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Sample records for glioma bearer mouse

  1. Dynamics of circulating gamma delta T cell activity in an immunocompetent mouse model of high-grade glioma

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Human gamma delta T cells are potent effectors against glioma cell lines in vitro and in human/mouse xenograft models of glioblastoma, however, this effect has not been investigated in an immunocompetent mouse model. In this report, we established GL261 intracranial gliomas in syngeneic WT C57BL/6 m...

  2. Glioma

    MedlinePlus

    ... problems, as well as changes in behavior and personality, are also fairly common in mixed glioma patients. ... Cerebri: Symptoms are often nonspecific and can include personality and behavioral changes, memory disturbance, increased intracranial pressure ...

  3. Delta-24-RGD Oncolytic Adenovirus Elicits Anti-Glioma Immunity in an Immunocompetent Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Hong; Clise-Dwyer, Karen; Ruisaard, Kathryn E.; Fan, Xuejun; Tian, Weihua; Gumin, Joy; Lamfers, Martine L.; Kleijn, Anne; Lang, Frederick F.; Yung, Wai-Kwan Alfred; Vence, Luis M.; Gomez-Manzano, Candelaria; Fueyo, Juan

    2014-01-01

    Background Emerging evidence suggests anti-cancer immunity is involved in the therapeutic effect induced by oncolytic viruses. Here we investigate the effect of Delta-24-RGD oncolytic adenovirus on innate and adaptive anti-glioma immunity. Design Mouse GL261-glioma model was set up in immunocompetent C57BL/6 mouse for Delta-24-RGD treatment. The changes of the immune cell populations were analyzed by immunohistochemistry and flow cytometry. The anti-glioma immunity was evaluated with functional study of the splenocytes isolated from the mice. The efficacy of the virotherapy was assessed with animal survival analysis. The direct effect of the virus on the tumor-associated antigen presentation to CD8+ T cells was analyzed with an in vitro ovalbumin (OVA) modeling system. Results Delta-24-RGD induced cytotoxic effect in mouse glioma cells. Viral treatment in GL261-glioma bearing mice caused infiltration of innate and adaptive immune cells, instigating a Th1 immunity at the tumor site which resulted in specific anti-glioma immunity, shrunken tumor and prolonged animal survival. Importantly, viral infection and IFNγ increased the presentation of OVA antigen in OVA-expressing cells to CD8+ T-cell hybridoma B3Z cells, which is blocked by brefeldin A and proteasome inhibitors, indicating the activity is through the biosynthesis and proteasome pathway. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that Delta-24-RGD induces anti-glioma immunity and offers the first evidence that viral infection directly enhances presentation of tumor-associated antigens to immune cells. PMID:24827739

  4. Mouse low-grade gliomas contain cancer stem cells with unique molecular and functional properties.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi-Hsien; McGowan, Lucy D'Agostino; Cimino, Patrick J; Dahiya, Sonika; Leonard, Jeffrey R; Lee, Da Yong; Gutmann, David H

    2015-03-24

    The availability of adult malignant glioma stem cells (GSCs) has provided unprecedented opportunities to identify the mechanisms underlying treatment resistance. Unfortunately, there is a lack of comparable reagents for the study of pediatric low-grade glioma (LGG). Leveraging a neurofibromatosis 1 (Nf1) genetically engineered mouse LGG model, we report the isolation of CD133(+) multi-potent low-grade glioma stem cells (LG-GSCs), which generate glioma-like lesions histologically similar to the parent tumor following injection into immunocompetent hosts. In addition, we demonstrate that these LG-GSCs harbor selective resistance to currently employed conventional and biologically targeted anti-cancer agents, which reflect the acquisition of new targetable signaling pathway abnormalities. Using transcriptomic analysis to identify additional molecular properties, we discovered that mouse and human LG-GSCs harbor high levels of Abcg1 expression critical for protecting against ER-stress-induced mouse LG-GSC apoptosis. Collectively, these findings establish that LGG cancer stem cells have unique molecular and functional properties relevant to brain cancer treatment. PMID:25772366

  5. A Novel Mouse Model of Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Glioma Initiated in Pax3-Expressing Cells12

    PubMed Central

    Misuraca, Katherine L.; Hu, Guo; Barton, Kelly L.; Chung, Alexander; Becher, Oren J.

    2016-01-01

    Diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG) is a rare and incurable brain tumor that arises predominately in children and involves the pons, a structure that along with the midbrain and medulla makes up the brainstem. We have previously developed genetically engineered mouse models of brainstem glioma using the RCAS/Tv-a system by targeting PDGF-B overexpression, p53 loss, and H3.3K27M mutation to Nestin-expressing brainstem progenitor cells of the neonatal mouse. Here we describe a novel mouse model targeting these same genetic alterations to Pax3-expressing cells, which in the neonatal mouse pons consist of a Pax3 +/Nestin +/Sox2 + population lining the fourth ventricle and a Pax3 +/NeuN + parenchymal population. Injection of RCAS-PDGF-B into the brainstem of Pax3-Tv-a mice at postnatal day 3 results in 40% of mice developing asymptomatic low-grade glioma. A mixture of low- and high-grade glioma results from injection of Pax3-Tv-a;p53fl/fl mice with RCAS-PDGF-B and RCAS-Cre, with or without RCAS-H3.3K27M. These tumors are Ki67 +, Nestin +, Olig2 +, and largely GFAP − and can arise anywhere within the brainstem, including the classic DIPG location of the ventral pons. Expression of the H3.3K27M mutation reduces overall H3K27me3 as compared with tumors without the mutation, similar to what has been previously shown in human and mouse tumors. Thus, we have generated a novel genetically engineered mouse model of DIPG, which faithfully recapitulates the human disease and represents a novel platform with which to study the biology and treatment of this deadly disease. PMID:26806352

  6. Insights Gained from Modeling High-Grade Glioma in the Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Rankin, Sherri L.; Zhu, Guo; Baker, Suzanne J.

    2011-01-01

    High grade gliomas (HGG) are devastating primary brain tumors with universally poor prognoses. Advances toward effective treatments require improved understanding of pathogenesis and relevant model systems for preclinical testing. Mouse models for HGG provide physiologically relevant experimental systems for analysis of HGG pathogenesis. There are advantages and disadvantages to the different methodologies used to generate such models, including implantation, genetic engineering or somatic gene transfer approaches. This review highlights how mouse models have provided insights into the contribution of specific mutations to tumor initiation, progression, and phenotype, the influence of tumor microenviroment, and the analysis of cell types that can give rise to glioma. HGGs are a highly heterogeneous group of tumors, and the complexity of diverse mutations within common signaling pathways as well as the developmental and cell-type context of transformation contribute to the overall diversity of glioma phenotype. Enhanced understanding of the mutations and cell types giving rise to HGG, along with the ability to design increasingly complex mouse models that more closely approximate the process of human gliomagenesis will continue to provide improved experimental systems for dissecting mechanisms of disease pathogenesis and for preclinical testing. PMID:22035336

  7. OKN-007 decreases VEGFR-2 levels in a preclinical GL261 mouse glioma model

    PubMed Central

    de Souza, Patricia Coutinho; Smith, Nataliya; Pody, Richard; He, Ting; Njoku, Charity; Silasi-Mansat, Robert; Lupu, Florea; Meek, Bill; Chen, Hong; Dong, Yunzhou; Saunders, Debra; Orock, Albert; Hodges, Erik; Colijn, Sarah; Mamedova, Nadezda; Towner, Rheal A

    2015-01-01

    Angiogenesis is essential to tumor progression, and the precise imaging of the angiogenic marker vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR-2) may provide an accurate evaluation for angiogenesis during a therapeutic response. With the use of molecular magnetic resonance imaging (mMRI), an in vitro cell assay indicated significantly decreased T1 relaxation values when tumor endothelial cells (TEC), which positively expressed VEGFR-2 (Western blot), were in the presence of the VEGFR-2 probe compared to TEC alone (P < 0.001). For in vivo mMRI evaluations, we assessed VEGFR-2 levels in untreated and OKN-007-treated GL261 mouse gliomas. Regarding treatment response, OKN-007 was also able to significantly decrease tumor volumes (P < 0.01) and increase survival (P < 0.001) in treated animals. Regarding in vivo detection of VEGFR-2, OKN-007 was found to significantly decrease the amount of VEGFR-2 probe (P < 0.05) compared to an untreated control group. Fluorescence imaging for the VEGFR-2 probe indicated that there was colocalization with the endothelial marker CD31 in an untreated tumor bearing mouse and decreased levels for an OKN-007-treated animal. Immuno-fluorescence imaging for VEGFR-2 indicated that OKN-007 treatment significantly decreased VEGFR-2 levels (P < 0.0001) when compared to untreated tumors. Immuno-electron microscopy was used with gold-labeled anti-biotin to detect the anti-VEGFR-2 probe within the plasma membrane of GL261 tumor endothelial cells. This is the first attempt at detecting in vivo levels of VEGFR-2 in a mouse GL261 glioma model and assessing the anti-angiogenic capability of an anticancer nitrone. The results indicate that OKN-007 treatment substantially decreased VEGFR-2 levels in a GL261 glioma model, and can be considered as an anti-angiogenic therapy in human gliomas. PMID:26269774

  8. The Presence of IL-17A and T Helper 17 Cells in Experimental Mouse Brain Tumors and Human Glioma

    PubMed Central

    Wainwright, Derek A.; Sengupta, Sadhak; Han, Yu; Ulasov, Ilya V.; Lesniak, Maciej S.

    2010-01-01

    Background Recently, CD4+IL-17A+ T helper 17 (Th17) cells were identified and reported in several diseased states, including autoimmunity, infection and various peripheral nervous system tumors. However, the presence of Th17 in glia-derived tumors of the central nervous system has not been studied. Methodology/Principal Findings In this report, we demonstrate that mRNA expression for the Th17 cell cytokine IL-17A, as well as Th17 cells, are present in human glioma. The mRNA expression for IL-17A in glioma was recapitulated in an immunocompetent mouse model of malignant glioma. Furthermore, the presence of Th17 cells was confirmed in both human and mouse glioma. Interestingly, some Th17 cells present in mouse glioma co-expressed the Th1 and Th2 lineage markers, IFN-γ and IL-4, respectively, but predominantly co-expressed the Treg lineage marker FoxP3. Conclusions These data confirm the presence of Th17 cells in glia-derived CNS tumors and provide the rationale for further investigation into the role of Th17 cells in malignant glioma. PMID:21060663

  9. 31 CFR 358.6 - What is the procedure for converting bearer corpora and detached bearer coupons to book-entry?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... bearer corpora and detached bearer coupons to book-entry? 358.6 Section 358.6 Money and Finance: Treasury... PUBLIC DEBT REGULATIONS GOVERNING BOOK-ENTRY CONVERSION OF BEARER CORPORA AND DETACHED BEARER COUPONS § 358.6 What is the procedure for converting bearer corpora and detached bearer coupons to...

  10. Synergistic Antivascular and Antitumor Efficacy with Combined Cediranib and SC6889 in Intracranial Mouse Glioma

    PubMed Central

    Lobo, Merryl R.; Kukino, Ayaka; Tran, Huong; Schabel, Matthias C.; Springer, Charles S.; Gillespie, G. Yancey; Grafe, Marjorie R.; Woltjer, Randall L.; Pike, Martin M.

    2015-01-01

    Prognosis remains extremely poor for malignant glioma. Targeted therapeutic approaches, including single agent anti-angiogenic and proteasome inhibition strategies, have not resulted in sustained anti-glioma clinical efficacy. We tested the anti-glioma efficacy of the anti-angiogenic receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor cediranib and the novel proteasome inhibitor SC68896, in combination and as single agents. To assess anti-angiogenic effects and evaluate efficacy we employed 4C8 intracranial mouse glioma and a dual-bolus perfusion MRI approach to measure Ktrans, relative cerebral blood flow and volume (rCBF, rCBV), and relative mean transit time (rMTT) in combination with anatomical MRI measurements of tumor growth. While single agent cediranib or SC68896 treatment did not alter tumor growth or survival, combined cediranib/SC68896 significantly delayed tumor growth and increased median survival by 2-fold, compared to untreated. This was accompanied by substantially increased tumor necrosis in the cediranib/SC68896 group (p<0.01), not observed with single agent treatments. Mean vessel density was significantly lower, and mean vessel lumen area was significantly higher, for the combined cediranib/SC68896 group versus untreated. Consistent with our previous findings, cediranib alone did not significantly alter mean tumor rCBF, rCBV, rMTT, or Ktrans. In contrast, SC68896 reduced rCBF in comparison to untreated, but without concomitant reductions in rCBV, rMTT, or Ktrans. Importantly, combined cediranib/SC68896 substantially reduced rCBF, rCBV. rMTT, and Ktrans. A novel analysis of Ktrans/rCBV suggests that changes in Ktrans with time and/or treatment are related to altered total vascular surface area. The data suggest that combined cediranib/SC68896 induced potent anti-angiogenic effects, resulting in increased vascular efficiency and reduced extravasation, consistent with a process of vascular normalization. The study represents the first demonstration that the

  11. Toward Distinguishing Recurrent Tumor From Radiation Necrosis: DWI and MTC in a Gamma Knife–Irradiated Mouse Glioma Model

    SciTech Connect

    Perez-Torres, Carlos J.; Engelbach, John A.; Cates, Jeremy; Thotala, Dinesh; Yuan, Liya; Schmidt, Robert E.; Rich, Keith M.; Drzymala, Robert E.; Ackerman, Joseph J.H.; Garbow, Joel R.

    2014-10-01

    Purpose: Accurate noninvasive diagnosis is vital for effective treatment planning. Presently, standard anatomical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is incapable of differentiating recurring tumor from delayed radiation injury, as both lesions are hyperintense in both postcontrast T1- and T2-weighted images. Further studies are therefore necessary to identify an MRI paradigm that can differentially diagnose these pathologies. Mouse glioma and radiation injury models provide a powerful platform for this purpose. Methods and Materials: Two MRI contrasts that are widely used in the clinic were chosen for application to a glioma/radiation-injury model: diffusion weighted imaging, from which the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) is obtained, and magnetization transfer contrast, from which the magnetization transfer ratio (MTR) is obtained. These metrics were evaluated longitudinally, first in each lesion type alone–glioma versus irradiation – and then in a combined irradiated glioma model. Results: MTR was found to be consistently decreased in all lesions compared to nonlesion brain tissue (contralateral hemisphere), with limited specificity between lesion types. In contrast, ADC, though less sensitive to the presence of pathology, was increased in radiation injury and decreased in tumors. In the irradiated glioma model, ADC also increased immediately after irradiation, but decreased as the tumor regrew. Conclusions: ADC is a better metric than MTR for differentiating glioma from radiation injury. However, MTR was more sensitive to both tumor and radiation injury than ADC, suggesting a possible role in detecting lesions that do not enhance strongly on T1-weighted images.

  12. Optic glioma

    MedlinePlus

    Glioma - optic; Optic nerve glioma; Juvenile pilocytic astrocytoma; Brain cancer - optic glioma ... Optic gliomas are rare. The cause of optic gliomas is unknown. Most optic gliomas are slow-growing ...

  13. 31 CFR 306.38 - Interest on bearer securities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Interest on bearer securities. 306.38.... SECURITIES Interest § 306.38 Interest on bearer securities. Unless the offering circular and notice of call provide otherwise, interest on coupon securities is payable in regular course of business...

  14. How stemlike are sphere cultures from long-term cancer cell lines? Lessons from mouse glioma models.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Mushfika; Frei, Karl; Willscher, Edith; Stefanski, Anja; Kaulich, Kerstin; Roth, Patrick; Stühler, Kai; Reifenberger, Guido; Binder, Hans; Weller, Michael

    2014-11-01

    Cancer stem cells may mediate therapy resistance and recurrence in various types of cancer, including glioblastoma. Cancer stemlike cells can be isolated from long-term cancer cell lines, including glioma lines. Using sphere formation as a model for cancer cell stemness in vitro, we derived sphere cultures from SMA-497, SMA-540, SMA-560, and GL-261 glioma cells. Gene expression and proteomics profiling demonstrated that sphere cultures uniformly showed an elevated expression of stemness-associated genes, notably including CD44. Differences in neural lineage marker expression between nonsphere and sphere cultures were heterogeneous except for a uniform reduction of β-III-tubulin in sphere cultures. All sphere cultures showed slower growth. Self-renewal capacity was influenced by medium conditions but not nonsphere versus sphere culture phenotype. Sphere cultures were more resistant to irradiation, whereas both nonsphere and sphere cultures were highly resistant to temozolomide. Nonsphere cells formed more aggressive tumors in syngeneic mice than sphere cells in all models except SMA-560. There were no major differences in vascularization or infiltration by T cells or microglia/macrophages between nonsphere and sphere cell-derived tumors implanted in syngeneic hosts. Together, these data indicate that mouse glioma cell lines may be induced in vitro to form spheres that acquire features of stemness, but they do not exhibit a uniform biologic phenotype, thereby challenging the view that they represent a superior model system. PMID:25289892

  15. 31 CFR 358.7 - Where do I send my bearer corpora and detached bearer coupons to be converted?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... detached bearer coupons to be converted to: Bureau of the Public Debt, Division of Customer Service, P. O... Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) FISCAL SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY BUREAU OF THE...

  16. A preclinical mouse model of glioma with an alternative mechanism of telomere maintenance (ALT).

    PubMed

    Jeitany, Maya; Pineda, Jose Ramon; Liu, Qingyuan; Porreca, Rosa Maria; Hoffschir, Françoise; Desmaze, Chantal; Silvestre, David C; Mailliet, Patrick; Junier, Marie-Pierre; Londoño-Vallejo, Arturo; Ségal-Bendirdjian, Evelyne; Chneiweiss, Hervé; Boussin, François D

    2015-04-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme is the most aggressive primary tumor of the central nervous system. Glioma stem cells (GSCs), a small population of tumor cells with stem-like properties, are supposedly responsible for glioblastoma multiforme relapse after current therapies. In approximately thirty percent of glioblastoma multiforme tumors, telomeres are not maintained by telomerase but through an alternative mechanism, termed alternative lengthening of telomere (ALT), suggesting potential interest in developing specific therapeutic strategies. However, no preclinical model of ALT glioma was available until the isolation of TG20 cells from a human ALT glioma. Herein, we show that TG20 cells exhibit a high level of telomeric recombination but a stable karyotype, indicating that their telomeres retain their protective function against chromosomal instability. TG20 cells possess all of the characteristic features of GSCs: the expression of neural stem cell markers, the generation of intracerebral tumors in NOD-SCID-IL2Rγ (NSG) mice as well as in nude mice, and the ability to sustain serial intracerebral transplantations without expressing telomerase, demonstrating the stability of the ALT phenotype in vivo. Furthermore, we also demonstrate that 360B, a G-quadruplex ligand of the pyridine derivative series that impairs telomere replication and mitotic progression in cancer cells, prevents the development of TG20 tumors. Together, our results show that intracerebral grafts of TG20 cells in immunodeficient mice constitute an efficient preclinical model of ALT glioblastoma multiforme and that G-quadruplex ligands are a potential therapy for this specific type of tumor. PMID:25175359

  17. The Ketogenic Diet Alters the Hypoxic Response and Affects Expression of Proteins Associated with Angiogenesis, Invasive Potential and Vascular Permeability in a Mouse Glioma Model

    PubMed Central

    Woolf, Eric C.; Curley, Kara L.; Liu, Qingwei; Turner, Gregory H.; Charlton, Julie A.; Preul, Mark C.; Scheck, Adrienne C.

    2015-01-01

    Background The successful treatment of malignant gliomas remains a challenge despite the current standard of care, which consists of surgery, radiation and temozolomide. Advances in the survival of brain cancer patients require the design of new therapeutic approaches that take advantage of common phenotypes such as the altered metabolism found in cancer cells. It has therefore been postulated that the high-fat, low-carbohydrate, adequate protein ketogenic diet (KD) may be useful in the treatment of brain tumors. We have demonstrated that the KD enhances survival and potentiates standard therapy in a mouse model of malignant glioma, yet the mechanisms are not fully understood. Methods To explore the effects of the KD on various aspects of tumor growth and progression, we used the immunocompetent, syngeneic GL261-Luc2 mouse model of malignant glioma. Results Tumors from animals maintained on KD showed reduced expression of the hypoxia marker carbonic anhydrase 9, hypoxia inducible factor 1-alpha, and decreased activation of nuclear factor kappa B. Additionally, tumors from animals maintained on KD had reduced tumor microvasculature and decreased expression of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2, matrix metalloproteinase-2 and vimentin. Peritumoral edema was significantly reduced in animals fed the KD and protein analyses showed altered expression of zona occludens-1 and aquaporin-4. Conclusions The KD directly or indirectly alters the expression of several proteins involved in malignant progression and may be a useful tool for the treatment of gliomas. PMID:26083629

  18. 12 CFR 615.5462 - Restrictive endorsement of bearer securities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Restrictive endorsement of bearer securities. 615.5462 Section 615.5462 Banks and Banking FARM CREDIT ADMINISTRATION FARM CREDIT SYSTEM FUNDING AND FISCAL AFFAIRS, LOAN POLICIES AND OPERATIONS, AND FUNDING OPERATIONS Book-Entry Procedures for Farm Credit Securities § 615.5462...

  19. Magnetic Targeting of Novel Heparinized Iron Oxide Nanoparticles Evaluated in a 9L-glioma mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jian; Shin, Meong Cheol; Yang, Victor C.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose A novel PEGylated and heparinized magnetic iron oxide nano-platform (DNPH) was synthesized for simultaneous magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and tumor targeting. Methods Starch-coated magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (“D”) were crosslinked, aminated (DN) and then simultaneously PEGylated and heparinized with different feed ratios of PEG and heparin (DNPH1-4). DNPH products were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID). The magentic targeting of DNPH3, with appropriate amounts of conjugated PEG and heparin, in a mouse 9L-glioma subcutaneous tumor model was confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)/electron spin resonance (ESR). Results DNPH3 showed long circulating properties in vivo (half-life > 8 h, more than 60-fold longer than that of parent D) and low reticuloendothelial system (RES) recognition in liver and spleen. Protamine, a model cationic protein, was efficiently loaded onto DNPH3 with a maxium loading content of 26.4 μg/mg Fe. Magnetic capture of DNPH3 in tumor site with optimized conditions (I.D. of 12 mg/kg, targeting time of 45 min) was up to 29.42 μg Fe/g tissue (12.26% I.D./g tissue). Conclusion DNPH3 showed the potential to be used as a platform for cationic proteins for simultaneous tumor targeting and imaging. PMID:24065589

  20. Heparan sulfate sulfatase SULF2 regulates PDGFRα signaling and growth in human and mouse malignant glioma

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Joanna J.; Huillard, Emmanuelle; Robinson, Aaron E.; Ward, Anna; Lum, David H.; Polley, Mei-Yin; Rosen, Steven D.; Rowitch, David H.; Werb, Zena

    2012-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM), a uniformly lethal brain cancer, is characterized by diffuse invasion and abnormal activation of multiple receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) signaling pathways, presenting a major challenge to effective therapy. The activation of many RTK pathways is regulated by extracellular heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPG), suggesting these molecules may be effective targets in the tumor microenvironment. In this study, we demonstrated that the extracellular sulfatase, SULF2, an enzyme that regulates multiple HSPG-dependent RTK signaling pathways, was expressed in primary human GBM tumors and cell lines. Knockdown of SULF2 in human GBM cell lines and generation of gliomas from Sulf2–/– tumorigenic neurospheres resulted in decreased growth in vivo in mice. We found a striking SULF2 dependence in activity of PDGFRα, a major signaling pathway in GBM. Ablation of SULF2 resulted in decreased PDGFRα phosphorylation and decreased downstream MAPK signaling activity. Interestingly, in a survey of SULF2 levels in different subtypes of GBM, the proneural subtype, characterized by aberrations in PDGFRα, demonstrated the strongest SULF2 expression. Therefore, in addition to its potential as an upstream target for therapy of GBM, SULF2 may help identify a subset of GBMs that are more dependent on exogenous growth factor–mediated signaling. Our results suggest the bioavailability of growth factors from the microenvironment is a significant contributor to tumor growth in a major subset of human GBM. PMID:22293178

  1. The PD-1/B7-H1 Pathway Modulates the Natural Killer Cells versus Mouse Glioma Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zong, Wen Jing; Yu, Chun Jiang; Li, Jun Fa; Qu, Yan Ming; Han, Song

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most malignant primary type of brain tumor in adults. There has been increased focus on the immunotherapies to treat GBM patients, the therapeutic value of natural killer (NK) cells is still unknown. Programmed death-1 (PD-1) is a major immunological checkpoint that can negatively regulate the T-cell-mediated immune response. We tested the combination of the inhibiting the PD-1/B7H1 pathway with a NK-cell mediated immune response in an orthotopic mouse model of GBM. Methods and Materials Mouse glioma stem cells (GL261GSCs) and mouse NK cells were isolated and identified. A lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assay was perfomed to detect the cytotoxicity of NK cells against GL261GSCs. GL261GSCs were intracranially implanted into mice, and the mice were stratified into 3 treatment groups: 1) control, 2) NK cells treatment, and 3) PD-1 inhibited NK cells treatment group. Overall survival was quantified, and animal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed to determine tumor growth. The brains were harvested after the mice were euthanized, and immunohistochemistry against CD45 and PCNA was performed. Results The mouse NK cells were identified as 90% CD3- NK1.1+CD335+ by flow cytometric analysis. In the LDH assay, the ratios of the damaged GL261GSCs, with the E:T ratios of 2.5:1, 5:1, and 10:1, were as follows: 1) non-inhibited group: 7.42%, 11.31%, and 15.1%, 2) B7H1 inhibited group: 14.75%, 18.25% and 29.1%, 3) PD-1 inhibited group: 15.53%, 19.21% and 29.93%, 4) double inhibited group: 33.24%, 42.86% and 54.91%. In the in vivo experiments, the mice in the PD-1 inhibited NK cells treatment group and IL-2-stimulated-NK cells treatment group displayed a slowest tumor growth (F = 308.5, P<0.01) and a slower tumor growth compared with control group (F = 118.9, P<0.01), respectively. The median survival of the mice in the three groups were as follows: 1) conrol group: 29 days, 2) NK cells treatment group: 35 days (P = 0.0012), 3) PD

  2. ET-06PRECLINICAL TESTING OF THE HISTONE DEACETYLASE INHIBITOR, PANOBINOSTAT, IN A GENETICALLY ENGINEERED DIFFUSE INTRINSIC PONTINE GLIOMA MOUSE MODEL

    PubMed Central

    Barton, Kelly; Misuraca, Katie; Becher, Oren

    2014-01-01

    Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Glioma (DIPG) is a type of incurable pediatric brain tumor with a dismal outcome. With overall survival of less than one year, and no therapeutic advancements over the last three decades, gaining a better understanding of how to treat these deadly tumors is crucial. Recent genomic analysis has revealed that nearly 80% of DIPGS harbor a K27M mutation in histone H3.3 (K27M H3.3) or histone H3.1 (K27M H3.1). In an effort to elucidate novel therapeutics to treat DIPG, we examined Panobinostat, a potent pan-histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi) currently in clinical trials for a variety of different cancers. HDACi are a promising new class of agents known to have multiple target effects. Panobinostat targets HDACs in Classes I, II and IV and can cause disruption of genes involved in cell cycle control, apoptosis, DNA damage repair, and differentiation. To determine the effect of Panobinostat on DIPG, we utilized cell lines derived from a genetically engineered DIPG mouse model driven by PDGF-B overexpression, p53 loss, and either K27M or WT H3.3. Our results indicate that Panobinostat is highly effective at low nanomolar concentrations (<50nM), decreasing proliferation and viability, and increasing apoptosis in a dose dependent manner. Furthermore, utilizing isogenic lines we found the sensitivity of DIPG cells to Panobinostat to be independent of their H3.3 mutational status and that both K27M H3.3 and WT H3.3 lines were equally susceptible to treatment. In conclusion, murine DIPG cell lines, both with and without the K27M H3.3 mutation, show high sensitivity to Panobinostat in vitro. We are currently investigating its efficacy in vivo with hopes of translation to the clinic as a new therapeutic avenue for DIPG.

  3. Human, mouse or rat? Species authentication of glioma-derived cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Higgins, Samantha C; Steingrimsdottir, Hedda; Pilkington, Geoffrey J

    2010-12-15

    Cell culture and the use of cell lines are often fundamental requirements in basic scientific research. It is of the utmost importance for researchers to ensure that the cell lines in use have a well defined origin and are routinely re-analysed to highlight possible areas of contamination. In this preliminary study species specific primers were designed to easily distinguish between human, mouse and rat DNA with standard agarose gel electrophoresis. Inter-species contamination is often the most common form of contamination experienced, with the most common of cell lines in use being of human, mouse and rat derivation. A PCR-based assay was therefore developed to ensure an accurate, quick and cost effective means of determining any cell line contamination which could be easily executed on a routine basis. Furthermore, this simple PCR is able to identify the species in the inter-species mixture of DNA and therefore provides a valuable tool for the authentication of human cell lines. PMID:20951163

  4. MicroRNA-Attenuated Clone of Virulent Semliki Forest Virus Overcomes Antiviral Type I Interferon in Resistant Mouse CT-2A Glioma

    PubMed Central

    Martikainen, Miika; Niittykoski, Minna; von und zu Fraunberg, Mikael; Immonen, Arto; Koponen, Susanna; van Geenen, Maartje; Vähä-Koskela, Markus; Ylösmäki, Erkko; Jääskeläinen, Juha E.; Saksela, Kalle

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Glioblastoma is a terminal disease with no effective treatment currently available. Among the new therapy candidates are oncolytic viruses capable of selectively replicating in cancer cells, causing tumor lysis and inducing adaptive immune responses against the tumor. However, tumor antiviral responses, primarily mediated by type I interferon (IFN-I), remain a key problem that severely restricts viral replication and oncolysis. We show here that the Semliki Forest virus (SFV) strain SFV4, which causes lethal encephalitis in mice, is able to infect and replicate independent of the IFN-I defense in mouse glioblastoma cells and cell lines originating from primary human glioblastoma patient samples. The ability to tolerate IFN-I was retained in SFV4-miRT124 cells, a derivative cell line of strain SFV4 with a restricted capacity to replicate in neurons due to insertion of target sites for neuronal microRNA 124. The IFN-I tolerance was associated with the viral nsp3-nsp4 gene region and distinct from the genetic loci responsible for SFV neurovirulence. In contrast to the naturally attenuated strain SFV A7(74) and its derivatives, SFV4-miRT124 displayed increased oncolytic potency in CT-2A murine astrocytoma cells and in the human glioblastoma cell lines pretreated with IFN-I. Following a single intraperitoneal injection of SFV4-miRT124 into C57BL/6 mice bearing CT-2A orthotopic gliomas, the virus homed to the brain and was amplified in the tumor, resulting in significant tumor growth inhibition and improved survival. IMPORTANCE Although progress has been made in development of replicative oncolytic viruses, information regarding their overall therapeutic potency in a clinical setting is still lacking. This could be at least partially dependent on the IFN-I sensitivity of the viruses used. Here, we show that the conditionally replicating SFV4-miRT124 virus shares the IFN-I tolerance of the pathogenic wild-type SFV, thereby allowing efficient targeting of a glioma

  5. hMSC-mediated Concurrent Delivery of Endostatin and Carboxylesterase to Mouse Xenografts Suppresses Glioma Initiation and Recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Jinlong; Kim, Jun-Kyum; Moon, Jai-Hee; Beck, Samuel; Piao, Dachuan; Jin, Xun; Kim, Sung-Hak; Lim, Young Chang; Nam, Do-Hyun; You, Seungkwon; Kim, Hyunggee; Choi, Yun-Jaie

    2011-01-01

    Glioma stem cells (GSCs) are known to be maintained within a “vascular niche” thereby, disruption of this microenvironment using antiangiogenesis agents is a promising therapeutic modality. However, this regimen leads to treatment failure and tumor recurrence in patients with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). Therefore, more effective therapeutic approaches that can eradicate GSCs and the bulk tumors are needed. Toward this goal, we examined the antitumor effects of an antiangiogenesis approach combined with conventional chemotherapy on suppressing glioma xenograft growth. We established three genetically engineered mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) lines (GE-AF-MSCs) by stably transducing the gene encoding endostatin (an antiangiogenesis factor), the gene encoding secretable form of carboxylesterase 2 (sCE2, a prodrug-activating enzyme), or a mixture of both genes. Among the three GE-AF-MSC cell lines, injection of amniotic fluid (AF)-MSCs-endostatin-sCE2 cells into U87MG-EGFRvIII-driven orthotopic brain tumor and postsurgery tumor recurrence models, and subsequent CPT11 treatment yielded the strongest antitumor responses, including diminished angiogenesis, increased cell death, and a reduced Nestin-positive GSC population. Therefore, our antitumor strategy provides a novel basis for designing stem cell-mediated therapeutic approaches to target and eradicate GSCs and the bulk tumors. PMID:21386822

  6. Fructus ligustri lucidi extracts induce human glioma cell death through regulation of Akt/mTOR pathway in vitro and reduce glioma tumor growth in U87MG xenograft mouse model.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Ji Cheon; Kim, Jin Won; Kwon, Chae Hwa; Kim, Thae Hyun; Kim, Yong Keun

    2011-03-01

    The present study was undertaken to examine the effect of Fructus ligustri lucidi (FLL) extracts on glioma cell growth and to determine the underlying mechanism by which FLL extracts exert anticancer properties in human U87MG glioma cells. The FLL extracts resulted in cell death in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Western blot analysis showed that treatment with FLL extracts caused down-regulation of the phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3K)/Akt pathway. Overexpression of Akt prevented the cell death induced by the FLL extracts. The FLL extracts caused a decrease in the expression of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and the FLL extract-induced cell death was increased by the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin. The FLL extracts decreased the expression of survivin. Oral administration of FLL extracts in subcutaneous U87MG xenograft models reduced the glioma tumor volume. These findings indicate that the FLL extracts resulted in glioma cell death through regulation of the Akt/mTOR/survivin pathway in vitro and inhibited glioma tumor growth in vivo. These data suggest that the FLL extracts may serve as a potential therapeutic agent for malignant human gliomas. PMID:20737659

  7. Optic glioma

    MedlinePlus

    ... et al. Optic Glioma in Children: A Retrospective Analysis of 101 Cases. American Journal of Clinical Oncology. 2013; 36(3):287-292. Karcioglu ZA, Haik BG. Eye, orbit, and adnexal structures. In: Abeloff MD, Armitage JO, ...

  8. Pharmacological Doses of Daily Ascorbate Protect Tumors from Radiation Damage after a Single Dose of Radiation in an Intracranial Mouse Glioma Model

    PubMed Central

    Grasso, Carole; Fabre, Marie-Sophie; Collis, Sarah V.; Castro, M. Leticia; Field, Cameron S.; Schleich, Nanette; McConnell, Melanie J.; Herst, Patries M.

    2014-01-01

    Pharmacological ascorbate is currently used as an anti-cancer treatment, potentially in combination with radiation therapy, by integrative medicine practitioners. In the acidic, metal-rich tumor environment, ascorbate acts as a pro-oxidant, with a mode of action similar to that of ionizing radiation; both treatments kill cells predominantly by free radical-mediated DNA damage. The brain tumor, glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), is very resistant to radiation; radiosensitizing GBM cells will improve survival of GBM patients. Here, we demonstrate that a single fraction (6 Gy) of radiation combined with a 1 h exposure to ascorbate (5 mM) sensitized murine glioma GL261 cells to radiation in survival and colony-forming assays in vitro. In addition, we report the effect of a single fraction (4.5 Gy) of whole brain radiation combined with daily intraperitoneal injections of ascorbate (1 mg/kg) in an intracranial GL261 glioma mouse model. Tumor-bearing C57BL/6 mice were divided into four groups: one group received a single dose of 4.5 Gy to the brain 8 days after tumor implantation, a second group received daily intraperitoneal injections of ascorbate (day 8–45) after implantation, a third group received both treatments and a fourth control group received no treatment. While radiation delayed tumor progression, intraperitoneal ascorbate alone had no effect on tumor progression. Tumor progression was faster in tumor-bearing mice treated with radiation and daily ascorbate than in those treated with radiation alone. Histological analysis showed less necrosis in tumors treated with both radiation and ascorbate, consistent with a radio-protective effect of ascorbate in vivo. Discrepancies between our in vitro and in vivo results may be explained by differences in the tumor microenvironment, which determines whether ascorbate remains outside the cell, acting as a pro-oxidant, or whether it enters the cells and acts as an anti-oxidant. PMID:25566497

  9. Membrane current responses of NG108-15 mouse neuroblastoma x rat glioma hybrid cells to bradykinin.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, D A; Higashida, H

    1988-01-01

    1. Membrane current responses to focal application of bradykinin (BK) were recorded in voltage-clamped NG108-15 neuroblastoma x glioma hybrid cells. 2. BK produced sequential outward and inward currents at clamp potentials between -60 and -30 mV, designated IBK(out) and IBK(in), respectively. 3. The outward current IBK(out) was accompanied by an increased membrane conductance. Ramp current-voltage (I-V) curves yielded a reversal potential (VBK) of -80 +/- 5.6 mV (mean +/- S.D., n = 9) in 5.4 mM [K+]o. VBK showed a positive shift on raising [K+]o, compatible with a primary increase in K+ conductance. Subtracted I-V curves indicated that the underlying conductance was not strongly voltage dependent between -120 and -40 mV. 4. IBK(out) was inhibited by d-tubocurarine (dTC, 0.1-0.5 mM) but was insensitive to tetraethylammonium (TEA) below 5 mM. 5. The inward current IBK(in) was accompanied by a fall in membrane conductance. This was associated with the inhibition of a time- and voltage-dependent K+ current, IM. In consequence, IBK(in) was strongly voltage dependent and dissipated, usually without reversal, on hyperpolarizing the cell beyond -70 mV in 5.4 mM [K+]o. Reversal to an outward current negative to -40 mV could be obtained on raising [K+]o to 54 mM. 5. Both IBK(in) and IBK(out) persisted when ICa was blocked with Co2+ or Cd2+. IBK(out) slowly diminished in Ca2+-free, Mg2+-substituted solution. 6. The Ca2+ spike current ICa and the Ca2+-activated K+ current IAHP were inhibited during IBK(out) or after Ca2+ injections. BK did not affect the voltage-activated K+ current IK(V) recorded in Co2+ solution. 7. It is concluded that the dual response to BK results from opposing effects on two different species of K+ current. IBK(out) results from activation of a Ca2+-dependent, voltage-insensitive K+ conductance, probably mediated by a transient rise in intracellular Ca2+. It is suggested that the Ca2+ is released from an intracellular store. IBK(in) results primarily

  10. A High-Throughput In Vitro Drug Screen in a Genetically Engineered Mouse Model of Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Glioma Identifies BMS-754807 as a Promising Therapeutic Agent

    PubMed Central

    Halvorson, Kyle G.; Barton, Kelly L.; Schroeder, Kristin; Misuraca, Katherine L.; Hoeman, Christine; Chung, Alex; Crabtree, Donna M.; Cordero, Francisco J.; Singh, Raj; Spasojevic, Ivan; Berlow, Noah; Pal, Ranadip; Becher, Oren J.

    2015-01-01

    Diffuse intrinsic pontine gliomas (DIPGs) represent a particularly lethal type of pediatric brain cancer with no effective therapeutic options. Our laboratory has previously reported the development of genetically engineered DIPG mouse models using the RCAS/tv-a system, including a model driven by PDGF-B, H3.3K27M, and p53 loss. These models can serve as a platform in which to test novel therapeutics prior to the initiation of human clinical trials. In this study, an in vitro high-throughput drug screen as part of the DIPG preclinical consortium using cell-lines derived from our DIPG models identified BMS-754807 as a drug of interest in DIPG. BMS-754807 is a potent and reversible small molecule multi-kinase inhibitor with many targets including IGF-1R, IR, MET, TRKA, TRKB, AURKA, AURKB. In vitro evaluation showed significant cytotoxic effects with an IC50 of 0.13 μM, significant inhibition of proliferation at a concentration of 1.5 μM, as well as inhibition of AKT activation. Interestingly, IGF-1R signaling was absent in serum-free cultures from the PDGF-B; H3.3K27M; p53 deficient model suggesting that the antitumor activity of BMS-754807 in this model is independent of IGF-1R. In vivo, systemic administration of BMS-754807 to DIPG-bearing mice did not prolong survival. Pharmacokinetic analysis demonstrated that tumor tissue drug concentrations of BMS-754807 were well below the identified IC50, suggesting that inadequate drug delivery may limit in vivo efficacy. In summary, an unbiased in vitro drug screen identified BMS-754807 as a potential therapeutic agent in DIPG, but BMS-754807 treatment in vivo by systemic delivery did not significantly prolong survival of DIPG-bearing mice. PMID:25748921

  11. Susceptibility of RDM4 lymphoma cells to LAK-mediated lysis is decreased in tumor bearers fed fish oil high fat regimen.

    PubMed

    el Ayachi, N; Begin, M; Mercier, D; Ells, G; Oth, D

    1990-03-01

    RDM4 lymphoma cells were grown intraperitoneally in genetically compatible AKR mice fed either regular mouse chow, or diet supplemented with either saturated fat (hydrogenated beef tallow = HBT) or unsaturated fat (fish oil = FO). It was observed that the lymphoma cells number was significantly greater in FO-fed hosts and lower in HBT-fed hosts, than in the mice fed regular chow. The tumor bearers diet did not dramatically influence the rate of DNA synthesis of RDM4 cells, as measured by [3H]thymidine uptake in culture, a few hours after harvesting from the peritoneal cavity. It was repeatedly found that FO feeding of the tumor bearers elicited an increased resistance of RDM4 cells to lysis by LAK effectors, as appraised in vitro by 51Cr release test and in vivo by the "Winn assay". Different FO percentage of the diet (16%, 8%, 4%) resulted in comparable reduction of susceptibility of RDM4 cells to lysis by LAK effectors. Lipid analysis showed that RDM4 cells grown in mice fed FO diet or HBT diet differed markedly in their fatty acid composition and that their resistance to lysis by LAK cells correlated with the quantity of oxidizable fatty acids especially of the n-6 type. PMID:2317783

  12. MEF promotes stemness in the pathogenesis of gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Bazzoli, Elena; Pulvirenti, Teodoro; Oberstadt, Moritz C.; Perna, Fabiana; Wee, Boyoung; Schultz, Nikolaus; Huse, Jason T.; Fomchenko, Elena I.; Voza, Francesca; Tabar, Viviane; Brennan, Cameron W.; DeAngelis, Lisa M.; Nimer, Stephen D.; Holland, Eric C.; Squatrito, Massimo

    2013-01-01

    Summary High-grade gliomas are aggressive and uniformly fatal tumors, composed of a heterogeneous population of cells that include many with stem cell-like properties. The acquisition of stem-like traits might contribute to glioma initiation, growth and recurrence. Here we investigated the role of the transcription factor myeloid Elf-1 like factor (MEF, also known as ELF4) in glioma. We found that MEF is highly expressed in both human and mouse GBMs and its absence impairs gliomagenesis in a PDGF-driven glioma mouse model. We show that modulation of MEF levels in both mouse neural stem cells and human glioblastoma cells, has a significant impact on neurosphere formation. Moreover, we identify Sox2 as a direct downstream target of MEF. Taken together, our studies implicate MEF as a previously unrecognized gatekeeper gene in gliomagenesis by promoting stem cell characteristics through Sox2 activation. PMID:23217424

  13. IDH1 Mutation in Gliomas in Mosul City - Iraq

    PubMed Central

    Saeed, Mohammed Sami

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: IDH1 (isocitrate dehydrogenase 1) mutation might be encounter in the low grade glioma and directs the progression of the tumor to a higher grade. OBJECTIVE: To assess the frequency of IDH1 mutations in gliomas and to correlate the IDH1 positivity with the type and grade of tumors, the age and sex of the patients. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A retro– and prospective case series study. One hundred and nine cases of intracranial gliomas were collected between 2008 and 2014 from Mosul Private Laboratories and Al-Jamboree Teaching Hospitals in Mosul. IDH1 mutations were assessed immunohistochemically using anti-IDH1 R132H mouse monoclonal antibody. RESULTS: IDH1 mutation was perceived in 34.86% of gliomas. In adult gliomas, the secondary glioblastoma and the low-grade astrocytoma had the greatest values of IDH1 positivity (88.88% and 62.5% respectively), followed by oligoastrocytoma/oligodendroglioma (50.0%), and anaplastic astrocytoma (47.36%). The primary glioblastomsa showed 17.64% IDH1 positivity. Males and females expressed the IDH1 equally. While, there was no role of IDH1 in pediatric gliomas. CONCLUSION: IDH1 mutation is commonly present in adult gliomas particularly in low-grade gliomas, and secondary glioblastoma, with equal sex distribution, but it has no role in pediatric gliomas.

  14. Tumor location, but not H3.3K27M, significantly influences the blood-brain-barrier permeability in a genetic mouse model of pediatric high-grade glioma.

    PubMed

    Subashi, Ergys; Cordero, Francisco J; Halvorson, Kyle G; Qi, Yi; Nouls, John C; Becher, Oren J; Johnson, G Allan

    2016-01-01

    Pediatric high-grade gliomas (pHGGs) occur with strikingly different frequencies in infratentorial and supratentorial regions. Although histologically these malignancies appear similar, they represent distinct diseases. Recent genomic studies have identified histone K27M H3.3/H3.1 mutations in the majority of brainstem pHGGs; these mutations are rarely encountered in pHGGs that arise in the cerebral cortex. Previous research in brainstem pHGGs suggests a restricted permeability of the blood-brain-barrier (BBB). In this work, we use dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI to evaluate BBB permeability in a genetic mouse model of pHGG as a function of location (cortex vs. brainstem, n = 8 mice/group) and histone mutation (mutant H3.3K27M vs. wild-type H3.3, n = 8 mice/group). The pHGG models are induced either in the brainstem or the cerebral cortex and are driven by PDGF signaling and p53 loss with either H3.3K27M or wild-type H3.3. T2-weighted MRI was used to determine tumor location/extent followed by 4D DCE-MRI for estimating the rate constant (K (trans) ) for tracer exchange across the barrier. BBB permeability was 67 % higher in cortical pHGGs relative to brainstem pHGGs (t test, p = 0.012) but was not significantly affected by the expression of mutant H3.3K27M versus wild-type H3.3 (t-test, p = 0.78). Although mice became symptomatic at approximately the same time, the mean volume of cortical tumors was 3.6 times higher than the mean volume of brainstem tumors. The difference between the mean volume of gliomas with wild-type and mutant H3.3 was insignificant. Mean K (trans) was significantly correlated to glioma volume. These results present a possible explanation for the poor response of brainstem pHGGs to systemic therapy. Our findings illustrate a potential role played by the microenvironment in shaping tumor growth and BBB permeability. PMID:26511492

  15. Antitumor activity of (R,R')-4-methoxy-1-naphthylfenoterol in a rat C6 glioma xenograft model in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Bernier, Michel; Paul, Rajib K; Dossou, Katina S S; Wnorowski, Artur; Ramamoorthy, Anuradha; Paris, Arnaud; Moaddel, Ruin; Cloix, Jean-François; Wainer, Irving W

    2013-12-01

    (R,R')-4-methoxy-1-naphthylfenoterol (MNF) inhibits cancer cell proliferation in vitro through cell-type specific modulation of β2-adrenergic receptor and/or cannabinoid receptor function. Here, we report an investigation into antitumor activity of MNF in rat C6 glioma cells. The potent antiproliferative action of MNF in these cells (IC50 of ∼1 nmol/L) was refractory to pharmacological inhibition of β2-adrenergic receptor while a synthetic inverse agonist of cannabinoid receptor 1 significantly blocked MNF activity. The antitumor activity of MNF was then assessed in a C6 glioblastoma xenograft model in mice. Three days after subcutaneous implantation of C6 cells into the lower flank of nude mice, these animals were subjected to i.p. injections of saline or MNF (2 mg/kg) for 19 days and tumor volumes were measured over the course of the experiment. Gene expression analysis, quantitative RT-PCR and immunoblot assays were performed on the tumors after treatment. Significant reduction in mean tumor volumes was observed in mice receiving MNF when compared with the saline-treated group. We identified clusters in expression of genes involved in cellular proliferation, as well as molecular markers for glioblastoma that were significantly downregulated in tumors of MNF-treated mice as compared to saline-injected controls. The efficacy of MNF against C6 glioma cell proliferation in vivo and in vitro was accompanied by marked reduction in the expression of cell cycle regulator proteins. This study is the first demonstration of MNF-dependent chemoprevention of a glioblastoma xenograft model and may offer a potential mechanism for its anticancer action in vivo. PMID:25505565

  16. 31 CFR 306.27 - Redemption of bearer securities at maturity, upon prior call, or for advance refunding or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... maturity, upon prior call, or for advance refunding or prerefunding. 306.27 Section 306.27 Money and... § 306.27 Redemption of bearer securities at maturity, upon prior call, or for advance refunding or prerefunding. All interest coupons due and payable on or before the date of maturity or date fixed in the...

  17. Glioma associated microglial MMP9 expression is up regulated by TLR2 signalling and sensitive to minocycline

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Feng; Ku, Min-Chi; Markovic, Darko; Dzaye, Omar Dildar a; Lehnardt, Seija; Synowitz, Michael; Wolf, Susanne A.; Kettenmann, Helmut

    2014-01-01

    The invasiveness of malignant gliomas is one of the major obstacles in glioma therapy and the reason for the poor survival of patients. Glioma cells infiltrate into the brain parenchyma and thereby escape surgical resection. Glioma associated microglia/macrophages support glioma infiltration into the brain parenchyma by increased expression and activation of extracellular matrix degrading proteases such as matrix-metalloprotease 2, matrix-metalloprotease 9 and membrane-type 1 matrix metalloprotease. In this work we demonstrate that, matrix-metalloprotease 9 is predominantly expressed by glioma associated microglia/macrophages in mouse and human glioma tissue but not by the glioma cells. Supernatant from glioma cells induced the expression of matrix-metalloprotease 9 in cultured microglial cells. Using mice deficient for different Toll-like receptors we identified Toll-like receptor 2/6 as the signalling pathway for the glioma induced upregulation of microglial matrix-metalloprotease 9. Also in an experimental mouse glioma model, Toll-like receptor 2 deficiency attenuated the upregulation of microglial matrix-metalloprotease 9. Moreover, glioma supernatant triggered an upregulation of Toll-like receptor 2 expression in microglia. Both, the upregulation of matrix-metalloprotease 9 and Toll-like receptor 2 were attenuated by the antibiotic minocycline and a p38 mitogen activated protein kinase antagonist in vitro. Minocycline also extended the survival rate of glioma bearing mice when given to the drinking water. Thus glioma cells change the phenotype of glioma associated microglia/macrophages in a complex fashion using Toll-like receptor 2 as an important signalling pathway and minocycline further proved to be a potential candidate for adjuvant glioma therapy. PMID:24752463

  18. Genetic epidemiology of glioma.

    PubMed

    Malmer, B; Iselius, L; Holmberg, E; Collins, A; Henriksson, R; Grönberg, H

    2001-02-01

    The present study performed a segregation analysis of a cohort of first-degree relatives (FDR) of glioma patients. The families with two or more gliomas were also expanded to determine if any more gliomas could be detected, and if any other types of cancers were associated. These glioma-prone families (n = 24/432) were extended to include first-, second- and third-degree relatives (n = 807) and a cohort was assembled, the standardized incidence risk for other types of cancer calculated and the pedigrees investigated for a possible mode of inheritance. A segregation analysis of the 2141 FDR in 297 families, performed using the Pointer software, did not clearly reject a multifactorial model chi(2)(3) = 6.13, P< 0.2. However, when letting all parameters be free, the recessive model provided the best fit. In the extended families, no increased risk of other types of cancer was found. This population-based study proposes that familial glioma occurs in about 5% of all glioma cases and that 1% have a possible autosomal dominant inheritance. This first segregation analysis performed in familial glioma must be cautiously interpreted, but an autosomal recessive gene provided the best fit, which could possibly explain 2% of all glioma cases. PMID:11161412

  19. Adult Brainstem Gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Reyes-Botero, German; Mokhtari, Karima; Martin-Duverneuil, Nadine; Delattre, Jean-Yves

    2012-01-01

    Brainstem gliomas are uncommon in adults and account for only 1%–2% of intracranial gliomas. They represent a heterogeneous group of tumors that differ from those found in their pediatric counterparts. In adults, a low-grade phenotype predominates, which is a feature that likely explains their better prognosis compared to that in children. Because biopsies are rarely performed, classifications based on the radiological aspect of magnetic resonance imaging results have been proposed to establish treatment strategies and to determine outcomes: (a) diffuse intrinsic low-grade, (b) enhancing malignant glioma, (c) focal tectal gliomas, and (d) exophytic gliomas. Despite significant advances in neuroradiology techniques, a purely radiological classification remains imperfect in the absence of a histological diagnosis. Whereas a biopsy may often be reasonably avoided in the diffuse nonenhancing forms, obtaining histological proof seems necessary in many contrast-enhanced brainstem lesions because of the wide variety of differential diagnoses in adults. Conventional radiotherapy is the standard treatment for diffuse intrinsic low-grade brainstem gliomas in adults (the median survival is 5 years). In malignant brainstem gliomas, radiotherapy is the standard treatment. However, the possible benefit of combined radiotherapy and chemotherapy (temozolomide or other agents) has not been thoroughly evaluated in adults. The role of anti-angiogenic therapies in brainstem gliomas remains to be defined. A better understanding of the biology of these tumors is of primary importance for identifying homogeneous subgroups and for improving therapy options and outcomes. PMID:22382458

  20. Bearer channel control protocol for the dynamic VB5.2 interface in ATM access networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fragoulopoulos, Stratos K.; Mavrommatis, K. I.; Venieris, Iakovos S.

    1996-12-01

    In the multi-vendor systems, a customer connected to an Access network (AN) must be capable of selecting a specific Service Node (SN) according to the services the SN provides. The multiplicity of technologically varying AN calls for the definition of a standard reference point between the AN and the SN widely known as the VB interface. Two versions are currently offered. The VB5.1 is simpler to implement but is not as flexible as the VB5.2, which supports switched connections. The VB5.2 functionality is closely coupled to the Broadband Bearer Channel Connection Protocol (B-BCCP). The B-BCCP is used for conveying the necessary information for dynamic resource allocation, traffic policing and routing in the AN as well as for information exchange concerning the status of the AN before a new call is established by the SN. By relying on such a protocol for the exchange of information instead of intercepting and interpreting signalling messages in the AN, the architecture of the AN is simplified because the functionality related to processing is not duplicated. In this paper a prominent B- BCCP candidate is defined, called the Service node Access network Interaction Protocol.

  1. Silencing of R-Spondin1 increases radiosensitivity of glioma cells

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Guoda; Cui, Lili; Li, You; Zhou, Haihong; Liang, Wandong; Zhao, Bin; Li, Keshen

    2015-01-01

    Although radiation therapy is the most effective postoperative adjuvant treatment, it does not substantially improve the long-term outcomes of glioma patients because of the characteristic radioresistance of glioma. We found that R-Spondin1 (Rspo1) expression was elevated in high-grade gliomas and was associated with worse overall survival and disease-free survival. Rspo1 expression was also associated with reduced survival rates in glioma patients after treatment with radiotherapy and temozolomide (RT-TMZ). Importantly, Rspo1 was dramatically upregulated after radiation treatment in patients with glioma. Rspo1 silencing by shRNA potentiated glioma cell death upon radiation treatment. In a xenograft nude mouse model, combining radiation and silencing of Rspo1 potentiated tumor growth inhibition. Thus, combining radiotherapy with silencing of Rspo1 is a potential therapeutic approach. PMID:25865226

  2. Genetic modeling of gliomas in mice: new tools to tackle old problems

    PubMed Central

    Hambardzumyan, Dolores; Parada, Luis F.; Holland, Eric C.; Charest, Al

    2011-01-01

    The recently published comprehensive profiles of genomic alterations in glioma have led to a refinement in our understanding of the molecular events that underlie this cancer. Using state-of-the-art genomic tools, several laboratories have created and characterized accurate genetically engineered mouse models of glioma based on specific genetic alterations observed in human tumors. These in vivo brain tumor models faithfully recapitulate the histopathology, etiology, and biology of gliomas and provide an exceptional experimental system to discover novel therapeutic targets and test therapeutic agents. This review focuses on mouse models of glioma with a special emphasis on genetically engineered models developed around key genetic glioma signature mutations in the PDGFR, EGFR and NF1 genes and pathways. The resulting animal models have provided insight into many fundamental and mechanistic facets of tumor initiation, maintenance and resistance to therapeutic intervention and will continue to do so in the future. PMID:21305617

  3. Histologic classification of gliomas.

    PubMed

    Perry, Arie; Wesseling, Pieter

    2016-01-01

    Gliomas form a heterogeneous group of tumors of the central nervous system (CNS) and are traditionally classified based on histologic type and malignancy grade. Most gliomas, the diffuse gliomas, show extensive infiltration in the CNS parenchyma. Diffuse gliomas can be further typed as astrocytic, oligodendroglial, or rare mixed oligodendroglial-astrocytic of World Health Organization (WHO) grade II (low grade), III (anaplastic), or IV (glioblastoma). Other gliomas generally have a more circumscribed growth pattern, with pilocytic astrocytomas (WHO grade I) and ependymal tumors (WHO grade I, II, or III) as the most frequent representatives. This chapter provides an overview of the histology of all glial neoplasms listed in the WHO 2016 classification, including the less frequent "nondiffuse" gliomas and mixed neuronal-glial tumors. For multiple decades the histologic diagnosis of these tumors formed a useful basis for assessment of prognosis and therapeutic management. However, it is now fully clear that information on the molecular underpinnings often allows for a more robust classification of (glial) neoplasms. Indeed, in the WHO 2016 classification, histologic and molecular findings are integrated in the definition of several gliomas. As such, this chapter and Chapter 6 are highly interrelated and neither should be considered in isolation. PMID:26948349

  4. A mismatch between the perceived fighting signal and fighting ability reveals survival and physiological costs for bearers.

    PubMed

    González-Santoyo, Isaac; González-Tokman, Daniel M; Munguía-Steyer, Roberto E; Córdoba-Aguilar, Alex

    2014-01-01

    Signals of fighting indicate an animal's intention to attack and so they serve to prevent costly aggressive encounters. However, according to theory, a signal that is different in design (i.e. a novel signal) but that fails to inform fighting intentions will result in negative fitness consequences for the bearer. In the present study we used males of the territorial damselfly Hetaerina americana, which have a red wing spot during territory defense that has evolved as a signal of fighting ability. By producing a novel signal (covering the red spot with blue ink) in territory owners, we investigated: a) the behavioral responses by conspecific males; b) survival cost and c) three physiological mediators of impaired survival: muscular fat reserves, muscle mass and immune ability. We predicted that males with the novel signal would be attacked more often by conspecifics as the former would fail to convey fighting ability and intentions adequately. This will result in lower survival and physiological condition for the novel signal bearers. We found that, compared to control males (males whose red spot was not changed), experimental males had reduced survival, were less able to hold a territory, and had a reduced muscle mass. It seems that spot modified males were not able to effectively communicate their territory tenancy, which may explain why they lost their defended sites. Our results provide support for theoretical models that a novel signal that fails to informing fighting ability may lead to a fitness cost for bearers. PMID:24409304

  5. A Mismatch between the Perceived Fighting Signal and Fighting Ability Reveals Survival and Physiological Costs for Bearers

    PubMed Central

    González-Santoyo, Isaac; González-Tokman, Daniel M.; Munguía-Steyer, Roberto E.; Córdoba-Aguilar, Alex

    2014-01-01

    Signals of fighting indicate an animal's intention to attack and so they serve to prevent costly aggressive encounters. However, according to theory, a signal that is different in design (i.e. a novel signal) but that fails to inform fighting intentions will result in negative fitness consequences for the bearer. In the present study we used males of the territorial damselfly Hetaerina americana, which have a red wing spot during territory defense that has evolved as a signal of fighting ability. By producing a novel signal (covering the red spot with blue ink) in territory owners, we investigated: a) the behavioral responses by conspecific males; b) survival cost and c) three physiological mediators of impaired survival: muscular fat reserves, muscle mass and immune ability. We predicted that males with the novel signal would be attacked more often by conspecifics as the former would fail to convey fighting ability and intentions adequately. This will result in lower survival and physiological condition for the novel signal bearers. We found that, compared to control males (males whose red spot was not changed), experimental males had reduced survival, were less able to hold a territory, and had a reduced muscle mass. It seems that spot modified males were not able to effectively communicate their territory tenancy, which may explain why they lost their defended sites. Our results provide support for theoretical models that a novel signal that fails to informing fighting ability may lead to a fitness cost for bearers. PMID:24409304

  6. Brainstem Glioma in Adults

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Jethro; Western, Stephen; Kesari, Santosh

    2016-01-01

    Brainstem gliomas are not nearly as common in adults as they are in children. They are likely the final common consequence not of a single disease process but of several. They can be difficult to diagnose, and are challenging to treat. Clinical studies of this diagnosis are few and generally small. Because of these factors, our understanding of the biology of adult brainstem glioma is incomplete. However, the knowledge base is growing and progress is being made. In this article, we review the current state of knowledge for brainstem glioma in adults and identify key areas for which additional information is required. PMID:27556016

  7. Glioma Stem Cells but Not Bulk Glioma Cells Upregulate IL-6 Secretion in Microglia/Brain Macrophages via Toll-like Receptor 4 Signaling.

    PubMed

    a Dzaye, Omar Dildar; Hu, Feng; Derkow, Katja; Haage, Verena; Euskirchen, Philipp; Harms, Christoph; Lehnardt, Seija; Synowitz, Michael; Wolf, Susanne A; Kettenmann, Helmut

    2016-05-01

    Peripheral macrophages and resident microglia constitute the dominant glioma-infiltrating cells. The tumor induces an immunosuppressive and tumor-supportive phenotype in these glioma-associated microglia/brain macrophages (GAMs). A subpopulation of glioma cells acts as glioma stem cells (GSCs). We explored the interaction between GSCs and GAMs. Using CD133 as a marker of stemness, we enriched for or deprived the mouse glioma cell line GL261 of GSCs by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS). Over the same period of time, 100 CD133(+ )GSCs had the capacity to form a tumor of comparable size to the ones formed by 10,000 CD133(-) GL261 cells. In IL-6(-/-) mice, only tumors formed by CD133(+ )cells were smaller compared with wild type. After stimulation of primary cultured microglia with medium from CD133-enriched GL261 glioma cells, we observed an selective upregulation in microglial IL-6 secretion dependent on Toll-like receptor (TLR) 4. Our results show that GSCs, but not the bulk glioma cells, initiate microglial IL-6 secretion via TLR4 signaling and that IL-6 regulates glioma growth by supporting GSCs. Using human glioma tissue, we could confirm the finding that GAMs are the major source of IL-6 in the tumor context. PMID:27030742

  8. Radiation-induced gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Gautam; Haas-Kogan, Daphne A.

    2013-01-01

    Radiation-induced gliomas represent a relatively rare but well-characterized entity in the neuro-oncologic literature. Extensive retrospective cohort data in pediatric populations after therapeutic intracranial radiation show a clearly increased risk in glioma incidence that is both patient age- and radiation dose/volume-dependent. Data in adults are more limited but show heightened risk in certain groups exposed to radiation. In both populations, there is no evidence linking increased risk associated with routine exposure to diagnostic radiation. At the molecular level, recent studies have found distinct genetic differences between radiation-induced gliomas and their spontaneously-occurring counterparts. Clinically, there is understandable reluctance on the part of clinicians to re-treat patients due to concern for cumulative neurotoxicity. However, available data suggest that aggressive intervention can lead to improved outcomes in patients with radiation-induced gliomas. PMID:19831840

  9. Galectins and Gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Le Mercier, Marie; Fortin, Shannon; Mathieu, Véronique; Kiss, Robert; Lefranc, Florence

    2010-01-01

    Malignant gliomas, especially glioblastomas, are associated with a dismal prognosis. Despite advances in diagnosis and treatment, glioblastoma patients still have a median survival expectancy of only 14 months. This poor prognosis can be at least partly explained by the fact that glioma cells diffusely infiltrate the brain parenchyma and exhibit decreased levels of apoptosis, and thus resistance to cytotoxic drugs. Galectins are a family of mammalian beta-galactoside-binding proteins characterized by a shared characteristic amino acid sequence. They are expressed differentially in normal vs. neoplastic tissues and are known to play important roles in several biological processes such as cell proliferation, death and migration. This review focuses on the role played by galectins, especially galectin-1 and galectin-3, in glioma biology. The involvement of these galectins in different steps of glioma malignant progression such as migration, angiogenesis or chemoresistance makes them potentially good targets for the development of new drugs to combat these malignant tumors. PMID:19371355

  10. Immunotherapeutic Approaches for Glioma

    PubMed Central

    Okada, Hideho; Kohanbash, Gary; Zhu, Xinmei; Kastenhuber, Edward R.; Hoji, Aki; Ueda, Ryo; Fujita, Mitsugu

    2009-01-01

    The development of effective immunotherapy strategies for glioma requires adequate understanding of the unique immunological microenvironment in the central nervous system (CNS) and CNS tumors. Although the CNS is often considered to be an immunologically privileged site and poses unique challenges for the delivery of effector cells and molecules, recent advances in technology and discoveries in CNS immunology suggest novel mechanisms that may significantly improve the efficacy of immunotherapy against gliomas. In this review, we first summarize recent advances in the CNS and CNS tumor immunology. We address factors that may promote immune escape of gliomas. We also review advances in passive and active immunotherapy strategies for glioma, with an emphasis on lessons learned from recent early-phase clinical trials. We also discuss novel immunotherapy strategies that have been recently tested in non-CNS tumors and show great potential for application to gliomas. Finally, we discuss how each of these promising strategies can be combined to achieve clinical benefit for patients with gliomas. PMID:19348609

  11. Malignant gliomas induce and exploit astrocytic mesenchymal-like transition by activating canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ping; Wang, Yajing; Liu, Xiuting; Wang, Hong; Zhang, Xin; Wang, Kequan; Wang, Qing; Hu, Rong

    2016-07-01

    The complex microenvironment of malignant gliomas plays a dynamic and usually cancer-promoting role in glioma progression. Astrocytes, the major stromal cells in the brain, can be activated by glioma microenvironment, resulting in a layer of reactive astrocytes surrounding the gliomas. Reactive astrocytes are universally characterized with the upregulation of glial fibrillary protein and glycoprotein podoplanin. In this work, we investigated the role of reactive astrocytes on malignant glioma microenvironment and the potential mechanism by which glioma cells activated the tumor-associated astrocytes (TAAs). The reactive astrocytes were observed around gliomas in the intracranial syngeneic implantation of rat C6 and mouse GL261 glioma cells in vivo, as well as primary astrocytes cultured with glioma cells condition medium in vitro. Besides, reactive astrocytes exhibited distinct epithelial-to-mesenchymal (-like) transition and enhanced migration and invasion activity, with the decrease of E-cadherin and concomitant increase of vimentin and matrix metalloproteinases. Furthermore, canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling was activated in TAAs. The Wnt/β-catenin pathway inhibitor XAV939 and β-catenin plasmid were used to verify the regulation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling on TAAs and their invasion ability. Taken together, our findings established that glioma cells remarkably activated astrocytes via upregulating Wnt/β-catenin signaling, with obviously mesenchymal-like transition and increased migration and invasion ability, indicating that glioma cells may stimulate adjacent astrocytes to degrade extracellular matrix and thereby promoting tumor invasiveness. PMID:27236327

  12. Microglia Activate Migration of Glioma Cells through a Pyk2 Intracellular Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Rolón-Reyes, Kimberleve; Kucheryavykh, Yuriy V.; Cubano, Luis A.; Inyushin, Mikhail; Skatchkov, Serguei N.; Eaton, Misty J.; Harrison, Jeffrey K.; Kucheryavykh, Lilia Y.

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma is one of the most aggressive and fatal brain cancers due to the highly invasive nature of glioma cells. Microglia infiltrate most glioma tumors and, therefore, make up an important component of the glioma microenvironment. In the tumor environment, microglia release factors that lead to the degradation of the extracellular matrix and stimulate signaling pathways to promote glioma cell invasion. In the present study, we demonstrated that microglia can promote glioma migration through a mechanism independent of extracellular matrix degradation. Using western blot analysis, we found upregulation of proline rich tyrosine kinase 2 (Pyk2) protein phosphorylated at Tyr579/580 in glioma cells treated with microglia conditioned medium. This upregulation occurred in rodent C6 and GL261 as well as in human glioma cell lines with varying levels of invasiveness (U-87MG, A172, and HS683). siRNA knock-down of Pyk2 protein and pharmacological blockade by the Pyk2/focal-adhesion kinase (FAK) inhibitor PF-562,271 reversed the stimulatory effect of microglia on glioma migration in all cell lines. A lower concentration of PF-562,271 that selectively inhibits FAK, but not Pyk2, did not have any effect on glioma cell migration. Moreover, with the use of the CD11b-HSVTK microglia ablation mouse model we demonstrated that elimination of microglia in the implanted tumors (GL261 glioma cells were used for brain implantation) by the local in-tumor administration of Ganciclovir, significantly reduced the phosphorylation of Pyk2 at Tyr579/580 in implanted tumor cells. Taken together, these data indicate that microglial cells activate glioma cell migration/dispersal through the pro-migratory Pyk2 signaling pathway in glioma cells. PMID:26098895

  13. Microglia Activate Migration of Glioma Cells through a Pyk2 Intracellular Pathway.

    PubMed

    Rolón-Reyes, Kimberleve; Kucheryavykh, Yuriy V; Cubano, Luis A; Inyushin, Mikhail; Skatchkov, Serguei N; Eaton, Misty J; Harrison, Jeffrey K; Kucheryavykh, Lilia Y

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma is one of the most aggressive and fatal brain cancers due to the highly invasive nature of glioma cells. Microglia infiltrate most glioma tumors and, therefore, make up an important component of the glioma microenvironment. In the tumor environment, microglia release factors that lead to the degradation of the extracellular matrix and stimulate signaling pathways to promote glioma cell invasion. In the present study, we demonstrated that microglia can promote glioma migration through a mechanism independent of extracellular matrix degradation. Using western blot analysis, we found upregulation of proline rich tyrosine kinase 2 (Pyk2) protein phosphorylated at Tyr579/580 in glioma cells treated with microglia conditioned medium. This upregulation occurred in rodent C6 and GL261 as well as in human glioma cell lines with varying levels of invasiveness (U-87MG, A172, and HS683). siRNA knock-down of Pyk2 protein and pharmacological blockade by the Pyk2/focal-adhesion kinase (FAK) inhibitor PF-562,271 reversed the stimulatory effect of microglia on glioma migration in all cell lines. A lower concentration of PF-562,271 that selectively inhibits FAK, but not Pyk2, did not have any effect on glioma cell migration. Moreover, with the use of the CD11b-HSVTK microglia ablation mouse model we demonstrated that elimination of microglia in the implanted tumors (GL261 glioma cells were used for brain implantation) by the local in-tumor administration of Ganciclovir, significantly reduced the phosphorylation of Pyk2 at Tyr579/580 in implanted tumor cells. Taken together, these data indicate that microglial cells activate glioma cell migration/dispersal through the pro-migratory Pyk2 signaling pathway in glioma cells. PMID:26098895

  14. Molecular Neuropathology of Gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Riemenschneider, Markus J.; Reifenberger, Guido

    2009-01-01

    Gliomas are the most common primary human brain tumors. They comprise a heterogeneous group of benign and malignant neoplasms that are histologically classified according to the World Health Organization (WHO) classification of tumors of the nervous system. Over the past 20 years the cytogenetic and molecular genetic alterations associated with glioma formation and progression have been intensely studied and genetic profiles as additional aids to the definition of brain tumors have been incorporated in the WHO classification. In fact, first steps have been undertaken in supplementing classical histopathological diagnosis by the use of molecular tests, such as MGMT promoter hypermethylation in glioblastomas or detection of losses of chromosome arms 1p and 19q in oligodendroglial tumors. The tremendous progress that has been made in the use of array-based profiling techniques will likely contribute to a further molecular refinement of glioma classification and lead to the identification of glioma core pathways that can be specifically targeted by more individualized glioma therapies. PMID:19333441

  15. Molecular classification of gliomas.

    PubMed

    Masui, Kenta; Mischel, Paul S; Reifenberger, Guido

    2016-01-01

    The identification of distinct genetic and epigenetic profiles in different types of gliomas has revealed novel diagnostic, prognostic, and predictive molecular biomarkers for refinement of glioma classification and improved prediction of therapy response and outcome. Therefore, the new (2016) World Health Organization (WHO) classification of tumors of the central nervous system breaks with the traditional principle of diagnosis based on histologic criteria only and incorporates molecular markers. This will involve a multilayered approach combining histologic features and molecular information in an "integrated diagnosis". We review the current state of diagnostic molecular markers for gliomas, focusing on isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 or 2 (IDH1/IDH2) gene mutation, α-thalassemia/mental retardation syndrome X-linked (ATRX) gene mutation, 1p/19q co-deletion and telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) promoter mutation in adult tumors, as well as v-raf murine sarcoma viral oncogene homolog B1 (BRAF) and H3 histone family 3A (H3F3A) aberrations in pediatric gliomas. We also outline prognostic and predictive molecular markers, including O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) promoter methylation, and discuss the potential clinical relevance of biologic glioblastoma subtypes defined by integration of multiomics data. Commonly used methods for individual marker detection as well as novel large-scale DNA methylation profiling and next-generation sequencing approaches are discussed. Finally, we illustrate how advances in molecular diagnostics affect novel strategies of targeted therapy, thereby raising new challenges and identifying new leads for personalized treatment of glioma patients. PMID:26948350

  16. A role for intracellular zinc in glioma alteration of neuronal chloride equilibrium

    PubMed Central

    Di Angelantonio, S; Murana, E; Cocco, S; Scala, F; Bertollini, C; Molinari, M G; Lauro, C; Bregestovski, P; Limatola, C; Ragozzino, D

    2014-01-01

    Glioma patients commonly suffer from epileptic seizures. However, the mechanisms of glioma-associated epilepsy are far to be completely understood. Using glioma-neurons co-cultures, we found that tumor cells are able to deeply influence neuronal chloride homeostasis, by depolarizing the reversal potential of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-evoked currents (EGABA). EGABA depolarizing shift is due to zinc-dependent reduction of neuronal KCC2 activity and requires glutamate release from glioma cells. Consistently, intracellular zinc loading rapidly depolarizes EGABA in mouse hippocampal neurons, through the Src/Trk pathway and this effect is promptly reverted upon zinc chelation. This study provides a possible molecular mechanism linking glioma invasion to excitation/inhibition imbalance and epileptic seizures, through the zinc–mediated disruption of neuronal chloride homeostasis. PMID:25356870

  17. Chlorotoxin-conjugated onconase as a potential anti-glioma drug

    PubMed Central

    WANG, XIAOMIN; GUO, ZHANYUN

    2015-01-01

    Gliomas are rarely curable malignant brain tumors arising from normal glial cells. The scorpion-derived small peptide, chlorotoxin (CTX), can selectively bind malignant gliomas. In the present study, a CTX-conjugated onconase (Onc), a small cytotoxic ribonuclease, was prepared as a potential anti-glioma drug. In this conjugate, recombinant CTX was covalently linked with recombinant Onc by reversible disulfide linkage. The chemically conjugated CTX-Onc showed much higher cytotoxicity to the cultured glioma U251 and SHG-44 cells than the physical mixture of CTX and Onc (CTX + Onc). In the nude mouse models bearing subcutaneous U251 or SHG-44 tumors, the CTX-Onc conjugate also showed improved anti-tumor effects than the CTX + Onc control. These results suggested that the reversible chemical-conjugated CTX promoted the tumor targeting of Onc, and thus the present CTX-Onc conjugate could be further developed as a potential targeted anti-glioma drug. PMID:25663909

  18. MicroRNA-544 inhibits glioma proliferation, invasion and migration but induces cell apoptosis by targeting PARK7

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Shiguang; Dai, Yan; Li, Cheng; Fang, Xiao; Han, Huijing; Wang, Daxin

    2016-01-01

    Glioma is a common type of primary brain tumor. The survival rate in people with malignant gliomas is extremely low associated with the lack of effective treatment. Here, we firstly observed that miR-544 expression is downregulated in glioma tissues and its overexpression in glioma cell line dramatically reduces cell proliferation, migration and invasion. In addition, we found that the tumor growth in nude mouse was as well inhibited by miR-544 overexpressed in glioma cell. Our further investigation showed that the inhibitor role of miR-544 in tumor development was related to the downregulated expression of Park7 gene which has been demonstrated as a functional downstream target of miR-544. Thus, our discovery suggested that miR-544 might used as a therapeutic reagent for the treatment of glioma in the future. PMID:27186306

  19. An allograft glioma model reveals the dependence of aquaporin-4 expression on the brain microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Noell, Susan; Ritz, Rainer; Wolburg-Buchholz, Karen; Wolburg, Hartwig; Fallier-Becker, Petra

    2012-01-01

    Aquaporin-4 (AQP4), the main water channel of the brain, is highly expressed in animal glioma and human glioblastoma in situ. In contrast, most cultivated glioma cell lines don't express AQP4, and primary cell cultures of human glioblastoma lose it during the first passages. Accordingly, in C6 cells and RG2 cells, two glioma cell lines of the rat, and in SMA mouse glioma cell lines, we found no AQP4 expression. We confirmed an AQP4 loss in primary human glioblastoma cell cultures after a few passages. RG-2 glioma cells if grafted into the brain developed AQP4 expression. This led us consider the possibility of AQP4 expression depends on brain microenvironment. In previous studies, we observed that the typical morphological conformation of AQP4 as orthogonal arrays of particles (OAP) depended on the extracellular matrix component agrin. In this study, we showed for the first time implanted AQP4 negative glioma cells in animal brain or flank to express AQP4 specifically in the intracerebral gliomas but neither in the extracranial nor in the flank gliomas. AQP4 expression in intracerebral gliomas went along with an OAP loss, compared to normal brain tissue. AQP4 staining in vivo normally is polarized in the astrocytic endfoot membranes at the glia limitans superficialis and perivascularis, but in C6 and RG2 tumors the AQP4 staining is redistributed over the whole glioma cell as in human glioblastoma. In contrast, primary rat or mouse astrocytes in culture did not lose their ability to express AQP4, and they were able to form few OAPs. PMID:22590566

  20. An Allograft Glioma Model Reveals the Dependence of Aquaporin-4 Expression on the Brain Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Noell, Susan; Ritz, Rainer; Wolburg-Buchholz, Karen; Wolburg, Hartwig; Fallier-Becker, Petra

    2012-01-01

    Aquaporin-4 (AQP4), the main water channel of the brain, is highly expressed in animal glioma and human glioblastoma in situ. In contrast, most cultivated glioma cell lines don’t express AQP4, and primary cell cultures of human glioblastoma lose it during the first passages. Accordingly, in C6 cells and RG2 cells, two glioma cell lines of the rat, and in SMA mouse glioma cell lines, we found no AQP4 expression. We confirmed an AQP4 loss in primary human glioblastoma cell cultures after a few passages. RG-2 glioma cells if grafted into the brain developed AQP4 expression. This led us consider the possibility of AQP4 expression depends on brain microenvironment. In previous studies, we observed that the typical morphological conformation of AQP4 as orthogonal arrays of particles (OAP) depended on the extracellular matrix component agrin. In this study, we showed for the first time implanted AQP4 negative glioma cells in animal brain or flank to express AQP4 specifically in the intracerebral gliomas but neither in the extracranial nor in the flank gliomas. AQP4 expression in intracerebral gliomas went along with an OAP loss, compared to normal brain tissue. AQP4 staining in vivo normally is polarized in the astrocytic endfoot membranes at the glia limitans superficialis and perivascularis, but in C6 and RG2 tumors the AQP4 staining is redistributed over the whole glioma cell as in human glioblastoma. In contrast, primary rat or mouse astrocytes in culture did not lose their ability to express AQP4, and they were able to form few OAPs. PMID:22590566

  1. A Phase I Study of Mebendazole for the Treatment of Pediatric Gliomas

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-08

    Pilomyxoid Astrocytoma; Pilocytic Astrocytoma; Glioma, Astrocytic; Optic Nerve Glioma; Pleomorphic Xanthoastrocytoma; Glioblastoma Multiforme; Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Gliosarcoma; Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Glioma; DIPG; Low-grade Glioma; Brainstem Glioma

  2. Oridonin inhibits tumor growth in glioma by inducing cell cycle arrest and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, X-H; Liu, Y-X; Jia, M; Han, J-S; Zhao, M; Ji, S-P; Li, A-M

    2014-01-01

    Glioma is the most common malignant intracranial tumors. Despite newly developed therapies, these treatments mainly target oncogenic signals, and unfortunately, fail to provide enough survival benefit in both human patients and mouse xenograft models, especially the first-generation therapies. Oridonin is purified from the Chinese herb Rabdosia rubescens and considered to exert extensive anti-cancer effects on human tumorigenesis. In this study, we systemically investigated the role of Oridonin in tumor growth and the underlying mechanisms in human glioma. We found that Oridonin inhibited cell proliferations in a dose- and time-dependent manner in both glioma U87 and U251 cells. Moreover, these anti-cancer effects were also confirmed in a mouse model bearing glioma. Furthermore, cell cycle arrest in S phase was observed in Oridonin-mediated growth inhibition by flow cytometry. Cell cycle arrest in S phase led to eventual cell apoptosis, as revealed by Hoechst 33342 staining and annexin V/PI double-staining. The cell apoptosis might be accomplished through a mitochondrial manner. In all, we were the first to our knowledge to report that Oridonin could exert anti-cancer effects on tumor growth in human glioma by inducing cell cycle arrest and eventual cell apoptosis. The identification of Oridonin as a critical mediator of glioma growth may potentiate Oridonin as a novel therapeutic strategies in glioma treatments. PMID:25553351

  3. P17.40GLIOMA ASSOCIATED MICROGLIAL MMP9 EXPRESSION IS UP REGULATED BY TLR2 SIGNALLING AND SENSITIVE TO MINOCYCLINE

    PubMed Central

    Hu, F.; Ku, M.; Markovic, D.; Dzaye, O. Dildar a; Lehnardt, S.; Wolf, S.A.; Kettenmann, H.; Synowitz, M.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The invasiveness of malignant gliomas is one of the major obstacles in glioma therapy and the reason for the poor survival of patients. Glioma cells infiltrate into the brain parenchyma and thereby escape surgical resection. Glioma—associated microglia/macrophages (GAMs) support glioma infiltration into the brain parenchyma by increased expression and activation of extracellular matrix degrading proteases such as maxtrix—metalloprotease (MMP)—2, MMP—9 and MT1—MMP. METHODS: Using in vitro, ex vivo, and in vivo techniques, we identified TLR2 as the main TLR controlling microglial MMP9 expression and promoting microglia assisted glioma expansion. RESULTS: In this work we demonstrate that MMP—9 is predominantly expressed by GAMs in mouse and human glioma tissue but not by the glioma cells. Supernatant from glioma cells induced the expression of MMP—9 in cultured microglial cells. Using mice deficient for different toll—like receptors (TLRs) we identified TLR2/6 as the signalling pathway for the glioma induced upregulation of microglial MMP—9. Also in an experimental mouse glioma model, TLR2 deficiency attenuated the upregulation of microglial MMP—9. Moreover, glioma supernatant triggered an upregulation of TLR2 expression in microglia. Both, the upregulation of MMP—9 and TLR2 were attenuated by the antibiotic minocycline and a p38 MAPK antagonist in vitro. Minocycline also extended the survival rate of glioma bearing mice when given to the drinking water. CONCLUSIONS: Thus glioma cells change the phenotype of GAMs in a complex fashion using TLR2 as an important signalling pathway and minocycline further proved to be a potential candidate for adjuvant glioma therapy.

