strongly influenced by the local geometric and electronic structures of the metal ion, which are difficult to study due to spectroscopically active and complex backgrounds, short lifetimes, and limited concentrations. Here, we use a wide range of complementary X-ray spectroscopies coupled to DFT calculations to study Co(III)4O4 cubanes and their first oxidized derivatives, which provide insight into the high-valent Co(IV) centers responsible for the activity of molecular and heterogeneous OER catalysts. The combination of X-ray absorption and 1s3p resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (Kβ RIXS) allows Co(IV) to be isolated and studied against a spectroscopically active Co(III) background. Co K- and L-edge X-ray absorption data allow for a detailed characterization of the 3d-manifold of effectively localized Co(IV) centers and provide a direct handle on the t2g-based redox-active molecular orbital. Kβ RIXS is also shown to provide a powerful probe of Co(IV), and specific spectral features are sensitive to the degree of oxo-mediated metal-metal coupling across Co4O4. Guided by the data, calculations show that electron-hole delocalization can actually oppose Co(IV) formation. Computational extension of Co4O4 to CoM3O4 structures (M = redox-inactive metal) defines electronic structure contributions to Co(IV) formation. Redox activity is shown to be linearly related to covalency, and M(III) oxo inductive effects on Co(IV) oxo bonding can tune the covalency of high-valent sites over a large range and thereby tune E(0) over hundreds of millivolts. Additionally, redox-inactive metal substitution can also switch the ground state and modify metal-metal and antibonding interactions across the cluster. PMID:27515121

  7. Charge transfer spectra of organometallic complexes—VIII. Energy contributions to the formation of a donor—acceptor complex and to the electron transfer in the interaction between trialkyltindonors R 3SnX and (X = NCS, Br) the acceptors, I 2 and TCNE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verbiest, P.; Verdonck, L.; Van der Kelen, G. P.

    1992-05-01

    The enthalpies of formation for charge transfer complexes of the type [R 3SnNCS-I 2] (R = Et, iPr), [Et 3SnNCSTCNE] and [R 3SnBrI 2] (R = Me, Et) have been determined by calorimetric measurements. The data are analyzed using Mulliken's resonance structure theory, to produce the different energy contributions to the charge transfer interaction in these complexes.

  8. NMR structures of apo L. casei dihydrofolate reductase and its complexes with trimethoprim and NADPH: contributions to positive cooperative binding from ligand-induced refolding, conformational changes, and interligand hydrophobic interactions.

    PubMed

    Feeney, James; Birdsall, Berry; Kovalevskaya, Nadezhda V; Smurnyy, Yegor D; Navarro Peran, Emna M; Polshakov, Vladimir I

    2011-05-10

    In order to examine the origins of the large positive cooperativity (ΔG(0)(coop) = -2.9 kcal mol(-1)) of trimethoprim (TMP) binding to a bacterial dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) in the presence of NADPH, we have determined and compared NMR solution structures of L. casei apo DHFR and its binary and ternary complexes with TMP and NADPH and made complementary thermodynamic measurements. The DHFR structures are generally very similar except for the A-B loop region and part of helix B (residues 15-31) which could not be directly detected for L. casei apo DHFR because of line broadening from exchange between folded and unfolded forms. Thermodynamic and NMR measurements suggested that a significant contribution to the cooperativity comes from refolding of apo DHFR on binding the first ligand (up to -0.95 kcals mol(-1) if 80% of A-B loop requires refolding). Comparisons of Cα-Cα distance differences and domain rotation angles between apo DHFR and its complexes indicated that generally similar conformational changes involving domain movements accompany formation of the binary complexes with either TMP or NADPH and that the binary structures are approaching that of the ternary complex as would be expected for positive cooperativity. These favorable ligand-induced structural changes upon binding the first ligand will also contribute significantly to the cooperative binding. A further substantial contribution to cooperative binding results from the proximity of the bound ligands in the ternary complex: this reduces the solvent accessible area of the ligand and provides a favorable entropic hydrophobic contribution (up to -1.4 kcal mol(-1)). PMID:21410224