  4. Molecular biology of malignant gliomas.

    PubMed

    Belda-Iniesta, Cristóbal; de Castro Carpeño, Javier; Casado Sáenz, Enrique; Cejas Guerrero, Paloma; Perona, Rosario; González Barón, Manuel

    2006-09-01

    Gliomas are the most common primary brain tumours. In keeping with the degree of aggressiveness, gliomas are divided into four grades, with different biological behaviour. Furthermore, as different gliomas share a predominant histological appearance, the final classification includes both, histological features and degree of malignancy. For example, gliomas of astrocytic origin (astrocytomas) are classified into pilocytic astrocytoma (grade I), astrocytoma (grade II), anaplastic astrocytoma (grade III) and glioblastoma multiforme (GMB) (grade IV). Tumors derived from oligodendrocytes include grade II (oliogodendrogliomas) and grade III neoplasms (oligoastrocytoma). Each subtype has a specific prognosis that dictates the clinical management. In this regard, a patient diagnosed with an oligodendroglioma totally removed has 10-15 years of potential survival. On the opposite site, patients carrying a glioblastoma multiforme usually die within the first year after the diagnosis is made. Therefore, different approaches are needed in each case. Obviously, prognosis and biological behaviour of malignant gliomas are closely related and supported by the different molecular background that possesses each type of glioma. Furthermore, the ability that allows several low-grade gliomas to progress into more aggressive tumors has allowed cancer researchers to elucidate several pathways implicated in molecular biology of these devastating tumors. In this review, we describe classical pathways involved in human malignant gliomas with special focus with recent advances, such as glioma stem-like cells and expression patterns from microarray studies. PMID:17005465

  5. Circulating glioma biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Kros, Johan M.; Mustafa, Dana M.; Dekker, Lennard J.M.; Sillevis Smitt, Peter A.E.; Luider, Theo M.; Zheng, Ping-Pin

    2015-01-01

    Validated biomarkers for patients suffering from gliomas are urgently needed for standardizing measurements of the effects of treatment in daily clinical practice and trials. Circulating body fluids offer easily accessible sources for such markers. This review highlights various categories of tumor-associated circulating biomarkers identified in blood and cerebrospinal fluid of glioma patients, including circulating tumor cells, exosomes, nucleic acids, proteins, and oncometabolites. The validation and potential clinical utility of these biomarkers is briefly discussed. Although many candidate circulating protein biomarkers were reported, none of these have reached the required validation to be introduced for clinical practice. Recent developments in tracing circulating tumor cells and their derivatives as exosomes and circulating nuclear acids may become more successful in providing useful biomarkers. It is to be expected that current technical developments will contribute to the finding and validation of circulating biomarkers. PMID:25253418

  6. RNA Sequencing of Tumor-Associated Microglia Reveals Ccl5 as a Stromal Chemokine Critical for Neurofibromatosis-1 Glioma Growth.

    PubMed

    Solga, Anne C; Pong, Winnie W; Kim, Keun-Young; Cimino, Patrick J; Toonen, Joseph A; Walker, Jason; Wylie, Todd; Magrini, Vincent; Griffith, Malachi; Griffith, Obi L; Ly, Amy; Ellisman, Mark H; Mardis, Elaine R; Gutmann, David H

    2015-10-01

    Solid cancers develop within a supportive microenvironment that promotes tumor formation and growth through the elaboration of mitogens and chemokines. Within these tumors, monocytes (macrophages and microglia) represent rich sources of these stromal factors. Leveraging a genetically engineered mouse model of neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) low-grade brain tumor (optic glioma), we have previously demonstrated that microglia are essential for glioma formation and maintenance. To identify potential tumor-associated microglial factors that support glioma growth (gliomagens), we initiated a comprehensive large-scale discovery effort using optimized RNA-sequencing methods focused specifically on glioma-associated microglia. Candidate microglial gliomagens were prioritized to identify potential secreted or membrane-bound proteins, which were next validated by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction as well as by RNA fluorescence in situ hybridization following minocycline-mediated microglial inactivation in vivo. Using these selection criteria, chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 5 (Ccl5) was identified as a chemokine highly expressed in genetically engineered Nf1 mouse optic gliomas relative to nonneoplastic optic nerves. As a candidate gliomagen, recombinant Ccl5 increased Nf1-deficient optic nerve astrocyte growth in vitro. Importantly, consistent with its critical role in maintaining tumor growth, treatment with Ccl5 neutralizing antibodies reduced Nf1 mouse optic glioma growth and improved retinal dysfunction in vivo. Collectively, these findings establish Ccl5 as an important microglial growth factor for low-grade glioma maintenance relevant to the development of future stroma-targeted brain tumor therapies. PMID:26585233

  7. Imaging hypoxia in gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Mendichovszky, I; Jackson, A

    2011-01-01

    Hypoxia plays a central role in tumour development, angiogenesis, growth and resistance to treatment. Owing to constant developments in medical imaging technology, significant advances have been made towards in vitro and in vivo imaging of hypoxia in a variety of tumours, including gliomas of the central nervous system. The aim of this article is to review the literature on imaging approaches currently available for measuring hypoxia in human gliomas and provide an insight into recent advances and future directions in this field. After a brief overview of hypoxia and its importance in gliomas, several methods of measuring hypoxia will be presented. These range from invasive monitoring by Eppendorf polarographic O2 microelectrodes, positron electron tomography (PET) tracers based on 2-nitroimidazole compounds [18F-labelled fluoro-misonidazole (18F-MISO) or 1-(2-[(18)F]fluoro-1-[hydroxymethyl]ethoxy)methyl-2-nitroimidazole (FRP-170)], 64Cu-ATSM Cu-diacetyl-bis(N4-methylthiosemicarbazone) (Cu-ATSM) or 99mTc- and 68Ga-labelled metronidazole (MN) agents to advanced MRI methods, such as blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) MRI, oxygen-enhanced MRI, diffusion-weighted MRI (DWI-MRI), dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) and 1H-magnetic resonance spectroscopy. PMID:22433825

  8. Jumonji AT-rich interactive domain 1B overexpression is associated with the development and progression of glioma

    PubMed Central

    FANG, LIPING; ZHAO, JIUHAN; WANG, DAN; ZHU, LIYU; WANG, JIAN; JIANG, KUI

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that jumonji AT-rich interactive domain 1B (JARID1B) plays an important role in the genesis of some types of cancer, and it is therefore considered to be an important drug target protein. Although the expression of JARID1B has been researched in some types of cancer, little is known about JARID1B expression in glioma and its function in the tumorigenesis of gliomas. In the present study, we examined the expression of JARID1B in glioma. In addition, RT-PCR, western blot analysis and immunohistochemical analysis were performed using glioma tissue samples and the results revealed that JARID1B expression increased according to the histological grade of glioma. However, in the normal brain tissue samples JARID1B expression was barely detected. Kaplan-Meier analysis revealed that higher JARID1B expression in patients with glioma was associated with a poorer prognosis. The overexpression of JARID1B stimulated the proliferation and migration of glioma cells as well as sphere formation, whereas suppressing the expression of JARID1B produced opposite effects. The overexpression of JARID1B increased the tumorigenicity of glioma cells in vivo in a nude mouse xenograft model of glioma. Moreover, the activation of phosphorylated (p-)Smad2 contributes to JARID1B-induced oncogenic activities. These findings suggest that JARID1B is involved in the pathogenesis of glioma, and that the downregulation of JARID1B in glioma cells may be a therapeutic target for the treatment of patients with glioma. PMID:27246838

  9. Jumonji AT-rich interactive domain 1B overexpression is associated with the development and progression of glioma.

    PubMed

    Fang, Liping; Zhao, Jiuhan; Wang, Dan; Zhu, Liyu; Wang, Jian; Jiang, Kui

    2016-07-01

    Previous studies have suggested that jumonji AT-rich interactive domain 1B (JARID1B) plays an important role in the genesis of some types of cancer, and it is therefore considered to be an important drug target protein. Although the expression of JARID1B has been researched in some types of cancer, little is known about JARID1B expression in glioma and its function in the tumorigenesis of gliomas. In the present study, we examined the expression of JARID1B in glioma. In addition, RT-PCR, western blot analysis and immunohistochemical analysis were performed using glioma tissue samples and the results revealed that JARID1B expression increased according to the histological grade of glioma. However, in the normal brain tissue samples JARID1B expression was barely detected. Kaplan‑Meier analysis revealed that higher JARID1B expression in patients with glioma was associated with a poorer prognosis. The overexpression of JARID1B stimulated the proliferation and migration of glioma cells as well as sphere formation, whereas suppressing the expression of JARID1B produced opposite effects. The overexpression of JARID1B increased the tumorigenicity of glioma cells in vivo in a nude mouse xenograft model of glioma. Moreover, the activation of phosphorylated (p-)Smad2 contributes to JARID1B-induced oncogenic activities. These findings suggest that JARID1B is involved in the pathogenesis of glioma, and that the downregulation of JARID1B in glioma cells may be a therapeutic target for the treatment of patients with glioma. PMID:27246838

  10. Purinergic signaling in glioma progression.

    PubMed

    Braganhol, Elizandra; Wink, Márcia Rosângela; Lenz, Guido; Battastini, Ana Maria Oliveira

    2013-01-01

    Among the pathological alterations that give tumor cells invasive potential, purinergic signaling is emerging as an important component. Studies performed in in vitro, in vivo and ex vivo glioma models indicate that alterations in the purinergic signaling are involved in the progression of these tumors. Gliomas have low expression of all E-NTPDases, when compared to astrocytes in culture. Nucleotides induce glioma proliferation and ATP, although potentially neurotoxic, does not evoke cytotoxic action on the majority of glioma cells in culture. The importance of extracellular ATP for glioma pathobiology was confirmed by the reduction in glioma tumor size by apyrase, which degrades extracellular ATP to AMP, and the striking increase in tumor size by over-expression of an ecto-enzyme that degrades ATP to ADP, suggesting the effect of extracellular ATP on the tumor growth depends on the nucleotide produced by its degradation. The participation of purinergic receptors on glioma progression, particularly P2X(7), is involved in the resistance to ATP-induced cell death. Although more studies are necessary, the purinergic signaling, including ectonucleotidases and receptors, may be considered as future target for glioma pharmacological or gene therapy. PMID:22879065

  11. Nitroxoline induces apoptosis and slows glioma growth in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Lazovic, Jelena; Guo, Lea; Nakashima, Jonathan; Mirsadraei, Leili; Yong, William; Kim, Hyun J.; Ellingson, Benjamin; Wu, Hong; Pope, Whitney B.

    2015-01-01

    Background Nitroxoline is an FDA-approved antibiotic with potential antitumor activity. Here we evaluated whether nitroxoline has antiproliferative properties on glioma cell growth in vitro and in vivo using glioma cell lines and a genetically engineered PTEN/KRAS mouse glioma model. Methods The effect of nitroxoline treatment on U87 and/or U251 glioma cell proliferation, cell-cycle arrest, invasion, and ability to induce an apoptotic cascade was determined in vitro. Magnetic resonance imaging was used to measure glioma volumes in genetically engineered PTEN/KRAS mice prior to and after nitroxoline therapy. Induction of apoptosis by nitroxoline was evaluated at the end of treatment using terminal deoxyribonucleotidyl transferase (TDT)-mediated dUTP-digoxigenin nick end labeling (TUNEL). Results Nitroxoline inhibited the proliferation and invasion of glioblastoma cells in a time- and dose-dependent manner in vitro. Growth inhibition was associated with cell-cycle arrest in G1/G0 phase and induction of apoptosis via caspase 3 and cleaved poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase. In vivo, nitroxoline-treated mice had no increase in tumor volume after 14 days of treatment, whereas tumor volumes doubled in control mice. Histological examination revealed 15%–20% TUNEL-positive cells in nitroxoline-treated mice, compared with ∼5% in the control group. Conclusion Nitroxoline induces apoptosis and inhibits glioma growth in vivo and in vitro. As an already FDA-approved treatment for urinary tract infections with a known safety profile, nitroxoline could move quickly into clinical trials pending confirmatory studies. PMID:25074541

  12. Pro-neural miR-128 is a glioma tumor suppressor that targets mitogenic kinases

    PubMed Central

    Papagiannakopoulos, T; Friedmann-Morvinski, D; Neveu, P; Dugas, JC; Gill, RM; Huillard, E; Liu, C; Zong, H; Rowitch, DH; Barres, BA; Verma, IM; Kosik, KS

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) carry out post-transcriptional control of a multitude of cellular processes. Aberrant expression of miRNA can lead to diseases, including cancer. Gliomas are aggressive brain tumors that are thought to arise from transformed glioma-initiating neural stem cells (giNSCs). With the use of giNSCs and human glioblastoma cells, we investigated the function of miRNAs in gliomas. We identified pro-neuronal miR-128 as a candidate glioma tumor suppressor miRNA. Decreased expression of miR-128 correlates with aggressive human glioma subtypes. With a combination of molecular, cellular and in vivo approaches, we characterize miR-128’s tumor suppressive role. miR-128 represses giNSC growth by enhancing neuronal differentiation. miR-128 represses growth and mediates differentiation by targeting oncogenic receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) epithelial growth factor receptor and platelet-derived growth factor receptor-α. Using an autochthonous glioma mouse model, we demonstrated that miR-128 repressed gliomagenesis. We identified miR-128 as a glioma tumor suppressor that targets RTK signaling to repress giNSC self-renewal and enhance differentiation. PMID:21874051

  13. Chlorotoxin labeled magnetic nanovectors for targeted gene delivery to glioma.

    PubMed

    Kievit, Forrest M; Veiseh, Omid; Fang, Chen; Bhattarai, Narayan; Lee, Donghoon; Ellenbogen, Richard G; Zhang, Miqin

    2010-08-24

    Glioma accounts for 80% of brain tumors and currently remains one of the most lethal forms of cancers. Gene therapy could potentially improve the dismal prognosis of patients with glioma, but this treatment modality has not yet reached the bedside from the laboratory due to the lack of safe and effective gene delivery vehicles. In this study we investigate targeted gene delivery to C6 glioma cells in a xenograft mouse model using chlorotoxin (CTX) labeled nanoparticles. The developed nanovector consists of an iron oxide nanoparticle core, coated with a copolymer of chitosan, polyethylene glycol (PEG), and polyethylenimine (PEI). Green fluorescent protein (GFP) encoding DNA was bound to these nanoparticles, and CTX was then attached using a short PEG linker. Nanoparticles without CTX were also prepared as a control. Mice bearing C6 xenograft tumors were injected intravenously with the DNA-bound nanoparticles. Nanoparticle accumulation in the tumor site was monitored using magnetic resonance imaging and analyzed by histology, and GFP gene expression was monitored through Xenogen IVIS fluorescence imaging and confocal fluorescence microscopy. Interestingly, the CTX did not affect the accumulation of nanoparticles at the tumor site but specifically enhanced their uptake into cancer cells as evidenced by higher gene expression. These results indicate that this targeted gene delivery system may potentially improve treatment outcome of gene therapy for glioma and other deadly cancers. PMID:20731441

  14. Chlorotoxin Labeled Magnetic Nanovectors for Targeted Gene Delivery to Glioma

    PubMed Central

    Kievit, Forrest M.; Veiseh, Omid; Fang, Chen; Bhattarai, Narayan; Lee, Donghoon; Ellenbogen, Richard G.; Zhang, Miqin

    2010-01-01

    Glioma accounts for 80% of brain tumors, and currently remains one of the most lethal forms of cancers. Gene therapy could potentially improve the dismal prognosis of patients with glioma, but this treatment modality has not yet reached the bedside from the laboratory due to the lack of safe and effective gene delivery vehicles. In this study we investigate targeted gene delivery to C6 glioma cells in a xenograft mouse model using chlorotoxin (CTX) labeled nanoparticles. The developed nanovector consists of an iron oxide nanoparticle core, coated with a copolymer of chitosan, polyethylene glycol (PEG) and polyethylenimine (PEI). Green fluorescent protein (GFP) encoding DNA was bound to these nanoparticles, and CTX was then attached using a short PEG linker. Nanoparticles without CTX were also prepared as a control. Mice bearing C6 xenograft tumors were injected intravenously with the DNA bound nanoparticles. Nanoparticle accumulation in the tumor site was monitored using magnetic resonance imaging and analyzed by histology, and GFP gene expression was monitored through Xenogen IVIS fluorescence imaging and confocal fluorescence microscopy. Interestingly, the CTX did not affect the accumulation of nanoparticles at the tumor site, but specifically enhanced their uptake into cancer cells as evidenced by higher gene expression. These results indicate that this targeted gene delivery system may potentially improve treatment outcome of gene therapy for glioma and other deadly cancers. PMID:20731441

  15. Development of a Sox2 reporter system modeling cellular heterogeneity in glioma

    PubMed Central

    Stoltz, Kevin; Sinyuk, Maksim; Hale, James S.; Wu, Qiulian; Otvos, Balint; Walker, Kiera; Vasanji, Amit; Rich, Jeremy N.; Hjelmeland, Anita B.; Lathia, Justin D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Malignant gliomas are complex systems containing a number of factors that drive tumor initiation and progression, including genetic aberrations that lead to extensive cellular heterogeneity within the neoplastic compartment. Mouse models recapitulate these genetic aberrations, but readily observable heterogeneity remains challenging. Methods To interrogate cellular heterogeneity in mouse glioma models, we utilized a replication-competent avian sarcoma-leukosis virus long terminal repeat with splice acceptor/tumor virus A (RCAS-tva) system to generate spontaneous mouse gliomas that contained a Sox2-enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) reporter. Glial fibrillary acidic protein-tva mice were crossed with Sox2–EGFP mice, and tumors were initiated that contained a subpopulation of Sox2–EGFP-high cells enriched for tumor-initiating cell properties such as self-renewal, multilineage differentiation potential, and perivascular localization. Results Following implantation into recipient mice, Sox2–EGFP-high cells generated tumors containing Sox2–EGFP-high and Sox2–EGFP-low cells. Kinomic analysis of Sox2–EGFP-high cells revealed activation of known glioma signaling pathways that are strongly correlated with patient survival including platelet-derived growth factor receptor beta, phosphoinositide-3 kinase, and vascular endothelial growth factor. Our functional analysis identified active feline sarcoma (Fes) signaling in Sox2–EGFP-high cells. Fes negatively correlated with glioma patient survival and was coexpressed with Sox2-positive cells in glioma xenografts and primary patient-derived tissue. Conclusions Our RCAS-tva/Sox2-EGFP model will empower closer examination of cellular heterogeneity and will be useful for identifying novel glioma pathways as well as testing preclinical treatment efficacy. PMID:25416826

  16. Myxoma Virus Infection Promotes NK Lysis of Malignant Gliomas In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Ogbomo, Henry; Zemp, Franz J.; Lun, Xueqing; Zhang, Jiqing; Stack, Danuta; Rahman, Masmudur M.; Mcfadden, Grant; Mody, Christopher H.; Forsyth, Peter A.

    2013-01-01

    Myxoma virus (MYXV) is a well-established oncolytic agent against different types of tumors. MYXV is also known for its immunomodulatory properties in down-regulating major histocompatibility complex (MHC) I surface expression (via the M153R gene product, a viral E3-ubiquitin ligase) and suppressing T cell killing of infected target cells. MHC I down-regulation, however, favors NK cell activation. Brain tumors including gliomas are characterized by high MHC I expression with impaired NK activity. We thus hypothesized that MYXV infection of glioma cells will promote NK cell-mediated recognition and killing of gliomas. We infected human gliomas with MYXV and evaluated their susceptibility to NK cell-mediated cytotoxicity. MYXV enhanced NK cell-mediated killing of glioma cells (U87 cells, MYXV vs. Mock: 51.73% vs. 28.63%, P = .0001, t test; U251 cells, MYXV vs. Mock: 40.4% vs. 20.03%, P .0007, t test). Using MYXV M153R targeted knockout (designated vMyx-M153KO) to infect gliomas, we demonstrate that M153R was responsible for reduced expression of MHC I on gliomas and enhanced NK cell-mediated antiglioma activity (U87 cells, MYXV vs. vMyx-M153KO: 51.73% vs. 25.17%, P = .0002, t test; U251 cells, MYXV vs. vMyx-M153KO: 40.4% vs. 19.27, P = .0013, t test). Consequently, NK cell-mediated lysis of established human glioma tumors in CB-17 SCID mice was accelerated with improved mouse survival (log-rank P = .0072). These results demonstrate the potential for combining MYXV with NK cells to effectively kill malignant gliomas. PMID:23762498

  17. Targetable signaling pathway mutations are associated with malignant phenotype in IDH-mutant gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Wakimoto, Hiroaki; Tanaka, Shota; Curry, William T.; Loebel, Franziska; Zhao, Dan; Tateishi, Kensuke; Chen, Juxiang; Klofas, Lindsay K.; Lelic, Nina; Kim, James C.; Dias-Santagata, Dora; Ellisen, Leif W.; Borger, Darrell R.; Fendt, Sarah-Maria; Heiden, Matthew G. Vander; Batchelor, Tracy T.; Iafrate, A. John; Cahill, Daniel P.; Chi, Andrew S.

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE Isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) gene mutations occur in low-grade and high-grade gliomas. We sought to identify the genetic basis of malignant phenotype heterogeneity in IDH-mutant gliomas. METHODS We prospectively implanted tumor specimens from 20 consecutive IDH1-mutant glioma resections into mouse brains and genotyped all resection specimens using a CLIA-certified molecular panel. Gliomas with cancer driver mutations were tested for sensitivity to targeted inhibitors in vitro. Associations between genomic alterations and outcomes were analyzed in patients. RESULTS By 10 months, 8 of 20 IDH1-mutant gliomas developed intracerebral xenografts. All xenografts maintained mutant IDH1 and high levels of 2-hydroxyglutarate on serial transplantation. All xenograft-producing gliomas harbored “lineage-defining” mutations in CIC (oligodendroglioma) or TP53 (astrocytoma), and 6 of 8 additionally had activating mutations in PIK3CA or amplification of PDGFRA, MET or N-MYC. Only IDH1 and CIC/TP53 mutations were detected in non-xenograft-forming gliomas (P=.0007). Targeted inhibition of the additional alterations decreased proliferation in vitro. Moreover, we detected alterations in known cancer driver genes in 13.4% of IDH-mutant glioma patients, including PIK3CA, KRAS, AKT or PTEN mutation or PDGFRA, MET or N-MYC amplification. IDH/CIC mutant tumors were associated with PIK3CA/KRAS mutations while IDH/TP53 tumors correlated with PDGFRA/MET amplification. Presence of driver alterations at progression was associated with shorter subsequent progression-free survival (median 9.0 vs. 36.1 months, P=.0011). CONCLUSION A subset of IDH-mutant gliomas with mutations in driver oncogenes has a more malignant phenotype in patients. Identification of these alterations may provide an opportunity for use of targeted therapies in these patients. PMID:24714777

  18. Chromosome abnormalities in glioma

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Y.S.; Ramsay, D.A.; Fan, Y.S.

    1994-09-01

    Cytogenetic studies were performed in 25 patients with gliomas. An interesting finding was a seemingly identical abnormality, an extra band on the tip of the short arm of chromosome 1, add(1)(p36), in two cases. The abnormality was present in all cells from a patient with a glioblastoma and in 27% of the tumor cells from a patient with a recurrent irradiated anaplastic astrocytoma; in the latter case, 7 unrelated abnormal clones were identified except 4 of those clones shared a common change, -Y. Three similar cases have been described previously. In a patient with pleomorphic astrocytoma, the band 1q42 in both homologues of chromosome 1 was involved in two different rearrangements. A review of the literature revealed that deletion of the long arm of chromosome 1 including 1q42 often occurs in glioma. This may indicate a possible tumor suppressor gene in this region. Cytogenetic follow-up studies were carried out in two patients and emergence of unrelated clones were noted in both. A total of 124 clonal breakpoints were identified in the 25 patients. The breakpoints which occurred three times or more were: 1p36, 1p22, 1q21, 1q25, 3q21, 7q32, 8q22, 9q22, 16q22, and 22q13.

  19. Cellular Host Responses to Gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Barish, Michael E.; Garcia, Elizabeth; Metz, Marianne Z.; Myers, Sarah M.; Gutova, Margarita; Frank, Richard T.; Miletic, Hrvoje; Kendall, Stephen E.; Glackin, Carlotta A.; Bjerkvig, Rolf; Aboody, Karen S.

    2012-01-01

    Background Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most aggressive type of malignant primary brain tumors in adults. Molecular and genetic analysis has advanced our understanding of glioma biology, however mapping the cellular composition of the tumor microenvironment is crucial for understanding the pathology of this dreaded brain cancer. In this study we identified major cell populations attracted by glioma using orthotopic rodent models of human glioma xenografts. Marker-specific, anatomical and morphological analyses revealed a robust influx of host cells into the main tumor bed and tumor satellites. Methodology/Principal Findings Human glioma cell lines and glioma spheroid orthotopic implants were used in rodents. In both models, the xenografts recruited large numbers of host nestin-expressing cells, which formed a ‘network’ with glioma. The host nestin-expressing cells appeared to originate in the subventricular zone ipsilateral to the tumor, and were clearly distinguishable from pericytes that expressed smooth muscle actin. These distinct cell populations established close physical contact in a ‘pair-wise’ manner and migrated together to the deeper layers of tumor satellites and gave rise to tumor vasculature. The GBM biopsy xenografts displayed two different phenotypes: (a) low-generation tumors (first in vivo passage in rats) were highly invasive and non-angiogenic, and host nestin-positive cells that infiltrated into these tumors displayed astrocytic or elongated bipolar morphology; (b) high-generation xenografts (fifth passage) had pronounced cellularity, were angiogenic with ‘glomerulus-like’ microvascular proliferations that contained host nestin-positive cells. Stromal cell-derived factor-1 and its receptor CXCR4 were highly expressed in and around glioma xenografts, suggesting their role in glioma progression and invasion. Conclusions/Significance Our data demonstrate a robust migration of nestin-expressing host cells to glioma, which

  20. In vivo evaluation of the uptake of [(123)I]FIAU, [(123)I]IVFRU and [(123)I]IVFAU by normal mouse brain: potential for noninvasive assessment of HSV-1 thymidine kinase gene expression in gliomas.

    PubMed

    Li, H-F; Winkeler, A; Moharram, S; Knaus, E E; Dittmar, K; Stöckle, M; Heiss, W D; Wiebe, L I; Jacobs, A H; Jacob, A J

    2008-01-01

    Radioiodinated 5-iodo-1-(2-fluoro-2-deoxy-beta-D-arabinofuranosyl)uracil (F *IAU) is most commonly used for noninvasive assessment of herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase (HSV-1-tk) gene expression. However, it does not permeate the intact blood-brain barrier (BBB) because of its moderate lipophilicity. In this work, three iodo-nucleosides, FIAU, IVFRU, and IVFAU, were radiolabeled with iodine-123 and tested for permeation of the BBB in mice and for potential measurement of HSV-1-tk gene expression in gliomas. The results demonstrate that brain uptake and retention of these nucleosides is not directly related to their lipophilicity. The low brain uptake of IVFAU, in conjunction with its higher and constant brain/blood ratio, may reflect greater stability against hydrolysis of the N-glycosidic bond. In vivo PET evaluations of [(124)I]IVFRU and [(124)I]IVFAU in tumor-bearing mice are warranted. PMID:18188770

  1. CK2 inhibition induced PDK4-AMPK axis regulates metabolic adaptation and survival responses in glioma.

    PubMed

    Dixit, Deobrat; Ahmad, Fahim; Ghildiyal, Ruchi; Joshi, Shanker Datt; Sen, Ellora

    2016-05-15

    Understanding mechanisms that link aberrant metabolic adaptation and pro-survival responses in glioma cells is crucial towards the development of new anti-glioma therapies. As we have previously reported that CK2 is associated with glioma cell survival, we evaluated its involvement in the regulation of glucose metabolism. Inhibition of CK2 increased the expression of metabolic regulators, PDK4 and AMPK along with the key cellular energy sensor CREB. This increase was concomitant with altered metabolic profile as characterized by decreased glucose uptake in a PDK4 and AMPK dependent manner. Increased PDK4 expression was CREB dependent, as exogenous inhibition of CREB functions abrogated CK2 inhibitor mediated increase in PDK4 expression. Interestingly, PDK4 regulated AMPK phosphorylation which in turn affected cell viability in CK2 inhibitor treated glioma cells. CK2 inhibitor 4,5,6,7-Tetrabromobenzotriazole (TBB) significantly retarded the growth of glioma xenografts in athymic nude mouse model. Coherent with the in vitro findings, elevated senescence, pAMPK and PDK4 levels were also observed in TBB-treated xenograft tissue. Taken together, CK2 inhibition in glioma cells drives the PDK4-AMPK axis to affect metabolic profile that has a strong bearing on their survival. PMID:27001465

  2. General Information about Childhood Brain Stem Glioma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Brain Stem Glioma Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Childhood Brain Stem Glioma Go to Health ... the PDQ Pediatric Treatment Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  3. Isolation and Flow Cytometric Analysis of Glioma-infiltrating Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Gregory J.; Castro, Maria G.; Lowenstein, Pedro R.

    2016-01-01

    Our laboratory has recently demonstrated that natural killer (NK) cells are capable of eradicating orthotopically implanted mouse GL26 and rat CNS-1 malignant gliomas soon after intracranial engraftment if the cancer cells are rendered deficient in their expression of the β-galactoside-binding lectin galectin-1 (gal-1). More recent work now shows that a population of Gr-1+/CD11b+ myeloid cells is critical to this effect. To better understand the mechanisms by which NK and myeloid cells cooperate to confer gal-1-deficient tumor rejection we have developed a comprehensive protocol for the isolation and analysis of glioma-infiltrating peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). The method is demonstrated here by comparing PBMC infiltration into the tumor microenvironment of gal-1-expressing GL26 gliomas with those rendered gal-1-deficient via shRNA knockdown. The protocol begins with a description of how to culture and prepare GL26 cells for inoculation into the syngeneic C57BL/6J mouse brain. It then explains the steps involved in the isolation and flow cytometric analysis of glioma-infiltrating PBMCs from the early brain tumor microenvironment. The method is adaptable to a number of in vivo experimental designs in which temporal data on immune infiltration into the brain is required. The method is sensitive and highly reproducible, as glioma-infiltrating PBMCs can be isolated from intracranial tumors as soon as 24 hr post-tumor engraftment with similar cell counts observed from time point matched tumors throughout independent experiments. A single experimentalist can perform the method from brain harvesting to flow cytometric analysis of glioma-infiltrating PBMCs in roughly 4–6 hr depending on the number of samples to be analyzed. Alternative glioma models and/or cell-specific detection antibodies may also be used at the experimentalists’ discretion to assess the infiltration of several other immune cell types of interest without the need for alterations to the

  4. RNA Sequencing of Tumor-Associated Microglia Reveals Ccl5 as a Stromal Chemokine Critical for Neurofibromatosis-1 Glioma Growth1

    PubMed Central

    Solga, Anne C.; Pong, Winnie W.; Kim, Keun-Young; Cimino, Patrick J.; Toonen, Joseph A.; Walker, Jason; Wylie, Todd; Magrini, Vincent; Griffith, Malachi; Griffith, Obi L.; Ly, Amy; Ellisman, Mark H.; Mardis, Elaine R.; Gutmann, David H.

    2015-01-01

    Solid cancers develop within a supportive microenvironment that promotes tumor formation and growth through the elaboration of mitogens and chemokines. Within these tumors, monocytes (macrophages and microglia) represent rich sources of these stromal factors. Leveraging a genetically engineered mouse model of neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) low-grade brain tumor (optic glioma), we have previously demonstrated that microglia are essential for glioma formation and maintenance. To identify potential tumor-associated microglial factors that support glioma growth (gliomagens), we initiated a comprehensive large-scale discovery effort using optimized RNA-sequencing methods focused specifically on glioma-associated microglia. Candidate microglial gliomagens were prioritized to identify potential secreted or membrane-bound proteins, which were next validated by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction as well as by RNA fluorescence in situ hybridization following minocycline-mediated microglial inactivation in vivo. Using these selection criteria, chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 5 (Ccl5) was identified as a chemokine highly expressed in genetically engineered Nf1 mouse optic gliomas relative to nonneoplastic optic nerves. As a candidate gliomagen, recombinant Ccl5 increased Nf1-deficient optic nerve astrocyte growth in vitro. Importantly, consistent with its critical role in maintaining tumor growth, treatment with Ccl5 neutralizing antibodies reduced Nf1 mouse optic glioma growth and improved retinal dysfunction in vivo. Collectively, these findings establish Ccl5 as an important microglial growth factor for low-grade glioma maintenance relevant to the development of future stroma-targeted brain tumor therapies. PMID:26585233

  5. Rehabilitation of patients with glioma.

    PubMed

    Vargo, Mary; Henriksson, Roger; Salander, Pär

    2016-01-01

    Disabling sequelae occur in a majority of patients diagnosed with brain tumor, including glioma, such as cognitive deficits, weakness, and visual perceptual changes. Often, multiple impairments are present concurrently. Healthcare staff must be aware of the "biographic disruption" the patient with glioma has experienced. While prognostic considerations factor into rehabilitation goals and expectations, regardless of prognosis the treatment team must offer cohesive support, facilitating hope, function, and quality of life. Awareness of family and caregiver concerns plays an important role in the overall care. Inpatient rehabilitation, especially after surgical resection, has been shown to result in functional improvement and homegoing rates on a par with individuals with other neurologic conditions, such as stroke or traumatic brain injury. Community integration comprises a significant element of life satisfaction, as has been shown in childhood glioma survivors. Employment is often affected by the glioma diagnosis, but may be ameliorated, when appropriate, by addressing modifiable factors such as depression, fatigue, or sleep disturbance, or by workplace accommodations. Further research is needed into many facets of rehabilitation in the setting of glioma, including establishing better care models for consistently identifying and addressing functional limitations in this population, measuring outcomes of various levels of rehabilitation care, identifying optimal physical activity strategies, delineating the long-term effects of rehabilitation interventions, and exploring impact of rehabilitation interventions on caregiver burden. The effective elements of cognitive rehabilitation, including transition of cognitive strategies to everyday living, need to be better defined. PMID:26948361

  6. Culture and characteristics of hormone-responsive neuroblastoma x glioma hybrid cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hamprecht, B.; Glaser, T.; Reiser, G.; Bayer, E.; Propst, F.

    1985-01-01

    Neuroblastoma x glioma hybrid cells were generated by cell fusion of the 6-thioguanine-resistant clonal mouse neuroblastoma cells and the bromodeoxyuridine-resistant rat glioma cells, selection, and cloning. Every characteristics generally ascribed to neurons has been observed with the hybrid cells. The paper explores the morphological differentiation of hybrid cells, procedures for testing the hormonal regulation of intracellular levels of cyclic, (/sup 3/H)AMP in hybrid cells, hormonal regulation of adenylate cyclase in homogenates of hyrbid cells, intracellular levels of cyclic GMP, and uptake of guanidinium ions in hybrid cells.

  7. Immunotherapy for malignant glioma

    PubMed Central

    Suryadevara, Carter M.; Verla, Terence; Sanchez-Perez, Luis; Reap, Elizabeth A.; Choi, Bryan D.; Fecci, Peter E.; Sampson, John H.

    2015-01-01

    Malignant gliomas (MG) are the most common type of primary malignant brain tumor. Most patients diagnosed with glioblastoma (GBM), the most common and malignant glial tumor, die within 12–15 months. Moreover, conventional treatment, which includes surgery followed by radiation and chemotherapy, can be highly toxic by causing nonspecific damage to healthy brain and other tissues. The shortcomings of standard-of-care have thus created a stimulus for the development of novel therapies that can target central nervous system (CNS)-based tumors specifically and efficiently, while minimizing off-target collateral damage to normal brain. Immunotherapy represents an investigational avenue with the promise of meeting this need, already having demonstrated its potential against B-cell malignancy and solid tumors in clinical trials. T-cell engineering with tumor-specific chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) is one proven approach that aims to redirect autologous patient T-cells to sites of tumor. This platform has evolved dramatically over the past two decades to include an improved construct design, and these modern CARs have only recently been translated into the clinic for brain tumors. We review here emerging immunotherapeutic platforms for the treatment of MG, focusing on the development and application of a CAR-based strategy against GBM. PMID:25722935

  8. Pediatric gliomas as neurodevelopmental disorders.

    PubMed

    Baker, Suzanne J; Ellison, David W; Gutmann, David H

    2016-06-01

    Brain tumors represent the most common solid tumor of childhood, with gliomas comprising the largest fraction of these cancers. Several features distinguish them from their adult counterparts, including their natural history, causative genetic mutations, and brain locations. These unique properties suggest that the cellular and molecular etiologies that underlie their development and maintenance might be different from those that govern adult gliomagenesis and growth. In this review, we discuss the genetic basis for pediatric low-grade and high-grade glioma in the context of developmental neurobiology, and highlight the differences between histologically-similar tumors arising in children and adults. GLIA 2016;64:879-895. PMID:26638183

  9. Erythropoietin Augments Survival of Glioma Cells After Radiation and Temozolomide

    SciTech Connect

    Hassouna, Imam; Sperling, Swetlana; Kim, Ella; Schulz-Schaeffer, Walter; Rave-Fraenk, Margret; Hasselblatt, Martin; Jelkmann, Wolfgang; Giese, Alf; Ehrenreich, Hannelore

    2008-11-01

    Purpose: Despite beneficial effects of irradiation/chemotherapy on survival of glioblastoma (GBM) patients, collateral damage to intact neural tissue leads to 'radiochemobrain' and reduced quality of life in survivors. For prophylactic neuroprotection, erythropoietin (EPO) is a promising candidate, provided that concerns regarding potential tumor promoting effects are alleviated. Methods and Materials: Human GBM-derived cell lines U87, G44, G112, and the gliosarcoma-derived line G28 were treated with EPO, with and without combinations of irradiation or temozolomide (TMZ). Responsiveness of glioma cells to EPO was measured by cell migration from spheroids, cell proliferation, and clonogenic survival. Implantation of U87 cells into brains of nude mice, followed 5 days later by EPO treatment (5,000 U/kg intraperitoneal every other day for 2 weeks) should reveal effects of EPO on tumor growth in vivo. Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction was performed for EPOR, HIF-1{alpha}, and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)vIII in cell lines and 22 human GBM specimens. Results: EPO did not modulate basal glioma cell migration and stimulated proliferation in only one of four cell lines. Importantly, EPO did not enhance tumor growth in mouse brains. Preincubation of glioma cells with EPO for 3 h, followed by irradiation and TMZ for another 24 h, resulted in protection against chemoradiation-induced cytotoxicity in three cell lines. Conversely, EPO induced a dose-dependent decrease in survival of G28 gliosarcoma cells. In GBM specimens, expression of HIF-1{alpha} correlated positively with expression of EPOR and EGFRvIII. EPOR and EGFRvIII expression did not correlate. Conclusions: EPO is unlikely to appreciably influence basal glioma growth. However, concomitant use of EPO with irradiation/chemotherapy in GBM patients is not advisable.

  10. 4'-Acetoamido-4-hydroxychalcone, a chalcone derivative, inhibits glioma growth and invasion through regulation of the tropomyosin 1 gene

    SciTech Connect

    Ku, Bo Mi; Ryu, Hyung Won; Lee, Yeon Kyung; Ryu, Jinhyun; Jeong, Joo Yeon; Choi, Jungil; Cho, Hee Jun; Park, Ki Hun; Kang, Sang Soo

    2010-11-19

    Research highlights: {yields} 4'-Acetoamido-4-hydroxychalcone (AHC) has anti-cancer property for glioma. {yields} 4'-Acetoamido-4-hydroxychalcone (AHC) increased tropomyosin expreesion through activattion of PKA signaling. {yields} 4'-Acetoamido-4-hydroxychalcone (AHC) inhibits glioma cell migration and invasion. {yields} In vivo administration of 4'-acetoamido-4-hydroxychalcone (AHC) reduced tumor growth. -- Abstract: Chalcones are precursors of flavonoids and have been shown to have anti-cancer activity. Here, we identify the synthetic chalcone derivative 4'-acetoamido-4-hydroxychalcone (AHC) as a potential therapeutic agent for the treatment of glioma. Treatment with AHC reduced glioma cell invasion, migration, and colony formation in a concentration-dependent manner. In addition, AHC inhibited vascular endothelial growth factor-induced migration, invasion, and tube formation in HUVECs. To determine the mechanism underlying the inhibitory effect of AHC on glioma cell invasion and migration, we investigated the effect of AHC on the gene expression change and found that AHC affects actin dynamics in U87MG glioma cells. In actin cytoskeleton regulating system, AHC increased tropomyosin expression and stress fiber formation, probably through activation of PKA. Suppression of tropomyosin expression by siRNA or treatment with the PKA inhibitor H89 reduced the inhibitory effects of AHC on glioma cell invasion and migration. In vivo experiments also showed that AHC inhibited tumor growth in a xenograft mouse tumor model. Together, these data suggest that the synthetic chalcone derivative AHC has potent anti-cancer activity through inhibition of glioma proliferation, invasion, and angiogenesis and is therefore a potential chemotherapeutic candidate for the treatment of glioma.

  11. Postirradiation cerebellar glioma. Case report

    SciTech Connect

    Raffel, C.; Edwards, M.S.; Davis, R.L.; Ablin, A.R.

    1985-02-01

    A 13-year-old girl developed an anaplastic astrocytoma of the cerebellum 7 years after irradiation of the central nervous system and prophylactic chemotherapy for acute lymphocytic leukemia. The fact that the astrocytoma was anaplastic and infiltrative was unusual for astroglial tumors at this site. It is proposed that this is a radiation-induced glioma.

  12. Characterization of a canine glioma cell line as related to established experimental brain tumor models.

    PubMed

    Rainov, N G; Koch, S; Sena-Esteves, M; Berens, M E

    2000-07-01

    A large animal tumor model for anaplastic glioma has been recently developed using immunotolerant allogeneic Beagle dogs and an established canine glioma cell line, J3T. This model offers advantages in terms of tumor morphology and similarity to human anaplastic glioma. The present study was aimed at evaluating the biological characteristics of the J3T canine glioma cell line as related to experimental gene therapy studies. Furthermore, development and morphology of canine brain tumors in a xenogeneic immunodeficient SCID mouse model was investigated. It was demonstrated that cultured J3T cells can be efficiently infected by adenovirus (AV), herpes-simplex type I (HSV), or retrovirus (RV) vectors, as well as by non-virus vectors such as cationic liposome/DNA complexes. Thus, in terms of infectability and transfectability, J3T cells seem to be closer to human glioma than the 9L rodent gliosarcoma. Cytotoxicity of selection antibiotics such as G418, puromycin, and hygromycin on J3T cells essentially resemble cytotoxicity seen with other established glioma lines, for example, 9L, U87, or U343. RV-mediated HSV-TK/GCV gene therapy demonstrated comparable LD50 for TK-expressing and control (non-expressing) J3T and 9L cells treated with Ganciclovir. Further, it was proven that J3T cells are tumorigenic and may grow heterotopically and orthotopically in a xenogeneic immunodeficient host, the SCID mouse, although morphology and growth pattern of these xenogeneic tumors differ from the demonstrated invasive phenotype in the Beagle dog. PMID:10901232

  13. Cellular factors promoting resistance to effective treatment of glioma with oncolytic Myxoma virus

    PubMed Central

    Zemp, Franz J.; McKenzie, Brienne A.; Lun, Xueqing; Reilly, Karlyne M.; McFadden, Grant; Yong, V. Wee; Forsyth, Peter A.

    2014-01-01

    Oncolytic virus therapy is being evaluated in clinical trials for human glioma. While it is widely assumed that the patient's immune response to the virus infection limits the therapy's utility, investigations into the specific cell type(s) involved in this response have been performed using non-specific pharmacological inhibitors or allogeneic models with compromised immunity. To identify the immune cells that participate in clearing an oncolytic infection in glioma, we used flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry to immunophenotype an orthotopic glioma model in immunocompetent mice after Myxoma virus (MYXV) administration. These studies revealed a large resident microglia and macrophage population in untreated tumours, and robust monocyte, T and NK cell infiltration 3 days following MYXV infection. To determine the role on the clinical utility of MYXV therapy for glioma, we used a combination of knockout mouse strains and specific immunocyte ablation techniques. Collectively, our experiments identify an important role for tumour-resident myeloid cells and overlapping roles for recruited NK and T cells in the clearance and efficacy of oncolytic MYXV from gliomas. Using a cyclophosphamide regimen to achieve lymphoablation prior and during MYXV treatment, we prevented treatment-induced peripheral immunocyte recruitment and, surprisingly, largely ablated the tumour-resident macrophage population. Virotherapy of CPA-treated animals resulted in sustained viral infection within the glioma as well as a substantial survival advantage. This study demonstrates that resistance to MYXV virotherapy in syngeneic glioma models involves a multi-faceted cellular immune response that can be overcome with CPA-mediated lymphoablation. PMID:25336188

  14. A novel bispecific immunotoxin delivered by human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells to target blood vessels and vasculogenic mimicry of malignant gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yonghong; Sun, Xinlin; Huang, Min; Ke, Yiquan; Wang, Jihui; Liu, Xiao

    2015-01-01

    Background In previous years, immunotoxins have been shown to be a greatly promising therapeutic tool for brain malignancies, such as gliomas. Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) exhibit tropism to tumor tissue. However, the effect of bispecific immunotoxins in malignant gliomas is still unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the function of bispecific immunotoxins in human malignant gliomas. Materials and methods In the present study, the bispecific immunotoxin VEGF165-ephrin A1-PE38KDEL was established using deoxyribonucleic acid shuffling and cloning techniques. The VEGF165-ephrin A1-PE38KDEL was delivered by hMSCs to mouse malignant gliomas. The effects of the bispecific immunotoxins on glioma-derived blood vessels and vasculogenic mimicry to elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying the antitumorigenic effects of immunotoxins were examined in vivo. Results In vitro, transfected hMSCs significantly inhibited the cell viability of gliomas cell lines U87 and U251 in a dose-dependent manner compared with untransfected hMSCs (P<0.01). In vivo, the intratumoral injection of engineered hMSCs was effective at inhibiting tumor growth in a malignant glioma tumor model. Conclusion The bispecific immunotoxin secreted from hMSCs acts as a novel strategy for improving treatment options for malignant gliomas in the clinic. PMID:26089644

  15. Platelet-derived growth factor receptor alpha in glioma: a bad seed.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kun-Wei; Hu, Bo; Cheng, Shi-Yuan

    2011-09-01

    Recent collaborative, large-scale genomic profiling of the most common and aggressive brain tumor glioblastoma multiforme(GBM) has significantly advanced our understanding of this disease. The gene encoding platelet-derived growth factor receptor alpha(PDGFRα) was identified as the third of the top 11 amplified genes in clinical GBM specimens. The important roles of PDGFRα signaling during normal brain development also implicate the possible pathologic consequences of PDGFRα over-activation in glioma. Although the initial clinical trials using PDGFR kinase inhibitors have been predominantly disappointing, diagnostic and treatment modalities involving genomic profiling and personalized medicine are expected to improve the therapy targeting PDGFRα signaling. In this review, we discuss the roles of PDGFRαsignaling during development of the normal central nervous system(CNS) and in pathologic conditions such as malignant glioma. We further compare various animal models of PDGF-induced gliomagenesis and their potential as a novel platform of pre-clinical drug testing. We then summarize our recent publication and how these findings will likely impact treatments for gliomas driven by PDGFRα overexpression. A better understanding of PDGFRα signaling in glioma and their microenvironment, through the use of human or mouse models, is necessary to design a more effective therapeutic strategy against gliomas harboring the aberrant PDGFRα signaling. PMID:21880180

  16. EGFRvIII-mediated transactivation of receptor tyrosine kinases in glioma: mechanism and therapeutic implications.

    PubMed

    Greenall, S A; Donoghue, J F; Van Sinderen, M; Dubljevic, V; Budiman, S; Devlin, M; Street, I; Adams, T E; Johns, T G

    2015-10-01

    A truncation mutant of the epidermal growth factor receptor, EGFRvIII, is commonly expressed in glioma, an incurable brain cancer. EGFRvIII is tumorigenic, in part, through its transactivation of other receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs). Preventing the effects of this transactivation could form part of an effective therapy for glioma; however, the mechanism by which the transactivation occurs is unknown. Focusing on the RTK MET, we show that MET transactivation in U87MG human glioma cells in vitro is proportional to EGFRvIII activity and involves MET heterodimerization associated with a focal adhesion kinase (FAK) scaffold. The transactivation of certain other RTKs was, however, independent of FAK. Simultaneously targeting EGFRvIII (with panitumumab) and the transactivated RTKs themselves (with motesanib) in an intracranial mouse model of glioma resulted in significantly greater survival than with either agent alone, indicating that cotargeting these RTKs has potent antitumor efficacy and providing a strategy for treating EGFRvIII-expressing gliomas, which are usually refractory to treatment. PMID:25659577

  17. CSF-1R inhibition alters macrophage polarization and blocks glioma progression.

    PubMed

    Pyonteck, Stephanie M; Akkari, Leila; Schuhmacher, Alberto J; Bowman, Robert L; Sevenich, Lisa; Quail, Daniela F; Olson, Oakley C; Quick, Marsha L; Huse, Jason T; Teijeiro, Virginia; Setty, Manu; Leslie, Christina S; Oei, Yoko; Pedraza, Alicia; Zhang, Jianan; Brennan, Cameron W; Sutton, James C; Holland, Eric C; Daniel, Dylan; Joyce, Johanna A

    2013-10-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) comprises several molecular subtypes, including proneural GBM. Most therapeutic approaches targeting glioma cells have failed. An alternative strategy is to target cells in the glioma microenvironment, such as tumor-associated macrophages and microglia (TAMs). Macrophages depend on colony stimulating factor-1 (CSF-1) for differentiation and survival. We used an inhibitor of the CSF-1 receptor (CSF-1R) to target TAMs in a mouse proneural GBM model, which significantly increased survival and regressed established tumors. CSF-1R blockade additionally slowed intracranial growth of patient-derived glioma xenografts. Surprisingly, TAMs were not depleted in treated mice. Instead, glioma-secreted factors, including granulocyte-macrophage CSF (GM-CSF) and interferon-γ (IFN-γ), facilitated TAM survival in the context of CSF-1R inhibition. Expression of alternatively activated M2 markers decreased in surviving TAMs, which is consistent with impaired tumor-promoting functions. These gene signatures were associated with enhanced survival in patients with proneural GBM. Our results identify TAMs as a promising therapeutic target for proneural gliomas and establish the translational potential of CSF-1R inhibition for GBM. PMID:24056773

  18. CSF-1R inhibition alters macrophage polarization and blocks glioma progression

    PubMed Central

    Pyonteck, Stephanie M.; Akkari, Leila; Schuhmacher, Alberto J.; Bowman, Robert L.; Sevenich, Lisa; Quail, Daniela F.; Olson, Oakley C.; Quick, Marsha L.; Huse, Jason T.; Teijeiro, Virginia; Setty, Manu; Leslie, Christina S.; Oei, Yoko; Pedraza, Alicia; Zhang, Jianan; Brennan, Cameron W.; Sutton, James C.; Holland, Eric C.; Daniel, Dylan; Joyce, Johanna A.

    2013-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) comprises several molecular subtypes including proneural GBM. Most therapeutic approaches targeting glioma cells have failed. An alternative strategy is to target cells in the glioma microenvironment, such as tumor-associated macrophages and microglia (TAMs). Macrophages depend upon colony stimulating factor (CSF)-1 for differentiation and survival. A CSF-1R inhibitor was used to target TAMs in a mouse proneural GBM model, which dramatically increased survival, and regressed established tumors. CSF-1R blockade additionally slowed intracranial growth of patient-derived glioma xenografts. Surprisingly, TAMs were not depleted in treated mice. Instead, glioma-secreted factors including GM-CSF and IFN-γ facilitated TAM survival in the context of CSF-1R inhibition. Alternatively activated/ M2 macrophage markers decreased in surviving TAMs, consistent with impaired tumor-promoting functions. These gene signatures were associated with enhanced survival in proneural GBM patients. Our results identify TAMs as a promising therapeutic target for proneural gliomas, and establish the translational potential of CSF-1R inhibition for GBM. PMID:24056773

  19. MicroRNA in Human Glioma

    PubMed Central

    Li, Mengfeng; Li, Jun; Liu, Lei; Li, Wei; Yang, Yi; Yuan, Jie

    2013-01-01

    Glioma represents a serious health problem worldwide. Despite advances in surgery, radiotherapy, chemotherapy, and targeting therapy, the disease remains one of the most lethal malignancies in humans, and new approaches to improvement of the efficacy of anti-glioma treatments are urgently needed. Thus, new therapeutic targets and tools should be developed based on a better understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of glioma. In this context, microRNAs (miRNAs), a class of small, non-coding RNAs, play a pivotal role in the development of the malignant phenotype of glioma cells, including cell survival, proliferation, differentiation, tumor angiogenesis, and stem cell generation. This review will discuss the biological functions of miRNAs in human glioma and their implications in improving clinical diagnosis, prediction of prognosis, and anti-glioma therapy. PMID:24202447

  20. Management of multifocal and multicentric gliomas.

    PubMed

    Patil, Chirag G; Eboli, Paula; Hu, Jethro

    2012-04-01

    The diffuse nature of gliomas has long confounded attempts at achieving a definitive cure. The advent of computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging made it increasingly apparent that gliomas could have a multifocal or multicentric appearance. Treating these tumors is the summit of an already daunting challenge, because the obstacles that must be surmounted to treat gliomas in general, namely, their heterogeneity, diffuse nature, and ability to insidiously invade normal brain, are more conspicuous in this subset of tumors. PMID:22440877

  1. Practical molecular pathologic diagnosis of infiltrating gliomas.

    PubMed

    Pekmezci, Melike; Perry, Arie

    2015-03-01

    Recent advances in molecular diagnostics have led to better understanding of glioma tumorigenesis and biology. Numerous glioma biomarkers with diagnostic, prognostic, and predictive value have been identified. Although some of these markers are already part of the routine clinical management of glioma patients, data regarding others are limited and difficult to apply routinely. In addition, multiple methods for molecular subclassification have been proposed either together with or as an alternative to the current morphologic classification and grading scheme. This article reviews the literature regarding glioma biomarkers and offers a few practical suggestions. PMID:25783821

  2. MiR-200a impairs glioma cell growth, migration, and invasion by targeting SIM2-s.

    PubMed

    Su, Yuhang; He, Qiaowei; Deng, Lin; Wang, Juntao; Liu, Qinglin; Wang, Donghai; Huang, Qibing; Li, Gang

    2014-01-01

    Recently, single-minded homolog 2-short form (SIM2-s) was reported to be related to tumor development and progression and to be elevated in many human cancer cells. In this study, we investigated the factors that contribute to the regulation of SIM2-s expression in gliomas. The results showed that SIM2-s was elevated in gliomas. In addition, inhibition of SIM2-s reduced glioma cell growth, migration, and invasion. Next, we demonstrated that SIM2-s is a functional target of miR-200a. Further, miR-200a is downregulated in human glioma and inhibition of miR-200a caused upregulation of SIM2-s in T98G cells and promoted their motility. Finally, blockage of miR-200a expression in a mouse model of human glioma resulted in significant promotion of tumor growth. These findings suggest that miR-200a could serve as a therapeutic tool for glioma. PMID:24162743

  3. Tumor Metabolism of Malignant Gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Ru, Peng; Williams, Terence M.; Chakravarti, Arnab; Guo, Deliang

    2013-01-01

    Constitutively activated oncogenic signaling via genetic mutations such as in the EGFR/PI3K/Akt and Ras/RAF/MEK pathways has been recognized as a major driver for tumorigenesis in most cancers. Recent insights into tumor metabolism have further revealed that oncogenic signaling pathways directly promote metabolic reprogramming to upregulate biosynthesis of lipids, carbohydrates, protein, DNA and RNA, leading to enhanced growth of human tumors. Therefore, targeting cell metabolism has become a novel direction for drug development in oncology. In malignant gliomas, metabolism pathways of glucose, glutamine and lipid are significantly reprogrammed. Moreover, molecular mechanisms causing these metabolic changes are just starting to be unraveled. In this review, we will summarize recent studies revealing critical gene alterations that lead to metabolic changes in malignant gliomas, and also discuss promising therapeutic strategies via targeting the key players in metabolic regulation. PMID:24217114

  4. Intraarterial Infusion Of Erbitux and Bevacizumab For Relapsed/Refractory Intracranial Glioma In Patients Under 22

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-16

    Glioblastoma Multiforme; Fibrillary Astrocytoma of Brain; Glioma of Brainstem; Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Pilomyxoid Astrocytoma; Mixed Oligodendroglioma-Astrocytoma; Brain Stem Glioma; Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Glioma

  5. The Potential of Tetrandrine against Gliomas.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yun; Tseng, Sheng-Hong

    2010-09-01

    Patients with malignant gliomas have poor prognoses, and the majority of the patients have local tumor recurrence after various treatments including surgery, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy. Thus it is mandatory to develop better therapies for treatment of these malignant brain tumors. Tetrandrine, a bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloid, has antitumor effects against some cancers. Tetrandrine affects the cell cycle, production of reactive oxygen species, mitogen-activated protein kinase activity, and reverses multidrug resistance in various cancer cells. Since tetrandrine is a highly lipid-soluble and hydrophobic molecule with a low molecular weight, it may cross the blood brain barrier; thus, it could be used for the treatment of gliomas. Tetrandrine inhibits the large-conductance, calcium-activated potassium (BK) channels and the expression of BK channel has a positive correlation with tumor malignancy grade in human gliomas. Furthermore, tetrandrine also exerts cytotoxic effects, and induces apoptosis and radiosensitization in glioma cells by elimination of radiation-induced cell cycle perturbation. It also has anti-angiogenesis effects in gliomas, and exerts an antitumor effect on subcutaneous and intracerebral gliomas. Tetrandrine is a radiosensitizer and also a multidrug resistance reversing agent. Tetrandrine can probably be combined with radiotherapy or other chemotherapeutic agents to treat gliomas. Nonetheless, it is important to determine the balance between the safety and efficacy of tetrandrine in patients with malignant gliomas before any clinical application. PMID:20879981

  6. MNK1 pathway activity maintains protein synthesis in rapalog-treated gliomas.

    PubMed

    Grzmil, Michal; Huber, Roland M; Hess, Daniel; Frank, Stephan; Hynx, Debby; Moncayo, Gerald; Klein, Dominique; Merlo, Adrian; Hemmings, Brian A

    2014-02-01

    High levels of mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) activity in malignant gliomas promote tumor progression, suggesting that targeting mTORC1 has potential as a therapeutic strategy. Remarkably, clinical trials in patients with glioma revealed that rapamycin analogs (rapalogs) have limited efficacy, indicating activation of resistance mechanisms. Targeted depletion of MAPK-interacting Ser/Thr kinase 1 (MNK1) sensitizes glioma cells to the mTORC1 inhibitor rapamycin through an indistinct mechanism. Here, we analyzed how MNK1 and mTORC1 signaling pathways regulate the assembly of translation initiation complexes, using the cap analog m7GTP to enrich for initiation complexes in glioma cells followed by mass spectrometry-based quantitative proteomics. Association of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E (eIF4E) with eIF4E-binding protein 1 (4EBP1) was regulated by the mTORC1 pathway, whereas pharmacological blocking of MNK activity by CGP57380 or MNK1 knockdown, along with mTORC1 inhibition by RAD001, increased 4EBP1 binding to eIF4E. Furthermore, combined MNK1 and mTORC1 inhibition profoundly inhibited 4EBP1 phosphorylation at Ser65, protein synthesis and proliferation in glioma cells, and reduced tumor growth in an orthotopic glioblastoma (GBM) mouse model. Immunohistochemical analysis of GBM samples revealed increased 4EBP1 phosphorylation. Taken together, our data indicate that rapalog-activated MNK1 signaling promotes glioma growth through regulation of 4EBP1 and indicate a molecular cross-talk between the mTORC1 and MNK1 pathways that has potential to be exploited therapeutically. PMID:24401275

  7. T Cells Enhance Stem-Like Properties and Conditional Malignancy in Gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Irvin, Dwain K.; Jouanneau, Emmanuel; Duvall, Gretchen; Zhang, Xiao-xue; Zhai, Yuying; Sarayba, Danielle; Seksenyan, Akop; Panwar, Akanksha; Black, Keith L.; Wheeler, Christopher J.

    2010-01-01

    Background Small populations of highly tumorigenic stem-like cells (cancer stem cells; CSCs) can exist within, and uniquely regenerate cancers including malignant brain tumors (gliomas). Many aspects of glioma CSCs (GSCs), however, have been characterized in non-physiological settings. Methods We found gene expression similarity superiorly defined glioma “stemness”, and revealed that GSC similarity increased with lower tumor grade. Using this method, we examined stemness in human grade IV gliomas (GBM) before and after dendritic cell (DC) vaccine therapy. This was followed by gene expression, phenotypic and functional analysis of murine GL26 tumors recovered from nude, wild-type, or DC-vaccinated host brains. Results GSC similarity was specifically increased in post-vaccine GBMs, and correlated best to vaccine-altered gene expression and endogenous anti-tumor T cell activity. GL26 analysis confirmed immune alterations, specific acquisition of stem cell markers, specifically enhanced sensitivity to anti-stem drug (cyclopamine), and enhanced tumorigenicity in wild-type hosts, in tumors in proportion to anti-tumor T cell activity. Nevertheless, vaccine-exposed GL26 cells were no more tumorigenic than parental GL26 in T cell-deficient hosts, though they otherwise appeared similar to GSCs enriched by chemotherapy. Finally, vaccine-exposed GBM and GL26 exhibited relatively homogeneous expression of genes expressed in progenitor cells and/or differentiation. Conclusions T cell activity represents an inducible physiological process capable of proportionally enriching GSCs in human and mouse gliomas. Stem-like gliomas enriched by strong T cell activity, however, may differ from other GSCs in that their stem-like properties may be disassociated from increased tumor malignancy and heterogeneity under specific host immune conditions. PMID:20539758

  8. Identification of RNA-Binding Protein LARP4B as a Tumor Suppressor in Glioma.

    PubMed

    Koso, Hideto; Yi, Hungtsung; Sheridan, Paul; Miyano, Satoru; Ino, Yasushi; Todo, Tomoki; Watanabe, Sumiko

    2016-04-15

    Transposon-based insertional mutagenesis is a valuable method for conducting unbiased forward genetic screens to identify cancer genes in mice. We used this system to elucidate factors involved in the malignant transformation of neural stem cells into glioma-initiating cells. We identified an RNA-binding protein, La-related protein 4b (LARP4B), as a candidate tumor-suppressor gene in glioma. LARP4B expression was consistently decreased in human glioma stem cells and cell lines compared with normal neural stem cells. Moreover, heterozygous deletion of LARP4B was detected in nearly 80% of glioblastomas in The Cancer Genome Atlas database. LARP4B loss was also associated with low expression and poor patient survival. Overexpression of LARP4B in glioma cell lines strongly inhibited proliferation by inducing mitotic arrest and apoptosis in four of six lines as well as in two patient-derived glioma stem cell populations. The expression levels of CDKN1A and BAX were also upregulated upon LARP4B overexpression, and the growth-inhibitory effects were partially dependent on p53 (TP53) activity in cells expressing wild-type, but not mutant, p53. We further found that the La module, which is responsible for the RNA chaperone activity of LARP4B, was important for the growth-suppressive effect and was associated with BAX mRNA. Finally, LARP4B depletion in p53 and Nf1-deficient mouse primary astrocytes promoted cell proliferation and led to increased tumor size and invasiveness in xenograft and orthotopic models. These data provide strong evidence that LARP4B serves as a tumor-suppressor gene in glioma, encouraging further exploration of the RNA targets potentially involved in LARP4B-mediatd growth inhibition. Cancer Res; 76(8); 2254-64. ©2016 AACR. PMID:26933087

  9. Associations of high-grade glioma with glioma risk alleles and histories of allergy and smoking.

    PubMed

    Lachance, Daniel H; Yang, Ping; Johnson, Derek R; Decker, Paul A; Kollmeyer, Thomas M; McCoy, Lucie S; Rice, Terri; Xiao, Yuanyuan; Ali-Osman, Francis; Wang, Frances; Stoddard, Shawn M; Sprau, Debra J; Kosel, Matthew L; Wiencke, John K; Wiemels, Joseph L; Patoka, Joseph S; Davis, Faith; McCarthy, Bridget; Rynearson, Amanda L; Worra, Joel B; Fridley, Brooke L; O'Neill, Brian Patrick; Buckner, Jan C; Il'yasova, Dora; Jenkins, Robert B; Wrensch, Margaret R

    2011-09-01

    Glioma risk has consistently been inversely associated with allergy history but not with smoking history despite putative biologic plausibility. Data from 855 high-grade glioma cases and 1,160 controls from 4 geographic regions of the United States during 1997-2008 were analyzed for interactions between allergy and smoking histories and inherited variants in 5 established glioma risk regions: 5p15.3 (TERT), 8q24.21 (CCDC26/MLZE), 9p21.3 (CDKN2B), 11q23.3 (PHLDB1/DDX6), and 20q13.3 (RTEL1). The inverse relation between allergy and glioma was stronger among those who did not (odds ratio(allergy-glioma) = 0.40, 95% confidence interval: 0.28, 0.58) versus those who did (odds ratio(allergy-glioma) = 0.76, 95% confidence interval: 0.59, 0.97; P(interaction) = 0.02) carry the 9p21.3 risk allele. However, the inverse association with allergy was stronger among those who carried (odds ratio(allergy-glioma) = 0.44, 95% confidence interval: 0.29, 0.68) versus those who did not carry (odds ratio(allergy-glioma) = 0.68, 95% confidence interval: 0.54, 0.86) the 20q13.3 glioma risk allele, but this interaction was not statistically significant (P = 0.14). No relation was observed between glioma risk and smoking (odds ratio = 0.92, 95% confidence interval: 0.77, 1.10; P = 0.37), and there were no interactions for glioma risk of smoking history with any of the risk alleles. The authors' observations are consistent with a recent report that the inherited glioma risk variants in chromosome regions 9p21.3 and 20q13.3 may modify the inverse association of allergy and glioma. PMID:21742680

  10. Associations of High-Grade Glioma With Glioma Risk Alleles and Histories of Allergy and Smoking

    PubMed Central

    Lachance, Daniel H.; Yang, Ping; Johnson, Derek R.; Decker, Paul A.; Kollmeyer, Thomas M.; McCoy, Lucie S.; Rice, Terri; Xiao, Yuanyuan; Ali-Osman, Francis; Wang, Frances; Stoddard, Shawn M.; Sprau, Debra J.; Kosel, Matthew L.; Wiencke, John K.; Wiemels, Joseph L.; Patoka, Joseph S.; Davis, Faith; McCarthy, Bridget; Rynearson, Amanda L.; Worra, Joel B.; Fridley, Brooke L.; O’Neill, Brian Patrick; Buckner, Jan C.; Il’yasova, Dora; Jenkins, Robert B.; Wrensch, Margaret R.

    2011-01-01

    Glioma risk has consistently been inversely associated with allergy history but not with smoking history despite putative biologic plausibility. Data from 855 high-grade glioma cases and 1,160 controls from 4 geographic regions of the United States during 1997–2008 were analyzed for interactions between allergy and smoking histories and inherited variants in 5 established glioma risk regions: 5p15.3 (TERT), 8q24.21 (CCDC26/MLZE), 9p21.3 (CDKN2B), 11q23.3 (PHLDB1/DDX6), and 20q13.3 (RTEL1). The inverse relation between allergy and glioma was stronger among those who did not (odds ratioallergy-glioma = 0.40, 95% confidence interval: 0.28, 0.58) versus those who did (odds ratioallergy-glioma = 0.76, 95% confidence interval: 0.59, 0.97; Pinteraction = 0.02) carry the 9p21.3 risk allele. However, the inverse association with allergy was stronger among those who carried (odds ratioallergy-glioma = 0.44, 95% confidence interval: 0.29, 0.68) versus those who did not carry (odds ratioallergy-glioma = 0.68, 95% confidence interval: 0.54, 0.86) the 20q13.3 glioma risk allele, but this interaction was not statistically significant (P = 0.14). No relation was observed between glioma risk and smoking (odds ratio = 0.92, 95% confidence interval: 0.77, 1.10; P = 0.37), and there were no interactions for glioma risk of smoking history with any of the risk alleles. The authors’ observations are consistent with a recent report that the inherited glioma risk variants in chromosome regions 9p21.3 and 20q13.3 may modify the inverse association of allergy and glioma. PMID:21742680

  11. Frequent Nek1 overexpression in human gliomas.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jun; Cai, Yu; Liu, Pin; Zhao, Weiguo

    2016-08-01

    Never in mitosis A (NIMA)-related kinase 1 (Nek1) regulates cell cycle progression to mitosis. Its expression and potential functions in human gliomas have not been studied. Here, our immunohistochemistry (IHC) assay and Western blot assay results showed that Nek1 expression was significantly upregulated in fresh and paraffin-embedded human glioma tissues. Its level in normal brain tissues was low. Nek1 overexpression in human gliomas was correlated with the proliferation marker (Ki-67), tumor grade, Karnofsky performance scale (KPS) and more importantly, patients' poor survival. Further studies showed that Nek1 expression level was also increased in multiple human glioma cell lines (U251-MG, U87-MG, U118, H4 and U373). Significantly, siRNA-mediated knockdown of Nek1 inhibited glioma cell (U87-MG/U251-MG) growth. Nek1 siRNA also sensitized U87-MG/U251-MG cells to temozolomide (TMZ), causing a profound apoptosis induction and growth inhibition. The current study indicates Nek1 might be a novel and valuable oncotarget of glioma, it is important for glioma cell growth and TMZ-resistance. PMID:27251576

  12. IDH1 R132H mutation generates a distinct phospholipid metabolite profile in glioma.

    PubMed

    Esmaeili, Morteza; Hamans, Bob C; Navis, Anna C; van Horssen, Remco; Bathen, Tone F; Gribbestad, Ingrid S; Leenders, William P; Heerschap, Arend

    2014-09-01

    Many patients with glioma harbor specific mutations in the isocitrate dehydrogenase gene IDH1 that associate with a relatively better prognosis. IDH1-mutated tumors produce the oncometabolite 2-hydroxyglutarate. Because IDH1 also regulates several pathways leading to lipid synthesis, we hypothesized that IDH1-mutant tumors have an altered phospholipid metabolite profile that would impinge on tumor pathobiology. To investigate this hypothesis, we performed (31)P-MRS imaging in mouse xenograft models of four human gliomas, one of which harbored the IDH1-R132H mutation. (31)P-MR spectra from the IDH1-mutant tumor displayed a pattern distinct from that of the three IDH1 wild-type tumors, characterized by decreased levels of phosphoethanolamine and increased levels of glycerophosphocholine. This spectral profile was confirmed by ex vivo analysis of tumor extracts, and it was also observed in human surgical biopsies of IDH1-mutated tumors by (31)P high-resolution magic angle spinning spectroscopy. The specificity of this profile for the IDH1-R132H mutation was established by in vitro (31)P-NMR of extracts of cells overexpressing IDH1 or IDH1-R132H. Overall, our results provide evidence that the IDH1-R132H mutation alters phospholipid metabolism in gliomas involving phosphoethanolamine and glycerophosphocholine. These new noninvasive biomarkers can assist in the identification of the mutation and in research toward novel treatments that target aberrant metabolism in IDH1-mutant glioma. PMID:25005896

  13. Gallic acid suppresses cell viability, proliferation, invasion and angiogenesis in human glioma cells

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yong; Jiang, Feng; Jiang, Hao; Wu, Kalina; Zheng, Xuguang; Cai, Yizhong; Katakowski, Mark; Chopp, Michael; To, Shing-Shun Tony

    2010-01-01

    Gallic acid, an organic acid, also known as 3,4,5-trihydroxybenzoic acid, is cytotoxic against certain cancer cells, without harming normal cells. The objective of this study is to evaluate whether gallic acid can inhibit glioma cell viability, proliferation, invasion and reduce glioma cell mediated angiogenesis. Treatment of U87 and U251n glioma cells with gallic acid inhibited cell viability in a dose- and time-dependent manner. BrdU and tube formation assays indicated that gallic acid significantly decreased glioma cell proliferation and tube formation in mouse brain endothelial cells, respectively. In addition, gallic acid decreased U87 cell invasion in vitro. Western blot analysis showed that expression of ADAM17, p-Akt and p-Erk was suppressed by gallic acid in both U87 and U251n cell lines. These data suggest that suppression of ADAM17 and downregulation of PI3K/Akt and Ras/MAPK signaling pathways may contribute to gallic acid-induced decrease of invasiveness. Gallic acid may be a valuable candidate for treatment of brain tumor. PMID:20553913

  14. Disruption of astrocyte-vascular coupling and the blood-brain barrier by invading glioma cells

    PubMed Central

    Watkins, Stacey; Robel, Stefanie; Kimbrough, Ian F.; Robert, Stephanie M.; Ellis-Davies, Graham; Sontheimer, Harald

    2014-01-01

    Astrocytic endfeet cover the entire cerebral vasculature and serve as exchange sites for ions, metabolites, and energy substrates from the blood to the brain. They maintain endothelial tight junctions that form the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and release vasoactive molecules that regulate vascular tone. Malignant gliomas are highly invasive tumors that use the perivascular space for invasion and co-opt existing vessels as satellite tumors form. Here we use a clinically relevant mouse model of glioma and find that glioma cells, as they populate the perivascular space of pre-existing vessels, displace astrocytic endfeet from endothelial or vascular smooth muscle cells. This causes a focal breach in the BBB. Furthermore, astrocyte-mediated gliovascular coupling is lost, and glioma cells seize control over regulation of vascular tone through Ca2+-dependent release of K+. These findings have important clinical implications regarding blood flow in the tumor-associated brain and the ability to locally deliver chemotherapeutic drugs in disease. PMID:24943270

  15. Pre-Clinical Models of Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Glioma

    PubMed Central

    Misuraca, Katherine L.; Cordero, Francisco J.; Becher, Oren J.

    2015-01-01

    Diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG) is a rare and incurable brain tumor that arises in the brainstem of children predominantly between the ages of 6 and 8. Its intricate morphology and involvement of normal pons tissue precludes surgical resection, and the standard of care today remains fractionated radiation alone. In the past 30 years, there have been no significant advances made in the treatment of DIPG. This is largely because we lack good models of DIPG and therefore have little biological basis for treatment. In recent years, however, due to increased biopsy and acquisition of autopsy specimens, research is beginning to unravel the genetic and epigenetic drivers of DIPG. Insight gleaned from these studies has led to improvements in approaches to both model these tumors in the lab and to potentially treat them in the clinic. This review will detail the initial strides toward modeling DIPG in animals, which included allograft and xenograft rodent models using non-DIPG glioma cells. Important advances in the field came with the development of in vitro cell and in vivo xenograft models derived directly from autopsy material of DIPG patients or from human embryonic stem cells. Finally, we will summarize the progress made in the development of genetically engineered mouse models of DIPG. Cooperation of studies incorporating all of these modeling systems to both investigate the unique mechanisms of gliomagenesis in the brainstem and to test potential novel therapeutic agents in a preclinical setting will result in improvement in treatments for DIPG patients. PMID:26258075

  16. Biomarker-driven diagnosis of diffuse gliomas.

    PubMed

    Appin, Christina L; Brat, Daniel J

    2015-11-01

    The diffuse gliomas are primary central nervous system tumors that arise most frequently in the cerebral hemispheres of adults. They are currently classified as astrocytomas, oligodendrogliomas or oligoastrocytomas and range in grade from II to IV. Glioblastoma (GBM), grade IV, is the highest grade and most common form. The diagnosis of diffuse gliomas has historically been based primarily on histopathologic features, yet these tumors have a wide range of biological behaviors that are only partially explained by morphology. Biomarkers have now become an established component of the neuropathologic diagnosis of gliomas, since molecular alterations aid in classification, prognostication and prediction of therapeutic response. Isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) mutations are frequent in grades II and III infiltrating gliomas of adults, as well as secondary GBMs, and are a major discriminate of biologic class. IDH mutant infiltrating astrocytomas (grades II and III), as well as secondary GBMs, are characterized by TP53 and ATRX mutations. Oligodendrogliomas are also IDH mutant, but instead are characterized by 1p/19q co-deletion and mutations of CIC, FUBP1, Notch1 and the TERT promoter. Primary GBMs typically lack IDH mutations and demonstrate EGFR, PTEN, TP53, PDGFRA, NF1 and CDKN2A/B alterations and TERT promoter mutations. Pediatric gliomas differ in their spectrum of disease from those in adults; high grade gliomas occurring in children frequently have mutations in H3F3A, ATRX and DAXX, but not IDH. Circumscribed, low grade gliomas, such as pilocytic astrocytoma, pleomorphic xanthoastrocytoma and ganglioglioma, need to be distinguished from diffuse gliomas in the pediatric population. These gliomas often harbor mutations or activating gene rearrangements in BRAF. PMID:26004297

  17. Radiation-induced intracranial malignant gliomas

    SciTech Connect

    Shapiro, S.; Mealey, J. Jr.; Sartorius, C.

    1989-07-01

    The authors present seven cases of malignant gliomas that occurred after radiation therapy administered for diseases different from the subsequent glial tumor. Included among these seven are three patients who were treated with interstitial brachytherapy. Previously reported cases of radiation-induced glioma are reviewed and analyzed for common characteristics. Children receiving central nervous system irradiation appear particularly susceptible to induction of malignant gliomas by radiation. Interstitial brachytherapy may be used successfully instead of external beam radiotherapy in previously irradiated, tumor-free brain, and thus may reduce the risk of radiation necrosis. 31 references.

  18. Advanced MR Imaging of Gliomas: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Shih-Wei; Chung, Hsiao-Wen; Tsai, Fong Y.; Chen, Cheng-Yu

    2013-01-01

    Recent advances in the treatment of cerebral gliomas have increased the demands on noninvasive neuroimaging for the diagnosis, therapeutic planning, tumor monitoring, and patient outcome prediction. In the meantime, improved magnetic resonance (MR) imaging techniques have shown much potentials in evaluating the key pathological features of the gliomas, including cellularity, invasiveness, mitotic activity, angiogenesis, and necrosis, hence, further shedding light on glioma grading before treatment. In this paper, an update of advanced MR imaging techniques is reviewed, and their potential roles as biomarkers of tumor grading are discussed. PMID:23862163

  19. A report on radiation-induced gliomas

    SciTech Connect

    Salvati, M.; Artico, M.; Caruso, R.; Rocchi, G.; Orlando, E.R.; Nucci, F. )

    1991-01-15

    Radiation-induced gliomas are uncommon, with only 73 cases on record to date. The disease that most frequently occasioned radiation therapy has been acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Three more cases are added here, two after irradiation for ALL and one after irradiation for tinea capitis. In a review of the relevant literature, the authors stress the possibility that the ALL-glioma and the retinoblastoma-glioma links point to syndromes in their own right that may occur without radiation therapy.56 references.

  20. Synergistic antitumor effect with indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase inhibition and temozolomide in a murine glioma model.

    PubMed

    Hanihara, Mitsuto; Kawataki, Tomoyuki; Oh-Oka, Kyoko; Mitsuka, Kentaro; Nakao, Atsuhito; Kinouchi, Hiroyuki

    2016-06-01

    OBJECT Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO), a key enzyme of tryptophan (Trp) metabolism, is involved in tumor-derived immune suppression through depletion of Trp and accumulation of the metabolite kynurenine, resulting in inactivation of natural killer cells and generation of regulatory T cells (Tregs). It has been reported that high expression of IDO in cancer cells is associated with suppression of the antitumor immune response and is consistent with a poor prognosis. Thus, IDO may be a therapeutic target for malignant cancer. The authors have recently shown that IDO expression is markedly increased in human glioblastoma and secondary glioblastoma with malignant change, suggesting that IDO targeting may also have therapeutic potential for patients with glioma. The aim of this study was to investigate the antitumor effect of IDO inhibition and to examine the synergistic function of IDO inhibitor and temozolomide (TMZ) in a murine glioma model. METHODS Murine glioma GL261 cells and human glioma U87 cells were included in this study. The authors used 3 mouse models to study glioma cell growth: 1) a subcutaneous ectopic model, 2) a syngeneic intracranial orthotopic model, and 3) an allogenic intracranial orthotopic model. IDO inhibition was achieved via knockdown of IDO in GL261 cells using short hairpin RNA (shRNA) and through oral administration of the IDO inhibitor, 1-methyl-l-tryptophan (1-MT). Tumor volume in the subcutaneous model and survival time in the intracranial model were evaluated. RESULTS In the subcutaneous model, oral administration of 1-MT significantly suppressed tumor growth, and synergistic antitumor effects of 1-MT and TMZ were observed (p < 0.01). Mice containing intracranially inoculated IDO knockdown cells had a significantly longer survival period as compared with control mice (p < 0.01). CONCLUSIONS These results suggest that IDO expression is implicated in immunosuppression and tumor progression in glioma cells. Therefore, combining IDO

  1. CacyBP/SIP inhibits Doxourbicin-induced apoptosis of glioma cells due to activation of ERK1/2.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yuan; Zhan, Wenjian; Cao, Tong; Tang, Tianjin; Gao, Yong; Qiu, Zhichao; Fu, Chunling; Qian, Fengyuan; Yu, Rutong; Shi, Hengliang

    2016-03-01

    Calcyclin-binding protein or Siah-1-interacting protein (CacyBP/SIP) was previously reported to promote the proliferation of glioma cells. However, the effect of CacyBP/SIP on apoptosis of glioma is poorly understood. Here, our study shows that CacyBP/SIP plays a role in inhibiting doxorubicin (DOX) induced apoptosis of glioma cells U251 and U87. Overexpression of CacyBP/SIP obviously suppressed the DOX-induced cell apoptosis. On the contrary, silencing of CacyBP/SIP significantly promoted it. Further investigation indicated that inhibition of apoptosis by CacyBP/SIP was relevant to its nuclear translocation in response to the DOX treatment. Importantly, we found that the level of p-ERK1/2 in nuclei was related to the nuclear accumulation of CacyBP/SIP. Finally, the role of CacyBP/SIP was confirmed in vivo in a mouse model with the cell line stably silencing CacyBP/SIP. Taken together, our results suggest that CacyBP/SIP plays an important role in inhibiting apoptosis of glioma cells which might be mediated by ERK1/2 signaling pathway, which will provide some guidance for the treatment of glioma. PMID:26825673

  2. Improving vaccine efficacy against malignant glioma.

    PubMed

    Ladomersky, Erik; Genet, Matthew; Zhai, Lijie; Gritsina, Galina; Lauing, Kristen L; Lulla, Rishi R; Fangusaro, Jason; Lenzen, Alicia; Kumthekar, Priya; Raizer, Jeffrey J; Binder, David C; James, C David; Wainwright, Derek A

    2016-08-01

    The effective treatment of adult and pediatric malignant glioma is a significant clinical challenge. In adults, glioblastoma (GBM) accounts for the majority of malignant glioma diagnoses with a median survival of 14.6 mo. In children, malignant glioma accounts for 20% of primary CNS tumors with a median survival of less than 1 y. Here, we discuss vaccine treatment for children diagnosed with malignant glioma, through targeting EphA2, IL-13Rα2 and/or histone H3 K27M, while in adults, treatments with RINTEGA, Prophage Series G-100 and dendritic cells are explored. We conclude by proposing new strategies that are built on current vaccine technologies and improved upon with novel combinatorial approaches. PMID:27622066

  3. The Art of Intraoperative Glioma Identification

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zoe Z.; Shields, Lisa B. E.; Sun, David A.; Zhang, Yi Ping; Hunt, Matthew A.; Shields, Christopher B.

    2015-01-01

    A major dilemma in brain-tumor surgery is the identification of tumor boundaries to maximize tumor excision and minimize postoperative neurological damage. Gliomas, especially low-grade tumors, and normal brain have a similar color and texture, which poses a challenge to the neurosurgeon. Advances in glioma resection techniques combine the experience of the neurosurgeon and various advanced technologies. Intraoperative methods to delineate gliomas from normal tissue consist of (1) image-based navigation, (2) intraoperative sampling, (3) electrophysiological monitoring, and (4) enhanced visual tumor demarcation. The advantages and disadvantages of each technique are discussed. A combination of these methods is becoming widely accepted in routine glioma surgery. Gross total resection in conjunction with radiation, chemotherapy, or immune/gene therapy may increase the rates of cure in this devastating disease. PMID:26284196

  4. Treatment Options for Childhood Brain Stem Glioma

    MedlinePlus

    ... before the cancer is diagnosed and continue for months or years. Childhood brain stem gliomas may cause ... after treatment. Some cancer treatments cause side effects months or years after treatment has ended. These are ...

  5. Stages of Childhood Brain Stem Glioma

    MedlinePlus

    ... before the cancer is diagnosed and continue for months or years. Childhood brain stem gliomas may cause ... after treatment. Some cancer treatments cause side effects months or years after treatment has ended. These are ...

  6. Photochemical internalization of bleomycin for glioma treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathews, Marlon S.; Blickenstaff, Joseph W.; Shih, En-Chung; Zamora, Genesis; Vo, Van; Sun, Chung-Ho; Hirschberg, Henry; Madsen, Steen J.

    2012-05-01

    We study the use of photochemical internalization (PCI) for enhancing chemotherapeutic response to malignant glioma cells in vitro. Two models are studied: monolayers consisting of F98 rat glioma cells and human glioma spheroids established from biopsy-derived glioma cells. In both cases, the cytotoxicity of aluminum phthalocyanine disulfonate (AlPcS2a)-based PCI of bleomycin was compared to AlPcS2a-photodynamic therapy (PDT) and chemotherapy alone. Monolayers and spheroids were incubated with AlPcS2a (PDT effect), bleomycin (chemotherapy effect), or AlPcS2a+bleomycin (PCI effect) and were illuminated (670 nm). Toxicity was evaluated using colony formation assays or spheroid growth kinetics. F98 cells in monolayer/spheroids were not particularly sensitive to the effects of low radiant exposure (1.5 J/cm2 @ 5 mW/cm2) AlPcS2a-PDT. Bleomycin was moderately toxic to F98 cells in monolayer at relatively low concentrations-incubation of F98 cells in 0.1 μg/ml for 4 h resulted in 80% survival, but less toxic in human glioma spheroids respectively. In both in vitro systems investigated, a significant PCI effect is seen. PCI using 1.5 J/cm2 together with 0.25 μg/ml bleomycin resulted in approximately 20% and 18% survival of F98 rat glioma cells and human glioma spheroids, respectively. These results show that AlPcS2a-mediated PCI can be used to enhance the efficacy of chemotherapeutic agents such as bleomycin in malignant gliomas.

  7. Improving seroreactivity-based detection of glioma.

    PubMed

    Ludwig, Nicole; Keller, Andreas; Heisel, Sabrina; Leidinger, Petra; Klein, Veronika; Rheinheimer, Stefanie; Andres, Claudia U; Stephan, Bernhard; Steudel, Wolf-Ingo; Graf, Norbert M; Burgeth, Bernhard; Weickert, Joachim; Lenhof, Hans-Peter; Meese, Eckart

    2009-12-01

    Seroreactivity profiling emerges as valuable technique for minimal invasive cancer detection. Recently, we provided first evidence for the applicability of serum profiling of glioma using a limited number of immunogenic antigens. Here, we screened 57 glioma and 60 healthy sera for autoantibodies against 1827 Escherichia coli expressed clones, including 509 in-frame peptide sequences. By a linear support vector machine approach, we calculated mean specificity, sensitivity, and accuracy of 100 repetitive classifications. We were able to differentiate glioma sera from sera of the healthy controls with a specificity of 90.28%, a sensitivity of 87.31% and an accuracy of 88.84%. We were also able to differentiate World Health Organization grade IV glioma sera from healthy sera with a specificity of 98.45%, a sensitivity of 80.93%, and an accuracy of 92.88%. To rank the antigens according to their information content, we computed the area under the receiver operator characteristic curve value for each clone. Altogether, we found 46 immunogenic clones including 16 in-frame clones that were informative for the classification of glioma sera versus healthy sera. For the separation of glioblastoma versus healthy sera, we found 91 informative clones including 26 in-frame clones. The best-suited in-frame clone for the classification glioma sera versus healthy sera corresponded to the vimentin gene (VIM) that was previously associated with glioma. In the future, autoantibody signatures in glioma not only may prove useful for diagnosis but also offer the prospect for a personalized immune-based therapy. PMID:20019846

  8. Targeted Radiolabeled Compounds in Glioma Therapy.

    PubMed

    Cordier, Dominik; Krolicki, Leszek; Morgenstern, Alfred; Merlo, Adrian

    2016-05-01

    Malignant gliomas of World Health Organization (WHO) grades II-IV represent the largest entity within the group of intrinsic brain tumors and are graded according to their pathophysiological features with survival times between more than 10 years (WHO II) and only several months (WHO IV). Gliomas arise from astrocytic or oligodendrocytic precursor cells and exhibit an infiltrative growth pattern lacking a clearly identifiable tumor border. The development of effective treatment strategies of the invasive tumor cell front represents the main challenge in glioma therapy. The therapeutic standard consists of surgical resection and, depending on the extent of resection and WHO grade, adjuvant external beam radiotherapy or systemic chemotherapy. Within the last decades, there has been no major improvement of the prognosis of patients with glioma. The consistent overexpression of neurokinin type 1 receptors in gliomas WHO grades II-IV has been used to develop a therapeutic substance P-based targeting system. A substance P-analogue conjugated to the DOTA or DOTAGA chelator has been labeled with different alpha-particle or beta-particle emitting radionuclides for targeted glioma therapy. The radiopharmaceutical has been locally injected into the tumors or the resection cavity. In several clinical studies, the methodology has been examined in adjuvant and neoadjuvant clinical settings. Although no large controlled series have so far been generated, the results of radiolabeled substance P-based targeted glioma therapy compare favorably with standard therapy. Recently, labeling with the alpha particle emitting Bi-213 has been found to be promising due to the high linear energy transfer and the very short tissue range of 0.08mm. Further development needs to focus on the improvement of the stability of the compound and the application by dedicated catheter systems to improve the intratumoral distribution of the radiopharmaceutical within the prognostically critical infiltrative

  9. Rapid Intraoperative Molecular Characterization of Glioma

    PubMed Central

    Shankar, Ganesh M.; Francis, Joshua M.; Rinne, Mikael L.; Ramkissoon, Shakti H.; Huang, Franklin W.; Venteicher, Andrew S.; Akama-Garren, Elliot H.; Kang, Yun Jee; Lelic, Nina; Kim, James C.; Brown, Loreal E.; Charbonneau, Sarah K.; Golby, Alexandra J.; Pedamallu, Chandra Sekhar; Hoang, Mai P.; Sullivan, Ryan J.; Cherniack, Andrew D.; Garraway, Levi A.; Stemmer-Rachamimov, Anat; Reardon, David A.; Wen, Patrick Y.; Brastianos, Priscilla K.; Curry, William T.; Barker, Fred G.; Hahn, William C.; Nahed, Brian V.; Ligon, Keith L.; Louis, David N.; Cahill, Daniel P.; Meyerson, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Conclusive intraoperative pathologic confirmation of diffuse infiltrative glioma guides the decision to pursue definitive neurosurgical resection. Establishing the intraoperative diagnosis by histologic analysis can be difficult in low-cellularity infiltrative gliomas. Therefore, we developed a rapid and sensitive genotyping assay to detect somatic single-nucleotide variants in the telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) promoter and isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1). OBSERVATIONS This assay was applied to tissue samples from 190 patients with diffuse gliomas, including archived fixed and frozen specimens and tissue obtained intraoperatively. Results demonstrated 96% sensitivity (95% CI, 90%–99%) and 100% specificity (95% CI, 95%–100%) for World Health Organization grades II and III gliomas. In a series of live cases, glioma-defining mutations could be identified within 60 minutes, which could facilitate the diagnosis in an intraoperative timeframe. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE The genotyping method described herein can establish the diagnosis of low-cellularity tumors like glioma and could be adapted to the point-of-care diagnosis of other lesions that are similarly defined by highly recurrent somatic mutations. PMID:26181761

  10. Palliative and supportive care for glioma patients.

    PubMed

    Walbert, Tobias; Chasteen, Kristen

    2015-01-01

    The diagnosis of a brain tumor is a life-changing event for patients and families. High-grade gliomas are incurable and long-term survival remains limited. While low-grade glioma patients have better outcomes, their quality of life is often affected by a variety of symptoms as well. Helping glioma patients improve quality of life at all stages of illness is an important goal for the interdisciplinary care team. There is evidence from advanced lung cancer patients that early involvement of a palliative care team can improve patient's quality of life, symptom burden, and even survival and a similar approach benefits glioma patients as well. Patients with high-grade and low-grade glioma often suffer from significant symptom burden. We discuss how validated global symptom assessments and symptom-specific screening tools are useful to identify distressing symptoms. Seizures, fatigue, depression, and anxiety are some of the more common symptoms throughout the disease course and should be managed actively. Patients with glioma also have high symptom burden at the end of life and the majority lose decision-making capacity. Advance care planning conversations early in the disease course are essential to elicit the patient's wishes for end of life care and effective communication with surrogate decision makers during all stages of the disease helps ensure that those wishes are respected. PMID:25468232

  11. Multifunctional targeting vinorelbine plus tetrandrine liposomes for treating brain glioma along with eliminating glioma stem cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Xue-Tao; Tang, Wei; Jiang, Ying; Wang, Xiao-Min; Wang, Yan-Hong; Cheng, Lan; Meng, Xian-Sheng

    2016-04-26

    Malignant brain glioma is the most lethal and aggressive type of cancer. Surgery and radiotherapy cannot eliminate all glioma stem cells (GSCs) and blood-brain barrier (BBB) restricts the movement of antitumor drugs from blood to brain, thus leading to the poor prognosis with high recurrence rate. In the present study, the targeting conjugates of cholesterol polyethylene glycol polyethylenimine (CHOL-PEG2000-PEI) and D-a-tocopheryl polyethylene glycol 1000 succinate vapreotide (TPGS1000-VAP) were newly synthesized for transporting drugs across the BBB and targeting glioma cells and GSCs. The multifunctional targeting vinorelbine plus tetrandrine liposomes were constructed by modifying the targeting conjugates. The studies were undertaken on BBB model, glioma cells, GSCs, and glioma-bearing mice. In vitro results showed that multifunctional targeting drugs-loaded liposomes with suitable physicochemical property could enhance the transport drugs across the BBB, increase the intracellular uptake, inhibit glioma cells and GSCs, penetrate and destruct the GSCs spheroids, and induce apoptosis via activating related apoptotic proteins. In vivo results demonstrated that multifunctional targeting drugs-loaded liposomes could significantly accumulate into brain tumor location, show the specificity to tumor sites, and result in a robust overall antitumor efficacy in glioma-bearing mice. These data suggested that the multifunctional targeting vinorelbine plus tetrandrine liposomes could offer a promising strategy for treating brain glioma. PMID:27029055

  12. Overexpression of TREM2 enhances glioma cell proliferation and invasion: a therapeutic target in human glioma

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiao-Qiang; Tao, Bang-Bao; Li, Bin; Wang, Xu-Hui; Zhang, Wen-Chuan; Wan, Liang; Hua, Xu-Ming; Li, Shi-Ting

    2016-01-01

    Gliomas are the most common and aggressive type of primary adult brain tumors. Although TREM2 mutation is reported to be related to Nasu-Hakola disease and Alzheimer's disease, little is known about the association between TREM2 and gliomas. Here, we reported that TREM2 was significantly overexpressed in glioma tissues compared with non-tumorous brain tissues. Furthermore, TREM2 expression was closely related to pathological grade and overall survival of patients with gliomas. Down-regulation of TREM2 in two glioma cell lines, U87 and U373, resulted in a significant reduction in cell proliferation, migration and invasion and a dramatic increase in S phase arrest and apoptosis. In vivo tumorigenesis experiment also revealed that depletion of TREM2 expression inhibited U87 cell proliferation. Moreover, based on gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA) with The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) dataset, we found that TREM2 was positive related to Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) apoptosis, Cromer metastasis and KEGG chemokine pathways, which was further validated by western blot in TREM2 knockdown glioma cells and indicated a possible mechanism underlying its effects on glioma. In summary, our study suggests that TREM2 may work as an oncogene and a new effective therapeutic target for glioma treatment. PMID:26506595

  13. Sleeping Beauty Mouse Models Identify Candidate Genes Involved in Gliomagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Vyazunova, Irina; Maklakova, Vilena I.; Berman, Samuel; De, Ishani; Steffen, Megan D.; Hong, Won; Lincoln, Hayley; Morrissy, A. Sorana; Taylor, Michael D.; Akagi, Keiko; Brennan, Cameron W.; Rodriguez, Fausto J.; Collier, Lara S.

    2014-01-01

    Genomic studies of human high-grade gliomas have discovered known and candidate tumor drivers. Studies in both cell culture and mouse models have complemented these approaches and have identified additional genes and processes important for gliomagenesis. Previously, we found that mobilization of Sleeping Beauty transposons in mice ubiquitously throughout the body from the Rosa26 locus led to gliomagenesis with low penetrance. Here we report the characterization of mice in which transposons are mobilized in the Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein (GFAP) compartment. Glioma formation in these mice did not occur on an otherwise wild-type genetic background, but rare gliomas were observed when mobilization occurred in a p19Arf heterozygous background. Through cloning insertions from additional gliomas generated by transposon mobilization in the Rosa26 compartment, several candidate glioma genes were identified. Comparisons to genetic, epigenetic and mRNA expression data from human gliomas implicates several of these genes as tumor suppressor genes and oncogenes in human glioblastoma. PMID:25423036

  14. Immunological Aspects of Malignant Gliomas.

    PubMed

    Cohen-Inbar, Or; Zaaroor, Menashe

    2016-07-01

    Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM) is the most common malignant primary brain neoplasm having a mean survival time of <24 months. This figure remains constant, despite significant progress in medical research and treatment. The lack of an efficient anti-tumor immune response and the micro-invasive nature of the glioma malignant cells have been explained by a multitude of immune-suppressive mechanisms, proven in different models. These immune-resistant capabilities of the tumor result in a complex interplay this tumor shares with the immune system. We present a short review on the immunology of GBM, discussing the different unique pathological and molecular features of GBM, current treatment modalities, the principles of cancer immunotherapy and the link between GBM and melanoma. Current knowledge on immunological features of GBM, as well as immunotherapy past and current clinical trials, is discussed in an attempt to broadly present the complex and formidable challenges posed by GBM. PMID:27324313

  15. Vaccine Therapies in Malignant Glioma

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Taemin; Sayegh, Eli T.; Fakurnejad, Shayan; Oyon, Daniel; Lamano, Jonathan Balquiedra; DiDomenico, Joseph David; Bloch, Orin; Parsa, Andrew T.

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma is a grade IV astrocytoma that is widely accepted in clinical neurosurgery as being an extremely lethal diagnosis. Long-term survival rates remain dismal and, even when tumors undergo gross resection with confirmation of total removal on neuroimaging, they invariably recur with even greater virulence. Standard therapeutic modalities as well as more contemporary treatments have largely resulted in disappointing improvements. However, the therapeutic potential of vaccine immunotherapy for malignant glioma should not be underestimated. In contrast to many of the available treatments, vaccine immunotherapy is unique because it offers the means of delivering treatment that is highly specific to both the patient and the tumor. Peptide, heat-shock proteins, and dendritic cell vaccines collectively encapsulate the majority of research efforts involving vaccine-based treatment modalities. In this review, important recent findings for these vaccine types are discussed in the context of ongoing clinical trials. Broad challenges to immunotherapy are also considered. PMID:25431096

  16. Microglial action in glioma: a boon turns bane.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Anirban; Chaudhuri, Swapna

    2010-06-15

    Microglia has the potential to shape the neuroimmune defense with vast array of functional attributes. The cells prime infiltrated lymphocytes to retain their effector functions, play crucial role in controlling microenvironmental milieu and significantly participate in glioma. Reports demonstrate microglial accumulation in glioma and predict their assistance in glioma growth and spreading. Clarification of the 'double-edged' appearance of microglia is necessary to unfold its role in glioma biology. In this article the interpretation of microglial activities has been attempted to reveal their actual function in glioma. Contrary to the trendy acceptance of its glioma promoting infamy, accumulated evidences make an effort to view the state of affairs in favor of the cell. Critical scrutiny indicates that microglial immune assaults are intended to demolish the neoplastic cells in brain. But the weaponry of microglia has been tactically utilized by glioma in their favor as the survival strategy. Hence the defender appears as enemy in advanced glioma. PMID:20338195

  17. BmKCT toxin inhibits glioma proliferation and tumor metastasis.

    PubMed

    Fan, Shaozhong; Sun, Zhengbo; Jiang, Dahe; Dai, Chao; Ma, Yibao; Zhao, Zhenhuan; Liu, Hui; Wu, Yingliang; Cao, Zhijian; Li, Wenxin

    2010-05-28

    Malignant gliomas are the most common primary brain tumors associated with significant morbidity and mortality. How to target the tumor in situ, and inhibit tumor cell proliferation and invasion is the key for therapy. Gliomas express a glioma-specific chloride ion channel that is sensitive to toxins including BmKCT. In the current study, the inhibitory effect of BmKCT on glioma growth was observed in vivo using the glioma/SD rat model. Furthermore, BmKCT prevented the metastasis of glioma cells in vivo. Moreover, biodistribution experiments with (l3l)I-labeled or Cy5.5-conjugated BmKCT revealed that BmKCT selectively targeted the glioma in situ. Our data suggest that BmKCT could be exploited as a potential therapeutic for glioma diagnosis and therapy. PMID:19906483

  18. Phenotypic Transition as a Survival Strategy of Glioma

    PubMed Central

    ICHIKAWA, Tomotsugu; OTANI, Yoshihiro; KUROZUMI, Kazuhiko; DATE, Isao

    2016-01-01

    Malignant glioma is characterized by rapid proliferation, invasion into surrounding central nervous system tissues, and aberrant vascularization. There is increasing evidence that shows gliomas are more complex than previously thought, as each tumor comprises considerable intratumoral heterogeneity with mixtures of genetically and phenotypically distinct subclones. Heterogeneity within and across tumors is recognized as a critical factor that limits therapeutic progress for malignant glioma. Recent genotyping and expression profiling of gliomas has allowed for the creation of classification schemes that assign tumors to subtypes based on similarity to defined expression signatures. Also, malignant gliomas frequently shift their biological features upon recurrence and progression. The ability of glioma cells to resist adverse conditions such as hypoxia and metabolic stress is necessary for sustained tumor growth and strongly influences tumor behaviors. In general, glioma cells are in one of two phenotypic categories: higher proliferative activity with angiogenesis, or higher migratory activity with attenuated proliferative ability. Further, they switch phenotypic categories depending on the situation. To date, a multidimensional approach has been employed to clarify the mechanisms of phenotypic shift of glioma. Various molecular and signaling pathways are involved in phenotypic shifts of glioma, possibly with crosstalk between them. In this review, we discuss molecular and phenotypic heterogeneity of glioma cells and mechanisms of phenotypic shifts in regard to the glioma proliferation, angiogenesis, and invasion. A better understanding of the molecular mechanisms that underlie phenotypic shifts of glioma may provide new insights into targeted therapeutic strategies. PMID:27169497

  19. Glycosilated nucleolin as marker for human gliomas.

    PubMed

    Galzio, R; Rosati, F; Benedetti, E; Cristiano, L; Aldi, S; Mei, S; D'Angelo, B; Gentile, R; Laurenti, G; Cifone, M G; Giordano, A; Cimini, A

    2012-02-01

    Nucleolin is a multifunctional DNA and RNA binding protein involved in regulation of gene transcription, chromatin remodeling, RNA metabolism, and ribosomal RNA synthesis. Nucleolin seems to be over-expressed in highly proliferative cells and is involved in many aspect of gene expression: DNA recombination and replication, RNA transcription by RNA polymerase I and II, rRNA processing, mRNA stabilization, cytokinesis, and apoptosis. Although nucleolin is localized predominantly in the nucleolus, it has also been shown to be localized in a phosphorylated/glycolsilated form on the cell surface of different cells. Numerous articles dealing with surface nucleolin targeting for tumor therapy have been recently published. However, at present, no extensive informations are so far available for the presence of nucleolin in human gliomas. In the present work we investigated on the presence and localization of nucleolin in glioma on glioma specimens at different grade of malignancy and on primary glioma cell cultures derived by surgical resection, trying to correlate the presence of glycosilated membrane nucleolin with the malignancy grade. To this purpose an antibody produced by us against gp273 protein, demonstrated to recognized the glycosilated surface nucleolin, has been used. The results obtained demonstrate that surface nucleolin increase with the malignancy grade thus suggesting that it may constitute a histopathological marker for glioma grading and a possible tool for targeted therapy. PMID:21938743

  20. Management of Elderly Patients With Gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Gállego Pérez-Larraya, Jaime

    2014-01-01

    The current progressive aging of the population is resulting in a continuous increase in the incidence of gliomas in elderly people, especially the most frequent subtype, glioblastoma (GBM). This sociohealth shift, known as the “silver tsunami,” has prompted the neuro-oncology community to investigate the role of specific antitumor treatments, such as surgery, radiotherapy, chemotherapy, and other targeted therapies, for these traditionally undertreated patients. Advanced age, a widely recognized poor prognostic factor in both low-grade glioma (LGG) and high-grade glioma patients, should no longer be the sole reason for excluding such older patients from receiving etiologic treatments. Far from it, results from recent prospective trials conducted on elderly patients with GBM demonstrate that active management of these patients can have a positive impact on survival without impairing either cognition or quality of life. Although prospective studies specifically addressing the management of grade 2 and 3 gliomas are lacking and thus needed, the aforementioned tendency toward acknowledging a therapeutic benefit for GBM patients might also apply to the treatment of patients with LGG and anaplastic gliomas. In order to optimize such etiologic treatment in conjunction with symptomatic management, neuro-oncology multidisciplinary boards must individually consider important features such as resectability of the tumor, functional and cognitive status, associated comorbidities, and social support. PMID:25342314

  1. Upregulation of PTEN in Glioma Cells by Cord Blood Mesenchymal Stem Cells Inhibits Migration via Downregulation of the PI3K/Akt Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Dasari, Venkata Ramesh; Kaur, Kiranpreet; Velpula, Kiran Kumar; Gujrati, Meena; Fassett, Daniel; Klopfenstein, Jeffrey D.; Dinh, Dzung H.; Rao, Jasti S.

    2010-01-01

    Background PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homologue deleted on chromosome ten) is a tumor suppressor gene implicated in a wide variety of human cancers, including glioblastoma. PTEN is a major negative regulator of the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway. Most human gliomas show high levels of activated Akt, whereas less than half of these tumors carry PTEN mutations or homozygous deletions. The unique ability of mesenchymal stem cells to track down tumor cells makes them as potential therapeutic agents. Based on this capability, new therapeutic approaches have been developed using mesenchymal stem cells to cure glioblastoma. However, molecular mechanisms of interactions between glioma cells and stem cells are still unknown. Methodology/Principal Findings In order to study the mechanisms by which migration of glioma cells can be inhibited by the upregulation of the PTEN gene, we studied two glioma cell lines (SNB19 and U251) and two glioma xenograft cell lines (4910 and 5310) alone and in co-culture with human umbilical cord blood-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hUCBSC). Co-cultures of glioma cells showed increased expression of PTEN as evaluated by immunofluorescence and immunoblotting assays. Upregulation of PTEN gene is correlated with the downregulation of many genes including Akt, JUN, MAPK14, PDK2, PI3K, PTK2, RAS and RAF1 as revealed by cDNA microarray analysis. These results have been confirmed by reverse-transcription based PCR analysis of PTEN and Akt genes. Upregulation of PTEN resulted in the inhibition of migration capability of glioma cells under in vitro conditions. Also, wound healing capability of glioma cells was significantly inhibited in co-culture with hUCBSC. Under in vivo conditions, intracranial tumor growth was inhibited by hUCBSC in nude mice. Further, hUCBSC upregulated PTEN and decreased the levels of XIAP and Akt, which are responsible for the inhibition of tumor growth in the mouse brain. Conclusions/Significance Our studies indicated that

  2. A novel cell cycle-associated lncRNA, HOXA11-AS, is transcribed from the 5-prime end of the HOXA transcript and is a biomarker of progression in glioma.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qixue; Zhang, Junxia; Liu, Yanwei; Zhang, Wei; Zhou, Junhu; Duan, Ran; Pu, Peiyu; Kang, Chunsheng; Han, Lei

    2016-04-10

    The comprehensive lncRNA expression signature in glioma has not yet been fully elucidated. We performed a high-throughput microarray to detect the ncRNA expression profiles of 220 human glioma tissues. Here, we found that a novel lncRNA, HOXA11-AS, was the antisense transcript of the HOX11 gene. It was shown that HOXA11-AS was closely associated with glioma grade and poor prognosis. Multivariate Cox regression analysis revealed that HOXA11-AS was an independent prognostic factor in glioblastoma multiforme patients, and its expression was correlated with the glioma molecular subtypes of the Cancer Genome Atlas. Gene set enrichment analysis indicated that the gene sets most correlated with HOXA11-AS expression were involved in cell cycle progression. Over-expression of the HOXA11-AS transcript promoted cell proliferation in vitro, while knockdown of HOXA11-AS expression repressed cell proliferation via regulation of cell cycle progression. The growth-promoting and growth-inhibiting effects of HOXA11-AS were also demonstrated in a xenograft mouse model. Our data confirms, for the first time, that HOXA11-AS is an important long non-coding RNA that primarily serves as a prognostic factor for glioma patient survival. HOXA11-AS could serve as a biomarker for identifying glioma molecular subtypes and as therapeutic target for glioma patients. PMID:26828136

  3. MicroRNA-128 coordinately targets Polycomb Repressor Complexes in glioma stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Peruzzi, Pierpaolo; Bronisz, Agnieszka; Nowicki, Michal O.; Wang, Yan; Ogawa, Daisuke; Price, Richard; Nakano, Ichiro; Kwon, Chang-Hyuk; Hayes, Josie; Lawler, Sean E.; Ostrowski, Michael C.; Chiocca, E. Antonio; Godlewski, Jakub

    2013-01-01

    Background The Polycomb Repressor Complex (PRC) is an epigenetic regulator of transcription whose action is mediated by 2 protein complexes, PRC1 and PRC2. PRC is oncogenic in glioblastoma, where it is involved in cancer stem cell maintenance and radioresistance. Methods We used a set of glioblastoma patient samples, glioma stem cells, and neural stem cells from a mouse model of glioblastoma. We characterized gene/protein expression and cellular phenotypes by quantitative PCR/Western blotting and clonogenic, cell-cycle, and DNA damage assays. We performed overexpression/knockdown studies by lentiviral infection and microRNA/small interfering RNA oligonucleotide transfection. Results We show that microRNA-128 (miR-128) directly targets mRNA of SUZ12, a key component of PRC2, in addition to BMI1, a component of PRC1 that we previously showed as a target as well. This blocks the partially redundant functions of PRC1/PRC2, thereby significantly reducing PRC activity and its associated histone modifications. MiR-128 and SUZ12/BMI1 show opposite expression in human glioblastomas versus normal brain and in glioma stemlike versus neural stem cells. Furthermore, miR-128 renders glioma stemlike cells less radioresistant by preventing the radiation-induced expression of both PRC components. Finally, miR-128 expression is significantly reduced in neural stem cells from the brain of young, presymptomatic mice in our mouse model of glioblastoma. This suggests that loss of miR-128 expression in brain is an early event in gliomagenesis. Moreover, knockdown of miR-128 expression in nonmalignant mouse and human neural stem cells led to elevated expression of PRC components and increased clonogenicity. Conclusions MiR-128 is an important suppressor of PRC activity, and its absence is an early event in gliomagenesis. PMID:23733246

  4. Bionanotechnology and the Future of Glioma

    PubMed Central

    Chiarelli, Peter A.; Kievit, Forrest M.; Zhang, Miqin; Ellenbogen, Richard G.

    2015-01-01

    Designer nanoscaled materials have the potential to revolutionize diagnosis and treatment for glioma. This review summarizes current progress in nanoparticle-based therapies for glioma treatment including targeting, drug delivery, gene delivery, and direct tumor ablation. Preclinical and current human clinical trials are discussed. Although progress in the field has been significant over the past decade, many successful strategies demonstrated in the laboratory have yet to be implemented in human clinical trials. Looking forward, we provide examples of combined treatment strategies, which harness the potential for nanoparticles to interact with their biochemical environment, and simultaneously with externally applied photons or magnetic fields. We present our notion of the “ideal” nanoparticle for glioma, a concept that may soon be realized. PMID:25722933

  5. Distinct germline polymorphisms underlie glioma morphologic heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, Robert B.; Wrensch, Margaret R.; Johnson, Derek; Fridley, Brooke L.; Decker, Paul A.; Xiao, Yuanyuan; Kollmeyer, Thomas M.; Rynearson, Amanda L.; Fink, Stephanie; Rice, Terri; McCoy, Lucie S.; Halder, Chandralekha; Kosel, Matthew L.; Giannini, Caterina; Tihan, Tarik; O’Neill, Brian P.; Lachance, Daniel H.; Yang, Ping; Wiemels, Joseph; Wiencke, John K.

    2010-01-01

    Two recent genome-wide association studies reported that single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in (or near) TERT (5p15), CCDC26 (8q24), CDKN2A/B (9p21), PHLDB1 (11q23), and RTEL1 (20q13) are associated with infiltrating glioma. From these reports it was not clear if the SNP associations predispose to glioma in general or whether they are specific to certain glioma grades or morphologic subtypes. To identify hypothesized associations between susceptibility loci and tumor subtype, we genotyped two case/control groups composed of the spectrum of infiltrating glioma subtypes, and stratified the analyses by type. We report that specific germline polymorphisms are associated with different glioma subtypes. CCDC26 (8q24) region polymorphisms are strongly associated with oligodendroglial tumor risk (rs4295627, OR=2.05, p=8.3*10−11), but not glioblastoma risk. The opposite is true of RTEL (20q13) region polymorphisms which are significantly associated with glioblastoma (rs2297440, OR = 0.56, p= 4.6*10−10) but not oligodendroglial tumor. The SNPs in or near CCDC26 (8q24) are associated with oligodendroglial tumors regardless of combined 1p and 19q deletion status; however, the association is greatest for those with combined deletion (rs4295627, OR=2.77, p=2.6*10-9). These observations generate hypotheses concerning the possible mechanisms by which specific SNPs (or alterations in linkage disequilibrium with such SNPs) are associated with glioma development. PMID:21356187

  6. Glial Progenitors as Targets for Transformation in Glioma

    PubMed Central

    Ilkanizadeh, Shirin; Lau, Jasmine; Huang, Miller; Foster, Daniel J.; Wong, Robyn; Frantz, Aaron; Wang, Susan; Weiss, William A.; Persson, Anders I.

    2014-01-01

    Glioma is the most common primary malignant brain tumor and arises throughout the central nervous system (CNS). Recent focus on stem-like glioma cells has implicated neural stem cells (NSCs), a minor precursor population restricted to germinal zones, as a potential source of gliomas. In this review, we will focus on the relationship between oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs), the largest population of cycling glial progenitors in the postnatal brain, and gliomas. Recent studies suggest that OPCs can give rise to gliomas. Furthermore, signaling pathways often associated with NSCs also play key roles during OPC lineage development. Recent advances suggesting that gliomas can undergo a switch from progenitor- to stem-like phenotype after therapy, implicating that an OPC-origin is more likely than previously recognized. Future in-depth studies of OPC biology may shed light on the etiology of OPC-derived gliomas and reveal new therapeutic avenues. PMID:24889528

  7. New naphthoquinone derivatives against glioma cells.

    PubMed

    Redaelli, Marco; Mucignat-Caretta, Carla; Isse, Abdirisak Ahmed; Gennaro, Armando; Pezzani, Raffaele; Pasquale, Riccardo; Pavan, Valeria; Crisma, Marco; Ribaudo, Giovanni; Zagotto, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    This work was aimed to the development of a set of new naphtoquinone derivatives that can act against glioma. The compounds were tested in order to find out their ability to inhibit the growth of glioma cells, and the results of these assays were correlated with electrochemical analysis and NMR-based reoxidation kinetic studies, suggesting that a redox mechanism underlies and may explain the observed biological behavior. In addition to a full description of the synthetic pathways, electrochemistry, NMR and single crystal X-ray diffraction data are provided. PMID:25916907

  8. Nitrosoureas in the Management of Malignant Gliomas.

    PubMed

    Brandes, Alba A; Bartolotti, Marco; Tosoni, Alicia; Franceschi, Enrico

    2016-02-01

    Nitrosoureas represent one of the most active classes of agents in the treatment of high-grade gliomas and glioblastoma. In clinical practice, the most commonly used compounds are lomustine (either alone or in combination with procarbazine and vincristine), carmustine, and fotemustine. Given their toxicity profile and subsequent to the introduction of temozolomide in clinical practice, most of these agents were moved to the recurrent setting. This review focuses on the role of the nitrosoureas currently used in clinical practice for the treatment of malignant gliomas. PMID:26750128

  9. In vivo MRI detection of gliomas by chlorotoxin-conjugated superparamagnetic nanoprobes.

    PubMed

    Sun, Conroy; Veiseh, Omid; Gunn, Jonathan; Fang, Chen; Hansen, Stacey; Lee, Donghoon; Sze, Raymond; Ellenbogen, Richard G; Olson, Jim; Zhang, Miqin

    2008-03-01

    Converging advances in the development of nanoparticle-based imaging probes and improved understanding of the molecular biology of brain tumors offer the potential to provide physicians with new tools for the diagnosis and treatment of these deadly diseases. However, the effectiveness of promising nanoparticle technologies is currently limited by insufficient accumulation of these contrast agents within tumors. Here a biocompatible nanoprobe composed of a poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) coated iron oxide nanoparticle that is capable of specifically targeting glioma tumors via the surface-bound targeting peptide, chlorotoxin (CTX), is presented. The preferential accumulation of the nanoprobe within gliomas and subsequent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast enhancement are demonstrated in vitro in 9L cells and in vivo in tumors of a xenograft mouse model. TEM imaging reveals that the nanoprobes are internalized into the cytoplasm of 9L cells and histological analysis of selected tissues indicates that there are no acute toxic effects of these nanoprobes. High targeting specificity and benign biological response establish this nanoprobe as a potential platform to aid in the diagnosis and treatment of gliomas and other tumors of neuroectodermal origin. PMID:18232053

  10. Mesenchymal high-grade glioma is maintained by the ID-RAP1 axis

    PubMed Central

    Niola, Francesco; Zhao, Xudong; Singh, Devendra; Sullivan, Ryan; Castano, Angelica; Verrico, Antonio; Zoppoli, Pietro; Friedmann-Morvinski, Dinorah; Sulman, Erik; Barrett, Lindy; Zhuang, Yuan; Verma, Inder; Benezra, Robert; Aldape, Ken; Iavarone, Antonio; Lasorella, Anna

    2012-01-01

    High-grade gliomas (HGGs) are incurable brain tumors that are characterized by the presence of glioma-initiating cells (GICs). GICs are essential to tumor aggressiveness and retain the capacity for self-renewal and multilineage differentiation as long as they reside in the perivascular niche. ID proteins are master regulators of stemness and anchorage to the extracellular niche microenvironment, suggesting that they may play a role in maintaining GICs. Here, we modeled the probable therapeutic impact of ID inactivation in HGG by selective ablation of Id in tumor cells and after tumor initiation in a new mouse model of human mesenchymal HGG. Deletion of 3 Id genes induced rapid release of GICs from the perivascular niche, followed by tumor regression. GIC displacement was mediated by derepression of Rap1gap and subsequent inhibition of RAP1, a master regulator of cell adhesion. We identified a signature module of 5 genes in the ID pathway, including RAP1GAP, which segregated 2 subgroups of glioma patients with markedly different clinical outcomes. The model-informed survival analysis together with genetic and functional studies establish that ID activity is required for the maintenance of mesenchymal HGG and suggest that pharmacological inactivation of ID proteins could serve as a therapeutic strategy. PMID:23241957

  11. Vorinostat modulates cell cycle regulatory proteins in glioma cells and human glioma slice cultures.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jihong; Sampath, Deepa; Lang, Frederick F; Prabhu, Sujit; Rao, Ganesh; Fuller, Gregory N; Liu, Yuanfang; Puduvalli, Vinay K

    2011-11-01

    Chromatin modification through histone deacetylase inhibition has shown evidence of activity against malignancies. The mechanism of action of such agents are pleiotropic and potentially tumor specific. In this study, we studied the mechanisms of vorinostat-induced cellular effects in gliomas. The effects of vorinostat on proliferation, induction of apoptosis and cell cycle effects were studied in vitro (D54, U87 and U373 glioma cell lines). To gain additional insights into its effects on human gliomas, vorinostat-induced changes were examined ex vivo using a novel organotypic human glioma slice model. Vorinostat treatment resulted in increased p21 levels in all glioma cells tested in a p53 independent manner. In addition, cyclin B1 levels were transcriptionally downregulated and resulted in reduced kinase activity of the cyclin B1/cdk1 complex causing a G2 arrest. These effects were associated with a dose- and time-dependent inhibition of cellular proliferation and anchorage-independent growth in association with hyperacetylation of core histones and induction of apoptosis. Of particular significance, we demonstrate histone hyperacetylation and increased p21 levels in freshly resected human glioma specimens maintained as organotypic slice cultures and exposed to vorinostat similar to cell lines suggesting that human glioma can be targeted by this agent. Our data suggest that the effects of vorinostat are associated with modulation of cell cycle related proteins and activation of a G2 checkpoint along with induction of apoptosis. These effects are mediated by both transcriptional and post-translational mechanisms which provide potential options that can be exploited to develop new therapeutic approaches against gliomas. PMID:21598070

  12. Vorinostat modulates cell cycle regulatory proteins in glioma cells and human glioma slice cultures

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jihong; Sampath, Deepa; Lang, Frederick F.; Prabhu, Sujit; Rao, Ganesh; Fuller, Gregory N.; Liu, Yuanfang

    2013-01-01

    Chromatin modification through histone deacetylase inhibition has shown evidence of activity against malignancies. The mechanism of action of such agents are pleiotropic and potentially tumor specific. In this study, we studied the mechanisms of vorinostat-induced cellular effects in gliomas. The effects of vorinostat on proliferation, induction of apoptosis and cell cycle effects were studied in vitro (D54, U87 and U373 glioma cell lines). To gain additional insights into its effects on human gliomas, vorinostat-induced changes were examined ex vivo using a novel organotypic human glioma slice model. Vorinostat treatment resulted in increased p21 levels in all glioma cells tested in a p53 independent manner. In addition, cyclin B1 levels were transcriptionally downregulated and resulted in reduced kinase activity of the cyclin B1/cdkl complex causing a G2 arrest. These effects were associated with a dose- and time-dependent inhibition of cellular proliferation and anchorage-independent growth in association with hyperacetylation of core histones and induction of apoptosis. Of particular significance, we demonstrate histone hyperacetylation and increased p21 levels in freshly resected human glioma specimens maintained as organotypic slice cultures and exposed to vorinostat similar to cell lines suggesting that human glioma can be targeted by this agent. Our data suggest that the effects of vorinostat are associated with modulation of cell cycle related proteins and activation of a G2 checkpoint along with induction of apoptosis. These effects are mediated by both transcriptional and post-translational mechanisms which provide potential options that can be exploited to develop new therapeutic approaches against gliomas. PMID:21598070

  13. Lymphoid Cell-Glioma Cell Interaction Enhances Cell Coat Production by Human Gliomas: Novel Suppressor Mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dick, Steven J.; Macchi, Beatrice; Papazoglou, Savvas; Oldfield, Edward H.; Kornblith, Paul L.; Smith, Barry H.; Gately, Maurice K.

    1983-05-01

    Certain human glioma lines produce mucopolysaccharide coats that impair the generation of cytolytic lymphocytes in response to these lines in vitro. Coat production is substantially enhanced by the interaction of glioma cells with a macromolecular factor released by human peripheral blood mononuclear cells in culture. This interaction thus constitutes an unusual mechanism by which inflammatory cells may nonspecifically suppress the cellular immune response to at least one class of solid tumors in humans.

  14. Photodynamic therapy of supratentorial gliomas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muller, Paul J.; Wilson, Brian C.

    1997-05-01

    We are reporting the results form intraoperative intracavitary PDT treatment in 56 patients with recurrent supratentorial gliomas who had failed previous surgery and radiotherapy. These patients received 2mg/kg Photofin iv. 12-36 hours prior to surgical resection of their tumor or tumor cyst drainage. The median survival times in weeks for glioblastoma (GBM), malignant astrocytoma (MA), malignant mixed astrocytoma-oligodendroglioma and ependymoma were 30, 40, >56 and >174 weeks, respectively. Eight patients with recurrent GBM who received >60 J/cm2 had a median survival of 58 weeks and 24 patients who received <60 J/cm2 survived 29 weeks. The survival of patients with recurrent glioblastoma who undergo surgical treatment alone is only 20 weeks. We are also reporting the results of PDT treatment in 20 patients with newly diagnosed MA or GBM treated with intracavitary Photofin-PDT at the time of their initial craniotomy. The median survival of the whole cohort was 44 weeks with a 1 and 2 year survival of 40 percent and 15 percent, respectively. The median survival of patients with GBM was 37 weeks with a 1 and 2 year actuarial survival of 35 percent and 0 percent, respectively. The median survival of patients with MA as 48 weeks with a 1 and 2 year actuarial survival of 44 percent and 33 percent, respectively. Six patients with a Karnofsky score of >70 who received a light dose of >1260J had a median survival of 92 weeks with a 1 and 2 year survival of 83 percent and 33 percent, respectively. The mortality rate in our total series of 93 PDT treatments or brain tumor is 3 percent. The combined serious mortality-morbidity rate is 8 percent.

  15. Glioma-Associated Microglia/Macrophages Display an Expression Profile Different from M1 and M2 Polarization and Highly Express Gpnmb and Spp1

    PubMed Central

    Szulzewsky, Frank; Pelz, Andreas; Feng, Xi; Synowitz, Michael; Markovic, Darko; Langmann, Thomas; Holtman, Inge R.; Wang, Xi; Eggen, Bart J. L.; Boddeke, Hendrikus W. G. M.; Hambardzumyan, Dolores; Wolf, Susanne A.; Kettenmann, Helmut

    2015-01-01

    Malignant glioma belong to the most aggressive neoplasms in humans with no successful treatment available. Patients suffering from glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), the highest-grade glioma, have an average survival time of only around one year after diagnosis. Both microglia and peripheral macrophages/monocytes accumulate within and around glioma, but fail to exert effective anti-tumor activity and even support tumor growth. Here we use microarray analysis to compare the expression profiles of glioma-associated microglia/macrophages and naive control cells. Samples were generated from CD11b+ MACS-isolated cells from naïve and GL261-implanted C57BL/6 mouse brains. Around 1000 genes were more than 2-fold up- or downregulated in glioma-associated microglia/macrophages when compared to control cells. A comparison with published data sets of M1, M2a,b,c-polarized macrophages revealed a gene expression pattern that has only partial overlap with any of the M1 or M2 gene expression patterns. Samples for the qRT-PCR validation of selected M1 and M2a,b,c-specific genes were generated from two different glioma mouse models and isolated by flow cytometry to distinguish between resident microglia and invading macrophages. We confirmed in both models the unique glioma-associated microglia/macrophage phenotype including a mixture of M1 and M2a,b,c-specific genes. To validate the expression of these genes in human we MACS-isolated CD11b+ microglia/macrophages from GBM, lower grade brain tumors and control specimens. Apart from the M1/M2 gene analysis, we demonstrate that the expression of Gpnmb and Spp1 is highly upregulated in both murine and human glioma-associated microglia/macrophages. High expression of these genes has been associated with poor prognosis in human GBM, as indicated by patient survival data linked to gene expression data. We also show that microglia/macrophages are the predominant source of these transcripts in murine and human GBM. Our findings provide new

  16. Enhancement of Glioma Radiotherapy and Chemotherapy Response With Targeted Antibody Therapy Against Death Receptor 5

    SciTech Connect

    Fiveash, John B. Gillespie, G. Yancey; Oliver, Patsy G.; Zhou Tong; Belenky, Michael L.; Buchsbaum, Donald J.

    2008-06-01

    Purpose: TRA-8 is an agonistic mouse monoclonal antibody that binds to tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) death receptor 5, which induces apoptosis in cancer cells through a caspase-8-dependent mechanism. We investigated the ability of TRA-8 to augment the radiotherapy (RT) and chemotherapy response of human glioma cells in vitro and in vivo. Methods and Materials: The in vitro cytotoxicity of TRA-8 and temozolomide (Tmz) or RT was examined using adenosine triphosphate-dependent viability and clonogenic survival assays with five glioma cell lines. Death receptor 5 expression was determined by flow cytometry. In vivo studies included subcutaneous and intracranial xenograft models testing various combination treatments, including RT, Tmz, and TRA-8. Results: TRA-8, combined with Tmz or RT, produced enhanced cytotoxicity against five glioma cell lines compared with the use of the individual agents alone. Death receptor 5 upregulation occurred in response to RT. Complete tumor regression in the subcutaneous experiments was the most common in animals that received combination therapy with TRA-8/Tmz/RT. TRA-8 enhanced tumor growth delay in combination with RT or Tmz. TRA-8 alone had limited activity against intracranial tumors. In contrast, the median survival of mice treated with TRA-8/Tmz/RT was significantly greater than the control or TRA-8-alone-treated mice. The median survival of the mice treated with TRA-8/Tmz/RT or chemoradiotherapy only was significantly greater than the control or TRA-8-treated mice. A trend toward improved survival was observed between TRA-8/Tmz/RT-treated and Tmz/RT-treated mice. Conclusions: These preliminary findings support the hypothesis that TRA-8 will augment the RT and chemotherapy response in gliomas. A humanized version of TRA-8 is being evaluated in a Phase II clinical trial.

  17. Robotics in the neurosurgical treatment of glioma

    PubMed Central

    Sutherland, Garnette R.; Maddahi, Yaser; Gan, Liu Shi; Lama, Sanju; Zareinia, Kourosh

    2015-01-01

    Background: The treatment of glioma remains a significant challenge with high recurrence rates, morbidity, and mortality. Merging image guided robotic technology with microsurgery adds a new dimension as they relate to surgical ergonomics, patient safety, precision, and accuracy. Methods: An image-guided robot, called neuroArm, has been integrated into the neurosurgical operating room, and used to augment the surgical treatment of glioma in 18 patients. A case study illustrates the specialized technical features of a teleoperated robotic system that could well enhance the performance of surgery. Furthermore, unique positional and force information of the bipolar forceps during surgery were recorded and analyzed. Results: The workspace of the bipolar forceps in this robot-assisted glioma resection was found to be 25 × 50 × 50 mm. Maximum values of the force components were 1.37, 1.84, and 2.01 N along x, y, and z axes, respectively. The maximum total force was 2.45 N. The results indicate that the majority of the applied forces were less than 0.6 N. Conclusion: Robotic surgical systems can potentially increase safety and performance of surgical operation via novel features such as virtual fixtures, augmented force feedback, and haptic high-force warning system. The case study using neuroArm robot to resect a glioma, for the first time, showed the positional information of surgeon's hand movement and tool-tissue interaction forces. PMID:25722932

  18. [Glioma treatment strategies using mesenchymal stem cells].

    PubMed

    Namba, Hiroki

    2010-10-01

    Because of the growth characteristics of malignant gliomas that are highly invasive and deeply infiltrate the surrounding brain area; the surgical resection of these gliomas with preservation of neural functions is almost always noncurative. The residual tumor cells are usually resistant to standard adjuvant radiochemotherapy, and therefore, the tumors inevitably recur after a certain period and finally cause the death of the patients. Neural and mesenchymal stem cells have been extensively studied for the development of new strategies for treating malignant gliomas because of these cells possess the intrinsic property of homing toward tumor cells. By using neural and mesenchymal stem cells as vehicles for drug carriers, it is possible to deliver anticancer drugs to the tumor cells that infiltrate functioning normal brain tissue and are difficult to remove. Several cytokines and suicide genes have been tested, and promising results have been reported in animal brain tumor models. However, further studies involving safety issues such as secondary cancer formation are required before human trials of stem cell therapies. In the present paper, the author has reviewed the recent concepts involved in the treatment of malignant gliomas with stem cells, especially mesenchymal stem cells that are much easier to obtain from the patients themselves. PMID:20940507

  19. Mixed glioma of the cerebellopontine angle.

    PubMed

    Millen, S J; Campbell, B H; Meyer, G A; Ho, K C

    1985-11-01

    A rare case of mixed ependymoma and astrocytoma of the cerebellopontine angle is reported. Its clinical presentation, characteristics on evaluation, and prognosis are compared with those of the acoustic neuroma and glioma. The central form of von Recklinghausen's disease and familial multiple lipomatosis as it applies to the patient is also discussed. PMID:3878094

  20. ARPP-19 promotes proliferation and metastasis of human glioma.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Tao; Zhao, Bing; Li, Xiaocan; Wan, Jinghai

    2016-09-01

    Glioma is the most common and aggressive type of human primary brain tumor with a poor outcome. The molecular mechanisms underlying glioma development and progression are still poorly understood. Recent studies have reported a novel role of ARPP-19 in the regulation of cell mitosis and cancer progression. However, no study has been carried out to determine the role of ARPP-19 in human glioma cells and assess the expression and clinical significance of ARPP-19 in human glioma. In this study, we systematically examined the role of ARPP-19 in glioma A172 cells and examined the expression of ARPP-19 and CD147 in 81 cases of human glioma tissue specimens and correlated them to clinicopathological parameters and patient survival. We found that ARPP-19 promoted both proliferation and metastasis of human glioma cells and the expression of ARPP-19 and CD147 in high-grade glioma was significantly higher than that in the low-grade glioma. Patients whose tumors were positive for expression of ARPP-19 or CD147 showed lower relapse-free survival and overall survival than patients whose tumors were negative for ARPP-19 or CD147, respectively. Pearson correlation analysis indicated that there was a statistically significant correlation between ARPP-19 and CD147. Expressions of ARPP-19 and CD147 may serve as biomarkers for high-grade glioma and poor patient survival. PMID:27380244

  1. Stem-like tumor initiating cells isolated from IL13Rα2-expressing gliomas are targeted and killed by IL13-zetakine redirected T cells

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Christine E.; Starr, Renate; Aguilar, Brenda; Shami, Andrew F.; Martinez, Catalina; D’Apuzzo, Massimo; Barish, Michael E.; Forman, Stephen J.; Jensen, Michael C.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate IL13Rα2 as an immunotherapeutic target for eliminating glioma stem-like initiating cells (GSC) of high-grade gliomas, with particular focus on the potential of genetically engineered IL13Rα2-specific primary human CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (IL13-zetakine+ CTL) to target this therapeutically resistant glioma subpopulation. Experimental Design A panel of low-passage GSC tumor sphere and serum-differentiated glioma lines were expanded from patient glioblastoma specimens. These glioblastoma lines were evaluated for expression of IL13Rα2 and for susceptibility to IL13-zetakine+ CTL-mediated killing in vitro and in vivo. Results We observed that while glioma IL13Rα2 expression varies between patients, for IL13Rα2pos cases this antigen was detected on both GSCs and more differentiated tumor cell populations. IL13-zetakine+ CTL were capable of efficient recognition and killing of both IL13Rα2pos GSC and IL13Rα2pos differentiated cells in vitro, as well as eliminating glioma initiating activity in an orthotopic mouse tumor model. Furthermore, intracranial administration of IL13-zetakine+ CTL displayed robust anti-tumor activity against established IL13Rα2pos GSC tumor sphere-initiated orthotopic tumors in mice. Conclusions Within IL13Rα2-expressing high-grade gliomas, this receptor is expressed by GSCs and differentiated tumor populations, rendering both targetable by IL13-zetakine+ CTLs. Thus, our results support the potential utility of IL13Rα2-directed immunotherapeutic approaches for eradicating therapeutically resistant GSC populations. PMID:22407828

  2. Economics of Malignant Gliomas: A Critical Review

    PubMed Central

    Raizer, Jeffrey J.; Fitzner, Karen A.; Jacobs, Daniel I.; Bennett, Charles L.; Liebling, Dustin B.; Luu, Thanh Ha; Trifilio, Steven M.; Grimm, Sean A.; Fisher, Matthew J.; Haleem, Meraaj S.; Ray, Paul S.; McKoy, Judith M.; DeBoer, Rebecca; Tulas, Katrina-Marie E.; Deeb, Mohammed; McKoy, June M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Approximately 18,500 persons are diagnosed with malignant glioma in the United States annually. Few studies have investigated the comprehensive economic costs. We reviewed the literature to examine costs to patients with malignant glioma and their families, payers, and society. Methods: A total of 18 fully extracted studies were included. Data were collected on direct and indirect costs, and cost estimates were converted to US dollars using the conversion rate calculated from the study's publication date, and updated to 2011 values after adjustment for inflation. A standardized data abstraction form was used. Data were extracted by one reviewer and checked by another. Results: Before approval of effective chemotherapeutic agents for malignant gliomas, estimated total direct medical costs in the United States for surgery and radiation therapy per patient ranged from $50,600 to $92,700. The addition of temozolomide (TMZ) and bevacizumab to glioblastoma treatment regimens has resulted in increased overall costs for glioma care. Although health care costs are now less front-loaded, they have increased over the course of illness. Analysis using a willingness-to-pay threshold of $50,000 per quality-adjusted life-year suggests that the benefits of TMZ fall on the edge of acceptable therapies. Furthermore, indirect medical costs, such as productivity losses, are not trivial. Conclusion: With increased chemotherapy use for malignant glioma, the paradigm for treatment and associated out-of-pocket and total medical costs continue to evolve. Larger out-of-pocket costs may influence the choice of chemotherapeutic agents, the economic implications of which should be evaluated prospectively. PMID:25466707

  3. Overexpressed KDM5B is associated with the progression of glioma and promotes glioma cell growth via downregulating p21

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, Bin; Hu, Zhiqiang; Huang, Hui; Zhu, Guangtong; Xiao, Zhiyong; Wan, Weiqing; Zhang, Peng; Jia, Wang; Zhang, Liwei

    2014-11-07

    Highlights: • KDM5B is overexpressed in glioma samples. • KDM5B stimulated proliferation of glioma cells. • Inhibition of p21contributes to KDM5B-induced proliferation. - Abstract: Epigenetic alterations such as aberrant expression of histone-modifying enzymes have been implicated in tumorigenesis. Upregulation of lysine (K)-specific demethylase 5B (KDM5B) has been reported in a variety of malignant tumors. However, the impact of KDM5B in glioma remains unclear. The objective of this study was to investigate the expression and prognostic value of KDM5B in glioma. In clinical glioma samples, we found that KDM5B expression was significantly upregulated in cancer lesions compared with normal brain tissues. Kaplan–Meier analysis showed that patients with glioma and higher KDM5B expression tend to have shorter overall survival time. By silencing or overexpressing KDM5B in glioma cells, we found that KDM5B could promote cell growth both in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, we demonstrated that KDM5B promoted glioma proliferation partly via regulation of the expression of p21. Our study provided evidence that KDM5B functions as a novel tumor oncogene in glioma and may be a potential therapeutic target for glioma management.

  4. Spontaneously Arising Canine Glioma as a Potential Model for Human Glioma.

    PubMed

    Herranz, C; Fernández, F; Martín-Ibáñez, R; Blasco, E; Crespo, E; De la Fuente, C; Añor, S; Rabanal, R M; Canals, J M; Pumarola, M

    2016-01-01

    Human gliomas are malignant brain tumours that carry a poor prognosis and are composed of a heterogeneous population of cells. There is a paucity of animal models available for study of these tumours and most have been created by genetic modification. Spontaneously arising canine gliomas may provide a model for the characterization of the human tumours. The present study shows that canine gliomas form a range of immunohistochemical patterns that are similar to those described for human gliomas. The in-vitro sphere assay was used to analyze the expansion and differentiation potential of glioma cells taken from the periphery and centre of canine tumours. Samples from the subventricular zone (SVZ) and contralateral parenchyma were used as positive and negative controls, respectively. The expansion potential for all of these samples was low and cells from only three cultures were expanded for six passages. These three cultures were derived from high-grade gliomas and the cells had been cryopreserved. Most of the cells obtained from the centre of the tumours formed spheres and were expanded, in contrast to samples taken from the periphery of the tumours. Spheres were also formed and expanded from two areas of apparently unaffected brain parenchyma. The neurogenic SVZ contralateral samples also contained progenitor proliferating cells, since all of them were expanded for three to five passages. Differentiation analysis showed that all cultured spheres were multipotential and able to differentiate towards both neurons and glial cells. Spontaneously arising canine gliomas might therefore constitute an animal model for further characterization of these tumours. PMID:26804204

  5. Veliparib, Radiation Therapy, and Temozolomide in Treating Younger Patients With Newly Diagnosed Diffuse Pontine Gliomas

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-04

    Childhood Mixed Glioma; Untreated Childhood Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Untreated Childhood Brain Stem Glioma; Untreated Childhood Fibrillary Astrocytoma; Untreated Childhood Giant Cell Glioblastoma; Untreated Childhood Glioblastoma; Untreated Childhood Gliosarcoma

  6. Oncolytic adenoviruses: A thorny path to glioma cure

    PubMed Central

    Ulasov, I.V.; Borovjagin, A.V.; Schroeder, B.A.; Baryshnikov, A.Y.

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM) is a rapidly progressing brain tumor. Despite the relatively low percentage of cancer patients with glioma diagnoses, recent statistics indicate that the number of glioma patients may have increased over the past decade. Current therapeutic options for glioma patients include tumor resection, chemotherapy, and concomitant radiation therapy with an average survival of approximately 16 months. The rapid progression of gliomas has spurred the development of novel treatment options, such as cancer gene therapy and oncolytic virotherapy. Preclinical testing of oncolytic adenoviruses using glioma models revealed both positive and negative sides of the virotherapy approach. Here we present a detailed overview of the glioma virotherapy field and discuss auxiliary therapeutic strategies with the potential for augmenting clinical efficacy of GBM virotherapy treatment. PMID:25685829

  7. A mathematical model of pre-diagnostic glioma growth.

    PubMed

    Sturrock, Marc; Hao, Wenrui; Schwartzbaum, Judith; Rempala, Grzegorz A

    2015-09-01

    Due to their location, the malignant gliomas of the brain in humans are very difficult to treat in advanced stages. Blood-based biomarkers for glioma are needed for more accurate evaluation of treatment response as well as early diagnosis. However, biomarker research in primary brain tumors is challenging given their relative rarity and genetic diversity. It is further complicated by variations in the permeability of the blood brain barrier that affects the amount of marker released into the bloodstream. Inspired by recent temporal data indicating a possible decrease in serum glucose levels in patients with gliomas yet to be diagnosed, we present an ordinary differential equation model to capture early stage glioma growth. The model contains glioma-glucose-immune interactions and poses a potential mechanism by which this glucose drop can be explained. We present numerical simulations, parameter sensitivity analysis, linear stability analysis and a numerical experiment whereby we show how a dormant glioma can become malignant. PMID:26073722

  8. TGF-β signaling and its targeting for glioma treatment

    PubMed Central

    Han, Jianfeng; Alvarez-Breckenridge, Christopher A; Wang, Qi-En; Yu, Jianhua

    2015-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) is a pleiotropic cytokine, secreted by a variety of cells including immune cells, tumor cells, and stromal cells. TGF-β signaling is dysregulated in cancer patients, and this aberrant signaling at least in part contributes to initiation and progression of many cancers including glioma. The dysregulated signaling components provide molecular targets for the treatment of glioma. In this article, we review TGF-β signaling and its targeting in glioma. PMID:26045979

  9. ELTD1, A Potential New Biomarker for Gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Towner, Rheal A.; Jensen, Randy L.; Colman, Howard; Vaillant, Brian; Smith, Nataliya; Casteel, Rebba; Saunders, Debra; Gillespie, David L.; Silasi-Mansat, Robert; Lupu, Florea; Giles, Cory B.; Wren, Jonathan D.

    2012-01-01

    Background Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), high-grade glioma, is characterized by being diffuse, invasive, and highly angiogenic, and has a very poor prognosis. Identification of new biomarkers could help in the further diagnosis of GBM. Objective To identify ELTD1 ([epidermal growth factor (EGF), latrophilin and seven transmembrane domain-containing 1] on chromosome 1) as a putative glioma-associated marker via a bioinformatic method. Methods We used advanced data mining and a novel bioinformatics method to predict ELTD1 as a potential novel biomarker that is associated with gliomas. Validation was done with immunohistochemistry (IHC), which was used to detect levels of ELTD1 in human high-grade gliomas, and rat F98 glioma tumors. In vivo levels of ELTD1 in rat F98 gliomas were assessed using molecular MRI (mMRI). Results ELTD1 was found to be significantly higher (P=.03) in high-grade gliomas (50 patients) compared to low-grade gliomas (21 patients), and compared well to traditional IHC markers including VEGF, GLUT-1,CAIX, and HIF-1α. ELTD1 gene expression indicates an association with grade, survival across grade, and an increase in the mesenchymal subtype. Significantly high (P<0.001) in vivo levels of ELTD1 were additionally found in F98 tumors, compared to normal brain tissue. Conclusion This study strongly suggests that associative analysis was able to accurately identify ELTD1 as a putative glioma-associated biomarker. The detection of ELTD1 was also validated in both rodent and human gliomas, and may serve as an additional biomarker for gliomas in pre-clinical and clinical diagnosis of gliomas. PMID:23096411

  10. The H3.3 K27M mutation results in a poorer prognosis in brainstem gliomas than thalamic gliomas in adults.

    PubMed

    Feng, Jie; Hao, Shuyu; Pan, Changcun; Wang, Yu; Wu, Zhen; Zhang, Junting; Yan, Hai; Zhang, Liwei; Wan, Hong

    2015-11-01

    Brainstem and thalamic gliomas are rare, and they are poorly understood in adults. Genetic aberrations that occur in these tumors are still unknown. In this study, we investigated whether thalamic gliomas have different genetic aberrations and clinical outcomes compared with brainstem gliomas in adults. Forty-three glioma samples were selected, including 28 brainstem and 15 thalamic gliomas. The frequency of the K27M mutation in adult midline gliomas was 58.1%. High-grade gliomas in the thalamus were statistically significantly more numerous than brainstem gliomas. Patients with K27M mutant brainstem gliomas had a significantly shorter overall survival than patients with wild-type tumors (P = .020) by Cox regression after adjustment for other independent risk factors. However, there was no statistical tendency toward a poorer overall survival in thalamic gliomas containing the K27M mutation compared with wild-type tumors. The presence of the K27M mutation significantly corresponded with mutations in TP53 in thalamic gliomas. Interestingly, the K27M mutation was mutually exclusive with mutations in IDH1, which was detected only in brainstem gliomas. The microarray data identified 86 differentially expressed genes between brainstem and thalamic gliomas with the K27M mutation. The cyclin-dependent kinase 6 (CDK6) gene, which plays an important role in cancer pathways, was found to be differentially expressed between brainstem and thalamic gliomas with K27M mutations. Although the K27M mutation was frequently observed in adult brainstem and thalamic gliomas, this mutation tended to be associated with a poorer prognosis in brainstem gliomas but not in thalamic gliomas. Brainstem gliomas may present different genetic aberrations from thalamic gliomas. These differences may provide guidance for therapeutic decisions for the treatment of adult brainstem and thalamic gliomas, which may have different molecular targets. PMID:26297251

  11. Tumor-Associated Macrophages in Glioma: Friend or Foe?

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Benjamin C.; Showers, Christopher R.; Anderson, David E.; Anderson, Lisa; Canoll, Peter; Bruce, Jeffrey N.; Anderson, Richard C. E.

    2013-01-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) contribute substantially to the tumor mass of gliomas and have been shown to play a major role in the creation of a tumor microenvironment that promotes tumor progression. Shortcomings of attempts at antiglioma immunotherapy may result from a failure to adequately address these effects. Emerging evidence supports an independent categorization of glioma TAMs as alternatively activated M2-type macrophages, in contrast to classically activated proinflammatory M1-type macrophages. These M2-type macrophages exert glioma-supportive effects through reduced anti-tumor functions, increased expression of immunosuppressive mediators, and nonimmune tumor promotion through expression of trophic and invasion-facilitating substances. Much of our work has demonstrated these features of glioma TAMs, and together with the supporting literature will be reviewed here. Additionally, the dynamics of glioma cell-TAM interaction over the course of tumor development remain poorly understood; our efforts to elucidate glioma cell-TAM dynamics are summarized. Finally, the molecular pathways which underlie M2-type TAM polarization and gene expression similarly require further investigation, and may present the most potent targets for immunotherapeutic intervention. Highlighting recent evidence implicating the transcription factor STAT3 in immunosuppressive tumorigenic glioma TAMs, we advocate for gene array-based approaches to identify yet unappreciated expression regulators and effector molecules important to M2-type glioma TAMs polarization and function within the glioma tumor microenvironment. PMID:23737783

  12. Malignant gliomas: old and new systemic treatment approaches

    PubMed Central

    Mesti, Tanja

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background Malignant (high-grade) gliomas are rapidly progressive brain tumours with very high morbidity and mortality. Until recently, treatment options for patients with malignant gliomas were limited and mainly the same for all subtypes of malignant gliomas. The treatment included surgery and radiotherapy. Chemotherapy used as an adjuvant treatment or at recurrence had a marginal role. Conclusions Nowadays, the treatment of malignant gliomas requires a multidisciplinary approach. The treatment includes surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy. The chosen approach is more complex and individually adjusted. By that, the effect on the survival and quality of life is notable higher. PMID:27247544

  13. Identify paraffin-embedded brain glioma using terahertz pulsed spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ze-ren; Meng, Kun; Chen, Tu-nan; Chen, Tao; Zhu, Li-guo; Liu, Qiao; Li, Zhao; Li, Fei; Zhong, Sen-cheng; Feng, Hua; Zhao, Jian-heng

    2015-01-01

    The refractive indices, absorption coefficients and complex dielectric constants spectra of paraffin-embedded brain glioma and normal brain tissues have been measured by a terahertz time domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) system in the range of 0.2 - 2.0 THz. The spectral differences between glioma and normal brain tissues were obtained. Our results indicate that, compared with normal tissue, glioma had higher refractive index, absorption coefficient, and dielectric constant. Based on these results, the suitable frequency components for different methods of glioma imaging (intensity imaging, coherent imaging and terahertz pulsed imaging) are analyzed.

  14. Sunitinib in Treating Patients With Recurrent Malignant Gliomas

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-01-29

    Adult Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Adult Diffuse Astrocytoma; Adult Giant Cell Glioblastoma; Adult Glioblastoma; Adult Gliosarcoma; Adult Mixed Glioma; Adult Oligodendroglioma; Adult Pineal Gland Astrocytoma

  15. Intraoperative Contrast Enhanced Ultrasound Evaluates the Grade of Glioma

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Ling-Gang; He, Wen; Zhang, Hong-Xia; Song, Qian; Ning, Bin; Li, Hui-Zhan; He, Yan; Lin, Song

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The aim of our study was to investigate the value of intraoperative contrast enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) for evaluating the grade of glioma and the correlation between microvessel density (MVD) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Methods. We performed intraoperative conventional ultrasound (CUS) and CEUS on 88 patients with gliomas. All of the patients have undergone surgery and obtained the results of pathology. All patients have undergone intraoperative CUS and CEUS to compare the characteristics of different grade gliomas and the results of CUS and CEUS were compared with pathological results. Results. The time to start (TTS) and time to peak (TTP) of low grade glioma (LGG) were similar to those of edema and normal brain surrounding glioma. The enhanced extent of LGG was higher than that of the normal brain and edema. The TTS and TTP of high grade glioma were earlier than those of the edema and normal brain surrounding glioma. The enhancement of HGG was higher than that of LGG. The absolute peak intensity (API) was correlated with MVD and VEGF. Conclusion. Intraoperative CEUS could help in determining boundary of peritumoral brain edema of glioma. Intraoperative CEUS parameters in cerebral gliomas could indirectly reflect the information of MVD and VEGF. PMID:27069921

  16. Bevacizumab and Irinotecan in Treating Young Patients With Recurrent, Progressive, or Refractory Glioma, Medulloblastoma, Ependymoma, or Low Grade Glioma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-14

    Childhood Cerebral Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Childhood Oligodendroglioma; Childhood Spinal Cord Neoplasm; Recurrent Childhood Brain Stem Glioma; Recurrent Childhood Ependymoma; Recurrent Childhood Medulloblastoma

  17. Tumor initiating cells in malignant gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Hadjipanayis, Costas G.; Van Meir, Erwin G.

    2009-01-01

    A rare subpopulation of cells within malignant gliomas, which shares canonical properties with neural stem cells (NSCs), may be integral to glial tumor development and perpetuation. These cells, also known as tumor initiating cells (TICs), have the ability to self-renew, develop into any cell in the overall tumor population (multipotency), and proliferate. A defining property of TICs is their ability to initiate new tumors in immunocompromised mice with high efficiency. Mounting evidence suggests that TICs originate from the transformation of NSCs and their progenitors. New findings show that TICs may be more resistant to chemotherapy and radiation than the bulk of tumor cells, thereby permitting recurrent tumor formation and accounting for the failure of conventional therapies. The development of new therapeutic strategies selectively targeting TICs while sparing NSCs may provide for more effective treatment of malignant gliomas. PMID:19189072

  18. Trends in Malignant Glioma Monoclonal Antibody Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Chekhonin, Ivan; Gurina, Olga

    2015-01-01

    Although new passive and active immunotherapy methods are emerging, unconjugated monoclonal antibodies remain the only kind of biological preparations approved for high-grade glioma therapy in clinical practice. In this review, we combine clinical and experimental data discussion. As antiangiogenic therapy is the standard of care for recurrent glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), we analyze major clinical trials and possible therapeutic combinations of bevacizumab, the most common monoclonal antibody to vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Another humanized antibody to gain recognition in GBM is epidermal growth factor (EGFR) antagonist nimotuzumab. Other antigens (VEGF receptor, platelet-derived growth factor receptor, hepatocyte growth factor and c-Met system) showed significance in gliomas and were used to create monoclonal antibodies applied in different malignant tumors. We assess the role of genetic markers (isocitrate dehydrogenase, O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransnsferase) in GBM treatment outcome prediction. Besides antibodies studied in clinical trials, we focus on perspective targets and briefly list other means of passive immunotherapy.

  19. Glioma Stem Cells: Signaling, Microenvironment, and Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Liebelt, Brandon D.; Shingu, Takashi; Zhou, Xin; Ren, Jiangong; Shin, Seul A.; Hu, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma remains the most common and devastating primary brain tumor despite maximal therapy with surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation. The glioma stem cell (GSC) subpopulation has been identified in glioblastoma and likely plays a key role in resistance of these tumors to conventional therapies as well as recurrent disease. GSCs are capable of self-renewal and differentiation; glioblastoma-derived GSCs are capable of de novo tumor formation when implanted in xenograft models. Further, GSCs possess unique surface markers, modulate characteristic signaling pathways to promote tumorigenesis, and play key roles in glioma vascular formation. These features, in addition to microenvironmental factors, present possible targets for specifically directing therapy against the GSC population within glioblastoma. In this review, the authors summarize the current knowledge of GSC biology and function and the role of GSCs in new vascular formation within glioblastoma and discuss potential therapeutic approaches to target GSCs. PMID:26880988

  20. Diffuse low-grade gliomas and neuroplasticity.

    PubMed

    Duffau, H

    2014-10-01

    The traditional approach in neuro-oncology is to study the tumor in great detail and ultimately give little consideration to the brain itself. Choosing the best treatment strategy for each patient with a diffuse low-grade glioma, in other words optimizing the oncologic and functional balance, implies not only a full knowledge of the natural history of this chronic disease, but also an understanding of the adaptation of the brain in response to growth and spread of the glioma. The aim of this review is to examine the mechanisms underlying this neuroplasticity, allowing functional compensation when the tumor progresses, and opening the way to new treatments with the principle of shifting towards "functional personalized neuro-oncology", improving both median survival and quality of life. PMID:25218490

  1. Overview of current immunotherapeutic strategies for glioma

    PubMed Central

    Calinescu, Anda-Alexandra; Kamran, Neha; Baker, Gregory; Mineharu, Yohei; Pedro Ricardo, Lowenstein; Maria Graciela, Castro

    2015-01-01

    In the last decade, numerous studies of immunotherapy for malignant glioma (glioblastoma multiforme) have brought new knowledge and new hope for improving the prognosis of this incurable disease. Some clinical trials have reached Phase III, following positive outcomes in Phase I and II, with respect to safety and immunological end points. Results are encouraging especially when considering the promise of sustained efficacy by inducing antitumor immunological memory. Progress in understanding the mechanisms of tumor-induced immune suppression led to the development of drugs targeting immunosuppressive checkpoints, which are used in active clinical trials for glioblastoma multiforme. Insights related to the heterogeneity of the disease bring new challenges for the management of glioma and underscore a likely cause of therapeutic failure. An emerging therapeutic strategy is represented by a combinatorial, personalized approach, including the standard of care: surgery, radiation, chemotherapy with added active immunotherapy and multiagent targeting of immunosuppressive checkpoints. PMID:26598957

  2. Anaplastic glioma: current treatment and management.

    PubMed

    Le Rhun, Emilie; Taillibert, Sophie; Chamberlain, Marc C

    2015-06-01

    Anaplastic glioma (AG) is divided into three morphology-based groups (anaplastic astrocytoma, anaplastic oligodendroglioma, anaplastic oligoastrocytoma) as well as three molecular groups (glioma-CpG island methylation phenotype [G-CIMP] negative, G-CIMP positive non-1p19q codeleted tumors and G-CIMP positive codeleted tumors). The RTOG 9402 and EORTC 26951 trials established radiotherapy plus (procarbazine, lomustine, vincristine) chemotherapy as the standard of care in 1p/19q codeleted AG. Uni- or non-codeleted AG are currently best treated with radiotherapy only or alkylator-based chemotherapy only as determined by the NOA-04 trial. Maturation of NOA-04 and results of the currently accruing studies, CODEL (for codeleted AG) and CATNON (for uni or non-codeleted AG), will likely refine current up-front treatment recommendations for AG. PMID:25936680

  3. AT1 receptor is present in glioma cells; its blockage reduces the growth of rat glioma

    PubMed Central

    Rivera, E; Arrieta, O; Guevara, P; Duarte-Rojo, A; Sotelo, J

    2001-01-01

    Malignancy of neoplasms is partly dependent on angiogenesis. Angiotensin II mediates angiogenesis and transcription of growth-related factors through stimulation of the AT1 receptor (AT1R). Losartan, a drug used mostly for treatment of hypertension, binds strongly to this receptor. We found the presence of AT1 receptor on C6 glioma cells and studied the effect of Losartan on the growth and angiogenesis of C6 rat glioma; Losartan in dose of 80 mg/kg induced 79% reduction of tumoural volume with a significant decrease of vascular density, mitotic index and cell proliferation. Our results demonstrate the conspicuous presence of AT1R in malignant glial cells and a favourable therapeutic response in experimental glioma by selective blockage of the AT1 receptor. © 2001 Cancer Research Campaign  http://www.bjcancer.com PMID:11720480

  4. ET-67SUICIDE GENE THERAPY FOR GLIOMA USING MULTILINEAGE-DEFFERENTIATING STRESS ENDURING (MUSE) CELLS

    PubMed Central

    Yamasaki, Tomohiro; Wakao, Shohei; Kawaji, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Tomo; Kamio, Yoshinobu; Amano, Shinji; Sameshima, Tetsuro; Sakai, Naoto; Tokuyama, Tsutomu; Dezawa, Mari; Namba, Hiroki

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: We have been investigating cell-based glioma gene therapy using various kinds of stem cells transduced with the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase gene (HSVtk). In our previous study, we used SSEA3/CD105 double-positive multilineage-differentiating stress-enduring (Muse) cells transduced with HSVtk (Muse-tk cells) as the vehicle for HSVtk/ganciclovir (GCV) gene therapy. We demonstrated a potent in vitro tumoricidal bystander effect for various glioma cells. In the present study, we examined the in vivo bystander effect between U87 human glioma cells and human Muse-tk cells. METHODS: Muse-tk cells were obtained by lentiviral transduction of HSVtk in human Muse cells. U87 cells transduced with the luciferase gene were used for the brain tumor model, in which tumor volume could be measured using a bioluminescence imaging system (IVIS 200). Nude mice were intracranially co-implanted at Muse-tk:U87 cell ratios of 1:4, 1:8, and 1:16 (U87 cell number: 1 × 105); GCV was intraperitoneally administered (100 mg/kg/day) for 10 days. RESULTS: Luminescence intensity progressively increased in the control mice implanted with U87 alone with or without GCV treatment, and in those implanted with Muse-tk and U87 but not treated with GCV. All control mice died because of the tumor by Day 51 post tumor implantation (no difference among the control groups). In contrast, no luminescence was observed in the mice implanted with Muse-tk and U87 (Muse-tk:U87 cell ratios of 1:4 and 1:8) from Day 14 onward. Almost all mice survived longer than 100 days and no mouse died as a result of the tumor. CONCLUSIONS: There was a potent in vivo bystander effect between human glioma and Muse-tk cells. The results of the present study suggest that HSVtk/GCV gene therapy using Muse-tk is a promising treatment strategy for malignant glioma.

  5. Raman spectroscopy of gliomas: an exploratory study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shenoy, Mahesh; Hole, Arti R.; Shridhar, E.; Moiyadi, Aliasgar V.; Krishna, C. Murali

    2014-03-01

    Gliomas are extremely infiltrative type of brain cancers, the borders of which are difficult to locate. Gliomas largely consist of tumors of astrocytic or oligodendroglial lineage. Usually stereotactic surgery is performed to obtain tumor tissue sample. Complete excision of these tumors with preservation of uninvolved normal areas is important during brain tumor surgeries. The present study was undertaken to explore feasibility of classifying abnormal and normal glioma tissues with Raman spectroscopy (RS). RS is a nondestructive vibrational spectroscopic technique, which provides information about molecular composition, molecular structures and molecular interactions in tissue. Postoperated 33 (20-abnormal and 13-normal) gliomas tissue samples of different grades were collected under clinical supervision. Five micron section from tissue sample was used for confirmatory histopathological diagnosis while the remaining tissue was placed on CaF2 window and spectra were acquired using a fiberoptic-probe-coupled HE-785 Raman-spectrometer. Spectral acquisition parameters were laser power-80mW, integration-20s and averaged over 3 accumulations. Spectra were pre-processed and subjected to unsupervised Principal-Component Analysis (PCA) to identify trends of classification. Supervised PC-LDA (Principal-Component-Linear-Discriminant Analysis) was used to develop standard-models using spectra of 12 normal and abnormal specimens each. Leave-one-out crossvalidation yielded classification-efficiency of 90% and 80% for normal and abnormal conditions, respectively. Evaluation with an independent-test data-set comprising of 135 spectra of 9 samples provided sensitivity of 100% and specificity of 70%. Findings of this preliminary study may pave way for objective tumor margin assessment during brain surgery.

  6. Perspectives in Intraoperative Diagnostics of Human Gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Tyurikova, O.; Dembitskaya, Y.; Yashin, K.; Mishchenko, M.; Vedunova, M.; Medyanik, I.; Kazantsev, V.