  9. NMR Structures of Apo L. casei Dihydrofolate Reductase and Its Complexes with Trimethoprim and NADPH: Contributions to Positive Cooperative Binding from Ligand-Induced Refolding, Conformational Changes, and Interligand Hydrophobic Interactions

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    In order to examine the origins of the large positive cooperativity (ΔG0coop = −2.9 kcal mol−1) of trimethoprim (TMP) binding to a bacterial dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) in the presence of NADPH, we have determined and compared NMR solution structures of L. casei apo DHFR and its binary and ternary complexes with TMP and NADPH and made complementary thermodynamic measurements. The DHFR structures are generally very similar except for the A−B loop region and part of helix B (residues 15−31) which could not be directly detected for L. casei apo DHFR because of line broadening from exchange between folded and unfolded forms. Thermodynamic and NMR measurements suggested that a significant contribution to the cooperativity comes from refolding of apo DHFR on binding the first ligand (up to −0.95 kcals mol−1 if 80% of A−B loop requires refolding). Comparisons of Cα−Cα distance differences and domain rotation angles between apo DHFR and its complexes indicated that generally similar conformational changes involving domain movements accompany formation of the binary complexes with either TMP or NADPH and that the binary structures are approaching that of the ternary complex as would be expected for positive cooperativity. These favorable ligand-induced structural changes upon binding the first ligand will also contribute significantly to the cooperative binding. A further substantial contribution to cooperative binding results from the proximity of the bound ligands in the ternary complex: this reduces the solvent accessible area of the ligand and provides a favorable entropic hydrophobic contribution (up to −1.4 kcal mol−1). PMID:21410224

  10. A variant in 3′-untranslated region of KRAS compromises its interaction with hsa-let-7g and contributes to the development of lung cancer in patients with COPD

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Hua; Zhang, Linlin; Teng, Geling; Wu, Yanhua; Chen, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Objective The objective of the present study was to explore the molecular mechanism by which a single nucleotide polymorphism (rs712) interferes with interaction between 3′-untranslated region (3′-UTR) of KRAS and let-7g, and its association with development of lung cancer in the patients with COPD. Materials and methods In this study, we confirmed that KRAS is a target of let-7g in lung cancer cells, and that introduction of rs712 minor allele into 3′-UTR significantly compromised the miRNA/mRNA interaction by using a luciferase reporter system. Additionally, a total of 35 lung tissue samples were obtained (TT:17, TG:12, GG:6), and let-7g and KRAS expression levels were determined. Results We showed that let-7g level was similar between groups, and the concentration of KRAS in GG genotype group was significantly higher than in TT or GT genotype group. Meanwhile, we found COPD patients with GG genotype had significantly higher risk for lung cancer (odds ratio OR =6.83, P=0.0081), compared with TT and GT genotypes. Conclusion Our study demonstrated that KRAS 3′-UTR rs712 polymorphism interfered with miRNA/mRNA interaction, and showed that the minor allele was associated with an elevated risk for development of lung cancer in COPD. PMID:26316738

  11. Positive and Negative Contributions in the Solvation Enthalpy due to Specific Interactions in Binary Mixtures of C1-C4 n-Alkanols and Chloroform with Butan-2-one.

    PubMed

    Varfolomeev, Mikhail A; Rakipov, Ilnaz T; Solomonov, Boris N; Lodowski, Piotr; Marczak, Wojciech

    2015-06-25

    In the paper, results of calorimetric measurements, IR spectra, and calculated ab initio stabilization energies of dimers are reported for binary systems butan-2-one + (methanol, ethanol, propan-1-ol, butan-1-ol, and chloroform). Changes in the total enthalpy of specific interactions due to dissolution of butan-2-one in the alcohols, calculated using equations derived in previous works, are positive. That results from the endothermic breaking of the O-H···O-H bonds not completely compensated by the exothermic effects of formation of the O-H···O═C ones. Moreover, the concentration of nonbonded molecules of butan-2-one is significant even in dilute solutions, as is evidenced by the shape of the C═O stretching vibrations band in the IR spectra. Apart from that, the spectra do not confirm 1:2 complexes in spite of two lone electron pairs in the carbonyl group of butan-2-one capable of forming the hydrogen bonds. The changes in enthalpy of specific interactions are negative for dilute solutions of alcohols and chloroform in butan-2-one and of butan-2-one in chloroform, because no hydrogen bonds occur in pure butan-2-one. The experimental results are positively correlated with the enthalpies estimated from the ab initio energies using a simple "chemical reaction" approach. PMID:26012694

  12. What contributes to professionalism?

    PubMed

    LaSala, Kathleen B; Nelson, Jenenne

    2005-02-01

    Appearance, behavior, dress, and communication skills play an important role in the image that a nurse projects. As the nurse interacts with patients, families, community members, corporate personnel, and policymakers, he or she must reflect a professional image. PMID:15779742

  13. CX3CL1-CX3CR1 Interaction Increases the Population of Ly6C(-)CX3CR1(hi) Macrophages Contributing to Unilateral Ureteral Obstruction-Induced Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Peng, Xiaogang; Zhang, Jing; Xiao, Zhicheng; Dong, Yanjun; Du, Jie

    2015-09-15

    Chemokines modulate inflammatory responses that are prerequisites for kidney injury. The specific role of monocyte-associated CX3CR1 and its cognate ligand CX3CL1 in unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO)-induced kidney injury remains unclear. In this study, we found that UUO caused a CCR2-dependent increase in numbers of Ly6C(hi) monocytes both in the blood and kidneys and of Ly6C(-)CX3CR1(+) macrophages in the obstructed kidneys of mice. Using CX3CR1(gfp/+) knockin mice, we observed a rapid conversion of infiltrating proinflammatory Ly6C(+)CX3CR1(1o) monocytes/macrophages to anti-inflammatory Ly6C(-)CX3CR1(hi) macrophages. CX3CR1 deficiency affected neither monocyte trafficking nor macrophage differentiation in vivo upon renal obstruction, but CX3CR1 expression in monocytes and macrophages was required for increases in fibrosis in the obstructed kidneys. Mechanistically, CX3CL1-CX3CR1 interaction increases Ly6C(-)CX3CR1(hi) macrophage survival within the obstructed kidneys. Therefore, CX3CL1 and CX3CR1 may represent attractive therapeutic targets in obstructive nephropathy. PMID:26254342

  14. Selective Interactions between Vertebrate Polycomb Homologs and the SUV39H1 Histone Lysine Methyltransferase Suggest that Histone H3-K9 Methylation Contributes to Chromosomal Targeting of Polycomb Group Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Sewalt, Richard G. A. B.; Lachner, Monika; Vargas, Mark; Hamer, Karien M.; den Blaauwen, Jan L.; Hendrix, Thijs; Melcher, Martin; Schweizer, Dieter; Jenuwein, Thomas; Otte, Arie P.

    2002-01-01

    Polycomb group (PcG) proteins form multimeric chromatin-associated protein complexes that are involved in heritable repression of gene activity. Two distinct human PcG complexes have been characterized. The EED/EZH2 PcG complex utilizes histone deacetylation to repress gene activity. The HPC/HPH PcG complex contains the HPH, RING1, BMI1, and HPC proteins. Here we show that vertebrate Polycomb homologs HPC2 and XPc2, but not M33/MPc1, interact with the histone lysine methyltransferase (HMTase) SUV39H1 both in vitro and in vivo. We further find that overexpression of SUV39H1 induces selective nuclear relocalization of HPC/HPH PcG proteins but not of the EED/EZH2 PcG proteins. This SUV39H1-dependent relocalization concentrates the HPC/HPH PcG proteins to the large pericentromeric heterochromatin domains (1q12) on human chromosome 1. Within these PcG domains we observe increased H3-K9 methylation. Finally, we show that H3-K9 HMTase activity is associated with endogenous HPC2. Our findings suggest a role for the SUV39H1 HMTase and histone H3-K9 methylation in the targeting of human HPC/HPH PcG proteins to modified chromatin structures. PMID:12101246