    2015-01-01

    Amongst large a variety of oncological diseases, malignant gliomas represent one of the most severe types of tumors. They are also the most common type of the brain tumors and account for over half of the astrocytic tumors. According to different sources, the average life expectancy of patients with various glioblastomas varies between 10 and 12 months and that of patients with anaplastic astrocytic tumors between 20 and 24 months. Therefore, studies of the physiology of transformed glial cells are critical for the development of treatment methods. Modern medical approaches offer complex procedures, including the microsurgical tumor removal, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy, supplemented with photodynamic therapy and immunotherapy. The most radical of them is surgical resection, which allows removing the largest part of the tumor, reduces the intracranial hypertension, and minimizes the degree of neurological deficit. However, complete removal of the tumor remains impossible. The main limitations are insufficient visualization of glioma boundaries, due to its infiltrative growth, and the necessity to preserve healthy tissue. This review is devoted to the description of advantages and disadvantages of modern intraoperative diagnostics of human gliomas and highlights potential perspectives for development of their treatment. PMID:26543495

  7. Recent Molecular Advances in Our Understanding of Glioma

    PubMed Central

    Pisapia, David

    2015-01-01

    Our molecular understanding of glioma has undergone a sea change over the last decade. In this review, we discuss two recent articles that employed whole genome sequencing to subclassify gliomas vis-à-vis known molecular alterations. We further discuss the relevance of these findings vis-à-vis current treatment paradigms. PMID:26244119

  8. Photodynamic therapy on the ultrastructure of glioma cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Shaoshan; Zhang, Ruyou; Zheng, Yongri

    2005-07-01

    OBJECTIVE :the main purpose of this experiment was to study the change of C6 glioma cells' ultrastructure treated by photodynamic therapy(PDT), observe the change of morphology METHOD :Make the model of rat glioma by transplanted C6 glioma cells into caudate nucleus,treated the glioma rat by PDT after two weeks. Observed the difference of subcellular structure before and after PDT by electron microscope. RESULT : Apoptosis and necrosis can be seen after treated by PDT in the C6 glioma, basal membrance damaged ,number of cellular organ of endothelial cell of blood capillary declined,tight junction of endothelial cell lengthen and the gap enlarge. The PDT has slightly effect on the nomorl rat"s subcellular structue. CONCLUSION: PDT can induce the apoptosis and necrosis of C6 glioma cell. The damage of the ultramicrostructure of mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum was the foundmentol of the change. PDT initiate the damage of BBB of the C6 glioma cell and weeken the function、and makes it a useful way of treating the glioma combained with chemotherapy.

  9. The molecular profile of microglia under the influence of glioma

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wei; Graeber, Manuel B.

    2012-01-01

    Microglia, which contribute substantially to the tumor mass of glioblastoma, have been shown to play an important role in glioma growth and invasion. While a large number of experimental studies on functional attributes of microglia in glioma provide evidence for their tumor-supporting roles, there also exist hints in support of their anti-tumor properties. Microglial activities during glioma progression seem multifaceted. They have been attributed to the receptors expressed on the microglia surface, to glioma-derived molecules that have an effect on microglia, and to the molecules released by microglia in response to their environment under glioma control, which can have autocrine effects. In this paper, the microglia and glioma literature is reviewed. We provide a synopsis of the molecular profile of microglia under the influence of glioma in order to help establish a rational basis for their potential therapeutic use. The ability of microglia precursors to cross the blood–brain barrier makes them an attractive target for the development of novel cell-based treatments of malignant glioma. PMID:22573310

  10. The molecular profile of microglia under the influence of glioma.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Graeber, Manuel B

    2012-08-01

    Microglia, which contribute substantially to the tumor mass of glioblastoma, have been shown to play an important role in glioma growth and invasion. While a large number of experimental studies on functional attributes of microglia in glioma provide evidence for their tumor-supporting roles, there also exist hints in support of their anti-tumor properties. Microglial activities during glioma progression seem multifaceted. They have been attributed to the receptors expressed on the microglia surface, to glioma-derived molecules that have an effect on microglia, and to the molecules released by microglia in response to their environment under glioma control, which can have autocrine effects. In this paper, the microglia and glioma literature is reviewed. We provide a synopsis of the molecular profile of microglia under the influence of glioma in order to help establish a rational basis for their potential therapeutic use. The ability of microglia precursors to cross the blood-brain barrier makes them an attractive target for the development of novel cell-based treatments of malignant glioma. PMID:22573310

  11. Association between Prediagnostic Serum 25-Hydroxyvitamin D Concentration and Glioma

    PubMed Central

    Zigmont, Victoria; Garrett, Amy; Peng, Jin; Seweryn, Michal; Rempala, Grzegorz A.; Harris, Randall; Holloman, Christopher; Gundersen, Thomas E.; Ahlbom, Anders; Feychting, Maria; Johannesen, Tom Borge; Grimsrud, Tom Kristian; Schwartzbaum, Judith

    2016-01-01

    There are no previous studies of the association between prediagnostic serum vitamin D concentration and glioma. Vitamin D has immunosuppressive properties; as does glioma. It was, therefore, our hypothesis that elevated vitamin D concentration would increase glioma risk. We conducted a nested case–control study using specimens from the Janus Serum Bank cohort in Norway. Blood donors who were subsequently diagnosed with glioma (n = 592), between 1974 and 2007, were matched to donors without glioma (n = 1112) on date and age at blood collection and sex. We measured 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D), an indicator of vitamin D availability, using liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry. Seasonally adjusted odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (95%CIs) were estimated for each control quintile of 25(OH)D using conditional logistic regression. Among men diagnosed with high grade glioma >56, we found a negative trend (P=.04). Men diagnosed ≤ 56 showed a borderline positive trend (P=.08). High levels (>66 nmol/L) of 25(OH)D in men > 56 were inversely related to high grade glioma from ≥ 2 years before diagnosis (OR=0.59; 95%CI=0.38,0.91) to ≥ 15 years before diagnosis (OR=0.61; 95%CI=0.38,0.96). Our findings are consistent long before glioma diagnosis and are therefore unlikely to reflect preclinical disease. PMID:26317248

  12. Efficacy of local polymer-based and systemic delivery of the anti-glutamatergic agents riluzole and memantine in rat glioma models

    PubMed Central

    Yohay, Kaleb; Tyler, Betty; Weaver, Kyle D.; Pardo, Andrea C.; Gincel, Dan; Blakeley, Jaishri; Brem, Henry; Rothstein, Jeffrey D.

    2015-01-01

    Object The poor outcome of malignant gliomas is largely due to local invasiveness. Previous studies suggest that gliomas secrete excess glutamate and destroy surrounding normal peritumoral brain by means of excitotoxic mechanisms. In this study the authors assessed the effect on survival of 2 glutamate modulators (riluzole and memantine) in rodent glioma models. Methods In an in vitro growth inhibition assay, F98 and 9L cells were exposed to riluzole and memantine. Mouse cerebellar organotypic cultures were implanted with F98 glioma cells and treated with radiation, radiation + riluzole, or vehicle and assessed for tumor growth. Safety and tolerability of intracranially implanted riluzole and memantine CPP:SA polymers were tested in F344 rats. The efficacy of these drugs was tested against the 9L model and riluzole was further tested with and without radiation therapy (RT). Results In vitro assays showed effective growth inhibition of both drugs on F98 and 9L cell lines. F98 organotypic cultures showed reduced growth of tumors treated with radiation and riluzole in comparison with untreated cultures or cultures treated with radiation or riluzole alone. Three separate efficacy experiments all showed that localized delivery of riluzole or memantine is efficacious against the 9L gliosarcoma tumor in vivo. Systemic riluzole monotherapy was ineffective; however, riluzole given with RT resulted in improved survival. Conclusions Riluzole and memantine can be safely and effectively delivered intracranially via polymer in rat glioma models. Both drugs demonstrate efficacy against the 9L gliosarcoma and F98 glioma in vitro and in vivo. Although systemic riluzole proved ineffective in increasing survival, riluzole acted synergistically with radiation and increased survival compared with RT or riluzole alone. PMID:24484234

  13. Glioma progression is mediated by an addiction to aberrant IGFBP2 expression and can be blocked using anti-IGFBP2 strategies.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Lynette M; Zhou, Xinhui; Cogdell, David E; Chua, Corrine Yingxuan; Huisinga, Anouk; R Hess, Kenneth; Fuller, Gregory N; Zhang, Wei

    2016-07-01

    Insulin-like growth factor binding protein 2 (IGFBP2) overexpression is common in high-grade glioma and is both a strong biomarker of aggressive behaviour and a well-documented prognostic factor. IGFBP2 is a member of the secreted IGFBP family that functions by interacting with circulating IGFs to modulate IGF-mediated signalling. This traditional view of IGFBP2 activities has been challenged by the recognition of the diverse functions and cellular locations of members of the IGFBP family. IGFBP2 has been previously established as a driver of glioma progression to a higher grade. In this study, we sought to determine whether IGFBP2-overexpressing tumours are dependent on continued oncogene expression and whether IGFBP2 is a viable therapeutic target in glioma. We took advantage of the well-characterized RCAS/Ntv-a mouse model to create a doxycycline-inducible IGFBP2 model of glioma and demonstrated that the temporal expression of IGFBP2 has dramatic impacts on tumour progression and survival. Further, we demonstrated that IGFBP2-driven tumours are dependent on the continued expression of IGFBP2, as withdrawal of this oncogenic signal led to a significant decrease in tumour progression and prolonged survival. Inhibition of IGFBP2 also impaired tumour cell spread. To assess a therapeutically relevant inhibition strategy, we evaluated a neutralizing antibody against IGFBP2 and demonstrated that it impaired downstream IGFBP2-mediated oncogenic signalling pathways. The studies presented here indicate that IGFBP2 not only is a driver of glioma progression and a prognostic factor but is also required for tumour maintenance and thus represents a viable therapeutic target in the treatment of glioma. Copyright © 2016 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27125842

  14. Role of tenascins in the ECM of gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Brösicke, Nicole; Faissner, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Tenascins are a family of extracellular matrix molecules that are mainly expressed in embryonic development and down-regulated in adulthood. A re-expression in the adult occurs under pathological conditions such as inflammation, regeneration or neoplasia. As the most prominent member of the tenascin family, TN-C, is highly expressed in glioma tissue and rising evidence suggests that TN-C plays a crucial role in cell migration or invasion – the most fatal characteristics of glioma – also the other members of this protein family have been investigated with regard to their impact on glioma biology. For all tenascins correlations between the expression levels of the different family members and the degree of malignancy and invasiveness of glial tumors could be detected. Overall, the former and recent results in the research on glioma and tenascins point at distinct roles of each of the molecules in glioma biology and the devastating properties of these tumors. PMID:25695402

  15. Mutations in chromatin machinery and pediatric high-grade glioma

    PubMed Central

    Lulla, Rishi R.; Saratsis, Amanda Muhs; Hashizume, Rintaro

    2016-01-01

    Pediatric central nervous system tumors are the most common solid tumor of childhood. Of these, approximately one-third are gliomas that exhibit diverse biological behaviors in the unique context of the developing nervous system. Although low-grade gliomas predominate and have favorable outcomes, up to 20% of pediatric gliomas are high-grade. These tumors are a major contributor to cancer-related morbidity and mortality in infants, children, and adolescents, with long-term survival rates of only 10 to 15%. The recent discovery of somatic oncogenic mutations affecting chromatin regulation in pediatric high-grade glioma has markedly improved our understanding of disease pathogenesis, and these findings have stimulated the development of novel therapeutic approaches targeting epigenetic regulators for disease treatment. We review the current perspective on pediatric high-grade glioma genetics and epigenetics, and discuss the emerging and experimental therapeutics targeting the unique molecular abnormalities present in these deadly childhood brain tumors. PMID:27034984

  16. Cancer cell death by design: apoptosis, autophagy and glioma virotherapy.

    PubMed

    Tyler, Matthew A; Ulasov, Ilya V; Lesniak, Maciej S

    2009-08-01

    Autophagy has been defined as a mechanism by which oncolytic adenoviruses mediate cell killing in some cancers, including malignant glioma. Until recently, however, adenovirus replication was regarded as a process that induced classical apoptosis in the infected cell. We have assessed the method of conditionally replicating adenovirus (CRAd) death in a model of malignant glioma, considering both autophagy and apoptosis as possible mechanisms of virally-induced cell death. Our initial investigations indicated that autophagy was the predominant system in CRAd-induced cell death in glioma. This appeared to be the case in vitro; however, further investigation in vivo shows that CRAds are capable of inducing both apoptotic and autophagic cell death. In this punctum, we summarize our latest research to uncover the method of oncolytic adenovirus-induced cell death in malignant glioma. Elucidating the relationship between autophagy and apoptosis in glioma virotherapy has significant implications for the design of optimal viral vectors. PMID:19430207

  17. IDH1 and IDH2 Mutations in Gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Adam; Holmen, Sheri; Colman, Howard

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) 1 and 2, originally discovered in 2009, occur in the vast majority of low grade gliomas and secondary high grade gliomas. These mutations, which occur early in gliomagenesis, change the function of the enzymes, causing them to produce 2-hydroxyglutarate, a possible oncometabolite, and to not produce NADPH. IDH mutations are oncogenic, although whether the mechanism is through alterations in hydroxylases, redox potential, cellular metabolism, or gene expression is not clear. The mutations also drive increased methylation in gliomas. Gliomas with mutated IDH1 and IDH2 have improved prognosis compared to gliomas with wild-type IDH. Mutated IDH can now be detected by immunohistochemistry and magnetic resonance spectroscopy. No drugs currently target mutated IDH, although this remains an area of active research. PMID:23532369

  18. MicroRNAs and cell cycle of malignant glioma.

    PubMed

    Ouyang, Qing; Xu, Lunshan; Cui, Hongjuan; Xu, Minhui; Yi, Liang

    2016-01-01

    The control of malignant glioma cell cycle by microRNAs (miRNAs) is well established. The deregulation of miRNAs in glioma may contribute to tumor proliferation by directly targeting the critical cell-cycle regulators. Tumor suppressive miRNAs inhibit cell cycle through repressing the expression of positive cell-cycle regulators. However, oncogenic miRNAs promote the cell-cycle progression by targeting cell-cycle negative regulators. Recent studies have identified that transcription factors had involved in the expression of miRNAs. Transcription factors and miRNAs are implicated in regulatory network of glioma cell cycle, the deregulation of these transcription factors might be a cause of the deregulation of miRNAs. Abnormal versions of miRNAs have been implicated in the cell cycle of glioma. Based on those, miRNAs are excellent biomarker candidates and potential targets for therapeutic intervention in glioma. PMID:26000816

  19. Mutations in chromatin machinery and pediatric high-grade glioma.

    PubMed

    Lulla, Rishi R; Saratsis, Amanda Muhs; Hashizume, Rintaro

    2016-03-01

    Pediatric central nervous system tumors are the most common solid tumor of childhood. Of these, approximately one-third are gliomas that exhibit diverse biological behaviors in the unique context of the developing nervous system. Although low-grade gliomas predominate and have favorable outcomes, up to 20% of pediatric gliomas are high-grade. These tumors are a major contributor to cancer-related morbidity and mortality in infants, children, and adolescents, with long-term survival rates of only 10 to 15%. The recent discovery of somatic oncogenic mutations affecting chromatin regulation in pediatric high-grade glioma has markedly improved our understanding of disease pathogenesis, and these findings have stimulated the development of novel therapeutic approaches targeting epigenetic regulators for disease treatment. We review the current perspective on pediatric high-grade glioma genetics and epigenetics, and discuss the emerging and experimental therapeutics targeting the unique molecular abnormalities present in these deadly childhood brain tumors. PMID:27034984

  20. Brain tumor modeling: glioma growth and interaction with chemotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banaem, Hossein Y.; Ahmadian, Alireza; Saberi, Hooshangh; Daneshmehr, Alireza; Khodadad, Davood

    2011-10-01

    In last decade increasingly mathematical models of tumor growths have been studied, particularly on solid tumors which growth mainly caused by cellular proliferation. In this paper we propose a modified model to simulate the growth of gliomas in different stages. Glioma growth is modeled by a reaction-advection-diffusion. We begin with a model of untreated gliomas and continue with models of polyclonal glioma following chemotherapy. From relatively simple assumptions involving homogeneous brain tissue bounded by a few gross anatomical landmarks (ventricles and skull) the models have been expanded to include heterogeneous brain tissue with different motilities of glioma cells in grey and white matter. Tumor growth is characterized by a dangerous change in the control mechanisms, which normally maintain a balance between the rate of proliferation and the rate of apoptosis (controlled cell death). Result shows that this model closes to clinical finding and can simulate brain tumor behavior properly.

  1. Glioma-Derived Platelet-Derived Growth Factor-BB Recruits Oligodendrocyte Progenitor Cells via Platelet-Derived Growth Factor Receptor-α and Remodels Cancer Stroma.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yang; Yamamoto, Seiji; Ishii, Yoko; Sang, Yang; Hamashima, Takeru; Van De, Nguyen; Nishizono, Hirofumi; Inoue, Ran; Mori, Hisashi; Sasahara, Masakiyo

    2016-05-01

    Glioma is an aggressive and incurable disease, and is frequently accompanied by augmented platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) signaling. Overexpression of PDGF-B ligand characterizes a specific subclass of glioblastoma multiforme, but the significance of the ligand remains to be elucidated. For this end, we implanted a glioma-cell line transfected with PDGF-BB-overexpressing vector (GL261-PDGF-BB) or control vector (GL261-vector) into wild-type mouse brain, and examined the effect of glioma-derived PDGF on the tumor microenvironment. The volume of GL261-PDGF-BB rapidly increased compared with GL261-vector. Recruitment of many PDGF receptor (PDGFR)-α and Olig2-positive oligodendrocyte precursor cells and frequent hemorrhages were observed in GL261-PDGF-BB but not in GL261-vector. We then implanted GL261-PDGF-BB into the mouse brain with and without Pdgfra gene inactivation, corresponding to PDGFRα-knockout (KO) and Flox mice, respectively. The recruitment of oligodendrocyte precursor cells was largely suppressed in PDGFRα-KO than in Flox, whereas the volume of GL261-PDGF-BB was comparable between the two genotypes. Frequent hemorrhage and increased IgG-leakage were associated with aberrant vascular structures within the area where many recruited oligodendrocyte precursor cells accumulated in Flox. In contrast, these vascular phenotypes were largely normalized in PDGFRα-KO. Increased matrix metalloproteinase-9 in recruited oligodendrocyte precursor cells and decreased claudin-5 in vasculature may underlie the vascular abnormality. Glioma-derived PDGF-B signal induces cancer stroma characteristically seen in high-grade glioma, and should be therapeutically targeted to improve cancer microenvironment. PMID:26945107

  2. High expression of VEGF and PI3K in glioma stem cells provides new criteria for the grading of gliomas

    PubMed Central

    WANG, LEI; ZHANG, LUYAO; SHEN, WEIGAO; LIU, YANBO; LUO, YINAN

    2016-01-01

    Glioma is a type of tumor derived from glial cells, which is associated with a high level of incidence and mortality. At present, the generation of a fast and efficient method to evaluate the malignancy grade of glioma is required. Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are currently attracting attention in oncological studies; therefore, the present study aimed to investigate novel biomarkers of glioma CSCs, in order to provide new criteria for the grading of glioma. The mRNA expression levels of CD133, (sex determining region Y)-box 2, nestin, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI3K) were detected in 15 human samples of high-malignancy glioma and 12 human samples of low-malignancy glioma in vitro. The mRNA expression levels of VEGF and PI3K were higher in the high-malignancy group, as compared with in the low-malignancy group. In conclusion, the mRNA expression levels of VEGF and PI3K in glioma CSCs may be considered a novel criteria for the grading of glioma. PMID:26893649

  3. Glioma Association and Balancing Selection of ZFPM2.

    PubMed

    Tsang, Shui-Ying; Mei, Lingling; Wan, Weiqing; Li, Jun; Li, Yi; Zhao, Cunyou; Ding, Xiaofan; Pun, Frank W; Hu, Xiaoxia; Wang, Jianmin; Zhang, Junyi; Luo, Rongcheng; Cheung, Siu-Tim; Leung, Gilberto K K; Poon, Wai-Sang; Ng, Ho-Keung; Zhang, Liwei; Xue, Hong

    2015-01-01

    ZFPM2, encoding a zinc finger protein and abundantly expressed in the brain, uterus and smooth muscles, plays important roles in cardiac and gonadal development. Abnormal expression of ZFPM2 in ovarian tumors and neuroblastoma has been reported but hitherto its genetic association with cancer and effects on gliomas have not been studied. In the present study, the hexamer insertion-deletion polymorphism rs71305152, located within a large haplotype block spanning intron 1 to intron 3 of ZFPM2, was genotyped in Chinese cohorts of glioma (n = 350), non-glioma cancer (n = 354) and healthy control (n = 463) by direct sequencing and length polymorphism in gel electrophoresis, and ZFPM2 expression in glioma tissues (n = 69) of different grades was quantified by real-time RT-PCR. Moreover, potential natural selection pressure acting on the gene was investigated. Disease-association analysis showed that the overall genotype of rs71305152 was significantly associated with gliomas (P = 0.016), and the heterozygous genotype compared to the combined homozygous genotypes was less frequent in gliomas than in controls (P = 0.005) or non-glioma cancers (P = 0.020). ZFPM2 mRNA expression was negatively correlated with the grades of gliomas (P = 0.002), with higher expression levels in the low-grade gliomas. In the astrocytoma subtype, higher ZFPM2 expression was also correlated with the rs71305152 heterozygous genotype (P = 0.028). In addition, summary statistics tests gave highly positive values, demonstrating that the gene is under the influence of balancing selection. These findings suggest that ZFPM2 is a glioma susceptibility gene, its genotype and expression showing associations with incidence and severity, respectively. Moreover, the balancing selection acting on ZFPM2 may be related to the important roles it has to play in multiple organ development or associated disease etiology. PMID:26207917

  4. Glioma Association and Balancing Selection of ZFPM2

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Weiqing; Li, Jun; Li, Yi; Zhao, Cunyou; Ding, Xiaofan; Pun, Frank W.; Hu, Xiaoxia; Wang, Jianmin; Zhang, Junyi; Luo, Rongcheng; Cheung, Siu-Tim; Leung, Gilberto K. K.; Poon, Wai-Sang; Ng, Ho-Keung; Zhang, Liwei; Xue, Hong

    2015-01-01

    ZFPM2, encoding a zinc finger protein and abundantly expressed in the brain, uterus and smooth muscles, plays important roles in cardiac and gonadal development. Abnormal expression of ZFPM2 in ovarian tumors and neuroblastoma has been reported but hitherto its genetic association with cancer and effects on gliomas have not been studied. In the present study, the hexamer insertion-deletion polymorphism rs71305152, located within a large haplotype block spanning intron 1 to intron 3 of ZFPM2, was genotyped in Chinese cohorts of glioma (n = 350), non-glioma cancer (n = 354) and healthy control (n = 463) by direct sequencing and length polymorphism in gel electrophoresis, and ZFPM2 expression in glioma tissues (n = 69) of different grades was quantified by real-time RT-PCR. Moreover, potential natural selection pressure acting on the gene was investigated. Disease-association analysis showed that the overall genotype of rs71305152 was significantly associated with gliomas (P = 0.016), and the heterozygous genotype compared to the combined homozygous genotypes was less frequent in gliomas than in controls (P = 0.005) or non-glioma cancers (P = 0.020). ZFPM2 mRNA expression was negatively correlated with the grades of gliomas (P = 0.002), with higher expression levels in the low-grade gliomas. In the astrocytoma subtype, higher ZFPM2 expression was also correlated with the rs71305152 heterozygous genotype (P = 0.028). In addition, summary statistics tests gave highly positive values, demonstrating that the gene is under the influence of balancing selection. These findings suggest that ZFPM2 is a glioma susceptibility gene, its genotype and expression showing associations with incidence and severity, respectively. Moreover, the balancing selection acting on ZFPM2 may be related to the important roles it has to play in multiple organ development or associated disease etiology. PMID:26207917

  5. Metronomic Doses of Temozolomide Enhance the Efficacy of Carbon Nanotube CpG Immunotherapy in an Invasive Glioma Model

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Qin; Zhang, Ian; Gao, Hang; Yanyan, Song; Chen, Xuebo; Weng, Yiming; Da Fonseca, Anna; Shah, Sunny; Manuel, Edwin R.; Zhang, Leying; Vonderfecht, Steven L.; Alizadeh, Darya; Berlin, Jacob M.; Badie, Behnam

    2016-01-01

    Even when treated with aggressive current therapies, most patients with glioblastoma survive less than two years. Rapid tumor growth, an invasive nature, and the blood-brain barrier, which limits the penetration of large molecules into the brain, all contribute to the poor tumor response associated with conventional therapies. Immunotherapy has emerged as a therapeutic approach that may overcome these challenges. We recently reported that single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) can be used to dramatically increase the immunotherapeutic efficacy of CpG oligonucleotides in a mouse model of glioma. Following implantation in the mouse brain, the tumor cell line used in these previous studies (GL261) tends to form a spherical tumor with limited invasion into healthy brain. In order to evaluate SWCNT/CpG therapy under more clinically-relevant conditions, here we report the treatment of a more invasive mouse glioma model (K-Luc) that better recapitulates human disease. In addition, a CpG sequence previously tested in humans was used to formulate the SWCNT/CpG which was combined with temozolomide, the standard of care chemotherapy for glioblastoma patients. We found that, following two intracranial administrations, SWCNT/CpG is well-tolerated and improves the survival of mice bearing invasive gliomas. Interestingly, the efficacy of SWCNT/CpG was enhanced when combined with temozolomide. This enhanced anti-tumor efficacy was correlated to an increase of tumor-specific cytotoxic activity in splenocytes. These results reinforce the emerging understanding that immunotherapy can be enhanced by combining it with chemotherapy and support the continued development of SWCNT/CpG. PMID:26829221

  6. Metronomic Doses of Temozolomide Enhance the Efficacy of Carbon Nanotube CpG Immunotherapy in an Invasive Glioma Model.

    PubMed

    Ouyang, Mao; White, Ethan E; Ren, Hui; Guo, Qin; Zhang, Ian; Gao, Hang; Yanyan, Song; Chen, Xuebo; Weng, Yiming; Da Fonseca, Anna; Shah, Sunny; Manuel, Edwin R; Zhang, Leying; Vonderfecht, Steven L; Alizadeh, Darya; Berlin, Jacob M; Badie, Behnam

    2016-01-01

    Even when treated with aggressive current therapies, most patients with glioblastoma survive less than two years. Rapid tumor growth, an invasive nature, and the blood-brain barrier, which limits the penetration of large molecules into the brain, all contribute to the poor tumor response associated with conventional therapies. Immunotherapy has emerged as a therapeutic approach that may overcome these challenges. We recently reported that single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) can be used to dramatically increase the immunotherapeutic efficacy of CpG oligonucleotides in a mouse model of glioma. Following implantation in the mouse brain, the tumor cell line used in these previous studies (GL261) tends to form a spherical tumor with limited invasion into healthy brain. In order to evaluate SWCNT/CpG therapy under more clinically-relevant conditions, here we report the treatment of a more invasive mouse glioma model (K-Luc) that better recapitulates human disease. In addition, a CpG sequence previously tested in humans was used to formulate the SWCNT/CpG which was combined with temozolomide, the standard of care chemotherapy for glioblastoma patients. We found that, following two intracranial administrations, SWCNT/CpG is well-tolerated and improves the survival of mice bearing invasive gliomas. Interestingly, the efficacy of SWCNT/CpG was enhanced when combined with temozolomide. This enhanced anti-tumor efficacy was correlated to an increase of tumor-specific cytotoxic activity in splenocytes. These results reinforce the emerging understanding that immunotherapy can be enhanced by combining it with chemotherapy and support the continued development of SWCNT/CpG. PMID:26829221

  7. PCR-Based Simple Subgrouping Is Validated for Classification of Gliomas and Defines Negative Prognostic Copy Number Aberrations in IDH Mutant Gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Nakae, Shunsuke; Sasaki, Hikaru; Hayashi, Saeko; Hattori, Natsuki; Kumon, Masanobu; Nishiyama, Yuya; Adachi, Kazuhide; Nagahisa, Shinya; Hayashi, Takuro; Inamasu, Joji; Abe, Masato; Hasegawa, Mitsuhiro; Hirose, Yuichi

    2015-01-01

    Genetic subgrouping of gliomas has been emphasized recently, particularly after the finding of isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) mutations. In a previous study, we investigated whole-chromosome copy number aberrations (CNAs) of gliomas and have described genetic subgrouping based on CNAs and IDH1 mutations. Subsequently, we classified gliomas using simple polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based methods to improve the availability of genetic subgrouping. We selected IDH1/2 and TP53 as markers and analyzed 237 adult supratentorial gliomas using Sanger sequencing. Using these markers, we classified gliomas into three subgroups that were strongly associated with patient prognoses. These included IDH mutant gliomas without TP53 mutations, IDH mutant gliomas with TP53 mutations, and IDH wild-type gliomas. IDH mutant gliomas without TP53 mutations, which mostly corresponded to gliomas carrying 1p19q co-deletions, showed lower recurrence rates than the other 2 groups. In the other high-recurrence groups, the median progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) of patients with IDH mutant gliomas with TP53 mutations were significantly longer than those of patients with IDH wild-type gliomas. Notably, most IDH mutant gliomas with TP53 mutations had at least one of the CNAs +7q, +8q, −9p, and −11p. Moreover, IDH mutant gliomas with at least one of these CNAs had a significantly worse prognosis than did other IDH mutant gliomas. PCR-based mutation analyses of IDH and TP53 were sufficient for simple genetic diagnosis of glioma that were strongly associated with prognosis of patients and enabled us to detect negative CNAs in IDH mutant gliomas. PMID:26558387

  8. Evaluation of porphyrin C analogues for photodynamic therapy of cerebral glioma.

    PubMed Central

    Karagianis, G.; Hill, J. S.; Stylli, S. S.; Kaye, A. H.; Varadaxis, N. J.; Reiss, J. A.; Phillips, D. R.

    1996-01-01

    A series of monomeric porphyrins (2-8) based on porphyrin C (1) have been tested as sensitisers for photodynamic therapy (PDT) of cerebral glioma using the in vitro/in vivo C6 intracerebral animal tumour model. The in vivo screening, consisting of cytotoxicity, phototoxicity (red light) and subcellular localisation studies, revealed two sensitisers (porphyrin 7, molecular weight 863 Da and porphyrin 8, molecular weight 889 Da), which had greater photoactivity than porphyrin C and similar photoactivity to haematoporphyrin derivative (HpD) although at a 5-fold higher dose than HpD. Both sensitisers showed intracellular localisation to discrete organelle sites and exhibited considerably less 'dark' cytotoxicity than HpD. The kinetics of uptake of porphyrins 7 and 8 was studied in the mouse C6 glioma model as well as in biopsy samples from normal brain, liver, spleen and blood. Maximal drug uptake levels in tumour occurred 9 and 6 h after intraperitoneal injection for 7 and 8 respectively, at which time the tumour to normal brain ratios were 15:1 and 13:1 respectively. The effect of PDT using porphyrin 7 activated by the gold metal vapour laser tuned to 627.8 nm was studied in Wistar rats bearing intracerebral C6 glioma. At a drug dose of 10 mg porphyrin 7 kg-1 body weight and laser doses of up to 400 J cm-2 light, selective tumour kill with sparing of normal brain was achieved, with a maximal depth of tumour kill of 1.77+/-0.40. mm. Irradiation following a higher drug dose of 75 mg porphyrin 7 kg-1 body weight resulted in a greater depth of tumour kill, but also significantly increased the likelihood and extent of necrosis in normal brain. Images Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 6 PMID:8595167

  9. Cord blood stem cells revert glioma stem cell EMT by down regulating transcriptional activation of Sox2 and Twist1

    PubMed Central

    Velpula, Kiran Kumar; Dasari, Venkata Ramesh; Tsung, Andrew J.; Dinh, Dzung H.; Rao, Jasti S.

    2011-01-01

    The dynamic nature of cancer stem cells that underlie metastasis or their ability to switch between different cellular identities, as in EMT and MET, has profound implications for cancer therapy. The functional relationship between molecules involved in cancer cell stemness and metastasis is not clear. In this regard, our studies on hGBM tissue grade IV specimens showed significant expression of Twist1 and Sox2, known mesenchymal and stemness related markers, respectively, indicating their association with glial tumor genesis and metastasis. The glioma stem cells obtained from CD133+ cells demonstrated increased expression of Twist1 and Sox2 accompanied by significant increase in the mesenchymal markers such as N-cadherin, vimentin and β-catenin. Our studies on glioma stem cells treatment with human umbilical cord blood derived- mesenchymal stem cells, showed down regulation of Twist1 and Sox2 proteins, apart from other mesenchymal stem cell markers. Based on the in vitro experiments and in vivo intracranial xenograft mouse model studies, we elucidated the potential therapeutic role of hUCBSC in suppressing glioma cancer stemness by the induction of MET. PMID:22184289

  10. Cord blood stem cells revert glioma stem cell EMT by down regulating transcriptional activation of Sox2 and Twist1.

    PubMed

    Velpula, Kiran Kumar; Dasari, Venkata Ramesh; Tsung, Andrew J; Dinh, Dzung H; Rao, Jasti S

    2011-12-01

    The dynamic nature of cancer stem cells that underlie metastasis or their ability to switch between different cellular identities, as in EMT and MET, has profound implications for cancer therapy. The functional relationship between molecules involved in cancer cell stemness and metastasis is not clear. In this regard, our studies on hGBM tissue grade IV specimens showed significant expression of Twist1 and Sox2, known mesenchymal and stemness related markers, respectively, indicating their association with glial tumor genesis and metastasis. The glioma stem cells obtained from CD133+ cells demonstrated increased expression of Twist1 and Sox2 accompanied by significant increase in the mesenchymal markers such as N-cadherin, vimentin and β-catenin. Our studies on glioma stem cells treatment with human umbilical cord blood derived- mesenchymal stem cells, showed down regulation of Twist1 and Sox2 proteins, apart from other mesenchymal stem cell markers. Based on the in vitro experiments and in vivo intracranial xenograft mouse model studies, we elucidated the potential therapeutic role of hUCBSC in suppressing glioma cancer stemness by the induction of MET. PMID:22184289

  11. The cyclic AMP pathway is a sex-specific modifier of glioma risk in type I neurofibromatosis patients.

    PubMed

    Warrington, Nicole M; Sun, Tao; Luo, Jingqin; McKinstry, Robert C; Parkin, Patricia C; Ganzhorn, Sara; Spoljaric, Debra; Albers, Anne C; Merkelson, Amanda; Stewart, Douglas R; Stevenson, David A; Viskochil, David; Druley, Todd E; Forys, Jason T; Reilly, Karlyne M; Fisher, Michael J; Tabori, Uri; Allen, Jeffrey C; Schiffman, Joshua D; Gutmann, David H; Rubin, Joshua B

    2015-01-01

    Identifying modifiers of glioma risk in patients with type I neurofibromatosis (NF1) could help support personalized tumor surveillance, advance understanding of gliomagenesis, and potentially identify novel therapeutic targets. Here, we report genetic polymorphisms in the human adenylate cyclase gene adenylate cyclase 8 (ADCY8) that correlate with glioma risk in NF1 in a sex-specific manner, elevating risk in females while reducing risk in males. This finding extends earlier evidence of a role for cAMP in gliomagenesis based on results in a genetically engineered mouse model (Nf1 GEM). Thus, sexually dimorphic cAMP signaling might render males and females differentially sensitive to variation in cAMP levels. Using male and female Nf1 GEM, we found significant sex differences exist in cAMP regulation and in the growth-promoting effects of cAMP suppression. Overall, our results establish a sex-specific role for cAMP regulation in human gliomagenesis, specifically identifying ADCY8 as a modifier of glioma risk in NF1. PMID:25381154

  12. Vaccine Therapy, Oncolytic Viruses, and Gliomas.

    PubMed

    Desjardins, Annick; Vlahovic, Gordana; Friedman, Henry S

    2016-03-01

    After years of active research and refinement, vaccine therapy and oncolytic viruses are becoming part of the arsenal in the treatment of gliomas. In contrast to standard treatment with radiation therapy and chemotherapy, vaccines are more specific to the patient and the tumor. The majority of ongoing vaccine trials are investigating peptide, heat shock protein, and dendritic cell vaccines. The immunosuppression triggered by the tumor itself and by its treatment is a major obstacle to vaccine and oncolytic virus therapy. Thus, combination therapy with different agents that affect the immune system will probably be necessary. PMID:26984213

  13. Gene therapy for high-grade glioma

    PubMed Central

    Natsume, Atsushi

    2008-01-01

    The treatment of high-grade gliomas remains difficult despite recent advances in surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy. True advances may emerge from the increasing understanding in molecular biology and discovery of novel mechanisms for the delivery of tumoricidal agents. In an attempt to overcome this formidable neoplasm, molecular approaches using gene therapy have been investigated clinically since 1992. The clinical trials have mainly been classified into three approaches: suicide gene therapy, immune gene therapy and oncolytic viral therapy. In this article, we review these approaches, which have been studied in previous and ongoing clinical trials. PMID:19262115

  14. Virotherapy against malignant glioma stem cells.

    PubMed

    Dey, Mahua; Ulasov, Ilya V; Lesniak, Maciej S

    2010-03-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme, the most common primary intracranial malignancy, is associated with very poor outcome despite advances in surgical techniques and chemo- and radiation therapy. Many novel treatment modalities are being investigated with varying amount of success. Evolution of cancer stem cell hypothesis provides a new venue for developmental therapeutics. In this review, we highlight the literature regarding the existence of glioma stem cells and their characteristics. We also discuss the potential for virotherapy, a novel therapeutic approach utilizing conditionally replicative viruses, to directly target this population of self-renewing cancer stem cells. PMID:19643532

  15. Virotherapy Against Malignant Glioma Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Dey, Mahua; Ulasov, Ilya V.; Lesniak, Maciej S.

    2009-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme, the most common primary intracranial malignancy, is associated with very poor outcome despite advances in surgical techniques and chemo- and radiation therapy. Many novel treatment modalities are being investigated with varying amount of success. Evolution of cancer stem cell hypothesis provides a new venue for developmental therapeutics. In this review, we highlight the literature regarding the existence of glioma stem cells and their characteristics. We also discuss the potential for virotherapy, a novel therapeutic approach utilizing conditionally replicative viruses, to directly target this population of self-renewing cancer stem cells. PMID:19643532

  16. Complete remission of a diffuse pontine glioma.

    PubMed

    Lenard, H G; Engelbrecht, V; Janssen, G; Wechsler, W; Tautz, C

    1998-12-01

    A patient is described in whom a large diffuse glioma of the pons extending into the midbrain was diagnosed at the age of 2 years. Biopsy showed a fibrillary astrocytoma. After shunting of a hydrocephalus, the clinical symptoms abated without conventional therapy. Repeated MRI studies showed a continuous decrease of the tumour which was no longer visible when the patient was 6.6 years old. In reviews on spontaneous remissions of oncologic disorders we were unable to find a case of a biologically benign brain stem tumour. There is one isolated report on a similar case, though without histologic documentation. PMID:10029356

  17. A Pilot Feasibility Study of Oral 5-Fluorocytosine and Genetically-Modified Neural Stem Cells Expressing E.Coli Cytosine Deaminase for Treatment of Recurrent High Grade Gliomas

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-03-02

    Adult Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Recurrent Grade III Glioma; Recurrent Grade IV Glioma; Adult Anaplastic Oligodendroglioma; Adult Brain Tumor; Adult Giant Cell Glioblastoma; Adult Glioblastoma; Adult Gliosarcoma; Adult Mixed Glioma; Recurrent Adult Brain Tumor; Adult Anaplastic Oligoastrocytoma; Recurrent High Grade Glioma

  18. Tipifarnib in Treating Young Patients With Recurrent or Progressive High-Grade Glioma, Medulloblastoma, Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor, or Brain Stem Glioma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-10-07

    Childhood High-grade Cerebral Astrocytoma; Childhood Oligodendroglioma; Recurrent Childhood Brain Stem Glioma; Recurrent Childhood Cerebellar Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Cerebral Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Medulloblastoma; Recurrent Childhood Supratentorial Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor; Recurrent Childhood Visual Pathway and Hypothalamic Glioma

  19. Regulation of C6 glioma cell migration by thymol

    PubMed Central

    LEE, KANG PA; KIM, JAI-EUN; PARK, WON-HWAN; HONG, HEEOK

    2016-01-01

    Tumor cell motility exhibits a crucial role in tumor development. Therefore, the present study aimed to investigate whether thymol could reduce C6 glioma cell migration. Cell viability was determined using the EZ-Cytox Cell Viability kit. The scratch wound healing and Boyden chamber assays were performed to test C6 glioma cell migration in the presence of fetal bovine serum (FBS). Additionally, the study investigated whether signaling proteins relevant to C6 glioma cell migration, i.e., extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK)1/2, protein kinase Cα (PKCα), matrix metallopeptidase (MMP)9 and MMP2, were affected by thymol treatment. Up to 30 µM, thymol did not alter cell viability, whereas 100 µM thymol induced the death of ~20% of the cells. Furthermore, thymol (30 µM) significantly reduced FBS-induced migration. In the FBS-stimulated C6 glioma cells, thymol (30 µM) suppressed PKCα and ERK1/2 phosphorylation. MMP9 and MMP2 production was also significantly reduced by treatment with 30 µM thymol in the C6 glioma cells. Taken together, these results indicate that thymol attenuates C6 glioma cell migration. Additionally, the study suggests that the effect of thymol on the FBS-induced migration of C6 glioma cells affects PKCα and ERK1/2 signaling, and suppresses MMP9 and MMP2 production. PMID:27073528

  20. De novo cerebellar malignant glioma: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Hiroaki; Yoshida, Yasuhisa

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Gliomas of the cerebellum are rare in adults, and their natural history and clinical behavior are not well known. Because cerebellar glioma is not usually diagnosed until clinical symptoms have appeared, no reports have described the developmental process of new cerebellar gliomas. We describe a case of de novo cerebellar anaplastic astrocytoma in which the developmental process was detected on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Presentation of case A 78-year-old man with a history of cerebral infarction was undergoing follow-up MRI every 6 months. This follow-up revealed a small abnormality in the left cerebellar hemisphere without clinical symptoms. Subsequent MRI showed lesion growth accompanying clinical symptoms. As cerebellar tumor was suspected, the lesion was extirpated. The histological diagnosis was anaplastic astrocytoma. Local recurrence developed and the patient died 20 months postoperatively. Discussion Cerebellar gliomas sometimes do not exhibit the common MRI findings of supratentorial gliomas, leading to difficulty with preoperative diagnosis. In this case, we initially diagnosed asymptomatic cerebellar infarction because the lesion was small and asymptomatic. The abnormal lesion gradually grew and clinical symptoms appeared. Cerebellar glioma may show few signs characteristic of tumor on MRI in the initial stages. Conclusion When MRI detects a new, faint abnormality in the cerebellum, close follow-up of clinical symptoms and MRI on suspicion of glioma is warranted PMID:27017277

  1. Proteomics of gliomas: Initial biomarker discovery and evolution of technology

    PubMed Central

    Kalinina, Juliya; Peng, Junmin; Ritchie, James C.; Van Meir, Erwin G.

    2011-01-01

    Gliomas are a group of aggressive brain tumors that diffusely infiltrate adjacent brain tissues, rendering them largely incurable, even with multiple treatment modalities and agents. Mostly asymptomatic at early stages, they present in several subtypes with astrocytic or oligodendrocytic features and invariably progress to malignant forms. Gliomas are difficult to classify precisely because of interobserver variability during histopathologic grading. Identifying biological signatures of each glioma subtype through protein biomarker profiling of tumor or tumor-proximal fluids is therefore of high priority. Such profiling not only may provide clues regarding tumor classification but may identify clinical biomarkers and pathologic targets for the development of personalized treatments. In the past decade, differential proteomic profiling techniques have utilized tumor, cerebrospinal fluid, and plasma from glioma patients to identify the first candidate diagnostic, prognostic, predictive, and therapeutic response markers, highlighting the potential for glioma biomarker discovery. The number of markers identified, however, has been limited, their reproducibility between studies is unclear, and none have been validated for clinical use. Recent technological advancements in methodologies for high-throughput profiling, which provide easy access, rapid screening, low sample consumption, and accurate protein identification, are anticipated to accelerate brain tumor biomarker discovery. Reliable tools for biomarker verification forecast translation of the biomarkers into clinical diagnostics in the foreseeable future. Herein we update the reader on the recent trends and directions in glioma proteomics, including key findings and established and emerging technologies for analysis, together with challenges we are still facing in identifying and verifying potential glioma biomarkers. PMID:21852429

  2. Telomere maintenance and the etiology of adult glioma.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Kyle M; Wiencke, John K; Lachance, Daniel H; Wiemels, Joseph L; Molinaro, Annette M; Eckel-Passow, Jeanette E; Jenkins, Robert B; Wrensch, Margaret R

    2015-11-01

    A growing body of epidemiologic and tumor genomic research has identified an important role for telomere maintenance in glioma susceptibility, initiation, and prognosis. Telomere length has long been investigated in relation to cancer, but whether longer or shorter telomere length might be associated with glioma risk has remained elusive. Recent data address this question and are reviewed here. Common inherited variants near the telomerase-component genes TERC and TERT are associated both with longer telomere length and increased risk of glioma. Exome sequencing of glioma patients from families with multiple affected members has identified rare inherited mutations in POT1 (protection of telomeres protein 1) as high-penetrance glioma risk factors. These heritable POT1 mutations are also associated with increased telomere length in leukocytes. Tumor sequencing studies further indicate that acquired somatic mutations of TERT and ATRX are among the most frequent alterations found in adult gliomas. These mutations facilitate telomere lengthening, thus bypassing a critical mechanism of apoptosis. Although future research is needed, mounting evidence suggests that glioma is, at least in part, a disease of telomere dysregulation. Specifically, several inherited and acquired variants underlying gliomagenesis affect telomere pathways and are also associated with increased telomere length. PMID:26014050

  3. Cy5.5 conjugated MnO nanoparticles for magnetic resonance/near-infrared fluorescence dual-modal imaging of brain gliomas.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ning; Shao, Chen; Li, Shuai; Wang, Zihao; Qu, Yanming; Gu, Wei; Yu, Chunjiang; Ye, Ling

    2015-11-01

    The fusion of molecular and anatomical modalities facilitates more reliable and accurate detection of tumors. Herein, we prepared the PEG-Cy5.5 conjugated MnO nanoparticles (MnO-PEG-Cy5.5 NPs) with magnetic resonance (MR) and near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) imaging modalities. The applicability of MnO-PEG-Cy5.5 NPs as a dual-modal (MR/NIRF) imaging nanoprobe for the detection of brain gliomas was investigated. In vivo MR contrast enhancement of the MnO-PEG-Cy5.5 nanoprobe in the tumor region was demonstrated. Meanwhile, whole-body NIRF imaging of glioma bearing nude mouse exhibited distinct tumor localization upon injection of MnO-PEG-Cy5.5 NPs. Moreover, ex vivo CLSM imaging of the brain slice hosting glioma indicated the preferential accumulation of MnO-PEG-Cy5.5 NPs in the glioma region. Our results therefore demonstrated the potential of MnO-PEG-Cy5.5 NPs as a dual-modal (MR/NIRF) imaging nanoprobe in improving the diagnostic efficacy by simultaneously providing anatomical information from deep inside the body and more sensitive information at the cellular level. PMID:26151564

  4. Differential expression of novH and CTGF in human glioma cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Xin, L W; Martinerie, C; Zumkeller, W; Westphal, M; Perbal, B

    1996-01-01

    Aims—(1) To investigate the expression in human derived glioblastoma cell lines of two structurally related genes, novH (nephroblastoma overexpressed gene) and CTGF (connective tissue growth factor), which encode putative insulin-like growth factor binding proteins of a novel type. (2) To investigate whether the same transcription factors regulate CTGF and novH expression. Methods—Expression of novH and CTGF was analysed in 24 glioblastoma derived cell lines by northern blotting. The CTGF promoter region was characterised by nucleotide sequencing, RNase protection experiments, by transient transfections, and CAT assays. Results—CTGF and novH mRNA levels differed in the glioma cell lines studied. NovH and CTGF genes were not co-expressed in all cell lines. The CTGF promoter region was highly conserved compared with the corresponding region in the mouse (FISP12) and exhibited in vitro transcriptional activity. Conclusions—Although the coding regions of novH and CTGF are highly homologous, their promoter regions are substantially different, suggesting that these two genes may be regulated by different mechanisms. Considering that novH and CTGF are likely to be, respectively, negative and positive regulators of growth and that some glioma cell lines expressing novH are not tumorigenic, expression of these two genes might represent a key element in determining the stage of differentiation or the malignant potential, or both, of some tumour cell lines. Images PMID:16696057

  5. G protein-coupled receptors as oncogenic signals in glioma: emerging therapeutic avenues

    PubMed Central

    Cherry, Allison E; Stella, Nephi

    2014-01-01

    Gliomas are the most common malignant intracranial tumors. Newly developed targeted therapies for these cancers aim to inhibit oncogenic signals, many of which emanate from receptor tyrosine kinases, including the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR). Unfortunately, the first generation treatments targeting these oncogenic signals provide little survival benefit in both mouse xenograft models and human patients. The search for new treatment options has uncovered several G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) candidates and generated a growing interest in this class of proteins as alternative therapeutic targets for the treatment of various cancers, including GBM. GPCRs constitute a large family of membrane receptors that influence oncogenic pathways through canonical and non-canonical signaling. Accordingly, evidence indicates that GPCRs display a unique ability to crosstalk with receptor tyrosine kinases, making them important molecular components controlling tumorigenesis. This review summarizes the current research on GPCR functionality in gliomas and explores the potential of modulating these receptors to treat this devastating disease. PMID:25158675

  6. CB-09THE CELL OF ORIGIN FOR GLIOBLASTOMA CONTRIBUTES TO THE PHENOTYPIC HETEROGENEITY OF GLIOMA STEM CELLS

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yiwen; Marinescu, Voichita D.; Xie, Yuan; Haglund, Caroline; Jarvius, Malin; Lindberg, Nanna; Olofsson, Tommie; Hesselager, Göran; Alafuzoff, Irina; Fryknäs, Mårten; Larsson, Rolf; Nelander, Sven; Uhrbom, Lene

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM) is the most frequent adult primary malignant brain tumor that remains incurable despite aggressive treatment. The cell of origin (COO) for GBM is unknown but assumed to be a glial stem or progenitor cell. GBM harbours hierarchical tumor cells called glioma stem cells (GSCs) that maintain tumor growth, drive tumor progression and cause tumor relapse due to their increased resistance to therapy. We have analyzed the significance of cellular origin for GBM development and GSC properties by comparing mouse GBMs and GSCs derived thereof induced in neural stem cells (NSCs), glial-restricted precursor cells (GPCs) or oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs) by identical mutations. There were striking differences in GBM development and the phenotypes of GSCs and their response to drugs owing to the COO. Global gene expression analysis of mouse GSC lines displayed a clear separation due to COO and differential gene expression analysis identified a COO gene signature of 175 genes. Cross-species bioinformatics analyses were performed. First we analyzed the human cancer genome atlas (TCGA) GBM tissue samples and the mouse GSC expression data for a collection of TCGA GBM subtype signature genes. This showed that we could model both Proneural and Mesenchymal GBMs in mice by merely switching the COO. Next, we used the mouse COO gene signature to stratify a large number of newly established human glioma stem cell lines. This produced two groups of human GSCs; the NSC origin group and the progenitor cell (PC) origin group in which the mouse GPC- and OPC-derived genes were combined. Importantly, patient survival was significantly different between the NSC and PC COO groups with a better prognosis for the PC group patients. Thus, the cell of origin is essential for GBM biology and needs to be considered for more accurate patient stratification, target identification and drug discovery.

  7. Selective Targeting to Glioma with Nucleic Acid Aptamers

    PubMed Central

    Aptekar, Shraddha; Arora, Mohit; Lawrence, Clare Louise; Lea, Robert William; Ashton, Katherine; Dawson, Tim; Alder, Jane Elizabeth; Shaw, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    Malignant glioma is characterised by a rapid growth rate and high capacity for invasive infiltration to surrounding brain tissue; hence, diagnosis and treatment is difficult and patient survival is poor. Aptamers contribute a promising and unique technology for the in vitro imaging of live cells and tissues, with a potentially bright future in clinical diagnostics and therapeutics for malignant glioma. The binding selectivity, uptake capacity and binding target of two DNA aptamers, SA43 and SA44, were investigated in glioma cells and patient tissues. The binding assay showed that SA43 and SA44 bound with strong affinity (Kd, 21.56 ± 4.60 nM and Kd, 21.11 ± 3.30 nM respectively) to the target U87MG cells. Quantitative analysis by flow cytometry showed that the aptamers were able to actively internalise in U87MG and 1321N1 glioma cells compared to the non-cancerous and non-glioma cell types. Confocal microscopy confirmed staining in the cytoplasm, and co-localisation studies with endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi apparatus and lysosomal markers suggested internalisation and compartmentalisation within the endomembrane system. Both aptamers selectively bound to Ku 70 and Ku 80 DNA repair proteins as determined by aptoprecipitation (AP) followed by mass spectrometry analysis and confirmation by Western blot. In addition, aptohistochemical (AHC) staining on paraffin embedded, formalin fixed patient tissues revealed that the binding selectivity was significantly higher for SA43 aptamer in glioma tissues (grade I, II, III and IV) compared to the non-cancerous tissues, whereas SA44 did not show selectivity towards glioma tissues. The results indicate that SA43 aptamer can differentiate between glioma and non-cancerous cells and tissues and therefore, shows promise for histological diagnosis of glioma. PMID:26252900

  8. Use of cardiac glycosides and risk of glioma.

    PubMed

    Seliger, Corinna; Meier, Christoph R; Jick, Susan S; Uhl, Martin; Bogdahn, Ulrich; Hau, Peter; Leitzmann, M F

    2016-04-01

    Cardiac glycosides induce apoptotic effects on glioma cells, but whether cardiac glycosides protect against risk for glioma is unknown. We therefore explored the relation between glycoside use and glioma risk using a large and validated database. We performed a case-control analysis using the Clinical Practice Research Datalink involving 2005 glioma cases diagnosed between 1995 and 2012 that were individually matched to 20,050 controls on age, gender, general practice, and number of years of active history in the database. Conditional logistic regression analysis was used to evaluate the association between cardiac glycosides and the risk of glioma adjusting for body mass index and smoking. We also examined use of common heart failure and arrhythmia medications to differentiate between a specific glycoside effect and a generic effect of treatment for congestive heart failure or arrhythmia. Cardiac glycoside use was inversely related to glioma incidence. After adjustment for congestive heart failure, arrhythmia, diabetes, and common medications used to treat those conditions, the OR of glioma was 0.47 (95 % CI 0.27-0.81, Bonferroni-corrected p value = 0.024) for use versus non-use of cardiac glycosides, based on 17 exposed cases. In contrast, no associations were noted for other medications used to treat congestive heart failure or arrhythmias. The OR of glioma in people with congestive heart failure was 0.65 (95 % CI 0.40-1.04), and for arrhythmia it was 1.01 (95 % CI 0.78-1.31). These data indicate that cardiac glycoside use is independently associated with reduced glioma risk. PMID:26721242

  9. Fluorescent Cancer-Selective Alkylphosphocholine Analogs For Intraoperative Glioma Detection

    PubMed Central

    Swanson, Kyle I.; Clark, Paul A.; Zhang, Ray R.; Kandela, Irawati K.; Farhoud, Mohammed; Weichert, Jamey P.; Kuo, John S.

    2015-01-01

    Background 5-ALA induced tumor fluorescence aids brain tumor resections but is not approved for routine use in the United States. We developed and describe testing of two novel fluorescent, cancer-selective alkylphosphocholine analogs, CLR1501 (green) and CLR1502 (near-infrared), in a proof-of-principle study for fluorescence-guided glioma surgery. Objective To demonstrate CLR1501 and CLR1502 are cancer cell-selective fluorescence agents in glioblastoma models and compare tumor (T) to normal brain (N) fluorescence ratios with 5-ALA. Methods CLR1501, CLR1502, 5-ALA were administered to mice with MRI-verified orthotopic U251 GBM and GSC-derived xenografts. Harvested brains were imaged using confocal microscopy (CLR1501), IVIS Spectrum imaging system (CLR1501, CLR1502, and 5-ALA), or Fluobeam near-infrared fluorescence imaging system (CLR1502). Imaging and quantitative analysis of T:N fluorescence ratios were performed. Results Excitation/emission peaks are 500/517nm for CLR1501, and 760/778nm for CLR1502. The observed T:N ratio of CLR1502 (9.28±1.08) was significantly higher (p<0.01) than CLR1501 (3.51±0.44 on confocal imaging; 7.23±1.63 on IVIS imaging) and 5-ALA (4.81±0.92). Near-infrared Fluobeam CLR1502 imaging in a mouse xenograft model demonstrated high contrast tumor visualization compatible with surgical applications. Conclusion CLR1501 (green) and CLR1502 (near infrared) are novel tumor-selective fluorescent agents for discriminating tumor from normal brain. CLR1501 exhibits a tumor to brain fluorescence ratio similar to 5-ALA, whereas CLR1502 has a superior tumor to brain fluorescence ratio. This study demonstrates the potential use of CLR1501 and CLR1502 in fluorescence-guided tumor surgery. PMID:25549194

  10. Dopamine induces growth inhibition and vascular normalization through reprogramming M2-polarized macrophages in rat C6 glioma

    SciTech Connect

    Qin, Tian; Wang, Chenlong; Chen, Xuewei; Duan, Chenfan; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Jing; Chai, Hongyan; Tang, Tian; Chen, Honglei; Yue, Jiang; Li, Ying; Yang, Jing

    2015-07-15

    Dopamine (DA), a monoamine catecholamine neurotransmitter with antiangiogenic activity, stabilizes tumor vessels in colon, prostate and ovarian cancers, thus increases chemotherapeutic efficacy. Here, in the rat C6 glioma models, we investigated the vascular normalization effects of DA and its mechanisms of action. DA (25, 50 mg/kg) inhibited tumor growth, while a precursor of DA (levodopa) prolonged the survival time of rats bearing orthotopic C6 glioma. DA improved tumor perfusion, with significant effects from day 3, and a higher level at days 5 to 7. In addition, DA decreased microvessel density and hypoxia-inducible factor-1α expression in tumor tissues, while increasing the coverage of pericyte. Conversely, an antagonist of dopamine receptor 2 (DR2) (eticlopride) but not DR1 (butaclamol) abrogated DA-induced tumor regression and vascular normalization. Furthermore, DA improved the delivery and efficacy of temozolomide therapy. Importantly, DA increased representative M1 markers (iNOS, CXCL9, etc.), while decreasing M2 markers (CD206, arginase-1, etc.). Depletion of macrophages by clodronate or zoledronic acid attenuated the effects of DA. Notably, DA treatment induced M2-to-M1 polarization in RAW264.7 cells and mouse peritoneal macrophages, and enhanced the migration of pericyte-like cells (10T1/2), which was reversed by eticlopride or DR2-siRNA. Such changes were accompanied by the downregulation of VEGF/VEGFR2 signaling. In summary, DA induces growth inhibition and vascular normalization through reprogramming M2-polarized macrophages. Thus, targeting the tumor microvasculature by DA represents a promising strategy for human glioma therapy. - Highlights: • Dopamine induces tumor growth inhibition and vascular normalization in rat C6 glioma. • Dopamine switches macrophage phenotype from M2 to M1. • Dopamine-induced vascular normalization is mediated by macrophage polarization. • Dopamine is a promising agent targeting the microvasculature in tumor

  11. Season of Birth and Risk for Adult Onset Glioma

    PubMed Central

    Efird, Jimmy T.

    2010-01-01

    Adult onset glioma is a rare cancer which occurs more frequently in Caucasians than African Americans, and in men than women. The etiology of this disease is largely unknown. Exposure to ionizing radiation is the only well established environmental risk factor, and this factor explains only a small percentage of cases. Several recent studies have reported an association between season of birth and glioma risk. This paper reviews the plausibility of evidence focusing on the seasonal interrelation of farming, allergies, viruses, vitamin D, diet, birth weight, and handedness. To date, a convincing explanation for the occurrence of adult gliomas decades after a seasonal exposure at birth remains elusive. PMID:20623001

  12. Somatostatin-receptor positive brain stem glioma visualized by octreoscan.

    PubMed

    Pichler, Robert; Pichler, Josef; Mustafa, Hamdy; Nussbaumer, Karin; Zaunmüller, Thomas; Topakian, Raffi

    2007-06-01

    In diffuse brainstem gliomas often surgical biopsies cannot be obtained. The diagnosis relies upon imaging criteria, first line being MRI. Gliomas generally express somatostatin receptors (SSTR), which might enable receptor imaging. We present the case of a female adolescent with acute onset of hallucinations, dysphagia and diplopia. MRI detected a suggestive large pontine glioma. This lesion presented with marked In-111-pentreotide tracer uptake. SSTR-scan provided information about SSTR-expression, tumour viability and extension. Radiopeptide therapy for selected patients might be discussed. PMID:17627256

  13. Comprehensive, Integrative Genomic Analysis of Diffuse Lower-Grade Gliomas

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Diffuse low-grade and intermediate-grade gliomas (which together make up the lower-grade gliomas, World Health Organization grades II and III) have highly variable clinical behavior that is not adequately predicted on the basis of histologic class. Some are indolent; others quickly progress to glioblastoma. The uncertainty is compounded by interobserver variability in histologic diagnosis. Mutations in IDH, TP53, and ATRX and codeletion of chromosome arms 1p and 19q (1p/19q codeletion) have been implicated as clinically relevant markers of lower-grade gliomas. METHODS We performed genomewide analyses of 293 lower-grade gliomas from adults, incorporating exome sequence, DNA copy number, DNA methylation, messenger RNA expression, microRNA expression, and targeted protein expression. These data were integrated and tested for correlation with clinical outcomes. RESULTS Unsupervised clustering of mutations and data from RNA, DNA-copy-number, and DNA-methylation platforms uncovered concordant classification of three robust, nonoverlapping, prognostically significant subtypes of lower-grade glioma that were captured more accurately by IDH, 1p/19q, and TP53 status than by histologic class. Patients who had lower-grade gliomas with an IDH mutation and 1p/19q codeletion had the most favorable clinical outcomes. Their gliomas harbored mutations in CIC, FUBP1, NOTCH1, and the TERT promoter. Nearly all lower-grade gliomas with IDH mutations and no 1p/19q codeletion had mutations in TP53 (94%) and ATRX inactivation (86%). The large majority of lower-grade gliomas without an IDH mutation had genomic aberrations and clinical behavior strikingly similar to those found in primary glioblastoma. CONCLUSIONS The integration of genomewide data from multiple platforms delineated three molecular classes of lower-grade gliomas that were more concordant with IDH, 1p/19q, and TP53 status than with histologic class. Lower-grade gliomas with an IDH mutation either had 1p/19q

  14. Restoration of Immune Responsiveness to Glioma by Vaccination of Mice with Established Brain Gliomas with a Semi-Allogeneic Vaccine.

    PubMed

    Gattoni-Celli, Sebastiano; Young, M Rita I

    2016-01-01

    Prior studies had shown the clinical efficacy of a semi-allogeneic glioma vaccine in mice with lethal GL261 gliomas. This was confirmed in the present study. As subcutaneous vaccination resulted in protection against tumor in the brain, the present study assessed the impact of this vaccination of mice bearing established GL261 brain gliomas on their cytokine production upon in vitro exposure to tumor-derived products. Mice with established GL261 brain gliomas were vaccinated subcutaneously with H-2(b) GL261 glioma cells fused with H-2(d) RAG-neo cells or with a mock vaccine of phosphate-buffered saline. The results of these analyses show that the presence of GL261 tumor-conditioned medium resulted in increased production of Th1, inflammatory and inhibitory cytokines by spleen cells from control mice and from vaccinated glioma-bearing mice. In contrast, spleen cells of tumor-bearing, mock-vaccinated mice produced lower levels of cytokines in the presence of tumor-conditioned media. However, these results also show that there was not a heightened level of cytokine production in the presence of tumor-conditioned medium by spleen cells of vaccinated mice over the production by spleen cells of control mice. Overall, these results show that vaccination slows growth of the GL261 tumors to the point where GL261-vaccinated mice do not show the signs of morbidly or splenic dysfunction exhibited by unvaccinated, late stage glioma-bearing mice. PMID:27598146

  15. Photodynamic therapy of recurrent cerebral glioma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Shu-Gan; Wu, Si-En; Chen, Zong-Qian; Sun, Wei

    1993-03-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) was performed on 11 cases of recurrent cerebral glioma, including 3 cases of recurrent glioblastoma, 7 of recurrent anaplastic astrocytoma, and 1 recurrent ependymoma. Hematoporphyrin derivative (HPD) was administered intravenously at a dose of 4 - 7 mg/kg 5 - 24 hours before the operation. All patients underwent a craniotomy with a nearly radical excision of the tumor following which the tumor bed was irradiated with 630 nm laser light emitting either an argon pumped dye laser or frequency double YAG pumped dye laser for 30 to 80 minutes with a total dose of 50 J/cm2 (n equals 1), 100 J/cm2 (n equals 2), 200 J/cm2 (n equals 7), and 300 J/cm2 (n equals 1). The temperature was kept below 37 degree(s)C by irrigation. Two patients underwent postoperative radiotherapy. There was no evidence of increased cerebral edema, and no other toxicity by the therapy. All patients were discharged from the hospital within 15 days after surgery. We conclude that PDT using 4 - 7 mg/kg of HPD and 630 nm light with a dose of up to 300 J/cm2 can be used as an adjuvant therapy with no additional complications. Adjuvant PDT in the treatment of recurrent glioma is better than simple surgery.

  16. Survivin and gliomas: A literature review

    PubMed Central

    Varughese, Rosilin Kotakkathu; Torp, Sverre Helge

    2016-01-01

    Gliomas are the most common primary brain tumor, the diagnosis of which is challenging. In this respect, the use of immunohistochemical proliferation markers may aid diagnosis; survivin, also known as Baculoviral IAP Repeat Containing 5, is one such marker. Survivin is a unique member of the inhibitors of apoptosis protein gene family, and is known for its dual function as an apoptosis inhibitor and mitosis regulator. Furthermore, survivin has been demonstrated to be overexpressed in a number of malignancies. The purpose of the present literature review was to gain an overview of studies published on the diagnostic and/or prognostic use of survivin in gliomas. Using PubMed, 19 studies matching the inclusion criteria were ultimately included in the present review. The majority of the studies identified revealed that survivin was significantly associated with other proliferation markers, histological malignancy grade, and inversely associated with prognosis. However, there were a number of inconsistencies between studies, which suggests a requirement for standardization of immunohistochemical procedures. PMID:27588117

  17. Advances in Oncolytic Virus Therapy for Glioma

    PubMed Central

    Haseley, Amy; Alvarez-Breckenridge, Christopher; Chaudhury, Abhik Ray; Kaur, Balveen

    2009-01-01

    The World Health Organization grossly classifies the various types of astrocytomas using a grade system with grade IV gliomas having the worst prognosis. Oncolytic virus therapy is a novel treatment option for GBM patients. Several patents describe various oncolytic viruses used in preclinical and clinical trials to evaluate safety and efficacy. These viruses are natural or genetically engineered from different viruses such as HSV-1, Adenovirus, Reovirus, and New Castle Disease Virus. While several anecdotal studies have indicated therapeutic advantage, recent clinical trials have revealed the safety of their usage, but demonstration of significant efficacy remains to be established. Oncolytic viruses are being redesigned with an interest in combating the tumor microenvironment in addition to defeating the cancerous cells. Several patents describe the inclusion of tumor microenvironment modulating genes within the viral backbone and in particular those which attack the tumor angiotome. The very innovative approaches being used to improve therapeutic efficacy include: design of viruses which can express cytokines to activate a systemic antitumor immune response, inclusion of angiostatic genes to combat tumor vasculature, and also enzymes capable of digesting tumor extra cellular matrix (ECM) to enhance viral spread through solid tumors. As increasingly more novel viruses are being tested and patented, the future battle against glioma looks promising. PMID:19149710

  18. Gene Therapy and Targeted Toxins for Glioma

    PubMed Central

    Castro, Maria G.; Candolfi, Marianela; Kroeger, Kurt; King, Gwendalyn D.; Curtin, James F.; Yagiz, Kader; Mineharu, Yohei; Assi, Hikmat; Wibowo, Mia; Muhammad, AKM Ghulam; Foulad, David; Puntel, Mariana; Lowenstein, Pedro R.

    2011-01-01

    The most common primary brain tumor in adults is glioblastoma. These tumors are highly invasive and aggressive with a mean survival time of nine to twelve months from diagnosis to death. Current treatment modalities are unable to significantly prolong survival in patients diagnosed with glioblastoma. As such, glioma is an attractive target for developing novel therapeutic approaches utilizing gene therapy. This review will examine the available preclinical models for glioma including xenographs, syngeneic and genetic models. Several promising therapeutic targets are currently being pursued in pre-clinical investigations. These targets will be reviewed by mechanism of action, i.e., conditional cytotoxic, targeted toxins, oncolytic viruses, tumor suppressors/oncogenes, and immune stimulatory approaches. Preclinical gene therapy paradigms aim to determine which strategies will provide rapid tumor regression and long-term protection from recurrence. While a wide range of potential targets are being investigated preclinically, only the most efficacious are further transitioned into clinical trial paradigms. Clinical trials reported to date are summarized including results from conditionally cytotoxic, targeted toxins, oncolytic viruses and oncogene targeting approaches. Clinical trial results have not been as robust as preclinical models predicted; this could be due to the limitations of the GBM models employed. Once this is addressed, and we develop effective gene therapies in models that better replicate the clinical scenario, gene therapy will provide a powerful approach to treat and manage brain tumors. PMID:21453286

  19. Gene Therapy and Targeted Toxins for Glioma

    PubMed Central

    King, Gwendalyn D.; Curtin, James F.; Candolfi, Marianela; Kroeger, Kurt; Lowenstein, Pedro R.; Castro, Maria G.

    2006-01-01

    The most common primary brain tumor in adults is glioblastoma. These tumors are highly invasive and aggressive with a mean survival time of nine to twelve months from diagnosis to death. Current treatment modalities are unable to significantly prolong survival in patients diagnosed with glioblastoma. As such, glioma is an attractive target for developing novel therapeutic approaches utilizing gene therapy. This review will examine the available preclinical models for glioma including xenographs, syngeneic and genetic models. Several promising therapeutic targets are currently being pursued in pre-clinical investigations. These targets will be reviewed by mechanism of action, i.e., conditional cytotoxic, targeted toxins, oncolytic viruses, tumor suppressors/oncogenes, and immune stimulatory approaches. Preclinical gene therapy paradigms aim to determine which strategies will provide rapid tumor regression and long-term protection from recurrence. While a wide range of potential targets are being investigated preclinically, only the most efficacious are further transitioned into clinical trial paradigms. Clinical trials reported to date are summarized including results from conditionally cytotoxic, targeted toxins, oncolytic viruses and oncogene targeting approaches. Clinical trial results have not been as robust as preclinical models predicted, this could be due to the limitations of the GBM models employed. Once this is addressed, and we develop effective gene therapies in models that better replicate the clinical scenario, gene therapy will provide a powerful approach to treat and manage brain tumors. PMID:16457645

  20. [The immunosuppressive microenvironment of malignant gliomas].

    PubMed

    Borisov, K E; Sakaeva, D D

    2015-01-01

    The dogma of the central nervous system (CNS) as an immune-privileged site has been substantially revised in recent years. CNS is an immunocompetent organ and actively interacts with the immune system. Microglia plays a leading role in a CNS immune response. However, in malignant gliomas, there is M2-polarization of microglia acquiring immunosuppressive and tumor-supportive properties. It occurs under the influence of tumor cytokines, such as transforming growth factor-β, interleukin-10, and prostaglandin E2. M2-polarized microglia exhibits reduced phagocytic activity, changes in the expression of many cellular determinants, or inverse of their functions, STAT3 activation, and production of immunosuppressive cytokines that suppress the function of cytotoxic CD8+ T cells or CD4+ T-helper cells type I. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells and regulatory T-lymphocytes, which have been recruited from peripheral blood into tumor tissue, also have immunosuppressive properties. The development of new treatment options for malignant gliomas must consider the role of the microenvironment in maintaining tumor vitality and progression. PMID:26841651

  1. Survival after stereotactic biopsy of malignant gliomas

    SciTech Connect

    Coffey, R.J.; Lunsford, L.D.; Taylor, F.H.

    1988-03-01

    For many patients with malignant gliomas in inaccessible or functionally important locations, stereotactic biopsy followed by radiation therapy (RT) may be a more appropriate initial treatment than craniotomy and tumor resection. We studied the long term survival in 91 consecutive patients with malignant gliomas diagnosed by stereotactic biopsy: 64 had glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) and 27 had anaplastic astrocytoma (AA). Sixty-four per cent of the GBMs and 33% of the AAs involved deep or midline cerebral structures. The treatment prescribed after biopsy, the tumor location, the histological findings, and the patient's age at presentation (for AAs) were statistically important factors determining patient survival. If adequate RT (tumor dose of 5000 to 6000 cGy) was not prescribed, the median survival was less than or equal to 11 weeks regardless of tumor histology or location. The median survival for patients with deep or midline tumors who completed RT was similar in AA (19.4 weeks) and GBM (27 weeks) cases. Histology was an important predictor of survival only for patients with adequately treated lobar tumors. The median survival in lobar GBM patients who completed RT was 46.9 weeks, and that in lobar AA patients who completed RT was 129 weeks. Cytoreductive surgery had no statistically significant effect on survival. Among the clinical factors examined, age of less than 40 years at presentation was associated with prolonged survival only in AA patients. Constellations of clinical features, tumor location, histological diagnosis, and treatment prescribed were related to survival time.

  2. SC-37THE ROLE OF NG2 EXPRESSING PROGENITOR CELLS IN DIFFUSE INTRINSIC PONTINE GLIOMA

    PubMed Central

    Yadavilli, Sridevi; Becher, Oren J.; Kambhampati, Madhuri; Packer, Roger J.; Nazarian, Javad

    2014-01-01

    Pediatric diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG) is one of the most difficult cancers to treat. pLys27Met (K27M) driver mutation in the H3F3A (H3.3) and HIST1H3B (H3.1) genes of histone are correlated with a subgroup of DIPGs. Other genomic aberrations include p53 mutations and amplification of signaling pathways including PDGFRα. We have recently reported the involvement of Hedgehog (Hh) pathway in a subset of DIPGs. Modulation of Hh and tyrosine kinase receptors may alter the self-renewal properties of cancer stem cells (CSC). NG2 Proteoglycan positive cells that co-express PDGFRα and Olig-2 are present in adult gliomas, where NG2 contributes to the neoplastic transformation of glioma cells. We examined NG2 expression in frozen brainstem specimens of DIPGs and observed significant NG2 expression in DIPGs [10 of 14 (71 %), fold change = 33, p < 0.05)] as compared to the adjacent normal tissue. NG2 expression was associated with histone 3 K27M mutation [8 of 10 (80 %)]. Two mechanisms of NG2 regulation in DIPG were identified: i) histone 3 binds to NG2 promoter, and ii) miR 129-2 negatively regulates NG2. We detected downregulation of miR129-2 in 85.7% (6 of 7) of DIPG tumors compared to normal tissue (FC = -30.79, n = 7 pairs). We also found overall hypermethylation at 8 CpG loci corresponding to the miR129-2 promoter. NG2 knockdown in vitro (shRNA, miR129-2 or demethylating drugs) retards cellular migration. Luciferase assay in primary mouse glioma cells co-transfected with 3'UTR of NG2 and miR129-2 revealed regulation of NG2 by miR129-2. This was further confirmed in vivo by injection of NG2-dsRed transgenic mice with mir129-2 lentivirus. Orthotopic injection of NG2+ cells results in rapid tumor formation while NG2-KD cells fail to form tumors. Our study offers a potential model for the expansion of tumor stem cells and their self-renewal properties in DIPGs.

  3. ATRX loss promotes tumor growth and impairs nonhomologous end joining DNA repair in glioma.

    PubMed

    Koschmann, Carl; Calinescu, Anda-Alexandra; Nunez, Felipe J; Mackay, Alan; Fazal-Salom, Janet; Thomas, Daniel; Mendez, Flor; Kamran, Neha; Dzaman, Marta; Mulpuri, Lakshman; Krasinkiewicz, Johnathon; Doherty, Robert; Lemons, Rosemary; Brosnan-Cashman, Jacqueline A; Li, Youping; Roh, Soyeon; Zhao, Lili; Appelman, Henry; Ferguson, David; Gorbunova, Vera; Meeker, Alan; Jones, Chris; Lowenstein, Pedro R; Castro, Maria G

    2016-03-01

    Recent work in human glioblastoma (GBM) has documented recurrent mutations in the histone chaperone protein ATRX. We developed an animal model of ATRX-deficient GBM and showed that loss of ATRX reduces median survival and increases genetic instability. Further, analysis of genome-wide data for human gliomas showed that ATRX mutation is associated with increased mutation rate at the single-nucleotide variant (SNV) level. In mouse tumors, ATRX deficiency impairs nonhomologous end joining and increases sensitivity to DNA-damaging agents that induce double-stranded DNA breaks. We propose that ATRX loss results in a genetically unstable tumor, which is more aggressive when left untreated but is more responsive to double-stranded DNA-damaging agents, resulting in improved overall survival. PMID:26936505

  4. Experimental therapy of human glioma by means of a genetically engineered virus mutant

    SciTech Connect

    Martuza, R.L.; Malick, A.; Markert, J.M.; Ruffner, K.L.; Coen, D.M. )

    1991-05-10

    Malignant gliomas are the most common malignant brain tumors and are almost always fatal. A thymidine kinase-negative mutant of herpes simplex virus-1 (dlsptk) that is attenuated for neurovirulence was tested as a possible treatment for gliomas. In cell culture, dlsptk killed two long-term human glioma lines and three short-term human glioma cell populations. In nude mice with implanted subcutaneous and subrenal U87 human gliomas, intraneoplastic inoculation of dlsptk caused growth inhibition. In nude mice with intracranial U87 gliomas, intraneoplastic inoculation of dlsptk prolonged survival. Genetically engineered viruses such as dlsptk merit further evaluation as novel antineoplastic agents.

  5. P01.23NEUROTENSIN PROMOTES THE PROGRESSION OF MALIGNANT GLIOMA THROUGH NTSR1 AND IMPACTS THE PROGNOSIS OF GLIOMA PATIENTS

    PubMed Central

    Yi, L.; Xu, M.; Xu, L.; Feng, H.; Cui, H.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Neurotensin (NTS) functions as a neuromodulator and induces cellular proliferation and migration in various solid tumors. However, whether NTS can promote the progression of malignant glioma and its prognostic significance for glioma patients remain unclear. METHODS: NTS and its high-affinity receptor (NTSR1) expression levels in clinical glioma samples were detected by immunohistochemistry and immunobloting. The prognostic analysis in glioma patients were conducted online by R2 microarray analysis and the visualization platform. The proliferation of glioma cells were evaluated by CCK8 and BrdU incorporation assay. The celluar invasiveness were tested by wound healing model and the Matrigel transwell assay. A neutralizing antibody to NTS, NTSR1-selective antagonist SR48692 and NTSR1-siRNA were used to suppress the NTS stimulation. Erk1/2 phosphorylation was tested by immunobloting. The orthotopic glioma implantation model was established to examine the role of NTS and NTSR1 in the progression of glioma in vivo. RESULTS: Positive correlations were shown between the expression levels of NTS and NTSR1 with the pathological grade of gliomas. The high levels of NTS and NTSR1 expression indicate a worse prognosis in glioma patients. The proliferation and invasiveness of glioma cells could be enhanced by NTS stimulation and impaired by the inhibition of NTSR1 functions. NTS stimulated Erk1/2 phosphorylation in glioma cells, which could be reversed by treatment with SR48692 or NTSR1-siRNA. In vivo experiments showed that therapy with SR48692 significantly prolonged the survival length of glioma-bearing mice and inhibited glioma cell invasiveness in vivo. CONCLUSIONS: NTS promotes the proliferation and invasion of glioma via the activation of NTSR1 and its downstream signaling molecules, resulting in Erk1/2 phosphorylation. High levels of NTS and NTSR1 expression predict a bad prognosis in glioma patients.

  6. Cancer metabolism as a central driving force of glioma pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Masui, Kenta; Cavenee, Webster K; Mischel, Paul S

    2016-07-01

    The recent identification of distinct genetic and epigenetic features in each glioma entity is leading to a multilayered, integrated diagnostic approach combining histologic features with molecular genetic information. Somatic mutations in isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) and receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) pathways are key oncogenic events in diffuse gliomas, including lower grade (grade II and III) gliomas (LGG) and the highly lethal brain tumor glioblastoma (GBM), respectively, where they reprogram the epigenome, transcriptome, and metabolome to drive tumor growth. However, the mechanisms by which these genetic aberrations are translated into the aggressive nature of gliomas through metabolic reprogramming have just begun to be unraveled. The intricate interactions between the oncogenic signaling and cancer metabolism have also been recently demonstrated. Here, we describe a set of recent discoveries on cancer metabolism driven by IDH mutation and mutations in RTK pathways, highlighting the integration of genetic mutations, metabolic reprogramming, and epigenetic shifts, potentially providing new therapeutic opportunities. PMID:27295313

  7. Terahertz pulsed spectroscopy of paraffin-embedded brain glioma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Kun; Chen, Tu-nan; Chen, Tao; Zhu, Li-guo; Liu, Qiao; Li, Zhao; Li, Fei; Zhong, Sen-cheng; Li, Ze-ren; Feng, Hua; Zhao, Jian-heng

    2014-07-01

    The refractive indices, absorption coefficients, and complex dielectric constants of paraffin-embedded brain glioma and normal brain tissues have been measured by a terahertz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) system in the 0.2- to 2.0-THz range. The spectral differences between gliomas and normal brain tissues were obtained. Compared with normal brain tissue, our results indicate that paraffin-embedded brain gliomas have a higher refractive index, absorption coefficient, and dielectric constant. Based on these results, the best THz frequencies for different methods of paraffin-embedded brain glioma imaging, such as intensity imaging, coherent imaging with continuum THz sources, and THz pulsed imaging with short-pulsed THz sources, are analyzed.

  8. Treatment of Gliomas: How did we get here?

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhary, Michelle M.; Ene, Chibawanye I.; Silbergeld, Daniel L.