  15. Transcriptome and Metabolite Profiling of the Infection Cycle of Zymoseptoria tritici on Wheat Reveals a Biphasic Interaction with Plant Immunity Involving Differential Pathogen Chromosomal Contributions and a Variation on the Hemibiotrophic Lifestyle Definition1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Rudd, Jason J.; Kanyuka, Kostya; Hassani-Pak, Keywan; Derbyshire, Mark; Andongabo, Ambrose; Devonshire, Jean; Lysenko, Artem; Saqi, Mansoor; Desai, Nalini M.; Powers, Stephen J.; Hooper, Juliet; Ambroso, Linda; Bharti, Arvind; Farmer, Andrew; Hammond-Kosack, Kim E.; Dietrich, Robert A.; Courbot, Mikael

    2015-01-01

    The hemibiotrophic fungus Zymoseptoria tritici causes Septoria tritici blotch disease of wheat (Triticum aestivum). Pathogen reproduction on wheat occurs without cell penetration, suggesting that dynamic and intimate intercellular communication occurs between fungus and plant throughout the disease cycle. We used deep RNA sequencing and metabolomics to investigate the physiology of plant and pathogen throughout an asexual reproductive cycle of Z. tritici on wheat leaves. Over 3,000 pathogen genes, more than 7,000 wheat genes, and more than 300 metabolites were differentially regulated. Intriguingly, individual fungal chromosomes contributed unequally to the overall gene expression changes. Early transcriptional down-regulation of putative host defense genes was detected in inoculated leaves. There was little evidence for fungal nutrient acquisition from the plant throughout symptomless colonization by Z. tritici, which may instead be utilizing lipid and fatty acid stores for growth. However, the fungus then subsequently manipulated specific plant carbohydrates, including fructan metabolites, during the switch to necrotrophic growth and reproduction. This switch coincided with increased expression of jasmonic acid biosynthesis genes and large-scale activation of other plant defense responses. Fungal genes encoding putative secondary metabolite clusters and secreted effector proteins were identified with distinct infection phase-specific expression patterns, although functional analysis suggested that many have overlapping/redundant functions in virulence. The pathogenic lifestyle of Z. tritici on wheat revealed through this study, involving initial defense suppression by a slow-growing extracellular and nutritionally limited pathogen followed by defense (hyper) activation during reproduction, reveals a subtle modification of the conceptual definition of hemibiotrophic plant infection. PMID:25596183

  16. Darwin's contributions to genetics.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y-S; Zhou, X-M; Zhi, M-X; Li, X-J; Wang, Q-L

    2009-01-01

    Darwin's contributions to evolutionary biology are well known, but his contributions to genetics are much less known. His main contribution was the collection of a tremendous amount of genetic data, and an attempt to provide a theoretical framework for its interpretation. Darwin clearly described almost all genetic phenomena of fundamental importance, such as prepotency (Mendelian inheritance), bud variation (mutation), heterosis, reversion (atavism), graft hybridization (Michurinian inheritance), sex-limited inheritance, the direct action of the male element on the female (xenia and telegony), the effect of use and disuse, the inheritance of acquired characters (Lamarckian inheritance), and many other observations pertaining to variation, heredity and development. To explain all these observations, Darwin formulated a developmental theory of heredity - Pangenesis - which not only greatly influenced many subsequent theories, but also is supported by recent evidence. PMID:19638672

  17. Mode Contributions to the Casimir Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Intravaia, F.; Henkel, C.

    2010-04-01

    Applying a sum-over-modes approach to the Casimir interaction between two plates with finite conductivity, we isolate and study the contributions of surface plasmons and Foucault (eddy current) modes. We show in particular that for the TE-polarization eddy currents provide a repulsive force that cancels, at high temperatures, the Casimir free energy calculated with the plasma model.

  18. Contributed Papers, 1967.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Special Libraries Association, New York, NY. Documentation Div.

    Included are six papers from the Special Libraries Association Documentation Division's Contributed Papers Session at the National Conference in New York, May 28 - June 1, 1967, which were not included in the November, 1967 issue of Special Libraries. The papers are: (1) "The Bibliographical Control of Aerospace Industry Conference Literature…

  19. Contribution Margin Budgeting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tambrino, Paul A.

    2001-01-01

    Describes Iowa Valley Community College District's Contribution Margin Budgeting (CMB) program, successfully implemented to stave off bankruptcy. In this program, each responsibility center receives credit for all income generated and is charged for all expenditures, and each must build its own reserve against revenue shortfalls and unanticipated…

  20. Authors: who contributes what?

    PubMed

    Squires, B P

    1996-10-01

    In this issue (see pages 877 to 882) Dr. H. Dele Davies and associates examine how a sample of pediatric department chairs and faculty deans' offices perceive the involvement of faculty members in medical research. Their findings point to the confusion that surrounds the question of authorship in collaborative research. Dr. Drummond Rennie, deputy editor of the Journal of the American Medical Association, has proposed that a complete and descriptive list of "contributors" replace author lists and acknowledgements. Slight modifications to the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors guidelines on authorship retain the designation "author" and the use of acknowledgements but encourage the explicit description of each investigator's contribution. Researchers and editors should continue to explore ways to ensure that contributions to published research are clearly and honestly identified. PMID:8837537

  1. Abstracts of contributed papers

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-08-01

    This volume contains 571 abstracts of contributed papers to be presented during the Twelfth US National Congress of Applied Mechanics. Abstracts are arranged in the order in which they fall in the program -- the main sessions are listed chronologically in the Table of Contents. The Author Index is in alphabetical order and lists each paper number (matching the schedule in the Final Program) with its corresponding page number in the book.

  2. Tank waste isotope contributions

    SciTech Connect

    VANKEUREN, J.C.

    1999-08-26

    This document presents the results of a calculation to determine the relative contribution of selected isotopes to the inhalation and ingestion doses for a postulated release of Hanford tank waste. The fraction of the dose due to {sup 90}Sr, {sup 90}Y, {sup 137}Cs and the alpha emitters for single shell solids and liquids, double shell solids and liquids, aging waste solids and liquids and all solids and liquids. An effective dose conversion factor was also calculated for the alpha emitters for each composite of the tank waste.

  3. Examining suicide: imaging's contributions.

    PubMed

    Church, Elizabeth J

    2015-01-01

    For many people, the death of hope leads inexorably to the conclusion that the only viable solution, the only way to put an end to unendurable pain, is suicide. What leads a person to commit this final, desperate act, and how might we predict, intervene, and prevent suicide? Health care workers, including radiologic technologists, can play an important role in detecting warning signs in patients and in better understanding what factors may lead to suicide. Although certain forms of suicide such as suicide bombings and assisted suicide are beyond its scope, this article explores medical imaging's contributions to the study of this phenomenon. PMID:25739108

  4. [Contributions and novelties from Functional Analytic Psychotherapy].

    PubMed

    Ferro García, Rafael; Valero Aguayo, Luis; López Bermúdez, Miguel A

    2007-08-01

    Functional Analytic Psychotherapy is based on the principles of radical behaviourism. It emphasises the impact of events occurring during therapeutic sessions, the therapist-client interaction context, functional equivalence of environments, natural reinforcement, and shaping by the therapist. Functional Analytic Psychotherapy makes use of both the basic principles of behaviour analysis: individual functional assessment and application of in vivo treatment. This paper analyses novelties and new contributions of this therapy. New contributions are classified in various categories: integration with other psychotherapies, improvement of therapeutic skills, methods for evaluation and data recording in therapy, its application to several clinical problems, and studies of its efficacy. PMID:17617985

  5. The Contribution of Support Teachers in Facilitating Children's Peer Interactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hillesøy, Siv