    2015-01-01

    Over the past 30 years, the treatment of gliomas has become more multi-modality with clinical trials demonstrating that adjuvant chemo-radiation following surgery improves survival of patients. Unfortunately, this advance in therapeutic intervention has had a modest impact on patient survival, with only a 3–6 month improvement in survival during this time period. In this review, we discuss the progress made in each key aspect of glioma treatment; chemotherapy, surgery and radiation therapy. We present key clinical trials that were used as basis for current management guidelines for patients with gliomas. Ultimately, it is clear that future treatments of patients with gliomas will entail specific chronologic combinations of these three modalities in personalized regimens designed for individual patient tumor sub-type. PMID:25722937

  9. Erlotinib and Temsirolimus in Treating Patients With Recurrent Malignant Glioma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-05-29

    Adult Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Adult Anaplastic Oligodendroglioma; Adult Diffuse Astrocytoma; Adult Giant Cell Glioblastoma; Adult Glioblastoma; Adult Gliosarcoma; Adult Mixed Glioma; Adult Pilocytic Astrocytoma; Adult Pineal Gland Astrocytoma; Adult Subependymal Giant Cell Astrocytoma; Recurrent Adult Brain Tumor

  10. Treatment Option Overview (Childhood Brain Stem Glioma Treatment)

    MedlinePlus

    ... before the cancer is diagnosed and continue for months or years. Childhood brain stem gliomas may cause ... after treatment. Some cancer treatments cause side effects months or years after treatment has ended. These are ...

  11. Glioma Stemlike Cells Enhance the Killing of Glioma Differentiated Cells by Cytotoxic Lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Bassoy, Esen Yonca; Chiusolo, Valentina; Jacquemin, Guillaume; Riccadonna, Cristina; Walker, Paul R; Martinvalet, Denis

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme, the most aggressive primary brain tumor, is maintained by a subpopulation of glioma cells with self-renewal properties that are able to recapitulate the entire tumor even after surgical resection or chemo-radiotherapy. This typifies the vast heterogeneity of this tumor with the two extremes represented on one end by the glioma stemlike cells (GSC) and on the other by the glioma differentiated cells (GDC). Interestingly, GSC are more sensitive to immune effector cells than the GDC counterpart. However, how GSC impact on the killing on the GDC and vice versa is not clear. Using a newly developed cytotoxicity assay allowing to simultaneously monitor cytotoxic lymphocytes-mediated killing of GSC and GDC, we found that although GSC were always better killed and that their presence enhanced the killing of GDC. In contrast, an excess of GDC had a mild protective effect on the killing of GSC, depending on the CTL type. Overall, our results suggest that during combination therapy, immunotherapy would be the most effective after prior treatment with conventional therapies. PMID:27073883

  12. Glioma Stemlike Cells Enhance the Killing of Glioma Differentiated Cells by Cytotoxic Lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Bassoy, Esen Yonca; Chiusolo, Valentina; Jacquemin, Guillaume; Riccadonna, Cristina; Walker, Paul R.; Martinvalet, Denis

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme, the most aggressive primary brain tumor, is maintained by a subpopulation of glioma cells with self-renewal properties that are able to recapitulate the entire tumor even after surgical resection or chemo-radiotherapy. This typifies the vast heterogeneity of this tumor with the two extremes represented on one end by the glioma stemlike cells (GSC) and on the other by the glioma differentiated cells (GDC). Interestingly, GSC are more sensitive to immune effector cells than the GDC counterpart. However, how GSC impact on the killing on the GDC and vice versa is not clear. Using a newly developed cytotoxicity assay allowing to simultaneously monitor cytotoxic lymphocytes-mediated killing of GSC and GDC, we found that although GSC were always better killed and that their presence enhanced the killing of GDC. In contrast, an excess of GDC had a mild protective effect on the killing of GSC, depending on the CTL type. Overall, our results suggest that during combination therapy, immunotherapy would be the most effective after prior treatment with conventional therapies. PMID:27073883

  13. Neurofibromatosis type 1 associated low grade gliomas: A comparison with sporadic low grade gliomas.

    PubMed

    Helfferich, Jelte; Nijmeijer, Ronald; Brouwer, Oebele F; Boon, Maartje; Fock, Annemarie; Hoving, Eelco W; Meijer, Lisethe; den Dunnen, Wilfred F A; de Bont, Eveline S J M

    2016-08-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is an autosomal dominant disorder, associated with a variable clinical phenotype including café-au-lait spots, intertriginous freckling, Lisch nodules, neurofibromas, optic pathway gliomas and distinctive bony lesions. NF1 is caused by a mutation in the NF1 gene, which codes for neurofibromin, a large protein involved in the MAPK- and the mTOR-pathway through RAS-RAF signalling. NF1 is a known tumour predisposition syndrome, associated with different tumours of the nervous system including low grade gliomas (LGGs) in the paediatric population. The focus of this review is on grade I pilocytic astrocytomas (PAs), the most commonly observed histologic subtype of low grade gliomas in NF1. Clinically, these PAs have a better prognosis and show different localisation patterns than their sporadic counterparts, which are most commonly associated with a KIAA1549:BRAF fusion. In this review, possible mechanisms of tumourigenesis in LGGs with and without NF1 will be discussed, including the contribution of different signalling pathways and tumour microenvironment. Furthermore we will discuss how increased understanding of tumourigenesis may lead to new potential targets for treatment. PMID:27263935

  14. Malignant glioma following radiotherapy for unrelated primary tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Marus, G.; Levin, C.V.; Rutherfoord, G.S.

    1986-08-15

    Four cases are documented where a glioma was histologically verified in the irradiation field of a previously treated malignancy of a different cell line. Radiation-induced neoplasia in the central nervous system now has been established in the induction of meningioma and sarcoma. The association between therapeutic irradiation and glioma in the reported cases lends to the evidence that a causal relation does exist. This incidence is small and does not detract from the overall benefit of irradiation as a therapeutic modality.

  15. Fluorescence-Guided Resection of Malignant Glioma with 5-ALA

    PubMed Central

    Kaneko, Sadahiro

    2016-01-01

    Malignant gliomas are extremely difficult to treat with no specific curative treatment. On the other hand, photodynamic medicine represents a promising technique for neurosurgeons in the treatment of malignant glioma. The resection rate of malignant glioma has increased from 40% to 80% owing to 5-aminolevulinic acid-photodynamic diagnosis (ALA-PDD). Furthermore, ALA is very useful because it has no serious complications. Based on previous research, it is apparent that protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) accumulates abundantly in malignant glioma tissues after ALA administration. Moreover, it is evident that the mechanism underlying PpIX accumulation in malignant glioma tissues involves an abnormality in porphyrin-heme metabolism, specifically decreased ferrochelatase enzyme activity. During resection surgery, the macroscopic fluorescence of PpIX to the naked eye is more sensitive than magnetic resonance imaging, and the alert real time spectrum of PpIX is the most sensitive method. In the future, chemotherapy with new anticancer agents, immunotherapy, and new methods of radiotherapy and gene therapy will be developed; however, ALA will play a key role in malignant glioma treatment before the development of these new treatments. In this paper, we provide an overview and present the results of our clinical research on ALA-PDD. PMID:27429612

  16. Fluorescence-Guided Resection of Malignant Glioma with 5-ALA.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Sadahiro; Kaneko, Sadao

    2016-01-01

    Malignant gliomas are extremely difficult to treat with no specific curative treatment. On the other hand, photodynamic medicine represents a promising technique for neurosurgeons in the treatment of malignant glioma. The resection rate of malignant glioma has increased from 40% to 80% owing to 5-aminolevulinic acid-photodynamic diagnosis (ALA-PDD). Furthermore, ALA is very useful because it has no serious complications. Based on previous research, it is apparent that protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) accumulates abundantly in malignant glioma tissues after ALA administration. Moreover, it is evident that the mechanism underlying PpIX accumulation in malignant glioma tissues involves an abnormality in porphyrin-heme metabolism, specifically decreased ferrochelatase enzyme activity. During resection surgery, the macroscopic fluorescence of PpIX to the naked eye is more sensitive than magnetic resonance imaging, and the alert real time spectrum of PpIX is the most sensitive method. In the future, chemotherapy with new anticancer agents, immunotherapy, and new methods of radiotherapy and gene therapy will be developed; however, ALA will play a key role in malignant glioma treatment before the development of these new treatments. In this paper, we provide an overview and present the results of our clinical research on ALA-PDD. PMID:27429612

  17. Liposome size and charge optimization for intraarterial delivery to gliomas.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Shailendra; Cooke, Johann R N; Chan, Darren K W; Ellis, Jason A; Hossain, Shaolie S; Singh-Moon, Rajinder P; Wang, Mei; Bigio, Irving J; Bruce, Jeffrey N; Straubinger, Robert M

    2016-06-01

    Nanoparticles such as liposomes may be used as drug delivery vehicles for brain tumor therapy. Particle geometry and electrostatic properties have been hypothesized to be important determinants of effective tumor targeting after intraarterial injection. In this study, we investigate the combined roles of liposome size and surface charge on the effectiveness of delivery to gliomas after intraarterial injection. Intracarotid injection of liposomes was performed in separate cohorts of both healthy and C6 glioma-bearing Sprague Dawley rats after induction of transient cerebral hypoperfusion. Large (200 nm) and small (60-80 nm) fluorescent dye-loaded liposomes that were either cationic or neutral in surface charge were utilized. Delivery effectiveness was quantitatively measured both with real-time, in vivo and postmortem diffuse reflectance spectroscopy. Semi-quantitative multispectral fluorescence imaging was also utilized to assess the pattern and extent of liposome targeting within tumors. Large cationic liposomes demonstrated the most effective hemispheric and glioma targeting of all the liposomes tested. Selective large cationic liposome retention at the site of glioma growth was observed. The liposome deposition pattern within tumors after intraarterial injection was variable with both core penetration and peripheral deposition observed in specific tumors. This study provides evidence that liposome size and charge are important determinants of effective brain and glioma targeting after intraarterial injection. Our results support the future development of 200-nm cationic liposomal formulations of candidate intraarterial anti-glioma agents for further pre-clinical testing. PMID:27091339

  18. Galunisertib inhibits glioma vasculogenic mimicry formation induced by astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chao; Chen, Wenliang; Zhang, Xin; Huang, Bin; Chen, Aanjing; He, Ying; Wang, Jian; Li, Xingang

    2016-01-01

    Gliomas are among the most lethal primary brain tumors found in humans. In high-grade gliomas, vasculogenic mimicry is often detected and has been correlated with prognosis, thus suggesting its potential as a therapeutic target. Vasculogenic mimicry mainly forms vascular-like channels independent of endothelial cells; however, little is known about the relationship between astrocytes and vasculogenic mimicry. In our study, we demonstrated that the presence of astrocytes promoted vasculogenic mimicry. With suspension microarray technology and in vitro tube formation assays, we identified that astrocytes relied on TGF-β1 to enhance vasculogenic mimicry. We also found that vasculogenic mimicry was inhibited by galunisertib, a promising TGF-β1 inhibitor currently being studied in an ongoing trial in glioma patients. The inhibition was partially attributed to a decrease in autophagy after galunisertib treatment. Moreover, we observed a decrease in VE-cadherin and smooth muscle actin-α expression, as well as down-regulation of Akt and Flk phosphorylation in galunisertib-treated glioma cells. By comparing tumor weight and volume in a xenograft model, we acquired promising results to support our theory. This study expands our understanding of the role of astrocytes in gliomas and demonstrates that galunisertib inhibits glioma vasculogenic mimicry induced by astrocytes. PMID:26976322

  19. Galunisertib inhibits glioma vasculogenic mimicry formation induced by astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chao; Chen, Wenliang; Zhang, Xin; Huang, Bin; Chen, Aanjing; He, Ying; Wang, Jian; Li, Xingang

    2016-01-01

    Gliomas are among the most lethal primary brain tumors found in humans. In high-grade gliomas, vasculogenic mimicry is often detected and has been correlated with prognosis, thus suggesting its potential as a therapeutic target. Vasculogenic mimicry mainly forms vascular-like channels independent of endothelial cells; however, little is known about the relationship between astrocytes and vasculogenic mimicry. In our study, we demonstrated that the presence of astrocytes promoted vasculogenic mimicry. With suspension microarray technology and in vitro tube formation assays, we identified that astrocytes relied on TGF-β1 to enhance vasculogenic mimicry. We also found that vasculogenic mimicry was inhibited by galunisertib, a promising TGF-β1 inhibitor currently being studied in an ongoing trial in glioma patients. The inhibition was partially attributed to a decrease in autophagy after galunisertib treatment. Moreover, we observed a decrease in VE-cadherin and smooth muscle actin-α expression, as well as down-regulation of Akt and Flk phosphorylation in galunisertib-treated glioma cells. By comparing tumor weight and volume in a xenograft model, we acquired promising results to support our theory. This study expands our understanding of the role of astrocytes in gliomas and demonstrates that galunisertib inhibits glioma vasculogenic mimicry induced by astrocytes. PMID:26976322

  20. Adult brainstem gliomas: Correlation of clinical and molecular features

    PubMed Central

    Theeler, Brett J.; Ellezam, Benjamin; Melguizo-Gavilanes, Isaac; de Groot, John F.; Mahajan, Anita; Aldape, Kenneth D.; Bruner, Janet M.; Puduvalli, Vinay K.

    2016-01-01

    Background Brainstem gliomas are rare in adults and overall have superior survival outcomes compared to pediatric brainstem gliomas. Patients and methods We conducted a retrospective data and tissue analysis of all adult patients (≥18 years old) with World Health Organization (WHO) Grade II, III, and IV brainstem gliomas in the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center institutional database from 1990 to 2012. Results We identified 143 cases in adults ages 18 and over. There were 28 glioblastomas, 43 anaplastic astrocytomas, 15 diffuse astrocytomas, and 11 gliomas not otherwise specified, and in 46 cases the diagnosis was made radiographically. 128 (89.5%) cases were classified radiographically as diffuse and of the focal tumors, 9 of the 15 were WHO Grade III or IV tumors. Increasing tumor grade and contrast enhancement were associated with significantly reduced overall survival. The median overall survival for the entire cohort was 32.1 months similar to previously published studies. Two of 25 grade II and III tumors, and 1 of 17 glioblastomas had IDH1 mutations on immunohistochemical testing. Nine cases had sufficient tissue for mutation profiling, 1 case had a BRAF V600E mutation and 2 had 2 PIK3CA mutations. Conclusions Survival outcomes for adult WHO Grade II to IV brainstem gliomas were similar to supratentorial IDH1 wild-type tumors of similar grade and histology. Potentially actionable mutations can be identified from small biopsy samples in a subset of adult brainstem gliomas. PMID:25934342

  1. The LIM-only transcription factor LMO2 determines tumorigenic and angiogenic traits in glioma stem cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, S-H; Kim, E-J; Hitomi, M; Oh, S-Y; Jin, X; Jeon, H-M; Beck, S; Jin, X; Kim, J-K; Park, C G; Chang, S-Y; Yin, J; Kim, T; Jeon, Y-J; Song, J; Lim, Y C; Lathia, J D; Nakano, I; Kim, H

    2015-09-01

    Glioblastomas (GBMs) maintain their cellular heterogeneity with glioma stem cells (GSCs) producing a variety of tumor cell types. Here we interrogated the oncogenic roles of Lim domain only 2 (LMO2) in GBM and GSCs in mice and human. High expression of LMO2 was found in human patient-derived GSCs compared with the differentiated progeny cells. LMO2 is required for GSC proliferation both in vitro and in vivo, as shRNA-mediated LMO2 silencing attenuated tumor growth derived from human GSCs. Further, LMO2 is sufficient to induce stem cell characteristics (stemness) in mouse premalignant astrocytes, as forced LMO2 expression facilitated in vitro and in vivo growth of astrocytes derived from Ink4a/Arf null mice and acquisition of GSC phenotypes. A subset of mouse and human GSCs converted into vascular endothelial-like tumor cells both in vitro and in vivo, which phenotype was attenuated by LMO2 silencing and promoted by LMO2 overexpression. Mechanistically, the action of LMO2 for induction of glioma stemness is mediated by transcriptional regulation of Jagged1 resulting in activation of the Notch pathway, whereas LMO2 directly occupies the promoter regions of the VE-cadherin gene for a gain of endothelial cellular phenotype. Subsequently, selective ablation of human GSC-derived VE-cadherin-expressing cells attenuated vascular formation in mouse intracranial tumors, thereby significantly prolonging mouse survival. Clinically, LMO2 expression was elevated in GBM tissues and inversely correlated with prognosis of GBM patients. Taken together, our findings describe novel dual roles of LMO2 to induce tumorigenesis and angiogenesis, and provide potential therapeutic targets in GBMs. PMID:25721045

  2. Kinesin superfamily protein-derived peptides with the ability to induce glioma-reactive cytotoxic T lymphocytes in human leukocyte antigen-A24+ glioma patients.

    PubMed

    Harada, Mamoru; Ishihara, Yuki; Itoh, Kyogo; Yamanaka, Ryuya

    2007-03-01

    One promising modality in the treatment of malignant glioma is specific immunotherapy. However, this modality requires information about target antigens and their epitope peptides that are recognized by T cells. In this study, we searched for new target candidates in specific immunotherapy for malignant glioma by utilizing cDNA microarray technology to compare gene expressions in malignant glioma tissues to those in benign glioma and a panel of normal tissues. The selected genes included three members of the kinesin superfamily proteins (KIFs): KIF1C, KIF3C, and KIF21B. RT-PCR showed that these three genes were expressed in the majority of glioma cell lines. These antigen-derived 25 peptides, which had the ability to bind to human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-A24 molecules, were first screened for their ability to be recognized by the immunoglobulin G of glioma patients, and then tested for their potential to induce peptide-specific and glioma-reactive cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) from the peripheral blood mononuclear cells of HLA-A24+ glioma patients. The results showed that the KIF1C149-158 and KIF3C512-520 peptides efficiently induced HLA-A24-restricted and glioma-reactive CD8+ T cells. These results suggest the existence of KIF-reactive CTL precursors in glioma patients, and should facilitate the development of specific immunotherapies for malignant glioma. PMID:17273744

  3. Three-dimensional cultured glioma cell lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonda, Steve R. (Inventor); Marley, Garry M. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    Three-dimensional glioma spheroids were produced in vitro with size and histological differentiation previously unattained. The spheroids were grown in liquid media suspension in a Johnson Space Center (JSC) Rotating Wall Bioreactor without using support matrices such as microcarrier beads. Spheroid volumes of greater than 3.5 cu mm and diameters of 2.5 mm were achieved with a viable external layer or rim of proliferating cells, a transitional layer beneath the external layer with histological differentiation, and a degenerative central region with a hypoxic necrotic core. Cell debris was evident in the degenerative central region. The necrotics centers of some of the spheroids had hyaline droplets. Granular bodies were detected predominantly in the necrotic center.

  4. History of chickenpox in glioma risk: a report from the glioma international case-control study (GICC).

    PubMed

    Amirian, E Susan; Scheurer, Michael E; Zhou, Renke; Wrensch, Margaret R; Armstrong, Georgina N; Lachance, Daniel; Olson, Sara H; Lau, Ching C; Claus, Elizabeth B; Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill S; Il'yasova, Dora; Schildkraut, Joellen; Ali-Osman, Francis; Sadetzki, Siegal; Jenkins, Robert B; Bernstein, Jonine L; Merrell, Ryan T; Davis, Faith G; Lai, Rose; Shete, Sanjay; Amos, Christopher I; Melin, Beatrice S; Bondy, Melissa L

    2016-06-01

    Varicella zoster virus (VZV) is a neurotropic α-herpesvirus that causes chickenpox and establishes life-long latency in the cranial nerve and dorsal root ganglia of the host. To date, VZV is the only virus consistently reported to have an inverse association with glioma. The Glioma International Case-Control Study (GICC) is a large, multisite consortium with data on 4533 cases and 4171 controls collected across five countries. Here, we utilized the GICC data to confirm the previously reported associations between history of chickenpox and glioma risk in one of the largest studies to date on this topic. Using two-stage random-effects restricted maximum likelihood modeling, we found that a positive history of chickenpox was associated with a 21% lower glioma risk, adjusting for age and sex (95% confidence intervals (CI): 0.65-0.96). Furthermore, the protective effect of chickenpox was stronger for high-grade gliomas. Our study provides additional evidence that the observed protective effect of chickenpox against glioma is unlikely to be coincidental. Future studies, including meta-analyses of the literature and investigations of the potential biological mechanism, are warranted. PMID:26972449

  5. Comparative characterization of the human and mouse third ventricle germinal zones.

    PubMed

    Dahiya, Sonika; Lee, Da Yong; Gutmann, David H

    2011-07-01

    Recent evidence indicates differences in neural stem cell biology in different brain regions. For example, we demonstrated that neurofibromatosis 1 (NF1) tumor suppressor gene inactivation leads to increased neural stem cell proliferation and gliogenesis in the optic chiasm and brainstem but not in the cerebral cortex. The differential effect of Nf1 inactivation in the optic nerve and brainstem (in which gliomas commonly form in children with NF1) versus the cortex (in which gliomas rarely develop) suggests the existence of distinct ventricular zones for gliomagenesis in children and in adults. Here, we characterized the third ventricle subventricular zone (tv-SVZ) in young and adult mouse and human brains. In children, but not adult humans, the tv-SVZ contains nestin-positive, glial fibrillary acidic protein-positive, brain fatty acid binding protein-positive, and sox2-positive cells with radial processes and prominent cilia. In contrast, the tv-SVZ in young mice contains sox2-positive progenitor cells and ciliated ependymal lining cells but lacks glial fibrillary acidic protein-positive, nestin-positive radial glia. As in the lateral ventricle SVZ, proliferation in the human and murine tv-SVZ decreases with age. The tv-SVZ in adult mice lacks the hypocellular subventricular zone observed in adult human specimens. Collectively, these data indicate the existence of a subventricular zone relevant to our understanding of glioma formation in children and will assist interpretation of genetically engineered mouse glioma models. PMID:21666496

  6. Roles of microRNA-99 family in human glioma

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Mingyu; Guo, Yong; Wu, Jun; Chen, Fenghua; Dai, Zhijie; Fan, Shuangshi; Li, Pengcheng; Song, Tao

    2016-01-01

    Objective Deregulation of microRNA (miR)-99 family members (miR-99a, miR-99b, and miR-100) has been reported to play a crucial role in many cancer types. However, their roles in human gliomas have not been fully elucidated. This study aimed to investigate the expression patterns of miR-99a, miR-99b, and miR-100 in glioma tissues and to evaluate their expression profiles with respect to tumor progression. Methods Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction was performed to detect the expression levels of miR-99a, miR-99b, and miR-100 in glioma and matched non-neoplastic brain tissues. Then, the associations of their expression with various clinicopathological features of glioma patients were statistically analyzed. Moreover, the roles of miR-99a, miR-99b, and miR-100 in regulating glioma cell migration and invasion were determined via transwell assay in vitro. Results Compared with non-neoplastic brain tissues, miR-99a, miR-99b, and miR-100 expression levels were all significantly decreased in glioma tissues (all P<0.001). miR-99a-low, miR-99b-low, and miR-100-low expression more frequently occurred in glioma patients with low Karnofsky performance score (<90) and high World Health Organization grade (III–IV). Further functional experiments revealed that the enforced expression of miR-99a, miR-99b, and miR-100 resulted in the inhibition of cellular migration and invasion in glioma cells. Conclusion Our results strongly suggest that the aberrant expression of miR-99a, miR-99b, and miR-100 may be a common feature in human gliomas with aggressive clinicopathological features and may participate in malignant phenotypes of the tumors. These findings highlight the potential of the three miR-99 family members as novel therapeutic targets for human gliomas. PMID:27382299

  7. (99m)Tc-HisoDGR as a Potential SPECT Probe for Orthotopic Glioma Detection via Targeting of Integrin α5β1.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Haitao; Gao, Hannan; Zhai, Luoping; Liu, Xujie; Jia, Bing; Shi, Jiyun; Wang, Fan

    2016-05-18

    Integrins, a large family of cell adhesion receptors, have been shown to play an important role for glioma proliferation and invasion. Several integrin receptors, including αvβ3, αvβ5, and α5β1, have generated clinical interest for glioma diagnosis and antitumor therapy. Integrin α5β1 has been highlighted as a prognostic and diagnostic marker in glioma, and its expression is correlated with a worse prognosis in high-grade glioma. However, unlike extensively studied integrins αvβ3 and αvβ5, very few integrin α5β1-specific radiotracers have been reported. Developing α5β1-specific radiotracers may provide alternative diagnosis and evaluation options in addition to well-studied αvβ3/αvβ5-specific tracers, and they may add new documents for profiling tumor progression. Here, a novel integrin α5β1-specific probe (99m)Tc-HisoDGR was fabricated for SPECT (single-photon emission computed tomography) imaging of glioma. To confirm its selective targeting of integrin α5β1 in vivo, the mouse models of α5β1-positive U87MG human glioma were subjected to SPECT/CT scans, and biodistribution experiments and blocking studies were performed. Small-animal SPECT/CT imaging experiments demonstrated that the tumors were clearly visualized in both subcutaneous and orthotopic glioma tumor models with clear background at 0.5, 1, and 2 h p.i. The tumor accumulation of (99m)Tc-HisoDGR showed significant reduction when excess cold isoDGR peptide was coinjected, suggesting that the tumor uptake was specifically mediated. Our work revealed that (99m)Tc-HisoDGR represented a powerful molecular probe for integrin α5β1-positive cancer imaging; moreover, it might be a promising tool for evaluating malignancy, predicting prognosis, selecting subpopulations of patients who might be sensitive to integrin α5β1-targeted drugs, and assessing and monitoring the response to integrin α5β1-targeted drugs in clinical trials. PMID:27098436

  8. Proton Beam Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Low Grade Gliomas

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-12-14

    Adult Brain Tumor; Adult Brain Stem Glioma; Adult Diffuse Astrocytoma; Adult Ependymoma; Adult Grade II Meningioma; Adult Melanocytic Lesion; Adult Meningeal Hemangiopericytoma; Adult Mixed Glioma; Adult Oligodendroglioma; Adult Pineal Gland Astrocytoma; Adult Pineocytoma; Recurrent Adult Brain Tumor

  9. Functionally Active Gap Junctions between Connexin 43-Positive Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Glioma Cells.

    PubMed

    Gabashvili, A N; Baklaushev, V P; Grinenko, N F; Levinskii, A B; Mel'nikov, P A; Cherepanov, S A; Chekhonin, V P

    2015-05-01

    The formation of functional gap junctions between mesenchymal stem cells and cells of low-grade rat glioma C6 cells was studied in in vitro experiments. Immunocytochemical analysis with antibodies to connexin 43 extracellular loop 2 showed that mesenchymal stem cells as well as C6 glioma cells express the main astroglial gap junction protein connexin 43. Analysis of migration activity showed that mesenchymal stem cells actively migrate towards C6 glioma cells. During co-culturing, mesenchymal stem cells and glioma C6 form functionally active gap junctions mediating the transport of cytoplasmic dye from glioma cells to mesenchymal stem cells in the opposite direction. Fluorometry showed that the intensity of transport of low-molecular substances through heterologous gap junctions between mesenchymal stem cells and glioma cells is similar to that through homologous gap junctions between glioma cells. This phenomenon can be used for the development of new methods of cell therapy of high-grade gliomas. PMID:26033611

  10. Analysis of hsa-miR-30a-5p expression in human gliomas.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kun; Jia, Zhifan; Zou, Jian; Zhang, Anling; Wang, Guangxiu; Hao, Jianwei; Wang, Yirong; Yang, Shuxu; Pu, Peiyu

    2013-07-01

    Our previous study demonstrated that miR-30a-5p was upregulated in six malignant glioma cell lines by microRNA(miRNA) array. For further verification of this finding, the expression of miR-30a-5p in 7 more malignant glioma cell lines, 43 freshly resected glioma samples and 75 archival paraffin embedded glioma specimens with different grade of malignancy were examined by qRT-PCR and in situ hybridization(ISH). Here, we present the first evidence that miR-30a-5p is overexpressed in glioma cell lines and glioma samples as compared to the normal brain tissues (NBTs), and its expression level is positively correlated with tumor grade of malignancy. It is concluded that miR-30a-5p may have the potential as a diagnostic or prognostic marker of gliomas and as the target of miRNA-based glioma therapy in further studies. PMID:23606081

  11. Use of Labelled tLyP-1 as a Novel Ligand Targeting the NRP Receptor to Image Glioma

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Hu-bing; Wang, Zhen; Wang, Quan-shi; Han, Yan-jian; Wang, Meng; Zhou, Wen-lan; Li, Hong-sheng

    2015-01-01

    Background Neuropilin (NRP) receptors are overexpressed in glioma tumor tissue, and therefore may be a potential target for imaging markers. We investigated whether labelled tLyP-1, an NRP targeting peptide, could be used as the targeting ligand for developing reagents for imaging glioma tumors. Methods The tLyP-1 peptide (CGNKRTR) was labeled with 5-carboxyfluorescein (FAM) or 18F-fluoride. A control peptide (MAQKTSH) was also labeled with FAM. The in vitro binding between FAM-tLyP-1 and U87MG cells and in vivo biodistribution of FAM-tLyP-1 in a U87MG glioblastoma xenograft model (nude mouse) were determined. The in vivo biodistribution of 18F-tLyP-1 was also determined by microPET/CT. Results In vitro, FAM-tLyP-1 was strongly taken up by U87MG cells at very low concentrations (1μM). In vivo, FAM-tLyP-1 accumulated in glioma (U87MG) tumors, but uptake was minimal in the normal brain tissue 1 h after administration. The distribution of FAM-tLyP-1 in the tumor tissue was consistent with expression of NRP1. The tumor/brain fluorescence intensity ratio in mice treated with FAM-tLyP-1 was significantly higher than the control FAM-labeled peptide 1 h after administration (3.44 ± 0.83 vs. 1.32 ± 0.15; t = 5.547, P = 0.001). Uptake of FAM-tLyP-1 in glioma tumors could be blocked by administering an excess of non-conjugated tLyP-1 peptide. [Lys4] tLyP-1 was labeled with 18F to synthesis a PET (18F-tLyP-1). MicroPET/CT imaging showed the tumor was visualized clearly with a high tumor/brain radiolabel ratio at 60 min (2.69 ± 0.52) and 120 min (3.11±0.25). Conclusion Taken together, our results suggest that tLyP-1 could be developed as a novel fluorescent or radio labelled tracer for imaging glioma. PMID:26398657

  12. Surgical Outcomes of High-Grade Spinal Cord Gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Hida, Kazutoshi; Yano, Syunsuke; Aoyama, Takeshi; Koyanagi, Izumi; Houkin, Kiyohiro

    2015-01-01

    Study Design A retrospective study. Purpose The purpose of this study was to obtain useful information for establishing the guidelines for treating high-grade spinal cord gliomas. Overview of Literature The optimal management of high-grade spinal cord gliomas remains controversial. We report the outcomes of the surgical management of 14 high-grade spinal glioma. Methods We analyzed the outcomes of 14 patients with high-grade spinal cord gliomas who were surgically treated between 1989 and 2012. Survival was charted with the Kaplan-Meier plots and comparisons were made with the log-rank test. Results None of the patients with high-grade spinal cord gliomas underwent total resection. Subtotal resection was performed in two patients, partial resection was performed in nine patients, and open biopsy was performed in three patients. All patients underwent postoperative radiotherapy and six patients further underwent radiation cordotomy. The median survival time for patients with high-grade spinal cord gliomas was 15 months, with a 5-year survival rate of 22.2%. The median survival time for patients with World Health Organization grade III tumors was 25.5 months, whereas the median survival time for patients with glioblastoma multiforme was 12.5 months. Both univariate and multivariate Cox proportional hazards models demonstrated a significant effect only in the group that did not include cervical cord lesion as a factor associated with survival (p=0.04 and 0.03). Conclusions The surgical outcome of patients diagnosed with high-grade spinal cord gliomas remains poor. Notably, only the model which excluded cervical cord lesions as a factor significantly predicted survival. PMID:26713128

  13. IDH1 mutation detection by droplet digital PCR in glioma.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Zhao, Yi-ying; Li, Jian-feng; Guo, Cheng-cheng; Chen, Fu-rong; Su, Hong-kai; Zhao, Hua-fu; Long, Ya-kang; Shao, Jian-yong; To, Shing shun Tony; Chen, Zhong-ping

    2015-11-24

    Glioma is the most frequent central nervous system tumor in adults. The overall survival of glioma patients is disappointing, mostly due to the poor prognosis of glioblastoma (Grade IV glioma). Isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) is a key factor in metabolism and catalyzes the oxidative decarboxylation of isocitrate. Mutations in IDH genes are observed in over 70% of low-grade gliomas and some cases of glioblastoma. As the most frequent mutation, IDH1(R132H) has been served as a predictive marker of glioma patients. The recently developed droplet digital PCR (ddPCR) technique generates a large amount of nanoliter-sized droplets, each of which carries out a PCR reaction on one template. Therefore, ddPCR provides high precision and absolute quantification of the nucleic acid target, with wide applications for both research and clinical diagnosis. In the current study, we collected 62 glioma tissue samples (Grade II to IV) and detected IDH1 mutations by Sanger direct sequencing, ddPCR, and quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR). With the results from Sanger direct sequencing as the standard, the characteristics of ddPCR were compared with qRT-PCR. The data indicated that ddPCR was much more sensitive and much easier to interpret than qRT-PCR. Thus, we demonstrated that ddPCR is a reliable and sensitive method for screening the IDH mutation. Therefore, ddPCR is able to applied clinically in predicting patient prognosis and selecting effective therapeutic strategies. Our data also supported that the prognosis of Grade II and III glioma was better in patients with an IDH mutation than in those without mutation. PMID:26485760

  14. IDH1 mutation detection by droplet digital PCR in glioma

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jing; Zhao, Yi-ying; Li, Jian-feng; Guo, Cheng-cheng; Chen, Fu-rong; Su, Hong-kai; Zhao, Hua-fu; Long, Ya-kang; Shao, Jian-yong; Tony To, Shing-shun; Chen, Zhong-ping

    2015-01-01

    Glioma is the most frequent central nervous system tumor in adults. The overall survival of glioma patients is disappointing, mostly due to the poor prognosis of glioblastoma (Grade IV glioma). Isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) is a key factor in metabolism and catalyzes the oxidative decarboxylation of isocitrate. Mutations in IDH genes are observed in over 70% of low-grade gliomas and some cases of glioblastoma. As the most frequent mutation, IDH1(R132H) has been served as a predictive marker of glioma patients. The recently developed droplet digital PCR (ddPCR) technique generates a large amount of nanoliter-sized droplets, each of which carries out a PCR reaction on one template. Therefore, ddPCR provides high precision and absolute quantification of the nucleic acid target, with wide applications for both research and clinical diagnosis. In the current study, we collected 62 glioma tissue samples (Grade II to IV) and detected IDH1 mutations by Sanger direct sequencing, ddPCR, and quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR). With the results from Sanger direct sequencing as the standard, the characteristics of ddPCR were compared with qRT-PCR. The data indicated that ddPCR was much more sensitive and much easier to interpret than qRT-PCR. Thus, we demonstrated that ddPCR is a reliable and sensitive method for screening the IDH mutation. Therefore, ddPCR is able to applied clinically in predicting patient prognosis and selecting effective therapeutic strategies. Our data also supported that the prognosis of Grade II and III glioma was better in patients with an IDH mutation than in those without mutation. PMID:26485760

  15. Signal transduction molecules in gliomas of all grades

    PubMed Central

    Ermoian, Ralph P.; Kaprealian, Tania; Lamborn, Kathleen R.; Yang, Xiaodong; Jelluma, Nannette; Arvold, Nils D.; Zeidman, Ruth; Berger, Mitchel S.; Stokoe, David

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To interrogate grade II, III, and IV gliomas and characterize the critical effectors within the PI3-kinase pathway upstream and downstream of mTOR. Experimental design Tissues from 87 patients who were treated at UCSF between 1990 and 2004 were analyzed. Twenty-eight grade II, 17 grade III glioma, 26 grade IV gliomas, and 16 non-tumor brain specimens were analyzed. Protein levels were assessed by immunoblots; RNA levels were determined by polymerase chain reaction amplification. To address the multiple comparisons, first an overall analysis was done comparing the four groups using Spearman’s Correlation Coefficient. Only if this analysis was statistically significant were individual pairwise comparisons done. Results Multiple comparison analyses revealed a significant correlation with grade for all variables examined, except phosphorylated-S6. Expression of phosphorylated-4E-BP1, phosphorylated-PKB/Akt, PTEN, TSC1, and TSC2 correlated with grade (P < 0.01 for all). We extended our analyses to ask whether decreases in TSC proteins levels were due to changes in mRNA levels, or due to changes in post-transcriptional alterations. We found significantly lower levels of TSC1 and TSC2 mRNA in GBMs than in grade II gliomas or non-tumor brain (P < 0.01). Conclusions Expression levels of critical signaling molecules upstream and downstream of mTOR differ between non-tumor brain and gliomas of any grade. The single variable whose expression did not differ between non-tumor brain and gliomas was phosphorylated-S6, suggesting that other protein kinases, in addition to mTOR, contribute significantly to S6 phosphorylation. mTOR provides a rational therapeutic target in gliomas of all grades, and clinical benefit may emerge as mTOR inhibitors are combined with additional agents. PMID:18759130

  16. The role of drebrin in glioma migration and invasion

    SciTech Connect

    Terakawa, Yuzo; Agnihotri, Sameer; Golbourn, Brian; Nadi, Mustafa; Sabha, Nesrin; Smith, Christian A.; Croul, Sidney E.; Rutka, James T.

    2013-02-15

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most common primary brain tumor in adults. Despite current advances in therapy consisting of surgery followed by chemotherapy and radiation, the overall survival rate still remains poor. Therapeutic failures are partly attributable to the highly infiltrative nature of tumor adjacent to normal brain parenchyma. Recently, evidence is mounting to suggest that actin cytoskeleton dynamics are critical components of the cell invasion process. Drebrin is an actin-binding protein involved in the regulation of actin filament organization, and plays a significant role in cell motility; however, the role of drebrin in glioma cell invasiveness has not yet been fully elucidated. Therefore, this study was aimed to clarify the role of drebrin in glioma cell morphology and cell motility. Here we show that drebrin is expressed in glioma cell lines and in operative specimens of GBM. We demonstrate that stable overexpression of drebrin in U87 cells leads to alterations in cell morphology, and induces increased invasiveness in vitro while knockdown of drebrin in U87 cells by small interfering RNA (siRNA) decreases invasion and migration. In addition, we show that depletion of drebrin by siRNA alters glioma cell morphology in A172 GBM cell line. Our results suggest that drebrin contributes to the maintenance of cell shape, and may play an important role in glioma cell motility. - Highlights: ► Drebrin is an actin-binding protein aberrantly expressed in several cancers. ► Role of drebrin in glioma cell morphology and motility is previously unknown. ► We demonstrate that drebrin is expressed in 40% of glioblastoma specimens. ► Drebrin plays a significant role in modulating glioma cell migration and invasion.

  17. Gap junctions modulate glioma invasion by direct transfer of microRNA.

    PubMed

    Hong, Xiaoting; Sin, Wun Chey; Harris, Andrew L; Naus, Christian C

    2015-06-20

    The invasiveness of high-grade glioma is the primary reason for poor survival following treatment. Interaction between glioma cells and surrounding astrocytes are crucial to invasion. We investigated the role of gap junction mediated miRNA transfer in this context. By manipulating gap junctions with a gap junction inhibitor, siRNAs, and a dominant negative connexin mutant, we showed that functional glioma-glioma gap junctions suppress glioma invasion while glioma-astrocyte and astrocyte-astrocyte gap junctions promote it in an in vitro transwell invasion assay. After demonstrating that glioma-astrocyte gap junctions are permeable to microRNA, we compared the microRNA profiles of astrocytes before and after co-culture with glioma cells, identifying specific microRNAs as candidates for transfer through gap junctions from glioma cells to astrocytes. Further analysis showed that transfer of miR-5096 from glioma cells to astrocytes is through gap junctions; this transfer is responsible, in part, for the pro-invasive effect. Our results establish a role for glioma-astrocyte gap junction mediated microRNA signaling in modulation of glioma invasive behavior, and that gap junction coupling among astrocytes magnifies the pro-invasive signaling. Our findings reveal the potential for therapeutic interventions based on abolishing alteration of stromal cells by tumor cells via manipulation of microRNA and gap junction channel activity. PMID:25978028

  18. HES6 gene is selectively overexpressed in glioma and represents an important transcriptional regulator of glioma proliferation.

    PubMed

    Haapa-Paananen, S; Kiviluoto, S; Waltari, M; Puputti, M; Mpindi, J P; Kohonen, P; Tynninen, O; Haapasalo, H; Joensuu, H; Perälä, M; Kallioniemi, O

    2012-03-01

    Malignant glioma is the most common brain tumor with 16,000 new cases diagnosed annually in the United States. We performed a systematic large-scale transcriptomics data mining study of 9783 tissue samples from the GeneSapiens database to systematically identify genes that are most glioma-specific. We searched for genes that were highly expressed in 322 glioblastoma multiforme tissue samples and 66 anaplastic astrocytomas as compared with 425 samples from histologically normal central nervous system. Transcription cofactor HES6 (hairy and enhancer of split 6) emerged as the most glioma-specific gene. Immunostaining of a tissue microarray showed HES6 expression in 335 (98.8%) out of the 339 glioma samples. HES6 was expressed in endothelial cells of the normal brain and glioma tissue. Recurrent grade 2 astrocytomas and grade 2 or 3 oligodendrogliomas showed higher levels of HES6 immunoreactivity than the corresponding primary tumors. High HES6 mRNA expression correlated with the proneural subtype that generally has a favorable outcome but is prone to recur. Functional studies suggested an important role for HES6 in supporting survival of glioma cells, as evidenced by reduction of cancer cell proliferation and migration after HES6 silencing. The biological role and consequences of HES6 silencing and overexpression was explored with genome-wide analyses, which implicated a role for HES6 in p53, c-myc and nuclear factor-κB transcriptional networks. We conclude that HES6 is important for glioma cell proliferation and migration, and may have a role in angiogenesis. PMID:21785461

  19. Glioma cell integrin expression and their interactions with integrin antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Mattern, Ralph-Heiko; Read, Susana B.; Pierschbacher, Michael D.; Sze, Chun-I; Eliceiri, Brian P.; Kruse, Carol A.

    2005-01-01

    Summary A panel of human glioma cell explants was screened for integrin expression by flow cytometry using ανβ-specific antibodies. A lower percentage of the glioma cells were positive for the ανβ3 (mean % positive = 20.8%) integrin, whereas higher percentages were positive for the ανβ5 (mean % positive = 72.7%), VLA5α (mean % positive = 87%) and VLAβ1 (mean % positive = 41.7%) integrins. A series of RGD peptides was designed, synthesized and tested for binding to integrin receptors. Based on the results of the binding to the isolated integrin receptors and the expression of integrins on glioma cell lines, a peptide that binds potently to the ανβ3, ανβ5 and α5β1 was selected for further investigations with regards to its effect on glioma cells. The peptide, Ac-c[(Pen)-Tyr(Me)-Ala-Arg-Gly-Asp-Asn-Tic-Cys]NH2 (RGD peptide), exhibited high potential for use in clinical intracranial administration since it had good stability in rat brain cell homogenates placed into artificial cerebrospinal fluid. Using an HPLC method for quantification of peptides in rat brain cell homogenates, we could demonstrate the half-life of the RGD peptide approximated 20 hr. Relative to a scrambled peptide control (non-RGD sequence, same amino acids), the experimental RGD peptide significantly decreased glioma cell proliferation of the entire panel of rat and human glioma cells tested. Adhesion of recently passaged glioma cells to glioma-derived extracellular matrix protein-coated plates was inhibited significantly by the RGD peptide. The peptide also reversed attachment of plated glioma cells. The RGD peptide caused some, but not substantial, glioma cell injury, as evidenced by a quantitative in vitro nuclear DNA morphologic assay and by a flow cytometric assay employing 7-amino actinomycin D (7AAD). We histologically monitored for toxicity caused by various doses of the RGD peptide infused repeatedly into normal cannulated rat brain. At safe doses, the experimental RGD

  20. Molecular analysis of diffuse intrinsic brainstem gliomas in adults.

    PubMed

    Reyes-Botero, German; Giry, Marine; Mokhtari, Karima; Labussière, Marianne; Idbaih, Ahmed; Delattre, Jean-Yves; Laigle-Donadey, Florence; Sanson, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Diffuse intrinsic brainstem gliomas (DIBG) account for 1-2 % of adult gliomas. Their biological characteristics are scarcely understood and whether DIBG are biologically different from supratentorial gliomas remains to be established. We analyzed 17 DIBG samples for IDH1 R132H, alpha internexin, p53, and Ki67 expression, and, in a subset with sufficient DNA amount, for IDH1 and histone H3 mutational status, genomic profiling and MGMT promoter methylation status. A series of 738 adult supratentorial gliomas was used for comparison. Median age at diagnosis was 41 years (range 18.9-65.3 years). Median overall survival was 48.7 months (57 months for low-grade vs. 16 months for high-grade gliomas, p < 0.01). IDH1 sequencing revealed two mutations (IDH1 (R132G) , IDH1 (R132C) ) out of 7 DIBG whereas the R132H IDH1 enzyme was detected in 1/17 DIBG, suggesting that IDH1 mutations are mostly non R132H in DIBG (2/2), in contrast to supratentorial gliomas (31/313; p = 0.01). Mutations in histone genes H3F3A (encoding H3.3) and HIST1H3B (encoding H3.1) were found in 3/8 (37.5 %) of the DIBG (two H3F3A (K27M) and one HIST1H3B (K27M) ) versus 6/205 (2.9 %) of the supratentorial high-grade gliomas (four H3F3A (G34R) and two H3F3A (K27M) ) (p = 0.002). The CGH array showed a higher frequency of chromosome arm 1q gain, 9q gain and 11q loss in DIBG compared to the supratentorial high-grade gliomas, which had a less frequent chromosome 7 gain, and a less frequent chromosome 10 loss. No EGFR amplification was found. These data suggest that adult DIBG differ from adult supratentorial gliomas. In particular, histone genes (H3F3A (K27M) , HIST1H3B (K27M) ) mutations are frequent in adult DIBG whereas IDH1 (R132H) mutations are rare. PMID:24242757

  1. Clinical Relevance of Prognostic and Predictive Molecular Markers in Gliomas.

    PubMed

    Siegal, Tali

    2016-01-01

    Sorting and grading of glial tumors by the WHO classification provide clinicians with guidance as to the predicted course of the disease and choice of treatment. Nonetheless, histologically identical tumors may have very different outcome and response to treatment. Molecular markers that carry both diagnostic and prognostic information add useful tools to traditional classification by redefining tumor subtypes within each WHO category. Therefore, molecular markers have become an integral part of tumor assessment in modern neuro-oncology and biomarker status now guides clinical decisions in some subtypes of gliomas. The routine assessment of IDH status improves histological diagnostic accuracy by differentiating diffuse glioma from reactive gliosis. It carries a favorable prognostic implication for all glial tumors and it is predictive for chemotherapeutic response in anaplastic oligodendrogliomas with codeletion of 1p/19q chromosomes. Glial tumors that contain chromosomal codeletion of 1p/19q are defined as tumors of oligodendroglial lineage and have favorable prognosis. MGMT promoter methylation is a favorable prognostic marker in astrocytic high-grade gliomas and it is predictive for chemotherapeutic response in anaplastic gliomas with wild-type IDH1/2 and in glioblastoma of the elderly. The clinical implication of other molecular markers of gliomas like mutations of EGFR and ATRX genes and BRAF fusion or point mutation is highlighted. The potential of molecular biomarker-based classification to guide future therapeutic approach is discussed and accentuated. PMID:26508407

  2. Seizures and gliomas - towards a single therapeutic approach.

    PubMed

    Huberfeld, Gilles; Vecht, Charles J

    2016-04-01

    Epilepsy often develops in patients with glioma, and the two conditions share common pathogenic mechanisms. Altered expression of glutamate transporters, including the cystine-glutamate transporter (xCT) system, increases concentrations of extracellular glutamate, which contribute to epileptic discharge, tumour proliferation and peripheral excitotoxicity. Furthermore, mutation of the isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 gene in low-grade gliomas causes production of D-2-hydroxyglutarate, a steric analogue of glutamate. Dysregulation of intracellular chloride promotes glioma cell mitosis and migration, and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) signalling suppresses proliferation. In neurons, however, chloride accumulation leads to aberrant depolarization on GABA receptor activation, thereby promoting epileptic activity. The molecular target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway and epigenetic abnormalities are also involved in the development of tumours and seizures. Antitumour therapy can contribute to seizure control, and antiepileptic drugs might have beneficial effects on tumours. Symptomatic treatment with antiepileptic drugs carries risks of adverse effects and drug interactions. In this Review, we discuss the potential for single therapeutic agents, such as the xCT blocker sulfasalazine, the chloride regulator bumetanide, and the histone deacetylase inhibitor valproic acid, to manage both gliomas and associated epilepsy. We also provide guidance on the evidence-based use of antiepileptic drugs in brain tumours. The development of solo therapies to treat both aspects of gliomas promises to yield more-effective treatment with fewer risks of toxicity and drug interactions. PMID:26965673

  3. Concurrent thermochemoradiotherapy for brain high-grade glioma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryabova, A. I.; Novikov, V. A.; Choinzonov, E. L.; Gribova, O. V.; Startseva, Zh. A.; Bober, E. E.; Frolova, I. G.; Baranova, A. V.

    2016-08-01

    Despite the achievements in the current strategies for treatment, the prognosis in malignant glioma patients remains unsatisfactory. Hyperthermia is currently considered to be the most effective and universal modifier of radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Preliminary treatment outcomes for 28 patients with newly diagnosed (23) and recurrent (5) high-grade gliomas were presented. All the patients received multimodality treatment including surgery, thermoche-moradiotherapy followed by 4 cycles of adjuvant chemotherapy. All the patients endured thermochemoradiotherapy well. A complication, limited skin burn (II stage), was diagnosed in two cases and treated conservatively without treatment interruption. A month after thermochemoradiotherapy the results were as follows: complete regression was achieved in 4 cases, partial regression in 4 cases, stable disease in 14 cases and disease progression in 6 cases (one of them is pseudo-progression). After completing the adjuvant chemotherapy 2 more patients demonstrated complete response and 1 patient had disease progression. Introduction of local hyperthermia in multimodal therapy of malignant glioma does not impair the combined modality treatment tolerability of patients with malignant gliomas. A small number of studied patients and short follow-up time do not allow making reliable conclusions about the impact of local hyperthermia on the treatment outcomes; however, there is a tendency towards the increase in disease-free survival in the patients with newly diagnosed malignant gliomas.

  4. Targeting the erythropoietin receptor on glioma cells reduces tumour growth

    SciTech Connect

    Peres, Elodie A.; Valable, Samuel; Guillamo, Jean-Sebastien; Marteau, Lena; Bernaudin, Jean-Francois; Roussel, Simon; Lechapt-Zalcman, Emmanuele; Bernaudin, Myriam; Petit, Edwige

    2011-10-01

    Hypoxia has been shown to be one of the major events involved in EPO expression. Accordingly, EPO might be expressed by cerebral neoplastic cells, especially in glioblastoma, known to be highly hypoxic tumours. The expression of EPOR has been described in glioma cells. However, data from the literature remain descriptive and controversial. On the basis of an endogenous source of EPO in the brain, we have focused on a potential role of EPOR in brain tumour growth. In the present study, with complementary approaches to target EPO/EPOR signalling, we demonstrate the presence of a functional EPO/EPOR system on glioma cells leading to the activation of the ERK pathway. This EPO/EPOR system is involved in glioma cell proliferation in vitro. In vivo, we show that the down-regulation of EPOR expression on glioma cells reduces tumour growth and enhances animal survival. Our results support the hypothesis that EPOR signalling in tumour cells is involved in the control of glioma growth.

  5. Multidimensional assessment of empathic abilities in patients with insular glioma.

    PubMed

    Chen, Peng; Wang, Guangming; Ma, Ru; Jing, Fang; Zhang, Yongjun; Wang, Ying; Zhang, Peng; Niu, Chaoshi; Zhang, Xiaochu

    2016-10-01

    Recent studies have provided evidence that there are two possible systems for empathy: affective empathy (AE) and cognitive empathy (CE). Neuroimaging paradigms have proven that the insular cortex is involved in empathy processing, particularly in AE. However, these observations do not provide causal evidence for the role of the insula in empathy. Although impairments in empathy have been described following insular damage in a few case studies, it is not clear whether insular cortex is involved in CE and whether these two systems are impaired independently or laterally in patients with insular gliomas. In this study, we assessed 17 patients with an insular glioma, 17 patients with a noninsular glioma, and 30 healthy controls using a method that combined a self-report empathy questionnaire with the emotion recognition task, assessment of empathy for others' pain, and the emotional perspective-taking paradigm. We found that patients with an insular glioma had lower scores for empathic concern and perspective taking than did either healthy controls or lesion controls. The patients' abilities to recognize facial emotions, perceive others' pain, and understand the emotional perspectives of others were also significantly impaired. Furthermore, we did not observe a laterality effect on either AE or CE among those with insular lesions. These findings revealed that both AE and CE are impaired in patients with an insular glioma and that the insular cortex may be a central neuroanatomical structure in both the AE and CE systems. PMID:27456973

  6. Cortical GABAergic excitation contributes to epileptic activities around human glioma

    PubMed Central

    Pallud, Johan; Varlet, Pascale; Cresto, Noemie; Baulac, Michel; Duyckaerts, Charles; Kourdougli, Nazim; Chazal, Geneviève; Devaux, Bertrand; Rivera, Claudio; Miles, Richard; Capelle, Laurent; Huberfeld, Gilles

    2015-01-01

    Rationale Diffuse brain gliomas induce seizures in a majority of patients. As in most epileptic disorders, excitatory glutamatergic mechanisms are involved in the generation of epileptic activities in the neocortex surrounding gliomas. However, chloride homeostasis is known to be perturbed in glial tumor cells. Thus the contribution of GABAergic mechanisms which depend on intracellular chloride and which are defective or pro-epileptic in other structural epilepsies merits closer study. Objective We studied in neocortical slices from the peritumoral security margin resected around human brain gliomas, the occurrence, networks, cells and signaling basis of epileptic activities. Results Postoperative glioma tissue from 69% of patients spontaneously generated interictal-like discharges. These events were synchronized, with a high frequency oscillation signature, in superficial layers of neocortex around glioma areas with tumor infiltration. Interictal-like events depended on both glutamatergic transmission and on depolarizing GABAergic signaling. About 65% of pyramidal cells were depolarized by GABA released by interneurons. This effect was related to perturbations in Chloride homeostasis, due to changes in expression of chloride co-transporters: KCC2 was reduced and expression of NKCC1 increased. Ictal-like activities were initiated by convulsant stimuli exclusively in these epileptogenic areas. Conclusions Epileptic activities are sustained by excitatory effects of GABA in the peritumoral human neocortex, as in temporal lobe epilepsies. Glutamate and GABA signaling are involved in oncogenesis and chloride homeostasis is perturbed. These same factors, induce an imbalance between synaptic excitatory and inhibition underly epileptic discharges in tumor patients. PMID:25009229

  7. Deciphering the 8q24.21 association for glioma

    PubMed Central

    Enciso-Mora, Victor; Hosking, Fay J.; Kinnersley, Ben; Wang, Yufei; Shete, Sanjay; Zelenika, Diana; Broderick, Peter; Idbaih, Ahmed; Delattre, Jean-Yves; Hoang-Xuan, Khe; Marie, Yannick; Di Stefano, Anna Luisa; Labussière, Marianne; Dobbins, Sara; Boisselier, Blandine; Ciccarino, Pietro; Rossetto, Marta; Armstrong, Georgina; Liu, Yanhong; Gousias, Konstantinos; Schramm, Johannes; Lau, Ching; Hepworth, Sarah J.; Strauch, Konstantin; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Schreiber, Stefan; Franke, Andre; Moebus, Susanne; Eisele, Lewin; Forsti, Asta; Hemminki, Kari; Tomlinson, Ian P.; Swerdlow, Anthony; Lathrop, Mark; Simon, Matthias; Bondy, Melissa; Sanson, Marc; Houlston, Richard S

    2013-01-01

    We have previously identified tagSNPs at 8q24.21 influencing glioma risk. We have sought to fine-map the location of the functional basis of this association using data from four genome-wide association studies, comprising a total of 4147 glioma cases and 7435 controls. To improve marker density across the 700 kb region, we imputed genotypes using 1000 Genomes Project data and high-coverage sequencing data generated on 253 individuals. Analysis revealed an imputed low-frequency SNP rs55705857 (P = 2.24 × 10−38) which was sufficient to fully capture the 8q24.21 association. Analysis by glioma subtype showed the association with rs55705857 confined to non-glioblastoma multiforme (non-GBM) tumours (P = 1.07 × 10−67). Validation of the non-GBM association was shown in three additional datasets (625 non-GBM cases, 2412 controls; P = 1.41 × 10−28). In the pooled analysis, the odds ratio for low-grade glioma associated with rs55705857 was 4.3 (P = 2.31 × 10−94). rs55705857 maps to a highly evolutionarily conserved sequence within the long non-coding RNA CCDC26 raising the possibility of direct functionality. These data provide additional insights into the aetiological basis of glioma development. PMID:23399484

  8. Malignant glioma - timing of response to radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Gaspar, L.E.; Fisher, B.J.; MacDonald, D.R.; Cairncross, J.G. London Regional Cancer Centre, Ontario ); LeBer, D.V. ); Halperin, E.C.; Schold, S.C. Jr. )

    1993-04-02

    The response of malignant gliomas to radiation was examined retrospectively in 71 patients with newly diagnosed supratentorial malignant gliomas. Questions asked included frequency, timing and clinical significance of response. After surgery, all were treated with whole brain plus boost radiotherapy followed 8 weeks later by chemotherapy. The rate, degree, and timing of response to radiation were determined by comparing postoperative, end of radiation, and prechemotherapy CT scans on each patient. Postoperative residual tumor was evident on 63/71 postoperative scans. Twenty-two of 63 tumors (35%) had a partial or complete response to radiation. Twenty (32%) had responded by the end of radiation; 17 maximally. Six to 8 weeks later, three responding tumors had responded further and two previously stable ones had begun to respond. Only three tumors (5%) responded completely. A greater proportion of anaplastic gliomas than glioblastomas responded to radiation (52% vs. 26%). Protracted or delayed responses were only observed in patients with anaplastic glioma. Patients who responded to radiation did not live significantly longer than non-responders. However, tumor progression prior to chemotherapy was associated with significantly shorter survival. This CT scan-based analysis demonstrates that malignant gliomas are only moderately radioresponsive tumors and also demonstrates that response to radiation, if it is going to occur, is usually evident by the end of treatment. 6 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  9. The Role of Semaphorins and Their Receptors in Gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Law, Janice Wai Sze; Lee, Alan Yiu Wah

    2012-01-01

    Gliomas are the most common tumor in the central nervous system. High-grade glioblastomas are characterized by their high invasiveness and resistance to radiotherapy, leading to high recurrence rate and short median survival despite radical surgical resection. Characterizations of gliomas at molecular level have revealed aberrations of various growth factor receptors, receptor tyrosine kinases, and tumor suppressor genes that lead to deregulation of multiple signaling pathways, thereby contributing to abnormal proliferation, invasion, and resistance to apoptosis in cancer cells. Recently, accumulating evidence points to the emerging role of axon guidance molecules in glioma progression. Notably, many signaling events harnessed by guidance molecules to regulate cell migration and axon navigation during development are also found to be involved in the modulation of deregulated pathways in gliomas. This paper focused on the signalings triggered by the guidance molecule semaphorins and their receptors plexins and neuropilins, and how their crosstalk with oncogenic pathways in gliomas might modulate cancer progression. The emerging role of semaphorins and plexins as tumor suppressors or oncogenes is also discussed. PMID:23050142

  10. Chemotherapy for gliomas in mainland China: An overview

    PubMed Central

    SAI, KE; YANG, QUN-YING; SHEN, DONG; CHEN, ZHONG-PING

    2013-01-01

    Chemotherapy is currently the standard treatment modality for malignant gliomas. Many patients with gliomas are treated in mainland China every year. The history and development of chemotherapy for glioma, however, are not well documented. In this study, an extensive literature search of Pubmed and major Chinese electronic databases was performed to identify clinical studies. A total of 210 publications were identified, with a total of 10,105 patients. Among these studies, 76.2% were retrospective and 23.8% were prospective. Chemotherapy was found to have been administered by the Department of Neurosurgery in 143 studies (68.1%). Oral or intravenous administration was found in 55.7% of studies, followed by intra-arterial (26.7%) and interstitial (15.7%) chemotherapy. Nitrosoureas were the most frequently used chemotherapeutic agents, as found in 133 studies (63.3%). Since 2003, 56 studies on temozolomide (TMZ) have been published. Studies on chemotherapy for gliomas began in the 1970s in mainland China but well-designed randomized controlled trials (RCTs) are rare. Much effort and collaboration should be made to carry out high-quality multicenter RCTs on chemotherapy for gliomas. PMID:23761809

  11. The rise and fall of "biopsy and radiate": a history of surgical nihilism in glioma treatment.

    PubMed

    Han, Seunggu J; Sughrue, Michael E

    2012-04-01

    Many neurosurgeons take a nihilistic approach to surgical treatment of gliomas, stating the inability to achieve a cure. Where this idea comes from is somewhat nebulous to most neurosurgeons. A review of the scientific studies supporting the commonly held beliefs about gliomas shows that these ideas regarding the surgical treatment of gliomas are based on overgeneralizations of data from older studies. One should avoid the temptation to apply them to the greater concept of what gliomas are, how they behave, and what should be done, but rather we should continue to scientifically evaluate the role of surgical resection in glioma treatment. PMID:22440864

  12. [Oncolytic viruses for therapy of malignant glioma].

    PubMed

    Sosnovtceva, A O; Grinenko, N F; Lipatova, A V; Chumakov, P M; Chekhonin, V P

    2016-05-01

    Effective treatment of malignant brain tumors is still an open problem. Location of tumor in vital areas of the brain significantly limits capasities of surgical treatment. The presence of tumor stem cells resistant to radiation and anticancer drugs in brain tumor complicates use of chemoradiotherapy and causes a high rate of disease recurrence. A technological improvement in bioselection and production of recombinant resulted in creation of viruses with potent oncolytic properties against glial tumors. Recent studies, including clinical trials, showed, that majority of oncolytic viruses are safe. Despite the impressive results of the viral therapy in some patients, the treatment of other patients is not effective; therefore, further improvement of the methods of oncolytic virotherapy is necessary. High genetic heterogeneity of glial tumor cells even within a single tumor determines differences in individual sensitivity of tumor cells to oncolytic viruses. This review analyses the most successful oncolytic virus strains, including those which had reached clinical trials, and discusses the prospects for new approaches to virotherapy of gliomas. PMID:27562991

  13. Exploiting Metabolic Differences in Glioma Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Galeffi, Francesca; Turner, Dennis A.

    2013-01-01

    Brain function depends upon complex metabolic interactions amongst only a few different cell types, with as-trocytes providing critical support for neurons. Astrocyte functions include buffering the extracellular space, providing substrates to neurons, interchanging glutamate and glutamine for synaptic transmission with neurons, and facilitating access to blood vessels. Whereas neurons possess highly oxidative metabolism and easily succumb to ischemia, astrocytes rely more on glycolysis and metabolism associated with synthesis of critical intermediates, hence are less susceptible to lack of oxygen. Astrocytoma and higher grade glioma cells demonstrate both basic metabolic mechanisms of astrocytes as well as tumors in general, e.g. they show a high glycolytic rate, lactate extrusion, ability to proliferate even under hypoxia, and opportunistic use of mechanisms to enhance metabolism and blood vessel generation, and suppression of cell death pathways. There may be differences in metabolism between neurons, normal astrocytes and astrocytoma cells, providing therapeutic opportunities against astrocytomas, including a wide range of enzyme and transporter differences, regulation of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF), glutamate uptake transporters and glutamine utilization, differential sensitivities of monocarboxylate transporters, presence of glycogen, high interlinking with gap junctions, use of NADPH for lipid synthesis, utilizing differential regulation of synthetic enzymes (e.g. isocitrate dehydrogenase, pyruvate carboxylase, pyruvate dehydrogenase, lactate dehydrogenase, malate-aspartate NADH shuttle) and different glucose uptake mechanisms. These unique metabolic susceptibilities may augment conventional therapeutic attacks based on cell division differences and surface receptors alone, and are starting to be implemented in clinical trials. PMID:22339075

  14. Protein Markers Predict Survival in Glioma Patients.

    PubMed

    Stetson, Lindsay C; Dazard, Jean-Eudes; Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill S

    2016-07-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is a genomically complex and aggressive primary adult brain tumor, with a median survival time of 12-14 months. The heterogeneous nature of this disease has made the identification and validation of prognostic biomarkers difficult. Using reverse phase protein array data from 203 primary untreated GBM patients, we have identified a set of 13 proteins with prognostic significance. Our protein signature predictive of glioblastoma (PROTGLIO) patient survival model was constructed and validated on independent data sets and was shown to significantly predict survival in GBM patients (log-rank test: p = 0.0009). Using a multivariate Cox proportional hazards, we have shown that our PROTGLIO model is distinct from other known GBM prognostic factors (age at diagnosis, extent of surgical resection, postoperative Karnofsky performance score (KPS), treatment with temozolomide (TMZ) chemoradiation, and methylation of the MGMT gene). Tenfold cross-validation repetition of our model generation procedure confirmed validation of PROTGLIO. The model was further validated on an independent set of isocitrate dehydrogenase wild-type (IDHwt) lower grade gliomas (LGG)-a portion of these tumors progress rapidly to GBM. The PROTGLIO model contains proteins, such as Cox-2 and Annexin 1, involved in inflammatory response, pointing to potential therapeutic interventions. The PROTGLIO model is a simple and effective predictor of overall survival in glioblastoma patients, making it potentially useful in clinical practice of glioblastoma multiforme. PMID:27143410

  15. Mechanisms of Chemoresistance in Malignant Glioma

    PubMed Central

    Sarkaria, Jann N.; Kitange, Gaspar J.; James, C. David; Plummer, Ruth; Calvert, Hilary; Weller, Michael; Wick, Wolfgang

    2008-01-01

    Intrinsic or acquired chemoresistance is a major cause of treatment failure in patients with malignant brain tumors. Alkylating agents, the mainstay of treatment for brain tumors, damage the DNA and induce apoptosis, but the cytotoxic activity of these agents is dependent on DNA repair pathways. For example, O6-methylguanine DNA adducts can cause double-strand breaks, but this is dependent on a functional mismatch repair (MMR) pathway. Thus, tumor cell lines deficient in MMR are resistant to alkylating agents. Perhaps the most important mechanism of resistance to alkylating agents is the DNA repair enzyme O6-methylguanine methyltransferase (MGMT), which can eliminate the cytotoxic O6-methylguanine DNA adduct before it causes harm. Another mechanism of resistance to alkylating agents is the base excision repair (BER) pathway. Consequently, efforts are ongoing to develop effective inhibitors of BER. Poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase (PARP-1) plays a pivotal role in BER and is an important therapeutic target. Developing effective strategies to overcome chemoresistance requires the identification of reliable preclinical models that recapitulate human disease and can be used to facilitate drug development. This manuscript describes the diverse mechanisms of chemoresistance operating in malignant glioma and efforts to develop reliable preclinical models and novel pharmacologic approaches to overcome resistance to alkylating agents. PMID:18483356

  16. Exploiting metabolic differences in glioma therapy.

    PubMed

    Galeffi, Francesca; Turner, Dennis A

    2012-12-01

    Brain function depends upon complex metabolic interactions amongst only a few different cell types, with astrocytes providing critical support for neurons. Astrocyte functions include buffering the extracellular space, providing substrates to neurons, interchanging glutamate and glutamine for synaptic transmission with neurons, and facilitating access to blood vessels. Whereas neurons possess highly oxidative metabolism and easily succumb to ischemia, astrocytes rely more on glycolysis and metabolism associated with synthesis of critical intermediates, hence are less susceptible to lack of oxygen. Astrocytoma and higher grade glioma cells demonstrate both basic metabolic mechanisms of astrocytes as well as tumors in general, e.g. they show a high glycolytic rate, lactate extrusion, ability to proliferate even under hypoxia, and opportunistic use of mechanisms to enhance metabolism and blood vessel generation, and suppression of cell death pathways. There may be differences in metabolism between neurons, normal astrocytes and astrocytoma cells, providing therapeutic opportunities against astrocytomas, including a wide range of enzyme and transporter differences, regulation of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF), glutamate uptake transporters and glutamine utilization, differential sensitivities of monocarboxylate transporters, presence of glycogen, high interlinking with gap junctions, use of NADPH for lipid synthesis, utilizing differential regulation of synthetic enzymes (e.g. isocitrate dehydrogenase, pyruvate carboxylase, pyruvate dehydrogenase, lactate dehydrogenase, malate-aspartate NADH shuttle) and different glucose uptake mechanisms. These unique metabolic susceptibilities may augment conventional therapeutic attacks based on cell division differences and surface receptors alone, and are starting to be implemented in clinical trials. PMID:22339075

  17. The role of ventriculoperitoneal shunting in patients with supratentorial glioma

    PubMed Central

    de la Fuente, Macarena I; DeAngelis, Lisa M

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To assess the impact of ventriculoperitoneal (VPS) in patients with glioma. Methods Retrospective review of patients with grade II-IV glioma who had VPS placement from January 1995 to November 2012. Results We identified 62 patients. At time of VPS, 41 had gait disturbance, 40 cognitive impairment and 16 urinary incontinence; 10 had the classic triad. Thirty-eight (61%) improved after VPS. Median overall survival from VPS was 7 months for all patients, but 11 months for those who improved and 2 months for non-responders. Leptomeningeal disease, glioma grade or radiographic ventricular decompression did not predict benefit. Conclusions VPS can improve functional status in some patients with symptoms suggestive of hydrocephalus. PMID:25356380

  18. Silver nanoparticles: a novel radiation sensitizer for glioma?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Peidang; Huang, Zhihai; Chen, Zhongwen; Xu, Ruizhi; Wu, Hao; Zang, Fengchao; Wang, Cailian; Gu, Ning

    2013-11-01

    Malignant gliomas are the most common primary intracranial tumors with a dismal prognosis. Previous investigations by our group demonstrated the radiosensitizing effect of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) on glioma cells in vitro. The goal of the present study was to evaluate the efficacy of intratumoral administration of AgNPs in combination with a single dose of ionizing radiation at clinically relevant MV energies for the treatment of C6 glioma-bearing rats. AgNPs (10 or 20 μg/10 μl) were stereotactically administered on day 8 after tumor implantation. One day after AgNP injection, rats bearing glioma received 10 Gy radiation. The mean survival times were 100.5 and 98 days, the corresponding percent increase in life spans was 513.2% and 497.7%, and the cure rates were 41.7 and 38.5% at 200 days for the 10 and 20 μg AgNPs and radiation combination groups, respectively. In contrast, the mean survival times for irradiated controls, 10 and 20 μg AgNPs alone, and untreated controls were 24.5, 16.1, 19.4, and 16.4 days, respectively. Furthermore, a cooperative antiproliferative and proapoptotic effect was obtained when gliomas were treated with AgNPs followed by radiotherapy. Our results showed the therapeutic efficacy of AgNPs in combination with radiotherapy without apparent systemic toxicity, suggesting the clinical potential of AgNPs in improving the outcome of malignant glioma radiotherapy.Malignant gliomas are the most common primary intracranial tumors with a dismal prognosis. Previous investigations by our group demonstrated the radiosensitizing effect of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) on glioma cells in vitro. The goal of the present study was to evaluate the efficacy of intratumoral administration of AgNPs in combination with a single dose of ionizing radiation at clinically relevant MV energies for the treatment of C6 glioma-bearing rats. AgNPs (10 or 20 μg/10 μl) were stereotactically administered on day 8 after tumor implantation. One day after Ag

  19. Effects of photodynamic therapy on human glioma spheroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madsen, Steen J.; Sun, Chung-Ho; Chu, Eugene A.; Hirschberg, Henry; Tromberg, Bruce J.

    1999-07-01

    The poor prognosis for patients with malignant brain neoplasm has led to a search for better treatment modalities. Although gliomas are considered to be disseminated tumors in the brain, most recur at the site of the previous tumor resection. Improved local control would thus be of clear benefit. The utility of photodynamic therapy (PDT) in the treatment of brain neoplasms is investigated using a human glioma spheroid model. Specifically, the effects of PDT on human glioma spheroids are investigated using PhotofrinTM and 56-aminolevulinic acid (ALA). The effects of various irradiation schemes were monitored using a simple growth assay. A growth delay was observed at an optical fluence of approximately 35 J cm-2 for spheroids incubated in Photofrin. Spheroids incubated in ALA were unaffected by the PDT treatment regimens examined in this study. This was most likely a result of inadequate photosensitizer concentration.

  20. Diffusion tensor imaging suggests extrapontine extension of pediatric diffuse intrinsic pontine gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Matthias W.; Bell, W. Robert; Kern, Jason; Bosemani, Thangamadhan; Mhlanga, Joyce; Carson, Kathryn A.; Cohen, Kenneth J.; Raabe, Eric H.; Rodriguez, Fausto; Huisman, Thierry A.G.M.; Poretti, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To apply DTI to detect early extrapontine extension of pediatric diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma along the corticospinal tracts. Methods In children with diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma, low-grade brainstem glioma, and age-matched controls, DTI metrics were measured in the posterior limb of the internal capsule and posterior centrum semiovale. Histological examination was available in one patient. Results 6 diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma, 8 low-grade brainstem glioma, and two groups of 25 controls were included. In diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma compared to controls, fractional anisotropy was lower in the bilateral posterior limb of the internal capsule, axial diffusivity was lower in the bilateral posterior centrum semiovale and posterior limb of the internal capsule, while radial diffusivity was higher in the bilateral posterior limb of the internal capsule. No significant differences were found between low-grade brainstem glioma and controls. In diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma compared to low-grade brainstem glioma, axial diffusivity was lower in the bilateral posterior limb of the internal capsule. Histological examination in one child showed tumor cells in the posterior limb of the internal capsule. Conclusion Reduction in fractional anisotropy and axial diffusivity and increase in radial diffusivity in diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma may reflect tumor extension along the corticospinal tracts as shown by histology. DTI may detect early extrapontine tumor extension in diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma before it becomes apparent on conventional MRI sequences. PMID:26971411

  1. Upregulation of p-Smad2 contributes to FAT10-induced oncogenic activities in glioma.

    PubMed

    Dai, Bin; Zhang, Yisong; Zhang, Peng; Pan, Changcun; Xu, Cheng; Wan, Weiqing; Wu, Zhen; Zhang, Junting; Zhang, Liwei

    2016-07-01

    The human leukocyte antigen f-associated transcript 10 (FAT10) has a similar structure and function with ubiquitin, which efficiently mediate proteasome degradation in an ubiquitin-independent manner. FAT10 expression is upregulated in many tumor tissues and plays a vital role in cell cycle regulation and tumor genesis. However, its role in glioma has not been illuminated. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prognostic value of FAT10 and investigate its functional roles in glioma. The expression of FAT10 in glioma patient samples was examined using quantitative real-time reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR), Western blotting and immunohistochemistry methods. Glioma cell lines with either FAT10 overexpression or knockdown were created. The effect of FAT10 on glioma cell migration and invasion was investigated using these cells. In the present study, we had shown that FAT10 was elevated significantly in glioma samples and correlated with tumor pathological grade. FAT10 high-expression glioma is associated with a poor clinical prognosis. Overexpression of FAT10 promoted proliferation, invasion, migration, and sphere formation of glioma cells, whereas downregulation of FAT10 had an opposite effect. Overexpression of FAT10 also promoted the growth of glioma cells in vivo. Moreover, FAT10 enhanced the phosphorylation of Smad2, which contributes to FAT10-induced oncogenic activities in glioma. In conclusion, these findings indicate that FAT10 is a critical regulator potential therapeutic target of glioma. PMID:26733179

  2. Expression of CDC5L is associated with tumor progression in gliomas.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wenjuan; Zhang, Li; Wang, Yan; Sun, Jie; Wang, Donglin; Fan, Shaochen; Ban, Na; Zhu, Junya; Ji, Bin; Wang, Yuchan

    2016-03-01

    Cell division cycle 5-like (CDC5L) protein is a cell cycle regulator of the G2/M transition and has been reported to participate in the catalytic step of pre-messenger RNA (mRNA) splicing and DNA damage repair. Recently, it was also found to act as a candidate oncogene in osteosarcoma and cervical tumors. However, the role of CDC5L expression in tumor biology was still unclear. Here, we analyzed the expression and clinical significance of CDC5L in gliomas. The expression of CDC5L in fresh glioma tissues and paraffin-embedded slices was evaluated by western blot and immunohistochemistry, respectively. We found that CDC5L was highly expressed in glioma tissues. The expression of CDC5L was significantly associated with glioma pathology grade and Ki-67 expression. Univariate and multivariate analyses showed that high CDC5L expression was an independent prognostic factor for glioma patients' survival. To determine whether CDC5L could regulate the proliferation of glioma cells, we transfected glioma cells with interfering RNA target CDC5L, then investigated cell proliferation with cell counting kit (CCK)-8, flow cytometry assays and colony formation analyses. Our results indicated that knockdown of CDC5L would inhibit proliferation of glioma cells. Besides, reduced expression of CDC5L could induce the apoptosis of glioma cells. These findings suggested that CDC5L might play an important role in glioma and thus be a promising therapeutic target of glioma. PMID:26490980

  3. Presence of neural progenitors in spontaneous canine gliomas: A histopathological and immunohistochemical study of 20 cases.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Francisco; Deviers, Alexandra; Dally, Claire; Mogicato, Giovanni; Delverdier, Maxence; Cauzinille, Laurent; Gnirs, Kirsten; Añor, Sònia; de la Fuente, Cristian; Fondevila, Dolors; Pumarola, Martí

    2016-03-01

    Gliomas are the most common primary brain tumours in humans and are associated with a poor prognosis. An accurate animal model of human glioma tumorigenesis is needed to test new treatment strategies. Dogs represent a promising model because they develop spontaneous diffusely-infiltrating gliomas. This study investigated whether spontaneous canine gliomas contain cancer stem cells previously identified in all grades of human gliomas. Twenty spontaneous cases of canine gliomas were graded according to the human WHO classification. The expression of different markers of lineage differentiation was evaluated with immunohistochemistry as follows: nestin and CD133 for neural stem cells, doublecortin for neuronal progenitor cells, Olig2 for glial progenitor cells, glial fibrillary acidic protein, vimentin and S-100 for mature glial cells, and NeuN and βIII-tubulin for mature neurons. Gliomas were characterised as follows: five grade II (oligodendrogliomas); nine grade III (seven anaplastic oligodendrogliomas, one anaplastic astrocytoma, one anaplastic oligoastrocytoma); six grade IV (glioblastomas). Immunohistochemical evaluation revealed that (1) nestin and CD133 were expressed in all grades of gliomas with a higher proportion of positive cells in high-grade gliomas; (2) the expression of S-100 protein and Olig2 did not differ substantially between astrocytic and oligodendroglial tumours, and (3) all gliomas were negative for mature neuron markers. The results demonstrated the presence of undifferentiated neural progenitors in all grades of spontaneous canine gliomas, confirming the relevance of this animal model for further studies on cancer stem cells. PMID:26831167

  4. Role of IL-6 in the invasiveness and prognosis of glioma

    PubMed Central

    Shan, Yongzhi; He, Xin; Song, Wei; Han, Dong; Niu, Jianxing; Wang, Jianzhen

    2015-01-01

    IL-6 is a cytokine secreted by glioma cells and plays an important role in the tumor growth. However, the impact of IL-6 on the invasiveness and prognosis of glioma is still unclear. In this study, immunohistochemistry was performed to determine the expression of IL-6 in 86 glioma tissues, and ELISA to measure IL-6 in the serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of these patients. Results showed, as ccompared with normal controls, the IL-6 in the glioma, CSF and serumincreased remarkably, and increased with the elevation of glioma grade. In addition, IL-6 in the supernatant was also detectable in glioma cell lines U251, U87, A172 and T98G. Transwell invasion assay showed that the invasiveness of glioma U87 cells and U251 cells increased remarkably after exogenous IL-6 treatment. Survival analysis indicated higher IL-6 before surgery and significantly reduction in IL-6 after operation in the serum and CSF predicted a poor prognosis. Thus, we speculate that, the poor prognosis of glioma is related to the IL-6 autocrine in the glioma and the IL-6 induced tumor growth and invasion. IL-6 may serve as a therapeutic target for glioma patients and IL-6 in the CSF and serum of glioma may be used to predict the prognosis of these patients. PMID:26309566

  5. Autophagy contributes to gefitinib-induced glioma cell growth inhibition

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Cheng-Yi; Kuan, Yu-Hsiang; Ou, Yen-Chuan; Li, Jian-Ri; Wu, Chih-Cheng; Pan, Pin-Ho; Chen, Wen-Ying; Huang, Hsuan-Yi; Chen, Chun-Jung

    2014-09-10

    Epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors, including gefitinib, have been evaluated in patients with malignant gliomas. However, the molecular mechanisms involved in gefitinib-mediated anticancer effects against glioma are incompletely understood. In the present study, the cytostatic potential of gefitinib was demonstrated by the inhibition of glioma cell growth, long-term clonogenic survival, and xenograft tumor growth. The cytostatic consequences were accompanied by autophagy, as evidenced by monodansylcadaverine staining of acidic vesicle formation, conversion of microtubule-associated protein-1 light chain 3-II (LC3-II), degradation of p62, punctate pattern of GFP-LC3, and conversion of GFP-LC3 to cleaved-GFP. Autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenosine and chloroquine and genetic silencing of LC3 or Beclin 1 attenuated gefitinib-induced growth inhibition. Gefitinib-induced autophagy was not accompanied by the disruption of the Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin signaling. Instead, the activation of liver kinase-B1/AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling correlated well with the induction of autophagy and growth inhibition caused by gefitinib. Silencing of AMPK suppressed gefitinib-induced autophagy and growth inhibition. The crucial role of AMPK activation in inducing glioma autophagy and growth inhibition was further supported by the actions of AMP mimetic AICAR. Gefitinib was shown to be capable of reducing the proliferation of glioma cells, presumably by autophagic mechanisms involving AMPK activation. - Highlights: • Gefitinib causes cytotoxic and cytostatic effect on glioma. • Gefitinib induces autophagy. • Gefitinib causes cytostatic effect through autophagy. • Gefitinib induces autophagy involving AMPK.

  6. Silencing of ataxia-telangiectasia mutated by siRNA enhances the in vitro and in vivo radiosensitivity of glioma.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Li, Luchun; Li, Bo; Wu, Zhijuan; Wu, Yongzhong; Wang, Ying; Jin, Fu; Li, Dairong; Ma, Huiwen; Wang, Donglin

    2016-06-01

    It is reported that high expression of the ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) gene is linked with radioresistance in glioma. We hypothesized that the radiosensitivity of this brain tumor is enhanced by silencing of the ATM gene. We transfected the glioma cell line U251 with the siRNA-ATMpuro (group A) lentivirus or the siRNA-HKpuro (group N, negative control) lentivirus before irradiation. RT-qPCR and western blotting were performed to verify the efficiency of siRNA‑mediated ATM silencing. Expression levels of the ATM gene and protein were obviously downregulated after transfection. Moreover, the expression of the p53, PCNA and survivin genes, which are related to radiosensitivity, was also decreased. CCK-8 and colony formation assays showed lower cell proliferation and survival in group A than in groups N and C (control group that was not transfected with any siRNA). The level of double-stranded DNA breaks was also greater in group A, as determined by the comet tail assay. Flow cytometry showed a higher rate of cell apoptosis and a higher number of cells in the G2 phase in group A. Furthermore, caspase-3, caspase-8 and caspase-9 activity was also higher in group A. In vivo analysis in mouse models created by implantation of the transfected cell lines showed that the amount of necrosis and hemorrhage was higher in group A than that in the control groups. In conclusion, silencing of ATM via the siRNA technique could improve the in vitro and in vivo radiosensitivity of glioma cells. PMID:27108486

  7. Mathematical modeling of efficient protocols to control glioma growth.

    PubMed

    Branco, J R; Ferreira, J A; de Oliveira, Paula

    2014-09-01

    In this paper we propose a mathematical model to describe the evolution of glioma cells taking into account the viscoelastic properties of brain tissue. The mathematical model is established considering that the glioma cells are of two phenotypes: migratory and proliferative. The evolution of the migratory cells is described by a diffusion-reaction equation of non Fickian type deduced considering a mass conservation law with a non Fickian migratory mass flux. The evolution of the proliferative cells is described by a reaction equation. A stability analysis that leads to the design of efficient protocols is presented. Numerical simulations that illustrate the behavior of the mathematical model are included. PMID:25057777

  8. Hydroxamic Acid and Benzoic Acid-Based STAT3 Inhibitors Suppress Human Glioma and Breast Cancer Phenotypes In Vitro and In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Yue, Peibin; Lopez-Tapia, Francisco; Paladino, David; Li, Yifei; Chen, Chih-Hong; Namanja, Andrew T; Hilliard, Tyvette; Chen, Yuan; Tius, Marcus A; Turkson, James

    2016-02-01

    STAT3 offers an attractive target for cancer therapy, but small-molecule inhibitors with appealing pharmacologic properties have been elusive. Here, we report hydroxamic acid-based and benzoic acid-based inhibitors (SH5-07 and SH4-54, respectively) with robust bioactivity. Both inhibitors blocked STAT3 DNA-binding activity in vitro and in human glioma, breast, and prostate cancer cells and in v-Src-transformed murine fibroblasts. STAT3-dependent gene transcription was blocked along with Bcl-2, Bcl-xL, Mcl-1, cyclin D1, c-Myc, and survivin expression. Nuclear magnetic resonance analysis of STAT3-inhibitor complexes defined interactions with the SH2 and DNA-binding domains of STAT3. Ectopic expression of the SH2 domain in cells was sufficient to counter the STAT3-inhibitory effects of SH4-54. Neither compound appreciably affected STAT1 or STAT5 DNA-binding activities, STAT3-independent gene transcription, or activation of a panel of oncogenic kinases in malignant cells. Each compound decreased the proliferation and viability of glioma, breast, and prostate cancer cells and v-Src-transformed murine fibroblasts harboring constitutively active STAT3. Further, in mouse xenograft models of glioma and breast cancer, administration of SH5-07 or SH4-54 effectively inhibited tumor growth. Our results offer preclinical proof of concept for SH5-07 and SH4-54 as candidates for further development as cancer therapeutics. PMID:26088127

  9. Destruction of vasculogenic mimicry channels by targeting epirubicin plus celecoxib liposomes in treatment of brain glioma

    PubMed Central

    Ju, Rui-Jun; Zeng, Fan; Liu, Lei; Mu, Li-Min; Xie, Hong-Jun; Zhao, Yao; Yan, Yan; Wu, Jia-Shuan; Hu, Ying-Jie; Lu, Wan-Liang

    2016-01-01

    The efficacy of chemotherapy for brain glioma is restricted by the blood–brain barrier (BBB), and surgery or radiotherapy cannot eliminate the glioma cells because of their unique location. Residual brain glioma cells can form vasculogenic mimicry (VM) channels that can cause a recurrence of brain glioma. In the present study, targeting liposomes incorporating epirubicin and celecoxib were prepared and used for the treatment of brain glioma, along with the destruction of their VM channels. Evaluations were performed on the human brain glioma U87MG cells in vitro and on intracranial brain glioma-bearing nude mice. Targeting epirubicin plus celecoxib liposomes in the circulatory blood system were able to be transported across the BBB, and accumulated in the brain glioma region. Then, the liposomes were internalized by brain glioma cells and killed glioma cells by direct cytotoxic injury and the induction of apoptosis. The induction of apoptosis was related to the activation of caspase-8- and -3-signaling pathways, the activation of the proapoptotic protein Bax, and the suppression of the antiapoptotic protein Mcl-1. The destruction of brain glioma VM channels was related to the downregulation of VM channel-forming indictors, which consisted of MMP-2, MMP-9, FAK, VE-Cad, and VEGF. The results demonstrated that the targeting epirubicin plus celecoxib liposomes were able to effectively destroy the glioma VM channels and exhibited significant efficacy in the treatment of intracranial glioma-bearing nude mice. Therefore, targeting epirubicin plus celecoxib liposomes could be a potential nanostructured formulation to treat gliomas and destroy their VM channels. PMID:27042063

  10. Immunohistochemical evaluation of tissue factor, fibrin/fibrinogen and D-dimers in canine gliomas.

    PubMed

    de la Fuente, Cristian; Pumarola, Martí; Blasco, Ester; Fernández, Francisco; Viu, Judit; Añor, Sònia

    2014-06-01

    In human gliomas, tissue factor (TF) is overexpressed, associated with the grade of malignancy and influences tumour biology. Intra-tumoural fibrin/fibrinogen deposition and activation of the fibrinolytic system also play a role in tumour cell proliferation and angiogenesis. The first aim of the present study was to investigate TF expression and the presence of fibrin/fibrinogen and D-dimers in canine glioma biopsies, graded according to the World Health Organization (WHO) classification of tumours of the central nervous system. The second aim was to investigate the occurrence of intravascular thrombosis (IVT) in canine gliomas, as a potential histological marker of glioma type or grade of malignancy. An immunohistochemical study using antibodies against TF, fibrin/fibrinogen and D-dimers was performed with 24 glioma samples, including 15 oligodendrogliomas, 6 astrocytomas and 3 mixed gliomas. Immunohistochemical data were statistically analysed to determine whether there was any relationship between glioma type and grade of malignancy. All gliomas were moderate to strongly positive for TF and the staining score was significantly higher (P = 0.04) in high-grade (III or IV) than in low-grade (II) gliomas. Intra-tumoural fibrin/fibrinogen deposition was detected in all tumour biopsies assessed, and D-dimers were detected in 17/24 gliomas. IVT was a frequent finding, but was not linked to a specific glioma type or malignancy grade. TF expression, fibrin/fibrinogen deposition, extravascular fibrinolytic system activation and IVT occur in canine gliomas. Canine glioma might be a suitable model for studying coagulation and fibrinolysis as potential therapeutic targets for human gliomas. PMID:24745770

  11. Positron Spectroscopy Investigation of Normal Brain Section and Brain Section with Glioma Derived from a Rat Glioma Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, SH.; Ballmann, C.; Quarles, C. A.

    2009-03-01

    The application of positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) and Doppler broadening spectroscopy (DBS) to the study of animal or human tissue has only recently been reported [G. Liu, et al. phys. stat. sol. (C) 4, Nos. 10, 3912-3915 (2007)]. We have initiated a study of normal brain section and brain section with glioma derived from a rat glioma model. For the rat glioma model, 200,000 C6 cells were implanted in the basal ganglion of adult Sprague Dawley rats. The rats were sacrificed at 21 days after implantation. The brains were harvested, sliced into 2 mm thick coronal sections, and fixed in 4% formalin. PALS lifetime runs were made with the samples soaked in formalin, and there was not significant evaporation of formalin during the runs. The lifetime spectra were analyzed into two lifetime components. While early results suggested a small decrease in ortho-Positronium (o-Ps) pickoff lifetime between the normal brain section and brain section with glioma, further runs with additional samples have showed no statistically significant difference between the normal and tumor tissue for this type of tumor. The o-Ps lifetime in formalin alone was lower than either the normal tissue or glioma sample. So annihilation in the formalin absorbed in the samples would lower the o-Ps lifetime and this may have masked any difference due to the glioma itself. DBS was also used to investigate the difference in positronium formation between tumor and normal tissue. Tissue samples are heterogeneous and this needs to be carefully considered if PALS and DBS are to become useful tools in distinguishing tissue samples.

  12. Positron Spectroscopy Investigation of Normal Brain Section and Brain Section with Glioma Derived from a Rat Glioma Model

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, SH.; Ballmann, C.; Quarles, C. A.

    2009-03-10

    The application of positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) and Doppler broadening spectroscopy (DBS) to the study of animal or human tissue has only recently been reported [G. Liu, et al. phys. stat. sol. (C) 4, Nos. 10, 3912-3915 (2007)]. We have initiated a study of normal brain section and brain section with glioma derived from a rat glioma model. For the rat glioma model, 200,000 C6 cells were implanted in the basal ganglion of adult Sprague Dawley rats. The rats were sacrificed at 21 days after implantation. The brains were harvested, sliced into 2 mm thick coronal sections, and fixed in 4% formalin. PALS lifetime runs were made with the samples soaked in formalin, and there was not significant evaporation of formalin during the runs. The lifetime spectra were analyzed into two lifetime components. While early results suggested a small decrease in ortho-Positronium (o-Ps) pickoff lifetime between the normal brain section and brain section with glioma, further runs with additional samples have showed no statistically significant difference between the normal and tumor tissue for this type of tumor. The o-Ps lifetime in formalin alone was lower than either the normal tissue or glioma sample. So annihilation in the formalin absorbed in the samples would lower the o-Ps lifetime and this may have masked any difference due to the glioma itself. DBS was also used to investigate the difference in positronium formation between tumor and normal tissue. Tissue samples are heterogeneous and this needs to be carefully considered if PALS and DBS are to become useful tools in distinguishing tissue samples.

  13. Gene expression profiling distinguishes proneural glioma stem cells from mesenchymal glioma stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Chandran, Uma R.; Luthra, Soumya; Santana-Santos, Lucas; Mao, Ping; Kim, Sung-Hak; Minata, Mutsuko; Li, Jianfeng; Benos, Panayiotis V.; DeWang, Mao; Hu, Bo; Cheng, Shi-Yuan; Nakano, Ichiro; Sobol, Robert W.

    2015-01-01

    Tumor heterogeneity of high-grade glioma (HGG) is recognized by four clinically relevant subtypes based on core gene signatures. However, molecular signaling in glioma stem cells (GSCs) in individual HGG subtypes is poorly characterized. Previously we identified and characterized two mutually exclusive GSC subtypes with distinct activated signaling pathways and biological phenotypes. One GSC subtype presented with a gene signature resembling Proneural (PN) HGG, whereas the other was similar to mesenchymal (Mes) HGG. Classical HGG-derived GSCs were sub-classified as either one of these two subtypes. Differential mRNA expression analysis of PN and Mes GSCs identified 5796 differentially expressed genes, revealing a pronounced correlation with the corresponding PN or Mes HGGs. Mes GSCs displayed more aggressive phenotypes in vitro and as intracranial xenografts in mice. Further, Mes GSCs were markedly resistant to radiation compared with PN GSCs. Expression of ALDH1A3 — one of the most up-regulated Mes representative genes and a universal cancer stem cell marker in non-brain cancers — was associated with self-renewal and a multi-potent stem cell population in Mes but not PN samples. Moreover, inhibition of ALDH1A3 attenuated the growth of Mes but not PN GSCs in vitro. Lastly, radiation treatment of PN GSCs up-regulated Mes-associated markers and down-regulated PN-associated markers, whereas inhibition of ALDH1A3 attenuated an irradiation-induced gain of Mes identity in PN GSCs in vitro. Taken together, our data suggest that two subtypes of GSCs, harboring distinct metabolic signaling pathways, represent intertumoral glioma heterogeneity and highlight previously unidentified roles of ALDH1A3-associated signaling that promotes aberrant proliferation of Mes HGGs and GSCs. Inhibition of ALDH1A3-mediated pathways therefore might provide a promising therapeutic approach for a subset of HGGs with the Mes signature. Here, we describe the gene expression analysis

  14. Hirsutinolide Series Inhibit Stat3 Activity, Alter GCN1, MAP1B, Hsp105, G6PD, Vimentin, TrxR1, and Importin α-2 Expression, and Induce Antitumor Effects against Human Glioma.

    PubMed

    Miklossy, Gabriella; Youn, Ui Joung; Yue, Peibin; Zhang, Mingming; Chen, Chih-Hong; Hilliard, Tyvette S; Paladino, David; Li, Yifei; Choi, Justin; Sarkaria, Jann N; Kawakami, Joel K; Wongwiwatthananukit, Supakit; Chen, Yuan; Sun, Dianqing; Chang, Leng Chee; Turkson, James

    2015-10-01

    We report that hirsutinolide series, 6, 7, 10, 11, 20, and 22, and the semisynthetic analogues, 30, 31, 33, and 36, inhibit constitutively active signal transducer and activator of transcription (Stat)3 and malignant glioma phenotype. A position 13 lipophilic ester group is required for activity. Molecular modeling and nuclear magnetic resonance structural analyses reveal direct hirsutinolide:Stat3 binding. One-hour treatment of cells with 6 and 22 also upregulated importin subunit α-2 levels and repressed translational activator GCN1, microtubule-associated protein (MAP)1B, thioredoxin reductase (TrxR)1 cytoplasmic isoform 3, glucose-6-phosphate 1-dehydrogenase isoform a, Hsp105, vimentin, and tumor necrosis factor α-induced protein (TNAP)2 expression. Active hirsutinolides inhibited anchorage-dependent and three-dimensional spheroid growth, survival, and migration of human glioma lines and glioma patients' tumor-derived xenograft cells harboring constitutively active Stat3. Oral gavage delivery of 6 or 22 inhibited human glioma tumor growth in subcutaneous mouse xenografts. The inhibition of Stat3 signaling represents part of the hirsutinolide-mediated mechanisms to induce antitumor effects. PMID:26331426

  15. Dihydropyrimidine Dehydrogenase Is a Prognostic Marker for Mesenchymal Stem Cell-Mediated Cytosine Deaminase Gene and 5-Fluorocytosine Prodrug Therapy for the Treatment of Recurrent Gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Taemoon; Na, Juri; Kim, Young-il; Chang, Da-Young; Kim, Young Il; Kim, Hyeonjin; Moon, Ho Eun; Kang, Keon Wook; Lee, Dong Soo; Chung, June-Key; Kim, Sung-Soo; Suh-Kim, Haeyoung; Paek, Sun Ha; Youn, Hyewon

    2016-01-01

    We investigated a therapeutic strategy for recurrent malignant gliomas using mesenchymal stem cells (MSC), expressing cytosine deaminase (CD), and prodrug 5-Fluorocytosine (5-FC) as a more specific and less toxic option. MSCs are emerging as a novel cell therapeutic agent with a cancer-targeting property, and CD is considered a promising enzyme in cancer gene therapy which can convert non-toxic 5-FC to toxic 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU). Therefore, use of prodrug 5-FC can minimize normal cell toxicity. Analyses of microarrays revealed that targeting DNA damage and its repair is a selectable option for gliomas after the standard chemo/radio-therapy. 5-FU is the most frequently used anti-cancer drug, which induces DNA breaks. Because dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPD) was reported to be involved in 5-FU metabolism to block DNA damage, we compared the survival rate with 5-FU treatment and the level of DPD expression in 15 different glioma cell lines. DPD-deficient cells showed higher sensitivity to 5-FU, and the regulation of DPD level by either siRNA or overexpression was directly related to the 5-FU sensitivity. For MSC/CD with 5-FC therapy, DPD-deficient cells such as U87MG, GBM28, and GBM37 showed higher sensitivity compared to DPD-high U373 cells. Effective inhibition of tumor growth was also observed in an orthotopic mouse model using DPD- deficient U87MG, indicating that DPD gene expression is indeed closely related to the efficacy of MSC/CD-mediated 5-FC therapy. Our results suggested that DPD can be used as a biomarker for selecting glioma patients who may possibly benefit from this therapy. PMID:27446484

  16. An analysis of 170 glioma patients and systematic review to investigate the association between IDH-1 mutations and preoperative glioma-related epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yuan; Mao, Qing; Wang, Xiang; Liu, Yanhui; Mao, Yunhe; Zhou, Qiao; Luo, Jiewen

    2016-09-01

    Seizure is a common presenting symptom of glioma, and many biomarkers have been suggested to be associated with preoperative seizure; however, the relationships between IDH (isocitrate dehydrogenase) mutations and glioma-related epilepsy only recently been studied. The authors aimed to examine the correlations between IDH mutations in glioma patients with preoperative seizures and tumor location. A series of 170 glioma samples were analyzed for IDH1 R132H mutations (amino acid change from arginine to histidine at codon 132) with immunohistochemistry (IHC) staining and for IDH mutations with direct DNA sequencing when the IHC results were negative. If either the IHC or direct DNA sequencing result was positive, the IDH status was defined as mutated. The results of the IDH mutation examinations were used to analyze the relationship between mutations and glioma-related epilepsy. The study population consisted of 64 (37.6%) World Health Organization (WHO) grade II gliomas, 58 (34.1%) grade III, and 48 (28.3%) grade IV gliomas. A total of 84 samples with IDH1 mutations were observed in our study, and 54 of these presented with seizures as the initial symptoms, whereas 28 of the patients with wild-type IDH status presented with seizures (p=0.043 for the WHO grade II gliomas, p=0.002 for the grade III gliomas and p=0.942 for the grade IV gliomas, chi-squared tests). Among the WHO grade II and III gliomas, IDH1 mutations were significantly associated with preoperative seizures, but no significant relationship between IDH mutations and preoperative seizures was found with glioblastoma multiforme. PMID:27406953

  17. Cell migration in paediatric glioma; characterisation and potential therapeutic targeting

    PubMed Central

    Cockle, J V; Picton, S; Levesley, J; Ilett, E; Carcaboso, A M; Short, S; Steel, L P; Melcher, A; Lawler, S E; Brüning-Richardson, A

    2015-01-01

    Background: Paediatric high grade glioma (pHGG) and diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG) are highly aggressive brain tumours. Their invasive phenotype contributes to their limited therapeutic response, and novel treatments that block brain tumour invasion are needed. Methods: Here, we examine the migratory characteristics and treatment effect of small molecule glycogen synthase kinase-3 inhibitors, lithium chloride (LiCl) and the indirubin derivative 6-bromoindirubin-oxime (BIO), previously shown to inhibit the migration of adult glioma cells, on two pHGG cell lines (SF188 and KNS42) and one patient-derived DIPG line (HSJD-DIPG-007) using 2D (transwell membrane, immunofluorescence, live cell imaging) and 3D (migration on nanofibre plates and spheroid invasion in collagen) assays. Results: All lines were migratory, but there were differences in morphology and migration rates. Both LiCl and BIO reduced migration and instigated cytoskeletal rearrangement of stress fibres and focal adhesions when viewed by immunofluorescence. In the presence of drugs, loss of polarity and differences in cellular movement were observed by live cell imaging. Conclusions: Ours is the first study to demonstrate that it is possible to pharmacologically target migration of paediatric glioma in vitro using LiCl and BIO, and we conclude that these agents and their derivatives warrant further preclinical investigation as potential anti-migratory therapeutics for these devastating tumours. PMID:25628092

  18. Monoamine oxidase A (MAO A) inhibitors decrease glioma progression

    PubMed Central

    Vaikari, Vijaya Pooja; Kota, Rajesh; Chen, Kevin; Yeh, Tzu-Shao; Jhaveri, Niyati; Groshen, Susan L.; Olenyuk, Bogdan Z.; Chen, Thomas C.; Hofman, Florence M.; Shih, Jean C.

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is an aggressive brain tumor which is currently treated with temozolomide (TMZ). Tumors usually become resistant to TMZ and recur; no effective therapy is then available. Monoamine Oxidase A (MAO A) oxidizes monoamine neurotransmitters resulting in reactive oxygen species which cause cancer. This study shows that MAO A expression is increased in human glioma tissues and cell lines. MAO A inhibitors, clorgyline or the near-infrared-dye MHI-148 conjugated to clorgyline (NMI), were cytotoxic for glioma and decreased invasion in vitro. Using the intracranial TMZ-resistant glioma model, clorgyline or NMI alone or in combination with low-dose TMZ reduced tumor growth and increased animal survival. NMI was localized specifically to the tumor. Immunocytochemistry studies showed that the MAO A inhibitor reduced proliferation, microvessel density and invasion, and increased macrophage infiltration. In conclusion, we have identified MAO A inhibitors as potential novel stand-alone drugs or as combination therapy with low dose TMZ for drug-resistant gliomas. NMI can also be used as a non-invasive imaging tool. Thus has a dual function for both therapy and diagnosis. PMID:26871599

  19. Gliomas and the vascular fragility of the blood brain barrier

    PubMed Central

    Dubois, Luiz Gustavo; Campanati, Loraine; Righy, Cassia; D’Andrea-Meira, Isabella; Spohr, Tania Cristina Leite de Sampaio e; Porto-Carreiro, Isabel; Pereira, Claudia Maria; Balça-Silva, Joana; Kahn, Suzana Assad; DosSantos, Marcos F.; Oliveira, Marcela de Almeida Rabello; Ximenes-da-Silva, Adriana; Lopes, Maria Celeste; Faveret, Eduardo; Gasparetto, Emerson Leandro; Moura-Neto, Vivaldo

    2014-01-01

    Astrocytes, members of the glial family, interact through the exchange of soluble factors or by directly contacting neurons and other brain cells, such as microglia and endothelial cells. Astrocytic projections interact with vessels and act as additional elements of the Blood Brain Barrier (BBB). By mechanisms not fully understood, astrocytes can undergo oncogenic transformation and give rise to gliomas. The tumors take advantage of the BBB to ensure survival and continuous growth. A glioma can develop into a very aggressive tumor, the glioblastoma (GBM), characterized by a highly heterogeneous cell population (including tumor stem cells), extensive proliferation and migration. Nevertheless, gliomas can also give rise to slow growing tumors and in both cases, the afflux of blood, via BBB is crucial. Glioma cells migrate to different regions of the brain guided by the extension of blood vessels, colonizing the healthy adjacent tissue. In the clinical context, GBM can lead to tumor-derived seizures, which represent a challenge to patients and clinicians, since drugs used for its treatment must be able to cross the BBB. Uncontrolled and fast growth also leads to the disruption of the chimeric and fragile vessels in the tumor mass resulting in peritumoral edema. Although hormonal therapy is currently used to control the edema, it is not always efficient. In this review we comment the points cited above, considering the importance of the BBB and the concerns that arise when this barrier is affected. PMID:25565956

  20. Myosin VI contributes to malignant proliferation of human glioma cells

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Rong; Fang, Xu-hao

    2016-01-01

    Previously characterized as a backward motor, myosin VI (MYO6), which belongs to myosin family, moves toward the minus end of the actin track, a direction opposite to all other known myosin members. Recent researches have illuminated the role of MYO6 in human cancers, particularly in prostate cancer. However, the role of MYO6 in glioma has not yet been determined. In this study, to explore the role of MYO6 in human glioma, lentivirus-delivered short hairpin RNA (shRNA) targeting MYO6 was designed to stably down-regulate its endogenous expression in glioblastoma cells U251. Knockdown of MYO6 signifi cantly inhibited viability and proliferation of U251 cells in vitro. Moreover, the cell cycle of U251 cells was arrested at G0/G1 phase with the absence of MYO6, which could contribute to the suppression of cell proliferation. In conclusion, we firstly identified the crucial involvement of MYO6 in human glioma. The inhibition of MYO6 by shRNA might be a potential therapeutic method in human glioma. PMID:26937209

  1. Mutant tristetraprolin: a potent inhibitor of malignant glioma cell growth

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Malignant gliomas rely on the production of certain critical growth factors including VEGF, interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-8, to fuel rapid tumor growth, angiogenesis, and treatment resistance. Post-transcriptional regulation through adenine and uridine-rich elements of the 3' untranslated region is one ...

  2. Histone deacetylase 6 inhibition enhances oncolytic viral replication in glioma

    PubMed Central

    Nakashima, Hiroshi; Kaufmann, Johanna K.; Wang, Pin-Yi; Nguyen, Tran; Speranza, Maria-Carmela; Kasai, Kazue; Okemoto, Kazuo; Otsuki, Akihiro; Nakano, Ichiro; Fernandez, Soledad; Goins, William F.; Grandi, Paola; Glorioso, Joseph C.; Lawler, Sean; Cripe, Timothy P.; Chiocca, E. Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Oncolytic viral (OV) therapy, which uses genetically engineered tumor-targeting viruses, is being increasingly used in cancer clinical trials due to the direct cytolytic effects of this treatment that appear to provoke a robust immune response against the tumor. As OVs enter tumor cells, intrinsic host defenses have the potential to hinder viral replication and spread within the tumor mass. In this report, we show that histone deacetylase 6 (HDAC6) in tumor cells appears to alter the trafficking of post-entry OVs from the nucleus toward lysosomes. In glioma cell lines and glioma-stem–like cells, HDAC6 inhibition (HDAC6i) by either pharmacologic or genetic means substantially increased replication of oncolytic herpes simplex virus type 1 (oHSV). Moreover, HDAC6i increased shuttling of post-entry oHSV to the nucleus. In addition, electron microscopic analysis revealed that post-entry oHSVs are preferentially taken up into glioma cells through the endosomal pathway rather than via fusion at the cell surface. Together, these findings illustrate a mechanism of glioma cell defense against an incoming infection by oHSV and identify possible approaches to enhance oHSV replication and subsequent lysis of tumor cells. PMID:26524593

  3. Cytomegalovirus and glioma: putting the cart before the horse.

    PubMed

    Dey, Mahua; Ahmed, Atique U; Lesniak, Maciej S

    2015-02-01

    In 1908, Oluf Bang and Vilhelm Ellerman laid the foundation for theory of oncoviruses by demonstrating that the avian erythroblastosis (a form of chicken leukaemia) could be transmitted by cell-free extracts. Since then, it has been shown very convincingly that viruses can directly cause several human cancers by various mechanisms. Epidemiological data imply that viruses are the second most important risk factor for cancer development in humans, exceeded only by tobacco consumption. Although the ability of certain viruses (hepatitis B and C, human papillomavirus, etc) to cause cancer has been time tested and proven scientifically, there are several other potential viral candidates whose role in oncogenesis is more controversial. One such controversial scenario involves the role of cytomegalovirus (CMV) in malignant gliomas, the most common form of primary brain tumour. CMV first attracted attention about a decade ago when CMV gene products were found in glioma tissue but not in normal brain. Since this initial observation, several different groups have shown an oncomodulatory effect of CMV; however, direct association between CMV infection and incidence of glioma is lacking. In this review, we will evaluate the evidence, both preclinical and clinical, regarding the possible role of CMV in gliomagenesis and maintenance. We will also critically evaluate the rationale for using antiviral drugs in the treatment of patients with glioma. PMID:24906494

  4. Monoamine oxidase A (MAO A) inhibitors decrease glioma progression.

    PubMed

    Kushal, Swati; Wang, Weijun; Vaikari, Vijaya Pooja; Kota, Rajesh; Chen, Kevin; Yeh, Tzu-Shao; Jhaveri, Niyati; Groshen, Susan L; Olenyuk, Bogdan Z; Chen, Thomas C; Hofman, Florence M; Shih, Jean C

    2016-03-22

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is an aggressive brain tumor which is currently treated with temozolomide (TMZ). Tumors usually become resistant to TMZ and recur; no effective therapy is then available. Monoamine Oxidase A (MAO A) oxidizes monoamine neurotransmitters resulting in reactive oxygen species which cause cancer. This study shows that MAO A expression is increased in human glioma tissues and cell lines. MAO A inhibitors, clorgyline or the near-infrared-dye MHI-148 conjugated to clorgyline (NMI), were cytotoxic for glioma and decreased invasion in vitro. Using the intracranial TMZ-resistant glioma model, clorgyline or NMI alone or in combination with low-dose TMZ reduced tumor growth and increased animal survival. NMI was localized specifically to the tumor. Immunocytochemistry studies showed that the MAO A inhibitor reduced proliferation, microvessel density and invasion, and increased macrophage infiltration. In conclusion, we have identified MAO A inhibitors as potential novel stand-alone drugs or as combination therapy with low dose TMZ for drug-resistant gliomas. NMI can also be used as a non-invasive imaging tool. Thus has a dual function for both therapy and diagnosis. PMID:26871599

  5. Interrelationship between differentiation and malignancy-associated properties in glioma.

    PubMed Central

    Frame, M. C.; Freshney, R. I.; Vaughan, P. F.; Graham, D. I.; Shaw, R.

    1984-01-01

    The phenotypic expression of cells derived from human anaplastic astrocytomas, rat glioma, normal human adult and foetal brain tissue have been examined for differentiated and malignancy-associated properties. Glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), high affinity glutamate and gamma-amino butyric acid (GABA) uptake and glutamine synthetase were used as indicators of astroglial differentiation. Plasminogen activator and tumour angiogenesis factor were the malignancy-associated markers. The normal adult brain-derived lines showed some differentiated astroglial features and expressed low levels of the malignancy-associated properties. The foetal cultures contained highly differentiated astroglia while the glioma lines showed considerable phenotypic heterogeneity from highly differentiated to undifferentiated. The least differentiated glioma cells exhibited the highest plasminogen activator activities. The density-dependent control of phenotypic expression was also investigated. High affinity GABA uptake, and GFAP in rat C6 glioma cultures, increased with increasing monolayer cell density, events probably mediated by an increase in the formation of cell-cell contacts at confluence. Plasminogen activator activity decreased with increasing cell density. Images Figure 2 Figure 6 PMID:6200130

  6. Histone deacetylase 6 inhibition enhances oncolytic viral replication in glioma.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, Hiroshi; Kaufmann, Johanna K; Wang, Pin-Yi; Nguyen, Tran; Speranza, Maria-Carmela; Kasai, Kazue; Okemoto, Kazuo; Otsuki, Akihiro; Nakano, Ichiro; Fernandez, Soledad; Goins, William F; Grandi, Paola; Glorioso, Joseph C; Lawler, Sean; Cripe, Timothy P; Chiocca, E Antonio

    2015-11-01

    Oncolytic viral (OV) therapy, which uses genetically engineered tumor-targeting viruses, is being increasingly used in cancer clinical trials due to the direct cytolytic effects of this treatment that appear to provoke a robust immune response against the tumor. As OVs enter tumor cells, intrinsic host defenses have the potential to hinder viral replication and spread within the tumor mass. In this report, we show that histone deacetylase 6 (HDAC6) in tumor cells appears to alter the trafficking of post-entry OVs from the nucleus toward lysosomes. In glioma cell lines and glioma-stem-like cells, HDAC6 inhibition (HDAC6i) by either pharmacologic or genetic means substantially increased replication of oncolytic herpes simplex virus type 1 (oHSV). Moreover, HDAC6i increased shuttling of post-entry oHSV to the nucleus. In addition, electron microscopic analysis revealed that post-entry oHSVs are preferentially taken up into glioma cells through the endosomal pathway rather than via fusion at the cell surface. Together, these findings illustrate a mechanism of glioma cell defense against an incoming infection by oHSV and identify possible approaches to enhance oHSV replication and subsequent lysis of tumor cells. PMID:26524593

  7. A combined preclinical therapy of cannabinoids and temozolomide against glioma.

    PubMed

    Torres, Sofía; Lorente, Mar; Rodríguez-Fornés, Fátima; Hernández-Tiedra, Sonia; Salazar, María; García-Taboada, Elena; Barcia, Juan; Guzmán, Manuel; Velasco, Guillermo

    2011-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is highly resistant to current anticancer treatments, which makes it crucial to find new therapeutic strategies aimed at improving the poor prognosis of patients suffering from this disease. Δ(9)-Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the major active ingredient of marijuana, and other cannabinoid receptor agonists inhibit tumor growth in animal models of cancer, including glioma, an effect that relies, at least in part, on the stimulation of autophagy-mediated apoptosis in tumor cells. Here, we show that the combined administration of THC and temozolomide (TMZ; the benchmark agent for the management of GBM) exerts a strong antitumoral action in glioma xenografts, an effect that is also observed in tumors that are resistant to TMZ treatment. Combined administration of THC and TMZ enhanced autophagy, whereas pharmacologic or genetic inhibition of this process prevented TMZ + THC-induced cell death, supporting that activation of autophagy plays a crucial role on the mechanism of action of this drug combination. Administration of submaximal doses of THC and cannabidiol (CBD; another plant-derived cannabinoid that also induces glioma cell death through a mechanism of action different from that of THC) remarkably reduces the growth of glioma xenografts. Moreover, treatment with TMZ and submaximal doses of THC and CBD produced a strong antitumoral action in both TMZ-sensitive and TMZ-resistant tumors. Altogether, our findings support that the combined administration of TMZ and cannabinoids could be therapeutically exploited for the management of GBM. PMID:21220494

  8. Neurodevelopmental Outcomes of Children with Low-Grade Gliomas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ris, M. Douglas; Beebe, Dean W.

    2008-01-01

    As a group, children with low-grade gliomas (LGGs) enjoy a high rate of long-term survival and do not require the intensity of neurotoxic treatments used with higher risk pediatric brain tumors. Because they are generally considered to have favorable neurobehavioral outcomes, they have not been studied as thoroughly as higher-grade brain tumors by…

  9. Insulator dysfunction and oncogene activation in IDH mutant gliomas.

    PubMed

    Flavahan, William A; Drier, Yotam; Liau, Brian B; Gillespie, Shawn M; Venteicher, Andrew S; Stemmer-Rachamimov, Anat O; Suvà, Mario L; Bernstein, Bradley E

    2016-01-01

    Gain-of-function IDH mutations are initiating events that define major clinical and prognostic classes of gliomas. Mutant IDH protein produces a new onco-metabolite, 2-hydroxyglutarate, which interferes with iron-dependent hydroxylases, including the TET family of 5'-methylcytosine hydroxylases. TET enzymes catalyse a key step in the removal of DNA methylation. IDH mutant gliomas thus manifest a CpG island methylator phenotype (G-CIMP), although the functional importance of this altered epigenetic state remains unclear. Here we show that human IDH mutant gliomas exhibit hypermethylation at cohesin and CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF)-binding sites, compromising binding of this methylation-sensitive insulator protein. Reduced CTCF binding is associated with loss of insulation between topological domains and aberrant gene activation. We specifically demonstrate that loss of CTCF at a domain boundary permits a constitutive enhancer to interact aberrantly with the receptor tyrosine kinase gene PDGFRA, a prominent glioma oncogene. Treatment of IDH mutant gliomaspheres with a demethylating agent partially restores insulator function and downregulates PDGFRA. Conversely, CRISPR-mediated disruption of the CTCF motif in IDH wild-type gliomaspheres upregulates PDGFRA and increases proliferation. Our study suggests that IDH mutations promote gliomagenesis by disrupting chromosomal topology and allowing aberrant regulatory interactions that induce oncogene expression. PMID:26700815

  10. Insulator dysfunction and oncogene activation in IDH mutant gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Flavahan, William A.; Drier, Yotam; Liau, Brian B.; Gillespie, Shawn M.; Venteicher, Andrew S.; Stemmer-Rachamimov, Anat O.; Suvà, Mario L.; Bernstein, Bradley E.

    2015-01-01

    Gain-of-function IDH mutations are initiating events that define major clinical and prognostic classes of gliomas1,2. Mutant IDH protein produces a novel onco-metabolite, 2-hydroxyglutarate (2-HG), that interferes with iron-dependent hydroxylases, including the TET family of 5′-methylcytosine hydroxylases3–7. TET enzymes catalyze a key step in the removal of DNA methylation8,9. IDH mutant gliomas thus manifest a CpG island methylator phenotype (G-CIMP)10,11, though the functional significance of this altered epigenetic state remains unclear. Here we show that IDH mutant gliomas exhibit hyper-methylation at CTCF binding sites, compromising binding of this methylation-sensitive insulator protein. Reduced CTCF binding is associated with loss of insulation between topological domains and aberrant gene activation. We specifically demonstrate that loss of CTCF at a domain boundary permits a constitutive enhancer to aberrantly interact with the receptor tyrosine kinase gene PDGFRA, a prominent glioma oncogene. Treatment of IDH mutant gliomaspheres with demethylating agent partially restores insulator function and down-regulates PDGFRA. Conversely, CRISPR-mediated disruption of the CTCF motif in IDH wildtype gliomaspheres up-regulates PDGFRA and increases proliferation. Our study suggests that IDH mutations promote gliomagenesis by disrupting chromosomal topology and allowing aberrant regulatory interactions that induce oncogene expression. PMID:26700815

  11. UPA-sensitive ACPP-conjugated nanoparticles for multi-targeting therapy of brain glioma.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bo; Zhang, Yujie; Liao, Ziwei; Jiang, Ting; Zhao, Jingjing; Tuo, Yanyan; She, Xiaojian; Shen, Shun; Chen, Jun; Zhang, Qizhi; Jiang, Xinguo; Hu, Yu; Pang, Zhiqing

    2015-01-01

    Now it is well evidenced that tumor growth is a comprehensive result of multiple pathways, and glioma parenchyma cells and stroma cells are closely associated and mutually compensatory. Therefore, drug delivery strategies targeting both of them simultaneously might obtain more promising therapeutic benefits. In the present study, we developed a multi-targeting drug delivery system modified with uPA-activated cell-penetrating peptide (ACPP) for the treatment of brain glioma (ANP). In vitro experiments demonstrated nanoparticles (NP) decorated with cell-penetrating peptide (CPP) or ACPP could significantly improve nanoparticles uptake by C6 glioma cells and nanoparticles penetration into glioma spheroids as compared with traditional NP and thus enhanced the therapeutic effects of its payload when paclitaxel (PTX) was loaded. In vivo imaging experiment revealed that ANP accumulated more specifically in brain glioma site than NP decorated with or without CPP. Brain slides further showed that ACPP contributed to more nanoparticles accumulation in glioma site, and ANP could co-localize not only with glioma parenchyma cells, but also with stroma cells including neo-vascular cells and tumor associated macrophages. The pharmacodynamics results demonstrated ACPP could significantly improve the therapeutic benefits of nanoparticles by significantly prolonging the survival time of glioma bearing mice. In conclusion, the results suggested that nanoparticles modified with uPA-sensitive ACPP could reach multiple types of cells in glioma tissues and provide a novel strategy for glioma targeted therapy. PMID:25443789

  12. Diffusion kurtosis imaging can efficiently assess the glioma grade and cellular proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Lingyun; Zhang, Jiaxuan; Zhang, Shun; Yao, Yihao; Yang, Shiqi; Shi, Jingjing; Shen, Nanxi; Su, Changliang; Zhang, Ju; Zhu, Wenzhen

    2015-01-01

    Conventional diffusion imaging techniques are not sufficiently accurate for evaluating glioma grade and cellular proliferation, which are critical for guiding glioma treatment. Diffusion kurtosis imaging (DKI), an advanced non-Gaussian diffusion imaging technique, has shown potential in grading glioma; however, its applications in this tumor have not been fully elucidated. In this study, DKI and diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) were performed on 74 consecutive patients with histopathologically confirmed glioma. The kurtosis and conventional diffusion metric values of the tumor were semi-automatically obtained. The relationships of these metrics with the glioma grade and Ki-67 expression were evaluated. The diagnostic efficiency of these metrics in grading was further compared. It was demonstrated that compared with the conventional diffusion metrics, the kurtosis metrics were more promising imaging markers in distinguishing high-grade from low-grade gliomas and distinguishing among grade II, III and IV gliomas; the kurtosis metrics also showed great potential in the prediction of Ki-67 expression. To our best knowledge, we are the first to reveal the ability of DKI to assess the cellular proliferation of gliomas, and to employ the semi-automatic method for the accurate measurement of gliomas. These results could have a significant impact on the diagnosis and subsequent therapy of glioma. PMID:26544514

  13. Expression and Prognostic Significance of p53 in Glioma Patients: A Meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Jin, Yueling; Xiao, Weizhong; Song, Tingting; Feng, Guangjia; Dai, Zhensheng

    2016-07-01

    Glioma is a brain tumor deriving from the neoplastic glial cells or neuroglia. Due to its resistance to anticancer drugs and different disease progress of individuals, patients with high-grade glioma are difficult to completely cure, leading to a poor prognosis and low overall survival. Therefore, there is an urgent need to look for prognostic and diagnostic indicators that can predict glioma grades. P53 is one of the widely studied biomarkers in human glioma. The purpose of this study was to comprehensively evaluate the significance of p53 expression in glioma grades and overall survival. We searched commonly used electronic databases to retrieve related articles of p53 expression in glioma. Overall, a total of 21 studies including 1322 glioma patients were finally screened out. We observed that the frequency of p53 immuno-positivity was higher in high-grade patients than that in low-grade category (63.8 vs. 41.6 %), and our statistic analysis indicated that p53 expression was associated with pathological grade of glioma (OR 2.93, 95 % CI 1.87-4.60, P < 0.00001). This significant correction was also found in 1-, 3- and 5-year overall survival. However, no positive relationship was found between age, sex, tumor size and p53 expression in patients with glioma. In conclusion, our results suggested that p53 immunohistochemical expression might have an effective usefulness in predicting the prognosis in patients with glioma. PMID:27038932

  14. Overexpressed homeobox B9 regulates oncogenic activities by transforming growth factor-β1 in gliomas

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, Liping; Xu, Yinghui; Zou, Lijuan

    2014-03-28

    Highlights: • HOXB9 is overexpressed in gliomas. • HOXB9 over expression had shorter survival time than down expression in gliomas. • HOXB9 stimulated the proliferation, migration and sphere formation of glioma cells. • Activation of TGF-β1 contributed to HOXB9-induced oncogenic activities. - Abstract: Glioma is the leading cause of deaths related to tumors in the central nervous system. The mechanisms of gliomagenesis remain elusive to date. Homeobox B9 (HOXB9) has a crucial function in the regulation of gene expression and cell survival, but its functions in glioma formation and development have yet to be elucidated. This study showed that HOXB9 expression in glioma tissues was significantly higher than that in nontumor tissues. Higher HOXB9 expression was also significantly associated with advanced clinical stage in glioma patients. HOXB9 overexpression stimulated the proliferation, migration, and sphere formation of glioma cells, whereas HOXB9 knockdown elicited an opposite effect. HOXB9 overexpression also increased the tumorigenicity of glioma cells in vivo. Moreover, the activation of transforming growth factor-β1 contributed to HOXB9-induced oncogenic activities. HOXB9 could be used as a predictable biomarker to be detected in different pathological and histological subtypes in glioma for diagnosis or prognosis.

  15. HOXB1 Is a Tumor Suppressor Gene Regulated by miR-3175 in Glioma

    PubMed Central

    Han, Liang; Liu, Dehua; Li, Zhaohui; Tian, Nan; Han, Ziwu; Wang, Guang; Fu, Yao; Guo, Zhigang; Zhu, Zifeng

    2015-01-01

    The HOXB1 gene plays a critical role as an oncogene in diverse tumors. However, the functional role of HOXB1 and the mechanism regulating HOXB1 expression in glioma are not fully understood. A preliminary bioinformatics analysis showed that HOXB1 is ectopically expressed in glioma, and that HOXB1 is a possible target of miR-3175. In this study, we investigated the function of HOXB1 and the relationship between HOXB1 and miR-3175 in glioma. We show that HOXB1 expression is significantly downregulated in glioma tissues and cell lines, and that its expression may be closely associated with the degree of malignancy. Reduced HOXB1 expression promoted the proliferation and invasion of glioma cells, and inhibited their apoptosis in vitro, and the downregulation of HOXB1 was also associated with worse survival in glioma patients. More importantly, HOXB1 was shown experimentally to be a direct target of miR-3175 in this study. The downregulated expression of miR-3175 inhibited cell proliferation and invasion, and promoted apoptosis in glioma. The oncogenicity induced by low HOXB1 expression was prevented by an miR-3175 inhibitor in glioma cells. Our results suggest that HOXB1 functions as a tumor suppressor, regulated by miR-3175 in glioma. These results clarify the pathogenesis of glioma and offer a potential target for its treatment. PMID:26565624

  16. The engineered Salmonella typhimurium inhibits tumorigenesis in advanced glioma

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jian-qiang; Zhan, Yue-fu; Wang, Wei; Jiang, Sheng-nan; Li, Xiang-ying

    2015-01-01

    Objective To explore the antitumor role of the attenuated Salmonella typhimurium ΔppGpp with inducible cytolysin A (ClyA) in advanced stage of glioma. Materials and methods The C6 rat glioma cells were orthotopically implanted by surgery into the caudate nucleus of rat brains. The rats were then randomly divided into the treatment group (SL + ClyA) (n=12), negative control group (SL) (n=12), and control group (phosphate-buffered saline [PBS]) (n=12). In the treatment group, the attenuated S. typhimurium were transformed with the plasmid-encoded antitumor gene ClyA. The expression of ClyA was controlled by the TetR-regulated promoter in response to extracellular doxycycline. The plasmid also contained an imaging gene lux to allow illumination of the tumor infected by the bacteria. The rat glioma C6 cells were implanted into the caudate nucleus of all rats. The engineered S. typhimurium and respective controls were injected intravenously into the rats 21 days after initial tumor implantation. The pathological analysis of the glioma tumor was performed at 21 days and 28 days (7 days after doxycycline treatment) postimplantation. All rats underwent MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) and bioluminescence study at 21 days and 28 days postimplantation to detect tumor volume. The differences between the three groups in tumor volume and survival time were analyzed. Results Advanced stage glioma was detected at 21 days postimplantation. Bioluminescence showed that the engineered S. typhimurium accumulated in glioma tumors and disappeared in the normal reticuloendothelial tissues 3 days after intravenous injection. MRI showed that the tumor volume in the S. typhimurium with ClyA group were significantly reduced compared to the bacteria alone and no bacteria groups 7 days post-doxycycline treatment (P<0.05), while the necrotic tumor volume in the S. typhimurium with ClyA group and S. typhimurium alone group increased significantly compared to the control group (P<0.01). In

  17. Colchicine derivative as a potential anti-glioma compound.

    PubMed

    Fang, Kuan-Min; Liu, Jun-Jen; Li, Chun-Chun; Cheng, Chih-Chi; Hsieh, Yun-Ti; Chai, Kit Man; Lien, Yu-An; Tzeng, Shun-Fen

    2015-09-01

    Colchicine, an anti-microtubule and antimitotic drug, is a common therapeutically agent for gout, which is thought to have potential anti-tumor effects. Owing to concerns of colchicines poisoning, the development of derivatives with low dose efficacy and less side effects is of obvious interest. In this study, we characterized the inhibitory effects of a colchicine derivative named AD1 on the cell proliferation of human malignant glioblastoma (MG) cell lines, U87MG and U373MG. We found that 50 % of U87MG and U373MG cells were reduced in the cultures after exposure to AD1 for 24 h at 10 and 50 nM, respectively. Moreover, α-tubulin immunostaining indicated that AD1 induced the disruption of the microtubule polymerization in glioma cells with apoptotic features including membrane budding/blebbing or fragmented nuclei. Increased levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) were also detected in AD1-treated U87MG and U373MG cells compared to that observed in the control culture. Moreover, examination of microtubule-associated protein 1A/1B-light chain 3 (LC3I)/LC3II conversion and acridine orange staining for autophagic vesicles, combined with flow cytometry, showed that treatment with AD1 induced the autophagic pathway in U87MG and U373MG cells. Furthermore, we found that the intermittent intravenous administration of AD1 suppressed glioma growth in rat brain receiving intracerebral injection with rat C6 glioma cells. Taken together, our findings reveal that treatment with AD1 at nanomolar scales can reduce glioma cell viability effectively, with the occurrence of a rise in ROS and cellular autophagy. In conjunction with the observations from in vivo study, the colchicine derivative AD1 has chemotherapeutic potential to suppress glioma progression. PMID:26239968

  18. Treatment With Bevacizumab Plus Carboplatin for Recurrent Malignant Glioma

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Eric M.; Dosa, Edit; Kraemer, Dale F.; Neuwelt, Edward A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To estimate overall survival (OS), progression-free survival (PFS), imaging responses, and toxicities of bevacizumab plus carboplatin for the treatment of recurrent malignant glioma. The secondary objective was to estimate the agreement between post-contrast T1-weighted and T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging. Methods A retrospective analysis of 9 patients who received bevacizumab (10 mg/kg intravenously) and carboplatin (AUC 5 intravenously) for recurrent malignant glioma (World Health Organization grades III and IV) is presented. Eight of 9 patients received this regimen at first recurrence. Results The median age and Karnofsky performance score were 51 years and 70, respectively. For the 5 patients with grade III gliomas, the median PFS was 126 days, whereas median OS was not attained at 517 days of follow-up. Six-month PFS was 40%, whereas 6-month OS was 60%. For the 4 patients with grade IV gliomas, the median PFS was 216 days, whereas the median OS was not attained at 482 days of follow-up. Six-month PFS was 50%, whereas 6-month OS was 75%. The agreement between contrast-enhanced T1-weighted and T2-weighted images to determine recurrence was moderate (kappa = 0.5714). Three patients had grade 3 and 4 toxicities including hyponatremia and thrombocytopenia. Conclusion Patients who received the combination of bevacizumab plus carboplatin for recurrent malignant glioma had reasonable PFS, OS, and toxicities. The median OS in our series is promising at well over 1 year. Agreement between postcontrast T1- and T2-weighted images is only moderate in the context of bevacizumab therapy. PMID:20559095

  19. Powerless Prof: From Candle Bearer to Burnout.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melendez, Winifred Albizu

    1986-01-01

    College faculty suffer from loss of esteem and place in the institutional structure, discrepancies between their commitment and that of the institution, and government intrusion into the academy. Burnout is one result of this loss of power and opportunity. Faculty must not become passive or cease caring or creating. (MSE)

  20. Description of selected characteristics of familial glioma patients – Results from the Gliogene Consortium

    PubMed Central

    Sadetzki, Siegal; Bruchim, Revital; Oberman, Bernice; Armstrong, Georgina N.; Lau, Ching C.; Claus, Elizabeth B.; Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill S.; Il’yasova, Dora; Schildkraut, Joellen; Johansen, Christoffer; Houlston, Richard S.; Shete, Sanjay; Amos, Christopher I.; Bernstein, Jonine L.; Olson, Sara H.; Jenkins, Robert B.; Lachance, Daniel; Vick, Nicholas A.; Merrell, Ryan; Wrensch, Margaret; Davis, Faith G.; McCarthy, Bridget J.; Lai, Rose; Melin, Beatrice S.; Bondy, Melissa L.

    2012-01-01

    Background While certain inherited syndromes (e.g. Neurofibromatosis or Li-Fraumeni) are associated with an increased risk of glioma, most familial gliomas are non-syndromic. This study describes the demographic and clinical characteristics of the largest series of non-syndromic glioma families ascertained from 14 centres in the United States (US), Europe and Israel as part of the Gliogene Consortium. Methods Families with 2 or more verified gliomas were recruited between January 2007 and February 2011. Distributions of demographic characteristics and clinical variables of gliomas in the families were described based on information derived from personal questionnaires. Findings The study population comprised 841 glioma patients identified in 376 families (9797 individuals). There were more cases of glioma among males, with a male to female ratio of 1.25. In most families (83%), 2 gliomas were reported, with 3 and 4 gliomas in 13% and 3% of the families, respectively. For families with 2 gliomas, 57% were among 1st-degree relatives, and 31.5% among 2nd-degree relatives. Overall, the mean (±standard deviation [SD]) diagnosis age was 49.4 (±18.7) years. In 48% of families with 2 gliomas, at least one was diagnosed at <40 y, and in 12% both were diagnosed under 40 y of age. Most of these families (76%) had at least one grade IV glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), and in 32% both cases were grade IV gliomas. The most common glioma subtype was GBM (55%), followed by anaplastic astrocytoma (10%) and oligodendroglioma (8%). Individuals with grades I–II were on average 17 y younger than those with grades III–IV. Interpretation Familial glioma cases are similar to sporadic cases in terms of gender distribution, age, morphology and grade. Most familial gliomas appear to comprise clusters of two cases suggesting low penetrance, and that the risk of developing additional gliomas is probably low. These results should be useful in the counselling and clinical management of

  1. EGFRvIII mCAR-modified T-cell therapy cures mice with established intracerebral glioma and generates host immunity against tumor-antigen loss

    PubMed Central

    Sampson, John H.; Choi, Bryan D.; Sanchez-Perez, Luis; Suryadevara, Carter M.; Snyder, David J.; Flores, Catherine T.; Schmittling, Robert J.; Nair, Smita; Reap, Elizabeth A.; Norberg, Pamela K.; Herndon, James E.; Kuan, Chien-Tsun; Morgan, Richard A.; Rosenberg, Steven A.; Johnson, Laura A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) transduced T cells represent a promising immune therapy that has been shown to successfully treat cancers in mice and humans. However, CARs targeting antigens expressed in both tumors and normal tissues have led to significant toxicity. Preclinical studies have been limited by the use of xenograft models that do not adequately recapitulate the immune system of a clinically relevant host. EGFRvIII is a constitutively activated mutant of the naturally occurring epidermal growth factor receptor and is antigenically identical in both human and mouse glioma, but is also completely absent from any normal tissues. Experimental Design We developed a third-generation, EGFRvIII-specific murine CAR (mCAR), and performed tests to determine its efficacy in a fully immune-competent mouse model of malignant glioma. Results At elevated doses, infusion with EGFRvIII mCAR T cells led to cures in all mice with brain tumors. Additionally, antitumor efficacy was found to be dependent on lymphodepletive host conditioning. Selective blockade with EGFRvIII soluble peptide significantly abrogated the activity of EGFRvIII mCAR T cells in vitro and in vivo, and may offer a novel strategy to enhance the safety profile for CAR-based therapy. Lastly, mCAR-treated, cured mice were resistant to rechallenge with EGFRvIIINEG tumors, suggesting generation of host immunity against additional tumor antigens. Conclusion All together, these data support that third-generation, EGFRvIII specific mCARs are effective against gliomas in the brain and highlight the importance of syngeneic, immune-competent models in the preclinical evaluation of tumor immunotherapies. PMID:24352643

  2. Formononetin sensitizes glioma cells to doxorubicin through preventing EMT via inhibition of histone deacetylase 5.

    PubMed

    Liu, Quan; Sun, Yan; Zheng, Jie-Min; Yan, Xian-Lei; Chen, Hong-Mou; Chen, Jia-Kang; Huang, He-Qing

    2015-01-01

    Chemoresistance is a major obstacle to successful chemotherapy for glioma. Formononetin is a novel herbal isoflavonoid isolated from Astragalus membranaceus and possesses antitumorigenic properties. In the present study, we investigated the anti-proliferative effects of formononetin on human glioma cells, and further elucidated the molecular mechanism underlying the anti-tumor property. We found that formononetin enhanced doxorubicin cytotoxicity in glioma cells. Combined treatment with formononetin reversed the doxorubicin-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in tumor cells. Moreover, we found that formononetin treatment significantly decreased the expression of HDAC5. Overexpression of HDAC5 diminished the suppressive effects of formononetin on glioma cell viability. Furthermore, knockdown of HDAC5 by siRNA inhibited the doxorubicin-induced EMT in glioma cells. Taken together, these results demonstrated that formononetin-combined therapy may enhance the therapeutic efficacy of doxorubicin in glioma cells by preventing EMT through inhibition of HDAC5. PMID:26261519

  3. Platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR) expression in primary spinal cord gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Canoll, Peter; McCormick, Paul C.; Feldstein, Neil A.; Anderson, Richard C.; Angevine, Peter D.; Kaiser, Michael G.; McCormick, Paul C.; Bruce, Jeffrey N.; Ogden, Alfred T.

    2013-01-01

    Abnormal signaling through the platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR) has been proposed as a possible mechanism of spinal cord glioma initiation and progression. However, the extent of PDGFR expression in human spinal cord gliomas remains unknown. In this study we perform immunohistochemical analysis of PDGFRα expression in a series of 33 primary intramedullary spinal cord gliomas of different types and grades. PDGFRα was seen to be expressed in a significant subset of these tumors across all major glioma types including ependymoma, oligodendroglioma, pilocytic astrocytoma, astrocytoma, and glioblastoma. These results support the hypothesis that growth factor signaling through the PDGFR may be important for the development of at least a subset of human spinal cord gliomas. Further studies investigating the prognostic significance of PDGFR expression as well as the role of PDGF signaling on the development of intramedullary spinal cord gliomas are warranted. PMID:21789698

  4. Light-controlled inhibition of malignant glioma by opsin gene transfer

    PubMed Central

    Yang, F; Tu, J; Pan, J-Q; Luo, H-L; Liu, Y-H; Wan, J; Zhang, J; Wei, P-F; Jiang, T; Chen, Y-H; Wang, L-P

    2013-01-01

    Glioblastomas are aggressive cancers with low survival rates and poor prognosis because of their highly proliferative and invasive capacity. In the current study, we describe a new optogenetic strategy that selectively inhibits glioma cells through light-controlled membrane depolarization and cell death. Transfer of the engineered opsin ChETA (engineered Channelrhodopsin-2 variant) gene into primary human glioma cells or cell lines, but not normal astrocytes, unexpectedly decreased cell proliferation and increased mitochondria-dependent apoptosis, upon light stimulation. These optogenetic effects were mediated by membrane depolarization-induced reductions in cyclin expression and mitochondrial transmembrane potential. Importantly, the ChETA gene transfer and light illumination in mice significantly inhibited subcutaneous and intracranial glioma growth and increased the survival of the animals bearing the glioma. These results uncover an unexpected effect of opsin ion channels on glioma cells and offer the opportunity for the first time to treat glioma using a light-controllable optogenetic approach. PMID:24176851

  5. Molecular Biology in Pediatric High-Grade Glioma: Impact on Prognosis and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Rizzo, Daniela; Ruggiero, Antonio; Martini, Maurizio; Rizzo, Valentina; Maurizi, Palma; Riccardi, Riccardo

    2015-01-01

    High-grade gliomas are the main cause of death in children with brain tumours. Despite recent advances in cancer therapy, their prognosis remains poor and the treatment is still challenging. To date, surgery followed by radiotherapy and temozolomide is the standard therapy. However, increasing knowledge of glioma biology is starting to impact drug development towards targeted therapies. The identification of agents directed against molecular targets aims at going beyond the traditional therapeutic approach in order to develop a personalized therapy and improve the outcome of pediatric high-grade gliomas. In this paper, we critically review the literature regarding the genetic abnormalities implicated in the pathogenesis of pediatric malignant gliomas and the current development of molecularly targeted therapies. In particular, we analyse the impact of molecular biology on the prognosis and treatment of pediatric high-grade glioma, comparing it to that of adult gliomas. PMID:26448930

  6. Formononetin sensitizes glioma cells to doxorubicin through preventing EMT via inhibition of histone deacetylase 5

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Quan; Sun, Yan; Zheng, Jie-Min; Yan, Xian-Lei; Chen, Hong-Mou; Chen, Jia-Kang; Huang, He-Qing

    2015-01-01

    Chemoresistance is a major obstacle to successful chemotherapy for glioma. Formononetin is a novel herbal isoflavonoid isolated from Astragalus membranaceus and possesses antitumorigenic properties. In the present study, we investigated the anti-proliferative effects of formononetin on human glioma cells, and further elucidated the molecular mechanism underlying the anti-tumor property. We found that formononetin enhanced doxorubicin cytotoxicity in glioma cells. Combined treatment with formononetin reversed the doxorubicin-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in tumor cells. Moreover, we found that formononetin treatment significantly decreased the expression of HDAC5. Overexpression of HDAC5 diminished the suppressive effects of formononetin on glioma cell viability. Furthermore, knockdown of HDAC5 by siRNA inhibited the doxorubicin-induced EMT in glioma cells. Taken together, these results demonstrated that formononetin-combined therapy may enhance the therapeutic efficacy of doxorubicin in glioma cells by preventing EMT through inhibition of HDAC5. PMID:26261519

  7. Autotaxin and LPA Receptors Represent Potential Molecular Targets for the Radiosensitization of Murine Glioma through Effects on Tumor Vasculature

    PubMed Central

    Linkous, Amanda G.; Hu, Rong; Leahy, Kathleen M.; Yazlovitskaya, Eugenia M.; Hallahan, Dennis E.

    2011-01-01

    Despite wide margins and high dose irradiation, unresectable malignant glioma (MG) is less responsive to radiation and is uniformly fatal. We previously found that cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2) is a molecular target for radiosensitizing cancer through the vascular endothelium. Autotaxin (ATX) and lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) receptors are downstream from cPLA2 and highly expressed in MG. Using the ATX and LPA receptor inhibitor, α-bromomethylene phosphonate LPA (BrP-LPA), we studied ATX and LPA receptors as potential molecular targets for the radiosensitization of tumor vasculature in MG. Treatment of Human Umbilical Endothelial cells (HUVEC) and mouse brain microvascular cells bEND.3 with 5 µmol/L BrP-LPA and 3 Gy irradiation showed decreased clonogenic survival, tubule formation, and migration. Exogenous addition of LPA showed radioprotection that was abrogated in the presence of BrP-LPA. In co-culture experiments using bEND.3 and mouse GL-261 glioma cells, treatment with BrP-LPA reduced Akt phosphorylation in both irradiated cell lines and decreased survival and migration of irradiated GL-261 cells. Using siRNA to knock down LPA receptors LPA1, LPA2 or LPA3 in HUVEC, we demonstrated that knockdown of LPA2 but neither LPA1 nor LPA3 led to increased viability and proliferation. However, knockdown of LPA1 and LPA3 but not LPA2 resulted in complete abrogation of tubule formation implying that LPA1 and LPA3 on endothelial cells are likely targets of BrP-LPA radiosensitizing effect. Using heterotopic tumor models of GL-261, mice treated with BrP-LPA and irradiation showed a tumor growth delay of 6.8 days compared to mice treated with irradiation alone indicating that inhibition of ATX and LPA receptors may significantly improve malignant glioma response to radiation therapy. These findings identify ATX and LPA receptors as molecular targets for the development of radiosensitizers for MG. PMID:21799791

  8. The ketogenic diet reverses gene expression patterns and reduces reactive oxygen species levels when used as an adjuvant therapy for glioma

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Malignant brain tumors affect people of all ages and are the second leading cause of cancer deaths in children. While current treatments are effective and improve survival, there remains a substantial need for more efficacious therapeutic modalities. The ketogenic diet (KD) - a high-fat, low-carbohydrate treatment for medically refractory epilepsy - has been suggested as an alternative strategy to inhibit tumor growth by altering intrinsic metabolism, especially by inducing glycopenia. Methods Here, we examined the effects of an experimental KD on a mouse model of glioma, and compared patterns of gene expression in tumors vs. normal brain from animals fed either a KD or a standard diet. Results Animals received intracranial injections of bioluminescent GL261-luc cells and tumor growth was followed in vivo. KD treatment significantly reduced the rate of tumor growth and prolonged survival. Further, the KD reduced reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in tumor cells. Gene expression profiling demonstrated that the KD induces an overall reversion to expression patterns seen in non-tumor specimens. Notably, genes involved in modulating ROS levels and oxidative stress were altered, including those encoding cyclooxygenase 2, glutathione peroxidases 3 and 7, and periredoxin 4. Conclusions Our data demonstrate that the KD improves survivability in our mouse model of glioma, and suggests that the mechanisms accounting for this protective effect likely involve complex alterations in cellular metabolism beyond simply a reduction in glucose. PMID:20831808

  9. Chordoid Glioma with Intraventricular Dissemination: A Case Report with Perfusion MR Imaging Features

    PubMed Central

    Ki, So Yeon; Kim, Seul Kee; Heo, Tae Wook; Baek, Byung Hyun; Kim, Hyung Seok

    2016-01-01

    Chordoid glioma is a rare low grade tumor typically located in the third ventricle. Although a chordoid glioma can arise from ventricle with tumor cells having features of ependymal differentiation, intraventricular dissemination has not been reported. Here we report a case of a patient with third ventricular chordoid glioma and intraventricular dissemination in the lateral and fourth ventricles. We described the perfusion MR imaging features of our case different from a previous report. PMID:26798226

  10. Subjective Quality of Life in Persons with Low-Grade Glioma and Their Next of Kin

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edvardsson, Tanja I.; Ahlstrom, Gerd I.

    2009-01-01

    Patients with low-grade glioma have a longer survival than patients with highly malignant glioma, and for this reason questions of quality of life (QoL) are of particular importance to such patients as well as to their next of kin. No studies have been found in which both adult patients with low-grade glioma and their next of kin have estimated…

  11. Identification of microRNAs in the cerebrospinal fluid as biomarker for the diagnosis of glioma.

    PubMed

    Baraniskin, Alexander; Kuhnhenn, Jan; Schlegel, Uwe; Maghnouj, Abdelouahid; Zöllner, Hannah; Schmiegel, Wolf; Hahn, Stephan; Schroers, Roland

    2012-01-01

    Malignant gliomas are the most common and lethal primary intracranial tumors. To date, no reliable biomarkers for the detection and risk stratification of gliomas have been identified. Recently, we demonstrated significant levels of microRNAs (miRNAs) to be present in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples from patients with primary CNS lymphoma. Because of the involvement of miRNA in carcinogenesis, miRNAs in CSF may serve as unique biomarkers for minimally invasive diagnosis of glioma. The objective of this pilot study was to identify differentially expressed microRNAs in CSF samples from patients with glioma as potential novel glioma biomarkers. With use of a candidate approach of miRNA quantification by reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR), miRNAs with significant levels in CSF samples from patients with gliomas were identified. MiR-15b and miR-21 were differentially expressed in CSF samples from patients with gliomas, compared to control subjects with various neurologic disorders, including patients with primary CNS lymphoma and carcinomatous brain metastases. Receiver-operating characteristic analysis of miR-15b level revealed an area under the curve of 0.96 in discriminating patients with glioma from patients without glioma. Moreover, inclusion of miR-15b and miR-21 in combined expression analyses resulted in an increased diagnostic accuracy with 90% sensitivity and 100% specificity to distinguish patients with glioma from control subjects and patients with primary CNS lymphoma. In conclusion, the results of this pilot study demonstrate that miR-15b and miR-21 are markers for gliomas, which can be assessed in the CSF by means of qRT-PCR. Accordingly, miRNAs in the CSF have the potential to serve as novel biomarkers for the detection of gliomas. PMID:21937590

  12. Identification of microRNAs in the cerebrospinal fluid as biomarker for the diagnosis of glioma

    PubMed Central

    Baraniskin, Alexander; Kuhnhenn, Jan; Schlegel, Uwe; Maghnouj, Abdelouahid; Zöllner, Hannah; Schmiegel, Wolf; Hahn, Stephan; Schroers, Roland

    2012-01-01

    Malignant gliomas are the most common and lethal primary intracranial tumors. To date, no reliable biomarkers for the detection and risk stratification of gliomas have been identified. Recently, we demonstrated significant levels of microRNAs (miRNAs) to be present in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples from patients with primary CNS lymphoma. Because of the involvement of miRNA in carcinogenesis, miRNAs in CSF may serve as unique biomarkers for minimally invasive diagnosis of glioma. The objective of this pilot study was to identify differentially expressed microRNAs in CSF samples from patients with glioma as potential novel glioma biomarkers. With use of a candidate approach of miRNA quantification by reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR), miRNAs with significant levels in CSF samples from patients with gliomas were identified. MiR-15b and miR-21 were differentially expressed in CSF samples from patients with gliomas, compared to control subjects with various neurologic disorders, including patients with primary CNS lymphoma and carcinomatous brain metastases. Receiver-operating characteristic analysis of miR-15b level revealed an area under the curve of 0.96 in discriminating patients with glioma from patients without glioma. Moreover, inclusion of miR-15b and miR-21 in combined expression analyses resulted in an increased diagnostic accuracy with 90% sensitivity and 100% specificity to distinguish patients with glioma from control subjects and patients with primary CNS lymphoma. In conclusion, the results of this pilot study demonstrate that miR-15b and miR-21 are markers for gliomas, which can be assessed in the CSF by means of qRT-PCR. Accordingly, miRNAs in the CSF have the potential to serve as novel biomarkers for the detection of gliomas. PMID:21937590

  13. Glioma cell proliferation controlled by ERK activity-dependent surface expression of PDGFRA.

    PubMed

    Chen, Dongfeng; Zuo, Duo; Luan, Cheng; Liu, Min; Na, Manli; Ran, Liang; Sun, Yingyu; Persson, Annette; Englund, Elisabet; Salford, Leif G; Renström, Erik; Fan, Xiaolong; Zhang, Enming

    2014-01-01

    Increased PDGFRA signaling is an essential pathogenic factor in many subtypes of gliomas. In this context the cell surface expression of PDGFRA is an important determinant of ligand sensing in the glioma microenvironment. However, the regulation of spatial distribution of PDGFRA in glioma cells remains poorly characterized. Here, we report that cell surface PDGFRA expression in gliomas is negatively regulated by an ERK-dependent mechanism, resulting in reduced proliferation of glioma cells. Glioma tumor tissues and their corresponding cell lines were isolated from 14 patients and analyzed by single-cell imaging and flow cytometry. In both cell lines and their corresponding tumor samples, glioma cell proliferation correlated with the extent of surface expression of PDGFRA. High levels of surface PDGFRA also correlated to high tubulin expression in glioma tumor tissue in vivo. In glioma cell lines, surface PDGFRA declined following treatment with inhibitors of tubulin, actin and dynamin. Screening of a panel of small molecule compounds identified the MEK inhibitor U0126 as a potent inhibitor of surface PDGFRA expression. Importantly, U0126 inhibited surface expression in a reversible, dose- and time-dependent manner, without affecting general PDGFRA expression. Treatment with U0126 resulted in reduced co-localization between PDGFRA and intracellular trafficking molecules e.g. clathrin, RAB11 and early endosomal antigen-1, in parallel with enhanced co-localization between PDGFRA and the Golgi cisternae maker, Giantin, suggesting a deviation of PDGFRA from the endosomal trafficking and recycling compartment, to the Golgi network. Furthermore, U0126 treatment in glioma cells induced an initial inhibition of ERK1/2 phosphorylation, followed by up-regulated ERK1/2 phosphorylation concomitant with diminished surface expression of PDGFRA. Finally, down-regulation of surface PDGFRA expression by U0126 is concordant with reduced glioma cell proliferation. These findings

  14. Temsirolimus and Perifosine in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Progressive Malignant Glioma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-06

    Adult Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Adult Anaplastic Oligodendroglioma; Adult Diffuse Astrocytoma; Adult Giant Cell Glioblastoma; Adult Glioblastoma; Adult Gliosarcoma; Adult Mixed Glioma; Adult Oligodendroglioma; Recurrent Adult Brain Neoplasm

  15. Erlotinib Hydrochloride and Isotretinoin in Treating Patients With Recurrent Malignant Glioma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-07-27

    Adult Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Adult Anaplastic Oligodendroglioma; Adult Diffuse Astrocytoma; Adult Giant Cell Glioblastoma; Adult Glioblastoma; Adult Gliosarcoma; Adult Mixed Glioma; Adult Oligodendroglioma; Recurrent Adult Brain Tumor

  16. Incidental diffuse low-grade gliomas: from early detection to preventive neuro-oncological surgery.

    PubMed

    Lima, Guilherme Lucas de Oliveira; Zanello, Marc; Mandonnet, Emmanuel; Taillandier, Luc; Pallud, Johan; Duffau, Hugues

    2016-07-01

    Although a large amount of data supports early surgical resection for symptomatic diffuse low-grade glioma, the therapeutic strategy is still a matter of debate regarding incidentally discovered diffuse low-grade glioma. Indeed, early and "preventive" surgery has recently been proposed in asymptomatic patients with silent diffuse low-grade glioma with better outcomes. The present review discusses the importance of an early diagnosis and of a preventive surgical treatment to improve the outcomes of incidental diffuse low-grade glioma and suggests the possible relevance of a tailored screening policy. PMID:26610909

  17. Plerixafor After Radiation Therapy and Temozolomide in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed High Grade Glioma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-21

    Adult Ependymoblastoma; Adult Giant Cell Glioblastoma; Adult Glioblastoma; Adult Gliosarcoma; Adult Medulloblastoma; Adult Mixed Glioma; Adult Oligodendroglial Tumors; Adult Pineoblastoma; Adult Supratentorial Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor (PNET)

  18. MYB-QKI rearrangements in Angiocentric Glioma drive tumorigenicity through a tripartite mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Bandopadhayay, Pratiti; Ramkissoon, Lori A.; Jain, Payal; Bergthold, Guillaume; Wala, Jeremiah; Zeid, Rhamy; Schumacher, Steven E.; Urbanski, Laura; O’Rourke, Ryan; Gibson, William J.; Pelton, Kristine; Ramkissoon, Shakti H.; Han, Harry J.; Zhu, Yuankun; Choudhari, Namrata; Silva, Amanda; Boucher, Katie; Henn, Rosemary E.; Kang, Yun Jee; Knoff, David; Paolella, Brenton R.; Gladden-Young, Adrianne; Varlet, Pascale; Pages, Melanie; Horowitz, Peleg M.; Federation, Alexander; Malkin, Hayley; Tracy, Adam; Seepo, Sara; Ducar, Matthew; Hummelen, Paul Van; Santi, Mariarita; Buccoliero, Anna Maria; Scagnet, Mirko; Bowers, Daniel C.; Giannini, Caterina; Puget, Stephanie; Hawkins, Cynthia; Tabori, Uri; Klekner, Almos; Bognar, Laszlo; Burger, Peter C.; Eberhart, Charles; Rodriguez, Fausto J.; Hill, D. Ashley; Mueller, Sabine; Haas-Kogan, Daphne A.; Phillips, Joanna J.; Santagata, Sandro; Stiles, Charles D.; Bradner, James E.; Jabado, Nada; Goren, Alon; Grill, Jacques; Ligon, Azra H.; Goumnerova, Liliana; Waanders, Angela J.; Storm, Phillip B.; Kieran, Mark W.; Ligon, Keith L.; Beroukhim, Rameen; Resnick, Adam C.

    2016-01-01

    Angiocentric gliomas are pediatric low-grade gliomas (PLGGs) without known recurrent genetic drivers. We performed genomic analysis of new and published data from 249 PLGGs including 19 Angiocentric Gliomas. We identified MYB-QKI fusions as a specific and single candidate driver event in Angiocentric Gliomas. In vitro and in vivo functional studies show MYB-QKI rearrangements promote tumorigenesis through three mechanisms: MYB activation by truncation, enhancer translocation driving aberrant MYB-QKI expression, and hemizygous loss of the tumor suppressor QKI. This represents the first example of a single driver rearrangement simultaneously transforming cells via three genetic and epigenetic mechanisms in a tumor. PMID:26829751

  19. Pleiotrophin promotes vascular abnormalization in gliomas and correlates with poor survival in patients with astrocytomas.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Kundu, Soumi; Feenstra, Tjerk; Li, Xiujuan; Jin, Chuan; Laaniste, Liisi; El Hassan, Tamador Elsir Abu; Ohlin, K Elisabet; Yu, Di; Olofsson, Tommie; Olsson, Anna-Karin; Pontén, Fredrik; Magnusson, Peetra U; Nilsson, Karin Forsberg; Essand, Magnus; Smits, Anja; Dieterich, Lothar C; Dimberg, Anna

    2015-12-01

    Glioblastomas are aggressive astrocytomas characterized by endothelial cell proliferation and abnormal vasculature, which can cause brain edema and increase patient morbidity. We identified the heparin-binding cytokine pleiotrophin as a driver of vascular abnormalization in glioma. Pleiotrophin abundance was greater in high-grade human astrocytomas and correlated with poor survival. Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK), which is a receptor that is activated by pleiotrophin, was present in mural cells associated with abnormal vessels. Orthotopically implanted gliomas formed from GL261 cells that were engineered to produce pleiotrophin showed increased microvessel density and enhanced tumor growth compared with gliomas formed from control GL261 cells. The survival of mice with pleiotrophin-producing gliomas was shorter than that of mice with gliomas that did not produce pleiotrophin. Vessels in pleiotrophin-producing gliomas were poorly perfused and abnormal, a phenotype that was associated with increased deposition of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in direct proximity to the vasculature. The growth of pleiotrophin-producing GL261 gliomas was inhibited by treatment with the ALK inhibitor crizotinib, the ALK inhibitor ceritinib, or the VEGF receptor inhibitor cediranib, whereas control GL261 tumors did not respond to either inhibitor. Our findings link pleiotrophin abundance in gliomas with survival in humans and mice, and show that pleiotrophin promotes glioma progression through increased VEGF deposition and vascular abnormalization. PMID:26645582

  20. [Diagnosis and prognosis of gliomas--current prospects of molecular diagnostics].

    PubMed

    Haapasalo, Joonas; Hyartt, Antti; Salmi, Minja; Nordfors, Kristiina; Lahtela, Sirpa-Liisa; Kähkönen, Marketta; Helén, Pauli; Haapasalo, Hannu

    2014-01-01

    Gliomas are tumors of the support cells of the brain and the most common of the primary brain tumors. Treatment of diffuse gliomas is based on surgical excision of the tumor and on radiotherapy and chemotherapy. The diagnosis is made in histopathological examination of the tumor, which today can be complemented with examinations involving molecular diagnostics. The most important new methods predicting the prognosis of glioma patients include demonstrations of the IDH mutation and the 1p/19q co-deletion. Profiling of gliomas may in the future allow tailoring of therapy in a patient-specific manner. PMID:24881141

  1. KIF23 is an independent prognostic biomarker in glioma, transcriptionally regulated by TCF-4.

    PubMed

    Sun, Lihua; Zhang, Chuanbao; Yang, Zhengxiang; Wu, Yiping; Wang, Hongjun; Bao, Zhaoshi; Jiang, Tao

    2016-04-26

    Kinesin family member 23 (KIF23), a nuclear protein and a key regulator of cellular cytokinesis, has been found to be overexpressed as an oncogene in glioma. However, the prognostic and clinicopathological features of glioma with KIF23 expression was not clear yet. Here, we analyzed KIF23 expression pattern by using whole genome mRNA expression microarray data from Chinese Glioma Genome Atlas (CGGA) database (http://www.cgga.org.cn), and found that KIF23 overexpression was significantly associated with high grade glioma as well as the higher mortality in survival analysis (log-rank test, p<0.01). The results of the three other validation datasets showed similar findings. Furthermore, KIF23 also served as an independent prognostic biomarker in glioma patients. Finally, functional assay showed that reduction of KIF23 suppressed glioma cell proliferation both in vivo and vitro. Additionally, we found that KIF23 was regulated by TCF-4 at transcriptionally level. Therefore, this evidence indicates KIF23 over-expression is associated with glioma malignancy and conferred a worse survival time in glioma, which suggests KIF23 is a new novel prognostic biomarker with potential therapeutic implications in glioma. PMID:27013586

  2. Human monocytes kill M-CSF-expressing glioma cells by BK channel activation.

    PubMed

    Hoa, Neil T; Zhang, Jian Gang; Delgado, Christina L; Myers, Michael P; Callahan, Linda L; Vandeusen, Gerald; Schiltz, Patric M; Wepsic, H Terry; Jadus, Martin R

    2007-02-01

    In this study, human monocytes/macrophages were observed to kill human U251 glioma cells expressing membrane macrophage colony-stimulating factor (mM-CSF) via a swelling and vacuolization process called paraptosis. Human monocytes responded to the mM-CSF-transduced U251 glioma cells, but not to viral vector control U251 glioma cells (U251-VV), by producing a respiratory burst within 20 min. Using patch clamp techniques, functional big potassium (BK) channels were observed on the membrane of the U251 glioma cell. It has been previously reported that oxygen indirectly regulates BK channel function. In this study, it was demonstrated that prolonged BK channel activation in response to the respiratory burst induced by monocytes initiates paraptosis in selected glioma cells. Forced BK channel opening within the glioma cells by BK channel activators (phloretin or pimaric acid) induced U251 glioma cell swelling and vacuolization occurred within 30 min. U251 glioma cell cytotoxicity, induced by using BK channel activators, required between 8 and 12 h. Swelling and vacuolization induced by phloretin and pimaric acid was prevented by iberiotoxin, a specific BK channel inhibitor. Confocal fluorescence microscopy demonstrated BK channels co-localized with the endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria, the two targeted organelles affected in paraptosis. Iberiotoxin prevented monocytes from producing death in mM-CSF-expressing U251glioma cells in a 24 h assay. This study demonstrates a novel mechanism whereby monocytes can induce paraptosis via the disruption of internal potassium ion homeostasis. PMID:17318194

  3. In vitro enhancement of dendritic cell-mediated anti-glioma immune response by graphene oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei; Li, Zhongjun; Duan, Jinhong; Wang, Chen; Fang, Ying; Yang, Xian-Da

    2014-06-01

    Malignant glioma has extremely poor prognosis despite combination treatments with surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy. Dendritic cell (DC)-based immunotherapy may potentially serve as an adjuvant treatment of glioma, but its efficacy generally needs further improvement. Here we explored whether graphene oxide (GO) nanosheets could modulate the DC-mediated anti-glioma immune response in vitro, using the T98G human glioma cell line as the study model. Pulsing DCs with a glioma peptide antigen (Ag) generated a limited anti-glioma response compared to un-pulsed DCs. Pulsing DCs with GO alone failed to produce obvious immune modulation effects. However, stimulating DCs with a mixture of GO and Ag (GO-Ag) significantly enhanced the anti-glioma immune reaction ( p < 0.05). The secretion of interferon gamma (IFN-γ) by the lymphocytes was also markedly boosted by GO-Ag. Additionally, the anti-glioma immune response induced by GO-Ag appeared to be target-specific. Furthermore, at the concentration used in this study, GO exhibited a negligible effect on the viability of the DCs. These results suggested that GO might have potential utility for boosting a DC-mediated anti-glioma immune response.