    2016-01-01

    In the Nordic countries, policies for children, who require special educational assistance, emphasize that support should be provided within regular preschool settings. As one measure to facilitate these children's participation in preschool activities, support teachers may be appointed. The present study explores how support teachers contribute…

  6. A Profile of Corporate Contributions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Hayden W.

    The extent and distribution of charitable contributions by corporations were studied. In addition to a history of giving from 1936 to 1981, information is presented on corporate contributions in 1977 in terms of the distribution of companies (1) by size of contributions, (2) by contributions as percentage of net income, (3) by industry, and (4) by…

  7. Minisuperspace models as infrared contributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bojowald, Martin; Brahma, Suddhasattwa

    2016-06-01

    A direct correspondence of quantum mechanics as a minisuperspace model for a self-interacting scalar quantum-field theory is established by computing, in several models, the infrared contributions to 1-loop effective potentials of Coleman-Weinberg type. A minisuperspace approximation rather than truncation is thereby obtained. By this approximation, the spatial averaging scale of minisuperspace models is identified with an infrared scale (but not a regulator or cutoff) delimiting the modes included in the minisuperspace model. Some versions of the models studied here have discrete space or modifications of the Hamiltonian expected from proposals of loop quantum gravity. They shed light on the question of how minisuperspace models of quantum cosmology can capture features of full quantum gravity. While it is shown that modifications of the Hamiltonian can be well described by minisuperspace truncations, some related phenomena such as signature change, confirmed and clarified here for modified scalar field theories, require at least a perturbative treatment of inhomogeneity beyond a strict minisuperspace model. The new methods suggest a systematic extension of minisuperspace models by a canonical effective formulation of perturbative inhomogeneity.

  8. 75 FR 43799 - Employee Contribution Elections and Contribution Allocations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-27

    ..., the Agency published a proposed rule with request for comments in the Federal Register (75 FR 34388... ``Automatic Contribution Arrangements'' 74 FR 8200, 8206 (February 24, 2009). The TSP must follow applicable... Part 1600 Employee Contribution Elections and Contribution Allocations AGENCY: Federal...

  9. EMSL Contribution Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, Allison A.

    2008-12-01

    This Contribution Plan is EMSL’s template for achieving our vision of simultaneous excellence in all aspects of our mission as a national scientific user facility. It reflects our understanding of the long-term stewardship we must work toward to meet the scientific challenges faced by the Department of Energy (DOE) and the nation. During the next decade, we will implement the strategies contained in this Plan, working closely with the scientific community, our advisory committees, DOE’s Office of Biological and Environmental Research, and other key stakeholders. This Plan is fully aligned with the strategic plans of DOE, its Office of Science, and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). We recognize that shifts in science and technology, national priorities, and resources made available through the Federal budget process create planning uncertainties and, ultimately, a highly dynamic planning environment. Accordingly, this Plan should be viewed as a living document and we continually evaluate the changing needs and opportunities posed by our stakeholders (i.e., DOE, users, staff, advisory committees), work closely with them to understand and respond to those changes, and align our strategy accordingly. This Plan is organized around two sections. Section 1 describes our vision and four strategic outcomes: 1) Scientific Innovation, 2) Capabilities that Transform Science, 3) Outstanding Management and Operations, and Engaged and Proactive Users. These outcomes provide the framework for seven critical actions we must take during the next 3 to 5 years: 1) Establishing leadership in EMSL science themes, 2) building and deploying transformational capabilities, 3) integrating computation with experiment, 4) ensuring EMSL’s workforce meets the scientific challenges of the future, 5) creating partnerships, 6) attracting and engaging users in EMSL’s long-term strategy, and 7) building a research infrastructure that meets emerging scientific needs. Section 2

  10. Powerful Interactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dombro, Amy Laura; Jablon, Judy R.; Stetson, Charlotte

    2011-01-01

    Interactions are the daily exchanges in words and gestures one has with others. As a teacher, the interactions he/she has with young children can make a positive difference in their lives. A teacher's powerful interactions with children play an important role in their emotional well-being and learning. Powerful interactions are not the same as…