  4. MYB-QKI rearrangements in angiocentric glioma drive tumorigenicity through a tripartite mechanism.

    PubMed

    Bandopadhayay, Pratiti; Ramkissoon, Lori A; Jain, Payal; Bergthold, Guillaume; Wala, Jeremiah; Zeid, Rhamy; Schumacher, Steven E; Urbanski, Laura; O'Rourke, Ryan; Gibson, William J; Pelton, Kristine; Ramkissoon, Shakti H; Han, Harry J; Zhu, Yuankun; Choudhari, Namrata; Silva, Amanda; Boucher, Katie; Henn, Rosemary E; Kang, Yun Jee; Knoff, David; Paolella, Brenton R; Gladden-Young, Adrianne; Varlet, Pascale; Pages, Melanie; Horowitz, Peleg M; Federation, Alexander; Malkin, Hayley; Tracy, Adam A; Seepo, Sara; Ducar, Matthew; Van Hummelen, Paul; Santi, Mariarita; Buccoliero, Anna Maria; Scagnet, Mirko; Bowers, Daniel C; Giannini, Caterina; Puget, Stephanie; Hawkins, Cynthia; Tabori, Uri; Klekner, Almos; Bognar, Laszlo; Burger, Peter C; Eberhart, Charles; Rodriguez, Fausto J; Hill, D Ashley; Mueller, Sabine; Haas-Kogan, Daphne A; Phillips, Joanna J; Santagata, Sandro; Stiles, Charles D; Bradner, James E; Jabado, Nada; Goren, Alon; Grill, Jacques; Ligon, Azra H; Goumnerova, Liliana; Waanders, Angela J; Storm, Phillip B; Kieran, Mark W; Ligon, Keith L; Beroukhim, Rameen; Resnick, Adam C

    2016-03-01

    Angiocentric gliomas are pediatric low-grade gliomas (PLGGs) without known recurrent genetic drivers. We performed genomic analysis of new and published data from 249 PLGGs, including 19 angiocentric gliomas. We identified MYB-QKI fusions as a specific and single candidate driver event in angiocentric gliomas. In vitro and in vivo functional studies show that MYB-QKI rearrangements promote tumorigenesis through three mechanisms: MYB activation by truncation, enhancer translocation driving aberrant MYB-QKI expression and hemizygous loss of the tumor suppressor QKI. To our knowledge, this represents the first example of a single driver rearrangement simultaneously transforming cells via three genetic and epigenetic mechanisms in a tumor. PMID:26829751

  5. CHD1L Regulates Cell Cycle, Apoptosis, and Migration in Glioma.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jie; Zhang, Li; Zhao, Hongyu; Qiu, Xiaojun; Chen, Wenjuan; Wang, Donglin; Ban, Na; Fan, Shaochen; Shen, Chaoyan; Xia, Xiaojie; Ji, Bin; Wang, Yuchan

    2016-05-01

    Chromodomain helicase/ATPase DNA binding protein 1-like (CHD1L) gene is a newly identified oncogene located at Chr1q21 and it is amplified in many solid tumors. In this study, we intended to investigate the clinical significance of CHD1L expression in human glioma and its biological function in glioma cells. Western blot and immunohistochemistry analysis showed that CHD1L was overexpressed in glioma tissues and glioma cell lines. In addition, the expression level of CHD1L was positively correlated with glioma pathological grade and Ki-67 expression. Kaplan-Meier curve indicated that high expression of CHD1L may result in poor prognosis of glioma patients. Accordingly, suppression of CHD1L in glioma cells was shown to induce cell cycle arrest and increase apoptosis. In addition, knockdown of CHD1L significantly accelerated migration and invasion ability of glioma cells. Together our findings suggest that CHD1L is involved in the progression of glioma and may be a novel target for further therapy. PMID:26162969

  6. Intratumoral IL-12 combined with CTLA-4 blockade elicits T cell–mediated glioma rejection

    PubMed Central

    vom Berg, Johannes; Vrohlings, Melissa; Haller, Sergio; Haimovici, Aladin; Kulig, Paulina; Sledzinska, Anna; Weller, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Glioblastomas (GBs) are the most aggressive form of primary brain cancer and virtually incurable. Accumulation of regulatory T (T reg) cells in GBs is thought to contribute to the dampening of antitumor immunity. Using a syngeneic mouse model for GB, we tested whether local delivery of cytokines could render the immunosuppressive GB microenvironment conducive to an antitumor immune response. IL-12 but not IL-23 reversed GB-induced immunosuppression and led to tumor clearance. In contrast to models of skin or lung cancer, IL-12–mediated glioma rejection was T cell dependent and elicited potent immunological memory. To translate these findings into a clinically relevant setting, we allowed for GB progression before initiating therapy. Combined intratumoral IL-12 application with systemic blockade of the co-inhibitory receptor CTLA-4 on T cells led to tumor eradication even at advanced disease stages where monotherapy with either IL-12 or CTLA-4 blockade failed. The combination of IL-12 and CTLA-4 blockade acts predominantly on CD4+ cells, causing a drastic decrease in FoxP3+ T reg cells and an increase in effector T (T eff) cells. Our data provide compelling preclinical findings warranting swift translation into clinical trials in GB and represent a promising approach to increase response rates of CTLA-4 blockade in solid tumors. PMID:24277150

  7. The emerging role of NG2 in pediatric diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma

    PubMed Central

    Yadavilli, Sridevi; Scafidi, Joseph; Becher, Oren J.; Saratsis, Amanda M.; Hiner, Rebecca L.; Kambhampati, Madhuri; Mariarita, Santi; MacDonald, Tobey J.; Codispoti, Kari-Elise; Magge, Suresh N.; Jaiswal, Jyoti K.; Packer, Roger J.; Nazarian, Javad

    2015-01-01

    Diffuse intrinsic pontine gliomas (DIPGs) have a dismal prognosis and are poorly understood brain cancers. Receptor tyrosine kinases stabilized by neuron-glial antigen 2 (NG2) protein are known to induce gliomagenesis. Here, we investigated NG2 expression in a cohort of DIPG specimens (n= 50). We demonstrate NG2 expression in the majority of DIPG specimens tested and determine that tumors harboring histone 3.3 mutation express the highest NG2 levels. We further demonstrate that microRNA 129-2 (miR129-2) is downregulated and hypermethylated in human DIPGs, resulting in the increased expression of NG2. Treatment with 5-Azacytidine, a methyltransferase inhibitor, results in NG2 downregulation in DIPG primary tumor cells in vitro. NG2 expression is altered (symmetric segregation) in mitotic human DIPG and mouse tumor cells. These mitotic cells co-express oligodendrocyte (Olig2) and astrocyte (glial fibrillary acidic protein, GFAP) markers, indicating lack of terminal differentiation. NG2 knockdown retards cellular migration in vitro, while NG2 expressing neurospheres are highly tumorigenic in vivo, resulting in rapid growth of pontine tumors. NG2 expression is targetable in vivo using miR129-2 indicating a potential avenue for therapeutic interventions. This data implicates NG2 as a molecule of interest in DIPGs especially those with H3.3 mutation. PMID:25987129

  8. Armodafinil in Reducing Cancer-Related Fatigue in Patients With High Grade Glioma | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    This randomized phase III trial studies armodafinil to see how well it works in reducing cancer-related fatigue in patients with high grade glioma. Armodafinil may help relieve fatigue in patients with high grade glioma. |

  9. A critical balance: managing coagulation in patients with glioma.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Erin R; Mason, Warren P; Maurice, Catherine

    2016-07-01

    Cancer-associated thrombosis, including both arterial and venous thromboembolism (VTE), is a significant source of morbidity and mortality in patients with glioma. This risk is highest in the immediate postoperative period and is increased by chemotherapy, radiation, and corticosteroids. Systemic anticoagulation with low molecular weight heparin is the treatment of choice in both the therapeutic and prophylactic settings. However, these patients are also at risk of intracranial hemorrhage, a potentially catastrophic complication of anticoagulation, and this risk must be carefully balanced against the risk of VTE. In this review we outline the incidence, pathophysiology and management of thrombosis in patients with glioma, with a focus on clinical considerations including perioperative management, chemotherapy-induced thrombocytopenia, and end-of-life management. PMID:27101362

  10. Cancer stem cells: the final frontier for glioma virotherapy.

    PubMed

    Dey, Mahua; Ulasov, Ilya V; Tyler, Matthew A; Sonabend, Adam M; Lesniak, Maciej S

    2011-03-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSC) are a very small subset of all cancer cells and possess characteristics very similar to normal stem cells, in particular, the capacity for self-renewal, multipotency and relative quiescence. These chemo- and radiation resistant cells are responsible for maintaining tumor volume leading to therapy failure and recurrence. In glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), the most common primary intracranial malignancy, glioma stem cells have been implicated as one of the key players in treatment failure. Many novel treatment modalities are being investigated to specifically target this small group of cells. In this review, we shed light on one such targeted therapy, specifically, oncolytic virotherapy, and review the literature to highlight the advances and challenges in designing effective oncolytic virotherapy for glioma stem cells. PMID:20237963

  11. Cancer Stem Cells: The Final Frontier for Glioma Virotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Dey, Mahua; Ulasov, Ilya V.; Tyler, Matthew A.; Sonabend, Adam M.

    2010-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSC) are a very small subset of all cancer cells and possess characteristics very similar to normal stem cells, in particular, the capacity for self-renewal, multipotency and relative quiescence. These chemo- and radiation resistant cells are responsible for maintaining tumor volume leading to therapy failure and recurrence. In glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), the most common primary intracranial malignancy, glioma stem cells have been implicated as one of the key players in treatment failure. Many novel treatment modalities are being investigated to specifically target this small group of cells. In this review, we shed light on one such targeted therapy, specifically, oncolytic virotherapy, and review the literature to highlight the advances and challenges in designing effective oncolytic virotherapy for glioma stem cells. PMID:20237963

  12. Understanding glioma stem cells: rationale, clinical relevance and therapeutic strategies

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Atique U; Auffinger, Brenda; Lesniak, Maciej S

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme is one of the most aggressive brain tumors in adults. Despite the use of the best available multimodal therapeutic approaches, the prognosis remains dismal. The identification of glioma stem cells (GSCs) has offered new hope to affected patients, since it could explain, in part, the highly heterogeneous nature of this tumor and its chemo- and radio-resistance. Although still in its infancy, GSC research has unveiled many of its complexities and the theory itself remains controversial. GSC phenotype can significantly vary between patients and a single tumor may present several distinct GSCs. New therapeutic solutions that effectively target this population are of utmost importance, since they may be able to decrease neoplastic recurrence and improve patient survival. Here, we discuss the mechanisms by which GSCs lead to glioma relapse, the main controversies in this field and the most recent treatments that could successfully target this population. PMID:23621311

  13. Understanding glioma stem cells: rationale, clinical relevance and therapeutic strategies.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Atique U; Auffinger, Brenda; Lesniak, Maciej S

    2013-05-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme is one of the most aggressive brain tumors in adults. Despite the use of the best available multimodal therapeutic approaches, the prognosis remains dismal. The identification of glioma stem cells (GSCs) has offered new hope to affected patients, since it could explain, in part, the highly heterogeneous nature of this tumor and its chemo- and radio-resistance. Although still in its infancy, GSC research has unveiled many of its complexities and the theory itself remains controversial. GSC phenotype can significantly vary between patients and a single tumor may present several distinct GSCs. New therapeutic solutions that effectively target this population are of utmost importance, since they may be able to decrease neoplastic recurrence and improve patient survival. Here, we discuss the mechanisms by which GSCs lead to glioma relapse, the main controversies in this field and the most recent treatments that could successfully target this population. PMID:23621311

  14. Clinical ramifications of "genomic staging" of low-grade gliomas.

    PubMed

    Verma, Vivek; Mehta, Minesh P

    2016-09-01

    "Low-grade gliomas" (LGGs), classification of which is derived from histopathological observations, exhibit significant heterogeneity in clinical behavior. Recently, increasing attention has been paid to genomic analyses of these tumors, to aid in treatment and prognostic decision-making. We discuss herein the recent genomic analysis of gliomas from two major recent publications, and also the results of seminal LGG trials in the context of molecular and genomic stratification, with respect to both prognosis and response to therapy. We also analyze implications of these "molecular classifications". We propose separating out the worst prognostic subsets, whose outcomes resemble those of glioblastoma patients. Lastly, a brief discussion is provided regarding translating this collective knowledge into the clinic and in treatment decisions; also addressed are some of the many questions that still need to be examined in light of these strong and emerging data. PMID:27401152

  15. Involvement of the Kynurenine Pathway in Human Glioma Pathophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Seray; Teo, Charles; McDonald, Kerrie L.; Zinger, Anna; Bustamante, Sonia; Lim, Chai K.; Sundaram, Gayathri; Braidy, Nady; Brew, Bruce J.; Guillemin, Gilles J.

    2014-01-01

    The kynurenine pathway (KP) is the principal route of L-tryptophan (TRP) catabolism leading to the production of kynurenine (KYN), the neuroprotectants, kynurenic acid (KYNA) and picolinic acid (PIC), the excitotoxin, quinolinic acid (QUIN) and the essential pyridine nucleotide, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+). The enzymes indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase-1 (IDO-1), indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase-2 (IDO-2) and tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase (TDO-2) initiate the first step of the KP. IDO-1 and TDO-2 induction in tumors are crucial mechanisms implicated to play pivotal roles in suppressing anti-tumor immunity. Here, we report the first comprehensive characterisation of the KP in 1) cultured human glioma cells and 2) plasma from patients with glioblastoma (GBM). Our data revealed that interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) stimulation significantly potentiated the expression of the KP enzymes, IDO-1 IDO-2, kynureninase (KYNU), kynurenine hydroxylase (KMO) and significantly down-regulated 2-amino-3-carboxymuconate semialdehyde decarboxylase (ACMSD) and kynurenine aminotransferase-I (KAT-I) expression in cultured human glioma cells. This significantly increased KP activity but significantly lowered the KYNA/KYN neuroprotective ratio in human cultured glioma cells. KP activation (KYN/TRP) was significantly higher, whereas the concentrations of the neuroreactive KP metabolites TRP, KYNA, QUIN and PIC and the KYNA/KYN ratio were significantly lower in GBM patient plasma (n = 18) compared to controls. These results provide further evidence for the involvement of the KP in glioma pathophysiology and highlight a potential role of KP products as novel and highly attractive therapeutic targets to evaluate for the treatment of brain tumors, aimed at restoring anti-tumor immunity and reducing the capacity for malignant cells to produce NAD+, which is necessary for energy production and DNA repair. PMID:25415278

  16. Dracorhodin perchlorate induces the apoptosis of glioma cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xin; Luo, Junjie; Meng, Linghu; Pan, Taifeng; Zhao, Binjie; Tang, Zhen-Gang; Dai, Yongjian

    2016-04-01

    Dracorhodin perchlorate (Dp), a synthetic analogue of the antimicrobial anthocyanin red pigment, has recently been shown to induce apoptotic cell death in various types of cancer cells. Yet, the inhibitory effect of Dp on human glioma cells remains uninvestigated. Therefore, in the present study, 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay and flow cytometry were used to detect cell viability and cell cycle progression in glioma U87MG and T98G cells, respectively. Annexin V-FITC/propidium iodide double staining and JC-1 staining were separately applied to determine cellular apoptosis and mitochondrial membrane potential damage in the cells. The expression levels of associated proteins involved in cell cycle progression and apoptosis were measured by western blotting. The activities of caspase‑9/-3 were determined by Caspase-Glo-9/3 assay. The results indicated that Dp treatment significantly inhibited cell proliferation in a dose- and time-dependent manner, and blocked cell cycle progression at the G1/S phase in the U87MG and T98G cells via the upregulation of p53 and p21 protein expression, and simultaneous downregulation of Cdc25A, Cdc2 and P-Cdc2 protein expression. Additionally, Dp treatment led to the loss of cellular mitochondrial membrane potential, and the release of cytochrome c, and strongly induced the occurence of apoptosis. Increased expression levels of Bim and Bax protein and the downregulated expression of Bcl-2 protein were observed. Caspase-9/-3 were activated and their activities were elevated after Dp treatment. These findings indicate that Dp inhibits cell proliferation, induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in glioma cells, and is a possible candidate for glioma treatment. PMID:26846469

  17. Involvement of the kynurenine pathway in human glioma pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Adams, Seray; Teo, Charles; McDonald, Kerrie L; Zinger, Anna; Bustamante, Sonia; Lim, Chai K; Sundaram, Gayathri; Braidy, Nady; Brew, Bruce J; Guillemin, Gilles J

    2014-01-01

    The kynurenine pathway (KP) is the principal route of L-tryptophan (TRP) catabolism leading to the production of kynurenine (KYN), the neuroprotectants, kynurenic acid (KYNA) and picolinic acid (PIC), the excitotoxin, quinolinic acid (QUIN) and the essential pyridine nucleotide, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)). The enzymes indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase-1 (IDO-1), indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase-2 (IDO-2) and tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase (TDO-2) initiate the first step of the KP. IDO-1 and TDO-2 induction in tumors are crucial mechanisms implicated to play pivotal roles in suppressing anti-tumor immunity. Here, we report the first comprehensive characterisation of the KP in 1) cultured human glioma cells and 2) plasma from patients with glioblastoma (GBM). Our data revealed that interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) stimulation significantly potentiated the expression of the KP enzymes, IDO-1 IDO-2, kynureninase (KYNU), kynurenine hydroxylase (KMO) and significantly down-regulated 2-amino-3-carboxymuconate semialdehyde decarboxylase (ACMSD) and kynurenine aminotransferase-I (KAT-I) expression in cultured human glioma cells. This significantly increased KP activity but significantly lowered the KYNA/KYN neuroprotective ratio in human cultured glioma cells. KP activation (KYN/TRP) was significantly higher, whereas the concentrations of the neuroreactive KP metabolites TRP, KYNA, QUIN and PIC and the KYNA/KYN ratio were significantly lower in GBM patient plasma (n = 18) compared to controls. These results provide further evidence for the involvement of the KP in glioma pathophysiology and highlight a potential role of KP products as novel and highly attractive therapeutic targets to evaluate for the treatment of brain tumors, aimed at restoring anti-tumor immunity and reducing the capacity for malignant cells to produce NAD(+), which is necessary for energy production and DNA repair. PMID:25415278

  18. Cancer Immunotherapy for Gliomas: Overview and Future Directions.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Naoya

    2016-07-15

    Immunotherapy has been highlighted because we have obtained much evidence, which includes theoretical backborn as well as favorable results from clinical trials. As immunotherapy gives an apparently different cytotoxic mechanism and a little adverse event, the promising results are getting a lot of attention. In this article, cancer immunotherapy for gliomas is reviewed thoroughly from the literature, focusing on the clinical trial results. PMID:27087194

  19. Cancer Immunotherapy for Gliomas: Overview and Future Directions

    PubMed Central

    HASHIMOTO, Naoya

    2016-01-01

    Immunotherapy has been highlighted because we have obtained much evidence, which includes theoretical backborn as well as favorable results from clinical trials. As immunotherapy gives an apparently different cytotoxic mechanism and a little adverse event, the promising results are getting a lot of attention. In this article, cancer immunotherapy for gliomas is reviewed thoroughly from the literature, focusing on the clinical trial results. PMID:27087194

  20. Epigenetic biomarkers of T-cells in human glioma.

    PubMed

    Wiencke, John K; Accomando, William P; Zheng, Shichun; Patoka, Joe; Dou, Xiaoqin; Phillips, Joanna J; Hsuang, George; Christensen, Brock C; Houseman, E Andres; Koestler, Devin C; Bracci, Paige; Wiemels, Joseph L; Wrensch, Margaret; Nelson, Heather H; Kelsey, Karl T

    2012-12-01

    Immune factors are thought to influence glioma risk and outcomes, but immune profiling studies to further our understanding of the immune response are limited by current immunodiagnostic methods. We developed a new assay to capture glioma immune biology based on quantitative methylation specific PCR (qMSP) of two T-cell genes (CD3Z: T-cells, and FOXP3: Tregs). Flow cytometry of T-cells correlated well with the CD3Z demethylation assay (r = 0.93; p < 2.2 × 10 (-16) ), demonstrating the validity of the assay. Furthermore, there was a high correlation between qMSP and immunohistochemistry (IHC) in quantifying tumor infiltrating T-cells (r = 0.85; p = 3.4 × 10 (-11) ). Applying our qMSP methods to archival whole blood from 65 glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) cases and 94 non-diseased controls, GBM cases had highly statistically significantly lower T-cells (p = 1.7 × 10 (-9) ) as well as Tregs (p = 5.2 × 10 (-11) ) and a modestly lower ratio of Tregs/T-cells (p = 0.024). Applying the methods to 120 excised glioma tumors, we observed that tumor infiltrating CD3+ T-cells were positively correlated with glioma tumor grade (p = 5.7 × 10 (-7) ), and that Tregs were enriched in tumors compared with peripheral blood indicating active chemoattraction of suppressive Tregs into the tumor compartment. Poorer patient survival was correlated with higher levels of tumor infiltrating T-cells (p = 0.01) and Tregs (p = 0.04). DNA methylation based immunodiagnostics represent a new generation of powerful laboratory tools offering many advantages over conventional methods that will facilitate large clinical epidemiologic studies and capitalize on stored archival blood and tissue banks. PMID:23108258

  1. Epigenetic biomarkers of T-cells in human glioma

    PubMed Central

    Wiencke, John K.; Accomando, William P.; Zheng, Shichun; Patoka, Joe; Dou, Xiaoqin; Phillips, Joanna J.; Hsuang, George; Christensen, Brock C.; Houseman, E. Andres; Koestler, Devin C.; Bracci, Paige; Wiemels, Joseph L.; Wrensch, Margaret; Nelson, Heather H.; Kelsey, Karl T.

    2012-01-01

    Immune factors are thought to influence glioma risk and outcomes, but immune profiling studies to further our understanding of the immune response are limited by current immunodiagnostic methods. We developed a new assay to capture glioma immune biology based on quantitative methylation specific PCR (qMSP) of two T-cell genes (CD3Z: T-cells, and FOXP3: Tregs). Flow cytometry of T-cells correlated well with the CD3Z demethylation assay (r = 0.93; p < 2.2 × 10−16), demonstrating the validity of the assay. Furthermore, there was a high correlation between qMSP and immunohistochemistry (IHC) in quantifying tumor infiltrating T-cells (r = 0.85; p = 3.4 × 10−11). Applying our qMSP methods to archival whole blood from 65 glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) cases and 94 non-diseased controls, GBM cases had highly statistically significantly lower T-cells (p = 1.7 × 10−9) as well as Tregs (p = 5.2 × 10−11) and a modestly lower ratio of Tregs/T-cells (p = 0.024). Applying the methods to 120 excised glioma tumors, we observed that tumor infiltrating CD3+ T-cells were positively correlated with glioma tumor grade (p = 5.7 × 10−7), and that Tregs were enriched in tumors compared with peripheral blood indicating active chemoattraction of suppressive Tregs into the tumor compartment. Poorer patient survival was correlated with higher levels of tumor infiltrating T-cells (p = 0.01) and Tregs (p = 0.04). DNA methylation based immunodiagnostics represent a new generation of powerful laboratory tools offering many advantages over conventional methods that will facilitate large clinical epidemiologic studies and capitalize on stored archival blood and tissue banks. PMID:23108258

  2. Epilepsy in patients with gliomas: incidence and control of seizures.

    PubMed

    Iuchi, Toshihiko; Hasegawa, Yuzo; Kawasaki, Koichiro; Sakaida, Tsukasa

    2015-01-01

    Brain tumor-related epilepsy (BTRE) is a unique condition that is distinct from primary epilepsy. The aim of this retrospective study was to clarify the epidemiology and results of treatment of BTRE in a single institution. From a database of 121 consecutive patients with supratentorial gliomas treated at Chiba Cancer Center from 2006-2012, the incidence and control of seizures before and after surgery were retrospectively evaluated. Epilepsy occurred in 33.9% of patients before surgery. All patients received prophylactic anti-epileptic drugs (AED) during surgery; however, seizures occurred in 9.1% of patients within the first postoperative week. During follow-up, seizures occurred in 48.3% of patients. The overall incidence of seizures was 73.7% in patients with World Health Organization Grade II gliomas, 66.7% in those with Grade III and 56.8% in those with Grade IV gliomas. Levetiracetam was very well tolerated. However, carbamazepine and phenytoin were poorly tolerated because of adverse effects. AED were discontinued in 56 patients. Fifteen of these patients (26.8%) had further seizures, half occurring within 3 months and 80% within 6 months of AED withdrawal. No clinical factors that indicated it was safe to discontinue AED were identified. The unpredictable epileptogenesis associated with gliomas and their excision requires prolonged administration of AED. To maintain quality of life and to safely and effectively control the tumor, it is necessary to select AED that do not adversely affect cognitive function or interact with other drugs, including anti-cancer agents. PMID:25192590

  3. Indocyanine green as an adjunct for resection of insular gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Abhidha; Rangarajan, Vithal; Kaswa, Amol; Jain, Sonal; Goel, Atul

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Many controversies exist regarding the extent of resection for insular gliomas and the timing of resection. Several techniques and adjuncts are used to maximize safety during resection of these tumors. We describe the use of indocyanine green (ICG) to identify the branches of the middle cerebral artery and discuss its utility to increase safety for resection for insular gliomas. Materials and Methods: Five patients with insular gliomas were surgically treated by the authors from June 2013 to June 2014. The patients presented with complaints of either a headache or recurring episodes of convulsions. All the patients were operated with the aid of neuronavigation and tractography. The long perforating branches of the middle cerebral artery course through the insula and pass onward to supply the corona radiata. It is essential to preserve these vessels to prevent postoperative neurological deficits. ICG (Aurogreen) was used to identify and preserve the long perforating arteries of the middle cerebral artery. Results: ICG dye correctly identified the long perforating branches of the middle cerebral artery and easily distinguished these vessels from the short perforating branches. All the branches of the middle cerebral artery that coursed through the tumor and had an onward course were preserved in all the patients. Only one patient developed a transient right sided hemiparesis that had improved at follow-up. Conclusions: Surgery for insular gliomas is challenging due to its location adjacent to eloquent areas, important white fiber tracts and the course of the middle cerebral artery within it. ICG is useful to identify and preserve the long perforating branches of the middle cerebral artery that course through the tumor and traverse onward to supply the corona radiata. PMID:27366256

  4. Tumor infiltrating immune cells in gliomas and meningiomas.

    PubMed

    Domingues, Patrícia; González-Tablas, María; Otero, Álvaro; Pascual, Daniel; Miranda, David; Ruiz, Laura; Sousa, Pablo; Ciudad, Juana; Gonçalves, Jesús María; Lopes, María Celeste; Orfao, Alberto; Tabernero, María Dolores

    2016-03-01

    Tumor-infiltrating immune cells are part of a complex microenvironment that promotes and/or regulates tumor development and growth. Depending on the type of cells and their functional interactions, immune cells may play a key role in suppressing the tumor or in providing support for tumor growth, with relevant effects on patient behavior. In recent years, important advances have been achieved in the characterization of immune cell infiltrates in central nervous system (CNS) tumors, but their role in tumorigenesis and patient behavior still remain poorly understood. Overall, these studies have shown significant but variable levels of infiltration of CNS tumors by macrophage/microglial cells (TAM) and to a less extent also lymphocytes (particularly T-cells and NK cells, and less frequently also B-cells). Of note, TAM infiltrate gliomas at moderate numbers where they frequently show an immune suppressive phenotype and functional behavior; in contrast, infiltration by TAM may be very pronounced in meningiomas, particularly in cases that carry isolated monosomy 22, where the immune infiltrates also contain greater numbers of cytotoxic T and NK-cells associated with an enhanced anti-tumoral immune response. In line with this, the presence of regulatory T cells, is usually limited to a small fraction of all meningiomas, while frequently found in gliomas. Despite these differences between gliomas and meningiomas, both tumors show heterogeneous levels of infiltration by immune cells with variable functionality. In this review we summarize current knowledge about tumor-infiltrating immune cells in the two most common types of CNS tumors-gliomas and meningiomas-, as well as the role that such immune cells may play in the tumor microenvironment in controlling and/or promoting tumor development, growth and control. PMID:26216710

  5. Functionally-defined Therapeutic Targets in Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Glioma

    PubMed Central

    Grasso, Catherine S.; Tang, Yujie; Truffaux, Nathalene; Berlow, Noah E.; Liu, Lining; Debily, Marie-Anne; Quist, Michael J.; Davis, Lara E.; Huang, Elaine C.; Woo, Pamelyn J; Ponnuswami, Anitha; Chen, Spenser; Johung, Tessa B.; Sun, Wenchao; Kogiso, Mari; Du, Yuchen; Lin, Qi; Huang, Yulun; Hütt-Cabezas, Marianne; Warren, Katherine E.; Dret, Ludivine Le; Meltzer, Paul S.; Mao, Hua; Quezado, Martha; van Vuurden, Dannis G.; Abraham, Jinu; Fouladi, Maryam; Svalina, Matthew N.; Wang, Nicholas; Hawkins, Cynthia; Nazarian, Javad; Alonso, Marta M.; Raabe, Eric; Hulleman, Esther; Spellman, Paul T.; Li, Xiao-Nan; Keller, Charles; Pal, Ranadip; Grill, Jacques; Monje, Michelle

    2015-01-01

    Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Glioma (DIPG) is a fatal childhood cancer. We performed a chemical screen in patient-derived DIPG cultures along with RNAseq analyses and integrated computational modeling to identify potentially effective therapeutic strategies. The multi-histone deacetylase inhibitor panobinostat demonstrated efficacy in vitro and in DIPG orthotopic xenograft models. Combination testing of panobinostat with histone demethylase inhibitor GSKJ4 revealed synergy. Together, these data suggest a promising therapeutic strategy for DIPG. PMID:25939062

  6. MiR-328 promotes glioma cell invasion via SFRP1-dependent Wnt-signaling activation.

    PubMed

    Delic, Sabit; Lottmann, Nadine; Stelzl, Anja; Liesenberg, Franziska; Wolter, Marietta; Götze, Silke; Zapatka, Marc; Shiio, Yuzuru; Sabel, Michael C; Felsberg, Jörg; Reifenberger, Guido; Riemenschneider, Markus J

    2014-01-01

    Background Diffusely infiltrative growth of human astrocytic gliomas is one of the major obstacles to successful tumor therapy. Thorough insights into the molecules and pathways signaling glioma cell invasion thus appear of major relevance for the development of targeted and individualized therapies. By miRNA expression profiling of microdissected human tumor biopsy specimens we identified miR-328 as one of the main miRNAs upregulated in invading glioma cells in vivo and further investigated its role in glioma pathogenesis. Methods We employed miRNA mimics and inhibitors to functionally characterize miR-328, 3' untranslated region luciferase assays, and T-cell factor/lymphoid enhancer factor reporter assays to pinpoint miR-328 targets and signaling pathways, and analyzed miR-328 expression in a large panel of gliomas. Results First, we corroborated the invasion-promoting role of miR-328 in A172 and TP365MG glioma cells. Secreted Frizzled-related protein 1 (SFRP1), an inhibitor of Wnt signaling, was then pinpointed as a direct miR-328 target. SFRP1 expression is of prognostic relevance in gliomas with reduced expression, being associated with significantly lower overall patient survival in both the Repository of Molecular Brain Neoplasia Data (REMBRANDT) and The Cancer Genome Atlas. Of note, miR-328 regulated both SFRP1 protein expression levels and Wnt signaling pathway activity. Finally, in human glioma tissues miR-328 appeared to account for the downregulation of SFRP1 preferentially in lower-grade astrocytic gliomas and was inversely related to SFRP1 promoter hypermethylation. Conclusion Taken together, we report on a novel molecular miR-328-dependent mechanism that via SFRP1 inhibition and Wnt activation contributes to the infiltrative glioma phenotype at already early stages of glioma progression, with unfavorable prognostic implications for the final outcome of the disease. PMID:24305703

  7. Restoring Soluble Guanylyl Cyclase Expression and Function Blocks the Aggressive Course of GliomaS⃞

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Haifeng; Li, Jessica Tao; Zheng, Fang; Martin, Emil; Kots, Alexander Y.; Krumenacker, Joshua S.; Choi, Byung-Kwon; McCutcheon, Ian E.; Weisbrodt, Norman; Bögler, Oliver; Murad, Ferid

    2011-01-01

    The NO and cGMP signaling pathways are of broad physiological and pathological significance. We compared the NO/soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC)/cGMP pathway in human glioma tissues and cell lines with that of healthy control samples and demonstrated that sGC expression is significantly lower in glioma preparations. Our analysis of GEO databases (National Cancer Institute) further revealed a statistically significant reduction of sGC transcript levels in human glioma specimens. On the other hand, the expression levels of particulate (membrane) guanylyl cyclases (pGC) and cGMP-specific phosphodiesterase (PDE) were intact in the glioma cells that we have tested. Pharmacologically manipulating endogenous cGMP generation in glioma cells through either stimulating pGC by ANP/BNP, or blocking PDE by 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine/zaprinast caused significant inhibition of proliferation and colony formation of glioma cells. Genetically restoring sGC expression also correlated inversely with glioma cells growth. Orthotopic implantation of glioma cells transfected with an active mutant form of sGC (sGCα1β1Cys105) in athymic mice increased the survival time by 4-fold over the control. Histological analysis of xenografts overexpressing α1β1Cys105 sGC revealed changes in cellular architecture that resemble the morphology of normal cells. In addition, a decrease in angiogenesis contributed to glioma inhibition by sGC/cGMP therapy. Our study proposes the new concept that suppressed expression of sGC, a key enzyme in the NO/cGMP pathway, may be associated with an aggressive course of glioma. The sGC/cGMP signaling-targeted therapy may be a favorable alternative to chemotherapy and radiotherapy for glioma and perhaps other tumors. PMID:21908708

  8. Overexpression of CD99 Increases the Migration and Invasiveness of Human Malignant Glioma Cells.

    PubMed

    Seol, Ho Jun; Chang, Jong Hee; Yamamoto, Junkoh; Romagnuolo, Rocco; Suh, Youngchul; Weeks, Adrienne; Agnihotri, Sameer; Smith, Christian A; Rutka, James T

    2012-09-01

    The malignant glioma is the most common primary human brain tumor, and its migration and invasiveness away from the primary tumor mass are considered a leading cause of tumor recurrence and treatment failure. Recently, gene expression profiling revealed that the transmembrane glycoprotein CD99 is more highly expressed in malignant glioma than in normal brain. Although its function is not completely understood, CD99 is implicated in cell adhesion and migration in a variety of different cell types. CD99 has wild-type and splice variant isoforms. Previous studies have shown that wild-type CD99 may be an oncosuppressor in some tumors, distinct from the role of the splice variant isoform. In this study, our data reveal that only wild-type CD99 is expressed in human glioma cells and tissues. Using a tissue microarray, we validated that gliomas demonstrate higher expression of CD99 compared with nonneoplastic brain. To assess the role of CD99 in glioma migration and invasion, we inhibited CD99 expression by siRNA and demonstrated decreased glioma migration and invasion. In contrast, when CD99 was overexpressed in glioma cells, we observed enhancement of cell migration and invasiveness. An orthotopic brain tumor model demonstrates that CD99 overexpression significantly increases invasiveness and decreases survival rate. Interestingly, Rac activity was decreased and Rho activity was increased in CD99 overexpressing glioma cells, and the proportion of amoeboid cells to mesenchymal cells was significantly increased. Taken together, our findings suggest that CD99 may play an important role in the migration and invasion of human gliomas independent of Akt, ERK, or JNK signaling pathways. Moreover, CD99 might be involved in amoeboid-mesenchymal transition in glioma migration. CD99 may be an important future target to inhibit migration and invasion, especially in CD99-expressing gliomas. PMID:23486730

  9. Glioma Groups Based on 1p/19q, IDH, and TERT Promoter Mutations in Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Eckel-Passow, Jeanette E.; Lachance, Daniel H.; Molinaro, Annette M.; Walsh, Kyle M.; Decker, Paul A.; Sicotte, Hugues; Pekmezci, Melike; Rice, Terri; Kosel, Matt L.; Smirnov, Ivan V.; Sarkar, Gobinda; Caron, Alissa A.; Kollmeyer, Thomas M.; Praska, Corinne E.; Chada, Anisha R.; Halder, Chandralekha; Hansen, Helen M.; McCoy, Lucie S.; Bracci, Paige M.; Marshall, Roxanne; Zheng, Shichun; Reis, Gerald F.; Pico, Alexander R.; O’Neill, Brian P.; Buckner, Jan C.; Giannini, Caterina; Huse, Jason T.; Perry, Arie; Tihan, Tarik; Berger, Mitchell S.; Chang, Susan M.; Prados, Michael D.; Wiemels, Joseph; Wiencke, John K.; Wrensch, Margaret R.; Jenkins, Robert B.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND The prediction of clinical behavior, response to therapy, and outcome of infiltrative glioma is challenging. On the basis of previous studies of tumor biology, we defined five glioma molecular groups with the use of three alterations: mutations in the TERT promoter, mutations in IDH, and codeletion of chromosome arms 1p and 19q (1p/19q codeletion). We tested the hypothesis that within groups based on these features, tumors would have similar clinical variables, acquired somatic alterations, and germline variants. METHODS We scored tumors as negative or positive for each of these markers in 1087 gliomas and compared acquired alterations and patient characteristics among the five primary molecular groups. Using 11,590 controls, we assessed associations between these groups and known glioma germline variants. RESULTS Among 615 grade II or III gliomas, 29% had all three alterations (i.e., were triplepositive), 5% had TERT and IDH mutations, 45% had only IDH mutations, 7% were triple-negative, and 10% had only TERT mutations; 5% had other combinations. Among 472 grade IV gliomas, less than 1% were triple-positive, 2% had TERT and IDH mutations, 7% had only IDH mutations, 17% were triple-negative, and 74% had only TERT mutations. The mean age at diagnosis was lowest (37 years) among patients who had gliomas with only IDH mutations and was highest (59 years) among patients who had gliomas with only TERT mutations. The molecular groups were independently associated with overall survival among patients with grade II or III gliomas but not among patients with grade IV gliomas. The molecular groups were associated with specific germline variants. CONCLUSIONS Gliomas were classified into five principal groups on the basis of three tumor markers. The groups had different ages at onset, overall survival, and associations with germline variants, which implies that they are characterized by distinct mechanisms of pathogenesis. PMID:26061753

  10. Radiotherapeutic management of optic nerve gliomas in children

    SciTech Connect

    Danoff, B.F.; Kramer, S.; Thompson, N.

    1980-01-01

    Optic nerve gliomas represent one to five percent of all intracranial tumors in children. The management of these tumors remains controversial. From 1956 to 1977, 18 children with optic nerve gliomas were treated at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital using external beam radiotherapy. All children presented with decreased visual acuity and five of eighteen were blind in one eye. No patient was found to have involvement of a single optic nerve. in eight patients, the chiasm was involved, in ten patients, tumor had extended to the frontal lobes and/or hypothalamus. Initial surgical management included biopsy only in seven patients, inspection of tumor in two patients and partial excision in seven patients. Two patients were treated with radiotherapy based on radiological findings. A tumor dose of 5000 to 6000 rad was given in 5.5 to 6.5 weeks. Stabilization of visual impairment or improvement in vision was noted in 78 percent of patients who were evaluable. The ten year survival was 73 percent. Radiological evidence of tumor regression will be presented. It is our impression that radiotherapy is indicated in the treatment of children with optic nerve gliomas who have poor prognostic signs (i.e., chiasmal and/or hypothalamic involvement and progressive visual loss).

  11. On the relevance of glycolysis process on brain gliomas.

    PubMed

    Kounelakis, M G; Zervakis, M E; Giakos, G C; Postma, G J; Buydens, L M C; Kotsiakis, X

    2013-01-01

    The proposed analysis considers aspects of both statistical and biological validation of the glycolysis effect on brain gliomas, at both genomic and metabolic level. In particular, two independent datasets are analyzed in parallel, one engaging genomic (Microarray Expression) data and the other metabolomic (Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy Imaging) data. The aim of this study is twofold. First to show that, apart from the already studied genes (markers), other genes such as those involved in the human cell glycolysis significantly contribute in gliomas discrimination. Second, to demonstrate how the glycolysis process can open new ways towards the design of patient-specific therapeutic protocols. The results of our analysis demonstrate that the combination of genes participating in the glycolytic process (ALDOA, ALDOC, ENO2, GAPDH, HK2, LDHA, LDHB, MDH1, PDHB, PFKM, PGI, PGK1, PGM1 and PKLR) with the already known tumor suppressors (PTEN, Rb, TP53), oncogenes (CDK4, EGFR, PDGF) and HIF-1, enhance the discrimination of low versus high-grade gliomas providing high prediction ability in a cross-validated framework. Following these results and supported by the biological effect of glycolytic genes on cancer cells, we address the study of glycolysis for the development of new treatment protocols. PMID:22614725

  12. Boldine: a potential new antiproliferative drug against glioma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Gerhardt, Daniéli; Horn, Ana Paula; Gaelzer, Mariana Maier; Frozza, Rudimar Luiz; Delgado-Cañedo, Andrés; Pelegrini, Alessandra Luiza; Henriques, Amélia T; Lenz, Guido; Salbego, Christianne

    2009-12-01

    Malignant gliomas are the most common and devastating primary tumors of the central nervous system. Currently no efficient treatment is available. This study evaluated the effect and underlying mechanisms of boldine, an aporphine alkaloid of Peumus boldus, on glioma proliferation and cell death. Boldine decreased the cell number of U138-MG, U87-MG and C6 glioma lines at concentrations of 80, 250 and 500 muM. We observed that cell death caused by boldine was cell-type specific and dose-dependent. Exposure to boldine for 24 h did not activate key mediators of apoptosis. However, it induced alterations in the cell cycle suggesting a G(2)/M arrest in U138-MG cells. Boldine had no toxic effect on non-tumor cells when used at the same concentrations as those used on tumor cells. Based on these results, we speculate that boldine may be a promising compound for evaluation as an anti-cancer agent. PMID:19050827

  13. Interleukin-33 in human gliomas: Expression and prognostic significance

    PubMed Central

    GRAMATZKI, DOROTHEE; FREI, KARL; CATHOMAS, GIERI; MOCH, HOLGER; WELLER, MICHAEL; MERTZ, KIRSTEN DIANA

    2016-01-01

    Interleukin-33 (IL-33) is a nuclear and pleiotropic cytokine with regard to its cellular sources and its actions. IL-33 is involved in the pathogenesis of brain diseases. Several factors account for the tumorigenicity of human gliomas, including cytokines and their receptors. The present study assessed the expression and prognostic significance of IL-33 in human astroglial brain tumors. Protein levels of IL-33 were determined by immunohistochemistry using a tissue microarray containing 95 human gliomas. mRNA expression data of IL-33, as well as of its receptors, IL-1 receptor-like 1 protein and IL-1 receptor accessory protein (IL1RAcP), were obtained from The Cancer Genome Atlas database. IL-33 protein was expressed heterogeneously in tumor tissue, but was, however, not detected in normal brain tissue. There was no differential IL-33 protein expression by tumor grade, while IL-33 protein expression was associated with inferior survival in patients with recurrent glioblastomas. Interrogations of the TCGA database indicated that mRNA expression of IL-33 and the IL-33 receptors was heterogeneous, and that IL-33 and IL1RAcP mRNA levels were correlated with the tumor grade. Elevated IL-33 mRNA levels were associated with the inferior survival of glioblastoma patients. Therefore, IL-33 may play an important role in the pathogenesis and prognosis of human gliomas. PMID:27347163

  14. Mathematically modeling the biological properties of gliomas: A review.

    PubMed

    Martirosyan, Nikolay L; Rutter, Erica M; Ramey, Wyatt L; Kostelich, Eric J; Kuang, Yang; Preul, Mark C

    2015-08-01

    Although mathematical modeling is a mainstay for industrial and many scientific studies, such approaches have found little application in neurosurgery. However, the fusion of biological studies and applied mathematics is rapidly changing this environment, especially for cancer research. This review focuses on the exciting potential for mathematical models to provide new avenues for studying the growth of gliomas to practical use. In vitro studies are often used to simulate the effects of specific model parameters that would be difficult in a larger-scale model. With regard to glioma invasive properties, metabolic and vascular attributes can be modeled to gain insight into the infiltrative mechanisms that are attributable to the tumor's aggressive behavior. Morphologically, gliomas show different characteristics that may allow their growth stage and invasive properties to be predicted, and models continue to offer insight about how these attributes are manifested visually. Recent studies have attempted to predict the efficacy of certain treatment modalities and exactly how they should be administered relative to each other. Imaging is also a crucial component in simulating clinically relevant tumors and their influence on the surrounding anatomical structures in the brain. PMID:25974347

  15. Circular RNA profile in gliomas revealed by identification tool UROBORUS

    PubMed Central

    Song, Xiaofeng; Zhang, Naibo; Han, Ping; Moon, Byoung-San; Lai, Rose K.; Wang, Kai; Lu, Wange

    2016-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that many endogenous circular RNAs (circRNAs) may play roles in biological processes. However, the expression patterns and functions of circRNAs in human diseases are not well understood. Computationally identifying circRNAs from total RNA-seq data is a primary step in studying their expression pattern and biological roles. In this work, we have developed a computational pipeline named UROBORUS to detect circRNAs in total RNA-seq data. By applying UROBORUS to RNA-seq data from 46 gliomas and normal brain samples, we detected thousands of circRNAs supported by at least two read counts, followed by successful experimental validation on 24 circRNAs from the randomly selected 27 circRNAs. UROBORUS is an efficient tool that can detect circRNAs with low expression levels in total RNA-seq without RNase R treatment. The circRNAs expression profiling revealed more than 476 circular RNAs differentially expressed in control brain tissues and gliomas. Together with parental gene expression, we found that circRNA and its parental gene have diversified expression patterns in gliomas and control brain tissues. This study establishes an efficient and sensitive approach for predicting circRNAs using total RNA-seq data. The UROBORUS pipeline can be accessed freely for non-commercial purposes at http://uroborus.openbioinformatics.org/. PMID:26873924

  16. Quantum dot-labeled aptamer nanoprobes specifically targeting glioma cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xue-Chai; Deng, Yu-Lin; Lin, Yi; Pang, Dai-Wen; Qing, Hong; Qu, Feng; Xie, Hai-Yan

    2008-06-01

    Two new techniques, aptamer-based specific recognition and quantum dot (QD)-based fluorescence labeling, are becoming increasingly important in biosensing. In this study, these two techniques have been coupled together to construct a new kind of fluorescent QD-labeled aptamer (QD-Apt) nanoprobe by conjugating GBI-10 aptamer to the QD surface. GBI-10 is a single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) aptamer for tenascin-C, which distributes on the surface of glioma cells as a dominant extracellular matrix protein. The QD-Apt nanoprobe can recognize the tenascin-C on the human glioma cell surface, which will be helpful for the development of new convenient and sensitive in vitro diagnostic assays for glioma. The QD-Apt nanoprobe has particular features such as strong fluorescence, stability, monodispersity and uniformity. In addition, this probe preparation method is universal, so it is expected to provide a new type of stable nanoprobe for high-throughput and fast biosensing detection and bioimaging. New methods for real-time and dynamic tracking and imaging can be accordingly developed.

  17. Integrated genomic characterization of IDH1-mutant glioma malignant progression

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Hanwen; Harmanci, Akdes Serin; Erson-Omay, E Zeynep; Li, Jie; Coşkun, Süleyman; Simon, Matthias; Krischek, Boris; Özduman, Koray; Omay, S Bülent; Sorensen, Eric A; Turcan, Şevin; Bakırcığlu, Mehmet; Carrión-Grant, Geneive; Murray, Phillip B; Clark, Victoria E; Ercan-Sencicek, A Gulhan; Knight, James; Sencar, Leman; Altınok, Selin; Kaulen, Leon D; Gülez, Burcu; Timmer, Marco; Schramm, Johannes; Mishra-Gorur, Ketu; Henegariu, Octavian; Moliterno, Jennifer; Louvi, Angeliki; Chan, Timothy A; Tannheimer, Stacey L; Pamir, M Necmettin; Vortmeyer, Alexander O; Bilguvar, Kaya; Yasuno, Katsuhito; Günel, Murat

    2016-01-01

    Gliomas represent approximately 30% of all central nervous system tumors and 80% of malignant brain tumors1. To understand the molecular mechanisms underlying the malignant progression of low-grade gliomas with mutations in IDH1 (encoding isocitrate dehydrogenase 1), we studied paired tumor samples from 41 patients, comparing higher-grade, progressed samples to their lower-grade counterparts. Integrated genomic analyses, including whole-exome sequencing and copy number, gene expression and DNA methylation profiling, demonstrated nonlinear clonal expansion of the original tumors and identified oncogenic pathways driving progression. These include activation of the MYC and RTK-RAS-PI3K pathways and upregulation of the FOXM1- and E2F2-mediated cell cycle transitions, as well as epigenetic silencing of developmental transcription factor genes bound by Polycomb repressive complex 2 in human embryonic stem cells. Our results not only provide mechanistic insight into the genetic and epigenetic mechanisms driving glioma progression but also identify inhibition of the bromodomain and extraterminal (BET) family as a potential therapeutic approach. PMID:26618343

  18. Atypical crossmodal emotional integration in patients with gliomas.

    PubMed

    Luherne-du Boullay, Viviane; Plaza, Monique; Perrault, Annabelle; Capelle, Laurent; Chaby, Laurence

    2014-11-01

    The relevance of emotional perception in interpersonal relationships and social cognition has been well documented. Although brain diseases might impair emotional processing, studies concerning emotional recognition in patients with brain tumours are relatively rare. The aim of this study was to explore emotional recognition in patients with gliomas in three conditions (visual, auditory and crossmodal) and to analyse how tumour-related variables (notably, tumour localisation) and patient-related variables influence emotion recognition. Twenty six patients with gliomas and 26 matched healthy controls were instructed to identify 5 basic emotions and a neutral expression, which were displayed through visual, auditory and crossmodal stimuli. Relative to the controls, recognition was weakly impaired in the patient group under both visual and auditory conditions, but the performances were comparable in the crossmodal condition. Additional analyses using the 'race model' suggest differences in multisensory emotional integration abilities across the groups, which were potentially correlated with the executive disorders observed in the patients. These observations support the view of compensatory mechanisms in the case of gliomas that might preserve the quality of life and help maintain the normal social and professional lives often observed in these patients. PMID:25463143

  19. Circular RNA profile in gliomas revealed by identification tool UROBORUS.

    PubMed

    Song, Xiaofeng; Zhang, Naibo; Han, Ping; Moon, Byoung-San; Lai, Rose K; Wang, Kai; Lu, Wange

    2016-05-19

    Recent evidence suggests that many endogenous circular RNAs (circRNAs) may play roles in biological processes. However, the expression patterns and functions of circRNAs in human diseases are not well understood. Computationally identifying circRNAs from total RNA-seq data is a primary step in studying their expression pattern and biological roles. In this work, we have developed a computational pipeline named UROBORUS to detect circRNAs in total RNA-seq data. By applying UROBORUS to RNA-seq data from 46 gliomas and normal brain samples, we detected thousands of circRNAs supported by at least two read counts, followed by successful experimental validation on 24 circRNAs from the randomly selected 27 circRNAs. UROBORUS is an efficient tool that can detect circRNAs with low expression levels in total RNA-seq without RNase R treatment. The circRNAs expression profiling revealed more than 476 circular RNAs differentially expressed in control brain tissues and gliomas. Together with parental gene expression, we found that circRNA and its parental gene have diversified expression patterns in gliomas and control brain tissues. This study establishes an efficient and sensitive approach for predicting circRNAs using total RNA-seq data. The UROBORUS pipeline can be accessed freely for non-commercial purposes at http://uroborus.openbioinformatics.org/. PMID:26873924

  20. Stereotactic radiosurgery of deeply seated low grade gliomas.

    PubMed

    Barcia, J A; Barcia-Salorio, J L; Ferrer, C; Ferrer, E; Algás, R; Hernández, G

    1994-01-01

    The authors report the results of a series of 16 cases of low-grade gliomas in whom radiosurgery was performed. This series started in 1977. All the tumours received a single radiosurgical session (with a mean dose of 21.7 Gy, 5-10 mm. collimator; one patient received two sessions and in another patient two different targets were irradiated in the same session). Prior to radiosurgery, six patients received conventional external fractionated radiotherapy, with two lateral fields of up to 10 x 10 cm. and a mean dose of 55.1 Gy and another six patients with tumours less than 5 cm. in diameter, received stereotactic radiotherapy using four fields of up to 5 x 5 cm. and a mean dose of 53.1 Gy. In both cases, conventional fractionation was used, giving a dose of 1.8 to 2 Gy/day. The tumour disappeared in 8 cases (50%) and shunk or ceased its growth in 5 additional cases (31%). In 3 cases of brainstem gliomas in which the clinical condition was previously very poor there was no evolutional change and the patients eventually died. We conclude that radiosurgery is effective in the treatment of deeply seated low-grade gliomas, where it may become the treatment of choice in the absence of other more definitive choices. PMID:7717138

  1. Expression profile of parkin isoforms in human gliomas.

    PubMed

    Maugeri, Grazia; D'Amico, Agata Grazia; Magro, Gaetano; Salvatorelli, Lucia; Barbagallo, Giuseppe M V; Saccone, Salvatore; Drago, Filippo; Cavallaro, Sebastiano; D'Agata, Velia

    2015-10-01

    Mutations of parkin gene are not restricted to familial forms of Parkinsonism but they also occur in a wide variety of malignancies including gliomas. Parkin over-expression reduces glioma cells proliferation and analysis of its expression is predictive for the survival outcome of patients with glioma. To date have been identified 21 parkin alternative splice variants. However, most of the studies have focused their attention exclusively on full-length protein. In the present study, the expression profile of parkin isoforms in different grades of astrocytomas was analyzed for the first time, in order to evaluate their involvement in this malignancy. Furthermore, to investigate their role in cellular processes, their expression in three glioblastoma cell lines was analyzed following treatment with the proteasome inhibitor MG132, or induction of mitophagy with CCCP, or after serum deprivation. Results suggested that H20, H1 and H5 isoforms are always expressed in tumors both in vivo and in vitro models. Therefore, these isoforms might be used as specific biomarkers to develop a prognostic tool for brain tumors. PMID:26238155

  2. Drug encapsulated aerosolized microspheres as a biodegradable, intelligent glioma therapy.

    PubMed

    Floyd, J Alaina; Galperin, Anna; Ratner, Buddy D

    2016-02-01

    The grim prognosis for patients diagnosed with malignant gliomas necessitates the development of new therapeutic strategies for localized and sustained drug delivery to combat tumor drug resistance and regrowth. Here we introduce drug encapsulated aerosolized microspheres as a biodegradable, intelligent glioma therapy (DREAM BIG therapy). DREAM BIG therapy is envisioned to deliver three chemotherapeutics, temporally staged over one year, via a bioadhesive, biodegradable spray directly to the brain surgical site after tumor excision. In this proof-of-principle article exploring key components of the DREAM BIG therapy prototype, rhodamine B (RB) encapsulated poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) and immunoglobulin G (IgG) encapsulated poly(lactic acid) microspheres were formulated and characterized. The encapsulation efficiency of RB and IgG and the release kinetics of the model drugs from the microspheres were elucidated in addition to the release kinetics of RB from poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) microspheres formulated in a degradable poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) solution. The successful aerosolized application onto brain tissue ex-vivo demonstrated the conformal adhesion of the RB encapsulated poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) microspheres to the convoluted brain surface mediated by the thermoresponsive carrier, poly(N-isopropylacrylamide). These preliminary results suggest the potential of the DREAM BIG therapy for future use with multiple chemotherapeutics and microsphere types to combat gliomas at a localized site. PMID:26238392

  3. Second Surgery in Insular Low-Grade Gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Ius, Tamara; Pauletto, Giada; Cesselli, Daniela; Isola, Miriam; Turella, Luca; Budai, Riccardo; DeMaglio, Giovanna; Eleopra, Roberto; Fadiga, Luciano; Lettieri, Christian; Pizzolitto, Stefano; Beltrami, Carlo Alberto; Skrap, Miran

    2015-01-01

    Background. Given the technical difficulties, a limited number of works have been published on insular gliomas surgery and risk factors for tumor recurrence (TR) are poorly documented. Objective. The aim of the study was to determine TR in adult patients with initial diagnosis of insular Low-Grade Gliomas (LGGs) that subsequently underwent second surgery. Methods. A consecutive series of 53 patients with insular LGGs was retrospectively reviewed; 23 patients had two operations for TR. Results. At the time of second surgery, almost half of the patients had experienced progression into high-grade gliomas (HGGs). Univariate analysis showed that TR is influenced by the following: extent of resection (EOR) (P < 0.002), ΔVT2T1 value (P < 0.001), histological diagnosis of oligodendroglioma (P = 0.017), and mutation of IDH1 (P = 0.022). The multivariate analysis showed that EOR at first surgery was the independent predictor for TR (P < 0.001). Conclusions. In patients with insular LGG the EOR at first surgery represents the major predictive factor for TR. At time of TR, more than 50% of cases had progressed in HGG, raising the question of the oncological management after the first surgery. PMID:26539503

  4. A malignant cellular network in gliomas: potential clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Osswald, Matthias; Solecki, Gergely; Wick, Wolfgang; Winkler, Frank

    2016-04-01

    The recent discovery of distinct, ultra-long, and highly functional membrane protrusions in gliomas, particularly in astrocytomas, extends our understanding of how these tumors progress in the brain and how they resist therapies. In this article, we will focus on ideas on how to target these membrane protrusions, for which we have suggested the term "tumor microtubes" (TMs), and the malignant multicellular network they form. First, we discuss TM-specific features and their differential biological functions known so far. Second, the connection between 1p/19q codeletion and the inability to form functional TMs via certain neurodevelopmental pathways is presented; this could provide an explanation for the distinct clinical features of oligodendrogliomas. Third, the role of TMs for primary and potentially also adaptive resistance to cytotoxic therapies is highlighted. Fourth, avenues for therapeutic approaches to inhibit TM formation and/or function are discussed, with a focus on disruption (or exploitation) of network functionality. Finally, we propose ideas on how to use TMs as a biomarker in glioma patients. An increasing understanding of TMs in clinical and preclinical settings will show us whether they really are a long-sought-after Achilles' heel of treatment-resistant gliomas. PMID:26995789

  5. Epigenetic silencing of KAZALD1 confers a better prognosis and is associated with malignant transformation/progression in glioma.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongjun; Feng, Ying; Bao, Zhaoshi; Jiang, Chuanlu; Yan, Wei; Wang, Yongzhi; Zhang, Chuanbao; Liu, Yanwei; Zhang, Quangeng; Zhang, Wei; Jiang, Chuanlu

    2013-11-01

    In order to more thoroughly analyze aberrant DNA methylation in glioma, we applied a large cohort methylation microarray including 119 glioma samples. Six genes, ADCY1, KAZALD1, KLF4, SLMAP, TETRAN and TP53INP1, were screened out through significance analysis of microarray (SAM), survival Cox-regression and certain other pre-set conditions. We focused on the KAZALD1 oncogene. KAZALD1, also known as IGFBP-rP10, belongs to the IGFBP family. We found that KAZALD1 was hypomethylated in high-grade glioma (anaplastic gliomas and glioblastomas) compared to low-grade glioma (astrocytoma, oligodendrocytoma and oligoastrocytoma) using methylation microarrays (p<0.001). Immunohistochemistry (IHC) of 91 glioma samples showed that the KAZALD1 expression scores of high-grade glioma samples were higher compared to the scores of low-grade gliomas (p<0.001). In high-grade gliomas, overall survival (OS) was shorter for patients with KAZALD1 hypomethylation or overexpression compared to those without. Decreased KAZALD1 expression in glioma inhibited cell proliferation and invasion both in vitro and in vivo. On the basis of these observations and the results from subset analysis, it is reasonable to conclude that KAZALD1 promoter hypomethylation is an important prognostic biomarker in glioma. KAZALD1 promotes glioma malignant progression through invasion and proliferation. PMID:24002581

  6. The therapeutic efficacy of the oncolytic virus Delta24-RGD in a murine glioma model depends primarily on antitumor immunity

    PubMed Central

    Kleijn, Anne; Kloezeman, Jenneke; Treffers-Westerlaken, Elike; Fulci, Giulia; Leenstra, Sieger; Dirven, Clemens; Debets, Reno; Lamfers, Martine

    2014-01-01

    Oncolytic viruses selectively lyse tumor cells, making these agents a promising treatment modality for glioma. Accumulating data suggest that the immune system plays an important role in the anti-glioma activity of oncolytic viruses. In an immune competent glioma model, the therapeutic effect of the oncolytic adenovirus Delta24-RGD was found to depend primarily on antitumor immune responses. PMID:25941622

  7. Increasing the efficacy of antitumor glioma vaccines by photodynamic therapy and local injection of allogeneic glioma cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christie, Catherine E.; Peng, Qian; Madsen, Steen J.; Uzal, Francisco A.; Hirschberg, Henry

    2016-03-01

    Immunotherapy of brain tumors involves the stimulation of an antitumor immune response. This type of therapy can be targeted specifically to tumor cells thus sparing surrounding normal brain. Due to the presence of the blood-brain barrier, the brain is relatively isolated from the systemic circulation and, as such, the initiation of significant immune responses is more limited than other types of cancers. The purpose of this study was to show that the efficacy of tumor primed antigen presenting macrophage vaccines could be increased by: (1) PDT of the priming tumor cells, and (2) injection of allogeneic glioma cells directly into brain tumors. Experiments were conducted in an in vivo brain tumor model using Fisher rats and BT4C (allogeneic) and F98 (syngeneic) glioma cells. Preliminary results showed that vaccination alone had significantly less inhibitory effect on F98 tumor growth compared to the combination of vaccination and allogeneic cell (BT4C) injection.

  8. Retinoids in the treatment of glioma: a new perspective

    PubMed Central

    Mawson, Anthony R

    2012-01-01

    Primary brain tumors are among the top ten causes of cancer-related deaths in the US. Malignant gliomas account for approximately 70% of the 22,500 new cases of malignant primary brain tumors diagnosed in adults each year and are associated with high morbidity and mortality. Despite optimal treatment, the prognosis for patients with gliomas remains poor. The use of retinoids (vitamin A and its congeners) in the treatment of certain tumors was originally based on the assumption that these conditions were associated with an underlying deficiency of vitamin A and that supplementation with pharmacological doses would correct the deficiency. Yet the results of retinoid treatment have been only modestly beneficial and usually short-lived. Studies also indicate that vitamin A excess and supplementation have pro-oxidant effects and are associated with increased risks of mortality from cancer and other diseases. The therapeutic role of vitamin A in cancer thus remains uncertain and a new perspective on the facts is needed. The modest and temporary benefits of retinoid treatment could result from a process of feedback inhibition, whereby exogenous retinoid temporarily inhibits the endogenous synthesis of these compounds. In fact, repeated and/or excessive exposure of the tissues to endogenous retinoic acid may contribute to carcinogenesis. Gliomas, in particular, may result from an imbalance in retinoid receptor expression initiated by environmental factors that increase the endogenous production of retinoic acid in glia. At the receptor level, it is proposed that this imbalance is characterized by excessive expression of retinoic acid receptor-α (RARα) and reduced expression of retinoic acid receptor-β (RARβ). This suggests a potential new treatment strategy for gliomas, possibly even at a late stage of the disease, ie, to combine the use of a RARα antagonist and a RARβ agonist. According to this hypothesis, the RARα antagonist would be expected to inhibit RAR

  9. The epidemiology of glioma in adults: a “state of the science” review

    PubMed Central

    Ostrom, Quinn T.; Bauchet, Luc; Davis, Faith G.; Deltour, Isabelle; Fisher, James L.; Langer, Chelsea Eastman; Pekmezci, Melike; Schwartzbaum, Judith A.; Turner, Michelle C.; Walsh, Kyle M.; Wrensch, Margaret R.; Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill S.

    2014-01-01

    Gliomas are the most common primary intracranial tumor, representing 81% of malignant brain tumors. Although relatively rare, they cause significant mortality and morbidity. Glioblastoma, the most common glioma histology (∼45% of all gliomas), has a 5-year relative survival of ∼5%. A small portion of these tumors are caused by Mendelian disorders, including neurofibromatosis, tuberous sclerosis, and Li-Fraumeni syndrome. Genomic analyses of glioma have also produced new evidence about risk and prognosis. Recently discovered biomarkers that indicate improved survival include O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase methylation, isocitrate dehydrogenase mutation, and a glioma cytosine–phosphate–guanine island methylator phenotype. Genome-wide association studies have identified heritable risk alleles within 7 genes that are associated with increased risk of glioma. Many risk factors have been examined as potential contributors to glioma risk. Most significantly, these include an increase in risk by exposure to ionizing radiation and a decrease in risk by history of allergies or atopic disease(s). The potential influence of occupational exposures and cellular phones has also been examined, with inconclusive results. We provide a “state of the science” review of current research into causes and risk factors for gliomas in adults. PMID:24842956

  10. Preclinical TSPO Ligand PET to Visualize Human Glioma Xenotransplants: A Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    Buck, Jason R.; McKinley, Eliot T.; Fu, Allie; Abel, Ty W.; Thompson, Reid C.; Chambless, Lola; Watchmaker, Jennifer M.; Harty, James P.; Cooper, Michael K.; Manning, H. Charles

    2015-01-01

    Current positron emission tomography (PET) imaging biomarkers for detection of infiltrating gliomas are limited. Translocator protein (TSPO) is a novel and promising biomarker for glioma PET imaging. To validate TSPO as a potential target for molecular imaging of glioma, TSPO expression was assayed in a tumor microarray containing 37 high-grade (III, IV) gliomas. TSPO staining was detected in all tumor specimens. Subsequently, PET imaging was performed with an aryloxyanilide-based TSPO ligand, [18F]PBR06, in primary orthotopic xenograft models of WHO grade III and IV gliomas. Selective uptake of [18F]PBR06 in engrafted tumor was measured. Furthermore, PET imaging with [18F]PBR06 demonstrated infiltrative glioma growth that was undetectable by traditional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Preliminary PET with [18F]PBR06 demonstrated a preferential tumor-to-normal background ratio in comparison to 2-deoxy-2-[18F]fluoro-D-glucose ([18F]FDG). These results suggest that TSPO PET imaging with such high-affinity radiotracers may represent a novel strategy to characterize distinct molecular features of glioma growth, as well as better define the extent of glioma infiltration for therapeutic purposes. PMID:26517124

  11. Alisertib and Fractionated Stereotactic Radiosurgery in Treating Patients With Recurrent High Grade Gliomas

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-11

    Adult Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Adult Anaplastic Ependymoma; Adult Anaplastic Oligodendroglioma; Adult Brain Stem Glioma; Adult Diffuse Astrocytoma; Adult Giant Cell Glioblastoma; Adult Glioblastoma; Adult Gliosarcoma; Adult Mixed Glioma; Adult Oligodendroglioma; Adult Pilocytic Astrocytoma; Adult Pineal Gland Astrocytoma; Adult Subependymal Giant Cell Astrocytoma; Recurrent Adult Brain Tumor

  12. Recent advances in diagnosis and treatment of gliomas using chlorotoxin-based bioconjugates

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Yongjun; Zhao, Jinhua; Qiao, Wenli; Chen, Kai

    2014-01-01

    Malignant gliomas, especially glioblastoma multiforme, are the most widely distributed and deadliest brain tumors because of their resistance to surgical and medical treatment. Research of glioma-specific bioconjugates for diagnosis and therapy developed rapidly during the past several years. Many studies have demonstrated that chlorotoxin (CTX) and Buthus martensii Karsch chlorotoxin (BmK CT) specifically inhibited glioma cells growth and metastasis, and accelerated tumor apoptosis. The bioconjugates of CTX or BmK CT with other molecules have played an increasing role in diagnostic imaging and treatment of gliomas. To date, CTX-based bioconjugates have achieved great success in phase I/II clinical trials about safety profiles. Here, we will provide a review on the important role of ion channels in the underlying mechanisms of gliomas invasive growth and how CTX suppresses gliomas proliferation and migration. We will summarize the recent advances in the applications of CTX bioconjugates for gliomas diagnosis and treatment. In addition, we will review recent studies on BmK CT bioconjugates and compare their efficacies with CTX derivatives. Finally, we will address advantages and challenges in the use of CTX or BmK CT bioconjugates as specific agents for theranostic applications in gliomas. PMID:25143859

  13. Reduced Expression of the Hyaluronan and Proteoglycan Link Proteins in Malignant Gliomas*

    PubMed Central

    Sim, Hosung; Hu, Bin; Viapiano, Mariano S.

    2009-01-01

    Malignant gliomas have a distinctive ability to infiltrate the brain parenchyma and disrupt the neural extracellular matrix that inhibits motility of axons and normal neural cells. Chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPGs) are among the major inhibitory components in the neural matrix, but surprisingly, some are up-regulated in gliomas and act as pro-invasive signals. In the normal brain, CSPGs are thought to associate with hyaluronic acid and glycoproteins such as the tenascins and link proteins to form the matrix scaffold. Here, we examined for the first time the expression of link proteins in human brain and malignant gliomas. Our results indicate that HAPLN4 and HAPLN2 are the predominant members of this family in the adult human brain but are strongly reduced in the tumor parenchyma. To test if their absence was related to a pro-invasive gain of function of CSPGs, we expressed HAPLN4 in glioma cells in combination with the CSPG brevican. Surprisingly, HAPLN4 increased glioma cell adhesion and migration and even potentiated the motogenic effect of brevican. Further characterization revealed that HAPLN4 expressed in glioma cells was largely soluble and did not reproduce the strong, hyaluronan-independent association of the native protein to brain subcellular membranes. Taken together, our results suggest that the tumor parenchyma is rich in CSPGs that are not associated to HAPLNs and could instead interact with other extracellular matrix proteins produced by glioma cells. This dissociation may contribute to changes in the matrix scaffold caused by invasive glioma cells. PMID:19633295

  14. Preclinical TSPO Ligand PET to Visualize Human Glioma Xenotransplants: A Preliminary Study.

    PubMed

    Buck, Jason R; McKinley, Eliot T; Fu, Allie; Abel, Ty W; Thompson, Reid C; Chambless, Lola; Watchmaker, Jennifer M; Harty, James P; Cooper, Michael K; Manning, H Charles

    2015-01-01

    Current positron emission tomography (PET) imaging biomarkers for detection of infiltrating gliomas are limited. Translocator protein (TSPO) is a novel and promising biomarker for glioma PET imaging. To validate TSPO as a potential target for molecular imaging of glioma, TSPO expression was assayed in a tumor microarray containing 37 high-grade (III, IV) gliomas. TSPO staining was detected in all tumor specimens. Subsequently, PET imaging was performed with an aryloxyanilide-based TSPO ligand, [18F]PBR06, in primary orthotopic xenograft models of WHO grade III and IV gliomas. Selective uptake of [18F]PBR06 in engrafted tumor was measured. Furthermore, PET imaging with [18F]PBR06 demonstrated infiltrative glioma growth that was undetectable by traditional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Preliminary PET with [18F]PBR06 demonstrated a preferential tumor-to-normal background ratio in comparison to 2-deoxy-2-[18F]fluoro-D-glucose ([18F]FDG). These results suggest that TSPO PET imaging with such high-affinity radiotracers may represent a novel strategy to characterize distinct molecular features of glioma growth, as well as better define the extent of glioma infiltration for therapeutic purposes. PMID:26517124

  15. The role of Alix in the proliferation of human glioma cells.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chengjin; Ban, Na; Dai, Shirong; Zhang, Xiubing; Zhang, Li; Xu, Peng; Chen, Wenjuan; Sun, Jie; Bao, Zhen; Chang, Hao; Wang, Donglin; Ren, Jianbing

    2016-06-01

    Apoptosis-linked-gene-2-interacting protein 1 (Alix) is involved in the endosome-lysosome system in the cytoplasm. The normal function of Alix may be altered by ALG-2 toward a destructive role during active cell death. Alix also may play a role in regulation of cell proliferation. However, the role of Alix in human glioma has not been elucidated yet. This study intended to clarify the relationship between Alix and glioma pathologic grades and its role in the proliferation of glioma cells. Our findings showed that Alix protein concentrations were significantly elevated in high-grade glioma tissue compared with low-grade glioma (P < .0001). Immunohistochemical study revealed that Alix was overexpressed in 75 resected glioma tissues and may forecast poor survival. Alix expression was increased in resting serum-stimulated glioma cells. Additionally, we reduced Alix expression in U251MG cells and then found that cell viability was decreased significantly when p21 expression increased. Colony formation assay and flow cytometry analysis demonstrated that reduced Alix expression may lead to growth inhibition and cell cycle arrest. In summary, our findings suggest that Alix plays an important role in the proliferation of glioma cells and may be a novel therapeutic target. PMID:26980041

  16. Methylation-induced silencing of maspin contributes to the proliferation of human glioma cells

    PubMed Central

    XU, LIANG; LIU, HONGYUAN; YU, JU; WANG, ZHONGYONG; ZHU, QING; LI, ZONGPING; ZHONG, QI; ZHANG, SHUYU; QU, MINGQI; LAN, QING

    2016-01-01

    Maspin, a member of the serpin superfamily of serine protease inhibitors, has been reported to be involved in cancer initiation and progression. However, the expression of maspin and its expression regulation in glioma remain unknown. In the present study, we aimed to investigate the function of maspin in glioma cells and its regulatory mechanism. We found that the expression of maspin was silenced in glioma cells and tissues. Although maspin had no effect on the migration and invasion of human glioma cells in vitro, overexpression of maspin inhibited cell growth in U87 cells. We showed that the methylase inhibitor 5-Aza-2′-deoxycytidine induced the expression of maspin in glioma cell lines. Furthermore, both U87 and U251 cells showed hypermethylation in the maspin promoter. In addition, bisulphite sequencing analysis indicated that 16 CpG sites in the promoter were completely methylated in glioma cells and cancerous tissues, while CpG dinucleotides in the maspin promoter were unmethylated in normal brain tissues. Our data suggest that methylation-induced silencing of maspin contributes to the proliferation of human glioma cells, and maspin may be a potential therapeutic target in glioma. PMID:27177016

  17. Galectin-1-mediated biochemical controls of melanoma and glioma aggressive behavior.

    PubMed

    Lefranc, Florence; Mathieu, Véronique; Kiss, Robert

    2011-09-26

    Gliomas and melanomas are associated with dismal prognosis because of their marked intrinsic resistance to proapoptotic stimuli, such as conventional chemotherapy and radiotherapy, as well as their ability to escape immune cell attacks. In addition, gliomas and melanomas display pronounced neoangiogenesis. Galectin-1 is a hypoxia-sensitive protein, which is abundantly secreted by glioma and melanoma cells, which displays marked proangiogenic effects. It also provides immune tolerogenic environments to melanoma and glioma cells through the killing of activated T cells that attack these tumor cells. Galectin-1 protects glioma and melanoma cells against cytotoxic insults (including chemotherapy and radiotherapy) through a direct role in the unfolded protein response. Altogether, these facts clearly point to galectin-1 as an important target to be combated in gliomas and melanomas in order to: (1) weaken the defenses of these two types of cancers against radiotherapy, chemotherapy and immunotherapy/vaccine therapy; and (2) reinforce antiangiogenic therapies. In the present article, we review the biochemical and molecular biology-related pathways controlled by galectin-1, which are actually beneficial for melanoma and glioma cells, and therefore detrimental for melanoma and glioma patients. PMID:21949569

  18. Identification of low miR-105 expression as a novel poor prognostic predictor for human glioma

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Yanlei; Chen, Ling; Bao, Yijun; Li, Zhipeng; Cui, Run; Li, Guangyu; Wang, Yunjie

    2015-01-01

    Glioma is the most common and aggressive brain tumor with poor clinical outcome. Identification and development of new biomarkers could be beneficial for diagnosis and prognosis of glioma patients. Recent studies have showed evidences that dysregulation of microRNAs (miRNAs) is involved in glioma tumorigenesis. Therefore, we attempted to identify specific miRNAs as prognostic and predictive markers for glioma. We statistically compared expression profile of 365 miRNAs between WHO grade IV and grade III gliomas, by qRT-PCR. MiR-105 was identified as a remarkably decreased miRNA in grade IV gliomas compared with grade III gliomas (P=0.012, fold change =0.04). We subsequently examined its expression levels in an independent series of gliomas, and statistically analyzed the associations between miR-105 expression and clinicopathological characteristics and survivals of these glioma patients. MiR-105 showed remarkably decreased expression in gliomas as compared to non-neoplastic brains. And grade IV gliomas had significantly lower miR-105 expression compared with grade III and II gliomas (both P<0.001). Additionally, low miR-105 expression was statistically associated with advanced tumor grade, advanced patient’s age and low pre-operative Karnofsky performance score (all P<0.001). Furthermore, patients with low miR-105 expression had significantly poorer survival by Kaplan-Meier method (P<0.001). Multivariate analysis indicated miR-105 as an independent prognostic indicator for glioma patients (P=0.018, risk ratio =4.2). Our results suggested that low expression of miR-105 may correlate with unfavorable clinical outcome and be involved in tumorigenesis and aggressive progression of glioma. And miR-105 may be a novel biomarker in prognostic prediction for glioma. PMID:26379879

  19. Securin promotes migration and invasion via matrix metalloproteinases in glioma cells

    PubMed Central

    YAN, HAICHENG; WANG, WEI; DOU, CHANGWU; TIAN, FUMING; QI, SONGTAO

    2015-01-01

    Human securin, encoded by pituitary tumor transforming gene 1, is implicated in several oncogenic processes in the pathogenesis of brain tumors, including glioma. The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of securin on the migration and invasion of glioma cells. The results revealed that the overexpression of securin in glioma LN-229 cells significantly increased the invasion and transmigration abilities. By contrast, these abilities were significantly reduced by the downregulation of securin in glioma U373 cells. Furthermore, the results demonstrated that securin overexpression and downregulation significantly increased and decreased the levels of matrix metalloproteinase 2 and 9, respectively. These findings indicate a promotive role for securin in glioma migration and invasion, which may involve the action of matrix metalloproteinases. PMID:26137166

  20. Clinicopathological and molecular features of malignant optic pathway glioma in an adult.

    PubMed

    Nagaishi, Masaya; Sugiura, Yoshiki; Takano, Issei; Tanaka, Yoshihiro; Suzuki, Kensuke; Yokoo, Hideaki; Hyodo, Akio

    2015-01-01

    Malignant gliomas of the optic pathway are rare, and their genetic alterations are poorly understood. We describe a 64-year-old woman with anaplastic astrocytoma originating from the optic pathway, together with the molecular features. She presented with progressive visual field loss, and a biopsy sample was obtained from the lesion in the optic chiasm. She underwent radiosurgery concomitant with temozolomide chemotherapy, and subsequently remained stable for 10 months after initial presentation. Molecular analysis indicated that the mass may have shared common molecular genetic features with conventional primary astrocytic gliomas but not pilocytic gliomas, which supported the morphologic diagnosis of anaplastic astrocytoma. Molecular analysis of malignant optic pathway gliomas in adults is useful for distinguishing between high-grade gliomas and anaplastic pilocytic astrocytomas, and for determining further therapy. PMID:25150758

  1. The cellular origin for malignant glioma and prospects for clinical advancements

    PubMed Central

    Zong, Hui; Verhaak, Roel GW; Canoll, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Glioma remains incurable despite great advancements in medicine. Targeting the cell of origin for gliomas could bring great hope for patients. However, as a collection of diverse diseases, each subtype of glioma could derive from a distinct cell of origin. To resolve such a complex problem, one must use multiple research approaches to gain deep insights. Here we review current evidence regarding the cell of origin from clinical observations, whole-genome molecular pathology and glioma animal models. We conclude that neural stem cells, glial progenitors (including oligodendrocyte progenitor cells) and astrocytes could all serve as cells of origin for gliomas, and that cells incurring initial mutations (cells of mutation) might not transform, while their progeny cells could instead transform and act as cells of origin. Further studies with multidisciplinary approaches are needed to link each subtype to a particular cell of origin, and to develop effective therapies that target the signaling network within these cells. PMID:22616703

  2. Application of iron oxide nanoparticles in glioma imaging and therapy: from bench to bedside

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Heng; Zhang, Jun; Chen, Xiao; Du, Xue-Song; Zhang, Jin-Long; Liu, Gang; Zhang, Wei-Guo

    2016-04-01

    Gliomas are the most common primary brain tumors and have a very dismal prognosis. However, recent advancements in nanomedicine and nanotechnology provide opportunities for personalized treatment regimens to improve the poor prognosis of patients suffering from glioma. This comprehensive review starts with an outline of the current status facing glioma. It then provides an overview of the state-of-the-art applications of iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) to glioma diagnostics and therapeutics, including MR contrast enhancement, drug delivery, cell labeling and tracking, magnetic hyperthermia treatment and magnetic particle imaging. It also addresses current challenges associated with the biological barriers and IONP design with an emphasis on recent advances and innovative approaches for glioma targeting strategies. Opportunities for future development are highlighted.

  3. Application of iron oxide nanoparticles in glioma imaging and therapy: from bench to bedside.

    PubMed

    Liu, Heng; Zhang, Jun; Chen, Xiao; Du, Xue-Song; Zhang, Jin-Long; Liu, Gang; Zhang, Wei-Guo

    2016-04-14

    Gliomas are the most common primary brain tumors and have a very dismal prognosis. However, recent advancements in nanomedicine and nanotechnology provide opportunities for personalized treatment regimens to improve the poor prognosis of patients suffering from glioma. This comprehensive review starts with an outline of the current status facing glioma. It then provides an overview of the state-of-the-art applications of iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) to glioma diagnostics and therapeutics, including MR contrast enhancement, drug delivery, cell labeling and tracking, magnetic hyperthermia treatment and magnetic particle imaging. It also addresses current challenges associated with the biological barriers and IONP design with an emphasis on recent advances and innovative approaches for glioma targeting strategies. Opportunities for future development are highlighted. PMID:27029509

  4. Germline mutations in shelterin complex genes are associated with familial glioma.

    PubMed

    Bainbridge, Matthew N; Armstrong, Georgina N; Gramatges, M Monica; Bertuch, Alison A; Jhangiani, Shalini N; Doddapaneni, Harsha; Lewis, Lora; Tombrello, Joseph; Tsavachidis, Spyros; Liu, Yanhong; Jalali, Ali; Plon, Sharon E; Lau, Ching C; Parsons, Donald W; Claus, Elizabeth B; Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill; Il'yasova, Dora; Schildkraut, Joellen; Ali-Osman, Francis; Sadetzki, Siegal; Johansen, Christoffer; Houlston, Richard S; Jenkins, Robert B; Lachance, Daniel; Olson, Sara H; Bernstein, Jonine L; Merrell, Ryan T; Wrensch, Margaret R; Walsh, Kyle M; Davis, Faith G; Lai, Rose; Shete, Sanjay; Aldape, Kenneth; Amos, Christopher I; Thompson, Patricia A; Muzny, Donna M; Gibbs, Richard A; Melin, Beatrice S; Bondy, Melissa L

    2015-01-01

    Gliomas are the most common brain tumor, with several histological subtypes of various malignancy grade. The genetic contribution to familial glioma is not well understood. Using whole exome sequencing of 90 individuals from 55 families, we identified two families with mutations in POT1 (p.G95C, p.E450X), a member of the telomere shelterin complex, shared by both affected individuals in each family and predicted to impact DNA binding and TPP1 binding, respectively. Validation in a separate cohort of 264 individuals from 246 families identified an additional mutation in POT1 (p.D617Efs), also predicted to disrupt TPP1 binding. All families with POT1 mutations had affected members with oligodendroglioma, a specific subtype of glioma more sensitive to irradiation. These findings are important for understanding the origin of glioma and could have importance for the future diagnostics and treatment of glioma. PMID:25482530

  5. [Glutamate and malignant gliomas, from epilepsia to biological aggressiveness: therapeutic implications].

    PubMed

    Blecic, Serge; Rynkowski, Michal; De Witte, Olivier; Lefranc, Florence

    2013-09-01

    In this review article, we describe the unrecognized roles of glutamate and glutamate receptors in malignant glioma biology. The neurotransmitter glutamate released from malignant glioma cells in the extracellular matrix is responsible for seizure induction and at higher concentration neuronal cell death. This neuronal cell death will create vacated place for tumor growth. Glutamate also stimulates the growth and the migration of glial tumor cells by means of the activation of glutamate receptors on glioma cells in a paracrine and autocrine manner. The multitude of effects of glutamate in glioma biology supports the rationale for pharmacological targeting of glutamate receptors and transporters in the adjuvant treatment of malignant gliomas in neurology and neuro-oncology. Using the website www.clinicaltrials.gov/ as a reference - a service developed by the National Library of Medicine for the National Health Institute in USA - we have evoked the few clinical trials completed and currently ongoing with therapies targeting the glutamate receptors. PMID:23883552

  6. Eckol suppresses maintenance of stemness and malignancies in glioma stem-like cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hyun, Kyung-Hwan; Yoon, Chang-Hwan; Kim, Rae-Kwon; Lim, Eun-Jung; An, Sungkwan; Park, Myung-Jin; Hyun, Jin-Won; Suh, Yongjoon; Kim, Min-Jung; Lee, Su-Jae

    2011-07-01

    A subpopulation of cancer cells with stem cell properties is responsible for tumor maintenance and progression, and may contribute to resistance to anticancer treatments. Thus, compounds that target cancer stem-like cells could be usefully applied to destroy cancer. In this study, we investigated the effect of Eckol, a phlorotannin compound, on stemness and malignancies in glioma stem-like cells. To determine whether Eckol targets glioma stem-like cells, we examined whether Eckol treatment could change the expression levels of glioma stem-like cell markers and self-renewal-related proteins as well as the sphere forming ability, and the sensitivity to anticancer treatments. Alterations in the malignant properties of sphere-derived cells by Eckol were also investigated by soft-agar colony forming assay, by xenograft assay in nude mice, and by cell invasion assay. Treatment of sphere-forming glioma cells with Eckol effectively decreased the sphere formation as well as the CD133{sup +} cell population. Eckol treatment suppressed expression of the glioma stem-like cell markers and the self-renewal-related proteins without cell death. Moreover, treatment of glioma stem-like cells with Eckol significantly attenuated anchorage-independent growth on soft agar and tumor formation in xenograft mice. Importantly, Eckol treatment effectively reduced the resistance of glioma stem-like cells to ionizing radiation and temozolomide. Treatment of glioma stem-like cells with Eckol markedly blocked both phosphoinositide 3-kinase-Akt and Ras-Raf-1-Erk signaling pathways. These results indicate that the natural phlorotannin Eckol suppresses stemness and malignancies in glioma stem-like cells, and thereby makes glioma stem-like cells more sensitive to anticancer treatments, providing novel therapeutic strategies targeting specifically cancer stem-like cells.

  7. Expression of ADP-ribosyltransferase 1 Is Associated with Poor Prognosis of Glioma Patients.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhen; Yan, Xinling; Sun, Yuyan; Yang, Xiaoqing

    2016-01-01

    Glioma has a poor prognosis due to its rapid overgrowth, diffuse invasion, and chemotherapy resistance. The improvements in clinical outcome are still limited and the identification of novel biomarkers involved in the progression of gliomas is still under critical demands. Amino acid ADP-ribosyltransferase 1 (ART1) is an enzyme that catalyzes the mono-ADP-ribosylation, a reversible post-translational modification. For example, the mono-ADP-ribosylation of transcription factors can affect their binding to target gene promoters. However, the functional significance of ART1 in glioma has not been reported. We collected 107 glioma cases from Qianfoshan Hospital and Yidu Central Hospital of Weifang between April 2008 and September 2015 to analyze the prognosis value of ART1 in gliomas. RT-qPCR analysis showed that the expression level of ART1 mRNA in glioma tissues was 4-fold higher than that in normal brain tissues. According to the immunohistochemical staining results, 44 patients (41.1%) were categorized as ART1 positive (≥ 20% of stained glioma cells), while the other 63 patients (58.9%) categorized as ART1 negative (< 20% of stained glioma cells). Moreover, the mean percentage of ART1-positive cells was 43.7%, 53.6% and 64.2% in WHO grade II, III and IV specimens, respectively. Through univariate and multivariate analyses, we identified ART1 as an independent prognostic factor. We also found that ART1 overexpression in U251 glioblastoma cells could significantly decrease the susceptibility to vincristine, one of tubulin-targeted drugs, which is widely used in clinical treatment for glioma. Taken together, we propose that up-regulation of ART1 expression is associated with the aggressiveness of glioma. PMID:27466078

  8. Fibulin-3 is uniquely upregulated in malignant gliomas and promotes tumor cell motility and invasion.

    PubMed

    Hu, Bin; Thirtamara-Rajamani, Keerthi K; Sim, Hosung; Viapiano, Mariano S

    2009-11-01

    Malignant gliomas are highly invasive tumors with an almost invariably rapid and lethal outcome. Surgery and chemoradiotherapy fail to remove resistant tumor cells that disperse within normal tissue, which are a major cause for disease progression and therapy failure. Infiltration of the neural parenchyma is a distinctive property of malignant gliomas compared with other solid tumors. Thus, glioma cells are thought to produce unique molecular changes that remodel the neural extracellular matrix and form a microenvironment permissive for their motility. Here, we describe the unique expression and proinvasive role of fibulin-3, a mesenchymal matrix protein specifically upregulated in gliomas. Fibulin-3 is downregulated in peripheral tumors and is thought to inhibit tumor growth. However, we found fibulin-3 highly upregulated in gliomas and cultured glioma cells, although the protein was undetectable in normal brain or cultured astrocytes. Overexpression and knockdown experiments revealed that fibulin-3 did not seem to affect glioma cell morphology or proliferation, but enhanced substrate-specific cell adhesion and promoted cell motility and dispersion in organotypic cultures. Moreover, orthotopic implantation of fibulin-3-overexpressing glioma cells resulted in diffuse tumors with increased volume and rostrocaudal extension compared with controls. Tumors and cultured cells overexpressing fibulin-3 also showed elevated expression and activity of matrix metalloproteases, such as MMP-2/MMP-9 and ADAMTS-5. Taken together, our results suggest that fibulin-3 has a unique expression and protumoral role in gliomas, and could be a potential target against tumor progression. Strategies against this glioma-specific matrix component could disrupt invasive mechanisms and restrict the dissemination of these tumors. PMID:19887559

  9. 68Ga-PRGD2 PET/CT in the Evaluation of Glioma: A Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Integrin αvβ3 is overexpressed in both neovasculature and glioma cells. We aimed to evaluate 68gallium-BNOTA-PRGD2 (68Ga-PRGD2) as a new reagent for noninvasive integrin αvβ3 imaging in glioma patients. With informed consent, 12 patients with suspicious brain glioma, as diagnosed by enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanning, were enrolled to undergo 68Ga-PRGD2 PET/CT and 18F-FDG PET/CT scans before surgery. The preoperative images were compared and correlated with the pathologically determined WHO grade. Next, the expression of integrin αvβ3, CD34, and Ki-67 were determined by immunohistochemical staining of the resected brain tumor tissue. Our findings demonstrated that 68Ga-PRGD2 specifically accumulated in the brain tumors that were rich of integrin αvβ3 and other neovasculature markers, but not in the brain parenchyma other than the choroid plexus. Therefore, 68Ga-PRGD2 PET/CT was able to evaluate the glioma demarcation more specifically than 18F-FDG PET/CT. The maximum standardized uptake values (SUVmax) of 68Ga-PRGD2, rather than those of 18F-FDG, were significantly correlated with the glioma grading. The maximum tumor-to-brain ratios (TBRmax) of both tracers were significantly correlated with glioma grading, whereas 68Ga-PRGD2 seemed to be more superior to 18F-FDG in differentiating high-grade glioma (HGG) from low-grade glioma (LGG). Moreover, 68Ga-PRGD2 PET/CT showed different accumulation patterns for HGG of WHO grades III and IV. This is the first noninvasive integrin imaging study, to the best of our knowledge, conducted in preoperative patients with different grades of glioma, and it preliminarily indicated the effectiveness of this novel method for evaluating glioma grading and demarcation. PMID:25093246

  10. Pristimerin triggers AIF-dependent programmed necrosis in glioma cells via activation of JNK.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hongwei; Wang, Chen; Lu, Bin; Zhou, Zijian; Jin, Yong; Wang, Zongqi; Zheng, Linjie; Liu, Kai; Luo, Tianfei; Zhu, Dong; Chi, Guangfan; Luo, Yinan; Ge, Pengfei

    2016-04-28

    Programmed necrosis is established as a new form of programmed cell death and is emerging as a new strategy of treatment for cancers. Pristimerin is a natural chemical with anti-tumor effect despite the fact that its mechanism remains poorly understood. In this study, we used glioma cell lines and mice model of xenograft glioma to investigate the effect of pristimerin on glioma and its underlying mechanism. We found that pristimerin inhibited the viabilities of glioma cells in vitro and the growth of xenograft gliomas in vivo, which was accompanied by upregulation of JNK and phosphor-JNK, nuclear accumulation of AIF, and elevation in the ratio of Bax/Bcl-2. In vitro studies showed that pristimerin induced necrosis in glioma cells, as well as mitochondrial depolarization, overproduction of ROS and reduction of GSH. Ablation of AIF level with SiRNA mitigated pristimerin-induced nuclear accumulation of AIF and prevented necrosis in glioma cells. Moreover, pharmacological inhibition of JNK with SP600125 or knockdown of its level with SiRNA reversed mitochondrial depolarization attenuated the elevation of Bax/Bcl-2 and suppressed nuclear accumulation of AIF. Further, inhibition of ROS with NAC not only rescued glioma cell necrosis but also suppressed JNK activation, mitigated Bax/Bcl-2 ratio, maintained mitochondrial membrane potential, and inhibited AIF translocation into nucleus. Therefore, we demonstrated first in this study that pristimerin triggered AIF-dependent necroptosis in glioma cells via induction of mitochondrial dysfunction by activation of JNK through overproduction of ROS. These results suggest that pristimerin has potential therapeutic effects on glioma. PMID:26854718

  11. Role of microRNAs Located on Chromosome Arm 10q in Malignant Gliomas.

    PubMed

    Wolter, Marietta; Werner, Thomas; Malzkorn, Bastian; Reifenberger, Guido

    2016-05-01

    Deletions of chromosome arm 10q are found in most glioblastomas and subsets of lower grade gliomas. Mutations in the PTEN gene at 10q23.3 are restricted to less than half of the 10q-deleted gliomas, suggesting additional glioma-associated tumor suppressors on 10q. We investigated 64 astrocytic gliomas of different malignancy grades for aberrant expression of 16 microRNAs (miRNAs) on 10q. Thereby, we identified four miRNAs (miR-107, miR-146b-5p, miR-346, miR-1287-5p) whose expression was frequently down-regulated in anaplastic astrocytomas and/or glioblastomas. DNA methylation analyses revealed 5'-CpG site hypermethylation of miR-346 in more than two-thirds of primary glioblastomas, while aberrant 5'-CpG site methylation of miR-146b-5p was frequent in IDH1-mutant astrocytomas and secondary glioblastomas. Overexpression of either of the four miRNAs in glioma cell lines reduced cell proliferation and/or increased caspase-3/7 activity. Expression analyses of miRNA overexpressing glioma cells and 3'-untranslated region luciferase reporter gene assays revealed evidence that these miRNAs post-transcriptionally regulate expression of glioma-relevant genes, including CDK6 (miR-107), EGFR (miR-146b-5p, miR-1287-5p), TERT and SEMA6A (miR-346), all of which are overexpressed in malignant gliomas in situ. In summary, we show that the 10q-located miRNAs miR-107, miR-146b-5p, miR-346 and miR-1287-5p are frequently down-regulated in malignant gliomas and thereby may support overexpression of important glioma growth-promoting genes. PMID:26223576

  12. Disruption of NF-κB signaling by fluoxetine attenuates MGMT expression in glioma cells

    PubMed Central

    Song, Tao; Li, Hui; Tian, Zhiliang; Xu, Chaojiu; Liu, Jingfang; Guo, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Background Resistance to temozolomide (TMZ) in glioma is modulated by the DNA repair protein O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT). This study aimed to examine the effects of fluoxetine (FLT) on MGMT expression in glioma cells and to investigate its underlying mechanisms. Materials and methods Expression of MGMT, GluR1, or IκB kinase β (IKKβ) was attenuated using short hairpin RNA-mediated gene knockdown. The 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol -2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay was used to evaluate the growth inhibition induced by FLT or TMZ. Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase deoxyuridine triphosphate nick end labeling (TUNEL) was conducted to detect apoptotic cells. Western blotting was conducted to analyze the protein expression of MGMT, IKKβ, and NF-κB/p65 following FLT treatment. The murine subcutaneous xenograft model was used to evaluate the combinational effect of TMZ and FLT. Results FLT markedly reduced MGMT expression in glioma cells, which was independent of GluR1 receptor function. Further, FLT disrupted NF-κB/p65 signaling in glioma cells and consequently attenuated NF-κB/p65 activity in regulating MGMT expression. Importantly, FLT sensitized MGMT-expressing glioma cells to TMZ, as FLT enhanced TMZ’s ability to impair the in vitro tumorigenic potential and to induce apoptosis in glioma cells. Knockdown of MGMT or IKKβ expression abolished the synergistic effect of FLT with TMZ in glioma cells, which suggested that FLT might sensitize glioma cells to TMZ through down-regulation of MGMT expression. Consistently, TMZ combined with FLT markedly attenuated NF-κB/p65 activity, reduced MGMT expression, and suppressed in vivo tumor growth in the murine subcutaneous xenograft model. Conclusion Our findings demonstrated that FLT attenuated MGMT expression by disrupting NF-κB signaling and sensitized glioma cells to TMZ, which may warrant further investigation toward possible clinical application in MGMT-expressing glioma. PMID

  13. KCa3.1 inhibition switches the phenotype of glioma-infiltrating microglia/macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Grimaldi, A; D'Alessandro, G; Golia, M T; Grössinger, E M; Di Angelantonio, S; Ragozzino, D; Santoro, A; Esposito, V; Wulff, H; Catalano, M; Limatola, C

    2016-01-01

    Among the strategies adopted by glioma to successfully invade the brain parenchyma is turning the infiltrating microglia/macrophages (M/MΦ) into allies, by shifting them toward an anti-inflammatory, pro-tumor phenotype. Both glioma and infiltrating M/MΦ cells express the Ca2+-activated K+ channel (KCa3.1), and the inhibition of KCa3.1 activity on glioma cells reduces tumor infiltration in the healthy brain parenchyma. We wondered whether KCa3.1 inhibition could prevent the acquisition of a pro-tumor phenotype by M/MΦ cells, thus contributing to reduce glioma development. With this aim, we studied microglia cultured in glioma-conditioned medium or treated with IL-4, as well as M/MΦ cells acutely isolated from glioma-bearing mice and from human glioma biopsies. Under these different conditions, M/MΦ were always polarized toward an anti-inflammatory state, and preventing KCa3.1 activation by 1-[(2-Chlorophenyl)diphenylmethyl]-1H-pyrazole (TRAM-34), we observed a switch toward a pro-inflammatory, antitumor phenotype. We identified FAK and PI3K/AKT as the molecular mechanisms involved in this phenotype switch, activated in sequence after KCa3.1. Anti-inflammatory M/MΦ have higher expression levels of KCa3.1 mRNA (kcnn4) that are reduced by KCa3.1 inhibition. In line with these findings, TRAM-34 treatment, in vivo, significantly reduced the size of tumors in glioma-bearing mice. Our data indicate that KCa3.1 channels are involved in the inhibitory effects exerted by the glioma microenvironment on infiltrating M/MΦ, suggesting a possible role as therapeutic targets in glioma. PMID:27054329

  14. Cytotoxicity of sophorolipid-gellan gum-gold nanoparticle conjugates and their doxorubicin loaded derivatives towards human glioma and human glioma stem cell lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhar, Sheetal; Reddy, E. Maheswara; Prabhune, Asmita; Pokharkar, Varsha; Shiras, Anjali; Prasad, B. L. V.

    2011-02-01

    Biocompatible gold nanoparticles were synthesized by using a naturally occurring gum-Gellan Gum-as a capping and reducing agent. These were further conjugated with sophorolipids which again were accessed through a biochemical transformation of a fatty acid. The cellular uptake of sophorolipid-conjugated gellan gum reduced gold nanoparticles and their cytotoxicity on human glioma cell line LN-229 and human glioma stem cell line HNGC-2 were investigated. Quite surprisingly even the simple sophorolipid-conjugated gellan gum reduced/capped gold nanoparticles showed greater efficacy in killing the glioma cell lines and, gratifyingly, the glioma stem cell lines also. The cytotoxic effects became more prominent once the anti cancer drug doxorubicin hydrochloride was also conjugated to these gold nanoparticles.Biocompatible gold nanoparticles were synthesized by using a naturally occurring gum-Gellan Gum-as a capping and reducing agent. These were further conjugated with sophorolipids which again were accessed through a biochemical transformation of a fatty acid. The cellular uptake of sophorolipid-conjugated gellan gum reduced gold nanoparticles and their cytotoxicity on human glioma cell line LN-229 and human glioma stem cell line HNGC-2 were investigated. Quite surprisingly even the simple sophorolipid-conjugated gellan gum reduced/capped gold nanoparticles showed greater efficacy in killing the glioma cell lines and, gratifyingly, the glioma stem cell lines also. The cytotoxic effects became more prominent once the anti cancer drug doxorubicin hydrochloride was also conjugated to these gold nanoparticles. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Confocal Z-stacking images of Texas Red Conjugated SL-GG-Au NPs, thermogravimetic analysis of DOX-SL-GG-Au-NPs and SL-GG-AuNPs, and time-dependent fluorescence spectra of DOX-SL-GG-Au NPs. See DOI: 10.1039/c0nr00598c

  15. IgE, allergy, and risk of glioma: update from the San Francisco Bay Area Adult Glioma Study in the temozolomide era.

    PubMed

    Wiemels, Joseph L; Wilson, David; Patil, Chirag; Patoka, Joseph; McCoy, Lucie; Rice, Terri; Schwartzbaum, Judith; Heimberger, Amy; Sampson, John H; Chang, Susan; Prados, Michael; Wiencke, John K; Wrensch, Margaret

    2009-08-01

    The consistently observed inverse relationship of allergic conditions with glioma risk and our previous demonstration that immunoglobulin E (IgE) levels also were lower in glioma patients than controls suggest that atopic allergy may be related to a mechanism that inhibits or prevents glioma. We sought to extend these results with a new and larger series of patients (n = 535 with questionnaire data; 393 with IgE measures) and controls (n = 532 with questionnaire data; 470 with IgE measures). As expected, glioma cases were less likely than controls to report history of allergies [among self-reported cases, Odds ratios (OR) = 0.59, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.41-0.85]. IgE levels also were lower in glioma cases versus controls (OR per unit log IgE = 0.89, 95% CI (0.82-0.98). However, this inverse relationship was only apparent among cases receiving temozolomide, a treatment which became part of the "standard of care" for glioblastoma patients during the study period. Among patients receiving temozolomide, IgE levels in cases whose blood samples were obtained within 30 days of diagnosis were slightly higher than controls, whereas IgE levels in cases whose blood sample was obtained >60 days after diagnosis were significantly lower than controls (OR = 0.80; 95% CI: 0.71-0.89). Thus, although our results robustly confirm the inverse association between allergy and glioma, the results for IgE are affected by temozolomide treatments which may have influenced IgE levels. These results have implications for the study of immunologic factors in glioma as well as for immunotherapy protocols for treating glioma. PMID:19408307

  16. IgE, Allergy, and Risk of Glioma: Update from the San Francisco Bay Area Adult Glioma Study in the Temozolomide Era

    PubMed Central

    Wiemels, Joseph L.; Wilson, David; Patel, Chirag; Patoka, Joseph; McCoy, Lucie; Rice, Terri; Schwartzbaum, Judith; Heimberger, Amy; Sampson, John H.; Chang, Susan; Prados, Michael; Wiencke, John K.; Wrensch, Margaret

    2009-01-01

    The consistently observed inverse relationship of allergic conditions with glioma risk and our previous demonstration that IgE levels also were lower in glioma patients than controls suggest that atopic allergy may be related to a mechanism that inhibits or prevents glioma. We sought to extend these results with a new and larger series of patients (n=535 with questionnaire data; 393 with IgE measures) and controls (n=532 with questionnaire data; 470 with IgE measures). As expected, glioma cases were less likely than controls to report history of allergies (among self-reported cases, OR = 0.59, 95% CI: 0.41–0.85). IgE levels also were lower in glioma cases versus controls (OR per unit log IgE=0.89, 95% CI (0.82–0.98). However, this inverse relationship was only apparent among cases receiving temozolomide, a treatment which became part of the “standard of care” for glioblastoma patients during the study period. Among patients receiving temozolomide, IgE levels in cases whose blood samples were obtained within 30 days of diagnosis were slightly higher than controls, while IgE levels in cases whose blood sample was obtained >60 days after diagnosis were significantly lower than controls (OR = 0.80; 95% CI: 0.71–0.89). Thus, while our results robustly confirm the inverse association between allergy and glioma, the results for IgE are affected by temozolomide treatments which may have influenced IgE levels. These results have implications for the study of immunologic factors in glioma as well as for immunotherapy protocols for treating glioma. PMID:19408307

  17. CSF1 Overexpression Promotes High-Grade Glioma Formation without Impacting the Polarization Status of Glioma-Associated Microglia and Macrophages.

    PubMed

    De, Ishani; Steffen, Megan D; Clark, Paul A; Patros, Clayton J; Sokn, Emily; Bishop, Stephanie M; Litscher, Suzanne; Maklakova, Vilena I; Kuo, John S; Rodriguez, Fausto J; Collier, Lara S

    2016-05-01

    Current therapies for high-grade gliomas extend survival only modestly. The glioma microenvironment, including glioma-associated microglia/macrophages (GAM), is a potential therapeutic target. The microglia/macrophage cytokine CSF1 and its receptor CSF1R are overexpressed in human high-grade gliomas. To determine whether the other known CSF1R ligand IL34 is expressed in gliomas, we examined expression array data of human high-grade gliomas and performed RT-PCR on glioblastoma sphere-forming cell lines (GSC). Expression microarray analyses indicated that CSF1, but not IL34, is frequently overexpressed in human tumors. We found that while GSCs did express CSF1, most GSC lines did not express detectable levels of IL34 mRNA. We therefore studied the impact of modulating CSF1 levels on gliomagenesis in the context of the GFAP-V12Ha-ras-IRESLacZ (Ras*) model. Csf1 deficiency deterred glioma formation in the Ras* model, whereas CSF1 transgenic overexpression decreased the survival of Ras* mice and promoted the formation of high-grade gliomas. Conversely, CSF1 overexpression increased GAM density, but did not impact GAM polarization state. Regardless of CSF1 expression status, most GAMs were negative for the M2 polarization markers ARG1 and CD206; when present, ARG1(+) and CD206(+) cells were found in regions of peripheral immune cell invasion. Therefore, our findings indicate that CSF1 signaling is oncogenic during gliomagenesis through a mechanism distinct from modulating GAM polarization status. Cancer Res; 76(9); 2552-60. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27013192

  18. Bevacizumab Targeting Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Glioma: Results of 89Zr-Bevacizumab PET Imaging in Brain Tumor Models.

    PubMed

    Jansen, Marc H A; Lagerweij, Tonny; Sewing, A Charlotte P; Vugts, Danielle J; van Vuurden, Dannis G; Molthoff, Carla F M; Caretti, Viola; Veringa, Susanna J E; Petersen, Naomi; Carcaboso, Angel M; Noske, David P; Vandertop, W Peter; Wesseling, Pieter; van Dongen, Guus A M S; Kaspers, Gertjan J L; Hulleman, Esther

    2016-09-01

    The role of the VEGF inhibitor bevacizumab in the treatment of diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG) is unclear. We aim to study the biodistribution and uptake of zirconium-89 ((89)Zr)-labeled bevacizumab in DIPG mouse models. Human E98-FM, U251-FM glioma cells, and HSJD-DIPG-007-FLUC primary DIPG cells were injected into the subcutis, pons, or striatum of nude mice. Tumor growth was monitored by bioluminescence imaging (BLI) and visualized by MRI. Seventy-two to 96 hours after (89)Zr-bevacizumab injections, mice were imaged by positron emission tomography (PET), and biodistribution was analyzed ex vivo High VEGF expression in human DIPG was confirmed in a publically available mRNA database, but no significant (89)Zr-bevacizumab uptake could be detected in xenografts located in the pons and striatum at an early or late stage of the disease. E98-FM, and to a lesser extent the U251-FM and HSJD-DIPG-007 subcutaneous tumors, showed high accumulation of (89)Zr-bevacizumab. VEGF expression could not be demonstrated in the intracranial tumors by in situ hybridization (ISH) but was clearly present in the perinecrotic regions of subcutaneous E98-FM tumors. The poor uptake of (89)Zr-bevacizumab in xenografts located in the brain suggests that VEGF targeting with bevacizumab has limited efficacy for diffuse infiltrative parts of glial brain tumors in mice. Translating these results to the clinic would imply that treatment with bevacizumab in patients with DIPG is only justified after targeting of VEGF has been demonstrated by (89)Zr-bevacizumab immuno-PET. We aim to confirm this observation in a clinical PET study with patients with DIPG. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(9); 2166-74. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27325687

  19. Germline rearrangements in families with strong family history of glioma and malignant melanoma, colon, and breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Andersson, Ulrika; Wibom, Carl; Cederquist, Kristina; Aradottir, Steina; Borg, Åke; Armstrong, Georgina N.; Shete, Sanjay; Lau, Ching C.; Bainbridge, Matthew N.; Claus, Elizabeth B.; Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill; Lai, Rose; Il'yasova, Dora; Houlston, Richard S.; Schildkraut, Joellen; Bernstein, Jonine L.; Olson, Sara H.; Jenkins, Robert B.; Lachance, Daniel H.; Wrensch, Margaret; Davis, Faith G.; Merrell, Ryan; Johansen, Christoffer; Sadetzki, Siegal; Bondy, Melissa L.; Melin, Beatrice S.; Adatto, Phyllis; Morice, Fabian; Payen, Sam; McQuinn, Lacey; McGaha, Rebecca; Guerra, Sandra; Paith, Leslie; Roth, Katherine; Zeng, Dong; Zhang, Hui; Yung, Alfred; Aldape, Kenneth; Gilbert, Mark; Weinberger, Jeffrey; Colman, Howard; Conrad, Charles; de Groot, John; Forman, Arthur; Groves, Morris; Levin, Victor; Loghin, Monica; Puduvalli, Vinay; Sawaya, Raymond; Heimberger, Amy; Lang, Frederick; Levine, Nicholas; Tolentino, Lori; Saunders, Kate; Thach, Thu-Trang; Iacono, Donna Dello; Sloan, Andrew; Gerson, Stanton; Selman, Warren; Bambakidis, Nicholas; Hart, David; Miller, Jonathan; Hoffer, Alan; Cohen, Mark; Rogers, Lisa; Nock, Charles J; Wolinsky, Yingli; Devine, Karen; Fulop, Jordonna; Barrett, Wendi; Shimmel, Kristen; Ostrom, Quinn; Barnett, Gene; Rosenfeld, Steven; Vogelbaum, Michael; Weil, Robert; Ahluwalia, Manmeet; Peereboom, David; Staugaitis, Susan; Schilero, Cathy; Brewer, Cathy; Smolenski, Kathy; McGraw, Mary; Naska, Theresa; Rosenfeld, Steven; Ram, Zvi; Blumenthal, Deborah T.; Bokstein, Felix; Umansky, Felix; Zaaroor, Menashe; Cohen, Avi; Tzuk-Shina, Tzeela; Voldby, Bo; Laursen, René; Andersen, Claus; Brennum, Jannick; Henriksen, Matilde Bille; Marzouk, Maya; Davis, Mary Elizabeth; Boland, Eamon; Smith, Marcel; Eze, Ogechukwu; Way, Mahalia; Lada, Pat; Miedzianowski, Nancy; Frechette, Michelle; Paleologos, Nina; Byström, Gudrun; Svedberg, Eva; Huggert, Sara; Kimdal, Mikael; Sandström, Monica; Brännström, Nikolina; Hayat, Amina; Tihan, Tarik; Zheng, Shichun; Berger, Mitchel; Butowski, Nicholas; Chang, Susan; Clarke, Jennifer; Prados, Michael; Rice, Terri; Sison, Jeannette; Kivett, Valerie; Duo, Xiaoqin; Hansen, Helen; Hsuang, George; Lamela, Rosito; Ramos, Christian; Patoka, Joe; Wagenman, Katherine; Zhou, Mi; Klein, Adam; McGee, Nora; Pfefferle, Jon; Wilson, Callie; Morris, Pagan; Hughes, Mary; Britt-Williams, Marlin; Foft, Jessica; Madsen, Julia; Polony, Csaba; McCarthy, Bridget; Zahora, Candice; Villano, John; Engelhard, Herbert; Borg, Ake; Chanock, Stephen K; Collins, Peter; Elston, Robert; Kleihues, Paul; Kruchko, Carol; Petersen, Gloria; Plon, Sharon; Thompson, Patricia; Johansen, C.; Sadetzki, S.; Melin, B.; Bondy, Melissa L.; Lau, Ching C.; Scheurer, Michael E.; Armstrong, Georgina N.; Liu, Yanhong; Shete, Sanjay; Yu, Robert K.; Aldape, Kenneth D.; Gilbert, Mark R.; Weinberg, Jeffrey; Houlston, Richard S.; Hosking, Fay J.; Robertson, Lindsay; Papaemmanuil, Elli; Claus, Elizabeth B.; Claus, Elizabeth B.; Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill; Sloan, Andrew E.; Barnett, Gene; Devine, Karen; Wolinsky, Yingli; Lai, Rose; McKean-Cowdin, Roberta; Il'yasova, Dora; Schildkraut, Joellen; Sadetzki, Siegal; Yechezkel, Galit Hirsh; Bruchim, Revital Bar-Sade; Aslanov, Lili; Sadetzki, Siegal; Johansen, Christoffer; Kosteljanetz, Michael; Broholm, Helle; Bernstein, Jonine L.; Olson, Sara H.; Schubert, Erica; DeAngelis, Lisa; Jenkins, Robert B.; Yang, Ping; Rynearson, Amanda; Andersson, Ulrika; Wibom, Carl; Henriksson, Roger; Melin, Beatrice S.; Cederquist, Kristina; Aradottir, Steina; Borg, Åke; Merrell, Ryan; Lada, Patricia; Wrensch, Margaret; Wiencke, John; Wiemels, Joe; McCoy, Lucie; McCarthy, Bridget J.; Davis, Faith G.

    2014-01-01

    Background Although familial susceptibility to glioma is known, the genetic basis for this susceptibility remains unidentified in the majority of glioma-specific families. An alternative approach to identifying such genes is to examine cancer pedigrees, which include glioma as one of several cancer phenotypes, to determine whether common chromosomal modifications might account for the familial aggregation of glioma and other cancers. Methods Germline rearrangements in 146 glioma families (from the Gliogene Consortium; http://www.gliogene.org/) were examined using multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification. These families all had at least 2 verified glioma cases and a third reported or verified glioma case in the same family or 2 glioma cases in the family with at least one family member affected with melanoma, colon, or breast cancer.The genomic areas covering TP53, CDKN2A, MLH1, and MSH2 were selected because these genes have been previously reported to be associated with cancer pedigrees known to include glioma. Results We detected a single structural rearrangement, a deletion of exons 1-6 in MSH2, in the proband of one family with 3 cases with glioma and one relative with colon cancer. Conclusions Large deletions and duplications are rare events in familial glioma cases, even in families with a strong family history of cancers that may be involved in known cancer syndromes. PMID:24723567

  20. The Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factor SWAP-70 Modulates the Migration and Invasiveness of Human Malignant Glioma Cells12

    PubMed Central

    Seol, Ho Jun; Smith, Christian A; Salhia, Bodour; Rutka, James T

    2009-01-01

    The malignant glioma is the most common primary human brain tumor. Its tendency to invade away from the primary tumor mass is considered a leading cause of tumor recurrence and treatment failure. Accordingly, the molecular pathogenesis of glioma invasion is currently under investigation. Previously, we examined a gene expression array database comparing human gliomas to nonneoplastic controls and identified several Rac guanine nucleotide exchange factors with differential expression. Here, we report that the guanine nucleotide exchange factor SWAP-70 has increased expression in malignant gliomas and strongly correlates with lowered patient survival. SWAP-70 is a multifunctional signaling protein involved in membrane ruffling that works cooperatively with activated Rac. Using a glioma tissue microarray, we validated that SWAP-70 demonstrates higher expression in malignant gliomas compared with low-grade gliomas or nonneoplastic brain tissue. Through immunofluorescence, SWAP-70 localizes to membrane ruffles in response to the growth factor, epidermal growth factor. To assess the role of SWAP-70 in glioma migration and invasion, we inhibited its expression withsmall interfering RNAs and observed decreased glioma cell migration and invasion. SWAP-70 overexpression led to increased levels of active Rac even in low-serum conditions. In addition, when SWAP-70 was overexpressed in glioma cells, we observed enhanced membrane ruffle formation followed by increased cellmigration and invasiveness. Taken together, our findings suggest that the guanine nucleotide exchange factor SWAP-70 plays an important role in the migration and invasion of human gliomas into the surrounding tissue. PMID:19956392

  1. Functional analysis of the 11q23.3 glioma susceptibility locus implicates PHLDB1 and DDX6 in glioma susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Baskin, Rebekah; Woods, Nicholas T.; Mendoza-Fandiño, Gustavo; Forsyth, Peter; Egan, Kathleen M.; Monteiro, Alvaro N.A.

    2015-01-01

    Glioma is the most common malignant primary brain tumor and is associated with poor prognosis. Genetic factors contributing to glioma risk have recently been investigated through genome-wide association studies (GWAS), implicating seven independent glioma risk loci in six chromosomal regions. Here, we performed an in-depth functional analysis of the risk locus proximal to the PHLDB1 gene on 11q23.3. We retrieved all SNPs in linkage disequilibrium (r2 ≥ 0.2) with the glioma-associated SNP (rs498872) and performed a comprehensive bioinformatics and experimental functional analysis for the region. After testing candidate SNPs for allele-specific activity in a luciferase-based enhancer scanning assay, we established a subset of 10 functional SNPs in the promoters of PHLDB1 and DDX6, and in a putative enhancer element. Chromatin conformation capture (3C) identified a physical interaction between the enhancer element containing a functional SNP (rs73001406) and the promoter of the DDX6 gene. Knockdown experiments in cell culture and 3D assays to evaluate the role of PHLDB1 and DDX6 suggest that both genes may contribute to the phenotype. These studies reveal the functional landscape of the 11q23.3 glioma susceptibility locus and identify a network of functional SNPs in regulatory elements and two target genes as a possible mechanism driving glioma risk association. PMID:26610392

  2. PDGF Engages an E2F-USP1 Signaling Pathway to Support ID2-Mediated Survival of Proneural Glioma Cells.

    PubMed

    Rahme, Gilbert J; Zhang, Zhonghua; Young, Alison L; Cheng, Chao; Bivona, Eric J; Fiering, Steven N; Hitoshi, Yasuyuki; Israel, Mark A

    2016-05-15

    Glioblastoma is the most aggressive primary brain tumor and responds poorly to currently available therapies. Transcriptomic characterization of glioblastoma has identified distinct molecular subtypes of glioblastoma. Gain-of-function alterations leading to enhanced platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) signaling are commonly observed in the proneural subtype of glioblastoma and can drive gliomagenesis. However, little is known about the downstream effectors of PDGF signaling in glioblastoma. Using a mouse model of proneural glioma and comparative transcriptomics, we determined that PDGF signaling upregulated ubiquitin-specific peptidase 1 (Usp1) to promote the survival of murine proneural glioma cells. Mechanistically, we found that PDGF signaling regulated the expression of the E2F transcription factors, which directly bound to and activated Usp1 Furthermore, PDGF-mediated expression of USP1 led to the stabilization of Inhibitor of DNA-binding 2 (ID2), which we found to be required for glioma cell survival. Genetic ablation of Id2 delayed tumor-induced mortality, and pharmacologic inhibition of USP1, resulting in decreased ID2 levels, also delayed tumorigenesis in mice. Notably, decreased USP1 expression was associated with prolonged survival in patients with proneural glioblastoma, but not with other subtypes of glioblastoma. Collectively, our findings describe a signaling cascade downstream of PDGF that sustains proneural glioblastoma cells and suggest that inhibition of the PDGF-E2F-USP1-ID2 axis could serve as a therapeutic strategy for proneural glioblastoma featuring increased PDGF signaling. Cancer Res; 76(10); 2964-76. ©2016 AACR. PMID:26951930

  3. Mouse Curve Biometrics

    SciTech Connect

    Schulz, Douglas A.

    2007-10-08

    A biometric system suitable for validating user identity using only mouse movements and no specialized equipment is presented. Mouse curves (mouse movements with little or no pause between them) are individually classied and used to develop classication histograms, which are representative of an individual's typical mouse use. These classication histograms can then be compared to validate identity. This classication approach is suitable for providing continuous identity validation during an entire user session.

  4. Building a Brainier Mouse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsien, Joe Z.

    2000-01-01

    Describes a genetic engineering project to build an intelligent mouse. Cites understanding the molecular basis of learning and memory as a very important step. Concludes that while science will never create a genius mouse that plays the stock market, it can turn a mouse into a quick learner with a better memory. (YDS)

  5. Genetic Modulation of Neurocognitive Function in Glioma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yanhong; Zhou, Renke; Sulman, Erik P.; Scheurer, Michael E.; Boehling, Nicholas; Armstrong, Georgina N.; Tsavachidis, Spiridon; Liang, Fu-Wen; Etzel, Carol J.; Conrad, Charles A.; Gilbert, Mark R.; Armstrong, Terri S.; Bondy, Melissa L.; Wefel, Jeffrey S.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Accumulating evidence supports the contention that genetic variation is associated with neurocognitive function in healthy individuals and increased risk for neurocognitive decline in a variety of patient populations including cancer patients. However, this has rarely been studied in glioma patients. Methods To identify the effect of genetic variants on neurocognitive function, we examined the relationship between the genotype frequencies of 10,967 single nucleotide polymorphisms in 580 genes related to five pathways (inflammation, DNA repair, metabolism, cognitive, and telomerase) and neurocognitive function in 233 newly diagnosed glioma patients before surgical resection. Four neuropsychological tests that measured memory (Hopkins Verbal Learning Test – Revised), processing speed (Trail Making Test A), and executive function (Trail Making Test B, Controlled Oral Word Association) were examined. Results Eighteen polymorphisms were associated with processing speed and 12 polymorphisms with executive function. For processing speed, the strongest signals were in IRS1 rs6725330 in inflammation pathway (P = 2.5×10−10), ERCC4 rs1573638 in DNA repair pathway (P = 3.4×10−7), and ABCC1 rs8187858 in metabolism pathway (P = 6.6×10−7). For executive function, the strongest associations were in NOS1 rs11611788 (P = 1.8×10−8) and IL16 rs1912124 (P = 6.0×10−7) in inflammation pathway, and POLE rs5744761 (P = 6.0 ×10−7) in DNA repair pathway. Joint effect analysis found significant gene polymorphism-dosage effects for processing speed (Ptrend = 9.4×10−16) and executive function (Ptrend = 6.6×10−15). Conclusions Polymorphisms in inflammation, DNA repair, and metabolism pathways are associated with neurocognitive function in glioma patients and may affect clinical outcomes. PMID:25904748

  6. Treatment of Glioma Using neuroArm Surgical System

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The use of robotic technology in the surgical treatment of brain tumour promises increased precision and accuracy in the performance of surgery. Robotic manipulators may allow superior access to narrow surgical corridors compared to freehand or conventional neurosurgery. This paper reports values and ranges of tool-tissue interaction forces during the performance of glioma surgery using an MR compatible, image-guided neurosurgical robot called neuroArm. The system, capable of microsurgery and stereotaxy, was used in the surgical resection of glioma in seven cases. neuroArm is equipped with force sensors at the end-effector allowing quantification of tool-tissue interaction forces and transmits force of dissection to the surgeon sited at a remote workstation that includes a haptic interface. Interaction forces between the tool tips and the brain tissue were measured for each procedure, and the peak forces were quantified. Results showed maximum and minimum peak force values of 2.89 N (anaplastic astrocytoma, WHO grade III) and 0.50 N (anaplastic oligodendroglioma, WHO grade III), respectively, with the mean of peak forces varying from case to case, depending on type of the glioma. Mean values of the peak forces varied in range of 1.27 N (anaplastic astrocytoma, WHO grade III) to 1.89 N (glioblastoma with oligodendroglial component, WHO grade IV). In some cases, ANOVA test failed to reject the null hypothesis of equality in means of the peak forces measured. However, we could not find a relationship between forces exerted to the pathological tissue and its size, type, or location. PMID:27314044

  7. Control of glioma cell migration and invasiveness by GDF-15

    PubMed Central

    Codó, Paula; Weller, Michael; Kaulich, Kerstin; Schraivogel, Daniel; Silginer, Manuela; Reifenberger, Guido; Meister, Gunter; Roth, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Growth and differentiation factor (GDF)-15 is a member of the transforming growth factor (TGF)-β family of proteins. GDF-15 levels are increased in the blood and cerebrospinal fluid of glioblastoma patients. Using a TCGA database interrogation, we demonstrate that high GDF-15 expression levels are associated with poor survival of glioblastoma patients. To elucidate the role of GDF-15 in glioblastoma in detail, we confirmed that glioma cells express GDF-15 mRNA and protein in vitro. To allow for a detailed functional characterization, GDF-15 expression was silenced using RNA interference in LNT-229 and LN-308 glioma cells. Depletion of GDF-15 had no effect on cell viability. In contrast, GDF-15-deficient cells displayed reduced migration and invasion, in the absence of changes in Smad2 or Smad1/5/8 phosphorylation. Conversely, exogenous GDF-15 stimulated migration and invasiveness. Large-scale expression profiling revealed that GDF-15 gene silencing resulted in minor changes in the miRNA profile whereas several genes, including members of the plasminogen activator/inhibitor complex, were deregulated at the mRNA level. One of the newly identified genes induced by GDF-15 gene silencing was the serpin peptidase inhibitor, clade E nexin group 1 (serpine1) which is induced by TGF-β and known to inhibit migration and invasiveness. However, serpine1 down-regulation alone did not mediate GDF-15-induced promotion of migration and invasiveness. Our findings highlight the complex contributions of GDF-15 to the invasive phenotype of glioma cells and suggest anti-GDF-15 approaches as a promising therapeutic strategy. PMID:26741507

  8. A New Epigenetic Mechanism of Temozolomide Action in Glioma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Barciszewska, Anna-Maria; Gurda, Dorota; Głodowicz, Paweł; Nowak, Stanisław; Naskręt-Barciszewska, Mirosława Z

    2015-01-01

    Temozolomide (TMZ) is an oral alkylating chemotherapeutic agent that prolongs the survival of patients with glioblastoma (GBM). Despite that high TMZ potential, progression of disease and recurrence are still observed. Therefore a better understanding of the mechanism of action of this drug is necessary and may allow more durable benefit from its anti-glioma properties. Using nucleotide post-labelling method and separation on thin-layer chromatography we measured of global changes of 5-methylcytosine (m5C) in DNA of glioma cells treated with TMZ. Although m5C is not a product of TMZ methylation reaction of DNA, we analysed the effects of the drug action on different glioma cell lines through global changes at the level of the DNA main epigenetic mark. The first effect of TMZ action we observed is DNA hypermethylation followed by global demethylation. Therefore an increase of DNA methylation and down regulation of some genes expression can be ascribed to activation of DNA methyltransferases (DNMTs). On the other hand hypomethylation is induced by oxidative stress and causes uncontrolled expression of pathologic protein genes. The results of brain tumours treatment with TMZ suggest the new mechanism of modulation epigenetic marker in cancer cells. A high TMZ concentration induced a significant increase of m5C content in DNA in the short time, but a low TMZ concentration at longer time hypomethylation is observed for whole range of TMZ concentrations. Therefore TMZ administration with low doses of the drug and short time should be considered as optimal therapy. PMID:26309255

  9. Nimotuzumab in combination with radiotherapy in high grade glioma patients

    PubMed Central

    Solomon, Maria Teresa; Miranda, Nederlay; Jorrín, Eugenia; Chon, Ivonne; Marinello, Jorge Juan; Alert, José; Lorenzo-Luaces, Patricia; Crombet, Tania

    2014-01-01

    Nimotuzumab, a humanized antibody targeting epidermal growth factor receptor, has potent anti-proliferative, anti-angiogenic, and pro-apoptotic effects in vitro and in vivo. It also reduces the number of radio-resistant CD133+ glioma stem cells. The antibody has been extensively evaluated in patients with advanced head and neck, glioma, lung, esophageal, pancreatic, and gastric cancer. In this single institution experience, 35 patients with anaplastic astrocytoma (AA) or glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) were treated with irradiation and 200 mg doses of nimotuzumab. The first 6 doses were administered weekly, together with radiotherapy, and then treatment continued every 21 days until 1 year. The median number of doses was 12, and the median cumulative dose was thus 2400 mg of nimotuzumab. The most frequent treatment-related toxicities were increase in liver function tests, fever, nausea, anorexia, asthenia, dizziness, and tremors. These adverse reactions were classified as mild and moderate. The median survival time was 12.4 mo or 27.0 mo for patients with GBM or AA patients, respectively, who received curative-intent radiotherapy in combination with the antibody. The survival time of a matched population treated at the same hospital with irradiation alone was decreased (median 8.0 and 12.2 mo for GBM and AA patients, respectively) compared with that of the patients who received nimotuzumab and curative-intent radiotherapy. We have thus confirmed that nimotuzumab is a very well-tolerated drug, lacking cumulative toxicity after maintenance doses. This study, in a poor prognosis population, validates the previous data of survival gain after combining nimotuzumab and radiotherapy, in newly diagnosed high-grade glioma patients. PMID:24521695

  10. Photochemical internalization for the treatment of malignant gliomas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madsen, Steen J.; Kharkhuu, Khishigzaya; Berg, Kristian; Hirschberg, Henry

    2007-02-01

    Photochemical internalization (PCI) is a technique to improve the utilization of macromolecules (e.g. chemotherapeutic agents) in cancer therapy in a site-specific manner. The concept is based on the use of specially designed photosensitizers which localize preferentially in the membranes of endocytic vesicles. Upon exposure to light the photosensitizers induce the formation of reactive oxygen species such as singlet molecular oxygen. The photooxidation of the endocytic membranes leads to the release of the contents of the vesicles into the cytosol. In this way, macromolecules encapsulated by the vesicles will reach the cytosol and exert their biological activity instead of being degraded by lysosomal hydrolases. The utility of PCI for the treatment of malignant gliomas was investigated in vitro using an F98 rat glioma cell line. The cytotoxicity of 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) based PCI of bleomycin was compared to: (1) ALA-PDT, and (2) bleomycin. In all cases, monolayers were incubated in ALA, bleomycin, or ALA + bleomycin for 4 hours and were subsequently exposed to 635 nm light. Toxicity was evaluated using colony formation assays. F98 rat glioma cells in monolayer were found to be susceptible to the effects of both ALA-PDT and bleomycin. ALA-PDT was found to be particularly effective when light was delivered at a low irradiance of 5 mW cm -2. In this case, a radiant exposure of 20 J cm -2 resulted in only 4% survival. Bleomycin was found to be toxic at relatively low concentrations, incubation of F98 cells in 10 μg ml -1 for 4 hours resulted in 1% survival. The PCI effect was found to be negligible for the parameters investigated in the F98 cell line suggesting that: (1) the incubation time was sub-optimal and/or (2) ALA was inappropriate for this application.

  11. From Bearers of Problems to Bearers of Culture: Developing Community in the Community Development Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shevellar, Lynda

    2015-01-01

    This paper brings together the impact of two major changes in higher education: the massification of the higher education system and the accompanying increase in international student mobility. Utilising collective narrative practice (CNP) as a classroom intervention, this research demonstrates a movement from teacher-centred and student-centred…

  12. Hypothalamic Glioma in a Patient With Sturge-Weber Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Julia W; Walter, Andrew W

    2016-01-01

    Sturge-Weber syndrome (SWS) is a neurocutaneous disorder characterized by vascular malformations involving brain, skin, and occasionally eyes. There is no recognized tumor predisposition in patients with SWS as there is with some other phakomatoses. We present a patient with SWS who developed a low-grade glioma (LGG). We hypothesize that there could be an association between SWS and LGG formation, noting that GNAQ mutations have been implicated in the underlying biology of both SWS and a subset of pediatric LGG. It is suggested that SWS may be a cancer predisposition syndrome. PMID:26422287

  13. [Current situation and future prospects of radiotherapy for malignant gliomas].

    PubMed

    Terahara, Atsuro

    2013-10-01

    Prognosis of malignant gliomas remains poor, although adjuvant radiotherapy increases survival time. To improve treatment outcomes, high-precision radiotherapy techniques such as three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy, stereotactic irradiation, intensity modulated radiotherapy, and charged particle radiotherapy have been developed for dose distribution optimization and dose escalation. Improvements in clinical outcomes with these new treatment strategies have been reported; however, the efficacy of these treatment strategies has not yet been verified in randomized trials. Further development of radiation delivery techniques, including boron neutron capture therapy, and ways of achieving more adequate target volume delineation using modern multimodality imaging technology are currently being intensively investigated to further improve patient outcomes. PMID:24105051

  14. Experimental approaches for the treatment of malignant gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Arko, Leopold; Katsyv, Igor; Park, Grace E.; Luan, William Patrick; Park, John K.

    2010-01-01

    Malignant gliomas, which include glioblastomas and anaplastic astrocytomas, are the most common primary tumors of the brain. Over the past 30 years, the standard treatment for these tumors has evolved to include maximal safe surgical resection, radiation therapy and temozolomide chemotherapy. While the median survival of patients with glioblastomas has improved from 6 months to 14.6 months, these tumors continue to be lethal for the vast majority of patients. There has, however, been recent substantial progress in our mechanistic understanding of tumor development and growth. The translation of these genetic, epigenetic and biochemical findings into therapies that have been tested in clinical trials is the subject of this review. PMID:20546782

  15. Hypofractionated Radiotherapy for Children With Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Gliomas.

    PubMed

    Hankinson, Todd C; Patibandla, Mohana Rao; Green, Adam; Hemenway, Molly; Foreman, Nicholas; Handler, Michael; Liu, Arthur K

    2016-04-01

    Children with diffuse intrinsic pontine gliomas have very poor outcomes, with nearly all children dying from disease. Standard therapy includes 6 weeks of radiation. There have been descriptions of using a shortened course of radiation. We describe our experience with a hypofractionated radiotherapy approach delivered over five treatments. In seven children, hypofractionated radiotherapy was well tolerated, but symptomatic radiation necrosis was seen in three of the children. Overall survival was slightly shorter than previously described in the literature. We are developing a prospective dose-finding protocol with the goal of tolerable short-course radiation treatment with outcomes comparable to conventional radiation. PMID:26544789

  16. Hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy combined with topotecan in recurrent malignant glioma

    SciTech Connect

    Wurm, Reinhard E. . E-mail: Reinhard.Wurm@charite.de; Kuczer, David A.; Schlenger, Lorenz; Matnjani, Gesa; Scheffler, Dirk; Cosgrove, Vivian P.; Ahlswede, Julia; Woiciechowsky, Christian; Budach, Volker

    2006-11-15

    Purpose: To assess hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (H-SRT) with concurrent topotecan in patients with recurrent malignant glioma. Methods and Materials: Between February 1998 and December 2001, 25 patients with recurrent malignant glioma were treated in a phase I-II study (8 females and 17 males; median age, 45 years; range, 11-66 years; median Karnofsky performance status, 80%, range, 50-100%; median Mini Mental Standard Examination score, 25 points; range, 10-30 points). Of the 25 patients, 20% had World Health Organization Grade III and 80% World Health Organization Grade IV glioma. All patients had been treated previously by external beam radiotherapy with 54.4 Gy in 34 fractions twice daily, at least 6 h apart, within 3.5 weeks or 60 Gy in 30 fractions within 6 weeks. In addition, 84% had already received at least one chemotherapy regimen for recurrence. The median H-SRT dose at the 80% isodose was 25 Gy, and the maximal dose was 30 Gy delivered in five to six fractions on consecutive days. Topotecan (1.1 mg/m{sup 2}/d) was given as a continuous i.v. infusion during H-SRT. Depending on the toxicity and compliance, patients received an additional 48 topotecan courses. Results: For all patients, the actuarial median progression-free survival was 10.5 months (range, 1.4-47.8 months), the median functional survival was 12.6 months (range, 1.6-49.5 months), and the median overall survival was 14.5 months (range, 3-56.4 months). Twelve percent of patients developed presumed adverse radiation effects (Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Grade 2). According to the Common Toxicity Criteria, version 2.0, no topotecan-related Grade 4 toxicity was noted. Grade 3 neutropenia was documented after 14 and Grade 3 thrombopenia after 12 courses. Conclusion: H-SRT with topotecan is feasible and well-tolerated in patients with recurrent high-grade glioma and results in similar survival compared with other repeat treatment modalities.

  17. Incidental Diagnosis of Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Glioma in Children

    PubMed Central

    Wright, K. D.; Sabin, N. D.; Cheuk, D.; McNall-Knapp, R. Y.; Shurtleff, S. A.; Gajjar, A.; Broniscer, A.

    2014-01-01

    Children with diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG) have a short onset, rapidly progressive neurologic decline before diagnosis. Therefore, incidental diagnosis of such an aggressive cancer is counterintuitive, yet our experience shows DIPG may occur as part of a spectrum of incidentally diagnosed pediatric brain cancers. Although children with incidentally diagnosed DIPG may experience a longer survival, it remains a potentially deadly cancer despite treatment with radiotherapy. Histologic confirmation is warranted when feasible in such patients to confirm diagnosis. Moreover, recent advances in genome-wide analyses may suggest incidentally diagnosed DIPGs are biologically distinct from the majority of these cancers. PMID:25598012

  18. Distinction of brain tissue, low grade and high grade glioma with time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Yong, William H; Butte, Pramod V; Pikul, Brian K; Jo, Javier A; Fang, Qiyin; Papaioannou, Thanassis; Black, Keith; Marcu, Laura

    2006-01-01

    Neuropathology frozen section diagnoses are difficult in part because of the small tissue samples and the paucity of adjunctive rapid intraoperative stains. This study aims to explore the use of time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy as a rapid adjunctive tool for the diagnosis of glioma specimens and for distinction of glioma from normal tissues intraoperatively. Ten low grade gliomas, 15 high grade gliomas without necrosis, 6 high grade gliomas with necrosis and/or radiation effect, and 14 histologically uninvolved "normal" brain specimens are spectroscopicaly analyzed and contrasted. Tissue autofluorescence was induced with a pulsed Nitrogen laser (337 nm, 1.2 ns) and the transient intensity decay profiles were recorded in the 370-500 nm spectral range with a fast digitized (0.2 ns time resolution). Spectral intensities and time-dependent parameters derived from the time-resolved spectra of each site were used for tissue characterization. A linear discriminant analysis diagnostic algorithm was used for tissue classification. Both low and high grade gliomas can be distinguished from histologically uninvolved cerebral cortex and white matter with high accuracy (above 90%). In addition, the presence or absence of treatment effect and/or necrosis can be identified in high grade gliomas. Taking advantage of tissue autofluorescence, this technique facilitates a direct and rapid investigation of surgically obtained tissue. PMID:16368511

  19. Oncolytic virotherapy for malignant glioma: translating laboratory insights into clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    Auffinger, Brenda; Ahmed, Atique U.; Lesniak, Maciej S.

    2013-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme, one of the most common and aggressive brain tumors in adults, is highly resistant to currently available therapies and often recurs. Due to its poor prognosis and difficult management, there is an urgent need for the development and translation of new anti-glioma therapeutic approaches into the clinic. In this context, oncolytic virotherapy arises as an exciting treatment option for glioma patients. These natural or genetically engineered viruses are able to effectively infect cancer cells, inducing a specific anti-tumor cytotoxic effect. In addition, some viruses have been redesigned to modulate glioma microenvironment, to express cytokines to boost a systemic anti-glioma immune response and to incorporate angiostatic genes to decrease glioma vasculature. Although recent clinical trials have confirmed the safety of oncolytic virotherapies in the brain, their moderate clinical efficacy has not yet matched the encouraging preclinical laboratory results. In this review, we will discuss the leading anti-glioma virotherapy approaches that are presently under preclinical and clinical evaluation. We will also review different delivery methods, in vivo virus behavior, fate, replication, intratumoral spread, activation of anti-tumor immune response, and targeting of glioma stem cells. We will focus on the advantages and limitations of each therapeutic approach and how to overcome these hurdles to effectively translate exciting laboratory results into promising clinical trials. PMID:23443138

  20. Use of tricyclic antidepressants and risk of glioma: a nationwide case–control study

    PubMed Central

    Pottegård, Anton; García Rodríguez, Luis Alberto; Rasmussen, Lotte; Damkier, Per; Friis, Søren; Gaist, David

    2016-01-01

    Background: A protective effect of tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs) against gliomas has been suggested by a small number of studies. We investigated this putative association in a nationwide setting. Methods: Using a case–control design, we identified all patients with histologically verified glioma (cases) in Denmark between 2000 and 2012 and matched these 1 : 20 to population controls. Conditional logistic regression was used to estimate adjusted odds ratios (ORs) for glioma associated with long-term (⩾3 years) use of TCAs. Similar analyses were performed for selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs). Results: We identified 3767 glioma cases and 75 340 population controls. Long-term use of TCAs was inversely associated with risk of glioma (OR 0.72, 95% CI: 0.41–1.25). Long-term SSRI use was not associated with glioma risk (OR 0.93, 95% CI: 0.75–1.16). Conclusions: Our study indicated that long-term use of TCAs may be associated with a reduced risk of glioma, however, the statistical precision was limited. A similar pattern was not observed for use of SSRIs. PMID:27115466

  1. Variants near TERT and TERC influencing telomere length are associated with high-grade glioma risk.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Kyle M; Codd, Veryan; Smirnov, Ivan V; Rice, Terri; Decker, Paul A; Hansen, Helen M; Kollmeyer, Thomas; Kosel, Matthew L; Molinaro, Annette M; McCoy, Lucie S; Bracci, Paige M; Cabriga, Belinda S; Pekmezci, Melike; Zheng, Shichun; Wiemels, Joseph L; Pico, Alexander R; Tihan, Tarik; Berger, Mitchell S; Chang, Susan M; Prados, Michael D; Lachance, Daniel H; O'Neill, Brian Patrick; Sicotte, Hugues; Eckel-Passow, Jeanette E; van der Harst, Pim; Wiencke, John K; Samani, Nilesh J; Jenkins, Robert B; Wrensch, Margaret R

    2014-07-01

    Glioma, the most common central nervous system cancer in adults, has poor prognosis. Here we identify a new SNP associated with glioma risk, rs1920116 (near TERC), that reached genome-wide significance (Pcombined = 8.3 × 10(-9)) in a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of high-grade glioma and replication data (1,644 cases and 7,736 controls). This region has previously been associated with mean leukocyte telomere length (LTL). We therefore examined the relationship between LTL and both this new risk locus and other previously established risk loci for glioma using data from a recent GWAS of LTL (n = 37,684 individuals). Alleles associated with glioma risk near TERC and TERT were strongly associated with longer LTL (P = 5.5 × 10(-20) and 4.4 × 10(-19), respectively). In contrast, risk-associated alleles near RTEL1 were inconsistently associated with LTL, suggesting the presence of distinct causal alleles. No other risk loci for glioma were associated with LTL. The identification of risk alleles for glioma near TERC and TERT that also associate with telomere length implicates telomerase in gliomagenesis. PMID:24908248

  2. Deoxypodophyllotoxin triggers parthanatos in glioma cells via induction of excessive ROS.

    PubMed

    Ma, Diandong; Lu, Bin; Feng, Chao; Wang, Chen; Wang, Yubo; Luo, Tianfei; Feng, Jiachun; Jia, Hongyao; Chi, Guangfan; Luo, Yinan; Ge, Pengfei

    2016-02-28

    Parthanatos is a new form of programmed cell death that is regulated by hyper-activated PARP-1, and is emerging as a new strategy to kill cancer cells. Deoxypodophyllotoxin (DPT) is a natural chemical that is found to induce cancer cell death, in which the role of parthanatos is unknown. Thus, we investigated this issue in this study by using glioma cell lines and mice model of xenograft glioma. We found that DPT induced glioma cell death in vitro and inhibited the growth of xenograft glioma in vivo, which was accompanied with parthanatos-related biochemical events including expressional upregulation of PARP-1, cytoplasmic accumulation of PAR polymer, and nuclear translocation of AIF. In vitro study revealed that genetic knockdown of PARP-1 with small interfering RNA attenuated DPT-induced elevation in the cytoplasmic PAR-polymer and the nuclear AIF, as well as protected glioma cells against the toxicity of DPT. Further, antioxidant NAC, as well as PARP-1 inhibitor 3AB, not only alleviated the overproduction of ROS caused by DPT, but also reversed the above-mentioned biochemical events, maintained mitochondrial membrane potential and rescued glioma cells death. Therefore, we demonstrated that deoxypodophyllotoxin triggered parthanatos in glioma cells via induction of excessive ROS. PMID:26683770

  3. MicroRNA-217 inhibits cell proliferation and invasion by targeting Runx2 in human glioma

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yonggang; Zhao, Hongguang; Feng, Li; Xu, Songbai

    2016-01-01

    MircroRNA-217 (miR-217) has been showed to involve in the initiation and development of human cancers, and is recognize as a tumor suppressor miRNA in several tumors. However, the clinical significance and its underlying role in human glioma remain unclear. Herein, we found that the expression of miR-217 was significantly down-regulated in glioma tissues as compared with adjacent normal brain tissues. Clinical association analysis disclosed that low-expression of miR-217 was evidently negative associated with advanced tumor stage (grade III + IV) in glioma. Further function assays showed that miR-217 inhibited proliferation, colony formation, invasion and migration of glioma cells. Notably, runt-related transcription factors 2 (Runx2) was identified as a functional target of miR-217 in glioma. Furthermore, an inverse correlation between miR-217 and Runx2 expression was observed in glioma tissues. Downregulation of Runx2 has similar with inhibition effect of overexpression of miR-217, and upregulation of Runx2 reversed the effects of overexpressing of miR-217. Taken together, these results suggest a critical role of miR-217 in suppressing proliferation, migration, and invasion of glioma by targeting Runx2. PMID:27186274

  4. Temozolomide/PLGA microparticles plus vatalanib inhibits tumor growth and angiogenesis in an orthotopic glioma model.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu-Hui; Yue, Zhi-Jian; Zhang, He; Tang, Gu-Sheng; Wang, Yang; Liu, Jian-Min

    2010-11-01

    Temozolomide (TM) has anti-tumor activity in patients with malignant glioma. Implantable poly (D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) microparticles of TM (TM-MS) have been developed, enhancing the cytotoxicity of TM to Glioma C6 cells. Vatalanib, as anti-angiogenic agent, has also shown anti-tumor activity with malignant gliomas. We examined the combined effects of TM-MS and vatalanib in a rat orthotopic glioma model and found TM-MS offered a greater tumor inhibition than TM, and combination treatment with both of them improved the survival time versus single agent therapy. The combination treatment also demonstrated an inhibition to rat glioma tumors, a significant decrease in cell proliferation, an increase in apoptosis, and a lower microvessel density within the glioma tumors. The results suggest that TM-MS can more effectively inhibit tumor than TM, and combination treatment with TM-MS and vatalanib inhibits tumor growth and angiogenesis and may prove to be a promising therapy for malignant gliomas. PMID:20816959

  5. Longitudinal prospective study of matrix metalloproteinase-9 as a serum marker in gliomas.

    PubMed

    Iwamoto, Fabio M; Hottinger, Andreas F; Karimi, Sasan; Riedel, Elyn; Dantis, Jocelynn; Jahdi, Maryam; Panageas, Katherine S; Lassman, Andrew B; Abrey, Lauren E; Fleisher, Martin; Deangelis, Lisa M; Holland, Eric C; Hormigo, Adília

    2011-12-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate if longitudinal measurements of serum matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) correlated with disease status or survival in adults with gliomas. Serum samples were collected prospectively and concurrently with MRI scans at multiple time points during the course of the disease. MMP-9 levels were determined by ELISA and correlated with radiographic disease status and survival. Forty-one patients with low-grade gliomas, 105 with anaplastic gliomas, and 197 with glioblastoma enrolled in this study from August 2002 to September 2008. A total of 1,684 serum samples (97.1% of all MMP-9 samples) had a matching MRI scan. No statistically significant association was observed between levels of serum MMP-9 and radiographic disease status in low-grade gliomas (P = 0.98), anaplastic gliomas (P = 0.39) or glioblastomas (P = 0.33). Among patients with glioblastoma, longitudinal increases in MMP-9 had a weak association with shorter survival (HR = 1.1 per each doubling in MMP-9 levels, 95% CI, 1.0-1.3, P = 0.04) but they were not independently associated with survival when adjusted for age, extent of resection, and performance status. Changes in serum MMP-9 were not associated with survival in the anaplastic glioma cohort. Serum MMP-9 showed no utility in determining glioma disease status and was not a clinically relevant prognostic marker of survival. PMID:21710351

  6. Oncolytic virotherapy for malignant glioma: translating laboratory insights into clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Auffinger, Brenda; Ahmed, Atique U; Lesniak, Maciej S

    2013-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme, one of the most common and aggressive brain tumors in adults, is highly resistant to currently available therapies and often recurs. Due to its poor prognosis and difficult management, there is an urgent need for the development and translation of new anti-glioma therapeutic approaches into the clinic. In this context, oncolytic virotherapy arises as an exciting treatment option for glioma patients. These natural or genetically engineered viruses are able to effectively infect cancer cells, inducing a specific anti-tumor cytotoxic effect. In addition, some viruses have been redesigned to modulate glioma microenvironment, to express cytokines to boost a systemic anti-glioma immune response and to incorporate angiostatic genes to decrease glioma vasculature. Although recent clinical trials have confirmed the safety of oncolytic virotherapies in the brain, their moderate clinical efficacy has not yet matched the encouraging preclinical laboratory results. In this review, we will discuss the leading anti-glioma virotherapy approaches that are presently under preclinical and clinical evaluation. We will also review different delivery methods, in vivo virus behavior, fate, replication, intratumoral spread, activation of anti-tumor immune response, and targeting of glioma stem cells. We will focus on the advantages and limitations of each therapeutic approach and how to overcome these hurdles to effectively translate exciting laboratory results into promising clinical trials. PMID:23443138

  7. Transformation of quiescent adult oligodendrocyte precursor cells into malignant glioma through a multistep reactivation process

    PubMed Central

    Galvao, Rui Pedro; Kasina, Anita; McNeill, Robert S.; Harbin, Jordan E.; Foreman, Oded; Verhaak, Roel G. W.; Nishiyama, Akiko; Miller, C. Ryan; Zong, Hui

    2014-01-01

    How malignant gliomas arise in a mature brain remains a mystery, hindering the development of preventive and therapeutic interventions. We previously showed that oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs) can be transformed into glioma when mutations are introduced perinatally. However, adult OPCs rarely proliferate compared with their perinatal counterparts. Whether these relatively quiescent cells have the potential to transform is unknown, which is a critical question considering the late onset of human glioma. Additionally, the premalignant events taking place between initial mutation and a fully developed tumor mass are particularly poorly understood in glioma. Here we used a temporally controllable Cre transgene to delete p53 and NF1 specifically in adult OPCs and demonstrated that these cells consistently give rise to malignant gliomas. To investigate the transforming process of quiescent adult OPCs, we then tracked these cells throughout the premalignant phase, which revealed a dynamic multistep transformation, starting with rapid but transient hyperproliferative reactivation, followed by a long period of dormancy, and then final malignant transformation. Using pharmacological approaches, we discovered that mammalian target of rapamycin signaling is critical for both the initial OPC reactivation step and late-stage tumor cell proliferation and thus might be a potential target for both glioma prevention and treatment. In summary, our results firmly establish the transforming potential of adult OPCs and reveal an actionable multiphasic reactivation process that turns slowly dividing OPCs into malignant gliomas. PMID:25246577

  8. Overexpression and lack of copy number variation in the BMI-1 gene in human glioma

    PubMed Central

    MADATHAN KANDY, SIBIN; ISHWARA BHAT, DHANANJAYA; CHOPPAVARAPU, LAVANYA; SUVATHA, ARATI; GHATI KASTURIRANGAN, CHETAN

    2015-01-01

    Malignant gliomas are neoplasms of the brain that are associated with a poor prognosis. The B-cell-specific Moloney murine leukemia virus integration site 1 (BMI-1) gene is one of the major cancer stem cell factors responsible for treatment failure in glioma. In the present study, the DNA-RNA-protein alterations in the BMI-1 gene were assessed in 50 glioma samples. Copy number variations in the BMI-1 gene were analyzed using SYBR® Green quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Gene expression analysis was performed using a Taqman assay and protein quantitation was performed using western blotting. A comparative Ct analysis showed the absence of copy number variations in all glioma samples. BMI-1 mRNA expression was found to be overexpressed in 36 out of 50 samples (72.0%), and 37 out of 50 samples showed overexpression (74.0%) of BMI-1 protein; this was statistically significant when compared with non-glioma tissues. It was observed that the protein and RNA expression in glioma were concordant. In this study on the BMI-1 gene, transcription and translation in glioma were observed and BMI-1 overexpression was found to be a common phenomenon. PMID:26722333

  9. Anticancer effect of eupatilin on glioma cells through inhibition of the Notch-1 signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    WANG, YAWEI; HOU, HONGWEI; LI, MING; YANG, YANG; SUN, LAN

    2016-01-01

    Eupatilin, one of the major flavonoids in Artemisia asiatica Nakai (Asteraceae), has been reported to possess antitumor properties. However, thus far there have been no reports regarding the effects of eupatilin on glioma. Therefore, in the current study the effects of eupatilin on glioma and the underlying molecular mechanism were explored. The effect of eupatilin on cell viability was detected by the MTT assay. Cell invasion and migration were performed with Transwell assays and cell apoptosis was determined by flow cytometric analysis. Notch-1 knockdown cells were established by transfection with Notch-1 small interfering RNA (siRNA). The expression levels of Notch-1 were detected by quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and western blotting. The results of the present study indicated that eupatilin exhibits an anticancer effect on glioma cells. Eupatilin inhibited proliferation, reduced cell invasion and migration, and promoted the apoptosis of glioma cells. Additionally, it suppressed Notch-1 expression. Knockdown of Notch-1 by siRNA contributed to the inhibitory effect of eupatilin on proliferation and invasion of glioma cells. In conclusion, eupatilin had an inhibitory effect on proliferation, invasion and migration, and promoted apoptosis of glioma cells through suppression of the Notch-1 signaling pathway. Therefore, eupatilin may have potential as an effective agent for the treatment of glioma. PMID:26676446

  10. Saw Palmetto Extract Inhibits Metastasis and Antiangiogenesis through STAT3 Signal Pathway in Glioma Cell

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Hong; Shen, Jinglian; Yang, Yang; Che, Yuqin

    2015-01-01

    Signal transducer and activator of transcription factor 3 (STAT3) plays an important role in the proliferation and angiogenesis in human glioma. Previous research indicated that saw palmetto extract markedly inhibited the proliferation of human glioma cells through STAT3 signal pathway. But its effect on tumor metastasis and antiangiogenesis is not clear. This study is to further clear the impact of saw palmetto extract on glioma cell metastasis, antiangiogenesis, and its mechanism. TUNEL assay indicated that the apoptotic cells in the saw palmetto treated group are higher than that in the control group (p < 0.05). The apoptosis related protein is detected and the results revealed that saw palmetto extract inhibits the proliferation of human glioma. Meanwhile pSTAT3 is lower in the experimental group and CD34 is also inhibited in the saw palmetto treated group. This means that saw palmetto extract could inhibit the angiogenesis in glioma. We found that saw palmetto extract was an important phytotherapeutic drug against the human glioma through STAT3 signal pathway. Saw palmetto extract may be useful as an adjunctive therapeutic agent for treatment of individuals with glioma and other types of cancer in which STAT3 signaling is activated. PMID:26788112

  11. NDRG1 overexpressing gliomas are characterized by reduced tumor vascularization and resistance to antiangiogenic treatment.

    PubMed

    Broggini, Thomas; Wüstner, Marie; Harms, Christoph; Stange, Lena; Blaes, Jonas; Thomé, Carina; Harms, Ulrike; Mueller, Susanne; Weiler, Markus; Wick, Wolfgang; Vajkoczy, Peter; Czabanka, Marcus

    2016-10-01

    Hypoxia-regulated molecules play an important role in vascular resistance to antiangiogenic treatment. N-myc downstream-regulated-gene 1 (NDRG1) is significantly upregulated during hypoxia in glioma. It was the aim of the present study to analyze the role of NDRG1 on glioma angiogenesis and on antiangiogenic treatment. Orthotopically implanted NDRG1 glioma showed reduced tumor growth and vessel density compared to controls. RT-PCR gene array analysis revealed a 30-fold TNFSF15 increase in NDRG1 tumors. Consequently, the supernatant from NDRG1 transfected U87MG glioma cells resulted in reduced HUVEC proliferation, migration and angiogenic response in tube formation assays in vitro. This effect was provoked by increased TNFSF15 promoter activity in NDRG1 cells. Mutations in NF-κB and AP-1 promoter response elements suppressed TNFSF15 promoter activity. Moreover, U87MG glioma NDRG1 knockdown supernatant contained multiple proangiogenic proteins and increased HUVEC spheroid sprouting. Sunitinib treatment of orhotopically implanted mice reduced tumor volume and vessel density in controls; in NDRG1 overexpressing cells no reduction of tumor volume or vessel density was observed. NDRG1 overexpression leads to reduced tumor growth and angiogenesis in experimental glioma via upregulation of TNFSF15. In NDRG1 overexpressing glioma antiangiogenic treatment does not yield a therapeutic response. PMID:26297987

  12. Chloride channel-mediated brain glioma targeting of chlorotoxin-modified doxorubicine-loaded liposomes.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Yu; Liang, Liang; Wang, Xueqing; Wang, Jiancheng; Zhang, Xuan; Zhang, Qiang

    2011-06-30

    The chlorotoxin (ClTx), a scorpion-derived peptide, binding to gliomas with high specificity, was firstly applied to establish the ClTx-modified doxorubicin (DOX)-loaded liposome delivery system for targeting the brain glioma and improving the anticancer efficacy. In vitro physicochemical characterization of the novel liposome system presented satisfactory size of 100 nm with uniform distribution, high encapsulation efficiency and adequate loading capacity of both fluorescent probe and anticancer drug. It was demonstrated quantitatively by the spectrophotofluorometry and flow cytometry and qualitatively by the confocal microscopy that ClTx highly facilitated the uptake of liposomes by three glioma cell lines and one endothelial cell line. In vitro cytotoxicity studies proved that the presence of ClTx increased the cytotoxicity against glioma cells and endothelial cells with various levels for different cell lines. In BALB/c mice bearing U87 tumor xenografts, biodistribution of DiR-loaded liposomes by body imaging and anti-glioma pharmacodynamics of DOX-loaded liposomes were investigated. The ClTx-modified liposomes showed more accumulation in the subcutaneous and intracranial tumors, higher tumor growth inhibition and lower blood toxicity in the armpit tumor model. The in vitro and in vivo results exhibited good correlation of glioma targeting of the ClTx-modified liposomes. Significantly, with the ClTx as the targeting ligand, the liposomes might serve as an applicable delivery system for brain glioma therapy or imaging. PMID:21435361

  13. GSK621 Targets Glioma Cells via Activating AMP-Activated Protein Kinase Signalings

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Hong; Liu, Wei; Zhan, Shi-Kun; Pan, Yi-Xin; Bian, Liu-Guan; Sun, Bomin; Sun, Qing-Fang; Pan, Si-Jian

    2016-01-01

    Here, we studied the anti-glioma cell activity by a novel AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activator GSK621. We showed that GSK621 was cytotoxic to human glioma cells (U87MG and U251MG lines), possibly via provoking caspase-dependent apoptotic cell death. Its cytotoxicity was alleviated by caspase inhibitors. GSK621 activated AMPK to inhibit mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and downregulate Tetraspanin 8 (Tspan8) in glioma cells. AMPK inhibition, through shRNA knockdown of AMPKα or introduction of a dominant negative (T172A) AMPKα, almost reversed GSK621-induced AMPK activation, mTOR inhibition and Tspan8 degradation. Consequently, GSK621’s cytotoxicity in glioma cells was also significantly attenuated by AMPKα knockdown or mutation. Further studies showed that GSK621, at a relatively low concentration, significantly potentiated temozolomide (TMZ)’s sensitivity and lethality against glioma cells. We summarized that GSK621 inhibits human glioma cells possibly via activating AMPK signaling. This novel AMPK activator could be a novel and promising anti-glioma cell agent. PMID:27532105

  14. Synergy of enediyne antibiotic lidamycin and temozolomide in suppressing glioma growth with potentiated apoptosis induction.

    PubMed

    Li, Xing-Qi; Ouyang, Zhi-Gang; Zhang, Sheng-Hua; Liu, Hong; Shang, Yue; Li, Yi; Zhen, Yong-Su

    2014-08-01

    The present work evaluated the synergistic efficacy of an enediyne antibiotic lidamycin (LDM) plus temozolomide (TMZ) against glioma in vitro and in vivo. LDM plus TMZ inhibited the proliferations of rat glioma C6 cells and human glioma U87 cells more efficiently than the single usage of LDM or TMZ. In addition, LDM also potentiated the apoptosis inductions by TMZ in rat C6 cells and human U87 cells. Meanwhile, the results of TdT-mediated dUTP Nick End Labeling assay for subcutaneous U87 tumor sections indicated an enhanced apoptosis induction in vivo by LDM plus TMZ, which confirmed the high potency of the combination for glioma therapy. As determined by Western blot, apoptosis signal pathways in C6 cells and U87 cells were markedly affected by the synergistic alteration of P53, bax, procaspase 3, and bcd-2 expression. In both subcutaneous U87 xenograft and C6 intracerebral orthotopic implant model, TMZ-induced glioma growth suppression was dramatically potentiated by LDM. As shown, the combination therapy efficiently reduced the tumor volumes and tumor weights of the human glioma U87 xenograft. Kaplan-Meier assay revealed that LDM plus TMZ dramatically prolonged the life span of C6 intracerebral tumor-bearing rats with decreased tumor size. This study indicates that the combination of LDM with TMZ might be a promising strategy for glioma therapy. PMID:24842385

  15. Lower expression of Nrdp1 in human glioma contributes tumor progression by reducing apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Shi, Hengliang; Du, Jin; Wang, Lei; Zheng, Bao; Gong, Hui; Wu, Yuxuan; Tang, Yuan; Gao, Yong; Yu, Rutong

    2014-10-01

    Ubiquitin ligase Nrdp1 (neuregulin receptor degradation protein 1) plays important roles in multiple physiological process because it can ubiquitinate various substrates such as ErbB3, BRUCE, MyD88, C/EBPβ, and Parkin, and so forth. In addition to the physiological function, it was also found to be involved in tumor progression. It has been shown that loss of Nrdp1 enhances breast cancer cell growth. Up to now, the role of Nrdp1 in glioma has not been elucidated. Here, we reported that Nrdp1 as well as cleaved caspase 3 was lower expressed in human glioma tissues comparing with the nontumorous. And then we found that the expression of Nrdp1 and cleaved caspase 3 was increased in the treatment of Temozolomide (TMZ), a drug for glioma chemotherapy. Further investigation indicated that transient transfection of Nrdp1 significantly promoted cell apoptosis by aggravating the degradation of BRUCE and activation of caspase 3. In addition, overexpression of Nrdp1 augmented TMZ induced apoptosis by evaluating the degradation of BRUCE and the activation of caspase 3, while silencing of Nrdp1 reduced the sensitivity to the TMZ by inhibiting the degradation of BRUCE and the activation of caspase 3 in human glioma cells. These observations show that Nrdp1 is a pro-apoptotic protein in human glioma and lower expression of Nrdp1 in human glioma may promote tumor progression by reducing apoptosis, suggesting that Nrdp1 may be an important regulator in the development of human glioma. PMID:25355637

  16. Targeting the RTK-PI3K-mTOR Axis in Malignant Glioma: Overcoming Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Qi-Wen

    2010-01-01

    Gliomas represent the most common primary brain tumor and among the most aggressive of cancers. Patients with glioma typically relapse within a year of initial diagnosis. Recurrent glioma is associated with acquired therapeutic resistance. Although neurosurgical resection, radiation and chemotherapy provide clear benefit, survival remains disappointing. It is, therefore, critical that we identify effective medical therapies and appropriate tumor biomarkers in patients at initial presentation, to promote durable responses in